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CONTENTS 14 DELVING INTO HISTORY 14 THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA’S BICENTENNIAL COMMEMORATION 20 THE THREE PRESIDENTS 23 MICHIE TAVERN CA. 1784

26 SEEING & DOING

26 IX COMPLEX & ART PARK | 30 THE CORNER 34 THE DOWNTOWN MALL

48 SHOPPING 52 MAKING MERRY 54 BECOMING CULTURED 60 FEASTING 72 DRINKING UP 84 GETTING OUT 92 DAY TRIPPING

92 NELSON COUNTY 98 ORANGE COUNTY 104 BLUE RIDGE LOOP

111 PHOTOGRAPHIC ESSAY

SHENANDOAH NATIONAL PARK

118 SAYING I DO 124 TURNING LOCAL 130 INDEX CHICORY. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF NATIONAL PARK SERVICE)

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PUBLISHERS Roy Van Doorn, Bill Morrow EDITORIAL ­& PRODUCTION

Design and Production Director Judy A. Bias Design and Production Consultant Erin E. Burks Chief Writer Jennifer L. Stover Copyeditor Steven Blaski ADVERTISING Senior Account Manager Bill Morrow Senior Account Manager Roy Van Doorn Account Supervisor Danielle Bricker CopyrightŠ 2017 ISBN 978-0-9981723-0-9 City Select 1140 E High Street Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434.220.0020 DiscoverCville.com To purchase a copy of Discover Charlottesville call 434.220.0020

Published by City Select, December 2017. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means in whole or in part for commercial use, without written permission of the publisher. Publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and/or omissions therein. By securing an order for advertising space in this publication, the advertising party agrees to indemnify the publisher against any and all claims relating to the advertisement. Printed in the United States of America.

COVER PHOTOGRAPH: ORANGE AUTUMN LEAVES. (COURTESY OF KAREN BLAHA)

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Michie Tavern ca. 1784

Jefferson Vineyards

Michie Tavern, located near Jefferson’s Monticello, accommodated travelers with food, drink and lodging for more than 200 years. Today, visitors experience this historic landmark through a journey recreating 18th century life. Servers in period attire offer Midday Fare for a lunch experience rich in southern culture and hospitality. The buffet features fried chicken, smoked pork barbecue, marinated baked chicken, stewed tomatoes, black-eyed peas, buttermilk biscuits and much more.  After lunch, visit the oldest section of the Tavern offering self-guided tours. Shopping opportunities abound in four unique shops all housed in period structures such as the Armory and Artifacts Shop, specializing in antique weapons for sale.

Jefferson Vineyards is a family owned winery and vineyard, located where Thomas Jefferson and Philip Mazzei first began the American wine revolution. 37 years ago, we introduced quality modern viticulture to Virginia, helping realize Jefferson’s dream. Our winery offers select wines of superior quality and is considered to have “one of the region’s most consistent track records” (Wine Spectator). Located between Monticello and Highland, we are the closest winery to Charlottesville. Tastings of our current wine list are $12. Please visit our website for current operating hours and group policies.

Open daily 9am–5pm. Midday Fare: 11:30am–3pm.

jeffersonvineyards.com

683 Thomas Jefferson Parkway, Charlottesville

434.977.1234

1353 Thomas Jefferson Parkway, Charlottesville

434.977.3042

James Monroe’s Highland James Monroe’s Highland is open year round to visitors interested in discovering more about the life and legacy of the nation’s fifth President. The historic buildings, including the Presidential Guest House, kitchens, and outbuildings, invite exploration of Monroe’s contributions to American democracy. The grounds feature flowering plants, Monroe-era trees, and productive kitchen and vegetable gardens. A division of the College of William & Mary since 1974, the site offers guided tours and hosts numerous community events throughout the year. Hours of Operation April-October: 9am– 6pm, November–March: 11am–5pm. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. 2050 James Monroe Parkway, Charlottesville

434.293.8000 highland.org

michietavern.com

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CONTRIBUTORS PHOTOGRAPHY & ILLUSTRATIONS Judy A. Bias, Map Illustrations Charlottesville Albemarle Convention & Visitors Bureau P.O. Box 178, Charlottesville VA 22902 Phone: 434.293.6789 | Toll-free: 877.386.1103 visitcharlottesville.org Lisa Green and Amy-Sarah Marshall Cindy Schornberg Keswick Vineyards 1575 Keswick Winery Drive, Keswick VA 22947 434.244.3341 keswickvineyards.com Shenandoah National Park • National Park Service (NPS) Katy Cain, N. Lewis and Brett Raeburn 3655 U.S. Highway 211 East, Luray VA 22835 Phone: 540.999.3500 nps.gov/shen/index.htm Skyclad Aerial Photography Matteus Frankovich skycladaerial.com University of Virginia Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library P.O. Box 400110, Charlottesville VA 22904-4110 Phone: 434.243.1776 small.library.virginia.edu University of Virginia Dan Addison and Sanjay Suchak Office of University Communications P.O. Box 400229, Charlottesville VA 22904-4229 Phone: 434.924.3801 communications.virginia.edu

ARTICLES We would like to thank the following people for sharing their stories about our community: Amelia Bailey, Cindy Conte, Kari Evans, Kirby Hutto, Susan Krischel, Lauren Maupin, Carla Moody, Will Richey, Christine Riggleman, Ann Shannon, Brian Schornberg, Chuck Shelton, Heather Stertzer, Stephen Stokes, Armand & Bernice Thieblot, Barry Wood 10

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Welcome to Charlottesville

DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTESVILLE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

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DELVING INTO HISTORY

The University of Virginia’s Bicentennial Commemoration

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n Oct. 6, 1817, three presidents gathered in an empty field west of Charlottesville. Then-President James Monroe laid a cornerstone near his former law offices while Thomas Jefferson and James Madison looked on. The local Freemasons performed a ceremony, a band played songs, and local judges, attorneys and enslaved laborers were all in attendance. This one day would change the course of education in our young nation. That day was a celebration of the first step in the creation of the University of Virginia — a university that its founder, Jefferson, envisioned would create educated and engaged citizen leaders and ensure the survival of democracy. It was not until over a year later that the Virginia General Assembly selected Charlottesville as the site of the state university. Now, the University is celebrating those historic events with bicentennial celebrations through the January 2019 anniversary of the University’s charter, as well as additional events in 2025 to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the arrival of the first students. The bicentennial commemoration will give the University the opportunity to celebrate the many accomplishments of UVA’s past 200 years and the achievement of the founder’s vision. But also — and more importantly — the University will use the bicentennial as an opportunity to look forward and to articulate aspirations for the next 200 years of Thomas Jefferson’s University. “Our University really had a role in the survival of our democracy,” says Kari Evans, executive director of the bicentennial. “It was pretty profound for its day in that it didn’t have a chapel at all, and it wasn’t just designed for the children of the wealthy landowners. It was there to create an educated citizenry to ensure this fledgling democracy could survive.” UVA was the first college in the country to offer classes other than politics and religion. Faculty at Jefferson’s University taught philosophy, chemistry, law and medicine. “It was such a departure from education in its day,” Evans says. “There have been bumps along the way and times throughout our history where we’ve had growing pains, but we are thriving now and looking to the future.”

FINAL EXERCISES. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF UVA OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS)

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THE ROTUNDA FIRE OF 1895 WAS RE-ENACTED IN DRAMATIC FASHION USING DIGITAL MAPPING TECHNOLOGY DISPLAYED ON THE ROTUNDA AT THE BICENTENNIAL LAUNCH CELEBRATION ON 10/6/17. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

DELVING INTO HISTORY — THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA’S BICENTENNIAL COMMEMORATION Bicentennial programs will include the stories of the enslaved people who helped build the University and kept it running during its early years, as well as women, who were excluded from full inclusion in the academic community for the first century and a half of the University’s existence. “We’re not trying to hide anything,” Evans says. “We really do want to recognize and mark those 16

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aspects of our history. We want to celebrate the University, to highlight our achievements, but at the same time be true and honest.” The integral role of the enslaved people who lived and worked at the University was denied for many years. Recently, though, UVA took steps to understand and honor the lives of

these people through research, dialogue, memorials, archaeology and commemoration. Bicentennial programs will delve into the role of slavery at the University. The first full class of women was not admitted until the fall of 1970, after a lawsuit threw out a proposed transition period and enrollment


cap. Thousands of women, however, did attend before that time, including graduate students, nursing students, and wives and daughters of faculty members. Today, women make up more than half the student population. Bicentennial programs have included a forum focused on the role of women in 21st century democracy that featured women leaders from around the world. The bicentennial commission charged with planning the celebration will also author a transformational report on the direction of UVA and public higher education as a whole. The hope is that the report will impact the state of higher education in the 21st century to the same degree the University’s founding changed education in the 19th century. “We’re reaching out to leadership at other institutions across the country,” Evans says. “It is not meant to be a roadmap just for UVA.” Visitors are encouraged to attend UVA’s bicentennial programs. “Everything we’re doing is meant to be very inclusive and engaging,” Evans says. “We love the idea of people who are traveling to this area coming and taking part in it.” Check the website at bicentennial.virginia.edu for the latest events. The Academical Village | Jefferson planned the University around what he called the Academical Village, a group of residential and academic buildings surrounding a green space called the Lawn, a gathering spot for students, faculty and the community. Graduation exercises are held on the Lawn each May. On the north end of the Lawn is the Rotunda, the most recognizable symbol of the University. Jefferson modeled the Rotunda after the Pantheon in Rome, and it housed the University’s first library. Recent renovations to the Rotunda restored historical features not seen in more than a century. Facing the east and west sides of the Lawn are 10 Pavilions and 54 student rooms that were part of the original design for the Academical Village. Faculty members live in most of the Pavilions, which each have a unique design based on Jefferson’s classification of the branches of learning. Behind each of the Pavilions, serpentine walls enclose gardens that are open to the public. Past the gardens and facing away from the Lawn are additional student rooms called the Range. The Academical Village — along with Monticello — is designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site because of its architectural and cultural significance. Student-led historical tours of the Academical Village begin at the Rotunda and are available most days when school is in session. TOP LEFT: AFRICAN-AMERICAN SERVANTS — UNCLE ALEX SOUTHALL AND AUNT MARTHEY SOUTHALL — 1900-05. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE ALBERT AND SHIRLEY SMALL SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA). RIGHT: GALT STATUE OF THOMAS JEFFERSON. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF UVA OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS)


THOMAS JEFFERSON. (PORTRAIT BY CHARLES WILSON PEALE) 19TH CENTURY UVA STUDENTS.

The General Assembly established a charter for “Central College” using Jefferson’s design for his Academical Village.

1816

The General Assembly confirmed funding for a state university to be titled the “University of Virginia.” Central College is chosen as that new university.

1817

1818

The location for Central College was confirmed, and the cornerstone was laid at Pavilion VII, the first building.

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The first “Public Day” was held in the Rotunda’s Dome Room, marking the first form of graduation for students.

The University opened for classes with five professors and a small number of students.

1819

1825

The Board of Visitors held its initial meeting, and Jefferson was elected as rector.

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA. PUBLISHED BY C. BOHN. ENGRAVED BY J. SERZ.

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1921 GRADUATION AND FINAL EXERCISES ON LAWN. ACADEMIC PROCESSION TO THE AMPHITHEATRE.

1826

Jefferson paid his last visit to the University. He died on July 4 at 83 years old. James Madison assumed Jefferson’s role as rector.

1829

The Honor System was established in response to ongoing conflict between teachers and students.

1840

1842

Law professor, John A.G. Davis, was murdered on the Lawn. The crime capped a period of riots, duels, gambling and drunken episodes amongst students.

Fire destroyed the Rotunda and its annex. The building was reconstructed with significant changes to its layout.

1895 to 1899

1889

The University Chapel was dedicated.

1901

The “Academic Procession” down the Lawn from the Rotunda was established for Final Exercises.

1905

The first UVA hospital was dedicated. It housed three operating rooms and 25 patient beds.

ANGELUS DECAL TRANSFER: VIRGINIA CAVALIER. UNIVERSITY CHAPEL.


DELVING INTO HISTORY — UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA TIMELINE

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL.

SCOTT STADIUM, AERIAL VIEW.

Doris KuhlmannWilsdorf became the first female full professor.

Scott Stadium opened for football games.

1921

Adelaide Simpson became first dean of women. At that time, women only attended summer classes and studied nursing or education.

1931

1950

1963

The first AfricanAmerican student, Gregory H. Swanson, was admitted.

(PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE ALBERT AND SHIRLEY SMALL SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, UVA OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS AND THE WOMAN CITIZEN, VOLUME 6 COURTESY OF GOOGLE BOOKS)

The first reports of “streaking the Lawn” occurred. Students, including one woman, also failed at an attempt to set a world record for streaking.

1970

The University admitted its first female undergraduates.

1974

Ground was broken for what is now University Hospital.

1976

1984

The Rotunda was restored to its original Jeffersonian design. Construction was completed in time for the nation’s bicentennial celebration.

The newly constructed David A. Harrison III Law Grounds were dedicated.

1987

The Academical Village was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

1997

Betsy and John Casteen Arts Grounds were established.

2010

2010

Teresa A. Sullivan became the first female president.

2016

Restoration and modernization of the Rotunda was completed prior to the University’s bicentennial celebration.

JULY 2, 1921

UVA PRESIDENT TERESA A. SULLIVAN AND INTERNS. UVA STUDENTS IN CLASS 12-18-1970.

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DELVING INTO HISTORY

The Three Presidents

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irginia is known as the Mother of Presidents, and central Virginia is the location of three presidential homes — Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello and James Monroe’s Highland, both just a short drive from Charlottesville, and James Madison’s Montpelier, about 30 miles away in Orange County. These three men all came from well-to-do Virginia families, and throughout their adult lives they collaborated on issues as diverse as politics and home renovations, remaining friends despite their differences. Jefferson and Madison met at the Virginia Constitutional Convention in 1776, the start of an enduring 50-year friendship between the author of the Declaration of Independence and the Father of the Constitution. Monroe met Jefferson, then the governor, in Richmond while studying law. In 1783, he and Jefferson represented Virginia in the Confederation Congress. They shared lodgings, and Jefferson encouraged Monroe to strike up a friendship with Madison. Monroe also served as governor of Virginia and as Jefferson’s special envoy to France, where he negotiated the Louisiana Purchase. Monroe and Madison would oppose each other in the race for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, but they remained friends after Madison’s win. Monroe later served as President Madison’s secretary of state and secretary of war. The three Virginians joined forces and opposed Alexander Hamilton’s push for a strong executive branch, national bank and military. They launched a political revolution with their Democratic-Republican Party, and Jefferson, Madison and Monroe — in that order — held the presidency from 1801–1825. The men shared more than a political affiliation. They frequently spent time at each other’s plantations. Jefferson advised James and Dolley Madison during renovations of Montpelier. All three men served on the Board of Visitors for the University of Virginia, which Jefferson founded on land that Monroe purchased. Madison advised Jefferson on the hiring of faculty and served as the second rector of the University after Jefferson’s death.

MONTICELLO — EASTFRONT. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE THOMAS JEFFERSON FOUNDATION AND THE CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU). INSET TOP RIGHT: SALLY HEMINGS’ VALUE WAS $50 ACCORDING TO THE INVENTORY & APPRAISAL OF JEFFERSON’S 1826 ESTATE. (ALEXANDER GARRETT, RECORDER, PAPERS REGARDING THOMAS JEFFERSON’S ESTATE, 1826, ACCESSION #5145, ALBERT AND SHIRLEY SMALL SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA). INSET BOTTOM RIGHT: HEMMINGS CABIN — RE-CREATED SLAVE CABIN OF JOHN AND PRISCILLA HEMMINGS ON MULBERRY ROW AT MONTICELLO. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF STACEY EVANS AND THE CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU)

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THOMAS JEFFERSON

JAMES MADISON

JAMES MONROE


DELVING INTO HISTORY — THE THREE PRESIDENTS Madison and Jefferson both advocated for freedom and liberty and wrote or contributed to the most enduring documents in our nation’s history. Monroe even favored abolition and the relocation of freed blacks to Africa and the Caribbean. Yet all three men died owning slaves. A visit to each presidential home is an in-depth opportunity to explore the lives of these three men, the stories of the enslaved populations who worked there and the complicated nature of our nation’s beginnings. Jefferson located Monticello, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, on an 850-foot-high peak overlooking the City of Charlottesville. Built in the neoclassical and Palladian traditions, the stately brick mansion includes an octagonal Dome Room, modeled after the Pantheon in Rome, that gives the building its unusual appearance. Monticello was a working plantation, and tours of Mulberry Row give insight into the lives of its enslaved people, including Sally Hemings, with whom Jefferson likely fathered six children. A $35 million restoration project will highlight the buildings where the enslaved population lived and worked, including Hemings’ bedroom, which previously was a visitor bathroom. Just a few minutes away from Monticello, Monroe’s Highland estate remains a working farm. Excavations in 2016 showed that the house standing today was a guesthouse during Monroe’s time, and his much larger home was likely destroyed by fire in the mid1800s. The guesthouse has many pieces of furniture and objects owned by Monroe and his wife, Elizabeth. The grounds include ornamental and vegetable gardens as well as slave quarters recreated from early 20th century photographs, and the original smokehouse and plantation overseer’s cottage. In nearby Orange County stands Montpelier, a brick mansion on a sprawling estate with sweeping views of the foothills of the Blue Ridge. A complex, years-long restoration project completed in 2008 removed over a century’s worth of substantial modifications and returned the mansion to its appearance during Madison’s time. Through the active engagement of a number of descendants of its enslaved population — who stressed the need to tell the personal stories of those people — Montpelier provides context and insight into the complexity of its past and our nation’s founding. A new exhibition examines the lives of the enslaved community through exhibits in the cellar and reconstructed living spaces and work buildings in the South Yard, mere steps from the mansion. 22

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THE TEMPLE AT MONTPELIER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JENN GLASS AND THE MONTPELIER FOUNDATION)

The Temple at Montpelier | President James Madison’s architectural tribute to “the sacred fire of liberty,” the neoclassical Temple at Montpelier is essentially a very fancy gazebo that sits atop what once was the property’s icehouse. It is the only surviving Madison-era structure on the property other than the mansion. Renovation was badly needed, especially after the nearby 2011 earthquake. As with the mansion’s restoration, care has been taken to ensure a resulting structure Mr. Madison would recognize. Repairs have included restoring the interior walls of the icehouse and a new roof, with shingles stained to match paint found on a shingle from the Madison era. Workers also removed the 20th century cement that covered the exterior of the Temple and replaced bricks damaged from moisture the cement retained. New bricks were handmade to match the originals, and mortar was made with sand from the nearby Rapidan River. Follow along to find out about all the restoration efforts at Montpelier at instagram.com/preserve_montpelier.

Visit monticello.org, highland.org and montpelier.org for details on hours of operation, as tour schedules and times change seasonally. You may wish to buy tickets to Monticello ahead of time online, especially during peak visiting times. Many special, in-depth tours and group tours are available at the homes and may need to be purchased in advance.


MIDDAY FARE AT MICHIE TAVERN. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF KATHY VERSLUYS AND MICHIE TAVERN)

The menu includes Southern-style favorites such as fried chicken, pork barbecue, mashed potatoes, cole slaw, black-eyed peas and biscuits. The chicken is the most popular dish, but the stewed tomatoes — cooked in a delicious mixture of sugar, butter and baked biscuits — are a close second, says Cindy Conte, curator of the historic tavern, who is partial to the peach cobbler dessert.

