City of Edmond, Budget & Financial Plan, FY 21-22

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CITY OF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA

BUDGET AND FINANCIAL PLAN

ABSO

L

PO Y L UTE

– 2021 R A AL YE FISC

2022

LY E V I SIT

ON M D E

D


Reader’s Guide This is our first year to apply for the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award Program from Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA). With preparing for this award, many changes to this document were implemented. The purpose of building a better budget book was to create a comprehensive overview of the City’s budget process, the services we provide, the overall strategic goals of the City and all the issues involved with creating this fiscal year 2021/2022 budget. This budget book now has 15 sections which allows for finding items more easily. Our new budget book will become not only a financial plan, but it has become a policy document, a communications device and an operations guide. The first Introductory section gives readers insight into who we are, where we are and a little history of our City. The City’s organizational chart can be found here as well as a list of our City Council. The Executive summary is a letter from Larry Stevens, our City Manager, in which hehighlights all the funds and what is happening across the City. This also includes some budget overview information as well as the budget calendar. Next are the budget summary pages. These pages detail the entire budget in a one-page document. These summaries are broken down into All Funds, the General Fund and Public Works Authority budgets. The summary pages are sometimes hard to find what you are seeking; therefore, we have listed in Sections 4 through 10 each of our funds and each with their own budget details. Section 4 through Section 10 lists each of the funds. Section 4 begins with the General Fund, which is where most of the services for our customers are budgeted. Then, the Special Revenue Funds contain our Fire and Police funds and other funds that are financed with a dedicated revenue source. The Capital Projects section reflects a five-year plan for all of our capital projects. This plan is a work in progress and is changed as needed to accommodate growth. The next section on Personnel shows details on changes that have taken place for the current budget. Appendix A section shows the letters and requests for services with various entities. Next, we have added a section on Fiscal and Budgetary Policies. This is a brief overview of our policies that help shape and development the budget plan. We close our book with a Glossary and Acronyms section, as we understand that not everyone who may read this document may have the same understanding of the terminology that we use.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION 1

INTRODUCTION

5-12

CORE VALUE....................................................................................................................................................5 COMMUNITY HISTORY................................................................................................................................6-7 TRUSTWORTHY SERVICE, LEADERSHIP EXPECTATIONS........................................................................8 DEMOGRAPHICS AND STATISTICS...............................................................................................................9 MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL.........................................................................................................................10 PRINCIPAL OFFICIALS .................................................................................................................................11 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART-CITYWIDE.........................................................................................................12

SECTION 2

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

13-60

CITY MANAGER’S MESSAGE..................................................................................................................13-32 STRATEGIC PLAN......................................................................................................................................33-54 BUDGET PROCESS.......................................................................................................................................55 BUDGET CALENDAR......................................................................................................................................56 BUDGET RESOLUTION.............................................................................................................................57-59 FUND STRUCTURE........................................................................................................................................60

SECTION 3

BUDGET SUMMARIES

61-66

BUDGET SUMMARY-ALL FUNDS...................................................................................................................61 SUMMARY OF REVENUES BY SOURCE-GENERAL FUND..........................................................................62 SUMMARY OF REVENUES BY SOURCE-EDMOND PUBLIC W ORKS (EPWA) FUNDS........................63 FUND BALANCE........................................................................................................................................64-66

SECTION 4

GENERAL FUND

67-118

FUND DESCRIPTION.....................................................................................................................................67 FUND BUDGET SUMMARY............................................................................................................................68

DEPARTMENTS WITHIN THE GENERAL FUND: GENERAL GOVERNMENT........................................................................................................................69-70 DOWNTOWN COMMUNITY CENTER (DCC)..........................................................................................71-74 SENIOR CITIZENS FUND..........................................................................................................................75-76

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FUND........................................................................................................77-80 CEMETERY FUND.....................................................................................................................................81-82 FESTIVAL MARKETPLACE FUND.............................................................................................................83-86 BUILDING FUND.........................................................................................................................................87-90 CITY COUNCIL..........................................................................................................................................91-92 HISTORICAL SOCIETY FUND...................................................................................................................93-94

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PARK AND RECREATION FUND...............................................................................................................95-98 STREET MAINTENANCE & CONSTRUCTION FUND.............................................................................99-100 MUNICIPAL COURT FUND.....................................................................................................................101-104 COMMUNITY IMAGE FUND...................................................................................................................105-108 PLANNING AND ZONING FUND.............................................................................................................109-112 PARKS AND RECREATION-SPECIAL EVENTS FUND.........................................................................113-114 EDMOND ELECTRIC ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND...................................................................115-116 COMMUNITY AGENCY REVIEW FUND................................................................................................117-118

SECTION 5

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS

119-152

FUND BUDGET SUMMARIES AND DETAIL:

SENIOR CENTER FUND........................................................................................................................119-122 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT FUND.......................................................................123-126 ASSET FORFEITURE FUND..................................................................................................................127-128 PARK TAX FUND....................................................................................................................................129-130 CEMETERY CARE FUND.......................................................................................................................131-132 AMBULATORY SERVICES FUND..........................................................................................................133-134 FIRE PUBLIC SAFETY LIMITED TAX FUND.........................................................................................135-138 POLICE PUBLIC SAFETY LIMITED TAX FUND....................................................................................139-142 VISIT EDMOND FUND............................................................................................................................143-146 CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND................................................................................................147-148 REAL PROPERTY FUND.......................................................................................................................149-150

HOSPITAL TRUST FUND......................................................................................................................151-152 SECTION 6

CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS

153-162

FUND BUDGET SUMMARIES AND DETAIL: ART IN PUBLIC PLACES FUND..................................................................................................... ......153-154 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS FUND........................................................................................................155-156 2000 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS TAX FUND.....................................................................................157-158 ROADWAY IMPROVEMENTS FUND.....................................................................................................159-160 2017 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS TAX FUND......................................................................................161-162

SECTION 7

EDMOND PUBLIC WORKS AUTHORITY (EPWA) FUNDS

FUND DESCRIPTION AND BUDGET SUMMARIES:

163-190

EDMOND PUBLIC WORKS AUTHORITY (EPWA) FUND SUMMARY..................................................163-164 EPWA REVENUE BOND FUND..............................................................................................................165-166 ELECTRIC UTILITY FUND......................................................................................................................167-170 WATER UTILITY FUND...........................................................................................................................171-174 SOLID WASTE UTILITY FUND...............................................................................................................175-178 WASTEWATER UTILITY FUND..............................................................................................................179-182 ARCADIA LAKE......................................................................................................................................183-186 DRAINAGE. .............................................................................................................................................187-190

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SECTION 8

OTHER ENTERPRISE FUNDS

191-200

KICKINGBIRD GOLF CLUB....................................................................................................................191-194 CITYLINK-PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION................................................................................................195-198 YOURGOVSHOP FUND........................................................................................................................199-200

SECTION 9

INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS

201-276

FUND BUDGET SUMMARIES AND DETAIL: ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT SERVICES FUND..................................................................................201-202 RISK MANAGEMENT (LIABILITY/TORT CLAIMS)................................................................................203-206 RISK MANAGEMENT (WORKER’S COMPENSATION RESERVE FUND)............................................207-208 EMPLOYEE GROUP INSURANCE FUND..............................................................................................209-210 VEHICLE MAINTENANCE FUND...........................................................................................................211-214 GENERAL GOVERNMENT FUND..........................................................................................................215-216 CITY CLERK FUND.................................................................................................................................217-220 CITY MANAGER FUND...........................................................................................................................221-224 FACILITY MAINTENANCE FUND...........................................................................................................225-228 MARKETING FUND.................................................................................................................................229-232 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES (IT) FUND........................................................................................233-236 LEGAL SERVICES FUND.......................................................................................................................237-240 PUBLIC WORKS ADMINISTRATION FUND...........................................................................................241-244 OPERATIONS CENTRAL WAREHOUSE FUND.....................................................................................245-248 PUBLIC SAFETY COMMUNICATION FUND..........................................................................................249-252 ENGINEERING FUND.............................................................................................................................253-256 FINANCIAL SERVICES FUND................................................................................................................257-260 HUMAN RESOURCES FUND.................................................................................................................261-264 UTILITY CUSTOMER SERVICE FUND..................................................................................................265-268 FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND................................................................................................................269-272 PUBLIC WORKS FIELD SERVICES FUND............................................................................................273-276

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SECTION 10

DEBT SERVICE FUND

277-278

DEBT SCHEDULES................................................................................................................................277-278

SECTION 11

CAPITAL PROJECTS

279-283

FIVE YEAR PLAN...................................................................................................................................279-280 FIVE YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM LIST.....................................................................281-283

SECTION 12

PERSONNEL

284-300

PERSONNEL INFORMATION................................................................................................................284-291

POSITION GROWTH VS POPULATION........................................................................................................292 POSITION COUNT..........................................................................................................................................293 NEWLY BUDGETED POSITION COUNT................................................................................................294-300

SECTION 13

APPENDIX A

301-307

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES AUTHORITY (EMSA)......................................................................301 EDMOND VISUAL ARTS COMMISSION (EVAC).......................................................................................302 COMMUNITY AGENCY REVIEW COMMISSION (CARC)..................................................................303-306 EDMOND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY (EEDA).................................................................307 SECTION 14

FISCAL AND BUDGETARY POLICIES

308-310

FINANCIAL POLICIES.............................................................................................................................308-310

SECTION 15

GLOSSARY AND ACRONYMS

311-320

GLOSSARY AND ACRONYMS.............................................................................................................311-320

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TAB PAGE

INTRODUCTION


City of Edmond Core Values

ACCOUNTABILITY We are responsible for our work, our words, and our actions. COMMUNICATION We value efforts to communicate with our customers in a caring, timely, professional manner. CUSTOMER SERVICE We provide service with courtesy, respect, dependability, flexibility and timeliness. INCLUSION We promote an inclusive workforce and equitable services for our increasingly diverse community. INNOVATION We value innovation, creative thought, and the collaboration of ideas. INTEGRITY We value the spirit of integrity in all aspects of our working lives. PROFESSIONALISM We continue to seek growth, striving to be a learning organization. TEAMWORK We encourage diversity of thinking, ideas, and responsibilities.

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Our City's History: From Indian Territory to Today Early Exploration First explored by Washington Irving in 1832, Edmond was part of the Unassigned Lands, territory that was not assigned to any Native American tribe living in the area. The area was open to exploration, inhabited by herds of buffalo, black bears and wild horses, and used for hunting by nearby tribes. On July 4, 1884, Congress granted rights to railroad companies to build tracks across the territory. By 1887, railroads were running across the Unassigned Lands. That year the train station, first named Summit for being the highest point of the railway between the Cimarron and North Canadian rivers, was officially renamed Edmond. There are several theories as to why Edmond was chosen, but it is unclear exactly why our city got its name. One passenger and one freight train arrived from each way daily stopping for water, coal and meals that Mrs. Steen, the wife of construction worker John M. Steen who came from New Mexico to build the well, cooked for the crews. One man said Edmond was the most important stop between Purcell and Arkansas City because crews could eat there.

History of Firsts At noon on April 22, 1889, the land run began due to a proclamation signed by President Benjamin Harrison to open the Unassigned Lands to settlers. At 12:05 PM, surveyors were laying out the townsite. The first legal settlers of Edmond were Colonel Eddy B. Townsend, Hardy C. Angelea, and J. Wheeler Turner. They rode their horses from 15 miles east of Edmond, at the west line of the Kickapoo Indian Reservation, to join the land run. It was the determination of settlers like these who put their stamp on Edmond and shaped its personality. The first settlers lead to many more firsts for our great city: • • •

First public school house, 1889 Territorial Schoolhouse at 2nd and Boulevard First flour mill in 1894, the Eagle Flouring Mill on 1st west of the railroad tracks First newspaper, the Edmond Sun at 2nd and Broadway

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First public institution of higher education, the Territorial Normal School, now the University of Central Oklahoma at 2nd and University

Continued Development In 1907, Edmond saw many monumental achievements. Oklahoma became a state, natural gas lines were built to reach the city, a housing addition was under construction south of 2nd St. between Broadway and Boulevard, and more. The Great Depression and the Dust Bowl days struck the city in the 1920s. Citizens saw some relief from oil booms in 1922 and 1930. City development continued in the 1930s, with the establishment of Ray Deveraux's jewelry store in 1932 and the Baggerly Funeral Home's opening in 1933. President Franklin Roosevelt's WPA program employed 93,000 people in Oklahoma in 1936. The WPA brought several projects to Edmond, including: • Gracelawn Cemetery stone fencing at Danforth and Broadway • The armory building, which now houses the Edmond Historical Society & Museum, at 5th and Boulevard • Stephenson Park at 4th and Littler • "Pre-Settlement Days" Mural at 1st and Littler These landmarks still stand today and are available for visitation. In the 1980s, nearly 100 years after the Land Run that started the City of Edmond, Hafer Park opened, the site for Arcadia Lake was dedicated and the Oak Tree Country Club was being built. Today, Edmond boasts a population of nearly 95,000. Several historic sites built throughout our city's history remain standing, like the 1889 Territorial Schoolhouse, the Rodkey grain elevator, and the University of Central Oklahoma's Old North. Edmond has grown exceedingly well in the past 130 years, and we are still growing.

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LEADERSHIP EXPECTATIONS Earn trust and respect by always speaking the truth and leading by positive example. Create an environment of openness and sharing of ideas to encourage employee engagement and empower them with confidence. Present your viewpoint and disagree when needed. However, once a decision has been made, own the final decision. Be willing to make tough decisions and deal with the issues in a timely manner. Recognize the big picture of city operations beyond your direct areas of responsibility. Seek partnerships with other city departments and outside agencies. Communicate with your team and ensure the water of knowledge and understanding gets to the end of the row.

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Demographics and Statistics Location

Edmond is located in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma and is just north of Oklahoma City and is considered to be the 5th largest city in the state.

About our City Edmond’s population is approximately 94,000 as compared to 81,405 just 10 years ago. The median age is 36.3 and the median household income is $80,993. Percent of population age 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree is 55.3%. 2020’s new single family home construction cost an average cost of $377,193 (not including the lot cost). Sales of existing homes sold in an average of 39 days on the market. Edmond has more than 30 parks and outdoor venues as well as 248 pieces of public art. The Guthrie-Edmond Regional Airport is located seven miles north of Edmond and in operated through an intergovernmental agreement between the City of Edmond and the City of Guthrie. The City partnered with a private developer for the construction of the six story, 158-room Hilton Garden Inn and 20,000 square foot Edmond Conference Center on the northwest corner of Interstate 35 and Covell. Several hundred acres of commercial development is available in and around this area. Edmond has approximately 90 square miles and is located 13 miles north of downtown Oklahoma City. Our Edmond Public Schools have 11 nationally recognized Blue Ribbon Schools-the highest in Oklahoma.

Source: www.eeda.com

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City Council

Description

Edmond, OK operates under a Council-Manager form of government established by the 1925 Charter. The Mayor and Council are the policy-making and legislative body and appoint the City Manager as well as the City Attorney and Municipal Judges.

Meetings

5:30 pm, Second and fourth Monday of each month Council Chambers 20 S. Littler, Edmond, OK 73034

Members Darrell Davis, Mayor Term Expires: May 2023 Darrell.davis@edmondok.com

Christin Mugg, Ward 3 Term Expires: May 2025 Christin.mugg@edmondok.com

David Chapman, Ward 1 Term Expires: May 2023 David.chapman@edmondok.com

Stacie A. Peterson, Ward 4 Term Expires: May 2025 Stacie.peterson@edmondok.com

Josh Moore, Ward 2, Mayor Pro Tem Term Expires: May 2023 Josh.moore@edmondok.com

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CITY OF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA PRINCIPAL OFFICIALS AND FINANCE COMMITTEE MEMBERS ELECTED OFFICIALS Darrell Davis David Chapman Josh Moore Christin Mugg Stacie A. Peterson

Mayor Councilmember-Ward 1 Councilmember-Ward 2 Councilmember-Ward 3 Councilmember-Ward 4 FINANCE COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Stephen Schaus Darrell Davis Christin Mugg Steve Murdock Larry Stevens Kathy Panas

Chairperson Member Member Member Member Member ADMINISTRATION

Larry Stevens Stephen Murdock Stephen Schaus Andy Conyers Jim Smith Cinda Covel Chris Goodwin J.D. Younger Lisa Goodpasture Diane L. Slayton

City Manager City Attorney City Treasurer Assistant City Manager-Administration Assistant City Manager-Operations City Clerk Fire Chief Police Chief Human Resource Director Municipal Judge FINANCE STAFF

Kathy Panas Sheila Briesch Brenda Mayer

Finance Director Controller Purchasing Manager

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Solid Waste

Vehicle Maint.

Public Works Admin

Facility Maint.

Utility Field Services

DCC

Street

Traffic Control

Water/WW Line Maint

Meter Services

CDBG

Water Wells

Field Services

Public Works

Electric

Planning/Zoning

Engineering

Building & Fire Code Services

Water Plant

ECVB

Marketing/PR

City Manager

Wastewater Treatment

Public Safety Communications & Emergency Mgmt

Water Resources

ACM Operations

Municipal Judges

Municipal Court

City Clerk s Office

Management Services

Mayor & City Council

Citizens

Pelican Bay

Festival Mkt Place

Cemetery

Animal Welfare

Police

Risk Management

City Attorney

Recreation

Park Maint.

Golf

Senior Center

Arcadia Lake

Fire

Utility Customer Service

Budget/Acct.

Treasury

Purchasing

Payroll

Insurance/Benefits

Training

Oil & Gas

Code Enforcement

Financial Services

Human Resources

Administrative Services

IT

Community Image

Parks and Rec

ACM Administration

Boards & Commissions

Urban Forestry

Authorities & Trusts


TAB PAGE

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


FY 21-22 Budget Message Honorable Mayor Davis and members of the City Council It is my pleasure to submit the proposed annual budget for 2021-2022 Fiscal Year and the Five-Year Financial Plan for the years 21-22 through 25-26. Our Finance team has done tremendous work in directing our organization through this extensive process. I also want to thank the people from our various departments who have been involved in preparing this information. Our ongoing internal mission, Trustworthy Service through Continuous Improvement, continues to be the foundation for the culture of our organization, reflected in our 8 Core Values of Customer Service, Integrity, Accountability, Inclusion, Innovation, Communication, Professionalism, and Teamwork.

The BIG Picture The total proposed amount of next year’s budget, or total estimated costs, is $363,663,946. This is a 13% increase over the current budget due mainly to increased capital outlay. Edmond’s total sales tax rate of 8.25% continues to be the lowest in the metro area. This total includes our local tax mix of 3.75% plus 4.5% paid to the State by all cities in Oklahoma. Our local economy has performed so much better than we anticipated during the COVID-19 situation. Although our situation is certainly not unique among cities, we continue to be very blessed. Through three quarters of our current fiscal year which ends June 30, sales tax revenues have increased 4.3% above last year, compared to a conservative zero growth budget projection. Use taxes were projected to increase 5%, and after nine months we are 25% above last year. Combined sales and use taxes are up almost 9% from a year ago. The special purpose sales taxes approved by voters in 2000 for Fire, Police and Capital Improvements continue to provide critical revenue. These taxes include a quarter-cent for Fire, an eighth-cent for Police, and three-quarter cents for Capital Improvements. Please also remember that Fire and Police also receive two-thirds of the revenue in the General Fund. An easy-to-understand snapshot of the City’s financial health is the “Performeter”, an annual financial statement analysis developed and prepared by Crawford & Associates. The current review is based on data for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2020 and is also available on our web site. The Performeter identified Edmond’s overall rating as 8.1 out of a possible 10, an increase from last year’s 7.7. The report noted “Edmond’s overall financial health remains well above satisfactory and is an overall improvement when compared to the prior year.”

City Council Strategic Plan You review your formal Plan twice each year and it is updated annually.

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General Fund Revenues Sales and Use taxes are the critical revenue sources for this fund, which is even more important since Edmond receives NO property tax (ad valorem). Property tax is not available in Oklahoma for cities to help fund operations. However, many cities of our size or larger do levy a small property tax that can be used to fund capital projects. Oklahoma is the only state in the U.S. that funds cities in this manner, and someday that has to change. As always we will be conservative in estimating next year’s sales and use tax revenues, but not as conservative as we were a year ago in trying to forecast the impact from COVID. For next year’s budget we are projecting a 3.25% increase and for the remaining four years of the Plan we are projecting a 2% annual growth in sales tax, as compared to this year’s zero growth projection. We are projecting 10% annual growth in use taxes for next year’s budget and a 5% increase for the remaining four years of the Plan. Consequently the revenue generated from a penny of sales tax in next year’s budget is estimated to be $20,000,000. You established a formal policy several years ago that provided for a “preferred minimum” of 10% in unreserved funds (Reserve for Emergencies and Shortfalls) for the General Fund. At the end of the current budget year this percentage is estimated to be 7.18% compared to a 4.35% projection, and 6.81% for next year’s budget. To keep these percentages in perspective however, remember that we always budget maximum expenditures, which makes the assumption that all budget $$ will be spent, and we always budget lower-thanexpected or conservative revenues. Each year this results in an “artificially low” identified cash balance by design. Next year’s budget projects General Fund revenue will increase 5.5%. In this year’s budget investment income decreased, and the coming budget estimates an additional decrease of approximately 17% as a result of falling interest rates. The automatic transfers from General Fund to Fire and Police operations are estimated to be $20,303,764 for Fire and $24,905,951 for Police.

General Fund: Assistance for Outside Agencies Social Agencies and Community Enrichment These annual budget recommendations are developed by the Community Agency Review Committee (CARC), a group of 6 citizens who work closely with Todd Hildabrand from our office. They review all funding applications, interview the various agencies, and then prepare funding recommendations. Next year’s budget includes all the funding recommendations exactly as submitted by the CARC. The same agencies are recommended for funding in next year’s budget, which includes 9 Social Agencies and 11 Community Enrichment entities. The combined total annual funding cap for both categories is 3.0% of current sales collections.

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Guthrie/Edmond Regional Airport The airport operation is equally funded by both communities for operating and capital expenses. My recommendation is to reduce what has been an annual placeholder amount of $200,000 to $100,000 for all five years of the Plan. Only a portion of the amount has been spent in recent years due primarily to very limited capital activity, and this reduction more accurately reflects the existing situation.

Edmond Economic Development Fund Our electric utility provides the allocations for this fund (page 2.18), which provides ED assistance to both existing and potential new businesses. The recommendation is to continue the annual $100,000 allocations for all five years of the Plan. Last year this fund provided $700,000 for the City’s portion of the Ice House Project, a downtown public/private redevelopment project. This assistance involves the construction of an 80-space parking lot on the south side and the paving of an alley on the north side.

Special Revenue Funds Edmond will be receiving a one-time allocation of $12M from the federal ARP (American Rescue Plan) for economic assistance from the COVID pandemic. A separate fund for this money will be established in next year’s budget, the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021. We will receive a $6M allocation in the current budget, and another $6M next year. We are projecting for this full amount to be spent in next year’s budget. We are still reviewing the spending guidelines/requirements however, so no recommendations have yet been made concerning how these funds will be spent. PUBLIC SAFETY LIMITED TAX FUNDS Whenever sales and use tax collections plus other GF revenues exceed budget projections, then both the Fire and Police Departments receive additional revenue. This situation has occurred in most years since voters approved the Public Safety sales taxes in 2000. Although the amount of this additional revenue is never known until September in the next fiscal year, for comparison purposes the Fire Department received $1,228,147 and the Police Department received $1,001,207 in the current budget. Fire Department The Fire Department’s projected expenditures exceed projected revenues in each of the coming five years, a very unusual occurrence in this budget. This is due to several good reasons, including equipment replacements, initial funding for major renovations of two fire stations, upgrades to emergency alerting systems, various capital expenses, anticipated increases in staffing, and the costs of conducting recruitment/hiring processes in three of the next five years. This unusual situation is not really a concern however, as several of the above expenses only occur periodically, and the FD continues to benefit from a healthy reserve balance which will be used to balance the budget in all five years. At the end of the Five-Year Plan the estimated amount of the reserve balance will still be close to $10M. The Department is currently working with an architect who is evaluating the feasibility of a major renovation to Fire Station 3, with the hope that this station can undergo a major

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renovation rather than having to be rebuilt at another site. If a renovation is feasible, work will begin in 2021 or early 2022. While the initial funding will come from the FD, this amount will be repaid from the 2017 repurposed capital improvements sales tax in the next few years. A similar renovation project and funding plan for Station 1 is included in year four of the Plan. The FD will work with the Planning Department to perform an internal fire station Location Study later in this calendar year. Chief Goodwin is then planning to recommend in 2022 a proposed location and timeline to add a Fire Station # 6. The Department will start a new internal Academy to train twelve new recruits in the fall of this year. Six of the twelve recruits will fill vacancies in Suppression. The remaining six will allow the Department to place a new two-person squad into service in order to improve response capabilities for our citizens. The FD has also budgeted for two additional academies in the outer years of the Plan. One frontline Quint (combination pumper and ladder truck), two frontline Brush Pumpers and several staff vehicles are due for replacement in next year’s budget. Several other frontline vehicles are scheduled for replacement in the remaining years of the Plan. The equipment and the vehicles have been identified, scheduled and budgeted in the Fleet Management Fund in Public Works, in conjunction with Vehicle Maintenance.

