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SPARTANBURG JOURNAL Spartanburg, SC • Friday, March 29, 2013 • Vol.9, No.13

Swamp Rabbit Trail pushes north PAGE 15

$29.3 billion needed to fix roads PAGE 19

Self-Sufficient

PARKS How the SC parks system aims to pay for itself by 2014 PAGE 8

Veteran and Greenville Health System volunteer Nat Moore in the Peace House. Moore will be working with patients using the Peace House when the facility opens.

Students bring sacred art to life Table Rock Mountain State Park, a popular destination for hikers, offers a wide variety of activities for visitors.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

PAGE 23

TECHNOLOGY DRIVES OPPORTUNITY IN HIGH-TECH SCHOOLS

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Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR

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Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS

Cindy Landrum clandrum@communityjournals.com April A. Morris amorris@communityjournals.com Charles Sowell csowell@communityjournals.com SENIOR BUSINESS WRITER

Dick Hughes dhughes@communityjournals.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Jennifer Oladipo joladipo@communityjournals.com PHOTOGRAPHER

Despite what you may have heard about lending in today’s unstable financial environment, the credit union continues to lend responsibly. As your not-for-profit alternative to banks, Greenville Federal Credit Union offers low loan rate services.

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Worth Repeating They Said It Quote of the week Greg Beckner / Staff

“Since when is a car a dining room?” Chef Ann Cooper, known as the “Renegade Lunch Lady,” on feeding kids the wrong way.

84%

“We’re building up audience trust. People are buying tickets even if they don’t know the title of a show.”

Operating expenses of the S.C. parks system covered by park revenue in the last fiscal year, up from 66 percent a decade ago. The system’s goal is to cover 100 percent of operating expenses with park revenue by July 2014.

Glenda ManWaring, Centre Stage executive and artistic director.

“Easter is not about Easter egg hunts and chocolate bunnies. Christ died on the cross for us. This shows the real reason for us to celebrate Easter.”

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“They’re great people and they’ve been through a lot.” John R. Cocciolone, newly hired executive director of the Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board, on the staff he anticipates working with at GCDSNB.

“There is a significant chance that this family may not get closure because we can no longer go forward with this case at this time.” 13th Judicial Circuit solicitor Walt Wilkins on the alleged destruction of evidence by Ralph Bobo in the 1984 murder case of Cassandra Johnson.

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The Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board (GCDSNB) will have a new executive director by early April, said interim board of Cocciolone directors chairman Alex McNair. The board had introduced John R. Cocciolone at its March 7 meeting and Cocciolone accepted the board’s offer shortly afterward, McNair said. After a nationwide search, Cocciolone was selected from among 80 applicants. He is the former president and CEO of Easter Seals in Michigan, serving between 1984 and 2010. In an interview last week, Cocciolone

said he is anticipating working closely One of the first things Cocciolone with the staff at GCDSNB. “They’re wants to do is “meet as many people as I great people and they’ve been through can, not just in the organization, but in a lot. the community.” He said his family has “I’m looking forward to getting them also always been active in service clubs to gel as a team and really doing even better than they’re doing now – and “I’m looking forward to getting them they’re doing a great to gel as a team and really doing even job,” he said. better than they’re doing now – and Cocciolone said his family is “exthey’re doing a great job.” cited about movJohn R. Cocciolone, the new executive director of the ing to Greenville. It Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board sounds like a great community and everyone I’ve met there has been so friendly and positive.” and leadership programs. “We’re really Said McNair, “Our sense of John’s excited. We can’t wait to get down there enthusiasm has been proven correct in and get going.” recent days by his frequent contact and Cocciolone will be moving to the personal trips to Greenville. He’s already Upstate on April 1 and begins work on found a home here and met with Mr. April 8, he said. His wife, Jane, will join (David) Goodell to discuss transition him, moving from Connecticut in early plans. We are excited about his arrival May. on April 8, and about the great things to come for this organization under his Contact April A. Morris at leadership.” amorris@communityjournals.com.

Journal reporting ‘paved way for change’ at DSN Sowell, Landrum, Simmons honored at SCPA awards By jerry salley | staff

The South Carolina Press Association has honored Journal reporter Charles Sowell for his series of investigative reports on the Greenville County Disabilities and Special Sowell Needs Board. Sowell won first place in the Investigative Reporting category for weekly newspapers at the SCPA’s annual awards banquet at the Westin Poinsett in downtown Greenville last Saturday. Sowell also won second place in the weekly division for the association’s Assertive Journalism Award. The judges called the series a “great example of using multiple sources and records to paint a picture of arrogance and mismanagement of a county agency. The depth and breadth of research and reporting makes this the clear winner. Reporting paved way for change.” Sowell’s articles, which ran throughout 2012 in the Journal, examined the aftermath of the firing of GCDSN Executive Director Brent Parker after a highly critical audit of the agency’s board and management. The Journal launched a three-month investigation into rumored financial problems, internal mismanagement and unaddressed complaints about the quality of care given the disabled Greenville County residents who rely on the county agency for services, and obtained state records that found the agency failed to meet the standard of care in the death of a resident at a group home. When three members of the county DSN board resigned, alleging intimidation by chairwoman Roxie Kincannon and her son Todd, the pair’s response to Journal inquiries attracted the serious attention of Greenville County Council. In late May 2012, the council voted to dissolve the agency’s 12-member board

of directors, fire GCDSN top management and appoint an interim board to oversee the agency. A new executive director, John Cocciolone, has been appointed to take over GCDSN in early April. “I think if it hadn’t been for Charlie, we would have never gotten what we needed done,” said Carolyn O’Connell, secretary for the family advocacy group Families Advocating, Networking and Supporting (FANS). “I personally had been attempting to get changes made for about three years and could not get anyone to listen. He did a wonderful job telling the story.” O’Connell attended the awards banquet with a group of family members and supporters of the Greenville disabilities community, all of whom bought tickets so they could cheer as Sowell accepted the award. “The Disabilities and Special Needs series of stories are what community journalism is all about. The impact was profound, and the most helpless of our citizens were the ultimate beneficiaries,” said Sowell. “As with any story of this nature, the pushback from entrenched officials at DSN was considerable. This was the kind of story that would have been impossible to pursue without the constant and courageous support of Executive Editor Susan Simmons and Publisher Mark Johnston. I thank them both.” Also at the awards ceremony, Journal reporter Cindy Landrum’s story on St. Anthony of Padua’s fundraising efforts to build a new school was honored with second place in the Landrum Short Story category for large weekly newspapers. Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons won third place among all weekly papers in the Harris Award for EdiSimmons torial Writing. Contact Jerry Salley at jsalley@communityjournals.com.

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MARCH 29, 2013 | the Journal 5

JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

In defense of vulnerable children No one would reasonably suggest that writing a $22.7 billion state budget is a simple process, even considering the unusual harmony with which the House completed its version earlier this month. Compared to such totals, it’s easy to see how a request for an additional $1.5 million for the state Guardian Ad Litem program might seem inconsequential to House leaders intent on funding the “core functions” of government. Budget writers might even be forgiven their reported testiness upon learning that eliminating the $1.5 million could stall the Family Court system when the guardian program runs out of money mid-year. Apparently that detail was never made clear. As Rep. Jim Merrill put it to The State newspaper, “I have seen mind readers, but I don’t claim to be one.” Point taken. However, the fallout now is clear – meaning Merrill and company should make haste to ensure their Senate counterparts get the money into the Senate budget now under construction. The guardian program is a core function abused and neglected children in this state cannot do without. Guardian ad litems serve as court representatives for children referred to protective services for care. They investigate each child’s circumstance, which means interviewing family, teachers, doctors, social workers – everyone involved in the child’s life. Most important, they listen to the child and advocate for him or her in court. They are literally the eyes and ears for Family Court judges in these cases, Patty Dellinger, circuit coordinator for Greenville’s guardian ad litem program, has told the Journal. As Senate budget writers learned recently from Christine Glover of the governor’s office, the state program is facing a Catch-22 of more cases and less money – the latter due to the recession’s effects and the former to a three-yearold mandate from the state Supreme Court. Until 2010, Family Court judges could appoint lawyers to serve as guardians, which they did in roughly 30 percent of the cases. The state’s guardian program covered the other 70 percent with volunteer advocates. That changed three years ago, when the state Supreme Court banned lawyer appointees and required every child in South Carolina family courts to have a volunteer guardian ad litem. The change has added about 1,500 more cases and 2,500 more children on average to the program’s caseload each year, Glover told the senators. This has translated into 700 additional guardian volunteers – who still need legal advice in court, meaning an increase in attorney fees, she said. Meanwhile, the program’s funding – most of which comes from interest on state refunds – has dropped due to the recession. The Guardian Ad Litem program expects $1.8 million in interest-generated funding next fiscal year – $100,000 less than it received this year and down $800,000 from its previous high – and requires $1.5 million more to cover its bills, Glover said. Meanwhile, the state is expecting a $163 million revenue surplus this year thanks to higher-than-projected individual and corporate income tax collections. Surely somewhere in that surplus, the Legislature can find $1.5 million to ensure Palmetto State children caught in harm’s way will have the advocates they need.

How safe are S.C. schools? Safe schools are everybody’s business in preventing a school crisis in our state. Providing a school climate where teachers can teach and students can learn should be the mission of every community. School safety issues also influence curriculum, staff development, student discipline, buildings and school management. How safe are South Carolina schools? There is a bandwagon movement in South Carolina and other states to allow teachers and administrators to carry guns at school. On March 21, the House Judiciary General Laws Subcommittee met and heard testimony on H.3160 (possession of a concealed weapon on school property). The bill allows public school employees who hold a concealed weapons permit to carry a firearm on the school campus where they are employed provided they meet several guidelines. The subcommittee heard testimony on the bill and then voted to adjourn debate. Guns in schools are NOT the answer. If state and local government want to improve support for school safety in our South Carolina schools, they might want to consider other ways to improve school safety in our state. They might consider providing assistance, evaluation and support for updating school crisis management plans and develop a standardized state plan for minimum compliance. Training for faculty, staff and students in school crisis management is also critical. Another essential is assistance in upgrading facilities with special attention to school entrances and exits. In fact, legislators genuinely concerned about school safety should consider providing: •  Assistance in upgrading school communication systems, school safety equipment and technology, e.g., walkie-talkies, classroom communication, cameras for hallways and school grounds, student, faculty and visitor ID systems. •  Support for community collaboration with school districts, law enforcement and emergency response agencies. •  Resources for SRO officers in schools where needed. Consider hall monitors as an alternative. •  Resources for school-based mental health services.

IN MY OWN WORDS by J. BRODIE BRICKER

•  Support for community law enforcement patrols during the school day. •  Space in schools for law enforcement substations. • Assistance for coordinated emergency drills with schools and local law enforcement and emergency response agencies. •  Assistance for standardized dress codes to improve discipline and decrease gang presence in schools where needed. • A dedicated phone line to law enforcement and emergency response agencies for school emergencies. • Assistance and incentives for business partners’ involvement in supporting safe school initiatives. These are just a few areas to consider as state and local government study ways to increase safety in our schools. Many can be achieved with little or no financial support. None can be achieved without leadership. Ask yourself, “How safe are our schools in South Carolina?” As a school administrator for over 42 years, I understand that schools are the safest place for faculties and students. I also understand that schools must be open to the public they serve in meeting the needs of all students. Therefore, schools by the nature of their function are the most vulnerable to crisis and emergencies. Having a well-developed school crisis plan that provides training and a higher level of awareness in school crisis management is the foundation to providing a safe school for students and faculty. J. Brodie Bricker served as a South Carolina school administrator for 42 years, including as vice principal and principal of four high schools and as an assistant superintendent. He now serves as an education consultant where he offers safe schools management, leadership training and interim administrative services. He is also author of “First Period Starts at Home: Teachable Moments for School Leaders, Teachers and Parents.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 29, 2013

JOURNAL NEWS

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Do your kids a favor.

Saying goodbye to the Spartanburg Journal

You checked for monsters under her bed, sent her to the best school and helped her buy her first car. Now, do her one more favor…

After eight years in Spartanburg, it is with mixed emotions that I find myself having to tell you that this issue, March 29, will be the last Spartanburg Journal to arrive in your driveways for the foreseeable future. Spartanburg plays a strong and important role in the Upstate that we will continue to cover in our Upstate Business Journal and TOWN Magazine – be it the cultural energy of Hub-Bub to the economic news driven by such international giants as BMW and Milliken, Cryovac and Invista. Likewise, Spartanburg’s drive to encourage well-planned economic development downtown, to draw more middle-class families to city neighborhoods and more young people to Spartanburg in general are stories we care about and will continue to report on. But we are a small business dependent on advertising revenue, and can no longer afford to operate in Spartanburg without advertising support. Regretfully, Spartanburg advertisers have never purchased the presence in the Spartanburg Journal pages we had hoped – and need – to continue publishing a weekly general-circulation newspaper in Spartanburg County of the quality that we feel our readers deserve. We gave it our best shot and leave you with genuine regret. We hope to be back someday. In the meantime, you will continue to find our monthly TOWN Magazine and the weekly Upstate Business Journal in multiple Spartanburg locations. And never hesitate to call me with a story idea. – Mark B. Johnston, publisher, Community Journals

march 22, 2013

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MARCH 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 7

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Paying for our parks State parks’ self-sufficiency effort brings new events, new marketing push By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

South Carolina Parks Director Phil Gaines is keeping a closer eye than normal on the weather this weekend. Easter weekend and spring break typically mark the start of the busy season for the state park system as people take advantage of school closings to go camping, hiking and boating to rid themselves of the cabin fever brought on by a long winter. Those two weeks are critical to the state’s effort to make its parks self-supporting, Gaines said, and it’s vitally important that the weather cooperate. Earlier this week, it didn’t. “Who would have thought the Tuesday before Easter it would be 30 degrees?” Gaines said. “It has been a crazy spring. I’m worried about this week. I really wish the weather would help us out. I am hoping the weather will break.” In the fiscal year that ended in July, South Carolina’s parks system – part of the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism – covered 84 percent of its operating expenses with park revenue. Just a decade ago – in 2002 – that amount was 66 percent. The goal, Gaines said, is to cover 100 percent of operating expenses with park revenue by July 2014. “It is a challenge,” he said. “Do I think we can do it? Yes.” The challenge is something only two states

in the Northeast – New Hampshire and Vermont – have accomplished with any regularity. Those state’s efforts are regularly aided by a big infusion of cash from leases of public land to private ski resorts, an advantage South Carolina obviously does not have. According to a PRT study, the average state park system in the Southeast covered just 53 percent of its operating costs with park revenue in 2009. The national average for state parks systems was 44 percent. Gaines says it’s too early to tell what the percentage will be in this fiscal year, which ends on June 30. “I think we’re close. We think we are ahead of last year in revenue and expenses are the same.”

FEE STRATEGY

Annual passes now have tiered pricing and some rates for lodging rentals have changed, Gaines said. “We have raised prices, but we’ve also decreased some prices. We think state parks are still a great value,” he said. “We are very cognizant that state parks have to be accessible. Most of our parks are $2 or less per person to get in. That’s the price of a drink and a pack of crackers.” A pass to enter all of the parks is now $75, a $25 increase. An “inland” pass that does not include the state’s five coastal parks in Myrtle Beach, Edisto, Charleston and Beaufort is $50.

S.C. STATE PARKS 1. Aiken State Park 2. Andrew Jackson State Park 3. Baker Creek State Park 4. Barnwell State Park 5. Caesars Head State Park 6. Calhoun Falls State Park 7. Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site 8. Cheraw State Park 9. Chester State Park 10. Colleton State Park 11. Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site 12. Croft State Park 13. Devils Fork State Park 14. Dreher Island State Park 15. Edisto Beach State Park 16. Givhans Ferry State Park 17. Goodale State Park 18. H. Cooper Black Jr. Mem. Field Trial & Rec Area 19. Hamilton Branch State Park 20. Hampton Plantation State Historic Site 21. Hickory Knob State Resort Park 22. Hunting Island State Park 23. Huntington Beach State Park 24. Jones Gap State Park 25. Keowee-Toxaway State Park 26. Kings Mountain State Park 27. Lake Greenwood State Park

8 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 29, 2013

A waterfall at Jones Gap State Park in Northern Greenville County.

A $99 pass includes entry into all the parks, plus extras such as free swimming at Paris Mountain, Oconee and Table Rock; free range balls at the system’s two golf courses, free admission to the Hunting Island lighthouse and Atalaya castle in Huntington Beach State Park, free admission to some park programs and a $10 gift card to use for park reservations. Gaines said the park system has sold more Pass Pluses this year than last and he attributes that to the extra amenities. “We’ve refocused on our program amenities,” he said. “The drive to be selfsufficient had refocused us on what our primary mission is and that is to serve the citizens of South Carolina and our customers. What we’re really in competition with is people’s time and how they spend their leisure time. We’re trying to focus on programs and activities to re-engage people in their state parks.”