S

tep inside the dining room at rustic Michie Tavern and you are transported back in time. Each day at lunchtime, the Colonial-era tavern offers unlimited portions of hearty Southern fare offered by servers dressed in period attire. In winter, you can enjoy your meal near one of the inviting fireplaces. And in every season, you can take a tour of the property and visit its small shops for one-of-a-kind gifts.

Cindy’s background in journalism proved useful when she researched the tavern’s history. The first records of Michie Tavern go back to 1784, when proprietor William Michie applied for a license to keep an “ordinary” — a Colonial tavern that sold meals to locals and travelers alike — in nearby Earlysville, though deeds and wills indicate that the tavern first opened a decade earlier, when licenses were not required. The Michie family Discover Charlottesville

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DELVING INTO HISTORY — MICHIE TAVERN

HISTORIC MICHIE TAVERN. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE ALBERT AND SHIRLEY SMALL SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA)

TOP: PHOENIX LINE — THIS LITHOGRAPH IMAGE IS TYPICAL OF STAGE COACHES IN THE 1800S. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF LIBRARY OF CONGRESS) LEFT: JOSIE HENDERSON, 1924. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION)

(pronounced “Mickey”) operated the tavern, which also provided lodging and alcoholic beverages, until the Civil War era, when stagecoach travel went into decline. The tavern was a private home until 1927, when an antique collector and local businesswoman, Josephine Henderson, had the building moved — out of concern for its preservation — 17 miles to its current location at the foot of Carters Mountain, just one-half mile from Monticello. Thanks to her efforts to save it — as well as its association with William Michie, a key local figure during the Revolutionary War era, and its representation of the architectural style of taverns during that period — Michie Tavern is listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register.

MICHIE TAVERN TODAY. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF MICHIE TAVERN)

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Mrs. Henderson and subsequent owners tried selling fried chicken, but none had the success that would come when M. Joseph Conte purchased the property, in a state of disrepair, in the late 1960s. Mr. Conte eventually moved other historic buildings to the site, including an armory and a mill.


PLAYING GAMES AT THE TAVERN. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF MICHIE TAVERN)

The amount of food served at Michie Tavern may seem overwhelming to first-time visitors, but Cindy says the biggest meal was served midday in the 18th century. “You get to experience what your 18th century counterparts experienced,” she says, noting that tomatoes were discussed in journals as early as the midto-late 1700s, and fried chicken, black-eyed peas, cole slaw (then known as cold slaw) and green beans were all served during that period.

While the tavern originally welcomed weary stagecoach travelers, today it is Charlottesville’s many visitors — and locals — who enjoy the hospitality and refreshment of a visit to Michie Tavern. The staff often go out of their way to assist guests by suggesting the best times for their visits to Monticello, Highland and other nearby sites, and tour guides will gear their talks to the particular interests of guests.

“We thoroughly enjoy our guests, and we try to be good ambassadors for the area,” Cindy says. “I’m just really grateful to be here at Michie Tavern. I think people really love Michie Tavern, and we’re an important part of the community.” Michie Tavern is located at 683 Thomas Jefferson Parkway in Charlottesville. For more information, visit michietavern.com. Discover Charlottesville

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SEEING & DOING

IX Complex & Art Park

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alk just a few blocks south of the Downtown Mall and you will find yourself in a space unlike any other. The IX Complex and its award-winning IX Art Park are not to be missed, playing host to some of the city’s most popular festivals and more intimate gatherings such as weddings, playdates and picnics. NPR calls it “the first of its kind in central Virginia.” The 17-acre property is the former location of Frank Ix & Sons (pronounced “icks”), a textile firm that was one of Charlottesville’s biggest employers for the better part of a century. The north end of the property now has a new life as the home of the popular IX Art Park, established in 2014, creating an artsy “Burning Man” festival vibe in Charlottesville, based on the annual gathering in the Nevada desert. The IX Art Park is populated with interactive, engaging murals and sculptures created by over 60 international artists, some of whom have studios within the complex. Much of the eclectic mix of artwork is meant to inspire participation: Write down your biggest dreams on a giant chalk mural; wander into a quiet space, such as a dome built from tree branches; or relax on a porch swing and see who strikes up a conversation with you. The park is a privately owned communal and creative space that is free to anyone who wants to visit, seven days a week, according to co-founder Susan Krischel, who adds that the property’s owners, including developer Ludwig Kuttner, “wanted to provide Charlottesville with a civic gathering space perfect for festivals and concerts and public, shareable works of art.” In part because of its setting in a small valley around Second Street SE and its large grassy area, IX has become what the founders imagined — a place where Charlottesville gathers for events both big and small, including an annual concert series, festivals, weekly drum circles and potlucks, outdoor summer movies, and political and social justice events. The park also hosted the Virginia Craft Brewers Fest in 2017, sponsored by Three Notch’d Brewing Co., a local brewer that recently moved its production, along with a beer garden and beer hall, to IX.

SUMMER FUN AT IX ART PARK. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF BRIAN WIMER)

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SEEING & DOING — IX COMPLEX & ART PARK

Downtown Mall

6th S t SE

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Brazos Tacos 5 is where Charlottesville goes to get its fix of Austin, Texas-inspired tacos — meaty, vegetarian and even gluten-free. The taqueria is popular for its early morning breakfast tacos and an outdoor patio with views of IX Art Park.

6th S t SE Discover Charlottesville

Three Notch’d Brewery Co. 7 produces its beer on-site and offers drinks and food in its hybrid German beer hall/beer garden.

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Sweethaus 6 satisfies your sugar cravings with homemade cupcakes and an eye-popping array of nostalgic candies.

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IX Art Park 4 includes large sculptures, murals and other art projects created by local citizens and school groups. Events and festivals are held throughout the year.

Eat & Drink

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Studio IX 3 is a collaborative space with meeting rooms, offices and flexible open space.

Avon St

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Blue Wheel Bicycles 1 , locally owned for over 40 years, carries a wide Ave selection of specialized bikes and offers full-service repairs and upgrades. MADabolic 2 offers intense interval workouts using equipment such as kettlebells, sandbags and sledgehammers.

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St E The freewheeling Water and artistic nature of the IX Art Park attracts a similar clientele to the former factory building that is home to most of the commercial space in the complex. Clients include retail shops such as Brazos Tacos, a popular taqueria; Sweethaus, a cupcake shop filled with tasty treats; the MADabolic and b:core fitness studios; nonprofits; and Studio IX, a flex office space — all located next South to the park. “It’s really important for us,” says Susan, “that IX is a St E collaboration of businesses who do good and create energy for the community. It’s a place where you can indulge your eyes, ears, mind, heart and soul. It’s all about possibility and the power of creativity. Admission is free. Participation is mandatory.”

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Carpe Café 8 is a venture from the owner of the Carpe Donut bakery and food truck that includes foods from local makers such as Revolutionary Soup and Breadworks, along with the doughnuts.


SEEING & DOING —

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ince the founding of the University of Virginia in 1819, The Corner has been a hub for students. Once part of a small town adjacent to Charlottesville — called University, Virginia — The Corner was the literal physical corner of Three Chopt Road (now Main Street) and the University’s Grounds. Early in its history, The Corner had a railroad stop, post office, barber shop and more to serve students. Today, it is a thriving seven-block commercial district full of restaurants, bars, stores and coffee shops.

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The Corner During the academic year, professors, doctors and students all flock to Corner restaurants at lunchtime, while locals often take advantage of the shops and restaurants during the quieter summer months. There are dozens of locally owned places to eat and shop on The Corner and plenty of history to explore around the area and on Grounds at the University.


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Ragged Mountain Running Shop 5 features employees trained to help select just the right shoe for you, using professional gait analysis. The business also helps organize local races, including the Charlottesville Women’s Four Miler. Heartwood Books 6 is an old-school used book store featuring room after room of books with reasonable prices, organized by a knowledgeable and helpful staff.

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St Mincer’s 7 is the place to get your UVA apparel — t-shirts, hats and just about anything else you can think of with a UVA logo.

Lee St The Virginian is LCharlottesville’s oldest restaurant, opened in ane 1923, and specializes in comfort food classics, including burgers, Rd sandwiches, and mac and cheese. 8

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Crozet Pizza at the Buddhist Biker Bar 9 is The Corner branch of the Crozet, Va., restaurant, offering ample seating and a full bar along with their renowned hand-tossed specialty pizzas. Café Caturra 10 offers a lunch and dinner menu of Mediterraneaninspired fare as well as boutique wines, craft cocktails and weekend brunch. Revolutionary Soup on the Corner 11 creates a wholesome fast-food option with its menu of soups, sandwiches, salads and wraps using ingredients from local farms.

PREVIOUS PAGE: THE CORNER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF MATTEUS FRANKOVICH AND SKYCLADAERIAL.COM)

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A colorful, towering mural 4 on the wall of the Graduate Charlottesville hotel was inspired by a poem by UVA English Professor and former U.S. Poet Laureate Rita Dove. It is part of the Charlottesville Mural Project, which so far has produced three murals in the area.

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Edgar Allan Poe 3 , the author of “The Raven” and other macabre tales, is thought to have resided on the West Range in room No. 13, which is maintained as a shrine to Poe, who attended the University in 1826.

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Blind Homer with his Student Guide 2 , unveiled in 1907, is a bronze statue of the Iliad and Odyssey author and his student guide, situated opposite the Rotunda in front of Old Cabell Hall. It is traditional for fourthyear students to “streak the Lawn” by running from the Rotunda to the statue and then back.

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The Rotunda 1 , modeled after the Pantheon in Rome, is the heart of the University’s Academical Village. Historical tours are offered daily when school is in session.

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PHOTOGRAPHS OF GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, 1915, TAKEN BY RUFUS HOLSINGER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE HOLSINGER STUDIO COLLECTION, ALBERT AND SHIRLEY SMALL SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA)

Georgia O’Keeffe 12 | One of America’s most celebrated artists, Georgia O’Keeffe, is best known for her abstract closeups of flowers and the landscapes and animal skulls of New Mexico. It was at the University of Virginia that O’Keeffe first moved away from realism and began her experimentation with modern abstract art. O’Keeffe’s mother moved from Wisconsin to Charlottesville in 1909 and ran a boarding house on Wertland Street, a short distance from The Corner. O’Keeffe spent summers at the University from 1912 to 1914, taking and teaching classes and hiking and camping in the nearby Blue Ridge Mountains. Prior to her time at UVA, O’Keeffe had considered abandoning her artistic dreams. Studying the philosophies of Arthur Wesley Dow opened her to not simply copying nature, but making conscious design choices that allow for greater personal expression. These ideas formed the underpinnings of her revolutionary American Modernism. A recent exhibit at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, N.M., focused on the pivotal influence of her time in Charlottesville, when she experimented with less traditional design in her works. The O’Keeffe house is not open to the public, but a historical marker on the corner of the property at 1212 Wertland Street commemorates the artist’s association with the City.

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SEEING & DOING —

The Downtown Mall

FRIDAYS AFTER FIVE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF MATTEUS FRANKOVICH AND SKYCLADAERIAL.COM)

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If you are in the mood for live music, you will find it almost any night of the week in Charlottesville — at small clubs that hold 50 people, all the way up to the 15,000-seat John Paul Jones Arena at UVA. The music venues and Live Arts, a community-based volunteer theater, give people reasons to go downtown after hours. That in turn has grown the restaurant scene, resulting in more businesses and residential spaces downtown. “It’s that whole critical mass that millennials are looking for,” Hutto says. “Even up to the mid1990s, if you asked what Downtown Charlottesville is, everyone would say it is a retail district, and that has really changed in the minds of both locals and tourists. This is an entertainment and dining district. There’s still a large retail component, but a lot of it is open in the evening, not traditional 9 to 5. The arts is really the glue that holds all of Downtown together.” Charlottesville has always had a good live local music scene, and there were times in the ’80s and ’90s when the city had smaller venues that hosted national artists, but not on the same scale it can accommodate 36

Discover Charlottesville

these days. “I think the thing that’s attractive about Charlottesville right now is that we have such a good variety of venues for artists to perform in,” says Hutto. “Charlottesville has a very good track record of folks supporting live music. They buy tickets.” M on tic Jones Arena are popular for live music, but there are The Pavilion and John Paul ell o A the beautifully restored Paramount Theater; the several smaller venues, including ve Jefferson Theater, with its two full-service bars; and the more intimate Southern Café & Music Hall, where you can enjoy a live show and dinner. The Charlottesville area does not just listen to music. It also creates it. “Incredibly talented local artists have sprung from Charlottesville,” Hutto says. The most famous of those is undoubtedly the Dave Matthews Band, but other well-known, smaller-scale acts also call the area home. Chamomile & Whiskey play their mix of Americana and Southern rock in clubs throughout the country, and Devon Sproule has toured Europe playing her blend of indie, folk, country and jazz. “The community is supportive and lets these folks earn their chops and take off and hit the larger markets,” Hutto says. “Charlottesville supports more of the acoustic folk-rock acts. Each community has a style that does best, both for national touring acts

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SEEING & DOING — DOWNTOWN MALL Monticello Ave he Downtown Mall and surrounding area is where many in Charlottesville want to live, eat and play, and a large part of that is owed to the growth of the entertainment and arts scene in the last 20 years, according to Kirby Hutto, general manager of the Pavilion, the outdoor amphitheater that anchors the eastern end of the mall.

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SEEING & DOING — DOWNTOWN MALL and local artists. Here it’s very much a local, homegrown type of feel,” says Hutto. The city’s love for the Americana, roots-oriented style is evident in the most popular act in the 11-year history of the Pavilion — the Avett Brothers, who have played the venue seven times, six of those to sold-out crowds. Other well-attended shows have included Old Crow Medicine Show, Alabama Shakes and Chris Stapleton. That is not to say other types of acts are not successful — among them Beck, Ryan Adams and Snoop Dogg. “It’s the fact that folks support it from the business side of things. You’ve got to have a community that’s willing to support live shows and Charlottesville does that,” Hutto says. The city is also home to Coran Capshaw’s Red Light Management, one of the largest artist management companies in the world. Another boon to artists playing downtown is the chance to walk around the day of a show and visit local bookstores and coffee shops. “They’re able to really experience what Charlottesville offers, and that’s an experience that sticks with them.”

Park Parking is available in the Water Street Parking Garage 1 and Market Street Parking Garage 2 . Both close at 1am Thursday–Saturday and earlier other nights. Many downtown businesses validate parking, so do not forget your ticket.

See & Do The Historic Downtown Mall 3 is a beautiful, vibrant pedestrian mall with restaurants, bookstores, coffee shops, boutiques and entertainment venues lining an eight-block stretch of historic buildings. The Charlottesville Downtown Visitors Center 4 assists travelers with planning trips and sightseeing, and sells tickets for many downtown venues. CENTRAL PLACE ON THE DOWNTOWN MALL. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROBERT MICAL AND THE CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU)

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SEEING & DOING — DOWNTOWN MALL The Freedom of Speech Wall 5 , created by the locally based Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression, gives anyone and everyone the opportunity to speak their mind for all to see. Write it down in chalk on the 54-foot-long wall or just spend some time reading others’ thoughts. This monument to the First Amendment honors Jefferson’s ardent belief in freedom of speech. Court Square 6 includes the area around the Albemarle County Courthouse, including Justice Park. The original courthouse was built in 1762, and today’s courthouse has been in use for 200 years. Jefferson, Madison and Monroe were frequently seen in the area, which was home to numerous taverns, homes and law offices as well as a slave auction block. Historical markers tell the story of Court Square, and walking tours are led by the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society from April through October. McGuffey Park 7 sits just two blocks north of the Downtown Mall and is a haven for kids, featuring a weeping water well, swings, slides, a circular bike path and a sunken basketball court. Entertainment options abound in Downtown Charlottesville. See regional and national musical acts at the Pavilion 8 , an intimate amphitheater that hosts numerous events, including Fridays After Five, a free summer concert series. Visit the beautifully restored historic Paramount Theater 9 for a variety of live acts. Listen to just about any musical genre with a show at the Jefferson Theater 10 , which boasts two full-service bars and a balcony. Catch a movie at the Violet Crown 11 , and take your chef-prepared meal and beer to the foldout table at your seat. Outdoor vendors 12 set up shop on the Downtown Mall on most days when weather permits, selling clothes, scarves, hats, jewelry and one-ofa-kind gifts. The majority of vendors are found outside of Central Place. Cville Escape Room 13 challenges teams who work together to solve puzzles and clues that aid them in their escape. This family-friendly activity includes several unique rooms to challenge would-be escape artists. Virginia Discovery Museum 14 welcomes little ones with handson activities, including a giant train table, a STEM lab, a honeybee observation hive, and sensory and art studios. This family favorite also features dress-up opportunities, from pioneers to firefighters. 40

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Tuel

Jewelers

C’ville Arts

Your friendly family full service jewelry store since 1945. Tuel Jewelers offers watch, jewelry & silver repair along with sales of 14k gold, sterling & platinum. We offer Jefferson & Virginia cups, clocks, plaques, Bulova watches, rings, pendants, earrings & gifts. We provide bead restringing, battery replacement & jewelry cleaning. In addition, we have machine & hand engravers to serve our customers. We also wrap & ship. Mon–Fri 10am–5pm.

C’ville Arts is a vibrant space featuring handmade works by more than 50 Virginia artisans. Our cooperative gallery features a tremendous range of fine crafts and art, perfect for gifts or home décor. Find paintings, photography, wearable art such as jewelry and scarves, organic balms, woodwork, sculpture and more. Meet and chat with the artists on duty each day. Mon–Thu 10am–6pm, Fri 10am– 9pm, Sat 10am–8pm, Sun 2–6pm.

319 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

118 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

434.295.4258

434.972.9500

tueljewelers.com

cvillearts.org

O’Suzannah

Angelo Jewelry

Don’t you cry for thoughtful gift ideas - every inch of this downtown boutique is filled with joyful color, Southern charm, and creative handmade goods. Owner Suzannah Fischer carefully curates an inventory of stationery and cards, clothing, jewelry, and accessories. From baby showers to office holiday parties, O’Suzannah’s got you covered. Mon– Sat 10am–6pm, Sun noon–5pm.

Angelo is the contemporary jewelry gallery on the Downtown Mall in Charlottesville. It is owned and operated by nationally recognized jewelry artist, Lee Angelo Marraccini, and Pam Perugi Marraccini. Angelo offers a wide range of jewelry from high-end, special occasion to fun, everyday wear. Now you can choose from the finest hand-crafted jewelry by over 40 distinguished artists. Tue–Sat 11am–6pm.

320 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

220 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

434.466.2449

434.971.9256

facebook.com/pg/osuzcville

angelojewelry.com

Pawprints Boutique

Great Graphics

Find the perfect little something for the pet lover in your life at Pawprints, a locally owned pet gift boutique on the Downtown Mall. Dedicated to celebrating the joy of pets, Pawprints carries a range of collars and leashes, cat and dog toys, treats, apparel, and other pet lover swag. Mon–Sat 11am–7pm, Sun 11:30am–4:30pm.

The gallery has been showcasing an extensive collection of vintage commercial advertising art and antique prints and maps for over 20 years in Charlottesville. We are a trusted source for custom picture framing services with an emphasis on creative design and archival components. We also offer wide format scanning and archival printing. Mon–Sat noon–5pm.