Police Department The Police budget is again projecting positive balances for next year’s budget and the outer 4 years of the Plan. Large capital expenditures for end-of-life radios and in-car computers are proposed in FY 21-22 to ensure reliable technical capabilities for first responders. The Department will begin internal Police Academy 21-07 in May, and expects 10 new Officers to graduate on October 1, 2021. Following a 14-week Field Training program, Officers will be eligible for solo assignment in January of next year. Three of the ten positions will back-fill three new School Resource Officer (SRO) positions assigned to Edmond Public Schools. The additional SRO positions are a result of a 3-year, 60% matching grant from the US Dept. of Justice Community Oriented Policing Program. The City and EPS have had a long-standing partnership to provide School Resource Officers in schools, and this program now has eight SROs in service at all three high schools, Boulevard Academy and five middle schools. The EPD and City Administration has been actively involved in the initial discussions among many different entities in Edmond concerning a “whole community response” in addressing Mental Health concerns. For several years the Department has identified a growing concern with the increase with the number of individuals that must be taken into Protective Custody for Mental Health issues. The Department repurposed a Patrol Officer position to serve as a Mental Health Liaison Officer during the 18-19 budget year. Next year’s budget proposes to fund a contract with the OK Dept. of Mental Health for a Mental Health Professional to assist the Liaison Officer in response to and follow-up for citizens experiencing mental health issues. Also included is a proposal to replace an existing vehicle with an unmarked vehicle in transporting mental health patients to minimize the stress associated with being placed in a marked police car.

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The much-needed expansion of the Animal Services Shelter Facility is now in operation and should be officially dedicated in May. The 2017 repurposed capital improvements sales tax provided all the funding for the $4M+ project.

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT SERVICES FUND The fifteen internal departments who provide support to the departments that directly provide services to our citizens are financed by this fund. “Cost allocations” or internally budgeted charges to the user departments are identified to pay for these internal services. For many years this process has involved a consultant who works with all of our various departments in very interactive discussions. The process has been improved over the years and it now is more straightforward, based on the actual costs incurred in the current budget instead of future budgets, resulting in budget authority increasing this year by about 5.1%.

Edmond Public Works Authority Electric Fund Edmond Electric (EE) began as a City-owned and operated utility over a century ago, and has always featured competitive rates and outstanding service to most Edmond residents. For many years EE has consistently provided ongoing support of general governmental operations, and this support has been very helpful in keeping local taxes lower than what would have been possible otherwise. This significant support for next year is budgeted to be $7,620,010 which includes $4,000,000 as a transfer to the General Fund and $3,620,010 in right-of-way use fees. The implementation of an Advance Metering Initiative (AMI) or Smart Meter system continues to move forward. This system will greatly improve our outage management system for both utilities, our ability to monitor peak demand, and it will allow customers to monitor their water usage on a daily basis. The rollout of electric and water meters in a test area is scheduled for June, and the beginning of the city-wide rollout of 3 years should begin by the end of this calendar year. The Electric and Water Departments are sharing the cost of this $16M program.

EE will continue its substation modernization program. Transformer # 2 at the Danforth substation will be replaced, and the associated relaying will be upgraded to electronic devices. The relay upgrade will also be done for Transformer # 3. At the Fairfield substation the switchgear for Transformer # 2 will be upgraded. The Garber substation will also receive a relay upgrade and other improvements. The Edmond Economic Development Authority (EEDA) will again receive most of its financial support from EE, and in next year’s budget that amount will be $820,577 (28.2% increase). This increase is primarily due to reimbursement of micro grants that were not covered by CARES money in the amount of $93,000, pandemic incentives of $25,000 and Streateries funding of $30,000.

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Water Fund This fund finances the City’s drinking water system, which includes over 550 miles of distribution lines, 52 water wells, and the Arcadia Lake Treatment Plant. The 21-22 budget includes the third of five phased-in 5-7% annual increases. (As a reminder, you delayed the year two increase by a year in November of 2019). We have extensively discussed the major capital improvements that will be accomplished to both the Water and Wastewater systems over the next five years to address critical bigpicture needs. The water projects include adding additional treatment capacity at the Water Plant to accommodate future growth, the drilling of additional well, the upsizing of current distribution lines and additional storage capacity for the system. We are using 30-year terms to service this debt, to ensure that future utility customers rightfully share in paying for these long-term improvements. As you know, other cities in the metro area are also addressing similar issues, also with very large expenditures. These improvements were formally identified in the 2013 Water and Wastewater Master Plan. In 2019 you agreed with staff recommendations to adopt a more phased-in approach to the implementation of a new Water Treatment Plant at the same basic site. The Water System Master Plan Update was recently revised in March to identify the progress that has been made, and this document is available for public review on our website. Next year’s projects include the new Intake Structure at Arcadia Lake, the next phase of Water Plant construction (the second of three phases, with the final phase involving the main plant construction), the continued drilling of additional wells, the design of a new water at the UCO water storage site at Ayers & Bauman, along with ongoing rehabilitation/replacement of existing water lines. The annual well rehabilitation program provides for a minimum of seven wells per year from a total of 52 operable wells in our system. Edmond participates in the OKC mandatory outdoor watering program as a requirement of our water purchase agreement. Another provision in this agreement involves working together with the State, OKC, and the Tribes toward the adoption of a joint Water Conservation Plan. Next year’s budget includes funding to hire a Water Conservation Coordinator. This individual will develop and promote our Water Conservation Outreach Program that involves conducting residential irrigation audits, hosting classes, and performing additional public education—all designed to continually make our residents more aware of the critical need to conserve our finite water supply. General City services will continue to be supported by this fund through an allocation of $1,167,469 in ROW use fees.

Wastewater Fund This fund finances the City’s wastewater collection and treatment system. Our system includes over 450 miles of collection lines, 6 lift stations, the operation of the Coffee Creek Water Resource Recovery Facility (WRRF) and other facilities. Along with water rates,

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wastewater rates will also increase in the third year of the same five-year phased-in increase program (3%). All of the projects funded through the $43.5M 2016 bond issue have now been completed and are operational. These projects include the Spring Creek lift station replacements, the Spring Creek force main, the Water Resources Admin/Lab facility, the LS-2 (I-35 and 33rd) project which replaces the 33rd and 40th St. lift stations, and an interceptor project near 2nd and Santa Fe. The WRRF identified above required a $171M bond issue and should be completed late this year. This facility will increase plant capacity from 9 to 12 million gallons per day (MGD) and will meet the State-mandated nutrient removal requirements. An allocation of $755,302 In ROW use fees to support general City services will be provided by this fund.

Solid Waste Fund Collection and disposal services to over 33,000 residential customers and over 2,600 commercial customers are provided by this fund, supported entirely by user fees. The residential recycling program includes single-stream recycling, full-sized carts with lids and rollers, the acceptance of cardboard, and every other week curbside pickup. General City services are supported by this fund through an operating transfer, which in next year’s budget will be $383,979.

Drainage Fund The only source of revenue for this fund is a $3 monthly residential fee, which has always been inadequate and results in projects being accomplished by “pooling” sufficient revenue for two or more years. Consequently our Community Image/Forestry Dept. in the General Fund provides for the maintenance of City-owned detention areas.

Arcadia Fund Recreational opportunities at Arcadia Lake are provided through this fund, and the charges for services normally produce over $1.1M per year in revenue. Weather is usually the determining factor of the success or the lagging in Lake revenue. In FY 19-20, the Lake experienced a loss of around $400,000 revenue due to wet weather conditions. The pandemic coupled with good weather conditions created unprecedented usage at Arcadia Lake in FY 20-21. Activity generated nearly a quarter of a million dollars more than a normal year, or around $1.35M. Because of this increased usage no fund transfers are shown from the Park Tax Fund to help support the Lake in any of the five years of the Plan. Lake improvements will instead come directly from the Park Tax to support refurbishment within different parks and in future years for additional park amenities at Carl Reherman Park.

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People looked for ways to find safe ways to enjoy the outdoors and get some physical activity and the Lake provided a great getaway. For some citizens they discovered Arcadia Lake and we have seen continued strong interest as we enter the Spring season with early strong use of the campgrounds. What was considered normal levels of lake usage in past years appear to be jumping to a new level of activity. The recently completed improvements to create trail head parking access to the Spring Creek trail from a partnership with Integris from their Medical Office building parking lot and from the gate entrance at Spring Creek Park were heavily utilized. An additional 2.4 miles of trail along Route 66 is now open which connects our lake parks along Route 66 together. Staff and our design consultant are working on the possibility of a low water crossing to connect the Spring Creek trail to the Route 66 trail to create trail connective between most of our lake parks. We will be seeking grant support or community donations to make this next section of trail possible. It has become clear with the expanded interest in Arcadia Lake we need to spend additional resources on park maintenance since many of the improvements are original to the opening of the Lake. We are working on an aggressive multi-year program to upgrade many of the amenities we provide. A Task Force has been created to look at the services we provide and things we should consider making available. The Task Force includes all the various user groups working cooperatively on a vision and action plan for the Lake. The final element that is being consider is the design development of a remote Police Station which is being funded from the 2017 CIP Sales Tax for design development in FY 21-22. This new building will provide a more visible presence for the PD on the eastern side of Edmond.

Golf Course Fund Kickingbird Golf Course continues to be operated as an enterprise fund, in the sense that revenues cover operating expenses. Major capital expenditures must be subsidized from other funding sources such as the Park Tax or CIP Sales Tax funds. In the same manner as Arcadia Lake, weather always plays a critical role in course revenue. Extremely hot or wet weather can result in revenue declines that require subsidy support for operations. Like the Lake, the pandemic encouraged safe outdoor activities like playing golf. In the current budget the period from July 1 to March 31 generated 28,558 rounds of golf played compared to the prior year’s number of 26,856, a 6% increase that generated about $150,000 in additional revenue. Kickingbird Golf Club will soon enjoy its 50th Anniversary this Memorial Day weekend 2021. Kickingbird is the oldest golf course in the community and considered a great public golf course in the metro. A series of necessary very major capital projects are planned for the course that will help Kickingbird stay competitive and improve this significant public asset. At the request of the City Council, we have moved up the development of the Golf Course Clubhouse project. The new building is being designed to enhance the experience for the

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golf community, and yet the improvements will be more welcoming to other members of the community to enjoy the facility. A separate banquet hall will be developed by the Number 9 Green and provide a much better experience to our tournament guests, and the new hall can also serve as a public venue that can be rented out for other events. New golf practice areas will be developed with the project and those areas can be developed into short practice holes for young golfers and other family members to enjoy playing golf together. Finally, the driving range will be lengthened with plans to construct an indoor teaching facility on the range to provide year-round golf instruction. We are also pursuing the creation of a pavilion area near the clubhouse for a more relaxed driving range experience that provides a gaming experience similar to another facility in the metro that provides entertainment on their range. About every 20-25 years golf course greens need to be rebuilt. With the building of a new clubhouse it is appropriate, necessary and timely to accomplish the improvements out on the course to replace the irrigation system and rebuild the greens at the same time. Doing this work at the same time means the course will be closed from mid-June 2021 to the fall of 2022. When all the work is completed from all outward appearance, we will have a brand-new facility. With these improvements, our goal is to make the golf complex a great place to visit to enjoy a meal, the views of Edmond from the clubhouse, and take part in other activities hosted in the facility which might include playing some golf. We will also work to create a synergy between the development of the former tennis center into a premiere Pickleball facility. Another activity for families to enjoy at this complex. These improvement funds are coming from the 2000 CIP Sales Tax and are estimated to cost in the $17M range.

Park Tax Fund This fund is financed by the 1/8 cents sales tax for parks, and it has mainly been used for capital improvements within the park system and has also provided subsidy support for the golf course and the lake at different times over the last decade. This fund helps with smaller improvements throughout the Park system. Revenue generated from the Sales Tax provides $2.4M of which $1-1.5M is available annually for capital improvements or major maintenance activities. About $1.2M of this revenue goes for ongoing staffing and operating expenses in parks around Edmond. To fund a major construction project, it either must be built in phases or money allowed to accumulate in the fund to construct a large improvement. With additional CIP funding available from the 2000 and 2017 CIP Sales Tax, some major park improvements are planned from these sources. Many major park improvement projects are included in the CIP Fund sections described later in the narrative. Park Tax funds will also be leveraged as available for park or trail grant improvement projects. Various design consulting services are being paid from this fund to prepare projects so they can then be accomplished through the CIP funds. These include renovations to Stephenson Park, Hafer Park (Caplinger Field) and design work for the Veteran's Memorial planned in

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Bickham- Rudkin Park. Design work is proceeding for additional trail sections and potentially other Lake improvements 1) Trail to connect Spring Creek Trail to the Route 66 Trail; 2) From the west end of Spring Creek Trail extend west to Coltrane which we are calling the Creek Bend Trail; 3) Design of a trail head parking area on the west side of 1-35 Frontage Road in the Fox Lake area; and 4) Initiate the environmental assessment to look at possible locations for a restaurant and Police Lake Station at Arcadia Lake. This fund provides for the replacement and addition of playground ground equipment in all the City Parks. In next year’s budget the large handicapped accessible playground area near the Mitch Park YMCA has a budget of $350,000 towards replacement and expansion of that equipment working with the potential of a local service club assisting in that project. Our people continue to seek grant support from the State's Fishery Program for a boat ramp and dock in Carl Reherman Park with matching grant money set aside if funding is successful. Also, we are looking to identify a major funding source besides the Park Tax to do major restoration and improvement work all around the Lake in conjunction with the Arcadia Lake Task Force. The Park Tax fund in FY21-22 will provide some support in the Stephenson Park renovation project with $250,000 to help with amenities in the park such as tables, benches, and trash containers. The construction funds and playground improvements will come from the 2017 CIP Sales Tax. Because of the growth in activity at Arcadia Lake no transfers will be needed from this tax to the Lake in next year’s budget. A $100,000 transfer to the Golf Course will be made to help transition the course through the time it will be closed to help pay for the materials our people will use on the course in constructing improvements. Staff will continue to work with the Park Board in exploring opportunities identified in the Park Master Plan as the driver of future major capital projects.

Ambulatory Services Fund For many years Edmond has participated in the EMSA (Emergency Medical Services Authority) regional ambulance service, which has earned a longstanding national reputation for outstanding clinical care. A $3 monthly charge on residential utility bills has provided the City’s annual subsidy to EMSA for over 12 years, and many of the participating cities use such a charge as a way to take financial pressure off the General Fund. Out-of-pocket charges for the EMSACare program are covered by this charge. Our residents are automatically enrolled for participation, but can opt-out during the month of October every year. That decision involves substantial risk however, as those residents are then responsible for this large expense, which are now in the $1,500-$2,000 range. We remain pleasantly surprised that the $3 amount has not needed to be increased since it was initiated. We project the amount can be maintained for next year’s budget, and this situation is re-evaluated every year as part of the budget process.

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Capital Improvement Funds CIP—General Fund Included in the General Government budget in the General Fund, this fund provides limited capital funding for specific, smaller needs. This fund has been used for major renovations and repairs of City-owned buildings. In FY 19-20 we completed a joint project with the Metropolitan Library System (MLS) for replacement of the heating and air conditioning system, carpet and ceiling tile replacement and new LED lighting at the Edmond Library. This $2.1M project had a cost share of $1.45M from the City and $650,000 from the MLS. In this year’s budget we have just awarded a project to improve bicycle transportation along Ayers Street: east of the University to Broadway and west of the University to Bryant. The project includes dedicated Bike Lanes to and from the University along this street. The Project cost is $284,749 (Grant support $108,500 and City Share $176,289). The City will initially pay for the project and receive grant funds as a reimbursement. Another project that should bid soon involves increasing the meal-making capacity for Mobile Meals, which utilizes our City building on 5th Street. $200,000 is allocated in next year’s budget, but firm costs will be identified as the project goes to bid.

An allocation of $400,000 is budgeted in all five years of the Plan for ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) improvements to continue our efforts in our 20-Year ADA Transition Plan. In the current year we started a program to fill gaps in our sidewalk system where sidewalks need to be constructed to connect with existing sidewalks. The Plan contains $200,000 per year in all five years for this type of work. This fund has been used in the past for major building repairs for City property. As a precaution, we have set aside $100,000 only in next year’s budget to address any major building repairs that might need to be addressed quickly.

2000 Capital Improvement Fund This fund has provided the primary financing for capital improvements in Edmond for many years, through a 3/4 cent tax initially approved by the voters in 1996 and indefinitely extended in 2000. Over $110M in bonds have been issued through this fund over the past 20 years. Over $200 Million of construction work has be accomplished since its permanent adoption in 2000. CURRENT YEAR BUDGET FY 20-21 Every year the City has a major Reconstruction & Resurfacing program. About $3.5 million is set aside each year to reconstruct roadways and alleys around our community. About $2.5M is for asphalt type work and about $1M for concrete reconstruction. When street reconstruction is identified on a roadway, ADA issues are addressed along these adjacent roadways as part of our ADA transition plan. We add a 2.5% escalator to this lineitem in future budget years to try to keep up with inflation. The biggest project in the current year budget is the completion of the Covell widening from Fairfax to Griffen Boulevard. $8.6M will be expended in the current year of the $10 million total construction cost. The project will be completed this Spring.

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The Railroad Quiet Zone (a $4 million project) is now completed and involves improvements at all eleven city railroad crossings. The quiet zone is already having an impact on development opportunities along the corridor especially downtown with new investment and potential investment in multi-family housing and other mixed-use development. We have so many great projects proceeding in Downtown Edmond, a $1M allocation has been budgeted for Infrastructure Downtown, which will probably be used for various Streetscape or sidewalk improvements to complement other downtown private investment improvements. This year’s budget includes design work for Cross Timbers Facility Expansion and ADA Sidewalk Improvements along 2nd Street/Edmond Road from I-35 to the west City limits. The sidewalk work will address several issues identified in our 20-yr. ADA transition plan. The City is responsible for the design work cost of the project, but a grant will assist in the construction of the nearly $4M project with the City share being $1.75M.

DEBT SERVICE Many projects and activities are currently being pursued that could have a major impact on future debt issuance paid from this fund. Last year we advised and presented debt schedules that showed debt retirement of all the currently issued debt by FY 26-27. Debt service is the largest annual expense incurred in this fund. The annual sales tax receipts provide $14.5 million a year. The funds needed for the current year and budget year to service the principal and interest is around $8.3 million. (That represents around 57% of the collected sales tax for this fund.) That leaves $6.2 for other expenditures and as we noted above $3.5 goes to reconstruction of our streets and alleys. As a result not much is left for other activities. The debt service drops significantly in the remaining years of the Plan. The City Council recently approved an advance refunding of two bond issues which will reduce the amount of debt outstanding and have a positive impact on the debt schedule in the future years. The proposed budget identifies the issuance of $40M in new debt to be issued early in the year to try to lock-in a lower interest rate, as it appears that higher interest rates may be returning. The debt is needed to pay for some big projects that are coming. Last year an internal loan from Edmond Electric of $8M was used to finance some of the costs of the Covell widening from Fairfax to Griffen Boulevard which had a total price tag of around $10M, so part of the debt issuance is to pay back Edmond Electric. The big projects that are coming include Golf Course Improvements, Cross Timbers Facility Expansion and Kelly/Danforth Intersection. The attached Debt Schedule for the CIP reflects the change with the refunding. As noted earlier, the current year debt expenditure represents 57% of the sales tax we collect for the fund. The last line on the debt schedule shows how that percentage is dropping even with adding additional debt. Our goal in setting the future debt service is to have that represent 25-35% of the sales taxes collected. The current worksheets accomplish that in the five-year Plan. PROPOSED BUDGET FY 21-22 The third phase of the Intelligent Traffic System (ITS) should be included in ODOT’s bid letting at the beginning of the next budget. Total construction cost is around $8M and the

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City’s share of construction is $2.3M and involves 22 intersections on 15th Street from Santa Fe to I-35 and on Kelly from south City limits to Robin Hill. We have been able to secure grant support for a project that involves ADA Sidewalk and Ramp Improvements from on 2nd Street/Edmond Road from I-35 across town to the west city limits. The project financing was mentioned earlier. This project will have a significant positive impact on our 20-year ADA Transition Plan. We have had discussions about the level of improvement that should occur over various sections of Covell and have proceed to obtain design services of final buildout for these two remaining stages of the corridor with roadway and intersection improvements around Covell/Bryant and Covell/Coltrane. Each of these segments will be in the $15 million cost range. However, please remember that current demands for traffic and other improvements around the community compete for these same resources. Staff is recommending that we make the same type of interim improvements that we did at Covell/Bryant at Covell/Coltrane. The Bryant intersection has held up well and allows for the free flow of traffic. The same type of improvement can occur at Coltrane with a price tag in the $3 million range. Staff is recommending the Covell & Coltrane Interim Improvements, which could safely improve traffic flow through that area for at least a decade, until such time that the buildout of these final two sections on Covell can be included into the long-term plan for improvements. Kickingbird Golf Course Improvements involves the reconstruction of a new golf course clubhouse, a lengthened driving range, an indoor teaching facility on the range, an expanded golf practice area outside of the clubhouse and a separate banquet hall to serve golf tournaments or to be rented for other activities. This work and other planned work on the course has guided the closing of the course as mentioned earlier. This and the work to be done at the former tennis center will make the Kickingbird Golf and Pickleball Center a hub of activity for a large segment of Edmond’s population. The final project involves the Cross Timbers Expansion of the maintenance facility. $6M is set aside for this work. The current facility has now been in operation for 16 years, and all City support facilities take more staff and equipment to meet the needs of a growing city. The Cross Timbers facility needs this expansion work to keep pace with Edmond’s growth.

FUTURE YEAR BUDGETS There are not a lot of projects identified in the final two years of the Plan, which leaves resources for other projects. If the 4th High School moves forward in this time frame most of those resources would be needed for that project. Growing sales tax collections does not preclude the issuance of additional debt in the future and this could be layered in with the proposed $40 million debt issuance. Because of grant adjustments administered through ACOG, expanding the capacity of intersections does not result in the same type of financial support that it did in previous grant cycles, meaning that our intersection improvements will need to be fully funded by the City in future years.

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The first project that has been impacted by these adjustments involves the Kelly/Danforth Intersection improvement. This project is now a $6.25M project because we have been unable to secure grant support for the project. This intersection has the highest number of accidents in Edmond, and restricting turn movements near the intersection will be a big part of the project along with adding more turn lanes to increase the capacity of this intersection. This project needs to follow the major waterline project on Danforth that goes through this intersection. Right-of-way acquisitions have been coordinated with that project to assist in the intersection work that needs to be done. This project can proceed in year two of the Plan after the waterline is completed and the utility services are relocated during the coming budget year. Other future work includes a new Golf Maintenance Building, Danforth Road Widening by North High School, and development of the Veteran’s Memorial. Funds are identified for the Memorial are a placeholder because final scope and future fundraising are yet to occur. We have also identified the Sooner Road Bridge replacement in year 5, if the interim improvements continue to be sufficient for regular traffic loads until that time.

2017 Capital Improvement Fund In 2016 voters approved a repurposing of the 2012 Public Safety Center half-cent sales tax for a ten-year period for capital projects that started in April of 2017. A Citizens Task Force identified many projects for consideration using these funds. The CIP Advisory Board was then expanded to include members of this task force, and this Board now reviews and makes recommendations for projects for both capital improvement sales tax funds. Both funds are utilized to address the 11 bullet-pointed project recommendations that came out of the task force discussions. Those projects are listed below, and a status note is provided. • City Streets Road Improvements to alleviate traffic congestion (many ongoing projects) • Tennis Center in partnership with Edmond Public Schools (COMPLETED) • Expanded and Improved Sports Facilities (These projects are proceeding to construction: Hafer Park Ballfields, Soccer Complex Renovations and Golf Course Clubhouse and Course improvements) • Downtown Revitalization including potential new library, performing arts center in partnership with UCO and parking garage (A second Library is being pursued) • Public Transportation Enhancement and Intermodal Center (COMPLETED Bus stop improvements and starting to look at possible transit center development) • Expanded and Improved Park System (Stephenson Park Renovation proceeding to construction) • Expanded and Improved Trail System (COMPLETED Route 66 trail at Lake and Access to Trail Head Parking at Integris and Spring Creek Park) • New Fire Station West of Broadway (COMPLETED) and Renovation of Existing Fire Stations (getting started with architect selection to move it forward) • Animal Shelter Addition (COMPLETED) • Consolidation of City offices (Working this with a plan to repurpose buildings not needed by the City in a Request for Proposal along the Littler Corridor) • Police Lake House Replacement (Baffling removed from the list)(Looking at architect selection for the Station project)

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Gracelawn Cemetery Expansion is the only new project that was added to the list (It is nearly completed)

CURRENT YEAR BUDGET FY20-21 This fund has already completed three of the major projects from the Task Force list noted above: Relocation of Fire Station #2, Joint Tennis Center with Edmond Public Schools and the expansion of the Animal Shelter. Construction on the expansion of the Gracelawn Cemetery should be completed by the end of Spring. Bidding on the Traffic Signals at I-35 and Covell has been completed and should be ready for construction this Summer. The 2nd and Bryant Intersection project has been awarded and is under construction with a Spring/Summer completion scheduled for next year.

