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Critics: Nonpartisan elections threaten minority progress SEE PAGE 21

County Council candidates questioned on the issues SEE PAGE 4

REVITALIZING THE UPSTATE’S TEXTILE MILLS

GREENVILLEJOURNAL

Statue of Erskine College President William Grier

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, April 18, 2013 • Vol.16, No.16

Philomathean Literary Society Hall (oldest building on campus)

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“I can fight without getting into trouble.”

“Participation in religious activities is purely voluntary, and there are no repercussions for students who decline to do so.” Clemson University’s response to a complaint filed by the Freedom from Religion Foundation asserting that the school’s football program is entangled with religion.

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JOURNAL NEWS

5 vie for County Council seat Greenville County will hold a special primary election on April 29 in the first of two steps to fill the District 26 County Council seat left vacant by the death of Dan Rawls. One Democrat and four Republican candidates have filed to fill the seat, requiring a Republican primary and runoff, if needed, on May 13. (Democrat Windell Rodgers will face the Republican winner in the general election on June 17.) The candidates responded to a series of questions posed by the Greenville Journal. What are the most important issues facing Greenville County? How will you address them? LYNN BALLARD (R): The deteriorating condition of roads, bridges and infrastructure are issues. One contributing factor is the lack of adequate state funding. Working with the other Ballard members of council, we will open communication with the Legislature to obtain the funds to adequately maintain roads and bridges. Traffic congestion, especially the Woodruff Road area, is also an issue that needs to be addressed as a high priority. There have been ongoing discussions about constructing alternate routes around the road. I will be working with members of council, the county Planning Department and the Roads Commission to address and propose solutions. Building infrastructure to accommodate future growth in the county should be a priority. Industries and businesses are continuing to locate and/or expand in the county. This increases employment and also requires adequate housing and commercial shopping be made available. Prior to growth of this type, adequate infrastructure – roads, water, sewers, etc. – must be in place. CLIFTON “BUDDY” DYER (R): Greenville County has several issues facing it, including the decay of our roads and bridges, security of our citizens and property and balancing Dyer growth for the future. Maximizing the effectiveness of our tax dollars is key. I do not want to increase taxes until other funding options and avenues have been exhausted. This

4 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

includes working to return to Greenville County our share of our tax dollars.

exactly what they expect and desire to resolve these problems.

TODD FREDERICK (R): Issues include crime on the rise, taxes on the increase, moral decline and an unemployment rate that needs to be lower. We need to put more Frederick police power into the “Crime Watch” program. The cost to screen and equip a volunteer citizens’ patrol unit will average between $300 and $600 per volunteer, compared to $90,000 per new Greenville County deputy hired. This would give the taxpayers 200 more people on “patrol” at just the cost of one deputy. The county must reduce wasteful spending and cap or even reduce taxes. The laws against vices that are now legal need to be revisited, such as sale of alcohol on Sundays. We should have more pro-family events that will appeal to more godliness and not the current race to decadence. As the crime rate is reduced and the attractiveness of a moral society [enhanced], companies will be drawn to Greenville County, thus providing jobs. Companies relocating or up-starting in Greenville County will need buildings. Therefore, many large tracts of land in (e.g.) “The Matrix” will have their property values increase. This in turn will yield more taxes based on the millage rates, without having to superimpose a 1 percent county sales tax on consumers in Greenville.   

WINDELL RODGERS (D): I believe the most important issues Greenville County is dealing with right now are the roads maintenance issues and the method to be used in Rodgers funding the muchneeded road improvements.

C.E. “ED” POORE (R): Greenville County is suffering from inadequate infrastructure, security of its citizens and drugs. Poor roads lead to more vehicular accidents, while crime Poore and drugs cause our citizens to feel insecure in their own homes. These deficiencies cause undue burden on the county law enforcement agencies. I understand that council and law enforcement are wrestling with this matter as best they can under certain fiscal restraints. A plan is being considered by County Council presently to address these infrastructure problems. The [citizen roads advisory] commission has recommended a structured plan to council. My plan at this point in time is to discuss it with the citizens and try to determine just

Are there unique issues facing voters in your district? How will you address those? BALLARD: Increasing crime and inadequate support from the Sheriff ’s Department is a concern. While we do have some roving sheriff ’s deputies patrolling District 26, they are not an overwhelming presence. We realize the Sheriff ’s Department has only a specified number of deputies on duty and priorities have to be assigned as calls for assistance are received. I feel it may be time to revisit the needs of the Sheriff ’s Department so that they may provide adequate protection to county residents, especially those who live in rural areas. Future growth in the district is also a concern. Growth and expansion are good things provided they are managed properly. Extension of public sewer lines further into the district is necessary in order for the growth to occur. All of us in the district want to see growth managed in such a way that it enhances the natural resources and allows us to maintain our quality of life. DYER: An issue is security of people and property in a vast rural community. The increase in thefts and vandalism has reached a boiling point in District 26. My family has experienced three thefts in the last two years. While the sheriff ’s response has been timely, there is no progress in catching the perpetrators. In the rural environment my family lives in, it is difficult for neighbors to observe the crooks in the act and they escape under the cover of night and the cover of the woods. I would pursue more deputy patrols especially between the hours of 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. I would also work with the crime watch organizations to educate on better prevention methods and technologies – e.g., better locking devices, more cameras, door reinforcements, etc. I would help secure

training for crime prevention, volume purchasing of security devices and organize teams to review prevention methods with district residents. FREDERICK: I will look to implement ways to cost-effective[ly] offset crime and increase morality. Statistically, where alcohol and drugs are prevalent, there are higher rates of crime. Churches and programs that mentor today’s tweens and teens need to be utilized to give these young people a sense of belonging and protection. Thus, their “needs” to join one of Greenville’s 50 gangs will be reduced.    POORE: The most unique issues facing the voters in the lower part of the district (and the entire county) are crime, drugs and lack of personnel to resolve these concerns. Roads and urban sprawl are also issues that concern the citizens of District 26. I will address these issues with all the tenacity and persistence I can muster by working with the council to resolve these issues, especially the criminal problem in the lower part of District 26. RODGERS: Crime is on the rise, from the northern part to the southern part of District 26. These issues involve theft of property and personal safety. I plan to address these issues by advocating an increase of deputies patrolling the area with seeking ways to reduce response time to reported incidents. I also plan to advocate for citizens of District 26 to create more neighborhood watches and ask for more funding for the sheriff ’s office for the hiring of more deputies. What are your qualifications for this position? Why should voters choose you? BALLARD: I have lived in Greenville County for 27 years, the last nine in Ware Place. I am in my second year as president of the Forest Oaks Homeowner’s Association and interact with several other Neighborhood Watch groups in southern Greenville County. Several years ago I was active in the Greenville Chamber of Commerce, serving four years as the chairman of the Environmental Affairs Committee. In that role I worked closely with state legislators and County Council as well as the environmental managers of all the large and many smaller companies in the Greenville area, where I gained experience as a team member,


JOURNAL NEWS team leader and negotiator. Having retired in June 2013, I now have the time and desire to serve the residents of south Greenville County as their representative on County Council. DYER: My background is working with major companies to improve their operations and reduce their costs. I look for new ways and technologies to solve problems versus providing a temporary fix. I would apply my skills to help create and implement ideas for crime prevention, improving the county’s assets and improving the use of tax money. I would bring to County Council a focus for maintaining the infrastructure. Also, as we plan for future growth I would strive to implement repairs and enhancements in a synergistic way. Additionally, I have implemented these skills as a member of the Greenville Arena District (Bon Secours Wellness Arena).

Read next week’s Greenville Journal for more questions and answers with the candidates.

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Lynn W. Ballard (R) Northwest Missouri State University, BS in chemistry Retired manager in chemical industry and rural mail carrier President of Forest Oaks Homeowners’ Assoc. Past chair of Environmental Affairs Committee, Greenville Chamber Former board member of Walker Foundation and Concern for Children Clifton “Buddy” Dyer (R) Georgia Southern University, BS in technology Owner of MSI Inc. mechanical and general services company Member of Greenville County Arena District board Todd W. Frederick (R) USC Upstate, Victory Bible College and Bethany Bible College Formerly with Flowers Industries Owner of Whiter Than Snow Appliances Past president of Piedmont Republican Precinct C.E. “Ed” Poore (R) Erskine College, BA in business administration Retired from S.C. Dept. of Revenue and U.S. Army Piedmont Public Service District Commissioner Windell Rodgers (D) North Greenville University, BA and Master’s in Christian ministry Former manager with U.S. Postal Service Pastor of Greater Mount Calvary Baptist Church Board member of Greenville Connect U.S. Army veteran Past moderator of Enoree River Baptist Assoc.

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book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner music by Frederick Loewe

POORE: My qualifications include being a commissioner on the Piedmont Public Service District for 10 years and chairman for seven years of this time. This position has given me experience in understanding the public budget process and learning to support the community by saving lives and protecting property. I also have the experience of resolving complicated issues learned while working on the management team with the S.C. Department of Revenue for 37 years. I am a conservative who believes each taxpayer dollar should be viewed and spent very wisely. Most of the time, “common sense” is the best approach to resolving these issues and knowing when to compromise. I can read and understand financial statements

RODGERS: I am qualified based upon my experience as a former mid-level manager with the U.S. Postal Service, where I was responsible for the processing of all mails that originated in and were destined for the Upstate of South Carolina. I am also a veteran of the U.S. Army of seven years, having served as a military pay specialist. I have the ability to work well with and for others. I am a pastor with 16 years as a senior pastor. I am a non-traditional college graduate, earning my BA in 2009 at the age of 55 years, and my master’s degree in 2012. I believe that learning is lifelong and one must be persistent and consistent when working for self and others.

YOU NEED YOUR HEARING CHECKED

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FREDERICK: I have been a believer in hard work, starting my own business from scratch and surviving the economic downturns of 2001 and 2008. My experience in operating a business and keeping down overhead costs, being familiar with the use and sales tax laws, having been through real estate school and studied some accounting at USCS [now USC-Upstate], as well as taking courses through two Bible colleges, can all be beneficial to helping govern the business of Greenville County. My fellow District 26 constituents should be confident that I am a conservative, both fiscally and societally. I have more than 20 years of sales and service to the public, which includes dealing with differences of opinion that ended amicably and satisfactorily for both parties. I will listen to, consort with and address the District 26 constituents’ concerns before the Greenville County Council.

and the public budget process. Voters should choose me because I possess the knowledge, experience, dedication, honesty, determination and persistence to evaluate and discuss complicated issues with management and citizens at all levels of government. I will always be a voice for the citizens and available at all times to listen to their concerns.

APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Too precious to risk losing

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Fix Greenville’s roads Greenville County Council has only one responsible path forward: Adopt the advisory panel’s project list and give voters a voice on a sales tax hike to pay for it. Rarely does a lay committee do a better job than the one provided Greenville County Council by the 19 citizens tasked with prioritizing the county’s most urgent infrastructure needs. The priority list the Citizens Road Advisory Commission gave the council three weeks ago is balanced, thorough and spiked with the urgency of $678 million worth of critical repairs that will go undone if the council refuses the next step: give county residents a vote on whether to create a funding source to pay for them. The list – and the four months of work behind it – will be a futile waste if the council refuses to put the question to voters in November: Should the county add a temporary, 1 percent sales tax to be dedicated to infrastructure repairs? A vocal, anti-tax minority cowed the council into stripping referendum language from the ordinance that created the advisory commission last November. Rather than make their case in civil debate, these activists want to bully the question off the table and deny their neighbors the essence of democracy: a voice. The commission held seven public hearings across the county and took a straw vote at each one. The support for a dedicated tax is strong. Of the 311 Greenville County residents who attended a town hall, 206 favored the tax and 57 opposed. Granted, these are anecdotal numbers. For the official poll, note the August 2013 survey commissioned by Upstate Forever, which showed 74 percent of county residents in support of putting a referendum on the 2014 ballot. Failure to do so threatens to “decimate our infrastructure,” the advisory commission warned the council. Greenville County roads and bridges are in dismal condition. Crumbling road surfaces, traffic congestion, substandard bridges; the list is long and the deficiencies dangerous. Bridge repairs totaled $27.8 million on the list. Road improvements totaled $303 million – all in Greenville County alone. A 1 percent sales tax hike would translate to 25 cents more on a $25 purchase. That would generate roughly $65 million annually for Greenville – to be spent solely on Greenville projects listed on the ballot at the time of the vote. The money won’t be controlled by Columbia or Washington. It would begin and end in Greenville and expire in eight years, renewable only by a new referendum. Protesters like those who rallied at County Square Tuesday are wasting their breath insisting the state pay the bill. At current funding levels, the state would take 83 years to simply resurface all the roads that need it in Greenville County. Like every year, the only action from the Legislature this session on that topic has been hand-wringing. The council has only one responsible path forward: Adopt the commission project list and give the voters a voice in November. That first caveat is vital; council members must not tinker with the list. Yes, they can, they have the power; but shredding it in a political turf war would discredit the council and dishonor the commission’s clear commitment to fairness. The projects on that list are equitably divided among all council districts and governing entities. Council members should honor the hard work required to achieve that – and let county residents vote on whether to pay for it. When the list was unveiled, commission member Tim Brett said, “My grandchildren will not see these projects done in my lifetime if you don’t take action.” It’s time for County Council to lead Greenville forward.

SPEAK YOUR MIND The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

Earth Day is an opportunity to appreciate the natural resources we may normally take for granted, and to reflect on how we can all do more to ensure sustainability for future generations. This year, I’d like to invite the Greenville community to join me in raising public awareness and stewardship for an infinitely important but finite resource: water. The world’s water supply is becoming an ever-growing concern. Already droughts are becoming more severe, aging infrastructure and sewage systems are operating over capacity, and conflict is breaking out over dwindling water supplies. The urgency of the situation may come as a surprise to Greenville residents. Our corner of the state is home to pristine watersheds that are diligently protected by the Greenville Water System. Our water has won awards for its outstanding quality. Greenville relies on its water resources, not only for our drinking supplies, but also for the hydroelectricity that powers our city and for the agriculture, industry, mining and aquaculture that drive our economy. Our thriving business community, together with the surrounding Upstate area, houses thousands of local and international firms. Greenville’s population grew 32.5 percent between 2000 and 2010, more than triple the national average. By 2030, the Greater Greenville community is expected to reach a population of 1.6 million and have 1 million jobs. Unfortunately, our region’s water consumption is also outstripping national averages. In 2009, South Carolina’s water use reached 16 trillion gallons per year, roughly 10 percent of the United States’ total annual water use. The droughts we recently faced serve as a reminder of how precarious the situation is. We’re already seeing some of the worst-case scenarios play out elsewhere. Georgia’s 38,000-acre reservoir, Lake Lanier, came less than three months from depletion during the 2007 droughts. The state’s water supply, unable to keep pace with growth in Atlanta and Athens, imposed restrictions, which resulted in layoffs and production cuts in industries like landscaping.

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

IN MY OWN WORDS by FRANCES A. SIMON

Georgia’s recent attempts to draw from the water supplies of Florida, Alabama, Tennessee and South Carolina have met with legal disputes as those states struggle to meet their own water needs. The PSGroup takes a long-term view to the well-being of our community and protection of our natural resources. This is why we’ve organized the Greenville Global Water Day, coinciding with Earth Day on Tuesday, April 22, to draw attention to the vital importance of water. Our co-sponsor, Calvert Investments, and Kleinwort Benson Investors both share our core values. Together we will explore the local and global impact of the water crisis and learn about companies that are developing innovative solutions. Spending on water infrastructure is projected to reach $22 trillion worldwide over the next two decades, more than roads, power, seaports and railroads combined. With this will come critical upgrades to pipelines and sewer systems, expansion of irrigation systems, and broader use of industrial water recycling. But the water crisis will not be solved by investment alone. We all have a role to play that extends beyond April 22. The Greenville Water System provides simple water-saving tips on its website. This Global Water Day I urge the Greenville community to commit to learning more about water locally, regionally and globally, and consider what each of us can do to protect our water supplies. The water crisis may be hidden for now but, like an iceberg, what we don’t see can in fact do us harm. If we don’t commit today to safeguarding our future prosperity, Greenville has an awful lot to lose. Frances A. Simon is CEO of The PSGroup: Designs for Wealth: Plans for Life, a Greenville company that provides financial services, securities products and advisory services through Park Avenue Securities and Guardian Life Insurance Company of America.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL NEWS

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JOURNAL NEWS

Erskine shows its resilience

Accessibility Solutions for Home

College rebounds from controversy with largest freshman class in years; prepares to celebrate its 175th anniversary

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If Erskine College has earned an adjective over its 175 years of existence, the word would be resilient. This year’s incoming class at the small liberal arts college in Due West – a sleepy town in Abbeville County about 45 miles from Greenville – is the school’s second-largest ever and largest in more than a decade. With May 1 approaching – the date that high school seniors must inform many colleges across the nation whether they’ll attend in the fall – the school is on track to have another incoming class of at least 200 students. “It’s been a good year,” said Dr. Brad Christie, the school’s acting president and vice president for academic affairs. “We are moving forward. The next president will come in to a much better situation than the last one did.” A candidate to become the school’s 16th president could be presented at the board’s next meeting at the end of May, Christie said. The last president was David A. Norman, who took the helm in 2010 while the college was embroiled in a high-profile dispute between the col7:46lege’s PM board and the synod of the church that founded it in 1839, the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, a small Greenville-based denomination with about 250 churches mainly in the Southeast. The dispute arose after students complained that some professors were intimidating them and pushing them too far in questioning their religious beliefs, leading to the synod’s firing of half the college’s board in 2010. That action led to lawsuits and calls to end the financial ties between the school and the church. The lawsuits were eventually dropped, and last year, the college’s charter was changed to give the synod authority to remove board members for cause, and the synod reaffirmed its financial support of the college. “The church and the alumni were essentially trying to protect the same thing,” said Tobe Frierson, a graduate of Erskine who is now the school’s director of admissions. “The alums wanted to make sure the school remained a school for everyone. The church wanted to make sure students entering the doors were exploring their faith. The two sides were really arguing over the same thing.”

HISTORY OF CHALLENGING TIMES

The flap certainly wasn’t the school’s first – or even biggest – challenge. The college was shut down for five years during the Civil War. In 1860, the college’s enrollment was equal to that of South Carolina College. But its endowment was heavily invested in Confederate bonds. In 1865, the college had no money and no students, other than a handful who were too old,

ERSKINE TIMELINE

Photo by Greg Beckner

too young or too physically unfit to fight in the Civil War. Some faculty members who were in town continued to teach them. The Great Depression and the World Wars were challenging times as well. During World War II, soldiers in the U.S. Army Air Corps spent two months at Erskine taking intensive courses in physics before heading to the Donaldson Air Base in Greenville. “Erskine College has shown resilience over its 175 years,” said Cliff Smith, the school’s vice president for communications. Even so, the most recent controversy still affects the college, Christie said. Norman, who stepped down last June, cited the toll the controversy had on him and his family in his resignation letter. “There’s still a good bit of wariness between the [lawsuit’s] two parties,” Christie said. “They are very watchful of each other. It’s not ideal for the school, but at least they are not at each other’s throats.” But Christie said the dispute had no effect at the classroom level. “It hasn’t affected the nature of what’s taught in the classroom, and that’s a very encouraging thing,” he said. “No colleague of mine has ever been pressured to include or exclude anything from the classroom. That’s what academic freedom is and it’s the kind of thing that has separated us from Bible colleges and other religious colleges that are more prescriptive in what is taught.”