201 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

410 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

434.964.0133

434.979.4747

pawprintsboutique.com

greatvintagegraphics.com

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SEEING & DOING — DOWNTOWN MALL

Shop Every Saturday from April through December, Charlottesville City Market 15 transforms a parking lot between Water and South streets into an oasis of local fresh produce, meats, baked goods and crafts. Open 7am–noon, April–October; and 8am–1pm, November–December. Caspari Design Store 16 specializes in high-quality printed paper products and home decor. This unique shop offers exquisite designs inspired by fine works of art from around the world. Blue Whale Books 17 features more than 25,000 volumes, with a focus on scholarly, art and architecture titles as well as antiquarian maps. Fashion options are plentiful on the Downtown Mall. Verdigris 18 offers, for both women and men, a carefully curated selection of designer apparel, shoes and bags. J. Fenton Too 19 is known for its linen clothing in a wide array of colorful and neutral styles. Jean Theory: 20 specializes in helping customers find the perfect pair of new or gently used premium denim, with over 70 styles to choose from. If you are looking for that special piece of jewelry, try Tuel Jewelers 21 , which sells fine jewelry and offers watch and jewelry repair as well as custom jewelry design; or Angelo 22 , which stocks a wide range of high-end and everyday contemporary jewelry, with many pieces designed by the owner. Telegraph Art & Comics 23 packs a kaboom! with comics from artists around the world in a wide selection of mainstream, small press and self-published titles. The store also carries a variety of kids’ and young adult titles, as well as exclusive prints and posters. Market Street Wineshop 24 stocks over 1,200 wines and 400 beers and ciders from the Charlottesville area and around the world, as well as a mouthwatering array of high-quality specialty foods such as cheese and chocolate.

Eat & Drink The Nook 25 understands the importance of comfort food and all-day breakfast. Slip into one of their big mahogany booths or grab a seat on the outdoor patio for a diner-style platter or sandwich. 42

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SEEING & DOING — DOWNTOWN MALL Draft Taproom 26 lets you serve yourself from their selection of 60 taps. Pay by the ounce and grab a beer-friendly sandwich or snack from the kitchen. Revolutionary Soup 27 offers made-from-scratch soups, innovative sandwiches and unique salads, featuring many locally grown and sourced ingredients, including breads, meats, tofu and veggies. Miller’s Downtown 28 serves its pub fare all day and late into the night, and offers live music every night, pool tables and a sports bar. Zocalo 29 devotes itself to Latin American fusion cuisine with dishes such as key lime chicken and Vella Jack fritters. The bar boasts a large repertoire of cocktails and a vast array of wines and beer. The Whiskey Jar 30 takes Southern cuisine to a new level with a menu that is entirely locally sourced from the fried chicken to made-fromscratch desserts. Whiskey is the name and they boast 125 varieties of it. Himalayan Fusion 31 spices things up with a delicious blend of Indian, Nepalese and Tibetan cuisine. Sample a little bit — or a lot — of the chicken, veggies, rice and naan at the affordable daily lunch buffet. Paradox Pastry 32 satisfies any sweet tooth with an assortment of homemade treats including cakes, pies, tarts, cookies and brownies. On the savory side, choose from an array of soups, quiches, frittatas and sandwiches. Red Pump Kitchen 33 whisks diners off to the rolling hills of Tuscany with classic and contemporary pizzas, pastas and antipasti. In warm weather, the dining room expands to a romantic alfresco setting on the Downtown Mall. The Shebeen Pub & Braai 34 pays homage to authentic South African cuisine with plates like durban spiced chicken and sadza cakes. Brunch is offered on weekends - grab a rustic swing by the outdoor bar for a specialty mimosa. South Street Brewery 35 continues a local tradition as Charlottesville’s longest running brewpub. Crisp lagers, seasonal ales and other craft beers accompany appetizers, salads, wings, and pub-style sandwiches and burgers. Fleurie 36 paints the picture of French elegance with contemporary, luxurious dishes, like foie gras and shrimp risotto. The a la carte and multicourse tasting menus are amplified by the restaurant’s much lauded wine list. 44

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York Place York Place is the only enclosed shopping plaza located on Charlottesville’s Historic Downtown Mall. It features a unique collection of stores and restaurants with the opportunity for Downtown living in 1BR and 2BR apartments, each with a private terrace and views of the Downtown Mall. Spend time exploring the shops for fine jewelry, unique crafts, and sweet treats. Pamper yourself with a manicure or new hairstyle. Have your suit tailored or dry-cleaned. Meet with friends or colleagues for coffee and breakfast. Enjoy lunch outdoors at one of the patio tables or enjoy cuisine from around the world for dinner at one of York Place’s restaurants.The plaza is located conveniently between 1st and 2nd Streets at the West end of the Downtown Mall. Look for the flags at the entrance. York Place is open every day of the week. York Place is Your Place.

112 W Main Street, Charlottesville

434.984.4517 yorkplace.net

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SEEING & DOING — DOWNTOWN MALL

JEFFERSON HIGH SCHOOL “RED DEVILS” FOOTBALL TEAM. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE HOLSINGER STUDIO COLLECTION, ALBERT AND SHIRLEY SMALL SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA)

The Jefferson School African American Heritage Center 37 | The center promotes the rich local history of Charlottesville and Albemarle County’s African-American community through historical exhibits, oral histories and contemporary art as well as through events such as films, lectures and concerts. The Heritage Center is located in the historic Jefferson School City Center at 233 Fourth Street NW. The school was opened in 1926 after parents petitioned the community for a high school for AfricanAmerican students, who had to leave the area to continue their education beyond eighth grade. The school was integrated in 1966 after years of organized resistance to integration in Charlottesville and throughout Virginia. The city was one of the first communities in the nation to close some of its schools to avoid integration. Permanent exhibitions at the center explore the struggle for racial equality and the pursuit of an equal education through the experiences of former Jefferson School students and faculty. Visit the website at jeffschoolheritagecenter.org for hours of operation and information on rotating exhibits.

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Chaps Ice Cream

Telegraph Art & Comics

Our ice cream is more than a dessert. It’s a gourmet delight. We’ve been using age-old family recipes for 32 years to serve the finest, premium quality ice cream, homemade donuts, and full grill service in a charming ‘50s atmosphere. Grab a burger on the patio, or take your homemade waffle cone for a stroll downtown. Mon– Thu 8am–10pm, Fri–Sat 8am–11pm, Sun 9am−9pm.

Stocking a wide selection of comics, posters, graphic novels, zines and collectibles, Telegraph is a comic shop unlike any other. Specializes in small publishers and independent artists. Carries books for children, young adults, and beyond. Mon–Sat 11am–6pm, Sun 11am–5pm.

223 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

211 W Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

434. 977.4139

434.244.3210

chapsicecream.com

Rock Paper Scissors A community staple since 2002, Rock Paper Scissors is your go-to destination for custom invitations and well-crafted paper goods. Stop in to browse laughout-loud greeting cards, journals, desk accessories, beautiful calendars and planners, and gifts for everyone on your list. RPS loves working with brides and other event planners on memorable invitations, and connecting visitors and locals to the best paper goods around. Mon–Sat 10am–6pm.

telegraphartandcomics.com

Bittersweet Clothing & Accessories Fashion for women, by women. Thoughtfully curated quality clothing and accessories for all women, for all ages, and for all occasions. Throw a graphic tee or cozy sweater over your new favorite pair of jeans, or find the perfect dress for your next party. Serving downtown Charlottesville for over 16 years. Come join us in finding your perfect style! Mon-Sat 10am–7pm, Sun noon–5pm.

321 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

106 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

434.979.6366

434.977.5977

thinkrockpaperscissors.com

Oyster House Antiques Direct wholesale distributor of Qinq Dynasty Chinese furniture and fine collectible accessories, hand-picked by the owner and carefully restored by expert team using methods of over 4000 years. Locally owned for 20 years. 13,000 sq. ft. showroom on the Downtown Mall. Delivery service available. Mon–Sat 10am–7pm, Sun 11am–7pm.

facebook: BitterSweet Mercantile

Ten Thousand Villages At Ten Thousand Villages, every handmade gift does a world of good. Shop fair trade gifts, home décor, and jewelry, and impact the lives of 20,000 makers in 30 countries across Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. The store’s collection covers a wide range of ancient artisan traditions in ceramics, textiles, wood, and more. Mon–Thu 10am–7pm, Fri–Sat 10am–9pm, Sun 1pm–5pm.

122 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

105 W Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

434.295.4757

434.979.9470

oysterhouse.com

tenthousandvillages.com/charlottesville

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SHOPPING

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hether you need to pick up a birthday gift for a friend or you want something special to remember your visit to Charlottesville, you will enjoy finding it in the area’s antique shops, carefully curated specialty boutiques and other retail experiences.

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If you want to take home a taste of Virginia, try The Virginia Shop at Barracks Road Shopping Center, where you can pick up wines, candies, peanuts and more — all made in Virginia — or put together a gift basket. Feast! on West Main Street delights with artisanal cheeses, charcuterie, chocolates and more.

Albemarle Square Shopping Center Charlottesville Fashion Square Mall

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For more shopping, wander around the Downtown Mall and explore bookstores filled with antique books and boutique clothing shops. Head to Barracks Road Shopping Center, on Emmet Street just off U.S. Route 29 and the Route 250 Bypass, for more open-air shopping, with national brands and local specialty shops such as The Happy Cook, where Ann says foodies “go crazy.”

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Most visitors would never think of a plant nursery, but Ann’s favorite shopping in town is the Ivy Corner Garden Center, Gift Shop & Landscaping, with beautiful decorative items for inside and outside the home. “The owner handpicks everything,” she says. “People go nuts over that shop.” She also loves the colorful Italian paper goods, fine china and clothing at Caspari on the Downtown Mall.

Little ones will love Alakazam Toys & Gifts on the Downtown Mall and Shenanigans on West Main Street. “Alakazam is amazing because it has all these cool, old-fashioned toys, and what I love about Shenanigans is that they wrap. They both have toys you can’t find anymore,” says Ann.

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Ann Shannon, the concierge at the Clifton Inn, spends her days recommending shops, restaurants, wineries and historic sites to the inn’s guests. She always recommends Patina Antiques, etc. on East High Street, a short drive from the Downtown Mall. “It’s a Victorian home, and each room is a different theme and different colors,” says Ann, who loves the furniture, rugs, lamps, art and gifts. She also sends shoppers to the antique stores at the Ivy Square Shopping Center on Ivy Road.

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Ann also likes to steer guests to the City Market, open on Saturdays in spring, summer and fall, for a great selection of local artisans selling wares ranging from jewelry and photography to soaps and clothing. “We have so many different places to go,” says Ann. “There are so many different options.”

LEFT MIDDLE: CONCIERGE EXTRAORDINAIRE ANN SHANNON. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF BILL MORROW)

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MAKING MERRY

Festivals & Events March

Virginia Festival of the Book ~ Downtown & UVA Charlottesville Ten Miler ~ Downtown

April

Charlottesville Marathon ~ Albemarle County Tom Tom Founders Festival ~ Downtown Taste of Monticello Wine Trail Festival ~ Downtown Foxfield Spring Races ~ Garth Road, Albemarle County Charlottesville Dogwood Festival ~ Charlottesville Historic Garden Week ~ Albemarle County

May

University of Virginia Commencement Exercises ~ UVA Montpelier Wine Festival ~ Montpelier Crozet Spring Arts & Crafts Festival ~ Crozet Strawberry Festival ~ Court Square, Stanardsville James River Runners Annual Chili Cookoff & Brewers Challenge ~ Scottsville Charlottesville Festival of Cultures ~ Downtown

June

Mid-Atlantic Power Festival ~ Event Field, U.S. Route 33, Ruckersville

July

Monticello Independence Day Celebration and Naturalization Ceremony ~ Monticello Orange County Fair - Orange County Fairgrounds Wintergreen Summer Music Festival ~ Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County Chihamba African American Cultural Arts Festival ~ Charlottesville


August

Albemarle County Fair ~ James Monroe’s Highland Virginia Craft Brewers Fest ~ IX Art Park Montpelier Civil War Encampment ~ Montpelier Lockn’ Music Festival ~ Oak Ridge Estate & Farm, Nelson County

September

Orange Street Festival ~ Town of Orange Heritage Harvest Festival at Monticello ~ Monticello Foxfield Fall Races ~ Garth Road, Albemarle County Constitution Day Celebration & Taste of Freedom Wine Festival ~ Montpelier Cville Pride Festival ~ Downtown Vegan Roots Fest ~ Downtown Charlottesville Women’s Four Miler ~ Garth Road, Albemarle County

October

Fall Fiber Festival & Montpelier Sheep Dog Trials ~ Montpelier Crozet Fall Arts & Crafts Festival ~ Crozet The Festy Experience ~ Infinity Downs Farm The Best of Virginia in Orange – Chili & Brewfest ~ Orange County Fairgrounds

November

Vintage Virginia Apples Annual Harvest Festival ~ Albemarle Ciderworks, Albemarle County Virginia Film Festival ~ Downtown & UVA Montpelier Hunt Races ~ Montpelier Top of the Hops Beer Fest ~ Downtown

December

First Night Virginia Festival of the Arts ~ Downtown

Noteworthy Ongoing Events Saturdays ~ City Market (April – Dec) ~ Downtown Fridays ~ Fridays After Five (April – Sept) ~ Downtown Summer ~ Charlottesville Opera ~ Paramount Theater, Downtown September & October ~ Apple Harvest Celebration ~ Carter Mountain Orchard, Albemarle County June through August ~ Heritage Theatre Festival ~ UVA

CELEBRATE YOUR PARK! (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF N. LEWIS, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE)

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BECOMING CULTURED

The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection

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ith world-class museums, popular festivals, and theatrical and live musical performances most nights of the week, you are bound to find an arts experience to suit your taste in Charlottesville. Among the offerings is the KlugeRuhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia, the only museum in the country dedicated solely to the display and study of indigenous Australian art. It houses the collections of businessman John W. Kluge and University of Kansas professor Edward L. Ruhe. The museum’s intimate space and friendly staff create opportunities you will not find at most museums, such as access to visiting artists and tours of the museum’s art storage space, where the vast majority of the pieces — many too large for display in the galleries — are stored yet accessible. Visitors can expect to see artifacts of a bygone culture, but Aboriginal art is contemporary art, notes the museum’s education and program coordinator, Lauren Maupin. Australian Aboriginal art goes back thousands of years, but much of it involved temporary art forms, including body painting or art created on permanent surfaces, such as rock art. These traditions were passed down orally and ceremonially until about 75 years ago, when artists began transferring their patterns and designs onto more portable and commercial mediums, such as canvas, photography, sculpture and prints. Much of what you can expect to see will be contemporary works in acrylic on canvas, but other forms, such as sculptures made from eucalyptus trees painted with handmade brushes and natural pigments,

TOP RIGHT: BUGAI WHYOULTER, WANTILI, 2014, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 60 X 60”. MIDDLE: THE KLUGE-RUHE ABORIGINAL ART COLLECTION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA MUSEUM. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF KLUGE-RUHE ABORIGINAL ART COLLECTION). ALL OTHERS: VISITORS AT KLUGE-RUHE’S NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM EVENT. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF TOM COGILL)

are on display as well, all the way from Arnhem Land and the Tiwi Islands in Australia’s Northern Territory. “There are so many layers of meaning that can be explored,” Maupin says. Themes include the artists’ connection to the land, which for indigenous Australians includes all of nature, as well as a diverse set of spiritual beliefs called the Dreaming. “We in Western culture think of land as something that belongs to us, whereas a lot of indigenous Australian cultures think of it as something that they belong to,” Maupin says. Many of the works also explore the history of the British invasion of the continent in the 18th century and its negative consequences, which many Aboriginal people still face today. Some of these issues involve race, discrimination and protecting the environment — themes relevant to America as well as Australia. Artwork at the Kluge-Ruhe offers visitors an opportunity to explore another culture and its history, and to see contemporary art through the lens of that culture. Through that exploration, the similarities in the human experience — regardless of cultural background — become clearer. Admission to the Kluge-Ruhe Collection at 400 Worrell Drive in Charlottesville is free. The museum provides a children’s scavenger hunt and a daily interactive art project for visitors, as well as a library. Guided tours are held on Saturday mornings at 10:30 am. Check the website at kluge-ruhe.org for hours of operation and special events. TOP: PUNTJINA MONICA WATSON, PUKARA, 2010, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 43” X 43”. BOTTOM: : NYILYARI TJAPANGATI, WILKINARRA, 2011, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 35.5 X 23.5”. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF KLUGE-RUHE ABORIGINAL ART COLLECTION)

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Tom Tom Founders Festival celebrates Thomas Jefferson’s birthday in April with a weeklong mix of music, art and innovation at venues in Downtown Charlottesville. The festival includes a variety of concerts, speakers and block parties. Cville Pride Festival attracts thousands from the LGBTQ community each September for an inclusive celebration of diversity that includes kids’ activities, a beer garden and food trucks. Straight allies are welcome and additional events are held throughout Pride Week.

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Les Yeux du Monde 3 presents the contemporary art of new and established artists from central Virginia and beyond in its sleek, ultramodern gallery. Second Street Gallery 4 is the oldest nonprofit, contemporary art space in Charlottesville, featuring 10 to 14 exhibitions a year, as well as related educational and outreach activities. Virginia Discovery Museum 5 offers engaging, interactive and hands-on displays for kids, including a STEM lab, a construction zone, and art and music rooms.

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The Fralin Museum of Art 2 features European and American paintings and sculpture, as well as African, Native American, and East and South Asian art and artifacts. The museum is free to the public and features many visiting exhibitions with related programming.

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Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection 1 is the only museum in the country dedicated to the display and study of Aboriginal Australian art. Affiliated with the University of Virginia, the museum seeks to advance an understanding of Australia’s indigenous people and cultures.

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Virginia Festival of the Book attracts nationally known and first-time authors from around the country for readings, discussions and signings at locations throughout the city. The diverse programming also showcases books created in Virginia. Many events are free.

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Virginia Film Festival takes place each fall at venues throughout the city and features more than 100 films. Discussion panels and guest speakers include filmmakers, actors and directors.

HAVING FUN AT THE CVILLE PRIDE FESTIVAL. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ELODIE WOLFE)

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Jefferson School African American Heritage Center 6 showcases rotating and permanent exhibits on the history of Charlottesville’s African-American community and promotes the contributions of the African diaspora. Discover Charlottesville

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Music & Theater John Paul Jones Arena 7 is the home of UVA basketball and hosts many internationally known musical acts, from Paul McCartney and Lady Gaga to Jay-Z. The Jefferson Theater 8 is a favorite spot for national and regional bands and features two full-service bars and state-of-the-art sound and lighting systems. The Paramount Theater 9 , which was awarded the 2017 Outstanding Historic Theatre Award by the League of Historic American Theatres, originally opened in 1931 as a movie theater. After undergoing a monumental restoration that concluded in 2004, it now offers a variety of live performances — from musicians and comedians to ballet and opera — as well as movies. The Southern Café & Music Hall 10 gives you the chance to grab dinner and see a show in an intimate, 300-seat space that hosts a number of regional and national music and comedy acts. Violet Crown Cinema 11 shows mainstream and independent films. Each seat has its own foldout table, where you can enjoy wine, craft beer and freshly prepared food from the onsite kitchen. Miller’s Downtown 12 showcases musical acts in an intimate space that once hosted each of the musicians from the Dave Matthews Band before they hit it big. The bar and late-night dinner make this a popular spot. The Pavilion 13 presents nationally known acts in an open-air, covered space on the Downtown Mall with assigned seats and an open lawn for general admission and picnicking. Fridays After Five is the Pavilion’s free summer concert series. Live Arts 14 brings community theater to the heart of Downtown with a half-dozen locally produced plays, each running several weeks, throughout the year. The theater produces classic and modern plays as well as more experimental works.

