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NEW MULTIMILLION CONTRACTS FOR SWINNEY AND SPURRIER

GREENVILLEJOURNAL

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New apartments proposed for Memorial Auditorium site

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, January 24, 2014 • Vol.16, No.4

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As night wears on, crowds change and problems start – but the city says new safety measures are making a difference SEE PAGE 8

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

“So few people do that. They’re too afraid and they allow others to define them. They spend their lives playing other roles instead of the lead character in their own story.” Johnathan Lee Iverson, ringmaster for Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus, on the need to follow your passion.

“I have never seen numbers of people admitted for flu complications this high since I began tracking data six years ago.” Sue Boeker, RN, infection preventionist with Greenville Health System.

“We blended in, but it was hard to because we had the buns on the back of our heads.” Pfc. Brittany Holloway on being a female in Marine Corps infantry training.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Apartments proposed for Memorial Auditorium site SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com After sitting vacant for several years, 400 N. Church St., the former site of the Greenville Memorial Auditorium, may see a new apartment development soon. Plans have been submitted to Greenville’s Design Review Board by Atlanta developer Alliance Residential Company for a four-story, 257-unit apartment complex called Broadstone Gateway. “We love the downtown story and the experience that has been created over time,” said Alliance spokesman Bob Weston. “Residents will have the ability to walk to all of the great restaurants and retail stores downtown, and it is also very close to the core job base in downtown Greenville.” Situated on a triangular piece of land bordered by North Church Street, East North Street and Beattie Place, the site has long been considered a gateway into downtown Greenville with its strategic location. A parking garage will be constructed, and the apartment complex is expected to have one- and two-bedroom units. On-site amenities will include a club room, coffee bar, resort-style fitness center, landscaped courtyards and a large pool area. Several courtyards and trees will be incorporated into the design work being done by Axiom

4 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014

Architecture. There will also be a grilling area and an outdoor fire pit surrounded by Adirondack chairs. The pool area will feature another outdoor fireside area and a covered lounge with an outdoor television.

Buildings that are currently on the site will be demolished. The design review board is set to review the plans on Feb. 6, and if approved construction is expected to begin in the third quarter of 2014.


JOURNAL NEWS

New multimillion contracts for Swinney, Spurrier SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com

MARK STURGIS / CONTRIBUTING

Spurrier

“My staff and I thoroughly enjoy coaching under the direction of President Pastides and Athletics Director Tanner,” said Spurrier. “We appreciate the attitude of our Board of Trustees in keeping our salaries competitive

Swinney

ZACHARY HANBY / CONTRIBUTING

Clemson football coach Dabo Swinney signed a new eight-year, multimillion-dollar contract this past weekend, increasing his pay next year to $3.15 million. The terms were approved by the Clemson University Board of Trustees Compensation Committee. That puts Swinney just behind University of South Carolina football coach Steve Spurrier, who announced last week that USC university trustees approved a pay raise to $4 million per year. According to ESPN, Spurrier is among the nation’s 10 highest-paid coaches. Spurrier’s new contract is extended through Dec. 31, 2018. His base salary will be increased to $1,050,000 from $350,000, and TV, radio and apparel compensation will remain at $2,950,000. Postseason bowl game compensation for Spurrier will double for most of the games, with compensation ranging from $100,000 for postseason bowl games other than the Capital One Bowl or a College Football Playoff (CFP) game to $250,000 if the team goes to a semifinal CFP. Once Spurrier completes his contract, a new contract clause gives him the option to serve as a special advisor to the president and athletics director. With the exception of defensive coordinator Lorenzo Ward, all of the assistant coaches, including Deke Adams, Kirk Botkin, Grady Brown, Shawn Elliott, G.A. Mangus, Joe Robinson, Everette Sands and Steve Spurrier Jr., also had their contacts extended through the 2015 season, according to a news release. Coach Ward’s threeyear deal now extends through 2016.

with the rest of the SEC. We all hope to coach here many more years and we still have some goals that have not been accomplished yet.”

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According to The State newspaper, Just back from market! COUPON VALID THROUGH JANUARY total pay for Clemson’s Swinney will 29, 2014. EXCLUDES SALE ITEMS. increase by $150,000 for the 2015 and 2016 seasons. Automatic raises GIFTS • HOME DECOR • OCCASIONAL PIECES • ACCENTS after that will be based on the number of season victories, starting with a $100,000 increase for nine wins and 864-241-0100 up to $300,000 for 12 wins. Should 2222 augusta street, unit 7 Clemson win the Atlantic Coast Con4roomsgreenville.com the fIrst and only InvIsIble 24/7* hearIng aId. ference inIntroduce any of theyour next ears threeto seamon-sat 10am-6pm; sun 1-5pm sons, Swinney’s pay would jump to FINALLY, EFFORTLESS $3.5 million the following year.HEARING The State also reported that SwinEVEN SHOwERpROOF** ney’s contract contains multiple incentives, including one of $400,000 CLEAR, NATURAL SOUNdPlayqUALITY for reaching the College Football off. Swinney would also earn $75,000 if his team’s academic progress rate (APR) score passed 950. Should Swinney be terminated without cause this season, the university would owe the Call Today For Your 14 DAY coach $24 million. That figure shrinks Risk Free Trial With Hearing Aid significantly with each year of the deal. Technology Recommended For “I’m extremely excited and appreciaEXpERIENCE LYRIC HEARING FOR YOURSELF! YOUR Hearing Loss, YOUR Life, tive for the opportunity to continue to risk free trial† • Complimentary Lyric Screening build our program under the leadership YOUR Budget. of President Jim Clements and ourOffers ath- expire May 31, 2013 letic director Dan Radakovich,” Swinney said. “The future of Clemson University is extremely bright and the future of our football program is as well. While we have accomplished many goals, we still have several out there to reach and we will continue to workKristin to get there. Davis,KathAu.D. Doctor of Audiology Kristin Davis, Au.D. Doctor of Audiology leen and I are looking forward to conPremier Lyric Hearing Professional Premier Lyric Hearing Professional tinuing to be a part of the great comW.and Poinsett Street, SC Improving 29650 Patient Satisfaction With Their Hearing HealthCare 17 yearsGreer, Experience munity of Clemson, the703 Upstate the state of South Carolina.” 703 W. Poinsett Street, Greer, SC 29650 • www.greeraudiology.com Athletic Director Dan Radakovich called Swinney “one of the top coaches CALL TODAY FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT! www.greeraudiology.com not only in the ACC but in the entire negative hearing experiences, *Individual patient needs may vary. Duration of device battery life varies by patient and is“After subject to two individual ear conditions.**Lyric is wateraid resistant, not waterproof, andI was referred to Greer Audiology by my nation. His teams have succeeded on should not be completely submerged under water. †Professional fees may apply.physician. Annual subscription begins the Kristin first day of trial. Lyric isto not appropriate for allprofessional patients. See I found Davis be a very and unassuming practitioner, with no determine if Lyric is rightand for you. Lyric, ©2013. All rights reserved. MS025831 NEW904 the field,a Lyric inProvider theto classroom in Distributed the by Phonak, LLC sales pressure or gimmicks. She immediately instills confidence and trust. I would, without community. We’re excited to have him hesitation, highly recommend her for those experiencing hearing difficulties and becoming like lead our program for a long time into me, a very grateful and satisfied patient.” – Philip Gauthier, Simpsonville, SC the future.”

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JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

The flu is serious business

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Turmoil in Simpsonville Elections have consequences, and among them is the responsibility to govern for the good of the whole. Simpsonville’s newest council members wasted no time last week demonstrating that elections have consequences, adding their votes to two others to oust City Administrator Russ Hawes in a 4-3 vote the same night they were sworn in. Last Tuesday’s council action was the latest salvo in a lengthy battle between supporters of former Police Chief Keith Grounsell and the previous council majority that fired him on Hawes’ advice in December 2012. Two of that old majority were defeated in November by Taylor Graham and Elizabeth Braswell, who focused their election campaigns on the Grounsell controversy. Graham and Braswell campaigned on a cause, and no one should be surprised that they joined council members Geneva Lawrence and Sylvia Lockaby to follow through. Judging from the reaction afterward, they have delighted their supporters and feel a mandate brewing. Graham called himself “merely the voice of the people” after the council action. And well he may be for the 539 Simpsonville residents who gave him 96 more votes than the incumbent he displaced. On Nov. 5, those 539 individuals represented roughly 0.05 percent of Simpsonville’s 11,770 registered voters, 1,069 of whom came to the polls that day, according to the county election commission. Braswell’s 535 votes (285 more than her predecessor) echoed Graham’s percentage. Both offer a useful reminder for the 91 percent who stayed home: elections do matter. Yet while the new council majority revels in Election Day consequences, its members should be mindful that actions have consequences, too – including those fueled by a 500-vote mandate. While city administrators serve at council’s pleasure and may be fired without notice, Hawes’ contract reportedly gives him four months’ severance pay if he is fired without cause. To fire him with cause would require a process documenting subpar performance or evidence of a crime. So far, the Simpsonville City Council has produced neither, meaning the city will likely have to pay Hawes four months’ salary to go away. Which returns us to November’s “mandate.” While the new majority denies any ties between Hawes’ dismissal and a plan to restore Grounsell’s job, Mayor Perry Eichor is publicly calling their bluff. Eichor described a “whole back-room, smoke-filled scenario” to WYFF-TV that includes firing Hawes, appointing a department head as interim and reinstating Grounsell. Time, as they say, will tell. In the meantime, a Facebook page to “keep the chief ” appeared within 24 hours of last Tuesday’s vote as anxious Simpsonville residents urged support for current Police Chief Steve Moore. At press time, the page had gathered 271 “likes.” Should it reach 540, would a new mandate be in force? Elections have consequences, and among them is the responsibility they convey: to govern sensibly, for the good of the whole, without bias or partiality. A responsibility to avoid acting in haste – before, say, SLED returns its long-awaited report on the circumstances of Grounsell’s termination. To consider the impact of sudden changes on city services and staff. To act with full transparency. Four council members in conversation anywhere equals a quorum. Simpsonville cannot prosper with a city government in turmoil. Thirteen months is long enough. It’s time for Simpsonville’s elected leaders to call a cease-fire for the good of the city.

SPEAK YOUR MIND The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

Influenza, or flu as we commonly call it, is a serious illness of the respiratory system that can cause illness, hospitalization and even death. Although it is difficult to isolate a specific number of influenzaassociated deaths, the Centers for Disease Control estimates between 3,000 and 49,000 people die each year from the flu. According to DHEC, there have been 30 flurelated deaths in South Carolina through Jan. 15, compared to 46 total flu-related deaths for the entire flu season 2012-2013. The flu season typically runs from midSeptember through March. Symptoms of the flu include fever, headache, extreme fatigue, cough, sore throat, muscle aches and runny or stuffy nose. Occasionally, especially in children, stomach symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea also occur. And it is important to note that not everyone with the flu will have a fever. Because the flu can be so serious, precautions against it are important. Without a doubt, getting the flu vaccine is the single most effective way to prevent the flu. The CDC recommends the vaccine annually for everyone over the age of 6 months, particularly the very young, the old and those who are pregnant or may become pregnant. It takes approximately two weeks for the vaccine to reach full protection. The flu vaccine works the best among young, healthy adults and older children, and people with chronic conditions may develop less immunity after vaccination. Many different types of flu virus circulate each year. Scientists base the flu vaccine formula on previous strains, last year’s activity and essentially a prediction of what will occur each year. Some years the vaccine and strain do not match, but in others, the match is very good. This year, there are multiple choices of vaccine available, all of which are effective. There is even a

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

IN MY OWN WORDS by MICHELLE BUSHEY

new egg-free vaccine this year. In addition to vaccinations, some other common-sense precautions will help limit the flu’s spread: Wash your hands frequently. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Cough or sneeze into a tissue or your sleeve. If you are sick, try to limit your exposure to others. The CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever has subsided. Bon Secours St. Francis Health System joined other hospitals and cities nationwide to safeguard employees and residents by making the flu vaccine mandatory for our employees. We have been successful with a 98 percent compliance rate. In addition, Bon Secours St. Francis Health System has joined with Greenville Health System and AnMed Hospital to request voluntary visitor restrictions for children. These are measures we are taking to keep our community healthy. The first and best thing you can do is to get yourself and your children vaccinated against the flu unless there are health reasons to avoid it. You can do this at your family doctor, at many drugstores or at local health departments. It is a quick, easy and inexpensive precaution that can keep you from getting the flu and, as importantly, keep you from spreading the flu. If you have additional questions about the flu or flu vaccine, please call 1-800-27SHOTS (1-800-277-4687) or visit Flu.gov or the CDC’s seasonal influenza website at cdc.gov/flu. Michelle Bushey is a registered nurse and director of infection prevention and patient safety for Bon Secours St. Francis Health System. organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE Dear Editor: In its 2014 session, the Judiciary Committee of the South Carolina Senate will consider several hundred pieces of proposed legislation. One of those bills is S.85, “Voter Registration,” first introduced by Sen. Michael Fair in January of 2013. This bill will require those voting in a partisan primary election to be a registered member of that party. Using a primary election to choose a candidate to represent a political party is a good idea. Voters who affiliate with a political party generally do so because they embrace the political philosophy of that party. The primary election is their opportunity to evaluate and support the candidate they believe best represents them. Current law permits voters to cast a ballot in a primary election without party affiliation. Consequently, persons with no interest, or, more to the point, conflicting or opposing interests, in the goals and objectives of any party are able to subvert those goals and objectives simply by voting in the primary. Additionally, allowing voters who are not registered members of a political party to cast a ballot in that party’s primary election clearly influences the outcome of that election – political chicanery at its worst. Sadly, it appears none of the other 45 senators was willing to cosponsor this bill. It’s especially disappointing that none of the 18 or so Upstate senators – 15 Republicans among them – is willing to support such a reasonable change to the way South Carolinians vote in primary elections. If they have legitimate reasons for maintaining the status quo, they should explain them to the voters.