OFF-SEASON OR AFTER HOURS

28. Lake Hartwell State Park 29. Lake Warren State Park 30. Lake Wateree State Park 31. Landsford Canal State Park 32. Lee State Park 33. Little Pee Dee State Park 34. Musgrove Mill State Historic Site 35. Myrtle Beach State Park 36. Oconee State Park 37. Oconee Station State Historic Site 38. Paris Mountain State Park 39. Poinsett State Park 40. Redcliffe Plantation State Historic Site 41. Rivers Bridge State Historic Site 42. Rose Hill Plantation State Historic Site 43. Sadlers Creek State Park 44. Santee State Park

45. Sesquicentennial State Park 46. Table Rock State Park 47. Woods Bay State Park For a park details visit: GreenvilleJournal.com

A big focus for the park system is luring people into the parks on weekdays, when they are less crowded, and during what is typically considered the offseason, said Kevin Evans, park manager at Devils Fork. Devils Fork recently held a ranger-led waterfall excursion weekend. The weekend sold out the first day it was offered, so another day was added. “The five villas were occupied during two weekends in late January and early March when they normally would be empty,” Evans said. “It doesn’t sound like much, but that’s money we would not have received otherwise.” The park is looking to do a similar excursion on a Monday and Tuesday during September or early October, he said.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

“It’s all about putting heads in beds,” he said. “We don’t have any problem getting people here in the summer. But we need to get people to realize they can enjoy the lake in the non-summer season. I personally think the lake is better in September than in July. You can still swim in September, the days are still long and warm, but the boat traffic decreases dramatically. It’s a more peaceful time.” Specials are listed on the state park website. Park managers have the freedom to offer deals on their own if they have a cabin empty for a night or two between reservations or if they have a last-minute cancellation. Facebook and other social media sites are used, giving the park system a way to get revenue which it would otherwise miss.

IMPROVEMENTS

Paris Mountain State Park held an event this week to market Camp Buckhorn and the recently renovated lodge to wedding and event planners. The lodge now sports exposed beams, restored window openings that fill the facility’s meeting room with more light and the original hardwood floors. “Table Rock and Camp Buckhorn are good places to have weddings,” Gaines said. In addition, improvements are planned at Oconee State Park, including the parking lot and kiosks at the park’s trailhead to the Foothills trail. Work will continue on renovating and restoring the cabins at Table Rock. All but the last couple have been restored and the park has seen its occupancy rates soar with the improvements, he said. “The more self-sufficient we can be, the better off we are,” Gaines said. “We’re focusing on our customers, what they want and what they do. If we do that, the other stuff will take care of itself.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL NEWS

ENVISION SC PRESENTS: CHAIRMAN DR. BEN S. BERNANKE “We must invest in our future by investing in our people.”

– Dr. Ben Bernanke

ABOUT DR. BEN BERNANKE NAME: Ben Shalom Bernanke HOMETOWN: Augusta, Ga.; raised in Dillon, S.C. EDUCATION: B.A., economics, Harvard University; Ph.D, economics, MIT OCCUPATION: Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System OTHER NOTABLES: Chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers (June 2005 to January 2006); Class of 1926 Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University (1994-1996); Howard Harrison and Gabrielle Snyder Beck Professor of Economics and Public Affairs and Chair of the Economics Department, Princeton University (19962002); served two terms as a member of the Montgomery Township (N.J.) Board of Education. WEBSITE: federalreserve.gov

When Dr. Ben Bernanke speaks, the entire world stops to listen. As chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System of the United States, Dr. Bernanke’s words have a resounding effect, not only in the United States, but also around the globe. Since 2006, Dr. Bernanke has served as a member of the Board of Governors, as well as chairman, and now nearly three years into his second term as the leader of the FRS (his term will end in 2014), and nearly seven years into a 14-year term as a member of the Board of Governors, Dr. Bernanke is poised to help position this nation for economic prosperity once again. Before assuming the leadership at the FRS, Dr. Bernanke had served in a number of advisory and academic positions over the years, including stints at Princeton, MIT, Stanford and New York University, as well as serving as a member of the Board of Governors of the FRS (2002-2006). Dr. Bernanke was born in Augusta, Ga., and grew up in Dillon, S.C., where he at-

tended the local public schools. Later, Dr. Bernanke earned his B.A. in Economics from Harvard University and his Ph.D. in Economics from MIT. Bernanke

Ben Bernanke is a very busy man. Running the largest economy in the world is a very big job – even for a homeboy from Dillon, S.C. When we first contacted him, Chairman Bernanke quickly agreed to participate in the Envision SC project but couldn’t do a sit-down interview as we did with others. Below are Chairman Bernanke’s responses to some questions we submitted to him in writing. It was quite evident from the beginning that Chairman Bernanke has a clear vision of what he believes it takes for South Carolina to truly be world-class and globally connected. His genuine interest in

bettering the state and raising the bar are greatly appreciated. We are extremely grateful and honored to have his participation as a proud native son of our Palmetto State. Chairman Bernanke on growing up in South Carolina I’m a proud South Carolinian. I was raised in the town of Dillon in the Pee Dee area and attended public schools there. I was lucky to have good teachers and many opportunities to help prepare me for college and my career. I hope that every young South Carolinian has similar opportunities to go wherever their talents, abilities and interests lead them. That means making sure that each South Carolinian has access to the best education our state and communities can provide. Chairman Bernanke on his vision of South Carolina We must invest in our future by investing in our people. In a world that is rapidly changing, educated people – people who

APRIL IS PREVENT CHILD ABUSE MONTH Greenville First Steps, along with churches, schools, non-profits, child care centers, and the business community, will join forces to recognize the role each of us plays in promoting the well being of children and families in Greenville County.

Look for the Project Pinwheels Special Insert in next week’s Journal.

How can you help? Become a Pinwheel Pal. If you (or a team of your friends, family, or co-workers) donate at least $100, you will have the opportunity to designate where you would like to see a pinwheel garden “planted.” Visit us online for details.

10 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 29, 2013

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journal news can read critically, think analytically, and write clearly – will be best able to adapt. Thus I hope South Carolina will continue to bring a world-class education to every young person in the state. Although education from kindergarten to the 12th grade is the foundation that provides young people with the basic skills they need, adults, too, need educational opportunities. To prosper in our modern, globalized economy, they must have chances to continually reinvent themselves and gain new skills and perspectives. Chairman Bernanke on education in South Carolina South Carolina needs to make sure it offers a diverse set of institutions to foster lifelong learning; not only strong colleges and universities but also community and junior colleges, technical and vocational schools, on-the-job training and other programs that people can return to whenever they need to raise their skill levels. The recent financial crisis has underscored that people, young and old, benefit when they acquire a basic knowledge of finance and economics. Chairman Bernanke on the need for financial literacy Young people need to learn how to manage their budgets, save and invest their money, find reliable information about buying a car or a house and prepare financially for retirement and other life goals. Our schools and our families must teach young people the financial literacy skills that they need to navigate in the modern financial world. These skills not only help people provide a better life

for themselves and their families, but by deepening their understanding of the world economy, they help equip them to be engaged citizens and informed voters. Let me close by congratulating the University of Charleston for its leadership in developing Envision South Carolina. I hope this innovative, multi-disciplinary program succeeds in its ambitious goal of helping the people of my home state dream, connect and learn together to make South Carolina world-class. Phil Noble lives in Charleston and is president of a global technology firm. He has launched several innovative nonprofit initiatives, including Envision SC, which he co-founded with College of Charleston President George Benson. phil@philnoble.com Envision South Carolina is a statewide initiative where some of the state’s brightest innovators and thinkers share success stories and insightful perspectives aimed at motivating and engaging others to do the same. The goal of Envision South Carolina is to inspire the Palmetto State to become world-class in technology, education and business, while simultaneously encouraging residents of all ages to “dream, learn, and share” ideas on EnvisionSC.org, with our media partners and with others around the world.

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journal news

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At Erskine, Exceptional is Pretty Much the Norm. A small college in a little town like Due West doesn’t attract the usual crowd. For nearly 175 years, Erskine College has been a small place to think big ideas and prepare to do big things. It’s the kind of place where you can’t fake it. Where your strengths will be recognized, your weaknesses strengthened and your character shaped by a community that values who you are and who you become. So if you’re in search of an academic community as distinctive as you are, get to know Erskine. And get to know the big advantages of a small college.

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Due West, South Carolina From Forbes, August © 2012 Forbes. All rights reserved. Used by permission and protected by the Copyright Laws of the United States. The printing, copying, redistribution, or retransmission of this Content without express written permission is prohibited.

12 THE Journal | MARCH 29, 2013

Former police officer charged with destroying evidence Missing evidence compromises 29-year-old cold murder case By april a. morris | staff

George Ralph Bobo, 53, a former Simpsonville police lieutenant, was arrested on March 26 by the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Bobo and charged with common-law obstruction of justice and common-law misconduct in office. According to Thirteenth Circuit solicitor Walt Wilkins, Bobo is accused of knowingly destroying physical evidence gathered at the crime scene in the 1984 murder of 20-year-old Cassandra Johnson in Simpsonville. The case was still open and the destruction of the evidence “seriously compromised” the investigators’ ability to pursue the case and charge a suspect, Wilkins told reporters at a news conference. He said authorities learned about six weeks ago that evidence in the case had been destroyed around 2007, and SLED began an investigation. Warrants state that Bobo disposed of or discarded the evidence between March 27, 2000, and Jan. 17, 2012. Wilkins would not elaborate on the type of evidence destroyed, only that it was physical evidence. He added that authorities have sufficient evidence to know what Bobo’s motive was for destroying the evidence, but would not comment because it would compromise the investigation. Over the last two years, Wilkins said his office had been involved in investigating the cold case. Because of advances in evidence testing, investigators were able to gather additional information and had identified six suspects in the case, he said. Despite the age of the case, “we were not at

a dead end on this particular case; we were continuing to run leads, reinterview witnesses and gather evidence,” he said. “We have a piece of material evidence that we no longer have, that we can no longer test, and it ultimately taints a significant part of the case, therefore making it very difficult to pursue a potential suspect in this case,” Wilkins told reporters. “That evidence is gone and we don’t know what that evidence meant.” A warrant was issued by Simpsonville police for one of the suspects about a year ago, but was dismissed because of lack of evidence not related to Bobo’s alleged actions, Wilkins said. Investigators gathered a large amount of physical evidence when Johnson’s body was discovered off a dirt road in Simpsonville. It was tested at SLED and later returned to the Simpsonville police. Wilkins said safeguards are in place for handling evidence, but a case agent can “check out” or remove evidence, especially for transporting to the SLED lab. Wilkins said his office will not prosecute this case, and he does not know at this point which agency will pursue the Bobo case. The solicitor’s office assisted in the SLED investigation because it pertained to the Johnson investigation, he said. Authorities believe Bobo acted alone and no other evidence was tampered with, Wilkins said. Each charge carries a maximum of 10 years penalty and Bobo’s bond was set at $60,000 bond, he said. As for the likelihood of solving the Johnson murder case now, Wilkins said, “There is a significant chance that this family may not get closure because we can no longer go forward with this case at this time.” Wilkins said his office had met with the Johnson family before Bobo’s arrest. “My heart goes out to the family of Cassandra Johnson. Their ability to get ultimate justice is now severely compromised, and it’s tragic,” he said. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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Greenville’s new bike-sharing program has started. Sponsored by Upstate Forever and the Greenville Health System, B-Cycle allows people who want to get around town on two wheels to do so without having to load up a bike and find a place to stow it the rest of the day. The program’s soft launch began Thursday and will run through April 9. After that, 28 bicycles will be available at six stations around town for people to access. Memberships are $5 for a 24-hour pass to $60 for an annual pass. Usage fees are charged after the first hour. “Mayor, I know you’re competitive,” said Councilwoman Amy Ryberg Doyle at Monday’s City Council meeting, where a resolution was approved for Upstate Forever to encroach on the city’s public rights-of-way for the program. “We’re going to have a bike share program before New York City.” Council members also approved an agreement with the South Carolina Department of Transportation necessary for a project to improve the northbound Interstate 85 exit ramp at Woodruff Road. The agreement paves the way for construction of dual right-turn lanes and limited intersection improvements between the I-85 northbound exit ramp at Woodruff Road and Market Point Drive. The project will allow motorists to make right turns out of the Shops at Greenridge, city officials said. City engineer Dwayne Cooper said the project could improve the flow of traffic on Woodruff Road. Mayor Knox White and Councilman David Sudduth said that the city would have to take the lead on trying to find a solution to Woodruff Road’s traffic congestion. “It’s really bigger than the city,” Sudduth said. Woodruff Road is already one of the city’s most congested streets and the opening of a Cabela’s in 2014 in Magnolia Park is only expected to increase the problem. Other new stores and restaurants are also planned in the area, further worsening the traffic congestion. “Even if our ideas are rejected by the highway department, hopefully they will listen to our concerns,” White said. “We need to really ratchet it up in terms of visibility. We need people to know we hear what they are saying.” The next regular meeting of the Greenville City Council is scheduled for Monday, April 8 at 5:30 p.m. in Council Chambers on the 10th floor of Greenville City Hall. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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The Interfaith Forum will be hosting a film and dialogue event on April 4 at 7 p.m. at the Kroc Center in Greenville. The event is free and open to the public and will feature the film “Fremont, U.S.A.” Following the viewing of the film, Scott Henderson, professor of education at Furman University, will lead a discussion, and a member of Greenville’s municipal government will speak about similar challenges facing our area. For more information, visit interfaithforum-sc.org.

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail poised for northern expansion

“We have plans to go even further. We want to expand the trail all the way up to the River Falls area where it (the Swamp Rabbit rail line) went.” Greenville County Councilman Joe Dill on GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail expansion north

(Below) Ty Houck with Greenville Recreation District announces the expansion of the Swamp Rabbit Trail in Travelers Rest (shown in orange on the map) during a press conference at Gateway Park.

By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

The more than 400,000 people who use the Greenville Health System’s Swamp Rabbit Trail every year will be able to push even further north by the summer, thanks to a newly approved trail extension. Greenville County Recreation District and Greenville Health System announced last week that approximately one additional mile of trail will be constructed along Highway 276, north of Travelers Rest. The current northern terminus of the trail is near North Greenville Hospital. County greenways director Ty Houck said the district is eager to keep up the community support and excitement the trail has generated in the last three years. “That excitement is what we’re looking to bring to Slater-Marietta,” he said. Houck said supporters hope to eventually have the trail run up to Northwest Middle School and Heritage Elementary, linking the two schools to an existing trail that runs past Travelers Rest High School. The new portion of the trail will run up to the corner of Highway 276 and Rock Quarry Road, he said. The building owner of Handee Deli located at that corner – the same owner who allowed the trail to go under Cedar Lane Road near the Swamp Rabbit Café – has agreed to allow the trail to go behind the building to improve safety for users in Travelers Rest, Houck said. The mile extension will offer even greater connectivity to the residential areas it passes through, Houck said. “It connects all those neighborhoods that right now don’t have a connection to the Swamp Rabbit. It (the expansion) gets us closer to connection so you can walk or bike to your elementary school or middle school or walk to the grocery store.” Houck reported there are already discussions about ways to bring the trail to North Greenville University and La Bastide. TRAIL continued on PAGE 16

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La Bastide, owned by cycling brothers Rich and George Hincapie, is one of the stops along a 70- and 40-mile road ride that will be part of the Swamp Rabbit Cyclebration on April 6, said organizer Steve Baker of Square One Events. Cyclebration is both a fundraiser for the parks foundation and a chance to showcase the network, Baker said. The daylong event includes several road rides, a 10-mile trail family fun ride, BMX and mountain bike demonstrations, and other activities. A new trail resource will be unveiled during Cyclebration: an expanded pump track at Travelers Rest’s Gateway Park featuring earthen hills and ramps for mountain bike and BMX skills. Created by more than 200 volunteers from the Upstate SORBA (Southern OffRoad Bicycle Association), the track will draw users from the region and beyond because of its size, said Joe Lanahan, the rec district’s program manager. “Usually a run on a track like this is 45 seconds; this one is about three minutes,” Lanahan said. Cyclebration will expose residents to various types of cycling, he said. “One of the things we want to show with the trail is that because Greenville has become such a road cycling destination… there are more ways to ride a bike than on narrow tires at seven in the morning. If you have a child who is learning to ride, there’s a place to do that,” he said. The GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail has created an immense economic impact in the area, said Travelers Rest Mayor Wayne McCall at the expansion announcement. “I refer to it as our economic black ribbon. I can’t begin to tell you the amount of commerce it has brought into town.” Greenville County Councilman Joe

Cyclists ride over the Mountain Bike Skills Park at Gateway Park in Travelers Rest. The course offers three levels of difficulty from beginner to expert. The park’s official grand opening will be held on April 6 as part of Greenville Rec’s Swamp Rabbit Trail Cyclebration.

