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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, February 23, 2018 • Vol.20, No.8

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

Top Producers of 2017 10 AGENTS

TOP

TOP

1

# Melissa Morrell

2

Spaulding Group

Pelham Road, Pelham Road #1 Team, Chairman’s Circle – Diamond

3

4

#

Maggie Aiken

N. Pleasantburg, Chairman’s Circle – Platinum

5

Jennifer Van Gieson

8

Paige Haney

10

#

Jenny McCord Pelham Road, President’s Circle

Simpsonville #1 Agent, President’s Circle

Pelham Road, President’s Circle

N. Pleasantburg, Chairman’s Circle – Platinum, 5 Year Legend

8

#

Sam Hankins

MacDonald HomeTeam

#

Lisa Norton Reese N. Pleasantburg, President’s Circle

The Sheri Sanders Team Easley #1 Team, Chairman’s Circle – Platinum

4

#

The Toates Team

The Chet & Beth Smith Group

5

Bob Schmidt

Greer #1 Agent, Chairman’s Circle – Gold

3

#

N. Pleasantburg #1 Team – Chairman’s Circle – Diamond, 20 Year Legend

#

#

9

#

N. Pleasantburg, Chairman’s Circle – Gold

7

#

N. Pleasantburg, Chairman’s Circle – Gold

#

Robbie Haney

Pelham Road #1 Agent, Chairman’s Circle – Gold

Jeff Meister

2

#

6

#

1

#

N. Pleasantburg N. Pleasantburg #1 Agent, Chairman’s Circle - Diamond

#

10 TEAMS

The Keagy Team

Pelham Road, Chairman’s Circle – Diamond

6

#

N. Pleasantburg, Chairman’s Circle – Diamond

7

#

Pam McCurry Team

The Clever People

Pelham Road, Chairman’s Circle – Platinum

9

#

Cousins & Associates Simpsonville #1 Team, Chairman’s Circle – Gold

Anderson #1 Team, Chairman’s Circle – Platinum

10

#

The Morgan Group N. Pleasantburg, Chairman’s Circle – Gold


Congratulations 2017 Award Winners The Greenville Team Pelham Road

Extraordinary Results. Extraordinary Agents.

Granville & Granville

DeYoung & Cain Group

The Gillis Group

Gia & Company

Twila Kingsmore

Ginnie Freeman

Dennis Chenault

N. Pleasantburg

Anderson

Garlington Road #1 Agent

The Downtown Group

Faith Ross

Marie Crumpler

Linda Ballard

Ginger Sherman

Theresa Nation & Associates

Jill Chapman

Eddie Burch

N. Pleasantburg

Pelham Road

Easley #1 Agent

Garlington Road

N. Pleasantburg

Beth Crigler

Ronda & Chris Holder

Jane Ellefson

Anthony Hackney

Jan Walker Team

Stephanie Miller

At Home Associates

The Cassity Partnership

Sheila Newton Team

Augusta Road #1 Agent

N. Pleasantburg

Pelham Road

Anderson

Easley

Greer

N. Pleasantburg

Garlington Road #1 Team

Augusta Road

Garlington Road

N. Pleasantburg

Anderson

Greer #1 Team

N. Pleasantburg

Greer

Anderson


Foronda Hall & Partners

Beresh-Martin Group

Jada Barnette

Charee McConchie

Vicki Galloway Roark

Beth Sarmento

Anderson

The Shepherd Team Greer

Sandra Palmer & Associates

Augusta Road

Simpsonville

Greer

Pelham Road

Bob & Linda Brown Group

Sheila Smalley

Charlene Panek

Donna O. Smith & Partners

Mashburn-Floore

The Norman Group

Garlington Road

N. Pleasantburg

Simpsonville

N. Pleasantburg

Augusta Road

Garlington Road

N. Pleasantburg

Augusta Road #1 Team

Live, love, laugh, learn and leave a legacy.

Cate Thompson Pelham Road

Haley Michael N. Pleasantburg

Hope Tz Schmalzl Commercial

Debbie Hearn

C. DAN JOYNER SPIRIT AWARD

Donna Stegall Easley

Bob Moffatt Garlington

Tammy Gras Greer

Simpsonville

Jim Sharpe Pelham Road

Joy Steverson N. Pleasantburg

– C. Dan Joyner

Bill Forrest Anderson

Lang Cheves Augusta Road

Marsha Foster Boiling Springs

Nelson Garrison Commercial

Tim Toates Pelham

Robbie Haney Pleasantburg

Clair Carson Property Mgr

Sandra Palmer Simpsonville

© 2018 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.


Carmen Crigler Feemster Augusta Road

Johnathan Lower Anderson #1 Agent

Tammy Copeland Simpsonville

Amy Ray Thomas Augusta Road

The French Connection Pelham Road

Jenny Weathers Garlington Road

Anna Hill Miller Augusta Road

Sonia Carr Pelham Road

Keith Boling Augusta Road

Carol Houston Easley

Greg Huff Commercial

Denise Parrett Anderson

Andrea Granada Pelham Road

Chris Graves Pelham Road

Alex Ly Simpsonville

Wayne Smith Commercial

Steve Greer Commercial

Michael Joseph Commercial

Holly Gunnels Anderson

Stina Thoennes Pelham Road

Nelson Garrison Commercial

Mike Stroud Anderson

Jean Keenan Garlington Road

The Bennett Kingen Group – Simpsonville

Pat Grissinger Easley

Sally Graves N. Pleasantburg

Elvin Rivera Pelham Road

Ginny Wylie Pelham Road

Mike Wallace N. Pleasantburg

Pat James N. Pleasantburg

Cindy Bolt Bishop Augusta Road

Sandy Patterson Pelham Road

Jennifer JD Davis N. Pleasantburg

CONGRATULATIONS to our 2017 Top Producers and THANK YOU to the nearly 4500 families who trusted us with their home journey in 2017. – Danny Joyner, President & CEO

– David Crigler, Executive Vice President

Your Home’s Best Friend.


IN THIS ISSUE

GHS FOR SALE? // “ELECTRIC JESUS” ON SCREEN // STATE ROADS UP FOR GRABS // WHOLE HEALTH NATION

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, February 23, 2018 • Vol.20, No.8

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

Cuban art sparks an Upstate conversation Artwork from the Clyde Hensley Collection

Greenville Federal Credit Union

You profit because we don’t. Join and prosper. Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County to join. © 2018, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. All claims are based on average comparison with other financial institutions. Specific services, rates, and fees may vary. Member NCUA. Checking accounts and VISA debit cards are subject to credit approval.

greenvillefcu.com 800.336.6309

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency


2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Emily Pietras epietras@communityjournals.com ADMINISTRATIVE EDITOR | Heidi Coryell Williams hwilliams@communityjournals.com

You profit because we don’t.

STAFF WRITERS Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Sara Pearce | spearce@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com COPY EDITOR Rebecca Strelow ARTS & CULTURE WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Susan Schwartzkopf VICE PRESIDENT OPERATIONS Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Rosie Peck | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES Shannon Rochester SALES MANAGER Emily Yepes MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES John Clark | Donna Johnston | Jonathan Maney Heather Propp | Meredith Rice Caroline Spivey | Liz Tew DIGITAL SALES ASSISTANT Amber Knox VISUAL DIRECTOR Will Crooks LAYOUT Bo Leslie | Tammy Smith ADVERTISING DESIGN Kristy Adair | Michael Allen EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT | Kristi Fortner CHAIRMAN | Douglas J. Greenlaw

Greenville

3375 Pelham Road Greenville, SC 29615 864.371.6060

Greenville

1501 Wade Hampton Blvd. Greenville, SC 29609 864.235.6309

Greer

107 W. Church St. Greer, SC 29650 864.877.9089

Mauldin

publishers of

581 perry ave., greenville, sc 29611 phone: 864-679-1200 delivery inquiries: 864-679-1240 communityjournals.com

© 2015 published by community journals llc. all rights reserved. all property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of community journals. no part of this publication may be reproduced, scanned, stored, distributed or transmitted by any means – whether auditory, graphic, mechanical, or electronic – without written permission from the publisher.

142 Tanner Rd. Greenville, SC 29607 864.676.9066

As your not-for-profit alternative to banks, Greenville Federal Credit Union offers a host of money-saving services that help maximize your finances. Only your credit union can offer truly FREE interest-bearing checking:

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Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County to join.

800.336.6309 greenvillefcu.com

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency

© 2018, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. All claims are based on average comparison with other financial institutions. Specific services, rates, and fees may vary. Member NCUA. Checking accounts and Visa debit cards are subject to credit approval.

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

02.23.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

PAGE 3 “I’M NOT LOOKING DOWN ON THESE CHARACTERS, BUT AT THE SAME TIME THERE’S A KID WITH BIG HAIR WITH HIS MAKEUP RUNNING AND TIGHT PANTS WHO’S READING SCRIPTURE, BECAUSE IT’S 1986.” Chris White, on the screenplay of his feature film “Electric Jesus,” which pays tribute to the ’80s Christian hair-metal genre

Education That Lasts a Lifetime

Stress and Emotional Eating Monday, February 5 at 6:00 p.m. or Wednesday, February 7 • Noon

Presented by Kristen Guenther, MS, RD, LD Emotional eating is eating for any reason other than hunger, such as boredom, stress or social pressure. This class helps you identify your personal triggers for emotional eating and develop skills for positive change.

Rev Up Your Metabolism! Tuesday, February 13 • Noon

Presented by Helen Rowland, RN, CDE

“It’s really a tribute to how much African-American culture has enriched America itself.” Carolina Ballet Theatre artistic director Hernan Justo, on the company’s upcoming Black History Month performance, “Black & Beautiful: A Tribute to African-American Dancers”

“Since we don’t sit around and snap peas with grandma, it’s foreign.” June Ellen Bradley, organizer of the first Whole Health Nation forum, on the lost art of people growing their own food and herbs

DRIVING ALONG

41,000

The number of miles in South Carolina’s state-maintained road system, the fourth largest in the country

How can you increase your metabolism? Learn what factors affect metabolism and the truth about the current myths.

Stress Management

Monday, February 26 • 6:00 p.m. Presented by Krishna Patel, FNP

Stress is what happens when you have to handle more than you can. Learn techniques for managing everyday stressors, and ways to gain a new, healthier perspective.

Weight Management Tuesday, February 27 • 6:00 p.m.

Presented by Kristen Guenther MS, RD, LD This recurring class presents a long-term approach to a healthy lifestyle—a balance of healthy eating, appropriate physical exercise, and the creation of positive accountability—and includes a discussion on the medical implications of obesity in our society. Following this session, those interested may take a tour through the HealThy Self Gym and learn about the programs available to help you achieve successful weight management.

Bon Secours St. Francis Health System offers a variety of complimentary health classes to help you achieve a healthier life. Call 864-400-3651 to register.

presented by


4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION

Views from your community

New path forward for GHS is a win for Greenville By Mike Burns, Bill Chumley, Tom Corbin, Dwight Loftis, Garry Smith, Leola Robinson-Simpson, William Timmons, and Ashley Trantham

The Greenville Health System is an important asset to our community. The Greenville County Legislative Delegation has always valued, supported, and trusted the way that the organization provides health care services to our families, friends, and constituents. Unfortunately, this trust was shaken when the GHS board unilaterally restructured and leased our publicly owned, multibillion-dollar asset without the legislative delegation’s input or consent, as the law requires. Matters were made worse when GHS announced its merger with Palmetto Health. Our local representatives echoed our distrust when the Greenville and Oconee county councils voted against restructuring the GHS debt to take on Palmetto Health’s more than $1 billion of debt. Historically, GHS would have worked with the delegation to figure out the best way forward so that patient care did not suffer and so that this public asset operated legally. After all, the delegation and GHS have worked together nine times since they were created in 1947 to adapt to our community’s changing needs. It is puzzling that this time would be different. In the last year, the GHS executives have attempted to justify their actions by claiming that the best way of providing high-quality patient health care in the future is to look to consolidation and privatization. The legislative delegation is in favor of this path if it is done the right way. To date, the GHS executives have yet to meaningfully work with the delegation on a legal path forward to make this possible. This is unacceptable. The nuclear power plant fiasco should have made apparent the dangers of a publicly owned entity selectively operating as a private company. Since GHS will not come to the table, even while GHS claims that patient health care is hanging in the balance, the best solution to the problem is to legally allow the system to move forward as a private entity. Simply put, we should sell GHS. We should allow the private market to provide innovative and high-quality care for our community and return the profit from the sale of this multibillion-dollar state asset back to the state and Greenville County. Last week, legislation was introduced to allow this to happen. The GHS board’s duties will be amended so that they are solely tasked with facilitating a sale. Current executive management will be relieved of their responsibilities while an interim president steps in. A third-party independent consultant will be used to handle a competitive bidding process, and proceeds of the sale will be distributed among five groups. It is safe to assume that we can expect proceeds from the sale to range from $2 to $3 billion. From this money, if necessary, bondholders will be paid so that debt is discharged. This would be addressed during the sale. Remaining funds will then be divided into quarters and distributed to the following: the state, the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, Greenville County Council, and a 501(c)(3) tasked with distributing funds within our community. Forty million dollars will be distributed to the state to replace aging and dangerous school buses. Thirty million dollars will be used to support workforce development on the technical college level. Eligible charter schools in Greenville County will receive $2 million each, and the remainder will go to Greenville County schools in $5

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

Since GHS will not come to the table, even while GHS claims that patient health care is hanging in the balance, the best solution to the problem is to legally allow the system to move forward as a private entity. Simply put, we should sell GHS. million increments to provide support services to low-income students and families. The hundreds of millions distributed to the medical school will be used to create an endowment for the purpose of educating, training, and growing the medical workforce in the Upstate. Of this amount, 25 percent must be dedicated to socioeconomically disadvantaged and minority communities. Five million dollars will be directed to the Levi S. Kirkland Sr., M.D., Scholarship Fund. With one of the largest endowments of any school in South Carolina, our medical school will prosper like never before. Money distributed to the Greenville County Council will be divided several ways for the good of the community. The Council must use 60 percent of the proceeds to offset property taxes of residences currently taxed at 4 percent over a period of five years. The Council will distribute $50 million for affordable housing projects and maintenance in Greenville County and the city of Greenville. Up to $5 million will be used for replacing and improving the Hampton Avenue bridge. Ten million dollars will go toward funding to develop and support minority small businesses through the Greenville Area Development Corporation, and another $10 million will be distributed to provide support to small businesses engaged in agriculture. Remaining funding will go toward projects to address needs around the community and to facilitate community health. Twenty-five percent of the proceeds from the sale shall be distributed to a newly formed 501(c)(3) for the purpose of promoting health and wellness in the community. Investing hundreds of millions of dollars for the good of Greenville County will create a legacy that will benefit our home for generations. In 1947, it was necessary for the government to own a hospital. In 2018, it does not make sense. The time has come for the government to divest itself from nonessential assets, especially when the private market will provide a better product. This is an incredible opportunity to address real needs within the community and maximize long-term prosperity. Most importantly, it is time for those with lawful authority to make a decision on a path forward from this controversy – and this is the most responsible decision.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Managing Editor Emily Pietras at epietras@communityjournals.com.


02.23.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Sustainability: an essential component for longevity and resiliency By Cheri Chastain

The ForeverGreen Awards Luncheon celebrates individuals and organizations for significant contributions in fields related to conservation and sustainable growth in Upstate South Carolina. This year’s award recipients worked on some truly impressive projects, including a statewide Adopt A Stream initiative, an eye-opening growth study, and a farm-to-school partnership. The awardees embody several core principles of sustainability: innovation, collaboration, and dedication. It’s no coincidence that these principles are also at the heart of some of the most entrepreneurial and successful businesses out there today. Sustainability isn’t just some hippie mantra or marketing buzzword — it’s an essential component for longevity and resiliency, requiring people of all ages, religions, ethnicities, socioeconomic statuses, and political affiliations to be engaged with it. Sierra Nevada, one of the country’s pioneer craft brewers, has made sustainability a core business value since its founding in 1980.  Sierra Nevada owns craft brewing’s largest solar array, offers free electric vehicle parking to our guests, and lends its voice to sustainable policy development. Our Mills River, N.C., brewery was the first facility in the world to achieve platinum-level certification in both LEED and TRUE Zero Waste.  Our commitment to sustainable and efficient business practices stems first and foremost from our values. Not only is it the right thing to do but also engaging in sustainability comes with plenty of economic reasons to incorporate this mindset into any business. Engaging in energy- and water-efficiency practices protect natural resources while reducing overall operating expenses. Our zero-waste efforts not only eliminate what would be thousands of dollars in disposal costs but also bring a revenue stream and keep materials in production cycles.  

Make no mistake: Choosing the longterm strategy for your business, community, or lifestyle isn’t always the path of least resistance. We all feel the daily pressure of immediate returns, benefits, and cost savings. But we need to understand the long-term impacts of the decisions we make: how do they impact our environment, our coworkers, our communities, and our ability to survive into the future. At Sierra Nevada, we choose to practice sustainability not only because of the business benefits, but because it’s part of our DNA.  In my conversations with Upstate Forever staff, I’ve learned that the Upstate is currently wrestling with the question of how to balance growth with natural resource protection. This is why the work Upstate Forever is doing to protect green space, water quality, and regional character is so urgent and critical.  There are no easy answers: It takes ongoing dedication, innovation, and collaboration to forge a sustainable vision for any community.  It’s certainly not an easy road, but judging from this year’s award recipients and Upstate Forever’s 20 years of success stories, there are plenty of reasons to feel optimistic about a sustainable future for the Upstate. 

Cheri Chastain has been the sustainability manager for Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. since 2006. She is responsible for educating employees on environmental issues and programs as well as maintaining and developing policies and projects related to renewable energy and energy efficiency, zero waste, alternative fuels, and water conservation and reuse.

Health Events Girls on the Run February-May • Times and locations vary This program combines training for a 5K with esteem-enhancing workouts for girls ages 8-15. Scholarships and payment plans available. Register at ghs.org/girlsontherun. Talk with the Docs Wed., Feb. 28 • 3:30 p.m. • GHS Facebook page February is Heart Month, so you’ve probably been hearing a lot about keeping yours healthy. If you have questions, ask them on this episode of Talk with the Docs, featuring host Cedrek McFadden, MD, and guest Eveleen Randall, MD, a GHS cardiologist. Prediabetes Class Mon., March 5 • 7-8 p.m. • GHS Life Center® About 84 million U.S. adults have prediabetes—many don’t even know it! Learn what prediabetes is and how to avoid type 2 diabetes. Free; no registration needed. Call (864) 455-4003 for more information. Lunch and Learn: Macular Degeneration Tues., March 6 • Noon-1 p.m. • Embassy Suites Greenville Learn signs, symptoms and treatment for macular degeneration with Jamie Oakman, MD, ophthalmologist with the GHS Eye Institute. The event is free and lunch is provided, but registration is required. Women’s Heart Screenings Tuesdays • 1-3 p.m. • GHS Women’s Heart Center Heart disease is more deadly to women than all forms of cancer combined. The best time to get checked is before symptoms appear—that way, you can make lifestyle changes early on. This early detection screening focuses on blood pressure, weight, cholesterol, nutrition and sleep. Fee: $100. Unless noted otherwise, registration is required for each event. To register, learn more or see a schedule of events, visit ghs.org/events.

ghs.org 18-0265GJ


6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

LAWMAKERS WANT TO FORCE SALE OF GHS Bill calls for proceeds to be used for items such as property tax relief, school buses, affordable housing, and workforce development

$

WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM Some Greenville County legislators want Greenville Health System sold and the proceeds used for property tax relief, to buy new school buses, to pay for affordable housing in the city and county, for workforce development, and to address community needs and health. A bill filed in the state House Thursday, Feb. 15, would amend the GHS board’s responsibilities to solely facilitating a sale of the health system’s assets in a competitive sealed bid process. Six local state House members sponsored the bill — Republicans Dwight Loftis, Garry R. Smith, Ashley Trantham, Mike Burns, Bill Chumley, and Democrat Leola RobinsonSimpson. State Sen. William Timmons said identical legislation would be introduced in the Senate next week. GHS spokeswoman Sandy Dees called the effort “the most recent attack on locally owned, not-for-profit health care” from a handful of local politicians. “The best health care organizations are led by medical experts, not politicians,” Dees said. “It’s time to put politics aside and let the physicians, nurses, caregivers, and local community leaders on our boards do what they do best — ensure the strongest health care future for the patients and communities we serve.” “We will not let these latest actions distract us from what truly matters — our singular focus of providing high-quality health care for all members of the community. Protecting access to locally controlled, not-for-profit health care is essential to the well-being of our community,” she said. The governance of GHS has been the subject of controversy since 2015, when the GHS board decided that the existing public nonprofit GHS would remain a property owner and lease the health system’s assets, but two private nonprofit organizations, the Strategic Coordinating Organization and the Upstate Affiliate Organization, would be formed to handle the health system’s planning and operations. Some legislative delegation members opposed the move, saying it would end government oversight of public assets, and filed a lawsuit. The state Supreme Court refused to take up the matter, but the lawsuit is still pending in the Greenville County Court of Common Pleas. In an op-ed sent to the Greenville Journal, some members of the legislative delegation, including Smith and Timmons, said the delegation and GHS have worked together nine times since GHS’ creation in 1947 to adapt to the community’s changing needs. “It is puzzling that this time would be different,” the letter said. The letter went on to say, “In the last year, the GHS executives have attempted to justify their actions by claiming that the best way of providing high-quality patient health care in the future is to look to consolidation and privatization. The legislative delegation is in favor of this path if it is done the right way. To date, the GHS executives have yet to meaningfully work with the delegation on a legal path forward to make this possible. This is unacceptable.”

