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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, February 17, 2017 • Vol.19, No.7

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

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On behalf of the C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS family, we want to say thank you to the Upstate for making 2016 another fantastic year! It is a great honor and privilege to help families achieve their homeownership dreams, and we are humbled by the loyalty of our clients for ongoing referrals and repeat business. Because of our clients – and the best agents in the business – we remain the #1 real estate company in the Upstate, a position we’ve held for more than 25 years. But who we really consider #1 are our clients. By putting our clients’ needs first, great things happen. Relationships are built. Families find a place to call home. Communities grow. We want to personally thank all of our associates, who truly are the best in the business, and congratulate the top producers for an outstanding year in 2016. We look forward to working together this year to help more families achieve their real estate dreams through our strong commitment to relationships, family and community.

CELEBRATING SUCCESS C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS recognizes agents for stellar performance in 2016.

Danny Joyner

David Crigler

President & CEO

Executive Vice President


2 0 1 6 AWA R D WI N N E R S Gia & Company Anderson

Greg Huff

Commercial #1 Commercial Agent

Cousins & Associates

Simpsonville Simpsonville #1 Team

Jan Walker Team Greer Greer #1 Team

Foronda Hall & Associates

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Beresh/Martin Group

DeYoung Company

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Bob Schmidt

Linda Ballard

Jill Chapman

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Simpsonville Simpsonville #1 Agent

The Gillis Group

Katy Glidewell

Ronda & Chris Holder

Sandra Palmer & Associates

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Jim Fritzsche Pelham Road

Donna O. Smith & Partners

Lisa Norton Reese N. Pleasantburg

Augusta Road Augusta Road #1 Agent

Carmen Feemster Augusta Road

Easley

Garlington Road #1 Garlington Road Team

Jill Norman

Greer

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Ginger Sherman

Augusta Road

Augusta Road

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Ginny Wylie Pelham Road

Mashburn-Floore Team N. Pleasantburg

Jean Keenan

Garlington Road #1 Garlington Road Agent

Keith Boling Downtown

The Cassity Partnership

Beth Crigler

Sheila Smalley

Cate Thompson

Eddie Burch

Vicki Roark

Nation & Associates

Bob & Linda Brown Group

Elvin Rivera

Mike Wallace

Stephanie Miller

Sheila Newton Team

Augusta Road

Garlington Road

Pelham Road

Garlington Road

Augusta Road

N. Pleasantburg

Anderson

Simpsonville

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, February 17, 2017 • Vol.19, No.7

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

Remembering

Rosenwald How a Jewish businessman built 500 schools in S.C. and changed black lives for the better

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2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EDITOR | Chris Haire chaire@communityjournals.com

Our mortgage rates and options can save you money.

MANAGING EDITOR | Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Emily Pietras | epietras@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS David Dykes | ddykes@communityjournals.com Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com Melinda Young | myoung@communityjournals.com OPERATIONS MANAGER | Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Jane Rogers

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BILLING INQUIRIES | Shannon Rochester MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Nicole Greer | Donna Johnston Annie Langston | Rosie Peck Caroline Spivey | Emily Yepes VISUAL DIRECTOR | Will Crooks LAYOUT | Bo Leslie | Tammy Smith ADVERTISING DESIGN Kristy Adair | Michael Allen EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT | Kristi Fortner CHAIRMAN | Douglas J. Greenlaw

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581 perry ave., greenville, sc 29611 phone: 864-679-1200 delivery inquiries: 864-679-1240 communityjournals.com © 2015 published by community journals llc. all rights reserved. all property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of community journals. no part of this publication may be reproduced, scanned, stored, distributed or transmitted by any means – whether auditory, graphic, mechanical, or electronic – without written permission from the publisher.

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02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

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page three

They Said It

“It’s very unpredictable at this point. Failure would be catastrophic.” Dave Hargett of the Conestee Foundation, on the state of the 125-year-old stone masonry dam currently holding back Lake Conestee.

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“We were shocked.” Katy Smith, executive director of Piedmont Health Foundation, remembering the reaction to a study finding that public funding for the Greenlink transit system lags significantly behind other cities.

“People have to believe you and believe your word and know that you’re not there for yourself.” Minor Shaw, winner of the annual James F. Barker Ethics in Action Award, explaining how integrity has shaped her professional and philanthropic endeavors.

Photo by Will Crooks

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION Views from your community

Sanford: My plan to replace Obamacare By Mark Sanford

Republicans in Washington have voted more than 60 times to repeal the Affordable Care Act — what some call Obamacare. It was popular to do so. It was also a safe vote. But that has changed because, for just the fourth time in the history of our republic, voters gave Republicans the keys to the House, Senate, and White House. Repeal is no longer a symbolic vote. It could bring with it change that some would like, and others wouldn’t. And so what we have seen in Congress recently is backtracking. Maybe we will repeal Obamacare, but not in its entirety. Maybe we will repeal, but not replace. It’s essential we do both. I’d humbly submit that Congress should not just be against something; it should be for something too — especially here. Health is vital and personal. It can mean life or

death. It affects those you most love. All these things make it crucial we are thoughtful in offering a remedy. It’s for these reasons that U.S. Sen. Rand Paul and I are introducing the Obamacare Replacement Act. Our plan is built around free-market principles vital to improving any product or service but, in this case, necessary to better care, access, and health care pricing. These things are missing in health care and made worse with Obamacare. So, what we do is assemble the building blocks that would create a market and empower each of us in our health care decisions. Our plan legalizes less expensive health insurance. Think about it. Right now, you can’t buy inexpensive plans. With aging comes more ailments, and yet if you’re young you can’t purchase a simple plan that fits your shorter list of aches and

pains. Obamacare’s minimum coverage mandates mean that each of us has to buy a plan that has what government deems essential, even if we don’t. This drives up cost, and consequently many young people simply skip on health insurance. Government dictating content and enrollment is hardly a monument to freedom, but it’s been catastrophic in escalating cost and limiting choice. In South Carolina, we are now down to one Obamacare insurance provider, and average premiums increased by 28 percent this year. Our plan affords the rest of us what employers already have. This is big. If an employer offers health insurance to an employee, the cost is deducted. The rest of us don’t get the same. Health insurance was linked to employment as a way of getting around the wage and price controls of World War II, but it shouldn’t be this way today. You don’t get your home or car insurance through your work, and doing Drawn Out Loud by Steve Stegelin so would create problems. Some people stay with jobs they don’t like just to hang onto health insurance; still others spend more thinking they are spending others’ money. People feeling like they are spending someone else’s money does not make for market pricing. To further competitive forces, we allow you to buy health insurance across state lines, just as you do with other forms of insurance. We also allow you to create buying power that comes with scale. One Realtor isn’t much in the

market, but 100,000 Realtors pooled together gives them the buying power of a large corporation. We strengthen an individual’s health savings account (HSA) to give more boost to people spending their own money. Did you know that with services like Lasik or plastic surgery, the areas of medicine where people spend their own money, prices have come down? Our plan expands HSA access to everyone, removes the contribution limit, and gives a nonrefundable tax credit of up to $5,000 a year. We even incorporate a few good ideas from Obamacare. This plan lets children stay on their parent’s plan until the age of 26. It’s reasonable to let someone deal with the costs of life after they have gotten started in life and finished school. We allow for pre-existing conditions, because some of us will be more fortunate than others here. I don’t want my sister to get cancer, but if she did, I would struggle with the idea of an insurance company knocking her off the rolls based on her misfortune. So in our plan, as long as you buy insurance and stay on it, they can’t kick you off. Obamacare did the reverse. It incentivized people waiting until they were sick to get insurance. This proved to be one of its fatal flaws, and our bill fixes it. Think about it like this: Do you wait until your house is burning to buy fire insurance? Obamacare was supposed to expand insurance options and lower premiums. We were promised that if we liked our plan, we could keep it. It didn’t work out that way, so it’s indeed time for a change. Mark Sanford is a U.S. Congressman from the Charleston area and the former governor of South Carolina.

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

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NEW HEIGHTS Like the Liberty Bridge in Falls Park, the city’s new west side park may have a signature attraction — an eight-story tower Iconic parks have iconic centerpieces. Chicago’s Millennium Park has The Bean. St. Louis’ Jefferson Expansion Memorial Park has The Arch. Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park has the interactive Fountain of Rings. Greenville’s major parks have signature features, too, that one thing that becomes the symbol for the park itself. Falls Park has The Liberty Bridge, Cleveland Park has the Greenville Zoo, and the Cancer Survivor’s Park will soon have an education center and pavilion. But what will symbolize City Park, the proposed park on Greenville’s western flank? A tower, at least according to very preliminary sketches revealed by Darren Meyer, principal of the Columbus, Ohio-based urban design and landscape architecture firm MKSK, which is opening an office in Greenville. At eight stories tall, the tower would provide views of the Greenville skyline. An 80foot tower would provide a panoramic view of the Blue Ridge Mountains as well. Meyer studied the Greenville Mill, the Liberty Bridge, Furman’s Bell Tower, the Southern Railway passenger station, Poe Mill, Mills Mill, Huguenot Mill, and the historic City Hall, a red brick Romanesque revival building built in 1892 and torn down in the 1970s. It could be made of wood, masonry, weathered steel, or glass. A tower for City Park is not a new idea. Renderings for the park completed by landscape architect Tom Keith of Arbor Engineering more than a decade ago also contained a tower. Other parks around the world have observation towers, too, including Killesbergpark in Stuttgart, Germany, which features a cable-stayed tower that gives park-goers a panoramic view of the city. —Cindy Landrum

The city is looking at smokestacks, like this one at Poe Mill, as inspiration for the proposed City Park tower. Photo by Will Crooks.

Among the ideas proposed by consultant MKSK is a calla lilyinspired tower with an observation deck.

The observation tower in Stuttgart, Germany’s Killesbergpark is 120 feet tall. Photo by Ben Garrett via Creative Commons.

The Bean in Chicago’s Millennium Park is made from 168 sheets of stainless steel. Photo by Vanessa Vancour via Creative Commons.


6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

‘Dams Don’t Last Forever’ Lake Conestee’s dam could spell disaster for the Reedy River, owner says ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

To hear the Conestee Foundation’s Dave Hargett tell it, Lake Conestee is one step closer to causing one of the worst environmental disasters in the Upstate since the 1996 Colonial Pipeline spill. That spill dumped nearly 1 million gallons of diesel fuel into the Reedy River. Lake Conestee, which is located on the Reedy River near Mauldin, holds about 2.8 million tons of sediment that’s been polluted with heavy metals like arsenic, pesticides, and cancer-causing chemical compounds. The toxins are thought to have been discharged from the textile mills, coal plants, and dyeing operations that were once located along the Reedy River.

The toxins eventually mixed with the river’s sediment and flowed downstream to Lake Conestee, where it now sits behind a 125-yearold stone masonry dam that’s quickly failing. In December, the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control rated the Lake Conestee dam in poor condition because its mortar is deteriorating and water from the lake is seeping through small cracks, according to DHEC spokeswoman Jennifer Read. “I think the dam could last another 10 years or so if it’s left alone. But it could slip if a significant flood or seismic event were to hit Greenville. … It’s very unpredictable at this point,” Hargett said. “Failure would be catastrophic.” Within 48 hours of the dam’s failure, large pieces of woody debris from Lake Conestee would likely float down the Reedy River and damage the Conestee Road bridge, which was built in 1958. That would close Conestee Road and disrupt businesses between Mauldin Road and the S.C. Technology and Aviation Center, according to Hargett. The dam would also release the lake’s toxic sediment into the Reedy River, where it would eventually float downstream to Boyd Pond in Laurens and Lake Greenwood, which provides

Conestee Foundation’s Dave Hargett. Photo by Will Crooks.

drinking water for more than 40,000 Greenwood County residents. “There’s actually enough sediment in the lake to fill the [Carolina] Panthers stadium, and it’s going to come blasting out into the Reedy if the dam’s not eventually repaired or replaced,” Hargett said. “Dams don’t last forever.” Now, the Conestee Foundation, the non-

profit that purchased the lake property in 2000, is trying to prevent the dam’s failure. Hargett has asked DHEC to include a $185,000 proviso in its 2017–2018 budget to fund an engineering study that will help the foundation identify a long-term solution for the dam. The state House Ways and Means health care subcommittee has approved the proviso, according to Hargett. However, it also has

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02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

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NEWS «

to be approved by the House and Senate. “DHEC has been really supportive throughout the process, but you never really know how it’ll play out,” Hargett said. “The state might not have enough money.” If the proviso is approved, Hargett plans to finish the study this year and eventually build a dam that protects the Reedy River for more than 100 years. However, that could cost at least $30 million. “We’re not going to ask taxpayers to pay for the new dam. But the study allows us to be shovel-ready should federal assistance come along later down the road,” Hargett said. “The only other option would be to go after the responsible parties that contaminated the river.” Many of the companies once located along the Reedy River have gone out of business, making it almost impossible for the foundation to file a suit under the Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund laws, he added. Also, the foundation can’t remove the dam because it would cost more than $1 billion to remove the toxic sediment from the lake. That means the foundation will likely need to build a new dam further downstream, leaving the Conestee dam to act as the first line of defense against the water and sediment, Hargett said. The foundation has struggled to contain the lake’s sediment for more than a decade. In 2000, Hargett started the Conestee Foundation and used settlement funds from

the Colonial Pipeline spill to purchase Lake Conestee and its dam. The nonprofit had to repair the dam in 2001 after a gate unclogged and released toxic sediment downstream. The foundation was also awarded a $200,000 grant from the EPA in 2011 to perform another major repair. So far, the foundation has spent more than $350,000 on engineering assessments, repairs, and maintenance, Hargett said. “We’ve really done everything we can to keep the dam from falling apart.” Hargett added that the foundation entered a voluntary cleanup contract with DHEC in 2000 and sampled the lake’s water until 2008. The health department determined that it was best for the foundation to leave the dam alone, allowing the sediment to settle at the bottom of the lake. Now, the dam poses a larger threat to future developments along the Reedy River. Hargett said the nearby Conestee Mill has garnered interest from several developers over the years. And if the property was ever redeveloped for retail or housing, DHEC would reclassify the dam as a high hazard structure, meaning its failure would likely result in the loss of life. “We’re not discouraging the development of the mill. That’d be great for the area,” Hargett said. “We just want the mill to be developed responsibly.”

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8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017

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NEWS

BUILDING BOOM

‘B’ is for Building… and Billion

South Carolina’s public colleges and technical schools have requested about $1 billion in added money in next year’s state budget, the bulk of which would go to capital projects. Here’s a sampling of what they want and why:

Clemson, Greenville Tech, and others ask for $1B in construction money from the state

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY Advanced Materials Science Complex Building Request: $25 million Synopsis: New 210,000-square-foot home for materials science and engineering, chemical and bio-molecular engineering and chemistry. Justification: Current buildings for programs are antiquated and require frequent maintenance. They have outdated labs and no longer meet instructional and technological needs.

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA USC Columbia School of Medicine Relocation Request: $50 million Synopsis: 130,000-square-foot teaching facility would be first of two phases in moving the medical school from space leased at Dorn Veterans Affairs Center. Justification: Lease runs out in 2030 and the facility needs significant capital investment.

clandrum@communityjournals.com

When Sirrine Hall, the home of the Clemson University College of Business and Behavioral Sciences, was built, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was president and the university’s enrollment was 10 times less than it is now. Since then, the college has outgrown Rendering of Greenville Tech renovations the space. building, too. The school wants a In response, the university plans $29.5 million building for its health to build a new $87.5 million business sciences and arts and sciences probuilding near Bowman Field to accom- grams. The new building would allow modate increasing enrollment, smaller the school to add programs such as classes, and new technology. medical equipment repair, cardiovasThe price tag for the new building: cular technology, and electrical and $25 million from the 2017–18 state electronics drafting, among others. budget. Once the building is constructed, the That’s not all that Clemson’s asking school could renovate one of the curfor. They also want $64.5 million for rent buildings in order to bring offother projects. Clemson is not the only uniProposed USC Upstate versity asking for construction library addition money. Combined, South Carolina’s two- and four-year colleges and universities have asked for $1 billion in new money, and most of that is for renovations and new construction. Like Clemson, the other schools cite rising enrollments as the cause. Greenville Technical College has requested money for a new

site admissions services to the Barton campus. Some state legislators have said they’d consider a bond bill to pay for capital projects. “We’re just waiting on a governor who won’t veto it,” said Sen. Brad Hutto (D-Orangeburg). The legislature last passed a bond bill for higher education in 2001. The Senate Finance Committee proposed a $236.7 million bill for higher education and the state’s National Guard armories, but it stalled because former Gov. Nikki Haley threatened a veto. The state House Ways and Means Committee is in the midst of holding a series of subcommittee meetings on the 2017-18 budget and is expected to begin full committee budget deliberations the week of Feb. 20. The full House is expected to consider the budget the week of March 13.

USC UPSTATE Library Addition Request: $17 million Synopsis: New HVAC system, new lighting, new addition for library expansion. Justification: Library needs have changed since library was built. GREENVILLE TECHNICAL COLLEGE Health Sciences/Arts and Sciences Building Request: $29.5 million Synopsis: Would provide space for STEM-related education in health sciences, biological sciences, and biotech disciplines, along with room for general education classes. Justification: The College would be able to better serve employers by expanding some programs and adding new manufacturing and medical-related offerings. LANDER UNIVERSITY Nursing Building Addition Request: $5 million Synopsis: Additional classrooms and simulation lab. Justification: Enrollment in nursing program has doubled since 1998.

