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STANDING UP AGAINST SLAVERY AT USC UPSTATE Goodbye walls, hello co-working FEATURED IN THE UPSTATE BUSINESS JOURNAL

PAGE 12

SPARTANBURG JOURNAL

Spartanburg, SC • Friday, March 8, 2013 • Vol.9, No.10

Gaining

MOMENTUM Oconee bell rings in spring PAGE 17

The Para-Cycling World Championships are headed to the Upstate PAGE 8

Some like (art) hot PAGE 27

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JOURNAL NEWS

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Finally…some spring-like weather for the weekend. Reminder, turn your clocks ahead one hour before going to bed Saturday night.

32˚

FRIDAY

61˚

33˚ SATURDAY 63˚

38˚

SUNDAY

66˚

WYFF News 4 Chief Meteorologist

John Cessarich

For weather information, 24 hours a day, visit WYFF4.com

Bright sunshine

2 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 8, 2013

Mostly sunny skies

Mostly to partly sunny


journal news

Worth Repeating They Said It Quote of the week

“We cross borders all the time – sometimes consciously, but many times without much thought.”

“As creatures women are so perfect, so sophisticated. They’re complex beings. Men are so simple.” Carolina Ballet Theatre Artistic Director Hernan Justo, regarding his original ballet, “Celebration of Women.”

“The nation is divided on this question. This is a partisan political issue, it’s got a lot of ideology embedded in it.”

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Stan Healy, president of Notus Sports, on the Para-Cycling World Championships.

“If we can’t get permission to build the condo complex we’ve got planned, we intend to build the (74-unit) housing development that the county has already approved.” Eric Kaufmann, on his plans for 50 acres he owns at the second-highest point on Paris Mountain.

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864-325-2112 Joan@AugustaRoad.com 4 THE Journal | MARCH 8, 2013

One way or another Developer says opposition won’t stop his plans for Paris Mountain By CHarles Sowell | staff

One way or another, Eric Kaufmann says his plans to develop the secondhighest point on Paris Mountain will bear fruit. The views from the 1,800-foot high building site are more than just panoramic on a crystal-clear winter day. There is nearly a 180-degree view of the Blue Wall. Distant Mt. Pisgah peeks over the wall. Whiteside Mountain is visible to the west and the mountains

of Georgia are crisp blue mounds on the horizon. The development would be called Altera and, as now proposed, would put a condo complex that hugs the 1,800-foot line in an arch around the top of the mountain, Kaufmann said. It would be designed to mimic the Biltmore Estate’s main house and have room for 74 units of about 2,000 square feet each. Included in the plan for Altera are amenities, a clubhouse/restaurant on a small pond on the property. Plans include a center focusing on the environment and miles of walking trails. Kaufmann expects opposition to the current plan. There was opposition to the last plan, too. Allan Jenkins, who lives within a mile of the proposed project, has no

Programs BOOST youth By Jeanne putnam | contributor

Representatives from Greenville County, the United Way and the Greenville Youth Commission gathered at the TD Convention Center in Greenville on Monday to celebrate Greenville’s recognition as one of America’s Promise Alliance’s 100 Best Communities for Young People in 2012. The 100 Best Communities for Young People is a national competition designed to recognize programs and initiatives aimed at supporting youth and ending the high school dropout crisis. National statistics show one in four students fail to graduate from high school in four years, which translates to 1 million young people per year dropping out of U.S. schools at an average of 7,000 students per day. Local officials say those patterns hold true in South Carolina, where 72.4 percent of students graduated in 2012. The Monday ceremony celebrated the designation – Greenville’s second – and Greenville County’s commitment to combating the dropout crisis through programs such as the United Way initiative BOOST and the city of Greenville’s Youth Commission. BOOST, an acronym for Building Opportunities in Out of School Time, seeks to provide at-risk students with high quality after-school programs through a network of public and private providers. United Way is piloting the Continu-

ous Program Quality Initiative in five after-school programs that serve close to 200 students. Greenville Sen. Mike Fair told the group the program “could not be named better. Over 8,000 students in Greenville County, more than 10 percent, are involved in after-school programs.” In addition to BOOST, the Greenville Youth Commission seeks to increase communication between young people and the city’s adult leadership and encourage student community involvement. The group consists of 16-24 high school students who serve one-year terms and advise the Greenville City Council about issues important to the city’s youth. Youth Commission chair Laura Woodside said in the past year, the group has teamed with the Greenville Drive to create the Just Drive program, which “encourages teens to no longer drive distracted” by cell phones. The young people also produced an antibullying video shot in Cleveland Park by commission member Stephen Simmons, a Wade Hampton senior and Fine Arts Center film student. For more information on: BOOST, visit boostgreenville.org; Greenville Youth Commission, visit greenvillesc. gov/ParksRec/Youth/YouthCommission; and America’s Promise Alliance, visit americaspromise.org. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL NEWS real opposition to the condos. “It’s his land and he has the right to do with it as he likes,” Jenkins said. However, he has strong opposition to the plans for a clubhouse, which would include a restaurant and bar that would be open to the public. “Altamont Road is dangerous enough as it is and we have many nights where the mountain is shrouded in fog. The road is dangerous enough up here for people who know it, much less strangers to the mountain who have had a few drinks,” Jenkins said. Kaufmann said, “If we can’t get permission to build the condo complex we’ve got planned, we intend to build the (74-unit) housing development that the county has already approved.” Kaufmann and his chief environmental advisor Jeff BeeThe proposed Altera development cham will go before Greenville County officials later this The change would allow the developer month in an attempt to have the prop- to create a mixed-use development with erty placed under the county’s new flex- a much smaller footprint than the 74 ible zoning regulations. single-family dwellings that already have

March 8

the county zoning board’s approval. Paris Mountain is considered an environmentally sensitive area because of the steep slope and fragile ecology, Bee-

cham said. There is, however, no limitation on lot size and many homes occupy large lots. Kaufman’s approved plan would put 74 single-family dwellings on about 50 acres. The homes’ footprint would occupy about half the property, Beecham said. The new plan would only occupy five percent of the site, Beecham said. “This is much more environmentally sensitive. There will be much less runoff and the construction impact will be far less than building 74 single family dwellings.” The proposed development is a long golf shot from Joe Hiller’s Altamont Forest development that achieved brief fame for its leaky sewer system that polluted the lakes at Paris Mountain State Park. Beecham said the Kaufmann plan includes a state-of-the-art biological sewage treatment plant that could, eventually, take care of the Altamont Forest wastewater, too. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

G H S H e a lt H e d u c at i o n

Controlling Asthma

Meet the Midwives

Tues., March 12 • Noon-1 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Join GHS physicians from Cross Creek Internal Medicine for a discussion on asthma and the latest treatments. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Tues., March 26 • 6-8 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required.

Spring Into Action to Prevent Colorectal Cancer Tues., March 19 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Join GHS colorectal surgeon Patrick Culumovic, MD, to learn about colorectal cancer and steps you can take to prevent it. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Kidney Screening Sat., March 23 • 10 a.m.-3 p.m. • Bethlehem Baptist Church Those with diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of these conditions or kidney disease are urged to get screened. Must be age 18 or older. To register, call (803) 799-3870 ext. 110.

Guyology: Just the Facts

Minority Health Summit Sat., April 13 • 11 a.m.-2 p.m. • BI-LO® Center Speakers include renowned pediatric neurosurgeon Benjamin Carson, MD; U.S. Olympic swimmer Cullen Jones; and nutrition and wellness expert Dr. Ann Kulze. Free; registration required. Parking is $5. Food available for purchase. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/360healthed or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

Sun., March 24 • 2:30-4:30 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This program for boys in 4th and 5th grade eases the transition into puberty through open discussion. Fee: $50 dad/son. To register, visit the events page at girlology.com. 130087

MARCH 8, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Call out the hypocrites A bill intended to make citizen access to public records easier and less costly is once again headed to a vote in the S.C. House, where it is expected to pass as handily as it did last year. The question is whether the state Senate will balk – as it did last year – at Rep. Rick Quinn’s last-ditch amendment to make the law apply as equally to the lawwriters as it would to the rest of government. A similar version of H. 3163, which aims to strengthen the state’s notoriously weak Freedom of Information Act, was derailed last year in the Senate – in retaliation for the self-same “poison pill” amendment that seeks to open legislative email and internal correspondence (now exempt from the FOIA) to public inspection. “Poison pill” is not Quinn’s choice of adjectives. His point is fair play. He said then, as now, that legislators are hypocrites to demand transparency from others and shield themselves. No other state in the union “has a South Carolinastyle ‘special’ exemption for state politicians. It truly is outrageous,” he wrote in a Greenville News guest column. Quinn is correct, of course. What gives the bill’s supporters heartburn is the threat of losing all its other reforms should his wholly justifiable amendment sink the bill again. While legislative transparency is definitely a bonus, the changes this bill envisions are tilted toward the secretive and obstructive behaviors common to state bureaucrats, school boards and city and county governments, the far greater offenders of open records laws. South Carolina’s FOIA is one of those laws that looks good until you realize how easy it is to circumvent. All H. 3163 would do is edge its provisions from ridiculous to tolerable. The bill proposes to cut from 15 to 10 working days the time allowed government agencies to say if they will even comply with a request for public records; compel most documents (if the answer is yes) to be turned over within 30 days (currently there is no deadline); reduce the costs public bodies may charge for providing said documents; and establish an Office of Freedom of Information Act Review to hear appeals should records be denied (now the only recourse is to hire a lawyer and go to circuit court). That this is even considered “reform” explains why the Palmetto State ranked 50th in the nation for access to public information in a study released last summer. South Carolina’s failure to provide an appeal process or impose penalties on agencies that violate FOI laws was a prime factor in the high “corruption risk” awarded South Carolina by the State Integrity Investigation, a project of the Center for Public Integrity, Global Integrity and Public Radio International. That rating played a sizable part in the governor’s decision to create an independent Ethics Reform Commission chaired by former attorneys general Travis Medlock and Henry McMaster, who, as luck would have it, share Rick Quinn’s view of legislative hypocrisy. Their report recommends that comprehensive ethics reform include the deletion of the FOIA exemption for “memoranda, correspondence, and working papers in the possession of individual members of the General Assembly or their immediate staffs.” Elected leaders and government bureaucrats forget too easily whom they serve; all this legislation seeks to do is remind them. As Quinn said, lawmakers have had a year to think it over. Only the basest hypocrites will vote “no” this time around.

The quest for the ‘perfect’ female form The pressure to be thin is prevalent in today’s society; so much so, that it reigns supreme as the cultural standard for beauty. Evidenced by the magazines we read, the television shows we watch and the world we live in, more often than not the definition of beauty is relevant to the size of one’s waist, the nature of one’s features and the shape of one’s figure. Sadly, this obsession with body image is not a new phenomenon. Shifting standards of beauty are evident throughout history. Reviewing American history alone, one can find a half a dozen different standards of what is considered “beautiful.” In the 1800s, women were expected to have tiny waists and hourglass figures. To achieve this ideal, ladies wore corsets to restrict their torsos and mold their bodies into desired yet unnatural shapes. In the 1920s, women were beautiful if they had flat chests and tanned skin. Top-heavy women tightly bound their upper bodies or purchased lingerie that minimized their features. In the 1950s, Marilyn Monroe was the epitome of style and beauty, inspiring small waistlines, full skirts and large busts. Hair dye kits became popular and even fake beauty marks (i.e., moles) were drawn on faces. In the 1960s, at the age of 16, Twiggy became the icon of beauty for women. Her exaggerated makeup, cropped hairstyle and slender frame adorned magazine covers. Gone was the full-figured ideal of beauty: Slim bodies and the extreme lengths at which to achieve them became standard. In the 1980s, Cindy Crawford and the athletic era came to the forefront. Today, women are bombarded with images of models who are so thin they appear waiflike and malnourished. Day in and day out, we are inundated by messages that both individually and collectively express an unrealistic image of beauty. The results speak for themselves: increasing rates of eating disorders, anxiety, depression and addictions. Today, more than 25 million Americans struggle with an eating disorder. More people die from eating disorders than any

IN MY OWN WORDS by NILLY BARR

other mental illness. As a society, it is time to open our eyes to the unrealistic portrayal of beauty that is poisoning our minds, destroying our bodies and wreaking havoc in our world. It is time for our nation to recognize and live by our stated values to honor the human being – not as an object, but as a precious life. We must take action and address the problem of beauty standards so that our sons, daughters and future generations are not pressured to walk down this same path. In an effort to educate our community as well as offer messages of hope and recovery to those struggling with eating disorders, a local nonprofit called ED Aware is sponsoring an exhibit during the month of March. “Body Lines: A Retrospective Look at the ‘Perfect’ Female Form” is a walking exhibit of images and statistics that paints a portrait of the evolution of body image and beauty standards. “Body Lines” will be on display at Coffee Underground for the entire month of March. On March 21, ED Aware will host a special reception on-site for individuals to meet local professionals and receive information and resources about eating disorders. Both the exhibit and reception are free of charge and open to the public. We encourage you to stop by and visit Body Lines soon; our hope is that you leave feeling encouraged, confident and renewed. Let’s come together as a community and challenge an epidemic that has plagued our society for far too long. While times, trends and fashions change, you are beautiful as you are. Nilly Barr is a licensed professional counselor with a Master of Science degree in counseling psychology from the University of Tennessee. She has been in practice for nearly 25 years and lives in Greenville.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 8, 2013


journal news

opinion voices from your community, heard here

Help for parental stress

Thank You!

There is plenty of research on parental stress. However, if you’re a parent, you don’t need a study. You’re familiar with the daily stress involved with making sure kids are safe, shuttled from place to place and served healthy meals while balancing other obligations, including work. Those responsibilities cause stress in all families, but those with children diagnosed with developmental disabilities often experience elevated stress. This is frightening because studies have found that these families are less likely to seek help when overwhelmed. Developmental disabilities are chronic health problems that can cause serious limitations in everyday activities, including self-care, communication, learning, mobility and the ability to live and work independently. Families with children diagnosed with developmental disabilities are often isolated socially. They sometimes avoid social settings because they do not know how their children will react. Social isolation combined with other issues, including marital strain, often leads to problems. Research shows that both mothers and fathers experience parental stress. However, one parent, often the mother, takes a more intense role as caregiver. This extreme caregiver might resent doing most of the work. But the other parent might feel that his or her spouse is not receptive to input or neglecting the marital relationship. It is also easy to imagine how single-parent families experience overwhelming stress. These families are often tired, frustrated and reluctant to schedule another appointment, but we are making strides every day to ensure that children diagnosed with developmental disabilities receive the most comprehensive, multidisciplinary care possible. Programs like SC LEND (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities) are teaching healthcare professionals how to better understand and assist families impacted by developmental disabilities. Greenville Hospital System Children’s Hospital has one of the most comprehensive centers in the country to evaluate and treat children diagnosed with developmental disabilities, recently attracting 150 professionals to its annual regional summit. Meeting with trained professionals and other families with similar experi-

in my own words by DR. TARA A. CANCELLARO and JULIE M. KELLETT

God’s Healing for A Mother’s Heart

Thank You! A Day-Retreat for Women Who Have Experienced the Death of a Child

Thank Thank ences can help with managing stress and provide information that can make you a better advocate for your child. There are a number of programs designed to help families address these common issues. Family Connection of South Carolina (familyconnectionsc.org) has a network of offices and families that offers programs for families, including workshops © 2011 CTA, Inc. to improve communication between couples and referrals to respite co-ops. The S.C. Autism Society (scautism. org) can pair parents across the state with local resources. Sibling Support Project (siblingsupport. org) provides information for siblings affected by a brother or sister’s health condition. Siblings can also connect with others through Yahoo and Facebook groups. Help Me Grow (1-855-476-9211) provides information to families who are concerned about their children’s behavior, development or learning. The program can also refer families to other resources. Resiliency can counterbalance stress. Make sure your family has healthy communication skills. Parents should be able to communicate their family’s needs to physicians and others they encounter. It’s also important for parents to communicate with each other and for children to have healthy communication skills. It is important that we manage stress and seek help when it is needed. We are our best selves when© we sleeping, get2011are CTA, Inc. ting exercise, spending time with our partners and friends. When we are not at our best it not only impacts our health, but it affects our children.

