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Making His Case Greenville attorney William Herlong says he has the right skills, experience, and passion to serve as state attorney general

Will Crooks / Greenville Journal

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IS HOCKEY HERE TO STAY? CHECK. New Swamp Rabbits owner Steve Donner confident about the team’s future in Greenville WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM

S

teve Donner has roots in minor league hockey. He also was among the first to sell hockey in the South. “I feel pretty comfortable that if I can sell hockey in a 30,000-seat building in Tampa, that we can tackle hockey here in Greenville,” said Donner, a former marketing executive for the National Hockey League’s Tampa Bay Lightning and the leader of a new ownership group, South Carolina Pro Hockey LLC, that bought the Greenville Swamp Rabbits. The ownership group is the East Coast Hockey League franchise’s third owner since it started as the Greenville Road Warriors in 2010. When the sale was disclosed, the team immediately announced that it had extended its lease with the Bon Secours Wellness Arena through 2021. “We didn’t buy the team as a relocation opportunity. We bought the team as a great opportunity in Greenville and wanted to make a statement. The best way to prove that is to commit to a multiyear lease with both the building and the community,” Donner said. South Carolina Pro Hockey bought the team from Chestnut Street Sports, a company owned by Fred Festa, president and CEO of Maryland-based W.R. Grace & Co. Festa had owned the team since 2012. “Fred could have taken many other options, including closing the team and selling the team to someone who would move it out of town, but he was looking for someone that would keep the team in Greenville,” Donner said. “He told me, ‘This can work here, Steve, just someone’s got to come here and live here and be part of the community, and have the marketing background to take it to the next level.’ I want to thank Fred for his commitment to Greenville and giving us the opportunity to continue this.” Donner has decades of experience in professional sports, a career that started in minor league hockey in

Will Crooks / Greenville Journal

1980. During the 14 years Donner was owner of the American Hockey League’s Rochester Americans, the team made the playoffs every season, advancing to the finals in four of them and winning one championship. “I’m returning to my roots,” Donner said. The Greenville Journal sat down with Donner to talk about what’s next for minor league hockey in Greenville.

Why Greenville? I’ve been in business for over 27 years, so at this point in my life I can be a little picky as to where I want to live and do business. I was looking for the right opportunity in the minor leagues that had a community soul. We looked at four other teams, three in the ECHL and one in the AHL. Some were in the South; some were in the Northern market. One of the first things about Greenville that really struck us was the community spirit here. Obviously, there’s a bit of a checkered past for hockey here, and the business models and numbers at first were a little bit daunting to look at, but again, we looked at the future and where the city’s going. Anywhere you go, you want to see vitality, a cooperative building, and a beautiful building to operate in. We just thought with where the market is going and with the backing of the arena, this market provided an opportunity.

What made Greenville stand out? We started looking at this in late July, early August. We took our time because we wanted to get to know the arena people here, and we really wanted to get an idea from current ownership some of the challenges they went through and some of the progress they made. It was a methodical process. What we saw was a hockey organization that was moving forward and stabilized, but maybe with the ownership situation could not be here every day. Maybe the manage-

ment group did not have the correct mix of assets and talents to make it successful at the next level. So we listened very carefully and tried to put together, and have put together, a dynamic team that can take this franchise, that was already moving in the right direction, to the next level.

What are some of the challenges that you and your organization have to overcome to take it to the next level? First and foremost, I think we have to rebuild the business model a little bit. I think we may have to lower some of our costs of overhead. I’m fortunate to have leadership skills in many areas of the business. We’ve got some good young people. I think with retooling our staff and retooling our business model, and I think with me living in town, I’m really hoping that we can establish long-term relationships in the community. If you look at the success of the Drive, they’ve done a great job. We’re not going to use them as a complete blueprint, but in our own way I’d like to methodically build what they’ve built. If we get in front of community leaders and they see our energy and commitment, and our willingness to be creative, I think we’ll win them over.

How will your experience in Tampa help you sell hockey here? I look at our opportunity here somewhere between a rebuild and an expansion opportunity. When you’re in the National Hockey League and you go through an expansion process, especially in a nontraditional market, you have to think outside the box. You’re going into it knowing that you don’t have a lot of hockey fans here. In Tampa, we had a daunting task of going into a 30,000-seat arena knowing we had probably 5,000 hockey fans at best. So when you do that, you’ve got to focus on entertainment.

Priority 1: The first order of business by the Swamp Rabbits’ new ownership group was to extend the team’s lease with the Bon Secours Wellness Arena through the 2020-21 season, ensuring that hockey stays in the Upstate.


01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM You do everything to get them into the building for the first time. When you get them here, we’re going to have to provide a lot of fun to bring them back. Little by little, if we can get them here often enough, we’re going to turn people into hockey fans. We’re trying to unshackle everyone and have some fun and really be creative, maybe do some things that are almost outlandish at times. The main thing is that we don’t have to go after things in a traditional sense. We’re going to be outof-the-box thinkers and relationship builders.

What about the team and building excited you? There are so many good parts of the organization. Take the hockey part. We’ve got a great head coach here. He’s a great recruiter. The style of play when we have a full roster is as entertaining as there is in the ECHL. Early on when we were looking, the team was winning big, losing big. No matter what, the team was entertaining.

here, that was a huge plus. They would like to see us doing a better job than we’re doing now, and we accept that responsibility.

What makes you think you can succeed where the owners before struggled? The two previous ownership groups were extremely well-intended. The first group was a good hockey group, but maybe they didn’t have the business ownership living here day-today and maybe didn’t take the time to understand the market. With Fred Festa, he had all the right intentions. He had all the financial strength to do this. He expressed his own frustrations to me that he couldn’t be here to make his own impact with the organization. This is a multimember group. It’s not just me. We have some strong partners. Strategically, we put together a powerhouse team of marketing and sales people with the under-

If you look at the success of the Drive, they’ve done a great job. We’re not going to use them as a complete blueprint, but in our own way I’d like to methodically build what they’ve built. When you look at this facility, for someone like me who’s been in the National Hockey League to have this building to market in, wow. It really has major league amenities. The suites, the video scoreboard ring, the party facilities, those are all NHL-level. One of the things I loved about the building is it’s like an accordion. It can be any number of things. What happens in some instances in the ECHL is you get into a building too small and lacks amenities that fans are looking for. It’s a real hindrance. But if you get into too big a building where you have NHL amenities, it can be expensive to operate in. Take Orlando, for example. The expense of operating a team in that building was choking to the last owner, and the Magic have taken over because they have the master lease to the building. Here with the accordion system, the building’s intimate enough with 7,400 seats. I’m a guy who likes to have capacity. Some teams like a small, compact building. I like the chance to have some big nights. So I’m hoping what we can do differently is have six or seven nights a year and blow it out with some really big crowds. But on those nights we can’t, if we get 4,000 people in here, the building has a great atmosphere. The fact that the arena manager and the board like hockey, and want to see hockey

standing we have to be patient, that it’s not going to happen overnight. We’re going to have to be on site. We’re going to have to roll up our sleeves and get involved in the community. I’m hoping that will make the difference. In addition, the lease can make or break minor league hockey teams. Beth [Paul, general manager of the Bon Secours Wellness Arena], the board, and the county, they have a very fair lease in place. I’d call our lease a partnership lease. There’s incentive for the building for us to succeed. The lease doesn’t choke us. There’s revenue sharing for us so if we do well, the building does well. They’ve been very fair to try not to saddle us with a lease that is very difficult to overcome from a cost standpoint. Corporate partnerships and being a part of the community have been key to the Greenville Drive’s success. How will you build your community relationships? We place a high value on community relationships. We’ll take our relationships one at a time without expectations that they have to love us just because we have a team. We have an ownership group that can certainly fund the operation while we’re building relationships. If we get in front of community leaders and they see our energy and commitment, I think we’ll develop those relationships. I’m hoping to literally win them over one at a time.

Health Events MoveWell January 2018 GHS is making exercise accessible and affordable this year with MoveWell, our online fitness resource. We’ll deliver monthly workout plans along with video demos of each movement in the workout. Find out more at ghs.org/movewell. Prediabetes Class Tue., Jan. 16 • 1-2 p.m. • GHS Life Center About 84 million U.S. adults have prediabetes—many don’t even know it! Learn what prediabetes is and how to avoid type 2 diabetes. Free; no registration needed. Call (864) 455-4003 for more information. Caregiving ABCs Tue., Jan. 16-Thur., Feb. 22 • 6-8 p.m. • Patewood Center, 255 Enterprise Blvd. Taking care of an aging family member is hard, but help is available. This sixweek series provides education and support to those caring for a loved one with dementia or a memory health condition. Free; registration required. Girls on the Run February-May • Times and locations vary This program combines training for a 5K with esteem-enhancing workouts for girls ages 8-15. Scholarships and payment plans available. Register at ghs.org/girlsontherun. Women’s Heart Screenings Tuesdays • 1-3 p.m. • GHS Women’s Heart Center Heart disease is more deadly to women than all forms of cancer combined. The best time to get checked is before symptoms appear. This early detection screening focuses on blood pressure, weight, cholesterol, nutrition and sleep. Fee: $100. Unless noted otherwise, registration is required for each event. To register, learn more or see a schedule of events, visit ghs.org/events.

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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

WILLIAM HERLONG Age: 59 Political party: Republican Occupation: Attorney Education: Bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from the University of Virginia; law degree from Northwestern University Prior political office: Two terms on the Greenville County School Board Previous experience in running for a statewide office: None Family: Wife, Joan; four children, three grandchildren

On the Ballot A Q&A with South Carolina attorney general candidate William Herlong WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

In a way, Greenville attorney William Herlong can credit a loss in a state House of Representatives race more than a decade ago for his ability to run for South Carolina attorney general now. Herlong, who as a two-term member of the Greenville County School Board championed the district’s billion-dollar school construction program and its unique financing mechanism, ran in 2006 in the Republican primary to fill the seat vacated when David Wilkins became U.S. ambassador to Canada. When he lost in a runoff, he took it as a sign that he should focus on his law career. It was shortly after that Safety Components International, an airbag manufacturing company in Greenville, merged with International Textile Group Inc. into a new entity that took the International Textile Group name. Two years later, SCI shareholders filed suit against billionaire financier Wilbur Ross and his company over the merger, saying SCI was successful at the time of the merger, while the original International Textile Group was struggling. The plaintiffs claimed that once the

merger was complete, the new International Textile Group stock plunged, negatively affecting shareholders of the previously successful SCI. Herlong was one of the plaintiff lawyers in the case, which, after seven years of litigation, settled with Ross agreeing to pay $81 million. “As a consequence of the success, I had the luxury to step back and basically say what can I do that a) would be interesting and b) would be good for the community,” Herlong said. “I feel that I’ve really learned a lot as a lawyer over the years and I’ve developed some good legal skills, and I’d like to use those in a good positive way.” Herlong, who will challenge current South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson in the Republican primary, has called for Wilson to resign because of his ties to targets in a Statehouse public corruption probe.

The Greenville Journal sat down with Herlong and talked about why he decided to run for attorney general and what he hoped to accomplish if he wins.

Why did you decide to run for attorney general now? About a year and a half ago, I was sitting in my living room when something triggered me to remember the prosecution and conviction of [then-Speaker of the House] Bobby Harrell. At the time, I was really impressed. I actually picked up the phone and called one of the people deeply involved and left a message telling her I thought it was good work. But I couldn’t remember it in detail so I Googled it and every single reference to Alan Wilson said, “Alan Wilson, who is running for governor.” It seems like the last three or four attorneys general were running for governor. I completely reject


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM that approach. If you’re going to be attorney general, be only attorney general and be the best attorney general you can be. It struck me that I could get really excited about challenging public corruption. I’ve got this great skill set, and I really do know how to relentlessly pursue complex litigation. Ten years ago, or even five years ago, I wouldn’t have been able to afford to take it on. But I am in a position now where I can take it on. Over the course of the summer, it came out that Wilson had communicated with the Quinns [political consultant Richard Quinn and former state Rep. Rick Quinn, who were named in the probe]. That is wrong in so many respects. Talking to people, 100 percent of them said that somebody needed to run, somebody who is not a part of the Columbia system, somebody who doesn’t want to make politics a career, somebody who is not beholden to the powers that be, all these things that I bring to the table. I decided I’m going to do this, and, if I succeed, I’m going to turn this office upside down.

What do you think needs to be done in that office? A couple of things jump to mind almost immediately. I’d have a lot to learn in that office, clearly, but even on the surface, you can see right now the State Grand Jury is the most powerful grand jury in the state, and it has been asleep. Frankly, it borders on dereliction of duty. It has been asleep, and Alan Wilson has flat out not utilized it. That thing needs to be humming. It’s not like the bad guys went away. Obviously, it has jurisdiction over public corruption, which is a growth industry, I’m afraid to say. If you’re not out there pulling the weeds, they’re just growing back. The State Grand Jury is where you pull the weeds. That needs to be turned up to a very high pitch. The State Grand Jury also has jurisdiction over gang activity, which is another serious problem in the state. It has jurisdiction over environmental crimes. It has jurisdiction over securities crimes. The grand jury historically has clicked pretty good, looking at a good number of cases each year. But the last couple of years, they’ve wound it down to almost nothing. That’s outrageous. The legislature has given them this incredibly powerful tool, and the attorney general has not been using it. And you have to think it’s because he’s been so distracted fighting off David Pascoe [the special prosecutor who took over the corruption probe that Wilson unsuccessfully tried to have kicked off the case]. There have also been a lot of suggestions that the opinion writing part of the attorney general’s office has been compromised. If somebody in state government, legislature, or political entities has a question about whether something is lawful, you can submit the question to the attorney general’s office and they will tell you what they think a court will say. There are allegations that the corruption down in Columbia contaminated that process. There’s at least an appearance it’s contaminated. That needs to be looked at. I look at things afresh. I’d take a deep, hard look at the whole office to make sure it’s doing what it should do and services are being delivered to the people of South Carolina in the best and most efficient way.

“Talking to people, 100 percent of them said that somebody needed to run, somebody who is not a part of the Columbia system, somebody who doesn’t want to make politics a career, somebody who is not beholden to the powers that be, all these things that I bring to the table. I decided I’m going to do this, and, if I succeed, I’m going to turn this office upside down.”

How will you use your experience to run the attorney general’s office? I’ve got a depth of knowledge and familiarity with how the court system works that’s just a part of breathing for me. The attorney general is responsible for the whole agency. I don’t think it’s that likely that I, because I have confidence in the courtroom, am going to be the guy taking this and that to court. My job will be to find the very best, most capable people to run the various departments. It’s like the football coach who finds the best offensive coordinator and the best defensive coordinator. My job is to get those men and those women in place and support them and turn them loose so they can do what the attorney general’s office is supposed to do. There may be times when I personally get involved in something.

One of the hallmarks of a trial attorney, at least the kind of trial attorney I am, is they learn how to learn. You don’t know what the case coming in the door is. What the trial attorney has to do is figure out what happened, what are the facts while figuring out what’s the relevant law. If you’re not the lead counsel in a case, you’ve got to learn to work in a team. When you are the lead counsel, you’ve got to learn how to marshal that team, organize everybody, and get everybody working in the right direction. That is an experience that is obviously very relevant to the attorney general’s office. The attorney general himself is not going to be Superman swooping in to solve this case or that case. What the attorney general needs to be is a capable person who is marshaling all the forces of the office.


