Page 1

What’s next for The Handlebar? SEE PAGE 7

Springtime for Centre Stage Pearlie Harris: From with “The Producers” plantation to boardroom SEE PAGE 33

SEE PAGE 19

PERSISTENCE PAYS FOR JOHN BAUKNIGHT

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47˚

FRIDAY

62˚

53˚ SATURDAY 70˚

42˚

SUNDAY

68˚

A springtime storm system with “showers and possible thunderstorms

on way for us this Saturday.

Rain likely

2 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

Rain, possible storms

Sunshine, lower humidity


JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

15

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

PHOTO COURTESY OF FACEBOOK.COM/HENRYS.SMOKEHOUSE

“The future of the food truck industry in Greenville is hampered by the limitations downtown.”

Number of rare plant species found in Stevens Creek Heritage Preserve in McCormick County, including the Florida or Miccosukee gooseberry.

$10.5 million

Cost of the new Performing Arts Center planned for Christ Church Episcopal School’s campus.

Bo Wilder, food truck operator for Henry’s Smokehouse.

Pearlie Harris, on her life’s path from living on a North Carolina plantation to chairing the St. Francis Internal Review Board.

“What the Lord put here was beautiful, but mankind messed it up a bit. I think we have the making of the Central Park of the South.”

1876

Hy Brand, Conestee Mill owner for nearly 40 years, referring to the mill’s recent addition to the National Register of Historic Places.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

“I’m not concerned about what people think about me. It’s not my business what they think about me. My greatest achievement was becoming me. I found myself.”

The approximate construction date of Conestee Mill, recently added to the National Register of Historic Places.

“Why not Greenville?” Brewery lawyer Brook Bristow, on the question he and fellow craft beer enthusiast Vance Arthurs asked when talk of a craft brew week came up.

96%

“We won’t have loyal committed alumni able to help for at least another two or three decades.”

Percentage of children who go through the treatment program at A Child’s Haven who are enrolled in mainstream classrooms.

Dr. Jerry Youkey, dean of the USC School of Medicine Greenville, on why he and his wife, Sharon, created an $800,000 scholarship fund to support physician education.

Criminal Justice Open House at the University Center of Greenville Join us on April 22nd at 5:45 pm To RSVP, visit www.andersonuniversity.edu/cj or call 864-231-2020

knowledge for your journey Anderson, SC | andersonuniversity.edu

MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 3


JOURNAL NEWS

City prepares for Cabela’s grand opening traffic JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

City, state and Magnolia Park officials are taking extra measures in anticipation of the surge in Woodruff Road traffic expected to accompany the April 3 grand opening of the Cabela’s outfitters store in the Magnolia Park shopping center. An additional left-turn arrow is being added at the shopping center entrance closest to Cabela’s, giving motorists two lanes for making left turns in and out of the center, city officials said. In order to address some of the traffic concerns, both Costco and the Greenville Police Department will have extra personnel working through the grand opening weekend to help with traffic control. “We are going to be working out there at the store and near Costco for presence,” said Johnathan Bragg of the Greenville Police Department. In addition to extra police officers provided by the city for traffic control, Costco is hiring three off-duty police officers to help deal with the traffic around its store April 3, and possibly around-the-clock through the weekend, said Gus Reina, assistant general manager of Costco. Reina said traffic gridlock on weekends is not a new development for Costco, but the store will be grateful when the long months of construction activity are over. “Ever since the construction has ramped up, it’s been a little difficult because some of those entry

points were shut down,” he said. “We are ready for this [construction and Cabela’s grand opening] to be done and see what happens.” Cabela’s new neighbors are watching all the fanfare with anxieties of their own. “Our biggest concern is public safety, including our employees, and the public at large,” said Greg Szabo, COO of Nutra Manufacturing, located across the street from Magnolia Park. “We have been here since the mid-’70s and seen a lot of growth. It’s pretty obvious that this section of Woodruff Road has become a big challenge and the intersection we share with Cabela’s is going to become the next crisis.” Nutra has already had problems with people cutting through its front parking lot and was forced to cut off public access to it, Szabo said. While Nutra certainly is in favor of growth, Szabo said he is concerned about the associated inconvenience and safety issues on the surrounding infrastructure, particularly the traffic potentially slowing down first responders.

C A B E L A’ S G R A N D O P E N I N G

April 3, 8 a.m. with a DJ and trivia games Ribbon cutting at 10:45 a.m. Special appearances by: John McLemore, Masterbuilt president and CEO; noon to 3 p.m. on April 3 R. Lee Ermey, “The Gunny”; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on April 5 Benny Spies, Cabela’s Ambassador and host of “Gun It with Benny Spies”; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 5-6 Tim Andrus, Realtree Pro Staffer; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on April 5 and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 6 Terry & Matt Drury, Drury Outdoors; 2 to 5 p.m. on April 5 and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April 6 Steve Scruggs, “Snake Master”; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 6 Michael Waddell, cohost of “Bone Collector”; 1 to 3 p.m. on April 6 Hank Parker, two-time Bassmaster Classic champion; 2 to 6 p.m. on April 6 Cabela’s will also offer family activities from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 5-6.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Heritage Green first phase improvements unveiled

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

This week, officials from the City of Greenville and Greenville County announced completion of the first phase of improvements to the Heritage Green urban arts and cultural campus located in downtown Greenville. The changes included new signage, a digital display, a raised terrace, landscape improvements and hardscapes. Covering two blocks, Heritage Green includes the Hughes Main Library, the Children’s Museum of the Upstate, Greenville Little Theatre, the Greenville County Museum of New signage and improved walkways and stairs at Heritage Green. Art, the Museum and Gallery at Heritage Green and the Upcountry History Museum-Furman University. In addition, the improvements worked to create a distinct, unified and inviting campus through making new internal connections, improving safety and providing “dynamic outdoor spaces,” county officials say. The $1.5 million project was funded through local accommodation tax funds. Future improvements have not been formally announced, but include pedestrian connection improvements from nearby streets and neighborhoods expected to be complete in 2015. “The Heritage Green campus is a tremendous community asset, and this most recently completed phase of revitalization improves upon what is already a unique and dynamic cultural centerpiece that is one of the best in the Southeast,” says Greenville County Council Chairman Bob Taylor.

City unveils proposed West Side brands JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com To strengthen community identity, the City of Greenville’s Connection for Sustainability team is branding the West Side and each of its three neighborhoods. The community brand was unveiled at a presentation held last week at the Kroc Center by Arnett Muldrow and Associates after conducting a three-day development workshop. Community Planner Wayne Leftwich said the Arnett Muldrow branding team met with the West Side residents and stakeholders to create a strategic

brand. “A brand can distinguish a community and make it more marketable for outside business,” he said. While connecting them all together, it’s still important to distinguish between the three West Side neighborhoods of Southernside, West End and West Greenville, said Ben Muldrow, partner at Muldrow and Associates. “We want the West Side to be the home place and the family place, and by offering this, it will give the city more to market the community,” he said.

Health Events Struggling with Weight? April 2 & 17 • 6 p.m. • Greenwood and Seneca Learn how GHS can help you achieve long-term weight loss through surgery. Free; registration required. Call 227-8932 (Greenwood) or 226-2290 (Seneca). Window Pains Thurs., April 3 • 6 p.m. • Travelers Rest High School This original one-act play by Anne Pecaro eavesdrops on the medical conditions facing 12 neighbors. Panel discussion with GHS physicians will follow. Free; registration required. Guyology: Just the Facts Sun., April 6 • 1:30 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus Boys ages 9-11 and their dads are invited to learn about puberty. Cost: $75 father/son. To register, visit girlology.com. Minority Health Summit Sat., April 12 • 10 a.m.-2 p.m. • TD Convention Center This annual event focuses on cancer prevention and features professional boxing champion and prostate cancer advocate Sugar Ray Leonard. Free; registration required. Save the Skin You’re In Wed., April 23 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • GHS Life Center® GHS dermatologist Angela Hutcheson, MD, will discuss how to prevent and detect skin cancer. Free; registration required. Women’s Health Watch Thurs., April 24 • Noon-1 p.m. • Caine Halter Y Join GHS OB/GYN Erin Thurston, MD, to learn about treatments for hormonal fluctuations and changes. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

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MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Moving SC forward After three days of debate and more than 210 roll call votes, the House of Representatives approved the $23.9 billion fiscal year 2014 South Carolina state budget and sent it to the Senate. About $6.9 billion of that amount is our true state budget, while most of the rest comes in federal pass-through dollars direct to other entities such as school districts, fees and fines paid to agencies, or items such as tuition payments to public colleges. This year’s budget funds the core functions of government, while living within our means, and includes no new or increased taxes. One of the major themes of the 2014-2015 budget is continued improvement in the state’s K-12 educational system. We adopted an updated funding formula for distribution of the Education Finance Act (EFA) funds that places greater emphasis on students in poverty, gifted students, and those requiring specialized instruction. The change will “hold harmless” school districts such as Greenville and ensure that while the formula has changed, we will not receive any less funding than we did in 2013. The budget also includes an additional $137 million added to the EFA to raise the Base Student Cost from $2,091 to $2,120, and $30 million to place a reading coach in every South Carolina elementary school. Schools with poor PASS test reading scores will have the position fully funded, and all others will receive 50 percent funding. Funding for summer reading camps in low-performing schools, digital instructional materials, school buses and charter schools is also included. At the higher education level, we included language for a national higher education consultant to conduct a complete review of the state’s higher education system. The review will focus on improved efficiency and effectiveness at the campus level and statewide. This will help us get a handle on how to save money, increase effectiveness and ultimately reduce tuition at our state’s institutions of higher education.

SPEAK YOUR MIND The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

No more excuses

IN MY OWN WORDS by PHYLLIS HENDERSON

Health care is also a major component of our state budget. We chose not to expand Medicaid as provided in the Affordable Care Act, but we fully funded our required maintenance of effort and implemented a number of new programs aimed at reducing costs and creating healthier communities. We continue to fund the South Carolina Healthy Outcomes Initiative that works to establish a free health care safety net for South Carolinians. We included additional funding for mental health services, cancer networks, and foster care reimbursements. The budget invests more than $13 million in the Department of Disabilities and Special Needs to reduce wait lists for families requiring these essential services. Job creation and training is another important part of our 2014 budget. The Ready SC program, a key component of South Carolina’s economic development engine, focuses on the recruiting and initial training needs of new and expanding businesses. The program was fully funded in this budget. In addition, the Department of Commerce received over $40 million to aid in recruitment, site development and applied research initiatives to support industry in S.C. We also affirmed our commitment to the citizens of South Carolina to continue to provide cybersecurity coverage and IT security upgrades at the Department of Revenue to protect vital information from cyber threats. As the Senate debates the budget, it will surely change in some aspects. However, you can be assured that your voice is being heard and your elected representatives in Columbia are making sure our state’s vital needs are met without asking you to pay more while our economy continues to recover. Phyllis Henderson represents House District 21 in the S.C. Legislature.

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

South Carolina is in desperate need of a statewide ban on texting while driving. The state Legislature should show leadership and concern for constituents’ safety on the roads while restoring public confidence in the legislative process by passing such a ban. Three anti-texting bills are currently moving through the Legislature. Senate Bill 416 and House Bill 4386 both prohibit all texting while driving, but not for lawfully parked or stopped vehicles or for someone requesting emergency assistance. Senate Bill 459 prohibits all wireless electronic devices – not just texting – but only for drivers in school zones and those with beginner’s permits, conditional drivers and special restricted drivers licenses. Both Senate bills have been contested and are on the calendar (visit scstatehouse.gov to see which legislators objected to these bills). The state Senate is historically where these bills have stalled, even after they were passed in the House. Legislators are elected to oversee and protect the public good. By failing to pass an anti-texting-while-driving bill, legislators are ignoring the fact that more than 850 people die annually on South Carolina roads. South Carolina and Montana consistently rank among the top three deadliest states to drive in, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. They are also the only two states in the country without any laws regulating cell phone use while driving. There are many reasons South Carolina should enact an anti-textingwhile-driving law: Drivers are 23 times more likely to crash when texting while driving, making it more dangerous than drunk driving. Texting takes a driver’s eyes off the road an average of five seconds. At 55 mph, that’s enough time to cover the length of a football field. Texting is one of the most dangerous types of distracted driving because not only does it take drivers’ eyes off the road, but also their hands off the wheel

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

IN MY OWN WORDS by DAVID E. PARSONS

and minds off the task of driving. A November 2013 survey of 600,000 AAA Carolinas members in South Carolina showed that 99 percent were in favor of anti-texting regulation for ALL drivers. Representing nearly 14 percent of the state population, more than a dozen municipalities in South Carolina have passed their own laws against texting while driving, indicating that South Carolina residents want a law. Furthermore, anti-texting laws vary in each municipality, making it difficult for drivers to know what restrictions apply. Opponents of an anti-texting law say it’s hard to enforce. However, cities and counties in South Carolina with antitexting laws have already issued hundreds of tickets. Additionally, once a law is passed, most law-abiding drivers who text today will refrain. Opponents also believe that the government shouldn’t tell people what to do behind the wheel. Is it an individual’s right to endanger others on public roads? Traffic laws are designed to protect the driving public, not defend individual choices that risk lives. We see the effects of texting while driving every day: drivers in front of us weaving out of their lane, cars stopping short or running through red lights while drivers are looking down, or the horrific T-bone accidents, rear-end collisions and highway run-offs that have prematurely ended too many lives. It’s time for the Senate to pass an antitexting-while-driving bill. The evidence clearly favors it. Why would South Carolina, with its deadly traffic safety record, want to be the last state in the country to pass such a law? David E. Parsons is President and CEO of AAA Carolinas.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL NEWS

The Handlebar to close Legendary music venue plans September reopening elsewhere SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com

wit, Debtor’s parking arrangement with an adjacent business was cancelled and Debtor is unable to find suitable parking nearby to enable it to continue conducting business at its present location.” Tremonti says Jeter and Laughlin owe him and the other two partners two years of unpaid rent and the move is to try to avoid paying that. Tremonti also told the Journal that the Stone Avenue property already has a buyer and is currently under contract. Regardless of the outcome in court, Jeter said he and Laughlin are “not new to moving” and remain committed to bringing the Handlebar back in a different venue. Jeter said he owns the Handlebar trademark in South Carolina and he and Laughlin will open the new location under the Handlebar name without their previous partners. The Handlebar opened in a former auto-body shop on Stone Avenue in spring of 2001, following a nine-month hiatus after leaving its first location, a 100-year-old textile mill on Mills Avenue, a sprawling building now converted to condominiums, Jeter noted. “When we first moved into Mills Avenue it was a pretty creepy place, but it became the vanguard of that whole corridor,” he said. The same transformation happened at the Stone Avenue location, and “wherever we end up, we’ll blow that place too.” Besides the impact on its fans, the closing of The Handlebar has created a conundrum for the two mainstay events at The Handlebar: Gene Dillard’s Blue Grass Jam and Paul and Ansley Hoke’s Swing Dance. The Hokes have hosted swing dance parties every Tuesday at the venue for the past 15 years.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

The Handlebar, a concert venue known for attracting both local and national musicians, announced earlier this week via Facebook and its website that it will be clos- Jeter ing its location at 304 E. Stone Ave. on April 30. Monday’s website post said the listening room, pub and café will re-open Sept.15 in an undisclosed new location. The post, which was addressed “to Handlebar Friends” and unsigned, said “between now and then, The Handlebar plans to pack so much talent and fun into its schedule that people will be talking about it until the unveiling of a new Handlebar.” Speculation swirled earlier this week on the reason for the closing. Co-owners John Jeter and wife Kathy Laughlin, who own 40 percent of The Handlebar, and partners John Egan, Charles Tremonti and Joseph Sorrentino who own the remaining 60 percent, have been embroiled in disputes over rent and bills being paid since the Handlebar entered into Chapter 11 bankruptcy in December 2013. Tremonti, Egan and Sorrentino own a majority stake in Mauldin Investments LLC, the entity that owns the property at 304 East Stone Ave. On March 25, the day after the closing announcement appeared, a stay was lifted as part of the bankruptcy proceedings to allow Tremonti, Egan and Sorrentino to proceed with “an eviction action regarding the principal place of The Handlebar will be closed on April 30. business of the Debtor (Handlebar Enterprises),” accord“We were there every week for 15 ing to court documents. years and everybody knew we were goCourt documents also state that “the ing to be there,” said Paul Hoke, adddebtor initially intended to assume the ing he wishes the couple well. They commercial lease with Mauldin; howev- “worked on a handshake for 15 years er circumstances have changed such that and I think they bent over backwards it is now in Debtor’s best interest to re- to help dancers in the Upstate and ject the lease and vacate the property. To keep the cover charge low.”

What’s Right in Health Care Right Care, Right Place, Right Time GHS has four MD360® locations to meet your non-emergent medical needs during the day, at night and on weekends. Sites are staffed by boardcertified doctors committed to delivering the highest quality of medical care. Visit ghsMD360.org to find the location nearest you. Quiet Time Baptist Easley Hospital, of which GHS is a 50 percent owner, has implemented a hospital-wide quiet time between 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Quiet Time is designed to promote optimal healing. Clemson Team a Finalist in Worldwide Cancer Challenge A Clemson University team made up of bioengineering and business administration students, as well as GHS surgical oncologist Brian McKinley, MD, was named a finalist in a worldwide breast cancer start-up challenge put on by the Avon Foundation, National Cancer Institute and The Center for Advancing Innovation. The team created a business plan for an invention that provides a new approach to tissue regeneration following breast cancer surgery that could change the way doctors treat the disease. Did You Know? Did you know that more than 5,000 students are educated each year at GHS? In fact, if GHS were a traditional college or university, it would be among the largest in the state! Visit blog.ghs.org to learn more about academics at GHS and to obtain important health information on topics ranging from cancer and heart disease to infertility and influenza.