Ron Tamaccio Greenville, SC Dear Editor: I’d like to thank Mimi Wyche for sharing her story with the Greenville Journal in the article “The Show Must Go On” (Jan. 10). As someone who has struggled with anxiety and depression – and a resulting eating disorder – from a young age, I can vouch for the importance of shining a brighter light on the issue of mental illness. The truth is, the shame many people with mental illnesses carry around with them often does more damage than the illness itself. I’m often afraid to tell others about my struggles out of fear of being misunderstood and judged. Sadly, this secrecy and isolation simply fuel the demons. Reading Mimi’s story gives me (at least momentarily) the courage to speak out. I’d love to see more coverage of mental illnesses and related issues in the Greenville Journal this year, because Mimi’s right, it’s something we don’t talk about nearly enough. The more light we shine on the issue, the less damage it can do. I wish Mimi the best in her current struggle. Thank you.

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DOWNTOWN DIARY  A firsthand look at navigating the wilds of Main Street after midnight JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com

In view of reports that downtown Greenville – especially Main Street – becomes two different places entirely in the hours before 11 p.m. and after, I accepted the mission to visit downtown after 11 p.m. to observe the so-called changes in both crowds and security measures. For this assignment, my 30-year-old husband and I explored the scenes we usually do not frequent on weekends. Here is my report: 11 P.M. We began the night at the Blu Martini and stayed around an hour. The Blu Martini has a bouncer at the door and another person directly inside to check IDs again and collect a cover charge. This bar had primarily the 30-and-older crowd and had a dance floor. It was very crowded inside. MIDNIGHT. Next up was Carolina Ale House’s upstairs bar. I had to show ID at the bottom of the steps, get a wristband, and pass at least three other security guards on the way upstairs. The extra security was new since my multiple visits to Carolina Ale after Greenville Road Warrior games last season. I showed my wristband again at the top of the stairs and was allowed inside. The packed bar had a mix of ages from 30 and older to college age. I stayed around an hour before deciding to walk around and see the crowds outside, which proved to consist primarily of groups traveling between bars. I did not witness any obnoxious drunks, but did notice a few amusing groups of young men who were happily yelling and laughing as they walked.

JUST BEFORE 1 A.M. We ventured to Ford’s Oyster House and based on the crowd inside, opted to not go in. Again, a bouncer at the door was checking IDs and applying wristbands. As we walked on down Main Street, I noted the enhanced police presence. From the Blu Martini to Ford’s I saw at least seven officers on the street, not counting those in patrol cars.

1 A.M. We decided to stop in at Rey’s. We found the now-familiar line waiting to get in. In addition to the bouncer at the door, I

8 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014

Main Street’s split personality Around midnight, downtown Greenville can seem to transform into a whole different town – can leaders find some way to keep both residents and partiers happy and safe? CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Downtown Greenville has a sort of Jekyll-and-Hyde personality. Most weekend nights, Main Street is filled with couples on dates, older folks grabbing dinner before walking to a show at the Peace Center, a hockey game at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena or a baseball game at Fluor Field. Friends stroll down Main Street and window shop. Families enjoy skating during wintertime or a walk through Falls Park when the weather is warmer. But around 11 p.m., that begins to change. Families and the older crowd go home and a younger, party crowd moves in. With that younger crowd come drunken fights and loud groups – especially after the 2 a.m. closing time when all of the drinkers converge on the streets to make their way home. The partiers also spark complaints from downtown residents who resent sleepless nights and the general ruin the noise inflicts on their downtown living experience. It’s a lifestyle conflict that could soon be exacerbated by warmer weather and a growing number of apartments and hotels – as Greenville city officials well know. “I think when the warm weather arrives, we’ll have some of the same issues that we have had in the past,” said City Councilman David Sudduth.

SAFETY MEASURES HAVE HELPED City officials say safety measures prompted by a spate of robberies and the attack of a bicyclist near Falls Park last summer have helped improve the situation and increase safety in an already safe downtown. “If anybody has a safer downtown than Greenville, let me know,” said Mayor Knox White. Sudduth said ideally, the city wants no

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

incidents downtown, but that is probably unrealistic with the throngs of people visiting there. “We certainly want the crowds.” At a work session Tuesday night, city Police Chief Terri Wilfong told the council eight new police officers have been hired for downtown, but are waiting for dates to start the required 16-week training at the South Carolina Police Academy. Some starting dates have been pushed to June, meaning the officers won’t be on the streets this summer. But Wilfong said even without the extra officers, the department has been able to increase patrols downtown during strategic times and at strategic places, depending on factors such as weather, ball games and holidays. “St. Patty’s Day will be big. It always is,” she said.

ALCOHOL DOMINATES ARRESTS A review by the Greenville Journal of 2013 city crime reports revealed that the

vast majority of the crimes that occurred in a one-mile radius of 100 North Main Street – which incorporates Main Street just past North Main Rotary Park to past where South Main turns to Pendleton Street – happen away from what most consider downtown. Based on those crime reports, the most common arrest made in downtown is for public drunk, disorderly conduct, open container or other alcohol violations. The vast majority of those are made after 11 p.m. “People come downtown to have a good time and some of them can’t handle their alcohol and act out and do things they otherwise wouldn’t do,” Wilfong said. “There’s always a few who ruin it for all. Not a weekend goes by where we don’t make an arrest.” Preliminary figures show violent crimes are down 10.5 percent citywide, and nonviolent crimes down 10.4 percent, the police chief said.

SECURITY GUARDS ADD EXTRA EYES The addition of uniformed security officers in key downtown areas during latenight hours has made a difference, Wilfong said. The security personnel are in radio communication with police and provide extra sets of eyes. In recent weeks, a security guard saw a woman’s purse being snatched and alerted officers who caught the suspect, the police chief said. The security officers also help patrol city parking garages, she said. That beefed up security – along with better lighting and more cameras – will


JOURNAL NEWS definitely help, Sudduth said. Sudduth and Councilwoman Amy Ryberg Doyle also point to an ordinance the council passed earlier this month that allows consumption of mixed drinks in sidewalk dining areas. The ordinance closes those areas at midnight, which they say could eliminate some late-night problems.

across the street spoke of the “real nightmare” of living across from a previous late nightspot at that site. They said they were awakened by loud shouts and drunken brawls, witnessed people urinating in parking lots, had their property vandalized and were forced to get extra security to protect their property. One resident said, “Nothing good ever happens after midnight.” Fire Chief Stephen Kovalcik told council members on Tuesday that a compliance officer has been hired to make sure the bars and restaurants open after midnight are complying with the city’s special exception permits and other codes. That means two inspectors are downtown on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, he said. “We were kind of losing our grip on it” before, he said. Since the fire department began aggressive patrols downtown more than a year ago, some bars have lines outside, not allowing patrons in until somebody leaves so they don’t exceed maximum capacities. Sudduth said the number of bars downtown still concerns him. Asked if downtown has reached a tipping point, he said, “I don’t have a magic number in mind.” Doyle said she thinks the city is taking the right steps to address the safety issues and tensions that come with the increased popularity of downtown as a living space

LEAVE BEFORE INFLUX Despite the additional security, some visitors to downtown make a point of leaving before the influx of younger people. “Downtown Greenville is a great place to hang out. I just don’t want to be here after midnight,” said Stacey McCullough, a Pickens County resident who visits downtown Greenville at least once a month, usually a couple of weekends a month. “I’d rather not have to deal with obnoxious drunks.” Others can’t leave because they live there. There are around 100 bars and restaurants on or near Main Street, about half of which are open after midnight. Owners must obtain a special exception from the city’s Board of Zoning Appeals if an establishment wants to serve alcohol past midnight. Those hearings can throw downtown’s lifestyle conflict into sharp relief. Speaking in opposition to a recent such request by a restaurant-bar just off South Main Street, residents of the condominium project

saw at least two security guards inside who looked more like Secret Service agents with their earpieces than regular security. The crowd at Rey’s seemed to be primarily people in their early 20s.

1:30 A.M. After about a half hour at Rey’s, my mission concluded at the Corner Pocket. Like Rey’s, the restaurant had a bouncer at the door checking IDs. However, I did not see any additional security, even when we went upstairs where the crowd was congregated. The area was packed with primarily college students and if there was additional security, they had to easily blend in.

City officials have beefed up security, improved, lighting and added more cameras to downtown.

and a nightlife space. “I think if we continue to look at the pinch points and address those, we can have a downtown for everybody,” she said. “The people who live there will be safe. The people who visit will be safe and the late-night crowd will be safe, too.”

Based on my observations, downtown security has definitely beefed up in the early-morning hours. The bars I ventured into have more than just the typical bouncer at the door, and they are all paying close attention to the crowds they are letting in. Greenville after midnight seems active, young, well attended and safe – far from fodder for the television show “Cops” or auditions for “The Real World” that I feared it might be based on recent reports.

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JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 9


JOURNAL NEWS

Council affirms work on rail trail expansion County Council also approves backyard chickens in certain areas APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com While officially a show of support, a resolution passed by Greenville County Council this week encouraging the work of the Greenville County Economic Development Corporation (GCEDC) could help move work on a rail trail expansion forward, supporters say. The county owns 3.4 miles of railroad right-of-way that runs parallel to Laurens Road from CU-ICAR to Pleasantburg Drive. The resolution of support doesn’t ask for any county funding, but is an “attaboy” for the GCEDC, said Fred Payne, council member, GCEDC chair and advocate of development centered on transportation routes. If landowners along the rail corridor grant the organization right-of-way agreements, the abandoned rail bed could connect downtown Greenville with CU-ICAR. The Verdae development and CU-ICAR have exchanged land swaps to grant right-of-ways for the corridor, said Van Whitehead, deputy director at Upstate Forever, and that sets a good example. Upstate Forever has received preliminary funding support to do planning for the corridor, Whitehead said. Council Chairman Bob Taylor said the S.C. Department of Transportation (SCDOT) property at Laurens and Airport roads could serve as a transit hub for the line. Travelers Rest residents never could have predicted the development boom that has erupted around the Greenville Health System’s Swamp Rabbit Trail, said Councilman Joe Dill, adding that people are talking about this corridor mirroring the trail’s success in the northern part of Greenville County. Council members Xanthene Norris and Lottie Gibson reminded the council that transportation projects and needs in other areas cannot be forgotten. Norris said transportation beyond automobiles is also needed. “Greenville is a driving community, but we need to grow up,” she said. Payne, an advocate of the “Green Villages” concept that features mixeduse development along multi-modal transportation routes, said GCEDC

10 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014

will seek public-private partnerships for funding to develop the corridor. In other business, council gave final approval in 10-1 vote (with Sid Cates voting against and Dan Rawls absent) to a zoning ordinance text amendment that would allow residents to keep backyard chickens in certain single- and multi-family zoning areas. The amendment does not supersede covenants of homeowners’ associations, said Taylor. The county had considered a similar ordinance in Nov. 2012, but it failed to get the minimum eight votes for approval after a denial by the Planning Commission. The number of chickens on a single property is limited to eight, and no roosters are allowed. The amendment also outlines parameters for chicken pens or coops and screening. Council’s Planning and Development Committee will review the change one year after its effective date. Council also approved a resolution to update a 1995 ordinance outlining how property owners can obtain special property tax assessments for rehabilitating historic property. The change reflects an update in the state requirements for designating historic properties and the process to receive a tax break. Council members also approved $20,000 from their community project accounts for assistance in funding the television broadcast of the College All-Star Bowl at Furman University on Feb. 14. Council members Dill, Willis Meadows, Jim Burns, Taylor, Liz Seman, Dan Rawls, H.G. “Butch” Kirven, Payne, Cates, Norris and Gibson contributed. The event had requested $50,000 from both the county and city of Greenville, said County Administrator Joe Kernell. On Jan. 23, 5 p.m., the Greenville County Citizen Roads Advisory Commission had its first meeting. Agenda items included how to receive public input, public meeting schedule and project selection criteria. The commission was established by County Council to draft a list of potential transportation projects in Greenville County. Council created the commission after discussion on a potential sales tax referendum. Council members removed any mention of a sales tax or referendum from the resolution establishing the commission. Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again on Feb. 4, 6 p.m., at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville.