01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

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Gov. McMaster says no to GHS-Palmetto debt refinancing Public officials express concerns about higher bills, tax liability for county residents Greenville Hospital System and Palmetto Health officials said last week they will continue to review options to try to save some of the $80 million to $100 million in interest that a failed $1.5 billion debt restructuring would have generated. As part of their new partnership, the hospitals had planned to refinance $642 million in GHS bond debt and $850 million in existing debt owed by Palmetto Health. The partnership was finalized in November. The new company under which GHS and Palmetto Health will operate will be one of the 50th largest hospital systems in the nation, and the largest in South Carolina, serving 1.2 million patients a year, earning a projected $3.9 billion in annual net revenue, and covering half the state. While county councils in Richland and Sumter counties voted to support refinancing, the Greenville and Oconee county councils did not. Greenville County Council tabled the request. Most of the debt the new company was refinancing came from outside of Greenville County, and there were fears that Greenville County residents could be stuck with higher bills to pay for it. Gov. Henry McMaster denied a request from the hospitals to approve the refinancing, saying he had concerns about spreading the Palmetto Health bond debt across Greenville and Oconee counties when those county councils did not approve. McMaster also cited a lawsuit filed by members of the Greenville County Legislative Delegation regarding GHS’s governance. Some members of the Greenville County Legislative Delegation filed a lawsuit over GHS’s transformation into two separate nonprofit groups, the Strategic Coordinating Organization (SCO) and the Upstate Affiliate Organization (UAO). The UAO will handle day-today operations of GHS, and the SCO will guide the UAO. The state Supreme

Court refused to take up the matter, but the issue is not entirely settled as the lawsuit is still pending in the Greenville County Court of Common Pleas. GHS is “clearly disappointed” by McMaster’s decision, said spokeswoman Sandy Dees in a statement. “As we’ve said before, taxpayers are absolutely not responsible or liable for repayment of these bonds, and there is no additional debt being incurred,” she said. In a letter dated Dec. 29 to former GHS CEO Mike Riordan and Palmetto Health CEO Charles Beaman Jr., McMaster said that while the refinancing would provide savings, a key purpose is to transfer ownership of the bond debt to the newly formed SC Health Company. “It is apparent that the issues and objections surrounding the restructuring of the GHS and [Palmetto Health] into a single entity, SC Health Company, need to be resolved within the home counties before spreading the responsibility for existing debt,” McMaster said in the letter. “I should not approve refinancing and restructuring bonds that would make county facilities in Greenville and Oconee counties liable for [Palmetto Health] debt when there are strong objections from both the Greenville County Council and the Oconee County Council, as well as pending litigation,” he continued. McMaster said GHS requested in October 2016 the reclassification of current bonds to maintain a tax-exempt status after the GHS board voted to change from a government-run health system to a nonprofit health system. Without reclassification, the bonds would have lost their tax-exempt status and cost GHS $167 million in financing fees, the governor’s letter said. “However, this previous request was different from the current scenario, as the Greenville County Council supported reclassification of the bonds and the debt in question was not spread across a new entity when refinanced. Moreover, the purpose of the current request is to place all debt under the SC Health Company umbrella, creating one unified direction for GHS and [Palmetto Health]. Refinancing half of the debt does not meet this goal and is not necessary to maintain a tax-exempt status,” the governor said. —Cindy Landrum

Education That Lasts a Lifetime

Making and Keeping Healthy Resolutions

Wednesday, January 3 at Noon or Monday, January 8 at 6:00 p.m. Learn how to make realistic resolutions for a healthy new year.

Nicotine Cessation & Management Monday, January 15 at 5:30 p.m.

This introductory class presents the highly successful QuitSmart® program.

Stress Management

Monday, January 22 at 6:00 p.m. Learn techniques for managing everyday stressors and ways to gain a new, healthier perspective.

Pre-Diabetes and Insulin Resistance Tuesday, January 23 at Noon

This class will focus on defining the meaning of prediabetes and insulin resistance, understanding the related health risks, and finding ways to prevent the development of diabetes.

Making Friends with Grief Thursday, January 25 at Noon

Explore some practical ways to “make friends” with your own grief and ways to respond to others who are grieving.

Bon Secours St. Francis Health System offers a variety of complimentary health classes to help you achieve a healthier life. Call 864-400-3651 to register.

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10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

How Did Our Solar System Form?

Clemson has new “Bubble Theory” to explain origins

The solar system is made up of the sun, eight planets, at least 138 moons, comets, asteroids and many space rocks. Rendering by NASA

While scientists have made many impressive discoveries about the universe over the years, they have yet to agree on a single model that explains how the solar system formed. The prevailing theory is that a massive star exploded billions of years ago and compressed a dense cloud of interstellar dust and gas until it collapsed under the force of gravity to form new stars — including our sun. But scientists at the University of Chicago and Clemson University have proposed an alternative theory that suggests the solar system instead formed within the walls of a massive bubble surrounding a Wolf-Rayet star. Wolf-Rayet stars are some of the largest and brightest stars in the universe. Their surfaces burn at incredibly high temperatures and produce large amounts of matter that are ejected into space by intense stellar winds.

When the star begins to shed its mass, the matter combines with the winds to form bubble structures with dense shells. “The shell of such a bubble is a good place to produce stars because dust and gas become trapped inside,” said Nicolas Dauphas, co-author of a study describing the new theory and professor of geophysical sciences at the University of Chicago. The researchers estimate that between 1 and 16 percent of all sun-like stars could have formed as a result of a Wolf-Rayet star. Their theory is based on the fact that two radioactive isotopes in the early solar system occurred in unusual proportions. Scientists sample meteorites for radioactive isotopes (unstable, energized atoms that decay over time) to help determine the conditions under which the solar system formed. Most samples contain large amounts of aluminum-26 and iron-60, radioactive isotopes that originate from a stellar explosion. That’s why many scientists believe a supernova, or stellar explosion, is responsible for the formation of the solar system. In 2012, however, Dauphas and his team of researchers tested several meteorites and found lower levels of iron-60. To explain the discrepancy, they set out to determine how a supernova could eject one isotope and not the other. The researchers ultimately concluded that Wolf-Rayet stars are the perfect trigger for our solar system’s formation,

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because they distribute large amounts of aluminum-26 but very little iron-60 when they begin to shed their mass. Bradley Meyer, professor of astronomy and physics at Clemson, and graduate student Michael Bojazi contributed results from their model of galaxy evolution to the new theory, which was published in the Astrophysical Journal on Dec. 22. “Past observations have shown star formation to occur near the edge of Wolf-Rayet wind bubbles and past theories abound concerning the mixing of aluminum-26 from the winds of Wolf-Rayet stars into the dense shell of Wolf-Rayet bubbles, but these theories lack sufficient details,” Bojazi said. “It was a matter of imagination for creating the right scenario and then hashing out the details to determine the theory’s plausibility.” Bojazi’s dissertation work aims to fill out the origin of the sun by extending the study of iron-60 and aluminum-26 to roughly 10 other radioisotopes that were present in the early solar system. As for the fate of the Wolf-Rayet star that led to our solar system’s formation, the researchers believe that its life ended long ago when it either collapsed into a black hole or exploded as a supernova. A collapse to a black hole would have produced low levels of iron-60; if it were a supernova, the iron-60 may not have penetrated the bubble walls or was distributed unequally as it was flung into space by stellar winds. —Andrew Moore


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Will Crooks / Greenville Journal

Lake Conestee Nature Park wins national environmental award Lake Conestee Nature Park has been awarded a 2017 Phoenix Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for excellence in brownfield redevelopment. The award was created in 1997 to honor individuals and groups who are working to solve the critical environmental challenge of transforming blighted and contaminated areas into productive new uses, according

to a press release. Phoenix Award winners represent projects from each of the 10 EPA regions, as well as projects that have a special community impact. Lake Conestee Nature Park was chosen as the winner for Region 4, which includes the Southeastern states of Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM Carolina, and Tennessee. The winning projects were honored last month during a ceremony at the National Brownfields Training Conference in Pittsburgh. Organizers also named the winner of the national Phoenix Award. Lake Conestee Nature Park was named first runner-up. “The recognition that we’ve achieved with these awards is unprecedented, because a nonprofit has never pulled off something like this,” said Dave Hargett, executive director of the Conestee Foundation. “We took an extremely blighted property that nobody wanted and transformed it into a community asset.” Lake Conestee is one of 450,000 areas in the country classified as a brownfield site by the EPA, meaning redevelopment or reuse is “complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.” Hargett said the lake, which is located along the Reedy River near Mauldin, holds more than 2 million tons of sediment that’s been polluted with heavy metals like arsenic, pesticides, and cancer-causing chemical compounds. The toxins are thought to have been discharged from the textile mills, coal plants, and dyeing operations that were

once located along the Reedy River. The toxins eventually mixed with the river’s sediment and flowed upstream to Lake Conestee. In 1998, Hargett and other conservationists launched the Conestee Foundation to acquire and rehabilitate Lake Conestee into a public green space. Using proceeds from the settlement of the Colonial Pipeline oil spill in 1996, the foundation purchased the lake and its dam in 2000. It also signed a “voluntary cleanup contract” with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control to improve the area. Today, Lake Conestee Nature Park boasts 402 acres of open space, 12 miles of trails and boardwalks, and 207 species of birds. About 100,000 people visit the park on a yearly basis to watch birds, run, and enjoy other outdoor activities, according to Hargett. The park has also become a venue for environmental education. More than 3,000 students visit the park every year to learn about nature via “learning stations” that are spread throughout the area. Students from Furman and Clemson universities also use the park to conduct studies in topics such as environmental toxicology. —Andrew Moore

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GHS asks DHEC board to reconsider application for new psychiatric hospital

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DHEC cites impact on medically underserved groups, other providers in denial Greenville Health System has asked the state Department of Health and Environmental Control board to reconsider the agency’s decision to deny a certificate of need for a new psychiatric hospital. GHS announced plans in November 2016 for a new 120-bed psychiatric hospital on the site of the old Blood Connection building. The facility was to replace Marshal I. Pickens Hospital and be built in partnership with Acadia Healthcare, a national health care giant that has 579 facilities in 39 states, the United Kingdom, and Puerto Rico. Acadia would manage the day-to-day operations of the hospital, while GHS would provide clinical oversight. But the certificate of need application drew opposition from those concerned the move could further strain a state system that already struggles to provide timely access to inpatient psychiatric care to some adults. Because the new facility would be a freestanding hospital, it would be unable to bill Medicaid for any care provided to eligible adult patients between the ages of 22 and 64. Currently, Marshall Pickens may bill Medicaid for treatment of eligible adults because it is part of the Greenville Health System. GHS had said the new hospital would provide inpatient and outpatient services to adult Medicaid patients even though it won’t receive reimbursement for those services. State mental health hospitals have had significant decreases in the number of adult inpatient psychiatric beds over the past 18 years, although the number of beds has been stable for several years, said Mark W. Binkley, deputy director of the division of administrative services at the state Department of Mental Health, in a letter to Louis Eubank, director of DHEC’s certificate of need program. At the same time, the state’s population has continued to increase. “As a result, the problem of timely access to adult inpatient psychiatric care has become a significant problem in some areas of the state,” Binkley wrote. While the Department of Mental Health supports efforts to increase the number of available adult psychiatric hospital beds, Binkley said in his letter that transferring existing

licensed beds from Marshall Pickens to the new hospital would increase demand for state beds when the system already is unable to timely admit referred patients. State Reps. Garry Smith, Mike Burns, and Dwight Loftis and state Sen. Tom Corbin also wrote a letter voicing the same concerns. In addition, Springbrook Behavioral Health and the Carolina Center for Behavioral Health, psychiatric hospitals in Greenville County, said the new hospital would unnecessarily duplicate their services because they both rely on Marshall Pickens’ ability to accept adult Medicaid patients that they cannot. DHEC denied the application because it determined that medically underserved groups could lose access to psychiatric care and that other providers in the area could be adversely impacted by the new hospital. GHS said it believed DHEC’s decision was “made in error.” “We hope that DHEC will allow us to proceed with this innovative plan, which will allow GHS, as part of a joint-venture partnership with Acadia Healthcare, to actually expand much-needed behavioral health services in our area,” said GHS spokeswoman Sandy Dees. “Under the projections for the new partnered hospital, services provided to adult Medicaid patients were expected to increase over what GHS could currently provide by itself.” “The state of mental health in the Upstate is at a crossroads. It will take innovative partnerships like the one we have developed with Acadia to meaningfully address the serious mental health needs of our community. We hope and believe that the DHEC board will agree that our plan is a good, solid one and grants us the approval to start building this new hospital,” she said. If the DHEC board chooses to hear the appeal, Grove Point and DHEC staff will present their case in an upcoming board meeting, said Tim Kelly, DHEC director of media relations. If it chooses not to hear the appeal, Grove Point could move for a contested case hearing in the Administrative Law Court, he said. —Cindy Landrum


01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

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ADVENTURE TIME With their expansion, Will and Kim Rutherford of Escape Artist Greenville hope to draw a new customer base: local businesses WORDS BY SARA PEARCE

W

ill and Kim Rutherford did not originally set out to open Escape Artist Greenville. Their shared love of the creative and theatrical was more of a hobby that quietly began taking over most of their free time, and when they realized that their respective backgrounds had set them up for success in creating a top-notch escape room experience, they gave it a shot. Constructing a haunted house within their home sparked an initial interest in escape rooms, Will says. “We did this crazy haunted house for like 10 years through our house and garage, and we spent three months setting this stuff up; we even had 12 actors. People suggested we should charge for it. But then we’d have to tear it down on Nov. 1, which was a real bummer.” As an offshoot of their original haunted house idea, the pair began exploring the possibility of opening an escape room. Will’s background in engineering paired with Kim’s past experience in design work was the perfect storm to create Escape Artist Greenville. Will defines an escape room as “an interactive adventure you get to play with your friends and family. The success is determined on how well you do. You’re going to unlock secret codes, compartments, and doors, and you’re going to have to work together to meet a certain objective.” He adds that the two prefer to call their experience “escape adventures” because of the multi-room aspect of the challenges. The success of Escape Artist Greenville led the Rutherfords to seek expansion, and they have now relocated to a

Will Crooks / Greenville Journal

building at 209 E. Stone Ave., which is five times the size of their previous space. The building has the capacity for five or six escape adventures, with three — Dr. Fratelli’s Cabin, The Fallout, and The Inventor’s Enigma — currently up and running. “Just like anything creative, you get on a roll and then you get stuck on something that’s just not working,” Will says of the process involved in creating the rooms. “It takes months and starts with a simple, fun idea, like The Fallout, and having the two teams duel, and then we bounce ideas off each other to create certain emotions, like pure competition or adventure and mystery.” Every room has a variety of different puzzles, and they are built into the most ordinary aspects of the room. “There is nothing readily apparent until you start moving things around and exploring the room,” Will says. Each puzzle type encourages different kinds of interaction between players. Some are communication puzzles, encouraging verbal collaboration; some are physical puzzles; and others are a mix of both. “The most challenging aspect is that we have hundreds, even thousands of people coming through here, and people come up with the craziest ways to solve a puzzle. You can’t prepare for that,” Will says. “This is why the testing phase is really important to see how different people solve the problems.” For Will and Kim, the most exciting aspect of the expansion is the potential to add themed rooms that are unlike their current offerings. “Our most commonly

asked question is, ‘Are they scary?’” Will says. “And the answer is no, not at all. But eventually we hope to add a horror room, since we have a background in that, and also a room that is pure comedy, like escaping your aunt’s boring dinner party.” In addition to the entertainment they provide for groups of friends and families, Will and Kim have discovered that Escape Artist Greenville draws a surprising amount of attention from businesses. “Escape rooms are a huge draw for corporate meetings. It is excellent for all kinds of corporate groups who are looking for something that is fun and away from work, that can still be branded as team building,” Will says. “Where else can you get your team together working on something for an hour that is fun, that you can either accomplish or not and then learn lessons from that? It’s hard to find anywhere else.” Escape adventures, while being disguised as a fun activity, tap into communication and teamwork skills. “You will learn a lot about the people you work with,” Will says. Branding Escape Artist Greenville as a unique instrument for corporate team building has been a key part of the Rutherfords’ success, and later this year, they plan to open an event and meeting room to continue to draw local businesses. “It will be for birthday parties or anything like that, but also many corporate groups want to meet after they do a room and discuss some of the things they learned, and this will be a great opportunity for them to do this,” Will says.


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FOLLOWING IN THE FOOTSTEPS

Rainbow PUSH Greenville aims to put the words and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. into action SARA PEARCE | STAFF

spearce@communityjournals.com

Originally founded in 1996 by Rev. Jesse Jackson as a merger between the National Rainbow Coalition and Operation PUSH, the Greenville chapter of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition was organized in the Upstate in 2003. The group’s first major undertaking was to ensure that Martin Luther King Jr. Day was observed as a holiday in Greenville County, an effort that was realized in 2006. Today, Rainbow PUSH Greenville holds an annual King Legacy Week, which includes a series of activities and events surrounding King’s life, work, and ideology. The 2018 King Legacy Week includes four main events that seek to bring positive changes to the Greenville community and encourage dialogue and involvement. The first event is the historically black college and university (HBCU) STEM Fair on Saturday, Jan. 13, which will give students an opportunity to connect with admissions representatives from 15 HBCUs and hear about higher education opportunities, particularly in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. There will also be presentations about internship and job opportunities that do not require four-year college degrees. Children in 4K through eighth grade are invited to attend the PUSHTECH2020 Hack-A-Thon on Monday, Jan. 15, which encourages young students to be engaged in technology and education through technology. Representatives from the Sylvan Learning Center will guide students in various computer games and coding activities. PUSHTECH2020 “aims to help bridge the digital divide between the majority and minority communities to help engage children in science and technology in a fun way,” says Davida Mathis, chairwoman of Rainbow PUSH Greenville. The Gospel of Social Justice Town Hall meeting will take place during the weekly Wednesday service at Long Branch

Baptist Church on Jan. 17. This event aims to discuss the role of the church in social justice. Mathis explains, “We forget that Dr. King was first a preacher, and the other six days a week, he was working toward social justice. The Gospel of Social Justice aims to address what’s in the news right now and how the church can help some situations.” Topics to be covered include economic empowerment, police brutality, criminal justice reform, voter registration, and education, according to a press release. “The church needs to be thinking about social justice, and this event promotes that,” Mathis says, adding that there is disconnect between the #blacklivesmatter generation and her own because of a lack of communication, when in reality the issues are the same. The Gospel of Social Justice, she says, hopes to reopen that dialogue. The week will conclude with the 2018 King Legacy Gala on Jan. 20, with all proceeds going toward keeping the other Legacy Week events free of charge and open to the public. Mignon Clyburn, a commissioner at the Federal Communications Commission and daughter of Rep. Jim Clyburn, will be the gala’s keynote speaker. Eustace Bennett, the first African-American police officer in the Greenville Police Department, and Asha Marie, a student who led the movement to rename Wade Hampton High School, will be recognized as Profiles in Courage honorees. Through the 2018 King Legacy Week, organizers hope to not only commemorate and continue the work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. but also promote community involvement and discourse about his teachings. “The overall goal for celebrating Dr. King is that we believe he was a visionary,” Mathis says. “We know that he had a deep love of God and the community, and that he was a highly educated and prepared person, but he used that great love, education, and mind that he had in service to the community through activism. So we say that love, education, and activism are our goals that we want to work toward through his example.”

