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City of Reno

Fire Department 2017 Annual Report


TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 MESSAGE FROM CHIEF DAVID R. COCHRAN 4 ABOUT THE RENO FIRE DEPARTMENT Contact Information, Mission and Values

6 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 7 RESPONSE DISTRICTS BY WARD 8 FIRE STATIONS Locations and Total Calls

10 RESPONSE STATISTICS 12 SPECIAL TEAMS

Hazardous Materials Response Team, Water Entry Team and Urban Search and Rescue Team

14 DIVISION OF FIRE PREVENTION

Mission, Public Education, Fire Inspections, Fire Investigations, Self-Inspection Program and Plan Review

16 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 17 EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 18 FLEET MAINTENANCE 19 TRAINING DIVISION

22 CHARITY AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS 24 WATER SAFETY River Safety, Flood Safety and Ice Safety

26 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS 27 FIRE SAFETY CHECKLIST FOR OWNERS AND RENTERS Smoke Alarms, Carbon Monoxide Alarms, Cooking, Electrical and Appliance, Escape Plan, Candle and Fire Safety

Firefighter Recruit Academy, Annual Department Training and Training Enhancements

20 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Station Tours, Ride-Alongs, Reading in the Schools and Chaplain Services

MESSAGE FROM RENO CITY COUNCIL Providing vibrant neighborhoods and public places is a top priority of the Reno City Council. As such, we are proud of the accomplishments our Fire Department has achieved this past year.

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Efficient and effective emergency response to our citizens and enhancing community engagement are key benchmarks in which our fire department continues to excel.

As our community continues to grow, we are committed to providing excellent emergency services to our residents and visitors.


MESSAGE FROM CHIEF DAVID R. COCHRAN Once again, I am pleased to report that 2016 has brought more positive change and progress to the Reno Fire Department (RFD).

Their mission is to respond to any medical and/or rescue incident with the capability not only to recover injured personnel from a potentially hazardous environment, but also provide the For the first time in eight years, we have highest level of medical care in the field. expanded our team. The first group of This is the first time such a unit has been new fire fighters has completed probation utilized in Nevada. and the second group will reach that milestone in April 2017. Some of our highlights from 2016 include: We are currently operating Engines 1, 9 and 21 as paramedic engines and plan to add an additional three units to our list of paramedic apparatus this year. We increased our level of service to the community by hiring Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Chief Dennis Nolan to oversee that division. In cooperation with the Reno Fire Fighters Association, IAFF 731, we established new two-person Medical Rescue Units (MRUs) that allowed us to open Stations 7 and 19. We currently have all Reno fire stations open for the first time in eight years. We added four MRUs to our fleet for a nominal cost and in December 2016, we successfully transported a patient for the first time in RFD history as part of our new Mutual Aid Agreement with REMSA. The RFD benefited by creating more promotional opportunities. Ten new Fire Equipment Operators were promoted at the end of 2015, followed by the promotions of seven Captains and three Battalion Chiefs in 2016. We also promoted two Fire Inspectors in the Fire Prevention Division and a Fire Equipment Mechanic in the Fleet and Facilities Division. Another accomplishment is the deployment of a Rapid Extrication Module (REM) on the Little Valley Fire. This unit consists of a brush truck and MRU staffed with a combination of paramedics and technical rescue specialists.

• We responded to a total of 37,664 calls in 2016 — a 12% increase from 2015 with an average response time of six minutes. • Community outreach continues to be a priority. We support charitable organizations such as Muscular Dystrophy Association, Northern Nevada Children’s Cancer Foundation and Moms on the Run. RFD continued its signature holiday events, the Children’s Christmas Party and the Sam Saibini Food Basket Program. • We increased the number of our EMS and education providers at special events, a capability that will be enhanced by delivery of an off-road vehicle that can operate at special events, as well as in the Wildland Urban Interface. • We deployed one of our MRUs staffed with paramedic firefighters on a wildland fire for the first time in the department's history. • We updated our fee schedule to make it more equitable for our customers and citizens. This will help to promote a culture of safety for our local businesses. As we enter 2017, my top priority will be to continue to provide the highest level of service to our community.