Dill agreed, saying the trail has brought “economic development we never expected” to northern Greenville County and downtown. According to the trail’s first year use survey, businesses adjacent to the trail reported 30 to 85 percent increases in revenue. “We have plans to go even further. We want to expand the trail all the way up to the River Falls area where it (the Swamp Rabbit rail line) went,” Dill said. Rebecca Cooper of the Greenville Health System said the trail ties into the

GHS mission to keep the community healthy. “Access to trails and parks are key components to reaching that goal,” he said. The new stretch of trail is the result of community support and grant funding, said Houck. Additional expansions could be completed piece by piece as funds are available, he said, citing that Fountain Inn received a grant to add a half-mile to the trail system. He said adding trails in the Taylors and Greer areas are also potential opportunities. “If we put something out there for the community to use, they’re going to use it and the community is healthier,” he said. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail: Greenville Rec’s Swamp Rabbit Trail Cyclebration WHEN: April 6 GREG BECKNER / STAFF

A cyclist rides along the Mountain Bike Skills Park at Gateway Park in Travelers Rest.

16 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 29, 2013

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Light It Up Blue shines on World Autism Awareness Day From the Empire State Building to Niagara Falls, buildings and landmarks worldwide will be shining blue lights on April 2 to mark United Nations World Autism Awareness Day. And with one in 88 children diagnosed with autism, chances are many Upstate residents know someone with autism. Upstate sites like BMW’s Zentrum, Hubbell Lighting, The Poinsett Hotel, Mauldin City Hall and Furman University will be joining world partners in “lighting it up blue.” For the second year in a row, the South Carolina Governor’s Mansion will be part of the effort, along with state government for the first time, said Derrick Howle, organizer of LUCAS (Loving Unconditionally Children with Autism Support Network). Both the South Carolina House and Senate passed resolutions declaring April 2 as Autism Awareness Day in the state.

“It means a lot to the autism community for our state government to support autism awareness in any way they can,” said Howle, who is parent to a child with autism. Howle said the blue lights will be shining at his own house, adding that anyone can light up their homes or businesses with colored gels or special bulbs available at Home Depot. Coleman is also offering a special lantern that glows white or blue. “Many people save the strings of blue Christmas lights from the holidays just for this occasion,” he said. Howle also recently convinced his alma mater, Francis Marion University, to light up its Performing Arts Center. Many also choose to wear blue that day, like students at Greenville Middle Academy, or even stop in to sample blue moonshine at Dark Corner Distillery. Howle said drawing attention to the prevalence and challenge of autism is important, and he hopes the day will lead to more understanding of children

LIGHT IT UP BLUE, APRIL 2 Places to see Light It Up Blue in the Upstate BMW Zentrum Hubbell Lighting RiverPlace NEXT Innovation Center The Hyatt Regency The Poinsett Hotel The Beaded Frog SC Autism Society Carolina Center for Counseling and Behavioral Interventions Furman University bell tower Spring Brook Behavioral Health New Day Physical Therapy Mary Praytor Gallery Mauldin City Hall

who are different. “The autism community is excited about April 2 because we hope it encourages everyone to accept our kids just as we accept their kids.” Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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When Chef Ann Cooper first proposed putting salad bars in schools, she was told it wouldn’t work. “They said the older kids will spit in it and the younger kids can’t serve themselves,” said Cooper, who is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, director of nutrition services for the Boulder Valley School District, a school lunch consultant and the founder of a foundation that puts salad bars in schools. Cooper was in Greenville for three appearances last week, and told members of the Carolina Foothills Garden Club they all needed to “do one thing” to change the way children are fed. “One in four meals is eaten in a car. One in four meals comes from a fastfood restaurant. Too many meals are eaten in front of a blue screen,” she said. “Since when is a car a dining room?” Cooper told the group that gathered for lunch in the A.J. Whittenberg cafeteria, one of 28 elementary schools in Greenville County that have adopted a healthy lunch menu, that 30 million pounds of antibiotics are used each year in animal husbandry (think meat supply) in the U.S. and seven million pounds for medical prescriptions. More than a billion pounds of pesticides are used each day in agriculture, about five pounds for each American, she said. And the country has more prisoners than farmers. “We can’t keep going this way with our food supply,” she said. “We’ve got to change the way we feed our children. Hungry children can’t learn and malnourished kids can’t think.” The author of “Lunch Lessons: Changing the Way We Feed Our Children,” Cooper has led the charge nationwide in changing what school cafeterias serve. She acted as a consultant for Greenville County School’s healthy lunch program, which has cut school cafeteria staples such as chicken nuggets and hot dogs from the menu of 28 elementary schools and replaced them with minimally processed, mostly made-from-scratch entrees that emphasize fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and less salt. The healthy lunch program will be implemented in the rest of the school district’s elementary schools this fall. Middle schools will be added in the fall of 2014 and high schools will come on board in 2015,

Chef Ann Cooper, aka “The Renegade Lunch Lady,” speaks to people attending the Virginia Crigler Speakers Series luncheon at A.J. Whittenberg Elementary School. The Carolina Foothills Garden Club hosts the Virginia Crigler Speakers Series this year and chose Cooper for her advocacy of healthy food for all school children.

said Eileen Staples, the school district’s director of nutrition services, and Ron Jones, the district’s culinary specialist. School gardens can help students grow their palates, Cooper said. “How do you get children to eat real food? Get them to grow real food.” Cooper said the U.S. Department of Agriculture allows schools to use food grown in school gardens. Parents need to push for states to adopt plans that have assurances that food from those gardens is safe, she said. “How do we think big corporations growing food in Mexico and being labeled from California is safer than what we grow in our gardens right here in our communities?’ she asked. Parents should make the effort to do at least one thing to improve their children’s diets, she said. They could insist that schools eliminate chocolate milk, something she calls “soda in drag.” They can insist whole grains be served. They can insist school cafeterias offer unlimited free water. They can install home gardens and have children help work them. They can insist that healthy choices replace junk food in vending machines. They can insist that schools don’t use cookies or candy in counting games. They can insist on longer lunch periods. “I challenge all of you that if we want to make a difference and make school lunches better, we need to do something,” Cooper told the garden club members. “Do something. Do one thing.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

Transportation secretary says billions needed to fix South Carolina roads South Carolina’s transportation system is in such disrepair that the state would need $29.3 billion over 20 years to bring state roads and bridges into good condi­ tion, state Transportation Secretary Rob­ ert St. Onge Jr. said Tuesday in Mauldin. South Carolina maintains the fourthlargest highway system in the country with 41,444 miles of roads, but has the fourth-lowest gas tax at 16.8 percent, he told elected and community leaders from Mauldin, Simpsonville and Foun­ tain Inn gathered for a Tri-Chamber event at Mauldin City Hall. Finding the funds for the many proj­ ects the state needs to do “in a no-newtaxes environment, it makes the Leg­ islature try to figure out where to take money from,” St. Onge said. “The math is tough and doesn’t work well.” State Rep. Garry Smith, who represents Simpsonville, told the group the proposed House budget includes an additional $104 million for road and bridge repair, but “it’s nowhere near where we need to be.”

The Department of Transportation is responsible for 62 percent of the roads in the state, St. Onge said, and the re­ maining 38 percent falls under the pur­ view of counties and cities. The SCDOT budget covers road pres­ ervation, rehabilitation and reconstruc­ tion – with most of the attention on pres­ ervation, or fixing cracks in the roads. Rehabilitation requires more work, but reconstruction is the most costly, he said. St. Onge acknowledged that road capacity is a major concern for most citizens, and “dealing with congestion is costing the state an estimated $2.6 billion in lost productivity.” Widening a road can be as costly as building a new one, he said, and just as disruptive. Construction like that planned for I-85 and I-385 may be difficult for the pub­ lic while the work is underway, but he believes the ultimate payoff is worth it. St. Onge also discussed a program en­ titled “Toward Zero Deaths,” which is be­ ing implemented by the SCDOT and the Interagency Safety Council. The goal is to educate drivers, particularly young ones,

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Open Mon. - Fri. 9:30-5:30 • Sat. 9-5

626 Congaree Road • 864-234-2150 www.wbu.com/greenville

Our spring seminars have a place reserved just for you!

with special guest speaker

CEO, Krispy Kreme

Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

Help Increase the Bluebird population

YOU’RE INVITED!

Annual Fundraising

Jim Morgan

about safe and defensive driving. They are also working on a campaign about driv­ ing safely to be featured in high schools. Safety is a big focus for St. Onge be­ cause the state ranks 43rd in the nation in overall road safety. Also, South Caro­ lina is tied for first in the nation for DUI fatalities with 44 percent of the state’s fatal crashes being alcohol-related. St. Onge said the state is heading in the wrong direction with highway fa­ talities. In 2010, the state experienced more than 1,000 deaths on highways, but the number dropped to 828 in 2011 only to jump to 852 in 2012. St. Onge also emphasized that good infrastructure attracts more companies to the area and, because of the Charles­ ton port and now the Inland Port, qual­ ity infrastructure is critical. He said that more than 700 companies from every county import or export through our ports, and one in 11 jobs are related to trade in the state.

It’s Bluebird Season

Providing shelter, food and hope since 1937

To sponsor this event, host a table, or reserve seating, please visit www.miraclehill.org/banquet or contact Cindy Kelly at 864.631.0137 or ckelly@miraclehill.org

MARCH 2 The Doctor Is In - Master Gardener problem clinic MARCH 16 Pruning - the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly MARCH 30 Anyone for Edibles? APRIL 6 Container Cuties

Check out our website calendar for complete details!

www.martinnursery.com

198 Martin Nursery Rd, Greenville • 864-277-1818 • Seasonal Hours

M33A

By Jeanne putnam | contributor

journal community

MARCH 29, 2013 | The Journal 19

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GIST OF IT When charity becomes toxic Author Robert Lupton on how to give in a way that helps instead of hurts M33A

SERVING THE UPSTATE SINCE 1950

Fashion with Comfort

Munro “Darian” Black, Silver

864-288-1951 | Mon.-Sat. 10am-6pm | SHOPS AT ORCHARD PARK | 86 Orchard Park Drive

EVENT: 2013 “Together. For Good.” Nonprofit Summit WHO WAS THERE: Over 400 nonprofit volunteers and Robert Lupton leaders from across South Carolina SPEAKER: Robert Lupton, founder and president of FCS Urban Ministries, Atlanta TOPIC: “Toxic Charity: How Churches Can Keep From Hurting Those They Help” (Charities in the Upstate that are following Lupton’s practices: Goodwill Industries of Upstate/ Midlands South Carolina, United Ministries, Miracle Hill Ministries, and Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County, among others.)

The South Carolina Association of Nonprofit Organizations (SCANPO) held its annual nonprofit summit last week, which highlighted several keynote speakers, sessions, exhibitors, and workshops that brought together over 400 nonprofit volunteers and leaders from throughout the state. This year’s conference featured keynote speaker Robert Lupton, founder and president of Focused Community Strategies (FCS) and author of “Toxic Charity: How

Churches and Charities Hurt Those They Help.” Lupton’s speech focused on the unintended, direct consequences that can result from one’s good intentions of helping the needy and delivered strategies for moving from toxic charity to transformative charity. ON HOW WE’RE DOING CHARITY Lupton opened his speech with

this question: “Is the poverty needle moving?” The answer, Lupton says, is clearly “‘No.’ There is something wrong with the way we are doing our charity.”

HOW CHARITY WORK OPERATES “Give once and you elicit appre-

ciation. Give twice and you create anticipation. Give three times and you create  expectation. Give four times and it becomes entitlement. Give five times and you establish dependency.”

ON OUR NEED TO GIVE Lupton’s book recognizes that while public service has become a way of life for Americans, our excessive need to give and radiate compassion may be hurting those on the receiving line more than helping them due to the tendency to develop dependence. The poverty needle is not moving due to the way we have done our charity. Whereas the main goal and ending result should be self-sufficiency and a better quality of life, we have created a situation in which we do for those in

The best selection and newest styles are at Palmetto Home and Garden!

www.PalmettoHG.com • 2422 Laurens Rd • 864.234.4960 20 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 29, 2013

THE GIST OF IT

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

need what they have the capacity to do for themselves and ultimately disempower them. A PRODUCTIVE ‘OATH FOR COMPASSIONATE SERVICE’ Lup-

ton says individuals should follow this Hippocratic-type oath whenever they provide charity and support to those in need: “I will never do for others what they can do for themselves. “I will limit one-way giving to crisis and seek always to find ways for legitimate exchange. “I will seek ways to empower by hiring, lending and investing and offer gifts sparingly. “I will put the interests of the poor above my own or organization’s selfinterest, even when it means setting aside my own agenda. “I will listen carefully for spoken and unspoken needs knowing that many clues may be hidden. “Above all, to the best of my ability, I will do no harm.” A CALL TO ACTION “Every talent is needed to help rebuild our communities and everyone has something to contribute. We need to make a commitment to view everyone as resourceful and make self-sufficiency the end goal of our charity work.”

– By Yolina Elenkova of DNA Creative Communications Founded in 1997, the South Carolina Association of Nonprofit Organizations (SCANPO) is the only statewide membership organization and network that brings together nonprofit leaders to strengthen the state’s entire nonprofit sector.

MARCH 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 21

journal community

journal community

our community

our community

community news, events and happenings

The Greater Greer Chamber of Commerce recently announced the Entertainment Schedule and Sponsorships for the 2013 Village Hospital Greer Family Fest sponsored by the City of Greer to be held May 3 and 4, 2013, in downtown Greer. On May 3 on the Nationwide Insurance Garfield Main Stage at 6 p.m. will be Alex Hunnicut and at 8 p.m. will be Noah Guthrie; and on The Upstate Information Hub Dick Ploof Community Stage at 6 p.m. will be Greer Idol and the City Street Band (shag and beach music) at 7 p.m. On May 4 on the Nationwide Insurance Garfield Main Stage will be: Benton Blount at 12:30 p.m., Dylan Arms at 3 p.m., Travis Smith at 4 p.m., Becky Green at 5:30, and Marshall Tucker Band at 7:30. On The Upstate Information Hub Dick Ploof Community Stage will be: 10 a.m.-noon, Little Miss and Master Pageant; 12:30 p.m., Chandler Creek Elementary Choir; 1 p.m., Greer Idol; 2:15 p.m., Elizabeth Wood; and 4 p.m., Arvie Bennet Jr. Adults 50 years of age and up are invited to participate in the 2013 Greater Greenville Senior Sports Classic April 13-19. This annual event consists of 15 recreational and Olympic-style sports at venues throughout the county. New this year is Pickleball, a game played on badminton courts with the net lowered to 34 inches where players use a perforated plastic ball and paddles. Contact Gary Allen at pickleball@charter.net for more information. Registration forms are available at Greenville Rec’s office, 4806 Old Spartanburg Road, Taylors. Forms are also available at greenvillerec.com. For more information or for a mailed registration form, call 864-288-6470. Registration deadline is April 5. Project XX is a new initiative whose mission is to increase the number of progressive women elected or appointed to office in South Carolina. Two organizations have been created to accomplish this: a nonprofit and a federal super PAC. The short-term goal of Project XX is to move the percentage of women on boards and commissions from the current mean of 27 percent women serving to the legally mandated goal of 51 percent,

community news, events and happenings

reflecting the percentage of women that make up the state’s population. For more information, contact Ginny Deerin at 843-437-5565 or visit projectxxsc.com. Book Your Lunch will host debut Southern author Kim Boykin on April 3 at Twigs Tempietto. Tickets are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. If you cannot make the event, reserve a personalized copy of “The Wisdom of Hair” by contacting Fiction Addiction in advance at 864-675-0540 or at info@fiction-addiction.com. Glendale Outdoor Leadership will offer a Spring Break Camp for ages 6 to 15 on April 1-5, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. In addition, a Summer Adventure Camp will be offered for ages 6 to 15. There are four available sessions: June 10-14, June 24-28, July 8-12 and July 22-26. For more information, visit setgols.org. The Greenville Guardian ad Litem program will hold a free training course to teach community volunteers how to advocate for children taken from homes of abuse and neglect. The 30-hour training program focuses on the family court system, how to recognize abuse and neglect, and how to communicate with children and others involved in the case. The first class begins April 1, 6 p.m., and will be held at General Air, 5409 Augusta Road, Greenville. For more information, call 864-467-5862 or visit greenville.scgal.org. On March 29, three Michelin-starred chefs will be the main attraction at the International Food & Wine Festival, 6:30-10 p.m. at Rick Erwin’s Nantucket Seafood and on the lawn of the Courtyard by Marriott’s Village Green, downtown Greenville. Dishes prepared by chefs Danny Brown of danny brown Wine Bar & Kitchen in New York; Homaro Cantu of moto and iNG in Chicago, and Greenville’s own Emmanuel Hodencq

will be available to ticket holders. Live music and dancing will also be part of this culmination of Upstate International Month. Tickets are $150 per person and a portion of the cost of each is tax deductible and supports Upstate International. For event details and to purchase tickets, email info@internationalupstate.org. The Upcountry History Museum presents Lunchbox Learning: The Shaping of South Carolina on April 3, noon. It is free to members, $5 for non-members. Chickfil-A or vegetarian lunch will cost $6. Reserve meals at 864-467-3100 or info@upcountryhistory.org. The Greenville Chamber’s Leadership Greenville program is now accepting applications for its 40th class. Applications are available online at greenvillechamber. org/class-40.php. Leadership Greenville is the Chamber’s premier 10-month leadership development program designed to help develop informed, committed and qualified leaders for Greenville County. Class 40 will kick off in August 2013 and end in May 2014. Class selection is based on essay responses, professional resume and community involvement. The deadline for applications is May 1 with an early-bird tuition discount for applications received by April 17. For more information, contact Tami Miller at tmiller@greenvillechamber.org or 864-239-3743. Music on Main, the popular every-Thursday night event that runs April-August, will have a new location and time for its 20th season. Starting with this season’s first concert on April 4, Music on Main will be held just below Morgan Square, Spartanburg. The only street closure will be a small portion of Spring Street. The new location will provide people with easier access to the majority of downtown’s restaurants, bars and other nightspots. Music on Main will be held 5:30-8:30 p.m. For more information, visit cityofspartanburg.org/music-on-main.

