Suffolk Police Department 2018 Annual Report

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Suffolk Police Department Law Enforcement Excellence and Public Service through Partnership with our Community

Service

Professionalism

Direction

Partnership

Risk Taking

Integrity

2018 Annual Report THOMAS E. BENNETT CHIEF OF POLICE

Dedication

Excellence


Suffolk City Council

Front row, left to right: Curtis R. Milteer, Whaleyville Borough; Mayor Linda T. Johnson; Vice Mayor Leroy Bennett, Cypress Burough; Michael Duman, Chuckatuck Borough Back row, left to right: Timothy J. Johnson, Holy Neck Borough; Lue R. Ward, Jr., Nansemond Borough; Roger W. Fawcett, Sleepy Hole Borough; Donald Z. Goldberg, Suffolk Borough

Patrick Roberts City Manager

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Table of Contents Topic

Page

Suffolk City Leadership

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Table of Contents

3

Chief’s Letter

4

Vision Statement, Core Values

5

City of Suffolk Overview

6

Department Demographics

8

Organizational Chart

10

Department Commands

12

Professional Standards Division

13

Administrative Division

16

Animal Care

18

Lip Sync Challenge

19

Precinct 1

20

Precinct 2

21

Special Operations

22

Investigations

24

Crime Statistics

26

Top 10 Offenses and Calls for Service

28

Traffic Activity

30

National Night Out

32

Promotions

34

New Officers/Employees/Retirements

36

Departmental Awards

38

Community Involvement

41

Senior Citizen/ Youth Academy

42

In Memorial

43

Law Enforcement Code of Ethics

44

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Chief of Police

I was recently recognized by the Friends of Scouting at a breakfast honoring my achievement many years ago of becoming an Eagle Scout. Only 4 in 100 Boy Scouts ever achieve Eagle Scout. And even today, it is one of my most prized accomplishments. It instilled in me a set of values that are as important today as they were then. Self-worth, caring for others, being productive, and having a desire to learn have been life-long principles for me. Having social adeptness is also a trait reinforced by scouting and it makes more sense now than ever before. Today, there are more millennials in the Department than any other age group. Being able to hire and retain these young bright people is a challenge for all departments. As a matter of fact, we are trying to attract the generation after millennials, called the “Gen Z�. As a police department we are looking for new ways to connect with this younger generation. Twenty or thirty years ago, who would have thought police departments across the country would be participating in a Lip-sync challenge? Members of our Department embraced it and the proud results can be seen on page 19 and YouTube. As we try to be more socially proficient, we will never waiver on the values that were imparted in me as an Eagle Scout. We will demand that our officers are of the highest quality and integrity and beyond reproach. The members of this Department are that way now, and always will be. Just like 4 in 100 Boy Scouts ever become an Eagle Scout; it takes roughly the same to hire a police officer. The standards are high and frankly the job is not for everyone. However, if you have selfworth, care for others, like being productive, and have a desire to learn, this may be the place for you. Thomas E. Bennett, Chief of Police

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VISION STATEMENT The Suffolk Police Department is a progressive organization committed to fostering healthy community relations while combating crime through developing effective lines of communication, the application of advanced technology, and the provision of innovative training. We will strive to retain and recruit diverse personnel that are well informed, service oriented, and embrace the ideals of integrity and honor.

Service We believe in providing the highest level of assistance to those in need, demonstrating our compassion and sensitivity to the needs of our community.

Professionalism We believe that each of us are an ambassador of our profession and each citizen contact reflects our commitment to quality.

Direction We value long term vision and leadership capable of adapting to and guiding change.

Partnership We believe that teamwork is the foundation of effective policing, requiring the collaborative efforts of law enforcement and the community.

Risk Taking

Suffolk Police Department

CORE VALUES

We promote innovation and initiative to solve ongoing community problems.

Integrity We believe in safeguarding the public trust by our dedication to values that promote honesty, ethical behavior, and treating others as we would want to be treated.

Dedication We believe that we are bound to our chosen profession and pledge our commitment to serve.

Excellence We believe each employee should strive to offer superior performance in service to our community.

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City of Suffolk Suffolk Virginia is located on the eastern seaboard of the United States. It is within minutes and a few hours of some of the most important landmarks of the United States. From the Lost Colony on Roanoke Island, to Williamsburg, to Washington D.C., Suffolk is surrounded by the beginning of our country and the history still being made today. As the largest city in the state and the 14th largest in the country, if you like “City” living you can find it here. And if you yearn for the country life, well... there’s a heap of that here too!

Suffolk Anticipated Population Growth 140,000

128,053

120,000 100,000 84,585

80,000

60,000

95,879

63,677

Population

40,000 20,000 0 2000

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Suffolk Demographics

112,920

2010

2020

2030

2040

Population Total Households Median Age Median Household Income Unemployment Rate Sex Male Female Race White Only African American Only Asian Only Other Races Two or More Races Ethnicity Hispanic Population Hampton Roads Region Population Virginia Population

92,714 30,868 36 67,009 3.0% 48% 52% 52.40% 42.40% 1.90% 0.50% 2.80% 4.40% 1,702,889 8,470.02


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Suffolk Police Department


DEPARTMENT DEMOGRAPHICS Full Time Sworn Demographics Race/Ethnicity/ Gender White/Male White/Female Black/Male Black/Female Hispanic/Male Hispanic/Female Asian/Male Asian/Female Total

PO I 10 4 5 1 1 1 1 23

PO II 31 12 7 4 5 4 1 64

PO III 20 4 4 2

MPO 18 4 5 1

SGT 11 4 7 1 1

LT 7 1 2

CAPT 1 2 2

30

28

24

10

5

Dep Chief 3

Chief 1

3

1

Total 102 31 32 9 7 5 1 1 188

Full Time Animal Care, Emergency Communications and Administration Demographics Race/Ethnicity/ Gender Animal Care Communications Central Records Other Support Total White/Male 1 1 White/Female 10 15 11 6 42 Black/Male 0 Black/Female 1 9 3 2 15 Hispanic/Male 0 Hispanic/Female 2 2 Asian/Male 0 Asian/Female 0 Total 11 24 14 11 60

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Total = $1,954,831 Total = $1,954,831

Suffolk Police Department

Total = $23,233,201

Total = $1,006,913

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DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION

CHART

Chief of Police Executive Secretary

Major (Deputy Chief) Investigations

Major (Deputy Chief) Administration Command Staff Secretary Administrative Analyst

