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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, March 7, 2014 • Vol.16, No.10

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LOSS Ladybird’s death this week means the end of the elephant exhibit at the Greenville Zoo PAGE 9 Wilfong to Augusta Street Bike GHS launches step down as Boulevard designed first Rare Tumor police chief for safety Center in U.S. PG 7

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT QUOTE OF THE WEEK

Just off Augusta!

“Who needs personalized medicine more than somebody with a rare cancer? These are the people who need this the most.” Dr. Jeffrey Edenfield of GHS Institute for Translational Research (ITOR) on its new rare tumor center.

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Austin Webb, winner of the inaugural Nashville Connection, a Greenville daylong workshop for singers and songwriters that connects the winners with major country industry labels.

“I am totally against a nonpartisan election in Greenville. This would be a step back for the city because we have done great things as we are.” Greenville City Councilwoman Lillian Brock Flemming, on a proposal to switch from partisan to nonpartisan municipal elections in Greenville.

“If the right person has the right skill set and they have a solid reason for running, I am confident the people of Greenville will elect that person regardless of color or socioeconomic background.” Greenville City Councilman David Sudduth.

“I wish the department well. It’s been a good ride.” Greenville Police Chief Terri Wilfong, on her coming retirement.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Piazza Bergamo rebranded as One City Plaza JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

With renovations nearing completion to what was once the Piazza Bergamo downtown, the city of Greenville has dropped the name of its sister city and rebranded the public space as One City Plaza. As part of a post-World War II initiative proposed by President Eisenhower, Greenville has enjoyed a sister city arrangement with Bergamo, Italy, since 1984, and the public space adjacent to the Project One building was originally designed to mimic an Italian piazza, said Councilman David Sudduth. City Council met on Feb. 24, and approved a resolution to rename the plaza, he said. The city decided to rebrand the public space following a $4 million public investment and the subsequent renovation efforts that were modeled after similar projects downtown. Sudduth said the city reinvested money and rebranded both the NOMA Square site at the Hyatt and public space around the Peace Center, and is now doing the same to public space in

phasize the advantages of the new plaza and the improved pedestrian oriented development, she said. Project Manager Mike Murphy said the new plaza will feature a shade structure, planted trees with large canopies, granite fountain, special seating areas, concrete sofa, and the possible addition of One City Plaza, formerly Piazza Bergamo, in downtown Greenville. men’s and women’s restthe middle of downtown. rooms. The city is always looking to invest The plaza will also include specialmoney to improve the downtown area ized and overhead lighting running while maintaining a balance between along Laurens Alley, he said. The lightpublic and private investment, he said. ed ceiling will connect to the face of the The majority of the public money in- Project One building. vested in One City Plaza came from the The plaza is roughly 98 percent comcity’s downtown infrastructure fund. plete and will remain at that level until Angie Prosser, director of public in- the Project One garage is finished in 12 formation and events, said the plaza to 18 months, Murphy said. renovation is a dramatic change from With the Project One garage currentthe character and configuration of the ly under construction, safety issues pre* Piazza Bergamo. Changing thetoname ventand some minor details24/7 in the plaza’s aId. Introduce your ears the fIrst only InvIsIble hearIng will enhance the council’s desire to em- completion, he said.

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JOURNAL NEWS

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JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Investing in our future

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Puppet master or police chief? Simpsonville City Council must prove it can supervise the new police chief it blew a hole in the city budget to reinstate. Simpsonville’s triumphant new council majority has guaranteed city residents will pay dearly for its steamroller vote to reinstate fired police chief Keith Grounsell with 14 months’ back pay – and that’s just where the fallout begins. To reinstate Grounsell, the council had to oust sitting police chief Steve Moore without cause (another 4-3 vote Feb. 25), which it softened by voting 4-3 to make Moore deputy chief at his current salary. In addition to that new position, the city may also be on the hook for four months’ severance pay to former City Administrator Russ Hawes, another casualty of the triumphant new majority. Hawes was fired without cause Jan. 21 on a 4-3 vote – the same day Taylor Graham and Elizabeth Braswell took office after defeating two members of the prior majority that sacked Grounsell on Hawes’ advice Dec. 28, 2012. Events have unfolded just as Mayor Perry Eichor predicted Jan. 21, describing a “whole back-room, smoke-filled scenario” to WYFF-TV that included firing Hawes, appointing a department head as interim and reinstating Grounsell. How to pay for it all came up only after the steamrolling was done. The city has not budgeted for a deputy police chief or the back wages Braswell, Graham and Councilwomen Sylvia Lockaby and Geneva Lawrence voted to pay Grounsell for the 14 months he did not work for Simpsonville. Grounsell was reportedly earning $73,500 per year at the time he was fired, while Moore’s current salary is $75,705, Interim City Administrator David Dyrhaug told the Journal. A called executive session ended Saturday with no decision in sight regarding where the money will come from. This is what happens when 91 percent of Simpsonville’s registered voters stay home on Election Day and let crusaders gain control of city government. Braswell, Graham, Lockaby and Lawrence have the power to spend other people’s money freely, and they are. If there’s not enough, they have the power to demand more. Are Simpsonville taxpayers ready to mob council chambers in their own defense with the same urgency Grounsell’s jeering supporters exhibited last year in his? Grounsell was fired after four months on the job because, in the words of Eichor and Hawes, he “would not and could not work with the City Council, the city administrator and the human resources director.” After 14 months of orchestrated turmoil, Grounsell need no longer worry about the first two. Grounsell has proven he understands coercion. Now he must demonstrate he can do the job he wrested away from Steve Moore. As Moore told reporters at their joint news conference, Grounsell inherits a police force that “has moved forward over the last 14 months and accomplished a lot of things. Morale is the highest it’s ever been.” Is Grounsell a puppet master or an employee? That’s the unanswered question facing Simpsonville now. The integrity of the police force – and city government – rides on the answer.

SPEAK YOUR MIND The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

Patients with rare cancers – and limited treatments – will now have significantly expanded options. Greenville Health System has opened a Rare Tumor Center that is the nation’s first center dedicated exclusively to the treatment and research of rare cancers. GHS, like most nationally ranked cancer programs, has clinical research studies for the nation’s most common malignancies, such as cancers of the breast, lung, colon and prostate. What’s been missing nationally is a standardized approach for patients with uncommon tumors who have no evidence-based data for management and no clinical trials to address their treatment. We’re creating something in Greenville, S.C., which only exists as pieces elsewhere. What these teams of physicians and scientists learn here will not only impact rare tumor research, but also provide answers to other cancer issues. The new center will be housed in the GHS Institute for Translational Oncology Research (ITOR). Through this unique strategic alliance, patients will gain access to sophisticated genomic testing through national molecular medicine leader Foundation Medicine and local partner Selah Genomics to help determine relevant treatment options or clinical trials for each patient based on that person’s unique molecular profiles. Rare tumors are typically considered those that affect anywhere from 150 to 5,000 patients each year. Altogether, rare tumors affect more than 20 percent of all cancer patients. This translational research will incorporate cancer genomics and rare tumor molecular profiling to a level of sophistication and precision only available here. GHS and its industry collaborators hope that the center will become a national and international resource for research and published data in the field. My wife, Harriet, and I are proud to be a part of this ambitious initiative with our gift of $1 million. We believe that Greenville can become the destination city for patients nationwide who suffer from some form of rare tumors.

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

IN MY OWN WORDS by JERRY DEMPSEY

I’ve been CEO of major Fortune 500 companies and helped lead university and hospital boards that have a major impact on our state. But I also grew up in a poor textile town and chopped wood every day for my family’s wood stove. I had a 12-mile paper route to help earn money and worked summers on oil barges on the Mississippi River to help pay for college tuition. I was valedictorian of my high school and graduated first in my mechanical engineering class at Clemson. But, even with all that work, I could not have afforded to attend Clemson without scholarships. Someone believed in my potential enough to invest in me – in much the same way Harriet and I believe enough in the GHS Cancer Institute Rare Tumor Center to invest early in what we know will be of great benefit to the nation in treating cancer. This is also an investment in regional economic development – a catalyst that will attract even more world-class physician-scientists to Greenville and help develop additional economic opportunities. It will help grow jobs, ideas and even new technologies, which themselves will be the catalyst for additional research or spin-off companies. I’ve seen up close the transformative work being done by GHS – and absolutely believe this investment will have great returns to our community now and in the future. The $1 million gift by Jerry and Harriet Dempsey marks the largest individual gift ever donated to the GHS Cancer Institute. Dempsey is the former president and CEO of Borg-Warner Corporation, vice chairman of WMX Technologies, chairman and CEO of Chemical Waste Management and chairman and CEO of PPG Industries Inc. He is also the former chair of Greenville Health System.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL NEWS

Greenville Police chief announces retirement Wilfong’s last day will be April 15 CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

sung heroes, the men and women who come to work every day and do the right thing.” Wilfong, a third-generation police officer, was an assistant police chief with the Louisville Metro Police Department before coming to Greenville. She served as a deputy with the Jefferson County Sheriff ’s Department and a Kentucky state trooper before she joined the Jefferson County Police Department, where she worked her way up the ranks to captain. She

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Greenville Police Chief Terri Wilfong announced on Tuesday she will retire next month. Wilfong, 56, became Greenville’s first female police chief seven years ago after a nationwide search. She plans to move back home to Kentucky to do law enforcement consulting work. “Now’s the time,” she said. “The department is in a really good place right now. I raised the bar of expectations when I came here and they’ve really worked so hard and gone beyond.” Wilfong’s tenure was marked by the implementation of a downtown teen curfew that requires anyone under Greenville Police Chief Terri Wilfong 18 years old to be accompanied by a parent or guardian after 10 p.m. on Fridays, was made an assistant chief when the Saturdays and holidays in the city’s Jefferson County Police Department and the Louisville Division of Police central business district. The city started the curfew in merged. Wilfong’s last day is April 15. She 2009 after a summer weekend when city officials said more than said leadership has been developed 1,000 teens gathered on the south within the organization during her end of Main Street and fights broke tenure and “it’s time for somebody else out and downtown visitors were to lead the department.” Wilfong, who has spent 33 years harassed. During Wilfong’s tenure, the depart- in law enforcement, said she’s been ment’s training facility was improved thinking about retiring for a while. and additional officers hired to patrol Her family is in Kentucky, and “there’s no place like home,” she said. downtown. “I wish the department well,” she Asked about her biggest accomplishment as chief, Wilfong said she doesn’t said. “It’s been a good ride.” City officials have not announced consider departmental improvements as her personal accomplishments, but who will lead the department in the as the accomplishments of “the un- interim after Wilfong’s departure.

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CORRECTION In its March 2014 issue, TOWN magazine, our sister publication, listed the incorrect venue for the March 29 Jane Monheit concert. The concert will be held at the Younts Center for the Performing Arts, 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $35-$40. Call 864-409-1050 or visit yountscenter. org for more information. TOWN regrets the error.

MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 7


JOURNAL NEWS

Room to ride

Augusta Street Bike Boulevard aims to keep cyclists safer SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

In an effort to get bicyclists off of Greenville’s most dangerous road for cyclists, city officials plan to implement an Augusta Street Bike Boulevard, which will allow for safer bike travel by routing cyclists off Augusta and through surrounding neighborhoods. More than 40 people attended the first of two public meetings last week to hear how the city intends to make bicycling safer for the Augusta area. “There’s really no way to provide for a safer bicycle environment [directly] on Augusta. It’s just too narrow and there’s no room,” said Edward Kinney, senior landscape architect with the Parks and Recreation Department. A proposed route would take cyclists off of Augusta and onto a maze of side streets to the west of and parallel to Augusta Street. “It’s really an exercise in navigation to orient riders through those neighborhoods,” said Kinney. “It’s easy to get turned around due to the existing infrastructure. We’re proposing pavement markings and signage, almost like trail markers from the south part of Augusta to the north of Augusta.” The mapped, signed route would start from Augusta Street at Meyers Drive and zigzag through the network of Augusta neighborhood roads all the way to the Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail connection near Whittenburg Elementary School. “I think it is a good plan to make things safer for cyclists to ride into or out of the Augusta Road area,” said Steve Baker, president of the Greenville Spinners Club. “There are some passionate, hard-core cyclists who would want to continue to ride directly onto Augusta. But you won’t see kids and moms and families choosing to ride onto Augusta ever.”

DANGEROUS INTERSECTIONS According to data collected by Alta Planning, the company that led the effort for the Bicycle Master Plan the city adopted in September 2011, a reported 11 collisions involving a bicyclist and a motor vehicle occurred on Augusta Street between 2005 and 2010. The top three intersections for bike-related collisions were also all on Augusta. Two collisions each were reported between 2005

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S. C HUR CH ST.

sjackson@communityjournals.com

a 12-month planning process that included extensive public participation along with staff from the city’s Parks and Recreation Department, Traffic Engineering Division, Law Enforcement, Planning Department and Transit. The Greenville Pickens Area Transportation Study also served in a critical advisory role during the process. The Bicycle Master Plan is intended to serve as “a framework to help strategize the expansion of the existing bikeway network, complete network gaps, and provide greater transportation connectivity while educating and encouraging bicycling throughout the city of Greenville,” according to the city’s website. The plan envisions a bicycling environment in the year 2020 that takes a holistic approach to the Six E’s (Engineering, Education, Encouragement, Enforcement, Evaluation and Planning and Equity) of a bicycle-friendly community. It creates specific action-oriented goals and objectives for each E.

a n d 2010 for the intersections of Augusta Street and Dunbar Street, Augusta Street and McDanD. IS R FAR iel Avenue and AuW. gusta Street and Tallulah Drive. The Greenville Green Ribbon Mobility Subcommittee, which advises the City Council on sustainability and environmentally responsible practices, ranked Augusta Street “No. 1 for number of bicycle collisions and No.1 for public comments requesting safety improvements. Given the importance of this corridor for bicycling and the bicycle boulevards opportunities identified in the Bicycle Master Plan, the Mobility Subcommittee recommends development of a bicycle boulevard bypass route for Augusta Street.”

PART OF THE MASTER PLAN The Augusta Street Bike Boulevard is part of about 50 miles of infrastructure recommendations included in a Bicycle Master Plan the city adopted in 2011 as a guideline for projects to address over time, Kinney said. The compilation came out of

AUGUSTA STREET & BUSY INTERSECTIONS

PROPOSED BIKE BOULEVARD

PLANNING FOR A BIKING FUTURE Some recommendations from the Bicycle Master Plan have already been completed, such as putting shared lane markings, or “sharrows,” on several downtown streets, including Faris Road, and bicycle route signage on the corner of East Washington and Lakehurst streets.