United Way of the Piedmont is sponsoring the 3rd Annual Great Cake Bake for all ages and expertise levels on April 13. This event benefits Imagination Library, United Way of the Piedmont’s early childhood literacy program. The theme is “children’s books” and the event is open to everyone. Public viewing of entries will be April 13, noon-4 p.m., at Spartanburg Public Library Headquarters on Pine Street. Admission is $5 and children 12 and under get in free. Cake entries are $10 or $25, depending on skill level. Entry divisions include: Minibaker, Junior Decorator, Beginner, Advanced, Professional and Wedding. Division requirements and rules can be found at greatcakebake.org. On April 1-6, the swimming pools at the Caine Halter Family YMCA and YMCA Adams Mill Program Center will be open to Y members and non-members for free, hour-long sessions. Water safety instruction will be provided by trained swim instructors, who will pass along their lifesaving knowledge to children age six months to 14 years old. Participants must register for Swim Lesson Week sessions in advance, and the program is first-come, first-served. Register by calling 864-679-9622 for the Caine Halter Family Y, 721 Cleveland St.; or 864-963-3608 for the Y Adams Mill Program Center, 100 Adams Mill Road, Simpsonville; in person or by visiting ymcagreenville.org/aquatics.php. Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

WE REINVENTED ENTIRE WE COMMUNITIES TOGETHER. WE CAN REINVENT CARE,, TOO. HEALTH CARE

In fact, we’re doing it already, in our own, proven way: by working together. That’s how we’re making health care more efficient, while providing new and vital services to the Upstate. Just ask Dr. William Schmidt, III, who helped build GHS Children’s Hospital into a nationally renowned institution. He’s seen how people working together can make a great community better. And, he’s helping do the same for health care. Learn more at ghs.org/modelofchange. 22 THE Journal | MARCH 29, 2013

MARCH 29, 2013 | The Journal 23

journal community

journal community

our community

our community

community news, events and happenings

The Greater Greer Chamber of Commerce recently announced the Entertainment Schedule and Sponsorships for the 2013 Village Hospital Greer Family Fest sponsored by the City of Greer to be held May 3 and 4, 2013, in downtown Greer. On May 3 on the Nationwide Insurance Garfield Main Stage at 6 p.m. will be Alex Hunnicut and at 8 p.m. will be Noah Guthrie; and on The Upstate Information Hub Dick Ploof Community Stage at 6 p.m. will be Greer Idol and the City Street Band (shag and beach music) at 7 p.m. On May 4 on the Nationwide Insurance Garfield Main Stage will be: Benton Blount at 12:30 p.m., Dylan Arms at 3 p.m., Travis Smith at 4 p.m., Becky Green at 5:30, and Marshall Tucker Band at 7:30. On The Upstate Information Hub Dick Ploof Community Stage will be: 10 a.m.-noon, Little Miss and Master Pageant; 12:30 p.m., Chandler Creek Elementary Choir; 1 p.m., Greer Idol; 2:15 p.m., Elizabeth Wood; and 4 p.m., Arvie Bennet Jr. Adults 50 years of age and up are invited to participate in the 2013 Greater Greenville Senior Sports Classic April 13-19. This annual event consists of 15 recreational and Olympic-style sports at venues throughout the county. New this year is Pickleball, a game played on badminton courts with the net lowered to 34 inches where players use a perforated plastic ball and paddles. Contact Gary Allen at pickleball@charter.net for more information. Registration forms are available at Greenville Rec’s office, 4806 Old Spartanburg Road, Taylors. Forms are also available at greenvillerec.com. For more information or for a mailed registration form, call 864-288-6470. Registration deadline is April 5. Project XX is a new initiative whose mission is to increase the number of progressive women elected or appointed to office in South Carolina. Two organizations have been created to accomplish this: a nonprofit and a federal super PAC. The short-term goal of Project XX is to move the percentage of women on boards and commissions from the current mean of 27 percent women serving to the legally mandated goal of 51 percent,

community news, events and happenings

reflecting the percentage of women that make up the state’s population. For more information, contact Ginny Deerin at 843-437-5565 or visit projectxxsc.com. Book Your Lunch will host debut Southern author Kim Boykin on April 3 at Twigs Tempietto. Tickets are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. If you cannot make the event, reserve a personalized copy of “The Wisdom of Hair” by contacting Fiction Addiction in advance at 864-675-0540 or at info@fiction-addiction.com. Glendale Outdoor Leadership will offer a Spring Break Camp for ages 6 to 15 on April 1-5, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. In addition, a Summer Adventure Camp will be offered for ages 6 to 15. There are four available sessions: June 10-14, June 24-28, July 8-12 and July 22-26. For more information, visit setgols.org. The Greenville Guardian ad Litem program will hold a free training course to teach community volunteers how to advocate for children taken from homes of abuse and neglect. The 30-hour training program focuses on the family court system, how to recognize abuse and neglect, and how to communicate with children and others involved in the case. The first class begins April 1, 6 p.m., and will be held at General Air, 5409 Augusta Road, Greenville. For more information, call 864-467-5862 or visit greenville.scgal.org. On March 29, three Michelin-starred chefs will be the main attraction at the International Food & Wine Festival, 6:30-10 p.m. at Rick Erwin’s Nantucket Seafood and on the lawn of the Courtyard by Marriott’s Village Green, downtown Greenville. Dishes prepared by chefs Danny Brown of danny brown Wine Bar & Kitchen in New York; Homaro Cantu of moto and iNG in Chicago, and Greenville’s own Emmanuel Hodencq

will be available to ticket holders. Live music and dancing will also be part of this culmination of Upstate International Month. Tickets are $150 per person and a portion of the cost of each is tax deductible and supports Upstate International. For event details and to purchase tickets, email info@internationalupstate.org. The Upcountry History Museum presents Lunchbox Learning: The Shaping of South Carolina on April 3, noon. It is free to members, $5 for non-members. Chickfil-A or vegetarian lunch will cost $6. Reserve meals at 864-467-3100 or info@upcountryhistory.org. The Greenville Chamber’s Leadership Greenville program is now accepting applications for its 40th class. Applications are available online at greenvillechamber. org/class-40.php. Leadership Greenville is the Chamber’s premier 10-month leadership development program designed to help develop informed, committed and qualified leaders for Greenville County. Class 40 will kick off in August 2013 and end in May 2014. Class selection is based on essay responses, professional resume and community involvement. The deadline for applications is May 1 with an early-bird tuition discount for applications received by April 17. For more information, contact Tami Miller at tmiller@greenvillechamber.org or 864-239-3743. Music on Main, the popular every-Thursday night event that runs April-August, will have a new location and time for its 20th season. Starting with this season’s first concert on April 4, Music on Main will be held just below Morgan Square, Spartanburg. The only street closure will be a small portion of Spring Street. The new location will provide people with easier access to the majority of downtown’s restaurants, bars and other nightspots. Music on Main will be held 5:30-8:30 p.m. For more information, visit cityofspartanburg.org/music-on-main.

United Way of the Piedmont is sponsoring the 3rd Annual Great Cake Bake for all ages and expertise levels on April 13. This event benefits Imagination Library, United Way of the Piedmont’s early childhood literacy program. The theme is “children’s books” and the event is open to everyone. Public viewing of entries will be April 13, noon-4 p.m., at Spartanburg Public Library Headquarters on Pine Street. Admission is $5 and children 12 and under get in free. Cake entries are $10 or $25, depending on skill level. Entry divisions include: Minibaker, Junior Decorator, Beginner, Advanced, Professional and Wedding. Division requirements and rules can be found at greatcakebake.org. On April 1-6, the swimming pools at the Caine Halter Family YMCA and YMCA Adams Mill Program Center will be open to Y members and non-members for free, hour-long sessions. Water safety instruction will be provided by trained swim instructors, who will pass along their lifesaving knowledge to children age six months to 14 years old. Participants must register for Swim Lesson Week sessions in advance, and the program is first-come, first-served. Register by calling 864-679-9622 for the Caine Halter Family Y, 721 Cleveland St.; or 864-963-3608 for the Y Adams Mill Program Center, 100 Adams Mill Road, Simpsonville; in person or by visiting ymcagreenville.org/aquatics.php. Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

WE REINVENTED ENTIRE WE COMMUNITIES TOGETHER. WE CAN REINVENT CARE,, TOO. HEALTH CARE

In fact, we’re doing it already, in our own, proven way: by working together. That’s how we’re making health care more efficient, while providing new and vital services to the Upstate. Just ask Dr. William Schmidt, III, who helped build GHS Children’s Hospital into a nationally renowned institution. He’s seen how people working together can make a great community better. And, he’s helping do the same for health care. Learn more at ghs.org/modelofchange. 22 THE Journal | MARCH 29, 2013

MARCH 29, 2013 | The Journal 23

journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

GREENVILLE’S ONLY EXCLUSIVE FURRIER FOR 60 YEARS

The Shannon Forest Golf Classic will be held on April 12 at Willow Creek Golf Course in Greenville, starting at 1:30 p.m. One lucky golfer could win the Holein-One Corvette from Kevin Whitaker Chevrolet. There will also be a Lowcountry Boil Dinner at 6:30 p.m. and Silent Auction at 5:30 p.m. Auction items include a BMW Ultimate Driving Weekend and a TREK Bike from The Great Escape. Online registration is available at shannonforest.com. Southside Christian School will host an Open House and campus tour for parents of students from age 2 through 12th grade on April 12, April 26 and May 3. The informational sessions begin at 9 a.m. Visitors will have an opportunity to meet the superintendent and principals and ask questions about the various programs at SCS.

Celebrate our SPECIAL 60th Anniversary SALE Purchase your next fur from your LOCAL furrier with over 60 years of experience. 233 N. Main Street, Suite 260 | Greenville | 864.242.1881 Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 10-5, Wed. 10-1, Sat. by appointment only Appointments appreciated

Heather Boling’s second-grade class at Mitchell Road Christian Academy has been answering the question: “How can we make a difference and show God’s love to people who are forgotten?” While researching homelessness, they discovered that children who are homeless have markedly higher rates of health problems than children who have stable homes. Boling’s students made and sold hot chocolate mix, raising a total of $291 for the Taylors Medical Clinic.

The Eastside High School Choral Department will present the 2013 dinner theatre show, “Broadway and Barbeque,” on April 13 at the school. Dinner will be served at 5:30 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. Dinner/show combination tickets are $15 per person and must be purchased by April 9.  Show-only tickets are $10 per person and will be sold at the door. All proceeds benefit the Choral Department. For additional information, call 864-268-2088.

Funding partnerships with Wofford College, Mt. Moriah Baptist Church Foundation and Chapman PTO brought character education through golf to three Spartanburg School District 7 elementary schools: Cleveland Academy of Leadership, Mary H. Wright and Chapman Elementary. Promoting core values and healthy habits through golf is now part of the physical education curriculum at each of seven Spartanburg District 7 elementary schools, positively impacting over 3,500 students K5 through grade 6 annually. For more information, visit thefirstteespartanburg.org. Mauldin High School seniors Olivia Marie Baddley and Kathryn Briana Jones were named semifinalists for the National Beta Club Scholarship. They competed against over 600 students across the country and were the only two students from Greenville County named semifinalists. Stone Academy of Communication Arts students recently won awards in the 2012-2013 South Carolina PTA Reflections competition. They will be honored at the state PTA Reflections banquet on May 4. The winners include: first place in visual arts: Nicholas Turgeon; first place in dance choreography: Kelsey Pranke; third place in music composition: Caleb Eells; third place in literature (primary): Chip Burnette; honorable mention in literature (intermediate): Sophie

24 THE Journal | MARCH 29, 2013

(From left, back): Nicholas Turgeon, Caleb Eells, Sophie Young, C.J. Arnold and Kelsey Pranke; (front, left): Chip Burnette and Caleb Ethan Dill.

journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Learn more about this and other Upstate businesses in the 2013 edition of

Young; honorable mention in film/video:  C.J. Arnold; and honorable mention in visual arts (special student): Caleb Ethan Dill. Ellen Woodside Elementary students raised $6,235 for the American Heart Association during the Jump Rope for Heart campaign. The top three earners were Jaisun Mars, Sarah Bellinger and Emma Morris. The Kappa Eta chapter of Pi Kappa Lambda honor society for music at North Greenville University inducted its most recent group of members into the society. The event included an Honors Recital performed by the new inductees. New local members include: Beth Keith of Spartanburg, Kelsey Meekins of Spartanburg, and Constance Petersen of Greenville. Anne Matthews, strings teacher at Greenville Middle Academy, was named a Golden Apple award winner recently by WYFF-TV for excellence in teaching. In addition, Rebekah Matthews was named a first-place winner on the state level for her literature entry in the PTA Reflections contest; she will now represent South Carolina in the national PTA contest. Ben Finkelstein was a second-place winner for Film/Video Production on the state level.  Riverside High School recently had multiple students honored in the 2012-2013 state level Reflections Cultural Arts contest. These students included Thomas Neff, honorable mention in music; Nikki Morath, second place in dance; Arsalan Kouser., second place in literature; Sanjana Mandilwar, honorable mention in literature; Carsyn Osiecki, third place in visual arts; and Amber Moloney, third place and honorable mention in photography. The Silver Crescent Foundation, the South Carolina Department of Education’s Office of Career and Technology Education, and SC Regional Career Specialists recently announced the finalists in the annual SC Discover Manufacturing Design Challenge. First-place winner was Kcenia Kuzmina of Spartanburg (fifth grade, Hickory Fairforest Elementary School) and Elaina Beck of Taylors (ninth grade, Eastside High School) received an honorable mention.   The National Junior Honor Society of Greenville Middle Academy recently sponsored a Stop Hunger Now packaging event. The school’s gym was transformed into a food factory where members of the National Junior Honor Society packaged nearly 25,000 meals. These meals will be delivered to a school feeding program in a developing country. The Fine Arts Center will hold Explore the Arts June 17-21 from 8:30 a.m.noon, Monday through Friday. The Fine Arts Center will offer art classes for rising elementary and middle school students in Painting on Canvas, Drama, Sculpture, Guitar, Drums and Shakers, Japanese Art, Creative Writing, Ballet, Drum Printmaking, Digital Photography and Metals. The cost to attend is $125 for elementary and middle school students and $150 for high school, college and adult workshops. Partial scholarships are available. For more information, visit fineartscenter.net/explore. Mauldin High Cheer camp registration is open for children ages 5 to 13. The camp will be held June 17 – 20 from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Mauldin High School gym. Camp registration cost is $65 and discounts are provided for multiple siblings. To register, visit maudlinhighcheer.com. For more information, email camp@mauldinhighcheer.com. Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

AJH Renovations, LLC & Designed for Downtown 215 E. Belvue Rd., Taylors | Monday-Friday 8-5 864.901.3021 | ajhrenovations.com

What does your company do best? We think there probably isn’t a home renovation contractor in the Upstate better able to visualize and actualize a whole-house transformation of an old-neighborhood residence. We follow the flow of the old home, and the atmosphere of the neighborhood, while incorporating the lifestyle needs of the homeowner, to arrive at a seamless renovation that blends the new with the old. Remember: Your local spending supports local jobs and businesses. Sales taxes support local schools...our future.

To feature your business, call 679-1200.

MARCH 29, 2013 | The Journal 25

journal community

the good

events that make our community better

The SC School Boards Association has named the Mary Black Foundation as a Champion for Public Education County and recently recognized the philanthropic organization. Connie Smith, SCSBA Region 14 director and member of the Spartanburg School District 2 board, presented the Champions for Public Education Award to foundation director Kathy Dunleavy, director of programs Molly Talbot-Metz, and board members Tony Fisher, Doris Tidwell, Bob Wynn and Bill Coker.  

Trip DuBard with SC Future Minds, Cindy Boyd and Ken Reynolds with Bojangles.