2018 KING LEGACY WEEK HBCU STEM Fair Jan. 13, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Bethlehem Baptist Church Family Life Center, 4 Harrison Bridge Road, Simpsonville. Free admission PUSHTECH2020 Jan. 15, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., West End Community Development Center, 404 Vardry St. Free admission The Gospel of Social Justice Town Hall Jan. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Long Branch Baptist Church, 28 Bolt St. Free admission 2018 King Legacy Gala Jan. 20, 6-9 p.m., Embassy Suites Golf Resort and Convention Center, 670 Verdae Blvd. $60/person For more information, visit rainbowpushgreenville.org.


01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

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Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings SOCIAL SERVICES

NONPROFIT

Center for Developmental Services completes lobby renovation

The Blood Connection announces increased need for blood donors

The Center for Developmental Services (CDS) has completed the renovation of their lobby, which is their first major renovation since opening 17 years ago. Some of the new features include a transportation theme with large wooden cars, a mural of the Blue Ridge Mountains, a separate waiting area for medically fragile children, and a lowsensory waiting area for patients who need less stimulation. The design was created by DP3 Architects, and construction was supervised by Creative Builders.

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The Blood Connection, a nonprofit community blood center that serves an 18,280-square-mile area of South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina, is urging blood donors to give blood to ensure that hospital need remains uninterrupted. According to a press release, “unusually cold temperatures,” including historic snowfall along the South Carolina coast, and widespread illness are “affecting turn out and blood donations.” The Blood Connection holds between 12 and 14 blood drives each day. The Blood Connection is in need of all blood types, and both whole blood and platelet donations will be accepted. In Greenville, donors can visit the organization’s donation center at 435 Woodruff Road. Other locations to give can be found via donate.thebloodconnection.org/donor/ schedules/geo. PHILANTHROPY

SYNNEX Share the Magic presents checks to four Upstate charities SYNNEX Share the Magic, a charitable fundraising initiative created in 2011, announced that more than $1.8M was raised in 2017 for four Upstate children’s charities. This is the most significant fundraising total that the initiative has achieved in its seven years. The beneficiaries of this year’s fundraising include A Child’s Haven, Clement’s Kindness, Make-A-Wish South Carolina, and Pendleton Place. SYNNEX Share the Magic was created in 2011 by Peter Larocque, the president of North American technology solutions for SYNNEX Corporation. SYNNEX Share the Magic has raised more than $8.5M over the past seven years for Upstate children. Some of the community events in 2017 included SYNNEX Share the Magic Day at the Greenville Drive, Comedy for Cause at the Greenville Comedy Zone, and

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OBITUARIES & MEMORIALS Glenn Patrick Sawicki GREER – Glenn Patrick Sawicki, 52, of Greer, passed away Jan. 1, 2018. He was the son of John and Rose Sawicki of Pittsburgh. Glenn was well-known in the Greenville community as the owner of Saffron’s. He was a true humanitarian who supported many local organizations including Centre Stage and the Warehouse Theatre, where he served as a board member for both theaters for many years. Saffron’s sponsored the Warehouse Gala and every preview night since 2012. Glenn’s personal generosity raised thousands of dollars over the years for the Warehouse Theatre, Centre Stage, the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, and The Children’s Museum of the Upstate. Glenn graduated from the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. Before his culinary career, Glenn was a firefighter and served two years as president of the Bower Hill Volunteer Fire Department. He became an Eagle Scout with his brother, Gary, in 1980 in Troop 834, and he also served as assistant scoutmaster. In addition to his parents, John and Rose, Glenn is survived by his sister, Donna Besz (Keith); his twin brother, Gary Sawicki; his niece, Nicole Besz; his nephew, Justin Besz; his aunt, Agnes Makitka; and many loving cousins and devoted friends. A funeral mass was held Friday, Jan. 5, at Prince of Peace Catholic Church, 1209 Brushy Creek Road, Taylors. Memorials may be made to the charity of your choice. An online guest registry can be found at MackeyMortuary.com.

DEATH NOTICES FOR JAN. 6-7 NAME Wells, Thomas Karl Freeman, Adline (Judy) Hendricks Jr., Leon A. (Lynn) Renner, Richard John (Dick) Moon, Michael Rodgers, Wilma Carlene McCombs Berrio, Elkin De Jesus Carragan, Veneriece Vivian Welch (Vennie) Roberts, Charlotte Alexander, Karen Schultz Curd, Mary Hicks Davis, Joyce Christine Greene Jr., Ernest Lonzo Hendricks Jr., Leon A. (Lynn) Hill, Eunice M.

AGE 53 83 74 61 85 78 94 91 71 84 85 62 83 93

Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

the SYNNEX Annual Charity Golf Tournament. SYNNEX Share the Magic was also a beneficiary of Greenville High Spirit Week, the Bill Haas Charity Classic, and the BMW Charity Pro-Am. DONATION

Countybank makes donation in memory of Kip Burrell Countybank has donated to the Anderson County Sherriff’s Department to support their future search and rescue equipment purchases. A dedication ceremony was held on Dec. 17, and a check was presented in honor of the late Kip Burrell. The check was presented in honor of Burrell because the Anderson County Sherriff’s Department was instrumental in finding his body after he went missing. Burrell was thrown from his boat during a storm in Lake Hartwell, and the search for him lasted nearly two months. Attendees of the ceremony included Ken Harper, Stacey Burrell, and Shannon Lusk of Countybank, Sherriff Chad McBride, emergency management director Lt. David Baker, support and special operations Capt. Darrell Hill, and other representatives from the Sherriff’s Department and Emergency Services.

TOWN

DEATH DATE

ARTS & CULTURE

Simpsonville Greenville Greenville Greenville Fountain Inn Taylors Piedmont Greer Greer Greenville Greenville Greenville Greenville Greenville Greenville

Jan 6, 2018 Jan 6, 2018 Jan 6, 2018 Jan 6, 2018 Jan 6, 2018 Jan 7, 2018 Jan 7, 2018 Jan 7, 2018 Jan 7, 2018 Jan 7, 2018 Jan 7, 2018 Jan 7, 2018 Jan 7, 2018 Jan 7, 2018 Jan 7, 2018

Local museum CEO to serve as national judge

For a complete listing of obituaries and memorials, please visit us online at legacy.com/obituaries/greenvillejournal.

A Lasting Legacy | Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com The Greenville Journal is pleased to announce the addition of obituaries to our weekly print publication. Online obituaries and memorials will be shared on our website via a Legacy.com affiliation. Obituaries can be placed in person at our office located at 581 Perry Ave., Greenville; via email at obits@communityjournals.com; or our website, GreenvilleJournal.com. Feel free to email or visit for more information about deadlines, space restraints, and editorial requirements.

Dana Thorpe, chief executive officer of the Upcountry History Museum at Furman University, a Smithsonian Affiliate, has been selected by the Costume Society of America to serve as a judge for the 44th Annual Meeting and National Symposium’s Innovative Showcase Design Exhibition in March. This event celebrates the study of dress in order to support wider communities of learning, research, and creative exploration. This year’s symposium will focus on the “making” aspects of projects, production, and design. Individuals submitted a variety of creative textile work under the heading of “Making Connections: Manufacturing Knowledge through Dress Studies.” Thorpe has over 30 years of experience in the museum profession and has served in key leadership and director positions at the Association of Children’s Museums, the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, and the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland, among others. EDUCATION

Crawford Strategy honors Greenville Tech student with annual scholarship Crawford Strategy awarded its third annual Sandy Linning Scholarship to Hunter McAbee, a Greenville Technical College student pursuing a marketing degree. McAbee will graduate from Greenville Tech in spring 2018 and currently works full-time for Chick-fil-A. She is a volunteer dance instructor for children who cannot afford the cost of classes on their own. She also volunteers in multiple capacities, from church marketing promotions to summer camps and nurseries. This is the third year of the annual scholarship, which was established by Crawford Strategy in 2015 to honor Sandy Linning, a strategic advisor and lifelong friend of company founder Marion Crawford. The scholarship is awarded annually to a communications student who receives a faculty recommendation and meets the requirements of eligibility.

Submit community news items to news@greenvillejournal.com.


01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

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A beautiful custom home to be built by Arthur Rutenberg Homes in the wonderful Acadia community! You may choose from a variety of plans and elevations available. The neighborhood features miles of frontage on the Saluda River and wonderful natural amenities such as green spaces, walking trails, the river and lots of wildlife. Acadia also offers an athletic field, pool, tennis courts, fitness center, covered pavilion with gas grills, and a neighborhood garden. Not to mention the “River House” with kayaks and canoes for rent. Don’t miss your chance at this great corner lot in The Village, walking distance to all amenities! Acadia is a truly beautiful and serene community located only minutes from Downtown Greenville!

864.430.6602 “Valerie Miller Properties is proud to welcome Annie Langston and Realtor Chris Drewer to their growing and dynamic team. Valerie Miller Properties began at The Marchant Company 14 years ago and has closed out their most successful year in real estate with sales in excess of $22 Million in 2017. It is the team’s privilege and pleasure to be the trusted advisors for their wonderful clients.”

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20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

On the market Cleveland Place • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Crossword puzzle: page 38

Sudoku puzzle: page 38

Why pay MORE to get LESS?

E North Street Area • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

14 Landsdown Avenue · $489,000 · MLS# 1358538

728 Richbourg Road · $315,000 · MLS# 1356910

3BR/3BA Beautiful townhome in private neighborhood. The perfect choice if downsizing! Master suite on main. Traditional floorplan. Attached 2-car garage. From Downtown, left on Cleveland off McDaniel. Right on Landsdown.

4BR/3BA Meticulously maintained-newer construction 4-bedroom, 3-bathroom + bonus+ 2 car attached garage just minutes from Downtown Greenville! Private one acre lot! E North St to Richbourg Rd.

Contact: Laura McDonald 640-1929 Wilson Associates

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner REALTORS

Fairview Meadow • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Autumn Trace • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

I manage your properties like I manage my own. No-nonsense full-service flat-fee management starting at $39/mo. Text us right now at (864) 477-9693 Or call (864) 475-1234

202 Blue Sage Place · $244,747 · MLS# 1357692

701 Kingsmoor Drive · $234,750 · MLS# 1358515

5BR/3.5BA The most desirable floor plan with the master on the main, huge bonus with full bath, plus a great location! Fairview Road, pass Target, right on Blue Sage into Subdivision.

5BR/3BA Location, Open Floor Plan, Huge Rooms, Great Schools, and Outdoor Living - This home checks all the boxes! Must see! Hwy 14 to PollardRoad. Left into Subdivision

Contact: Joan Rapp 901-3839 The Marchant Company

Contact: Ashley Steigerwald 907-0601 Wilson Associates

Advertise your home with us

Kelli Catena, Managing Partner

Contact:

CarolinaM M ves

Caroline Spivey | 864-679-1229 cspivey@communityjournals.com

Smar t Proper ty Management.

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info@carolinamoves.com

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GREENVILLEMOVES.COM


01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Dec. 1 – 15 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$5,400,000 $2,700,000 $926,250 $850,576 CLEVELAND TERRACE $800,000 $700,000 HAMPTON CENTRE $620,000 121 RHETT STREET $600,054 $585,000 LANNEAU DRIVE HIGHLANDS $570,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $557,000 MCBEE BOOKEND $510,000 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $500,000 STONEWOOD MANOR $487,966 FOREST HEIGHTS $484,000 KANATENAH $460,750 121 RHETT STREET $418,000 PARK HILL $418,000 WESTHAVEN $407,540 SILVER MEADOWS $402,000 WOODBERRY $400,000 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $384,467 BRIARWOOD MEADOWS $366,753 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $366,025 $365,000 ROLLINGWOOD $360,000 TUSCANY FALLS $350,000 WALNUT RIDGE $347,617 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $345,000 SHADOWOOD $345,000 SUMMIT AT CHEROKEE VALLEY $343,516 THE VILLAS @ OAK GROVE $339,990 BOTANY WOODS $335,000 $334,900 LINKSIDE $332,500 THE VILLAGE AT FOUNTAIN INN $331,149 COPPER CREEK $330,731 VERDMONT $330,000 VERDMONT $330,000 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH $322,870 STONEHAVEN $315,000 LOST RIVER $311,900 BRIAR OAKS $310,980 LAKEVIEW FARMS $310,000 HIGHLAND CREEK $308,000 CARRONBRIDGE $307,900 EASTON RIDGE $307,816 LONGLEAF $304,419 SILVERLEAF $302,500 RESERVE AT ASHETON LAKES $301,000 SUGAR CREEK $300,000 $299,000 $298,428 BELLE TERRACE ACRES $295,000 ABBEYHILL PARK $295,000 SPARTAN PLACE $295,000 PELHAM CREEK $294,900 LIPSCOMBE ESTATES $289,000 FLAGSTONE VILLAGE $288,000 THE VILLAGE AT FOUNTAIN INN $283,595 GARDENS AT ROSE RESERVE $282,000 HARTWOOD LAKE $280,440 BRUSHY MEADOWS $278,900 $277,500

ARE HOLDINGS LLC DCHG INVESTMENTS LLC PUTMAN & PUTMAN LLC ALEXRULES LLC CARTER JAMES E HARRISON LESLIE W WESTCHESTER SOUTH INVEST 121 RHETT STREET HOLDING SMYTHE WILLIAM T DH REPOP LLC MERTINS DIANNE C (JTWROS DIPRIMA JOESPH MUELLERS JAN-HINNERK MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH DRAKE DANIEL A (JTWROS) TROYER RYAN LEE (JTWROS) 121 RHETT STREET HOLDING CAIRNS MARY FRANCES D R HORTON-CROWN LLC OWENS CALIN L (JTWROS) LAWS ROBERT HOWARD ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L NVR INC RIVERA RAMON J (JTWROS) SCOGGINS ROBERT L MIDKIFF MARK J (JTWROS) ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC APPLEGREN CHRISTINE (JTW PADULA REBECCA A DEVORO HOMES LLC D R HORTON INC COOK FAMILY LIVING TRUST SUMMERALL JEANNIE MCNUTT MARY ANN NVR INC MUNGO HOMES INC HOVANEC PAUL A (JTWROS) CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA NVR INC SPEER DREW V MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH NVR INC DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC LENTZ DANIEL K (JTWROS) NVR INC MUNGO HOMES INC D R HORTON INC DONZE DAIN MOORS JANET CANTLEY JAMES A (JTWROS) DEZEN ANDREW C RSM FARM LLC PENNY HAUS LLC DILL GAIL G DOWDS MICHAEL D WOLFE STEPHEN W MJM PROPERTIES & DEVELOP EACHUS REVOCABLE TRUST NVR INC OGULEWICZ CYNTHIA J D R HORTON-CROWN LLC SAFERIGHT DARRIN TAD COLEMAN JERRY (JTWROS)

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

844 S E MAIN LLC GODLEY FRED D COMMUNITYWORKS CHARLES A BERRY LIMITED J & W HOLDINGS LLC ALEKSINAS ABIGAIL M (JTW GRIF-KO APARTMENTS INC SHERMAN JOEL S (JTWROS) TAYLOR BRYAN P (JTWROS) HAMILTON MICHAEL M (JTWR DIXON KAITLIN (JTWROS) DIBELLA ROBERT J REVOC T HOLOHAN MARY RUZICKA KOURTNIE FITZGER SCARPA PAUL E (JTWROS) LOVELESS C RYAN (JTWROS) OWENS WILLIAM RILEY BOUKNIGHT MENDAL A JR COPE ANTHONY J (JTWROS) LEWIS TERI P FLETCHER MICHAEL T (JTWR BRACHT FREDERICK W (JTWR DILUZIO RICHARD TRUST TAN CHONG LEONG (JTWROS) GREGORY TYLER MACK (JTWR MARTIN EARL W JR (JTWROS ROSS KYLE NOEL (JTWROS) ARABEA ELLEN V BERGERON RICHARD KAHR CHRISTOPH J GORMAN ANN E (JTWROS) MCKINNEY DANIEL N LIVING COOK JACKSON B (JTWROS) LYNCH JOHN A (JTWROS) BROWN DANIEL J (JTWROS) NICHOLS PATRICIA (JTWROS SANNITI GABRIELLE M (JTW CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA VANUFFELEN JEFFREY J ALEXANDER RENEE A (JTWRO NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO WATSON BRENDA K (JTWROS) SEMON SANAA (JTWROS) SAXTON MATTHEW (JTWROS) HERTZBERG JENNIFER N (JT YUAN YE STUCK ANNETTE SIMMONS BARBARA JONES GINA E (JTWROS) AHMED PAUL O CURTIS JACKSON R CHANCE METRO PROPERTIES PULCINI JOHN M (JTWROS) KALINA ANDRIA D THOMAS LISA WILLIAMS AMANDA M (JTWRO DYE LANE WELLS KOWALIK CHRIS A (JTWROS) ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L WILLIAMS TRACY O’DELL DUQUETTE ANDREA M (JTWRO EPPS COURTNEY WEST INABINET WILLIE R JR LOMAX TAX AND FINANCIAL