PROPOSED BUDGET FY 21-22 Next year’s budget will provide major renovation work to our oldest City park, Stephenson Park, and initiate major improvements to sports fields at Hafer Park and the Service-Blake Soccer Complex. The Stephenson Park improvements are intended to refresh the park and make it a place that people will congregate to enjoy the amenities of the park and surrounding businesses as part of the downtown redevelopment. Significant private investment around the park in the coming years will provide a significant number of new living units near the Park. The park improvements will have a much larger playground for children, an expanded lawn area for people to create their own outdoor activities and a new pavilion to serve as a focal point for people to visit and relax as they experience this area of downtown. Improvements will start late in the summer and should be ready for full enjoyment by next Spring. Major renovation work will begin in the proposed budget year at the Service-Blake Soccer complex with a focus on new restrooms, concession area, visitor pavilion and a new inviting entrance to the facility. We often refer to making improvements at our athletic facilities to upgrading them to “tournament quality” and this complex needs that type of attention. Five million dollars is budgeted over two budget years to make these improvements to the facility. An initial phase of work at Hafer Park will begin to improve the quality of the baseball complex known as Caplinger Fields. Those improvements will add additional parking, ball field improvements on part of the complex and shade structures for the fans. Improving the fan amenities at the ball fields will make them more comfortable for our citizen experience, but will also be more attractive for out-of-town visitors to bring their son or daughter to play at our tournament quality complex. We believe design work will be initiated on a 2nd Public Library that would better serve the eastern side of Edmond. Once a location is finalized the City would work with the Metropolitan Library System to develop a building plan. Library services are very important to our citizens as our present Library has ranked as the most utilized not only in the metro,

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but the State of Oklahoma. Once the land is acquired a schedule for design and construction can be finalized. Two other projects should begin the design phase in next year’s budget, including both 15th and Kelly to improve the capacity of the intersection and the Police Arcadia Lake Station to provide a more visible presence at the Lake and for an ever-expanding East Edmond.

Future Year Budgets As noted earlier, grant adjustments administered through ACOG such as expanding the capacity of intersections does not garner the same type of grant support that it did in previous grant cycles, so our intersection improvements will need to be fully funded by the City in future years. Work is planned at Sooner and Danforth along with the construction improvements at 15th and Kelly. The lack of grant support does not allow us to leverage those grant dollars to address additional roadwork in the community. Upon the completion of the construction of 2nd and Bryant Intersection improvement, work will be initiated at 2nd and Boulevard. Projects like this take a year or more for right-of-way acquisition and utility relocations. Because we do not have an abundance of right-of-way each utility has to be brought in individually to decrease the congestion and allow traffic to flow during their relocation process. Construction of this intersection improvement is scheduled to begin in the second year of the Plan. With the completion of the design, the Police Arcadia Lake Station will be constructed as noted in future budget years. The other public safety expenditures include the Fire Station Renovations which will initially be financed through Fire Department funds and then reimbursed upon completion in future budget years.

CITYLINK Public Transportation Fund Edmond’s public transportation service will celebrate its 12th year in the 21-22 budget. This service includes four local routes, an express route to and from OKC, and on-demand paratransit service available within three-quarters of a mile within the city limits from the fixed routes. CITYLINK and other transportation systems throughout the area have experienced ridership declines of 50% or more due to the COVID pandemic. However, it is important to remember that our service continues to provide an important public service to Edmond with around 188,355 rides in 2020. CITYLINK has been at full service throughout most of the pandemic and recently has seen the ridership returning to levels pre-pandemic, especially the paratransit service. Our partnership with Tyler Outdoor Advertising continues as we install ADA-compliant bus benches or shelters along our routes with a second phase of installing additional shelters at high ridership stops beginning this budget year which will continue adding additional revenue. Our system continues to benefit from outsourcing fleet maintenance operations to RATP Dev in 2017. The City of Edmond is in the process of reviewing proposals from qualified and professional transit management companies to operate, maintain and administer the CITYLINK service starting this next budget year. FTA regulations require the City of

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Edmond to seek proposals for an operator and maintenance provider every 7 years maximum. The contract is expected to be in place on July 1, 2021. The 21-22 budget includes the City’s 20% match with federal funds to purchase equipment for fleet maintenance, and upgrades to the existing maintenance facility. These funds will continue to improve the maintenance of all CITYLINK vehicles and improve efficiency by reducing “deadhead” miles for such situations. Additionally, the City of Edmond has been awarded $254,070 from the Oklahoma Department of Transportation Office of Mobility and Public Transit, to replace two buses in our fleet in our next budget year. The CARES Act funding for COVID-19 provided approximately $2M that enable the City to support the capital, operating, and other expenses, including those related to the preparation for, and response to, COVID-19. CITYLINK continued operating on all our routes including the Broncho Link during the pandemic. CITYLINK has also recently been awarded additional federal funds in the amount of $635,885 from the American Rescue Plan Act for COVID-19 relief. These funds will again assist CITYLINK in providing full service to all routes. As a result of this temporary funding, next year’s CITYLINK projected budgeted revenues total $2,482,442 which is broken down into $400,000 from the General Fund and $2,082,442 in federal and state funding. The possibility of regional commuter rail service in central Oklahoma continues to gain traction through the Regional Transit Authority (RTA). This group is working with the consulting firm of Holmes & Associates in considering regional funding options to provide a fixed guideway transit system that will initially serve the six original partnership communities of Edmond, Oklahoma City, Norman, Midwest City, Del City and Moore. James Boggs is our Edmond representative on the RTA and he is a dedicated and enthusiastic advocate of this concept and is serving our community’s interests very well. The Board is working with Kimley-Horn to select locally preferred alternatives and routes for the system.

Art in Public Places Fund Public art in Edmond is financed through this fund. This program features an impressive public/private partnership in the form of a dollar-for-dollar match for up to $30,000 for a single piece of art. This program began in 2002, and there are 254 total pieces that have been acquired, mainly located in local parks or along local streets. Next year’s funding request from the Edmond Visual Arts Commission VAC is for $250,000, which is larger than previous years, in anticipation of both a large private donation and the potential of sculpture park on private land at 2nd and Coltrane that would eventually be donated to the City (their letter is included in Appendix ). For comparison purposes, last year the EVAC request was a reduced amount of $90,000 in recognition of the pandemic. Also included is a $3,000 allocation for administrative expenses associated with the program through the City Clerk’s office. Hospital Trust Fund The proceeds from the City’s 1982 sale of the hospital facility now known as OU Medical Center Edmond and a portion of the accrued interest are included in this fund. A public vote

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is required for spending any of the principal amount. In 2011 voters approved a provision that allowed these funds to be loaned to provide interim financing for City projects. We believe this fund should be considered as a possible source of temporary funding for capital projects in future years.

Real Property Fund This fund was created to purchase property to be utilized by the City using some of the interest from the above Hospital Trust Fund. In the next budget year this fund balance is projected to be $127,805. CDBG Fund The City’s Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program is operated through this fund, and Edmond is designated as an “entitlement community” for this federal program since our population is over 50,000. The only funds spent are those that are actually received. Edmond received a total of $740,808 from the CARES allocation in 2020 in addition to the annual allocation of $484,433. The City’s CDBG program quickly awarded funds to those approved public social agencies that provide a wide range of assistance throughout the City. With those funds the programs have assisted approximately 5,000 individuals and still counting. The City of Edmond’s allocation for next year will be $519,833, about a 1% increase from the current year. We also have $100,000 from a previous year’s award for a total of $619,833 for next year’s budget.

Visit Edmond Fund The revenue available for this fund is the 4% Hotel Tax generated by 15 Edmond hotels. COVID-19 has drastically affected this funding due to critically low hotel occupancy. Advertising has paused and expenses have been lowered in order to help balance this budget. In 2020, an additional $65,000 was allocated from the General Fund to supplement this fund and ensure an adequate reserve fund balance. A citizens committee suggested adding short-term rentals as an additional income source for this fund. Our Lodging Tax Ordinance 3.12.010 was updated to include an agreement with the Oklahoma Tax Commission to collect 4% lodging tax from short-term rentals as well as Edmond hotels that will begin in July, 2021. A potential 1% increase of the Lodging Tax to realign it with surrounding cities in our region is also being considered. Increased funding would enable the Visit Edmond to actively market Edmond to new visitors, increase grant support for new events and attract more sports tournaments, conferences, meetings and leisure travelers.

Employee Pension Fund This self-funded program includes all City employees except uniformed police and fire personnel and the City Manager, and the projected contributions are identified in the individual fund budgets. The City’s annual contribution rate is determined by an independent actuary hired by the Employee Pension Board.

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In the current budget the employee contribution rate was increased from 5.25% to 6% at mid-year, the first increase in the employee rate in over 30 years. This was done in partial recognition of the City’s rate continuing to increase, which this year is 11%. For many years both the City rate and the employee rate were the same 5.25%. Next year’s budget includes the actuarial recommendation to increase the City’s rate to 11.5%. The employee rate will remain at 6%.

Human Resources A comprehensive report from HR Director Lisa Goodpasture in the attachment behind the “Personnel” tab provides detailed information concerning the activities of this department. I am recommending a 1.5% cost-of-living (COLA) increase for all non-union employees in next year’s budget, pending the results of a current benchmark study as identified in the first page of Lisa’s report. Appropriate funding has been included in the various departments for this increase. The police and fire unions are both in the second year of four-year Collective Bargaining Agreements. We are fortunate to be one of the few cities that have four-year agreements, and the only city in Oklahoma. The length of these contracts is strong evidence of the good working relationship that exists between management and labor in both of these departments. I am also recommending approval of the additional positions identified in Lisa’s material as recommended by the Employee Personnel Review Committee. A total of 21 new positions will address a wide variety of needs in continuing to provide exceptional public services for our growing community, including 10 public safety positions. The number of new positions is larger than we have had in recent years, including this year with the pandemic, and we will now have 810 full-time positions in our City of Edmond organization. Included in these new positions is the City’s first Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Officer. We have had an internal DEI Committee for several years, and Inclusion was added three years ago as our eighth internal Core Value. I believe it is now appropriate for our organization to have a full-time individual who will lead and coordinate the City’s efforts, including working closely with the DEI Committee, in this initiative. It is important to remind you and all our residents that recommendations to add new positions are very thoroughly scrutinized by both the Committee and me. Lisa’s information includes a graph that compares new City positions with Edmond’s growth in population over the last six years, and you can see from that information that there is a close correlation between these two numbers.

Employee Group Insurance Fund The City’s self-funded health insurance program remains one of the major employment benefits for full-time and some part-time employees . Lisa’s report identifies the details of

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our program. The City’s plan is based on a calendar year instead of a fiscal year, which includes halves of two budget years. I am pleased to report that our program is now balanced for all five years of the Plan, which is a positive step forward from the negative balances in the last two years of the current Plan. The Employee Health Insurance Committee is a good partner in working with management and our health care consultant by taking joint ownership of the plan and being aware of the economic challenges of providing health care in today’s environment. Another major benefit for our employees is the Employee Health Clinic, which has been in operation for the last seven years. The clinic has been managed and staffed by our thirdparty partner (Care ATC). This has been very popular with our employees, their dependents and retirees covered by our insurance plan. More detailed information is available in Lisa’ report. The Clinic’s impact on the wellness of our employees remains an ongoing focus.

Conclusion The City of Edmond continues to be proud of the professionalism, transparency, and openness of our budget process. Our internal culture remains focused on the reality that the City of Edmond exists to provide services. I continue to be blessed by having the privilege to work with outstanding women and men in our organization. Respectfully submitted,

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Strategic Plan – Initiatives, Goals and Objectives Strategic planning is a process for continuous improvement within the City of Edmond. A common vision for staff is identified through our strategic plan. Our current strategic initiatives were developed leading up to the commencement of fiscal year 2018. This was the year that our current strategic planning process began to take shape. The City of Edmond has 12 key strategic initiatives that align practices of various departments. Departments take ownership in setting goals that achieve these initiatives. Each quarter, progress reports are developed to communicate success of departments on their goals. We strive to make it an inclusive process, sharing information with all employees and encouraging feedback from staff in setting departmental goals. Strategic Initiatives are the consistent priorities identified within the City. Goals are the projects or benchmarks identified to achieve those strategic initiatives on a departmental level. Objectives are the individual steps identified to achieve departmental goals. The following pages list the 12 key strategic initiatives and the goals that the Strategic team developed with the assistance with staff across the city departments. To find what each department is working on to achieve these city wide initiatives, review the individual department pages as there is a list of goals and performance measures to let you know that each department is stepping up to the bar and working to accomplish the City has laid out in this plan.

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Economic Development – Revitalize and encourage development of commercial areas. Goal 2013 Water & Wastewater Master Plan project will maximize the area served along the I35 & 33rd corridor and be completed by the end of calendar year 2019. Continue implementation of the 2014 Downtown Master Plan.

Determine future of city owned property on Littler Street in downtown.

Objectives 1. Reduce the number of lift stations in the system by replacing the 33rd and 40th lift stations into one new lift station. 2. Work with developers, landowners, and the Boys Ranch to maximize the areas served by the new lift station. 1. Assess efficacy of a Downtown Management Organization funded by a Business Improvement District. 2. Expand the Central Business District zoning area south along Boulevard. 3. Implement initial recommendations from 2020 Downtown Parking Plan. 4. Initiate a Tax Increment Finance district 5. Initiate process for designing and constructing a transit center. 6. Modify the Site Plan process to make it more transparent and easier to use. 7. Update and modernize the Downtown Design Guidelines 8. Update CBD and DRD to eliminate unintended challenges and provide more distinction between those zoning districts. 1. Request for Interest (RFI) Distributed. 2. Select firms to interview from submitted RFIs. If more than 4-5 submittals, short list interviews to 3-4 firms. 3. Release Request for Proposal (RFP) based on the defined scope developed during the RFI process. 4. Evaluation of submitted RFPs and prepare recommendation to City Council. 5. City Council to decide to accept or reject recommendation- If accepted proceed to have a development agreement prepared. 6. Acceptance of Development Agreement.

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Department(s) Lead: Water Resources

Lead: Planning & Zoning Support: City Manager’s Office

Lead: City Manager’s Office

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Economic Development – Support commercial and residential development through improving the review process. Goals

Objectives

Improve Building & Fire Code Service's team member communication with the Site Plan Review Team to clarify requirements and expectations for all departments involved with the site plan process.

1. Identify and correct contradicting codes and ordinances between departments. 2. Create a process for correcting the contradictions. 3. Identify which departments need to be involved. 4. Schedule a round table discussion on how to identify and correct contradictions. 5. Set up a series of meetings over time to work on issue.

Department(s) Lead: Building Services

Environmental Stewardship – Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior through public education and outreach to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in land fill waste. Goals

Objectives

Digitize records, applications, permits, licenses, etc. and clear out expired records.

1. Clear out expired records. 2. Develop staff skills with Laserfiche records management system. 3. Digitize all non-permanent records We will expand upon current public 1. Promote outdoor water conservation with at education and outreach methods least one weekly social media post between June for encouraging water conservation and September. efforts within the City of Edmond, 2. Create four redesigned study guides using OSUspecific to outdoor watering. OKC Extension fact sheets. 3. Staff will create three new commercials/PSAs to support the department goal. 4. Create General Production Schedule Develop a responsible water use 1. Educational Programming specifically for largest and water conservation educational outdoor water users. program that will increase the 2. Educational programming through community efficiency and long-term meetings, workshops, and site visits. sustainability of Edmond water 3. Public Service Announcement Campaign resources by reducing peak 4. Responsible Water Use Advisory Group outdoor water use by 10% through 5. Simple Irrigation Audit Program 2022. Implement a program to divert 1. Prepare staging area to receive woody debris. internal tree debris from the landfill 2. Acquire roll-off dumpster and towards reuse of the material. 3. Develop outline for policy and terms with vendor for reuse of tree debris. 4. Implement collection of woody debris and transport to wood chip facility

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Department(s) City Clerk’s Office

Lead: Marketing Support: Water Resources

Lead: Water Resources Support: Marketing

Lead: Urban Forestry Support: Public Works, Parks & Recreation

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Environmental Stewardship – Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior through public education and outreach to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in land fill waste. Goals

Objectives

Department(s)

Simplification of Locating Records within Finance.

1. Reduce Paper Documentation and increase electronic storage vs manual and/or paper storage.

Lead: Finance

Coordinate City’s Sustainability Projects

1. Coordinate Action Plan on Community Garden 2. Coordinate Action Plan on Conservation Easements 3. Coordinate with Departments on Sustainability Marketing 4. Update Website to include Sustainability Metrics

Lead: Planning

Digitize current records that are retained in paper form and ensure implementation of electronic alternatives for future use.

1. Scan all files currently kept in paper form to Permanent Document Storage Solution. 2. Destroy all scanned non-permanent and closed case files in compliance with the Cities Records Retention Policy. 3. Implementation of online payments, forms, & case information will significantly improve department efficiency and reduce daily call volume. Successful Implementation of eTicketing Software will significantly improve department efficiency while reducing data entry errors. 1. Create a secure digital signature on line application. This will save time and paper for our customers and help us reach our "Go paperless" goal. 2. Promote our ecity web portal to encourage customers to enroll in "ebills" and auto draft. Reducing file cabinet space by adding applications to CIS and the S-Drive

Use less paper while offering customers access to online options such as payments, contracts, etc.

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Support: Parks & Recreation, City Manager’s Office, Marketing, Sustainability Committee Lead: Municipal Court Support: Information Technology, Police Department

Lead: Utility Customer Service Support: Information Technology, Marketing

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Environmental Stewardship – Protect our natural resources through promotion and enhancement of green infrastructure. Goals Support the Urban Forestry Commission's development of a Residential landscape ordinance proposal. Implement a program to deter illegal dumping.

Objectives

Department(s)

1. Receive feedback from applicable City boards. 2. Deliver the proposal to City Council.

Lead: Urban Forestry

1. Determine procedures and criteria for camera placement and use. 2. Begin assessment of pilot program. 3. Begin formal program. Assign key contact personnel.

Lead: Code Enforcement

Support: City Attorney

Support: Solid Waste, Police Department, City Attorney

Financial Responsibility – Promote fiscal stability by increasing efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring internal and external financial partnerships. Goals Improve HR efficiency and effectiveness by automating and streamlining processes, reducing manual/paper transactions and administrative time.

Upgrade software that communicates with other departments and reduces manual entries to increase efficiencies and mitigate costs Continue AMI project implementation

Objectives 1. Continued implementation of Novatime-City Wide. 2. Refresh HR Applicant & New Hire Forms 3. Implementation of Human Resource Information System (HRIS). A stand alone, all-in-one system that includes payroll and Employee Online 4. Develop an HR Form Retention Policy and a document retention strategy. 1. Evaluate current software limitations and issues 2. Identify software requirements 3. Research other courts software for comparison 4. Implement New Case Management Software 5. Implement New Document Storage Solution 6. Implement New eTicketing Software 7. Implement New Payment Solution Software 1. Ensure rate codes are accurate on accounts for billing. Compare manual reads with data received via MDM for accuracy. 2. Begin full deployment of meters city-wide. 3. MDM and AMI field communication systems in place in the pilot area. Testing to confirm software is communicating with each other. Meters installed in pilot area.

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Department(s) Lead: Human Resources Support: Information Technology

Lead: Municipal Court Support: Information Technology, Police Department Lead: Edmond Electric Support: Information Technology, Water Resources, Field Services, Marketing

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Financial Responsibility – Promote fiscal stability by increasing efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring internal and external financial partnerships. Goals

Objectives

Department(s)

To obtain multiple lines of insurance 1. Risk Mgmt. will obtain multiple lines of insurance from A-rated insurance companies with acceptable limits of coverage and minimal with the lowest deductible/ deductibles/retentions. retention available with the best 2. Risk will seek approval of all lines of insurance price. with the City Attorney, City Manager, and City Council. Development of New Budget Book Guidelines

Lead: Risk Management

Ecity upgrades will need to be installed to complete full functionality of enhancements for us to be able to continue promoting and marketing to our customers. Increase Visit Edmond's financial resources and support for events coming to Edmond.

Lead: Utility Customer Service

Utilize Technology, current research and grant opportunities to ensure efficient and effective operations and services.

Timely maintenance and completeness of the general ledger.

1. Increase participation which will reduce Lobby traffic. Faster receipt of Customer statements and payments. 1. Realign City Ordinance, Short Term Rental Agreements & Lodging Tax 2. Sponsorship Guidelines and Application - Create a sponsorship program with guidelines and an application 3. Visit Edmond Grant Program Review - Evaluate current guidelines and make adjustments as needed based on feedback from event partners and the Visit Edmond Tourism Advisory Board. 1. Transition fully to Lexipol online platform for policies and procedures. 2. Consider changing to online virtual training for medical recertification requirements. 3. Implement Operative IQ software for inventory of apparatus, EMS equipment, and tracking of narcotics. 4. Re-evaluate Polycom platform feasibility. Consider moving to less costly technology which hs become available. 5. Transition to the use of inspection software or an online application for Fire Prevention inspections 6. Utilize Microsoft 365 and available applications to improve internal operations. 7. Transition to ESO patient care reporting. 1. We will create new processes and workbooks for reconciliation and budgeting to better ensure the timely maintenance of the general ledger.

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Support: City Attorney Lead: Finance

Support: Information Technology, Marketing Lead: Visit Edmond Support: Marketing, City Manager’s Office, City Clerk’s Office, Finance

Lead: Fire Department Support: Information Technology

Lead: Finance

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High Performing Government - Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization. Goals Expand the existing Animal Shelter to meet the current and future needs of the City of Edmond.

HR Staff will cross train to be knowledgeable, proficient, and timely in performing the top 18 Service Actions requested by employees. Improve communication within department.

Improve communication and collaboration within the City Attorney's Office and with the City Council, and the City's Boards and Commissions and other departments

Objectives

Department(s)

1. Identification of stakeholders and their inclusion in all phases of the project to ensure successful design and construction of the Animal Services Shelter expansion. 2. Selection and contracting with architectural firm for the project. 3. Completion of survey of existing facilities. 4. Development and approval of schematic design of project. 5. Development and approval of design development documents. 6. Development and approval of construction documents. 7. Bidding and selection of contractor for the project. 8. Construction of the project. 9. Completion of the project and opening of the new facility. 1. All HR staff will Cross Train on four (4) new Service Actions by 12/31/2020.

Lead: Police Department

1. Establish a "Formal" staff meeting with the department to communicate and discuss issues that have come within the department. 2. Communicate issues that are taking place or are coming up with other departments and with the City in general. 3. Discuss continuous improvement ideas and strategies to enhance the functions of the department. 1. At least on a weekly basis, hold one on one meetings with members of the City Attorney's staff to discuss goals and expectation and organizational news. 2. Hold at least one annual general training session with the new police officers to assist them in performing their duties. 3. Conduct at least two annual training sessions with the Human Resources department for supervisory employees on topics relevant to staff development. 4. Hold at least monthly meetings with the Planning Dept. and Municipal Court to ensure all parties are aware of and working to solve current challenges/problems.

Lead: City Attorney

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Support: Finance, Engineering, Information Technology, Public Works, Planning

Lead: Human Resources

Lead: City Attorney Support: City Clerk’s Office, Risk Management, Police Department, Human Resources, Municipal Court, Planning

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High Performing Government - Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization. Goals Improve communication throughout the department.

Improve communication and morale in all divisions of the parks and recreation department.

Reduce the amount of administrative time spent per code violation addressed.

Update Construction Standards

Improve Customer Service by reducing phone call wait times and abandoned calls. Increase capability and ensure that all Departments can contact employees during emergency or crisis situations. Update resource survey in Emergency Operations Plan in collaboration with other City Departments. Provide dependable and secure Mail Room operation. Develop an online interactive app that will assist City staff and the public in identifying Edmond’s Watersheds and the current Regulatory Floodplains

Objectives

Department(s)

1. As needed, hold departmental staff meeting with all staff to outline non-construction projects and lay out near term goals. 2. Conduct follow-up as needed to address items from Employee Survey and break out sessions. 1. Give more recognition and praise by celebrating our successes. 2. Improve communication with employees in regards to decisions that affect their work and at times ask for their input. 3. Set clear expectations through consistent coaching, mentoring and evaluation of employees. 1. Develop notifications options that can be done in the field. 2. Get "dark side" letters into system as a standard letter option 3. Track voluntary compliance achieved through educations resources 1. Update existing construction standards. 2. Publish applicable standards online for developer access. 3. Provide access to field crews. 1. Use Cisco to accurately capture available/unavailable status. 2. Reduce abandoned calls due to extended wait times. 3. Reduce amount of time “Not Ready” 1. Conduct an annual call down drill where departments contact all employees when instructed to do so. Contact appropriate City Departments to determine resources available.

Lead: Edmond Electric

1. Continue to cross train and exercise procedures for back-up operational support

Lead: Code Enforcement

1. Work with IT to complete remaining edits to online app. 2. Create content for new webpage. 3. Work with Marketing to create new webpage and design elements for new app. 4. Publish webpage and new app after “Letter of Determination” has been received prompting the COE to adopt the new floodplains maps from FEMA.

Lead: Engineering

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Lead: Parks & Recreation

Lead: Code Enforcement

Lead: Edmond Electric

Lead: Municipal Court Support: Public Safety Communications Lead: Emergency Management Support: All Departments

Support: Information Technology, Marketing

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High Performing Government - Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization. Goals

Objectives

Department(s)

Establish New Hire Training Program

1. Informational session at the WRRF 2. Visit other Water Resources Facilities

All HR staff will develop a ‘How To’ book on their key tasks/duties, allowing others to utilize the book to perform core duties for staff that are absent. Update hazard annexes in collaboration with other City Departments.

1. All HR staff to develop a ‘How To’ book outlining steps to perform their core tasks by 09/30/2020.

Support: Human Resources Lead: Human Resources

1. Contact all City Departments establishing expectations.

Lead: Emergency Management

Further unify brand marks.

1. Pursue the process of creating a new city flag. Collaborate with Visit Edmond and Planning Department to create wayfinding plan.

Collaborate with the City Clerk's Office to develop a revised Records Retention Policy for the City of Edmond. Develop and carry out employee trainings regarding website updates and Sharepoint usage. Increase/improve communication between SPRT and within our department as well; keep people in the loop on major issues, be aware of whose projects are whose, etc.

