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STATE HACKING FALLOUT: THE BAD NEWS IS IN THE MAIL

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GREENVILLE JOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, January 4, 2013 • Vol.15, No.1

Soccer

A night of hockey, strictly for the ladies

GOAL

PAGE 18

Students find their voice at the Peace Center

MARY ELIZABETH MCNAIR WAITED YEARS TO TAKE THE FIELD

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After years of surgery and therapy to help straighten twisted bones in her legs and tendons that were too tight to allow her to walk normally, Mary Elizabeth McNair’s soccer dreams are finally coming true. PHOTOS PROVIDED

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

“When it comes to recommending potential board members, people tend to recommend people who look like them. And that perpetuates the problem.” Nika White, Greenville Chamber of Commerce vice president of diversity and inclusion, on the dearth of qualified women and minorities on corporate and nonprofit boards.

$50,000 Yearly salary for state lawmakers – nearly five times the current salary – proposed by Rep. John King of Rock Hill.

1.8 million

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“The more successful you are at preventing disaster, the less people are willing to fund disaster preparedness. We have to keep reminding ourselves that bad things can happen and will happen.”

Approximate number of state taxpayers who will receive letters informing them that their personal information was stolen from the state Department of Revenue last September.

Dr. Lee Crandall

85%

Board members for Fortune 500 companies who are white men, according to the Alliance for Board Diversity.

Dr. Lee Crandall, chair of Clemson University’s department of public health sciences, on preparing for public health emergencies.

“Poetry is a great way to get out on paper what you hold inside.” Woodmont High School freshman Tristan Bellah, on her response to the Peace Center workshop Peace Voices.

15

States, including South Carolina, that scored 6 out of 10 indicators for public health emergency preparedness in the “Ready or Not?” report.

“You get to yell and holler and be a little wild.” Rebekah Smith of FOX Carolina, explaining why women should give Road Warriors hockey a try.

“This site was hacked.” Image that appeared Dec. 22 on the state Department of Employment and Workforce website and 12 other websites nationwide.

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journal news spartanburgregional.com

News and information from Spartanburg Regional

healthmatters DON’T LET FLU CATCH YOU About 5-20 percent of U.S. residents get the flu each year, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Seasonal flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. It spreads between people and can cause mild to severe illness, even death. Here a few facts about the most common infection families face: • Flu season occurs in the fall and winter • Seasonal flu typically peaks in January and/or February, but it can occur as early as October or as late as May • Getting the flu vaccine is your best protection against the flu • Flu-related complications include pneumonia and dehydration How does seasonal flu spread? Most experts believe that you get the flu when a person with the flu coughs, sneezes, or talks and droplets containing their germs land in your mouth or nose. You can also get the flu by touching a surface or object that has the flu virus on it and then touching your mouth, eyes or nose. Who is at risk? Some groups are more likely to experience complications from the seasonal flu, including: • Seniors (those age 65 and older) • Children (especially those younger than 2) • People with chronic health conditions What are common complications from the seasonal flu? • Bacterial pneumonia • Ear or sinus infections • Dehydration • Worsening of chronic health conditions How long does the illness last? Most people who get the flu feel much better within one or two weeks. How long am I contagious? Most healthy adults can infect others one day before symptoms develop and five to seven days after symptoms appear. Some people, especially young children and people with weakened immune systems, might be contagious for a longer period. For more information about flu, visit the Center for Disease Control’s flu monitoring site at fluview.gov.

EXPERT CARE Lisa Carroll, M.D., of Family Physicians of Boiling Springs, is accepting new patients of all ages at 864-560-3650.

REGIONAL FOUNDATION GRANTS Community nonprofit groups that address health needs may apply for funding for 2013 programs through the Spartanburg Regional Foundation. Groups are required to submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) by January 31. While the LOI is non-binding, it is required for eligibility to proceed in the application process. To submit an LOI, please visit regionalfoundation.com for guidelines and requirements. For more information, contact Grants Coordinator Stacey Dulin at 864-560-6827.

TUNE IN TO DISCOVER HEALTH on WYFF News 4 on Sundays at 12:30 p.m. to learn more about the latest advances in medical care at Spartanburg Regional.

4 THE Journal | JANUARY 4, 2013


New bills await legislators Proposals would allow teachers to pack heat at school, criminalize implementation of Obamacare By Cindy Landrum | staff

Public school employees with concealed weapon permits could have guns at school as long as they use “soft” bullets under a bill filed in advance of the 2013 South Carolina legislative session. In addition, Rep. John King, D-Rock Hill, wants to increase the salaries of state lawmakers to $50,000 – nearly five times what it is now – saying it would give working-class residents a chance to run for the Legislature. Those are among the proposals awaiting state legislators when the new legislative session begins Tuesday. Legislators prefiled 348 bills, ranging from those that would create early voting in South Carolina and impose term limits on state lawmakers to those proposing to increase the penalties for homicide by child abuse, create a weekend where state residents could buy hurricane supplies with no sales tax and require that student athletes be taught about the risk of concussions. Some of the bills are repeats of bills that didn’t pass last year. Others are brandnew. Some have no real chance of passing, while others are sure to spark big debates. A bill filed by Rep. Phillip Lowe, RFlorence, just days after the school shooting in Newton, Conn., that left 20 first-graders and six adults dead, would allow teachers and other public school employees to have firearms on campus if they have a concealed weapon permit. Under the bill’s provisions, the employee would be required to keep the gun on his person at all times and concealed when not in use, use only “frangible bullets to avoid ricochets,” and be certified as a precision marksman by the State Law Enforcement Division. The teacher or school staffer could have no documented history of violence or unmanaged anger. State Rep. Bill Chumley filed a bill that says any state official caught enforcing President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care reform law known informally as Obamacare would be guilty of

a misdemeanor and “must be fined not more than $1,000 or imprisoned not more than two years, or both.” But federal officials caught enforcing the law would be “guilty of a felony and, upon conviction, must be fined no more than $5,000, or imprisoned not more than five years, or both.” Rep. Garry R. Smith co-sponsored the bill. A bill filed by Rep. Bakari Sellers would establish an early voting period that would begin 30 days before an election and end three days prior. Early voting is different from absentee voting, as voters do not have to have a reason to cast a ballot during the early voting period. Another bill would create a program to divert qualifying nonviolent military veteran offenders away from the criminal justice system and into appropriate treatment programs. Other bills would give a state income tax deduction to South Carolina residents to purchase identity theft protection in response to the cybertheft of Social Security numbers and other sensitive taxpayer information at the state Department of Revenue. Another bill would provide a refundable tax credit to taxpayers who sustain actual losses resulting from identity theft. Another bill would eliminate the requirement that state residents have proof of insurance in their vehicle and to allow proof of financial responsibility to be displayed on an electronic device. Several bills seek to increase penalties for criminal offenses. One would allow prosecutors to seek the death penalty in homicide by child abuse cases. Another would increase the penalty for cockfighting. A third would create graduated penalties for weapons violations. Another bill would require students to have an electrocardiogram before being allowed to participate in interscholastic athletics. Another bill would allow teachers to sue in civil court any student who assaults them at school or at a school-related event. Sen. Lee Bright filed a bill that would prohibit members of the General Assembly from being elected as a judge until 20 years after they last served in the Legislature. Another bill would allow counties to impose a local option motor fuel user fee of no more than two cents a gallon on retail sales of motor fuel for road improvement and maintenance projects. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

journal news

UPCOMING EVENTS FREEDOM FROM SMOKING® Mondays, January 7-February 18 • 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehab, 299 East Pearl Street This is a comprehensive, systematic approach to quitting. The American Lung Association-trained facilitators will lead you through this seven-week program. Registration is required, with a fee of $50, and covers a participant workbook and light refreshments. Call the Joe R. Utley Heart Resource Center at 5604472 for more information.

MEDICAL WEIGHT LOSS INFORMATION SESSION Tuesday, January 8 and Tuesday, January 29 • 4-5 p.m. Cafeteria Conference Room, Spartanburg Regional This free class covers information about our medical weight loss programs: Rapid Weight Loss, Healthy Lifestyle and 9- or 18-week Optifast. For more information or to register, call 560-7070.

LAPBAND® INFORMATION SESSION Wednesday, January 9 • 6:30-9 p.m Family Medicine Conference Room, Regional Outpatient Center This free class covers detailed information about LapBand weight loss surgery. Register online or call 560-7070.

GASTRIC BYPASS AND SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY INFORMATION SESSION Wednesday, January 16 • 6:30-9 p.m. Family Medicine Conference Room, Regional Outpatient Center This free class covers detailed information about gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. Register online or call 560-7070.

MOBILE MAMMOGRAPHY Spartanburg Regional’s mobile mammography unit will be at the following sites on the dates listed below: January 11: Wal-Mart, 165 Walton Drive, Gaffney Call 216-5912 to schedule January 17: Chesnee Center for Family Medicine, 230 S. Alabama Ave. Call 461-4951 to schedule January 19: Landrum Library, 111 Asbury Drive, Landrum January 30: Inman Family Practice, 12230 Asheville Highway, Inman

MIND-BODY SKILLS GROUP Mondays, January 14-March 4 • 5-7 p.m. Bearden-Josey Center for Breast Health Education Room The Mind-Body Skills Group is an eight-week program modeled after the Center for Mind-Body Medicine. Participants will learn the scientific basis for mind-body medicine while experiencing the power of the small-group approach. Call Hunter Mahon at 560-1981 for more information and to register. Online registration and event details are available at spartanburgregional.com or by calling 864-560-7999.

Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System JANUARY 4, 2013 | the Journal 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

First things first Inquiries will continue apace into the unprecedented cybertheft at the state Department of Revenue as lawmakers return to Columbia to begin a new legislative session. But as the long-promised notification letters finally begin to arrive, security and selfdefense will become far more critical for millions of freshly alarmed state residents. The first New Year’s resolution for those who haven’t already done so should be to register for the free, one-year credit-monitoring program the state has contracted to provide through Experian. State residents have until March 31 to sign up for ProtectMyID. Call 1-866-578-5422 or go online to www.protectmyid.com/ scdor and enter the code SCDOR123. Make sure to perform this step for every Social Security number affected or suspected to be. State residents should also stay on high alert for scammers trolling for prey as those notification letters confirm worst fears about individual exposure to identity theft. Expect potential grifters to represent themselves as banks, state agencies or private monitoring companies offering special protection from the hacking, state consumer affairs officials warn. Never give such callers personal information over the phone; state agencies, banks and legitimate private enterprises will never ask for it. Make direct, independent contact with your bank or any private company you may be considering for additional protection, and alert the state consumer affairs department of any offer you suspect to be a scam at www.consumer.sc.gov or 800-922-1594. The department’s website also has a number of consumer alerts and suggestions for minimizing the effects of the security breach. Go to www.consumer.sc.gov and select “Consumer Alert: Special Edition – Identity Theft.” If this all has a too-little-too-late feel, well, that’s because it is – and unfortunately will continue to be as the Palmetto State stumbles forward into the posthacking era. Everything state government does will be catch-up from this point on; the question will be how quickly and competently the catch-up proceeds. The Revenue Department is encrypting data, working on a dual-password system, and has adopted Division of State Information Technology cybersecurity measures like the 16 other Cabinet agencies under Gov. Nikki Haley’s control. Several Cabinet agencies have split the cost of hiring four new full-time employees to help provide 24-hour monitoring for intrusions and viruses, and the state is buying a program that will shut off computers should they become infected or move suspicious amounts of data. Meanwhile, the Legislature will be taking up bills to create a muscular state information-technology division and reimburse state residents for the costs of protecting themselves from identity theft beyond the one year the state is providing free of charge. For however well state government manages to forestall future cybertheft attempts – a questionable feat – the exposure for 6.4 million South Carolina consumers and businesses is a done deal. The fraud monitoring Experian will provide is an after-the fact program. It includes $1 million in identity theft insurance and alerts to credit report changes – but those alerts will come only after a thief has used stolen personal information to apply for a loan, or medical services, or a credit card. There’s no way to get the stolen data back. It will remain a cyber-treasure trove for decades to come. State taxpayers will have to guard against identity theft for the rest of their lives. Which means the first order of business this legislative session – the very first – must be to secure taxpayers’ personal data against any further attack. This is a test of leadership for House Speaker Bobby Harrell, Senate President Pro Tempore John Courson and Gov. Nikki Haley – and failure is not an option.

Slouching toward depravity Anyone who has lost a child has a heartfelt understanding of the tremendous grief felt by the parents of those children murdered at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Though some may think that time heals all wounds, I know from personal experience that time cannot perform that miracle. Those parents now know that the death of a child robs them of all that they are and all that they might have been. For the sake of the victims, these murders demand justice. Unfortunately, the Sandy Hook killer took the coward’s way out before justice could be served. Though the killer’s motives are unknown and unjustified, we know that he acted with depraved indifference. Depravity as a reason for the murders has not been much focused on by the news media in their coverage of Sandy Hook. Rather than talk about the individual responsibility of the killer, the pundits have used all of their bandwidth to focus on their perception of societal ills such as lack of gun control and lack of government funding for the mentally ill. Their simplification of the problem ignores the complexity of the issue and prevents adequate discussion to find a solution. Many politicians, both liberal and conservative, have fallen into this narrow debate. Judging from their sound bites, it seems that the problem can be solved with either more guns or fewer guns. Many have defined the act as evil but few have focused on why individuals act in a depraved manner. Also largely absent from the national discussion are any religious leaders of note. Pope Benedict XVI commented that he was “deeply saddened by Friday’s senseless violence” and that we should “dedicate ourselves more fervently to prayer and acts of peace.” Though his platitudes were heartfelt, he would surely agree that the root cause of our societal ills will not be cut out by mere acts of peace. On the Protestant side, America has had no mainstream Protestant minister to lean upon since the decline of Rev. Billy Graham. The absence of such a person was apparent in the aftermath of the Sandy Hook murders. Almost 100 years ago, the poet W.B. Yeats wrote “The Second Coming.” The

IN MY OWN WORDS by REP. TOMMY STRINGER

poet writes not of Christ’s triumphant return but of evil’s second coming after the decline of Christianity. The oft-quoted lines, “Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; / Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, / The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere / The ceremony of innocence is drowned,” poignantly describe the events at Sandy Hook. When trying to understand the killer’s drift toward depravity, acknowledging the lack of mainstream religious guidance presents a necessary starting point. Our moral center has softened through years of neglect. It is not holding. In our schools, young people are taught ethics without exposure to any underlying religious moral authority. In our churches, mainstream religious leaders have diluted traditional moral standards for the sake of increased “relevance” to society. In our homes, parents struggle to withstand the glorification of violence and immorality found almost everywhere in our society. Without constant reinforcement of our moral foundation by all parties, a gradual drift toward individual depravity is inevitable. It has taken generations to create our problems and it will take generations to correct them. We need strong leaders, both religious and political, with the wisdom to rebuild a moral center for our society. That should be the discussion taking place now. Instead, weak-willed pundits and politicians will try to take away our guns or anything else that will grab them a headline, while we watch our children devoured by an increasingly depraved society described by Yeats as that “rough beast” that “slouches toward Bethlehem to be born.” Tommy Stringer is president of Stringer Resource Group in Greer and represents District 18 in the S.C. House of Representatives.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 4, 2013


journal news

Amazon center in Spartanburg sold for $63 million By Dick Hughes | senior business writer rent base rent is $3.4 million annually.

fulfillment center in Lexington County, where it employs approximately 2,000. Cole Corporate said it acquired the Spartanburg facility under a Delaware-registered subsidiary, Cole ID Spartanburg SC LLC. Cole held 12 wholly owned corporate and industrial properties in eight states as of Dec. 21. The total includes the Spartanburg property and three others acquired last month. The company said in a prospectus that it has “no plan for any renovations, improvements or development” of the recently acquired properties. Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@communityjournals.com.