“If privatization is what you want, this is how you do it,” Smith said. Timmons said government doesn’t need to own hospitals or power plants, referencing state-owned utility Santee Cooper’s involvement in the abandoned V.C. Summer nuclear project. He said GHS governance is a major controversy that needs to be addressed. “A number of individuals stole a government asset worth $3 billion, and that’s not OK,” he said. “It would be a dereliction of duty if we didn’t do anything.” Legislators said they would expect $2 billion to $3 billion in proceeds from the sale. Debts incurred by GHS before the change in governance would be paid first. Under the bill, the rest of the proceeds would be divided in quarters and distributed to the state, the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, Greenville County, and a new nonprofit that would fund health-related needs in Greenville County.

THE MONEY WOULD BE USED FOR $40 million to buy school buses $25 million to Greenville Technical College to create a scholarship to support workforce development, and an additional $5 million for the creation of a workforce reentry center $10 million to the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services for STEM K-12 initiatives in Greenville County Property tax relief for homeowners for five years $50 million for affordable housing in the city and county $10 million to the Greenville Area Development Corporation for developing and supporting minority-owned businesses $5 million for construction of the Hampton Avenue bridge in Greenville Additional money would go to Greenville County Schools and charter schools for support services for low-income students.


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8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

STATE OF THE ROADS South Carolina wants to divest itself from some of the roads it has to maintain. Greenville may be interested in taking some off its hands WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM At more than 41,000 miles, South Carolina’s state-maintained road system is the fourth largest in the country. In Greenville, the state maintains major interstates and arteries such as Interstate 85 and Woodruff Road, main downtown roads, and some in residential neighborhoods. “There are a lot of state roads in Greenville. Some are obvious. Some are not,” Mayor Knox White said. The South Carolina Department of Transportation wants local governments to take over some of the roads in its system, and Greenville may be interested in taking some of them off the state’s hands, especially those in downtown and other areas that are ripe for economic development. Eight streets in the central business district and two in the vicinity of City Park, the city’s new signature park in the western section of downtown, are in the state system and are on the list of state roads the city is studying for possible takeover because of their impact on capital improvement projects, flexibility in streetscaping and road design, low priority on the state DOT maintenance list, and location in residential neighborhoods. White said the city likely would look at state roads in the central business district and near the new park for possible takeover first. “Street design shapes the design of developments,” White said. The problem is that when the state controls the road, it also controls what can be done on or near it when it comes to items such as parking, landscaping, and redesign. “Main Street used to be a state highway. We know it wouldn’t look like what it does today if it still was a state road.”

STATE ROADS IN THE CITY Some of the streets within the city limits of Greenville are actually state roads, which means the South Carolina Department of Transportation controls maintenance, streetscaping, and even striping. Some of those roads may surprise you.

White said he became really aware of the problem when the Bookends project on McBee Avenue ground to a halt because its balconies hung ever so slightly over the state right-of-way. The project was at a financially sensitive stage and was nearly derailed, White said. Getting approval to put parking spaces on a state-owned road downtown or rearranging parking can often take a year, he said. On Washington Street, the Greenville Water System’s landscaping plan for its office building still isn’t complete because the state DOT says it’s not safe to plant oak trees in the area between the street and sidewalk, even though there are trees on the rest of the street, White said. “Street design shapes the design of development,” White said. In downtown, East and West Washington streets, West Broad Street, Butler Avenue, River Street, Richardson Street, East and West Elford streets, Townes Street, and West McBee Avenue are all state roads. The state controls North and South Hudson streets and Mayberry Street, which are in the vicinity of where the new City Park will go. The city is studying the condition of those roads to see what it would take to bring them up to city road standards, which Greenville Public Works Director Mike Murphy says are more stringent that the state’s. Residential collector streets are also in the state system, something that surprises neighborhood residents who want them repaved. Those streets include Cleveland Street, McDaniel Avenue, Parkins Mill Road, North Main Street, East and West Park avenues, Atwood Street, North

McDaniel Avenue Cleveland Street Parkins Mill Road Haynie Street Washington Street (Source: City of Greenville)

“Main Street used to be a state highway. We know it wouldn’t look like what it does today if it still was a state road.” -Mayor Knox White

and South Calhoun streets, Green Avenue, Dunbar Street, Haynie Street, Jones Avenue, Tindal Avenue, Carroll Lane, University Ridge, Ashley Avenue, and Hampton Avenue. If the city takes over a state road, it will be responsible for future maintenance, the reason why White and other City Council members say Greenville must be judicious when deciding which to assume control over and which to leave with the state.

Broad Street Richardson Street McBee Avenue Richardson Street Hudson Street


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Pro soccer team to play inaugural season at Furman University Greenville Football Club (FC) has partnered with Furman University to use Eugene Stone Soccer Stadium as its home venue for the 2018 season. “Eugene Stone Soccer Stadium is close to my heart having been a player for Furman. I understand firsthand how this stadium allows us the opportunity to provide the Greenville FC community a meaningful experience,” said Greenville FC president Marco Carrizales, who was a midfielder for the Paladins during the 2015 season after transferring from Southern Methodist University. “I can’t wait to bring in new faces to a stadium I used to call home.” Carrizales is part of the team’s ownership group along with his brother, Richard Carrizales II, and their father, Richard Carrizales Sr. The trio announced the creation of Greenville FC last year after the team was accepted into the National Premier Soccer League, which has nearly

Hub City/Emrys writing contest deadline extended

100 teams that compete in four regions and 14 conferences. Greenville, which is the only team in the state, will compete in the South Region’s Southeast Conference and face off against teams from North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, and Louisiana. The regular season begins in May and runs through June. Season tickets are now available for purchase on the club’s website, according to a news release. “As a first-year club, Greenville FC’s expectations both on and off the field are very high, but we remain realistic and will stop at nothing to build a club that is competitive, sustainable, and representative of the entire Greenville and Upstate community,” Carrizales said. “We want to build a team the city and region are proud to call their own.” –Andrew Moore

Hub City Writers and Emrys Foundation have pushed the deadline for their writing contest from Feb. 15 to March 1. The Hub City Upstate Writing Prize, which awards writers for excellence in prose, is an annual event in which people can submit one unpublished short story or essay to the Hub City Press website on their submission page. Carol Gallagher, vice president of Emrys’ board of directors, said the contest deadline has been extended to receive more submissions. The winner, announced in April, will receive a full scholarship to Hub City’s Writing in Place conference, held July 20-22 at Wofford College. Full scholarship includes meals, room and board, and a manuscript critique with a faculty member.

To enter the contest, applicants must be at least 18 years and a full-time resident of Greenville or Spartanburg counties, or of Polk County in North Carolina. Gallagher said the contest was opened to residents of Polk County for the first time this year because of prior expressed interest from residents. “Tryon has a really vibrant writing scene, and we’d fielded a lot of requests from people who lived right outside of Landrum,” she said. The short story or essay must be no more than 10 double-spaced pages with 12-point type, and entries can only be submitted once. The applicant’s name and email address should be placed on a coversheet but not on the manuscript itself. –Robert Hull

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3 Hedge Street Church Simpsonville for mothers who who havehave Church Simpsonville for mothers Simpsonville, SC 29681 8. “Kindness Rocks” Art8. Project Simpsonville, SC 29681 “Kindness Rocks” Art Project experiencedexperienced the deaththe of death a child. this this event, of aThrough child. Through event, COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM 02.23.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11 started in 2013, 9. Out, Looking Up, Reaching we desirewetodesire to 9. Looking Up, Reaching Moving On Out, Moving On started in 2013, Registration Cost:Cost: $15.00$15.00 Registration reach out to other mothers in Includes Lunch 10. Straight Talk reach out to other mothers in Includes Lunch 10. Straight Talk compassion to bring you love, For More Information 11. Finding an Anchor in the Tidal Wave of Grief compassion to bring you love, Small Group Choices and hope. God’s Healing for a comfort, For More Information 11. Finding an Anchor in the Tidal Wave of Grief Kathryn Helt (Please Circle Four) Small Group Choices 12. How Personality Affects The Way We Grieve comfort, and hope. Kathryn Helt 864-325-3526 • kathryn.helt@dignitymemorial.com (Please Circle Four) 1. Art to Heal the Heart Mother’s Heart Alice Ann Holman 12. How Personality Affects TheGrief Way We Grieve • kathryn.helt@dignitymemorial.com 13. Sibling Special thanks to our864-325-3526 Sponsors and Community Partners:

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Alice Church Ann Holman James First Baptist Simpsonville 13. Sibling Grief Special thanks to our Sponsors and Jan Community Partners: 864-979-3198 • aadholman@gmail.com 864-963-3543 • jan@pdtm.us Bonds– Living with the 14. Grief Recovery Toolkit 2. Unbreakable 3. How to Love Through Loss Brixx Pizza for luncheonWesalads will be glad to talk with you. Loss of a Child Jan James First Baptist Church Simpsonville Mortuary 4. The Anchor of Peace in a Turbulent Sea Mackey 864-963-3543 • jan@pdtm.us Brochures and Small Group descriptions 14. Grief Recovery Toolkit 15. A Journey of Forgiveness 3. How to Love Through Loss Brixx Pizza for luncheon salads can be found at : Park www.fbcsimpsonville.org, Woodlawn Funeral Home Memorial 5. Where is God in My Grief? We will beunder glad Women’s to talk with you. Ministries Dillard-Hillcrest Memorial Park Funerals & Cremations 16. Navigating the Ocean 4. The Anchor of Peace in a Turbulent 6. Anchored in Hope Sea Mackey Mortuary Brochures and Small Group descriptions This event is offered to you by Volunteers, Community 15. A Journey of Forgiveness Greenville Memorial Gardens can be found at : Park www.fbcsimpsonville.org, Woodlawn Home Memorial 7. Stretches to Soothe AwayFuneral Stress and Make Class descriptions and biographies of is those Partners, and Heartstrings Members. Heartstrings is a 5. Where God in My Grief? under Women’s Ministries Us StrongerPalmetto Cremation Service, Oconee Gardens faith-basedMemorial encouragement group of First Baptist presenting may be found on the website atDillard-Hillcrest Memorial Park Funerals & Cremations 16. Navigating the Ocean Simpsonville for mothers who have 6. Anchored in Hope8. “Kindness Rocks” Art Project Over the Rainbow Church Gift Shop www.fbcsimpsonville.org under the Heartstrings experienced theyou death a child. Through this event, This event is offered to byofVolunteers, Community Greenville Memorial Gardens Also thanks to: McAfee Funeral 7. Stretches to Soothe and Make started in 2013, weHome desire to, and 9. Away LookingStress Up, Reaching Out, Moving OnThomas Class descriptions and biographies of thosein Women’s Partners, and Heartstrings Members. Heartstrings is a Day-Retreat information Ministry. reach out to other mothers in Us StrongerPalmetto Cremation Service, Oconee Memorial Gardens Our Wonderful Volunteers 10. Straight Talk faith-based encouragement group of First Baptist Loss of a Child

Who Have Experienced A Day-Retreat for Women the Death of a Child

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Experienced Death of a Child Saturday, Marchthe 24th, 2018 8:45—4:00

Saturday, Check-in: March 8:15-8:45 24th, 2018 First Baptist Church 8:45—4:00 3 Hedge Street Simpsonville, SC 29681 Check-in: 8:15-8:45

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3 Hedge Street compassion to bring you love, presenting may be found on the website at 11. Finding an Anchor in the Tidal Wave of Grief Church Simpsonville for mothers who have comfort, Please join usand forhope. a day of encouragement, pampering, loving support, Over the Rainbow Gift Shop Simpsonville, SC 29681 8. “Kindness Rocks” Art Project 12. How Personality Affects The Way We Grieve www.fbcsimpsonville.org under the Heartstrings experienced the death of a child. Through this event, comfort food, authentic presenters, and sharing the love of Christ, our Great Also thanks to:OnThomas McAfee Funeral Home 13. Sibling startedSpecial in 2013, weto desire to, and thanks our Sponsors and Community Partners: Out,Grief Moving Day-Retreat information in Women’s Ministry.9. Looking Up, Reaching Registration Cost: $15.00 Healer and Comforter. We welcome mothers of all faiths and at all points First Baptist Church Simpsonville out to other mothers in Includes Lunch Our Wonderfulreach Volunteers 10. Straight Talk 14. Grief Recovery Toolkit Brixx Pizza for luncheon salads

Legacy Early College’s physical activity program continues to show positive results

11. Finding an Anchor in the Tidal Wave of Grief

compassion to bring youjourney love, along their of healing regardless of the age of the child. Mackey Mortuary

comfort, and Please join usWoodlawn forhope. aFuneral dayHome of Memorial encouragement, pampering, loving support, Park 12. How Personality Affects The Way We Grieve Dillard-Hillcrest Memorial Park Funerals & Cremations 16. Navigating the Ocean comfort food, authentic presenters, and sharing the love of Christ, our Great Greenville Memorial Gardens 13. Sibling Grief Class descriptions and biographies of thoseSpecial thanks to our Sponsors and Community Partners: Palmetto Cremation Service, Oconee Memorial Gardens presenting may be found on the website at Healer andFirst Comforter. welcome mothers of all faiths and at all points Baptist ChurchWe Simpsonville Over the Rainbow Gift Shop www.fbcsimpsonville.org under the Heartstrings 14. Grief Recovery Toolkit Brixx Pizza luncheon Also thanks to: for Thomas McAfeesalads Funeral Home , and Day-Retreat information in Women’s Ministry. along their journey of healing regardless of the age of the child. Our Wonderful Volunteers Mackey Mortuary 15. A Journey of Forgiveness

15. A Journey of Forgiveness 16. Navigating the Ocean

Saturday, March 24, 2018 8:45 am - 4:00 pm First Baptist Church, Simpsonville

Woodlawn Funeral Home Memorial Park 3 Hedge Street Simpsonville, SC 29681 Dillard-Hillcrest Memorial Park Funerals & Cremations Check-in: 8:15-8:45 am Greenville Memorial Gardens Registration Cost Gardens - $15.00 (Includes lunch) Palmetto Cremation Service, Oconee Memorial Over the Rainbow Gift Shop Our Home Guest Also thanks to: Thomas McAfee Funeral , andPresenter Dianne Collard – International speaker, author, and missionary leader Our Wonderful Volunteers

Saturday, March 24, 2018 8:45 am - 4:00 pm

On Feb. 13, Legacy Early College released risk behaviors, such as physical inactivity, to Class descriptions and biographies of those the results of the fitness and cognitive be consistently linked with poor grades and presenting may be found on the website at relationship study of the school’s physical test scores. However, research on the impact www.fbcsimpsonville.org under the Heartstrings activity program. of regular physical activity on inacademic Day-Retreat information Women’s Ministry. The study, which began in 2010 and is performance and achievement continues to First Baptist Church, Simpsonville now in its eighth year, examines the impact be understudied. 3 Hedge Street Simpsonville, SC 29681 of 45 minutes of daily physical education According to the executive summary, ~ Small Group Choices ~ Check-in: 8:15-8:45 am and how it affects the cognitive and fitness “Physical activity can have both immediate Straight Talk • Art to Heal the Heart Registration Cost - $15.00 •(Includes lunch) performances of elementary and middle and long-term benefits on academic • Looking Up, Reaching Out, • Unbreakable Bonds– Living with school youth of Legacy Early College, performance and academic achievement. Moving On the Loss of a Child Our Guest Presenter compared with control groups of students Youth are often better able to concentrate Dianne Collard – International speaker, author, missionary leader • Finding anand Anchor in the • How to Love Through Loss at other schools. on classroom tasks, which can enhance Tidal Wave of Grief • The Anchor of Peace in a According to an executive summary learning immediately after a bout of physical • How Personality Affects The Turbulent Sea prepared by Julian Reed, associate professor activity.” Way We Grieve • Where is God in My Grief? ~ of health sciences at Furman University, Eight hundred and fifty-five elementary • Sibling Grief • Anchored in Hope lack of physical activity among young people and middle school students from Legacy • Grief Recovery Toolkit “Kindness Rocks” Art Project • Straight Talk • Art to•Heal the Heart has become one of the largest public health Early College participated in this year’s • A Journey of Forgiveness • Stretches to Soothe Away Stress concerns of the 21st century. study, along with control groups from two • Looking Up, Reaching Out, Bonds– Living with For More• Unbreakable Information • Navigating the Ocean and Make Us Stronger Group Moving On the Loss of a Child Across the country, onlySmall 54 percent of Choices other Title I schools. Kathryn Helt adolescents ages 6 to 19 are (Please meeting Circle the Four) Below are some of the results: • Finding an Anchor in the • How to Love Through Loss 864-325-3526 • kathryn.helt@dignitymemorial.com daily physical activity recommendation The number of steps taken in a typical To RSVP & receive registration brochure, please Tidal Wavecontact: of Grief • The Anchor of Peace in a Art to Heal the Heart outlined in the1. National Physical Activity week in 2017 by Legacy elementary and aadholman@gmail.com • 864-979-3198 Alice Ann Holman • How Personality Affects The Turbulent Sea Guidelines for Americans, which is “at least middle school students ranged between jan@pdtm.us • 864-963-3543 864-979-3198 • aadholman@gmail.com Way We Grieve 2. Unbreakable Bonds– Living with the • Where is God in My Grief? 60 minutes of daily vigorous or moderate- 8,515 and 13,845 steps. In comparison, A Day-Retreat For Women Who Have Sibling Grief of a Child Jan and Jamesmiddle intensity physical Loss activity.” Nationally, 18.5 control group elementary Deadline to register is• March 9th. • Anchored in Hope 864-963-3543 • jan@pdtm.usBrochures and Small Group descriptions can be found theToolkit Death of a Child percent of children are obese. In South school students ranged between 954 and at: www.fbsimpsonville.org •Experienced Grief Recovery • “Kindness Rocks” Art Project 3. Howof to10Love Through Loss 6,190 steps taken in a typical week. Carolina, 32.9 percent to 17-year-olds We will be glad to talk with you. • A Journey of Forgiveness • Stretches to Soothe Away Stress are overweight or obese. Legacy students demonstrated 4. The Anchor of Peace in a Turbulent Sea • Navigating the Ocean Make Us Stronger Currently, only 4 percent of public “significant improvements” in Brochures fitness and Smalland Group descriptions elementary schools and 8 percent of public performance across grade and gender, while can be found at : www.fbcsimpsonville.org, Where is God in My daily Grief? control school students demonstrated middle schools5. nationwide provide under Women’s Ministries MACKEY FUNERALS AND CREMATIONS physical education (PE) for their students. no significant improvements in fitness To RSVP & receive registration contact: DILLARD MACKEY CENTURY DRIVE brochure, please Anchored in Hope FUNERALS AND CREMATIONS MEMORIAL FUNERAL HOME GREENVILLE South Carolina6. does not have a uniform performance across grade and gender. In Check-in: 8:15-8:45 AT WOODLAWN MEMORIAL PARK aadholman@gmail.com 864-232-6706 • 864-979-3198 This event is offered to you by Volunteers, Community HILLCREST WOODLAWN definition for physical activity in early fact, some post-test assessments among MEMORIAL PARK MEMORIAL PARK 7. Stretches to Soothe Away Stress and Make jan@pdtm.us • 864-963-3543 GREENVILLE PICKENS Partners, and Heartstrings Members. Heartstrings is a childhood education settings, nor does the control school students showed a decrease 864-878-6371 864-244-0978 OCONEE MEMORIAL PARK Us Stronger state require middle and high school students in fitness performance. faith-based encouragement group of First Baptist SENECA 3 Hedge 864-882-2369 “to participate in a minimum amount of The percentage of obese male and female Deadline is March 9th. Street Church Simpsonville for mothers who have to register Simpsonville, SC 29681 8. “Kindness Rocks” Art Project time in PE.” Furthermore, a recess period is middle school students decreased at Legacy Brochures andThrough Small Group descriptions be found at: www.fbsimpsonville.org experienced the death of a child. this event, PALMETTO CREMATION SERVICE can GREENVILLE MEMORIAL GARDENS not mandatory for elementary schools. but increased among middle school males at SERVING THE UPSTATE PIEDMONT Looking Up,Control Reachingand Out, Moving On 864-878-6661 864-277-0078 The Centers9. for Disease control schools. –Robert Hull started in 2013, we desire to Registration Cost: $15.00 reach out to other mothers in Includes Lunch Prevention (CDC) has identified health10. Straight Talk compassion to bring you love, For More Information For More Information 11. Finding an Anchor in the Tidal Wave of Grief Small Group Choices God’s Healing for a Small Group Choices Kathryn Helt comfort, andFour) hope. Kathryn Helt (Please Circle Mackey_hlfV_TOWN Mar18.indd 1 • kathryn.helt@dignitymemorial.com 2/17/18 9:40 PM 864-325-3526 (Please Circle Four) 12. How Personality Affects The Way We Grieve 1. Art to Heal the Heart 864-325-3526 • kathryn.helt@dignitymemorial.com Mother’s Heart Alice Ann Holman

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12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

McPherson Lane barricade sparks controversy between city and neighborhood residents Does it stay or does it go? When it comes to the barricade that has turned the second block of McPherson Lane — the first block allows access to parking on the side and back of the strip shopping center on Augusta Street that houses Verizon and Moe’s Southwest Grill — into a one-way street, that question is once again sparking controversy. The barricade was put up the end of May and allows residents to exit out of the neighborhood on Augusta but does not allow motorists on Augusta to take McPherson. Residents on McPherson and some of the surrounding streets thought it was permanent, a way to deal with additional traffic they expected to come with plans to redo the strip center that could replace low-traffic generating businesses with higher-traffic ones. But the city told them no, that the barricade was temporary and they would have to go through the city’s established process for traffic calming, including formation of a study team that would develop a plan to be voted upon by neighborhood residents. But when the city’s traffic engineer sent an email to the committee saying it began its review before the neighborhood vote and that regardless of the

