2018 City of Edmond Energy Sustainability Report

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E N E R GY 2 0 1 8 S U S TA I N A BI L I T Y R E P O R T


AC K N OW L ED G EM EN T S

TA B L E O F C O N T EN T S

Building Services

1 F O R WA R D

Citylink

6

E N E R GY E F F I C I E N CY

Edmond Electric

7

C I T Y FAC I L I T I E S E N E R GY F O OT P R I N T

Engineering

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TO P F I V E A N D B OT TO M F I V E

Information Technology

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H VAC , L E D L I G H T S A N D W H I T E R O O F S

Marketing

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E N E R GY M A N AG E M E N T S Y S T E M S

Parks, Events, and Recreation

14

V F D ’s A N D S O F T S TA R T S

Planning Department

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EDMOND ELECTRIC’S TREE PROGRAM

Public Works

17

RESIDENT INCENTIVES

Solid Waste

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R E N E WA B L E E N E R GY

Urban Forestry

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G E OT H E R M A L E N E R GY

Utility Customer Service

24

W I N D E N E R GY

Vehicle Maintenance

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GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION

Water Resources

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R ECYC L I N G

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RESIDENTIAL CURBSIDE

Special Thanks

PA R T I C I PAT I O N

The University of Central Oklahoma

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and BBN Architects, Inc.

4 UNIVERSIT Y OF CENTRAL 3 O K L A H O M A

H O U S E H O L D H A Z A R D O U S WA S T E


Perhaps the greatest challenge is to leave a world for our children that is better than it was before. The Edmond Greenprint | A Report to the City Council and the Residents of Edmond Green City Task Force, July 2003

F O R E WO R D Private and public stakeholders, elected officials, and city staff have worked together to make this community what it is today. Census numbers indicate the City of Edmond grew from a population of 68,315 to 81,405 from the year 2000 to 2010. The City’s population for 2020 is projected to reach 95,350. This reflects a 40% increase from the year 2000. As with any growing community, it’s necessary to make plans for accommodating urban growth, and to understand the consequences of our actions, or inaction, for future residents.

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The City of Edmond has proven it is a good

place to do business, has shown to be environmentally sensitive, and has been consistent as one of the most desirable places to live in the US. In 2018, Money Magazine in partnership with Realtor.com ranked Edmond number 36 as one of the best places to live. Today, the City of Edmond is building on the same conversations that made this City, incorporating ideas and concepts that will make the community stronger and more livable. Sustainable practices for the City of Edmond are derived from the following priorities. Rooted in our values and a science-based approach, our priorities are long-term, comprehensive, community-driven and action focused. The primary mission for the City of Edmond is to provide Trustworthy Service through Continuous Improvement. As a component of the City’s Internal Strategic Plan, City departments are asked every year to provide their goals and objectives regarding a variety of organizational priorities, including sustainability. Throughout the year, departments report updates on their goals to City Management. These priorities fall under the larger Organizational Priority of Environmental Stewardship.

Protecting our natural resources

Enhancing energy management

Improving the built environment

Maximizing waste reduction

Balancing land use and transportation

Promotion of economic development

Providing alternatives for food security

Improving City partnerships and outreach efforts

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Traditional planning processes will often focus on isolated places rather than interconnected systems. Having moved beyond traditional planning we are addressing social, economic and environmental challenges in a variety of ways. While this publication was written with city managers and staff in mind, we also wanted to communicate generally to the public about some of those activities. City Departments provide meaningful assessments to the City’s leaders. One of the functions of the Sustainability Office is to capture metrics that will help leaders make informed decisions about sustainability. Keeping dollars in the local economy, attracting new business, and improving the community’s quality of life are important objectives. Sustainable cities help achieve these objectives by 1 | Using energy more efficiently 2 | Buying and harnessing renewable energy 3 | Enhancing access to alternative transportation modes 4 | Recycling and reusing its waste 5 | Greening the community through landscape ordinances and tree plantings 6 | Making informed land management decisions 7 | Providing local food alternatives 8 | Empowering customers to be more sustainable through City programs 9 | Encouraging residents to buy local

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S T R AT EG I E S Strategies are based on the organizational priorities. For each Sustainability Strategy, whether it is observed implicitly, or stated directly, there is a defined Value, a quantitative or qualitative Goal, and a Measure that can be achieved to help determine future activities. In order to help determine strategies the City of Edmond has an informal Sustainability Committee, consisting of multiple City department staff. The Mission of Edmond’s Sustainability Committee is to provide leadership in researching and developing practices that emphasize efficiencies in energy use, renewable energy, operations, waste reduction, and natural resource protection through measurable performance criteria. This publication is in a Three-Part Series to illustrate important strategies the City has employed over the years. Some strategies will be represented by metrics the City of Edmond utilizes, and others will be highlights to describe more fully what a department or division does. Two additional highlights will be the University of Central Oklahoma, and the Coffee Creek Water Resource and Recovery Facility.

