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SEE UPSTATE BUSINESS JOURNAL INSIDE

SPARTANBURG JOURNAL Spartanburg, SC • Friday, February 15, 2013 • Vol.9, No.7

Charlie’s

HEART

Cribb’s Kitchen keeps downtown Spartanburg hopping

A firsthand account of life lessons from a near-death experience

PAGE 21

PAGE 8

A red-carpet weekend for Oscar-nominated short films PAGE 33

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Worth Repeating They Said It Quote of the week

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journal news

Steve Moore named Simpsonville police chief By Jeanne putnam | contributor

When Simpsonville City Council convened on Feb. 12, they were met with a crowded room full of ousted Police Chief Keith Grounsell’s supporters. At meeting’s end, Mayor Perry Eichor and council members George Curtis, Brown Garrett and Matthew Gooch voted to name Interim Police Chief Steve Moore the acting chief of police. Councilmembers Geneva Lawrence and Sylvia Lockaby voted against the motion. Moore said the appointment surprised him. “I am a people-oriented person and I have to do everything to make sure that the people who work for me and the people of Simpsonville are taken care of.” The embattled Grounsell said, “Congratulations to Steve Moore. He’s a good man and he will do a jam-up job.” However, Grounsell still holds out hope he will get his job back, saying he believes SLED will determine he was wrongly

terminated after completing its investigation into charges that Lawrence and Grounsell conspired to hire one of her relatives to the police department. This vote came at the end of a meeting where citizens were welcomed by seven police officers in the Council chambers. Those attending had to be checked with a metal detector and submit to a bag search. The increased police presence was explained by Moore as a request by “members of council after what they read on social media.” Mayor Eichor had previously mentioned on Jan. 8 that he had been reading the comments by Grounsell’s supporters on Facebook. Grounsell said in response that he and his supporters are not violent people. They came to quietly watch and observe. He also vowed to come to every council meeting in the future. The council also implemented rules such as not allowing those from outside the city to speak and not allowing citi-

“I am a people-oriented person and I have to do everything to make sure that the people who work for me and the people of Simpsonville are taken care of.” Police Chief Steve Moore

zens to address personnel issues. However, these new rules did not stop some citizens from criticizing the actions of certain council members and the mayor. Jeff Jeffress said, “I’m embarrassed over the amount of name-calling that went on in the last meeting. The actions of this council and mayor have discredited the city.” Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

A story well told In the daily contest for leisure time, there’s no question television regularly beats out reading for America’s attention. According to the latest from the Bureau for Labor Statistics, Americans aged 15 and older devote 18 minutes to reading on an average day, and 2.8 hours to TV watching. But lovers of the written word may find solace in the numbers the Pew Research Center released late last year: 75 percent of the Americans Pew surveyed aged 16 and older told researchers they read at least one book (either in print or electronically) in the previous 12 months. Of those, half had read fewer than six and half more than six – and 14 percent had read 21 or more books. People read for work and for school, to keep up with current events, to do research and, at least occasionally, for pure pleasure, 80 percent of them told Pew. Plainly, the written word is still far from obsolete. But to keep that ever true, the wise community must actively seek to nourish the literary life – and it is here the Upstate owes its deepest gratitude to Greenville’s Emrys Foundation, which this year will celebrate 30 years of nurturing writers, reading and the magic of a really good story. The idea for Emrys dates back to 1980 when, in a basement apartment “over melting bowls of ice cream,” co-founders Keller Cushing Freeman and Sally Wyche Coenen “reflected on the obstacles confronting writers, composers and artists who were in sore need of a place to present their work, an audience to receive the work, and a patron to subsidize the projects,” Freeman writes on the Emrys website. By 1982, Freeman and Coenen had a song cycle of 24 poems and songs for soprano voice, narrator and piano ready to present. Called “Feast and Famine: Songs of Women in Love,” the performance premiered at the Greenville Arts Festival and moved on to other venues across the state, including Charleston’s Piccolo Spoleto. Other poets soon joined them to form a monthly poetry workshop, from which flowed individual performances, teaching careers, publications, and eventually Emrys Press. Now Emrys’ spring anthology of poetry, short stories and essays attracts submissions from all over the world, and the press launched its first chapbook series in 2005. In these 30 years, Emrys Foundation has made itself pivotal to Greenville’s literary life. While its focus extends to the visual and dramatic arts as well as the literary, the nonprofit has long nurtured authors, experienced and fledgling, in creative writing workshops offered through The Writing Room, founded and directed by award-winning Greenville author Mindy Friddle. Emrys’ monthly Reading Room brings readers together with established regional writers to discuss process and hear works read aloud, while Open Mic, its newest venue, gives writers of all skill levels a monthly chance to read their works to a supportive audience. It’s no surprise a number of successful authors have flourished from such soil, among them Friddle, Ashley Warlick, Handlebar owner John Jeter and Tommy Hays, whose novel “The Pleasure Was Mine” was chosen in 2008 for Greenville’s first community-wide “Amazing Read.” This year, as part of its 30th anniversary, Emrys is collaborating with the Greenville Museum of Art on the publication of “Hearing Helen,” the museum’s first book for children, in which 16 Emrys poets respond to the whimsical works of Spartanburg painter Helen Dupre Moseley. Thomas Jefferson once wrote to John Adams, “I cannot live without books.” The Upstate is fortunate that for 30 years, Emrys has felt the same.

Take heart from a writer’s story Last month, Charles Sowell, a writer with the Journal, became one of 750 or more patients who are hospitalized at Greenville Hospital System (GHS) annually with acute congestive heart failure, a potentially fatal condition. Sowell was the beneficiary of a novel treatment called aquapheresis. He is telling his story in this week’s Journal. In congestive heart failure (CHF), the heart cannot pump blood efficiently. Fluid accumulates in the body with a pressure buildup in the heart and the lungs, much like drowning. This is a crisis that requires rapid removal of excess fluid from the body. Aquapheresis removes excess salt and water from a patient’s body more efficiently and rapidly than traditional diuretic therapy. It works by running blood from a large vein over a filter and then returning the blood via the same vein. In our experience at GHS, the treatment typically removes about seven liters (15.4 pounds) of fluid in 48 hours from patients’ bodies with dramatic symptom relief. CHF symptoms include breathlessness, weight gain, leg swelling, inability to lie flat and occasionally waking up from sleep gasping for air. Approximately 6 million Americans have CHF; there are 1 million hospitalizations nationwide for CHF annually and there is a high risk of death. The major causes of CHF include coronary artery disease, heart attacks, high blood pressure and heart valve disease. The major risk factors for CHF are being overweight (two out of three adults), smoking (one in five adults), having high blood pressure (one in six adults), and having diabetes (one in 10 adults). All these risk factors are more prevalent in S.C. than the U.S. average. To combat the high prevalence of CHF in our state, GHS created a CHF multidisciplinary team in 2006, an inpatient hospital unit in 2007 and a CHF outpatient clinic in 2008 to provide comprehensive and focused care for this condition both in and out of the hospital. Thanks to our dedicated team members,

IN MY OWN WORDS by DEV G. VAZ, MD, FACC

GHS is currently ranked in the top eight CHF programs in the country for the lowest hospital readmission rate for CHF. February is American Heart Month. Let’s take this opportunity to raise awareness and improve efforts towards prevention of CHF and heart disease as a whole. Nearly 40 percent of all deaths in the U.S. are due to heart disease, and we spend almost $500 billion annually on heart and vascular disease. Health problems from smoking, including secondhand smoke, cost an estimated $193 billion each year. Much of CHF and heart disease can be prevented with the following simple steps to change one’s lifestyle. • Maintain an ideal body weight by eating smart and exercising daily. • Don’t smoke! On average, smokers live about 14 years fewer than nonsmokers. A free stop-smoking support group meets weekly at the GHS Patewood campus at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Call 864-3125671 for more information. • Limit alcohol use to one beverage a day or less. • Establish care with a primary care physician to screen for high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes. Educational resources are available at the American Heart Association (heart. org) and the GHS Heart and Vascular Institute (ghs.org/heart). GHS’ awardwinning Heart Life Program also has resources available at no charge. Call 864455-7726 for information. This February, take heart in the knowledge that taking charge of your health will have a profound impact. Dr. Dev. G Vaz, MD FACC, is a cardiologist with Carolina Cardiology Consultants and the medical director of the GHS Congestive Heart Failure Program. For more information about Carolina Cardiology, visit carolinacardio.com.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 15, 2013


JOURNAL NEWS Stephanie Smith lives to hear two words – “thank you” – every day. “It means so much to be appreciated,” she says. “I get a lot of satisfaction helping others.”

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

For a funeral director, of course, helping is all in a day’s work. “I wanted a profession where I could make a difference,” Stephanie explains, so per her great-grandfather’s suggestion she shadowed an experienced mortician and was immediately intrigued with the importance of providing that just-right touch. “This is a meaningful way to help people during a time of need.”

Editor’s Note: A letter to the editor in the Feb. 8 Journal incorrectly attributed a water main project under construction on Pleasant Ridge Drive in Greenville to Renewable Water Systems.  Renewable Water Systems is not associated with this project. The Journal regrets the error. For more information on the construction project in question, see page 12 of today’s Journal.  

Dear Editor, I would like to apologize for criticizing the wrong culprit about the water main mess on Pleasant Ridge Drive. I am embarrassed that I did not know that the sewers and water department were completely separate. However, the mess certainly needs to be addressed, and soon! The trucks sit there day after day, week after week, and month after month, with only a little shoddy work completed and much left unfinished after many months. I hope the Journal can stimulate some proper response. Sincerely, Chuck West, Greenville

Making a Difference Stephanie Smith

Funeral Director

Her servant’s heart also finds expression in the community, where she is vice president of the Greenville Lions Club and a den leader for the Cub Scouts. Her family attends Rock Springs Baptist Church. Stephanie is proud to carry on Mackey’s 140-year legacy by providing compassionate expertise to families of all faiths. “We have such deep roots of caring here,” she says. “Families find comfort when they walk in the door and see a familiar face.” Mackey Mortuary. We are here for you … since 1872.

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Dear Editor, As a resident and a customer of the local utilities in Greenville County, I know that reading through and deciphering all of the charges on your bill can be confusing. When I am out in the community, I am frequently asked about the various sections on a water bill and I know that our customer service representatives at Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) also receive that same question daily. Each month when you receive your water bill, whether by mail or online, you see multiple agencies and charges, and you may wonder what they all represent and if all the money goes to the same entity. The answer is that several independently operated utility agencies consolidate their billing to reduce costs and become more environmentally-friendly by using less paper, ink, and electricity. One of the areas that Greenville County residents often find especially confusing is the reclamation portion of the water bill. Why are there two sewer charges – ReWa Sewer Treatment Charge and Sewer Collection Charge? Sewer is listed twice on your bill because different Greenville wastewater agencies provide separate services. The sewer collection charge goes to sewer subdistricts, which operate the connecting lines from your homes, schools, businesses, stores, etc., that transport wastewater to the larger ReWa trunk lines. These larger trunk lines transport the wastewater to the nearest ReWa wastewater treatment facility. As you might imagine, cleaning wastewater is both complex and expensive. Each day, approximately 40 million gallons of wastewater travel through 360 miles of trunk sewer lines to one of ReWa’s nine wastewater treatment facilities. ReWa cleans the water through a series of biological processes in addition to using advanced technology like ultraviolet lights and membrane filters to reduce the environmental impact and cost of excessive chemical use. All of the recycled water meets stringent environmental standards before it is returned back to area rivers and streams or reused for purposes such as irrigation. Most of ReWa’s recycled non-potable clean water returns to our water basins – Reedy, Saluda and Enoree – cleaner than the river’s original state. All of the agencies that you see listed on your water bill are united in their commitment to keeping your bill as low as possible, in addition to protecting our local environment and community health. We are working hard in our communities to educate our customers. Be Freshwater Friendly is one of many examples of collaboration between ReWa and other agencies. It is a public education campaign to inform our customers on how small changes in their day-to-day actions, like properly disposing of medication, picking up pet waste, and not pouring grease down the drain, can have a great impact on the local environment. You can learn more about the campaign by visiting BeFreshwaterFriendly.org. At ReWa, we are committed to providing high-quality wastewater treatment services to the Upstate. We value our customers and believe it is important to keep the community informed. To sign up for our community e-newsletter, take a tour or to learn more about our organization, visit ReWaOnline.org. Sincerely, Ray T. Orvin, Jr. Executive Director, ReWa

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JOURNAL NEWS

How to mend a broken heart

Journal writer Charles Sowell describes his near-death encounter with congestive heart failure By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

Nothing serves to focus like a neardeath experience; but we are forgetful creatures by nature and unwilling to be watchful for threats outside our experience – particularly where health is concerned. So it was for me on Jan. 13 of this year, when my wife, Laura, recognized the signs of congestive heart failure and rushed me to the emergency room at North Greenville Hospital. Laura is a registered nurse with 30 years of experience. It took that to save a life that night. I would have simply gone to sleep on the couch and never awakened. The events of that day, indeed of the next 10 days to two weeks, passed in the blur of an oxygen-deprived brain. Acute congestive heart failure was the diagnosis. It means a sudden onset of literally drowning in your own bodily fluid. A primary effect is that the heart is unable to pump enough oxygen to the brain and the rest of the body to sustain life.

with a vengeance, forcing surgery: three bypasses and a roto-rooter job. One doesn’t forget the symptoms of a near heart attack; it can hurt like hell. Thankfully, there was no actual damage to my heart muscle in the 2007 incident. Congestive heart disease is different. It is subtle and easy to ignore, up to a point. Most of all, at least in my case, it doesn’t hurt. Cresting Cold Mountain in North Carolina was my statement of independence four months after the 2007 surgery. Things have not worked out as well with this congestive heart disease diagnosis, as measured by the “ejection fraction,” or how well the heart pumps blood out. A normal ejection fraction is 50 percent, as my heart was pumping after bypass surgery. My current ejection fraction is 25 percent. That number may get better and it may not, depending on how well I react to the drugs I take and how well I adhere to a draconian diet and staying away from tobacco.

A NEW NO. 1 KILLER

“With our aging population, heart disease is now the number one killer,” said Heart disease, primarily coronary artery Dr. Dev Vaz, my cardiologist and new best disease, is the most common illness in the friend. Heart disease swamps hospitals United States, according to the Centers in this post-baby boomer world. Heart for Disease Control and Prevention. Six failure, in its various years ago, this illness struck me forms, take more and more beds yearly. Coronary heart disease sets you up for a host of other illnesses – diabetes and the like – that contribute to congestive heart disease. Dr. Vaz’s best guess is a bout with pneumonia set off my near-fatal attack of congestive heart failure. Diabetes’ deleterious effect on the body is a major stered nurse. gi re a so contributor to al is wife, Laura, who Charlie with his congestive heart disease, Vaz said. 8 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 15, 2013

EASY TO IGNORE SYMPTOMS

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Cardiologist Dr. Dev Vas listens to Charles Sowell’s heart during Sowell’s first visit to the doctor after being discharged from the hospital.

“Learn to listen to your body and pay attention when warning signs crop up.” – Cardiologist Dr. Dev Vaz

It showed up about two months after my bypass surgery. The first symptom was loss of vision in my left eye, which lasted for two weeks. This time around, the biggest warning sign I missed that heart failure might be in my future was sudden bouts of sleepiness. There were far too many other factors that might have caused me to fall asleep.

The other major sign was an inability to sleep while lying down. A feeling of suffocation kept my sleep to 15-minutes spurts. This symptom is most often mistaken for sleep apnea. Tests showed apnea was not the culprit in my case, so I blamed it on sinuses. Mostly, I wasn’t honest with my family doctor. It is the easiest trap to fall into. No one wants to acknowledge a serious illness.

20 POUNDS Once transferred to intensive care at Greenville Memorial, it quickly became evident to my doctors that I was gravely ill. For the first 24 hours, they tried large doses of diuretics and measured the effect by Foley catheter output of urine. The diuretics didn’t purge enough fluids, so they decided to try aquapheresis,


journal news

Quick Medical Emergency Response for Yourself or A Loved One

Image provided

A still image taken from a video of an echocardiogram of Charles Sowell’s heart after he was admitted to the hospital.

a technology that uses a modified dialysis procedure to remove sodium and water from the body. Dr. Joseph Kmonicek brought the procedure to GHS in 2007. The hospital system eats the cost of $1,000 filters used by the machine. Only the sickest 10 percent of congestive heart patients get it. I qualified. Aquapheresis safely, predictably and effectively removes excess salt and water from the body. In my case, something on the order of eight liters of sodium and water were removed – more than 20 pounds in about 72 hours. It got me through the crisis but didn’t treat the core problem. Nothing will cure it; congestive heart disease will be part of my life until death.

Photo provided

Doctors perform open-heart surgery in this photo courtesy of the Greenville Hospital System.

One last fish sandwich How long it takes to reach that point is up to me, Vaz said. How well I stick to diet and medication schedules. How closely I monitor my weight and blood sugar is also crucial. Rehab started this week. There are trout streams to fish and mountains to climb. How much I do, Vaz said, is more a function of how it feels. “Learn to listen to your body and pay attention when warning signs crop up,” he told me. Like most in my position, the disease can be found in every branch of my family tree. Understanding that genetic relationship is vital in facing what can become a chronic health problem. Laura is rapidly becoming a low- or nosodium chef extraordinaire. Of course there were errors early on – mostly on the side of caution. The sodium level in my diet, and Laura’s, went so low that she developed swimmer’s hands: wrinkled fingers due to low sodium levels. She’s since upped the sodium level in her own diet, and I’ve learned more about the fine art of reading labels. Sodium is so pervasive in the American diet that even flash-frozen fresh veggies often have about 80 milligrams of sodium. There is no such thing as safe restaurant-prepared food for me. Arby’s new fish sandwich has more than 900 milligrams of sodium, but it sure tastes good. Had my last one today. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

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journal news

Upstate Forever leads effort to preserve Nine Times tract Upstate Forever is leading an effort to preserve 1,600 acres of the Nine Times tract in Pickens County and joining in a push to expand public lands surrounding Lakes Toxaway and Jocassee. Upstate Forever is in negotiations with Duke Power on expanding public lands around the lakes, but those talks are not at a state where they are likely to yield results, said Brad Wyche Wyche, executive director of the organization. Preservationists were unable to raise the money needed to purchase the entire Nine Times tract back in 2008, and were forced to settle with a 560-acre parcel across E. Preston McDaniel Highway from the far larger tract now being considered for purchase.