The department's goal is to strengthen our staffing and equipment resources by growing in importance as the City of Reno supports its strategic priorities, including promoting vibrant neighborhoods and public places, along with well-managed growth. The Reno Fire Department continues to enjoy tremendous support from Reno Mayor Hillary Schieve, her fellow Reno City Council Members and the RFD members who will provide the best service in northern Nevada. As your Fire Chief, I am grateful for the support of this department and this community, and I will repay that support by continuing to advocate for progress and growth in our department and the City of Reno.

Reno Fire Chief David R. Cochran RFD Est. May 10, 1888


ABOUT THE RENO FIRE DEPARTMENT The Reno Fire Department (RFD) provides all-risk emergency service to City of Reno residents. All-risk emergency service is the national model of municipal fire departments, providing the services needed in the most efficient way possible.

a hazardous materials team capable of identifying unknown materials and controlling or containing a release disaster; and preparedness and management of large-scale incidents.

CONTACT INFORMATION Emergency: 9-1-1

Non-Emergency: (775) 334-4636 Maintaining this level of service requires Administration: (775) 334-2300 nearly constant training of personnel. We now provide paramedic-level service This training maintains both the skills Website: Reno.Gov/Fire to the citizens and visitors of Reno. This needed to operate safely in emergency is the highest level of emergency medical environments and the physical fitness @RenoFireDept care that can be provided in the field. necessary to reduce the likelihood and severity of injuries. @RenoFireDept In addition to responding to fires, whether they occur in structures, The minimum annual-training Facebook.com/RenoFireDepartment vegetation/brush or vehicles, we also requirement to maintain firefighting and provide rescue capabilities for almost medical skills is 240 hours per year. any type of emergency situation. Special teams and company-level drills add significantly to that number of hours. This includes quick and efficient emergency medical care for our citizens;

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OUR MISSION

OUR VALUES TO OUR ORGANIZATION

Our Mission is to provide our citizens • We will work as a team to accomplish and visitors with the best possible all-risk the department’s missions and emergency service in the protection of goals through open communication, life and property. Public health, safety cooperation and recognition of shared and prevention education are key successes. components of our mission. • We encourage and promote pride, loyalty and a true sense of ownership We are and will continue to be in our department and our community. identified by our dedication and pride in • We seek responsibility and take outstanding customer service. responsibility.

OUR VALUES TO OUR CITIZENS AND VISITORS

OUR VALUES TO EACH OTHER

• The lives and well-being of our citizens, • We are committed to openness and visitors and department members are honesty in all situations. our highest priority. • We value each member of the • We will be fiscally responsible in all we department and treat each person's do. diverse contributions with dignity, fairness and respect. • We will constantly strive to earn the respect of our community by providing • We are accountable to those we serve the best possible emergency response and to each other. based on concern, compassion and professionalism in everything we do. • We strive to provide the highest level of public safety to our citizens.

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ORGANIZATIONAL CHART Fire Chief

Emergency Operations Division

Safety & Training Division

Facilities & Fleet Division

Fire Prevention Division

Division Chief

Division Chief

Division Chief

Fire Marshal

56 Hour Training Captains (3)

Fire Equipment Mechanic (3)

Fire Prevention Captain (2)

A-Shift Battalion Chief (2) Captains Operators Firefighters

Fire Service Technician

B-Shift Battalion Chief (2)

Water Supply Inspector

Captains Operators Firefighters C-Shift Battalion Chief (2) Captains Operators Firefighters

Fire Inspector II (8) Fire Inspector I (2)

Administrative Services Division

Admin Manager

Emergency Management & Health/Wellness Division

Logistics Division

Logistics Officer

Division Chief

Equipment Parts Technician

Management Asst. Program Asst. Admin Secretary Secretary Office Asst. II

254

36 Operators 135 Firefighters

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EMS Chief

EMS Captain

Total Personnel Count 223 Emergency Operations 14 Fire Prevention

42 Captains

Emergency Medical Services Division

9

Administration

4

Fleet Maintenance

3

Training

1

EMS


FIRE RESPONSE DISTRICTS BY WARD Legend Fire Stations Reno Fire Districts Ward One Ward Two

99

Ward Three Ward Four Ward Five

SILVER LAKE

GOLDEN VALLEY

10 10

22 8 8

19 19

44 1

1

21 21 55

33 77

66

Fire Stations 1

495 East 4th St.

8

3600 Kings Row

2

2500 Sutro St.

9

14005 Mount Vida St.

3

580 West Moana Ln.

10 5250 North Virginia St.