Greg Beckner / Staff

Ownership of the 1-million-squarefoot distribution center that Amazon leases in Spartanburg has changed hands. Cole Corporate Income Trust, a real estate investment trust based in Phoenix, Ariz., acquired the building Dec. 17 for $63 million from Tango SC LLC, which is registered in South Carolina as a Texas company. According to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Cole, it has an agreement to lease the distribution center to Amazon through Sept. 30, 2027, with renewal options of four and five years. The cur-

In January 2012, Amazon announced plans to invest $50 million in the distribution center on John Rodd Road near I-26. The county granted the online retailer a property tax break in the form of a 6 percent in-lieu payment. Construction started immediately, and the first shipments left the center in September. It was anticipated that Amazon would have a workforce of around 400 but many more in peak buying seasons. The Spartanburg facility is one of the largest distribution centers in the county after Adidas’ expanded 2.4-million-square-foot center. In 2011, Amazon opened a larger order

The 1-million-square-foot facility that Amazon leases in Spartanburg was recently sold to an Arizona company.

Chamber program hopes to help more women, minorities get on board Diversity Leadership Pipeline seeks potential nonprofit, corporate board members By Cindy Landrum | staff

There’s an effort underway to make Greenville’s nonprofit and corporate boardrooms less white and less male. The Greenville Chamber of Commerce has started a Diversity Leadership Pipeline, a database of qualified women and minorities interested in serving in leadership capacities, including nonprofit and corporate boards of directors. “Our community is rich with diverse talent; however, many of those individuals just haven’t been presented with the opportunity to serve in a leadership position,” said Nika White, the chamber’s vice president of diversity and inclusion. “Further, there is merit to broadening the pool of diverse leaders to avoid the same individuals being tapped for opportunities.” Boardroom diversity is not just a problem in Greenville.

Eighty-five percent of board members for Fortune 500 companies were white men. White women made up 12.6 percent of Fortune 500 boards, while minority men comprised 6.8 percent of board members and minority women 3 percent, according to the Alliance for Board Diversity. A national effort, 2020 Women on Boards, is trying to increase the percentage of women on U.S. corporate boards to at least 20 percent by 2020. “When it comes to recommending potential board members, people tend to recommend people who look like them,” White said, “And that perpetuates the problem.” Catalyst, a nonprofit membership organization that works to increase opportunities for women in business, said fewer than one-fifth of Fortune 500 companies’ boards had more than 25 percent women. Catalyst said one in 10 had no women on their boards. A study Catalyst completed in 2011 of boards with three or more women members had a 53 percent higher return on equity, 42 percent higher return on sales and 66 percent higher return on invested capital. 2020 Women on Boards said women comprise about half of the total U.S. workforce, and more than half of all

When you are done reading this paper, please recycle it.

managers are women. Women are also responsible for almost 80 percent of all consumer spending, the organization said. More than 200 women and minorities are now included on the Diversity Leadership Pipeline. The chamber has a goal of having at least 500 on the list by the end of the first quarter in 2013. The list will include information on a person’s experience and areas of interest. White said nonprofit groups and corporations sometimes contact the Chamber for suggestions for minority and women board members. “Diverse boards lead to better governance and the Diversity Leadership Pipeline is a way to facilitate that,” White said. The Chamber is working with various organizations on the list, including professional groups, Leadership Greenville alumni, the United Way and corporate affinity groups. White said the pipeline would give people who are qualified to be community and corporate leaders but haven’t had the opportunity a chance to take on leadership. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

JANUARY 4, 2013 | the Journal 7


journal news

A sporting chance After years of surgery and therapy, Mary Elizabeth McNair’s soccer dreams are finally coming true

Photo by Randy Hadaway

Before she talks about her favorite sport, Mary Elizabeth McNair has to show off the scars on her legs. The bubbly, ponytailed 11-year-old uses the nine scars as a springboard to tell about her journey toward a longtime dream: to play on a | soccer team. By april a. morris staff Mary Elizabeth was slow to hit the milestones of standing and walking, said her father, Alex McNair, and doctors quickly discovered that she had twists in her leg bones, not to mention tendons that were too tight to allow her to walk in a normal way. After much consideration and an evaluation in the Greenville Shriners Hospital’s gait lab (which uses motion capture technology identical to that used in movies), the McNairs opted for surgery to straighten Mary Elizabeth’s bones. So at seven years old, Mary Elizabeth underwent her first surgery in 2007 that literally cut her femur bone in half, rotated it and then patched it back together. The recovery was long, said Alex McNair. And during that protracted recuperation, “her main inspiration was that she could maybe play on a soccer team.” Mary John McNair, Mary Elizabeth’s mother, said the couple does not know where the fixation on soccer originated, but it was definitely more than a passing, childish infatuation. Mary Elizabeth’s soccer focus endured through surgery to straighten her bones and lengthen muscles, painstaking physical therapy, a year in permanent braces and a year in orthotics. After that, she continued to talk about the possibility of playing soccer even when the entire multi-year process was repeated for another leg. Mary Elizabeth chose a soccer ball as the image affixed to the back of her plastic braces, said her father, “and the talk of soccer has never ceased.” In December 2011, Mary Elizabeth had her final surgery to remove all of the plates and screws that had held her bones together. She was mobile enough to scoot

Mary Elizabeth with her father, Alex McNair.

down the steps that Christmas morning, her father said. Dr. Jon Davids, former Greenville Shriners Hospital chief of staff and Mary Elizabeth’s surgeon, said several decades ago children who could move as well Mary Elizabeth did would simply be left with walking difficulties. “Getting around was good enough.” But with the gait lab technology, Davids could identify four ways to improve Mary Elizabeth’s mobility. And while Mary Elizabeth’s parents praise Dr. Davids and the Shriner’s staff, Davids says that the success also hinged on his young patient’s attitude. “She worked very hard and she was very dedicated to that therapy,” he said. Though the family constantly talked about the possibility of Mary Elizabeth playing soccer, her parents were unsure whether it would actually happen. However, not even a year after her final surgery, Mary Elizabeth and her father ran into his friend Mark Dullea and Dullea’s daughter, not knowing that the chance meeting would set off a series of events that Alex Mc-

Nair described as divinely driven. “Mary Elizabeth spotted a group of girls in uniform [including Dullea’s daughter] and they played for CESA (Carolina Elite Soccer Academy),” he said. Dullea explained the ins and outs of the program and McNair was soon in touch with another acquaintance, Jack Puckett, chairman of the CESA board. Within the very competitive organization, said McNair, “we talked about the possibility of Mary Elizabeth joining a team, having a uniform and maybe being something like a coach’s assistant.” CESA identified three teams of the 25 in Mary Elizabeth’s age group that might be a good fit. And then another seemingly divine intervention happened, said McNair. Team coaches Bo and Karen Greene heard about the girl searching for a team and knew it was Mary Elizabeth, former classmate of their daughter, Delaney. They readily agreed to add her to the roster. When he broke the news to Mary Elizabeth, “She jumped up, knocked over her chair and ran around

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journal news the house screaming. Dinnertime was pretty much over,” her father said. The parents said the typical fears about their child joining a new group were amplified for them and they were nervous about that first practice – whether Mary Elizabeth would be accepted by a group of strangers. It turns out that in addition to Delaney Greene, there were many familiar faces, including several other former classmates. “We thought that was an answer to our prayer,” said Alex McNair. The team of 10-12 year-olds, named “The Flying Burritos with a Side of Danger,” welcomed Mary Elizabeth. Outfitted with uniform and cleats, Mary Elizabeth was slated to simply help out during the game, but the team and coaches conspired to surprise Mary Elizabeth – and set a precedent for the entire season. At the end of the first quarter, referee Jonathan Shaw blew the whistle, but none of the players left the field, said McNair. Mary Elizabeth was called out as a substitution and dribbled down the field, kicking a goal. Alex McNair said once again, they saw their prayers answered. Shaw was a veteran referee and had the experience and forethought to get Mary Elizabeth onto the field. “It was a life-changing experience for Mary Elizabeth,” he said. “That first goal was a truly wonderful thing. Not only did it get Mary Elizabeth fully engaged, but the parents and girls from both teams joined in the fun cheering. It brought us all closer together on many, many levels and set the stage for the rest of the season.” Coach Bo Greene said team sports are about much more than rules and skills. “We tell the girls it takes courage to give something everything you have, knowing there is a chance you may fall short of your goal. But as in life, they will be better for it. “I think the courage and passion that Mary Elizabeth displays at practice and in life had a profound effect on the other

players. Her ability to overcome a difficulty and come as physical challenges was an infar as she has.” spiration to the rest of the team, “It was very touchand to us as coaches,” Greene ing to the parents on said. the sidelines when it Now that she’s completed her was Mary Elizabeth’s first season, Mary Elizabeth turn to kick the ball said that participating is “aweand score a goal, to some” and she will be practicwatch our girls assist ing over the winter months, her and watch the othgetting ready for the spring. er team do the same,” “She’s talking about soccer added Byrd. play dates during the off-seaAndrew Fleming, son,” her father said. assistant programs diMary Elizabeth has learned rector for CESA, said everything from a straight the girls on Mary Elizkick to a side kick and added, abeth’s team quickly “Coach Bo taught me to kick figured out how she around the cones.” She drills could participate. And with the team, often with the though they could be Greenes’ son, Robert. typical, silly girls, they “He would teach me cool were also very intellimoves,” she said. gent and mature about Mary John McNair said one including her. of the highlights was the “whole “You could almost new world” that playing soccer remove the adults has opened up for Mary Eliza- The Flying Burritos soccer team: (back row, L to R) Coach Bo Greene, Coach Karen Greene, Ana from the equation beth. Antonakis, Madelyn Spitzer, Lauren LaRosa, Delaney Greene; (middle row, L to R) Cailey Owens, and things would have “They are a very strong group Mary Elizabeth McNair, Anna Claire Byrd, Lucy Cassels; and (front row, L to R) Delaney Carter, been pretty much the of girls, it’s very impressive,” she Chase Beeby. Teammates not pictured are Margaret Coburn and Sarah Grace Swift. same,” he said. said. And though Mary Elizabeth “We did not win evwasn’t the most experienced player, they all Greene said. “She works hard, she does ery game we played this year, nor did we embraced her, she said. “There have been practice and she comes to practice excited win the championship,” Bo Greene said. so many miracles along the way, that from to show us what she’s learned, and I think “But our girls played with passion and they it’s helped her in a lot of different ways.” our perspective, God is in control.” never quit. I think that was in large part to Teammate Anna Clair Byrd, 11, was in having Mary Elizabeth on the team and Karen Greene, who helps husband Bo coach, said, “When she came out to prac- Mary Elizabeth’s third-grade class during seeing the courage that she displayed.” tice, the girls were really looking forward her time of surgery and recovery. Byrd, also At home, recounting the stories from to her coming and really wanted her to a first-time team member, said, “When I her first season, Mary Elizabeth displays a saw her the first day of practice, I was sur- silver soccer ball signed by the team. She feel like part of the team.” Each teammate alternates drilling with prised at how well she could move around adds that she won’t be using it for practice, Mary Elizabeth so she always has a part- and how well she could run with us.” though. “I want to get a black and white “I thought she had a really good time ball because this one is special.” ner, said Karen Greene. Mary Elizabeth added a different dynamic: “When we get and we all enjoyed it,” Byrd said. “She’s And as she shows off her team trophy, stressed out at practice or get frustrated always very enthusiastic and she always Mary Elizabeth sums up the realization with something small, Mary Elizabeth put a smile on our faces.” of an enduring dream in just a few words: Anna Clair’s mother, Tyree Byrd, said, “I slept with it the first night.” helps keep everything in perspective.” The 11-year-old “always has such a “Mary Elizabeth joining our team has Contact April A. Morris at great attitude, no matter what is going on,” shown the girls that anyone can overcome amorris@communityjournals.com.

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journal news

Mom gives books to NICU parents to honor son ed to bring that kindness to others,” she added. For more information on the program, visit www.matthewlovesbooks.org.

Matthew Love was born prematurely at Spartanburg Regional Hospital and was later transferred to the Greenville Hospital System Children’s Hospital NICU, where he later passed away.

“The NICU can be a scary and intimidating place, but also a place full of miracles,” Love said. “Matthew … loved to hear stories. The stories we were able to share let Matthew know we were with him. We really believe that’s how he learned to recognize us when we arrived at his bedside.” “We were so touched by the many kindnesses visited upon us during our stay in the NICUs that we want-

photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

When Sarah Love’s son, Matthew, was in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) at Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System and Greenville Hospital System Children’s Hospital, she told him stories every day. Matthew was born eight weeks early and weighed less than three pounds, only living for five months. In memory of her son, Sarah Love launched a nonprofit program called Matthew Loves Books that provides books to the parents of children in NICUs, giving them a way to connect with their children. Books are provided for children who are admitted to the NICU and can be taken home with the children. Love started the program in May 2012 at Spartanburg Regional and expanded it to Greenville Hospital System in December. More than 100 copies of “I Love You Through and Through” by Bernadette RossettiShustak were recently donated to the GHS Children’s Hospital Bryan NICU.

Christina DeFour reads the book she received from Sarah Love to her son, Logan, in the Greenville Hospital System Children’s Hospital NICU.

New mother Markenya King, left, gets a copy of “I Love You Through and Through” from Sarah Love.

Sarah Love, left, and Rachel Black with the Greenville Hospital System unload books from the back of Love’s car. In the honor and memory of her son, Matthew, Love started the nonprofit Matthew Loves Books, which provided books to parents with children in the NICU so parents can read to their babies.

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journal news

‘Ready or Not’ States need to improve response for natural disasters, bioterrorism and disease, study says By april a. morris | staff

A focus on emergency preparedness after 9/11, anthrax attacks and Hurricane Katrina bolstered efforts of public health agencies to be ready for anything. However, after funding cuts and complacency, preparations are suffering, according to “Ready or Not,” a public health report released in late December. Compiled from information from public sources or public health officials, the Trust for America’s Health report rates states on a list of 10 indicators. South Carolina earned a point for six out of the 10. It fell short on the number of residents vaccinated against whooping cough, climate change adaption plan, evacuation and relocation plans for childcare facili-

ties and the ability to sustain staff surges in public health laboratories. The Palmetto State garnered points for maintaining funding for public health programs, quick assembly time of key public health staff in an emergency, infectious disease control, emergency management accreditation, chemical threat preparedness in public health labs and the ability for nurses to practice across state lines. Dr. Lee Crandall, chair of the department of public health sciences at Clemson University, said one challenge for preparedness efforts is that there is no state funding for public health emergency preparedness – just federal money that requires a state match. South Carolina uses its public health activities to generate an in-kind match amount, but “it’s getting harder and harder for them to show that they have sufficient activities for the match. In the long term, that funding stream is fragile,” he said. Even so, Crandall commended what the state’s public health agencies are doing. “It looks to me, however, given that

amount of limited resources, that the people of South Carolina are doing an awful lot with the money they have,” he said. Crandall said he has also seen funding shift from public health agencies to hospitals for responding to natural disasters and other crises. This is not generating additional money for either, but is a positive change since hospitals are becoming more involved in community health, he said. A key advantage for the South Carolina public health system is the fact that the departments of health and environmental control are combined, he said. In an emergency, many states have to coordinate two departments that are not accustomed to working together. In South Carolina, the disaster vulnerability lies in the Lowcountry as sea levels rise, he said. Health officials will have to prepare for hurricanes that are potentially larger than those ever seen before. Another concern could be Upstate nuclear power plants that have disaster plans dating before the creation of Lake Keowee, and the potential issues if the dam breaks, he said. “That is something that is a very low probability, just as the Fukishima plants overrun by a tsunami was also

The One About Pop Art by Doug McAbee

Mon-Sat, 10-5; Sun, 1-5 Free Guild Gallery 200 E. Saint John St. Spartanburg 12 THE Journal | JANUARY 4, 2013

Who got what out of 10? 8 out of 10: Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Vermont and Wisconsin 7 out of 10: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota and Virginia 6 out of 10: Connecticut, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Washington and Wyoming 5 out of 10: Alaska, Arizona, Washington, D.C., Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Texas and West Virginia 4 out of 10: Colorado, Georgia, Hawaii, Nevada and New Jersey 3 out of 10: Kansas and Montana

very low probability, but those things that are the most unlikely to happen are the ones that we’re least prepared for,” he said. A key focus is having response plans that are as flexible as possible, he said. Crandall said he also predicts that in light of recent incidents of gun violence, public health providers may also be asked to assist in the aftermath of such events. According to the report, 35 states and Washington, D.C., scored six out of 10 or lower. Kansas and Montana scored the lowest, with three out of 10, and Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Vermont and Wisconsin scored highest with eight out of 10, said the report. To help the country be even more prepared, the report made recommendations to dedicate funding to public health preparedness, modernize biosurveillance that identifies and tracks threats, address antibiotic resistance, increase readiness for extreme weather systems and update the food safety system nationwide. Congress should also renew the Pandemic and All Hazards Preparedness Act, which was due to expire at the end of 2012. According to Crandall, all public health services suffer from a similar chronic problem. “To the extent you’re successful in preventing things from happening, people view those things as something we don’t have to worry about and don’t have to fund anymore. The more successful you are at preventing disaster, the less people are willing to fund disaster preparedness. We have to keep reminding ourselves that bad things can happen and will happen.” Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.