10 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 15, 2013

The Nature Conservancy came to the rescue then, partnering with Upstate Forever to raise the purchase price. Eventually the conservancy borrowed the money from the state’s Conservation Land Bank and bought the land, turning it into a hiker-friendly preserve of remarkable biological diversity. Upstate Forever has obtained a $400,000 grant from the U.S. Forest Service, which it hopes to leverage into enough money to pay Crescent’s asking price for the property of $3.5 million, said Wyche. “I believe the remaining acreage of the Nine Times is a ‘must have’ for land conservation in the Upstate,” said Wes Cooler, an activist with the state Wildlife Federation.  “It is critical habitat for a number of species, including the black bear and the timber rattlesnake, and it has many of the same soil types typical of the most botanically rich and diverse tracts in the region, indicating that it may likely harbor similar biological diversity. It has the potential to be one more reason to visit Pickens County and enjoy its

wealth of natural resources.” Cooler said in addition to the funding already identified by Upstate Forever, he has hopes “that the SC Conservation Bank could play a major role in funding the acquisition of this tract. Also, as a former owner of the tract, Duke Energy was a good steward of the property for nearly 50 years, and they could now potentially play a pivotal role in its permanent protection for the enjoyment of generations to come.” Upstate Forever has until June to find the rest of the money needed to purchase the tract, Wyche said. “We’re very hopeful the state Conservation Land Bank will be willing to help out in coming up with the money.” Patrick McMillan of Clemson University and host of SCETV’s “Expeditions” nature series once identified 134 different species of wildflowers in one small plot of the Nine Times Tract. While not as diverse as the conservancy lands, the 1,600-acre tract is a remarkable property, McMillan said. “The new tract doesn’t have as much

mature tree canopy,” he said. “It has been heavily logged both by Crescent and previous owners. But it does have some remarkable species like faded trilMcMillan lium, a species endemic to the area and not found elsewhere.” The faded trillium has a pale yellow blossom and has been rarely recorded. Also pink root is found on the property, particularly around Big Pink Mountain, McMillan said. It was used in colonial times as a stomach treatment and was a major export for people eking out a living in the backcountry. “This large tract of land potentially could become a major migration root for wildlife coming out of Jocassee Gorges,” McMillan said. Courtesy of Clemson University

By CHarles Sowell | staff

Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.


journal news

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FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | the Journal 11


journal news

Despite delays caused by weather, the Greenville Water System says it will complete a water line replacement project on Pleasant Ridge Drive as soon as possible.

BECOME PART OF HISTORY Leadership Greenville Class 39 is working with Greenville County Recreation District to refurbish a 70-year-old boxcar and create a unique destination that will be a resting/gathering point along the Greenville Hospital System Swamp Rabbit Trail. Swamp Rabbit Station will be at the center of the 17-mile trail, a heavily used resting and turn-around spot for families, cyclists and runners. You can be a part of this trail’s history by buying, or gifting, an engraved brick for $50. To buy your brick or learn more, visit www.SwampRabbitStation.com or snap the QR code below.

Weather worsens water main woes By Cindy Landrum | staff

Weather has delayed completion of a water line replacement project on Pleasant Ridge Drive, but a Greenville Water System official said the utility is committed to finishing it as soon as possible. In a letter to the Journal, Greenville resident Chuck West expressed concern over the length of time it has taken to complete the job and the quality of repaving. “While the city has put thousands into repaving and upgrading several inner-city neighborhoods, these folks have had to endure months of either dust or mud on their cars and homes and the final result is a cosmetically ugly mess that downgrades the appearance of the neighborhoods,” West wrote. Greenville Water System CEO David Bereskin called the complaint “just, but a little misguided.” He said the repaving West referred

to in his letter is just an asphalt patch and the project calls for Pleasant Ridge Drive to be fully repaved. “It will look as good as any other repaving done in the city of Greenville,” he said. Wet weather slowed the project that replaced 5,000 feet of new pipe, and now cold temperatures are a factor, Bereskin said. Asphalt plants must be fired back up to make the material and it must be 40 degrees before the material can be laid, he said. He said the city public works department is now assessing whether any sewer pipes in the area need to be replaced before final paving is completed. “We’re committed to finishing the project as soon as possible,” he said. “Sometimes construction projects don’t progress as scheduled.” Bereskin said if the city doesn’t have to do any sewer line work, the project should be completed within four weeks. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

Brown Mackie opens nursing school

12 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 15, 2013

Greg Beckner / Staff

Brown Mackie College of Greenville recently celebrated the opening of the school’s first nursing lab at Two Liberty Square in Greenville. The nursing skills lab has been built to support students in the new Associate of Applied Science in Nursing degree program. The first group of students in the program began classes in early February.

Lining up to cut the ribbon formally opening Brown Mackie College’s nursing lab are (front row from left) Greenville Mayor Knox White, Brown Mackie College nursing program administrator Frances Echols, and Brown Mackie College Greenville president Karen Burgess.


journal news

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JOURNAL NEWS

K4-12 Open House February 18, 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

EOC: Changes needed in SC schools By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Too many students in South Carolina can’t read on grade level, too many do not earn high school diplomas and many students who do graduate are unprepared, according to an annual report released this week by the state’s Education Oversight Committee. “We can’t continue to operate our schools the same way and expect different results,” said Neil Robinson, committee chairman. “Innovation and transformation need to occur at the system level all the way down to the classroom level.” While some improvement has been made since 2009 toward the panel’s 2020 goals, the report said that South Carolina and its students are still lagging behind on the measures of reading proficiency, on-time graduation and workforce readiness. Some of the changes being pushed by Robinson and other state education leaders – such as earlier intervention for students whose reading skills are lagging and increased teacher training – are already being done in Greenville County. Reading at grade level by the end of third grade is one of the highest predictors for future academic success. On the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress reading assess-

ments, only 61 percent of South Carolina’s fourth-graders scored basic or above. Only 72 percent of eighth-graders scored at that same level on the test. In 2012, 80 percent of third-graders and 70 percent of eighth-graders were shown to be reading on grade level on South Carolina’s PASS test. Robinson called for a mandatory diagnostic assessment of reading skills in first and second grade to identify struggling readers early on. Many elementary school teachers are required to take just one class in how to teach reading, putting them at a disadvantage when it comes to teaching the struggling readers who need the instruction the most. A reading initiative sponsored by Public Education Partners of Greenville County in conjunction with Greenville County Schools includes additional teacher training and uses a balanced literacy approach to reading instruction that includes reading aloud, independent reading, guided reading, phonemic awareness and phonics instruction. The EOC report also showed too many schools are underperforming and too many students do not graduate within five years. According to Robinson, 9 percent of the state’s students attend schools that earn below-average grades on the

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The Clemson Alumni Association has recognized William L. “Roy” Abercrombie Jr., Russell Carlton Ashmore Jr., and E. Mitchell “Mitch” Norville as three of five 2013 winners of the Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor. Distinguished Service Award honorees demonstrate a dedication to enhancing the value of the Abercrombie university for future generations; church, professional and public service; and personal accomplishments that serve as a model for present and future Clemson students. A 1969 graduate, Abercrombie is the former CEO and president of American Federal Bank. He has been in commercial real estate for eight years and is chairman of Colliers International. Ashmore, who was president of Clemson’s Class of Ashmore 1950, has continued to be an active member of the Clemson family. He is co-owner of Ashmore Brothers Inc., an Upstate leader in grading and paving since 1959. A 1980 Clemson graduate, Norville recently retired as chief operating officer of Boston Properties in Boston, one of the largest self-managed real estate investment trusts specializing in the development and ownership of office, industrial and hotel properties in the United States. Norville


journal news state report card and one in five students do not earn high school diplomas. Too many who do graduate are unprepared for college, he said. Forty-one percent of high school graduates need remediation in math and reading when they enroll in the state’s technical colleges. Robinson said he wants to see the state get rid of its high school exit exam and instead administer the ACT college entrance exam and WorkKeys, a group of tests that assess workers’ skills and award credentials at the bronze, silver, gold and platinum levels.

While the workforce will continue to need employees with credentials ranging from a high school diploma to advanced degrees, the days of low-skill jobs are gone, said Herb Johnson, director of community relations for Michelin. Manufacturing jobs today require workers with competency in science and math and who can communicate, collaborate, think and question, Robinson and Johnson said. Johnson said while 90 percent of the population believes the manufacturing sector is really important to the country and the economy, only 17 percent of par-

ents encourage their children to pursue that field. “There’s a huge disconnect and we believe part of the reason is so many people don’t realize what today’s manufacturing sector looks like,” he said. “The days of the sweatshop are gone.” Johnson said it is important that businesses and industries that invest in the state also invest human capital in schools so schools can prepare students for the future workforce. Dream Connectors, a program Michelin began piloting this fall – and is operational in Hughes Academy and Lakeview Mid-

dle in Greenville County– actually brings seventh-graders into its facilities for an unprecedented look at the company’s manufacturing process, Johnson said. Company employees talk to students about how they use the skills they learned in seventh grade in their current jobs. The hope is that when eighth-graders get ready to pick their career clusters in high school, they’ll no longer have the perception that jobs in manufacturing are not good, attractive jobs. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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journal news

By CHarles Sowell | staff

Cox Media Group plans to sell its radio stations in the Greenville market to SummitMedia as soon as federal regulators at the FCC approve, said Steve Sinicropi,  vice president and general manager of the stations. “This is part of a restructuring of a large corporate media company,” he said. “Essentially, we’re selling all of our radio stations that are located in markets where we don’t own a newspaper or TV station.” WJMZ-FM and WHZT-FM will be sold to SummitMedia once the FCC approves the sale, a process that usually takes about 90 days, Sinicropi said. Other Cox stations in Connecticut, Alabama, Hawaii, Kentucky and Virginia will also be sold, Sinicropi said. The Greenville sale will actually involve four stations, including Chuck FM

and X98.5, which are spinoffs from JMZ and HZT created since the digital revolution in broadcast. Those stations broadcast on high-definition signals that are captured and then rebroadcast on regular FM. “The process essentially doubles our presence in the market,” Sinicropi said. “WJMZ is the top station in this market, based on the latest book (surveys).” According to industry website Inside Radio, Summit Media is a newly formed group led by 16-year Cox Birmingham market manager David DuBose and former Heftel Broadcasting executive Carl Parmer. The broadcast realignment is part of CMG’s strategy to focus on larger markets, cross-media collaboration, and heightened impact in fewer markets, Cox said in a company statement. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

Community honors Warth photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Cox Media to sell 4 Greenville radio stations

Russell Stall welcomes everyone in attendance at the Kroc Center to the Charlie Warth Day celebration. For more than seven years, Warth has been executive director of the Allen Temple Community Economic Development Corporation and has led the effort to build 50 single-family rental homes for the low-income families in Greenville and beyond.

The conference room at the Kroc Center was close to capacity for Charlie Warth Day. Warth has been fighting lung cancer since 2011.

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University of Dayton president Daniel Curran talks about Charlie Warth’s college life and the fact that Warth left the college a few credits shy of graduating. President Curran was in Greenville to present Warth with his diploma, giving Warth his remaining credit hours for what he accomplished during his life. In 2010, Warth received the Max Heller Award for Excellence in Community Development, and last year was named the Affordable Housing Developer of the Year by the South Carolina Affordable Housing Coalition.


journal news

District 17 voters must return to the polls March 12 general election will proceed with one candidate on the ballot By april a. morris | staff

Residents of S.C. House District 17 will have to return to the polls for a third time on March 12 to cast their vote for the representative to fill the seat vacated by Rep. Tom Corbin. Burns In a runoff on Feb. 5, Mike Burns faced off against Chris Sullivan and Burns pulled ahead by 249 votes. Despite Burns being the only candidate on the ballot, the general election will still be held because of a state statute that stipulates a general election if more than one person files, said Conway Belangia, Greenville County’s director of elections and voter registration. Five candidates filed for the primary. The state election commission made a ruling on a similar case in Manning several years ago, said Belangia. “The state election commission is literal in their interpretation,” he said. Belangia added that he was unaware of the ruling and therefore said Burns would be sworn in as long as no write-in candidate was announced before Feb. 21. Though he is the only listed candidate, Burns will have to continue to campaign because if a write-in campaign

is mounted, a write-in candidate could win the seat, said Belangia. In a statement after the ruling, Burns said he would abide by the decision. “I am disappointed, though, because this means the people of District 17 must go without a voice in Columbia for at least another month while very important legislation is being considered.” All polling places used in the runoff contest will be used again, Belangia said, although some schools are not being used because classes are in session and students will be present. The cost of holding the general election is between $5,000 and $6,000, he said. Burns said he would continue to campaign, adding, “When I announced to the people of District 17 last November that I wanted to represent them in Columbia, I told them I wanted to take a ‘common sense’ approach to government. Spending money to hold an election with one name on the ballot does not pass the ‘common sense’ test.” Turnout for the third round of voting could diminish, said Belangia. However, the runoff on Feb. 5 drew more voters than the primary contest on Jan. 22. South Carolina District 17 encompasses much of northern Greenville County, including Tigerville, SlaterMarietta and Travelers Rest. The district has about 20,000 eligible voters. The House District 17 seat was left vacant when S.C. Rep. Tom Corbin won both re-election and an S.C. Senate seat in the Nov. 2012 election. For a list of polling places in the District 17 election, visit greenvillecounty.org/voter_registration or call 864-467-7250. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

Greenville County Fine Arts Center students honored Fine Arts Center creative writing students have walked away with 62 regional awards in this year’s Scholastic Art and Writing award competition. Awards are given in levels of Gold or Silver Keys and Honorable Mentions in the region. From these regional results, Gold Key winners have their work sent on to the final round of judging in New York where they can potentially win recognition on a national level, as well as publication. Every student in the creative writing class at the Fine Arts Center won recognition at some level, but 10 of the 62 awards were Gold Keys. Kathleen Cole, Hayden DeBruler, Sara Wilkinson, Jenine Dunn, Kelsey Fuson, Kathleen Maris, Kate Holcombe and Bekah Hubbel’s work will all be passed along for the final round of judging.

Bon Secours St. Francis Culture Fusion introduces a month long series celebrating Black History Month. Eliminating Health Disparity

What would it take to eliminate health disparity in our community? Join Russell Stall (President, Greenville Forward); Pastor Sean Dogan (Long Branch Baptist Church);  and Liz Keith (Senior Vice President of Mission, Bon Secours St. Francis), as they share results from Greenville’s Health Assessment and the mission imperative to move our community to health and wellness.

Tuesday, February 19 | 6:30pm at United Way

Black History Celebration

Join us in the Sterling community as we celebrate in fellowship. The event will include a healthy spin on traditional foods, entertainment reflective of African American culture and arts, and honoring local heroes.

Thursday, February 28 | 6:30pm at Sterling Community Center

Visit us online at stfrancishealth.org/culturefusion to learn more about this free event and to register.

FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | the Journal 17


journal news

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Rotary program turns students into knights Modern-day character education program based on qualities of medieval knights By Cindy Landrum | staff

Chivalry is not dead – at least in a handful of Upstate elementary and middle schools. Lead Academy, a Greenville County charter school serving fifth-througheighth-grade students, became the latest Upstate school – and the first in Greenville County – to implement the EarlyAct First Knight character education program developed by the Rotary. “It’s really a perfect fit for our school,” said Principal Rodney Johnson. “Knights lived by a code and those traits are the traits we want our students to have.” Local Rotary clubs sponsor the program in individual schools. The series has five components: an introductory outdoor dramatic performance by a team of knights on horses, age-appropriate studies of monthly core values through daily 10-minute lesson plans, regular knighting ceremonies honoring students who have exemplified that month’s value, a campus service club and an adult education component to teach parents how to use the program at home. Students are also taught to apply the Rotary Four-Way Test to question what they think, say and do: Is it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build goodwill and better friendships? Will it be beneficial to all concerned? Johnson said students at Lead Academy are already asking themselves those questions, even though the school only started the program on Jan. 14. “It creates a common language,” he said. “The nice thing about the program is some of the traits are morally based, but others are things such as prowess, which opened the discussion to excellence and work ethic, things that point toward college readiness and doing the best job you possibly can.” EarlyAct First Knight was developed in Texas. Powdersville Middle School

Elizabeth Lyons, president of the Rotary Club of Greenville, gives the official charter to the Lead Academy Early Act First Knight Service Club.

in Anderson School District 1 became the first school east of the Mississippi to implement it, in 2010, after a parent asked about the program after the family moved to the Upstate from Texas, said Mark Thornburgh, president of the Greenville Evening Rotary Club. “I really think it fills a void in the school program,” Thornburg said. “It talks about and reinforces positive behavior on a daily basis. It builds positive peer groups and allows teachers to get to know their students better.” And it recognizes students who may not receive recognition for their academic or athletic accomplishments, he said. “Some students may not get recognized for anything and maybe they are getting in trouble so they do get recognized,” Thornburgh said. “We want them to be recognized for the right reasons.” EarlyAct First Knight is in a handful of schools – Powdersville Middle, Wren Middle and Powdersville Elementary in Anderson District 1 as well as Lead Academy in Greenville County. Three schools in Anderson will soon be adding the program. Other Rotary Clubs in Greenville and Anderson counties are interested in starting similar programs, but need to raise the money to buy classroom materials, Thornburgh said. Clubs also need volunteers to help schools with their service clubs, he said. Schools that have implemented the program have seen classroom interruptions and disciplinary problems decrease almost immediately, Thornburgh said. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL NEWS

GREENVILLE CITY COUNCIL FROM THE FEBRUARY 11 MEETING

Streetscaping improvements will be made by the city of Greenville in conjunction with two projects downtown. Members of City Council gave preliminary approval to development agreements with LPA Rhett LLC and American Roadside McBee LLC at their regular council meeting Monday night. LPA Rhett plans to build 150 apartment units in Greenville’s West End. Construction is expected to begin during the first quarter of this year. A spring 2014 completion date is expected. According to the agreement, the city will earmark $175,000 from its West End Tax Increment Financing District balance for streetscape improvements on Rhett, Wardlaw and Ferguson streets, $37,000 from its Stormwater Fund fund balance for stormwater improvements on Wardlaw Street and $49,000 from its Undergrounding Fund fund balance for utility work in the Rhett Street corridor. The development agreement calls for Lat Purser to make an investment of at least $18.25 million. The streetscape improvements include landscaping, installation of sidewalks, curb and gutter and lighting. The developer will pay for a brick plaza area on Wardlaw Street. The city will pay for benches, trashcans, light poles and light fixtures, while the developer will be required to install bike racks. American Roadside Burgers plans to build a restaurant on the former Jim Beam gas station site on the corner of East McBee Avenue and South Irvine Street. The restaurant will have the aesthetics and appearance of drive-in restaurants that dotted the American landscape in the 1950s and ’60s. American Roadside Burger installs a freestanding, two-

sided digital clock at each of its locations, a nostalgic nod to the old-time clocks that graced diners and restaurants on the roadside during that era. The clocks carry the message, “Time for a Burger.” City officials said the redevelopment will provide an improved link between Main Street and McBee Station and fits their goal to expand economic development on downtown side streets. According to the development agreement, the city will reimburse the developer $45,000 for streetscape improvements surrounding the site on public right-of-way. The city will also provide at least one decorative light fixture around the project. The improvement costs are $51,289. The city had $39,289 set aside for the project. The rest will come out of its downtown infrastructure fund balance. According to the development agreement, the developer will invest at least $600,000 in the project and complete it within a year after receiving the necessary building permits. A divided council gave initial approval to a change in the city code that would allow subdivisions to have gates. The change would allow gates, gatehouses and guardhouses only at access points to provide streets, located on private property and must provide adequate queuing. Council will consider final approval at its Feb. 25 meeting. The next regular meeting of the Greenville City Council will be Feb. 25 at 5:30 p.m. in Council Chambers on the 10th floor of City Hall. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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journal news

spartanburg city council from the february 11 meeting

Spartanburg City Council approved an $89,125 bid for demolition of the T.K. Gregg Recreation Center as part of a comprehensive plan to reduce recreation costs around the city. Councilwoman Linda Dogan cast the lone dissenting vote, citing the center’s history within the community. It should take about 90 days to complete work at T.K. Gregg, said David Cook, the project manager for the city. Depending on the schedule at B&B Demolition Specialists of North Charleston, work should get underway in about a month.