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Reading Vision Correction is Here! The inlay is a tiny porous ring placed in the cornea. It works like a camera aperture, returning reading vision to patients. Almost 114 million people in America struggle with agerelated near vision loss (presbyopia). The inlay is designed to reduce or eliminate the need for reading glasses in people generally over 40 who have good distance vision, but problems with near vision. With the Kamra procedure, patients previously dependent on readers can see things up close again – menus, text messages, food labels, computers, books, magazines – and still have clear distance vision.

Frustrated with your readers? There’s a solution.

It received FDA approval in April 2015. Since then, more than 1,500 have been implanted in the United States. Note that more than 37,000 have been implanted worldwide over the past 10 years.

Clemson Eye is the first and only clinic in the Upstate to offer patients reading vision correction through the KamraTM corneal inlay.

“We are proud to be first in the Upstate to offer patients this procedure. The Kamra is a great solution for people in their 40s and 50s who are frustrated with blurry near vision.

ADVERTORIAL

The inlay offers presbyopia patients a safe reading vision correction solution and freedom from the hassle of readers,” says Dr. Joseph Parisi, Chief Ophthalmologist and Medical Director at Clemson Eye. The elective procedure takes about 15 minutes and is reversible if the patient chooses. Even patients who have had previous eye surgery, such as cataract patients, or who wear bifocals can be candidates for the Kamra. Clemson Eye offers free reading vision correction consultations. To find out if you’re a candidate, call today to book your appointment. Clemson Eye’s new Greenville location is 360 Pelham Road, just off Haywood. Clemson Eye has been a leading provider of eye care in the area for 40 years.

New Technology for Cataract Patients Cataracts are a common eye condition where the natural lens becomes clouded, impairing a patient’s vision. According to the National Eye Institute, more than 20 percent of Americans will have cataracts by the age of 65, and the prevalence increases with age. In cataract surgery, the clouded natural lens is removed and replaced with an IOL. For many patients, cataract surgery freed them from prescription glasses, but sometimes replaced them with readers. A new intraocular lens (IOL) that provides a full range of vision for cataract patients, even those with astigmatism, is now an option for many patients. Clemson Eye surgeon Dr. Brian Johnson calls The Symfony lens a “game changer.” In September, Dr. Johnson became one of the first surgeons in Greenville to implant the new lens, which was just approved by the FDA in July for use in the U.S.

Until the Symfony, cataract patients with significant astigmatism were limited to monofocal lens implants that would correct either distance or near vision, but not both. Symfony is the first extended depth of focus lens with astigmatism correction. This allows excellent night vision and sharpness of vision (visual acuity) at near, intermediate and far distances. New technology innovations, like the Symfony, continue to improve the IOLs and the visual outcomes for patients with a variety of conditions. The two most significant improvements are vastly improved intermediate vision and an extended range of vision acuity for patients with astigmatism.

The Symfony has been in use in 49 countries for several years, but the FDA approval came after a randomized clinical trial of 148 patients. In that trial, 77 percent of Symfony patients had 20/25 vision at intermediate distances, compared with 34 percent who had a traditional mono-focal lens. Near vision for reading was improved and patients were able to read two levels of smaller lines than their mono-focal counterparts. “Patients who have received these have been very excited and pleased with how their lifestyles have improved,” Dr. Johnson notes. “These lenses are ideal for patients who have an active lifestyle. They meet the needs of our patients who like to golf, use a computer or tablet, shop, use a smartphone, and drive at night.”


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Cookie

You lookin’ at me? You should be.

I’ve heard there are some people out there who have reasons for not adopting a shelter pet. Well, whatever their reason may be, they’re wrong. Let me tell you why everyone should adopt and not shop. First, you’re helping more than just one animal. The animal you adopt gets a loving home and space is made for another who still needs to find theirs. You’re also saving a life. The facts are simple; there are more animals in the world than people who want to adopt. We need humans on our team! It will also cost you less - WAY less. Animal Care’s $35 adoption fee covers spay/neuter, vaccines, microchip and testing. Plus, no purebred will be half as thankful that you adopted them as an animal who knows what it’s like to be homeless. So please, adopt at Animal Care!

GreenvillePets.org

Making the Case for More Money Greenlink’s new director says the public transportation system needs to make a case for more local money. “It’s not fair to go to the City Council, County Council, or the state legislature saying we need more money without a plan,” said Gary Shepard, who ran two transit authorities in Massachusetts, including the Pioneer Valley Transit Authority in Western Massachusetts, the largest regional transit authority in the state. “We’re going to have a plan that makes sense for this community.” Shepard, who also worked as an economic development director in Springfield, Mass., said he wants to work toward half-hour routes and expanded hours at night and on the weekends. “Transportation is economic development, and economic development is transportation,” Shepard said. “Every time we provided transportation to someone to get to an employment opportunity, we’re adding to the economy. Every time we get somebody to shopping, we’re helping small business. Every time we get a student from Furman to an in-

Transit System Revenues, by Source AREA Birmingham, AL Charleston, SC Chattanooga, TN Columbia, SC Greensboro, NC Greenville, SC Mobile, AL Nashville, TN Richmond, VA Winston-Salem, NC

Total Revenues $35,311,910 $19,629,699 $20,614,444 $19,235,384 $22,824,403 $5,666,655 $11,727,427 $89,068,494 $51,457,238 $14,585,946

Local 62% 49% 25% 50% 48% 13% 55% 53% 42% 45%

State 0% 0% 13% 30% 7% 11% 0% 7% 20% 9%

Federal 31% 29% 22% 8% 27% 48% 35% 21% 15% 28%

Fare 7% 18% 22% 11% 16% 17% 8% 14% 21% 16%

Other 0% 3% 17% 1% 2% 11% 1% 5% 1% 2%

Source: TS1.1 - Total Funding Time Series

$40.70 $38.16 $30.69 $28.46 $17.79

$49.22

$48.22 $33.14

RICHMOND, VA

NASHVILLE, TN

MOBILE, AL

GREENVILLE, SC

$3.76 WINSTON-SALEM, NC

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Greenlink, Greenville County’s public transportation system, receives significantly less money from local sources than its counterparts in comparable cities in the Southeast, according to a study released last Wednesday by the Piedmont Health Foundation. Greenlink receives $3.76 million in revenues from local sources for its fixed routes, more than four times less than any of the eight other cities included in the study. Greenlink receives 19 times less in local revenue than the top city in the study, Nashville, Tenn. “We thought it would show the need for more money for buses, but what we heard is that it’s much bigger than that,” said Katy Smith, Piedmont Health Foundation executive director. “We were shocked.” Piedmont Health Foundation compared Greenlink’s revenue to public transportation systems in Birmingham, Ala.; Charleston; Chattanooga, Tenn.; Greensboro, N.C.; Mobile, Ala.; Nashville, Tenn.; Richmond, Va.; and Winston-Salem, N.C., cities that have comparable populations, geography, or economies. One dollar out of every 10 Greenlink receives comes from either Greenville County or the City of Greenville. Greenlink’s local revenue as a percentage of budget is 13 percent. That compares to 49 percent in Charleston and 50 percent in Columbia. Richland County passed a penny sales tax for transportation in 2012. Charleston voters approved a half-cent sales tax in November that will add $600 million for public transit. Charleston voters also passed a half-cent sales tax for mass transit in

$71.45

GREENSBORO, NC

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Local Funds Per Capita by Service Area, 2015

COLUMBIA, SC

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

2004. The City of Greenville pays for Greenlink’s management, a figure that was not included in the foundation’s local revenue figures. “Even if it was counted, the local contribution to Greenlink is still paltry,” Smith said. The lack of local money hits Greenlink with a double-whammy. There’s more flexibility with local funds and allowing systems to innovate to better serve residents, Smith said. Ridership, along with miles covered and hours run, determines how much federal money Greenlink receives, so if people aren’t riding the buses, it has a direct impact, she said. Greenlink’s ridership in Greenville County is the lowest of all the cities included in the study. Ridership in Greenlink’s service area, defined as areas within three-fourths of a mile of fixed routes, was second lowest, ahead of only Mobile, Ala. Greenlink’s fares are competitive with other markets, the study said.

CHATTANOOGA, TN

Local funding for Greenville’s bus system lags significantly behind other cities

CHARLESTON, SC

Correspondent

It’s Not Easy Being Greenlink

BIRMINGHAM, AL

Animal Care’s

Local revenues per capita by service area, source: 2015 Database Revenue and 2015 Annual Database Service, FTA NTD.

ternship, we’re adding to the brain power of the region.” But right now, the system can’t tell where its riders get on and off the bus. A comprehensive operational analysis is underway to identify the system’s inefficiencies and strengths and to lead to a full-blown transportation plan, Shepard said. The bottom line is that the system doesn’t provide service that appeals to all segments of the population. “Folks who are using vehicles today are not our customers because we do not go where they want to go when they want to go,” Shepard said. “People who have to get from Simpsonville to the Eastside to work don’t want to have to go from Simpsonville to downtown to Eastside. Who would want to use that system?” Shepard said. Shepard said Greenlink needs to get people to work faster, and that could include more routes with smaller buses. “Taxpayers hate to see a big bus with one person on it,” he said. Small pilot projects with bidirectional and 30-minute routes could allow Greenlink to establish credibility and get people to start thinking about public transportation as an alternative, not a last resort. Shepard hopes to gain the support of the business community in improving the system. Katy Smith, executive director of the Piedmont Health Foundation that studied Greenlink’s financing compared to other bus systems in the Southeast, said Shepard’s new ideas could help Greenlink increase ridership. She would also like to test the notion that Clemson’s public transportation system is more successful than Greenlink because it has a built-in customer base — Clemson University students. “We’ve got Furman and Greenville Tech, employers who run shifts, and the density of downtown,” she said. “If we look at our populations differently and start thinking about making them customers, we can convert them into transit users.”


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NEWS

Crossroads City Council candidate Russell Stall eyes smart growth, affordable housing, connectivity, public spaces, and safe neighborhoods CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Greenville City Council candidate Russell Stall is not a proponent of stopping growth. He is a proponent of deliberate and intentional growth. “Greenville is at a crossroads right now,” said Stall, the retired founder and former executive director of Greenville Forward, a nonprofit established in 2006 to facilitate Vision 2025, a plan developed by hundreds of residents that pictured Greenville as a place with a marquee downtown park along the Reedy River, minor league baseball downtown, and an improved bus system. “We must have the courage to plan growth intentionally and deliberately and be smart.” Stall officially announced he would run as a Democrat for an at-large seat on Greenville City Council currently held by Gaye Sprague. Sprague has held the seat since 2009 and has announced she will not run for re-election. Running for one of council’s two at-large seats instead of a district that represents only a portion of the city was important to Stall, who is making his first go at elected office. “I have a history of connectedness and a history of listening to the community as a whole,” he said. “That’s really what Greenville Forward was about, collecting the voices of Greenville and responding to them.” Stall said growth is inevitable and necessary. “We have to grow as a community. If you stop growing, you stop prospering,” he said. “But we’ve got to be smart about it.” He pointed to the proposed 55 Camperdown project that would have put a modern office building on the banks of the Reedy River near the Main Street bridge. “To me, it didn’t make sense. It destroyed the aura of the Reedy River,” he said. “We just have to think about how the different developments coming into Greenville fit. There are communities across the country that have done a good job with planned growth that we should emulate. We just need to think about it.” Stall said how the city, along with Green-

Russell Stall

ville County, handles the redevelopment of County Square, which ultimately could be the largest development in the history of downtown, will be “really important in showing which direction the city is going.” “That is one of the best pieces of real estate in Greenville County, and it can’t just be a bunch of apartments and condos,” said Stall, as he stood in Falls Park looking toward County Square while the sound of hammers echoed away from one of the many developments under construction in the background. In addition to smart, sustainable growth, Stall said affordable housing, connectivity, parks and public spaces, and safe and authentic neighborhoods are keys to Greenville’s continued success. “As more same-looking apartment complexes are constructed, our city is losing some of the charm derived from creative and varied architectural styles,” he said. Parks and public spaces differentiate Greenville from other communities, he said. He said Main Street is an amazing example of what planning can do. “We are at a critical time in our city’s future,” he said. Prior to founding Greenville Forward, Stall owned ResearchWorks, a strategic marketing research firm focusing on community development and customer satisfaction research. He is past president of the Rotary Club of Greenville, South Carolina’s largest and oldest Rotary Club. He also was the class facilitator for Leadership Greenville for 13 years. He’s also a master gardener and a member of the Woodworkers Guild of Greenville. Stall is a member of the Peace family, one of Greenville’s most prominent families.

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12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

IT’S PLANE SIMPLE

NEWS

MORE NONSTOPS • CONVENIENT PARKING LESS HASSLE • LOW FARES OVER

95

Photo by Will Crooks

TOTAL D NONST AILY OPS

The City of Greenville wants to install a protected pedestrian and bicycle lane on the Church Street Bridge, rather than sidewalks.

TRANSPORTATION

A pedestrian pathway for Church Street Bridge

Detroit

Chicago (O’Hare)

NYC (LaGuardia) Newark

Philadelphia

Washington (Dulles & Reagan)

GREENVILLE/SPARTANBURG

Charlotte

1 ST CONNE OP CTIONS

TO OVE R 200 CIT I E WORLD S WIDE

Atlanta Dallas/Fort Worth

Orlando/Sanford Tampa/St. Petersburg

Houston (Intercontinental)

Fort Myers/Punta Gorda

Fort Lauderdale

“They’ve done it elsewhere,” Mayor Knox White said. He said he’s seen protected lanes in Columbia over the Broad River in the Riverside Forest neighborhood. The SCDOT plans to start work on the bridge in April. The project includes the demolition of the existing bridge deck, structural repairs, replacement of the bridge deck surface, replacement of sidewalks, and repair of lighting conduits and circuits. Having a barrier-separated bicycle and pedestrian lane would not affect the number of lanes of traffic for cars. White said the sidewalks are underutilized because of heavy traffic on Church Street, and the city has adopted a complete streets program that says streets should accommodate bicyclists and pedestrians where funding and engineering allows. Church Street is a state highway and not under the control of the city.

NEARLY

7%

CHE THAN C APER HAR ON AVE LOTTE RA

White said city engineers have determined there’s enough room for 6-foot-wide protected lanes.

GE

The Church Street rehabilitation work is scheduled for completion in July.

Domestic Round Trip Fares (exclusive of all taxes & fees except passenger facility charges) Source: U.S. DOT Period: 12 months ending Q1 2016

When the state Department of Transportation rehabilitates the Church Street bridge this spring, the City of Greenville wants it to install a protected bicycle and pedestrian lane instead of sidewalks.

www.gspairport.com

The SCDOT does not plan to completely close the bridge at any time during the project; however, lanes will have to be closed to allow for some of the work to be done. The SCDOT has a detour plan, but motorists should expect travel at peak times to be impacted. —Cindy Landrum

RESOURCES

Clemson wants money for water research programs Clemson University is hoping to help South Caro-

lina agencies and municipalities better address the state’s continuing water shortage, a shortage brought on by drought and contamination. “We are feast or famine when it comes to water in South Carolina,” said George Askew, vice president of Clemson University’s Public Service and Agriculture. Askew and other administrators recently requested $11 million from the state to expand the university’s water research capabilities. The expansion would allow the state’s agencies and municipalities to better understand “what we have for water resources, our current demands, future demands, and future limitations,” Askew said. The university has requested $9.5 million to hire more researchers and renovate a 34,000-squarefoot building on campus to house faculty, staff, labs, and virtual meeting spaces. Currently, the university’s researchers are working on crop irrigation systems, forested watershed management, and water treatment. They’re also conducting data analysis of the state’s water resources. “We want to make sure as a university that we provide them with all the tools they need to be prepared long-term to answer questions before the situation becomes critical,” Askew said. — Andrew Moore

INFRASTRUCTURE

House Ways and Means Committee passes roads bill The S.C. House and Ways Means Committee passed a roads bill last week that includes long-term funding and governance reform, but opponents say it doesn’t do enough to help fix the state’s crumbling infrastructure. “South Carolina has the most dangerous roads in the country,” said House Speaker Jay Lucas, a Hartsville Republican. “Businesses and job creators continue to stress the importance of infrastructure repair as a necessity to further economic investments.”