Thank You! Thank You!

Dr. Tara A. Cancellaro is a developmental-behavioral pediatric fellow and Julie M. Kellett, MA, is a psychology resident. Both work in the Division of DevelopmentalBehavioral Pediatrics with the Greenville Hospital System’s Children’s © 2011 CTA, Inc. Hospital. Both are SC LEND Program trainees.

Please join us for a day of encouragement, pampering, loving support, comfort food, authentic presenters and sharing the love of Christ, our Great Healer and Comforter. We welcome mothers at all points along their journey of healing regardless of the age of the child or the length of time since the death.

Saturday, April 20, 2013 9:00 am - 3:30 pm

© 2011 CTA, Inc.

First Baptist Church, Simpsonville MPAC Building (101 Church Street) Registration: 8:30 am - 9:00 am Registration Cost - $10.00 (Includes lunch) Our Guest Speakers

Thank You! Patti Cannady Alyce Kemp DeWitt Cathy Schwartz

Christian Speaker Christian Speaker Christian Entertainer

Small Group Choices

1. Journaling through Grief Beth Marshall – Author of a Time to Heal

2. Stress and Spiritual Health Kathy Kent – Health Educator

3. Prayer Walking

Susan Bledsoe – Campus Crusade

4. Healing through Art Expression

Jesse Martini – Art Teacher

5. Healthy Eating

Colleen Finley – Teacher

7. How to Talk to Children About Death and Coping Dr. Anne Henderson – School Counselor

8. De-stress Through Yoga Ellen Hampshire – School Psychologist

9. The Trauma of Suicide

Leigh Bostic – Clinical Social Worker

10. Ideas to Honor Your Child’s Memory

Holly Warren and Susan Wilkerson

Thank You! 6. Coping with the Physical Symptoms of Grief Dr. Rebecca Smith – Family Medicine

11. Encouragement Cards

Anna Hewett and Judy Orr

© 2011 CTA, Inc.

12. The Mother’s Role in the Healing of the Family

Allyson Helvie – Counselor & Pastor

To RSVP & receive registration brochure, please contact: Cindy: 864-238-6796 • Kathryn: 864-325-3526 Alice Ann: aadholman@gmail.com • Jan: jan@pdtm.us

Deadline to register is March 22. Please understand the seating capacity of the facility determines the size of our group. It is limited to the first 120 women who register.

© 2013 STEI

© 2011 CTA, Inc.

MARCH 8, 2013 | the Journal 7


JOURNAL NEWS

Lucky Para-cycling rolls into town You! April event is precursor to 2014 Para-Cycling World Championships

we have St. Patrick’s Day decorations galore!

By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

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3219 Augusta Street, Greenville 864-277-4180 • ThePickwick.net Monday-Friday 9-6 & Saturday 9-3

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pionships. “I think it’s exciting because we’re going to focus on the elite athletes who are disabled from around the world. It really shows that Greenville is an allinclusive cycling community.” Healy, also a cyclist, said this event will be just as exciting as the U.S. Championships and hopes the community will come out to support the athletes. The athletes he has encountered say the best part

ATHLETES ARE DIVIDED INTO FOUR GROUPS OF DISABILITIES FOR PARA-CYCLING: • BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED (B AND VI) – Athletes ride on tandems, accompanied by sighted pilots. • CEREBRAL PALSY (CP) – Athletes ride on bicycles or tricycles based on the nature of their disability. • LOCOMOTOR DISABILITIES (LC) – Amputees and other individuals with an apparent functional disability ride on bicycles, with approved adaptations, as necessary. • HANDCYCLING (HC) – Wheelchair athletes ride on hand tricycles. Source: USA Cycling

April 20-21, 2013 • CUICAR

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M-Sat 10-6 • 864.342.0805 8 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 8, 2013

The Roger C. Peace para-cycling team: back, from left, Jason Kimball, Bryant Young, Ryan Boyle; front, from left, Tony Pedeferri, Will Lachenauer, Sean Haggard, Tim Conner.

PARA-CYCLING OPEN

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Greenville has long billed itself as a cycling town, with good reason. Though the U.S. Cycling Championships left the Upstate in 2012 after seven years, the area will soon be hosting international athletes – including some Olympic medalists – in the 2014 Para-Cycling World Championships. Some of those athletes will be checking out the course next month during the Para-Cycling Open April 20 and 21. The 2013 event will be a points competition for athletes who use traditional or adapted bicycles, tandem models (for the sight-impaired), tricycles or hand cycles. For the first time in the United States since 1998, up to 200 athletes are expected for this year’s para-cycling event and nearly 400 for next year’s, said Angie Prosser, city director of public information and events. April’s event will hopefully introduce the athletes to the Upstate and give them a chance to ride the championship course ahead of time, she said. This competition operates on a different level from the U.S. Professional Championships, Prosser said. Para-cycling is a unique discipline and puts the city on the world stage. “It allows Greenville to show off Greenville to a world audience,” she said. Winning the chance to host the event – awarded in February 2012 – was the culmination of three decades of work, Prosser said. Each cycling event built on the other. “We never would have been considered that quickly (for the world para-cycling event) had we not hosted the U.S. Championships for all those years,” she said. “A para-cycling event like this has not been in the United States for 16 years,” said Stan Healy, administrator at Roger C. Peace Hospital and president of Notus Sports, which put in the bid for the cham-

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of the events is the community cheering them on. There will be a medal ceremony at both the 2013 and 2014 events, and Healy said they are hoping to plan an opening ceremony next year. The event fits in with the hospital’s mission to help increase physical activity through ventures like the Swamp Rabbit Trail and can also inspire those who don’t normally exercise, Healy said. “To watch these individuals who have severe disabilities, that are world-class athletes who work normal jobs and train like a professional athlete – what is our excuse? This is truly an inspiring event.” Bryant Young, 46, a local competitive para-cyclist and member of the Roger C. Peace cycling team, will be one of those inspiring athletes. He began cycling about six years ago in order to become more active. He was able to get out walking with his six kids, but soon discovered he was suited to cycling. Young is not a professional athlete. He holds down a full-time job in outside sales and spends time with his family, but also trains 15 to 20 hours each week on the bike, in addition to time in the gym, he said. Young rides an upright bike with an adaptation for his left leg. He said the


JOURNAL NEWS upcoming events are very exciting because they will feature some of the very best athletes in the sport. “It’s almost like getting in the Olympics.” Next month’s competition is “the only world-caliber para-cycling event in the U.S. this year,” he said. “I hope the local community really em-

“This is another example of our community excelling and showing off what we have – and building on a 30-year momentum to be a world-class community.” Angie Prosser, director of public information and events for the city of Greenville, on the Para-Cycling World Championships

braces these visiting individuals,” Healy said. “It’s going to have an impact on our community. It’s going to be a nice little economic shot in the arm.” Exactly how much of a shot in the arm is still unknown, Prosser said. According to USA Cycling, the area can benefit from an estimated $4.5 million economic impact for the world championships based on data from the event in Canada in 2010. The competition is partially funded through sponsors, said Prosser, and through the local accommodations tax. As with the U.S. Professional Championships, the city offers support in the form of an office for Notus Sports and staff support in the day-to-day planning, she said. Preparation to bring this event to town began as soon as the city learned they were going to host, Prosser said. Healy and Prosser were part of a group that attended Paralympic events in London, England and Segovia, Spain. They also formed the Roger C. Peace para-cycling team when Greenville won the bid to host the event, Healy said. Prosser said after visiting a competition in Spain and the Olympics in England this past summer, they are ready to host the worlds. “We went not knowing what to expect, but when we got back, we said ‘We’ve got this.’ Because (in Spain) they didn’t do anything different than what we had done in Green-

“They all have life stories that are inspirational on every level.” Local para-cyclist Bryant Young on his fellow athletes who will come to the Upstate for 2013 and 2014 para-cycling events.

ville at the national championships.” This different classification of athletes requires more attention to detail, Prosser said, like additional space in lanes for tricycles. Accommodating these athletes is not a problem because the United States has much better facilities than many countries in Europe, she said. For the 2014 championships, one challenge will be keeping up the energy level of volunteers and others during a lengthy, five-day event, she said. Greenville won’t be hosting an event as big as the Olympics anytime soon, Prosser

said, but will continue to pursue cycling events at all levels and are already planning for 2015 and 2016. “This is our first opportunity to be on that world calendar,” she said. “We definitely hope it will lead to more international and national events.” Young said he is excited to be a local competitor in such a prestigious event. “To have a world championship – it’s phenomenal. These athletes were just in London six months ago and now they’ll be here in Greenville.” Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Spartanburg Foundation selects CEO Mary Thomas has been promoted to chief operating officer of the Spartanburg County Foundation, officials with the group announced this week. Thomas, who has Thomas more than 25 years experience, will be responsible for the general oversight of staff and facilities and the integration of all Foundation departments, foundation officials said. “Thomas has and continues to play an instrumental role in the success of the Spartanburg County Foundation,” Robert Gregory, chairman of the board of trustees, said in an announcement on the company website. “She is extremely innovative and strategic in her leadership approach, which will continue to benefit the Foundation as she assumes this new role.” Thomas has established a reputation for her skill at building partnerships across the public, private and nonprofit sectors to foster community improvement. Thomas serves on multiple boards and committees, including the Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System Board of Trustees, the Rotary Club of Spartanburg, the Southeastern Council of Foundations Board and the BMW Community Advisory Panel. She is a past member of CF Leads (an organization dedicated to helping community foundations advance the practice of community leadership to build thriving communities), Women in Philanthropy, the AFL Advisory Board, the Mary Black Health System Women’s and Children’s Advisory Board, the Mary Black Health System Board of Trustees and the SC ETV Advisory Board, and is a former commissioner for the South Carolina State Housing and Finance Authority. Thomas has held several leadership roles in the Spartanburg community. She is a graduate of Leadership Spartanburg and is a past chairwoman of The SC Grantmakers, the Spartanburg County Consensus Project and Spartanburg Communities in Schools. – Charles Sowell

10 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 8, 2013


journal news

District 17 voters to return to polls By april a. morris | staff

Residents of S.C. House District 17 return to the polls for a third time on March 12 to cast their vote for the r e p r e s e nt at i v e to fill the seat vacated by Rep. Burns Tom Corbin. In a runoff on Feb. 5, Mike Burns defeated Chris Sullivan. However, despite Burns being the only candidate on the ballot, the general election must be held due to a state statute stipulating a general election if more than one person files, according to Conway Belangia, Greenville County’s director of elections and voter registration. Five candidates originally filed for the primary. Though he is the only listed candidate, Burns could have a challenger if a write-in campaign was organized, said Belangia. In a statement this week, Burns said, “I also regret that the people of District 17 have not had a voice in the S.C. House for so long, especially while important legislation is being considered. But I understand … there is protocol to be followed to make sure that the political process is fair and open to everyone.” All polling places used in the runoff contest will be used again, said Belangia. The cost of holding the general election is between $5,000 and $6,000. District 17 includes much of northern Greenville County, including Tigerville, Slater-Marietta and Travelers Rest. The seat was left vacant when S.C. Rep. Tom Corbin won both re-election and a S.C. Senate seat in Nov. 2012. For polling place information, visit greenvillecounty.org/voter_registration or call 864-467-7250. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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journal news

USC Upstate students protest slavery Vigil seeks to raise awareness and funds for International Justice Mission

Battling a stiff wind on a cold Wednesday morning, a few USC Upstate students tied down tents and covered tables, as they made ready for a long cold night of vigil-keeping. Inspired by the International Justice Mission (IJM), a human rights organization dedicated to eradicating violent oppression, the students planned a 27-hour vigil in support of victims of human trafficking and slavery, said Shelley Wilton, 22, one of the organizers of the event. Worldwide, about 27 million people are being held in bondage, she said. The net economic worth of the slave trade exceeds the net income of Google on a

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By CHarles Sowell | staff

yearly basis. It is big business and has come to America in a big way. “We want to raise awareness of the problem here and around the world,” said Wilton, who is a junior at USC Upstate. The little town of Inman is a major drop-off point for slaves coming out of Atlanta, a major hub in the trade, she said. The students hope the vigil, which lasted from 8 a.m. on Wednesday until 11 a.m. on Thursday, will raise awareness about human trafficking and generate at least $2,700 for IJM. Donations can be made to ijmfreedommaker.org/campaign/883/ Stand-For-Freedom-at-USC-Upstate. All donations will support the work of the International Justice Mission. IJM investigators, lawyers and aftercare staff work on the front lines of the fight for justice in Latin America, Africa and Asia. In 2011 alone, IJM partnered with local authorities to rescue more than 1,600 children, women and men from sex trafficking, forced labor slavery and other violent oppression, and helped put more than 100 slave-owners, traffickers and rapists behind bars. According to the National Underground

USC Upstate sophomore Jerika Tolliver participated in the 27-hour stand to raise awareness of slavery.

Railroad’s Freedom Center’s website, slavery, or forced labor, exists throughout the world. The enslaved work as field hands, seamstresses in back-alley sweatshops, kidnapped fishermen, child soldiers and common laborers deeply in debt. In the United States forced laborers are mostly used as common workers or in the sex trade. Women – mostly teenage girls and younger – are caught up in the

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sex industry of prostitution, pornography and pedophilia. According to the International Labor Organization (ILO), at least 12.3 million people are caught in some form of forced labor; about four of every 1,000 people in the global work force are slaves. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

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journal news

greenville city council from the march 4 meeting

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Food trucks would not be allowed to operate in the Greenville city limits within 250 feet of a restaurant that is open for business under new regulations proposed by a city task force. The task force included representatives from the restaurant and hotel industries, but no food truck owners. There are two food trucks in operation in Greenville. City officials said more are planned. The new regulations would have to be approved by City Council before taking effect. Currently, food trucks are allowed to park on any public street outside the central business district for no more than 30 minutes. Food trucks are also allowed on private property outside the central business district with the owner’s permission and a temporary-use permit without regard to how close they are to restaurants. Under the proposed regulations, mobile food vendor vehicles would be prohibited from operating on any street, sidewalk, alley, trail or other right-of-way or cityowned property unless it was approved as part of a permitted special event. The proposed regulations would allow mobile food vendors to operate on private property no closer than 250 feet from the door of an eating establishment open for business. Food vendor vehicles would have to pay a $500 permit fee for a vehicle decal and have a zoning temporary-use permit for each location. Trucks would be allowed to operate from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m. unless authorization with cause is granted for the hours of 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Under the proposed regulations, ice cream trucks would be prohibited in the central business district unless operating in a permitted special-event area. Outside of the central business district, ice cream trucks would have to remain mobile, except for periodic stops for short periods in order to make a sale. Ice cream trucks could operate from 9 a.m. until one half hour before sunset. Angie Prosser, the city’s director of public information and events, said many cities that regulate food trucks have greater distance restrictions. The city’s proposed 2014-2018 capital improvement program focuses on infrastructure, facilities and investments tied to future growth of the city. The plan presented to Council by City Manager John Castile calls for $30.7 million in projects over the five years, including nearly $7.4 million in 2013-14. A second work session is planned for March 18. Initial approval of the plan is set for April 8. Final approval will coincide with approval of the city’s 2014 operating budget. Projects included in the first year of the plan are rehabilitation of the Poinsett parking garage, $500,000 for the city’s public camera system downtown and on Haywood Road and pedestrian improvements on West Camperdown Way, Coffee Street and Washington Street. The plan also calls for nearly $1 million to improve access to the Swamp Rabbit Trail at several locations, $630,000 for a proposed Cancer Survivors Garden and $350,000 for a River Street underpass to improve pedestrian access to the Swamp Rabbit Trail and landscape and street improvements on North Main Street. The next regular meeting of the Greenville City Council will be March 11 at 5:30 p.m. in council chambers on the 10th floor of City Hall. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL NEWS

GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL FROM THE MARCH 5 MEETING

Approximately six months after full council voted down a proposal to allow members of county boards and commissions to recuse themselves from a vote in the event of a conflict of interest, Greenville County Council took up the issue again with a new proposal Tuesday night. Councilwoman Liz Seman presented the new ordinance during the Committee of the Whole and sparked lively discussion. Seman said her revision differs from the previous one in that it requires a written statement by the board or commission member, reflection in the minutes for recusal and removal from the board if the ordinance is violated. The current ordinance, in place for approximately 17 years, does not allow recusal in the event of a conflict of interest and if one occurs, the member must resign. County staffers were charged with enforcing the existing ordinance in July. They did not discover any conflicts after reviewing board and commission applications, according to clerk to council Theresa Kizer. Councilman Joe Dill, who opposed a similar change when it was considered in June and August 2012, was again concerned, saying, “The previous ordinance was similar to the one before us today and it didn’t work.” He said he doubted that only qualified members of county boards would be the ones with a potential conflict of interest. “That bothers me when I hear that said. This issue is being watched and is something that’s not being taken lightly.” Councilman Jim Burns argued that the change “al-

lows us to recruit the highest-qualified people for each board.” Councilor Fred Payne agreed, saying, “The potential for violation to occur is there. …They need that opportunity to do it (recusal) because if we don’t and we need to try to enforce it, it’s going to be difficult to find qualified people to serve on these different boards.” Seman added, “I would hope that we come to this with the lens that people are in it to do the right thing.” Councilwoman Xanthene Norris voiced her support in allowing board members the option of recusal, just as County Council has. “If we bring these people on board, they should have the same type of privilege … without being kicked off the board.” The proposed change was approved in a 7-2 vote with Dill and Willis Meadows opposed. Burns, Bob Taylor, Norris, Seman, H.G. “Butch” Kirven, Payne and Joe Baldwin voted in favor. Sid Cates was absent for the vote. The full council will consider the change in first reading at the next meeting. If it is approved, Dill said he will push for stringent training for members of boards and commissions. “We have a staff that supervises us,” said Dill. “Some of these boards and commissions handle millions of dollars and don’t always have as strict supervision.” In other business, council approved amendments to the county stormwater banking program and approved the ordinance. Developers who participate can pay a fee to be in the program, which allows for alternative densities, lot

sizes and setback requirements for developments in some county single-family and multi-family zoning districts. Willis Meadows proposed changes that would include council approval of the participating projects after a public hearing and review and report by the Planning and Development Committee. He said he is concerned about neighbors of the proposed projects not having a say, and the additional step does not delay the process more than three weeks. The council approved several other amendments proposed by Meadows: council approval to any changes in the program, a program review after two years and addition of streets to the program area maps. The council also gave final approval to an ordinance amendment that places restrictions on certain businesses like auto-wrecking facilities, junkyards, recycling and processing centers, salvage yards and scrap processors in the I-1 zoning district. Council also approved the addition of the Conestee Community Plan to the Comprehensive Plan. The plan outlines goals for physical renewal and attracting economic development. Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again on Tuesday, March 19 at 6 p.m. at County Square. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY Annual appearance of

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Bellfest showcases Lake Jocassee and arrival of Oconee bell

O

conee bells are a harbinger of spring too many people never see. The rare plant with rounded and serrated leaves is found only in a handful of counties in the By CINDY LANDRUM staff Carolinas and Georgia.

It is the only ephemeral wildflower brave enough to peek out before winter has said its last good-bye, typically showing its dainty, nodding white flowers in mid-March along the smaller creeks of the Lake OCONEE BELL continued on PAGE 18 Jocassee watershed. CINDY LANDRUM / STAFF

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY OCONEE BELL continued from PAGE 17

This year, however, the Oconee bells have made an early appearance, thanks to a winter that has alternated weekends containing mixes of cold rain, snow and sleet with days of arm-baring temperatures that should normally come a bit later in the calendar. One of the best places – and most accessible – to see the Oconee bells is from Devils Fork State Park’s appropriately named Oconee Bell Nature Trail, an easyto-walk, one-mile loop that begins in the corner of the back parking lot near the Devils Fork State Park headquarters. Not too far down the trail, a hiker will run into McKinney Creek. There, along the banks, is where the rare plant will be found. The tiny wildflowers line the creekside, creating entire colonies in spots. Bells have solitary white to pinkish campanulate flowers with five fringed petals atop

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6-inch-tall salmon-colored stalks. The plants are seldom found more than about 20 feet from water, so don’t wander too far from the creek. French botanist and explorer Andre Michaux, who spent 11 years exploring the east coast for the King of France, using Indian guides to find the location of “new” plants and flowers. He discovered the Oconee bell in 1787 near the confluence of the Horsepasture and Toxaway rivers. Asa Gray, often called the father of American botany, examined the dry plant specimen about 50 years later and named the plant. Its scientific name is “Shortia galacifolia.” Like many people today, Michaux and Gray never saw the plant in bloom. Gray’s unsuccessful search for the plant lasted decades. It eluded botanists for almost a century until the son of a herb collector rediscovered it in McDowell County, N.C. The Oconee bell will be featured in two upcoming events at Devils Fork. The park’s annual Oconee bell nature walk will be held March 14 from 10 a.m. until noon. The walk is $5 and registration deadline is the day before. Those interested in registering may call the park office at 864-944-2639. Two days later on March 16, the non-

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profit organization Friends of Jocassee will sponsor Bellfest, a one-day festival celebrating the plant. The event will feature guided wildflower walks with Upstate master naturalists as well as guided woodland songbird tours, guided boat tours of Lake Jocassee, live bluegrass music, food, a silent auction and book signing by local writers Claudia Hembree, Debbie Fletcher and Dot Jackson. The festival is free with a $2 park admission. Friends of Jocassee is a nonprofit organization devoted to protecting and promoting the natural and cultural resources of the Lake Jocassee area and the recreational opportunities it provides. Oconee bells factored in National Geo-

graphic’s decision to name the Jocassee Gorges area of South and North Carolina one of the “50 of the World’s Last Great Places – Destinations of a Lifetime.” “Thanks to the second-highest rainfall in the continental United States, the Jocassee Gorges area of North and South Carolina supports rare plants and one of the highest concentration of waterfalls in the eastern United States,” the article begins, “Living here are black bears, bobcats, wild turkeys and the highest number of salamanders found anywhere in the world. Included among some 60 species of rare plants are 90 percent of the world’s Oconee bells, whose nearest relatives are in China and Japan.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.


journal community

Both sides present arguments in Medicaid debate Upstate Chamber Coalition hosts forum By april a. morris | staff

As employers and insurers brace for the full implementation of the Affordable Care Act in 2014, states have been debating one part of the legislation: whether to participate in Medicaid program expansion. The federal government has offered to pay for the first three years of expansion, ramping down the federal share in subsequent years to 90 percent. States have to come up with a 10 percent match to receive the federal funds. Gov. Nikki Haley has said that South Carolina will not take the deal, citing the uncertainty of future funding from the federal government. According to the Advisory Board Company, 24 governors supported expansion as of early March. In a forum sponsored by the Upstate Chamber Coalition, Tony Keck, head of the state’s Department of Health and Human Services, and Thornton Kirby, president of

the South Carolina Hospital Association, outlined the arguments for and against Medicaid expansion in South Carolina. Kirby said the question has put those who normally partner on opposing sides. For states, he said, the biggest difficulty has been willingness to put up the initial investment – a little more than $1 billion – by 2014 to receive more than $10 billion in federal money. Uncertainty about sustaining federal funding is a close second. States “have a fear that the federal government will not keep its commitment financially,” he said. Whether a state opts to expand Medicaid or not tends to track political leanings nationwide, he said, with primarily Democratic states opting in and primarily Republican states opting out. “The nation is divided on this question. This is a partisan political issue, it’s got a lot of ideology embedded in it.” Hospitals are required to treat the uninsured and the ACA aims to cover those uninsured and reduce cost, Kirby said. Hospitals are also anticipating cuts in federal funding, but don’t know when these will take effect. “What hospitals see through their lens is a lot of cuts coming and the possibility

of bringing a lot of federal money to the state to backfill. And the question is, ‘Is this a wise course of action?’” he said. Someone must pay for indigent care in every state and the Medicaid expansion will help, Kirby said. “Through Medicaid, the other 49 states are offering to help us bear the lion’s share of that cost,” he said. “If we don’t opt to let them help us pay for that, we must pay for it within our borders.” Expanding Medicaid wouldn’t be worth it for the state, Keck said. In South Carolina, the expansion would bring roughly 344,000 new people into the Medicaid system, he said. Already, some states that have expanded Medicaid early have had to declare a Medicaid deficit, he said. “When it comes down to it, when we talk about whether to expand or not expand, it will affect the lives of about 200,000 people in South Carolina out of about four and a half million,” Keck said. Meanwhile, “the other 4.3 million people are in a (healthcare) system that is not working, they’re in a system that’s out of control.” Keck said the solution is not to expand Medicaid, but to improve health by increasing value in the healthcare system, including

moving away from a fee-for-service model, focusing on total cost, outcomes, pricing transparency, pushing for clinical integration and examining why costs are so high. “We probably wouldn’t be all worked up about this spending if we had the best outcomes in the world,” he said. Improving social determinants like education, personal choices and economic status will make a huge difference. Much of a person’s overall health does not have to do with the care they receive, but with other factors, he said. “Our system is so fragmented, you’ve got hospitals, all sorts of doctors, home health, nursing … all of them try to maximize their returns and outcomes independently,” Keck said. “Integration makes better sense. We can’t continue to chop people up into little bits and try to solve their problems – we’ve got to view them as a whole person.” Healthcare is one of the nation’s largest industries and needs to be treated as such, he said. “Purchasers (like us) and employers need to look at this like one gigantic negotiation.” Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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MARCH 8, 2013 | The Journal 19


journal community

the gist of it

Crossing borders as a discipline of life EVENT: 2013 Peggy & Ed Good Lecture, Center for Vocational Reflection, Furman University Rev. Mark Adams LECTURE TITLE: “The Spiritual Discipline of Crossing Borders”

PRESENTER: Rev. Mark Adams DATE: FEB. 19, 2013

Each year, the Center for Vocational Reflection hosts nationally or internationally significant theologians, public servants, thinkers and writers through its Peggy & Ed Good Lecture. This year’s lecture was presented by Presbyterian pastor Mark Adams, who serves as mission co-worker at Frontera de Cristo, a unique transnational ministry located in Agua Prieta, Mexico, and Douglas, Ariz. The 1993 Furman graduate is co-author of a book, “Just Coffee: Caffeine with a Conscience,” which chronicles the work of the Cafe Justo Cooperative in the states of Chiapas and Sonora in Mexico. Adams’ lecture was informed by his background in history and theology, and his vast experience working with migrants from, and within, Mexico. He addressed the deep difficulties of migration, as well as his own spiritual journey as a minister working in less than ideal conditions

to build and sustain just relationships across different nations and cultures. Introduction “We cross borders all the time – sometimes consciously, but many times without much thought.” Spiritual Disciplines “Spiritual

disciplines should not be seen as a burden, but rather as a way to open ourselves up to the Divine transformation of us as individuals and our communities.” “Crossing Borders” as a Spiritual Discipline “None of the tradi-

tions that I have looked at name ‘Crossing Borders’ as one of the Disciplines. [But I believe that] Jesus models the spiritual discipline of crossing borders and calls us into a life of crossing borders that normally separate us from one another – to cross them with intentionality to share, experience and discover God’s shalom with the purpose of participating in the creation of the peaceable kingdom envisioned by the prophets and manifested in the life of Jesus.” Hospitality “Hospitality requires an openness to understand that our own borders are permeable and not rigid and to welcome others, regardless of whether they are one of us, to cross them and share, experience and discover God’s shalom. “In crossing borders without the intention of imposing our will but with the intention of entering into right relationship with our neighbors, our enemies

and all of creation, we move out of our comfort zones and open ourselves up for profound transformation.” Crossing the Divine/Human Border “God in Jesus Christ crosses

the divine/human border and sets a model for those who hear the call to ‘follow me’… God crossed the divine/human border to know us so that we can know him.” Forming Across the

Relationships Border Speaking

with a group of migrants from southern Mexico in northern Mexico, Adams recalls, “What I was to learn was that the brothers and sisters had left their land of Chiapas because of economic and political reasons. And all felt the reality of what one brother shared, ‘Salir de nuestra tierra es sufrir (To leave our land is to suffer).’ [And yet many people follow] in the footsteps of millions of our ancestors [to] journey to our nation of immigrants in search of a better life for themselves and their families in the ‘land of opportunity.’ They take tremendous risks by crossing the border. Many arrive in a city where there is very little emotional, spiritual, cultural or social support.”

God the Border Crosser “When God arrived in the flesh on that first Christmas, the ‘immigration officials’ did not roll out the red carpet nor did the local hospitals provide an ornate crib lined with red velvet. God crossed

the border as a dependent baby whose arrival came as his parents were traveling to receive their official documents from the state (Luke 2). God took great risks in crossing the border as a vulnerable baby born in an unsanitary stable to humble parents.” Following the Divine Border Crosser “Jesus calls us to understand

borders not as places of separation, but opportunities for encounter. The [place] Jesus calls us to is one that spans linguistic, cultural, political, social, religious and economic borders.”

Conclusion “Crossing borders is a discipline in which the powerful relinquish power and the humble are empowered. It is a discipline that has been practiced by Christians and non-Christians. It is a risky discipline, but one that leads to abundant life and rich and profound community.”

– By Eric Cain, Furman Center for Vocational Reflection The Peggy & Ed Good Lectures have enabled the Furman Center to share resources not only with students, faculty and staff, but also with alumni, friends and the Greenville community. Previous lectures have been given by teachers, scholars, theologians, musicians, artists, activists and many others who have shared and reflected on their own vocational journeys.

A Pioneering season for Spartanburg Methodist College This season has been unlike any in the history of Spartanburg Methodist College’s men’s basketball team. The Pioneers’ 30-0 overall record has brought an excitement into the basketball program as they head into the semifinals of the Region 10 Tournament on March 8. In addition, they have qualified for the NJCAA National Tournament in Hutchinson, Kan., on March 18. Head coach Jeff Brookman credits this year’s team’s performance on how “unselfish” each player is on the court. “There is not a single player that has an ego or thinks he is bigger than the team. The guys get along on and off the court, and they all seem to sacrifice for the good of the team,” he said.

20 THE Journal | MARCH 8, 2013


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journal community

Public gets first glimpse at new park’s possibilities By Cindy Landrum | staff

Some Greenville residents have long talked about the possibility of a major new park downtown. On Thursday, they got their first glimpse of what the park could look like. Consultants with Seamon Whiteside + Associates unveiled three preliminary concept drawings they had crafted from input gathered at public meetings over the week before. Based on comments they received about the concept drawings, the consultants will now begin to create a draft plan for the park, incorporating programming costs and engineering and environmental constraints. The city wants to relocate its public works department now located in the floodplain of the Reedy River and turn that land near the Kroc Center and A.J. Whittenberg Elementary into a public park. The city has already purchased 33 acres of land on Fairforest Way next to the Duke Energy Operations Center for the public works relocation, although a cost estimate and timetable for the move has not yet been released. The Swamp Rabbit Trail, the well-used biking and walking trail built on an old railroad bed from Greenville to Travelers Rest, also runs through the potential park. The park would also connect residents of the city’s west side to downtown. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

(Top right) One concept drawing for a potential park on the land now occupied by the Greenville Department of Public Works facility featured a pavilion, gardens, boulders to climb and a skate park. (Bottom right) A zipline, a play area for adults, an amphitheater and a tot lot were ideas offered by the public at a series of planning meetings. (Facing page) Further public input will be received before a final plan is drawn up for the potential park. This concept drawing features a dog park and a labyrinth, items that may or may not be included in the final drawing.