Individual notifications of SC cybertheft begin arriving at last

journal news

By CHarles Sowell | staff

Just in time for Christmas, state residents began receiving formal notification that their personal information had been stolen from the state Department of Revenue in September. Some of the 1.2 million persons who live out of state got their notification earlier. The notification letters arrived two months after Gov. Nikki Haley first announced the massive cybertheft at DOR. Waiting that long to send notices to affected South Carolinians is “way beyond pale,” Beth Givens, director of the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse in San Diego, told the State newspaper. People who don’t follow the news or lack online access need notification as soon as possible, Givens said. Typically, such notifications are sent within 30 days of when a data breach becomes public, she said. The state is paying SourceLink Carolina of Greenville to send notices at a cost of $1.2 million, according to the governor’s office. About 1.8 million taxpayers in South Carolina will receive letters and more than 800,000 who signed up for credit-monitoring from Experian will get e-mails. In a related development, state officials have said that the state Department of Employment and Workforce came under computer attack recently. The agency’s website was defaced, but no personal information was taken, DEW spokeswoman Adrienne Fairwell told the Associated Press. WLTX-TV of Columbia reported an image appeared on the DEW website that said, “This site was hacked.” Fairwell called the image a “website defacement” and said the vandalism was taken down after a little more than an hour. “Website defacement is an attack on a website that changes the visual appearance of the site or a webpage,” the agency said in a news release. “This can be compared to graffiti on a wall.” Fairwell said the defacement also occurred at about 12 other websites nationwide. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

JANUARY 4, 2013 | the Journal 13


journal news

School provides students three squares a day

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tional or enrichment programs. She said the Legacy program started in December 2010 as part of the Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act. “We’re working to get the word out,” she said. “More schools have expressed

interest.” The dinners must meet USDA school meal nutritional guidelines, and schools are reimbursed $3.0875 for each meal. Young said the program is important because some children have to eat lunch early and are really hungry by 3 p.m. or 4 p.m. “This is a wonderful opportunity to ensure children who are in need of a nutritious meal after school get one,” she said. Crawford said participation in the program is greater than school officials had anticipated. “Students are coming in and taking care of their plates and if anybody else has anything left over, they take that, too,” he said. “A lot of our children may not have access to fruits and vegetables once they leave school. This is, for a lot of them, the last hot meal they have.” Crawford said the meal is served between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m. during the school’s enrichment program that runs until 5:30 or 6 p.m. each night. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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Legacy Charter School is providing more than education to students – it’s also providing three square meals a day. The charter school is the first public school in Greenville County to offer a dinner program through the Child and Adult Care Feeding Program administered by the state Department of Social Services. Three schools in Spartanburg County – Jesse S. Bobo Elementary and Arcadia Elementary in District 6 and Pacolet Elementary in District 3 – are among the 61 schools statewide now serving dinner to students, said Mary Young, program manager for DSS. Legacy Charter, which has 92 percent of its students qualify for free or reducedprice school meals, began the dinner program in November and now feeds about 300 of the school’s elementary students and about 160 middle and high school students, said Fred Crawford, the school’s executive director. That’s more than half of the school’s

800 students from kindergarten through 11th grade, he said. “With the mission of the school, it just makes sense.” Legacy is the only public school in South Carolina to require all students to have 45 minutes of physical education every day. It also has a healthy breakfast and lunch program and serves no fried food. According to Feeding America, the nation’s leading domestic hunger-relief charity, one in four Greenville County children are food insecure, meaning they don’t have consistent access to nutritious and adequate amounts of food necessary for a healthy life. Food insecurity impacts a child’s mental and physical health, academic achievement and future economic productivity, Feeding America said. Young said schools are eligible for the Child and Adult Care Feeding Program if they have an after-school or extended learning program, at least 50 percent of the student body qualify for free and reduced-price school meals and the after-school or extended learning program provides educa-

si p Pe day h t r Bi y ! t r Pa age k c Pa If you live in Greenville or Laurens County and your child will be 6 years old in January, bring your child’s birth certificate to the Pepsi Plant and receive a FREE Pepsi Birthday Party Package! January 7 - 12, Mon.- Fri. 1pm-5pm; Sat. 10am-12pm 751 State Park Road, Greenville, SC • 864-672-2060 ext.2057 Listen to the Ellis and Bradley Show on 100.5 WSSL or visit www.wsslfm.com for more details!

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Journal community

Search: Things To Do

Southern Art… Spartanburg Art Museum is presenting the artwork of South Carolina native Tarleton Blackwell thru Feb. 16. Large murals filled with collage icons of what it means to be both a South Carolinian and southerner. Who knew pigs could be so important?

Surreal… Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg presents the work of Spartanburg native Doug McAbee. His show—The One About Pop—is a surreal and abstract showcase of images that are based on the all-too-real and then candy coated. These drawings and sculptures make you wonder. Free. Reception: Thurs., Jan. 17

Grande Dame… Starting Jan. 7, Spartanburg Art Museum will present Mary Ellen Suitt: In Retrospect. Known for her “blue people,” Ms. Suitt is one of South Carolina’s most respected artists. Her use of both opaque and transparent paints with various techniques has established her as one of our most talented and revered residents.

Chicago… The Spartanburg Little Theatre presents this Broadway hit with all the razzle dazzle the David Reid Theatre can handle. See it Fri., Sat., and Sun., Jan. 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20. Expect sellouts!

Tour of sushi

Open on Sunday…

Army vet brings ‘creative rolls’ to his sushi restaurant in Greenville By NICHOLE LIVENGOOD | contributor

Matthew Wuhrman, owner of Red Fin on Main, ambles from his home across Main Street to his restaurant in bright yellow board shorts with sushi print – just a sample of his sushi clothing collection. Sushi was not always his obsession, however. “I used to despise sushi,” he says. That changed when he joined the military. “A buddy of mine took me to a place

right outside the base in Fayetteville, N.C., and he bought pretty much the gauntlet. I learned how to enjoy it. ” Once you have a handle on what turns you off about sushi – the texture or a particular taste – you can narrow it down and find something you like, Wuhrman says. “There’s a roll for everyone.” The Army veteran turned restaurateur spent 25 months in Iraq with the 82nd Airborne Division, an aggressive combat unit based out of Fort Bragg. Raised in Huntington Beach, Calif., the “typical

California surf kid” joined the military in August 2005. “It’s not that I wanted to go to war necessarily, I was just very curious. My mind couldn’t comprehend the third world and someone initiating harm on others,” he said. Wuhrman has been “all over that county, every single corner of it – Basra, Bagdad, Balad, Fallujah, Al Asad,” and sitting behind a gun in the Iraqi desert RED FIN continued on page 16

Chapman Cultural Center is now open on Sunday afternoons, 1-5 p.m. Visit Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg Science Center, Spartanburg Regional History Museum, Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg Gallery, and the student galleries. Be on the lookout for special presentations!

Tango… Ready to clench a rose in your teeth and strut your stuff? Tango every Monday night at 7:30. Ballroom lessons are ongoing and ever changing. So you think you can’t dance? Call 583-0339.

542-ARTS ChapmanCulturalCenter.org 200 E. Saint John St. Spartanburg

JANUARY 4, 2013 | The Journal 15


JOURNAL COMMUNITY RED FIN continued from PAGE 15

16 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 4, 2013

GERRY PATE/ CONTRIBUTOR

for days on end gave him plenty of time to contemplate running his own restaurant. After two tours, the Army started taking its toll. Deployments became frustrating and he found it impossible to sustain a relationship of any kind. “My buddy missed (his children’s) first words and walking and I couldn’t imagine having a kid and missing all those important things. I figured I had done my bit and it was time to get out,” he said. Wuhrman moved to Greenville to be close to his mom, who had recently relocated to the Upstate, and started looking for opportunities in the restaurant industry. He was lucky to find a space that would be turnkey, and brought in an established sushi chef from New York. He finds the restaurant business to be a good fit. “I thrive in constant chaos. I’m ADD like crazy.  I need 50 things going on so I can fix 50 things. I love the details, both the beauty and the devils in them.” What’s more, he has fallen in love with Greenville. “It has such a big heart. I love the

Matthew Wuhrman (center), owner of Red Fin on Main, with No. 1 chef Taka Santana and No. 2 chef Aaron Martinez.

fact that there are 60 restaurants in the downtown area and they are all busy and all able to sustain themselves. The business owners are supportive and friendly, too. It’s been phenomenal.” Red Fin specializes in creative rolls.

Rolls on the Specials Board will have names like the Mohawk Roll or Polar Bear Roll. For Christmas, there was a popular Christmas Tree Roll. “We have the traditional sushi, but there’s also the fun, social aspect to it,”

he says. One of the sections on the menu is “Stone Cooking.” A Himalayan salt block is delivered to the table heated to 500 degrees, along with a selection of sushi-grade fish or beef. The meat is cooked in sizzling butter on the block until the desired doneness. “Two guys can sit down and share a meal. It’s what I enjoy about the food and about Greenville. It’s very social and it brings people together. You can have a meal upstairs with your family, hang out on the couch or dine on the main level with a couple of friends, or get a drink at the bar downstairs here. I facilitate those basic human needs – food and interaction with others… and I do the dishes.” Red Fin is open later than most restaurants in Greenville, serving food until at least midnight every night, seven days a week. Staff is currently working together on a new menu for the new year. “I don’t like leaving. I love this place. I think I have the coolest customers in the world,” Wuhrman says. “I get to constantly meet new people and eat sushi. I just bounce around with a smile on my face.” Contact Nichole Livengood at nlivengood@communityjournals.com.


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JANUARY 4, 2013 | The Journal 17


journal community

Hockey ’N Heels Women get a little Hockey 101

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M13A

18 THE Journal | JANUARY 4, 2013

Greg Beckner / Staff

NEW YEAR

For women who think biscuits and icing are just another way to blow New Year’s resolutions, the Greenville Road Warriors would beg to differ. The hockey team is throwing an educational event just for women at the BI-LO Center on Jan. 10 from 6 to 9:30 p.m., to school budding female fans on the terminology of the game and get them excited about hockey. Hockey ’N Heels is a new program for the team’s female fans that gives women the opportunity to mingle with players and team staff and learn about the sport. Local celebrities Alex Wilson and Rebekah Smith from FOX Carolina – one of the media sponsors for the team – will be hanging out with the ladies as they learn a little Hockey 101. This is the first season Smith has been involved with the sport, and she’s learning as she goes along. “I knew nothing about hockey,” Smith said. “Being raised in the South, I grew up with other sports. Hockey is so fast-paced. That puck is flying across the rink, and it is such a contact sport, which is exciting. It is so aggressive. You get to yell and holler and be a little wild.” Even when she is not appearing at the BI-LO Center as the “Face of FOX” to emcee and mingle with the crowd at games, Smith says she is going out to see the Road Warriors games with friends or family to enjoy the excitement. “Especially being here in the Upstate, I think a huge issue is that a lot of people don’t know about the game of hockey. This event will definitely be a hockey crash course,” she said. Women will glean the basics from team coach Dean Stork, learn how to make a pass and take a shot from assistant coach Dwayne Zinger, and learn a thing or two about game preparation, equipment and injury care from Road Warriors trainers. Coaches and players will also hit the ice for demonstrations. “This event will help females with the rules of the game, and we will be teaching them shooting techniques along with passing of the puck and

This month, the Road Warriors launch Hockey ‘N Heels, a program for female fans.

some of the basic hockey techniques,” Stork said. “If you’ve never been to a game before or only been to a couple, sometimes what’s happening on the ice can be a little confusing,” said Amanda Perkins, Road Warriors account executive. “It helps to know what penalties and icing are, and it’s a lot easier to enjoy the game when you know why there are stoppages in play and what a high sticking or a boarding call is. We are just trying to get people who love hockey to understand it a little more.” Tickets for the event are $60 and include a Premium Blue ticket to the Jan. 11 Road Warriors game versus Orlando. Along with the crash course in hockey, the women will have access to the locker room, media room and bench as well as a one-hour meet-andgreet with the entire hockey team in the newly renovated Concourse Lounge. Drinks and light dining fare will also be provided. The Warriors promise opportunities for photos and autographs with the coaches and players, and participants will walk away with a special Hockey ’N Heels gift. “We’re hoping to build our female fan base and give current fans a chance to meet the players one-on-one in a smaller setting,” Perkins said. “It will give them a chance to talk to some of the players and get to know them.” Women may register by visiting GreenvilleRoadWarriors.com or by calling Amanda Perkins at 864-250-4926. Contact Nichole Livengood at nlivengood@communityjournals.com.


journal community

Ellen Hines Smith Girls’ Home expands By april a. morris | staff

For nearly four decades, the Ellen Hines Smith Girls’ Home has offered a safe, home-like environment for girls who are the victims of abuse and neglect. Since its founding in 1974 as the Spartanburg Girls’ Home, the nonprofit has expanded to serve girls, boys and entire families through its residential home and a Family Strengthening program that reaches out to families to prevent abuse and neglect. As the new year begins, the nonprofit will be expanding its Spartanburg County in-home outreach program into Cherokee County, which has one of the highest rates of first-time child abuse in the state, said executive director Chamlee Loscuito. With a $57,529 federal CommunityBased Child Abuse Prevention grant administered through the Children’s Trust of South Carolina, the Ellen Hines Smith Girls’ Home will also be able to further implement a Positive Parenting Program it began in 2010. The parenting program is an evidencebased approach that gives parents additional tools, especially for those of chil-

dren with behavioral issues, Loscuito said. Staffers have been visiting homes since 2010, and now will be equipped with the Positive Parenting Program model. “This takes their training to a whole other level,” Loscuito said. “Basically, it teaches parents appropriate discipline techniques that work at different ages.” An in-home program also works better in many cases, she said, because of transportation issues associated with parents having to attend a class at a certain time and other factors. The in-home interaction offers a clearer picture of the situation, she said. “Us going into the home is really meeting a huge need in our community. This way we’re able to meet them where they are and really observe the interaction going on between the parents and the child so the input that we give to them is much more individualized.” Reaching out to the community ideally will help to alleviate some problems before they get to the point that a child needs to be removed from his or her home and come to live in the Ellen Hines Smith Girls’ Home residential setting, Loscuito said. She anticipates the Positive Parenting Program out-

Amanda LaNoir and Latrice Thompson are two of the staff members who will be using the Ellen Hines Smith Girls’ Home’s Positive Parenting Program.