Collaborate with Marketing department on a regular basis to optimize water conservation messaging to residents

2. Upon City Clerk’s Office drafting of a revised municipal records retention policy, will ensure compliance with statutory requirements. 1. Hold one Sharepoint training class for department editors to enhance their pages on the new Ednet. 3. Host one-on-one website trainings with department editors to expand pool of people making updates. 1. Amend the workflow to create a better process for review and improve level of communication. 2. Evaluate/assess the workflow in our department. and SPRT departments (individually meet) 3. Meet with departments again to discuss results of poll. 2. Poll each department based off of input, to determine if/where the miscommunication is occurring. 1. Coordinate on messages and alert sent to Edmond Residents. 2. Establish monthly meeting with Marketing to collaborate on Water Conservation Program efforts. 3. Implement Water Resources Facebook page 1. Vehicle wraps for Lab vehicles (Nissan Leaf)

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Lead: Water Resources

Support: All Departments Lead: Marketing Support: Planning, Visit Edmond Lead: City Attorney Support: City Clerk’s Office Lead: Marketing Support: Information Technology, All Departments Lead: Planning Support: Engineering, Public Works, Edmond Electric, Water Resources, Urban Forestry Lead: Water Resources Support: Marketing

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High Performing Government - Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization. Goals

Objectives

Department(s)

Continue to improve communications among all divisions of the department

2. Fire Chief will visit stations to discuss strategic planning goals and progress on annual plan of action. 3. Deputy Chiefs will visit stations to discuss updates to current and upcoming projects and to gather information as needed. 4. Battalion Chiefs will visit stations to review company performance goals, pass on departmental information and to train with crews as needed. 5. EMS Chief/Staff will visit stations to review documentations of EMS incidents, provide company training and quality assurance during actual incidents. 6. Fire Prevention Chief/Staff will visit stations to discuss prevention and public education topics and for further collaboration with suppression. 7. Training Chief/Staff will visit stations to gather information from suppression on future training needs and assist with company level training as needed. 4. Fire Chief and Deputy Chief will hold regular meetings with the staff from each division to continue working on important continuous improvement projects and objectives.

Lead: Fire Department

High Performing Government - Recruit, retain, and develop a skilled, diverse, and inclusive workforce. Goals Ensure Public Safety Dispatchers, Call Takers, and Supervisors maintain and expand skill levels while having the opportunity to learn new methods, theories, and technologies.

Objectives 1. All PS Dispatchers, Call Takers and Supervisors receive at least 24 hours of recurring training each evaluation year. Ensure candid performance management dialogue and timely step increases. Ensure that service meets established standards. 2. All department supervisors attend at least one BUILD session per year.

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Department(s) Lead: Public Safety Communications Support: Human Resources

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High Performing Government - Recruit, retain, and develop a skilled, diverse, and inclusive workforce. Goals Develop and implement a comprehensive approach to workforce recruitment that attracts and retains the best qualified candidate, resulting in a skilled, diverse, engaged work force that meets the present and future needs of the City of Edmond. Provide staff with adequate training opportunities, enact a training program for new hires, and cross train so that all duties have at least one trained backup. We will support efforts to recruit and retain quality employees by creating and enhancing employee enrichment opportunities and promoting organizational culture. Develop Internal Departmental Training

Centralize departmental policy and procedure manuals.

Increase Communication, build rapport and gain knowledge with other Departments by providing opportunities for additional training (cross training) which we are scheduling weekly and holding open meetings (monthly) where ideas and concerns can be discussed.

Objectives

Department(s)

1. In partnership with Marketing, create content to revamp the Human Resources (HR) website to place more focus on our organizational culture and benefits of working for the city. 2. In partnership with Marketing, create content for testimonial video(s) with employees to promote workplace culture. 3. City of Edmond, Benefits flyer (Infographic) to be placed on the HR website 1. Create a policies and procedure manual. 2. Encourage all staff become certified by OMCCA. 3. Create a training program for new hires.

Lead: Human Resources

1. Create video pieces to promote the workplace culture and benefits. 2. Improve HR website to put more focus on our organizational culture and benefits of working for the city. 1. Annually, conduct: A minimum of three internal field training exercises, a minimum of one cross departmental training exercise, and a minimum of one cross departmental emergency response table top exercise. 1. Arrange and refine information for compliance. 2. Collaborate with IT for accessibility. 3. Conduct training workshops within the department. 4. Generate internal central location for gathered material. 1. Rotating new hires for a field day with USR / Meter Staff and a SW driver. 2. Schedule Departments (water, electric, fire, police, risk mgmt, etc) to discuss how UCS can improve our interdepartmental communication and learn more about the specific departments. 3. Conduct monthly department meetings with open invitations for USR/ Meter and office staff to discuss strategies for improvement. 4. Crosstrain with other areas within UCS. Timing will be based on the current need for the training. 5. Provide each team member the opportunity to participate in skill enhancement training and training classes offered in AED/CPR; Safe Driving: Hazardous office materials etc.

Lead: Marketing

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Support: Marketing

Lead: Municipal Court Support: Human Resources

Support: Human Resources Lead: Edmond Electric

Lead: Building Services

Lead: Utility Customer Service Support: Solid Waste, Water Resources, Edmond Electric, Fire Department, Police Department, Risk Management

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High Performing Government - Recruit, retain, and develop a skilled, diverse, and inclusive workforce. Goals

Objectives

Provide a meaningful and relevant training opportunity to every member of Finance Department. The Edmond Police Department property room will become accredited by the International Association for Property and Evidence (IAPE).

Develop Improvement Opportunity Program for Employees Improve Communication within Departments Work on Continuous Improvement

Department(s) Lead: Finance

1. Review current facilities, practices and policies to ensure they meet the standards set by the International Association for Property and Evidence (IAPE). Deficiencies in any of these areas, if found, will be corrected so they comply with standards. 2. Accreditation by the International Association for Property and Evidence (IAPE) by June 2021. 1. Meet with Supervisors to get input on program 2. Develop Procedure Documentation for Program 1. Communicating expectations within Staff 2. Plan quarterly meetings with UCS & Finance to find ways to better communicate with each other on changes, goals, procedures, etc. 1. Perform initial analysis of response time data 2. Develop and implement a new comprehensive training plan. 3. Develop formal mentoring program. 4. Develop rank specific task books. 5. Continue to improve promotional processes. 6. Implement formal After Action Review process for all working structure fires and other incidents 7. Train and certify all officers to operate as Incident Safety Officers 8. Refocus training efforts, prioritizing special operations training and needs of the department 9. Create New annual report

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Support: Human Resources Lead: Police Department

Lead: Water Resources

Lead: Finance Support: Utility Customer Service Lead: Fire Department

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High Performing Government - Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation. Goals

Objectives

Implement Cityworks PLL Permits, Licensing and Land software across multiple departments

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Implement Advanced Metering and Meter Data Management

1. Accomplish System Acceptance Testing 2. Implement Advanced Metering Infrastructure System (AMI HES) - Command Center 3. Implement Meter Data Management System (MDM) - Smartworks / Compass 4. Implement System Integration between AMS/MDM and existing systems CIS and Cityworks 5. Expand Meter Communication Network (Mesh IP/SNI - 12 Gateways and 92 Routers) for full deployment 1. Implement Fiber Network Management Software 2. Replace IT Asset Management System 3. IT Help Desk Management Process Review 4. Perform a Risk Management Assessment to include a Business Impact Analysis 1. Ensure all City Clerk's Office employees are familiarized with Cityworks workflows. 2. Test all processes within Cityworks on a monthly basis. 3. Develop tutorial worksheets of the basics of Cityworks for City Clerk's Office reference. 4. Document step-by-step instructions on City Clerk's Office processes within Cityworks and add to Admin Notes. 1. Data entry 2. Identify all data needs for assets when updating in the system (nameplate data, PM requirements, warranty information) 3. Provide base information to GIS for data templates 1. Create a print advertising plan 2. Implement digital media, social media advertising. 3. Promote Edmond to new groups and existing contacts. 4. Research Peer Cities

Implement policies, processes, procedures and tools in an effort to continually improve the efficiency and productivity of the IT department operations. Work with IT Department on implementation of new Permitting, Licensing, and Land Management system.

Establish and implement process for creating asset management and preventive maintenance work order system for existing assets and new construction Develop marketing plan for 20202021.

Configuration Data Conversion Field investigations and mobile inspections Systems Integrations Electronic Plan Review Customer Access to PLL information via a web portal 7. Provide Web Portal access to GIS Open Data and Mapping

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Department(s) Lead: Information Technology Support: Building Services, Planning, Community Image, Engineering, City Clerk's Office, Edmond Electric, Public Works, Fire Lead: Information Technology Support: Water Resources, Edmond Electric, Public Works

Lead: Information Technology

Lead: City Clerk’s Office Support: Information Technology

Lead: Water Resources Support: Information Technology Lead: Visit Edmond Support: Marketing

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High Performing Government - Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation. Goals Streamline Planning Department Network Folders - Create an Empty Network Folder Structure that is acceptable to the Department, and begin migrating files to the new structure this year. Develop new or improved processes which support a paperless work environment.

Objectives

Department(s)

1. Hold Joint Staff Progress Meetings

Lead: Planning

1. Work with IT to create fillable work order forms and to determine method of incorporating into Cityworks. 2. Working with Payroll and one division at a time, all Field Services employees will use Novatime to request leave. 3. Assess Field Services tablet needs and budget for FY21/22. 4. Working with IT, determine and configure a mobile solution for Water Line Maintenance to record water meter installs and changeouts in Cityworks.

Lead: Public Works Support: Information Technology

Infrastructure – Give the same level of importance and attention to the maintenance of infrastructure as to new infrastructure. Goals

Objectives

Expand Network Infrastructure – across the City to provide reliable and secure access to the City’s technology environment

1. Support Fiber Expansion for AMI, ITS and Remote City Facilities (Water Resources & Electric) 2. IT Installation and Configuration of network for Water Resources - Oak Tree 3. Installation and Configuration of network for Water Resources - 2nd St Pump Station & University Tower 4. Extend Fiber for Gateway at Boulevard & 33rd 5. Extend Fiber for Gateway at Kelly and Coffee Creek 6. Extend Fiber for Gateway at Midwest Blvd near Coffee Creek 7. Support Wireless Communication expansion for AMI, ITS and Other City Facilities

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Department(s) Lead: Information Technology Support: Water Resources, Edmond Electric, Engineering

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Infrastructure – Give the same level of importance and attention to the maintenance of infrastructure as to new infrastructure. Goals Provide a premier parks and recreation system with outstanding facilities. Maintain existing infrastructure utilizing reliability centered maintenance through pro-active maintenance. Assure adequate funds are available to support work of the preventative maintenance crew.

Ensure that upgrades to technical systems are completed as necessary. Improve quality of public tree and landscape plantings through implementation of tools which further develop maintenance scheduling, tracking, and practices. Create a process to track radio assignments. Plan for additional maintenance and renovation of current amenities.

Objectives 1. Develop a preventative maintenance plan for all parks and facilities. 1. Capture all preventive and corrective maintenance work performed in Cityworks. 1. Improve system reliability Preventative Maintenance project budgeted for and completed within FY. 2. Monthly expenditure reports to ensure preventative maintenance project(s) stay within budget. 1. Create a document which outlines specific plans to upgrade the following systems: Radio System, Telephone System and Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) System 1. Develop a tree treatments policy. 2. Incorporate existing tree management data into tree management software. 3. Meet with stakeholders regarding irrigation operation for public plantings. 4. Obtain tree management software. 1. Maintain accurate database of radio users 1. Try to budget higher than estimated costs to receive a better value and wow factor. 2. When planning for renovations or future smaller projects (e.g. playgrounds), add additional 10% to 25% to total project costs.

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Department(s) Lead: Parks & Recreation Support: Facility Maintenance Lead: Water Resources Support: Information Technology Lead: Edmond Electric Support: Finance

Lead: Public Safety Communications Support: Information Technology Lead: Urban Forestry Support: Information Technology

Lead: Public Safety Communications Lead: Parks & Recreation Support: Facility Maintenance

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Infrastructure – Plan, design, implement, and maintain transportation infrastructure that allows easy connections throughout the city and between different modes of transportation. Goals Complete Phase I of the traffic sign replacements and develop plan for Phase II.

Objectives 1. Determine and locate signs remaining for replacement. 2. Replace identified signs. 3. Work with IT to develop process for collecting and storing sign data for managing the Phase II sign preventative maintenance program.

Department(s) Lead: Public Works Support: Information Technology

Quality of Life – Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural and recreational facilities, and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction. Goals Provide a premier parks and recreation system with outstanding programs and facilities.

Objectives 1. Offer a diverse range of programs and activities for all ages, skills, socio-economic status, background and culture. 2. Research and evaluate interactive trail map applications to determine if feasible now or after further trail development by December 31, 2021. 3. Update printed trail maps trail after completion of connections and Route 66 Trail by December 31, 2021. 4. Update trail maps on City of Edmond website by June 30, 2021. 5. Focus on Excellence. 6. Key department staff read/discuss a book on this topic (customer loyalty and culture of excellence). 7. Form training and orientation for remaining department staff and new staff (part time and seasonal). 8. Ask/survey other departments regarding what Parks and Recreation can do to achieve that next level with external and internal customers. 9. Involve other departments to provide input when working on projects with Parks and Recreation (e.g. capital projects, renovations, marketing materials, technology needs, etc.). 10. Obtain national accreditation by 2025. 11. Determine requirements from application process necessary to achieve accreditation (e.g. met and pending requirements). 12. Contact and/or visit locally/regionally accredited facilities.

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Department(s) Lead: Parks & Recreation

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Quality of Life – Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural and recreational facilities, and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction. Goals

Objectives

Implementation of Bicycle Master Plan - Trails Plan

1. Gather internal stakeholders to discuss and identify responsibilities 2. Film bicycle educational videos 3. Reconvene EBC sub-committee for discussions and connect with other appropriate Boards, Committees, and Commissions. 4. Prioritize trails and bicycle facilities for action 5. Implement wayfinding and trail connections 1. Address the occurrence of manmade water bodies or containers where mosquitoes are likely to breed 2. Deal with blighted properties, buildings, and structures that are dangerous to public health and safety 3. Annually participate in ENS, Edmond Electric open house, etc. 4. Provide training to identify responsible parties of infrastructures 5. Set clear expectations for identifying discarded and inoperable vehicles 6. Use outreach to promote a culture of pride in ownership 7. Collaborate with Oklahoma County Health Department, participate in vector control continuing progress to cross train, and divide workload among inspectors 8. Annually participate with Fire Dept & Police Dept in National Night Out 9. Apply for grant money to assist in outreach event 1. Identity stakeholders who will be a part of decision making process. 2. Gather feedback from stakeholders to decide on a path forward for location of a 2nd library to include possible location study. 3. Conduct location study and develop consensus on location. 4. Explore ways to purchase identified land and/or property. 1. Continue the use of social media platforms to effectively communicate with residents and engage the community. 2. Increase transparency of crime data.

Promote a well-kept appearance of the community and ensure active property management

Identify a location and source of funds for a 2nd library.

Maintain police community engagement by utilizing social media.

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Department(s) Lead: Planning Department Support: Engineering, Marketing, Parks & Recreation, City Manager’s Office, Public Works Lead: Code Enforcement Support: Fire Department, Edmond Electric, Marketing, Police Department

Lead: City Manager’s Office Support: Planning, Engineering

Lead: Police Department Support: Marketing

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Quality of Life – Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural and recreational facilities, and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction. Goals Acquire public open space(s) for parks.

Develop Community Outreach Program within the City of Edmond that enhance the overall lifestyle of the community. Promote Edmond as a premier visitor destination.

Objectives 1. Kick-off meeting with primary departments to define locations, uses, and parcel sizes we will pursue. 2. Select parcels, research ownership, pros & cons of site, and conduct other research that will help determine viability. 3. Decide best options and get feedback from City Council. 4. Purchase land. 1. Create a plan/process for outreach events. 2. Gather internal stakeholders to discuss 3. Initiate process for community outreach events 4. Provide a list of private partners 5. Create a list of projects 1. Arcadia Lake Study - Explore ways to enhance Arcadia Lake's current activities and future economic development opportunities. 2. Serve on the East Edmond Study with Halff and Associates 3. Form a working tourism board committee 4. Interview potential consulting partners for an Arcadia Lake Study 5. Contribute to writing RFP from City of Edmond for Arcadia Lake Study 6. Downtown Edmond - Partner with local leaders to promote new interactive art exhibits that will attract and engage new visitors. Oversee progress as University of Central Oklahoma students document public art pieces and create walking tour brochures as the result of a grant. 7. Collaborate with Mathew Myers, Switchgrass Capital, on three new art exhibits in downtown Edmond 8. Store and replenish Edmond postcards weekly for "Share the Love" art piece near the post office 9. Collaborate with DEBA to distribute pad locks to downtown business for "Locks of Love" art piece at Festival Market Place 10. Promote all new interactive downtown art exhibits on Visit Edmond social media and website when installed and periodically as a tourist attraction 11. Monitor progress of the UCO art grant and promote new art tours as a tourist attraction on Visit Edmond social media and website 12. Route 66 - Promoting Edmond as an interactive destination along Route 66.

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Department(s) Lead: City Manager’s Office Support: Planning, Parks & Recreation, Urban Forestry

Lead: Planning Support: Community Image, Urban Forestry, Parks & Recreation Lead: Visit Edmond Support: Planning, Marketing, Engineering, City Manager’s Office, Public Works, Parks & Recreation, Edmond Electric, City Clerk’s Office

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Quality of Life – Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural and recreational facilities, and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction. Goals Promote Edmond as a premier visitor destination. (Continued)

Identify community partnerships to offset cost of facilities, programming and additional programming on the east side of Edmond.

Develop an action plan to meet the current and future needs of Arcadia Lake

Plan programs to enhance team satisfaction. Reduce the effect of a stressful environment on our team members which in turn should increase job satisfaction.

Objectives 13. Work with Edmond Historical Society and Museum and Boy Scouts to create an Eagle Scout project at Festival Market Place to attract visitors. Deadline to submit project to committee: July 2. Deadline for completion: November 8 14. Host a state Tourism Summit and Route 66 stakeholder convention at Armstrong Auditorium on October 20, 2020 15. Organize first annual Cycle 66 bike ride on November 8, 2020 16. Wayfinding - Promoting Edmond as a visitor destination by collaborating with City of Edmond departments to create a wayfinding plan for helpful directional and parking signage to Edmond attractions. 17. Collaborate with 8 City of Edmond departments 18. Create a wayfinding plan 19. Prepare a map, list and take photos of current directional and parking signage 1. Offer traditional programs that are currently at MAC/Senior Center on the east side of Edmond in an offsite location such as school, church, or other facility. 2. Measure demand for programs on east side by surveying participants, checking databases, prepare a heat map, etc. 3. If participants in demand of programs on east side, attempt to offer 3 programs on the east side of Edmond in a non-city facility. 1. Implement a game plan for trash removal entering Arcadia Lake from the Deep Fork River and Spring Creek. 2. Meet with internal stakeholders to understand and prioritize the maintenance needs at Arcadia Lake. 3. Develop a multi-year list that addresses the maintenance needs as well as identifying funding sources. 4. Purchase equipment for trash removal 5. Begin implementation of maintenance needs. 1. Each month we have a Birthday Celebration and a Fun Friday Event. Our Fun Friday events are planned and scheduled by our Fabulous Five event coordinators. Due to Covid-19 our events are suspended until it is deemed safe to resume.

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Department(s) Lead: Visit Edmond Support: Planning, Marketing, Engineering, City Manager’s Office, Public Works, Parks & Recreation, Edmond Electric, City Clerk’s Office

Lead: Parks & Recreation

Lead: City Manager’s Office Support; Parks & Recreation, Visit Edmond

Lead: Utility Customer Service

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Safe Community – Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens. Goals

Objectives

Ensure commercial activities are compliant with applicable zoning, safety, and operational ordinances

1. Enforce Oil and Gas ordinance to ensure the safety of citizens around well sites and to protect Edmond's water sources 2. Perform Annual Inspections 3. Ensure adherence to the job-site sanitation ordinance 1. Dispatch emergency calls for service that are ready for dispatch within 30 seconds. 2. Process incoming emergency calls for service and have them ready for dispatch within 30 seconds. 3. Evaluate each employees' processing/dispatching times to determine stretch goals for individual performance reviews. 1. Review ordinances and newly enacted state and federal laws with the Police Department and Municipal Court at least twice per year 2. Review ordinances with Planning Department staff at least twice per year to ensure our land use practices are updated and consistent with the City Council's strategic plan 3. Proactively received input from citizens and employees on safety concerns and requests for ordinance revisions 4. Regularly review claims filed by both citizens and employees to determine compliance with safety procedures and make recommended changes as soon as possible. 1. Assist other departments in obtaining compliance with regulation they administer 2. Establish our expectations of other departments before we initiate action 3. Prevent foreign materials from entering storm water and sanitary sewer systems 1. Provide data to the departments quarterly that includes information on injuries and accidents to allow them to focus on past trends in an effort to prevent them from reoccurring 2. Provide safety training/classes monthly to enhance the safety awareness of employees

Provide emergency dispatch services in the least amount of time while maintaining the integrity of information.

Review City ordinances and policies and procedures to ensure compliance with all applicable laws to assist the departments in providing for the safety and general welfare of our employees and citizens

Provide protection of Public Infrastructure

Provide safety data and safety training to departments that they can in turn use to help reduce accidents and injuries while both at and away from the workplace

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Department(s) Lead: Code Enforcement Support: City Attorney’s Office Lead: Public Safety Communications

Lead: City Attorney’s Office

Lead: Code Enforcement Support: Public Works, Engineering Lead: City Attorney’s Office

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Safe Community – Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens. Goals Continue implementation of ADA Transition Plan

Maintain Edmond's high level of community safety.

Plan for the growth and needs of our city and department

Objectives 1. Assist on ODOT Grant to make Edmond Rd/2nd St accessible 2. Initiate Contract for the Design of Edmond Rd/2nd St Improvements 3. Initiate Contracts for FY 2021 ADA Projects 4. Make Gossett Park Accessible 5. Initiate Contract for Improvements 6. Provide Comprehensive update on Transition Plan 7. Finalize Comprehensive Update Report on the Completion of the ADA Transition Plan 8. Provide Project Alternatives for ADA Committee - FY 2020 9. Finalize Goals for FY 2021 through the ADA Advisory Committee 1. Identify areas and assign resources to high crime locations. 2. Identify areas and assign resources to high traffic and collision locations. 3. Improve quality of service for mental health consumers. 4. Partner with the Oklahoma Highway Safety Office through grant and educational programs. 1. Perform ongoing data analysis of response date for proper station/apparatus location 2. Test small squad concept at fire station 2. 3. Complete specifications for new brush pumpers for station 3 and 4, and award contract. 4. Complete comprehensive facility assessment of all fire stations for future repairs, renovations and cost estimates. Budget as appropriate 5. Complete ISO Analysis in 2020. 6. Partner with the City of Edmond Planning department to perform an internal Fire Station Location Study 7. Begin plans to purchase land for a future station(s) if results of data analysis and fire station location study warrant 8. Construct EFD Blue Card simulation lab 9. Perform comprehensive analysis of apparatus assignments at each station and make all appropriate changes. 10. Replace Q2 in 2021 11. Replace staff vehicles in 2021, Fitzgerald, Armer, Davis

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Department(s) Lead: Planning & Zoning Support: Engineering, Pubic Works, Parks & Recreation

Lead: Police Department Support: Engineering

Lead: Fire Department Support: Planning, Vehicle Maintenance

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Safe Community – Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens. Goals Consolidate and expand Public Works emergency plans to produce a comprehensive plan for response to weather events, manmade events or pandemics.

Objectives

Department(s)

1. Review all Public Works current emergency, Lead: Public Works continuity of operations, and pandemic plans. 2. Based on the review, complete overarching plan outline which lists new information for inclusion and obsolete information for revision.

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Budget Process Budget guidelines are established at the beginning of the budget process and allows the departments to know the direction of the City. We strive to build our budget report around the City’s strategic initiatives set forth each year. By law, the City is required to adopt a balanced budget in which the expenditures do not exceed estimated resources. If there is a need to increase a budget during the year, City Council has the authority to increase and amend the budget. The City Manager or his designee may authorize budget transfers between line items within the same category. The level of budgetary controls is set at the Fund level and by category to ensure compliance with the budget that was approved by the Mayor and City Council. Our goal is to have a minimum of a 10 percent in the General Funds unassigned fund balance as a means to meet those emergencies and unexpected expenditures that arise in the course of a year. Modest revenue growth projections for fiscal year 2021-2022 were used across the board. Our City was so fortunate during the last 24 months during COVID-19 that our sales tax revenue remained steady and we did not have to reduce our revenues going into fiscal year 2021-2022. We actually did a 2% growth increase for this budget. The EPWA divisions which consists of the Utilities, Arcadia Lake and Kickingbird Golf Club all base their revenues according to historical data. The City generally will increase revenues based on a zero increase or a 2% increase, and some years it has been as much as 5% increase. All appropriations lapse at fiscal year-end except for those under contract. We roll those encumbrances into the new year, and the budget will increase by those outstanding approved purchase orders.