The Ruth Caplin, Culbreth and Helms Theatres 15 host the University of Virginia’s programs in acting, direction, scenic and lighting design, costume design and technology. The professional-grade productions offer a glimpse into the next generation of theater. The Garage 16 is a real one-car garage near Emancipation Park in Downtown Charlottesville that hosts local and regional bands and art exhibitions as well as the occasional film or potluck. The tiny space offers “stadium seating” on a hill in the park. The McIntire Department of Music 17 at the University of Virginia produces over 100 concerts and ensembles annually, many in Old Cabell Hall. From choral, orchestral and jazz to bluegrass, rock and the Cavalier Marching Band, there is an offering for most musical tastes.

Creative Arts & Entertainment IX Art Park 18 provides an outdoor space for largeform art exhibits that are free and open to the public, as well as concerts and other art events. The Glass Palette 19 holds classes and workshops in creating glass art, including fusing glass and kiln-forming items, lampworking to create beads, stained glass and mosaics as well as sandblasting. City Clay 20 will get your creative juices flowing with classes in pot throwing and glazing, studio space, workshops and a gallery. Bashir’s Taverna 21 on the Downtown Mall offers authentic Mediterranean cuisine along with traditional belly dancing most Saturday nights. Club r2 22 is the place to go for dancing. This nightclub, located inside the restaurant Rapture, features nationally known DJs and live bands. The last Friday of every month is ’80s night.

TALL TALL TREES AT THE GARAGE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE GARAGE)

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FEASTING

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harlottesville prides itself on its status as a culinary destination in Virginia. For years, the area has hosted more than 400 restaurants — far more than the population would seemingly warrant. While some amount of turnover is inevitable, with new restaurants quickly popping up where old ones closed, the mainstays of Charlottesville’s culinary scene are surprisingly stable. Although chain restaurants have their place in Charlottesville, locally owned and operated eateries make up the vast majority of restaurants, with many of them owned by the chefs who create the dishes. The city is also at the forefront of the farm-to-table movement, and you will find many restaurants focusing on fresh, locally sourced ingredients all year round. Whether you want a filling breakfast to start your day, traditional Southern dishes or some late-night noshing, Charlottesville offers just about anything your taste buds could desire.

ENJOYING A SPRING EVENING AT THE LOCAL. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

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Breakfast Bodo’s Bagels is likely Charlottesville’s most popular eatery and a bona fide institution since the late 1980s. Adults, kids, students, visitors — everyone loves to eat at Bodo’s, and they all have their favorite order. Choose from 10 kinds of bagels, and top yours with a variety of cream cheeses or try one of their many sandwich options, including egg and sausage for breakfast. Three locations at 505 Preston Avenue (Downtown), 1418 Emmet Street (Route 29) and 1609 University Avenue (across from the UVA Grounds). The Nook serves a traditional diner breakfast all day, with stick-toyour-ribs options such as biscuits and gravy, omelets, pancakes, home fries and grits, as well as supersized Bloody Marys and mimosas. Seasonal patio service. 415 E Main Street, on the Downtown Mall.

Lunch Revolutionary Soup is a great spot to grab a quick, healthy lunch, offering an array of homemade soups as well as sandwiches, wraps, salads and sides. 108 Second Street SW, on the Downtown Mall. Burger Bach is a New Zealand-style gastropub featuring beef, lamb and chicken burgers and a variety of seafood options, including mussels, shrimp and oysters, along with vegetarian dishes and salads. 2050 Bond Street, in the Shops at Stonefield. Bashir’s Taverna offers authentic Mediterranean cuisine, with sandwich and platter options such as falafel, roasted vegetables, lamb sausage, curry chicken and glazed meats. Belly dancing Saturday nights. 507 E Main Street, on the Downtown Mall. Ace Biscuit & Barbecue smokes its own meats out behind the tiny hole-in-the-wall restaurant. It is a great place for a takeout Southern lunch, with pulled pork, pit beef and fried chicken, along with traditional sides such as collard greens and mac and cheese. 711 Henry Avenue, northwest of Downtown.

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Dinner Michael’s Bistro on The Corner focuses on locally sourced ingredients and serves entrées such as duck breast, ahi piccata, and shrimp and grits, along with small plates, specialty drinks and craft beers. 1427 University Avenue, across from the UVA Grounds. Ivy Inn welcomes you with impeccable service and fine dining in an historic 19th century house. Seasonal, locally sourced entrées include options such as lamb, pork chops and trout, as well as mouthwatering desserts. 2244 Old Ivy Road, close to UVA and western Charlottesville. Downtown Grille offers classic American fine dining with an extensive menu of steaks, seafood and family-style side dishes such as creamed spinach and au gratin potatoes. 201 W Main Street, on the Downtown Mall. Bang! serves Asian-inspired tapas and creative martinis in a cozy house. It offers extensive vegan and gluten-free options. 213 Second Street SW, two blocks south of the Downtown Mall.

Treats Sweethaus creates an ever-changing variety of small-batch cupcakes, so there is always a flavor that is sure to entice. Treat yourself to some of their mix-and-match nostalgic candy and chocolates, a cake pop, or the full espresso bar. 929 Second Street SE, in the IX Complex. Chaps Ice Cream satisfies your sweet tooth with homemade ice cream, doughnuts, sundaes and shakes. Try a few of their many flavors and find your favorite. If you need more than sweets, they also make burgers and sandwiches. 223 E Main Street, on the Downtown Mall.

Late Night Rapture offers a menu with Southern favorites, along with a well-stocked bar, billiards and a popular nightclub, Club r2, with some of the best dancing in town. 303 E Main Street, on the Downtown Mall. Marco & Luca Dumplings is open until the early hours of the morning on weekends, serving dumplings, noodles, pork buns and other quick bites. Another location on the Downtown Mall has earlier closing times. 107 Elliewood Avenue, on The Corner. 64

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Serving It Up! Local Restaurant Entrepreneur Will Richey

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harlottesville’s creative and wide-ranging restaurant scene is the ideal domain for Will Richey, one of the forces behind the city’s farm-to-table renaissance. “Luckily, we’re in a town where so many people are social,” he says. “It really is a very cosmopolitan town with so much going on. The music scene and the Downtown Mall make it a great place to be.” Richey has made a habit of partnering with talented local and regional chefs, as well as designers and artists, and the result is a creative blend of restaurants under his parent company, Ten Course Hospitality. “The unifying factor is I really like a restaurant with a personal touch. None of them feel corporate-y or stamped out.” His latest project, Brasserie Saison, showcases his love of food and brews. “I saw a deficit in good beer food in the area. We have a lot of breweries, but no good food to go with it,” he says. Brasserie Saison pairs pub foods from Belgium and the Netherlands, such as mussels and chicken liver toast, with drinks from the restaurant’s own small-batch, in-house brewery, run by restaurant partner Hunter Smith, owner of Champion Brewing Co. Richey’s other ventures appeal to varied tastes. Revolutionary Soup, a long-standing community favorite with two locations, sells farm-to-table soups and sandwiches in a casual setting. The restaurant took off, Richey thinks, because it made locally sourced, sustainable food an everyday option in the city. “Most local food in the area at the time was fine dining,” he says. Traditional Southern recipes inspired by

Richey’s Virginia heritage fill the menu at The Whiskey Jar, which places a strong focus on local and regional music — and of course, whiskey. For classic French shared plates and handcrafted cocktails, there is The Alley Light, a hip and stylish spot with an unassuming exterior. The sweet and savory delights of The Pie Chest offered The Whiskey Jar’s former baker a chance to spread her culinary wings, while The Bebedero highlights Mexican cuisine from the homes of its chefs, who hail from coastal Veracruz, known for seafood, and Puebla, popular for its chiles rellenos.

and involves a lot of planning, but it is worth it to him when he provides customers with sustainably raised, local food grown by farmers who do not use chemicals. “It’s a lot harder,” he admits, “but it’s something that we think is important. I believe in putting good food on the table.” Downtown: Brasserie Saison is at 111 E Main Street. The Whiskey Jar is at 227 W Main Street. The Alley Light is at 108 Second Street SW. The Pie Chest is at 119 Fourth Street NE. The Bebedero is at 225 W Main Street. Revolutionary Soup is at 108 Second Street SW.

Richey has opened four restaurants in the The Corner: A second Revolutionary Soup last four years, and he says he intends to take is located at 104 14th Street NW. Menus and a break and share his expertise by consulting details are available at tencoursehospitality.com. for other restaurateurs. While he has cooked at most of his own restaurants at one time or another, these days he spends all of his time managing his enterprise and enjoying cooking in his own home kitchen. He and his wife and children live on a 5-acre farm in Esmont, south of Charlottesville, where they raise almost all the organic summer produce for Revolutionary Soup and The Whiskey Jar. Richey deals with large distributors for the basics, but most of the food in his restaurants is locally produced, and he partners with dozens of area food and beverage producers and distributors. SAID THE ORANGE, "SLICE ME ONCE, SHAME ON YOU, SLICE ME Working that way is challenging TWICE, SHAME ON ME, SLICE ME THRICE, SANGRIA!" COOPER &

WILL RICHEY AT THE WHISKEY JAR. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

THIEF'S BOURBON-BARREL-AGED WINE GIVES OURS SOME EXTRA VIDA. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE WHISKEY JAR)

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Paradox Pastry

The Downtown Grille

Firefly

A one-of-a-kind, open format bakery and café, Paradox Pastry invites you to watch the bakers in action as you enjoy a variety of European and American offerings paired with signature coffees and teas. Enjoy a breakfast quiche, frittata, multi-grain muffin or croissant, try the tasty lunch specials featuring sandwiches, healthy soups and salads or go straight for the dessert action! You will find a rotating menu of confections to delight in — layer cakes, tarts, gluten-free options, pies and cookies upon cookies. Find us in the Warehouse District, just south of the Downtown Mall on 2nd Street. Mon–Fri 7am–6pm, Sat 7am–4pm

The Downtown Grille, located on Charlottesville’s historic Downtown Mall, serves only the finest in Midwestern corn-fed beef and fresh seafood, while incorporating local ingredients. The restaurant has an extensive wine list which has been honored by The Wine Spectator with the Award of Excellence every year since opening in 1999.

Firefly offers a casual family-friendly environment that combines great food, craft beverages and games. The menu is inspired by local, seasonal ingredients and vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options are always available. Pair your food with a choice from 18 rotating beer and cider taps, as well as a selection of wine, mead, and cocktails. Nonalcoholic mocktails and all natural sodas are available. Game lovers can play pool, foosball, skeeball, four pinball machines, seven arcade games, and a plethora of board games. TVs for sports, news, or shows. “Geeks Who Drink” Tuesday Trivia Nights.

313 2nd Street, Charlottesville

The Downtown Grille offers an elegant, private dining room with a seating capacity of 50 people and standing room capacity of 85 for cocktails and appetizers. Our lovely architecture and warm professional staff lend a superb ambiance to an already exquisite dining experience. Mon–Thu 5–10pm, Fri–Sat 5–11pm, Sun 5–9pm

Tue–Thu 11am–11pm, Fri–Sat 11am–midnight, Sun 10am–9pm

434.245.2253

paradoxpastrycafe.com

201 W Main Street, Charlottesville

1304 E Market St, Charlottesville

434.817.7080

434.202.1050

downtowngrille.com

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fireflycville.com


Wild Wing Cafe

Aberdeen Barn

C&O Restaurant

A laid-back sports bar in the historic downtown train station, Wild Wing is Charlottesville’s ultimate sports central. The kitchen’s full menu ranges from game-friendly finger food to an array of burgers, sandwiches and salads, but the focus is rightly on madefrom-scratch hot wings with your choice of 33 homemade sauces, including traditional buffalo, barbecue, and other bold, sweet and spicy flavors. Wash it all down with one of 30 local and craft beers. Unwind at weeknight happy hours with a variety of food and drink specials, or let loose with weekly live music, karaoke and trivia nights.

Established in 1965 as Charlottesville’s premier steakhouse. Dinner at “the Barn” has become as central to the Charlottesville experience as tailgating at Scott Stadium before the big game. Serving only the finest certified Angus steaks among the fires of our open charcoal hearth, award-winning roast prime rib, fresh seafood, exceptional wine & much more. Discover what has made the Aberdeen Barn a local favorite for more than 40 years! You can also enjoy fine wine, cocktails & cordials at our piano bar in this unique cocktail area. Featuring light jazz piano Friday and Saturday and three flat screen televisions tuned into the latest sporting events.

Experience the craft of fine dining at C&O Restaurant, a decades-old Charlottesville institution. Overlook the historic Chesapeake & Ohio rail yard from upstairs, or cozy up for a romantic evening in the intimate mezzanine or European-style bistro. Dine al fresco on the patio or terrace, or reserve the gallery for a special occasion. Ingredients from local farmers, vintners, cheesemongers, and ranchers shine in the spotlight of the Frenchinspired dinner menu, while late nights feature simpler, comforting fare. Just off the Downtown Mall, C&O is the ideal place to enjoy fine Virginia produce and warm Southern hospitality. Dinner: 5–10pm (7 days a week) Late Night: 10pm–1am (7 days a week)

Sun–Thu 11am–midnight Fri–Sat 11–2am

Open daily from 5pm 820 W Main Street, Charlottesville

434.979.9464

wildwingcafe.com/locations/charlottesville-va

2018 Holiday Drive, Charlottesville

434.296.4630

aberdeenbarn.com

515 E Water Street, Charlottesville

434.971.7044

candorestaurant.com

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Ivy Inn Restaurant Refined American cuisine graces the tables of this historic 19th century inn. Chef-owner and Culinary Institute of America graduate Angelo Vangelopoulos uses the finest locallysourced ingredients to compose a daily menu of authentic, seasonal Virginia fare. Try an heirloom tomato salad, a rich pate de campagne, a thick-cut pork chop from a local farm, or a classic Virginia apple crisp. The award-winning wine list also features local Virginia wines. The elegant dining room is located in the historic Faulkner House, named for author William Faulkner when he was a writer-in-residence at UVA. Open daily 5–9:30pm 2244 Old Ivy Road, Charlottesville

434.977.1222

ivyinnrestaurant.com

The Shebeen Pub & Braai

Michael’s Bistro & Tap House

With a full menu of authentic South African dishes, the Shebeen is owner Walter Slawski’s interpretation of his magical African childhood. Try traditional dishes like peri peri chicken or sadza cakes, or enjoy a comforting British meal like fish & chips or shepherd’s pie. Weekend brunch service is especially popular with a range of hearty plates and specialty mimosas. Late night pub hours are the perfect time to grab a swing at the rustic outdoor bar and listen to live music with a drink in hand.

One of the East Coast’s first true craft beer tap houses, Michael’s Bistro has been serving up chef-driven, locally sourced New American cuisine alongside carefully curated draught and bottled beer selections since 1994. Located across the street from the historic University of Virginia campus, Michael’s offers a cozy bistro ambience in the heart of the bustling Corner. Boasting the best balcony in Charlottesville, Michael’s is the perfect place for a quick lunch, leisurely dinner, or a fantastic beer or craft cocktail any time of the day or night.

Mon–Thu 11am–10pm, Fri 11am–11pm, Sat 8am–11pm, Sun 8am–9pm

Mon–Wed 11:30am–midnight (or later) Thu-Sat 11:30am–2am

247 Ridge McIntire Road, Charlottesville

434.296.3185 shebeen.com

1427 University Avenue, Charlottesville

434.977.3697

michaelsbistro.com

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Citizen Burger Bar

Fellini’s

Bodo’s Bagels

There are certain basic freedoms we hold dear. For one, the enjoyment of a great burger and a beer with friends. This is America, after all… a delicious burger is your right – perhaps even your responsibility. Since nothing’s simpler than a burger, we’ve teamed up with a few nearby farms who keep it simple, with hormone-free grass-fed cows and free-range chickens. The bar is no slouch, either. We’ve stocked a huge curated collection of beers and inspired cocktails. Our vision is anything but complicated: we believe in good food, cold drinks and common ground. This is the people’s burger bar.

The traditional dishes at this contemporary Italian eatery use local Virginia produce and meats to create fresh, original appetizers, pastas, and entrees. Chef-owner Chris Humphrey is particularly lauded for his classic sautéed calamari in chili butter sauce, though the hearty bolognese, lump crab cake with vegetables in bagna cauda, and fondutafilled arancini are all also excellent choices. Live music rocks the intimate dining room into the wee hours nearly every night, with local singer-songwriters, jazz pianists, and even a little lively Zydeco during Mardi Grasthemed Sunday brunches.

A genuine Charlottesville institution, Bodo’s bakes authentic New York bagels all day long, and is known for natural ingredients, low prices, and fast, friendly service. Build a sandwich from a wide selection of deli meats, cheeses, spreads and toppings, or choose soup, salad, eggs or a house-made cream cheese.

Open daily 11:30am–midnight

Tue 5pm–2am, Wed 5–9:30pm, Thu–Sat 5pm–2am, Sun 11am–2pm and 5–9pm

212 E Main Street, Charlottesville

434.979.9944

citizenburgerbar.com

200 W Market Street, Charlottesville

434.284.7676

fellinisincville.com

1418 Emmet Street Mon–Fri 6:30am–8pm, Sat 7am–8pm, Sun 7:30am–4pm

434.977.9598 505 Preston Avenue Mon–Fri 6:30am–8pm, Sat 7am–8pm, Sun 8am–3pm

434.293.5224 1609 University Avenue Mon–Fri 7am–8pm, Sat 8am–4pm, Sun 8am–4pm

434.293.6021

bodosbagels.com

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hether your tastes tend toward sipping wine and sampling beers and ciders, or indulging in something more spirited, central Virginia is a prime destination for anyone looking for artisan-crafted beverages. Local makers follow in the footsteps of those who came before, catering to different tastes and providing visitors the chance to lift a glass with friends old and new at locations with stunning views of the Blue Ridge Mountains or rolling farmland. The roots of today’s booming Virginia wine industry are planted in the Colonial era, with Thomas Jefferson’s unsuccessful attempts at growing European vines on the Monticello plantation. More than half a century later, the Monticello Wine Co., founded in 1873, produced award-winning claret wine in Charlottesville using grapes from local vineyards, but it was forced to close with the onset of Prohibition in 1916. Not until the 1970s did winemaking experience a resurgence in the Commonwealth — one that would see it grow into a force in the state’s tourism. Noted winemaker Gabriele Rausse grew grapes at Barboursville Vineyards near Gordonsville and consulted with numerous other wineries in Virginia, helping the industry become what it is today — with more than 75 wineries in central Virginia alone. Colonial-era Virginians found better success with beer and hard apple cider, then a staple beverage. Today’s cideries offer a taste of the bountiful apple varieties of the region, and the area is a hotbed of craft beer, with visitors sampling flights and drinking pints at local breweries. Several distilleries also offer sophisticated spirits, including gin, whiskey, vodka and rum, proving the area truly caters to all tastes. Many local companies offer limousine tours of artisan beverage spots for those who want to relax and let someone else do the driving. Find out more about area wineries at monticellowinetrail.com and pick up a copy of the Craft Beverages of the Blue Ridge brochure from local hotels, the Charlottesville Albemarle Convention & Visitors Bureau and other locations around town or check the mobile site at brcraftbev.com.