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM vote, it will not allow the installation of the one-way street, neighborhood residents accused the city of changing the rules again. Jamie Bach, a Cothran Street resident, said neighborhood residents were led to believe the one-way street was permanent and that’s the reason the neighborhood didn’t oppose the rezoning for the redevelopment at Augusta and Faris. “The city is breaking the trust for the neighborhoods, developers, and cities to work together,” Bach said. “The city can take away the one way, but we can’t go back and oppose the rezoning.” Neighborhood resident Chris Hayes said, “It appears we were purposely deceived to benefit a developer.” Greenville Public Works Director Mike Murphy said the intent of the email was to get the study committee to look at other options, such as having a left-turn-only lane out of the parking lot of the development, wider sidewalks, and a series of prefabricated speed bumps. “The one way is just not working,” he said. “We think we have other options short of making it a one-way street that we wanted the study committee to look at. The process hasn’t changed. All we’re saying is we’re going to have difficulty supporting the one way.” But Patrick Springhart, who chairs the committee, said data collected by

the city show the one way is working. Before the barrier was put up, there were 530 cars passing through each day. Now, there are 233. Curry Brown, who lives on McPherson, said the barricade is working well. “It’s had a substantial impact on the neighborhood,” he said. Mike Redmon, who lives on Cureton Street, said more than a one-block one way is at stake. Other neighborhoods bordering commercial corridors will take note of what happens in this case and, if it goes badly, will challenge proposed zoning changes and developments in the future. City Council members told neighborhood residents the traffic calming process would be adhered to. The process says once a plan has been developed by the study team and evaluated for technical feasibility by the city, a ballot will be developed. Neighborhood residents will vote on that plan and that plan only. Each item on the ballot must get yes votes on at least 70 percent of the ballots submitted to pass. The last step calls for traffic engineering to process the recommendations and, unless further review is required by the city manager or City Council, the passing items will be scheduled for installation by the public works department. -Cindy Landrum

Students won’t have to make up January snow days Good news for Greenville County Schools students — they won’t have to make up the three days of school they missed in January because of a winter storm. The Greenville County School Board has voted to excuse the Jan. 17, 18, and 19 snow days missed because of icy roads. So far this school year, Greenville County Schools has canceled six days of school because of weather. Schools were closed Sept. 11 and 12 because winds exceeded what is considered safe for high-profile vehicles such as school buses. School was also canceled Jan. 8 after a winter advisory issued the day before called for rain and warned of “sudden icing” and hazardous road conditions in the morning. The predicted conditions did not occur. Students will make up those days during the three makeup days built into the school calendar — March 19, March 30, and April 27. If any other days are missed because of bad weather, those days will have to be made up or forgiven by the South Carolina Board of Education. –Cindy Landrum

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OPINION

Views from your community

Life skills: the foundation for success in your education and career By Bill Vicary

Traditionally, life skills, also called soft skills or people skills, are taught by parents and grandparents. Because of a shift in our American culture, in many cases these skills are not being taught in school or learned at home effectively. Therefore, there is a “needs gap” for today’s youth and adults to learn and understand the importance of life skills, especially as it relates to their career. Research conducted by Harvard University, the Carnegie Foundation, and the Stanford Research Center has concluded that 85 percent of job success comes from having well developed life skills. Therefore, only 15 percent of job success comes from technical knowledge (hard skills). In another study by the Wall Street Journal, of the 900 business executives surveyed, 93 percent said that character skills were as important as or more important than technical skills, and 89 percent reported difficulties in finding employees with these abilities. A recent Zogby poll reveals that 64 percent of business leaders know someone who’s lost a promotion or job due to poor “social emotional skills.” Kayla Alewine, Mauldin United Methodist Church’s director of youth ministry, and I have teamed together to develop a life skills and job program for students in the Upstate. We recently hosted our annual program, where more than 100 students and parents attended from various middle and high schools in our area. Students came from as far away as Clinton and Powdersville, and several Greenville-area schools — private, public, and home-school programs — were also represented. Kayla and I saw a need for improving life skills and wanted to teach students how to apply these skills in landing a job. In many cases, this is the first time students have been introduced to these skills, so we created this community outreach ministry at Mauldin United Methodist Church. This is an annual, free program to teach these skills and also introduce students to a supportive youth community that seeks to help students grow and live in Christ and love all people. The need to learn Life Skills and how it applies to one’s career goes beyond what can be taught in an annual program. Therefore, I have developed a more in-depth program for high school and college students. The following is a summary of the two-and-a-half-hour Youth Life Skills and Job Program. You will learn life skills as a foundation to how to look for a job in our program: • Life skills • Why are life skills important? • The importance of first impressions • Creating your personal brand

Helping Hands When You Need Them

• How to shake hands and introduce yourself properly • Dress for success • The importance of your digital footprint • Making good choices • How to get a job • Where to look for a job • What do employers look for in candidates • Create a job search plan • Do your homework • How to fill out an application • How to prepare for a job interview (before, during, follow-up) • Parent role in your job search • Getting the job Local company participation Recently, Chick-fil-A, Cook Out, Frankie’s Fun Park, Gravitopia, Greenville Recreation, Jimmy John’s, Publix, and Spinx participated in our annual youth job program. The program provided an opportunity to meet and listen to these local companies that are hiring students and adults. They gave students advice, guidance, and information on the following: • Expectations for finding and working at a job • Do’s and don’ts in your job search • Potential for growth • Making it a job or a career • Potential opportunity for interviews Whether you are 16 and just starting out in life with your first job or 60 in a wellestablished career, life skills are the foundation for success. The old saying “you don’t know what you don’t know” is true. So if you don’t know these skills or need to brush up on these skills, it’s never too late to start. Get started today! Bill Vicary is the founder and president of Vicary Management Group. He created Life Skills U to teach and coach high school and college students, as well as adults, life skills as they directly relate to getting a job and career. He can be reached at 864-621-0224 or at bill@vicarymanagementgroup.com.

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AWARD

Greenville native Tom Ervin receives National Eagle Scout Association Outstanding Eagle Scout Award The National Eagle Scout Association Outstanding Eagle Scout Award for 2017 was recently presented to Greenville native Tom Ervin by Council President Mac McLean. The award was presented at the 2018 Blue Ridge Council Banquet, which was held on Thursday, Feb. 8, at Buncombe Street United Methodist Church. The award recognizes Ervin’s distinguished service to his profession and community. Ervin began his scout career in Troop 63 in Honea Path, S.C., where he earned the rank of Eagle Scout with three palms, and received the God and Country Award in 1967. He served on several camp staffs throughout the years and received numerous

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awards, including the BSA Medal for Meritorious Action for utilizing his Boy Scout first-aid skills to rescue a motorist whose car had gone down a steep embankment. Ervin graduated from Erskine College (class of 1974) and the University of South Carolina School of Law, served two terms in the S.C. House of Representatives for Anderson County, and was elected as the youngest circuit court judge in South Carolina at age 32. Ervin currently serves on the Blue Ridge Council board of directors. COMMUNITY SERVICE

Outstanding Youth Awards Initiative helps children celebrate Valentine’s Day The Outstanding Youth Awards Initiative held a community service project, Spread Love for Our Little Ones, on Saturday, Feb. 10. The Outstanding Youth Awards alumni and other community volunteers gathered to decorate handcrafted pillows, gifted by Fairfield Products, for children and teens to be delivered on Feb. 12 for Valentine’s Day at Shriners Hospitals for Children and GHS Children’s Hospital. Twenty-five volunteers helped create the pillows and assemble 116 Valentine’s treat bags filled with bubbles, coloring books, play dough, toy cars, headbands, socks, and more. The Outstanding Youth Awards Initiative was established as a 501(c)(3) organization in June 2015 to encourage volunteers to give back to their community, specifically to children and teens. VETERANS

Iraq veteran receives sponsorship for art program Purchase tickets online at forevergreenluncheon.eventbrite.com

Brad Carraway, an Iraq War veteran, has developed a free art program in association with the Travelers Rest Art Association (TRAA) that is specifically for veterans. He has been offering free classes in Travelers Rest to both veterans and their caregivcontinued on PAGE 18

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OBITUARIES & MEMORIALS

Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com

DEATH NOTICES FOR FEB. 11-17

Dr. Arthur Lee Eberly, Jr., M.D.

Joel Robert Johnson, 68, of Greenville, died Wednesday, February 14, 2018. Arrangements by Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, Northwest Chapel.

Andrew “Andy” Reeves Robertson, 37, of Greer, died Wednesday February 14, 2018. Arrangements by The Wood Mortuary, Inc.

Sharan “Sherry” Couch Mayer, 74. of died on Sunday, February 11, 2018. Arrangements by Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, Downtown.

Aileen Alewine Odom, 102, of Greer, died Thursday, February 15, 2018. Arrangements by The Wood Mortuary, Inc.

Born January 14, 1932 in Charleston, WV, he was the son of the late Arthur Lee Eberly, Sr. and Salome Bernheim Eberly.

Ruby “Doris” Whittaker Reece, 91, of Greenville, died Tuesday, February 13, 2018. Arrangements by Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, Downtown.

Robert Lee Stewart, 80, of Greer, died on Thursday, February 15, 2018. Arrangements by The Wood Mortuary, Inc.

Dr. Eberly attended Florida Southern College (FSC) in Lakeland, FL, where he obtained his BS degree. While at FSC, he played varsity basketball, served as secretary of the Inter Fraternity Council, and was elected as vice president of the student body. Dr. Eberly was a member of SAE social fraternity and was drafted while in his senior year of college, serving two years of active duty during the Korean War. He attended the University of Miami School of Medicine, now the Miller School of Medicine at UM, and received his MD in 1960. Dr. Eberly did a rotating internship at Marion County General Hospital in Indianapolois, IN, where he met his wife, Jane Demaree, of Advance, IN. They were married September 30, 1960 and had three children, Arthur III, John Brewer, and Sarah Elizabeth. Dr. Eberly opened his private practice of family medicine in 1962 in Lighthouse Point, FL, where he practiced for 32 years before going into administrative duties. He was active in civic affairs, having served as president of the Optimist Club of Pompano Beach, as coach in the youth basketball league for 9 years, was active in the Trinity United Methodist Church of Lighthouse Point, and served in many positions including Chairman of the Official Board and Lay Leader. Dr. Eberly was active throughout his career in medical affairs, serving as Chief of Staff at the North Broward Hospital, as well as chair of the Family Practice Department. He held many elected offices in county, state, and national medical organizations. Dr. Eberly served as president of the Broward County Medical Association, president

Donna Margaret Bothfeld Bagwell, 81, of Mauldin, died Monday, February 12, 2018. Arrangements by Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, Southeast.

Barrie Lee Jones, 54, died on Friday, February 16, 2018. Arrangements by Mackey Mortuary. Attorney Neil Benjamin Caesar, 61, of Greenville died on February 15, 2018. Arrangements by Mackey Mortuary.

Carson Sprow UNION – Carson Wade Sprow, the President and founder of International Mortuary Shipping LLC, passed away unexpectedly on February 18, 2018. Mr. Sprow was a United States Army Combat Veteran (Feb. 1979-Aug. 1989), serving as a proud United States Army Ranger, 2d Bn, 75th Infantry, and an instructor in the Florida Phase and Desert Phase Ranger School during his final five years of service. He attended the Commonwealth Institute of Funeral Service, Houston TX and graduated in 1990, summa cum laude. During his career, Mr. Sprow taught Restorative Arts in the Piedmont Technical College Mortuary program and served as Preceptor for students completing the internships required for licensing. Mr. Sprow also co-authored the Standard Operating Procedures for identification of human remains through prosthetics and orthodontics with the late Dr. Tony Manoukian, Chief Medical Examiner for the State of Hawaii. The SOP was first used following Hurricane Katrina and later adapted for use by other disaster organizations. Mr. Sprow was a member of the National Funeral Directors Association, the South Carolina Funeral Directors Association, the South Carolina Coroner’s Association and Association of Latin American Funeral Homes and Cemeteries. He was a Board Member of the Greenville Symphony and a supporter of the Terrier Club of Wofford College; he was a member of the Spartanburg Rotary Club and was a mason. He was also an avid Carolina Panthers fan. Mr. Sprow was known for his boundless energy, generosity, booming laugh and sharp wit as well as his strong work ethic and entrepreneurial spirit. Mr. Sprow is survived by his wife, Gale Plotkin Sprow, who resides in Union, South Carolina, and his brother Carl Sprow. He was pre-deceased by his son, Wade Sprow, his mother, Connie Williams and his father, Carlton Ward Sprow. Visitation was held on February 21 at the S.R. Holcombe Funeral Home in Union, SC and burial on February 22 at the Georgia National Cemetery in Canton, GA. In lieu of flowers, the family requested donations be made to The Rebecca Kutchins Fund, 1101 Perimeter Dr., Ste 760, Shaumberg, IL 60173 / rebeccakutchinsfund.org or to MD Anderson, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, #426, Houston TX 77030. S.R. Holcombe Funeral Home holcombefuneralhomes.com.

MACKEY

Funerals And Cremations Century Drive GREENVILLE 864-232-6706

Dr. Arthur Lee Eberly, Jr., M.D., 86, widower of Jane Demaree Eberly, of Greenville, died February 16, 2018.

Same Mackey expertise and experience

now in two locations.

of the Florida A c a d e m y of Family Physicians, president of the Florida Medical Association, and as a member of the senior physicians group governing council of the American Medical Association. Dr. Eberly was honored as a Distinguished Alumnus by the University of Miami School of Medicine and received a Dr. of Science (hon.) from Florida Southern as well as the appellation of Distinguished Alumnus. He served on the Florida Southern College board of trustees for 10 years. Dr. Eberly was also honored as the Doctor of the Year by the North Broward Hospital District, encompassing three hospitals in Broward county, where he also started a family practice residency affiliated with the University of Florida. He is survived by a daughter, Sarah Hendricks and husband, Kevin, of Greenville; two sons, Arthur L. Eberly, III, MD and wife, Stacy, of Greenville, and John Eberly, MD and wife, Ronda, of Greenville; eight grandchildren, Caroline, Charlotte, Wallace, Brewer, Elizabeth, Catherine, Margaret, and Arthur IV; and a great grandson, John Brewer Eberly, III. Services were held February 18, 2018 at Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, Downtown. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Greenville County Medical Society, Student Scholarship, PO BOX 8738., Greenville, SC 29604. Also, donations may be made to: Greenville County Medical Society, Student Scholarship, PO BOX 8738, Greenville SC 29604

MACKEY

Funerals And Cremations at Woodlawn Memorial Park GREENVILLE 864-244-0978


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Community news, events, and happenings

ers for the past year, which provides them with a creative outlet. He recently signed an agreement to partner with Upstate Warrior Solution, which presented Brad with a $1,000 check to sponsor his program. Both TRAA’s Veteran Art Program and Upstate Warrior Solution offer services to veterans in the area, and they are excited about the possibilities that collaboration may bring. Carraway served overseas from 2004-2005 with the South Carolina National Guard Field Artillery as combat convoy security platform. Carraway is a graduate of the University of South Carolina and holds degrees in graphic design and interdisciplinary studies with a minor in phycology. He is a Certified Peer Support Specialist (SCDMH) and a counselor to fellow combat veterans. He is active in many veteran support programs and continues to explore the use of expressive creative therapy as a form of treatment for combat-induced PTSD. He lectures and gives educational art talks on the benefits of art in the treatment of PTSD while exhibiting his veteranthemed artwork. The workshops will explore various forms of water-based art, pencil, pen, ink, watercolor, and more. There is no previous experience necessary, and dropins are encouraged. FOOD & DRINK

euphoria announces Lexus of Greenville as presenting sponsor for 2018 euphoria, the Upstate’s premier food, wine, and music festival, recently announced Lexus of Greenville as the title sponsor of 2018. The organization has a previous partnership with Lexus, as they have been the official vehicle of the festival since 2015. euphoria is in its 13th year and will take place Sep. 20-23, 2018. The weekend will have more than 25 events, including live musical performances, cooking demonstrations, wine seminars, multicourse dinners, and curated tasting events. Tickets for euphoria presented by Lexus go on sale April 22 at www.euphoriagreenville.com.

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02.23.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

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HOME

Featured Home

Alta Vista

121 Tindal Avenue, Greenville, SC 29605

Home Info Price: $765,000 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 3.5 Lot Size: 0.73

MLS#: 1361218 Sq. Ft: 3200-3399

Schools: Augusta Circle Elementary, Greenville Middle, and Eastside High Agent: Sharon Wilson | 864.918.1140 sharon@wilsonassociates.net wilsonassociates.net

Charming 3 bedroom 3.5 bathroom home sits on a private oversized lot just one block off Crescent Avenue. Beautiful hardwood floors on first and second level. Master on main with heated flooring in bath, plus sitting room that could also be a 4th bedroom. Updated eat in kitchen with granite counters and stainless-steel appliances.

Lower level walkout features recreational room, full bath and walk-in laundry room with sink. Abundant outdoor living space with screened porch and large patio, ideal for entertaining. Separate studio/ office that includes additional bedroom and half bath. Perfect for comfortable family living!


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

On the market Ridges at Paris Mountain • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Hammett Creek • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Plantation on Pelham • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Caroline Spivey 864-679-1229 59 Grand Vista Drive · $1,270,500 · MLS# 1357141

31 Highfield Ct · $639,900 · MLS#

101 Rivoli Lane · $454,900 · MLS# 1360228

4BR/4.5BA A custom Dillard-Jones Builders original design, breathtaking views, stone and timber details, and only 15 minutes from Downtown Greenville! Old Buncombe road, right on Altamont road, right into neighborhood.

5BR/4.5BA Much desired gated community, master on main, new roof-2017, poured concrete basement, new Jenn-Air appliances, and 2 two-car garages. HAMMETT CREEK on BRETON. RT ON HIGHFIELD CT.

3BR/2.5BA Beautiful Custom Townhome In Gated Community Near Downtown! Amazing Value So Close To Everything! Porches, Office, Loft, Elevator, 2-Car, More! From I385, N on Haywood Rd, L@Pelham, L@Villa, R

Contact: Kendall Bateman 320-2414 The Marchant Company

Contact: Chet & Beth Smith Group 458-7653 The Chet and Beth Smith Group

Contact: Tina Arroyave 420-9357 Allen Tate

N. Main Area

River Oaks

River Oaks

cspivey@communityjournals.com

Treybern Subdivision

12 Kenwood Lane · $575,000 · MLS# 1360944

15 Stone Valley Ct · $399,000 · MLS# 1359123

10 Running Deer Ct · $344,000 · MLS# 1354931

215 Haddington Lane · $247,500 · MLS# 1360960

4BR/2.5BA North Main. Large living room-gas log fireplace. Hardwoods-downstairs. Renovated kitchen open to breakfast & large den-wood burning fireplace. Master-2nd w/full bath-garden tub, natural stone shower. Office/study could be 5th BR.

4BR/3BA volume ceilings, bamboo floors, screen porch, big deck, side porch, 3 car garage, three bedrooms down, including master, bedroom, bath and bonus up, brick exterior, end of cul-de-sac. Good value

3BR/2BA Brick custom built, end of cul-de-sac with glass porch looking into flat fenced back yard, lots of parking rear garage, hardwoods, beautiful moldings, landscaped well. formal dining and separate breakfast

4BR/2.5BA Open floor plan. Outdoor space with pergola/stone firepit & oversized patio. Eat-in kit. has corian countertops/tile backsplash/stainless steel appliances. Master on 2nd has tray ceiling/walk-in closet/dual vanities/garden tub/separate shower.

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Virginia Abrams 270-3329 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Virginia Abrams 270-3329 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner REALTORS

Real Estate News

Chad Dowden Joins The Pelham Road Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce that Chad Dowden has joined the company’s Pelham Road office as a sales associate. Dowden is a father of four boys and married to his beautiful wife, Amy.  They have one granddaughter and have lived in Greer since 2000. Dowden was a realtor from 2003 to 2008 and is also a licensed contractor with his own landscaping company. He attends Brushy Dowden Creek Baptist Church. “We welcome Chad back to real estate as he brings an amazing work ethic and vast array of experience to our team. From his years with the school system and his knowledge of the construction industry, he can guide his clients with expertise in their home buying or selling,” said Tim Toates, The Toates Team Leader at the company’s Pelham Road office.

Anderson Office Of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Announces Two New Associates

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce that Angela Burnette Moore and Renee Watts have joined the company’s Anderson office as sales associates. Angela Burnette Moore has lived her entire life in the Upstate of South Carolina. She has over 20 years of experience working in the medical field, as Moore Watts well as property management for a hospital. Her life’s work has been spent helping people from the medical realm, and she now channels that experience into helping people find the perfect spot to call home.  Renee Watts has extensive experience in large investments having owned multiple businesses. For 20 years, she and her husband, Darrin, owned and operated convenience stores. Watts joins The Clever People of Berkshire Hathaway Home Services C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS’ Anderson office. “Angela is a vivacious, spark of energy whose contagious personality sets everyone Rosana Quintero Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville at ease the first time they meet her. With an eye for design and value, Renee can help Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Rosana Quintero as a resiyou find your dream home and also help guide you in making a wise investment for dential sales agent to its Greenville office. Rosana joins Coldwell Banker your future,” said Rusty Garrett, Broker-In-Charge of the Anderson office. Caine with previous experience at Petrobras America Inc., where she negotiated contracts and deals for corporations. There she received recognition as an exceptional negotiator. She looks forward to applying the Top Agents For The Month for JOY Real Estate same skills towards helping her clients achieve their real estate goals. Craig Bailey, Managing Broker of JOY Real Estate, proudly announces the top perRosana is proficient in Portuguese, Japanese, and English, and has a forming agents for the Greenville area for the month of January 2017. Quintero deep understanding of a variety of cultures. She enjoys taking advantage Listing Units: Listing Volume: Sales Units: Sales Volume: of all that Greenville has to offer – particularly outdoor activities. You can find Rosana jogHally Postlewaite Hally Postlewaite Anne Marie Egan Anne Marie Egan ging in Cleveland Park when the weather is nice, and participating in local cultural events. Sherry Bruce Sherry Bruce Michael McGreevey Michael McGreevey “It is a joy to welcome Rosana to our team,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and Brenda Ledford Brenda Ledford Leah McGee Leah McGee CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine.” Her skill set and personality will be of great benefit                                to our Greenville office.”