PART 1 | Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Recycling,

University of Central Oklahoma

PART 2 | Land Use Considerations and Urban Forestry,

Transportation, City Parks

PART 3 | Water and Wastewater, Water Resources

Recovery Facility, Stormwater Quality

The University of Central Oklahoma (UCO), a strategic partner for the City of Edmond, is included this year to demonstrate the full commitment by our two respective entities. We also want to acknowledge BBN Architects, Inc for its contribution to this year’s publication about an award-winning design for the new Coffee Creek Water Resource and Recovery Facility. The City is extremely grateful to UCO and BBC Architects for their contribution in this publication! We also want to acknowledge the unsung heroes, whether they are city staff, university personnel, or other residents, that make our City more sustainable every day by using less paper, turning off the lights, and other everyday activities that make a difference.

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S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y R E P O RT | 3

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LAND 2 0 1 8 S U S TA I N A BI L I T Y R E P O R T

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EN ER GY EF F I C I EN CY The City wants to set an example through action, while providing opportunities and incentives for residents to make their homes and businesses more efficient. (See page 17) We strive to save money on heating, cooling, and other energy costs for City operations, while reducing dependence on fossil fuels. CITY Energy Operational Costs R E S I D EN T S Use of City Energy Efficiency Programs


C I T Y FAC I L I T I E S EN ER GY F O O T P R I N T (F Y10 to F Y18) Megawatts Per Hour 35K 34K 33K 32K 31K 30K 29K 28K 27K

2010

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Natural gas usage is not included in this energy metric.

The City of Edmond monitors energy usage for its government facilities and uses different methodologies to try and bring down associated costs. Some of those methodologies are described in the following pages. Indicators like these are collected and reported to management staff. Recording usage from year to year, and reporting by department and governmental building provides the first overview for City managers.

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TOP FIVE AND BOTTOM FIVE (F Y16 to F Y18) This metric is an analysis of consumption by each department and/or building. More detailed analysis is not provided in this document, but this indicator may be used to measure the usage at each individual facility to detect deficiencies. For a more complete list of City departments, contact the Planning Department at EdmondOK.com/Sustainability.

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T O P F I V E | D EC R E A S ED EN ER GY % 56%

Downtown Community Center

27% Downtown City Hall 26%

Edmond Historical Society Museum

20%

KickingBird Golf and Tennis Center

4% Water/Wastewater Services

Water and Wastewater services may seem like a low percentage, but it’s significant due to the department consuming roughly 61% of the City’s electricity. It amounted to a savings of 863,047 kWh/year. For comparison, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the average household in Oklahoma consumes roughly 1,142 kWh per month, or 13,704 kWh per year.

B O T T O M F I V E | I N C R E A S ED EN ER GY % 128% Public Safety Center 55% IT Building 37% Pelican Bay Aquatic Center 28% Multi-Activity Center 21% Arcadia Lake Project Office

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The Public Safety Center (PSC), as well as other Police facilities not included here, were new facilities in 2016. As will be shown in this document, the PSC was designed to be an efficient facility. However, the building’s full potential was not fulfilled shortly after construction. This is also the case with the IT Building; new operations have been added to increase the energy footprint for those facilities.

Overall, the City of Edmond reduced its electric energy footprint by 0.6% from ‘16 to ‘18, even while new facilities and operations were coming online. Several new city facilities were constructed and/or occupied in the 2013 to 2016 timeframe. However, the City continues to make the upgrades necessary to try and bring down costs. Total energy costs are largely dependent on the weather for heating and cooling, but are also affected by a facility’s building envelope, everyday practices of City employees, the operational practices of a facility, and the application of advanced energy-saving technologies.