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The demolition of T.K. Gregg is part of the city’s plan to close the swim center and reduce maintenance costs at facilities that see lower amounts of usage. A new T.K. Gregg is planned for construction through savings on maintenance costs. Council also approved a plan to replace 350 feet of corrugated metal stormwater pipe on Barkley Downs Drive with concrete pipe. Jay Squires, the city’s stormwater manager, said the contract for $39,996 with McAbee Contracting of Inman will take a few weeks and will not disrupt traffic on the street since the pipeline is far

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enough to one side of the street to allow traffic to pass. The project should take a few weeks to complete. A rezoning request for property at 710 S. Church St. won council’s OK Monday night. The property will be rezoned from R-6, general residential, to LC, limited commercial district. City Council next meets on Feb. 25 at 5:30 p.m. in chambers at City Hall, 145 W. Broad St. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.


Journal community By NICHOLE LIVENGOOD | contributor

Gerry pate / contributing

At 29, William Cribb not only owns a successful catering business, he owns one of the most successful restaurants in Spartanburg, Cribb’s Kitchen.

Havin’ fun and eatin’ good Cribb’s Kitchen keeps downtown hopping in Spartanburg

Not many people can say they have their lives figured out before 30, but at 29 William Cribb not only owns a successful catering business, he owns one of the most successful restaurants in Spartanburg. By the time he was 14, it was obvious Cribb had an affinity for life in the kitchen. “My mother and father have always been great cooks and they always entertained while I was growing up,” he said. “Mom was pretty renowned for awesome salads and fresh vegetable dishes. She had a pretty dynamite stuffed squash.” Grilled whole leg of lamb, pulled pork, grilled marinated flank steak and Greekstyle pork ribs were only a few of the dishes that found their way to the table. Good food, every day, inspired Cribb to start cooking. He started out as a dishwasher and worked his way up through the kitchens at Venus Pie, Gerhard’s and Carolina Country Club. “I was taught a thing or two during the early stages, but mostly just watched what was going on around me. By the time I was 16, I started working for Gerhard Grommer and that’s when I really started learning about food,” Cribb said. Gerhard was his first major culinary mentor and remains a good friend to this day. Cribb dropped out of school in the 10th grade to focus on cooking. He earned his GED while working his way through restaurants. “I think culinary school is a good avenue to go down if you are serious about it, but I also think you can learn what you need to know in the field,” he said. “Working in that atmosphere was exciting and almost like a counterculture of people. It was a different language, fast-paced, late hours, and I worked with some delightfully crazy people. I observed and learned and worked under some great teachers.” CRIBB’S continued on page 22

FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | The Journal 21


journal community

Don’t buy cheap clothes, buy good clothes CHEAP!

PHOTOS BY Gerry pate / contributing

CRIBB’S continued from page 21

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After more than a decade in other people’s kitchens, it was time for him to venture out on his own. Two years ago, he opened Cribb’s Kitchen in downtown Spartanburg. “If I am guilty of one thing, it’s going with my gut. Did I have an airtight business plan? Not really. Did I do all the market research I could have? No. I just had a feeling that my skills in the kitchen were really coming together, that I had learned from my past chefs, and that I had an understanding of the kinds of food people would really love. I didn’t go into this planning for failure,” he said. “My journey as a chef is more or less my journey through life. It’s been a fun ride.” These days he is whipping out creative New American cuisine in the form of burg-

ers, paninis, and some entrees that push the norm like crispy pork belly, cashew crusted salmon and pan-seared N.C. grouper with a local oyster mushroom broth. “Just the broth itself is a thing of beauty: worthy of being sopped up with crusty bread,” Cribb said. “We are always trying to push the bar a little further. We are always creating. The moment you stop being creative, you might as well hang up your jacket.” Cribb’s goal is to have something for everyone as far as price point and taste. The restaurant runs weekly specials like Starving Student Saturdays where burgers are half price and students get 10 percent off. Starting in February, the restaurant rolls out a new happy hour concept called “Downtown Wind Down” with live music Tuesday to Friday from 5 to 7 p.m. with Cribb (above) dropped out of school in the 10th grade to focus on cooking. He earned his GED while working his way through restaurants.

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drink specials nightly. The bands are being announced on the Cribb’s Kitchen Facebook page. Cribb also has a new concept on the horizon, about which he is tight-lipped other than to say it is onward and forwards as far as plans to do more. “I grew up in Spartanburg. The city is supportive of us,” he said. “We like to be downtown and we like to see growth, and we are having fun doing it.” Contact Nichole Livengood at nlivengood@communityjournals.com.


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Club owner appeals revocation of registration Sheriff ’s office requests closing after two murders on site By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Following the revocation of her Greenville County business registration, a local club owner has appealed the decision, a first-time occurrence, according to Greenville County officials. The Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office requested the revocation, citing the high number of law enforcement calls, frequent arrests and failure to provide sufficient security for people and property in the immediate vicinity. In the last six months, there have been two murders in the parking lot of the establishment, including the killing of the club’s manager. Betty Barton, owner of Z2 on White Horse Road, and several supporters attended the appeal hearing on Feb. 11. Barton said she had provided security and bouncers and the owners had no

control over what happened in the parking lot when a man was gunned down on Jan. 13. David Adam Young was charged with murder in connection with the death of Marcus McGee. The January incident comes in the shadow of the death of club manager Raheem Robinson, 28, who was killed on the premises on Aug. 6, 2012. William Lykas McKinney was later arrested in connection with Robinson’s murder. The club was known as BOBTZ’s at that time; Barton took over ownership of the club in September 2012. Monday’s hearing was moderated by county administrator Joseph Kernell and both sides presented arguments and questions. Barton said there have been no problems since she took over the club in September prior to the shooting in January. Barton and club manager Arlo Workman said that they should not be held responsible for the previous owner’s management of the business. “What happened before, we can’t be held accountable,” said Workman. He added that the club, and others like it, contribute to the local economy.

The Z2 nightclub on White Horse Road has been the scene of two homicides since last May.

Master Deputy Michael Bryan, who represented the sheriff ’s office, said that the office requested the registration be revoked to protect life and property. He cited excessive calls, gunfire, assaults, narcotics and violence, in addition to the two shootings. Bryan said that Barton filed the business registration in May 2012 and between that time and January 2013, there were 28 calls to law enforcement. He said Barton was an “absentee owner” and that

the club was run without a liquor license between May and September 2012 and prior to her managing it. When prompted by Barton, Bryan did say that between Nov. 28 and Jan. 18, there had been four calls for service from law enforcement, including the one for the Jan. 13 shooting. Barton said that she will not be reopening the club, but wants to retain the business registration. Workman agreed, saying, “If we open another business, it’ll be something like a landscaping business.” Kernell said he would notify both parties about his decision on whether to uphold the revocation or reinstate the registration soon. County spokesperson Bob Mihalic said the decision could come by the end of the week. If a business registration is revoked, the business may reapply after one year. If the business owner is not satisfied with the county appeal process, he can appeal in court within 10 days after the decision, according to the ordinance. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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The great outdoors GOAT offers wild experiences, mentoring for at-risk kids By april a. morris | staff

Ryan McCrary would rather be hurtling down a whitewater river or backpacking through the Blue Ridge Mountains than working in the office of Great Outdoor Adventure GOAT founder and Trips, or GOAT for executive director short. However, on Ryan McCrary a rainy February day, the bearded 28- year-old took time to sit down and talk about the nonprofit and ministry he founded. When the weather warms up, McCrary, executive director, and program director Joey Short will be outside, tak-

ing nearly 1,000 kids on whitewater rafting, rock climbing, backpacking and hiking trips throughout the summer. GOAT focuses on kids who wouldn’t normally participate in these GOAT program outdoor activities, director Joey Short who may be at-risk, or in need of mentoring, said McCrary. Ages 10 and up go on the outdoor trips and ages 4 and up may participate in the indoor programs. Throughout the summer, the organization will take at least two outdoor trips each day and one overnight trip each week, and host several groups at the gym, McCrary said. And by 5 o’clock, The Mountain Goat, an indoor climbing gym adjacent to the office, will be filled with everyone from professionals to students clinging to a 25-foot wall by their fingertips. The gym is open to the public in the evenings and to student groups during the day. GOAT has worked with groups

throughout the Upstate, including Greenville and Spartanburg counties and as far away as Seneca, Greenwood, Rock Hill and Newberry. McCrary came back to working with young people after interning in Washington State with an outdoor ministry. After graduating from Clemson and the internship, he returned to the Upstate and used his college degree, working for an advertising agency. McCrary would still take groups on adventures, paying for it out of his salary, he said. “We started taking kids out on the weekends on these kind of trips. We didn’t have to do fundraising, we could take kids climbing, I could foot the bill – it was easy.” After that first summer, groups began to ask if he would guide their kids. He struggled with the decision, but eventually quit his job and began guiding groups full time. Staff member Joey Short, 25, is a Clemson grad who was working in a restaurant and on his way to medical school when he met McCrary and volunteered with GOAT. Two years ago, he became its second full-time staff member. Now there are a few part-time workers who help at the gym and numerous interns and volunteers who help on the trips.

Young adventurers enjoy the Mountain Goat indoor climbing gym

GOAT’s goal was to serve 100 students during its first summer in 2009; there were 150 participants, said McCrary. The program grew each year, and 900 students participated in 2012. The GOAT staff and volunteers will take any group of children, whether they live at a boys or girls home or residential

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GOAT offers outdoor adventures for at-risk kids.

rehabilitation facility, or attend an afterschool program, McCrary said. The highest-risk populations can participate in indoor activities in the 2,500-squarefoot climbing gym, which has been open a little over a year. “One of the residential rehab facilities we work with has probably the best view of Paris Mountain in Greenville and they’ve never been outside to that stuff ” due to legal, staffing or monetary reasons, said Short. GOAT offers an opportunity that they don’t normally have, he said. At this point, nearly 85 percent of the participants go on the trips for free. Groups show up with a waiver and GOAT provides packs, camping gear, climbing gear, food and transportation. In addition to outdoor adventures, the nonprofit does discipleship and leadership training for regular indoor participants, along with homework help and mentoring, McCrary said. In 2013, GOAT predicts it will serve more than 1,000 kids during the summer and 500 throughout the rest of the year. One of the challenges is convincing reluctant organizations, Short said. When asked if they want to take their kids rock climbing, they respond, “Well, our kids are difficult kids, that sounds like a terrible idea, they can’t handle it,” he said. “But this is what we do and that’s who we work with,” McCrary said. Added Short, “We are able to earn their trust in an afternoon when it normally takes months and months of working with them.” For kids who don’t normally walk in

the woods or see a river, the experience can be both liberating and disorienting, with some going wild and others not sure how to act. “The car is miles away and they need someone to trust in that circumstance and we are really very intentional about following through with that,” said Short. One beneficial lesson is food rationing on a multi-night trip. “We’ll inevitably have one kid who eats all their food on the first day and one who has all of their food at the end of the trip,” said McCrary. A success story is the climbing team of high school students, Short said. “On the first trip, they were one of the most difficult groups we worked with. They didn’t make any real effort to connect or respond to anything we were doing.” Since that first outing, they have taken multiple overnight trips and participated in rock climbing competitions. GOAT is heading into the busy season, deciding how to expand its staff and investigating a larger facility. “The Lord has done his thing with it and we’ve tried to follow and keep up as much as we can,” McCrary said. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW Great Outdoor Adventure Trips (GOAT) & The Mountain Goat climbing gym 61 Byrdland Drive, Greenville 864-469-5042 goattrips.org

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Finding treasures at Hidden Treasure Christian School Unique Upstate school is changing lives By CASEY DARGAN | contributor

THE ALL NEW

Greg Beckner / Staff

Thirty-five years ago, Pastor John Vaughn’s wife and two-year-old daughter were victims of a house fire. Vaughn’s daughter suffered severe physical injuries from the burns, which physically disabled her, confining her to a wheelchair and causing her to struggle in a conventional school. In 1981, Vaughn acted to aid his daughter and children like her by opening Hidden Treasure Christian School. The private school focuses on providing an effective Christian educational environment for children with special needs. Beginning with a few modular buildings, the school moved in 2000 to its current location on the campus of the Faith Baptist Church in Taylors. Students have come from 16 U.S. states and all over the world, including one from Jordan. Becky Berryhill, a parent

Hidden Treasure teacher Monique Lindsey helps her students prepare snacks in the school’s kitchen.

and employee of Hidden Treasure, relocated her family from New Jersey so her son could attend. Unlike most special-needs schools, Berryhill says Hidden Treasure maintains a strong Christian focus. She noticed almost immediately that the students were comfortable and motivated. She also noticed the commitment of the teachers. With small classes,

the students are given much more attention, and it is reflected in their education. Berryhill said her son, Ryan, has made significant improvements in the past six years. Before attending Hidden Treasure, Ryan Berryhill was diagnosed with moderate to severe autism and had limited communication and writing skills. Now, he is part of the Faith Christian Academy, a junior/senior high school program, and is working toward a high school diploma. Asked why he preferred this school, Ryan said, “It teaches the Bible, and the students and teachers are nice.” Most students answered similarly, saying that their teachers cared about them and they could learn more in this kind of setting. Ryan Berryhill’s favorite part of school is honors lunches, which rewards students with field trips to restaurants, museums and zoos. Beyond academics, the curriculum also focuses on independence, teaching vocational and personal skills such as hygiene, cooking and budgeting finances. Becky Berryhill urges donors to consider the needs of Hidden Treasure’s students. Because the school is privately funded, students

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are often provided with scholarships. However, with limited funds, the student body has dwindled to 42 students from its high of 90. Although the school still receives funding and donations from local business owners, such as Mark Lynch, who donated all the appliances for the school, more donations are needed to continue aiding new and current students. Donations may be made directly to the school or through events like the upcoming Walk-Fest, an annual fundraiser aimed at defraying tuition costs and providing scholarship funds. Tuition ranges from $15,000 to $18,000 per year, and 40 percent of the budget stems from donations. Contact Casey Dargan at cdargan@communityjournals.com.


Mental health center forum focuses on programs, budget woes By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

South Carolina has been treating patients with mental illness since the 1700s, but recent incidents of gun violence have turned the national spotlight on gun control and prompted a discussion on the need for better mental health treatment. Mental health experts and the public gathered at the Greenville Mental Health Center for an annual community forum on Feb. 7 to discuss everything from funding to new programs. John Magill, South Carolina Department of Mental Health state director, spoke, along with S.C. Senator Tom Corbin and Dr. Al C. Edwards, director of the Greenville Mental Health Center. Though the event is annual, recent events have brought mental health into focus, Edwards said. “I think it puts that idea in people’s minds that maybe there’s something we need to be doing, that maybe there’s a need out there that’s unmet.” Magill highlighted mental health advancements despite repeated budget cuts, including a telepsychiatry emergency room program to assist with mental health cases. Approximately seven psychiatrists take calls from 21 emergency rooms statewide, and the program has proved to be very successful, he said. A challenge for the state has been finding enough inpatient beds, along with psychiatrists willing to work at the salary level the state can offer. Following four years of budget cuts totaling roughly $90 million since 2008, Magill brought a message of hope in regards to funding. In the 2012-2013 budget year, he said, $18 million was restored and it appears that more will be added. “The buildup is coming back and I’ll be requesting additional money for several years,” he said. Magill said he plans to ask for $12.5 million for operations and up to $70 million for capital. The increase is partially because of the state’s improving financial health, but also thanks to elected officials, he said. “I do think you’ve got a coalition of elected leaders who believe mental health should begin taking the forefront.” Edwards said his center, which is

funded through Medicaid, Medicare, self-pay on a sliding scale and private insurance, has operated with little money from the state. However, if state dollars were allocated to it, he said the center could help those people who are “caught between Medicaid and having a job with insurance.” Sen. Tom Corbin said mental health is of interest to him personally and he considers it to be a “core function” for the state. However, he predicts a “fight for dollars” in Columbia over the looming expansion of Medicaid in the state. The event was attended by representatives of local agencies and nonprofits, including those serving children, the homeless and the mentally ill. Attendees brought up the success of school-based mental health programs, services for veterans and law enforcement training that helps defuse situations involving a person in crisis. Much of the discussion centered on housing, which is in short supply for the mentally ill, said Edwards. He added that a “housing first” model for those with mental illness and addiction has been extremely successful. A new focus is also helping patients monitor their physical health, he said. Mental health centers perform screenings for conditions like high cholesterol and diabetes. “People with serious mental illness live about two thirds as long as others and the main reason is they don’t get basic health care,” he said. After client feedback, Greenville Mental Health Center recently instituted changes in how people access its services, resolving to set appointments within 24 to 48 hours after someone contacts them, said Edwards. Greenville Mental Health Center, one of 17 statewide, sees about 4,200 patients each year, he said. A local challenge is finding work for those with mental illness, said Edwards. Another is treating those in the detention center. Once a person is incarcerated, sources like private insurance or Medicaid, stop paying for treatment, he said, and the county provides services.