“A PERSONALIZED TOUCH”

Frierson, who has worked at Erskine since 2002, said she stayed through the controversy because it is the right place for her. “The noise didn’t scare me because it didn’t make sense,” she said. “The two sides were essentially fighting for the same thing.” She said most students who come to Erskine know it’s the right place for them, too. “In order to recruit students here, a student has to visit the campus,” she said. “Erskine is not for everyone. You don’t really hear people describing Erskine as OK. They either say, ‘Wow,’ or they couldn’t wait to get out.” Schadell Brooks, a 2013 graduate from Charlotte who now works as an admissions counselor, said

1839 – Erskine College, the first fouryear church-related college in South Carolina. founded by the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church 1859 – Due West Female College founded independently by ARP ministers and laymen. 1859 – Philomathean Hall, the oldest building on campus, built. 1894 – Erskine begins admitting transfer students from the women’s college. 1899 – Erskine became officially coeducational 1921 – R.C. Grier becomes president 1925 – Accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges 1927 – Erskine College, the women’s college and the seminary merge into one institution World War II – Erskine served as a cadet training school for the U.S. Army Air Corps 1954 – J. M. Lesesne becomes president 1966 – Joseph Wightman named president 1973 – M. Stanyarne Bell becomes president 1981 – William Bruce Ezell Jr. becomes president 1995 – Bowie Arts Center opens 1990 – James W. Strobel becomes president 1998 – John L. Carson becomes president 1999 – Daniel-Moultrie Science Center completed 2006 – Randall T. Ruble becomes president 2008 – Moss Mathematics and Music Education Facility completed. 2010 – ARP General Synod votes to restructure board, sparking a lawsuit; David A. Norman named president 2013 – Erskine board agrees that Synod has right to remove trustees with cause; Norman resigns as president; Brad Christie named acting president. 2014 – Erskine celebrates 175th anniversary

more photos online View additional photos at www.greenvillejournal.com


she visited Erskine “on a whim.” “Erskine had a more personalized touch,” she said. “As soon as I came on campus, I felt like a part of a family.” Erskine wasn’t the first choice for Claire Mueller, a sophomore from Charleston, until she arrived for her campus visit. “Clemson was my first choice. I wanted a rural setting,” she said. “But something felt different here. It felt a lot more personal. I didn’t feel like just a number.”

“WE’RE NOT GOING ANYWHERE”

Christie said in some ways, Erskine hasn’t changed much over its history. “That’s part of our charm and part of our problem,” he said. Christie said Erskine hasn’t changed in the most important way: its commitment to its mission of providing a quality Christian liberal arts education. Christie said what is changing – both for Erskine and throughout higher education – is the way students learn and how content is delivered. “This business has been primarily about delivering content. But every piece of content of our curriculum is available to our students elsewhere. Anything I teach in

American literature in terms of content I can get on here,” Christie said, pointing to his smartphone. “You can get content that way. What you don’t get that way is wisdom. What you don’t get it community.” Christie said he believes there will always be a place for the liberal arts. “The careers people are clamoring for today didn’t exist 30 years ago,” he said. “If you had gone to college to study and train for one kind of job, it may not exist any more. The liberal arts prepares students for a lifetime.” Christie said while he doesn’t see Erskine changing its commitment to the liberal arts or a relational kind of college education, he does see changes in terms of its delivery. He also sees the college offering different programs in the not-too-distant future. Frierson said she could see Erskine’s enrollment growing to 700 to 800 students. “Erskine has staying power,” she said. “We’re not going anywhere.” The official celebration of Erskine’s 175th anniversary will culminate on or around its Oct. 18 homecoming. Events planned include the premiere of a documentary film, an exhibit at the Upcountry History Museum and a festival on the school’s campus.

WHAT IS A ‘FLYING FLEET’?

Erskine’s early athletic teams were called the “Seceders,” an acknowledgement of Erskine’s relationship to the Associate “Seceder” Presbyterian Church in Scotland. Erskine’s passing attack during a 1929 football game at Furman caused Greenville News reporter Scoop Latimer to call Erskine “The Flying Fleet.” The student body voted and the name stuck.

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JOURNAL NEWS

SC Supreme Court upholds CON law DHEC must administer program that approves health care expansion, equipment APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled this week that the Certificate of Need program that authorizes health care providers to expand or purchase equipment remains in force as state law. The program must continue to be operated and enforced by the state’s Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) despite a successful line-item funding veto by Gov. Nikki Haley last July, the court ruled. After the S.C. House upheld Haley’s veto, DHEC announced it would suspend the Certificate of Need (CON) program for the 2013-2014 fiscal year. The agency also requested a clarifying ruling from the state Supreme Court on its regulatory responsibility and how the hold on the CON process affects health care entities still under the law’s

authority. Meanwhile, a group of hospitals and nursing homes sued DHEC, seeking to have the program reinstated. The justices upheld the law and DHEC’s supervisory responsibility in a 4-1 vote, with Justice Costa Pleicones dissenting in a separate opinion, but agreeing with the legality of the CON program. The court’s opinion asserted that the governor cannot use a line-item veto to “negate the effect of a long-standing permanent law.” Haley has publicly voiced her long-standing opposition to the program, the court noted, and “the governor’s veto message leaves no doubt that she intended to use her line-item veto power to abolish the entire CON program.” In her veto message under the heading “Closing Programs That Don’t Work,” Haley wrote, “The Certificate of Need program is an intensely political one through which bureaucratic policymakers deny new health care providers from offering treatment. We should allow the market to work rather than politics.” DHEC maintained that it could not administer the program without the $1.7 million in funding cut by the veto. The court’s opinion called this argu-

ment “a smoke screen.” The opinion states, “Under the CON Act, DHEC’s responsibility to administer the CON Act is not discretionary, and thus, DHEC must comply with the CON Act – a duty that inevitably encompasses funding the CON program.” DHEC had the option of adopting a fee structure to fund the program or could legally move funds from one program to another without the General Assembly’s approval, the justices wrote. State hospitals have said that the program’s suspension has delayed nearly 30 projects. The South Carolina Hospital Association supports the regulatory program, which is designed to contain costs, establish facilities that will best serve the public and keep health care providers from establishing facilities that duplicate services. Program supporters say that without

County commissions look at potential I-85 parallel route APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

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a CON program, providers could set up boutique hospitals or treatment centers that would only offer high-profit services and lower-income areas would be left without care because local hospitals could not make enough profit to cover charity care. DHEC has reviewed the court’s ruling and plans to file a motion for reconsideration, according to DHEC spokesperson Jim Beasley. “The Certificate of Need program is outdated and bad public policy, which is why the governor vetoed it and the House voted to support her decision,” said Doug Mayer, Haley’s spokesman. “Gov. Haley is determined and will continue working with like-minded legislators to reform a clearly politically driven process that puts additional bureaucracy between South Carolinians and their health care decisions.”

The South Carolina Inland Port has been open since late last year and officials say it extends the reach of the Port of Charleston and is expected to eliminate 25,000 truck trips on I-26 each year. The inland port is designed to transport freight via a Norfolk Southern rail line between Greer and the Port of Charleston. However, officials do not know how the opening of the inland port will impact the traffic along the I-85 corridor. Greenville County and the Greenville Pickens Anderson Transportation Study (GPATS) have commissioned a study to determine whether the port will create increased traffic along I-85 through Greenville County. In addition, the study will evaluate potential mitigation measures, particularly the feasibility of a parallel route between the I-385 and I-185 intersection and I-85 east of Greer. The $37,500 study is funded through $15,000 in federal grant money set aside annually for GPATS to conduct studies and $22,500 matching funds from Greenville County, said county officials. At the inland port’s opening, SC Ports Authority (SCPA) officials said they and local transportation officials will monitor the impact of traffic flow near the inland port. They noted that vehicles

serving the port would be traveling on underutilized roads. Jack Ellenberg, senior vice president of economic development and projects with the SC Ports Authority, said the traffic on I-85 would be minimal at first, but would be monitored as port operations increased. H.G. “Butch” Kirven, Greenville County Council member and member of GPATS, said the study was “justified” and that GPATS was already looking at I-85 because of existing congestion. “The inland port is just a new factor,” he said. The port is no doubt great for the local economy, said Kirven, but the traffic impact is yet unknown. Officials touted the reduction of trips along I-26, “but nobody said much about I-85,” he said. According to the county’s proposal request, “It is unknown how the increased truck transportation from current and future SC Inland Port nearby warehouses, industrial facilities, potential reshoring manufacturing facilities from abroad, ecommerce distributions centers, etc., will impact local traffic and the I-85 corridor.” Kirven said the route could make a wide loop around the Greenville metro area through more rural regions, potentially traveling through northern Laurens County. Greenville County had not announced the firm that will conduct the study as of press time.


JOURNAL NEWS

A Distinctive Academic Community Worth Discovering for Nearly 175 Years. Erskine feels like a second home to generations of graduates who’ve experienced it. As South Carolina’s first private Christian college, Erskine equips students to flourish through academic excellence and a family-like learning environment. It’s a rare college experience. But since it’s in the Upstate, going away to college doesn’t have to mean going far. So while Erskine may be a little harder to find, you’ll always know where you belong.

KNOW. BE KNOWN. Due West, South Carolina

erskine.edu

APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 11


JOURNAL NEWS

Ervin drops out of primary Will run as a petition candidate CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com As quickly as Tom Ervin jumped into the Republican primary race to oppose Gov. Nikki Haley, he has jumped back out – but his candidacy is not over. Ervin withdrew from the GOP primary on Friday – less than two weeks after his surprise filing as a candidate – saying the June 10 date did not allow him enough time to get his message out to voters. Instead, he will begin to gather signatures of registered voters so he can be on the November ballot as a gubernatorial petition candidate. Ervin’s withdrawal from the Republican primary leaves both Gov. Nikki Haley and Democratic Sen. Vincent Sheheen unopposed as their parties’ nominees for governor. The rematch of the 2010 election – Haley won by 4.5 percentage points – has been long anticipated.

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Two third-party candidates have also filed: Libertarian Steve French and United Citizens Party candidate Morgan Bruce Reeves. “I believe South Ervin Carolina is ready for fresh new leadership and ready for a governor who cares about our people and not selfish political ambition,” Ervin wrote in a press release announcing his primary withdrawal. “Both Nikki Haley and Vince Sheheen are career politicians. I’m a small business owner who will serve as governor and then return home to run my business.” After he filed for the primary, Ervin said he decided to challenge Haley after reading about a state Senate panel’s investigation into the state Department of Social Services. A former worker and two coroners testified that the agency cared more about numbers and making Haley’s administration look good than the welfare of the children under its oversight, he said. “Like most South Carolinians, I’m a fiscal and social conservative with an independent streak,” Ervin said Friday. “I’m running to reform state government and restore executive competence, honesty and accountability – especially as it relates to protecting our most vulnerable children in harm’s way.” He said Haley promised transparency and accountability, but instead, has “delivered four years of missteps, mistakes, scandals and cover-ups.” Haley’s campaign has said the governor is focused on the current legislative session, passing education and ethics reform and keeping the state’s economic and jobs momentum going. Ervin loaned his campaign $420,181.34, according to the latest campaign report filed with the state Ethics Commission. He has $271,172 on hand. The report showed no outside contributors. Haley reported $863,416.40 in contributions this reporting period. She has $5.274 million on hand, according to the April 10 report. Sheheen reported $557,898 in contributions this reporting period. He has $1.046 million on hand. French reported total contributions of $8,525, of which $7,925 was from himself, according to the report filed with the Ethics Commission.

Dream big Laurens County wants to hop on the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com The newly formed Laurens County Trails Association (LCTA) has big plans for the future: It hopes to extend the Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail into Laurens County and complete a loop connecting to the state’s Palmetto Trail. LCTA’s primary goal will be to establish “a backbone trail through Laurens County,” says Managing Director Don Walker. The group also plans to proactively collaborate between the various local groups working on establishing hiking and biking trails within the county. LCTA plans to connect to the southern portion of the Swamp Rabbit Trail once it is extended into Fountain Inn, he said. Walker says he has met with Upstate coordinators for both the SRT and the Palmetto Trail and they “are very much on board with this Upstate loop.” Walker also intends to meet with utility companies to discuss using their existing rights of ways for the new trail, as

rights of way can be hard to obtain, especially on private property. The association’s seven-member board of directors includes city and county leaders and is in the initial stages of creating a master plan to include trail design, funding, maintenance, security and actual construction. LCTA is also looking into resources to conduct a route feasibility study, including GIS and topographical work. Walker says he is contacting local colleges to see if it would fit in with graduate student work. He is also in “early conversations” with the National Park Service on possible grant funding for the project. Walker says that it will still be “many years” before the plan comes to fruition. The group is interested in expanding “to as many as 15 members and constructive input is welcomed.” He said LCTA needs volunteers to help with fundraising, the master plan, and spreading the word. For more information, contact Don Walker at 864-871-1255 or donwalker@prtcnet.com.

Striving for artistic excellence

The Graham Foundation recently awarded The Warehouse Theatre a $50,000 challenge grant to support The Harriet Wyche Endowment Fund for Professional Artistic Excellence. The endowment fund is designed to perpetually provide financial support to The Warehouse in its ongoing mission to provide the area with high-quality, professionally produced theatre. The challenge grant will match gifts given to the endowment up to $50,000. The completed campaign will result in a $100,000 increase in the fund and must be fulfilled by December 2014. A $40,000 public campaign is underway to fulfill the challenge. Anyone interested in donating may contact Katie Leckenbusch, director of development, at 864-235-6948, ext. 6 or katie@warehousetheatre.com.​


JOURNAL NEWS

More thresholds crossed. For more than 80 years. For more than 80 years, Caine has been the first name in Upstate real estate. Although quite a bit has changed in those eight decades, some things haven’t: like the personal service people expect from our agents. And the results they expect from our company. Learn more about both at cbcaine.com.

cbcaine.com APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 13


JOURNAL NEWS

Critics say nonpartisan elections threaten progress JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com

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14 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

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Following a series of community meetings and months of emotional debate, many minority voters in the city of Greenville remain firmly opposed to a proposal to change the municipal election process from partisan to a nonpartisan format. Former City Council members joined the president of the Greenville NAACP at a packed council chamber Monday night to urge the council against a change they warned would undo years of minority progress in Greenville. Monday’s public hearing was the fourth the city has held since January on the council’s proposed plan to drop party labels from the municipal ballot in future elections. The discussion highlighted a racial divide attached to the issue, despite assurances from city staff that the city’s four single-member districts (two of which are majority-minority) will stay the same regardless of which election format is used. Rev. J.M. Flemming, husband of Councilwoman Lillian Brock Flemming and president of the Greenville NAACP, said he feared for the minority seats under nonpartisan elections and issued a stern warning to council. “As president of the NAACP, we will seek legal action against the city of Greenville if you move forward,” he said. Councilwoman Amy Ryberg Doyle said the change is more about the future than the past. A change in the voting process would promote voter turnout and encourage the spirit of “working together,” she said. “This is not about the 1960s; it is about the future and engaging the younger generation to become involved in their municipal elections.” Greenville remains one of the few South Carolina municipalities to preserve a partisan system. Doyle was one of several council members who suggested the change last year as a way to attract more candidates in the wake of several city elections with unopposed candidates and low turnouts. Under the current system, the election cycle runs 174 days and includes party labels on the ballot. A change to nonpartisan elections would shorten the cycle to 60 days and remove party labels from the ballot, but would not prohibit candidates from declaring their affiliation with a political party. President of the Southernside Neighborhoods in Action Mary Duckett told the council Monday a nonpartisan elec-

tion would favor the wealthy and the influential and remove “those with the least” from the city. “The Bible says we are going to be with you always, and we are not going anywhere,” she said. Saying he had no intention of supporting a nonpartisan election, former City Councilman Ray Martin said party labels help voters identify with candidates holding beliefs similar to theirs. “I think this effort is a red herring to take over the city government,” Martin said, though he did not clarify who was behind the attempt. State Rep. Chandra Dillard said the city failed to conduct enough research to justify the change. City Council has not provided proof that voter turnout would increase or additional candidates would step up under a nonpartisan form of elections, she said. “It is not the Greenville way to move forward in the face of opposition.” “I am saddened by the false sense of security that many place in party labels,” said Councilman David Sudduth. Party affiliation does not guarantee qualified candidates any more than race or economic status, he said. “I chose to empower the voters because I have confidence in them to elect the most qualified.” Proponents of nonpartisan elections at the public hearing also pointed to the lack of party politics as a key contributor to the need for change. City resident Sarah Fletcher said a nonpartisan election was needed because the work of city government is not political. “Is a pothole Republican or Democrat?” Identifying herself as a liberal, Melinda Young of Earle Street said she was in favor of the election change because a nonpartisan approach would promote the ideas of the person rather than the political party. “I have voted for Republicans in Greenville including the mayor, Amy Doyle, and Susan Reynolds,” she said. Of the 21 people who spoke at the hearing, 17 opposed a change to the election process. The hearing offered clear proof that the people are against a change, said City Councilwoman Jil Littlejohn. “I don’t think we need to move forward.” The council will now discuss the results of the public hearing, and if the majority decides to move forward, an ordinance will be prepared for first reading, Sudduth said. “I expect a go or no-go decision by the end of April,” he said.


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Scam season Warmer weather brings out door-to-door donation seekers, but scams are year-round APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

scams, she said. The foremost: People allow themselves to become emotional. Scammers can appeal to everything from fear and greed to romanticism and compassion, Samra said. People may also not want to seem rude, tend to act impulsively or rush into decisions. Unfortunately, consumers can’t always take a salesman at his word, she said. “When someone tries to talk you into buying something, you have to be extra skeptical and do

Rising temperatures bring Upstate residents out into their yards and door-to-door solicitors on the prowl. To protect against potenHINDER THE HUSTLERS tial scams, customers Visit bbb.org/nw-south-carolina to see scams, should lean hard on their skeptical side, search vetted businesses and charities and says Jennifer Samra sign up for email and mobile alerts. The senior of the Upstate Betfraud hotline is 864-240-2080. ter Business Bureau (BBB). “It seems like every single day there’s your research.” some kind of scammer who is trying to There’s no boom in scams during a find a different way to cheat people out particular season, she said, but there of their money or their time,” Samra are some that pop up each year. This said. spring, consumers should beware of After a nationwide survey among spring break vacation scams, which BBB locations, officials discov- offer too-good-to-be-true travel deals ered there are several typical traits or free trips. of people who may fall victim to Another potential springtime

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Collection by Atlanta charity mistaken for local effort Residents in the Greer area recently reported receiving pink plastic bags asking for donations and printed with the words “Hope Chest,” once the name of Safe Harbor’s local resale store. Some thought the bags were an appeal from the local Safe Harbor for donations. However, Safe Harbor officials said the nonprofit does not solicit donations in this way, but accepts them at the store or arranges pickup for larger items. The Journal has learned that the bags are from a charity called Nspire Outreach and Hope House, which operates out of Atlanta, Charlotte, Memphis and Los Angeles. According to the organization’s website, the charity serves the homeless and victims of domestic violence, providing clothing, housing, training and coun-

seling for clients. In addition, clients work in call centers for the clothing donations. The website printed on the bags is maintained by Charity Clothing Pickup, which collects donations and sells them in bulk to thrift stores. Charity Clothing Pickup reportedly operates in California, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia, Florida and North Carolina. A representative at the clothing pickup hotline confirmed that Nspire Outreach and Hope House are planning to establish a presence in the Upstate and are starting with donation pickups first. According to an Atlanta BBB charity review, Nspire Outreach is listed as a church and is also known as Hope House and Hope for Domestic Violence.


