Page 1

DISTRACTED DRIVING BAN GAINS TRACTION

GREENVILLE JOURNAL

Friday, January 17, 2014 • Vol.16, No.3 • GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SEE FULL STORY ON PAGE 15

Simpsonville ousts city administrator PAGE 16

Exploring Greenville’s civil rights history PAGE 29

BOOMTOWN In just 18 seconds this Sunday, the Greenville skyline will change forever with the destruction of Scott Towers PAGE 8

3710-GreenvilleJournal-RD1.pdf

2

1/15/14

9:51 AM

INCREASING INVESTMENTS IN A HEALTHIER WORKFORCE FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

Home Equity Lines of Credit - NO CLOSING COSTS more information and full disclosure at bncbanksc.com I N T R O D U C T O R Y R AT E F O R 1 8 M O N T H S

G R E E N V I L L E | 550 E. McBee Ave. | 864.250.9800

Equal Housing Lender. Member FDIC.


JOURNAL NEWS

GREENVILLE JOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 FOR DELIVERY REQUESTS, CALL 679-1240 PUBLISHER

Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Save money on your mortgage with our lower rates and options.

Susan Clary Simmons ssimmons@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR

Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS

Cindy Landrum clandrum@communityjournals.com Sherry Jackson sjackson@communityjournals.com April A. Morris amorris@communityjournals.com Joe Toppe jtoppe@communityjournals.com

3.00% 2-year ARM Limited time offer 3.98% APR*

PHOTOGRAPHER

Greg Beckner gbeckner@communityjournals.com NEWS LAYOUT

Kristy Adair Tammy Smith

As a not-for-profit financial alternative to banks, Greenville Federal Credit Union offers mortgages that can save you money by combining a competitive rate and a lower down payment. Contact us for details.

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Holly Hardin CLIENT SERVICES MANAGERS

Anita Harley Jane Rogers

3.00% 2-Year Adjustable Rate Mortgage • Initial rate and payments fixed for two years. • Rate cannot change more than 1% every two years. • Only 10% down to avoid Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

BILLING INQUIRIES

Shannon Rochester CONTROLLER

Kim Mason

Other Low Rate Mortgage Options • 30-year fixed • 15-year fixed • 5/1-year ARM

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES

Lori Burney Kristi Jennings Donna Johnston Annie Langston Pam Putman

Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County to join.

COMMUNITY SPONSORSHIPS AND EVENT MARKETING

Kate Banner PO BOX 2266 GREENVILLE, SC 29602 PHONE: 864-679-1200 FAX: 864-467-9809 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM © The Greenville Journal is published by Community Journals LLC. All rights reserved. All property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of Community Journals, no part therefore may be reproduced without prior written consent.

800.336.6309 • greenvillefcu.com © 2013. Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. *This limited-time rate applies to new loans and refinanced loan amounts not currently held by us. APR quoted assumes our 2-year ARM of $100,000 without private mortgage insurance (PMI) for a term of 30 years. Initial interest rate of 3.00%. Initial monthly principal and interest of $421.60. 1% origination fee. 30 days interim interest prepaid. Other closing costs may apply. Limited to borrower’s primary or secondary residence located in SC. Rate cannot change more than 8% over the life of the loan. Excludes attorney, title, tax, recording, survey, pest and other fees. $350 appraisal and $8 flood certification is required. Initial rate set independent of current index plus margin. Other property and underwriting restrictions apply. Mortgage loans are subject to credit approval. Member NCUA.

28˚

FRIDAY

46˚

21˚ SATURDAY 42˚

27˚

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

SUNDAY

expect a cold start “ toWethecanweekend, but a little

milder on Sunday.

Few showers possible

2 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

Sunny, quite chilly

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency

Not as cold

50˚


JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING

ion! cat t o l ew ree urch; ur n sta St aptist Ch o in u s B t us 1 Augst Height Muffin) i s i V 302 ugu ug & A

THEY SAID IT

“Ultimately it’s the individual who pays the bills no matter what … It doesn’t come from some magic spot in the sky, it doesn’t come from the government; it all comes from you.”

oss (acr

from ext to N

M

Anthony Keck, director of the S.C. Department of Health and Human Services, on how healthcare costs are ultimately financed.

“I know you are doing the right thing by bringing awareness to that gang I work with down in Columbia. We have let the use of phones while driving create an unneeded safety issue and it needs to be addressed.”

“What else are they going to say?” Gov. Nikki Haley, on her opponents’ contention that the coming election played a part in her executive budget proposal.

Custom Designed Lamps & Lighting Shades | Unique Chandeliers & Sconces Gas & Electric Lanterns | Design, Construct, Repair & Restore

Beautiful Lighting,Distinguished Service, Creating Brilliance harrisonlighting.com | 3021 Augusta Street, Greenville | 864.271.3922 |

State Rep. Don Bowen of Anderson, speaking at a Greenville City Council public hearing on a potential citywide ban on texting while driving.

“I am merely the voice of the citizens.”

Our Only Limitation is Your Imagination

Newly elected Simpsonville City Councilman Taylor Graham, on his vote to fire City Administrator Russell Hawes shortly after being sworn into office.

M cAbee’s Custom Carpet, Inc.

“We’ve got a history of projecting ourselves in the best light to attract outsiders. Any kind of conflict on Main Street or the schools would have hurt the New South image we wanted to portray.”

CARPET AND RUGS • REPAIR • RUG CLEANING

R

12 N. Kings Road • Greenville

Located off Mauldin Road next to I-85 and Exit 46

Courtney Tollison Hartness, Furman assistant history professor and Upcountry History Museum historian, on why Greenville tends to “undertell” the uglier side of the civil rights movement in Greenville County.

864.277.0470 | www.mcabeescarpet.com

C103R

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

Buy tickets online! www.GreenvilleCamelot.com

C I N E M A S

30-50% 30-50% OFF

NOW SHOWING: FRIDAY, JANUARY 17 - THURSDAY, JANUARY 23 IN BIG THEATER

LONE SURVIVOR

(R) DIGITAL PRESENTATION THX BIG SCREEN

SHOPS AT ORCHARD PARK • 86 Orchard Park Drive Mon-Sat 10am-6pm • 288-1951

$7.00 BARGAIN SHOWS BEFORE 6PM

1:30 | 4:15 | 7:00 | 9:30 In Digital

PRESENTED IN DIGITAL PROJECTION / STADIUM SEATING: DEVIL’S DUE (R) 1:30 | 3:20 | 5:20 | 7:30 | 9:30 JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT (PG-13) 1:00 | 3:10 5:15 | 7:25 | 9:40 THE NUT JOB IN 3D (PG) 4:45 | 8:30 THE NUT JOB (PG) 1:00 | 3:05 | 6:30 RIDE ALONG (PG13) 1:00 | 3:05 | 5:10 | 7:20 | 9:30 THE LEGEND OF HERCULES (PG13) 1:00 | 3:05 | 5:10 | 7:20 | 9:30 FROZEN (PG) 12:30 | 2:45 | 5:00 | 7:15 | 9:20

M14A

SERVING THE UPSTATE SINCE 1950

E. Antrim Dr., McAlister Square • 864.235.6700

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 3


JOURNAL NEWS

Don’t Let Cataracts Slow You Down! Ask Us About Bladeless, Laser Optimized, Custom Cataract Surgery.

Safe Harbor reaches goal for Oconee shelter APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

Keeping You In Sight

864.583.6381 479 Heywood Avenue, Spartanburg www.palmettoeyeandlaser.com Billy J. Haguewood, Jr., M.D. Brice B. Dille, M.D. K. Leanne Wickliffe, M.D. Robert J. Haas, M.D. Michael W. Holmes, M.D. David W. Nicholson, M.D.

If you have cataracts, now is the best time in history to have them removed! We oer premium, customized, and LASER OPTIMIZED cataract procedures for our patients including the latest in lens implant technology. With these enhanced procedures many patients experience the best vision of their lives following cataract surgery! If you are ready to put your cataracts behind you, now is the time to call us and let our surgeons discuss BLADELESS LASER OPTIMIZED CUSTOM CATARACT SURGERY with you!

4 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

Less than a year after announcing a capital campaign to establish a 24-hour domestic violence shelter in Oconee County, Safe Harbor has exceeded its goal and raised enough money to begin work, according to Julie Meredith of Safe Harbor. The campaign raised approximately $1.2 million, exceeding its $990,000 goal. Safe Harbor has purchased the property for an emergency shelter and will now start renovations, said Meredith. In the six months before the shelter announcement in March 2013, there were six deaths related to domestic violence in Oconee County. Safe Harbor had been offering education in Oconee County schools and community counseling, but those who needed shelter had to travel to facilities in Greenville or Anderson counties. Local advocates had approached the nonprofit about the need for a shelter in 2008, said Becky Calla-

At a press conference last week, Safe Harbor received a check for $1,176,980 for a shelter in Oconee County.

ham, Safe Harbor director. A feasibility study revealed that 47 percent of Oconee County residents knew someone who had been a victim of domestic violence, she said. The new shelter will be able to house up to 20 people and will be staffed 24 hours a day. Safe Harbor expects to have the shelter open and operating by July 1.


JOURNAL NEWS

Governor’s budget: more money for education, roads But opponents call proposal ‘a failure to lead’ CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Gov. Nikki Haley wants to bolster funding for education, spend more money on roads without raising the gas tax or other fees, and cut slightly the state’s income tax Haley for most taxpayers. Haley’s critics found fault with her executive budget, with the campaign manager for her Democratic opponent, state Sen. Vincent Sheheen, calling it “a failure to lead.” Haley’s $6.6 billion budget plan calls for an additional $177 million for public schools, a shift from her previous stance that education could be improved without additional money. Last week, Haley announced an education reform initiative that focused on the state’s poorer districts, as well as reading, technology and teacher training. Haley’s budget would increase money for charter schools, fund new reading coaches in elementary schools, allocate more than $29 million for laptop computers and tablets for students in schools with Internet access and to get Internet access to schools that don’t have it. Sheheen, who lost to Haley in the 2010 gubernatorial race, has also made education a central part of his campaign. A bill he introduced last year to expand the state’s kindergarten program for 4-year-olds to more lowincome students passed. For this session, Sheheen has proposed expanding the 4K program statewide. Regarding transportation, Haley said the state could find more than $1 billion over the next decade to spend on roads by using what she called the “money tree” – the growth in revenue from the state’s first estimate to the final estimate in May. A state task force has estimated $29 billion will be needed over 20 years to bring the state’s roads to an acceptable condition. Rep. Tommy Stringer, R-

Greer, and Sen. Ray Cleary, R-Georgetown, have both introduced bills to raise the state gas tax for the first time in 27 years. Haley said the growth in revenue from the start of the year until May averages nearly $107 million each year. Critics said that’s not enough, is not guaranteed and is a way to punt the issue until after the election. “For those who want to raise taxes, I’m not your girl,” Haley said. Furman University political science professor Glen Halva-Neubauer said that while Haley’s budget may look to some to be an attempt to take away some traditional Democrat issues, he sees it as more of an attempt to reassure her core constituency groups. “I think for the most part the budget is trying to reassure some of the more nervous parts of her constituency. It’s more of an attempt to shore up that support rather than inoculate from an attack from the other side,” HalvaNeubauer said. Democrats attacked the budget proposal as having “few details and no true vision for how to improve South Carolina.” “The only thing less impressive than Nikki Haley’s failure to lead in this budget is her inability to deliver results on what she’s proposed in this budget or in the past,” said Sheheen campaign manager Andrew Whalen. Haley countered her opponents’ contention that the coming election played a part in her budget proposal. “What else are they going to say?” she asked at a press conference announcing her budget plan. Other items in Haley’s budget include: • An income tax cut that would average $29 for three-fourths of state taxpayers. • A 2 percent pay increase for state Forestry Commission firefighters, the only state employees slated to get a pay increase. • A 5.1 percent budget increase for the Department of Mental Health. • 25 more SLED agents, 10 additional state troopers and five additional prosecutors for the state Attorney General’s office. • $44.8 million to move 1,400 disabled citizens off waiting lists and into programs. • An increase in foster care rates, the first in nearly a decade.

Health Events What You Need to Know About Venous Disease Tues., Jan. 21 • Noon-1 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus Learn signs, symptoms and treatments of venous disease from GHS vascular medicine doctor Lisa Darby, MD. Free; registration required. Coffee and Conversation Wed., Jan. 29 • Noon-1 p.m. • Starbucks (Fairview Road, Simpsonville) Moms on the go are invited to join GHS physician Carole Mercer, MD, for coffee and a conversation about women’s health issues. Free; registration required. The Skinny on Belly Fat Tues., Feb. 4 • Noon-1 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus Join GHS primary care doctor Philip Way, MD, to learn how losing a little around the middle can help you gain a lot. Free; registration required. A Life Transformed: A Conversation with Alan Ethridge Tues., Feb. 4 • 6:30-8 p.m. • Centre Stage Alan Ethridge, executive director of the Metropolitan Arts Council, will talk about his life leading up to his heart attack and how it transformed him. Includes a panel discussion with GHS doctors. Free; registration required. Prevent Heart Attacks, Strokes & Vascular Disease Sat., Feb. 8 • 11 a.m.-1 p.m. • Embassy Suites GHS doctors will share strategies to keep heart and blood vessels healthy. Blood pressure checks and hands-only CPR demonstrations are available. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

ghs.org 131063GJ

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

The accessible altruist

Are you better off in 2014?

Here at Year of Altruism headquarters (the corner of my kitchen table) we forever struggle with a dilemma: “Altruism – what do you mean?” We could bluster about what altruism means abstractly. But we have found the best way to define altruism is to exemplify it. “Name me some altruists,” I say, and an “aha” crosses my questioner’s face. Mother Theresa, Mandela, Gandhi, Schweitzer, Wallenberg, Schindler, hundreds of other Righteous Gentiles who risked their lives rescuing Jews from the Holocaust. What is common to all the altruists? Incredible self-sacrifice. No expectation of reward. Determination to use all their strength and resources to save lives, sometimes even at the cost of their own lives. I daresay that the most compelling, accessible image of the consummate altruist in our times is Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. We marvel at Dr. King’s mastery in injecting God’s will into the human spirit via thought, speech, deed. But we do not declare him an altruist simply because he suffered a martyr’s death. We do so because each day that he fearlessly preached and lived the vision of the “Beloved Community,” he knowingly took enormous risks to promote the ultimate good. Dr. King recognized the gifts with which God had blessed him and used them self-sacrificially. His words exhorted us not to despair, keep hope, take positive, idealistic action without violence, to change the evil in our hearts and in the inequities that plagued our nation. Who would dare challenge Dr. King’s “Dream” as the most stirring articulation of altruism in our lifetimes and beyond? We learn that altruists like him do not lose faith in the midst of adversity. His faith in God remained unswerving. When the faith of others flagged, he had the gift to uplift them and continue the journey to the radiant goal. What of his other altruistic qualities? Love of humanity, even adversaries. Patience. Belief in the limitless potential for goodness, despite so much evidence to the contrary. We call Dr. King “accessible” for reasons that should now be obvious. His altruistic qualities are all achievable even

As the calendar turns to an election year here in South Carolina, all the usual political suspects are starting to offer up all the usual political rhetoric to try to win your vote, with one side telling you that our state’s current economic forecast is cloudy with a chance of Armageddon, and the other insisting that prosperity, or at least whatever passes for it these days, is right around the corner. All of which reminds me of the 1980 presidential debate, when Ronald Reagan famously asked the simple question, “Are you better off now than you were four years ago?” A majority of American voters answered with a resounding “NO,” and Jimmy Carter was defeated for reelection. This got me thinking about whether we really are better off – not just this year, or four years ago, but for the long term – say 20 years. So I did a little research and what I found may surprise you. It did me. Per capita income is the most oftenused index of how we are doing financially on a personal level. So I looked at the data for the last 20 years from the U.S. government’s Bureau of Business & Economic Research. These are the folks responsible for keeping track of such things and they use the same methods and standards from year to year. In short, this is the single best, most impartial measuring stick there is to answer the question, “Are you better off?” The most recent per capita income data was from April 2013, and it was based on 2012 data. This is what it said about us here in South Carolina: In 2012, our per capita income was $34,266 and ranked 48th. The U.S. average was $42,693. Five years before, in 2007, we were at $31,990 and ranked 45th. The U.S. average was $39,506. Five years before that, in 2002, we were at $26,049 and ranked 40th. The U.S. average was $31,481. Five years before that, in 1997, we were at $21,287 and ranked 38th. The US average was $25,654. And five years before that, in 1992, we were at $17,010 and ranked 43rd. The U.S. average was $20,799.

SPEAK YOUR MIND The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

IN MY OWN WORDS by MARC HOWARD WILSON

by the simplest among us: Do some good in your life through thought, speech, and deed. Don’t lose faith in God or his children. Keep hope alive. Do good without looking for reward. If you are required to take a “bullet” for what you do or believe, accept it as the necessary consequence of doing the right thing. Do justly, love mercy, walk humbly. The gift of accessible altruism is that M L K I N T E R FA I T H S E R V I C E

Sunday, Jan. 19, 6 p.m. Springfield Baptist Church 600 East McBee Ave. Guest Preacher: Rev. Dr. Joseph Roberts, successor to Dr. King at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta.

it is a model of goodness that is “doable” by everyone. Dr. King’s example is not an object of worship, but of inspiration. That is precisely the spirit in which we are moving into the weekend celebrating his legacy. The community will do good works in his spirit, break bread and share fellowship that moves beyond racial and religious differences. On Sunday evening, we will crown the weekend with an interfaith service celebrating “Dr. King – The Consummate Altruist.” In song, speech and giving, we will praise God for gifts like Dr. King and altruists like him who open our eyes to the vision of ultimate good: a world at peace, mutual understanding, respect, love, the building of a universal Beloved Community. Now, please help us build the Beloved Community by adding your affirmation to the voices we lift to the greater glory of God and his beloved servant. Let us reach for our own altruistic potentials. Marc Howard Wilson is a rabbi and founder/ director of Year of Altruism in Greenville.