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NEWS «

According to Lucas, a gradual increase to the state’s motor fuel user fee “is the most responsible option” to generate a long-term, sustainable funding stream for road repair. Americans for Prosperity in South Carolina, however, called on lawmakers instead to support a Senate bill that the group said would make the DOT accountable to taxpayers. “While we recognize the great need to improve South Carolina’s roads, it is important to remember that without meaningful reform to the Department of Transportation, tax increases are almost meaningless,” said Daniel Brennan, state director of Americans for Prosperity. “A series of tax and fee increases on our roads, vehicles, and gasoline won’t solve the problem alone.” —David Dykes

PARKS

City Park takes one step forward On Monday, Greenville City Council signaled their intent to issue revenue bonds to pay for City Park on the city’s west side. The bonds will be repaid with hospitality tax revenue. City Park is expected to transform Greenville’s western flank much like Falls Park and subsequent projects transformed the West End. The park has already been a catalyst for commercial and residential development even though groundbreaking likely won’t happen until spring 2018. SPI_GJ_History Ad_10x5.445.pdf 1 The park site is currently home to the city’s public works facility. A new public works facility is under

construction on city-owned land on Fairforest Way and should be completed in the fall. Once the $25 million relocation is complete, the current site could be prepped so the space is usable and redeveloped within the park as money becomes available. Preliminary plans for the park include a great lawn, a “sprayground” water feature, a picnic area, basketball courts, and the transformation of Welborn Street into a promenade. The park could also have an observation tower. A unanimous resolution says bonds would be issued to pay for components eligible for tourismrelated funding, provided annual debt is no greater than $2 million per year for 20 years. In addition to signaling council’s intent to issue bonds, the resolution also authorized consultant MKSK to start working on design, engineering, and permitting for the first phase of the park, which includes the widening of the Reedy River stream bank. The resolution also authorizes City Manager John Castile to negotiate nonbinding terms for the acquisition and sale of properties along Welborn Street and properties adjacent to the proposed park area, as well as to identify and prioritize parkrelated street and utility improvements. —Cindy Landrum

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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017

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Rosenwald Revisted The movement to shine the spotlight on Julius Rosenwald, a forgotten hero of the Jim Crow era Words by Laura Haight Photos by Will Crooks

Truman Humbert, Katrina Sims, Julius Rosenwald Cobb


02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

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In 1911, the paths of two men from diametrically different worlds were brought together. And the path for black communities in the rural South was changed forever. The influence and experience of Booker T. Washington combined with the vast wealth and social conscience of Chicago businessman Julius Rosenwald, challenging and transforming educational systems and bringing real educational opportunities for the first time to thousands of black youngsters. Rosenwald helped to build 5,357 schools, including more than 500 in South Carolina and 105 in five Upstate counties. For the first time, educated teachers, decent schools, and structured curricula were accessible. And by the mid-20th century, more than one-third of the black youth in the South had received education and occupational training at Rosenwald schools. The story of these schools and Rosenwald’s significant contributions to black education and cultural preservation will be the subject of two Black History Month events sponsored by the Greenville Jewish Federation. The program includes the biographical film “Rosenwald,” a talk by his historian grandson, Dr. Peter Ascoli, and a book signing. The Greenville Jewish Federation’s mission is to “connect, educate, and inspire,” according to executive director Amy Hammer. Hammer describes the Rosenwald story as “significant for our times because he was Jewish, because he was the child of immigrants, and because of the connection he made when he heard about the need for education in the South.” Rosenwald began as a peddler who became a shopkeeper, and then parlayed experience in the family haberdashery business into a one-third share of Sears. He eventually became its chairman, instituted cutting-edge technology solutions, and took the retailer public in 1906. Despite his wealth and position, Rosenwald was, by all accounts, self-effacing, socially aware, and intent on using his vast wealth philanthropically. “He was a great unsung philanthropist,” says Ascoli. But he was not unsung in the South.

Julius Rosenwald decided to start a school after reading Booker T. Washington’s “Up From Slavery”

story very, very well,” says Humbert. “They knew about his philanthropy and what he had done and they made sure they told us.” While built to educate black youth, the Rosenwald schools served a greater purpose. In the Jim Crow era, blacks could not use the library, so the schools filled that purpose. They were also community meeting places and sources of pride where people came together and worked to maintain the schools. “When World War II ended and black soldiers came back home, Chapman Grove was the headquarters for administering GI Bill programs.” Humbert notes. “Chapman Grove was the heart of the community in southern Greenville County. Everything was centered around the school and what it had to offer.”

“We would have had a different America”

The heart of a community Truman Humbert attended Chapman Grove School (originally Pleasant Grove School), off Route 25, for one year just prior to the school consolidation program that spelled the

Rosenwald schools in South Carolina

Today only 10–12 percent of the schools are still standing.

end of the need for Rosenwald schools. A retired teacher, member of the executive board of the Greenville County chapter of the NAACP, and president of the Greenville chapter of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, Humbert has a dream of turning the Chapman Grove site into “a museum to record the life of black people in southern Greenville County.” The school opened in 1922, at a time when education of black children was substandard at best. Schools were few and far between, and those that existed were in disrepair, poorly equipped, and staffed by teachers who were undereducated themselves. But black leaders, like Booker T. Washington, understood that education was the path to better futures. And that filtered down into black communities. “My mother and father told us over and over again to get an education, to read,” Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, a Rosenwald alumnus, recalls in an interview in the film. “Leaders of the community knew Julius Rosenwald’s

The foundation for the program was laid in the summer of 1910 when Rosenwald read Washington’s “Up From Slavery” and William Henry Baldwin Jr.’s “An American Citizen.” “They changed his life,” notes Ascoli. “He was really struck by the problems that were faced by African-Americans.” In their stories of the treatment of blacks in the U.S., Rosenwald saw parallels to the pogroms against Jews in Eastern Europe. In 1911, he met Washington and asked him how he could help. Washington had founded Tuskegee University in Alabama in 1881 in a one-room shanty. By 1911, it was an impressive facility, designed, built, and maintained by its students. Washington gave Rosenwald a blueprint to bring form to his philanthropic intent. The program they devised was a hand up to black communities, not a handout. Rosenwald agreed to provide a total of $687,000 (roughly $16 million today). He would cover 25 percent of the funds for a school in any community that could raise a matching 25 percent from the black community and get the remaining 50 percent from a combination of state and local funds. It was, Ascoli says, “the first true public-private partnership.” ROSENWALD continued on PAGE 16


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS ROSENWALD continued from PAGE 15

Give yourself a little credit.

Humbert carefully guards documentation that shows that a teachers’ home was built at the Chapman Grove site in 1931. The black community raised $1,283 toward the $3,958 to build it. “In the heart of the Depression,” Humbert emphasizes. Ascoli points out that the black community contributed more overall to the cost than Rosenwald did between fundraising, donating lumber and materials, and providing labor. By the end of the program, Rosenwald had endowed well beyond his initial plan. In South Carolina alone, the Rosenwald School Building Program invested $380,305 between 1917 and 1932 to build more than 500 schools, according to documentation from the National Register of Historic Places. Schools were not immune to the violence in their communities; some were burned. But Rosenwald provided funds to rebuild them. It is hard to overstate the role these schools had in the South, according to Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Levering Lewis. Without the Rosenwald schools, he says, “we would have had a different America.”

Lost forever

Take a class or two this summer, and you can return to campus a step ahead.

In 1938, 4-year-old Katrina Sims started school at Chapman Grove. The school had been renamed to honor its founder John H. Chapman, Katrina’s uncle. The middle child of eight, Katrina, walked the 3 miles to school each morning. Her older siblings “didn’t want me to go,” she says, “because they didn’t think I could keep up. But I did!” The Rosenwald schools mirrored ideas that Washington had instilled in Tuskegee. The “industrial” curriculum prepared students for a world of work, offering skills training for the boys and cosmetology and

Students have different reasons for taking courses as a Transient Visiting Student at GTC: to graduate early, recover from dropped classes, take fewer hours in a challenging semester, or take difficult classes one at a time in the summer without the distraction of a full schedule. But no matter what the reason, most find that the cost per credit hour here is lower than at their home school, many classes are smaller, and if they stay at home, there’s no room and board to pay. Choose from five campuses and hundreds of courses offered in convenient formats with condensed and full summer schedules. To get started, visit gvltec.edu/transient-visiting.

Helping people love what they do for a living: Business &Technology • Health & Wellness Public Service, Arts & Sciences Economic Development and CorporateTraining

Truman Humbert, Julius Rosenwald Cobb

Julius Rosenwald and Booker T. Washington.

home economics for the girls, along with reading, writing, math, and typing. Sims, who is a part-time bailiff at the county courthouse, was a good student, bringing home reports with A’s and B’s. Despite good grades and plans for nursing school, Sims’ education ended with high school graduation when her mother passed away at age 45, leaving her to help her father care for her younger siblings. Sims’ cousin, J.R. Cobb, has a deep connection to the Rosenwald schools: He is named after the benefactor. Julius Rosenwald Cobb and Sims went to school together. The day started at 8 a.m., but they had been up for hours before that. As an agricultural community, there were always chores to do. Before school, Cobb recalls “milking cows, slopping the hogs.” The walk to school could include being run off the road by school buses. “We had to jump into the ditch,” he adds. “The bus would run you down if you were in the road.” Without electricity for light or heat, schools relied on nature to provide. All

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NEWS

Julius Rosenwald and some students.

«

the Rosenwald schools had some distinguishing characteristics and were designed from core plans developed by architects. In South Carolina, the Rosenwald schools were built from the designs of Robert Taylor, the architect of Tuskegee University, and, in later years, Samuel L. Smith of Nashville. Regardless of the architect, they are oriented North to South and are recognizable by very large and numerous windows, designed to take advantage of the sunlight for both light and warmth. J.R. often began his winter school days collecting wood to stoke the school fires and bring warmth to the classrooms. Humbert, Sims, and J.R. have experienced all three education eras in the South: segregation, consolidation, and integration. Chapman Grove operated for 31 years until 1954 when black high schools were consolidated into Bryson High School, and all the elementary schools into Burgess Elementary. Black students were bused to school until desegregation in 1970.

Consolidation spelled the end of the Rosenwald era as well. Many of the schools were sold — or, as in the case with Chapman Grove, torn down. Today only 10–12 percent of the schools are still standing. Those that remain are part of the National Register of Historic Places. For Humbert, the school, a centerpiece of the community of his youth, is also a physical manifestation of its founder and principal. The two are indistinguishable from each other. “John Chapman’s efforts made a difference in the quality of life. He made sure that black people had the opportunity to get the maximum education available to black people at that time,” says Humbert. Through his efforts, he hopes to have a historic marker placed on the Chapman Grove site as the first step toward honoring its role in the area’s development. “We have a mandate to record the history of our community,” he says. “If we don’t, it will be lost forever.”

IF YOU GO The Rosenwald program, sponsored by the Greenville Jewish Federation, features a talk by Dr. Peter Ascoli, Julius Rosenwald’s grandson and a historian who has written his biography. Ascoli will speak about Rosenwald’s significance and sign copies of his book. The film “Rosenwald” will also be screened. The programs at Clemson and Furman universities are both free to attend but online registration is required. Feb. 20, Clemson University, 7–9 p.m. Self Auditorium, Strom Thurmond Center Register online bit.ly/2ky8HRv Feb. 21, Furman University, 7–9 p.m. The Younts Center Register online bit.ly/2ky8Q7Q Katrina Sims

䌀栀漀挀漀氀愀琀攀 ☀ 䌀栀愀洀瀀愀最渀攀 䌀栀愀洀瀀愀最渀攀 䌀栀漀挀漀氀愀琀攀 ☀ 䌀栀漀挀漀氀愀琀攀 ☀ 䌀栀愀洀瀀愀最渀攀 一攀琀眀漀爀欀椀渀最 䔀瘀攀渀琀 一攀琀眀漀爀欀椀渀最 䔀瘀攀渀琀 一攀琀眀漀爀欀椀渀最 䔀瘀攀渀琀 吀甀攀猀搀愀礀Ⰰ 䘀攀戀爀甀愀爀礀 ㈀㄀猀琀 簀 㐀㨀㌀  倀䴀 吀甀攀猀搀愀礀Ⰰ 䘀攀戀爀甀愀爀礀 ㈀㄀猀琀 簀 㐀㨀㌀  倀䴀 吀甀攀猀搀愀礀Ⰰ 䘀攀戀爀甀愀爀礀 ㈀㄀猀琀 簀 㐀㨀㌀  倀䴀 䨀漀椀渀 甀猀 昀漀爀 愀 搀爀漀瀀 椀渀 愀琀 吀栀攀 䌀爀漀猀猀椀渀最猀 愀琀 䘀椀瘀攀  䨀漀椀渀 甀猀 昀漀爀 愀 搀爀漀瀀 椀渀 愀琀 吀栀攀 䌀爀漀猀猀椀渀最猀 愀琀 䘀椀瘀攀  䘀漀爀欀ᤠ猀 猀愀氀攀猀 漀ϻ挀攀 琀漀 氀攀愀爀渀 愀戀漀甀琀 匀椀洀瀀猀漀渀瘀椀氀氀攀ᤠ猀  䨀漀椀渀 甀猀 昀漀爀 愀 搀爀漀瀀 椀渀 愀琀 吀栀攀 䌀爀漀猀猀椀渀最猀 愀琀 䘀椀瘀攀  䘀漀爀欀ᤠ猀 猀愀氀攀猀 漀ϻ挀攀 琀漀 氀攀愀爀渀 愀戀漀甀琀 匀椀洀瀀猀漀渀瘀椀氀氀攀ᤠ猀  渀攀眀攀猀琀 䤀渀搀攀瀀攀渀搀攀渀琀 䰀椀瘀椀渀最Ⰰ 䄀猀猀椀猀琀攀搀 䰀椀瘀椀渀最 ☀  䘀漀爀欀ᤠ猀 猀愀氀攀猀 漀ϻ挀攀 琀漀 氀攀愀爀渀 愀戀漀甀琀 匀椀洀瀀猀漀渀瘀椀氀氀攀ᤠ猀  渀攀眀攀猀琀 䤀渀搀攀瀀攀渀搀攀渀琀 䰀椀瘀椀渀最Ⰰ 䄀猀猀椀猀琀攀搀 䰀椀瘀椀渀最 ☀  䴀攀洀漀爀礀 䌀愀爀攀 䌀漀洀洀甀渀椀琀礀⸀ 䰀攀琀 甀猀 猀栀愀爀攀 眀椀琀栀 礀漀甀  渀攀眀攀猀琀 䤀渀搀攀瀀攀渀搀攀渀琀 䰀椀瘀椀渀最Ⰰ 䄀猀猀椀猀琀攀搀���䰀椀瘀椀渀最 ☀  䴀攀洀漀爀礀 䌀愀爀攀 䌀漀洀洀甀渀椀琀礀⸀ 䰀攀琀 甀猀 猀栀愀爀攀 眀椀琀栀 礀漀甀  栀漀眀 漀甀爀 挀漀洀洀甀渀椀琀礀 渀甀爀琀甀爀攀猀 戀漀搀礀 愀渀搀 猀瀀椀爀椀琀  䴀攀洀漀爀礀 䌀愀爀攀 䌀漀洀洀甀渀椀琀礀⸀ 䰀攀琀 甀猀 猀栀愀爀攀 眀椀琀栀 礀漀甀  䴀攀洀漀爀礀 栀漀眀 漀甀爀 挀漀洀洀甀渀椀琀礀 渀甀爀琀甀爀攀猀 戀漀搀礀 愀渀搀 猀瀀椀爀椀琀  䴀攀洀漀爀礀 愀渀搀 氀攀愀搀猀 爀攀猀椀搀攀渀琀猀 椀渀 攀渀樀漀礀椀渀最 爀攀渀攀眀攀搀  栀漀眀 漀甀爀 挀漀洀洀甀渀椀琀礀 渀甀爀琀甀爀攀猀 戀漀搀礀 愀渀搀 猀瀀椀爀椀琀  愀渀搀 氀攀愀搀猀 爀攀猀椀搀攀渀琀猀 椀渀 攀渀樀漀礀椀渀最 爀攀渀攀眀攀搀  䴀攀洀漀爀礀 䌀愀爀攀 攀渀最愀最攀洀攀渀琀 愀渀搀 昀爀椀攀渀搀猀栀椀瀀猀⸀ 䴀攀攀琀 琀栀攀 琀攀愀洀  䌀愀爀攀 愀渀搀 氀攀愀搀猀 爀攀猀椀搀攀渀琀猀 椀渀 攀渀樀漀礀椀渀最 爀攀渀攀眀攀搀  攀渀最愀最攀洀攀渀琀 愀渀搀 昀爀椀攀渀搀猀栀椀瀀猀⸀ 䴀攀攀琀 琀栀攀 琀攀愀洀  䌀愀爀攀 愀渀搀 栀攀愀爀 愀戀漀甀琀  愀渀搀 栀攀愀爀 愀戀漀甀琀 挀漀渀猀琀甀挀琀椀漀渀 甀瀀搀愀琀攀猀⸀ 攀渀最愀最攀洀攀渀琀 愀渀搀 昀爀椀攀渀搀猀栀椀瀀猀⸀ 䴀攀攀琀 琀栀攀 琀攀愀洀  愀渀搀 栀攀愀爀 愀戀漀甀琀  愀渀搀 栀攀愀爀 愀戀漀甀琀 挀漀渀猀琀甀挀琀椀漀渀 甀瀀搀愀琀攀猀⸀ 愀渀搀 栀攀愀爀 愀戀漀甀琀  愀渀搀 栀攀愀爀 愀戀漀甀琀 挀漀渀猀琀甀挀琀椀漀渀 甀瀀搀愀琀攀猀⸀ 䌀愀氀氀 㠀㘀㐀⸀㐀㄀㈀⸀㐀㜀   琀漀 刀匀嘀倀 戀礀 ㈀⼀㈀ ⸀ 䌀愀氀氀 㠀㘀㐀⸀㐀㄀㈀⸀㐀㜀   琀漀 刀匀嘀倀 戀礀 ㈀⼀㈀ ⸀ 䌀愀氀氀 㠀㘀㐀⸀㐀㄀㈀⸀㐀㜀   琀漀 刀匀嘀倀 戀礀 ㈀⼀㈀ ⸀

㈀㄀㘀 匀挀甀ӻ攀琀漀眀渀 刀漀愀搀Ⰰ 唀渀椀琀 䜀 簀 匀椀洀瀀猀漀渀瘀椀氀氀攀Ⰰ 匀䌀 ㈀㤀㘀㠀㄀  ㈀㄀㘀 匀挀甀ӻ攀琀漀眀渀 刀漀愀搀Ⰰ 唀渀椀琀 䜀 簀 匀椀洀瀀猀漀渀瘀椀氀氀攀Ⰰ 匀䌀 ㈀㤀㘀㠀㄀  㠀㘀㐀⸀㐀㄀㈀⸀㐀㜀   簀 吀䠀䔀䌀刀伀匀匀䤀一䜀匀䄀吀䘀䤀嘀䔀䘀伀刀䬀匀⸀䌀伀䴀 ㈀㄀㘀 匀挀甀ӻ攀琀漀眀渀 刀漀愀搀Ⰰ 唀渀椀琀 䜀 簀 匀椀洀瀀猀漀渀瘀椀氀氀攀Ⰰ 匀䌀 ㈀㤀㘀㠀㄀  㠀㘀㐀⸀㐀㄀㈀⸀㐀㜀   簀 吀䠀䔀䌀刀伀匀匀䤀一䜀匀䄀吀䘀䤀嘀䔀䘀伀刀䬀匀⸀䌀伀䴀

㠀㘀㐀⸀㐀㄀㈀⸀㐀㜀   簀 吀䠀䔀䌀刀伀匀匀䤀一䜀匀䄀吀䘀䤀嘀䔀䘀伀刀䬀匀⸀䌀伀䴀


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY

DNA Creative Communications set to introduce 2017’s Shine the Light forum EMILY PIETRAS | ASSOCIATE EDITOR

epietras@communityjournals.com

LEADING THE WAY

Will Crooks / Staff

Katie Leckenbusch (Warehouse Theatre), Lamont Sullivan (Big Brothers Big Sisters), Debbie Nelson (DNA Creative Communications), and Sara Montero-Buria (Hispanic Alliance of Greenville), among others, will put their artistic skills to use at the Creating Greenville’s Nonprofit Landscape event.