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FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 27


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Education-related nonprofits merge College Hub, Children’s Service Alliance join forces to promote lifelong learning By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

When it comes to improving education, talk is often of how to get more students to graduate from high school or earn college degrees. Sometimes, the conversation is about making sure the youngest children get off to a good start. It’s rare to find one organization advance both. But that’s no longer the case in Spartanburg after two nonprofit organizations working to advance education in Spartanburg County – the Children’s Service Alliance and College Hub – decided to combine resources. “Our vision to make Spartanburg County the best educated county in South Carolina continues, yet we can only make this a reality if we align efforts across all sectors of education,”

said Dr. John Stockwell, retired University of South Carolina Upstate president and College Hub board chairman. “This merger recognizes that early childhood education, together with success across the educational spectrum, is crucial to any hope the county has in substantially increasing workforce readiness and college degree achievement.” Founded in 2011, College Hub historically has focused on K-12 students and adults. Meanwhile, the Children’s Service Alliance, which was formed in 2008, focused on the advancement of early childhood health and wellness through education, local advocacy and research. The merged effort will retain the College Hub name. College Hub put a lot of its effort into working on the culture and helping Spartanburg residents understand the importance of education and how to find resources that could help them. Only 19 percent of adults 25 and older in Spartanburg County have a bachelor’s degree or higher, which is well below state and national averages. The College Hub wants to increase that to 40 percent by 2030.

In its efforts to increase those numbers, the College Hub found that many Spartanburg residents were starting out educationally behind, said Dr. Carrie Priddy, the organization’s executive director. “This partnership was born from the understanding that early child development sets the stage for a lifetime of learning,” Priddy said. “We think that large-scale social change needs broad collaboration. Our common goal is to support our neighbors in attaining the level of education they desire by providing support at each stage of the age continuum.” CSA Executive Director Ida Thompson will join College Hub as program manager of early childhood initiatives. She will focus on CSA’s cornerstone project, the Toolkit for Kindergarten Readiness and Early Childhood Assessment Initiative. The two-part initiative has a publication that provides parents and caregivers with basic early development and literacy information as well as access to free developmental screening for all Spartanburg children from birth to age five. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

Loaves & Fishes announces leaders Loaves & Fishes of Greenville recently announced the election of its new board of directors’ chairman and vice chair- Davis man. Ana Davis of Godshall Staffing was elected chairman of the board for 2013. Former chairman Jon Good completed his term Smoak in December, and will remain active with the nonprofit organization. Davis has served on the board of Loaves & Fishes for the past six years. She is the business manager at Godshall Professional Recruiting & Staffing in Greenville. Tyson Smoak was elected vice chairman of the board. Smoak is a broker with NAI Earle Furman LLC.

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Learning by gaming USC Upstate students goes to class in a virtual world By Jeanne putnam | contributor

Video and computer gaming have been immensely popular for years. The University of South Carolina Upstate and the University Center of Greenville are now capitalizing on this popular form of media by using SimHub and OpenQwac online learning environments to reach their students. Tim Ellis, who heads USC Upstate’s Engineering Technology Management program, has been the poster child for using the virtual world as a learning tool. Ellis teaches one class in SimHub and two other classes in the virtual world OpenQwac – the only faculty member at the University Center to do so. Ellis requires his students to meet in OpenQwac’s virtual classroom at a set time, just like a traditional lecture class. However, each student appears as an avatar, created with his or her photo as its face (a requirement, as the only time Ellis sees his students in the flesh is when they

take the final exam). Otherwise, the students interact with him and each other online from home or anywhere there is an Internet connection. OpenQwac also allows for projection screens in the virtual classroom, where the students can display what they are working on from their own computers. Ellis has to use multiple computer monitors to see what he is showing and review what the students are doing. “The biggest concern I have had with doing the virtual classroom is making sure that each student’s computer had enough horsepower,” Ellis said. “I wanted to try my classes online because I feel this can be an effective way of doing class, since most of the students are used to playing games and I hope they will see the classwork as fun.” It is that mindset that enticed him into utilizing SimHub, a virtual world used by both education and nursing majors at the University Center. This program, as well as OpenQwac, allows the students to interact in an online platform without downloading anything to their home computers. Ellis saw the opportunity to use SimHub as a way of making his lectures come to life by offering a taste of a real-world

Tim Ellis’ SimHub classroom provides a virtual recreation of a real-world factory floor.

setting. The program simulates a potato chip factory, which uses the same process-mapping strategies his students are studying. Since Ellis’s students are learning engineering management, he thought it made sense for them to meet in a virtual world where they can learn the order of processes and implement strategies to increase and improve production. Additionally, Ellis feels using this program is more practical than taking the students on multiple field trips. Ellis’s SimHub world allows students to follow a robot around the factory and monitor his progress. His goal is to make the program look like a real, interactive factory and have the students do most of their as-

signments online by using what they study in the textbook to improve operations. Students will be using SimHub this semester at USC Upstate. Ellis admits that it is a work in progress. “I feel that it will take at least three years before the program does 90 percent of what I want it to,” he said. Ellis’s biggest hope is that using programs like OpenQwac and SimHub will not only increase his students’ technological skills for the workplace, but also make what they are reading in their textbooks come to life. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com

Rotary Club recognizes local law enforcement

U.S. Postal Inspector Richard “Phil” Carter of the United States Postal Inspection Service makes comments after receiving the 2012 Rotary Officer Of The Year-Federal award.

Lt. Joe Browning of the Greenville City Police Department makes comments after receiving the 2012 Rotary Officer Of The Year-City award.

which is Fall for Greenville. His “ability to plan and coordinate so effectively contributes to the quality of life Greenville residents experience” and the city’s success as a tourist destination, the award notes. Eldridge began his career in the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office in 1990, progressing through the ranks to achieve his current position in 2005. As chief deputy, John Eldridge manages the daily operations of an office

Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

The Rotary Club of Greenville this week honored three law enforcement officers for exceptional performance at its annual Law Enforcement Appreciation Day, a celebration Greenville Rotarians have observed for more than 35 years. The 2012 Rotary Officers of the Year were: U.S. Postal Inspector Richard “Phil” Carter Jr., federal winner; Chief Deputy John Eldridge of the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office, county winner; and Lieutenant Joe Browning of the Greenville City Police Department, city winner. Carter, a career-long member of the South Carolina law enforcement community, has served since March 2007 as Greenville’s postal inspector and head of the USPIS Upstate Financial Crime Task Force. Carter coordinates law enforcement personnel from a wide array of city, county and federal departments and offices, the award notes, “distinguishing himself through his ability not only to fight crime but to successfully coordinate across diverse agencies to great benefit to the Upstate community.” Browning began his career with the Greenville City Police Department in 1995 as a patrol officer and has held the rank of lieutenant since 2007. In addition to his daily responsibility for planning and allocating police department resources, Lt. Browning acts as coordinator of special events, ensuring public safety at the city’s more than 300 annual events, the largest of

Greenville County Sheriff Steve Loftis, right, gives Chief Deputy John Eldridge of the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office the 2012 Rotary Officer Of The Year-County award.

comprising more than 600 employees. Eldridge “distinguishes himself through all of these efforts that promote the safety of the Upstate community and the service the Sheriff ’s Office is able to provide,” the award notes. Rotary Club President Elizabeth Lyons said the club is “honored to celebrate these outstanding individuals who put their lives on the line to protect the citizens of Greenville County.”

FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | The Journal 29


journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

Slow Food Upstate will host “It’s a Southern Thing” at Stella’s Southern Bistro, located at 684-C Fairview Road in Simpsonville, on Feb. 21 at 7:00 p.m. Tickets to the event are $63.09 per person and can be purchased at  brownpapertickets.com/ event/320628. For more information, visit slowfoodupstate.com. Greenville Rec is accepting team registrations for spring adult softball, adult flag football, adult soccer and adult kickball. Men’s and coed leagues are available for each sport. Visit greenvillerec.com/adultsports for more information and to register a team, or contact Rich Dixon at richd@gcrd.org or 864-676-2180, ext. 134. Baptist Easley Hospital has been named a top performer in the Top Rural Hospital category by the Leapfrog Group. The Top Hospital designation, which is the most competitive national hospital quality award, recognizes hospitals that deliver the highest quality care by preventing medical errors and reducing hospital readmissions for patients being treated for conditions like pneumonia and heart attack. Local and regional businessman George Fletcher is moving from an advisor at Miniature World of Trains Transportation Museum of the World to a member of the museum’s board of directors. He is a professional engineer and a diplomat in the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. The Greenville County Election and Voter Registration Office will conduct an informational seminar for the citizens of Greenville County concerning the new state law on photo identification and the effects the new law will have on voters in coming elections. The seminar will be held Feb. 16, 9:30 a.m., in County Council Chambers at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville. The focus of the seminar will be on what has changed; the new procedures being followed at the polling places in the county; how to obtain a photo identification voter registration card if the registered voter does not have one; and how can everyone help those voters with difficulty getting the proper photo ID. The informational seminar is open to the public. For more information, contact Conway Belangia at 864-467-7250. Wofford College will hold a dedication ceremony and reception for the Aldo Leopold Shack, a new educational and outreach building in the Goodall Environmental Studies Center Garden. Following the reception, the film “Green Fire,” an exploration of life and legacy of famed conservationist Aldo Leopold, will be screened. The event will be Feb. 20, 5-8 p.m., at the Goodall Environmental Studies Center. The Blood Connection will be hosting a blood drive event, “Find Your Direction for Life,” at the Spartanburg Donation Center through Feb. 15, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. This event is designed to spotlight the new center and give each donor a chance to enter a drawing for a TomTom XXL portable GPS device. In addition, each donor will also receive a free movie ticket. For more information, call 864-641-6013 or visit thebloodconnection.org.

Nursing students from The Mary Black School of Nursing at the University of South Carolina Upstate will hold a free body mass index screening and discussion on Feb. 18 from 1:30 to 4 p.m. in the Campus Life Center ballroom. The event will be informative and encouraging to those who are struggling with weight and nutrition issues. For more information, contact Dr. Julie Moss at 864-503-5462. On Feb. 28, ladies in red will gather at the Marriott on the Parkway for a National Heart Month celebration. Cocktails will begin at 5:30 p.m., followed by a dinner at 6:30 p.m. This year’s event will feature Jane Robelot as emcee, and Marilyn Smedgerg-Gobbett, WomenHeart national spokeswoman, will share her testimony about her history of heart disease. For more information or to register, call 864-225-1040 or email Debbie_richardson@bshsi.org. The Shepherd’s Center of Spartanburg will host poet Glenis Redmond to celebrate Black History Month on Feb. 26 at 11 a.m. in the Fogartie Hall at First Presbyterian Church in Spartanburg. For more information, call 864-585-1999. The South Carolina Native Plant Society is hosting a Green Woodland Orchids Workday on Feb. 23, 9-11 a.m. The workday will focus on removing privet, shrubs and some ivy from a stand of green woodland orchids and bunched arrowhead. Participants must wear boots or shoes that can get wet and clothing to protect against poison ivy. The group will meet in the parking lot of Berea Middle School at 9 a.m. To attend, email Bill Sharpton at gsharpton@aol.com with a name and phone number. Greenville Chautauqua and Greenville Library System will present a free discussion on women and politics on Feb. 26, 7-8:30 p.m., at the Hughes Main Library. Liz Patterson, former U.S. representative, will explore the life and work of Susan B. Anthony and the role of women in South Carolina politics. This discussion is the first of a four-part monthly series entitled “American Legends.” The series continues with Davy Crockett on March 19, Herman Melville on April 16 and Malcolm X on May 14. For more information, visit greenvillechautauqua.org or call 864-224-1499. Every Friday through tax season, 20 business majors at the George Dean Johnson Jr. College of Business and Economics at the University of South Carolina Upstate will be provide free tax preparation services to the community. From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., IRS-certified students will prepare federal and state income tax returns as part of the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program through the United Way of the Piedmont. Assistance will be provided for household incomes of less than $51,000 a year. To make an appointment, call 864-582-7556. For more information, contact Michael Wooten at wootenmh@email.uscupstate.edu or 864-901-1829.

If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to email: community@communityjournals.com.

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journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Eleven Greer High School Band students placed in the Greenville All-County Band. These students include: Shassae Styles, Taylor Carroll, Taia Sewell, Ben Campbell, Chandler Searcy, Chandler Hyatt, Brady Wilson, Tyler Holliday, JT Abrams, John Vanselow and Rebecca Marullo. The Greer High Band will perform at the opening of the WalMart Neighborhood Market on Feb. 18.

Cherrydale Elementary School students recently participated in the “Cherrydale Idol” and “So You Think You Can Dance” talent and variety show. Mikayla and Abrianna Byrd, Song Byrd and Lady Byrd, won Cherrydale Idol with their performance of “Drift Away.” First runner-up was Ashlynn Sweet, “Sweet T,” and second runner-up was D’Yazia Johnson, “D-Nice.” The Tu-Tu Ladies, Montasia Williams, Sha’Coriea Robinson, Serray Walker, and Miranda Roman, won the “So You Think You Can Dance” contest with their choreographed performance to “Tu-Tus and Tennis Shoes.” First runner-up went to the “Diamonds,” DeAsia Anderson, Allyah Duke, Rolanda McBride and Martiyanna Weeks. Jazzmen Turmon, “The Hot Diva,” was second runner-up. The Cherrydale Elementary School Family Fitness Night will be Feb. 28 at 6 p.m. Bob Jones Academy will host an open house on Feb 18, from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., for parents and students. Prospective and returning families will have the opportunity to see firsthand what BJA offers its students. Visitors are welcome to attend any time during the day. For more information, call 864-770-1395 or visit www.bobjonesacademy.net. On March 2, Huntington Learning Center will join teachers and administrators, librarians, education support professionals, higher education faculty, students Brock Huff, a second grader in Heather Boling’s class at Mitchell Road Christian Academy, and classmates made Valentines for the children at GHS Children’s Hospital.

and members of the National Education Association to celebrate Read Across America Day. Now in its 16th year, the national commemoration strives to motivate children and teens to read. The day also marks the 109th birthday of Theodor Seuss Geisel, children’s author Dr. Seuss. The Greenville Middle Academy PTA is sponsoring the annual Quiz Bowl competition through Feb. 27. Teams of students from each advisory class are competing during this three-week tournament. A winning class from each grade level will be selected. In addition, initial plans are being made for a student trip to London, Paris and Rome in June 2014. This nine-day trip will feature tours of important historical and cultural sites in these European capitals.

Pictured from left to right are student council officers Isaac Lopez, treasurer; Jada Hudson, president; Haley Waterman, vice president; and Ashlyn Styles, secretary. 

The Palmetto Elementary student council is sponsoring the Pennies for Patients program for the month of February. This annual school-wide program raises funds for lifesaving cancer research. Each student in the school receives his own box to take home and collect spare change around the house. At the end of the month, each student returns the money collected to his classroom box. The school’s money is then sent to help fund the leukemia and lymphoma society. 

Legacy Charter School is accepting applications for the 2013-2014 school year. Enrollment for all grades will be open until Feb. 28 at 1 p.m. on a firstcome, first-served basis. Enrollment forms for grades K5 through four are available at the elementary school. Applications for grades five through 12 can be submitted at the Parker campus. Applications must be submitted in person, along with the child’s birth certificate, immunization form and proof of residence. If more than 110 applications are received per grade, a lottery will be held on March 8 at 4 p.m. Completed applications will be placed on a waiting list until spots become available. For more information, visit legacycharterschool.com or call 864- 214-1600. Clemson University recently dedicated its new 100,000-square-foot life sciences facility for what it calls a new era of collaborative interdisciplinary research and education. The new $50 million facility has 25 laboratories organized by research clusters that focus on emerging pathogens, cancer prevention and cure, microbiology and food safety. It also includes an advanced imaging suite.

Submit entries to: Community Journals, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or email: community@communityjournals.com.

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FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | The Journal 31


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

United Way of Greenville County Young Philanthropists recently announced that Jo Watson Hackl of Wyche, P.A., Clarence Kegler of Michelin North America, Mike McGuigan of Elliott Davis LLC and Kent Satterfield of Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP are the finalists for 2013 YP Mentor of the Year. This year’s winner will be named during the Mentor of the Year Awards Ceremony on Feb. 19 at the TD Convention Center in Greenville. Tickets to the Mentor of the Year Awards Ceremony are available for $30 and can be purchased by contacting Andrea Smith at 864-467-3583 or asmith@unitedwaygc.org. On Feb. 28 from 6-10 p.m., Camp Opportunity will be at The Handlebar at 304 East Stone Ave. in Greenville for their Seventh Annual Adult Spelling Bee, including a live auction and special guest entertainers. Thirty teams of four spellers will compete for bragging rights and to raise money. All proceeds raised will go directly to Camp Opportunity’s year-round children’s programming. For more information, email patti@campoppsc.org or call 864-416-7986 or visit campoppsc.org. For tickets or to sign up, visit eventbrite.com/event/2641447641?ref=ebtn. Auction for a Kaws will hold a bachelor and bachelorette auction on Mar. 1 at the Marriott on the Parkway in Greenville to benefit Carmen’s Rescue, Pet Tender Angels and Kitten Action Team animal rescue organizations. There are currently about 30 bachelors and bachelorettes participating and the event is open to anyone who would like to join. The event will be catered by Palmetto Ale House, Shane’s Restaurant and Copper River Grill. A meet and greet is 6:30-8 p.m. and the auction will begin at 8 p.m. There will also be a great silent auction. There are several local “celebrities” being auctioned off, including Erika Powell, former Ms. South Carolina USA, and Jay Byars, international model and “Survivor” contestant. On Mar. 7 at 6:30 p.m., Fashion with a Passion at the Poinsett Club will feature an evening of fashion, food and fun for a good cause. The event is a benefit for Safe Harbor presented by Tom Ervin and Kathryn Williams. The fashion show will include the latest styles from Greenville’s favorite local boutiques, including Monkee’s of the West End, Plaza Suite, Petals Boutique, Muse Shoe Studio, Wisteria Salon & Spa, and Coplon’s. Weekend vacation packages, spa days, downtown dining experiences, golf packages and local artwork will also be available to the highest bidder during a silent auction. General admission tickets are $55 and include food and two drink tickets. VIP tickets and tables are available as well. Tickets are available at fashionwithapassionsc.org.