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

IN MY OWN WORDS by PHIL NOBLE

Over this 20-year period, we started out ranked 43rd, jumped up to 38th and in the last 15 years we have dropped back to 48th. (Thank God for Idaho and Mississippi). And what of South Carolina’s standing relative to the rest of the world? Here, there is more not-so-good news. The rough global equivalent of per capita income is something called PPP, or purchasing power parity, and it is used to compare and rank each of the countries of the world. In 1992, South Carolina’s per capita income would have ranked us between the Bahamas (23rd) and the UK (24th). Today, we have fallen slightly, as we rank between Israel (25th) and South Korea (26th). Meanwhile, the UK has jumped from 24th to 21st. So, what is the bottom line? Are we better off than we were five, 10 or 20 years ago? The answer is clearly “no” – not compared to other states, and not compared to the rest of the world. And if you look at just the national numbers for the last 15 years, the answer isn’t just no, it’s “Hell, no!” Now, lots of good things are happening in our state and we should all be proud of our accomplishments. But going into the 2014 election year, it’s worth looking at where we are, where we’ve been, and where we appear to be headed. When we do, three things are clear. We should not accept the status quo, from either political party. We are gaining speed in the wrong direction. We can do better. Phil Noble is a Charleston businessman and president of the South Carolina New Democrats, an independent reform group founded by former Gov. Richard Riley. Reach him at phil@ scnewdemocrats.org.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.


City begins hearings on election change JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com In the first of four public hearings on a possible switch to nonpartisan city elections, City Attorney Ronald McKinney addressed a small crowd at the West Greenville Community Center Tuesday night on possible changes to the city of Greenville’s election process. Under the current partisan election cycle, filing begins in March with a primary election in June and a runoff if necessary two weeks later, McKinney said. The closing date for partisan candidates comes 75 days before Election Day, with the last date for political parties to certify their candidates coming 60 days before the first Tuesday of November, he said. Conway Belangia, director of elections and voter registration for Greenville County, said the change to a nonpartisan election would remove the primary election from the sequence of events. “Under a nonpartisan election, the candidates would file for office and there would be one election in November, but the ballot would probably be a little bigger because the June primaries under the partisan process tended to weed things out,” he said. Many citizens in attendance Tuesday night questioned the switch, saying they wanted to know the political party of the candidates. McKinney said the party labels would only be removed from the ballots. A change to a nonpartisan election would not prohibit candidates from declaring themselves as members of a political party, nor would it prohibit the capacity of the parties to

endorse a candidate. The switch would not change the number of seats on City Council or the Greenville Water System, nor would it alter the terms of council members, water commission seats, boundaries, polling places, or the November date of general municipal elections, he said. Governmental Relations Manager Julie Horton told the crowd the proposed change grew out of a council discussion on the length of the current election process and the general lack of party issues in local government. Municipalities that make this change typically do so because they do not usually deal with partisan issues; their focus is basic infrastructure and community matters rather than big ideological arguments, she said. The switch would also shorten the election timeframe from 174 to just 60 days under a nonpartisan election, she said. Councilwoman Lillian Brock Flemming told the crowd she has not been a proponent of nonpartisan elections because she considers it a weak style of electing an official. “We’ve looked at this before, but from my standpoint it is not the strongest way to support a community,” she said. The city will hold three additional public hearings beginning Tuesday, Jan. 21, at 7 p.m. in the Sears Shelter at McPherson Park, followed by a meeting at Nicholtown Community Center on Thursday, Jan. 28, at 6:30 p.m., and the Augusta Road Library on Tuesday, Jan. 28, at 7 p.m. Once the public meetings have concluded, City Council will receive reports on public comments and schedule a public hearing at City Hall during a formal Council meeting.

Winter SALE Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri: 10–4 | Wed: 10–1 | Sat: 10–3 233 N. Main Street, #260 | Greenville | 864.242.1881

JOURNAL NEWS

What’s Right in Health Care GHS’ 2013 Report to the Community Available Online GHS’ annual report for Fiscal Year 2013, which summarizes our efforts to fulfill our mission to heal compassionately, teach innovatively and improve constantly, is available online at ghs.org/annualreport. Consumer Choice Award For the 18th year in a row, Greenville Memorial Hospital was recognized as a 2013/2014 Consumer Choice Award winner by National Research Corporation for providing high-quality health care. GMH is the only hospital in South Carolina to have won this prestigious award every year it has been given. Look for our name in Modern Healthcare magazine. Baptist Easley Employee on Council of Regents Susan Shugart, chief administrative officer at Baptist Easley Hospital, has been appointed to the Council of Regents, which is the legislative body of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). Shugart will take office March 22 and represent ACHE membership in South Carolina. ACHE is an international professional society of more than 35,000 healthcare executives who lead hospitals, healthcare systems and other healthcare organizations. GHS Names Pediatrician of the Year Jennifer Hudson, MD, medical director for Newborn Services at GHS Children’s Hospital, recently received the 2013 Pediatrician of the Year Award at the 22nd annual DeLoache Seminar. Dr. Hudson was recognized by her colleagues for her passion to teach and mentor trainees and for working tirelessly to ensure all babies get outstanding care in Newborn Services.

ghs.org 131063GJ

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 7


JOURNAL NEWS

When the walls come tumbling down The implosion of Scott Towers ends 40 years of history, makes way for new development

TIMELINE FOR IMPLOSION OF SCOTT TOWERS ON SUNDAY, JAN. 19. 7 A.M.

7:30 A.M.-8:30 A.M.

A 600-foot safety perimeter will be set up and evacuation will begin of the Garden Apartments and surrounding homes and businesses.

Augusta Street from Haynie Street to Harris Street, Claussen Avenue, Thruston Street, McHan Street and Seawright Lane will be closed.

9 A.M.

9:30 A.M.

11:15 A.M.

11:30 A.M.

Cleanup to be completed.

All roads to be re-opened and residents/businesses that were evacuated can return.

SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com In approximately 18 seconds at 9:30 a.m. on Sunday morning, Jan. 19, a Greenville landmark will be reduced to a pile of rubble and concrete. Scott Towers, the 14-story icon on Augusta Street that has housed low-income seniors for more than 40 years, is set to be demolished. Onlookers may watch the implosion from an observation viewing area the city will make available on Dunbar Street. The Greenville Housing Authority made the decision last year to demolish the building after multiple studies determined the repair costs to bring the structure up to current building code requirements would be prohibitive. Scott Towers lacked sprinklers, the elevators were not pressurized, and numerous structural and safety issues persisted, said GHA Interim Director Cindi Herrera.

Meanwhile, property value estimates for the site plus the building were $775,000, but rose to $1.8 million with the building gone, she said. Rehab costs were estimated at more than $30 million, while demolition costs will total $1.3 million, Herrera said. Agency officials blamed years of deferred maintenance, dwindling federal funds for public housing and changing building codes.

MONTHS IN THE (UN)MAKING A meeting was held last week at the Garden Apartments building behind Scott Towers to inform nearby residents and busi-

Th ey’re Hot! And We Have Them... Air Plants and Terrariums Are Here at Roots!

Final security sweep and Housing Authority Recognition Ceremony.

IMPLOSION

nesses of the implosion plans and timeline. “We want to reassure everyone in the community of the safety plan,” Herrera said. On hand were representatives from law enforcement, fire personnel and NEO Corp., the North Carolina environment and industrial services company contracted to perform the implosion. NEO Corp. subcontractor Steve Pettigrew, a nationally recognized demolition expert from Jacksonville, Fla., said the team has been prepping the building since August, adding cables to assist the structure when it falls, drilling holes, removing walls and removing all hazardous materials. Pettigrew said the “safest and most effective way to bring the structure down is an explosive demolition application,” with the implosion beginning in the center of the buildings and then moving to the north and then south sides. Chain-link fences and protective barriers have been installed for safety around the perimeter to catch debris. Those nearby on Jan. 19 will hear an initial seven seconds of explosions at 9:30 a.m. that will activate the system, Pettigrew said, followed by another seven seconds of explosions that will be the actual charges going off. Seismographs will be set up to monitor vibration and air pressure, he said. Cleanup crews will inspect a 100-foot radius for dust and debris and perform cleanup as needed. Nearby residents and businesses within a 600-foot safety perimeter have already been told they will need to evacuate Sunday morning, Herrera said. Housing Authority officials will evacuate residents of the Garden Apartments at 6 a.m., bussing them over to the Sterling Community Center where breakfast and activities have been planned.

TOWERS FILLED A NEED

2249 Augusta Street, Greenville (Located across the street from Foxfire)

864-241-0100

w w w.RootsofGreenville.com 8 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

Built in 1970 under the federal housing program, Scott Towers provided subsidized housing for low-income seniors for 43 years, fulfilling a critical housing need in Greenville. GHA developed, owned and managed Scott Towers since its construction, and the building was named in honor of Elmer E. Scott, former chairman of the Federal Housing Board in the 1970s, Herrera said.

Scott had served as chairman of the Federal Housing Board for 35 years and was a dedicated advocate for affordable senior housing for the Greenville community. He moved to Greenville in 1930 to open Greenville’s J.C. Penney store and was with the company for 41 years. Scott passed away in 1984 at the age of 89. A recognition ceremony will be held prior to Sunday’s implosion with some of Scott’s extended family expected to be in attendance.

TRAINING FOR FIRST RESPONDERS GHA began relocating Scott Towers residents to other housing options more than a year ago, and the towers have been vacant since March 2013. Since then, the Greenville City Fire Department has used the vacant buildings to conduct training drills in conjunction with other area fire and rescue personnel. The department was able to conduct multiple high-rise firefighting operations area personnel normally would have no opportunity to do, Fire Inspector L.C. Dendy told the Journal last May. Firefighters were also able to conduct large area searches, standpipe operations (accessing water piping within a multi-story building), RIT/MAYDAY operations (Rapid Intervention Teams put in place solely to assist firefighters in distress) and other combinations of training. More drills are planned after the debris is cleared and dust has settled from the implosion. This time, an emergency response exercise will take place the week of Jan. 19-25, with 12-hour, real-time exercises planned with “a scenario similar to a 9/11 or Oklahoma City bombing,” city officials said. Local EMS, law enforcement, rescue resources and medical personnel are expected to participate in the “simulated collapse scenario.”

BUILDING FROM THE RUBBLE Once the drills are completed, work will begin on the property’s redevelopment. GHA is working with McCormack Barron, a large development company out


JOURNAL NEWS St.

t. eS

How

.

Ave

t.

t.

eS

How

nS

sto

u Thr

t.

en

uss

Cla

. Augusta St

ta St.

Augus

Burn s St.

eS

ris

Har

Ho w

Augusta St.

of St. Louis. Conceptual plans Evacuation call for new construction of Traffic 197 multifamily Route units consisting of studios, oneHard bedroom and Barrier two-bedroom units. The development is expected to include a new parking deck, commercial space on the corner of Augusta and Thruston streets and outdoor amenity r St. and Dunba space for resiComm t s Po dents. The redevelopment will also provide 142 onebedroom senior garden apartments; 62 of them new construction and 80 more through the modernization of existing units at the Garden Apartments located behind Scott Towers. Once complete, the entire development will offer 339 units in a mixed-use, mixed-income community with about 80 percent at market rate and 20 percent affordable housing for lowerincome seniors and families.

Scott Towers

Ella Mae Logan Park

.

McHan St

.

Haynie St

It has taken months of preparation to get ready for Sunday’s implosion. Visit GreenvilleJournal.com for Scott Towers fun facts. Cleanup of the demolished building will take about two months to complete.

Physician News GHS welcomes these new doctors & sites! Cardiothoracic Surgery Scott Johnson, MD 890 W. Faris Rd., Ste. 550 Greenville, 455-6800

NEW OFFICE SITES Greenville Midwifery Care 333 S. Pine St. Spartanburg, 455-1600

Family Medicine Telicia Allen, MD Keystone Family Medicine Simpsonville, 454-5000

Vascular Health Alliance 340 Medical Pkwy., Ste. 200 Greer, 797-9400

Philip Way, MD Riverside Family Medicine–Eastside Greenville, 454-2700

KARA DIOGUARDI: HOPE, HEALING & TRIUMPH THROUGH MUSIC

RSVP BY

Join us February 6th for the 4th Annual Julie Valentine Center Luncheon to hear the remarkable story of an amazing woman. Former American Idol judge Kara DioGuardi will share her triumphant life as an artist, songwriter, and experience with sexual abuse. Kara found hope and healing in her music. As one of the most successful contemporary songwriters in the world, Kara’s songs have appeared on more than 160 million albums.

SPONSORED BY

11:30 CHECK-IN • TD CONVENTION CENTER

KARA DIOGUARDI AMERICAN IDOL

JAN. 31st 2014

FEBRUARY 6, 2014 AT NOON

RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW JULIEVALENTINECENTER.ORG

Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Carole Mercer, MD Heritage Pediatrics & Internal Medicine–Simpsonville Simpsonville, 454-6440 Pediatrics Matthew Grisham, MD Christie Pediatric Group Greenville, 242-4840 Joseph Maurer, MD The Children’s Clinic Greenville, 271-1450

WELCOME TO THESE LAURENS COUNTY PRACTICES & PHYSICIANS Family Medicine Neal Goodbar, MD Holbrook Raynal, MD, DHA Advanced Health Care 210 S. Broad St. Clinton, 833-0973 General Surgery Carter McCormack, MD Sam Wilson, MD Wilson & McCormack Surgical Services 1012 Medical Ridge Rd. Clinton, 833-3852 OB/GYN Joni Coker, DO Tim Harkins, MD Carolina Women’s Center 102 Medical Park Ct. Clinton, 938-0087

ghs.org 131063GJ

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 9


JOURNAL NEWS

CON program may revive

Carpet · Hardwood · Area Rugs · Tile & Stone · Laminate

Some Certificate of Need projects stalled after program’s funding cut APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

15% OFF

To make it easier to buy what you need, Classic Carpets & Interiors is offering 15% off all flooring (material only).* Stop by today and ask a sales associate for all of the details. *Minimum order of 50 sy or 450sf.

COME AND SEE OUR GORGEOUS SELECTION OF AREA RUGS FROM THESE GREAT LINES:

CLASSIC CARPETS & INTERIORS

www.classiccarpetsgreenville.com 167 Verdin Road | Greenville, SC | 864.527.5555 10 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

A regulatory process that authorizes health care providers to expand or purchase equipment could be funded again if a newly introduced bill passes in the state Legislature. The state’s Certificate of Need (CON) program, which gives approval for hospitals and nursing homes to expand or purchase certain types of equipment, stopped issuing certificates or enforcing compliance in July after Gov. Nikki Haley successfully vetoed the roughly $1.7 million needed to operate the program. The state Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), which administers the program, put the hold in place for the 2013-14 fiscal year. However, the law authorizing the program is still in effect. DHEC requested a clarifying ruling from the state Supreme Court on its regulatory responsibility and how the hold on the CON process affects health care entities still under the law’s authority. Meanwhile, a group of hospitals and nursing homes sued DHEC, seeking to have the program reinstated. DHEC had received 38 CON applications in 2013 before the funding was cut. The Greenville Health System said last week that none of its projects needing a CON have been delayed. Bon Secours St. Francis’s CEO Mark Nantz said St. Francis supports the CON program and he hopes the uncertainty will be resolved in the Supreme Court or the Legislature. St. Francis officials would not comment on whether they have put a hold on any projects requiring a CON. However, a June 2013 DHEC CON update document said Bon Secours St. Francis had the purchase of a da Vinci surgical system and construction of an outpatient oncology center at the Millennium campus under CON review. Spartanburg Regional’s Gibbs Regional Cancer Center at the Village Hospital was also under review. According to a survey by the South Carolina Hospital Association, 29 hospitals have reported they are hold-

ing capital projects of approximately $60 million and projects equaling about $48 million in potential capital project investment. DHEC reported that 75 licensing applications that would have required a CON have been received since July 1, 2013. The majority are for home health agencies, but also include projects by Colleton Medical Center, Trident Medical Center and Grand Strand Regional Medical Center, along with an expansion of Spartanburg Regional Medical Center Health Services. The South Carolina Hospital Association is a supporter of the CON program. Established in 1971 in South Carolina, CON is designed to keep health care providers from establishing facilities that duplicate services in an area, contain costs and establish facilities that will best serve the public. “The basic assumption underlying CON regulation is that excess capacity (in the form of facility overbuilding) directly results in health care price inflation,” the National Conference of State Legislatures has said. “When a hospital cannot fill its beds, fixed costs must be met through higher charges for the beds that are used.” The program was once federally mandated, but handed over to the states in 1986. Today, 36 states have a CON law. Supporters argue that typical market forces and competition do not apply to health care and patients do not shop for services, but instead use the provider recommended by their doctor. Opponents assert that new construction restrictions drive up health costs and that CON approvals are driven by political influence and institutional prestige. In 2013, Sen. Harvey Peeler sponsored a bill that would require an entity that loses a CON appeal in the Administrative Law Court to pay the other party’s attorney’s fees and costs. The bill is currently with the Senate Medical Affairs committee. Peeler told The State newspaper he believes the program was extreme before the governor’s veto and moved to the other extreme after the veto. A bill by Sen. Joel Lourie also in the committee would require DHEC to use its revenue funds to fund the CON program.


JOURNAL NEWS

Ingles helps me And with an Ingles Advantage Card, they can help you too!

INGLES PREMIUM CERTIFIED USDA CHOICE BEEF T-BONE OR PORTERHOUSE STEAK All Sizes

Save up to $3.20 Lb.

2 $FOR

4

FLORIDA STRAWBERRIES 1 LB.

Save $3.92 on 2

and more...PER GAL ANY GRADE Save 5¢/gal per 100 Points Earned. Redeem on One 20 gal Fill-up. See Store Associate for Details*

EARN UNLIMITED GAS SAVINGS!