02.23.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Jan. 22 – 26 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$8,250,000 $6,800,000 $1,660,000 SHAW AT BUTLER $1,442,720 ALTA VISTA PLACE $1,350,000 $1,338,514 MARKLEY ACRES $1,001,000 $895,000 $895,000 FOREST HILLS $810,000 $805,000 AUGUSTA WALK $780,000 PARK PLACE ON HUDSON $734,006 $720,000 $675,000 HARRISON HILLS $661,000 $616,000 $568,085 ALLEGHENY $551,000 STONEWOOD MANOR $550,000 LINKSIDE $501,000 CARISBROOKE $465,500 $462,000 $460,000 AVONDALE HEIGHTS $456,000 $419,900 $405,000 STONEHAVEN $405,000 GLENS @ ROPER $400,000 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $399,735 RIVER WALK $397,000 BELHAVEN PARC $385,504 STONEHAVEN $353,100 PROVIDENCE SQUARE $350,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $346,695 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $345,000 KILGORE FARMS $342,747 WESTHAVEN $341,370 SWANSGATE $340,000 HAWTHORNE RIDGE $314,500 MEADOW CREEK $309,000 HALF MILE LAKE $305,000 $300,000 SOUTHBROOK $298,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $297,140 CAROLINA OAKS $289,000 CREEKWOOD $287,000 HERITAGE POINT $285,000 BELSHIRE $284,965 FAIR HEIGHTS $279,900 PARK RIDGE $275,000 $275,000 D T SMITH EST. $270,000 HOLLINGSWORTH PARK @ VERDAE MANOR $268,500 JONES MILL CROSSING $266,705 ONEAL VILLAGE $261,500 KENWOOD PLACE $260,700 HARRISON COVE $260,000 SUMMIT AT PELHAM SPRINGS $258,000 HUDSON ACRES $252,500 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $251,828 $250,000 $250,000 BROWNSTONE CROSSING $245,000

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ILLINOIS TOOL WORKS INC 625 S OLD PIEDMONT LLC STORE MASTER FUNDING XII MILLPORT HOSPITALITY LLC JORDAN L DIANNE STEADY AND SOBER BLACKSM MARKWELL SARAH ELIZABETH CLEAR CHOICE SERVICES OF UMIYAMA LLC PEARL MARK ALAN LIVING T ROBINWOOD LLC LECHOWICZ MARGARET A JERNIGAN JAN C (JTWROS) WOLTERS CHRISTIAN BURCH ANDREA J ROETS GREGORY J (JTWROS) WELCOMBE CREEK MOBILE HO CAMILLONI DIANE L BOKROS JACKIE L (JTWROS) VANDERPOL MICHAEL E COLEMAN ANNA (JTWROS) BURNS ANN J REVOCABLE TR STORE MASTER FUNDING XII WALKER DOUGLAS S (JTWROS SPENCER KELLI A (JTWROS) RADIANT REAL ESTATE LLC WHITTEN JAMES B JR LIVIN BATES DIANA MICHELLE (JT BERENS KORRIE M (JTWROS) LINDNER LEOR J (JTWROS) VANCE LANNIE S PFISTER TYLER (JTWROS) BALLENGER TARAH MCCURRY BEREAN AMBER DAWN (JTWRO CERNY KYLE (JTWROS) GAINES DANIEL (JTWROS) EMMERT VIRGIL (JTWROS) WATSON THOMAS C (JTWROS) HUNTINGTON LINDA B DECLA CALL JAMES (JTWROS) ANDERSON MERRILY J LIVIN EWELL JANIE MITCHELL (JT BURDETTE ENTERPRISES INC FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA DE ESCOBAR ANA CRISTINA DIAZ DIANA L BRITTO JOSEPH (JTWROS) NEAVES JOSHUA (JTWROS) NAGORITE AMABELLA (JTWRO THRUSH DALE EDWARD DALY BRIAN (JTWROS) CONWAY DAVID (JTWROS) AJH CUSTOM HOMES LLC SMART CHERYL (JTWROS) ZIEGENFUS TIMOTHY A WEST ANDREW O (JTWROS) SELLERS AUDREY LAMAR DOLAN SHANE M (JTWROS) MITCHELL SAMUEL A (JTWRO WENGER LINDA (JTWROS) JETTE PHYLLIS (JTWROS) CARRILHO ALEXIS W (JTWRO HIGHLAND HOMES L L C JACKSON CAREN (JTWROS)

155 HARLEM AVE 2730 TRANSIT RD 8377 E HARTFORD DR STE 100 1919 E MAIN ST 359 RIVERSIDE DR 8 PRISTINE DR 10 LEDBURY LN 700 DILLS FARM WAY 501 HIGHWAY 8 805 CRESCENT AVE 509 HUNTINGTON RD 9385 E MAIDEN CT 100 S HUDSON ST UNIT C17 45 WINSTONS CHASE CT 2392 ROPER MOUNTAIN RD 271 RIDGE WAY 1200 WOODRUFF RD STE A3 875 ALTAMONT RD 202 ALLEGHENY RUN 206 COLERIDGE LN 14 BOBBY JONES CT 700 LADYKIRK LN 8377 E HARTFORD DR STE 100 303 HAMMETT RD 6 MENDENHALL CT 39 MCRAE PL 1028 PLANTATION RD 26 SPRINGHAVEN CT 6 BROADSTONE CT 617 PONDEN DR 50 DEER TRACK RD 20 JACKSON PARC CT 104 SUNNING HILL RD 42 VERONA CIR 11 RADLEY CT 18 W CRANBERRY LN 203 PETERS GLEN CT 509 SOUTHINGTON CT 109 WREN WAY 5 MEDINA LN 109 MEADOWDALE LN 433 BECKENHAM LN 1300 EDWARDS RD #40026A 5000 PLANO PKWY 414 SANDUSKY LN 136 CAROLINA OAKS DR 116 WILD MEADOW DR 124 HERITAGE POINT DR 205 CARROLLTON CT 104 BROOKDALE AVE 15 GAMESFORD CT 122 LESHER RD 215 E BELVUE RD 4 CHINQUAPIN LN 503 CULLEDON WAY 303 WICKER PARK AVE 12 PINEHURST DR 301 CYPRESSHILL CT 226 ROCKY TOP DR 412 ROCKMONT RD 423 SANDUSKY LN 395 BEECHWOOD DR PO BOX 3965 14 CROYDON WAY

THE BRIO $245,000 GRESHAM PARK $244,000 BRECKENRIDGE $241,300 SHENANDOAH FARMS $240,000 FIELDSTONE $240,000 VICTORIA PARK $237,500 GREEN HILLS $235,085 HUDDERS CREEK $231,900 OLD MILL ESTATE $230,000 $226,900 BROOKSTONE $225,000 $220,950 BRYSON MEADOWS $220,892 CITY LIGHTS $220,000 HUNTERS WOODS $219,900 CHRISTOPHER MEADOWS $215,000 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $215,000 HOWARDS PARK $214,990 JONESVILLE LANDING $214,900 ORCHARD FARMS $214,000 WOODRUFF LAKE $214,000 WELLINGTON GREEN $212,500 FIELDSTONE $210,000 BAYWOOD PLACE $207,500 HOWARDS PARK $205,990 SPARROWS POINT $205,000 RIVERBEND $202,000 DEVENGER PLACE $200,000 FONTANA FOREST $199,900 LAKEVIEW FARMS $199,788 WILLOW GROVE $199,500 $196,000 ANNANDALE ESTATES $193,460 $190,000 GIVENS SQUARE $190,000 FAIRVIEW POINTE $190,000 ORCHARD CREST $189,725 SEVEN OAKS@BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION $189,152 HUNTERS PLACE $187,242 PARK PLACE $185,000 MARTINS GROVE $185,000 WYNDHAM PLACE $183,000 PINEHURST $177,000 ENCLAVE AT BRIDGES CROSSING $176,000 ORCHARD CREST $175,920 GRAY FOX RUN $173,000 LAKEVIEW CHASE TOWNES $171,924 $170,000 WINDSOR OAKS $170,000 LAKEVIEW CHASE TOWNES $169,900 BRYSON MEADOWS $169,500 OAK FOREST TOWNHOMES $169,000 LAUREL MEADOWS $168,000 BRENTWOOD $168,000 CANEBRAKE $166,277 MAPLESTEAD FARMS $165,460 FAIR HEIGHTS $165,000 TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD $165,000 LOCKELAND PARK $165,000 INDIAN HILLS $164,000 ST MARKS POINTE $163,800 LENHARDT VILLAGE $162,500 CROFTSTONE ACRES $162,000 $161,718

PRICE SELLER EBERHARD DAVID L (JTWROS HOY RUSSELL J SK BUILDERS INC ROGERS JOSHUA W MULLENIX SUSAN VICTORIA PROPERTIES LLC COLLINS CHRISTOPHER M SACCO LISA M ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC GENDLIN HOMES LLC KNIGHT JAMES W BELLISSIMO JESSICA R MUNGO HOMES INC MARGARET H DURHAM LIVING SEXTON’S HEATING & AIR L JONES BILLY C JR LABARGE GERARD P D R HORTON-CROWN LLC CHAPMAN CHARLES C LEBRUN TIMMY V SPITLER PAULA MILNER STEPHANIE R FLOORE REBA H T M PROPERTIES LLC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MAUND KIMBERLYN W MCIVER ANNE BUNDY BROCK LAWRENCE W IV STRONKOWSKY JEANNA BIGGERSTAFF JOHN P MARK III PROPERTIES INC DURHAM ANNIE SUE (FBO) MARK III PROPERTIES INC 107 LADSON LLC THACKSTON EDWARD S JR FAIRVIEW POINTE HOMEOWNE ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L SK BUILDERS INC WILLIAMS JESSE A WALDROP N A III CALABRESE KRISTEN JENNINGS MARY D WILLIAMS SIERRA R (JTWRO GARKUSHA MATHEW A (JTWRO ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L GEIGER LARRY DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL ABBOTT KEN SANCHEZ GISELA N DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL WAGNER KRISTINA R GRIFFIN REBECCA A LIGON HARRELL W JR (JTWR BYRD GRADY LEE ANABTAWY MANAL N MARK III PROPERTIES INC CRAWFORD FAMILY INVESTME ST CLAIR HUGH E III SUNCREST HOMES LLC NADEAU HOMES LLC ZIMMERMAN TANYA D HILL DAVID PAUL LOLLIS BARBARA H FOTINOS GEORGE

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POWELL AMANDA LEIGH BAKER BRYAN C (JTWROS) CURTIS ROBERT JAMES BIGA MARY BETH FLOORE JAMES GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC MCKAY CARLYNN R (JTWROS) SMITH JOSHUA ADAM BURGESS AMIE R FLEMING IAN C GROGAN K PETER (JTWROS) BOND SARAH BURR CAROLINE G (JTWROS) NARRO LEAH (JTWROS) REDMOND DAWN S (JTWROS) LONG JAMES K (JTWROS) CALLIS ERIKSON (JTWROS) CRUZ JORGE VANHOUT HAROLD A III RAMIREZ ASA M (JTWROS) SANDUSKY ROBERT JOHN (JT LAWRENCE RICHARD A (JTWR LEATHERMAN HAROLD D JAMES BENJAMIN KEITH (JT RAULERSON MARGARET ELIZA GIBSON MARCUS T HIMMEL ANNE MARIE MALOCH JOHN E (JTWROS) CELY EMILY (JTWROS) FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA D R HORTON INC GARDINER GROUP LLC NVR INC GENDLIN HOMES LLC JOHNSON WHITNEY A TRUMAN 2016 SC6 TITLE TR GRIESI MARCIA LYNN VIARS GAIL (JTWROS) BRESSLER ROBERT SAMUEL 120 SHAW STREET LLC SUNDAY JUSTIN (JTWROS) BERRYMAN DIXIE L HEAD SONYA R COTHRAN TERESA B DUNCAN ROBIN L FRISH ILAN (JTWROS) GASKIN DAVID M DUNLAP CHARLES W JR GIORDANI ILEANA WRIGHT WANDA ANN AH4R PROPERTIES LLC TOWNSEND STEPHEN R MORALES BRIAN S EMILY MEGAN E FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA NVR INC KOENIG ROBERT MARK LE HANH THIMY (JTWROS) MACMILLAN KATHERINE E KENNEDY CLIFFORD S PRUITT RACHEL ELIZABETH LAND REGINA A KILL ALISON L SNYDER DOUGLAS (JTWROS)

1001 S CHURCH ST UNIT 403 8 JILLIAN LEE CT 408 SKYWAY PL 361 STRASBURG DR 64 CANTERA CIR 90 N ROYAL TOWER DR 100 CHIPWOOD LN 207 HUDDERS CREEK WAY 19 BURLWOOD CT 305 LOWNDES HILL RD 18 BROOKSTONE GRN 141 OLD RUTHERFORD RD 10 HOWARDS END CT 659 FOREST AVE 902 WILLOW BRANCH DR 7 SPRING SKY CT 10 BURL HOLLOW LN 221 ELMHAVEN DR 214 DYLAN OAKS DR 309 CRESTHAVEN PL 14 BIRCHSTONE CT 6 NEW CASTLE WAY 52 CANTERA CIR 232 REDCOAT CT 216 ELMHAVEN DR 101 BAY HILL DR 925 CLEVELAND ST UNIT 275 304 WINDWARD WAY 211 PENNWOOD LN 5000 PLANO PKWY 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 16 DEVONHALL WAY 651 BROOKFIELD PKWY STE 200 1613 E NORTH ST 104 GAULT ST 939 W NORTH AVE STE 680 704 THOMAS EDWARDS LN 111 CHERRYBARK LN 134 FOX RUN CIR PO BOX 5835 20 TWO GAIT LN 9 KENNEBEC LN 16 VISTA DR 209 WHALEBACK DR 552 THOMAS EDWARDS LN 114 CROWNDALE DR 16 TIMBER OAK WAY 901 MUSH CREEK RD 101 BUCKINGHAM WAY 12 TIMBER OAK WAY 30601 AGOURA RD STE 200 2808 E NORTH ST UNIT 34 8 HIGH FARM RD 108 SANDHURST DR 5000 PLANO PKWY 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 210 CUMBERLAND AVE 70 BAY SPRINGS DR 466 PEAKSVIEW DR 7 CHICKASAW DR 8 CALALLA CT 4 KAVANAGH CT 909 RUTHERFORD RD 7 BLYTHEWOOD DR

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TURNS OUT THE BEST THINGS REALLY ARE FREE

Named one of South Carolina’s “10 Best Attractions,” by 2018 USA TODAY 10Best and as one of the Top Three Things to Do in Greenville by U.S. News & World Report Travel, the Greenville County Museum of Art is home to the world’s largest public collection of watercolors by renowned American artist Andrew Wyeth. When you visit the GCMA, you’ll discover a carefully curated selection of American art, including one of the world’s best institutional collections of works by America’s most acclaimed living artist, Jasper Johns. The museum’s unrivaled Southern Collection highlights a collection of clay vessels created by the enslaved potter David Drake and one of the largest collections of paintings by William H. Johnson outside the Smithsonian.

Greenville County Museum of Art

And admission is always free! Learn more at gcma.org.

Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

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420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org admission free

1/30/18 2:28 PM


ARTS & CULTURE LAURA LEIGH MORRIS REVISITS WEST VIRGINIA page

26

A Q&A WITH ZOE SHAYE SNEED page

30

CHEERS TO ‘80S CHRISTIAN HAIR-METAL page

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Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

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24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOT ART,

COOL CULTURE A collection of Cuban art that has traveled to 14 cities lands in Greenville to kick off Upstate International Month WORDS BY VINCENT HARRIS

Rob Rowen, who recently moved to the Upstate from Florida, purchased the 300-piece Clyde Hensley Collection, a once-in-a-lifetime collection of works from Cuban artists. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal Artwork from the Clyde Hensley Collection


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aken in together, the images are stunning. The 300-plus paintings in the Clyde Hensley Collection are kaleidoscopic in color and style, fitting for a collection created by 16 different artists. The artists, all Cuban, draw on surrealism, impressionism, and expressionism, styles that were popular in past decades but have only recently rippled into Cuba. They portray everyday scenes, like a couple holding each other close in a forest, or a busy group of fishermen knee-deep in the ocean, or two musicians playing guitar and maracas in a field. But the variations in style are numerous. There are the hyperrealist individual portraits of Antonio Ferrer Cabello, an elder of the Santiago art community who passed away eight years ago. Then there are the more abstract works of Roel Caboverde Llacer, whose figures seem stretched and contracted as if in a fun-house mirror. Jeho Rodriguez’s acrylics seem almost like stained-glass windows, with fractured pieces of light shining through the depictions of a woman holding two doves close to her heart or a fisherman and his wife nearly buried in the day’s catch. These paintings will all be on display at the Artists Guild Gallery on Main Street in Greenville starting on March 1, as part of an event called Caliente Cuba. The event is co-organized by Upstate International, a nonprofit started 20 years ago to help engage incoming international families in the Upstate, and the World Affairs Council, an independent, nonpartisan organization dedicated to engaging the public with information about America’s international role and policy choices. It’s the kickoff to a month of cultural, educational activities throughout the city. In addition to the exhibit, Caliente Cuba will feature a performance of Afro-Cuban jazz music by the Greenville Jazz Collective and authentic Cuban cuisine provided by La Habana restaurant. But the focus will be on the dazzling array of artwork, and what’s perhaps most fascinating about the exhibit is that its debut in Greenville was something of a happy accident. “We’d been wanting to do a Cuban event, and God and nature put Rob Rowen here,” says Tracie Frese, the executive director of Upstate International and the World Affairs Council’s Upstate chapter. Rowen is both a member of the World Affairs Council and president of the Global Action Coalition, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) devoted to promoting world peace through humanitarian aid. He also recently moved to the Upstate from Florida, where he was an art gallery owner. In that capacity, Rowen came to own the Hensley Collection, which has traveled to 14 cities around the country. How he came to have this collection is a story unto itself.

The story

Among other interests throughout his life, Clyde Hensley, born in Norfolk, Va., developed a passion for art. As part of a cultural exchange and humanitarian aid program, Hensley was allowed brief visits to Cuba, which began in the mid-1990s.

Hensley discovered a treasure trove of undiscovered artists in his travels, artists who were in desperate need of supplies. In fact, they were creating their work on scraps of cardboard and making their own paint. To help these artists, Hensley created the Eastern Cuba Cultural Exchange Association. Now licensed through the government’s Office of Foreign Asset Control, Hensley was able to take in supplies and take out art, paying the artists for their work. We’ll let Rob Rowen pick up the story from there. “I was in the art business for 35 years, and I owned one of the largest galleries in the Tampa Bay area,” he says. “And about seven years ago I met a friend [Hensley] who had a collection of Cuban art. This was a man who was a fisherman, who would go to east Cuba, as this American who was allowed to go there, and he brought canvases and paints and did things to support these artists he found in east Cuba. Since he didn’t talk politics, and was checked out by the secret police, they let him go back and forth, and he amassed this huge collection of art.” Rowen has noticed a growing interest in Cuba as the country’s relationship with the U.S. ebbed and flowed during the Obama and Trump administrations. “Obviously in Florida, there’s a connection,” he says. “But I can’t tell you how many people have said, ‘I want to go there,’ or ‘I have been there.’ There’s this fascination that’s spurred the movement of people being interested in buying Cuban art.” But any exhibit or sale of Cuban art would have to be nongovernment, because the administrations of the United States and Cuba have long been reluctant to work together. So Hensley had what amounted to a once-in-a-lifetime collection, especially as then-President Barack Obama’s more open approach to Cuba gave way to President Donald Trump’s more stringent policies. Trump left some of Obama’s loosened restrictions regarding travel and tourism in place, but significantly reduced the ability of American businesses to work with Cuban ones. “He had this collection in 15 or 16 different styles,” Rowen says. “And it traveled the country for four years.” Ultimately, rather than simply having the collection on loan, Rowen decided to make a move. “I ended up buying the whole collection, over 300 pieces,” he says. “I mentioned the collection to Tracie, and that’s how this all happened. Hopefully, this will help people move away from the politics of Cuba and see them as people.”

Origins of Upstate International Month

Frese says the collection and the kickoff itself are great introductions to what Upstate International’s role is today. “We started out with language classes and relocation help and groups for traveling spouses,” she says, “and we still have all of that, but over the years we grew into more cultural programming and classes, and about five years ago we decided that we really needed to find a way to help South Carolinians engage in those global cultures that are now here. The question was, ‘How do we celebrate it?’”

CALIENTE CUBA: A NIGHT OF HOT ART AND COOL CULTURE WHEN March 1, 6-9 p.m. WHERE Artists Guild Gallery, 200 N. Main St. TICKETS $30 for UI/WACU members, $40 for nonmembers INFO https://upstateinternational.org/event/save-dateinternational-month-kickoff/

See more of the collection at greenvillejournal.com

That’s where the concept of Upstate International Month was born. “It’s a community collaboration for the month of March where we go find businesses and civic groups and other organizations to do some sort of international activity,” Frese says. “That can be anything from bilingual story time at the libraries, cooking sessions at local restaurants, or the Peace Center bringing in international performances. This is going to be our sixth year in March. Last year we partnered with 60 different groups to do 116 different activities, things that people could taste, try, see, experience from all over the world, right here.” Upstate International teamed with the World Affairs Council two years ago when Frese says they noticed a gap in their programming. “We were trying to get people to engage in foreign policy and global events and current issues,” she says, “so we started looking at the World Affairs Council of America. The WAC Upstate programming focuses on bringing international experts, distinguished speakers, events on hot topics like NAFTA, and bringing them to a broad public base. We’ll do a distinguished speaker one evening, and maybe take an expert to Clemson or Furman for discussions. These are events that wouldn’t normally be open to the public. So we are happy to be part of a system that’s dedicated to this type of educational programming.” And much like the focus of the Hensley exhibit itself, Frese emphasizes that Upstate International serves no political purpose. “We’re completely nonpolitical and nonpartisan,” she says. “It’s more about topics and ideas. In the case of Cuba, Rob and I were talking about how over the course of the political crisis, people have started learning more about Cuba’s rich history and are curious and there are lots of restrictions, so how do you learn more about it? And we think one way is to engage culturally through food, art, and music.”


