2018 City of Edmond Land Sustainability Report

Page 1

LAND 2 0 1 8 S U S TA I N A BI L I T Y R E P O R T


AC K N OW L ED G EM EN T S

TA B L E O F C O N T EN T S

Building Services

1

F O R E WO R D

Citylink

6

LANDUSE

Edmond Electric

7

SENSITIVE L AND

Engineering

8

SALES RE VENUE

Information Technology

1 1

P O P U L AT I O N G R OW T H

Marketing

1 2

L A N D C H A R AC T E R I S T I C S

Parks, Events, and Recreation

1 6

U R B A N F O R E S T RY

Planning Department

1 7

T R E E C A N O P Y G OA L S

Public Works

1 8

TREE PL ANTING PROGRAM

Solid Waste

2 1

L ANDSCAPE ORDINANCE

Urban Forestry

2 3

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Utility Customer Service

2 4

T R A N S P O R TAT I O N

Vehicle Maintenance

2 5

TRAFFIC PROJECTS

Water Resources

2 8

B I C YC L E M A S T E R P L A N

3 2

S I D E WA L K PA R T N E R S H I P P R O G R A M

Special Thanks

3 4

C I T Y L I N K– P U B L I C T R A N S P O R TAT I O N

The University of Central Oklahoma

3 7

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

and BBN Architects, Inc.

4 0

CIT Y OF EDMOND FLEET

4 2

C I T Y PA R KS


Perhaps the greatest challenge is to leave a world for our children that is better than it was before. The Edmond Greenprint | A Report to the City Council and the Residents of Edmond Green City Task Force, July 2003

F O R E WO R D Private and public stakeholders, elected officials, and city staff have worked together to make this community what it is today. Census numbers indicate the City of Edmond grew from a population of 68,315 to 81,405 from the year 2000 to 2010. The City’s population for 2020 is projected to reach 95,350. This reflects a 40% increase from the year 2000. As with any growing community, it’s necessary to make plans for accommodating urban growth, and to understand the consequences of our actions, or inaction, for future residents.

1.


The City of Edmond

has proven it is a good place to do business, has shown to be environmentally sensitive, and has been consistent as one of the most desirable places to live in the US. In 2018, Money Magazine in partnership with Realtor.com ranked Edmond number 36 as one of the best places to live. Today, the City of Edmond is building on the same conversations that made this City, incorporating ideas and concepts that will make the community stronger and more livable. Sustainable practices for the City of Edmond are derived from the following priorities. Rooted in our values and a science-based approach, our priorities are long-term, comprehensive, community-driven and action focused. The primary mission for the City of Edmond is to provide Trustworthy Service through Continuous Improvement. As a component of the City’s Internal Strategic Plan, City departments are asked every year to provide their goals and objectives regarding a variety of organizational priorities, including sustainability. Throughout the year, departments report updates on their goals to City Management. These priorities fall under the larger Organizational Priority of Environmental Stewardship.

Protecting our natural resources

Enhancing energy management

Improving the built environment

Maximizing waste reduction

Balancing land use and transportation

Promotion of economic development

Providing alternatives for food security

Improving City partnerships and outreach efforts

2.


Traditional planning processes will often focus on isolated places rather than interconnected systems. Having moved beyond traditional planning we are addressing social, economic and environmental challenges in a variety of ways. While this publication was written with city managers and staff in mind, we also wanted to communicate generally to the public about some of those activities. City Departments provide meaningful assessments to the City’s leaders. One of the functions of the Sustainability Office is to capture metrics that will help leaders make informed decisions about sustainability. Keeping dollars in the local economy, attracting new business, and improving the community’s quality of life are important objectives. Sustainable cities help achieve these objectives by 1 | Using energy more efficiently 2 | Buying and harnessing renewable energy 3 | Enhancing access to alternative transportation modes 4 | Recycling and reusing its waste 5 | Greening the community through landscape ordinances and tree plantings 6 | Making informed land management decisions 7 | Providing local food alternatives 8 | Empowering customers to be more sustainable through City programs 9 | Encouraging residents to buy local

3.


S T R AT EG I E S Strategies are based on the organizational priorities. For each Sustainability Strategy, whether it is observed implicitly, or stated directly, there is a defined Value, a quantitative or qualitative Goal, and a Measure that can be achieved to help determine future activities. In order to help determine strategies the City of Edmond has an informal Sustainability Committee, consisting of multiple City department staff. The Mission of Edmond’s Sustainability Committee is to provide leadership in researching and developing practices that emphasize efficiencies in energy use, renewable energy, operations, waste reduction, and natural resource protection through measurable performance criteria. This publication is in a Three-Part Series to illustrate important strategies the City has employed over the years. Some strategies will be represented by metrics the City of Edmond utilizes, and others will be highlights to describe more fully what a department or division does. Two additional highlights will be the University of Central Oklahoma, and the Coffee Creek Water Resource and Recovery Facility.

PART 1 | Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Recycling,

University of Central Oklahoma

PART 2 | Land Use Considerations and Urban Forestry,

Transportation, City Parks

PART 3 | Water and Wastewater, Water Resources

Recovery Facility, Stormwater Division

The University of Central Oklahoma (UCO), a strategic partner for the City of Edmond, is included this year to demonstrate the full commitment by our two respective entities. We also want to acknowledge BBN Architects, Inc for its contribution to this year’s publication about an award-winning design for the new Coffee Creek Water Resource and Recovery Facility. The City is extremely grateful to UCO and BBC Architects for their contribution in this publication! We also want to acknowledge the unsung heroes, whether they are city staff, university personnel, or other residents, that make our City more sustain-able every day by using less paper, turning off the lights, and other everyday activities that make a difference.

4.


S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y R E P O RT | 3

E N E R GY 2 0 1 8 S U S TA I N A BI L I T Y R E P O R T

LAND 2 0 1 8 S U S TA I N A BI L I T Y R E P O R T

WAT E R 2 0 1 8 S U S TA I N A BI L I T Y R E P O R T

5.