Welcoming children ages 2½ to 9 to a nurturing, hands-on, learning environmentWeldesi coming chigldned ren ages j2½ustto 9 tfor o a nurturing, on, learnlaingblenviero.nment designed just for them. Three day programhands-avai

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reach will serve 45 families in Spartanburg and Cherokee counties each year. The Empowering Families program also serves about 600 families each year, providing case management and connecting stressed and isolated families with supportive resources. “Our work with families helps us have

more of a prevention focus so that we’re not just intervening when things get really bad,” Loscuito said. “Parenting can be really tough and we all need some support. Some people have more support built in than others… For those who don’t have that or for those who have children with severe behavioral issues, it can be really hard.” The Ellen Hines home historically has housed girls who are victims of abuse and neglect until they can find a long-term place to live. The residential program serves about 35 girls each year. The Ellen Hines Smith Girls’ Home is one of five organizations that received a grant for the 2012-2015 cycle. The Julie Valentine Center in Greenville also received funding, along with Hope Haven of the Lowcountry, the South Carolina Research Foundation and Windwood Farm Home for Children. For the future, Loscuito said the Ellen Smith Hines Girls’ Home is investigating sources of funding to help create a transitional residential program for teens who are aging out of the foster care system and who are faced with issues associated with independent living. For more information, visit www.spgirlshome.com or call 864-573-9223. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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journal community

Greg Beckner / Staff

Pastor Martha Evans of the Resurrected Treasure Ministries hands out candy to schoolchildren in the community room of the Fleetwood Manor Apartments. RTM runs the after-school program as one of the many community outreach programs Evans is involved with.

New charter elementary school planned for Greenville’s west side By CHarles Sowell | staff

ReTeach Mastery Math Arts and Business Academy, a new charter school serving children from kindergarten through the fifth grade, is expected to be ready for students in 2014 or 2015, said Martha Evans, pastor of Resurrected Treasure Ministries. It will be a school born of tragedy – Evans followed her path into the ministry after a mentally disturbed young man killed her son. Years of working with the poor on the west side of Greenville have taught her the value of a good education and the urgent need for better mental health care. In the wake of the tragedy at Sandy Hook, Conn., Evans wants to have teachers trained in National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) protocols for dealing with students and plans to have Michelle Ready, NAMI-certified instructor, on staff to help evaluate students at the school. “I don’t think it’s a good idea to have more guns in the schools,” Evans said of calls for more police presence in Upstate schools. “Greenville County schools have not shown a great deal of interest in NAMI programs.” Evans has been busy for some time talking with state education officials

20 THE Journal | JANUARY 4, 2013

about her plans for a charter school. “They are on board with this,” Evans said. “We intend to accept any student, but don’t want to become a dumping Sherwood Evans, son ground for the of Pastor Martha Evans Greenville School of the Resurrected District.” Treasure Ministries, In Evans’ vision, was murdered in 1996. the earlier students get the help they need with problems, the more likely a good outcome becomes. The academy will occupy the space now used by Evans’ small church at 904 White Horse Road, she said. The cost is estimated at $5.7 million to build the three-story structure. Furnishing and equipping the facility pushes the price tag to $7 million to $8 million. To help with fundraising, Evans has hired Development Systems International to handle coaching for the school’s board. “We looked all over the country to find just what we need in Columbia, practically in our own backyard,” she said. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.


journal community

Fluor Field wins national honor By Cindy Landrum | staff

Greg Beckner / Staff

The grounds crew cover the infield of Fluor Field before a rainstorm. The field was named best professional baseball field of the year by the Sports Turf Management Association.

Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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ers to compete at the highest levels,” said Ben Crockett, director of player development for the Boston Red Sox. “Having a great playing surface allows players to focus on fundamentals without worrying about the consistency of their footing or a bad hop, and also keeps them healthy.” Once, 15 minutes before the first pitch, a pipe burst behind the pitching mound, resulting in a geyser of water in the infield. The crew quickly shut off the water to the field, sopped up the standing water and the game started on schedule. “Our job is to ensure that the playing surface at Fluor Field is top-notch every night, so to receive such recognition for our work is personally very satisfying and also exciting,” Burgess said. The crew is also responsible for the grounds outside the stadium, the berm where some fans sit along the left-field line and the bullpen. “It’s not a lot of square footage, but it’s maintained in different ways and at different times,” he said. Greenville Drive General Manager Mike de Maine said the award recognizes what the organization already knew – that the ground crew is among the best in the business. “Greg and his team do not have any control over the weather and other circumstances that impact our field but they always control how they respond to those circumstances, and they always respond as consummate professionals,” de Maine said. The Field of the Year Award began in 1992. Awards are given for baseball, football, soccer, softball and sporting grounds. For each field type, awards may be given in three categories: professional, college and university, and schools and parks. Hillcrest High won the award for school and college baseball fields in 2005.

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It takes a lot of work to keep Fluor Field in immaculate shape, most of which goes unnoticed by fans attending a Class A Greenville Drive game, a college baseball game or one of the special events held at the field during non-baseball months. “My ground crew is a fantastic crew,” said Greenville Drive head groundskeeper Greg Burgess. “I’d put them up against anyone in the minor leagues.” Burgess isn’t the only one who thinks the grounds crew is top-notch. The Sports Turf Managers Association chose Fluor Field at the West End, the downtown home of the Class A Greenville Drive, as its 2012 Professional Baseball Field of the Year. There are more than 225 professional baseball fields in the nation. Fields are judged on their playability and appearance of the playing surface, innovative solutions employed to address challenges brought about by the weather and other factors, the effective expenditure of monies and the development of a sound agronomic program. Keeping the field of Bermuda grass that is over-seeded with a perennial rye in tiptop shape is a yearlong job, Burgess said. And although the minor-league baseball season runs from April to around Labor Day, Fluor Field is in use from midFebruary through mid- to late November. “You have to have a strategic plan for the field,” Burgess said. The rye grass gives the field its green color early; then as the weather gets hot, the Bermuda takes over. “Our biggest challenge is balancing one grass dying with another that is greening up,” Burgess said. On game days, Burgess, his assistant Ross Groenevelt and a crew of eight part-timers work from 9 a.m. until 11:30 p.m. or later. An eight-game home stand can mean a 120-hour workweek. Burgess said the weather is his crew’s top challenge. “The weather is great sometimes but other times, it can be your worst nightmare,” he said. “We have to make sure the game gets in if at all possible. If a game gets cancelled, it’s just Mother Nature.” A good playing surface is more than aesthetics. “The exceptional playing surface at Fluor Field really helps prepare our play-

JANUARY 4, 2013 | The Journal 21


journal community

our community

Wild Birds Unlimited Eliminator Feeder

community news, events and happenings

Hospice of the Upstate will host a Winter Grief Series, educational sessions for those who have lost a loved one in the last year, beginning on Jan. 7. Both groups will run for five consecutive weekly meetings. The groups will meet at Hospice of the Upstate’s Sadler Center, 1835 Rogers Rd., Anderson. Topics include symptoms of grief and common feelings, normal vs. abnormal grief, coping techniques for handling stress, and measurements. Both series are free and open to the public. Participants are welcome to bring a friend. For more information and to register, call Donna Davis, bereavement coordinator, at 864-328-1950 or 1-800-261-8636 x3115.

Feed the Birds, Not the Squirrels

The Mauldin Garden Club will meet on Jan. 8 at 7 p.m. at the Mauldin Cultural Center, East Butler Road, to discuss the beauty of using heirloom seeds in Upstate garden plantings. For more information, visit www.mauldingardenclub.org or contact Ann Smith, Garden Club president, at jerryannesm115@charter.net.

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Glendale Outdoor Leadership School in Glendale, S.C., will host a Wilderness First Aid Course on Jan. 10-11. The 16-hour course provides entry-level training for outdoor enthusiasts to prepare themselves for outdoor trips. The WFA course covers topics ranging from preparation and prevention to assessment and treatment and meets the ACA guidelines. WFA is a twoyear certification, but the American Heart Association HeartSaver CPR is an optional extra that can be taken on the evening of day one. Cost is $185 for the two-day course and $20 for the CPR course. Lodging is $15 per night for on-site bunkhousestyle lodging. For details and to sign up, call 803-771-0870. Fiction Addiction is offering a preschool story time on Jan. 17 at 10:30 a.m. for a featuring “Animals Don’t, So I Won’t!” by David G. Derrick Jr. For more information, call 864-675-0540.

Was this the rug I wasn‛t supposed to “go” on?

Instructors with the Young Appalachian Musician program will resume teaching evening classes in acoustic instruments beginning Jan. 7. The program is designed to teach students to play by ear and offers guitar, mandolin, fiddle and banjo lessons for ages third grade through adult. The six-week sessions are $60 and are offered in Easley, Pickens, Clemson and downtown Greenville. Enrollment period runs through Jan. 10. For more information and to register, contact Susan Ware-Snow, 864-979-9188 or susu9196@gmail.com (Easley and Greenville); Steve McGaha, 864-283-4871 or blindpunkin54@yahoo.com (Pickens); or Ryan Wilson, 864-360-4763 or bipryan@gmail.com (Clemson). Furman University’s Learning for You registration is underway and offers more than 100 trips, classes and camps for all ages, including a Social Media series, Pen and Ink Drawing, Cyanotype Photograms, Tai Chi, a World Flavors Cooking series and Composting and Organic Gardening. Online registration is available. Visit www.furman.edu/learningforyou or call 864-294-2153 for more information.

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Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey will present “Built To Amaze” at the BI-LO Center in Greenville, Jan. 30-Feb. 3. For more information, visit www.ringling.com. The latest vehicles will take over the TD Convention Center in Greenville for the 2013 South Carolina International Auto Show on Jan. 11-12, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Jan. 13, 10 a.m-6 p.m.

This automotive event will offer an up-close look at the newest cars, crossovers, trucks, alternative fuel vehicles and more. Admission is $8 for adults, and $5 for seniors (62 and older) and for children ages 7-12. Children six and younger are free. For more information or to purchase advance e-tickets, visit www.southcarolinaautoshow.com. Roper Mountain Science Center and friends from around the state will celebrate oceans with fun-filled activities for kids and adults. H2Oceans! will take place Jan. 12 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Admission is $5 for children ages 5-12, $6 for teens and adults ages 13-59, and $5 for senior citizens ages 60 and over. No admission is charged for children under five years or for RMSC Association members. The science center is located at 402 Roper Mountain Road, Greenville. For more information, visit www.ropermountain.org or call 864-355-8900. Local taxpayers can now schedule appointments to have their taxes filed for free by United Way’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. VITA, sponsored by the Internal Revenue Service and Bank of America, provides free income tax preparation assistance to individuals and families with a household income of less than $51,000 a year. Appointments are now being accepted for VITA sites via United Way’s 2-1-1 resource line. Appointment times are available in Greenville County beginning Jan. 16, followed by Pickens County on Jan. 23, Anderson County on Jan. 25, Spartanburg County on Jan. 30 and Laurens County on Jan. 31. VITA sites will remain open through April 18. For more information, visit www.unitedwaygc.org/vita. North Carolina romance author Ryan Jo Summers will be signing copies of her debut novel, “Whispers in Her Heart,” at Fiction Addiction at 1175 Woods Crossing Rd, Greenville, on Jan. 19 from 1-3 p.m. If you cannot make the signing, you can reserve a personalized copy by contacting Fiction Addiction in advance at 864-675-0540 or at info@fiction-addiction.com. Greenville Rec’s Westside Aquatic Complex is waiving the joining fee in January. Families save $55 on a household membership and adults save $35 on a single membership. Located at 2700 W. Blue Ridge Drive, Westside Aquatic Complex is Greenville’s premier indoor swimming facility featuring a 50-meter pool, a five-lane, 25-yard heated therapy pool, an exercise room and water fitness classes. For more information, visit www.greenvillerec.com. The City of Greenville is once again sponsoring its annual “Grinding of the Greens” Christmas tree recycling program. Undecorated trees can be placed at the curb for collection on regularly scheduled pick-up days or taken to Holmes Park, Timmons Park, Gower Park and West Greenville Community Center for recycling. All listed locations will be open through Jan. 30, but curbside pick-up will continue as long as needed. Trees are ground into mulch at Twin Chimneys Landfill. For more information, call the Twin Chimneys Landfill at 864-243-9672. In addition, all holiday boxes, tissue paper and wrapping paper (except foil-lined) can be recycled at the curb and at the recycling centers on 800 East Stone Avenue and 514 Rutherford Road. If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to email: community@communityjournals.com.


journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

The Northwest Student Council sponsored a canned food drive to help the North Greenville Food Crisis Ministry. The drive capitalized on the University of South Carolina vs. Clemson football rivalry and the USC fans won by collecting the most donations. They donated several hundred pounds of food Nov. 1-Dec. 3.   Furman University senior Jerodis Williams was recently named a first-team Sports Network Football Championship Subdivision All-American as a kick returner. A twotime All-Southern Conference selection as a running back and also all-league choice in 2012 as a return specialist, Williams recorded his second consecutive 1,000-yard rushing campaign this fall, running for 1,170 yards and 11 touchdowns to complete his career with 3,097 yards. Williams is the 57th player in Furman football history to be accorded All-America honors.  Greer Middle College Charter High School recently honored the athletes who made the 2012 All Region Teams: Tori Cooper, Micah Williams and James Page in cross-country and Diane Frank in volleyball. The school is also still enrolling for the 2013-2014 school year. For more information, visit www.greermiddlecollege.org. 

David Setzer, GTCHS board chairman; Charles R. “Bob” Bayne, GTCHS principal; Dr. Tom Barton, Sargent Foundation board trustee; Dr. Robert Wilson, Sargent Foundation board chairman; and Teresa Wilson.

Sargent Foundation Board Chairman Dr. Robert Wilson recently presented the Greenville Technical Charter High School board of directors and principal Charles R. “Bob” Bayne with a donation from the Sargent Foundation. Greenville Technical Charter High School is a public school that serves students in grades nine through 12 in the Greenville County School District. The school just ended its open enrollment for the 2013-14 freshman class with 384 students applying for 115 seats. Students are chosen by a lottery that was held in November.

Christ Church Episcopal School sophomore Alex Mahaffey helped to raise more than $40,000 for the Chris and Kelly’s HOPE Foundation at the Red Ribbon Golf Challenge. The foundation supports organizations that treat drug and alcohol dependency in adolescents and adults. The Red Ribbon Golf Challenge was part of Mahaffey’s CCES sophomore project. Greenville Middle Academy’s Reflections winners and runners-up included: video/film production, Ben Finklestein, winner and Tyler Shirley, runner-up; photography, Jack Jopling, winner; Justin Baustert, David Grier and Mary Beth Hughes, runners-up; literature, Anna Fox, winner; Davis Crews, Davie Marchant, Rebekah Matthews and Ekaterina Nechayeva, runners-up; visual arts, Katherine Thomas, win-

ner; and musical composition, Taelyn Kuykendall, winner. Students who placed at the Northeast Council PTA level included Anna Fox, first place; Ben Finklestein, first place; Jack Jopling, second place; and Katherine Thomas, third place. Clemson University recently approved the addition of a concentration in intercollegiate athletic leadership to its online Master of Human Resource Development program. MHRD is a program within the Eugene T. Moore School of Education’s Department of Leadership, Counselor Education, Human and Organizational Development. Created to provide academic leadership training to aspiring and current coaches in the areas of human performance, athletic counseling and ethical decision making, the athletic leadership concentration is available to students through an online program or as a graduate certificate program. For more information, visit www.grad.clemson.edu/programs/humanresources-development or contact Mike Godfrey at mgodfre@clemson.edu. Mt. Zion Christian School will host a school fundraiser night at Chick-fil-A on Woodruff Road on Jan. 10 from 5-8 p.m. A portion of all sales at that time will go to support MZCS and participants can try to win a brownie party for their child’s class. Clemson University and NASA are teaming up for a second year to ask sixththrough eighth-grade students to design a mission to an asteroid. The contest is open to teams of one to four students who will submit slide shows or video presentations to NASA outlining their plans to send a human crew on a trip to an asteroid. Winners of the Asteroid Contest will have their presentations highlighted on the NASA website. Submissions will be accepted Jan. 15-Mar. 8. For more information, visit www.clemson.edu/psych/ugrad/nasa-challenge. Spartanburg Day School students recently placed in the Urban League of Spartanburg’s “Why We Can’t Wait” poetry writing contest. Rebeka Wellmon and Jesseca Kusher were winners in the contest for students in grades eight-12 throughout Spartanburg County. Wellmon’s “Never Take Their Bait” and Kusher’s “Sick of Waiting, Sick of Sinking” were honored. Runners-up also included Lauren Thomas’s “The Time is Now” and Ella Webster’s “Shade of Skin.” All of the finalists will be recognized at About A Dream on Saturday, Jan. 19. The winners will read their poems at the event.