32 NGU THETempest JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 15, 2013 Quarter Page Ad.indd 1

The St. Patrick’s Day Dash and Bash will be Mar. 16. The event features a 5K, 10K and kids’ fun run to benefit children’s charities, including Make-A-Wish South Carolina, Let There Be Mom and Camp Spearhead. There will be many children’s activities including a 1/4-mile fun run, games, face painting and a bounce house. For the adults, there will be live musical entertainment, food, vendor booths and green beer. 5K registration is $25-$30 and 10K registration is $30-$35. For more information, visit stpattysdashandbash.com. Cavalier Rescue USA partners with Wood“RUFF” Pet Resort & Spa Inc. for the Annual Easter Bone Hunt on Mar. 16 at Wood“RUFF” Pet Resort and Spa, 70 Concourse Way, Greer. Four-legged family members are invited for a day of fun featuring an Easter Bone Hunt for the dogs, a 50/50 raffle, silent auction, spring pet portraits and supporting vendors. Proceeds benefit Cavalier Rescue USA and Wood“Ruff ” Pet Resort & Spa. Small dogs are allowed in 10 a.m.-noon and large dogs are allowed in 12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m. For more information, call 864-877-0488 or visit woodruffpetresort.com or cavalierrescueusa.org. The north Anderson communities will be hosting the Third Annual Relay for Life on May 3 at the Wren High School field. There will be many fundraisers to support the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life in the coming months. One fundraiser is a pageant on Apr. 13 at 10 a.m. For more information, contact Melanie Duncan at melanieduncan@allstate.com. Registration is open for Let There Be Mom’s annual Seek & Snap scavenger hunt on April 14, noon-6 p.m. Family, friends and co-workers are invited to form teams of four and compete to find as many items as possible in downtown Greenville. Prizes will be awarded to winning teams. Let There Be Mom works to preserve the legacies of moms and dads with life-threatening illnesses. For more information and to register, visit lettherebemom.org. Meals on Wheels of Greenville recently hosted its 18th annual Sweetheart Charity Ball at the newly renovated Hyatt Regency Downtown, raising funds for over 30,000 meals for the homebound in Greenville County. The Sweetheart Ball recognized Lori Center, the director of community ministries for Bon Secours St. Francis, as its Sweetheart of the Year. This prestigious honor distinguishes a person or couple who goes above and beyond to support Meals on Wheels and the Greenville community. Greenville resident and Clemson University graduate David May, and Seneca resident and Costal Carolina University graduate Drew Ernst, recently beat out 21 other pros at Thornblade Club to win professional exemptions in the 2013 BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation golf tournament on May 16-19. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.

1/28/13 2:20 PM


Journal culture “Asad”

Short films tall on

entertainment Oscar-nominated short films featured at Peace Center “Buzkashi Boys” length compared to the feature films that win most of the Oscar glory, they make up for in quality, entertainment value and the ability to provoke thought. Short films often feature the same themes as their longer, more commercial counterparts: coming of age, life changes based on a chance encounter on a morning commute, spouses who have grown apart. There are films with pirates, films with soldiers, and even a film featuring the

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Simpsons. They range in length from two minutes to 40 minutes. The festival will feature the live-action nominees on Thursday, Feb. 21, the animation nominees on Friday, Feb. 22 and the documentary nominees on Saturday, Feb. 23. The theatrical release of the Academy Award nominated short films began in 2006.

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For full-length feature films, an Oscar nomination sometimes means a second run – or a lengthy extended first run – in movie theaters. For short films, a nomination often is the only path to being seen by a wide audience. That audience in the Upstate may see all of the Oscar-nominated live-action, ani-

mation and documentary short films at the Peace Center next week during the Peace Center’s Oscar Shorts Film Festival. The three categories will be screened over three nights, allowing Upstate residents to see all of the films prior to the winners being announced during the Academy Awards ceremony on Feb. 24. The Oscars’ definition of a short film is one that lasts 40 minutes or less. But what the nominated short films may lack in

February 21

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FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | The Journal 33


JOURNAL CULTURE FILMS continued from PAGE 33

“Fresh Guacamole”

“Curfew”

THURSDAY’S FILMS ARE: “Asad” is an 18-minute long South African coming-of-age film set in a war-torn fishing village in Somalia about a boy faced with falling into the pirate life or rising above to choose the path of an honest fishing man. The cast is made up of all Somali refugees. “Buzkashi Boys” is a 28-minute film set around contemporary Afghanistan and the national sport of Buzkashi, a brutal game of horse polo played with a dead goat. The film tells the story of two best friends who struggle to realize their dreams while making their way to manhood in one of the most war-torn countries on Earth. “Curfew” is a story about Richie, a man at the lowest point in his life, who gets a call from his estranged sister asking him to look after his 9-year-old niece for the evening. “Death of a Shadow,” a 20-minute film from Belgium and France, is about a soldier, Nathan, whose shadow was imprisoned by a strange collector. Nathan is given a new chance: a second life against 10,000 captured shadows. Love guides him, until he finds out the woman he fell in love with before he died

“Inocente” is a story about a young artist, the transformative power of art and a snapshot of the new face of homelessness in America – children. is already in love with someone else. “Henry” is a Canadian film about Henry, a great concert pianist whose life is thrown in turmoil the day the love of his life disappears mysteriously.

FRIDAY’S FILMS ARE: “Head Over Heels,” a film about a couple living separate, parallel lives – he lives on the floor, she on the ceiling. When one tries to reignite their old romance, it brings their equilibrium crashing down and the couple that can’t agree which way is up must find a way to put their marriage back together. Maggie Simpson in “The Longest Daycare,” a 5-minute film about Maggie Simpson spending a day at the Ayn Rand Day-

JOFFREY BALLET

care Center where she is diagnosed at an average intelligence level. She longs to be grouped with the gifted children. “Paperman” tells the story of a lonely young man in New York City whose destiny takes an unexpected turn after a chance meeting with a beautiful woman on his morning commute. He’s convinced the girl of his dreams is gone forever until he spots her in a skyscraper window across from his office. He has only his heart, his imagination and a stack of papers to get her attention. “Fresh Guacamole” is a 2-minute film showing how to transform familiar objects into, you guessed it, fresh guacamole.

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34 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 15, 2013

“Open Heart” is the story of eight Rwandan children who have to leave their families to embark on a life-or-death journey seeking high-risk heart surgery in Sudan. Rwanda’s lone government cardiologist must convince the Sudanese government to keep Africa’s only link to life-saving cardiac surgery free of charge for the people who need it. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

“Adam and Doc” is a story about the dog of Eden and what happened in those first days of creation that made man and dog so inseparable.

SO YOU KNOW

In addition, three award-winning films other than the Oscar nominees will be shown: “Abiogenesis,” “Dripped” and “The Gruffalo’s Child.”

WHEN:

SATURDAY’S FILMS ARE:

“Intense and breathtaking”

“Redemption” follows a growing army of New Yorkers whose treasures are in the trash. They are poor but proud people who don’t ask for a handout but who rake through the discards of other people’s lives to build their own one nickel at a time.

“Kings Point,” the stories of five seniors living in a typical American retirement resort – men and women who came to Florida decades ago with their spouses and health intact and now find themselves grappling with love, loss and the desire for human connection. The film looks at the dynamic tension between living and aging, the desire for independence and need for community. “Mondays at Racine” is a film about a Long Island hair salon that offers once-a-month free beauty services for women undergoing chemotherapy. The film is the story of what hair means in our culture that unfolds into a look at woman“Head Over hood, marriage Heels” and survival.

WHAT: Oscar Shorts Film Festival WHERE: Peace Center THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 7 P.M. Live-action nominees: “Asad,” “Buzkashi Boys,” “Curfew,” “Death of a Shadow (Dood van een Schaduw),” and “Henry.” FRIDAY, FEB. 22, 7 P.M. Animation nominees: “Adam and Dog,” “Fresh Guacamole,” “Head Over Heels,” Maggie Simpson in “The Longest Daycare,” “Paperman.” SATURDAY, FEB. 23, 3 P.M. Documentary nominees: “Inocente,” “Kings Point,” “Mondays at Racine,” “Open Heart” and “Redemption.”

TICKETS: $10 for each series INFORMATION: 864-467-3000


JOURNAL CULTURE

Strength in vulnerability

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Being vulnerable should not be equated to being weak, says Brene Brown, a University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work research professor turned YouTube Brown sensation. In fact, she says, vulnerability can become a tool for success. “It is necessary,” she said in a TED talk viewed by millions of people on YouTube. “Vulnerability is the willingness to say ‘I love you’ first, the willingness to do something when there are no guarantees.” Brown will be in Greenville on Feb. 22 and 23 as one of the two speakers at Furman University’s Engaging Faith 2013 Conference. The second is Yvette Flunder, a preacher, educator, conference speaker and singer who in 1991 founded the City of Refuge United Church of Christ, a thriving inner- Flunder city congregation in San Francisco uniting gospel and social ministries. She spoke at last year’s conference. The annual conference welcomes speakers from diverse perspectives who encourage attendees in their spiritual journeys and challenge them to examine the intersections of faith, life and vocation. This year’s theme is “The Gifts of Imperfection and Inclusion.” Brown has spent the past decade studying vulnerability, courage, worthiness and shame. Her research led her to develop a concept she calls “wholeheartedness.” “The bottom line is that our capacity

to be wholehearted can never be greater than our willingness to be brokenhearted,” she said in an interview with Redbook magazine. “It’s okay if you get crushed sometimes, because you’ll be growing and will be getting closer to the place where you want to be. The outcome of a life spent performing, pleasing and perfecting is resentment, grief, judgment and anger. Being vulnerable is about saying ‘I love you’ first, risking heartbreak, and being all in.” When society loses its tolerance for vulnerability, it loses the courage to be joyful, Brown told “Spirituality and Health” magazine. During her TED talk on vulnerability, Brown said many times people don’t appreciate the joy that a new job or a new love may bring. Instead, they think about what can go wrong. “Disappointment as a lifestyle is easier to live than experiencing disappointment in our lives,” she said. But living like that is like a low-grade fever – it probably won’t kill us, but it makes us feel awful, Brown said. “Connection is why we’re here. Connection is what gives meaning to our lives,” she said. “In order for connection, we need to be seen, really seen.” To register online for Engaging Faith, go to engagingfaith.eventbrite.com.

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SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Engaging Faith 2013 Conference “The Gifts of Imperfection and Inclusion” WHERE: Daniel Memorial Chapel Furman University WHEN: Feb. 22 and 23 WHO: Open to church members, laity, social workers, health care professionals, ministers and community members COST: $135-$160 INFORMATION: Susan Bennett in the Chaplain’s office at 864-294-2133 or susan.bennett@furman.edu. For questions about contact hours or CEU credits for LPC/LMFT/LMSW/LISW, please contact SCSCSW president Jennifer Massey at jmassey@stillwindministries.org. TO REGISTER: engagingfaith.eventbrite.com BROWN’S TED TALKS: ted.com/speakers/brene_brown.html

BEFORES & AFTERS Whether rescuing artworks from devastating floods and fires or from the ravages of time spent in a hot attic or damp basement, noted paper conservator Christine Young restores family heirlooms as well as museum treasures. Don’t miss this fascinating presentation on the art and science of paper conservation. February 17 Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 admission free gcma.org

FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL CULTURE

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 2/16, BI-LO CENTER

Kid Rock Rap-rock superstar. Tickets $30-$89. Call 864-241-3800 or visit bilocenter.com. 2/23, GROUND ZERO

Mushroomhead Eight-piece horror-heavy metal outfit. Call 864-948-1661 2/23, PEACE CENTER

Kodo Drummers Japanese taiko drumming ensemble. Tickets $35-$45. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 2/24, PEACE CENTER

Joshua Bell Classical music superstar. Tickets $45-$75. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 2 / 2 8 , B R O W N S T. C L U B

Mark Dye Trio Bassist for The Work brings the jazz. Call 864-250-9193 or visit brownstreetclub.com. 3/2, THE HANDLEBAR

Of Montreal Multi-genre electronica collective. Tickets $19 in advance, $21 day of show. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 3/7, THE HANDLEBAR

Chris Duarte Brilliant blues guitarist. Tickets $14. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 3/8, GOTTROCKS

Lionz Of Zion Cool reggae grooves. Call 864-235-5519. 3/13, THE HANDLEBAR

Hinder Multi-platinum hard rock. Tickets $26. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 3/19, PEACE CENTER

Matchbox 20 Multi-platinum rock band reunites. Tickets $65-$85. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org.

36 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 15, 2013


sound check with vincent harris

journal culture

FREE PREMIERE FILM SCREENING

Sisters of SHEL steer far from the mainstream

Upstate Film Society presents the Premiere of

“AMOUR”

Golden Globe winner for Best Foreign Film Academy Award Nominee for Best Film

Friday, February 15th at 7:25 PM SHARP Regal Cherrydale Cinemas

UPSTATE

www.upstatefilm.com upstatefilmsociety@gmail.com

FILM

SOCIETY

J23

When the average music fan hears that SHEL, a Fort Collins, Colo., quartet that is playing The Handlebar on Feb. 22, is a band of sisters who harmonize, play their own acoustic instruments and write their own songs, comparisons to the Dixie Chicks might spring to mind. But SHEL, which stands for Sarah, Hannah, Eva and Liza, the Holbrook sisters, are about as far from mainstream country as you can get. These classically trained musicians can play rings around the average ensemble, spinning webs of mandolin, violin, piano and percussion through a variety of genres, including a mesmerizing cover of Led Zeppelin’s “The Battle of Evermore.” The Holbrook sisters first appeared on the stage backing their singer-songwriter father, Andrew Holbrook.  They formed SHEL in  2005,  playing and writing all of their own music and working alongside Grammy-winning producer Brent Maher. The band has toured nationwide, played  the South by Southwest and Lilith Fair festivals, and had one of their songs featured in a Glade commercial. I spoke with singer, Who: SHEL mandolin player and songwriter Eva Where: The Handlebar, 304 E. Stone Ave., Holbrook. Greenville Q: When you decided to form your When: Feb. 22, 8:30 p.m. own group, was there any hesitation? Did your time playing together make it Tickets: $8 easier? Info: handlebar-online.com or 864-233-6173 I guess it didn’t feel so much like a decision as it did a natural progression. We grew up backing up our dad, and as we all grew in musicianship, we began composing instrumental pieces that we would perform together, just the four of us. When we began to show an interest in songwriting and singing, we had the perfect platform to test our work. But we were all players long before we were ever interested in singing. Q: With a sound like SHEL’s, how important is good production, and how important was it for the group to be part of the production process? Brent Maher is a brilliant guy and really has a knack for creating an open creative platform. He’s challenged us and educated us with new ideas and really encouraged us to incorporate more harmonies in our work. We knew he shared our vision. We’re 100 percent involved in all the production on our albums because the entire goal of each record is to do our best to capture the magic that happens live. Brent understands this. Q: What attracted you to “Battle of Evermore?” Probably a combination of our fascination with Zeppelin and J.R.R. Tolkien. We had been considering covering it for a while, but after fans constantly began recommending it, we decided it was time. Q: What are some pros and cons of playing in a band with people you’ve literally been with all your life? The biggest pro is the improvement our family relationship has undergone. We rely on one another to bring in the bread and butter. You can’t go on stage and give your fans everything you’ve got when you have unresolved anger, so we don’t perform that way. We’re all extremely proud of one another and we’ve been working together for a long time to create a platform where everyone has the opportunity to shine. If there are any cons, I don’t think we’ve encountered them yet. Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

Free tickets available in the lobby at 7pm on first come, first served basis. FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | The Journal 37


JOURNAL CULTURE

Southern Modern Charm, Hospitality

Plan your next event at Greenville’s premier downtown hotel located in the new shopping, dining and entertainment hub at NOMA Square. With over 35,000 square feet of flexible meeting and event space, in-house audio visual expert and a new dedicated meeting planners lounge, we are well-equipped to partner with you to make your next meeting a success. Call us at 864-235-1234 to set up a tour. • Newly reinvented atrium with artisan chandelier • 330 spacious guest rooms and suites • ROOST, a new soil-to-city restaurant featuring local, seasonal cuisine • 15,000 sq. ft. Regency Ballroom, the Upstate’s largest hotel ballroom • Innovative and modern meeting spaces, including a business Think Tank, Studio 220, high tech Boardroom, and The Pergola @ ROOST

220 Main Street, Greenville, SC

(864) 235 1234

Greenville.Hyatt.com

The Place to Be. nomasquare.com

38 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 15, 2013


journal culture

scene. here.

don’t

the week in the local arts world

The Young Artist Orchestra and The Philharmonic Concert entitled “From Distant Lands” will be at the Peace Center on Feb. 16 at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $15 for adults, $8 for students and children.

reflected in their selection of furniture. It is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and on Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Tickets are $4 for adults, $3 for senior citizens and veterans, and $2 ages 6-17. For more information, call 542-ARTS.

Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg will host a reception and award program for the monthlong non-juried competition Artists’ Guild Member Awards Show Feb. 28, 6-9 p.m. in the Guild Gallery at Chapman Cultural Center. Guild members will have exhibited one art piece each during the month of February, and the public will have voted on their favorite pieces. For more information, please call 764-9568.

The North Greenville University theatre department will present “The Tempest,” directed by Corrie Danieley, Feb. 2123 and Feb. 28-Mar. 2 at 7:30 p.m. on the NGU campus in the Billingsley Theatre. Tickets are $8 adults and $5 students, available online at theatre.ngu.edu or by calling 864-977-7085. Email theatre@ngu.edu for more information.

miss a beat!