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H VAC , L E D L I G H T S A N D W H I T E R O O F S

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Three City buildings received white roofs. While reducing energy costs, white roofing also requires less care and maintenance. Those buildings were Mobile Meals, the Downtown Community Center, and the Historical Museum. Four buildings received LED lighting. They were Mobile Meals, the Historical Museum, KickingBird Golf Club, and one zone at the Cross Timbers Municipal Complex. The new Edmond Downtown Health Clinic was also constructed to include LED lighting. Replacement lighting for all City facilities is now going to LED. Four buildings also received more energy efficient HVACs. They are Fire Stations 1, 2, and 3, and the Downtown Community Center. In 2015 six out of seven HVAC units were also replaced on the Mobile Meals facility with higher Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio* (SEER) ratings. The new Water Distribution Station on Danforth Rd also received LED lighting and geothermal heat pumps. In addition, the Water Treatment Plant changed out some large wattage lights (1000 watts each) to LED lights.

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The Downtown Community Center received a total of 8 new Package HVAC units, and the Planning and Public Works Building received a new 35-ton chiller.

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Lights at the Crosstimbers Municipal Complex were replaced with LEDs, as well as the interior lights for the garage at Vehicle Maintenance.

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LED lights were installed at the Historical Museum in addition to HVAC upgrades. In 2018 the City also installed additional white Thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) roofs on the front of the DCC and on the flat roof on Mobile Meals. TPO roofs are among the fastest growing commercial roofing products, for their performance and installation advantages. These are heat-reflective, and energy efficient roofing systems and the single-ply membrane provides resistance to ultraviolet, ozone and chemical exposure. A new 20-ton heat pump and cooling tower was also installed for the Council Chambers building.

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Exterior lights and parking lot lights are also being changed from Halide to LED. Office and remaining lights at Vehicle Maintenance will be changed, and Mobile Meals is receiving more energy efficient windows.

* The efficiency of air conditioners is often rated by the Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) which is defined by the Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute in its 2008 standard AHRI 210/240, Performance Rating of Unitary Air-Conditioning and Air-Source Heat Pump Equipment.

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In 2018 the new Water Resources Administration Building contains several features that not only save energy, but also provide a learning experience for the many tours that they offer. The 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) is used as the standard for new facilities, although this code has yet to be adopted by the State. A small solar project for the building, LED lighting, white roofs and/or green roofs, and geothermal wells have been incorporated into the design, as well as an area for small groups to be taught. In future years new facilities for water and wastewater treatment, as well as 2 new lift stations will be constructed. As a standard part of these designs, energy-saving variable frequency drives and soft starts are now a standard practice.

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EN ER GY M A N AG EM EN T SYS T EM S

Energy Management Systems (EMS) are a combination of building management and advanced software solutions that assist in managing building functions in a more energy efficient way. They monitor, measure, and control electric building loads by turning off the lights and adjusting HVAC equipment automatically, to adjust for periods when the buildings are not in use.

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05

20

08

20

EMS installed for the Edmond Historical Museum

EMS installed for the Crosstimbers Municipal Complex, Animal Welfare, and Fire Station 5. These were new facilities, and this became the standard for new City buildings.

11

20

Eleven facilities were upgraded for HVAC and lighting controls. EMS was upgraded at the Crosstimbers Municipal Complex, Animal Welfare, the Historical Museum and Fire Station 5 to include lighting and the use of 2-hour overrides for off hours.

12

20

Fire Stations 1, 2, 3 and 4, Downtown Community Center, the Planning and Public Works Building, the Municipal Court, the Council Chambers, the City First Building, and the Mitch Park Activity Center received EMS upgrades for lighting and HVAC.

16

20

The new Public Safety Center had an EMS installed controlling 140 ground source HVAC units throughout the building. Delta EMS were also installed at the Mobile Meals facility and the new IT building.

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VA R I A BL E F R EQ U EN CY D R I V E S A N D S O F T S TA R T S Variable Frequency Drives and Soft Starts are one way the City is improving overall energy efficiency. This technology is being implemented on large, 75 horse-power or greater, motors utilized within the City’s Water and Wastewater processes.