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM Photo by Will Crooks

A R T S C A LE N DA R FEB. 23 - MAR. 1

Metropolitan Arts Council

Direct Experience: Art & Cancer Through Feb. 23 ~ 467-3132 Peace Center

Dream Weaving, Gullah Stories & Songs Through Feb. 23 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center

Steve Martin & Martin Short Feb. 23-24 ~ 467-3000 Rainer’s Café

Emile Pandolfi & Dana Russell Feb. 24 ~ 232-1753 Greenville Little Theatre

Charlotte’s Web Through Feb. 24 ~ 233-6238 Peace Center

Jonny Lang with Doyle Bramhall II Feb. 25 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center

David Gonzalez’s Cuentos: Tales from the Latino World Feb. 26 ~ 467-3000 The Peace Center

Rodriguez Feb. 27 ~ 467-3000 SC Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities

Spring Sinfonia Feb. 27 ~ 467-3000 SC Children’s Theatre

Balloonacy Through Feb. 27 ~ 235-2885 Carolina Ballet Theatre

Black & Beautiful Feb. 28 ~ 421-0940 Peace Center

Frindle Feb. 28-Mar. 2 ~ 467-3000 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage

Works by Glory Day Loflin Through Mar. 4 ~ 233-6733 Greenville Chamber of Commerce

Works by Danielle Fontaine Through Mar. 12 ~ 242-1050 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

The Artists of Studio South Through Mar. 28 ~ 735-3928 Main Street Real Estate Gallery

Works by Doug & Meredith Piper Through Mar. 31 ~ 250-2850

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com

16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132

LAURA LEIGH MORRIS LAUNCH PARTY WHEN March 1, 6-8 p.m. WHERE Fiction Addiction, 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 TICKETS Free INFO www.fiction-addiction.com


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02.23.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

STORIES OF THE MOUNTAIN STATE Laura Leigh Morris’ ‘Jaws of Life’ spotlights the recent struggles of her home state of West Virginia SARA PEARCE | STAFF

spearce@communityjournals.com

They say you can’t go home again, and Laura Leigh Morris had to go pretty far away from her home — to Texas, to be exact — to finally write about West Virginia. Morris’ new book, “Jaws of Life,” is a series of short stories about the people, places, and issues facing her home. Morris, an assistant professor of English at Furman University, found herself in Greenville from a simple job application, but she still has a deep respect for and connection to her home state. She explains that in order to finally write about the place she grew up, she realized she had to get some space before she could do it justice. “Jaws of Life” originally started as a series of short stories for pleasure and practice. “I realized I was writing these stories, and I wasn’t thinking of them as a book, but then they all started coming together,” Morris explains. “I realized I have a collection here, and I realized that I could make it stronger, so I kept writing stories to accomplish that.” Morris has long been a storyteller, earning her undergraduate, master’s, and Ph.D. in some form of creative writing. A much earlier version of “Jaws of Life” served as her dissertation for her Ph.D. “For me, it was about learning the craft,” Morris says. “This was my book where I learned how to put a story together, and a 200- to 300-page book is a lot harder to fix when you mess up, rather than scrapping a 15-page story and starting over. But it really just depends on the story.” Though the stories are based on Morris’ home, she tries to stay away from specific people she knows in her writing. She prefers to focus on common issues that face the area and crafts stories that can be used to portray them. “The first story in the book is about fracking (called “Frackers”), and I had wanted to write about fracking because it’s such a huge thing there now, but I wasn’t quite sure how to approach it,” Morris explains. “But driving one night with my parents, I passed a fracking site, and we were blinded by the lights so badly that we almost ran off the road. I thought, light pollution, which was something I had never thought of, and the story kind of came from that. And the story isn’t about my mom, but they come from these little moments sometimes and experiences I remember growing up.” Morris considers herself to be a dark writer. A previous experience teaching creative writing in a Texas prison camp helped shape her writing to focus on the murkier side of life, and those themes are present throughout “Jaws of Life.” “It definitely explores some of the issues that Appalachia confronts right now, and some of those issues are dark,” Morris says. “One thing that I think the stories do is to blow the lid off the stereotypes of the area, and they explore the realities of living in a place where resource extraction is everything. Coal mining, fracking, gas wells, and always stripping the resources from the land, and what happens when an entire populous relies on this ripping the land apart to live, and that definitely shows up in some of my stories. It’s heartbreaking for the area, and for my home.”

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28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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BIBLICAL INSPIRATION VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

Chris White’s screenplay might bear the potentially controversial title “Electric Jesus,” but the Greenville producer, actor, and writer has actually created an homage to an oft-maligned subgenre of an oft-maligned genre: the Christian hair-metal of the late 1980s, made most popular by bands like Stryper and Petra. The fictional teenage band at the center of the screenplay, which has been chosen as a finalist at this year’s Film Festival, is called 316, a group that piles on the hairspray and spandex while quoting Scripture. The story is neither a parody like “This Is Spinal Tap,” nor a straight-ahead musical. White, who has developed the screenplay over four years with an eye on shooting the film this summer, calls it a “band movie.” “Band movies tend to be about the joy of creation hitting a wall of disappointment or failure,” White says, “with the band ultimately either pushing through and succeeding or collapsing and realizing later that there was still intrinsic value in what they were doing.” The story follows the band and its soundman Eric, the protagonist, as they leave a gig at a church one night in 1986 with an unexpected stowaway: the pastor’s daughter, Sarah. “The movie starts, and we see the main character as an adult,” White says. “He’s just pulled up to a funeral and he’s about to go in, and he flashes back to the summer of ’86. We meet the band, and a girl sneaks off with the band. They’re playing at a church and they get down the road and discover that Sarah is in the van. And Eric falls for Sarah. And ultimately, we find that the story is actually about Sarah, about her life and career.” In its fully realized form, “Electric Jesus” will feature cover songs by Stryper and original songs by Daniel Smith. “Like any kids that wanted to be a Christian hair-metal band, they have had some Stryper in their repertoire,” White says. “But there are spots in the movie for three original songs by Daniel, and I wrote lyrics. It’s not a parody, but the Christian theology of a

Chris White’s ‘Electric Jesus’ screenplay is a love letter to 1980s Christian hair-metal 15-year-old writing a song in 1986 might be ... sentimental and confused, let’s put it that way.” White, who has more than 20 film and television credits as an actor, producer, director, and writer, got his inspiration from a childhood spent in a Southern Baptist church youth group in Columbia. “Part of being in that culture was listening to contemporary Christian music,” he says. “I’m not looking down on these characters, but at the same time there’s a kid with big hair with his makeup running and tight pants who’s reading Scripture, because it’s 1986.” White’s ultimate goal is to make an independent film entirely in South Carolina, not just because it’s his home, but because he says the state’s tax incentives are tailor-made for indie films with a $2-$6 million budget. “I’m a film artist that’s also a producer,” he says. “If you gave me a screenplay you wrote, my job is to try to figure out how to make the movie in a way that it makes money and we all get paid. And South Carolina has great film incentives. For me, for this project, the way the incentives work is perfect. You get cash rebates from the state to the tune of about 20 to 30 percent of what you spend. If your investors are from South Carolina, they get a tax credit. It’s the perfect place to make a $2-$6 million movie. And what surprises me is that the tax credit has been in existence for 10 years and no one’s ever used it. These are great incentives, and people aren’t taking advantage of them.” White hopes that he can use the screenplay’s appearance in the Beaufort Film Festival, which began on Wednesday, Feb. 21, as part of his pitch to potential investors. “It’s the best film festival in South Carolina, maybe in the region,” he says. “Just getting in and being a part of it is great. But if I’m doing meetings with investors and I want to persuade them that this is a viable project, this is something I want them to know about. The fact that we have the honor of being a finalist means that I can go to somebody who’s about to write a check and say, ‘This really awesome film festival thinks it’s great, too.’”


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ON THE CIRCUIT

Animal Care’s

Correspondent

For rockabilly trio Little Lesley & The Bloodshots, playing festivals was key to getting noticed VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

vharris@communityjournals.com

“Heart Beat,” the new album by the Greenville trio Little Lesley & The Bloodshots, is largely pure, no-nonsense rockabilly. Not the revved-up punkabilly hybrid of artists like The Reverend Horton Heat or the unhinged psychobilly of The Cramps or the Legendary Shack Shakers. It’s down-the-line Sun Records-style late-’50s hiccup and bounce all the way, driven by Lesley Swift’s thumping standup bass, Brian Swift’s echo-layered riffs, and Bobby Lee’s propulsive drumming. It’s also a load of fun, with Lesley Swift’s voice switching from pouty heartbreak to badass swagger on a dime, and there are stylistic quirks, a sudden stop here, a jolt of heavy riffs there, a couple of honky-tonk-ready countrified ballads, that keep the band from being a strictly revisionist act like the Stray Cats once were. The album was recorded in the U.K. and produced by Alan Wilson, a towering figure in rockabilly music because of his time in a band called The Sharks. Wilson spotted The Bloodshots at the Hot Rod Hayride, one of many national and international rockabilly festivals the band has concentrated on playing for the past few years. “We’ve really tried to get out there in the rockabilly circuit,” Lesley Swift says. “It’s kind of its own little scene that has festivals all over the world. And it’s really the only way for an unknown band like us to get noticed. Even though it’s a small scene, you can play all over the world, and we really tried to embrace it. We did a lot of research finding the best festivals, and as a result of that we wound up getting on this record label in England [Wilson’s Western Star label]. I think that time at the festivals made us really attractive to the label because we had our name out there on the circuit.” You’d never be able to tell it from the performances, or from Swift’s frisky, confident vocals, but they were somewhat intimidated about working with Wilson because of his reputation within the genre. “The Sharks, they were really big,” Swift says. “He’s been in this scene forever; everyone knows him and loves him, but it was such a great thing to get to work with him. He’s so open and easy to work with. He didn’t push us to record too fast, and he wanted us to be happy with everything.” Another plus of playing the festivals was that the band was able to hone its songs in front of a crowd before hitting the studio. “I feel way more ready if we play live shows before going into the studio, as opposed to rehearsing,” she says. “If I’ve only practiced it as opposed to playing it live, I miss things because that excitement of being live will always give me new ideas. I have to

Harris

We’ll Match You Up Perfctly!

Little Lesley & The Bloodshots recorded their last album in the U.K. with Alan Wilson, a well known figure in rockabilly music. Photo by Trashy Betty Photography

do it live for a little while to make those adjustments that you couldn’t preplan.” The Bloodshots’ stage show is quite a thing to behold. Typically decked out in vintage 1950s pinup/biker gear, Swift wields that standup bass like a weapon, often standing on it during the show’s climax without missing a note. Their album-release show this Friday at Gottrocks will be your last chance to see them in their current configuration, however. Brian Swift, Lesley’s husband, is leaving the band (but not the marriage) to work on his own projects, leaving her with a new lineup that will feature her on rhythm guitar. “It’s a huge change,” she says. “But Brian is ready to move on and focus on some other projects. But actually, I write all the songs on guitar, and in my last band I played guitar. It’s the instrument I enjoy playing. All those tricks with the bass came naturally to me, but at some point, I became ‘the girl that stands on the bass’ and not the singer-songwriter. So I wanted to make a transition back to that.”

LITTLE LESLEY & THE BLOODSHOTS with THE PSYCHO-DEVILLES WHEN Friday, Feb. 23, 9 p.m. WHERE Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive, Greenville TICKETS $10 INFO 864-235-5519, http://www.gottrocksgreenville.com/

The adoption counselors at Animal Care are the absolute BEST. No, really. They are. My advice to you when coming in to adopt? Don’t get any ideas set in your head. Most people have a specific look or breed in mind before they adopt. In my experience, the best pets are the ones who choose you. That’s why Animal Care hires people like Justin, who can take a description of your lifestyle and your family and use that to introduce you to pets that match with you perfectly. Or Casey, who could tell you the personality of almost any dog or cat here. I may not have found my forever family yet, but that’s ok. I know I’m in good hands and the adoption counselors have my back. If you’re the one for me, I’ll let you know that we belong together. So please, come find your perfect match!

GreenvillePets.org


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

BACKSTAGE

A Q&A with assistant technical director and carpenter Zoe Shaye Sneed WORDS BY SARA PEARCE | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

The Greenville Journal is excited to introduce a new recurring series in our culture section, Backstage. In an effort to bring the theater community and the community at-large closer together, we’ll be conducting Q&As with local actors, directors, and designers who are instrumental in shaping our performing arts scene. The work that goes on behind the scenes before a show opens can often go unnoticed by the audience. After the set designer submits their designs for the show, that’s where Zoe Sneed comes in. As master carpenter and assistant technical director of GLOW Lyric Theatre and assistant technical director at the Warehouse Theatre, Sneed assists in the creation of technical drawings based on the needs of the show and makes them come to life through her construction. Sneed has worked as a carpenter on all of the Warehouse Theatre’s mainstage productions this season and is currently building for “The Flick” by Annie Baker at the Warehouse Theatre, which premieres March 9. She acted as technical director for GLOW Lyric Theatre’s Festival season last year, which included “Hair,” “The Crucible,” and “The Gondoliers.” She was recently master carpenter for Converse Opera Theatre’s spring production of “Summer and Smoke” by Lee Hoiby and stage manager for Ballet Spartanburg’s production of “The Nutcracker.” She does contracted work with stage tech staffing at the Peace Center and audio, video, and lighting solutions.

When did you first become involved in theater as a master carpenter (or were you involved in theater previously), and when did you know this was something you wanted to do long term? I started my journey through theater as an actress, as I believe  most folks do.  In the sixth grade, my chorus teacher told me that if I didn’t try out for the school play, she would fail me in choir, and being the naive 12-yearold that I was, [I] completely believed her and showed up to audition.  That singular production showed me the magic of theater and gave me a place in school where for the first time I felt I truly belonged. The foundation laid from involvement with this group not only gave me friendships that lasted for years to follow but also showed me that honest interpersonal connections are one of the greatest benefits of theatrical involvement.  I “officially” made the transition from onstage to backstage during my undergraduate years in the theater department at USC Upstate, but it was even before then that I was fascinated by the inner workings of theater

from my involvement with the South Carolina Children’s Theatre. Early on, I believed every production I worked on … truly came together by magic, because I wasn’t exposed to the process of production. SCCT and [USC] Upstate allowed me forums to experience the technical elements of theater firsthand and taught me that theater is so much more than the sum of its parts. But  I was a part of it, and I fell in love. I learned how to create the magic that I had spent so many years fascinated by from afar. Now everyday when I go to work I get to build this same illusion for others to experience, and that feels like magic to me. 

What has been your most challenging set/project/play to design for and why? The most  challenging set I have ever built  was for GLOW  Lyric Theatre’s  2017 Festival season.  I have built plenty of sets in difficult places before, including black boxes, recital halls, outdoors, and venues great and small. In all that time, however, I have never built a set that


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“Early on, I believed every production I worked on … truly came together by magic, because I wasn’t exposed to the process of production. SCCT and [USC] Upstate allowed me forums to experience the technical elements of theater firsthand and taught me that theater is so much more than the sum of its parts.”

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–Zoe Shaye Sneed

did not want to be built. During that summer, three table saws were broken; a staple gun  up and walked away; I repainted the  32-by-36-foot  floor three  separate times with only a  4-inch  chip brush and my own tears,  and everything that could go wrong did.  On top of all that, we dealt with extreme time  constraints, as we were performing in a school district building during their summer hours. One night,  one of  my carpenters and I spent the evening painting outside by the glow of her Jeep’s headlights, because, as they say, the show must go on. In the end, we forced the set to life by  the determined hands of four very, very, very tired carpenters and proudly lived to tell the tale.   

What has been your most enjoyable project and why?

Oh man … a parent isn’t supposed to have  favorites. I can’t pick; I just can’t do it. Every single project I’ve worked on has brought me layers of joy, happiness, and pride. True, they’ve also brought me heartache, loss of sleep, and a stress-eating habit that QT  really has got to stop feeding, but hey, that’s life, right? You take the good with the bad, and you keep on going. 

What is your favorite play? I couldn’t pick even if I tried.  I get invested in the play that I am working on and that is my world  until the next one comes along. 

What do you most enjoy about Greenville’s theater scene? Getting to work with my friends and watching them succeed. Having grown up in Greenville, I am fortunate enough to get to work professionally with people that I went to college and even high school with. As we grow, I get to watch them develop their talents and, if I’m lucky, even help them along. 

How has Greenville’s theater scene changed since you first became involved? It’s definitely become more of its own respected entity. I can’t remember if someone told me this or I read it somewhere, but it used to be that when you said you were from Greenville, people would ask which one you meant.  Nowadays, if you tell someone you’re from Greenville, they assume it’s ours. When I’m telling someone that I work in theater in Greenville, it now comes with a layer of recognition and respect that I don’t believe it always has.    

What is your hope for the future of theater in Greenville?

MARCH 13-18

That it continues down the path it’s on now, challenging Greenvillians  in all the ways theater is designed to challenge us – mentally, emotionally, physically, and spiritually. GROUPS (15+)


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THE CENTER OF ATTENTION

On Jonny Lang’s carefully sequenced ‘Signs,’ the guitar remains the instrumental focal point VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

When Jonny Lang, who will perform at the Peace Center in Greenville on Sunday, was preparing to release his new album, “Signs,” he remarked that the album was an effort to turn his searing, electrifying, bluesy guitar-playing back into a prominent role in his music. It was something of a confusing statement, seeing as how for many, that guitar never left. For more than 20 years and nine albums, Lang, who began his major-label career with the hit “Lie to Me” in 1997, slung out guitar solos like the second coming of Stevie Ray Vaughan. Equally adept at rock, blues, and soul, Lang was a stunningly skilled player and singer, all the more remarkable for the fact that he began his career in his mid-teens. Even when his music turned toward a more gospel-influenced sound on 2006’s “Turn Around,” he still took the opportunity to shoot sparks on guitar whenever he could. So how could he think that his six-string had taken a back seat? “Actually, what I meant was that with the last couple of records, the guitar wasn’t really the centerpiece of the album as much as in the past,” Lang says. “I was listening to older stuff like Howlin’ Wolf when I was writing this album, and some-

Photo by Daniella Hovsepian

AND THE GOLD MEDAL WINNER IS… The Gold Medal Winner of the 2017 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, Yekwon Sunwoo, makes his SC debut with Rachmaninoff’s thrilling Third Piano Concerto!

Caliente Cuba A Night of Hot Art & Cool Culture

Thursday, March 1 from 6-9pm

at The Artist’s Guild Gallery 200 N. Main St., Greenville Get your tickets now! Come sway to the Beats of Cool Afro Cuban Music by the Jazz Collective. Enjoy Delicious, Authentic Cuban Cuisine from La Habana Cafe. Feast Your Eyes on Unique Cuban Art Collection.

March 3 at 8 pm & March 4 at 3 pm The Peace Center / Edvard Tchivzhel, Conductor

View the collection throughout the month of March.

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“That’s actually one of the elements that I’m most concerned about, is the song order. I don’t get too conscious of steering the other facets of making the record, but that’s one of the things I’m conscious of.” –Jonny Lang

thing clicked again with me, with the production style and how great these guitar riffs sounded. The song builds around the anchor of the riff, and that’s the centerpiece of the song. And it started me trying to write some songs like that.” In that sense and several others, “Signs” is a definite artistic success. Kicking off with the largely acoustic stomper “Make It Move,” Lang’s playing, and his soulful rasp of a voice, are center stage, moving through roadhouse stompers (“Snakes”), thundering hard rock (“Last Man Standing”), and grinding blues swagger (the title track) before moving into soul and wide-screen ballads in the second half. The sound is raw and massive, and the album is a great example of proper song-sequencing, starting stripped-down and acoustic and ending with an epic showstopper (the near-six-minute “Singing Songs”).

“That’s actually one of the elements that I’m most concerned about, is the song order,” Lang says. “I don’t get too conscious of steering the other facets of making the record, but that’s one of the things I’m conscious of.” Lang co-produced “Signs” with Drew Ramsey and Shannon Sanders (with an assist from Josh Kelly on “Bring Me Back Home”), the same group he’d worked with in “Turn Around.” Lang says the familiarity among the three men helped the music gel nicely. “After so many years, you meet a lot of people who do what you do and who you feel like you would get along with for a particular project,” he says, “and I’ve been so lucky to meet amazing people and musicians and get to know a lot of them. Drew and Shannon, we’re friends, and with all the people I work with now, whether it’s on the road or in the studio, it’s more about the hang. It’s

about the friendship and the sense of community. It’s a family thing, and then out of that, great music gets made from that.” One of the surprising things about the “great music” is how much of it was built in the studio rather than planned out beforehand. In a video clip accompanying the release of “Signs,” Lang, Ramsey, Sanders, and the band often seem to be trying ideas on the spur of the moment, throwing different ideas at a song to see what works. As it turns out, that’s just how Lang works best. “A long time ago, I remember the feeling of, ‘I’m scared to fail, and I’m scared to fail in front of people I respect,’” he says, “and it’s hard to let go of that. But one of the fun things is that I’ve learned to trust that. I just step off the cliff. And luckily, you’re not stepping off the edge of the cliff to your death; you can try it over and over again in the studio. You do that enough times you learn to trust your instincts and flow with it.”

JONNY LANG with DOYLE BRAMHALL II WHEN Sunday, Feb. 25, 6:30 p.m. WHERE Peace Center, 300 S. Main St., Greenville TICKETS $35-$55 INFO 864-467-3000, www.peacecenter.org

Get the most out of your summer. Take a class or two at Greenville Technical College this summer, and you can return to campus a step ahead. Visit us at gvltec.edu/transient-visiting.