The Bojangles’ restaurant on Pelham Road in Greenville recently presented several high school age-group books to a local District Teacher of the Year, Cindy Boyd from Wren High School in Piedmont. This donation is one of 15 planned for this year, and is part of Bojangles’ ongoing partnership with South Carolina Future Minds, which is designed to support teachers across the state who make a positive impact on their students and the future of South Carolina through their commitment to education.  

Greer Chiropractic Center recently held the 24th Annual Doctors with a Heart Day to benefit Greer Relief and Resources. The event collected more than 300 food, hygiene and clothing items. The donated chiropractic services to 102 patients equaled $4,080 in-kind services rendered free to patients, thanks to Dr. Karen and David Thomas.   Junior League of Greenville recently awarded top honors to Laura Woodside in its Young Women’s Writing Contest. Woodside wrote on a mentor in her life and was awarded a $500 savings bond from TD Bank. Prizes were also contributed by Luna Rosa Gelato Café. The winning entry will be published in the organization’s May community magazine. For more information about the Junior League of Greenville, visit JLGreenville.org.

South Carolina Bank and Trust recently donated three computers to A Child’s Haven, a nonprofit organization dedicated to transforming the lives of young children who have experienced developmental delays or behavioral challenges. The computers will be used by staff members for various purposes such as tracking attendance, entering goals for each child, and managing Medicaid, transportation and billing. More than 400 guests gathered at the Poinsett Club for an evening benefiting Safe Harbor. The runway fashion show featured spring styles from Monkees of the West End, Plaza Suite, Petals Boutique, Muse Shoe Studio, Wisteria Salon & Spa, Vestique, Coplons and the Safe Harbor Resale Shop.  Two former Safe Harbor clients shared their stories of hope and success with the crowd. The event raised $80,000, doubling the original fundraising goal. Member of Leadership Greenville Class 39 recently joined with TreesGreenville volunteers to plant roughly 50 trees along the undeveloped stretch of road leading into the Brutontown Community. The project was a jump-start for the Poinsett Corridor Revitalization Coalition. The small streetscape project at Hammett Street Extension will serve as a template for tying other nearby residential areas to Poinsett Corridor. Best Chevrolet recently donated equipment bags, baseball buckets, a practice net, batting tees, lineup card pads, umpire ball bags, 500 pairs of eye black and 150 T-shirts and a $500 check to Easley Little League.

Bob Morris, president of the Greenville Community Foundation, installs hurricane straps on the trusses of the Taylor home, being built by Morris and 18 other Upstate CEOs and their employees in Habitat for Humanity’s “CEO Build.”

We are...

• Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology. • Doctors of Audiology. • Angie Gerbasi, Courtney Russo, Susan Valenti & Lisa Ramos.

The Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine received notable recognition recently as the college was named to the 2013 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. This designation is the highest honor a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning and civic engagement. More information can be found at vcom.vt.edu/outreach. Additional information on eligibility and the full list of Honor Roll awardees can be found at nationalservice.gov. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.

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26 THE Journal | MARCH 29, 2013

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JOURNAL CULTURE

“Decent from the Cross,” a sculpture in ivory by Adam Lenckhardt, is recreated by models as part of Bob Jones University Museum and Gallery’s Living Gallery performance.

ARTWORK COMES

TO L I F E Bob Jones University’s Living Gallery tells Easter story through art, music

After about 30 seconds, Joseph Winter II’s muscles start to burn. A minute or two later, they start screaming at him. Such is the reality of winning a role as one of the live models who replace human figures in life-size works of religious art in Bob Jones University’s annual Living Gallery. By CINDY LANDRUM | staff Because of the construction of the ivory sculpture of “Descent of the Cross,” gravity can’t really help Winter maintain the awkward position he must assume to become the Jesus figure in Adam Lenckhardt’s depiction of Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus taking Christ down from the cross after his crucification. A small bar offers some support for his torso, as do a fellow model’s arm and a strap around his waist. His costume is made of slippery cloth, making balance a little more precarious. By the time four minutes pass, the Bob Jones freshman from Maryland is straining to ignore the pain and stay perfectly still so as not to ruin the effect. “I’m fighting pain on the inside,” said Winter, a future Marine who said his weightlifting regimen helps. “I have to look like I’m dead so I can’t give a sign that I’m holding on to something.” The Living Gallery, which has become a popular Upstate Easter tradition over the past 16 years, combines an original drama, music and life-size reproductions of classic works of religious art. LIVING GALLERY continued on PAGE 28

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

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JOURNAL CULTURE LIVING GALLERY continued from PAGE 27

In past Living Galleries, the artwork has typically served as the backdrop for the drama. This year, some of the actors will actually walk into and out of the artwork and speak their lines in the drama, “The Shadow of the Cross,” written by Bob Jones faculty member Dave Schwingle. “Some people said that they heard the artwork had live people but they never saw them because they never moved,” said Paul Radford, director of this year’s production. “This year, we’re not trying to hide the fact that the people are alive. We’re trying to celebrate it.” This year’s Living Gallery focuses on what the characters in the artwork would say if they could speak, Radford said. For instance, Peter walks out of “Peter’s Denial,” talks and walks into “Boat on the Sea of Galilee.” Judas Iscariot will speak before walking into “The Last Supper.” Mary walks out of “Descent of the Cross” and into “Pieta.” Jennifer Stuber, a senior criminal justice major from Greenville, plays Mary Magdalene.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: The Living Gallery “The Shadow of the Cross” WHO: Bob Jones University WHEN: March 29, 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., March 30, 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. WHERE: Rodeheaver Auditorium, Bob Jones University campus TICKETS: Adults, $11; children ages 6-12, $9 INFORMATION: 864-770-1372 or livinggallery.bju.edu “When the art comes to life, it makes it more real. It’s not just a painting or sculpture,” she said. “It happened in real life in history and an artist tried to capture history. We’re just trying to bring that to life. We’re putting life back into history.” Stuber, who played Mary in last year’s Living Gallery, has attended all of BJU’s Living Galleries. The idea for the Living Gallery is modeled after a similar

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Makeup artist Lara Hoster applies makeup to living gallery performer Joesph Winter. Winter was part of the sculpture “Decent from the Cross” by Adam Lenckhard.

Join us for an afternoon of music and poetry inspired by the artwork of Helen DuPré Moseley.

Sunday, April 7 2 pm

Greenville County

Created by members of the Emrys Foundation for art lovers of all ages, poems and lyrics are paired with Moseley’s dreamlike paintings in the newly released children’s book, Hearing Helen.

28 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 29, 2013

Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-271-7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm free admission

program in Laguna Beach, Calif. “Living Gallery is a big deal for a lot of people, whether they are Christian or non-Christian,” she said. “This production shows the real meaning of Easter. Easter is not about Easter egg hunts and chocolate bunnies. Christ died on the cross for us. This shows the real reason for us to celebrate Easter.” Stuber said it is special to have a part in a tradition she grew up watching. “It makes it more real and more special,” she said. “I’m not in it for applause and praise. It’s for the glory of God and the message.” Radford said having the actors actually walk out of and into the artwork presented a lot of challenges, even for the school’s crew of talented artists and production personnel. “When we were looking at what it takes to get people in and out of the

artwork, there was a challenge at every turn,” Radford said. “For each piece of art, we’re having to do it in a different way.” For one piece, it meant rebuilding a portion of the artwork, he said. “I think it’s a good idea to try. Artists need to try things and fail,” Radford said. “If you always take the safe route, you’re not really an artist. Trying something new is the artist mentality.” Other art featured in this year’s Living Gallery are Rembrandt’s “The Three Crosses,” Ciseri’s “Ecce Homo,” Bloch’s “Peter’s Denial,” Cavallion’s “Christ Driving The Traders from the Temple,” Munkacsy’s “Golgotha,” de Troy’s “Samaritan Woman at the Well” and Andrew’s “The Resurrected Christ.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

JOURNAL CULTURE

1957 memory sparks novel set on the Enoree River By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

"Enoree," by Jerry Mullinax, has been described as "true to the ugliness of that time, yet gentle in its forgiveness of human frailty."

Author Jerry Mullinax was inspired to write "Enoree" by the memory of seeing the dead body of a black boy in 1957.

and made him a hero in the book,” Mullinax said. The book is about the fear of the unknown, segregation and discrimination. “Mullinax’s portrayal is true to the ugliness of that time, yet gentle in its forgiveness of human frailty,” wrote Ruth Morris, an English instructor at Greenville Tech, in a review. “The swing across the Enoree River in Pelham, South Carolina, in the 1950s is the metaphor for the boys’ bridging the turbulent waters of the Jim Crow south.” Many of the places in Mullinax’s novel still stand, including the church and parsonage in Pelham. “Enoree” is one of several books Mullinax has written. He said he was pushed into being a writer by an assignment he had given his sixth-grade class. He was an English teacher at Hendersonville Middle School in North Carolina when he told the class one Monday morning that they would begin writing the first chapter of their novels that day and complete the chapter by week’s end. One of the students suggested he write a first chapter as well. He did, and it became the start of his first novel, “Jasper’s Castle.” Mullinax said “Enoree” took him only a month to write. “The story was ready to come out. All I had to do was put fingers to the keys of the keyboard.” He’s now working on his next book, “Balfour,” a novel about mill baseball in the 1940s. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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It was an image Jerry Mullinax couldn’t forget: a black arm jutting out from under a white sheet. It was burned into his memory one day in 1957, when his father, then the pastor at First Baptist Church in Pelham, herded Mullinax and his two brothers into the family car to go see a black boy who had been struck by lightning and killed. “It was a different time then,” said Mullinax, who is a part-time English instructor at Greenville Technical College. And while decades have passed since that day, the image never left. Mullinax turned the memory into a novel, “Enoree.” “It was time to get the story out,” he said. “I think that’s why it stayed with me like it did.” “Enoree” tells the story of Jake, an 8-year-old white preacher’s son, and Josiah, a black boy who lives across the Enoree River, and the secret friendship between them. The boys in the novel meet after Josiah swings across the river on a vine and then is too scared to swing back and must go home another way. “I gave that little black boy a name

MARCH 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 29

JOURNAL CULTURE

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journal culture

sound check

In cooperation with Harry and Sheila Bolick, Clemson Downs, TD Bank, and The Westin Poinsett

with vincent harris

‘What really matters’ Songwriter Drew Holcomb discovered ‘a new perspective’ in fatherhood

Even if the name Drew Holcomb doesn’t sound familiar, you’ve probably heard his music. Since the Tennessee-born musician made his debut with 2005’s “Washed in Blue,” his songs have been used by many television shows, including “Justified,” “How I Met Your Mother” and “House.” Holcomb’s songs are packed with vivid detail and dramatic character studies, accompanied by the unflashy but soulful playing of Holcomb and his band, The Neighbors, which includes Holcomb’s wife, Ellie. Their style incorporates lowkey rock, country and gospel influences into a startlingly original whole, and the band’s most recent album, “Good Light,” currently Who: needtobreathe with Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors holds a five-star listener rating on iTunes. Holcomb & The Neigh- Where: Timmons Arena, Furman University bors are playing a show with When: April 6, 9 p.m. needtobreathe at Furman UniverTickets: $29.50; 864-294-3097 or timmonsarena.com sity’s Timmons Arena on April 6. Tell me a little about “Good Light.” I started writing this album in October of 2011. It was about a nine-month writing process, and we started recording it last fall. We spent about four weeks recording it. The album has gotten a huge response on iTunes. Did that surprise you? A little. You never want to take anything for granted. But we’ve spent the last decade, really, doing it the old-fashioned way: Getting out on the road touring and pounding the pavement. And we have a lot of really loyal fans. Your daughter was born last November; has becoming a parent changed your writing at all? I think it’s certainly brought a different perspective for me. We recorded them before we had our little girl, but I wrote a lot of songs while my wife was pregnant, and there’s a really intense gravity to being a parent that kind of makes a lot of the other troubles of life seem a little smaller. It makes you think about what really matters. How involved are you in your songs being used by TV shows? I get to approve whether or not the songs are used, but I don’t have any participation in the pitch. We have a company in California that has represented us in that world for a long time. I’ll just get an email that says, “So-and-so from ‘How I Met Your Mother’ really loves this song and wants to use it. Will you approve it?” Have you gotten any sense of why so many shows have used your songs? I think that TV is a dramatic medium, and there are certain aspects to our music that are appropriately dramatic. The big rock ’n’ roll songs are not the ones that the shows are picking. It’s the album tracks that are mellower that tend to be used. I think they’re drawn to that side of what we do. And TV is also a great marketing tool for your music. Yeah. Traditional radio has become so consolidated that it’s really hard to break in, so one of the only ways to get your music in front of millions and millions of people is through TV. It’s a great matchup, because we need new ears listening to our music, and they need our music for their shows. You’re playing the Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival this year; it’s not until June, but are you feeling excited or nervous? It’s excitement, it’s nervousness, and at the same time it feels like an arrival of sorts. And to share a poster with a Beatle (Paul McCartney is headlining this year’s festival)… you can’t get much more exciting than that. Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

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journal culture

Centre Stage 30th season will bring Tuesday Night Fringe

April 6th

Series offers ‘out of the box’ productions director says ‘need to be seen’ By Cindy Landrum | staff

Kick off the return of spring with Spartanburg County’s legendary festival! Race or float this classic whitewater run. All participants will have a chance to win prizes and enjoy live music, BBQ, boat demos, and more at the finish Spectators welcome. Festival is free! Visit SpartanburgParks.org or call 864-804-5815 for more information.

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32 THE Journal | MARCH 29, 2013

For Centre Stage’s 30th anniversary season, Glenda ManWaring briefly considered reprising some of the theater’s biggest hit productions over the years. Then she decided, in her fourth season as Centre Stage’s executive and artistic director, she did not want to look back. She wanted to look forward. In 2013, forward means rep theater and a new Tuesday Night Fringe Series, along with a new version of a Christmas classic, a rock ’n’ roll show, a couple of musicals and a play with a famous catchphrase. “I really love the whole season,” ManWaring said. “It has really good balance.” Not too long ago, there were doubts whether Centre Stage would make it to its 30th season. Three weeks into the job, ManWaring started receiving phone calls from creditors. The theater owed a substantial amount of back rent. Expenses and payroll were cut. Auditors had doubt whether the theater would survive. Thanks to donations and a string of sold-out shows, the theater endured – and has now turned its focus to longterm goals and financial health. “People don’t want it to end and they’re turning out to support us,” ManWaring said. Centre Stage is opening its Main Stage season with two shows that will alternate nights from September to November. “Lend Me a Tenor,” a Ken Ludwig farce with a protagonist who has to appear for the greatest tenor of his generation; and “Unnecessary Farce” by Paul Slade Smith, which features a cheap hotel room, two cops, three crooks and eight doors, will use the same set, ManWaring said. “A lot of people say farce is all about the doors,” she said. “And a lot of times it really is.” A new version of “A Christmas Carol” is planned for November and December. Next up in January and February 2014 is “Rock and Roll Through the Ages,” an original concert featuring songs from throughout the genre’s decades. The show is not a part of the theater’s Main Stage offerings. “The Producers,” a big musical based

on the 1968 film, is coming to Centre Stage in March and April 2014. In May 2014, the season continues with “A Few Good Men,” the Aaron Sorkin play about military lawyers who uncover a high-level conspiracy while defending their clients at a court martial. The Main Stage season ends with “Shout! The Mod Musical” in July and August 2014. The Tuesday Evening Fringe Series includes plays ManWaring thinks are important for Greenville audiences to see but that she doubts would be able to sell 300 seats a night during the four-weekend run typical of the theater’s Main Stage productions. “These are meaty stories, but not the norm,” she said. “These are minimal shows with smaller casts geared toward out-of-the-box thinking.” As the name suggests, the five Fringe plays will be staged on Tuesday nights during the theater’s Main Stage productions. They’ll use the same sets or be staged in front of the Main Stage sets. “These are pieces that stand on their own,” ManWaring said. “They are plays about contemporary situations that affect all of us.” The first three of the Fringe Series shows have been announced. ManWaring has picked the plays for the two other series’ shows, but the theater hasn’t secured rights yet. “Freud’s Last Session” is a play by Mark St. Germain that centers on the legendary psychoanalyst Dr. Sigmund Freud, who invites the rising young C.S. Lewis to his home in London. On the day England enters World War II, the pair clash about love, sex, the existence of God and the meaning of life. “Irena’s Vow” by Dan Gordon tells the story of 19-year-old Irena Gut, who is promoted to housekeeper in the house of a highly respected Nazi officer. Gut is determined to help 12 Jewish workers and decides to shelter them in the safest place she can think of. “Love, Loss and What I Wore” is a play by Nora and Delia Ephron that uses clothing, accessories and the memories they trigger to tell funny and often poignant stories to which all women can relate. “We’re building up audience trust,” she said. “People are buying tickets even if they don’t know the title of a show.” ManWaring’s goal for the 2013-14 season is to surpass 900 season members. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