On March 1, DNA Creative Communications, in partnership with the Community Foundation of Greenville, the United Way of Greenville County, and the Hollingsworth Funds, will host Creating Greenville’s Nonprofit Landscape, a free event to kick off the 2017 Shine the Light nonprofit leadership series. This year marks the eighth year of the forum, which has had more than 1,000 participants representing 350 nonprofits since its inception. Shine the Light is geared toward nonprofit professionals, executive directors, and board members. Topics in past sessions have included “fundraising, strategic planning, branding, public relations, and leadership development.” “The sessions are always about some kind of leadership strategy,” says Debbie Nelson, founder and president of DNA Creative Communications. “The biggest part we really focus on is offering some kind of experience at our events and some kind of engagement part. We facilitate conversations and get the nonprofits talking so they understand how they overlap and can work together more strongly.” The event, which will be held at Zen (924 S. Main St.) from 4–6 p.m., is a celebration of the local nonprofit community and an opportunity to network. Last year, the Shine the Light

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COMMUNITY

schedule was announced via video, but this year, Nelson wanted to try a different route. “One of the greatest things about Shine the Light is to get together and collaborate. Every session I’ve done has been about that — let’s get together, network, have fun,” she says. Creating Greenville’s Nonprofit Landscape is “an extension of what we’ve done in the past.” This year’s theme in the Shine the Light series, which will include four half-day work-

shops, is “Creativity: A Pathway to Change.” The kickoff event’s main activity ties into that concept. Jeff Renow, owner of Zen and a local artist, is painting a Greenville-themed backdrop on a 10-foot by 8-foot canvas, and attendees will add a design that represents their nonprofit to the canvas. “Everything we’ll do [for Shine the Light] is creative strategies around leadership in nonprofits, so we’re setting the stage for that,” Nelson says, regarding the canvas. So far, about 150 people have signed up

‘‘ Give me one good day, Lord, one good day. The Blood Connection gave me that day.

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for the kickoff event. Attendees will represent a wide range of nonprofits, from human service agencies to arts and education organizations to policy-based and communitybased nonprofits. “It’s a lot of new folks, so I want to broaden that conversation between nonprofits. It’s open to anyone serving a community need through a nonprofit,” Nelson says. “I want it to be a very inclusive event. I want people … in the nonprofit community who haven’t participated in the past to feel com-

fortable coming to celebrate the sector.” To register for Creating Greenville’s Nonprofit Landscape, visit nonprofitforums.org.

Creating Greenville’s Nonprofit Landscape When: Wednesday, March 1, 4–6 p.m. Cost: Free Where: Zen, 924 S. Main St. Register: nonprofitforums.org


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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COMMUNITY

A Compassionate Leader Minor Shaw awarded James F. Barker Ethics in Action Award EMILY PIETRAS | ASSOCIATE EDITOR

epietras@communityjournals.com

Theatre, Junior League of Greenville, United Way of Greenville County, Ronald McDonald House, and the Governor’s School for Arts and Humanities. She helped establish the Roper Mountain Science Center, which opened in 1985. Additionally, Shaw has chaired the United Way of Greenville County, United Way of South Carolina, Community Foundation of Greenville, and the Urban League of the Upstate. In 2012, Shaw was inducted into the S.C. Business Hall of Fame. She is currently the chair of the Daniel-Mickel Foundation, the Duke Endowment, Hollingsworth Funds, and the Greenville-Spartanburg Airport

At a dinner held at the Poinsett Club last Thursday evening, Minor Mickel Shaw was presented with the 2016 James F. Barker Ethics in Action Award, which is “bestowed upon an exceptional individual whose actions exemplify integrity” and reveal “deep and sustained commitment to ethical conduct.” The award’s namesake is former Clemson University President James F. Barker, who was the inaugural recipient in 2014. Scott Dishman, formerly of The Family Effect, was the award’s 2015 recipient. “[Minor Shaw is] a wonderful woman who has taught me a great deal and someone who I couldn’t be more proud of,” Barker said. The award is presented by the Rutland Institute for Ethics at Clemson University, which was established in 2001 to “encourage discussion on campus, in businesses, and in the community about how ethical decision-making can be the basis of both personal and professional Jack Robert Photography success.” Minor Shaw’s philanthropic resume extends more than three “The Rutland Institute is one decades. of the best ideas Clemson has had,” Barker said. “We strive to instill character, integrity, and ethical behav- Commission. She also is on the board of diior in each of our alumni.” rectors for BlueCross BlueShield South CarCaroline Stewart, president of Louis P. olina, Piedmont Natural Gas, and Columbia Batson Company, and Susan Reed nominat- Funds mutual fund group. ed Shaw for the award. “The sheer volume of work that Minor “Minor is a compassionate, genuine lead- Shaw has done is impressive,” said Robert er. She truly has the utmost regard for all H. Jones, executive vice president for acamembers of her community and wants to demic affairs and provost of Clemson Uniprovide opportunities for all to succeed,” versity. “Individually, these are outstanding, Reed said. and collectively they represent a dedication “She is not swayed by politics or emo- to others and exemplary citizenship.” tions in her community involvement. Her Asked how integrity has shaped her procharacter is such that she approaches her fessional and philanthropic endeavors, Shaw involvement with thoughtfulness and kind- said, “Integrity is crucial to any relationship. ness but is governed by her ethics,” Stewart You have to build trust to have a good readded. lationship.” She added that acting with inShaw, who is president of Micco LLC, a tegrity and ethics is necessary to yield sucprivate investment company, has a remark- cessful collaborative efforts in all sectors. able philanthropic resume that extends “People have to believe you and believe your more than three decades. Her involvement word and know that you’re not there for includes various roles in the S.C. Children’s yourself.”


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22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY The Good

Events that make our community better

FUNDRAISER

Upstate International holds a cocktail tasting with a ‘twist’ Upstate International is hosting its Epic International Party Feb. 24 from 6:30–10:30 p.m. at the City of Greer Events Center, 301 E. Poinsett St., Greer. The evening will include cocktail tastings, appetizers, and dancing from around the globe, as well as a silent auction. For the twist: Buy a mystery package for $100 for a guaranteed win of an item or combination of items valued between $100 and $1,000. Mystery items can be picked up at Upstate International after Feb. 24 or at the party. Tickets are $85 or $160. Call 864-631-2188 or email info@upstateinternational.org. Visit upstateinternational.org for more information. Crossword puzzle: page 42

Sudoku puzzle: page 42

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Julie Valentine Center receives donation from ASIS International Chapter 97 The Julie Valentine Center received a check for the amount of $8,000 by ASIS International Chapter 97. ASIS International Chapter 97 held its 10th Annual Golf Tournament and donated all of its proceeds to the Julie Valentine Center. ASIS member Bush Banton was one of the investigators with the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office who worked the original Julie Valentine case. Julie Valentine was an infant who was found deceased in a wooded area here in Greenville on a cold February day in 1990. The police named her Julie Valentine. Adopted by the community, her legacy has become a symbol of hope for those who have survived rape or child abuse. Banton is also a former Julie Valentine Center board member.

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Our Schools

Activities, awards, and accomplishments

83

GREENVILLE TECHNICAL CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL

Students participate in school-wide service day The high school participated in a school-wide community service day Jan. 20, providing service activities to 15 community organizations. One group of students filled more than 200 boxes for distribution at the Harvest Hope food bank. GTCHS students complete 50 hours of service work each year as a graduation requirement.

RIVERSIDE HIGH SCHOOL

Student wins statewide cross-country running award Cate Ambrose was named the Gatorade South Carolina Girls’ Cross-Country Runner of the Year. The award recognizes outstanding athletic excellence, academic achievement, and exemplary character. Ambrose raced to the Class 5A individual state championship this season with a time of 18:35, leading the Warriors to the state title. The president of her graduating class, Ambrose has volunteered locally for Special Olympics and Triune Mercy Center. Ambrose has also excelled academically.

CHRIST CHURCH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

CCES students sign commitments to play college-level athletics Zachary Davis will play football at Davidson College, Ryan Putman will play football at Brown University, and Wes Quattlebaum will play tennis at Clemson University.

BOB JONES UNIVERSITY

Senior presents research paper during conference at USC Senior Lauren Watts presented an oral research paper titled “The Two-Step Hantzsch Thiazole Synthesis of Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor II” at the 2017 Southeastern Undergraduate Research Conference (SURC) conducted at the University of South Carolina on Jan. 28 in Columbia. Watts, a resident of Greenville, is a biochemistry and molecular biology major. Her research was conducted during summer 2016 under the direction of Robert Lee, Ph.D., in BJU’s Department of Chemistry and Physics in conjunction with Cayman Chemical located in Ann Arbor, Mich.

ST. JOSEPH’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL

New building to connect gym to school Mavin Construction broke ground on a new building designed by McMillan Padzan Smith architecture that will connect St. Joseph’s gymnasium to academic buildings. The addition includes space for academic and athletic use. The project is a result of the school raising $2.7 million through their UKnighted Campaign. Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.


02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

LOOK

Katie Fenske / Contributing

On Feb. 11, Quest Brewing Co. hosted a Yoga and Brunch event. Following a onehour yoga class, attendees enjoyed food from Coastal Crust Greenville.

Jack Robert Photography

On Feb. 12, M. Judson Booksellers hosted a sit-down, fourcourse Italian dinner with Chef Michael Kramer of Jianna.

Katie Fenske / Contributing

WinterSkunk Music Fest was held at The Spinning Jenny in Greer on Feb. 11. The one-day concert series included six Americana, folk, and bluegrass acts. There were also food trucks, craft vendors, and local breweries represented at the festival.


feast

THE BOURBON BUBBLE HOW TO ENJOY THE SMOOTH TASTE OF AGED LIQUOR AT A FRACTION OF THE COST

ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com We get it. Bourbon is great. Enter any popular restaurant and bar these days and you’ll discover a hefty percentage of millennial drinkers savoring some version of bourbon or whiskey with soda or ginger, on the rocks, or straightup neat. While they may be enjoying such topshelf brands as Bulleit, Woodford Reserve, or Basil Hayden, they can’t afford the best of the best — let’s say something like a 15-year Pappy Van Winkle. And therein lies the rub. First, there’s the task of actually snagging a bottle of the small-batch bourbon released only once a year. Then there’s the cost of a bottle if you do — it could easily cost you $250 at the store. Heaven forbid you turn to eBay to buy a bottle. There, Pappy might cost you a couple thousand or more. What’s a young imbiber to do? The solution: bottle-aging staves. For only $11, Beyond Barrels’ bottleaging staves can turn a bottle of lowergrade liquor into something worthy of the reserve label. And the aging process takes one week to three months, rather than 15 years. (In case you’re not up

24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017

on wine trivia, a stave is one of the long slats, or ribs, of a wine barrel.) Beyond Barrels is the brainchild of Greenville’s Chris Harrigan, one of the founders of the local bourbon club Upstate Usquebaugh. The group will hold its second meeting in a couple of weeks. For Harrigan, the conflict between his palate and his budget was precisely what drove him to devote five years to developing a way to enjoy top-shelf-like bourbon without breaking the bank. Beyond Barrel’s bottle-aging stave is a round, wooden post the size of a standard cigar. (Harrigan actually packages them in clear cigar tubes.) The staves are made out of the same barrel wood used to age high-end bottles of wine, and they’re hand-milled by Harrigan in his family’s woodshop. Harrigan uses American white oak, French oak, and cherry for the three staves he manufactures. Each imparts a different flavor profile to the bourbon, much in the same way a barrel made from the same wood would flavor the liquid inside. To use the stave, simply drop it in a bottle of liquor. Or you can flame-char

the exterior on all sides, depending on the flavor profile you’re going for, and once it’s cooled drop it in your liquor of choice. Then, seal the bottle for a couple weeks to a few months, depending on the type of liquor you’re using. Barrel-aged cocktails are gaining in popularity in the mixology world, and several local restaurants are using Beyond Barrels staves to age premixed cocktails, not just a single liquor. Larkin’s, Aloft’s WXYZ, Sip, Sassafras, and Cigar Boxx currently serve cocktails using Harrigan’s product. Other restaurants that plan to use Beyond Barrels include Breakwater, Gringos, American Grocery Restaurant (AGR), and the muchanticipated Vault & Vator speakeasy from the AGR team; it’s set to open in a couple weeks. Poogan’s Smokehouse in Charleston, Mix Mix Kitchen Bar in Santa Ana, Calif., and the Four Seasons in Singapore are other bars currently aging cocktails with Beyond Barrels staves. “A couple places in Atlanta have them occasionally, but people have moved around so much I don’t know who is using what anymore,” Harrigan says. Bottle-aging staves are not new to the

liquor market. Those with favorable reviews, however, are almost nonexistent. After a hefty amount of R&D, Harrigan discovered why. Barrel staves for wine casks are created using side-grain, or the vertical sections from of the tree. By contrast, most bottleaging stave manufacturers use in-grain sections of wood (the rings you see when you chop down a tree). The taste difference between the two is obvious, Harrigan says. “The in-grain basically tastes like brown paper bag, relative to the side-grain,” he says. Harrigan says he did blind A/B testing using staves made with both kinds of wood, and only one of 27 taste testers chose the liquor aged with the in-grain stave. As a result, Harrigan uses only sidegrain staves. “I knew what I tasted, but you’re inherently biased when you’re developing your own product, so that’s why I always got confirmation from everyone else around town who had no vested interested in what I was doing, and also didn’t know there was even a difference between the two,” Harrigan says. Harrigan says having his product fea-

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM


feast tured at local restaurants was a tactic to increase his retail presence. As more diners taste expertly crafted cocktails using his bottle-aging staves, they may be inclined to purchase them to try at home, he says. Currently the bottle-aging staves are available only online (beyondbarrels.com and other online retailers), but Harrigan is working on packaging to sell them in retail stores. If he can make some solid sales over the next month or so, he hopes to order his first batch of packaging supplies in bulk. “If I don’t, it’ll just take a little bit longer,” Harrigan says. “But I’m definitely heading that way.”

Wonder why that aged cocktail might cost up to $15? Itʼs labor- and time-intensive. Tone Stone of Larkinʼs on the River has developed several cocktails for the barʼs permanent drink menu using Beyond Barrels aging staves. The cocktails involve multiple steps and lots of waiting. Here are two drinks Stone developed that will also be featured in an upcoming March Madness challenge put on by The Hungry Fan Daina Falk (hungryfan.com) and the Greenville-based Bandwagon ticketing service.

MANHATTAN & BEYOND

BETTER BARREL G&T Caption here

1. American oak stave, soaked in cola syrup for two weeks. 2. Combine spirits: 3 parts Four Roses Yellow Label bourbon, 2 parts Noilly Prat sweet vermouth, 8 drops Angostura bitters, and 8 drops cinnamonorange bitters. 3. Rest at room temperature for 18 days. 4. Stir with ice and serve with cocktail cherry.

1. American oak stave, toasted over flame 30 seconds, rotating until noticeable over entire stave. 2. Peel one orange leaving very little pith on inner skin portion. 3. Combine Plymouth gin with stave and orange peel and let rest at room temp for two-plus weeks. 4. Pour into freshly iced glass with Jack Rudy Small Batch Tonic and top with club soda. Garnish with orange peel and lime slice.