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

‘BEAUTY IS BEAUTY’ CBT’s Black History Month performance pays tribute to influential dancers like Arthur Mitchell and Misty Copeland VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

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The Carolina Ballet Theatre had long planned a performance at the Kroc Center to commemorate Black History Month. After all, that fits in with its mission to provide performances and classes to expose people to the art of dance regardless of social or economic barriers. But the theater’s artistic director, Hernan Justo, was at a loss when it came time to create the show. The Argentinian-born Justo had created all manner of productions since joining the Carolina Ballet in 2000, but he was coming up empty this time. “When the project came along, I really didn’t know if there was a take that I could do,” Justo says. “Because I come from a country where ... don’t get me wrong, it’s not as if we don’t have racial issues, but we don’t have as many as America. So when I came here, I had to learn about Black History Month and why it was created. I’m not African-American, so I have no idea what they go through.” Eventually, Justo turned to what he knew to create the Ballet’s production, which is called “Black & Beautiful: A Tribute to African-American Dancers.” The nucleus of the performance, which takes place in different acts, is a tribute to dancers like Arthur Mitchell and Misty Copeland, who were great influences on Justo’s own career. “I realized how much African-American culture impacted me in my dancing,” he says. “I realized how much it impacted me in my taste in music, so I did a tribute to all of that. It’s really a tribute to how much African-American culture has enriched America itself. I had to think about what was relevant to me, and it was the great African-American artists in dance.” The show begins with a piece called “We the People,” in which a solo male dancer traces the history of African-Americans in the United States. “It gives a timeline of how they came to this country and went from slavery to the election of a president,” Justo says. “Along the way there are tributes to Michael Jordan, Michael Jackson, Martin Luther King, all of these great people. This dancer becomes all of them through till the end.” “Black & Beautiful” then moves into a section that echoes the great performances of Mitchell and Copeland. Mitchell in particular is a source of inspiration for Justo, who was once able to work with the great dancer. Mitchell’s list of achievements could be an entire article themselves, but among other things, he created a ballet training school; founded the first African-American classical ballet company, Dance Theatre of Harlem; was recognized as a MacArthur Fellow; and has received the United States National Medal of Arts. He was also one of the most prominent victims of discrimination, at a time and place where things were supposedly changing for the better. “The first time he did a dance onstage, he did a duo with a white woman [in 1957], and many people were very upset about that,” Justo says. “And this was in New York City, not Alabama. People were upset. And in ballet, when your donors are upset, they can take their money away, which means your company can collapse.” The concluding performance of the evening will be a popular dance piece set to Queen’s classic hit “Somebody to Love,” a performance that portrays humanity as one universal race and calls for unity. Justo says the ultimate goal of the show is to demonstrate that African-Americans have as much place in ballet and other forms of dance as anyone else. “Beauty is beauty,” he says. “You don’t have to have a blond girl to be in ‘Sleeping Beauty.’ As long as you can dance beautifully, that is what is important.”


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THE CAROLINA BALLET THEATRE PRESENTS “BLACK & BEAUTIFUL: A TRIBUTE TO AFRICAN-AMERICAN DANCERS” WHEN Wednesday, Feb. 28, 7 p.m. WHERE The Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Community Center, 424 Westfield St., Greenville TICKETS Free INFO 864-421-0940, http://carolinaballet.org/

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36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

feast

PARTNERS INCLUDE

FOOD FOR THOUGHT Whole Health Nation seeks to teach people how to grow and use food for their health

WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER

PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

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June Ellen Bradley holds medicinal foraged plants that are often mistaken as weeds.

“Choose your farmer as your grocery store and your kitchen as your pharmacy” is the theme of visual artist and herbalist June Ellen Bradley’s brainchild — the first Whole Health Nation forum to be held March 3 at Zen in the West End. According to the Whole Health mission statement, “We envision coming together as a community around plants and gardening, sourcing local farmers to supply fresh and sustainable produce that in turn nurtures the earth, connecting us all in a common unified purpose. We hope to increase our awareness, skill sets of resilience, and define our daily culinary choices in order support abundant life for all people.” “Part of it is to try to reduce that fear and anxiety and replace it with wonder and awe and how exciting it is that we can grow our own food,” says Bradley, who has been a Greenville resident for about 18 months. The vision for Whole Health Nation was cultivated from Bradley’s years of experience working with people, plants, agriculture, natural medicine, and other health-empowering practices. The mission is to expand the collective concept of health while supporting local connections in the community, and to educate and develop skills that empower people to live a vibrant, health-filled, and purposeful life. Bradley’s background consists of serving as assistant to the director of Agricultural Economic Development in

Polk County, N.C., for four years, interviewing more than 100 farmers, establishing an online database, installing an edible and medicinal demonstration garden, and teaching workshops at the Mill Springs Agricultural Center. She also consulted clients in her herbal medicine practice for seven years while living in a community centered on health. The community grows produce for the on-site health food store, local CSAs, and the Polk County Farmers Market. Bradley managed the community’s farmers market booth for five years and served on the board of directors for the Farmers Market for three years, along with various other agriculture and environmental projects through the years. She also grew up in the household of an anesthesiologist. “I grew up steeped in the medical community,” she says. “I was dissecting frogs at 8 years old and all this other stuff, but I didn’t know that plantain, which is a common plant that you find everywhere, I didn’t know you put that on a bee sting and it will suck out the poison.” Bradley hopes that through events like Whole Health Nation, it will start conversations that turn into actions, such as using empty lots for community gardens or growing edible plants as ground cover rather than grass. Bradley says providing people with more information is key so that growing food and herbs doesn’t seem intimidating.

WHOLE HEALTH NATION WHEN March 3, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. WHERE Zen, 924 S. Main St. TICKETS $75 INFO wholehealthnation.com

“We’ve gotten so far removed from it,” Bradley says. “There’s been an intergenerational failure to transfer information for the past generation or two. Since we don’t sit around and snap peas with grandma, it’s foreign.” On the day of the event, registration begins at 8:30 a.m. and sessions begin at 9 a.m., with the last one at 4 p.m. Session topics during the day include Weeds: Friend or Foe?; Growing & Preparing Ginger and Turmeric; Seed Saving, Culinary Herbs for Healing Meals; Keynote - Emotions, Health, and Eating; Mushrooms for Immunity; Potato Gardening in Containers; The Art and Science of Herbal Tea; and What’s Healthful to Eat in 2018? Many of the forums are geared toward not only learning how to grow food but also how to use it to fuel and heal the body rather than just for entertainment. Additionally, Slow Food, a nonprofit organization that promotes local food and traditional cooking, will be holding a seed swap during the day. “We’re hoping it will start inspiring people to do things like this,” Bradley says.


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small plates

Basically an Oscar nomination

The Anchorage in the Village of West Greenville, 586 Perry Ave., has officially put Greenville as a restaurant destination on the map. Led by executive chef Greg McPhee, The Anchorage has been named a 2018 Semifinalist for Best New Restaurant (in the entire country) by the James Beard FoundaFOOD NEWS tion. “We could not be more excited & EVENTS for our staff with the news of our nomBY ARIEL TURNER ination,” McPhee says. “This validates all their hard work and growth over the past year. To be in such great company and bring attention not only to the restaurant but to Greenville is something we couldn’t be prouder of. We look forward to continuing to grow and provide a unique experience to our guests moving forward.” Finalists will be announced March 14, which will narrow down the field of 28 semifinalists. The winners will be announced May 7. The Anchorage is the only South Carolina restaurant to make the Best New Restaurant list for 2018, and this is the first time a Greenville restaurant has been a named a semifinalist in any category.

That name, though Husk restaurant has collaborated with Blackberry Farm Brewery to offer a new, exclusive beer called Reezy Peezy, Red Bay Breezy (try to say that five times fast). The new, limited-edition beer will be available on draft at Husk restaurants in Greenville, Charleston, and Savannah. A group of Blackberry Farm and The Neighborhood Dining Group guys got together and asked chef Sean Brock which ingredient he was most excited about in the kitchen at the moment, and he said koji (fermented bean paste). Drawing inspiration from the koji, this beer was conceptualized and developed. (Now if only Brock had said Benton’s ham.) Let’s see what else these guys come up with.

Drumroll please… Tacos and Tequila Festival, which was a smashing success in its inaugural year, has announced the participating restaurants and bars for its taco and cocktail contests for 2018. For the chef’s challenge we have Jorge “Papi” Barrales (Papi’s Tacos), Hector Batista (Tacos & Mas), Shane Clary (Good Life Catering), William Cribb (Willy Taco), Aaron Hobbs (Tin Lizzy’s), Melissa Plumbley (Farmhouse Tacos), and Team Bar Louie. The cocktail contest will have bartenders from Restaurant 17, Tin Lizzy’s, Sticky Fingers, Gringo’s, Encore Gastrolounge, Roost, Topside Pool Club, Bar Louie, TILT arcade bar, Wild Ace Pizza & Pub, and Willy Taco. Tickets are still available for the March 25 event at tacotequilafiesta.com.

Hot topic Coffee sourcing, brewing, tasting, and the whole process have become a hot (pun intended) topic these days. Along with Ally Coffee Merchants and Due South Coffee Roasters, the Greenville County Library is offering coffee classes on a different topic each session on March 3, 10, and 17 at 10 a.m. and March 22 at 7 p.m. at a variety of locations. Topics include how coffee is grown and sourced, how a bean goes from green to dark and aromatic, how to prepare a stellar cup of joe, and the history behind it all. Email explore@greenvillelibrary.org or call 864-527-9258 to register.

Get your hands dirty Definitely not for the squeamish but great for anyone wanting to know where exactly our food comes from: learn the art of whole-animal butchering at Greenbrier Farms’ upcoming Whole Hog Butcher Class, March 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at 766 Hester Store Road, Easley. The hands-on class will feature Greenbrier’s pastured heritage hogs and be instructed by Culinary Institute of the Carolinas chef Patrick Wagner. In addition, guests will enjoy a farm-to-table lunch and 100 percent of the finished product. Lunch will be provided in the barn during a Q&A session. The class is $125 per person. Email Amy@ greenbrierfarms.com for more information.

THERAPY FOR EVERYBODY Cross Your Heart While this time of year is typically associated with Valentine’s Day, there’s another reason to keep your heart in check. February is American Heart Month and, now more than ever, efforts are being made to increase awareness of cardiovascular disease, educate the general population, and take preventative measures to keep your heart healthy. Here in South Carolina, heart disease is still the leading cause of death. Fortunately, 80% of heart disease and stroke events can be prevented by: • Increasing physical activity • Eliminating tobacco use • Adjusting diet and maintaining healthy weight • Getting plenty of sleep • Managing stress • Getting regular health screenings (monitor your blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and diabetes)

Who is at risk? Cardiovascular issues can affect anyone, but symptoms and risk factors can fluctuate based on a number of variables such as age, gender, ethnicity, and lifestyle choices. For example, although heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women, women are believed to be more at risk than men as symptoms aren’t as easily identifiable. In order to raise awareness by educating those at higher risk, there are programs and campaigns in place at local and national levels geared towards very specific demographic groups. How can ELITE help? By definition, physical therapy improves quality of life for people of all ages who have medical conditions, illnesses, or injuries that limit their regular ability to move and function. But that’s not all! Physical therapy can be utilized as a preventative measure for various conditions—cardiovascular health included. Significant improvements in blood pressure, weight, quality of life, and other health indicators can be made through exercise under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist, in conjunction with other health professionals such as primary care physicians, dietitians, health and wellness professionals, etc. In fact, studies show habitual physical activity helps reduce and sometimes prevent symptoms in patients with cardiovascular disease. Need assistance starting a preventative exercise routine, or looking to transition to a higher level program? Think of Elite Integrated Therapy Centers as your partner in establishing a healthier lifestyle! Just a phone call away, their team can help you schedule an appointment with a licensed physical therapist within 24-48 hours—No referral needed!

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38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

BLUES, FOLK, AND ROCK

JONNY LANG WITH SPECIAL GUEST

DOYLE BRAMHALL II | FEB. 25

IN THE SPOTLIGHT FEB. 25 HUMONGOUS: The Biggest Night of Comedy! COMEDY

Alchemy Comedy Theater is trying something completely new to them — creating a smorgasbord of all the different kinds of performances they produce in one single-night production. This huge event will include a mix of improv, stand-up, sketch, and musical comedy from a variety of the theater’s players and teams. HUMONGOUS will take place at Greenville’s oldest comedy event space, Cafe and Then Some. “This show is a perfect introduction for our first-time guests, a great way to experience the quality entertainment that Alchemy Comedy Theater produces every weekend of the year in one special night,” Alchemy Comedy executive producer Alrinthea Carter says. “HUMONGOUS is also fantastic for our regular audience members that may not realize the wide breadth of comedy that we produce!” “The Greenville Comedy scene is thriving and growing, and Alchemy Comedy Theater is proud to be at the forefront of that growth,” Carter adds. –Melody Wright

WHEN Sunday, Feb. 25, 7:30-9:30 p.m. WHERE 101 College St., Greenville ADMISSION $16 INFO www.alchemycomedy.com/shows/41568486462

FEATURED IN THE 2012 OSCAR®-WINNING DOCUMENTARY

WITH SPECIAL GUEST VICTORY BOYD

MAR. 3

FOOD & DRINK

Greenville Taco Crawl

FEB. 27

MAR. 11 GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! peacecenter.org @peacecenter

GROUPS

864.467.3000 864.467.3032

Strolling around Greenville with a taco in one hand and a cold drink in another… now, that’s something to taco ‘bout. Greenville will have its first ever Taco Crawl on Saturday, March 3. The crawl gives participants a great venue to eat tacos, check out new bars, enjoy drink specials, and meet new friends. Tickets for the event include four complimentary tacos tickets, a taco-themed koozie, exclusive drink specials at every stop, Taco Crawl map, additional taco specials with a bar crawl wristband, and more giveaways to come. Crawlers will also receive a survey to vote for their favorites as The Best-Tasting Taco and The Most Unique Taco. VIP tickets also include a Taco Crawl T-shirt and an additional taco ticket. Open rain or shine, this free-flowing event highlights 10+ restaurants including Gringos, Pour Taproom, DT’s Tavern, SIP Whiskey & Wine Bar, Ink N Ivy Greenville, Cantina 76 – Greenville, and Jack n’ Diane’s (more to come/subject to change). Some stops on the map will be “party stops 21+ with drink specials only,” and there will be several registration locations to spread out the groups. Crawlers under the age of 21 must be accompanied by an adult. Some stops with drink specials only will be for ages 21+, while restaurants with taco specials will be ages 18+. –Melody Wright

WHEN Saturday, March 3, noon-8 p.m. WHERE Various locations around downtown Greenville ADMISSION $22.50-$36.50 INFO www.bit.ly/2o9AcV1


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VISUAL ARTS

Southern Icons, A to Z

Greenville Technical College Art Department | Benson Campus Galleries 2522 Locust Hill Road (Hwy 290), Taylors Southern Icons, A to Z is an exhibition of photographs each accompanied by a written response and curated by Rob McDonald, Donna Rosser, and Meryl Truett of SlowExposures. VISUAL ARTS

“Direct Experience: Cancer and Art”

Metropolitan Arts Council | 16 Augusta St. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Monday-Friday | FREE This exhibit features cancer survivors creating in both two- and three-dimensional work. Artists include: Joanne Anderson, Ellie Daniels, Jamie Davis, Carol Funke, Elisa Golden, Susanne Flyd Gunter, Christina Laurel, Cheryl LeCroy, Monita Mahoney, Linda McCune, Joanna Llew, Marilyn Murrell,Mike Stoner, and Carole Knudson Tinsley. www.greenvillearts.com VISUAL ARTS

23 Awards

Greenville Technical College Art Department Riverworks Gallery | 300 River St., Suite 202 23 Awards is an exhibition of the award winners from the 2017 DVA Student Annual Exhibit at Greenville Technical College. The student annual exhibit marks the culmination of a year of studio practice by recognizing the best works created by Greenville Technical College’s visual and applied art students. One hundred and thirty-seven entries were submitted. Seventy-nine were juried into the exhibition. www.gvltec.edu/riverworks

FEB. 23

Chunx w/ Totally Slow, Irata, In Case Of Emergency, and Coffin Torture

CONCERT

THRU FRI

Radio Room | 110 Poinsett Highway 9 p.m. | $7

The way the members of Chunx see it, it’s not that surprising that they ended up forming a band. After all, the four of them loved to skate, loved punk music, and lived in Easley. “We all knew each other in the local skate scene either personally or through mutual friends,” says vocalist Clean Gene. “If you really think about it, in a small mill hill town like Easley, we were bound to get together and form a band.” Afterhttps://chunx.bandcamp.com/releases they formed in 2013, there was little doubt what the foundation of their music would be. The band’s self-titled album is all speed, tight riffs, and sneering attitude, like the punk they grew up loving. “We get stoked on all kind of music at this point,” Gene says. “And why wouldn’t you? There’s all kinds of great music out there! As long as it gets us through the day in a positive way, we’re down. But regardless what riff we jam to, at the heart of it all there will be always be punk rock.” –Vincent Harris FRI

23

MUSIC

“Beethoven’s 5th”

Furman University McAlister Auditorium | 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 8 p.m. | $15/adult, $10/senior, $5/student The Furman Symphony Orchestra will present a concert featuring faculty guest artists Derek Parsons and Gary Malvern. A pre-concert lecture about composer Dmitri Shostakovich will be led by Furman’s Laura Kennedy, renowned Shostakovich scholar. Her talk takes place at 7 p.m. in Room D-104 of the

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Daniel Music Building. Conducted by Thomas Joiner, the 75-member FSO presents the music of John Williams, Shostakovich, and Beethoven. 864-294-2086 | www.bit.ly/2nUGyri furmanmusic@furman.edu FRI-SAT

23-24

PERFORMANCE ARTS

“An Evening You Will Forget For The Rest Of Your Life”

Peace Center Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $100-$250 Audiences can expect an evening of nonstop

laughs when Steve Martin and Martin Short bring “An Evening You Will Forget For The Rest Of Your Life” to the Peace Center. Martin and Short will be joined by the Grammy Award-winning bluegrass band The Steep Canyon Rangers and renowned jazz pianist and “Jimmy Kimmel Live” band member Jeff Babko. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org FRI-MAR

23-23

VISUAL ARTS

Furman University Presents Art by Sara Pedigo

Furman University | 3300 Poinsett Hwy. Thompson Art Gallery, Roe Art Building 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Monday-Friday | FREE The Furman University Department of Art will present drawings and paintings by Flagler College associate professor Sara Pedigo. Reception and talk: Friday, Feb. 23, 6-7:30 p.m. 864-294-2995 | www.bit.ly/2BYxdD5 Marta.lanier@furman.edu FRI-APR

23-08

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

TreesGreenville’s EnergySaving Trees Giveaway

TreesGreenville | Various Pick-Up Locations 11 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE Thanks to Duke Energy, TreesGreenville is giving away another 650 trees this February and April of 2018 to pre-registered Duke Energy customers. The trees are available to help you save on energy, reduce your utility bills, and help clean the water and air in Greenville County. This year’s giveaway dates are Feb. 23-25 and April 6-8. www.treesgreenville.org/giveaway info@treesgreenville.org

BECAUSE ANYBODY CAN SAVE A LIFE. We can’t all be doctors or emergency professionals but we can still save lives. By donating blood, you too can be a life saver. At The Blood Connection, we need approximately 500 units of blood per day to meet the needs of the hospitals we serve. However, less than 10% of the population eligible to donate blood does so annually. In less than an hour, you can donate 1 pint of blood and save 3 lives. #idonateblood #isavelives #givelife

Behind The Counter has been the most popular business publication in the Upstate for the past 15 years. Featuring large, full bleed photos and interesting insights, the 2018 Behind The Counter promises to be a great read on great local businesses. Don’t miss the opportunity to feature your business in the upcoming edition – publishing on April 13.