journal culture

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

The Fountain Inn Center for Visual and Performing Arts will host 20-year-old singer, songwriter and American Idol finalist Casey Abrams on Sept. 14. Ticket sales begin on May 1. For more information, call 864-409-1050 and purchase tickets at ftinnarts.org. The Artists’ Guild Gallery of Spartanburg will present Ralph Pàquin’s exhibit “Genes and Chromosomes” throughout April at the Chapman Cultural Center. Pàquin is the department chair and professor of art at Presbyterian College in Clinton. His ex- Pàquin’s “Pink Horticulture” hibit at the gallery will consist of a balance of sculpture and drawings based around the theme of genes and chromosomes. “Genes and Chromosomes” will be open to the public April 1–27, with an opening reception on April 5, 5:30-8 p.m. in the Guild Gallery. There will be another reception on ArtWalk, April 18, 6-9 p.m. This exhibit is free to the public and is open Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday 1-5 p.m. For more information, call 864-764-9568. Two of Spartanburg’s native bands will mash up on the stage of the David Reid Theatre, April 6 at 8 p.m. Mill Billy Blues, an acoustic quartet of men defining the indigenous soulful music of Upstate South Carolina, and the origiThe Sparkletones nal Sparkletones, a rockabilly band that scored big in the 1950s, will play a benefit concert at Chapman Cultural Center. Each band will play a set of their own music and then mash up to create something wholly new and uniquely Spartanburg. Proceeds for this concert will benefit arts in education in Spartanburg. Tickets are $11 for adults and $6 for students. Call 864-542-ARTS or visit chapmanculturalcenter.org for additional information and tickets. The Greenville County Museum of Art will host an exhibition of Virginia artist Sarah Lamb’s paintings April 10–June. For more information, call 864-271-7570 or visit gcma.org. Pan Harmonia presents “Elegy, Holocaust Remembrance” on April 25, 7:30 p.m., at the Fine Arts Center in Greenville and April 28 at 5 p.m. at the Reuter Center, UNC-Asheville. The free concert will feature the music of Ervin Schulhoff and the Sephardic Diaspora by Kate Steinbeck, flute; John Ravnan, viola; Amy Brucksch, guitar; and Ian Bracchitta, bass. For more information, visit pan-harmonia.org. The Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg is accepting applications to exhibit in its gallery in 2014. Nine exhibits are being scheduled and each will showcase either one or two guild members. Entries are due by May 1 and can be submitted only online by emailing artistsguildofspartanburg@gmail.com. Applications will be reviewed and selected by a jury of current members. Selected artists will be announced on June 1. Anyone in Spartanburg County, or in a county tangent to Spartanburg, can

be a guild member by paying the annual $40 membership fee. For more information and entry requirements, visit artistsguildofspartanburg.com. Artios of Greenville will present “Oliver!” May 9-11 at the Fountain Inn Center for Visual and Performing Arts, 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn. Performances will be at 7 p.m. on May 9-11 and at 2 p.m. on May 11. Tickets are $12 for adults and $8 for ages 8 and under and 55 and older. For additional information, visit ftinnarts.org or call 864-409-1050.

Art Fusion Galleries of Miami recently announced that local artist Karen Childress Clardy’s painting, “Walking Down the Aisle,” received third place in their second annual International Fine Arts Competition. More than 1,000 works of art were entered into the competition and a panel of seven judges from around the world selected three artists to participate in their show, “Subjects of Splendor,” which will open at the gallery in Miami on April 13 and run through June 17. Clardy works out her Southern experience on canvas while juxtaposing her love of celebrity culture and hip-hop music with her traditional role as wife and mother to depict worlds colliding. To learn more about Art Fusion Galleries, visit artfusiongalleries.com. To learn more about Karen Childress Clardy and her artwork, visit kkclardy.com. The Mauldin Cultural Center recently formed a collaboration with American Callboard to expand its programming offerings to include a year-round theatre program beginning summer 2013. The new program will include two summer camps for children plus three full productions over the course of the year. American Callboard is a newly formed Upstate-based company that leverages the extensive theatrical experience of its director, Andrea Lathbury, to produce live theatre. The first camp session, geared towards children ages 8-14 with little to no experience in theatre, runs weekdays June 10 -28 and will end in two performances of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” on June 28 and June 29. The second camp, geared towards those who are more experienced in theatre, runs July 8-26 and will end with a performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Registration for both summer camps is now open and more details can be found at mauldinculturalcenter.org. Submit entries to arts@communityjournals.com.

MARCH 29, 2013 | The Journal 33

JOURNAL CULTURE

Arts Calendar Mar. 29 – Apr. 4

SC Children’s Theatre Hop, Hop, Hop! Tell Me a Story Pajama Party Mar. 29 ~ 235-2885 Bob Jones University Living Gallery 2013 Mar. 29-30 ~ 770-1372 North Greenville University Brass-Percussion Concert Apr. 2 ~ 977-7085

Downtown Alive Stereo Reform Apr. 4 – 232-2273

Metropolitan Arts Council Some Like It Hot: Encaustic Art in the Upstate Through Apr. 12 ~ 467-3132 The Warehouse Theatre Romeo and Juliet Through Apr. 13 ~ 235-6948

Centre Stage A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Through Apr. 21 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art The Art of Helen Moseley Through Apr. 14 ~ 271-7570 Jamie Wyeth, Rockwell Kent and Monhegan Through Apr. 21 ~ 271-7570 Stephen Scott Young in Greenville

Through Apr. 21 ~ 271-7570 William H. Johnson: Native Son Through Sep. 29 ~ 271-7570 Jackson Marketing Vision Gallery Works by Carole Tinsley Through Apr. 27 ~ 272-3000

Greenville Chamber of Commerce Photographs by William Abbott and Lynn Pilewski Through May 3 ~ 242-1050

Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage Works by Kim Hassold Through Apr. 29 ~ 233-6733

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900 N. Main St. #37 | $189,900 3BR/2.5BA End unit condo in North Main Area! MLS#1248921

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34 Rollingreen Rd | $135,000

523 Chamblee Blvd, Claremont. Greenville Beautiful custom brick and stone 4 BR, 4 BA home featuring 10’ ceilings on the main level and 9’ ceilings upstairs. Master suite on main features his and hers walk in closets, double sinks, walk in shower and jetted tub. There is also a second BR on the main level, as well as a study. Great room has a fireplace with gas logs, coffered ceiling, and opens to large screened porch. Kitchen features glazed cabinetry, stainless appliances, granite countertops and wonderful pantry. Hardwood floors throughout main level. Upstairs there are 2 additional BRs, 2 full BAs and large bonus. Clad Energy star windows, custom cabinetry throughout, security system, central vacuum and structured wiring package are just a few of the extras.

HOME INFO Price: $769,000 | MLS: #1252608 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4 Square Footage: 4200-4399 Schools: Oakview Elementary Beck Middle | JL Mann High Contact: Margaret Marcum | 864.420.3125 Prudential C. Dan Joyner, Co. To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

3BR/2BA one owner home on a huge lot in great neighborhood! MLS#1249202

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7 Barrett Street | $198,500

4BR/2BA, huge rooms, hardwood floors, full basement, fenced yard, zoned C3.

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206 S.Woodgreen | $85,000

Health & Wellness Center - just opened. Special on initiation fees thru Jan. MLS#1247769

864.616.3685 sreid@cbcaine.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

C33R

SUSAN REID

MARCH 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 37

JOURNAL HOMES

S PA RTA N B U R G T R A N S A C T I O N S

NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE

O C T O B E R 2 0 - 2 6, 2 012 SUBD. RIVER FALLS PLANTATION WOODFIN RIDGE WOODLAKE ROCK SPRINGS LONDONDERRY WOODRIDGE

Ruskin Square at Hollingsworth Park, Greenville It’s happening at Verdae. Ruskin Square at Hollingsworth Park features a new style in city living with maintenance-free lawns and homes interset amid shared pocket parks, plazas and pedestrianfriendly streetscapes. It’s an easy stroll to the 20-acre central park and residents enjoy being close to everything. Classic homes are under construction now. Buyers may build the custom home of their dreams or select from a collection of the pre-approved land/home packages that are priced from the mid $200s. Premium lot selections are going fast, so plan a visit soon. The community’s Sales Office, located at 18 Shadwell Street, is open daily. For more information, call (864) 329- 8383 or visit www.verdae.com.

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Land/Home packages from: Mid $200s Lot Sizes: 40'x100' and larger Schools: Pelham Road Elementary Beck Academy JL Mann High School

38 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 29, 2013

Amenities: Walking/Biking paths, 20 acre Legacy Park, Legacy Square – Neighborhood Professional/Retail District, The Preserve Golf Course at Verdae, Shopping and Entertainment

PRICE

$355,000 $290,000 $271,000 $267,000 $265,000 $256,750 $192,500 GLENLAKE $192,342 SPRING LAKE $191,644 SUMMERWOOD $190,000 SHENANDOAH III $185,000 REIDVILLE CROSSING $181,505 MEADOWBROOK $181,000 LAUREL SPRINGS AT BENT CREEK PLANT $175,000 THE COURTYARDS AT MADISON CREEK $166,500 SHAFTSBURY $164,900 HEATHWOOD EAST $163,000 DOGWOOD FOREST $160,000 HILLBROOK FOREST $155,000 KINGSLEY PARK $152,000 GLENLAKE $145,250 OAKS AT ROCK SPRINGS $144,900 EARLERIDGE $142,500 STONEWOOD CROSSING $139,759 FERNWOOD FARMS $138,130 KENNEDY COMMONS $132,000 EAGLE POINTE $130,500 HANGING ROCK $128,500 ALFRED HAMMETT ESTATE $123,700 HAMPTON HEIGHTS $123,036 LITTLE VISTA HEIGHTS $120,000 SALEM ESTATES $115,120 $105,900 FOUR SEASONS FARM $105,000 TANGLEWOOD ACRES $104,000 $98,873 $98,000 TIMBERWOOD ACRES $95,900 STARCREST $93,885 MAPLEWOOD $92,800 WEDGEWOOD TOWNES $90,000 PALMETTO TOWNES $89,400 WADSWORTH HILLS $86,500 $84,000 LONGHORN ESTATES $80,000 KATESTONE $76,546 $74,000 HILLVIEW $72,719 $71,500 COUNTRY CLUB SPRINGS $68,500 WOODS CREEK CROSSING $67,000 OAKBROOK $65,000 $63,125 $59,000 NORTH COUNTY FARMS $58,335 DRAYTON REALTY $55,000 $55,000 $51,000 HUNTINGTON WOODS $50,000 PACIFIC MILLS $49,000 FOREST HILLS $45,000 NORTH COUNTY FARMS $39,114 DELMAR ESTATES $36,385 MAXWELL HILLS $33,846 JAMES CREEK $32,000 FIELDSTONE ARENA $30,100 MAYFAIR MILLS $30,000 WILKINS HILLS $28,000 NORTH COUNTY FARMS $27,556 CLEARWATER $27,500 $27,500 $25,000 WINSMITH PLACE $25,000 KALKORA $23,500 CINNAMON RIDGE $23,366 NORTH COUNTY FARMS $22,114 NORTH COUNTY FARMS $21,858 HARRISON ACRES $21,500 SPRINGFIELD FARLEY ESTATE $20,000 $20,000 NORTH COUNTY FARMS $19,612 $18,900 NORTH COUNTY FARMS $18,755 LYMAN FARMS $18,000 HARVEST RIDGE $18,000 HARVEST RIDGE $18,000 LAKE EMORY $17,500 STRATTON PLACE $16,156 $16,000 $15,000 COWPENS MILLS $15,000 ISLAND CREEK MILLS INC $15,000

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

GOSSETT, JAMES L LEVER, JOHN GRAHAM 740 W TARA LN RANDY CAMP CONSTRUCTION LLC AMAKER, BOBBY D 232 TUSCAN RIDGE TRL DIONNE, GREGORY F RADFAR, RAMIN 225 WOODLAKE DR ESMAEILI, EHSAN ODELL, TIMOTHY S 284 ROCK SPRINGS DR GARNER, JAMES T KOTLARICH, MARY ANN 348 E KILLARNEY LK HAMMOND, CARL R FREDERICK, ALAN J 208 WOODRIDGE DR THE PALMETTO BANK GARRETT, MEL A 1018 WOODBURN RD NVR INC WAGNER, MICHELLE 254 BRIDGEPORT RD ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC WEATHRS, ANGELINA R 361 THORNAPPLE DR AMAKER, BOBBY D MARTIN JR, THEODORE 316 SUMMERWOOD LN SHELOR, DANIEL W TUCKER, BUFFY G 316 TRACY LN S C PILLON HOMES INC JOHNSON, DEMPSEY N 124 E FARRELL DR OWENS SR, RONALD BRUCE LAPP, JASON 156 BROOKGREEN DR STROUD, MICHAEL PACE, DANIEL E LOT NUMBER: 333 SK BUILDERS INC FALLS, MICHAEL A 457 MADISON CREEK CT GM HOMES INC LOR, MAIN N 534 ABBERLY LN GREENE, JERRI L NIX, ERIC T 263 HEATHWOOD DR PACK, BETTY W WHITE, RONDY P 122 BENTWOOD DR ARTHUR STATE BANK MEYER, ALAN SCOTT 129 MABRY DR WEBB JR, JAMES C GOODENOUGH, LEE R 304 CRYSTAL COVE CT ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC PACK, BRYAN DOUGLAS 294 BRIDGEPORT RD ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC MCCASLIN, LAUREN 298 WYCLIFF DR HUDSON, JANET T SABO, ELLEN D 112 SKYUKA CIR MUNGO HOMES INC LARUE, REBECCA M 269 STONEWOOD CROSSING DR HANSEN, DONALD D FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE 107 APPLEWOOD LN STEADMAN, JEREMIAH M LUCIANI, VINCENT L 1323 BISHOP RD BICKFORD, DAN CHURCH, AUDREY L 678 THORNBIRD CIR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE BLACKWELL, JOSHUA M 120 SLATE DR STEPHENS, GEOFF C JACKSON, KRISTY M 5189 RAINBOW LAKE RD WELCH, SUSAN FANNIE MAE 569 CECIL CT SPARKLE PORTFOLIO LLC JUSTUS ENTERPRISES SPARTANBURG 726 UNION ST ENGLISH, PEGGY L ENGLISH, WILLIAN 123 CHURCHILL AVE HODGE, JOY ANN GREGG, TIMOTHY T 6221 S PINE ST ROUNDS, JOHN R WILLIAMS, TRUDY A 627 W HEATHERSTONE LN LASTER, JUDY PERRY, HEYWARD R 205 WHITE OAK RD HOLDEN, KEVIN S FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE 632 VANNEY CIR ESTATE OF GAIUS JACKSON MILLE R, RONALD K 49 BLACKSTOCK RD RODGER C JARRELL REAL ESTATE MOELLMAN, CHRIS 135 OLD TIMBER LN RITTENBERG MIRANDA, L SC STATE HOUSING FINANCE 268 MILKY WAY ESTATE OF HARRY MACCHIA THE BANK OF NEW YORK 123 SPRUCE AVE BRIGHT, SUSAN H SMITH, OLIVIA FLOYD 106 BUCKSTONE LN THE VILLAS AT LAWSONS CREEK LLC STOW, ALICIA G 716 W SAGO CT MARCENGILL, RICHARD L HUGHES, CHARLTON KENDRICK 204 SAINT MATTHEWS LN NALLEY, ROBERTA LEE FAGAN SIEGFRIED, RODNEY D 305 S LYLES AVE HORTON BONA, ROSE WILLIAMS III, BOBBY JOE 300 CALVERY RD EVANS, GREGORY MAURICE THE BANK OF NEW YORK 109 JAMIE BARNETTE DR MCMAHAN, CHAD L SHOCKEY, GARNET T 543 MAGNESS DR REEDER, DONNA DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST 1069 MARYLAND AVE DRAYTON REALTY ASSETS CROOK PROPERTIES LLC 1945 DRAYTON RD FIELDS INVESTMENTS LLC DOVER, MATTHEW 14 HIDDEN SPRINGS RD JPMORGAN CHASE RYZHKOV, ANDREY 715 SANDY CREEK WAY SHAWLEY, REED DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST 310 W BUSHY HILL DR CALDWELL, MICHAEL FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE 570 EL PASO ST JOHNSON JR, CHARLES A IRIZARRY, BENITO 170 JACKSON RD SMITH & LOWE DEVELOPMENT INC BELLEW, SCOTT M 4675 PEACHTREE RD DRAYTON REALTY ASSETS GROMMER PROPERTIES LLC 1955 DRAYTON RD DOOLY, ELEANOR S FANNIE MAE 670-674 ZION HILL RD FANNIE MAE MULLEN, DAVID P 102 OAK ST SMITH, MARY L ANDERSON, JOHN C 3010 W CROFT CIR GARNER, JOAN C COOPER, JENISON B 85 LAWRENCE ST MATHER, WILLIAM JAY SKELTON, WILLIAM J 444 E PARK DR SMITH & LOWE DEVELOPMENT PANCHYSHYN, BRIAN R 4675 PEACHTREE RD LEBOEUF, RICHARD L FARLEY, WENDY C 3035-A&B KELSEY CREEK RD WILLIAMS, DIONE YVETTE PITTS, BRANDON 236 LORING ST REDUS SC HOUSING LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC LOT NUMBER: 39 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE BORISHKEVICH, SERGEY 243 ARENA PARK DR STEWART, MEGHAN LEIGH FERNANDORS, MAMIE LUCILLE 1110 W BLACKSTOCK RD US BANK NA RADION, VIKTOR 565 WILKINS RD SMITH & LOWE DEVELOPMENT INC SMART, BRADY 4675 PEACHTREE RD MARTIN, DORIS GRACE KONG, YOUA 257 WASPNEST RD DRAYTON REALTY ASSETS ANDERSON, JAMES R 2001 DRAYTON RD BANK OF AMERICA NA BUILDERS OF HOPE INC 427 HAWES DR FANNIE MAE BRITTEN PROPERTIES LLC 304 ALEXANDER AVE KALKORA DEVELOPERS LLC RUD, OLEG STODDARD DR MATIAS, ARNALDO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK 497 CINNAMON RIDGE DR SMITH & LOWE DEVELOPMENT INC THOMPSON, RICK S 4675 PEACHTREE RD SMITH & LOWE DEVELOPMENT INC JOLLEY, CHARLIE A 4675 PEACHTREE RD FBSA 1 LLC CARPENTER, JASON H 630 HALLS BRIDGE RD GENESIS GD LLC CLEMENT, FEDALEFILS 601 S CENTER ST HENRY, DANIEL FARWELL, GEORGE C 166 WILLIAMS ST SMITH & LOWE DEVELOPMENT INC YELTON, RACHEL S 4675 PEACHTREE RD FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CALL JR, HAROLD L 214 CRESCENT CIR SMITH & LOWE DEVELOPMENT INC OWENS, PRESTON 4675 PEACHTREE RD MAECO LLC DISTINGUESHED DESIGN LLC 241 WALCOTT DR ARCAAE LLC MIKE SEAY CONSTRUCTION INC 524 CORNUCOPIA LN ARCAAAE LLC MIKE SEAY CONSTRUCTION INC 506 CORNUCOPIA LN LAKE EMORY DEVELOPMENT INC BROWN, RYAN S 703 OUTRIGGER CV CLARK EZELL LLC GREEN, BEULAH LOT NUMBER: 132 KAMRINE COMPANY LLC CAPITAL BANK NA 807 WHITLACK ST CITIZENS BUILDING & LOAN ASSOC BUD CAMPBELL JR BUILDERS INC 715 S BOMAR AVE WATKINS, JESSIE S WORLEY, CECILIA H 134 N LINDA ST FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ALI, BARBARA ELAINE