36 DOGWOOD LN 20940 BETHELWOOD LN 100 W ANTRIM DR 11111 CARMEL COMMONS BLVD #207 1421 AUGUSTA ST 316 BYRD BLVD 2607 WOODRUFF RD STE E 121 RHETT ST UNIT 2017 205 TOMASSEE AVE 24 PONCE DE LEON DR 101 LEGENDS WAY 111 E MCBEE AVE #203 702 BENNETT ST UNIT D 509 MARSTELLAR LN 755 N MAIN ST 25 OREGON ST 121 RHETT ST 123 CONESTEE AVE 326 MANSFIELD LN 328 BROWN FARM WAY 1 WOODBERRY DR 621 PONDEN DR 14 THORNBRIAR CT 23 VERLIN DR 443 REEDY FORK RD 204 CLUB DR 209 TUSCANY FALLS DR 512 AUTUMN WILDS CT 515 FULTON CT 100 SHADOWOOD DR 136 CLUB CART RD 6 OCONELL CT 9 BOTANY RD 461 KEELER MILL RD 103 SNEED DR 119 VILLAGE VISTA DR 133 LEIGH CREEK DR 40 APPLE RIDGE RD 102 LISMORE ST 238 ROCKY SLOPE RD 2707 N 118TH ST 415 WINDWOOD ST 204 LIMBERLOCK WAY 607 TUGALOO RD 201 DUNROBIN LN 5 CARRONBRIDGE WAY 115 EASTON MEADOW WAY 208 REDMONT CT 17 CROSSWINDS WAY 818 ASHETON COMMONS LN 402 HUNTING HILL CIR 411 RIVER ST APT 402 603 STONE RIDGE RD 410 LAKE EL JEMA DR 625 HEATHERCREST CT 535 MAVERICK CIR 208 SUN GARDEN CT 120 RIVER ST 1479 MOUNT LEBANON RD 408 FRONT PORCH DR 304 TINEKE WAY 417 GRAYPOINTE DR 204 BRUSHY MEADOWS DR 416 REVIS CREEK CT

HAWTHORNE RIDGE $274,617 LONGLEAF $271,924 SILVERLEAF $270,000 PELHAM FALLS $267,500 COVENTRY $265,966 CAROLINA SPRINGS $263,900 OAKS AT GILDER CREEK FARM $259,000 LONGLEAF $256,162 PEBBLECREEK $255,400 PLEASANT MEADOWS $255,356 WELLINGTON GREEN $255,000 THE VILLAGE AT FOUNTAIN INN $252,500 RIDGECREEK ESTATES $250,000 CLIFFS@MOUNTAIN PARK WESTVIEW $250,000 MOSS CREEK $249,000 RUNION ESTATES $248,563 KELSEY GLEN $247,500 HARTWOOD LAKE $242,990 WINDSOR CREEK $240,400 BROOKFIELD WEST $240,000 $238,500 WHITE PINES COTTAGES $237,200 QUAIL RUN $236,000 THE ENCLAVE AT LISMORE $235,394 RICELAN SPRINGS $232,000 AUTUMN TRACE $231,000 UNIVERSITY PARK $230,000 $230,000 $229,467 $225,000 SWANSGATE $225,000 HERITAGE CREEK $224,500 FOWLER CHASE $221,525 $220,607 ORCHARD FARMS BAKER’S GARDEN $219,900 ORCHARD CREST $219,400 KINGSFIELD $218,758 SEVEN OAKS@BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION $217,556 $216,000 PLANTERS ROW $216,000 $216,000 EDGEBROOK $214,900 VISTA HILLS $210,000 LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON $207,000 $205,000 $205,000 FOX TRACE $202,000 EDGEBROOK $201,212 WATERTON $200,000 WYNDHAM PLACE $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 ORCHARD FARMS $200,000 LEDFORD LANDING $197,000 FOXWOOD $197,000 WESTCLIFFE $195,000 RIVER MIST $195,000 ALLEN WEST $193,286 REVIS FALLS $193,000 WINDSOR FOREST $191,900 $190,130 THE GROVE $190,000 FAIRVIEW MEADOWS $189,000 FERNCREEK $187,000

PRICE SELLER MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN D R HORTON INC JONES GINA E (JTWROS) SEXTON ANDREW C DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL GARRETT REALTY INVESTMEN KERSBERGEN DANIEL T (JTW MARK III PROPERTIES INC JOHNSON CLAY M (JTWROS) MCGEE PROPERTIES OF GREE ERTTER JASON CHRISTOPHER NVR INC HAYES EDWARD JORDAN (JTW SCHNEIDER MARTA TUMBLIN ALISON DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL SERNA DONNA J REVOCABLE D R HORTON-CROWN LLC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL HORTON PATRICK W (JTWROS 00926-08 ROTH IRA BRICKER CHESTER A GENTRY KENNETH L JR TRUS EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL WEIRICK JOHN M (JTWROS) RAMIREZ CARLOS F COMFORT OAKS LLC ARIAIL J STEADMAN FOWLER EDNA M LINDLEY WILLIAM B PLUMMER-VANCE PROPERTIES CANTRELL AMANDA C SK BUILDERS INC AMBRIA PROPERTIES LLC SIMONS RITA J ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L SK BUILDERS INC SK BUILDERS INC DARRINGTON LLOYD NOLAN FOTI DEBRA A HENNESSY THOMAS F (JTWRO SK BUILDERS INC WILSON SARA E BISHOP BRIAN R (JTWROS) JORKEN LLC ARROWOOD JOHN D KIDDLE ROBERT F (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC HUFF ARTHUR L GOSNELL DAVID S STYLES CARRIE W WICKLINE CHARLES R (JTWR SCHROEDER DANIEL C ARGONAUT REALTY LLC HOFFMAN ERIN K (JTWROS) WRIGHT BONNY W NICHOLS MASON ANDREW SK BUILDERS INC HAYDEN WANDA J BAYNE AARON HEATH DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC HUCKER KATIE WALKOS HARRIET C SPITLER NATHANIEL C

BUYER

ADDRESS

PICONE AMY (JTWROS) GUTIERREZ CHRISTOPHER J TORRES LENYN E (JTWROS) BROADWELL MEGAN PAPPS (J HOWLE MURI L (JTWROS) GALIOS KEITH K (JTWROS) CEASAR ADRICK D (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC ELROD DAVID WALKER (JTWR PACHECO DEIBY J (JTWROS) LATHAM ANALEISA D (JTWRO HENDERSON ALICIA (JTWROS EACHUS REVOCABLE TRUST REES PATRICIA A HORN BRENNA SHAE (JTWROS RANDOLPH ABIGAIL LEE HAMILTON JOY B BARBATO ALICE D (JTWROS) KEMPF ADAIR (JTWROS) KALLSTROM TARA DAWN-MARI CLOUD CHRISTOPHER DAVID BAGHERI CYRUS (JTWROS) BRICKER CHESTER A II (JT SHU LINA PULS JASON RICHARD BAGGESEN MEG L (JTWROS) BURRIS ADRIENNE K 10 ABERDEEN DRIVE LLC KAY CHARLES W III PONDER WILLIAM TODD WATERS BETTE K REAVES NATHAN LAMAR BOYKINS LOLITA D NIX BRANDON J WILLIAMS ROBERT H HERNANDEZ JOSE L (JTWROS TAGUE TERRY S (JTWROS) SPEICHER ALYSSA K (JTWRO HENNESSY THOMAS F (JTWRO VALLE ADRIAN FLORES (JTW HENNESSY SUSAN L (JTWROS HARVEY JENNILYNN (JTWROS TAYLOR EMILY LOUISE (JTW CRUZ SORY M FLORENTINO D BURTON CATHERINE BERESHEIM ERIC B (JTWROS DAI HONG BAGWELL TRAVIS S BERG JULIA (JTWROS) LUX ANN CATHERINE (JTWRO MARTIN GERALD R (JTWROS) BAYNE AARON (JTWROS) WHITAKER JOYCE P (JTWROS NRITHYANJALI SCHOOL OF D KACZMAREK BRITTANY (JTWR PAYNE ALEX R (JTWROS) BEASLEY ERIN M MILLS ALICE E ESKANDER SHEREIN M (JTWR BRIESEMEISTER SCOTT C (J PADEN RACHEL MONSALVE LUIS WOODS DAVID L (JTWROS) DANIELS ROGER ANDRA

340 LOST LAKE DR 200 REDMONT CT 230 W SILVERLEAF ST 127 RIVER WAY DR 724 LOCKHURST DR 1603 SCUFFLETOWN RD 511 GRIMES DR 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 109 WHITTLIN WAY 22 ANA ROSE CT 3 IMPERIAL DR 303 FRONT PORCH DR 625 NICHOLE PL 9327 KRAMER DR 300 BELGRAY CT 501 DEWY MEADOWS DR 43 CHAPEL HILL LN 112 HARTWOOD LAKE LN 317 WILLIAM SETH CT 115 KINGS MOUNTAIN DR 23 CHARLOTTE ST 321 ROBERTS CIR 210 QUAIL RUN CIR 343 SUGAR TIME LN 318 WILD RICE DR 6 SAYBROOK RD 148 BRADLEY BLVD 10 ABERDEEN DR 500 ACKER RD 913 N MAIN ST 406 SWANSGATE PL 261 OAK BRANCH DR 16 IVYBERRY RD 497 DALLAS RD 117 N ORCHARD FARMS AVE 537 THOMAS EDWARDS LN 107 KINGSFIELD PL 178 BUR OAK DR 95 PEACE TRL 14 LESLIE CT 95 PEACE TRL 300 WHEATFIELD CT 11 KENT LN 211 MAREFAIR LN 26 BURDETTE ST 123 PITTMAN RD 59 BORDER AVE 117 MOUNTAIN SLOPE CT 123 WATERTON WAY 121 HIGH CREST CT 1041 LITTLE TEXAS RD 12241 OLD WHITE HORSE RD 10930 REIDVILLE RD 505 SUMMERGREEN WAY 605 SPRING MEADOW WAY 6 BALMORAL CT 4 BOX TREE WAY 4 STEVENSON LN 2 REVIS CREEK CT 141 BATHURST LN 316 MITCHELL RD 10 PLANTERS GROVE DR 207 BLUE SAGE PL 906 STANDING SPRINGS RD

ANOTHER SATISFIED CLIENT ”Experience, professionalism, and knowledge of the Greenville area were the driving factors in choosing an agent to help us with our RELOCATION process. We highly recommend the Norman Group.” ~ C. Payne

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“A jewel of a museum.” Boston, MA

“Should be on anyone visiting Greenville’s “to do” list” Wakefield, UK

“Open, airy and with a sound sense of the relationship between how art is hung and viewer appreciation. A worthy stop for any art lover.” Charleston, SC

“What a wonderful experience we had!” Knoxville, TN “An unexpected gem.” Los Angeles, CA

“World-class art.” Charlotte, NC

“Addresses thematic issues of race, urbanization, nature, and humanity in a subtle, yet powerful manner.” Houston, TX

“Wonderful place to visit.” Chicago, IL

“An art museum you won’t want to miss!” Birmingham, AL

Why take their word for it ?

COME SEE FOR YOUR SELF! Named one of the Top Three Things to Do in Greenville by U.S. News & World Report Travel, the Greenville County Museum of Art is home to the world’s largest public collection of watercolors by renowned American artist Andrew Wyeth.

When you visit the GCMA, you’ll discover a carefully curated selection of American art, including one of the world’s ten best collections of works by America’s most acclaimed living artist, Jasper Johns. The unrivaled Southern Collection explores the breadth of American art and history through the Southern experience. Among the highlights are a collection of clay vessels created by the enslaved potter David Drake and one of the largest collections of paintings by William H. Johnson outside the Smithsonian. In addition, the GCMA has an outstanding collection of American Impressionism and 20th-century American Modernism as well as an impressive collection of works by African-American artists.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

Journal Why Take Word.indd 1

admission free

12/22/17 10:01 AM


ARTS & CULTURE A NEW COFFEE CLASS page

26

THE SYNTH-ROCK SOUNDS OF POLYMATH page

25

COUNTRY MUSIC’S PLATINUM QUEEN page

33

Vincenzo Antignani Will Crooks / Greenville Journal COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

MUSIC NOTES A R T S C A LE N DA R JAN. 12-18 2018

Peace Center Guess How Much I Love You & I Love My Little Storybook Jan. 12 ~ 467-3000 Metropolitan Arts Council Direct Experience: Art and Cancer Jan. 12-Feb. 23 ~ 467-3132 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage Wet Paint: Works by Glory Day Loflin Jan. 12-Mar. 4 ~ 233-6733 Peace Center Searching for Sugar Man Jan 13-14 ~ 467-3000 Window Horses Jan. 13-14 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center Mike Wiley’s Tired Souls: King and the Montgomery County Bus Boycott Jan. 16-18 ~ 467-3000 Centre Stage Rockin’ the Keys Jan. 18-Feb. 10 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Works by Craig Crawford Through Jan. 21 ~ 271-7570 Greenville Center for Creative Arts Exhibition: Structural Probability Through Jan. 24 ~ 735-3948 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Cindy Cater & Jennifer Hagans Through Jan. 27 – 242-1050 SC Children’s Theatre Balloonacy Through Feb. 27 ~ 235-2885

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com

16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132

Photo Provided

DADDY’S BEEMER VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Band Name: Daddy’s Beemer Formed: October 2016 From: Clemson Members: Brady Sklar (vocals, guitar), Luke Waldrop (guitar), Wesley Heaton (bass), Dan Fetterolf (drums, piano, violin) What they sound like: Imagine the heavy jangle-rock riffs of The Smiths, topped with remarkably soulful falsetto vocals and grounded by a flexible, jazz-influenced rhythm section. Indie-rock with a lighter, more skillful touch. Who They Like: Hugger Mugger, Horrible Girl and The Hot Mess, SUSTO, Hot Showers Daddy’s Beemer may be just as important for the scene they created as the music they make. The quartet met working at Clemson University’s radio station, WSBF, and began playing together, but bassist Wesley Heaton had a bigger idea than just forming a band. “I noticed that there was a vacuum in Clemson,” he says, “a need for some sort of music scene. So we got a house and started doing shows there, because there was youth in the area that wanted to see live music.” Heaton christened the house-slashDIY-venue “Pablo,” and a small-but-dedicated group of fans started showing up to

see Daddy’s Beemer play. And then over time, audience members began forming their own connections and creating their own bands. “We started to see bands being formed to play at our spot,” Heaton says. “A lot of people had made music on their own and put it on the Bandcamp site, but they didn’t have musicians to play live with. Pablo became a place to go where you could find people who played guitar or bass and wanted to be in a band.” Over the last year or so, a collective of musicians called “The Pablo Generation” has grown out of that scene, forming a series of bands like Tom Angst, Wallpaper, Prozac Dreams, and Apricot Blush. Often, the musicians will play in multiple groups at the same time. Since Daddy’s Beemer is the band that essentially started a music scene, you might expect them to take their music very seriously, but their soul-meets-indierock hybrid is the result of the band very consciously NOT taking things too seriously. “We just try to have fun when we write our songs,” guitarist Luke Waldrop says. “That’s something I really appreciate about this band.” “Thinking about the atmosphere of a song while we’re writing it is counterproductive for us,” adds drummer Dan Fetterolf. “But it does seem like each song we’ve written has its own vibe.”

The band’s cohesive sound seems to come together from several different starting points. Firstly, all of them can play multiple instruments, and Heaton says that gives each of them a unique understanding of what the others are going for. “A lot of the time we’ll write the song, record it, and then add things that make sense for the atmosphere later,” he says. “It helps with arrangement when you understand what the other person is doing; you can fit the pieces together more easily.” Then there’s singer Brady Sklar’s love of classic soul music. “I’m a really big fan of the Motown era,” Sklar says. “Maybe not the texture, but the melodies. I just love those all-over-theplace melodies that have so much soul.” And finally, there’s a creative tension between Fetterolf’s urge for big arrangements and Sklar’s love of minimalism. “I try to push a lot of stuff, and Brady is always pulling back,” Fetterolf says. “Dan and I have gone in to the studio together, and I’ll be doing something he wanted me to do and he’s still throwing ideas at me,” Sklar adds with a laugh. “But there’s always one idea he has that totally changes the direction of the song. We can go with minimal and maximal, and it meets somewhere in the middle.”