22 THE Journal | MARCH 8, 2013


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MARCH 8, 2013 | The Journal 23


journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

PFAFF, a brand of premier sewing and embroidery machines, announced Greenville resident Susan Dunnavant as the overall winner of the World’s Most Creative Sewer Contest. Dunnavant competed with sewers globally in the yearlong competition to celebrate the brand’s 150th anniversary. She was recognized as Sewer of the Month in November and won for her “Gabe” project. Photos can be viewed at pfaff150anniversary.com/us/contest/winners#mainmenu. Hospice Care of South Carolina has increased the number of board-certified medical directors as Dr. Kevin McRedmond, Dr. Lori Thompson, Dr. Michelle Floyd and Dr. Frank Sharp recently completed the Medical Director Board Certification and passed the American Board of Hospice and Palliative Medicine exam. Greenville City Police Chief Terri Wilfong and Jack Logan, the president of Put Down the Guns Young People, will be the guest speakers at the meeting of Democratic Women of Greenville County on March 11 at Runway Café at 5:30 p.m. The topic of discussion will be prevention of gun violence in our community. The cost of the buffet dinner is $15. Reservations are required for dinner and must be made by March 7 by calling 864-232-5531 or emailing headquarters@greenvilledemocrats.com. Roper Mountain Science Center presents Science Roadshow, part science lesson and part treasure hunt, on March 9, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The event features roadshow experts, including a herpetologist, archeologist, meteorologist, master gardener, astronomer, entomologist and architect, who will identify mystery science items. Ticket costs are $5 and $6. For more information, call 864-355-8900 or visit ropermountain.org. Interfaith Forum of the Upstate invites clergy and lay faith leaders of all denominations to the Second Annual Informational Breakfast on March 15, 8-9:30 a.m. at Long Branch Baptist Church. The purpose is to learn more about the work of the Interfaith Forum and how congregations can become members. Speakers include Reggie Bruster, Imam Bilal Malik and Frances Worthington. There is no cost to attend, but an RSVP is requested – contact Kim Adams at theliveministry@yahoo.com. Call Laurie Rovin at 864-467-3650 or email lrovin@pendletonplace.org with questions. To learn more, visit interfaithforum-sc.org. The Pickens County Cultural Commission presents Super Kids Fest on March 16, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. at the Hagood Mill in Pickens. Admission is free and the event features Wizards of Odd Steve McGaha and Gregg “Buffalo” Barfield in concert. There will also be a workshop on how to make traditional instruments from found objects; participants can learn to play them and participate in a jam session. Also performing are the Sweet Potato Pie Kids and Young Appalachian Musician bands. Players can also sign up to compete in a bluegrass and old-time music competition. For more information, visit yamupstate.org or pickenscountymuseum.org.

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The Mauldin Garden Club will meet on March 12, 7 p.m., at the Mauldin Cultural Center to highlight the beauty of garden art. To learn more, visit mauldingardenclub. org or contact Ann Smith at jerryannesm115@charter.net. The Greenville Hospital System half-marathon and 5K will take place March 9 at 8 a.m. The half-marathon starts in Gateway Park in Travelers Rest and continues on the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail into downtown Greenville. The 5K takes place in Cleveland Park. To register, visit book-events.com/ghshalfmarathon. In addition, the hospital system will be offering a talk on how the body responds to stress on March 13 at 9:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m. at the Life Center. Admission is free but registration is required. To register, call 964-455-4021. Specialized Alternatives for Families and Youth and South Carolina State University presents The Upstate Foster Care and Adoption Expo on March 9, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at the University Center of Greenville at McAlister Square. The event will include training sessions, informative and educational exhibits, vendors, giveaways and a theatrical event entitled “Imagine That.” Admission is free. For more information, call 864-250-1601. Parmageddon, a celebration of Parmigiano-Reggiano with a crack-off and tasting, will be held March 9, 2-4 p.m. at Whole Foods Market in Greenville. The market will reclaim the Guinness World Record for the number of wheels of Parmigiano-Reggiano simultaneously cracked with a nationwide cracking at 3 p.m. For more information, visit wholefoodsmarket.com/store/event/parmageddon-3. Foothills Piecemakers Quilting Guild will celebrate National Quilting Day on March 16 at the Berea Library, 111. N. Highway 25 Bypass from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with quilting demonstrations. The 2013 theme is Celebrate America and the official quilt incorporates stars in a red, white and blue motif. Quilts made at this event will be donated to soldiers and veterans through Blue Star Mothers and Quilts of Valor. For more information, contact Ruth Pollow at president@ nqaquilts.org. Award-winning teacher, nationally acclaimed Chautauqua performer and professional magician Larry Bounds explores the contradictions that reveal the amazing life of the American legend Davy Crockett – the backwoods frontiersman who almost became president. Bounds’s free performance on March 19, 7 p.m., and March 23, 2 p.m., at the Hughes Main Library in Greenville is part of a monthly discussion series, “American Legends,” presented by Greenville Chautauqua and the Greenville County Library System. The series continues with Herman Melville on April 16 and Malcolm X on May 14. For additional information, call 864-244-1499 or visit greenvillechautauqua.org. If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to email: community@communityjournals.com.

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journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Veritas Preparatory School is hosting an Open House and special guest speaker on March 13 at St. Paul’s Church, 304 E. Camperdown Way, Greenville. An information session on the school will begin at 7 p.m. At 7:45 p.m. Dr. Christopher Perrin, an expert on classical education, will speak on “Why Classical, Why Greenville, Why Now?” Veritas is a Christian, classical, university-model school opening in the fall of 2013 for K5-fifth grades. For more information, visit veritasgreenville.com or email info@veritasgreenville.com. A meeting will be held March 12 at 5:30 p.m. at Langston Charter Middle School, 1950 Woodruff Road, Greenville, for anyone interested in running for the Langston School Board. Attendees are invited to stay after the meeting for the regularly scheduled board meeting. March 14 will be a Chick-fil-A Spirit Night for Mt. Zion Christian School. Supporters can visit the Woodruff Road location from 5-8 p.m. and tell the cashier they want to support the school. The NEXT Intern Event will be March 12, 6-8:30 p.m., at the NEXT Innovation Center, 411 University Ridge, Greenville. College students in search of internships can utilize this opportunity to discover NEXT, hear from some of the fastest-growing companies in the Upstate, learn about available internships, interview for a specific internship, network with potential employers and peers, and enjoy free food and refreshments. Visit nextupstatesc.org for more information and to apply online. For more information, contact Brenda Laakso at blaakso@nextupstatesc.org or 864-751-4806. St. Joseph’s Catholic School will host Spring Parish Night on March 15. Area students will be admitted to any sporting event on campus that night free of charge with a Catholic parish bulletin; adults $5.00 each. For game times, visit sjcatholicschool.org. Shannon Forest will present “The Wizard of Oz,” a non-musical adaptation by Anne Coulter Martens on March 15-16 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 for students, $8 for adults, and $2 for children 6 and under. For tickets, call 864-678-5107 or email bteie@ shannonforest.com. Mauldin High School recently recognized the top 12 ranked students in the junior class who have been named the 2012-2013 Junior Marshals: William Cummings, Nikita Deshpande, Joshua Dunster, Zachary Girvin, Alondra Gutierrez, Christian Monsalve, Andrew Moore, Alexander Phillips, Sarah Shepard, Eric Singleton, Juliana Wallace and Madeline Weih. Olivia Baddley, 18, of Simpsonville and Emma McDaniel, 14, of Inman were named South Carolina’s top youth volunteers of 2013 by the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, a national program honoring middle level and high school students for outstanding volunteer service. The program also recognized four Distinguished Finalists from South Carolina, including Rachel Bryson, 17, of Lyman. On a recent field trip, Bob Jones Academy fifth-grade classes learned firsthand about South Carolina state history from Gov. Nikki Haley and Reps. Wendy Nanney and Dan Hamilton. They also spent time exploring the S.C. State Museum. The field trip included guided tours of the South Carolina State Museum and the State House. Hamilton and Nanney, both Bob Jones graduates, gave students a glimpse into life at the State House and spent time answering questions. Governor Nikki Haley also took time to talk to the students.

Two students in Spartanburg Community College’s digital design associate degree program received $500 scholarships from The Printing Industry of the Carolinas Foundation. Krysten Steinecke of Inman and Courtney Gay of Pacolet were among six students selected from two-year colleges in South Carolina and North Carolina. Greer Middle College Charter High School students recently attended the 75th Annual South Carolina State Beta Club Convention in Myrtle Beach. For the first time in the school’s history, three students qualified for national competitions to be held in Mobile, Ala., in June 2013. Asa Reini qualified for the science competition, Leighton Higgins qualified for creative writing, and Morgan Palmer qualified for English competition. St. Joseph’s Catholic School’s Anna Marchek placed second in the statewide Junior Beta Club T-shirt Design Competition. St. Joseph’s has now been invited to submit this T-shirt design to the National Convention in Mobile, Ala., in June. Twenty-two SJCS Beta Club members joined 3,800 middle school students from across the state for the annual convention. The fourth-grade students at Augusta Circle Elementary recently hosted a book drive. Throughout the week, students collected new and gently used books to donate to the youth served by Pendleton Place. Parents and students delivered 2,339 books to Pendleton Place. The school is also celebrating 90 years with a fundraiser to purchase new playground equipment and is asking donors to give $90 to the cause. Further information is available at AugustaCirclePTA.com. South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities poetry students Ian Burnette and Anne Shelley Hucks were recognized by the international poetry contest, The Patricia Grodd Poetry Prize for Young Writers. Burnette claimed first prize and Hucks was one of two runners-up selected. The Kenyon Review, an internationally respected literary journal, is the contest sponsor; editor David Baker Burnette annually selects one winner and two runners-up.

Hucks

St. Joseph’s Catholic School Love of Giving Club, which provides books, blankets and stuffed animals to children in the hospital, was recently awarded a large donation from Kohl’s Department Store. Members worked one afternoon tying ribbons and tags on the 250 stuffed animals and placing bookmarks in over 600 hardback children’s books. The items were then delivered to Children’s Hospital and Shriner’s Hospital in Greenville. Submit entries to: Community Journals, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or email: community@communityjournals.com

MARCH 8, 2013 | The Journal 25


journal community

the good

events that make our community better

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate presents the 13th Annual Chocolate Soiree on March 14 at the Poinsett Club. The fundraising event features local top chefs competing with unique, original chocolate creations. New additions to the event include a purple theme, Greenville’s first ever Tombola Wall, four purple tickets and an artistic bench project called “Sweet Seats.” Twelve local artists were chosen to embellish wooden benches handcrafted by the Kiwanis of the Carolinas. The benches will be auctioned off at the Chocolate Soiree and can be enjoyed in the museum for a year, beginning March 15. For more information, visit the chocolatesoiree.com or tcmupstate.org. The Rotary Club of Greenville Evening will hold their second annual pancake breakfast fundraiser on March 9 at Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill and Bar on Woodruff Road, 8 to 10 a.m. Breakfast includes pancakes, butter/syrup, sausage, coffee, tea or orange juice. Adult and children’s tickets are $7 each. The proceeds support the club’s many service projects and programs in the Greenville community, including the Reedy River Duck Derby and EarlyAct FirstKnight. Tickets may be purchased from any club member or at the door. For more information, contact Candy Surkin at 864-313-1034 or Bryn Brutosky at 864-525-2094. Trees Greenville’s “Stand Up for Trees,” a comedy performance of six regional stand-up comedians, will be held at The Warehouse Theatre on March 8 and 9 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 and membership to Trees Greenville, which includes a free ticket, is $35. Tickets can be purchased at warehousetheatre.com or at the box office. All of the proceeds from the show will help pay for the organization’s goal of planting 50-75 trees in public spaces along the Poinsett Highway. Frodo’s Pizza at Cherrydale is hosting a fundraiser for The Friends of the Greenville County Library System on March 14, 6-9:30 p.m. Mention the Friends of the Library and Frodo’s will donate 15 percent of your total purchase to the volunteer nonprofit organization that provides financial support to library system. For additional information, call 864-527-9291 or visit greenvillelibrary.org. Bojangles’ is supporting the Muscular Dystrophy Association through its 12th annual Shamrocks Against Dystrophy in-store fundraiser. The campaign provides funds for children to enjoy the magical experience of attending MDA Summer Camp for one week. March 1-17 customers can support the organization by purchasing a green shamrock for $1 or gold shamrock for $5. The program is offered at all company-owned Bojangles’ and participating franchise locations. Customers who purchase a shamrock will be rewarded with a coupon for a free Bo-Berry Biscuit. On March 19 Upstate Forever will present a breakfast workshop on planned giving, “Touching the Future with Charitable Planning,” 7:30-9 a.m., at Mary Beth’s, 500 E. McBee Ave., Greenville. The workshop will focus on the charitable gift annuity. There is no charge and all interested parties are invited to attend. Limited seating is available; RSVP no later than March 15 by calling 864-327-0090 or emailing aviney@upstateforever.org.

Centre Stage will present a fundraiser, “Totally Toga Tonight,” on March 22 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $75 and VIP tickets are $125. VIP tickets include: gala party, preview of signature drinks, preview of signature hors d’oeuvres by Saffron’s Catering, and optional toga fitting. For more information, visit centrestage.org. The YMCA of Greenville has received four grants totaling $20,000 from JCP Cares, JCPenney’s new charitable giving program, to provide school-aged children with financial assistance to attend after-school programs at the Y. This gift provides children in the Greenville community with access to after-school programs. The grants included: Judson Community Center, the George I. Theisen Y in Travelers Rest, the GHS Y in Simpsonville and the Caine Halter Family Y. Toyota of Greer recently announced that it will donate $25,000 to March of Dimes. In addition to this donation, Toyota of Greer challenged all other Greenville-area auto dealerships to join its “Fill the Front” campaign. Participating dealerships compete to collect donations to March of Dimes and “Fill the Front” windows of their dealership with March of Dimes’ paper sneakers honoring each individual donor. For more information, visit marchofdimes.com/southcarolina. Project Pinwheel is gearing up for National Child Abuse Prevention Month in April. Greenville First Steps, along with 150 or more organizations in the community, plans to implement a more impactful awareness campaign for 2013 called Project Pinwheel. Funds collected will remain in the Greenville community and benefit programs to assist at-risk families, as well as fund the materials to spread the awareness message, including a print publication, a CD, a community-wide rally event and the pinwheel gardens. Visit projectpinwheel. com for more information. The Anderson County First Steps Partnership board of directors recently received the South Carolina International Reading Association’s Literacy Award honoring an individual or group that has made significant contributions in the area of literacy in their community or state. For more information about the Anderson County First Steps programs, visit 1stepsac.org. Best Chevrolet of Easley recently provided Greenville United Soccer Club with new equipment, a vehicle giveaway sweepstakes and participation in an instructional soccer clinic. Best Chevrolet was one of 15 dealers in the Upstate that partnered with local youth soccer leagues for the 2012 season. Through the sweepstakes, one winner in each region won his or her choice of a 2012 Chevy Cruze or Equinox. Greenville United Soccer Club is a nonprofit organization providing an atmosphere that is focused, positive, safe, friendly and enjoyable. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.

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26 THE Journal | MARCH 8, 2013

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Old is new again

JOURNAL CULTURE

Beeswax with pigment

added prior to being hea

ted up for use.

Ancient wax technique growing in popularity among Upstate artists By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Beeswax with pigment added waits to be used in Pat Kilburg’s studio. Unlike traditional paint, beeswax must be heated to be used.