TECH TIP | With a soft starter, the motor uses reduced voltage to start, and when the motor is at full speed, or a timing circuit has timed out, a running by-pass contactor pulls in and the motor continues to run at full base speed. With a variable frequency drive (VFD) the motor will soft start, and you can vary the speed of the motor, by varying the output frequency. So, if you don’t need to vary the speed of the motor, once the motor is up to speed, then the correct solution is a soft start starter. A U.S. Department of Energy (Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant) was obtained through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to initially retrofit five well pumps and two large motors at the Water Resources Plant, using VFD technology. To illustrate how this technology works, two graphs are provided below that show the City putting these drives to work. These pumps were compared on a yearly basis, using the annual average kWh/MG of water production. Beginning in 2011 and 2012, this method of measuring efficiency showed a marked improvement in performance for most of these facilities. Those that didn’t show an immediate improvement had some other underlying problems, such as age of the well. Two examples of those wells are shown below.

E X A M P L E O F I M P R OV EM EN T k W h / M G of Wate r P ro d u cti o n WELL #32

WELL #44

V F D I n st a l l e d J u n e , 2 0 10

V F D I n st a l l e d A p r i l , 2 0 1 1

8K

4K

7,300 6,149

6K

3K 3,831

4K

3,013

3,252

3,115 2,958

2K 2,579

2K 0

1K

2010

11

12

0

13

14 .

2010

11

12

13


Water and Wastewater processes are by far the largest consumer of electricity for City operations. In 2018 roughly 61% of all electric expenditures for City operations came from these processes.

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ED M O N D EL EC T R I C ’ S T R EE P R O G R A M

Beginning in Fall 2015, Edmond Electric started distributing trees to its customers. The Energy Saving Trees program is a partnership with the Arbor Day Foundation.

FREE T REES

Number of trees received by Edmond Electric customers each year. Customers have the opportunity to reserve a specific tree species of their choice using an online mapping tool created by the Arbor Day Foundation. While doing that, the customer will “place” their tree around their home using the mapping software and the program will generate the KwH savings and cost savings for when the tree reaches maturity. The program has been wildly successful with the trees being sold out on the first day in the first hour.

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R E S I D EN T I N C EN T I V E S A N D U T I L I T Y S ERV I C E S Edmond Electric’s Home Energy Audit Program is another outreach program for our residents to help make qualifying energy efficiency improvements to homes 10 years or older. Trained technicians perform a free review of your home, rating its energy efficiency and offering helpful advice on how to lower your energy costs. The metric below is based on fiscal years 2009 to 2018. Following the number of energy audits helps the City to gage how well we are reaching customers. Saving energy reduces our nation’s overall demand for resources. Increasing your energy efficiency is like adding another clean energy source to the electric power grid. On older homes much energy can be wasted through leaky windows, ducts, old appliances, or inefficient heating and cooling systems.

N U M B ER O F EN ER GY AU D I T S 300 242

250

229

229

219 173

200 150

152

140

131

123

121

100 50 0

2009

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Residents can also use the Energy Star Home Energy Yardstick on the Energy Star website to compare their home’s energy efficiency to similar homes across the country and get recommendations for energy-saving home improvements from Energy Star. Following an audit by a trained technician, recommendations may follow for installation of heat pumps and ceiling insulation, for which customers may qualify for significant rebates. Contact Edmond Electric at (405) 216–7608 to arrange your audit today.

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R E S I D EN T I N C EN T I V E S A N D U T I L I T Y S ERV I C E S con’t. Edmond Electric’s Heating and Air rebates program allows customers to receive significant rebates in both existing and new buildings, from $250 per ton on 16.0 SEER air-source/dual fuel heat pumps, to $800 per ton on 17.1 EER ground-source (geothermal) heat pumps. Possible savings are dependent on several factors, however: type of heat pump installed, the age, insulation, and size of your home, as well as the owner’s living habits. Go to Edmond’s Heat Pump Rebate page to find out more EdmondOK.com/Sustainability. The Ceiling Insulation program was new in 2018 and is included in the rebate totals below. Ceiling insulation is one of the easiest and most cost-effective ways to improve the energy efficiency of a home. Rebates are available up to $500, based on the initial R-values in the attic before new insulation is added. Measuring the number of rebates helps the City gage how well we are reaching out to customers and encouraging the kind of energy efficiency we would like to promote as a City. Go to Edmond’s Ceiling Insulation page to find out more EdmondOK.com/Sustainability.

N U M B ER O F EN ER GY S AV I N G R EBAT E S 140 124

120 105

100

90 78

80

80

84

69

60

52

43

40

29

20 0

2009

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Savings for these installations can be substantial for property owners. According to the Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA), if you replace your old gas furnace and air-conditioning unit with an air-source or dual-fuel heat pump you can potentially cut your heating and cooling in half.