Give it a listen: dadsbeem.bandcamp.com


01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

MUSICAL MINDS For synth-rock quintet Polymath, collaboration is key VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

The story of Greenville’s Polymath quintet is almost as interesting as the music they make. It’s a story of precise control and collective collaboration. It’s a combination of a specific vision and random friendships. It’s a band that was founded by two Anderson University students, singer/keyboardist Logan Carroll and guitarist Tanner Corley, who consciously planned exactly what they wanted the band to sound like, then eventually (and not without a struggle) let that sound be influenced by others. We’ll start with the music. Polymath’s debut EP, “Plymth,” is five tracks of lush, danceable, evocative synth-rock, bursting with inventive arrangements and layers of shimmering electronics. It’s also the polar opposite of stripped-down folk music, which was the other direction the CarrollCorley duo considered when they formed. “Tanner and I had a conversation right before we started crafting our sound,” Carroll says. “Did we want to do something indie-folk or more of a synth-rock kind of thing. And ultimately, we decided on our sound because of the avenues that that provides. There’s no dead end with the sound we picked up, whereas guitarbased music has more of a dead end that you reach; you hit a ceiling.” Carroll sees the sleek, synthesized music that Polymath makes now merely as a bigger version of the folk music he was considering making. “I think my tendency was to select some sort of sound that I could experience some sort of passion through,” he says. “What we do now is like singing folk songs with an acoustic guitar but bigger and louder, and more energetic. That’s why synth rock also appealed to me.” The lyrical perspective would probably have stayed the same even if Carroll had picked up an acoustic guitar instead of a synthesizer. His themes might best be summed up in one line from “Chinese New Year,” the second track on the EP: “Who will I be if I forget myself?” “When I was a teenager, I was ensconced in writing songs about love or heartbreak, those two extremes,” Carroll says. “I was writing about my girlfriend and how much I loved her, but then we

Photo Provided

Polymath

broke up, and I couldn’t sing those songs anymore. I was suddenly trying to write songs about not knowing what the universe amounts to. I wanted to embrace some sort of music that I never tired of and that was timeless and that anyone could draw something from.” With the lyrical and musical vision in place before the duo even had a band put together, there were bound to be some growing pains when they added drummer Richie Blanton, bassist Joe Montore, and keyboard player Nathan Carlton. “I couldn’t have picked better friends who are also musicians,” Carroll says, “but for the longest time, I viewed other players as a hindrance; a system to limit my power. For a long time, it was hard for me to give anything up. If anyone told me an arrangement of my song wasn’t perfect, I wanted to argue with them. The first time someone told me to cut some lyrics, it was like they were killing my baby. It was very difficult. But once I let go and embraced the idea of having five musical minds working on a song rather than just my own, it became immensely beneficial. However high I can take a song on my own, it can go five times as high with the influence of other people.” In fact, Carroll has “let go” to the extent that Polymath, who will play at the Radio Room in Greenville on Jan. 18, has become a larger collective, with friends handling the band’s art, videos, and photography, and all sharing equal status within the group. “All of our album artwork has been done by someone we really trust. We send her the tracks for the album and say, ‘Let this inspire you to create art and we’ll trust what-

ever you do.’ I’ve been lucky to be around so many artists who are incredibly talented and passionate, who are willing and hungry to do something they believe in. We really haven’t struggled in any facet of our media because there’s always someone, a videographer or photographer, who’s right there with us and loves our music.”

POLYMATH W/ MYFEVER AND ESTUARIE WHEN Thursday, Jan. 18, 9 p.m. WHERE Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Highway TICKETS $7 INFO 864-609-4441, radioroomgreenville.com

Open House 7 24 Jan.Nov. 23 and 9 9-11am - 11 am Our children are: Curious, Independent, Self-Reliant, Respectful, Courteous, Tolerant, Determined, Reliable, Creative, Self-Motivated, and so much more.

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feast

IT’S COMPLICATED

New international coffee course helps discern coffee preferences for the aficionado and novice alike WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS “Do you know why you like coffee?” A new international coffee course offered by Greenville History Tours opens with this question, and while it may seem pretty basic, the answer is much more complex than just the function or the flavor. Greenville History Tours owner John Nolan, who previously attended and enjoyed a coffee tasting in Italy, has added this new course to his lineup of history and culinary tours to highlight one part of the expanding beverage-focused experiences in Greenville. The 90-minute class is held Fridays at 6:30 p.m. at Le Petit Croissant. The course, led by Vincenzo Antignani, an Italian native and biology professor who combines his cultural heritage with the chemical knowledge of coffee, is designed to answer just about any question you may have, whether you take your espresso black or you add a little coffee to your sugar and cream. Antignani grew up in Naples, Italy, a culture in which coffee has a long history and is a daily ritual for nearly everyone, but it’s different from what is readily available in the U.S. When Antignani moved to the U.S. in 2009, he started to look for coffee that he would enjoy. He says he tried 50 to 60 kinds in coffee shops and at home, and he couldn’t find one. He soon came to the understanding that the reason was that he didn’t truly know the coffee he was trying to brew.

WANT TO GO?

Vincenzo Antignani, an Italian native and biology professor, combines his cultural heritage with the chemical knowledge of coffee.

International Coffee Course WHERE Le Petit Croissant, 640 S. Main St., 101B WHEN Fridays, beginning Jan. 12, from 6:30-8 p.m. COST $39 INFO John M. Nolan, owner, 864-567-3940 greenvillehistorytours@gmail.com greenvillehistorytours.com

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feast Antignani demonstrates brewing methods during the course, including the use of an Italian moka pot.

South Carolina raised

singer, songwriter, storyteller!

Patrick Davis & his midnight choir

January 19 Thus began his journey to source, roast, and brew the perfect cup. In the international coffee course, guests will benefit from Antignani’s years of trial and error and research by learning about the primary beans that are used to make coffee, which international countries grow the different varieties, and what the distinct characteristics are from each of these regions of the world. The class will engage all five senses as guests learn a type of bean’s brewed flavors, smell the aromas of the ground beans, and hear about how to discern the nutty, acidic, fruity, and other types of flavors of the beans.

A key point of the class is to understand the three main factors that influence the taste of each cup of coffee: the source, roasting method, and brewing method. Antignani says the same bean coming from the same country, roasted exactly the same way, but brewed by two differing methods, will taste completely differently. During numerous rounds of tastings, Antignani demonstrates several primary brewing methods, including the Italian moka pot and the French press, and how those methods influence the taste of the coffee. He’ll also roast green coffee beans to show the various stages and the final desired color and flavor.

BROOKLYN

RIDER FEBRUARY 15 “The future of chamber music”

RESTAURANT WEEK GREENVILLE RUNS JAN. 11-21 More than 30 restaurants are rolling out special menus Jan. 11-21 for Restaurant Week Greenville. Special Restaurant Week-only offers and deals allow diners to try out new restaurants and revisit their favorites at a discounted cost. New this year is a social media treasure hunt throughout the week featuring lowercase wooden “g’s” for #yeahTHATgreenville decorated by local artists and hidden around town by local members of the media. Those hiding the “g’s” will post clues on their social media pages, and whoever locates it will receive a restaurant gift card and get to keep the piece of local art. Participating artists include Once Again Sam, Lindsay McPhail, Susan Sorrell, Kent Ambler, Greg Patton, Marcy Conners Yerkes, Sunny Mullarkey McGowan, and Kristin Elliot LaRoy. Follow along for a chance to find and win: Christen Clinkscales (Christen Eats, @ChristenEats), Jamarcus Gaston (@jamarcusontv, WSPA Scene on 7), Grey Thompson (Facebook.com/grey.thompson, Fete Magazine), Ariel Turner (@arielhturner, Greenville Journal), Michelle Parker (@yelpgreenville, Yelp! Greenville), Nichole Livengood (@gapcreekgourmet, Gap Creek Gourmet), and Amy Wood (@tvamy, WSPA Channel 7). Greenville Restaurant Week is a part of the statewide Restaurant Week South Carolina, a campaign run by the South Carolina Restaurant and Lodging Association. The newly designed website (RestaurantWeekSouthCarolina.com) allows users to search participating restaurants by city, neighborhood, cuisine, and type of restaurant, including casual dining, gluten-free, or pet-friendly. Participating restaurants and their menus can be found at RestaurantWeekSouthCarolina.com/city/Greenville. –Ariel Turner COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

- STRINGS

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! peacecenter.org @peacecenter

GROUPS

864.467.3000 864.467.3032

01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27


28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

HAPPY NEW YEAR

JAN. 12-14

CONVENTION

C A MERON M ACK INTOSH ’S S P E CTA CUL A R NE W PROD U CTION OF

A N D R E W L L O Y D W E B B E R ’S

South Carolina International Auto Show The 2018 South Carolina International Auto Show is back, bringing over 250 all-new vehicles, preproduction vehicles, and more to the TD Convention Center. The auto show is designed as a one-stop shop to research, compare, and test hundreds of new models. It is great for those in the market for a new car and also those who are just interested in the newest automotive technology. There will be many brands on display, including Chevrolet, Dodge, Ford, GMC, Honda, Lexus, Maserati, and Toyota, among others. The new models will have technological upgrades, updated safety features, and added convenience features. This year the event will have three test-drive events, allowing attendees to complete their research by driving certain vehicles. There will also be custom-built cars and trucks on display from Greenville’s own Tommy Pike Customs, along with Modern Muscle, One-of-a-Kind Customs, and Restored Vehicles Display. –Sara Pearce

WHEN Jan. 12-14; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. WHERE TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Ave. ADMISSION $8 INFO www. southcarolinaautoshow.com

JAN. 13

SPORTS

The Harlem Globetrotters

MAKES ITS TRIUMPHANT RETURN TO GREENVILLE!

JAN. 31 - FEB. 11 GROUPS (15+)

The Harlem Globetrotters are coming to Greenville on their continued worldwide tour. This talented group of basketball players will face off in a game while also showcasing their impressive ball-handling skills, basketball artistry, and variety of tricks. After the event, make sure to stick around for autograph and photograph opportunities with the stars of the show. Founded in 1926, the Harlem Globetrotters have wowed audiences around the world with their unique mix of comedy, theater, and feats of athleticism on the court. –Sara Pearce

WHEN Jan. 13, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. WHERE Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. ADMISSION $17-$103 INFO www. bonsecoursarena.com/events/detail/harlem-globetrotters-2018


01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

JAN. 13-14

MAIN STAGE SHOW PRESENTED BY

FILM

“Window Horses: The Poetic Persian Epiphany of Rosie Ming” “Window Horses,” an animated feature film about love of family, poetry, history, and culture, will have two screenings at the Peace Center this weekend. “Window Horses” is written and directed by award-winning filmmaker Ann Marie Fleming. The story follows 20-yearold Rosie Ming, who lives at home with her overprotective Chinese grandparents. Rosie has never gone anywhere alone, until she is invited to perform at a poetry festival in Iran. She discovers her love of poetry and learns more about her Iranian father, whom she assumed had abandoned her. Her journey also leads to a deeper understanding of herself and her cultural identity. The film explores the themes of bridging cultural and generational divides through experiences and the magic of poetry. –Sara Pearce

Start 2018 with 2 Important Daily Supplements

WHEN Jan. 13, 7 p.m., and Jan. 14, 1 p.m. (Run time is 1 hour, 25 minutes) WHERE The Peace Center, 300 S. Main St. ADMISSION $10 INFO www.windowhorses.com, www.peacecenter.org

25% OFF In January! 25% OFF IN JANUARY! JAN 18 - FEB 10

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Thursday - Sunday

GET TICKETS 864.233.6733

FRINGE SERIES

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Columbia 4840 Forest Drive, #15a Columbia, SC 29206 (803) 454-7700

501 River Street, Greenville SC 29601 info@centrestage.org

JAN 23, 24, 30, 31, FEB 6, 7 (2018)


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

We always let you know who will be there when you open the door!

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

JAN. 16-18

PERFORMING ARTS

Mike Willey’s “Tired Souls: King and the Montgomery County Bus Boycott” “Tired Souls” opens in Montgomery, Ala., on Dec. 1, 1955 – the day Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Her choices inspired the black citizens of Montgomery to abandon traveling on the buses until they were no longer forced to sit in the back. This performance also tells the story of other key figures in the civil rights movement, including Jo Ann Robinson and Claudette Colvin, who led the way for Parks’ protest and permanently changed the course of U.S. history. “Tired Souls” is appropriate for classrooms studying social studies, U.S. history, the civil rights movement, the performing arts, and drama and theater. The performance is recommended for grades third through fifth and sixth through eighth, depending on showtime. –Sara Pearce

WHEN Jan. 16-18, times vary WHERE The Peace Center, 300 S. Main St. ADMISSION $10 INFO www. peacecenter.org

Sail Away!

JIM NELMS,

HVAC Technician “Service on HVAC today by Jim was superb. Exactly what we’ve come to expect and appreciate from Corley. We will never change service companies for our HVAC, plumbing or electric needs. Corley is simply

the best in town.”

— Earl & Noelinda C., Simpsonville

Call Corley to experience the remarkable service your family deserves.

Get a Loan of $30,000+, and We’ll Give you a Cruise Vacation for Two*! Call 370.5670 to take advantage of this offer!

NOT A MEMBER? YOU CAN JOIN! Call 467.4160 or visit our website at www.greenvilleheritage.com for information on this promotion or how to join.

(864) 908.3360

| W W W. CO R L E Y P R O. CO M

*Promotion dates: January 1 to 31, 2018. Normal credit guidelines apply. Cannot be combined with any other promotion. **Certificate recipient is responsible for: 1) a one-time registration fee of $19 per person (certificate is transferable prior to registration, during registration period), 2) port charges, taxes, customs and fulfillment fees of $39.60 per day/per person, 3) transportation to and from the port, 4) any applicable incidental/gratuity charges and/or fees. Visit your nearest branch or our website for full promotion details.

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01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

JAN. 12

West End String Band

Smiley’s Acoustic Café | 111 Augusta St. | 6:30 p.m. | Free

CONCERT

The veteran Greenville bluegrass quintet West End String Band suffered a terrible loss last year when banjo player and tenor vocalist Jim Rollins died in a car crash. Rollins was a powerful vocalist, an expert player, and a beloved music scene fixture, and it would’ve been understandable if the group decided not to continue after his death. But singer/guitarist Charlie McDaniel says that’s not what Rollins would’ve wanted. “Jimmy was a trooper,” McDaniel says. “He would’ve wanted us to keep playing shows, because he never missed a show. He’d see other bands lose members and go fill in for guys because he knew you don’t call off a show.” The band has played with fill-in banjo players and done shows as a four-piece, and McDaniel says they’ve had to make some adjustments to their sound. “We decided we weren’t going to get another regular banjo player right away,” McDaniel says. “We have material that we can play without a banjo, and some of those tunes that Jimmy sang we just don’t mess with anymore.” —Vincent Harris

12

COMMUNITY

Community Breakfast with Naomi Tutu

Furman University 3300 Poinsett Hwy. Melvin and Dollie Younts Conference Center Breakfast at 8 a.m. | program at 8:30 a.m. $50 Race and gender justice activist Nontombi Naomi Tutu will speak during a community breakfast celebrating the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Naomi Tutu will present “Truth & Reconciliation: Healing the Wounds of Racism.” Her talk is part of “Building the Beloved Community,” a series of events honoring MLK. The community breakfast featuring Tutu is open to the public and is sponsored by Furman’s Center for Inclusive Communities, and the Community Relations office. www.Furman.edu/mlk MUSIC

Tara Erraught, mezzo-soprano

Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. 7 p.m. | $45 Acclaimed for her rich voice, expansive range, and dynamic stage presence, Irish-born mezzo-soprano Tara Erraught enjoys an ever-growing international career and a wide operatic repertoire. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org PERFORMING ARTS

Martha Washington, Chautauqua History Alive Show

Greenville Chautauqua Headquarters Library, Barrett Room 151 S Church St., Spartanburg 7-8:30 p.m. | FREE On the upcoming anniversary of the stunning Patriot victory at the Battle of Cowpens, let us (as Abigail Adams, another Revolutionary Grande Dame) also remember the ladies. Martha Washington will be portrayed by Maggie Worsdale from the Traveling Literary Theater in Charleston. 864-244-1499 www.greenvillechautauqua.org/spartanburg/ caroline@greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

COMMUNITY

A New Year, A New You: Events for all Ages in January

Greenville County Library System FREE The Greenville County Library System is looking forward to an exciting new year with many opportunities for folks in the community to learn a new skill, research their family history, take a coding class, watch a ballet, and more, all for free. See online for a complete listing of opportunities. www.greenvillelibrary.org CONCERT

Furman Faculty Chamber Music Series Concert features soprano Jazmin Black Grollemund