$1 in Groceries* = 1 Point WHEN YOU EARN 100 pts 200 pts 300 pts

YOU SAVE PER GAL 5¢ 10¢ 15¢

2$FOR 68

PET ICE CREAM 56 Oz., Selected Varieties Save $6.08 on 2

1. Get your Ingles Advantage card & save

2. Go to www.ingles-markets.com/amail & follow the instructions

5

Hurry – sale ends Saturday!

"With my Ingles Advantage Card and Tools for Schools, I'm helping the local schools get the equipment they need to keep up with the fast-paced world of technology. A percentage of each purchase I make goes to the school of my choice."

Sign up for AdvantageMail™

6

$ 98 Lb.

A M E R I C A N O W N E D & O P E R AT E D – GOD BLESS AMERICA!

www.ingles-markets.com/amail

3. Ingles will let you know, weekly, what items you buy are on sale

PLUS enjoy exclusive

AdvantageMail savings.

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 11 TOOLS FOR SCHOOL MARKETING © Ad design is property of Community Journals and cannot be used in any other publication.


JOURNAL NEWS

Leaders discuss healthcare cost, access and quality APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

Meet

SCOTT STEPHENS / CONTRIBUTING

Representatives from three different sectors predicted big changes in the cost, quality and access of healthcare at this week’s Greenville Rotary meeting. Anthony Keck, head of South Carolina’s Department of Health and Human Services; Matthew Shaffer, a senior vice president with BlueCross BlueShield South Carolina; and Dr. Angelo Sinopoli, chief medical officer with Greenville Health System, sat down for a panel discussion and question-and-answer session. All three said that big data will play a big role in healthcare, from analyzing populations and assessing their needs to monitoring conditions. Shaffer predicted that over the next 10 years, the four big trends would be data, wellness, consolidation of providers and health systems, and consumerism or awareness of the economics of healthcare. The emphasis on data may present some challenges in privacy, he said, noting that more consumers’ financial information was available than

their health information. The new federal legal requirements for care quality will force some providers out of the business and others to consolidate to get the scale needed to meet the standards, he said. Anthony Keck predicted funding mechanisms will be simplified and “fewer organizations will be controlling the dollar.” He said more employers will “offload the risk that they now carry related to healthcare costs to their employees” and pass money to From left, SCDHHS director Anthony Keck, GHS CEO employees, who will purchase their and president Mike Riordan, GHS chief medical officer own insurance. Dr. Angelo Sinopoli, South Carolina BlueCross major The reduction in who controls the group senior vice president Matthew Shaffer and GHS money will ultimately lead to consoli- chair of obstetrics Dr. Donald Wiper. dation and fewer options for consumers, Keck said. “That’s something that tion while others are pushing for new the rest of the world deals with in lots of different ways, but that’s something drugs and treatments. How patients access care is also gowere not used to in the United States.” The consolidation could lead to a ing to dramatically shift, said Sinopoli. greater risk pool and some members A patient won’t see a doctor face-tocontributing more and some less, he face regarding a health issue, but would call his or her health coach, potentially said. “It’s all about trade-offs.” In terms of cost, Shaffer added that via teleconference, and could receive a some forces are working to reduce costs prescription, he said. GHS has a proby moving toward wellness and preven- gram that has managers who monitor

diabetic patients between doctor visits, thereby extending the time between visits, he said. Keck added that the state is already using telemedicine for stroke response care and for psychiatric evaluations in emergency rooms. On the insurance provider front, Shaffer said the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has fundamentally changed how his company does business. BlueCross BlueShield has always assumed there would be 100 percent compliance with the law in the face of changing deadlines and directives, dedicating up to 150 full-time employees to compliance, he said. The panel fielded questions on the state’s rejection of Medicaid expansion, waste and inefficiency and the charitable status of some hospitals. A focus in how the business of healthcare is funded needs to shift from one that relies on sickness and filling beds to one that relies on maintenance and wellness without bankrupting the providers, Keck said. “Everyone I work with knows the system we need to get to; the discussion is how to get there and who pays,” he said.

New Years Resolution #1

CONVERGENT PROPERTY GROUP.

Yikes! It’s 2014, call Ike’s! Ike’s Carpet, Rug and Upholstery Cleaning has more than 39 years of experience in the carpet and upholstery cleaning industry. We have been satisfying our clients by providing individual attention and excellent customer service. Let us take care of your rugs and upholstery! Our services include: • In-Plant Cleaning of Orientals, Dhurries, Silks and Upholstery • On Location Cleaning Services

Greenville’s Partner for Property Management Our dynamic team of property management and real estate professionals specializes in converging properties for lease or sale with qualified tenants and buyers. Voted Best of the Upstate 2013, we help you capitalize on the value of your real estate with income-producing solutions backed by our 10-Point Promise. Contact us today for a free consultation! (864) 751-1000 | www.convergentpg.com /ConvergentPropertyGroup /ConvergentPG

• Hot-Water Extraction • Odor Control • Carpet Inspections, Corrections & Repairs • Solvent Dry Cleaning (In-Plant Only) • Water Damage Restoration and Structure Drying We’d like to add you to our long list of satisfied customers. Call us today at 864-232-9015 for a free estimate. We look forward to serving you!

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL

Where Relationships Meet Results

12 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

CARPET, RUG & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING, INC. IKE’S 128 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville, SC • 864-232-9015 • www.ikescarpet.com


JOURNAL NEWS

FLOOR SAMPLE SALE

UP TO 50%

OFF RETAIL

ON CERTAIN ITEMS

3411 Augusta Road, Greenville

864-277-5330

www.oldcolonyfurniture.com

J0713

Sale ends January 31st

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 13


JOURNAL NEWS

The Bassmaster Classic, which was last held in the Upstate in 2008, will return to the area in 2015.

Bassmaster Classic to return to SC in 2015 SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com

14 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

Area fishermen can cast a line and rejoice. The Bassmaster Classic is returning to the Upstate in 2015. The popular world championship of fishing will be held at Lake Hartwell and competition dates have been set for Feb. 20-22, 2015. Anglers who qualify for the world championship through various Bassmaster competitions throughout 2014 will compete. “B.A.S.S. (Bass Anglers Sportsman Society) is delighted to be returning to Lake Hartwell and Greenville,” said Bruce Akin, CEO of B.A.S.S. “We will be working closely with our South Carolina partners over the next year to be sure Classic 2015 will be the first-class sporting event B.A.S.S. members and fishing fans worldwide have come to expect.” The announcement was made at a press conference on Thursday. B.A.S.S. and South Carolina officials, including Gov. Nikki Haley, representatives from South Carolina Parks, Recreation and Tourism (SCPRT), VisitGreenvilleSC, VisitAnderson, the city of Greenville, Greenville County and Anderson County made the announcement jointly. “We are thrilled that the Bassmaster Classic has chosen to return to South Carolina and selected Greenville for their 2015 location,” said Haley. “It’s truly a great a day in South Carolina, and now millions of people will get to see why our beautiful state continues

to attract top-notch sporting events.” B.A.S.S last brought the Classic to Greenville and Lake Hartwell in February 2008. The lake produced what was then the third-largest winning weight for a Classic: 49 pounds, 7 ounces. Bassmaster Elite Series pro Alton Jones of Texas was the author of that mark. Jones bested the 44-5 posted by Cliff Pace, then a 25-yearold, up-and-coming Elite pro from Mississippi. Pace went on to become a Classic champ himself in 2013. A new multimillion-dollar launch facility, Green Pond, has been constructed near Anderson for the anglers’ daily takeoffs. They’ll bring their catches to Greenville for weigh-ins at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena. The Bassmaster Classic Expo, the consumer show held concurrently with the competition days, will be at the TD Convention Center in Greenville. “We are thrilled that the Bassmaster Classic has chosen to return in 2015. The world championship of bass fishing recognizes the great combination of Lake Hartwell and facilities in Anderson and Greenville,” said Chris Stone, president of VisitGreenvilleSC. Stone noted that in 2008, more than 75,000 people attended the Classic in Greenville over three days. “We look forward to an even larger event in 2015, which will have tremendous impact on the local economy, with a projected impact of more than $17 million in revenue to the Upstate,” Stone said.


JOURNAL NEWS

Public weighs in on distracted driving issue JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com Using a hand-held device while driving in the city of Greenville may soon cost you. In a public hearing held on Monday, interested parties gathered at City Hall to provide input on a possible ordinance banning the use of hand-held devices while driving. Cities such as Beaufort, Charleston and Clemson have already incorporated similar ordinances, and with a first reading planned for Jan. 27, the city of Greenville could become the 14th municipality statewide to place a ban on texting while driving. Mary Duckett, president of the Southernside Neighborhoods in Action, said she was glad the mayor and council recognize the danger of using a hand-held device while operating a vehicle. “We stand whole-heartedly behind

you on the ban of these devices while driving,” she said. Furman student Laura Woodside emphasized the need for council to thoroughly educate high school and college students on changes in the law should the ordinance pass. The city has the responsibility to keep its citizens safe, she said. Some council members expressed concerns that law enforcement could run into problems upholding an ordinance against the singular act of texting. Councilwoman Lillian Brock Flemming said hand-held devices can be used for a variety of functions, and the city needs a clear ordinance so the police can enforce it. “We want to define the ordinance so that it covers all of the things that cause the greatest number of wrecks, such as dialing a number or e-mailing,” Flemming said. “The ordinance will have to cover more than just texting so that our

Former Erskine College president dies SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com Dr. James W. Strobel, who served as the 12th president of Erskine College and Theological Seminary from 1990 until his retirement in 1998, died in an automobile accident in Florida on Jan. 8, 2014. Strobel came to Erskine after serving as founding director of the Mississippi Universities Center in Jackson, Miss., and was a Board Distinguished Professor at Jackson State University. He also served an 11-year term as president of the Mississippi University for Women in Columbus, Miss. Strobel was an Ohio native and graduate of Ohio University. He received his Ph.D. in plant pathology from Washington State University. During his tenure at Erskine, the college more than doubled its endowment, removed all debt, and successfully completed the $33 million Campaign for Erskine, according to a statement from the college. Strobel and his wife, Donna, extended warm hospitality to Erskine students and were known for their

homemade candy, including “Erskine Crunch,” which they shared generously. He also worked with students to create The Hangar, a Strobel student meeting space and lounge in the historic Erskine Building. Dr. Strobel is survived by Donna Strobel, his wife of 58 years; daughter Cynthia; son Jay; his two brothers, Robert Strobel of Cadiz, Ohio, and Darryl Strobel of Pittsburgh; his sister, Cheryl Connery of St. Paul, Minn.; and grandchildren Trey, Courtney, Jarrett, Annalee, Dana, and Jacob. A Celebration of Life for Dr. Strobel will be held at Hope Lutheran Church, The Villages, Florida, on Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014, at 2:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to scholarships in his name at Erskine or at Mississippi University for Women. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Lady LakeThe Villages, Florida, is in charge of arrangements.

police can actually see a crime being committed like holding a phone to your ear while driving.” Possible exceptions are likely for EMS workers and bus drivers who use handheld devices such as two-way radios. Once the ordinance is in place, Flemming expects a series of fines to be installed for violations. “We are still working on the details of it all and the possible penalties for violating the ordinance, but I do not expect phones to be confiscated in place of a series of fines that make sense,” she said. Jim Evers, regional director at AT&T, provided some perspective on the issue,

telling the council and crowd that the average text can take five seconds. At 55 mph, it is like driving the length of a football field while blindfolded, he said. In 2011, a study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) on distracted driving pointed to texting as especially dangerous because it includes all three major types of driving distractions: visual, manual and cognitive. Many who spoke to council discussed the need for something to be done on a state level, and state Rep. Don Bowen told the crowd he agreed. “I know you are doing the right thing by bringing awareness to that gang I work with down in Columbia,” he said. “We have let the use of phones while driving create an unneeded safety issue and it needs to be addressed.” Only two states – South Carolina and Montana – have no distracted driving law of any form on the books. The positive input heard at the public hearing is evidence city residents understand something needs to be done to tackle this problem, Flemming said, calling it “a sign of the times.”

Toll Free 1-800-985-1778 • Local 1-864-283-0633 700 Woodruff Rd #6 Greenville, SC 29607 (near Beck Academy) ExtremeColorsGreenville.com • 1 Day Bumper Repairs • Clearcoat Polishing and Sealing • Scratch & Chip Correction • Paint Protection Film and Installation

• Paintless Dent Removal • Cosmetic Wheel Repair • 3M Window Tinting

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 15


JOURNAL NEWS

PERSONALIZE YOUR WEDDING & PARTY EVENTS

Simpsonville Council fires city administrator than it has to do with any person’s performance.” The vote came on the same night two new council members were sworn into office, both of whom voted to terminate Hawes. The two – Taylor Graham and Elizabeth Braswell – centered their election campaigns around the Grounsell controversy. Graham said after the vote that he was elected to do a job and his decisions on council will be based on “what the citizens want. I am merely the voice of the citizens.” The council voted to fire Grounsell in December 2012 after three months on the job, stating in a termination document that the former police chief seemed incapable of working with Hawes or the council majority. As part of the back-and-forth between the city government and Grounsell, Hawes had denied Grounsell the right to have the hearing he requested last January following his firing. In other business, the council voted unanimously to adopt the same resolution the city of Greenville did to potentially avoid paying increased millage due to Greenville County’s takeover of the Greenville Recreation District last year.

JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com

✤ INVITATIONS ✤ PAPER GOODS ✤ STATIONERY ✤ GIFTS & MORE!

OFFICIAL DEALER OF SMOCK 109A North Main Street, Simpsonville • 864-228-9600 • www.EEPaperBoutique.com

Mirroring the events of last year with its police chief, Simpsonville City Council started the calendar year with a 4-3 vote to give City Administrator Russell Hawes the option to resign or be fired. The vote, which was discussed in executive session at the end of the meeting, comes after nearly a year of tension-filled meetings pitching former council members, the mayor and city administrator at odds with former Simpsonville police chief Keith Grounsell and his supporters. Supporters regularly packed council meetings waving signs and calling for the resignation of the mayor, the members of council who voted to fire Grounsell, and Hawes. The large crowds early last year led to increased security with metal-detector wands and several police officers at each meeting. “I would just like to say that I feel Mr. Hawes has been an excellent employee of the city and that he has performed remarkably the past years while I have been here,” Councilman George Curtis said after the vote. “I believe that the action that is being taken has to do with politics far more

How they voted SIMPSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL VOTED 4-3 TO GIVE CITY ADMINISTRATOR RUSSELL HAWES THE OPTION TO RESIGN OR BE FIRED.

TAYLOR GRAHAM (WARD II)

C

MATTHEW GOOCH (WARD I)

C C C C

GENEVA LAWRENCE (WARD III)

ELIZABETH BRASWELL (WARD IV)

C C

GEORGE CURTIS (WARD V)

SYLVIA LOCKABY (WARD VI) PERRY EICHOR (MAYOR)

Small green steps Greater Greenville Sanitation recently launched the Roll into Recycling pilot program, which will determine whether a larger recycling container will result in greater recyclable material generated by homeowners. The program will use a 95-gallon recycling roll cart rather than an 18-gallon bin. Pilot neighborhoods will be monitored for three months and the program was recently launched in the Monaghan neighborhood.

16 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Dreams center of MLK weekend Weekend encourages Upstate residents to work for unity and diversity CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Photo Provided

Here come the robots Children’s museum hopes to have new climber open in February; new ‘Robot Zoo’ exhibit opens Saturday

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Two exhibits will soon have visitors to the Children’s Museum of the Upstate

climbing the walls – or at least climbing, anyway. The museum’s Kaleidoscope Climber – a three-story tall climbing structure that has been one of the facility’s most

popular attractions – has been closed since July. But thanks to a gift by an anonymous donor that is covering most of the expense, the museum expects to

All. Together. Now. is the theme of MLK Dream Weekend. Charleston Mayor Joe Riley, the keynote speaker for Monday’s MLK Diversity Luncheon at the TD Convention Center, is a good – albeit not so obvious – illustration of that, said Nika White, one of MLK Dream Weekend’s five founders and a member of the event’s executive board. “Sometimes the not-so obvious choice can be more impactful,” she said. Riley, the event’s first non-AfricanAmerican keynote speaker, has led a city with increased racial harmony and progress, White said. “He has certainly won the respect of people there. He has pushed for racial harmony and urban development among other things, issues that align with the legacy of Dr. King.” Pas tor Curtis Johnson, chairman of MLK Dream Weekend, said, “We are excited to welcome The Honorable Mayor Riley to the Upstate for this great celebration of Dr. King. MLK continued on PAGE 20

ROBOTS continued on PAGE 18

Finish What You Started. on campus -or- online

Finish faster while working or taking care of your family Enrolling now!

ACCEL at www.andersonuniversity.edu • 231-2020

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 17


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

ROBOTS continued from PAGE 17

have a new, redesigned climber open next month. And a traveling exhibit based on John Kelly’s book “The Robot Zoo” that opens to the public on Saturday will give visitors a chance to stick like flies to a sloped surface. Luckey Climbers has built indoor climbers for museums, malls, zoos and parks across the United States. The Greenville

climber, which is under a skylight in the center of the museum’s exhibit space, was the company’s first clear climber, a dream of the company’s founder, Tom Luckey. Originally, plans called for the “stones” to be made of glass, but an architect from London said glass would be too heavy and too sharp, said Nancy Halverson, president and CEO of the museum. The architects recommended using a polycarbonate, which they told the museum could not break or crack, Halverson

SUNDAY BRUNCH 11 AM ’TIL 2 PM (MAULDIN LOCATION)

Photos Provided

BEST Burgers, Crab Cakes, Nachos, & Tacos IN TOWN!

Enjoy our WORLD FAMOUS Crab Cakes!