Old is new again. Encaustic, an ancient medium of pigment and hot wax used by ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians dating back to at least the first century AD, is growing in popularity among artists in the Upstate and across the country. “It is such a versatile medium,” said Patricia Kilburg, a Greenville artist who became interested in encaustic after seeing an exhibition at the Greenville County Museum of Art. “There are unlimited possibilities.” Encaustic involves heating beeswax and damar resin, often with added pigment, and then brushing or pouring the liquid wax onto a surface. The tree resin helps harden the wax. The artist builds layer upon layer – individual pieces can have 30 or more. Layers can include collages with other items such as paints, pencils, ink, photo transfers and fabric. Photos may be burnished in, while dental tools and ceramic craft loops can be used to scrape layers away from specific places in the piece. Each layer of wax must be fused to the one below, using a heat gun for delicate work and a blowtorch for times when several layers must be softened at once to get the desired affect. “It’s between sculpture and painting,” said Jane Nodine, a Spartanburg artist who has been working with encaustic since 2006, making her one of the deans of the medium in the Upstate. Kilburg and Nodine are two of 26 Upstate artists involved in “Some Like It Hot: Encaustic Art in the Upstate,” an exhibit that runs through April 12 at the Metropolitan Arts Council. ENCAUSTIC continued on PAGE 28

MARCH 8, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 27


JOURNAL CULTURE ENCAUSTIC continued from PAGE 27

“You can blow away something you love if you’re not careful,” Cato said. Artists can paint realistically or more abstractly, Kilburg said. Encaustic is translucent and a viewer can see into the layers, something that’s not always possible with acrylic or oils. “It gives it so much depth,” said Ziemer, who said working with encaustic has liberated his approach to his art. “I was always uptight and structured in my painting. You have to give up a lot of control. This has made art fun for me again.”

Other artists participating in the exhibition are Arlene Antonio, Dipti Bhide, Suzanne Bodson, Alexia Timberlake Boyd, Caroline Thomas Calder, Kellie Cawthon, Pat Cato, Jeanet Dreskin, Tricia Earle, Greg Flint, Paul Flint, Marie Gruber, Nadia Land-Greene, Laura Macpherson, Rosemary Moore, Marie Nitsche, Teri Pena, Teresa Prater, Susan Sorrell, Pat Spangler, Judy Verhoeven, Philip Whitley, Suzanne Young and Michael Ziemer. Kilburg and Macpherson organized the exhibit. “The works truly show what a diverse medium that encaustic can be in both 2-D and 3-D art,” said Alan Ethridge, executive director of MAC. “There has been a renewed interest in using wax in paintings for the last 20 years.” Encaustic’s popularity waned with the advent of tempera paints, Nodine said. “It was dormant for so long,” she said, until the discovery of the Fayum Portraits, or mummy portraits, in Egypt in the 1800s renewed interest in the medium. The portraits date to the Roman period, from the late first century. Jasper Johns used encaustic in some of his work, including his iconic “Flag” painting. “It came back to the public eye,” she said. Nodine said encaustic has caught on because artists have a curiosity and fascination about painting with wax and because it’s a natural material that is so versatile. Pat Cato, an acrylic painter, said she likes the ghostly appearance that the wax gives the work. “The wax just looks alive,” she said. Artists can push the colors in different ways depending on the temperature used to fuse the layers of wax.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Some Like It Hot: Encaustic Art in the Upstate WHO: 26 artists from the Upstate WHERE: Metropolitan Arts Council gallery, 16 Augusta St., Greenville WHEN: Through April 12 RECEPTION: Friday, March 8, 6:30-9 p.m. INFORMATION: 864-467-3132

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

WORK BY ARTIST PAT CATO

WORK BY ARTIST TERESA PRATER

(LEFT) Upstate artist and art instructor Pat Kilburg demonstrates one of the differences of encaustic art as compared to traditional painting.

WORK BY ARTIST JUDY VERHOEVEN

WORK BY ARTIST TERI PENA

28 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 8, 2013

Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

Author revisits Union crime that gripped a nation Historian says images used to explain Susan Smith marked shift in view of motherhood By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Many pictures were painted of Susan Smith during the days she riveted the nation back in October 1994 – first with her claims that a black man had carjacked her and kidnapped her two young sons, and then her confession that she had rolled her car into a lake with the boys strapped in their car seats. Loving single working mother. Racist white woman. Abused small-town girl. Scheming adultress. Exploited victim. Monster. A historian from Coastal Carolina University uses the case to analyze what she calls the “new sexism” found in the conservative politics of that time.

“Why did the world fixate on her? Because she fit into the different images of motherhood – although some did not fit very well – that we had,” said Dr. Williams Keira V. Williams, a professor in Coastal Carolina’s departments of history and women and gender studies. Williams, author of the book “Susan Smith and the Mommy Myth: Infanticide and the Politics of Gender,” will speak Monday at Converse College. The talk, which will include a discussion with the audience, is at 6:30 p.m. in Lever Auditorium on the second floor of Kuhn Hall. Williams said her book isn’t about the facts of the case. Instead, she explores how the world tried to make sense of a case that was beyond comprehension for most. Smith “originally fit into the way America saw motherhood in the 1990s,” Williams said. Beginning in

the 1980s and reaching a crescendo in the 1990s, America’s ideal mother was white, married and middle class, she said – a stay-at-home woman who dedicated her entire being to motherhood. “Think soccer mom, not a lot different from the 1950s moms we were seeing on television,” she said. Williams calls this ideal the “conservative counter-reaction” to feminism and women entering the workforce in droves. After Smith confessed, she immediately became the most hated woman

in America, Williams said. The media’s portrayal of her changed from grieving mother to Southern racist. She became a scheming woman who was sleeping around and did away with her children so she could do more of it. “In my book, I wanted to look at the case’s cultural framework,” she said. “We tried to use the available images to make sense of it all.” Williams’ lecture is free and open to the public. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: “Susan Smith and the Mommy Myth: Infanticide and the Politics of Gender” WHO: Historian and Coastal Carolina history and women and gender studies professor Dr. Keira V. Williams WHERE: Lever Auditorium, second floor of Kuhn Hall, Converse College WHEN: March 11, 6:30 p.m. COST: Free

MARCH 8, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 29


JOURNAL CULTURE

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SOUND CHECK

JOURNAL CULTURE

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Kick-starting another round Atlanta band returns to active status with reissue of two ’80s albums Atlanta’s Swimming Pool Q’s formed in 1978, springing from the same fertile Southern soil as bands like R.E.M. and The B-52’s. The band’s songs, infectiously melodic, but angular and off-kilter, were mostly written by singer/guitarists Jeff Calder and Bob Elsey and sung by Calder and Anne Richmond Boston. They were ahead of their time by a decade or so, foreshadowing the hard-edged-but-catchy guitar pop that alternative rock bands took to platinum Swimming Pool Q’s and Bowie status in the mid-’90s. Ultimately, after releasing their critically acclaimed independent debut (“The Deep End”) and two masterful albums on A&M Records (1984’s “The Swimming Pool Q’s” and 1986’s “Blue Tomorrow”) the Q’s faded to cult status and an infrequent recording schedule. However, the band never officially broke up, and recently, with the help of a fundraising campaign on Kickstarter.com, the Q’s raised $21,000 to reissue their two A&M albums. The band has a show coming up at The Bohemian in Greenville to promote the re-issues, and I decided to speak with Calder about how the campaign came together, as well as Q’s past, present and future. I’ve never heard of a band raising money to re-issue their older albums. Tell me a little about how this came together. Calder: These records were actually never released on CD in the United States. We’ve tried to get them reissued for the last 10 or 15 years, but it ended up going nowhere. But things changed in the music business; A&M’s catalog is controlled by Universal Music now. And in my negotiations with them, we figured out very quickly how much it was going to cost to do it. It was a little beyond our own means, but it could still be done. And that’s when we decided that maybe we could do a Kickstarter project to essentially license them and have the albums manufactured by Universal. And we ended up raising $21,000. Did the response surprise you? Calder: It was surprising to me, but the people I work with at the record company (Bar None) were not uncertain at all. We launched the Kickstarter project on a Friday, and by Monday, we had about $4000. I mean, it’s 2013; nobody has any money! But we ended up with 261 backers. Did going back to those recordings change your perspective on them at all? Calder: We’ve always been really proud of those two records, and I didn’t suddenly decide that they’re terrible. But when you go back and listen to something that you did 28 years ago, you hear certain things that you’re surprised you did as well as you did, and then you hear some things that you might have done differently. But we worked with really good people on both of those records. When you look back at the Swimming Pool Q’s career, are there any regrets? Anything you would’ve done differently? Calder: I certainly wish that we had a larger savings account. I don’t see that there’s anything we could have done differently. And we’re still a very active band. We’ve written seven or eight new songs, we rehearse all the time, and we have a new album coming out potentially within the next year. The amount of bands that have international success is very small. We started in 1978, when the new wave and punk were just starting to happen in the South. And I think we did the best we could, considering that situation. The Swimming Pool Q’s will play The Bohemian Cafe at 2 W. Stone Ave. on Saturday, March 16. Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

MARCH 8, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL CULTURE

Justo’s celebration of women continues

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32 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 8, 2013

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CBT artistic director revisits ballet he wrote after birth of his first daughter

Women are just as much of a mystery to Carolina Ballet Theatre Artistic Director Hernan Justo now than they were when he wrote his original ballet, “Celebration of Women,” after the birth of his first daughter. “As creatures women are so perfect, so sophisticated. They’re complex beings,” Justo said. “Men are so simple.” “Celebration of Women” is one of three of Justo’s original ballets to be performed at CBT’s 40th anniversary season finale performance on March 15 at 7:30 p.m. at the Peace Center. “Celebration of Women” is designed to honor women and their contributions to humankind. The ballet – which premiered at the Peace Center in 2004 and has had its choreography revisited since – comes during Women’s History Month. “When I wrote the ballets, I was in a place emotionally different from where I am now,” he said. “And I am more experienced.” The ballet’s central figures are four of history’s best-known women. Each represents unique female characteristics. Joan of Arc represents bravery and faith; Helen Keller, determination and the overcoming of obstacles; the Virgin Mary, maternal love; and Giselle, the fictional embodiment of purity. Another of the ballet’s movements references Rosa Parks and her refusal to sit in the back of the bus during segregation. “I am fascinated by the way women operate. Women sometimes defy explanation,” he said. “It amazes me how they can pour hot wax on their legs and then scream when they see a bug on the floor.” The production has live accompaniment by two female pianists, Anne Kocielny and Ileana Posada Shaner. Kocielny is an internationally acclaimed concert pianist and used to teach Shaner, a “dance mom” and president of the

Guild of Carolina Ballet Theatre. Shaner was named volunteer of the year for CBT’s 40th anniversary season. In addition to “Celebration of Women,” the program includes “8:25 PM: The Chestnut of Your Eyes Erased,” a ballet that Justo wrote as a tribute to his mother’s love of Eva Perone. The ballet concludes with “Tangofusion.” Guest dancers from the Boston Conservatory and the North Carolina Dance Theatre will perform with the CBT’s company dancers. The evening will include a special tribute to Barbara Selvy, the woman who founded the ballet in 1972. A celebratory gala will be held in Genevieve’s, the Peace Center lounge, following the performance. Tickets are available for the performance and the gala. Packages include tickets to both. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: “Black +White,” a 40th anniversary season finale performance and gala WHO: Carolina Ballet Theatre WHEN: March 15, 7:30 p.m. performance, Three Hernan Justo original ballets; “Celebration of Women,” “8:25 p.m.: The Chestnut of Your Eyes Erased,” and “Tangofusion.” 9 p.m. gala TICKETS: Performance-only tickets, $15 to $45. Gala-only tickets, $75 TICKET PACKAGES: $90 to $120 INFORMATION: 864-467-3000


journal culture

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

An art reception will be held for Joan Potter and Zan Wells on March 8 from 5:30-7 p.m. at The Blood Connection, 435 Woodruff Road, Greenville. For more information, visit thebloodconnection.org/about-us/artist-showcase. Bob Jones University will host the New York Gilbert and Sullivan Players as they present “The Mikado” in Rodeheaver Auditorium on the Bob Jones University campus, March 7–9 at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at bju.edu/tickets or by calling 864-770-1372.

The Fine Arts Faculty at North Greenville University will present its Faculty Showcase on April 1 at 7 p.m. in Hamlin Recital Hall on NGU’s campus. Tickets are required and will be available March 18. For more information, contact the North Greenville University Cultural Events Office at 864-977-7085. Hub-Bub presents the Expecting Goodness Short Film Festival, a writer’s film festival, on March 23 at Chapman Cultural Center. Talented South Carolina writers and their stories are connected with emerging and experienced filmmakers across the state to create original short films over a four-month period. For more information, call 864-582-0056. Art & Light Gallery features “Bring on Spring” with a new spring collection of art, jewelry and home furnishings by Kent Ambler, Sarah Mandell, Teresa Roche, Annie Koelle, Paul Flint, Diane K. Condon, Christopher Rico, Caroll Williams and Tami Cardnella. Visit artandlightgallery.com for details. The Pickens County Art Museum is featuring work from students in the art programs in Pickens County schools during Pickens Youth Arts Month. The exhibit will continue through March 28. For more information, call 864-898-5963.

Send us your arts announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com

Auditions for the Spartanburg Little Theatre’s production of the play “A Streetcar Named Desire” will be held on March 11-12 at the Chapman Cultural Center. The production will run from May 3-12, and will be directed by Dan Harvey. Roles are available for 10-12 adult males and females, age 25 and older, and one younger male, age 17-21. Auditions will consist of readings from the script. For more information, call 864-585-8278 or visit spartanburglittletheatre.com The Swimming Pool Q’s will perform a free show on March 16 at 9 p.m. at the Bohemian Café, 2 West Stone Ave., Greenville. For more information, call 864-233-0006 or visit theswimmingpoolqs.com. Is Spider getting too big for his own skin? Will Fly find her superhero powers in time to save her Aunt Rita from peril? Will Worm learn to stand on his own two feet ... even though he doesn’t have feet? In “Diary of a Worm, a Spider and a Fly” from the SC Children’s Theatre, children are invited to take a look at the world from a bug’s perspective. This musical (rap, hip-hop, ballads and boogie-woogie), presented March 15-24, captures all of the droll humor and whimsy of the wildly popular books. Tickets are $7 per person and can be purchased at scchildrenstheatre.org or at the theatre’s offices. Spartanburg Regional History Museum presents “Southern Fashion Through the Years,” a history exhibit that showcases the ever-changing styles in clothing by citizens of the South. Special emphasis will be given to clothes for special occasions, such as weddings. This exhibit will be open March 15-May 31, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sundays, 1-5 p.m. For more information, call 542-ARTS. Ballet Spartanburg presents DanSynergy V, March 21, at 7 p.m. in the David Reid Theatre at Chapman Cultural Center. This is not tutus and pink tights. Rather, this is locally choreographed contemporary ballet set to edgy modern music. This year, the featured musical guests will be the Wheresville Project. For more information, call 542-ARTS.

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The Sordid Lives of the Pride of Greenville Men’s Chorus will be on March 26, 7:30 p.m. at the Warehouse Theatre in Greenville. The event features a screening of the film “Sordid Lives,” a yard sale, audience participation and a chance to win prizes for those who dress as characters from the movie. Cost is $25 in advance or $32.09 at the door. Visit warehousetheatre.com for tickets and pogmc.com for additional information.