JOURNAL NEWS scam affecting homeowners are offers of door-to-door lawn service, tree-trimming or gutter-cleaning services. While many are legitimate, Samra said, the best way to verify is to ask for identification and proof of insurance and research the company on the BBB website. According to the city of Greenville, door-to-door salespersons must have

a business license, ID badge and shirt with a business logo displayed. These salespeople can call on residents between 9 a.m. and a half hour before sunset, but not on Sundays unless by appointment. Perennial scams include a variation on the email plea from a friend trapped in a foreign country and needing mon-

ey: phone calls to senior citizens saying their grandchild or other family member is in trouble and needs money fast, said Samra. BBB offers a telephone hotline for senior citizens to verify offers or services. Another recent phone scam involves calls from a company called Prime Technologies, claiming to be based in Greenwood. The caller tells consumers a virus was detected on their computer and offers a maintenance plan – for a price. The scammers obtain passwords, gain remote computer access and later claim the owner owes them up to $400 for a security service.

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When investigated, the company had no physical address and was not registered with the SC Secretary of State, said Samra. Scammers also use fake news stories, such as recent ones about the missing Malaysian airliner, as “click bait” to install malware on a user’s computer, she added. Even though it may be embarrassing to realize a scammer has duped you, you are not alone, Samra said. Consumers should report scams to the BBB, which can help consumers track down credit charges and log the scam to warn others, she said.

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APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 17


JOURNAL NEWS

Cabela’s has competition Bass Pro Shops is coming to Spartanburg County SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com Destination retailer Bass Pro Shops announced Wednesday a new South Carolina store location at I-85 and SC-101, near the BMW plant in Spartanburg County. “We are Spartanburg and we are revolutionary,” said Spartanburg County Councilman David Britt, chairman for eco- Artist’s rendering of Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World in Spartanburg County. nomic recruitment and development, on near Greer.  We’re proud to offer Bass Pro Shops’ revealing the news. “This announcement low prices and famous friendly, expert service to will be heard around the world.” The new store is expected to draw customers from the many sportsmen and women who call this reNorth Carolina, Tennessee and Georgia in addition gion home,” said Johnny Morris, the store’s founder. “This store will be a tribute to the great sporting to South Carolina. Bass Pro Shops will be the primary anchor for a tradition and heritage of the region and a celebration of the sporting men and women of 75-acre mixed-use development that is exSouth Carolina.” pected to include a hotel, restaurants Nationally, Bass Pro Shops will and additional retail, according to a host more than 116 million peopress release. ple visiting their 85 stores and This will be the third South marine centers across AmeriCarolina location for the Misca and Canada this year. The souri-based outdoor megaaverage customer stays two retailer of hunting, fishing, and a half hours and drives an camping and outdoor equipaverage distance of 50+ miles, ment. Bass Pro Shops has two according to the press release. other Palmetto State stores – one The 120,000-square-foot store will in Myrtle Beach and one in North also feature the company’s popular Uncle Charleston that is expected to open next year. “We are very excited to have the opportunity to Buck’s Fishbowl and Grill, a nautical-themed center build a super outdoor store directly fronting I-85 for family recreation and dining. The Fishbowl offers

12 bowling lanes, leading customers to feel like they are bowling under the ocean. Casual family dining will be available in the Grill, which typically offers a variety of appetizers, sandwiches, salads and burgers. The announcement comes on the heels of competitor Cabela’s grand opening on Woodruff Road. Bass Pro Shops also announced a new 100,000-squarefoot location in Decatur, Ala., on April 8. The announcement was “exciting news for the Upstate,” said Steve Owens, communications manager for the City of Greer, in a statement. Morris had expressed an interest in bringing a store to Greer last July and asked the city to help find potential sites, according to the statement. “The city is extremely pleased that this search has come to a fruitful conclusion at a site that already offers sewer, gas, and electricity through Greer [Commission of Public Works],” said the statement. “We welcome Bass Pro Shops as our newest retail neighbor.” The new store is expected to open in 2016.

Clemson accused of pushing religion in football program Freedom from Religion Foundation files complaint APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Clemson University’s football program is entangled with religion and raises multiple constitutional concerns about the public university, according to a complaint filed by the Freedom from Religion Foundation, a Wisconsin-based church-state separation advocacy organization. Filed on April 10, the letter of complaint from the foundation’s attorney Patrick Elliott said, “Christian worship seems interwoven into Clemson’s football program. We are concerned

18 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

that this commingling of religion and athletics results not from student initiative, but rather from the attitudes and unconstitutional behaviors of the coaching staff.” The complaint said that Head Coach Dabo Swinney had selected James Trapp to be the team’s chaplain and the school’s guidelines stipulated that student groups must choose a chaplain. By granting Trapp access to players and allowing him to hold Bible study between team drills, Swinney showed “preference for religion over nonreligion, alienates those players who don’t believe as he does and creates a culture of religious coercion within the university’s football program.” The FFRF also cited that Swinney confirmed that the entire team would attend a Fellowship of Christian Ath-

letes (FCA) breakfast in 2011 and that team members participate in “Church Day,” using privately funded buses to attend services. “Players wishing to abstain should not be forced to subject themselves to the resentment, embarrassment or scrutiny that could result from taking such a stand,” Elliott wrote. The foundation calls for Swinney and Trapp to “immediately stop team prayers, sermons, Bible studies and ‘church days’ for players and train staff about their First Amendment obligations and monitor compliance.” Clemson University responded this week that it believes “the practices of the football staff regarding religion are compliant with the Constitution and appropriately accommodate differing religious views.”

“Participation in religious activities is purely voluntary, and there are no repercussions for students who decline to do so. We are not aware of any complaints from current or former studentathletes about feeling pressured or forced to participate in religious activities,” the university said in a statement. Clemson said it would evaluate complaints in the FFRF letter and respond directly to the foundation, “but we believe FFRF is mistaken in its assessment.” “Clemson takes very seriously its obligation to provide a comprehensive program for the development and welfare of our student-athletes – which encompasses academic, athletic and personal support, including support for their spiritual needs,” according to the statement.


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Young nationally ranked boxers learn in and out of the ring

Ernie Cuevas Sr., a coach at the Center for Educational Equity, helps his son, Ernie Cuevas Jr., put on his boxing gloves before training. APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com The brightly colored gloves are flying so fast, it’s hard to get a sharp photo of 13-year-old Ernie Cuevas Jr. and 14-yearold Khaliid Johnson as they circle and spar. The two are in the boxing ring at the Center for Educational Equity in West Greenville, training for competition in the 2014 Junior Southeast Regionals hosted in Greenville this May. Khaliid “Knots” Johnson has been boxing for four years with the Greenville

Boxing Club, housed at CEE, where his father, Shakir Robinson, is a coach and director. Ernie “Lil’ Kidfire” Cuevas Jr. has been training in the ring since he was four years old and began boxing at CEE after moving to the Upstate from San Diego a few years ago. Johnson and Cuevas, along with four other young boxers, will represent the Greenville Boxing Club in the regionals and the 2014 RSM Belt Blast Tournament, another USA Boxing-sanctioned event the same weekend. Johnson and 14-year-old Crystal Tu-

menelo will compete in the regionals, a qualifying event for the 2016 Olympic Games, while Cuevas, Tajah Fuller, 9, and Sir Cuevas, 8, will be competing in the Belt Blast Tournament. Hosting the championship “will be good for our boxing club and for the state of South Carolina … bringing boxers from other states in the region will help expose South Carolina’s boxing to the rest of the world,” Cuevas told the Journal. Cuevas said at first he was nervous before a bout, but now “it’s more of a job.

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APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 19


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APRIL MORRIS / STAFF

It’s like an everyday situation.” Qualifying for the Olympics was once a dream, he said, “but once I won the nationals, I realized it could become a real-life situation.” Johnson, a student at Southside High School, said, “I like competing against other people who are good.” Cuevas and Johnson aren’t just good – they’re nationally ranked. Cuevas is second in the nation in his weight class (No. 1 in 2012) and Johnson is ranked fifth in the nation. Both are Silver Gloves (sanctioned amateur boxing ages 8-15) champions and have more than 80 bouts each under their belts. Johnson said he is looking forward to competing. “I think I’m going to win. I’m in it for the belt and to go on to the Olympics.” Boxing or fitness training offered to other athletes isn’t the only focus for the approximately 40 students who participate, said coach Shakir Robinson. While coaching basketball and football, Robinson founded a program that would close the educational gap for some students, he said. The Boxing Club blends academic support and physical training for students. “We needed to come up with an everyday program,” and the combination of academics and physical activity has worked well, Robinson said. After bouncing around several locations,

Robinson purchased the space on Pendleton Street about six years ago. A former boxer himself, Robinson had two sons in training – one ranked second in the nation twice without having access to a gym. “We wanted to do something different from other gyms, so we started a boxing fitness program with an academic program,” he said. Before donning gloves and workout gear, students spend time in the CEE basement space, working on homework or academics. The physical discipline complements school work, Robinson said, lending focus and a work ethic. During the summer, CEE offers a free fitness/ academic boot camp to the community, which has grown from five to 40 participants in five years. The program boasts a 100 percent graduation rate in an area that has an average 30 percent graduation rate, Robinson said. Cuevas said the center offers him a chance to finish schoolwork before training for three hours, five days a week. The physicality of boxing is a draw, he said. “I can fight without getting into trouble.” It helps that he enjoys school, too. Cuevas is considering a career as a physician. “Math right now is hard, but I love it.” Johnson agreed that the physical discipline helps him in school, where he enjoys math and science and hopes to focus

Shakir Robinson, boxing coach and director of the Center for Educational Equity, helps his son, Khaliid Johnson, put on his boxing gloves before training. Johnson, who is ranked fifth nationally, will compete in the USA Boxing Junior Olympics Southeast Regional Event on May 1-3.

on science in college. He’s happy to see the program growing with “more people coming, competing and making the gym bigger and better.” Ernie Cuevas Sr., Ernie’s father and a coach at the gym, said the program doesn’t emphasize boxing as a career or venue to fame, but a way to get through college and on to a career. “I tell them, ‘You’re a student athlete, not an athletic student.’ School is definitely first,” he said. As far as producing elite boxers, “It takes all of us to come together to bring different aspects of boxing, family, studying to mold and form these kids. We teach them to be champs in the ring and out of the ring,” said Cuevas Sr. The participants form an extended family, he said. When his own family moved to the area, he heard about CEE by word of mouth and contacted Robinson. Once the two fathers connected, the sons got together to spar the very next day, Robinson said. “They have the most beautiful chemistry. Some days it gets in-

tense over who wants to be the best, but when they step out of those ropes, they are back to being best of friends.” Regarding that fated meeting, “It was a blessing that our paths crossed,” said Robinson about Cuevas. “Since we met, we’ve taken off to another level. We have one of the best boxing gyms in the Southeast region.”

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BBQ and big competition Competitors sling the sauce to benefit Project Host APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Project Host has close ties to barbecue. They don’t cook up the smoked Southern delicacy in the facility that offers up a soup kitchen for the hungry, community culinary school, student food program, garden and greenhouse, but the annual Project Host BBQ Cook-Off and Festival on April 25 and 26 is “everything,” said execu-

HIGH ON THE HOG WHAT: Project Host BBQ Cook-Off and Festival WHEN: April 25-26 Friday, 6-10 p.m. – wings competition Saturday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. – BBQ competition COST: Free admission, $1 samples, $10 pork BBQ plates INFO: projecthost.org/bbq

tive director Sally Green. Nearly 40 competitors will come together at Main and Broad streets in downtown Greenville for a pork barbecue cooking competition – sanctioned by the S.C. Barbecue Association – on Saturday to vie for the tastiest barbecue and a People’s Choice best wings contest on Friday night. Wing lovers are invited to vote for their favorite on Friday, said Green, and then come back on Saturday to sample all the varieties of pork barbecue. The event has many contestants who have participated all four years, she said. Project Host provides the meat, and the competitors, a mix of professionals and amateurs, cook all night long for the judging on Saturday morning. Cookers get points in the S.C. Barbecue Association and can win up to $750 for first place. Winners will be announced on Saturday afternoon. In the meantime, said Green, “if you can, you can taste 37 different types of barbecue.” Bo Stoddard of Bo Daddy’s Smokehouse in downtown Greenville is a

dubbed The newcomer to Meat Doctors. the Upstate and Made up of gena first-time pareral surgery and ticipant. He and orthopedic resihis crew will be dents, the team smoking wings More then 45,000 - number of meals was initially for up to three served by Project Host soup kitchen in guided by a resihours on Fri2013. dent from Texas day, he said, and More then 350 - number of children who knew someprepping pork who receive healthy meals and snacks five thing about barbutts and brisdays a week through Project Host’s Feeding becue, he said. ket to smoke for Hungry Children Project This is the only 13 hours overcook-off they night. Stoddard take part in, and will “set it and forget it” for the dry rubbed pork and they enjoy supporting the cause. The Meat Doctors especially relish have it ready for Saturday’s judging the ritual of staying up all night cookand sampling, he said. The weekend event will have a fair- ing on Friday, Jones said. To gain votes like atmosphere with live music, bar- during the People’s Choice competition, becue-alternative concessions, desserts, they tell everyone at the hospital to vote beer and wine available for purchase, for their wing offerings, he said. The said Green. The concentration of cook- team, which works in shifts, even has a ers also offers residents a chance to printed schedule (created by the nowsample the wares of catering groups relocated Texan), which precisely outbefore booking them for an event, she lines when to begin cooking and seasaid. That is the exposure that he is soning throughout the night, he added. Green commended the barbecue enhoping for, said Stoddard, who opened thusiasts for their willingness to give his business in December. Mark Jones, a surgery resident of their time and talent. “Without the with Greenville Health System, has cookers, we wouldn’t have an event. been participating in the cook-off They do it for fun and they do it with since the beginning as part of a team heart.”

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sitore said. A limited number of bibs are available to charity runners and Tessitore was surprised in November to learn that she received the one extra bib for the MMRF team. Tessitore was on the short list beAPRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF cause of her desire to support her amorris@communityjournals.com mother and “make this a really meaningful year for the marathon, my At this week’s annual Boston Mara- mom and for our family,” she said. thon, runners and residents will com“My source of inspiration is trying memorate – in different ways – the to show my mom how much I love celebration of physical endurance her and do something really positive and the one-year anniversary of a fin- because I’m in a position that I can’t ish line bombing that killed three and do a lot while she is up there going injured more than 260. through chemo and the struggles she’s had with the disease,” she said. “My source of inspiration is trying To date, Tessitore to show my mom how much I love has raised more than her and do something really positive $15,000, and donors because I’m in a position that I can’t can continue to support her through April do a lot while she is up there going 23. Tessitore said that through chemo and the struggles the Greenville Track Club has fully supportshe’s had with the disease.” ed her. When she has talked to others about Jennifer Tessitore her fundraising, “total Greenville runner and former Bos- strangers had a connection with myton resident Jennifer Tessitore will eloma and have donated,” she said. be pushing toward the finish for her Receiving all the information about mom, Lois Rosenfeld. marathon security and being part of Tessitore said she grew up picnick- multiple waves of 9,000 runners is ing on Heartbreak Hill along the a “little overwhelming,” she said, but marathon route, watching her father, her mom will be able to come and be cousins or other relatives pass by. waiting at the finish line. “We always seemed to know someone “It’s going to be a nice homecomwho was running in the marathon,” ing,” Tessitore said. she said. An assistant solicitor for the 13th Judicial Circuit, Tessitore ran her first marathon several years ago after a friend encouraged her to run longer distances. On April 21, she will be part of the 16-member Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation’s (MMRF) charity PowerTeam in the Boston Marathon. Tessitore calls MMRF a “high-impact charity” that raises funds for a cure for the blood cancer. About two years ago, Tessitore’s mother was diagnosed with multiple myeloma and she was searching for a way to support her. Rosenfeld has been going to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston for treatments and clinical trials. “After the crazy events of last year [Boston Marathon], I started to think about applying for a charity bib,” Tes-

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Rising from the canvas Bob Jones University’s Living Gallery features live actors in life-size art reproductions CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Nowhere is the old saying “Seeing is believing” more true than Bob Jones University’s Living Gallery. The Living Gallery, which has become a popular Upstate Easter tradition over the past 17 years, mixes music and drama with art. Live models take the place of human figures in life-sized reproductions of Biblical-themed paintings and sculptures. Through the use of costumes, makeup and lighting techniques, the reproductions and human models look truly like two-dimensional paintings. “The first time people see it, they’re so mesmerized by the art form,” said Dr. Darren Lawson, dean of BJU’s School of Fine Arts and Communication and producer of the Living Gallery. “It reaches out and touches you in a way you don’t experience anywhere else.” The idea for the Living Gallery came from a Laguna Beach, Calif., art festival GALLERY continued on PAGE 26

ANTHONY VAN DYCK’S PAINTING “ENTRY OF CHRIST INTO JERUSALEM” IS BROUGHT TO LIFE IN TABLEAU ARTIST JOHNATHAN JOHNSON’S RENDITION USING LIVING MODELS (FROM LEFT) ALEXANDER SCHEFFER, AUSTIN REED AND PRESTON SPRECHER, PART OF BOB JONES UNIVERSITY’S 17TH ANNUAL LIVING GALLERY. GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Want to give a Mother’s Day gift she’ll never forget?

Take her to see Music From The Heavens featuring the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, The Greenville Chorale and soprano Christina Major. This divinely inspired concert showcases spiritual works including Verdi’s “Te Deum” and “Stabat Mater,” Poulenc’s “Gloria,” and Mascagni’s Easter Hymn from “Cavalleria Rusticana.” The GSO is offering a special discount of

$5 off per ticket

to the Mother’s Day performance of Music From The Heavens on Sunday, May 11, 2014. To take advantage of this offer, purchase tickets from The Peace Center Box Office online by entering the coupon code JOURNAL to receive the $5 discount or purchase tickets in person or by phone and give the coupon code JOURNAL.

Music From The Heavens Edvard Tchivzhel, Music Director & Conductor The Greenville Chorale (Bingham Vick, Jr., Artistic Director)

Christina Major, Soprano The Peace Center for the Performing Arts 24 Journal THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014 Mothers Day Double Truck Ad.indd

1

For tickets call 864-467-3000 www.greenvillesymphony.org APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 25 4/14/14 3:49 PM


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Rising from the canvas Bob Jones University’s Living Gallery features live actors in life-size art reproductions CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Nowhere is the old saying “Seeing is believing” more true than Bob Jones University’s Living Gallery. The Living Gallery, which has become a popular Upstate Easter tradition over the past 17 years, mixes music and drama with art. Live models take the place of human figures in life-sized reproductions of Biblical-themed paintings and sculptures. Through the use of costumes, makeup and lighting techniques, the reproductions and human models look truly like two-dimensional paintings. “The first time people see it, they’re so mesmerized by the art form,” said Dr. Darren Lawson, dean of BJU’s School of Fine Arts and Communication and producer of the Living Gallery. “It reaches out and touches you in a way you don’t experience anywhere else.” The idea for the Living Gallery came from a Laguna Beach, Calif., art festival GALLERY continued on PAGE 26

ANTHONY VAN DYCK’S PAINTING “ENTRY OF CHRIST INTO JERUSALEM” IS BROUGHT TO LIFE IN TABLEAU ARTIST JOHNATHAN JOHNSON’S RENDITION USING LIVING MODELS (FROM LEFT) ALEXANDER SCHEFFER, AUSTIN REED AND PRESTON SPRECHER, PART OF BOB JONES UNIVERSITY’S 17TH ANNUAL LIVING GALLERY. GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Want to give a Mother’s Day gift she’ll never forget?