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BUDGET CALENDAR November-December • • • • •

Strategic Planning Process

Department meetings with MGT Consulting for Allocation Drivers Assess /modify goals and strategies Determine staffing needs Review performance measurements Develop personnel data and presentation for staffing requests due to HR by Dec. 31st

January Personnel Change Process • • • • •

Identify any structural changes in division of departments Personnel Review Committee will review requests Setup Social Agency Review Committee hearings Start review and forecasting of revenues. Council Budget Workshop- January 25th

February • • • • • • March • • • • April • • • • May

Enter Budget into One Solution

Revised budget spreadsheets for current year due February 9th One Solution Training Lab provided Human Resources (HR) organized recommendation and all changes Payroll for all departments entered by HR Deadline for 5 year planning in One Solution’s BID (budget entry) Check Fleet, VM and Computer costs Final balancing and Department Pages Cost allocation from PRM Consulting calculated and entered Departments finalize their budget page data and reviewed by staff Final Budget balancing, final forecasting, final programs and decisions Preliminary draft to City Manager by March to April City Manager Review and Changes City Manager review and changes Budget Message due by April 22nd Supporting documentation preparation Budget Draft to Council April 29th Council Review

• June • •

Public Notice of Budget hearings and Budget Summary May 12th Public Hearings and Adoption Final Budget to Council for Adoption June 14th Final budget document filed with State Auditor

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RESOLUTION NO.

A RESOLUTION THE

APPROVING

VARIOUS

DELINEATED

CITY

J2- 2 D

THE APPROPRIATIONS

FUNDS,

MORE

OF

SPECIFICALLY

AS EXHIBIT " A", ATTACHED HERETO FOR

THE FISCAL YEAR 2021- 2022.

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Edmond has reviewed and evaluated the departmental proposals presented by City staff, and WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Edmond has solicited and incorporated public input into the budget proposal, and WHEREAS,

the City Council of the City of Edmond has determined that the proposed appropriations adequately meets the needs of the citizens of the City of Edmond for the Fiscal Year 2021- 2022,

and

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Edmond acknowledges that encumbered funds remaining from the Fiscal Year 2020- 2021 appropriations shall be carried forward and re- appropriated to become a part of the City' s Fiscal Year 2021- 2022 appropriations adopted by this resolution, and WHEREAS, the City Council acknowledges current lease agreements in existence and the renewals of such leases through the appropriation of sufficient funding for lease payments,

and

NOW, THEREFORE,

BE IT RESOLVED

BYTHE MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF THE

CITYOF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA;

THAT the City Council of the City of Edmond do adopt said appropriations for the following objects and purposes for which approval is made pursuant to attached Exhibit A"

BE IT FURTHER

RESOLVED

BY THE MAYOR AND COUNCIL

OF THE CITY OF

EDMOND, OKLAHOMA:

THAT the City Clerk be and is hereby directed appropriation

to assure publication

of said

according to the Statutes of the State of Oklahoma,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED BY THE MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA;

THAT

the

Mayor

and

City

Clerk be

and

57

the

same

hereby

are

directed

to

sign

said

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appropriation

for the

City.

58


PASSED AND APPROVED by the Mayor and City Council of the City of Edmond, this the

day of June, 2021.

I

FRT- D ARRELL

pF

Attest:

DA

IS

E10o2 ,

i//:

v

SE City Clerk

OK

APPROVED

as

to form this -

day

of

STEP

-

Stt.,

2021.

EN T. MURDOCK

C ffY ATTORNEY

59

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FUND STRUCTURE Governmental Funds

General Fund

Special Revenue Funds

Capital Project Funds

• General Fund- Gen. Gov. • Downtown Community Center • Senior Citizens Center • Emergency Management • Cemetery • Festival Market • Building & Fire Code Services • City Council • Historical Society • Park Department • Street & Alley • Municipal Court • Parks Special Event • Edmond Electric Economic Development • Urban Forestry • Streetscape • Planning & Zoning • Social Agencies • Real Property

• Senior Citizen Center • Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) • Asset Forfeiture • Ambulatory Services • Fire Public Safety Tax • Police Public Safety Tax • Visit Edmond • Cemetery Perpetual Care • Hospital Trust • America Rescue Plan Act Fund

• Capital Improvement • Roadway Improvement • 1996 Cap. Improvement Tax Fund • 2000 Cap. Improvement Tax Fund • 2017 Cap. Improvement Tax Fund • Park Tax Fund • Cemetery Care • Cemetery Perpetual Care • Art in Public Places

Proprietary Funds

Enterprise Funds • Debt Service Fund • Electric • Water • Solid Waste • Waste Water • Arcadia Lake • Drainage • PWA Economic Development

Fiduciary Funds

Pension Trust Fund • Pension Trust Fund

Agency Funds • Sidewalk & Driveway Escrow • C.L.E.E.T. Penalty Assessment Fund

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Internal ServiceFunds • Tort/Liability • Workers Comp. Reserve • Employee Group Insurance • Vehicle Maintenance • Fleet Maintenance • Field Services • Administrative Support - City Clerk - City Manager - CM-ACM Operations - Facility Maintenance - Marketing - Information Technology - Legal Services - Public Works Administration - Central Operation Whse. - Central Communications - Dispatch - Engineering - Financial Services - Human Resources - Utility Customer Services

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TAB PAGE

BUDGET SUMMARIES


THE CITY OF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA BUDGET SUMMARY - ALL FUNDS FISCAL YEAR 21-22

GENERAL FUND

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS

CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS

ENTERPRISE FUNDS UTILITY OTHER FUNDS FUNDS

INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS

COMBINED FUNDS

ESTIMATED RESOURCES REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses & Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

56,768,354 1,840,824 1,635,486 1,146,860 8,412,777 56,250 295,121 70,155,672

7,905,499 6,792,460 956,016 119,400 158,055 15,931,430

27,268,496 58,068 289,400 2,266,485 29,882,449

1,681,208 165,334,152 665,000 595,295 168,275,655

2,482,442 225,000 4,000 58,000 2,769,442

9,860,000 73,650 14,685,036 203,384 825,700 25,647,770

91,942,349 20,975,726 3,390,344 1,146,860 189,671,049 1,337,434 4,198,656 312,662,418

4,039,773 100,000 5,082,887 79,378,332

49,157,269 65,088,699

40,000,000 18,071,214 87,953,663

7,048,391 182,897,446 358,221,492

2,453,838 5,223,280

23,031,754 537,294 49,216,818

40,000,000 101,348,400 100,000 190,971,465 645,082,284

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: General Government/ Central Services Public Safety Park & Recreation Streets & Highways Health & Welfare Utility Services Maintenance Services Other Activities Economic Infrastructure Development DEBT SERVICE COST: Principal and Interest Judgement Retirement Issuance Costs Debt Service Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

2,880,133 2,036,281 3,965,704 1,320,000 557,500 2,293,064

12,000,000 50,639,352 644,759 541,146 -

8,840,350 350,000 28,818,388 12,550,000 -

1,467,921 140,998,747

1,190,692 2,093,553 -

42,492,990 5,135,664 5,149,776 9,009,283

135,533

73,747 -

-

13,052,682

63,825,257

7,181,896 57,740,634

22,271,218 164,873,419

3,357,992

61,787,713

66,213,473 58,161,297 35,442,705 19,019,776 3,295,812 150,008,030 2,907,957 135,533 29,453,114 364,637,696

TRANSFERS IN: Sales Tax Other Transfers Debt Service Transfers Internal Service Charges & Allocations TOTAL TRANSFERS IN:

14,875,727 4,483,979 19,359,706

45,209,715 45,209,715

1,278,500 1,278,500

14,875,727 8,713,028 2,911,577 26,500,332

1,400,000 12,026 1,412,026

48,237,244 48,237,244

29,751,454 61,085,222 2,911,577 48,249,270 141,997,523

TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Other Transfers TOTAL TRANSFERS OUT:

(6,587,922) (134,561) (109,764) (74,199) (7,068,932) (14,875,727) (500,000) (1,000,000) (46,752,743) (77,103,847)

(4,490,217) (2,279,269) (214,320) (1,123,349) (765,000) (5,828) (100,000) (8,977,983)

(540,997) (9,337) (4,464) (8,000) (78,500) (8,260,000) (8,901,298)

(8,885,149) (1,207,415) (990,000) (317,634) (1,243,895) (7,236,892) (14,875,727) (4,383,979) (2,846,516) (100,000) (42,087,208)

(223,277) (157,257) (23,381) (500) (65,061) (469,476)

(2,546,546) (889,803) (70,000) (372,462) (578,900) (4,457,711)

(23,274,108) (4,677,642) (1,274,320) (1,951,053) (2,670,494) (14,311,652) (29,751,454) (578,500) (5,383,979) (2,911,577) (55,212,743) (141,997,523)

TOTAL NET TRANSFERS

(57,744,141)

36,231,732

(7,622,798)

(15,586,876)

942,550

43,779,533

3,618,008 100,000 4,863,501 8,581,509

37,495,174 37,495,174

15,668,667 6,921,565 22,590,231

5,892,500 171,868,698 177,761,198

2,807,838 2,807,838

30,499,946 708,691 31,208,637

15,668,667 40,010,454 44,516,739 180,248,728 280,444,587

79,378,332

65,088,699

87,953,663

358,221,492

5,223,280

49,216,818

645,082,284

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES * LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue

6.52% 24

0.00% 0

61

0.00% 0

97.11% 354

67.34% 246

2.76% 10

-

48.23% 176

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GENERAL FUND FISCAL YEAR 21-22

folder

REVENUE SOURCES

Prior Year Actual Adopted Year Budget Current Year Revised FY 19-20

Projected Budget

Projected Budget

Projected Budget

FY 22-23 2.0% 41,323,167 15,257,835 1,690,034 51,380

FY 23-24 2.0% 42,149,630 16,020,727 1,706,934 51,894

FY 24-25 2.0% 42,922,623 16,821,763 1,724,003 52,413

FY 25-26 2.0% 43,852,475 17,662,851 1,741,243 52,937

37,810,479 11,008,539 2,012,044 45,000

38,566,689 13,210,247 1,656,733 50,368

51,014,809

50,876,062

53,484,036

56,768,354

58,322,416

59,929,185

61,520,802

63,309,506

54,413 1,587,515 23,592

15,100 1,547,750 25,000

8,109 1,103,133 28,623

13,190 1,593,386 28,910

13,322 1,642,029 29,199

13,475 1,692,413 29,199

13,590 1,743,763 29,786

13,725 1,796,944 30,084

Sub-Total FINES & FORFEITURES Court Fines

1,665,521

1,587,850

1,139,865

1,635,486

1,684,550

1,735,087

1,787,139

1,840,753

1,653,304

2,170,000

1,135,504

1,146,860

2,214,284

2,236,427

2,258,791

2,280,480

Sub-Total INTERGOVERNMENTAL Grant Revenues Alcoholic Beverage & Cigarette Tax Vehicle & Gas Tax

1,653,304

2,170,000

1,135,504

1,146,860

2,214,284

2,236,427

2,258,791

2,280,480

15,500 951,759 764,834

910,000 868,230

6,429 981,616 834,554

6,493 991,432 842,899

1,001,347 852,990

1,050,423 861,519

1,060,928 866,763

1,071,537 877,125

Sub-Total CHARGES FOR SERVICES Right of Way Fees Right of Way Fees-True Up Recreational Program Fees Cemetery Fees Emergency 911 Fees Animal Welfare Fees Curb Cut Fees Filing Fees Transportation Fees Miscellaneous Charges

1,732,093

1,778,230

1,822,599

1,840,824

1,854,337

1,911,942

1,927,691

1,948,662

5,593,790 44,591 133,076 234,031 32,063 10,350 51,472 37,435

5,828,863 60,000 133,000 125,000 50,000 11,000 65,000 5,000

5,828,862 2,229,354 20,769 142,098 139,401 3,736 10,543 47,153 42,788

5,715,119 2,230,000 60,600 143,519 125,000 20,000 10,648 47,625 43,266

5,867,326 61,206 144,955 125,000 50,000 10,862 66,300 43,698

5,993,335 61,818 146,404 125,000 50,000 10,971 66,963 44,135

6,094,901 62,436 147,868 125,000 50,000 10,862 67,633 44,575

6,199,410 63,061 149,347 125,000 50,000 11,081 68,309 45,021

Sub-Total INTEREST Earnings on Deposit

6,136,808

6,277,863

8,464,704

8,395,777

6,369,347

6,498,626

6,603,275

6,711,229

194,039

150,000

127,457

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

Sub-Total MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES Miscellaneous Revenue

194,039

150,000

127,457

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

383,295

129,500

290,078

290,621

329,231

332,687

335,970

339,328

Sub-Total OTHER FINANCING SOURCES Capital Lease Proceeds Sub-Total

383,295

129,500

290,078

290,621

329,231

332,687

335,970

339,328

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

62,779,869

62,969,505

66,464,243

70,127,922

70,824,165

72,693,954

74,483,668

76,479,958

4,255,489 14,179,329 -

4,342,932 13,818,754 -

4,342,932 13,818,754 -

4,383,979 14,875,727

4,399,492 15,476,706 -

4,407,482 15,786,240 -

4,415,631 16,101,964 -

SUBTOTAL - REVENUES TRANSFERS IN E.P.W.A. manual entry from OS Sales Tax In Hospital Trust Fund Convention Visitors Bureau Fund Golf Course Fund Schoolhouse Preservation Fund Capital Improvements Fund Edmond Electric Fund Additional Transfers In Sub-Total Transfers In OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Reserve for Council Special Projects Restricted Prior Year Reserves: Street & Alley Juvenile Court Capital Infrastruture Improvement Transportation Comm. Development Employee Obligations Committed Prior Year Reserves Unassigned (Unrestricted) Prior Year Reserves Sub-Total Other Resources TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

FY 20-21

Projected Budget

38,128,223 10,811,523 1,922,300 152,762

Sub-Total LICENSES & PERMITS City Clerk Building Fees Oil & Gas Fees

FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22 0.0% 40,512,910 14,531,271 1,673,301 50,872

TAXES Sales Tax Use Tax Franchise Tax Liquor Tax

-

-

4,391,659 15,173,241 -

17,745,236

18,161,686

19,259,706

19,564,900

19,876,198

20,193,722

20,517,595

-

-

-

100,000

-

-

-

-

2,385,711 643,743 629,396 1,190

2,367,491 640,947 629,396 1,190

2,367,491 640,947 629,396 1,190

2,349,271 638,151 629,396 1,190

2,302,285 574,336 629,396 1,190

2,256,240 516,903 629,396 1,190

2,211,115 465,212 629,396 1,190

2,166,892 418,691 629,396 1,190

7,367,702 11,027,742

4,526,034 8,165,058

5,016,607 8,655,631

4,787,952 8,505,960

1,218,365 4,725,572

(1,446,728) 1,957,000

(3,443,217) (136,304)

(4,994,162) (1,777,993)

92,242,429

88,879,799

93,281,560

97,893,588

95,114,637

94,527,152

94,541,086

95,219,560

18,434,818

-

(416,450)

fy20 CAFR p70

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PUBLIC WORKS RESOURCES SUMMARY BY SOURCES

REVENUE SOURCES

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR

Projected Budget

Projected Budget

Projected Budget

Projected Budget

FY 21-22

FY 22-23

FY 23-24

FY 24-25

FY 25-26

INTER-GOVERNMENTAL Electricity Water Solid Waste Wastewater Drainage Utility Arcadia Lake PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds Sub-Total LICENSES & PERMITS Electricity Water Solid Waste Wastewater Drainage Utility Arcadia Lake PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds

53,797 1,707 55,504

-

150,000 1,926 151,926

-

-

-

-

-

1,167,539 717,665 4,840 -

1,055,000 565,899 -

1,055,000 565,899 -

1,110,000 571,208 -

1,049,152 571,230 -

1,054,192 571,230 -

1,054,192 571,230 -

1,054,192 571,230 -

Sub-Total CHARGES FOR SERVICES Electricity Water Solid Waste Wastewater Drainage Utility Arcadia User Fees PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds

1,890,044

1,620,899

1,620,899

1,681,208

1,620,382

1,625,422

1,625,422

1,625,422

95,352,232 30,767,501 10,695,588 19,920,179 1,853,725 1,244,880 -

97,222,459 32,979,773 10,753,981 23,296,892 1,785,000 1,187,000 -

97,802,198 33,174,773 10,753,981 23,296,892 1,785,000 1,500,000 -

93,485,263 34,611,933 11,466,175 22,300,680 1,980,983 1,489,118 -

93,949,751 37,372,177 11,695,602 23,081,396 2,020,603 1,518,900 -

94,416,571 39,416,902 11,929,512 23,885,867 2,061,014 1,549,279 -

94,885,712 40,787,916 12,168,103 24,718,495 2,102,235 1,568,246 -

95,355,195 42,206,916 12,411,465 25,580,264 2,144,280 1,611,870 -

159,834,106

167,225,105

168,312,844

165,334,152

169,638,429

173,259,145

176,230,707

179,309,990

200,000 200,000 67,600 255,000 55,000 7,500 1,000 75,000

409,682 502,477 76,062 750,000 55,000 7,500 1,000 75,000

200,000 150,000 68,000 120,000 50,000 1,000 1,000 75,000

200,000 150,000 68,000 100,000 50,000 1,000 1,000 75,000

200,000 150,000 68,000 100,000 50,000 1,000 1,000 75,000

200,000 150,000 68,000 100,000 50,000 1,000 1,000 75,000

200,000 150,000 68,000 100,000 50,000 1,000 1,000 75,000

Sub-Total INTEREST Electricity Water Solid Waste Wastewater Drainage Utility Arcadia Lake PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds

1,616,535 1,764,779 270,770 2,387,771 281,745 (1,798) 2,318 143,288

Sub-Total MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE Electricity Water Solid Waste Wastewater Drainage Utility Arcadia Lake PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds

6,465,408

861,100

1,876,721

665,000

645,000

645,000

645,000

645,000

160,291 2,001,569 5 1,037 20,086 103,873 -

219,439 315,707 54,907 -

219,439 54,907 -

423,934 123,063 48,298 -

447,647 125,966 49,264 -

461,110 127,869 50,249 -

474,167 171,617 51,254 -

484,167 171,617 52,279 -

Sub-Total

2,286,861

590,053

274,346

595,295

622,877

639,228

697,038

708,063

170,531,923

170,297,157

172,236,736

168,275,655

172,526,688

176,168,795

179,198,167

182,288,475

0 -

-

60,000,000 13,500,000 -

-

-

-

-

-

0

-

73,500,000

-

-

-

-

-

52,020 6,683,979 6,735,999

188,412 93,927 7,146,899 7,429,238

188,412 93,927 7,146,899 7,429,238

68,316 5,810,308 5,878,624

283,783 4,437,575 4,721,358

499,250 3,199,038 3,698,288

714,717 3,264,038 3,978,755

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

87,528,718 57,946,552 12,370,816 13,622,549 10,877,315 551,496 -

86,971,307 49,718,310 13,193,084 11,757,681 9,941,866 286,449 -

89,336,444 52,575,910 13,968,322 7,938,859 9,638,866 206,052 -

86,796,200 54,745,844 14,752,157 8,082,011 9,632,433 220,570 -

87,109,934 57,599,302 15,522,184 9,688,542 9,643,053 167,520 -

SUBTOTAL - REVENUES OTHER RESOURCES: DEBT/LOAN PROCEEDS Electricity Water Solid Waste Wastewater Drainage Utility Arcadia Lake PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds Sub-Total RESTRICTED PRIOR YEAR RESERVES Electricity Water Solid Waste Wastewater Drainage Utility Arcadia Lake PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds Sub-Total ASSIGNED PRIOR YEAR RESERVES Electricity Water Solid Waste Wastewater Drainage Utility Arcadia Lake PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds Sub-Total COMMITTED PRIOR YEAR RESERVES Electricity Water Solid Waste Wastewater Drainage Utility Arcadia Lake PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds Sub-Total UNRESTRICTED PRIOR YEAR RESERVES Electricity Water Solid Waste Wastewater Drainage Utility Arcadia Lake PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds

59,764,955 65,373,121 10,070,778 22,555,389 10,595,752 (74,500) -

66,257,870 72,447,753 11,485,209 45,582,041 11,875,901 (11,655) -

66,257,870 72,447,753 11,485,209 45,582,041 11,875,901 (11,655) -

(147,151) 7,181,666 7,034,515

Sub-Total

168,285,494

207,637,119

207,637,119

182,897,446

171,868,698

173,664,454

174,229,214

179,730,534

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

345,553,416

385,363,514

460,803,093

358,207,616

350,274,010

354,554,607

357,125,669

365,997,764

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Fund Balances The fund balance table reflects the estimated beginning fund balance as of July 1, 2020, plus the FY21/22 budgeted revenues, transfers in, expenditures, and transfers out and the projected ending fund balance at June 20, 2022. These totals are reflected in each department budget detail page. When looking at the Audited Comprehensive Annual Report located on our website at www.edmondok.com under financial services/audit reports, you will find the audited totals of all equity. Equity is classified as net position and displayed in three components: •

Net investment in capital assets-Consists of capital assets including restricted capital assets and bony construction proceeds, net of accumulated depreciation and reduced by the outstanding balances of any bonds, mortgages, notes or other borrowings that are attributable to the acquisition, construction, or improvement of those assets. Restricted net position-Consists of net position with constraints placed on the use either by 1) external groups such as creditors, grantors, contributors, or laws or regulations of other governments, or 2) law through constitutional provisions or enabling legislation. Unrestricted net position-All other net position that does not meet the definition of “restricted” or “net investment in capital assets”.

Governmental fund equity is classified as fund balance and is further classified as non-spendable, restricted, committed, assigned and unassigned. These classifications are defined as: Non-spendable-included amounts that cannot be spent because they are either (a) not in spendable form or (b) legally or contractually required to be maintained intact. Restricted-consists of fund balance with constraints placed on the use of resources either by (1) external groups such as creditors, grantors, contributors, or laws or regulations of other governments, or (2) laws through constitutional provisions or enabling legislation. Committed-included amounts that can only be used for specific purposed pursuant to constraints imposed by formal action of the city’s highest level of decision-making authority. The City’s highest level of decision-making authority is made by ordinance. City Council adopts an ordinance that established this constraint. Assigned-included amount that are constrained by the City’s intent to be used for specific purposed but are neither restricted nor committed. Assignments of fund balance may be made by city council action or management decision when the City Council has delegated that authority. Assignments for transfers and interest income for governmental funds are made through budgetary process. Unassigned-represent fund balance that has not been assigned to other funds and has not been restricted, committed, or assigned to specific purposes within the general fund. The general fund is the only fund that reports a positive unassigned fund balance. In an effort to ensure the continuance of sound financial management of public resources, the City of Edmond’s Unassigned Fund Balance within the General Fund will be maintained to provide the City with sufficient working capital and a comfortable margin of safety to address emergencies, sudden loss of revenue or operating needs, and unexpected downturns. The City strives to maintain in the Unassigned fund balance in the General Fund of (10%). Other goals and limits are listed in the notes of our annual comprehensive annual report on our website.

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Fund Balance increase/decrease of 10% or more On the following chart of Fund Balance Estimation for 2022, notice that the Major funds are identified in bold font and marked with an asterisk (*). Below is a short discussion of the change estimates in these major funds as well as a few others. •

General Fund-Is expected to be within the range of 10% change. Sales tax and Use taxes remained steady for the City during the pandemic and shut down of various venues.

Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fund-Is estimated to have a 19.95% decrease in fund balance. New staff is approved for the FY22, which is creating a rotating staff of firefighters. Fire also has scheduled to purchase new computer supplies. A new prop conversion for safety training is also planned to be purchased this year, as well as some repairs to building and a retainage wall.

Police Public Safety Limited Tax Fund-Is estimated to have a 17.57% decrease in fund balance. A new Academy is planned for this fiscal year which will increase salaries for this department. New this year will be replacement of handheld radios and computer systems. Demolition of tower at Police Training Facility and funding for various community outreach programs are also scheduled.

2000 Capital Improvement Tax Fund-Is estimated to have a 292.07% decrease in fund balance. This decrease is primarily due to an increase of expenditures on CIP projects including the complete renovation of the Kickingbird Golf Clubhouse, the Cross Timbers Facility Expansion, the Covell/Coltrane intersection projects and the Intelligent Traffic System phase IV.

The remaining non major funds and various larger are listed in the following table and various larger increase/decrease funds are listed below: •

The Administrative Support-General Government. The large estimated decrease in this fund is due to a new allocation process that was started in fiscal year ending 6-30-20. The new allocation process is based on actual expenditures.

Kickingbird Golf Club-Is estimated to have a decrease of 330.93%, due to loss of revenues from closure of the Golf Course for renovations.

Visit Edmond-Is estimated to have a decrease of 126.62% due to lower revenues during COVID19.

Asset Forfeiture-Is estimated to have 130.89% decrease in fund balance due to several large capital expenditures that are planned, including a patrol boat for Arcadia Lake, fencing at the Police Training Center, and radio headsets.