DRINKING UP AT THE KNOW GOOD BEER FESTIVAL. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

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Blue Mountain Brewery

Grace Estate Winery

The first brewery in Nelson County, we are a unique destination in the heart of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains. All our ales and lagers are brewed, bottled, canned and kegged onsite in Afton or down the road in Arrington at our Blue Mountain Barrel House. Our full-service restaurant is open daily and features appetizers, salads, sandwiches, burgers, specialty pizzas and desserts made from scratch using the highest quality ingredients we can find.

“An old world family heritage blends a new world wine tradition with Virginia terroir.” On 62 acres of Estate vineyards, we produce artisan small batch red and white wines, single varietals and blends. Join us in the friendliest tasting room around! Enjoy our award winning wines and beautiful vineyard views. Wed &Thu 11am– 5:30pm, Fri 11am–9pm with live music and a food truck (Fri evening in the Vineyard) every week from 6–9pm, Sat 11am–8pm, Sun 11am– 5:30pm.

9519 Critzers Shop Road Afton, VA 22920

5273 Mount Juliet Farm Crozet, VA 22932

540.456.8020

434.823.1486

bluemountainbrewery.com

Cunningham Creek Winery Cunningham Creek Winery at Middle Fork Farm is a family friendly, dog friendly gathering place with music, food and events happening year round. Inside, savor a tasting at a table, the sipping bar or in front of the fireplace. Outside, enjoy the beautiful scenery on the deck, at a picnic table or on the lawn. Mon, Thu, Fri, Sat 11am–5pm, Sun 1–6pm.

graceestatewinery.com

Pollak Vineyards Pollak Vineyards is a small, familyowned winery founded in 2003. We have 27 acres of French vinifera used to make estate grown wine that has the finesse and balance of the traditional French varietals. Our tasting room and patio offer views of our first vines, the pond and the nearby Blue Ridge Mountains. It is a scenic setting to enjoy a glass of wine and some of the best of Central Virginia’s wine country. Open daily 11am–5pm.

3304 Ruritan Lake Road Palmyra, VA 22963

330 Newtown Road Greenwood, VA 22943

434.207.3907

540.456.8844

cunninghamcreek.wine

Chestnut Oak Vineyard Chestnut Oak Vineyard was started with the intent of producing the highest quality wine possible in Central Virginia. We were inspired by those vineyards of the Monticello Region that came before us.

pollakvineyards.com

Wild Wolf Brewing Company

Come visit us for an unusual experience. We are located along a scenic Virginia byway, three miles south of the iconic Barboursville Vineyards. Sat–Sun noon–5pm.

Wild Wolf Brewing Company is an award winning brewery and farm to fork restaurant featuring gorgeous mountain views, a Biergarten with waterfalls, a four season pavilion, cornhole, big screenTVs and live music. With 13 beers on tap and a made from scratch restaurant, there is something for everyone. Mon–Fri 11:30am–last call, Sat–Sun 11am–last call.

5050 Stony Point Road Barboursville, VA 22923

2461 Rockfish Valley Hwy Nellysford, VA 22958

434.964.9104

434.361.0088

chestnutoakvineyard.com

wildwolfbeer.com

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Silverback Distillery

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long Rockfish Valley Highway in rural Nelson County, a silverback gorilla stands in the shadow of Afton Mountain. Not a real gorilla, but a statue outside Silverback Distillery, named in honor of co-owner Denver Riggleman, who looks — and possibly acts — a bit like a silverback gorilla, according to his daughters. After years of moving around while Denver served in the Air Force, the Riggleman family returned to their roots in Virginia, where Denver’s wife, Christine, knew she wanted to start her own business. A trip to Scotland helped her figure out what that business should be: a distillery.

art for people,” says Christine, who says her love for cooking and creating translates well to distilling. “My happy point is watching people partake of something I created. I just translated my love of cooking to cooking hooch.” The couple’s three daughters all work at Silverback and one is the general manager. Belly up to one of Silverback’s five soapstone bar tops for a tasting of their award-winning spirits and you will have your choice of vodka, gin, whiskey, bourbon or a honey rye whiskey made with honey locally sourced in Nelson County. Go for straight pours or a rotating selection of mini cocktails, such as a Tom Collins, Bloody Mary or seasonal hot chocolate. Christine’s favorite is her 70-proof honey rye. “You can drink it straight. You can add a little ice or make a hot toddy. It’s a nice tranquilizer if you don’t feel good,” she says.

“This is my baby,” Christine says. “I wanted to be a producer, and I wanted to produce something I was passionate about.” The passions run deep. Christine’s grandmother and great-aunts made bathtub gin during World War II. In fact, Christine says, traditionally, many distillers were women, cooking up concoctions in their kitchens in between making supper and doing housework. All that changed when industrialization brought hooch out of the backyard and into the factory. Even today, craft distilling is largely male-dominated.

Due to strict controls by the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, guests are limited to 3 ounces of liquor per day. While there are some 40 distilleries in Virginia, Christine does not see the industry booming like wineries unless the state’s strict postProhibition-era regulations are eased and taxes on liquor sales lowered.

“I think a female touch to distill the spirits is refreshing. I just trust my instincts. I’m creating

Hours at Silverback Distillery, located at 9374 Rockfish Valley Highway in Afton, depend on the time of year. Check its website at sbdistillery.com for details. Large groups do not need reservations but are encouraged to call ahead.

Silverback cuts down on its costs by using a geothermal system for the chilling process. The distillery also produces its liquor with all local grains and recycles and reuses everything it can. Used mash is donated to local farmers for fertilizer or feed. “It’s really important to us to be forward thinking,” Christine says. “It was just what we wanted to do.” That dedication shows in the products. “We want to put out the best product we can to the customers. We don’t want to just hurry. We work long days, but we are so happy with the response from our customers and the love they have for our products.”

LEFT: SERVING UP — CHRISTINE RIGGLEMAN CEO & MASTER DISTILLER OF SILVERBACK DISTILLERY. ABOVE: TITUS — THE SILVERBACK STATUE. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF CHRISTINE RIGGLEMAN AND SILVERBACK DISTILLERY)

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DRINKING UP

Albemarle CiderWorks

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ucked into the side of the mountains in southern Albemarle County, Albemarle CiderWorks uses heirloom apples grown on-site to create a distinctly Virginian artisanal cider. Bud Shelton started a small orchard on the property after retiring from the Virginia Department of Forestry in the 1990s. After his daughter Charlotte attended a fruit tasting at Monticello and sampled many varieties no longer commercially grown, her interest in heirloom apples grew — as did the number of trees in the orchard. The family sold their Vintage Virginia apples at a farm market on the property and started a tree nursery, eventually producing cider to make the business more profitable. Most of the family has worked at the property at some point over the years, and what started as about 20 apple varieties grew to about 250 varieties today. Charlotte is the principal owner and Bud’s son Chuck, who retired from a career at a nuclear plant in North Carolina, has a second career making what he calls “apple wine.” The ciders are like sparkling wines and, in fact, come in wine bottles, not the beer bottles you expect when buying commercial cider in a grocery store. Chuck uses many heirloom apple varieties, including Albemarle Pippin, Arkansas Black and Winesap as well as a few modern varieties such as GoldRush. Because the family has a relatively small orchard, they buy from other local orchards to meet their needs. Most apples are not native to the United States. Colonists brought them here and grew hundreds of apple varieties, more for cider than for food. The drink was a popular beverage, often replacing water, which was not always safe to drink. Jefferson grew several kinds of apples at nearby Monticello, including the Albemarle Pippin. Cider’s popularity continued for years, but industrialization and Prohibition wiped out many apple varieties and destroyed the cider making industry. FAMILY IS THE MORTAR THAT HOLDS THE BUSINESS TOGETHER — BILL, CHARLOTTE AND CHUCK SHELTON. CIDERS THE FAMILY PRODUCES. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF ALBEMARLE CIDERWORKS)

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The prevailing wisdom is that it takes a blend of apples to produce good cider, but Chuck disagrees and will often produce a single varietal if he thinks the apple can stand alone. Nevertheless, his most popular cider is Jupiter’s Legacy, a tart and citrusy blend of many varieties. “We put every apple we felt was ciderworthy in it,” he says. Apples you would not necessarily want to eat because of their bitterness are ideal apples for cider, and getting the right blend is more instinctive than science. “Blending, to me, it’s art,” says Chuck. He usually decides on his combinations of apples before he puts them in the press, though he notes that other cider makers blend later in the process. There are different styles of cider — English, French and Spanish — but Chuck says his cider is distinctly American. “I think that what we’re doing is akin to what they were doing in 1750 in Virginia, aside from the equipment. A lot of the varieties we use were used back then, and it was a local or regional commodity. That’s kind of what we’re doing here. The apples are the same for the most part. I’d say we’re a modern replication of what they did in the Colonial era.”


Albemarle CiderWorks is located at 2545 Rural Ridge Lane in North Garden, about 20 minutes south of Charlottesville. Cider offerings change depending on the season. Tastings are held in a large window-filled tasting room, and depending on the time of year, visitors can relax in front of a large fireplace or sit on the patio and enjoy the orchard views. Check albemarleciderworks.com for hours of operation and information on special events, including live music, workshops and a fall harvest festival.


DRINKING UP

Keswick Vineyards

ENJOYING A SUMMER AFTERNOON AT THE TASTING ROOM. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF CINDY SCHORNBERG — KESWICK VINEYARDS)

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s you drive along the winding road to the tasting room at Keswick Vineyards, you glimpse row upon row of grapevines growing next to a pond dotted with swans gracefully swimming in the sunlight. Once you arrive at the tasting room, just 15 minutes east of Charlottesville, there is a good chance that Mittens, the unofficial blackand-white feline mascot, will greet you with a “meow.” At Keswick, you have plenty of options

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if you want to relax with a glass of wine. There is a deck and patio, where the vineyard hosts live music and food trucks on warm Saturday afternoons, and a covered porch that is enclosed and warmed by a fireplace in the winter and open and airy in the summer. The outside space is a popular play area for children and dogs while everyone else can relax and enjoy music, wine and even a picnic with peaceful views of the rolling foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. There is also a newly enclosed dog park. Nearby

is the beautiful Colonial-era home of owners Al and Cindy Schornberg that is a popular spot for Keswick’s outdoor weddings. The Schornbergs purchased the 400-acre property in 2000 after Al retired from his job as CEO of a Detroit tech company following a plane crash that nearly killed the couple. After looking throughout the country for the best location to start their new lives and a new winemaking business, they settled on central


TOP LEFT: CINDY AND AL SCHORNBERG. TOP: A MAGICAL EVENING AT KESWICK VINEYARDS. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF CINDY SCHORNBERG — KESWICK VINEYARDS)

Virginia, says their son Brian, who manages the Keswick Vineyards Wine Club. “Dad always wanted to own a winery. His grandfather worked at his family’s winery in France.” The Schornbergs have kept the family winemaking tradition going. In addition to Brian, their daughter is the social media manager and their son-in-law, Stephen Barnard, is the winemaker. The property the Schornbergs selected was once a part of an 18,000-acre crown grant in Keswick and the site of a Confederate encampment of Gen. James Longstreet’s troops, who were preparing for the nearby Battle of the Wilderness. According to local legend, the estate also played a part in Thomas Jefferson’s escape from Monticello during the Revolutionary War. Jefferson and members of the state legislature were able to escape Charlottesville after the British colonel dispatched to capture them stayed too long on the property. While the vines at the entrance to the property are planted in the Virginia red clay found throughout the Piedmont region, the rear of the property has a special soil that grapevines seem to love — a long band of quartz, schist

and shale that drains very well, says Brian. “The good drainage causes the vines planted there to develop deeper roots, meaning the grapes can hang on the vine longer and ripen more.” Today, Keswick Vineyards has 45 acres of vines, Brian says, and most of those vines are planted in the rich soil at the rear of the property. While it is a relatively small winery in terms of the number of cases it produces — 6,000 — it is still one of the most awarded wineries in the state. Keswick is probably best known for its cabernet sauvignon reserve wine. Its viognier, a varietal the central Virginia region is known for, is also popular, as are the house white and red Trevillian blends, named after a nearby Civil War battle. Keswick grows a large variety of grapes — 12 varietals in all — with small selections of each lot available depending on the season. This allows the Schornbergs to offer a wide selection of wines to their popular wine club. The main wine club event, Consensus, is held annually and invites members to try their hand at blending. The wines are voted on by club members, and the winner is selected by wine experts and then bottled and sold in the tasting room.

The wine club is one of the offerings that sets Keswick Vineyards apart from the nearly 300 wineries in Virginia, says Brian. In 2000, when the Schornbergs set out on their winemaking adventure, central Virginia had far fewer wineries than it has now. They knew all that was about to change, though, and it is a large part of what drew them here, says Brian. “My father was just excited to be a part of the growing industry in central Virginia.” Keswick Vineyards, located at 1575 Keswick Winery Drive in Keswick, is open daily for tastings. Groups of 10 or more are encouraged to call ahead. On summer Saturday afternoons, the winery offers live music and food trucks, as well as doggie “yappy hours” on Sundays, where local animal shelters bring homeless pets to play. A portion of the tasting room sales from the yappy hours are donated to the shelter, and guests are encouraged to bring their own animals to enjoy the winery’s dog park any day of the week. Check keswickvineyards.com for hours of operation and information on other special events.

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Wood Ridge Farm Brewery

THE TASTING ROOM AT WOOD RIDGE FARM BREWERY. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF BILL MORROW)

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arry Wood never planned on opening Wood Ridge Farm Brewery in rural Nelson County, but it seemed like the right thing to do after he found success growing and malting barley for other craft breweries and distilleries. His family has owned his 300-acre farm since the 1890s, and he moved back there 17 years ago after operating a farm and produce market in Centreville in Northern Virginia. Barry raised everything from shrimp to alpacas on his farm before he decided to try his hand at growing malting barley — malted barley is the source of the fermented sugar used to make beer. He spent several years working with colleges, including Virginia Tech and Iowa State

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University, to find barley that would work in Virginia’s humid, highmoisture climate, where the grain is susceptible to molds and fungus. Barley was grown for beer in Virginia hundreds of years ago, Barry says, but these days its primary use is livestock feed. Once he found the right grain, he built a malting facility in an old airplane hangar on the property and distributed his malted grain to local breweries and distilleries. But he produced more than he could sell, so he decided to open his own brewery. Visitors at Wood Ridge can sit down at the beautiful wood bar in the rustic tasting room and enjoy sweeping views of the rolling Blue Ridge Mountains and gaze out at the grains that will make the following year’s


beers growing in the adjacent fields. Wood Ridge offers 16 beers on tap, including light lager, ale, porter, IPA and stout, as well as seasonal beers made with local fruit, including strawberry, apple, blackberry and peach. “We try to have a beer for everyone,” says Barry, who notes that Wood Ridge’s lighter beers are popular, as is its ultra-hoppy double IPA. While he learned malting from the Canadian Malting Barley Technical Centre, he admits he is not a brewer, so Barry hired Chris Firey, who previously brewed beers and ciders for 20 years in Pennsylvania. In addition to farm-to-table, Barry says beverages at Wood Ridge are from “the dirt to the glass.” “Everything is done right here,” he says. “It’s kind of the natural way to go. As far as I know, there’s not many in the U.S. that actually grow the ingredients, malt the ingredients and then brew the ingredients on one farm.” The malted barley is rolled out and dried on the floor of the repurposed hangar, the wild yeast is cultivated on the farm, the spring water is piped in from a spring on the farm and the beer is brewed in a glass-sided room right next to the tasting room. “We’re really unique in the industry in that all of our stuff comes from the farm,” Firey says. “This is ultra-mega local. It’s you-can-look-at-itfrom-your-barstool local.” In addition to the beer, a food truck sells sliders and steak and cheese sandwiches as well as other items made from beef, pork and vegetables all raised and grown on the farm. A pizza oven and a bakery are in the works for buns, rolls and dough — all made from Wood Ridge grain. “You not only drink the grains through the beer, you eat them through breads,” Barry says. Wood Ridge is a place where you could easily spend an entire afternoon or longer. Televisions at the bar are tuned to the game, and two levels of wraparound decks on the tasting room and an enormous patio give visitors plenty of space to relax. Also offered are horseshoe pits, cornhole games, a volleyball court and a fire pit where kids — or adults — can make s’mores. For Barry, who is almost always found barefoot around the farm, the brewery is a business that gives him the chance to indulge his love of farming every day, whether he is planting seeds or chasing after wayward pigs. “Owning a brewery isn’t necessarily what I set out and intended to do,” he says. “We do the planning, the fertilizing, the harvest, everything. It’s a lot of work. Since we do everything in-house, it’s not time-saving by any means. I couldn’t make money just farming, and this allows me to farm and use what comes from the farm.” Wood Ridge Farm Brewery is located at 165 Old Ridge Road near Lovingston in Nelson County. Check their Facebook page at facebook.com/WoodRidgeFarmBrewery for hours of operation. Tastings are available, as well as sales by the glass and growlers. The brewery often hosts live local bands on weekends in the summer. Leashed dogs are welcome. FROM TOP RIGHT: HARVEST TIME, BARRY WOOD SKINNING LOGS FOR HIS NEXT PROJECT, THE RUSTIC INTERIOR OF THE TASTING ROOM, A SAMPLER FLIGHT. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF WOOD RIDGE FARM BREWERY AND ROY VAN DOORN)

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South Street Brewery Charlottesville’s original brewery just one block off the downtown mall. We feature 12 beers on tap, including venerated South Street originals that helped shape the Central Virginia beer scene, as well as new beers reflecting the diversity and experimentation that is the heart of American craft brewing. Our food offerings lean heavily toward local artisans — from beef to bread, from tofu to produce and everything in between — reflecting our belief that Charlottesville, Virginia is the best place on Earth to live, drink and eat! Daily food and drink specials. Also offering six packs and Growlers TO - GO. Sun– Thu 11am–11pm Sat 11am–Midnight 106 W South Street, Charlottesville

434.293.6550

southstreetbrewery.com

Seven Arrows Brewing Company Inspired by a Native American blessing of the creator, the earth and the four directions, avid homebrewers Aaron and Melissa Allen turn lifelong dreams into real deal craft beer in the heart of the Shenandoah Valley. Sidle up to the bar for a seasonal pour like rich doppelbock or a cherry lambic aged in wine barrels, or keep it simple with pilsners and award-winning lagers. The Nobos kitchen onsite cranks out sandwiches, salads, and appetizers while the tasting room hosts frequent events like paint nights and yoga classes. Mon 11am–9pm, Wed–Thu 11am–10pm, Fri 11am–11pm, Sat noon–11pm, Sun noon–9pm 2508 Jefferson Highway #1 Waynesboro, VA 22980

540.221.6968

sevenarrowsbrewing.com

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Basic City Beer Co. Founded among the ruins of a lost city, Basic City Beer reclaims an historic Victorianera boomtown in the name of great beer and the enduring American dream. Honeyhued lagers, Belgian-style witbiers, oatmeal stouts, and juicy DIPAs flow freely in the tasting room, with solid backup from the beer-friendly dishes off the Hops Kitchen food truck. Sink your teeth into a craft burger or warm up with a bowl of beer braised short rib chili. Live music from local bands on Saturday nights. Tue–Fri 3–10pm, Sat noon–10pm, Sun noon–8pm. 1010 E Main Street Waynesboro, VA 22980

540.943.1010

basiccitybeer.com


GETTING OUT

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harlottesville provides plenty of reasons for outdoor enthusiasts to get outside and get moving, no matter your experience level. Bring your clubs and hit the golf course, or delve into area history with a walk in one of the cemeteries. See the scenic beauty from an entirely different perspective with a river tubing excursion. When you have worked up an appetite, taste the bounties of the region when you pick your own fruit and berries at a local farm. Plus, no matter where you are, parks and trails await you nearby with new places and views to explore.

