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CONTENTS 14 DELVING INTO HISTORY 14 UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA | 17 THE ROTUNDA RESTORATION | 22 JAMES MONROE’S HIGHLAND 25 THOMAS JEFFERSON’S MONTICELLO | 26 JAMES MADISON’S MONTPELIER 27 MICHIE TAVERN CA. 1784

28 SEEING & DOING 28 BARRACKS ROAD | 32 THE CORNER | 36 THE DOWNTOWN MALL | 46 MIDTOWN

50 BECOMING CULTURED 54 MAKING MERRY 56 LIVING OFF THE LAND 56 PICK YOUR OWN | 58 FARM TO TABLE

60 FEASTING 70 DRINKING UP 78 GETTING OUT 84 DAY TRIPPING 84 CROZET | 86 LITTLE MOUNTAIN LOOP 90 SCOTTSVILLE | 96 NELSON | 102 ORANGE | 110 GREENE 112 SKYLINE DRIVE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY 116 STAUNTON

118 SAYING I DO 124 TURNING LOCAL 130 INDEX ALBEMARLE WEDDING. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF SAMANTHA TOBIAS AND THE CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU)


James Madison’s Montpelier

James Monroe’s Highland

Montpelier was home to President James Madison, Father of the Constitution and Architect of the Bill of Rights, and his wife Dolley, America’s first “First Lady.” The 2,650-acre estate features the house, enslaved community sites, a formal garden, walking trails, Madison family and slave cemeteries, an archaeology lab and a visitor center with a cafe and a museum shop. Spend an hour or two, or a full day, touring the house, exploring the grounds and trails and learning about Madison’s political and cultural impact, the relevance of the U.S. Constitution and the history of the enslaved community. The grounds are free and open to the public seven days a week during business hours. Visit our website for details.

James Monroe’s Highland is open year round to visitors interested in discovering more about the life and legacy of the nation’s fifth President. Monroe’s contributions to American democracy invite exploration of historic buildings, including the Presidential Guest House, kitchens and outbuildings. The grounds feature flowering plants, Monroe-era trees and productive kitchen and vegetable gardens. Managed by the College of William & Mary since 1974, the site offers guided tours and hosts numerous community events throughout the year.

11350 Constitution Highway Montpelier Station, VA 22957

540.672.2728 montpelier.org

Hours of Operation April-October: 9am– 6pm, November–March: 11am–5pm. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. 2050 James Monroe Parkway, Charlottesville

434.293.8000 highland.org

Michie Tavern ca. 1784 Michie Tavern, located near Jefferson’s Monticello, accommodated travelers with food, drink and lodging for more than 200 years. Today, visitors experience this historic landmark through a journey recreating 18th century life. Servers in period attire offer Midday Fare for a lunch experience rich in southern culture and hospitality. The buffet features fried chicken, smoked pork barbecue, marinated baked chicken, stewed tomatoes, black-eyed peas, buttermilk biscuits and much more.  After lunch, visit the oldest section of the Tavern offering self-guided tours. Shopping opportunities abound in four unique shops all housed in period structures such as the Armory and Artifacts Shop, specializing in antique weapons for sale. Open daily 9am–5pm. Midday Fare: 11:30am–3pm. 683 Thomas Jefferson Parkway, Charlottesville

434.977.1234

michietavern.com

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PUBLISHERS Roy Van Doorn, Bill Morrow EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Design and Production Director Judy A. Bias Design and Production Consultant Erin E. Burks Chief Writer & Editorial Consultant Jenny Paurys, Fine Lines Editing Copyeditor Steven Blaski ADVERTISING Senior Account Manager Bill Morrow Senior Account Manager Roy Van Doorn Account Supervisor Erin E. Burks Copyright© 2016 ISBN 978-0-9981723-1-6 City Select 1140 E High Street Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434.220.0020 DiscoverCville.com To purchase a copy of Discover Charlottesville call 434.220.0020 Published by City Select, November 2016. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means in whole or in part for commercial use, without written permission of the publisher. Publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and/or omissions therein. By securing an order for advertising space in this publication, the advertising party agrees to indemnify the publisher against any and all claims relating to the advertisement. Printed in the United States of America.

COVER PHOTOGRAPH: ROTUNDA SUNSET. (COURTESY OF MIKE HERRICK — WAHOO PHOTOGRAPHY)

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CONTRIBUTORS PHOTOGRAPHY & ILLUSTRATIONS Judy A. Bias, Map Illustrations Karen Blaha Albuquerque, NM kabpics.com • flickr.com/photos/vironevaeh Charlottesville Albemarle Convention & Visitors Bureau P.O. Box 178, Charlottesville VA 22902 Phone: 434.293.6789 | Toll-free: 877.386.1103 visitcharlottesville.org C’ville Images | Charlottesville, VA Our new book, “Flash: The Photography of Ed Roseberry” is now available at cvilleimages.com. Donna Dunivan Shenandoah National Park • National Park Service (NPS) 3655 U.S. Highway 211 East, Luray VA 22835 Phone: 540.999.3500 nps.gov/shen/index.htm University of Virginia Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library P.O. Box 400110, Charlottesville VA 22904-4110 Phone: 434.243.1776 small.library.virginia.edu University of Virginia Dan Addison Office of University Communications P.O. Box 400229, Charlottesville VA 22904-4229 Phone: 434.924.3801 communications.virginia.edu Special thanks for all the photography of the Rotunda restoration.

ARTICLES We would like to thank the following people for sharing their stories about our community: Sara Bon-Harper, Jason Burch, Amanda Charette, Melinda Crawford, Jody Kielbasa, Mark Lorenzoni, Justin McKenzie, Gareth & Maggie Moore, Kai Rady, Stu Rifkin, Jay & Steph Rostow, Russ Simpson, Angela Spathos, Keith & Jessie Stowell, Attila Woodward 10

Discover Charlottesville


Welcome to Charlottesville


BICOLOR TULIPS AND SERPENTINE WALL — UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF KAREN BLAHA)


DELVING INTO HISTORY

The University of Virginia

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he University of Virginia was founded by President Thomas Jefferson in 1819. Jefferson — who lived nearby at his mountaintop home, Monticello — was deeply involved in the creation of the University, planning the curriculum, recruiting the initial faculty and designing what he called the Academical Village, a tidy arrangement of residential and academic buildings around a rectangular, terraced green space, called the Lawn. Jefferson’s vision was to create a public university offering courses of study in professions beyond religion and politics — the first of its kind in the United States. It was also the first university in the U.S. to use an elective course system. When it opened for classes in 1825, the University of Virginia’s eightperson faculty taught ancient and modern languages, moral and natural philosophy, chemistry, law and medicine. Most of the initial 68 students were not Virginians — they came from the south and west regions of the United States. Over the 190 years since it opened, the University has seen an immense amount of change, and for much of the 20th century, it struggled to adapt to shifting social norms. The first African-American student graduated in 1953, and it was not until 1970 that UVA admitted its first female undergrads. These social evolutions ultimately benefited the University, which in the latter part of the 20th century began to solidify its modern position as one of the finest public universities in the country. Since U.S. News & World Report began a listing of the top 50 public universities, the University has never been ranked lower than No. 3.

UVA STUDENT AT THE ROTUNDA. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF DAN ADDISON — UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS)

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DELVING INTO HISTORY — THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA Rotunda | The focal point of the Academical Village is the Rotunda, which stands at the north end of the Lawn. Jefferson designed the building, modeling it on the Pantheon in Rome — though at half its diameter and height. Originally the University of Virginia’s library, the Rotunda today is the most recognizable symbol of the University. In October 1895, a fire gutted the Rotunda, leaving only the brick walls intact. New York architect Stanford White designed a new interior, changing the original three-level interior layout to one with two levels, among other changes. The rebuilt Rotunda was completed in 1899. In the 1970s, students, alumni and faculty raised funds to renovate the Rotunda to more closely align with Jefferson’s original vision, including restoring the three-story design. The Rotunda reopened in 1976 on Jefferson’s birthday — April 13. Queen Elizabeth II visited the Rotunda as one of five American sites she visited publicly for the country’s Bicentennial. In 2012, the Rotunda entered a new phase of renovation, which included restoring historical features — including 16 new marble capitals on the outside columns — and updating the complex’s utility systems. All funds for the $42.5 million renovation were raised through private philanthropy and state appropriations. In the course of renovating the Rotunda, workers uncovered a chemical hearth, part of an early science classroom that had been sealed in one of the lower-floor walls of the Rotunda since the 1850s, protecting it from devastation during the 1895 fire. The semicircular chemical hearth included two fireboxes to provide heat — one burning wood for fuel, the other burning coal — as well as underground brick tunnels that fed fresh air to fireboxes and workstations. Flues, meanwhile, carried away fumes and smoke. Students worked at five workstations cut into stone countertops. With the completion of the Rotunda’s renovation, the chemical hearth is now on permanent display. TOP: THE ROTUNDA IN 1896 DURING RECONSTRUCTION AFTER THE FIRE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE ALBERT AND SHIRLEY SMALL SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY. UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA) BOTTOM: ROTUNDA CHEMICAL HEARTH. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF DAN ADDISON — UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS)

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The Lawn | The rectangular green space in the nexus of the Academical Village, the Lawn is flanked by the Rotunda to the north, four rows of colonnades to the east and west, and Old Cabell Hall, Rouss Hall and Cocke Hall to the south. Facing the east and west sides of the Lawn are the 10 Pavilions and 54 student rooms, part of Jefferson’s original designs. He created the Pavilions to reflect his classification of the branches of learning, THOMAS JEFFERSON. each with its own unique design. Additional (PORTRAIT BY CHARLES student rooms face outward from the WILSON PEALE) Lawn complex, situated in colonnades that surround those on the edge of the Lawn, called the Range. Since the University’s inception, the Lawn has been a gathering place for students, faculty and alumni. Graduation exercises are held on the Lawn every May. On Halloween, locals bring their children to trick-ortreat along the colonnades, and in December of each year, UVA students, faculty and staff — as well as the broader Charlottesville community — mark the winter holidays with the annual Lighting of the Lawn. UNESCO World Heritage Site | The Academical Village at the University of Virginia is designated as a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site based on its architectural and cultural significance. Thomas Jefferson’s home, Monticello, also carries this distinctive honor. “The University of Virginia is a fine example of the architectural ideal of the Age of Enlightenment put to use in the great educational programme of the third President of the United States,” UNESCO said in its 1987 Statement of Significance, describing the important elements of the site.

Trees of Honor | “I am still planting trees to yield their shade and ornament half a century hence,” wrote Thomas Jefferson of his lifetime devotion to cultivating a curated canopy at his mountaintop home, Monticello, and at the Grounds of the University of Virginia, the school he founded in the valley below. Jefferson wrote that THE PRATT GINKGO TREE. (PHOTOGRAPH he envisioned his soCOURTESY OF DAN ADDISON — UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS) named Academical Village to feature “an open square of grass and trees,” thus establishing a wealth of trees as an indelible part of the University’s identity. In this spirit of planting trees for future generations to enjoy, groundskeepers at UVA preserve and plant trees in honor of members of its community. The Pratt Ginkgo tree, which rises on a grassy knoll near the University Chapel, is named in honor of William Pratt, the superintendent of grounds during the 1860s, who oversaw the planting of many trees on the Grounds during his tenure. In the fall the ginkgo’s canopy turns a brilliant yellow, and as its leaves fall, its distinctive foliage creates a lush golden carpet.

PhotograPhic Essay: rEstoration of thE UnivErsity of virginia’s rotUnda

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he Rotunda, a beloved centerpiece of Thomas Jefferson’s Academical Village, has experienced much since its creation nearly two centuries ago. From its beginning, the stately structure was constantly being repaired, reconstructed or re-imagined. Water leakage issues, an 1895 fire and the need for expansion changed the Rotunda’s appearance and forced several closures of the building over the years. The need for exterior improvements prompted a major renovation from 2012 to 2016. Black netting covered the crumbling capitals until new marble replicas arrived and were carefully mounted using an elaborate system of tracks and scaffolding. Crews labored to repair the circular roof, replacing the exterior steel plating with new copper panels that were painted white. The oculus at

the pinnacle of the dome received new glass panels and a shade. The plaster eagle on the ceiling of the south portico received meticulous restoration, as did the north and south portico clocks. Excavation efforts revealed a myriad of artifacts, from tools found within the walls to a cistern discovered underneath a courtyard fountain. Inside, the Dome Room received a new plaster ceiling, classroom space was added, safety and mechanical systems were updated and a new elevator created better accessibility for all. These efforts restored the University’s focal point, ensuring that students and visitors alike would be able to experience the Rotunda’s splendor for years to come. (All photographs courtesy of Dan Addison — University Communications. See following pages.) Discover Charlottesville

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DELVING INTO HISTORY

James Monroe’s Highland

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ames Monroe was the fifth president of the United States. When he was elected to his first of two terms in 1816, he had already served as a member of the Virginia General Assembly, the Confederation Congress and the first United States Senate; Minister to France, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State and Secretary of War. As a diplomat, he negotiated the Louisiana Purchase. During his presidency he resolved long-standing grievances with the British, acquired Florida from Spain and announced the Monroe Doctrine, which stated that while the U.S. intended to remain neutral in European wars and wars between European powers and their colonies, the Americas would also be free from future European colonization and interference in the affairs of the Americas’ sovereign countries. With his wife, Elizabeth, Monroe had three children, two of whom survived to adulthood. From 1799 to 1823, the Monroe family lived at Highland, a 3,500-acre tobacco plantation adjacent to Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello. A two-story home with a Victorian-era wing remains on the property; while for many years this structure was thought to be the Monroe’s home, recent excavations at the property suggest that it was in fact a guest residence. The Monroe’s modest mansion, nearby on the property, most likely burned down after they sold the plantation in 1825. The surviving home reflects Monroe’s time and features many objects that belonged to the Monroes, as well as period pieces and reproductions similar to those they owned. As was the fashion for the time — and in part due to Monroe’s post as Minister to France — many of the furnishings were imported from France, while others were crafted in America. A working plantation, Highland used slave labor to run its homes and its grounds, and its outbuildings included 30 to 40 slave quarters. Visitors can learn about the lives of slaves at Monroe’s home through the Slavery at Highland program, available on weekends from April through October.

sPotlight: sciEncE rEwritEs history at highland

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he long-told history went like this: James Monroe, the fifth president of the United States, was more modest than his peers. Instead of a grand mansion, Monroe lived with his family in a humble twoover-two cottage at Highland, a plantation located a few miles southeast of Charlottesville. The cottage thought to be the Monroes’ home during their tenure at Highland — from 1799 to 1823 — was what modern-day visitors toured when they came to the estate. There, they heard how Monroe described his Highland home as a “cabin castle” and admired his desire to live in such a seemingly simple abode. But certain things didn’t add up. Three insurance documents from 1800, 1809 and 1816, respectively, depicted a two-wing structure, but the cottage had no second wing. Monroe wrote a letter in 1818 detailing the construction of “a new house just below the present one” — yet there was no evidence of this second house. It was that problem, in fact, that needled archeologist Sara Bon-Harper, who became director of Highland in 2012. “We had never really been able to say, ‘There are the remains of what was attached. Here they are on this JAMES MONROE’S HIGHLAND PLANTATION. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF GENE RUNION AND JAMES MONROE’S HIGHLAND)

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DELVING INTO HISTORY — JAMES MONROE’S HIGHLAND side,’” Sara explains. “So we started looking and really asking the hard questions.” Sara and her team began small excavations in a large yard to the right of the cottage. There, they found buried architectural debris, including nails, stone and brick, suggesting the remnants of a structure that had been demolished or destroyed, likely by fire. It was possible that this was the missing “larger wing” that some had theorized once existed, but more work had to be done to determine the source of the debris. In April 2015, Sara and her team decided to embark upon a larger excavation at the site of the buried debris. In short order, the team uncovered part of a large, well-preserved foundation, confirming the source of the debris and suggesting the presence of a much larger home — something more on the scale of a mansion and unlikely to have been attached to the small cottage. It was a dramatic discovery, and one that flew in the face of more than a century of historical interpretation. What was needed now was to disprove the long-held theory that the cottage was the Monroes’ main home. To do this, the team utilized dendrochronology, or tree-ring dating, of the cottage’s lumber. This technology revealed that the cottage rafters dated to 1818 — the same year Monroe wrote the letter about a new house on his estate, and a full 19 years after he had moved to Highland. Combined with the discovery of the large foundation in the adjacent yard, it appeared increasingly likely that the Monroe cottage was not the president’s home, but rather a guesthouse constructed later. To be certain, Sara and her team ordered another dendrochronology study, this time of a corner post of the cottage — an element unlikely to have been replaced or repaired. It, too, confirmed a date of 1818. “That was the moment of saying that has to be the freestanding 1818 guesthouse,” Sara says, gesturing to the cottage, “and this,” she says, pointing to the yard where the foundation was uncovered, “has to be a separate 1799 main house.” While this finding upended more than 100 years of historical interpretation at Highland, it opened new doors, too. The Highland team is reinterpreting the cottage as a guesthouse, and a fundraiser is underway to open up the next stage of excavation of the main house’s foundation. For an archeologist like Sara, it is an exciting opportunity. “I hope that we can engage people who might see history as removed or all finished,” she says. “We don’t know all there is to know, and we keep adding to it.” ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATIONS SHOW THAT A SIZEABLE FOUNDATION UNCOVERED IN THE YARD IS IN FACT THE MONROE HOME. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF LARRY BOUTERIE AND JAMES MONROE’S HIGHLAND)


Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello Monticello Jefferson’s Thomas MONTICELLO IN SPRING. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

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his stately brick house perched atop a small, 850-foot mountain directly southeast of Charlottesville was the home — and life’s work — of Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States. A native Virginian, Jefferson began constructing Monticello in 1769, when he was 26 years old, on land bequeathed to him by his father. He was remodeling portions of the home as late as 1809, the final year of his presidency. His original plans for the home called for 14 rooms; upon completion, the house and its pavilions and terraces included 43 rooms. Jefferson designed the home in neoclassical and Palladian traditions, the latter of which celebrated symmetry and the formal classical architectural approach of the ancient Greeks and Romans. One of the home’s unusual features is its octagonal Dome Room, a homage to the Pantheon in Rome — a building Jefferson found deeply inspiring. Special tours of the Dome Room, which was long closed to the public, are now available. Jefferson was one of the brightest minds of his generation, constantly immersed in the worlds of literature, philosophy, history, architecture and agriculture. In addition to serving as president, Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence and founded the University of Virginia, one of the first nonsectarian public universities in the fledgling nation. His love of learning is in ample supply at Monticello, where visitors can tour his private rooms, including his extensive library, and view artifacts such as those brought back from the Lewis and Clark Expedition, which

Jefferson commissioned following the Louisiana Purchase — the land deal between the United States and France that added 827,000 square miles of land west of the Mississippi River for a price of $15 million. Monticello sat amid a 5,000-acre plantation that produced tobacco, wheat and other mixed crops, and Jefferson was an avid farmer and gardener. He was also a slave owner who wrote about his conflicted opinions toward the institution of slavery, and is believed to have fathered six children with Sally Hemings, one of his slaves. Visitors to Monticello can learn more about Jefferson’s complex relationship with slavery and tour Mulberry Row — a hub of enslaved life on the plantation with more than 20 dwellings, workshops and storehouses. After his death on July 4, 1826, Jefferson was buried at Monticello. As per his wishes, the memorial at his gravesite lists his accomplishments as author of the Declaration of Independence and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom and as the father of the University of Virginia. His tombstone makes no mention of his two-term presidency. When he died, Jefferson was in debt by about $107,000, or more than $2.4 million in today’s dollars. Some of his debt was inherited, some was a result of the financial panic of 1819, and some was due to his spending habits, which included his investment in Monticello. It is somewhat ironic that to reconcile his debt after his death, his family had to sell the plantation, its slaves and many of its furnishings. Discover Charlottesville

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DELVING INTO HISTORY

James Madison’s Montpelier

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ANNIE DU PONT FORMAL GARDEN. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JEN FARIELLO PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE MONTPELIER FOUNDATION)

ontpelier is the name of the brick mansion and surrounding 2,700-acre plantation that was home to James Madison — the fourth president of the United States, the “Father of the Constitution” and author of the Bill of Rights — and his wife, Dolley, who is credited with helping to define the role of the First Lady in the country’s early years. Visitors to Montpelier can take a 45-minute tour of the home, learning about the couple’s busy social life hosting distinguished guests, Madison’s love of literature and incredible gift for learning languages, and the couple’s own deep connection and affection for each other. In 1901 — nearly 70 years after Madison’s death — Montpelier was purchased by William du Pont, a member of one of America’s richest and most influential industrial dynasties. For more than 80 years, members of the family owned and lived at Montpelier. Upon her death in 1983, William’s daughter, Marion, bequeathed Montpelier to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The property underwent a subsequent restoration to its Madison-era


TOP: MONTPELIER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF KENTON ROWE PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE MONTPELIER FOUNDATION) RIGHT: LUNCH AT THE TAVERN. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

appearance, a transformation that unveiled many archeological findings. Today, the Archeological Sites and Laboratory provides visitors the chance to experience the excavation of historic artifacts as well as a tour of the artifacts found at archaeology sites throughout the Montpelier homestead. The grounds surrounding the mansion are rich in the history of the Madisons and du Ponts, including the Annie du Pont Formal Garden, a 2-acre garden on the site of the Madison’s original 4-acre garden, which today is styled as it was in the early 20th century when William du Pont’s wife, Annie, oversaw its restoration. Visitors also enjoy the serenity of Mr. Madison’s Temple, a small, classical structure used as the symbol of Montpelier, constructed beginning in 1810 by two carpenters suggested by Madison’s close friend and colleague Thomas Jefferson. A little walk from the house and its surrounding grounds, the Madison Family Cemetery includes the graves of James and Dolley, as well as many of their ancestors and descendants, while the Slave Cemetery was the final resting place of many of the plantation’s slaves, who were buried in unmarked graves. Surrounding the plantation is the 200-acre, old-growth James Madison Landmark Forest, which includes miles of walking trails of varying difficulty.

Michie Tavern ca. 1784

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ocated a half mile from Monticello, this tavern was originally founded on Buck Mountain Road by Cpl. William Michie. The two-story inn included an Assembly Room, which served as a social hub not only for the tavern itself, but for the county as a whole, hosting dances and church services, as well as providing a place for traveling magicians, guest doctors and dentists to set up shop. It also served as a makeshift post office and school. Michie Tavern operated continuously until the mid-1800s, when stagecoach traffic began to subside. The tavern reverted to serving as a private home until 1927, when local businesswoman Josephine Henderson purchased the property as a museum to house her personal antique collection. Feeling the tavern’s remote location would make it less accessible to visitors, she invested in moving the structure to the side of Carter’s Mountain, not far from Monticello, which was newly opened. Over the course of three months, the inn was carefully dismantled and moved 17 miles by horse and wagon and by truck. It reopened in 1928. Since the 1960s, Michie Tavern has again welcomed guests as a place to gather and dine, serving a Southern buffet at midday every day — served by staff dressed in period clothing — and offering tours of the property. Discover Charlottesville

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SEEING & DOING

BARRACKS ROAD SHOPPING CENTER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF FEDERAL REALTY INVESTMENT TRUST)

Barracks Road

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or an eclectic Charlottesville shopping experience, check out Barracks Road Shopping Center, an open-air shopping and dining center just off U.S. Route 29 and Route 250 Bypass on Emmet Street. Barracks Road Shopping Center includes two large sections: the main shopping area and the North Wing across Barracks Road. Here you’ll find more than 80 businesses, with stores ranging from national luxury brands to local favorites and a delicious array of eateries for any occasion. With grocery stores, pharmacies and banks added to the mix, Barracks — as the locals call it — truly has something for everyone.

Salon Cielo offers exceptional hair care and products as well 28

Phenix Salon Suites offers a different approach to the salon experience, with suites that provide a spa experience that includes professionals specializing in hair, nails, spa treatments and more. 3

Oil & Vinegar is the spot for gourmet items, with a focus on Mediterranean cuisine. 7 The Albemarle Angler provides a local resource for fly fishing equipment and clothing, plus guided fly fishing trips. 8

Origins carries hair, body and cosmetic products that emphasize plant-based ingredients. 4

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Rebecca’s Natural Foods brings its knowledgeable staff to bear in helping customers shop for organic food, nutritional supplements and natural body products. 9

The Virginia Shop, located in the “Island” at Barracks, is the place to go for a memento of the Commonwealth. 5

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Neroli Spa & Apothecary sports a plentiful menu of spa services as well as a carefully curated collection of bath and beauty products. 1

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SEEING & DOING — BARRACKS ROAD The Happy Cook stocks a wide selection of tools for home cooks and professional chefs alike. 10

Eat Aromas Café offers an extensive menu of Mediterranean cuisine in an elegant, yet comfortable, environment. 11 HotCakes is beloved for its specialty entrees and wonderful desserts.

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Brixx Wood Fired Pizza offers an artisan spin on an old standby, with vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free pizza options. 13 Zoës Kitchen features many Mediterranean-inspired dishes, including a host of salads and a kids’ menu full of favorites. 14

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n an unassuming storefront within Barracks Road Shopping Center hums a Charlottesville fixture since the 1920s: Staples Barber Shop. Men of all ages have been loyal to this business as their favorite spot for a haircut — and, for many, a shave — for the better part of a century. The original Staples Barber Shop was opened downtown in 1923 by Albert Staples, a trained barber who continued his profession until he retired in 1994, at age 96. Albert’s son, Ken, took over the reins of the shop in 1956 and oversaw its migration to the brand-new Barracks Road Shopping Center in 1959 — one of the first shops to open there. Back then, Barracks Road Shopping Center was on the rural outskirts of town, and moving Staples from its beloved downtown location was a gamble — one that paid off. BARBER KEN STAPLES AND SOME OF HIS FELLOW BARBERS, With acres CIRCA 1960. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ED ROSEBERRY of free parking and AND C’VILLE IMAGES) 30

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CARROLL’S TEA ROOM. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ED ROSEBERRY AND C’VILLE IMAGES)

Carroll’s Tea Room | Located on the corner of Barracks Road and Emmet Street until it closed in 1956, a small, nondescript, tworoom building was home to Carroll’s Tea Room. While it sounded like a spot for ladies who lunch, Carroll’s was instead a popular watering hole among UVA students during the 1940s and 1950s. “The only time someone over 25 years of age walked into the place was when University President Colgate Darden had to break up a chaotic party,” according to a story in The Cavalier Daily that was published in February 1973. Packed with a jukebox, bar, large booths, tables, pinball machines and a large piano — as well as many UVA students — Carroll’s carried the unofficial motto, “No Carroll, No Tea, No Room.” It sold more beer than any place in the Commonwealth of Virginia, according to The Cavalier Daily, which noted that it was commonplace for Carroll’s to serve 5,000 people a day!