4

1096 Ralston St.

11 7105 Mae Anne Ave.

5

1500 Mayberry Dr.

12 1190 Steamboat Pkwy.

6

3970 Mira Loma Dr.

19 2105 Hawk Meadow Trail

7

3050 Skyline Blvd.

21 2501 Mill St.

1212

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FIRE STATIONS

37,664

TOTAL CALLS IN 2016

STATION

1

STATION

2

STATION

3

495 East 4th Street 7,866 Total calls in 2016 // 20.9%

2500 Sutro Street 3,456 Total calls in 2016 // 9.2%

580 West Moana Lane 6,021 Total calls in 2016 // 16.0%

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STATION

4

STATION

5

STATION

6

STATION

7

1096 Ralston Street 3,528 Total calls in 2016 // 9.4%

1500 Mayberry Drive 1,820 Total calls in 2016 // 4.8%

3970 Mira Loma Drive 2,497 Total calls in 2016 // 6.6%

3050 Skyline Boulevard 396 Total calls in 2016 // 1.1%


STATION

8

STATION

9

STATION

10

STATION

11

3600 Kings Row 2,349 Total calls in 2016 // 6.2%

14005 Mount Vida Street 1,715 Total calls in 2016 // 4.6%

5250 North Virginia Street 1,341 Total calls in 2016 // 3.6%

7105 Mae Anne Avenue 976 Total calls in 2016 // 2.6%

STATION

12

STATION

19

STATION

21

1190 Steamboat Parkway 1,856 Total calls in 2016 // 4.9%

2105 Hawk Meadow Trail 249 Total calls in 2016 // 0.7%

2501 Mill Street 3,594 Total calls in 2016 // 9.5%

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RESPONSE STATISTICS The Reno Fire Department (RFD) had 37,664 calls for service in 2016, a 12% increase from 2015. 71% of these calls were for emergency medical situations. All RFD apparatus are capable of providing care at the Intermediate Life Support level. We have 55 paramedics within the Department and are now able to provide paramedic services to our citizens. We also responded to 732 fire calls, or an average of about two per day. As a busy metropolitan fire department, we staff all fire engines and trucks with four people to allow for maximum efficiency in fire-ground operations. Aggressive interior attack is the key to putting fires out while they are small to minimize damages and provide greater life safety. We also responded to vehicle accidents and rescue calls, which includes extricating people trapped in vehicles, elevators and machinery and waterrescue responses. RFD also responded to numerous calls for animal rescues, because our furry and feathered friends are important, too!

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732 37,664

Total Calls for Service

Friday

Busiest Day of the Week

Station 1

26,749

Total Fire Calls Total Medical Emergency Calls

5-6 p.m.

Busiest Time of the Week Busiest Station 7,866 calls

(21% of total call volume)


RESPONSE TIME AVERAGES

7 minutes 21 seconds

6 minutes 0 seconds

17 minutes 23 seconds

From 9-1-1 Call to Arrival

From Fire Station to Scene

Average Time Spent on Scene

15 2,031 False 434

6,589

1,108

Hazmat

Good Intent

Public Assistance

Other

0.04%

5.39%

5

Rupture/ Explosion 732

0.01%

Fire

1.94%

1.15%

17.49%

2.94%

2016 TYPE OF CALLS FOR SERVICE

26,749 EMS

71.02%

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SPECIAL TEAMS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS RESPONSE TEAM RFD contributes 33 members to the Regional Hazardous Materials Response Team. This hazmat team is composed of members from RFD, Sparks Fire Department and Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District.

WATER ENTRY TEAM necessary for personnel to enter hazardous areas to control or contain a release.

The Water Entry Team (WET) currently consists of 34 Reno firefighters who have received specialized training for swift/still water and ice rescues.

Reno is a major shipping corridor with interstate highways, railroad lines and an Team members train monthly in the air cargo terminal. classroom, in the river, and lakes and All members are specially trained to ponds in the city. All team members This, coupled with our high industrial the hazmat technician level to respond must pass an annual fitness/swim test area and occurrence of illegal dumping, that exceeds the standards of the United to chemical, biological and radiological means our team must be capable incidents. States Lifesaving Association for Aquatic to respond to minimize the human Rescue Response Teams. and environmental effects of hazmat The team maintains a variety of detection incidents. The team has two apparatus specially devices and protective equipment equipped with zodiac-style rubber

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URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE TEAM inflatable boats, whitewater rafts, inflatable and hard-shell kayaks, river boards and an ice rescue sled.