Take her to see Music From The Heavens featuring the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, The Greenville Chorale and soprano Christina Major. This divinely inspired concert showcases spiritual works including Verdi’s “Te Deum” and “Stabat Mater,” Poulenc’s “Gloria,” and Mascagni’s Easter Hymn from “Cavalleria Rusticana.” The GSO is offering a special discount of

$5 off per ticket

to the Mother’s Day performance of Music From The Heavens on Sunday, May 11, 2014. To take advantage of this offer, purchase tickets from The Peace Center Box Office online by entering the coupon code JOURNAL to receive the $5 discount or purchase tickets in person or by phone and give the coupon code JOURNAL.

Music From The Heavens Edvard Tchivzhel, Music Director & Conductor The Greenville Chorale (Bingham Vick, Jr., Artistic Director)

Christina Major, Soprano The Peace Center for the Performing Arts 24 Journal THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014 Mothers Day Double Truck Ad.indd

1

For tickets call 864-467-3000 www.greenvillesymphony.org APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 25 4/14/14 3:49 PM


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that resurrected the art form of tableau vivant, French for “living picture.” BJU is the only place on the East Coast now doing tableau vivant, Lawson said. This year’s Living Gallery is called “Looking Unto Jesus” and is set in the Old Testament period, 500 years before the resurrection, said Dr. David Eoute, the show’s director and Eoute an assistant professor of communication disorders at the school. “Typically, we’re looking back to the crucifixion. Here, the Jews are looking forward to the Messiah. They don’t know how it will be revealed,” Eoute said. “This program highlights the Old Testament prophecies and illustrates their fulfillment in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.” An original drama written by faculty member David Schwingle unfolds on the wings of the stage. It pauses periodically to focus on the artwork, rebuilt in large scale on the stage. “It’s like a picture pop-up book,” Lawson said. “It leaves people wondering what’s coming next.” Work on this year’s production began two years ago. It involves 70 student

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Walk on

GALLERY continued from PAGE 24

Alicia Carr, wig master for The Living Gallery, works on the beard of model Alexander Scheffer.

models, two dozen musicians, nearly four dozen makeup artists and scores of set builders, costume artists, a wig crew and a production crew. The program features a dozen pieces of art, two of which are from the Bob Jones Museum & Gallery collection. Three of the pieces are new – “Moses and the Brazen Serpent” by Sebastien Bourdon, “Entry of Christ into Jerusalem” by Anthony van Dyck and “Crucifixion” by Jacopo Bassano. The rest of the pieces have been used in previous Living Galleries and have been taken out of storage, Lawson said.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

When viewed from the side, models pop out of the masterpiece of the Living Gallery.

Two pieces are stained glass: “Christ Blessing the Children” by an unknown artist and “Ascension Window” by Louis Comfort Tiffany. Five performances are scheduled for Friday and Saturday. Tickets are $11 for adults and $9 for children 6 through 12 years of age. Eoute said the biggest challenge for him was making sure everything comes together. “The hardest thing is making sure to get the vision and the concepts just right. The unity of all the disparate parts is key,” he said. For the student models, the most difficult part is holding absolutely still. Although the designers try to incorporate as many support pieces as they can to help the models have an easier time maintaining their poses, staying still for the minutes they are on stage can be tough physically. In all of the years of doing Living Gallery, Lawson said he’s only had to replace one model because he couldn’t hold still enough. The student had a fear of heights and trembled so badly it made the entire set shake, he said. “It’s hard to believe that this is our 17th,” Lawson said. “Countless people have been blessed and challenged each year by the message of Easter displayed in these performances.”

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Living Gallery WHERE: Bob Jones University Rodeheaver Auditorium WHEN: April 18, 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. April 19, 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. TICKETS: $11 for adults, $9 for children 6-12 INFO: 864-770-1372 or livinggallery.bju.edu

APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 27


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

The members of the Blue Ridge High School FBLA chapter received recognition in multiple competitive events at the two-day FBLA State Leadership Conference in Charleston. Twenty-eight members attended the conference. The following students qualified to attend the national conference: Jaclyn Kellems, Ryan Teems, Taylor Holton, Savannah Reeves, Karlee Gibson, Abby Roth, Heather Fitch, Charlee Wilkerson, Marc Western, Mary Anna Case, Courtney LeHew, Jon Andrews, Taylor Holton, Darrin Andrews. Karlee Gibson and Abby Roth each received $750 scholarships from Johnson & Wales University. The Blue Ridge High chapter is led by Stephanie Casey. In addition, Blue Ridge High School FBLA member Karlee Gibson was elected as a FBLA State Officer at the 2014 FBLA State Conference. The Ellen Woodside Battle of the Books Team led by media specialist Lucy Tinsley won the Regional Championship and placed second in the district. Pictured: (left to right) Alex McCain, Ethan Rampergash, Reid Parker, Lucy Tinsley, Renzo Muzzareli, Alex McMillan and Bailey Maison The first class of the GE Machinist Apprentice Program is graduating May 22 and will start working full-time at GE on May 27. The program was launched in 2012 in an effort to ensure a pipeline of highly skilled employees for the future. Eleven apprentices have gone through the two-year program involving academic studies through Greenville Tech and on-the-job training. The program provides compensation for on-the-job training and covers tuition and books. The program is taking applications for the next class through May 5 at gegasturbinejobs.com.

Riverside Middle School principal Eric Williams with former U.S. Secretary of Education Richard Riley and Dr. Clifford Fulmore, SCPTA president.

Riverside Middle School principal Eric Williams was named the SCPTA Outstanding Middle School Principal of the Year at the SCPTA State Convention.

28 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

Track Club-ELITE will host a running camp open to boys and girls ages 12-18 at Legacy Charter School Parker Campus July 7-10. The camp will focus on running workouts, strength training, dynamic warm-ups, nutrition, racing tactics, goal setting and the mental approach to the sport. Cost is $50 per person and includes breakfast and lunch. The program will award 25 scholarships to those who qualify. Registration is a $25 deposit due by May 30. For more information, contact director Cristina Lindsey at clindsey@legacycharter.org or 864-304-6732. For more information about the school, visit legacycharter.org and gtcelite.org for more information on Greenville Track Club-Elite.

Cherrydale Elementary School students Alivia Read, Lillie Coats and Mikayla Byrd recently participated in the annual Spring Sing concert. Spring Sing is an annual concert where students from elementary and middle schools perform various choral pieces. The Fine Arts Center will host Explore the Arts July 14-18. Classes are held 8:30 a.m.noon, Monday-Friday.  Arts classes for rising elementary and middle school students will be offered in painting on canvas, drama, sculpture, guitar, drums and shakers, Japanese art, creative writing, ballet, drum set and snare drum, and Photoshop. High school, college and adult workshops will be offered in printmaking, digital and alternative photography, metal and glass combo, and ballet. The cost to attend is $125 for the elementary and middle school program and $150 for the high school, college and adult workshops. Some partial scholarships are available. For more information, call 864-355-2574 or email dshank@greenville.k12.sc.us.  Jacob C. Boyette, a homeschooled senior, has been awarded the Crusader Fellows Scholarship by North Greenville University, which covers tuition, room and board for four years. The Crusader Fellows Scholarship is awarded to students who are residents of South Carolina that qualify for the state’s Palmetto Fellows Scholarship. He is the son of John and Elizabeth Boyette of Simpsonville. In addition, Kaylee Adams, a senior at Riverside High School, has been awarded the Trustee Scholarship. This scholarship will guarantee $56,000 over the course of four years of attendance at NGU. She is the daughter of Peter and Donna Adams of Greer. All three Bob Jones Academy orchestras recently competed and received excellent or superior ratings in the South Carolina Music Educators Association (SCMEA) Region Orchestra Festival held at North Greenville University. The elementary school orchestra, under the direction of Rachel Taclob, received an excellent rating. The middle school orchestra, directed by Becca Grove, received a superior rating. Taclob also directed the high school orchestra, which entered at the highest level of musical difficulty, and was awarded a superior rating.  

Pictured are (left to right): Blue Ridge High School Latin students Sarah Lefever, Jordan Grissop, Brock Cooper, MecKenzie Whittier, Kelli Pentecost, Amber Hampton, Judson Snyder, Jake Wilson, Skye Hill, Marc Western, Miles Johnson, David Dunlap and Charles Williams.

Thirteen Latin students from Blue Ridge High School, accompanied by their Latin teacher Jim Westcot, parent Mark Johnson, and Furman University classics professor Randall Childree, recently competed in the annual Spring Forum of the South Carolina Junior Classical League. The group brought back the second-place trophy for overall sweepstakes points, outclassing a number of delegations larger than itself. Students competed in several areas of competition, including written tests, graphic arts, costumes, oratory and dramatic interpretation, certamen (academic team) and olympika.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

“Harmony…Past, Present and Future” is the theme of the Garden Tour sponsored by the Greenville Council of Garden Clubs April 25-26, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Featured gardens include: Linky Stone Children’s Garden; Karen LaFleur Stewart, 216 East Park Avenue; Jan Hubble, 200 E. Earle St.; Joyce Murphy, 14 E. Earle St.; Robin Kaczmarczyk, 31 E. Montclair Ave.; Gwen Garrett, 315 McDonald St.; Donna Dowling, 309 Ashford; and The Kilgore Lewis House. Tickets are $18 in advance and $20. The “He Said, She Said” Author Road Show featuring Wendelin Van Draanen, author of more than 30 books for kids and young adults, and her husband, Mark Huntley Parsons, longtime nonfiction writer and the author of “Road Rash,” will be at Fiction Addiction on April 22, 4:30 p.m. Tickets are $10; a ticket admits one teen/adult and up to four accompanying children 12 years or younger to the event and may be redeemed on a purchase that evening. Tickets may be purchased online, at the store or by calling 864-675-0540.

Grace Church will sponsor its sixth annual Daddy Daughter Dance on April 25 at 7 p.m. Hosted by the church’s Men’s Roundtable, the event is designed to help fathers connect with their daughters and be a positive influence. Dads are invited to take their daughters out for dinner and come to the event for dessert and dancing. For more information and to register, visit mensroundtable.org/dance.

Author Ashton Lee will be signing copies of his new novel, “The Reading Circle,” at Fiction Addiction on April 19, 2-4 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. In addition, Janette Turner Hospital will be at Book Your Lunch on April 25, noon, at The Lazy Goat. Tickets are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch. com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540.

Greenville drive-through locations include: McAlister Square, 225 S. Pleasantburg Drive; and St. Francis Millennium, 2 Innovation Drive. More than 20 other dropoff sites will also be available. Find the full location details at ariverremedy.org/ locations. For more information, visit ariverremedy.org or call 864-299-4000. The Reserve at Lake Keowee Community Foundation will hold a number of community events featuring a variety of art forms. “Landscape,” an art exhibit, runs now-April 30 at The Hill House, featuring the works of Laura Buxo, Pat Grills, Robert Decker and David Waldrop with an artists’ reception on April 23, 4:30-6 p.m. On April 27, 7-8 p.m., Menotti’s romantic opera “The Telephone” will be performed at the Founder’s Hall. The band Fayssoux and Company will perform May 4, 7-9 p.m., on the Great Lawn. For more information, visit reserveatlakekeowee.com. Greenville County Animal Care, located at 328 Furman Hall Road in Greenville, is offering free cat spays and neuters in the 29609 ZIP code through 2015. Residents of the 29609 ZIP code should contact 864-467-SPAY to make appointments to have their cats or kittens spayed or neutered at no charge. They will need to bring in proof that they reside in the 29609 ZIP code. The Year of Altruism will present Altruism in Medicine: A Panel Discussion with Current and Future Physicians on April 22 at the USC School of Medicine Greenville. A welcome reception will be at 6 p.m. and the panel at 6:30 p.m. Upstate physicians, medical students and faculty will participate in a panel discussion presented by USC School of Medicine Greenville and Greenville Health System will explore whether medical professionals are beholden to a higher standard than most professionals by virtue of what they do for a living and obligations of the Hippocratic Oath. The event is free, but seating is limited and registration is required. To register, visit yearofaltruism.org.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

Advent United Methodist Church is offering “Egg”venture, a free Easter egg hunt, carnival and lunch, to the community on April 19, 10 a.m.-noon, at 2258 Woodruff Road, Simpsonville. Kids ages 1-10 are invited to experience bounce houses, face painting, egg hunts, games and free lunch. For more information, call 864-288-8217. Book Your Lunch with best-selling author Jane Green on April 23 at noon at The Lazy Goat. Tickets are $35 or $52.55 per person. Green will be discussing her new novel, “Tempting Fate.” In addition, Book Your Lunch with New York Times best-selling author Cassandra King on April 24 at noon at Twigs Tempietto. Tickets are $35 or $40.90 per person. Tickets for both events must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. The annual Quilt Show at the Greer Heritage Museum will be April 25-26. The museum is looking for quilters who would like to display their handmade quilts. There will be two divisions: hand-quilted and machine-quilted. Ribbons will be given for the best quilts and a best-of-show cash prize will be awarded. Quilters should bring their quilts to the museum on April 23, 1-4 p.m., or make arrangements for another time. There will be a $5 entry fee for each quilter. For more information, call 864-877-3377. Project Rx: A River Remedy will hold a drug take-back event on April 26, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Upstate residents can bring prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements for a free and safe disposal. Sharps or syringes will not be accepted. Participants should leave the name of the drug visible on medication labels and use a permanent marker to eliminate personal information.

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APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 29


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

High Cotton, 550 S. Main St., Greenville, will host a special Administrative Professionals Day Lunch on April 23, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. All proceeds will be donated to Communities in Schools in Greenville, a nonprofit organization that champions youth education with a mission to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in stay in school and achieve in life. The cost is $25 per person, excluding tax and gratuity. To make a reservation, call 864-335-4200. Loaves & Fishes, a Greenville-based food rescue organization, has received $1,052 to help fight hunger in the Upstate from Pomegranate on Main restaurant’s March Hummus for Hunger Campaign. The Greenville Free Medical Clinic, along with Beaufort Jasper Hampton Comprehensive Health Services and St. James Santee Family Health Center, has been awarded nearly $120,000  in grants from CVS Caremark Charitable Trust, CVS’s private foundation, in partnership with the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC) and the National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics (NAFC). The dedication of Chris and Kelly’s HOPE Fitness Park will be on April 23 at 10 a.m. on the Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail. The Northwestern Mutual Foundation gave a $10,000 grant to support the park, located on the trail and adjacent to the White Horse Academy, a residential treatment facility which treats adolescent males and families impacted by substance abuse. The event will feature remarks by U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy. On May 3, 4-8 p.m., The Links Incorporated, Greenville Chapter will hold its annual fundraiser, Run for the Roses (A Kentucky Derby Event), at the TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Drive, Greenville. At this event, the Oliver Lewis

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April is National Donate Life Month and MatchingDonors is taking donations to assist patients in getting organ transplants. MatchingDonors is a nonprofit organization and the nation’s largest online living organ donor organization. For more information, visit matchingdonors.com. DNA Creative Communications, in partnership with the Hollingsworth Funds, the Community Foundation of Greenville and United Way of Greenville County, will host its 2014 Shine the Light Leadership Academy from May to November. Sessions will feature keynote addresses by thought leaders from outside the area, as well as local panels and presenters. This year’s focus is on the four key elements of nonprofit leadership: on May 21 is Creating a Strong Organizational Culture featuring Pratichi Shah, founder and CEO of Flourish Talent Management Solutions; on July 16 is Developing and Engaging a High-Performing Board; on Sep. 17 is Expanding Leadership Beyond Your Walls; and on Nov. 19 is Leading for Sustainability. All sessions will be held at the Kroc Center in Greenville, 8 a.m.-noon. For more information, visit nonprofitforums.org or call Katie Ward at 864-2350959, ext. 0.

The Safe Harbor Cycle Tour 2014 will be May 31 at 8:05 a.m. in Iva. It will be a 25-mile, 42-mile or 65-mile metric century cycle ride through the rolling hills of southern Anderson County, all in support of Safe Harbor. All courses begin and end at the Iva Civic Center in downtown Iva. Registration is $40 and includes event T-shirt, snacks, SAG, course map and lunch. For more information and to register, visit safeharborsc.org/cycle-tour.

Cornell Sweeney Jr. 864-967-2362

On Aug. 21, 7-10 p.m., the Commerce Club will participate in the 2014 ClubCorp Charity Classic, ClubCorp’s annual philanthropic open-house event. In 2013, the Classic raised more than $2 million nationwide for the Muscular Dystrophy Association’s Augie’s Quest and other charities. Locally, the Commerce Club raised more than $15,000. This year’s “Be a Kid for a Day, an Adult Carnival” will benefit A Child’s Haven. The event will feature live entertainment and carnival games designed for adults, a gourmet twist on carnival food and complimentary bar service. Guests can participate in both silent and live auctions. The event is open to the public and cost is $30 per person. For more information, visit clubcorpcharityclassic.com or call 864-232-5600. 77534

Main Street @ Clock Tower Simpsonville csweeney@allstate.com

30 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

Upstate Forever presents Upcountry Muse, an event featuring the world premiere of nature-based music and dance, on April 24, 7 p.m., at the Fine Arts Center. All proceeds will benefit Upstate Forever. The evening will include live performances and a silent auction featuring artwork by Fine Arts Center students. Tickets are $50 per person and are available at upstateforever.org/upcountrymuse.

Miracle Hill Ministries presents the 10th annual Miracle Hill Challenge fundraising event on June 7 at Furman University. Cyclists, runners and walkers of all ages and abilities are invited to participate in this opportunity to raise funds to help the homeless and hurting of Upstate South Carolina. In keeping with this year’s theme, “We All Have a Challenge,” ride options include 100, 62 and 40 miles as well as a 20-mile option along the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail. In addition, a 5K run/walk/ride is available to encourage total family participation. Family-friendly games, activities, a bounce house, healthy lunch and music will round out the day. Participants may set up online fundraising pages prior to the event to raise funds for specific needs at Miracle Hill’s shelters. Register at miraclehillchallenge.com or contact Sandy Furnell at 864-631-0137.

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Aristide Award will be presented to the Rev. Sean Dogan, pastor of Long Branch Baptist Church. Proceeds from this event will support the Marie S. Huggins Scholarship and other local community organizations such as: SHARE, Meals on Wheels, Susan B. Komen Race for the Cure, American Heart Association, the Fine Arts Center and programs at Nicholtown Community Center. For tickets and more information, contact Violeita Irby, event chair, at 864-962-8418 or chapter president Flora Ratliff at 864-963-6923 by April 25.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

ROCK. FILM. COMEDY.