“This is the first public workshop we’ve had based on the Bicycle Master Plan,” Kinney said. The signage at Washington and Lakehurst will be “similar if not identical” to the proposed Augusta route. Kinney said the master plan was adopted “in principle,” meaning the city is required to “go back to the public for further input” on a regular basis. The city has decided to do that via the community workshop format. Laurens Road and Pleasantburg Drive were also identified in the master plan public survey “as the highest priority corridors for improved bicycling conditions,” but the city has no timetable right now on when those will be addressed, he said. Baker said Augusta is an important neighborhood and he “couldn’t list a seriously more important area” for the city to address now. He would also like to see the city continue to implement safer streets for cyclists and the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail extended south through the Parkins Mill area into Clemson University’s International Center for Automotive Research (CUICAR) and Lake Conestee Nature Park. The latter is a goal of Greenville County’s Economic Development Corp., which wants to expand the trail along a former freight railroad line from Washington Street to Clemson ICAR. Robin Bylenga, owner of Pedal Chic, a cycling shop geared towards women located in downtown Greenville, and an Augusta Street area resident, called the off-Augusta bike route “a good step in the right direction.” Augusta Street is “way too small for four lanes of traffic and really unsafe,” she said. Bylenga added that sharrows are definitely a step forward, but if Greenville really wants to tout itself as a livable, alternative-transportation city, there need to be cycle lanes with a physical buffer. “I would like to see us go farther and commit to it,” she said. Community residents who attended the public meeting were generally in favor of the project. “There was a lot of discussion of paths and alternate routes, but nobody seemed to have issue with putting up signs and the idea itself,” said Kinney. Parks and Recreation staff will take the input received at the public meeting and possibly revise the route. Kinney expects to schedule a follow-up public workshop sometime in the next two months that will show the final plan. Once the second workshop has been conducted, final changes will be made to the route and funding will come out of the city’s operational budget. The project will be scheduled with the public works department to implement, and Kinney expects it to be completed in 2014.


JOURNAL NEWS

Greenville Zoo’s Ladybird dies Zoo staff forced to euthanize sick elephant SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com The Greenville Zoo announced Tuesday that Ladybird, one of its two African elephants, has died. Ladybird was almost 44 years old, which is considered very elderly for an elephant in captivity, where normal life expectancy is 37.9 years, zoo officials said at a Tuesday press conference. The elephant has been monitored closely for the past month after an episode of colic – a general term for any type of abdominal pain that makes an animal not want to eat – thought to be caused by a change in the weather, zoo officials said. “Despite being a geriatric elephant, she was doing well for her age until a couple of months ago when she began showing signs of age-related medical issues, including arthritis and other joint-related issues,” said Dr. Heather Miller, Greenville Zoo deputy administrator for animal health. Greenville Zoo staff discovered Lady-

bird lying down in the barn late Monday afternoon. Staff made multiple unsuccessful efforts to help the elephant stand. The Greenville Zoo staff veterinary team assessed Ladybird’s condition and determined she was too weak and that euthanasia was the best course of action. “Our entire zoo family is heartbroken over this loss,” said Greenville Zoo Director Jeff Bullock. “Because the Greenville community has shared in our joy over the birth of Kiko and Autumn’s current pregnancy, we know that the community also shares in our grief as we all cope with the death of such a beloved member of our family.” A team of pathologists from the University of Georgia Exotic Animal and Pathology Service, under the direct super-

The L le L Shop

vision of Miller, will perform a necropsy, which is required for any animal that passes away at the zoo. The Greenville Zoo expects to receive the test results within the next two to three weeks. Ladybird came to the Greenville Zoo in 2006 from the Lion Country Safari Wildlife Park in Loxahatchee, Fla., to be a companion to Joy, the zoo’s other 44-year-old female African elephant. Zoo staff will monitor Joy closely over the next few days as elephants are very social animals and mourn similarly to humans, said Bullock. Greenville Zoo officials will talk with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) in the next few days about transferring Joy to another zoo since AZA regulations prohibit zoos from holding single elephants. Elephants are not part of the Greenville Zoo’s 2012 master plan, and discussions were already underway to relocate the elephants to another facility by 2016. Zoo officials say this will speed up that process as they look for a new home for Joy. The Greenville Zoo is encouraging memoriam notes about Ladybird be left on the Zoo’s Facebook page at facebook. com/greenvillezoo.

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Henderson announces re-election bid S.C. House representative Phyllis Henderson announced this week that she will seek re-election for the District 21 seat she has held since December 2010. Henderson currently serves on the Medical, Municipal and Military Affairs Committee and the House Operations and Management Committee. She also serves on the Joint Legislative Committee to Screen Candidates for College Boards of Trustees. Henderson is former chairwoman of the Greenville County Council and a member of the board of Women in Government. Henderson

New DSN board takes over APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Four months following their appointment by Greenville County Council, permanent board members of the Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board were approved by Gov. Nikki Haley and presided over their first meeting last week. New permanent board members chosen in November 2013 include Cynthia Baughan, Peggy Farmer, Paul Hamberis and William “Bern” Mebane. Baughan is an assistant professor of special education with UNCCharlotte based in Greenville. Farmer has served on the DSN board in the past and is mother of a special-needs child. Hamberis is a physical therapist,

and Mebane is a publisher and parent of special-needs children. They join former interim members Bob Ariail, Pearlie Harris and Alex McNair. Interim board members took over after County Council dissolved the previous 12-member DSN board in May 2012 amid management and financial issues. The agency held its first fundraiser in February featuring comedians Dave Coulier and Eric Hunter. DSN executive director John Cocciolone reported that despite limited time for promotion, the event broke even and attracted about 200 people. The agency plans to hold another fundraiser, he said. The DSN board is scheduled to meet again on March 27, 6 p.m., at 1700 Ridge Road.

Greenville Tech to host career nights Greenville Technical College will host Career Night events in March. On March 13, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Transportation Career Night will be held at McKinney Automotive Center. The event will feature aircraft avionics, aircraft maintenance technology, auto body repair, automotive technology, diesel equipment technology, motorsports technology and truck driver training. On March 25, 6 p.m., Paralegal Career Night will be held in the Criminal Justice Building, Room 231 on the Barton Campus. This event will feature information about the American Bar Association-approved program that focuses on teaching students to assist attorneys with various legal functions and to draft discovery, correspondence and pleadings. Call 864-250-8162 to reserve a space.

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JOURNAL NEWS

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JOURNAL NEWS

Revision saves 3 trees at proposed Cottages at Mills Mill

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The Cottages at Mills Mill received approval last week from the Greenville Planning Commission with the provision that a proposed gated entry be removed from the plans. After much discussion, planning commission officials said the gates “have a negative effect and slow down emergency vehicles” and new ordinances discourage gated communities within the city of Greenville. The developer also removed one of the proposed homes from the initial plans after nearby residents voiced concerns about a grove of eight 100-plus-year-old cedar trees that would have been razed. Initial plans called for all eight trees to be cut down. By removing one home from the site plan, minority owner David Glenn will now save three of the eight cedar trees. Several people from the community spoke at the meeting, both for and against the development. Interior de-

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signer Eric Brown, who spearheaded the effort to save the cedar trees, submitted a petition to the commission that he said contained 700 signatures from residents wanting to see the cedar trees saved.

The new 28-unit community, to be located adjacent to the Lofts at Mills Mill condo complex off Church Street on Guess and Seth streets, will feature common-area courtyards with prices expected to be in the $400,000 range.


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JOURNAL NEWS

GHS launches rare tumor research center

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tor of GHS’s Institute for Translational Oncology Research (ITOR), said he has been part of developing this project for about a year. “We looked for something similar and someone to partner with, but we couldn’t really find anything like it,” he said. Large clinical trials on lung, breast and colon cancers offer up advances and discoveries, but some patients with

hundreds of genes and sequence the genetic code of cancer cells fairly quickly, Edenfield said. Selah Genomics, co-located at ITOR, is a local company that is also developing genomic technology that can be used for local cancer patients, he said. The rare tumor center will help treat cancer patients in their community, Edenfield said. “To me, it’s a logical extension of all

Patients diagnosed with rare forms of cancer can face limited treatment options because of the very nature of their “We’re just now at that little elbow where things are disease. To increase opstarting to change because we can do this sophisticated tions for these patients, Greenville Health Sys- molecular work so much more quickly and inexpensively.” tem (GHS) and Foundation Medicine anDr. Jeffrey Edenfield, GHS oncologist on the nounced this week the new rare tumor center and personalized cancer care. launch of the nation’s first Rare Tumor Center. rare tumors “aren’t served well by this of our efforts for precision therapy and The new center, which is expected to process,” he said. “They’re kind of left personalized medicine. Who needs persee more than 100 patients in the first behind on the progress.” sonalized medicine more than someyear, will provide patients with molecuAdvances in technology over the last body with a rare cancer? These are the lar testing through Foundation Medi- decade have made cutting-edge tests people who need this the most,” he said. cine’s FoundationOne test, a diagnostic more available, Edenfield said. “Now “It’s a way of hopefully finding them opevaluation, and support services. Some that we can do this very sophisticated tions that we never knew before.” patients will also be part of an 18-month molecular interrogation of cancer cells, Cancer patient Judy Roberts said she research study. what a great way to standardize evalu- thinks the new center will be beneficial. Dr. Jeffrey Edenfield, medical direc- ation for these people and see how we Roberts, who lives in Georgia, had been can begin to tease out some treatments part of a clinical trial in Atlanta, but that we never would have thought was told “the computer picks the mediabout.” cation,” she said. Helping to esShe was not comfortable with the tablish the Rare care and switched to a trial in GreenTumor Center is a ville in May 2013. Doctors took a deep $1 million dona- tissue sample to help determine treattion to the GHS ment options, she said. About the new Cancer Institute center, she said, “especially what I’ve by Jerry and Har- been through, I think it will be great. riet Dempsey. Jer- It’s better to target each person differry Dempsey served ently.” as CEO of multiple Providing an out-of-town patient an Dempsey companies and for exhaustive report that he can take back five years on the GHS board. to his local doctor will also help that Dempsey said he wanted to support doctor make decisions for that patient, the unique center because through it, said Edenfield. Center physicians will 99 $ 99 GHS will fill an unmet need. “I’ve al- also track patients and follow up with ways felt that Greenville can be a desti- the doctors on the treatments, he said. nation for healthcare.” Foundation Medicine has a database Dr. Larry Gluck of the GHS Cancer of genomic information that clinicians Institute said, “What our teams of phy- can tap into, Edenfield said. Physicians sicians and scientists learn here will not at the Rare Tumor Center will be able to only impact rare tumor research, but share their information with other rehopefully provide answers to other can- searchers as well. “Maybe we can make cer issues. While cancer is immensely a difference without doing a huge trial,” complex, some rare tumors may be he said. driven by relatively fewer alterations; With the expanded availability of geknowing what these alterations are may nomic testing, cancer care is coming lead to more effective treatments and into a new era, said Edenfield. “We’re provide valuable clues in the more com- just now at that little elbow where mon cancers.” things are starting to change because Foundation Medicine is a molecular we can do this sophisticated molecular technology company based in Boston work so much more quickly and inexthat has developed a test that can map pensively.”

59

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City Council divided over nonpartisan elections

JOURNAL NEWS Martha Franks Baptist Retirement Community Laurens, South Carolina

JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com A proposed change from partisan to a nonpartisan form of municipal elections has left Greenville City Council members sharply divided. Councilwoman Lillian Brock Flemming said Monday that nonpartisan elections have a history of being negative for African-Americans and other minorities who desire to be officeholders in areas where their populations are small. The change would jeopardize the city’s two minority districts, which have already seen historic drops in population, Flemming told her fellow council members at a Monday work session. Nonpartisan elections can also dilute the ability for new candidates to defeat an incumbent, said Councilwoman Jil Littlejohn, who represents the primarily black Nicholtown community. Without party support, name recognition or resources, it is difficult to become elected, she said. With other cities such as Charleston and Columbia having made the switch to nonpartisan elections, Greenville remains one of the few South Carolina municipalities to preserve a partisan

system. After several elections with unopposed candidates and low turnouts, several Greenville council members called for a change to nonpartisan elections in an attempt to attract more candidates and voters. Flemming said cities such as Charleston and Columbia have much larger minority populations, and a nonpartisan form of elections does not have the negative impact on the demographic that it would in Greenville. “I am totally against a nonpartisan election in Greenville,” she said. “This would be a step back for the city because we have done great things as we are.” Columbia City Councilwoman Tameika Devine told the Journal nonpartisan elections in the state capital have not been an issue because the demographics there are equal. “Good or bad, people identify with others most like them,” she said. City Attorney Ronald McKinney told the council he was surprised by the lack of turnout at four public hearings held on the issue in January. Most of the opinions voiced there favored the current system, he said. The change the council is debating would shorten the municipal election

cycle from 174 to 60 days and eliminate the need for a primary, city officials have said. Council members who support the change say city elections tend to turn on problems such as infrastructure rather than ideological arguments and partisan issues. Councilman David Sudduth said he sees no value in a partisan system and favors the change. “I have never made a decision based on party affiliation, nor has that ever factored into my thought process,” he said. “If the right person has the right skillset and they have a solid reason for running, I am confident the people of Greenville will elect that person regardless of color or socioeconomic background.” A nonpartisan election system would allow candidates to focus solely on the issues and encourage more people to make themselves available for service, he said. Over the objections of Flemming and Littlejohn, the council instructed the city attorney to draft an ordinance on the proposed election change, which will require a public hearing and two readings from council. Sudduth said he expects a public hearing to be scheduled in the next 30 to 40 days.

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JOURNAL NEWS

County Council wants more say in Tech board APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com How members of the Greenville Technical College Area Commission, the governing body of the technical school, are appointed became a hot issue during Greenville County Council’s Committee of the Whole meeting on Tuesday. In an evening full of appointments for various local commissions, council members debated whether to pass along nominees for the Tech commission to the Greenville County legislative delegation. Council members say a 2013 change in legislation that details how members of the Tech commission are chosen removed all influence the county once had over a commission that administers funds collected through taxes from Greenville County residents. According to the revised act, County Council must submit at least two nominees to the county delegation. Delegation members then can nominate “additional candidates for any seat other than the seats filled from among the members of the Greenville County School District Board of Trustees and the Greenville County Workforce Investment Board.” Council members said that they can nominate members for the Tech commission, but the delegation does not have to abide by their choices. On the agenda were six names, two each from the school board, the Workforce Investment Board and House District 19. The Tech commission has 12 voting members, with six coming from House districts and six at-large members selected by the Greenville County delegation, according to the law. County Attorney Mark Tollison said the revised legislation had added several layers of procedure to the selection process. The statute was unclear about what County Council should do with the four submitted names from the school board and Workforce Investment Board, which were previously ex-officio, said Tollison. According to the statute, council would pass along the four names from the school board and the Workforce Investment Board, he said. Council’s only action would be nominating two names for the District 19 seat. “I’m really troubled about this convoluted law that we’re dealing with now,” said Councilman H.G. “Butch”

16 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

Kirven, who recommended sending all the names back to the delegation for clarification. Councilman Jim Burns objected to the process, saying the council had submitted two names to fill unexpired terms on the commission last year, “and they completely ignored our requests.” “My objection is that we have zero say in selection of commissioners on the area commission that controls their budget,” Burn said. “The amount of money that we tax Greenville County citizens for – for us to have no control over the expenditures of that money is ridiculous.” Burns suggested that council refuse to participate in the process until it is changed to “collaborate to make the best possible board to represent Greenville County. It doesn’t make any sense for us to fund something over and over again and have no say-so in the selection of the commissioners or the expenditures of those monies.” Burns noted that council recently approved a $25 million bond for Greenville Tech to build its new Enterprise Campus, but doesn’t have any influence on the commission. According to Greenville Tech, it received 9 percent of its funding for fiscal year 2012-2013 from Greenville County. The council passed a motion by Kirven to send forward two nominees, James Blakely Jr. and Brian McSharry, for the House District 19 seat. “It’s my intent by my motion that County Council not engage in the games that are apparently being played here,” said Kirven. During the regular council meeting, members approved the nomination of Blakely and McSharry and approved a request for the county attorney to review the law and advise them of possible improvements the council might propose to the legislative delegation. In other business, council appointed James Jones, Simon McClain Jr., Margaret McJunkin and Charles Shipman to the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission. In addition, Chet Chea, Christopher Sullivan and Chad Tumblin were appointed to the Greenville County Planning Commission. Alan Mitchell was appointed to the Board of Tax Assessment and Appeals. A proposed development at Phillips and Boiling Springs roads may come before the council soon for consideration. The developer has requested rezoning to a Flexible Review District


Clinton to visit Greenville

JOURNAL NEWS

The Peace Center may welcome former President Bill Clinton on April 8. According to Furman University officials, Clinton is tentatively scheduled to speak April 8 at an event to celebrate Richard W. Riley’s lifelong work and the 15th anniversary of the Riley Institute. Information for ticket sales has not been announced. The Riley Institute, which offers programs to engage students and citizens across the state in politics, public policy, and public leadership, is named for Greenville native Richard Riley, who was a two-term governor of South Carolina, and served as U.S. Secretary of Education in the Clinton administration from 1993-2001. (FRD) to build a 54-home development, Windwood Cottages, on approximately 13 acres. Residents have collected nearly 1,000 signatures through signed and online petitions objecting to the plan, citing concerns about increased traffic, flooding and traffic safety on Boiling Springs Road. The Planning Commission and staff both recommended approval of the rezoning with conditions, including inclusion of an access point on Phillips Road, dedicated left-turn lane into the development, and sidewalks. Council’s Planning and Development Committee is due to review the request on Monday, March 10, at 4:15 p.m. The Greenville County Citizen Roads Commission will meet for the first time after all public input meetings on March 7, 3 p.m., at County Square. Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again on March 18, 6 p.m., at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville.

MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 17


JOURNAL NEWS

Berea Middle mourns loss of teacher Investigators call her death a homicide CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Berea Middle School is mourning the death of a popular special education resource teacher, and Greenville County

Sheriff ’s Office investigators are trying to solve a homicide. The body of Laurie Patton, 39, of 12 S. Poinsett Highway, Travelers Rest, was found in a room at Patton the Quality Inn motel on South Pleasantburg Drive early Monday morning.

Guests at the hotel reported an explosion and fire, but authorities now say they believe the fire was set to destroy evidence in the room and the “explosion” was probably the sound of glass shattering as somebody broke out the window to try to get to the victim. Patton had worked as a special education teacher at Berea Middle since 2005. “Laurie Patton was an amazing person and inspiring teacher and

friend who cared so deeply about her students, their families, and fellow teachers and school staff,” said Principal Robin Mill in a statement. “Our Berea Middle School community is devastated by her loss.” Investigators are investigating the connection between Patton and a man who was stopped driving her car at 30 mph on Interstate 85 in Banks County, Georgia.

9 say they’ll run for state school superintendent Incumbent Republican Mick Zais not seeking re-election CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com While filing is still officially one week away for the South Carolina Superintendent of Education race, the list of candidates already looks like the roll of an overcrowded classroom. The race was thrown wide open in December when incumbent Mick Zais announced he would not seek a second term. Eight Republicans and one Democrat plan to run for the seat. Filing opens on March 16 and closes March 30. The primary is June 10. A runoff will be held on June 24 if necessary. The winners will face off in the Nov. 4 general election. Republicans who plan to run for the seat are Sally Atwater, Gary Burgess, Meka Childs, Amy Cofield, Sheri Few, Don Jordan, Elizabeth Moffly and Molly Spearman. The Democratic candidate is Mon-

tri Belton. Atwater, 62, is the widow of Lee Atwater, a political operative who rose to national prominence in the 1980s as an advisor to Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. Atwater, who retired as a public school teacher last month, supports Gov. Nikki Haley’s education plan. This is her first run for office. Burgess is a member of the Anderson County Board of Education and former superintendent of Anderson School District 4. He ran unsuccessfully for the seat in 2010 and then served on Zais’ transition assessment team. Burgess, an Inman native, is CEO of the Burgess Research Action Group. He wants to “take the shackles off teachers and let them teach.” Until last month, Childs, 36, was Zais’ deputy superintendent. She was a public school teacher in Richland County and education policy advisor to then-Gov. Mark Sanford. She served as a member of the South Carolina Education Oversight Committee for three years. Her campaign centers on five things – bringing accountability to every classroom, in-

dividualized education, eliminating federal overreach, attracting the best teachers and improving community involvement in education. Cofield, 50, an attorney, grew up in Greenville but currently practices law in Lexington. She is a former public school teacher. A campaign donor to Gov. Nikki Haley, Cofield is touting her “unique experience” as a parent, educator and holder of a law degree. Few, executive director of South Carolina Parents Involved in Education, is running for superintendent to eliminate Common Core. Few has served as a GOP Executive Committee member and as Kershaw County Republican Party chair. Jordan, 70, is a professor of mathematics and science and mathematics education at the University of South Carolina. He is the founder and executive director of a science academy that focuses on increasing the number of students, especially females and minorities, who enter science professions. He favors teacher evaluations that don’t assign letter grades, incentives to attract good teachers to

the state’s poorer districts and pay raises. Moffly, 52, a member of the Charleston County School Board, is making her third run at school superintendent. She opposes Common Core, supports multiple state diplomas and moving the state to a 10-point grading scale. Spearman, 60, is the executive director of the South Carolina Association of School Administrators. She previously worked as teacher, principal, state legislator and deputy superintendent at the state Department of Education under Democrat Inez Tennenbaum. Spearman said she wants to help Haley implement her education plan and that she has proven she can work with lawmakers of both parties. Belton is an Abbeville native who served as part of Zais’ team as director of the Office of School Transformation. Belton holds a doctorate in educational leadership. He has nearly two decades of experience as a teacher, coach, high school assistant principal and middle school principal.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Bringing books to children

Free little library spurs artist’s drive to start Afghan children’s book project CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Inspiration for Greenville artist Melinda Hoffman’s latest project came as she built a Little Free Library for her granddaughter to put out in her front yard. As Hoffman transformed a Rubber-

maid container and some recycled wood into the free book exchange, she thought about how lucky her granddaughter and other children she knew were to have access to quality children’s books. Then she thought of children who lived in Afghanistan who had no books. AFGHAN continued on PAGE 20

(LEFT) Melinda Hoffman with one of the books in the process of translation for use in Afghanistan. (ABOVE) English books translated for use in Afghanistan. PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY AFGHAN continued from PAGE 19

Back in 2011 when Hoffman was taking printmaking at Clemson University, news of U.S. casualties in Afghanistan and Iraq were daily occurrences. Hoffman made a print called “5,778,” the number of U.S. soldiers killed in those two war-torn countries as of November of that year. The print had a sheer silver overlay and a notch for each life lost.

She began researching Afghanistan for projects in her sociology and anthropology classes, too, and discovered that only 26 percent of the Afghan population is literate. In rural areas, she said, there’s a 97 percent illiteracy rate among women. “I was working on the free library for my granddaughter when it hit me that I could send book boxes to Afghanistan,” she said. She contacted an anthropology profes-

sor at Indiana University whose nephew happened to be Afghanistan’s Minister of Culture. She told him of her idea to buy books, have them translated into Dari and Pashto, the native Arabic languages of Afghanistan, and sent to the country to be placed in clinics for children to read. The nephew wrote back and told Hoffman that Afghanistan didn’t have children’s books with pictures. He offered shelf space in one of Kabul’s 14 public libraries.

Hoffman and children’s librarian Laura Griner are now trying to raise $5,500 through Kickstarter to buy about 150 books. Sixty of the books remain in English; the rest were translated into the two languages by some Afghan fathers who are in South Carolina training at Fort Jackson, Hoffman said. The translations are then transferred to vinyl and applied over the English words in the book. The vinyl matches the color of the pages so the look of the book is maintained, she said. “We want them to feel a book, to carry a book,” Hoffman said, “all the things that our kids who have books have taken for granted.” Books will have universal themes such as animals, friendship, love, science, astrology and bugs, she said. The translators are making sure the books stay within cultural boundaries, Hoffman said. The Kickstarter campaign ends March 29. The project must raise the entire $5,500 goal or it does not get any funding. Details are available at bit.ly/afghanbooks.

Some books to be translated for use in Afghanistan. GREG BECKNER / STAFF

20 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014


Return to the Green Irish Festival takes place March 9 on Fluor Field

SUMMER ZOO CAM

sjackson@communityjournals.com

Green is the organization’s signature event and is the longest running event of its kind. Music and dance acts will perform throughout the afternoon. The headlining act, Asheville-based Celtic band Carolina Ceili, will perform at 4 p.m. Food vendors and Irish-themed products and merchandise will also be on hand. A drawing held for a $500 cash prize will take place around 5:45 p.m. Any festival attendee over 18 can enter once, but you have to be present to win. “People associate Irish events with good luck,” says Flynn. “This is a way for someone to walk away with some extra money.” For more information visit the festival’s website at returntothegreensc.com.

Sign-Up SC Day Region IV regional director of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Dr. Pamela Roshell, will be featured at the upcoming SC Regional Outreach and Enrollment Coalition Group event on March 8, “Sign-Up SC Day.” The event will be held at the West End Community Development Center in Greenville, 8 a.m.4 p.m. The day is a statewide effort to bring attention to enrollment opportunities, the availability of local assistance, and the four ways to apply for health insurance through the federal insurance marketplace. Anyone who would like to be contacted by a Certified Application Counselor from New Horizon Family Health Services, leave a message at 864-233-1534, ext. 2219 or email nhfhsacainfo@gmail.com.

‘Happy’ Greenville Natural Health Center’s film series continues on March 11, 6 p.m., with the documentary “Happy.” The free film and discussion is hosted by Greenville Natural Health Center, 1901 Laurens Road, Suite E. Seating is limited, so those wishing to attend should call 864-370-1140 or email info@ greenvillenaturalheatlh.com to reserve a seat.

Par The Business Golf Association of the Carolinas will begin its 2014 schedule on March 7 at The Reserve at Lake Keowee. The second event will be April 11 at Greenville Country Club’s Chanticleer course. All businesses in the area are welcome to participate and enjoy networking with other local companies and building new relationships. To learn more, visit bizgolfcarolinas.com.

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SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

Fluor Field will be going green this weekend with the 19th annual Return to the Green Irish Festival on March 9. About 4,000 people attend the free event held annually on the Sunday prior to St. Patrick’s Day. The Irish cultural festival features Celtic music, bagpipes, dance, Irish food, drinks and a variety of children’s activities. Opening ceremonies will be at 2:30 p.m. featuring a Cead Mile Failte (a common welcome in Ireland) with the city of Greenville Pipes and Drums band playing the Irish National Anthem and “The Star Spangled Banner.” Children’s activities begin at 1:30 p.m. and include face-painting and crafts. New this year will be students from the Governor’s School reading Irish stories and teaching Irish music to the kids. “This is a family-friendly, free event,” says Marty Flynn, founder of the Irish Cara organization, which puts on the festival. Flynn founded the Irish Cara organization in 1992 for people of Irish heritage in the Upstate as a “reference and social club.” The Return to the

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Meet zookeepers! See what a paleontologist does! Discover animal survival skills! Learn the art of tracking! Go behind-the-scenes!

CAMPS BEGIN JUNE 9!

Online registration begins March 10

For more info and to register online, visit

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150 Cleveland Park Dr • Greenville, SC 29601 • 864-467-4850 MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 21


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Sick at work Survey finds more than a quarter of American workers come to work sick APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Flu season may be on the downswing, but illness activity is still elevated nationally and people are still suffering, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There’s a good chance one of them could be that coworker coughing in the cubicle next to yours. According to a recent NSF International survey, roughly a quarter of American workers admit to coming to work sick. Of workers surveyed, 26 percent said they went to work sick and an additional 34 percent said they waited until they experienced the full effect of symptoms before they opted to stay home. The survey included 493 respondents. Of those, 42 percent said they come to work sick because they have deadlines to meet or would have too much to make up when they got back if they stayed out. One-quarter reported their boss expects them to be at work no matter what. Upstate workers are no different, said Dr. Joshua Paul of Families First Family Medicine. A family practitioner, Paul sees all ages and the brunt of the type of illnesses that can quickly turn a workplace into a ghost town. Some employees want to be seen as tough, but it’s difficult to quantify how effectively a person works while in the throes of a cold or flu, Paul said. “Is it better to take three days off work or work at 70 percent?” The danger of coming to work sick

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intensifies when a cold turns out to be the flu, which can be deadly in some cases and spread rapidly in settings where people are working together in close quarters, he said. This year, the flu has hit workplaces especially hard, said Paul, who noted that he had been writing work excuses for up to four patients daily in recent weeks. Another issue is the many patients who fail to stay home long enough for the flu to work its course – a recommended five days, he said. “In the long run, it’s better to take two to three days off [for a cold] and not contaminate the workplace,” Paul said. And if a colleague brings sickness into the office, “what remains the most important for prevention is hand-washing before and after contact,” he said. If you decide to come to work sick, in addition to hand-washing, covering your cough is the best way to help keep office-mates from suffering the same fate, he said.

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consider coworkers who come to work sick to be hard workers consider coworkers who come to work sick to be selfish and uncaring about colleagues would tell a sick coworker to go home

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS The Greenville Middle Academy Junior Beta Club recently attended the state convention in Myrtle Beach. Award winners included: GMA Orchestra, third place in the group talent competition; Jack Smallridge, Evan Bearden, Henry Heidt, Charlie McMahon and Payton Mangrum, second place in the Tower of Power competition; Caroline Patterson, Michael Lynch and Sophie Hincapie, second place in the Battle of the Books competition; Katie Hardison, second place in color photography; Gabriella Gonzalez, second place in the speech competition; Whit Klutz, second place in the essay competition; and Aiden Forster, Betty Sue Graben, Ariel Shephard, Miles Phifer, Anibel Husted and Gray Aust, first place in the Quiz Bowl competition. The Greenville Middle Academy’s Junior Beta Club recently placed second in the Tower of Power competition at the state convention in Myrtle Beach.

Riverside High School presents “Music, Mystery and Mutts,” a dinner theater fundraiser to benefit the choral department on March 15. Dinner catered by Mutts BBQ will begin at 5:30 p.m. in the cafeteria and the show in the auditorium will begin at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 for dinner and show, $10 for show only. Call 864355-7828 or email Donna Fowler at dofowler@greenville.k12.sc.us for tickets.