The Reno Fire Department's Urban Search and Rescue Team consists of 32 highly trained and dedicated members capable of handling some of the “highMore than half the calls for service are to risk, low-frequency� incidents that occur the Truckee River, especially in the area in our community. from Mayberry Park to Wingfield Park during the spring and summer rafting Team members specialize in high-angle season. Call volume can double during rope rescue, collapsed building search years of above-average annual snow and shoring, confined-space rescue and pack due to the spring run-off. trench rescue. Although rare, these types of incidents require many well-trained

individuals working as a team to give the victim the best chance of survival. The team maintains a variety of specialized rescue equipment and is working towards becoming a Regional Task Force within the FEMA response model.

See page 24 for additional information on RFD WET Team and Water Safety.

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DIVISION OF FIRE PREVENTION MISSION STATEMENT

PUBLIC EDUCATION

FIRE INSPECTIONS

The Division of Fire Prevention is dedicated to providing efficient, effective, and equitable life safety and property protection to the citizens and visitors of Reno.

RFD provides public education programs upon request. Both our engine companies and our prevention personnel have an active presence in our community.

Fire inspections are conducted to discover and correct any condition likely to cause a fire or life-safety hazard. All properties within the City of Reno, except private dwellings, are inspected.

We will do so actively, demonstrating ethical conduct, excellent customer service and professional integrity in all areas of fire inspections, fire investigations, plans examinations and public education.

Some of the programs we offer include station tours, fire extinguisher training, home escape planning and general fire safety for children.

Frequency of inspection is determined based on the associated hazards that a site may pose, and may include materials and manner of storage, maintenance of exits, accessibility to fire service personnel, maintenance of fire protection and detection systems and general housekeeping.

185

Other Service Calls

29

Public Education Events 0.4%

168

Special Event Inspections 2.4%

204

Special Event Plan Reviews

1,974

2.9%

Reoccurring District Inspections Includes annual, re-inspects, complaints & child care

1,006

2.7%

Fire Investigation Calls 1.6%

1,298

New Construction Reviews 18.7%

1,955

New Construction Inspections 28.2%

FIRE PREVENTION DIVISION WORK LOAD DISTRIBUTION

28.5%

New Business License Inspections

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14.5%


FIRE INVESTIGATIONS

SELF-INSPECTION PROGRAM

PLAN REVIEW

Fire Prevention conducts investigations into suspicious fires to determine their origin and cause.

On July 1, 2016, the City adopted a fee schedule that decreased the fee of an annual fire inspection to $75.00 per hour. Prior to this, annual inspection fees were based on the type of occupancy and ranged from $91.00 to $5,160.00.

Fire Prevention also reviews plans to determine compliance with current International Fire and Building Codes, as well as all local codes, ordinances, standards and regulations.

Whether a fire is accidental in nature or intentionally set, the investigation team determines action needed to prevent future occurrences, such as product recalls, public awareness, increased code-compliance inspections, or arresting and prosecuting an arsonist. Fire Prevention Arson Investigators are Nevada Peace Officer Standards and Training-certified. In 2016, the Reno Fire Prevention Bureau investigated 109 fires within the City of Reno. The Fire Investigation Unit had seven arson arrests and seven juvenile fire-setter referrals. From these investigated fires, we had zero civilian fatalities and five civilian smoke and burn victims.

With this new fee schedule, RFD has implemented a self-inspection program for businesses within the City. This program provides an opportunity for the RFD and the city's business community to form a partnership in fire education and life safety. It also provides an economic incentive to the business owner to perform and maintain a fire-safe environment.

Fire Plan reviewers look for such things as adequate and compliant fire-safety systems, fire resistant building materials, fire department access and proper and adequate exiting.

GOALS An important element of the selfinspection program is to conduct inspections on an annual basis in order to proactively identify safety issues, ensure basic compliance with fire safety regulations, educate business owners, and to promote continuous improvement of health and safety conditions in all Reno businesses.