LIVE MUSIC EVERY THURSDAY! MARCUS KING BAND ~ (DOWNTOWN LOCATION) 116 North Main · Mauldin · 864.991.8863 Hours: Sunday Brunch 11 am till 2 pm; Monday–Saturday 11:30am ’til late

608B South Main Street · Downtown Greenville · 864.232.4100 Hours: Tuesday–Sunday 11:30 am till late; Closed on Monday

www.ChicoraAlley.com 18 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

said. A Canadian company manufactured the “stones,” but refused to guarantee them because the company had not done a project like it before, Halverson said. Halverson began noticing cracks in the stones shortly after becoming the museum’s CEO about a year ago. She was reassured the stones could not break, she said. Last April, she became convinced the cracks were growing. An engineer was sent to do an evaluation, and Halverson said she was again told again the polycarbonate could not break. But in July, a group of children were playing on the climber and a piece broke when a boy stepped on it, Halverson said. The boy was not injured, but the museum shut down the popular attraction. Productions Unlimited owner Brian Phillips, who was involved in installation of lighting and sound in the museum, said he could redesign the climber and use another plastic product that would not be clear, but would be sturdy. “Essentially, it is the plastic used in outdoor playgrounds,” Halverson said. A donor gave $60,000 and the museum needed to raise the other $30,000. The museum has raised half of it, Halver-

son said. “The Robot Zoo” exhibit will be at the museum until June 1. The 2,500-squarefoot exhibit allows children to explore the biomechanics of complex animal robots to learn how real animals work. The zoo will include three larger-thanlife-size robot animals – chameleon, platypus and housefly, the latter with a 3-foot wingspan – and seven hands-on activities that illustrate real-life animal characteristics, such as how a chameleon changes colors and how a fly walks on the ceiling. Activities include “Swat the Fly,” a test of reaction time, and “Sticky Feet,” where visitors wear special hand and knee pads to stick to a sloped surface like flies stick to ceilings. The “Tongue Gun” demonstrates how a real chameleon shoots out its long, sticky-tipped tongue to reel in a meal. On Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the museum will hold “Kids’ Maker Fest,” an event designed to create opportunities for young people to learn through making things. There will be maker groups from the Carolinas and Georgia, hands-on workshops, product demonstrations and exhibitor booths.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC NEW LISTING

201 Cammer Avenue - Augusta Road Area - $174,605

NEW LISTING UNDER CONTRACT

Lot 15 - 58 Setting Sun Lane Ridge at Sunset - $299,690

UNDER CONTRACT

200 Clarendon Dr - Hampton Downs - Easley - $185,642

UNDER CONTRACT

100 Cammer Ave - Augusta Road Area - $319,605

111 Hunters Way - Hunters Ridge $229,617

9 Setting Sun Lane in 304 West Prentiss Ave - Augusta The Edge Condo - Unit 16B The Ridge at Sunset - $274,690 Circle Area - $299,605 North Main Area - $299,609

NEW LISTING UNDER CONTRACT

425 Longview Terrace Augusta Road Area - $349,605

46 Setting Sun Lane in The Ridge at Sunset - $349,690

213 Oregon Street - Augusta Road Area - $374,605

3 Crabapple Court - Augusta Road Area - $384,605

NEW PRICE

3 Club Drive - GCC Area To be built - $399,605

790 Roe Ford Road on 11.5 acres - $399,617

222 Waverly Hall Simpsonville - $399,681

110 Jones Avenue - Augusta Road Area - $574,601

4 Southbourne Ct. - Parkins Mill Area - $599,607

16 Keowee Ave - Augusta Circle Area - BRAND NEW - $609,605

101 Country Club Drive GCC Area - $769,605

160 Ridgeland - Unit 100 $889,601

121 Stonehaven Drive Parkins Mill Area - $948,607

LOTS OF LOTS!!! 731 Brookdale - Greer - $46,651 NEW PRICE - Lot 91 - Limestone Trail - 6 acres - Cliffs of Glassy - $49,356 Lot 31- Hidden Hills Ct - Chanticleer Towns - $149,605 Lot 67 - Club Forest Lane - Chanticleer - $149,605 Lot 311 Lawson Way - Chanticleer - $374,605 Lot 291/Pt lot 29 - Lawson Way - Chanticleer - $394,605

120 E Augusta Place - Augusta Road Area - $449,605

408 Altamont - Paris Mtn $483,609

35 E Tallulah - Augusta Road Area - $489,605

318 Meyers Drive - Augusta Circle Area - $624,605

163 Augusta Court - Augusta Circle Area - $724,605

611 McDaniel Avenue Alta Vista Area - $764,605

702 Crescent Ave. - Alta Vista $959,601

102 Bruce Farm Road - On 7 acres in Simpsonville $989,681

112 Riverside Drive Greenville Country Club Area $1,750,605

Joan Herlong Owner, BIC

531 S. Main Street, Suite 201 Greenville, SC 29601

864-325-2112

Joan@AugustaRoad.com JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 19


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Greenville’s Audiology Team

Marcy W. Stowell, MA, FAAA Alisa S. McMahon, MS, CCC-A Licensed Audiologist

Licensed Audiologist

Multiple solutions for your hearing needs, including:

Hearing Aids Bluetooth Hearing Loop Technology Like us on

12 Waite Street, Suite B-2, Greenville, SC 29607 • Phone 864-509-1152

864.509.1152 hearingsolutionsbymarcy.com HS-1-4p-ColorAd-Marcy/Alysa.indd 1

8/21/13 11:28 AM

GIF T CARD

20 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

MLK continued from PAGE 17

Mayor Riley was invited for his numerous leadership accolades including his commitment to racial harmony and his highly effective approach to progress in affordable housing, economic revitalization, and urban development. MLK Dream Weekend is a series of events surrounding Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday. The observation began in 2006, the first year that a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday was recognized in Greenville County. The weekend’s focus has since shifted from a celebration of the milestone achieved with that recognition to looking toward a future when King’s dream of a society where everyone is treated equally is an actual reality. This year’s MLK Dream Weekend runs Jan. 17-20. The observation begins with a 7 p.m. prayer vigil this Friday, Jan. 17, in the Graham Plaza in front of the Peace Center. “It’s an opportunity for all of us to come together on one accord,” White said. On Saturday, volunteers will fan out and work on projects throughout the community as a part of MLK Community Day of Service. The event is held in conjunction with Hands On Greenville. From 10 a.m. until noon, volunteers will work to landscape, garden and organize donations at Little Steps, deliver Meals on Wheels, mentor students, beautify the grounds of United Ministries, clean up the Old Pilgrim Church cemetery, landscape for Homes of Hope, work in the Safe Harbor Resale Shop, work with the Harvest Hope Food Bank and help build a Habitat for Humanity house. Volunteers will also work at the Free Medical Clinic, share songs and poetry with residents of the Diamond Health & Rehab in Simpsonville, clear out brush and undergrowth and plant native plants near the Happy Hearts Community Center and beautify North Main Rotary Park. The weekend’s main event, the MLK Diversity Banquet, has been moved from evening to Monday at noon. The change was made because Monday is a holiday for schools and many businesses and changing from dinner to a luncheon makes tickets more affordable, White said. “The change was very thoughtful. We wanted to extend and broaden the reach of the event,” she said. Organizers expect between 800 and 1,000 people to attend. Under Riley’s leadership, the city of Charleston has seen a decrease in crime, experienced a revitalization of its historic downtown business district, seen the creation and growth of Spoleto

Festival U.S.A., had significant additions to its park system, developed nationally acclaimed affordable housing and experienced unprecedented growth, Dream Weekend organizers say. Among the accolades Riley has received is a 2009 National Medal of the Arts during a ceremony at the White House, the South Carolina Governor’s Award in the Humanities, the American Society of Landscape Architects’ 2004 Olmsted Medal and the Verner Award from the South Carolina Arts Commission. The U.S. Conference of Mayors created the Joseph P. Riley Jr. Award for Leadership in City Design in his honor. Governing Magazine named him its Public Official of the Year in 2003. He received the Arthur J. Clement Award in Race Relations for his efforts to remove the Confederate flag from the South Carolina Statehouse. At the banquet, 10 scholarships totaling more than $100,000 will be awarded to students in the Upstate. Tickets to the luncheon are $35 for individuals or $300 for tables of 10. They are available online at mlkdreamweekend.com or at Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Church, BJ’s Music, Bethlehem Baptist Church and the Greenville County Human Relations Commission. Doors open at 11:20 a.m. Distinguished Gentlemen will provide musical entertainment. More information about MLK Dream Weekend can be found at mlkdreamweekend.com.

SO YOU KNOW

2014 MLK Dream Weekend Events

FRIDAY, JAN. 17 • 7 P.M. WHAT: MLK Prayer Vigil WHERE: Peace Center Graham Plaza INFO: Free, open to the public

SATURDAY, JAN. 18 10 A.M. UNTIL NOON WHAT: MLK Community Day of Service WHERE: In conjunction with Hands on Greenville, volunteers will work at project sites throughout Greenville County INFO: Sign-up is available at mlkdreamweekend.com

MONDAY, JAN. 20 • NOON WHAT: MLK Diversity Luncheon WHERE: TD Convention Center KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr. TICKETS: $35, available at mlkdreamweekend.com


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Driver turns love of 4-wheel drives into Monster career Digger. “I’ve been able to parlay my passion for four-wheel drives as a kid into a career. It’s every little kid’s dream.” Only it wasn’t Huffaker’s dream, because Monster Jam didn’t exist when he was growing up. “It’s a sport that’s really grown over the years,” Huffaker said. “ I wouldn’t want to be a newcomer to it. It has changed so much since I first started. It has gone to a level we never dreamed of.” Huffaker will be one of the drivers when Monster Jam makes its return to Greenville next weekend at Bon Secours Wellness Arena. When he first started out in the sport, it was a big deal if a driver drove up and over two cars, he said. “I’d pull up to the car, bounce the front tires on, bounce the back tires on, stop at the top and wave,” he said. “If I did that today, I’d get booed out of the building.” Now, drivers use the truck’s 2,000 horsepower to generate speeds of up to 70 mph and fly up to 130 feet, or a distance greater than 14 cars side-byside. They fly up to 35 feet into the air. “You just drive like a madman and

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

SHAWN HANCOCK

Going to see the movie “Take This Job and Shove It” turned into a life-changing event for Pablo Huffaker. After seeing the truck Bigfoot in the Huffaker movie, Huffaker decided he wanted to build a Monster truck to promote his four-wheel drive shop in Houston. He and Scott Stephens scraped up some money and built a two-and-ahalf ton monster truck with 48-inch tires. TNT Motorsports told them they’d let them run in their January, February and March season if they’d agree to a new paint job and change the name to King Krunch. He’s been driving the oversized trucks – each 12 feet tall and 12 feet wide sitting on 66-inch tires – for the past 32 years. “I had no idea I’d make a living out of it, much less make a career out of it,” said Huffaker, who drives Grave

just attack a track,” he said “You’re driving at the edge of control. Fans expect to see us way up in the air. They expect to see us roll over. They want us to push the truck beyond its limits. We’re actually in control, but it doesn’t look like it sometimes.” Huffaker said driving a monster truck is different from driving in any other motorsports. “About the only thing similar is they have gas pedals, brakes and a steering wheel,” he said.

SO YOU KNOW: WHAT: Monster Jam WHERE: Bon Secours Wellness Arena WHEN: Jan. 24, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 25, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. TICKETS: Adult tickets, $30 and up, plus fees Children’s tickets, $5 and up, plus fees Pit passes: $10 for adults, $5 for children (Tickets are $2 more on day of show) Tickets can be purchased at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena Box Office, Ticketmaster or by calling 1-800-745-3000. INFORMATION: MonsterJam.com

Wild Birds Unlimited Eliminator Feeder

Feed the Birds, Not the Squirrels

626 Congaree Road ∙ 864.234.2150 www.wbu.com/greenville Locally Owned & Operated, Gifts, Baths Feeders, Houses, Hardware, Birdseed

C012R

Mon.–Fri. 9:30–5:30 • Sat. 9:00–5:00

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 21


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

A GUEST LIST THAT LIVES UP TO ITS NAME JOIN THE INAUGURAL MEMBERS OF “WHO’S WHO” AND OUR VIPS IN HONORING

8 OF THE UPSTATE’S NOISEMAKERS, GAMECHANGERS & SPARK STARTERS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014 AT 5:30 PM CLEMSON MBA’S 5TH FLOOR & ROOFTOP TERRACE ONE BUILDING Limited Corporate Event Sponsor Ticket Packages available starting at $1,000. Please contact Kate Madden for details at kmadden@communityjournals.com or 864-679-1254

Award Sponsor: JB Lacher Jewelers Event Sponsors: Greenville Office Supply & Wyche Law Firm

22 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014


GoodGuides seeks more mentors Goodwill-sponsored program serves more than 200 APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Research has proven that children and teens reap benefit from having a mentor in their lives, including increased academic confidence and reduced behavior problems. A five-year Canadian study on mentoring released in early 2013 noted that girls who had mentors were four times less likely to bully, lie, fight or express anger than those without a mentor, and boys were twice as likely to believe that doing well academically is important. To coincide with National Mentoring Month in January, Goodwill Industries of Upstate/Midlands South Carolina is seeking volunteers for its local Goodwill GoodGuides mentoring program. Launched in 2009, the program connects mentors with students either on a group or individual basis, said program coordinator Jamie Raichel. The program is designed for ages 12 to 17 and

Goodwill GoodGuides mentors at work on a Hands On Greenville project.

has served 214 young people with 74 volunteer mentors. Volunteers participate in clubs at Title I schools, said Raichel, including LEAD Academy, Lakeview Middle School and Carolina High School. They may help with school clubs and often take field trips with the students, she said. In addition to short trips to Greenville Technical College and the Greenville County Museum of Art, the groups

visit universities like Claflin and Emory. They have also been to the Georgia Aquarium and taken historic tours in Charleston. Many students have “limited opportunity to go somewhere outside of their neighborhood,” Raichel said, and the trips give them a chance to see the larger world. All participants in the GoodGuides program have an individual success plan that outlines their short- and long-

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

term goals. The goal may be as simple as doing better in school or attending class, said Raichel. Students also participate in service learning projects. Maya Simmons, who was matched with a mentor just over a year ago, went on to improve her grades and create a service project that sews cloth bags, fills them with toiletries and distributes them to Upstate homeless, Raichel said. Simmons was also a recent recipient of Greenville Forward’s Generation Forward award. Volunteer mentors commit to four hours each month and “our program capacity is only seriously limited by the number of mentors that we have,” Raichel said. There are now nearly 30 students waiting to get matched to an individual mentor and more could be added, she said.

TO LEARN MORE Call 864-303-3769 or email jraichel@ goodwillsc.org for information about mentoring with GoodGuides. Visit goodwill.org/get-involved/volunteer/ goodguides or nationalmentoringmonth.org.

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 23


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

A moveable feast Dishcrawl brings unique spin to local dining SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com

Greenville (864) 235-1883 • Columbia, SC • Valle Crucis • Boone • Waynesville Hendersonville • Asheville, NC • Knoxville, TN • MastStore.com • Parking available behind our store in the Richardson Street Garage. Use our back entrance.

24 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

Greenville foodies will have more options in 2014 to sample area restaurants as Dishcrawl Greenville, which debuted September 2013, plans even more “crawls” and events this year. Dishcrawl is a three-year-old startup that has been rapidly expanding across the country. Will Morin, a self-described “foodie,” experienced Dishcrawl in other cities and wanted to bring it to the Upstate. He signed on as an “ambassador” for the company and completed a five-week training program to learn about social media, public relations, marketing and event planning. Dishcrawl follows the pattern of a progressive dinner party. Potential participants are notified of upcoming events via the company’s website, social media or word of mouth. While there may be a theme to the event, such as a pub crawl, international flavors, or beer and distillery pairings, restaurant locations are kept secret. Hungry patrons sign up at $45 per person. Ticket holders are notified of the first meeting location by email 48 hours prior to the event, and will then make their way to four area restaurant locations over two and a half hours. The experience is like a moveable feast, said Morin. Diners are treated to chef ’s tasting menus that are healthy portions – not quite tapas but not full dinner portions either, said Morin. The last restaurant visited always includes dessert. The concept has taken off in Greenville, with each Dishcrawl selling out quickly once it’s posted on the company website. One regular called it an “opportunity to get out of the house, experience four different restaurants without having to plan anything.” Another said “it really takes you out of your comfort zone and forces you to experience things you might not have tried otherwise.” The concept offers a great way


JOURNAL COMMUNITY for restaurants to gain new customers, Morin says. Participating restaurants are not charged an extra fee. Morin said all he asks is that “the chef or manager come out and greet the guests and tell them about the dishes they will be eating.” Morin plans to continue to expand Dishcrawl Greenville with events “every two to three weeks,” he said. He plans events for both larger and smaller groups to get a good variety of restaurants in the mix, as not every venue can handle the larger (30-40 people) groups. Also new in 2014 will be an April

It’s good to be a quitter

Fool’s Day event, which Morin said will “take every conceived notion about dining, like ordering drinks and appetizers before dinner, and flip it on its head.” Plans are in the works for a singles-only dish crawl and a cocktail square-off in March. He hopes to expand the concept to neighboring cities such as Greer, but Morin said he has to eat and sample each restaurant before adding it to the lineup so that takes a little time. “It’s important for me to take people to restaurants that I enjoy,” he said. “I’m not going to take someone to a place where I’ve had a bad experience.”

The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control recently announced that free nicotine replacement therapy is available to smokers who do not have health insurance through the agency’s tobacco quitline at 1-800-QUIT-NOW. The quitline is open 8-3 a.m. daily. All South Carolinians, insured or uninsured, who call the quitline are guaranteed at least one free session with a trained quit coach and a referral to local resources. Many callers are eligible for up to five free sessions with a quit coach, and pregnant tobacco users can get up to 10 free sessions. Free nicotine replacement therapy, such as gum, lozenges or patches, is available for callers who do not have health insurance. For more information, visit scdhec.gov/quitforkeeps.

Lunch with Sonja Condit Book Your Lunch with local author Sonja Condit on Feb. 12 at noon at City Range. Tickets are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540.

Looking for a more youthful appearance?

e h t f o t r a p a n e e b We’ve y r o t s i h y l i m a f e Byrn . s r a e y 0 1 r e v o for

Call or register on-line today for our

Breast, Body, and Facial Seminars Join us for a monthly Cosmetic Procedure Seminar, hosted by Dr. Sutton Graham, to see before and after results and have the opportunity to ask questions in a comfortable environment.