JOURNAL NEWS

THE BLOTTER An 11-year-old boy was rescued from a well at a vacant home on Fews Chapel Road in Greenville County Tuesday evening. The boy, who suffered a broken arm and possible hypothermia, was in water up to at least his waist for about two hours before being pulled out of the well by rescuers from the Lake Cunningham Fire Department. The well was estimated to be at least 50 feet deep. The well was covered and the home’s back porch was built around the well, authorities said. Authorities said the boy and a friend were supposed to be walking to a store but let themselves in the vacant house. The boys likely had no idea the well was there and the boy fell in after the cover gave way. Firefighters responded to the scene around 5:30 p.m. and the boy was pulled out around 7 p.m. They estimate the boy had been in the well about 30 minutes before firefighters arrived. Clemson University police are investigating a reported sexual assault on campus. Campus police found a 24-year-old female graduate student unconscious Saturday morning around 1 a.m. between the Life Sciences Facility and the greenhouses. At the hospital, the woman told police she had been assaulted while jogging late Friday or early Saturday. She reported being grabbed from behind and being sexually assaulted, according to a campus alert posted on the school’s website. The woman could not provide a description of her assailant. The Clemson University Police Department has stepped up patrols and increased police escort shuttle services, according to the alert. Police Chief Johnson Link urged students and others on campus to be aware of their surroundings and to report suspicious people or activity to police. Link urged people to avoid walking or jogging alone at night. He also suggested students limit use of earphones and lengthy phone conversations. A lawsuit has been filed in federal court in connection with an October 2012 officerinvolved shooting in Woodruff that left a pregnant woman and her unborn child dead. According to the lawsuit, Lacy Lamb was a passenger in a car driven by Matt Simmons that was pulled over because the driver wasn’t wearing a seat belt. Simmons stopped the vehicle at a stop sign and abruptly got out of the car and started to flee, leaving the vehicle gearshift in drive, according to the lawsuit. The lawsuit alleges Lamb then attempted to move from the passenger’s side to the driver’s side to gain control of the vehicle. The lawsuit alleges Woodruff police officer William Todd Knight exited his patrol car and recognized Simmons, telling him there was no use in running because he knew who he was. Simmons continued to run. According to the lawsuit, Knight then drew his sidearm and fired two shots, killing Lamb and her unborn child. Lamb was 21 weeks pregnant. The lawsuit claims Knight used excessive force and had other methods available to handle the situation.

DSS to investigate Boys Home APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com South Carolina Department of Social Services officials say they will investigate the Dec. 20 removal of four boys in residential care at the Boys Home of the South. Al Squire, executive director of the facility, reported earlier this year that the residents were removed by DSS caseworkers just before the holidays. Squire said Boys Home staff did not receive any prior indication from DSS that there were issues at the facility, but he suspects the removal was connected to a lawsuit filed in May. The lawsuit alleges that the Boys

Home and DSS failed to track childon-child maltreatment, specifically in the case of a resident who had a history of sexually inappropriate behavior. In a statement issued last week, DSS said, “The Department of Social Services is concerned about all of the children under our care and is conducting an investigation into the situation.” Squire said in a recent interview with the Greenville Journal that he does not anticipate receiving any more residential clients, but the facility is moving toward specializing in treating development trauma and attachment disorder and will include outreach and services for the entire family.

Flu activity high in Upstate Hospitals issue visitation restrictions to slow spread of illness APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Enough people are suffering the sniffling, sneezing and fever of the flu in the Upstate that six local hospitals have jointly issued a temporary visitation restriction for children under the age of 18 in an attempt to prevent the spread of influenza. In the Upstate, AnMed Health, Baptist Easley, Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, Cannon Memorial Hospital, Greenville Health System and Laurens County Memorial Hospital requested last week that children refrain from visiting hospitalized patients. They also urged adults who have flu, cold or respiratory illness symptoms to stay away as well. The restriction is not mandatory and officials realize the timing of visits is vital for some patients, the hospitals said. They ask that visitors wear facemasks and wash their hands often. The state Hospital Association “would like to commend these Upstate hospitals for working together to take proactive steps for the prevention of exposure and spread of the influenza virus … and the promotion of influenza prevention measures like immunization and proper hand hygiene in the communities they each serve,” said Dr. Rick Foster, the association’s senior vice president for quality and patient safety, in a written statement. The Upstate flu season thus far has

not been especially harsh, but more patients have been admitted for flu symptoms and complications, said Sue Boeker, RN, infection preventionist with Greenville Health System (GHS). “I have never seen numbers of people admitted for flu complications this high since I began tracking data six years ago,” Boeker said. As of press time, 89 patients have been admitted to GHS with severe flu symptoms or complications, which include secondary infections like pneumonia, she said. Bon Secours St. Francis Health System reported nine flu-related admissions. Last flu season, health officials saw two waves of flu infections, one around Thanksgiving and another in January, Boeker said. Influenza cases typically peak in South Carolina in February, she added, and this year the state has seen peak-level numbers in December and January. This year, GHS has seen slightly more adults admitted than children, Boeker said. Children and senior citizens are typically the most vulnerable to influenza. For the week ending Jan. 11, more than 21,000 cases of flu have been reported in the state, according to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control’s (DHEC) weekly flu report. To date, there have been 1,049 hospitalizations and 30 deaths between late September 2013 and Jan. 11, 2014. Though influenza cases are near peak levels, area residents still have time to get flu shots and would benefit from doing so, said Boeker. It takes up to two weeks to attain full immunity, but the flu season in South Carolina can last through April.

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JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 11


JOURNAL NEWS

Gun carry bill moves forward JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com South Carolinians with concealed weapons permits may soon be able to carry firearms into bars and restaurants willing to allow them. The state Senate amended a bill last week that allows permit holders to carry guns into restaurants or bars as long as they abstain from drinking alcohol. However, the bill allows restaurant and bar owners to post signs on their property banning concealed weapons. The bill now returns to the S.C. House, where it is expected to pass. Senate Judiciary Chairman Larry Martin said he expects South Carolina gun owners to behave responsibly. “The law specifically recognizes that alcohol and guns don’t mix and we provide the opportunity for CWP permits based on those following the law,” he said. “Those who choose not to follow the law will be dealt with very severely. These are law-abiding citizens and I feel very confident that we will not have any difficulties going forward.” Martin said existing law gives business owners the right to ban concealed weapons, and that won’t change. The bill simply allows CWP holders to keep their guns with them when going to and from restaurants or bars rather than being forced to leave them in the car.

Drive-thru flu shots

Greenville Health System will host a drive-thru flu vaccine clinic at 4-6 p.m. this Friday at Patewood Memorial Hospital. Shots will be given free of charge to adults as long as supplies last. For more information, visit ghs.org.

Open up and say ‘Laaaa’

Quartets and small groups from the award-winning Greenville in Harmony Show Chorus will deliver Singing Valentines on Valentine’s Day. The chorus will send a costumed group of 4-8 ladies to deliver two songs, a small box of chocolates and a personalized card. They can deliver to homes, workplaces, most restaurants, schools, hospitals or anywhere else. They also offer Singing Valentines by phone. For more information, visit greenvilleinharmony.com.

12 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Corps values Brittany Holloway is one of 13 women nationwide to complete Marine infantry training – and the first from S.C. APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com When Pfc. Brittany Holloway, 19, entered Marine Corps infantry training last fall, she didn’t see herself as a trailblazer. It was simply the next step in a military career that started in high school. Holloway, a Fountain Inn resident, was one of a handful of women Marines who volunteered for infantry training after the infantry was opened to females in early 2013. She graduated this month and is the first female Marine from South Carolina to complete the training. As of early January, 13 women have completed training in two

waves, according to the Marine Corps. The military is using data on up to 200 women who complete the training to determine whether on-the-ground infantry positions should be open to females. At 5 feet, 3 inches tall “on a good day,” Holloway admits that when she walked into infantry training at Camp Geiger in North Carolina, “it was very, very frightening.” She had been preparing for the challenge, however, having participated in JROTC at Woodmont High School. “I’ve always been adventurous,” said Holloway in a telephone interview from Ft. Leonard Wood, where she is waiting

to begin motor transportation school.

“A MILITARY KIND OF GIRL” The youngest of five children, Holloway said family history influenced her choices: Her father, Rob Holloway, is retired after 25 years in the Army and her brother is in the Navy. The decision was also driven by her own ambition, she said. Holloway did well in JROTC and “people in my school knew me as a military kind of girl.” Multiple people, including some drill instructors, tried to dissuade her from entering infantry training, citing the MARINE continued on PAGE 14

Brittany Holloway, with her parents and grandmother, at her graduation from Marine Corps infantry training.

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length of the hikes, the 80-pound packs (up to three times heavier than those in basic training) and the possibility of injury – a reality that has sidelined many female recruits. “People asked if I would enter infantry if it was open to women and it was expected of me. But I didn’t join because it

Upon arriving at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, recruits are greeted by a drill instructor and ordered to get off the bus and onto the legendary yellow footprints.

was expected of me, it was just who I was,” she said. Holloway said she entered training with 15 other women in a platoon of more than 300 men. Five women graduated.

“PART OF THE BROTHERHOOD” Though detractors say that women could be sexually harassed as part of an infantry unit, Holloway said she did not experience it. “The males became like family; they were very professional. They knew that we weren’t the girls that would participate in those kinds of activities with them, so they never tried,” she said. “We became part of the brotherhood of the Marine Corps.” Holloway said the female trainees were easy to spot, though. “We blended in, but it was hard to because we had the buns on the back of our heads.” The women participated in all of the training and exercises, including the upper-body strength tests that have proven to be the most difficult for female recruits. According to Holloway’s mother, Shannon, Holloway had been doing up to five pull-ups – two more than the three pullup minimum required of male and female trainees. “She had to do everything the guys had to do,” Shannon Holloway said. “She’s been

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an inspiration to many young women.” In addition to belonging to the brotherhood, Holloway said that the women supported each other, including some that were behind her group in training. “They cheered us on and were inspirational to us. It kept me going on the hardest days.” One of those hardest days included a 20K hike with full combat packs, followed by a two-mile hike with additional 50-pound daypacks and patrolling for three to six hours. “That day was physically so hard,” she said. “People say infantry training is physically harder, but for me it was mentally harder. I definitely learned who cared about me in my life and who didn’t care about me – very quickly.”

school brought the two closer, she said. “It was like a switch turned on for the both of us and we both had a lot to talk about and a lot to relate about.” Holloway said she realizes her role as an example and inspiration, that “I not only need to represent the Marine Corps, but females in the Marine Corps.” “Putting other people first is something that I’ve always loved doing, and if I could do this job for free, I absolutely would,” she said.

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While she never considered sexual harassment an issue, Holloway admits “a lot of males made fun of not only me, but the other women in the company. They made Facebook pages that made fun of female Marines and we showed up on there.” Holloway said she didn’t show that it bothered her and confided in friends and family. “Females are different. It’s not that we can’t do it, we do it differently,” she said. When faced with various situations in training, often times the females offered a “different look,” she said. And after being one of the first women to graduate from the grueling infantry school, Holloway shares a secret goal: She wants to eventually outrank her father in the Marine Corps. In fact, her decision to enter infantry

13 1 306 15

number of females who have completed Marine Corps infantry training

number of females from South Carolina who have completed Marine infantry training

number of men in Brittany Holloway’s infantry training platoon

number of women in Brittany Holloway’s infantry training platoon


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Life is one big circus Ringmaster turns oneyear gig into role of lifetime CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

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Johnathan Lee Iverson never thought he’d turn being the ringmaster for Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus into a career. The directors for Ringling were looking for a ringmaster who could sing. Iverson, who traveled all over the world as a kid as a member of the Boys Choir of Harlem, had his sights on an opera career. The University of Hartford graduate wanted a job so he could save money to study in Europe. “I didn’t even know what a ringmaster did,” he said. “I figured I could use it as a good pickup line later.” Iverson landed the job, one that he thought he’d keep for a year, tops. “I had heard of Ringling Bros. growing up and I enjoyed the circus as much as any fan,” he said during a phone interview last week from the circus’s stop in Jacksonville, Fla. “But I never perceived the circus as a career. I thought, ‘Those people are strange. They are daredevils who walk on wires high off the ground and hang by the hairs of their heads.’” When he landed the job in 1998, he became the first black ringmaster in Ringling’s history. He was also the youngest at age 22. He’s still with the circus 15 years later. Iverson and the rest of Ringling’s blue team will be in Greenville beginning Jan. 29 to perform their new show, “Legends.” Iverson grew up in Central Park West in New York City. He attended LaGuardia High School, the school that inspired the 1980 film “Fame.” As a member of the Boys Choir of Harlem, he Johnathan sang for four presiLee dents and with Tony Iverson Bennett, although at HEINZ the time he didn’t reKLUETMEIER ally know who Tony CONTRIBUTING

Bennett was. The choir also sang for Nelson Mandela at JFK International Airport after Mandela’s release from prison in 1990. “This job has just confirmed what my parents told me while I was growing up to follow my passion,” he said. “So few people do that. They’re too afraid and they allow others to define them. They spend their life playing other roles instead of the lead character in their own story.” Iverson’s wife, Priscilla Iverson, is associate producer of the brand-new show, “Legends.” She is from Rio de Janeiro and was a dancer with the circus. They travel with their two children, ages 8 and 4. Preparing for the new show is hard work and days are long. “The performers are either practicing, performing or sleeping. They literally practice for perfection,” Iverson said of the circus performers. “Because you have to be perfect. Your life depends on it.” As ringmaster, Iverson acts as narrator and storyteller. He says the circus strives to provide audience members an element of surprise in each show, something they’ve never seen before. “We want to hear those ‘ahhhs,’” Iverson said. There’s a duo flying trapeze act that features four successive triple somersaults, eight women who hang by their hair and a Chinese national acrobatic troupe. An hour before each show, ticketholders will be allowed to get on the area floor for the all-access pre-show. There, they can learn juggling and balancing skills, meet some of the performers and the famous Ringling Bros. clowns. One of the circus’s elephants will paint a picture that will be given to an audience member. For the first time, the circus is offering Ringmaster’s Zone tickets that allow exclusive access to go behind the scenes, meet the ringmaster and get a family photo taken on the Ringling red carpet with a circus star.