LANDUSE Strategies for minimizing the costs and impacts of traffic congestion and helping to determine the best use and function for land have been established through the City’s local development regulations and Council Resolutions, beginning with a foundation in Edmond Plan 2018 (comprehensive land use plan) and the Edmond Transportation Plan. Other plans that the City has adopted include the Edmond Bicycle Master Plan in 2012, and the Parks and Recreation Master Plan in 2013. In addition, several community dialogues, studies, and community surveys support the enhancement of outdoor recreational amenities and the preservation of natural resources. Among these are Tomorrow’s Edmond (1996), the Edmond Greenprint (2003), Sensitive Area Studies (2003-04), and the Green Infrastructure Initiative (2012). Citizen Satisfaction Surveys also consistently rank public parks, greenways, and bicycle and pedestrian trails near the top for potential new projects.


S EN S I T I V E L A N D The City quantifies community growth regarding sensitive land areas. Sensitive areas in the Edmond Plan 2018 include remnant forests (forests that pre-date statehood), new-growth forests, prime farmland, and the flood plain. New developments are generally not allowed within the 100-year regulatory floodplain. Special consideration is also given to each development through the city’s tree preservation, stormwater, and landscape codes. Common areas are often established on new plats that can serve as a stormwater detention area, or open space. Low impact development (LID) is also encouraged in the City’s Stormwater Drainage ordinance. Examples of LID include rainwater harvesting, permeable pavements, rain gardens and bioretention cells, green roofs, and riparian buffers. One activity that Edmond’s Stormwater Quality program spearheaded in 2013 was a demonstration project for permeable pavement and a rain garden. This parking lot is located just east of the Planning and Public Works building at 10 S Littler.

LID is as an ecosystem-based approach to land development and stormwater management. LID practices can help protect the natural hydrology of watersheds.

7.


S A L E S R E V EN U E The City also quantifies community growth regarding undeveloped land, which not only helps provide a picture for development opportunities, but in terms of “sensitive areas,” it helps to quantify the intrinsic value of the property based upon its pre-developed state. Ways in which the City measures growth are through building permits and sales taxes collected. The graphics on the following pages are used as an indication of where the community’s population is growing. Population and land use are important factors for sales tax, but the maps and figures also begin to identify potential areas for neighborhood revitalization. An important goal for the City’s Finance and Marketing departments is to raise awareness about the importance of commercial business in Edmond and how sales tax is the primary economic engine for services provided.

71% of the city’s revenue comes through local sales tax, which goes toward supporting critical services, but it will also fund “quality of life” activities.

8.


G OV ER N M EN TA L R E V EN U E BY S O U R C E 3 % 2% 10%

Sales Tax Grants Charges for Service 14%

Other Other Taxes 71%

71% of our revenue is earned through Sales and Use Tax collections. Property Tax is not collected for use in operations per State law. Major commercial development at the interchange of Covell and Interstate 35 should stimulate significant visitor traffic to Edmond and generate new sales tax dollars for the community.

G OV ER N M EN TA L AC T I V I T I E S U S E S 2%

1%

8%

Public Safety (Fire & Police) Streets and Highways

9%

Culture, Parks and Recreation General Government Health and Welfare 61%

Interest on Long-Term Debt

Public Safety combined with construction and maintenance of streets and highways dominate the expenditures to keep Edmond safe and address problem areas identified by our citizens through engineering analysis of traffic needs.

19%

9.


E S T I M AT ED P O P U L AT I O N G R OW T H BY C EN S U S T R AC T (2 0 10 –18)

T O TA L N E W BU I L D I N G P ER M I T S BY T Y P E (2 0 10 –18) Non-Residential 700

635

603

600

Residential 601 585 543

500

488 415 387

400 297

300 200 100

71 22

0

2010

11

30

12

33

57

13

14

10 .

42

15

72

16

64

17

55

18


P O P U L AT I O N G R OW T H A steady amount of residential growth has occurred over the last several years north of Danforth and east of I-35. EAST OF I-35

In this area building permits comprised 26% of new residential growth city-wide after 2010, and by the end of 2018 the population east of I-35 grew by approximately 82.6%. W E S T O F I - 3 5 A N D N O R T H O F DA N F O R T H

This area comprised 52% of new residential growth. Areas of slower growth indicate neighborhoods that are either fully developed, or there may be changing neighborhood dynamics, such as family size. Vacancies are also important to track in areas of the City that may be experiencing slower growth. The City is working on a new model to make vacancy data more meaningful. Using this data, opportunities for revitalization efforts and neighborhood planning may present themselves. Neighborhood planning will involve factors where the City might be able to help, whether it is sidewalks, parks, housing rehabilitation assistance, or providing additional infill opportunities to make neighborhoods more vital and responsive to the residents. While the City is fortunate to have continued growth and renewal, we want to be mindful of the quality of established neighborhoods as well. Edmond’s landuse analysis includes a monthly report for the Edmond Economic Development Authority (EEDA). This report provides the EEDA with data related to new housing permits and new commercial development. Generally, it also provides them with locations for land still undeveloped, along with the number of acres.

11 .


U N D E V EL O P ED L A N D Undeveloped property (Table 1) comprised approximately 33% of the land area in Edmond at the end of 2018. There is a considerable amount of land in Edmond still to be developed. For the purposes of our analyses, a 10-acre lot or larger with only one single-family home is also identified as undeveloped because those properties tend to be future opportunities for the land owner. The following tables show the percentage of land types by category that are considered undeveloped, as well as the percentage of Sensitive Land types within those categories. Identifying sensitive land types in the development process provides an opportunity for the developer to work with nature; some of those opportunities have been defined in the municipal code and are explained in the following pages. Urbanized infill (Table 2) is undeveloped land within the “urbanized area,� as defined by the US Census Bureau. The urbanized area constitutes the largest and most dense area of settlement and is sometimes used as a guide to determine the best use of federal assistance through grants. It primarily covers land west of I-35. Of the 18,053 acres of undeveloped land in Edmond, approximately 3,953 acres, or 22% is in the urbanized area.