(L to R) Rebeka Wellmon, Roberta Camp (Upper School English teacher), Lauren Thomas, Crystal Irby (Urban League of Spartanburg) and Jesseca Kusher. Not pictured: Ella Webster.

Submit entries to: Community Journals, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or email: community@communityjournals.com

BRINGING FAMILY AND FRIENDS TOGETHER FOR THE HOLIDAYS. AVOID THE HIGHWAY THIS YEAR. FLY HOME.

Search and Compare Fares. Book Flights, Hotel Rooms and Rental Cars gspairport.com JANUARY 4, 2013 | The Journal 23


journal community

the good

events that make our community better

The TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, recently donated $166,000 to nonprofit organizations in South Carolina from August through October 2012. As part of TD Bank’s commitment to giving back to the community, the TD Charitable Foundation awarded 18 grants to nonprofit organizations that provide affordable housing, financial literacy and education, and environmental programs in South Carolina during the quarter, including South Carolina Hispanic Outreach, United Ministries Place of Hope, Charleston Trident Urban League Inc. (CTUL) and Waccamaw Community Foundation. The Goodfellows Club, an activity of The James F. Daniel Jr. Post 3 of the American Legion in Greenville, recently distributed more than 1,000 food boxes to families in need identified by United Ministries of Greenville. The program has been going on for the past 87 years and is still taking donations to help fund the distribution. For more information, contact Donald Patterson at 864-271-2000. Verizon recently presented Harvest Hope Food Bank with a $15,000 donation to help fund holiday meals for those in need. Verizon also collected 15,000 pounds of food through a corporate food drive. Last year, Harvest Hope provided food for more than 38,000 people a week across 20 S.C. counties and served almost one million families. For more information, visit www.harvesthope.org.  Upstate Forever recently announced the addition of Glenn Hilliard and Don McClure to its board of directors. Hilliard is CEO of Hilliard Group and founder of the Foothills Trail Conference. Don McClure is a retired orthopedic surgeon and 40-year resident of Spartanburg County who lives on a tract protected by Upstate Forever. Board officers elected for 2013 also include: chairman Dick Carr of Spartanburg County; vice-chair Brice Hipp of Greenville County; secretary Dianne Culbertson of Laurens County; and treasurer Tom Brown of Greenville County. In addition, John Frampton, former director of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, has joined Upstate Forever’s Advisory Council. The Carolina Recycling Association has issued a call for nominations for the awards ceremony at its annual conference and trade show, “Recycling: No Time to Waste.” The awards honor the best programs, projects and individuals for outstanding achievement and commitment to the mission of the organization. For more information, categories and nomination forms, visit www.cra-recycle.org/2013. Upstate Forever will welcome Nell Newman, founder and president of Newman’s Own Organics, as the keynote speaker at its ForeverGreen Annual Awards Luncheon on Feb. 21. An ardent supporter of sustainable agriculture, Newman will discuss the importance of organic foods and share her perspective on why living a more environmentally conscious life helps everyone. Newman has a direct connection to the Upstate since her mother, actress Joanne Woodward, graduated from Greenville High

24 THE Journal | JANUARY 4, 2013

From left: Brother James Blackwell, resident monk; Father Lawrence Holcombe, parish priest; Julie Accetta, Meals on Wheels director of community relations; Joni Zeller of St. Martha’s Guild.

Holy Trinity Anglican Church, through its fourth annual St. Francis Blessing of the Animals, recently collected donations and contributions to aid Meals on Wheels in delivering pet food to their homebound clients. Help came from most of the pet owners who had their pets blessed by Father Lawrence Holcombe, and other generous parish pet owners. Holy Trinity Church will accept any pet food donations at the parish hall, located at 717 Buncombe St. in Greenville. For more information, call can 864232-2882.

School and launched her career at the Greenville Little Theatre. The annual event recognizes individuals and organizations for significant contributions in the fields of land conservation, water quality, air quality, sustainable development, public service and volunteer work. For more information, visit www.upstateforever.org. Best Chevrolet of the Upstate recently donated $1,000 to the Miracle Hill Children’s Home in Pickens County. The donation came a little less than 24 hours after organizers of an annual Christmas event to give gifts to children at Miracle Hill said the holiday tradition was in jeopardy. An annual toy drive for Miracle Hill has been spearheaded by Michael Hedrick of Michael’s Pizzeria in downtown Easley for the past decade. Best Chevrolet’s donation along with several others will help make the event a reality, but the general community still is encouraged to donate items. For more information, call 864-855-0025. Kids’ Chance of South Carolina, a nonprofit organization that provides scholarships and support to dependents of South Carolina workers who have been killed or seriously injured on the job, recently announced the new members of its board of directors. The new members include: Amity Edmonds of Gallivan, White & Boyd, Greenville; Nicholas Haigler of Sowell, Gray, Stepp & Laffitte, Columbia; Michael Jordan of The Steinberg Law Firm, Charleston; and Sandra Walthall of Eastern Alliance Insurance, Charlotte. For more information, visit http://kidschancesc.org. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.


Journal culture

Giving people a voice Peace Voices program allows students, adults to express themselves through writing and performance of poetry Kayley McCasland found her voice on the stage of the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre one Sunday afternoon in November, reading a poem she had written about where she By Cindy Landrum | staff came from. The performance was part of the Peace Center’s new educational outreach program, Peace Voices. “I felt like when I got on that stage, I found myself,” said McCasland, a freshman at Woodmont High. “I found a way to express to people who I am.” Peace Voices is a collaboration between the Peace

Center and nationally acclaimed performance poet Glenis Redmond, herself a graduate of Woodmont High. Redmond, the Peace Center’s artist-in-residence, is building a program that fosters creative expression through writing and performing poetry among young and mature writers. Peace Voices, which Peace Center President Megan Riegel expects to become the Peace Center’s signature educational outreach program, will provide for the first time a space and a stage where the community can come together to share original poems in a performance setting. VOICES continued on page 26

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JOURNAL CULTURE VOICES continued from PAGE 25

Through the outreach, the Peace Center will host poetry events in its education center, host a youth poetry slam for the region and conduct artist residencies in local schools. The concept is unique to the region. “It’s not just designed to promote poetry, but people having a creative voice,” said Staci Koonce, the Peace Center’s vice president for education. “There’s a real need for this voice in the community. Teenagers often don’t feel connected to their community. We want to make the arts in general accessible for them, but also create a platform for them as artists.” The topics the teens tackle in their poetry are serious. “The things they talk about in their poems are not public service announce-

ments,” Koonce said. “They are real, very honest. They are diving into themselves. They really do some soul-searching.” The question Redmond posed to the students at a recent workshop at Woodmont High could not have been more timely, coming just days after the Newtown, Conn. school shooting that left the country reeling and asking why: “What is wrong with our planet? What is wrong with our world from your perspective?” Redmond said the school shooting rocked her world because nobody thinks of 5-year-olds dying. “I was at the grocery store that weekend and kept seeing parents with their 5-year-olds,” she told the students. “What do you think I thought? It took me back to Connecticut. You know, we all remember what it is like to be a 5-year-old.” One by one, the students listed one-

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Peace Voices student reading WHO: Students from Greenville County share and perform their original poetry WHERE: Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre WHEN: Jan. 8, 7 p.m. TICKETS: Free, but required. EXTRA: Performance by Peace Center artist-in-residence and poet Glenis Redmond INFORMATION: 864-467-3000

word answers to Redmond’s question: Intolerance. Fear. Impatience. Doubt. Disbelief. Cruelty. Violence. Deception. They looked closer to their own worlds – the hallways of their school: Backstabbing. Bullying. Immodesty. Degradation. Self-esteem. Pride. Then they looked at what is good in the world: Acceptance. Humility. Truth. Equality. Joy. Justice. Laughter. They soon would begin weaving those words and some of their own memories together into a new poem, their own recipes for a better world. Redmond said she’s not trying to create poets out of all of the students she works with. Instead, she wants to get them to reflect, to go “deep into their own wells.” “I want them to develop a deeper connection with themselves,” she said. “When they voice that and somebody says to them, ‘Yes, I feel that, too,’ it gives them a deeper connection with others. They feel like they are not alone.” Poetry is a way to navigate the landscape of emotions, she said. “I find these residencies glorified conversations,” she said. “We have to talk about the world, art, literature and politics to spark the conversation. Students find that there are words out there that are reflective of them.” Tyson Neal, a freshman at Woodmont, said while he has always enjoyed poetry, he didn’t realize he could write before working with Redmond in the Peace Voices program. Through poetry, he’s been able to see life through a different perspective, he said.

PHOTOS PROVIDED

“I see that there’s a larger world out there. I’ve been able to see how the world is larger than my perspective. It has inspired me to try to look at everything in my life and how that has made me the person I am today.” Tristan Bellah, also a freshman at Woodmont, said, “Poetry is a great way to get out on paper what you hold inside.” On the Gunter Stage in November, McCasland performed a poem about her parents’ struggles as young parents and their ability to make things better for the family through hard work. She said the opportunity allowed her to express her feelings through poetry in ways that she’s never been able to through conversation. “It’s yourself on paper,” she said. The next Peace Voices student poetry reading will be Jan. 8 at 7 p.m. in the Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center. The reading is free, but tickets are required due to limited seating. For tickets, call the Peace Center box office. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

UpstateFoodie.com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

stateFoodie.com 26 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 4, 2013


JOURNAL CULTURE

Upward lures volleyball tourney to Spartanburg By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

GERRY PATE / CONTRIBUTING

Upward, a Spartanburg-based Christian-oriented youth sports organization, will play a big role in bringing a 200-team volleyball tournament to Spartanburg this spring. Upward’s recently completed indoor volleyball complex is the big draw for the tournament heading to Spartanburg. The facility, located at 6655 Pottery Road, just off Interstate 26 northwest of Spartanburg, “is the largest indoor volleyball facility in the Southeast,” said Corey Helle, director of Upward’s Club South Volleyball. Helle, a former Wofford volleyball coach with extensive experience in the sport both on the collegiate and club volleyball levels, said Upward decided a couple of years ago to expand its athletics program to include older athletes with the Club South Volleyball Powered by Upward Stars program. “We’re seeing private groups vying for a slice of the athletic tourism business,” said Jim Campbell, interim director of Spartanburg County Recreation. The county’s massive Tyger River softball and baseball complex had about $17.6 million in economic impact this year, a Clemson University survey found. Helle said he expects the volleyball center and subse-

The Upward Stars Volleyball Complex in Spartanburg will host a tournament next spring, with 200 teams expected to attend.

quent tournaments to have a similar impact for the area. “There will be about 200 teams of eight players. Each team will bring along family members. That will fill a lot of hotel rooms and seats at local restaurants,” he said. The tournament is a regional volleyball event and games will be split among private facilities in Greenville and Spartanburg counties, Helle said. “Ours is the biggest,” he said. “And the facilities are excellent.” Work on renovating a large building at Restoration Church, located in the former Wacammaw Pottery Mall,

started earlier this year, Helle said. “What has come out of that is a state-of-the-art facility” – for Upward and for the sports tourism potential of the area. Globally, sport tourism amounts to a $600 billion business. More than 100,000 people visited Tyger River Park last year, according to Clemson. The economic impact of the 60,000 out-of-towners was impressive, County Council was told last fall. “You knocked this one out of the park by investing in Tyger River Park,” said Bob Brookover of Clemson’s International Institute for Tourism Research and Development. Across the state, cities and counties are buying into sports tourism. The state Municipal Association reported last year that Rock Hill has become a pioneer in sports tourism with its Cherry Park hosting state, regional and national tournaments year-round. Cherry Park is part of a complex of sports facilities in the city that have brought 475,000 visitors to Rock Hill with an estimated direct economic impact of $59 million in the past six years. “These sports tourism facilities … act as an important economic development tool to grow our city,” said Ed Thompson, director of Rock Hill Parks, Recreation and Tourism. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

PHOTOS BY JOAN MARCUS

– New York Post

January 15th – 20th ONLY AT

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journal culture

listen up

sound check

best bets for local live music

with vincent harris

1/5, Brown Street Club

1/22, Peace Center

Zataban Heavy blues band features members of The Marshall Tucker Band, Gypsy Souls. Call 864-250-9193 or visit www.brownstreetclub.com.

New Century Chamber Orchestra Conductorless, 19-piece orchestral ensemble. Tickets $10-$35. Call 864-4673000 or go to www.peacecenter.org. 1/23, The Handlebar

The Bottle Rockets & Marshall Crenshaw Once-in-a-lifetime co-headlining show. Tickets $17. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com.

1/5, Gottrocks

Ten Toes Up Upstate alt-rock band. Call 864-235-5519. 1/9, Brown Street Club

Craig Sorrells Project Funk/soul combo. Call 864-250-9193 or visit www.brownstreetclub.com.

Rachel Kate Quirky acoustic folk from Charleston. Call 864-235-5519

1/11, Blind Horse Saloon

1/25, The Handlebar

Florida Georgia Line Up-and-coming country duo. Tickets $15. Call 864-233-1381 or visit www.blind-horse.com.

Crowfield Harmony-drenched classic-sounding rock. Tickets $11. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com.

1/11, The Handlebar

1/26, Brown Street Club

Infamous Stringdusters Next-generation bluegrass. Tickets $15. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com.

TJ Lazer Good-time dance funk band. Call 864-250-9193 or visit www.brownstreetclub.com.

1/17, Smiley’s Acoustic Cafe

1/26, Gottrocks

Darby Wilcox Upstate’s acoustic folk singer-songwriter. Call 864-282-8988 or visit www.smileysacousticcafe.com.

Col. Bruce Hampton Southern jam-rock legend. Call 864-235-5519.

1/25, Gottrocks

1/30, The Handlebar 1/19, Gottrocks

JoJo Taterhead Revival Party-time ska band from the Upstate. Call 864-235-5519.

The Malah Jam band incorporates electronics into stretched-out soundscapes. Call 864-2336173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com.