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GUEST COLUMN WITH WENDY WALDEN

Tech honors Upstate’s Unsung Heroes

Robertson

Ackerman

This week, Greenville Technical College took the time to recognize some very deserving people in the Upstate at our Unsung Heroes event. These are not people who act honorably in the hope that someone will notice. Instead, they do the right thing because they act from the heart, and many of them come forward to receive their awards with reluctance. They’re much more comfortable with giving than receiving. We were pleased to honor Bo Robertson, a student veteran who gets involved with groups on campus – not to pad his resume, but to make a difference. He’s been very active with the Greenville Tech Veterans group, Student Government, our Emerging Leaders program, and our new Habitat for Humanity club. David Ackerman received an employee award for giving students the support they need to succeed, whether that means a little extra help with a question in one of his classes on building and construction technology or business, or a place to live so that the student can concentrate on finishing his academic program. Tomeika Bennett, who serves Greenville Tech as a college skills instructor, was recognized as a role model, humanitarian and hero for seeing issues from the student side and reminding others

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Brockman

to view challenges from that perspective. Mary Brockman also received an employee award for being a champion of the defenseless, the powerless and the poor. A 30-year employee of the college, she has assisted thousands of students in achieving their goals and is often remembered by graduates as that pivotal person whose actions allowed someone to move forward. One of our community awards went to Kelly Walker, founder and executive director of the Upstate Fatherhood Coalition, a group that helps fathers overcome the barriers to being responsible and involved parents. The other community award was presented to Bryan Dods of GE Energy Power and Water, Jason Premo of ADEX Machining Technologies, and Mike McCormick of Bosch Rexroth. These manufacturing leaders have been instrumental in plans and progress for the Center for Manufacturing Innovation that Greenville Tech will open in conjunction with Clemson University. Finally, we honored a corporate hero, Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes and owners Thomas McAfee IV and John McAfee, for not only providing trusted, compassionate and dignified assistance to families and individuals facing loss, but for also giving to the community with conferences on grieving and high-

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quality educational experiences for our nursing students. We salute these unsung heroes and the people who have come before them over the past 17 years as we have recognized people who give of themselves for the betterment of all. And this week, we also recognize the many people who came forward to participate in our second Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service. These heroes rotated through service stations including an education station that informed participants about the day and its meaning, a station where sandwiches were prepared for agencies serving the hungry, a station where appreciation cards were made for service members, an animal appreciation station where attendees made toys for groups serving animals, and a giving station where donations were made for the college’s planned Habitat for Humanity build and coats and canned goods were dropped off. These events in the first weeks of the year will set the tone at Greenville Technical College for 2014. To further ensure that our future takes a positive direction, this year we are completing civil treatment training for all employees, allowing the college to become a workplace in which all employees are

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treated consistently, professionally and legally, and a place where business decisions are based on legitimate criteria rather than personal characteristics. This training is a result of a comprehensive plan instituted in the last year at Greenville Tech based on a true belief in and understanding of the value of diversity and inclusion. Thanks to that plan, we have made enormous strides in creating and celebrating a community reflective of the diverse audiences we serve. We are proud of the progress we have made and look forward to a year in which we continue to make concrete progress toward measurable goals. Wendy Walden is associate vice president for executive affairs at Greenville Technical College.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

TEDxGreenville gets ‘Unzipped’ April 11 conference will feature 12 speakers TEDxGreenville, an annual conference featuring speakers on topics from inventions to social issues, has announced the 12 speakers and seven performers for the April 11 conference. The local conference is based on the TED (technology, entertainment, design) national conference designed to share ideas from “thinkers and doers” who present a talk in 18 minutes or less. The TEDxGreenville 2014 theme is “Unzipped” and each speaker has the potential to “catalyze change,” said TEDxGreenville 2014 curator Lisa Corley. More than 150 speakers and performers were nominated for this year’s event, more than any other previous years, Corley said. Tickets for the daylong event are available beginning March 5 at tedxgreenville.com. TEDxGreenville 2014 speakers are: Dr. Melisa Holmes, OB-GYN and founder of Girlology and Guyology, educational programs, books and Web community on puberty and emerging sexuality. Heather Marshall, Greenville-based author and yoga teacher. Jody Servon, who has created art installations, drawings, photographs, sculptures, video and social experiments. Paul McAvinney, inventor of the first optically-scanned, multi-touch sensor (Sensor Frame) and the first optically-scanned musical instrument (VideoHarp), and expert witness in the patent wars between Apple and the Android smartphone manufacturers. Joseph “Joey” Obermann, electrical design engineer with a passion for new innovation and founder of a busi-

ness focusing on solar energy and LED lighting design. Dr. John DesJardins, assistant professor in bioengineering at Clemson University and the director of the Frank H. Stelling and C. Dayton Riddle Orthopaedic Education and Research Laboratory at CUBEInC. Caroline Caldwell, Ph.D., founder of New Mind Health and Care and creator of a behavioral modification strategy that works with families and individuals for successful reentry after incarceration. Marie Majarais Smith, program manager and bilingual victim advocate for the Immigrant Victim Program of the S.C. Victim Assistance Network, ensuring victims’ rights and access to justice and resources. Alfred Squire, CEO of the Boys Home of the South, diversity initiatives advocate and owner of Success to Dreams, Inc. Gen Kelsang Nyema, American Buddhist nun and the resident teacher of Ganden Kadampa Buddhist Center in Columbia. Chauncey Beaty, performance poet, speaker, trainer and certified life coach, specializing in “hard work and heart work” and facilitating dialogue on difficult-to-discuss topics. Roxy, Charlotte-based female impersonator and entertainer, whose performances are noted for their combination of wit, comedic timing, celebrity illusion and live vocals. • Performers include: • Jacob Johnson, guitarist • Chiccy Baritone, performance poet • Conrad Ma, beatbox • David Benedict, mandolin player • Carolina Ballet Theatre, dance • WireWood, guitar/cello duo • Granville Automatic, storytelling band

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JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 19


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Hampton Park Christian School will hold an open house Jan. 28-30. Hosts and hostesses will be available to assist visitors and a nursery will be provided for children age 3 and younger from 8:30-11:30 a.m. each day. Reservations are not required. For more information, visit hpcsonline.org or call 864-233-0556. Michelle Bennett, Greenville High School’s career development facilitator, recently arranged for professionals to present information during their lunch shifts. Members of the hospitality and tourism industry visited, including Bill Groves, general manager of Embassy Suites; Eileen Staples, director of food and nutrition services at Greenville County Schools; and Tracey Williams, director of culinary at Greenville Technical College. South Carolina electric cooperatives are sponsoring one-day teacher workshops to introduce teachers to enLIGHTenSC, an energy education program. Upcoming workshops will be held in Columbia on Feb. 1 and 8. There will also be summer graduate-credit courses paid for by the electric cooperatives. For more information, visit enlightensc.org.

From left: Kevin Marcedes, Jeremy Meier, Justin Finley, Christian Sutton, K.J. Keesling, Yi Wang, Victor Chen and Sam Peng.

A team of Southside Christian School engineering students instructed by Susan LaFlam was one of 32 teams nationwide to earn $10,000 in scholarships and grants in the Lexus Eco Challenge. The SCS team participated in the final challenge for a chance at one of two $32,000 grand prizes. Teams were required to define an environmental issue important to them, develop an action plan to address the issue, implement the plan and report on the results. SCS students entered a project to address climate change by seeking ways to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gases. Winners in the competition will be announced in February.

Langston Charter Middle School students and faculty recently assisted members of the United States Marine Corps as they collect donations for Toys for Tots in the school car line. The collection totaled more than 450 toys, 12 books and 35 stocking stuffers.

20 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.


OUR COMMUNITY

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

Greenville Forward presents “Brother Outsider: The Life and Work of Bayard Rustin” on Jan. 29 at 7 p.m., at Coffee Underground, 1 E. Coffee St. Admission is $5 as a suggested donation. To register, visit jan14challenge.eventbrite. com or call 864-233-8443. Clarence B. Jones, who served as political advisor, counsel and draft speechwriter for Martin Luther King Jr., will speak on the Furman University campus Jan. 27 at 7 p.m. in Shaw Hall of Younts Conference Center. His talk, “King’s Legacy: Challenge for the 21st Century,” is free and open to the public. Jones will also be signing books following the lecture. For more information, contact Chandra Dillard at chandra.dillard@furman.edu or 864-294-2503, or visit furman.edu. On Jan. 25, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., several student organizations from the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine will join together to host a health and wellness fair at the Carolinas Campus, 350 Howard St., Spartanburg. The event is free and open to the public and will offer a number of health screenings, including blood pressure checks, blood sugar, cholesterol, HIV, health counseling and other physical screenings. The event will also feature healthy activities for participants such as yoga, Zumba, free flu shots and more than 20 exhibitors. There will also be door prizes, giveaways and activities for children. For more information, contact Natalie Brown at nbrown@vcom.edu or 864-327-9814. Coffee and Conversation, a program for moms on the go, will be held Jan. 29, noon-1 p.m., at Starbucks on Fairview Road, Simpsonville. Moms are invited to join Dr. Carole Mercer of Heritage Pediatrics and Internal Medicine-Simpsonville to talk about women’s health issues. The event is free, but registration is required. To register, visit ghs.org/healthevents. Registration for the eighth spring season of Carolina Miracle League baseball will be open through Feb. 3 at carolinamiracleleague.org or in person at Miracle Park, Old Furnace Road in Boiling Springs on Jan. 25, 10-11 a.m. The CML set a new record for participation in the spring of 2013 with 104 children enjoying the game of baseball. The CML will celebrate “Opening Week” with games on March 24 and 27. Participants in the spring season will enjoy eight weeks of play beginning in March and ending on May 22. For more information, call 864-579-1805. The Greenville Zoo and its guests will celebrate the eighth birthday of Bob, a Bornean orangutan, with a birthday bash at the Orangutan Exhibit on Jan. 25, 2-3 p.m. Event highlights include Bob picking the 2014 Super Bowl winner, refreshments by Chick-fil-A at Cherrydale (while supplies last), special educational sessions with zoo docents, and presents and cupcakes for Bob and his family. The Greenville Zoo is also accepting donations of old sheets and blankets for the orangutan family. Bob’s Birthday Bash is free for Greenville Zoo members and children under 3. Zoo guests can attend the event for free with the purchase of a general admission ticket. For more information, visit greenvillezoo.com. Local independent bookstore Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s story time at 1175 Woods Crossing Road at 10:30 a.m. on the following dates: Feb. 6 will feature “Otis and the Puppy” by Loren Long; Feb. 13 will be “Tulip Loves Rex” by Alyssa Satin Capucilli; Feb. 20 will be “Henny” by Elizabeth Rose Stanton; and Feb. 27 will feature “Superworm” by Julia Donaldson. Girls on the Run and Girls on Track combine training for a 5K with esteemenhancing workouts for girls ages 8-15 and starts on Feb. 5. The fee is $199. Scholarships and payment plans are available. To register, visit ghs.org/girlsontherun. Book Your Lunch with New York Times best-selling N.C. author Sarah Addison Allen on Feb. 7 at noon at Twigs Tempietto. Tickets are $35 or $52.55 per person and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. The $35 ticket includes a $10 book voucher and the $52.55 ticket includes a copy of Addison’s “Lost Lake.”

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 21


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

The Friends of the Reedy River recently elected board officers and additional members. Officers include: Nikki Grumbine, president; Bob Lloyd, vice president; Paula Wynn, secretary; and Bill Stephenson, treasurer. New board members are Rick Huffman, Brock Koonce, Melanie Ruhlman and Wade Kolb. For more information, visit friendsofthereedyriver.org. 

Fashion with a Passion on March 6 will benefit Safe Harbor, which serves victims of domestic violence. Held at the Poinsett Club, the event will feature a silent auction, followed by a fashion show with the latest spring styles from Greenville’s boutiques. All proceeds will benefit Safe Harbor. Tickets are $55 for general admission, $90 for VIP admission and $750 for a table. For more information and tickets, visit fashionwithapassionsc.org.

The Mary Black Foundation recently added three new staff members. Kimberly D. Stravolo was named controller/finance manager. Stravolo formerly worked for Upstate CPAs PA, Stravolo & Company PA, and Ernst & Young LLP. Tamela Spann has been named the program specialist in early childhood development and was formerly the program officer for The Spartanburg County Foundation. Matthew C. Manley was named program specialist in healthy eating/active living. He recently served as a Safe Routes to School planning consultant and the community planning coordinator for LiveWell Greenville.

Fall for Greenville recently presented $50,000, a portion of the three-day event’s proceeds, to multiple local nonprofits. Recipients this year include: Boy Scout Troop 260, Greenville Chinese Association, Greenville in Harmony, Hands On Greenville, Newcomers Club of Greater Greenville in support of Greenville Meals on Wheels, Red Shoe Society in support of The Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas and Surgeons for Sight. To date, Fall for Greenville has donated more than $360,000 to local charities.

The Community Foundation welcomed six members to its board of directors. New members include Mark Cooter, managing partner of Cherry Bekaert’s South Carolina Upstate practice; Jon Good, CEO of NAI Earle Furman; Lesa Kastler, former board chair with Clarity, Center for Developmental Services and A Child’s Haven; Adela Mendoza, executive director of the Hispanic Alliance; Marie Monroe, an attorney with Merline & Meacham P.A.; and Steve Spinks, CEO of The Spinx Company. Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill and Bar, 430 Congaree Road, Greenville, will host a Flapjack Fundraiser on Jan. 25, 8 a.m., to benefit the National MS Society, a nonprofit that funds research to learn more about multiple sclerosis. Proceeds will be used to help prepare for the Charleston Challenge Walk, an annual 50-mile benefit walk. Tickets are $7 and can be purchased by contacting Allison Cook at 864-2754756. Breakfast includes a short stack of pancakes, sausage and beverages.