Register today & receive a complimentary consultation & gift. UPCOMING MONTHLY SEMINAR:

January 21, 6PM Call to reserve space. Limited Seating. Non-surgical and cosmetic surgical services to be discussed include: breast augmentation, lift & reduction; tummy tuck & liposuction; facelift, eyelift & browlift; lip enhancement; wrinkle treatments; vein & pigment treatments; Botox®; and intense pulsed light. No obligation.

rative Assistant)

Jane (Administ l Engineer) and

Bill (Mechanica

with their children

, r dental family ou of rt a p a e To becom appointment! t rs fi r ou y le u ched simply call to s

615 Halton Road, Suite 100, Greenville • 864-676-1707

www.ExpertPlasticSurgeon.com

C12J

Visit our website for before and after photos and more information JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 25


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Mitchell Road Christian Academy will hold an open house Jan. 22 and 29, 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., for prospective students. No reservations required for the drop-in open houses. For more information, visit mitchellroadchristian.org or call 864-268-2210. Greenville High School will host its third annual Law Week during the week of Jan. 27 with the theme of law enforcement. Topics for the week include police in action, federal law enforcement, criminal court procedures and the law in regards to prosecution and defending individuals. Parents and community members are invited to attend. The keynote speaker will be Chief Terri Wilfong of the Greenville Police Department on Jan. 31 at 10:30 a.m. Those interested in attending should call Pam Player at 864-355-5518. Shannon Forest Christian School students of Ashley King and Stephanie Lewis recently visited Greenville’s Peace Center’s performance of “Tired Souls: King and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.” The field trip was part of the school’s Silva-mester (mini-mester) Triple Threat – vocal, drama and dance training class. Participants enjoyed a meet and greet with the star of the one-man show, actor and playwright Mike Wiley. They were also given a backstage tour of the facilities.

hear the school’s incoming headmaster share the vision behind Veritas and learn about the Christian, classical, university-model school for grades kindergarten through five. For more information, visit veritasgreenville.com or email info@veritasgreenville.com. Southside Christian Greenville Middle Academy’s Junior Beta Club made 52 fleece School will host an open blankets for patients at Greenville Health System Children’s house and campus tour for Hospital. A small group of members delivered blankets in December. The students also met with Emily Durham, supervisor parents of students from of Child Life services at GHS, on how the donation of blankets age 18 months through benefits the young patients. 12th grade every Friday through Jan. 31 and on Feb. 7, 21 and 28. The informational sessions begin at 9 a.m. Visitors will have an opportunity to meet the superintendent and principals, and ask questions about the school’s programs. Visit southsidechristian.org for additional information.

(left to right standing): Ben Wilson, Steven Fric, Julius Peter, Karla Paiz, Hanna Holliday, Cassidy Van Houten, teacher Stephanie Lewis and teacher Ashley King; (left to right seated): Daniel Lopez, actor Mike Wiley and Auggie Auffarth.

Veritas Preparatory School will host an open house on Jan. 26 at 3 p.m. in the sanctuary of Augusta Road Baptist Church, where the school is located. Visitors can

Prince of Peace sixthgraders recently participated in the “Tired Souls: King and the Montgomery Bus Boycott” production at the Peace Center. As the author performed, he brought in students from the audience to participate, including Sarah Younce as Rosa Parks along with Jo Ann Robinson and Claudette Colvin. In addition, an open The Langston Charter Middle School dance team house for prospective stuperformed during the school’s annual holiday performance. dents and their families will be held Jan. 26, 2-4 p.m., at Prince of Peace Catholic School. Families are invited to tour the school and campus and meet the staff. For more information, contact Jennifer Simpson at 864-331-3911. Eleanor Moser, a preschool teacher at The Meyer Center for Special Children, recently received the Golden Apple Award from WYFFTV. Moser was honored for her dedication in the classroom and organizational skills coupled with balancing the pursuit of additional education and being a foster parent.

Shannon Forest Christian School will host K3-12th grade drop-in open houses beginning Jan. 21 at 9 a.m. Future drop-in open houses are Feb. 4 and 18 and March 4 and 18. For more information, contact Lynn Pittman at lpittman@shannonforest.com. In addition, Shannon Forest’s Upper School choirs will perform with the African Children’s Choir on Jan. 29, 6:30 p.m., at Aldersgate United Methodist Church. The performance is free.

26 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

Fiction Addiction, 1175 Woods Crossing Road, will host Stories and Sweets with Suzanne Woods Fisher, best-selling author of Amish fiction and nonfiction. Fisher will be discussing her latest novel, “The Calling,” on Jan. 20 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 or $15.89 per person and can be purchased at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. Refreshments will include homemade sweets and non-alcoholic beverages. On Jan. 24 at 6:30 p.m., Soby’s will present a five-course wine dinner showcasing Lewis Cellars, a family winery in Napa Valley established by racing celebrity Randy Lewis and his wife, Debbie. Chefs Shaun Garcia and Rodney Freidank have created a menu of seasonal flavors to complement the wine selection, which includes three of Lewis’ highly acclaimed cabernet sauvignon releases and one chardonnay. Lewis will also be attending the dinner. Cost is $125 per person, plus tax and gratuity. For reservations, call 864-232-7007. “On Science, Species, and Spirit: Exploring the Value of Wild Places” will take place on Jan 21 at 7 p.m. in Founders Hall at Southern Wesleyan University in Central. Dr. Rocky Nation, professor of biology and environmental studies program coordinator at Southern Wesleyan University, will explore these topics at the January meeting of the SC Native Plant Society. The meeting is free and open to the public. For more information, visit scnps.org. Greenville’s First Presbyterian Church will hold its 37th Annual Turner Memorial Breakfast on Jan. 30. This year’s speaker will be Major League Baseball’s Michael Roth. Roth was National Player of the Year at the University of South Carolina and led the Gamecocks to back-to-back College World Series titles. He now pitches for the Los Angeles Angels. A full breakfast buffet will be served 6-7 a.m. and Roth will speak at 7 a.m. Tickets are $10 each and are available at the church office. No tickets will be sold at the door. Call 864-235-0496 for additional information. To help celebrate the opening of its newest traveling exhibit, “The Robot Zoo,” The Children’s Museum of the Upstate is presenting its first annual Kids’ Maker Fest on Jan. 18, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Kids’ Maker Fest is a single-day event that is free with admission. Admission to the museum is $9 for children, $10 for adults and free to museum members. For more information, visit tcmupstate.org. Caregiving ABCs, a five-week program offering information and support to those caring for a loved one with dementia, will kick off Jan. 22, 6-8 p.m., at Greenville Health System’s Patewood Medical Campus. To register, visit ghs.org/ healthevents. In addition, the Meet the Midwives program is Jan. 28, 6-8 p.m., at Greenville Midwifery Care. It is free, but registration is required. To register, call 1-877-447-4636 or visit ghs.org/healthevents. Hospice of the Upstate will host its annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Celebration Breakfast on Jan. 20, 8:30-9 a.m., in the Rose Hall Dining Room. Hospice of the Upstate chaplain Don Davis will speak, followed by music by Hospice of the Upstate’s intake clinical assistant, Sheila Campbell. The event will begin with a complimentary continental breakfast and is open to the community. Hospice of the Upstate is located at 1835 Rogers Road, Anderson. Clemson University is observing Martin Luther King Jr. Day this year with a series of events Jan. 20-23. The 14th annual MLK Day of Service and blood drive will be Jan. 20, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., in Hendrix Student Center. An MLK Commemorative Service will be at 6 p.m. on Jan. 21, in Tillman Hall auditorium. Civil rights

activist and former freedom rider Bob Zellner will deliver the keynote at the service. The observance will continue with a public forum at 6 p.m. on Jan. 22, in the Clemson House Holmes Ballroom. The “Racism Revisited” forum is intended to honor Martin Luther King Jr.’s aspirations for a post-racial society by addressing contemporary issues in an historical context. Award-winning presenter and author Bryant Smith will facilitate the discussion. The events will conclude with the Tunnel of Oppression on Jan. 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Hendrix Student Center. All events are free and open to the public. Music in the Mountains 2014 kicks off with “Milling, Music and Memories” at the Hagood Mill in Pickens on Jan. 18, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. This will be the first time the mill has opened since last month’s passing of mill site manager Eddie Lee Bolt. Friends and supporters, old and new, are encouraged to bring their guitar, fiddle, spoons or voice to jam and raise a few songs in memory of Bolt. A memorial celebration is being planned for a later date. The mill will be operating and folklife demonstrations will be happening throughout the day. For additional information, call 864-898-5963. Monster Jam roars into Greenville for three shows at Bon Secours Wellness Arena on Jan. 24 at 7:30 p.m., and Jan. 25 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The event will feature Monster Jam trucks Grave Digger, Wolverine, Predator, Prowler, Samson, Higher Education, Iron Warrior and more. Tickets start at $30 for adults and $5 for children’s tickets (ages 2-12) in select areas. Pit passes are $10 for adults and $5 for children. Additional fees apply on all tickets and tickets are $2 more on the day of show. Tickets are available at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena Box Office, Ticketmaster or by calling 1-800-745-3000. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey presents “LEGENDS!,” a new show, Jan. 29–Feb. 2 at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena. The show also features an all-access pre-show and Ringmaster’s Zone where participants can go behind the scenes. Ticket prices are $15, $20, $25, $45 and $60. All seats are reserved, and tickets are available through Ticketmaster and the BSW Arena Box Office. For group rates and information, call 864-241-3800. The City of Greenville will host public input meetings on the nonpartisan election process on Jan. 21 at 7 p.m. at the Sears Recreation Center, 100 East Park Ave., Greenville; on Jan. 23 at 6:30 p.m. at the Nicholtown Community Center, 112 Rebecca St., Greenville; and Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. at the Augusta Road Library, 100 Lydia St., Greenville. The Greenville City Council is considering a change from partisan to nonpartisan municipal elections and is seeking input from city residents. Before taking any formal action, City Council will review the input and hold a public hearing at City Hall. For more information, visit greenvillesc.gov/cityclerk/nonpartisanelections.aspx. Citizens who are unable to attend input meetings can send their comments to elections@ greenvillesc.gov.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

Don’t buy cheap clothes. Buy good clothes, cheap.

1922 Augusta St. Greenville, SC 29605 labelsgreenville.com | 864.631.1919

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 27


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

Kara DioGuardi, former “American Idol” judge, songwriter and survivor, will be the keynote speaker at The Julie Valentine Center Luncheon presented by Silent Tears on Feb. 6, 11:30 a.m., at the TD Convention Center. Proceeds will aid the center’s efforts to provide healing services to victims of child abuse and sexual assault in Greenville County while increasing awareness and promoting prevention. DioGuardi, who found hope and healing in music, will share her triumphant life as an artist and songwriter and her experience with sexual abuse. For more information, visit julievalentinecenter.org. Dr. Jennifer Hudson, medical director for newborn services at Children’s Hospital of Greenville Health System, recently received the 2013 Pediatrician of the Year Award at the annual DeLoache Seminar. Hudson was recognized for her passion to teach and mentor trainees and her work to ensure all babies get outstanding care. Homes of Hope recently received a $100,000 affordable housing grant through the TD Charitable Foundation’s Housing for Everyone grant competition. The grant will be used to assist in the development of 61 Hills, a former Anderson apartment complex that will be transformed to an 85-home single-family neighborhood. 61 Hills will be Homes of Hope’s largest single-site project to date. For more information, visit homesofhope.org. Hudson

Meals on Wheels will host the 19th annual Sweetheart Charity Ball on Feb. 1, 6:30 p.m., at the Hyatt Regency Downtown to benefit the homebound in need. Meals on Wheels will also recognize its Sweetheart of the Year, an individual or couple who exemplifies the nonprofit’s spirit with their dedication and support. The event will feature auctions, seated dinner and live music by Finesse. Sponsorship information and ticket reservations are available at mealsonwheelsgreen-

ville.org or by calling 864-233-6565. All proceeds support the mission of Meals on Wheels. In addition, Meals on Wheels of Greenville received a 2013 BI-LO Charities Grant of $30,000 to fund Project Care, an ongoing initiative to ensure the neediest clients receive evening and weekend, frozen meals. Greenville Family Partnership has been awarded a $25,000 grant from Hollingsworth Funds Inc. The grant will be used to support the nonprofit’s parenting programs and expanding the number of sessions offered, including Hispanic outreach parenting classes. With this funding, GFP will provide many parents with the tools and education they need to become better parents by improving their skills and understanding of modeling behavior and communication. For more information, visit greenvillefamilypartnership.org. Loaves & Fishes of Greenville recently added board members and elected officers. Tyson Smoak of NAI Earle Furman was elected chairman of the board for 2014. Smoak has served on the Loaves & Fishes Board for the past five years. Former chairwoman Ana Davis of Godshall Staffing will remain an active member of the board. Jake Cluverius, a litigation attorney in the Greenville office of Rogers Townsend & Thomas PC, was elected vice chair. Cluverius served his first year on the board in 2013. Loaves Smoak Cluverius & Fishes is a nonprofit that rescues perishable fresh food and delivers it to more than 94 agencies that feed the hungry. For more information, visit loavesandfishesgreenville.com.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

Grades K4-12 February 17 8:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. Learn more at BobJonesAcademy.net 1700 Wade Hampton Boulevard • Greenville, SC • (864) 770-1395 28 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

(16392) 01/14

Open HOuse


JOURNAL CULTURE

Photos Provided by Clemson University Libraries Digital Initiatives

Photo by Jeremy Daniel

Young African-Americans sit in at a segregated lunch counter in downtown Greenville.

‘PROTESTS, PRAYERS AND PROGRESS’ Upcountry History Museum exhibit explores Greenville’s civil rights movement CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Greenville’s impact on the national and regional civil rights movement is a story that has gone largely underrepresented and under-told. Events in Greenville have had national impact. Notable among them: a protest at the Greenville airport sparked by the treatment of baseball great Jackie Robinson, a library sit-in that included a young Jesse Jackson, and a peaceful lunch counter protest that led to a U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning a local segregation ordinance. That ruling served as a legal precedent for desegregating lunch counters throughout the country. “Protests, Prayers and Progress: Greenville’s Civil Rights Movement” is

Greenville activists organized a march on the Greenville Municipal Airport on Jan. 1, 1960, to protest the segregation of the waiting rooms.

the Upcountry History Museum-Furman University’s landmark exhibit exploring

the people, places and events that shaped Greenville during the seminal years of the national civil rights awakening. The exhibit opens Saturday and runs through June 15. While it traces the national stage, the exhibit provides the first-ever comprehensive look at the civil rights movement here. In 1959, several African-Americans were harassed for sitting in the “whites only” waiting area at the Greenville airport – among them Jackie Robinson, the first black player in Major League Baseball. On Jan. 1, 1960 – the anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation – several hundred people marched from Springfield Baptist Church to the airport to protest segregated waiting rooms. It was a month before the more famous lunch counter sit-ins in Greensboro, N.C. PROTEST continued on PAGE 30

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 29


JOURNAL CULTURE PROTEST continued from PAGE 29

“Greenville was somewhat of a vanguard of demonstrative protests,” said Courtney Tollison Hartness, an assistant history professor at Furman University who serves as the Upcountry History Museum’s historian. “The airport protest was one month before the Greensboro lunch counter sit-ins that have long been considered by historians as the beginning of the activist phase.” Peaceful lunch counter sit-ins at Kress Variety Store also had national significance. In 1960, students held sit-ins at lunch counters in downtown Greenville businesses to protest city ordinances that strictly segregated food service establishments. Students were instructed to act as model citizens during the sit-ins. They quietly read the menu or stared straight ahead, ignoring the insults of hecklers. The manager called police and 14 students were arrested. Their arrests were eventually overturned and the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Greenville’s segregation ordinances violated the Constitution. In the opinion, the court said the manager of the store did not request that police arrest the students. He asked them to leave because integrated services was “contrary to local customs” of segregation at lunch counters and in violation of an ordinance requiring separation of the

Protestors in Greenville carry picket signs with anti-bussing slogans. Photos Provided

races in restaurants. The manager and police “conceded that the petitioners were clean, well dressed, unoffensive in conduct, and that they sat quietly at the counter which was designed to accommodate 59 persons.” The court ruled the ordinance also violated the manager’s rights since he was forced to discriminate against the students based solely on race. The ruling served as legal basis to get rid of ordinances requiring discrimination based on race nationwide. “This exhibit tells the stories of Greenville,” said Heather Yenco, the museum’s curator. “Many of the people involved in the civil rights movement in Greenville are still involved in the community today.”

EYE CANDY FOR ART LOVERS.

The exhibit features photographs by Greenville News photographer James G. Wilson and Margaret Bourke-White, a photographer sent to Greenville in 1958 by Life magazine to record life in segregated Greenville. Replicas of a lunch counter and two school classrooms – one for white students, the other for black students – are part of the exhibit. Among other local events included in the exhibit are: • The lynching of Willie Earle, a black man accused of robbing and beating a white taxi driver, in 1947. It is the last recorded lynching in the state. • Sit-ins at the white library by students, including the Rev. Jesse Jackson. • Springfield Baptist Church and Sterling High School, two institutions that played a key role in Greenville’s civil rights movement. • Desegregation of K-12 schools. While the civil rights movement in Greenville didn’t have the kind of violence that marked the struggle in other places in the South, that doesn’t mean it always went smoothly, Hartness said. “African-American girls were spit on; cars were driven directly at them when they were conducting voter registration drives,” she said. “[Greenville’s] movement was not without personal attack.”