“IT’S SOME KIND OF

” WONDERFUL!

FEBRUARY 21-26

Photo: Joan Marcus

–NY1

OPENS TUESDAY! COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25


02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Talent and Tapestry

CULTURE

The smash Broadway musical ‘Beautiful’ tells the story of songwriting great Carole King CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Julia Knitel owes a debt to Carole King, not just because she plays a fictionalized version of the celebrated singer-songwriter in the national touring production of “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical.” King was a groundbreaker. “Carole paved the way for a young, career-driven woman like me,” said Knitel, a 23-year-old who understudied for the role on Broadway. “Carole grew up in a time when she wasn’t told by society she could do what she wanted. But she didn’t let obstacles

Photos by Joan Marcus / Contributing

Above: Julia Knitel as Carole King in “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical.” Below: Knitel with Liam Tobin as Gerry Goffin.

get in her way. She is a woman who did it all.” But King wasn’t always so confident, even though she first wrote the No. 1 hit “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow” for the Shirelles when she was only 17. “Carole took a really long time to believe she was worthy. It took years of writing for others people before she said, ‘This is my voice,’” Knitel says. “But that was a product of her time and circumstances.” “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical” is more than a jukebox musical, Knitel says, “It’s not a revue. It tells an important story.”

The musical is the story of King before “Tapestry,” the 1971 album that included “You’ve Got a Friend” and “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman.” “Tapestry” sold more than 25 million copies, stayed on the Billboard charts for 313 weeks, and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. “Carole’s story doesn’t start with ‘Tapestry,’” Knitel said. “That’s where our story ends.” The musical tells the story of the early part of King’s career, from being half of a hit songwriting team with her husband Gerry Goffin and her relationship with songwriters Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann. “They were best friends, but they were furiously competitive with one another,” Knitel said. Knitel said playing a living legend is challenging. “You want to do that person jus-

tice,” she said. “But I had the freedom and material to pull from. I could immerse myself in her world.” While she was a part of the Broadway cast, Knitel got to sit down with King, Weil, and Mann and hear stories that few had ever heard. But for Knitel, none of that compares to when King caught a performance of “Beautiful” in Boise, Idaho. “That was a magical moment,” Knitel said. “It has to be strange to see somebody else play out your life. She seemed to love it.”

“Beautiful: The Carole King Musical” When: Feb. 21–26 Where: Peace Center Tickets: $35 to $95 Information: peacecenter.com

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ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATED FILMS

CULTURE

Behind the Mask The Bunny the Bear’s Matthew Tybor bares his soul on heavy new LP, ‘The Way We Rust’ VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

FEBRUARY 17, 18, & 19

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FEBRUARY 24 & 25

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Buffalo, N.Y.’s The Bunny the Bear is usually called a “post-hardcore” band, one of those music-critic creations that both mean something very specific and yet mean nothing at all. But in the case of The Bunny the Bear, led by Matthew Tybor, it’s a fitting label considering the genre can include anything from synth-pop to alternative rock to metal to electronic dance music. The band’s 2010 self-titled debut created a blueprint for their sound, a mesh of synthesizers and heavy guitars with singersongwriter Tybor’s hardcore metal growl typically handling the verses and Chris Hutka’s cleaner, more melodic vocals taking the choruses. Onstage and in photos and videos, Tybor wore a bunny mask and Hutka a bear mask — hence the name. But over time, the band’s sound has grown heavier and darker, moving the electronics more into the background and focusing more on throat-tearing vocals, slashing guitars, and pounding drums. Hutka’s departure in 2014 seemed to signal a new chapter in the band’s development, and their 2015 album “A Liar Wrote This” was their heaviest yet, with new “clean vocals” provided by Haley Roback. As it turned out, though, “A Liar Wrote This” was the end of an era for Tybor rather than a beginning, ushering in a series of personal and professional changes and ending a prolific streak of six albums in six years. “Changes,” Tybor says with a laugh. “Yeah, there have been a few. ‘A Liar Wrote This’ marked the end of something. I laid some demons to rest and the guy writing ‘The Way We Rust’ [the band’s new album, due out in March] wasn’t the same man. A lot happened in my life in a short amount of time.” In addition to adding Joseph Garcia as the new clean vocalist (aka “The Bear”), Tybor changed record labels, moving from his longtime home Victory Records to Needful Things. This is also the first recording he’s made sober, after a long battle with alcohol abuse. “I’ve been dry now almost 10 months,” he says. “I was blessed enough to meet an amazing woman who provided me the inspiration to confront a lot of issues I’d been avoiding for years. I think all of that helped

The Bunny the Bear

make ‘The Way We Rust’ what I firmly believe it is: the essential The Bunny the Bear album. It’s where I’ve strived to be for years now, musically.” The first single, “Love Lies,” is a chaotic mix of styles that throws jagged shards of electronic noise, heavily distorted vocals, and an oddly catchy chorus into a blender, contrasting the soothing comfort of Garcia’s crooning with Tybor’s almost inhuman wailing. The video is just as harrowing, depicting Tybor’s struggle with substance abuse. It’s also striking because it shows Tybor without his trademark bunny mask for the majority of the video. At a time when Tybor is performing some of his most vulnerable material, it’s part of a conscious move away from wearing the mask. “I suppose it’s just something I thought was overdue,” he says. “I decided to show a tad more of the human behind the mask.” Perhaps part of that comfort with being vulnerable comes from the fact that The Bunny the Bear have an incredibly devoted fan base, which has propelled each album higher up the charts than the one before it, and packs venues all over the country. “They’ve just always stuck by me, through thick and thin,” Tybor says. “It’s a rare thing. I couldn’t be more grateful that people related and appreciate my work to that extent. It’s something extremely special.”

The Bunny the Bear w/ ISMFOF, Everthrone, Reason Define, & Redefind Where: Ground Zero, 3052 Howard St., Spartanburg When: Friday, Feb. 17, 6 p.m. Tickets: $10 Information: 864-948-1661, Facebook: GroundzeroSC


LOVE LETTERS “What a wonderful experience we had!”

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“Open, airy and with a sound sense of the relationship between how art is hung and viewer appreciation. A worthy stop for any art lover.”

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www.MarchantCo.com (864) 467-0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Leslie Scott (864) 313-9727 RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com (864) 527-4505 sis Oa ille! e t va nv Pri Gree n i

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me Ho urse! e vat Co Pri Golf on

te/ sta asley E e Acr n E 3.2 ntow w Do

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y xur Lu me! R o 2 B wnh To

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s ou en! rgeKitch o G m sto u C

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2 W. Thistle Lane - Roper Mtn. Estates $398,900 • 1336270 • 4BR/3BA/1Hf BA

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ce! ! Pri ation w Ne t Loc a Gre

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RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | VETERAN SERVICES | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES


02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

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Featured Home

The Villas at Carriage Hills & West Georgia 9 Layken Lane, Simpsonville, SC

Home Info Price: From the high $200s to the high $400s Info: Enjoy the benefits of maintenance-free living on one level with a selection of award-winning floor plans HOA Services Provided: All lawn maintenance, irrigation, mulch applications, weed control, leaf removal, gutter repairs, pressure washing, exterior paint, driveway and sidewalk repair, roof repairs and termite bond Agent: Krystal Land 864-637-9653 | Krystal@NewStyleCommunities.com

ASK ABOUT YEAR-END SPECIALS ON MARKET HOMES So, you’ve been thinking about what life would be like without the hassles of yard work and home maintenance. We understand. If you’re like most of our home buyers, you’ve been thinking about “right-sizing” your next home for a long time. But you don’t want to sacrifice quality and you don’t want to compromise on features. We understand. You need to check out The Villas at Carriage Hills and West Georgia where architecture and natural beauty intersect with a no-maintenance platform where all exterior maintenance is handled by others – giving you the freedom to enjoy your free time.

We’ve designed Carriage Hills and West Georgia with a quaint and intimate streetscape – combined with charming architectural elements and high-quality construction practices. The well-coordinated community will be one-of-a-kind for the residents of Greenville. You’ll soon discover the benefits of maintenance-free living and the convenience of having all of life’s amenities right outside your front door. You’ll have no need for a lawn mower, edger, hedge trimmer or leaf blower. These services will now be handled by someone else. It’s time for you to enjoy the Maintenance-free Lifestyle.

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32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017

Spring brings near perfect outdoor temperatures, make sure the inside of your home can offer the same!

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME : On the market River Falls Plantation � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Augusta Road � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

298 Old South Road · $495,000 · MLS# 1335866

4 Cromwell Avenue · $699,000 · MLS# 1323934

5BR/4.5BA Situated on a large corner lot in beautiful golf course community, this 5 bedroom home has all the upgrades desired! Exit 63 2.5 miles R on Player R Old South.

5BR/3.5BA Wonderful brick new build! Open floorplan with master on main. 4 bedrooms plus bonus room upstairs. 2-car attached garage. Augusta Street to Left on Lupo Street. Right on Cromwell.

Contact: Linda O’Brien 325-0495 Wilson Associates

Contact: Nick Carlson 386-7704 Wilson Associates

Alta Vista

Augusta Road

207 Fairview Avenue · $698,000 · MLS# 1337003

43 Conestee Avenue · $409,000 · MLS# 1336707

4BR/2.5BA Charming home on large, landscaped lot features eat-in kitchen, dining room, living room, den, playroom, office, mudroom, deck, covered parking. Move-in ready. Walk to Afton Park and downtown.

3BR/2BA Charming bungalow with open floorplan features living, dining, updated kitchen, large screened porch, front porch, double lot that’s great for expansion, and covered parking. Walk to Augusta Road shops, restaurants!

Contact: Virginia Hayes 313-2986 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Virginia Hayes 313-2986 Coldwell Banker Caine

Real Estate News

Allen Tate Announces January Winner’s Edge Graduates – Upstate

Free Furnace with the purchase of a qualifying air conditioner.

Payments starting at $85. Financing with approved credit. Offer expires 2/28/17.

Call Corley to schedule your free in home estimate.

(864) 908.3360 W W W. C O R L E Y P R O. C O M

Allen Tate Realtors, the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, has announced that the following individuals have graduated from the company’s Winner’s Edge training in the Upstate region: Melissa Tomberg – Greenville-Woodruff Road Stephanie Kestner, Whit Linhares, Kristen Parks, Jenna White – Simpsonville Exclusively for  Allen Tate  Realtors,  Winner’s Edge  is a required, comprehensive real estate training program. The curriculum includes the latest in national real estate trends, technology, license law, sales and  marketing  techniques, integrated with detailed information about the local real estate market. As a result of this intensive course of study, Realtors are equipped with the latest tools in the industry in order to serve their clients in a knowledgeable, caring and professional manner.  Since 1957, Allen Tate Realtors has focused on the needs of consumers by providing one-stop shopping with choices in branches located in communities throughout the Carolinas.

Lori Bayne Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Lori Bayne as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. Lori joins the firm with extensive experience with another Upstate real estate company where she enjoyed consistent success and recognition for her performance, beginning with Rookie of the Year in 2010. Prior to joining the real estate world, Lori excelled in building relationships as a Business Development Manager in the technology sales industry for more than a decade. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Integrated Bayne Marketing Communications from Winthrop University and is a Greenville native, versed in the region’s culture, schools, and neighborhood compositions. Lori is also a real estate investor, owning several rental properties throughout the county. She enjoys spending time with her husband, Travis, their pets, and staying healthy through her chosen sport, swimming. “Lori is a trusted realtor and friend to many in our community,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “We are so delighted to have her skills, passion, and local knowledge joining the Caine Family.”


OPEN SUNDAY, FEB. 19 from 2-4PM PLANTATION GREENE upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/8LXMGD/8-Firnstone-Court-Greenville-SC-1337085

COTTAGES @ HARRISON BRIDGE

NOW IN THE WEEKEND UPDATE

ALSO OPEN

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/R8PKAM/116-Belle-Oaks-Drive-Simpsonville-SC-1337395

SPAULDING FARM

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/ACJSH3/15-Ryedale-Court-Greenville-SC-1320005

8 Firnstone Court • 3BR/2.5BA $389,000 · MLS# 1337085 Regina L. Coulomb · 420-1362 CODE 4137859

Text each property’s unique CODE to 67299 for pictures and details.

116 Belle Oaks Dr • 3BR/2.5BA $275,000 · MLS# 1337395 Andrew Van · 905-3737 CODE 4149345

15 Ryedale Ct • 5BR/4.5BA

$699,900 · MLS# 1320005 CODE 3525306 Stephanie Miller · 915-6076

MONTEBELLO PALAZZO

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/EJ7SRG/701-Montebello-Drive-Unit-103-Greenville-SC-1336538

701 Montebello Dr Unit 103 • 2BR/2.5BA $440,000 · MLS# 1336538 CODE 4122201 Phyllis MacDonald · 313-3753

COTTAGES @ HARRISON BRIDGE upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/A8DP27/109-Belle-Oaks-Drive-Simpsonville-SC-1332950

109 Belle Oaks Dr • 3BR/2.5BA $276,500 · MLS# 1332950 CODE 3990766 Janie Collins Gibbs · 901-3403

A REAL ESTATE COMPANY IS LIKE A HOME.

DRUID HILLS/NORTH MAIN

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/4V58SL/201-W-Hillcrest-Drive-Greenville-SC-1328030

201 W. Hillcrest Drive • 3BR/3BA $260,000 · MLS# 1328030 CODE 3828243 Jane Ellefson · 979-4415

KINGSGATE

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/89MS3U/17-Rushden-Drive-Greenville-SC-1335622

17 Rushden Dr • 4BR/2.5BA

$215,000 · MLS# 1335622 CODE 4100135 Norm MacDonald · 313-7353

THE GOOD ONES HAVE A STRONG FOUNDATION.

OPEN NEW COMMUNITIES Alta Vista Place upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/VFMPCU

Tues.-Sat. 11 am-5pm, Sun. 2-4 pm Units starting @ $949,000 CODE 2931606 AltaVistaPlace.com 622-5253

The Oaks at Roper Mountain Open Sunday 2-4pm MLS 1331535 $665,000 CODE 3944714 Cynthia Rehberg 884-9953

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/85JU93/216-Garlington-Oak-Lane-Greenville-SC-1331535

Cureton Place

Bringing quality home since 1964.

Open Sunday 2-4pm 15 Cureton St. • Units starting @ $400,000 • CODE 3418021 Becky Orders 270-0743 Leigh Irwin 380-7755 curetonplace.com

www.CDanJoyner.com

Agents on call this weekend

Deborah Granados Robbie Haney 879-4239 270-4192 Greer N. Pleasantburg Dr.

Lindsie Sink 616-8865 Downtown

Tyler Nasim 313-4088 Pelham Road

Heather Shehan 449-3289 Garlington Road

Regina L. Salley 979-9646 Easley

Mark Gwinn 415-3004 Simpsonville

Ellie Linder 430-5881 Augusta Road

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of January 16 – 20, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

THE VILLAS @ OAK GROVE ABNEY MILLS GRIFFITH FARM HUNTINGTON CLIFFS@MTN PARK WESTVIEW BARRINGTON PARK REGENT PARK ALEXANDER FARMS FIVE FORKS PLANTATION SYCAMORE RIDGE RIVERBEND ESTATES BRIDGEWATER ESTATES AT RIVERWOOD FARM THORNBROOKE ROCKY SLOPE ROAD WATERS RUN GREYTHORNE POINSETT CORNERS FOREST COVE PENNINGTON PARK HUDSON FOREST MORNING MIST PEBBLECREEK ST MARK COTTAGES HAMPTON CENTRE MORTON GROVE DEER RUN MORNING MIST FARM MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS CARILION NORTHPARK TOWNHOMES PELHAM FALLS SUMMIT AT PELHAM SPRINGS SHADOW MOSS KELSEY GLEN CLIFFS VALLEY GRIFFIN PARK PELHAM ESTATES ST MARK COTTAGES GREYTHORNE FOREST LAKE AMBER OAKS FARM BEAVER BROOK II WOODRUFF LAKE LANNEAU DRIVE HIGHLANDS LAKE FOREST NORTHCLIFF MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS RIVERSIDE COMMONS

$16,227,000 $2,900,000 $1,810,577 $1,485,000 $1,200,000 $1,200,000 $682,800 $607,500 $598,890 $560,000 $555,715 $503,000 $500,000 $427,000 $425,000 $425,000 $406,000 $387,000 $327,726 $325,000 $321,000 $315,000 $309,072 $309,010 $301,500 $300,000 $299,500 $299,000 $296,000 $294,500 $290,000 $285,000 $282,390 $282,000 $280,248 $280,000 $276,714 $273,500 $272,500 $269,000 $267,835 $264,787 $262,000 $260,000 $259,900 $255,000 $254,900 $254,000 $250,000 $250,000 $249,900 $246,000 $245,000 $242,000 $241,900 $235,000 $232,000 $230,000 $229,900 $226,300 $225,295 $224,085