MELISSA ETHERIDGE: THIS IS ME SOLO

Dec. 23-28, 2014

TONIGHT! AMY BOYLE

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

CINDERELLA Aug. 4-9, 2015

CAROL ROSEGG

WICKED

Jan. 28-Feb. 15, 2015

Friday, April 18, 8:00 PM MelissaEtheridge.com

JOAN MARCUS

KINKY BOOTS Sept. 1-6, 2015

MATTHEW MURPHY

APP

PIPPIN

A film by Bobby Boemans

Mar. 17-22, 2015

When Anna’s cellphone mysteriously downloads a new app and it begins controlling her life in fearful ways, she’ll set in motion a fatal series of events in order to remove it. Saturday, May 10th, 6:30PM Appdefilm.nl

JOAN MARCUS

Sept. 23-28, 2014

THE BOOK OF MORMON

JOAN MARCUS

ONCE

Nov. 11-16, 2014 JOAN MARCUS

“Book of Mormon,” “Wicked” in Peace Center’s Broadway Series’ lineup CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com It’s easy to see why the Peace Center’s 2014-15 Broadway Series lineup is being called the best ever to come to Greenville. “The Book of Mormon,” a religious

satire that won the 2011 Tony Award for Best Musical and is sure to spark discussion, will come to Peace Center for the first time in November. The Tony’s 2012 and 2013 Best Musicals – “Once” and “Kinky Boots” – will be part of the upcoming season as well.

Throw in a return three-week run of “Wicked,” Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast,” Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” and “Pippin,” the winner of the 2013 Tony Award for Best Broadway Revival, and it’s no wonder the seven-

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BROADWAY continued on PAGE 32

APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL CULTURE

BROADWAY continued from PAGE 31

show lineup is being billed as the best Broadway Series on the East Coast. “The best is very subjective, but, absolutely, I’m really excited about this season which is filled with fresh, big shows,” said Peace Center President Megan Riegel. “It’s strong.”

“PIPPIN,” MARCH 17-22, 2015

Denèe Benton in “The Book of Mormon.”

After it returned to Broadway after 40 years, “Pippin” won the Tony Award for the Best Musical Revival. The touring show will come to Greenville in March 2013. “‘Pippin’ is to die for,” Riegel said. “This production is so unbelievable, so incredibly well done.” “Pippin” tells the story of a young prince on a death-defying journey to find meaning in his existence. Diane Paulus directs the new production. She directed “Hair” and “The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess.” The score is by Tony nominee Stephen Schwartz, who worked on “Godspell” and “Wicked.” “Pippin” features sizzling choreography and breathtaking acrobatics.

“ONCE,” SEPT. 23-28

April 18-20 & 25-27

Tickets: $18, $15 & $10

“THE BOOK OF MORMON,” NOV. 11-16

“The Book of Mormon” is a religious satire by the creators of Comedy Central’s “South Park.” “It’s here with the perfect mix of shows,” Riegel said. “The Book of Mormon” tells the story of two young Mormon missionaries sent to a remote village in northern Uganda, where a brutal warlord is threatening the local population. Naïve and optimistic, the two missionaries try to share the Book of Mormon, one of their scriptures – which only one of them has read – but have trouble connecting with the locals who are more concerned with famine, war, poverty and AIDS. “As outrageous as it is, it’s also poignant,” Riegel said. Riegel said some in Greenville may not

32 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

Tim Rogan as Gaston in “Beauty and the Beast.”

like the show, but said, “We need to look at it as satire. It is not an attack on religion at all.”

“BEAUTY AND THE BEAST,” DEC. 23-28

The musical based on the Academy Award-winning animated film from Disney is a perfect show for the week of Christmas, Riegel said. “It’s a family show. It appeals to all generations.” Linda Woolverton, the woman who wrote the screenplay, adapted it for the stage, adding new scenes to fill out the story. The expanded score includes several new songs by composer Alan Menken and lyricist Tim Rice. “Beauty and the Beast” ran on Broadway for more than 13 years, or 5,461 performances, and has been performed in more than 120 cities and 21 countries, including Canada, Japan, Mexico, Ireland, South Korea, the United Kingdom, Spain, Brazil and Argentina. It has been translated into eight languages.

“WICKED,” JAN. 28-FEB. 15, 2015

“Wicked” sold out nearly every performance during its three-week run at the Peace Center in 2010. It will return again in 2015 for a threeweek run in January and February. Riegel expects the show to be as big a hit as it was the first time it was here. “Ever since it left, people have been asking when it will return,” she said. “It will be a five-year span between the two runs and it’s the kind of show that people want to see again and again.” “Wicked,” the prequel to “The Wizard of Oz,” has busted box office records in every city it has played. The story tells how the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good Witch came to be. “Wicked” has won more than 50 major awards, including a Grammy and three Tony Awards.

“CINDERELLA,” AUG. 4-9, 2015

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, the creators of “The Sound of Music” and “South Pacific,” put a contemporary take on the classic “Cinderella.” The production features jaw-dropping transformations and all the moments audiences love – the pumpkin, the glass slipper, the masked ball and more – plus some surprising new twists. The production includes Rodgers and Hammerstein’s most beloved songs, including “In My Own Little Corner,” “Impossible/ It’s Possible” and “Ten Minutes Ago.” “When I saw this on Broadway, it knocked my socks off,” Riegel said.

“KINKY BOOTS,” SEPT. 1-6, 2015

“Kinky Boots” tells the story of a struggling shoe factory owner who works to turn his business around with the help of Lola, a fabulous entertainer in need of some sturdy stilettos. The unlikely pair finds they have more in common than they ever dreamed possible. Cyndi Lauper did the show’s score. “It’s unique, fun, special, poignant, outrageous all at the same time,” Riegel said. “Kinky Boots” won six 2013 Tony Awards and was inspired by a true story. Season subscriptions, ranging from $395 to $595, are on sale now. New season subscription forms are available at the Peace Center website, peacecenter.org. Single tickets will go on sale later.

JOAN MARCUS

yountscenter.org

AMY BOYLE

864.409.1050

JOAN MARCUS

Steel Magnolias

If it weren’t for the longtime friendship between noted Irish playwright Enda Wright and director John Tiffany, the offbeat Irish indie film “Once” may never had been made into an award-winning musical. After initially telling the producers that transforming the movie into a musical wasn’t for him, Wright agreed to take two days to read the screenplay, listen to the songs and talk with Tiffany, who also had his doubts. The rest is history. The love story about two down-ontheir-luck musicians – an angst-ridden Dublin street singer-songwriter who works as a vacuum repairman, and a Czech immigrant who sells flowers to support herself and her family – won eight Tony Awards in 2012. “It’s sweet and soulful, very mellow compared to ‘Book of Mormon,’” Riegel said.

Haley Podschun in “Wicked.”


JOURNAL CULTURE

Lead in “Flashdance” says role is most difficult of her career CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com When Sydney Morton watched the 1983 movie “Flashdance” as a little girl, she identified with Jennifer Beals’ character as she danced to the song “Maniac.” “I felt like she was the grown-up version of me,” Morton said in a telephone interview. “I had dreams of becoming a dancer, too.” Now, Morton is playing the lead role in “Flashdance: The Musical,” which begins a weeklong run at the Peace Center on Tuesday. “Flashdance” tells the story of Alex Owens, a Pittsburgh steelworker by day and bar dancer by night who yearns to become a professional dancer. “It’s the most challenging role I’ve ever done,” said Morton, whose Broadway credits include “Motown,” “Evita,” “Memphis” and the Chicago company of “Jersey Boys.” “It’s up there with one of the most physically demanding roles on Broadway.” Morton grew up in a family of musicians, including a grandfather who performed on Broadway. She earned a musical theater degree from the Uni-

versity of Michigan and then moved to New York. “Alex is an ideal character for me. My first love is ballet,” said Morton, who had a role in NBC’s recent live production of “The Sound of Music.” “I think the role is an amazing culmination of all my training. It hits all of the skill sets – singing, acting and dancing.” Morton said although she didn’t work in a steel mill like the lead character, she can relate to the struggles to get to where she wanted to be. “Nothing has come easy. Like Alex, there here have been times when I felt like an underdog,” she said. “I think it’s good to have struggles. It gives you more motivation to achieve your goals and more appreciation when you do have success.” Morton calls “Flashdance” a modern-day fairy tale. “It’s the story of a girl who gets to strive for her dream, and she falls in love along the way,” she said. The musical is true to the story of the film, although it has been fleshed out some, especially when it comes to the supporting characters, she said. The musical includes new songs, too. “There’s a character in there for everybody,” she said. “I think the audience is getting both their nostalgic fix and something new. Even for the diehard ‘Flashdance’ fan, there’s a fun element to the show you haven’t seen.”

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APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 33


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Peace Center Melissa Etheridge Apr. 18 ~ 467-3000 Younts Center for Performing Arts Steel Magnolias Apr. 18-27 ~ 4409-1050 Peace Center Standing Ovation Tour Apr. 19 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center Flashdance – The Musical Apr. 22-27 ~ 467-3000 Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive Stereo Reform Apr. 24 ~ 232-2273

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LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 4/18, INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ALE HOUSE

The Deluge Quintet blends roots-rock and soul. Call 864-552-1565 or visit facebook.com/ipagreenville. 4/18, PEACE CENTER

Melissa Etheridge Multi-platinum star plays rare solo acoustic set. Tickets: $45-$65. Call 864467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 4/18, RADIO ROOM

Matrimony Sparkling, blissfully melodic countryrock. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com. 4 / 1 9 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D (GREENVILLE)

Metropolitan Arts Council Works by Lin Pulliam Through Apr. 18 ~ 467-3132

5th & York Smooth urban jazz. Tickets: $7. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com.

Centre Stage The Producers Through Apr. 19 ~ 233-6733

4/19, BON SECOURS WELLNESS ARENA

Greenville Little Theatre Don’t Dress for Dinner Through Apr. 19 ~ 233-6238

Casting Crowns Best-selling Christian band. Tickets: $26-$77. Call 1-800-745-3000 or visit bonsecoursarena.com.

SC Children’s Theatre Tell Me a Story Theatre: Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse Apr. 22 ~ 235-2885

4/19, GROUND ZERO

Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Garland Mattox Through Apr. 25 ~ 242-1050 Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Paintings by Tami Cardnella Through May 12 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Sigmund Abeles: Pastels Through Jun. 15 ~ 271-7570 Legacy of Impressionism: Languages of Light Through Sep. 21 ~ 271-7570 Andrew Wyeth: Selected Watercolors Continuing ~ 271-7570

Green Jelly ’90s metal band hit big with “Three Little Pigs.” Call 864-948-1661 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2. 4/23, THE HANDLEBAR

G. Love & Special Sauce Alt-funk-rock combo sends The Handlebar out in style. Tickets: $25. Call 864233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 4/24, DOWNTOWN ALIVE

Stereo Reform Electro-dance-rock duo. Visit bit.ly/gvldowntown. 4 / 2 5 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D (GREENVILLE)

Wanda Johnson Veteran Upstate blues singer. Tickets: $5. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

‘Controlled chaos’ Bassist Ian Bracchitta improvises at Blues Boulevard this Friday Of all the Upstate jazz musicians I’ve spoken with in this column, bassist Ian Bracchitta’s resume might be the most impressive. The Westchester, N.Y., native has played in dozens of Broadway shows (including productions of “Annie Get Your Gun,” “A Chorus Line” and “West Side Story”), and performed with jazz luminaries from Diane Schuur to the Cab Calloway Orchestra. He’s got versatility covered, as well: He’s gone from playing with the Fifth Dimension and Burt Bacharach to serving as principal bassist for the Spartanburg Philharmonic. And WHO: Ian Bracchitta Quartet he’s somehow found time to serve on the adjunct faculties of WHERE: Blues Boulevard, 300 the South Carolina Governor’s School, Furman University, River St., Ste. 203 UNC-Asheville, Clemson University and Converse College. WHEN: Friday, April 18, 7:30 Not bad for a guy who didn’t actually start out playing bass. and 9:45 p.m. “I started as a classical guitar player back in high TICKETS: $5 school,” Bracchitta says. “But I started listening to a lot of records that featured electric bass, and I thought, ‘Wow, INFO: 864-242-2583 it would be pretty cool if I could do that.’ I thought it or bluesboulevardjazzwould increase my performing potential, because with greenville.com classical guitar, you’re pretty much by yourself.” Bracchitta’s branching out into both jazz and classical music was more practical than artistic. “It was really kind of by chance that I ended up doing both,” he says. “In school, I was mostly concerned with how I was going to make a living as a musician. I had friends in the jazz and classical world. And at the time, there was a phenomenon starting where people would play both jazz and classical. Before, you didn’t see too much of that. But then all of a sudden, guys like Wynton Marsalis were very out about it. They had backgrounds in both and felt like they were pretty good at both.” Making a living as a musician is exactly what Bracchitta has done, and he’s accomplished a large portion of it on Broadway. “I’ve done 35 national Broadway shows,” he says. “The Broadway thing is a very specialized animal, especially for bass. You might have to be swinging hard one second, and then a couple of measures later it has to sound like you’re playing in an orchestra. I toured with one musical that was a three-bass book. It’s heavy-duty double-bass, heavy-duty fretless four-string and heavy-duty fretted five-string. So every other second, you’re putting down one bass and picking up another and having to make that work. So there’s a lot of variety involved with that. The more versatile you are in the bass chair, the better off you’re going to be.” Bracchitta is moving from ensemble member and instructor to bandleader this Friday at Greenville’s Blues Boulevard location, where he will play a show with a quartet that includes John Valerio on piano, Steve Watson on guitar and veteran drummer Sonny Thornton. “We’ll be doing things from the American songbook, but hopefully, jazz is never the same way twice,” Bracchitta says. “And every time you approach those tunes as vehicles for improvisation, they are a product of their moment. They are sudden, spontaneous music; controlled chaos.” After all that time spent as an instructor and a pit-orchestra player, Bracchitta says he’s able to bring aspects of those experiences to his role as bandleader. “Essentially, what you try to do is bring people together who you know will work well and inspire one another. And you pick the repertoire accordingly. You want something that’s going to be a good fit with those players. It’s a very special thing. I can still safely say at my age that there is nothing else that brings me that particular thrill like when things are really happening musically. I don’t know if it’s a euphoria or if you’re in another zone, but it’s great.” VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

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JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

The Department of Visual and Performing Arts at Greenville Technical College’s Greer Campus will feature the 24th Annual Upstate High School Art Exhibition. This year’s exhibit features 163 works from 19 Upstate high school students. There will be a special ceremony and presentation of cash awards to students and high school programs on April 24, 7-9 p.m. The exhibition will remain through April 25 at 2522 Locust Hill Road, Greer. This exhibition and reception is free and open to the public.

will feature Women’s Glee, Men’s Glee and Clemson University Singers presenting short individual programs lasting around 10 minutes each. After intermission, the choirs combine and are joined by professional soloists and orchestra to present The Great Mass in C-minor by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Tickets and information are available at clemson.edu/brooks and through the box office at 864-6567787, Monday-Friday, 1-5 p.m.

The Greenville Symphony Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel, presents its fourth and final Chamber Orchestra Series concert of the 2013-2014 season, “A Night In Vienna,” on April 25-26 at 8 p.m., and April 27 at 3 p.m. in the Gunter Theatre. Tickets are $41. For ticket information, call 864467-3000 or 800-888-7768 or visit greenvillesymphony.org.

Thanks to a grant from the Metropolitan Arts Council, The Children’s Museum of the Upstate (TCMU) recently welcomed local artist Kelley Rustine to the museum for the latest installment of their Artist-In-Residence program. Rustine will work with the public throughout April and May to create an outdoor play space that will become a permanent installation at the museum. The play-scape will be composed of natural materials and non-recyclable waste products that have been donated to the museum by the community. Visitors, with the help of TCMU staff and the Natural Builders of the Upstate, will learn how to use these materials to build a living roof, sensory walls, a seating area, shoe cubbies and tactile components. Help build the play-scape through interactive workshops with local artists on April 27 and May 17-18 at 1-3 p.m. For more information, visit tcmupstate.org.

S.C. Children’s Theatre’s Second Stage presents “Glow Tales,” a black-light puppetry performance, April 25-May 4. Three short tales told through black-light puppetry, prerecorded voices, sound effects and narration create a magical theatre experience for younger audience members. “Charlie and the Big Splash” follows a wee fish as he tries to find a bigger splash, “Benjamin Bee’s Secret Wish” is to see a rainbow, and the tale of a young girl who is less than thrilled about bedtime is “Rosie Bloom’s Dreams.” For tickets, visit scchildrenstheatre.org. FIRE presents “Steel Magnolias” at the Younts Center for Performing Arts, 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn, on April 18-20 and April 25-27. Tickets are $18 per adult, $15 for seniors and $10 per student/child. For more information, call 864409-1050 or visit yountscenter.org. The Clemson University Singers and Men’s and Women’s glees will perform April 22, 8 p.m. Tickets are $8 adults and $5 students. The first half of the concert

Let me put my 11 years of award-winning experience to work for you! W NE ING! T S I L

Jazz singer/songwriter Gregory Porter will perform a free concert in the Mauldin Cultural Center’s outdoor amphitheater on April 26 as a part of the 2014 Railroad Concert Series. The series continues on May 9 with a double-header concert featuring Overmountain Men, with N.C. songwriter David Childers at the helm, and the bluegrass trio South Carolina Broadcasters. All concerts are free to the public and begin at 7:30 p.m. Though free, tickets are required and available at mauldinculturalcenter.org. The Mauldin Cultural Center is located at 101 East Butler Road in Mauldin.

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.

Susan McMillen REALTOR®

864-238-5498 Susan.McMillen@allentate.com

W NE ING! T S I L

LONG CREEK PLANTATION - SWEET 3BR/2BA RANCH ON EXTERIOR LOT! EASY MAINTENANCE! READY NOW! 100% FINANCING! #1277676/$149,900

LONG CREEK PLANTATION - 3BR/2.5BA PLUS BONUS ROOM, NEWER ROOF AND HVAC. GREAT ROOM WITH WOOD-BURNING FIREPLACE. #1276547/$164,900

REMINGTON - AWESOME 3BR PLUS BONUS RM HOME ON OVERSIZED LOT! ON CUL-DE-SAC WITH FENCED YARD! NICE UPGRADES! #1277630/$174,900

HARTS LANE - CUL-DE-SAC, 3BR PLUS LOFT, MASTER ON MAIN! 2 STORY GREAT ROOM, OPEN KITCHEN. #1276561/$182,000

NEELY FARM - 5BR/2BA WITH AWESOME BACKYARD! ALMOST HALF ACRE LOT. VERY SPACIOUS! #1276580/$207,900

SADDLEHORN - BRICK 3BR/3BA WITH LARGE DECK AND SUNROOM ON CUL-DE-SAC. MASTER ON MAIN. 2.91 ACRES. #1276557/$264,900

HIDDEN ACRES - 6 ACRES, CUSTOM 4BR/3BA WITH MASTER AND GUEST ON MAIN. NEAR AUGUSTA ROAD. #1276554/$299,900

CHANDLER LAKE - 4BR/3BA ON OVERSIZED LOT BUILT IN 2012. LUXURY AND AFFORDABILITY! #1276654/$329,900

SYCAMORE RIDGE - SPACIOUS 5BR/4.5BA ON HALF ACRE LOT. WONDERFUL COMMUNITY AMMENITIES. #1276664/$434,900

HARRISON HILLS - 4BR/4.5BA, 5 ACRES, INGROUND POOL, ADD’L DETACHED GARAGE WITH EXTRA SPACE. #1276568 $469,900

WEATHERSTONE - 5BR/3.5BA PLUS BONUS, CUSTOM BRICK ON LARGE CUL-DESAC LOT, 3 CAR GARAGE. #1276569/$474,900

CATALINA ESTATES STUNNING CUSTOM BUILT 4BR/3BA/2 HALF BA ON 2.4 ACRES IN GATED COMMUNITY. #1276269/$819,900

36 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014


JOURNAL HOMES

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

McBee Park, Downtown Greenville

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

available

available

McBee Park is an urban gem…the perfect opportunity to enjoy a new home within walking distance of the heart of Downtown Greenville…shopping, entertainment, fine dining, parks and so much more! McBee Park offers eight single-family lots, each with private garden areas, but open to generous green spaces. Entertain with ease in an open floor plan specifically designed to fit your lifestyle. The two and a half story homes, complete with two car garages and elevators, will feature brick exteriors complimentary to the architecture of the neighborhood. Interior features include high ceilings, rich mouldings, large windows and doors, hardwoods, custom cabinetry, granite countertops and Wolfe and Sub Zero appliance packages. Don’t miss the chance to be this close to downtown in your very own newly constructed home in the sought after McBee/McDaniel area…a brief walk to everything Downtown!