U N D E V EL O P ED A N D S EN S I T I V E L A N D CAT EG O R I E S (2 0 1 8) | TA B L E 1 Category

Total Acres

Percentage of Total Area of the City

Forested Acreage

Acres Covered in Forest

Prime Farmland

Acres in Prime Farmland

Potential Remnant Forest

Acres in Potential Remnant Forest

Undeveloped Commercial

1,168.25

2.15%

512.39

44%

501.68

43%

280.29

24%

Undeveloped Industrial

353.49

0.65%

131.94

37%

199.2

56%

48.87

14%

Undeveloped Office

162.04

0.30%

61.34

38%

69.88

43%

24.16

15%

Undeveloped Residential

6,868.30

12.62%

3452.87

50%

2573.94

37%

1517.49

22%

Undeveloped Agriculture Land

9,501.72

17.46%

5358.53

56%

3141.78

33%

2809.58

30%

Totals

18,053.80

33.17%

1 2.


U N D E V EL O P ED AC R E S T H AT I S U R BA N IZED I N F I L L (2 0 1 8) | TA B L E 2 Category

Total Acres

Urbanized Infill Acreage

Urbanized Infill Percentage

Forested Acreage

Acres Covered in Forest

Prime Farmland

Acres in Prime Farmland

Potential Remnant Forest

Acres in Potential Remnant Forest

Undeveloped Commercial

1,168.25

617.77

52.88%

178.51

15.28%

277.86

23.78%

111.99

9.59%

Undeveloped Industrial

353.49

262.80

74.34%

78.68

22.26%

174.29

49.31%

26.3

7.44%

Undeveloped Office

162.04

116.44

71.86%

43.79

27.02%

48.09

29.68%

23.82

14.70%

Undeveloped Residential

6,868.30

1816.39

26.45%

779.31

11.35%

930.24

13.54%

370.2

5.39%

Undeveloped Agriculture Land

9,501.72

1140.20

12.00%

680.44

7.16%

521.61

5.49%

383.89

4.04%

Totals

18,053.80

3,953.60

U N D E V EL O P ED P R O P ER T Y (B a s e d o n Zo n i n g a n d C u r re n t Us e)

13 .


D E V EL O P ED L A N D These are the combined land characteristics of existing developed lots. Open Space in this case is only the turf area for each lot. It doesn’t include neighborhood common areas, water features, the flood plain, or neighborhood parks. As part of Site Plan Review commercial projects are evaluated to determine the amount of necessary parking lot that will be needed, but they are also evaluated according to the City’s Landscape ordinances.

C H A R AC T ER I S T I C S O F D E V EL O P ED L O T S (2 0 1 8) Category

Total Acres

Commercial Industrial Office Residential Totals

1,436.50 667.20 157.60 20,032.26 22,293.57

Percentage of Total Area of the City 2.64% 1.23% 0.29% 36.80% 40.96%

Building Footprint

Parking Lots

18.19% 10.71% 17.22% 12.35% 12.71%

40.93% 20.09% 30.65% 0.60% .54%

14 .

Roads and Driveways Tree Cover Sidewalks 5.62% 2.74% 6.48% 7.59% 6.82%

0.22% 0.03% 0.67% 4.68% 4.20%

7.00% 4.56% 13.65% 29.97% 26.93%

Open Space 28.05% 61.87% 31.33% 44.82% 48.80%


For new projects, where there are more parking spaces than needed, additional trees are required. An additional tree must be provided for every four, or any portion thereof, excess parking spaces.

15 .


U R BA N F O R E S T RY Edmond City Council worked with the Edmond Urban Forestry Commission in recent years to develop a tree canopy goal for Edmond. In 2018 a benchmark goal was adopted into City Council’s Strategic Plan.

16 .


T R EE CA N O PY G OA L S The City’s Urban Forestry department seeks to promote, preserve, and enhance Edmond’s regional urban forest and overall environment through active forest resource management and outreach. Trees are a part of the City’s critical community infrastructure; they improve air quality and water quality, mitigate the urban heat island effect, reduce storm water runoff, conserve energy, improve biodiversity, increase property value, and improve mental well-being. Edmond is home to the unique Cross Timbers forest type, with some areas that have been forested since before Oklahoma’s statehood; mostly that is east of I-35. An assessment of tree canopy across Edmond city limits in 2018 determined that 37.3% of the city is covered by tree canopy, or branches and tree foliage. Undeveloped Land largely contributes to this favorable amount of tree canopy. In 2010, Edmond’s undeveloped areas were found to have 46.1% tree canopy coverage. These areas contain much of Edmond’s Cross Timbers forest.

T R E E C A N O P Y P E R C E N TA G E OPTIMAL

2014 BASELINE

‘18

‘12

35.9%

38.5%

37.3%

CRITICAL BENCHMARK GOAL “Implement and continue policy and programs that strive to increase tree canopy into the Optimal Range (>40%), while preventing tree canopy levels from falling below the Baseline (37-40%) into the Critical Range (<37%). Reassess canopy cover every 2-3 years in order to gage progress.”

17.


T R EE P L A N T I N G P R O G R A M Urban Forestry’s programs and services support the Tree Canopy Benchmark, through a variety of tree planting programs, policy administration, and education and engagement opportunities for Edmond’s residents. Some of the most visible tree plantings managed by the Department include trees in medians and downtown streetscapes. Trees are also made available to Edmond residents through the Foster-A-Tree program, an annual tree seedling distribution, and the new Edmond Tree Grants Program. These programs provide planting opportunities for individual residences, neighborhood common areas, and public-school grounds. Residents may also participate in enhancing public spaces through community tree planting events conducted through Urban Forestry’s Volunteer Program. Urban Forestry’s Street Tree Risk Management is another program that provides assistance for Edmond residents with high-risk tree issues originating from the public right-of-way.

T R EE D I S T R I BU T I O N T O R E S I D EN T S (2 0 10 –18) Seedlings 800

3-Gallon Trees

800 700

700

650

650

650 600

600

600

625 525

525

500

400

400 325

300

300 200

150 100

100 0

0

2010

11

12

13

14

18 .

15

16

0

17

18


2,112 Trees distributed/planted by Edmond’s Urban Forestry Department since 2010.

19.