AHP H6 GREENVILLE LLC REGULATORS HOLDINGS LLC RYLAND PROPERTIES LLC D R HORTON INC MAJOR REEF LLC GDL TRUST GETTIG KATHERINE R (JTWR LONG MELISSA S POP ANCA I GUPTA BARNA D BBW HOLDINGS LLC SAWYER STEVEN T DOMONOSKE CHAD H CUTHBERTSON RALPH H III LARSON ADAM C (JTWROS) HARMSTAD CLIFFORD J (JTW DOREMUS BETH ELLANE LOCKE SHARRY GEAN (JTWRO DEFILIPPI TARA L (JTWROS RYLAND PROPERTIES LLC BAILEY JASON D LOKHANDE KAMALSHIL JWH ROCKY SLOPE LLC JAYACHANDRAN JAGADHA BOYKIN GLEEN J (JTWROS) COOPER FURMAN (SURV) BENTLEY MARTHA MOTT ANTHONY S (JTWROS) COOK JEAN A (JTWROS) MILLER JEFFREY KEMP CONNIE A (JTWROS) RICKETTS PROPERTIES LLC KNOTTS TIFFANY PORTER ESSENHIGH KATHERINE A GIZZI KATIE M SHC HOLDINGS LLC KING KEEFE (JTWROS) TAYLOR ALISON P (JTWROS) CHOURAKI JILLIAN R (JTWR MAINE KEVIN COUCH JOHN L (JTWROS) ALLEN ANTONIO D (JTWROS) SIJON JANET ANN FOSTER MATTHEW B (JTWROS KINNEBERG JENNIFER K (JT SARTORE STEPHEN J BRADY PATRICIA H (JTWROS HUNTER ROBERT L BRITT LISA A LOLLIS EDWARD C (JTWROS) FRANCO ANGELA M GORE EMILY REBECCA (JTWR AZANGUE LAURIANT PICARD WILSON CHARLES G (JTWROS BERRYHILL BRUCE R (JTWRO ALLEN JENNIFER L (JTWROS NAIL SARAH B KURTZ ERIK HARRIS LANE J (JTWROS) HOMESLEY ELISE E (JTWROS HULIN MARCUS FLYNN PATRICK M (JTWROS)

5950 BERKSHIRE LN STE 850 6 CHARLESTONPLACE CT 1381 OLD MILL CIR STE 200 1371 DOGWOOD DR SW 303 MILLS AVE 506 HERCULES DR 204 GRIFFITH HILL WAY 3 STRATTON PL 85 BELLHAVEN TRL 102 BARRINGTON PARK DR 3175 MOUNT LEBANON RD 321 HUNTCLIFF DR 17 BEN ST 2 ALEXANDER MANOR WAY 116 WARE ST 8 CLIFTON GROVE WAY 213 WHITWORTH WAY 208 PLEASANTWATER CT 204 RED ORCHID RD 1381 OLD MILL CIR STE 200 503 GLADSTONE WAY 12 SPRINGHEAD WAY 2812 WINDSOR AVE 432 FIELDSVIEW LN 105 KETTLE OAK WAY 412 NEW NEELY FERRY RD 101 W COURT ST STE A 1756 LAKE CUNNINGHAM RD 6 COUNTRY MIST DR 722 RUTHERFORD RD 2 WOLF DEN DR 513 W WADE HAMPTON BLVD 409 ASCHOFF CT 19 HONEYBEE LN 206 ROCK SLIDE CT 1307 N MAIN ST 101 MORTON GROVE LN 105 THISTLEDOWN WAY 303 PLUM HILL WAY 911 HAMPTON AVE 302 SANDUSKY LN 134 HIGHWAY 417 16 RIDENOUR AVE 1209 E WASHINGTON ST UNIT 105 12 WRENWOOD CT 314 ROCKY TOP DR 120 WILD THORN LN 335 KELSEY GLEN LN 2821 ROBYS WAY 129 ARNOLD MILL RD 1 HORTON GROVE 202 ROCK SLIDE CT 208 DAIRWOOD DR 121 FOREST LAKE DR 27 MEADOWGOLD LN 101 BROOKE LEE CIR 25 LAKE VALLEY CT 119 LANNEAU DR 109 SHANNON DR 230 NORTHCLIFF WAY 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 103 MIDDLEBY WAY

SHADOW CREEK $220,000 FONTANA FOREST $220,000 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $220,000 NORTHCLIFF $218,200 BRYSON MEADOWS $217,631 ORCHARD FARMS $217,000 BRYSON MEADOWS $213,435 VICTORIA PARK $212,500 SUMMERSIDE@ROLLING GREEN $210,000 $210,000 BRYSON MEADOWS $208,520 BROOKFIELD WEST $199,900 TIMBERLAND TRAIL $198,500 BETHEL GREENE $196,750 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $195,000 STONE GLEN $195,000 GLASTONBURY VILLAGE $194,000 DRUID HILLS $193,000 SHADOW CREEK $192,500 SPARROWS POINT $189,900 $187,300 THE ELEMENTS $185,000 FAIRVIEW CHASE $185,000 $185,000 GILDER CHASE $182,000 VISTA HILLS $180,000 NORTH SUNSET HILLS $179,000 $176,000 WATERMILL $175,000 WATERMILL $172,580 RABON VALLEY $172,500 HARBOR@LAKE CUNNINGHAM $172,500 WEXFORD $171,000 LAKEWOOD ON THE SALUDA $170,500 SUGAR CREEK VILLAS $170,000 DEVENGER PLACE $170,000 $169,000 LOCKELAND PARK $168,800 CEDAR RIDGE $168,000 RABON VALLEY $165,830 COOPERS LAKE $165,000 DUNWOODY OAKS $165,000 PEBBLE VALLEY $165,000 MICHELAND PLACE $164,900 THE GROVE $161,000 CHESTERFIELD ESTATES $160,000 HOMESTEAD ACRES II $155,000 HIGHVIEW ACRES $150,000 BERKSHIRE PARK $149,573 COUNTRY GARDENS $145,000 BEREA FOREST $143,895 REVIS FALLS $142,000 COTTON MILL PLACE ONE $141,000 $139,000 SHANNON TERRACE $138,000 STANDING SPRINGS ESTATES $137,000 WADE HAMPTON GARDENS $136,000 WESTMINSTER VILLAGE $135,000 COUNTRY GARDENS $134,900 CARRINGTON $133,000 LISMORE VILLAGE $132,900 SUGAR CREEK VILLAS $132,500

NOBLE/WALTON GREENVILLE PISGAH LLC FOOD LION LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC M & L LEASING LLC ALEXANDER SARA B (WILL) GAUGHF KATHY DILLON (JTW LEAPHART JOSEPH K POP IRREVOCABLE TRUST TH BENNETT PATSY A BBW PROPERTIES LLC BENJAMIN JANE G REEVES ADGER S MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH T J BLAIR LLC RAINBOW GROUP INC SARMIENTO EMMANUEL MIDDLEHOUSE BUILDERS INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SC JOHNSON WILLIE JAMES PRIMESTAR-H FUND I TRUST LEJARZA ELGA VERDAE PROPERTIES LLC NVR INC CHAMBERLIN GEORGE R HARKINS DEBRA A MANTHEY JAMES SCOTT GREENE DOUGLAS W SK BUILDERS INC CARMONA SANCHEZ MIGUEL A CARTER MERRILL W ALVERSON PROPERTIES LLC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC FAIRCHILDS KIMBERLY H (J ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L RMDC INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL SNOVER DEBRA B WELLS CHRISTOPHER A WOLFGANGBROS LLC NVR INC STONEWOOD HOMES INC FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG RODEGHIERO KEELI M FORD LAUREN JANE SATCHER ARK SERRUS LLC ARNETT PATRICIA A SILLEMAN DONALD (JTWROS) BURNSIDE RONDA K FERNANDES GLORIA HOOPER LASHIRLL WHITE ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L RREF RB SBL-SC LLC TZOUVELEKAS TOMMY J SK BUILDERS INC FORTNER MICHAEL E DUQUETTE BENOIT (JTWROS) TRAXLER DAVID GATLING II BURCH ERICA A AMBRIA PROPERTIES LLC NVR INC NVR INC

PRICE SELLER TERRY BOBBY D CARTER KENNETH GRADY (JT NVR INC WEEKS JENNIFER CHASTINE MUNGO HOMES INC SUD RITAMBHARA (JTWROS) MUNGO HOMES INC KIMPELL KARLA WILLEY SYBIL S TAYLOR ALISON P MUNGO HOMES INC LANO JOHN SIRIGNANO STEVEN J CAHOON ELIZABETH STEEN CHRISTY VAUGHN PRICE EMILY K BOUGHNER WILLIAM R PITTS EMILY R CROUCH JAMES T TERRY GAYE B BREWSTER JANET P BAKER EDWARD M (JTWROS) GARCIA JORGE C SR WILLIAMS TERRY L OTT DANIELLE JOY PROPERTY INVESTMENTS HUFFLIN ANGELA DIANNE (S M & R INVESTORS LLC MORTON JESSICA HAYES EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL CONSUMERS CONSTRUCTION S GMAT LEGAL TITLE TRUST 2 NIELSEN ALYCIA ANN SHAPIRO ANNA R (SURV) DEAMICIS GENE (JTWROS) HARMSTAD CLIFFORD J KEYS CHRISTOPHER CARSON SUNCREST HOMES LLC MITTEN JONATHAN R CONSUMERS CONSTRUCTION S OGBURN ROSANNE G REVOCAB BAILEY TODD A GALLOWAY E PERRY DAVIS CHARITY A CHRIST JOAN L BUNTON DONALD L KONOPKA BRIAN P (JTWROS) COVIL COURTNEY MEGAN MAY RUFUS JAMES HOUVENER CHELSEY PRINCE JULIA FRANCES SCRIVEN THOMAS J WILLIAMS SUSAN T JOHNSON CHRISTOPHER DEWA RESIDENTIAL BUILDING SOL SMITH DIANE C ENTWISTLE KENNETH KEILMAN KEVIN GRAHAM ROB TRUSTEE CUBIDES RUBEN BAILEY JESSICA C WINGO BENJAMIN W

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ADDRESS

HICKLIN DAVID J GOLDSMITH JENNIFER L WALLES DANIEL K DEVEREAUX DEBRA (SURV) MCKELLEY ELIZA D ACHARYA JIGNESHKUMAR J ( CRUELL LAFAYETTE (JTWROS LONDONO ANA BAUER GERALD H & BAUER V DAVIS MONICA M (JTWROS) BLUME JAMES O’NEAL COLVIN DONALD R II (JTWR YOUNG COLIN M (JTWROS) MAZUREK JILLIAN CHOWBEY ANAND K SMITH JONATHAN YORK GIVIDEN NATHAN J MCKENNA LAURA KATHERINE SILVA MARCOS MIRANDA (JT FERCANA DANTE L MORRIS LAURA LEIGH THOMPSON ANGELA JOHNSON-MCDONALD KELLY L JAMES WHITE ENTERPRISES POINDEXTER CHERYL (JTWRO ROSEBANK INVESTMENTS LLC GRUSHOVENKO GENNADIY P ( L & G PROPERTIES OF GREE HARPER ALIVIA S (JTWROS) THACKSTON JOSHUA R SMITH JULIANNE C (JTWROS TERAULT PAULA A (JTWROS) TROTTER JAMES A BRYAN AUSTIN P WALL THERESA ANNE RAINBOW GROUP INC HAWKINS CHERYL R OCAMPO MARTA SALVATIERRA LESTER MINTO DEAN LUERY CAROL K LENGER FREDERICK C JR (J ABUNIJEM NIDAL SMITH KRISTA L GRIFFITH GEORGE JOHNSON CLEMENT SWANSON ROXANNE S (JTWRO GRIFFIN CROFT HARRISON 38 DEVONHALL TRUST TALLEY DARYLE LEWIS SPERRY SETH WALDON HAMILTON CHELSEA D WULFF DAVID HENRY (JTWRO TERRY GAYE B JENEC PROPERTIES LLC HANNA MOUSA A COX ANNA M MINNICK STEVEN B HARRIS REGINA M TAVERAS BRIAN GOLDEN GATE PROPERTIES L SMITH MORGAN THOMAS

125 SEDGEBROOK DR 1501 STATE PARK RD 111 MIDDLEBY WAY 116 NORTHCLIFF WAY 15 HOWARDS END CT 20 HALEHAVEN DR 7 HOWARDS END CT 208 STONEBURY DR 17 RAINSTONE DR 5 W SCENIC DR 11 HOWARDS END CT 303 GILDERBROOK RD 512 CREST HILL DR 141 GREENAPPLE WAY 209 TUXEDO LN 75 TILBURY WAY 5 AVEBURY CT 231 W HILLCREST DR 231 APPLEHILL WAY 317 COTTON BAY WAY 106 DARLINGTON AVE 350 MOHAWK DR #402 13102 LARCHDALE RD APT 5 124 N LEACH ST 9 IVORY ARCH CT 7809 ROSEBANK THE COLONY 20 HARRIS ST 1249 S PLEASANTBURG DR 200 PORTLAND FALLS DR 508 RIVERDALE RD 225 S NELSON DR 2 LAKE HARBOR CT 7 DAUGHTRY CT 120 OLD SALUDA DAM RD 317 SKYLARK CIR PO BOX 443 1505 SOQUEL DR STE 5B 301 LOCKELAND PARK DR 119 CEDAR RIDGE LN 221 S NELSON DR 301 DOVE HAVEN DR 229 OAK VALLEY DR PO BOX 25381 12 PICARDY DR 21 APPLETON LN 230 PIEDMONT GOLF COURSE RD 517 HAVENHURST DR 8 ARLENE DR 119 CLEVEIRVINE AVE 1209 AUTUMN LEAF LN 36 RIVERWOOD CIR 109 REVIS CREEK CT 167 TRAILS END 114 MAULDIN CIR 15 SUNSET DR 314 CHETSWORTH LN 213 BALFER DR 111 BURLINGTON AVE 1914 COUNTRY APPLE CT 501 W 173RD ST APT 13 206 UPPER VIEW CT 422 SPARROW HAWK CT

NO ZIP CODE LEFT UNTURNED! SOLD 2016 — Huge Thank You to My Sellers and Buyers!

864.678.8208

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241 Ingleside Way • Eastside

212 Rivers Edge Circle • Simpsonville

319 Gleniea Lane • TR

121 Windfield Road • Gower Estates

19 Blazing Star Trail • The Cliffs at Glassy

40 Sunset Drive • Augusta Road

116 Penn Street • Augusta Road

20 Penrose Avenue • Augusta Road

1037 Parkins Mill Road • Parkins Mill

3 Woolridge Way • Greer

8C Knoxbury Terrace • Downtown

109 E. Cranberry Lane • Roper Mtn Estates

11 Ottaway Drive • Alta Vista

1 Woodland Hills Lane • Fountain Inn

27 Babbs Hollow Road • Collins Creek

206 E. Cranberry Lane • Roper Mtn Estates


02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

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HOME Featured Neighborhood

Breckenridge Travelers Rest SC

Home Info Price: $204,900-$300,000’s Amenities: Close to Swamp Rabbit Trail and Downtown Travelers Rest. Mountain Views and Large Home Sites. Schools: Gateway Elementary, Northwest Middle, and Travelers Rest High Contact Information: Stan McAlister | 864.292.0400 stan@builderpeople.com

Beautiful mountain views and large home sites, Breckenridge is the newest SK Builders community in Travelers Rest. Only a few miles from the Swamp Rabbit Trail this community is a uniquely beautiful place to live. SK Builders, Craftsman Signature Series Collection, ensures both exceptional craftsmanship and outstanding value. Standard Upgrades in this Community include: 9 foot ceilings on first level, granite countertop, rounded corners, arched doorways, double sinks with garden tub and separate shower in master bathroom, cultured marble vanities, fireplace with gas logs, fiber cement siding, and many more features that distinguish an SK Builders’ home. Choose to build your home with the largest local builder in the

Upstate. SK Builders and McAlister Realty are focused on your complete home-building experience. Family owned and operated for over 25 years, we understand residential construction which enables us to anticipate your concerns during the build. From the homes and locations offered, the quality of materials and workmanship, and the customer service you get along the way – we make home construction an enjoyable process. We’re not just building homes – We’re Building a Way of Life. Hwy 25 to Tigerville Rd (Spinx). Turn right on Tigerville Rd. Approx 1 mile and Breckenridge is on the right. OR from Taylors: Jackson Grove Rd to Tigerville, left on Tigerville, 0.5 miles and Breckenridge is on the left.

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GO BEYOND THE EXPECTED.