Furman University | Daniel Recital Hall 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 8 p.m. | $15/adult, $10/senior, $5/student Furman University alumna and soprano Jazmin

JAN. 12 CONCERT

FRI

Black Grollemund will give the South Carolina premiere of “The White Album,” a song cycle by Furman music professor Mark Kilstofte. Black Grollemund received degrees in vocal performance and opera at Furman and Maryland Opera Studio. 864-294-2086 | www.bit.ly/2z4nMnh FurmanMusic@furman.edu SAT

13

Animal Care’s

Correspondent

RECREATION

Carolina Dance Collaborative

First Baptist Greenville AYMC Building 10:30-11:30 a.m. | Saturdays through April 28 $50/month or $15/class Come move with Carolina Dance Collaborative. Classes have begun and will follow the Greenville County School Calendar until April 28. info@carolinadancecollaborative.com LITERATURE

Writing Class

Coldwell Banker Caine Building 111 Williams St. Saturdays | $85 Author Carol Baldwin will be hosting a monthly writing class for new and intermediate writers. Jan. 13 class will focus on plot and structure. Class time will include writing activities, critique, and discussion. Please see her blog for a list of upcoming topics. Class size is limited to 10 students. www.carolbaldwinblog.blogspot.com cbaldwin6@me.com SAT-SUN

13-14 Approach

VISUAL ARTS

Portrait Painting from the Live Model: A Direct

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $225 Study the naturalistic and impressionistic techniques of painting first taught in turn-of-the-century European studio schools and later brought to America by a select group of gifted painters known as ‘the Boston School’ or American impressionists. The techniques imparted are broad, direct, brilliant in color, and immediate. This is the way of working espoused by John Singer Sargent, Edmund Tarbell,

Tides In Transit w/ Dead Swells and The Apartment Club

Radio Room | 110 Poinsett Highway 9 p.m. | $7 Last year, the Greenville sextet Tides In Transit released five singles that displayed such a wide range of styles that you’d be forgiven for not realizing they were all done by the same band. They played everything from tricky mid-’80s-Rush-style time signatures (“Me & Monogamy”) to straightforward anthems (“The Words”) to synth-spiked progressive rock (“Lady In White”) to electronic funk-rock (“Slightly Dirty”), with only Matt Dubuc’s pas-

sionate vocals uniting them. https://tidesintransit.bandcamp.com/ And Dubuc says those singles were specifically designed to showcase the band’s versatility. “We all kind of come from different backgrounds musically speaking, and they’re all completely different-sounding songs,” he says. “One of my favorite things about this band is that the influences are so diverse.” With that display of their range out of the way, Dubuc says the next step for the band is a concept album that ties all the disparate threads together. “The concept itself is still under wraps,” he says, “but I want the sound to be a lot more cohesive on our next release.” —Vincent Harris

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Buggzie

If it’s too cold for you, it’s too cold for your dog Winter is here and, oh my dog, it’s a cold one! That means it’s especially important to make sure your dog has a warm place to stay safe and comfortable. It’s the humane thing to do, and it’s the law. Bring pets inside at night, even if they’re outdoor pets. When you do let your pet outside, give them plenty of food and unfrozen water. If your pet is whining, shivering or showing weakness, those could be signs of hypothermia. If you see someone else’s dog out in extreme cold for an inappropriate amount of time, call your local Animal Control. You can also take immediate action to help the animal by giving it a blanket, water and some food. Make sure you tell your friends and family that your dog is just as susceptible to the cold as you are. The rule of thumb is, if it’s too cold for you it’s too cold for your pet!

GreenvillePets.org


32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM etc. and preserved and disseminated by R.H. Ives Gammell and his many students. Students will learn about these methods and philosophies as applied to portrait painting working from the live model. Teaching will proceed through demonstration, discussion, and one-on-one critiques. Emphasis will be given to composition, doing a simple start, value unity, color relationships, and an overview of American impressionism- with examples of its practitioners. This workshop will focus on oil painting techniques, but acrylic painting or mass drawing in charcoal can be accommodated. All skill levels are welcome. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 www.artcentergreenville.org liz@artcentergreenville.org MOVIE SCREENING

“Searching for Sugar Man” Screenings

Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. 4 p.m. | FREE Rodriguez, the legendary singer-songwriter known only by his surname, is a self-taught guitarist. Rodriguez is the subject of the 2012 Oscar-winning documentary film “Searching for Sugar Man.” These free screenings do require tickets. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org THRU SUN

14

VISUAL ARTS

“Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen”

Upcountry History Museum 540 Buncombe St. This exclusive exhibition of Hepburn’s private collection makes its Southeastern United States debut in Greenville. Featuring over 35 free-

standing costumes worn in 21 films and six stage productions spanning Hepburn’s illustrious career, the 2,500-square-foot project is the first major costume exhibition in the Upstate. www.upcountryhistory.org/changing-exhibits/current-exhibits/ SUN

14

HEALTH & WELLNESS

New Year Party

The Pole Academy 637 Congaree Rd Suite G 6-9 p.m. | $10 Join us bringing in 2018. Make your pole resolution, learn a few new tricks, and bring in 2018 with pole friends. Every person will join our raffle for free TPA swag. There will be three hours of unlimited pole play, lots of food, and shenanigans, so bring friends. 864-520-2834 | www.thepoleacademy.com COMMUNITY

Music in Mauldin

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin 4 p.m. | FREE Join the Cultural Center for a musical showcase as Cindy Overfield’s voice students share what they’ve worked hard to accomplish and show off their talents. www.mauldinculturalcenter.org VISUAL ARTS

Wet Felting Wool Accessories

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 1-5 p.m. | $89 Make and embellish your own unique felted jewelry and accessories. Students will be invited to

HERE, YOU’RE ALWAYS SOMEBODY’S TYPE.

play with their own design ideas, guided by the instructor to apply various felting techniques and approaches to explore the jewelry making process. Create a wool bracelet or necklace or wearable art of your choosing. All basic materials included but please bring an old tea towel or bath towel. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 | liz@artcentergreenville.org www.artcentergreenville.org CONCERT

West End Brass and Percussion

Temple of Israel | 400 Spring Forest Road 3 p.m. | $20 Featuring selections from Bach, Bernstein, and Beyond. Five stellar brass performers, and one percussionist, all member of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, in a wide ranging program. Complimentary wine and cheese reception follows performance. www.templeofisrael.org/monthly-calendar/ music-on-sunday COMMUNITY

Sunday Supper

Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery 205 Cedar Lane Road 4-7 p.m. | $12/adult and $6/child The Swamp Rabbit Cafe is hosting a family-style meal of fresh pasta, meatballs, and all the stecca you can hold. www.swamprabbitcafe.com media@swamprabbitcafe.com MON

15

COMMUNITY

MLK Holiday – A Day of Service

Furman University | 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 8:30 a.m. - breakfast and check-in at Trone Student Center 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., service at various locations Sponsored by Heller Service Corps, the Center for Inclusive Communities, and Fraternity and Sorority Life. 864-294-2900 | www.Furman.edu/mlk nancy.cooper@furman.edu MON-FEB

15-15

VISUAL ARTS

Furman University Presents Prints by Taryn McMahon

cells. The need for your specific type is always in need, and donors are the

Furman University | 3300 Poinsett Hwy. Thompson Art Gallery, Roe Art Building 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Monday-Friday | FREE The Furman Department of Art presents prints by Kent State University School of Art professor Taryn McMahon. Vanishing Points includes an installation of eight large-scale printed banners and 12 additional works on paper. McMahon says the exhibition investigates our relationship to the natural world. She uses images from botanical gardens to explore ways these spaces project our own desires and fantasies of the natural world and our place within it. Reception and talk Thursday, Feb. 15, 6-7:30 p.m. 864-294-2995 | www.bit.ly/2Bj8U3j Marta.lanier@furman.edu

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16

FAMILY & EDUCATION

George Washington, Chautauqua History Alive Talk

Greenville Chautauqua Hughes Main Library | 25 Heritage Green Place 7-8:30 p.m. | FREE Join an audience that loves talking back to history to discuss the courage of George Washington – with AV Huff, Ph.D., distinguished author, beloved OLLI teacher, and public servant. This event is not a costumed performance. Ron

Carnegie, the George Washington at Colonial Williamsburg, will perform as George Washington in Winter Chautauqua. 864-244-1499 www.greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org COMMUNITY

Simpsonville Garden Club January Meeting

Simpsonville Garden Club Rotary Club 205 North Maple St., Simpsonville 1 p.m. | FREE If you want to help create a healthier South Carolina, you won’t want to miss a special presentation on reducing solid waste and recycling at the Simpsonville Garden Club’s January meeting featuring Jane Hiller, Director of Education at Sonoco Recycling in Columbia. www.simpsonvillegardenclub.com HOBBIES & SPECIAL INTEREST

Pokemon League

The Red Barn 2333 N. Pleasantburg Drive 6-8 p.m. | Tuesdays | FREE Pokemon League is a fun and accessible way for fans to get together and have fun. League events are open to all Pokemon TCG and video game players. Using your own cards and Pokemon video games, you can play, trade, and even earn cool prizes. 864-324-2369 | www.easleypokemongym.ml easleypokemongym@gmail.com COMMUNITY

Grief Support Group Registration

1 Pine Knoll Drive 5:30-7 p.m. | Tuesdays | FREE Are you struggling with loss of your cherished loved one? Are you having difficulty finding companions who really understand? Join Interim Healthcare for 10 weekly meetings, through March 13, to help you cope and adjust with the painful reality of deep loss in the presence of those who are or have been where you are. Registration deadline is Jan. 16. 864-627-7049 | www.hospicegriefsupport.com jillian.storm@interimcares.com COMMUNITY

Greenville Downtown Line Dancing

Sears Rec Center | McPherson Park 100 E. Park Ave. | 6:15-8 p.m. | Tuesdays $5 (Greenville City Residents -$4) Greenville Downtown Line Dancing is a fun way to exercise. No partner or dance knowledge required. Dances are taught in a fun and easy way with a variety of music including hip hop, R&B, rock ‘n’ roll, Latin, country, shag, and swing. Party dances include Electric Slide, Cupid Shuffle, Bikers Shuffle, and Cha Cha Slide. Second hour moves into more advanced dances -fireball, footloose, R&B boogie, and more. Two left feet are fine. Bring your friends and have some fun. 864-467-4326 | www.greenvillesc.gov WED

17

LITERATURE

Brigadier General A.J. Tata to Talk About New Military Thriller Novel

Fiction Addiction The Poinsett Club | 807 E. Washington St. noon | $26 Meet Brigadier General A.J. Tata, U.S. Army (Retired), as he discusses his new military thriller, “Direct Fire,” the latest book in his Jake Mahegan series, at a luncheon event. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com


01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Geology of the Upstate Region

Sierra Club Upstate Greenville UU Fellowship 1135 State Park Road 7:30 p.m. | FREE Have you ever wondered how the rock outcrops and other geologic features that you see while driving or hiking around South Carolina formed, or how old they might be? Join Brian Grothaus to examine the geology of the Upstate, the basic processes involved, some of the rocks and minerals that are the products of these forces and how these forces have and continue to shape our state. Join us for a fascinating presentation about the geology of our area. Light beverages and snacks provided. This event is hosted by the local Sierra Club group. Members and nonmembers are always invited. 864-420-0168 www.sierraupstate.org WED-MAY

17-09

COMMUNITY

Outshine Homework Help Program

Center for Developmental Services 29 N. Academy St. 3-4:45 p.m. | Wednesdays FREE Outshine is a free community homework help program offered by the Center for Developmental Services. Volunteers and CDS staff will assist children ages 5-13 with any homework subject. 864-331-1445 leslie.salazar@cdservices.org THU

18

LECTURE

Palmetto Poets: Speaking of the South

Huguenot Mill 101 W. Broad St. 6:30 p.m. | FREE The Peace Center’s 2017-2018 Peace Voices program presents Palmetto Poets: Speaking of the South, featuring DéLana Dameron, Ray McManus, and Ed Madden. DéLana Dameron is the winner of the South Carolina Book Prize; Ray McManus is a professor at the University of South Carolina Sumter; and Ed Madden is a professor at the University of South Carolina and the poet laureate of Columbia. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org LECTURE

2017-2018 Master Classes

Peace Center Ramsaur Studio at Huguenot Mill 101 W. Broad St. 4:30 p.m. | FREE Master classes give teens from the workshop series an opportunity to dig deeper into the nuts and bolts of the poetic process. Visiting poets will share pieces, dissect their own work, and hold an open forum. Participants are encouraged to ask questions about their own poems. Master classes are held in Ramsaur Studio and the public is invited to observe. This class features guest poets DéLana Dameron, Ray McManus, and Ed Madden. 864-467-3000 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org

JAN. 18

Miranda Lambert w/ Jon Pardi and Brent Cobb Bon Secours Wellness Arena | 650 N. Academy St. 7 p.m. | $47.75-$83.75

CONCERT

COMMUNITY

Miranda Lambert already has the “commercial success” part covered in country music. Since her career caught fire with 2005’s “Kerosene” (which featured huge hit singles with the title track, “Bring Me Down,” and “New Strings”), Lambert has been country’s platinum queen, scoring four million-selling albums in a row during an era where full-length records don’t move as much as they used to. But with 2016’s double-album “The Weight of These Wings,” Lambert went for something morehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-dZzpTce30 and succeeded in spades. The 24-track epic expanded Lambert’s rough-and-tumble twang into atmospheric acoustic folk (“Tin Man”), funky minimalism (“We Should Be Friends”), old-school sweeping balladry (“To Learn Her”), and gritty, distorted rock (“Pink Sunglasses”). And in addition to going platinum (again), “The Weight of These Wings” garnered some serious critical acclaim, landing on the year-end Best Of lists in Entertainment Weekly, Billboard, Rolling Stone, SPIN, and Variety, while picking up an Academy of Country Music Award for Album Of The Year, to boot. —Vincent Harris CONCERT

Violinist Kristin Lee and Pianist Julio Elizalde

Clemson University Brooks Center for the Performing Arts 141 Jersey Lane 7:30 p.m. | FREE Violinist Kristin Lee and pianist Julio Elizalde will join forces for a duo recital on the Utsey Chamber Music Series. This Americana program showcases a broad spectrum of illustrious composers and the American musical styles that influenced them, as well as their own musical styles that influenced generations of composers to come. www.clemson.edu/centers-institutes/brooks COMMUNITY

Dance Party

Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery 205 Cedar Lane Road | 6-9 p.m. | FREE Dance for a cause. Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery will have a DJ spinnin’ beats, wood-fired pizza, and craft beer. Ten percent of event sales will be donated to Gateway House, a mental health resource here in Greenville. www.swamprabbitcafe.com media@swamprabbitcafe.com FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured book is “Bear and Chicken” by Jannie Ho. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com COMMUNITY

Toastmasters Open House

Rise N’ Shine Greenville Toastmasters Club #7649 Patewood Memorial Hospital 6:30-8 p.m. Ever wonder what Toastmasters is all about? Spend an evening with us to observe a club meeting then interact with club members to learn how a leadership and public speaking club could impact you personally and professionally in 2018.

THU-SAT

18-10

MUSIC

“Rockin’ The Keys”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. $35, $30, $25 Centre Stage’s annual hit rock show features the music of legendary piano greats like Billy Joel, Elton John, Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, and so many more. Featuring iconic songs like “Somebody to Love,” “Rocket Man,” and of course, “Piano Man,” “Rockin’ The Keys” will have you singing along and feeling the magic from these Grammy Award winning powerhouses. 864-233-6733 | www.centrestage.org FRI

19

CONCERT

Patrick Davis + His Midnight Choir

Peace Center | Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $35 South Carolina native and singer-songwriter Patrick Davis returns to the Peace Center. 864-467-3000 www.peacecenter.org SAT

20

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Buti Yoga

The Pole Academy 637 Congaree Rd Suite G 10-11 a.m. | $10 Join TPA for Buti Yoga with certified instructor Sara Brooks. The class will include an intro session with common poses and alignment and super energetic flow. Buti fuses power yoga with cardio-intensive tribal dance, hip-hop, and other sexy moves to sculpt and tone the deep abdominal muscles that stabilize and strengthen the body. Class is open to women and men 18+ (explict lyrics during class). Register online. 864-520-2834 | thepoleacademy.com MUSIC

New York Polyphony

Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre | 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $45 Praised for a “rich, natural sound that’s larger and more complex than the sum of its parts” (NPR), two-time Grammy-nominated New York Polyphony is one of the foremost vocal

chamber ensembles active today. The four men give vibrant, modern voice to repertoire ranging from Gregorian chant to cutting-edge compositions. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org COMMUNITY

Community Organizing Training

Phillis Wheatly Center 40 John McCarroll Way 9 a.m.-3 p.m. The Greenville Young Democrats and the South Carolina Democratic Party are hosting a Community Organizing training to learn from trainers Terri Jowers and Scott Thorpe about community organizing and how you can engage and mobilize your neighborhood, your city, your state, and your country for change. The training will teach how to effectively use narrative, how to build and use relationships to create capacity, how to establish a shared purpose, and some basic strategy and tactics for organizing. As our community faces challenges like gentrification, lack of public transportation, and the need for police reform, this training is needed for our community more than ever before. 864-915-7020 SAT-SUN

20-21

VISUAL ARTS

Figure Drawing Workshops with Suzy Hart

122 Broome Lane, Easley 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $240 for one workshop or $450 for both Beginning to advanced artists welcome. Hart will demonstrate each with detailed analysis of anatomy for artists. Lunch provided. 845-986-3653 | www.suzyhart.com suzyhartfineart@gmail.com MON

22

CONCERT

GOBSMACKED!