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David Dalby, science teacher at Riverside High School, had a paper accepted for publication in The Chemical Educator. The paper, entitled “Simple Colligative Properties Laboratory Experiment,” is designed for college and high school students and describes a novel procedure to allow students to determine the molar mass of unknown compounds by freezing point depression using safe and common chemicals. The Bob Jones Academy Forensics Team recently participated in a forensics tournament in Charleston and won the First Place Sweepstakes Trophy and Percentage Trophy for the highest number of students placing in the tournament. The following students also won individual awards: Julianne Doney, Will Christmas, Davis Fleisher, Elliot Lovegrove, Sandeep Kattepogu, Michael Leung, Jacquelynne Perry, Elliott Kelley, Callie Gieck, Ghevont Panosian, Helena Sullivan, Haley Brammer, Ashley Gillespie, Andrew Clater, Carter Henderson and Ranna Harley. The Upstate Writing Project is offering three youth writing camps this summer for students interested in creative writing, film and game design. Camps are open to students entering grades 3-9. These high-interest camps focus on the integration of writing and technology. Early registration deadline is April 11. A camp brochure and registration form are available at upstatewritingproject.org. The Arbor Day Foundation has recognized Furman University and Clemson University as 2013 Tree Campuses USA. Furman has earned the honor six consecutive years. Tree Campus USA honors colleges and universities for effective campus forest management and for engaging staff and students in conservation goals. Ellen Woodside Elementary students in fourth and fifth grades entered an essay contest hosted by Michelin. Students wrote about influential AfricanAmericans. Michelin selected student writing that was entered to be featured in a calendar that celebrates African-American history. The students chosen from Ellen Woodside are: Hudson Givens, Catherine O’Bryan, Juliana Jenkins, Lillie Beth Johnson, Malaki Branton, Renzo Muzzarelli, Clayton Collins, Brett Pate, Abbie Carroll, Alissa Byars, Alexis McAbee, Jayla Love, Cassandra Gonzalez, Kassadi McClain, Sabrina Ewart, Emily White, Caden Dickey and Raegan Smith. These students were also invited to a banquet, hosted by Michelin.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.


OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

New South Carolina independent publisher Sekwana Comics celebrates the release of its first graphic novel, “Southern Cross: AnnuitCopesis,” volume 1 of the “CSA: Confederate States of America” alternate history series, on March 8, 2-4 p.m., with a signing at Fiction Addiction. The event is free and open to the public. If you cannot make the signing, reserve a personalized copy by contacting Fiction Addiction in advance at 864-675-0540 or at info@fiction-addiction.com. Each year the Music Club of Greenville provides college scholarships for high school seniors. Scholarship applicants must be high school seniors planning to major in music and residents of Greenville, Pickens or Spartanburg counties. Audition areas include voice, piano, organ, strings (including guitar), winds, brass and percussion. Auditions will be held on the morning of March 29 at the Fine Arts Center, 102 Pine Knoll Drive, Greenville. Application deadline is March 14. Forms are available at greenvillemusiclub.org.

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

you could Splash with us!

be at the

Kroc Center

krocgreenville.org 527-5948

Join Greenville Master Gardeners and Clemson Extension agent Cory Tanner for Sowing and Growing, a six-week series on how to be a successful gardener in the Upstate, on Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m., March 11-April 14. This course will cover creating healthy garden soil, growing an attractive lawn, how to have a productive vegetable garden, caring for trees and shrubs, and more. Space is limited and registration is taken on a first-come, first-served basis. Cost is $120. For more information, call 864-232-4431 or email aavants@clemson.edu. Upstate Forever’s ForeverGreen Annual Awards Luncheon will be held on March 11, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at Embassy Suites, 670 Verdae Blvd., Greenville. The luncheon honors individuals and organizations for contributions in the fields of land conservation, water quality, air quality, sustainable development, public service and volunteer work. This year’s keynote speaker is Rob Sisson, president of ConservAmerica. Tickets are $50 and can be ordered online at upstateforever.org. Verizon Wireless is offering free workshops to the community. Android: Getting Started will be on March 15 and 29, 8-9 a.m., at the 4 Market Point Drive, Greenville, location and March 11 and 25, 6-7 p.m., at the 469 Congaree Road, Greenville, location. Apple iPhone: Getting Started will be on March 8 and 22, 8-9 a.m., at the 4 Market Point Drive store and March 18, 6-7 p.m., at the 469 Congaree Road store. Registration is required. For more information, visit verizonwireless.com/workshops. NanoDays at Roper Mountain Science Center on March 8 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. is part of a nationwide festival of educational programs about nanoscale science and engineering. NanoDays is organized by the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network (NISE Net), and takes place nationally from March 29-April 6. For more information, visit ropermountain.org. The Southern Home & Garden Show will be held March 7-9 at TD Convention Center. The event features 300 exhibits with merchandise for sale, product demonstrations and workshops for adults and children. Admission prices are $5-$7. For more information, visit southernhomeandgardenshow.com. Camp Burnt Gin, a residential camp for children, teenagers and young adults who have a physical disability or chronic illness, is accepting applications for campers and staff for the 2014 season. There will be sessions for children 7-15 years old, teenagers ages 16-20 and a session for young adults ages 21-25. The camp has two nurses in residence and a physician on call for specialized medical care. Camp sessions are scheduled for June, July and August. Camper applications can be obtained by contacting the camp director, Marie Aimone, at 803898-0784. Applications will be accepted after the March 1 deadline as long as space is available. For more information, visit scdhec.gov/campburntgin.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

HOSPITALITY PROMISES 1. We greet 2. We treat 3. We strive 4. We listen you warmly by everyone with to anticipate your and respond needs and act courteous enthusiastically in a accordingly. respect. timely manner. We hold We make We embrace and ourselves and one you feel important. value our differences. another accountable.

name with a smile.

5.

6.

7.

8. We ask, “is 9. We maintain high levels of 10. We pay there anything else professionalism, both in conduct attention to details. I can do for you?”

and appearance, at all times.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate recently announced that McDonald’s has committed to be the 2014 presenting sponsor of a special events series. The 2014 McDonald’s Family Series includes: Bunny Brunch on April 12, Mess Fest messy play day on April 26, Daddy & Me on June 15, Back to School Celebration in August 2014, Tiny Tots Halloween Ball on Oct. 25, Breakfast with Santa on Dec. 13 and 20, and Noon Year’s Eve on Dec. 31. Twirl: An Evening of Dance to Celebrate the Carolina Ballet Theatre will be on April 24 at 7 p.m. at the Certus Loft at the Peace Center. Tickets are $55 per person or $85 for couples. For more information, visit carolinaballet.org. Area Li’l Cricket stores recently launched the Million-Dollar Scratch Card Game, a promotion that could make one shopper and one online contestant each $1 million richer. At the same time, Greenville-based nonprofit Pendleton Place is among approximately 15 nonprofits that will vie for a chance to win a $20,000 charitable donation. Participants make a purchase to receive a scratch card and can instantly win cash prizes by scratching off the right boxes and a second chance to win $1 million. Shoppers can visit win1mm.com to vote for their favorite charity. The Southern Goat Producers Association is hosting a special Farm to Table dinner on March 15 at Timberock at Hopkins Farm to raise money for goat-based education programs. Attendees will enjoy a six-course dinner prepared by several local chefs featuring grass-fed goat. The event will benefit the Southern Goat Producers Association. Featured chefs include Agnew Hopkins of Timberock, executive chef Adrian Carpenter of High Cotton, Jeff Bannister of Bovinoche, chef Liz Minetta Bardsley of Kitchen Arts & Pottery, Mike McGirr of Feed & Seed and Jake Lassow, pastry chef at American Grocery. Tickets are $80 per person and reservations are required. For more information, visit southerngoatproducers.org.

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Celebrating 10 years of work to bring Greenville neighborhoods together to create positive community change, Greenville Dreams recognized the contributions of 17 of its pioneering members. Greenville Dreams was founded in 2003 as a public/private partnership between United Way of Greenville County, the City of Greenville, the Greenville Community Foundation and the Greenville County Redevelopment Authority. The honorees included: Renae Blanton, Gitonya Bolden, Margaret Clark, Pat Dilger, Mary Duckett, Vardrey Flemming, Felsie Harris, Princella Lee-Bridges, Margaret McJunkin, Weldon Mikulik, Bob Morris, Minor Shaw, Diane Smock, Ginny Stroud, Ulysses Sweeney, Mamie Watkins and Baxter Wynn. The TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, donated $63,242 to nonprofit organizations in South Carolina from August through October 2013. The local recipient was Upstate Forever’s Value Your Trees Program. Loaves & Fishes has topped its own yearly record for pounds of food rescued, finishing 2013 with more than 1.4 million pounds. Thanks to local grocery stores like BI-LO, Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, Publix and others, Loaves & Fishes provided more healthy food, including 13 percent more fresh produce, to local agencies that feed the hungry in Greenville County. Business donors like Duke Sandwich Company, Greenville Tech and Dietz and Watson, as well as restaurants like Henry’s Smokehouse, Ryan’s and Red Lobster, enabled Loaves & Fishes to provide fresh, prepared food to the area’s busy soup kitchens and other feeding programs. Greenville Family Partnership (GFP) received a $5,000 grant from TD Charitable Foundation. This grant will be used to support GFP’s Youth Act project, which is advocacy and community training for young people. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) recently honored the Upstate Air Quality Advisory Committee with the “Spare the Air” Award in the Outstanding Community Improvement Campaign category for the Clean Air Upstate (CAU) initiative. The award recognizes environmental leaders who have made a voluntary commitment to promote and practice air quality improvement in South Carolina. Clean Air Upstate is an initiative of the Upstate Air Quality Advisory Committee, a group of diverse stakeholders from the public and private sectors. For more information, visit cleanairupstate.org.

Parent Information Meeting Tuesday, March 18th | 6:00 p.m. Primrose School of Greenville Enrollment Center 3110 Augusta Street Greenville, SC 29605

The Greenville Civitan Club recently celebrated Hometown Heroes Jim and Eunice Guyton of Greenville. The Guytons are a recently married mature couple who share a passion to improve the lives of others. Together they collaborate with their church to service the community and positively impact the lives of the homeless and children of single mothers. Additionally, the couple advocates for three young boys to strengthen their physical, emotional and spiritual growth. This Hometown Heroes couple serves as Sunday school teachers and Bible study leaders.

SPACE IS LIMITED Call to reserve your spot today! Educational Child Care for Infants through Private Pre-Kindergarten and After School

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26 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

Greenville Dreams founding members (from left): Mamie Watkins, Margaret McJunkin, Weldon Mikulik, Diane Smock, Vardrey Flemming, Princella Lee-Bridges, Felsie Harris, Mary Duckett and Rene Blanton.

Bon Secours St. Francis Health System employee volunteers are helping Tammy Jones construct a Habitat for Humanity home in the Sterling community. Volunteers helped to raise the walls of the home in late February and will help construct the home through May 31.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE Connecting with

NA SHVI LLE Austin Webb’s career has taken off since he won the inaugural Nashville Connection CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Austin Webb’s first trip to Nashville sounds like a country song. Webb was on his way home after a bad breakup with his girlfriend when he decided to turn his car around and drive all night to Nashville. It was about four in the morning when Webb stopped at Johnny Cash’s grave to smoke a few Pall Malls and play a few songs on his guitar. On his way back home, he stopped at a Waffle House. While waiting for breakfast, he played a Patsy Cline song on the jukebox. It was a song his mother used to sing. An older couple started talking to him about his song choice. It turns out the man was Charlie Louvin, a country music legend and member of the Country Music Hall of Fame. Louvin invited Webb to play with him on stage that night at Jim Oliver’s Smokehouse in Monteagle, Tenn. Webb’s second trip to Nashville was just as spontaneous. A graduate of Palmetto High in Williamston, Webb was in a guitar store with a buddy when they saw a flyer for The Nashville Connection, an event in Greenville that started with a daylong workshop for singers and songwriters given by music industry professionals. The program culminated with a competition whose winner would open for country music’s Craig Morgan. WEBB continued on PAGE 28

Photo Provided

MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 27


JOURNAL CULTURE WEBB continued from PAGE 27

Webb won. The next day, he quit his job at BMW and moved to Nashville. “I knew one way or another, I’d be a successful musician in my life,” Webb said. “The Nashville Connection was just a really great opportunity that presented itself.” Streamsound Records, the Nashvillebased label founded by Grammy awardwinning producer Byron Gallimore and veteran music industry executive Jim Wilkes, signed Webb to a record deal. Gallimore has produced country stars Tim McGraw, Faith Hill and Sugarland. Webb’s first single, “It’s All Good,” ended up No. 53 on Billboard. His second single, “Slip on By,” a sentimental ballad about the value of time and not living in regret, made it to 38th on the charts. “Raise ‘Em Up,” Webb’s third single, will be released March 17. “I think it’s going to be my big breakthrough song. I think it’s a Top 10 song,” he said. “It’s an up-tempo, fun song. It’s a lot about where I’m from. I really think it’s going to be the big one.” Webb has been performing since he was 16, playing a Martin guitar his father won on eBay for $300. The guitar has two autographed photos – of Guy Clark and Kris Kristofferson – on the back. “I really love that guitar … it never

talks back, it never pisses me off, it never gets mad,” Webb said. “It’s so neutral and apathetic, but it cares for me in a sense. I love it.” Webb is on tour now with Jana Kramer. He’s opened for country stars such as Luke Bryan, Florida Georgia Line and Little Big Town. He’s played at the Grand Ole Opry three times. Country Weekly named him to its 2013 watch list. “It’s been a crazy ride,” he said. “I’m grateful to be doing what I’m doing. I want to keep doing this for as long as I can. I’ve been working my ass off for this since I was 10 years old. I’m a 15-year overnight success.” Webb is headlining this year’s Nashville Connection concert, three years after his win. “The person who wins this year will get to open up for me,” he said. “That’s pretty cool. I’m excited about it. But I’m mostly excited about coming home and seeing my family and friends.”

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A new event for this year’s Nashville Connection is the Songster Bus. Two tour buses will depart from Nashville, and one from Atlanta. On board will be songwriters chosen via an online competition. While on the buses, the songwriters will work with a distinguished songwriter to pen a hit song. The buses will arrive in Greenville on Tuesday around 4 p.m. at the Hyatt. Throughout the week, the contestants will have a chance to polish the song. The teams will compete during Friday’s Nashville Connection Heroes Salute competition for the right to perform the song during Saturday’s gala. Other Nashville Connection events include a day of workshops about various aspects on the music industry and a movie premiere at the Warehouse Theatre. For more information, go to thenashvilleconnection.com.

THE NASHVILLE CONNECTION HEROES SALUTE WHERE: Hyatt Regency Downtown Greenville unless otherwise noted WHEN: March 12 through March 15 INFORMATION: thenashvilleconnection.com

» WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12 • SALUTE MEDIA MOVIE PREMIERE, “Return to the Hiding Place,” 8 p.m., the Warehouse Theatre.

Monday–Thursday 5:30-9:30pm; Friday and Saturday 5:30-10:00pm

» THURSDAY, MARCH 13

Private dining rooms available. Reservations suggested. Minutes from downtown with on-site parking.

• WORKSHOPS: Music experts present workshops on such things as songwriting, musical composition, publishing, entertainment law, image consulting, social media and digital marketing; 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.; $95. • SHINE NIGHT, Wild Wing Café, 8 p.m. Singers and songwriters compete for the chance to be a wild-card finalist in the Nashville Connection competition.

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28 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

• THE NASHVILLE CONNECTION COMPETITION DAY: Singers and songwriters compete in an “American

Idol”-type competition. In addition, the teams of songwriters who participated in the Songster Bus will compete to have the song they wrote during a seven-hour bus ride pitched to major industry labels. Winners are announced at 5 p.m. • SPONTANEOUS JAM, 10 p.m., The Roost.