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MARCH 8, 2013 | The Journal 33


journal culture

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FEATURED OPEN HOUSE

O P E N S U N D AY, M A R C H 10 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

Coldwell Banker Caine Announces Annual Top Producing Agents and Awards February 12, 2013 – Each year, Coldwell Banker Caine recognizes its top producing agents with honors. This year, the company awarded over 40 agents across the Upstate for producing within the top local, national and international rankings during their annual meeting earlier today. Sharon Wilson was named top producing agent in Coldwell Banker Caine for 2012, #1 Volume Producer for 2012, and the #1 Coldwell Banker Sales Associate in South Carolina. The company announced the top 15 sales associates in the following order: 1. Sharon Wilson 2. Jacob Mann 3. Pat Loftis 4. Helen Hagood 5. Nick Carlson 6. Lori Thompson 7. Francie Little 8. Susan Reid 9. Faith Ross 10. Susan Gallion 11. Carolyn Dowling 12. Jennifer Wilson 13. Annette Starnes 14. Berry Gower 15. Kathy Harris Sharon Wilson, Jacob Mann, Pat Loftis and Lori Thompson qualified for the International President’s Elite society, made up of the top 2 percent of all sales associates internationally. Helen Hagood, Nick Carlson, and Donna Morrow qualified for the International President’s Circle, made up of the top 4 percent of Coldwell Banker’s agents internationally.

206 Iverness Way, Smithfields, Easley Enjoy the golf club lifestyle in this updated Colonial, on the beautiful Smithfields golf course with clear views of the 4th fairway and 4th green. Well landscaped lot with mature hardwoods, irrigation system, and decorative aluminum fenced area in the backyard. Over 3,000 square feet of living space with 4 LARGE Bedrooms, oversized Family Room with gorgeous rock fireplace, and huge gourmet kitchen with wall oven, bread warmer, and separate stand alone oven/stove range. New premium flooring on both levels, new paint throughout, and updated lighting/fan fixtures. Plenty of space in the 2.5 garage for a workshop and storage, property prewired for generator. Hwy 123 into Easley, Left on Brushy Creek Rd, Left on Iverness.

HOME INFO Price: $279,900 | MLS: #1254645 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 2.5 Square Footage: 3000-3199 Schools: Forest Acres Elementary Richard H. Gettys Middle | Easley High Contact: Steve May | 864.346.2572 Prudential C. Dan Joyner, Co. To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Jake Dickens, Carolyn Dowling, Susan Gallion, Kathy Harris, Francie Little, Susan McCoy, Charlene Panek, Heather Parlier, Susan Reid, Faith Ross, Annette Starnes, and Carol Walsh received the International Diamond Society award, recognizing the top 8 percent of Coldwell Banker agents internationally.

C O N T I N U E D… PA G E 41

36 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 8, 2013

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re atu n g Si

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108 Augusta Ct. - Augusta Rd. Area

720 Villaggio Dr. - Montebello

117 James St. - Downtown

$574,500 • 1252698 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$569,900 • 1254535 • 3 BR/3.5 BA

$580,000 • Non-MLS • 5 BR/3 BA

Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 | Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

Great street, 4 yr old custom built home, hardwoods on 3 levels, 2 car detached garage. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

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38 Mount Vista Ave. - Augusta Rd. Area $429,900 • 1253949 • 4 BR/4 BA

≈0.35 acre lot, hardwoods, granite, fenced yard, partially finished basement, + updates.

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Historic Willie Ward home. Col Elias Earle Historic District. ≈4000sf

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3 Andy Ct - On Lake Robinson

106 Wren Way - Swansgate

$405,000 • 1250243 • 3 BR/3 BA

$299,000 • 1250156 • 2 BR/2 BA

Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

Arrowhead, 5 car garage, workshop and Updates: hardwoods, windows & neutral paint.

Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

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Gourmet Kitchen, ss appl., hdwds, granite, loggia w/fpl, amenities. (Add’l home sites starting at $58,000)

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Great floor plan, hardwood floors, deck, ≈2500 sf

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at Greation Loc

805 Farming Creek Dr. - Neely Farm $235,000 • 1254783 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

11 Beaver Run Dr. - Travelers Rest $212,000 • 1248432 • 4 BR/3 BA Beautiful acre, lower level can be separate apartment, workshop or studio

Cul-de-sac lot, hardwood floors & built-ins, convenient location

Landscape maintenance-free, amenities and minutes to Downtown.

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

Nancy McCory 864.505.8367 | Karen Turpin 864.230.517

Granite, stainless steel appliances. New lighting, fresh paint, screen porch and deck

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101 Ramblewood Ln. - Wildaire $185,000 • 1250944 • 3 BR/2 BA

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104 Foxfield Way - Foxfield $164,921 • 1249122 • 3 BR/2 BA

6 Dove Haven Dr. - Coopers Lake $135,000 • 1255083 • 3 BR/2 BA

Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

All brick, open floor plan, plantation blinds, hardwoods, 2-tiered deck

FANNIE MAE OWNED

507 Wren Way - Swansgate $99,500 • 1254174 • 2 BR/2 BA

≈1300 SF condo, 2 parking spaces, handicap accessible, appliances remain, amenities

Brick, 1 car garage, sunroom, fenced in back patio, close to 385.

Villaggio Homesites Starting at $58,500

Joey Beeson 864.660.9689

407 Fairview Dr. 7 Creek Arbor Ct. 206 Wilton St. 400 Chartwell Dr. 16 Dillingham Ct. 10 Cottingham Cir. 107 Elrod 120 E Wilburn Ave.

$244,900 $229,900 $178,500 $134,900 $127,500 $54,900 $37,500 $24,900

1253293 1255113 1253402 1255078 1255066 1253183 1253910 1254604

www.Homepath.com Kathy Slayter • 864.982.7772

RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

Celebrating 20 years of Service in the Upstate www.marchantco.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

|

864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

MARCH 8, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL HOMES

JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, M A R C H 10 F R O M 2 – 4 P M GREYWOOD AT HAMMETT

PARKINS MILL

101 TREETOPS COURT . $689,000 . MLS#1252165 4BR/4BA New home in gated community. Must see. I-85 to Pelham Rd, Right on the Parkway, Left on Batesville Rd, Left on Enoree Rd, Left on Old Spartanburg Rd, Right on Hammett Rd, SD approx 1 mile on Left. Contact: Emily Fayssoux 787-0496 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

CATALINA ESTATES

1 DOLPHIN POND LANE . $449,900 . MLS#1253300 29 QUAIL HILL DRIVE . $730,000 . MLS#1249821 Location and quality! Fabulous traditional brick home with 4 bedrooms and 4 1/2 baths. 2 story foyer with Travertine floor and circular staircase. Formal dining room has custom painted walls.

4BR/3.5BA Brick ranch on 3.6 acres. Woodruff Rd to Right on Scuffletown, go approx 5 miles to Right on Hewitt (across from Rudolph Gordon Elem, Right into SD, Home on Left

Contact: Janet Sandifer 864-979-6713 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Kathy Flleming 918-2142 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

FOXCROFT

BELLS GRANT

SHADOWOOD

306 CONTINENTAL DRIVE . $399,999 . MLS#1253277

107 BELL ROAD . $364,500 . MLS#1237694

4 SHADOW POINT COURT . $301,500 . MLS#1244619

What a beautiful home in popular Foxcroft subdivision. Home has incredible curb appeal and promises to WOW you from the moment you walk through the front door.

LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! WHAT A BEAUTIFUL COMMUNITY AND HOME!!! You will love the convenience of tons of shopping, private schools, public schools, and the airport.

3BR/2.5BA OPEN SUNDAY!! Brick Home with 3/bed. 2 ba./2 half ba. With Bonus Rm on cul-de-sac in heart of Simpsonville. New Kitchen/Paint/Windows. Screened in porch overlooking landscaped backyard!

Contact: Charlotte Sarvis 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Charlotte Sarvis 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Karen Lawton 444-7004 Keller Williams Upstate

38 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 8, 2013

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JOURNAL HOMES

ON T H E M A R K ET

OPEN THIS WEEKEND SMITHFIELDS

ASHFORD

KINGSBRIDGE

206 INVERNESS WAY . $279,900 . MLS#1254645

205 CHETSWORTH . $264,900 . MLS#1251804

4 DEMPSEY GLEN LANE . $627,000 . MLS#1255181

4BR/2.5BA Updated Colonial on Smithfields Golf Course with clear views of the 4th fairway and 4th green. Over 3000 SF of living space. Hwy 123 into Easley, Left on Brushy Creek Rd, Left on Inverness

4BR/2BA Beautiful custom home w/newly remodeled BA & kitchen. A truly must see home. 1 mile South of Motor Mile turn West on Knolwood Dr, Left on Chetsworth Lane

4BR/3.5BA Gorgeous 4 BR, 3.5 bath home on private culde-sac lot in gated neighborhood! HW throughout main, MBR on main. Beautiful kitchen w keeping room, new ss appliances,center isle. 3 car garage!

Contact: Steve May 346-2570 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Kathy Piccione 979-5906 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Pam McCartney (864) 630-7844 Spaulding Group at Prudential C. Dan Joyner

POWDERHORN

TANNERS MILL

FOUNTAIN INN

111 HARRISBURG DR . $179,900 . MLS#1251719

313 JENKINS BRIDGE ROAD . $279,900 . MLS#1250471

3BR/2.5BA Wonderful home with basement on culdesac lot. 2 full and 2 half baths. 385 South to Exit 27, Left on Fairview Rd, Continue thru all light to Left on Harrisburg

3BR/3BA A beautiful farm house located on a corner lot with tons of yard space for gardening, pets and children to run & play! The updates include: stainless appliances in 2010, roof in ‘02, HVAC 5 ton in ‘09

Contact: Linda Brown 884-0966 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

SHERWOOD FOREST

COUNTRY WALK

212 SCARLETT STREET . $149,000 . MLS#1251035

100 COBB HALL CT . $177,000 . MLS#1248401

2 LONG ACRE LANE . $65,000 . MLS#1255092

3BR/2BA Move in ready. New roof & AC. Faboulous interior inculdes large LR & sunroom overlooks backyard. 385 to S. Pleasantburg- Left onto Scarlett(across from Greenville Tec) . Home on Left.

3BR/2.5BA Charming home in great location. New hardwoods andceramic tile. Great floor plan. Butler Rd, right on Tanner Rd, right into s/d on Old Hall Ln, 1st right on Cobb Hall, home on right.

3BR/2BA A tranquil neighborhood located just off Fork Shoals Rd. This cozy split floor plan sits on a large 1.32 acre, level lot that is perfect for a game of football or pets to run about! Must See!

Contact: Ashley Sherman 918-7845 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Scott Holtzclaw 884-6783 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MARCH 8, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL HOMES

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S F E B R U A R Y 11 T H – 15 T H , 2 013 SUBD.

80 years of coming home to forts made from sofa cushions and blankets. The real estate professionals of the Caine Companies have always known real estate is about more than buying, selling or leasing houses and buildings. It’s about helping people come home—which we’ve been doing for the past 80 years. Let us help you find your dream home—visit cbcaine.com

40 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 8, 2013

PRICE

$6,756,673 $4,521,374 $1,500,000 $1,300,000 CLAREMONT $768,500 CHELSEA WOODS $685,000 THE BROWNSTONES $550,000 $515,000 100 COURT ST CONDO $439,500 MCRAE PARK $430,000 MCBEE BOOKEND $420,000 ASHETON LAKES $417,000 PARK HILL $390,000 WEST FARM $365,000 RIVER WALK $359,500 CREEKWOOD $341,750 BUNKER HILL $339,000 WAREHOUSE PARK $325,000 $315,000 COBBLESTONE $300,000 KINGSGATE $300,000 PLANTATION HEIGHTS $286,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $264,000 GREYTHORNE $263,712 LEGACY FARM $254,000 RICHLAND CREEK @ NORTH MAIN $250,000 $250,000 WOODSTONE COTTAGES $248,900 RICHLAND CREEK @ NORTH MAIN $248,000 KELSEY GLEN $237,015 SAVANNAH POINTE $235,921 TREYBERN $235,000 FOWLER FIELDS $235,000 THE VILLAGE AT WINDSOR CREEK $231,303 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $225,000 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $223,000 FOXGLOVE $218,000 SEVEN OAKS@BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION $215,000 PELHAM FALLS $215,000 CARLYLE POINTE $213,500 BRENTMOOR $202,395 $200,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $191,890 COUNTRY ESTATES $190,000 TANGLEWOOD $189,900 $185,000 COPPER CREEK $184,960 WOODRUFF LAKE $179,900 GARRISON WOODS $178,500 MATTHEWS CREEK $175,000 PINEHURST $174,500 THE HEIGHTS $172,948 CASTLE ROCK $172,760 VICTORIA PARK $171,962 PINE BROOK FOREST $169,900 TERRE BONNE $165,000 RIDGECREEK ESTATES $163,000 THE HEIGHTS $159,761 ELLETSON ACRES $155,000 STEEPLECHASE $153,000 SHADOW CREEK $152,802 PARK HILL $152,562 COLUMBIA INVESTMENT $150,000 NORTHWOOD HILLS $150,000 $150,000 SUMMER WOOD $147,900 VINEYARD AT PLANTERS ROW $145,500 NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK $143,000 VINEYARD AT PLANTERS ROW $143,000 RIVER RUN $141,000 CEDAR GLEN $140,600 $140,000 IMPERIAL HILLS $140,000 PINE VALLEY ESTATES $139,000 $139,000 GARRISON PINES $135,000 LAKEWOOD $135,000 $135,000 SPRING HAVEN $134,400 ANNACEY PARK $133,300 CASTLETON $132,000 EASTCREEK $130,000 $128,500 RIVERBREEZE $127,613 BELMONT HEIGHTS $126,400 VILLAGE @ GLENLEA $126,000 ASHLEY GROVE $125,000 BEREA FOREST $125,000 ADAMS MILL ESTATES $123,690 SUMMERSIDE AT ROLLING GREEN $121,000 VILLAGE @ GLENLEA $120,250 CANEBRAKE $119,212

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

ROPER MOUNTAIN APARTMENT QUIKTRIP CORPORATION PARK STERLILNG BANK NEW PLAN (169) TURTLE CR GOODWIN FOUST CUSTOM HOM BROWN MICHAEL D DUFFIE ROBIN D FOOTHILLS PRESBYTERY MCCOY EVAWN R BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT LYSAK REGINA LEE LS RESIDENTIAL LLC CAMWOOD LLC WOODLAND BUILDERS INC KOUTEN JOSEPH BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BATSON BRAD SOH DISTRIBUTION COMPANY TRIPLETT DOUGLAS G VALINOR INVESTMENT GROUP TIMANUS WILLIAM B KERN RICHARD J ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC S C PILLON HOMES INC TAYLOR MELISSA R REDD BRAD EDGAR MARGARET G ROSEWOOD OF THE PIEDMONT TANSEY THOMAS M NVR INC ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC MERRITT ENTERPRISES LLC ALLENSPACH ADAM MATHEW EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL MALSAM JERRY L ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC CHAPMAN MONICA J KREISER DUNCAN E ELLISON LISA R FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA D R HORTON INC GOLDEN TOURS PROPERTIES ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC BANNING LINDA D COVINO AUDREY A HARKINS WANDA RICE MUNGO HOMES INC WILKINS CHRISTOPHER L SIMS DONALD B TANKERSLEY RHONDA M JACKMAN CHRISTOPHER WILL NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC MUNGO HOMES INC SMITH GEORGE M JR KPS CONSTRUCTION LLC FULLER CAREY S NVR INC SISTRUNK ROBERT D (SURV) NAGLE JAMES M EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL CARTEE NANCY CAMILLE (JT CRAIG SCOTT E HOWARD BRENDA C PEDDYCORD MARSHA ANN SAVELL DONALD W MCDOUGALL CINDY H CORBIN CHRISTOPHER L GRASSER KRYSTAL M CASEY ROBERT W CHOICE BETTIE DOYLEY RALLIS RONALD D JR BARRETT DONALD E CHENG SZE MO BANK OF TRAVELERS REST SCIONTI KRISTEN R MCCALL DOROTHY H USS HOLDINGS LLC SCOTT RUNACUL COE MICHAEL A SEPPALA ABEL ABUNIJEM NIDAL NICHOLS SYLVIA H PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI PGH PROPERTIES LLC JTB LLC OF GREENVILLE DUVALL LINDA M VAZQUEZ DANEIN M BARKSDALE HELEN L DUBOSE ETHEL (LIFE ESTAT J T B LLC OF GREENVILLE BALDWIN DAVID M