Captain Office of Professional Standards

Captain Administration Criminal Intelligence and Analysis Unit

Lieutenant

Finance

Communications

Inspections/ Accreditation

Central Records

Training

Property & Evidence

Recruiting/ Background

Quartermaster

Captain Investigations

Fugitive Unit Administrative Specialist

Lieutenant Special Investigations

Lieutenant Criminal Investigations

Sergeant

Sergeant Neighborhood Enforcement Team SOUTH

Sergeant Neighborhood Enforcement Team NORTH

Officers

Officers

Investigators Sergeants Investigators

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Records

CSI

Internal Affairs


Suffolk Police Department

Major (Deputy Chief) Operations

Animal Control

Chief Animal Control Officer

Animal Shelter Manager

Animal Control Officers

Animal Caretakers

Captain Precinct 1

Captain Precinct 2

A Squad

B Squad

C Squad

A Squad

B Squad

C Squad

Special Operations

Lieutenant

Lieutenant

Lieutenant

Lieutenant

Lieutenant

Lieutenant

Lieutenant

Sergeants

Sergeants

Sergeants

Sergeants

Sergeants

Sergeants

Patrol Officers

Patrol Officers

Patrol Officers

Patrol Officers

Patrol Officers

Patrol Officers

Auxiliary Officers

Sergeant

Sergeant

Motor Carrier Unit

School Resource Officers

Traffic Unit

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DEPARTMENT COMMANDS Administrative Command Major Gerald Brandsasse is responsible for providing leadership and oversight for the Administrative Command. This Command is comprised of the Administrative Division, Professional Standards Division, and Animal Care. The Administrative Division includes Emergency Communications, Central Records, Property and Evidence, Quartermaster, Warrant/Fugitive Unit, the Administrative Specialist, and Administrative Analyst. The Office of Professional Standards includes the Internal Affairs Unit, Accreditation, Training and Inspections Unit, Recruitment, and Background Investigations. Animal Care includes the Animal Control Officers and Shelter Management.

Investigations Command Major James Buie provides the leadership and guidance for the Criminal Investigations Command. This Command consists of the Criminal Investigations Unit, the Special Investigations Unit, the Crime Scene Investigations Unit and the North and South Neighborhood Enforcement Teams. The Crime Intelligence Analyst, Crime Analyst, Transcriptionist and Criminal Investigations Records Technician are also part of the Criminal Investigations Command.

Operations Command The Operations Command is led by Major Steve Patterson. This Command includes two divisions: Precinct I and Precinct II. These divisions compose the majority of sworn personnel on the Department. The Special Operations Section, which falls under Precinct II, includes the Traffic Unit, Motor Carrier Unit, School Resource Officers, Marine Patrol, Search and Rescue, Auxiliary Unit, and K-9 Unit. Additionally, Operations Command oversees the Department’s Underwater Recovery, Mobile Field Force, and Unmanned Aerial System teams.

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PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS DIVISION Commanding Officer Captain Cassandra Garvin

Training Unit From enrollment to recordkeeping, the Training Unit is responsible for all aspects of training. Every new hire is followed by the Training Unit from their first day at the academy until they graduate to independent patrol. The Unit supervises and maintains all of the training records for newly hired officers, and oversees the selection and training of the field training officers that will instruct them. The Training Unit is also responsible for ensuring that every sworn member of the Department meets the training requirements set forth by the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services. They are also responsible for ensuring that all Communications staff and Animal Control officers receive the proper instruction either through Hampton Roads Regional Academy or other affiliate departments.

· 1 Basic CSI Class · 3 Speed Measurement Classes · 2 CIT classes · 17 Remedial Shooter/Open range days · 2 Verbal Judo Classes · 3 Traffic Incident Management Classes · 4 Mental Health First Aid classes · 1 Community Policing Training classes · 1 Senior Citizen’s Academy The Training Unit completed the final transition training on the new Taser X2 ECW in the beginning of 2018.

The Training Unit consists of a Sergeant and two training In 2018 the Training Unit implemented the new officer family night orientation program. This is a brief introduction to the officers. Police Department, its Command and various tools and techIn 2018, the Training Unit coordinated and/or conducted the nology the Department has at its disposal. following training for departmental employees: The Training Coordinator produced bulletins throughout the · 13 (40) hour in-service classes for all sworn personnel for a year, updating personnel on changes in law, emerging crimitotal of 520 hours nal trends, and any other pertinent information. During 2018, · 9 (16) hour in-service classes for all non-sworn personnel for 10 training bulletins were created and disseminated. On-line a total of 144 hours training classes are available to Department personnel either · 10 auxiliary in-service classes for all auxiliary for a total of 40 through the police academy or on the Department’s PowerDMS. The Training Coordinator is responsible for building hours the training programs contained in the Department’s internal · 3 Post-Academy classes for a total of 688 hours system and coordinating between the academy and the · 2 (17) week academy classes for which the unit coordinates officer to enable the proper on-line training. staff instructors One training officer is assigned to work with new recruit officIn 2018, the Unit also coordinated or oversaw the following ers full time at Hampton Roads Criminal Justice Academy. specialty instruction: This allows the Department the opportunity to monitor each recruit’s progress and keep abreast of the latest training · 16 VCIN classes techniques and information. · 8 Defensive Driving classes for non-sworn personnel · 2 Patrol Rifle class

Suffolk Police Department

The Professional Standards Division is comprised of the Training Unit, Accreditation, Internal Affairs, Recruiting, and Inspections. This Division is responsible for recruiting for open positions throughout the Department (sworn and nonsworn), coordinating and supervising the hiring process for all positions, all training (initial, continuing, promotion-based, and remedial), internal affairs functions (investigating complaints from internal and external sources), and compliance with international accreditation standards through the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA).

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PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS DIVISION Inspections Staff inspections are an evaluation of the facilities, equipment, personnel and operations of the Department by Lieutenants who do not have direct control of the division which is being inspected. Staff inspections are comprehensive in nature, examining all aspects of a unit’s operations and administrative performance. They also include the input of the personnel assigned to the unit being inspected. The results of the staff inspections are reported in writing to the Chief of Police. Any deficiencies noted must be corrected by the inspected division. In 2018, there were six inspections completed on the following divisions: Investigations – Criminal Investigations, Investigations – Crime Scene Investigations, Investigations – Crime Analysis, Investigations – NET, Administration – Central Records/Warrants, Administration – Communications. For 2019, the following inspections are scheduled: Administration – Property and Evidence, Other – Office of Chief of Police/ Planning and Research, Other –Professional Standards, Other – Animal Control, Uniform Patrol – Precinct One, Uniform Patrol – Precinct Two

Recruitment and Hiring The Suffolk Police Department practices a rigorous, consistent, fair and non-discriminatory selection process by which employees are hired based upon their job-related knowledge, skills, and abilities. To that end, the Suffolk Police Department’s Background Investigator and the Recruitment Team attended 29 recruiting events in an effort to increase the applicant pool. Monthly testing continued to be the quickest way to regularly obtain a new pool of applicants. During 2018, the Suffolk Police Department received 834 applications. Of those applicants, 188 passed the physical agility test requirements. Of that number of applicants, 150 applicants successfully completed the written examination. In 2018, 19 of the 834 applicants were qualified and hired by the City of Suffolk Police Department.

Accreditation In 2018, the Department prepared for the second annual Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) review. The Department had to evaluate all 163 standards as it related to policies and procedures. The Accreditation Manager had to ensure the written directives and proofs were collected and in compliance with the standards. The Department is slated to complete its first review in April of 2019. The Emergency Communication Center has requested an on-site assessment and accreditation by CALEA. This should occur in October 2019.