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BU I L D I N G A N D F I R E C O D E S ERV I C E S Edmond’s Building & Fire Code Services ensures the safe and lawful use of buildings through the issuance of building and trade permits. The goal is to promote safe, quality living and working conditions through efficient use of available resources. The Department’s primary activities are 1) performing plan reviews 2) issuing permits, and 3) inspecting properly permitted projects. The City currently uses the International Building Code (IBC), 2015 Edition, for commercial buildings, while the International Residential Code (IRC), 2015 Edition, is followed for residential buildings. The City has also adopted the rules set forth by the Oklahoma Uniform Building Code Commission. As the State moves forward on new code requirements, the City will adopt those changes. Those new standards for efficiency may be in place in Edmond as soon as 2021.

Building Inspections are important when hundreds of thousands of dollars are at stake in the building process. For the small price of an inspection, homeowners and businesses save money on heating and cooling costs and prevent possible catastrophic failure.

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BU I L D I N G A N D F I R E C O D E S ERV I C E S con’t. Regarding new and existing construction, there are several activities the Department currently undertakes to address efficiency and long-term sustainability.

Verify proper insulation and air sealing of duct work to minimize operating costs.

Confirm that mechanical systems in a home or building are compatible with the building envelope, for indoor air quality.

Perform moisture barrier inspections on structures for long-term protection from outside moisture intrusion.

• Inspect structural concrete footings designed site-specific by professional engineers to ensure quality control and longevity. •

Verify proper ventilation of attics and crawl spaces for moisture and mold mitigation.

Verify plumbing fixture water-use standards.

Verify separation of fats, oil and grease from sanitary sewer systems for water quality.

Verify backflow protection for potable water protection from contaminating sources.

Verify water drainage away from foundations to protect the structure.

Verify proper construction techniques for driveway approaches and sidewalks.

Verify new construction techniques and materials for

proper application and safety.

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R EN E WA B L E EN ER GY

GEOTHERMAL ENERGY Geothermal energy is another way in which the City is saving on energy costs and using renewable sources to benefit the environment. Geothermal energy is heat from the ground.

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G EO T H ER M A L EN ER GY

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The Crosstimbers Municipal Complex was completed and approximately 230 tons of ground-source geothermal wells were installed.

TECH TIP | A “ton� refers to the amount of cooling a ton of ice provides per hour. The energy unit, ton, can be used as a measure for both heating and cooling, because cooling is simply the removal of heat from a space. Geothermal cooling works by pushing the hot air to a level deep beneath ground level. The hot air is absorbed in water or a coolant that is drained beneath the surface. Typically, each hole is three-quarter inches wide by two-hundred feet deep. Each hole provides a ton of load.

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The new Public Safety Center, which houses the Edmond Police Department, Public Safety Communications, and Emergency Management functions, had 140 geothermal wells installed. The Edmond Recreation and Aquatic Center (ERAC) also installed 300 geothermal wells. At the ERAC energy savings are an estimated 50% on energy costs. Also, at the ERAC, to help increase energy efficiency, the pool dehumidification units are connected to the pool water heating system to provide pool pre-heating, rather than using the boilers for the entire pool heating load. This facility houses a competitive Natatorium with an Olympic-size pool, seating for 800 spectators, indoor running track, and numerous spaces for indoor sports.

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The new Water Resources Recovery Facility (WRRF), housing administration and a laboratory, had 18 geothermal wells installed, along with photovoltaic panels.

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W I N D EN ER GY Over a decade ago Edmond Electric was among the first utilities in the state to offer an innovative, green-power program designed to allow customers to purchase electricity from a pure, non-polluting wind resource. Edmond Electric provided the opportunity to reduce indirect emissions. Indirect emissions are those resulting from electricity purchased from an electricity service provider. In this case Edmond Electric purchases its power from the Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA). The program came to be known as Pure and Simple.

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Edmond’s Water Resources converted its remaining facilities over to the Pure and Simple program, and the City became an EPA Green Power Partner, a voluntary program that encourages the use of renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and low-impact hydro.

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The City’s use of renewable energy allowed Edmond to become a member of the EPA Green Leadership Club through EPA’s Green Power Partnership.

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The City became the State’s 1st EPA Green Power Community, meaning that the community exceeds the EPA guidelines for buying renewable energy. The City will continue to hold that designation, demonstrating environmental leadership by reducing its carbon footprint, but also signifying a broader commitment to sustainability.