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28 THE Journal | JANUARY 4, 2013

Go for the big picture Stringdusters quintet strives for the fresh and unconventional In March of this year, the Infamous Stringdusters, an award-winning acoustic quintet formed in Nashville, Tenn., in the mid-2000s, will pick up their instruments and head onstage. Nothing out of the ordinary about that, until you discover that the stage is a gigantic underground cave. The Stringdusters will be taking part in the “Bluegrass Underground” radio and TV show, filmed over 300 feet below ground in Cumberland Caverns, located in McMinnville, Tenn. They will play in a natural amphitheater called the Volcano Room. “It’s a really unique show,” says the Stringdusters’ guitarist, Andy Falco. “It’s actually, literally in a cave. You walk through caverns down into the cave, and that’s where the show is. It’s really unbelievable. You’re literally playing inside the belly of the Earth. It’s an incredible space.” Sure, it’s a bit of an unconventional venue, but it’s fitting for a group that has become increasingly less conventional in the six years since their debut recording, The Infamous Stringdusters “Fork In The Road.” That album won the band two International Bluegrass Music Association awards, but Falco says they’ve changed quite a bit since that first album. “I don’t think of us as a traditional bluegrass band at all, actually,” he says. “The band started out in the more traditional bluegrass world, but it’s evolved into something completely different. There is bluegrass in the roots of our music; that’s undeniable. But everybody in the band grew up listening to and playing all kinds of different music, and we allow all those influences to come out in our own music.” The Stringdusters have expanded their palette to include jazzy improvisation, pop-music melodies and a wide range of material (including U2’s “In God’s Country” and The Police’s “Walking On The Moon”), but Falco says he doesn’t worry about categorizing the band’s music. “Our goal is just to make the best music that we can, and not try to ‘make’ it bluegrass or anything else,” he says. “If you talk to someone who listens to a lot of Bill Monroe or Flatt and Scruggs, we’re nowhere near a bluegrass band. But if you talk to somebody who listens to the Avett Bros, we seem more traditional. So it’s all perspective. As it grows, music changes and morphs. If you look at rock ’n’ roll, Led Zeppelin is rock ’n’ roll, but very different from Buddy Holly, who is also rock ’n’ roll. Rock ’n’ roll has changed over the years, and I think that bluegrass and roots music have done the same.” Falco says as time has passed, the band has become more comfortable letting the music progress organically, which has contributed to its movement away from a more traditional sound. “I think our music has naturally evolved as we’ve gotten more comfortable with ourselves and as a band, and as our songwriting has gotten better. Everybody writes, so everybody has ideas, and everybody brings in material. We’ve gotten more comfortable with letting the music do what it’s going to do and go where it’s going to go. And then ideas start flowing and we put it all together.” Falco says the Stringdusters strive to keep things fresh on the road as well as in the studio. “It’s important to us to experience life as much as possible,” he says. “We’re into cycling; we’re into skiing; we’re into rafting. We take advantage of all of that on the road. And those experiences add to the music. To us, it’s about the bigger picture of life.” The Infamous Stringdusters are playing Greenville’s Handlebar Listening Room on Friday, Jan. 11. Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

Transportation Museum keeps chugging forward Organizers revise plans to start smaller in 2013

Frank Ruby and his fellow volunteers have big dreams for the Transportation Museum of the World they are planning to build in Greenville County. But after three years of obstacles and frustrations, they are willing to start smaller. “Fundraising is the biggest problem,” said Ruby, who owns Blue Ridge Hobbies. “We have the plans drawn and we’re ready to get going on this, but we can’t get the cash together to get in a building somewhere.” Ruby said approximately 250 volunteers have worked toward the creation of the museum for the past three years. Various county and city officials, area businesses and corporations have said they like the idea of a transportation museum, which would use miniature model railroads, model buildings and technology

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for education and entertainment. “They want to collaborate on it, but when we ask for cash, they pull back,” Ruby said, adding that the recent recession and fiscal cliff worries have created some reticence. But the volunteers have remained enthusiastic, and organizers have looked into a variety of possible venues, including the former Belk’s at McAlister Square, the former Best Buy on Laurens Road and, Ruby’s top pick, the former Sam’s on Laurens Road. “That’s right near I-85, and for this to be a tourist attraction, we want it to be easily accessible from Atlanta and Charlotte,” he said. However, at 133,000 square feet, the Sam’s Club was larger than they needed, and with $120,000 cash in hand, the organization is well short of the $500,000 required for the security deposit and operating capital, so the plan was shelved. “Our thought process has changed, so now we’re looking to start smaller, with a 7,000- to 10,000-square-foot building,” Ruby said. To stir up interest and raise funds,

Frank Ruby, owner of Blue Ridge Hobbies and chairman of the Transportation Museum of the World, with an HO-scale model of a locomotive.

the Transportation Museum operated a Miniature World of Trains 2012 Christmas model train display at Fountain Inn’s History Center, in conjunction with the town’s Spirit of Christmas Past events. More than 3,000 visitors came to see the trains, participate in a scavenger hunt and meet the museum’s mascot. On Dec. 21, the display moved to a temporary office on North Pleasantburg Drive. Through the miniature displays, Ruby hopes to show that the Greenville community and surrounding area would sup-

port the museum. “Banks don’t like our numbers, because this is an out-of-the-box concept and they don’t have anything to compare it to, except in Germany,” he said. “They don’t think we can achieve the numbers. But I disagree.” He and his board members expect upwards of 100,000 people per year would visit the museum in its first year, and that the project will create 150 jobs and have a 2.5 million annual impact on the community. Ruby hopes to replicate the success of Miniature Wonderland, a massive museum billed as the world’s largest model train set that has brought in more than one million visitors per year in Hamburg, Germany. “They’ve got a 12-year jump on us, but we want to take what they’ve done and do it more prototypically, to teach about transportation systems,” Ruby said. “The technology is there, and we just want to do it on a grand scale.” Contact Leigh Savage at lsavage@communityjournals.com.

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864-250-0203 www.greenvillecfm.com JANUARY 4, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 29


journal culture

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

Greenville artists Signe Swett. In addition, the and Genna Grushovenexhibit features Adam ko  have spent 10 years Rogers, a student at Satranslating old photovannah College of Art graphs into paint. In a new and Design. There will exhibit at the Art & Light be an opening reception Gallery, the duo features on Jan. 9, 6-8 p.m. The paintings based on photos Riverworks Gallery is of subjects in motion. The operated by and for the “all dancers” series will be faculty and students of unveiled at a reception the Department of Visuon Jan. 4, 6-9 p.m. Art & al and Performing Arts Light Gallery is located at at Greenville Technical 4 Aberdeen Drive, GreenCollege. The gallery is ville. For more informa- From Art & Light Gallery located at 300 River St., tion, call 864-363-8172 or Greenville. For more visit www.artandlightgallery.com. information, call 864-271-0679 or visit www.gvltec.edu/vpa. Riverworks Gallery will present the “Student Exit Portfolio” exhibit Jan. Fans of bluegrass and old-time moun8-27. Greenville Technical College’s tain music won’t want to miss the Young graphic arts students complete their Appalachian Musicians’ Winter Jubilee course of study by preparing an exit on Jan. 11 and 12, 2013, at the Performportfolio. This exhibit features the work ing Arts Center at Pickens High School. of five graphic design graduates: Alessan- Ten bands from North and South Carodra Bennett, Alex Petkus, Christopher A. lina will compete in the Blue Flame BlueRadecke, Catherine Roberts and William grass Band Competition on Friday eve-

2013 It’s tIme to take a look.

BehindTheCounterONLINE.com

Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-271-7570 gcma.org

Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm Free Admission

1

The big-band, swing-dance musical revue known as “In the Mood” will be performed Jan. 31 at 7 p.m. in McAlister Auditorium on the Furman University campus. “In the Mood” is presented by Artbeat Inc., a not-for-profit arts presenter. For more information about the event, go to www.artbeatshows.org. Tickets are $29-$49 and available at Timmons Arena or Ticketmaster. For ticket information, call the Timmons Arena Box Office at 864-294-3097 or visit www.timmonsarena.com. Tickets may also be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling 800745-3000 or at www.ticketmaster.com.

Shop Local. It Matters.

Greenville County

30 1210 THEGville Journal | JANUARY 4, 2013 Journal See you next year Ad.indd

ning. Saturday will feature the Little Roy and Lizzy Show, performances, acoustic music workshops, open jams and more. Proceeds support the Pickens High School Bluegrass Class and the YAM program, an after-school program. The YAM program is sponsored by Preserving Our Southern Appalachian Music Inc. (POSAM), a nonprofit organization. More information and tickets can be found at www.yamupstate.org.

1/2/13 1:59:19 PM

"By a Thin Green Line" by Pat Cato. 36 x 36, mixed media on canvas. Can be viewed at Bin 112 Bistro, Downtown Greer and Ellie’s Uptown Café in Downtown Greenville. www.patcatoart.com Want to see your artwork here? Send a high res image to arts@ communityjournals.com

The South Carolina Children’s Theatre presents “Charlotte’s Web” Feb. 1-10 at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre in Greenville. Admission is $26 for adults and $17 for children 18 and under, except for Feb. 3, when admission will be $16 per person. This classic show featuring Wilbur, Charlotte and a barnyard full of animals is for most ages. For more information, visit www.scchildrenstheatre.org or www. peacecenter.org, or call 864-467-3000. Send us your arts announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND STAFF OF THE METROPOLITAN ARTS COUNCIL WISH YOU A HAPPY HOLIDAY SEASON AND A PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR. HERE’S TO A GREAT 2013 FOR THE ARTS IN GREENVILLE.


journal homes F e at u r e d H o m e s & N e i g h b o r h o o d s | O p e n H o u s e s | P r o p e r t y T r a n s f e r s

This Week’s Featured Home

Home Info W Mountainview, North Main Area, Greenville Enjoy views of Downtown Greenville from the front porch of one of the stunning new homes to be constructed in this popular North Main Area. The homes designed for Highland Homes by architect Mel Dias, will look as though they have been a part of this traditional neighborhood for years, but will incorporate craftsman architecture with the

modern luxuries and green technologies of homes built today. Amenities will include hardwood floors, Granite countertops, Energy Star appliances and high efficiency heating and air conditioning systems. And, all this just minutes from Downtown cafes, shops, parks, museums, and so much more. Don’t miss this opportunity to own brand new construction in this convenient and established North Main community.

More photos, info and over 1,900 neighborhoods online at

Nicely finished in the 600’s, 3000+SF Huge Great Room, Master Bedroom with Suite on Main, Large Formal Rooms, Energy Efficient Appliances and Two-car Garage. Patrick Franzen 864.250.1234 patrickfranzen@msn.com Highland Homes 864.233.4175 www.highlandhomessc.com Send us your Featured Home for consideration: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Custom Build – Renovations – Design

TURNING DREAMS I N T O R E A L I T Y Special to the Journal

C111R

highlandhomessc.com – 864.233.4175

JANUARY 4, 2013 | T h e J o u r n a l 31


F e a t u r e d Open

S unday ,

O p e n january

6

H o u s e

f ro m

2–4pm

211 Aberdeen Drive, Greenville Nestled on one of the Augusta Road neighborhood’s most popular streets, this home features lots of charm and many modern amenities. The current owners have completely renovated this home which features a large master suite with beautiful hardwood floors, trey ceiling, 3 large closets and a spa-like master bath with cast-iron whirlpool tub, separate shower, double vanity and separate water closet. The master also features double french doors leading to a wooden deck. The home features 2 additional bedrooms with hardwood floors and a Jack and Jill bathroom with beautiful ceramic tile and tub. The gourmet kitchen features granite countertops and island, beautiful cabinetry with returns on all doors and drawers, high-end stainless steel appliances, and an adjacent dining room. Also located off the kitchen is a living room with fireplace, bonus room or office and large foyer with built-ins. Additionally, the home features a granite half-bath, large screened porch, deck and fenced backyard with outdoor shed. Additional updates include: new Home Info 30-year architectural shingle roof, new gutters, all new low-e windows, Price: $399,500 | MLS#1250968 new hardboard siding, new 5-ton 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, 2200-2399SF HVAC system, new solid fiberglass Augusta Circle Elementary front door, new wiring and plumbing Hughes Middle throughout home, new lighting Greenville High fixtures throughout, refinished hardwood floors, closet systems Contact: Virginia Hayes throughout, new landscaping... 864.313.2986 The list is endless! Don’t miss out Prudential C. Dan Joyner, Co. on this home - it won’t last long!

OPen this weekend Open Claremont

Sun 2-4pm (1/6/13)

10 Sable Glen Dr - $695,000 4BR/4BA. Beautiful Woodland Bldrs home. Floor plan that is flawless, MBR & add’l BR on main.Fabulous light filled GR. 385 S to Roper Mtn Rd exit & L off ramp, go apprx 5 miles to R into S/D on Chamblee. Margaret Marcum/Leigh Irwin, 420-3125/3807755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1236332

S unday ,

january

6

Augusta Road area Sun 2-4pm (1/6/13) Augusta Road area Sun 2-4pm (1/6/13) Tucker Branch

211 Aberdeen Drive - $399,500 102 Grove Rd - $299,000 3BR/2.5BA. Lots of charm and many modern 4BR/3.5BA. Beautifully renovated brick bungalow home. Hardwood floors throughout, amenities. Completely renovated with gourmet kitchen, large master suite. The list is granite coutertops & much more. Augusta endless. Augusta Rd to Aberdeen, home on Circle, Hughes and Greenville High Schools. left. Virginia Hayes, 313-2986 Prudential C. Augusta Rd to Grove Rd, 3rd home on Right. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1250968 Ashley R. Behlke, 915-0253 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1251251

R e a l

A w ards ,

Wajciechowski Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®   Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Patte Wajciechowski has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Pelham Wajciechoowski 32 T h e J o u r n a l | JANUARY 4, 2013

Road office. Originally from W illiamsburg, VA, Wajciechowski graduated from Bethel High School and earned her degree at Thomas Nelson Community College with a Bachelor of Science in Business Management and Marketing. 

2-4

Sun 2-4pm (1/6/13)

5 Brierfield Way - $259,900 3BR/2.5BA. Energy Style qualified superior quality home. Hdwds, 9 ft clgs, deep crown mldgs, scrnd prch.385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go approx 1/2 mile- turn L. R at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile - turn L into SD Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady, 363-3634 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1250930

E s t a t e People,

f ro m

pm

Tucker Branch

Sun 2-4pm (1/6/13)

33 Donemere Way - $199,900 3BR/2.5BA. craftsman style, Energy Star home. Upgradees & advanced technology. 385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go apprx. 1/2 mile and turn Left. Turn Right at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile & turn Left into SD Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady, 363-3634/9087200 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1249245

Tanners Mill

Sun 2-4pm (1/6/13)

100 Cobb Hall Ct - $177,000 3BR/2.5BA. Charming home in great location. New hardwood flors & ceramic tile. Great floor plan. Butler Rd, right on Tanner Rd, right into s/d on Old Hall Ln, 1st right on Cobb Hall, home on right. Scott Holtzclaw, 884-6783 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1248401

D i g e s t H onors

She has 20 years experience in the real estate industry. Patte  served as Residential Sales Broker in Denver, Colorado.  She was awarded the Silver Sales Award and Bronze Sales Award, and named Site Manager of the Year.  “We are excited to have Patte join the Pelham Road Office,” said John Moore,

Broker-in-Charge. “She is a welcome addition to the Spaulding Group.” Wajciechowski currently resides in Spartanburg with her husband, Wayne and daughter Madison.    In her free time, she enjoys sailing, interior decorating, and “repurposing” household items.  She is a new member at First Baptist Church in Spartanburg. Special to the Journal


On The Market m ar k e t

$320,000

3BR/3BA

Gracous Family Home in best location in town. 5500 sq ft Private landscaped .7 acres. Pool & hot tub. Finished walk out bsmnt. w/ bath & kitchen. Tons of storage and extras. Don’t miss this one! SP McNamara (864) 918-9963

A beautiful farm house located on a corner lot with tons of yard space for gardening, pets and children to run & play! The updates include: stainless appliances in 2010, roof in ‘02, HVAC 5 ton in ‘09 Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 MLS#1250471

$219,747 4BR/3BA Mount Ver non Estates

$198,000 4BR/2BA Bluestone Cottages

4/3 Ranch with 3 car garage located in upscale Mt. Vernon Estates; just minutes from town, GSP airport, dining & shops! Home offers a split floor plan with a master suite fit for a King! Must See! Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 MLS#1210344

Look no more! Low maintenance and energy efficient living at it’s best. Come see this modern yet cozy cottage with hardwoods, upgraded cabinets, 9 ft ceilings and covered patio. Open floor plan! Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 MLS#1249625

before you buy or sell, do your

HOME $159,900 4BR/2.5BA River Mist Must see, beautiful 2 story home with tons of curb appeal! Walk through the covered entry to see the grand 2 story entrance that flows into the open greatroom that offers tons of space! Hilary Hurst (864) 3136077 MLS#1247322 Special to the Journal

work

Stonehaven, Simpsonville, SC Stonehaven is an established neighborhood featuring over 400 beautiful, traditional homes with large, landscaped lawns. Enjoy time at the swimming pool or exercising at the tennis courts or spend an afternoon relaxing at the clubhouse. Award-winning schools, I-385, The

Shops and Greenridge, restaurants, and more are just a few minutes from the inviting atmosphere that Stonehaven offers as one of Simpsonville’s most popular communities.

N e i g h b o r h o o d In f o 12 Month Average Home Price: $399,431 Amenities: Swimming Pool, Tennis Courts, Club House Oakview Elementary Mauldin Middle School Mauldin High School

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Over 1,900 neighborhoods online at JANUARY 4, 2013 | T h e J o u r n a l 33


Greenville Transactions December SUBD.