Internal Affairs Law enforcement agencies cannot function to the highest degree of integrity without being willing to invite and investigate complaints made against personnel. Not only are agencies expected to investigate external complaints but they are also expected to monitor and take prompt corrective action judiciously on departmentally generated investigations. It is not surprising that most internal affairs investigations are generated from within the Department. An agency will always keep the confidence of its citizens if the community believes that the agency is committed to oversight, investigation, discipline and training. For the calendar year of 2018, there were eighty-seven (87) complaints resulting in investigations. Sixty-nine (69) of the eightyseven (87) complaints were generated from within the department and eighteen (18) were generated by citizens. Department generated complaints being 79% of the total is typical and follows the trend of the previous two years. Of the eighty-seven (87) complaints, sixty-two (62) were sustained and of the sixty-two (62) sustained, six (6) were citizen generated.

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The table below summarizes the internal investigations conducted in 2018.* Sustained

Bias Based Policing Body Camera Policy Violations

Not Sustained

Exonerated

2

Unfounded 4~

1

Civil Rights Violations

3

Excessive Force

2~

Fail to Notify

4

Fail to Report for Duty

1

Fail to Supervise

2

1

Improper Arrest/Prisoner Processing

1

1

Improper Investigation

3

Inappropriate Behavior/Misconduct

2

Late

3

Lying/Deception

2

1

2

Loss of Equipment

1

Not Follow/Disobey Orders

4

Property and Evidence Policy Violations

24

1

Rude/Unprofessional

7

3

Unsatisfactory Work Performance

5

Violation of Alcohol Policy

1

Violate Camera Policy

2

2

Suffolk Police Department

Complaint Type

1

Violation of Pursuit Policy

1

Violation of Recording Policy

1

Violate Vehicle Policy

2

Total Investigations Findings in 2018

62

11

1

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*Note: The above is the total number of investigations conducted by the Suffolk Police Department and is based on the aggregate of incoming complaints. The investigations may involve more than one officer and/or multiple policy violations at the conclusion of the investigation. The listed disposition is the finding based on the overall investigation. ~ Two Bias Based Policing complaints were closed unfounded and one Excessive Force complaint was closed unfounded without formal investigation and are included in the totals for this chart.

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ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION

The Administrative Division provides support services to our internal customers, while effectively meeting citizens’ requests for a multitude of record keeping services. This Division is comprised of Central Records, Property and Evidence, Quartermaster, Communications, Fugitive Unit, Finance, Administrative Specialist, and the Administrative Analyst.

Commanding Officer Captain John McCarley

Central Records This unit, comprised of Police Records Technicians and a Records Management Supervisor, is responsible for all data entry into our Records Management System. In addition, they are required to respond to all citizen walk-in requests for service at two different facilities. They are assigned to Headquarters 24 hours a day and at Precinct 2 Monday through Friday during normal business hours. The data entry function is critical to ensuring accuracy of information and statistics.

Quartermaster The Quartermaster is responsible for maintaining records and tracking all properties belonging to the Suffolk Police Department. This unit is also responsible for all supplies, equipment within the police department, inventory, purchase, maintenance and distribution of such equipment and supplies. One officer is staffing this position at this time.

Communications The Communications Section is the Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) for all wire line and wireless non-emergency and 911 (emergency) calls within the City. It is comprised of 23 Communications Operators, 3 Communications Lead Operator Supervisors, and a civilian PSAP Manager. Officers, firefighters, rescue personnel and citizens rely on this unit to provide accurate and timely information and/or service to meet their individual needs. The Communications Operator must be able to prioritize, plan and multi-task to accomplish the desired result which is excellent customer service for both internal and external customers. Emergency Communications

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staff continued to work towards CALEA accreditation by drafting new operating procedures and collecting proofs of compliance. One dispatcher will be assigned to an administrative assignment with a goal of completion in 2019. The Emergency Communication Center received 137,947 calls into the Emergency Communications Center in 2018. They received 41,064 wireless calls, 984 Voice over Internet (VoIP) calls, 9,351 landline calls, 87,532 administrative calls, and made 46,832 outbound calls. This totaled 184,779 calls handled by the center. Not all calls received by the Emergency Communications Center are 911 calls, or calls for service. In addition, a single event may elicit multiple calls for service. The numbers above only represent inbound and outbound calls, not the type of call, or the calls dispatched to public safety personnel. This is covered elsewhere in this report.

Fugitive Unit This unit is responsible for the recording and service of all warrants of arrest that are issued by the magistrate’s office and courts system for the City of Suffolk. In 2018, the Department received a total of 3,578 warrants and 545 indictments, 844 Emergency Protective Orders (EPO), 253 Preliminary Protective Orders (PPO). This was a total of 5,220 documents to serve with a total served of 4,181. In 2018, the Fugitive Unit served 587 in city warrants, 169 out of city warrants, and 0 EPOs/PPOs for a total of 756. This Unit is also responsible for conducting all out of state extraditions and conducted 37 such extraditions in 2018. This Unit is comprised of two officers, one sergeant, and one civilian clerk.


Property and Evidence This unit is responsible for the intake, maintenance, return, destruction, or auction of all property or evidence that is taken into police custody, in accordance with Virginia legal requirements. This unit is responsible for all data entry regarding property, as well as periodic audits of the cataloging system. The total number of items received in P&E in 2018 was 9,264. The Unit disposed of 10,588 items. Below is a breakdown of the disposed items: * Destroyed – 8718

* Kept by Court – 45

* Released to AFIS—361

* Released to owner – 716

* Released to another jurisdiction—529

* Auctioned – 154 * Other—65

The Administrative Specialist manages all media storage for the Department to include body cameras, in-car cameras and crime scene photos which equal approximately 100,000 pieces of potential evidence. The Specialist also handles the Department’s Freedom Of Information Act (FIOA) requests, concealed weapons permits applications and subpoena duces tecums. In 2018, the Specialist processed 580 FOIA’s, 2,680 Concealed Weapons Permit applications and 53 subpoena duces tecums.

Administrative Analyst The Administrative Analyst maintains the Department’s Strategic Plan and Vision Plan and is responsible for collecting data throughout the year to be used in this annual report as well as other Department reports. The Analyst is responsible for applying for, administering, and reporting on foundations, state, and federal grants. In 2018, the Department was awarded $598,751 in grant funding for equipment, overtime, training, and other items.