Home Instead Senior Care is taking nominations for outstanding senior volunteers age 65 and older in the Salute to Senior Service program. Nominations and votes will be accepted through March 1. The winner in each state will receive $500 and one national winner will receive $5,000 to donate to each winner’s charity of choice. For more information, visit salutetoseniorservice.com. Twenty-four local nonprofit executive directors and board chairs will embark on a five-month pilot program, known as the Healthy Organization Institute, a bestpractices training program that incorporates peer learning, classroom instruction and creative problem solving. The program is made possible through a partnership of the Mary Black Foundation, The Spartanburg County Foundation, Spartanburg Regional Foundation, United Way of the Piedmont and the University of South Carolina Upstate’s George Dean Johnson, Jr. College of Business and Economics.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

BE THE BRIDGE

Christian Resource Foster Parents Needed Call 864-878-9987 or visit www.MiracleHill.org/foster to find out how you can help.

22 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014


JOURNAL CULTURE

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY MICHAEL LUTCH

‘PORGY AND BESS’ returns to its roots

THINGS YOU MAY NOT HAVE KNOWN ABOUT

But the national touring show coming to South Carolina is not the same as original CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

• “Summertime” is the most popular song covered by recording artists, with more than 3,000 known recordings. • “Porgy and Bess” premiered 76 years ago with the largest all-black cast ever seen on an American stage. • The cultural significance of “Porgy and Bess” was recognized by the United States Postal Service when it issued a commemorative 29-cent postage stamp in 1993. • Singer Anne Brown, the original Bess, was the first African-American female vocalist to be admitted by the Juilliard School in New York. • John W. Bubbles, the original Sportin’ Life, gave tap dance lessons to Fred Astaire in the 1920s. • The fictitious Catfish Row is based on Cabbage Row, a small neighborhood in Charleston.

Coming to South Carolina has special meaning to the cast of the national tour of “Porgy and Bess: The Broadway Musical.” “As a company, we’re looking forward to being in the same state where the story originated,” said Nathaniel Stampley, who plays the role of Porgy in the revamped version of the George and Ira Gershwin classic. “Porgy and Bess” is set on Catfish Row, a fictional black ghetto based on a real neighborhood in Charleston called Cabbage Row. Gershwin’s original four-hourlong folk opera was based on Charleston native DuBose Heyward’s novel, “Porgy.” Greenville is the national tour’s

closest stop to Charleston. The production opens Jan. 28 at the Peace Center and is suitable for ages 12 and up. “‘Porgy and Bess’ is just such a big part of American theater history,” Stampley said. The opera premiered in Boston in 1935 with the largest all-black cast ever seen on an American stage. In 1936, the show was scheduled to play at the National Theatre in Washington, D.C. when lead actors Todd Duncan and Anne Brown refused to appear as Porgy and Bess until the theater agreed to allow blacks and whites to sit side-by-side in a fully integrated audience. In 2011, Tony Award-winning director Diane Paulus and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright PORGY & BESS continued on PG 24

JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 23


JOURNAL CULTURE

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY MICHAEL LUTCH

PORGY & BESS continued from PAGE 23

Suzan-Lewis Parks turned the four-hour opera into a two-and-one-half hour musical. Their version replaced much of the sung dialogue with spoken words, eliminated repetitiveness and developed the characters further. “In this version, the emphasis is more on the storytelling, who these people are, where they come from and how they re-

late to the community and each other,” Stampley said. “The story is still the same. It’s still a wonderful love story.” The remake was controversial. Purists, including Stephen Sondheim, complained that a musical treasure was being corrupted. But the Broadway revival that featured Norm Lewis and Audra McDonald onstage won awards and was a box office hit. Stampley understudied Lewis in the title role on Broadway and played the role

EYE CANDY FOR ART LOVERS.

“As a company, we’re looking forward to being in the same state where the story originated.” Nathaniel Stampley

several times in New York. That gave him an advantage to land the role in the national tour. “A lot of guys have done Porgy around the country, but other than Norm Lewis, I was the only guy who knew this version,” he said. Landing the role of Porgy was a dream for Stampley, who first was introduced to the show when he was a teenager in Milwaukee and a member of his high school opera chorus. “I don’t think it gets much better than this,” he said. “I’ve come full circle. Decades later, here I am living a dream that I didn’t think would be possible.” The revamped musical still has the classic songs such as “Summertime,” “I Got Plenty o’ Nothin” and “It Ain’t Necessarily So.” “George Gershwin is truly one of the country’s great composers,” Stampley said. “The music is just incredible. Any

time you can hear it, it’s a good thing.” Stampley said a lot of thought and care went into this version of “Porgy and Bess” and some say the depiction of AfricanAmericans is less offensive. But, he said, not all the elements that made people uneasy have been eliminated. “There’s no way to erase 75 years of history. People bring their own experiences to it,” he said. “But in this version, you see the humanity of every person on stage and celebrate that. No matter who you are, you’re going to see a bit of yourself in one of the characters on stage. We’re celebrating the humanity and universality of the themes.” Stampley does hope this version will make “Porgy and Bess” accessible to more people, especially those who are not opera fans. “You really get the best of both worlds. You get a great story and you get to hear Gershwin. How can that not be good?”

“THE GERSHWINS’ PORGY AND BESS: THE BROADWAY MUSICAL” WHERE: Peace Center

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

TICKETS: $45 to $75 NOTE: This show is recommended for ages 12 and up ESTIMATED RUNNING TIME: 2 hours, 30 minutes with 15-minute intermission INFORMATION: peacecenter.org or 864-467-3000.

admission free

24 GCMA THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014 0814 Journal EYE CANDY.indd 2

WHEN: Jan. 28, 29 and 30, 7:30 p.m.; Jan. 31 and Feb. 1, 8 p.m.; Feb. 1, 2 p.m.; Feb. 2, 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

1/15/14 10:05 AM


Pressure to perform GLT will write, perform three one-act plays in 24 hours CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Talk about the pressure to perform. In Greenville Little Theatre’s fifth annual 24-Hour Play Festival, three teams will write, rehearse and perform one-act plays in – as the name suggests – just 24 hours. Each team of writers must come up with a one-act play that has five actors and lasts about 10 minutes. This year, each play must incorporate a situation selected by an online vote – a sword fight, somebody’s pants getting pulled down, somebody getting slapped or somebody dancing for at least 30 seconds. One of the play’s characters must be a lion tamer, astronaut, mortician or a zombie – again, depending on what wins the online vote. The writers must also use a winning line of dialogue – an Elvis impersonation, a line in Pig Latin, a line from

a Beatles’ song or the line a character must read after picking up a random script off the stage – and the winning prop, choices for which include a Hula-Hoop, jump rope, rubber chicken, bricks in a suitcase or a foam finger. The online vote ends at 2 p.m. Friday. The winning choices will be revealed to the writers when they show up at GLT five hours later. The online vote is “one of the fun things about it,” said Katie King, GLT’s associate director and overall director of the 24-Hour Play Festival. “It ensures that nobody cheats and starts writing early, and the combinations can create some really funny moments in the plays.” The writers must turn their scripts in by 7 a.m. The plays’ directors get the scripts at 8 a.m. and the actors start rehearsing at 9 a.m. Saturday morning. Actor Evan Harris has participated in each 24-Hour Play Festival. He said over the years, the writers have learned not to overload one character with dialogue because they only have about 10 hours to memorize their lines. “If you have a great part but it happens to have a lot of lines and an hour or two before the show you’re still learning

JOURNAL CULTURE

S O Y O U K N O W. . . WHAT: 24-Hour Play Festival WHO: Greenville Little Theatre’s Studio 444 WHEN: Saturday, Jan. 25, 8 p.m. WHERE: Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. TICKETS: $10 INFORMATION: greenvillelittletheatre. org or 864-233-6238

your lines, that’s scary,” Harris said. “I’ve paraphrased a little, I’m not going to lie.” Harris said the writers are good at integrating the online vote winners into their plays, even when those items have nothing in common. “It creates some really funny moments in the storylines,” he said. Harris said he thinks the 24-Hour Play Festival is popular because patrons are fascinated by the concept – and some are kind of hoping for a train wreck. “We haven’t had a complete disaster yet,” he said. “But if you do enough theater, something’s going to go wrong.” After the performances, GLT’s Laughing Stock Improv Group will perform.

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JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 25


JOURNAL CULTURE

A R T S CALENDAR JAN. 24-30 Greenville Little Theatre 24 Hour Play Festival Jan. 25 ~ 233-6238 Younts Center for Performing Arts Mountain Heart Jan. 25 ~ 409-1050 Greenville Symphony Orchestra And the Winner Is … Jan. 25-26 ~ 467-3000

127 NOMINATIONS. 5 JUDGES. 8 WINNERS.

SC Children’s Theatre Timbre Tales: I Want My Hat Back Jan. 28 ~ 235-2885 Peace Center The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess Jan. 28-Feb. 2 ~ 467-3000 Centre Stage Rock ‘n Roll Gold Through Feb. 15 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art South Carolina Art: Eight Decades of New Through Mar. 16 ~ 271-7570 Greenville County Museum of Art Interiors: Karen Ann Myers Through Mar. 23 ~ 271-7570

?

Greenville County Museum of Art Will Henry Stevens: The Flowering of Southern Abstraction Continuing ~ 271-7570 Greenville County Museum of Art Andrew Wyeth: Selected Watercolors Continuing ~ 271-7570 Metropolitan Arts Council The Artist Trade Show Through Feb. 21 ~ 467-3132 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Melissa Anderson Through Feb. 28 ~ 242-1050

WHO’S WHO?

Find out February 2014 26 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014

Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Greg Flint & Paul Flint Through Mar. 17 ~ 233-6733

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 1/29, GROUND ZERO

The Bunny The Bear Boundary-breaking experimental hardcore. Call 864-948-1661 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2. 1/31, GOTTROCKS

Brushfire Stankgrass Bluegrass with electronics. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976. 1/31, RADIO ROOM

Grown-Up Avenger Stuff         Prog-rock with pop melodies. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com. 1/31, SMILEY’S ACOUSTIC CAFÉ

Gregory Hodges Talented blues guitarist. Call 864-282-8988 or visit smileysacousticcafe.com. 2/1, BLIND HORSE SALOON

Charlie Worsham Rising country star. Tickets: $10 in advance, $12 day of show. Call 864-233-1381 or visit blind-horse.com. 2/1, THE HANDLEBAR

Robyn Hitchcock Acclaimed songwriter plays solo acoustic show. Tickets: $18. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 2/5, PEACE CENTER

Ricky Skaggs and Bruce Hornsby with Kentucky Thunder Bluegrass classics and brand-new tunes. Tickets: $40-$50. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 2/15, THE HANDLEBAR

Rodney Crowell Iconic Nashville performer/writer/producer. Tickets: $21. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 2/28, INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ALE HOUSE

The Executives Alt-pop/reggae. Call 864-552-1265 or visit facebook.com/ipagreenville.


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

A hoot and a holler The Hooten Hallers combine pre-rock styles with modern energy If someone were to pull Tom Waits aside, sit him down and play him any of the Hooten Hallers’ three studio albums, you’d have to think he’d be smiling, and maybe a little envious. That’s because the swaggering, staggering ball of chaos that is the Hooten Hallers sound recalls the prime 1970s work of the Growling One himself. The drums pound and stumble, the guitar WHAT: The Hooten Hallers sleazily slings riffs left and right, and there’s a tuba burbling along in the WHEN: Monday, Jan. 27; doors open 8 p.m. background, giving the proceedings a WHERE: Independent Public Ale House, distinctly seasick feel. 110 Poinsett Hwy. And while this loose-but-limber INFO: 864-552-1565 or facebook.com/ipagreenville dustball unevenly rolls along, singer/ guitarist John Randall wails, rasps and howls like Howlin’ Wolf slamming full speed into Joe Cocker. The band, which came together in Columbus, Mo., in 2006, pulls heavily from pre-rock musical styles ranging from jump-blues to hillbilly country, with some jarring, early-Chess-Records-style electric distortion thrown in. Stand-up drummer Andy Rehm says that the Hooten Hallers combine those older styles with modern energy. “We’re all fans of pre-war blues and American music,” he says, “but we’re big fans of rock ’n’ roll music, too, and we just decided to mix them all together and see what happened. Of course, there are a lot of notable American bands that are mixing styles, but we’ve tried to do our own thing with it.” Rehm says that the band’s raucous playing is deceptively loose sounding. “You’ve got to be laid back while keeping the whole thing tight,” he says. “Nobody wants to see you fall apart onstage. But it’s not too disciplined. John and I have been playing together for many years, and we’ve always gone for that loose kind of feel.” The Hooten Hallers were a duo for years until they officially added Paul Weber on harmonica and tuba. Weber had been playing a behind-the-scenes role with the band. “He’s someone we’d known for a long time,” Rehm says, “and he’d even played on our previous album (2012’s “Greetings From Welp City”) before he joined. He played on several songs on that album, and then played with us on the new one (“Chillicothe Fireball”) to help us record it. And we realized that this was the kind of guy that could hop in the van and do this with us, no problem. So we just basically said, ‘What will it take to get you in our band, instead of the one you’re in [laughs]?’” The band aimed to record live in the studio on their most recent album for both economic and performance-related reasons. “It does make a little more sense financially, because it takes a little less time,” Rehm says, “especially when you’re paying by the hour. But all the records that we love have been done that way. There’s nothing that can replace a band just playing together. There’s no substitute for that. Our goal for these last two albums was basically to just try to bring what we bring to each and every show into the studio. If you’re tracking rhythm parts, then adding lead parts and all this other [stuff ], and then putting a vocal track on top of it, it doesn’t have the raw power or emotion that you have if you’re just playing together.” Rehm says he’s encouraged by the rising number of bands like the Hooten Hallers who are combining disparate influences into their music. “There’s a lot of genre-mixing right now,” he says. “There are punk-bluegrass bands, country-metal bands … there are all kinds of variations. I love it. I just want people to listen to the good stuff, wherever that may come from.” VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

TMG

Custom Homes...