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MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 7


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Hungry for access City rules and parking restrictions make many food trucks feel unwelcome downtown Control (DHEC) food inspection report showing a posted grade. The designated areas provide quality loFinding a good place to park downtown cations for food vendors, but the varying has become a persistent issue for business hours of operation place a limit on business owners in Greenville’s food truck industry. expectations, said David Allen, owner of With the city’s new food truck ordinance ap- The Chuck Truck. “We need to have spots that allow service proaching a year old, many food truck owners say they still feel unwelcome in the city center. without any time frame,” he said. Henry’s Smokehouse’s food truck operator While the city ordinance provides reBo Wilder agreed, saying mobile food venserved parking areas for food trucks, Thoroughfare Food Truck owner Neil dors have been relegated to the low-traffic arBarley said the locations prohibit food eas of downtown and aren’t allowed to place signs in high-traffic locations to alert the pubtruck vendors’ prosperity. “In my opinion, the downtown area is lic where they are operating. “The future of the food truck industry in against food trucks,” he said. Before last summer, mobile food vendors Greenville is hampered by the limitations were not allowed to operate in the downtown downtown,” he said. Other restaurateurs are more forgiving, City zoning coordinator Kim Jones said saying with certain restrictions in place, business district. The ordinance City Council approved last June lifted that ban, but limited placing temporary snipe signs along the the food truck industry can bring an added the trucks’ operations to either four reserved street front is prohibited in the city of flavor to Greenville’s downtown scene. parking areas or private property no closer Greenville for any business. A “snipe sign” If stationed correctly, food trucks can help is a sign of any size or mate- create a diversity needed in the hub of the than 250 feet from an open rial attached to trees, poles city, said Table 301 President Carl Sobocinski. restaurant, unless the food or other objects that provendor has signed documenA $50 fine “Although I am concerned about food motes advertising material trucks parking too close to restaurants, I can tation from the restaurant can be incurred for parking in the designated space of not applicable to the prem- see a place for them downtown,” he said. owner stating no objection to a food vendor during closer proximity. ises in which it is located. City Councilman David Sudduth said operating hours. Vendors are allowed on The zoning ordinance finding a profitable coexistence for both is public property or rights-ofstates food truck owners also the city’s aim. “We are trying to strike a way only for permitted speApproximately can apply for a temporary balance between the two,” he said. cial events. eight tickets permit to display one A- Greenville’s limits are comparable to those Although food truck ownframe sign near their truck imposed in cities like Asheville and Raleigh, have been issued since ers weren’t included on the location on private prop- N.C., where food trucks are established and the ordinance was passed, task force that came up with erty, but not in the right of plentiful. Asheville allows food carts vendaccording to Dennis Garrett, the first draft, representaway, she said. ing prepackaged foods in its central business Greenville’s manager of tives of the industry had Former Neue South- district, but limits food trucks (four at a time) parking services. input in the final ordinance, ern Food Truck owners in to one parking lot adjacent to the downcity officials say. Greenville, Graham Foster town bus terminal. In Raleigh, food trucks “Food truck owners were included in the and Lauren Zanardelli, gave up and left, mov- may conduct sales on public streets only for process,” said Jodie Dudash, Greenville’s ing their mobile food business to Portland, special city festivals, and operate on private revenue administrator. The final ordinance Ore., after selling their food truck to local res- property downtown up to 20 days a year at a reflected the city’s effort to promote growth taurant owners Aaron and Justi Manter. 150-foot distance from private dwellings and of the food truck industry within the context “As owners of The Owl restaurant, we 100 feet from the front door of a restaurant. of the community, Dudash said. Asheville City Councilman Cecil Bothsaw an opportunity to enter the mobile The city staff spent several days search- food market, but operating downtown well said in spite of the limitations, food ing its downtown for prime food truck op- seems very restrictive,” Aaron Manter said. trucks in downtown Asheville seem to be erating locations, said Angie Prosser, direcOn the other side of the divide, brick-and- fairly popular. tor of public information and events. mortar restaurants often The ultimate choices were Falls Street at resent the competition Camperdown Way, East Camperdown Way, food trucks represent. the Rhett Street surface lot, and Spring Street Alan Fields, manager FOOD TRUCK TIMES OF OPERATION: at East North Street. The four designated ar- at Wild Wing Café, said • Fall Street at Camperdown Way: Mon-Sun, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Fri-Sun, 5:30-10 p.m. eas are ideal for food vendors because the open there is a consensus • East Camperdown Way: space along Main Street could not accommo- among downtown resMon-Sun, 5:30-10 p.m.; Sat-Sun, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. date such a service, Prosser said. taurants that it is unfair • Rhett Street surface lot: Mon-Sun 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Mobile food vendors are allowed to op- for food trucks to park (vendors are not required to pay parking fee at this location) erate in those areas at specific, posted in prime locations of the times, and must first secure a city decal city’s center. Brick-and- • Spring and East North streets: Mon-Sun 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5:30-10 p.m. permit specific to the vendor and vehicle, mortar restaurants have and prominently display a South Carolina to pay a steep price for a Department of Health and Environmental spot downtown, he said. JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com

8 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014


JOURNAL NEWS

Conestee Mill added to National Historic Register APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

bit Trail. Several developers have expressed interest in converting the mill to housing, mixed-use developments or office space, she said, and the announcement of the historic designation has sparked renewed interest. Converting the mill to housing would be especially attractive to employees who work at the multiple companies at SCTAC, said Doug Webster, senior associate at CBRE. The Conestee Mill is offered for sale for $1.8 million. Approximately 500 people now live in the village of Conestee that grew up around the mill, which operated until 1971. Greenville County planners have

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Bordered by Lake Conestee Nature Park and the SC Technology Aviation Center (SCTAC), the village of Conestee could see another step on the road to renewal with the addition of Conestee Mill to the National Register of Historic Places this month. The mill, which dates back to roughly 1876, was and still is the “heart of the community,” said Greenville County Planner Eric Vinson. A developer who was looking at renovating the mill building had already started the application process for National Register recognition, but the submission was incomplete, Vinson said. In early March, the application was approved after the county assisted with the stalled nomination, filling in informational gaps. “The mill and its history are a source of pride in the community,” he said. “It now gets some welldeserved notoriety.” In addition to the 1 0 5 , 0 0 0 - s q u a r e - f o o t The historic Conestee Mill and dam. mill, the designation includes the company store (circa 1919), Conestee Dam (circa identified the area as one in the county 1892) and Conestee Lake. The mill is that needs investment and growth. In of historical significance due to its role early 2013, Greenville County Counin the area’s textile industry and textile cil approved a Conestee Community manufacturing growth in the late 19th Plan, which outlines seven areas for century. improvement, including the Village A developer interested in rehabili- Center area, which encompasses the tating the mill could qualify for tax mill. credits for the project, Vinson said. Short-term projects have included Hy Brand, owner of the mill for 39 welcome signage, landscaping and years, said the historic designation is the planting of more than 100 trees in a step in a process of renewal that has partnership with TreesGreenville and spanned many years. Palmetto Pride, said Vinson. “It makes “What the Lord put here was beau- people want to be more engaged and tiful, but mankind messed it up a build community pride.” If the mill is bit,” Brand said. Noting the lake and rehabilitated, it can be a catalyst for nearby Lake Conestee Nature Park, he economic renewal in Conestee, he added, “I think we have the making of said. the Central Park of the South.” In addition to the mill, Conestee’s The Historic Register designation McBee Methodist Church, an octago“will help not just the mill, but the en- nal church constructed circa 1842, is tire village of Conestee,” Brand said. on the National Register of Historic Shelby Dodson of CBRE, listing bro- Places. A historic marker was installed ker for the mill property, said the mill recently, said Brand, and gateway sigis located in a unique area near Lake nage is welcoming visitors. Conestee Nature Park and SCTAC “I want to see this place become with access to the GHS Swamp Rab- something – and it will,” Brand said.

Physician News GHS welcomes these new doctors & sites! Doctors’ Day is March 30. In appreciation for all that our physicians do to fulfill GHS’ mission—heal compassionately, teach innovatively, improve constantly—we extend our thanks! Family Medicine Telicia Allen, MD Keystone Family Medicine Simpsonville, 454-5000 Philip Way, MD Riverside Family Medicine–Eastside Greenville, 454-2700 Hand Surgery Timothy Brown, MD Timothy Dew, MD S. John Millon, MD M. Jason Palmer, MD L. Edwin Rudisill, MD John Sanders, MD The Hand Center Greenville, 242-HAND (4263) Neurosurgery Sharon Webb, MD Southeastern Neurosurgical & Spine Institute Greenville, 797-7150

Obstetrics & Gynecology Adam Tyson, MD OB/GYN Center Greenville, 455-8897 Plastic Surgery John W. Culpepper, MD Plastic Surgery & Aesthetics Greenville, 454-4570 NEW OFFICE SITES Gastroenterology 890 W. Faris Rd., Ste. 100 Greenville, 455-2888 General Surgery 333 S. Pine St. Spartanburg, 591-1664 Vascular Health Alliance 340 Medical Pkwy., Ste. 200 Greer, 797-9400 PRACTICE NAME CHANGE GHS Outpatient Radiology Greenville Radiology at 1210 W. Faris Rd. is now called GHS Outpatient Radiology.

ghs.org 14-21368844GJ

MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 9


JOURNAL NEWS

State-of-the-arts New CCES Performing Arts Center gives program needed space CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com A new $10.5 million Performing Arts Center planned for the Christ Church Episcopal School campus will serve two needs for the school’s growing music and drama programs. It will give the programs much needed space. But, perhaps more importantly, the new facility will send the message to students that their talents in the band, chorus or on stage are just as important as their talents in the classroom or on the athletic field, said David Sims, the school’s director of arts. “This facility will help the overall morale of the arts program in general,” Sims said. “It will send a message that the arts are just as important as anything else at the school.” The Performing Arts Center is the capstone project for the school’s Faith

10 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

in the Future campaign, a five-year effort that has produced significant upgrades to the private school’s athletic and academic facilities and created a new program for students. The school has generated approximately $6 million of the $7 million necessary to begin construction in June. “In recent years, CCES has been able to claim a position of excellence in academics and athletics,” said Kathryn Norwood, chair of the PAC committee. “It is time as a school community to give our arts program every opportunity to be just as successful.” The 37,000-square-foot Performing Arts Center will include a 600-seat theater with an orchestra pit, five practice rooms, a music room for Lower School students, a “drum pad,” classrooms for band and orchestra, a shop for the drama program to build sets and an expanded lobby that will give the school’s visual arts program another space in which to exhibit students’ work. The school’s 41-year-old auditorium will be torn down this summer. The Performing Arts Center will take its place. Construction is expected to last about a year and school officials hope the new

facility is completed for the start of the 2015-16 school year. While construction is going on, the school’s music and drama programs will hold performances and concerts elsewhere in the Greenville area, including Powdersville High and the Peace Center, Sims said. “We’re going to be performing elsewhere for a year, but it will be worth it,” he said. The school started an instrumental music program six years ago and the program is growing. Last year, the school started a mandatory music program in the fifth grade that requires students to choose an instrument and play it for a year. That program has already almost doubled the number of band students in the later grades, Sims said. “Sometimes it’s a matter of exposure,”

he said. In addition to the music program, the school’s drama program should benefit greatly from the new facility, Sims said. The school’s visual arts program won’t be getting any new classroom space, but a lobby that is triple the size of the current auditorium’s lobby will give the program a new space for exhibits, he said. Sims said he expects additional growth in the school’s fine arts program after construction is completed. “Once it’s built, I think the programs will get bigger and bigger,” he said. While the new facility will primarily serve CCES’ 1,150 students, the school will also offer the facility as a performing venue for the community, Sims said. McMillan Pazdan Smith is the architect and Triangle Construction is the contractor.


JOURNAL NEWS

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JOURNAL NEWS

Room to grow New facility will double A Child’s Haven’s therapeutic space CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

In real life, superheroes wear white coats. Happy Doctors’ Day to all of the hardworking physicians who provide outstanding care to their patients. We are grateful for all of your sacrifices and for your commitment to the health of our community. On March 30th, join us by saying thank you to a doctor who has made a difference in your life!

Sponsored by the Greenville County Medical Society Alliance

12 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

A new 25,000-square-foot facility under construction at the site where the old Armstrong Elementary School once stood will allow A Child’s Haven to double the number of children the nonprofit serves and minister to infants for the first time. A Child’s Haven is the county’s only comprehensive treatment program for young children who have social and emotional development delays or behavioral issues due to poverty, abuse and unintentional neglect. Fifty-one children aged two to five receive services at A Child’s Haven’s current facility on Rutherford Road. Satellite programs offered at the Riley Child Development Center and three Head Start facilities serve another 27 children. But that’s only a fraction of the children who need help. The Rutherford Road location does not allow for programs for children aged birth through two because the classrooms don’t have entrances leading outdoors as building codes require. The new facility will have space for a dozen infants and toddlers, said Debbie Roach, A Child’s Haven’s executive director. “Research shows that the sooner you can work with a child and their family, the better off they are,” Roach said. She said when the nonprofit works with a child and family simultaneously, younger siblings often benefit and similar developmental delays are avoided. Some of the children served by A Child’s Haven’s programs have been previously dismissed from preschool or kindergarten programs due to developmental or behavioral issues, Roach said.

Once in the program, 90 percent of children meet three-quarters of their developmental objectives. Ninety-six percent of children who go through the program are enrolled in mainstream classrooms, Roach said. A Child’s Haven takes a threepronged approach – a daily classroom setting led by teachers with experience in therapeutic interventions, intensive in-home guidance led by licensed counselors and parenting classes. “The first years of a child’s life are so critical,” Roach said. Plans originally called for the old Armstrong Elementary to be renovated. But further study found that the 45,000-square-foot school would be too big and it would be more cost-efficient and sustainable to tear the school down and build a new 25,000-squarefoot facility. The new facility at 20 Martin Drive will have a capacity of 100 students, Roach said. It will include a conference room, two therapy rooms, a large multipurpose room that can be divided, teacher workrooms and office space. More than half of Greenville County’s children under six who live in poverty live within a seven-mile radius of the site. “It is still one of the most underserved areas in Greenville,” Roach said. Construction should be completed in September. A Child’s Haven has raised all but $200,000 of the $5.5 million needed for construction and an endowment. The agency is selling personalized brick pavers to raise the rest of the money. The pavers are $100 and can include up to three lines of type. For an additional $25, a logo or monogram can be included. An online order form is available at achildshaven.org/our-campaign. The bricks will be installed as the facility, known as the Laura Kathleen Dobson building at the Tunky Riley Campus, is completed.


JOURNAL NEWS

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JOURNAL NEWS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

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jputnam@communityjournals.com Journalists at the Greenville Journal, Upstate Business Journal and TOWN magazine earned 15 awards Saturday at the annual meeting of the South Carolina Press Association in Columbia. The honors included four

first-place winners, three second-place winners, six third-place awards and two honorable mentions. As the recipient of four of the 15 awards, photographer Greg Beckner won first place in the Feature Photo (weekly over 6,000 division) for “Construction worker welds,” a feature photo of a construction worker at

New for 2014:

Inaugural Walk For Prevention On March 30th at 2:00pm, the inaugural 1.5 mile

Look for the Project Pinwheel Special Insert in next week’s Journal. APRIL IS PREVENT CHILD ABUSE MONTH

Project Pinwheel Walk for Prevention will take place. An expected 300 participants will meet at First Baptist Greenville and walk down the Swamp Rabbit Trail with pinwheels to the Julie Valentine Statue in Cleveland Park. Once the walkers arrive, everyone will plant pinwheels in one of South Carolina’s largest pinwheel gardens. Brought to you by: Augusta Heights Baptist Church, First Baptist Greenville, and Chick-Fil-A Pelham Road

Join us for the walk, plant pinwheels in Cleveland Park, stay for family friendly activities and snacks.

Visit ProjectPinwheel.com to see more details on the Walk for Prevention and to make a donation. 14 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014


JOURNAL NEWS

Greenville is contender for Best U.S. Cycling Town SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com Greenville is once again vying for a “best” award. This time it’s for the Best U.S. Cycling Town in the 10Best Readers’ Choice travel award contest sponsored by USA Today. “For our nominations, we went to none other than celebrated cyclist George Hincapie, a former world champion and national champion,” 10Best posted on its website. “He took into account the cycling cities he knows and loves; cities in which he’s competed; cities with conducive weather; cit-

& SELLING

ies generating great buzz in the cycling community; and the places attracting cyclists on a permanent basis.” Hincapie’s nominees include 20 cities across the country and are “a broad mix of Northern and Southern destinations: Some appeal more to competitive cyclists, while others draw recreational cyclists or mountain bikers.” The contest gives voters until noon Apr. 14 to vote. Participants are allowed one vote once per day, per category. Winners will be announced on Wednesday, April 16. Vote online at 10best.com/awards/ travel/best-u-s-cycling-town.

Equipping Seniors in selling, downsizing, and moving in 2014

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U.S. Cycling Town Nominees

Ann Arbor, Mich. Asheville, N.C. Austin, Texas Bend, Ore. Boulder, Colo. Chattanooga, Tenn. Davis, Calif.

Durango, Colo. Fort Collins, Colo. Gainesville, Fla. Greenville, S.C. Madison, Wis. Malibu, Calif. Minneapolis, Minn.

ONE, and third place in the same category for his “Perry Earle” photo; as well as first place in Humorous Photo (weekly over 6,000 and 2-3 times division) for “Petunia gets a bath” and third place in the Pictorial (all-weekly division) category for “A thunderstorm lights up the night sky.” Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons took the second place Harris Award for Editorial Writing for her body of work and an honorable mention in the Editorial/Column in Support of FOIA category for her March 18, 2013, Greenville Journal editorial, “Call out the hypocrites.” Creative design lead and UBJ art director Kristy Adair won first place in the Single Page One Design (weekly over 6,000 division) category for the Upstate Business Journal’s Dec. 21, 2012, issue “The Business of Brew.” She also won an honorable mention for her Page One design for the Greenville Journal’s July 26, 2013, issue “The ‘Frankenfood’ debate.” TOWN won second place for its November 2013 issue in the Feature Specialty Publication or Magazine category; and the Upstate Business

Moab, Utah Park City, Utah Portland, Ore. Sacramento, Calif. Seattle, Wash. Tucson, Ariz.