Suffolk Police 2018 Grants Grant Name DCJS JAG Equipment and Tech Target Inc. Grant VITA PSAP VITA PSAP FY 17 JAG FY 18 Highway Safety Alcohol FY 18 Highway Safety Occ Pro FY 18 DUI Task Force FY 2018 Port Security Grant FY 18 JAG DCJS FY 17 Bulletproof Vest Grant

Items/Program Ballistic Shields, RADAR recorder kits T-shirts for National Night Out Text to 9-1-1 Education Undercover cameras, Training, Barricades Overtime, Training, Equipment Overtime Overtime, Uniforms Dive Equipment Training, Equipment, Supplies Naloxone 34 Vests

2018 Total

Program Amount

Suffolk Police Department

Administrative Specialist

$24,066 $750 $150,000 $2,000 $30,968 $30,204 $4,662 $274,053 $14,690 $29,426 $4,500 $33,432

$598,751

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ANIMAL CARE

Laurie Brittle Animal Shelter Manager

Meghann McGillvray-Lanier Chief Animal Control Officer

The Suffolk Animal Control Unit is responsible for the investigation and enforcement of State and City laws regarding domestic animals within the City’s jurisdictional boundaries. During 2018, Animal Control Officers handled 5,995 calls for service. Animal Control Officers attended 2 Career Days, provided Animal Safety training to the Post Office, conducted 7 Roll Call Trainings for Dispatch and 7 Roll Call Trainings for Uniform Patrol. Animal Control Officers utilized Facebook to provide public information on prevailing animal control issues. The Division is staffed with a Chief Animal Control Officer and five Animal Control Officers. The Suffolk Animal Care Center maintains a shelter to protect, house, feed, and, if necessary, euthanize the stray, injured, abused or unwanted animals within the City. Adoption and redemption of stray animals, as well as lost and found pets are handled through the facility. Members of the Suffolk Animal Care Center work diligently to promote the adoption of animals and use different media outlets and private partnerships to accomplish this goal. During 2018 Suffolk Animal Care Center continued to use social media to increase reclamations of stray animals, advertise adoptable animals and post educational facts for pet owners. The Suffolk Animal Care Center is staffed with an Animal Care Facility Manager, three full time Animal Caretakers, and two part time Animal Caretakers. During 2018, Suffolk Animal Care took in 2,280 animals to include wildlife and companion animals. Of that number, 1,226 of them were considered friendly enough to be adoptable. 1,392 animals were adopted, redeemed or placed with a rescue organization.

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BEEEEEEEEP……..We interrupt this annual report to bring you the Suffolk Police Department ’s winning Lip Sync Challenge !

Suffolk Police Department

LIP SYNC CHALLENGE

Check it out! www.suffolkva.us/spd/lipsyncchallenge

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PRECINCT 1 Commanding Officer Captain Alfred Chandler

Precinct 1 is responsible for 310 of the City’s 430 square miles. This Precinct covers 12 patrol districts, comprising 46% of the City’s population. Precinct 1 operates with 57 officers and supervisors within the patrol division. The Precinct continues to be diligent in providing quality service to the citizens within the City of Suffolk. During 2018, Precinct 1 officers handled 30,432 citizen-initiated calls for service, which equates to 62% of the citizen initiated calls for service received by the Department. In 2017, officers and supervisors within Precinct 1 continued to use proactive patrols to address quality of life issues and safety concerns raised by citizens. This initiative concentrates on the identification of problems, problem-solving efforts, and evaluation of efforts on a single issue until the problem is resolved, or reduced, to a more manageable level. The proactive patrol concept has been used to address traffic-related complaints and reports of criminal activity. This concept has also been instrumental throughout the year in the prevention of crime within the high crime neighborhoods. Officers have also participated in a safety initiative involving traffic enforcement along several specified areas identified as high crash areas such as Holland Road, Carolina Road and Whaleyville Boulevard. Enforcement efforts were enhanced in these areas to combat the high number of crashes involving serious injury and fatalities. The precinct conducted 2 DUI checkpoints and 11 traffic initiatives in 2018 in an effort to impact traffic related offenses. Precinct 1 Officers have stepped up enforcement of the “No Through” truck zones in the Downtown district to provide citizen motorists less delays in traffic and reduced the amount of traffic accidents involving tractor-trailer trucks on confined roadways. With the predictive policing component of the Crime Analysis Unit, Precinct 1 has vigorously utilized their prediction models to reduce the opportunities for crime in predetermined areas. Officers receive daily reports outlining the possibility of crime in areas identified by geographic maps along with statistical data to provide an analytical approach to managing policing resources. Officers use this information as a tool to observe any anomalies that may drive crime predictions in their assigned areas and develop actions to reduce or eliminate the predicted crime. Precinct 1 officers also attend Civic League meetings for each active Civic League in the Precinct 1 area of responsibility. Attending these meetings enhances the relationship between the communities and the Police Department. The officers are also able to provide crime prevention tips and up to date crime statistics to each Civic League. The Civic Leagues voice concerns for their communities and officers are able to address these concerns proactively. Civic League attendance and participation is crucial to maintaining and building positive relationships within the communities we serve. Monthly inspections have continued to be completed to ensure personnel, vehicles, and weapons are above standard. Supervisors continuously review incident reports, customer feedback surveys, body worn camera and in-car camera footage to ensure that officers are delivering the best customer service possible. The addition of body worn cameras has aided in officer performance feedback and has reduced the number of citizen complaints. The video from body worn cameras have been instrumental in providing opportunity for teachable moments.

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PRECINCT 2

Precinct 2, housed in the North Suffolk Public Safety Center, is responsible for 120 of the City’s 430 square miles. This Precinct covers six of the Department’s 18 patrol districts. This Precinct is staffed with 41 sworn officers, and one Police Records Technician. Additionally, the Department’s Special Operations Unit, two Property Crimes Detectives and the Neighborhood Enforcement Team North are assigned to Precinct 2. In 2018, Precinct 2 had a total of 16,707 citizen initiated calls for service. The calls for service in 2018 were up 1,479 calls from 2018. Precinct 2 accounted for 38% of the citizen calls received throughout the city. During 2018, Precinct 2 conducted a traffic safety checkpoint, and over 11 DUI roving patrols. The purpose of the checkpoints, and the roving patrols were to reduce the number of impaired drivers operating vehicles within the city of Suffolk, and to reduce the number of accidents within the city. During the two checkpoints over 84 summonses were issued and there were 3 arrests. Precinct 2 has also conducted several hundred hours doing speed enforcement in our high crash corridors. The enforcement initiatives, which were scheduled around our heaviest traffic volume times, were to conduct speed enforcement, aggressive driving enforcement and safety belt enforcement in our high traffic corridors. These enforcement activities resulted in more than a 50% decrease from 2017, from working 13 to 6. During the initiatives, covering the 3 highest crash zones, over 2,155 traffic summonses were issued. In 2018, Officers partnered with the community by attending over 43 civic league meetings to educate the public on general traffic safety, home and holiday safety.

Suffolk Police Department

Commanding Officer Captain Janet Brandsasse

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SPECIAL OPERATIONS Officer in Charge Lieutenant T. Shelton The Department’s Special Operations Unit is comprised of eight specialized units: the School Resource Officers, a Traffic Enforcement Unit, the Motor Carrier Unit, the Motorcycle Unit, the Marine Patrol Unit, the Auxiliary Unit, the Search and Rescue Team, and a K9 Unit consisting of 3 certified canines.