21 stores at its grand opening, Charlottesville’s first shopping center quickly became a thriving retail hub, filling the barber shop’s chairs day after day. And it wasn’t just the customers who were dedicated: many of the barbers who work at Staples today joined the shop in those early years and have been the barber of choice for several generations of local families. While men’s hair fashions have changed over the years, Staples has maintained its reputation by staying true to its barbering brand: a simple approach based on exceptional customer service. It’s a formula that has benefited the shop, and its clients, for 90 years — and counting. Open 8am–6pm, Monday–Saturday. 1103 Emmet Street N in Charlottesville.


Ben & Jerry’s

The Virginia S hop

What better way to celebrate any occasion than hand dipped Ben & Jerry’s ice cream from your locally owned scoop shop! We’ve been proudly serving over 30 unique and euphoric flavors of ice cream, Greek frozen yogurt, and sorbet since 1999. Featuring hand-made milkshakes, decadent sundaes, Ice cream cakes for large or small occasions, and truly remarkable catering services. Now offering Delivery with our partners at OrderUp!

The Virginia Shop has been selling Virginia’s finest foods and traditional gifts since 1990. We are locally owned and specialize in bringing you all the unique goods that Virginia has to offer, or that remind us of the Virginia lifestyle. We have the largest Virginia peanut selection in all of Charlottesville. Pick up gourmet local food, wine, souvenirs and gift baskets at either of our two locations in Charlottesville. Open 7 days a week at Barracks Road Shopping Center or the Historic Downtown Mall.

A very special luggage and leather goods shop with a wide range of merchandise for travel, everyday living, and gifts perfect for everyone - from the graduate to the retiree. Quality selections of leather bags and purses, wallets, briefcases and travel packs. Specializing in products from Briggs & Riley, Travelpro, Osgoode Marley, Bosca, Baggallini and Jack Georges.

Barracks Road Shopping Center 1047 Emmet Street, Charlottesville

Barracks Road Shopping Center 1108 Emmet Street, Charlottesville

Open Mon–Thu 11:30am–10pm, Fri & Sat 11:30am–11pm, Sun 12–10pm Barracks Road Shopping Center 1112 Emmet Street, Charlottesville

434.244.7438

benjerry.com/charlottesville

434.977.0080 thevashop.net

VanNesA Luggage & Leather

Mon–Sat 10am–6pm

434.977.8561

vannesaluggage.com

Downtown Mall (Next to The Paramount at Central Place) 201 E Main Street Suite B, Charlottesville

434.529.6051 thevashop.net

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SEEING & DOING

The Corner

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hose looking for the heartbeat of college life at the University of Virginia can find it at The Corner — seven blocks of restaurants, bookstores, coffee shops and stores located across from the University’s Grounds. The Corner has been a retail hub since the inception of the University of Virginia in 1819. UVA was originally its own small town, called University, Virginia, located adjacent to Charlottesville, with Three Notch’d Road connecting the two. The Corner was at the physical corner of that road and the University’s Grounds. Charlottesville and UVA expanded and eventually intertwined, but The Corner remained the nucleus of student and faculty life. There are dozens of places to eat and shop on The Corner, most of which are locally owned.

sEE Madison Hall holds the University’s administrative offices, including those of UVA’s president. Opened in 1905 as a YMCA, the building was named for James Madison, fourth president of the United States and the second rector of the University. 1 Mad Bowl, short for Madison Bowl, is the 3-acre field stretching behind Madison Hall, ringed by several of the University’s fraternity and sorority houses. One of the University’s original recreational fields — it once housed five tennis courts — it is equally integral as a place for students to gather and socialize. 2 The Grounds of the University of Virginia center on the Academical Village, with its Rotunda building on the north end — designed to echo the Pantheon in Rome — as well as the two parallel rows of Federal-style buildings to its east and west called the Pavilions and the expanse of terraced green space that lies in the middle, called the Lawn. 3

University Chapel sits perched to the northwest of the Rotunda and the Academical Village, designed to offer a spiritual contrast to the secular world of academia. The chapel includes richly colored stained glass, including a small mandorla window in the east transept designed at Louis Comfort Tiffany’s studios. 4 Serpentine walls can be found dividing six of the gardens in the Academical Village. With each wall only one brick thick, the graceful curving line helps provide stability. The walls were restored in the late 1940s as part of a broader restoration of the Pavilion Gardens. 5

shoP Natty Beau bills itself as “Dixie done right” with men’s fashion brands including Southern Proper, Barbour, Duck Head and Fish Hippie. 6 Heartwood Books is an old-school used book store featuring room after room of books with reasonable prices, organized by a knowledgeable and helpful staff. 7 finch carries men’s and women’s clothing in a vast range of styles and well-known brands. 8 Duo Boutique is so-named for its dual offerings of affordable new and gently used women’s clothing in the latest fashions. 9 Mincer’s specializes in UVA-branded apparel; the shop has been family-owned and -operated since 1948. 10

Eat The Biltmore long ago solidified itself as a UVA favorite, offering the city’s largest outdoor patio and a menu that includes house-smoked barbecue. 11

UNIVERSITY AND HOSPITAL ON THE CORNER IN SPRING. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF KAREN BLAHA)

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SEEING & DOING — THE CORNER Corner Joe is the UVA-centric branch of Charlottesville’s beloved Shenandoah Joe Coffee Roasters, which carefully sources the best beans in the world and roasts them right here in its hometown. 12 The Virginian is Charlottesville’s oldest restaurant — founded in 1923 — and remains a cozy, comfortable and approachable spot to grab a home-cooked lunch or dinner. 13 Marco & Luca Dumpling Store specializes in Chinese favorites, serving sesame noodles, dumplings and pork or veggie buns with a sweet and slightly spicy sauce. 14 The College Inn, open since 1953, offers an extensive menu of favorites available for dining in, taking away or delivery. Open late every day,

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students and visitors alike appreciate delivery of cold beer and ice cream whenever the mood Lee strikes. 15 St Lan e Bodo’s BagelsRdholds a special place in the hearts of locals for its innovative bagel sandwiches. r ell D The city is home to three Bodo’s locations, each Crisp with its regulars who come for the camaraderie as much as the delicious food. 16 Roots Natural Kitchen wins accolades for its deliciously healthy bowls filled with greens, grains and proteins. The menu also includes many vegetarian options. 17 Boylan Heights dubs itself a gourmet burger bar, though its menu includes many mouthwatering appetizers, salads and sandwiches as well; the veggie burger receives rave reviews. 18

TOP: UVA CORNER IN SNOW. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF KAREN BLAHA) BOTTOM: NIGHT TIME ON THE CORNER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

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Brooks Hall | This three-story Victorian building to the east of the Rotunda opened in 1877 as Lewis Brooks Hall of Natural Science W Ma among the most impressive and innovative and was considered in St museums of natural history in the nation at the time, preceding the natural history museums in Washington, D.C., New York and Chicago that would later take up that mantle. In its heyday, it housed several prominent exhibits, including a dinosaur skeleton and a reconstructed full-size mammoth in its main gallery.

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BROOKS MUSEUM, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA. DETROIT PUBLISHING CO., PUBLISHER. DATE: BETWEEN 1900 AND 1910. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PRINTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION)

Lewis Brooks, a textiles mogul from the north, donated $45,000 toward the construction and outfitting of the museum, which was very positively received in its initial years. However, the style of its ornate exterior — complete with carved stone animal heads paired with names of prominent natural historians on the exterior — fell out of fashion at the turn of the 20th century, and the building ceased functioning as a museum in the 1940s. It is now the home of faculty offices. 19

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SEEING & DOING

The Downtown Mall

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he Downtown Mall is central to Charlottesville’s contemporary identity — a gathering place for townies, students and visitors, filled with independent and locally owned restaurants and retail shops and buzzing with the communal feeling unique to a pedestrian-dedicated space. A robust number of live music venues and theaters add further excitement on any given night. Anyone looking to understand the heart and soul of Charlottesville need look no further.

Park Parking is available in the Market Street Parking Garage 1 , one block north of the Downtown Mall at the corner of Market and Fifth streets, and in the Water Street Parking Garage 2 , one block south of the Downtown Mall at the corner of Water and Second streets. Many local retailers and restaurants validate parking, so take your ticket with you.

sEE Charlottesville Downtown Visitors Center is a one-stop resource for visitors, located on the east end of the Downtown Mall. It provides maps, brochures and specially trained travel specialists ready to help visitors get the most out of their visit to the city. Tickets for several live local music venues also are available for purchase. 3 Downtown Transit Center is a transportation hub located in the lower level of the same building that houses the Downtown Visitors Center. Visitors can catch buses to various points in the city, or take a free trolley to Midtown, The Corner and the University of Virginia. 4

DOWNTOWN MALL IN SUMMER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)


McGuffey Art Center provides a flourishing art space with studios, exhibits, performances and classes. The center is located a block north of the Downtown Mall in the former William H. McGuffey Primary School, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and on the Virginia Landmarks Register. 5 The Jefferson Theater reopened in 2009 after an extensive restoration and has become a favorite tour stop for many nationally known bands. Their full event schedule features a mixture of music, comedy and even burlesque shows. 6 The Southern Café & Music Hall offers a chance to see local and upand-coming bands in an intimate venue. Arrive early and enjoy dinner from the café prior to the show. 7 Presidential statues adorn the corner of City Hall on the eastern edge of the Downtown Mall, across from the Charlottesville Downtown Visitors Center. Set in low relief, the statues of presidents James Madison, Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe — all Charlottesville area residents — are reminiscent of those of saints at European cathedrals. All three are portrayed as the same height, though Madison was significantly shorter, at just 5 feet, 4 inches tall. 8 The Paramount Theater’s blade sign shines brightly at night from the center of the Downtown Mall. In December 2015, among a throng of gathered locals, the theater illuminated its historic vertical blade sign. The reconstructed, 33-foot sign was part of the Blade Restoration project, which carried a price tag of $175,000, all of which was donated by individuals and businesses. The Paramount Theater hosts a wide variety of music, dance, drama, Broadway, comedy and family performances every year. 9 McGuffey Park, two blocks northwest of the Downtown Mall next to McGuffey Art Center, offers a sunken basketball court, a weeping water well water feature, state-of-the-art play equipment for kids, a circular bike path and several benches. 10 Jefferson-Madison Regional Library on Market Street, one block north of the Downtown Mall, has been serving the citizens of Charlottesville since opening in 1921. A local philanthropist, Paul Goodloe McIntire, offered the community the gift of a library, including its land, design and construction of the original building, as well as furnishings and a collection of books. The library’s current building was originally a U.S. Post Office. 11

shoP Alakazam Toys and Gifts specializes in toys and other items that encourage creative and imaginative play, inspired by the Waldorf and Montessori philosophies. 12 Discover Charlottesville

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SEEING & DOING — DOWNTOWN MALL Tuel Jewelers has been part of downtown Charlottesville for decades. Established in 1945, this full-service jewelry store offers retail sales as well as watch, jewelry and silver repair. Its owners are Frances Loose — who began working at the shop in 1953 — and her daughters Mary Loose DeViney and Frieda Loose-Wagner. 13

Timberlakes Drug Store and Soda Fountain shares the joy of an authentic old-fashioned downtown experience, from its retail shelves of tried-and-true pharmacy favorites to its diner serving sandwiches, soups, salads and honest-to-goodness milkshakes. 20 C’ville Arts features the works of 50 to 60 contemporary Virginia artisans, offering a tremendous cross-section of the rich artistic talent here in the Commonwealth. Each month the gallery features a special exhibition of new work by a member. 21

Ten Thousand Villages reflects a world of cultures, carrying high-quality, handmade items sourced from disadvantaged artisans in 38 countries, providing them with a steady source of income. 14 Market Street Wineshop sports a vast selection of wine and beer from across the world as well as the Charlottesville area’s own thriving vineyard scene. A fixture of the city’s downtown neighborhood since 1986, its tucked-away location in the basement of a brick building on Market Street adds to its allure. Over 1,200 wines and 400 beers in stock; wine tastings on Friday nights. 15

Angelo Jewelry offers a rich selection of hand-crafted jewelry in a contemporary gallery setting, carefully curated by owners Lee Angelo Marraccini and his wife, Pam Perugi Marraccini. 22

Eat

Tastings of Charlottesville peeks out from its corner of the Market Street Parking Garage building with an unassuming lattice façade. This unique combination of wine shop, wine bar and restaurant is one of only a few on the East Coast. Peruse their extensive selections for purchase Pre or experiment sto with a flight of wines along nA with a meal. 16 ve W High St

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Charlottesville City Market pops up on Saturdays in a parking lot on Water Street and features dozens upon dozens of vendors selling fresh produce, herbs, plants, baked goods, grass-fed and pastured meats and freshly prepared breakfast and lunch fare. St Mainincludes The marketWalso vendors selling their own handcrafted goods. Held from April through December. 19 38

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Blue Whale Books offers an inventory of about 20,000 used books, hundreds of antique and rare books, antique maps and 1,000 original prints, with a special focus on 1800s chromolithographs. 18

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The Second Yard carries a rich selection of decorator fabrics — including firstquality, second-quality and close-outs — as well as home furnishings including lamps, furniture, mirrors, prints and accessories. 17

The Nook specializes in thoughtfully prepared, diner-style comfort food, including breakfast served all day, seven days a week, sandwiches and salads for lunch and hearty entrées for dinner. 23


C’ville Arts

Tuel

Jewelers

C’ville Arts is a vibrant space featuring handmade works by more than 50 Virginia artisans. Our cooperative gallery features a tremendous range of fine crafts and art, perfect for gifts or home décor. Find paintings, photography, wearable art such as jewelry and scarves, organic balms, woodwork, sculpture and more. Meet and chat with the artists on duty each day. Mon–Thu 10am–6pm, Fri 10am– 9pm, Sat 10am–8pm, Sun 2–6pm.

Your friendly family full service jewelry store since 1945. Tuel Jewelers offers watch, jewelry & silver repair along with sales of 14k gold, sterling & platinum. We offer Jefferson & Virginia cups, clocks, plaques, Bulova watches, rings, pendants, earrings & gifts. We provide bead restringing, battery replacement & jewelry cleaning. In addition, we have machine & hand engravers to serve our customers. We also wrap & ship. Mon–Fri 10am–5pm.

118 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

319 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

434.972.9500

434.295.4258

cvillearts.org

tueljewelers.com

Kilwins

Angelo Jewelry

Kilwins Chocolates, Fudge & Ice Cream features an array of store-made Fudge, Caramel Apples, Brittles and Caramel Corns, as well as dozens of other confections like Sea-Salt Caramels, Single-Origin Chocolates, Tuttles and more. We also feature hand-crafted Chocolates and “Original Recipe” Ice Cream in over 36 flavors, all available in a fresh-made waffle cone or as a sundae. Locally owned and operated. Open Sun– Thu 11am–9pm, Fri & Sat 11am–10pm.

Angelo is the contemporary jewelry gallery on the Downtown Mall in Charlottesville. It is owned and operated by nationally recognized jewelry artist, Lee Angelo Marraccini, and Pam Perugi Marraccini. Angelo offers a wide range of jewelry from high-end, special occasion to fun, everyday wear. Now you can choose from the finest hand-crafted jewelry by over 40 distinguished artists. Open Tue–Sat 11am–6pm.

313 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

220 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

434.234.3634

434.971.9256

kilwins.com/charlottesville

angelojewelry.com

Draft Taproom

Cville Escape Room

Draft is an opportunity for craft beer enthusiasts to enjoy the area’s largest selection of Virginia craft beers on tap. At Draft, you pour your own beer in any quantity. Enjoy the opportunity to sample over 60 local and regional beers, ciders and wines. Your experience includes 20 screens of the best in sports, combined with a great beer-centric menu. Like we say at Draft: “So Many Beers, So Little Time.” Visit our website for operational hours.

Can you and your team solve the puzzles and find the hidden objects to unravel the mystery within one hour? An escape room is a game room featuring real-life quests. Each group is enclosed in a room and has 60 minutes to win the game by using strategy, creativity and logic. Bring your friends, family or co-workers for an adventure in one of our themed rooms. Visit our website for details and to reserve your Escape!

425 E Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

218 W. Main Street (Downtown Mall) Charlottesville, VA 22902

434.422.5901

434.566.9499

drafttaproom.com

cvilleescaperoom.com

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SEEING & DOING — DOWNTOWN MALL

ANDREW COMBS PERFORMING AT THE GARAGE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF RICH TARBELL AND THE GARAGE)

The Garage | This studio in a converted one-car garage in downtown Charlottesville presents art shows, concerts and amateur films and hosts other creative gatherings. The venue provides space for local and regional artists of all types to share their work. For music and film presentations, the audience typically sits across the street on a hillside in Lee Park. The result is an art space that feels both open and intimate and is, in that way, the perfect expression of Charlottesville’s creative community. Located on 1st Street N in Charlottesville, between Market and Jefferson streets. 34 DEAD FINGERS AT THE GARAGE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE GARAGE)

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South Street Brewery offers a glimpse into the roots of Charlottesville craft beer, with tasting flights for the brew-curious, pints for the committed and excellent appetizers, salads, sandwiches and burgers to pair with a brew. 24 Tin Whistle Irish Pub takes its name from the 1843 invention by English villager Robert Clarke that became a mainstay of Irish folk music. Cofounded by a member of local Celtic ensemble King Golden Banshee, the pub offers lunch and dinner menus with Irish favorites, including bangers and mash and Scotch eggs. 25 Bashir’s Taverna serves a Mediterranean-based menu designed by its founder and namesake, who is devoted to using fresh ingredients to make innovative dishes. Live entertainment, including belly dancing, is a frequent feature that is not to be missed. 26 Java Java Cafe crafts espresso drinks and serves 100% organic, fair trade coffee, as well as blends from Republic of Tea. Enjoy ample seating, including couches and easy chairs. 27 Fellini’s boasts classic Italian fare, regular live music and a wine and beer menu rounded out by handcrafted cocktails. Locals love the weekend brunch and late-night atmosphere. 28 Citizen Burger Bar devotes itself to creating some of the town’s best burgers using locally raised beef that is exclusively grass-fed. Vegetarian, paleo and non-beef options, too. 29 The Downtown Grille draws inspiration from classic American fine dining with an extensive menu of seafood, Midwestern beef and refined side dishes such as au gratin potatoes and creamed spinach. 30 Hamiltons’ at First & Main was at the forefront of downtown Charlottesville’s dining scene when it was established more than 20 years ago, and it remains there today, serving outstanding lunch and dinner menus with contemporary American fare, prepared from locally sourced ingredients. 31 Miller’s Downtown has been a cornerstone of Charlottesville food, music and culture for 35 years. It serves lunch and dinner late into the night and includes a sports bar and pool tables on its third floor. 32 Christian’s Pizza is Charlottesville’s homegrown local pizza chain that got its start at its location in an old storefront on the Downtown Mall. Peruse a selection of pies with a host of topping combinations, then choose a slice or a whole pie to be heated on the spot. 33 Discover Charlottesville

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SEEING & DOING — DOWNTOWN MALL


sPotlight: city MarkEt

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n Saturday mornings in the spring, summer and fall, while the sun is still rising over Charlottesville, a large parking lot on Water Street is bustling with activity. Beneath awnings of every shape and color are tables laden with fruits and vegetables, flowers, pies and baked goods, jewelry and pottery — and the list goes on. This is the City Market, a weekly gathering of vendors in downtown Charlottesville that showcases the goods grown, raised and crafted by farmers, cooks and artisans from throughout central Virginia, and beyond. If there is anything more remarkable than the range of products available at the City Market, it is the enthusiastic support the market enjoys from the community. “We attract about 2,000 to 3,000 people each Saturday,” explains Justin McKenzie, the City Market’s manager. “We have families that bring their babies; we have 20-year-old UVA students; we have people from the senior community. So, we serve a diverse group of people in this community, and we also help support local businesses by featuring our local artisans, cooks and farmers.” The City Market got its start in 1973 with 20 vendors, the majority of whom sold agricultural products grown on their own farms. Today, the market features 110 vendors each week, with agricultural vendors making up about 60% of the mix, vendors offering prepared foods accounting for about 25% and artisans selling nonfood items comprising 15%. “We try to focus on local farmers and get as wide an array of produce in here as we can,” Justin says of the market’s agricultural vendors. For those creating prepared foods — be it a food cart serving doughnuts or a baker offering pies to take home — Justin and his team focus on local businesses, many of which use ingredients they grow or raise themselves. When it comes to the nonfood vendors, diversity of offerings is key, Justin says, noting that these artisans include jewelers, photographers, soapmakers and woodworkers, as well as several who produce items especially for children. The City Market begins on the first Saturday of April and runs through the last Saturday in November. In December, it is replaced by the Holiday Market, which takes place each Saturday morning until Christmas and features a larger number of artisans, including those who make wreaths and candles. After Christmas, the market goes on hiatus until spring, when it pops up again — much to the delight of the many locals and visitors, for whom a true Charlottesville Saturday always begins with a trip to the City Market. Find the City Market on Saturday mornings in the parking lot at 100 Water Street. Parking is available across the street in the Water Street Parking Garage. For those looking to experience an extra dose of Charlottesville culture, Justin recommends parking at the IX Art Park, about two blocks away, and enjoying some of the town’s local art on a leisurely stroll to the City Market. SPRING AT THE CITY MARKET. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

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SEEING & DOING — DOWNTOWN MALL

sPotlight: stU rifkin — thE nook + collEgE inn

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simple black awning greets you on the eastern end of the Downtown Mall: The Nook, it says, in white capital letters. Breakfast is available all day at this iconic diner, which first opened its doors in 1951. The menu boasts tried-and-true offerings, such as chicken fried steak, mingled with more contemporary favorites, including a sweet basil and tomato omelet. There’s meatloaf, mac ‘n’ cheese and crab cakes — all unassuming, but made with care. Everything about The Nook conjures an authentic diner, and that’s no accident — it’s exactly what Stu Rifkin intended when he and his partners bought the place in 2006. It seemed best to retain the very thing that had made it popular in the first place. So, as they renovated, they focused on retaining the diner’s classic, lived-in feel. When revamping The Nook’s menu, they took the same approach, improving ingredients but leaving the basic formula unchanged. “We bought The Nook and did the things we thought were important,” Stu says, simply. Stu knows what’s important because he has spent his entire professional career in the hospitality and restaurant industry, starting 44

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in his hometown of Boston, and then in New York, where he learned valuable lessons in how to create and manage a brand. In the 25 years since he moved to Charlottesville, he has owned 10 restaurants, including those in which he served as an investor and an adviser as well as the creator of new concepts he built from the ground up. Stu’s natural ability to see the potential in restaurant concepts and spaces also led to another venture — Rifkin Associates, a real estate and business brokerage that specializes in restaurants. Through the brokerage, he helps would-be restaurant owners find the ideal space for their project. When creating a restaurant brand, Stu pays attention to the details, and he doesn’t waiver. That could mean saying no to trends that may seem, on the face of it, to be smart business moves, but would ultimately degrade the brand. “You have to stay true to the concept,” he explains. In 2014, Stu seized the opportunity to revive another Charlottesville icon: College Inn. Well known to every University of Virginia student, College Inn has been operating continuously on The Corner — UVA’s campus town — since 1953. It specializes in pizza and offers delivery


STU RIFKIN OF THE ICONIC RESTAURANTS, THE NOOK AND COLLEGE INN. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

service. When Stu and his business partners bought the restaurant it was outdated, so the team started by renovating the kitchen, then revamped the facade. But, following the same formula Stu had used for The Nook, they didn’t dramatically remake the place. In revitalizing the menu, Stu took another page from The Nook playbook, focusing on refining the ingredients rather than rebuilding the menu from scratch. “We didn’t change the pizza recipe except for some of the toppings,” he explains. While he toys with ideas for other restaurants, for now Stu seems content to focus on extending the life of these two treasured Charlottesville eateries. “The College Inn, like The Nook, is an iconic business,” he explains. “I’m going to make sure they stay close to their roots.” Discover Charlottesville

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SEEING & DOING

Midtown

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ome call it Midtown, others West Main, but there’s no denying that this corridor along West Main Street is buzzing with activity. Once known as Three Notch’d Road, West Main Street connected University, Virginia — the town that originally housed the University of Virginia — with Charlottesville. As the latter grew, it eventually connected with and then consumed the town of University. Over the past decade, restaurants and shops have sprung up all along this street, breathing new life and vibrancy into an old area of town as historic buildings are transformed for modern-day businesses. Charlottesville’s rich food culture is out in full force on West Main Street, with eateries ranging from greasy spoons to upscale restaurants poised along its path, while storefronts offer everything from kids’ toys to antiques to import beers. If you’re looking to experience a slice of the real Charlottesville, here is where you’ll find it.

sEE The Lewis & Clark and Sacagawea Statue rises at the mouth of West Main Street, capturing Meriwether Lewis, William Clark and Sacagawea — explorers who led the 1803-1806 expedition into the Louisiana Purchase. Sculpted by Charles Keck in 1919, the statue was commissioned by Paul Goodloe McIntire as a gift to the city and in commemoration of one of its own, as Meriwether Lewis was born outside Charlottesville in Albemarle County. The statue has been criticized in recent years for its depiction of Sacagawea, who is crouched beneath the looming figures of Lewis and Clark but whose knowledge of Native American language and cultures was vital to the expedition’s ultimate success. 1 Jefferson School African American Heritage Center aims to honor and preserve the heritage and legacy of the Charlottesville and Albemarle County AfricanAmerican community. As part of this effort, the center offers permanent historical exhibits and a contemporary gallery showcasing the art of local African-American artists. It is located on the second floor of the Jefferson School City Center, one block north of West Main Street on Commerce Street. 2 CORNER OF 4TH STREET NW & MAIN STREET. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)


First Baptist Church on West Main Street came to life after the Charlottesville African Church Congregation formed in 1864. A few years later, the congregation purchased the circa 1828 Delevan building on West Main Street; at the site in 1877, it laid the cornerstone for its church, which was completed in 1893. The church continues to be a bustling house of worship and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 3

homemade sides. Blue Moon hosts live music on Wednesday and Thursday nights, 8–10pm, and on Friday nights, 9–11pm. 10 Tavern & Grocery set up shop in the historic Inge Grocery Store, a brick building purchased in 1890 by George Inge, a public school teacher. Inge set up a grocery store with a boardinghouse overhead that hosted the likes of Booker T. Washington, Inge’s classmate from college. Tavern & Grocery offers classic dishes such as steak frites and croque madame. The wine list is extensive, and Sunday brunch is a local favorite. 11

shoP The Spice Diva offers a vast array of high-quality spices and herbs, available in small or large quantities, as well as bulk beans and grains, making it a favorite among chefs and kitchen cooks alike. The shop, founded by a former opera singer, also offers cooking classes. 4

The Shebeen Pub & Braai offers South-African-inspired cuisine, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner seven days a week and weekend brunch. The menu is filled with familiar dishes and African fare such as groundnut stew, sadza cakes and entrées cooked to order from the braai (grill). 12

Feast!, in the Main Street Market at the corner of Fourth and West Main streets, is a specialty grocery store brimming with top-quality charcuterie, a global selection of cheese, hundreds of artisan-crafted foods and a café offering enticing sandwiches, salads and soups. 5

Continental Divide marks its front window with a neon sign reading “Get In Here.” With just 10 tables, this little restaurant has a cult following among Charlottesvillians, who love its strong margaritas and Red Hot Blues nachos. 13

Shenanigans is the kind of toy store you remember from your childhood, filled with toys and games for every age, from infants through teens. 6

sPotlight: shEnanigans

A children’s paradise is tucked away on West Main Street in Midtown Charlottesville. It’s not a park or a playground — it’s a toy store called Shenanigans, and for more than 40 years it has brought the joy of highquality, imaginative toys to generations of Charlottesville families. Here, kids can play with a wooden train set, flip through a book or cuddle a new stuffed animal. The space is bright and comfortable and its selection is astounding. To curate the toys she stocks at Shenanigans, owner Kai Rady looks back to her own childhood, when she and her

Gearharts Fine Chocolates handcrafts gourmet chocolates right in the heart of Charlottesville. At its production kitchen and dessert café in the Vinegar Hill Shopping Center, visitors can enjoy coffee and dessert, pick up chocolates to go and inquire about a tour. 7

Eat Mel’s Café cooks up delicious food for a very reasonable price tag. Whether they’re in the mood for a biscuits-and-gravy breakfast, a burger and fries or some of the best fried chicken in town, locals know they’ll always get a good meal at Mel’s. 8

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Blue Moon Diner understands the power of “breakfast all day” and top-notch diner favorites such as burgers and sandwiches, as well as classic comfort food entrées and

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Maya Restaurant is serious about crafting Southern cuisine using ingredients grown close to home. To create an authentic Southern menu, Chef Christian Kelly included family recipes offered by customers and friends throughout Charlottesville and beyond. W Main The result is aSttrue taste of the South. 9

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In the intervening years, Shenanigans has grown into a Charlottesville institution. “We are on our third generation,” Kai says, noting that some of the children who were young teens when the shop originally opened are now grandparents. Recently, a woman stopped in the store with three young adults and a child. The adults were her nieces, visiting their aunt in Charlottesville. “This is our tradition,” the customer told Kai. For someone who sees good, old-fashioned playtime as a birthright, there can be no higher compliment. “We have become a tradition,” Kai says, her eyes sparkling with delight. Visit Shenanigans at 601 West Main Street, in Charlottesville. Hours: 10am–6pm, Monday-Saturday; 12pm–5pm, Sunday.