T R EE P L A N T I N G P R O G R A M con’t. The Urban Forestry department has planted 2,112 trees in Edmond since 2010. This number includes tree planting events, capital projects for the City of Edmond, medians and streetscapes, and other public landscape enhancement, as well as the Foster-A-Tree program. The Edmond Tree Awards program provides additional opportunities for residents to receive trees, as well as fostering community engagement and recognizing community groups that are actively supporting Edmond’s tree canopy. Education and engagement are at the foundation of all Urban Forestry programs, and information is frequently made available through a variety of platforms. In 2013, the Urban Forestry Department implemented a new quarterly email, entitled “Edmond Tree Mail”. The purpose of Tree Mail is to engage Edmond residents by providing information about Urban Forestry programs and services, unique experiences fellow citizens are having related to trees, information about tree species and planting and care, and ways that residents benefit from their local urban forest. An issue of the newsletter is sent out at the beginning of each season, and people can subscribe through the City web site. To further engage this audience, Urban Forestry set up a Facebook page in the Fall of 2013. Instagram was also recently added to engage more customers. Through these mediums, followers have access to information about tree distributions and volunteer events, stories about Edmond trees, interactions with the urban forest, and information about relevant and timely urban forestry topics. *2017 values are estimated.

N U M B ER O F S U B S C R I B ER S

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Edmond Tree Mail 397 497 618 686 708

Urban Forestry Facebook 122 504 822 1044 1151

2018

730

1258

Year

20.


L A N D S CA P E O R D I N A N C E

Edmond City Council recently approved modifications to the municipal landscape ordinance related to zoning and non-residential developments. The changes were based on language recommended by the Urban Forestry Commission. Edmond’s landscape ordinance promotes beautification throughout the community, but even more so, the improved ordinance will result in increased environmental, health, economic, and social benefits experienced through ecosystem services of trees and natural areas. A summary of modifications is listed below. 1 | A review is required for anticipated impact to tree canopy cover, forested areas, and areas of the Cross Timbers ecosystem for new Zoning, Specific Use, and Site Plan applications. Consideration of forest resources early in the development process will encourage a proactive approach to planning around the natural elements of a site before layout decisions have been finalized. 2 | Trees planted throughout parking lots will offer shade, contributing to such benefits as improved air quality and urban heat island mitigation. Updates to landscape requirements for excess parking spaces provide the benefit of trees throughout parking areas, without creating challenges in plant placement and spacing. In addition, the allowable use of permeable pavement provides flexibility for sites that are unable to meet required widths of landscape islands and buffers. 3 | Ordinance modifications also include a requirement that only qualified professionals design landscape plans, perform tree resource assessments, and prepare tree preservation plans for new development. An application process has been set in place, however, for approval of “Alternatively Qualified Professionals.� Any professional who does not meet the base qualification set forth in the Code must go through this process in order to submit plans or assessments.

21 .


L A N D S CA P E O R D I N A N C E con’t. 4 | Addition of a tree requirement in the Site Landscaping standards will help to conserve and enhance Edmond’s tree canopy cover into the future. Projects will also have the option to preserve natural areas and exclude them from required landscape calculations. Previously, requirements have been based on the total lot area. 5 | Adjustments to the density requirements for plant material will provide for continuous future canopy cover, while still allowing trees to mature without suppressed growth due to insufficient spacing, particularly in the I-35 District. The landscape code modifications continue to promote beautification and aesthetic benefits throughout Edmond, while also enhancing the environmental contributions made by trees and natural areas. In addition to meeting these goals, the improvements will also result in healthier landscapes with better growing conditions, more adequate plant spacing, and better chances for growing into healthy, mature landscapes.

Required Perimeter Buffer

Street Right of Way

Property Line

Sidewalk

Reduced Perimeter Buffer Sidewalk

Permeable Pavement Terminal Island

Interior Island 10.0'

Permeable Pavement

Median Island

Permeable Pavement

Building

2 2.


In 2008 a committee was formed

among local stakeholders and City staff to analyze and find ways to mitigate some of the development impacts across Edmond regarding its ecological systems. The product from that committee, the 2012 Green Infrastructure (GI) Report, proposed many activities pertaining to land use that have been pursued, and are still being pursued by City departments. The GI report can be found at EdmondOK.com/Sustainability. An informal partnership was also reinforced between the City of Edmond and the Edmond Land Conservancy (ELC) – a nonprofit land trust organization committed to preserving, creating, and improving Edmond’s natural, scenic and outdoor recreational environment. Since 2003 the Edmond Land Conservancy has provided the community one vehicle for participating in the preservation and improvement of Edmond’s green space. It has worked with landowners who wished to donate conservation easements (permanent deed restrictions that prevent harmful land uses). The ELC also became the City’s first non-profit vehicle for donations to the Arcadia Lake Trail, a multi-use trail around Arcadia Lake.

23.


T R A N S P O R TAT I O N Improving transportation efficiency and decreasing emissions is an important goal for Edmond and the Oklahoma City region. This is accomplished through needed roadway improvements and intelligent transportation systems (ITS) to help facilitate the flow of traffic. A traffic impact analysis is also required for any potential development that generates 100 or more trips during peak hour traffic, or if it’s decided there may not be enough roadway capacity.

24 .


T R A F F I C P R O J EC T S The following pages describe how Edmond is developing additional transportation alternatives for the public; this includes addtional bike and pedestrian facilities, and the Citylink bus service. The City also recognizes that proper vehicle fleet management includes minimization of excessive idling incidents among City employees, which reduces fuel costs and mitigates the effect that idling has on air quality. The City employs several tools, including Average Daily Traffic Counts (ADT) and data on traffic incidents, to help determine where roadway improvements are needed. From 2014 to 2018, the population of Edmond is estimated to have grown from 84,436 to 94,798, approximately 12.27%. Traffic Counts overall have averaged a 9% increase in daily traffic over the same period.

AV ER AG E DA I LY T R A F F I C C O U N T S (2 0 1 8)

25.