Walking & Hiking Old Rag Mountain in Shenandoah National Park challenges even experienced hikers with a 9-mile loop that includes a strenuous rock scramble through boulders on the mountain’s exposed ridge top. The effort exerted on the park’s most popular hike is rewarded with 360-degree views at the top. Before taking on Old Rag, make sure you are physically able to complete the hike and check the park website for instructions and a safety video. Observatory Hill, on land owned by the University of Virginia, is a popular destination for hikers and bikers. Seven miles of winding and intersecting trails offer steep, rocky climbs and descents. Oakwood Cemetery, on the southern side of the city, has been Charlottesville’s primary public cemetery since the late 1800s and includes 19th century stone carvings, slate markers, cast-iron fencing, and stone and quartz walls. Burials include civic and religious leaders, workers, and people of different races and nationalities. Oakwood was the main burying ground for the city’s poor and indigent. While the cemetery previously included a “colored” section, many African-Americans opted for burial at the adjacent Daughters of Zion Cemetery. HIKERS ON THE RIDGE TRAIL. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF KATY CAIN, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE)

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GETTING OUT


GETTING OUT Daughters of Zion Cemetery, next to Oakwood Cemetery, was founded by a group of African-American women in 1873 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is the resting place for many of Charlottesville’s prominent AfricanAmericans — among them, Benjamin Tonsler, a former slave who taught at the city’s first school for black students and was an important figure in the area’s civil rights movement. The cemetery is now owned by the City. Charlottesville Hebrew Cemetery, directly across the street from Oakwood Cemetery, was founded in 1870 to provide a proper religious burial place and service for the city’s Jewish community. The wrought-iron gates to the historic stone-walled cemetery are not locked. Before visiting, you may wish to look online for resources to help you read and understand Hebrew tombstones. Old Mills Trail runs along the Rivanna River from Darden Towe Park to just below Martha Jefferson Hospital near Interstate 64. Walkers, runners, hikers and bikers all use the 3-mile urban greenway. Also located in Darden Towe Park is the Lewis & Clark Exploratory Center, which includes full-size replica boats from the historic expedition and hands-on rotating activities focused on mapmaking, drawing, carpentry and nature observation.

Fishing Walnut Creek Park, about 12 miles south of Charlottesville, is a favorite fishing spot for locals. The 45-acre lake is stocked with largemouth bass, sunfish and channel catfish, and offers parking and ramp facilities. A Virginia state fishing license is required. Ragged Mountain Reservoir, just southwest of Charlottesville, is the water supply reservoir for the city. The 170-acre lake contains largemouth bass and bluegill. Parking is limited, and boats and canoes must be carried to the water as there is no boat ramp. A Virginia state fishing license is required.

Golfing Meadowcreek Golf Course, at Pen Park off Rio Road East, is an 18-hole municipal course owned by the City of Charlottesville, with views of the nearby mountains. Open year-round, the course boasts a full-service pro shop, driving range and grill.

THE HARD CIDER RUN. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF BILL MCCHESNEY)

Yearly Foot Races | Charlottesville provides a scenic — and often challenging — landscape for a significant number of foot races each year, many of which benefit local charities and businesses. The following list highlights annual events that draw visitors and locals alike, whether strictly for fun and exercise or for improving upon a personal record. March – Charlottesville Ten Miler April – Charlottesville Marathon, Half Marathon, Marathon Relay, 8K & Kids K April/May – Montalto Challenge 5K May – Adam and Eve Half Marathon and 8K July – Kiwanis Independence Day 5K September – Charlottesville Women’s Four Miler October – Charlottesville Fall Classic Half Marathon & 10K October – Danger! Zombies! Run! 5K November – Bill Steers Men’s Four Miler For more information on these races and to view a full calendar of events, visit raggedmountainrunning.com/upcoming-area-races and badtothebone.biz.

Spring Creek Golf Club, at Zion Crossroads, is an 18-hole championship course open for public play seven days a week. The award-winning course features bent grass fairways and beautiful greens. Amenities include practice facilities, a pro shop, and a full-service restaurant and bar.

SAW A BEAR. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF BRIAN TIMMERMEISTER)

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TUBING ON THE JAMES RIVER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JAMES RIVER RUNNERS AND THE CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU)

GETTING OUT

Floating Rivanna River Co., on East High Street, helps you cool off at the river with paddle sports and tubing adventures along this tributary of the James River that passes through the city with views of rocky terrain and the remains of historic dams. The company also offers kayaks, canoes and stand-up paddleboards. Transportation from office to river provided. James River Runners offers tubing, rafting, canoeing and kayaking on the James River near Scottsville, about a half hour south of Charlottesville. Tubing trips wind through beautiful countryside and last two to four hours.

Orchards & Farms Carter Mountain Orchard, just south of Charlottesville, features pickyour-own apples, peaches and nectarines as well as some of the best views available overlooking the city. Fresh produce, jams and jellies, and local crafts also are offered. The popular Thursday evening summer sunset concert series showcases local musicians, wine and craft cider. Chiles Peach Orchard, near Crozet, welcomes you with fresh peaches, apples, strawberries and more. Pick your own or visit the farm market for already-picked fruits and local vegetables, cider, doughnuts and ice cream before sipping on a refreshing peach milkshake, hard cider or wine. 88

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Saunders Brothers Nursery, Orchard and Farm Market has sold peaches and apples for more than 100 years in Nelson County. Visit the family-run market for seasonal fruits and vegetables, relishes, salsas and more, and visit their Antique Farm Equipment Museum. The nursery sells annuals, perennials, shrubs and container trees, with an expertise in boxwood. The Market at Grelen grows pick-your-own berries, peaches and apples at its 600-acre nursery in Orange County. Miles of free trails connect to nearby James Madison’s Montpelier, and the nursery includes a wideranging choice of annuals, perennials, trees and more. Caromont Farm, 40 minutes south of Charlottesville, produces awardwinning, delectable goat’s milk and cow’s milk cheeses. Depending on the time of year, they offer tours, tastings, classes, open houses and highly popular cuddle sessions with baby goats. A Better Way Farm, near Waynesboro, offers casual tours of its farm and micro-dairy and sells goat’s milk cheeses, ice cream, soap and more. They also hold soap-making and cheese-making classes. Critzer Family Farm, near Afton, is the place to go for pick-your-own berries — strawberries, cherries, blackberries and raspberries. They also sell fresh fruit and vegetables, plants and other products, including frozen fruit that is ideal for making preserves.


FROM TOP LEFT: SCOTTSVILLE SUPPLY CO. STOREFRONT (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF HEATHER STERTZER), THE MOMENT YOU ZIP UP YOUR VEIL AND YOUR NOSE IMMEDIATELY ITCHES, HONEY, WELCOME TO THE WORLD LITTLE BUDDY! (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF TIFFANY GIBSON GAUCHER)


GETTING OUT

Scottsville Supply Co.

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eather Stertzer’s adventures in beekeeping started after she and her wife, Jennifer, attended a class on the subject at Albemarle High School. The class was Jennifer’s idea, but it turned out Heather was the one with the real passion for the subject. As a newcomer to the local world of beekeeping, she quickly realized the need for a supplier close to the Charlottesville area, and in 2015, the women opened Scottsville Supply Co., which melded Heather’s new-found love of beekeeping with Jennifer’s desire to run a shop in Scottsville. With its bright yellow decorative hive out front, the well-stocked store on Valley Street has all the supplies a new or seasoned beekeeper might want. “Beekeeping is incredibly popular and it’s growing in its popularity,” says Heather, who notes the many beekeeping clubs in central Virginia. “There’s a sense of going back to our roots.” As it turns out, Heather discovered that her involvement in beekeeping is a return to her own roots: Two of her great-great-grandfathers were beekeepers in Ohio, and a great-grandfather and grandfather also tried it. “It was far more common a century ago than it is today, but it’s coming back as a way of getting back in touch with the earth and an understanding of where our food comes from,” she says, adding that buying or producing local honey gives people a chance to experience more variety. Tulip poplar, clover and other botanicals give honey distinctive colors, aromas and flavors that cannot be found in the commercially produced, store-bought product. Step into Scottsville Supply Co. and you will find local honey produced in the Scottsville area as well as honey-based candy, candles, lip balms, soaps, bee-themed antiques and decor, and more. The shop even sells full beekeeper’s suits and complete beekeeping kits — which Heather assembles for her customers — that include everything a budding beekeeper needs to get started. Perhaps the most essential product Scottsville Supply Co. sells is the honeybees themselves. “To have enough bees for the demand in this area, the bees have to come out of the South,” notes Heather, who sells some 6 million to 7 million bees a year. Each colony includes 10,000 bees and a queen. Heather also offers beginner and intermediate beekeeping classes, which fill up quickly. “It’s important to sit down and have someone tell you how to be a beekeeper in that first year and how to manage a colony the first year,” she says. Beekeeping involves a lot of waiting and worrying, and it is a challenge in today’s world to keep and sustain hives. Colony collapse disorder has killed countless honeybees in recent years, and many newer

beekeepers are motivated by a desire to increase the honeybee population, which is critical to the human food chain. The largest killer of honeybees is the varroa mite, a parasite that feeds on bees and their brood and spreads deadly pathogens that can wipe out entire colonies. To combat the mite, Stertzer recommends a miticide, as well as methods that can make the brood and queens stronger. Bees also succumb to a lack of resources, which is why it is important for communities to encourage bee-friendly practices, Heather says. Through the efforts of the Scottsville Supply Co. and the Scottsville Center for Arts and Nature, Scottsville is the first town in Virginia to be designated as a Bee City USA. The program encourages communities to be pollinator-friendly by planting more native plants and pesticide-free trees, shrubs and perennials — small steps that make big differences for the bee population and, ultimately, humans. Heather hopes to continue growing the business and supporting the needs of all the beekeepers in the region — from the backyard hobbyist to those who consider beekeeping a part-time job — and she wants to provide more in-store local honey from the counties surrounding Scottsville. “A lot of beekeepers had never been to a bee supply store before they visited here. People ordered out of catalogs for years,” she says, adding that beekeepers often drive up to two hours to shop in the store. “Here they can try a suit on and touch the product and have things explained to them in person. It takes some of the scariness out of it because it’s confusing when you open a bee catalog and you’re new to beekeeping.” Scottsville Supply Co. is located at 531 Valley Street in Scottsville, about a half hour south of Charlottesville. For store hours, see their website at scottsvillesupplyco.com.

LINDEN AND I. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF TIFFANY GIBSON GAUCHER)

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DAY TRIPPING — NELSON COUNTY

The Quarry Gardens at Schuyler

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rmand and Bernice Thieblot say they always need a project to keep them occupied. The retired Nelson County couple found an ambitious one after a visit to Butchart Gardens in British Columbia, where an abandoned limestone quarry found new life as colorful, ornate gardens. As beautiful as the Canadian gardens are, though, it was only an inspiration for the couple’s plans for botanical gardens on their own property, which is the site of six former soapstone quarries in Schuyler. “[The Canadians] hide the fact they were originally a quarry,” Armand says. “We thought our quarries were fun to look at and we’d emphasize them, not hide them.” The Quarry Gardens at Schuyler, which opened in early 2017 and is operated by a nonprofit foundation, contains only native plants, primarily those found no more than 15 miles from the property. “It’s as much a conservation effort as anything,” says Bernice. “It’s a fairly rugged site. It’s not what you think of when you think of a botanical garden.” Because the Thieblots had no experience in creating a botanical garden, they hired a firm to devise a master plan for the gardens. They also worked with the Charlottesville-based Center for Urban Habitats, a firm that specializes in habitat restoration and ecosystem design and installation. The result is a natural woodland area with galleries of native plants designed to blend in with the surroundings. What was once the noisy site of heavy industry is now a tranquil retreat. Depending on the time of day or year you visit, nature will show you something different. There are mushrooms, flowers, insects and more. Perhaps you will see a brightly colored smooth green snake or blueeyed grass, a delicate purple member of the iris family. A hillside by one of the quarries is covered in silvery reindeer lichen. You might look down and spot downy rattlesnake plantain, a plant with dark green leaves covered in bright-white veins. Nature is not the only highlight here. The man-made sharp edges and geometric patterns of the cut rock on the towering walls of two waterfilled quarries have a powerful beauty of their own as they reflect off the water and change color with the light. QUARRY GARDENS IN SUMMER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JUDY BIAS)

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DAY TRIPPING — NELSON COUNTY In order for visitors to get around the quarries, the couple had staircases cut through massive piles of abandoned rock left behind during the mining process. “I’m enamored of the giant stairs,” Bernice says. These stairways put the visitor in touch with nature as well as the mining process. From the late 1880s through much of the 20th century, Schuyler was the soapstone capital of the world, with many companies competing for business in the area and up to 90 quarries in use. Named because it feels like soap when rubbed, soapstone was used for laundry sinks and laboratory countertops, among other things. The quarries on the Thieblots’ property were mined from about 1955 to 1975. Bernice says the work completed on the Quarry Gardens, which includes 40,000 new plants, is not the end. “I don’t think we’ll ever be finished,” she says. “It’s not a good business model. It’s a project for our retirement — just something we’re doing for the fun of it.” The Quarry Gardens at Schuyler is open Friday through Sunday, April to November. There is about two miles of walking trails. A visitor center includes a classroom and exhibits on native plants, local ecosystems and the history of the soapstone industry in Schuyler, as well as a model of the Nelson & Albemarle Railway. Visits are by appointment only and reservations can be made through the website at quarrygardensatschuyler.org. Tours are free. 94

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TOP LEFT: ARMAND AND BERNICE THIEBLOT LEADING A TOUR OF THE QUARRY GARDENS. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JUDY BIAS) LEFT MIDDLE: CALLOPHRYS AUGUSTINUS BROWN ELFIN AND PONDHAWK. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF EMILY LUEBKE & THE QUARRY GARDENS AT SCHUYLER) LEFT BOTTOM: SKYLA — THE QUARRY DOG AND THE ONLY ONE ALLOWED TO SWIM AT THE QUARRY GARDENS. RIGHT TOP: THE VISITOR CENTER. RIGHT MIDDLE: ARMAND POINTING OUT NATIVE PLANTS ALONG THE TRAIL. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF JUDY BIAS) RIGHT BOTTOM: AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY AND SABATIA ANGULARIS. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE QUARRY GARDENS AT SCHUYLER)


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Walton’s Mountain 3 in Museum Schuyler is a must for fans of the classic television show. Replicas of rooms from the set include John-Boy’s bedroom, the kitchen and living room. Ike Godsey’s store serves as the museum gift shop.

Tpke Afton sh Gap fi k c o R 151 692 Plank R 17 18 d Critzer Shop Rd 6

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DelFosse Vineyards and Winery 1 serves French-inspired wines, y y kw w P k P along dgwith sweet and savory e e g Ri Rid Blue Enjoy a picnic by the crepes. e Blu lake or hike the DelFosse Love Trail at Deer Rock 2 , which winds through Montebello Falls Hwy rock forest btree and Cra 56outcrops surrounding the vineyard. Hike or ride your bike on the Tyro 5.5-mile trail. 56

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ucked between Charlottesville to its north and Lynchburg to its south, rural Nelson County’s natural beauty and mountainous terrain offer stunning vistas of the Blue Ridge Mountains and abundant recreational opportunities. From fishing in the streams and rivers to hikes along the Appalachian Trail and biking, golfing and skiing, there is something for almost every interest. Visitors can explore historic family farms and orchards or hike to Crabtree Falls and see the highest waterfall east of the Mississippi. For a more leisurely approach, relax and enjoy the views from one of the county’s many inviting vineyards, taprooms and distilleries.

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DAY TRIPPING — NELSON COUNTY and galleries of native plants alongside two water-filled former soapstone quarries. Reservations must be made in advance at quarrygardensatschuyler.org. Nelson County Visitor Center 5 in Lovingston offers information, maps and brochures on local and statewide attractions. Vito’s Pizza, Bar & Grill 6 in Lovingston is a classic Italian-American eatery, specializing in pastas and pizzas, subs, steaks, salads and more. Drumheller’s Orchard 7 sells apples and peaches in season, including pick-your-own. Don’t miss their summer peach festival and fall apple festival. Lovingston Winery 8 believes in a hands-on approach to winemaking. Located on a family farm, this winery produces small lots of varietals including cabernet franc, petit manseng and seyval blanc. Almost Home Pet Adoption Thrift Shop 9 sells carefully chosen clothing, home items, furniture, new and estate jewelry, books and more. Proceeds benefit the homeless pets of the Humane Society/SPCA of Nelson County. Historical Salvage 10 reclaims materials from houses and barns slated for demolition and specializes in restoration with antique materials. Finds include rustic flooring, beams, mantels and handmade furniture. Devils Backbone 11 beers get their inspiration from German craft beer, like hefeweizen and schwarzbier. Visitors can choose pints and flights from 16 taps and enjoy a picnic in the beer garden. Bold Rock Hard Cider 12 caters to fans with a wide variety of hard ciders — from apple and pear to citrus, cherry and blood orange. Enjoy tastings and pints in the tasting room or on the deck. Sandwiches, appetizers and a kids’ menu are available.

NELSON COUNTY COURTHOUSE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY — LIBRARY OF CONGRESS)

Lovingston 19 | Charming, tiny and sitting in the shade of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains, Lovingston is the seat of Nelson County and the hub of community activity in the rural county. While the town has grown over the years, the layout has changed little since its founding in 1809. The downtown Lovingston Historic District and the county courthouse are on the National Register of Historic Places. The district includes family homes, churches and offices, as well as former hotels and taverns, a theater and a cooper shop. The courthouse, the town’s first public structure, opened in 1810 and has been in continuous use ever since. Standing in the courthouse square is a monument honoring the more than 100 Nelson County residents who died in massive flooding from Hurricane Camille in 1969.

Spruce Creek Park 13 encourages exploration with its children’s, butterfly and birding trails. Nearby Rockfish Valley Foundation Natural History Center houses exhibits from the Virginia Museum of Natural History.

Silverback Distillery 16 produces premium whiskey, gin, bourbon, vodka and other spirits. Visitors can sample straight pours or mixed drinks.

Blue Ridge Pig 14 smokes its meats on-site. This nationally acclaimed hog heaven offers pork, turkey, and country ham sandwiches and plates with mouth-watering sides, like slaw and potato salad.

Veritas Vineyard & Winery 17 delights with high-quality wines in an idyllic setting. Its summer concert series, Starry Nights, draws thousands to enjoy wine, music and dancing under the stars.

Edible Landscaping 15 sells a wide variety of herbicide- and GMO-free fruit, nut and berry plants, including exotic plants such as pomegranates and pawpaws, and also offers classes and workshops.

Blue Mountain Brewery 18 serves 10 handcrafted brews on tap along with a full local food menu that includes pizzas, burger, soups and sandwiches. Beers are available by the glass, six-pack, growler or keg.