The Ridge

Creating your New Home Place In Travelers Rest

at sunset

Just off Old White Horse Road, In Travelers Rest

ct

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unde

9 Setting sun Lane

46 Setting sun Lane

$274,690

$349,605 | MLS 1263818

AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC Joan Herlong, Listing Agent · 864-325-2112

KARA DIOGUARDI: HOPE, HEALING & TRIUMPH THROUGH MUSIC

RSVP BY

Join us February 6th for the 4th Annual Julie Valentine Center Luncheon to hear the remarkable story of an amazing woman. Former American Idol judge Kara DioGuardi will share her triumphant life as an artist, songwriter, and experience with sexual abuse. Kara found hope and healing in her music. As one of the most successful contemporary songwriters in the world, Kara’s songs have appeared on more than 160 million albums.

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JAN. 31st 2014

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JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 27


JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

The Ward Artist Studios, located at 110 Wardlaw St. in Greenville, presents “Curiosities” on Jan. 25, 5-8 p.m. Curious guests are also invited to their after party at Gringos, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., featuring music by Wasted Wine. Tickets are $3 in advance and $5 at the door and include: entrance to the “Curiosities” art show, one raffle ticket, curious refreshments, invitation to the after party and one free Gringos house drink. Advance ticket holders also get a personal little curiosity keepsake. For more information, visit thewardartists.com. The Hub City/Emrys Prizes will be awarded in March 2014 for excellence in personal essay and short story. All entries must be received by midnight Feb. 1. Participants must be at least 18 years of age to enter and a resident of Greenville or Spartanburg County. Winners will each receive a full, $650 scholarship to the Wildacres Writers Workshop, a weeklong creative writing summer school in the Blue Ridge Mountains in July. Second- and third-place winners receive full or partial scholarships to Hub City’s “Writing in Place” workshop July 11-13 at Wofford College. For information on entry requirements and to submit work, visit hubcity. submittable.com/submit. Winners will be notified by April 1. Submissions may also be made by mail to HCWP, 186 West Main Street, Spartanburg, SC 29306. Highlights for Children, publishers of childhood favorites Highlights, Highlights HighFive and Highlights Hello, will present a workshop for illustrators to learn the art of creating Hidden Pictures puzzles at the Kroc Center in Greenville on Jan. 25, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Faculty includes local Greenville artist Tim Davis, the most prolific Highlights Hidden Pictures illustrator (currently drawing his 509th puzzle), and art director Cynthia Faber Smith who has been working with Highlights for more than 10 years. The workshop fee of $85 includes the full-day workshop, lunch and online faculty coaching. For more information, visit highlightskids.com/hpi-workshop. Converse College recently launched a new website to help put cultural events on the public’s radar. Dubbed “Your Hub for the Arts,” culture.converse.edu is a mobile-friendly website that delivers information on nearly 200 public performances, exhibitions, readings and lectures each year by world-renowned artists and Converse faculty and students. Visitors can add events to their calendar with a click, explore venues and interactive maps, subscribe to and share the Culture@Converse e-newsletter and support the arts at Converse.

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COTHRAN HOMES 28 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014

CothranHomes.com A PRODUCT OF COTHRAN PROPERTIES

The Greenville Chamber of Commerce is hosting an exhibit of Melissa Anderson’s work now through March 23. The chamber is open Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. The exhibit is sponsored by the Metropolitan Arts Council. The SC Children’s Theatre presents “Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type” Jan. 31-Feb. 9. Performances are held at the Peace Center Gunter Theatre. Tickets are $26 for adults and $17 for children 18 and younger with $16 per person for the Feb. 2 performance. For tickets, call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org.

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.

BASEBALL/SOFTBALL EXTRAVAGANZA February 1 • 9am - 3pm

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2520 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville 864.268.6227 | FirstTeamSC.com Mon.-Fri. 9am-6pm; Sat. 9am-3pm REPS FROM THE VENDORS ABOVE WILL BE AVAILABLE


JOURNAL HOMES

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

3 Club Drive, Greenville Country Club Area, Greenville Another Oasis Custom Home designed with YOUR family in mind. This Hardiplank home with rustic accents such as board & batten shutters, and wood trim in covered front porch features 3 bedrooms plus bonus room (or 4 bedrooms if you prefer), first floor master suite, OPEN floor plan, 9 ft ceilings, site finished hardwoods, custom granite kitchen, granite vanities in ALL bathrooms. All the space you need, but no wasted space! Also includes covered or screened porch, and 2 car attached garage. All this for under $400K? Yes! The list price is just $399,605. Construction begins asap, and Oasis is happy to customize any way you want. Call Joan Herlong to set up an appointment today! Exterior design by architect Hays Reynolds.

O REPRESENTATIVE FINISHES

ASIS CUSTOM HOMES

HOME INFO Price: $399,605 | MLS Area: 072 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2.5 Square Footage: 2600 Schools: Blythe Academy Hughes Adademy Greenville High Contact: Joan Herlong, Owner Broker in Charge AugustaRoad.com Realty, LLC 864.325.2112 To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

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SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

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ILDING ... with your family

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Marketed exclusively by Joan Herlong, BIC 864-325-2112 AugustaRoad.com

JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 29


JOURNAL HOMES

ON THE MARKET

PEOPLE, AWARDS, HONORS Mike Dassel Joins Coldwell Banker Caine

Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Mike Dassel as a residential sales agent to its Spartanburg office. Dassel joins Coldwell Banker Caine with 7 years of real estate experience. He previously worked as Product Cost Manager for Draexlmaier. He received a Bacheolor of Science in Industrial Engineering from Georgia Tech. Dassel In the community Dassel is involved with the Children’s Ministry at First Baptist North Spartanburg and in his free time he enjoys home improvement. He and his wife, Rosemary, have four children. “We are excited about Mike joining our Spartanburg team,” said Brad Halter, Chairman of Coldwell Banker Caine. “And we are confident that he will have a long and successful career with us at Coldwell Banker Caine.”

RIVER SHOALS

NEW PRICE! 120 LAKE POINT DRIVE • $369,900 4 BR/2 FULL BA/2 HALF BA LAKE BOLING ESTATES • MLS 1261563 A jewel of a lake front home just minutes from everything. Gourmet kitchen with JennAire and LG stainless appliances, master on main has two walk-in closets and sitting room overlooking the lake, plus a second bedroom on the main. Two very good size bedrooms on the second floor. Wrap around front porch and lovely screened porch lakeside.

RE/MAX Moves opens in Five Forks, Announces New Agent

Call today to schedule a showing of your new home!

10 WATEREE WAY . $229,900 . MLS# 1272003 4BR/2.5BA Immaculate 4BD/2.5BA plus bonus with fenced backyard that backs to 30+ acres of vacant land! Hardwoods on main, wired for surround sound! Visit GreenvilleMoves.com for even more!

www.allentate.com/cynthiaserra Cynthia.Serra@allentate.com

J123

Cynthia Serra 864.304.3372

Contact: Cameron Keegan | 864-238-7109 RE/MAX Moves

Broker/Owner Cameron Keegan is proud to announce the opening of RE/MAX Moves in Simpsonville’s Five Forks area, after working with Prudential C. Dan Joyner Realtors for more than 10 years. He Keegan Tchirkow is also excited to welcome Tracy Tchirkow as a buyer’s agent.

OUR CLIENTS $AVE WITH FLAT FEE LISTING!

CLAREMONT • 14 SCOGIN DRIVE

SOLD! SAVED $16,200 IN COMMISSIONS!*

List with us! List for less! Janet Sandifer, REALTOR, ABR

864.979.6713

janets@carolpyfrom.com 30 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014

*This calculation of savings assumes a 3% listing commission.

Charlotte Sarvis, REALTOR, ABR

864.346.9943

charlottes@carolpyfrom.com

Flat Fee Listing 864.250.2112 | www.CarolPyfrom.com SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D H OM E You Dream It – We Build It For over 12 years, American Eagle Builders has built a reputation as one of the finest custom homebuilders in the Upstate area by being passionate about the difference we make in a community and in our customers’ lives. Arthur Rutenberg Homes, a Florida legend in homebuilding has selected American Eagle Builders to build their award-winning designs here in the Upstate. It starts as our design, but it becomes your home. First, we listen to you. Then our team of expert designers helps you create a home that meets your unique needs – and dreams. With creativity, attention to detail and sensitivity to your budget, we customize your plan, offering you the most efficient and pleasurable experience available in the designing and building of your home.

W NE

G TIN LIS

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA 101 W. Prentiss Ave MLS#1272563 $499,000

R/ 4B

A 4B

HAMMETT CREEK 15 Marlis Court #1271073 $647,900

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JENKINSON

Fully furnished show home open daily 10-6 and Sunday 1-6. Or call for your own private tour. Contact: Somerset Show Home | 864.558.0066 | 205 Chamblee Blvd., Greenville, SC

TO BE BUILT • MLS#1271065 RockwoodatAugusta $549,900

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JENKINSON TO BE BUILT • MLS#1271064 RockwoodatAugusta $597,500

Helen Hagood SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Visit americaneaglebuilders. arhblog.com

Like us on Facebook

Selling Greenville for 30 years! Ranked # 3 year after year

864.419.2889 | See my listings and more at helenhagood.com JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, J A N U A R Y 2 6 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

GREYWOOD @ HAMMETT

NORTH MAIN AREA

RIVER WALK

21 RILEY HILL CT . $767,500 . MLS# 1264504

411 HAMPTON AVE . $589,900 . MLS# 1268981

208 WALNUT TRACE COURT . $575,000 . MLS# 1270955

4BR/4.5BA Home under construction. Cul-de-sac. MBR &1BR on main. Bonus Room. The Parkway, Left on Batesville, Left on Enoree, Left on Old Spartanburg, Right on Hammett, SD 1 mile on Left.

4BR/4.5BA Restored circa 1890 Queen Anne style home. Fencd Backyard. 385 to Downtown Greenville, Right on Academy St, Right on Hampton Ave, Home on Left.

5BR/4.5BA PERFECT floor plan!Almost 5000 Sf, finished w/o basement w kitchenette. MBR and 2 more BRs on main. Bonus room, Gourmet kitchen w SS appliances, granite, On Gilder Creek and trail.

Contact: Leigh Irwin | 380-7755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Chet Smith | 458-SOLD(7653) Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Pam McCartney | 630-7844 Prudential Spaulding Group

SPAULDING FARM

STONEHAVEN

KNIGHTS BRIDGE

11 RUFFIAN WAY . $565,000 . MLS# 1270598

225 MILLSTONE WAY . $381,900 . MLS# 1258667

123 CANDLESTON PLACE . $369,900 . MLS# 1269743

4BR/3.5BA Wonderful home on cul-de-sac lot in Spaulding Farm. Roper Mtn Rd to Hwy 14, turn on Spaulding Farm Rd, Left on Blockhouse, Left on Ruffian, Home in cul-de-sac.

4BR/2.5BA Brick home. .41 acre lot ,convenient location. Completely renovated kitchen. Heading toward Five Forks/ Simpsonville turn Right into entrance of Stonehaven off Woodruff Rd. Left on Millstone Way. Home on Left.

6BR/5BA More than 5,000 sf on nearly a 1/2 acre that backs to woods. Spacious kitchen, open floor plan, and more! Jonesville to Knights Bridge, RIGHT on Candleston. Near end cul-de-sac.

Contact: Margaret Marcum | 420-3125 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Erin Foster | 386-9749 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Tracy Tchirkow | 238-2561 RE/MAX Moves

Agents on call this weekend

ANGIE BURNETT 350-4871 PELHAM ROAD

WANDA REED 270-4078 GARLINGTON ROAD

LINDA BALLARD 449-6302 EASLEY/ POWDERSVILLE

DIANE SHAPUITE 505-3692 SIMPSONVILLE

ELLIS CRIGLER 616-1348 AUGUSTA ROAD

DEANNA ARCE 593-5020 N. PLEASANTBURG DR.

SIGRID PERRETGENTIL 879-4239 GREER

RACHEL MILLER 561-2739 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

|

|

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com.

For all your Real Estate needs, call one of our offices today! ANDERSON: 226-8100

|

AUGUSTA RD: 241-2880

32 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014

|

EASLEY/POWDERSVILLE: 220-5100

|

GARLINGTON RD: 288-4048

GREER: 879-4239

PELHAM RD: 244-9111

|

N. PLEASANTBURG: 242-6650

|

SIMPSONVILLE: 963-0900

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, J A N U A R Y 2 6 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

ASHMORE LAKES

BIG OAKS

WHITEHALL PLANTATION

34 HIDDEN LAKE . $319,900 . MLS# 1262674

4 OAKMONT CT . $264,900 . MLS# 1269577

16 WATERS REACH LN . $226,900 . MLS# 1263725

3BR/2.5BA This hidden treasure is luxury on one level. Quality craftsmanship. 85 South to Fork Shoals Rd, Right on Griffin Mill, Left into SD, Home on Right.

5BR/3.5BA Beautiful Home. So many wonderful features at very affordable price! Roper Mountain Rd to Right on Godfrey, SD on Right.

4BR/2.5BA Beautiful landscaping. Master bedroom is on the main level. Woodruff Road past Five Forks. Right into 1st SD. Left on Waters Reach Ln, home is on the Right.