T R A F F I C P R O J EC T S con’t. Keeping traffic moving is important for several reasons. Vital services and the general health of the local economy are not the least of these, but one important factor is that increased traffic congestion contributes to increased levels of greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to considerations about climate change, poor air quality can also result in respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. A status of “non-attainment� in the National Ambient Air Quality Standard will also require our region to undertake several federally mandated actions that will result in an increased financial burden for residents, businesses, and government. The map and tables on the opposite page reflect improvement projects that the City has planned to help mitigate congestion.

P L A N N ED T R A F F I C P R O J EC T S

26 .


S T R EE T I M P R OV EM EN T S A N D W I D EN I N G S FY

Name

Estimated Cost

Edmond Share

Multi-modal

Future

Danforth Widening, Thomas to Fretz

$2,822,369

$564,473

5 ft Sidewalks

Future Future Future

33rd St Widening, Coltrane to Interstate 35 Covell Widening, Santa Fe Ave to West City Limits Covell Widening, Griffin to Fairfax

$3,911,046 $5,500,000 $6,865,674

$782,209 $1,100,000 $6,865,674

10 ft Multi-use Trails 10 ft Multi-use Trails 10 ft Multi-use Trails

I N T ER S EC T I O N I M P R OV EM EN T S A N D B R I D G E R EP L AC EM EN T S FY

Name

Estimated Cost

Edmond Share

Current

Phase II Intelligent Transportation System (ITS)

$6,751,535.68

$1,350,307.14

Current Future

Phase II Downtown ITS, ADA, and Street Lighting Phase III Intelligent Transportation System Sooner Rd Bridge Replacement, .6 Miles N of Covell Danforth Rd and Kelly Avenue 15th Street and Broadway 2nd Street and Bryant 2nd Street and Boulevard

TBD $7,217,745.00

100% $1,443,549.00

$2,975,971.00

$595,194.20

Trail Underpass

$5,509,711.00 $495,939.00 $919,322.00 $2,027,300.24

$1,101,942.20 $138,862.92 $919,322.00 $2,027,300.24

5 ft Sidewalks 5 ft Sidewalks 5 ft Sidewalks 5 ft Sidewalks

Future Future Future Future Future

27.

Multi-modal


BI CYC L E M A S T ER P L A N The Bicycle Master Plan, initially adopted by the City in 2012, described a planned network of trails and on-street bicycle corridors. In 2018 this plan was updated to include more on-street wayfinding routes and refinements to the proposed trail components. The updated plan also consolidates some facility types, removes corridors that are infeasible, and presents new opportunities. Below is a map of the Bicycle Master Plan with overlays for City properties, Parks, and the FEMA flood plains.

BI CYC L E R O U T E P L A N

On the following pages is a measure of existing trails and bicycle lanes/paths, providing data on how well we are implementing this plan. Implementation of bicycle and pedestrian facilities can take place at the initial platting of a new neighborhood, through new street improvement projects, or through other capital improvement projects initiated by the City. Funding from the State in the form of grants has also been extremely beneficial. In addition, residential subdivisions are required to provide for the installation of sidewalks on section line roads, except in the more rural areas of the City.

28.


In 2011,

a new ordinance was passed providing better regulation, and rules for allowing bicycles on sidewalks.

2 9.


E X I S T I N G BI CYC L E A N D P ED E S T R I A N FAC I L I T I E S Existing Trails

Trail Type

Linear feet

Miles

Arcadia

Mountain Bike Path

48,945.60

9.27

Arcadia Arcadia University Central Oklahoma Bickham-Rudkin Park Covell Sidepath Boulevard Sidepath Kelly Sidepath Sooner Rd Sidepath Fallbrook Neighborhood Downtown Detention Chitwood Trail Barnett Fields Mitch Park Trail Spring Creek Trail Coffee Creek Trail Hafer Park Trail Fink to Hafer Trail Fox Lake Trail Thomas Trail

Equestrian Path Hiking Path Bike Lanes Multi-Use Multi-Use Sidepath Multi-Use Sidepath Multi-Use Sidepath Multi-Use Sidepath Walking Path Walking Path Walking Path Walking Path Multi-Use Multi-Use Multi-Use Multi-Use Multi-Use Multi-Use Multi-Use

25,872.00 22,334.40 10,296.00 6,124.80 26,611.20 11,193.60 10,348.80 4,646.40 3,854.40 2,640.00 1,478.40 792.00 24,974.40 13,200.00 12,144.00 8,976.00 6,600.00 4,646.40 3,168.00 Totals

4.90 4.23 1.95 1.16 5.04 2.12 1.96 0.88 0.73 0.50 0.28 0.15 4.73 2.50 2.30 1.70 1.25 0.88 0.60 47.13

SHARED LANE MARKINGS

Boulevard

Shared Lane Markings

26,347.20

4.99

Fretz Ave 9th Street Main Street Chowning Ave Ayers Street Kickingbird

Shared Lane Markings Shared Lane Markings Shared Lane Markings Shared Lane Markings Shared Lane Markings Shared Lane Markings

19,958.40 6,494.40 6,230.40 6,177.60 4,329.60 2,428.80 Totals

3.78 1.23 1.18 1.17 0.82 0.46 13.63

NEIGHBORHOOD TRAILS

Hawk's Landing

Walking Path

1,478.40

0.28

Hunter's Creek Connector North Coffee Creek Tributary South Chisholm Creek The Colony The Trails South Willow Creek

Walking Path Walking Path Walking Path Walking Path Walking Path Walking Path

422.40 2,640.00 3,379.20 1,056.00 4,646.40 211.20 Sub Total Total

0.08 0.50 0.64 0.20 0.88 0.04 2.62 63.38

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C O N C EP T UA L M A P A R CA D I A L A K E T R A I L S

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S I D E WA L K PA R T N ER S H I P P R O G R A M In addition to the Bicycle Master Plan and other roadway improvements, the City also offers residents the opportunity to improve pedestrian accessibility in front of their own homes. Improved and accessible mobility options are a part of what makes the community more walkable and safer. If you have a damaged sidewalk or one that could be a safety hazard, the City of Edmond has a program that could assist you in having the sidewalk repaired. The City’s participation is subject to availability of funds. Before you are asked to decide, you will be provided an estimate for the cost of the repair or replacement. The City will identify and recommend maintenance options that include grinding, materials, partial repairs and/or complete replacement of the sidewalk sections, and tree removal. Go to the City of Edmond’s website to find out how you can qualify.