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FUND BALANCE ESTIMATION BASED ON 2022 BUDGET Beginning Balance

GENERAL FUND* Total-General Fund SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fund* Police Public Safety Limited Tax Fund* Senior Citizens Community Development Block Grant American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 Asset Forfeiture Hospital Trust Fund Real Property Visit Edmond Ambulatory Services (EMSA) Total CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS Capital Improvement Roadway Improvement 1996 Capital Improvement Tax Art in Public Places Cemetary Care Cemeter Perpetual Care Park Tax 2000 Capital Improvement* 2017 Capital Improvement Total PUBLIC WORKS AUTHORITY FUNDS (PWA) Electric Water Resources Solid Waste Wastewater Sewer Impact Arcadia Lake Drainage PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Total OTHER ENTERPRISE FUNDS Kickingbird Golf Club YourGov Shop CityLink Total INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Risk Management Workers' Compensation Reserve Employee Group Insurance Fund Vehicle Maintenance Administrative Support- General Government Fleet Management Field Services Total Total Fund Balance Estimation * Major Fund

Revenue

Transfers In

Expenditures

Transfers Out

Ending Fund Balance

Difference

$ $

9,222,660.00 9,222,660.00

$ 70,155,672.00 $ 70,155,672.00

$ 19,359,706.00 $ 19,359,706.00

$ 13,052,682.00 $ 13,052,682.00

$ 77,103,847.00 $ 77,103,847.00

$ $

8,581,509.00 8,581,509.00

-7.47% -7.47%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

20,722,919.00 13,151,111.00 313,626.00 (248,491.00) 6,000,000.00 532,848.00 7,292,582.00 127,805.00 150,632.00 1,114,237.00 49,157,269.00

$ 5,089,353.00 $ 2,688,609.00 $ 69,779.00 $ 619,833.00 $ 6,000,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 10,000.00 $ 1,400.00 $ 501,369.00 $ 949,087.00 $ 15,931,430.00

$ 20,303,764.00 $ 24,905,951.00 $ $ -

24,999,008.00 24,650,754.00 644,759.00 12,000,000.00 304,070.00 2,000.00 1,500.00 414,796.00 685,520.00 63,702,407.00

$ $ $ $

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

17,275,673.00 11,185,901.00 260,555.00 (291,416.00) 230,778.00 7,300,582.00 127,705.00 66,470.00 1,338,927.00 37,495,175.00

-19.95% -17.57% -20.37% 14.73%

$ 45,209,715.00

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

-130.89% 0.11% -0.08% -126.62% 16.78% -31.10%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

20,051.00 11,819.00 64,371.00 65,244.00 189,978.00 133,090.00 2,531,318.00 44,967,045.00 10,088,298.00 58,071,214.00

$

2,500.00

$

700,000.00

$

700,150.00

$ 104,000.00 $ 25,568.00 $ 33,400.00 $ 2,649,104.00 $ 17,075,727.00 $ 9,992,150.00 $ 29,882,449.00

$ $ $

578,500.00 -

$

2,270.00

$

1,278,500.00

$ 578,500.00 $ 26,000.00 $ 600.00 $ 2,713,288.00 $ 42,067,096.00 $ 11,655,000.00 $ 57,740,634.00

$ $ $ $

168,407.00 8,506,583.00 224,038.00 8,901,298.00

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

22,401.00 11,819.00 64,371.00 166,974.00 189,546.00 165,890.00 2,298,727.00 11,469,093.00 8,201,410.00 22,590,231.00

10.49% 0.00% 0.00% 60.93% -0.23% 19.77% -10.12% -292.07% -23.01% -157.06%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

87,528,718.00 57,946,552.00 12,370,816.00 13,622,549.00 13,876.00 551,496.00 10,877,315.00 (147,151.00) 7,181,666.00 189,945,837.00

$ $ $ $

86,971,307.00 49,718,310.00 13,193,084.00 11,757,681.00 13,876.00 286,449.00 9,941,866.00 68,316.00 5,810,308.00 177,761,197.00

-0.64% -16.55% 6.23% -15.86% 0.00% -92.53% -9.41% 315.40% -23.60% -6.85%

$ $ $ $

398,804.00 452,825.00 1,602,209.00 2,453,838.00

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ $ $

3,841,355.00 4,909,016.00 122,850.00 17,999.00

170,735.00 38,877.00 9,100,832.00

94,109,197.00 35,994,996.00 11,534,175.00 22,991,888.00

$ 8,160,000.00 $ 14,875,727.00

$ 92,094,494.00 $ 35,834,010.00 $ 7,447,758.00 $ 20,890,870.00

$ 10,732,114.00 $ 23,264,955.00 $ 3,264,149.00 $ 3,965,886.00

$ 1,538,416.00 $ 2,030,983.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 75,000.00 $ 168,275,655.00

$ 203,028.00 $ $ 350,000.00 $ 2,911,577.00 $ 26,500,332.00

$ 1,467,921.00 $ 2,644,898.00 $ 135,533.00 $ 4,357,935.00 $ 164,873,419.00

$ $

$ 42,087,208.00

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ $ $ $

215,000.00 51,500.00 2,502,942.00 2,769,442.00

$ $ $ $

1,000,000.00 12,026.00 400,000.00 1,412,026.00

$ $ $ $

1,190,692.00 73,747.00 2,093,553.00 3,357,992.00

$ $ $ $

330,567.00 2,517.00 136,393.00 469,477.00

$ $ $ $

92,545.00 440,087.00 2,275,205.00 2,807,837.00

-330.93% -2.89% 29.58% 12.61%

4,160,932.00 1,991,715.00 3,490,860.00 537,294.00 3,379,938.00 12,851,910.00 (2,843,601.00) 23,569,048.00

$ 160,000.00 $ 20,000.00 $ 13,471,651.00 $ 1,385,573.00 $ 411,150.00 $ 133,002.00 $ 10,066,394.00 $ 25,647,770.00

$

1,951,053.00

$

2,593,517.00

$

62,796.00

$ 2,670,494.00 $ 23,352,082.00 $ 5,951,962.00 $ 14,311,652.00 $ 48,237,243.00

$ $ $ $ $ $

12,756,371.00 3,690,869.00 26,797,852.00 5,305,571.00 10,643,533.00 61,787,713.00

$ $ $ $ $ $

6,074.00 193,801.00 264,653.00 51,978.00 3,878,408.00 4,457,710.00

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

3,615,672.00 2,011,715.00 4,200,066.00 708,691.00 80,665.00 13,579,325.00 7,012,504.00 31,208,638.00

-15.08% 0.99% 16.89% 24.19% -4090.09% 5.36% 140.55% 24.48%

329,966,028.00

$ 309,892,976.00

$ 140,585,496.00

$ 361,156,855.00

$ 141,650,895.00

$

280,444,587.00

-17.66%

66

538,570.00 321,534.00

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TAB PAGE

GENERAL FUND


GENERAL FUND


GENERAL FUND DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARY The General Fund is the principal fund of the City which accounts for all transactions not accounted for in the other funds. It accounts for the costs of operating many of the City’s general basic services, such as street maintenance, parks and recreation, and general government. Financing is primarily provided by City sales tax, franchise taxes and Edmond Public Works Authority (EPWA) transfers, fines, licenses, and permits, charges for services and interest earnings.

CONTACT City Manager Ph (405) 359-4500

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FUND BUDGET SUMMARY

General Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR Projected Budget FY 21-22

FY 22-23

Projected Projected Budget Projected Budget Budget FY 23-24 FY 24-25 FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses & Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue

51,014,809 1,732,093 1,665,521 1,653,304 6,149,183 219,753 383,595

50,876,062 1,778,230 1,587,850 2,170,000 6,294,863 156,250 134,000

53,484,036 1,822,599 1,139,865 1,135,504 8,481,704 134,114 294,578

56,768,354 1,840,824 1,635,486 1,146,860 8,412,777 56,250 295,121

58,322,416 1,854,337 1,684,550 2,214,284 6,386,517 56,250 333,776

59,929,185 1,911,942 1,735,087 2,236,427 6,515,968 56,250 337,277

61,520,802 1,927,691 1,787,139 2,258,791 6,620,791 56,250 340,606

63,309,506 1,948,662 1,840,753 2,280,480 6,728,919 56,250 344,010

Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

62,818,258

62,997,255

66,492,400

70,155,672

70,852,130

72,722,136

74,512,070

76,508,580

4,546,508 6,776,971

4,651,232 7,367,702

4,651,232 7,367,702

4,039,773 100,000 5,082,887

4,037,422 4,863,501

4,043,058 4,816,541

4,056,375 5,707,553

4,076,683 7,737,677

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

74,141,736

75,016,189

78,511,334

79,378,332

79,753,054

81,581,735

84,275,998

88,322,940

141,796 90,022 2,290,987 667,194 831,508 435,791 881,315 269,873 212,822 1,128,002 865,470 25,259 1,304,803 119,077 293,188

928,250 226,295 2,693,017 1,770,000 975,821 486,655 1,069,000 392,270 314,371 1,677,803 1,080,303 71,096 1,534,015 171,199 283,500

928,250 238,395 2,358,213 1,770,000 1,179,625 432,620 1,022,961 362,645 278,380 1,588,294 1,082,827 57,380 1,480,918 150,013 283,500

228,250 325,737 2,834,636 1,320,000 967,540 561,918 959,000 386,289 355,722 1,703,342 1,183,552 98,150 1,649,992 175,054 303,500

228,250 259,127 2,763,204 1,550,000 997,714 496,616 959,000 366,858 366,823 1,660,430 1,172,652 98,061 1,709,280 173,312 303,500

228,250 219,870 2,765,052 1,100,000 998,176 492,923 959,000 362,384 364,033 1,656,456 1,112,890 98,277 1,698,898 173,252 303,500

154,750 261,370 2,787,603 900,000 1,010,735 499,615 959,000 368,364 368,179 1,682,425 1,021,272 102,387 1,735,354 175,367 303,500

154,750 263,840 2,811,416 807,500 1,023,418 510,305 959,000 386,178 372,878 1,708,379 1,034,203 99,828 1,769,449 178,716 303,500

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

9,557,107

13,673,595

13,214,021

13,052,682

13,104,827

12,532,961

12,329,921

12,383,360

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

18,534,818 (72,091,706)

17,845,236 (71,022,772)

18,261,686 (74,837,088)

19,359,706 (77,103,847)

19,664,900 (77,989,378)

19,976,198 (79,913,691)

20,293,722 (81,195,210)

20,617,595 (83,005,977)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(53,556,887)

(53,177,536)

(56,575,402)

(57,744,141)

(58,324,478)

(59,937,493)

(60,901,488)

(62,388,382)

3,660,040

3,639,024

3,639,024

3,618,008 100,000

3,507,207 -

3,403,728 -

3,306,913 -

3,216,169 -

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: General Government City Council Park & Recreation Street Maintenance & Construction Municipal Court Senior Citizens Center Outside Agencies Emergency Management Cemetery Community Image Planning & Zoning Festival Marketplace Building Services Department Downtown Community Center Historical Society

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES * LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Revenue DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Other Transfers Total Transfers Out:

7,367,702

4,526,034

5,082,887

4,863,501

4,816,541

5,707,553

7,737,677

10,335,029

11,027,742

8,165,058

8,721,911

8,581,509

8,323,748

9,111,281

11,044,590

13,551,198

74,141,736

75,016,189

78,511,334

79,378,332

79,753,054

81,581,735

84,275,998

88,322,940

10.98% 40 10.92% 40

5,568,824 114,510 113,002 37,593 6,343,809 14,179,329 153,000 45,581,639 72,091,706

6.72% 25 6.42% 23

5,530,348 129,617 12,000 96,527 70,149 6,617,409 14,180,249 93,000 44,293,473 71,022,772

7.18% 26 6.88% 25

5,515,965 129,617 12,000 96,462 70,149 6,617,000 14,180,249 93,000 48,122,646 74,837,088

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6.52% 24 6.46% 24

6,587,922 134,561 109,764 74,199 7,068,932 14,875,727 500,000 1,000,000 46,752,743 77,103,847

6.40% 23 6.34% 23

6,432,893 140,910 111,959 75,149 7,209,187 15,173,241 500,000 48,346,039 77,989,378

7.40% 27 7.42% 27

6,561,552 147,580 114,198 76,347 7,269,897 15,476,706 500,000 49,767,412 79,913,691

9.80% 36 9.95% 36

6,692,781 154,589 116,482 77,394 7,430,369 15,786,240 500,000 50,437,355 81,195,210

12.77% 47 13.03% 48

6,826,638 161,934 118,812 78,494 7,578,975 16,101,964 500,000 51,639,161 83,005,977

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARY This department details the transfers that come out of the General Fund which are listed on the following page.

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DEPARTMENT: General Government

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION Personal Services Materials & Supplies

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20 -

FUND: GENERAL FUND KP entered 4.1.21 Adopted Year Current Year BUDGET YEAR Budget Revised FY 20-21 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 -

Projected Budget FY 22-23

-

-

Projected Budget FY 23-24 -

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

-

-

4,964

-

-

-

-

-

-

136,747

228,000

228,000

228,000

228,000

228,000

154,500

154,500

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Transfers Out

69,351,010

67,501,279

71,315,595

73,500,851

74,584,059

76,436,719

77,645,122

79,381,081

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS:

69,492,721

67,729,279

71,543,595

73,728,851

74,812,059

76,664,719

77,799,622

79,535,581

3,093,233 6,343,809 14,179,329 153,000 19,253,550 23,617,689 1,200,000 239,435 144,465 -

2,314,383 2,765 6,617,409 14,180,249 93,000 18,943,112 23,236,883 450,000 248,478 240,000 775,000

2,300,000

20,700,306 25,308,862 450,000 248,478 240,000 775,000

3,300,688 2,762 7,068,932 14,875,727 500,000 1,000,000 20,303,764 24,905,951 700,000 203,028 240,000 -

3,352,775 2,817 7,209,187 15,173,241 500,000 21,144,413 25,937,147 400,000 224,479 240,000 -

3,419,831 2,873 7,269,897 15,476,706 500,000 21,662,678 26,572,885 400,000 491,849 240,000 -

3,488,227 2,931 7,430,369 15,786,240 500,000 22,184,441 27,212,914 400,000 240,000 -

3,557,991 2,989 7,578,975 16,101,964 500,000 22,724,174 27,874,987 400,000 240,000 -

1,126,500 69,351,010

400,000 67,501,279

400,000 71,315,595

400,000 73,500,851

400,000 74,584,059

400,000 76,436,719

400,000 77,645,122

400,000 79,381,081

Other Services & Charges

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA)** Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fund Police Public Safety Limited Tax Fund Capital Improvement Fund Arcadia Lake PWA Economic Development Edmond Electric Fund CityLink - on Other transfer line CVB Fund Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

2,700 6,617,000 14,180,249 93,000

**Appropriation of the City's sales tax revenue to the Edmond Public Works Authority is in accordance with the junior lien bond Indenture.

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DOWNTOWN COMMUNITY CENTER (DCC) The DCC delivers high quality, cost effective best in class trustworthy service to our customers. The department provides a clean, safe, reasonably priced, and quality rental facility to accommodate City of Edmond related events and functions as well as diverse events and functions held by and for the public and private sectors. We strive for excellence in customer service and maintain the building in a manner that prompts a positive customer response. The department evaluates written and verbal customer requests for service and facility use as a consideration for future annual budget needs and, as possible, promote those requests which best promote the public interest.

We have had the privilege of hosting the Edmond Duplicate Bridge Club on a weekly basis for over 17 years. — Prior to Covid-19, we were booked at 98% capacity .

CONTACT Sandra Henderson Ph (405) 359-4698

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

GOALS

GOALS

Provide unparalleled customer service to internal and external customers. (In progress)

Achieve APWA reaccreditation in December, 2021

Improve the performance of the technical staff with at least one job related training course per year. (Complete)

Work with I.T., Finance and Parks and Recreation to configure and go live with the new software system that has been chosen.

Update rental information on DCC services and provide to Marketing Dept. for use on the City’s website. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Train on new software to be ready to go live.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Be involved with the Public Works Strategic Plan, attend meetings. Continue with the Fred Pryor online training as time allows.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

1-0-0

2-0-0

2-0-0

2-0-0

2-0-0

2-0-0

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DEPARTMENT: Downtown Community Ctr.

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION Personal Services

FUND: GENERAL FUND

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

BUDGET YEAR

79,490

94,864

88,118

102,585

105,912

104,277

105,142

105,891

1,900

11,696

6,996

5,269

2,975

2,975

2,975

4,875

37,687

64,639

54,899

67,200

64,425

66,000

67,250

67,950

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30,541

242,209

242,209

273,352

258,029

263,190

268,454

273,823

149,618

413,408

392,222

448,406

431,341

436,442

443,821

452,539

29,992 549 30,541

241,608 601 242,209

241,608 601 242,209

272,718 634 273,352

257,383 647 258,029

262,530 659 263,190

267,781 673 268,454

273,137 686 273,823

Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

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SENIOR CITIZENS FUND The Senior Citizens Fund has been established to account for dedicated revenues received for the benefit of the Senior Center and its patrons which include grants, donations, and other sources. Expenditures of the fund are administratively restricted for the benefit of senior citizens' activities or programs.

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Senior Citizens Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

1,443 2,000 112,901 116,344

1,458 2,000 113,462 116,920

1,472 2,000 113,948 117,420

1,487 2,000 114,600 118,087

BUDGET YEAR

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

646 7,823 58,814 67,282

1,415 1,803 64,426 67,644

64,426 68,028

1,429 2,000 66,350 69,779

287,519

234,116 83,452 -

234,116 83,452 -

313,626 -

260,555 -

275,549 -

291,119 -

307,189 -

354,801

385,212

385,596

383,405

376,899

392,469

408,539

425,276

2,544 34,689 -

6,860 65,110 -

6,860 65,110 -

51,100 71,750 -

29,600 71,750 -

29,600 71,750 -

29,600 71,750 -

29,600 71,750 -

37,233

71,970

71,970

122,850

101,350

101,350

101,350

101,350

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

83,452 30,081 204,035

313,242

313,626

260,555

275,549

291,119

307,189

323,926

317,568

313,242

313,626

260,555

275,549

291,119

307,189

323,926

354,801

385,212

385,596

383,405

376,899

392,469

408,539

425,276

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

1,415 2,187

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

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EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Edmond’s Emergency Management Office is focused on promoting and providing public safety in our community. Our planning is toward one goal: that the City and our community will be prepared for dealing with the effects of large scale events affecting public safety and disasters whether natural or man-made. We also provide public education and planning assistance for a variety of emergency management activities. We are dedicated to ensuring coordination and resources in time of need.

MISSION STATEMENT Committed to protecting our citizens from the effects of disasters through mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery actions.

EMPLOYEES:

3 -The Director, Emergency Management Coordinator, and Emergency Management Resource Specialist

Be prepared! Build a kit, have a plan, practice the plan and stay informed! — We are committed to protecting our citizens from the effects of disaster through mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.

CONTACT Matt Stillwell Ph (405) 359-4371

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization. (i.e. between departments, with the City Council, with Boards and Commissions, etc.).

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization. (i.e. between departments, with the City Council, with Boards and Commissions, etc.).

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

GOALS

GOALS

Increase capability and ensure all Departments can contact employees during emergency or crisis situations. (Complete)

Increase capability and ensure all Departments can contact employees during emergency or crisis situations.

Update hazard annexes in collaboration with other City Departments. (Complete)

Seek alternate funding sources for operations, special projects, and unanticipated events in an effort to mitigate direct costs to the City.

Seek alternate funding sources for operations, special projects, and unanticipated events in an effort to mitigate direct costs to the City. (Complete)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Conduct an annual call down drill where departments contact all employees when instructed to do so.

Conducted an annual call down drill where departments contacted all employees when instructed to do so.

Seek alternate funding such as grants and direct aid to provide funding for the City’s response to COVID-19.

Coordinated with all City Departments and annexes were signed off.

Maintain Emergency Management’s EMPG Grant from the Oklahoma Emergency Management Department.

Emergency Management’s EMPG Grant from the Oklahoma Emergency Management Department was awarded and maintained.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

2.2-0-0

2.2-0-0

2.2-0-0

2.2-0-0

2.2-0-0

2.2-0-0

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DEPARTMENT: Emergency Management

FUND: GENERAL FUND

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

Personal Services

187,982

201,138

197,986

207,887

218,994

216,884

221,364

225,858

2,706

44,382

24,665

32,652

32,114

29,750

31,250

44,570

79,185

81,750

74,994

80,750

80,750

80,750

80,750

80,750

Capital Outlay

-

65,000

65,000

65,000

35,000

35,000

35,000

35,000

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Transfers Out

152,866

143,448

143,448

138,801

132,191

135,011

137,900

140,859

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

422,740

535,718

506,093

525,090

499,049

497,395

506,264

527,037

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

140,287 9,081 1,768 1,731 152,866

128,556 9,535 1,357 4,000 143,448

128,556 9,535

125,249 8,115 1,437 4,000 138,801

118,206 8,520 1,466 4,000 132,191

120,570 8,946 1,495 4,000 135,011

122,981 9,394 1,525 4,000 137,900

125,441 9,863 1,555 4,000 140,859

Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

1,357 4,000

143,448

80

BUDGET YEAR

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CEMETERY FUND The Cemetery’s mission is to serve the Public with their interment needs and provide landscape maintenance for 50 acres of Cemetery grounds. The Cemetery averages 130 interments per year; 90 stakings for monument companies; 20 Veteran Markers; and continue to sell burial spaces per year. With the Cemetery expansion near completion, the estimate of burial spaces is 20-25 years.

The oldest tombstone in the cemetery is dated 1893. — Grace Lawn Cemetery was called Fair Lawn from 1897 to 1903, due to unknown reasons. — The wall surrounding the cemetery was built by WPA in 1939-1940.

CONTACT Manager- Jamie C. Whitworth Gracelawn Cemetery 1407 N. Boulevard Edmond, OK 73034

Office (405) 216-7645 Cell (405) 403-3087 Jamie.Whitworth@edmondok.com

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DEPARTMENT: Cemetery

FUND: GENERAL FUND

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

Personal Services

164,009

237,038

201,077

244,607

255,708

252,918

257,064

261,763

9,661

13,918

13,903

18,050

18,050

18,050

18,050

18,050

39,152

63,415

63,400

93,065

93,065

93,065

93,065

93,065

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Transfers Out

114,159

105,035

105,035

143,164

137,595

140,600

143,682

146,844

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

326,981

419,406

383,415

498,886

504,418

504,633

511,861

519,722

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

101,448 9,711 1,611 1,389 114,159

88,970 10,197 1,668 4,200 105,035

88,970 10,197

113,717 10,707 14,541 4,200 143,164

107,322 11,242 14,831 4,200 137,595

109,468 11,804 15,128 4,200 140,600

111,658 12,394 15,431 4,200 143,682

113,891 13,014 15,739 4,200 146,844

Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

1,668 4,200

105,035

82

BUDGET YEAR

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FESTIVAL MARKETPLACE The Festival Market Place’s mission is to be a focal point for community life and a setting for cultural and civic activities and special events, which compliment the Festival Market Place and its location in the Downtown Edmond business district. The Festival Market Place is home to the Edmond Farmers Market (spring, summer and fall), many City of Edmond-Sponsored and Affiliated events, and can be rented for private functions, such as wedding receptions and customer appreciation events.

DIVISIONS Coordinator

Seasonals

Manages market program. We have an outdoor program in spring, summer and fall and a indoor market during the winter.

Assist coordinator with market/grocery pickup and other tasks; 2 PTE

The Edmond Farmers Market has been in operation since 1988 and started in the Downtown Community Center Parking Lot until the Festival Market Place was built/opened in May 2004. — The Market is the site of the popular Kentucky Daisy Statue. The statue represents the first female land owner, reporter Nanitta R.H. Daisey, who claimed land in the 1889 land run.

CONTACT Diane Self Ph (405) 359-4630 www.edmondparks.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

GOALS

GOALS

Provide a high quality Farmers Market that will provide local produce, made in Oklahoma items and educate the community on the benefits of buying local. (In progress)

Provide a high quality Farmers Market that will provide local produce, made in Oklahoma items and educate the community on the benefits of buying local.

Provide an alternate shopping experience for shoppers to reduce direct contact. (In progress)

Offer a location for individuals and organizations to rent for private and public events.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Maintain updated list of local vendors.

Search new vendors to participate in the market.

Create educational opportunities to discuss benefits of buying local.

Create new educational opportunities for market growth.

Offer an online shopping experience with pick-up or potential delivery options.

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STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

0-1-0

0-1-0

0-1-0

0-1-0

0-1-0

0-1-0

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DEPARTMENT: Festival Marketplace

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

FUND: GENERAL FUND

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

Personal Services

2,403

20,831

20,830

43,060

43,599

44,137

44,675

45,213

Materials & Supplies

4,187

4,165

4,925

9,990

8,512

6,490

9,012

5,915

18,669

46,100

31,625

45,100

45,950

47,650

48,700

48,700

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7,749

13,622

13,622

30,922

29,186

29,769

30,365

30,972

33,008

84,718

71,002

129,072

127,247

128,046

132,752

130,800

7,717 32 7,749

13,587 35 13,622

13,587

30,885 37 30,922

29,148 37 29,186

29,731 38 29,769

30,326 39 30,365

30,932 40 30,972

Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

35

13,622

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BUILDING AND FIRE CODE SERVICES The mission of the Building and Fire Code Services Department is to provide professional support in protecting the health, safety, and public welfare in the built environment of the community. Department employees perform plan review, permitting, and field inspections to ensure compliance with currently adopted building, state, and local codes consistent with the policies and ordinances adopted by the City of Edmond.

DIVISIONS Inspections

Plan Review

Inspect all residential and commercial construction to verify compliance with adopted codes; 8 FTE

Review building plans for compliance with adopted state and local construction codes; 2 FTE

Permitting

Management (Admin)

Provide customer service, process permit applications, contractor licensing, and issue certificate of occupancy documents; 2 FTE

Supervision, leadership, and administrative support to reach department goals efficiently and effectively; 4 FTE

Residential single-family dwelling permits increased by over 6000 new homes in the last 10 years. — Completed over 26000 annual inspections, issued over 6500 permits, and building permit valuations exceeded $350,000,000. — The department has 362 years of collective construction/trade industry experience and 138 years of combined employee dedicated service.

CONTACT Main Number Ph (405) 359-4780 buildingadministration @edmondok.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Economic Development- Support commercial and residential development through improving the review process.

Economic Development- Support commercial and residential development through improving the review process.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain, and develop a skilled, diverse, and inclusive workforce.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain, and develop a skilled, diverse, and inclusive workforce.

GOALS

GOALS

Improve Building and Fire Code Service’s team member communication with the site plan review team to clarify requirements and expectations for all departments involved with the site plan process. (In progress)

Improve Building and Fire Code Service’s team member communication with the site plan review team to clarify requirements and expectations for all departments involved with the site plan process. (Continued from FY 2021)

Centralize departmental policy and procedure manuals. (In progress)

Centralize departmental policy and procedure manuals. (Continued from FY 2021)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Round-table discussions with city organizations, to communicate vital involvement for consistent and standard permitting practices.