» SATURDAY, MARCH 15 • HEROES JAM, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., showcase with past Nashville Connection winners. • RED CARPET MEET AND GREET, 5 p.m. • HEROES SALUTE BENEFIT, live auction, 6 p.m. • NASHVILLE CONNECTION HEROES SALUTE CONCERT, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., headlined by Austin Webb. Concert tickets, $30. Concert and benefit tickets, $65.


JOURNAL CULTURE

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JOURNAL CULTURE

A R T S CALENDAR MARCH 7-13 Peace Center Peace Center Gala Mar. 7 ~ 467-3000 Furman University Thompson Gallery Photography by Terri Bright Through Mar. 7 ~ 294-2074 Fine Arts Center An Evening of Shakespeare Mar. 7-8 ~ 355-2550 The Warehouse Theatre Jose de Guadalupe Flamenco Mar. 7-8 ~ 235-6948

A bistro in the park. French-inspired casual fare. As the temperatures drop, enjoy a place at The Chef’s Bar. It’s one of the warmest seats in town.

Greenville Little Theatre Agatha Christie’s Spider Web Through Mar. 8 ~ 233-6238 Younts Center for Performing Arts Seussical Jr. Through Mar. 8 ~ 409-1050 Furman University Carolina Youth Symphony Concert Mar. 9 ~ 232-3963 Peace Center Aziz Ansari: Modern Romance Mar. 9 ~ 467-3000 Bob Jones University Chamber String Orchestra Mar. 12 ~ 242-5100 Fine Arts Center Strings Chamber Music Concert Mar. 13 ~ 355-2550 Greenville County Museum of Art South Carolina Art: Eight Decades of New Through Mar. 16 ~ 271-7570 Interiors: Karen Ann Myers Through Mar. 23 ~ 271-7570

INTRODUCING

Chef’s Tour d’Europe & HALF-PRICE Select Wine on Wednesdays & WEEKEND BRUNCH Specials this Winter

30 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Greg Flint & Paul Flint Through Mar. 17 ~ 233-6733 Fine Arts Center National High School Metals Exhibition Through Mar. 21 ~ 355-2550

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 3/7, BLIND HORSE SALOON

The Lacs Slamming country-rap hybrid duo returns. Tickets: $12 in advance, $15 day of show. Call 864-233-1381 or visit blind-horse.com. 3/7, THE HANDLEBAR

Friends Of Russ present Grey Spy, Our Western Sky, Everlasting Earle and Mountain Homes Outstanding multi-band show benefits a great cause. Tickets: $8. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 3/7, RADIO ROOM

All Hands Emo quartet brings the passionate rock. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com. 3 / 8 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D ( S PA R TA N B U R G )

St. Maurice Genre-bending rock-funk quartet. Tickets: $5. Call 864-573-9742 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com/Spartanburg. 3/8, GROUND ZERO

Rivers Of Nihil Progressive death-metal outfit from Pennsylvania. Call 864-948-1661 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2. 3/8, SMILEY’S ACOUSTIC CAFÉ

Donnie Blackwell Upstate music legend. Call 864-292-8988 or visit smileysacousticcafe.com. 3/12, THE HANDLEBAR

Greenville Jazz Ensemble 17-piece big band. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 3 / 1 4 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D ( S PA R TA N B U R G )

The Craig Sorrells Project The Work’s frontman leads jazz-funk solo group. Tickets: $5. Call 864-573-9742 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com/Spartanburg.


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Hard work pays off Will Hoge suffered setbacks, but never gave in It’s not surprising that Will Hoge, one of the hardest-working musicians out there, has finally begun to find some mainstream success after more than a decade of touring and recording. What is surprising is that he’s found it on country radio. While Hoge’s mix of gritty roadhouse rock and heart-tearing balladry certainly has its share of country layered into the sound, his songs always seemed a little too WHO: Will Hoge rough to score on any strictly formatted station. But “Strong,” from Hoge’s most recent WHERE: The Handlebar, 304 E. Stone Ave. WHEN: Saturday, March 8, 9 p.m. album, “Never Give In,” has become a hit, aided by its appearance in a Chevrolet ad. TICKETS: $15 in advance, $20 day of show But a closer look at Hoge’s career reveals INFO: 233-6173 or handlebar-online.com that he’s been on country music’s radar for a while. The Tennessee-born Hoge co-wrote “Even If It Breaks Your Heart,” which Eli Young took to the top of the country charts and to a Country Song of the Year Grammy nomination. It was a triumphant moment for Hoge, who’s suffered various setbacks during his career. His major label deal with Atlantic Records ended badly when his 2003 “Blackbird on a Lonely Wire” album received little promotion. After he earned a loyal fan base thanks to his dynamic live performances, a scooter accident in 2008 left him severely injured and unable to tour or even hold a guitar. Now fully recovered and bigger than ever, Hoge is touring hard again, and he’s returning to The Handlebar on Saturday, March 8. Did you ever anticipate that your success would come on country radio? Not really. When I wrote “Even If It Breaks Your Heart,” country radio said, “That just flat-out won’t work,” and a year later, we had a Number One single with it and it was nominated for Song of the Year. It’s a real honor to be there, but it’s not something that, 10 years ago, I thought would’ve been the case. But I don’t think there’s any question that there’s been an evolution. And what I’ve been doing for the last decade and half fits right smack in the middle of it. I’m as grateful as I can be that they’re giving me a chance. You’ve long had a great reputation as a live performer; how important has your live show been to your growth in popularity? It’s as important as anything, with the exception of continuing to write songs that draw people in. It always has been. It’s the one thing I can control. I can’t control whether a record label’s going to spend money on me, or whether the radio’s going to play me or not, but I can control having people leave at the end of the night saying, “That was the best show I’ve ever seen, and I can’t wait to tell my friends and come back to see him again.” Do you ever see yourself being on a major label again? I’d be lying if I said I wouldn’t love the opportunity. But I’m not willing to sacrifice what I want to do artistically to try to do that again. I guess it’s a yes and a no. But I’m not going to go back and do it like a 19-year-old, where you’re begging and pleading for someone to pay attention to you. I’d rather continue to make records on my own if that’s the other option. Your song “Strong” became popular when it was used in a Chevy ad; do you think the attitude towards artists having their songs in commercials has changed? Yeah, it’s totally changed. It used to be considered a sellout anytime you did anything with a commercial entity or a corporation. That argument got lessened when advertisers realized that the less they did with jingles and the more they did with real songs, they see a much better reaction to it. No one’s going to call Wilco a sellout, and they did a Volkswagen commercial. It’s the Wild West out here at this point; whatever you can do to get some recognition without compromising yourself artistically, I think that you’d be a fool not to do it.

ART HISTORY IS HISTORY. Now open:

The Content of Our Character: From States Rights to Civil Rights Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm free admission

1114 GCMA JournalArt History.indd 2

2/19/14 6:28 PM

VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

Centre Stage presents “The Producers” March 27-April 19 with performances on ThursdaysSaturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. Tickets are $35, $30 and $25. Student rush tickets available 30 minutes prior to show time for $20 with school ID. For more information, call 864233-6733 or visit centrestage.org. Clemson University’s Brooks Center for the Performing Arts presents Flamenco Vivo at 8 p.m. on March 11. Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for students. The Pulitzer Prizewinning classic “Driving Miss Daisy” arrives March 13 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25 for adults and $10 for students. Tickets and information are available at clemson.edu/brooks or by calling 864-656-7787 from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Brooks Center hosts a performance of “LEO” at 7 p.m. on March 25, as part of the Family Series. Families are encouraged to arrive at 6 p.m. to take part in “Imagination Station,”

32 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

a new, free element of the Family Series. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students and are available online at clemson.edu/brooks or by calling the box office at 864-656-7787 from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Greenville Technical College’s Riverworks Gallery, 300 River St., Suite 202, Greenville, presents “Drawings for the Persistent” through April 6 with an artists’ reception on April 4. The gallery is open 1-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday and 6-9 First Fridays, closed March 8-9 and March 1524. For more information, call 864-271-0679, email fleming.markel@gvltec.edu or visit gvltec. edu/vpa and click on Riverworks. The Mauldin Cultural Center’s Railroad Concert Series continues on May 19 with a doubleheader concert featuring Overmountain Men and the bluegrass trio South Carolina Broadcasters. All concerts are offered free to the public and begin at 7:30 p.m. The concerts happen rain or shine. In the event of inclement weather, concerts may be moved indoors to the center’s auditorium with limited seating. Though free, tickets are required and are available at mauldinculturalcenter.org.

Send entries to arts@communityjournals.com.

Registration is now open for three new art workshops with Christina Laurel at the Pickens County Museum of Art & History. The classes are: Creative Living: Grow Your Inner Artist on March 29, with pre-registration deadline of March 27; Suminigashi & Sumi-E on April 12, with preregistration deadline of April 10; and Graphite Expanded on May 24, with a pre-registration deadline of May 22. All classes are $80 per person, $70 for museum members. Register at visitpickenscounty. com/calendar, in person or by calling 864898-5963. The museum is located at 307 Johnson St., Pickens.


JOURNAL HOMES

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

JOURNAL HOMES

DETAILS

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO

Coachman Plantation and the Estates at Coachman Plantation For years, Coachman Plantation has attracted homeowners who relish in the beauty and serenity of rolling country meadows, while being close to shopping, dining and great schools in Simpsonville. Today, Coachman Plantation and The Estates at Coachman Plantation offer gorgeous homes from the $200’s* built by the Nation’s Number One Builder**, D.R. Horton, on large homesites in a peaceful and tranquil country setting. D.R. Horton brings 35 years of national building expertise to Coachman Plantation. The ranch and two story homes include features such as signature trim package, generous hardwoods, granite countertops and backsplash and MUCH more…plus too many options to list! The beautiful swimming pool and cabana at Coachman Plantation are

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

ready for your Spring enjoyment. With fantastic Grand Opening Incentives, now is the time to invest in your future with the beauty, privacy and quality of your own D.R. Horton Home in Coachman Plantation and the exclusive Estates at Coachman Plantation. Five homes are available now for Quick Move-In! *Home and community information including pricing, included features, terms, availability, and amenities are subject to change and prior sale at any time without notice or obligation. Pictures, photographs, colors, features and sizes are more illustration purposes only and will vary from the homes as built. **According to Builder Magazine.

Directions: From Greenville: Take I-385 South to Woodruff Road (Exit 35. Travel East on Woodruff Road for 7.4 miles. Turn right on East Georgia Road and drive 1.7 miles. Turn left on Coachman Drive for 1.2 miles and the entrance to Coachman Plantation is on the left. Model address is 5 Scotts Bluff Drive, Simpsonville, SC 29681. Schools: Rudolph D. Gordon Elementary Bryson Middle | Hillcrest High Contact: Edward Wingate, your D.R. Horton Sales Professional, at Coachman Plantation 615.414.7653

MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 33


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, M A R C H 9 F R O M 2 – 5 P M 300 Ryans Run Ct. This elegant 7700 sq.ft. custom home on a .8 acre lot cul-de-sac in Spaulding Farm, is move in ready! The large two story foyer, accented with millwork, deep moldings, custom niche details and a stunning crystal chandelier, says welcome and WOW! The foyer flows into the living room that opens to the deck overlooking the beautifully landscaped, private backyard. The heart of this home is the show stopping kitchen and keeping room has intimate seating around a stone fireplace, custom cabinetry, Wolf double ovens and 6 burner gas range with griddle, warming drawer, Sub Zero refrigerator and wine refrigerator and Miele dishwasher…a professional cook’s delight! The main level master suite has newly remodeled master bath featuring glass shower, jetted tub, marble tiles, and double sink vanity with granite. Upstairs are 3 bedrooms, each with its own bath plus a large bonus room, perfect for playroom, or upstairs den. The 2600 s/f walk out basement is beautifully finished with full bath, media room, with a super sized bar, fireplace, sound system and carpet that is a replica of the carpet at the clubhouse at Augusta National. Spaulding Farm is home to 353 custom, traditional homes on large lots, has 3 pools, 2 tennis courts, club house, and weight room, 10 acre lake with dock and is surrounded by walking paths, and mature trees.

HOME INFO Price: $810,000 | MLS: #1274876 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 5 full/2 half | Square Footage: 7700 Schools: Oakview Elementary | Beck Academy Middle | JL Mann High Contact: Valerie Miller | valeriejsmiller.com | 864.430.6602 The Marchant Company Valerie Miller | Award Winning agent 2007-2013 & 2013 Signature Agent & Volume Sales Agent of the Year

WL

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IN IST

LAURENS $295,000 MLS#1274390 4BR/2.5BA 1925 Colonial style home has been a landmark for the Chestnut Ridge community. Several tasteful updates! GREEN VALLEY $535,000 MLS#1264893 4BR/5 full and 2 half BA. Gorgeous estate nestled on 2+ acres, over 5000 s.f. with saltwater pool.

34 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

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E SIV U L EXC

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To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com GIBBS ROAD $120,000 MLS#1252940 20 acres of gorgeous rolling pasture that is tucked in against a mature stand of hardwoods to build your dream home on. MAIN ST., LAURENS $410,000 MLS#1270944 4BR/4BA. Historic elegance in this 1892 Victorian home, immaculately maintained on a 2.57 acre lot in downtown Laurens.

Jake Dickens 864.616.6005 jdickens@cbcaine.com www.cbcaine.com SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D H OM E

T8 LO

ROCKWOODATAUGUSTA Under Construction • MLS#1271065 $549,900

T9 LO

ROCKWOODATAUGUSTA Under Construction • MLS#1271064 $597,500

LF HA

OT EL R AC

HAMMETT CREEK 15 Marlis Court • MLS#1271073 $647,900

W NE

24 Gossamer Place, Greenville

HOME INFO Price: $779,900 | MLS: #1273482 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4 full/2 half Square Footage: 4600–4799 Schools: Sara Collins Elementary Beck Middle | JL Mann High Contact: Brenda Busby | 864.275.9855 bbusby@cbcaine.com Coldwell Banker Caine To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

An absolutely stunning custom, one owner home in sought after Parkins Mill area designed by Jack Thacker and built by Quinn and Satterfield with attention to every detail both inside and outside features 10’ ceilings on the 1st level and 9’ ceilings on the second, hardwoods, granite, Dacor and Miele appliances, both 1st floor and second floor laundry rooms - even a half bath in the double garage! Every bedroom has it’s own private bath plus the extra spacious third guest bedroom and bath up could serve as an upstairs Master. Enter the grand front door from a wide, welcoming southern veranda and into understated luxury. Pass by the formal dining room and study and into an open floorplan living room with fireplace, kitchen, breakfast area, den and sitting/music room – and do not miss the awesome media room over the garage. The Master suite is on the main floor complete with remote controlled fireplace and 3 bedrooms and 3 baths are up. Outdoor relaxation and entertaining are equally inviting on the stone patio with outdoor fireplace plus a cozy courtyard all highlighted with gas lanterns. This location is a matter of minutes to nationally ranked Downtown Greenville, Falls Park, Cleveland Park, etc. Truly, no stone has been left unturned in the creation of this beautiful home so come see for yourself today – you’ll want to call it YOUR home!!!