Traffic Enforcement Unit

Motor Carrier Unit

While there were no officers assigned to the Traffic Enforcement Unit, the Department has been utilizing a National Highway Transportation Safety Act (NHTSA) grant for two full-time officers to conduct DUI Enforcement and thus the DUI Task Force Unit was activated May 15, 2016. The officers conducted saturated DUI patrol efforts to reduce DUI related accidents while keeping the roads safe. The DUI Task Force Unit’s other duties includes teaching recruit officers the fundamentals of DUI Standard Field Sobriety Testing and attending DUI forums within the region. During the 2018 calendar year, the DUI Task Force Unit yielded the following results in traffic enforcement:

The Motor Carrier Unit continued to enforce motor carrier violations to ensure the safe travel of commercial motor vehicles throughout the City. Below is a list of their activity for 2018:

DUI/DUID DRE Evaluation Juvenile DUI Refusal/Blood Draw Speeding Reckless Driving Inspection Violation Registration Violation Number of SFST's Conducted No Operators License Suspended DUI Related Suspended Revoked/License Felony Arrest Misdemeanor Possession Seat Belt Child Safety Seat Underage Drinking Weapons Charge Open Container Warrant Arrest Other charges Vehicles Stopped:

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157 16 1 65 1,152 112 74 70 351 62 31 59 34 74 32 10 2 11 31 47 241 2,781

· Overweight Summonses - 74 · Overweight charges - $737,659.00 · Permit Violations - 24 · Motor Carrier Inspections - 287 · Passenger Bus Inspections – N/A · Hazmat Inspections – 45 · Vehicles placed Out Of Service - 48 · CVSA Decals Issued - 124 · Drivers placed Out Of Service - 5 · Total CMV Violations – 300 · Escorts/Super loads - 28

School Resource Unit The Department currently has eight state certified School Resource Officers. School Resource Officers are certified to teach Virginia Rules and the Gang Resistance Education And Training (GREAT) program. Other topics that are taught by School Resource Officers are: Anti-Bullying, Internet Safety, Gang Prevention, DUI Avoidance, and Texting While Driving programs. Many of the School Resource Officers assist Suffolk Parks and Recreation in summer programs. Below are some of the numbers of students that are taught the GREAT and Virginia Rules programs. All of the 2,347, ninth & tenth grade high school students, are taught the Virginia Rules program during the school year and 1,071 sixth grade students are instructed in the GREAT program during the school year. All School Resource Officers participate in the truancy prevention program.


K-9 Unit

        

Building Searches Tracks Narcotic Sweeps School Sweeps Article Searches Demos Apprehensions Bites Call Outs

37 56 64 9 10 4 17 2 36

Marine Patrol Unit The Suffolk Marine Patrol consists of 2 boat operators (Officers) and is supplemented by the Special Operation’s Sergeant. These Officers will operate one of the Department's four boats depending on the need and conditions. The Marine Patrol Unit’s season is from May to September, although a boat is always ready for deployment. During 2018, the Marine Patrol Unit conducted the following operations: Security details to include the Stars and Stripes Spectacular, Operation Dry Water BUI Enforcement, Crittenden Raft Race, Fourth of July event, Norfolk Harbor Fest and Chippoke’s Pork Peanut & Pine Festival. The Marine Patrol Unit partnered with the U.S. Coast Guard to host a National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) Boat Crew Member) Course. Thirty-one officers from five public safety agencies graduated from this collaborated course; providing more capable boat operators proficient with skills necessary to operate in the maritime environment, to respond to emergency maritime incidents or Search and Rescue operations on the waterways. The Marine Patrol Unit also conducted the following activities during 2018:

ship of unattended kayaks discovered adrift in area waterways. The Unit provided boater education to 18 Suffolk Youth Public Safety Academy Students, assisted with Clean the Bay Day and patrolled “No Wake” zones.

Motorcycle Unit The Police Department currently has 5 certified Auxiliary Police Officers and 1 Traffic Assistance Officer. These officers assist with low priority calls for service and special patrols to include Traffic Safety Checkpoints and “Holiday on the Beat” patrols. The Auxiliary Officers provide security and traffic control for many special events throughout the year to include, the Taste of Suffolk, Peanut Fest, Peanut Fest Parade, Fourth of July celebrations, Grand Illumination, and many more. The Auxiliary Unit allows the Department to allocate resources more effectively and is a vital asset to the Police Department. These officers volunteer their time throughout the year contributing over 1,200 hours and provide a very valuable service to the Police Department and the community.

Auxiliary Unit The Police Department currently has 5 certified Auxiliary Police Officers and 1 Traffic Assistance Officer. These officers assist with low priority calls for service and special patrols to include Traffic Safety Checkpoints and “Holiday on the Beat” patrols. The Auxiliary Officers provide security and traffic control for many special events throughout the year to include, the Taste of Suffolk, Peanut Fest, Peanut Fest Parade, Fourth of July celebrations, Grand Illumination, and many more. The Auxiliary Unit allows the Department to allocate resources more effectively and is a vital asset to the Police Department. These officers volunteer their time throughout the year contributing over 1200 hours and provide a very valuable service to the Police Department and the community.

Suffolk Police Department

The K-9 (canine) Unit had three (3) K-9 teams in 2018. The teams consisted of three dual purpose patrol/narcotics K9s. Along with regular patrol and investigative responsibilities, the teams also participated in demonstrations at various school events, Mutt Strut, Senior Citizens Academy, Boy Scouts of America, and the Suffolk Youth Public Safety Academy. The K-9 teams were also utilized for the following duties during 2018:

· 15 boat safety inspections · 8 search and rescue operations · 0 vessel escort assisting U.S. Coast Guard (2 scheduled escorts were canceled) The Unit provided numerous registration decals to kayak owners. The decals enable search teams to quickly identify owner-

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INVESTIGATIONS Commanding Officer Captain Mark Erie The Investigations Division of the Police Department consists of Criminal Investigations, Criminal Intelligence and Analysis, Crime Scene Investigations Unit, the Neighborhood Enforcement Teams, and Special Investigations.

Criminal Investigations

Neighborhood Enforcement

During 2018, Criminal Investigations staff members assisted with the investigation of over 2500 Part 1 offenses reported throughout the City of Suffolk. The Department saw a decrease in aggravated assaults, burglaries, and arsons. For 2018, the Department experienced a 10% decrease in aggravated assaults with 13 fewer cases than 2017, a 14% decrease in burglaries with 47 fewer cases than 2017, and a 27% decrease in arsons with 3 fewer cases than 2017.