KAI RADY — OWNER OF SHENANIGANS. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

SEEING & DOING — MIDTOWN brothers used to play with toys that had belonged to their father, including his toboggan, sled and pogo stick. “These were great-quality, great-playvalue toys,” Kai recalls. While her own childhood informs her approach at Shenanigans, it was motherhood that inspired Kai to enter the toy business in the first place. When she arrived in Charlottesville in 1973, she was a new mother with a 4-week-old baby boy, and she found herself on a constant search for safe and interesting toys to enrich his environment. That’s when she read an article in Ms. magazine that emphasized the importance of play and noted that by the time they enter the first grade, children have spent more than 10,000 hours playing. “[T]oys are most prized and best-loved if they have one simple quality: fun,” the article noted. Kai recalls thinking of her son and realizing, “This is his entitlement: to have developmentally appropriate, quality toys.” But finding those types of playthings was difficult. Kai also saw that she wasn’t the only Charlottesville parent in need of such a resource — so she decided to create it. She opened Shenanigans in 1974. Since then, the toy business has changed remarkably. Beyond competition from online retailers, Kai must work with more than 400 suppliers to get the right mix of toys for the store. But she remains steadfast in her initial inspiration for the store. “I still consider it to be an entitlement of childhood that children have quality playthings,” she says. 48

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UNION STATION — EARLY 20TH CENTURY. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE HOLSINGER STUDIO COLLECTION. ALBERT AND SHIRLEY SMALL SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY. UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA.)

Union Station | Once Charlottesville’s local train station, Union Station sits at the convergence of an east-west line owned by CSX Transportation and a north-south line owned by Norfolk Southern Railway. The station is a stopping point for several Amtrak routes and is the fourth-busiest station in Virginia for Amtrak. The original station was built in 1885, serving the Charlottesville and Rapidan Railroad, Virginia Midland Railway and Chesapeake and Ohio Railway. A baggage handling facility, added in 1915, is now home to the Amtrak ticket office and waiting area, while the original station now houses Wild Wing Cafe. 14


Linden Lane Interiors

Threepenny Cafe

The Spice Diva

At Linden Lane Interiors, you will find a curated collection of unique and beautiful items for a gracious home. We are your source for upholstery, furniture, lighting, pillows, candles, art and antiques, as well as gifts for all occasions. While searching for these treasures from near and far is fun for us, even more enjoyment comes from being able to share them with you, knowing they will fill your life with pleasure and comfort. Professional interior design services are available. Conveniently located in Midtown. Reserved parking available behind the store in spaces #4, 5, 6.

At Threepenny Cafe, we believe food is art. Food should not only fill you up, it should please all of your senses. It should be composed of fresh and healthful ingredients, locally and responsibly sourced. Join us for innovative, artisan cuisine made from the best and freshest ingredients, as well as craft cocktails, local draft beers and small vineyard wines. Ask us about the local farmers and producers we work with and our commitment to sustainability.

Offering the finest, freshest spices, salts, peppers, teas, pantry items, cookbooks to peruse or buy, Neuhaus Belgian chocolates, exquisite oils, vinegars, cocktail syrups and kitchen gadgetry. We have weekly cooking demonstrations and classes by area chefs. Local artisans have been commissioned to make cooking implements, kitchen art and condiments which make the perfect gift or addition to your kitchen. We are here to help you, answer questions, find spices from the usual to the most exotic and recipes to accompany them. Find us on Facebook, Instagram, RelayFoods.com or on our online store at our website.

Monday by appointment Tuesday–Saturday 11–6pm Sunday Closed 325 W Main Street, Charlottesville

434.529.6617

lindenlaneinteriors.com

The quality of your experience is our first priority. All dishes are made to order, so we can accommodate your special dietary needs. Dine outdoors on our dog-friendly patio. Free parking is available. Find our full menu and hours online at threepennycafe.com. Serving Dinner Wednesday-Saturday Serving Brunch Saturday and Sunday

410 W Main Street, Charlottesville, VA

434.218.3482

thespicediva.com

(Private Bookings Only Sun–Tues Evenings) 420 W Main Street, Charlottesville

434.995.5277

threepennycafe.com

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BECOMING CULTURED

Festivals

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ith its setting in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, its pedestrian-friendly Downtown Mall and its ready access to the University of Virginia, Charlottesville is home to a host of festivals each year. Virginia Film Festival takes place each fall at venues scattered throughout the city. Hosted by the University of Virginia, the most recent iteration featured more than 130 films and more than 100 filmmakers and guest speakers, including high-profile actors and directors. Look3 Festival of the Photograph transforms the Downtown Mall each June into an outdoor gallery filled with large reproductions of riveting photographs. This internationally acclaimed festival, hosted at venues throughout downtown, celebrates the exceptional work of photographers from across the world, including those who call Charlottesville home. Virginia Festival of the Book attracts authors from across the world while also showcasing books created right here in the Commonwealth. This five-day event — held each spring at venues around Charlottesville and the University of Virginia — is produced by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and includes a wide range of literary genres, from fiction to memoir to recipe collections to photography and beyond. Tom Tom Founders Festival marks Thomas Jefferson’s birthday each April with a week of events that focus on music, art and innovation. Centered in downtown Charlottesville, a rich variety of bands, startups, artists and visionaries gather to share their creativity in both ticketed and free events.

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or lovers of fine arts, Charlottesville has museums and galleries that present collections in a broad range of media, from painting, sculpture and photography to illustration, conceptual art and beyond. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection carries the mantle as the only museum in the United States dedicated to exhibiting and studying Australian aboriginal art. Affiliated with the University of Virginia, the collection strives to advance the knowledge and understanding of Australia’s indigenous people and share that culture with a worldwide audience. 1 DAVE MATTHEWS BAND AT JOHN PAUL JONES ARENA. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF GRANT BURKS)

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The Fralin Museum of Art comprises a permanent collection of more than 12,000 objects, featuring European and American paintings and sculpture, and Asian, American Indian and ancient Mediterranean art. The University of Virginia’s art museum, it also offers a robust ledger of visiting exhibits. 2 Graves International Art boasts an inventory of original artwork that spans over six centuries. John Graves, and his son, Alex, carefully curate a gallery of antique and contemporary paintings and prints from both American and European artists, with all pieces being of the finest quality. 3 Second Street Gallery presents 10 to 14 separate exhibitions of local artists’ work each year, as well as related educational and outreach activities. Founded in 1973 by a group of 10 artists, it is the oldest nonprofit, contemporary art space in central Virginia. 4 Virginia Discovery Museum features permanent and rotating exhibits promoting children’s imaginative play, including Showalter Cabin, originally built in the 1700s and reconstructed within the museum. Little C’ville offers child-size replicas of the local post office, fire station, bakery, doctor’s office, theater and market. 5

Music & Theater

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ith performances happening in Charlottesville nearly every day, whenever the mood strikes to catch live music, chances are you’ll find something to suit your taste. If theater is your passion, you’ll find high-quality productions underway year-round through numerous student and volunteer groups. John Paul Jones Arena plays host not only to UVA Cavaliers basketball but also internationally known musicians such as Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones, Lady Gaga, Elton John and Dave Matthews Band, which got its start in Charlottesville in the early 1990s. The 15,000-seat arena also hosts conventions and other events throughout the year. 6 The Jefferson Theater first launched in 1912 as a live performance theater, reopening in 2009 after a comprehensive restoration. With two full-service bars and state-of-the-art lighting and sound systems, the Jefferson has become a favorite spot for many nationally known bands. 7 The Paramount Theater is a cultural crossroads for the community, as it has been since it opened in 1931. In 2004, the theater was painstakingly restored and continues to offer a wide array of entertainment, including shows geared especially for children. 8 Discover Charlottesville

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53 20 The Southern Café & Music Hall offers the ideal spot to catch a show in a smaller venue, with a 300-seat capacity. Southern-inspired fare is also available at the adjacent café, making for the perfect night on the town. 9 Violet Crown Cinema hosts both mainstream and independent films and provides a contemporary movie theater experience, complete with freshly prepared food, craft beer and fine wines. Each chair has a fold-out table, and reclining front-row seats are also available. 10 Miller’s Downtown hosts musical artists of all stripes, such as jazz trumpeter John D’earth, who plays on Thursday evenings. Each of the musicians from the Dave Matthews Band also played at Miller’s before the group won international fame. With a full-service bar and dinner served late, this is the spot for an intimate experience of Charlottesville’s live music scene. 11 Sprint Pavilion presents nationally known acts in a covered outdoor theater that includes regular and box seats as well as a large lawn for general admission. The Pavilion, as the locals call it, is also home to Fridays After Five, Charlottesville’s free summer concert series. 12 Live Arts brings community theater into the heart of downtown Charlottesville, producing a half-dozen plays each year, each running for several weeks. The group provides opportunities for children, teens and adults to learn all aspects of theater — from acting, playwriting and script analysis to improvisation, musical theater and movement. 4 The Ruth Caplin, Culbreth and Helms Theatres host UVA’s undergraduate and graduate programs in acting, technical direction, scenic and lighting design, costume design and technology. The resulting professional-level productions provide a remarkable experience and a glimpse into the next generation of theater. 13 52

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Creative Arts & Entertainment

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harlottesville’s robust arts community embraces creativity in a host of forms. For those looking for the creative path less traveled, there are plenty of events, exhibitions and classes to enjoy. Charlottesville Lady Arm Wrestlers, also known as CLAW, is a group of women who raise funds for female-initiated causes in the Charlottesville community. Arm-wrestling events take place two to three times a year in the parking lot of Blue Moon Diner on West Main Street. Learn more at clawville.org. 14 IX Art Park provides an outdoor space for large-form art exhibits that are free and open to the public. Nearly all works are created on-site through the efforts of artist-led citizen teams and school groups. 15 The Glass Palette offers classes and workshops in creating glass art, with techniques including fusing glass and kiln-forming items, such as plates and bowls; lampworking to create beads; stained glass and mosaic production; and sandblasting. Walk-in projects welcome. 16 City Clay is the community’s hub for clay arts, with studio space, workshops and a gallery. Classes are offered in hand-building, pot throwing, glazing and more, and visitors can admire the work of studio artists in regularly rotating gallery exhibits. 17 Charlottesville Derby Dames includes more than 80 members who compete in flat-track roller-skating. The group donates a portion of its event proceeds to local charities and participates in local community events and fundraisers. Learn more at charlottesvillederbydames.com.

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FROM LEFT: AFRICAN MUSIC & DANCE ENSEMBLE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JANE HALEY) | UVA STUDIO ART. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF 160OVER90) | CREATIVE LOCK-IN AT HACKCVILLE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ANDY PAGE) | SHEETHAL JOSE [COLLEGE ’16] AT THE FRALIN MUSEUM OF ART DURING INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION WEEK. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF COE SWEET)

sPotlight: Uva arts

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lthough you may have come to Charlottesville for business, or for a wine country tour or a visit with family, Jody Kielbasa, vice provost for the arts at the University of Virginia, invites you to stay for the art. “Even if you are a guest in Charlottesville spending a night or two in a hotel, if you are interested in taking in a production or a performance, or touring a museum or an exhibition, we provide all those opportunities at the University,” he says. When he first came to Charlottesville seven years ago, Jody was impressed not only by the breadth of its arts offerings, but also by the quality of its exhibits and productions. He credits the caliber of the arts at UVA to the strong collaboration between deeply talented students and professionals from both the faculty and the wider Charlottesville community. Add to this the avid support of the University, and you have an arts program that is unrivaled anywhere in central Virginia. Jody notes that the University is home to central Virginia’s only comprehensive museums of art: The Fralin Museum of Art, which features a permanent collection of more than 12,000 objects, and the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, the foremost collection of aboriginal art in the United States. These are exceptional collections that sometimes fly under the radar of visitors and residents alike, who are not necessarily expecting museums of such caliber in a small city. Jody hopes to change that as more visitors discover the wealth of visual art right here in Charlottesville. “We are really providing these facilities and these great collections to our community, and welcoming them in,” he says. While UVA Arts includes fantastic visual art collections, it only starts there. Jody’s initial relocation to Charlottesville was to serve as director of the annual Virginia Film Festival, which shares new feature films and

documentaries from filmmakers near and far and attracts well-known actors and directors from across the world. He continues to direct the film festival, which is embarking on its 29th season. For those who appreciate theater, the Heritage Theatre Festival is the only professional summer theater in the Charlottesville area. In this oneof-a-kind festival, professional stage artists work side by side with UVA faculty, staff and students, as well as with members of the Charlottesville community, to present musicals, classic works and contemporary plays. Music lovers will also find plenty to enjoy through UVA Arts, including the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia, which combines the talents of professional musicians, Charlottesville residents and University of Virginia students. In addition, the Tuesday Evening Concert Series presents the works of internationally known classical chamber musicians, such as violinist Joshua Bell, mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe and the Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet. UVA Arts expands further, as well, and includes WTJU, the University’s radio station, which presents original programming offering a rich, diverse array of music and other forms of expression. Jody is also proud of the annual President’s Speaker Series for the Arts, which brings accomplished individuals to the University to discuss the importance of arts. Past speakers have included comedian and actress Tina Fey and actor Kevin Spacey. Not only does UVA Arts offer an exceptional roster of events — it does so affordably. Jody notes that admission to the University’s museums, exhibitions and events is often either free or much less expensive than at comparable venues in larger metropolitan areas. To explore more about UVA Arts, visit arts.virginia.edu where you’ll find an up-to-date calendar with links to tickets and venue information. Discover Charlottesville

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MAKING MERRY

Festivals & Events

March

Virginia Festival of the Book ~ Downtown & UVA Charlottesville Ten Miler ~ Downtown

April

Charlottesville Marathon ~ Albemarle County Tom Tom Founders Festival ~ Downtown Taste of Monticello Wine Trail Festival ~ Downtown Foxfield Spring Races ~ Garth Road, Albemarle County Charlottesville Dogwood Festival ~ Charlottesville Historic Garden Week ~ Albemarle County

May

University of Virginia Commencement Exercises ~ UVA Montpelier Wine Festival ~ Montpelier Crozet Spring Arts & Crafts Festival ~ Crozet Strawberry Festival ~ Court Square, Stanardsville James River Runners Annual Chili Cookoff & Brewers Challenge ~ Scottsville Charlottesville Festival of Cultures ~ Downtown

June

Look3 Festival of the Photograph ~ Downtown Mid-Atlantic Power Festival ~ Event Field, US Route 33, Ruckersville

July

Monticello Independence Day Celebration and Naturalization Ceremony ~ Monticello Orange County Fair - New Fairgrounds, Orange County Wintergreen Summer Music Festival ~ Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County Albemarle County Fair ~ James Monroe’s Highland African-American Cultural Arts Festival ~ Charlottesville

August

Virginia Craft Brewers Fest ~ Devils Backbone Brewing Company, Nelson County Montpelier Civil War Encampment ~ Montpelier Lockn’ Music Festival ~ Oak Ridge Estate & Farm, Nelson County


September

Top of the Hops Beer Fest ~ Downtown Orange Street Festival ~ Town of Orange Heritage Harvest Festival at Monticello ~ Monticello Foxfield Fall Races ~ Garth Road, Albemarle County Constitution Day Celebration & Taste of Freedom Wine Festival ~ Montpelier Cville Pride Festival ~ Downtown Cville Vegetarian Festival ~ Downtown Charlottesville Women’s Four Miler ~ Garth Road, Albemarle County

October

Fall Fiber Festival & Montpelier Sheep Dog Trials ~ Montpelier Crozet Fall Arts & Crafts Festival ~ Crozet The Festy Experience ~ Nelson County Preserve

November

Vintage Virginia Apples Annual Harvest Festival ~ Albemarle Ciderworks, Albemarle County Virginia Film Festival ~ Downtown & UVA Montpelier Hunt Races ~ Montpelier

December

First Night Virginia Festival of the Arts ~ Downtown

Noteworthy Ongoing Events Saturdays ~ City Market (April – Nov) ~ Downtown Friday ~ Fridays After Five (April – Sept) ~ Downtown Summer ~ Ash Lawn Opera ~ Paramount Theater, Downtown September & October ~ Apple Harvest Celebration ~ Carter Mountain Orchard, Albemarle County June through August ~ Heritage Theatre Festival ~ UVA

SCENIC VIEW OF SHENANDOAH NATIONAL PARK. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF KAREN BLAHA)

Discover Charlottesville

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LIVING OFF THE LAND

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mall farms and artisan-crafted food took root in the Charlottesville area nearly two decades ago, putting this region at the forefront of the contemporary local food movement that is gaining popularity across the United States. Central Virginia’s fertile land and farming heritage, combined with the entrepreneurial spirit of its citizens, proved the ideal combination for a thriving small-farm culture. Now, restaurant menus all over town tout local ingredients, farmer’s markets take place nearly every day of the week and grocery stores stock items produced right here, making it easy for even a casual visitor to get a taste of the place we call home.

Pick yoUr own

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ick-your-own farms have gained popularity in recent years and with good reason — the experience of harvesting locally grown produce at its peak of freshness, plucked right from the field or orchard, is immensely enjoyable. For the farms themselves, it is a business model that helps maximize the amount of harvest that stays in the community. The Charlottesville area is home to several pick-your-own farms that have been family owned for generations. Whether visiting in spring, summer or fall, these are fun excursions, especially for families. Chiles Peach Orchard is a local favorite for strawberries in the spring and peaches in the summer. The orchard sells fresh-picked fruit and other produce in its country store, where it also offers treats — ice cream, milkshakes and doughnuts — flavored with peaches. Wine and cider tasting rooms round out the orchard’s offerings. 1351 Greenwood Road in Crozet, about 25 miles west of Charlottesville. Carter Mountain Orchard, perched on a mountaintop just outside Charlottesville, offers sweeping vistas of the Blue Ridge Mountains and the City of Charlottesville. With wine and cider tasting rooms, a bakery, weekend hayrides and Thursday night concerts in the summertime, Carter Mountain is a destination for spring, summer and fall. Late summer and autumn visitors can pick their own apples at the 150-acre apple orchard, choosing among more than a dozen varieties, including Ginger Gold, Gala, Stayman, Winesap, Braeburn, Pink Lady and Albemarle Pippin. 1435 Carters Mountain Trail, about 3 miles south of Charlottesville. Spring Valley Orchard offers the opportunity to pick sweet cherries from late May through June and pick up gourmet foods such as fruit butters, jams and jellies at the orchard’s country store. 3526 Spring Valley Road in Afton, about 25 miles southwest of Charlottesville. CHILES PEACH ORCHARD. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF AARON WATSON PHOTOGRAPHY AND CHILES FAMILY ORCHARDS)

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is made on the farm, and visitors can purchase products at the farm’s store, which is open every day and accepts cash or check. 839 East Side Highway in Waynesboro, about 30 miles west of Charlottesville.

LIVING OFF THE LAND

Caromont Farm produces fresh and aged goat’s and cow’s milk cheeses, making about 30,000 pounds per year. The farm’s herd of Alpine, Saanen and LaMancha goats are bottle-raised, rendering them friendly and docile. Each year, co-owner Gail Hobbs-Page, a former chef, puts out requests in the community for “goat cuddlers” to help tend to the newborn goats during kidding season, a beloved annual tradition that was widely reported in the national media in spring 2016. For cow’s milk cheeses, Caromont sources grass-fed Jersey milk from nearby Silky Cow Farm. Look for its products at cheese stores throughout Charlottesville, including Feast! and Timbercreek Market.

MOM & BABY GOAT. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JUSTIN IDE AND CAROMONT FARM)

Drumheller’s Orchard was established in 1937 and has remained in the Drumheller family ever since. The orchard includes apple and peach trees available for pick-your-own harvesting, while a commercial kitchen on the property churns out pies, cakes, jellies, jams, ice creams and cobblers. Each fall since the 1970s, the orchard has put on a festival that includes hayrides to a pumpkin patch and corn maze, apple slingshots, food and craft vendors, live music, fresh cider and apple baked goods. 1130 Drumheller Orchard Lane in Lovingston, about 40 miles southwest of Charlottesville.

he Charlottesville local food community hosts a prolific number of small farms producing a broad array of products, including organic produce, pastured meat and eggs, and fresh milk and artisan cheese.

The Market at Grelen is a farm and market where visitors can pick blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, peaches and apples amid the 600acre Grelen tree nursery. Afterward, visit the café for lunch featuring many locally sourced ingredients or peruse the European-style garden

A Better Way Farm & Goat Dairy raises dairy goats and sells goat’s milk products — including cheese, soap and gelato — as well as herd shares, which provide direct ownership in the herd through which one can receive raw goat’s milk. Everything A Better Way produces

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shop for trees and shrubs raised in the nursery, as well as a healthy dose of garden equipment and planters. 15091 Yager Road in Somerset, about 25 miles northeast of Charlottesville.

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Timbercreek Market features a robust selection of pastured meat — including beef, chicken, duck, lamb, pork and rabbit — raised just 7 miles away at Timbercreek Farm and prized by local chefs and bakers. The store also carries fresh fruit and produce from both its own fields and from other sustainable farms in the area as well as dry goods and specialty foods, much of which is also crafted in the Greater Charlottesville area. Timbercreek Market serves lunch Tuesday through Sunday and features a collection of delectable sandwiches. Prepared sides and the market’s signature “Steak on a Plate” — a steak chosen from the case, cooked to order — are also available for dine-in or take-out. Dinner is served by reservation Thursday through Saturday. 722 Preston Avenue in Charlottesville. Yoder’s Country Market specializes in bulk foods including nuts, dried fruits and snacks; preservative-free homemade baked goods sourced from a half-dozen Mennonite bakers; all-natural, locally raised meat and dairy products; and many organic, gluten-free and sugar-free items. The market also features


specialty goods such as canning supplies and a wide selection of Amish-made indoor and outdoor furniture and playground equipment. A visit can include lunch from the market’s in-house deli and a walk down to the barnyard, home to chickens, ducks, guineas, pheasants and turkeys, as well as friendly goats that can often be seen climbing their own 15-foot-high skywalk. 2105 S Seminole Trail (U.S. Route 29) in Madison, about 30 miles northeast of Charlottesville.

sPotlight: Jay + stEPh rostow

“I

don’t like to waste things,” Jay Rostow says, taking a break from work on a sweltering summer afternoon. “I view people’s work as very important.” It is this penchant for preservation that led Jay and his wife, Steph, to their thriving small business, Virginia Vinegar Works, launched in 2007. At their production facility in Nelson County, Jay and Steph produce gourmetquality vinegars from Virginia-made wine and beer and locally sourced fruits and berries. “Whether it’s a brewer or a winemaker or a fruit grower, we repurpose things that would normally be thrown away, or — as far as the fruit goes — be relegated to just processing for canned goods,” Jay explains. “We really enjoy the repurposing of something, and when we find something that meets our criteria, we can do a really good job.” Winemaking is a delicate process, and many things can go wrong along the way. When a Virginia winemaker has a batch of wine that has been compromised in some way during processing or aging, it can find new life in Jay and Steph’s hands. “Winemakers work very hard at the wine that they create, and the brewers work very hard at the beer they create, and those are the raw materials that we use to make our wine and our malt vinegars,” Jay says. “Without these wonderful people, we wouldn’t have a raw material to work with.”