The prosecution rate for arson crimes investigated averages 18%. The estimated dollar amount for fire loss was $4,837,000. The Fire Prevention Bureau investigated fire causes for 2016 and are By having business owners and as follows: 45 accidental, 38 incendiary managers conduct these inspections and 26 undetermined. within their own work areas, the business responsible will become more familiar and take on greater ownership of fire-safety requirements. Supervisors become more involved in ensuring the health and safety of their employees and customers.

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EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Emergency Management for the City of Reno is responsible for administering an all-hazard mitigation, preparedness, protection, response and recovery program to protect Reno residents. The goal is to work collaboratively with regional partners to ensure adequate plans are in place to guide the City of Reno to effectively prepare, respond and recover from disasters. Emergency Management for the City of Reno is organized within RFD, however, the Emergency Management response encompasses all City of Reno departments based on the individual

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incident. Primary department responders for emergency management are the Reno Fire Department, the Reno Police Department and the Reno Public Works Department. Each of these agencies responds to many types of emergencies throughout the year. Fortunately, we very rarely encounter dealing with disasters such as a major earthquake, flood, large wildfire or act of terrorism. Nonetheless, we must always be prepared to respond to such an event to provide our citizens with the service and support needed in the event of such a crisis.

The City of Reno uses a Regional Emergency Operations Plan to guide actions in the occurrence of a disaster. Emergency preparedness is not only the responsibility of the City of Reno, but also a responsibility for all citizens. Working together will allow the entire community to be more prepared, safer and resilient during a disaster. For more information on how you can prepare for a disaster visit Reno.Gov/Fire.


EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES We provide emergency medical services on a daily basis and during citywide special events. RFD responders are trained to the EMT, Advanced EMT and Paramedic service levels to meet the needs of the citizens of Reno and the surrounding community. For the first time in the 128-year history of RFD, Reno firefighters staffed three paramedic engine companies in 2016. We also added an EMS Division Chief and EMS Captain to the administrative ranks to help oversee

the administration, training and delivery of quality patient care. Additionally, the department added four Medical Response Units to its fleet. Utilizing these MRUs, RFD supplemented the 9-1-1 EMS transport system during periods of high call volume by providing mutual aid ambulance transport for patients to local hospitals. MRUs also provide advanced lifesupport care at special events throughout the city and during largescale wildland fire incidents.

With the completion of two firefighter academies in 2016, the department certified an additional 21 paramedics to its ranks. To meet the recognized need for providing the highest level of patient care to all of Reno’s citizens and visitors, RFD plans to continue expanding its paramedic level of service for the remainder of 2017 and beyond.

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FLEET MAINTENANCE Striving to maximize our citizens’ tax dollars, RFD provides the highest level of safety for our community and firefighters. RFD successfully garnered more than $250,000 in federal money to replace aging hydrants in some of Reno's older neighborhoods. We are targeting as many as 50 hydrants for replacement

to help ensure a reliable water supply for an emergency situation, as well as protecting our environment through minimizing catastrophic failures in an outdated system. Most of these hydrants were installed in the 1950s, and in one case the system was initially put into operation in 1930.

We are proud to announce that we have purchased three new fire engines that you will see in service in your neighborhoods. These new fire engines include the latest safety features for our firefighters and reduced emissions to help maintain our clear air.

LADDER TRUCK

FIRE ENGINE

RESCUE

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BRUSH RIG


TRAINING DIVISION The Training Division coordinates and delivers training for RFD and provides incident safety officers on every multicompany response, in addition to serving as blood-borne pathogen safety officers for all city departments. The Training Division also maintains the training records for every RFD employee, and manages ongoing training that keeps personnel safe, efficient, knowledgeable and protected.

FIREFIGHTER RECRUIT ACADEMY In 2016, the Training Division managed two separate 12-month recruit training programs, each of which included a three-month firefighter academy for 16 recruits. The academy also managed specialized individual recruit training for an additional nine months for each of the 32 recruit firefighters.

ANNUAL DEPARTMENT TRAINING

TRAINING ENHANCEMENTS

This division delivered more than 30,000 hours of training in 2016, from federally mandated programs to emergency medical training, fire ground tactics and strategy classes.

In 2016, RFD upgraded and modernized the captain-level training, resulting in the January 2017 Captain’s Academy for newly promoted Captains. This academy will also be used as a base for anticipated acting Captain training throughout 2017.