Journal won third place for its Sept. 27, 2013, issue of “The Business of Obamacare” in the News Special Edition or Section category. Single award recipients include: first place in the Short Story category (weekly over 6,000 division) to staff writer April A. Morris for her March 15, 2013 Upstate Business Journal article, “Cafe Blends brings warm cuppa to Lexus dealership”; third place in Feature Headline Writing (all-weekly division) to Managing Editor Jerry Salley for “Fear and clothing in the Upstate”; “Spirits of the Dark Corner”; and “The beagle has landed”; third place in Business Reporting (all-weekly division) to senior business writer Jennifer Oladipo; third place in Spot News Reporting (weekly over 6,000 division) to staff writer Cindy Landrum for her July 12, 2013, Greenville Journal article, “There are no words, no answers”; and second place in Lifestyle Feature Writing (weekly over 6,000 division) to contributing writer Leigh Savage for her March 1, 2013, Greenville Journal article, “Biking for Everyone.”

Retirement is a new and exciting chapter; however at Cascades Verdae, we understand it can be a difficult transition. Moving from your home or downsizing can seem daunting, but there are many resources available to help ease the stress. We invite you to attend a FREE Moving and Selling Symposium on Wednesday, April 2nd at 10:00 AM. If you are looking to take the next step to downsize or relocate, this event is for you. Topics will include: • • • •

Market Analysis of Greenville, SC - National Market Specialist Selling & Relocating - Successful Realtors Downsizing & Organizing - Professional Organizer/Moving Manager Our Moving Experience - Cascades Member Panel

Guests will have the opportunity to ask the Experts pertinent questions! Even if you are only beginning the process to sell your home or downsize, this symposium is an excellent resource to start planning for your future.

To enroll in this free seminar, call 864-528-5507 or register online at www.Cascades-Verdae.com. Space is limited, please call today. 10 Fountainview terrace Greenville, Sc 29607 caScadeS-verdae.com Independent LIvIng • AssIsted LIvIng • ALzheImer’s CAre skILLed nursIng • WeLLness MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 15


JOURNAL NEWS

Med school head endows scholarship Youkey announces funds to attract top students APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Dr. Jerry Youkey, dean of the University of South Carolina (USC) School of Medicine Greenville, and his wife, Sharon, have established a scholarship fund for the fledg- Youkey ing medical school that the couple announced last week at the school’s Experience the Dream fundraiser. The Youkeys created an $800,000 scholarship fund that will support the education of five physicians over its course. The Experience the Dream event also raised $572,000 for the school. “As one of the nation’s newest med schools, we do what we can to help ‘seal the deal’ with the best of our applicants,” said Youkey. “We have their attention, but closure depends on our ability to offer them competitive scholarship support. And we won’t have loyal committed alumni able to help for at least another two or three decades.” Youkey, who helped with the development of the Upstate medical school, said he recalls working three jobs to pay for school as a medical student four decades ago, and costs have only increased. USC and Greenville Health System, where the school is based, have set aside 10 percent of tuition funds for scholarships. In addition, The Charles D. Walters Family Foundation and James T. Pearce Sr. and late wife Ellis “Kit” Pearce gave $1 million gifts in early fundraising. The school accepted its first class in 2012 and applications have increased each year. According to GHS, more than 2,700 students have applied for the 75 spots in the incoming class. “We must be competitive – or, despite the incredible facilities, the awesome technology and the extraordinary education and training we offer, we will not be the first choice of the most desirable applicants,” Youkey said.

16 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014


JOURNAL NEWS

THE BLOTTER BY SHERRY JACKSON

Fredrick Robert Kissling, Greenville County resident and owner of Dixie’s Tavern, was arrested on March 20, 2014, and charged with eight counts of tax evasion. SC Department of Revenue officials charged Kissling, 60, with four counts of evading payments on gross sales tax and four counts of evading payments on liquor by the drink excise tax.  Kissling could face a fine of $80,000 or 40 years of imprisonment or both.  For tax years 2009 through 2012, Kissling is accused of underreporting gross sales on his monthly sales tax returns and gross sales on his liquor by the drink tax returns, documents show. Kissling reportedly evaded payments totaling $80,252 of sales tax and liquor by the drink tax for tax years 2009 through 2012, documents show. Kissling is being held at the Greenville County Detention Center. Investigators with the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office Homicide Unit have charged Sylvester Keejaun King, 45, with murder and possession of a weapon during the commission of a violent crime.  Documents show an investigation led deputies to believe that King stabbed Janice Hackett, resulting in her death at her home on Rangeview Circle, off White Horse Road in Greenville.  King has not yet been taken into custody, and the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office is seeking the media and public’s assistance in locating him. He is believed to be in the Charlotte, NC area. Anyone with information regarding King’s whereabouts is asked to contact Crime Stoppers at 23-CRIME. Garrett Esser of Mauldin recently received $732,000 in a settlement with a trucking company for a 2011 accident in Abbeville County.

Birds are Scouting for Nests!

According to court documents, Esser was driving his 2001 Nissan on Highway 28 in Abbeville in the early morning of June 30, 2011, looking for a friend’s house on Lake Secession, when a semi-truck started passing him on the twolane road. He reportedly began a left-hand turn and a collision occurred. A dispute arose as to which party was at fault for making an improper lane change. Esser was transported to AnMed Medical Health Center in Anderson by helicopter. He suffered severe brain trauma and injury, documents show. Between March 22, 2014 and March 24, 2014, the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office received reports of six armed robberies in Simpsonville and Greenville. In all of these incidents, the victims reported they were approached by individuals armed with handguns. The suspects stole handbags, credit cards, cash and other items, according to the Sheriff ’s report. Two suspects are now in custody. Ian Derrick-James Kinlow, 21, has been arrested and charged with five counts of armed robbery, five counts of conspiracy and one count Kinlow of assault and battery first degree. Donald Lamar Burton, 24, has been arrested and charged with six counts of armed robbery, six counts of conspiracy and two counts of assault and battery first degree Warrants have been issued for one additional subject, Nicholas Kendrick Williams, 19, wanted on five counts of armed robbery, six counts of conspiracy and three counts of assault and battery first degree. Investigators ask that anyone with information regard- Williams ing his whereabouts contact Crime Stoppers at 23-CRIME.

Excellence Has A New Name. Pelham Medical Center Village Hospital is no longer just a hospital. It is a hospital that is now accompanied by the Gibbs Cancer Center & Research Institute and the physicians of the Medical Group of the Carolinas. As a result, the hospital name is being changed to better unify all of the programs and services now available on the campus. For more information, call 864.530.6000.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Village Hospital renamed Pelham Medical Center Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System announced this week that Greer’s Village Hospital will now be known as Pelham Medical Center. Announced Monday, Spartanburg Regional officials said the change is due to new services on the site, including the Gibbs Cancer Center and Research Institute and the Medical Group of the Carolinas (formerly Spartanburg Regional Physician Group), a group of general care and specialist physicians. “As a part of Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, this campus is a part of larger system. When we work as a team, we’re able to provide a full spectrum of services to our patients, not just in Greer, but also across the Upstate,” said Anthony Kouskolekas, president of Pelham Medical Center. Located off Highway 14 in Greer, Pelham Medical Center opened in 2008 and offers emergency care, primary physician care, surgical facilities, imaging and a cancer center. Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System also operates a 540-bed facility in Spartanburg.

Walk with the Docs

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The Greenville Free Medical Clinic will hold its annual Walk with the Docs on March 29, 9 a.m., to raise funds for the clinic, which serves more than 4,000 patients in need with medical and dental care. The walk begins at the clinic, 600 Arlington Avenue, Greenville. Onsite registration begins at 8:30 a.m. For information, call 232-1470. To register and donate, visit greenvillefreeclinic.org. Les Beaux Art Gallery, 1239 Pendleton St., Greenville, will offer children’s art classes taught by artist Esther Rivas on Saturdays in April, noon-2 p.m. Cost will be $25 per class, which will include all materials. For information or to reserve a spot, contact Esther Rivas at esthercreations.rivas@gmail.com. The Blood Connection will hold an art reception for Laura K. Aiken’s exhibit April 1, 5:30-7 p.m., at 435 Woodruff Road. Aiken’s mosaic jewelry will be on display through May 15. For information, call 751-3031.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH

A life of

SERVICE

Pearlie Harris went from plantation tenant to chairwoman’s seat APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

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Inset: A mobile mammography coach from the Pearlie Harris Center for Breast Health at St. Francis.

Pearlie Mae Suber Harris has traveled a long road from living on a plantation in North Carolina to longtime educator and honored volunteer. Harris sat down in her Mauldin home to talk about growing up a pastor’s daughter and taking over household duties at a young age. Born in 1936, Harris was one of four children, the only girl and daughter of Samuel Lester Suber, pastor of St. Matthew Baptist Church. She was born in Hendersonville, and the family also lived in Flat Rock, N.C., and Saluda, where Harris had to walk to school. “The kids from the white school always ‘rocked’ us; my father told us we couldn’t throw rocks back,” she said. Even if you were treated badly, you treat the other person nicely, she says he told them. Harris speaks frankly about growing up in the segregated South. “We lived in colored town … and then we were Negros, we were monkeys and coons,” she said. She recalled a near miss that almost got her brothers into trouble in a store with water fountains marked “colored” and “white.”

“I drank out of the one that said ‘white’ and that’s when a man came over and said, ‘You darkies get out of here.’ I drank out of that fountain because I thought the water in the other was colored,” she said.

FAITH INTO PRACTICE Harris said her father’s example and teaching had great influence on her. He put his faith into practice, sharing what the family did have. “We had a long front porch and we used to feed the chain gang from that porch. I asked why we did that and he said, ‘They’re God’s children, too.’” When she was 10 years old, Harris’ mother, Blandena Hawkins Suber, became very ill. As the only other woman of the house, Pearlie took over the cooking, cleaning and other chores. “I stayed home on Mondays and Fridays from school. On Mondays, I washed and ironed. On Friday, I got everything ready for the weekend until the truant officer came and picked me up. I was in no shape to be in school because I was worried about my mother eating for the rest of the day … even then, I was a worrier,” she said. HARRIS continued on PAGE 20

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY HARRIS continued from PAGE 19

At about 12 years old, Pearlie began taking care of the children of the Ogden family, also cooking for another family every day. The Harrises also lived close to Carl Sandburg’s house. “I grew up with his daughters and played with them every Wednesday,” she said. When Harris graduated high school at age 16 in 1953, she attended Barber-Scotia College in Concord, N.C. With few career opportunities open to black women at the time, she had heard a family friend talking about a daughter going off to be a trained nurse, which she misheard as “train nurse.” “In my head, I thought the train nurse had the opportunity to ride on the train all the time. I thought I would love to do that,” she laughed. She opted to be an elementary school teacher instead, later attending Furman University for a master’s degree. Enrolling in college didn’t end Harris’ domestic service, however. After her freshman year, she began to work for the Simpson family, of Belk Simpson department store renown, doing all the household chores. “You know that book ‘The Help?’ That was me,” she said. She had to use the outdoor bathroom and slept in a damp basement, adding that her clothes always “smelled awful” – memories she recalls candidly and without anger. She also recounts how the Simpson family told her they had something for

her to use at college, which she thought would be a much-needed winter coat, but turned out to be her favorite car: a 1951 Cadillac Fleetwood. After graduation, Harris began her teaching career in 1957 in Beaufort, S.C., where she met James L. Harris, master gunnery sergeant in the Marine Corps. The couple married in 1961 and son Anthony Lewis was born in 1962. Their other son, Llewellyn James, was born in 1963. The family moved to Greenville, where Harris taught elementary grades and in the gifted program. One of her favorite grades to teach was third, she said. “They’ll do anything for you and they love to learn.” She taught handwriting and until retirement, required her students to use fountain pens, purchasing them for each student. Her husband passed away in 1987, and Harris still lives in the Mauldin home that they bought in 1971.

A NEW JOURNEY After her 1994 retirement, Harris embarked on a different focus: volunteering. “This was a journey I never thought about taking. I didn’t know what I was going to do after I retired, but I knew I wasn’t going to sit around,” she said. Her volunteer work started in a surprising way. While her children attended St. Mary’s Catholic School, she sang in the church choir and was lector. There she

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was introduced to Sam Francis, who invited her to meet him out in front of St. Francis Hospital one day. She agreed, and Francis introduced her to the hospital’s volunteer director. “You’re going to volunteer,” Harris said he told her, “and I said, ‘I am?’ They put me to work that very day.” She worked the front desk and also did work for St. Mary’s fundraisers. “When Sam asked you for something, you did it,” she said. By 1996, Harris began serving on the St. Francis Internal Review Board (IRB). Four years later, she became a board member and then was elected chair of the 18-member group, the first woman and African-American to hold the post. She called it a “big shock,” but a friend reminded her that she had managed the more than 30-person Mardi Gras board for St. Mary’s. Harris said many people supported her and helped move her toward that next step in service. To date, she’s served on nearly 20 boards. In 2011, the Pearlie Harris Center for Breast Health at St. Francis was named in her honor. Harris said it made her proud when someone told her, “‘I’m so glad these people want you for who you are and not the money you have.’”

Photos Provided

BEST ADVICE: Harris’ parents gave her the best advice, in rhyming form, she said. “Whether a task is large or small, do it well or not at all,” and “True friends are like diamonds, precious and rare. False friends like oak leaves, found everywhere.”

PLAYING WITH THE BOYS: In

elementary school, Harris loved to play marbles with the boys, and still loves marbles to this day. However, when she came home with the spoils of victory – a lunch pail brimming with the glass orbs – her father made her return the winnings.

Assessing the reward is simple, she said. “How does it look? What does it feel like? Did you make any progress? Did you touch somebody’s life? The giving that you gave, did it mean something for somebody else and not for you?” From once being called “Ugly Pearlie” in school, Harris is comfortable with who she has become. “I’m not concerned about what people think about me. It’s not my business what they think about me. My greatest achievement was becoming me. I found myself.”


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7 days of brew Greenville to host first Craft Beer Week March 31-April 6 APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com By Joseph Fernandez

6th Grader at GREEN Charter School Mrs. Steverson Teacher

Being freshwater friendly helps the environment and saves our water. Like Thomas Fuller once said “We never know the worth of water till the well is dry.” If we don’t watch out our water could become polluted and we wouldn’t be able to use water like we do right now. Pet waste is a slight cause to pollution of water, as well as lawn fertilizers and washing your car on your driveway. Poop Etiquette Pet Waste is not what people usually talk about and they don’t think it is a major thing that pollutes the environment, though it does. Unscooped pet waste contains things such as nitrogen, phosphorous, fecal bacteria and parasites that can be washed down, by rain, into bodies of water. To keep the water clean please pick up your pets waste, like you are supposed to. Curb Control When washing your car with soap and water, getting all that dirt off of your car, the water is mixed with soap goes down your curb and down into the storm drains. Storm drains aren’t usually filtered, and is just deposited into the lakes, rivers and streams. To help not pollute lakes and rivers even more than they are polluted right now, use soap and cleaning products sparingly and use a hose with a trigger

22 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

nozzle. To not let most of the pollutants pollute our lakes and rivers wash your car on your lawn, the grass will filter the dirty water. Yard Savvy Lawn fertilizers do contain nitrogen and phosphorus and those two things are major pollutants. Those two pollutants lower oxygen in our waterways and they have a negative impact on aquatic life. Some people’s lawns don’t even need fertilizers, so test your lawn to see if it does need fertilizer. When buying fertilizer look for fertilizer with low concentration. The END? All these three things, pet waste, lawn fertilizer and car washes, pollute the water we take for granted. However you can help to save water by doing all the things that were talked about in the paragraphs before. I will be trying to do these things at my home. To get more information go toReWaOnline.org or BeFreshWaterFriendly.org. The 6th graders at the GREEN Charter School were invited to participate in a “Be Freshwater Friendly” essay contest sponsored by Renewable Water Resources. The content above is an excerpt from Joseph’s winning essay.

With multiple new breweries opening within the last year and brewery fixture Thomas Creek expanding its operations, the business of brew is doing well in the Upstate. To celebrate the impact of craft beer and introduce residents to the burgeoning movement, the first Greenville Craft Beer Week will offer up events that showcase beer styles, brew masters, local producers and purveyors daily from March 31 through April 6. Events range from a yoga workout followed by a pint and a beer brunch to a food truck rodeo and meet-the-brewer events. “Why not Greenville?” Brook Bristow said he and fellow craft beer enthusiast Vance Arthurs thought when talk of a craft brew week came up. Bristow, a lawyer who represents breweries, authored the bill that began last year’s state law allowing breweries to serve fullsized pints on premises. “Greenville has seen such growth in craft beer, we should have a week to celebrate,” he said. In addition to simply sampling the diverse brews, Greenville Craft Beer Week participants may attend educational events, including Beer School at Thomas Creek and a U.S. Craft Beer 101 seminar at the Growler Station. Bristow said the events are a chance to “knock down preconceptions about beer” and educate attendees about the growing popularity of craft beer. Several events will also involve cuisine and beer. “It’s not just wine that pairs well with food,” Bristow said. Though he will be attending most events, Bristow said he will definitely be present for the Quest Brewing and Terrapin Collaboration Beer Release on April 3, which also kicks off Quest’s weekly concert series. The inaugural Greenville Craft Beer Week is expected to not only draw in the locals, but hopefully garner attendees from Asheville, Columbia and Charleston, Bristow said. Organizers hope to make the brew celebration a yearly one.