JAY AND STEPH ROSTOW AT THEIR VIRGINIA VINEGAR WORKS PLANT. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JUDY BIAS)

Before they made vinegar commercially, Jay and Steph produced it at home. Making and preserving food has been a cornerstone of life on the couple’s 46-acre homestead near Wingina, Va. “We did natural pickles before, we’ve brewed beer before, we’ve made wine before and we thought, ‘Well, we are going to try to make a homemade vinegar and see if it’s any better than a store-bought vinegar,’” Jay recalls. The couple began making vinegar from wine and gifting it to friends, who responded with enthusiasm. Jay and Steph found that, yes, artisan-crafted vinegar was far superior to what was available on most store shelves. “It was quite a treat when we first sampled our own first batch of vinegar,” Jay says. “The thing that surprised us the most was how very well the vinegar took on the flavor characteristics of the wine that it was made from.”

Today, Virginia Vinegar Works produces a half-dozen red wine, white wine, malt, nectarine and blackberry vinegars in addition to small batches of varietals such as Norton, a grape native to Virginia. Their products are sold from Connecticut to Alabama and will soon be on shelves in the Midwest. At their homestead, Jay and Steph continue to practice the lifestyle that first brought them to vinegar making. They preserve the food they grow in their expansive vegetable gardens and raise chickens for meat and eggs. Their 760-square-foot cabin, which they built themselves, is solar-powered. “We try to conserve quite a bit,” Jay says. “We like our gardening, being able to grow our own food, make our own power and have our own water. It makes us feel very independent, and not really beholden to anybody else for any one thing.” Discover Charlottesville

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AL FRESCO DINING ON THE HISTORIC DOWNTOWN MALL. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

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irginia’s reputation as an emerging culinary mecca was sealed when Esquire magazine bestowed on the Commonwealth a special recognition for its wealth of talented chefs, its dedicated farmers and food artisans and its enthusiastic eaters. In many ways, Charlottesville is the epicenter of this food revolution. For years, the city and its immediate surrounding area have hosted a heap of restaurants — over 400 by some estimates. It is a staggering number of eateries for a city of just 44,000 people. And while there is always a degree of churn, with new restaurants replacing old ones, the mainstays of Charlottesville’s culinary scene are surprisingly stable. Another hallmark of the city’s restaurant offerings is the number of independently owned and operated eateries. While chain restaurants certainly exist here, locally owned spots make up the lion’s share. Charlottesville’s citizens value entrepreneurship, and nowhere is that more evident than in its array of eateries. Whether you’re hungry for a hearty breakfast or a light lunch, a Southern supper or a French-inspired dinner, Charlottesville offers a solution to make practically any food wish come true. 60

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BrEakfast Ivy Provisions serves breakfast sandwiches on a biscuit, croissant or bread or inside a wrap and offers other casual fare such as yogurt and granola. Espresso and coffee drinks are also available, as are lunch items and a wide selection of wines and other local foods. Eat it there or take it to go as you head off to your day’s adventures. 2206 Ivy Road, close to UVA and western Charlottesville. Moose’s Restaurant by the Creek awaits at the bottom of a quiet road in the Belmont neighborhood, ready to present you with a delicious, dinerstyle breakfast (or lunch) in its unassuming dining room. Breakfast is served all day, with daily specials including eggs Benedict and countryfried steak with country gravy. New visitors are encouraged to take a picture with the diner’s set of majestic moose antlers. 1710 Monticello Road, in Charlottesville, in the Belmont neighborhood.


Bodo’s Bagels features several bagel flavors and every fixin’ you can imagine. Families love the quick service and PB&J option. With three locations in Charlottesville — at 1418 Emmet Street N, near Barracks Road Shopping Center; 1609 University Avenue, on The Corner; and 505 Preston Avenue, near the Downtown Mall — a Bodo’s is bound to be nearby. Tip Top Restaurant serves breakfast all day, with an extensive menu featuring tried-and-true diner fare such as eggs, omelets and platters. With equally extensive lunch and dinner menus and terrific views of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Tip Top is family-friendly and popular with locals. 1420 Richmond Road in Charlottesville, on Pantops Mountain. Blue Moon Diner is a longtime cult favorite, with breakfast served all day (as well as lunch and dinner) in this funky restaurant in Midtown. Weekend brunch specials are also available. 512 W Main Street in Charlottesville, near the Downtown Mall. La Taza Restaurant & Coffeehouse has been churning out Latininspired cuisine for years, winning a strong following among locals and visitors for its weekday breakfast and weekend brunch menus. In a hurry? La Taza offers a full coffee menu, fresh-baked muffins and taquitos to go. 407 Monticello Road, in Charlottesville, in the Belmont neighborhood. Lumpkin’s Restaurant, a family-owned business in Scottsville, offers classic diner fare for breakfast as well as American comfort food at lunch and dinner. Cash only. 1075 Valley Street in Scottsville, about 20 miles south of Charlottesville.

lUnch The Market at Bellair offers sandwiches, soups and sides all freshly prepared on-site, making it a great grab-and-go option, especially if your adventures are taking you to Crozet or other points west of Charlottesville. This gourmet market is a hidden gem within the Tiger Fuel gas station at 2401 Ivy Road in Charlottesville. Brazos Tacos specializes in Austin, Texas-style tacos for carnivores, vegetarians and even paleo enthusiasts. Order take-out from its user friendly online system or enjoy lunch (or breakfast or dinner) in Brazos’ large dining room or on its casual patio adjacent to a large green space ideal for kids and dogs. 925 2nd Street SE in Charlottesville, in the IX Building. Riverside Lunch has been a Charlottesville institution since 1935, specializing in burgers, fries and an extensive menu of casual fare. Locals love the fast and friendly service. 1429 Hazel Street in Charlottesville, just off High Street. Discover Charlottesville

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FEASTING Afghan Kabob cooks Afghan cuisine for its daily all-you-can eat lunch buffet, served in a setting where the culturally-themed decor and music contribute to an authentic experience. 400 Emmet Street N, in Charlottesville, across from John Paul Jones Arena. Milan Indian Cuisine serves a rich selection of Indian dishes at its buffet, available for lunch seven days a week. Pair your all-you-can eat meal with a traditional Indian beverage, such as chai tea or mango lassi, for the full experience. 1817 Emmet Street N in Charlottesville, on southbound U.S. Route 29. Burrito Baby, located in Gordonsville, serves burritos, bowls, nachos and soft tacos, made to order. If a sweet treat sounds like the perfect chaser for your burrito, try one of the restaurant’s dozen flavors of ice cream. 111 S Faulconer Street in Gordonsville, 20 miles northeast of Charlottesville.

dinnEr Tastings of Charlottesville lays low behind the lattice of its facade, but inside is one of the area’s premiere selections of wines, many of them available by the glass and still more for purchase by the bottle to take home. Lunch is served Tuesday though Saturday, and dinner is served Thursday through Saturday. Menus draw from both French and Virginian traditions. 502 E Market Street in Charlottesville, just off the Downtown Mall. Vivace, in the headquarters of an old peach orchard on the western side of town, has been serving fine Italian fare in Charlottesville since 1995. Its dinner menu, served seven nights a week, does not shy away from fine pastas, and seafood and meat lovers alike can find entrées to enjoy. 2244 Ivy Road in Charlottesville. Threepenny Cafe, named for the groundbreaking “Threepenny Opera” of the late 1920s, offers dinner Wednesday through Saturday and brunch on the weekends, with a menu laden with seafood and internationally inspired dishes. Enjoy a meal on the lush outdoor patio and stay for live music. 420 W Main Street in Charlottesville, in Midtown. Fry’s Spring Station — named for Fry’s Spring Service Station, which occupied the building for more than 70 years — serves dinner seven nights a week, showcasing a menu filled with seasonal ingredients and a mix of Italian and Virginian fare. Enjoy your dinner in the dining room, at the bar or on the restaurant’s ample outdoor patio. 2115 Jefferson Park Avenue in the Fry’s Spring neighborhood of Charlottesville, near the University and Scott Stadium. 62

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FEASTING

C’VILLE’S BELOVED C&O RESTAURANT. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

The Spudnut Shop | For a true taste of Charlottesville, simply cross the Belmont bridge from downtown and head into The Spudnut Shop, which has been serving its signature potato flour doughnuts since 1969. Owned by Lori and Mike Fitzgerald — and originally opened as a franchise by Lori’s parents — C h a r l o t t e s v i l l e ’s Spudnut Shop has enduring popularity SPUDNUT SHOP. (PHOTOGRAPH among locals, who COURTESY OF NICK STROCCHIA AND routinely buy every THE CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU) doughnut in the place. A few settle down at the shop’s tables to enjoy their breakfast, while most others get their doughnut fix to go. Stop by for a hot Spudnut, and you’ll immediately understand. Open 6am–2pm, Tuesday–Friday; cash only. Located at 309 Avon Street in Charlottesville.

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Firefly serves new American cuisine, with dinner seven days a week, as well as late-night menus and brunch on the weekends. A robust menu of drinks includes not only local, national and international wines and beers, but a selection of meads — alcohol made from honey — from Virginia. Bonus features include a small family-friendly arcade as well as board and card games. 1304 E Market Street in the Belmont neighborhood of Charlottesville. Restaurant Pomme, located in Gordonsville, offers classic French fine dining. From its menu to its decor to its carefully selected wine list, the restaurant’s owners pull from their own French roots to bring an authentic French experience to central Virginia. 115 S Main Street in Gordonsville, about 20 miles northeast of Charlottesville. Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie, located in North Garden, makes its wide selection of pizzas fresh on-site, using many ingredients sourced from local farms. The inventive specialty pies — with names like Annie Oakley, Lil Mermaid, Jack London and Buff Orpington — are true stand-outs, bringing in regulars and travelers alike. 4916 Plank Road in the Crossroads Store complex in North Garden, about 12 miles south of Charlottesville. Old Mill Room was built from the timbers of an old Virginia grist mill, steeping it in the history of the Old Dominion. Here, you can find traditional fine dining, featuring ingredients sourced from throughout the Commonwealth and dishes reflecting Virginia’s culinary traditions. Elegant casual attire required, with jackets and ties recommended. 200 Ednam Drive in Charlottesville, within the Boar’s Head Inn.


trEats Ben & Jerry’s satisfies a craving for ice cream like few others can. Stop by the shop for a scoop of an old favorite or try one of the limited edition flavors available only in its brick-and-mortar stores. 1112 Emmet Street N in Charlottesville, in Barracks Road Shopping Center. Splendora’s Gelato serves authentic, small-batch gelato — the Italian ice cream famous for its rich, dense texture. Try a few flavors and find your favorite, or nab one of the store’s imaginative desserts and espresso drinks. 317 E Main Street in Charlottesville, on the Downtown Mall. Paradox Pastry is the place to go for that 3 o’clock sugar fix, with cookies, cakes and pastries that are equal parts familiar and innovative. The Jewish Apple Cake is a specialty, and the carrot cake is nut-free. A full espresso bar offers a host of beverages to accompany your sweet treat. 313 2nd Street SE in Charlottesville, in Suite 103 of the Glass Building south of the Downtown Mall. The Pie Chest is Charlottesville’s homegrown pie shop, offering a rich selection of sweet and savory hand pies, slices and whole pies, including gluten-free and dairy-free options. The peanut butter pie is not to be missed. 119 4th Street NE in Charlottesville, right next to the Downtown Mall. Gearharts Fine Chocolates creates its award-winning chocolate confections by hand at its production kitchen and café near downtown Charlottesville. Discover your favorite artisan-crafted chocolate in their café and assemble a box to take home. Tours of the production facility (complete with tastings) are also available for a fee. 243-B Ridge McIntire Road in Charlottesville, across from the Omni Hotel in Midtown. King’s Gourmet Popcorn on Afton Mountain serves fair food favorites such as kettle corn, ice cream and pork rinds. Open seven days a week, this food truck is set up on U.S. Route 250, also accessible via U.S. Interstate 64 at Exit 99.

latE night C&O Restaurant stays open until 1 am seven nights a week, offering a late-night menu of comfort foods, prepared to the restaurant’s exacting standards using local ingredients. An icon of the Downtown Mall for over 40 years, C&O is beloved by locals for the large and varied selection of its wine cellar, including a nice offering of Virginia wines. 515 E Water Street in Charlottesville, one block from the Downtown Mall. Discover Charlottesville

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THE WHISKEY JAR. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU)

FEASTING Littlejohn’s New York Delicatessen is open 24 hours at its location on The Corner, the campus town for the University of Virginia. Choose from a wide selection of sandwiches and salads. 1427 University Avenue in Charlottesville, across from the UVA Grounds. LW’s Livery Stable is a great spot if you dig a good, small pub. It features a lively menu with tongue-in-cheek food categories such as Pony Bites, Grazing, Horse Bites and Sweet Feed — homages to the building’s history as a livery stable. 120 Old Preston Avenue in Charlottesville, on the lower level of the small shopping complex, at the western end of the Downtown Mall. The Biltmore keeps its outdoor patio — the largest in the city — open late, serving its Southern-inspired casual cuisine late into the night. 16 Elliewood Avenue in Charlottesville on The Corner, the campus town of UVA, across from the University’s Grounds. Zocalo creates Latin-inspired cuisine, taking inspiration from Spain, South America and Mexico, with dishes that are equal parts ingenuity and approachability. The bar boasts a large repertoire of cocktails and a vast array of wines and beer. 201 E Main Street in Charlottesville, on the Downtown Mall. Miller’s Downtown hosts a sign announcing “Kitchen Open Late” — a welcome sight for those looking for a burger or other bar fare after most other downtown spots are shuttered. Patrons can also choose to sit at the first-floor bar or head up to the third floor for the sports bar and pool tables. 109 W Main Street in Charlottesville, on the Downtown Mall. 66

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sPotlight: aBErdEEn Barn — a charlottEsvillE tradition

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The menu also bears a striking resemblance to the one George and ometimes, you just need a steak. Here in Charlottesville, when his chefs first developed in the mid-1960s. Early on, the steakhouse locals find themselves craving a choice cut of beef, they head over became known for its prime rib, which is slow-cooked overnight and to Aberdeen Barn. served with housemade au jus. “Everything’s prepared in-house,” Angela Founded in 1965 by George Spathos, Aberdeen Barn remains a prime explains. The restaurant is also known for its rib-eye steaks and bone-in example of the quintessential American steakhouse, just as he intended. Angus sirloin — all corn-fed beef sourced from the Midwest. For those George’s daughter, Angela, explains that her father developed an affinity not steak-inclined, the restaurant for steakhouses after immigrating offers a variety of seafood dishes — to the United States from Greece at such as crab cakes, sea scallops and the age of 18. “He came into New salmon — plus salads and more. York City and really loved the old, Like the menu, the decor has big-time steakhouses,” she says. largely kept with George’s original George eventually married and conception. The walls feature wood moved to Charlottesville, where paneling and decorations such as he realized his goal of owning antique wagon wheels — several of a restaurant by opening a small which were gifted by the restaurant’s breakfast place, The Waffle Shop — early customers. Many of those now Blue Moon Diner — on regulars now have grandchildren, West Main Street. Business was who know which wagon wheels came good, but George’s dream of a from their family. “When they come steakhouse persisted. He rounded in, they know the story,” Angela says. up the necessary capital and opened Angela treasures the fact that Aberdeen Barn on what was then the local families continue to make northern edge of Charlottesville, Aberdeen Barn a special place for and for the past five decades, the gatherings, and it warms her heart restaurant has remained true to when she sees children taking part George’s original vision. in extending family traditions — or This continuity is made making new ones. possible in part by the restaurant’s “There was a 5-year-old’s long-tenured staff. Among its birthday the other day and the 25 full- and part-time staff are family told us, ‘We’re here because several people with between 15 it’s where she wanted to come have and 45 years of service at the her birthday,’” she says, with a restaurant, including one of its hearty laugh. “So, it doesn’t hurt to head chefs. “It’s so much like a have the youngsters want to come family business,” says Angela, and bring the whole family.” who took over ownership of the Aberdeen Barn is located at restaurant with her brother, Terry, 2018 Holiday Drive in Charlottesville after their father died in 1986. and opens for dinner at 5pm “We get to know their families nightly. Reservations are encouraged, and their children — see them especially during home football games. growing up now and going off Visit aberdeenbarn.com for more to college and having children of ANGELA SPATHOS — CO-OWNER OF THE ABERDEEN BARN. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY information. their own.” OF ROY VAN DOORN)

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Michael’s Bistro & Tap House

Commonwealthskybar Restaurant & Bar

One of the East Coast’s first true craft beer tap houses, Michael’s Bistro has been serving up chef-driven, locally sourced New American cuisine alongside carefully curated draught and bottled beer selections since 1994. Located across the street from the historic University of Virginia campus, Michael’s offers a cozy bistro ambience in the heart of the bustling Corner. Boasting the best balcony in Charlottesville, Michael’s is the perfect place for a quick lunch, leisurely dinner, or a fantastic beer or craft cocktail any time of the day or night.

We welcome you to our commonwealth where we bring you inventive and distinctive dining, exceptional award winning bar offerings and our shared commitment to providing you an experience you won’t soon forget. Our menus feature expertly crafted dishes influenced by the bounty of our home state highlighting our region’s abundant flavors. Whether imbibing at our Library Bar, relaxing in our Restaurant or star gazing at our Skybar, we promise you a warm welcome and something to please your palate. We look forward to having you become a part of our community.

Mon–Sat 11:30–2am Sun 5:30pm–12am (or later) 1427 University Avenue, Charlottesville

434.977.3697

Mon–Thu 5–10pm Fri–Sat 5–11pm Happy Hour: Mon–Fri 3–7pm Brunch: Sun 10am–2:30pm

michaelsbistro.com 422 E Main Street, Charlottesville

434.202.7728 cwskybar.com

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ZoCaLo ZoCaLo is located in the center of Charlottesville’s Historic Downtown Mall. We offer contemporary Latin-inspired cuisine in a warm, modern setting. Flavors are drawn from Spain, South America and Mexico, and our dishes have just the right amount of boldness and spice to excite your palate without overwhelming it. Enjoy a glass of wine from our extensive wine list, which features a broad selection of Spanish, South American and Virginia wines. Our large patio is fantastic for sipping a signature cocktail as you catch up with friends or watch people strolling the Mall. Come and see what has made us a favorite with locals and visitors alike for the past decade. Dinner begins at 5pm Closed Monday

201 E Main Street, Charlottesville

434.977.4944

zocalo-restaurant.com


The P ointe Restaurant & Bar Savor breakfast, lunch and dinner in a fun, casual restaurant overlooking Charlottesville’s Downtown Mall. Relax and catch up with family and friends in the cool, lush atmosphere of our seven story garden atrium. Enjoy seasonal outdoor dining on The Pointe Patio sipping craft cocktails, local beers and international wines. The Pointe is the ideal place to stop in during or after a long day in downtown Charlottesville. Restaurant open daily 6:30am–10pm Bar open daily 11am–12am

212 Ridge McIntire Road, Charlottesville

Paradox Pastry

Aberdeen Barn

A one-of-a-kind, open format bakery and café, Paradox Pastry invites you to watch the bakers in action as you enjoy a variety of European and American offerings paired with signature coffees and teas. Enjoy a breakfast quiche, frittata, multi-grain muffin or croissant, try the tasty lunch specials featuring sandwiches, healthy soups and salads or go straight for the dessert action! You will find a rotating menu of confections to delight in — layer cakes, tarts, gluten-free options, pies and cookies upon cookies. Find us in the Warehouse District, just south of the Downtown Mall on 2nd Street. Mon–Fri 7am–6pm Sat 7am–4pm Sun Closed

Established in 1965 as Charlottesville’s premier steakhouse. Dinner at “the Barn” has become as central to the Charlottesville experience as tailgating at Scott Stadium before the big game. Serving only the finest certified Angus steaks among the fires of our open charcoal hearth, award-winning roast prime rib, fresh seafood, exceptional wine & much more. Discover what has made the Aberdeen Barn a local favorite for more than 40 years! You can also enjoy fine wine, cocktails & cordials at our piano bar in this unique cocktail area. Featuring light jazz piano Friday and Saturday and three flat screen televisions tuned into the latest sporting events.

434.817.6767

omnihotels.com/charlottesville

313 2nd Street, Charlottesville

434.245.2253

paradoxpastrycafe.com

Open daily from 5pm 2018 Holiday Drive, Charlottesville

434.296.4630

aberdeenbarn.com

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JEFFERSON VINEYARDS HARVEST. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF NGUYEN NGOC KHANH AND JEFFERSON VINEYARDS)

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harlottesville’s thriving local food movement extends into artisanal, handcrafted beverages — wines, beers, ciders and spirits that seek to capture the essence of their surroundings. In some ways, this industry represents the re-emergence of a craft beverage tradition that was strong among early Americans. Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States and a Charlottesville area native, actively cultivated European grapevine varietals at his mountaintop home, Monticello, with the vision of producing fine wines in the Commonwealth. At the same time, Virginia’s mountainous terrain proved ideal for tannic apple varieties that in turn made excellent cider, a common staple of the Colonial-era table. These days, the region around Charlottesville is perhaps best known for its wines. While Jefferson’s dreams of a wine industry took nearly 200 years to come to fruition here, over the last two decades Virginia has developed into a world-class wine region. The Monticello Wine Trail — a group of 30 wineries surrounding the city — is pivotal to this success, producing 70

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wines that are winning recognition in competitions around the globe for a delicate, old-world style combined with a bold, new-world flavor profile. As the region began to prove its wine-producing prowess, craft cider also experienced a resurgence, with its enthusiasts looking to revive this traditional beverage. Cideries now dot the entire map of Virginia, with a number of these artisans concentrated in the Greater Charlottesville area. At the same time, Virginia has become a hotbed of craft beer, and Charlottesville is home to some of the oldest craft breweries in the Commonwealth. Craft distilleries, the newest entrant to this mix, provide customers a chance to connect with a process that is deeply rooted in Southern culture and produces smooth, sophisticated spirits, including gin, whiskey, vodka and rum. While these artisan-crafted beverages cater to different tastes, they all share the ability to bring people together to lift a glass with friends old and new in a moment of pure enjoyment they will remember fondly.


A SELECTION OF CIDERS FOR EVERYONE’S TASTE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ALBEMARLE CIDERWORKS)

Albemarle CiderWorks is a family-owned cidery dedicated to the preservation of heirloom apple trees and artisan-crafted cider. More than 200 trees are cultivated at its orchard, and the cidery produces seven types of cider, including blends and single varietals, available for sampling and for purchase at its tasting room. In early November each year, Albemarle CiderWorks hosts its Apple Harvest Festival, with apple and cider tastings, hay rides, live music and local vendors. Located at 2545 Rural Ridge Lane in North Garden, about 12 miles southwest of Charlottesville.

Glass House Winery produces a dozen wines, including single varietals such as pinot gris, viognier, chardonnay and chambourcin as well as blends including a Bordeaux-style red and a Port-style red. Beyond its 12 acres in vine, Glass House produces a line of artisan chocolates handcrafted by its own chocolatier on-site. Enjoy your wine and chocolate in the winery’s tropical conservatory or out on one of its decks or lakeside tables. 5898 Free Union Road in Free Union, about 20 miles northwest of Charlottesville.

Bold Rock Hard Cider produces a range of ciders, including Virginia Apple, Carolina Apple, Virginia Draft, India Pressed Apple and Pear. The cidery has three central Virginia taprooms where visitors can stop in for a pint or fill a growler to go. Located at 1020 Rockfish Valley Highway in Nellysford, about 35 miles southwest of Charlottesville; 1351 Greenwood Road at Chiles Peach Orchard in Crozet, about 18 miles west of Charlottesville; and 1435 Carters Mountain Trail at Carter Mountain Orchard, about 3 miles southeast of Charlottesville.

Grace Estate Winery rests on the side of a mountain, overlooking the Piedmont to the east, surrounded by 62 cultivated acres. Tasting room visitors can sample the vineyard’s offerings, which range from single varietals such as chardonnay, malbec and tannat to blends including Le Gras Cuve — a vidal blanc-petit manseng mix. Food vendors and live music on Friday evenings. Tastings are not offered during this time, but select wines are discounted by the glass and bottle. 5273 Mount Juliet Farm in Crozet, about 17 miles northwest of Charlottesville. Discover Charlottesville

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DRINKING UP Three Notch’d Brewing Co. takes its name from Three Notch’d Road, a Colonial-era east-west passage that runs through Charlottesville. The brewery proudly salutes the area’s rich history via brew names such as Hydraulion Red — named after the original fire truck of the University of Virginia — and “No Veto” English Brown Ale, named for Patrick Henry’s vocal opposition in a Virginia court to the king of England’s right to veto Colonial laws. Head in on Thursdays for new beer releases. Located at 946 Grady Avenue until summer 2017, when the brewery relocates to the IX Building on 2nd Street SE.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE MONTICELLO WINE COMPANY IN THE CHESAPEAKE & OHIO RAILWAY DIRECTORY 1881–1882.