Feb. 23, 8:00pm

Nationally acclaimed artist and instructor Tony van Hasselt will be giving a watercolor workshop Feb. 18-20, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at Trinity United Methodist Church, 2703 Augusta St., Greenville. Watercolor will be the main instruction, but acrylic may also be used. Cost is $250. For more information and registration, contact Jean Earle at 864-232-3084. USC Upstate students Meghan Ford and Katie Garland are presenting their first public art exhibit at the West Main Artists Co-op in Spartanburg, Feb. 17-Mar. 16. The exhibition is open to the public and consists of works that were created during their WMAC Fellowship in the summer of 2012. On display will be various art media including painting, photography and mixed-media works. The opening reception will be on Feb. 21 from 6-8 pm, during Spartanburg’s Art Walk. The exhibit is also open during WMAC’s regular hours on Thursdays and Fridays, 3-6 p.m., and on Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., or by appointment. West Main Artists Co-op is located at 578 W. Main St., Spartanburg. For more information, call 864-8046501 or visit westmainartists.org. Spartanburg Art Museum spring term art classes begin Feb. 18. For a complete listing of all offerings, visit spartanburgartmuseum.org. For more information, call 542-ARTS. The Reserve at Lake Keowee Community Foundation recently announced its 2013 concert lineup. On Feb. 22 at 7 p.m., the Poinsett Piano Trio will perform at the Reserve at Lake Keowee. Admission is free. To RSVP, contact Kathryn Gravely at 864-481-4010 or kgravely@reservekeowee.com. Brenda Leonard and Ben Smith will perform a cello duo at Music Sandwiched In, Feb. 27, 12:15-1 p.m. at Spartanburg’s main library downtown. Bring your lunch or buy one there at this free live concert presented by The Music Foundation of Spartanburg. For more information, call 542-ARTS. Spartanburg Regional History Museum’s exhibit Southern Lifestyle Through Furniture, on display through March 2, examines how typical family lifestyles in Spartanburg were

Spartanburg Art Museum will host its fifth annual Art & Antique Show, a four-day-long affair, starting Feb. 21 and showcasing dealers from six states. In addition, the show will present guest expert speakers on southern architecture and the floral arts. The show will kick off on Feb. 21, with the Benefactor’s Gala, held in the tented plaza of the Chapman Cultural Center at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $150 per person. The show will open to the public on Feb. 22 at 10 a.m. One-day passes are $10 and weekend passes are $20. Tickets to hear guest speakers Susan Sully and Ralph Null are $5 each for each speaker and admission to the Low Country Sunday brunch is $25. The show will continue on Feb. 23, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Spartanburg Science Center will present Fun for Kids, an educational camp for children 5 and older, noon-3 p.m. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit spartanburgartmuseum.org or call 864-542-7616.

JOSHUA BELL

with pianist Sam Haywood Feb. 24, 3:00pm

KEITH LOCKHART

and the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra featuring Ann Hampton Callaway Feb. 26, 7:30pm

The Greenville Little Theatre will hold auditions for “Annie Get Your Gun” on Mar. 4 at 7 p.m. in Magill Hall. Roles are available for 17 men, 15 women, two young girls and one young boy (ages 7-12). Be prepared to sing a verse of a song (preferably from the show) and to perform a short dance routine. For more detailed information, visit greenvillelittletheatre.org or phone the box office Mon-Fri, at 864233-6238. BEST SEATS

ONLY AT

peacecenter.org BEST PRICES

864.467.3000 800.888.7768

Send us your arts announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com

FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | The Journal 39


journal culture

Arts Calendar Feb. 15-21

Furman University Orchestra Concerto Concert Feb. 15 ~ 294-2086 Fountain Inn Arts Center Barefoot in the Park Feb. 15-24 ~ 409-1050 Greer Children’s Theatre Grease: The School Version Feb. 15-24 ~ 848-5383 Metropolitan Arts Council Gallery Counterpoints: Form & Space Through Feb. 15 ~ 467-3132 Greenville County Youth Orchestra From Distant Lands Feb. 16 ~ 467-3000 Furman University Theatre Doubt Through Feb. 16 ~ 294-2125

13 Collins Ridge

A stunning departure from the ordinary! This charming brick home is a unique blend of traditional architecture and open interior living space. The Master Suite is on the Main level with a private sitting area overlooking pool and yard. The upstairs of the main house features 4 bedrooms, each with access to baths. Style, Quality and Elegance!

$1,100,000

MLS #1244549

2114 Cleveland Street

Nearly 6,400 SF home in Parkins Mill area with pool and TONS of features! Large windows let plenty of light in. Beautiful crown moldings, hardwood floors, recessed lighting, builtin speakers, and 2 laundry rooms. Huge Kitchen with oversized island and custom cabinets. Halogen cooktop with decorative hood. 2 Master suites – one upstairs, one on the main level.

$1,199,000

MLS #1224647

The Warehouse Theatre Eurydice Through Feb. 16 ~ 235-6948 Greenville Chorale Music for the Soul Feb. 17 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center Billy Elliott Through Feb. 17 ~ 467-3000 North Greenville University The Tempest Feb. 21-Mar. 2 ~ 977-7085 Peace Center Oscar-Nominated Short Films 2013 Feb. 21-23 ~ 467-3000

11 Brookside Way

243 Pine Forest Drive

9 Quail Hill

Greenville Country Club Area, 4 Beds/4 Baths–1.87 acres

Crescent Avenue Area, 4 Beds/4 Full and 3 Half Baths

Parkins Mill Area, 4 Beds/3.5 Baths – .84 acre

MLS #1250000

$849,000

MLS #1224647

$1,199,000

MLS #1245172

$599,500

Centre Stage Rock ‘n Roll Forever: ’80s Edition Through Feb. 23 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Here’s Your Freedom Through Feb. 24 ~ 271-7570 The Art of Helen Moseley Through Apr. 14 ~ 271-7570 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Lynn Greer & Liz Rundorff Smith Through Mar. 1 ~ 242-1050

61 Oak Crest Court Augusta Road Area, 4 Beds/3.5 Baths – Cul de sac

MLS #1246071

101 West Court Street

107 Brookside Way $475,000

Marshall Forest, 4 Beds/2.5 Baths – 1+ acre

MLS #1248792

$399,900

Downtown Greenville, 1 Bed/1 Bath – Built in 2005

MLS #1250959

Sharon Wilson · ABR, CRS, GRI 111 Williams Street · Greenville, SC 29601 sharonwilson.net · swilson@cbcaine.com · 864-918-1140 40 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 15, 2013

$249,500

Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Georgia Harrison Through Mar. 4 ~ 233-6733


JOURNAL HOMES F E AT U R E D H O M E S & N E I G H B O R H O O D S | O P E N H O U S E S | P R O P E R T Y T R A N S F E R S

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

Cottages at Chanticleer, Augusta Road Area, Greenville New construction on the lot of your choice within The Cottages of Chanticleer, a sidewalk lined, gated-community section in the prestigious, traditional neighborhood of Chanticleer. An ideal location for a golf cart ride to the fabulous Chanticleer Golf Course or a few minutes drive to the activities of Downtown Greenville (Peace Center, BI-LO Center, Augusta Shopping, Dining), I-85, and Greenville Hospital’s Medical Campus.

traditional craftsman architecture with modern luxuries and green technologies. Living areas are spacious and open with inviting master suites on the main level. Modern luxuries include hardwood floors, gas fireplaces, gourmet kitchens with custom cabinets, granite counter tops, and Energy Star appliances. Don’t miss this opportunity to become involved in the design of your very own newly constructed home in the convenient and established Augusta Road area.

The outstanding Highland homes will combine More photos, info and over 1,900 neighborhoods online at

HOME INFO Lots priced in the low $100’s. Completed with nicely finished homes in the low $400’s. Contact: Patrick Franzen 864.250.1234 patrickfranzen@msn.com Highland Homes 864.33.4175 www.highlandhomessc.com Send us your Featured Home for consideration: homes@greenvillejournal.com

HOTTEST NEIGHBORHOODS and everything you want to know about them SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 41


F E A T U R E D OPEN

S U N D AY,

O P E N

FEBRUARY

17

H O U S E

FROM

2–4PM

2 V a l l e y D a l e L a n e , Ta y l o r s Gorgeous property in popular location that provides solitude but is also close to everything, (downtown Greenville, shopping, airport, etc). Large cul-de-sac lot with a wrap-around porch and private fenced backyard. Outdoor living at it’s best with a pool, huge deck, covered porch, and large green space. Stunning mountain views during the fall and winter months! Interior layout is perfect for families with live-in parents or an older child who needs their own space. The main level includes a large family room, (w/gas log fireplace), huge gourmet kitchen, (w/granite counters and tile backsplash), and large master suite (his & her closets) and master bath, (jetted tub, his & her vanities). Also on the main level is the adjoining “in-law/guest” quarters which is handicap accessible and includes a living area, bedroom, full bath, kitchen and washer/dryer. Upstairs has 3 additional large bedrooms, full bath, loft, and huge media/rec room. Three HVAC units, 2 water heaters, 2 separate phone lines, central vacuum, and beautiful landscaped lot with full irrigation system. It even includes a 52’x11’ carport for your extra vehicles, boat, or RV. There is also a tall crawl space (cement floored) for additional storage. HOME INFO Immaculate and move-in ready!

Price: $284,900 | MLS#1248670 5 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, 3400-3599SF Mountain View Elementary Blue Ridge Middle Blue Ridge High Contact: Steve May 864.346.2570 Prudential C. Dan Joyner, Co.

OPEN THIS WEEKEND OPEN CLAREMONT

SUN 2-4PM (2/17)

THISTLEDOWN

SUN 2-4PM (2/17)

S U N D AY, SHADOWOOD

FEBRUARY SUN 2-4PM (2/17)

17

COLONY

FROM

2-4

SUN 2-4PM (2/17)

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA SUN 2-4PM (2/17)

102 GROVE RD - $279,000 4BR/3.5BA. Beautifully renovated brick bungalow home. Hardwood floors throughout, granite coutertops & much more. Augusta Circle, Hughes and Greenville High Schools. Augusta Rd to Grove Rd, 3rd home on Right. Ashley R. Behlke, 915-0253 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1251251

523 CHAMBLEE BLVD - $769,000 4BR/4BA. Beautiful home under construction in gated community. MBR and 2nd BR + Study on main. Upstairs-2BR/2BA + Bonus. 385 S to Roper Mtn exit, L off ramp, go 5 miles to Right into SD on Chamblee Blvd. Margaret Marcum/Leigh Irwin, 4203125/380-7755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252608

19 THISTLE BROOK CT - $529,000 3BR/3.5BA. Energy Star hm in gated community. Bonus room, unfished basement, MBR on main, 2 car garage, dream kitchen w/double ovens. I-385 S to Roper Mountain Rd Exit, Left off ramp, go 1 mile to Left into SD. Leigh Irwin, 380-7755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252171

4 SHADOW POINT COURT - $301,500 3BR/2.5BA. OPEN SUNDAY!! Brick Home with 3/bed.2 ba./2 half ba. With Bonus Rm on cul-de-sac in heart of Simpsonville. New Kitchen/Paint/Windows. Screened in porch overlooking landscaped backyard! Karen Lawton, 444-7004 Keller Williams Upstate MLS#1244619

2 VALLEY DALE LANE - $284,900 5BR/3.5BA. Gorgeous home w/mtn views. Adjoining Guest Quarters. Priced$20K below appraisal. Hwy 29 to St Mark, Left on Locus Hill, Right on Colony Rd, Right on Philmar, Left on Valley Hill Ln Steve May, 346-2570 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1248670

TUCKER BRANCH

TUCKER BRANCH

EAGLEWATCH

SUMMER WOODS

SUN 2-4PM (2/17)

SUN 2-4PM (2/17)

SUN 2-4PM (2/17)

PM ROBINSON ESTATE

SUN 2-4PM (2/17)

14 CRUSOE COVE - $265,000 4BR/2BA. Gorgeous custom home only 5 miuutes from Lake Robinson. Wonderful features. Wade Hampton to L on Hwy 290, R on Hwy 101, go approx 4.7 miles to L on Mays Bridge, R on Pennington, L on Poole, R on Cruso Scott Holtzclaw, 884-6783 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1244392

SUN 2-4PM (2/17)

BEFORE YOU BUY OR SELL, DO YOUR 5 BRIERFIELD WAY - $259,900 3BR/2.5BA. Energy Style qualified superior quality home. Hdwds, 9 ft clgs, deep crown mldgs, scrnd prch.385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go approx 1/2 mile- turn L. R at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile - turn L into SD Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady, 363-3634 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1250930

33 DONEMERE WAY - $199,900 3BR/2.5BA. Craftsman style, Energy Star home. Upgradees & advanced technology. 385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go apprx. 1/2 mile and turn Left. Turn Right at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile & turn Left into SD Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady, 363-3634/9087200 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1249245

42 T H E J O U R N A L | FEBRUARY 15, 2013

4 FLANNERY CT - $134,900 3BR/2BA. This sweet house is move-in ready w/beautiful paint, new deck, updated kitchen and more! 385 S. to Harrison Bridge Rd Exit, L on Harrison Bridge, R on Main/417, R on Putman, L into SD on Flannery Carolyn Laws-Irwin, 451-9407 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1253028

709 SUMMER WOODS DR - $90,900 2BR/2.5BA. Large LR w.fp, eat-in kitchen, patio that backs to private wooded areas. 385 South to Exit 34, Right on E. Butler Rd, Approx 1.5 miles to SD, 2nd entrance. Property on Left. Jean Keenan, 380-2331 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1248634

HOMEWORK SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


F E A T U R E D PREMIER

PROPERTIES

H O M E

C U R R E N T LY

ON

THE

MARKET

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

Water Oak Home 507 Townes Street, Downtown Greenville The construction features Energy Star and Earth Craft certifications that creates an energy efficient home plus a SUPER quiet home environment. Guaranteed utility costs include gas and electric not to exceed a total of $100 per month or $1200 for the first 12 months of ownership. This guarantee is for the first year only to show the new owner we are serious about the efficiency in the energy costs for the homes at Craftsman Court. This is amazing downtown new construction designed by award winning Arts and Crafts designer, Trey Cole,

with the detailing of the sought after charming bungalows of the Arts and Crafts era. This is the BEST alternative to the downtown condo. It is only a few blocks from Main Street and on the trolley route, with an abundance of natural light, often an objection from downtown condo owners, no one living above or on either side.

Send us your Featured Home for consideration: homes@greenvillejournal.com

ON THE MARKET C U R R E N T LY

ON

THE

Price: $419,000 | MLS# 1251732 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, 2400-2599 SF Stone Academy League Academy Greenville High Academy Contact: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 The Marchant Company

More photos, info and over 1,900 neighborhoods online at

HOMES

HOME INFO

R EA L E STAT E D I G E ST

MARKET

PEOPLE,

AWARDS,

HONORS

Thomason Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® February 5, 2013 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Will Thomason has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Pleasantburg office. $299,000

3BR/3BA $219,747

FOUNTAIN INN A beautiful farm house located on a corner lot with tons of yard space for gardening, pets and children to run & play! The updates include: stainless appliances in 2010, roof in ‘02, HVAC 5 ton in ‘09. Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 MLS#1250471

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

4BR/3BA

MOUNT VERNON ESTATES 4/3 Ranch with 3 car garage located in upscale Mt. Vernon Estates; just minutes from town, GSP airport, dining & shops! Home offers a split floor plan with a master suite fit for a King! Must See! Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 MLS#1210344

A North Carolina native, Thomason graduated from Hickory High School and earned his degree at Elon University in Elon. Following college, he gained 20 years of experience working in plumbing, mechanical and HVAC sales.

“We are excited to have Will join our family of Realtors,” said Jeremy Wood, Broker-in-Charge. “We look forward to working with him.” Thomason currently lives on the Eastside with his wife and two children. He is a member of First Presbyterian Church and a Cub Scout Leader. Thomason

FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 43


Let me help you today!

The Marchant Company salutes our

2012 AWA R D W IN N E RS

Kathy Slayter

Unit Listing Agent of the Year Volume Sales Agent of the Year Unit Sales Agent of the Year

Tom Marchant Volume Listing Agent of the Year

Valerie Miller

Highest Avg Listing Price Agent of the Yr. Highest Avg Sales Price Agent of the Yr. Signature Agent of the Year

Nancy McCrory & Karen Turpin Top Sales Team of the Year

The following are recognized for their commitment and years of service with the Marchant Company:

C

N OU

Y

TR

B CLU

. EST Right to Left: Gordon D. Seay – 20 years; Kathy Slayter – 20 years; Brian Marchant – 17 years; Nancy McCrory – 16 years; Karen Turpin – 16 years; Joan Rapp – 16 years; Barb Riggs – 16 years; Lisa McDowell – 16 years; and Nellie Wagoner – 10 years

Celebrating our 20th Anniversary in the Upstate marchantco.com | 864-467-0085 100 W Stone Avenue, Greenville

34 Rollingreen Rd | $135,000

3BR/2BA one owner home on a huge lot in great neighborhood! MLS#1249202

G AU

N E I G H B O R H O O D

D OA

GRESHAM

R STA

U

P R O F I L E

PARK

8 Cammer | $165,000

2BR/1.5BA, adorable Augusta Road cottage with updates. MLS#1236852

G LLIN

RO

G RE

EN

L VIL

AGE

206 S.Woodgreen | $85,000

Health & Wellness Center - just opened. Special on initiation fees thru Jan. MLS#1247769

864.616.3685

sreid@cbcaine.com

C23R

SUSAN REID

Gresham Park, Simpsonville, SC Enjoy a truly one level living with yard maintenance included at Gresham Park! This charming, peaceful neighborhood features lovely singlefamily homes with fully maintained yards, so you’re free to lounge by the community pool or gather with friends and neighbors at the community clubhouse. You’ll also appreciate being conveniently located just

44 T H E J O U R N A L | FEBRUARY 15, 2013

minutes to the Five Forks area’s many shops, restaurants, entertainment and medical facilities. New homes range from the $170s to $290s and are ENERGY STAR® Certified. The final phase has been released. Don’t miss your final opportunity to live in Gresham Park! The decorated model is at 2 Carter Run Ct. is open daily. For more information, call (864) 676-0158 or visit www.ryanhomes.com.

R EA L E STAT E DIGEST Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® Announces Top Producer Office Awards for December January 29, 2013 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce the following Top Producer awards for the month of December 2012. Top Producers for Listings: · Anderson Office – Nancy Lamar and The Clever People · Easley/Powdersville Office – Linda Ballard and Sheri Sanders Team · Garlington Road Office – David Hartness and Donna O. Smith & Partners · Greer Office – Paige Haney and Jan Walker Team · Pelham Road Office – Dana Mathewes and Spaulding Group · Pleasantburg Office – Mike Wallace and The Chet and Beth Smith Group · Simpsonville Office – Diane Shapuite and Sandra Palmer/Carl Jones Team Top Producers for Sales: · Anderson Office –Nancy Lamar and The Clever People · Easley/Powdersville Office – Pat Grissinger and Sheri Sanders Team · Garlington Road Office – Carole Weinstock and Donna O. Smith & Partners · Greer Office – Paige Haney and Jan Walker Team · Pelham Road Office – Beth French and Spaulding Group · Pleasantburg Office – Bob Morgan and The Chet & Beth Smith Group · Simpsonville Office – Susan McMillan and Sandra Palmer/Carl Jones Team Top Producers Overall · Garlington Road Office – Sheila Smalley and Donna O. Smith & Partners · Greer Office – Paige Haney and Jan Walker Team · Pleasantburg Office – Bob Morgan and Chet and Beth Smith Group · Simpsonville Office – Susan McMillen and Sandra Palmer/Carl Jones Team SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


Celebrating Success For 80 years, Coldwell Banker Caine sales associates have taken Upstate Real Estate personally. Each year the Coldwell Banker network awards its top producing agents in the form of society recognition. Societies are calculated based on the years’ national production numbers. Join us as we celebrate the Coldwell Banker Caine agents across the Upstate who achieved a society ranking in 2012.