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DAY TRIPPING — ORANGE COUNTY

Stokes of England

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lacksmith Stephen Stokes uses tongs to place a piece of iron into a 1,500-degree coal fire. The iron emerges glowing a short time later, and sparks fly as he hammers the softened bright-orange metal against a heavy anvil. The clangclang of metal against metal resounds through the shop as he bends and shapes — or forges — the iron with motions both powerful and precise. The metal quickly cools to a dark red, and he reheats and shapes it again. After more bending and a few twists, a Colonial-era nail hook emerges. It is perhaps one of the simpler items Stephen creates at his forge in Keswick, but the basic techniques are the same whether he makes a hook or works on an elaborate years-long project. When Stephen left his Shropshire, England home during high school for an exchange program in Northern Virginia, he had no intention of becoming a blacksmith. Growing up, he learned the trade from his father, Joe, who worked for the U.K. military and then taught blacksmithing to rural African villagers for the United Nations. However, it was Joe he called on in 1981 to help him start Stokes of England in the Charlottesville area, where Stephen and his wife, Alison, moved while she attended the University of Virginia. Stephen was inspired after reading a story about a successful knife-maker in Maryland. He

THE SPARKS ARE FLYING AS STEPHEN STOKES HEATS UP METAL AT HIS BLACKSMITH SHOP IN KESWICK. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

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DAY TRIPPING — ORANGE COUNTY soon discovered that knife-making was not profitable, though, and the pair quickly took on any project that came through the door. Joe eventually moved back to England, but Stephen kept the business running and opened a gallery in Gordonsville. Over the years, projects have included items for the gift shops at Colonial Williamsburg, a Princess Leia slave costume, palace gates for the sultan of Oman and a staircase for the emir of Qatar. “In 35 years, the range of things has just been absolutely incredible,” Stephen says. The company, in the 1990s, produced all the iron and bronze work for what is now the Atlantis Paradise Island resort in the Bahamas, a project that took three years to complete and required hiring a much larger crew. Whether his customer is a sultan or one of his many Charlottesvillearea residential clients, Stephen works with them to design the project and does on-site measurements and installation. “I sat down with the king in Oman and had dinner completely covered in dirt and wearing Salvation Army reject clothes,” he laughs. Stephen still makes knives, too. He and his father presented a set of pruning knives to Prince Charles, who is known for his love of gardening. The prince took the elder Stokes aside and talked with him for an hour and a half. “He was insisting my dad pass the trade on and make sure it doesn’t die out.” Stephen is doing his best to keep blacksmithing going himself. He trains apprentices — 30 so far over the course of 35 years in business. “I’d like people to realize that if they have an interest in blacksmithing, they can always come by and have a chat and see how it’s done,” Stephen says. His retirement plan is to continue blacksmithing for as long as possible. “Dad died at 73. He worked right up until he physically couldn’t. The man my father apprenticed to dropped dead over the anvil at 92.” That, Stephen says, is the way to go. The Stokes of England forge, at 4085 Keswick Road in Keswick, is open Monday through Friday, 8:30am–5pm for short talks and demos. Call in advance to arrange a formal tour and talk. The Stokes of England gallery, located at 117 S Main Street in Gordonsville, is open Tuesday through Sunday, 11am–5pm. The gallery sells everything from hooks and hinges to furniture, lighting and decorative wall hangings. WATCHING A HOOK EMERGE. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)


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James Madison’s Montpelier 1 was the lifelong home of our fourth president and the Father of the Constitution. Ongoing archaeological and restoration projects, exhibits telling the story of the enslaved population, formal gardens and forest walking trails are just a few of the highlights. Orange County Visitors Bureau 2 provides help with reservations and visits to area attractions, and offers local and statewide brochures and maps.

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Orange County is an ideal place to 29 enjoy the outdoors, explore trails and Civil War sites, or indulge 743 in fine dining and award-winning 663is perhaps wineries. The area best known for743James CHO 606 Ear Madison’s Montpelier, ly the stately plantation 649 home of the nation’s fourth president, which hosts 743 several popular 643 festivals each 29 649 year.

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33 ich in history and beauty, Orange County — located northeast of Charlottesville — is home to historic sites, charming small towns, and unique shops and galleries. The winding, scenic roads offer stunning views of the rolling foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains — lush in warmer months 607 and alive with color in autumn.

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15 64 208 The Arts Center in Orange 3 showcases exhibitions of fine Exit 143 contemporary arts, and provides studio space and 250 art classes for children and adults, as well as a gallery shop.

The James Madison Museum 4 caters to history buffs with displays of the former president’s artifacts and exhibits focused on African-American history, transportation, agriculture and more. Discover Charlottesville

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DAY TRIPPING — ORANGE COUNTY Stonewall Harley Davidson 5 is a destination stop for motorcycle aficionados. Enjoy the trip there along beautiful byways and relax on the front porch, where you are sure to meet other riders. The Market at Grelen 6 draws in visitors with its garden shop full of unusual gifts, a café serving casual meals and miles of walking trails that connect to Montpelier. In season, find pick-your-own fruit and a wide selection of annuals, perennials, trees and more. Barboursville Vineyards 7 is built on the grounds of the 19th century home of Virginia’s Gov. James Barbour. The first successful vineyard in the state, Barboursville also offers fine dining at its Palladio Restaurant.

SOMERSET STEAM AND GAS PASTURE PARTY. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JOY MILLER)

Horton Vineyards 8 tempts visitors to stay a while with stunning views of the nearby mountains, a stone underground cellar and the first portstyle wine made in the state since Prohibition.

Somerset Steam and Gas Pasture Party 16 | Step back in time with demonstrations of antique farming equipment at this threeday show held each September in the community of Somerset.

Town of Gordonsville

Get a look at steam boilers, steam and gas engines, and antique tractors, and watch demonstrations of threshing, baling, corn chopping, plowing and other farming practices. Take in a tractor pull and let the kids participate in their own kiddie tractor pull, plus see sawmill demonstrations and other events.

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his town charms visitors with its quaint shops, fine art galleries and critically acclaimed dining. Buildings in the downtown historic district reflect the town’s role as a vital transportation hub during the mid–19th century and the Civil War. Alpaca Boutique 9 offers luxurious sweaters, coats, scarves, hats and more, all made from warm alpaca fibers. Jewelry and other accessories, including pieces created by female artisans, are sold next door at Sara’s Jewel Box 10 . Stokes of England Blacksmithing Co. 11 sells handcrafted hooks, hinges, furniture, decorative wall hangings and much more at its gallery. Custom pieces are also available for order. The Exchange Hotel – Civil War Medical Museum 12 houses exhibits on Gordonsville’s history as a railroad town as well as the building’s role as a receiving hospital for 70,000 Confederate and Union soldiers and as a Freedmen’s Bureau for newly freed slaves during Reconstruction. Old American Barn 13 practically begs you to get lost in its collection of antiques, vintage items and collectibles, plus an inventory of reclaimed materials such as doors and windows. 102

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The Pasture Party, which has been held for more than 40 years, also features a flea market, live music and many more family-friendly activities. Find out more about the Somerset Steam and Gas Pasture Party at somersetsteamandgas.org.

Castle Hill Cider 14 makes hard apple ciders on a centuries-old estate with 360-degree views of the mountains and countryside. Enjoy a tasting or purchase a bottle and enjoy it on the octagonal porch. Keswick Vineyards 15 bottles award-winning wines at its vineyard south of Gordonsville. Enjoy a drink on the patio or get cozy on the heated porch in the winter. Keswick’s popular wine club will ship a selection of wines to your home.


Posh

BBQ Exchange

adj. tres chic, sophisticated, luxurious, glamorous. noun. a sister duo dedicated to assisting you with all of your fashion decisions.

Featuring hickory-smoked, slow-roasted pork shoulders, spareribs, beef brisket & chicken. Our meats are dry cured, smoked in our specialized cooker & served with homemade sauces, fresh breads & sides like hushpuppies, mac & cheese & collard greens. Service is quick-counter & take-out style with a Virginia genteelness. The rustic building is warm & inviting, furnished with picnic tables lending to the comfortable family experience. Open daily 11am–8pm.

Opening their doors in 2003, Posh provided an opportunity for the creative sibs to work together! Janice, a designer and pattern maker, offers custom clothing from her sample collection. Victoria, offers selections in new and vintage jewelry as well as creations by artists from around the world. Open daily 10am–5pm. 107 S Main Street Gordonsville, Virginia, VA 22942

540.406.5103

facebook.com/poshoriginalclothing

Sara’s Jewel Box An offering of wearable art handcrafted by female artisans from imaginative blends of materials and methods ... for that finishing touch! These distinctive combinations of metals, glass, beads and stones will inspire notice and comments wherever you wear them. They are complemented by pieces selected from the collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art/NYC and the Smithsonian/DC, offering classical as well as trendy options.

102 Martinsburg Avenue Gordonsville, VA 22942

540.832.0227 bbqex.com

The Alpaca Boutique ...and More! Discover the soft luxury and warmth of alpaca clothing without the prickle often found in wool. This apparel is lightweight and easy to layer making it clothing for all seasons. Sales associates will help you make the ‘right’ choice whether the purchase is a gift or a treat for yourself. Your clothing purchase will be of the highest quality and at the forefront of today’s fashion choices.

107 S Main Street Gordonsville, VA 22942

107 S Main Street Gordonsville, VA 22942

540.832.3076

540.832.3075

sorbiefarmalpacas.com

Horton Vineyards

Restaurant Pomme

Horton Vineyards is considered by many to be one of the most innovative wineries in the United States. It has led the way in Virginia by searching out grape varietals that would flourish in the Old Dominion’s climate and soil. Horton Vineyards is credited with introducing the Viognier grape to the state and bringing back the native grape varietal, Norton. Horton Vineyards currently has 67 acres under vine. Open daily for tastings 10am–5pm.

Nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge, in downtown Gordonsville, Virginia, Restaurant Pomme provides an authentic classic French dining experience and award winning wine list. The restaurant welcomes diners and guests to a warm and inviting recreation of the French country side-from food to decor. Whether on a day trip or gathering with friends and family, we wish to share our passion of food and wine with you. À votre santé et bon appétit.

6399 Spotswood Trail Gordonsville, VA 22942

115 S Main Street Gordonsville, VA 22942

540.832.7440

540.832.0130

hortonwine.com

restaurant-pomme.com

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DAY TRIPPING

Blue Ridge Loop


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ormed hundreds of millions of years ago from the uplift of tectonic plates, the ancient Blue Ridge Mountains are among the oldest mountain ranges on earth. With spectacular views of the fertile Shenandoah Valley to the west and the rolling hills of the Piedmont to the east, Skyline

Drive winds along the mountain ridge tops through the vistas of Shenandoah National Park. Quaint towns and engaging stops on either side of the mountains offer opportunities for outdoor adventures, wines and brews, shopping and so much more. Drive through the area in one day or take a leisurely approach and spend a few days exploring the area — there is much to see and do. FIRE MOUNTAIN. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF MATTEUS FRANKOVICH AND SKYCLADAERIAL.COM)

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Waynesboro

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Charlottesville Barracks Rd 614 250

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Shenandoah National Park 9 extends along the Blue Ridge Mountains and is home to many deer, birds, bears and other creatures. The 105-mile Skyline Drive runs 106

Madison Rd

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Exit 247

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340 644

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Elkton

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Glass House Winery 7 is an oasis no matter what time you visit their tasting 250 of year 250 WB road room, which has an attached glass St conservatory full of tropical plants. WM In addition to wines, they sell their 340 ain S t own handcrafted chocolates. 8 Blue Ridge Pottery sells handmade pottery with glazes inspired by the colors of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Visit the studio to watch potters at work and listen to the rush 1 of a nearby trout stream. 4th St

Rd od o n - H 230 lftow o W

33 12

Harrisonburg

Patricia Ann Byrom Forest Preserve Park 6 offers steep and challenging trails for hikers, runners and horseback riders. Several trails offer stunning views of the area and ample opportunities to spot wildlife.

11

Shenandoah National Park Entrance

NE 340

29

Seminole Trl

9

Starr Hill Brewery 4 , one of the most awarded breweries in Virginia, takes its name from the Charlottesville neighborhood where it was first located. Today, the taproom and brewery occupy 81 a large facility in Crozet, offering more than 15 varieties of craft beer.

Big Meadows

Skyline Drive

Piedmont Place 3 , a mixed-use, three-story building in downtown Crozet, includes restaurants, a yoga studio, shops and a sky bar, along with luxury apartments. The building also features a market with businesses selling local beer and wine, books, ice cream and more.

Stinson Vineyards 5 serves French-influenced wines in a converted three-car garage. This family-run, boutique vineyard offers panoramic views and an artisan farm store selling local meats and produce.

10

10 Miles to Skyland

340 Crozet Artisan Depot 1 is a gallery and hub for local artisans, featuring works from over 60 regional artists. It shares space in the town’s historic former train 81 depot with the Albemarle Tourism & Adventure Center 2 , a high-tech, interactive visitor center specializing in local outdoor activities.

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The AlbemarleTourism and Adventure Center Located in the Historic Train Depot, the Albemarle Tourism & Adventure Center connects visitors and locals alike with the arts, culture, music, food and outdoor attractions that make this area so enjoyable. Our expert Travel Specialists are happy to offer their guidance and provide you with materials on local attractions and so much more! Wed–Sat 10am–5pm, Sun noon–5pm.

The Barn Swallow The Barn Swallow, an artisan gallery for home, garden and you. Stroll through garden paths leading to our 1800’s historic barn featuring 80+ artisans. Founders, friends and potters Mary Ann Burk and Janice Arone curate a collection of one of a kind objects sure to delight the senses: clay, textiles, wood, jewelry. Event flowers and gift registry available. We are just west of the “city.” A perfect stop. A perfect destination. Wed–Sat 10am–5pm, Sun noon–5pm.

5791 Three Notch’d Road Crozet, VA 22932

796 Gillums Ridge Road Charlottesville, VA 22903

434.293.6789

434.979.4884

visitcharlottesville.org

thebarnswallow.com

Starr Hill Brewery

Whistlestop Grill

Born in a Charlottesville music hall in 1999, Starr Hill Brewery was founded out of a passion for bringing people together through great beer and live music. Visit the Tap Room in Crozet and enjoy 24 rotating taps of new and award-winning craft beers. Starr Hill also features local food trucks, live music and free brewery tours on weekends. Tue–Fri noon–9pm, Sat 11am–9pm, Sun noon–6pm.

Newly opened in Crozet, Whistlestop Grill serves up country food at its finest. The dining room’s friendly hometown atmosphere is the perfect place to chow down on homemade sausage gravy, fresh burgers, footlong hot dogs, macaroni salad, coleslaw, and more. Check out the gallery of photos of old Crozet while making your own memories at a classic family meal. Mon–Sat 5:30am–8pm, Sun 6am–2pm.

5391 Three Notch’d Road Crozet, VA 22932

1200 Crozet Avenue Crozet, VA 22936

434.823.5671

434.823.9000

starrhill.com

Crozet Artisan Depot

Old Trail Golf Club

As a hub for the thriving artisan community in Central Virginia, “The Depot” represents the work of more than 70 local artisans, creating a delightful collection of arts, crafts and accessories. Come see why our quality selection of pottery, jewelry, painting, photography, textiles, artisanal chocolates and more makes us your destination for locally handmade gifts. Located in the historic Crozet Train Depot. Mon–Sat 10am–5pm, Sun noon–5pm.

Old Trail Golf Club is a public 18 hole championship course offering magnificent views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The course features bent grass greens and immaculate zoysia fairways, which provide perfect lies throughout the course.

5791 Three Notch’d Road Crozet, VA 22932

Before or after your round enjoy a wonderful lunch or dinner at Restoration, our onsite restaurant, or get your game tuned up at the Kandi Comer Golf Academy! 5494 Golf Drive Crozet, VA 22932

434.205.4795

434.823.8101

crozetartisandepot.com

oldtrailgolf.com

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DAY TRIPPING — BLUE RIDGE LOOP the length of the park with 75 scenic overlooks. Get out of the car and take a hike on one of the many trails, even if it is a short one, to experience all the park has to offer. The Harry F. Byrd Sr. Visitor Center 10 at mile marker 51 offers maps, park information, first aid, backcountry permits, exhibits, ranger programs, a gift shop and restrooms. The nearby grassy trails of Big Meadows are easy and popular hikes, while another trail leads to Rapidan Camp 11 , the restored fishing retreat of President Herbert Hoover (tours of Rapidan Camp are ranger-led and must be booked in advance). Other hikes take visitors to cascading waterfalls, historic sites, and breathtaking views of mountains and valleys. A significant portion of the Appalachian Trail is located within the park and is accessible from several points, including the Big Meadows area. Four entrances give access to Skyline Drive and Shenandoah National Park: at Front Royal, via I-66 and Route 340; Thornton Gap, via Route 211; Swift Run Gap, via Route 33 near Stanardsville; and Rockfish Gap, via I-64 and Route 250 near Waynesboro. Camping, lodging and dining are available in the park. Massanutten Resort 12 provides year-round fun with skiing and tubing, an indoor/outdoor water park and two golf courses. Visitors can relax at the day spa or enjoy dining, shopping and other amenities at this premier resort. Grand Caverns 13 wows with giant stalactites, shield formations (disc-like projections) and Cathedral Hall, one of the largest rooms in any East Coast cavern. Opened in 1806, Grand Caverns is the oldest continually operating show cave in the nation. Wayne Theatre 14 presents live theater and musical acts in a recently restored 90-year-old space. The theater also shows movies, including a Monday classic film series, and hosts academic speakers. P. Buckley Moss Gallery 15 in downtown Waynesboro displays the most extensive collection of the artist’s watercolors, etchings and prints, which draw on the landscapes and scenes of the Shenandoah Valley, especially Amish and Mennonite culture. The Green Leaf Grill 16 gives a New Orleans flair to a diverse array of dishes and offers a wide selection of local wines and craft beers. Constitution Park 17 hosts concerts, festivals and car shows, plus the Waynesboro Farmers Market, held Saturdays May through October. The park includes an arboretum showcasing trees, shrubs and bulbs. 108

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Greene County Visitor Center

Blue Ridge Cafe & Catering Co.

Experience small town charm as we greet and assist you with our expansive assortment of resources. As a State Certified Visitor Center, we offer brochures & maps covering the coastal sands to the Blue Ridge Mountains. Centrally located to many wonderful venues, we guide visitors to wineries, potteries, antiques, national parks & presidential homes. We invite you to enjoy complimentary coffee & wi-fi.

From Sunday football to wedding parties, Blue Ridge Café has been dishing out country comfort food since 1995. Part cozy café, part lively sports bar, the restaurant is open daily serving burgers, salads, seafood, ribs, steaks, and hungerslaying sandwiches you’ll need two hands to hold! Mon–Thu 11am–10pm, Fri–Sat 11am–11pm, Sun 11am–10pm.

8315 Seminole Trail Ruckersville, VA 22968

8315 Seminole Trail Ruckersville, VA 22968

434.985.6663

434.985.3633

exploregreene.com

The Wooly Lam Whether you’re a casual antiquer or avid treasure hunter, you’re in luck! The Wooly Lam is an antiques and gift shop with an appeal and personality all its own. It is the bright and sunny home of 40+ vendors on two large floors. Here you will find an exciting mix of new and vintage goods such as furniture, collectibles, bottles, signs, tools, toys, as well as jewelry, glassware, primitives, shabby chic furniture and much more. Open daily 10am–6pm.

blueridgecafe.com

Stone Mountain Vineyards Now under new ownership, Stone Mountain Vineyards is celebrating a record harvest for 2017, a new winemaker, and new and exciting events. Join us for a glass on our expansive deck and take in the breathtaking view from the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Do not use GPS for directions. OpenThu–Mon Mar– Nov, check website for hours Dec–Feb.