MARCH 31 Upstate Beer Dinner, Trappe Door, $50 Hatha & Hops Yoga, Quest Brewing Co., $10 U.S. Craft Beer 101 Event, The Growler Station APRIL 1 Cask Night, Thomas Creek Brewery, $5 Rare Keg Growler Fills, Greenville Beer Exchange Quest & Terrapin Collaboration Release private tasting, Barley’s Taproom, $40 Stone Cask Enjoy by 4.20.14, Barley’s Taproom April 2 Game Night & Food Truck Rodeo, Brewery 85 Beer Dinner, American Grocery, $75 Randall Night, Quest Brewing, Co. April 3 Quest & Terrapin Collaboration Beer Release, Quest Brewing Co. Beer & Jerky Pairing, Greenville Beer Exchange Meet the Brewer with Thomas Creek & Beer Tasting, The Community Tap Founders Blow-Out, Barley’s Taproom APRIL 4 Home Brewing Competition, Grape and Grains Beer School, Crafted the Beer Store Oskar Blues Tap Takeover, Cork and Tap APRIL 5 The Community Tap Craft Beer Fest After Party, The Community Tap APRIL 6 Beer Brunch, The Bohemian APRIL 4-6 Let Your Taste Buds Wander with Sierra Nevada Weekend, Barley’s Taproom


Mill Village Farms expands, adds partners SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com Mill Village Farms, a local nonprofit organization that educates teens in basic job skills, sustainable agriculture, and entrepreneurship, announced this week new partnerships with The Farm at Rabon Creek and the Swamp Rabbit Café and a fundraiser with Tupelo Honey Café. Partnering with the Farm at Rabon Creek – an 80acre farm in Fountain Inn – will allow Mill Village Farms to expand to include livestock, special events, school field trips and a Farm Fresh Fair in September, said Dan Weidenbenner, Mill Village Farms director. The partnership will also allow for the budding organization to grow even more food and create opportunities for local area youth, he said. “Mill Village Farms’ partnership with Rabon Creek is really a game-changer for our organization,” Weidenbenner said. “It allows us to raise livestock, which will add beef, lamb and pork to our market. It also allows us to host special events and private parties for those wanting a casual farm party or wedding. Most importantly, it allows us to greatly expand our opportunities to teach and employ youth in the community. “ The Farm at Rabon Creek will also host a Tupelo Honey Café Farm Dinner on May 17, 2014, as a fundraiser for the organization. Tupelo Honey will be

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preparing scratch-made plates from their newly published cookbook, organizers said. The event will include live music, libations and transportation from downtown Greenville. Weidenbenner said the goal is to raise more than $10,000 to “help us grow tenfold. We hope to get 100 people to join at $100 per ticket to raise $10,000.” The funds will allow the organization to provide 10 more opportunities for youth to be a part of the next growing season. “100 percent of the ticket costs benefits Mill Village Farms,” he said. Mill Village Farms also announced that they will be partnering with Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery to expand their Good to Go Mobile Farmer’s Market to include freshly baked treats and local farm goods. The market will be traveling to various food-desert communities of Greenville on Saturdays and to Greer and Simpsonville communities on Wednesdays, he said. The schedule will be released in early May. Mill Village Farms began in 2012 in the Greater Sullivan neighborhood, just outside of downtown Greenville with a mission to transform communities through fresh foods and developing successful youth. The organization made a video to the tune of Pharrell Williams’s song “Happy,” which features “happy dances” from their newest farm animals and from special guests at Tupelo Honey Café, CertusBank and Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery. To see the video, visit Scenes from a video, set to “Happy” by Pharrell Williams, millvillagefarms.org/happy. celebrating Mill Village Farms’ new partnerships.

KILGORE FARMS

JUST LISTED • 413 KILGORE FARMS CIRCLE • $326,900 • MLS 1276145 Awesome all brick home in popular Kilgore Farms. This 4 bedroom, 3 full bath home boasts of 2 bedrooms and 2 full baths on the main floor. Wait till you see the Master suite with the sitting room, 2 walk in closets ( his and her closets) and a gorgeous master bath. This home has beautiful ceilings throughout to include coffered ceilings, double trey and cathedral ceilings. Beautiful wrought iron staircase. The builder paid a lot of attention to detail with

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the moldings and trim work. It is a 5 Star Energy Efficient Home. Sellers have installed new carpet in the master bedroom and bonus room and have also freshly painted the interior of the home. Granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, gas range with convection oven and a kitchen island make this kitchen a cook’s dream. Very open floor plan. Seller is willing to leave the Bose speakers in the Great Room. Owners have created a private backyard with the addition of mature Leland Cypress trees.

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Nature’s reward Wildflowers will color Upstate landscape now through October CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

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Devil’s Fork State Park is one of the prime locations for the Oconee Bell, which are found in only seven counties in the Carolinas and Georgia. The endangered species has a solitary white to pinkish bell-shaped flower and can be spotted in moist woods along streams. They bloom in mid-March until early April. The easiest place to see them is on the Oconee Bells Nature Trail, a one-mile loop trail in Devil’s Fork State Park in northern Oconee County.

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Located on Oak Grove Road in northern Greenville County, Chestnut Ridge Heritage Preserve is one of the best spring wildflower hikes in the Upstate. Several waterfalls just add to the attraction. The first mile of Chestnut Ridge, owned and managed by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, is an easy stroll through the woods. The second mile has a large display of toadshade trillium and bloodroot.

STATION COVE FALLS

In March, April and May, it is difficult to walk in Station Cove without stepping on a wildflower. The Station Cove Falls Trail begins near the Oconee Station State Historic Site off

PHOTOS BY CINDY LANDRUM PHOTOGRAPHY

SPRING OPEN HOUSE

Winter is reluctant to give up its grip on the Upstate, but the reward for surviving its stark gray days and cold temperatures is emerging in parts of the region in the familiar form of wildflowers. Spring ephemerals have begun their colorful show in the Upstate. The rarest of all – the Oconee Bells – are now in bloom and will disappear in early April. But others will take their place before giving way to showy flowering trees and shrubs in May and June and ending with a wash of goldenrods and asters in September and October. The Upstate has several prime wildflower locations – and if you don’t get your fill here, several more can be found within an hour’s drive of Greenville across the North Carolina border.

WILD GERANIUM

Near Saluda, N.C., Pearson’s Falls is one of the better short wildflower hikes within an hour’s drive of Greenville. The Tryon Garden Club purchased Pearson’s Falls and the surrounding glen in 1931. Wildflowers can be found from March until October, but midApril is best. The one-third mile path offers a delightful – and easy – hike to a scenic waterfall. Along the way, visitors are likely to see bloodroot, punctatum, Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Solomon’s seal, foamflower, trillium, sharp-lobed hepatica, sweet Betsy and American alumroot.

STEVENS CREEK HERITAGE PRESERVE

While it will take about an hour and half to get to the Stevens Creek Heritage Preserve from Greenville, it is well worth the trip, especially in the spring. The preserve, which is in McCormick County near Lake Thurmond in Modoc, is home to 15 rare plant species, including the Florida or Miccosukee gooseberry, a small, perennial shrub that is found only here and Lake Miccosukee in Florida and is listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The preserve, which is owned by the state Department of Natural Resources, is also home to Webster’s salamander, a secretive


The healing power of honey JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

With spring coming into full bloom, allergy season has arrived. However, before reaching for the antihistamines, allergy suffers may want to consider the benefits of local honey. “Many people use local honey to treat allergies,” said Tim Dover of the Carolina Honey Bee Company. “A lot of allergists are sending people to my store to buy local honey.” The allergists instruct patients to eat a spoonful of local honey every day to develop a tolerance for local allergens – the equivalent of getting an allergy shot a day, he said. Because of their physicians’ advice, Dover has customers who purchase honey from him and swear by it. Dover also recommends that his customers eat the honeycomb, which contains more pollen and helps build up the immune system to handle the local pollen. Charlotte Anderson of Carolina Honeybees Farm, a South Carolina master beekeeper for eight years, said some of her customers have found the same relief from seasonal allergies “even though there are no scientific studies to confirm it.” “I sincerely believe there is no magic number for how ‘local’ honey should be,” she said. “I would suggest that first and foremost the honey should be raw. Second, it should not have been overheated or over-filtered, so purchase

Honeybees at work.

from your local beekeeper rather than large stores.” Any raw honey that comes from an area “with the same blooming trees and plants that you have in your area should be fine, whether that area is two miles away or 100,” Anderson said. Besides treating seasonal allergies, both Dover and Anderson say that honey can serve as a natural healer for cuts, similar to Neosporin ointment. “In third-world countries, people would put it on cuts and scratches to treat it,” said Dover. Both he and Anderson have used honey to dress wounds. Dover said burn centers will use honey to help with wound healing, and there is a lot of use in Africa and the Caribbean to reduce scarring. For more information on the Carolina Honey Bee Company, visit carolinabeecompany.com. To learn more about the Carolina Honeybees Farm, visit carolinahoneybees.com.

dark brown, zigzag-striped salamander rare in South Carolina.

ASHMORE HERITAGE PRESERVE

Ashmore Heritage Preserve, off Persimmon Ridge Road between Jones Gap and Caesar’s Head state parks in Greenville County, is part of the Mountain Bridge Wilderness and is a must-see in the spring. It is home to rare plants such as Indian Paint Brush, grass of Parnassus and Piedmont ragwort. It is also home to a natural bog that contains orchids, sundews and ferns. The fire-dependent, and rare, turkeybeard grows on two of its pinedominated ridges.

BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY

The North Carolina section of the Blue Ridge Parkway is home to a wide variety of wildflowers that bloom from early spring all the way into October. The nice part is visitors don’t have to walk more than a few yards from the car. For those who want to be a bit

PHOTOS BY CINDY LANDRUM PHOTOGRAPHY

BLUE-EYED GRASS

more adventurous, the parkway offers several hikes worth the extra effort. The Price Lake trail in Julian Price Memorial Park is abundant with painted trillium the first half of May. The Tanawha trail beginning at the Linn Cove Visitor’s Center has turkeybeard and mountain laurel peaking in mid-June. In July and August, Frying Pan Mountain will give respite from the Upstate’s heat. Joe-Pye weed attracts hordes of butterflies, and a climb up the fire tower will yield an unobstructed 360-degree view.

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LEC 14 MHIO Advertorial.qxp_Layout 1 3/24/14 12:05 PM Page 1

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Laurens Electric offers golfers shot at $1 million “There have been a lot of changes since the creation of Laurens Electric Cooperative back in 1939, but one thing that has not changed is our commitment to the communities we serve,” said J. David Wasson, Jr., Laurens Electric Cooperative President and CEO.

Come to the Eagle Zone Golf Improvement Center on Pelham Road in Greenville Friday, April 25 & Saturday, April 26 for a chance to win $1 million in Laurens Electric Cooperative’s and Touchstone Energy’s® 12th Annual Hole In One Shootout. All proceeds from the event will benefit the co-op’s 75 Acts of Kindness community initiative. 10 players will qualify each day by being closest to the pin to compete in the finals, when participants have a chance of winning one million dollars by shooting a hole-in-one. Qualifying times are Friday, April 25 from 9 a.m.– 9 p.m. and Saturday, April 26 from 9 a.m.– 5 p.m. The finals will follow on Saturday at 6 p.m.

“We decided that the best way to celebrate our 75 year history is to give back to those communities.”

Event proceeds to benefit 75 Acts of Kindness community initiative

Other prizes include $500 each day to golfers with shots closest to the pin, and during the finals, $1000 to the golfer closest to the pin, $500 for the second closest, and $250 to third. Laurens Electric is dedicated to improving the quality of life of the citizens in the upstate and in the communities the cooperative serves. All proceeds from the Hole In One Shootout will benefit the co-op’s 75 Acts of Kindness community initiative in recognition of its 75th anniversary in 2014. Throughout the year the cooperative will award up to $500 for specific projects or needs to 75 different recipients, totaling nearly $40,000.

Every dollar spent at the hole-in-one event is a dollar that will go to support 75 Acts of Kindness; it’s a fantastic way to contribute to the community and have a great time in the process. For more information about 75 Acts of Kindness, visit the co-op’s web site at www.laurenselectric.com.

Laurens Electric Cooperative, a Touchstone Energy Cooperative serves 53,000 member-owners in Laurens, Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, Newberry, Union and Abbeville counties. Since 1939, the co-op has been dedicated to being the provider of choice for energy and related services in the Upstate. Laurens Electric is a member-owned electric cooperative in Upstate South Carolina that provides service to more than 53,000 residential customers in Laurens, Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, Abbeville, Newberry, and Union counties.

Giving back to the community we serve is one of our core values. Tracy Bailey (center) of Simpsonville came just eight feet from winning $1 million at the 2013 Million Dollar Hole in One Shootout. Bailey won $1,000 for his closest-to-the-hole shot. Al Hyjek (left) placed second and won $500, followed by David Sarkela (right), who took home $250.

26 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

Volunteers bag balls at the 2013 Million Dollar Hole in One Shootout. Use the attached coupon at this year’s event and buy one bag and get one free, that is 24 balls for $10.

Six-year-old Kelsey got her very first "big girl bed," as part of Laurens Electric Cooperative's 75 Acts of Kindness. "

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OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

The Mauldin High Chorus will present “A Salute To America.” Tickets are on sale now for the Mauldin High Chorus Annual Dinner Theater on March 28 and 29. Tickets are $16 for a dinner and show and $8 for the show only. Female students in sixth to 12th grade are invited to participate in the Junior League of Greenville’s Young Women’s Writing Contest. Entrants are asked to write about the biggest challenges for women their age, their primary female role models and favorite memories and how they impacted the writer’s life. Essays are due by April 7 and the prize is a $500 savings bond. Submit entries to editorvisions@jlgreenville.org.

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The Shannon Forest Christian School Concert Choir recently traveled to New York City to compete in the Worldstrides Heritage Music Festival. The choir of 16 students in 10th-12th grades performed in the Riverside Church on the Upper West Side under the direction of SFCS choral director Ashley King.

Greenville Middle students will participate in Clemson University’s Emagine! engineering event at Roper Mountain Science Center on April 5. Emagine! offers middle and high school students the chance to work with Clemson faculty and students to test their creativity and technical skills in a series of three engineering challenges in the fields of civil, electrical and computer, and mechanical engineering.

ate degree. For more information, contact Erin Bouchillon, department head for animal studies, at 864-250-3621.

Greenville Technical College will host an Animal Studies Career Night on April 8, 5:30-7 p.m., at its Northwest Campus. The college offers three programs of study, a Professional Grooming and Animal Care certificate, Veterinary Assistant certificate and phase one of a Veterinary Technology associ-

The Fine Arts Center is currently accepting nominations for ARMES, Arts Reaching Middle and Elementary Schools. The arts program is a tuition-free program for gifted and talented students in fourth through eighth grades who live in Greenville County. It is an audition-

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OUR SCHOOLS

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only program. Classes in drama, dance, strings and visual arts are offered during the school year, after school, or once or twice a week depending on art discipline. The online nomination process will be available until April 22 for the next school year. Auditions will be held in May and nominated students will be notified with their audition date and time. For more information, visit armesprogram.com and click ARMES nomination. Students in the St. Anthony of Padua School IMAGINATION Club recently visited Michelin MARC facilities where they toured process areas, learned about tire prototype manufacturing and met with the Michelin STEM engineering team. The IMAGINATION Club is part of the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) program. On May 1, Greenville Technical Charter High School will present the Charter Champions award to Sen. Jim DeMint, Dr. Hal and Minor Mickel Shaw, George Singleton and Lockheed Martin Corporation. The event will be held at the Marriott on the Parkway with a meet-and-greet/registration from 6-7 p.m. followed by an awards program and dinner at 7 p.m. The GTCHS Strings Group and the Speakeasys will perform during the meet-and-greet. Tickets and sponsorships are available. To reserve tickets, contact Ellen Pourmand at epourmand@staff.gtchs.org or 864-250-8925. The Shannon Forest Christian School’s Varsity Mathcounts Team recently competed at Clemson University: Paris Cruz, seventh grade; Abby McGovern, eighth grade; Jack Cummings, sixth grade; and Victoria McGovern, sixth grade. Spartanburg Methodist College recently established an endowed scholarship to honor Champ Squires, a 2013 graduate. The Champ Squires Endowed Scholarship was established by the estate of Betty Stewart Parnell in memory of her sister, Margie Stewart Treadway. Treadway was a graduate of the class of 1943 and a former member of the SMC Board of Trustees. Awards will be made annually to students who demonstrate academic promise and determination and who are physically impaired. For more information, visit smcsc.edu. Angie Brown, department head and associate professor of Indirect Patient Care with the Corporate and Career Development Division at Greenville Technical College, has been selected as the South Carolina Technical Education Association’s Educator of the Year for Administrator/Manager. The Bob Jones Academy Forensics Team was named State 1-A Champions in Speech and Debate for the eighth consecutive year during the recent South Carolina Forensic Coaches Association State Championship Tournament, and placed fourth overall. Coaches Chuck and Gail Nicholas were also honored as the 1A Coaches of the Year. In addition, 10 Bob Jones Academy high school and middle school band students scored high enough at Region Band auditions to audition for S.C. All State Band chairs. The following students have earned chairs in the 2014 S.C. All State Honor Bands: Bryn Carrier, Ethan Thompson, Daniel Leedy, Daniel Steeves, Michael Yoon, Claire Overly and Brandon Woods.