1-7,

PRICE SELLER

FOX TRACE $1,750,000 $630,000 HAMMETT CREEK $586,100 LAURELWOOD $570,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $564,450 $517,778 TRAXLER PARK $465,000 TRAXLER PARK $435,000 RIVER OAKS $395,000 PEBBLE GROVE $385,000 LANNEAU DR HIGHLANDS $362,000 ESTATES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $359,000 SUMMER PLACE $356,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $350,773 ABLES & RASOR $350,550 RIVER WALK $345,000 CLARK MANOR $340,000 HOLLINGTON $334,630 VILLAGE AT THE CLIFFS $315,000 GREYTHORNE $313,789 BRAEMOR $311,820 $300,000 RIVER WALK $299,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $273,434 PARKER CREEK $272,465 RAVENWOOD $270,868 GREYTHORNE $269,373 HEARTHSTONE AT RIVER SHOALS $266,075 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $265,085 $265,000 CREEKWOOD $263,500 DOVE TREE $262,500 $260,000 BRIDGEWATER $254,770 NEELY FARM-HAWTHORNE RIDGE $252,900 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $252,000 GREYTHORNE $250,820 AUGUSTA RD HILLS $246,000 $245,000 THE TOWNES AT HIGHGROVE $243,556 $237,000 RESERVE AT PLANTATION GREENE $231,900 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $231,250 CLIFFS AT GLASSY $230,000 ADAMS RUN $230,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $226,110 $225,000 CROSSGATE AT REMINGTON $224,047 CHANDLER LAKE $223,875 HARRISON COVE $223,065 GREYTHORNE $221,519 PELHAM FALLS $220,000 MERRIFIELD PARK $214,700 THE COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $214,225 THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD $212,870 $208,725 BROOKFIELD WEST $202,000 NORTHWOOD HILLS $201,000 CEDAR COVE $200,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $198,199 TOWNES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $198,000 KANATENAH $197,000 $195,000 EBENEZER HEIGHTS $192,500 PELHAM FALLS $192,000 GRESHAM PARK $185,930 PARTRIDGE RIDGE $185,000 RABON CHASE $184,900 HERITAGE CREEK $184,805 SHADOW CREEK $184,200 FLAGSTONE VILLAGE $183,450 THE FARM@SANDY SPRINGS ORC. $182,592 HERITAGE CREEK $181,035 $181,000 BOULDER CREEK $180,000 $180,000 AVALON ESTATES $178,250 AUTUMN TRACE $177,456 PINE BROOK FOREST $176,000 IVYBROOKE $173,000 DEVENGER PLACE $170,000 THE PARK DOWNTOWN $170,000 AVALON ESTATES $169,900 SHOALS CROSSING $164,307 NORTHCLIFF $160,997 ALLISON’S MEADOW $160,500 CHESTNUT HILL PLANTATION $160,000

CYPRESS COMPANY AT FOX T HOLTZCLAW WELDON E CORNELIUS CARA R WATKINS LIVING TRUST NVR INC FIRST FEDERAL BANK DOBSON BELINDA J SANDERS SUZANNE W WHAT NEXT LLC SCOTT CARRIE M ADVANCED AUTOMATION INC HENZEL ROSS KNAPP ROBERTA E BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PLANTE JENNIFER J THORNLEY REBECCA L ROBB LEIGH B (JTWROS) BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BURKETT GLENDA R S C PILLON HOMES INC D R HORTON INC MOON JOSEPH T BLACK JOHN R ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC RELIANT SC LLC S C PILLON HOMES INC NVR INC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC POE KATHERINE L BUSBY BRENDA K MOODY BRADLEY D BLAKELY GRETCHEN ANNE BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT WISEMAN SUE B JONES BENJAMIN A S C PILLON HOMES INC MURDOCK ANDREA L BUFF JOHN PHILLIP NVR INC TARPON POINT LLC GREENE VILLAS LLC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC GRANO VIVIAN WALTERS GEORGE A (JTWROS BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT CHURDAR CAMERON O D R HORTON INC Y AND Y DEVELOPMENT CORP EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL S C PILLON HOMES INC BOYD BRETT M KIM GINA B BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT RELIANT SC LLC R & J ENTERPRISES OF EAS LAWSON ROBERT W JR BROOKS KATHERINE A JONES RALPH E HERRERA DIANA M WILSON BARBARA G JONES VIVIAN MARIE A JENERETTE LISA L KOZIC DAVID M SMITH JEREMY J EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL OSTEEN JASON L FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG S C PILLON HOMES INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L D R HORTON INC S C PILLON HOMES INC FORRESTER WAYNE ALLEN MONARCH HOMES OF THE UPS MANWARING BEVERLY(JTWROS GOINS LORI COX JACKSON W TRUITT STRATTON SUE E LUKANIC PAUL CATOE WILLIAM P JR & SAN WOOD AMY A AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION CO INGRAM ELISABETH C AGARWAL MUKESH K FISKEY EMERY

34 T h e J o u r n a l | JANUARY 4, 2013

S pa rta n b u rg T r a n sac t i o n s

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ju l y

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ADDRESS

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

S C PILLON HOMES INC DEBRUIN GARY F (JTWROS) AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R O’BOYLE LISA M ODOGWU MADUKA H YISTICO LLC PHILMON TIMOTHY RYAN (JT HILL JOHNATHAN C (JTWROS HILLABRAND BRENT (SURV) OSBORNE CHERYL L MOORE J DAVID (JTWROS) RIEMENSNIDER LAURA (JTWR KIM GINA BRENDLE ROBB RON (JTWROS) KRAMER AARON JOSEPH (JTW SAYEGH JUDITH FREYTAG AMY S HAMMOND JEFFREY P (JTWRO STARBUCK STEPHEN CARROLL JASON G TUCKER JAMES (JTWROS) TRANSTECH OF SOUTH CAROL JEFFREY BENNY (JTWROS) FANER MADELINE S HILGEMAN BRANDON PATRICK SPILKER SAMUEL J WILSON BRIGETTA LINARDI ANTHONY J DILEO JANET E (JTWROS) MURDOCK ANDREA LYNN FLORES EDWIN JR (JTWROS) ARMSTRONG DAVID (JTWROS) BLACKWELL JOE CLEVELAND GRUBEL ROGER JENNINGS CAMELIA (JTWROS LOVE JESSICA (JTWROS) SHENOY AJITA MANOHAR (JT RUSSO WILLIAM (JTWROS) FARRIS CHRISTOPHER P (JT VONDERHAAR GEORGE T JR CARLSON VIVIAN C MEYER ROBERT BRUCE (JTWR BRESCIA EDWARD V (JTWROS MOORE MEREDITH PAIGE ERICKSON RAYMOND E JR CROMER BRANDON K LACY JOHN E CAZESSUS KRISTINA RENAE BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SANGHANI BHAKTI B MCBRIDE JULIE LYNN (JTWR HAMMOND FLOR-CAMILLE A NORVELL ERIC G BARTLEY AMY Y GENTRY ANTHONY LEE (JTWR BANKS CRAIG HARMON DAWN C GODBEY MICHAEL CORY (JTW BURROUGHS EVE L (JTWROS) FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG GROPP PHYLLIS M REVOCABL HANNA PAUL D (JTWROS) POWELL JOHN DANIEL CHAPMAN HEIDI E FISHER CHRISTIAN (JTWROS QUIGLEY EDWARD J JR FOY ALLISON MCCANN (SURV LEWIS SUSAN ADELE GALLOWAY WILLIAM EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL RIDGEWAY CHAD MICHAEL HUBARTT TIMOTHY P PARKER KIMBERLY D MANJI ZIA BOONE CANDICE H ROWE HARVEY RANDAL AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND BONNER RONALD STEVEN KNOWLES ROBERT L (JTWROS CATOE JOHN LELAND BUFFALO MATTHEW BURTON EGAS ADAM CHRISTOPHER ROBERSON SCOTT WILLIAM SCHULT RONALD F SECKINGER AARON J (JTWRO STANSBURY CHRISTINA L

1371 DOGWOOD DR SW 30 W DARBY RD 6 PENN CTR W 2ND FL 956 LAURELWOOD WAY 18 STRATTON CHAPEL CT 107 GRAYSTONE RD 33 BYRD BLVD 56 WOODVALE AVE 314 NEW TARLETON WAY 113 AMANDAS AUTUMN LN 17 LANNEAU DR 304 GLADSTONE WAY 213 GOVERNORS SQ 1 ANGELINE WAY 22 CLUB DR 14 GILDERVIEW DR 201 GERALD DR 23 CADOGAN DR 10609 COYLE CIR 220 DAIRWOOD DR 115 YORKSWELL LN 709 AUGUSTA ARBOR WAY 7 DEER TRACK RD 230 ASHLER DR 1220 N PARKER RD 116 RAVEN FALLS LN 104 DAIRWOOD DR 6 TIPPECANOE ST 609 CASTLESTONE DR 9 MARSHALL CT 201 WILD MEADOW DR 102 SHINLEAF DR 120 LAKE CIRCLE DR 307 BRIDGE CROSSING DR 602 FARMING CREEK DR 103 GILDEN LN 256 DAIRWOOD DR 220 CAMMER AVE 302 E FARIS RD 30 PATEWOOD DR STE 257 24 COOLIDGE AVE 43 BARNWOOD CIR 16 PEBBLEBROOK CT 139 CATNIP TRL 9 WAXWING CT 364 STRASBURG DR 334 DELLWOOD DDR 215 KINGS HEATH LN PO BOX 1039 313 CYPRESSHILL CT 10 LAZY WILLOW DR 107 BRIARPARK DR 101 PARLIAMENT RD 123 SHEEPSCOT CT 2109 GARDEN DISTRICT DR PO BOX 670 104 BRITON WAY 308 COVINGTON RD 419 SE MAIN ST STE 4000C PO BOX 650043 13 BELFREY DR 101 OREGON ST 329 VIEWMONT DR 10 THUNDER RD 7 WOODWAY DR 4 CARTER RUN CT 104 CHUKAR WAY 113 RABON CHASE CT 267 OAK BRANCH DR 2857 WESTPORT RD 61 LEBANON CT 160 MAREHAVEN CT 258 OAK BRANCH DR 913 LAURENS RD 305 MELLOW WAY 838 PRINCETON HWY #76 6 PENN CTR W 2ND FL 4400 WILL ROGERS PKWY STE 300 217 CANNON CIR 496 HARBOR POINT 216 HEDGEWOOD TER 204 E PARK AVE UNIT 1203 204 COLLINGSWORTH LN 7 HARTLINE CT 224 NORTHCLIFF WAY 528 HORTON GROVE RD 506 AUSTIN WOODS CT

WOODRIDGE BROWN ARROW DILLARD CREEK CROSSING LONDONDERRY COBBLESTONE CLARK ESTATES MEADOW BROOK FARMS DILLARD CREEK CROSSING SHORESBROOK PIERCE ACRES WATERFORD GLENLAKE REIDVILLE CROSSING CHESTNUT HILL HOLCOMBE CREEK WESTGATE PLANTATION BLACKBERRY FARM WOODSBERRY SILVER LAKE FOUR SEASONS FARMS PATRIOT HILL BENT CREEK PLANTATION DOGWOOD ACRES KINGSLEY PARK STONEWOOD CROSSING ROGERS MILL GREENBRIAR CREEK DORMAN ACRES WYNBROOK SCAY RIDGE FARMS HUNTWOOD PANORAMA ESTATES E Z HEIGHTS CROSS POINTE STONEWOOD CROSSING STONE STATION LYMAN FARMS HAWK CREEK NORTH COUNTRY GLEN BEAVER CREEK LAWSONS FORK HUMMINGBIRD HILLS GLYN OAKS PACIFIC MILLS KILGORE FOREST WESTON TOWNES CEDAR ACRES HUNTINGTON WOODS POPLER CREEK FARMS TIMBERWOOD ACRES CAMPBELL ACRES FALCON RIDGE BROOKFIELD HEIGHTS ARCHER ACRES THE HERITAGE AT LAKE FOREST OAK FOREST SAXON VILLAGE OAKLAND HEIGHTS TRAMMEL CROSSING VILLAGE AT BENT CREEK SOUTH TYGER HILLS BUSHY MEADOS RIVER FALLS PLANTATION GLENLAKE COBBS CREEK COBBS CREEK HOBBS, ARCHIE LEE INMAN MILL KILGORE FOREST SOUTH TYGER HILLS FAIRVIEW HEIGHTS ALLENE COOLEY ESTATE

$432,500 $310,000 $253,725 $253,704 $252,350 $245,000 $235,000 $225,000 $222,437 $216,000 $202,000 $195,550 $192,500 $182,500 $179,205 $160,000 $158,900 $158,000 $156,500 $155,000 $154,900 $150,000 $149,000 $140,000 $139,900 $139,000 $138,000 $135,000 $134,784 $132,000 $130,000 $129,900 $123,100 $123,000 $121,000 $119,900 $119,500 $118,000 $114,153 $113,250 $113,000 $110,000 $109,000 $108,900 $106,000 $99,900 $92,000 $87,400 $85,000 $85,000 $85,000 $79,000 $75,000 $75,000 $73,500 $68,000 $66,000 $61,765 $60,000 $58,000 $57,000 $56,000 $52,000 $51,000 $50,000 $50,000 $47,189 $46,550 $45,000 $45,000 $45,000 $40,355 $40,000 $38,500 $32,500 $32,001 $26,500 $26,500 $25,000 $25,000 $22,300 $22,000 $21,000 $18,055 $18,000 $16,900 $12,500

4,

2012

BUYER

CHIPLEY, BRANT W CARSON, MICHAEL COREY MCMICHAEL, ROBERT DALE HAWK, JEFFREY P GARBAR, FEDOR HANLEY, MARK T S C PILLON HOMES INC WILKISON, WILLIAM URQUHART, MARIE OTT, TIMOTHY E CARSON, MICHAEL COREY CABLE, CONSTANCE L SCRUGGS JR, JAMES B UPCHURCH, RON C COOLEY, JOSEPH C REEVES, ROBERT W S C PILLON HOMES INC PFISTER, BABARA RIDGE JR, HENRY W QUALITY HAULERS INC WILSON, BRENNAN T WIND, WARREN COLLINS, SCOTT D SMITH, CHRISTOPHER N SHACKLETON, CHRISTOPHER GREGORY, PAUL J ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC SQUIRES, CHADWICK S S C PILLON HOMES INC DOTSON, PATRICIA SHEPHERD, ROBIN GIBBS, MARSHA H ASHMORE HOMES INC PEARSON, BJORN M HARTMAIER, HOLGER DESAI, MIT K AMBRIA PROPERTIES LLC SILL, DAVID FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE LINDMAIR, JILL M R&R BUILDERS LLC MOFFITT, KRISTIN T OTT, TIMOTHY E GABER JR, ROBERT F MARLOWE, JAMES DOUGLAS TARDIF, MARGARET M SINOBAS, JAVIER WILKINS, VERLANTRA T NICHOLSON, KOEY W BRYANT JR, JACK D WELKER, DONALD F WATKINS, JUSTIN W TURNER, NANCY H GARBER III, MILES D ANTRIM JR, DAVID E ROGERS, ADAM C MUNGO, HOMES INC PITTS, SHIRLEY A FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE WHITTED, JOHN TERRY TYO, JAMES M COCHRAN, BENJAMIN MASON, JON BROWNING SITMAN, JOSHUA D ECHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC EVANS, ROGER D MARTIN, ADAM WADE HOWARD, AMANDA M HOWELL, MICHAEL E SPITZLI, JONATHAN A CONN, JAMYE NICHOLE HAWLEY, MATHEW STEVEN DAVIS, REGINA DUNCAN, JOSEPH UPCHURCH, RON C WRIGHT, TERRY J MUNGO HOMES INC RHODE, JOHNNY L FAZZONE, HELEN M DUNVEGAN PROPERTIES LLC HOBBS, MICHAEL D MOWRY, LORI M PYHALA, LORENA E NETHERY, SHANNON C ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC HOBBS, MICHAEL D CANTRELL, WILLIAM W JOHNSON, ROBERT GENE WHITE, BRIAN K SEGET, ANNA R COLLINS, ROBERT W BAKER, PRESTON HICKS, JAMES B SELBY, AUDREY L HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANISAY, DOUANG CHIVACHAREN, MALEE MCKINNON, AUBRE PAGE, ROGER J BAXTER, JEFFREY T LANGSTON PROPERTIES LLC WOMBLE, BLAKELY S JARRELL, RODGER C ELTZ, JESSICA L KORIKOVA, ANZHELIKA V CORBITT, TERRELLW WELLS, WILBERT EARLE, JONSI FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE BLANTON, AMANDA ROSE WALKER, PATRICIA A REGIONS BANK FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE MCCUAN, BRENDA OSBORNE MELTON, DONNA C DAVIS, MICHAEL T HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT I & I PROPERTIES LLC MURDOCK, TERRY TWEED, BARRY MAHAFFEY, TRACY C LUCIER, ROBERT STEPHEN FBSA 1 LLC HURST, JUDITH KORBLER BLACKWELDER, MATTIE MAE SORRELS, DAVID D CITIMORTGAGE INC GRACE UNLIMITED INTERNAT’L WILKINS SR, BOBBY L LOVING, DENNIS POWELL BILY, L FLEMING, MACK DANIEL SOLESBEE, MARION HARDING, CAROL M HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT REMAT LLC LANGSTON PROPERTIES LLC STENSEL, GARY W MCCLEER CONSTRUCTION CO LLC MCCLEER, FRANK CANTRELL, SUSAN D VANWYK, JOHN SCOTT CMH HOMES INC JENSON, J W COLEMAN HOMES LLC WIRTH, ANDREAS BOWERS, MARC KEITH PAGE, ROGER J MARK III PROPERTIES INC NVR INC MILLWOOD, STEPHEN JAY OLIVARES, VERONICA P COBBS CREEK LLC SPAULDING QUALITY HOMES LLC COBBS CREEK LLC SPAULDING QUALITY HOMES LLC HOBBS, ARCHIE LEE NELSON JR, KENNETH O MARTIN, JAMES H HUTCHINS, CHAD LITTLEJOHN, SUSAN R PYHALA, LORENA SIMMONS, WENDELL FISKE, CLAUDIA MAREADY, RONNIE EARL CMH HOMES INC CITIMORTGAGE INC WALL, JERRY L SMITH, JOHNNIE KINCS, ZOLTAN FIRST PIEDMONT FED. SAVINGS KRAMAREV, VLADIMIR FFT INC POPPY PUB LLC