SO YOU KNOW: WHAT: “Protests, Prayers and Progress: Greenville’s Civil Rights Movement” WHO: Exhibit exploring the people, places and events that shaped Greenville during the civil rights movement WHERE: Upcountry History Museum-Furman University, 540 Buncombe St., Greenville WHEN: through June 15 ADMISSION: Free for museum members; $5 for adults; $4 for seniors and college students; $3 for children ages 4 to 18 EVENTS: a series of public programs and lectures will be scheduled during the run of the exhibit. INFORMATION: upcountryhistory.org or 864-467-3100

Hartness said part of the reason Greenville’s role in the civil rights movement has been under-told is because Greenville was very protective of its image. “We’ve got a history of projecting ourselves in the best light to attract outsiders,” she said. “Any kind of conflict on Main Street or the schools would have hurt the New South image we wanted to portray.” The exhibit will be accompanied by a series of public programs and lectures exploring the social and political current that shaped Greenville’s civil rights movement.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm admission free

A swimming pool in Greenville’s Green Forest Park before desegregation.

30 GCMA THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014 0814 Journal EYE CANDY.indd 2

1/15/14 10:05 AM


Artists celebrate Japanese culture in ‘Youkoso’

JOURNAL CULTURE

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Many of the artists from Studio South have never been to Japan, but that didn’t stop them from participating in “Youkoso: A Celebration of Japanese Culture.” “It was a challenge for all of us,” said Carole Knudson Tinsley, one of the 15 artists with work in the exhibition, which runs through Feb. 14 at the Anderson Arts Center. Studio South is a collective of Upstate professional artists from Greenville and Easley to Anderson and Honea Path who come together to share techniques, provide each other critiques and explore different ideas. Studio South was formed in 1995 and included artists who painted together at the Greenville County Museum of Art, Tinsley said.

“Lotus In Spring” by Jane Todd Butcher

The artists work in a wide variety of mediums and have varied styles. The variety was just what Kimberly Spears, the executive director of the Anderson Arts Center, was looking for in an exhibit that coincides with the Anderson International Festival. The biennial festival features films, lectures, performances and exhibits designed to foster a deeper understanding of international culture. Jane Butcher Todd said the Japanese theme of the exhibit fit perfectly with her nature-themed work and personal interest in conservation. “The lotus is an ever-popular image in Japanese art. Bamboo is also a pervasive theme in Japanese art, but as a conservationist, I am particularly interested in it because it offers a renewable source of wood for many commercial uses,” she said. “We even see bamboo used in fabrics – how about socks made of bamboo?” Tinsley said the motif fit with her

“From The Heart” by Carole Knudson Tinsley

curiosity about different cultures, especially ancient ones. She integrated some items that a geisha girl may carry into her abstract paintings. She also incorporated some Japanese symbols into her work. “Their character is so interesting and rhythmic,” she said. “It created an interest in me to learn some of that.” Other artists included in the exhibit are Randy Armstrong, Carrie Brown, Wyn Foland, Ann Heard, Ruth Hopkins, Pat Kilburg, Monita Mahoney, Lorraine Martinie, Rosemary Moore, Marilyn Murrell, Patti Rivers, Barbara St. Denis and Bobbie Stitt. In addition to the work of the Studio South artists, “Youkoso” also features the Asian collection of the late Bob Klatt and regional artists Mark Copple, CynDe Copple and Briana Steele. The exhibit runs through Feb. 14. The Anderson Arts Center is at 110 Federal St. in Anderson.

WHAT: “Youkoso: A Celebration of Japanese Culture” WHO: An exhibit featuring Studio South artists Randy Armstrong, Carrie Brown, Jane Todd Butcher, Wyn Foland, Ann Heard, Ruth Hopkins, Pat Kilburg, Monita Mahoney, Lorraine Martinie, Rosemary Moore, Marilyn Murrell, Patti Rivers, Barbara St. Denis, Bobbie Stitt and Carole Knudson Tinsley WHERE: Anderson Arts Center WHEN: through Feb. 14 INFORMATION: 864-222-2787 or andersonarts.org “Sustainable Forest” by Jane Todd Butcher

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL CULTURE

A R T S CALENDAR

Annual Winter Sale 60-75% off

Peace Center Don Williams Jan. 17 ~ 467-3000

1/17, INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ALEHOUSE

Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Greg Flint & Paul Flint Jan. 17-Mar. 17 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Youth Orchestra Now and Then Jan. 18 ~ 467-3000

C112R

o the fIrst and only InvIsIble 24/7* hearIng aId.

ARING

YOU NEED YOUR HEARING CHECKED

qUALITY

Call Today For Your 14 DAY Risk Free Trial With Hearing Aid Technology Recommended For YOUR Hearing Loss, YOUR Life, YOUR Budget.

Better Hearing Month.

E LYRIC HEARING FOR YOURSELF!

ial† • Complimentary Lyric Screening Offers expire May 31, 2013

Au.D.

Doctor of Audiology c Hearing Professional

Kristin Davis, Au.D.

Doctor of Audiology Premier Lyric Hearing Professional

oinsett Street, SC Improving 29650 Patient Satisfaction With Their Hearing HealthCare 17 yearsGreer, Experience

703 W. Poinsett Street, Greer, SC 29650 • www.greeraudiology.com 4-655-8300 Today!

CALL 864-655-8300 TODAY FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT! ww.greeraudiology.com

“After two negative hearing aid experiences, I was referred to Greer Audiology by my physician. I found Kristin Davis to be a very professional and unassuming practitioner, with no sales pressure or gimmicks. She immediately instills confidence and trust. I would, without hesitation, highly recommend her for those experiencing hearing difficulties and becoming like me, a very grateful and satisfied patient.” – Philip Gauthier, Simpsonville, SC

ttery life varies by patient and is subject to individual ear conditions.**Lyric is water resistant, not waterproof, and essional fees may apply. Annual subscription begins the first day of trial. Lyric is not appropriate for all patients. See , Distributed by Phonak, LLC ©2013. All rights reserved. MS025831 NEW904

32 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

1/17, GOTTROCKS

JAN. 17-23

Metropolitan Arts Council The Artist Trade Show Jan. 17-Feb. 21 ~ 467-3132

T IT’S UTIONARY THING ABOUT IT.

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC Whiskey Mountain Machine Bone-crushing metal. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976.

Younts Center for Performing Arts S. Holmes of Baker Street Jan. 17 ~ 409-1050

2222 Augusta Road, Greenville | museshoestudio.com INVISIBLE864.271.9750 MAY BE THE

LISTEN UP

Four 14 & Milli Fungus Psychedelic and progressive bands jam out together. Call 864-552-1265 or visit facebook.com/ipagreenville. 1/17, PEACE CENTER

Don Williams Legendary country balladeer. Tickets: $25-$55. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 1 / 1 8 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D (GREENVILLE)

Greenville Symphony Orchestra & SC Children’s Theatre Lollipops Performance: The Really Awful Musicians Jan. 18 ~ 235-2885

Calvin Edwards Trio Former Five Blind Boys Of Alabama guitarist. Tickets: $5. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com.

The Warehouse Theatre 40th Anniversary Gala Jan. 18 ~ 235-6948

1/23, CHICORA ALLEY

Younts Center for Performing Arts Rick Alviti: A Tribute to Elvis Jan. 18 ~ 409-1050 Greenville County Museum of Art David Drake: Potter & Poet of Edgefield District Through Jan. 19 ~ 271-7570 Greenville County Museum of Art South Carolina Art: Eight Decades of New Through Mar. 16 ~ 271-7570 Greenville County Museum of Art Will Henry Stevens: The Flowering of Southern Abstraction Continuing ~ 271-7570 Greenville County Museum of Art Andrew Wyeth: Selected Watercolors Continuing ~ 271-7570 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Melissa Anderson Through Feb. 28 ~ 242-1050

Marcus King Band Stunning guitar prodigy. Call 864-232-4100 or visit chicoraalley.com. 1/24, GOTTROCKS

Shane Pruitt Band Blindingly fast, soulful guitarist. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976. 1/24, INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ALEHOUSE

Stereo Reform Electro-rock duo kick out the jams. Call 864-552-1265 or visit facebook.com/ipagreenville. 1/24, RADIO ROOM

Grey Spy Former Mountain Homes member brings new project. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com. 1/25, SMILEY’S ACOUSTIC CAFÉ

Lisa Stubbs & Niel Brooks Spellbinding folk duo. Call 864-282-8988 or visit smileysacousticcafe.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Reinvention

In cooperation with BNC Bank and Piedmont Natural Gas

The Company’s lead songwriter ‘never wants to sound the same’ If you listen to the first and most recent releases by The Company, a Charlestonbased band led by singer/songwriter/guitarist Brian Robert Hannon, it’s difficult to believe they were made by the same group, let alone written by the same person. Their first full-length album, “Holy City,” is tightly wound guitar rock that resembles a more aggressive early R.E.M. Their 2013 EP, “Bird Skulls,” is another animal entirely. Hannon’s mournful voice echoes across cavernous, musically minimal soundscapes dominated by ominous synthesized drones and reverberating bass and drums. The distance between the two albums is startling. The Company actually began in Greenville a decade or two ago, though neither of the principals involved knew it at the time. “I actually grew up in Greenville, and the original drummer [Kelly Grant] and I both went to St. Mary’s Catholic School,” WHO: The Company Hannon says. “We ended up going down our separate paths, but we both moved to Charleston around WHEN: Friday, Jan. 17, 10 p.m. the same time five years ago and started the band.” WHERE: The Radio Room, The band’s charismatic sound caught the attention 2845 N. Pleasantburg Drive of Band of Horses’ Ben Bridwell, who recommendINFO: wpbrradioroom.com ed The Company to record label Fat Possum and brought them along on a Band of Horses tour. That’s usually a great spot to begin a band’s story, but a tragedy was waiting in the wings. Kelly Grant passed away unexpectedly in 2010, and losing his best friend and musical collaborator was devastating for Hannon. “I was faced with the issue of whether or not to go on,” Hannon says, “but if anything, it only reinforced my drive to continue to do what I do, despite the hardship.” Perhaps some of that sadness had an influence on The Company’s change of direction, but Hannon also says he makes it a point to make sure his music evolves. “I have a lot of musical influences, and I never want to sound the same from album to album,” he says. “There’s a great quote from Brian Eno, where someone asked him what his protocol in the studio was. He said, ‘I think about everything I’ve done before, and then I do the opposite.’ So I kind of imitate that. All my favorite bands are the ones that develop and sound different from album to album.” Hannon’s range of influences also plays a role in his mixture of musical styles. “I have a basis in indie rock, so I love bands like Pavement, Modest Mouse, Guided by Voices, Built to Spill, stuff like that. But at the same time, I love Gram Parsons and Townes Van Zandt. I really love the songwriting aspect of those guys. I like jazz and ambient music, too. And my local heroes are Shovels and Rope. They’re amazing songwriters. I do try to mix all those styles into my music.” The Company, whose membership has changed consistently other than Hannon, has just begun working on a new album and Hannon is focused more on songs than style. “On this album, I’m really trying to have strong songs. All of our songs are about stuff that I’ve gone through, or something that symbolizes what I’ve gone through,” he says. He does, however, add one (perhaps not unexpected) note about the band’s next album that indicates his musical restlessness. “I’m actually in the studio right now,” he says, “and this album that I’m working on is a real country/folk kind of album.” VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

presents

ROCK ‘N ROLL

GOLD The

Ag n e Gold

e

‘n Ro k c o ll R f o

JAN. 23 -FEB.15 THU SUN

Tuesday Night Fringe Series

Feb 11 & 18

FOR TICKETS

233-6733 centrestage.org JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 33


JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

Lewis Cellars Wine Dinner Friday, Jan 24th at Soby’s 207 South Main Street

Amazing

An night of limited production and beautifully paired

Wines Cuisine

hosted by

Randy Lewis

winery owner and celebrated Indy car driver Arrival 6:30pm, Dinner at 7:00pm For tickets- 864.232.7007

Menu

Lobster- Rich Man/Poor Man Maine lobster and monkfish in red curry lobster broth 2012 Chardonnay Duck Two Ways Dry-aged breast with confit pot pie, foie gras streusel, yam puree, Brussels sprouts and juniper jus 2011 Mason’s Cabernet Sauvignon and Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon Seared carpaccio of Strube Ranch Wagyu Beef with butternut squash, radishes, parsnips, arugula, mustard greens and crispy garlic 2003 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon Braised Bison Short Rib with smoked loin risotto, mushrooms, pearl onions, beets and truffle demi-glace 2011 “Alec’s Blend” Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon Dessert “Walkabout” A tour of nostalgic desserts Hot Cocoa Experience

$125++/person

(portion of the proceeds will be donated to American Red Cross of the Western Carolinas)

The Upcountry History Museum-Furman University will present a new exhibit, “Protests, Prayers and Progress: Greenville’s Civil Rights Movement,” exploring the people, places and events that shaped Greenville during the civil rights movement. Opening on Jan. 18 and continuing through June 15, the exhibit is open to the public and free for museum members, $5 for adults, $4 for seniors and college students and $3 for children and students age 4 to 18. Admission is free for children three and younger. For more information, visit upcountryhistory.org. The Furman Faculty Chamber Music Series will present a concert on Jan. 17 at 8 p.m. in Daniel Recital Hall on campus. “Something Old and Something New” is hosted by Furman music professor Laura Kennedy. The 90-minute concert features music performed by these Furman faculty members: Omar Carmenates, Robert Chesebro, Anna Barbrey Joiner, Thomas Joiner, Grant Knox, Christopher Hutton, Daniel Koppelman, Ruby Morgan, Ruth Neville, Matt Olson, Dewitt Tipton, Steven Walter and Petrea Warneck. Cost is $12 for adults, $10 for senior citizens and $5 for students and youth. For more information, call 864-294-2086. Greenville Little Theatre’s Studio 444, its alternative series, presents its fifth annual 24 Hour Play Festival on Jan. 25 at 8 pm. Three short oneacts will be written, rehearsed and performed in only 24 hours. This unique event challenges all the artists involved to produce in one day what normally takes six to eight weeks. The public can visit greenvillelittletheatre.org and follow the link from the front page to vote on situations, characters and more to be used in the plays. To round out the evening, the Laughing Stock Improv Group will pile on the laughs following the performance.  Tickets are $10 and available at greenvillelittletheatre.org and at the door. For more information, call 864-233-6238. The Greenville Chorale will hold auditions on Jan. 26. Singers must be experienced with strong ability to sight sing. For an appointment, call 864-235-1101. For more information on the chorale, visit greenvillechorale.com. The Brooks Center for the Performing Arts will present “Bring It On: The Musical” at 8 p.m. on Jan. 28, as part of the Boni Belle Brooks Series. This is a free performance for Clemson students. Normal ticket rates are $35 for adults and $15 for students. Tickets and information are available at clemson.edu/brooks or by calling the box office at 864-656-7787, 1-5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra will present the world-famous Millennium Brass in concert Jan. 25 at 8 p.m. in the Chapman Cultural Center theater. On Jan. 24, SPO will host its annual fundraiser, 7-10 p.m., in the theater and its lobby. Food and beverages will be served throughout the event, and local musicians will join the Millennium Brass on stage for an informal jam session. Tickets are available through the box office and can be purchased online at chapmanculturalcenter.org or by calling 864542-2787. Furman University will present a concert to close its annual Church Music Conference on Jan. 24 at 7:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Greenville. “A Festival of Sacred Choral Music” is free and open to the public, and features guest conductor Mack Wilberg, music director and conductor of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. For more information, call 864-294-2086, email furmanmusic@furman.edu or visit furman.edu/music.

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.

34 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014


JOURNAL HOMES

DETAILS

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

222 East Earle Street, Greenville Live on Earle Street, the heart of one of Greenville’s coveted historic districts, only moments from downtown, yet totally encapsulated in the quiet North Main area where family friendly sidewalks and inviting neighborhood porches are a given. Following a complete renovation, this home redesigned for Highland Homes by architect, Thomas Croft, Jr. will combine traditional architecture with modern luxuries and green technologies. Inside the 3000+ SF featuring 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Master Suite on the Main level, you will find an open floor plan with a large welcoming Family room, a spacious Kitchen and a generous Dining room. There is also a perfect grilling deck off the back. Amenities will include hardwood floors, Granite countertops, and Energy Star appliances including tank-less water heater, and high efficiency heating and air conditioning systems.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

HOME INFO Price: $599,000 | Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Square Footage: 3014 Schools: Stone Elementary League Middle | Greenville High Huge Family Room, Master Bedroom Suite on Main, Large Bedrooms, Energy Efficient Appliances Patrick Franzen 864.250.1234 | patrickfranzen@msn.com Highland Homes 864.233.4175 | highlandhomessc.com To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL HOMES

PE OPL E , AWA R D S , H ON OR S McAlister Realty Congratulates Vanessa Herb McAlister Realty would like to congratulate Vanessa Herb for being the 2013 Top New Homes Sales Agent of the year! Vanessa has been with McAlister Realty since 2005. She specializes in New Home Construction and is the Build On Your Lot program expert.

NEW PRICE! 120 LAKE POINT DRIVE • $369,900 4 BR/2 FULL BA/2 HALF BA LAKE BOLING ESTATES • MLS 1261563 A jewel of a lake front home just minutes from everything. Gourmet kitchen with JennAire and LG stainless appliances, master on main has two walk-in closets and sitting room overlooking the lake, plus a second bedroom on the main. Two very good size bedrooms on the second floor. Wrap around front porch and lovely screened porch lakeside.

Smith is named GGAR 2013 REALTOR® of the Year

Call today to schedule a showing of your new home!

J123

Cynthia Serra 864.304.3372 www.allentate.com/cynthiaserra Cynthia.Serra@allentate.com

Herb

Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Donna O. Smith was recently named REALTOR of the Year for 2013 by the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS (GGAR), for the second time in her career . Smith is the Broker in Charge of Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS at the Garlington Road

SOLD

and Simpsonville Offices. A real estate practitioner in the Upstate since 1976, she possesses a wealth of experience in all facets of the residential brokerage business. She has been elected, appointed or served in virtually all leadership positions of the local and state associations of REALTORS including President of those groups, and in 2013 being recognized by the South Carolina REALTORS (SCR) with a Distinguished Service Award for her unselfish work on behalf of members. The REALTOR® of the Year is an annual award selected by a committee of REALTOR® peers and based on demonstrated leadership in the industry and service to GGAR and the community. In 2013 Smith chaired the important Land Use Committee of the National Association of REALTORS (NAR) and among its many agenda items was advocating for revisions to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to avoid the many unintended effects that last year’s legislation may have on homeowners across the country, whether covered by a flood policy or not. She has spoken on the topic widely, moderated national panels on the topic, and accompanied the 2013 NAR President to Capitol Hill in support of his testimony to congress on the issue. In 2014 she has been appointed to the NAR Executive Committee and will continue to advise leadership

on NFIP. Additionally she was recently appointed to the Greenville Roads Advisory Committee.