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S M A R C H 1 - 8, 2 013 SUBD.

PRICE

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

LOWNDES HILL REALTY CO.

$2,050,000 $953,750 $700,000 $597,643 $484,000 $480,000 $435,000 $390,000 $382,250 $380,000 $377,000 $373,000 $360,000 $358,000 $347,000 $336,105 $335,330 $330,000 $328,410 $328,320 $320,255 $315,678 $310,900 $306,132 $280,000 $277,500 $272,950 $271,125 $270,500 $270,000 $270,000 $264,460 $257,000 $251,500 $250,000 $249,350 $247,000 $245,000 $244,500 $244,000 $238,500 $238,000 $235,900 $234,600 $229,000 $225,000 $221,732 $219,900 $219,900 $219,387 $218,000 $212,900 $210,000 $209,000 $206,000 $205,000 $205,000 $200,000 $196,295 $195,000 $192,000 $188,000 $186,830 $186,500 $184,000 $182,000 $181,000 $180,000 $179,000 $175,000 $172,500 $169,000 $168,000 $168,000 $168,000 $167,500 $165,000 $160,000 $160,000 $159,200 $157,615 $155,000 $153,027 $150,450 $150,000 $149,000 $148,000 $147,900 $145,000 $145,000 $145,000 $145,000

VASUDEV HOTELS LLC COTTINGHAM A HALLAM IV WASH & WIN LLC COUGHLIN KEVIN (JTWROS) LACKEY ELLEN A DANIEL DOROTHY N COGGINS JACK O BECK LAURIE A BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT DAVIS RONALD A (IRA) MCVAY GLENDA S MORSE BRYAN C KIMTY LIMITED PARTNERSHI MCKAIN LYNN C HODGES ALLEN A S C PILLON HOMES INC S C PILLON HOMES INC ALEXANDER DOROTHY M ANDERSON EXCAVATING INC S C PILLON HOMES INC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT NIEMITALO INC NETZLOFF JOHN D NVR INC JOHNSTON EUGENE B SINKA ERIK (JTRWOS) S C PILLON HOMES INC S C PILLON HOMES INC FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA EXPEDITION INVESTMENTS L SPRINGFIELD MARGARET R NVR INC MCNUTT COURTNEY L DAN RYAN BUILDERS SC INC GREER STATE BANK BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PORCH CECELIA A PLOOF AMBER MARKS BRUNO (JTWROS) FOXWORTHY DEBORAH TOOTHMAN CHARLES C HTP RELO LLC GREENE VILLAS LLC DGR LLC JEFFERSON BARBARA CAROLINA ASSET MANAGEMEN NVR INC FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG SK BUILDERS INC KETTELS HEATHER L FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG KOPP MARK W CAIN MARK ALBRECHT MARGARET O MANGURIAN BETHANY E RICH RONALD R MEEKS JOSHUA EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL EDWARDS NANCY DIANA BALL CHESNEY RONALD SCOTT WEINSTEIN BEVERLY R BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT FARHAN ANWAR ALFORD JUDITH A TRUST DIX DOUGLAS E BEAM JOHN R MCRAE PARK VENTURES LLC CLIFF HAWK PROPERTIES LL ROSS DONALD HARRISON TUCKER ALVIS R SK BUILDERS INC CARMIC LLC YAO DAQING FAIRVIEW INVESTMENTS LLC ROTHERHAM MATTHEW ALEXAN TULLOH PHILLIP R AMES CURTIS SEBASTIAN MICHELLE E FBSA 1 LLC ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK TH D R HORTON INC BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC BRIARCLIFF DR LAND TRUST MOORE CHRISTINE M ROEDER CASSANDRA FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG BREZEALE JARED DAVID HARGRAVES ERIC S HAAS MARILYN R DICKSON DEBBIE

QUIKTRIP CORPORATION WEEKES BRADFORD G IV BAILEY ROBERT J JONES BRIAN T CARTWRIGHT BETH K FALLIS MERRILL S WELCH THOMAS HOWARD JEFFERSON BARBARA F (JTW MADUBUIKE IHEOMA C REAMS CAMILLE BURNS BRENDA LEE IRREVO MORRIS ALISON (JTWROS) THALER PROPERTIES LLC SCHULTZ MICHELE L MEGILL RICHARD R (JTWROS TILGHMAN DONALD G (JTWRO CROSSLEY ALICIA F (JTWRO PHAM LONG T (JTWROS) GAULT DARWIN (JTWROS) FERRELL DAVID A (JTWROS) MOMIN SABA RINGWELSKI DOUGLAS S (JT ROBBINS LAURIE RANGASAMY GHANA S HAINES PATRICIA (JTWROS) MISENHEIMER LINDSAY (JTW JACOBS ELENA I WEBER BRADLEY E (JTWROS) DICKERSON BIRGIT STATHOS GUS P ROTHERMICH JOHN W (JTWRO SYED FARAH HARRIS CHARLES W JR (JTW KING RENEE BE STILLWATERS LLC AVERSA DOMINIC J BURROUGHES JOHN MICHAEL NATIONAL RESIDENTIAL NOM DENNIS LINDSI S (JTWROS) DAVIDSON DREW E (JTWROS) HTP RELO LLC STOLL JEFFERY MOXIE ANN S (JTWROS) HOWARD J R JR (JTWROS) WEAKLEY SHANNON R (JTWRO SEGALE ERIC TAYLOR BEZUIDENHOUT JOHANNES N ROBINSON JENNIFER K HENTZ JANE D HEGLAR MATTHEW CARUSO CHRISTOPHER J (JT MORRIS DOUGLAS M BROWN ELIZABETH KING REV BAKER DANIEL F JR (JTWRO BURKE ALLEN SCOTT (JTWRO RUTHERFORD WILLIAM (JTWR CRUZ JEREMY S (JTWROS) RESIDENTIAL ASSET SECURI MARTZ ROBIN WELLSPRING PROPERTIES LL HILL ROSCOE E DENNIG BRIAN C GILLILAND TIMOTHY KUNKLER KATHERINE H (JTW GEIB ROBERT C (JTWROS) PHILO ANNIEKA CLARISSA FORD LARRY TRIPP BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT GREATHEAD NANCY S SHAW WILLIAM ROGAN RAMPY HEATHER L ALLENSPACH AMBER R 604 GROVE RD LLC AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR MUNGO HOMES INC VAN CLEEF JOHN E (JTWROS GUERRANT DANIEL J BATES JESSICA M MONTILLA NATACHA (JTWROS WILLIS AMBER PAIGE MILLER FAYE M NUNN MONICA HUNTER AMANDA UNDERWOOD GEORGE MILER INC JENSEN TINA H ATKINS AMANDA SHARPE NENOV MARTIN NGUYEN HUONG TRAHN LAKE JENNIFER A CROCKER EVERETT M BURTON LEMUEL KEITH LYONS EMILY CARGILL (JTW

PO BOX 3475 546 CRESCENT AVE 140 CHILDERS CIR 313 HAMPTON AVE 5 ANGEL OAK CT 2921 W TAMBAY AVE 2000 GEORGETOWNE DR 113 WOODBRIDGE WAY 42 MCRAE PL 211 ABERDEEN DR PO BOX 6286 210 GREENSIDE CT 427 HENDERSON RD 312 WILMINGTON RD 3 FABLING CT 122 STREATER LN 200 TUSCANY FALLS DR 10 WEYBRIDGE CT 10 BLUE HORIZON CT 2 VERSILIA LN 6 ANGELINE WAY 342 CHASTAIN HILL RD 212 LAUREL MEADOWS PKWY 30 PATEWOOD DR STE 257 400 CAROLDEAN DR 60 OAK CREST CT 260 DAIRWOOD DR 3 DAWN MEADOW CT 211 LAKE HILLS LN 1030 BRIARWOOD DR 118 SILVER RIDGE CT 305 BICKLEIGH CT 395 S PHILLIPS RD 103 CARILION LN 7715 CHATHAM RD 322 HERITAGE POINT DR 105 GRABURN DR 7500 DALLAS PKWY STE 300 21 BEAUDON CT 9 WOODWAY CT 701 CRESTDALE RD 34 BOSWELL CIR 62 BARNWOOD CIR 18 WILTON ST 213 SPRING LAKE LOOP 102 RICE ST 20 VELMERE DR 10 MOSS ROSE CT 105 WINDING RIVER LN 124 BEAUMONT CREEK LN 508 HEATHER GROVE CT 207 FORKED OAK WAY 4 BLACK KNOB CT 623 W RIDGEWAY RD 420 BRIGHT WATER LN 300 ASHFORD AVE 115 GLENCREEK DR 888 E WALNUT ST 25 PARKWALK DR 31 EMPORIA CT 1 SUNAPEE CT 133 RUNAMO WAY 200 TICKFAW CT 100 CRANEBILL DR 300 WATERCOURSE WAY 101 JORDAN CREST CT 1924 ELROD RD PO BOX 1039 110 MERITAGE ST 900 N MAIN ST UNIT 35 6 ELIAS CT 157 DAMASCUS DR 604 GROVE RD 23815 STUART RANCH RD 441 WESTERN LN 302 PEARLE BROOK LN 203 HEATHWOOD DR 7 TEAKWOOD COVE 68 SYCAMORE RIDGE DR 204 S MEMMINGER ST 403 AIRDALE LN 109 CARRUTH ST 102 SHEFLEYS RD 12 BRIDGEWATER DR 54 BRIARCLIFF DR 610 GREENING DR 108 SUMMERCHASE DR 904 CENTER RD 410 REVIS CREEK CT 101 W OKALOOSA WAY 115 AYERSDALE DR 104 RICHBOURG RD

THE OAKS AT ROPER MOUNTAIN HAMMETT’S GLEN BRADLEY OAKS MCRAE PARK PARK HILL CHERRY HILL RIVER WALK WOODRUFF CORPORATE CENTER BOTANY WOODS WOODLANDS TUSCANY FALLS TUSCANY FALLS SMITHWOOD CASTLE ROCK TUSCANY FALLS CLEAR SPRINGS NORTHWOOD HIGHGROVE OAK CREST GREYTHORNE GREYTHORNE CLIFFS VALLEY WYNETTE ESTATES SILVER RIDGE THE TOWNES AT HIGHGROVE LAKE LANIER CARILION STILLWATERS HERITAGE POINT THE TOWNES AT HIGHGROVE CUNNINGHAM POINT BEAUCLAIRE PELHAM FALLS BOSWELL WOODS BOSWELL WOODS RESERVE AT PLANTATION GREENE ADAMS RUN AUGUSTA RD RANCHES KELSEY GLEN MOSS CREEK WHITEHALL PLANTATION BEAUMONT ABBEYHILL PARK THREE OAKS HALF MILE LAKE HALF MILE LAKE STONE LAKE HEIGHTS RICHGLEN HOLLY TRACE PARKSIDE AT LISMORE ROCKBROOKE NORTH BLUESTONE COTTAGES THE COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE LONG CREEK PLANTATION WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE JONESVILLE LANDING ORCHARD FARMS MCRAE PARK ONEAL VILLAGE NORTHGATE TRACE NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK COPPER CREEK WOODLAND SUMMERFIELD FAIRVIEW CHASE BEAVER BROOK II HEATHWOOD FOX TRACE THE HEIGHTS CARRIAGE WEST FOX TRACE GRIFFIN PARK LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD EAST OVERBROOK THE GLEN AT GILDER CREEK FARM FAIRVIEW LAKE REID VALLEY REVIS FALLS FOXDALE

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

PEOPLE, AWARDS , HONORS Gorski Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® March 15, 2013 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Vivian Gorski has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Simpsonville office.

Gorski Originally from Miami, Florida, Gorski graduated from University of Miami with a Bachelor of Science degree majoring in Microbiology/ Immunology and English Literature and a minor in French. She previously worked in medical sales for eleven years.

“We are excited to have Vivian join our family of Realtors,” said Donna Smith, Broker-in-Charge. “We look forward to working with her.” Gorski relocated to the Upstate six years ago and lives in Simpsonville with her husband, Alexander Gorski, Attorney at Law, and their three children, ages 4, 6, and 6 months. In her free time, she loves to spend time with her family, watching movies and enjoys the outdoors. Gorski is an active volunteer with Susan G. Komen, Ronald McDonald House, March of Dimes and the Humane Society, and she is fluent in English, Spanish and French.

Rourk Promoted to Network Manager for C. Dan Joyner Company Corporate Services Division March 13, 2013 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Lisa Rourk has been promoted to Network Manager. Lisa has Rourk extensive real estate experience, and joined the staff of the corporate services department last year as the International Client Services Manager for the company. In her new position Lisa will be responsible for network referrals as well as international services. “We are truly fortunate to have someone as talented and personable as Lisa to be part of our Prudential C. Dan Joyner Company,” said Judy Vaughn, Director of Corporate Services and Relocation.