S I D E WA L K P R O J EC T S (2 0 0 4 –18) Year

Paid By Applicant

Edmond Matching Funds

2004

$35,593.73

$83,051.97

$6,829.78

$125,475.48

140

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Totals

21,233.54 17,093.59 7,833.80 6,693.83 7,734.24 3,527.28 11,298.44 13,054.04 6,232.00 3,560.40 8,199.78 6,559.56 7,982.76 13,191.54 $169,788.53

49,544.85 39,885.11 18,278.92 15,618.97 18,046.61 8,230.33 26,362.96 30,459.43 14,541.33 8,307.60 14,489.46 11,737.34 14,158.80 27,973.43 $380,687.11

6,444.50 8,157.33 4,230.31 4,148.20 11,811.79 3,150.36 9,174.62 5,371.43 3,099.53 1,752.13 4,643.36 3,568.36 4,467.64 2,806.83 $79,656.17

77,222.89 65,136.03 30,343.03 26,461.00 37,592.64 14,907.97 46,836.02 48,884.90 23,872.86 13,620.13 27,332.60 21,865.26 26,609.20 43,971.80 $630,131.81

94 56 31 32 47 21 53 34 19 12 29 24 31 17 640

Internal Labor Cost Total Project Cost

3 2.

Number of Applicants


If your sidewalk qualifies, the City will pay for 70% of the repair or replacement costs. For every $100 of work, you pay only $30! EdmondOK.com/Sustainability

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C I T Y L I N K– P U B L I C T R A N S P O R TAT I O N In 2010, the City began operating its own public transportation service known as Citylink. This service has the impact of reducing overall emissions and providing Edmond residents an alternative mode of transportation, while lessening the number of cars on the road, and aiding Central Oklahoma’s effort to keep air quality within acceptable parameters. One Citylink survey in 2011 found that of respondents who rode 20 or more days a month, nearly 49% of them did not own a vehicle. Measuring Citylink passenger counts, as well as wheelchair and bicycle boardings by route helps determine whether there is adequate system support for this population, but it also verifies the utility of the system. The Edmond Public Transportation Committee is also considering a plan to partner with businesses along I-35 to provide a route for the hospitals and shopping areas in that corridor.

Y E A R LY R I D ER S H I P C O M PA R I S O N

300K

300K 265K

270K

277K

247K

235K

240K

274K

210K

210K 179K

180K 150K 120K 90K

109K 68K

60K 30K 0

2008–09

08–09 10–11

11–12 12–13

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13–14 14–15

15–16 16–17

17–18


2009–2018

RIDERSHIP INCREASED BY

208% (68,159 riders/year to 209,941 riders/year).

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C I T Y L I N K W H EEL C H A I R A N D BI CYC L E B OA R D I N G S Wheelchairs

Bicycles

4000 3800

3611

3688

3756

3679

3600

3418

3400 3301

3200

3388 3280

3084

3000 2800 2600

3314 2992

2835

2438

2400 2200 2000

2373

2227

FY10–11 11–12

12–13 13–14

14–15

15–16

2390

16–17

17–18

The convenience and quality of the bus service, plus the added benefit of accommodating bikes and wheelchairs, the efficiency and timeliness of the bus routes, courteous drivers, and the fact that the service is free, have all contributed to sustained ridership. In recent years the ridership on the Citylink bus service has declined somewhat, which might be attributed to using fixed bus stops, but the ridership is expected to rise again. In 2017 $400,000 was spent on adding accessible transit stops for people in wheelchairs. Users can no longer “wave” down the bus along a route; they wait at one of 108 stops along Citylink’s 5 fixed routes. The recent addition of a phone app, that will inform customers on the next bus arrival time, is also expected to have a positive impact. Free Wi-Fi service is also available on the Expresslink buses as well as throughout Downtown Edmond, including the Citylink Transfer Center. In 2018 the overnight parking lot for the buses was moved closer to downtown to reduce the number of daily ‘deadhead’ trips to and from Crosstimbers Vehicle Maintenance at I-35 and Covell Rd. This has saved significant time for the drivers, and reduced fuel costs. The City of Edmond will consider expanding the Citylink service as demand warrants and as additional funding sources become available.

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E L EC T R I C V E H I C L E S City plans for workplace charging have already begun. The City Water Resources and Recovery Facility has to-date installed three (3) Level Two dual charging stations and has plans for two (2) dual chargers at the new Water Treatment Plant (WTP) Administration Building.The WTP will also be easily expandable by two (2) more EV spaces in the future. The 2019 City Council Strategic Plan outlines current and future goals for the City. The seventh item under Current Goals states: “Develop policies and plans to take advantage of the growing market for electric vehicles, including a program to promote home charging and adding vehicles to the city fleet.� In 2019 the City of Edmond partnered with the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO), to receive $50,550 to install ten (10) public and workplace charging stations for electric vehicles. These types of stations are capable of charging two electric vehicles simultaneously and are free to the public. Two grants were received in coordination with the Association of Central Oklahoma Governments (ACOG) Clean Air Public Fleet Grant ($25,138.60), and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality 2019 Charge OK Grant Program ($25,367.00). The grants will also pay for the bollard concrete mounting kits, a one-year prepaid commercial cloud plan to remotely monitor the stations (including avoided emissions), an on-site validation per the vendor’s requirements, and a five-year prepaid Assurance Plan, which provides high-quality maintenance and a warranty period by the vendor. As stated previously, the stations to be installed are dual stations, and there is a total of five locations. These are Level 2 Charging Stations, meant for a slower charge, so these have been planned in locations where there are other activities.