Contact: Melissa Morrell | 918-1734 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Brenda Kinne | 349-6910 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Melanie Veness | 787-7656 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

GRANITE WOODS SOUTH

SPARROWS POINT

PINE FOREST

107 CALCITE DRIVE . $176,000 . MLS# 1271815

2 INNISBROOK LANE . $173,500 . MLS# 1272269

120 VINE HILL ROAD . $165,750 . MLS# 1271186

3BR/2BA Riverside schools, energy efficient, 1 story with bonus, new vinyl, lots os windows, fenced yard. Dillard Road to L on Gibb Shoals R into s’division.

4BR/2.5BA Beautifully well maintained home in great location. Private fenced backyard. Woodruff Rd to Right on Scuffletown Rd, 2nd entrance into SD, Right on Innisbrook.

3BR/2BA Completely renovated 3 bedroom 2 bathroom brick home in a great neighborhood near Woodruff road shopping. Must see this home! On Mapleton Drive from Forrester Drive, right on Vine Hill. Open Sunday 1-3 p.m.

Contact: Patty Pfister/The Lawton Team 630-0410 Keller Williams

Contact: Tim Keagy | 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Wade Zebro | 977-1521 Convergent Property Group

MAIN ST., LAURENS $410,000 MLS#1270944 4BR/4BA. Historic elegance in this 1892 Victorian home, immaculately maintained on a 2.57 acre lot in downtown Laurens.

GREEN VALLEY $535,000 MLS#1264893 4BR/5 full and 2 half BA. Gorgeous estate nestled on 2+ acres, over 5000 s.f. with saltwater pool. GRAY COURT $335,000 MLS#1272490 3BR/3BA. Beautiful custom built home on 2.43 acres nestled in the quiet countryside.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

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GRAY COURT From $76,500 to $82,500 MLS#1272697 Between 8-11 acres. All waterfront with lake access.

Jake Dickens 864.616.6005 jdickens@cbcaine.com www.cbcaine.com JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 33


JOURNAL HOMES

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S D E C E M B E R 2 3 - 27, 2 013

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$20,000,000 $16,517,362 $16,024,673 BROOKFIELD CENTER $6,843,445 $6,695,810 $6,415,750 PATEWOOD PLAZA $5,702,960 CLIFFS VALLEY $850,000 CHAUNESSY $567,000 HAMMOND’S POINTE $505,000 ESTATES@RIVERWOOD FARM $469,900 KILGORE FARMS $436,746 SYCAMORE RIDGE $430,000 ASHETON $393,000 MCRAE PARK $381,371 KILGORE FARMS $381,170 BRADLEY OAKS $370,000 HAWKS RIDGE $345,000 GREEN VALLEY ESTATES $339,000 $336,000 GREEN VALLEY ESTATES $310,000 CARILION $299,100 CAMERON WOODS $292,500 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $282,000 ASCOT $280,000 $277,000 CLIFFS@MOUNTAIN PARK $260,000 LINDEN PARK $256,500 HEARTHSTONE@RIVER SHOALS $234,500 MEADOW BREEZE $231,051 PARK RIDGE $228,714 TWIN CREEKS $228,000 COVE@SAVANNAH POINTE $227,345 LANDING@SAVANNAH POINTE $226,874 COTTAGES@HARRISON BRIDGE $226,000 LANDING@SAVANNAH POINTE $224,716 FARM@SANDY SPRINGS ORCHARD $224,170 CHAPEL HILL ESTATES $215,000 MILL POND@RIVER SHOALS $213,900 WOODGREEN $206,000 PEACHTREE RIDGE $205,000 TREYBERN $205,000

BUYER

ADDRESS

2000 WADE HAMPTON BOULEV 12 TH FL MAC D1086-120 BARUCH GREENVILLE LLC PAPEC BROOKFIELD I LLC GARRISON GREENVILLE BROO 1290 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS HIGHWOODS/FORSYTH LTD PA GARRISON GREENVILLE PATE 1290 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS AP SOUTHEAST PORTFOLIO P GARRISON GREENVILLE BROO 1290 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS AP SOUTHEAST PORTFOLIO P GARRISON GREENVILLE PATE 1290 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS HIGHWOODS/FORSYTH LTD PA GARRISON GREENVILLE PATE 1290 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS AP SOUTHEAST PORTFOLIO P GARRISON GREENVILLE PATE 1290 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS MENKIN RANDI K (JTWROS) MULLENS THOMAS C 48 MOUNTAIN OAK LN KLINGMANN HELMTRAUD TRUS NESMITH CARL (JTWROS) 1 WEATHERBY DR MARKERT CARL HENRY JR BIANUCCI LAWRENCE 28 MANDARIN CIR STIEB COLLEEN A HIGGINBOTHAM ANNE M 204 TRAYMORE WAY BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT WICKHAM BRETT M (JTWROS) 15 QUIET CREEK CT CULPEPER KIMBERLY L BAYER JEREMY R (JTWROS) 9 PLAYER WAY AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R BROWN MEREDITH PRESNELL 101 RED FERN TRL BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT ROBERTSON FREDERICK C (J 104 MCRAE PL BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT RIDINGS KELLY M (JTWROS) 111 FORT DR SCHOFIELD JOSEPH D III MOORE ELIZABETH T (JTWRO 300 WOODRIDGE WAY DUPUY MONTY ZMUDA ALICIA A (JTWROS) 140 PILOT RD THOMAS WILLIAM D JR HUNT ELIZABETH ABBOTT (J 308 SUNRISE VALLEY RD ELROD JAMES F JOHNSTON ANDREW LEWIS (J 221 E EARLE ST ASPER RHONDA RODDY FREELAND ALLISON M 106 W ROUND HILL RD TYRPAK DESIGN AND CONSTR GAHAN MARILYN 316 RIDENOUR AVE BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST MILLER DEE DEE (JTWROS) 1408 BEVERLY RD BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MOUA BEE (JTWROS) 27 PALM SPRINGS WAY DENNIS INDIA C AMER GHADA A (JTWROS) 15 TREYBURN CT CLARK SUZANNE TRUSTEE BARR AARON L (JTWROS) 109 BUTLER AVE URBANA CLIFFS RE LLC DARNALL ELIZABETH ANNE 2167 HAWTHORNE RD COVENANT BUILDERS INC SADIE JAMES L 212 WEDDINGTON LN SC PILLON HOMES INC PAQUETTE SHARON 2 TIPPECANOE ST SK BUILDERS INC MCMILLAN CAMELA J (JTWRO 15 RISING MEADOW LN REMBREY CONSTRUCTION AND KELLEY APRIL (JTWROS) 301 BRENLEIGH CT SANCHEZ SERGIO A LIVING LANGFORD BRANDIE M (JTWR 26 MERCER DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT CHRISTMAN WILLIAM C JR 413 SABIN CT D R HORTON INC MANNING GREGORY A 203 PELHAM SQUARE WAY DWELLING GROUP LLC MOORE BETTY J (JTWROS) 12 BRIARHILL DR D R HORTON INC MASSE GREGORY D (JTWROS) 512 BARN SWALLOW DR D R HORTON INC ETHRIDGE VICKY L (JTWROS 115 MAREHAVEN CT VARA ANTHONY J RONZANI JUDITH K (JTWROS 104 JUDGES LN NVR INC SITTON KENDRICK N 100 PLATTE LN OWENS JAMES JOSHUA (SURV LONG CARLY (JTWROS) 300 FARMWOOD DR TAYLOR DAVID A KENNEMORE KALA LISTER (J 933 ANSEL SCHOOL RD PETIE JOSEPH MCDONALD DAVID 231 HADDINGTON LN

SUBD.

Building Business with Convergent ProPerty grouP

PRICE SELLER

HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $200,075 FOREST LAKE $200,000 VILLAGE@WINDSOR CREEK $199,360 SUMMERWALK $192,000 TOWNES@BROOKWOOD $190,975 FAIRVIEW POINTE $189,900 FOX TRACE $189,540 MELROSE $187,000 SHADOW CREEK $186,302 MEADOW BREEZE $185,849 $185,000 VICTORIA PARK $177,941 STRATFORD FOREST $175,000 WEATHERSTONE $172,500 THE HEIGHTS $170,280 STONE ESTATES $170,000 REVIS FALLS $163,000 WATERMILL $162,368 WILDFLOWER MEADOWS $160,000 BALDWIN FOREST $158,000 FRENCH WOODS $156,500 $156,000 PLANTERS ROW $156,000 REMINGTON $155,500 WATERMILL $155,417 WOODCREST $147,500 FAIRVIEW CHASE $147,435 $146,700 LINKSIDE GREEN $145,000 GLASTONBURY VILLAGE $143,900 WATERMILL $143,200 WEST GEORGIA HEIGHTS $143,000 REVIS FALLS $143,000 FOUNTAIN PLACE $142,450 JENKINS ESTATES $140,000 ADAMS MILL ESTATES $137,500 $136,000 GREENS@ROCKY CREEK $135,000 COURTYARD@ORCHARD FARMS $135,000 $134,000 SADDLER’S RIDGE $130,000 TIMBERLAKE $130,000

BUYER

ADDRESS

LANZONE ANTHONY R (JTWRO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N A 3415 VISION DR FINTEL JEANETTE E HONEYCUTT KEITH M (JTWRO 126 FOREST LAKE DR EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL CROWDER BRIAN LEE (JTWRO 208 PENRITH CT FARISH ANGIE E KOURY LINDSAY (JTWROS) 112 SUMMERWALK PL BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC HOLLEY WILLIAM C 607 MOUNT SINAI LN UNIT 15D BAYER JEREMY R SMITH JAMIE ALAN (JTWROS 10 ROSE PETAL CT S C PILLON HOMES INC FUGATE KELLI (JTWROS) 141 BORDER AVE LANKFORD CAROL A GARRIS GENE MICHAEL 17 ROSEBANK WAY SK BUILDERS INC VARA ANTHONY (JTWROS) 116 COLEWOOD PL SK BUILDERS INC PACE BRITTANY L (JTWROS) 23 RISING MEADOW LN LALAS JAMES S CAPITAL INVESTORS NC LLC 101 BELGRADE DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BENDGEN MICHAEL J (JTWRO 339 BARRETT CHASE DR NIMMONS HELEN O SOLE TRU NORTH GREENVILLE PROPERT 874 JACKSON GROVE RD WEATHERSTONE II LLC MUNGO HOMES INC 441 WESTERN LN NVR INC NIMMONS LISA MARIE (JTWR 24 GRANITE LNY STE 140 BURDETTE ERIN EILEEN BENTLEY LISA A 116 WILSHIRE DR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG GAINES KEVIN 4 REVIS CREEK CT EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL SULLIVAN DAPHNE L (JTWRO 155 PORTLAND FALLS DR MCCURRY MANDY M SKLENAR JASON (JTWROS) 5 CLEMATIS DR WATSON CLAIRE T CARINO CHRISTOPHER J (JT 104 SENTRY WAY RW PROPERTIES LLC SPANGLER ROBERT RAY (JTW 300 MOUNTAIN CREEK RD SLARK LLC THOMAS PALMER MELLETTE 117 ASBURY LN URBAN TRUST BANK EDENS STACEY M 213 WOODVINE WAY LANGFORD JEFFERY B MACK JAMAL S 15 SEMMELROCK DR EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL HOUSTON JOLYANE V (JTWRO 2857 WESTPORT RD WINSTON MARK B WOLK CHARLES A 105 CLANCY CT MUNGO HOMES INC WILLIAMS GRAYSON N 214 RIVERS EDGE CIR MITCHELL ANDREA M KESSLER JONATHAN WILLIAM 16 OVERBROOK RD SKELTON ROBERT W GIANG NGOC 3 GREENVIEW DR ANDERSON EXCAVATING INC PATTERSON JESSICA R (JTW 9 FENTON CT EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL GIBBS BRITTANY (JTWROS) 212 RIVERDALE RD TRIPLE E ENTERPRISES I L KALBACH DAVID A 406 PRYOR RD COOPER JEFFREY A DILL LISA L (JTWROS) 206 REVIS CREEK CT CAROLINA NORTHSTAR 1 LLC JED INVESTMENTS L L C 11237 CORNELL PARK DR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG JACKSON NEIL H (JTWROS) 202 BEAUCLAIR DR GALLUCCI RAYMOND EDWARDS JEFFREY E (JTWRO 124 AMBERWOOD LN CRAIGO ROBERT F IV JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N A 3415 VISION DR HERIN JERALD F NOVAK BONNIE O (JTWROS) 112 MISTY MEADOW DR GARCIA YAMEL SMROF II 2012-1 TRUST PO BOX 422039 101 BRUNSON ST LAND TRUS DICKSON CHRISTINA L (JTW 101 BRUNSON ST BROWN MICHAEL C KELLEY REBECCA L 3 LEIGHTON CT MULLINAX MURIEL MOORE NK INVESTMENTS INC 11535 CARMEL COMMONS BLVD

Residential Property Management | Residential + Commercial Real Estate Brokerage | Investment Analysis + Advising

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From left to right: Wade Zebro, Dan Lemanski, Trey Varn, Barb Turner, James McKissick, Katie B. Walsh

728 N. Pleasantburg Drive Greenville, South Carolina 29607 /ConvergentPropertyGroup /ConvergentPG www.Convergentpg.com

34 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

www.MarchantCo.com 864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Chas Whitmire 864.430.6110 RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com e l tat oo . Espt & p c A 8+ age a r a g w/

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116 Ridge Glen - Harrison Hills

4 Phillips Ln. - Augusta Rd.

6 Kingsway Ct. - Griffith Farm

113 Kingswood Cr. - Woodruff Rd Area, S’Ville

$799,900 • 1252670 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$594,000 • 1265590 • 4 BR/3.5 BA + Bonus