The Department has two Neighborhood Enforcement Teams (NET). One team is assigned to each patrol precinct and is slated for five officers and a sergeant. Their main focus is the proactive enforcement of gang related crimes and the collection of gang intelligence. The Neighborhood Enforcement Teams are focused on both short and long term, street level gang investigations, and have been instrumental at reducing gang related crime in the city. Both teams work very closely with our School Resource Officers, Intelligence Analyst, Uniform Patrol, and the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office, to share information to ensure that gang members are identified and prosecuted for criminal activity. The Neighborhood Enforcement Teams not only focus on prosecution of gangs, but also works to prevent gangs and youth violence by educating youth and their families with gang awareness programs and work to eradicate quality of life challenges within neighborhoods. In 2018, the Neighborhood Enforcement Teams conducted 40 gang awareness programs. In addition, the teams placed a combined total of 17 gang participation charges on individuals. They were also responsible for placing 385 various other (criminal) charges in 2018.

Property Crimes detectives have remained very busy investigating larcenies and motor vehicle thefts this year. Property Crimes for 2018 show an increase of 4% from 2017. Some property crimes detectives are housed within the precincts to investigate crimes where a trend or pattern is discovered within a defined area, such as thefts from motor vehicles and motor vehicle thefts. For 2018, the Department experienced a 68% increase of motor vehicle thefts. A large number of these motor vehicle thefts occurred when vehicles were left unlocked with keys inside. There were also several moped thefts. The Criminal Investigations staff continues to urge citizens to protect their belongings by locking vehicles and removing valuable items from automobiles.

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The continuing focus of 2018 was combating the rising opioid epidemic that is not only effects Suffolk, but the Commonwealth of Virginia. During 2018, the Special Investigations Unit served 25 search warrants, made 24 arrests, and made 114 controlled purchases of various items including heroin, cocaine, crack cocaine, marijuana, prescription narcotics, and alcohol. The Unit also responded to and investigated heroin related overdose incidents throughout the city. The Command Level Officer of the Special Investigations Section is responsible for the processing of all asset forfeiture and seized property for the Department. The Department seized over $121,000 worth of property and currency. The Special Investigations Unit was responsible for seizing nearly $77,000.00 of the total seized assets. Throughout 2018, the Department continued to maintain a prescription drug drop off program. Collection centers were established at Headquarters and Precinct II. The Special Investigations Unit is responsible for the collection of the prescription drugs from the bins. As a result, over 510 pounds of prescription medication was collected in 2018.

Crime Scene Investigations During 2018, there were 447 cases where the CSI Unit worked as the lead forensic investigators. During these investigations they collected 2,795 pieces of evidence. Of these, 525 pieces were processed within the Police Department’s lab. Street Technicians worked 243 cases. The CSI Unit also took 22,112 photographs of crime scenes, fingerprinted 322 citizens, conducted 47 trainings and presentations, and completed 27 photo assignments for various events for the Department. There were 4 DNA hits and 22 fingerprint identifications made. There

were approximately 158 fingerprint examinations conducted, all in-house by two forensic technicians. There were approximately 192 digital forensic cases conducted to include cell phone extractions and surveillance video analysis. The Unit was also honored this year by achieving the ANSI-ASQ ISO/IEC 17020:2012 international forensic reaccreditation.

CSI Accreditation In October the CSI Unit achieved ANSI-ASQ ISO/IEC 17020:2012 international forensic reaccreditation in 2018. ANSI-ASQ stands for American National Standards Institute /American Society of Quality Control. The CSI Unit spent months preparing, rewriting policies, establishing updated procedures, and taking annual proficiency testing, culminating in an assessor review that occurred earlier in the year by an accreditation assessor that specializes in Crime Scene Investigation. CSI Unit Graduates Member of DFS Academy CSI Forensic Technician Tonja Thornton graduated from the Virginia Forensic Science Academy. Only 12 students are accepted from around the State for each session, which is available only to practitioners within the Commonwealth of Virginia whose primary duty includes collection of physical evidence and documentation of crime scenes. The class is a nine week (360 hour) full-time school consisting of classroom instruction by forensic experts, practical exercises, and evidence collection exercises. The Academy is coordinated and hosted at the Department of Forensic Sciences Central Laboratory in Richmond.

Suffolk Police Department

Special Investigations Unit

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CRIME STATS In 2018, the Police Department saw a 3% increase in Part I crimes. Aggravated Assault, Burglary, and Arson decreased, while Rape, Larceny, and Motor Vehicle Theft increased. Aggravated assaults decreased by thirteen incidents, Burglaries decreased by forty-seven incidents, and Arsons decreased by three incidents. An increase in Larceny (4%) and Motor Vehicle Theft (68%) incidents played a large role in the Part I crimes increase of 2018. Larcenies accounted for about 74% of Part I crimes in 2018, while motor vehicle thefts accounted for 6% of Part I crimes in 2018. Overall, violent crime decreased by 4% from 2017, but property crime increased by 4% from 2017.

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Suffolk Police Department


TOP 10 OFFENSES

AND

CALLS

FOR

SERVICE

Top 10 Offenses It is important for the Police Department to document crime. Only then can it set priorities to combat it. The Top 10 reported offenses gives a good indication where the Police Department’s core functions are: Patrol and Investigations. Patrol responds to these crimes and in many ways prevents them from occurring. Investigations works the more serious crimes that are beyond the capabilities (time and resources) of Patrol.

Calls for Service

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Population

Calls for Service

In 2018, the Emergency Communication Center handled 173,975 calls for service into the Center. A “call for service” occurs each time that an entry is made into the dispatching database. Citizens may make the call for service (noted in blue on the chart) or an Officer may make a call (noted with green on the chart). As one can see, Officers will create more “calls” than citizens. That is because they are actively patrolling and handle many duties during their shift. Calls for service in 2018 were up 14% when compared to 2017 and a 35% increase over 2016.


Citizen Initiated Calls for Service for Police and Fire-Rescue

The below chart depicts the Top 10 citizen and officer initiated calls. Citizen initiated calls are considered reactive police work, while officer initiated calls are many times proactive. Both types are vital for a good police community relationship and effective crime fighting. 2018 Top 10 Citizen-initiated CFS

Suffolk Police Department

The Emergency Communication Center is part of the Police Department and it also serves as the dispatch center for Suffolk Fire & Rescue. The below chart shows the comparison of police calls for service compared to Suffolk Fire & Rescue.

2018 Top 10 Officer-initiated CFS

Nature of Call See Complainant Alarm B and E Auto Accident Suspicious Person Animal Control Call Disturbance Traffic Detail Disturbance Domestic Checking Building

Total 4,906 3,386 2,511 2,267 2,124 1,920 1,711 1,467 1,432

Nature of Call Checking Building Community Policing Project Vehicle Stop Directed Patrol Foot Patrol Busy at Headquarters Busy on Investigation Traffic Detail See Complainant

Total 25,264 21,578 17,928 13,920 11,242 4,646 4,349 4,244 3,440

Reckless Driver

1,418

Busy Report Writing

2,924

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TRAFFIC ACTIVIT Y In 2018, motor vehicle crashes rose by 3% over 2017 and has climbed 8% since 2016. However, fatalities have fallen from 15 in 2017 to only 6 in 2018. This is a positive trend, but is only one year. There were two speed related fatalities and three unrestrained occupant fatalities (speed and no seatbelt contributed to the same fatality). Crashes with injuries dropped 8% when alcohol was involved, but went up 39% where speed was involved and 16% where no restraint was used. These trends require strict attention by all officers to unsure compliance improves.