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EL EC T R I C V EH I C L E S con’t. The four locations that were chosen as a part of these grants are near the Senior Center and trails at Mitch Park, the Service-Blake Soccer Complex, the City First Administration Building, and at two UCO parking facilities. “As an additional bonus for those that prefer Electric Vehicles for the air quality benefits, the sites will all be powered with 100% renewable wind energy through Edmond Electric and the OMPA,” said Phil jones, City of Edmond Sustainability Planner. Additional public stations are also being planned by Edmond Electric. Those will be at Show Biz Cinemas, and the new Edmond Soccer Complex on 15th Street, and also a Level 3 Fast charger in the near future, though that location has not been determined at the time of this publication. Edmond locations will be registered with the Alternative Fuel Data Center station locator tool at AFDC.Energy.Gov. In addition to the City of Edmond, OnCue was also awarded money through the Charge OK Grant Program for a Level 3 Fast charging station in Edmond. “OnCue is excited to have been awarded four Level 3 Fast Charging Stations, including the store on the southwest corner of 15th and I-35 in Edmond. It’s great to expand our alternative fuel offer and accommodate more Oklahomans as they make the switch to electric vehicles,” said Scott Minton, Director of Business Development at OnCue. “Now, our patrons can charge their vehicle while recharging themselves with our delicious food and drink options.”

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“Develop policies and plans to take advantage of the growing market for electric vehicles, including a program to promote home charging and adding vehicles to the city fleet.� 2019 City Council Strategic Plan


C I T Y O F ED M O N D F L EE T In 2016, a Fleet Idle Reduction Directive was created and distributed to City Staff. The purpose of the Idle Reduction Directive was to outline a procedure for City employees to reduce vehicle and equipment idle times. Prior to this directive by the City, excessive idle times were evident in vehicle fleet reports acquired through City GPS data. One sample vehicle spent 46 days idling in one year! Today, the Fleet Manager receives automatic notifications on excessive idling, and can respond quickly via phone or email. This departmental directive is supported by the City’s goals to reduce vehicle emissions, mitigate environmental impacts, and reduce operating/ maintenance costs. Reducing the combustion of fossil fuels will reduce airborne sulfur dioxides, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and other toxic air pollutants. These pollutants are known to cause respiratory or nervous system damage as well as cancer and other health problems. Other critical fleet management operations that the City pursues to make the fleet more sustainable are right-sizing vehicles for the duties that will be required, regular maintenance, pursuit of clean diesel tech, and efficient solid waste routing for the waste management service. These activities lower environmental impacts and reduce the cost of operations, which directly benefit the citizens of Edmond.

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GPS technology allows Solid Waste routing to be as efficient as possible and also allows for monitoring of the city’s idle reduction initiatives throughout the entire fleet. Bobby Masterson | City of Edmond Fleet/Solid Waste Superintendent

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CIT Y PA R KS Edmond Citizen Satisfaction Surveys consistently rank public parks, greenways, and bicycle and pedestrian trails near the top as residents consider what is most important to them for potential new City projects. The only item that ranks higher are major roadway and traffic improvements.

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VA L U E A D D E D City Parks provide the recreational and aesthetic value necessary for quality urban neighborhoods. They play a larger role in job opportunities, youth development, public health, and community-building. They also support research in areas of sustainable practice, provide space for pilot projects and help to instruct residents about nature and the importance of caring for the environment. Studies show that parks are valued even by those who do not use them. A park’s value to neighborhood quality is further reinforced by studies that find a statistically significant link between property values and the proximity to green space. In Edmond beautiful parks are located throughout the City; these are some of Edmond’s greatest natural resources. The Parks & Recreation Department has been and will continue to strive to be stewards of Edmond’s natural resources.

I N VA S I V E S P EC I E S The City Parks Department actively manages the grounds, and this requires more than just mowing and pulling weeds. One important practice is to remove invasive species from areas where they are taking over the natural habitat. At Mitch Park, Arcadia Lake and many other locations, the maintenance crews periodically remove Eastern Red Cedar trees that have been overtaking native grass fields; not only does this help the growth of the native grasses but also helps reduce fuel loads in the event of a wildfire. However, hundreds of trees have been planted in our parks, increasing all the benefits that trees provide, and simultaneously providing a more diverse environment.

REUSEABLE RESOURCES Park maintenance crews reuse wood chips from tree harvesting or trimming projects; they use the chips to reduce soil erosion at the disc golf courses at Mitch Park and Arcadia Lake. These chips are also used to create soft surface trails in many of our parks. By reusing these wood chips, not only is further erosion prevented, but the amount of landfill waste is reduced. At Kickingbird Golf Course, crews reduce waste by composting tree limbs and other organic matter. Instead of sending old landscaping material to the landfill, crews add these materials to their compost pile. The compost is then repurposed as top-soil and fill dirt that’s utilized throughout the golf course trees to provide bee nesting sites.

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C I T Y O F ED M O N D PA R KS A N D AC R E S PARK NAME CLERGEN PARK SHANNON MILLER PARK JOHNSON PARK BROOKHAVEN PARK CENTENNIAL PARK CHITWOOD PARK FINK PARK GOSSETT PARK KELLY PARK MATHIS SKATE PARK MEADOW LAKE PARK DAVID PENICK PARK STEPHENSON PARK TED ANDERSON PARK WESTBOROUGH PARK WHISPERING HEIGHTS PARK BICKHAM-RUDKIN PARK & DOG PARK E.C. HAFER PARK MITCH PARK CENTRAL STATE PARK EDMOND PARK SCISSOR TAIL PARK SPRING CREEK PARK CARL REHERMAN PARK BICKHAM SOFTBALL COMPLEX EDMOND 66 PARK SOFTBALL COMPLEX KICKINGBIRD GOLF COURSE KICKINGBIRD TENNIS CENTER PELICAN BAY AQUATIC CENTER SERVICE-BLAKE SOCCER COMPLEX A.C. CAPLINGER SPORTS COMPLEX J.L. MITCH PARK SPORTS FIELD TOTALS

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ACRES 0.21 1.10 1.08 2.28 4.87 3.51 7.42 2.22 0.49 2.34 5.39 3.55 4.78 3.21 3.16 1.58 49.41 87.08 237.85 249.03 131.44 140.99 194.40 50.00 14.29 114.36 148.06 5.60 3.82 69.52 33.52 39.00 1620.04


With over 30 parks and hundreds of acres of land, the department is tasked with managing these resources proactively; all while providing outdoor recreational opportunities.