ADDRESS 818 OAKCREST RD 1004 FISH CAMP RD 211 BROWN ARROW CIR 515 HORTON GROVE RD 353 E KILLARNEY LK 846 REDSTONE DR 316 WILD AZALEA DR 421 BELCHER ST LOT NUMBER: 129 13101 HIGHWAY 221 832 SHORESBROOK DR 344 FAIRLANE DR 162 WATERFORD DR 266 BRIDGEPORT RD 132 E FARRELL DR 326 HEATHWOOD DR 26 HOLCOMBE RD 100 FLINDERS WAY 427 SILVER THORNE DR 522 FOREST SHOALS LN 115 DILLARD RD 252 STONECREST DR 95 BEN HURT RD EXT 308 BRANDON OAKS DR 402 WEEPING WILLOW CT 164 GREEN ACRES ST 215 DOGWOOD CIR 212 N HAMLET CT 559 BRANCH WOOD DR 641 S MORNINGWOOD LN 655 HIBBARD FARM RD 111 LURAY ST 603 CLARION CT 247 SUMMER LADY LN 315 COURSON CT 213 BLALOCK RD 37 LEE ST 123 CHANDLER DOWNS TRL 281 STONEWOOD CROSSING DR 224 N LANFORD RD 292 AUGUSTINE DR 102 WALCOTT DR 532 WESBERRY CIR 237 CLEARVIEW HTS 643 BUSHY CREEK RD 120 BEAVER CREEK DR 103 GOWER RD 230 HUMMINGBIRD LN 2433 OLD FURNACE RD 16 UPLAND ST 121 REAGAN LN 222 WESTON VALLEY DR 111 HANCOCK AVE 110 LANDIS ST OLD FURNACE RD 153 LOBIOLLY DR LOT NUMBER: 31 650 GROGAN RD 168 FALCON RIDGE DR LOT NUMBER: 1-3 415 JASMINE ST 113 HERITAGE LAKE FOREST DR 2244 COUNTRY CLUB RD 4729 WORDEN DR 480 N HIGHWAY 150 4 MANNING ST 420 BLACKWELL DR 652 MOGA DR 2543 TRAMMEL RD LOT NUMBER: 8 2850 E MAIN ST EXT 255 S HILLS DR 715&719 OLD BETHEL RD 301 RIVER FALLS DR LOT NUMBER: 204 612 S KENTUCKY AVE ` 518 ELLERSLY CT 514 ELLERSLY CT 227 ELIJAH SIMMONS RD 165 HUSKEY RD 4 B ST 1521 KILGORE BRIDGE RD 255 S HILLS DR 408 RICHLAND ST 237 GRANDVIEW DR 230 WILKINS RD MAIN ST

Special to the Journal


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THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATIONS NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Public Relations Services for Greenville County Soil and Water Conservation District, RFP# 2001/22/13, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Atmosphere, Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 2726 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than Janurary 20, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filLAPBAND® INFORMATION SESSION lapband® information lapband® information session session ing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where Monday, January 7 • 6:30-8:30 p.m. Monday, november 12 Monday, • 6:30-8:30 november 12 • 6:30-8:30 p.m. p.m. the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and Medical Building Center tuesday, december tuesday, 4 •Office 6:30-8:30 december 4 Community • 6:30-8:30 p.m.p.m. the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, This free class covers detailed information about LapBand weight loss Medical Office Building Medical Community Office Building Community Center Center ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: free (803) 896-0110 This class covers detailed surgery. information This free class detailed about LapBand® about LapBand® weight weight loss loss surgery. surgery. This covers procedure hasinformation no stapling, cutting or intestinal rerouting

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Register atthe villageatpelham.com or call 864-849-9470. To know the latest on the innovative To knowand thetoday latest patient-centered on innovative and patient-centered care provided care provided through through Spartanburg Regional Healthcare Spartanburg System, Regional watch Healthcare Discover System, watchHealth Discover Health TV TVsegment segment on on Sundays at 12:30 p.m. on Sundays WYFF, atthe 12:30Village Channel p.m. on Hospital, WYFF, Channel 4. the 4. The campus features Medical Office

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Building, a wide variety of medical practices and the Surgery Center at Pelham. It is conveniently located at Westmoreland Road LOOKING AHEAD REQUIRES LOOKING The campus features the Village Hospital, The campus features the theMedical Village Hospital, Office the Building, Office Building,aa wide wide variety variety and Highway 14Medical in Greer. BACK TO THE PEOPLE AND PLACES THAT register today at villageatpelham.com register today at villageatpelham.com or call 864-849-9470. or call 864-849-9470.

of medical practices and the Surgery of medical Center practices and atthe Pelham. Surgery Center Itatis Pelham. conveniently It is conveniently located located at at Westmoreland Road andWestmoreland Highway Road14 and in Highway Greer. 14 in Greer.

HAVE SHAPED OUR PRESENT

SAVE FACE DURING THE RAVAGES OF WINTER

JAN UARY 2 013 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

www.towncarolina.com MKTGP112B

JANUARY 4, 2013 | THE Journal 35

MKTG


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Crossword puzzle: page 38

Sudoku puzzle: page 38

Bella Durham-Howard, 8, looks over to her dad, Carlos Howard, during skate night. Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Students from St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School get some help putting on their ice skates during skate night at Greenville Technical College Ice on Main. Fluor Corporation sponsored the skate night for the school.

St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School students enjoy skate night at Ice on Main. About 100 students took part from K3 through sixth grade.

photos by mark sturgis / contributing

36 THE Journal | JANUARY 4, 2013

Dabo Swinney coaches the Clemson offense.

Clemson’s Tajh Boyd lunges for a touchdown in the Chick-fil-A bowl.

Clemson players celebrate their 25-24 win over LSU in the Chick-fil-A Bowl on New Year’s Eve.


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

UN First-graders at St. Anthony of Padua School made and decorated gingerbread houses as part of their Christmas celebration.

R DE

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Stone Academy students attending the SC Children’s Theater production of “Junie B. Jones in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells,” from left: Mallie Medlock, Emma Grace Haines, Chaz Haines (starring as Herbert, Junie B.’s best friend), Chloe Arnold, and Joe Medlock in front. Not pictured: Stone Academy third-grade student Karis Phillips, who played Charlotte in “Junie B.”

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Washington Center students Cleveland Davis (left) and Paul Barnette, assisted by teacher McKenzie Riley (center), create baked treats as gifts for the school staff.

Best Chevrolet of the Upstate’s Peter Mirante presents a check for $1,250 to the Shriners Hospital for Children.

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Washington Center students enjoyed percussion instruction from parent John Dalby (left) as para-educator Robert Poole and music teacher Julie Dail assist student Davis Dalby in playing the drums.

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JANUARY 4, 2013 | THE Journal 37


journal culture

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McDaniel Village | 1922 Augusta St., Ste. 112 864.631.1919 | labelsonaugusta.com

38 THE Journal | JANUARY 4, 2013

1 Fight reminder 5 Joined 8 Kuwaiti, e.g. 15 Cut (back) 19 Benedict XVI, e.g. 20 Rather than 22 “I’ll pay” 23 Red sky, to some 24 Unoiled robot’s problem? 26 The “O” of OWN 28 Sign about a space shortage, briefly 29 Feel a strong need (for) 30 Sinusitis-treating MD 31 Relevant element 33 18-Down’s rank: Abbr. 36 Use an entrance 37 __ es Salaam 38 Embarrassed parrot’s cry? 42 Deli selection 43 Peruvian songstress Sumac 44 Palme __: Cannes prize 45 Rattan alternative 47 “Half-caf” was added to it in 2012 48 “Modern Family” role 52 Lottery winner’s reaction, perhaps? 59 Et __ 60 Dickens’s “__ Mutual Friend” 61 Religious title starter 62 Decked out at the Forum

65 Troy story? 69 Raves about 73 Sudden storm in Hunan? 77 __ Lake, town near Lake Placid 78 App for long-distance partners 79 Israeli tender 80 Hot again 82 Prefix with caching 84 True-to-life 85 Shout when zucchini falls off the boat? 92 Soft vocal signals 93 Distillery container 94 Hokkaido port city 95 Here, to Henri 97 Embarrassed 98 Capital gain? 101 Escort at the farmyard ball? 108 Like Beethoven’s Sonata Op. 109 109 Omani tender 111 __-Pei 112 “Mansfield Park” novelist 113 M ÷ IV 114 Vegging out 117 Xhosa and Zulu are among its official langs. 119 Do a legislature’s job 120 Any Mr. Magoo story? 125 Pre-’90s orchard spray 126 30 Seconds to Mars frontman Jared

127 Latin Mass prayer 128 Foul 129 Belgian river 130 Three-ball family project, typically 131 Zero has one 132 Ivy growing for 300+ years

40 “Cool” sum 41 Anti-discrimination initials 46 Mail svc. that may cover a general store 48 Quarterback Ryan et al. 49 Island greeting

50 Landlocked African land 51 Falls for two lovers? 53 Stop 54 Bookmarked addresses, briefly 55 Gambling game 56 Five Norwegian

royals 57 Dressing with wings 58 Some church supporters 63 Seaside soarers 64 Donne’s “__ Be Not Proud” 66 95% of them are between 70 and 130 67 Seaside diver 68 Time to seize? 70 “Oliver Twist” antagonist 71 “That’s __ trick!” 72 Some latte sizes 74 Phobia beginning 75 Natalie Gulbis’s org. 76 Sinister stare 81 Ab __: anew 83 Anthony Hopkins’s “Thor” role 85 To the letter 86 Slakes 87 Stet 88 “You know the rest,” for short 89 “We’re winning!” 90 Jewish ritual 91 “That smarts!” 92 Feeling felt in fits 96 Lee’s letters 98 Big oil exporter 99 Fitness test components 100 Maid of fiction 102 Zippy racers 103 Faux 104 “Anchors Aweigh” org. 105 1990 World Cup host, locally 106 Manufacturer’s nightmare 107 Menu listing 110 Allegro’s opposite 115 Stressful thing to get into 116 Four years, perhaps 118 Away from most of the blowing 121 Campus gp. 122 Molecular code carrier 123 William, to Charles 124 Afore

Crossword answers: page 36

Down

1 Send-ups 2 2002 HP acquisition 3 Overview 4 Opera director Scotto 5 “I __ had!” 6 Titles in court, for short 7 Brad of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” 8 Mental health org. 9 Seoul protector 10 Craigslist caveat 11 Proclivity 12 Place for a pet name 13 Thumping 14 “I will fear __”: Psalm 23 15 Get into 16 “Don’t leave me” 17 Cry from the flock 18 Scotland Yard inspector in Sherlock Holmes stories 21 Menial laborers 25 Ohio’s __ State 27 “Hey, Tex” 32 “Top Hat” studio 34 It’s about a foot 35 “Qué __?” 39 -ish

Easy

Sudoku answers: page 36


JOURNAL CULTURE

LIFE IS SO DAILY WITH STEVE WONG

I resolve not to tell you So how’s that New Year’s resolution going for you so far? It’s just a few days into 2013, not really enough time to tell if you’ll stick to your self-made promise to be a better person. Or is it? How many Mountain Dews did you drink today? Did you eat just five potato chips with just “a taste” of sour cream onion dip (did you know that you can reinforce Lays chips by stacking them together, therefore allowing you a lot more dip per scoop)? How about those eight laps around the track? (In the rain? Are you kidding?) Crunches? Yes, I heard a lot of crunches as I ate those stacked-together potato chips, dulled only by the high-fat content of the sour cream coursing through my arteries. As I’ve approached middle age (and I do promise to stop lying about my age), I’ve stopped telling other people my New Year’s resolutions. Oh, I still make them; I just keep them to myself. You might think this would only serve to make me less accountable – that if other people knew I was trying to improve something in my life, I might try harder just to keep from embarrassing myself in the eyes of others. But it doesn’t really work that way. No one else cares if I keep my New Year’s resolutions or not. They have their own loathsome habits to break and would never think of calling the kettle black. A sort of “don’t ask, don’t tell” tradition. What I have found is if I make a promise to myself and tell no one else, I am much more likely to keep it. It is like some deep dark secret that gets to haunt me into compliance. No one else can see it, hear it, feel it, know it, but I do; and if I don’t do something

about it… well, that’s an episode of “Being Human” just waiting for me to write. (Reminder: Google Syfy/Being Human/staff writer.) Promises made to one’s self are among the strongest and most important ever to be left unsaid. After all, it’s easy to break them and disappoint your parents, your spouse, even your kids. They all love you no matter what. But break one to yourself and you’ll never forgive yourself. (Go to church.) Everyone else knows you’re just human, but tell that to the guy in the mirror, and he’ll roll your eyeballs in a sneer of “told you so” that you’ll never live down. Do you know how hard it is to put in a contact lens and not look yourself in the eye? Yes, I’ve made my New Year’s resolution, and I have every intention of keeping it. And when I do (as I’ve done before), I’ll rejoice in the privacy of my own company. No one will know (not even my therapist) that I succeeded where so many have failed. It might be the loss of a few pounds or the saving of a few dollars. It might be being a better friend (the line forms to the right) or giving an at-risk child my spare time (to the front of the line, please). All these things and many more need to be addressed in my life, and I promise… Happy New Year, and good luck with those resolutions! Steve Wong is a writer living in Spartanburg County. His strange opinions and ideas on life are all his own. If you feel compelled to comment on his overly complex thoughts, he can be reached at Just4Wong@gmail.com.

When you are done reading this paper, please recycle it.

SALE CONTINUED! GARRISON OPTICIANS McDaniel Village 271-1812 1922 Augusta Street M-F 9:30-5:30 & by appt. www.garrisonopticians.com

• $100 off a complete pair of glasses • $125 off each additional complete pair • 10% off all sunglasses, readers, and accessories Offer applies to stock on hand, no other discounts apply.

Sale Extended!

Now through January 18

JANUARY 4, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39

 $100 off a complete pair of glasses  $125 off each additional complete pair


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Jan. 4, 2013 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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