G TIN S I L

COBBLESTONE 109 Tooley Road • MLS#1274804 $759,000

W NE

G TIN S I L

KINGSBRIDGE 201 Hemingford Circle • MLS#1275036 $649,000

Helen Hagood

Ranked #3 again! Out of 200 agents. #12 in Greenville County!

864.419.2889 | See my listings and more at helenhagood.com MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND AUGUSTA ROAD

O P E N S U N D AY, M A R C H 9 F R O M 2 – 4 P M HOLLAND TRACE

16 BYRD BOULEVARD . $434,900 . MLS# 1265533

100 HOLLAND TRACE CIRCLE . $374,900 . MLS# 1274785

4BR/4BA This home has best of everything with lots of charm and character plus it’s updated and move in ready. Augusta Rd to Byrd Blvd. home on right

4BR/3BA Beautiful home attention to detail. Move-in ready! Woodruff Rd to Hwy 14 S toward Simpsonville, go approx 3.5 miles, Left on Holland Trace Circle, Home on Right

Contact: Charlotte Sarvis | 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Roger Tate | 630-2999 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

HOLLY TREE PLANTATION

PELHAM FALLS

CAMELOT ESTATES

205 HOLLY PARK LANE . $310,000 . MLS# 1270068

6504 HIGHWAY 81 N . $255,900 . MLS# 1266756

202 PELHAM FALLS DRIVE . $324,900 . MLS# 1274490

4BR/3.5BA Unique contemporary in Holly Tree. New exterior paint, roof is one year old, new HVAC. Come see this exceptional home! Call agent for directions.

5BR/3.5BA Spacious family home with in-law apartment over garage:1-acre, fenced backyard. I-85 to Exit #32 (Hwy 8 Northwest). Go 1 mile, Left on Highway 81. 1/4 mile see on Left.

4BR/3.5BA MUST SEE! Beautiful home perfect for entertaining. Updates galore/huge family room/spa-like master bath/massive screened room and covered porch! Pelham Rd. to Batesville. Left on Pelham Falls Drive.

Contact: Karen Lawton | (864)444-7004 Keller Williams Realty Upstate

Contact: Ron McDaniel | 979-6633 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Nancy Janich | 864-313-2393 Keller Williams Realty

AUTUMN TRACE

POINSETTIA

PLANTERS WALK /SPARTANBURG

8 SAYBROOK RD . $200,000 . MLS# 1260959

508 HILLPINE DR . $194,000 . MLS# 1270724

831 OLD WYND CT . $184,900 . MLS# 1272468

4BR/2.5BA Open floor plan from kitchen to the den. Covered patio. 385 South, Left onto Main St, Simpsonville, Left Hwy 14. Right on Pollard Rd. Left into SD.

4BR/2.5BA Fabulous home! Openfloor plan! Bedrooms upstairs! Well maintained, large lawn! Main Street Simpsonville turn on Curtis then Right into SD, Right on Hillpine Dr

4BR/2.5BA Basement home on cul-de-sac lot w/deck overlooking fenced backyard. Hwy 29. Right on Shoresbrook. Right @ endofstreet. Right onBellevue. Left on Arlington. Left on Larkhall. Right on Old Wynd.

Contact: Judith Tancibok | 616-8740 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Olivia Grube | 385-9087 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Sheila Smalley | 449-2878 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

36 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND LAUREL MEADOWS

O P E N S U N D AY, M A R C H 9 F R O M 2 – 4 P M WESTWOOD

MCKENNA COMMONS

1 HIGH FARM RD . $154,900 . MLS# 1272396

335 PINONWOOD DR . $105,000 . MLS# 1267733

132 MCKENNA CIRCLE . $89,900 . MLS# 1243679

3BR/2.5BA Traditional home with bonus room, corner lot. 276 toward Mauldin, Right on Butler, Right on Laurel Meadows @ Library, Left on High Farm.

3BR/2BA Move in ready, updated, deck overlooking above ground pool. 385 S to Exit 27, Right on Fairview, Right Grandview, Left on Davenport, Left -Vinewood, Right Wilow Branch, Right Pinonwood.

3BR/2BA Lovely condo. Close to downtown. 3rd floor unit. Move-in Ready!! E North St past Mitchell Rd, S/D is on Right across from Fire Dept

Contact: Wanda Reed | 270-4078 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Linda Brown | 884-0966 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Sheila Hasser | 313-7409 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

ON THE MARKET HALF MILE LAKE

403 HALF MILE WAY . $172,900 . MLS# 1274578 3BR/2.5BA Super home w/ great curb appeal. LR w/ FP, DR, Office, Kit/Bkfst w/ bay window. Rocking chair front porch, 2 C Gar., new roof & AC. Nicely landscaped corner lot w/tree lined backyard. Contact: Pat Norwood 864-420-1998 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

When you are done reading this paper, please recycle it.

Agents on call this weekend

C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS ®

ROGER TATE 630-2999 PELHAM ROAD

WANDA REED 270-4078 GARLINGTON ROAD

MARY ROSS 230-8833 EASLEY/ POWDERSVILLE

CURRAN MORGAN KATY & JIM GINGER TIMMERMAN 351-9706 GLIDEWELL YELTON 270-0982/414-6073 N. PLEASANTBURG 360-2327 DR. AUGUSTA ROAD SIMPSONVILLE

JULIA DICKEY 879-4239 GREER

SARAH JONES 630-7316 PRPT MGMT

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL HOMES

PE OPL E , AWA R D S , H ON OR S Allen Tate Realtor® Kathy Weeks Promoted to Regional Vice President of Upstate South Carolina Region Allen Tate Company, the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, has named Kathy Weeks as  regional vice president  for the company’s Upstate South Carolina region. In her new role, Weeks will overseeing all aspects of operations and management for four  Upstate  offices. In addition, she will continue to  serve Weeks as branch leader of the Greenville and Easley/Powdersville sales offices. She is an award-winning career professional with 18 years of real estate experience, establishing the top-producing Kathy Weeks Team with Allen Tate before moving into leadership with the company in 2010. In June 2013, she was named area manager for the Upstate region. Prior to that, she served as

branch leader for the company’s Lake Wylie office and as sales manager for the company’s University office.  Prior to her real estate career, Weeks worked as a public school teacher in South and North Carolina. Weeks is a member of the National Association of Realtors, the  South Carolina  Association of Realtors, the Greater Greenville Association of Realtors, Spartanburg Association of Realtors and Western Upstate Association of Realtors. She is a member of the Greenville Chamber of Commerce, and past member of the Lake Wylie Chamber of Commerce and Charlotte Chamber of Commerce.  She has served as chairperson for the Allen Tate Companies 2011 and 2012 Cultural Campaign and the 2012 vice-chair for the Allen Tate FUNday for Public Education.   “Kathy has continued to distinguish herself as a leader, trainer and mentor as we grow Allen Tate’s presence in the Upstate. She is most deserving of this title,” said Phyllis Brookshire, president, Allen Tate Realtors. A native of Greenville, S.C.,  Weeks  has three children and four grandchildren.

Boling Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®  is pleased to announce that Keith Boling has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Easley office. Boling attended Gainesville State College and Gwinnett Technical College in Georgia.   He currently serves as a Firefighter for the City of Boling Greenville. “We are excited that Keith has joined the Easley office,” said Anush Showghi, Broker-in-Charge.  “We look forward to working with him.” Boling and his wife, Courtney, live in the Augusta Road area of Greenville.   In his free time, he enjoys travel, new restaurants, golf and football.   He is a member of the Fire Safety Team and teaches fire safety to children.

C O N T I N U E D O N… PA G E 3 9

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G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S F E B R U A R Y 3 - 7, 2 014 SUBD.

PRICE

$41,866,000 $1,440,000 $1,351,500 $1,060,000 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $780,000 $750,000 BARKSDALE $670,000 $638,000 $600,000 MONTEBELLO $575,000 $552,500 HUNTINGTON $521,317 COUNTRY CLUB EST. $496,400 RESERVE@GREEN VALLEY $480,464 IVY GROVE $470,000 $450,000 $445,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $387,645 KNIGHTS BRIDGE $380,000 KILGORE FARMS $380,000 CHATELAINE $370,500 MCRAE PARK $368,291 ELLINGTON PARK $346,056 RIVER OAKS $332,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $312,250 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $307,500 TOWNES@THORNBLADE $303,095 HEARTHSTONE@RIVER SHOALS $299,089 GREYSTONE@NEELY FARMS $289,000 HILLSIDE PLANTATION $283,955 NORTH HILLS $279,500 $279,000 LAKE VIEW ESTATES $275,000 RICHLAND CREEK@N.MAIN $268,000 MILL POND@RIVER SHOALS $266,000 BRUSHY MEADOWS $265,000 GOWER ESTATES $262,500 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $261,150 HIGHLAND TERRACE $260,000 RIVER OAKS $259,000 COVE@SAVANNAH POINTE $250,680 MEADOW BREEZE $249,900 FOXCROFT $246,000 $245,041 $240,000 THE HEIGHTS $238,118 FOXGLOVE $235,000 $232,500 $220,000 COVE@SAVANNAH POINTE $218,248 LISMORE PARK $215,000 BOULDER CREEK $215,000

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

19950 W COUNTRY CLUB DR STE 80 VERANDAS AT THE POINT II TS AVENTINE LLC UPSTATE PROPERTY RENTALS MANCUSO HOLDINGS LLC 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD STE 18 AMERICAN LEPROSY MISSION 20 BROADUS AVENUE LLC 400 N CONGRESS AVE STE 100 UPSTATE PROPERTY RENTALS MANCUSO HOLDINGS LLC 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD STE 18 LEE VALERIE SCHWEITZER ERIC C (JTWRO 309 SORONO DR RUTH MATTHEW (JTWROS) SNOW BRADLEY M (JTWROS) 2 ARGONNE DR MCNAMARA SUSAN P WILLIAMS FRANK C III (JT 5 BARKSDALE RD NEWELL MARJORIE K CLAYTON CHARLES AUBREY J 201 TINDAL AVE ROE DAVID H CALMES JOHN L JR 8 FRONTUS ST NANCE ROBERT LEON (JTWRO MOORE ASHLEY 501 SIENA DR BRASHIER T WALTER TRUSTE WYCHE C THOMAS PO BOX 728 PARKER SCOTT M GERRALD STEVE E 408 HUNTINGTON RD ALFORD JOSEPH R ROTHSTEIN DAVID E (JTWRO 35 DOUGLAS DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BUTLER LARRY G JR (JTWRO 26 WOOD LEAF TRL BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SPENCER JAMES H (JTWROS) 9 GROVE VALLEY WAY BROYLES RANDAL A HALLER BARBARA A (JTWROS 649 OAKLAWN RD ELLIOTT DAVID WAYNE DUNBAR RAYMOND MATTHEW 323 JONES AVE NVR INC DEANGELIS DONNA R 607 PAWLEYS DR MEYER KAREN L ACKER EMILY P 209 CANDLESTON PL CHRISTMAN SAMANTHA N HUTCHISON BRIAN C (JTWRO 15 CEDAR GLENN WAY CHESTER AIMEE W (JTWROS) RIALS JANICE RENEE (JTWR 82 CASTELLAN DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT ADIMISETTY VENKATA NARES 216 PLEASANT ISLE LN BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PARIKH JAGADISH U 208 ELLINGTON CREEK LN CASH MELISSA H CASH MELISSA H 5 PENNY MEADOW CT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT YOUNG HERVERY (JTWROS) 104 RED BLUFF RD HOEFFNER MOLLY E BURAKOVSKI ROBERTA MOEBI 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 427 TOWNES AT THORNBLADE LLC BODEPUDI SURENDRA B 213 BELL HEATHER LN S C PILLON HOMES INC MCCURLEY ROBERT C (JTWRO 14 STONOVIEW CT O’BRIEN ANDREA PELLETIER MATTHEW H 215 QUAIL RIDGE DR GHP FARM LLC TRILK JENNIFER L 18 BOLERO LN KEMNITZ GRAYDON D SR HILL AMANDA T 100 E HILLCREST DR BYERS JANE CAROLL MHG PROPERTIES LLC 207 W MAIN ST YUKICH BRENDA (JTWROS) DOWLING MICHALE O (JTWRO 58 TALAVERA LN CARSWELL THOMAS S JR GUNTER ERIK OHST 21 RICHLAND CREEK DR BELSHE JENNIFER MARIE HAMBY WILLIAM C (SURV) 102 BRAZOS LN COOK LAWRENCE ALAN (JTWR HOUSTON JOSHUA (JTWROS) 405 MEADOW LAKE TRL PURKERSON GAIL H HAWKINS BARBARA D (JTWRO 817 WEMBLEY RD ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC FAULKNER ROBERT E (JTWRO 816 SHANDWICK DR KINARD JAMES WILLIAM JR OWEN DAVID S 15 E MONTCLAIR AVE BRACY LORENE S BROWN VINTRESS A 121 RIVER OAKS RD BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT KUNAWOTOR EYRAM 317 SABIN CT SK BUILDERS INC BOSTWICK ROBERT B (JTWRO 5 RISING MEADOW LN PARSONS A MICHAEL MOZINGO ASHLEY E (JTWROS 300 MEADOW WOOD DR SYDNEY HOMES LLC DUNAWAY RICHARD K 4448 S KING RD PALMETTO CHASE LLC MCNINCH JANIS M (JTWROS) 212 PERRY AVE NVR INC PAULDING JIMMIE E JR (JT 39 GRANITE LN MARTIN EMMET F MCKINNEY CLINTON C (JTWR 214 AMBERJACK CT COLEMAN RICKY DSR BUILDERS INC 1530 S HWY 14 DERMOND SUSAN SK BUILDERS INC 52 ST MARKS RD BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SMITH ASHLEY M (JTWROS) 241 ST LUCIE DR LE NGHIA T (JTWROS) AZZER MADONNA (JTWROS) 2760 DRY POCKET RD BOONE GARY B (JTWROS) GADDY GINA KATHRYN 305 MELLOW WAY

38 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

SUBD. WETHERILL PARK FOX TRACE FAIRVIEW POINTE SHERWOOD FOREST WOODLANDS@WALNUT COVE NORTHWOODS

PRICE

$207,878 $205,574 $205,000 $200,000 $194,900 $188,000 $187,000 MARTINS GROVE $185,000 NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK $183,750 HERITAGE CREEK $182,000 $182,000 $180,000 PLANTERS ROW $180,000 AUGUSTA HEIGHTS $175,000 PINEWOOD ESTATES $174,600 WATERMILL $174,270 $174,000 FORRESTER WOODS $172,800 TOWNES@CARDINAL CREEK $172,727 THE GROVE $170,000 WOODMONT ACRES $167,900 SPRING FOREST $165,000 $165,000 CANEBRAKE $163,000 FAIRVIEW CHASE $161,911 BUXTON $161,000 PEBBLECREEK $160,000 FOXDALE $160,000 DUFFIE WOODS $159,900 $158,000 BROOKSIDE $154,900 $154,000 FAIRVIEW CHASE $153,243 GRANITE WOODS SOUTH $153,000 FORESTDALE HEIGHTS $151,000 CREEK BANK COMMONS $150,000 ELLETSON ACRES $150,000 COUNTRY KNOLLS $149,900 DEVENGER PLACE $148,500 RIVER MIST $145,500 $145,500 THORNBLADE CROSSING $145,000 WHITE OAKS $144,900 FORRESTER WOODS $144,000 BAILEY MILL FARM $140,000 RIDGEWATER $139,600 WATERMILL $138,182 FAIRWAY ACRES $137,000 FAIRVIEW CHASE $136,079 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $135,000 $132,000 COTTON MILL PLACE ONE $130,000