For more information, call Community Journals at 864.679.1205

Sharing Life, Saving Lives | 864.255.5000 | TheBloodConnection.org


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Brooks Dixon Band

Smiley’s Acoustic Café | 111 Augusta St. | 10 p.m. | Free

If you’re a fan of Greenville singer-songwriter Brooks Dixon, you probably know that none of his single or EP releases have sounded quite the same as the others. He’s moved from acoustic folk to gentle rock and even to danceable R&B, but he’s never sounded quite as comfortable as he does on his new EP, “White Roses.” The five songs on the EP are so unified stylistically that they almost come off like a suite. Using bassist Luis Espaillat (Trace Adkins), Nashville fiddle player Brenna Fitzgerald, and harmony vocalist Ira Well, Dixon has recast his songs in a rootsy alt-country style that suits them perfectly. “I’d released versions of some of these songs before, but they’re a bit different here,” he says. “There were https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uenJumLUotk some songs I felt had more of an alt-country feel at the core, and I really wanted to hear what that sounded like. So it was almost like a concept EP, if you will.” –Vincent Harris

CONCERT

#LOVE YOUR SUMMER JOB

FEB. 24

THRU SAT

24

PERFORMANCE ARTS

“Charlotte’s Web”

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. | $15 Greenville Little Theatre’s touring performance of “Charlotte’s Web” is coming to the MainStage and offers audiences early showtimes of 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. “Charlotte’s Web” is this year’s touring production currently being performed at schools by the GLT resident acting company. 864-233-6238 | www.greenvillelittletheatre.org SAT

24

MAKE A SPLASH WORK AT THE WATERPARK

Lifeguards (FREE certification; ages 15+), Party Hosts, Admissions

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CONCERT

“Peppered with Percussion”

First Baptist Greenville Fellowship Hall | 847 Cleveland St. 2 & 7 p.m. | $15 Principal musicians from the Greenville Symphony Orchestra will present the third and final Spotlight Series concert of the 2017-2018 season, “Peppered with Percussion.” 864-232-0344 ext. 118 www.greenvillesymphony.org VISUAL ARTS

Exploring Encaustic

Greenville Center for Creative Arts | 25 Draper St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $120 Learn and practice the basic techniques of encaustics, the art of painting with hot pigmented wax. This is a beginner introductory workshop, perfect for the artist or crafter who is curious about encaustics. All materials are provided but feel free to bring anything you might like to play with. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 | liz@artcentergreenville.org www.artcentergreenville.org COMMUNITY

Maker Fest

Children’s Museum of the Upstate | 300 College St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | Free with Admission Maker Fest invites makers from our Upstate community to share their creations with TCMU guests. From 3-D printing to mixed media art and more, join us for a day of demos and workshops that will leave all inspired to make and create. www.tcmupstate.org/maker-fest/?ri=0 HEALTH & WELLNESS

Buti Yoga

The Pole Academy | 637 Congaree Road Ste. G 10-11 a.m. | $10 Join TPA for Buti Yoga with certified instructor Sara Brooks. The hour class will include an intro

session with common poses and alignment and super energetic flow. Class is open to women and men 18 and over. Register online. 864-520-2834 | www.thepoleacademy.com COMMUNITY

African-American Genealogy Workshop with LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson

Greenville County Library System Hughes Main Library | Meeting Room C 11 a.m.-noon | FREE Laurens County native LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson discusses sources and strategies for researching enslaved ancestors. Her book is available for purchase after the program. For more events, visit the library’s website. 864-527-9212 | www.greenvillelibrary.org RECREATION

Carolina Dance Collaborative

First Baptist Greenville | AYMC Building 10:30-11:30 a.m. | Saturdays through April 28 $50/month or $15/class Come move with Carolina Dance Collaborative. Classes have begun and will follow the Greenville County School Calendar until April 28. info@carolinadancecollaborative.com COMMUNITY

Cardboard Regatta

Greenville County Rec Greenville County Aquatic Complex 2700 W Blue Ridge Dr. | 2-5 p.m. It may sound crazy, but that’s just another word for fun. See if participants can make a cardboard boat float. www.bit.ly/2018CardboardRegatta THRU SUN

25

PERFORMANCE ARTS

“Twisted Tales From Shakespeare”

Furman University | The Playhouse 3300 Poinsett Hwy. $18/adult; $15/senior; $10/student Furman University Theatre presents “Twisted Tales from Shakespeare,” based on the same-titled 1957 book by Richard Armour. Furman theater professor Rhett Bryson adapts the book for stage. The performance, suitable for all audiences, interprets two of Shakespeare’s most famous plays: “Hamlet” and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” www.bit.ly/2DVxEni


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HISTORY

Randal Garrison to Speak at Foothills Civil War Roundtable

University of South Carolina Upstate Olin B. Sansbury, Jr. Campus Life Center Ballroom 6 p.m. | $25 for the evening or $5 for the presentation only Randal Garrison, lieutenant colonel of the Twenty-Sixth North Carolina Troops Reactivated, will present “Re-Living the Past.” The evening begins with a social and dinner beginning at 6 p.m., followed by the presentation at 7 p.m. 864-503-5219 | bwerlini@uscupstate.edu GARDENING

Greater Greenville Rose Society

MD360 community room | Powdersville 7 p.m. Interested persons are invited to attend the Greater Greenville Rose Society to learn and share information about growing roses. 864-884-9853 LITERATURE

Emrys’ Winter-Spring 2018 Reading Room Series

Joe’s Place Bookstore | 2 Williams St. 7 p.m. Readings feature a local/regional writer. Feb. 26 will feature Kimberly Simms. Simms’s literary voice is rooted in the Southern tradition of storytelling, informed by her British and Southern lineage. She is an award-winning poet who entertains and educates with poetry that is both poignant and inspiring. www.emrys.org/reading-room-1/ emrys.info@gmail.com

FEB. 27

Rodriguez w/ Victory Boyd

COMMUNITY

Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. | 7:30 p.m. | $35-$65

The story of Sixto Rodriguez, told more completely in the Oscar-winning documentary “Searching For Sugar Man,” is one of the more unusual in music history. The singer-songwriter recorded two albums of passionate, mildly psychedelic rock in 1970 and 1971: “Cold Fact” and “Coming From Reality.” The albums, marked by Rodriguez’s passionate, yearning voice and incisive lyrics, came and went with little notice in the U.S., but they gradually became iconic overseas, especially in South Africa. The slow build allowed Rodriguez to successfully tour Australia in the late ’70s, but he faded into obscurity after that, to the extent that as his https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPn7ZSmQEk8 albums sold hundreds of thousands of copies around the world, many thought he had committed suicide. In fact, he was working a day job in his native Detroit while his songs inspired the revolutionary spirit of South Africa during the struggle to end apartheid. Since being rediscovered in the last decade, Rodriguez’s music has returned to its homeland, and his albums finally made the Billboard charts in the wake of the 2012 documentary. –Vincent Harris

CONCERT

MON

TUE

27

COMMUNITY

Trivia with Wilson Casey

Greenville County Library System Pelham Road Branch 7-8:30 p.m. | FREE Learn from a Trivia Guinness World Record holder as he shares the story of his career in trivia. Then, play trivia games individually or with a team. Space is limited. For more events, visit the library’s website. 864-288-6688 | www.greenvillelibrary.org

ForeverGreen Luncheon

Upstate Forever Embassy Suites | 670 Verdae Blvd. 11 a.m. | $50 Upstate Forever is hosting their annual ForeverGreen Awards Luncheon. The luncheon celebrates individuals and organizations for significant contributions in fields related to conservation and sustainable growth. This year’s keynote speaker will be Cheri Chastain, sustainability manager for Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. upstateforever.org HOBBIES & SPECIAL INTEREST

Pokemon League

The Red Barn | 2333 N. Pleasantburg Drive 6-8 p.m. | Tuesdays | FREE Pokemon League is a fun and accessible way for fans to get together and have fun. League events are open to all Pokemon TCG and video game players. Using your own cards and Pokemon video games, you can play, trade, and even earn cool prizes. 864-324-2369 | www.easleypokemongym.ml easleypokemongym@gmail.com

CONCERT

COMMUNITY

Peace Center | Gunter Theatre | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | FREE The S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities’ Sinfonia Chamber Orchestra will present a preview of the program they will perform at the ASTA National Orchestra Festival. The SCGSAH Wind Ensemble will also perform works by Frank Ticheli, Peter Menin, and Karel Husa. www.scgsah.org

Sears Rec Center | McPherson Park 100 E. Park Ave. | 6:15-8 p.m. | Tuesdays $5 (Greenville City Residents -$4) Greenville Downtown Line Dancing is a fun way to exercise. No partner or dance knowledge required. Dances are taught in a fun and easy way with a variety of music including hip hop, R&B, rock ‘n’ roll, Latin, country, shag, and swing. Party dances include Electric Slide, Cupid

Sinfonia Chamber Orchestra Concert

Greenville Downtown Line Dancing

MARCH 2-4 • TD CONVENTION CENTER

The largest of its kind in South Carolina, the Southern Home & Garden Show features more than 100 professional, go-to companies for home improvement. From landscaping to light fixtures, fences to fireplaces – whether looking to polish off a punch list or start on that forever home, homeowners have trusted the Southern Home & Garden Show for more than 55 years. PRESENTED BY

PRODUCED BY

Photo courtesy of Southern Crafted Doors

SouthernHomeandGardenShow.com


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM Shuffle, Bikers Shuffle, and Cha Cha Slide. Second hour moves into more advanced dances — fireball, footloose, R&B boogie, and more. 864-467-4326 | www.greenvillesc.gov THRU WED

28

VISUAL ARTS

Works by Caroline Harnish

My Sister’s Store 104 S. Poinsett Hwy, Travelers Rest Works by artist Caroline Harnish featuring supernatural, spiritual, and country themes. WED

28

COMMUNITY

Outshine Homework Help Program

Center for Developmental Services 29 N. Academy St. 3-4:45 p.m. | Wednesdays | FREE Outshine is a free community homework help program offered by the Center for Developmental Services. Volunteers and CDS staff will assist children ages 5-13 with any homework subject through May 9. 864-331-1445 | leslie.salazar@cdservices.org

MAR THU

01

FUNDRAISING

SCCT’s Caribbean Crush 2018 tickets on sale

South Carolina Children’s Theatre 1200 Pendleton St. Slip on a pair of Bermuda shorts or a sundress and enjoy this laid-back event. The night will bring together Caribbean steel drums, fantastic food, beach drinks and a silent auction. 864-235-2885 | scchildrenstheatre.org

FAMILY

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured book is “This Is It” by Daria Peoples-Riley 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com MUSIC

Of Good Nature - Set Sail Winter Tour Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Dr. 8-11:45 p.m. Of Good Nature with Little Birds www.ofgoodnature.com THU-FRI

01-02

CONCERT

FRI

Storytime Thursday

COMMUNITY

2018 Converge Autism Summit

Springbrook Autism Behavioral Health Embassy Suites Greenville Downtown Riverplace | 250 Riverplace $95-$195 The Converge Autism Summit is attended by professionals, teachers, parents, and caregivers who get a chance to meet and discuss educational, therapeutic, social, and psychological topics related to Autism Spectrum Disorder. The conference is focused on providing resources and assistance to providers, teachers, and parents of those with autism. The speaker lineup is comprised of professionals in the fields of youth psychiatry, occupational therapy, behavioral analysis, special education, advocacy, and family therapy. www.ConvergeAutism.com

Congratulations! Look who won jewelry from Reed’s Jewelers in the Haywood Mall

Kim Pittman From now through March 9th, any ticket sold will also get the buyer 2 FREE tickets to the Swamp Rabbits Hockey Game on March 11th. Pictured L to R are Christine Schmidt, Debbie Dailey and Randy Vogenberg. Debbie is standing in for Kim who is not pictured.

North Greenville Rotary Club

E L F F A R R E P 2018 SU P U R C H A S E YO U R T I C K E T AT

www.RotaryRaffle.org

.

Evening of Original Music 02 An with Edwin McCain, Maia Sharp, and Gabe Dixon The Peace Center | Genevieve’s 300 S. Main St. | 7:30 p.m. | $75 Songwriters Edwin McCain and Maia Sharp return for An Evening of Original Music, and they’ll be joined by Gabe Dixon. The intimate, listening-room style concert will be held in Genevieve’s theater lounge. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org COMMUNITY

LiveWell Greenville Annual Meeting

University Center of Greenville Auditorium 225 South Pleasantburg Dr. | 10-11:30 a.m. Join the 150 LiveWell coalition partners at the annual meeting. There will be a draft version of Greenville’s Comprehensive Community Action Plan focusing on Healthy Eating and Active Living. Partners will have an opportunity to add to this “living document” making Greenville the healthiest county to live, learn, work, play, and pray. www.livewellgreenville.org FRI-SUN

02-04

COMMUNITY

Spring Southern Home & Garden Show

TD Convention Center | 1 Exposition Dr. $7/adults; $5/seniors (55+); under 12 free The Southern Home & Garden Show, presented by the Home Builders Association of Greenville and sponsored by Jeff Lynch, is back for its Spring show and will feature over 140 exhibitors. www.southernhomeandgardenshow.com

THRU SAT

03

VISUAL ARTS

Glory Day Loflin

The Metropolitan Arts Council Centre Stage Gellery | 501 River St. Through wet on wet oil painting, Glory Day Loflin explores the relationship between figurative language and its visual counterpart in her show “Wet Paint.” www.greenvillearts.com/art-scene/mac-featured-galleries/ and www.glorydayloflin.com FAMILY

“The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre The Salvation Army Kroc Center 424 Westfield St. | $9.50 C.S. Lewis’ magical, timeless classic from his “Chronicles of Narnia” series is back. A unique adaptation of C.S. Lewis’ classic (toured by the Lincoln Center) in which all the roles are done by two performers. All the familiar characters are there (Tumnus the faun, the White Witch, Mr. Beaver, Aslan), but they are portrayed by a grown-up Peter and Lucy who reminisce about their adventures in Narnia and decide to reenact them for the audience. 864-235-2885 | scchildrenstheatre.org VISUAL ARTS

S.C. Governor’s School Visual Arts Student Midyear Exhibit

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Lipscomb Gallery | 15 University St. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | FREE The Lipscomb Gallery at the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities presents

I am a visual learner who benefits from using hands-on materials. I receive one-on-one lessons in a classroom with a 12:1 student to teacher ratio.

I am encouraged to develop my strengths and explore subjects that interest me. I am Five Oaks Academy.

Toddler through Middle School 1101 Jonesville Road Simpsonville, SC (864) 228-1881 www.fiveoaksacademy.com Minds Opened Here!


02.23.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM the Visual Arts Student Midyear Exhibit, featuring works created during the fall semester. Students in the Visual Arts program come from all over the state and learn from established, practicing artists, exploring a broad spectrum of mediums while refining their own imagery and self-expression. www.scgsah.org SAT

03

WORKSHOP

The Songwriter’s Workshop

The Peace Center | Ramsaur Studio 101 W Broad St. 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. | $150 Part workshop and part master class, this experience is designed to help aspiring songwriters put the finishing touches on their songs. Edwin McCain, Maia Sharp, and Gabe Dixon will review and discuss attendees’ songs, provide feedback and share tips on the songwriting process. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org LITERATURE

John Hart to Discuss Latest Book

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 4 p.m. | $10 or $30 John Hart, the only writer in history to win consecutive Edgar Awards for Best Novel, will discuss his latest book, “The Hush.” There are two ticket options for this event. The $30 ticket admits one, guarantees a seat, and includes a copy of “The Hush.” The $10 ticket is standing room only, admits one, and can be redeemed for $10 off merchandise purchased at the event. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

COMEDY

James Gregory - Funniest Man in America

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin 7:30-9 p.m. | $30 For over two decades, the unforgettable caricature of veteran comedian James Gregory has stood grinning: his shirt untucked, his arms outstretched, a carefree welcome to a downhome, hilarious comedy experience. www.mauldinculturalcenter.org LECTURE

Peace Center’s 2017-2018 Master Classes Ramsaur Studio at Huguenot Mill 101 W. Broad St. 1 p.m. | FREE Master Classes give teens from the workshop series an opportunity to dig deeper into the nuts and bolts of the poetic process. Visiting poets will share pieces, dissect their own work, and hold an open forum. Participants are encouraged to ask questions about their own poems. Master classes are held in Ramsaur Studio and the public is invited to observe. This class features David Gonzalez. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Peacock STRIDES for Babies 5K

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 East Butler Road 9-10:30 a.m. | $20 This 5K race raises money to support research and treatment options to combat Sudden

Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The race begins and ends at the Mauldin Cultural Center. More information can be found on our website. 864-335-4855 jedwins@mauldinrecreation.com www.cityofmauldin.org/rec/special-events SAT-SUN

03-04

VISUAL ARTS

Exploring Dry Point Intaglio Printmaking

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $225 Create an original print using the medium of dry point intaglio with an acrylic plate matrix. Students will produce an edition of at least five consistent prints. No printmaking experience is necessary however intermediate skills in drawing would be advised. Students should bring multiple drawings to the workshop to reference while working on 5-inch by 7-inch plates. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 liz@artcentergreenville.org www.artcentergreenville.org CONCERT

And the Gold Medal Winner Is

The Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. $18-$75 Yekwon Sunwoo, the Gold Medal Winner of the prestigious 2017 Van Cliburn International Competition, makes his South Carolina debut with his thrilling performance of Rachmaninoff’s Third Piano Concerto! This incredible concert comes to a grand finish with Brahms’ heartfelt and passionate Fourth Symphony. www.greenvillesymphony.org

SAT-APR

03-14

LESSONS & TRAINING

Fiction 101

Bobby Pearse Community Center 904 Townes St. 1-4 p.m. | Saturdays skipping March 31 $45/class/city resident; $50/class/non-city residents; entire course - $225/city resident; $250/non-city resident Fiction 101 is geared towards the serious adult or young adult who has dreamed of writing fiction but didn’t have the tools to pursue that goal. Each class will include a short lecture, writing activities, feedback, and discussion. In an informal manner, local author Carol Baldwin, provides a blend of information and hands-on learning experiences. If you sign up for the entire course, you will receive one free class. Registration caps at 15. www.carolbaldwinblog.blogspot.com cbaldwin6@me.com SAT-MAY

03-27

SPORTS

Tickets on Sale Now for the College Baseball Series

Fluor Field | 945 S. Main St. 3 p.m. | $8-$12 The 2018 spring schedule includes the annual installment of the Reedy River Rivalry presented by ScanSource, highlighting the meeting of Clemson and South Carolina in college baseball’s most passionate rivalry, the First Pitch Invitational, and the return of the Southern Conference Tournament to Fluor Field. Tickets for all college games not involving Clemson or South Carolina will be $9. Tickets for games involving Clemson or South Carolina will be sold at regular tiered pricing ranging from $8-$12,

Introducing Adventure Tech at Greenville Tech!

Summer day camps in STEM & culinary education for 11-14 year olds Learn. Discover. Experiment.

Rising 6th through 8th graders are invited to explore career pathways at Greenville Technical College at the new Adventure Tech day camps beginning this summer. The two-day camps in June and July will feature fun, hands-on learning experiences taught by leaders in the fields of STEM/advanced manufacturing and culinary education. Registration begins February 26. Sign up today to receive more information about the curriculum and an exclusive early-bird registration pricing opportunity. • STEM Camp at Center for Manufacturing Innovation (CMI) • Culinary Camp at Northwest Campus Visit gvltec.edu/summer-camps to learn more or to sign up.


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM but tickets for the Reedy River Rivalry can only be purchased through the ticket offices of Clemson and South Carolina. 864-240-4528 | www.bit.ly/FluorCollegeSeries SUN

04

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

TreesGreenville and REI Tweed Ride

TreesGreenville Birds Fly South Ale Project 1320 Hampton Ave. Ext. 1-5 p.m. | $10+ Join TreesGreenville and REI for a bicycle ride along 15 miles of the Swamp Rabbit Trail while wearing tweed. The ride will start at Birds Fly South Ale Project and ride to Travelers Rest and back. The ride will be relaxed and family friendly. 864-313-0765 www.treesgreenville.org/tweed-ride/ MUSIC

Carolina Youth Symphony

Peace Center | Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. | $10/adult, $5/student The Carolina Youth Symphony is one of the premier youth orchestras in the Southeast, with three orchestras consisting of 240 gifted musicians from two states, 39 cities, and 80 schools. The first concert will start at 3 p.m. and will feature the repertory and concert orchestras being led by repertory orchestra conductor Ginger R. Greer and concert orchestra conductor James F. Kilgus. The second concert will begin at 7 p.m. and will feature the symphony orchestra joined by the winners of the Carolina Youth Symphony Concerto Competition. Dr. Leslie W. Hicken will conduct. www.carolinayouthsymphony.org

MON

FAMILY

Adult Authors Ashley 05 Young Poston and Beth Revis to Discuss Latest Books

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 6 p.m. | FREE Young adult authors Ashley Poston and Beth Revis will discuss their books, “Heart of Iron,” and “Rebel Rising.” Please RSVP. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com CONCERT

Willie Nelson & Family

Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $65-$95 Willie Nelson & Family are coming to the Peace Center. With a six-decade career and more than 200 albums, Willie Nelson is the creative genius behind the historic recordings of “Crazy,” “Red Headed Stranger,” and “Stardust.” The iconic Texan has earned every conceivable award as a musician and amassed reputable credentials as an author, actor, and activist. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org CONCERT

Governor’s School Cantus Chamber Choir

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Smith Recital Hall 15 University St. 7:30 p.m. | FREE The S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities’ 21-member Cantus Chamber Choir will present their spring concert. www.scgsah.org

TUE

FAMILY

To Sleep In Your Own 06 “Go Bed!” by Candace Fleming and Lori Nichols

South Carolina Children’s Theatre 1200 Pendleton St. 9:30 and 11 a.m. | $1 A chance for wee ones (Pre-K) to hear a favorite story read and acted out. The material may include audience participation segments or simple audience interaction. The performance will last no more than 30 minutes. 864-235-2885 | scchildrenstheatre.org FUNDRAISER

CDS Hockey Night

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N Academy St. 7 p.m. | $15 The Center for Developmental Services is proud to announce the CDS Hockey Night with the Swamp Rabbits. On this special evening the Swamp Rabbits will go head to head with the Stingrays while wearing CDS themed jerseys. All funds raised will go directly to programs benefitting more than 7,000 children CDS and its partners serves each year. 864-331-1304 | www.cdshockey.com blair.stephenson@cdservices.org TUE-APR

06-10

COMMUNITY

Sowing and Growing Lecture Series

Greenville County Extension Office 6-8 p.m. | Tuesdays Want to learn how to be a better gardener in the Upstate? Join the Greater Greenville Master Gardeners and Clemson Extension agent Jordan Franklin for a six-week series on how to be a successful gardener. You will learn about creating healthy soil, lawn care, growing vegetables, trees, shrubs, flowers, and more. Space is limited and registration ends Feb. 23. 864 232-4431 | aavants@clemson.edu WED

07

COMMUNITY

Navy League Presents Dinner Program on Undersea Warfare during the Cold War

12 Sevier Street Greenville, SC 29605 864-282-8600

embassy-flowers.com

The Upper South Carolina Council of the Navy League Poinsett Club | 807 East Washington St. 6-8:30 p.m. | $33 The Upper South Carolina Council of the Navy League is pleased to announce that Vice Admiral Al Konetzni, USN (ret), will be the guest speaker at its dinner meeting. Admiral Konetzni will give his highly acclaimed multimedia presentation, Undersea Warfare, during the Cold War. 843-819-0614 | www.facebook.com/NLUSUSC THU

08

MUSIC

Jon Stickley Trio

Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Dr. 9:30 p.m. | advance/ $12 day of show/ $20 Jon Stickley Trio is a genre-defying and cinematic instrumental trio, whose deep grooves, innovative flatpicking, and sultry-spacy violin moves the listener’s head, heart, and feet. 864-235-5519 | www.gottrocksgreenville.com FRI-SUN

09-25

PERFORMANCE ARTS

“Ragtime”

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. Greenville Little Theatre will bring an epic piece of musical theater to the stage with their upcoming

production of “Ragtime.” This Tony award-winning musical features some of the Upstate’s most vocally talented performers and features Greenville’s own Delvin Choice in what might be his last local performance before pursuing his dreams of Broadway. 864-233-6238 | www.greenvillelittletheatre.org THRU SAT

10

COMMUNITY

Sensory Friendly Saturdays

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. | 9 a.m.-noon $9/child (ages 1-15); $10/adult; free/member Sensory Friendly Saturdays are designed for children with special sensory needs, sensory processing differences, and other special needs. Children will be encouraged to explore the museum, partake in programming, and engage with our staff in an inclusive and comfortable environment. Bright lights will be dimmed throughout the museum; loud sounds from exhibits will be limited; and there will be designated quiet spaces, with a symbol denoting where quiet spaces are on each floor. 864-233-7755 | info@tcmupstate.org www.tcmupstate.org/sensory-friendly-saturdays/ SAT

10

FAMILY

SCCT’s Character Breakfast

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Poinsett Club | 807 E. Washington St. 8:30 and 11 a.m. | $32 Jaws dropping, cameras flashing, and fairytale celebrity sightings. What can it be and who can you see? It’s the Character Breakfast. A magical morning for children and their families, the Annual Character Breakfast brings together some of the most beloved characters around. From princesses to Winnie the Pooh himself, you’ll have the opportunity to get pictures with them all. Be sure to bring your appetite, because we’re serving up eggs, bacon, grits, fruit, biscuits, beverages, and a heaping helping of fun. 864-235-2885 | www.scchildrenstheatre.org CONCERT

Jason Mraz

Peace Center Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $65-$95 Multiple Grammy Award-winner Jason Mraz has announced plans for a 17-city live tour dubbed “An Evening With Jason Mraz, Solo Acoustic.” 864-467-3000 www.peacecenter.org LITERATURE

Writing Class

Coldwell Banker Caine Building 111 Williams St. Saturdays | $85 Author Carol Baldwin will be hosting a monthly writing class for new and intermediate writers. March 10 class will focus on beginnings, transitions, and endings. Register by March 3 for early bird special. Class time will include writing activities, critique, and discussion. Please see her blog for a list of upcoming topics. Class size is limited to 10 students. www.carolbaldwinblog.blogspot.com cbaldwin6@me.com CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Diamond Jubilee Ball

Guild of the Greenville Symphony Thornblade Club | 1275 Thornblade Blvd., Greer 6 p.m. | $175 The proceeds from this black-tie event will benefit the Greenville Symphony Orchestra.