In addition, the Training Division supported and helped to coordinate technical team training for the Hazardous Materials Response Team, Water Entry Team, and the Urban Search and Rescue Team, and oversaw two separate month-long night drills, with a Hazardous Materials Response Team drill in the spring and an Emergency Medical Service drill in the fall. The ongoing Fire Equipment Operator training includes a two-week Engine Operator Academy and a one-week Truck Operator Academy, and ongoing re-certification by acting Fire Equipment Operators. The division sponsored an out-of-area training resource to bring a detailed fire apparatus class to RFD in order to expand the department’s breadth of knowledge.

RFD coordinates with outside agencies to implement new, state-of-theart training. Examples include our participation in the Traffic Incident Management System, a federally mandated safety program, and wildland fire training. Our goal is to provide nationally certified safety training opportunities for RFD personnel. These trainings will make our team safer and more efficient during the incidents we respond to in the Reno area on a regular basis. Last year, this division supported employees by implementing new emergency-incident rehabilitation policies, supporting critical incident-stress management and peer-support programs.

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT STATION TOURS

RIDE-ALONGS

READING IN THE SCHOOLS

Ever wonder what it’s like to work in a fire station? RFD offers free tours of our fire stations. Tours are conducted during normal business hours and are available by appointment only.

RFD offers ride-alongs for anyone over the age of 18 interested in experiencing the life of a firefighter. Attendees spend a nine-hour day at a fire station, experiencing firsthand what life in the firehouse is like, and what is involved when responding to emergency calls.

RFD continues to partner with the Washoe County School District during National Reading Month in March.

For more information, call (775) 3337775 or visit Reno.Gov/Fire.

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To apply, visit Reno.Gov/Fire.

This program allows us to better keep our area children safe by visiting elementary school classrooms to read and share our fire safety message, in the hope that we can help move closer to our goal of having the safest possible community. In 2016, RFD had the opportunity to talk with over 1,500 children and we project to exceed that number in 2017.


CHAPLAIN SERVICES RFD’s Chaplaincy Services Program provides trauma intervention, resource services and spiritual care to employees and the public.

emotional care due to loss of life and may include physical outreach such as providing blankets, clothing and followup care.

Our board-certified Crisis and Trauma Response Chaplain Stephen Arvin is on call 24/7 and responds to calls for community and citizen assistance.

Chaplain Arvin provides extended outreach as a liaison with the Reno Firefighters Community Assistance Program (RFFCAP) and partners with the American Red Cross. Chaplain Arvin provided more than 1,900 hours of service in 2016.

The focus of crisis and trauma response varies from mental, spiritual and/or

An additional 700 hours of community outreach was provided to area public safety agencies and the Medical Examiner’s office for next-of-kin searches, notifications and trauma intervention. For more information on RFFCAP or to contact Chaplain Arvin, call (775) 560-4861.

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CHARITY & NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS THE RENO FIRE DEPARTMENT PROUDLY SUPPORTS THE FOLLOWING CHARITIES, NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS AND EVENTS:

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• Northern Nevada Children’s Cancer Foundation • Natalia’s Night • St. Baldrick's Foundation • Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern Nevada

• JUSTin HOPE Foundation • Susan G. Komen • Moms on the Run • Washoe County School District • Senior Citizen Outreach


• Gatekeeper Program

• Homeless Children’s Christmas Party

• Renown Children's Hospital

• Osher Lifelong Learning

• Sierra Pediatric Blood and Cancer Specialists

• American Cancer Society-Relay for Life

• Notables

• Legends of the Game Celebrity Golf Tournament

• American Heart Association

• Sam Saibini Christmas Baskets

• Special Kids' Rodeo

• Older Americans Month

• Care Chest

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WATER SAFETY The Water Entry Team (WET) responded to 36 calls for service in 2016. Of those calls, 30 were water-related and six were ice-related. Twenty-nine of these events occurred in or around the Truckee River and seven occurred in other lakes, ponds or ditches in the City of Reno. With the 120-mile long Truckee River running through downtown Reno, water safety is a top priority for RFD.

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The Truckee River drains 3,060 square miles and has an average flow of 804 cubic feet per second (cfs). The maximum-recorded flow for the Truckee was in 1963 when the river flowed at 18,900 cfs. As a comparison to recent events, in 1997 the Truckee was measured at 18,200 cfs, and in 2005 at 16,000 cfs.