Monticello Wine Co. | Long before Virginia’s recent success in the world of wine, the Monticello Wine Co. of Charlottesville was using locally grown grapes to make well-respected wine. Founded as a cooperative in 1873, it became the largest winery in the South, with a capacity of 200,000 gallons. The winery was best known for its Virginia Claret Wine, and one of its wines was used to christen the USS Virginia in 1904. Monticello Wine Co.’s success prompted Charlottesville to name itself “Capital of the Wine Belt in Virginia.” After more than 35 years of making a name for itself in the wine world, Monticello Wine met its demise in 1916 with the coming of Prohibition. The four-story brick building that it called home, located on Perry Drive, burned down in 1937. A sign commemorating the winery is at the intersection of McIntire Road and Perry Drive. 72

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Pro Re Nata Farm Brewery, named for the Latin expression “as needed,” serves handcrafted ales and lagers in nearby Crozet. Sip a pint in the brewery’s taproom, or grab a seat outside and take in a marvelous view of the Blue Ridge Mountains. If you work up an appetite, the Over the Counter food truck on-site will gladly meet your noshing needs. 6135 Rockfish Gap Turnpike in Crozet, about 15 miles west of Charlottesville. Virginia Distillery Company offers central Virginia visitors the opportunity to discover and savor traditional Scottish whisky. At its production facility and visitors center in Lovingston, you can tour the distillery and learn more about its old-world methods, including its copper pot stills crafted in Scotland and its made-by-hand approach. The distillery’s first spirit, Virginia Highland Malt Whisky, is available to sample and for purchase by the bottle. Located at 299 Eades Lane in Lovingston, about 32 miles southwest of Charlottesville. Silverback Distillery produces vodka, white whiskey, rye whiskey and gin using rye, winter wheat, white corn and malted barley grown in Virginia. At its production facility and tasting room on the North Fork of the Rockfish River in Nelson County, visitors can sample straight pours of its spirits, or enjoy mini-cocktails, and then purchase a bottle (or two) to take home. Located at 9374 Rockfish Valley Highway in Afton, about 24 miles southwest of Charlottesville.

sPotlight: virginia distillEry coMPany

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wo large copper pot stills rise toward the ceiling of a pristine production facility in Nelson County. Beyond them, huge stainless steel tanks sit in neat rows, gleaming in the light streaming in the windows. This is the production hub of Virginia Distillery Company, and every day these tanks and stills are at work blazing a new trail in distilling: American single-malt whisky. To be a single-malt, a whisky must be produced at a single distillery, using malted barley — grain that is harvested, encouraged to germinate, heated to cease germination and ground into a coarse flour, or grist. The grist is mixed with water at varying temperatures to create mash, which is fermented into wash. The wash is then double-distilled into spirit and placed into casks for aging. In Scotland’s cool climate, single-malt whisky takes 12 to 18 years to mature. In Virginia’s temperate climate, that aging process takes just a few years, explains Gareth H. Moore, Virginia Distillery Company’s chairman and CEO. “The climate here is very similar to central Kentucky, where bourbon is made,” he says, noting that distillation also has a long history in Virginia. “It’s a proud tradition here.” Virginia Distillery Company was the brainchild of Gareth’s father, Dr. George G. Moore, a lifelong Scottish single-malt whisky aficionado and entrepreneur who saw the opportunity to marry Discover Charlottesville

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the distillery’s Virginia Single Malt continues to mature, it offers its Virginia Highland Malt, a single-malt whisky distilled in Scotland and finished in port wine casks at its Lovingston facility. “We decided to really make something that will stand out and rival the independent producers you see in Kentucky on the Bourbon Trail,” explains Maggie. “I think we did that pretty well.” Virginia Distillery Company is located at 299 Eades Lane in Lovingston. Tours and tastings are available on a walk-in basis or by reservation at the company’s website, “VIRGINIA WHISKY EXPERIENCE” TOUR. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF TOM DALY AND VIRGINIA DISTILLERY COMPANY) vadistillery.com. If you can’t make it to the distillery but would like to try single-malt whisky from Virginia Distillery Company, you can pick up a bottle of Virginia Highland Malt at Virginia’s climate with the centuries-old tradition of single-malt any Charlottesville ABC store. distillation. He invested in a 100-acre site just north of Lovingston, Virginia, and designed a state-of-the-art distillery with custom-made Potlight EffErson inEyards copper stills from Scotland as its centerpiece. It was an immense project, and one he did not live to see come n the Tree Deck outside the main tasting room at Jefferson to fruition. After George passed away in 2013, Gareth took the reins Vineyards, it’s easy to forget you are just 4 miles from town. It’s at Virginia Distillery Company to realize his father’s passion project. peaceful here. Large beech, maple and cedar trees rise overhead. Across As work progressed, Gareth and his wife, Maggie — the distillery’s a gravel walkway, the winery’s production facility hums with activity. chief experience officer — saw the value of inviting visitors to tour Nearby, English border gardens frame a stone patio and a parking area, the facility and learn about single-malt whisky. With the help of creating a country courtyard. Charlottesville-based architects, the couple designed a beautiful On the horizon are mountains lush with trees: Montalto and a Visitors Center, which provides guests a truly immersive education in somewhat hidden Monticello, both once owned by Thomas Jefferson, the art of single-malt whisky distilling. the third president of the United States, who made his home atop the Now, at Virginia Distillery Company, visitors can learn about the latter. Jefferson also once owned part of the land that is now the site spirit’s long history in Scotland, discover the tradition of distilling in of present-day Jefferson Vineyards, and in 1773 he gifted 193 acres to Virginia, tour the production facility and barrel house, and taste the Italian viticulturist Filippo Mazzei, whose family had a long history final product, either straight or in seasonally inspired cocktails. While of producing wine in Italy. A wine enthusiast, Jefferson envisioned

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Horton Vineyards

South Street Brewery

Jefferson Vineyards

Horton Vineyards is considered by many to be one of the most innovative wineries in the United States. It has led the way in Virginia by searching out grape varietals that would flourish in the Old Dominion’s climate and soil. Horton Vineyards is credited with introducing the Viognier grape to the state and bringing back the native grape varietal, Norton. The winery is located in Orange County, Virginia and was started in 1988 by Dennis and Sharon Horton along with long-time business partner Joan Bieda. Horton Vineyards currently has sixty seven acres under vine with plantings from the Rhone Valley, Bordeaux, Madiran, Spain and Portugal.

Charlottesville’s original brewery and the city’s only brewpub! We feature 12 beers on tap, including venerated South Street originals that helped shape the Central Virginia beer scene, as well as new beers reflecting the diversity and experimentation that is the heart of American craft brewing. Our food offerings lean heavily toward local artisans—from beef to bread, from tofu to produce and everything in between— reflecting our belief that Charlottesville, Virginia is the best place on Earth to live, drink and eat! Daily food and drink specials. Located just off the Downtown Mall.

Jefferson Vineyards is a family owned winery and vineyard, located where Thomas Jefferson and Philip Mazzei first began the American wine revolution. Three decades ago, we introduced quality modern viticulture to Virginia, helping realize Jefferson’s dream. Our winery offers select wines of superior quality and is considered to have “one of the region’s most consistent track records” (Wine Spectator). Located between two presidential homes, we are the closest winery to Charlottesville. Tastings of our current wine list are $10. Visit our website for current operating hours and group policies.

Open daily 11am–1am.

Open daily for tastings 10am–5pm.

1353 Thomas Jefferson Parkway, Charlottesville 106 W South Street, Charlottesville

6399 Spotswood Trail, Gordonsville, VA 22942

540.832.7440

434.293.6550

434.977.3042

jeffersonvineyards.com

southstreetbrewery.com

hortonwine.com

Discover Charlottesville

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ATTILA WOODWARD — MANAGING PARTNER & CO-OWNER AT JEFFERSON VINEYARDS. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JEFFERSON VINEYARDS)

DRINKING UP cultivating European grapes — known as Vitis vinifera — here in Virginia and thought Mazzei was the perfect person to do it. This collaboration brought about the establishment of the first commercial wine company in the Virginia colony. But fate had different plans. With the advent of the Revolutionary War, the vineyards were abandoned, and over the next 200 years, Jefferson’s dream of Virginia-grown European-style wines faded. Then, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, a few vineyards in the Commonwealth decided to try growing vines again. Jefferson Vineyards was one of those intrepid ventures. Jefferson Vineyards, which includes Mazzei’s original 193-acre parcel, is part of a 700-acre estate owned by the Woodward family since 1939. In 1981, the Woodwards began cultivating Vitis vinifera on the estate, initially as a personal hobby. Once again, an Italian viticulturist played a pivotal role in the plan: The family hired Gabriele Rausse — who had established vines at Barboursville Vineyards, about 20 miles away — to plant the first two vineyards. Within three years, the experiment proved a success, and the family set up a commercial winery. Now, 35 years later, Jefferson Vineyards has 22 acres in vine with chardonnay, pinot gris, merlot, cabernet franc, petit verdot, petit 76

Discover Charlottesville

manseng, viognier and riesling. “There has been a lot of emphasis on making a quality product here,” says Attila Woodward, the third generation of his family to helm Jefferson Vineyards, as he stands outside the production facility on this sultry summer morning. As a young man, Attila’s first job was working with Gabriele in the vines; now, he takes great pride in understanding every detail of the vineyard’s production, led by winemaker Chris Ritzcovan. “I feel very, very humbled by the great team we have here,” Attila says. A key member of that team is Amanda Charette, the vineyard’s general manager, who has watched the wine industry in Virginia grow rapidly over the past half-decade, mushrooming to more than 250 vineyards and wineries. While each tasting room offers visitors a unique experience, at Jefferson Vineyards, Amanda notes, the emphasis is on education. Team members receive detailed training in the vineyard’s wines and have a wealth of knowledge at their fingertips. “Consistently, visitors comment on the educational component of their experience,” Amanda says. “That’s something we really work hard at here.” Another remarkable aspect of a Jefferson Vineyards tasting is its sheer breadth: the vineyard produces 10 wines — and offers visitors tastings of them all, when available. This meticulous approach isn’t limited to the tasting room. One of the Woodward family’s long-held beliefs is the importance of serving as stewards of the land. In the early 1970s, the family was the first in Albemarle County to put its land under conservation easement, a decision that provides today’s visitors those unspoiled, panoramic views. And while the winemaking operation is three times the size it was 35 years ago, the family approaches continued expansion carefully to ensure that this vital piece of Virginia’s viticultural history is preserved. “We’ve tried to grow, but we’re trying to keep the essence of a village-like feel here,” Attila says. That effort is evident throughout Jefferson Vineyards on this summer morning. Honeybees buzz gently in the nearby border garden, and cicadas sing in the trees above the deck. Attila casts his gaze across the valley, where his family grows their grapes, toward the mountains once owned by Jefferson, rising in the distance. “Jefferson and Mazzei — they have a beautiful story of collaboration,” he remarks. Indeed, it is a collaboration that, 200 years later, continues to bear fruit. Jefferson Vineyards, located at 1353 Thomas Jefferson Parkway in Charlottesville, is open daily for tastings. Groups of more than six guests are invited to purchase bottles and glasses and enjoy their tasting on the vineyard’s grounds. In addition, groups of more than six people must make a reservation. For details, visit the Tastings page at jeffersonvineyards.com. On select Saturdays from late spring through summer, Jefferson Vineyards hosts Sunsets Become Eclectic, a family-friendly event that features some of the region’s finest musicians. There is a small admission fee per car, and guests may bring their own food, with wine from the vineyard available to purchase. For details, visit the Events page at jeffersonvineyards.com.


Castle Hill Cider

Chestnut Oak Vineyard

Utilizing both tradition and the cutting edge, Castle Hill Cider strives to bring you the highest quality and most enjoyable ciders. Visit our tasting room in gorgeous Keswick to try our award winning collection. Grab a few bottles for home after enjoying the views, both inside and out. Over 8,500 square feet of private event space available with magnificent views. Open daily 11am–5pm.

Chestnut Oak Vineyard was started with the intent of producing the highest quality wine possible in Central Virginia. We were inspired by those vineyards of the Monticello Region that came before us.

6065 Turkey Sag Road Keswick, VA 22947

5050 Stony Point Road Barboursville, VA 22923

434.296.0047

434.964.9104

castlehillcider.com

Blue Mountain Brewery The first brewery in Nelson County, we are a unique destination in the heart of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains. All our ales and lagers are brewed, bottled, canned and kegged onsite in Afton or down the road in Arrington at our Blue Mountain Barrel House. Our full-service restaurant is open daily and features appetizers, salads, sandwiches, burgers, specialty pizzas and desserts made from scratch using the highest quality ingredients we can find.

Come visit us for an unusual experience. We are located along a scenic Virginia byway, three miles south of the iconic Barboursville Vineyards.

chestnutoakvineyard.com

Cunningham Creek Winery Cunningham Creek Winery at Middle Fork Farm is a family friendly, dog friendly gathering place with music, food and events happening year round. Inside, savor a tasting at a table, the sipping bar or in front of the fireplace. Outside, enjoy the beautiful scenery on the deck, at a picnic table or on the lawn. Open Mon, Thu, Fri, Sat 11am–6pm, Sun 1–6pm.

9519 Critzers Shop Road Afton, VA 22920

3304 Ruritan Lake Road Palmyra, VA 22963

540.456.8020

434.207.3907

bluemountainbrewery.com

cunninghamcreek.wine

Grace Estate Winery

Pollak Vineyards

“An old world family heritage blends a new world wine tradition with Virginia terroir.” On 62 acres of Estate vineyards, we produce artisan small batch red and white wines; single varietals and blends. Join us in the friendliest tasting room around! Enjoy our award winning wines and beautiful vineyard views. Wed & Th 11–5:30, Fri 11–9 with live music and a food truck (Fri evening in the Vineyard) every week from 6–9, Sat 11–8:00, Sun 11– 5:30. Closed Mon & Tues.

Pollak Vineyards is a small, familyowned winery founded in 2003. We have 27 acres of French vinifera used to make estate grown wine that has the finesse and balance of the traditional French varietals. Our tasting room and patio offer views of our first vines, the pond and the nearby Blue Ridge Mountains. It is a scenic setting to enjoy a glass of wine and some of the best of Central Virginia’s wine country. Open daily 11am–5pm.

5273 Mount Juliet Farm Crozet, VA 22932

330 Newtown Road Greenwood, VA 22943

434.823.1486

540.456.8844

graceestatewinery.com

pollakvineyards.com

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GETTING OUT


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ore than two dozen parks lie within Charlottesville’s city limits, offering a means for all kinds of outdoor activities, from paved walking and biking trails to elaborate playgrounds to nature walks — and even a disc golf course. The city and its surrounding area are also home to several golf courses of the traditional kind. And for those looking for more rugged terrain, parks in neighboring counties offer hiking and mountain biking trails.

Bird watching Saunders Monticello Trail runs through the 89-acre Kemper Park along the Thomas Jefferson Parkway. The wide, gravel-lined trail winds its way 2 miles up to Monticello’s visitor center and ticket office, offering ample opportunity to observe native flora and fauna along the way. Other more rustic hiking trails are also available adjacent to the trail. With low wet areas and mixed hardwoods, birding opportunities include both resident and migratory species, including warblers, vireo and woodpeckers. Ivy Creek Natural Area offers 8 miles of walking and hiking trails just north of the city, accessible from Earlysville Road. With shady woods, open fields, streams and shoreline on the South Fork Rivanna Reservoir, watchful birders can find a wide array of resident and migratory species in this 200-acre wildlife habitat, including thrush, wrens, kinglets, warblers and waterfowl.

walking & hiking Ragged Mountain Natural Area, located just off of Fontaine Avenue southwest of Charlottesville, features 7 miles of trails that wind through 980 acres of mature forest, including oak, maple, poplar, hickory and pine trees. An important source of water for the City of Charlottesville, the natural area also features 4 miles of shoreline along Ragged Mountain Reservoir, with a floating trail bridge connecting the trail loop. Dogs, bikes and jogging are not permitted. The Appalachian Trail meanders along 544 miles in Virginia — more than in any other state. A significant portion of the trail, more than 100 miles, is within the Shenandoah National Park, where elevations rarely exceed 500 or 1,000 feet, making this portion of the Appalachian Trail (AT) ideal for beginners. You can access the AT from several points on Skyline Drive, including Skyland, milepost 41; Big Meadows, milepost 51; and Hightop Mountain, milepost 66.5. From the Blue Ridge Parkway, find the AT at Rockfish Gap, milepost 0; Humpback Gap, milepost 5.8; and Ravens Roost, milepost 11, among several others. DARK HOLLOW FALLS TRAIL ON A FOGGY DAY — SHENANDOAH NATIONAL PARK. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF KATY CAIN, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE)

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HAPPY GUESTS! — SHENANDOAH NATIONAL PARK. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF KATY CAIN, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE)

GETTING OUT

cooling off Onesty Family Aquatic Center, not far from downtown Charlottesville, on Meade Avenue, includes water slides, a lazy river, diving board, lap lanes and in-water playgrounds, offering something for every member of the family to enjoy. Locker rooms and a snack bar are available. An entrance fee is required. Greenleaf Park, on Rose Hill Drive, is home to a beloved spray park, where kids can play under a mushroom fountain, around an interactive water pole, or by in-ground jets, then dry off with a romp through the adjacent playground. Access is free. Forest Hills Park, south of Midtown Charlottesville, includes the city’s largest dedicated spray park, with several interactive water features. Two adjacent playgrounds include equipment for varying ages. Restrooms 80

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are available during spring, summer and fall. Forest Hills also provides a covered picnic area and a paved walking path. Mint Springs Valley Park, located at the northwestern edge of the neighboring town of Crozet, includes a 1-acre beach, with swimming open daily from Memorial Day through Labor Day for a modest fee. After a swim, you can take to the trails or cast a line and catch some trout. Parents can find playgrounds and picnic tables for the family as well. Walnut Creek Park, off of Old Lynchburg Road, south of Charlottesville, offers a 2-acre beach, with swimming open daily from Memorial Day through Labor Day for a modest fee. An additional 45 water acres are stocked with sunfish, channel catfish and largemouth bass, making Walnut Creek a favorite fishing spot. In addition, you can take advantage of the park’s 15 miles of biking, hiking or running trails and 18-hole disc golf course.


Chris Greene Lake Park, located north of the Charlottesville Albemarle Airport, is also home to a 2-acre beach and, as with other Albemarle County parks, offers swimming access for a modest fee from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Canoe rentals are also available, and the lake makes a peaceful fishing spot. Dogs can also swim at a roped-off water access area.

rUnning Riverview Park, located on the southeastern side of Charlottesville at the end of Chesapeake Street, provides the southern access point to the Rivanna Trail. This 2.3-mile paved trail treks along the Rivanna River. Variations of landscape, including tree canopy, wildflowers and river bluffs, offer a relaxing atmosphere for a good run. Lannigan Field, on Copeley Road, is home to the University of Virginia’s track-and-field teams and is open for use by the community. The 36.8-meter-radius track features eight 48-inch lanes.

golfing Old Trail Golf Club, in Crozet, is an 18-hole, links-themed course framed by mature hardwoods and mountain vistas. A great test for golfers of all skill levels, this local favorite features a full practice facility, golf academy and a full-service restaurant called Restoration. Spring Creek Golf Club, in Zion Crossroads, is worthy of its reputation as one of the top-rated courses in the U.S. and is home to several national and state tournaments. The club features a fully stocked pro shop, experienced teaching professionals and an exemplary practice facility as well as a full-service restaurant and bar called Tavern on the Green.

Ballooning Boar’s Head Ballooning has spent more than 35 years showing Charlottesville visitors an impressive view of the area. Setting off at sunrise from the Boar’s Head Inn, these one-hour hot air balloon tours offer panoramic views of the city, as well as Monticello to the east and the Shenandoah Valley to the west. Flights are followed by a celebration at Boar’s Head Inn. Evening flights are also available. Reservations required; visit 2comefly.com. Bonaire Charters offers hot air balloon flights in the early mornings and late afternoons, taking off from various locations surrounding Charlottesville and charting courses that provide a view of the town’s breathtaking surroundings. A bottle of champagne — or another drink of choice — is included in the ticket price. Reservations required: bonaire-charters.com. PILEATED WOODPECKER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF NATIONAL PARK SERVICE)


GETTING OUT

sPotlight: raggEd MoUntain rUnning shoP

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n Ragged Mountain Running Shop on a Tuesday morning a customer jogs, up and back through racks of running attire, wearing a pair of new running shoes. On his return, he slows abruptly, testing the fit. As he repeats the process, two Ragged Mountain Running Shop employees stand, their backs to walls of brightly colored running shoes on display, assessing his gait. When he completes the second round, one of the employees kneels to examine the shoes, zeroing in on what she thinks may be the issue. She offers an assessment, then walks to the back room, returning moments later with another pair. The process repeats. This pair is better — it’s the one. The gentleman leaves 10 minutes later, box in hand. This is the Ragged Mountain Running Shop experience. The oldest shop devoted to running gear in Virginia, customers come here knowing they will receive such one-on-one attention and expertise. The employees are trained to listen intently to their customer’s needs, including how the shoes will be used and whether any physical challenges are at play, and offer choices that speak to those needs. “Every single customer is treated to the highest level of service we feel is possible in this business, in this day and age,” says Mark Lorenzoni, who is sitting on one of the shop’s antique school benches. Co-owner of the shop with his wife, Cynthia, Mark says the impeccable customer service upon which Ragged Mountain Running Shop has built its reputation comes from a lengthy training process. Longer-tenured employees are integral in coaching newer ones, and Mark and Cynthia drive home the importance of customer service, including listening, making eye contact and dedicating time and attention to customers and, importantly, showing gratitude for each and every purchase. This approach to business has developed since the shop’s founding in 1982, in a 500-square-foot store on Elliewood Avenue, just up the street from its current location. “We wanted to build a culture of fitness — of outdoor walking, running — and share our passion with people and get them involved,” Mark says, reflecting back on the shop’s genesis when he and Cynthia were in their mid-20s. They chose Elliewood Avenue, in The Corner neighborhood of Charlottesville across from the Grounds of the University of Virginia, because they liked the energy that part of town offered. The store would relocate two more times to larger spaces in the intervening years — always on Elliewood Avenue — until it settled into its current spot in 2006. MONTALTO CHALLENGE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF CASSIDY GIRVIN AND THE CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU)


ALL IN THE FAMILY — RAGGED MOUNTAIN RUNNING SHOP. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF CASS GIRVIN)

“The business has been successful and grown,” says Mark. “We’ve worked really hard at it. We’ve tried to maintain that thought process of getting out of bed each day to serve people at two levels, giving them the best possible service they can get in here, but also providing what we see as a path to health: putting on races, helping organize training programs, doing clinics with kids, talking to schools.” Central to this dedication to volunteerism is the couple’s founding of the Charlottesville Women’s Four Miler, an annual race benefiting the breast cancer program at UVA Cancer Center, spearheaded by Cynthia. Since its inception in 1983, the race has raised more than $3 million for breast cancer research. “That’s been a real thrill to be able to raise money through our hobby,” says Mark. Through the years, Ragged Mountain Running Shop has served as the couple’s livelihood as well as a vehicle through which to support their community. It’s also been a way to connect with their children as they grew. All four of the couple’s kids work at the shop in some capacity — four members of a staff that numbers more than 60. Many are UVA students, as well as high school students and other young adults in the community. This vibrant tapestry of employees has been an unexpected joy for Mark and Cynthia. “We’ve had this family of UVA [student] employees, which turns over every three or four years, but have had a profound effect on our joy of what we’re doing,” says Mark. “We’ve gotten older; we had kids who grew up, moved on to college; now one of them is married and we have a grandkid — but our kids at Ragged Mountain stay the same age. We never even thought of it when we were 25, when we opened the doors of this business, that eventually we would be like second parents to the kids,” he adds. “That’s been really just a neat side path that we weren’t expecting.”

VINE TO WINE 5K AT BARREN RIDGE VINEYARDS IN FISHERSVILLE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF CORKSCREW RACING)

Corkscrew Racing | With its beautiful topography and views, central Virginia is an ideal spot for folks who enjoy outdoor recreation. These qualities also make it a natural home to dozens of vineyards, breweries, cideries and other venues that showcase the area’s exceptional beauty. Corkscrew Racing brings the best of these worlds together, offering running events at these locations that culminate in a post-race party featuring the finest central Virginia craft beverages, food and music. Participants register for the event, paying a registration fee that typically includes a t-shirt, tasting glass and tastings. Live music features local bands, and food is often available for purchase from one of the area’s top-notch food trucks. It’s an experience that is not to be missed. Learn more at corkscrewracing.com.

Now nearly 35 years into their journey, Mark and Cynthia remain as dedicated as ever to serving their customers. In the age of online retailers, Mark says he understands the value of customers who are interested in a hands-on experience. “When you shop here, we want you to feel like you’re investing,” he says. “It’s a cliché, but you’re investing in your community.” More customers filter in, searching for their next favorite pair of running shoes. As they enter the shop, each teams up with a Ragged Mountain Running shop employee who is eager to help. Mark surveys the scene from his perch. “It’s been a fun ride,” he says, with a quiet smile. “We feel very blessed.” Discover Charlottesville

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DAY TRIPPING A BUSY EVENING AT THE LOCAL FAVORITE — CROZET PIZZA. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

Crozet

J

ust an easy, 20-minute drive west of Charlottesville, this small but thriving community offers recreation, relaxation and ravishing views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Crozet’s downtown includes several eateries, including Crozet Pizza, Fardowners Restaurant and Public West Pub and Oyster Bar. You can chill out at a coffee shop or the new library, work out at a gym or browse the locally owned shops and artist galleries, including Blue Ridge Beads & Glass, Crozet Hardware and Crozet Artisan Depot. Families can enjoy the bounty of pick-yourown orchards featuring farm-fresh produce such as apples, peaches and strawberries. Visits to these farms are annual traditions among locals. With wine country and the Blue Ridge in its backyard, Crozet offers plenty of opportunities to dine, drink and kick back in al fresco splendor. In addition to beautiful tasting rooms, many of the area’s wineries, such 84

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as King Family Vineyards and Grace Estate Winery, feature outdoor seating designed for admiring the breathtaking views. For beer lovers, Starr Hill Brewery offers a rotating lineup of more than a dozen original brews on tap as well as free brewery tours on the weekend, frequent live music and locally owned food trucks. On the other side of town, Pro Re Nata Farm Brewery features its own food truck, plus outdoor seating that includes a seasonal fire pit ideal for spending an evening with friends. For those seeking more out-of-doors attractions, Crozet hosts numerous spots to hike, bike, fish and swim. Information on the town’s many offerings is available at the Albemarle Tourism & Adventure Center, located in the historic Crozet train depot, where visitors can find informational brochures and talk with the center’s travel specialists.


The Barn Swallow The Barn Swallow, an artisan gallery for home, garden and you. Stroll through garden paths leading to our 1800’s historic barn featuring 80+ artisans. Founders, friends and potters Mary Ann Burk and Janice Arone curate a collection of one of a kind objects sure to delight the senses: clay, textiles, wood, jewelry. Event flowers and gift registry available. We are just west of the “city.” A perfect stop. A perfect destination. Open Wed–Sat 10am–5pm, Sun 12–5pm.