$564,900 • 1266627 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$499,000 • 1271321 • 3 BR/3 BA + b’ment Bonus

Valerie Miller | 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller | 864.293.4778 vmiller@marchantco.com | cmillergsp@aol.com

Tom Marchant | 864.449.1658 tom@marchantco.com

Anne Marchant | 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly |864.414.1688 anne@marchantco.com | jolene@marchantco.com

Tom Marchant | 864.449.1658 tom@marchantco.com

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82 Castellan Dr. - Chatelaine - Townhouse

9 Savona Dr. - Montebello - Townhome

506 Summergreen Way - Warrenton

715 Neely Farm Dr. - Neely Farm

$374,900 • 1272334 • 4 BR/3 BA

$305,000 • 1271831 • 2 BR/2.5 BA

$259,900 • 1269319 • 4 BR/3.5 BA + Bonus

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Valerie Miller | 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller | 864.293.4778 vmiller@marchantco.com | cmillergsp@aol.com

Nancy McCrory | 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin | 864.230.5176 nmmccrory@aol.com | karenturpi@aol.com

Jonathan Mullikin | 864.449.4132 jonathan@marchantco.com

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Barb Riggs |864.423.2783 barbriggs@marchantco.com

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1 Matteson Brook - Matteson Brook

1511 E. North St. - Overbrook

3385 Knighton Chapel Rd. - Foutain Inn

1001 S. Church St. - The Brio - Condo

$247,900 • 1268724 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$199,900 • 1268843 • 3 BR/1.5 BA

$179,921 • 1270302 • 3 BR/3 BA

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Barb Riggs |864.423.2783 barbriggs@marchantco.com

Mary Praytor | 864.593.0366 marypraytor@gmail.com

Joan Rapp |864.901.3839 joan@marchantco.com

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104 Cold Branch Way - Half Mile Lake

142 Fair Oaks Dr. - Pelham Oaks -Townhome

111 Andover Rd. - Heritage Hills

$178,900 • 1272298 • 3 BR/2 BA

$174,900 • 1272463 • 3 BR/2 BA

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Nancy McCrory | 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin | 864.230.5176 nmmccrory@aol.com | karenturpi@aol.com

Kathy Slayter | 864.982.7772 kslayter@charter.net

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Kathy Slayter | 864.982.7772 kslayter@charter.net

James Akers |864.325.8413 jamesakersjr@gmail.com

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212 S. Woodgreen Way - Rolling Greens - Townhome $60,900 • 1268014 • 2 BR/2 BA

Anne Marchant | 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly |864.414.1688 anne@marchantco.com | jolene@marchantco.com

Residential | Commercial | New Home Communities | Property Management | Foreclosures | Land & Acreage | Mountain Properties

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2014 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-14-01 APPLICANT: OUR LADY of the ROSARY CATHOLIC CHURCH PROPERTY: Tax Map #0366.0001-008.00; 3710 Augusta Rd, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for construction of a new church building on site into the R-10 zoning

NOTICE OF ACTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT C/A No. 2013-DR-23-5368 NORMA LAGUNA GOMEZ, Plaintiff, vs. ANTONIO NAVARRO, Defendant. YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the original Summons and Complaint in the above entitled action were filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court in the Family Court of Greenville County, South Carolina, the object of the prayer is to obtain a divorce from Antonio Navarro. Contact: The Carruthers Law Firm 111 Toy Street Greenville, SC 29601

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Noble-Interstate Management Group, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 40 W. Orchard Park Dr., Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 2, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

A check presentation was made recently at Meals On Wheels from proceeds raised at The Work’s annual Christmas Jam. From left, Clair Ray, marketing director for the Christmas Jam; Julie Accetta, director of community relations for Meals on Wheels; Mark Dye, The Work’s bassist and vocalist; Catriona Carlisle, executive director for Meals on Wheels; Thomas Croft, presenting sponsor for the Christmas Jam; and Charles Hedgepath, The Work’s guitarist and vocalist. Teddy bears donated by the Washington Center were taken to the Greenville Health System Children’s Hospital to give to children right before they go into surgery.  During the holidays, these teddy bears were decorations on the Washington Center’s Christmas tree at the Festival of Trees at the Hyatt in downtown Greenville.  On behalf of Washington Center, teachers Samantha Stansell, Erin Sosebee and Elizabeth Piper (left to right) bring donated teddy bears to Missie Townsend (far right).

WEDDINGS  ENGAGEMENTS  ANNIVERSARIES Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

CB-14-02 APPLICANT: QUEST LEADERSHIP ACADEMY PROPERTY: Tax Map #0371.00-07-003.00; 29 Ridgeway Dr. Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to operate a new Primary/Secondary Charter School on site in R-12 zoning.

WEDDINGS

1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90 For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@communityjournals.com

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 email: aharley@communityjournals.com

RIverside Middle School seventh-grade social studies students spent the week before winter break reviewing material from first semester and completing an Art in History project about the French Revolution: a Limoges style box called a tabatiere.

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JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

Greenville Technical College students Anderson Johnson, left, and Onrico Blanding make dog toys from old T-shirts for the Greenville Humane Society during the school’s MLK Day of Service.

Greenville Technical College students Allayha Smith, left, and Ashlee Walker make dog toys from old T-shirts during the school’s MLK Day of Service. The dog toys were given to the Greenville Humane Society.

People taking part in Greenville Technical College’s MLK Day of Service received a certificate of participation and an MLK Day of Service sticker.

People participating in Greenville Technical College’s MLK Day of Service received a free T-shirt and a pizza lunch.

Crossword puzzle: page 38

W When it comes to the care of a special

person in your life, there’s no such thing as too much. At Rolling Green Village, we go beyond the ordinary customer service to provide something more: true hospitality. Independent Living Patio and Apartment Homes Assisted Living • Memory Care • Rehabilitation • Skilled Nursing

Sudoku puzzle: page 38

1 Hoke Smith Blvd., Greenville • 864.987.4612 • www.RollingGreenVillage.com

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

We greet you warmly by name with a smile. We treat everyone with courteous respect. We strive to anticipate your needs and act accordingly. We listen and respond enthusiastically in a timely manner. We hold ourselves and one another accountable. We make you feel important.

We embrace and value our differences.

We ask, “is there anything else I can do for you?” We maintain high levels of professionalism, at all times.

We pay attention to details.

JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL CULTURE

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. ‘JUST SAY NO’

By Mark Feldman

85 Chamber group income? 89 Bland stuff 91 Significant periods 92 Angry 93 Scrawny 97 Family member 98 __ Aviv 99 FDR’s mother 100 They’re expected 102 Keats creations 103 Promo line for an open wine bar? 109 Slow movement 111 “You really think that’s true?” 112 At 116 Unimportant orbiter? 121 See 122-Across 122 With 121-Across, force from hiding 123 Persona 124 First-aid kit item 125 Half and half 126 Some are dominant 127 Colorado resort 128 Bugs’ nemesis 129 Not many

38 Big name in real estate 41 Sonata section 42 Pierre’s school 43 Scoop holders 45 Hearty entrée 47 Hosp. test 48 One who more than just trash-talks? 50 Spanish dish 52 Deadly shark 54 Mrs. Dithers in “Blondie” 55 Special delivery? 58 Classic Welles role 59 Part of IBM: Abbr. 60 Clinch 63 Liqueur flavorings 65 Heraldic border 66 Setting for Camus’ “The Plague” 67 Ancient Celt 70 Average 71 Nixon, in the ‘50s 72 “Haystacks” series painter 73 Be gaga over 74 Kind of artery 77 Did floor work 78 Draw out 79 Field protectors

81 British bluebloods, informally 83 Vast amount 86 Part of Q.E.D. 87 ___ Beach, Fla. 88 Wax-wrapped cheese 90 Regional life 94 Steal the spotlight from 95 Drop off 96 Isotope of hydrogen 101 Drop off 103 Penniless 104 Fairy tale baddies 105 Feudal lord 106 City near Düsseldorf 107 Pose 108 One with a title 109 Green shade 110 Before long 113 It may be 77-Down 114 Buggy site 115 Brood 116 Stir-fry additive 117 Actress Zadora 118 Morning hrs. 119 Cover 120 Singer Bachman Crossword answers: page 37

Fewer delays. Fewer headaches.

ACROSS 1 Paddle 4 Peter who produced James Taylor’s debut album 9 Stash 14 Old Dodge 19 Pair 20 Now, in Spain 21 Yam, e.g. 22 Time-share unit, often 23 Investment adviser’s

suggestion, for short 24 Congressman lacking influence? 27 Where you might see “Hello” 29 Take on 30 O. Henry device 31 Inexperienced company leader? 36 Wit 39 Those, in Spain 40 Myth ending

41 __ room 44 Really enjoyed 46 __ room 49 1987 Costner role 50 Slightly, to Salieri 51 Cheerleader’s accessory 53 Conquer one’s Pachelbel addiction? 56 Doe in “Bambi” 57 Becoming fond of 61 Rib

62 “Smokey and the Bandit” city 64 Scout group 68 Tart fruits 69 Flight getting in at 12:00? 72 Santa ___ 75 “Oklahoma!” aunt 76 Gashed 80 Ukrainian port 82 Teacher’s concern 84 Altar vow

DOWN 1 Thor’s father 2 Ghostly glow 3 Gad about 4 Finnish architect Alvar __ 5 Bundle, as wheat 6 Greedy 7 “___ tu”: Verdi aria 8 Most daring 9 Oldest Beatle 10 One in a class by himself? 11 Kimono sash 12 Gun 13 Before, in poems 14 __ squash 15 Automaton 16 Part of, plotwise 17 Whirlpool 18 Tofu base 25 Sass 26 Ratings giver 28 Eventually become 32 Gentle sound 33 Ruin 34 “New Jack City” actor 35 Short run 36 10th century French king 37 Make amends

Medium

For all your travel in 2014 remember to

Sudoku answers: page 37

Fewer delays. headaches. THINK Fewer GSP FIRST! GSP is closer, faster and less crowded than Atlanta or Charlotte Airports. Think GSP first. gspairport.com : Book Flights, Hotel Rooms and Rental Cars. 38 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 24, 2014


60 & BEYOND WITH PEGGY HENDERSON

Sharp as a tack For all you gamers out there, I read a report about the puzzle named “Jumble: That Scrambled Word Game” that runs in over 600 United States and Canada newspapers daily. The game was launched in 1954 and now can be played on Nintendo DS. That game brings back painful memories. I was nine years old when the puzzle made its debut. My grandmother unscrambled words each morning at the kitchen table. Armed with her coffee, yellow pencil and the carefully snipped puzzle, she sat there lost in concentration – until I appeared. “Peggy dear,” my grandmother would say without looking up, “help me make a word out of these letters.” Being a people-pleaser, I would try in vain to form a word out of something that looked like alphabet soup. I finally braved up one morning and declared that I didn’t like puzzles. And the tug of war was finally over. Sixty-one years later, I surprise myself by consuming part of each day with the likes of sudoku, computer mah-jongg or Lumosity.com. Lumosity offers games that work on memory and speed skills. My druthers are to complete one difficult sudoku puzzle accompanied with a Mozart sonata. I’m not kidding or showing off. Dr. Cynthia McVey, a senior lecturer in psychology at Glasgow Caledonian University, wrote, “Listening to classical music, in particular Mozart sonatas, has been studied and shown to improve the mind’s mathematical capabilities.” Doing my research for this article, I discovered more tidbits for improving the mind. Eggs for breakfast is one of them: Apparently high protein is excellent for loss of brain cells. Actually, this wasn’t as much as a revelation as the discouragement of multitasking. I have taken a sort of subtle pride in my skills as a multitasker in everything I do. Alas, according to the New Scientist guide to getting smarter, the brain performs better if it focuses on one thing at a time. For example, like so many of us over-60 darlings, I struggle with the everfamiliar mismanagement of keys, glasses, checkbook and cellphones, etc. When I straighten/clean my house, I go on autopilot and think about everything but what I’m actually doing. As a result, I often leave my cellphone in the bathroom, my glasses upstairs in my office, my handbag in the sunroom – and too often, the checkbook in the car. Time efficiency professionals advise to pay strict attention to the solo task at hand to avoid acute frustration and low productivity. Another biggie for me was the realization that reading the Wall Street Journal or taking lecture classes in Eastern Culture 101 would indeed improve my knowledge of the world. However, the exercise is regarded as passive brain stimuli. The flip side is any creative endeavor such as arts and crafts, writing poetry or a career such as a landscape architect is considered superb active brain stimuli. The ultimate no-no is the television self-occupation. There is zero creativity on ESPN or even PBS. I must confess that perhaps I am overzealous about all this brain stuff. The reason is that I’m afraid. I’m afraid when I read the scary facts that without a cure, up to 16 million Americans are expected to suffer from degenerative brain disease. That’s one in 10 people older than 65. The health insurer MetLife must be worried, too. They offer a brochure called “Love Your Brain.” Also check out MyBrainTrainer.com and (I love this title) HappyNeuron.com. So like the redundant clichés “Use It or Lose It” or “Just Do It,” I recommend becoming a gamer. Who knows? I might challenge my personal happy neurons with the classic puzzle called “Jumble.” For old times’ sake. Peggy Henderson is a 60 & Beyond former freelance writer turned newspaper columnist. Besides appearing in the Greenville Journal, her column is syndicated with Senior Wire News Services. In addition, she’s a staff writer for the website Go60.us. Contact her at peg4745@aol.com.

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JOURNAL CULTURE

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JANUARY 24, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 39


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Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.