9422 Seminole Trail Ruckersville, VA 22968

1376 Wyatt Mountain Road Dyke, VA 22935

434.990.6000

434.990.9463

thewoolylam.net

stonemountainvineyards.com

Boot’Vil

Noon Whistle Pottery

Conveniently located on U.S. 29, Boot’Vil has been a Greene County staple for over 20 years. We carry the biggest names in the boot industry, as well as apparel, hats and accessories to complete your look. We strive for a comfortable, down-home feel, excellent customer service and affordable prices for all. There is truly something here for everyone, and you won’t leave without something that you love! Tue–Thu 11am–7pm, Sat 10am–5pm, Sun 1–5pm.

Come browse the three floors of Noon Whistle Pottery and discover fine art and handcrafted treasures for you, your friends and family. Here you will find a unique collection from 150 American artisans — an eclectic mixture of pottery, sculpture, jewelry, handblown glass, woodwork, paintings, soap, candles, weavings and so much more. Located just 18 miles from Charlottesville in historic downtown Stanardsville. Tue–Sat 10am–6pm, Sun noon–5pm. Mondays by chance.

8633 Seminole Trail Ruckersville, VA 22968

328 Main Street Stanardsville, VA 22973

434.985.4574

434.985.6500

bootvil.com

noonwhistlepottery.com

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DAY TRIPPING — BLUE RIDGE LOOP Basic City Beer Co. 18 , located in a refurbished metalworks building from a lost Victorian boomtown, offers over 10 beers on tap as well as food trucks most nights and live music on Saturdays.

Blue Ridge Tunnel | In the mid-19th century, Virginia politicians made a push for railroad construction to replace the state’s outdated canal system between the capital in Richmond and the Ohio River, the state’s western border at the time. The brainchild of state engineer Claudius Crozet, the railroad plan included three tunnels through the mountains west of Charlottesville. The Blue Ridge Tunnel, constructed by Irish laborers and slaves, opened in 1858 and was the longest railroad tunnel in North America at the time. The eastern entrance to the mile-long tunnel is located near Afton in Nelson County, and the western entrance is near the city of Waynesboro in Augusta County.

BLUE RIDGE TUNNEL, U.S. ROUTE 250 AT ROCKFISH GAP, AFTON, NELSON COUNTY, VA. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF HISTORIC AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD — LIBRARY OF CONGRESS)

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The railroad tracks were r e r o u t e d through a newer tunnel in 1944, and the original tunnel has remained unused since. The Claudius Crozet Blue Ridge Tunnel Foundation is raising funds to transform the tunnel into a hiking and biking trail and an educational resource.


Photographic Essay: Shenandoah National Park

I

n the mid-18th century, European settlers discovered that the Blue Ridge Mountains provided an abundance for their families, and communities began to dot the slopes and bases of the impressive range. Hunting and farming helped sustain villages, and mining of the natural resources aided in the prosperity of those living in the shadow of the mountains. Tourism burgeoned in the 1900s as visitors found that the expansive views, crisp air and clear water made for the perfect retreat, and vacation resorts emerged along the ridgeline that would come to be known as Skyline Drive. Responding to the call for a national park in the East, a commission was formed in Charlottesville in 1925 to collect funds and donated land along the Blue Ridge. In 1934, the Supreme Court ruled that additional lands could be taken from the residents living on them to create the park. Most of the mountain families were resettled or displaced, and virtually all signs that people once inhabited the area were erased, though the National Park Service has dedicated exhibits telling the story of the people from these original settlements. Meanwhile, the Civilian Conservation Corps had arrived on the scene, grading the slopes along the roadway and establishing overlooks, planting myriad trees, shrubs and acres of grass, and building picnic areas, campgrounds and other recreational facilities for the enjoyment of visitors. A legion of rangers, maintenance technicians and support staff act as stewards of this scenic park. Because the park is always open — though Skyline Drive closes periodically for inclement weather or emergency situations — crews constantly work to ensure that all those within its boundaries are safe and free to enjoy their adventures. Skyline Drive, the lone public road, provides access to more than 500 miles of hiking trails as well as campgrounds, cabins and lodges. The road climbs to 3,680 feet above sea level and offers 75 overlooks with picturepostcard panoramas. Wayside stores, gas stations and picnic areas can be found along the drive and are open seasonally. Flora and fauna abound within Shenandoah National Park. Visitors can discover over 1,000 species of native plants among the nearly 200,000 total acres — 80,000 of which is declared “designated wilderness.” Wildlife of all kinds thrives here: Keep an eye to the sky to identify hundreds of species of birds; take a peek in a stream to spy fish, reptiles or a bevy of busy insects; or even catch a glimpse of a black bear, a red fox or a group of deer along the way. Shenandoah National Park maintains a busy schedule of ranger-guided programs, festivals and special events, such as naturalization ceremonies and fee-free days. Visit the park’s website at nps.gov/shen for help with planning a trip to this national treasure. (Big Meadows in Spring photograph courtesy of Ingrid A. Kischnick. All other photographs courtesy of Katy Cain, N. Lewis and Brett Raeburn — National Park Services. See following pages.) Discover Charlottesville

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AKLEY ON THE EMMA SUSAN WE EAD FAMILY HOMEST PORCH OF THE 1920). (CA S OW AD AT BIG ME


BIG MEADOWS 1936. (PHOTOG RAPH

COURTESY OF GE ORGE C. KNOX AND THE NATIO NAL PARK SERV ICE)

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SAYING I DO

H

istoric estates and farms on rolling hills, stunning wineries and cideries, architecturally splendid churches, the backdrop of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains — the Charlottesville area has no shortage of wedding venues for that perfect day. Whether you want urban or rustic, formal or casual, or indoor or out, the area provides hundreds of picture-perfect places to say, “I do.” For those going the traditional route with a church wedding, the Chapel at the University of Virginia fits that bill with a uniquely local twist. Charlottesville is known for its presidential history, and the charming gardens and historic house at James Monroe’s Highland lets couples follow in the footsteps of Monroe’s own daughter, who was married at the estate. Charlottesville brides know a vineyard is always a great locale, and near Crozet, panoramic views of the mountains await couples who wed at King Family Vineyards, while weddings at Grace Estate Winery are set against a stunning backdrop of the foothills of the Blue Ridge and the estate’s grand mansion. To the north in Orange County, 600 acres of nursery and orchards offer picturesque options for weddings of all sizes at The Market at Grelen. Those seeking some drama could opt for The Paramount Theater, where you can see your name in lights on the marquee and choose the magnificent performance hall or the ballroom for the big day. For those seeking a country club wedding, Spring Creek Golf Club at Zion Crossroads offers lovely vistas of the course and indoor and outdoor venues. Whether your wish is a crisp fall evening or a bright summer afternoon, the area’s growing network of caterers, photographers and planners specialize in making it a memorable day, and the varied venue options ensure that you will find the ideal locale for your vows.

LISA + AMY-SARAH MARRIED! (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF SARAH CRAMER SHIELDS - CRAMER PHOTO)

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Lisa & Amy-Sarah


­SAYING

I DO

— The Details

Ceremony & Reception Venue IX Art Park

Catering Morsel Compass food truck

Hair & Makeup Daphne Latham

Event Planner Friend

Cake/Dessert Friend and Cocoa & Spice

Photography Sarah Cramer-Shields

Officiant Brittany Dare-Conley

Dress Glad Rags Consignment

Flowers “Borrowed” from a magnolia tree

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SAYING I DO

SAYING I DO The Details Venue Keswick Vineyards Officiant Vernon Gordon Event Planner Kim Lynch Photography Shot with A Bow Photography Florist Hedge Fine Blooms Catering Mama J’s Kitchen Rentals MS Events Desserts Pearls Bake Shoppe DJ DJ Rayvon Hair Megan Lewis Lighting Skyline Tent Company (SPREAD PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF CINDY SCHORNBERG)

Brittney & Lance


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TURNING LOCAL

A

beautiful place to live, work and raise a family, Charlottesville lures people with year-round recreation in the picturesque Blue Ridge Mountains, the history and homes of three Founding Fathers, food and music scenes that rival many larger cities, and dozens of breweries and wineries.

These attractions are among the many reasons why area residents — whether they were born here or adopted the city as their home — choose to stay and why Charlottesville frequently tops national lists of the best places to live. In 2017, it was named one of the country’s top five places to live by the website Livability, and Southern Living magazine called it one of the South’s best small towns.

SUNRISE MARKET. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF MATTEUS FRANKOVICH AND SKYCLADAERIAL.COM)

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Cville Snapshot #5

Top 10 U.S. communities with the highest

Best Wine Vacations

(CHO) in 2015

Best

in the GallupHealthways State of American Well-Being 2016 Community Rankings

CHO averages

21 flights a day with

Places to

connections to Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Philadelphia and the Washington, Major stop along D.C. area.

Retire

- Livability.com 2015

3 hours to

Virginia Beach Washington D.C.,

66

29

Harrisonburg 29

1 hour to

Staunton

95

Culpeper

Charlottesville

64

81

29

64

64

95

Amtrak line

Richmond 295

Roanoke

Major Employers:

64

Lynchburg

460 29

77

University of Virginia

81 77

- US News & World Report

85

Danville

64 95

VA Beach

UVA Health System Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital

15 Best Places to

Over 35 miles of nature trails

Live

(#3)

– City of Charlottesville Parks & Recreation

Washington DC

66

81

81

north and south

Winchester

or

Richmond

people flew through

Charlottesville Albemarle Airport

10

Top

well-being

#7

500,000+

400

Over eateries in

State Farm Insurance

in the U.S.

Northrop Grumman Corp. S&P Global Market Intelligence

- NY Post 2016

WillowTree Inc.

Craft Beverages

General Electric

Charlottesville and the surrounding county.

Top 100 Best Places to Live (#5) 2017 - Livability.com

40+

wineries

27+

breweries

7+

cideries

5+

distilleries


TURNING LOCAL

CARLA MOODY — DIRECTOR OF ST. MARK LUTHERAN PRESCHOOL. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

A variety of career opportunities — especially in the areas of education, health care and government — bring people to Charlottesville. Proximity to the acclaimed University of Virginia and its highly educated populace encourages entrepreneurship and startups, and the University’s focus on commercializing academic research and inventions makes Charlottesville a fast-growing market for venture capital investment. Two outstanding regional hospitals with an array of specialists and primary care physicians — UVA Health System and Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital — ensure that residents receive the highest quality healthcare. Charlottesville cherishes and fosters education for everyone, from its youngsters to its retirees. The City of Charlottesville and surrounding Albemarle County offer excellent public elementary, middle and high schools and a number of private schools, as well as a regional technical education center for high school students and adults. Charlottesville’s love for education starts young, according to Carla Moody, the director of St. Mark Lutheran Preschool, which provides fullday, year-round preschool for children ages 2 to 6. The preschool pulls from the best practices of several early childhood educational philosophies to create a program geared toward the individual child. “Children don’t fit the program; the program is created to fit each child,” Moody says, noting the school’s low teacher-child ratio and focus on outdoor play. A joint task force made up of educators and community leaders from the city and Albemarle County is focused on ensuring that every child has access to quality, affordable pre-K programs and on closing the achievement Discover Charlottesville

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AMELIA BAILEY — OLLI STUDENT. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JUDY BIAS)

TURNING LOCAL gap for at-risk children. “There’s a growing sense in Charlottesville, and a collective understanding in the country, that early childhood is where you make a difference,” Moody says. “This is an education town, and a quality education begins from birth. The brain is growing so quickly in young children. The best time to make the biggest difference in a person’s life is before the age of 5, and I think the Charlottesville community is really focused on providing high-quality early childhood education.” The community also offers ample educational opportunities for older residents, such as Amelia Bailey, who was among the first women to graduate from UVA in the 1960s — a time when most women were not allowed to attend. Bailey retired in 2015 and wanted something interesting to keep her busy, so she tried out UVA’s renowned Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), which provides educational and enriching classes for adult students. 128

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Bailey has taken many courses through the program, including classes on film, World War I and the anthropology of evil. Most classes meet a few hours a week for three to six weeks and are designed to fit an older adult’s schedule, with convenient parking and classes during daylight hours. “There isn’t really any homework,” she notes. “The instructor may ask you to go over questions, and some ask you to read a book or article to be prepared for the class. It’s affordable and the quality of the courses is just great.” The popular OLLI program is just one of the many nontraditional adult educational opportunities in the area, says Bailey, who previously worked in real estate and tourism. “I think many people move to this area to live because of the educational opportunities for seniors and retirees,” she says. “We have so many education programs in the area with night courses at the University and Piedmont Virginia Community College. There are so many different opportunities. I think it’s a big draw to this area.”


INDEX Attractions 89

Carter Mountain Orchard 1435 Carters Mountain Trail 434.977.1833 chilesfamilyorchards.com

59

Charlottesville Symphony University of Virginia 434.924.3139 cvillesymphony.org

89

Chiles Peach Orchard 1351 Greenwood Road Crozet, VA 22932 434.823.1583 chilesfamilyorchards.com

42

59

111

37

29

BC

Cville Escape Room Downtown Mall Main Street 434.566.9499 cvilleescaperoom.com Fralin Museum of Art, The University of Virginia 155 Rugby Road 434.243.5584 virginia.edu/artmuseum Grand Caverns 5 Grand Caverns Drive Grottoes, VA 24441 540.249.5705 | 888.430.2283 grandcaverns.com Halo Salt Spa Downtown Mall 400 E Main Street 434.234.3827 | halosaltspa.com IX Art Park 963 Second Street SE whatisix.com

107

Old Trail Golf Club 5494 Golf Drive Crozet, VA 22932 434.823.8101 | oldtrailgolf.com

40

Paramount Theater, The Downtown Mall 215 E Main Street 434.979.1922 | theparamount.net

44

Violet Crown Cinema Downtown Mall 200 W Main Street violetcrown.com

59

Virginia Film Festival virginiafilmfestival.org

James Monroe’s Highland 2050 James Monroe Parkway 434.293.8000 | highland.org

59

Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia 400 Worrell Drive 434.244.0234 | kluge-ruhe.org

4

Massanutten Resort & Indoor Water Park 1822 Resort Drive Massanutten, VA 22840 540.289.9441 | massresort.com

9

Michie Tavern ca. 1784 683 Thomas Jefferson Parkway 434.977.1234 | michietavern.com

130

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2 & 82 South Street Brewery 106 W South Street 434.293.6550 southstreetbrewery.com 107

Starr Hill Brewery 5391 Three Notch’d Road Crozet, VA 22932 434.823.5671 | starrhill.com

109

Stone Mountain Vineyards 1376 Wyatt Mountain Road Dyke, VA 22935 434.990.9463 stonemountainvineyards.com

Craft Beverages 83

Barboursville Vineyards 17655 Winery Road Barboursville, VA 22923 540.832.3824 | bbvwine.com

82 & 110 Basic City Beer Co. 1010 E Main Street Waynesboro, VA 22980 540.943.1010 | basiccitybeer.com 73

73

73

73

James Madison’s Montpelier 11350 Constitution Highway Montpelier Station, VA 22957 540.672.2728 | montpelier.org

9

82 & 110 Seven Arrows Brewing Company 2508 Jefferson Highway Waynesboro, VA 22980 540.221.6968 sevenarrowsbrewing.com

Blue Mountain Brewery 9519 Critzers Shop Road Afton, VA 22920 540.456.8020 bluemountainbrewery.com Chestnut Oak Vineyard 5050 Stony Point Road Barboursville, VA 22923 434.964.9104 chestnutoakvineyard.com Cunningham Creek Winery 3304 Ruritan Lake Road Palmyra, VA 22963 434.207.3907 cunninghamcreek.wine Grace Estate Winery 5273 Mount Juliet Farm Crozet, VA 22932 434.823.1486 graceestatewinery.com

103

Horton Vineyards 6399 Spotswood Trail Gordonsville, VA 22942 540.832.7440 | hortonwine.com

62

James River Brewery 561 Valley Street Scottsville, VA 24590 434.286.7837 | jrbrewery.com

9

Jefferson Vineyards 1353 Thomas Jefferson Parkway 434.977.3042 jeffersonvineyards.com

73

Pollak Vineyards 330 Newtown Road Greenwood, VA 22943 540.456.8844 pollakvineyards.com

73

Wild Wolf Brewing Company 2461 Rockfish Valley Highway Nellysford, VA 22958 434.361.0088 | wildwolfbeer.com

Eateries 69

103

63

109

71

Aberdeen Barn 2018 Holiday Drive 434.296.4630 | aberdeenbarn.com BBQ Exchange 102 Martinsburg Avenue Gordonsville, VA 22942 540.832.0227 | bbqex.com Biltmore Restaurant, The 16 Elliewood Avenue 434.202.1498 thebiltmorecville.com

63

Citizen Bowl Downtown Mall 223 W Main Street 434.234.3662 | citizenbowlshop.com

63 & 71 Citizen Burger Bar Downtown Mall 212 E Main Street 434.979.9944 | citizenburgerbar.com 68

Downtown Grille, The Downtown Mall 201 W Main Street 434.817.7080 | downtowngrille.com

71 Fellini’s 200 W Market Street 434.284.7676 | fellinisincville.com 68 Firefly 1304 E Market Street 434.202.1050 | fireflycville.com 70

Ivy Inn Restaurant 2244 Old Ivy Road 434.977.1222 ivyinnrestaurant.com

63

Lost Saint 333 W Main Street lostsaintbar.com

70

Michael’s Bistro and Tap House 1427 University Avenue 434.977.3697 | michaelsbistro.com

7 MidiCi The Shops at Stonefield 2055 Bond Street 434.284.8874 | mymidici.com 68

Blue Ridge Cafe & Catering Co. 8315 Seminole Trail 434.985.3633 | blueridgecafe.com

Paradox Pastry 313 Second Street 434.245.2253 paradoxpastrycafe.com

65

Bodo’s Bagels 1418 Emmet Street 434.977.9598 | bodosbagels.com

Public Fish & Oyster 513 W Main Street 434.995.5542 | publicfo.com

103

Restaurant Pomme 115 S Main Street Gordonsville, VA 22942 540.832.0130 restaurant-pomme.com

71

Bodo’s Bagels 505 Preston Avenue 434.293.5224 | bodosbagels.com

71

Bodo’s Bagels 1609 University Avenue 434.293.6021 | bodosbagels.com

70

Shebeen Pub & Braai, The 247 Ridge McIntire Road 434.296.3185 | shebeen.com

64

Burger Bach The Shops at Stonefield 2050 Bond Street 434.328.2812 | theburgerbach.com

46

Splendora’s Gelato Cafe Downtown Mall 317 E Main Street 434.296.8555 | splendoras.com

69

C&O Restaurant 515 E Water Street 434.971.7044 candorestaurant.com

63

Tavern & Grocery 333 W Main Street 434.293.7403 tavernandgrocery.com

47

Chaps Ice Cream Downtown Mall 223 E Main Street 434.977.4139 chapsicecream.com

62

Tavern on the James 280 Valley Street Scottsville, VA 24590 434.286.3500 tavernonthejames.com


Discover Charlottesville 2018  

Premium coffee table book about great things to do and see in the greater Charlottesville, Virginia area. Wineries, restaurants, breweries,...

Discover Charlottesville 2018  

Premium coffee table book about great things to do and see in the greater Charlottesville, Virginia area. Wineries, restaurants, breweries,...

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