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P O L L I N AT I N G P L A N T S Looking to the future, Park crews understand why sustainability must be practiced now. Walking through City parks, residents will experience wildflowers, which are great for supporting pollinators like bees. However, this is not the only source of pollen in Edmond parks. Park maintenance staff have been diligent in promoting habitats for pollinators. Brightly colored plants fill the pollination garden located on the trail at Mitch Park, creating a great viewing point for any pedestrian interested in watching busy bees do their work. Staff will also drill tiny holes into existing dead trees to provide bee nesting sites. In addition, the Urban Forestry Department has planted more pollinator-friendly plants at Bickham-Rudkin Park,and the Downtown Regional Detention Area.

W I L D L I F E M A N AG E M E N T Bird watching is a popular past time, and at many parks you will notice manmade bird houses. Crews have constructed homes for sparrows, wood ducks, finches, bluebirds, and kestrels just to name a few species. These homes not only provide more habitats, but also provide a location for bird watching. At Arcadia Lake, many wildlife habitat improvements are made annually. When water levels become low enough to expose mud flats, Milo and Millet seed are planted to grow food for waterfowl. With help from the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, Arcadia Lake Staff also hold annual archery hunts, based on herd surveys and established hunting quotas. Proper herd management prevents over population which can have negative impacts on the deer and the surrounding environment. Providing adequate habitats for our wildlife is a high priority for our department and helps to sustain the lands we manage.

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WAT E R E F F I C I E N CY The Parks and Recreation Department is a large consumer of water; therefore, sustainable water use is a driving force behind how we use water. Within our parks, we have grasses, landscape beds, and tree plantings that all require water. Selecting species of plants that will thrive in different scenarios is key to reducing the amount of resources put into the plant, especially water. Xeriscape is a type of landscape design that utilizes drought tolerant plants. These designs have been incorporated into landscape beds in areas such as Bickham-Rudkin Park, or the traffic circle at University Drive and 4th Street. With more plans to incorporate drought tolerant plants, the City will see a reduction in outdoor water use. Getting water to the plant is either done by hand-watering or irrigation systems. Where Parks use irrigation systems, staff are diligent in checking the system’s function. Looking for leaks or broken spray heads ensures we don’t waste water. In many of the older irrigation systems, staff has replaced the old spray heads with new high efficiency sprinkler heads; this reduces the amount of water wasted while still meeting the plant’s needs. As the demand on our water system grows, the department will seek new innovative ways to reduce water use.

47.


Creating a connection between young residents and nature will help ensure that the next generation will be advocates for sustaining our natural resources.

48.


R E D U C E , R E U S E , R ECYC L E Unfortunately, littering is an issue in City parks. Maintenance staff spend several hours each week picking up litter from our parks, trails, and at Arcadia Lake. The Arcadia Lake Sweep is a volunteer event held each spring to help reduce the amount of trash along the banks and in the forested areas at Arcadia Lake. Staff also holds numerous, smaller volunteer events with the same focus. As a department, we encourage staff to recycle, making sure recycling receptacles are accessible in easy to use areas. Small steps also make a difference, like encouraging our board members to use tablets or electronic devices, rather than printing out agenda documents for the meetings. As a department, we work to reduce the amount of waste we generate and decrease the amount of litter that will eventually pollute our natural and aquatic areas.

E N E R GY E F F I C I E N CY In our office buildings and maintenance shops, when light bulbs are replaced, they are replaced with LED lights or other high efficiency bulbs. This small and easy step can save the City money all while reducing the load we create on the electrical grid. At the Kickingbird Golf Course, the tornado siren is run on solar power. To be more sustainable, the golf carts at Kickingbird are also electric, and not gas powered. We want to reduce the amount of non-renewable resources we use and find more eco-friendly ways to power our operations.

F U T U R E G E N E R AT I O N S Supporting outdoor recreation for the youth is a great way to teach the necessity of minding our natural resources; it’s with the hope that they will incorporate sustainable practices into their daily lifestyles. Recreation staff has introduced an “Outdoors Adventure Series,” which is a great way to expose young children to different outdoor recreational activities. Children will learn to fish, read a compass, and learn to mountain bike, among many other things.

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B E S T M A N AG E M E N T P R AC T I C E S Emphasizing “Best Management Practices” for everyday projects will guarantee the Parks Department is making the City more sustainable. Through proper land management, we can serve the outdoor recreational needs of the public, while still emphasizing good stewardship. Currently, many of our parks and sports complexes are in the conceptual phase for renovations. When developing plans for renovations, a high priority is to create more sustainable parks. Some examples are designing irrigation systems that will use water efficiently, creating bio retention areas for on-site stormwater filtration, or incorporating LED lights for the sports fields. City Parks is addressing sustainability in the design phase to allow identification of future environmental impacts before they occur. The department will continue to seek opportunities to make the city a little greener, while becoming more sustainable through best practices.

2 0 2 0 A N D B E YO N D A future goal in the 2019 City Council Strategic Plan is one where Edmond is promoted as a livable community. Regarding Parks this includes the expansion of bike and multi-use trails, and the acquisition of additional public open space. As new parks are added and others rehabilitated, a few sustainability indicators for Parks include median park size, amenities provided, walkable park access by residents within a half-mile, and the City’s investment dollars in parks. Edmond’s land area is approximately 54,430 acres. The City has committed about 3% of total land area for parks, but that does not include the City’s trail system. The number of Edmond Parks per 10,000 residents is 3.2, and the median park size is 5.4 acres. In 2018 roughly 9 percent of all City expenditures went toward Culture, Parks and Recreation. That equates to roughly $83.99 per person for parks, recreation and beautification. According to the Trust for Public Land, Tulsa, OK currently spends about $78.07 per person, whereas Austin, TX spends roughly $113.07 per person. The Master Parks Plan also calls for additional parks on the east side of I-35 as it becomes more developed. The Edmond 66 Park was one such park, added in 2014. There are also pockets in urbanized areas where neighborhood parks would be beneficial. New parks will be an ongoing consideration for the Edmond Parks Board and City Council as Edmond’s population grows and more land becomes urbanized.

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