It is critical that our citizens understand the power and force of the Truckee River. With that, here is some river, flood and ice safety information keep you safe.


RIVER SAFETY

• Always wear a personal flotation device • Fish/float/swim/boat with a buddy • Tell someone where you are going and when you plan to be back • Save the alcohol for after you leave the river • If you fall in, assume a defensive swimming position

FLOOD SAFETY

• Keep your distance from raging flood waters • Avoid skin contact with any flood water • Don’t drive through flooded roads • Be prepared to not have tap water at your home for several days

ICE SAFETY

#1 Rule – Stay off the ice • Call 9-1-1 Immediately • Attempt shore-based rescue, do not enter the ice or water to attempt arescue • Victim has about 10 minutes of purposeful muscle movement • They will lose heat 25-32 times faster • Hypothermia can cause unconsciousness in as few as 7 minutes

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A FIRE ENGINE AND A FIRE TRUCK? FIRE ENGINE 500+

Engines respond first and begin to fight the fire. They are equipped with a water pump and a 500-750 gallon water tank to enable quick fire attack until a water source can be secured from a hydrant. The engine carries thousands of feet of fire hose. Photo of a fire engine is on page 18. FIRE TRUCKS

WHY DOES THE RFD SEND A FIRE ENGINE WITH 4 FIREFIGHTERS TO EVERY CALL, INCLUDING MEDICAL EMERGENCIES? The Engine Company is the basic unit of response for most fire departments and is staffed to respond to the widest range of possible emergencies including fires, medical emergencies, hazardous materials incidents and other hazardous situations. Because the personnel operate as a cohesive crew with set responsibilities, they respond together as a unit to all emergencies. Fire stations are strategically placed around our community to allow for quick response times to all neighborhoods. By responding to medical emergencies quickly, we provide the best service to the citizens.

Trucks specialize in ventilation, search and rescue and extrication. They are equipped with an aerial ladder to access upper floors and have the ability to spray water on a fire from an elevated position. In most cases, an engine will arrive several minutes before an ambulance Trucks also carry multiple ground and provide extra trained personnel ladders, numerous power and hand to assist in patient care and preparing tools, ventilation fans and heavy rescue for transport. For critical patients, our and extrication equipment. Photo of a fire personnel will join the ambulance crew truck is on page 18. and ride with the patient to the hospital.

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WHAT IS THE WORK SCHEDULE FOR FIREFIGHTERS? Because emergencies can happen at any time, the fire department is staffed 24 hours-a-day, 365 days-a-year. Firefighters work 48-hour shifts. To maintain this staffing there are three shifts or battalions that each work two consecutive shifts (48 hours) followed by 96 hours off. A firefighter's work week averages 56 hours. This is the most cost-effective way to provide constant staffing.


FIRE SAFETY CHECKLIST FOR OWNERS AND RENTERS SMOKE ALARMS Located on every level of the home. Located inside and outside sleeping areas. Test every month by listening for the noise when you press the "test" button. Batteries are changed as needed. Age: less than 10 years old.

CARBON MONOXIDE ALARMS Located on every level of the home. Age: less than seven years old.

COOKING SAFETY

ELECTRICAL & APPLIANCE SAFETY All electrical cords are in good condition and not broken or cut. Clean dryer lint after every use. All electrical outlets are safe and do not feel warm when touched. If they are warm, call the landlord or an electrician.

ESCAPE PLAN Create a fire escape plan that shows two ways out of every room. Everyone knows where the safe meeting place is outside the home. Everyone living in the house should practice the escape plan two times a year.

CANDLE SAFETY Place in a sturdy fire-proof container that won't tip over. Blow out all candles when leaving the room or going to bed. Keep out of reach of children and pets.

FIRE SAFETY To prevent children from starting fires, lock up matches, lighters, cigarettes, candles, etc. Dispose of fireplace ashes property.

Around any cooking area, leave no items that can burn. People stay in the kitchen when they are frying, grilling, boiling or broiling food. Pot handles are always turned toward the back of the stove.

2015-2016 2017 Reno Fire Department Fire Department Community AnnualReport Report2727


2017 Reno Fire Department: Annual Report  
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