Spreadsheet will track all ordinances that have a contradiction or identify what is to be eliminated. Corrections being revised with code cycle updates.

Identify which organizations, throughout the city, need to be involved.

Continue updating inspection data configuration with the IT department.

Collaboration with the IT department for compliance of software systems applicable for updates.

Conduct training workshops within the department.

Shortcut on the drive for accessibility.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

16

16

16

16

16

16

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DEPARTMENT: Building Services

FUND: GENERAL FUND

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

1,212,887

1,397,365

1,345,983

Materials & Supplies

23,672

60,400

Other Services & Charges

68,243

Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

1,467,292

1,543,555

1,527,436

1,555,930

1,583,825

43,635

68,400

46,275

46,668

49,081

49,516

76,250

91,300

114,300

119,450

124,794

130,343

136,108

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

303,596

482,831

482,831

431,392

413,361

422,844

432,581

442,582

1,608,399

2,016,846

1,963,749

2,081,384

2,122,641

2,121,742

2,167,935

2,212,031

239,603 23,724 27,261 13,008 303,596

416,995 26,221 21,115 18,500 482,831

416,995 26,221

364,856 25,768 21,768 19,000 431,392

344,339 26,868 22,204 19,950 413,361

351,226 28,022 22,648 20,948 422,844

358,251 29,234 23,101 21,995 432,581

365,416 30,508 23,563 23,095 442,582

21,115 18,500

482,831

90

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

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CITY COUNCIL DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARY The Edmond City Council’s vision is that Edmond will be a diverse and innovative hometown committed to excellence through leadership, balanced growth, and cooperation. These high standards will only be accomplished in full partnership with the community. The mission of the Edmond City Council is to lead by setting policy for City direction, by balancing growth, and by serving as stewards of assets for today’s, as well as tomorrow’s, community & citizens. The following goals were adopted in the Fall of 2020.

CURRENT GOALS 1.

2.

3.

4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9.

Continued support of the Capital Improvement Projects (CIP) Advisory Board regarding the use of ¾ cent (2000) and ½ cent (2017) sales tax funds for: • Hafer Park baseball field updates • Gracelawn Cemetery expansion • Redesign of existing Kickingbird facilities to include clubhouse, tennis courts, and addition of pickleball courrts • Route 66 Trail • Stephenson Park redesign Continue actions that make downtown Edmond a destination for all to experience safely for living, shopping, entertainment or work Monitor and improve traffic through: • Continued implementation of the Phase III Intelligent Traffic System • Prioritization of efforts to improve traffic flow - Covell and Coltrane - 2nd and Boulevard - 2nd and Bryant - Danforth and Kelly Improved/enhanced coordination of brand identification, place making, and wayfinding Work with Urban Forestry Commission to focus on forming relationships with residential developers and creating open spaces and tree preservation Continued exploration of creation of a new Veterans Memorial based upon task force recommendations Complete development of Water Resources Recovery Facility to increase capacity and meet new regulatory standards Support development of the revised Water Treatment Plant expansion plan Conduct a feasibility study/analysis of comprehensive look at challenge of expanding city infrastructure into East Edmond

10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Pursue potential RFP’s for compatible Arcadia Lake development Explore potential increase of hotel/motel tax thorough CVB board committee Investigate Arcadia Lake trash problem and possible solutions Develop beautification project for I-35 rightof-way to potentially include signage, trees, and landscaping Partner with the Edmond Chamber of Commerce to implement a diversity and inclusion program

FUTURE GOALS 1.

2.

3.

4. 5. 6.

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Continue development efforts to become a preferred destination to experience art, entertainment, amateur sporting events and outdoor recreation, including possible partnership with UCO in a performing arts center Continue planning for economic development of I-35 corridor including adequate infrastructure improvements to improve traffic safety Promote Edmond as a livable community with access to recreation and transportation via: • Participation in Association of Central Oklahoma Governments’ Regional Transit Planning • Expansion of bike and multi-use trails • Invest in new and existing recreational sports facilities • Acquire public open space(s) for parks • Participate in Regional Transit Authority’s Regional Rail project Actively pursue expansion of library services Completion of Covell Parkway development Identify plans for redevelopment/ repurposing of the former Police Department site and other unused City of Edmond buildings

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DEPARTMENT: City Council

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION Personal Services

FUND: GENERAL FUND Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year BUDGET YEAR Revised FY 20-21 FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

26,090

24,545

24,545

49,090

50,977

49,090

49,090

49,090

2,787

8,750

8,750

7,250

7,250

7,250

8,750

8,750

61,146

193,000

205,100

269,397

200,900

163,530

203,530

206,000

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Transfers Out

571,429

552,173

552,173

633,550

598,045

610,006

622,206

634,650

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

661,451

778,468

790,568

959,287

857,172

829,876

883,576

898,490

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Transfer to CVB Transfer to Luminance/Elect Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

566,758 4,671 571,429

550,041 2,132 552,173

550,041

631,969 1,581 633,550

596,432 1,613 598,045

608,361 1,645 610,006

620,528 1,678 622,206

632,938 1,712 634,650

Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges

2,132

552,173

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HISTORICAL SOCIETY The Edmond Historical Society is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that was formed in 1983 and incorporated in 1984. It was formed to establish, maintain, and operate a local museum of history as well as to collect, preserve, and exhibit artifacts, photographs and documents that interpret the history and development of Edmond and the surrounding area.

PURPOSE • The Society shall assume the responsibility of all functions of the Museum under the direction of the Board of Directors. •

The Museum shall exhibit and interpret the history of Edmond and the surrounding area, shall engage traveling exhibits, and shall offer educational programs, including off-site exhibits.

• The Museum collection shall be the sole property of the Society as defined in the collection policy. • The Museum shall be open to the public on an established schedule at a minimum of 120 days per calendar year and closed on legal holidays, shall schedule special events, and shall be staffed by docents, volunteers, and/or staff during open hours.

The museum is housed in a historic National Guard Armory built in 1936, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. — The first family living in Edmond was John and Cordelia Steen and their son, John. They ran the train station before the Land Run.

CONTACT Ph (405) 340-0078 edmondhistory.org

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DEPARTMENT: Historical Society

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

FUND: GENERAL FUND Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year BUDGET YEAR Revised FY 20-21 FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

Personal Services

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Materials & Supplies

-

750

750

750

750

750

750

750

Direct Contribution-Society

246,000

246,000

246,000

266,000

266,000

266,000

266,000

266,000

Other Services & Charges

47,188

36,750

36,750

36,750

36,750

36,750

36,750

36,750

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30,477

8,999

8,999

9,542

9,276

9,462

9,651

9,844

323,665

292,499

292,499

313,042

312,776

312,962

313,151

313,344

26,740 3,737 30,477

5,387 3,612 8,999

5,387 3,612 8,999

5,992 3,550 9,542

5,656 3,621 9,276

5,769 3,693 9,462

5,884 3,767 9,651

6,002 3,843 9,844

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

The direct contribution to the Historical Society is shown separately above while the TOTAL line represent the complete support provided to the Society and the facilities occupied.

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PARKS AND RECREATION The Parks and Recreation Department’s vision is to provide a premier parks and recreation system with well-maintained facilities, outstanding programs and a customer loyalty focus. Funding for maintenance operations recreational programs comes from general tax revenues and the Park Tax Fund. New projects construction/renovations are funded thru Park Tax Fund and The City of Edmond’s Capital Improvement Project Fund (CIP). Development of trails, community parks and athletic facilities as well as increasing interactive programming for all ages is our current focus.

DIVISIONS Administration

Park Maintenance

Oversee department, facilitate 3 commissions and manage landscape contract services and sports partners; 3 FTE

Maintains parks and grounds of all parks and recreation facilities; 16 FTE Cemetery- 3 FTE

Recreation/ Farmers Market

Senior Center

Provides programs and events for the public; 3 FTE, 4 PTE, 3 Seasonal

Provides programs and events at the senior center; 5 FTE

Edmond has over 30 miles of paved multi-use trails in town and with 25 miles of current planned trails around and to Arcadia Lake. — Edmond Center Court which will open in 2020 will be one of the top tennis facilities in the country and will host many regional, state and national tennis events.

CONTACT Ph (405) 359-4630 www.edmondparks.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

Infrastructure- Give the same level of importance and attention to the maintenance of infrastructure as to new infrastructure.

Infrastructure- Give the same level of importance and attention to the maintenance of infrastructure as to new infrastructure.

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural, historical, and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident satisfaction.

High Performing Government- Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

GOALS

GOALS

Assure that the quality of all parks and facilities meet the public’s expectations. (In progress)

Plan for additional maintenance and and renovation of current amenities-will be more evident in FY22 as construction will start on several facilities.

Provide for additional recreational opportunities for all ages, skill levels and those not currently participating in specific activities – i.e. golf, tennis and outdoor programs. (In Progress)

Identify community facility and programming needs on the east side of Edmond-this will take some time as we have just started to research participants from east of I35 and potential partners for facilities, new parkland and program growth.

Use effective and efficient marketing methods to ensure that the public is well-informed of our offerings. (In Progress)

Look at our technology needs throughout our department (i.e. lake software and online registration, lake parking kiosks and “unmanned” entrance gates and security cameras at new and existing facilities).

PERFORMANCE MEASURES In our vision of providing a premier system and a goal of offering additional senior exercise programs, we will build two bocce ball courts outside of the senior center by June 2021.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Include next level supervision from each division in our monthly staff meetings for at least 3 times/year.

In our long-term goal of becoming an accredited agency we will divide specific responsibilities among key staff in the department by June 2021.

Look for a facility on the east side of Edmond where we can have 3 events for senior and/ or recreation participants - recreation class, special event, etc.

To become a more cohesiveness department, each division will be responsible to work through a self-help study/book of their choice by June 2021 (recreation/admin, senior center, golf, lake, park maintenance/ cemetery).

Add one parking kiosk at Arcadia Lake and determine its efficiency and effectiveness.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

22.5*-7-127

22.5*-7-127

22.5*-7-127

22.5*-7-127

22.5*-7-127

22.5*-7-127

*Staffing includes Park Admin, Park Maintenance, Cemetery, Recreation, Pelican Bay, Parks Tax, Mitch Park Maintenance crew. The MAC building custodian is counted as .5 FT in Parks and .5 FT in Senior Center.

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DEPARTMENT: Parks & Recreation

FUND: GENERAL FUND

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

1,150,652

1,267,285

1,267,285

Materials & Supplies

172,552

211,782

Other Services & Charges

955,221

Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

1,304,274

1,371,318

1,357,387

1,382,552

1,406,442

212,578

241,012

237,186

239,665

235,351

223,424

1,195,600

860,000

1,270,300

1,136,100

1,150,200

1,152,600

1,164,450

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

554,101

566,763

566,763

581,801

558,009

570,172

582,657

595,449

2,832,526

3,241,430

2,906,626

3,397,387

3,302,613

3,317,424

3,353,160

3,389,765

466,197 34,538 42,059 11,308 554,101

469,697 44,461 35,105 17,500 566,763

469,697 44,461

476,981 46,862 37,458 20,500 581,801

450,159 49,142 38,207 20,500 558,009

459,162 51,538 38,972 20,500 570,172

468,345 54,061 39,751 20,500 582,657

477,712 56,691 40,546 20,500 595,449

35,105 17,500

566,763

98

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

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STREET MAINTENANCE & CONSTRUCTION This department included all maintenance activities with Street Maintenance until the creation of the Field Services operation which started in FY 06-07 Budget. The remaining funds involve the expenditures of resources which are dedicated through the gasoline tax from the state. These will be used for major maintenance projects. Unused gasoline tax funds remain in the General Fund as “Other Restricted Purposes”.

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DEPARTMENT: Street Maint. & Const.

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

FUND: GENERAL FUND Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

Personal Services

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Materials & Supplies

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other Services & Charges

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

667,194

1,770,000

1,770,000

1,320,000

1,550,000

1,100,000

900,000

807,500

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Transfers Out

-

-

-

43,737

-

-

-

-

667,194

1,770,000

1,770,000

1,363,737

1,550,000

1,100,000

900,000

807,500

-

-

-

43,737 43,737

-

-

-

-

Capital Outlay

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

Streets Maint., Sign and Signals moved to Field Services Fund starting FY06/07.

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MUNICIPAL COURT SERVICES The Municipal Court is the judicial branch of city government and must maintain the independence of the Judiciary while strengthening relations with the citizens and the other branches of government. The fundamental purpose of the Municipal Court is to provide an impartial forum for citizens, ensure due process of law procedures and a commitment to administering justice in a fair, efficient and timely manner. The Municipal Court is responsible for case management, collection of fines, fees and state costs; filing citations/complaints; docket scheduling; issuing, tracking and clearing warrants; maintaining our records of collections, convictions and statistical data.

DIVISIONS Criminal Court

Traffic / Complaint Court

Filing, prosecution, processing of non-traffic offenses such as petit larceny, assault and battery, possession of marijuana etc

Filing, prosecution, processing of all traffic and citizen complaints

Juvenile Court We allow the University of Central Oklahoma Criminal Justice program to use our Court room for mock trials. — We partner with other agencies so juveniles can gain various community credit through their programs.

Provide rehabilitative services to youth and families through education, community-based programs and referrals to decrease incidences

CONTACT Ph (405) 359-4360 Email edmondok.com/MunicipalCourt

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior through public education and outreach to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease inlandfill waste.

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior through public education and outreach to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease inlandfill waste.

GOALS

GOALS

Issue a Request for Proposals for third party Court collections and implement collections program. (Complete)

Cross train on new Court Software system that is being implemented and going live in June/July 2021.

Improve customer service by reducing phone call wait times and abandoned calls. (Complete)

Create importing of data to Financial software to eliminate manual entries. To be able to begin electronic citations 100%.

Digitize current records that are retained in paper form and ensure implementation of electronic alternatives for future use. (In Progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES This continues to be an ongoing goal. On a monthly basis, records are scanned and many are then sent off-site. Additionally, our organization is in the test phase of implementing electronic citations. Once fully implemented, we will no longer issue paper tickets.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES The proposal was listed and a law firm was selected to be the third party provider of collection servcies for Municipal Court. The first batch of overdue cases was turned over to the third party in June 2019.

Reduce the amount of time creating manual documentation for Finance to enter into their financial software system.

Wait times and abandoned calls were reduced by tracking each through our phone system provider. This continues to be an ongoing goal. On a monthly basis, records are scanned and many are then sent off-site. Additionally, our organization is in the test phase of implementing electronic citations. Once fully implemented, we will no longer issue paper tickets.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) Support Staff:

CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

9-0-0

9-0-0

9-0-0

9-0-0

9-0-0

9-0-0

CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

0-2-0

0-2-0

0-2-0

0-2-0

0-2-0

0-2-0

Judicial Staff:

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DEPARTMENT: Municipal Court

FUND: GENERAL FUND

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

657,263

734,896

698,798

16,136

49,500

158,110

Capital Outlay Debt Service

Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year BUDGET YEAR Revised FY 20-21 FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

762,380

797,934

792,100

807,825

822,838

48,490

19,320

14,200

20,496

17,200

15,000

191,425

432,337

185,840

185,580

185,580

185,710

185,580

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

402,819

528,381

528,381

527,408

498,419

508,388

518,556

528,927

1,234,327

1,504,202

1,708,006

1,494,948

1,496,133

1,506,564

1,529,291

1,552,345

394,838 7,981 402,819

520,396 7,985 528,381

520,396 7,985 528,381

518,641 8,767 527,408

489,477 8,942 498,419

499,267 9,121 508,388

509,252 9,303 518,556

519,437 9,490 528,927

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COMMUNITY IMAGE The Community Image department is comprised of work groups: Code Enforcement & Urban Forestry. Though their daily duties differ, their primary goal is to support a healthy physical environment for the citizens and visitors.

DIVISIONS Code Enforcement

Urban Forestry

Proactively seeks compliance with municipal ordinances related to property management; 7 FTE

Provides tree related service programs. Adminsters commerical landscape and residential tree preservation ordinances; 5 FTE

Code Inspectors made over 3,400 investigations in 2020. — Our Urban Foresters manage pruning for clearance around Edmond Electric’s overhead lines, completing all circuits on a four-year cycle.

CONTACT Ryan Ochsner Ph (405) 359-4799

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in land fill waste.

Environmental Stewardship- Protect our natural resources through promotion and enhancement of green infrastructure. (i.e., preserving natural areas and watersheds, and beautifying parkways, medians, and public spaces).

Environmental Stewardship- Protect our natural resources through promotion and enhancement of green infrastructure. (i.e., preserving natural areas and watersheds, and beautifying parkways, medians, and public spaces).

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural, historical, and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident satisfaction.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

GOALS

GOALS

Continue to develop programs that partner with community groups and citizens.

Implement a program to divert internal tree debris from the landfill and towards reuse of the material

Implement further residential education of the Fats, Oil & Grease (FOG) program.

Support the Urban Forestry Commission’s development of a Residential landscape ordinance proposal

Continue to review ordinances used by Code Enforcement to meet developing community issues.

Develop a bi-lingual notice that we can use as a talking point when we see a person blowing grass clippings and other yard debris into the street.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Put together a “pre-development package” of educational urban forestry information for developers after code changes are implemented.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Tree trimmings from City operation are taken to a mulch producing facility.

Assist City Council in setting a tree canopy percentage goal and recommend ideas to support it.

Delivery of an ordinance proposal to City Council.

Assess public lands to identify opportunities to increase ecosystem services and public use.

Prevent foreign materials from entering storm water and sanitary sewer systems.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) Code Enforcement:

CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

6-1-0

6-1-0

6-1-0

6-1-0

6-1-0

6-1-0

CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

Urban Forestry:

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DEPARTMENT: Community Image

FUND: GENERAL FUND

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

798,960

931,583

53,203

Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

877,310

973,992

1,029,255

1,022,106

1,045,750

1,070,129

110,950

92,950

113,050

91,200

91,275

92,325

92,475

271,567

505,270

488,034

576,300

519,975

523,075

524,350

525,775

4,271

130,000

130,000

40,000

20,000

20,000

20,000

20,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

278,122

391,642

391,642

306,988

313,290

320,186

327,056

334,111

1,406,124

2,069,445 -

1,979,936

2,010,330

1,973,720

1,976,642

2,009,481

2,042,490

233,821 24,991 13,472 5,838 278,122

325,692 26,115 12,000 10,085 17,750 391,642

325,692 26,115 12,000 10,085 17,750

252,334 29,367 6,988 18,300 306,988

257,154 30,709 7,127 18,300 313,290

262,297 32,119 7,270 18,500 320,186

267,543 33,598 7,415 18,500 327,056

272,894 35,154 7,564 18,500 334,111

391,642

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BUDGET YEAR

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PLANNING MISSION STATEMENT Enhance quality of life of Edmond residents and visitors through the practice of professional planning.

DIVISIONS Long Range Planning

Current Planning

Implementation of Comprehensive Plan, Transportation, Long Range, ADA Transition, & Sustainability Plans; 3 FTE

Review of development applications and staff support to Planning Commission, CEUDB, BOA, and City Council; 3 FTE

Federal Funds Related to CDBG and CityLink; 1 FTE

Planning: 199 Applications for development processed in 2020. — CDBG: Distributed $755,808 in CARES funding to social service agencies in 2020. — City Link: 188,335 Ridership in 2020.

CONTACT Ph (405) 359-4790 planning@edmondok.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Economic Development- Revitalize and encourage development of commercial areas. (i.e. downtown, the south Broadway Corridor, the Route 66 Corridor, and the I-35 Corridor)

Economic Development- Revitalize and encourage development of commercial areas. (i.e. downtown, the south Broadway Corridor, the Route 66 Corridor, and the I-35 Corridor)

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

GOALS

GOALS

Continue the implementation of the 2014 Downtown Master Plan.

Continue the implementation of the 2014 Downtown Master Plan.

Continue the implementation of the Bicycle Master Plan and Trails Plan.

Continue the implementation of the Bicycle Master Plan and Trails Plan, and the development of the EdmondShift (Mobility) Plan.

Continue the implementation of the ADA Transition Plan.

Continue the implementation of the ADA Transition Plan

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Implement initial recommendations from the 2020 Downtown Parking Plan by revising parking standards in the Urban District.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Downtown Master Plan: Adopt updated design guidelines for the CEUD. Continue implementation of the 2020 Downtown Parking Study by pursuing a District Management Organization for the area.

Apply for recreation trails grant for trail connections. Apply for ODOT Grant to make ADA improvements along Edmond Road/2nd Street.

Bicycle Master Plan: Implement wayfinding through neighborhoods with pavement markings. ADA Transition Plan: Design and implement ADA improvement to and within City parks.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

7-0-0

7-0-0

7-0-0

7-0-0

7-0-0

7-0-0

(CDBG staff is not counted in the above totals.)

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DEPARTMENT: Planning & Zoning

FUND: GENERAL FUND

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

737,392

783,053

797,027

5,669

13,550

122,410

Capital Outlay Debt Service

Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year BUDGET YEAR Revised FY 20-21 FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

883,702

926,602

911,990

923,722

935,903

11,200

14,650

14,750

18,800

15,000

15,000

283,700

274,600

285,200

231,300

182,100

82,550

83,300

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

193,564

351,830

351,830

340,588

321,895

328,333

334,899

341,597

1,059,034

1,432,133

1,434,657

1,524,140

1,494,547

1,441,223

1,356,171

1,375,800

188,604 4,960 193,564

346,738 5,092 351,830

346,738

334,567 6,021 340,588

315,753 6,142 321,895

322,068 6,264 328,333

328,510 6,390 334,899

335,080 6,517 341,597

5,092

351,830

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PARKS AND RECREATION SPECIAL EVENTS The Parks Special Events Fund tracks activity and fees for special events provided through the Edmond Parks & Recreation Department’s Program Division.

The City of Edmond Parks and Recreation Department puts on community events for families, including concerts in the park, camping adventures, Daddy Daughter dances, movie nights, and more. October brings the largest event month, drawing close to 10,000 people with a movie night, family camp-out, Mummy and Son costume party, and a Trunk or Treat event.

CONTACT Sarah London Ph (405) 359-4580

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General Fund: Parks Special Events Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

12,375 1,864 300 14,539

17,000 250 4,500 21,750

17,000 250 4,500 21,750

17,000 250 4,500 21,750

17,170 250 4,545 21,965

17,342 250 4,590 22,182

17,516 250 4,636 22,402

17,690 250 4,682 22,622

79,653

94,192

81,629 103,379

81,629 103,379

85,029 106,779

87,729 109,694

91,094 113,276

95,476 117,878

100,778 123,400

455 12,108 12,563

1,000 17,350 18,350

18,350

1,200 17,850 19,050

950 17,650 18,600

950 16,850 17,800

950 16,150 17,100

950 16,150 17,100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

81,629

85,029

85,029

87,729

91,094

95,476

100,778

106,300

81,629

85,029

85,029

87,729

91,094

95,476

100,778

106,300

94,192

103,379

103,379

106,779

109,694

113,276

117,878

123,400

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT) OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

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1,000 17,350 -

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EDMOND ELECTRIC ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT The Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund has been established to stimulate the growth of Edmond’s economy by offering services that facilitate the growth and expansion of new and existing businesses and generating opportunities to increase the sales tax base of the City of Edmond. Funding for this activity is provided by Edmond Electric through a transfer of funds.

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General Fund: Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Interest Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

23,850 23,850

6,000 6,000

6,407 6,407

6,000 6,000

6,000 6,000

6,000 6,000

6,000 6,000

6,000 6,000

806,815

830,665

930,579 936,579

930,579 936,986

336,736 342,736

442,486 448,486

548,236 554,236

653,986 659,986

759,736 765,736

86 86

250 700,000 700,250

250 700,000 700,250

250 250

250 250

250 250

250 250

250 250

100,000 100,000

100,000 100,000

100,000 100,000

100,000 100,000

100,000 100,000

100,000 100,000

100,000 100,000

100,000 100,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

930,579

336,329

336,736

442,486

548,236

653,986

759,736

865,486

930,579

336,329

336,736

442,486

548,236

653,986

759,736

865,486

830,665

936,579

936,986

342,736

448,486

554,236

659,986

765,736

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT) OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

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COMMUNITY AGENCY REVIEW COMMISSION The Community Agency Review Commission performs an annual review of local community agencies to determine eligibility and necessity for funding. After the annual review the Commission issues a formal recommendation to the Edmond City Council, for funding of the agencies. A community agency is directly engaged in charitable, educational, health, social services, community enrichment or related activities, which provide a direct and distinct benefit to the City of Edmond and its residents. The community agency primarily serves those residing in the City of Edmond.

CRITERIA FOR FUNDING • Applying organizations shall conduct a recognized program of contracted service in or for the community, and must show evidence to the City of Edmond that it is effectively meeting a social need, and providing a direct and distinct benefit to the City of Edmond and its residents. • Applying organizations shall have a plan of organization which gives evidence of a properly chosen Board of Directors which meets at least quarterly, and which in actual fact assumes responsibility to the public for efficient management of the agency it represents. • Applying organizations must provide the City of Edmond with annual financial statements and annual statistical reports of services rendered. Agency shall have its finances audited annually by an auditing firm acceptable to the City of Edmond.

19 community and social agencies received assistance in Fiscal Year 2020. — The Community Agency Review Commission (CARC) has been in place since 1984. — The CARC is governed by a five-person commission.

• Applying organizations must provide to the City of Edmond a statement of budgetary needs and provide any other operational information upon request by the City of Edmond. • Applying organizations must complete and submit for approval the contract services application form. Submission of an application does not assure the social agency of financial assistance from the City of Edmond.