Sharon Wilson President’s Elite

Jacob Mann President’s Elite

Pat Loftis President’s Elite

Lori Thompson President’s Elite

Helen Hagood President’s Circle

Nick Carlson President’s Circle

Donna Morrow President’s Circle

Francie Little Diamond

Susan Reid Diamond

Faith Ross Diamond

Susan Gallion Diamond

Carolyn Dowling Diamond

Annette Starnes Diamond

Kathy Harris Diamond

Jake Dickens Diamond

Charlene Panek Diamond

Carol Walsh Diamond

Heather Parlier Diamond

Susan McCoy Diamond

Jennifer Wilson Sterling

Berry Gower Sterling

Beth Beach Sterling

Judy McCravy Sterling

Virginia Abrams Sterling

Pam Walker Sterling

Lisa Humphreys Suzanne Freeman Sterling Sterling

Trish Hollon Sterling

Lorraine Gibson Sterling

Sharon Tootell Sterling

Holly West Sterling

Sherry Sponseller Sterling

Linda Wood Sterling

Shelbie Dunn Sterling

Rhonda Porter Sterling

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE • PROPERTY MANAGEMENT • RELOCATION • REAL ESTATE GALLERIES • DEVELOPMENT SERVICES • MORTGAGE • CONCIERGE SERVICES

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 45


GREENVILLE TRANSACTIONS JANUARY SUBD.

PRICE

$979,749 REGENCY COMMONS $725,000 NORTHGATE $584,000 $550,000 CLIFFS VALLEY STONE CREEK $527,260 THE PRESERVE AT PARKINS MILL $483,250 ASHETON $472,740 CHEROKEE PARK $390,000 $375,000 COVE AT BUTLER SPRINGS $341,400 $337,000 $284,292 BATESVILLE RIDGE $275,000 THORNBROOKE $265,000 BATTERY POINT $259,208 LAKEVIEW FARMS $255,000 SUNSET HILLS $255,000 KELSEY GLEN $253,451 GOWER ESTATES $248,000 100 COURT ST CONDO $240,000 GLASSY MOUNTAIN $235,000 HERITAGE COVE $235,000 SUGAR CREEK $235,000 $224,900 BOULDER CREEK $223,000 THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD $220,260 PELHAM ESTATES $215,000 KELSEY GLEN $212,724 TWIN CREEKS $205,900 THE CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK $198,209 $194,000 REMINGTON $189,757 KELSEY GLEN $185,205 WOODFIELD ESTATES $184,000 RUSSTON PLACE $177,500 CHANDLER RIDGE $173,000 TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD $170,484 DEVENGER WOODS $168,500 FORRESTER WOODS $168,000 HAWTHORNE RIDGE $168,000 ANSLEY CROSSING $162,000 SUMMERFIELD $158,750 WEST FARM $152,000 NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS $146,500 HAWTHORNE RIDGE $143,500 WATERMILL $142,350 FOXDALE $135,000 SHELBURNE FARMS $129,000 CANTERBURY HILLS $127,000 $125,000 $125,000 INGLESIDE CONDO $120,000 PARKINS GROVE $119,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $117,704 $115,000 $110,000 REEDY FALLS $101,681 $100,000 WESTWOOD $95,000 WOODWIND TOWNHOUSES $89,500 CLIFFS AT GLASSY EAST $85,000 ALLEGHENY $79,900 CLEAR SPRINGS $78,000 WOODSIDE MILLS $75,000 CHESTERFIELD ESTATES $72,270 COVE AT BUTLER SPRINGS $70,300 GOLDEN GROVE ESTATES $62,500 THE PRESERVE AT MOUNTAIN CREEK $62,500 HIGHLAND $60,000 $60,000 $60,000 SHERWOOD FOREST $56,600 RIVERBEND $56,000 ALLEGHENY $55,900 WOODFIELDS $50,000 ABNEY MILLS $47,309 VICTOR MONAGHAN $45,000 GREER MILL VILLAGE $40,000 DUNEAN MILLS $40,000 $39,000 CITY PLACE TOWNHOMES $38,000 HOLLINGTON $38,000 LEE EAST $36,500 $36,380 UNION BLEACHERY $35,100 BOULDER CREEK $34,000 $33,500

21-25,

S PA RTA N B U RG T R A N SAC T I O N S

2013

SEPTEMBER

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

CONVENIENCE & PETROLEUM RAM HOLDINGS LLC COLWELL HEIDI E BRASHIER T WALTER REVOC CLIFFS AT GLASSY INC SUMMERS HEATHER N LYLES OBY G SMITH GEORGE M JR SHULL MARY PORTER RED CLAY INVESTORS LLC UNDERWOOD CHARLES N W K BROWN LAND MERCK HUBERT W PHETLUANGSY KHARN SAVATH SIPE RICK B DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC HUNTER MARGARET MCLEOD NVR INC WILLIAMS BROOKE EUBANKS MYERS BRETT T HENIGE GERALD L MASON JEFFREY P COATS SIDNEY O (EST) GOLDSMITH ALISHA BETHANN DEGUMBIA MATTHEW J (IRA) RELIANT SC LLC SELF LARRY WAYNE NVR INC HUSHEN ARTHUR S HILL MELISSA A CITIMORTGAGE INC D R HORTON INC NVR INC JOHNSTON DONNA BOLT BRITTNEY K DORRITY DAVID L BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC ASHMORE ANNE GILLESPIE GARY MARK A-1 PROPERTIES LLC WINDSOR/AUGHTRY COMPANY NATIONAL RESIDENTIAL NOM HOWARD DRIVE PROPERTIES SECRETARY OF VETERANS AF SERRUS REAL ESTATE FUND EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL KIRKLAND AARON J WILLIAMS SCOTT ANDREW HALDAMAN CORT A ANDERSON CRYSTAL H HYDER JEFFREY SCOTT AMERICAN WIPING CLOTH CO MTGLQ INVESTORS LP SK BUILDERS INC PACE CANDACE LACY CANSLER PENELOPE MARTIN RASHIDA T BISHOP LUCILLE B BLALOCK MEGAN CHEYENNE BALLARD NORMA D FISHER JEFFREY H RED CLAY INVESTORS LLC KOJA LLC PALMETTO HERITAGE PROPER JPMORGAN CHASE BANK NATI BUTLER COVE LLC FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG LUSK R MICHAEL LANE SHERRIE W SALAZAR CHRISTIAN SUNTRUST BANK LUTHI PERRY S ALLEGHENY LLC MCGEE JEANNIE DIANNE W KEITH SANDRA L MASSEY BECKY MARAVILLA ISAIAS ADAMS JUNIE FAY HOLMES MEMORIAL TABERNAC HSI ASC TRUST 2006-WMC1 BK RESIDENTIAL VENTURES FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG KEY DANIEL B FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG MIDLAND INCORPORATED CROOK KENNETH L

SPINKS INVESTMENTS INC SCBT BLAINE JOHN W (JTWROS) ICU PROPERTIES LLC BANK OF NORTH CAROLINA STONE FINANCING LLC LEETE DAVID C (JTWROS) COLLINS WANDA H HODGES CRAIG S DREWES ADAM P (JTWROS) GREGORY STEPHENS (JTWROS JORDAN JOHN W III IRREVO ZUZOLO JERROLD J (JTWROS MCLEOD JOHN D NOLAN BRUCE C (JTWROS) SOSA HOPE (JTWROS) HUNTER SAMUEL MARVIN III CIORCIARI ANTHONY REESE ANNA H (JTWROS) VAUGHAN JENNIFER L GOLAN EELIN C ATHANS CHRISTY P (JTWROS DIGIACOMO KARAN C TREVARTHEN TRUDY M VON MARTYNOW CATHERIN E ELWASILA NAZAR WALDREP RICHARD A PITZ DINORA REES ROBERT WELLS FARGO BANK N A BRADBERRY JAMES MONTALVO CHRISTIAM W NEWBILL ROBERT N III CROCKER KATHRYN E BATEMAN KENDALL R (JTWRO CERVO MARISA BERNADETE G DIBICCARI MARIA V DAVIS THELMA L PATRICK FLOYD III RUMER DANA B KERNS MARY A (JTWROS) MAXWELL ANGELA D MUNGO HOMES INC NANCE LINDA J GLIDER FAMILY REVOCABLE HAILSTOCK ASHLEY N BARROW THERESA M FRANCIS ELISE HEISHMAN CHERIE (JTWROS) FAIRWAY INVESTMENTS LLC UNDERWOOD CHARLES NEAL LAVIGNE KRISTI ANN BECERRA RICARDO VAVRO DEBORAH MARIE SILZELL ENDHANG PUJI PANCOAST SCOTT SOUTH CAROLINA STATE HOU BISHOP TONY M (JTWROS) SZARAWARSKI JOHN SOLTYSHAK DIANE C DYE J MARSHALL JR GILBERT JOHN L (JTWORS) BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HAMILTON KELLI R PRIDDY JUDY M COLVIN CHRISTOPHER E (JT KELLETT DARRELL YAQOOB ZAID JOSEPH RIVERA MARITZA SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND MTG FINANCE LLC 16 SIR ABBOTT LAND TRUST HUNT VIRGINIA ANNE HEIM LINDA SUSAN EUGENE ALBERT (JTWROS) MIDFIRST BANK ALEXANDER LEE F SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND NOVAK PETER SHAW RESOURCES INC HUANG CUNFANG BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT WILLIAMS JESSE A LAKE COUNTY MORTG LOAN T OPTIMA PROPERTIES LLC SPAULDING QUALITY HOMES NISKANEN DEAN C (JTWROS)

1414 E WASHINGTON ST 200 E BROAD ST STE 200 1803 N MAIN ST 1585 SKYLYN DR 1999 HENDERSONVILLE RD 16260 N 71ST ST 309 RED FERN TRL 114 CONESTEE AVE 102 E AUGUSTA PL 22 WISCASSET WAY 492 N BARTON RD 2600 ONE COMMERCE SQ 320 WERRINGTON CT 220 SANDY RUN DR 116 BATTERY POINT CIR 36 LAKE FARM CT 4 SEMINOLE DR 8 VELMERE DR 28 HIALEAH RD 100 COURT ST APT 3-J 35 MARK SMITH DR 20 FOX CREEK CT 102 SILVER CREEK RD 175 RED TURNER RD 301 MELLOW WAY 30 COPPERDALE DR 17 CAPE CHARLES DR 16 VELMERE DR 901 LAURELWOOD WAY 1100 KINGHAM DR 8931 AUGUSTA RD 502 PLAMONDON DR 123 CHAPEL HILL LN 518 WOODHEIGHTS WAY 9 MILFORD CT 506 FRUITVILLE RD 502 JUBILEE WAY UNIT 18C 1119 DEVENGER RD 101 BURNING BUSH LN 209 HAWTHORNE CREEK DR 208 HEATHBURY CT 203 CATALAN ST 441 WESTERN LN 5 RED GATE CT 105 LOST LAKE DR 204 PORTLAND FALLS DR 4 WICKBY CT 338 HIGHGATE CIR 100 CAMELBACK RD 2323 LAURENS RD PO BOX 209 223 INGLESIDE WAY 9 RIVER PARK LN 621 CHARTWELL DR 144 N LAKESIDE DR NW PO BOX 2651 300-C OUTLET POINTE BLVD 2105 MOUNTAINSIDE RD 112 ASPENWOOD DR 6 JASON WRIGHT DR 6 LITTLE BOTTOM RD 212 SOUTHERN WOODS DR PO BOX 1039 205 BEATTIE ST 6738 M CATMAN AVE 3 QUAIL MEADOW LN 3467 FORK SHOALS RD 89 BIRDSONG LN 15 N TEXAS AVE 4400 WILL ROGERS PKWY STE 300 314 S FRANKLIN ST 2ND FL 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD 925 CLEVELAND ST APT 19 18523 BEAR CREEK TER 9 WOODMONT LN 999 NW GRAND BLVD 4TH FLOOR 46 E 8TH ST 5250 77 CENTER DR STE 200 N/O/D PO BOX 5835 104 W SPINDLETREE WAY PO BOX 1039 4 LOVALLEY WAY 1400 TURBINE DR 4020 N 128TH ST 180 HENSON DR 125 CANEBRAKE DR

ECONO LODGE MARLBOROUGH ESTATES

46 T H E J O U R N A L | FEBRUARY 15, 2013

PRICE

$1,150,000 $485,000 $400,000 DILLARD CREEK CROSSING $375,000 PINEWOOD TRIANGLE $350,000 LINKS OTYRON $304,000 WOODRIDGE $255,000 SILVER HILL ESTATES $250,000 SHENANDOAH $242,304 CARLSHALTON BY THE BAY $220,000 MOSTELLER $218,400 MASONS CROSSING $186,500 TWIN LAKES $184,500 WEST FOREST $178,500 $175,000 WOODLAND FOREST $168,500 TOWNES AT ROCK SPRINGS $159,900 PIERCE ACRES $150,000 GLENLAKE $148,395 WILLIAMS VIEW $145,000 SWEETWATER HILLS $145,000 HOLCOMBE CREEK $135,600 ALEXANDER FARMS $134,000 HARVEST RIDGE $131,900 WOODLAND HEIGHTS $131,000 TYGER POINTE $129,900 PHILLIPS ESTATES $126,500 PEACH VALLEY INC FAIRWAY ESTATES $123,900 PEACHTREE ESTATES $123,000 $120,000 CANDLEWOOD $114,000 $100,000 CARROLLWOOD $100,000 OAKMONT ESTATES $94,900 PINECREST $93,000 NEW VICTOR HEIGHTS $89,000 SPRING LAKE $82,500 CAMELOT WEST $78,000 GRANDVIEW $76,000 LAURELWOOD $72,000 PEACHTREE ESTATES $70,000 OAK FOREST $69,904 INMAN MILLS $60,000 LAUREL HILL $56,900 REIDVILLE CROSSING $55,000 RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS $54,450 $54,392 CLEVELAND $54,244 RIVERSIDE HILLS $49,900 GREENWOOD $42,901 ALLEN ACRES $42,500 $40,500 SNOWMILL ACRES $40,021 $40,000 SUMMERHILL $39,900 ORCHARD LAKES $37,533 COOPER ESTATES $33,413 GLENLAKE $31,500 ALLENE COOLEY ESTATE $31,000 VICTOR MILL VILLAGE $30,300 LAMOTTE SHORES $30,000 BISHOP MEADOWS $30,000 $28,000 PERRY ACRES $26,500 SPARTAN MILLS VILLAGE $25,500 GREENWOOD $24,901 CORIE CREST $24,500 $20,888 MOUNTAIN VIEW ACRES $20,000 ABNEY MILLS $20,000 BROOKSIDE VILLAGE $19,899 WYNBROOK $18,500 WYNBROOK $18,500 WYNBROOK $18,500 WYNBROOK $18,500 BROOKSIDE VILLAGE $18,000 HILLCREST $16,500 SOUTH TYGER HILLS $16,000 PERRY ACRES $13,200 CROOKED CREEK $11,000 BROWNSTONE $11,000 $6,000 CROOKED CREEK $3,700 CRESCENT MILL $2,874 JOHN BURKE ESTATE $2,500 CONVERSE CIRCLE $2,500 MEADOWIND FARMS $1,600

SELLER

8-14,

2012

BUYER

V SQUARED LLC GIRIRAJ HOSPITALITY INC LYON JENNINGS, MICHAEL D C LINDA VISTA LLC COLONIAL FAMILY LTD PARTNERSHIP J T ENTERPRISES LLC VIRANI LLC BRADY, KEVIN RAGAN, THOMAS E ANDREWS, H HUGH HART, JOHN C MOORE, RALPH K LINDSEY, CHARLES R RICKENBACKER, THOMAS M THACKSTONE JR, HENRY GRADY FORD, MARTIN R FIRST RATE CONSTRUCTION INC JARLEBRINK, KARL SPAULDING QUALITY HOMES LLC SHELL, TIMOTHY E MCIVER, DAVID W WALLD, RONALD PANTHER, GINA S TUCKMANTEL, KENNETH FANNIE MAE SMITH, KEVIN D RUSH, JAMES A QUEEN, LISA SNYDER F HUGH ATKINS REAL ESTATE PERRY, LEWIS I SOLESBEE, MARY ELEN BROWN, PATRICIA ANN SMITS, JAMES P THOMAS, BETTY P PHILLIPS, WILLIAM R STAPLETON, RUSSELL A NVR INC HANSEN, TYLER BAKER, CLINTON C LIPSCOMB, MELVIN M HENSLEY, DREW TAYLOR, BRIAN PATTON ASHMORE HOMES OF GREER BRENNA, THOMAS C CAROUSAL COMMONS LLC COOLEY, FARON LYNN MIKE SEAY CONSTRUCTION INC FENDLEY JR, BRYANT EDDISON FERREIRA, MARIA RUSH SR, JAMES A BLUESKY RESOURCES INC LITTLEJOHN, SHANNON L PATTERSON DEVELOPERS OF LYMAN RAINES, RAYMOND L SIENKIEWICZ, BEVERLY N POLSENE, JAMES FRESEMAN, ADAM D FOSTER, JOHN M PERRY, LEWIS I A S BOBO REAL ESTATE TUCKMANTEL, KENNETH JOHNSON, MICHAEL J LEDBETTER SR, RICHARD GUERRIERO, PATRICK CULLER, RICHARD E KLUTTZ, WILLIAM KEITH TAYLOR INVESTMENT CORP SPANN, SHIRLEY TOWNER, RICHARD M LEE, KAYLA ANN J2911 INVESTMENTS INC CHATMAN, MICHAEL R KEF LLC SC PILLON HOMES INC LUTHI CONSTRUCTION CO INC JOHNSON, BENNIE L MARK III PROPERTIES INC S C PILLON HOMES INC WILKIE, BETTY A MCABEE, KASEY P HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT SCHELL, CHRISTOPHER DAVID HUSKEY, JULIE PUTNAM ASCEND ENTERPRISE LLC BROCK, TERESSA PRICE, REBECCA K BANK OF AMERICA NA YAHRES, CARMEN R MARK III PROPERTIES INC S C PILLON HOMES INC RMJ ENTERPRISES LP MOSSBURG, GARY A HUGHES, BETTY JEAN FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE PARKER, DAVID THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FOWLER, SCOTTIE K FIELDS INVESMENTS LLC PRUITT, KELLY S SOUTH POINTE REAL ESTATE LLC PERROTTA, HELEN R BOYTER, IAN GATES JR, CARL R THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON LANGSTON PROPERTIES LLC RODDY, HASKELL DONNIE SIEGFRIED, RODNEY D NUTT, FRANK M SOUTH CAROLINA STATE HOUSING FOSTER, LOUIS D CALDWELL, NICOLE M GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC WATSON, WILLIAM J CITIFINANCIAL INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC STANISLAVOV, STANISLAV GAZIRBAZAN, IVAN HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOP FREEMAN, TIMOTHY A PAINTER, MARSHA E PAINTER, DOUGLAS E BISHOP, CLAUDE EMORY NIEMETALO INC FIRST CITIZENS BANK & TRUST BANKS, CRAIG DANIEL, JOHN S RIVERWATCH INC SMITH, ALBERT V NORTHSIDE DEVELOPMENT PRUITT, KELLY S SOUTH POINTE REAL ESTATE LLC M SEAY LLC MIKE SEAY CONSTRUCTION INC HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOP THE 1840 GOLDMINE ROAD LAND TRUST PATTERSON, BLANCHE S CMH HOMES INC JACK PROPERTIES LLC ROSENDO, CALVARIN SERRANO PERRY, EDNA L BALOUGH, JOY L MARK III PROPERTIES INC ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC MASON, JOHN W HAMMOND, GROVER E GLOVER, BETTY I HADDAD, GEORGE FOUNDERS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION EQUITY TRUST CMPANY FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE BREWER, ALISHA M GRAMLING BROTHERS SURVEYING MCCALL, ERIC K RILEY, SHERRY JONAS, LLOYD US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION ODELL NATIONWIDE LLC QUINTON, GLENN COOLEY JR, JONES M 13 ENTERTAINMENT INC FORFEITED LAND COMMISSION ROCK WATER TAVERN TFO HALL, RAYMOND A GOLDFARB, JAY FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE SPARTANBURG CTY FORFEITED LAND