BELL CHARLESTON OAKS ROP DBA-ECA INVESTMENTS LLC AGSC LLC ROPER APARTMENTS ASSOCIA BAILEY ROBERT O (JTWROS) ARNOLD CHRISTOPHER SCOTT GREENSTEIN ROBIN L SUBER ROAD PROPERTIES LL CLARK MELANIE (JTWROS) LEE JULIETTE HUANG CHUNHUA MASHBURN AMANDA L (JTWRO CASON JAMES MATTHEW AYERS FRANCES N MORGAN MELISSA K (JTWROS BEISSER BRIAN G KALISCH RICHARD A D HOLDINGS LLC ELLIOTT DAVID W (JTWROS) JAY COX CONSTRUCTION LLC BOLT BRITTNEY K KOHLER ANDREW M (SURV) CLAIRMONT CRAIG COLLINS CHRISTOPHER S BOLT HEATHER DAWN (SURV) ASHFAQ ASMA H (JTWROS) CHAPMAN MARY ANN GARRISO BOBO JULIE ANITRA (JTWRO KING JOHN P EMINOGLU CEM MURAT PONCHAMNI JEAN GRAY (JTW EBNER SETH M (JTWROS) SPARKS NATALIE S (JTWROS WYLER DENNIS J (JTWROS) PETERSON CHRISTOPHER M BEITZEL MARK A BRILEY JAMES B (JTWROS) SIMMONS MARGARET STACEY FISCHER CINDY L (JTWROS) RAVAL KAJAL (JTWROS) YODER ROBERT S KELLY COMPANY INC NAVALLE ESTELA RAMONA TAYLOR MELISSA R (SURV) BLAKE CHRISTINA S (JTWRO RICE KEITH A (JTWROS) AMADOR SACHA L (JTWROS) PEAY MICHAEL ERIC JACKSON DIANNE H (JTWROS HAMMOND CORRINE M (JTWRO TIRICO DARYL NEWHART JAMES W GARRETT CHRISTOPHER M FRANZEN GARY W (JTWROS) CRIBB CHARLES LYDE (JTWR JAMES CALEB AR (JTWROS) ADAMS STEPHANIE D (JTWRO ALLEY BRADLEY S BROCKMAN THERESA M (JTWR HART SALLY C GREEN CAROL R STURTEVANT GAIL V (JTWRO CBNA-SC LLC KEABLES KEITH X CORRAL ELENA E (JTWROS) GREEN PAMELA AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR WILD HORSE CREEK LAND TR AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR RIVER RUN LAND TRUST FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG S C ASSET MANAGEMENT CO BUDDIN JASON KYLE (JTWRO LIN XING KYKER JAMES VOLLMER JORDAN JENNIFER A (JTWRO GREENE SUSAN MCCALL (SUR QUARTER INVESTMENTS LLC NOVASTAR HOME EQUITY LOA TWARDOSZ ALFRED JR HANSEN VICTORIA J (JTWRO ABUNIJEM JAD BOWENS PATRICIA A SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND BURGESS ROSS A (JTWROS) BRASHIER T WALTER REVOC AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NE RITTER MARION POSEY VANESSA M GREER NEDENE R REVOC FAM

300 N GREEN ST STE 1000 1406 TERRACE DR 424 S YORK ST 5800 NW 74TH PL 109 ROLLESTON DR 207 CHELSEA LN 236 RHETT ST UNIT 101 1312 DEVENGER RD 100 W COURT ST UNIT 1F 36 MCRAE PL 111 E MCBEE AVE STE 303 504 MOSSY LEDGE LN 207 BROOKWOOD DR 223 BRUCE FARM RD 215 RIVER WALK DR 132 CREEK SHOALS DR 5 COLONEL STORRS CT 12 INTERNATIONAL CT 323 JONES AVE PO BOX 881 104 LAMBOURN WAY 715 PLANTATION DR 224 ASHLER DR 240 DAIRWOOD DR 6 FARMSTEAD WAY 16 CREEKSTONE CT 246 BLAKELY AVE 4 LITTEN WAY 14 CREEKSTONE CT 216 KELSEY GLEN LN 104 DUCKTRAP CT 240 HADDINGTON LN 111 ROBIN RD 214 PENRITH CT 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 426 201 BAYSWATER LN 104 KINGSMILL CT 101 BUR OAK DR 103 WOODWAY DR 14 BRICEWOOD DR 8200 ROBERTS DR STE 100 15 ORCHARD MEADOW LN 201 ASHLER DR 115 CAROLINA WAY 12 TANGLEWOOD DR 315 BRIDGES RD 108 PILGER PL 12 LAKE VALLEY CT 1 LEAF LN 107 MATTHEWS CREEK LN 19 LINDEN DR 205 SHALE CT 317 CASTLE CREEK DR 308 STONEBURY DR 104 BROOK DR 247 CHAMPLAIN DR 620 NICHOLE PL 114 SHALE CT 40 LOCKWOOD AVE 816 PALOMINO CT 269 APPLEHILL WAY 2304 PIRATE CT 6602 CALHOUN MEMORIAL HWY 105 TRAFALGAR RD 204 ASSEMBLY DR 14 RUSHCRAFT DRIVE 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 25 WOODS LAKE RD STE 313 23815 STUART RANCH RD 25 WOODS LAKE RD STE 313 14221 DALLAS PKWY STE 100 414 WOODGROVE TRCE 203 WAKEWOOD WAY 112 CARLTON DR 208 WOODLAND CREEK WAY 20 GLEN MARTIN LN 212 BALCOME BLVD PO BOX 536 1675 PALM BEACH LAKES BLVD STE 705 CALLE PL 14 RED MILE WAY 19 BUTLER CROSSING DR 306 PIEDMONT GOLF COURSE RD 451 7TH ST SW 100 MONTCLAIR RD PO BOX 17859 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 14221 DALLAS PKWY STE 100 3900 WISCONSIN AVE NW 100 SUMMERSIDE DR 103 MARAVISTA AVE 101 RIVOLI LN

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HH B

PE OPL E , AWA R D S , H ON OR S The following agents earned entrance into the International Sterling Society, named to the top 12 percent of agents internationally: Virginia Abrams, Beth Beach, Shelbie Dunn, Suzanne Freeman, Lorraine Gibson, Berry Gower, Trish Hollon, Lisa Humphreys, Judy McCravy, Rhonda Porter, Sherry Sponseller, Sharon Tootell, Pam Walker, Holly West, Jennifer Wilson, and Linda Wood. The # 1 Unit Producer was Lori Thompson, #1 Increased Production was LeNelle Tanner, the top relocation agent was Judy McCravy, the Rookie of the Year was Heidi Putnam, the Team Spirit Award was awarded to Rhonda Porter, and the Team Leadership Award was awarded to Susan McCoy. Other awards included the Frank B. Halter award is the highest honor that can be bestowed on a member of the Caine Company. It’s an award of excellence

exemplifying integrity, passion, dedication, selflessness, and leadership. In memory of Frank Halter who passed away on January 29, Virginia Abrams and Susan Clary were both recognized with this honor. Coldwell Banker Caine was awarded the #1 Company in South Carolina and the Chairman’s Circle award recognizing the top 5 percent of all companies in the United States and Canada. The Greenville, Williams St. office, was awarded the #1 Coldwell Banker office in the state of South Carolina. “Coldwell Banker Caine agents continue to lead the industry in world class caliber and top producing results,” said Brad Halter, president of Coldwell Banker Caine and Coldwell Banker Commercial Caine. “To be included among the top ranks of Coldwell Banker’s agents internationally is quite a testament to our agents’ hard work and dedication to their clients.”

Helen Hagood Selling Greenville for over 28 years. Ranked #4 out of 100 Agents.

864.419.2889 | See my listings: cbcaine.com/agents/HelenHagood

Welcome to the Team! Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS is proud to announce new sales associates have joined the company.

PAM CHILDRESS

MAGGIE AIKEN

TAMMY ZURAW

JESSE CHILDRESS

Pelham Road Office Cell 864-201-8832 pchildress@cdanjoyner.com

North Pleasantburg Office Cell 864-616-4280 maiken@cdanjoyner.com

Greer Office Cell 864-965-8080 tzuraw@cdanjoyner.com

Greer Office Cell 864-367-7018 jchildress@cdanjoyner.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MARCH 8, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL HOMES

PE OPL E, AWA RD S, HONOR S The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in January 2013 February 20, 2013 – The Marchant Company is known as the Upstate’s local “Signature Agency” in Real Estate, representing buyers and sellers of residential, land, and commercial properties. Seabrook Marchant, Broker-in-Charge, recently recognized several agents for their outstanding performance during the month of January. Valerie Miller was recognized as Volume Listing Agent of the month. Kathy Slayter was recognized as Unit Listing and the Sales Unit Listing Agent of the month. Joey Beeson was recognized as Sales Volume Agent of the month.

Miller

Slayter

Beeson

“March to SOLD” team, Anne Marchant, Jolene Wimberly and Brian Marchant were recognized as Sales Team of the month.

Marchant

Wimberly

Marchant

S PA RTA N B U R G T R A N S A C T I O N S S E P T E M B E R 2 9 T H – O C T O B E R 5 T H , 2 012 SUBD.

PRICE

$435,000 $349,000 $293,000 $285,000 $275,000 $275,000 $270,000 $265,000 PARK PRESERVE $260,204 COBBLESETONE $253,500 MOSTELLER $235,000 VILLAGE AT BENT CREEK $220,130 $214,000 COUNTRY MEADOWS $209,000 MILL BROOK $186,900 VILLAGE AT BENT CREEK $180,000 OAKS AT ROCK SPRINGS $176,500 LAUREL SPRINGS $165,000 SWEETWATER HILLS $164,230 BORDEAUX $162,000 OAK FOREST $159,900 WYNBROOK $143,900 LAUREL SPRINGS $142,000 SWEETWATER HILLS $141,500 STONEWOOD CROSSING $133,000 PLANTERS WALK $130,000 CHESNEE SCENIC VIEW HEIGHTS $125,000 EAGLE POINTE $124,000 $122,900 PHEASANT HILL $122,500 QUAIL RIDGE $122,000 CANDLEWOOD $121,900 SHOALLY CREEK ESTATES $120,000 PANTHER ESTATES $120,000 GROVEHILL FARM $118,000 THE ARBOURS $117,000 LYMAN FARMS $117,000 CREEKSIDE FARMS $115,000 BRADFORD CROSSING $114,299 BRADFORD CROSSING $114,299 SPRING HILL $112,900 GROVEHILL FARM $110,000 HAWKCREEK NORTH $109,900 LAKEVIEW HEIGHTS $109,000 WIND CREST $107,000 FAWN BRANCH $104,900 SHORESWOOD $100,000 $99,900 TWIN BROOKS ESTATE $99,000 SANDY CREEK $98,000 BRADFORD COMMONS $97,000 SHERWOOD ACRES $94,900 LYMAN FARMS $92,750 FOUR SEASONS FARMS $91,199 CEDAR ACRES $90,000 WESTON TOWNES $90,000 SILVER HILL ESTATES $89,200 EMMA K CANNON ESTATE $85,995 PACIFIC MILLS $85,000 POTTER SHOALS $85,000 SUNCREST RIDGE $84,000 EASTBROOK $84,000 TANGLEWOOD ACRES $75,000 CROSS HILL $74,000 $69,000 STERLING ESTATES $68,000 CANYON RIDGE $66,500 STARTEX MILL VILLAGE $57,900 $52,000 $48,500 GRANDVIEW LAKE EMORY SADDLEBROOK CLARK ESTATE STERLING ESTATES WOODFIN RIDGE

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

MAKOID, ALFRED J MYERS, THOMAS L PACE JR, JAMES R ODELL, TIMOTHY EVATT, JOHN STEPHEN BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION LLC RICKY CAMP CONSTRUCTION LLC CHEROKEE SPRINGS FIRE DISTRICT NIEMITALO INC MORGAN, JEREMY E NIX, KEVIN B EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LLC MARSH, FREDERICK E BUTTERBAUGH, SCOTT A SILL REAL ESTATE & CONSTRUCTION MCCLEER CONSTRUCTION CO LLC FANNIE MAE BARNHART, CHRISTINE WHALEN ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC YAGER, GEORGE F BETA LLC ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC TROTTER, MATTHEW R PLUMLEY, JUSTIN R BONDARCHUK, ALESANDR V SKINNER, STEVE BOUTWELL, JACOB MOSHKUN, BORIS YERKES, RHONDA W SUMEREL, WILLIAM T KOWALCZYK, MARIAN ROGERS, ZACHARY S MCKINNEY, BOBBY W ROGERS, ZACHARY SUTTLES, CHRISTOPHER D LANFORD, ALANA K WOFFORD, DAVID M HSBC BANK USA NATIONAL ASSOCIATION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST WILLIAMS, CHRISTOPHER J NAFTZGER, MARY L ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC REED, EDDIE ROETHLISBERGER, STEVEN E RODGER C JARRELL REAL ESTATE FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE JARRELL, RODGER C CHURCH, CAROLYN T DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING OSBORNE, MATTHEW R BETA LLC TILTON, THOMAS R DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST LANDSOUTH LLC SCRUGGS, ZACHARY L RW PROPERTIES LLC HSBC MORTGAGE SERICES INC LOUDERMILK, BLAKE ALLEN, DAVID SOUTH POINTE REAL ESTATE LLC DUNCAN, DONNIE MCELRATH, BRADLEY D NATIONSCREDIT FINANCIAL SERVICES ELEAZER, JOHN A J FOUR LOTS LLC WAGNER, AMBER HARRIS, JOSHUA M CODY, DEWEY A CASEY, WENDELL LARRY

WARNER, GARTH DUNNIING, ROSS A REID IV, GEORGE P WRIGHT, JOHN E WESSON, PAUL LLIBRE, ALEJANDRO SAVAGE, MEREDITH BLUE EAGLE INC FERGUSON, GEORGE B CHURCH JR, JOHNNY R SISK, DAVID RICHARD ALBER, MARILYN M THADANI, RAJU HARPER, PATRICK W HARRIS, JOSHUA M EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LLC LESTER, CARL V TEMPLE, RODNEY WILLIAMS II, HENRY C WADE, LINDA DAVIS, CAROLYN FOWLER, MYRA PAIGE RADER, STELLA M WORTHY, CECELIA FRAN KSIAZAK, TRACY JONES, DAVID ANTON BULLMAN, AMBER DANIELLE DILLON, CHRISTY E YERKES, MECHELLE SAVGHAD, DANIEL C THOMAS, JULIE E DAVIS, GLORIA KUHN, JASON L JONES, ANDREW N STEWART, JUSTIN E GIBAS, PAUL M RICH, EDWARD T MCNEIL, MEKEANA G BLUE SKY RESOURCES INC BLUE SKY RESOURCES INC MARLER, BRITTNEY LANDIS, CHRISTOPHER J DECKEN, ALYSHA M PAINTER, BRANDON M RUPPE, ROBERT DUSTIN CROSBY, TIFFANY LOCKE, JACK ADAMS, ANNIE LUNDEEN, STEPHANIE M DEWART, PARKER RICHARDSON, LAKISHA N BOYD, AUDREY BLALOCK, WHITNEY E RENO, KEITH BLAKE, JAMMIE SOMERS, BRYAN R HAWKINS, JAMES E BAUER, TIMOTHY CRISP, ANDREW R ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC BEDOYA, LINA V SMITH, JESSIE TEAGUE, JOYCE M RENO, KEITH UPSHUR, JAMES B BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION CONOVER SR, RONALD L KUGLER, TRAVIS W PENLAND, DONALD B WILLIS ROAD HOLDINGS LLC

725 W TARA LN 219 SLATE ROCK DR 309 FISHERMANS CV 228 SADDLEBROOK DR 215 PINE COVE DR 240 COLFAX DR 608 BELLE TERRE CT SHA LN 364 SORLEY CT 464 COBBLESTONE DR 205 NANIE MYREE LN 116 CHANDLER CREEK LN 617 MASSWOOD LN 121 WINDY HILL RD 306 N PENDERNALE DR LOT NUMBER: 17&41-43 369 MILHAVEN DR 943 BREEZEWOOD CT 840 BAYSHORE LN 237 MEDOC LN 4404 GRISSOM RD 118 WYNBROOK WAY 908 BREEZEWOOD CT 404 N SWEETWATER HILLS 116 STONEWOOD CROSSING DR 1102 SHORESBROOK RD 219 SCENIC VIEW RD 863 THORNBIRD CIR 527 BONANZA DR 263 W PHEASANT HILL DR 442 QUAIL RIDGE CIR 292 WAXBERRY CT 114 SHOALLY PARK DR 261 LISA CT 526 HAMMETT STORE RD 3 TWININGS TER 707 WHITE CLOUD DR 308 RIVER FOREST DR 121 BRADFORD CROSSING DR 121 BRADFORD CROSSING DR 288 AUTUMN GOLD DR 103 ROBERT DANIEL PL 531 WESBERRY CIR 300 GOLIGHTLY ST 480 ISLAND FORD RD 574 FAWN BRANCH TRL 103 LORETTA DR 460 MAGNESS DR 185 WICK ST 706 SANDY CREEK WAY 101 WILLISTON WAY 240 GRANGER RD 654 GROVER DR 328 E RUSTLING LEAVES LN 125 SARATOGA AVE 281 WESTON VALLEY DR LOT NUMBER: 14B 416 N JOHN ST 7 LAWRENCE ST LOT NUMBER: 3-A 124 COSMOS LN 90 EASTBROOK TER 2 CEDAR LN 210 MOUNTAIN VIEW CIR HIGHWAY 417 LOT NUMBER: 268&299 128 FLINT LN 97 ACADEMY ST 427 MOUNT ZION RD 325 WILLIS RD

Agents on call this weekend

MARK KING 979-3552 PELHAM RD.