2013–2014

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MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 29


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OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

The next meeting of the Upstate Monarch Lymphedema Support Group will be on April 2, 5 p.m., at Earth Fare on Pelham Road in Greenville. For more information, call 864-630-4084. The Greenville Friends of Jung will hold an evening with Jungian analyst Dr. Howard Tyas of Charlotte, N.C., on March 28. Persons new to Jungian psychology or already acquainted with Carl G. Jung are invited to attend. Tyas’ topic is “Dreams: The Nocturnal Life We Live.” The event will be held at the Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1135 State Park Road, Greenville. Registration and light refreshments will be at 6:30 p.m., with the program 7-8:30 p.m. Tickets will only be sold at the door. Cost is $15 for members, $20 for non-members and $10 for students with ID. For more information, visit greenvillefriendsofjung.com or email greenvillefriendsofjung@gmail.com. Open Arms Hospice, a ministry of Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, will host a Bereavement Support Group on Thursdays, March 27-May 1, 6:307:30 p.m., at the McCall Hospice House, 1836 West Georgia Road, Simpsonville. This group is led by Teresa Lewis, chaplain/bereavement coordinator at Open Arms Hospice, and Joe Farry, chaplain of Open Arms Hospice. Camp 36, 16th Regiment S.C. Volunteers & United Daughters of Confederacy, Hunley 2667 Chapter, will offer free genealogy research available to help find Confederate ancestors on March 29, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., and March 30, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at the South Carolina Arms Collectors Association Exhibition at the TD Center. Those interested should bring their information, and researchers will fill in the blanks and document Confederate veteran’s service. If researchers cannot finish the work on site, they will do so in a timely manner and arrange to deliver the completed work. Simpsonville Garden Club is having a Yard, Plant and Bake Sale on April 5, 8 a.m.-noon, at City Park, in the Community Building on East Curtis Street. Profits and objectives of the club support civic beautification, gardening and education of youth and seniors.

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Families are invited to participate in a “Family Feud”-style game show complete with food and prizes as at Greenville County Rec’s Brutontown Community Center on March 29 at 5:30 p.m. The questions will be based on family surveys conducted by the Department of Juvenile Justice and the Phoenix Center. The event is all part of Get Smart Upstate, an effort to support parents in their efforts to help their children make positive choices. This event is free and open to the general public. Preregistration is recommended but not required. Brutontown Community Center is located at 200 Leo Lewis St., Greenville. For more information or to preregister, call Brutontown Community Center manager Joey Freeman at 864-233-4669. The Friends of the Greenville Zoo will hold Zoom Through The Zoo, a fundraiser 5K and children’s fun run, on March 29, 8 a.m., in Cleveland Park. The course will wind through the park and includes roughly 0.8 miles inside the Greenville Zoo – allowing runners and walkers of all ages to run past the elephants, lions, giraffes and large cats. Participants can register online at gogreenevents.com/zoomthroughthezoo. Registration rates are $35 for the 5K and $20 for the children’s run. Greenbrier Farms will hold its annual organic plant sale on April 19-20, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at 772 Hester Store Road, Easley. Organic starter plants for sale include heirloom tomatoes, pepper varieties, squash, cucumbers, okra, eggplant, herbs and flowers. Greenbrier’s pastured and grass-fed meats will also be available. For more information, call 864-855-9782 or visit greenbrierfarms.com. The Annual Swamp Rabbit Cyclebration will be on March 29 at 8 a.m. at Gateway Park in Travelers Rest. The ride times are: 8 a.m. for 70 miles in northern Greenville County, 9 a.m. for 40 miles in northern Greenville County, and 10 a.m. for 10 miles to Swamp Rabbit Station on Swamp Rabbit Trail. On March 28, 6 p.m., will be Freak Bike at Sunrift Adventures. March 29 will


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

One family

also feature Youth Races and Cyclocross Race at Gateway Park and Bike Drag Races and a bonfire at Sunrift Adventures. On March 30 at 10 a.m. will be Skills de Quatro, which includes Cross Country Time Trial, Pump Track Time Trial, Jumps and Trials competition. Participation cost is $40 and registration is at gogreenevents.com/gatewaymtb.

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University of Oklahoma history professor Wilfred M. McClay, Ph.D., will speak about Tocqueville and the American Republic April 2 at 4:30 p.m. in the Watkins Room of the Trone Student Center on the Furman University campus. His talk, “The Tocquevillean Moment … and Ours,” is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Paige Blankenship at 864-294-3547 or visit furman.edu/tocquevilleprogram.

EST.

1913

Y E A R S

Bon Secours St. Francis has earned recognition from the Surgical Review Corporation as an AAGL Center of Excellence in Minimally Invasive Gynecology (COEMIG). The program is focused on improving the safety and quality of gynecologic patient care and lowering overall costs associated with treatment. Sixteen physicians received this designation. In addition, the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE) and International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) have recognized the health system for excellence in lactation care. Additionally Bon Secours St. Francis downtown is the only South Carolina hospital named one of the nation’s 100 Top Hospitals by Truven Health Analytics. The Truven Health 100 Top Hospitals study identifies hospitals and leadership teams that provide the highest level of value to their communities, based on a national balanced scorecard. Join the SC Native Plant Society in a visit to the beautiful Stevens Creek Heritage Preserve near North Augusta, S.C., on April 5 at 8 a.m. Bill Stringer will lead this hike to see spring wildflowers and the rare Miccosukee gooseberry. After walking the Stevens Creek trail, walkers will drive to the other side of Stevens Creek to adjoining private property. Bring water, a bag lunch/snacks, and wear field clothing and shoes. Email Judy Seeley at judy_seeley@hotmail.com to sign up and to get directions to carpool meeting sites. For more information, visit scnps.org.

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Enrollment is now underway for Appalachian music lessons. The next session of the Evening Music Program will begin the week of April 7. This program is open to all ages (third grade through adults) and is designed to teach students to play Appalachian music with acoustic instruments, including guitar, mandolin, fiddle and banjo. The six-week sessions will be held in Easley, Pickens, Greenville and Clemson. The cost is $60 per six-week session, and instrument rental is available for $25 per session. Anyone interested should contact the following program directors: Susan Ware-Snow at 864-979-9188 or susu9196@gmail.com for Easley and Greenville; Steve McGaha at 864-283-4871 or blindpunkin54@ yahoo.com for Pickens; or Ryan Wilson at 864-360-4763 or bipryan@gmail. com for Clemson.

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MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 31


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THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

The Under the Bridge Benefit for Greenville’s homeless services will be March 30, 7:30 p.m., at the Loft at Falls Park, 631 S. Main St., Greenville. The event is $25 per person and includes music by DJ Master A and stand-up comedy by Nick Shaheen, Ben LeRoy, Tom Emmons, Cary Goff, Shivani Nadarajah and Carrie Adams. For more information, visit underthebridgebenefit.com.

training that prepares people for entry into a career field with current employment opportunities. The gift will assist up to eight people to become self-supporting, productive members of the community.  Enhanced Living Chiropractic has ended its 2013 Miracle Year for Wellness campaign with a $5,000 donation to Greer Relief. Greer Relief ’s mission is to serve the Greer community by providing emergency relief, promoting self-sufficiency and facilitating the partnership of the agencies within the J. Verne Smith Center.

Project Pinwheel, a campaign to support efforts to keep children safe, will host its inaugural Walk for Prevention on March 30, 2-4 p.m. Pre-registration for the walk ends on March 29 at 5 p.m., but walk-up registration on March 30 is allowed. The walk will begin at the First Baptist Church, 847 Cleveland St., Greenville, and will end at the Julie Valentine statue in Cleveland Park to plant one of the largest pinwheel gardens in South Carolina. Participation in the walk is free, but participants are asked to collect donations to benefit Project Pinwheel. For more information, visit projectpinwheel.kintera.org. FamilyCorps partnered with Family Bridges of Pendleton Place for Children and Families and brought Parents Anonymous Parenting Support Groups to the families of Greenville.  Due to the success of pilot sites at Family Bridges, offerings have been doubled with groups now meeting weekly on Sundays, 3:30-5 p.m. The program model supports parents and caregivers to find skills and resources to help with the struggles of parenting. The support groups are offered for free to any parent or caregiver of children; free childcare is also available for families who attend. The Family Bridges Program provides supervised visitation and safe custody exchange services. For more information on supervised visitation, contact Teri Walker McLaughlin at 864-516-1219. Officials of the BMW Charity ProAm presented by SYNNEX Corporation recently announced that the Celebrity Walk of Fame will return after a six-year hiatus. The red carpet event, when the tournament’s celebrities greet fans, take photos and participate in media interviews, will take place May 15, 6:45-7:45 p.m., on Main Street in front of the Courtyard Greenville Downtown. Actor and comedian Gary Valentine will emcee the event, which is free to the public. Twenty-five charities have been selected to benefit from the 2014 tournament. The charities have the opportunity to earn funds through ticket sales, volunteer recruitment and one-day pro-am team sales. Learn more at bmwcharitygolf.com.  AFL has given $3,000 to the Greenville Tech Foundation for students participating in the Quick Jobs With a Future program at Greenville Technical College. The program is the first of its kind in the nation and provides short-term intense

More than 450 guests gathered for Safe Harbor’s Fashion with a Passion event and raised $130,000, topping the 2013 total of $80,000. Safe Harbor serves victims of domestic violence in Greenville, Anderson, Oconee and Pickens counties along with providing education and prevention efforts. The Sargent Foundation recently donated $30,000 to Greer Middle College Charter High School for use in their educational program. The Sargent Foundation was started by Earle and Eleanor Sargent more than 50 years ago and benefits local interests such as Greenville Technical College, Miracle Hill, Bob Jones University and Gallery, Phillis Wheatley Center and Pendleton House. The foundation also funded the Greenville County Library System’s Sargent Branch. The Guild of the Greenville Symphony will host the Downtown Condo Rondo in Greenville on May 10, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., during Artisphere. Five condos will be open for touring and all are within walking distance of each other in downtown Greenville. Each condo is a distinctive reflection of the owner’s interest in art, antiques and exotic collectibles. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 the day of the tour. Information and the locations of presale ticket outlets are available at guildGSO.org or by calling 864-370-0965. All proceeds benefit the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. On May 16 at 7 p.m. at Hyatt Regency downtown Greenville, Homes of Hope will hold a fundraising event. The evening includes dinner and dessert, a focus on the ministry and silent and live auctions. Among the auction items will be Hope Houses, wooden birdhouses built by the men in the program and decorated by local artists. There is no cost to be a table host or a guest. All funds benefit Homes of Hope’s programs for developing affordable housing in the Upstate, as well as providing a second chance for men overcoming addictions through job training and mentoring. For more information, contact Jordon Weldon at 864-269-4663 or jweldon@homesofhope.org.

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FLASHDANCE THE MUSICAL “An astonishing musical spectacle.” -Atlanta Journal Constitution Tuesday-Sunday, April 22-27 FlashdanceTheMusical.com Mike Gallagher, standing, as Max Bialystock and Todd Weir as Leo Bloom in the Centre Stage production of “The Producers.”

Photo Provided

Mike Gallagher, Todd Weir reunite on stage in “The Producers” CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Sometimes when Centre Stage executive and artistic director Glenda ManWaring picks a show for the theater’s schedule, the perfect actors for the lead parts instantly leap to mind. That’s what happened with Centre Stage’s current performance, “The Producers.” Although the show wasn’t pre-cast, ManWaring thought it would be a perfect chance to reunite nationally syndicated radio talk show host Mike Gallagher and Todd Weir in one of the

theater’s Main Stage shows. The pair had starred in Centre Stage’s 2011 production of “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels,” one of the first big musicals at Centre Stage and ManWaring’s directing debut at the theater. “They really work well together,” ManWaring said of Gallagher and Weir. “They are two completely different types of actors. Their strengths work well together.” It didn’t hurt that “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” was a box office hit exactly when Centre Stage needed it the most. The show sold out most nights and ManWaring would have held it over if she could.

“With ‘Dirty Rotten Scoundrels,’ I wanted to bring in a celebrity to give Centre Stage a shot in the arm,” ManWaring said, “and when I thought about it, Mike was perfect. He’s a great actor with a following. People know him. And it was a show he always wanted to do.” But Gallagher’s star power wasn’t the attraction this time. It was the chemistry between him and Weir. “‘The Producers’ has such iconic characters that I knew we could fill with local talent – and Mike is local talent,” ManWaring said. The play tells the story of a down-on-

Roby Lakatos Ensemble Worldly ensemble mixing jazz with classical and contemporary elements for an unparalleled sound. Tuesday, April 29, 7:30 PM Roby-Lakatos.com

PRODUCERS continued on PAGE 34

MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 33


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Mike Gallagher, center, stars as Max Bialystock in the Centre Stage production of “The Producers.” PRODUCERS continued from PAGE 33

his-luck Broadway producer, Max Bialystock, and a nerdy accountant, Leo Bloom, who hatch a plan to raise more money than they need to produce the biggest flop Broadway has ever seen. They produce a musical called “Springtime for Hitler” written by escaped Nazi Franz Liebkind, get the flamboyant Roger De Bris to direct and hire the loopy Swedish bombshell Ulla (with a last name lugging over 15 syllables) to star. What could go wrong? Everything, in comedic Mel Brooks fashion. ManWaring said when it came to casting Leo Bloom, she could think of nobody but Weir to play the part. Gallagher was the first name she thought of when it came to casting Max. “Leo has a lot of layers, insecurities and issues. He is crazy immature,” ManWaring said. “Leo is your anomaly. It’s the hardest character to cast. Sometimes actors can do comedic roles but are not good at playing straight roles, and vice versa. Todd’s a versatile actor. He can do both.” Weir brings that talent and his creativity to a role, ManWaring said. “He’s got the ability to explore the core of a character and explore on his own. With Todd, in early and mid-rehearsals, a scene is never the same way twice. He tries things that are completely different.” Gallagher, on the other hand, is a

34 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

director’s actor, ManWaring said. “He wants you to direct every aspect of a character and how that character is developed,” she said. “Mike is the grounding force in a scene. He puts it all out there and that works for the role of Max.” The contrast in styles helps to complete the scenes and bring wonderful energy to each, ManWaring said – a sentiment regarding his costar that Weir shared. “We complement each other well,” Weir said. “We bring different strengths to the process. We really feed off each other.” ManWaring agreed, saying, “There’s a chemistry between them. You can see they are having so much fun with each other every night in every scene. You

Photo Provided

can’t fake that.” It’s a chemistry that developed long before “The Producers” or even “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels,” but way back when the pair appeared in the Greenville Little Theatre’s 1993 production of “Guys and Dolls.” While Gallagher and Weir are garnering the most headlines as the lead characters, the ensemble is what makes Centre Stage’s production of “The Producers” so successful, ManWaring said. “It’s one of the most talented ensembles we’ve had,” she said of the cast of two dozen. “It’s a huge part of the show. The key is it’s a big enough ensemble, but it’s not too big for our stage. It gives the feel of a big Broadway show in a small theater.”

“THE PRODUCERS” WHERE: Centre Stage, 501 River St., Greenville WHEN: March 28 and 29, April 3-5, April 10-12; 8 p.m.; March 30, April 6 and April 13, 3 p.m. TICKETS: $20-$30 INFORMATION: centrestage.org or 864-233-6733


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A Distinctive Academic Community Worth Discovering for Nearly 175 Years. Erskine feels like a second home to generations of graduates who’ve experienced it. As South Carolina’s first private Christian college, Erskine equips students to flourish through academic excellence and a family-like learning environment. It’s a rare college experience. But since it’s in the Upstate, going away to college doesn’t have to mean going far. So while Erskine may be a little harder to find, you’ll always know where you belong.

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MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 35


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Saturday’s “Look! Through My Eyes” exhibit hosted by Family Connection is more about changing perceptions than the photography itself. “Look! Through My Eyes” features 20 photographs taken by children and young adults with special healthcare needs who were paired with local photographers – both professional and amateur. “Photographs have a powerful way of bringing people together, creating discussion and inspiring change,” said Susie Wallace, Family Connection’s Greenville area co-coordinator. Saturday’s photography exhibition will be held at the Children’s Museum of the Upstate. “Look!” is designed to celebrate the beauty, strength and potential of people with special needs, Wallace said. “It’s really for people to look and see with their hearts,” she said. “Sometimes, we’re taught not to see. This exhibit is designed to show that when they have a camera in their hands, everybody’s the same. There are no wheelchairs, no disabilities. Its just people.” Jen Patton, photography teacher at St. Joseph’s Catholic School, worked with three of the photographers with images in the exhibition, including Amanda Marlow, who photographed her dolls in a public park. Marlow’s mother served as her photographic assistant, placing the dolls in the spots where the soon-tobe 33-year-old pointed. “One of my favorite photographers, Ansel Adams, once said there are two people in every photograph, the photographer and the viewer,” Patton said. “This is a really good example.” The other photographers she worked with took images of their grandfather and their dog. “They photographed what they love and they photographed them fearlessly,” Patton said. Susan Moran thought she was meeting Rachel Lewis at the YMCA pool to help her take photographs of what she loves – swimming – to give others a small glimpse of her world. “I couldn’t have been more wrong,” she said. “For three hours, Rachel and I were best friends. I learned a lot about Rachel in those three hours, but

Amanda Marlow with her camera.

I learned a lot about me, too.” While working with Rachel, Moran learned the young adult loves to swim – and that she has the Special Olympic medals to prove her flawless backstroke. But Rachel wasn’t interested in talking about her medals, Moran said. She wanted to take photographs of her flippers, the water, the waves, Moran said. This is the second year of Family Connection’s “Look!” photography exhibition. Photographs from last year’s event, “Look! I’m Just Being a Kid,” will also be on display. “We hope the exhibition changes impressions of what those with special needs can do,” Wallace said. “Changing assumptions and perceptions comes first. Eventually, that leads to changing policy.” Other events on Saturday will include “Keys to Friendship,” a disability simulation presented by the Mauldin High Teacher Cadets, and “The Young Adults Social” in the museum’s café. All event attendees will receive “The LOOK! And LEARN” Parent’s Guide to Resources, Greenville’s first comprehensive guide to special-needs resources, compiled by Family Connection.