ADDRESS 6765 POTTERY RD 470 LOOP RD 214 A E VICTOR HILL RD SHOP 341 HARKINS BLUFF DR LOT NUMBER: 9,11&12 154 GLENEAGLES RD 369 CARLETON CIR 616 E VICTOR HILL RD 308 GRAYSON DR 337 REFLECTION DR 320 AUNT CARRIE PL 172 SUGAR HILL CT 103 MEMORY LN 139 W FOREST DR 101 MOORE DUNCAN HWY 107 EASTOVER DR 319 CRANDALL WAY 104 FALCON WAY 246 BRIDGEPORT RD 185 WILLIAMS DR 310 N SWEETWATER HILLS DR LOT NUMBER: 2 575 ARROWOOD BRANCH RD 522 CORNUCOPIA LN 223 MIDWAY DR 331 KELLY FARM RD 263 DORIS ANN CT 237 PEACH VALLEY DR 126 RED GLOBE LN 318 REXFORD DR 335 BRIGHT WICK CT 6061 HIGHWAY 9 121 CARROLLWOOD LN 405 ROCKSHIRE CT 665 PINECREST RD 106 ANITA ST LOT NUMBER: 79&90 103 MOUNTAINBROOK LN LOT NUMBER: 1&21 201 LAURELWOOD DR 121 RED GLOBE LN 4714 WORDENDR 16 D ST 113 MAPLE DR LOT NUMBER: 10&116 LOT NUMBER: 3&4 106 WINTER ST 811 WHITLOCK ST 1108 E MAIN ST 1308 E RUTHERFORD ST 921 BARNWELL RD 566 HATCHETT DR 227 SNOWMILL RD 45 ABERNATHY RD 314 HILLANDALE RD 743 OHENRY DR 575 ZIMMERMAN RD LOT NUMBER: 165 160 WILKINS RD 111 WOODRUFF DR 6 LAMOTTE ST LOT NUMBER: 14 736 CHESNEE HWY 119 PERRY RD 216 MILAN ST 103 OVERBROOK CIR 1020 CORIE CREST DR 1840 GOLDMINE RD LOT NUMBER: 9&10 424 E PEACHTREE ST 211 PENROSE LN 319 ANIKEN CIR 323 ANIKEN CIR 327 ANIKEN CIR 331 ANIKEN CIR 7 IVANHOE CIR 1355 DRAYTON RD 218 S HILLS DR 139 PERRY RD 3309 OLD FURNACE RD 450 TUMBLE ROCK DR 111 PINK ROBINSON RD OLD FURNACE RD 137 SEAY ST 1010 S CHURCH ST 193 CONVERSE CIR TIUTYUMA, YELENA

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THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 28-03/01/13 Leachate Hauling, March 1, 2013, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

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SUMMONS AND NOTICE (JURY) IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE Case No: 2012-CP-23-6277 Bryan Leppard, Plaintiff, v. Antonia Avila and Emilio Perez, Defendant(s). TO: THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint and to serve a copy of your Answer upon the subscriber at 1007 East Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina, within thirty (30) days after the service heron, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. By: Richard V. Davis 1007 East Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 (864)232-7363 Attorney for Plaintiff

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NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Azteca Mauldin, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 114 W. Butler Road, Mauldin, SC 29662. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 24, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Basilio’s Bar and Grill, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 6300 White Horse Road, Suite 106, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 17, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Greenville Hop House Company, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 1619 E. North Street, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/ permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than March 3, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Brewery 85, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON AND OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 6 Whitlee Court, Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 17, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that SWH Mimi’s Café, LLC/ DBA Mimi’s Café, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 1133 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than March 3, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Little Hat Tavern, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 22349 Asheville Highway, Landrum, South Carolina 29356. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than March 3, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

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FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | THE Journal 47


JOURNAL CULTURE

2nd

NCAA DiviSioN ii

3rd

CouNCil of ChriStiAN CollegeS & uNiverSitieS

4th

South CAroliNA

A Distinctive Academic Community Worth Discovering for Nearly 175 Years. Erskine feels like a second home to generations of graduates who’ve experienced it. As South Carolina’s first private Christian college, Erskine equips students to flourish through academic excellence and a family-like learning environment. It’s a rare college experience. But since it’s in the Upstate, going away to college doesn’t have to mean going far. So while Erskine may be a little harder to find, you’ll always know where you belong.

KNOW. BE KNOWN. visit.erskine.edu Due West, South Carolina From Forbes, August © 2012 Forbes. All rights reserved. Used by permission and protected by the Copyright Laws of the United States. The printing, copying, redistribution, or retransmission of this Content without express written permission is prohibited.

48 THE JOURNAL | FEBRUARY 15, 2013


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Jimmy Martin / contributing

Roy Fluhrer, Beth Barwick, and Sally Potosky at the opening night gala for “Chautauqua: Benedict Arnold” at Greenville’s Fine Arts Center.

Larry Bounds and Jon Grier

Stephen Petrus of Fluor Corporation receives the No. 1 award for top overall United Way campaign from 2012 campaign chairman Jim Bourey. Fluor Corporation and its employees contributed $1,656,280.

Ann Robinson addresses the crowd after being elected chairwoman of the 2013 United Way Board of Trustees.

Nancy McEachern tells the story of a sculpture in the Fine Arts Center lobby.

Derek Watchorn of AMECO receives the No. 1 award for top workplace campaign for a company with 100-199 employees from 2012 United Way campaign chairman Jim Bourey. AMECO employees contributed $127,525.

Stone Academy announces its January 2013 “Written in Stone” winners, who produced the best essays and poetry on the topic of “My Family’s Tradition.” The winners are (from back row, left): Carly Batson, Chaz Haines, Sophie Pitney, Marley Leventis, Maggie Heinbaugh, Ansel Riley, Owen Cheek, Malia Bernson, Emie Sholly, Eva Thurman and Lexi Hawkins. Zabraya Palmer and Arianna Workman also won but are not in the photograph.

From left: Levi Humphreys, Alex Crotti, Avery Anderson and Amelia Gray, award recipients in the Greenville Classical Academy 2013 Science Fair.

Jennifer Johnsen of Gallivan, White & Boyd receives the No. 1 award for top workplace campaign for a company with 25-99 employees from 2012 United Way campaign chairman Jim Bourey. Gallivan employees contributed $83,722.

Greenville Classical Academy student Carson Blough displays his 2013 Science Fair project.

The Spartanburg County Medical Society recently had its annual meeting with local legislators at the Piedmont Club. It was moderated by Dr. Robert McDonald. Health care issues were discussed, including scope of practice (independent and expanded practice by nonphysicians, such as nurse practitioners, physician assistants, podiatrists, optometrists, etc.), Medicaid expansion, tort reform and malpractice insurance.

FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | THE Journal 49


journal culture

Counoise? Zibibbo? By: Richard deBondt

figure. this. out. Begone!

By Mike Peluso

Counoise is a grape, one of many in common use in the Southern Rhone wine regions. Most notably, it is one of the approved varieties in Châteauneufdu-Pape. It is championed by Château de Beaucastel and Domaine de Pegaü, two of Frances greatest red wine estates. It is almost always used in red blends to which it adds an element of crisp fruit flavor and acidity. Zibibbo is the Sicilian name for a truly ancient grape (thought to be more than 3,000 years in cultivation) which has spread around the world under at least 50 different names. American growers call it Muscat of Alexandria. The modern world’s most exciting product of this grape is Donnafugata’s great Italian dessert wine, Ben Ryé, a Passito di Pantelleria. This is an exotic wine in every sense. It is made on the island Pantelleria off the coast of Tunisia using Zibibbo grapes, many of which have been dried in the sun. These are two examples of the thousands of winemaking grapes in the world. Grapes have been cultivated for thousands of years. Nature provides anomalies very readily and producers have aggressively nurtured crosses between successful varieties to make new ones. Estimates for the total number of different grape types used in winemaking today run as high as 7,000. Yes, that’s right 7,000. Jancis Robinson, Julia Harding, and José Vouillamoz recently published a beautiful book, “Wine Grapes” listing and discussing 1,368 of the most important varieties. It is a beautiful book with many color renditions of famous grape types and a remarkable text regarding their heritage, botanically and culturally. Although many entries are simple and succinct, equally many detail the history and distribution of important grape types as well as their historic references and their modern use in wines of note. This does serve as a reminder of how limited our perspective can be. The wine world is full of unique and intriguing wines.

Northampton Wines www.northamptonwines.com 211-A East Broad Street • 271-3919 50 THE Journal | FEBRUARY 15, 2013

Across

1 Charge for unlimited use, say 8 Nice woman 13 Dines lavishly 19 Go back over 20 Connecticut town on Long Island Sound 21 “It was all __” 22 About to deliver 23 Garden tool for unexpected situations? 25 Escargot 26 Start the day 27 NBA one-pointers 28 Ayres who played Dr. Kildare 29 Barone’s superior 30 Ridge 31 Pvts.’ superiors 33 Start of many California city names 34 N.Y. neighbor 35 Hardly ever laugh? 37 PowerShot maker 39 Up 42 Elite school 43 Welcomes at the door 44 Drive aimlessly 45 Annoy with complaints 48 Mentalist Geller 49 “Just a __!” 50 Nickels and dimes 51 Reason for a few nicks? 54 Some sopranos 55 Spies on, in a way 56 Runs amok 60 Thought: Pref.

61 “Tales From the __”: ‘50s horror comic 62 Small toy? 64 Al Green genre 65 Blisters 67 Apples, e.g. 68 “What __!”: “Yawn!” 69 Plumber’s assessment? 72 Closely watched index 73 Abbr. usually preceded by a comma 76 AMEX adjustments 77 Tenured coll. employees 78 Walks casually 79 Golfer Garcia 81 Sch. fundraising gp. 82 Scandinavian capital 83 Suave competitor 84 Panama Canal bash? 89 Capp and Kaline 92 Joey’s mom 93 __ Mawr 95 Equip anew 96 Amoxicillin target 98 Alliance formed under HST 99 Great Basin cap. 100 His name is Spanish for “fox” 101 Punt navigator 102 Highland scoundrel? 106 At a moment’s notice 108 Relents 109 Most exposed 110 Author Prosper __ who wrote “Carmen,” on which the opera is based

111 Old cinemas 112 Orchard Field, nowadays 113 Surprise success

Down

1 Giants’ home, familiarly 2 “The Lawrence Welk Show” sisters’ surname 3 Loud parties in Georgia? 4 Blue eyes, e.g. 5 It has a moral 6 Green prefix 7 Eternally, to Blake 8 Starve, to Shakespeare 9 1974 hit sung entirely in Spanish 10 Muddy area 11 Bit of computer memory 12 Omaha-to-Milwaukee dir. 13 Statistical input 14 It’s Dreyer’s west of the Rockies 15 SFO info 16 Routes for liners 17 Show particular interest 18 Fish-eating duck 20 She was the ten in “10” 24 Broncos’ org. 26 Pie slice feature 30 Leonardo’s co-star in “The Aviator” 31 Halloween gathering?

32 Snoop 33 Pennzoil letters 35 Do surgery, in a way 36 __ golf 37 Invigorating, as air 38 Pres. advisory team 40 Controversial baby food ingredient

Easy

41 Major leagues, in baseball lingo 43 Crotchety sort 44 Rebuke 45 Party enforcer 46 Stop 47 OR hangers 48 Eurasian range

50 Early 5th-century year 51 Authority 52 A mystery, metaphorically 53 Aging pro, maybe 55 Arduous journeys 57 Vulcanized rubber inventor’s unsteady gait? 58 Guilder replacements 59 Ton 61 Light cigar wrapper 62 Response from Fido 63 Ins. plans 66 Five-time MLB AllStar Cooper 67 Oslo Accords signer: Abbr. 68 “I get it,” wryly 70 Author Sinclair 71 Gillette razor word 72 Parliament member 73 Seer’s alleged gift 74 Like many apartments 75 Piling coating 78 Business sch. major 80 Day-__ 81 Thickness 85 Cincinnati-based retailer 86 Look over 87 Octagonal road sign, in Arles 88 El Amazonas, por ejemplo 90 Actress Sobieski 91 More like a spring chicken 93 Dots that may beep 94 Some colas 96 What a slash may mean in some scores 97 “It’s __ for!” 98 City served by Gardermoen Airport 99 Dumbfound 100 Writer __ Neale Hurston 103 Chicken general? 104 “Veep” network 105 Cheer word 106 Apt. divisions 107 Sushi fish

Crossword answers: page 47

Sudoku answers: page 47


JOURNAL CULTURE

WHERE I’VE BEEN WITH BILL KOON

The downside of sane and responsible teachers The Privileged Child is just finishing high school, and I have enjoyed following her work over the years. As a former teacher, I am especially interested in her teachers. Generally, they seem to be smart and efficient. They post homework assignments and grade averages constantly. They are available and supportive. There is only one problem. None of her teachers is crazy, not even one. I wonder what has happened to the old loonies I had when I was in school. My geometry teacher, Mr. Abraham, was tired of geometry. And, instead of teaching, he frequently would send a student to the board to write out theorems which he read aloud from the textbook. One day, the unlucky kid pointed out to Mr. Abraham that the board was full – to which Mr. Abraham replied, “Just write on top of what you’ve written.” And on he went, theorem on top of theorem, the chalk dust flying. Speaking of chalk, I had a wiry history professor, Dr. Potphil, who threw sticks of chalk at us when she thought we were not paying attention to her fascinating lectures on Washington’s wooden teeth or Whitney’s cotton gin. There were marks on the wall that, fortunately, indicated that she was not always on target. One of my favorite poetry teachers used to come to class through the window. Dr. Evans would skip the walk around to the building’s front door and step over the sill of a floor-to-ceiling window into the classroom, briefcase in hand. He wouldn’t teach until all the blinds were level. Three of us were assigned to the three windows to adjust the blinds. Dr. Evans stood in the middle of the classroom directing us as if he were Zubin Mehta. One day after we finished, he noted that the classroom across the hall was empty. So he had the three of us go over and level those blinds. My trig teacher, Mr. Smith, read to us out of the text and occasionally swiveled his chair around so he could write on the board without getting up. From time to time, one of our bolder students would jump out of the classroom window. Once the kid landed directly in front of the dean. The next day, the class was moved to the second floor. I failed the trig exam miserably – missed two of the three problems entirely. Mr. Smith looked at my paper and then looked up at me. “What’s your major, Mr. Koon?” “English,” I answered. “Well then,” he said, “you made a ‘C.’” I’d still be taking trig were it not for the gracious heart of Mr. Smith. Most of my history teachers were also coaches. One of them, the football coach, simply showed films of great heavyweight boxing matches. I would never have learned about Primo Carnera, the giant Italian heavyweight, had I not taken that world history course. My college language teacher was an ancient German who hunched over his cane and carried two pairs of glasses, one for reading and the other for everything else. The group was small, about a dozen of us, and we had him for two years. Yet he could never keep our names straight. Class was a matter of “reciting,” reading aloud in German and then translating passages from “The Student Prince.” Dr. Schwarz would get angry if we were unprepared, and we worked hard. But then he would call on someone to “recite” using the wrong name. He’d call on Jack when there was no Jack. He’d bang his cane on the desk when no one responded. A timid young man named Mathew suffered terribly because Dr. Schwarz could never get his name right. He’d try to call on Mathew but would use the name of one of the other disciples. “Recite, Andrew,” he would command. Nothing from Mathew. Once, the furious old man even hit Mathew in the shins with his cane. Then, sometime during our second year, Mathew figured it out. He’d recite any time the old teacher called on one of the 12 disciples. I have often wondered what kind of grade Mark, Luke and John made in that course. Many of my readers may think that my education fell a bit short. That could be. But what would I be writing about if I had had sane and responsible teachers like those of the Privileged Child?

SERVING THE UPSTATE SINCE 1950

30-50% 30-50% OFF SHOPS AT ORCHARD PARK • 86 Orchard Park Drive Mon-Sat 10am-6pm • 288-1951

Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

FEBRUARY 15, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 51


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Feb. 15, 2013 Spartanburg Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Spartanburg, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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