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In 2018 the City of Edmond became the first City in Oklahoma to use 100% renewable energy for its City facilities. Other Cities in the Green Power Partnership using 100% renewable energy include Dallas, TX, Austin TX, and Santa Monica CA. Every year there are more cities and businesses that are making that commitment to renewable energy. There are also many well-known companies using 100% renewable energy, and there are more all the time.

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TODAY, CITY FACILITIES A R E O P E R AT I N G AT

100% R E N E W A B L E E N E R G Y,

PRIMARILY USING POWER THROUGH THE

PURE & SIMPLE

PROGRAM ESTABLISHED BY THE

OMPA AND

EDMOND E L ECTRIC 26 .


GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION While the City of Edmond does not have a Climate Action Plan, the Sustainability Office takes heed that there are residents, businesses and researchers concerned about climate change. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are an effective indicator, as excessive GHG in the troposphere has caused an unprecedented warming of the planet. The total reduction in equivalent CO2 by residents, businesses, the university and the City of Edmond demonstrates that this is a community-wide effort.

City-wide utility accounts show that 958 customers were utilizing the Pure and Simple Program in 2018. In addition to the City of Edmond’s efforts, the University of Central Oklahoma also uses 100% renewable energy. 20 09

There were approximately 51,171 metric tons of equivalent CO2 avoided per year. In 2018, there were approximately 72,570 metric tons of eCO2 emissions avoided per year.

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From 2009 to the present, there has been a 41.8% increase in eCO2 avoidance. Those utilizing Edmond Electric’s Wind Power Program cumulatively reduced GHG by an average 72,570 metric tons eCO2, which is equivalent to: • Annual greenhouse gas emissions from 15.4 thousand passenger vehicles. • CO2 emissions from the electricity use of 12.6 thousand homes for one year. • CO2 emissions from 2.9 million propane cylinders used from home barbeques. • CO2 emissions from 9.2 billion smart phones charged. • Carbon sequestered by 1.2 million tree seedlings grown for 10 years.

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R ECYC L I N G Recycling conserves our natural resources, saves landfill space, conserves energy, and reduces water pollution, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Recycling isn’t just good for the environment, it’s also good business, providing employment in an innovative industry that re-uses the material for new recycled products. Together, reducing, reusing, and recycling are the foundational practices that promote a better use of resources and energy.

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R E S I D EN T I A L C U R B S I D E PA R T I C I PAT I O N When businesses and residents recycle in Edmond, one hundred percent of the recycled material is taken to Republic Services, Allied Waste Division in west Oklahoma City, where it is processed and shipped in bales to manufacturers to make toys, furniture, equipment, shoes, clothing and other supplies. Make sure your recyclables are clean and follow the tips on Edmond’s website! Three measures that the City of Edmond uses to gage its residential recycling program are the participation rate, the total volume of recycled material, and the recycled percentage. The Participation Rate is calculated by the number of stops / total units billed for that period. If there is no recycling bin at the curb on the scheduled day, the trucks simply don’t stop.

R E S I D EN T I A L PA R T I C I PAT I O N R AT E 100 84

80

88

90

92

75

60 40

39

39

2009

10

35

40

42

20 0

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

In 2013 changing the recycling containers to the large 96-gallon bins and allowing more recyclables, such as cardboard, benefited the program greatly.

2 9.

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R E S I D EN T I A L C U R B S I D E PA R T I C I PAT I O N con’t. From years 2013 – 2018 the average number of customers participating in the curbside program increased by 119%.

R E S I D EN T I A L R ECYC L I N G VO L U M E Recycling in Tons 6K 5K

5,196

5,281

5,496

15

16

17

5,238

4,663

4K 3K

2,773

2,684

2,268

2,091

1,988

12

13

2K 1K 0

2009

10

11

14

18

P ER C EN TAG E R ECYC L ED M AT ER I A L O F R E S I D EN T I A L C U R B S I D E S ERV I C E 14% 12%

10.74

11.63

11.76

15

16

12.12

11.94

17

18

10% 8%

6.72

7.20

6.24 5.50

6%

4.82

4% 2% 0

2009

10

11

12

13

30.