S O Y O U K N O W. . . WHAT: “Look! Through My Eyes,” WHERE: The Children’s Museum of the Upstate, 300 College St., Greenville WHEN: March 29, 6:30 p.m. INFORMATION AND TO REGISTER: familyconnections.org


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Brett tells a feathered fairy tale Noted children’s authorillustrator turns Cinderella into a chicken story CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Noted children’s author and illustrator Jan Brett combined two of her loves – chickens and travel – for her unique take on the classic fairy tale “Cinderella.” Brett (who owns a flock of award-winning ornamental chickens) was talking with her editor one day when the conversation turned to chickens and what characters they can be. The editor told Brett how one of her neighbor’s beautiful Cochins was being picked on by two bossy hens. The women immediately said together, “Cinderella.” And Brett, who loves the snow and winter, immediately knew she wanted to set her version of “Cinderella” in Russia, a country with a strong folkloric tradition to which she had never been. So Brett, who is known for taking extensive research trips so the illustrations in her books are filled with realism, went to St. Petersburg with her husband, Joe. “Travel is a constant source of inspiration,” she said. Next week, Brett – a No. 1 New York

Times best-selling author with more than 38 million books in print – will travel to Greenville. On Tuesday, she will visit Oakview Elementary, an experience the Greenville County elementary school won through a contest on the author’s Facebook page. On Wednesday, Brett will conduct an illustration demonstration and book signing at the Upcountry History Museum beginning at 6 p.m. The museum is hosting an exhibit of Brett’s original artwork through May 4. Brett’s books are on the shelves of virtually every public library and elementary school library in the country. The feathered inspiration for “Cinders: A Chicken Cinderella” goes back years. Brett grew up near Boston, where her family had a horse, guinea pigs, donkeys and chickens. When she was 8, she had a chicken that rode on the handlebars of her bike. “Cinders: A Chicken Cinderella,” written for children ages 3 to 5, tells the tale of Cinders, the most picked-upon hen in the flock. After a transformation by her Sikie Godmother, Cinders becomes the belle of Prince Cockerel’s ball. The transformation is so big that even Cin-

SO YOU KNOW WHO: “The World of Jan Brett” WHAT: Exhibit of original artwork and favorite characters of the children’s book author and illustrator WHEN: Through May 4 COST: $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $3 for children and students up to age 18. INFORMATION: 864-467-3100 or upcountryhistory.org SPECIAL EVENT: Meet Jan Brett, April 2 Drawing demonstration, 6 p.m. Book signing, 6:30 p.m. COST: Purchase of Brett’s latest book, “Cinders,” from Museum Shop provides access to demonstration for two people. Individuals attending the demonstration will be first in line for the book signing. One outside book may be brought for the signing. The museum does not guarantee that all books will be signed.

ders’ bossy sisters don’t recognize her. For information on the Upcountry History Museum event and the Brett exhibit, go to upcountryhistory.org.

SPRING INTO ART. Legacy of Impressionism now on view

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm free admission

1614 GCMA Journal Spring into Art.indd 2

MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 37 3/11/14 3:00 PM


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Shane Pruitt Band Blazing blues guitarist. Call 864-573-9742 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com/spartanburg. 3/28, RADIO ROOM

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Marcus Anderson Album-Release Party Talented saxophonist celebrates new release. Tickets: $10-$38.50. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com. 3/29, HORIZON RECORDS/ THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

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John Durham/Sarah Clanton Schaffer/Rob Crouch Killer trio of Upstate artists. Call 864-552-1565 or visit facebook.com/ipagreenville.

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Third Day & Skillet Two superstar Christian bands. Tickets: $21-$99. Call 1-800-745-3000 or visit bonsecoursarena.com.

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Bombadil Quirky pop quartet plays two shows. Call 864-235-7922 or visit blog.horizonrecords.net.


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SOUND CHECK

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WITH VINCENT HARRIS

601 South Main Street 864.509.0142 PasserelleinthePark.com

Going Postal John Durham leads an eclectic ensemble in tribute to a favorite album PHOTO COURTESY OF J. SCOTT SHRADER

I’ve spoken with guitarist/bandleader John Durham several times over the last two years, twice after successful events at The Handlebar. In 2013, Durham organized a packed tribute to Pink Floyd’s classic 1973 album “The Dark Side of the Moon,” with an ensemble of Upstate musicians re-creating the album track for track. And earlier this year, he put on a sold-out show based on the Beatles 1968 self-titled WHO: John Durham & Friends double album (commonly known as the White Album). WHAT: “Nothing Better: A Celebration of The Postal Service” Both times I’ve spoken to him after WHERE: Independent Public Alehouse, the shows, Durham has been careful 110 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville about giving credit to the other muWHEN: Friday, March 28, 8 p.m. sicians involved, reluctant to accept any praise, and quick about what he INFORMATION: 864-552-1265 or ipagreenville.com learned and what mistakes he wouldn’t make again at the next show, which he inevitably had already started planning. So perhaps I shouldn’t have been surprised when John emailed me the day after the White Album show about his next project. And perhaps it also shouldn’t be a surprise that, after two huge shows involving classic rock icons and ensembles of up to 20 musicians, he’s decided to scale down a bit. This time, at the Independent Public Ale House on March 28, Durham will assemble a small group to pay tribute to one of his personal favorite albums, The Postal Service’s acclaimed 2003 album “Give Up.” The group will consist of Durham, drummer Rob Crouch, bassist Neil Alexander, singer/cellist Sarah Clanton Schaffer, singer/ guitarist Todd Bates, trombone player Brad Jepson and vocalist Chelsea Ashford. The Postal Service was a collaborative effort between Death Cab for Cutie singer Ben Gibbard and Dntel’s Jimmy Tamborello, and they only produced one album. “This show is going to be so much smaller,” Durham says. “It’s just really close to my heart. And I wanted to do something a little newer with a smaller ensemble, in a little more laid-back setting. The ‘Dark Side’ show and the ‘White Album’ show were big shows, where it was about getting 20 or more people together to play these classic songs. And this one I wanted to be more low-key.” Doing the album “low-key” presented some problems. “As I got into the album, I realized that a lot of the songs don’t really lend themselves to a stripped-down approach,” Durham says. “So we added people. Rob has always been a good team player. He did great work on the ‘Dark Side’ and ‘White Album’ shows. He’s someone I can trust. And Sarah’s a very talented musician, and this was an opportunity for us to work together on songs we both loved.” For Schaffer’s part, she was thrilled to work on songs she loved, as well. “This is one of my favorite records of all time,” she says. “When I was in college, I listened to it all the time. So it’s very nostalgic for me. So when he asked me to do it, I said yes immediately. I guess not everybody knows about it, and I don’t know why it struck me, but when an album clicks with you it really clicks with you. It takes me back to the time when I had just started playing open-mic nights, and coming out of the classical music world.” Both Durham and Schaffer are happy with the venue choice, hoping that the smaller concert area with translate to a more intimate experience. “In a smaller environment it’ll be easier for people to listen to it and become engaged with it, even if it’s something they’re not familiar with,” Schaffer says. Added Durham, “We really wanted a smaller room; something that was applicable to the show. It’s a niche album, even though the people who do know about it have a really strong connection to it.”

A bistro in the park. French-inspired fare. As the temperatures rise and the days get longer, join us on the patio for amazing views and delicious cuisine.

Chef Teryi’s Baked Goat Cheese

VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

Father-daughter bonding takes many forms, but it isn’t often that it takes the form of virtuoso classical music performance. Fabio and Maria Parrini are that rare duo. Parrini and his 16-year-old daughter, Maria, are world-class pianists based in Greenville who will perform with the Clemson University Symphony Orchestra on April 1, 8 p.m. Daughters who attend the performance with their fathers will receive free admission. Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for students and are available for purchase at clemson.edu/Brooks and at 864-656-7787, MondayFriday, 1-5 p.m. The Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg will feature Spartanburg artist and member Edythe S. Wise from April 1-27 in its Gallery at Chapman Cultural Center. The exhibit will be open for free public viewing Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. The public reception will be on April 3, 5-9 p.m. For more information, call 864-764-9568 or visit artistsguildofspartanburg.com. The Gap Creek Singers will present their annual Cabaret Night on March 29 at First Presbyterian Church, 100 School St., Greer. Tickets are $15 and include

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a dinner of lasagna and more. Proceeds from the concert will go to the group’s scholarship fund. The Gap Creek Singers provide scholarships to local students pursuing degrees in music. Tickets may be purchased at Salon 906, 906 N. Main St., Greer; Laurenda’s Family Restaurant and Catering, 300 S. Line St., Greer; The Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 200 Cannon St., Greer; and from any member of the Gap Creek Singers. The Pickens County Museum of Art & History recently announced that registration is open for the Spring Studio Art Sessions for Children and Adults beginning April 1. Renee Gillespie will teach Children’s Studio Art (ages 8-12) April 1-May 13. Gillespie will also teach Children’s Studio Art (ages 13-16) April 2-May 14. Jo Johnston will teach Let’s Sketch Spring! Sketching from Nature, Part 1 April 8-May 13, and From Sketchbook to Painting: Working in a Series April 3-May 8. All classes are $88 ($78 for museum members). Pre-registration is required for all classes and can be made at visitpickenenscounty.com/calendar or by calling 864898-5963. The Pickens County Museum of Art & History’s 35th Annual Juried South Carolina Artists Competition will take place beginning April 2. This competition is open to all artists working in any medium, 18 years or older and living in South Carolina. Cash and purchase awards exceeding $5,000 will be presented in this year’s competition. Entries may be shipped or delivered to the museum beginning April 2 and continuing April 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. The exhibition resulting from the competition will open with a gala reception and awards ceremony on April 26 and will continue through June 12. Artists requesting information or an entry prospectus may contact the museum at 307 Johnson St., Pickens, or call 864-898-5963.

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.

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40 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

116 South Main Street | Greenville, SC 29601 | 864.373.7300 www.thenosedive.com | www.facebook.com/thenosedive Lunch & Dinner, Monday - Friday | Brunch & Dinner, Saturday | Sunday Brunch


JOURNAL HOMES

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

Five Forks Plantation, Simpsonville, SC Five Forks Plantation offers all brick, side entry garage homes in the prestigious Five Forks area from the mid $300s to the $600s. You’ll enjoy the country club-style amenities that include a large clubhouse with full kitchen and wrap-around porch, a junior Olympic size pool, lighted tennis courts, athletic field and a 1.3 acre scenic pond. Ryan Homes offers the quality and features you would expect in a custom home but at a much better price. Plus, every new Ryan Home is Independently Inspected to be ENERGY STAR® Certified saving over 30% on your utility costs versus standard new homes! It’s no wonder why more homeowners have trusted Ryan Homes with their largest investment than any other builder in the Upstate. Visit the decorated Brookmere model today!

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Directions: From I-85 or I-385 travel East on Woodruff Road (SC 146) for approximately 5 miles. Five Forks Plantation is on the left (Pawleys Drive). Turn left onto Clifton Grove Way. Model Home is on the right just before the Clubhouse. Schools: Monarch Elementary Beck Academy | JL Mann Academy Contact: Ryan Homes | 864.234.1497

LAURENS $295,000 MLS#1274390 4BR/2.5BA 1925 Colonial style home has been a landmark for the Chestnut Ridge community. Several tasteful updates! GRAY COURT $335,000 MLS#1272490 3BR/3BA. Beautiful custom home on 2.43 acres nestled in the quiet countryside. Many upgraded features.

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GRAY COURT Warrior Creek Church Rd $82,500 2 tracts of land have terrific lake access and plenty of depth off of the road. Just a short drive from Simpsonville. MAIN ST., LAURENS $410,000 MLS#1270944 4BR/4BA. Historic elegance in this 1892 Victorian home, immaculately maintained on a 2.57 acre lot in downtown Laurens.

Jake Dickens 864.616.6005 jdickens@cbcaine.com www.cbcaine.com MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, M A R C H 3 0 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

STRATTON PLACE

STONEHAVEN

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA

125 WHITTINGTON DR. . $425,000 . MLS# 1273104

327 ENGLISH OAK RD . $399,900 . MLS# 1275875

423 E. FARIS RD . $399,000 . MLS# 1275930

4BR/2.5BA Cul-de-sac home and perfect for entertaining. Hudson Road to Left into Stratton on Providence Square, Right on Coventry, Left on Brighton, Right on Whittington.

4BR/2.5BA All Brick Updated Home. In-ground pool. A must see!. 385-S to Woodruff Rd Exit,Left off ramp, 3 miles to Right into Stonehaven entrance , Right onto English Oak

4BR/3BA Completely renovated home. Open floor plan. Augusta Rd to Faris, Last home on Left before Pine Forest Ext.

Contact: Phyllis MacDonald | 313-3753 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Melissa Morrell | 918-1734 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Virginia Hayes | 313-2986 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

PEBBLE GROVE

BIRCH MEADOW

GREYTHORNE

105 AMANDA’S AUTUMN LN . $359,900 . MLS# 1275688

102 BIRCH MEADOW DR . $349,900 . MLS# 1265406

107 KETTLE OAK WAY . $324,900 . MLS# 1271135

4BR/3.5BA All brick home with hardwood floors, home office, beautiful landscaping. Rutherford Rd to Stallings, Left on ReidSchool, Right on Meece Bridge, Left into SD on Brannons View, Right on AmandasAutumn

4BR/2.5BA Loaded with extras & charm. A must see!!. 85 South to Exit 35, Right on SC 86 E, 1st Left on Hwy 17, Right on Birch Meados Dr.

4BR/4BA Custom home. Fenced backyard, custom kitchen, deck, screenedporch & more. 385 to Georgia Rd then Right, Pass Standing Springs Rd, Right into SD on Kettle Oak.

Contact: Chrys Davis | 275-5554 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Joanne Beresh | 505-1646 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Norm MacDonald | 313-7353 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

MOORCROFT

NEELY FARM

PARKERS PLACE

1 BLANDING LANE . $269,900

11 SOUTHBRIDGE . $195,000 . MLS# 1270368

106 ROBERTS HILL DR . $187,900 . MLS# 1275607

4BR/2.5BA Beautiful, absolute move in ready condition with hardwood floors, granite counters, sun room, screened porch, fenced yard and more! Pelham Rd to Boiling Springs through light to Moorcroft Subdivision

4BR/2.5BA Great location, perfect updated. Charming cul-de-sac home. 385 S to Exit 27, Right on Fairview, Right on Harrison Bridge Rd, Right into Neely Farm.

3BR/2BA Adorable one story home. Many upgrades. Tanner Rd to( Left or Right depending the direction you come from), Right on Roberts, Left on Roberts Hill

Contact: J. J. Bowers | 483-6172 RE/MAX Realty Professionals

Contact: Beth French | 386-6003 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Regina Coulomb | 420-1362 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

42 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D H OM E

PEOPLE, AWARDS , HONORS Gilley Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville

Ansley Crossing, 113 Ansley Crossing Court, Simpsonville The Winnfield model is a spacious home that features a master on the main floor with open living areas and close to 2,700 sq. ft. 3 bedrooms and 3 1/2 baths with a large open media/living area upstairs provides plenty of room for family and or guest. This homes has a large formal dining area as well as a eat-in breakfast/keeping room with a stone fireplace. Granite in the kitchen, recessed can lights, and pantry all adorn the spacious open kitchen. Ansley Crossing is in the pop-ular Five Forks area of Simpsonville. We offer a LOW MAINTENANCE life-style to include lawn maintenance and trash pickup. Only 35 homes will com-plete this quaint and cozy neighbor-hood. Conveniently located approxi-mately 1 mile from Woodruff. Close to shopping, restaurants, medical fa-cilities and more. This great home is priced at $245,998 with additional incentives of *$12,014 through the month of March.

HOME INFO Price: $245,998 Directions: Directions: Take I-385 (exit 35) and go east on Woodruff Rd. Turn right on Scuffletown Rd. beside the Publix.Approximately 1 mile down on the right. Contact: Laura Moore | 864-881-8113 drhorton.com/upstatesc To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Sarah Gilley as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. Gilley joins Coldwell Banker Caine with six years of real estate experience. Her wide-range of expertise includes representing buyers, sellers, new homes, re-sales and relocation transactions. She received her Bachelor of Science in Financial Management and Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from UNC Charlotte. During her real estate career, Gilley received multiple awards because of her exceptional Gilley service. Her awards include: 2013 Committee Chair of the Year, Greater Greenville Association of Realtors; 2011, 2012, 2013 Chairman Award Recipient for outstanding sales performance (Allen Tate Realtors); 2011 Client Relations Associate of the Year (Allen Tate Realtors). Active in the community, she serves as the Social Committee Chair for the Greater Greenville REALTOR® Association. In her free time, Gilley enjoys the outdoors, running the Swamp Rabbit Trail and playing with her children in Cleveland Park. “We are thrilled to have Sarah join our team in Greenville,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “And we are confident that she will excel given her experience and work ethic.”

Towe Joins Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Stephanie Towe has joined the company and serves as a Sales Associate at the Pleasantburg office. Towe  worked with Distinctive Designs of Simpsonville where she provided Towe design and staging

C O N T I N U E D… PA G E 4 4

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

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MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 43


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, M A R C H 3 0 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

HALF MILE LAKE

HIGHVIEW ACRES

403 HALF MILE LAKE . $172,900 . MLS# 1274578

112 RUBY DR . $99,500 . MLS# 1274877

3BR/2.5BA Rocking chair frontporch, LR w/ fp, Kit/Brkfast w/bay window, corner lot. N. Pleasantburg to Right on Piney Mtn, Right on State Park Rd, Right into SD.

3BR/1BA Great brick ranch home near Furman, Cherrydale, Blue Ridge Mountains. N. Buncombe Rd to Ruby Drive across from Tomato Vine.

Contact: Pat Norwood | 420-1998 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Jane Ellefson | 979-4415 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

ON THE MARKET SPAULDING FARM

SPAULDING FARM

GREEN VALLEY

232 NORTHBROOK WAY . $679,000 . MLS# 1276220

205 RYAN’S RUN CT . $619,000 . MLS# 1276164

250 FOOT HILLS RD . $599,900 . MLS# 1273285

5BR/4BA Stunning brick home on .73 acre culdesac lot. 2 Sunrooms,bonus and office. Covered porch, deck and fire pit.

4BR/3.5BA Beautiful brick home on Spaulding Lake. Master on main, new hardwood floors and granite countertops. 2 offices, bonus & kitchenette. Stunning lake views..

5BR/3.5BA Lovely all brick traditional home located on the Green Valley golf course features salt-water pool, a large corner lot, and mature landscaping! Over 4800 square feet!.