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

S C PILLON HOMES INC QUALLS KRISTY (JTWROS) 6 RIVER VALLEY LN S C PILLON HOMES INC RAYMOND RONALD J (JTWROS 19 DANDIE DR GRIGSBY RYAN J REDDEN JOSHUA WADE 34 VALLEY BLUFF LN NIX KELLY A VAN GIESON JACOB MICHAEL 308 RIVER WAY DR HODGES JASON E JONES MELISSA CHRISTINE 100 FLOWERWOOD DR MONTS NANCY W ROSS ANNA LOUISA 12 WINDSOR DR BYERS DANIEL L MHG PROPERTIES LLC 207 W MAIN ST HOLLIS BRYAN W (JTWROS) WILLIS MICHAEL (JTWROS) 22 TILDEN CT SCHREIBER MARK J STANDIFER ROBERT GRAFTON 216 NEELY CROSSING LN HEINIG BONNIE S BERRY CRISTINA (JTWROS) 710 E MCBEE AVE SULLIVAN JORDYN LIGHTWEIS ALAN 226 GERALD DR LEE KAREN M WALKER KATHLEEN F 217 CROFT ST FEUERHERD JAMEY C (JTWRO COSTA ALLISON L (JTWROS) 113 WOODVINE WAY KNOX JASON L STAMM DREW AUSTIN 9 TYLER ST SHUMATE MICHAEL H MEYER SHONNA L 117 WYNETTE WAY EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL ROBLES LUIS J 201 PORTLAND FALLS DR MILLER MARK ALAN WITKOVSKY BETTY (JTWROS) 20 HALL RD LAUDERBACK DOROTHY A BANK OF AMERICA N A MAILSTOP PTX-C35 NVR INC MONZI MARK P (JTWROS) 142 AWENDAW WAY CHARLES EDNER FAYETTE CHARLENE M 305 PARK GROVE DR ROGERS JO T VASSALLO DEREK A 433 N FLAT ROCK RD BRUMBAUGH JUANITA E (JTW BOOKER WILLIE R (JTWROS) 3302 E NORTH ST DHZ ENTERPRISES LLC AKA ENTERPRISES LLC 117 WILD GEESE WAY WEST DEBORAH A BURNETT LUKE M (JTWROS) 115 TICONDEROGA DR MUNGO HOMES INC SOBIERAJ HENRY (JTWROS) 245 RIVERS EDGE CIR RATLIFF RONALD C SEXTON JEREMIAH D 3 WINSFORD DR KING ALENE ZUPIC PHILIP C 1 GINGER LN REEL PROPERTIES GROUP CO SINGLETON ANTOINETTE L ( 118 W OKALOOSA WAY PAULSEN PATTY PICONE AMY H 100 W COURT ST UNIT 3H NISKANEN CAMI L (JTWROS) CAUTHEN MICHAEL E (JTWRO 101 S HOWELL ST VOLT ASSET HLDINGS TRUST MOSCHGAT DARIN J 1 GILLIN DR FINNELL GRACE A CLAY AMANDA (JTWROS) 805 HAMPTON AVE MUNGO HOMES INC BLACK MARGARET KATHRYN 249 RIVERS EDGE CIR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG JANA STEFANY MICHELLE 116 SLATE LN GRAHAM PATRICIA A WAGNER BRENT R 209 FORESTDALE DR SERRUS REAL ESTATE FUND AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 30601 AGOURA RD STE 200 BEESON CAROL G RENO KEITH 365 HUNTING DR MCINTYRE BRYON M HOLCOMBE BRENDA A (JTWRO105 LONG POND CT SHAW SUSAN A FIRST CAROLINA TRUST OF 4113 E NORTH ST FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA ROBERTSON ALICIA 327 BELLARINE DR SCHELL CHRISTOPHER SAMUE GAUTAM MAKRAND 10 OAKLAND DR BARTON GORDON S EDMONDS PAMELA JEAN 304 ROCKBROOK CT THOMPSON MELISSA G SMITH MICAH ADAM (JTWROS 15 SEWANEE AVE MASSON EILEEN W JOHNSON DANIEL E 113 COLD SPRINGS RD JOHNSON THOMAS W FARNHAM KELSEY KNUTSON 3 PACKRIDGE MARK III PROPERTIES INC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PO BOX 1039 EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL BELCHER PHILLIP M 216 RIVERDALE RD FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG REYES NOE 32 TERRAIN DR MUNGO HOMES INC GAITANIS WILLIAM MICHAEL 211 RIVERS EDGE CIR TRUMAN 2012 SC2 TITLE TR MANLEY BRONCO WILLIAM 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 311 MENDENHALL SCOTTY A GUILLIAMS MARK E (JTWROS 148 MOUNTAIN VIEW CIR DURANT BRENDA M BURROWS WILLIAM D 300 S ST UNIT 124

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S HOME SALES HIGHEST IN FIVE YEARS

Just when it seemed that home sales were taking a breather, new data from the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) says that home sales in 2013 were the highest since 2006, well before the housing meltdown. For all of 2013, housing sales totaled 5.09 million units, which is 9.1 percent higher than in 2012. Jon Pickhardt, 2014 President of The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® and co-owner of Flagship Properties and The Office Centers, LLC in Greenville, SC, explained, “Existing home sales have risen nearly 20 percent since 2011, with job growth, record low mortgage interest rates and a large pent up demand driving the market. Pickhardt says some momentum was lost toward the end of 2013 from disappointing job growth and limited inventory, but the year ended close to normal given the size of the population. The national median existing home price for all of 2013 was $197,100, which is 11.5 percent above the 2012 median of $176,800. That’s the strongest gain since 2005 when prices rose 12.4 percent. One bright spot was the decline of distressed homes in the mix. Foreclosures and short sales were 14 percent of December 2013 sales, down from 24 percent the year before. Total housing inventory at the end of December fell 9.3 percent to 1.86 million existing homes on the market, a 4.6month supply at the current sales pace.

www.susanburch.com

Homes took longer to sell in December from November, but less time than in 2012. The NAR suggests that home buyers and sellers face a few challenges in 2014. Mortgage rates are expected to continue to rise, and lenders and borrowers face new mortgage rules, such as new Qualified Mortgage underwriting standards. But there’s still plenty of pent up demand, with more young adults moving out of their parent’s home and into their own homes. The key is job growth, says the NAR Only the confidence that stems from job security can enable first time buyers and move up to purchase their next homes. Fortunately, a new report by the U.S. Conference of Mayors suggests that nearly all U.S. cities are forecast to see economic growth this year, including some cities that have not really recovered from the Great Recession. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,700 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

10 Clearwater Ct

$281,900 • MLS#1260331 • 4BR/3BA UNDER CONTRACT

371 Christopher Rd

$269,760 • MLS#1270636

PE OPL E , AWA R D S , H ON OR S , N EW S C O N T I N U E D F R O M… PA G E 3 8

†

Hamet Joins Coldwell Banker Caine as VP and Sales Leader Coldwell Banker Caine recently named Amanda Hamet Vice President and Sales Leader of the Greenville office. The position builds on Caine’s 80year commitment to providing agents with the best resources, tools and career support in the industry. Hamet serves as the broker for the Company’s Greenville agents. She began her real estate career in 2005 and has over 15 years of leadership experience. Prior to joining Coldwell Banker Caine, she worked Hamet as a manager for a local real estate firm. In this role, she worked closely with the agents and was very involved in their training and development. Over the course of her career, Hamet received numerous awards such as Rookie of the Year, Rising Star, Office Spirit Award and Pioneer Award for bringing substantial growth into a new market.    Hamet received her Master of Business Administration from Clemson University and Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Art from Virginia Tech. As an active community member, she serves on the Board for the Greenville Literacy Association. Originally from Rhode Island, Hamet moved to the Upstate in 1998. She resides in Greenville with her husband Michael, a Greer native, and her young son named Hudson. In her free time she enjoys photography, painting and cooking.   “We are excited to welcome Amanda to our management team given her leadership experience and industry knowledge,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “And we are confident that with her expertise and positivity, she will bring change and growth to Coldwell Banker Caine.”

Little Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®  is pleased to announce that Beverly Renee Little has joined the company and serves as a Sales

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Associate at the Simpsonville office. “We are very excited that Beverly has joined our family of Realtors,” said Donna Smith, Broker-inCharge.  “We look forward to working with her.” Little worked seven years as a Medical Assistant in Summerville.  Her interpersonal  and communication skills will be very beneficial in her real estate career. Little graduated from Montclair High School in California and  currently lives in the Five Little Forks Area of Simpsonville with her husband, William, and their three children Kaila, Devon and Thompson. She is active at St Philips Episcopal Church and enjoys traveling, outdoor activities and reading.

Latimore Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Sabrina Latimore as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. Latimore joins Coldwell Banker Caine with experience in higher education.   She previously worked as an Academic Advisor and College Business Professor for Brown Mackie College. She received her MBA in Human Resource Management from Strayer University and is pursuing her Ph.D in Lattimore Organizational Leadership from Argosy University. Latimore is a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, Sigma Beta Delta Honor Society, National Black MBA Association and Society of Human Resource Management. She is the creator of Being Empowering And Uplifting To Yourself (BEAUTY), which is an organization that encourages self-confidence in young women as a motivator to set and accomplish goals. In her free time, Latimore enjoys bike riding on the Swamp Rabbit Trail, walking her Toy Poodle, Emily and shopping. “We are excited about Sabrina joining our team in Greenville,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “And we are confident that she will have a successful career with Coldwell Banker Caine.”

susanburch love where you live

401 Hudders Creek Way

$189,900 • MLS#1266422 • 3BR/2BA

302 Hudders Creek

$184,971 • MLS#1272872

www.susanburch.com Susan Burch | C: 864.346.3864 | F: 864.679.5473

sburch@cdanjoyner.com

MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL HOMES

www.MarchantCo.com 864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: JeanE Bartlett 864.506.4083 RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com SE OU M H EN -5P OP un 2 S

Sig na tur e

al ion tails t p e de Exc ity & l a qu

Sig na tur e

er e orn ours C C ge lf Lar e Go h T On

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ced Fenres y l l Fu 3+ Ac

Sig na tur e

300 Ryans Run Ct. - Spaulding Farm

102 Veronese Dr. - Montebello

250 Foot Hills Rd. - Green Valley

113 Kingswood Cr. - Woodruff Rd. Area, S’Ville

$810,000 • 1274876 • 4 BR/5 FL, 2 (1/2 )BA

$749,000 • 1261495 • 5 BR/4.5 BA

$599,900 • 1273285 • 5 BR/3 FL, 3 HF BA

$499,000 • 1271321 • 3 BR/3 BA w/b’ment

Valerie Miller | 864.430.6602 | vmiller@marchantco.com Chuck Miller | 864.293.4778 | cmillergsp@aol.com

ion vat e l ft E 00 31

Sig na tur e

Nancy McCrory | 864.505.8367 | nmmccrory@aol.com Karen Turpin | 864.230.5176 | karenturpi@aol.com

! ed ore del ch m o m Re & mu n e ch Kit

James Akers |864.325.8413 | james@jamesakersjr.com

r oo n t fl catio a e Gr & Lo n pla

39 Echo Dr. - Caesars Head

42 E.Faris Rd. - Augusta Rd.

506 Summergreen Way - Warrenton

$435,000 • 1268979 • 3 BR/ 2 BA

$309,000 • 1274294 • 3 BR/2 BA

$259,900 • 1269319 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

Tom Marchant | 864.449.1658 |tom@tommarchantco.com

cs e 7 A garag t s o w/ Alm hop ors s rk do Wo

Jonathan Mullikin | 864.449.4132 | jonathan@marchantco.com

s ate pd U ny Ma

Jonathan Mullikin | 864.449.4132 | jonathan@marchantco.com

W NE

G TIN LIS

6342 Highway 418 - Fountain Inn

403 Eelgrass Ct. - Morning Mist

215 Northcliff Way - Northcliff

$239,921 • 1252537 • 4 BR/3 BA

$229,000 • 1267418 • 5 BR/2.5 BA

$192,000 • 1274601 • 3 BR/2 BA

Joan Rapp | 864.901.3839 | joan@marchantco.com

at Gre

on ati Loc

Barb Riggs |864.423.2783 | barb@marchantco.com

s. cre 2.99 A l le 5 4.8 itionaailab d s av d A re Ac

200 Governors Square - Governors Square

1112 Zion Church Rd. - Easley

$158,000 • 1274185 • 4 BR/2 BA

$145,000 • 1264941 • 2 BR/1 BA

Mary Praytor | 864.593.0366 | marypraytor@gmail.com

Joey Beeson | 864.660.9689 | joeymbeeson@gmail.com

Tom Marchant | 864.449.1658 | tom@tommarchantco.com

& es t rad arpe g Up w C Ne

1 Mallard Ridge Pl. - Neely Farm $259,000 • 1268285 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

Barb Riggs |864.423.2783 | barb@marchantco.com

W NE

G TIN LIS

15 Southern Height Dr. - Miller Heights $174,500 • 1274566 • 3 BR/2.5 BA

Valerie Miller | 864.430.6602 | vmiller@marchantco.com chuck Miller | 864.293.4778 | cmillergsp@aol.com

Anne Marchant | 864.420.0009 | anne@marchantco.com Jolene Wimberly |864.414.1688 | jolenewim@aol.com

iew eV n i l y Sk

se ou n nh catio w To at Lo Gre

1001 S. Church St. #504 - The Brio - Lux D’town Condo $124,900 • 1273334 • 1 BR/1 BA James Akers |864.325.8413 | james@jamesakersjr.com

105 Pelham Square Way - Pelham Square $89,000 • 1273259 • 3 BR/ 2 BA

Anne Marchant | 864.420.0009 | anne@marchantco.com Jolene Wimberly |864.414.1688 | jolenewim@aol.com

Residential | Commercial | New Home Communities | Property Management | Foreclosures | Land & Acreage | Mountain Properties

40 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

Members of the Greenville Federal Credit Union “Despicable Me” team pose for a photograph during the Junior Achievement Oscar Night BIZ Bowl event.

Both St. Mary’s Middle School girls and boys basketball teams finished the season undefeated and brought home the Carolina Middle School Conference championship. The teams are coached by Willis Holliday. A Simpsonville soldier surprised her family as she returned from Afghanistan a few days early, having been gone nearly a year. Spc. Kayla Patterson stepped off the plane Wednesday and began preparing to surprise her family at her younger brother’s lacrosse match. Her brother, Adam Clements, is on the Hillcrest High School lacrosse team, and he did not know she was standing on the sidelines, dressed as just another referee for the introduction of captains and the coin toss.

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

PHOTOS BY GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

Greenville Technical College accounting student Raul Cardona gains real-world experience as he assists a client with free tax preparation through the United Way’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program.