Tim Keagy 864-905-3304

Ted Green 864-684-8789

Ray Bergey 757-409-4900

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Angela Harmon 864-508-4462

Andrew Van 864-905-3737

Jennifer Kephart 864-991-6732


UNDER CONTRACT

108 Burwood Dr., Simpsonville $149,500 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms 1,400 sq.ft. MLS#1336905 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

303 St Helena Ct., Greenville $549,000 4 Bedrooms, 3 Full & 2 Half Bathrooms 3,635 sq.ft. MLS#1332743 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

5 Graywood Ct., Simpsonville $489,000 5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms 4,540 sq.ft. MLS#1333714 Stephanie Towe 864-270-5919

104 Pheasant Trail, Greenville $230,000 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms 2,153 sq.ft. MLS#1336299 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

120 E Round Hill Rd., Greenville $2,495,000 5 Bedrooms, 7 Bathrooms 23 acres MLS#1335830 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

6 Monet Dr., Montebello $925,000 3 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms 3,500 sq.ft. MLS#1336098 Stephanie Towe 864-270-5919

132 Horsepen Way, Simpsonville $270,000 5 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms 3,188 sq.ft. MLS#1337305 Steven Delisle 864-757-4970

420 Packs Mtn. Ridge Rd., Taylors $450,000 5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms 4,900 sq.ft. MLS#1336503 Steven Delisle 864-757-4970

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02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

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HOME The Abstract Art of Grateful Living

with Paula Angermeier

Short shrift for Mardi Gras

UP TO

75% OFF

Friday, February 17 – Monday, February 20

Mardi Gras? Not in our neck of the woods. Around here, the day before Ash Wednesday is known as Shrove Tuesday. And there will be no étouffée or crawfish, only pancakes, in keeping with the tradition of emptying the pantry of the sugar, eggs, butter, and cream that historically have been off-limits during the Lenten season. The name Shrove Tuesday evolved from the practice of “shriving,” or confessing one’s transgressions or sins. Although the term fell out of use years ago, it survives in the expression “short shrift,” which means to show little concern for another’s troubles or excuses. Our family spent many happy Shrove Tuesday evenings enjoying pancakes and fellowship with our local flock in Mount Dora, Fla., where the elder gentlemen of the parish fried sausage and kept three or four electric griddles filled with circles of golden batter. Each year our two boys vied with their friends for the unofficial pancake-eating record. Our son Joe is the titleholder, with 17 to his credit. He’s now a junior at Clemson, and I shudder to think how many free pancakes he could eat these days. Sadly, our church in Greenville does not host a Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, but we don’t let that stop us. Thanks to a recipe from

my dear friend Michelle, we still enjoy our pancakes and our sausage, but I don’t have to stand in front of a hot griddle all evening. This recipe is also perfect comfort food for a simple supper or as a kid-friendly brunch dish with a side dish of fruit. It’s a great slumber party morning-after breakfast, too.

PANCAKE BAKE • 1 pound ground turkey or pork sausage, browned and drained • 2 cups pancake mix • 1 1/3 cups milk • 2 eggs, beaten • 1/4 cup vegetable oil • cinnamon sugar Brown and drain sausage. Mix pancake mix, eggs, milk, and oil. Add sausage to batter and pour into a 9 by 13-inch pan, coated with nonstick cooking spray. Sprinkle cinnamon sugar over top and bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until lightly browned. Serve with warm maple syrup. Whenever I make this, I’m always reminded of the sweet old fellows at church, wearing their aprons emblazoned with “Taste and see that the Lord is good; blessed is the one who takes refuge in Him. Psalm 34:8.” By day, Paula Angermeier is the head of communications for the Greenville County Museum of Art. By night, she writes about the art of living at TownandCountryHouse.com.

C93R

This Mardi Gras, you can keep your gaudy beads and boisterous krewes, your jambalaya and gumbo, and, by all means, indulge in your cake with its plastic baby. Oh wait. We don’t really do much Mardi Gras celebrating in Greenville, do we? Nevertheless, I’m giving King Cake short shrift because for the Mister and me, the only cake to have on Feb. 28 is a pancake.

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02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

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FRI

17

CALENDAR

COMMUNITY

CONCERT

Simpsonville Garden Club Meeting

Furman Symphony Orchestra Presents Concerto Concert

Rotary Hall | 126 S. Main St., Simpsonville 2 p.m. | Third Tuesday of each month | FREE Jane McCutcheon, a master gardener, will give a talk on how to grow tasty herbs for the kitchen. Anyone with an interest is welcome to attend. simpsonvillegardenclub.com

CONCERT

Local Legends Revel | 34 E. Stone Ave. 7 p.m. (VIP pre-show), 8 p.m. (general admission) $15 (general admission), $25 (VIP Tickets) This is a celebration of local legends that call Greenville “home��� and will highlight musicians Greg Payne and The Piedmont Boys, Darby Wilcox and the Peep Show, Jacob Johnson, and a VIP pre-show with WPOS. The emcee for the evening is local comedian Zane Mitchell. chassevents.com

EDUCATION

Guided Tour, Film, and Reception

Furman University | McAlister Auditorium 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | $12/adults, $10/seniors, and $5/students The FSO Concerto Concert features student soloists selected by competitive audition who will perform concerto movements from the standard repertoire. Thomas Joiner conducts the event. Soloists for the concert are Emma Gierszal, marimba, “Concerto for Marimba & String Orchestra” by Eric Ewazen; Melvin Robinson, alto saxophone, “Rhapsody for Alto Saxophone” by André Weignein; Emma Marie Saba, piano, Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor by Camille Saint-Saens; Hayden Christine Wilson, violin, Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 47 by Jean Sibelius; and Ju Sun Paul Yoon, cello, “Cello Concerto in D Minor” by Edouard Lalo. 864-294-2086 | bit.ly/2kMdbEn furmanmusic@furman.edu

FRI-SUN

17-19

FILM

Peace Center Screens OscarNominated Short Films

“Piper,” and a selection of additional films. Shows Friday at 6 p.m., Saturday at 10 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., and Sunday at 3:30 p.m. Documentary screening runs for approximately 150 minutes and includes: “4.1 Miles,” “Extremis,” “Joe’s Violin,” “The White Helmets,” and “Watani: My Homeland.” Shows Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 6 p.m. Separate tickets are required for each day and category. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

FRI-SUN

17-26

THEATER

“Two Dancing Princesses”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre SCCT Headquarters | 153 Augusta St. various times | $8 This “swing” version of the Grimm Fairytale, based on “Twelve Dancing Princesses,” is fun for boys and girls, and there will be a post-show dance party after every performance. 864-467-3000 | scchildrenstheatre.org

NOW THRU

18

THEATER

The World Premiere of “Kappa Kappa Scream”

Chapman Cultural Center 200 E Saint John St.

Peace Center | 300 S. Main St.

Furman University The Playhouse | 3300 Poinsett Highway

various times | $10

$18/adults, $15/seniors, $10/students

6 p.m. | FREE

Live action screening runs for approximately 130 minutes and includes “Ennemis Intérieurs,” “La Femme Et Le TGV,” “Silent Nights,” “Sing (Mindenki),” and “Timecode.” Shows Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturday at 1 p.m., and Sunday at noon. Animation screening runs for approximately 90 minutes and includes “Blind Vaysha,” “Borrowed Time,” “Pear Cider and Cigarettes” (not suitable for children), “Pearl,”

Every October, the new pledge class of Kappa Kappa Delta sorority enjoys a weekend retreat together. This year, the sorority president has decided that placing the women in a cabin in the woods and scaring them will lead to deeper bonding and friendship. Unfortunately for them, someone – or something — at the cabin has other ideas. The world premiere production of Randall David Cook’s

CONCERT

FEB. 17 Polymath, w/ Anthem and Estuarie The Spinning Jenny | 107 Cannon St., Greer | $8 in advance/$10 day of show

Depending on where and when you see them, Anderson’s Polymath could be an almost entirely different group. Formed by singer/keyboardist Logan Carroll and guitarist Tanner Corley, the group creates a swirling, complex, synth-heavy brand of progressive, experimental rock with an ever-shifting lineup of musical and visual collaborators. “I originally started with just Tanner and myself at Anderson University,” Carroll says, “but I was also looking for an avenue to include all of my artistic friends. It’s a group of a lot of different talents, and music is just the most accessible one. A lot of our friends do our artwork, videos, and photography. Everything that’s presented has gone through a lot of hands.” Given that multifaceted presentation, it’s not always easy for Carroll to describe what the band does. “I always tell them that going to a live show is the best way to experience it,” he says. “When people come to see us, they realize that whether it’s a musician’s first show with Polymath or their 20th, they really believe in the music.” —Vincent Harris

FEB. 17 CONCERT

Erwin Redl will lead a special guided tour for museum and art professionals. He will speak about his process and materials for each of the works of art within Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light. 864-542-2787 | info@seeingspartanburg.com

“Kappa Kappa Scream” is intended for mature audiences. Not for those afraid of the dark. 294-2125 | bit.ly/2jqgz9e Mickie.spencer@furman.edu

THEATER

“Important Hats of the Twentieth Century” by Nick Jones The Warehouse Theatre | 37 Augusta St. $30 & $35 In a theatrical sci-fi farce like no other (possibly because there is no other), Sam Greevy is the hottest fashion designer in 1930s New York. At least he is until upstart rival Paul Roms begins releasing fantastically strange but popular pieces like “sweatshirts,” “tracksuits,” and “skater pants.” Soon Greevy discovers the secret behind Roms’ design inspirations and learns where and more importantly “from when” these wild styles are coming. The hilarious rivalry turns into a battle for the very future of humankind and, more importantly, fashion. warehousetheatre.com

SAT

18

COMMUNITY

Furman Presents Events Honoring Martin Luther King Jr. Furman University, Trone Student Center, Burgiss Theater | 3300 Poinsett Highway 10 a.m.-2 p.m. | FREE Joseph Vaughn Oratorical Contest sponsored by Alpha Phi Alpha Greenville Foundation. 906-7078 | voc@alphagreenville.org furman.edu/MLK, alphagreenville.org

McLovins w/ Soul Mechanic Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Drive | 9 p.m. | $10

The McLovins formed somewhat by accident a decade or so ago, when the thenteenaged band made a video of themselves playing a cover of Phish’s “You Enjoy Myself.” The video became popular among Phish’s fans, and the young group found themselves unexpectedly part of the jamband scene. But as time has passed and the lineup has changed, the McLovins have adopted more of a funk-based sound, locking into danceable grooves and layering rock guitars and pop hooks over the top. “We’ve changed pretty dramatically,” says drummer Jake Huffman. “When we formed the band, we were 14 years old. And those are such big years in terms of development, just as human beings.” Huffman says that they settled on funk as the root of their sound because of its flexibility. “When we first heard Parliament-Funkadelic, it swung, and it had this feel, and you could dance to it, and we all fell in love with it,” he says. “Funk music was the perfect genre to use to make each song sound totally different but still have that sound.” —Vincent Harris

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40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

2017 American Advertising Awards Gala Zen | 924 S. Main St. 6:30-10 p.m. | $45-$65 Mingle with elite creative professionals from across the Upstate while celebrating excellence in the local advertising community. Themed “Vintage Hollywood,” this year’s American Advertising Awards Gala promises to be an exciting evening showcasing award-winning design from people who have helped put Greenville on the map. Enjoy heavy hors d’oeuvres, cocktails, and a chance to win great prizes. 386-6450 | aafgreenville.org

BOOK SIGNING

Book Signing with Todd Livingston & Mitch Rogers Richard’s Comics & Collectibles 1214-A Laurens Road 2–5 p.m. | FREE Comic book writer Todd Livingston (“Starring Sonya Devereaux”) and writer/artist Mitch Rogers (“The Bogre”) will be signing copies of their newest releases. 271-1105 | richardscomics.wordpress.com

COMMUNITY

Jewelry for Kids Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | $75 Ages 7-12 will combine sculpture with jewelry design and innovation to create wearable art with Kate Furman in the one-day workshop. 864-735-3948 | bit.ly/2kQXVt8

MUSIC

Al Watson - Live Music Joe’s Place | 640 S. Main St., Ste. 101B 6:308:30 p.m. | FREE Our favorite “old folkie” is back, and if you haven‘t had a chance to hear Al perform, you’re missing out. The man wrote a song about Joe’s Place; he’s gotta be cool. 864-558-0828 | joesplacellc.com info@joesplacellc.com

HEALTH

Reflexology Massage

FEB. 18 CONCERT

CALENDAR « COMMUNITY

The Soundbox Tavern | 507 W. Georgia Road, Simpsonville | 10 p.m. | Free The nucleus of the Greenville progressivemetal quartet Broken Testimony is drummer Bryce Chism and singer/guitarist Judge Page. The pair formed the group at a two-man jam session early last year, and by the time it was over, they’d hit on a style, mixing the serpentine, complex rhythms of bands like Tool with a more melodic, but still heavy, songwriting sensibility. After recruiting guitarist Nic Delvaux and bassist Billy Reed, they further honed their sound. “We’re very big fans of bands who use those progressive elements,” Chism says. “So we thought, why not see what we can do with those elements in our own style?” Lyrically, the band thinks outside the typical metal box as well, particularly on “Unknowns,” an intense, slow-building ballad from their debut EP, “W.A.R.” “We wrote it based on the rapture,” Chism says. “It’s from the point of view of a character who was left behind on Earth, and he’s speaking to God, trying to get saved again.” —Vincent Harris

ZZ Top’s Tonnage Tour Peace Center | 7:30 p.m.

Deep Winter Blues Hagwood Mill | 138 Hagwood Mill Road, Pickens 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $5 parking fee This year’s lineup features Folk Heritage Award winning bluesmen, Freddie Vanderford and Steve McGaha, accompanied by musician Brandon Turner. As a special treat, Freddie Vanderford will be hosting a harmonica workshop immediately following his performance. 864-898-2936 | visitpickenscounty.com/calendar

COMMUNITY

Repticon Greenville

Joe’s Place 640 S. Main St., Ste. 101B

Greenville Shrine Club | 119 Beverly Road

11 a.m.-4 p.m. $25/30 minutes

$10 (adults), $5 (children 5-12), children under 5 are free

Book your appointment now with Carlos O’Neal, certified reflexologist. Your feet will thank you for it. 864-363-7717 joesplacellc.com info@joesplacellc.com

This family-oriented event offers the opportunity to learn about animals not normally seen in local pet stores. There will be seminars on animal-related topics by experts. 803-814-5018 | bonnie.miller@repticon.com repticon.com/south-carolina/greenville

10 a.m.–5 p.m. (Saturday) & 4 p.m. (Sunday)

will meet from 4:15-5 p.m. Chill Skills high school group will meet from 5:15-6 p.m. 864-331-1400

VISUAL ARTS

NOW THRU

Four Artists Show Photography at Furman

21

Furman University, Thompson Art Gallery, Roe Art Building | 3300 Poinsett Highway

VISUAL ARTS

9 a.m-5 p.m. | Monday-Friday | FREE

Sundays at 2 Gallery Tour: Wyeth Dynasty

The exhibition “Re-vision: New Directions in Traditional Genres” features work by four emerging artists: Furman faculty member Terri Bright (Greenville, S.C.), Adam Reynolds (Columbus, Ind.), Ivette Spradlin (Pittsburgh, Penn.) and Mike Tittel (Cincinnati, Ohio). The bodies of work in the exhibition represent the genres of still life, portraiture, documentary, and street photography, all thoughtfully explored and reimagined. 864-294-3360 | bit.ly/2hhn91Y

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2-3 p.m. | FREE Don’t miss this guided tour focusing on the expressive works featured in “Jamie Wyeth: The Child Is the Father of the Man (Smile).” 864-271-7570 | gcma.org

EDUCATION

February Meeting of Genealogical Society South Carolina Genealogical Society The Confederate Museum | 15 Boyce Ave. 3 p.m. | FREE Patricia G. McNeely, author of Civil War literature, will be the featured speaker. scgen.org

MON

20

MUSIC

Beecher’s Fault Joe’s Place | 640 S. Main St., Ste. 101B

6 p.m. | FREE

MUSIC

18-19

19

CONCERT

More than four and a half decades after their formation in the Houston area, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees ZZ Top are set to begin a new tour in 2017. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org

Broken Testimony, w/ Absolute Zero and Decibel

SAT-SUN

SUN

Now’s your chance to hear the band that Deli Magazine says has “one foot in pearly pop, while including sonic somersaults to keep your head twirling while your feet are moving.” 864-558-0828 | joesplacellc.com info@joesplacellc.com

MON-APR

20-17

EDUCATION

Clarity Offers Kids Relax and Chill Skills Classes Center for Developmental Services 29 North Academy St. $300 Clarity’s psychology and learning department will begin offering two new classes in February: Relaxed Kids, for children 6-13, and Chill Skills, for children 14-17. These classes are designed to help young people feel more confident, improve their learning potential, manage their emotions, and be the best they can be. Both Chill Skills and Relaxed Kids will run for eight weeks. Classes will meet Feb. 20 and 27, March 9, 13, 20, and 27, and April 3 and 17. Relaxed Kids elementary-school group will meet from 3:15-4 p.m. Relaxed Kids middle school group

TUE

21

COMMUNITY

Waterfalls of South Carolina: Waterfalls, Hikes, and Wildflowers Along the Way South Carolina Native Plant Society Southern Wesleyan University, Founders Hall 907 Wesleyan Drive, Central 7-9 p.m. | FREE Nature photographer Thomas King, author of “Waterfall Hikes of Upstate South Carolina,” will speak at the Upstate Native Plant Society, meeting in the lower level of Founders Hall. 877-644-5556 | scnps.org

LECTURE

Michael Rubin of American Enterprise Institute Furman University | Hartness Pavilion 3300 Poinsett Highway 7:15 p.m. | FREE Furman presents American Enterprise Institute scholar Michael Rubin whose talk is titled “Make Israel Unstable Again? How the Trump Presidency will Affect the Israel-Palestine Conflict.” A former Pentagon official, Rubin is a lecturer at the Naval Postgraduate School. He teaches regional politics to senior military officers who are deployed to the Middle East and Afghanistan. He also teaches classes about Iran, Arab politics, and acts of terrorism perpetrated on board United States aircraft. bit.ly/2k3r18u

CONCERT

Organ Concert with Pamela Decker Furman University | Daniel Memorial Chapel 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | $12/adults, $10/seniors, and $5/students

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02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

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CALENDAR «

Decker’s program, performed on Furman’s Hartness Organ (C.B. Fisk Opus 121, three manuals, 42 stops), features her own compositions and music by Myron Roberts, Felix Mendelssohn, Noel Rawsthorne, Leo Sowerby, and Marcel Dupré. Decker is professor of organ/music theory at the University of Arizona in Tucson, and organist at Grace St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Tuscon. 864-294-2086 | furmanmusic@furman.edu

TUE-SUN

21-26

THEATER

“Beautiful: The Carole King Musical”

10:30 a.m. | FREE Bring your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “Bee: A Peek-Through Picture Book” by Britta Teckentrup. 675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

THU-SUN

23-26

THEATER

“Alice in Wonderland”

Greenville Technical College Barton Campus | 506 S. Pleasantburg Drive 7:30 p.m. (Feb. 23-25) and 3 p.m. (Feb. 26)

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St.