Peace Center Concert Hall 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $15-$35 Featuring reigning world champion beatboxer BallZee and an international cast of world-class vocalists, GOBSMACKED! weaves through all forms of a cappella, from traditional street corner harmonies to cutting edge, multi-track live looping. It’s funny, joyful, and uplifts the spirits of all ages. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org TUE-WED

23-07

PERFORMANCE ARTS

“The Christians”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. Tuesdays and Wednesdays | $15, $10 Pastor Paul decides he no longer believes in hell, and today, he’s going to preach a sermon that finally says what he really believes. He thinks all the people in his church are going be happy to hear what he has to say. He’s wrong. 864-233-6733 | www.centrestage.org THU

25

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured book is “The Very Very Very Long Dog” by Julia Patton . 864-675-0540 www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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MUSIC

Tom Wright’s Cat and Mouse Ensemble

The Wheel 1288 Pendleton St. 7:30 p.m. 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month $10 Tom Wright has established the Cat and Mouse Ensemble as a mainstay of the Wheel Sessions. Endless energy and flawless technique are hallmarks of his cutting-edge jazz saxophone style. Along with Tom, Cat, and Mouse features Philip Howe playing both trumpet and piano, Robert Nance on bass, and Kevin Korschgen on drums. The “Wheel Sessions” is a jazz performance series hosted at the Wheel. The entrance fee includes complimentary beverage and two sets of music; all proceeds go to the artists. Attendees may also BYOB. To reserve a seat, call or text. 312-520-2760 CULINARY

Cooking with Fire

Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery 205 Cedar Lane Road 6:30 p.m. $75 Watch SRC&G’s three chefs play with fire while they make you a steak dinner complete with lots of delicious sides. Beverage pairings included. www.swamprabbitcafe.com/events media@swamprabbitcafe.com

MUSIC

Furman presents organ concert with guest Nigel Potts of Charleston’s Grace Cathedral

Furman University | Daniel Memorial Chapel 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 8 p.m. $15 for adults, $10 for seniors, and $5 for students/youth. Church Music Conference registrants receive free admission to this recital. The Furman University music department presents Nigel Potts, organist and master of the choristers at Grace Cathedral (Episcopal) in Charleston, S.C. Potts will perform a recital on Furman’s magnificent C.B. Fisk organ. Potts’ wife, acclaimed soprano Sarah Rose Taylor, will join the program for a performance of Edward Elgar’s song cycle “Sea Pictures.” 864-294-2086 | http://bit.ly/2B0qv36 furmanmusic@furman.edu THU-FRI

25-26

MUSIC

Furman University Hosts Church Music Conference

Furman University | 3300 Poinsett Hwy. Various venues on campus Registration $95 per person. Registration for full-time students is $40. The Furman music department will host its 2018 Church Music Conference. Registration includes two days of conference sessions, an organ concert Thursday night with Nigel Potts, a conference music packet, and a Friday luncheon. The conference features guest clinicians Donald McCullough and Nola Reed Knouse. McCullough, noted choral conductor, composer, and church

musician, will present sessions on vocal/choral and rehearsal techniques. Knouse, president of The Moravian Music Foundation, will lecture on the Moravian sacred music tradition. 864-294-2086 | http://bit.ly/2CPE4AQ furmanmusic@furman.edu THU-SUN

25-28

MUSIC

The Return

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. | $35 Beatlemania is expected to hit the Upstate as the critically acclaimed Beatles tribute band, The Return, returns to Greenville Little Theatre. The Fab Four’s music is alive and well thanks to this nationally touring and critically acclaimed Beatles tribute band. The Return will take you right back to the 1960s and have you experiencing the British Invasion and Beatlemania all over again. With a song list packed with all the fun and lively tunes from the Beatles’ beginnings in the Cavern Club to their farewell performance at Candlestick Park, The Return concert is more than reminiscent of a Beatles concert; it’s as close to the real thing as your can get. 864-233-6238 | www.greenvillelittletheatre.org FRI

26

MUSIC

An Evening of Original Music with Maia Sharp, Randy Sharp, and David Ryan Harris Genevieve’s | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $75 This intimate, listening-room-style concert will be held in Genevieve’s theater lounge, located adjacent to the Peace Concert Hall. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org

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Trivia Night

Joe’s Place | 2 Williams St. 7 p.m. Don’t miss out on the fun and competition. 864-558-0828 | info@joesplacellc.com www.joesplacellc.com/events/ FRI-SUN

26-28

FUNDRAISER

Sweet Caroline Open

Sportsclub Greenville 712 Congaree Road The South Carolina Racquetball Players’ Association in cooperation with Sportsclub Fitness and Wellness and OB Hospitalist Group will host the Sweet Caroline Open racquetball tournament for professionals and amateurs. This year’s focus will be on heart health education, prevention, and emergency treatments for those suffering a heart attack. The tournament will also work to raise funds for the purchase of 40 AEDs for organizations in South Carolina that directly impact the community. The Sweet Caroline Open will also offer a buy one give one opportunity for local businesses. A business will be able to purchase an AED for their use while giving a second AED back to the community. Lynette Froelich at 864-430-8810 FRI-SUN

26-04

PERFORMING ARTS

“Junie B. Jones Is Not a Crook”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Peace Center, Gunter Theatre | 300 S. Main St. $18-$27 She’s back! Junie B. Jones is ecstatic about her brand new mittens – until a dirty, rotten thief steals them. So when she finds a fantastic pen on the school floor, she should get to keep it. Right? This comical and heartfelt tale finds our fearless friend in another mess. What will happen? That’s anyone’s guess. 864-235-2885 or 864-467-3000 www.scchildrenstheatre.org www.peacecenter.org SAT

27

CONCERT

Corey Smith Live

The Blind Horse Saloon 1035 Lowndes Hill Road 7-11:45 p.m. | $18-$20 The way Corey Smith sees it, he owes a debt to his fans. And it’s one he is determined to repay with his 10th album, “While the Gettin’ Is Good.” The result is Smith’s most ambitious record yet, as well as a return on the investment

made by the fans who have supported him since his first album in 2003. www.blind-horse.com CONCERT

Jeezy Live Peformance

Greenville Shrine Center | 119 Beverly Road 8-11:30 p.m. | $50 Celeste Davenport Birthday Bash with a live performance from Young Jeezy. www.eventbrite.com/e/jeezy-live-peformance-tickets-40088712418?aff=es2 MUSIC

The Songwriter’s Workshop

Ramsaur Studio | 101 W. Broad St. 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. | $150 Part workshop and part master class, this experience is designed to help aspiring songwriters put the finishing touches on their songs. Maia Sharp, Randy Sharp, and David Ryan Harris will review and discuss attendees’ songs, provide feedback, and share tips on the songwriting process. www.peacecenter.org LITERATURE

Cultivating Writing Resilience Workshop with North Carolina Author Bryan E. Robinson

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10 a.m.-noon | $25 Come learn techniques to help you turn your writing roadblocks into stepping stones at a two hour seminar with North Carolina author Bryan E. Robinson. Each ticket admits one and includes a copy of Bryan’s new writing book, “Daily Writing Resilience: 365 Meditations & Inspirations for Writers.” Chances are, whether you’re a seasoned author or an aspiring scribe, you’ve grappled with your share of rejection, setbacks, and heartbreak. However, literary agents say the number one key to writing success is perseverance in the face of disappointment. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com SAT-SUN

27-28

VISUAL ARTS

Water Etch Photopolymer Intaglio Printmaking

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $225 The intaglio printing process uses a plate that has a photosensitive emulsion on the surface. Exposing the image to the plate with ultraviolet light and processing in tap water makes this method of intaglio printing a friendly medium. This unique

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36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM printmaking process uses a positive image that is placed in contact with the plate’s surface and then exposed to the plate using UV light. Using a transparent acetate to create the image with opaque media such as India ink, printer’s ink, or permanent markers is fairly simple and is open for much experimentation. Participants should bring multiple drawings to the workshop to reference while working on 6x8 inch plates. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 | liz@artcentergreenville.org www.artcentergreenville.org CONCERT

Love Stories

Greenville Symphony Orchestra Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. Jan. 27 at 8 p.m and Jan. 28 at 3 p.m. | $18 - $75 The drama and ecstasy of love reveals itself through four different stories musically told by Tchaikovsky and Strauss: the timeless love of Romeo and Juliet, the classic Casanova, Don Juan, the tragic tale of Francesca da Rimini, and the comic, yet bittersweet opera of Der Rosenkavalie. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org THRU SUN

28

VISUAL ARTS

“The World of Jan Brett”

Upcountry History Museum 540 Buncombe St. Designed for children from birth through 10 years old and their caregivers, the 3-D play and learning environments will provide children with hands-on literacy-based experiences and adults with tools for cultivating literacy through everyday activities. This exhibit will guide visitors to the discovery that it is never too early to begin the love of reading. www.upcountryhistory.org/changing-exhibits/current-exhibits/ MON

29

CULINARY

Cookbook Talk, Signing, & Tasting with North Carolina Chef & Gardener Cathy Cleary

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 2 p.m. | FREE Asheville, N.C., chef, gardener, and restaurateur Cathy Cleary will be discussing her new cookbook, “The Southern Harvest Cookbook,” at a book talk, followed by a Q&A session and a book signing. Ms. Cleary will have samples from her cookbook for attendees to taste. RSVP to Fiction Addiction if you plan to attend. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com THRU WED

31

VISUAL ARTS

John Acorn Exhibition

SIFT | 400 Augusta St. McMillan Pazdan Smith and Hampton III Gallery invite you to join them at SIFT, a curated gallery at Claussen Bakery, for an exhibition featuring the work of the artist-inresidence John Acorn. WED

31

CULINARY

The Craft of Charcuterie

Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery 6 p.m. | $50 The Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery will host “The Craft of Charcuterie,” a charcuterie, beer, and wine pairing class in their newly renovated event space. Swamp Rabbit’s head butcher, James Bryant, and special guest, butcher and author Meredith Leigh, will educate guests on the significance of ethical meat before providing them with the skills necessary to craft their own expert charcuterie boards. www.swamprabbitcafe.com/events

WED-SUN

31-11

THEATER

“The Phantom of the Opera”

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. starting at $65 Cameron Mackintosh’s spectacular new production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “The Phantom of the Opera” will return to Greenville as part of a brand new North American tour. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org

FEB THU

01

LITERATURE

Bestselling Children’s Authors Sarah Mlynowski & Lauren Myracle

University Center Greenville | McAlister Square 225 S. Pleasantburg Dr. in the open space by the USC Upstate office 4:30 p.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction and the University of South Carolina Upstate are excited to bring New York Times bestselling authors Sarah Mlynowski and Lauren Myracle to Greenville to discuss the new book in their middle-grade “Upside-Down Magic” series, “Upside-Down Magic: Dragon Overnight.” Fiction Addiction will have books for sale at the event, or you can purchase beforehand. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com PERFORMING ARTS

George Washington, Chautauqua History Alive Show

Greenville Chautauqua Headquarters Library, Barrett Room 151 S Church St., Spartanburg 7-8:30 p.m. | FREE Nationally acclaimed Colonial Williamsburg historical interpreter Ron Carnegie creates a compelling portrayal of courage. Hear the bullets whistle as Washington stands exposed to enemy fire. Contemplate certain death if the cause fails. Steer a fledgling country clear of danger, and take perhaps the most courageous historic step of all – return to Mt. Vernon as a private citizen. You’ll laugh. You’ll be challenged. You’ll have lots of questions. And as always at Chautauqua, the audience is part of the show. Bring your stories. Share your experiences. Get inspired. Because it’s not just history; it’s personal. 864-244-1499 www.greenvillechautauqua.org/spartanburg/ caroline@greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured book is “Sophie the Skunk Who Sometimes Stunk” by local author Kathryn G. Evans and illustrated by Katilin M. Messich. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com THU-SUN

01-04

FAMILY

Marvel Universe Live! Age of Heroes

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. $20-$80 Marvel fans assemble for this live, legendary battle to defend the universe from evil. The Avengers, the Guardians of the Galaxy, and Spider-Man join forces with Doctor Strange, master of the mystic

arts, in a race against time to recover the Wand of Watoomb before it falls into Loki’s hands in this all-new, spectacular arena stunt show. 1-800-745-3000 | www.ticketmaster.com www.marveluniverselive.com THU-SUN

01-11

PERFORMANCE ARTS

“5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche”

Converse College | Laird Theatre 580 E. Main St., Spartanburg $10 general/$5 students The award-winning Proud Mary Theatre Company, South Carolina’s first and only theatre company devoted exclusively to LGBTQ+ stories and voices, is proud to announce its second MainStage show, “5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche” by Evan Linder and Andrew Hobgood. www.proudmarytheatre.com FRI

02

PERFORMING ARTS

Chautauqua Benefit Show: George Washington

Greenville Chautauqua South Carolina Governor’s School for Arts & Humanities | 15 University St. 7:30-9:30 p.m. | $30 Join us for a spectacular dessert reception and private conversation with “George Washington” in the intimate setting of Smith Recital Hall. Nationally acclaimed historical interpreter Ron Carnegie – “the” George Washington at Colonial Williamsburg since 2005 – appears as the courageous military leader and president. Ron Carnegie is not to be missed as George Washington. He will personally answer all your questions. This event is up close and personal – with limited seating. This event has sold out every year. 864-244-1499 www.greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org caroline@greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org SAT

03

COMMUNITY

2017 Martin Luther King Youth Program and Rudolph Gordon College Fair

Furman University | Burgiss Theater and Watkins Room, Trone Student Center 3300 Poinsett Hwy. | 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sponsored by Alpha Phi Alpha Greenville Foundation. 864-441-9067 | www.Furman.edu/mlk mlkfair@alphagreenville.org SAT-SUN

03-04

PERFORMING ARTS

George Washington Chautauqua History Alive

Greenville Chautauqua Wade Hampton High School Auditorium 100 Pine Knoll Drive 2 p.m. | FREE Nationally acclaimed historical interpreter Ron Carnegie – “the” George Washington at Colonial Williamsburg since 2005 – appears as the courageous military leader and president. Get ready to flat out be inspired as you meet President George Washington. Sign-interpreted show: Feb. 4 at 2 p.m. If you would like seating near the interpreter, please call. 864-244-1499 www.greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org caroline@greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org MON

05

LITERATURE

Min Jin Lee to Talk About Latest Korean Novel

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 3 p.m. | $16.95 - each ticket admits one and includes a paperback copy From national bestselling author Min Jin Lee

comes her latest novel, “Pachinko,” a finalist for the National Book Award. This page-turning saga follows four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family fighting to control their destiny in 20th-century Japan while exiled from a home they never knew. Lee will discuss her new book at a book talk, followed by a Q&A session, and a book signing. Tickets and books can be purchased online, at the store, or by calling. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com TUE

06

FAMILY

“Giraffes Can’t Dance” by Giles Andreae

South Carolina Children’s Theatre 1200 Pendleton St. 9:30 and 11 a.m. | $1 A chance for wee ones (Pre-K) to hear a favorite story read and acted out. The material may include audience participation segments or simple audience interaction. The performance will last no more than 30 minutes – perfect for young, wiggly patrons. Traysie Amick, SCCT’s principal teaching artist, brings her high energy and child-friendly interpretation of favorite children’s stories to you for a fun weekday performance. 864-235-2885 | www.scchildrenstheatre.org THU

08

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured book is “Love” by Matt de la Pena and illustrated by Loren Long. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com SAT

10

PERFORMANCE ARTS

Disney’s “James and the Giant Peach” auditions

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin 9 a.m. | FREE The Mauldin Youth Theatre will hold open auditions for youth. Auditions will take place in the auditorium. Please be prepared to sing a song from the show or of a similar style. Auditioners will be asked to read from the script in groups. Bring a headshot photo and resume of past experience (if applicable). Showdates are April 20-22. Rehearsals will Mondays through Thursdays, 6-9 p.m. with occasional Saturdays (10 a.m.-1 p.m.) and extended hours when necessary as production dates come closer. There will be times when the ensemble will not need to attend rehearsals. A tentative rehearsal schedule will be provided at the audition. This production has nine principle roles available and numerous ensemble roles. Roles are for youth in fifth through 12th grade. Register online. www.mauldinculturalcenter.org http://bit.ly/2pSFnw4 SUN