Coldwell Banker Caine Names Upstate’s Top Producers Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from each of its five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and Spartanburg – for the month of December. The top producing agents from each office are ranked by the total volume of business closed last month and include: • Easley: Lori Brock, Heather Parlier, Melissa Hall • Greenville: John Stephenson, Helen Hagood, Nick Carlson • Greer: Charlene Panek, Tammy Kingsley, Susan Wagner • Seneca: Pat Loftis, Brett Smagala, Wendy Brown • Spartanburg: Francie Little, Trish Hollon, Donna Morrow Top listing agents in each office are recognized for listing the highest total volume of residential properties last month and include: • Easley: Susan McCoy, Carol Walsh, Lisa †

ON THE MARKET GREER

350 Foothills Road · Greenville 29617 5BR/4BA/2HalfBA · MLS1255512

Your “Home Town” Advantage

619 ARLINGTON ROAD . $979,900 . 1258159

Born and raised in Greenville, SC and proud to still call it “HOME”…let me use my 15 years of Real Estate experience and my knowledge and love of Greenville’s diverse neighborhoods to help you find your next home.

3BR/2.5BA 20 acres/pond, walking trails, natural island. Stately home with 3 bdrms, 2-1/2 bths, formal rooms, hardwoods, sunroom, outbuilding for gatherings. 1100 ft of road frontage. Could be multi-use property.

Suzanne Freeman

O: 864.250.2850 | M: 864.982.3800 sfreeman@cbcaine.com

36 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

Contact: Sharon Calhoun 864-346-0821 Prudential C. Dan Joyner

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D H OM E

PEOPLE, AWARDS , HONORS † Watson

• Greenville: Maggie Worsham, Helen Hagood, Jacob Mann • Greer: Faith Ross, Shelbie Dunn Behringer, Alicia Waynick • Seneca: Pat Loftis, Connie Williams, Jere duBois • Spartanburg: Lori Thompson, Eva Sandfort, Holly West

Allen Tate Realtors Top Agents Kathy Weeks, Upstate Regional Leader at Allen Tate Realtors, is proud to announce Top Agents for December 2013.

208 Weddington Lane, Linden Park, Simpsonville Custom built one and a half story built by Highland Homes. Features include granite countertops, oak hardwood floors, ceramic tile bathrooms, and nice moldings. Master suite is located on main level and features soaking tub, separate walk-in shower, and double vanities with granite tops. Upstairs has 2 large bedrooms plus a bonus area and a full bath. Double garage accessed by rear alley and screened porch off breakfast room. Hardiplank siding, architectural roof, covered front porch, Low E windows, and sprinkler system front and back. Guided by strict architectural guidelines, we have some of Greenville’s best local builders ready to personalize your home design and help you through the selection process. Linden Park is just a stone’s throw from I-385 and short walk to shopping and downtown Simpsonville. Life here moves at an easier pace. If this is the kind of relaxed, engaging atmosphere that brings you pleasure, we invite you to visit us at Linden Park.

HOME INFO Price: $274,900 | MLS: #1263039 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2.5 Square Footage: 2200–2399 Schools: Simpsonville Elementary Hillcrest Middle | Hillcrest High Contact: Providence Realty & Marketing 864.676.1719 LindenParksc.com To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Brady

Rick

In the Greenville Office, Teresa Brady was Top Listing Agent and Top Producer. In the Easley Office, Missy Rick was Top Listing Agent and Top Producer. The Murphys (Celia and Gary), were the Top Listing and Producing Team for the Easley office.

The Murphys

Merritt

Sheehan

In the Greer Office, Ali Merritt was Top Listing Agent and Kathy Sheehan was the Top Producer. The Herseys (Paul and Marcia) were the Top Listing and Producing Team.

The Herseys JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND AUGUSTA ROAD

O P E N S U N D AY, J A N U A R Y 19 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

WILLOW CREEK GOLF COMMUNITY

KILGORE FARMS

4 PHILLIPS LANE . $594,000 . 1265590

546 LIVE OAK COURT . $574,950 . 1270829

5 ASHBY GROVE DR . $347,900 . 1270353

4BR/3.5BA Gorgeous and spacious new construction. 10’ceilings. Upscale custom finishes. 2-car attached garage. Covered porch. Fenced yard. Walk to Augusta Circle. Augusta St past Byrd Blvd. Right on Phillips Lane.

4BR/4BA Lifestyle living in golf community! Custom brick home on large lot with versatile floor plan. Beautifully appointed. Don’t miss it! Hwy. 85 to Hwy. 101. Five miles on right.

4BR/3.5BA Spacious home with open floor plan. I385 to Woodruff. Left Kilgore Farms Cir. Right on Ashby Grove Dr.

Contact: Tom Marchant | 864-449-1658 Marchant Real Estate

Contact: Jenny McCor | 864-313-2680 Keller Williams

Contact: Erin Foster | 386-9749 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

KILGORE FARMS

KILGORE FARMS

308 KILGORE FARMS CIRCLE . $344,900 . 1271471 4BR/3BA Custom built home w/impressive floorplan, top of the line finishes. 2 miles past Five Forks on Woodruff turn Left into SD, Home on Right.

4BR/3BA QUALITY construction by Wellbrock! Open floor plan. Must see. Woodruff Road, Left into Kilgore Farms, Right onto Ashby Grove.

Contact: Melissa Morrell | 918-1734 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Kathy Cassity | 414-8408 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

ALTAMONT TERRACE

27 ASHBY GROVE DR . $320,900 . 1266589

NEELY FARM

ASHLEY COMMONS

7 ALTAMONT TERRACE . $294,900 . 1269653

7 TREECREST CT . $275,000 . 1270225

211 SAINT CROIX CT . $225,000 . 1269811

4BR/2BA Home is in terrific shape & movein ready! Hwy 25 past Furman, Right on Roe Ford Rd, Left on Old Buncombe, Right onto Altamont, Left on Altamont Terrace.

4BR/3.5BA This home has the total package: location, movein condition, price. I-385 to Fairview; Right on HarrisonBridge; Right on Neely Ferry; Left on Farm Club; Right on Worchester; Right onto Treecrest

3BR/2BA Well maintained home in great location. Open Floor plan. Wade Hampton to Hwy 14N, Left on Ansel School Rd, Right into S/D, 1st Right on St.

Contact: Doug Banner | 640-6800 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Jeffrey Meister | 979-4633 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Tim Keagy | 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

38 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND POPLAR FOREST

O P E N S U N D AY, J A N U A R Y 19 F R O M 2 – 4 P M GRANITE WOODS SOUTH

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA

511 SUMMITBLUFF DR . $198,500 . 1271731

107 CALCITE DRIVE . $176,000 . 1271815

210 STRATFORD RD . $99,500 . 1266299

3BR/2.5BA Immaculate home. Open floor plan & fenced backyard. Poinsett Hwy past Furman, Left on New Ford Rd, Right on Hwy 25, Left on Foothills Rd, Right into SD.

3BR/2BA wonderful home with great schools, energy efficient, new refrigerator, new vinyl, fenced yard, bonus room. Batesville to R on Dillard, L on Gibb Shoals, R into s’division, L on Calcite

3BR/2.5BA Lovely home in well-established mature neighborhood. South on Hwy 291, L on Augusta Rd, R on E Fairfield, R on Stratford.

Contact: Janie Gibbs | 901-3403 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Patty Pfister/The Lawton Team 864-630-0410 Keller Williams Upstate

Contact: Scott Holtzclaw | 884-6783 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S D E C E M B E R 16 - 2 0, 2 013 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$13,668,909 $9,508,909 $8,741,909 $8,300,000 $5,880,000 BURRESS PARK $1,817,500 $1,175,000 $1,120,000 $880,880 CLIFFS@GLASSY EAST $800,000 TERRACE@RIVERPLACE $623,000 MONTEBELLO $620,000 HIGHLANDS $590,000 EXCHANGED PLANNED DVLPMNT $588,000 FOXBROOKE $580,000 PARK HILL $573,000 VALLEY VILLAS $525,000 $525,000 BARRINGTON PARK $510,015 $480,000 $473,000 MCBEE BOOKEND $460,000 MOUNTAIN VIEW VALLEY $450,000 BATESVILLE FOREST $446,000 DEERFIELD $412,000 ROCKWOOD PARK $404,500 $395,000 ACADIA $370,000 SUGAR CREEK $365,000 STONEHAVEN $356,000 $350,000 $345,000 FAIR HEIGHTS $340,000 KILGORE FARMS $336,500 BRAEMOR $330,222 $325,000 CURETON CORNERS $320,000 RIDGEWATER $313,978 CRESCENT MOUNTAIN VINEYARDS $310,000 SHADOWOOD $305,000 MILL POND@RIVER SHOALS $303,150 CARILION $302,135 NORTHGATE $295,000 ESTATES@GOVERNOR’S LAKE $285,000 COVE@BUTLER SPRINGS $279,000 SHANNON CREEK $269,400 CASTLE ROCK $266,048 PARAMOUNT PARK $265,000 $265,000 BUMCOMBE PARK $265,000 SHADOWOOD $264,502 $250,000 CARILION $249,990

BUYER

ADDRESS

CP LAKEWOOD LLC CF FWB VIEWS ON PELHAM L 1345 AVE OF AMERICAS 46TH FL CP NORTH SLOPE LLC CF FWB NORTH SLOPE LLC 1345 AVE OF THE AMERICAS 46TH CP WILLOWICK LLC CF FWB VINTAGE LLC 1345 AVE OF THE AMERICAS 46TH CONCORD LAND & DEVELOPME SUSO 3 DILL CREEK LP 568 JETTON ST STE 200 VERDAE PROPERTIES INC SC DEPOT POOH LLC 103 W 55TH ST PRINCE & BOSTIC LLC SC L LIFT PROPERTIES LLC 441 BARBER LOOP S CAROLINA PROPERTIES LL REJ TRANQUIL COURT LLC 3344 SAWGRASS DR VERDAE PROPERTIES INC MCDEPOT POOH LLC 103 W 55TH ST HAMBY WILLIAM MICHAEL MARK III PROPERTIES INC PO BOX 170248 GLAVIN CONSTANCE M STEENBARGER MARC (JTWROS 6729 THE MASTERS AVE WILLIAMS ANTHONY A ELDRIDGE MARIE C 10 ALEXANDER RD FOWLER JAMES W ATKINSON KATHRYN B 168 CHAPMAN RD JOHNSON DANIEL W SOONG ANTHONY W (JTWROS) 139 LANNEAU DR M & T ENTERPRISES INC UPSTATE AREA HEALTH EDUC 104 S VENTURE DR SLATER THOMAS A (JTWROS) FINLEY ASHLEY Q (JTWROS) 2 DOWNINGTON CT FEREBEE MATTHEW C HEIGEL JONATHAN E 39 CONESTEE AVE KELAHER JOHN T HEWSON GENEVIEVE C (JTWR 11291 BALD CYPRESS LN GEROW DAWN MICHELE PAIR SIMPSON MICHELLE N 115 E EARLE ST SCROGGS ERIN G TERWIN MTG TRUST 2006-11 8742 LUCENT BLVD STE 300 SHAW ENTERPRISES OF THE SUBER MILL HEIGHTS LP BUILDING 200 SUITE 175 WOOD GEORGIA NORTH GREENVILLE UNIVERS PO BOX 1892 PIERCE DAVID W LEWIS GREGORY A 111 E MCBEE AVE UNIT 405 DRAPER TODD TRUMAN ACM GOLDEN STATE 15480 LAGUNA CANYON RD DEFLORIO ALAN A FIVE OAKS TRUST THE PO BOX 25783 BAILEY FRANCIS T MCMAHON JILL B 406 DEERFIELD DR MICKEL TINA MARIE NELL KATHRYN ELYSE 111 ROCKWOOD DR MS 2011 FAMILY TRUST GRAHAM JOSEPH (JTWROS) 195 MONTVERDE DR BLASO ANNA M PRINCE KIMBERLY L 10 CUSHING ST DEMAINE JAMIE D BRYANT JOSEPH W JR (JTWR 107 N WINGFIELD RD AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R DIXON SAMUEL W 331 ENGLISH OAK RD HTH DEVELOPERS LLC A LTD TUXFORD JAY W REVOCABLE 900 W POINSETT ST STREET HELEN T (JTWROS) BELL ERIC L (JTWROS) 308 CLEAR SPRING RD CORNERSTONE NATIONAL BAN GACM LLC 103 SHERARD CT ARANT JOHN T (JTWROS) STEINER THOMAS L (JTWROS 319 CARTERS CREEK CT D R HORTON INC TRANTHAM TARA ELIZABETH 18 LATHERTON CT PROSPERITY JOCKEY LOT IN KIRIAKIDES ALEXS JR TRUS 2049 WADE HAMPTON BLVD GUNTER CHRISTOPHER GUY MCCUTCHEN LETITIA YOUNG 6 CURETON ST BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT D’WATER LARISSA O (JTWRO 6 KNOTTY DR GARST JOHN M PENNACHIO JOSEPH P (JTWR 106 CABERNET WAY MARRON PATRICIA I JONES DANA RENEE (JTWROS 109 SHADOWOOD DR NVR INC BAILLET CHRISTOPHE P (JT 205 RIO GRANDE PL DAN RYAN BUILDERS SC LLC MALONEY CHARLES J JR 70 PALLADIO DR KELLY ANDREW W MCCOY DUSTIN L (JTWROS) 16 N AVONDALE DR RAMEY GORDON F (JTWROS) GEYER KELLY D (JTWROS) 32 GOVERNORS LAKE WAY DAN RYAN BUILDERS SC LLC WILLIAMS ANTHONY A 24 WISCASSET WAY GEIER SUSAN GREGORY JAMES MYRON JR 16 SHANNON RIDGE CT SK BUILDERS INC BARNWELL CASIE (JTWROS) 113 CASTLE CREEK DR MCGEE DANIEL R DIVISION 16 INDUSTRIES L PO BOX 17472 JETER BETTY A PARKER KEVIN C 17 GARRAUX ST LOWRANCE EDGAR JOHNSTON HORTON MELODY C (JTWROS) 7 CLARENDON AVE HAMMOND DAVID W SIMPSON TIMOTHY A (JTWRO 101 SHADOWOOD DR BUNCOMBE STREET UNITED M RALLIS RONALD DEAN JR 202 N MAIN ST #201 DAN RYAN BUILDERS SC LLC HIERS CAROLYN 5 HOGARTH DR

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

PROVIDENCE SQUARE $248,400 CAROLINA OAKS $247,267 HARRISON COVE $246,015 $243,802 MORNING MIST $242,081 PELHAM FALLS $240,000 PROVIDENCE SQUARE $239,200 WEST FARM $237,955 VILLAGE@WINDSOR CREEK $236,317 KELSEY GLEN $236,183 CYPRESS RUN $235,501 BRENTMOOR $232,210 CAROLINA OAKS $228,284 VERDMONT $228,000 TWIN CREEKS $227,570 SHOALLY RIDGE $225,034 $225,000 UNIVERSITY PARK $224,000 COTTAGES@HARRISON BRIDGE $223,320 ORCHARD FARMS $222,500 RICHGLEN $221,500 TOWNES@RIVERWOOD FARM $220,000 ORCHARD FARMS $218,000 SUMMERFIELD $216,000 WOODGREEN $214,000 STILLWOOD@BELL’S CROSSING $210,000 CROSSGATE@REMINGTON $208,805 RAVENWOOD $204,020 THOUSANDHILLS $189,500 VICTORIA PARK $188,505 BRADFORD NORTH $187,000 LANSDOWNE@REMINGTON $186,842 $185,000 ORCHARD FARMS ARBOR WALK $185,000 BEAVER BROOK $185,000 $185,000 $185,000 GRESHAM PARK $184,805 HERITAGE CLUB VILLAS $182,500 LISMORE PARK $180,000 JONESVILLE LANDING $180,000 ANSEL CROSSING $179,900 CRESCENT TERRACE $178,428 $178,300 BLUE WATERS $177,670 TWIN CREEKS $174,535 MONTEBELLO $173,000 DEER RUN $173,000 PARK HILL $168,750 LANSDOWNE@REMINGTON $168,169 SPRING FOREST $167,500 WATERMILL $166,329 SHADOW CREEK $165,700