FREE

$35–$95

Greenville Technical College is proud to present an adaptation of Carroll’s children’s classic stories, which never fail to refresh the imagination. Reconnect with the tale’s eccentric characters, including the Cheshire Cat, the Mad Hatter, the Duchess, the White Knight, the wicked Queen of Hearts, and of course, Alice. Recommended for all ages. dan.robbins@gvltec.edu

“Beautiful: The Carole King Musical” tells the inspiring true story of King’s remarkable rise to stardom, from being part of a hit songwriting team with her husband, Gerry Goffin, to her relationship with fellow writers and best friends Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann to becoming one of the most successful solo acts in popular music history. Along the way, she made more than beautiful music; she wrote the soundtrack to a generation. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org

WED

22

COMMUNITY

Coffee and Connections at CDS

Center for Developmental Services 29 North Academy St. 9:30-10:30 a.m. | FREE Meet at CDS on the fourth Wednesday of each month for coffee and conversation. There will be a chance for parents and caregivers of children with special needs and learning disabilities to grab a cup of coffee while learning more about local resources, connecting with others who are experiencing similar journeys of life, and navigating resources and supports that are available for children with special needs. GreenvilleInfo@FamilyConnectionSC.org

LECTURE

Historian Egerton Who Speaks About Film “Glory” Furman University | Johns Hall 101 3300 Poinsett Highway 5 p.m. | FREE Doug Egerton, professor of history at Le Moyne College (Syracuse, N.Y.), will deliver the 2017 George B. Tindall Memorial Lecture in History. “Thunder at the Gates: The Black Civil War Regiments That Redeemed America” explores the 1989 film “Glory.” 864-294-3492 | bit.ly/2kocbbl

THU

23

LITERARY

“Bee: A Peek-Through Picture Book” storytime

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5

THEATER

“A Streetcar Named Desire” Clemson Players | Clemson University Brooks Center for the Performing Arts 141 Jersey Lane Thursday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 3 p.m. $15 (adults), $10 (students A classic of the American stage, Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire” is a sensual and heartbreaking portrait set against the backdrop of 1940s New Orleans. This play features two of the most memorable characters in dramatic literature: the visceral Stanley Kowalski and his sister-in-law, the fragile and tormented Blanche DuBois. Once they meet, they begin to crash towards Blanche’s breaking point. bit.ly/2ipiudK

NOW THRU

24

VISUAL ARTS

In the Gallery at Centre Stage

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices $165 All others $1.20 per line

864.679.1205 | 864.679.1305 email: aharley@communityjournals.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Lambo Taps, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 120 South Main Street , Suite B and C, Simpsonville, SC 29681. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 26, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Fireforge LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON AND OFF premises consumption of BEER and ON premises consumption of WINE at 311 E. Washington St., Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 19, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Centre Stage 501 River St.

Tuesday-Friday from 2-6 p.m. FREE The art of Sunny Mullarkey McGowan is presented in cooperation with the Metropolitan Arts Council. This partnership is sponsored by South State Bank. 233-6733 centrestage.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that David B. Duncan DBA Cherokee Rose Saloon intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 2824 Geer Highway, Marietta, SC 29661. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 5, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Demolition of Structures, IFB #52-03/09/17, due at 3:00 P.M., E.S.T., March 9, 2017. Pre-Bid meeting at 10:00 A.M., E.S.T., February 22, 2017 at Greenville County Procurement Services, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Procurement/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING A public hearing will be held on Tuesday, March 7, 2017, at 6:00 p.m., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), in Council Chambers, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29601 for the purpose of receiving comments from members of the public concerning a proposed ordinance to amend Exhibit A established as an addendum to Ordinance No. 4079, as last amended by Ordinance No. 4868, so as to appropriate additional operating funds for tourist related projects. Butch Kirven, Chairman Greenville County Council NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING A public hearing will be held on Tuesday, March 7, 2017, at 6:00 p.m., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), in Council Chambers, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29601 for the purpose of receiving comments from members of the public concerning a proposed ordinance to establish a uniform public safety telecommunications user fee of $14.95, annually imposed upon each parcel of real property located in Greenville County, for the provision of upgraded county-wide public safety telecommunication services to all real property within Greenville County; and to amend Ordinance No. 2474, as amended, so as to increase the county road maintenance fee to twenty-five and 00/100 Dollars ($25.00). Butch Kirven, Chairman Greenville County Council PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 3/11/2017, at 9:00 a.m. at Woodruff Road Storage, 1868 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, Woodruff Road Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore stored with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: B012, Evangeline S Butler Furniture, Clothing, Boxes, Misc. 2. Unit: A010, Katherine M Flanagan Furniture, Boxes/Misc. 3. Unit A026, Ashley J Huffstetler Furniture, Household Items, Boxes/Misc. 4. Unit C258, Terry L Edens Bike, Chairs, Boxes/Misc. 5. Unit E22, Mary C, Wright Appliances, Boxes/Misc. 6. Unit C198: Michael D Stroud Furniture, Household Items, Boxes/Misc. 7. Unit A050, Joseph G Rollins Furniture, Boxes/Misc. 8. Unit E16 Allison C Burnett Furniture, TV, Appliances, Boxes/ Misc. 9. Unit C233, Dennis R Young Tools, Furniture, Misc. 10. Unit B217, Dennis R Young Tools, Mini Fridge, Clothing/ Misc. 11. F02, Grant P Mies Wooden Furniture Pieces/Misc.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 2017 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-17-08 APPLICANT: MERCY RECYCLING/ Childs Architecture TAX MAP#: P004.00-01-001.00 LOCATION: 1801 Rutherford Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to operate a Materials Recovery Facility on site CB-17-09 APPLICANT: DREIBRODT, ALLISON, CORBIN, LLC TAX MAP#: 0478.00-01-021.07 LOCATION: 1105 Old Buncombe Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from Sign Setback requirement for placement of a new sign on site. CB-17-10 APPLICANT: PAUL & DeANNA NEELY TAX MAP#: B004.04-.01-072.00 LOCATION: 121 Club Circle, Greenville SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from FRONT Setback requirement to build a single-family residence on site CB-17-11 APPLICANT: RENEWABLE WATER RESOURCES/Aecom TAX MAP#: 0245.00-01-002.00 LOCATION: 3635 Old Easley Bridge Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to install solar panels on the Public Utility site CB-17-12 APPLICANT: WINDWARD PARTNERS IV, LP/ADC Engineering TAX MAP#: 0538.13-01-001.03 & 0538.13-01-001.05 LOCATION: 5000 & 5008 Old Spartanburg Rd, Taylors SC REQUEST: Appeal Zoning Administrator’s decision that use of the Planned Development for Gas Sales would be a Major Change of Use. CB-17-13 APPLICANT: WAREHOUSE SERVICES/St. Clair Signs TAX MAP#: M010.03-01-001.00 LOCATION: 3309 Laurens Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from Sign Setback requirement for placement of a new sign on site. CB-17-14 APPLICANT: IGLESIA BAUTISTA La LIBERTAD TAX MAP#: 0134.00-01-001.00 LOCATION: 1 W. Marion Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from Left Side Setback & Use by Special Exception for a second building on church property.

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 2017, AT 6:00 p.m. (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER THE BOUNDARIES OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT SHOULD BE ENLARGED TO INCLUDE THOSE CERTAIN PROPERTIES LOCATED ON MONTAGUE CIRCLE FOR THE PURPOSE OF ORDERLY COLLECTING AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE, GARBAGE AND TRASH WITHIN GREENVILLE COUNTY. THE NEW BOUNDARY LINES TO RESULT FOR THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX MAP NUMBERS (“TMS#”) 0430000300100 0430000300108 0430000200200 0430000200300 0430000100400 0430000200400 0430000401100 0430000100500 0430000200709 0430000402100 0430000300101 0430000200715 0430000300109 0430000300107 0430000200712 0430000200706 0430000401900 0430000200600 0430000200701 0430000300103 0430000402000 0430000200705 0430000300105 0430000401101 0430000401400 0430000400501 0430000300106 0430000100601 0430000401103 0430000100100 0430000100200 0430000400500 0430000200714 0430000401800 0430000401500 0430000200707 0430000200702 0430000300102 0430000401300 0430000200713 0430000200601 0430000401102 0430000200100 0430000100800 0430000100300 0430000400502 0430000400102 0430000401600 0430000400101 0430000200710 0430000401200 0430000100604 0430000300110 0430000200703 0430000200704 A MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. THE REASON FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE DISTRICT, NOR WILL THERE BE ANY CHANGE IN THE COMMISSION OR IN THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT. BUTCH KIRVEN, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Tech company closings ACROSS 1 No-elevator multistory building 7 Prefix with bar or belief 10 Long tales 15 Boo-boo 19 Consider identical 20 Go-between: Abbr. 21 Roping event 22 NCAA’s Bruins 23 Protection for many bank tellers 26 “— cost ya!” 27 Closeout, e.g. 28 Preamble 29 Puzzler’s cry 30 Net vending 31 Kinnear of Hollywood 33 Reflections 36 Connecticut state song 41 Spanish bull 42 Actor Ed 43 Yoko of the avant-garde 44 Mall binge, maybe 48 Get a pic of 51 Wooden peg 52 “In a pickle,” e.g. 54 Part of ERA 55 “Bear” of the outback 56 Insignia 58 Three-section holder of bills 61 52, to Livy 62 Spanish surrealist 64 See 6-Down

65 Simpson judge Lance 66 Probe for 68 Journals 72 Really cries 76 Bass finale? 78 Notion, in Nancy 79 Yule song 81 Syllable after “oom” 82 Element like barium or radium 88 Hard but easily broken 90 Verse-writing, old-style 91 1940s pres. 92 Pricey hotel offering 94 Pact of the U.S., Can. and Mex. 95 University of Kentucky’s — Arena 96 Some aria singers 98 Vintage auto inits. 99 Adept 100 Conflicted 102 Arbitrary security inspection 105 Collection for the Red Cross, say 110 Shrewd 111 Keno cousin 112 Water, in Nancy 113 Tweaks text 115 Unbox, e.g. 119 Napoleonic exile locale 120 2014 Kentucky Derby winner 124 Pennant, e.g. 125 From Tehran or Tabriz

By Frank Longo

126 Elegant shade tree 127 1991 horror film sequel subtitled “The Awakening” 128 “Rent” actor Diggs 129 Pastis base 130 South Korea’s Kim — -jung 131 Tech giant whose name can precede nine words in this puzzle DOWN 1 Attic sights 2 Watery color 3 Abatement 4 Frilly green 5 Rugged truck, in brief 6 With 64-Across, snookums or sweetie, say 7 Real nice 8 “— it!” (outfield call) 9 Extra entryway for bad weather 10 Physicist’s work unit 11 Diametrically opposite 12 Sun Valley’s state 13 Romero or Franck 14 “Help me!” 15 Parts of many rock songs 16 Eight-sided 17 Stan’s pal in old films 18 Drops 24 — -à-terre 25 Kitchen wrap 30 Genre of rock 31 Coagulated 32 Fam. member 99 Ending of enzymes 114 Visiting H’wood, say 34 High- — graphics 101 Los del — (“Macarena” 115 Black-and-white cookie 35 Suffix with favor or zinc duo) 116 Atari classic 36 Mountaintop melodies 103 Chevy debut of 2004 117 Jannings of “Quo Vadis” 37 Societal breakdown 104 Plateau’s kin 118 “54” actress Campbell 38 Tyro, slangily 105 Rock fissure 120 U.S. org. with moles 39 “The Spy Who Loved Me” 106 Shout out, colloquially 121 Archaic “Curses!” actor Richard 107 Hanker 122 Machine part 40 Getting the job done 108 — Lama 123 Gp. with a copay 45 Brochure or blurb, maybe 109 Devastates Crossword answers: page 22 46 Settle from the bench 47 Terminus by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 49 Stein drink 50 Too glib 52 Skye, e.g. 53 Babysitters, e.g. 55 “Krazy —” 57 Cuban patriot José 59 Terrif 60 Less naive 63 Most frigid 67 Compact SUV model 69 “— a Nightingale” 70 Singer Chris 71 Basketball’s Bryant 73 Select 74 Like Latvia or Lithuania 75 Sword cover 77 Duplicitous 80 Actor Hal 82 Mo. with Arbor Day 83 Reed of rock 84 Held off 85 Flyers’ gp. 86 Blushed 87 Hurried, quaintly 89 “Sharknado” actress Reid 93 Occurred gradually 96 House pest Sudoku answers: page 22 97 Mysore “Mr.” Medium

Sudoku


02.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACK PAGE Community Voices

Rapid Eye Reality with Brad Willis

What is Greenville missing? Just listen. If you’re a fan of almost any sort of music, run to your nearest internet-connected device and Google the calendar for Asheville’s Orange Peel. Between now and mid-spring, some of the nation’s best-known and up-and-coming artists are on the bill. There is barely time to breathe between one good act and another. That’s not even to mention the show by Richard Thompson, a man widely regarded as one of the best songwriters in the world. Normally the Orange Peel would have to pay good money for an advertisement like that, but in this case the club gets it for free. Why?

Full disclosure: I loved The Handlebar when it was on Mills Avenue. I loved The Handlebar when it was on Stone Avenue. Over the years, owner John Jeter became a friend of mine, and no matter how many feathers he ruffled during his years in the business, he managed to make Greenville cooler than it ever would’ve been otherwise. He continues to do so for Converse College and others, but The Handlebar’s absence remains a wound that itches every day. Things didn’t work out for The Handlebar, and Greenville has been worse for it ever since.

That’s not to say Greenville is dead for music. Festivals like Fall for Greenville have impressed me in Because I live in Greenville County, and for maybe the recent years. The Rock the River series at the Peace only time ever, I’m sad about that fact. Center was a welcome addition to the outdoor shows. I’ve attended the two ZooTunes fundraisers I can hop in my car and make it to the Orange Peel in at the Greenville Zoo with Jason Isbell and Bruce less than an hour and half. I’ve done it many times. It’s a beautiful room, and I love to see shows there. I don’t, Hornsby, and both were amazing experiences. however, love driving up the mountain on a weeknight. What’s more, there are smaller venues here that have stood the test of time. Smiley’s Acoustic Café Moreover, I loathe the idea of driving back down the has a wonderful small stage, and the stalwarts at mountain after a show on any night. That usually Gottrocks deserve a medal for their continued means I see the Orange Peel calendar, sigh aloud, efforts to bring shows to Greenville. In recent years, and lament the fact the Greenville area hasn’t found others clubs like The Radio Room and Independent a way to recover from the loss of The Handlebar, the Public Alehouse have joined the effort. We’re better longtime listening room that was the place to see off for all of them and all the local artists who play music for my best years in this community.

the small stages around town. We owe them big time for keeping us in music. But when it comes time to bring in the artists that can fill a midsized room and blow its doors off, Greenville isn’t really on the map anymore. Take another look at that Orange Peel schedule. Shovels & Rope is basking in nationwide fame and has booked two consecutive nights in Asheville. Why is that distressing? Because Shovels & Rope is a South Carolina band that absolutely packed Washington Street when it performed at Fall for Greenville a few years back. Now, it and Jump Little Children (another Carolina band of much renown) are skipping Greenville entirely. They aren’t the only ones. Several others popular bands we used to watch at The Handlebar are booked at the Orange Peel over the next few months and probably didn’t even give Greenville a second thought. There is enough blame to go around for this. Depending on who you talk to, the fault could lie with a city government that doesn’t support the music efforts (hello, noise ordinance supporters!), citizens who would rather spend $60 on a reboot of “Point Break” at the movies than listen to a good band, or bands that have just decided Greenville isn’t cool

enough to make it worth the stop. All of that should be disconcerting for anyone invested in the idea that we can continue to rest on the mountain of Top 10 lists the community has accumulated over the years. People drive here for our restaurants. They drive here to see our downtown. Imagine if music from national artists brought in even more people every night of the week. It would check just about every box for the Top 10 writers. More importantly, we’d get more great music in Greenville. The alternative is the reality we have now: People who live here driving to other cities to see music. In short, if Greenville doesn’t finally find a way to fill the black hole left when The Handlebar closed down, those Top 10 lists might eventually read a little differently: “Greenville, S.C., is a wonderful destination for shopping, food, and outdoor life, but if you’re looking for a community that supports music, keep driving until you see the signs for Asheville.” At least, that’s how I’d write it. Brad Willis is a writer who lives in Greenville County. You can find more of his work at BradWillis.net.

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Feb. 17, 2017 Greenville Journal