MARCH 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39

journal culture NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 38-04/23/13 Poinsett Corridor Streetscape Project, April 23, 2013, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, April 15, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items: DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-16 APPLICANT: Jake Van Gieson CONTACT INFORMATION: jakev@naief.com or 232-9040 PROPERTY LOCATION: East North Street and Howell Road (Howell Ridge) PIN: 0541030101604, 0541030101605 and 0541030101606 (portion) EXISTING ZONING: O-D, Office District and PD, Planned Development REQUESTED ZONING: C-1, Commercial ACREAGE: 1.1 COUNTY COUNCIL: 22 - Taylor DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-17 APPLICANT: Freeland and Kauffman, Inc. CONTACT INFORMATION: tsimmons@fk-inc.com or 672-3426 PROPERTY LOCATION: 1506 & 1508 Easley Bridge Road & 5 N. Georgia Avenue PIN: 0229000600800, 0229000601000, and 0229000601100 EXISTING ZONING: R-7.5, Single-Family Residential and C-2, Commercial REQUESTED ZONING: C-1, Commercial ACREAGE: 1 COUNTY COUNCIL: 25 - Gibson All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Zoning Ordinance and Map are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different zoning classification than requested.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF PICKENS IN THE PROBATE COURT 2012-ES-39-00584 In the matter of William Daniel Thomas, Deceased Jimmy R. King, Esq. as Agent for the Estate of Smith Thomas, Petitioner, vs. Heirs of the Decedent, William Daniel Thomas, a/k/a William Danny) Thomas, a/k/a Dan Thomas, a/k/a William D. Thomas, Respondents. TO: Heirs of the Decedent, William Daniel Thomas YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Petition in this action, of which a copy is herewith served upon you (a copy of the Petition can be obtained from Lewey C. Hammett, Jr., P.A. or from the Pickens County Probate Court), and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Petition on the subscriber at his office at Lewey C. Hammett, Jr., P.A., 1821 North Boulevard, Anderson, South Carolina 29621, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to Answer the Petition within the time aforesaid, the Petitioner in this action will apply to the Court for the said relief demanded in the Petition. This shall also serve as Notice of a Hearing scheduled for Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. at the Pickens County Probate Court located at 222 McDaniel Avenue, Suite B-16, Pickens, South Carolina 29671. Please be advised that the Probate Court may change the Hearing date to a date after June 19, 2013. Therefore, it is your responsibility to contact the Pickens County Probate Court for the dates of any Hearings occurring after June 19, 2013. You have the right to retain an attorney to represent your interest in this matter. If you retain legal counsel, please have your attorney to advise the Pickens County Probate Court immediately. Respectfully submitted, LEWEY C. HAMMETT, JR., P.A. LEWEY C. HAMMETT, JR. 1821 North Boulevard Anderson, SC 29621 (864) 226-5006 Attorney for Petitioner March 20, 2013

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2013, AT 6:00 P.M., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC 29601 FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING PUBLIC COMMENTS CONCERNING A PROPOSED ORDINANCE TO COMPLY WITH THE DIRECTIVES OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA BUILDING CODES COUNCIL BY REPEALING ORDINANCE NO. 4198 AND ADOPTING THE ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS (CHAPTER 1) OF THE VARIOUS CODES PROMULGATED BY THE SOUTH CAROLINA BUILDING CODES COUNCIL RELATING TO DESIGN REVIEW AND INSPECTION ACTIVITIES OF THE COUNTY OF GREENVILLE AND ENFORCEMENT OF BUILDING PROVISIONS AS PROVIDED IN SAID CODES; AND, AN ORDINANCE TO ADOPT THE PROPERTY MAINTENANCE CODE, THE STANDARD SWIMMING POOL CODE AND EXISTING BUILDING CODE IN GREENVILLE COUNTY AS AUTHORIZED BY THE SOUTH CAROLINA BUILDING CODES COUNCIL; AND TO ADOPT CERTAIN APPENDICES OF THE ADOPTED CODES TO RECOGNIZE CERTAIN VARIATIONS IN THE CODES BASED ON PHYSICAL CONDITIONS FOUND WITHIN GREENVILLE COUNTY; AND FURTHER, TO REPEAL ORDINANCE NO. 3440 TO ESTABLISH PROCEDURES, AREAS, AUTHORITIES, AND RULES FOR THE GREENVILLE COUNTY CODES DEPARTMENT RELATING TO CODE ENFORCEMENT. AND REPEAL ORDINANCES NOS. 178, 325, AND 376; AND FURTHER, TO REPEAL ORDINANCE NUMBER 4288 TO COMPLY WITH THE DIRECTIVES OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA BUILDING CODES COUNCIL TO IMPLEMENT THE NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE, 2008 EDITION, AS PUBLISHED BY THE NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION; AND TO ADOPT THE NECESSARY PROVISIONS TO ADMINISTER AND ENFORCE THIS REGULATORY CODE IN THE COUNTY OF GREENVILLE. Bob Taylor, Chairman Greenville County Council

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that TLJG LLC/ DBA Bubbly, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 20 West McBee Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this license/ permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than April 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2013, AT 6:00 P.M., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING PUBLIC COMMENTS REGARDING A PROPOSED ORDINANCE REQUIRING A PERSON OR ENTITY LOCATING AN UNATTENDED RECEPTACLE IN GREENVILLE COUNTY FOR DONATED CLOTHING, FOOTWEAR OR HOUSEHOLD GOODS, TO CLEARLY DISPLAY CERTAIN INFORMATION ON THE RECEPTACLE. Bob Taylor, Chairman Greenville County Council

AMENDED SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE NO.: 2012-CP-23-2009 TINA FREEMAN YOUMANS, Plaintiff, v. DUGOUT OF GREENVILLE, INC., DREDD (LAST NAME UNKNOWN) AND PROTECTIVE DIVISION ONE SECURITY, LLC, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at his office at 112 Wakefield Street, P.O. Box 10496, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty days (30) after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and, if you fail to appear and defend by filing an answer to the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Respectfully submitted, FLETCHER N. SMITH, JR., Attorney at Law 112 Wakefield Street (29601) Post Office Box 10496, F.S., Greenville, South Carolina 29603 (864) 232-6541 GREENVILLE, South Carolina Dated: November 12, 2012

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO.: 2013-CP-23HAROLD LEE MOON, Plaintiff, v. JESSICA DAWN PARSONS and ANNA CHASSE, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at his office at 112 Wakefield Street, P.O. Box 10496, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty days (30) after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and, if you fail to appear and defend by filing an answer to the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Respectfully submitted, FLETCHER N. SMITH, JR., Attorney at Law 112 Wakefield Street (29601) Post Office Box 10496, F.S., Greenville, South Carolina 29603 Greenville, South Carolina Dated: February 7, 2013

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that IZUMI Japanese Steakhouse, Inc. DBA IZUMI Japanese Steakhouse, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 16 Park Woodruff Dr., Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than March 31, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

 Saturday, April 6, 2013 1:00—4:00 pm  

Greenville County Animal Care 328 Furman Hall Road Greenville, SC 29609

www.greenvillepets.org 40 THE Journal | MARCH 29, 2013

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

The 1st Annual Hub City Hog Fest took place last weekend in Spartanburg.

photos by Gerry pate / contributing

NOTICE NOTICE OF SERVICE BY PUBLICATION (Termination of Child Support) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT OF THE 13th CIRCUIT DARYL S. THOMAS PLAINTIFF V. BELICIA M. GRANT DEFENDANT, PLAINTIFF TAKE NOTICE that a Petition to terminate your receipt of child support payments has been filed in Greenville County Family Court in the 13th Circuit, Greenville County, South Carolina. YOU ARE required to make defense to such pleading not later than May 6, 2013, exclusive of said date, and upon your failure to do so, the party seeking service against you will apply to the Court for summary judgment for the relief sought on or after May 7, 2013. You are also hereby notified that you have the right to be represented by to a lawyer in this case. This the22nd day of March, 2013. Charles W. Marchbanks, Jr., Attorney for Plaintiff 1225 S. Church Street, Greenville, SC 29605 (864) 5521606 S. C. Bar No. 76395

DEPUTY ASSESSOR REAL PROPERTY SERVICES County of Greenville Government Greenville, South Carolina Salary Range: $50,467.35 Under general supervision, participates in and supervises subordinate staff assessing real and personal property for the purposes of taxation as prescribed by Statute, and serves as Assessor in that official’s absence. Basic knowledge of drafting; thorough knowledge of supervisory skills; knowledge of how to interpret and apply various tax related laws, policies and procedures. Must be able to work in a team environment. Associate’s degree in a related field and considerable experience in real property appraisal with some experience at the supervisory level. Must have successfully completed required course of study in Assessment/ Appraisals. Apply online at: www.greenvillecounty.org or the County of Greenville, Human Resources Department, 301 University Ridge, Suite 500, Greenville, SC 29601. The County of Greenville is an EEO/AA-M/F/D/V employer.

journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Students at St. Anthony's School listened to John Brock, construction superintendent of the new school building, during the school's Career Day last week. The Honorable Leila Foster spoke St. Anthony's students about her job as magistrate judge during Career Day.

Students in Brooke Timms’ and Amy Garbe’s Washington Center classes took a behind-the-scenes look at the Fox Carolina news station. Coanchor of the morning news, Cody Alcorn, provided students with a tour of the station while explaining the on- and off-air details of Fox 21. Students were able to look inside the satellite news van, witness stories being developed, practice predicting the day’s weather in front of the green screen, and sit alongside Cody at the anchor’s desk.

Danane Wright, a graduate of St. Anthony’s School, spoke to students about his job as an engineer with Greenville County during Career Day.

A therapy dog visits with Abigail Arnold and Eleanor Hart in Kara Holmgren's fourth-grade class at Stone Academy during their spring book fair.

Kara Holmgren's fourthgrade students at Stone Academy visit with a therapy dog during their spring book fair.

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Crossword puzzle: page 42

Sudoku puzzle: page 42

In Digital

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M33A

IN BIG THEATER

MARCH 29, 2013 | THE Journal 41

journal culture

figure. this. out. Support Group

By Andrew J. Ries

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42 THE Journal | MARCH 29, 2013

Across 1 Festive occasion 5 Stinging remark 9 Italian for “small rolls” 15 Epps of “House” 19 One working on figures? 21 Knocked the socks off 22 Goody-goody’s “headwear” 23 Tibetan breed 24 Cinematographer’s concern 26 Patriotic org. 27 Starts the haggling at 29 Powerful perch 30 First Bond girl 36 Let the tears go 37 In the past 39 Rocker Young 40 Real estate listing abbr. 41 Palm tree nut 43 Cuban of the Dallas Mavericks, e.g. 45 Orange County seat 47 Max Ernst, for one 50 Bases-loaded walk stat 51 Well-stated 54 Literally, “the tar” 55 Crimson Tide’s home 61 Mao’s successor 64 Jobs offering of 2007 65 Former Bears coach 66 Full or half holds 68 Train-stopping spots: Abbr. 69 Event where the

number 12 is important, and a feature of 12 twoword answers in this puzzle 72 Once, archaically 73 Texas Hold ‘em variety 76 Believing in the greencheese moon, say 77 Smoothing tool 79 Leveling initials 80 “The Voice” coach 84 Rub with oil 85 Evelyn Waugh, but not George Eliot 86 Pujols blasts: Abbr. 87 Interactive website plug-in 91 Unusual thing 96 Scare 97 Reacted to a massage 100 __-de-France 101 Wolfe who tracks crooks 102 “Licensed to __”: Beastie Boys album 103 Sea-Tac posting 106 Its largest hub is in Atlanta 109 Turtledove 111 Hair disheveler 112 Ambulance VIP 113 First Japanese car to be produced in the U.S. 116 Mozart highlight 122 Ancient Andean 123 Just as prescribed 124 Save a date, say 125 Consider 126 Bugs

127 Flower stalk 128 Wrist-directed reprimand

Down 1 “The Simpsons” real estate agent Gunderson 2 Hamburger beef? 3 Shows the way (to) 4 Military attack 5 Ovine bleat 6 Men’s tennis org. 7 Thing in court 8 Like some shoulders 9 Lambeau Field pro 10 Saved up 11 Site of ‘60s action 12 Modern ending? 13 “Darn it!” 14 State with a panhandle 15 [Gasp!] 16 Oscar winner Anna 17 Asserts sans proof 18 Fish eggs 20 Bush advisor Rove 25 Like koalas 28 Mexican Mrs. 30 Young __ 31 “Bloom” star Stephen 32 Ideal for growing 33 OB/GYN test 34 Org. in the film “Sneakers” 35 Italy’s La __ 38 Morsel 42 Very little 44 6-Down counterpart

founded by Billie Jean King 46 Ireland’s __ Islands 48 Go out with __ 49 Soldat’s weapon 51 “__ sure you’re aware …” 52 One of Edison’s 1,000-

Easy

plus 53 Put in the crosshairs 55 Quaint “Not so” 56 B.J. or Justin of baseball 57 Commandment verb 58 Mozart’s “__ fan tutte” 59 Seraglio room

60 J.Lo, for one 61 Mezzo Marilyn 62 Racing great Bobby 63 Stars at the Forum? 67 Official emblem 69 Aweigh 70 US Open champ between John and Mats 71 Grant-providing gp. 74 ‘60s defense secretary 75 Chain with stacks 77 Coddled kitty, e.g. 78 Crossword-solving Simpson 81 At a Lakers’ home game, e.g. 82 Place 83 ‘90s U.N. secretarygeneral Boutros-__ 84 River past Berne 87 Start of a rhyming Basque game 88 Finished 89 Element’s combining power 90 2011 Liam Neeson film involving a wolf pack 91 Fjord-like inlet 92 Pink Floyd album including “Dogs” and “Sheep” 93 Abdominal 94 Mad-as-all-get-out state 95 Tapped-out letters 98 Gets away from 99 Boozer’s affliction 104 Stampede rope 105 Casing outing, briefly 107 Physics bits 108 Spring 110 Pop singer Lambert 113 Kept under wraps 114 Crushable container 115 Native Nebraskan 117 Search, with “down” 118 Scratch (out) 119 Sleep lab acronym 120 TV chef Garten 121 Cause of Cleo’s demise

Crossword answers: page 41

Sudoku answers: page 41

JOURNAL CULTURE

PAST AND PRESENT WITH COURTNEY TOLLISON HARTNESS, PH.D.

From inhumanity to altruism Kristallnacht’s 75th anniversary to celebrate mankind’s capacity for good Nearly five years ago, Greenvillians solemnly commemorated the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht, an event commonly known as the Night of Broken Glass, in which Jewish synagogues, businesses and homes in Germany and Austria were destroyed and set aflame, more than 90 Jews were killed, and 30,000 transported to concentration camps. Kristallnacht is considered amongst the first acts of state-sponsored Nazi terrorism against Jews. It was, essentially, the beginnings of the Holocaust. On Nov. 16, 2008, Rabbi Marc Wilson, Dick Berger, Bob St. Claire, and others held an evening program in the Verne Smith auditorium at Greenville Tech. The program featured excerpts from the memoir of Werner Schleyer, a survivor of Kristallnacht whose second cousin, Berger, lives in Greenville. Former Mayor Max Heller and his wife, Trude, both Holocaust survivors, read excerpts, as did WYFF-TV’s Michael Cogdill and others. As a historian of World War II, I am keenly interested in this topic. After teaching classes at Furman, I drove to Greenville Tech that evening, eagerly anticipating this program. When I arrived, I was unprepared for the situation I faced. I couldn’t

find a parking spot. When I finally did, I walked briskly toward the building, shadowed by the headlights of cars also seeking parking, and into the lobby. Several hundred people were milling about. I heard murmurs that the auditorium was full. Sure enough, the auditorium was over capacity. I was turned away. So were 400 others. While disappointed that I would not see the program that evening, I was also intrigued. As a public historian, I was thrilled to see the public so drawn to history and its observation. The pubic interest in the commemoration of Kristallnacht stunned even those who planned this event. Two months later, the group offered an encore program, and again received an overwhelmingly positive response. In May 2011, Rabbi Wilson and Bob St. Claire convened a group of community leaders in the chapel on the Furman campus and began to discuss ideas of how to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht in 2013. These discussions evolved, and eventually, the committee embraced the notion that since the 70th anniversary focused on the horrors of man’s inhumanity, the 75th anniversary could highlight man’s capacity for good. Thus was

born a yearlong effort to emphasize the goodness of mankind: the Year of Altruism. What began as a grassroots effort five years ago to commemorate the Night of Broken Glass has evolved into a 10-month long focus on altruism and philanthropy throughout our community. Dozens of events are in various planning stages, with community partners, schools, and over 40 faith-based communities participating in this effort. More than 100 community leaders have become involved over the past two years. The result: From August 2013 through May 2014, Greenvillians will gather at a multitude of venues to celebrate altruism, defined by Webster as the “unselfish regard for or devotion to the welfare of others.” As a community, we have much to commend. Last year, the local United Way raised over 15 million dollars in funds to benefit local agencies. The Greenville Meals on Wheels is the oldest MOW organization in the Southeast, and the sixth-oldest in the nation; next month, they will celebrate their 45th year of serving hot meals to those who are housebound. The Greenville Literacy Association ranks in the top three percent nationally in terms of the number of volunteers and the number of those

it serves. We are fortunate to live in an unusually caring community. When this Year of Altruism concludes in Spring 2014, we hope to contribute a piece of public art downtown, honoring our community’s efforts to serve our own. Already, Year of Altruism partners have developed partnerships among themselves that have the potential to extend well beyond this 10-month focus period. Furthermore, we hope to encourage increased philanthropy and brand Greenville as a place of unusual community involvement. Dr. Courtney Tollison Hartness is assistant professor of history at Furman, museum historian at the Upcountry History Museum, and program coordinator for Year of Altruism. She can be reached at Courtney@upcountryhistory.org.

GET INVOLVED If you would like to become involved in efforts to promote and/or organize The Year of Altruism, contact Jamie@ startflourishing.com. If you would like to support these efforts, contact The Community Foundation Year of Altruism fund at 864-233-5925.

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M43A

Park closer. Check-in faster. MARCH 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 43

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Mar. 29, 2013 Spartanburg Journal