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In 2018 the City of Edmond disposed of 69,662 tons of waste. Approximately 37% of that waste was commercial tonnage where the City has no commercial contract for recycling. 63% of the City’s collected waste has potential for being recycled. The City provides recycling service for its residential customers, so the best indicator for the City’s recycling program is to compare the total residential curbside tons with the total amount recycled. In 2018, 11.94% of all residential waste was recycled. That figure represents an increase of 163% from 2013–18. In 2013 a City study also showed that roughly 10% of all residential waste is also yard waste. Though a large composting operation for this waste is not financially feasible right now, the City’s Drainage Utility has been promoting residential composting at annual events as a low tech alternative. Since 2016, 154 compost bins have been distributed.

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H O U S EH O L D H A Z A R D O U S WA S T E Edmond has a solid record of collecting large quantities of hazardous waste from its residents. Improper use, storage, and disposal of household hazardous waste is dangerous. That’s why Edmond Solid Waste Services partners with residents to make the community safer. For more information visit our website at EdmondOK.com/Sustainability.

H O U S EH O L D H A Z A R D O U S WA S T E C U R B S I D E Recycling in Tons 40 35.14

35

33.83

33.45

30.23

30

28.00

26.05

29.98

25

23.17

20 15

17.21 14.47

10 5 0

2009

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

An important part of the City’s recycling program is to increase awareness, and provide current, relevant information to our customers. Marketing regularly updates the Edmond Recycles webpage, as needed, and will also include information or articles in the Utility Newsletter to help inform the public about Edmond’s recycling programs, and what items can and cannot be recycled. Ads in popular local publications are also run for the Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) program.

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The City of Edmond continues to focus on ways to improve convenience and efficiency when disposing of your household hazardous waste and e-waste.

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U N I V ER S I T Y OF

CENTRAL OKL AHOMA

The University of Central Oklahoma is committed to environmental responsibility both inside and outside the classroom. A longstanding partnership with the City of Edmond has allowed the university and City to work together on projects of shared interest. UCO’s sustainability commitment focuses on infrastructure, student engagement, and academics in order to ensure that the university is environmentally, fiscally, and socially sustainable.

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INFRASTRUCTURE UCO administration and facilities has been a longstanding leader in sustainability. Through a partnership with Edmond Electric, UCO sources 100 percent of its electricity from wind power, which saves the university and taxpayers money, and provides a renewable and environmentally friendly source of electricity for the entire campus. For more than a decade, UCO has worked with Johnson Controls to upgrade the efficiency of campus buildings. This partnership has resulted in massive saving for the university, and has substantially limited the university’s impact on the environment. In 2017-18, UCO received three rebates from the Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority totaling over $166,000. These rebates were granted to the university because of energy efficiency upgrades through the use of LEDs throughout campus. This represents just a portion of the savings the university has experienced through its commitment to energy efficiency and environmental responsibility.

Since 2009, UCO has partnered with the City of Edmond to provide a student-centric route for the Citylink bus program. This route, known as the Broncholink, has contributed to an increase in monthly ridership numbers, which reduces traffic congestion on and off campus, and improves air quality in the city. Since the beginning of this partnership, Citylink has seen over 2.2 million rides, including over 500,000 rides on the Broncholink alone.

S T U D E N T E N G AG E M E N T UCO has many opportunities for students to learn about sustainability and participate in making the university and the city of Edmond a more sustainable place. Students for Sustainability, a registered student organization on campus, plans events and projects, including a Local Food Summit, Student Sustainability Summit, and panels on renewable energy, waste diversion, and many other pressing environmental topics. In addition, the UCO Office of Sustainability offers internships for students in many diverse areas, including sustainable behavior change, local food cultivation, food waste diversion, peer education, renewable energy development, and many other areas. Since 2016, the office has had 20 students complete internships that taught them important sustainability concepts, and helped to cultivate a culture of sustainability on campus.

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ACA D EM I C S UCO is devoted to teaching sustainability concepts in the classroom setting. Sustainability concepts are represented across campus, woven into the fabric of each of our six colleges. Courses such as environmental biology, urban sustainability, environmental health, and many more focus on the importance of sustainability knowledge no matter what career paths students choose. In 2017, UCO officially launched a Sustainability Studies minor program, which takes a multidisciplinary approach to sustainability and attracts students from all backgrounds and career aspirations. UCO students have presented regionally and nationally about their sustainability work. Additionally, a group of faculty known as the Sustainability Faculty Scholars works to develop more sustainability pedagogy on campus, and includes representatives from all colleges on campus.

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