BUYER

ADDRESS

WIRTHLIN WILLIAM J BANK OF NORTH CAROLINA 3751 ROBERT M GRISSOM PKWY #10 D R HORTON INC HORN JEFFREY A (JTWROS) 151 CAROLINA OAKS DR EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION CO MITCHELL BERNARD J (JTWR 300 CYPRESSHILL CT THREATT ENTERPRISES INC CARTER JR PROPERTIES LLC PO BOX 27064 S C PILLON HOMES INC JOCHIMS KAI (JTWROS) 610 TULIP TREE LN SEARLE PROPERTIES LLC MEYER KAREN 317 PELHAM FALLS DR WIRTHLIN WILLIAM J BANK OF NORTH CAROLINA 3751 ROBERT M GRISSOM PKWY #10 MUNGO HOMES INC WITT DUANE R JR (JTWROS) 405 CHILLINGHAM CT EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL NUNEZ AMY C (JTWROS) 5 PENRITH CT NVR INC O’DANIEL NATHAN J (JTWRO 51 CHAPEL HILL LN SARGENT MAUREEN M CAROLINA ASSET MGMT GROU PO BOX 8838 D R HORTON INC RUSSELL PHILLIP K (JTWRO 105 MACINTYRE ST D R HORTON INC MORRIS ROSITA B 5 BENDSBROOK WAY DAN RYAN BUILDERS SC INC FOX WHITNEY R 224 CLAIRHILL CT NVR INC AVERY MARK (JTWROS) 10 YOUNG HARRIS DR STONEWOOD HOMES INC ACKERMAN RICHARD E (JTWR 2 CANYON CT SUMMERS JEFFERY C GILREATH BRIAN D 9 HOLLY HEDGE CT DIAZ TANYA ANTALEC MICHELLE F 126 BROOKSIDE CIR DWELLING GROUP LLC CARTER DAWN REVOCABLE LI 43 BRIARHILL DR BARNES COMMERCIAL HOLDIN 34 MOUNTAIN ROSE COURT L 725 LOWNDES HILL RD BAZEMORE ADRIAN W CLINE BRIAN K 6 COVEY CT MALONE CHARLES D BENNETT THOMAS J 208 WILD RIDGE LN MEYER KAREN M BREAULT JEFFREY M (JTWRO 331 CRESTHAVEN PL OREN HYON O CROCKETT JAY A 208 TANNER CHASE WAY GAUTHIER ROBERT L FARMER LONNIE ADAM 303 FARMWOOD DR MAILANDER PAM STANDIFER JOSHUA L (JTWR 340 AMBERLEAF WAY D R HORTON INC TIDWELL JACK BERNARD (JT 209 KINGS HEATH LN RELIANT SC LLC COLLINS COREY LINIER 129 RAVEN FALLS LN FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA BARTLEY CHARLES E JR (JT 35 SAINT MARYS WAY KB&D SERVICES LLC GARTRELL GERLIE T 15 DUNSBOROUGH DR LEO MARY B SORENSEN JOAN A D (JTWRO 403 REDSPIRE DR D R HORTON INC WILLIAMS MICHAEL S (JTWR 10 STRAIHARN PL HARDIN INVESTMENTS LLC JBM INVESTMENTS GROUP LL 14 MANLY ST ABEDINI ATOUSA KILPO PETER O & PRIKKO H 45 TAMARACK CIR #20724 ALLEN CRICKET H (JTWROS) EMBREE MICHAEL S (JTWROS 4 OTTER LN WELSH VIRGINIA R STYLES JAMES V 12 VANNOY ST RUSSELL GRAY REAL ESTATE SPRINGFIELD INDUSTRIES L 4 MEDDABROOK DR EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL CARR CAROL E 5 ALDERSHOT WAY SMALLWOOD FAMILY TRUST T GERSTENBERGER ROSEMARIE 1300 HERITAGE CLUB DR DRUMMOND PATRICIA M (JTW JOLIE CLIFF 19 RIVER WAY DR FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA CHEUNG TERESA S (JTWROS) 5 HILEY CT FORD ASHLEY M EAVES JOHN T (JTWROS) 6 KIMBRELLS COVE LN MURRAY & MCMULLEN SC GEN MCMULLEN CHARLES W JR 1619 AUGUSTA ST ROPER JOEL C ROPER RESIDENTIAL TRUST 433 E STANDING SPRINGS RD SK BUILDERS INC LAJOIE DESTINY (JTWROS) 117 YELLOW FIN CT NVR INC GILCHRIST MARCUS L 111 YOUNG HARRIS DR PUTNAM MICHAEL G BLOOMER DANNELLE (JTWROS 701 MONTEBELLO DR UNIT 204 SOROCHAK WILLIAM L KALU JACOB U (JTWROS) 102 PARTRIDGEBERRY WAY JOHNSON BROTHERS RESIDEN 105 BROOKWOOD LLC 40 W BROAD ST STE 410 D R HORTON INC DILLARD CANDANCE LASHAWN 9 STRAIHARN PL GRAHAM LINDSAY B NEUER JOSHUA A (JTWROS) 2 AYRSHIRE DR EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL HALAIXT CATHERINE A 221 RIVERDALE RD SK BUILDERS INC FRESHWATERS DENNIS A (JT 104 APPLEHILL WAY

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Noble-Interstate Management Group, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 40 W. Orchard Park Dr., Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 2, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF ACTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT C/A No. 2013-DR-23-5368 NORMA LAGUNA GOMEZ, Plaintiff, vs. ANTONIO NAVARRO, Defendant. YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the original Summons and Complaint in the above entitled action were filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court in the Family Court of Greenville County, South Carolina, the object of the prayer is to obtain a divorce from Antonio Navarro. Contact: The Carruthers Law Firm 111 Toy Street Greenville, SC 29601

PHOTOS BY GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

PUBLIC HEARING SOLICITATION NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE Greenville County, 301 University HELD ON TUESDAY, JANUARY Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 21, 2014, AT 6:00 P.M., (or 29601, will accept responses for as soon thereafter as other the following: public hearings are concluded), Replacement of Slider Doors, IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, RFP #31-02/04/14, 3:00 P.M. 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, A pre-proposal meeting and GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR site tour will be held at 9:00 THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING A.M., E.S.T, January 22, 2014 at WHETHER THE METROPOLITAN Greenville County Procurement SEWER SUBDISTRICT Services Office, County Square, BOUNDARIES SHOULD BE 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, ENLARGED TO INCLUDE REAL Greenville, SC 29601. PROPERTY LOCATED OFF OF Solicitations can be found at SCUFFLETOWN ROAD. http://www.greenvillecounty. THE NEW BOUNDARY org/Purchasing_Dept/RFP.asp LINES TO RESULT FOR THE or by calling (864) 467-7200. METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE THOSE AREAS KNOWN AS GREENVILLE TAX MAP PUBLIC HEARING NUMBERS (TMS#) 0548.02-01020.01, 0548.02-01-020.02, A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE AND 0548.02-01-020.04. A HELD ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES 4, 2014, AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE time thereafter as the hearing AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY may be held), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY COUNCIL OFFICE. GREENVILLE, SC THE REASON FOR THE RIDGE, PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE RECEIVING COMMENTS FROM ORDERLY COLLECTING OF THE PUBLIC REGARDING THE SEWAGE AND WASTE. NO PROPOSED RELINQUISHMENT MAINTENANCE OF ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE OF ISSUED BY THE SUBDISTRICT, APPROXIMATELY 800 FEET NOR WILLTHERE BE ANY OF OLD ROADBED (Stenhouse CHANGES IN THE COMMISSION Road - F0029) AND TRANSFER OR THE PERSONNEL OF THE THE OWNERSHIP OF THE RIGHT PRESENT COMMISSION OF OF WAY TO THE ADJOINING THE METROPOLITAN SEWER PROPERTY OWNERS. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN SUBDISTRICT. GREENVILLE COUNTY BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN COUNCIL GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL it.

Judson Chapin III shows off his 1953 MG TD at the South Carolina International Auto Show at the TD Convention Center. John Montgomery, left, shows off the new Fiat at the car show.

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 email: aharley@communityjournals.com

Katie, left, and Emma Jackson tailgate while their parents, Julie and Eric, check out the car.

Classic cars were on display at the South Carolina International Auto Show.

This classic Mustang caught many eyes. More than 250 of various makes and models were on display at the show.

40 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Workers from St. Clair Signs install the new Bon Secours Wellness Arena sign onto the side of the facility. The three signs will take about three weeks to install. Each letter of the sign is 4 feet tall and attaches to the building by very long bolts that run through the wall and are bolted from inside.

The Stone Academy Thinkers won trophies for Best Robot Performance and Best Robot Design at a First Lego League state qualifier tournament on Saturday, Jan. 11, at Spartanburg Methodist College. The team, coaches and videographer include: (back row) parent volunteer Caroline Fritz, Dylan Fritz, Hayse McGowan, Robbie Young, Sophie Young, Benjamin Bowen, Prema Van Deren and Stone Academy fourth-grade teacher Lyndsey Trickett; (front row) Katherine Wiedemann, Jonah Holbrooks, Tyler Harvey, Max Hajosy and Chip Burnette.

In Amanda Wakely’s adaptive art class at Washington Center, students recently learned about the sky through Eric Carle’s “Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me.” Students used multiple painting techniques to create fullmoon paintings. Pictured, Kayla Radi reaches high to mix the colors for her moon during adaptive art class.

Dede Ward of the Carolina Shag Club presents a $6,000 check to a surprised Cathy King, nursing supervisor at BI-LO Charities Children’s Cancer Center. Camp Courage is one of the Carolina Shag Club’s charities. Also pictured are Terry Gordon and Jeff Ward, Carolina Shag Club officers.

Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County dedicated its 313th home in December – a build by Guardian Building Products and its affiliate companies for the Easterling family. The company’s Guardian Pride Committee (Susie Grant, Steve Lanzl, Kelly Pastore, Johnathan Burman and Sara Eller), who led the company’s participation, congratulate the homeowner, Portia Easterling (center, in blue), on her achievement.  

We offer...

• Latest in Digital Technology • Streaming to Phone and TV • Multiple Major Manufacturers

Professional & Personalized Services

200 Patewood Dr., Bldg B, Suite B-400 • 454-4368

Crossword puzzle: page 42

Sudoku puzzle: page 42

Doctors of Audiology: Angie Zuendt, Courtney Russo, Susan Valenti & Lisa Ramos

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL CULTURE

MEN & WOMEN

You’re Gonna

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. OH, NO!

By John Lampkin

Lose it!

AVERAGE WEIGHT LOSS OF 30-50 LBS IN 10 WEEKS! DOCTOR SUPERVISED RAPID WEIGHT LOSS SPA

Doctorskinnyweightloss.com

✔ NO SURGERY! ✔ NO STARVING! ✔ NO INJECTIONS! ✔ NO EXERCISE!

864-553-5553 Dr. James Potere, DC 1099 E. Butler Rd. Suite 107G Greenville, SC 29607 42 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 17, 2014

ACROSS 1 Fix things 6 Egret kin seen in hieroglyphs 10 “Paw” on “The Beverly Hillbillies” 13 Courage 19 Give room for growth, as seedlings 20 Slacker’s word 21 Program file extension 22 Slacker’s lack 23 “$%*#& computer!”? 25 Spillane’s inspiration? 27 Networking, maybe 28 Predictions affected by storms, briefly 30 Dance step 31 Fancy wheels 33 Apt name for a truck driver? 35 Wagner’s “__ Rheingold” 36 ER part: Abbr. 40 Armor-breaking weapon 43 “Sure” 46 Sherlock’s adversary Adler 47 Add to a busy schedule 50 Prior to A.D. 51 Some OPEC ministers 53 It’s about 10% larger than Australia 54 Like PETA members? 57 Fresno campus inits.

58 Birch flower clusters 60 Pigged out 61 __ of fare 62 Mechanical learning 63 Way up 65 “No way!” 67 Takedown expert? 69 Sculls 70 Father 71 Mr. Rogers and others 72 Flash mob? 74 Tear 75 Goya’s “The Duchess of __” 76 Bygone theaters 77 Antlered Eurasians 79 The 2006 novel “Hannibal Rising,” for one 82 “__ durn tootin’!” 83 Sugar daddy? 86 1880s pres. monogram 87 Interweave 89 Actress Hagen 90 More than dull 92 Mug at a bar 93 Detect intuitively 95 Fencing tool 96 On the fence 97 __ room 99 Old touring car 100 Sniggler 103 Kitschy garden figures 106 Scary contest 108 Where to find baked blackbirds

112 Keyboard technique suggested by the instruction “attacca”? 116 Well-mannered sisters? 118 Drawing power 119 When Le Havre gets hot 120 Rain-deflecting aid 121 Grimm baddies 122 Cleaver 123 Leb. neighbor 124 One in a flight 125 2013 Daytime Emmy winner Gibbons

DOWN 1 Violist’s direction 2 “One good __ deserves another”: birder’s quip 3 Aussie gem 4 “Fat chance!” 5 Centric opening 6 “ER” setting 7 Nudist’s covering? 8 Technical sch. 9 Hot and heavy 10 Atticus Finch’s son 11 Way out 12 Figure out 13 Boy-girl link 14 Grammy-winning Celtic musician 15 Andrew Wyeth medium 16 “__ Calling”: 2000s Eliza Dushku TV series 17 Optimus F3 cell-

phones 18 Batting organ 24 Frame of Bugs, e.g. 26 Mauna __ 29 Holy day 32 Chain with popcorn 34 Bike 37 “Thanks, Pierre, nice

Easy

mug!”? 38 Like Crusoe 39 Outcomes 40 1/60,000 of a min. 41 Cyan shade 42 Short anchor? 44 “Wheel” purchase 45 Biological pigment

46 Commonly mistyped word 48 Piece polisher 49 Region 51 Repeat exactly 52 New Yorker cartoonist Peter 55 Bugs 56 Former Calif. base 59 Hawaiian storms 61 Backyard Jul. 4 event 63 Obscured 64 Metal named for a blue line in its spectrum 66 Jags or Vikes 67 Most nimble 68 Fallen for 69 Protective layer 70 One whose efforts were feudal 73 Have __ of good luck 74 Entertained 75 Field 78 Key with an arrow 79 Neo- or bryo- ender 80 Comfort 81 Overdue 83 Dart part 84 Flap 85 Soul mate 88 Hand-tightened fastener 91 Make bananas? 93 Curtain-raising time 94 Watchmakers’ aids 97 Pricey watch 98 Avian Aussie 101 Concern in the rough 102 Join, in London 104 __ Barnacle, wife of James Joyce 105 Snorkel et al.: Abbr. 107 Q.E.D. part 109 Utter 110 R&B singer Foxx 111 She, in Salerno 112 Spray in the pantry 113 Seine sight 114 Bit of culinary jargon 115 Bard’s adverb 117 Spirit

Crossword answers: page 41

Sudoku answers: page 41


JOURNAL CULTURE

WHERE I’VE BEEN

One family

WITH BILL KOON

Watching radio I skipped the movie version of “The Lone Ranger.” I did not reach this decision easily. I love the Masked Man and Tonto. When I was a kid, I listened to their radio show faithfully, sprawled on the sofa, staring at our huge Philco radio. The show came on about twilight; I’d leave the lamp off and stretch out to imagine Kemosabe and his sidekick and Silver. I saw them in my imagination more clearly than I would see them on TV later on. I didn’t understand why the TV people did not know what those guys really looked like. Their depiction was just too neat, too much like a comic book. And somehow, shouting “hi-yo, Silver” and galloping away worked better on the radio than it did on TV. Johnny Depp wearing a stuffed crow for a hat would have been better on radio as well. I didn’t see “The Green Hornet” for similar reasons. The radio, with that screeching siren, was far better, in my estimate, than the big screen. The same goes for Superman. His flying looked fake in the movies; it was real on the radio. Tarzan in the movies did not bother me so much; I’m not sure why. Maybe it was because I never heard a radio show about him, or because I did not read those books. But I think it might have been hard to capture Cheetah on just the sound waves. We could have gotten his chatter, but we really needed to see him scratching his armpits. And, of course, it was important that we could see Tarzan and Jane swinging through the treetops in their undies. Radio never did much for sexy. One of my favorite radio shows seems to be missing altogether – “The Fat Man.” The program started with a series of pretty heavy footsteps: the Fat Man, who was a crafty detective, walking down the street and then pausing to weigh himself on a penny scale. You could hear the coin drop in as he stepped up, and then the voice-over would say, “Weight: 300 pounds. Fortune: danger.” Our hero would go on to run down some vicious, but shrimpy, criminals. I guess that weighing on a penny scale does not translate easily into cinematic footage. But it worked beautifully on the radio. I’m glad Hollywood left it alone. I don’t remember that “Fibber McGee and Molly” made it to the silver screen. I hope not. It was a favorite at my house. The show started, week in and week out, with Fibber opening the closet door to an avalanche of junk that tumbled out. We knew it was coming and I think we started laughing like idiots before it happened. I don’t believe that even the best technicians at Dreamworks could accomplish what a couple of radio sound effects people got done long ago. Maybe it worked so well because our closets were miniscule and always stuffed with junk. I wonder if it would work now, here in the day of walk-in closets. My nostalgia makes me a big fan of the public radio show “A Prairie Home Companion,” in which Garrison Keillor rambles from one skit to another, accompanied by some very talented performers who portray the folks of the imaginary town Lake Wobegon where “all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average.” No costumes required. The sound effects are always obvious, clopping horses or rattling tableware down at The Chatterbox Café. And the commercials are wonderful fantasies about Powdermilk Biscuits and the National Ketchup Council and Bertha’s Kitty Boutique and The Society for Unemployed English Majors. It all adds up to a wonderful radio show in and of itself, but at the same time it pokes a little fun at those old shows – and at the nostalgia of us gray panthers. Keillor takes the show on tour from time to time. The amazing thing to me is that I have bought and paid for tickets to go see this radio program. Hard cash to watch a radio show? Really. But come to think of it, I’m back where I began – staring at that old Philco, watching radio.

100

EST.

1913

Y E A R S

www.ThomasMcAfee.com

Discover the Benefits of Ownership!

NOT A MEMBER? JOIN TODAY! Anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County can join!

Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

JANUARY 17, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 43


Security, now at your fingertips! ▼ ▼

Smart phone access. Control your alarm system with smart phone apps. Receive text messages and emails when your system is armed, disarmed or during a break-in. Camera systems with digital recorder. Cameras at your home or business provide live views and videos to your smart phone or computer via TM high-speed internet access. Also available: Interactive services. Medical Alert for seniors. Control thermostats, lights Simply press your pendant necklace or and door locks from your wristband and an operator will get you the smart phone or computer via help you need. high-speed internet access.

Cellular communication. No landline needed. Eliminates the risk of a telephone line being cut and reduces the chance of lightning damaging your system.

ProTec Security offers the latest technology and remote services:

LifeGard

No installation fee and a discounted rate for existing security customers.

For more information about any of these services or to upgrade an existing security system contact us at

1-800-942-3141 www.protecservice.com

PROTEC SECURITY IS A DIVISION OF

Jan. 17, 2014 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you