Erin and Grant Mayfield surprised their mom and dad, Pam and Leland, with a 60th birthday party at the River Walk Clubhouse. A large crowd of family and friends were gathered, in advance of Pam and Leland, to surprise them on arrival.

In preparation for a class project, the Leadership Greer class attended a two-hour training at Lowe’s in partnership with Christmas in Action. Class members were trained on flooring installation, drywall repair and safety procedures for equipment. During the project day last weekend, the class sponsored and volunteered on four projects and homes in the Greer area.

The Langston Charter Middle School girls’ basketball team, the Chargers, finished fourth in the Carolina Middle School Conference. Sam Woodard received the All-Conference award. Back row, left to right: Coach Dawn Woodard, Vena Mohan, Caroline Earle, Jennings Bryson, Carrington Williams, Jaeydon Hill-Mims, Monica Avila, and Assistant Coach Keisha Mims. Front row, left to right: Emily Mages, Sam Woodard, Hannah Fugate, Amy Thompson, Hannah Young, and Caroline Mackie. (Not pictured: Assistant Coach Erica Fuller, Ashley Kessinger and Elise Holbrooks.)

MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL CULTURE

Discover a Healthier, Happier You!

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. INCIDENTAL MUSIC

By Doug Peterson

One stop for all of your health needs! • Fresh Juices Daily • Massage Therapy • Colon Hydrotherapy • Nutritional Counseling • Organic Skin Care • Essential Oils • Total Body Vibration • Natural Vitamins • Herbal Supplements

233 N Main St. Ste 105, Greenville 864-991-2726 www.pureonmain.com

 WEDDINGS  ENGAGEMENTS  ANNIVERSARIES Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

WEDDINGS

1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90 For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@ communityjournals.com 42 THE JOURNAL | MARCH 7, 2014

ACROSS 1 Campfire residue 4 Volkswagen sedan 10 Speak for yourself? 14 Office __: Staples rival 19 Suffix with señor 20 Outfielder who had a single-season record 262 hits in 2004 21 Four-ring logo company 22 Hidden repository 23 Donut lover’s discipline? 26 C.S. Lewis lion 27 Symbol of steadiness 28 School-wk. start 29 Shell lobbers 31 Copy editor’s mark 32 Kicking back with the drones? 36 Emulate Eminem 39 “CSI” actor George 40 Literature Nobelist Canetti 41 Japanese soup, apparently? 46 Gander, e.g. 47 Player with earbuds 51 Lyricist Gershwin 52 Dustin’s “Midnight Cowboy” role 53 One of a hotel room pair 55 Medina native 56 Feeling sluggish 58 Defunct ‘80s gridiron gp. 60 Recipe quantity

63 Missile stabilizer 64 Shinbone neighbor 67 So-so joe? 70 Forbidden 72 Honoree on the third 28-Across in Jan. 73 Squiggly diacritic 74 Bangle, often? 79 Julius and Augustus, e.g. 83 Blubber 84 Haile Selassie followers 85 De Matteo of “The Sopranos” 87 Many a Royal Troon golfer 88 Be on the same page 90 State secrets? 92 Longhorn rival 95 Baton Rouge sch. 96 Romney’s 2012 running mate 97 1/640 of a square mile 99 Snorkeling area patrol unit? 102 __ cotta 104 Singer Tennille 105 The “t” in Crete? 106 Broadcaster who goes on and on and on? 112 Farm Belt state 116 Swallowed one’s pride 117 MD workplaces 118 Item kept near brushes 121 Name on many video games 122 “Water that poor

plant before all the leaves dry up!”? 126 Fallback option 127 “And don’t forget ...” 128 Break 129 “__ Maria” 130 “The Playboy of the Western World” dramatist 131 Scrabble two-pointers 132 Enthusiastic 133 Folk hero Kelly

DOWN 1 Gave a ride, say 2 Log cabin warmer 3 Eye color 4 Best of health, figuratively 5 Climber’s goal 6 Hosiery variety 7 Move furtively 8 D-backs, on a sports ticker 9 Typical “Yo Gabba Gabba!” viewer 10 Relay sticks 11 Feeling sorry about 12 Stir 13 Cheap saloon 14 Beltway region, briefly 15 Taiwan’s locale 16 Programming class setting 17 Orchard Field, today 18 Keyed up 24 Año opener 25 In the thick of 30 Great Depression

migrant 33 Take to the airport, say 34 Floppy topper 35 Most pleasing to Jack Sprat 37 Bubble filler 38 Sch. meeting group 41 Cereal go-with

Hard

42 Weights, when pumped 43 Judicious 44 Zombie-like states 45 Suffix with lion 46 Skimpy skirt 48 Powder __ 49 Patient of Dr. Liz

50 Enjoy a meal 54 Got the job done 55 Fine china name 57 High-elevation enigma 59 San Diego suburb whose name means “the table” 61 Loop site 62 Pac-12 school 65 Core group 66 “Take a Chance on Me” quartet 68 Down with something 69 Come clean, with “up” 71 Muffin stuff 74 Dueling memento 75 Unrestrained party 76 Constellation named for an instrument 77 NASCAR Hall of Famer Yarborough 78 Like some flaws 80 Scopes Trial gp. 81 Historic Parks 82 Simple earring 86 Psych 101 topic 89 Hard to resist 91 Skirt companion 93 Mtge. feature 94 Panamanian pronoun 97 2012 Best Picture 98 Crustacean used in Cajun cuisine 100 “Barbara __”: 1960s hit 101 Bails 103 Dress like a justice 104 Statue subjects 106 Packs down 107 Land of the Apennines 108 Showed again 109 Futile 110 Period in history 111 More valuable, possibly 113 Giant squid’s home 114 Give up 115 Paid to play 119 Rick’s flame 120 Light bite 123 Ringside cheer 124 Clearance rack abbr. 125 Genteel gathering Crossword answers: page 18

Sudoku answers: page 18


JOURNAL CULTURE

60 & BEYOND WITH PEGGY HENDERSON

The pitfalls of acting young So what’s new about falling at my age and walking one’s dog for companionship? The subject is about as fresh as last week’s banana bread. But hang with me. I’ll spare you the elaborate whys and wherefores of my debacle. (Me flat on my back on a public street, with my English Crème Retriever running in circles amidst stopped cars.) The succinct version is no broken bones. And thankfully, my precious puppy, Gracie, survived the horror show. What did I learn from this Humpty Dumpty tumble? Hopefully a nifty insight worth your five-minute read. But before I attempt to justify my unfortunate episode, you might be interested to know that according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one out of three adults over age 65 falls each year. If you’re a man over 65, you’re 46 percent more likely to die from a fall, while 58 percent of women are more likely to be seriously hurt. And ladies, the odds are not good for hip fractures that don’t heal. Alas, if we seniors take these numbers to heart, some of us would think twice about walking out the front door, much less around the block. No way is this going to happen to me or, I trust, you. In regard to the hazards of loss of balance, my take as a supposedly mature adult is there’s more going on than just gravity and lack of focus. The culprit is the ego. I’m 69 and struggle with the distasteful habit of being a prideful lady. I enjoy patting myself on the back for events such as walking a charity run, or even eating an apple instead of a hotdog with mustard, onions and chili. Cosmopolitan magazine and The View assures us there’s no sin in choosing plastic surgery, fanny and boob lifts or dental work that costs as much as a trip to France. There’s nada plastic surgery in my future – but bridgework, yes. Then a hearing aid. I read an inspiring essay in The Wall Street Journal recently about achieving well-being through acceptance of self. I nodded in agreement and cringed at the puffy sound of the word “acceptance.” After all, I’m a child of the ’60s cultural revolution of rebellion, the pill and serious “Blowin’ in the Wind.” My lifelong friends from college are not cheerleaders of descriptive terms such as stoic, mousy, haughty or (God forbid) the two M’s: matrons and maven. I recognize that I am the only one who can help myself. I choose my attitude and actions that will reward me with my acceptance of my limitations and gratitude for my gifts. More importantly, I realize now that my family is silently relieved when they ask how things are going and I can truthfully answer, “just fine.” My adult children don’t need another person on their fix list. There is nothing I need to prove to validate my existence. My life speaks for itself. Nobody else really cares whether I walk 3 miles a day or 1, or occasionally eat peach ice cream for breakfast out of the carton. And I refuse to quit wearing my “Not Your Daughter’s Jeans.” As long as I’m being kosher and principled, this positive boost offers me authentic freedom that gives me a smiley face. The following are a few basic tools I make myself do and recommend the same for you: Glance down frequently to see what’s ahead. Pick up your feet. Use handrails in public places. Take elevators. Don’t ride mall escalators. Always do your yoga stretches and balance routine. In closing, I must mention the Dowager Countess, Lady Violet of “Downton Abbey.” If and when I require a cane in the winter of my years, I hope I remember to swish that cane across the room like Violet, poised and ready for the next step that offers, within its shadows, glints of grace and circumstance. Peggy Henderson is a 60 & Beyond former freelance writer turned newspaper columnist. Besides appearing in the Greenville Journal, her column is syndicated with Senior Wire News Services. In addition, she’s a staff writer for the website Go60.us. Contact her at peg4745@aol.com.

THE DESIGNATED   LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA Public Notice of Candidate Filing

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FAMILY COURT PROCEEDINGS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 2013-DR-23-1028 Olivia and Dana Holcomb, Plaintiff, -vs- David Kenneth Youngblood, Defendant You will please take notice that the original Summons and Complaint in the aboveentitled action were filed with the Greenville County Clerk of Family Court on the 7th day of March, 2013. You are further notified that this proceeding relate to a Termination of Parental Rights and Step-Parent adoption action. You are further notified that if you wish to contest, intervene or otherwise respond you must, within thirty (30) days of receiving this notice, respond in writing by filing with the Court notice and reasons to contest, intervene or otherwise proceed. You are further notified that failure to file a response within thirty (30) days of receiving notice constitutes consent for such divorce. You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint and to serve a copy of your answer to the pleadings upon the subscriber at the Godfrey Law Firm, LLC, 10 East Avenue, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, exclusive of the date of service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within the time judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint submitted by Mary Alice Godfrey, Attorney for Plaintiff.

Greenville County PUBLIC NOTICE OF CANDIDATE FILING GREENVILLE COUNTY Any candidate seekingseeking a political party’sparty’s nomination for anyforoffiany ce office in the in 2014 General Election Any candidate a political nomination the 2014 General Election must filemust withfile thewith appropriate election commission duringduring the upcoming filingfiling period. the appropriate election commission the upcoming period. Filing opens 2014, closes noon, noon, MarchMarch 30, 2014. Filingnoon, opensMarch noon, 16, March 16,and 2014, and closes 30, 2014. Offices

Filing Location

Constitutional Officers U.S. Senate U.S. Senate (To Fill Unexpired Term) U.S. House of Representatives (All Districts) Judicial Circuit Solicitor (13th) Greenville/Pickens

State Election Commission (SEC) 2221 Devine St., Suite 105 Columbia, SC 29205

State House of Representatives (file in county of residence) House District 10 (shared w/Anderson County House District 16 (shared w/ Laurens County House District 17 House district 18 House district 19 House district 20 House district 21 House District 22 House District 23 House District 24 House District 25 House district 27 House District 28 House District 35(shared w/Spartanburg County) House District 36(shared w/Spartanburg County)

Greenville County Election Commission Greenville County Square 301 University Ridge , Suite 1900 Greenville SC 29601 864-467-7250 Greenville county offices to be Filled in 2014 Auditor Probate Judge Treasurer

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Carisbrooke Phase 3 Project in Greenville County on March 26, 2014, 3:00 P.M. A mandatory pre-bid meeting and site tour will be held at 9:00 A.M., EDT, March 12, 2014 at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Purchasing_Dept/Bids.asp or by calling 864-467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 42-03/24/14, Heritage Green Parking Garage Management, March 24, 2014, State Election Commission Filing Hours: 3:00 P.M. State Election Commission Filing Hours: Weekdays: 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. IFB# 43-03/20/14, Asbestos and Weekdays: 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Weekends: Closed March 16, 22-23; Open March 29-30, 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Lead-based Paint Abatement, Weekends: Closed March 16, 22-23; Open March 29-30, 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. March 20, 2014, 3:00 P.M. A preGreenville Commission Office Hours: GreenvilleCounty CountyElection Election Commission OffiFiling ce Filing Hours: bid meeting and site visit will be Weekdays: Weekdays: Open OpenMonday Mondaythrough throughFriday Friday8:30 8:30a.m. a.m.– –5:5:p.m. p.m. held at 10:00 A.M., E.D.T., Friday, Weekends: 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.p.m. Weekends: Closed ClosedMarch March16, 16,22-23; 22-23;Open OpenMarch March29-30, 29-30, 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 March 14, 2014, at 115 Wilhelm Filing of of Intention of of Candidacy & Party Pledge (SICPP) form required for for filing is available in the FilingForm: Form:The TheStatement Statement Intention Candidacy & Party Pledge (SICPP) form required filing is Winter Street, Travelers Rest, SC available inInformation” the “Candidate Information” section and of scVOTES.org and at the election “Candidate section of scVOTES.org at the election commission office.commission office. 29690. Solicitations can be found at Filing Fee: Filing fees are paid at the time of fi ling by candidates seeking the nomination of a party Filing Fee: Filing fees are paid at the time of filing by candidates seeking the nomination of a party nominating by www.greenvillecounty.org/ nominating primary. of filing fees is available atand scVOTES.org andcommission at the election commission primary. Thebylist of filingThe feeslist is available at scVOTES.org at the election office. Filing fee checks Purchasing_Dept/RFP.asp or offi ce. Filing fee checks should be made payable to the appropriate state political party. A candidate should be made payable to the appropriate state political party. A candidate seeking the nomination of a party nominating by calling (864) 467-7200. seeking the nomination of a party nominating by convention does not pay a filing fee. Greenville County Council County Council District 17 County Council District 19 County Council District 23 County Council District 26 County Council District 28

by convention does not pay a filing fee.

State Ethics Filings: Candidates are required to file a Statement of Economic Interests and a Campaign

State Ethics Filings: Candidates are required to file a Statement of Economic Interests and a Campaign Disclosure online Disclosure online with the State Ethics Commission at http://ethics.sc.gov. Failure to file these documents with the State Ethics Commission at http://ethics.sc.gov. Failure to file these documents may result in a candidate fine but NOTICE may result in a candidate fine but will not disqualify a candidate from the election. Contact the State will notCommission disqualify a candidate from the election. Contact the State Ethics Commission for more information. On March 25, 2014 Greenville Ethics for more information.

 

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Soby’s on the Side, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 22 East Court St., Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 23, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Yard House USA, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1025 Woodruff Road (Bldg L 101), Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 23, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Soby's LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 207 S. Main Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 23, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

County, City of Greenville, City of Mauldin, City of Simpsonville and City of Fountain Inn will hold an informal meeting to discuss the draft Multi-jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan 2015 Update. This meeting will be held in Conference Room A, Greenville County Square at 6:30 PM. The public is invited to ask questions and to submit comments on the plan during the meeting. The draft plan is available for review on the Greenville County website (www. greenvillecounty.org) If you need further information please contact Robert Hall by phone (467-7523) or e-mail (rohall@greenvillecounty.org).

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305 email: aharley@ communityjournals.com

MARCH 7, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 43


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March 7, 2014 Greenville Journal