Only two lots available.

HOME INFO Price: $600s to $800s Square Footage: 2500-3000 Open Floor Plans, Quality Finishes, Elevators, Two Car Garages, Private Patios, Green Spaces Schools: Sara Collins Elementary Hughes Middle | Greenville High Contact: Patrick Franzen | 864.250.1234 patrickfranzen@msn.com Highland Homes | 864.233.4175 www.highlandhomessc.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, A P R I L 2 0 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

ON THE MARKET

CREEKWOOD

JAMESON PLACE

209 WILD MEADOW DR . $292,000 . MLS# 1270388

624 JAMESON DRIVE . $157,900 . MLS# 1271136

4BR/3.5BA Great Lazy River Pool Community. Corner lot. Open floor plan. 385 Woodruff Rd pass Five Forks. Left Jonesville, Right on Creek Shoals. Left on Wild Meadow. 1st home on Right.

3BR/2BA Renovated 3 BDRM. Main floor master. 3.5% toward closing costs. Fenced yard detached workshop. Rear screen porch. Eligible for Renovation Mortgage.

Contact: Elvin Rivera | 921-4733 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Kathy Slayter | 864.982.7772 The Marchant Company

PE OPLE , AWA R D S , HONOR S C. Dan Joyner, realtors’ teams rank among the top teams In nationwide real estate network

Chet and Beth Smith, The Chet & Beth Smith Group

Tim and Della Toates, The Toates Team

Carole Atkison, The Spaulding Group

Tim Keagy, The Keagy Team

Four Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS’ teams were recognized with top honors for 2013 sales performance during the network’s national sales convention in Nashville last month. The C. Dan Joyner teams honored included, The Chet & Beth Smith Group, The Spaulding Group, The Toates Team and The Keagy Team. The Chet & Beth Smith Group was named 2013 recipient of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices’ prestigious Top of The Rock Award for top residential units for the U.S. South region. In addition, the team received the prestigious Pinnacle Award as the no. 4 team nationwide. The Spaulding Group ranked #14 nationwide in closed residential units and received the

38 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

Legend 5 Year Award for ranking among the top teams for five years. The Keagy Team and The Toates Team were both ranked in the Top Teams nationwide at #79 and #82 respectively. The Toates Team also received the Legend 10 Year Award for consistently ranking among the top teams for 10 years. “We applaud each team on these outstanding achievements, which highlight their exceptional work in 2013,” said Danny Joyner, CEO, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS. “They are dedicated to providing top-notch service so that their customers have the best home buying or selling experience. The hard work of our teams and individual agents are what makes our company the best in the Upstate year after year.” An Upstate real estate leader for 50 years, C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS became a member of the new Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices network in February 2014.

Coldwell Banker Caine Honored with Multiple Awards at Cartus Broker Network International Conference Coldwell Banker Caine was awarded the Five Star award and the Platinum award in recognition of its service to Cartus and the customers, members and relocating employees whom the company assists. The Cartus Five Star Award recognizes brokers who have met or exceeded their individual objectives for outgoing broker-to-broker referral closings during the calendar year. “The effort that Coldwell Banker Caine put forth toward not only achieving but also exceeding their objectives for outgoing broker-to-broker referral closings speaks volumes about the commitment to success that makes our brokers such highly valued partners,” said Gerald Pearce, Cartus executive vice president, Broker Services and Affinity Services. “We are proud to be affiliated with this talented group of real estate professionals and look forward to our continued joint success in the future.” The Platinum Award is the highest level of the Excellence Awards presented to Cartus Broker Network members. Platinum Award recognition is based on performance results related to a wide variety of goals including customer service, cost management, and effective analysis and marketing of homes. Less than 21 percent of the Network’s principal brokers achieved Platinum level recognition for 2013 performance, and Coldwell Banker Caine is the only Upstate firm to achieve this recognition. “Coldwell Banker Caine has delivered the very highest levels of results to both its customers

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SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D H O M E

HOME INFO 121 Ramsford Lane, Cobblestone, Simpsonville This phenomenal brick and stone home is situated on a .93 acre wooded lot with mature hardwood trees. The large gourmet kitchen is the heart of the home and is perfect for entertaining. It features a huge center island, walk in pantry, bar area, and is open to the breakfast, keeping and great rooms. The upgraded stainless steel appliances include a Fisher Paykel double drawer dishwasher, professional gas range, pot filler, warming drawer, convection oven, wine cooler, and ice maker. The master bedroom retreat as well as another bedroom/study is on the main level. On the upper level you will find three bedrooms, two full baths, a media room and a large unfinished rec room. The lower level features a large bonus room, exercise room, full bathroom, large unfinished storage space, and a screened porch. In addition to all of this, there is a two car garage on the main level, a two car garage on the lower level and a circular drive. This house is a must see!

Price: $1,249,900 | MLS: #1263785 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 5 | Square Footage: 6600–6799 Schools: Oakview Elementary | Beck Middle JL Mann High Contact: Carole Atkison | 864.787.1067 BHHS C. Dan Joyner To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Agents on call this weekend

C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS ®

ROGER TATE 630-2999 PELHAM ROAD

JOHN RATHBUN 640-0202 GARLINGTON ROAD

KEITH BOLING 419-6903 EASLEY/ POWDERSVILLE

ANGELIKA SCHMIDT 430-1671 SIMPSONVILLE

GINGER SHERMAN 313-8638 AUGUSTA ROAD

JOY STEVERSON 337-0625 N. PLEASANTBURG DR.

LINDA DILLARD 879-4239 GREER

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL HOMES

PE OPLE , AWA R D S , HONORS C O N T I N U E D F R O M… PA G E 3 8

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and the Cartus Broker Network,” said Gerald Pearce, Cartus executive vice president, Broker Services and Affinity Services. “The Platinum Award has long represented extraordinary accomplishment. To earn this distinction, Coldwell Banker Caine has successfully executed a business plan that involves attention to customer needs, understanding of local conditions and incorporation of best business practices.” “Receiving these Cartus Broker Network awards speaks to the work that our dedicated Relocation team and agents have put into making us a successful brokerage,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “I thank Caroline Schroder, Lynne Thompson and Janine Kernohan for their efforts in reaching our 2013 relocation goals.” Representing 800 of the top-performing brokers across the country, the Cartus Broker Network provides real estate services to clients and customers of Cartus’ affinity, corporate, and government clients. In 2013, Cartus and the Cartus Broker Network closed sales of approximately 90,000 properties, with a value of more than $24.8 billion, on behalf of Cartus clients and Network members.

Coldwell Banker Caine promotes Kernohan to Director of Agent Services Coldwell Banker Caine recently named Janine Kernohan Director of Agent Services. The position builds on Caine’s 80-year commitment to providing agents with the best resources, tools and career support in the industry. Kernohan began her real estate career in 2003 as the Relocation Coordinator Kernohan for Coldwell Banker Caine. With over 10 years of experience in this industry as well as with the Caine Companies, she transitions into the role of Director of Agent Services. With this position, she will be in charge of the Experience Managers across all offices and will lead the staff to provide agents with more resources and career support . “Janine has been a great asset in our Relocation

Department helping us attain our goals each year,” said Lynne Thompson, Relocation Director of Coldwell Banker Caine. “She definitely has the skill set to be very successful in her new position.” Prior to joining Coldwell Banker Caine, Kernohan worked as the Sales Manager for Courtyard by Marriott. She received her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Alabama. Active in the community, she volunteers for Meals on Wheels and served as the Board of Director at The Lofts at Mills Mill. In her free time she enjoys golf, biking and hiking. “We are excited to promote Janine given her leadership capabilities and dedication to the company,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “This position provides more structure and support for our agents and staff, building a more cohesive working environment at Coldwell Banker Caine.”

Garvey Joins Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS®   Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Deborah Garvey has joined the company and serves as a Sales Associate at the Anderson office. Garvey brings five years of real estate knowledge and   experience   from her work with Clockwork Real Estate in Pennsylvania.  She is a graduate of POHS Institute of Insurance in New York.  Garvey “We are very excited that Deborah has joined our family of Realtors,” said Anush Showghi, Broker-in-Charge.  “We look forward to working with her.”   Garvey currently lives in Pendleton with her husband, John, and their five grown children.  She is an active volunteer at Mount Lebanon Elementary School and Clemson Area Food Exchange, a Board Member at Pendleton Leadership Foundation, and on the School Improvement Council.  She is active with the Pendleton Leadership Class of 2013 and helped raise funds to support Veterans Park. In her free time she pursues her culinary interest and enjoys walking.

Coldwell Banker Caine Promotes Andrews and Byrd Coldwell Banker Caine recently promoted Ashley Andrews to Experience Manager of Property Services and Heather Byrd to Project Manager. Andrews began her career with Coldwell Banker Caine in 2010 as the Manager of Greenville Office Operations and Concierge Services. Her primary duties included staff Andrews leadership, agent support and managing Real Estate Galleries. As she transitions into her role as Experience Manager of Property Services, her duties include Commercial Property Management and Concierge Services. Before joining Coldwell Banker Caine, Andrews worked as a Sales and Finanial Analyst for Dunlop Sports. Byrd She recieved her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Carson Newman College. In the community, she is a United Way Palmetto Society member, and out of the office she enjoys hiking, pliates and visiting downtown Greenville. “Ashley has been a wonderful asset to the company,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “And her leadership, upbeat attitude and skill set will be of great use to Commercial Property Management.” Byrd began her career at Coldwell Banker Caine in 2012 as the Commercial Property Management Coordinator. With this position she managed office operations and retail properties. In her new role as Project Manager, she will be managing large projects within the company and working closely with the Relocation Department. Prior to joining the Caine Companies, Byrd worked as the Catering Director and Marketing Assistant for Chick-fil-a of Simpsonville. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Film from the University of Georgia. Byrd is an active member of Calvary Baptist Church in Simpsonville, S.C. and in her free time enjoys running.

Distinctive Homes To Fit Your Life.

Projects Spanning All Sizes. 40 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

IBI Builders | Greenville | www.ibibuilders.com | 864.414.6658

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Innovation To Fit Your Needs.

Expertize You Can Count On. SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

PEOPL E, AWA R D S , HONOR S C O N T I N U E D F R O M… PA G E 4 0

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“Heather has done a great job in Commercial Property Management,” said Edgerton. “And I know she will excel at her position because of her work ethic and eagerness to take on new tasks.”

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in February 2014

Miller

Slayter

“March to SOLD”

The Marchant Company, the Upstate’s local “Signature Agency” in Real Estate, representing buyers and sellers of residential, land, and commercial properties, is proud to recognize select REALTORS® for outstanding performance through February 2014. Congratulated by Seabrook Marchant, broker-in-charge, agents honored included: Valerie Miller – Top Volume & Unit Listing Leader, also Top Sales Volume Leader of the month; Valerie Miller & Kathy Slayter – Top Sales Unit Leaders of the month; “March to SOLD” Anne Marchant, Jolene Wimberly & Brian Marchant - Top Sales Volume Team of the month; Nancy McCrory and Karen Turpin – Top Sales Listing Team of the month.

McCrory and Turpin

Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “And we are confident that she and Reba will prosper together as a team.”

Meticulously Updated!

Kathy Weeks, Upstate Vice President at Allen Tate Realtors, is proud to announce Top Agents for February 2014

203 OREGON STREET GREENVILLE Farr

Rogoff

Fedder

• 3BR/2BA • $347,500 • MLS 1276385 • 2000-2199 SF • Unbelievable Master Suite • Laundry Room

Robby Brady Team

Rick

• Bonus Room • Unfinished Garage with Workshop Area • New Architectural Roof • Large, Fenced Back Yard

Celia and Gary Murphys

Sheehan

Call for an appointment!

Mashburn Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Mandy Mashburn as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. She will be teaming up with her mother, Reba Floore, in efforts to expand their reach in the Upstate. Prior to joining Coldwell Banker Caine, Mashburn previously worked as an Insurance Account Representative for Wells Fargo Commercial Insurance. She received her Bachelor of Science in Mashburn Business Administration from College of Charleston. In the Greenville community, Mashburn volunteers for Project Host, United Way and Cancer Society of Greenville. She previously was a member of the School Improvement Council for Clover School District. In her free time, she enjoys relaxing by the lake with family and friends, cooking, exercising and reading. She and her husband, Richard, have a son named Rick, who attends the University of South Carolina. They reside in Simpsonville, S.C. “We are thrilled that Mandy has joined the Greenville family,” said

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Stroble

John Yukich Team

In the Greenville Office, John Farr was Top Listing Agent and Kathy Rogoff was Top Producer. The Robby Brady Team was the Top Listing and Producing Team for the Greenville office. In the Easley Office, Bob Fedder was Top Listing Agent and Missy Rick was Top Producer. The Murphys (Celia and Gary), were the Top Listing and Producing Team for the Easley office. In the Greer Office, Kathy Sheehan was Top Listing Agent and Chris Stroble was the Top Producer. The John Yukich Team was the Top Listing and Producing Team.

SFreeman uzanne O: 864.250.2850 M: 864.982.3800

sfreeman@cbcaine.com APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL HOMES

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S M A R C H 24 - 2 8, 2 014 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$4,548,825 $1,314,000 VERDAE PROPERTIES LLC $1,050,000 $900,000 KILGORE PLANTATION $895,000 SOUTHAMPTON $856,085 $850,000 GLEN ABBEY $640,000 CLAREMONT $600,000 CLIFFS@GLASSY SOUTH $550,000 $455,000 $450,000 $398,700 MORNING MIST BOTANY WOODS $395,000 $393,800 WEATHERSTONE GROVE PARK $389,500 ESTATES@RIVERWOOD FARM $387,000 $365,000 TUSCANY FALLS $351,401 $330,000 STONE CREEK CHATELAINE $330,000 STONEBROOK FARMS $310,000 CHEROKEE PARK $310,000 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $302,386 $296,613 CASTLE ROCK $296,000 $287,999 RIVERBREEZE CAMERON CREEK $287,480 SUGAR CREEK $285,000 HUDSON ACRES $284,000 KILGORE FARMS $283,500 COACHMAN PLANTATION $278,500 WEST FARM $273,991 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $270,000 SADDLEHORN $269,900 $262,000 THORNBLADE $260,000 BRIDGEWATER $258,729 HIGHLAND CREEK $258,500 OAKS@GILDER CREEK FARM $257,500 BRYSON ACRES $253,500

BUYER

ADDRESS

QUIKTRIP CORPORATION WEST BUTLER ROAD INVESTO 7920 CINQUENTA FORCE FORTUNA LLC SCBT 4331 ROBERT GRISSOM PKWY VERDAE PROPERTIES INC WOODRUFF REALTY LLC 156 N EMPORIA RHP & RLP PROPERTIES II DHRUVI LLC 55 PARK WOODRUFF DR MCCUTCHEN JAMES D TOKISH JOHN M (JTWROS) 5 BRICK HOUSE CT STONELEDGE PROPERTIES LL MORDAS DONALD M 208 PRIVELLO PL DILLARD PAPER CO KIDCO LLC PO BOX 17859 SAXON CHAD A (JTWROS) NORTH TYLER J (JTWROS) 5 LONDON CT GALLOWAY CUSTOM HOMES LL GALLOWAY MICHAEL S (JTWR 424 CHAMBLEE BLVD CLEMALLE LLC WALKER JONATHAN P (JTWRO 569 HAMILTON CORNERS RD CRESS JAMES T WORKMAN JOHN PARKS (JTWR 207 JONES AVE COLLINS JACQUELINE J NORWOOD KATHRYN H REVOCA 4 THORNBURY CT MARK III PROPERTIES LLC S C PILLON HOMES INC 1371 DOGWOOD DR SW ROCHESTER LEIGH WESTBROO PATRICK CHARLES D (JTWRO 8 STONYBROOK DR BLACK GERALDINE WILSON ONE FAMILY TRUST 6 GRAYWOOD CT MCCANLESS SUSAN A RHODEN SCOTT ANDREW (JTW 1 KENNESAW WAY MAGILL CHARLES A III POWELL CHRISTOPHER D (JT 504 GLADSTONE WAY STROUD BOBBIE SUE TUMBLI MCBEE PARK LLC 19 W STONE AVE S C PILLON HOMES INC WEST MICHAEL G (JTWROS) 204 MONTALCINO WAY WILSON STEVEN H BABB ANDREW P (JTWROS) 105 MOSS CREEK CT BRIDGES EDWARD ANTHONY RIDGEWAY CAROL D (JTWROS 120 CASTELLAN DR WARREN CHARLES O III TRU ARMOCIDA LIVING TRUST 6 RUBY LAKE LN BUSH SARAH ELIZABETH WALL BEN R JR IRREVOCABL PO BOX 1030 BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SAWHOOK JAMES (JTWROS) 124 PALM SPRINGS WAY SK BUILDERS INC JOHNSON JOHN K 221 CASTLE CREEK DR TESTA ROBERT J JR SNYDER ANDREW DOUGLAS 315 E FARIS RD PATEL NITINKUMAR (SURV) KVCP LLC 14032 AZALEA DR SC PILLON HOMES INC SULLIVAN LAMONT (JTWROS) 14 HOWDEN PL KIRKPATRICK LIVING TRUST GATLIN EDWARD SANDERS (J 119 WOODY CREEK RD WHALEY MICHELLE L REVOC HUBBLE STEVEN L (JTWROS) 2 GREENWOOD AVE HUNT AMANDA E BOWERS HALEY F 210 KILGORE FARMS CIR SCHMITT DANIEL R WILSON ERIC D (JTWROS) 60 SCOTTS BLUFF DR MUNGO HOMES INC MANCUSO JOSEPH SR (JTWRO 15 BELGIAN BLUE WAY ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC BARANZANO SILVERIO 711 CANNONGATE DR QUELLET DERECK J (JTWROS BROWN IRA THOMAS 301 SADDLEBRED DR GLUR GERALD R GREENE MICHAEL (JTWROS) 217 BOILING SPRINGS RD RUNION CHARLES EARL MITCHELL TODD (JTWROS) 120 ANTIGUA WAY BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT UNDERHILL JOSEPH A (JTWR 354 BRIDGE CROSSING DR VENTER JAN S VAN DUSER STEVEN J (JTWR 407 DUNROBIN LN COOK PATRICIA L LEONHARDT MELISA 504 GRIMES DR WILTBERGER BETH A TUMLIN TIM J (SURV) 215 PINE DR