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Speeding (All Types) Driving Under Suspension Expired State Tags No Drivers License Following too Close Expired Registration Decal Reckless - Improper Brakes Fail to Obey Signs/Bond Surrender/Improp Equip Improper Passing on Double Solid Line Reckless Driving - Excessive Speed Failure to Wear Seatbelt Inspection - None or Expired Reckless - General Fail to Yield at Intersections with a Stop or Yield Sign Failure to Stop at Red Light Trucks/Carriers Prohibited on Certain Streets Vehicle Registration Violations Fail to Yield - Left Turn Traffic to Yield Right of Way No Insurance

4,319 877 609 319 300 286 283 242 203 200 198 190 187 182 121 112 98 90 83

Suffolk Police Department

Top Traffic Citations for 2018

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NATIONAL NIGHT OUT

For the fifth time in ten years, the City of Suffolk’s National Night Out event was named best in the nation among communities with a population of 50,000 to 100,000 residents by the National Association of Town Watch (NATW). Suffolk’s 2018 edition of National Night Out saw thousands of individual citizens, neighborhoods, civic groups, businesses, City employees, and City public safety personnel gather to celebrate and say no to crime. The City of Suffolk had previously received the number one ranking in 2008, 2009, 2014 and 2016. This is the 13 th straight year the City of Suffolk has placed in the top 5 in the nation for National Night Out. Suffolk is also the highest ranking City/County in the State of Virginia. National Night Out is an annual community-building campaign that promotes police-community partnerships and neighborhood camaraderie to make our neighborhoods safer, more caring places to live. This event enhances the relationships between neighbors and first responders while bringing back a true sense of community and provides a great opportunity to bring police and neighbors together under positive circumstances.

National Night Out 2019 is scheduled for Tuesday, August 6, 2019. For more information on Suffolk’s National Night Out events, visit www.suffolknno.com or www.facebook.com/SuffolkVaNNO.

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Suffolk Police Department


PROMOTIONS Promoted to Lieutenant Promoted to Sergeant

Cheryl Balzer

Aaron Smith

Ashley Shockley

Wallace Weatherly

Promoted to MPO

Jay Burton

Ben Johnson

Heather Linville

Ryan Linville

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Christopher Scherer

John Lampe


Daniel Rowland

Khandi Johnson

David Gawryluk

Promoted to: Emergency Communication Lead Operator

Jodi Holliman

Animal Control Officer

Animal Control Officer

Intelligence Analyst

Kaitlin Armstrong

Casey White

Briana Martinez

Suffolk Police Department

Promoted to PO III

Swearing in of Sergeant Aaron Smith by Clerk of the Circuit Court Randy Carter

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New Employees

Christine Buckner

Vicki Snyder

Sabel Hill

Julissa Armstrong

Pamela Nichols

Nicole Powell

Jennifer Floriano

Retired in 2018

Major Gerald Brandsasse

Officer Kimberly Young

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Sgt. Timothy Cooper

MPO Brent Wages

Sgt. Dana Santore

ACO Harry White

PRT Dianne Lynch

ECO Gloria Harper

MPO Tammy James


Left to right: Officer Carlos Gonzalez Jr., Clerk of the Circuit Court Randy Carter, Officer Jacob Hughes, City Manager Patrick Roberts, Officer Brigitte Wendel, Officer Summer Johnson, Mayor Linda Johnson, Chief Thomas Bennett, Officer Travis Gardner, Officer Christian McIntyre, Officer Timothy Olah, Officer Anthony Lucena, Vice Mayor Leroy Bennett

Left to right: City Manager Patrick Roberts, Officer Shane Turner, Officer Shamar James, Officer William Culpepper, Deputy Chief Steve Patterson

Suffolk Police Department

New Officers

Left to right: Clerk of the Circuit Court Randy Carter, Officer Jacob Clark, Officer Kevin Southern, Officer Daniel Currier, Chief of Police Thomas Bennett, City Manager Patrick Roberts, Officer Zoraida Kareivis, Officer Thomas Mills, Officer Te’chan Nichols, Officer Diane Caudill

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DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS Commendations

1st Row Captain John McCarley, Captain Cassandra Garvin, Lieutenant Troy Shelton, Lieutenant Michael Wise, Lieutenant, Cheryl Balzer, Sergeant Thomas Cain, Sergeant Jason Lyons 2nd Row Sergeant Chad Hooker, Sergeant Jeffrey Lurie, Communication Lead Operator Del Shannon, MPO Chalimous Grant, MPO Tyson Wild, MPO Ryan Linville, MPO Christopher Scherer 3rd Row MPO Michael Uriah, MPO James Babor, Investigator Gary Parker, Investigator Kevin Dodson, Investigator David White, Investigator Nicholas Gasparini, Detective Steven Ireland 4th Row Officer Haley Brock, Officer James Capehart, Officer William Bradshaw, Officer Grayson Craun, Officer Benjamin DeLugo, Officer Yamilai Diaz Ibarra, Kristi Gaines 5th Row Officer Judson Gauf, Officer Derek Jackson, Officer Brad Little, Officer Jonah Cravey, Officer Ryan Moore, Officer Kyle Valois, Officer Michael Wingate

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1st Row Officer Marcus Carter, Officer Daniel Nesbitt, Officer Eric Brigham , Officer Clifton Sessoms, Officer John Worth, Officer Hunter Triplett, Officer Lori Ellis 2nd Row Officer Adrian Feliz, Officer Lamont Greer, Officer Matthew Moraczewski, Officer Shatera Bradley, Officer Jerry Fowler, Officer David Gawryluk, Officer Rosario Tumminello 3rd Row Officer Christian McIntyre, Officer Nicholas Smith, Officer Nicholas Walker, Officer Shawn Powell, Officer Nicole Heyward, Officer Shane Sukowaski, Officer Zachary Hyman, 4th Row Communication Operator II Elaine Holman, Communication Operator III Tracy Pierce

Noteworthy Performance of Duty Lieutenant Timothy Duncan Lieutenant Cheryl Balzer Lieutenant David Heroux Sergeant Antonio Diggs Sergeant Joe Rivera Sergeant Herman Kee Sergeant Sandra Springle Sergeant Ashley Shockley (2) Sergeant Keith Fromme Sergeant Robert Fahrman Sergeant Jeffrey Lurie MPO Chris Butler MPO Duffie McLamb

MPO Tyson Wild MPO Paul Hutta (2) MPO Andrew Fenneman (2) MPO Dwayne Wiggins Detective Christopher Scherer Detective Tiffany Folkers Officer Adrian Feliz Officer Reginald Boone Officer Daniel Ferster (2) Officer David Green (2) Officer Dazemore Joseph Officer Marco Leslie Officer Sean Powell