Contact: Margaret Marcum | 8644203125 C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS

Contact: Margaret Marcum | 8644203125 C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS

Contact: James Akers, Jr. | 8643258413 The Marchant Company

PE OPLE , AWA R D S , HONOR S C O N T I N U E D F R O M… PA G E 4 3

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services.   She also served as a Para-Teacher in the Special Education Class at Greenville County Schools.  “We are very excited that Stephanie has joined our family of Realtors,” said Fritzi Barbour, Broker-in-Charge.  “We look forward to working with her.” Towe currently lives in Simpsonville with her husband, Ted and three children, Hannah, Matthew and Ila.  She is an active volunteer with the PTA and the Booster Club.  She is also active at   Simpsonville First Baptist Church and enjoys photography.

44 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

Gabriel Builders Inc. of Greer Receives Best Of Houzz 2014 Award Annual survey and analysis of 16 million monthly users reveals top-rated building, remodeling and design professionals. Gabriel Builders Inc. of Greer, South Carolina was awarded “Best Of Houzz” by Houzz, the leading platform for home remodeling and design. The custom home builder in the premier Cliffs Communities and Upstate Carolinas with 30 years of continued service was chosen by the more than 16

million monthly users that comprise the Houzz community. The Best Of Houzz award is given in two categories: Customer Satisfaction and Design. Customer Satisfaction honors are determined by a variety of factors, including the number and quality of client reviews a professional received in 2013. Design award winners’ work was the most popular among the more than 16 million monthly users on Houzz, known as “Houzzers,” who saved more than 230 million professional images of home interiors and exteriors to their personal ideabooks via the Houzz site. Winners will receive a “Best Of Houzz 2014” badge on their profiles, showing the

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SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S F E B R U A R Y 24 - 2 8, 2 014 PRICE SELLER

$7,453,864 $3,385,000 HALTON VILLAGE $2,450,000 PARKINS LAKE $2,250,000 CHERRYDALE VILLAGE $1,890,000 HIGHLAND PARC $1,450,000 $1,320,000 MCDANIEL ESTATES $1,237,500 $1,010,000 CHANTICLEER $840,000 CLAREMONT $725,000 CHANTICLEER $630,000 RIVER WALK $550,000 OAKS@ROPER MOUNTAIN $546,000 400 NORTH MAIN CONDOS $539,900 CHANTICLEER $510,000 $500,000 SANIBEL OAKS $461,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $412,860 STONEHAVEN $382,500 HOLLAND PLACE $350,000 GLEN MEADOWS $325,000 STONEBROOK FARM $325,000 OAK HOLLOW $320,000 KILGORE FARMS $320,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $319,674 SUGAR CREEK $310,000 HERITAGE GLEN $305,000 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $300,750 GOWAN’S FORT $300,000 RICHLAND CREEK@N. MAIN $300,000 PELHAM FALLS $285,000 PLANTATION GREENE $282,500 PELHAM FALLS $275,000 $273,001 WOODLAND CREEK $270,390 $260,000 SWANSGATE $259,000 LAKE FOREST HEIGHTS $258,000 ABBEYHILL PARK $253,000 SPRING FOREST ESTATES $250,000 CASTLE ROCK $250,000 SILVERLEAF $250,000 COTTAGES@HARRISON BRIDGE $247,000 EDWARDS FOREST $246,500 GLENS@LEXINGTON PLACE $245,000 BRIDGEWATER $242,000 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $235,075 TREYBERN $234,900 TOWNES@RIVERWOOD FARM $234,000 PELHAM FALLS $232,000 PELHAM FALLS $228,000 FLAGSTONE VILLAGE $227,250 LANDING@SAVANNAH POINTE $226,339 NORTHGATE $225,000 HAVEN AT RIVER SHOALS $221,450 TOWNES@RIVERWOOD FARM $220,000 LISMORE PARK $219,000 PARK@PENDLETON WEST $215,000 STILLWOOD@BELL’S CROSSING $213,000 KINGSGATE $212,000 COURT SQUARE $210,000 VILLAGE@WINDSOR CREEK $206,037 OAK GLEN $205,000 BELMONT HGHTS $200,000 HALF MILE LAKE $199,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $198,000 $197,573 SHADOW CREEK POINSETTIA $197,000 ONEAL VILLAGE $190,000 WOODRUFF LAKE $189,000 IVYBROOKE $185,000 MEADOWS @ BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION $180,950 CLIFFS VALLEY NORTH PANTHER MT OVER $180,000 $180,000 ISAQUEENA PARK $179,900 LINKSIDE AT BONNIE BRAE $178,000 RIDGECREEK ESTATES $178,000 ROSEDALE $178,000 RICHGLEN $177,500 MEADOW BREEZE $175,569 GILDER CHASE $175,076 CLIFFS VALLEY-PANTHER MTN PARK $175,000 CLIFFS VALLEY-PANTHER MTN PARK $175,000 WAGON CREEK $170,000 FOX TRACE $168,611 HUDDERS CREEK $168,000 FARM@SANDY SPRINGS $166,585 MEADOWBROOKE $166,000 INN VILLAGE $162,500 DEVENGER PLACE $161,500 WOODLANDS@WALNUT COVE $161,500

BUYER

ADDRESS

407 LLC SIMPSONVILLE EXCHANGE LL 440 W MARKET ST HILLCREST GDS LLC SKK LLC 2603 HANNAH FARM CT SOUTH EAST BORDERS LLC INDEPENDENCE BANCSHARES PO BOX 1776 MCCRARY ESTA B TRUSTEE BROWN CRAIG D LIVING TRU 1240 GORDON RIVER TRL CHERRYDALE HOLDINGS LLC 11 PELHAM LLC 15 PELHAM RD MARK III PROPERTIES INC S C PILLON HOMES INC 1371 DOGWOOD DR SW WHITEMAN LINDA G RJJM LLC 688 CIRCLE RD PLATING CYNTHIA L ALLIN SONJA BURNETT 502 MCDANIEL AVE STATE FARM MUTUAL AUTO I SUSHI HUNTER PROPERTIES 508 PENNSYLVANIA AVE DENNIS HUGH M BURGAMY LARRY G JR 106 CHAMBERLAIN CT GALLOWAY MICHAEL S (JTWR BUDELMANN CYNTHIA 201 ROLLESTON DR BUTLER MARY M FREELAND KATHERINE E (JT 117 LOWOOD LN FLOYD ELIZABETH Y PENALOZA ROQUE A 208 WALNUT TRACE CT WOODLAND BUILDERS INC INGRAHAM DAVID M 10 ANGEL OAK CT JOHNSON KENNETH S (JTWRO SOUTH MINE PROPERTIES IN PO BOX 1990 FREELAND KATHERINE E JOHNSTON ERIN WHITLOCK ( 223 E SEVEN OAKS DR NORRIS THOMAS K REVOC LI SCOTT J DREW 5146 WADE HAMPTON BLVD CLARA DANIEL E (JTWROS) CLARY LOYD A (JTWROS) 10 SANIBEL OAKS DR NVR INC CARRINGTON CRAIG M (JTWR 625 PAWLEYS DR EVANS KATHRYN HART GORDO PEZANT MICHAEL B 806 CARRIAGE HILL RD WAYLETT CLIVE EDWARD REV LENTZ KATHRYN A 32 HAGUE CT GILLESPIE WILLIAM D PEEK KALEY E (JTWROS) 4 PINEHAVEN WAY PARK MI JA FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG 3415 VISION DR MALPHRUS L ANN NAJI OMAR A 304 CARDINAL DR EMCH JAMES P ELLINGTON CHARIS L (JTWR 5 ASHBY GROVE DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT WILLIAMSON RITA L (JTWRO 1 NIAGARA PL ROTH DAVID J LACKEY ANGELA G (JTWROS) 108 SWEETWATER CT SHIMIZU KEIICHI LEE IL HEE 2302 HIGHWAY 14 ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC STEWART CARIE (JTWROS) 512 FULTON CT CARVER BETTY D CARVER MARINA M 124 PARDO RD PRITCHARD HEATHER FERRILL ERIC (JTWROS) 46 RICHLAND CREEK DR LEWIS GREGORY J HARDEE JENNIFER 21 RIVER WAY DR DAVIS AMELIA L CUMALANDER DONALD BART ( 9 PARKHAVEN WAY KAZEMIAN SHAUN F (JTWROS TEMPLETON ALEXANDER L (J 5 BRIARBERRY CT MCNUTT SERVICE GROUP INC WALTERBORO REAL ESTATE H 1201 PEACHTREE ST NVR INC LUKOVIC BARBARA L (JTWRO 212 HEDGE ROSE CT PEZANT MICHAEL B CRONE ANDREW P 701 WACCAMAW AVE CLAY AILEEN S BUTLER MARY B (JTWROS) 119 WREN WAY THOMASON DANA L MCCARLEY AARON (JTWROS) 103 SWEETBRIAR RD YANEZ SAM GONZALEZ SALLY ANN 617 HEATHERCREST CT FINLEY DAVID M FINLEY ROBERT M 351 SPRING FOREST DR SK BUILDERS INC BORGSTEEDE MARK ALLEN 10 RIDGEBURG CT DRUMMOND NANCY W VAN DER BURGH ABEL (JTWR 220 E SHEFFORD ST DWELLING GROUP LLC LEVASSER CONNIE V (JTWRO 11 BRIARHILL DR GOLDSTROM JULIE MINKA KATERINA I 9 RANDY DR FAULKNER JAMES M PERLOFF SHARON 4 BELMONT STAKES WAY HUBBARD GAIL D STANKIEWICZ DEREK (JTWRO 366 BRIDGE CROSSING DR ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC GREER NANCY Q 311 OWASSO DR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG TEAGUE WILLIAM SCOTT 5 PLASSEY LN MIRANTE PETER A YAMASAKI CATHERINE M 22 REDDINGTON DR DONAHOE DONALD ANDERSON KEVIN C (JTWROS 205 BARLEY MILL DR GRIMLEY ROBERT P TOMKOW AMY (JTWROS) 7 MISTY OAKS DR ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L FOULK KASEY M 15 LEBANON CT D R HORTON INC CAPOLONGO MARITZA 630 FAIRVIEW RD APT 209 CHILDRESS MARTHA JEAN PEERY TARA L 15 N AVONDALE DR NVR INC COON LYNSEY Y (JTWROS) 259 CHESTATEE CT MULLIGAN LYNN W DRUMMOND NANCY W 15 BRIGHTMORE DR SPENCER BROOKLYN W FLETCHER HOLLY LEA (JTWR 5 GALWAY DR MCCOLLUM DENNIS M BAILEY BRITTANY (JTWROS) 204 ANDERSON ST STEPHANY LINDA C MULE CAROLYN J (JTWROS) 372 AMBERLEAF WAY ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC JACKSON JACOB HUNTER N/O/D MCCLAIN META MCALLISTER WILLIAM T 121 S MAIN ST UNIT 4 EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL THOMAS AUDREY M (JTWROS) 101 PENRITH CT LYNN DAVID G BAGWELL BECKY A (SURV) 325 N VALLEY VIEW DR CAMPBELL THOMAS HENRY (J TOWNSEND MARGIE A (JTWRO 249 SHEFFIELD RD PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND 451 7TH ST SW SK BUILDERS INC KIM KUN HYO 648 CHARTWELL DR EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL BUSCH-RICHARDSON HEIDI S 309 SEDGEBROOK DR DANIELS KIMBERLY A (JTWR PATTERSON BENJAMIN F (JT 704 N ALMOND DR CLIFF HAWK PROPERTIES LL RHODES CAROL L 104 MERITAGE ST KARKI BIMAL FITZGERALD ERIK S (JTWRO 12 BIRCHSTONE CT PRETTY MARILYN C WATSON CHERYL J 3 SWATHMORE CT METCALF ROGER W UPDIKE DONALD E (JTWROS) 18 HOLLANDER DR CLIFFS AT GLASSY INC BANK OF NORTH CAROLINA 3751 GRISSOM PKWY STE 100 COLLINS WARREN DAVID JR BURR JOSHUA A (JTWROS) 806 DACUSVILLE RD KIRKWOOD LANE LAND TRUST THACKRAY RYAN J (JTWROS) 15 KIRKWOOD LN NUBSON AMANDA E IRVING ANDRE C 256 BONNIE WOODS DR FLEMING ALBERT J SR (JTW BOTT THOMAS J 9 CHASIE LN TATE F WAYNE BECKER BRIAN G (JTWROS) 5 IVANHOE CIR STILES JUANITA C GARDNER MEGAN V (JTWROS) 301 GLENCREST SPRINGS RD SK BUILDERS INC FLEMING ALBERT J SR (JTW 42 RISING MEADOW LN EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL FOX VICKI K 18 IVORY ARCH CT CLIFFS AT GLASSY INC BANK OF NORTH CAROLINA 3751 GRISSOM PKWY STE 100 CLIFFS AT GLASSY INC BANK OF NORTH CAROLINA 3751 GRISSOM PKWY STE 100 HARMON GEORGE T V PAULEY HEATHER GRACE (JT 300 PIONEER CT ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC WYSKO GLORIA J (JTWROS) 213 SCOTTISH AVE BITTING JOHN C JR YOUNG WILLIAM M 6 HUDDERS CREEK WAY DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC MAHAFFEY BRANDON L 148 LARGESS LN KIM AE KYONG WILLIAMS JENNIFER L 103 CEDAR CT HORVATH MARGARET BEAM CHRISTOPHER C (JTWR 216 INN CIR TWO TIGERS INVESTMENTS L BLACK ANDREW B 323 LONGSTREET DR GARRITSON GARRY B STOKES DARYL 256 WATERCOURSE WAY

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

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x7 MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 45


JOURNAL HOMES

PE OPLE , AWA R D S , HONOR S C O N T I N U E D F R O M… PA G E 4 4

Leaders of the month; “March to SOLD” Anne Marchant, Jolene Wimberly & Brian Marchant - Sales Volume Team of the month; Nancy McCrory and Karen Turpin - Sales Listing Team of the month.

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Houzz community their commitment to excellence. These badges help homeowners identify popular and top-rated home professionals in every metro area on Houzz. “I love making homeowners’ dreams become reality, the pride in quality workmanship, and the wonderful people we’ve met who we now count among our great friends. It’s about being passionate about quality, service, and relationships.”

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in January 2014

Riggs

Akers

Marchant

The Marchant Company, the Upstate’s local “Signature Agency” in Real Estate, representing buyers and sellers of residential, land, and commercial properties, is proud to

46 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

Wagoner

March to SOLD

Slayter

McCrory and Turpin

recognize select REALTORS® for outstanding performance through January 2014. Congratulated by Seabrook Marchant, broker-in-charge, agents honored included: Barb Riggs – Sales Volume leader of the month; James Akers Jr. - Volume Listing and Unit Listing leader of the month; Tom Marchant, Nellie Wagoner & Kathy Slayter – Sales Unit

Felknor Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Shay Felknor as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. Felknor joins Coldwell Banker Caine with a sales background. She previously worked as a Client Executive for Level 3 Communications. She received her Bachelor of Science in Management with a Concentration in Marketing from Clemson University. Felknor In the Greenville community, Felknor is a member of the Metropolitan Arts Council, serves on the board for Izzie’s Pond and is an animal rescue volunteer. In her free time, she is an artist and photographer. She is a member of the Professional Photographers of South Carolina as well as the Professional Photographers Association. She has three rescue dogs named Stella, Lucy and Buddy and has family in Anderson, S.C.

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JOURNAL HOMES

PE OPLE , AWA R D S , HONOR S C O N T I N U E D F R O M… PA G E 4 6

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“We are very pleased to welcome Shay to our Greenville team,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “And we know she will provide great service given her skillset.”

Frederick Joins Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Denise Frederick has joined the company and serves as a Sales Associate with The Clever People group at the Anderson office. Frederick brings 25 years of experience with her and has earned the Certified Real Estate Brokerage Frederick Manager (CRB) designation.   She served previously as Broker in Charge at Mountain Lifestyle Realty Group in North Carolina. “We are very excited that Denise has joined our family of Realtors,” said Anush Showghi, Broker-in-Charge.  “We look forward to working with her.” Frederick currently lives in Anderson with her husband,  Randal.  She is an active volunteer with the Chamber of Commerce, National Association of Realtors education, and the local community.  In her free time, she enjoys traveling.

Sharon Wilson of Coldwell Banker Caine Awarded #1 Coldwell Banker Agent in South Carolina Sharon Wilson was awarded numerous outstanding awards including the #1 Coldwell Banker agent in the state of South Carolina.  Sharon is dedicated to real estate with over 28 years of service with Coldwell Banker Caine Real Estate.  Wilson was awarded the top producer and #1 Volume Producer Wilson for Coldwell Banker Caine. She has consistently ranked among the top two producers in the company and in the Coldwell Banker network in the state of South Carolina. This year, she qualified for the International President’s Premier Society, made up of the top 1 percent of all Coldwell Banker agents internationally. This is the highest recognition Coldwell Banker awards throughout its global network.  Along with the dedication to her business, Wilson is an active volunteer of Project Host and the C.C. Pearce Community Culinary School, a founding member of the McCall Hospice House of Greenville, United Way Women’s Leadership Council and a Junior League of Greenville Sustainer.

“Sharon leads a very successful real estate career that is demonstrated by her distinguished awards from year to year,” says Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Her commitment to excellence, passion for her clients, and dedication to the field, are what make her such an asset to our company and community. We are thrilled she is a member of the Caine family and will enjoy watching her flourish for many years to come.”

Church Joins Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Gwen Church has joined the company and serves as a Sales Associate at the Greer office. Church is a graduate of Greenville Technical College with a degrees   in Business and Marketing.  She previously served as a J. Crew style associate. “We are very excited that Gwen has Church joined our Greer office,” said Avanelle Pelfrey, Broker-in-Charge.  “We look forward to working with her.” Church currently lives in Lyman with her two children.  They live on a horse farm where she trains the thoroughbreds.  In her free time, she enjoys playing tennis and traveling.