The AlbemarleTourism and Adventure Center Located in the Historic Train Depot, the Albemarle Tourism and Adventure Center connects visitors and locals alike with the arts, culture, music, food and outdoor attractions that make this area so enjoyable. Our traveling specialist experts are happy to offer their guidance and provide you with materials on local attractions and so much more! Open Wed–Sat 10am–5pm, Sun 12–5pm.

796 Gillums Ridge Road Charlottesville, VA 22903

5791 Three Notch’d Road Crozet, VA 22932

434.979.4884

434.293.6789

thebarnswallow.com

Public West Pub & Oyster Bar Public West specializes in fresh, seafoodcentric, unpretentious fare delivered in a cozy and vibrant environment with friendly service. We strive to source only the freshest, responsibly sourced seafood, meats and produce. Our talented staff take pride in excellence and it shows in all culinary and beverage offerings. Open Tue–Thu 4:30-9:30pm, Fri & Sat 4:30–10pm, Sun 4:30–9pm.

visitcharlottesville.org/adventurecenter

Crozet Artisan Depot As a hub for the thriving artisan community in Central Virginia, “The Depot” represents the work of more than 60 local artisans, creating a delightful collection of arts, crafts and accessories. Come see why our quality selection of pottery, jewelry, painting, photography, textiles, artisanal chocolates and more makes us your destination for locally handmade gifts. Located in the historic Crozet Train Depot. Wed–Sat 10am–5pm, Sun 12–5pm.

1015 Heathercroft Circle (Old Trail Village Ctr) Crozet, VA 22932

5791 Three Notch’d Road Crozet, VA 22932

434.812.2909

434.205.4795

publicwestpub.com

crozetartisandepot.com

Starr Hill Brewery

Crozet Pizza

Born in a Charlottesville music hall in 1999, Starr Hill Brewery was founded out of a passion for bringing people together through great beer and live music. Visit the Tap Room in Crozet and enjoy 24 rotating taps of new and award-winning craft beers. Starr Hill also features local food trucks, live music and free brewery tours on weekends. Open Tue–Fri 12–9pm, Sat 11am–9pm, Sun 12–6pm.

Our story started in 1977 as a small family-owned business. Since then we have been named by National Geographic, USA TODAY and Food Network Magazine as the best pizza in Virginia. We strive to deliver superior quality dough and fresh cut toppings with every order. We welcome everyone to come experience this mouth-watering pizza that is worthy of all its hype. Open Mon–Thu 11:30am–12am, Fri–Sat 11:30am–1:30am, Sun 11:30am–10pm.

5391 Three Notch’d Road Crozet, VA 22932

5794 Three Notch’d Rd. Crozet, VA 22932

434.823.5671

434.823.2132

starrhill.com

crozetpizza.com

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DAY TRIPPING COME TO MY WINDOW — THE BASEMENT AT MONTICELLO. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF NCinDC)

Little Mountain Loop

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ead south of town on Route 20 and within minutes of the city limits, you are enveloped in the mountainous terrain, thriving wine culture and historic underpinnings distinctive to the Charlottesville area. Two of the nation’s early presidents made their homes southeast of the city: Thomas Jefferson on his mountaintop plantation, Monticello, and James Monroe at his country estate, Highland. The route that leads to these homes is dotted with meticulously managed vineyards crafting a myriad of wines — the realization of Jefferson’s vision of producing Virginia-grown wines to rival the best in Europe. Saunders-Monticello Trail | Running through the 89-acre Kemper Park along the Thomas Jefferson Parkway, this popular 2-mile trail includes a wide paved and gravel path that winds its way up to Monticello’s visitor and education center. Those traversing the trail can enjoy examples of native fauna and flora, many of which are marked for identification. 86

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To the south of Kemper Park is Secluded Farm, a 100-acre property offering 2 miles of mowed paths winding through natural grasslands that are suited for trail runners and dog walkers. 1 Carter Mountain Orchard | This 150-acre mountaintop orchard, accessible off Thomas Jefferson Parkway, offers sweeping vistas of the Blue Ridge Mountains and the City of Charlottesville in the valley below. Tasting rooms for Madison County-based Prince Michel Vineyard & Winery and Nelson County-based Bold Rock Hard Cider — both of which source some of their respective fruit from Carter Mountain — provide a sampling of the area’s thriving craft beverage scene. Fresh seasonal fruit is available at the apple barn, where locals are fond of sampling the orchard’s fresh-baked apple cider doughnuts. Festivals and activities abound in the fall, when families come to pick their own haul of more than a dozen varieties, including Ginger Gold, Gala, Stayman, Winesap, Braeburn, Pink Lady and Albemarle Pippin. 2


CARTER MOUNTAIN ORCHARD. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF AARON WATSON PHOTOGRAPHY AND CHILES FAMILY ORCHARDS)

Michie Tavern ca. 1784 | Midday every day, this tavern — perched on Thomas Jefferson Parkway — serves its visitors home-cooked fare as it did more than 200 years ago. Servers in Colonial period attire offer a lunch experience rich in Southern culture and hospitality, with a buffet featuring fried chicken, hickory smoked pork barbecue, stewed tomatoes, black-eyed peas and buttermilk biscuits, just to name a few, with desserts including peach cobbler. A self-guided tour provides information on the oldest part of the tavern established by Scotsman William Michie, and small shops located around it offer one-of-a-kind gifts capturing this important period in American history. 3 MICHIE TAVERN CA. 1784. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)


DAY TRIPPING — LITTLE MOUNTAIN LOOP Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello | Located off Thomas Jefferson Parkway, Monticello is the mountaintop plantation homestead of our third president, Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence and founder of the University of Virginia. Jefferson designed the neoclassical home and surrounding grounds, creating in Monticello — Italian for “little mountain” — a monument to his appreciation of form, function and beauty. Park at the visitor and education center, purchase tickets and take a shuttle to the house, where you can tour the home, grounds and gardens, and get an intimate look at the lives of Jefferson and many others, including enslaved laborers. Lunch fare is available at the visitor center. 4 Salt Artisan Market | Located in a 1930s-era gas station and farm store, this casual eatery serves breakfast and lunch, prepared from ingredients sourced from Virginia farmers and food artisans. Dine in or call ahead and pick up lunch to go. 5 Jefferson Vineyards | Situated just past the road that leads to Monticello, a portion of this vineyard’s lands were originally gifted to Italian viticulturist Filippo Mazzei by Thomas Jefferson, who was eager to see European grapevines gracing the rolling hills of his beloved Virginia. Mazzei planted six varieties of grapes. While the initial harvest was small, he found the Commonwealth very promising for grape cultivation, envisioning the day when “the best wine in the world will be made here.” With the Revolution approaching, Mazzei’s experiment came to a premature end, and more than 200 years would pass before grapevines were again planted on this land. Today, Jefferson Vineyards produces nearly a dozen wines, including dry and semi-dry white, red and rosé wines. Visitors can sip in the tasting room or come by on select Saturday evenings in the summer for the vineyard’s Sunsets Become Eclectic concert series. 6 James Monroe’s Highland | A few miles down James Monroe Parkway, a winding road that forks off of Thomas Jefferson Parkway, is Highland, once the estate of James Monroe, the nation’s fifth president. The site hosts numerous community events throughout the year and is a beloved spot for couples to tie the knot. Visitors JEFFERSON VINEYARDS TASTING ROOM. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROBERT RADIFERA PHOTOGRAPHY AND JEFFERSON VINEYARDS)


c Rd H y d rauli

can take guided tours of the house, which likely served as a residence for visitors in Monroe’s time; his own home is thought to have burned down sometime after he sold the property. The grounds, meanwhile, offer a quiet perspective on the day-today life of a plantation, including its enslaved workers. On Fridays and Saturdays from April through October, visitors can learn more about these individuals and their lives through the Slavery at Highland program. 7

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The Trump family is newer to Charlottesville, purchasing the winery, then called the Kluge Estate Winery and Vineyard, in 2011. The Trump family also purchased Albemarle House, a 24,000-square-foot manor home on the property, which was renovated and reopened as a bed-and-breakfast named Albemarle Estate, one of several event venues on the property.

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Celebrity Vineyard Ownership | Charlottesville has its fair share of famous residents, and in recent years a few of those celebrities have forayed into the world of wine. Two of the wineries on the Little Mountain Loop are owned by our wellknown brethren — Blenheim Vineyards and Trump Winery. Blenheim was BLENHEIM WINES. (PHOTOGRAPH established in 2000 COURTESY OF GRANT BURKS) by Dave Matthews, lead singer of the well-known Charlottesville-born Dave Matthews Band, who also owns Best of What’s Around, a grass-fed beef cattle operation he founded in 2002.

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Trump Winery | Located off Carters Mountain Road, this 1,300-acre estate produces a host of white, red, rosé and sparkling wines from its nearly 200 acres of carefully cultivated grapevines. Helmed by Eric Trump, son of real estate mogul Donald Trump, the vineyard is the realization of two decades of work by the Trump team as well as Patricia Kluge, who owned the estate and planted the original vines in the early 1990s. Under Trump ownership, the property has blossomed, showcasing the potential for Virginia wine and hosting numerous events at its various venues. 8

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Blenheim Vineyards | The site of one of the oldest homes in Albemarle County, dating to the mid-1700s, this vineyard just off Blenheim Road produces a variety of white and red wines that seek to reflect the climate, soil and beauty of the Piedmont. Blenheim, pronounced blen-em, hosts many events throughout the year as well as several of the area’s top-notch food trucks on weekend afternoons. 9 Discover Charlottesville

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DAY TRIPPING SCOTTSVILLE ON THE JAMES RIVER. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF MATTEUS FRANKOVICH AND SKYCLADAP.COM)

Scottsville

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river town with a long and vibrant history, Scottsville rests on the banks of the 347-mile James River, which stretches across Virginia. The town’s history is deeply intertwined with the river, which brought trade throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. Scottsville today is a charming small town with a well-preserved historic downtown thriving with restaurants and shops. Its commitment to history is matched by its pride in the natural resources and beauty of the area. Innovative ideas, such as adopting a resolution to become a Bee City USA, reflect the town’s care and protection of their riverside environment. The James River remains an important element in the lives of those who live in and around Scottsville, providing recreation opportunities such as fishing, tubing and kayaking. The town also features many walking and running paths in close proximity to the river. When evening comes, choose from the eclectic mix of eateries in town for a fine meal, then savor a stroll by the James to catch the sunset. 90

Discover Charlottesville

Lumpkin’s Restaurant and Motel | A Scottsville institution for nearly 50 years, this family-owned restaurant on Valley Street offers simple diner fare and is especially beloved by locals for its breakfast. Look for the statue of the large rooster, named Rodney, outside. Cash only. 1 River Town Antiques | The inventory is vast and varied at this shop, in the Scottsville Shopping Center on James River Road, with over 50 vendors selling antiques and collectibles ranging from home furnishings to jewelry, vintage clothing and signs. 2 Scottsville Supply Co. | For the apiary enthusiast, this locally owned shop on Valley Street specializes in beekeeping supplies and gifts. Besides beekeeping gear, the shop carries honey, honey-based candies, soaps, candles, beeswax polish, seeds and bee-themed and farm-related antiques. 3


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Canal Basin Square | Billed as an Outdoor Transportation History Park and located on the site of the old James River and Kanawha Canal Turning Basin on Main Street, this park is open for selfguided tours during daylight hours. Learn

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Levee Walk | This walking path along the A. Raymon Thacker Levee, which was dedicated in 1989 and has kept Scottsville flood-free ever since, affords a wonderful opportunity to see the James River. Enter from Harrison Street, behind Canal Basin Square, or from Ferry Street. Handicapped access is available off Bird Street, just past the library. 6

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Baine’s Scottsville | This independent 726 is bookstore and coffee shop on Valley Street a favorite with locals for its seasonally inspired espresso drinks and eclectic book selection. 5

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LUMPKIN’S ROOSTER — RODNEY. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF BRIAN WHEELER, CHARLOTTESVILLE TOMORROW)

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SCOTTSVILLE HISTORIC DISTRICT. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

DAY TRIPPING — SCOTTSVILLE about the river’s history and canal travel in the 18th and 19th centuries. On display is a replica of a James River batteau and a scale-model demonstration canal lock. 7 Scottsville Museum | This museum inside the former Disciples of Christ Church on Main Street, built in 1846, traces the town’s history, from its settlement in the 18th century to its rise to prominence in the 19th century as a river and canal port. Learn about the town’s role during the Civil War and how Scottsville navigated the changing times of the 20th century. Open weekends, April through October. 8 Van Clief Nature Area & Scottsville Lake | With 63 acres of walking trails and a 5-acre, trout-stocked lake, this park just east of Valley Street in downtown Scottsville includes the area surrounding the lake as well as many acres beyond it. Fishing licenses are required. Park by Victory Hall/ 92

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Scottsville Center for the Arts on Valley Street and walk up the road to Doug’s Maytag to find the adjacent entryway to the nature area. There is a separate entrance on Hardware Street; look for the “Public Fishing” signs. The nature area is open during daylight hours only. 9 Amici’s Italian Bistro | This Italian eatery on Valley Street offers Sicilian-inspired cuisine, including house-made pastas, lasagna, pizza, subs, salads, steaks, chops and vegetarian dishes. Enjoy eating in their family-friendly dining room or place a carry-out order. 10 The Smokehouse Grille | The menu for this lunch and dinner spot features many locally sourced ingredients and includes vegan and vegetarian options alongside its more standard fare. Seating options include a full-service bar, indoor dining room, townside balcony, a deck and a patio backing up to Mink Creek on Valley Street. 11


Tavern on the James

Scottsville Supply Co.

Located just steps from the James River, Tavern on the James is a converted historic feed store renovated into a 21st century restaurant featuring patio and indoor dining, full bar, seven big screen televisions and an art gallery. American fare lunch and dinner is served daily and entertainment includes live music most weekends! Banquet services available. Open Mon–Thu 11am–9pm, Fri & Sat 11am–12am, Sun 11am–8pm.

Do you want to know what it takes to become a BEEKEEPER? Scottsville Supply Company has the knowledge, support, and equipment needed to get you started in beekeeping, whether you want one hive or twenty. Visit our locally owned store for your bee equipment or a gift that comes from the hive! We offer honey, beeswax products, as well as a variety of other handcrafted products. Tues–Fri 10am–6pm, Sat 10am–5pm.

280 Valley Street, (Historic Downtown) Scottsville, VA 24590

531 Valley Street, (Historic Downtown) Scottsville, VA 24590

434.286.3500

434.286.2145

tavernonthejames.com

scottsvillesupplyco.com

James River Brewery

Thistle Gate Vineyard

James River Brewery offers a relaxed, friendly place to enjoy a flight or a pint of award-winning beers, such as our River Runner ESB which won 2016 Virginia Craft Brewers Cup Best in Show and Gold in British Bitter. Experience down home warmth and community spirit in our taproom and beer garden along Mink Creek. Join us for games, trivia and live music on the weekends. Mon & Tues–Closed, Wed–Fri 3-9pm, Sat 12–9pm, Sun 12–8pm.

Located near historic Scottsville, Thistle Gate Vineyard produces award winning estate-grown wines. We also have the best sangria in Virginia. Come relax in our tasting room or on the expansive porch and deck overlooking the vineyard. We have music most weekends. Lite fare, including local products available. Picnics welcome, child and pet-friendly. Tasting fee is $8/person ($10/groups of ten or more). Open Fri & Sat 12–6pm, Sun 1–5:30pm.

561 Valley Street, (Historic Downtown) Scottsville, VA 24590

5199 W River Road Scottsville, VA 24590

434.286.7837

434.286.7781

jrbrewery.com

thistlegatevineyard.com

The Smokehouse Grille

Lumpkin’s Restaurant

Scottsville’s best (and only!) farm-totable, local food spot. Vegan, vegetarian and good, old fashioned carnivores will all find something to enjoy on our seasonally changing menu. Daily specials are always offered, along with a from-scratch dessert menu. Dine in our intimate dining room or on our second floor balcony overlooking downtown or the banks of Mink Creek. Open Tue–Thu 11am–9pm, Fri & Sat 11am–10pm, Sun 11am–9pm.

Lumpkin’s Restaurant has been family-owned and -operated for nearly 50 years. Join us for breakfast, lunch or dinner where we serve a full menu of comforting, down-home dishes in a quaint, welcoming atmosphere. Lumpkin’s feels just like home. Look for the gigantic rooster to greet you in front of our restaurant. Cash only. Closed Wednesday & Sunday. Open Mon & Tue, Thu–Sat 7am–8pm.

515 Valley Street, (Historic Downtown) Scottsville, VA 24590

1075 Valley Street Scottsville, VA 24590

434.286.4745

434.286.3690

thesmokehousegrille.com

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Hatton Ferry is the last pole-operated ferry in America, shepherding visitors across the James River between Albemarle and Buckingham counties for more than 140 years. The ferry escorted farm animals and supplies, mail for residents, timber, carriages and eventually motorized vehicles, creating a bustling hub of daily life by the river’s edge. Despite destruction by Hurricane Agnes in 1972 and attempts to shudder its service throughout the years, Hatton Ferry remained operational. Today, it transports both vehicles and people across the river on most weekends. Operated by a nonprofit, it is funded entirely through donations provided by those who ride the ferry and those who choose to support it.

THE HATTON FERRY CROSSES TO THE NORTH SIDE OF THE JAMES RIVER IN ALBEMARLE COUNTY, FIVE MILES SOUTHWEST OF SCOTTSVILLE (1949). (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION)

Hatton Ferry is 5 miles southwest of Scottsville at the terminus of Hatton Ferry Road and runs weekends from mid-April through October. Call the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society at 434.296.1492 to ensure that the ferry is in service. 19

DAY TRIPPING — SCOTTSVILLE James River Brewery | Located in a 19th-century brick tobacco warehouse on Valley Street, this brewery offers a host of seasonal brews at its taproom as well as a quartet of flagship beers — an unfiltered Bavarian-style wheat beer, an American-style pale ale, an English-style sweet stout, and a full-bodied and malt-balanced East Coast IPA. 12 Tavern on the James | Open for lunch and dinner seven days a week, this hometown favorite on Valley Street features American cuisine, a full-service bar and large dining room, patio dining and a banquet hall. Plenty of parking is available. 13 James River Runners | Since 1979, this local company, with a base camp at Hatton Ferry, has offered rentals for canoeing, tubing, rafting, kayaking, camping and fishing on the James River, generally available April through October. In addition, for 35 years the company has hosted the James River Runners Chili Cook-Off and Brewers Challenge on the first Saturday of May, benefiting the Scottsville Volunteer Fire Department. 14 James River Reeling & Rafting | This family-run business offers rental supplies for canoeing, rafting, tubing, kayaking and fishing on the James River. Self-guided float trips are available seven days a 94

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week for kids ages 6 and older and adults of all ages. Their facility, in Scottsville on Ferry Street, offers hot showers, which is very refreshing after a day on the river. 15 Thistle Gate Vineyard | This family-owned vineyard, 5 miles east of Scottsville on Route 6, produces a full complement of red and white wines, as well as a Port-style wine, using traditional techniques and aged in French and American oak casks. A favorite among Scottsville locals, the vineyard often hosts live music. Closed January and February; open Friday, Saturday and Sunday afternoons from March through December. Call ahead to ensure that the vineyard is open. 16 First Colony Winery | Off Harris Creek Road, north of Scottsville, this winery features a tasting room open seven days a week, a production facility with an authentically crafted thatched roof and beautiful vistas ideal for catching a central Virginia sunset. 17 Michael Shaps Wineworks | At this contemporary winery on Harris Creek Way north of Scottsville, visitors can taste wines produced from Virginia-grown grapes as well as Burgundies grown and bottled in France by winery owner Michael Shaps. 18


DAY TRIPPING

Nelson County

RAVENS ROOST ON THE BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ELI CHRISTMAN)

T

ucked between Charlottesville to the northeast and Lynchburg to the southwest, Nelson County’s mountainous terrain offers vistas of the Blue Ridge Mountains and the deep green splendor of the George Washington National Forest, with the wide, winding James River forming the boundary to the southeast. Within this bounty of natural beauty are miles of hiking trails, crystal-clear fishing streams, historic family farms and orchards, picturesque vineyards, inviting brewery taprooms, distillery tasting rooms and unparalleled views of the Commonwealth. Blue Ridge Parkway: Ravens Roost Overlook | At milepost 10.7 on the Blue Ridge Parkway, Ravens Roost Overlook offers an unparalleled westward view of Torrey Ridge and the Shenandoah Valley. Ample parking and a picnic area provide a spot to stretch, while the overlook at the end of the short path imparts a vista not to be missed. To the south, a solitary 96

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conifer tree and stately rock ledge frame a view of the valley 1,800 feet below, with farms dotting the landscape as you gaze northward, catching a glimpse of Lyndhurst and Stuarts Draft. You may be able to spy hang gliders taking off from the ridgeline nearby. 1 Devils Backbone Brewing Co. | Inspired by German craft beer, this brewery just off Route 151 is named after a description of the terrain provided by a 1746 land survey expedition. The brewery, launched in 2008, is situated on 100 acres and serves as the Devils Backbone test kitchen, where new brews are piloted on the 8.5-barrel brewing system at the brewpub, known as Basecamp Brewpub & Meadows. There, visitors can choose pints and flights from 16 taps as well as a full menu of brewpub favorites and enjoy outdoor festivals and live music. 2


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Oakland — d Nelson County’s 800 Museum of Rural History | 617 Originally a tavern when it was built602 in 1838, this brick Schuyler house on 617 U.S. Route 29 in Arrington is now home to a museum dedicated to exploring Nelson ard s vill County’s history and its relationship to the Commonwealth of Virginia and, in turn, the United States. The museum, 602 part of the Nelson County Historical Howardsville Shipman Society, offers permanent and rotating exhibits illuminating the county’s history, 626 56 including Hurricane Camille, the 1969 d storm that devastated the area, eand ll R b Ca county native Earl Hamner Jr., author and creator of “The Waltons.” 7

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Saunders Brothers Inc. | Comprising a 150-acre wholesale nursery, a 125-acre orchard and a farm market, Saunders Brothers on Route 56 West in Piney River is a local favorite for fresh-picked fruit and vegetables, homemade jams, jellies, pies and other baked goods made in its own kitchen. This family-owned and -operated business has been a mainstay of 1 the community for more than 100 years. 4

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Crabtree Falls | Located in the George Washington National Forest, Crabtree Falls is the highest vertical-drop cascading waterfall east of the Mississippi River, consisting of five major cascades and several smaller ones plunging more than 1,000 feet over a massive cliff toward the Tye River. Visitors can catch the first overlook of the falls down an easy-tonavigate, paved trail just a few hundred feet from the parking area. A more rigorous hike along a 3-mile trail includes four other overlooks. Please note that the Forest Service cautions hikers to stay on the trail. 3

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DAY TRIPPING — NELSON COUNTY Nelson County Visitor Center | On U.S. Route 29 in Lovingston, this information hub offers handicapped-accessible parking, restrooms, Wi-Fi and an area where your pet can get some exercise. Nelson County maps are available to help in exploring the area, and the staff is an excellent source of local knowledge and tips for making the most of your visit to Nelson County. The center also carries brochures for statewide attractions. 8

Mountain Cove Vineyards | Founded in 1973, this vineyard on Fortune’s Cove Lane near Lovingston has been producing wine in Virginia for more than 40 years, selling under both its own label and commissioned private labels. Products include varietals, blends and fruit wines, all of them vegan. Tours and tastings are available afternoons from Wednesday through Sunday. 11

Lovingston Cafe | On Front Street in Lovingston, this family-owned and -operated eatery serves lunch and dinner, with specialties including seafood, steaks, house-made sausages, fresh vegetables, homemade soups and scrumptious desserts. A full-service lounge is open daily, and a garden patio offers al fresco dining when weather permits. 9

Fortune’s Cove Preserve | Accessible from the trailhead’s parking lot on State Route 651 near Lovingston, visitors come to this 755-acre nature preserve for its challenging 5.5-mile hike that ascends 1,500 feet to rewarding mountain views. The preserve is located within 29,000 acres of forest habitat that remains largely intact. Please note that dogs are not permitted at this preserve. 12

Democracy Vineyards | Situated on a venerable old apple orchard on Mountain Cove Road, this 45-acre estate was founded by a couple who spent their prior careers in politics and the federal government. The vineyard includes 6 acres of chambourcin, petit verdot, merlot, pinotage, viognier and petit manseng varietals, as well as 15 acres of apple trees. At the winery’s tasting room, visitors can sample red and white varietals and blends, including dry and sweet varieties. Call ahead to ensure that the tasting room is open. 10 98

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Virginia Distillery Company | Tucked just north of Lovingston on U.S. Route 29, this distillery produces single-malt whisky in the Scottish tradition. Its visitors center offers tours of the production facility, where guests can view the massive copper stills imported from Scotland and visit the barrel room where the whisky ages. Tastings are available, including cocktails using locally sourced ingredients. 13


LOCKN’ Festival | On a particular weekend in late August, the normally serene setting of Oak Ridge Farm, in Arrington, Va., transforms into a lively concert venue for the burgeoning music festival called LOCKN’. This four-day festival celebrates all genres of music, hosting over 30 acts on multiple stages, with a scenic view of the Blue Ridge Mountains as its backdrop. The brainchild of industry virtuosos Dave Frey and Peter Shapiro, LOCKN’ is so named for the interlocking schedule of music that provides an almost continuous experience for the 30,000+ enthusiastic attendees. Now in its fifth year, fans have been treated to a wide range of bands, from regional to national, with acts from Tom Petty, The Wailers, Gary Clark Jr. and Phish, to Carlos Santana, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue and My Morning Jacket taking their places in the lineup.