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$252,600 $246,000 FOXCROFT $245,900 CAROLINA OAKS $235,412 WOODLANDS@WALNUT COVE $232,000 $230,000 POPLAR FOREST WETHERILL PARK $223,503 VILLAGE@WINDSOR CREEK $223,500 $218,500 AUTUMN TRACE CROSSGATE@REMINGTON $214,032 $213,684 FOX TRACE LIBERTY PARK $212,000 $209,000 HERITAGE POINT $205,293 FOX TRACE FARM@SANDY SPRINGS ORCHARD $200,851 GLEN@GILDER CREEK FARM $198,000 $195,580 MEADOW BREEZE $192,000 TANNER’S MILL FOX TRACE $188,631 $187,739 VILLAGE @ GLENLEA $187,500 DEVENGER PLACE MEADOW BREEZE $182,683 $182,000 TROTTER’S RIDGE SHELBURNE FARMS $180,500 DEVENGER POINTE $180,000 BEAVER CROSSING $180,000 CROSSWEND $180,000 $179,999 HERITAGE HILL $179,900 FAIRVIEW MEADOWS $179,500 MEADOW@BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION $179,000 $178,000 MATTESON BROOK GLEN@GILDER CREEK FARM $178,000 $174,687 WATERMILL TOWNES@BROOKWOOD $174,400 GRANITE WOODS SOUTH $170,000 PLANTERS ROW $168,500 PELHAM OAKS $168,000 PARTRIDGE RIDGE $167,900 HAMPTON FARMS $166,000 TANNER’S MILL $160,000

BUYER

ADDRESS

TURNER MARY C PERRY STREET PARTNERS LL 312 CHAPMAN RD GANNON FRANK J GREENVILLE-SPARTANBURG A 2000 GSP DR STE 1 DASSIE MARION NEWELL MITCHELL DAVID (JTWROS) 5 WALKER CT D R HORTON INC FINLEY NANCY E 125 CAROLINA OAKS DR STUCKEY KEVIN C LUTHER TRACY M 205 BAYSWATER LN TRIPLE B COMPANY INC PIRIE ROGER N (JTWROS) 9 LEDGE RUN CT S C PILLON HOMES INC BERGIN ERIC (JTWROS) 145 RIVER VALLEY LN MARK III PROPERTIES INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL 2857 WESTPORT RD SCHWANDT MAX W EVANS MATTHEW G (JTWROS) 549 KINGSMOOR DR D R HORTON INC CARTLEDGE CORY LEE (JTWR 112 HAZELDEEN PL S C PILLON HOMES INC OOSTDYK MICHAEL (JTWROS) 15 CORGI DR STAMEY CHRISTOPHER J RICE JOEL T IV 6 VALERIE DR SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND ERICKSON SHELLY R 225 HERITAGE POINT DR S C PILLON HOMES INC BYARS NATHAN W (JTWROS) 35 DANDIE DR D R HORTON INC HENNINGER CRAIG 163 MAREHAVEN CT ALEXANDER CURTIS B BENJAMIN THOMAS JOHN WAL 305 CROWN EMPIRE CT SK BUILDERS INC WILSON MICHAEL OWEN (JTW 47 RISING MEADOW LN FREIRE ANGEL ELIZONDO ALAIN J (JTWROS 213 STAPLEFORD PARK DR S C PILLON HOMES INC ALBIN JOSHUA (JTWROS) 145 BORDER AVE VELAZQUEZ JOSE C FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG PO BOX 650043 COWAN DARRYL L CRAIG BETHANY C 309 ROSEBUD CT SK BUILDERS INC HENDSBEE DANIEL P (JTWRO 91 RISING MEADOW LN HADROSEK GEORGE E PENNINGTON WILLIAM F JR 209 FORESTDALE DR BAKER DEBORAH J LUNDIN SCOTT MICHAEL (JT 208 HIGHGATE CIR HENRICH PATTIE GASQUE PAUL C (JTWROS) 112 ATHERTON WAY DODGE WENDY J STANDISH KEVIN LEE 6 WOOD CHIP LN SINGER PATRICIA A DUTRA MICHELLE A (JTWROS 219 WHISPER PASS RENAISSANCE CUSTOM HOMES GRIMM BRIAN RAY 124 COLVIN RD FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG PEDDICORD BRANDON RICHAR 14 LADY FERN WAY NEWLAND ROBERT E C AND G CONSTRUCTION LLC 111 WACCAMAW CIR SK BUILDERS INC HAGLER CHERYL G 117 BERRIGAN PL PENNYMAC CORP JOHNSON BARBARA DWYER 255 NEW CANAAN AVE FORD CORRIE WONG OLIVER (JTWROS) 4 GALA CT EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL WATKINS MICHAEL STEPHEN 372 RIVERDALE RD BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC LARKIN ANNE M 65 BAY SPRINGS DR BAGLEY SUSAN L HUGHES CHARLES A (SURV) 107 CALCITE DR TATE VIRGINIA PARKER WEBSTER HALEY BROOKEY 2 PLANTERS ROW SLOAN BOBBIE J MCDANIEL RICHARD N 41 SPRINGLAWN DR ELLINGTON DOUGLAS J SANDERS RYAN JAMES (JTWR 2 CANVASBACK TRL SK BUILDERS INC NIX JAMES RICHARD (JTWRO 321 HAMPTON FARMS TRL SUHR JUDITH LYNN HERRERA JESUS A RIVERA 115 WHIXLEY LN

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S The Greater Greenville housing market continues to show strength as we head into the spring home buying season. Housing sales volume and closed sale prices are significantly higher than they were a year ago. One of the most significant changes in the overall market is how much more quickly homes are selling than in the past few years. In 2013, homes that sold closed within 93 days on market on average. By comparison, homes that sold in Upstate in 2011 closed in 113 days. “Days on market” is an important measure of housing strength. They are counted from the day a home enters the marketplace via the multiple listings service to the day the home closes escrow.

W NE

POINSETTIA 810 S. Almond MLS#1273598 $399,900

Typically, a healthy market has approximately six month supply of homes for sale, which means that all homes listed would sell down to zero in inventory if no more homes were added to the market. Days on market are also shrinking in Upstate. As of March 10, 2014, sales volume is up 11 percent over the same period a year ago. The median price of homes that sold was $153,700, about 5.8 percent higher than the median price of $145,250. Not only are prices rising, but more expensive homes are going on the market, a sure sign of consumer confidence. At the beginning of March 2014, the median price of homes listed for sale was $191,000, an increase of 6.7 percent over $179,000 the year before.

ICE PR

G’VILLE COUNTRY CLUB 25 Club Drive MLS#1276575 $472,500

Helen Hagood 42 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

W NE

MCRAE PLACE 18 McRae MLS#1275904 $549,000

Between January 1 and February 28, 1068 housing units were sold. That’s eight percent more than the 989 units sold in the same period a year ago, and it’s the largest number in over six years. At the current pace of sales, Greater Greenville would reach the same volume as all of 2013 by August 2014 at 9160 units sold. It’s a great time to buy a home! Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,700 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www. ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

ICE PR

KINGSBRIDGE

201 Hemingford Circle MLS#1275036 $629,900

COBBLESTONE 109 Tooley Road MLS#1274804 $759,000

Ranked #3 again! Out of 150 agents. #12 in Greenville County! 864.419.2889 | See my listings and more at HelenHagood.com

J44

GGAR MARKET OVERVIEW

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S M A R C H 24 - 2 8, 2 014 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

WESTCLIFFE $160,000 EASTCREEK $159,000 WADE HAMPTON GARDENS $158,000 GREEN AVE REVITALIZATION $154,399 $153,000 HAWTHORNE RIDGE $150,000 $150,000 HAWTHORNE RIDGE HAWTHORNE RIDGE $150,000 IVYBROOKE $149,900 MOSS CREEK $149,000 GLASTONBURY VILLAGE $149,000 $142,500 FORRESTER WOODS ASHMORE SPRINGS $137,500 DEVENGER PLACE $135,000 $133,100 OAKWOOD ACRES LENHARDT CREEK $130,500 $130,000 THORNWOOD ACRES THORNBLADE CROSSING $130,000 WILLOW TRACE $129,900 BURGISS HILLS $128,000 $127,008 $125,900 RIVERSIDE GLEN MANLEY HEIGHTS $125,000 TOWNES@PINE GROVE $125,000 EAGLEWATCH $125,000 WOODS@BONNIE BRAE $124,155 $123,000 HOLLIDAY HILLS $123,000 DUNWOODY OAKS BRENTWOOD $121,500 $120,000 EAST HIGHLANDS ESTATES $120,000 $120,000 PEBBLECREEK $118,745 OAK WIND ESTATES $116,000 OAK KNOLL VILLAGE @ GLENLEA $115,000 HOMEVIEW ESTATES $115,000 OWENS MEADOWS $112,507 HILLCREST HEIGHTS $112,500 $111,500 ASHMORE SPRINGS $109,500 CANEBRAKE $107,896

BUYER

ADDRESS

ROPER MARIAN DAY HUERTA CONCEPCION 101 EASTCLIFFE WAY CARR CAROL E TRUSTEE BALL ALLEN JOHN (JTWROS) 6 BUTLER CROSSING DR RIEBLING KATHERINE L (JT COOPER CAROLYN P 24 ORIOLE ST RED CLAY INVESTORS LLC FORNER COLLIN 4 NELSON ST TRUJILLO CLAUDIA P VANDERHOOF DEVIN J 114 W LONG CREEK CT BOEX LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PO BOX 1039 BOEX LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PO BOX 1039 BOEX LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PO BOX 1039 PEREZ ANDRES MURRAY JEFFREY MARK 109 WYNDHAM CT RASC 2006KS8 KATES JEFF 107 EMERALD POINTE DR SMITH APRIL DODGE MARTIN CODY 39 FEVERSHAM CT WILSON HAROLD R ROGERS HENRY M 319 CHERRY HILL RD HASHICO XIII LLC RUCKER LATWANYA M 43 JUNEAU CT FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA DEESE MARK W 324 LONGSTREET DR BYRD INA RUTH H CURRY MICHAEL J 2102 E LEE RD VICARS CONSTRUCTION LLC CROFT SHARON 30 CEDAR BROOK CT MCMULLIN BRAD N LEHMAN DERIK R (JTWROS) 100 LEAFWOOD DR WALKER KAYE R WALKER PAULA K 624 GLASSYROCK CT NAVIA SIGIFREDO NULPH NATHANAEL P (JTWRO 302 WINDING WILLOW TRL PARRIS KAREN D (L-EST) BURGESS CHARLES M (JTWRO 106 OAKDALE AVE TIMBER-LANDS L P PINNACLE PARTNERS OF THE 3598 HWY 11 FAIN MARILYN B KUKLA VINCENT T (JTWROS) 123 GLEN WILLOW CT DELES CRISPIN TOROK MARIA M 125 S MANLEY DR BEESON JAMES H TRUST TORRICOS SERGIO A 370 JUNIPER BEND CIR PHELPS BENJAMIN L BERRIOS DAMIAN R 216 FLAGSTAR CT DAVIS JOYCE ASTORIA FEDERAL SAVINGS 1 CORPORATE DR STE 360 TAYLOR JOAN M MICHAUD JORDAN D (JTWROS 820 MOSTELLER DR LEONHARDT PHILLIP B LEWIS JEFFREY P (SURV) 6 WOODDALE CT HOUSES & THEN SOME INC CABALLERO LUIS ALBERTO 108 DELMAR DR BYRD JASON M CHAPIN JUDSON K III 112 LISTER RD CHENEY GLENN DAVID POWELL KARI M 104 CAROLINA AVE BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST ROWLAND BETTY S 506 THORNINGTON CT PRUITT LARRY FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG PO BOX 650043 STRICKLAND WILLIAM H IV REHM DENNIS C 3 SHUMAGIN CT GANTT DOROTHY E PARKER SARAH E 53 MARAVISTA AVE CROCKETT ABIGAIL P FREITAG TIMOTHY (JTWROS) 157 HOMES POND LN FOWLER LASHAFFER D FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA 100 OWENS MEADOW CT SORGEE RONALD SCOTT BOYTER MICHELLE 304 HILLCREST DR PURINI MARCOS DAVIS HANNAH T (SURV) 23 KINDLIN WAY CHAMBERS GROUP LLC LEE CHRISSA 302 YUKON DR COOPER JAMES D BANK OF AMERICA N A 5701 HORATIO ST

FOXBROOKE ~ GATED COMMUNITY

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$107,000 STONEGATE ESTATES $105,900 SUMMERSIDE@ROLLING GREEN $105,100 $105,000 CARMAN GLEN RIVERBEND $105,000 $100,000 LAUREL HILLS $99,000 $95,000 MORROW PARK WESTWOOD $90,000 $90,000 CLAREMONT $89,900 OAK WIND ESTATES $87,000 $86,250 HOLLINGSWORTH PARK@VERDAE $85,000 $85,000 FAIR HEIGHTS CANTERBURY HILLS $84,000 $82,700 RIVERBREEZE RIVER RUN $81,620 $80,115 LEAGUE ESTATES WESTWOOD $80,000 $80,000 FAIR HEIGHTS BELLE MEADE $80,000 $77,500 $75,000 COUNTRY GARDENS $73,000 VILLAS ON THE GREEN $72,000 $70,000 LAKEVIEW FARMS $65,000 $65,000 CASTLE ROCK $63,000 $57,000 $56,000 HOLLY TOWNE $55,000 ATKINSON ACRES $55,000 $54,900 $54,900 SILVER MEADOWS $52,500 LEDGEMONT $52,000 THE VILLAGE $51,400 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $49,000 $49,000

BUYER

ADDRESS

GARRETT STEVE MITCHELL SHAUN 152 DELLWOOD DR FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA GIBSON WILLIAM 200 GRASSLAND LN HOWORTH LIVING TRUST JAMES TERRY C (SURV) 403 MILSTEAD WAY MORENO VICTOR SANDQUIST DAVID (JTWROS) 9 FALCON RIDGE WAY CARRO LLC CULBERTSON H MICHAEL 522 WEMBLEY RD STEINMEYERS ANNE W LDC INCORPORATED 704 E WASHINGTON ST FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTG BARANSKI JOHN D 100 SKYLINE WAY JARDON JORGE STONE SEAN T (JTWROS) 113 MORROW ST CHACON BENJAMIN (JTWROS) AGRINSONIS ERICK 204 CORKWOOD DR CLAREMONT DEVELOPMENT LL SHAH PURVI (JTWROS) 103 LEATHERTON WAY EWC LLC CAMPBELL BRENDA C 3704 EDWARDS RD HAGLER TAMARA STICHNOTH CHIAROLANZIO CARL (JTWRO 118 WINDY OAK WAY RENNER ANGELA M INDEPENDENCE NATIONAL BA 500 E WASHINGTON ST LS RESIDENTIAL LLC DE VOS SOREN (JTWROS) 201 CAROLINA POINT PKWY #725 RICHARDSON DIANE C HUFSTETLER LINDA D 101 HARNESS TRL RESIDENITAL ASSET MORTGA ALL PROPERTY SERVICES LL 10 QUEENSBURY DR PATEL NITINKUMAR KVCP LLC 14032 AZALEA DR KLEIN PAMELA ILEEN FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG PO BOX 650043 HOPKINS DEBORAH P PALMER SANDRA M (JTWROS) PO BOX 80791 BARNES THOMAS L NELSON GEORGIA (SURV) 116 ASHDOWN DR HUFSTETLER LINDA D HUFSTETLER BRITTON WILLI 2285 HWY 418 SATTERFIELD CANDICE S CARMONA KARINA BEDOLLA 507 E DORCHESTER BLVD BURDETTE LLC BARR PHILIP 417 PERRY AVE STEWART HAROLD R EDENS CALVIN MICHAEL PO BOX 4481 SYKES JEREMY D SMITH ANDREW BLAKE 1102 AUTUMN LEAF LN FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG FARINHA GLEN 150 STALLINGS RD DUNCAN SARA E BUCHANAN JAMES DENNIS 104 FREEMAN BRIDGE RD BRIDGES JESSICA H ERDLEY GREGORY D (JTWROS 20 WILD FERN CT JANIEC JACK WORDEN IRENE E (JTWROS) 425 PHILLIPS LN THACKSTON EDWARD S PAGE VENICE N MAIN ST BAGWELL CLARENCE PEARSON MARGARET AND SONS LLC 1905 E NORTH ST NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDIN MILLER ALICIA MENDOZA 3210 BETHEL RD UNIT 52 S TEAM PROOPERTIES LLC 15 BEECHWOOD AVE LAND TR 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD STE 18 SHOCKLEY A PAIGE PRIVETT MICHAEL R (JTWRO 43 MEADOW ROSE DR B & J PROPERTIES GREENVI PERRY STREET PARTNERS LL 312 CHAPMAN RD BURGER JEFFREY THOMAS PARAS LARAMIE JOY (JTWRO 400 FORRESTER DR SILVER RIDGE II LLC COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC PO BOX 2585 WELLS FARGO BANK N A NEGRETE LUIS ALBERTO ONE HOME CAMPUS BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING L WATTS TREVOR 127 NEW CASTLE PL PATTON PEGGY O HINCAPIE RICHARD 500 VILLAGGIO DR MCGEE REAL ESTATE CO NEW HOPE OUTREACH CENTER 307 W MORGAN ST

NEW CONSTRUCTION ~ AUGUSTA ROAD

MLS 1277755 • 605 Foxcroft Road • 4BR/3.5BA • $649,900

MLS 1275449 • 110 Moultrie Street • 3BR/3.5BA • $495,000

FABULOUS HOME IN GREAT EASTSIDE GATED COMMUNITY! This custom home was built by Scott Lynch with Hollison Homes and has tons of bells and whistles! Home is perfect for entertaining. The main floor has an open floor plan with heavy moldings, finishes, and trim work. The formal dining room, living room and great room all have easy access to the eat-in kitchen. A floor to ceiling stacked stone fireplace with beautiful wood cathedral ceiling make the great room extra special. The gourmet kitchen is a cook’s dream with a spacious island and prep area, gas cook top with hot water pot filler, granite counters, under counter lighting, tile backsplash and custom cabinetry. Looking over the beautifully fenced in backyard is a screened-in porch with Trex decking and paver patio. The wooded lot is professionally landscaped offering numerous flowering shrubs and plantings. Tons of storage, central vac, in-ground irrigation system, security system and private cul-de-sac lot.

NEW CRAFTSMAN-STYLE CONSTRUCTION IN THE HEART OF AUGUSTA ROAD! Great open floor plan with attention to detail and quality! Residential Building Solutions delivers a fabulous home with all the bells and whistles you expect; rocking chair front porch,screened-in porch, beautiful finishes, hardwoods in living spaces, masonry fire place, large eat-on island, granite, stainless steel appliance package, large walk-in pantry,spacious walk-in laundry, security system and irrigation system! Master suite and second bedroom on the main floor. Additional bedroom upstairs with flex space that can be used as a bonus, office, or media room. Spacious walk-in closets, 3 1/2 baths, side entry 2 car garage and storage space galore! Location, location, location!!!