Officer Steven Turnmeyer Officer Lauren Stabinski Officer Nicholas Walker Officer Jerry Fowler Officer Eric Brigham Officer Elizabeth Bullock Officer Jonah Cravey Officer David Gawryluk Officer Matthew Moraczewski Officer Aaron Smith (2) Officer Nicole Heyward Officer Kyle Valois Officer Bruce Walker

Officer Christina Jaramillo Officer David Wells Officer Josie Hall Officer Khandi Johnson (3) Officer Michael Swinney Officer Shane Sukowaski Officer Trevor Tello (2) PSAP Manager Kimberley Hendricks CLO Brandee Curl K9 Rommel

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DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS CONT. Employees of the Year Officer of the Year

Supervisor of the Year

Civilian Employee of the Year

Officer Kyle Valois

Sergeant Eric Crawley

Field Technician Mary Delugo

Emergency Communication Operator of the year

Communication Operator II Andrea Beale

Officers of the Quarter 1st Quarter

2nd Quarter

3rd Quarter

4th Quarter

Officer Corey Hubbard

Officer Haley Brock

Officer Zachary Hyman

Detective Chris Scherer

Lifesaving Awards

Officer Haley Brock

Officer Daniel Ferster

Community Service Awards

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Officer Ben Holland

Officer Zachary Hyman (2)

Officer Michael Holman Lieutenant Cheryl Balzer Sergeant Chad Hooker MPO Paul Hutta Officer Steven Turnmeyer Officer Kyle Hall

Officer Josie Hall

Officer Marco Leslie Officer Ginet Hart Officer Lauren Stabinski Officer Shane Sukowaski C.O. II Andrea Beale (2)

C. O. II Barbara Hughes

Officer Jonathan Bulls

Citizen Awards Mr. Darnell Berry


COMMUNIT Y INVOLVEMENT The Department participated in many events during 2018. Each year, the Department raises money and awareness for the Special Olympics through a Torch Run. At Christmas, the Department holds a “stuff the car� event to help support the Salvation Army. Department members play basketball at different schools which is called the Hometown Heroes Basketball Challenge. Every year, the Department along with Fire and Rescue stages a Mock DUI related crash at all high schools to reinforce the importance of not drinking and driving.

Suffolk Police Department

Special Olympics Torch Run

Salvation Army Stuff the Car

Mock DUI Crash Hometown Heroes Basketball Challenge

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ACADEMIES Senior Citizen Academy The fourth annual Suffolk Police Senior Citizens Academy was held one day a week, for eight weeks in the summer of 2018. Students were provided a range of city and state law enforcement topics to include: Traffic Stops, why and how to respond to Law Enforcement, personal safety, and crime prevention classes. Instructors explained the purpose of the Department’s specialized units and equipment. There was also an interactive class on Crime Scene Investigations which is always the class favorite. The Academy concludes with attendees having the chance to ride with officers on the street which rounds out the Academy’s goals of educating the citizens on the job of law enforcement and gives a firsthand account of the dedicated men and women of the Suffolk Police Department.

Youth Public Safety Academy The Youth Public Safety Academy sponsored by the City of Suffolk, Suffolk Police Department and Suffolk Fire & Rescue, is designed to build confidence and focus on the duties of public safety personnel in the hopes of establishing respect and trust between at-risk youth and professionals. The Academy emphasizes mentoring, education, team building, respect, discipline, leadership, as well as community responsibility. The Academy provides an educational experience that includes hands-on activities based on actual public safety duties. The friendly but structured atmosphere offers positive interaction with public safety that develops an appreciation for their duties.

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IN MEMORIAM Chief of Police William E. Brinkley, shot and killed in the line of duty on December 2, 1918

Suffolk Police Department

Police Officer II William Andrew (Drew) Henley, suffered a fatal heart attack in the line of duty on March 19, 2005

Images of names were taken from the National Law Enforcement Memorial in Washington D.C.

Patrolman Joseph S. Pratt, shot and killed in the line of duty on October 20, 1935

Policeman George T. Smith (not pictured), shot and killed in the line of duty on July 4, 1908

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BECOME A HOMETOWN HERO CALL 757-514-4120 WWW.SUFFOLKVA.US/SPD

Law Enforcement Excellence and Public Service through Partnership with our Community

Service

AS

Professionalism

Direction

Risk Taking

Integrity

Dedication

Excellence

Law Enforcement Code of Ethics

A LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER, MY PROPERTY; TO PROTECT THE INNOCENT AND THE PEACEFUL AGAINST VIOLENCE MEN

I

Partnership

FUNDAMENTAL DUTY IS TO SERVE MANKIND; TO SAFEGUARD LIVES AND AGAINST DECEPTION, THE WEAK AGAINST OPPRESSION OR INTIMIDATION, AND DISORDER; AND TO RESPECT THE CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS OF ALL TO LIBERTY, EQUALITY, AND JUSTICE.

WILL KEEP MY PRIVATE LIFE UNSULLIED AS AN EXAMPLE TO ALL; MAINTAIN COURAGEOUS CALM IN THE FACE OF DANGER, SCORN, OR RIDICULE; DEVELOP SELF-RESTRAINT; AND BE CONSTANTLY MINDFUL OF THE WELFARE OF OTHERS; HONEST IN THOUGHT AND DEED IN BOTH MY PERSONAL AND OFFICIAL LIFE. I WILL BE EXEMPLARY IN OBEYING THE LAWS OF THE LAND AND THE REGULATIONS OF MY DEPARTMENT. WHATEVER I SEE OR HEAR OF A CONFIDENTIAL NATURE OR THAT IS CONFIDED IN ME IN MY OFFICIAL CAPACITY WILL BE KEPT EVER SECRET UNLESS REVELATION IS NECESSARY IN THE PERFORMANCE OF MY DUTY.

I WILL NEVER ACT OFFICIOUSLY OR PERMIT PERSONAL FEELINGS, PREJUDICES, ANIMOSITIES, OR FRIENDSHIPS TO INFLUENCE MY DECISION. WITH NO COMPROMISE FOR CRIME AND WITH RELENTLESS PROSECUTION OF CRIMINALS, WILL ENFORCE THE LAW COURAGEOUSLY AND APPROPRIATELY WITHOUT FEAR OR FAVOR, MALICE, OR ILL WILL, NEVER EMPLOYING UNNECESSARY FORCE OR VIOLENCE, AND NEVER ACCEPTING GRATUITIES.

I

I RECOGNIZE THE BADGE OF MY OFFICE AS A SYMBOL OF PUBLIC FAITH, AND I ACCEPT IT AS A PUBLIC TRUST TO BE HELD SO LONG AS I AM TRUE TO THE ETHICS OF THE POLICE SERVICE. I WILL CONSTANTLY STRIVE TO ACHIEVE THOSE OBJECTIVES AND IDEALS, DEDICATING MYSELF BEFORE GOD TO MY PROFESSION-LAW ENFORCEMENT.