LOCKN’ 2015. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF CP THORNTON)

DAY TRIPPING — NELSON COUNTY The Apple Shed | Named for its stellar variety of locally grown apples, The Apple Shed includes a wealth of local produce, as well as preserves and other homemade treats, all in a quaint storefront right on U.S. Route 29 north of Lovingston. 14

features ciders produced at its nearby 28-acre “farm-to-tap” cider barn in Wintergreen. Pub menu classics include nachos and poutine. Parents will especially appreciate the large playground outside. 17

Wild Wolf Brewing Co. | This brewery, established in 2011, features a restaurant where a variety of hand-crafted beers and food made from locally sourced ingredients are served seven days a week in a renovated century-old schoolhouse with sweeping views of the surrounding mountains. Located on Route 151, the property also includes a biergarten with a gazebo, koi pond and water wheel, a sports bar and a 15-barrel brewing facility. 15

Cardinal Point Vineyard and Winery | This vineyard near Route 151 on Batesville Road is the 30-year project of the Gorman family, who moved to the property in the mid-1980s with the dream of owning a vineyard. With 15 acres under cultivation, the winery produces red and white varietals and blends. Cardinal Point Green, which takes inspiration from the vinho verde wine of Portugal, is produced by cofermenting chardonnay and petit manseng, creating a crisp, refreshing wine with a beautiful peridot hue. 18

Tuckahoe Antiques | An antique mall for nearly three decades, the building that houses it was originally an apple-packing shed built in 1939. The 10,000-square-foot space on Route 151 boasts items that run the gamut from early American furniture and collectible glassware to original paintings and more. 16

Blue Mountain Brewery | Pioneers of craft brewing in central Virginia, Blue Mountain Brewery, located on Route 151 in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, affords visitors beautiful views while its restaurant cooks casual fare to enjoy with a cold pint made from hops grown right on its farm. 19

Blue Toad Hard Cider Pub | Those looking for new horizons in craft beverage will appreciate this pub situated squarely on Route 151, which

Rockfish Gap Country Store | Originally built in the 1930s as a fruitpacking shed for local farmers, this country store at the base of Afton

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Festivalgoers can camp on-site or stay offsite at nearby Wintergreen Resort or hotel rooms offered in the surrounding cities of Charlottesville and Lynchburg. A multitude of local food and craft vendors can be found around grounds, as well as a diverse selection of regional craft beverages. Frey and Shapiro feature the community and its offerings to show gratitude for the area’s support of this event. Folks can round out their days with outdoor excursions or water activities at numerous sites in Nelson County. The 2017 festival will be held August 24-27 at Oak Ridge Farm in Arrington. Visit locknfestival.com for information on tickets, musical lineup and vendors. 21

Mountain on the corner of Routes 151 and 250 offers an eclectic mix of merchandise, including antiques, Virginia-made goods and wines, novelty candies, original paintings by Virginia artists and the largest collection of April Cornell linens in Virginia. 20

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ou’ll find The Apple Shed about half an hour south of Charlottesville — halfway between Covesville and Lovingston — in a small clearing on the right side of the road. For 60 years, this little enterprise has been a community cornerstone, a place where neighbors drop in, catch up and grab some of the freshest, best-quality produce the area has to offer. Owner Russ Simpson’s father started The Apple Shed as a weekend business and passed it on to his son when Russ returned from college. While initially named for the large selection of Virginia-grown apples it offered each fall, The Apple Shed showcases a bounty of fruits and vegetables — along with preserved goods made from them — throughout the growing season, as well as grass-fed beef from the Irish Dexter cattle that Russ grows on his family farm nearby. But the Apple Shed is much more than just the sum of what it sells. “We do a few different kinds of things here,” Russ says. He is an International Sports Sciences Association-certified personal trainer, and

RUSS SIMPSON — OWNER OF THE APPLE SHED. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF JUDY BIAS)

his clients often swing by the shed to talk fitness and nutrition. He is also devoted to raising funds for melanoma cancer research, organizing fitness and community events through his nonprofit. Plus, he is a wedding celebrant, officiating at nuptials that tend toward the quirky and offbeat, especially when the wedding takes place at the shop — or, as Russ calls it during such events, “The Apple Chapel.” It’s all part of the give and take that has much to do with the success and longevity of his business. “We make efforts to help our community,” Russ says, simply. “And in turn, we reap the benefits.” Visit The Apple Shed at 14815 Thomas Nelson Highway, in Lovingston. Hours: 10am–5pm, Monday–Saturday; 11am–5pm, Sunday. Discover Charlottesville

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DAY TRIPPING MONTPELIER HUNT RACES. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF M. BANDMAN)

Orange County

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estled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Piedmont region northeast of Charlottesville, Orange County is rich in history and natural beauty, with expanses of rolling, open farmland and blue-hued mountain vistas capped with Virginia’s quintessential green tree canopy. A day trip to Orange County offers visitors an enjoyable mix of historical and cultural attractions, fine dining and small-town charm.

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Montpelier | The home of James Madison, the fourth president of the United States, Montpelier offers the opportunity to learn about James and Dolley Madison and tour their stately mansion, located off Route 20. The home underwent an extensive renovation in recent years, and visitors can witness archaeological digs continuing at the estate. 1


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Wol ftow n-H ood Rd Exchange Café | Located within the Montpelier Visitor Center, this extension of the 230 beloved BBQ Exchange restaurant in nearby Gordonsville offers freshly made coffee, 230 espresso, sandwiches, soups, salads, 230 desserts, Chap’s ice cream and daily specials.Orang eR 231 d Annie du Pont Formal Garden | To the back of the mansion lies the Annie du Pont 29 owner of Montpelier in Formal Garden, named after the wife of William du Pont, the early 1900s, who reinvented the garden site originally tended by the Madison family. The current flower beds feature many of the same perennials of the early du Pont garden, such as bearded and Japanese irises, daylilies and peonies.

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e which takes place on a weekend in The annual Montpelier Wine Festival, ext 208 15 visitors the opportunity n early May, provides to sample wines from Virginia’s i Po thriving wineries while enjoying offerings from specialty food vendors, live 613 music, kite flying, Exit 136arts and crafts, horse-drawn wagon rides and more. Visit montpelierwinefestival.com for more details. th o 15 C ou r Discover Charlottesville 103 64 208

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Montpelier Hunt Races, held the first Saturday 613 in November each year, is a premier Virginian equestrian event — a day of races that is an 33 official part of the National Steeplechase Association circuit. For information and tickets, visit montpelierraces.org.

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33 ge Tur Special Events at Montpelier | The Fall Fiber Festival & Montpelier Sheep np ik Dog Trials, held in early October each year, feature workshops for 231 adults and children, animal exhibits, sheep dog trials, 33 hands-on demonstrations, a 20 fleece sale, fiber and crafts vendors and music. Visit 607 po 607 tsw fallfiberfestival.org ood 644 Trl for details.

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DAY TRIPPING — ORANGE COUNTY The Market at Grelen | This casual café, European-style garden shop, event venue and pick-your-own farm is located at Grelen’s 600-acre tree nursery off Route 655. Enjoy a locally sourced lunch on the patio or in the shade garden and pair it with Virginia-crafted beers, ciders or wines. Then take a hike on the property’s 3.9 miles of trails, which connect to the Montpelier trail system. 2 Town of Orange | Situated amidst rolling landscapes and spectacular views of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Orange serves as the small-town hub of Orange County. 3 Orange County Tourism and Visitor Bureau | Located in the Orange Train Station on East Main Street, this visitor center offers a wealth of information about attractions in the county. 4 The Arts Center in Orange | On East Main Street in Orange, the Arts Center aims to enrich its community by offering gallery, venue and classroom space. With eight shows annually, the gallery’s exhibit space displays the work of emerging artists. At the Gallery Shop, take home artwork created by Virginia artists, including paintings, pottery, sculpture, fiber art, glassware, metalwork and jewelry. 5 James Madison Museum | This museum on Caroline Street in Orange includes an extensive collection of items related to James and Dolley Madison, including personal effects, papers and furnishings, as well as the Virginia Convention document ratifying the Constitution and several other pivotal papers. The museum also features a permanent exhibit exploring the early African-American experience in the area. 6 Silk Mill Grille | This family-owned and -operated casual eatery on Woodmark Street is housed in the weaving department of an old silk mill. It serves lunch and dinner featuring classic contemporary American dishes including hand-cut steaks, hearty pastas, delicious sandwiches and daily specials. 7 Lake Orange and Angler’s Landing | A favorite fishing spot — located off Route 629 on Lake Orange Road — Lake Orange produced a world record-setting white bass in 1989 that weighed in at 6 pounds, 13 ounces. The lake boasts a boat ramp, concessions, fishing pier, picnic facilities and plenty of great shoreline. Access permit or valid Virginia hunting, fishing or trapping license required for adults; purchase online at dgif.virginia.gov/licenses. 8 104

Discover Charlottesville


DAY TRIPPING — ORANGE COUNTY EVENING IN GORDONSVILLE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF ROY VAN DOORN)

Town of Gordonsville

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idway between James Madison’s Montpelier and Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello is the town of Gordonsville, whose downtown historic district features quaint shops and a variety of eateries. 9 Cooke Park | Perched on Main Street amid Gordonsville’s shops and galleries, this small wooded park was built on land donated by the William A. Cooke Foundation, honoring long-time local businessman William Cooke. 10 BBQ Exchange | Chef Craig Hartman and his crew focus on crafting authentic Virginia barbecue at their restaurant on Martinsburg Avenue, and their efforts have landed the restaurant on both the Food Network and the Cooking Channel. The meat is wood-smoked on green hickory, and the side dishes — including coleslaw, macaroni and cheese, potato salad, pickles, cornbread and baked beans — are just as delicious. 11 The Exchange Hotel – Civil War Medical Museum | Prior to the Civil War, from its spot on Main Street, at the crossroads of the Virginia Central Railroad and the Alexandria Railroad, the Exchange Hotel offered railway travelers a 106

Discover Charlottesville

welcome respite on their journeys. Once war flared, the hotel was transformed into the Gordonsville Receiving Hospital, where 70,000 soldiers — both Union and Confederate — received treatment. After the war, the building served as a Freedman’s Bureau for newly freed slaves. Now, it is the Commonwealth’s only standing Civil War receiving hospital, and visitors can view the museum’s extensive collection of Civil War-era medical care artifacts. 12 Restaurant Pomme | For classic French fare, try this restaurant on South Main Street in historic downtown Gordonsville. France native, Gerard Gasparini, opened Pomme in 2005 along with his wife, Maryvonne, and their son, Guillaume, who now carries on its culinary traditions. Whether you are in the mood for lunch, dinner or Sunday brunch, the restaurant offers an authentic taste of France, from its menu to its décor. 13 Krecek Kakes Bakery & Coffeeshop | This family-run bakery in downtown Gordonsville serves homemade cakes and breads and other freshly baked confections to enjoy with a cup of tea or a latte. 14


The Alpaca Boutique ...and More! Discover the soft luxury and warmth of alpaca clothing without the prickle often found in wool. This apparel is lightweight and easy to layer making it clothing for all seasons. Sales associates will help you make the ‘right’ choice whether the purchase is a gift or a treat for yourself. Your clothing purchase will be of the highest quality and at the forefront of today’s fashion choices.

Sara’s Jewel Box An offering of wearable art handcrafted by female artisans from imaginative blends of materials and methods ... for that finishing touch! These distinctive combinations of metals, glass, beads and stones will inspire notice and comments wherever you wear them. They are complemented by pieces selected from the collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art/NYC and the Smithsonian/DC, offering classical as well as trendy options.

107 S Main Street Gordonsville, VA 22942

107 S Main Street Gordonsville, VA 22942

540.832.3075

540.832.3076

thealpacaboutique.com

A Change For All Seasons We create unique open terrariums inspired by nature to enhance your environment. Using incredible vintage containers such as lanterns, birdcages, wooden tool boxes, driftwood, serving pieces, copper vases & baskets, along with high quality faux plants, we produce custom life-like gardens.These creations are maintenancefree, so it doesn’t matter what color your thumb is, they will last forever!

sarasjewelbox.com

Restaurant Pomme Nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge, in downtown Gordonsville, Virginia, Restaurant Pomme provides an authentic classic French dining experience and award winning wine list. The restaurant welcomes diners and guests to a warm and inviting recreation of the French country side-from food to decor. Whether on a day trip or gathering with friends and family, we wish to share our passion of food and wine with you. À votre santé et bon appétit.

Gordonsville, VA 22942

115 S. Main Street Gordonsville, VA 22942

703.901.9337

540.832.0130

kathyhalcomb.com

restaurant-pomme.com

BBQ Exchange

Old American Barn

Featuring hickory-smoked, slow-roasted pork shoulders, spareribs, beef brisket & chicken. Our meats are dry cured, smoked in our specialized cooker & served with homemade sauces, fresh breads & sides like hushpuppies, mac & cheese & collard greens. Service is quick-counter & take-out style with a Virginia genteelness. The rustic building is warm & inviting, furnished with picnic tables lending to the comfortable family experience. Open daily 11am–8pm.

Come browse Old American Barn and discover a shop you can bring the whole family to! Here you will find a unique collection from over 30 vendors offering antiques, crafts, collectibles, primitives, architectural salvage, new and old jewelry, barn wood, wrought and cast iron pieces and much more. Located just around the corner from the BBQ Exchange. Open Mon–Fri 9:30am–6pm, Sat 9:30am–7pm, Sun 9:30am–5:30pm.

106 Martinsburg Avenue Gordonsville, VA 22942

107 Martinsburg Avenue Gordonsville, VA 22942

540.832.0227

571.643.3286

bbqex.com

facebook.com/oldamericanbarn

Discover Charlottesville

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BARBOURSVILLE RUINS. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF AMY C EVANS, SFA ORAL HISTORIAN)

DAY TRIPPING — ORANGE COUNTY Barboursville Ruins | Originally designed by Thomas Jefferson for his friend James Barbour — Virginia governor, U.S. senator and Secretary of War — the Barboursville mansion was destroyed by fire on Christmas Day 1884. Its ruins, located off Route 33, evoke the grand neoclassical architecture of the early 19th century and the area’s plantation homes. 15 108

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Barboursville Vineyards & Palladio Restaurant | This vineyard and its restaurant are a darling of not only Orange County but all of Virginia. Through the work of Luca Paschina, its resident winemaker since 1990, Barboursville has been on the forefront of Virginia’s emergence as a wine powerhouse. The fine-dining Palladio Restaurant, off Route 33, serves lunch and dinner featuring Northern Italian cuisine. 16


GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH — BLESSING OF THE HOUNDS. (PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF BEV NASH, KESWICK)

Grace Episcopal Church – Blessing of the Hounds | Built on the site of one of Virginia’s six Colonial-era churches, Grace Episcopal Church was originally completed in 1855. A fire in 1895 left only the tower and four walls standing, which were incorporated into the structure when it was rebuilt. A 1,575-pound bell also salvaged

from the fire remains in use today. The church complex’s Parish House and a great room were added in the 20th century. Each year on Thanksgiving Day, Grace Episcopal Church, on Gordonsville Road in Keswick, holds the Blessing of the Hounds, in which fox hunters, their horses and their

Reynard Florence Vineyard & Winery | On Burnley Road in Barboursville, this small winery grows petit manseng, merlot, cabernet franc, petit verdot and grenache grapes, producing a portfolio of reds and whites made in small batches by the family that owns and operates the vineyard. Open Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and holiday Mondays. 17 Castle Hill Cider | A homestead founded in 1764, Castle Hill, in Keswick off Turkey Sag Road, is now among Virginia’s premier cideries, offering cider through tastings and by the bottle. The cidery’s many varieties include Levity, which is fermented in buried clay vats called kvevri — the world’s oldest known fermentation vessels — as well as Serendipity, which is created using new cross-flow filtration technology. Visitors can try several ciders in the tasting room, all the while enjoying the open, rolling topography. 18 Keswick Vineyards | Finish your afternoon with a visit to Keswick Vineyards, a family-owned and -operated winery and vineyard located close to Charlottesville off Route 231. Visitors can try several of the

hounds gather in the churchyard for prayers and to give thanks. While such blessings trace back centuries, the tradition at this church dates to 1929, and its continuation pays homage to the popularity of fox hunting in Virginia since Colonial times. After the hunters, horses, hounds and foxes have been blessed, the hunt begins. 21

vineyard’s wines which have won awards including, most recently, the 2016 Virginia Governor’s Cup for the 2014 Cabernet Franc Estate Reserve. Spread out a blanket on the tasting room lawn to sip wine and enjoy a picnic or views of the Virginia countryside. 19 Fossett’s Restaurant | This flagship restaurant of Keswick Hall and Golf Club, located off Route 22, takes its name from Edith Fossett, Thomas Jefferson’s head cook, who was trained in French cooking in the early 1800s. At Fossett’s Restaurant, guests enjoy sweeping views of the estate while they savor meals rooted in locally sourced ingredients, including many that come right from the restaurant’s own garden. The resulting menus — including a high tea on Saturday and a buffet brunch on Sunday — offer a true taste of contemporary Virginia cuisine. A jacket is suggested but not required; jeans and shorts are not permitted. Villa Crawford, the original mansion and now the historic wing of Keswick Hall, offers visitors a full lunch menu as well as a buffet option for casual yet elegant indoor or al fresco dining. 20 Discover Charlottesville

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DAY TRIPPING

TAKING FLIGHT OVER GREENE COUNTY. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF GREENE COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM)

Greene County

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his county directly north of Charlottesville offers convenient access to Skyline Drive and the Appalachian Trail in the Shenandoah National Park, as well as marvelous views of the Blue Ridge Mountains and the rolling hills of the Piedmont region. Outdoor enthusiasts will relish hiking the county’s myriad trails, cycling along its picturesque country roads or fly-fishing in its clear mountain streams. Scenic vineyards scattered throughout the county, such as Kilaurwen Winery and Stone Mountain Vineyards, offer distinctive wines and sweeping views. Memorable meals await at local dining favorites, including Lafayette Inn & Restaurant and Blue Ridge Cafe & Catering Co., and visitors will find accommodation options ranging from rustic cabins to B&Bs and contemporary hotels. 110

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Antique lovers will bask in the county’s 75,000 square feet of antiques, fine arts and collectibles. Ruckersville’s antique district is the hub, where you can search for vintage treasures — ranging from period furniture to rare books and glassware, at shops such as Ruckersville Gallery — or pick up some locally made pottery at Blue Ridge Pottery. Those with a soft spot for history will appreciate the Stanardsville Historic District, which features more than 150 properties of historical significance, including hotels, stores, churches and homes dating from the 19th and early 20th centuries. Information on many of the county’s attractions is available at the Greene County Visitor Center on U.S. Route 29, just south of the U.S. Route 33 intersection.


Greene County Visitor Center Experience small town charm as we greet and assist you with our expansive assortment of resources. As a State Certified Visitor Center, we offer brochures & maps covering the coastal sands to the Blue Ridge Mountains. Centrally located to many wonderful venues, we guide visitors to wineries, potteries, antiques, national parks & presidential homes. We invite you to enjoy complimentary coffee & wi-fi.

Boot’Vil Conveniently located on U.S. 29, Boot’Vil has been a Greene County staple for over 20 years. We carry the biggest names in the boot industry, as well as apparel, hats and accessories to complete your look. We strive for a comfortable, downhome feel, excellent customer service and affordable prices for all. There is truly something here for everyone, and you won’t leave without something that you love! Open Tue–Thu 11am–7pm, Sat 10am–5pm, Sun 1–5pm.

8315 S eminole Trail Ruckersville, VA 22968

8633 S eminole Trail Ruckersville, VA 22968

434.985.6663

434.985.4574

exploregreene.com

bootvil.com

The Wooly Lam

Noon Whistle Pottery

Whether you’re a casual antiquer or avid treasure hunter, you’re in luck! The Wooly Lam is an antiques and gift shop with an appeal and personality all its own. It is the bright and sunny home of 40+ vendors on two large floors. Here you will find an exciting mix of new and vintage goods such as furniture, collectibles, bottles, signs, tools, toys, as well as jewelry, glassware, primitives, shabby chic furniture and much more. Open daily 10am–6pm.

Come browse the three floors of Noon Whistle Pottery and discover fine art and handcrafted treasures for you, your friends and family. Here you will find a unique collection from 150 American artisans — an eclectic mixture of pottery, sculpture, jewelry, handblown glass, woodwork, paintings, soap, candles, weavings and so much more. Located just 18 miles from Charlottesville in historic downtown Stanardsville. Open Tue–Sat 10am–6pm, Sun 12–5pm. Mondays by chance.

9422 S eminole Trail Ruckersville, VA 22968

328 Main Street Stanardsville, VA 22973

434.990.6000

434.985.6500

thewoolylam.net

Blue Ridge Pottery A historic stage coach inn located in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains is the setting for the pottery produced by Alun Ward, Master Potter. Blue Ridge Pottery makes a variety of functional stoneware and porcelain pottery. Our pottery is safe for use in the oven, microwave and dishwasher. It is lead free and safe for use with food of all types. Visit our Studio Shop to browse our unique collection. Open daily 8am–8pm.

noonwhistlepottery.com

Stone Mountain Vineyards At 1,700 ft., family-owned Stone Mountain Vineyards is one of the highest vineyards in Virginia. Coupled with superb Monticello terroir, we produce award-winning wines year after year. Join us for a glass on our expansive deck and take in the breathtaking view from the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Do not use GPS for directions. Mar–Dec, Fri–Sun 11am–5pm.

9 Golden Horseshoe Road Stanardsville, VA 22973

1376 Wyatt Mountain Road Dyke, VA 22935

434.409.3319

434.990.9463

blueridgepottery.com

stonemountainvineyards.com

Discover Charlottesville

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Skyline Drive & Shenandoah Valley


he Shenandoah Valley is a 200-mile region stretching from Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, to Roanoke, Virginia, and bordered by the Blue Ridge Mountains to the east and the Allegheny Mountains to the west. The Valley, as Virginians call it, is rich with history and proud rural traditions. A vital agricultural hub for the state — providing bountiful vegetables, meat and eggs from farms large and small — it is home to several notable cities, including Waynesboro, Staunton and Harrisonburg.

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Skyland | This 16-acre property at Skyline Drive’s highest elevation — 3,680 feet — was first staked out by George Freeman Pollock Jr. in 1888 when he went in search of the ideal spot for a summer retreat. The lodge offers accommodations amid an unmatched view of the Shenandoah Valley, along with nightly, family-friendly entertainment in its Mountain Taproom and daily guided horseback rides at Skyland Stables. Open late March through late November; located at mileposts 41.7 and 42.5. 3

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Harry F. Byrd Sr. Visitor Center | This center features movies and exhibits that tell the story of the park’s creation and the issues it faces today. Other amenities include restrooms, an information desk, a bookstore, ranger programs, backcountry permits, maps and first aid. Open daily; located at milepost 51 in Big Meadows. 2

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Skyline Drive | The 105-mile Skyline Drive runs north and south along the backbone of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Shenandoah National Park. The lone public road in the park, it climbs to a height of 3,680 feet above sea level and offers 75 overlooks with picture-postcard panoramas of the Shenandoah Valley to the west and the foothills of the Blue Ridge to the east. Skyline Drive boasts more than 500 miles of hiking trails as well as several campgrounds, cabins and lodges that provide a home base for outdoor fun. Four entrances give access to Skyline Drive and Shenandoah National Park: at Front Royal, via I-66 and Route 340; Thornton Gap, via Route 211; Swift Run Gap, via Route 33; and Rockfish Gap, via I-64 and Route 250. 1

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Rapidan Camp | President Herbert Hoover’s summer retreat, this 13-cabin compound is located on the eastern slope of the Blue Ridge Mountains, within Shenandoah National Park. A 2.5-hour, rangerguided tour of the property includes The Brown House, the president’s cabin, which has been restored to its 1929 appearance. The tour is offered in late spring through fall and is available by reservation. For more information, and to book a tour, go to recreation.gov, type “Rapidan camp tours” in the search field, then choose the Rapidan camp tours link. Located between mileposts 52 and 53. 4 A VIEW OF THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY FROM THE SKYLINE DRIVE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF FLICKR MEMBER m01229)

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DAY TRIPPING — SKYLINE DRIVE & SHENANDOAH VALLEY Loft Mountain Campground + Wayside | Sitting atop Big Flat Mountain, Loft Mountain Campground is the largest in the Shenandoah National Park, featuring exceptional eastward and westward views, two nearby waterfalls and trails into the Big Run Wilderness area. Wayside stores dot Skyline Drive, offering travelers a place to grab groceries, snacks and prepared meals. Loft Mountain Wayside stocks hiking and camping supplies and features a large gift shop. It also offers access to several trails, including the Appalachian Trail via Frazier Discovery Trail, a 1.3-mile moderate hike with lovely views. Open midApril through early November and located at milepost 79.5. 5 Massanutten Resort | Perched just northwest of Shenandoah National Park, this family-friendly, four-season resort offers skiing, swimming, fishing and hiking. Visitors need not stay at the resort to enjoy its many activities. The water park includes indoor and outdoor pools and water features, as well as an arcade and eatery. Massanutten offers several dining choices, including fine dining at Fareways Restaurant and Lounge or more casual fare at Virginia Barbeque & Pizza Co. and the Hideaway Lounge. 6 Grand Caverns | Discovered by a trapper in 1804 and opened for tours in 1806, Grand Caverns, near the town of Grottoes, is the oldest continually operating show cave in the country and was declared a National Natural Landmark in 1973. Features have names such as Persian Palace, Dante’s Inferno, Bridal Chamber and the Grand Ball Room, where dances were held in the 1800s. The signatures of hundreds of Civil War soldiers adorn the cave’s walls. Surrounding the caverns is a park with hiking and biking trails, an Olympic-size swimming pool, an 18-hole miniature golf course, and plenty of picnic tables and shelters. 7 Rockfish Gap Outfitters | Sitting next to the southern entry to Shenandoah National Park and the northern tip of the Blue Ridge Parkway, this shop in Waynesboro is the perfect stop to suit up for a camping trip, a mountain bike ride, a kayaking trip or a day of hiking the nearby Appalachian Trail. The store’s knowledgeable staff of outdoor enthusiasts will help choose the appropriate clothing and the ideal gear to enhance any mountain journey. 8 Waynesboro Water Trail | This 4-mile stretch of the South River offers those who like to canoe or kayak an easy course to paddle amid the scenic view. An access point from Ridgeview Park, off South Magnolia Avenue, makes accessing the water trail a breeze, and rapids are class I or class II — easy to spot and straightforward to navigate. 9 114

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Constitution Park & South River Greenway | Expansive and centrally located, Constitution Park is home to the Waynesboro Arboretum and Waynesboro Farmers Market, as well as soccer games, concerts, festivals and shows. Large and medium-size shelters with picnic tables are available as well; reservations for larger parties are recommended. Behind the park’s Dominion Shelter, visitors can access the town’s newest park, South River Greenway, with a trail that currently runs for nearly a mile along the South River. 10 Eagle’s Nest Airport | For those looking for a truly stunning view of the Shenandoah Valley, sightseeing flights are the way to go. Catch a plane at Eagle’s Nest Airport and see the Valley with a bird’s-eye view. These affordable flights accommodate up to three passengers and are particularly spectacular in the fall. 11 Waynesboro Heritage Museum | Discover the history of Waynesboro at this museum on Main Street, where permanent and rotating exhibits, as well as video presentations, tell the story of this Shenandoah Valley town. 12 P. Buckley Moss Gallery Waynesboro | On West Main Street in historic downtown Waynesboro, this museum shares the life and art of Patricia Buckley Moss, who settled in the area in the 1960s and went on to have a thriving art career. Working in various media, she often portrayed life in the Shenandoah Valley. The museum opened in 1989 and includes educational exhibitions, lectures, permanent collections and archival files. 13 Stella, Bella & Lucy’s | A cozy breakfast and lunch spot in downtown Waynesboro, this eatery was founded by two town natives and named after beloved dogs. The menus showcase locally sourced ingredients, and the proprietors’ love of art is evident throughout the restaurant in its décor of antique and collectable pieces. 14 The Purple Foot | A Waynesboro lunchtime staple since 1978, this charming restaurant offers a menu laden with specialty sandwiches, pitas, soups, salads and crepes as well as their signature Dream Potatoes — baked spuds with several choices of toppings. After the meal, check out the gift shop for unusual items, including wines, wind chimes and flameless air fresheners. 15 Basic City Beer Co. | Taking up residence in the former Virginia Metalcrafters building on East Main Street, this brewery seeks to capture the working-class roots of Waynesboro with high-quality, approachable craft brews. The brewery uses natural spring water in all of its beers, which carry names such as Foggy Logger, Falcon in the Draft and Ohhh So Sweet, as well as more conventional brews, including Amber Ale and Basic City Pale Ale. 16 Discover Charlottesville

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Staunton

STAUNTON NIGHT LIGHT. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF STAUNTON CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU)

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ounded in 1747 in the Shenandoah Valley, Staunton has long been a center of business and commerce. Now located at the crossroads of two major interstates, it was once home to the nation’s westernmost courthouse. Pronounced STANN’-tun, the town has some 24,000 residents and hosts Mary Baldwin University, a private women’s liberal arts school. Staunton comprises several nationally registered historic districts, including its quaint downtown. With its 19th-century charm and “Main Street” vibe, downtown Staunton boasts several very walkable blocks of carefully renovated storefronts featuring more than 100 independent shops, art galleries and eateries. The adjacent Historic Wharf District is named for the shops and warehouses that grew up around the original train depot in the mid-1800s. The town’s restaurant scene is especially vibrant, with local favorites including The Depot, Zynodoa, Aioli and The Shack, which is owned by a James Beard Foundation Award nominee. Those interested in the town’s presidential ties can visit Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library and Museum, whose galleries explore 116

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Wilson’s early years and presidency, women’s suffrage, Prohibition and World War I and include his beloved 1919 Pierce-Arrow limousine. Another local attraction is Trinity Episcopal Church, which features 12 stained glass windows created at the studio of Louis Comfort Tiffany. The town also houses the American Shakespeare Center, complete with the world’s only re-creation of the bard’s original indoor theater, the 300-seat Blackfriars Playhouse, where actors provide contemporary audiences with the authentic experience of a Renaissance-era play. Right outside Staunton is the Frontier Culture Museum, which tells the story of the thousands of people who migrated to Colonial America and of the life they created here. Visitors can tour replicas of typical homes of rural England, Germany, Ireland and West Africa, which provide insights into the lives of these first immigrants, as well as experience Native American dwellings and the farmsteads of early settlers on the American frontier. Visitor information can be found at the Staunton Convention and Visitors Bureau, located at 35 S New Street.