02.23.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM This year, the Guild will celebrate the Diamond Jubilee Anniversary of 60 years dedicated to supporting the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. This gala event will have lots of sparkle and glamour. Guests will enjoy complimentary valet parking, champagne greeting, open bar, delicious seated dinner, silent and live auctions, and dancing to live music. 864-370-0965 | www.guildGSO.org LITERATURE

Bill Kopp to Discuss New Book

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 2 p.m. | FREE Asheville-based music journalist and author Bill Kopp will discuss his book, “Reinventing Pink Floyd.” RSVP to attend. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com THRU MON

12

VISUAL ARTS

Still Time: Danielle Fontaine

TD Bank Gallery Chamber of Commerce 24 Cleveland St. Fontaine’s fascination with art began as a child, with the architecture of the Montreal World’s Fair. The fantastic forms, colors, and stories of Expo ’67 inspired her to study architecture and later, creative writing. When she discovered encaustics in our wonderful arts community of Greenville, a new storytelling adventure began. www.greenvillearts.com/art-scene/mac-featuredgalleries and www.daniellefontaineartist.com TUE-APR

13-17

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

TreesGreenville Community Tree Keepers Class

TreesGreenville The Community Tap | 217 Wade Hampton Blvd. 6:30-8:30 p.m. | Tuesdays $50/person, or $25/person with 5 TreesGreenville volunteer hours The Community Tree Keeper Course is designed for: TreesGreenville volunteers, master gardeners, master naturalists, park hero volunteers, and anyone interested in learning more about how to properly plant, care, and maintain a healthy urban forest. Minimum age is 18. Master Gardeners can earn continuing education hours. 864-313-0765 | www.SCTreeKeeper.com info@treesgreenville.org TUE

27

COMMUNITY

Upstate SC Alliance Annual Meeting

Upstate Alliance TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Dr. Networking and registration: 11:15 a.m.-noon Luncheon and meeting: noon-1:30 p.m. $25/Upstate SC Alliance investors, $45/noninvestors, $200/investor table for 10 Investors and Friends, please join us for our 2018 Annual Meeting. This event is always our largest of the year, drawing nearly 200 business and civic leaders from across South Carolina’s Upstate to hear the latest on economic development trends and to see updates on the previous year’s activities. This year’s featured speaker is Knudt Flor, president and CEO of BMW Manufacturing Co. 864-283-2305 lscoggins@upstatealliance.com www.bit.ly/UpstateAlliance2018Meeting

THRU WED

28

VISUAL ARTS

“Making Our Mark: The Artists of Studio South”

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. “Making Our Mark” brings together seventeen artists of the Studio South painting group. The work included in the exhibition represents the range of techniques and styles that each member contributes to the group while highlighting the love of painting that they share. www.artcentergreenville.org/maingallery THRU SAT

31

VISUAL ARTS

A Marriage of Mediums: Meredith + Douglas Piper

Coldwell Banker Caine Main Street Real Estate Gallery 428 S. Main St. www.meredithpiper.com www.douglaspiper.com

APR FRI-MAY

06-23

VISUAL ARTS

Material Transformation

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. A group exhibition of artists George Bedell, Donte Hayes, James Lynch, Rob Millard-Mendez, and Kathy Moore. www.artcentergreenville.org/maingallery

MAY THRU WED

16

Artwork of Edith Hardaway and Lou Koppel

JUN 03

The Greenville County Democratic Party County Convention Will be held on Thursday, March 1, at 6 p.m. at the Fuller Normal Industrial Institute, 901 Anderson Road, Greenville SC 29601. Agenda: Election of county party officers, election of state convention delegates, and adoption of resolutions for submission to the state convention. Announced candidates for election in 2018 will address the convention. Paid for by the Greenville County Democratic Party, 1300-J East Washington St., Greenville, SC 29607; Phone 864-232-5331, www.greenvilledemocrats.com.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Iron Hill Brewery of South Carolina, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON & OFF premises consumption of BEER and ON premises consumption of WINE & LIQUOR at 741 Haywood Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 4, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

VISUAL ARTS

The Blood Connection 435 Woodruff Rd. Hardaway’s current body of work reflects the influence that the textile industry had on the upstate. Koppel is a self-taught metal and mixed-media sculptor. His artwork is inspired by the sparse, boldly-colored, geometric works of the Constructivist and Bauhaus artists of the early Twentieth Century. Reception: March 22, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. 864-751-3056

THRU SUN

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

VISUAL ARTS

Superheroes and Superstars: The Works of Alex Ross

Upcountry History Museum 540 Buncombe St. Superheroes and Superstars includes over 100 pieces of original artwork; including paintings, sketches, and models created by Alex Ross, one of the greatest artists in the field of comic books. www.upcountryhistory.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that FWC Greenville, LLC / DBA Foxcroft Wine Co. intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON AND OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 631 South Main Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 11, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Red Horse Inn LTD intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 45 Winstons Chase Court, Landrum, SC 29356. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 4, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-06282 DEFICIENCY REQUESTED Fifth Third Mortgage Company, PLAINTIFF, vs. Kimberly Sue Deaton; Billy L. Deaton; South Carolina Department of Revenue DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the

Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on October 5, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

NOTICE Mountain Springs Holdings, LLC, PO Box 6562, Greenville, SC 29606, contact number: 864-295-2011is seeking Title to a mobile home through a Judicial Sale in Magistrate Court in Greenville, SC. This mobile home is a 1978 Brigadier Mobile Home, Model: GBI. The serial number is: GB1CS27247A&B and is located at17 Willimon Dr., Piedmont, SC 29673. The owner of record at the SC DMV Office is Monica Sylvia Valipour, 17 Willimon Dr., Piedmont, SC 289673. Mountain Springs Holdings, LLC has attempted to contact Monica Sylvia Valipour by certified and regular mail to inform them of this matter.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: IFB#42-03/19/18, Poinsett Highway Streetscape Project, March 19, 2018 3:00 P.M. E.D.T. Mandatory Pre-Bid, March 7, 2018, 10:30 A.M., E.D.T., Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601 Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP#44-03/15/18, Playgrounds, March 15, 2018, 3:00 P.M. E.D.T. RFP#45-03/12/18, Human Relations Consultant Services – Financial Empowerment Center, March 12, 2018, 3:00 P.M. E.D.T. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices $165 Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line

864.679.1205 email: aharley@communityjournals.com


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.23.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Delicacy Beneath the Surface By Frank Longo ACROSS

1 Belgradians, e.g. 6 Head hair hides them 12 Aped 20 Irked a lot 21 Was released 22 In a mannerly manner 23 Start of a riddle 26 Myrna of “The Thin Man” 27 Seasons’ first games 28 Cried feebly 29 Gives in (to) 33 PIN point 34 TV reporter Burnett 36 — Marian 37 Riddle, part 2 45 Currently airing 47 Like straight lines, for short 48 Recycling receptacles 49 Notable years 50 Riddle, part 3 55 Singer Levine 56 — Fridays (restaurant) 57 Dalai — 58 Freeze Away targets 60 Youth org. 63 Bitten at persistently 67 Penalized monetarily 70 Taunt 72 Riddle, part 4 76 Nero or Livy 77 Actress Eva

78 Actress Eva 79 Ar follower 80 Plane parts 82 Korbut of gymnastics 84 Fleur-de- — 86 Tick’s cousin 87 Riddle, part 5 96 Stage decor 97 Champ’s cry 98 Novelist Seton 99 “Ask, I might know the answer” 100 End of the riddle 106 Sword type 107 See 9-Down 108 Basketballer Ming 109 Gift from above 111 Test pilot’s garb 114 Least dry 118 Surg. sites 119 Riddle’s answer 126 More ready to hit the hay 127 Mexican or Guatemalan 128 Wall painting 129 Steed riders 130 Revises, as text 131 Messy types DOWN

1 Toothed tool 2 King James Bible suffix 3 San Luis —, California

4 Really scolded 5 Rose to one’s feet 6 Police rank: Abbr. 7 “It’s Impossible” singer Perry 8 Over 9 With 107-Across, give in to despair 10 “The 25th Annual — County Spelling Bee” 11 Tampa Bay city, for short 12 Stock mkt. debuts 13 Floor cleaner 14 In bad health 15 Neckwear clasps 16 Make harmonious 17 Blue hue 18 Sommer of “The Oscar” 19 Like much blond hair 24 No, to Dmitri 25 Writer Bombeck 29 Love, to Nero or Livy 30 Walking stick 31 French “five” 32 Loafer, e.g. 34 Revise 35 Revive 38 With 113-Down, product’s ultimate consumer 39 Vietnamese celebration 40 Hero type 41 Nets’ org. 42 Form-filling 43 Millet, fescue and sorghum 44 Tuber often candied 46 Going gaga, with “out” 51 Wedding band 52 Lieutenant Geordi on “Star Trek: The Next Generation” 53 Exclude 54 — Zone 55 Zone 59 Disbeliever in God 60 Exclude 61 Like a worse blizzard 62 Confess 64 Birth mo. for many Leos 65 Job-creating FDR agcy. 66 Big shot 68 LAX stat 69 Cannes’ Palme — 71 Mag heads 73 Hamlet, e.g. 74 Ballot site 75 Takei’s “Star Trek” role 81 Close with stitches 83 Way out 85 Full of tension 86 Soup flavor enhancer, for short 88 Over 89 Not Rep. or Dem. 90 Party card game 91 Lower Manhattan sch. 92 Turf toughs 93 Ballyhoo 94 “Preach it!” 95 Really mad, with “off”

97 Krypton-86, for one 101 Cries feebly 102 Gazing sort 103 Baby’s toy 104 New York City moniker 105 Way out 110 Instruments with sticks 111 Lillian of silent films 112 French battle site of ’44 113 See 38-Down 114 Threadbare

Sudoku

Massage. Facials. Stretch.

Hard

115 Suffix with sermon 116 Where the tibia is 117 Minister (to) 120 Tiny — 121 Tiny 122 Set- — (brief fights) 123 Swing to and — 124 Test center 125 Lofty rails Crossword answers: page 12

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 12


PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE The undersigned, pursuant to the South Carolina Self-Storage Facility Act, South Carolina Code Section 39-20-45 will sell at public auction on the website Storage Treasures – www.storagetreasures.com SpaceMax Storage, 305 McAlister Road, Greenville, SC, 29607, 864-240-5494. The auction will conclude at 11:00 A.M. on Wednesday, March 14th, 2018. Unit: 3H18 Tenant: Renata Hill Household Furniture, Household Goods, Boxes Unit: 2A12 Tenant: Fredrick Pyles Household Furniture, Household Goods, Boxes

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-07481 DEFICIENCY WAIVED U.S. Bank National Association, PLAINTIFF, vs. Scott A. McBride; Greenville County Clerk of Court DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to

the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on November 20, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Demolition of Structures, IFB #43-03/13/18, due at 3:00 P.M., E.D.T., Tuesday, March 13, 2018. Pre-Bid meeting at 10:00 A.M., E.D.T., February 28, 2018 at Greenville County Procurement Services, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Auctioneer Services, RFP #46-03/14/18, due at 3:00 P.M., E.D.T., Wednesday, March 14, 2018, at Greenville County Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Procurement/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, =MARCH 14, 2018 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-18-06 APPLICANT: ROBERT CAUDLE/ BETH ANN CAUDLE TAX MAP#: 0624.03-10-007.00 LOCATION 30 Glenolden Drive, Landrum SC REQUEST: Variance from Right Side setback for existing garage CB-18-07 APPLICANT: DAN RYAN BUILDERS TAX MAP#: 0574.35-01-028.00 LOCATION: 208 Red Leaf Lane, Simpsonville SC REQUEST: Variance from Rear setback for existing porch CB-18-08 APPLICANT: CITY ARSENAL/ Garfield Signs & Graphics TAX MAP#: 0172.00-01-014.00 LOCATION: 1210 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville SC REQUEST: Variance from Sign setback requirement APPLICANT: COUNTY of GREENVILLE TAX MAP#: B010.00-02-001.02 LOCATION: 6 Hunts Bridge Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for a new Government Facility Senior Action Community Center

ABC Notices

NOTICE IN THE WORKERS’ COMPENSATION CLAIM OF MICHAEL MORIN VS. SJR ENTERPRISES, LLC AND AMERICAN INTERSTATE INSURANCE The above-identified carrier or self-insurer employer hereby gives notice to Michael Morin that it intends to assume and assert herewith his entitlement to bring a third party action in the above matter against the at-fault driver, on the ground that the right of action of the injured employee has passed to the carrier or self-insurer by statutory assignment for failure to effect a settlement or to commence an action against the third party within one (1) year after the acceptance of liability for payment of Workers’ Compensation by the carrier or self-insurer employer. In the event you wish to pursue this action on your own, you must contact me within the next 20 days or the assignment of your cause of action will be perfected under SC Code 42-1-560. Speed Seta Law Firm 803-748-2919

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2018, AT 6:00 p.m., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT BOUNDARIES SHOULD BE ENLARGED TO INCLUDE REAL PROPERTY LOCATED OFF OF WEST GEORGIA ROAD AND ROCKY CREEK ROAD. THE NEW BOUNDARY LINES TO RESULT FOR THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE THAT AREA KNOWN AS GREENVILLE TAX MAP NUMBER (TMS#) 0575.03-01-004.01. A MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. THE REASON FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTING OF SEWAGE AND WASTE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE SUBDISTRICT, NOR WILLTHERE BE ANY CHANGES IN THE COMMISSION OR THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT. BUTCH KIRVEN, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

Unit: 2G20 Tenant: Dennis Johnson Household Furniture, Household Goods, Boxes, Speakers Unit: 2A32 Tenant: Amy Johnson Household Furniture, Household Goods, Boxes, Mattress Unit: 3H09 Tenant: Earlis Dixon Household Furniture, Household Goods, Boxes

SUMMONS (NON-JURY) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2017-CP-23-07829 Gatlin Family Enterprises, Inc., Plaintiffs, VS. Carmax Auto Superstores, Inc., Carmax Business Services, Inc. and Williams Thomas Wiggins, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiff shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. COMPLAINT (NON-JURY) The Plaintiff will prove the following: FOR A FIRST CAUSE OF ACTION 1) Plaintiff is a company located and doing business in Greenville County. 2) Defendant Carmax Auto Superstores, Inc. (Carmax) is a company doing business in Greenvi Defendant Carmax Business Services, Inc. (CBS) is a company doing business in Greenville County. Upon information and belief, CBS is a financing entity closely associated with Carmax. 4) Defendant Williams Thomas Wiggins (Wiggins) is, upon information and belief, a resident of Greenville County. 5) Defendant Wiggins sold a vehicle to Carmax, receiving a check in the amount of $20,500.00. 6) Defendant Wiggins then took the check to Plaintiff and attempted to cash it. Plaintiff contacted Carmax and was assured by an authorized representative of Carmax and/ or CBS that the check was good. 7) In reliance on Carmax’s and/or CBS’s assurance that the check was good, Plaintiff gave Defendant Wiggins cash in return for his endorsing the check to Plaintiff. 8) Plaintiff then attempted to cash the check but was told that the check was not good because Carmax and/or CBS had canceled the purchase of the vehicle, returned the vehicle to Wiggins and stopped payment on the check. 9) Plaintiff is entitled to a judgment against Carmax and/ or CBS for the amount it paid

to Wiggins, under the doctrine of promissory estoppel, in an amount to be determined by the trier of fact. FOR A SECOND CAUSE OF ACTION 10) All previous consistent allegations are repeated herein. 11) Carmax and/or CBS had a duty to Plaintiff to provide correct information regarding the check issued to Wiggins. 12) Carmax and/or CBS breached this duty by informing Plaintiff that the check was good, then stopping payment on the check. 13) As a result of Carmax’s and/ or CBS’s breach of duty, Plaintiff was damaged in that it gave cash to Defendant Wiggins but was unable to cash the check that it received in return. 14) Plaintiff is entitled to judgment against Carmax and/ or CBS in an amount to be determined by the trier of fact. FOR A THIRD CAUSE OF ACTION 15) All previous consistent allegations are repeated herein. 16) Carmax’s and/or CBS’s actions are deliberate, unfair and deceptive actions made in the course of trade and commerce. 17) These actions are capable of repetition and damage the interests of the public. 18) Plaintiff is entitled to judgment against Carmax and/ or CBS under Section 39 – 5 – 10, et seq., SC Code for damages as provided in that statute. FOR A FOURTH CAUSE OF ACTION 19) All previous consistent allegations are repeated herein 20) Plaintiff and Wiggins entered into a contract whereby Plaintiff provided cash to Wiggins in return for Wiggins’ endorsement of the above – mentioned check and giving the check to Plaintiff. 21) Wiggins then received the return of his vehicle from Carmax and/ or CBS and kept the money he received from Plaintiff in return for the check. 22) Wiggins is unjustly enriched by being allowed to keep the cash obtained from Plaintiff and also the vehicle that he had sold to Carmax and/or CBS. 23) Plaintiff is entitled to judgment against Defendant Wiggins in an amount to be determined by the trier of fact. WHEREFORE, Plaintiff requests judgment against the Defendants as pled for above, in an amount to be determined by the trier of fact. C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 S.C. State Bar No.: 5346

SUMMONS (NON-JURY) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2017-CP-23-07438 Gendlin Homes, LLC, Plaintiff, Vs. Christopher Bernard Smith, Christopher J. Smith – Robinson, LVNV Funding, LLC, The City of Greenville, The United States of America, Cach LLC, The State of South Carolina, and all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #0200.00-08026.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: INFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL those three (3) certain lots of land situate in State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, City of Greenville, and being known as Lots No. 23, 24 and 25 of Block B of the subdivision known as Jefferson Heights, according to a plat of same recorded in Plat Book C at Pages 34 and 35, and being described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on Second Avenue at joint corner with land now or formerly of L. A. Mills and running thence along the line of Lot No. 25, N. 81 – 40 E. 87.5 feet to a pin at the corner of Lot No. 50; thence along the back line of Lots No. 50, 49 and 48, N. 0– 30 E. 76.3 feet to a pin; thence along the line of Lot No. 22, S. 81 – 40 W. 87.5 feet to a pin on Second Avenue; thence along said Second Avenue S. 0 – 30 W. 76.3 to the point of BEGINNING. Reference is made to said plat for a more detailed description. TAX MAP #0200.00-08-026.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346

ENGAGEMENTS ENGAGEMENTS ANNIVERSARIES ANNIVERSARIES ANNIVERSARIES 

AMENDED SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT (NON-JURY) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2017-CP-23-06842 Grace Kelley, LLC, Plaintiff, V. Loretta D. Thompson, all unknown heirs of Teretha Parks Gault, all unknown heirs of Mildred Butler, Willie Mae Williams, Shirley Williams, Beverly Hunt, all unknown heirs of Leila Booker, and all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #0026.00-07-011.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Amended Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Amended Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Amended Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply for the Court the relief demanded in the Amended Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Amended Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: INFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO , ,(GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Amended Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon amended complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that piece, parcel or tract of land located, lying and being in the County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, in Greenville Township at the intersection of Cook Street and a forty foot street having a frontage of 45 feet more or less on Cook Street with a depth along the 40 foot Street of 100 feet more or less and being the remainder of lots conveyed to S J Eassy by G B Stoeber by Deed 21, Page 71, recorded August 20, 1912 in the RMC Office for Greenville County. Tax Map # 0026.0007-011.00 C. Richard Stewart; SC Bar #5346 Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 dstewart@ attorneyrichardstewart.com



 

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February 23, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

February 23, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.