11

VISUAL ARTS

Felting: From Image to Wool Painting

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 1-6 p.m. | $89 Wool can be transformed into a painterly landscape image using the felting technique. Fiber artist Cecilia Ho will demonstrate how to blend and mix various shades of colorful NZ Corriedale


01.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM wool fibers to achieve a beautiful wool painting. Discover how a felting needle can replace a paintbrush to create a decorative work of art. Once the wool painting is done, you can bring it home to frame in a shadow box or sew onto any textile materials. All basic felting materials and supplies are included. Optional: Bring a photo or 11-inch by 8-inch image printout from smartphone/tablet. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 | liz@artcentergreenville.org www.artcentergreenville.org WED

14

CONCERT

A Musical Valentine

Greenville Symphony Orchestra Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $25-$65 Celebrate the most romantic holiday with some of the most beautiful music ever composed in a very special Valentine Pops concert. Edwin McCain returns with the GSO for a blend of romantic classics and pop standards, including several of Mr. McCain’s original works in a concert that celebrates the power of love. www.greenvillesymphony.org THU

15

MUSIC

Brooklyn Rider

Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. 7 p.m. | $45 Hailed as “the future of chamber music” (Strings), string quartet Brooklyn Rider attracts fans by playing an eclectic mix, including music by Phillip Glass, John Adams, Björk, Sting, Elvis Costello, and more. With a performance style that draws rave reviews from classical, world, and rock critics alike, they close the 2017-2018 Peace Chamber concert series with a gripping performance. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org COMEDY

Brian Regan

Peace Center Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7 p.m. | $40-$60 Fresh off of the November 2017 release of his first Netflix special, “Brian Regan: Nunchucks and Flamethrowers,” celebrated comedian Brian Regan comes to the Peace Center. Regan is the unique comedian whose material is relatable to generations of fans and revered by comedians as the best in the business. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured book is “Woolly and Me” by Quentin Greban. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com FRI

16

VISUAL ARTS

“Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo”

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. 8 p.m. | $15-35 “Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo” was founded in 1974 by a group of ballet enthusiasts for the purpose of presenting a playful, entertaining view of traditional, classical ballet in parody form and en travesti. “Les Ballets Trockadero” first performed in the late-late shows in Off-Off Broadway lofts. The TROCKS, as they are affectionately known, quickly garnered a major

critical essay by Arlene Croce in The New Yorker which, combined with reviews in The New York Times and The Village Voice, established the company as an artistic and popular success. FRI & FRI

16 & 23

VISUAL ARTS

New Approaches to Landscape Painting

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $89/each session This workshop is a two-part series but participants may register for either one or both days. Create more exciting landscapes in watercolor, acrylic, collage, or mixed media while finding new ways to enhance your landscapes and use color to create atmosphere. Day One, we will explore new ways to develop a landscape in water media. We will work on several painting studies, using underpainting, painting on new surfaces, and other methods to get a fresh look, using your normal techniques. Artists may bring photos for reference, though we will use our imaginations to go beyond what we see in photos. The workshop is suitable for artists with some painting experience. Artists will bring their own paint and brushes. Materials for additional mixed media techniques will be provided. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 | liz@artcentergreenville.org www.artcentergreenville.org THRU FEB

17

COMMUNITY

2018 Mac-n-Cheese Off Registration

Birds Fly South Ale Project 1320 Hampton Ave. Ext. Make some room in those stretchy pants and save the date for the Second Annual Mac-nCheese Off, Feb. 24. All foodies are encouraged to compete. There will be multiple categories, including people’s choice and judges’ choice. goo.gl/forms/vVSG8628tmKl4M3m2 SAT

17

EDUCATION

America’s Boating Course

Upstate Boating Club Cabela’s | Woodruff Road 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $50 and $10/additional family member America’s Boating Course is developed by the United States Power Squadrons. The eight-hour course covers boat handling, anchoring, finding directions, adverse condition, and using the marine radio. This course has been approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators and Recognized by SCDNR and many major insurance carriers and the United States Coast Guard. www.UpStateBoatingCourse.org COMMUNITY

Joseph Vaughn Oratorical Contest

Springfield Baptist Church | Fellowship Hall 10 a.m.-2 p.m. “The Next Civil Rights Movement: What Direction Should It Take?” is sponsored by Alpha Phi Alpha Greenville Foundation. 864-906-7078 | www.Furman.edu/mlk jvoc@alphagreenville.org SAT-SUN

17-18

VISUAL ARTS

Abstract Isn’t a Style: An Introduction to Decision Making in Abstraction Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | $125 This workshop will help students begin to learn

how to make decisions when making a nonrepresentational (abstract) work of art. Workshop exercises will allow students to extrapolate from a variety of sources, and help take abstraction beyond an idea of style or just making sound design decisions. Workshop content will be reinforced with relevant examples from art history. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 | liz@artcentergreenville.org www.artcentergreenville.org SUN

18

MUSIC

The Herring Chamber Ensemble

Buncombe Street United Methodist Church 200 Buncombe St. 3 p.m. | $30/adult and $15/student The Herring Chamber Ensemble, recognized as the upstate’s finest chamber choral group, presents their 21st annual winter concert at Buncombe Street United Methodist Church in the sanctuary. Music, and especially singing, has the power to dramatically enhance and influence lives. The Herring Ensemble concert program taps into some of that mysterious yet real power. The three-part program expresses consolation, celebrates life and singing, and for dessert, “music that is just plain fun to sing.” Tickets are available from the Peace Center Box Office, Pecknel Music Company on Pleasantburg Drive, and at the door the afternoon of the concert. Bing.vick@furman.edu or kelly@greenvillechorale.com THRU MON

19

VISUAL ARTS

GCCA Art School Winter Session Registration

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. Develop your creative skills and discover new art forms in a six week class, one or two day workshop, or curate your experience in a 2-3 hour group class of your choosing. Register now for Winter 2018 six week classes starting the week of Jan. 8 through Feb. 17, 2018 (Winter Session I), and Feb. 26 through April 7, 2018 (Winter Session II). Please register at least one week in advance of the class/workshop start date. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 | Liz@artcentergreenville.org www.artcentergreenville.org TUE

20

FAMILY & EDUCATION

Harriet Tubman, Chautauqua History Alive Talk

Greenville Chautauqua Hughes Main Library | 25 Heritage Green Place 7-8:30 p.m. | FREE Join an audience that loves talking back to history to discuss Harriet Tubman – with Duff Bruce, founding Greenville Chautauqua board member and former owner of The Open Book. This event is not a costumed performance. Harriet Tubman will be performed by Becky Stone in the Chautauqua History Alive Festival. 864-244-1499 www.greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org FAMILY

“Solutions for Cold Feet” by Carey Sookocheff

South Carolina Children’s Theatre 1200 Pendleton St. 9:30 and 11 a.m. | $1 A chance for wee ones (Pre-K) to hear a favorite story read and acted out. The material may include audience participation segments or simple audience interaction. The performance will last

no more than 30 minutes – perfect for young, wiggly patrons. Traysie Amick, SCCT’s principal teaching artist, brings her high energy and child-friendly interpretation of favorite children’s stories to you for a fun weekday performance. 864-235-2885 | www.scchildrenstheatre.org WED

21

MUSIC

Mavis Staples

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. 7:30 p.m. | $25-$55 Grammy Award-winner and Kennedy Center Honoree Mavis Staples is living, breathing history, weaving herself into the very fabric of gospel, soul, folk, pop, R&B, blues, rock, and hip-hop over the last 60 years. She made a name for herself in the 1950s as part of The Staple Singers, went on to contribute to the freedom songs of the Civil Rights era, and later rose to pop radio stardom with hits like “I’ll Take You There” and “Respect Yourself.” 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org THU

22

LECTURE

Pictures & Words: Motionpoems Highlights Black Poetry

Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. 6:30 p.m. | FREE The Peace Center’s 2017-2018 Peace Voices program presents Pictures & Words: Motionpoems Highlights Black Poetry, featuring Todd Boss, Irving Hillman, and Glenis Redmond. Todd Boss is the co-founder and artistic director of Motionpoems, which takes contemporary poetry and turns it into beautiful short films. Peace Center Poet-in-Residence Glenis Redmond’s poem “The Tao of the Black Plastic Comb” is part of the latest installment of Motionpoems, which partnered with the foundation Cave Canem to feature African American poetry. This Poetic Conversation will feature a screening of 11 Motionpoems’ films, followed by a discussion with Boss, Redmond, and film producer Irving Hillman. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org CONCERT

RAIN Concert

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. 7:30 p.m. | $45-65 A Tribute to The Beatles celebrates the 50th anniversary of the release of “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.” The celebration comes to Greenville when RAIN plays the Peace Center. As “the next best thing to seeing The Beatles!” (Associated Press), RAIN performs the full range of The Beatles’ discography live onstage, including the most complex and challenging songs that The Beatles themselves recorded in the studio but never performed for an audience. In addition to the updated sets that include brand new LED, high-definition screens and multimedia content, RAIN will bring “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” to life in its entirety with the launch of the 2017 tour. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

The Latest Fashion ACROSS

1 Stuff pumped into a 747 8 Bracing devices 14 Teeny bit 20 “Stephen,” to the French 21 Rip into 22 Untrue rumor 23 Start of a riddle 25 “Ironic” singer Morissette 26 Enzyme name ender 27 Solo for a 41-Across 28 Not feeling well at all 30 Set aflame 31 Riddle, part 2 39 Shar- — 40 No, to Burns 41 Certain opera singer 42 Actress Joanne 43 Bit of slander 44 Neighbor of a Croat 46 The, to Josef 48 Apt rhyme of “grab” 50 — -O-Fish (McDonald’s sandwich) 52 Riddle, part 3 59 Very pungent 61 Certain opera singer 62 Adders, e.g. 63 Most blaring 66 Sculling tools 68 As blind as — 69 Elegant tree 72 Pharmacy amount 73 Riddle, part 4

76 Blackthorn 77 Fire residue 78 Lady Grey 79 Sauce brand since 1937 80 Stays away from 82 Total or Life 84 Neighbor of a Swede 86 Goes fast 87 Riddle, part 5 93 NATO part 94 Mineo of “Tonka” 95 Knighted one, e.g. 96 Pleasant 99 The Beatles’ “— Loser” 100 “Citizen X” actor Stephen 103 Equine noise 107 Do a lawn chore 109 Relo vehicle 110 End of the riddle 115 Dir. from Del. to Vt. 116 Busy mo. for a CPA 117 Big particle physics lab in Switz. 118 “Hail, Nero!” 119 Big name in sneakers 121 Riddle’s answer 128 Lenient 129 Beethoven’s Third, familiarly 130 Mark Antony’s wife 131 Local lingoes 132 Wet slightly 133 Wee baby

By Frank Longo

DOWN

1 Seder celebrant 2 Ordinal number ender 3 Carrere of “True Lies” 4 Beyond embryonic 5 Oneness 6 Baja California resort port 7 Permit to 8 Biblical angel 9 Chicana, e.g. 10 Many flying creatures 11 Got together 12 Compadre 13 “Shrek!” author William 14 Like time, speed and temperature 15 Bad, to Luc 16 Including everything 17 Author Steel 18 More sandlike 19 MS markers 24 “Yuk” relative 29 PC screen variety 31 Special — (mil. group) 32 Toll, for one 33 Atomizer for spraying paint 34 Turned right on a horse 35 Has no life 36 — Ark (biblical boat) 37 With 57-Down, supporter for a caterer’s dishes 38 Pets’ docs 45 Groom’s partner

St. Mary’s Catholic School Tradition

Virtue

Priority Testing Dates at 9 am:

27 January 2018 24 February 2018

Excellence

Grades K3-8

Call to schedule your school tour: 864.679.4117 101 Ha mpton Aven u e, Gr eenv ille, SC 2 9 6 0 1

SACS Accredited National Blue Ribbon School w w w. st m a r y s gv l . o r g/t h e s ch o o l

47 Microwave brand 49 Unoriginal 51 Indefinite things 53 Keats verse 54 Gobs 55 Railing locale 56 Hurricane relative 57 See 37-Down 58 Green-lights 59 Alan of “White Mile” 60 Doves’ calls 64 Horrify 65 Reasonably muscular 67 Lactose, e.g. 69 Unrequired course 70 Rob of the Brat Pack 71 Disorder 74 Gets close 75 Mom or dad’s sister 76 “Da Doo Ron Ron” singer Cassidy 78 — Tull (rock band) 81 — -Magnon man 82 Persian, e.g. 83 Country singer Rimes 85 Suffix with lion 87 Army group 88 Ball of perfume in a closet 89 Exhausting 90 Urged in defense 91 Intentions 92 Close friendship between guys 97 “Wheels” 98 Nav. officer 101 Expunges 102 African viper 104 Implant that helps in returning a lost pet

105 Athens’ land 106 Husband of Lily Munster 108 Greet with a hand motion 111 Resulted in 112 Followed a curved path 113 Hit skit show since ’75 114 “— & Kel” (1990s teen show) 119 — Khan

Sudoku

Hard

120 Height fig. 122 Hunters’ gp. 123 — de plume 124 Cyclotron bit 125 Actress Longoria 126 Apt humor 127 Letter encl. to facilitate a reply Crossword answers: page 20

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 20


SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 38-01/29/18, Ice Resurfacing Machine with Training, January 29, 2018, 3:00 P.M. E.D.T. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA PUBLIC INFORMATION NOTICE The Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) reflecting proposed flood hazard determinations within the Grove Creek water shed located in Greenville County. You are invited to attend our open house to review the FIRMs and ask questions in preparation for the formal 90-day appeal process. The open house will be held: February 1, 2018 from 4 – 8 pm 301 University Ridge (Greenville County Square) Conference Room B

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices $165 Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line 864.679.1205 | email: aharley@communityjournals.com

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Trailblazer Park RR/ Concession Building, RFP #37-02/13/18, due at 3:00 P.M., E.S.T., February 13, 2018. Pre-Bid meeting with Site visit at 10:00 A.M., E.S.T., January 23, 2018 at Greenville County Procurement Services, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Traffic Line Marking, IFB #3601/25/18, due at 3:00 P.M., E.S.T., January, 25, 2018. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Procurement/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

ESTADO DE CAROLINA DEL SUR CONDADO DE GREENVILLE EN LA CORTE DE FAMILIA C.A. No.: 2017-DR-23-3813 NOTA DE ACTOS A: FRANCISCO JUAN MARTINEZ Usted ha sido notificado de acuerdo al Código de Carolina del Sur Ann Sec. 15-9-710. Que actos de divorcio han sido iniciados bajo el caso arriba mencionado por Elias Carlos Perez. USTED HA SIDO NOTIFICADO COMO SIGUE : 1. Que dentro de treinta (30) días de haber recibido la notificación usted responderá la clasificación por escrito a nuestra oficina localizada en 201 W. Stone Ave., Greenville, SC 29609 o con la Corte del Tribunal que se encuentra localizada en el 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29602 la nota y las razones para refutar intervenir ó de otro modo responder: 2. Que el Tribunal debe ser informado de su dirección actual y cualquier cambio de domicilio durante el proceso legal de divorcio. 3. Que si no presenta una respuesta dentro de (30) días de recivir el edicto constituye juicio de manera predeterminada rendido contra usted para el alivio demandado en el reclamo. Nathalie M. Morgan (69848) Nathalie M. Morgan, LLC 201 West Stone Avenue Greenville, SC 29609 (864)242-6655 (864)242-6111 (facsimile)

WEDDINGS  NGAGEMENTS  NNIVERSARIES

your announcement to the eater Greenville Area

WEDDINGS  ENGAGEMENTS  ANNIVERSARIES Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

WEDDINGS

1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90 For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@communityjournals.com

AMENDED SUMMONS (NON-JURY) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2017-CP-23-07466 Gendlin Homes, LLC, Plaintiff, Vs. Landon Keith Williams, Samantha M. Ingram, Bank of America, The South Carolina Department Of Revenue and all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #0119.00-07-005.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Amended Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Amended Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Amended Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Amended Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Amended Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: INFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Amended Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon amended complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, City of Greenville known as Lot 26 on plat entitled Property of Ladson A. Mills shown in Plat Book H, Page 117 – 118 recorded in the ROD Office for Greenville County. Reference is made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. TAX MAP #0076.02-02-019.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-07602 DEFICIENCY WAIVED STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS Navy Federal Credit Union , PLAINTIFF, vs. Mildred Wiggins; The South Carolina Department of Mental Health, through its agency the Greenville Mental Health; Pinnacle Providence Trust 01-042512, Susan Lueck, Trustee, DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the

WEDDINGS

1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90

Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on November 27, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Cherrydale Cigar Club intends aharley@communityjournals.com

to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 2845 N. Pleasantburg Dr., Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 14, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-06598 DEFICIENCY REQUESTED Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC, PLAINTIFF, vs. Donald Segars a/k/a Donald K. Segars; Greenville Rental Company; Williams Land Company, Inc.; SC Housing Corp., DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the

Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on October 19, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Derrick Cannon intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 601 Airport Rd., Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 28, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110


January 12, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

January 12, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.