More first-time buyers, and sellers. For more than 80 years. For more than 80 years, Caine has been the first name in Upstate real estate. Although quite a bit has changed in those eight decades, some things haven’t: like the personal service people expect from our agents. Learn more at cbcaine.com.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 47


JOURNAL CULTURE THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 45-04/22/14, Environmental Engineering Consulting Services, April 22, 2014, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Purchasing_Dept/RFP.asp or by calling (864) 467-7200. IFB# 48-04/09/14, Asphalt and Paving Services, April 9, 2014, 3:00 P.M. IFB# 47-04/23/14, Slater Hall HVAC Installation, April 23, 2014, 3:00 P.M. A mandatory pre-bid meeting and site visit will be held at 10:00A.M., E.D.T., April 10, 2014 at Slater Hall, 5 Whitney Street, Slater, SC 29683. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Purchasing_Dept/Bids.asp or by calling (864) 467-7200.

COMPLAINT NOTICE A complaint has been brought before the Code Enforcement Division of a dangerous, insanitary and unsafe structure located at the following locations: 700 Edgemont Avenue a.k.a. Pt. 7 Cedar Lane Gardens, Greenville County Tax Map Number B11-2-6.1, Greenville County, SC. 1 Taylor Street a.k.a. Lots Nos. 28 and 29 on a plat of property of Mrs. Sara E. Adams, Greenville Tax Map Number T6-13-30, Greenville County, SC. 4584 Highway 14 a.k.a. a 2.79 Acre Tract on Plat of J.W. Mills property, Greenville County Tax Map Number 629.21-8.3, Greenville County, SC. 124 Patterson Street a.k.a. ¼ Acre – Patterson Street – Grove Township, Greenville County Tax Map Number 610.2-1-7, Greenville County, SC. 122 Stephenson Street a.k.a. Stephenson Street a.k.a. all that piece, parcel or lot of land in Chick Springs Township, Greenville County, State of South Carolina near the Town of Taylors, Greenville County Tax Number T6-13-3, Greenville County, SC. 611 Edgemont Avenue a.k.a. Pt. Lot 75 & 76 a.k.a. 601 Edgemont Avenue a.k.a. all that certain piece, parcel or tract of land situate, lying and being on the southerly side of Edgemont Avenue, in the County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, being known and designated as a portion of Lots 75 and 76 as shown on plat of G.J. Douglas Estate, as prepared by Century Land Surveying Land Surveying Company Dated January 2, 1979, Greenville County Tax Map Number 145-210, Greenville County, SC. 10 Pelzer Street a.k.a. Lot 23, Section 1, Victor-Monaghan Mills, Greenville County Tax Map Number 142-17-12, Greenville County, SC. 6 Pelzer Street a.k.a. Lot 25, Section 1, Victor-Monaghan Mills, Greenville County Tax Map Number 142-17-14, Greenville County, SC.

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, April 14, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items: DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2014-11 APPLICANT: D. Alan Chastain CONTACT INFORMATION: alchastain@bellsouth.net or 864-449-1792 PROPERTY LOCATION: 310 Clearview Drive PIN: 0593040104500 EXISTING ZONING:R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: C-3, Commercial ACREAGE: 3.4 COUNTY COUNCIL: 25 – Gibson DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2014-14 APPLICANT: John Beeson with Mark III Properties, Inc. for Ellis O. Meredith, Sr., (P.O.A), Ellis O. Meredith, Jr., and Flavelia Morton CONTACT INFORMATION: john@markiiiproperties.com or 864-595-1735 PROPERTY LOCATION: Morton Road and McKinney Road PIN: 0559030100901 and 0559030100900 EXISTING ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: R-15, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 20.1 COUNTY COUNCIL: 27 – Kirven DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2014-16 APPLICANT: Site Design for Culvin Enterprises, LLC, Joe Brookshire, III, and Natalie Brookshire CONTACT INFORMATION: danaa@sitedesign-inc.com or 864-271-0496 PROPERTY LOCATION: Locust Hill Road PINS: 0632010103300, 0632010103200, and 0632010103301 EXISTING ZONING: NC, Neighborhood Commercial and R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: C-1, Commercial ACREAGE: 5.21 COUNTY COUNCIL: 18 – Baldwin All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Zoning Ordinance and Map are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different zoning classification than requested.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Bending Wood Circle Drainage Improvements Project in Greenville County by April 21, 2014, 3:00 P.M. A mandatory pre-bid meeting and site tour will be held at 9:00 A.M., EDT, April 7, 2014 at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty.org/ Purchasing_Dept/Bids.asp or by calling 864-467-7200.

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305 email: aharley@ communityjournals.com

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Blue Ridge Olive Oil. LTD, Co., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of LIQUOR at 4 Market Point Drive Ste F, #2, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 6, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that 2 Little Men LLC / DBA: The Cigar Boxx, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 23 College Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 13, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Creative Arts, LLC / DBA Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of LIQUOR at 1237 Pendleton Street, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 13, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that South Carolina CVS Pharmacy, L.L.C, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 2446 Hudson Rd., Greer, SC 29650. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 6, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas and FAVOR of Greenville teamed up to host the Second Annual Greenville Roast. A large crowd was on hand for this year’s roast, which took place at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Greenville. Pictured are 2014 roastee Stewart Spinks with friend Leighton Cubbage.

Brooke Sherbert and Barbara Goodjoin’s 4K class had fun learning about transportation. They had a special visitor come to teach them about a bucket truck. 

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Cliffs Club at Mountain Park, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 154 River Road, Marietta, SC 29661. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 30, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Blue Ridge Olive Oil. LTD, Co., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 4 Market Point Drive Ste F, #1 Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 6, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Washington Center student Caleb Massey is ready to put on his running shoes to “pay it forward” with Team Flash for the school’s first annual Spirit Day.​

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) Airman Nicholas Barnes, from Greenville, waits to recover the arresting cable while an F/A-18F Super Hornet, attached to the “Fighting Black Lions” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213, prepares to land on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). George H. W. Bush is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Andrew Johns.

2 D Street (Judson) a.k.a. Lot 45, Judson Mills Village, Section 6, Greenville County Tax Map Number 114-6-10, Greenville County, SC. 10 Boyce Street (Piedmont), Greenville County Tax Map Number 610.2-1-28, Greenville County, SC. Any persons having interest in these properties, or knowledge of the property owner should contact the Codes Enforcement Office at 864-467-7090 on or before April 3, 2014.

Crossword puzzle: page 50

48 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

Sudoku puzzle: page 50


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK Below, Barbara Martin, Habitat vice president of development; Erica Downs, homeowner; and Monroe Free, Habitat president and CEO.

Community leaders raise the ceremonial first wall for a house in the Abigail Springs subdivision. Upstate business leaders gathered in Taylors to start construction of a Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County home. The leaders are part of a project known as the CEO Build, which is in its second year. Each member of the CEO Build team will work on the house for the next few months.

Camp Bow Wow was the sponsor of the March Yappy Hour and provided several raffle prizes. The next Yappy Hour will be April 10 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Humane Society. There will be a total of eight Yappy Hours this year held the second Thursday of each month. The 14th annual Baptist Easley Foundation gala was on Saturday, March 15, at the Poinsett Club in Greenville, with nearly 300 in attendance. The black-tie-optional event was a St. Patrick’s Day celebration with a seated dinner, silent and live auctions, and dancing to a live band. Proceeds from the gala will support a campaign to raise $100,000 for procuring digital mammography for Medical Center Powdersville. Pictured here are Dr. and Mrs. Joshua Morowitz, left, and Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Wood.

Local singer and musician Trey Francis provided the evening entertainment at Yappy Hour. Jay and Stephanie Gillespie with their dogs Abby and Maggie at the Greenville Humane Society’s first Yappy Hour of 2014.

L

T

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Join us as we celebrate the many different cultures in the Upstate.

AFTER BALL & BALLET… COME HOME TO A SHAW FLOOR.

MARCH

Carpet | Tile & Stone | Hardwood | Laminate | Resilient | shawfloors.com

21st

La Fiesta

21st

Requiem Hiroshima

22nd

CU-ICAR Millennium Drive

25th

Greenville Chamber International Event

For more information on these events and others in your area, visit

167 Verdin Rd | Greenville | 864.527.5555 | www.classiccarpetsgreenville.com MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 49


JOURNAL CULTURE

Don’t buy cheap clothes. Buy good clothes, cheap.

1922 Augusta St. Greenville, SC 29605 labelsgreenville.com 864.631.1919 50 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 28, 2014

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. CB SWITCHES

ACROSS 1 “Waverley” novelist 6 Sch. with a Waterbury campus 11 Early computer acronym 16 Standout 19 Many a network 20 Competition with ropes 21 One of a dozen 22 Pres. or P.M. 23 Sidewalk vendor’s income? 25 Steeped salad topping? 27 Romantic request 28 High land 30 Fill with bubbles 31 Foot on a farm 33 “It matters to us” 34 Trypanosome transmitter 35 Really enjoy 38 All-Star outfielder Raul 40 Pondside stalk 41 More than walk 42 Equals 43 Equally, say 46 E.T. policers of film 49 Notre Dame’s conf. 50 Smoothie fruit 51 “Say it soft and it’s almost like praying” girl of song 52 Old Bristol-Myers toothpaste 54 Online meeting place 56 Announce

57 Backwoods 58 Scientology guru Hubbard 59 Silent 60 Turn right 61 What you can’t get if you pass the bar? 62 Cake with a kick 64 Accident report? 67 Model Sastre 68 Aimée of “La Dolce Vita” 70 L.A.’s __ Center 71 Confrontational opening 72 All there 74 Eastern guru 75 Like slalom courses 77 Roaring Twenties Hollywood sex symbol 81 Leftovers cover 82 Lotto variant 83 Base shade? 84 Kimono accessory 85 Chicago airport code 86 Liftoff sensation 88 Patriot and Liberty 89 Hosp. scanners 90 Howdy to a mate 91 Puzzle 93 Gear features 94 Diacritic for a long vowel sound 97 Puzzled reactions 99 Mount sacred to Judaism 101 Poise 102 Goes for 103 Restful break

By Nora Pearlstone

107 Sketched a Gibb brother? 109 Villain’s backwoods hideout? 113 Baloney 114 Regular’s request, with “the” 115 “C’mon, pal!” 116 Map type: Abbr. 117 Portland-to-Helena dir. 118 Come together 119 Declines with a check, maybe 120 Plenty

DOWN 1 Moose Jaw’s prov. 2 Diamond Preferred credit card offerer 3 Hockey legend Bobby et al. 4 Drive, often 5 Aftershock 6 Ending for sub- or ex7 __ anglais: English horn 8 Keats work 9 Spiffs (up) 10 “Out of the question” 11 Glower? 12 Up from Mexico 13 Having four sharps 14 Central California city 15 Robin selling Roquefort? 16 Smug look 17 Proof jobs 18 1957 Bobbettes hit 24 Auto racer Fabi

26 Scott who sued for his freedom 29 Market 32 Sporty ‘80s Pontiac 33 On alert 35 What a dot may mean, in mus. 36 Prefix meaning “pri-

Hard

mary” 37 Qualifying exam for opera school? 39 Earthen wall 40 One may weep after being told to do this 42 McJob holder 44 Continue intermi-

nably 45 More repulsive 46 Undersea party pooper? 47 Hardly well-thoughtout 48 Pitching slips 50 Fella 51 Seashell, maybe 53 Pet food giant 55 Emotional shock 56 Run well 59 Fanatic 62 Rossini’s Doctor Bartolo, e.g. 63 Sadat of Egypt 64 One helping swingers? 65 Not so elevated 66 Vaudeville family name 69 Official loafer of the realm? 72 Nordstrom rival 73 Agent Gold on “Entourage” 76 Derisive looks 77 __ lab 78 Two-mile-high city 79 Memorial news item 80 Something made on a star? 83 Brewery lineup 87 Boosters, as a group 88 Their parts are hard to tell apart 89 Cough drop flavor 90 Increase 92 Hiker’s snack 93 Salutes of a sort 94 Familia member 95 Kitchen protection 96 ‘50s-’60s Yankee Boyer 97 Skinny sort 98 Rules immortal 100 Nail down, as victory 104 Scruff 105 Have __: flip out 106 P.O. deliveries 108 Classic Capek play 110 Lic.-issuing bureau 111 Skip, as stones 112 Ones with seats

Crossword answers: page 48

Sudoku answers: page 48


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE SYMPTOMS BY ASHLEY HOLT

The big freeze Certain ideas just seem to come out of nowhere when I first wake up in the morning. I rise from the depths of slumber, rubbing my swollen eyelids, and suddenly think to myself, “Is Kitty Carlisle still alive?” And then I can’t get on with my day until I’ve Googled. Other times a random song is inexplicably delivered unto me at this early hour. For years this was “Let’s Hear It for the Boy,” a song I haven’t heard since it was first released, yet can sing from start to finish (just ask next time you see me). Other “first thoughts” of the day might include “How does Uri Geller eat soup?,” the phrase “elongated stucco buckles,” or a deep longing to visit the set of “Family Affair.” These thoughts are like a last-second jump shot from the subconscious, hitting my waking mind just before the buzzer. And on this particular day a few months back, the random thought that occurred to me upon waking was, “I want an Icee.” I focused on this impulse a bit, letting it clarify in my mind, and realized that no, I NEEDED an Icee. And I needed it today. An Icee, for the culturally deprived, is a frozen beverage consisting of crushed ice, syrup and a blast of CO2 carbonation. It’s dispensed in neon colors from a refrigerated Icee machine by disgruntled, third-shift clerks at Stop-N-Go, Quick Stop, Fast Fuel or many other convenience stores with names that encourage your hasty exit. Shoplifting frequently in just such convenience stores throughout my childhood, it’s fair to say I was raised on

Icees. They were the traditional victory drinks after a successful Little League game, a handy method of pacifying whiny tykes during a long car ride, and the logical result of having “found” 68 cents on your sister’s bedside table. I lay in bed that morning, remembering this artificially flavored concoction fondly. I wanted another hit. But it had been a long time since I had even thought of Icees. Did they even exist anymore? Panic set in. It wasn’t that I couldn’t live without slurping an Icee again, but I wasn’t sure I could live in a world where Icees were no longer available. The integrity of America itself was riding on this. What were all those missile defense programs and firefights in Southeast Asia for if not to keep the flow of Icee on tap? What represents the purity of the American dream more than the liberal distribution of corn syrup and Red Dye No. 2? I had to know that Icees were still out there, that America was still strong. To my delight, I discovered the momand-pop store down the road was advertising Icees, so I went in to investigate. What I found there was an Icee-brand “slushie,” a generic vat of crushed ice floating in snow cone syrup, with no carbonation. This was not an Icee. But it occurred to me that perhaps that was all that was left of the once-noble Icee brand. Maybe the kids of today would have no connection with the true legacy of the Icee and all that it represented. They would think THIS syrupy gunk was what I’ve been rhapsodizing all these years, just

like they get confused about the real “Clash of the Titans.” This may seem like a lot of fuss over a trashy junk food item, but you know as well as I that junk culture is what binds our generation together. We do not connect through shared remembrance of traditional foods cooked by native grandmothers or ceremonial dances of springtime. Our shared cultural heritage is “Speed Buggy.” Our nostalgia for home and hearth includes Pop Rocks, Space Invaders, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Smurfs and Shasta. We grew up in a branded culture, and we reestablish contact with our youth by sorting through the debris of antique consumption. Tell me you don’t get giddy just thinking about Bubblicious. The trouble is that junk ain’t what it used to be. Like other pathetic Gen Xers, I get excited about the seasonal reappearance of Frankenberry on the store shelves, and impulsively purchase a box. But tasting the cereal again, hoping to be magically transformed to the breakfast table of yesteryear, I find something is vaguely wrong with the experience. The taste isn’t the same. The corn syrup kick I’m expecting feels bland. It’s an artificial version of the artificial flavor we remember. It WANTS to be Frankenberry, but like the monster for which it’s named, it had been resurrected from the dead and rebuilt too many times to have its original impact. The same goes for McDonald’s fries, Mountain Dew or an REO Speedwagon reunion tour. We can’t even depend on garbage to be the garbage we remember. I suppose it’s a pretty sad commentary on our culture that we place such emotional value on Skittles and Big Macs, but such is our TV-addled condi-

tioning. In fact, this is no soapbox I’m ranting from, but a Beanie Babies collector’s case. I’ve learned over the years to accept these nostalgic attachments to Big Boy and Captain Crunch as very real. For some of us, Aunt Jemima was the only family member who provided unconditional love (she only once politely suggested I attend military school, then never brought it up again). We can’t depend on our drunken parents; we should feel secure in our Fruit RollUps. And so maybe you can understand my quest for the Icee, and my great relief when I finally discovered that the beverage was still widely available (Burger King and Target stores, for those who share my juvenile craving). Better yet, the drink was exactly as I remembered it: fizzy, revoltingly sweet, and inducing a brain freeze which temporarily blinded me. It brought back a flood of childhood memories: wetting my pants in kindergarten, setting fire to the couch, getting stung by a swarm of angry bees – all of them “Icee moments.” I felt great relief in knowing that the Icee brand was still alive, and still providing the direct link to the comforting garbage consumption of our collective, brainless youth. Because this is something we all have within us, this internal reservoir of feel-good pop-culture nostalgia. Which is why you’ve had “Let’s Hear It for the Boy” in your head this whole time. Ashley Holt is a writer and illustrator living in Spartanburg. His neurotic quirks and extreme sensitivity to broad social trends are chronicled in The Symptoms, an illustrated blog. Check out his website at ashleyholt.com.

Custom Build – Renovations – Design

TURNING DREAMS I N T O R E A L I T Y

C111R

highlandhomessc.com – 864.233.4175

MARCH 28, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 51


FORE a Million Dollars! April 25 – April 26 Eagle Zone Golf

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Use this coupon during early bird hours, Friday 9-11 and Saturday 9-10 and receive two bags free with one bag purchase. Greenville Journal


March 28, 2014 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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