Janet Sandifer

Charlotte Sarvis

864.979.6713

864.346.9943

REALTOR

janets@carolpyfrom.com Flat Fee Listing SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

REALTOR

charlottes@carolpyfrom.com

864.250.2112 www.CarolPyfrom.com APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 43


JOURNAL HOMES

www.MarchantCo.com 864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Jolene Wimberly 864.414.1688 RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com & ily me m a o F ng g H azi ainin m A tert En

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SF 0+ n 00 itche 7 m tK sto e Cu ourm G w/

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, , Lot rse er f Cou ol n r Co Gol er Po e Th Wat On Salt

Sig na tur e

538 Crestwood Dr. - Crestwood

300 Ryans Run Ct. - Spaulding Farm

250 Foot Hills Rd. - Green Valley

$1,250,000 • 1276652 • 5 BR/4 FL, 3 HF BA

$810,000 • 1274876 • 4 BR/5 FL,2 HF BA

$599,900 • 1273285 • 5 BR/3 FL, 3 HF BA

s ou e rge Hom o G om st Cu

/ ing Liv iews l e lev se V gle Cour n i S olf G

GordonDSeay | 864.444.4359 | gordondseay@gmail.com

W NE

G TIN LIS

Sig na tur e

Valerie Miller | 864.430.6602 | vmiller@marchantco.com Chuck Miller | 864.293.4778 | cmillergsp@aol.com

James Akers |864.325.8413 | james@jamesakersjr.com

W NE

G TIN LIS

Sig na tur e

712 Villagio Dr. - Montebelllo - Villa $574,900 • 1277092 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

Nancy McCrory | 864.505.8367 | nmmccrory@aol.com Karen Turpin | 864.230.5176 | karenturpi@aol.com

es dat t p o U at le L Gre oub D

701 Montebello Dr. #302 - Montebello - Condo

117 Kettle Oak Way - Greythorne

3 Hidden Hills Dr. - Chanticleer - Townhouse

42 E. Faris Rd. - Augusta Rd.

$439,000 • 1277466 • 2 BR/ 2 FL, 1 HF BA

$398,000 • 1276337 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$329,000 • 1276814 • 3 BR/2.5 BA

$299,000 • 1274294 • 3 BR/2 BA

Nancy McCrory | 864.505.8367 | nmmccrory@aol.com Karen Turpin | 864.230.5176 | karenturpi@aol.com

ice y N des r e V gra Up

Tom Marchant | 864.449.1658 |tom@tommarchant.com

W NE

G TIN S I L

114 Whiffletree Dr. - Neely Farm

8 Bergamot Ct. - Foxglove @Pebble Creek

$246,310 • 1275936 • 4 BR/ 2.5 BA +Bonus/5th BR

$239,000 • 1277079 • 3 BR/2.5 BA

Barb Riggs |864.423.2783 | barb@marchantco.com

Nancy McCrory | 864.505.8367 | nmmccrory@aol.com Karen Turpin | 864.230.5176 | karenturpi@aol.com

Tom Marchant | 864.449.1658 | tom@tommarchant.com

! ity un t r po Op re a R

$179,900 • 1276496 • 3 BR/2 BA

Anne Marchant | 864.420.0009 | anne@marchantco.com Jolene Wimberly |864.414.1688 | jolenewim@aol.com

G ed TIN ap LIS ndsc W a NE vel, l e eL On

200 Governors Square - Governors Square

108 Westminster Dr. - Wemberly Way

40 Wood Point Dr. Unit 22 - Scottswood -Townhouse

$158,000 • 1274185 • 4 BR/2 BA

$144,757 • 1277514 • 3 BR/2 BA

$117,000 • 1277275 • 3 BR/3 BA

Joan Rapp | 864.901.3839 | joan@marchantco.com

t ! ric sacl Dist e l-d oo Cu Sch d i e ers Riv

102 Fairoaks Dr. - Pelham Oaks - Townhouse 305 Londonderry Ct. - Shelburne Farms

Lot er ard n r o ky e C Bac g r d La nce Fe

Mary Praytor | 864.593.0366 | marypraytor@gmail.com

Jonathan Mullikin | 864.449.4132 | jonathan@marchantco.com

G TIN n LIS catio W o NE eat L r G

Nancy McCrory | 864.505.8367 | nmmccrory@aol.com Karen Turpin | 864.230.5176 | karenturpi@aol.com

$164,900 • 1276536 • 3 BR/2.5 BA

Anne Marchant | 864.420.0009 | anne@marchantco.com Jolene Wimberly |864.414.1688 | jolenewim@aol.com

W NE

G TIN LIS

100 Reedy River Way - River Run - Fannie Mae $99,900 • 1277429 • 3 BR/2 BA

Kathy Slayter | 864.982.7772 | kslyater@charter.net

Residential | Commercial | New Home Communities | Property Management | Foreclosures | Land & Acreage | Mountain Properties

44 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, MAY 6, 2014, AT 6:00 P.M. (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC REGARDING AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE AND APPROVE THE CONVEYANCE OF APPROXIMATELY 12.08 ACRES OF COUNTY OWNED REAL PROPERTY, INCLUDING HOLIDAY LAKE AND HOLIDAY LAKE DAM, KNOWN AS GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX MAP NUMBER 0679040100301; AND TO DIRECT THE CHAIRMAN OF COUNTY COUNCIL AND THE COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR TO EXECUTE APPROPRIATE DEEDS AND AGREEMENTS RELATED THERETO. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, May 19, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following item: DOCKET NUMBER: CP-2014-1 APPLICANT: Greenville County Planning Commission CONTACT INFORMATION: jhanna@greenvillcounty.org or 864-467-7291 TEXT AMENDMENT: The proposed amendment would revise the Imagine Greenville County Comprehensive Plan to include the New Washington Heights Community Plan. All persons interested in this proposed amendment to the Greenville County Comprehensive Plan are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendment.

FORFEITED LAND COMMISSION SALE The Forfeited Land Commission (FLC) of Greenville County will begin selling assignments on properties not sold at the Greenville County Delinquent Tax Sale. This sale will begin May 12, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. in the Greenville County Treasurer’s office, 301 University Ridge, Suite 600. Random numbers will be drawn to establish place in line at 1:00 p.m. The FLC will accept offers-to-purchase equal to the published price for each property. Offers-to-purchase will be considered in the order submitted. The FLC reserves the right to reject any offer-topurchase that does not meet these published requirements. Payment will only be accepted in the form of cash, cashier’s check or money order from a recognized financial institution and must be received at the time the sale is made. Property is sold “as is”. Tax accounts of buyers must be in good standing with the Greenville County Tax Collector. A list of the properties as well as an offer form can be obtained in the Forfeited Land Commission section of the Greenville County Treasurer’s web page –http:// www.greenvillecounty.org/ County_Treasurer/ or in the Greenville County Treasurer’s Office.

NOTICE OF ACTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE C/A No. 2013-DR-23-5368 NORMA LAGUNA GOMEZ, Plaintiff, vs. ANTONIO NAVARRO, Defendant. YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the original and amended Summons and Complaint in the above entitled action were filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court in the Family Court of Greenville County, South Carolina, the object of the prayer is to obtain a divorce from Antonio Navarro. Contact: The Carruthers Law Firm 111 Toy Street Greenville, SC 29601 Phone: 864-467-0100

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, MAY 6, 2014, AT 6:00 p.m. (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC REGARDING AN ORDINANCE PROHIBITING UNATTENDED DONATION RECEPTACLES IN GREENVILLE COUNTY. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Korean BBQ LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 1170 Woodruff Road #D, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 27, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Last Call Operating Co I., Inc. d/b/a Bailey's Sports Grille, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 2409 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 4, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2014-DR-23-1316 Jennifer Ann DeVilbiss, Plaintiff, vs. Anthony Isaac DeVilbiss, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint upon the Subscriber at 2B Cleveland Court, Greenville, SC 29607 within thirty days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Complaint filed 03/20/2014 at 11:32 am in Clerk of Court's Office, Greenville, SC. V. B. (TRIPP) ATKINS III (SC Bar No. 74697) Attorney for Petitioner 2B Cleveland Court Greenville, South Carolina 29607 Phone: 864-735-8699

tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 email: aharley@communityjournals.com

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Contact us at 864-679-1200 for more information and additional locations. APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 45


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

The Greenville Red Raiders and the Wando Warriors met on the rugby pitch at Furman University for the state rugby championship. Wando won the match 10 to 3.​

46 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

Best-selling author Jan Brett was at Oakview Elementary School for workshops with students and faculty recently. After her school visit she joined Oakview families, faculty and staff at the Upcountry History Museum for a dessert reception in the evening. With over 39 million books in print, Jan Brett is one of the nation’s foremost author-illustrators of children’s books.​

J.L. Mann High School JROTC cadets recently visited Washington, D.C. Four cadets presented a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. ​

Greenville Technical College Early Care and Education students manned a bubble station at Picnic in the Park, held April 9 at the Greenville County Recreation Pavilion to promote families, children and schools during the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Week of the Young Child. 


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

Crossword puzzle: page 48

Sudoku puzzle: page 48

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

Easley High School’s art department took home first prize in the In-Tire-Art Contest hosted by Michelin North America in Greenville. Easley’s piece “Mandela Mandate” featured South Africa’s president from 1994 to 1999. The 1993 Nobel Peace Prize-winner helped dismantle the legacy of apartheid. 

Chandler Creek Elementary’s student council collected newspaper and paper towels for the Greenville Humane Society. Sponsors Lynn Pennington and Jessica Preisig and several student council members delivered the donations to the shelter and were able to visit with the animals. Pictured, from left: Lynn Pennington, Anna Giebner, Landon Keeley, MacKenzie Prince, Matthew Williams and Jessica Preisig.

HOSPITALITY PROMISES 1. We greet 2. We treat 3. We strive 4. We listen you warmly by everyone with to anticipate your and respond needs and act courteous enthusiastically in a accordingly. respect. timely manner. We hold We make We embrace and ourselves and one you feel important. value our differences. another accountable.

name with a smile.

5.

6.

7.

8. We ask, “is 9. We maintain high levels of 10. We pay there anything else professionalism, both in conduct attention to details. I can do for you?”

Reece Lyerly of Gardening for Good (l) and Joshua Friesen, representing the 16th Upstate class of the Riley Institute Diversity Leaders Initiative, celebrate completion of a Tool Library project that benefits local community gardens.

and appearance, at all times.

Independent Living Patio and Apartment Homes Assisted Living • Memory Care • Rehabilitation • Skilled Nursing

www.RollingGreenVillage.com 1 Hoke Smith Blvd., Greenville • 864.987.4612 APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 47


JOURNAL CULTURE

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48 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 18, 2014

ACROSS 1 Hardly orderly 7 Angler’s quarry 11 Suffix with Einstein 14 Clench 18 More arch 19 Type of exam 20 Kinshasa-to-Cairo dir. 21 Inclined (to) 22 Cherubim, e.g. 23 Storybook meanie 24 HCH successor 25 *2012 Hot 100 #1 song in both the U.S. and Canada 26 “Cool!” 27 See 47-Across 30 Golfer Aoki 32 Humble 33 Some airport displays, briefly 34 See 71-Across 41 “I Guess __ Rather Be in Colorado”: John Denver song 42 Bogus blazer 43 Breakfast pastry 47 *Source of the song “The Hostess With the Mostes’ on the Ball” 50 Regretful one 51 Actress Joanne 54 Chiwere speakers 56 Most clichéd 58 See 91-Across 62 Literary hodgepodge 63 Pod-bearing tree 64 Ship substitute

65 See 119-Across 69 It may be false 71 *Memorable 1851 novel line 74 Blot 75 Of last month 77 Energizer choice 78 *Van Heusen/Cahn classic 83 Hurling goo at 87 Wintry mix component 88 Small bit 89 Henriette, to Henri 91 *Parting request 92 Lakota tribe 95 Rapscallions 97 X, to Xanthippe 98 See 25-Across 104 Serious, as a reader 108 Clarifier beginning 109 Fluency 110 See 78-Across 115 Lion __ 119 *”This is going to sound dumb ...” 120 Courtroom VIPs 121 Emilia’s husband 122 1980 Blondie charttopper, and what’s needed to make sense of the answers to starred clues 123 Eyes a little too long 124 Bracketing criterion 125 Place for a coin 126 Apathetic 127 Ratted (on)

128 Many a pol. talk show guest 129 Voiced relief 130 Group doctrines DOWN 1 Adult cygnet 2 Conga formation 3 Actress Kurylenko of “Oblivion” 4 Cobbler holder 5 Hastert’s successor 6 Jr. and sr. 7 Philistine 8 2012 political thriller 9 Poet Teasdale 10 Iditarod critter 11 “... a date which will live in __”: 24-Across 12 Staying gray, say 13 Siren relative 14 Holy quest vessel 15 Rolls partner 16 __ shape: not well 17 Preps, as potatoes 21 Cameron and Blair of Eng. 27 Spade player 28 www word 29 Donald Duck, to his nephews 31 Luanda is its cap. 34 Electrician’s units 35 Three-__: consecutive sports titles 36 Historic Icelandic work 37 Corvallis sch.

38 Ran away 39 WWII Italian river 40 Tie feature 44 “Was __ blame?” 45 March composer 46 Leigh’s counterpart in the 1998 version of “Psycho”

Hard

48 Shepard in space 49 Bill of fare 51 Art __ 52 Raise 53 Bars in stores 55 Silverstein of kid-lit 57 Ate in bed, say 59 Skewered dish

60 Shakespeare’s “Richard __” 61 Sounding stuffy 65 Novelist Kingsley 66 Actress Thomas 67 Like some markeddown mdse. 68 __-mo 69 “Mona __” 70 Enclosed in 72 Thunderstorm formation, perhaps 73 Bear whose porridge was too cold 76 “We Know Drama” network 79 Unadon fish 80 Opp. of legato 81 Climbing or fast follower 82 Key of Haydn’s Symphony No. 29 83 Oozed 84 Hard-to-reach problem, at times 85 Classic pop 86 Backbone 90 “__ been had!” 93 Private retreat 94 Large fleets 95 “The Hunger Games” heroine 96 FICA funds it 99 “Gil Blas” novelist 100 China’s Sun __ 101 Genetic code carrier 102 Big spread 103 Kevin of “SNL” 104 Cravat cousin 105 Sign of the maiden 106 Counting everything 107 Confused partner? 111 Burrell and Pennington of TV 112 Spanish surrealist 113 All excited 114 Van Halen’s David Lee __ 116 Lille girl: Abbr. 117 Discharge 118 Bordeaux, e.g. 122 Ala. clock setting Crossword answers: page 47

Sudoku answers: page 47


JOURNAL CULTURE

WHERE I’VE BEEN WITH BILL KOON

All together now: ‘visualize’ I watch golf on TV now and then, when I’m so bored that I enjoy watching a camera pan across the sky following a ball I can’t see. I also watched a lot of the 2014 Winter Olympics, especially the giant slalom races and the ski jumping and the half-pipe. I think I understand why golf is not yet an Olympic sport. Now, of course, I’m glued to a lot of baseball. As I watched these sports, I learned a new term: “visualizing.” As an old English teacher, I would normally make fun of a fancy term that could mean only “looking at” or “hoping for.” But it turns out that “visualizing” an event is actually a way of making it happen. A golfer stands behind a ball on the green, squats down, measures the distance with the shaft of his putter, and “visualizes” the ball bumping along a bit before dropping into the hole for an eagle or at least a birdie. (Prayer would be a better option for many of them – or maybe they should have “unvisualized” the sand trap.) The skiers and snowboarders “visualize” a lot of twists and turns, leaps and bounds, before gracefully sliding across the finish line and into a fence draped with an ad for an expensive watch or American Express. The baseball player is busy “visualizing” his home run or no-hitter. Now the exercise that I propose for you is this: How can we bring an interesting word like “visualizing” out of the world of championship athletes and into the world of ordinary folk, especially those of us who are quickly aging? A few suggestions: About halfway through my lunch every day, I start “visualizing” my “postprandial” nap – I like to believe that “postprandial” makes an after-lunch snooze sound more dignified, just as “visualizing” sounds more scientific than “I sure hope so.” Give it a try. Or maybe you do that already without really knowing what to call it. Anyway, you, too, can “visualize” a nap as you finish lunch. (Be careful about the timing; you don’t want to doze off before you finish the fried chicken.) I have to admit that I don’t know how to “visualize” waking up. That calls for further research. I’ll report back to you soon. Now, for another scenario. Your grass is about knee-high, and your spouse is getting grumpy about it. We all know, as you explain, that it is foolish to mow the lawn as a thunderstorm approaches. Now, all you have to do is “visualize” a thunderstorm. You can do that by plundering around looking for your umbrella, thereby stalling the yard work; after all, no one can find his umbrella until the rain has stopped. Or, you could put your duck boots out on the back porch as if you might need to jump into them at any moment. I recommend bringing out canoe paddles and life jackets only as a last resort. Then, of course, you walk down the driveway with one hand shading your eyes from the sun as you scan the skies for an approaching storm. Thus “visualizing” a storm can save you from mowing the grass – plus, I always enjoy my naps more when it is raining. Plus, plus, nothing interrupts a nap more than the sound of a lawn mower, especially one that I might be pushing. I welcome your suggestions about the benefits of “visualization.” In fact, I think we’ll have a contest. The person who comes up with the best idea will win a prize – an invitation to “visualize” an all-expense-paid trip wherever that person wants to go. As an alternative, the winner can “visualize” picking up the Publisher’s Clearing House bonanza. Think hard now about a caravan pulling up in your yard with a ton of balloons and a huge check for a bazillion dollars. Then you can “visualize” going back into your living room, flopping down in your recliner, and watching “Wheel of Fortune” as you visualize the winning numbers on your lottery ticket.

Be Freshwater Friendly Protecting Our Environment By Cathy Caldwell CPA, Director of Administrative Finance at ReWa.

No matter our race, gender, education level or Facebook status, the one thing that we all depend on is planet earth. We use the earth to grow our food, provide our water sources and sustain all life, and as guests on this planet we must take an active role to protect our home. Earth Day is Tuesday, April 22nd, and more than 192 countries will recognize the day by planting trees, organizing park or beach clean-ups, leading recycling drives – all on behalf of protecting the environment. At Renewable Water Resources (ReWa), our ongoing promise is to protect, clean and renew the valuable environmental resources of our community. One way we accomplish this is by hosting Project Rx with other community focused organizations. Project Rx is a free and safe, safe drug drugtake-back take-back event held at several locations in the Upstate.

Considerable amounts of these medications are unused or expired, creating the need for a proper disposal method. With Project Rx, residents can gather all their unwanted and expired medications and visit one of the convenient drive-thru locations to hand off their medicines to a team of volunteers. The volunteers sort the pill bottles and plastic containers for recycling and sort the drugs for proper incineration by law enforcement as this is currently the most environmentally friendly disposal method. The next Project Rx event is Saturday, April 26th – four days after the official Earth Day holiday; but as I see it, every everyday dayisisEarth EarthDay Daybecause because the positive actions you take any day of the year benefit our planet and generations to come. For more information, please visit our website at www.ariverremedy.org.

Many people do not realize that pouring medications down the drain can harm the environment. Sometimes even trace elements of medicine can disrupt the balance of life in our rivers, lakes and streams. The average person in the United States fills approximately 12 prescriptions a year. With 450,000+ people in Greenville County, our community brings home more than 5 million prescriptions a year, not to mention the overthe-counter drugs and vitamins that are also purchased.

Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

APRIL 18, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 49


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April 18, 2014 Greenville Journal (B)