Sunspots Studios

Staunton

Watch art happen at Sunspots Studios! See live glassblowing daily until 4pm. Our gallery is filled with our colorful hand-blown glass — vases, bird feeders, oil candles, drinking glasses & more. Blow your own ornament with our glass blowers. We also carry local and American artisan-made jewelry & accessories, including Alex and Ani, Holly Yashi & Maruca. Don’t miss Virginia’s most unique shopping experience. Open Mon–Sat 10am–6pm, Sun 11:30am–5pm.

Big time culture. Small town cool. Travel+Leisure recently voted Staunton one of “America’s Favorite Mountain Towns” and it’s easy to see why. Staunton’s gorgeous downtown is celebrated for its architecture, dining, theater, history and music. This charming small city is an easy 30-minute drive from Charlottesville. For more information on what to see and do, VisitStaunton.com.

202 S Lewis Street Staunton, VA 24401

35 S New Street Staunton, VA 24401

540.885.0678

540.332.3971

sunspots.com

American Shakespeare Center Visit the world’s only re-creation of Shakespeare’s Blackfriars Playhouse for an intimate, interactive, and unforgettable theatrical experience. The American Shakespeare Center offers one-of-a-kind performances 12 months out of the year, and is just a short drive away in the charming and picturesque town of Staunton. Purchase tickets online or via phone.

visitstaunton.com

Ox-Eye Vineyards At Ox-Eye Vineyards, our focus is crafting high quality, food-friendly wines from grapes best suited to the soil and climate of Virginia’s beautiful Shenandoah Valley. Visit our tasting room in Historic Downtown Staunton. Sample 100% Estate wines and enjoy a glass on our patio. Convenient parking and easy walking distance to attractions & restaurants. Open daily (except holidays). Visit our website for hours and details.

10 S Market Street Staunton, VA 24401

44 Middlebrook Avenue Staunton, VA 24401

877.682.4236

540.849.7926

americanshakespearecenter.com

oxeyevineyards.com

Wright’s Dairy Rite

Artful Gifts LLC

Wright’s Dairy Rite was founded in 1952 by Forester and Alka Wright. Visitors to Wright’s get to experience the food and atmosphere of a bygone era with speaker or telephone ordering from your car or table. Wright’s continues to offer delicious homemade specialties, including homemade onion rings, hand pattied burgers, Malts and Shakes. Recently voted one of the top 10 original Drive-In Restaurants in the nation by Roadfood Guide.

Internationally recognized fiber artist, Lisa Jacenich, creates non-woven fabric with the heritage skill of felt making. Textiles are made from locally sourced raw fibers of silk and the finest wool, then fashioned into unique, earthfriendly designs of clothing, accessories and interior decor elements. Workshops and demonstrations available for all ages, groups and corporations. You’ve got to feel it to believe it! Custom orders encouraged.

346 Greenville Avenue Staunton, VA 24401

6 Byers Street (Historic Wharf District) Staunton, VA 24401

540.886.0435

540.414.1812

dairy-rite.com

artfulgifts.biz

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ush farmland and rolling hills that give way to majestic mountain ridgelines, historic homes and churches hewn from brick and stone, vineyards with row upon row of neatly trimmed vines — such elements of the Charlottesville area landscape have won the hearts of visitors for centuries and more recently have drawn a new kind of visitor: couples looking for the perfect place to marry. With Charlottesville’s growing popularity as a wedding destination, the city boasts a network of professionals — including caterers, planners and photographers — who specialize in creating a memorable wedding day, and the city and its environs offer numerous options, from vineyards to churches to one-of-a-kind spots, to host the ideal wedding.

chUrchEs Couples seeking the traditional beauty of a church wedding can choose from plenty of options, including the Chapel at the University of Virginia and Thomas Jefferson Memorial Church – Unitarian Universalist. For those looking for a chapel of a different sort, the owner of the locally beloved country store called The Apple Shed, in Nelson County, performs unique wedding ceremonies, an enterprise he goodnaturedly dubs The Apple Chapel.

vinEyards, BrEwEriEs & cidEriEs Charlottesville’s thriving craft beverage culture includes dozens of vineyards, breweries and cideries with pastoral settings and extraordinary vistas. Castle Hill Cider, Early Mountain Vineyards, First Colony Winery and the Event Center at Wild Wolf Brewing are among local favorites.

additional vEnUEs Those wanting an out-of-the-ordinary locale for their wedding day could opt for nuptials at the University of Virginia’s storied Alumni Hall; in true Southern style at the Pharsalia estate in mountainous Nelson County; at the stately Glenmore Country Club amid the rolling hills of nearby Keswick; or in the rustic Blue Ridge splendor of Adventure Farm & Vineyard, Montfair Resort Farm and Lydia Mountain Lodge & Log Cabins. ESTHER AND ANDREW’S WEDDING DAY — WEDDING PLANNING & DESIGN BY MALLORY JOYCE DESIGN. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF MICHAEL AND CARINA PHOTOGRAPHY)


Nisha & Jay

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The Details Ceremony & Reception Venue The Market At Grelen, Somerset

Dress Diana’s Couture And Bridal

Event Planner & Rentals LOGAN with Real Southern Accents

Hair & Makeup Moxie Hair & Body Lounge

Catering Mike Lund Food

Photography ksant photography

Cake/Dessert Mike Lund Food

Bridal Henna Henna Harmony

Plants and Centerpieces Real Southern Accents and The Market At Grelen

Wedding Horse Marriage, Carriage And More

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Ceremony & Reception Venue Lydia's Barn at Evermore, Stanardsville Rental Company Lydia Mountain Lodge and Log Cabins

Music DJ Kilo

Catering Wayside Catering

Photography Kibler Photography

Flowers Stargazer Floral

Wedding Cake Kim Brown

Wedding Dress Reflections Bridal

Officiant Sean Dickerson


TURNING LOCAL

THE TERMINAL OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE AIRPORT. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE AIRPORT (CHO))

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merica is discovering what locals have known all along: Charlottesville is a special place. The city’s exceptional traits — its natural beauty, low crime rate, ample jobs and vibrant local economy, as well as its educated and affluent workforce — are gaining recognition on the national stage. In 2015, Charlottesville was named one of the country’s Top 10 Best Places to Retire by the website Livability, while U.S. News and World Report singled out the University of Virginia as the No. 1 Most Beautiful College Campus in America. While locals enjoy the accolades, they are quick to point out the many other qualities that make Charlottesville a great place to live. It’s easy to access, with an airport that packs a punch for its small size, flying to more than a thousand destinations across the globe. The city sits on a major Amtrak route, providing convenient connection to Washington, D.C., 124

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and points north. The interstate on the city’s southern border will carry you to Richmond and on to the Atlantic Ocean, or into the Blue Ridge Mountains. Given all these qualities and more, it follows that many are choosing Charlottesville as their place to live, work and put down roots.

sPotlight: charlottEsvillE alBEMarlE airPort

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olling farmland unfolds below as you fly into Charlottesville Albemarle Airport — fields of corn, pastures of cattle and horses, neat rows of grapevines at well-tended vineyards. Once your plane is on the tarmac, you can see a nearly 180-degree view with the Blue Ridge Mountains etched across the western horizon.


TURNING LOCAL

LEAVING C’VILLE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE AIRPORT (CHO))

Inside the terminal, a tidy, well-appointed airport welcomes you. There’s a restaurant with food prepared on-site and a bar serving local craft beer. You can grab a little something from the gift shop, and families can take advantage of the airport’s new nursing mother’s room and family restrooms. If you use airport parking, a shuttle is available to take you to your car. It’s a little astounding to find so many amenities in what feels like a small airport. For Jason Burch, the airport’s director of Marketing, Air Service Development & Communications, that’s the point. “We feel that those little things, those amenities, are going to separate us from other airports that people may choose to use,” Jason explains. This focus on truly serving the needs of its travelers appears to be working. Indeed, of the roughly 500 commercial airports in the United States, Charlottesville Albemarle Airport is ranked No. 163 for the number of in-plane passengers it hosts. More than half a million people flew through the airport in 2015. Each day, an average of 21 flights depart from its pastoral tarmac, connecting to Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Philadelphia and the greater Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. The three major U.S. airlines — American, United and Delta — fly here, and the airport — known locally by its aviation code CHO — is also a hub for many private planes. “It’s very unique, if you were to go do a comparative study of an area our size, to have the amount of air service we have,” says Jason. “The demand from our own local market, and the supporting market around us, is strong.” CHO serves Charlottesville, Albemarle County and nine other outlying markets, including several on the other side of the Blue Ridge in the Shenandoah Valley; nearly 100,000 passengers from the Valley flew 126

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through CHO in 2015. Its footprint stretches along the Shenandoah Valley, north to Culpeper, south to Lake Monticello and east toward Richmond. While Virginia is home to large airports such as Reagan National and Dulles International — both in the Washington, D.C., area — CHO’s growth since 2010 is among the strongest in the Commonwealth. “CHO is a little airport compared to Reagan and Richmond, but we pack a big punch,” Jason says. “We have figured out the demand for our community, and the airlines have responded and it’s working,” says Melinda Crawford, the airport’s executive director. That strong demand comes from a unique mix of travelers, including those associated with the University of Virginia and federal government agencies as well as tourists. Jason points out that the community’s utilization of the airport has directly affected the air service CHO can offer. “When our local community uses this airport, it creates the opportunity for growth, and it keeps us strong and viable,” he says. Despite its impressive growth over the past decade, CHO receives no local tax dollars, making it the exception to the rule for airports of its size. Rather, it generates economic activity, to the tune of $128 million in 2009. Incredibly, CHO has managed this growth with a team of fewer than 40 employees. “We have some really good, dedicated people that work here that they want to make CHO special,” Melinda says. The motivation is simple. “CHO serves as a front door to the community,” Melinda explains. “We welcome the people that are coming to this area that may never have seen it before. This could be their very first introduction, not only to Charlottesville, but to Virginia. It could even be their first introduction to the United States. So, we serve as that welcoming mat for the community.”


thE charlottEsvillE arEa Major Employers | An array of career opportunities bring people to Charlottesville, including education, healthcare, government and data analysis. Among the top and growing employers are the University of Virginia and UVA Health System, Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital, State Farm Insurance, the United States Department of Defense, global security company Northrop Grumman Corp., data analytics firm S&P Global Market Intelligence and app developer WillowTree Inc. Education | As the birthplace of public higher education in America, Charlottesville is proud to host many exceptional schools across the spectrum of education, from preschool through doctoral work. The City of Charlottesville and surrounding Albemarle County offer several excellent public elementary, middle and high schools, as well as private schools that run the gamut from Montessori and Waldorf approaches to college preparatory. Higher education programs include Piedmont Virginia Community College and President Thomas Jefferson’s pride, the University of Virginia, which offers courses and degrees not just for undergraduate and graduate students, but for older adults as well through its celebrated Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Senior Living | Charlottesville’s temperate climate, rich history, strong medical network and approachable size make it a great place to retire, and people from all over the United States are choosing to do just that. Many retirement communities are located in and around Charlottesville, providing a plethora of options for those embarking on a new chapter in a new phase of life. Various combinations of independent and assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing facilities are available in beautiful, wellappointed communities, including The Lodge at Old Trail, Our Lady of Peace, Westminster-Canterbury of the Blue Ridge, Rosewood Village, The Colonnades, Martha Jefferson House and The Independence Charlottesville. Hospitals + Healthcare | For a city of its modest size, Charlottesville is fortunate to have two outstanding hospitals as well as an array of primary care physicians and specialists in private practices. Many of these specialists are associated with UVA Health System or Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital, making for continuity of care between inpatient and outpatient needs. For those seeking integrated and alternative medicine approaches, there’s ChinaMed for traditional Chinese medicine; Common Ground Healing Arts for yoga, massage, acupuncture and other wellness therapies; AquaFloat for salinized aqueous tank therapy, massage and infrared saunas; and The Elderberry Community Herbs & Healing, a contemporary apothecary stocking bulk herbs, powders, oils and extracts. Discover Charlottesville

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ON THE WAY TO WORK ON A SNOWY MORNING IN DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTESVILLE. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF FUNKY TEE)

TURNING LOCAL Grocery Stores | One factor important to making a city truly livable is its ability to meet the day-to-day needs of life. When it comes to shopping, this town offers an impressive array of grocery stores. In addition to conventional, well-known grocers such as Kroger, Giant and Harris Teeter, you can find nationally known specialty names including Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods Market and Wegmans. The city’s love of local extends to its grocery stores as well, and Charlottesville has many small markets that are thriving — Reid Super128

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Save Market and Market Street Market among them. If you’re hunting for specialty items, local purveyors have you covered; check out Integral Yoga Natural Foods, Rebecca’s Natural Foods, Foods of All Nations and a robust number of ethnic markets, such as La Guadalupana Mexican and Afghan Grand Market. And for those who would rather have someone else do the shopping, there’s an option for that, too: Relay Foods offers pickup or delivery of your customized online grocery order, sourced from a host of shops, farms and artisans.


sPotlight: PUtting down roots in charlottEsvillE

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n a small storefront at the west end of education,” Jessie explains, adding that their the Downtown Mall, near the movie research quickly zeroed in on Charlottesville, theater and the ice rink, a beguiling sign catches which was topping lists of the best places to the eye: Cville Escape Room it says in a typewriterlive in the nation. So in January 2005, they style font. Inside are rooms with themes, including booked a flight straight into the Charlottesville Fortune Teller’s Secret, Spy’s Demise and Mad Albemarle Airport to see it for themselves. As Scientist’s Laboratory, in which visitors have one their plane landed, it started to snow. hour to solve a mystery through clues and puzzles within the room. This is Keith and Jessie Stowell’s brainchild, inspired by similar concepts in larger metropolitan areas such as Washington, D.C., and Richmond, Va. “It’s a very fun place to be because people come there just to have fun — and they do,” says Keith. Since it opened in May 2016, Cville Escape Room has been met with enthusiasm throughout the Greater Charlottesville community. “The customers who’ve come in had a lot of positive feedback, and they’ve been just very warm and welcoming,” Keith says. For the Stowells, there is some irony in owning a business on the Downtown Mall, as the pedestrian mall was their original inspiration for moving to Charlottesville a decade ago. “We did a lot of research, and we had it narrowed down between Charlottesville and Fredericksburg,” says Jessie. “Then we came for a visit, and just fell in love with Charlottesville — with the mountains and the scenery, and the Downtown Mall.” Originally from Wisconsin, Jessie KEITH & JESSIE STOWELL — OWNERS OF CVILLE ESCAPE ROOM. (PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF KATIE STOWELL) and Keith had been looking for the right hometown for their family. At the time, they had two young children — a daughter and a “It snowed a few inches, so everything was son — and were living in Tampa. They appreciated blanketed in this gorgeous fresh white for a day,” some aspects of Florida — including the lack of recalls Jessie, adding, while laughing, “And then the harsh winters they’d known growing up — but it melted, and it was like 65 degrees.” the Stowells weren’t satisfied that it was the right The couple returned a year later to put in place for their family to set down roots. an offer on a new house in Lake Monticello, “We wanted to have more of a communityabout a half-hour outside of town, making focused area, with less crime and better their move official in May 2006.

In the decade since, Jessie and Keith feel they have met the goals they set for their family — and then some. Both kids have done well in school, attending the Fluvanna County School System, southeast of Charlottesville. Their daughter, now 17, plans to enroll at Charlottesville’s Piedmont Virginia Community College upon graduation, taking advantage of PVCC’s guaranteed transfer to the University of Virginia after two years for students with the qualifying grade and credit requirements. Once their kids were both teenagers, it seemed like a good time for the couple to realize another dream — small-business ownership. And so, 10 years to the month after they moved their family to Charlottesville, Keith and Jessie started a new chapter as owners of Cville Escape Room. “We’re thrilled to be right on the Downtown Mall,” says Jessie of their new business, noting that after all these years, it remains their favorite part of town. In fact, they remain enamored with many of the qualities that first inspired them to relocate here. In addition, Keith notes, they’ve also come to appreciate other aspects of what this area has to offer, including how closeknit the community truly is. “It’s a whole family just under the surface,” he says. Jessie points out that while most of the people she knew during the first part of her life in Wisconsin were born there, and quite a few of their neighbors in Florida seemed to be just passing through, many of Charlottesville’s residents have chosen to live here — just as she and Keith did. “Most of my close friends here are from somewhere else, but they came to Charlottesville because of UVA or because of other circumstances, fell in love with it and decided that this is home,” Jessie says. “And that’s how we feel, too.” Discover Charlottesville

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American Shakespeare Center 10 S Market Street Staunton, VA 24401 540.851.1733 | 877.682.4236 americanshakespearecenter.com 57 Carter Mountain Orchard 1435 Carters Mountain Trail 434.977.1833 chilesfamilyorchards.com 57 Chiles Peach Orchard 1351 Greenwood Road Crozet, VA 22932 434.823.1583 chilesfamilyorchards.com 39 Cville Escape Room Downtown Mall 218 W Main Street 434.566.9499 cvilleescaperoom.com 115 Grand Caverns 5 Grand Caverns Drive Grottoes, VA 24441 540.249.5705 | 888.430.2283 grandcaverns.com 9 IX Art Park 963 2nd Street SE whatisix.com BC & 7 James Madison’s Montpelier 11350 Constitution Highway Montpelier Station, VA 22957 540.672.2728 montpelier.org 7 James Monroe’s Highland 2050 James Monroe Parkway 434.293.8000 highland.org 45 Main Street Arena Downtown Mall 230 W Main Street 434.817.2400 mainstarena.com 7 Michie Tavern ca. 1784 683 Thomas Jefferson Parkway 434.977.1234 michietavern.com 40 Paramount Theater Downtown Mall 215 E Main Street 434.979.1922 theparamount.net 57 Spring Valley Orchard 3526 Spring Valley Road Afton, VA 22920 434.960.9443 chilesfamilyorchards.com 44 Violet Crown Cinema Downtown Mall 200 W Main Street violetcrown.com

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Craft Beverages Barboursville Vineyards 17655 Winery Road Barboursville, VA 22923 540.832.3824 bbvwine.com 115 Basic City Beer Co. 1010 E Main Street Waynesboro, VA 22980 basiccitybeer.com 77 Blue Mountain Brewery 9519 Critzers Shop Rd. Afton, VA 22920 540.456.8020 bluemountainbrewery.com 73 & 77 Castle Hill Cider 6065 Turkey Sag Road Keswick, VA 22947 434.296.0047 castlehillcider.com 77 Chestnut Oak Vineyard 5050 Stony Point Road Barboursville, VA 22923 434.964.9104 chestnutoakvineyard.com 77 Cunningham Creek Winery 3304 Ruritan Lake Road Palmyra, VA 22963 434.207.3907 cunninghamcreek.wine 77 Grace Estate Winery 5273 Mount Juliet Farm Crozet, VA 22932 434.823.1486 graceestatewinery.com 75 Horton Vineyards 6399 Spotswood Trail Gordonsville, VA 22942 540.832.7440 hortonwine.com 93 James River Brewery 561 Valley Street Scottsville, VA 24590 434.286.7837 jrbrewery.com 75 Jefferson Vineyards 1353 Thomas Jefferson Parkway 434.977.3042 jeffersonvineyards.com 117 Ox-Eye Vineyards 44 Middlebrook Avenue Staunton, VA 24401 540.849.7926 oxeyevineyards.com 77 Pollak Vineyards 330 Newtown Road Greenwood, VA 22943 540.456.8844 pollakvineyards.com 5 & 75 South Street Brewery 106 W. South Street 434.293.6550 southstreetbrewery.com

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Starr Hill Brewery 5391 Three Notch’d Road Crozet, VA 22932 434.823.5671 starrhill.com Stone Mountain Vineyards 1376 Wyatt Mountain Road Dyke, VA 22935 434.990.9463 stonemountainvineyards.com Thistle Gate Vineyard 5199 W River Road Scottsville, VA 24590 434.286.7781 thistlegatevineyard.com Virginia Distillery Company 299 Eades Lane Lovingston, VA 22949 434.285.2900 vadistillery.com

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Aberdeen Barn 2018 Holiday Drive 434.296.4630 aberdeenbarn.com BBQ Exchange 106 Martinsburg Avenue Gordonsville, VA 22942 540.832.0227 bbqex.com Ben & Jerry’s Barracks Road Shopping Center 1112 Emmet Street 434.244.7438 benjerry.com/charlottesville Biltmore Restaurant, The 16 Elliewood Avenue 434.202.1498 thebiltmorecville.com Burger Bach 2050 Bond Street 434.328.2812 theburgerbach.com Citizen Burger Bar Downtown Mall 212 E Main Street 434.979.9944 citizenburgerbar.com Commonwealthskybar Restaurant & Bar Downtown Mall 422 E Main Street 434.202.7728 • cwskybar.com Crozet Pizza 5794 Three Notch’d Road Crozet, VA 22932 434.823.2132 crozetpizza.com Draft Taproom Downtown Mall 425 E Main Street 434.422.5901 drafttaproom.com

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Lost Saint 333 W Main Street lostsaintbar.com Lumpkin’s Restaurant 1075 Valley Street Scottsville, VA 24590 434.286.3690 Michael’s Bistro and Tap House 1427 University Avenue 434.977.3697 michaelsbistro.com Nook Restaurant, The Downtown Mall 415 E Main Street 434.295.6665 thenookcville.com Paradox Pastry 313 2nd Street 434.245.2253 paradoxpastrycafe.com Pointe Restaurant & Bar, The Downtown Mall 212 Ridge McIntire Road 434.817.6767 omnihotels.com/charlottesville Public West Pub & Oyster Bar Old Trail Village Center 1015 Heathercroft Circle Crozet, VA 22932 434.812.2909 publicwestpub.com Restaurant Pomme 115 S Main Street Gordonsville, VA 22942 540.832.0130 restaurant-pomme.com Rhett’s River Grill & Raw Bar 2335 Seminole Trail 434.974.7818 rhettsrivergrill.com Smokehouse Grille, The 515 Valley Street Scottsville, VA 24590 434.286.4745 thesmokehousegrille.com Splendora’s Gelato Cafe Downtown Mall 317 E Main Street 434.296.8555 splendoras.com Tavern and Grocery 333 W Main Street 434.293.7403 tavernandgrocery.com Tavern on the James 280 Valley Street Scottsville, VA 24590 434.286.3500 tavernonthejames.com Threepenny Cafe 420 W Main Street 434.995.5277 threepennycafe.com


Discover Charlottesville 2017  

Premium coffee table book about great things to do and see in the greater Charlottesville, Virginia area. Wineries, restaurants, breweries,...

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