JUNE COUSINS 313-3907 SIMPSONVILLE

42 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 8, 2013

JEAN KEENAN 380-2331 WOODRUFF RD.

ALLEN CULVER 879-4239 GREER

LOGAN COTTINGHAM 630-2458 PLEASANTBURG

PAT GRISSINGER 608-5009 EASLEY/ POWDERSVILLE

CHERRY REYNOLDS 979-2633 AUGUSTA RD.

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

cdanjoyner.com.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com


journal culture

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SALE NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 3/23/2013, at 9:00 a.m. at Woodruff Road Storage, 1868 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, Woodruff Road Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore stored with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: C004, Ivan Dario Zopata, 100 Turtle Creek #H86, Greenville, SC 29607 Furniture/Misc., Appliances 2. Unit: C019, Patti S. Owens, 332 Easterlin Way, Greenville, SC 29607 Furniture/Misc., Fax/Copier, Bicycle 3 Unit: D03, Jeffrey Clifton, 522 Todd Rd., Gray Court, SC 29645 Furniture/Misc. 4. Unit: G07, Damien Walker, PO Box 27210, Greenville, SC 29616 Furniture, Kites, Misc./Other SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS COUNTY OF ANDERSON 2010-CP-04-1065 Dell Jones and Lorraine Jones, Plaintiff, vs. Bradley H. Batson and James C. Owens, individually and doing business as Tylar Construction Company, Inc., Defendants, AND Bradley H. Batson, individually and doing business as Tylar Construction Company, Inc., Third-Party Plaintiff, vs. James C. Owens, individually and doing business as Tylar Construction Company, Inc., ThirdParty Defendant. TO: THE DEFENDANT AND THIRDPARTY DEFENDANT, JAMES C. OWENS, INDIVIDUALLY AND DBA TYLAR CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. YOU will please take notice that the Summons and Second Amended Complaint in the above entitled action was filed in Court of Common Pleas on February 6, 2013, and is now on file therein. You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Second Amended Complaint in this action upon the subscriber at his office, 116 West Whitner Street, Anderson South Carolina, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service and if you fail to answer the said Second Amended Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for relief demanded. Robert L. Waldrep, Jr. Robert L. Waldrep, Jr., P.A. 116 West Whitner Street Anderson, South Carolina 29624 (864)224-6341

ď€

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Kugel Korp Inc. DBA/ Shot!, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of LIQUOR at 3641 Pelham Road, Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this license/ permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than March 24, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Crossword puzzle: page 46

Sudoku puzzle: page 46

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145

tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com

The first place to go if your pet goes missing. Greenville County Animal Care 328 Furman Hall Road Greenville, SC 29609

www.greenvillepets.org MARCH 8, 2013 | THE Journal 43


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

St. Anthony’s kindergarten and first-grade students met with their Elder Buddies to celebrate St. Valentine’s Day with a breakfast and enrichment activity. The Elder Buddy program is a multigenerational program that brings members of the community and students together throughout the school year to foster mutual learning and enrichment.

44 THE Journal | MARCH 8, 2013

photo courtesy of treesgreenville

Ellen Woodside Elementary School third-grade students and their teachers perform a dance to “The Gummy Bear Song” at the talent show held recently at the school.

Volunteers plant trees for TreesGreenville.

Chandler Creek kindergartners in Michelle Yandle’s class were visited by the Greer Pediatric Dental Care Office in recognition of Dental Health Awareness Month. Auree Rice looks on as Graham Driscoll brushes the teeth of a toy to practice the correct way to brush teeth. Kindergarten students also learned the importance of visiting the dentist, flossing and eating healthy foods.


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK PHOTOS COURTESY OF BON SECOURS SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM

Attendees of the Black History Month Celebration at Sterling Community Center last week were treated to a performance by dancers from the Imani School of Dance led by Willena Franklin. The celebration was the health system’s fourth event in their inaugural Culture Fusion series for Black History Month. In addition to food and entertainment, five local leaders received awards in recognition of their positive impact on the Sterling community and the history of Greenville.

Maxim Williams with Bon Secours St. Francis Health System served as master of ceremonies at the event.

Members of the “Sterling Seniors on the Go” perform gospel songs at the event.

Local leaders receiving awards in recognition of their positive impact on the Sterling community and the history of Greenville are (standing from left) Xanthene Norris, John Lewis Robinson, Annie Bates, Winfred Daniels and (seated) Freddie Stoddard Reid.

Drummer Krishna Bowen performs for the crowd.

CORRECTION

Upstate UpstateFoodie .com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

PHOTOS BY DALY JONES / CONTRIBUTING

In a photo last week showing Upstate Forever’s fourth annual ForeverGreen Annual Awards Luncheon, an award recipient’s name was misspelled. The Sustainable Communities Champion Award went to Howell Clyborne, representing the Greenville Hospital System. We apologize for the error.

(Left) Master of ceremonies J Dew announces the winner of the tacky bridesmaid’s dress contest at the 2013 Upstate Homeless Coalition’s Bridesmaid’s Ball at the Marriott. (Right) Taylor Smith, winner of the tacky bridesmaid’s dress contest, with Gregory Ellenberg at the 2013 Upstate Homeless Coalition’s Bridesmaid’s Ball.

Shop local. It Matters. BehindTheCounterONLINE.com

MARCH 8, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 45


journal culture

figure. this. out. Spring forward

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46 THE Journal | MARCH 8, 2013

Across

1 Badge bearer 4 Ancient: Pref. 9 English : C :: Greek : __ 14 “The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?” playwright 19 Rah relative 20 Like basic switches 21 “__ Gold”: 1997 film 22 Fine partner 23 Booze 25 Furrier’s service 27 Not under wraps 28 “30 Rock,” e.g. 30 Pasha in the Nixon White House, and others 31 Salacious stuff 34 Holiday dishes? 35 Salmon yield 36 Spots in a Senate race, say 39 Most golf pencils lack one 41 Ron Howard, once 47 Chris Evert forte 51 Coll. helpers 52 Port, e.g. 53 Env. contents 54 Private club, briefly? 55 Uses an acetylene torch 57 Took a little off 58 “Okey-__!” 60 Get via scheming 62 Word on an “evacuation route” sign 64 Mischief-maker 67 Tending to arouse

69 Annoying noise 70 “On the Waterfront” actor 74 Beef often braised 76 Equal 77 Herbal brew 79 Exchange worker 80 Some Broadway performers 82 Game opener 84 Big name in game shows 88 Former TWA owner 89 Where glasses may be raised? 90 Cooler cooler 93 Stroll in the shallows 94 32 years elapsed between his first and most recent Emmys 95 Slice of history 97 One roaming on the range 100 News grabber 103 __ del Fuego 104 WWII carrier 105 Vegas opening 106 Can’t get enough of, in a way 109 Cristie Kerr’s org. 111 Relief 115 Lumber problem 117 Felt sore 121 Circulatory system component 123 Economical heater 126 Put out 127 __-Whirl 128 Connecting points 129 Hall of Fame quar-

By Gail Grabowski and Bruce Venzke

terback Dawson 130 Holds, as an arena 131 Clampett player 132 Stingray relative 133 Annual cause of losing an hr.’s sleep hidden in this puzzle’s 10 longest answers

Down

1 Silver salmon 2 Patron saint of Norway 3 Euro pop? 4 Drivers of red-whiteand-blue vans 5 Colony member 6 Teammate of Babe 7 Pair of duffers? 8 Cop 9 Big name in leather bags 10 Crazy as __ 11 ‘40s-’60s dinnerware brand 12 Sweatshirt size: Abbr. 13 Ancient empire on the Tigris 14 Liked loads 15 Carefree diversion 16 __ B’rith 17 Benefit of oneupmanship 18 Seeing things 24 HMO members 26 Level and bevel 29 Confused 32 Language of Pakistan 33 Sputnik reporter 36 Started to pucker up? 37 Reclusive 1962 film

villain 38 Argyle, for one 40 Longshoreman’s chore 42 Nos. on driver’s licenses 43 It’s depicted by a cello melody in “The Carnival of the Animals”

Easy

44 Angry outburst 45 Lack of vigor 46 It’s bad for business 48 Tech callers 49 Places for 61-Downs 50 “Oklahoma!” aunt 56 Signify 57 Vital signs 59 China’s Sun __

61 Kind of collectible handle 62 Treat for Tabby 63 Teen safety org. 65 Barely burn 66 They may be bummed, briefly 68 Infer 70 Bias-ply alternative 71 Ancient prophet 72 “Gracias” reply 73 Agree to more issues 75 Netful of shrimp, say 78 Abruzzo town in a Longfellow poem 81 Libya neighbor 83 Bit of horse show gear 85 Barred room 86 Hullabaloos 87 Margate’s county 89 Stroked tool 91 SW corner key 92 Frontier lawman 95 Dakota du Sud and Floride, e.g. 96 Floral ornament 98 Renounces 99 “Louisiana Real & Rustic” chef/author 101 Arrives home safely, perhaps 102 Alpine melodies 107 Prepare, as pizza cheese 108 The “L” in L. Frank Baum 110 One way to enjoy being in a cast 111 12 of these is the single-player record for an MLB game 112 Other than this 113 1998 N.L. MVP 114 Mope 116 Helped oneself to 118 Believe 119 Pre-holiday periods 120 Ding, but not dong 122 Umbrella part 124 Harem room 125 “Law & Order” title: Abbr.

Crossword answers: page 43

Sudoku answers: page 43


journal culture

The Symptoms By ashley holt

The mouth shall rise again You might not know it from the top hat and monocle I wear to the opera these days, but I was born a hillbilly. I was a redneck child, raised amid the pluff mud and pork rinds of the South Carolina Lowcountry. And from the moment I first said “mawmuh,” I spoke with a nauseating Southern twang. In my high, girlish tones, my speech sounded something like Gomer Pyle reciting Eudora Welty. With the hiccups. This wasn’t considered unusual; listening to the hog-calling pipes of my parents would make you think Ben Matlock and Blanche DuBois got married. The half-yodel style of Southern speak oozed freely from us all like syrup from Mrs. Butterworth’s skull. It seemed as natural to us as catfish on Christmas. But as my cognitive awareness matured, I began to notice something in my rustic environs: a glowing box that sat in the corner of our tarpaper shack. It was called television, and as I focused on the voices and images it produced, I noticed that television had one particular message it wanted to impart to me: Southerners are morons. From Jethro Bodine to Huckleberry Hound, anyone drawling with a Southern accent on TV was invariably a jabbering doofus. Even movie and TV dramas striving for realism marched the fat Southern sheriff out of Central Casting to bellow, “You in a whole heapa trouble, bwoy!” while wrestling Harvard graduates to the ground. TV revealed what my peers didn’t want to admit; that a Southern drawl was considered indicative of drooling stupidity. Intelligence, dependability, expertise or even streetwise cockiness – these were qualities never expressed with a Southern accent. Kojak never assessed a murder scene with “Shoooey! Them head wounds is a’bleedin’ sumpin awful!” Julia Child never advised viewers to “get you some nanners in that puddin’,” nor did Cronkite end his newscast with “That thar’s how it is.” Sophisticated television personalities, from game show hosts to wisecracking sitcom kids, spoke with

velvet tones in sharp patterns foreign to my bumpkin ears. But if any of these TV programs wished to impart that a character had trouble tying his shoes due to a brain injury, that character hailed from Georgia or Alabama. The message got through to me: I needed a complete vocal relocation across the Mason-Dixon. I studied the available A/V material and learned to mimic everyone from David Brinkley to Captain Kangaroo. I developed a handy method for determining the correct approach to speech: Listen to what my father said, then imagine it coming out of Darth Vader. If it didn’t sound right in the voice of

James Earl Jones, I didn’t say it. As you can imagine, this break with my chicken-fried upbringing was considered tantamount to flag-burning in the name of Allah by my friends and family. It didn’t help that, once the counterculture influences began to creep in, I was not only enunciating sharply, but adding the word “man” to the end of every statement. I was bringing both ivory-tower intellectualism and Greenwich Village cool into our home in my one-man War of Northern Aggression. It’s debatable how successful I was in my transformation from Goober to Gallant. To this day, when talking with any family member, my jaw will loosen as if I have a mouthful of mashed ‘taters and I begin to “reckon” and “declare.” Without immediate correction, I will be reduced to guttural “golderns” within seconds. The swampy roots of Southernism cling deep in the marsh. Despite embracing the King’s English, I will admit to feelings of comfortable familiarity if the waitress calls me “baby doll,” and I never trust an auto mechanic to even refill my washer fluid unless he sounds like Buck Owens. I’ve come to terms with my accent these days, laced with detectable traces of NASCAR fandom, but with aspirations to Toastmasters. But what galls me when considering my struggle is knowing that somewhere out there is a student at Cambridge or Juilliard, studying for the stage. He’s perfecting his New England cadence to recite Shakespearian soliloquies, musically rolling his R’s with the refined diction of a young Olivier. And when he graduates, his dream is to play a fat Southern sheriff. Ashley Holt is a writer and illustrator living in Spartanburg. His neurotic quirks and extreme sensitivity to broad social trends are chronicled in The Symptoms, an illustrated blog. Check out his website at ashleyholt.com.

PLANNED GIVING FOR PAYING IT FORWARD From the Kroc Center to Greenville Forward, Jean Harris Knight’s legacy gift to the Community Foundation helped establish programs dedicated to improving Greenville’s future. We make it easy to give back to the place we all love to call home. www.cfgreenville.org MARCH 8, 2013 | THE Journal 47


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Mar. 8, 2013 Spartanburg Journal