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DEPARTMENT: Social Agencies

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

FUND: GENERAL FUND Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

Personal Services

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Materials & Supplies

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

764,417

849,000

834,000

834,000

834,000

834,000

834,000

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Transfers Out

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

764,417

849,000

795,490

834,000

834,000

834,000

834,000

834,000

SOCIAL AGENCIES DETAIL: Edmond Family Counseling Liberty Fest HOPE Center UCO Sports & Recreation U R Special Ministries Ministries of Jesus Fostering Sweet Dreams Fnd Oklahoma Baptist Homes Child Lilyfield, Inc. Turning Point Ministries Edmond Mobile Meals Edmond Round-Up Club Parents Helping Parents Fine Arts Institute Character Council of Edmond Refined Silver Edmond Soccer Club Project 66 Food Pantry Mitch Park YMCA TOTAL

172,500 80,000 160,000 20,000 25,459 60,000 10,000 5,000 10,000 30,000 72,959 7,500 15,500 36,000 9,500 35,000 15,000 764,417

172,500 80,000 160,000 20,000 25,000 70,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 42,000 75,000 7,500 15,500 60,000 9,500 5,000 17,000 45,000 15,000 849,000

172,500 187,668 20,000 25,244 64,167 10,000 10,000 14,167 42,000 75,244 7,500 15,500 60,000 9,500 5,000 17,000 45,000 15,000 795,490

172,500 40,000 170,000 20,000 25,000 70,000 15,000 7,500 15,000 50,000 80,000 7,500 15,500 60,000 6,000 25,000 40,000 15,000 834,000

172,500 40,000 170,000 20,000 25,000 70,000 15,000 7,500 15,000 50,000 80,000 7,500 15,500 60,000 6,000 25,000 40,000 15,000 834,000

172,500 40,000 170,000 20,000 25,000 70,000 15,000 7,500 15,000 50,000 80,000 7,500 15,500 60,000 6,000 25,000 40,000 15,000 834,000

172,500 40,000 170,000 20,000 25,000 70,000 15,000 7,500 15,000 50,000 80,000 7,500 15,500 60,000 6,000 25,000 40,000 15,000 834,000

172,500 40,000 170,000 20,000 25,000 70,000 15,000 7,500 15,000 50,000 80,000 7,500 15,500 60,000 6,000 25,000 40,000 15,000 834,000

Other Services & Charges

795,490

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TAB PAGE

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS


SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS


SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER The mission of the Edmond Senior Center is: “The Edmond Senior Center provides comprehensive programs and services to improve the quality of life for mature adults through recreation, nutrition, socialization, education and referral.” Our continuing focus will be to strive for the highest quality leisure programs and activities for senior adults through diligent attention to our customers’ needs and interests.

EMPLOYEES:

5 FTE, 1 PTE

You are eligible to attend the senior center if you are 55+ years old. — Seniors can make reservations to join their friends for lunch and then head over to our game room for a round of pool or dominoes.

CONTACT LeAnna Holman Ph (405) 216-7604 edmondseniorcenter.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural, historical, and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident satisfaction.

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural, historical, and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident satisfaction.

GOALS

GOALS

Provide a premier parks and recreation system with outstanding programs and facilities. (Complete)

Provide a premier parks and recreation system with outstanding programs and facilities.

Promote public awareness of center activities to attract community resources and support. (Complete)

Promote public awareness of center activities to attract community resources and support. Promote wellness through exercise, diet, and education.

Promote wellness through exercise, diet, and education. (Complete)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Offer a diverse range of programs and activities for all ages, skills, socio-economic status, background and culture.

Offer a diverse range of programs and activities for all ages, skills, socio-economic status, background and culture.

Offer 5 day per week hot meal program.

Offer 5 day per week hot meal program. The Senior Center offered both hot meals and drive-thru pick up meals.

Offer a variety of exercise classes and monthly educational programs geared to mature adults.

Offer a variety of exercise classes and monthly educational programs geared to mature adults.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

5-1-0

5-1-0

5-1-0

5-1-0

5-1-0

5-1-0

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DEPARTMENT: Senior Center

FUND: GENERAL FUND

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

Personal Services

369,805

385,523

333,297

369,658

388,966

387,073

393,265

399,655

8,248

30,988

31,229

33,710

23,800

22,000

22,000

26,300

57,738

70,144

68,094

158,550

83,850

83,850

84,350

84,350

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Transfers Out

101,271

134,560

134,560

141,750

136,022

139,012

142,082

145,238

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

537,062

621,215

567,180

703,668

632,638

631,935

641,697

655,543

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

79,586 12,465 4,901 4,320 101,271

108,298 13,088 4,975 8,199 134,560

108,298 13,088

115,589 13,742 4,221 8,199 141,750

109,089 14,429 4,305 8,199 136,022

111,271 15,151 4,391 8,199 139,012

113,496 15,908 4,479 8,199 142,082

115,766 16,704 4,568 8,199 145,238

Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

4,975 8,199

134,560

122

BUDGET YEAR

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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Within the Planning Department, the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) oversees several projects and programs that meet the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development national objectives. The CDBG program utilizes its funds to assist extremely low, low, moderate income families and individuals, including the elderly, veterans, and persons with mental, physical and developmental disabilities with public services, housing rehabilitation, lead base paint abatement, fair housing issues, neighborhood tree program, and code compliance.

EMPLOYEES:

1–2

Edmond received a total of $740,808 from the CARES allocation in 2020 in addition to the annual allocation of $484,433. With those funds CDBG has assisted approximately 5,000 individuals and families, including providing funding to cover MiFi costs to those Edmond Public School Students that could not afford the service.

CONTACT Ph (405) 359-4694 https://www.edmondok.com/209/ Community-Development

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

GOALS

GOALS

Eliminate barriers and improve access to affordable, safe, energy efficient, and fair housing. (In progress)

Eliminate barriers and improve access to affordable, safe, energy efficient, and fair housing.

Provide needed public and social services, especially for those with functional needs. (In progress)

Fund non-profit organizations that provide assistance to low-mod income residents, senior citizens, residents with mobilitylimitations, uninsured and under-insured residents with prescriptions and/or lab cost, food, clothing, transportation, meals, and promote fair housing.

Support neighborhood organization and community. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Assisted 10 homeowners with homerehabilitation projects that prevented homelessness.

Preservation of existing housing stock, particularly in the CDBG target area where the greatest concentration of lower income individuals and families reside.

Provided assistance to over 3,000 individuals/ families in public and social services.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Assist 10 homeowners with homerehabilitation projects that prevented homelessness. Provide assistance to over 3,500 individuals/ families in public and social services.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

1-0-0

1-0-0

1-0-0

1-0-0

1-0-0

1-0-0

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CDBG Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Charges for Services Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

548,681 548,681

726,922 726,922

(86,247)

(100,047) -

-

1,182,752 1,182,752

(100,047) -

619,833 619,833 (248,491) -

462,434

626,875

1,082,705

371,342

86,631 139 83,480 372,419 -

56,807 1,950 99,710 557,489 -

59,671 1,900 1,247,144 -

57,241 1,950 93,710 491,858 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

542,669

715,956

1,308,715

644,759

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

(19,812)

(22,481)

(22,481)

(17,999)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(19,812)

(22,481)

(22,481)

(17,999)

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services General Fund Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

-

-

-

-

(100,047)

(111,562)

(248,491)

(291,416)

(100,047)

(111,562)

(248,491)

(291,416)

462,434

626,875

1,082,705

371,342

19,512 300 19,812

22,143 338 22,481

22,143

17,648 352 17,999

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ASSET FORFEITURE FUND The Asset Forfeiture Fund has been established to account for the Edmond Police Department’s share of assets that have been seized. Assets seized can vary from monetary instruments (cash, checks, stocks, bonds, etc.), hauling conveyances (cars, trucks, boats, airplanes, etc.) or any other real property with monetary value. The seizures are the result of a criminal investigation and are divided among all the agencies assisting in the investigation based on their level of involvement.

DIVISIONS Federal Asset Forfeitures

State Asset Forfeitures

This account is used to record receipts and expenditures of funds received through seizures in federal court.

This account is used to record receipts and expenditures of funds received through seizures in state court.

Money from this fund has been used to purchase: • In Car Cameras • Body Cameras • Command Post • Rescue Vehicle

CONTACT Non-Emergency Number Ph (405) 359-4338 EdmondPD.com

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Asset Forfeiture Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

6,015

2,000 2,000

2,000 2,000

2,000 2,000

2,000 2,000

2,000 2,000

831,268 87,259 -

831,268 87,259 -

532,848 -

230,778 -

172,078 -

113,378 -

54,678 -

1,014,351

920,527

924,542

534,848

232,778

174,078

115,378

56,678

43,437 31,025 21,361 -

161,931 50,700 120,000 -

187,627 50,700 153,367

57,370 20,700 226,000 -

40,000 20,700 -

40,000 20,700 -

40,000 20,700 -

40,000 20,700 -

95,824

332,631

391,694

304,070

60,700

60,700

60,700

60,700

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

831,268

587,896

532,848

230,778

172,078

113,378

54,678

(4,022)

918,527

587,896

532,848

230,778

172,078

113,378

54,678

(4,022)

1,014,351

920,527

924,542

534,848

232,778

174,078

115,378

56,678

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

24,493 153,803 178,296

2,000 2,000

836,054

6,015

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services General Fund Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

87,259

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PARK TAX FUND The Park Tax Fund is a dedicated 1/8 cent City sales tax for operations and improvements within the Parks & Recreation Department and its various divisions such as Arcadia Lake, KickingBird Golf & Tennis and our sports partners—such as EASI, Edmond Soccer, Rodeo, Adult Softball, Lacrosse benefit from this funding source.

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Fund Budget Summary

Park Tax Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

105,266 2,486,846

2,475,619 10,000 163,485 2,649,104

2,525,132 10,000 163,685 2,698,817

2,575,634 10,000 163,785 2,749,419

2,627,147 10,000 163,885 2,801,032

2,679,690 10,000 163,985 2,853,675

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue EPS Reimbursement Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

2,383,014 86,113 609,034 77,528 3,155,689

2,363,142 10,000 105,266 2,478,408

2,363,142

1,564,017

2,532,550 546,024 -

2,532,550 546,024 -

2,531,318 -

2,298,727 -

1,712,412 -

1,555,035 -

1,718,253 -

4,719,706

5,556,982

5,565,420

5,180,422

4,997,544

4,461,831

4,356,067

4,571,928

409,400 74,863 559,534 227,160 -

497,974 56,043 655,980 1,450,000 -

463,723 53,018 679,820 1,450,000

529,688 63,300 670,300 1,450,000 -

558,353 63,300 670,300 1,800,000 -

554,669 63,300 670,300 1,425,000 -

565,798 63,300 670,300 1,150,000 -

577,515 63,300 670,300 1,200,000 -

1,270,957

2,659,997

2,646,561

2,713,288

3,091,953

2,713,269

2,449,398

2,511,115

18,438

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

(370,175)

(387,541)

(387,541)

(168,407)

(193,179)

(193,527)

(188,416)

(219,849)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(370,175)

(387,541)

(387,541)

(168,407)

(193,179)

(193,527)

(188,416)

(219,849)

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Restricted (Reserve for Capital Improvements) Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES

2,527,651 546,024 4,899

TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Transfers - EE Debt Golf Course Fund Arcadia Lake Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

-

2,509,444

2,531,318

2,298,727

1,712,412

1,555,035

1,718,253

1,840,963

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3,078,574

2,509,444

2,531,318

2,298,727

1,712,412

1,555,035

1,718,253

1,840,963

4,719,706

5,556,982

5,565,420

5,180,422

4,997,544

4,461,831

4,356,067

4,571,928

41,156 4,629 87,829 3,377 1,667 1,516 110,833 119,167 370,175

61,178 8,291 4,072 8,000 6,000 100,000 200,000 387,541

61,178 8,291

40,606 9,337 4,464 8,000 6,000 100,000 168,407

38,323 9,803 4,553 8,000 7,500 125,000 193,179

39,089 10,294 4,644 8,000 6,500 125,000 193,527

39,871 10,808 4,737 8,000 125,000 188,416

40,668 11,349 4,832 8,000 30,000 125,000 219,849

130

4,072 8,000

6,000

100,000 200,000 387,541

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CEMETERY CARE FUND The Cemetery Care Fund has been established to account for 12.5% of all monies received from the sale of lots and interments in accordance with state law. Monies received must be used to purchase lands for cemeteries and for making capital improvements. Interest earned may be used for improving, caring for and beautifying cemetery property.

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Fund Budget Summary

Cemetery Care Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

23,394 6,963 30,357

21,675 500 22,175

23,610

25,068 500 25,568

25,569 500 26,069

26,081 500 26,581

26,602 500 27,102

27,134 500 27,634

141,432

152,205 17,063 -

152,205 17,063 -

189,978 -

189,546 -

212,615 -

224,196 -

248,298 -

171,789

191,443

192,878

215,546

215,615

239,196

251,298

275,932

2,521 -

3,000 -

3,000 23,000 -

3,000 -

3,000 12,000 -

3,000 -

3,000 -

21,675 1,935

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

2,900 -

2,521

3,000

2,900

26,000

3,000

15,000

3,000

3,000

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

152,205

188,443

189,978

189,546

212,615

224,196

248,298

272,932

169,268

188,443

189,978

189,546

212,615

224,196

248,298

272,932

171,789

191,443

192,878

215,546

215,615

239,196

251,298

275,932

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Restricted (Reserve for Capital Improvements) Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Transfers - EE Debt Golf Course Fund Arcadia Lake Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

17,063

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AMBULATORY SERVICES FUND The Ambulatory Services Fund provides funding of the City of Edmond’s Ambulance Services through the regional Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA). It primarily covers those citizens who have elected to participate in the TotalCare Program which began in FY09-10.

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Ambulatory Services Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

828,500

945,587 3,500 949,087

964,499 3,500 967,999

983,789 3,500 987,289

1,003,465 3,500 1,006,965

1,021,981 3,500 1,025,481

BUDGET YEAR

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

883,108 27,591 910,699

825,000 3,500 828,500

764,744

922,031 66,933 -

922,031 66,933 -

1,114,237 -

1,338,927 -

1,570,461 -

1,807,216 -

2,049,176 -

1,675,443

1,817,464

1,817,464

2,063,324

2,306,926

2,557,750

2,814,181

3,074,657

9,243 648,084 -

12,000 660,020 -

12,000 660,020 -

12,000 673,520 -

12,000 687,220 -

12,000 700,685 -

12,000 714,418 -

12,000 714,418 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

657,328

672,020

672,020

685,520

699,220

712,685

726,418

726,418

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

(29,151)

(31,207)

(31,207)

(38,877)

(37,245)

(37,849)

(38,587)

(39,327)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(29,151)

(31,207)

(31,207)

(38,877)

(37,245)

(37,849)

(38,587)

(39,327)

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

825,000 3,500

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services General Fund Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

922,031

1,114,237

1,114,237

1,338,927

1,570,461

1,807,216

2,049,176

2,308,912

988,964

1,114,237

1,114,237

1,338,927

1,570,461

1,807,216

2,049,176

2,308,912

1,675,443

1,817,464

1,817,464

2,063,324

2,306,926

2,557,750

2,814,181

3,074,657

29,151 29,151

25,701 5,506 31,207

25,701

33,049 5,828 38,877

31,191 6,054 37,245

31,814 6,035 37,849

32,451 6,136 38,587

33,100 6,227 39,327

66,933

134

5,506

31,207

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FIRE DEPARTMENT The mission statement of the Edmond Fire Department is “Trustworthy Service-Through Continuous Improvement.” We accomplish this through preparedness, emergency response, prevention, education, and training.

DIVISIONS Administration

Training

Provide oversight and support for all departmental functions; 8 FTE

Provide ongoing training to maintain skills proficiency; 4 FTE

Fire Prevention

Emergency Medical Services

Conduct investigations, business inspections, enforce fire codes and provide education; 5 FTE

Provides continuing education, medical training, certification, and quality assurance; 3 FTE

Fire Suppression Since we opened Fire Station 5, call volume has more than doubled from 4,052 to more than 8,900 emergency incidents in a calendar year. — Through our Children’s Safety Village and other efforts to provide outreach, we can contact around 20,000 children and adults annually with fire and safety related messages.

Protect life and property through response to emergency calls within the community; 114 FTE

CONTACT Fire Administration Ph (405) 216-7304

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal responsibility by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities and exploring internal and external partnerships.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

GOALS

GOALS

Utilize technology and current research to ensure efficient and effective operations and services. (In progress)

Utilize technology and current research to ensure efficient and effective operations and services.

Continue to improve communication among all divisions of the department. (Complete)

Continue to improve communication among all divisions of the department.

Work toward continual improvement. (Complete)

Plan for the growth and needs of our city and department.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Transition to Lexipol online platform for policies and procedures.

Fully implement Operative IQ software for inventory of apparatus, EMS equipment and tracking of narcotics.

Implement Operative IQ software for inventory of apparatus, EMS equipment and tracking of narcotics.

Regular station visits from each division and Chief Officer.

Regular station visits from each division and Chief Officer.

Work with Planning Department to perform an internal Fire Station Location Study in 2021 to allow us to identify sites for future stations by June of 2022.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

128-0-0

134-0-0

134-0-0

134-0-0

134-0-0

134-0-0

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Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

41,151 8,366,541

4,951,238 22,627 6,000 65,000 44,488 5,089,353

5,050,263 23,079 6,000 65,000 45,378 5,189,720

5,151,268 23,541 6,000 65,000 46,285 5,292,094

5,254,294 24,011 6,000 65,000 47,211 5,396,516

5,359,379 24,492 6,000 65,000 48,155 5,503,026

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

4,766,028 1,000 17,468 347,438 92,845 5,224,778

4,726,750 6,000 65,000 41,151 4,838,901

4,726,750 3,527,640

15,891,414

16,550,772 1,520,044 -

16,550,772 1,520,044 -

20,722,919 -

17,275,673 -

15,963,689 -

12,575,212 -

10,932,383 -

21,116,193

22,909,717

26,437,357

25,812,272

22,465,393

21,255,783

17,971,728

16,435,409

17,894,962 593,046 620,586 947,719 -

19,316,193 998,800 1,147,500 71,000 -

18,622,899 1,110,800 1,000,481 147,762

20,622,508 1,004,500 1,056,000 2,316,000 -

22,328,841 771,200 917,000 328,000 -

22,717,545 792,500 1,222,000 2,188,000 -

22,986,301 773,400 930,000 978,000 -

23,431,722 762,000 908,000 114,000 -

6,000 65,000

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

20,056,312

21,533,493

20,881,942

24,999,008

24,345,041

26,920,045

25,667,701

25,215,722

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

19,253,550 (2,242,614)

18,943,112 (3,775,608)

18,943,112 (3,775,608)

20,303,764 (3,841,355)

21,144,413 (3,301,076)

21,662,678 (3,423,205)

22,184,441 (3,556,085)

22,724,174 (3,720,088)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

17,010,936

15,167,504

15,167,504

16,462,409

17,843,337

18,239,473

18,628,356

19,004,086

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16,550,772

16,543,728

20,722,919

17,275,673

15,963,689

12,575,212

10,932,383

10,223,773

18,070,816

16,543,728

20,722,919

17,275,673

15,963,689

12,575,212

10,932,383

10,223,773

21,116,193

22,909,717

26,437,357

25,812,272

22,465,393

21,255,783

17,971,728

16,435,409

1,404,298 200,000 367,330 270,986 2,242,614

1,656,255 1,503,976 290,377 325,000 3,775,608

1,656,255 1,503,976

1,605,697 1,410,000 500,657 325,000 3,841,355

1,515,406 925,000 510,671 350,000 3,301,076

1,545,714 981,607 520,884 375,000 3,423,205

1,576,628 1,048,155 531,302 400,000 3,556,085

1,608,161 1,145,000 541,928 425,000 3,720,088

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services General Fund Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

1,520,044

138

290,377 325,000

3,775,608

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POLICE The mission of the Edmond Police Department is “Trustworthy Service” by partnering with the community in the protection of life, property, public peace, and individual rights. Guided by the Community Oriented Policing philosophy, the Edmond Police Department focuses on building relationships with all segments the Edmond community to improve our citizen’s quality of life. Engagement activities such as the Citizen’s Police Academy, the School Resource Officer program, Community Oriented Policing Leadership Council, and Coffee with a Cop events increase trust between citizens and the Officers that serve them.

DIVISIONS Administration

Patrol

Provide oversight and supports Technology Services, Crime Analysis, Planning & Research and Public Information Officer; 10 Employees

94 commissioned Officers and 1 non-sworn position. Respond to calls for assistance, traffic. Has 12 Officers in Edmond Public Schools.

Criminal Investigation

Special Services

21 commission Officers and 5 non-sworn positions. Follow up on crimes,provide support for digital forensic examinations.

1 commissioned Officer and 30 non-sworn positions, 2 PT. Records Detention, Animal Services, Property & Custodial services.

The Edmond Police Department has three K9s. Jager is a German Shepard, Kor is a Czech Shepard, and Robbie is a Dutch Shepard. — The Department responded to 31,277 Calls for Service in 2020. — There were 1,252 traffic collision reports filed in 2020.

CONTACT Non-Emergency Number Ph (405) 359-4338 EdmondPD.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain and grow a skilled and inclusive workforce. Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

GOALS Expand the existing Animal Shelter to meet the current and future needs of the City of Edmond. (Complete)

GOALS

Maintain police community engagement by utilizing social media. (In progress)

The Edmond Police Department property room will become accredited by the International Association for Property and Evidence (IAPE).

Maintain Edmond’s high level of community safety. (In progress)

Maintain police community engagement by utilizing social media.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Maintain Edmond’s high level of community safety by identifying and assigning resources to high crime areas, high traffic and collision locations.

Maintain a collision rate no greater than one standard deviation from the five-year average. Track the number of ‘likes’ to the Police Facebook page.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Maintain a part one crime rate no greater than one standard deviation from the 5 year average.

Maintain a collision rate no greater than one standard deviation from the five-year average. Track the number of ‘likes’ to the Police Facebook page. Maintain a part one crime rate no greater than one standard deviation from the 5 year average.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

163-0-0

165-0-0

166-0-0

166-0-0

166-0-0

166-0-0

(Includes Special Services, Patrol, Investigations, and Animal Welfare.)

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Police Public Safety Limited Tax Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

25,000 5,011,379

2,475,609 150,000 3,000 35,000 25,000 2,688,609

2,525,132 150,000 3,000 35,000 75,000 2,788,132

2,575,634 150,000 3,000 35,000 75,000 2,838,634

2,627,147 150,000 3,000 35,000 75,000 2,890,147

2,679,690 150,000 3,000 35,000 75,000 2,942,690

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

2,383,014 99,124 232,438 384,031 3,098,607

2,363,142 150,000 3,000 35,000 25,000 2,576,142

2,363,142 2,585,237

8,454,190

8,364,982 2,079,310 -

8,364,982 2,079,310 -

13,151,111 -

11,185,901 -

10,182,401 -

10,003,738 -

10,095,728 -

11,552,797

13,020,434

15,455,671

15,839,720

13,974,033

13,021,035

12,893,885

13,038,418

19,365,812 680,307 565,057 23,447 -

20,923,124 1,442,330 824,192 -

20,923,124 1,442,330 662,483 -

22,063,254 1,640,814 946,686 -

23,049,119 1,139,312 946,686 -

22,894,916 1,044,031 965,436 -

23,121,959 1,099,184 984,186 -

23,483,658 1,166,011 1,007,936 -

3,000 35,000

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

20,634,623

23,189,646

23,027,937

24,650,754

25,135,117

24,904,383

25,205,329

25,657,605

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

23,617,689 (4,091,571)

23,236,883 (4,573,156)

25,296,533 (4,573,156)

24,905,951 (4,909,016)

25,937,147 (4,593,662)

26,572,885 (4,685,799)

27,212,914 (4,805,742)

27,874,987 (4,920,382)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

19,526,118

18,663,727

20,723,377

19,996,935

21,343,485

21,887,086

22,407,172

22,954,605

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES

8,364,982

8,494,515

13,151,111

11,185,901

10,182,401

10,003,738

10,095,728

10,335,418

10,444,292

8,494,515

13,151,111

11,185,901

10,182,401

10,003,738

10,095,728

10,335,418

TOTAL ESTIMATED USES

11,552,797

13,020,434

15,455,671

15,839,720

13,974,033

13,021,035

12,893,885

13,038,418

2,551,399 614,667 522,244 403,261 4,091,571

2,830,919 843,241 458,996 440,000 4,573,156

2,830,919 843,241

2,765,218 869,269 214,320 620,209 440,000 4,909,016

2,609,724 901,324 632,614 450,000 4,593,662

2,661,919 918,614 645,266 460,000 4,685,799

2,715,157 962,414 658,171 470,000 4,805,742

2,769,460 999,587 671,335 480,000 4,920,382

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services General Fund Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

2,079,310

142

458,996 440,000

4,573,156

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VISIT EDMOND Visit Edmond promotes Edmond, Oklahoma as a destination in the state and region, and is a resource for newcomers and residents. We invite and encourage visitors and residents to dine, shop, see, play and stay in Edmond.

MISSION STATEMENT Visit Edmond strives to facilitate positive visitor experiences for leisure travelers, conference, meeting and sporting event attendees. We promote Edmond events, amenities and attractions to visitors, newcomers and citizens. Our goal is to become recognized as an established travel destination in this region.

DIVISIONS Group Sales

Conference Services & Marketing

Brings visitors, meetings, conferences, events and ultimately business to Edmond; 1 FTE

Connects meeting planners to Edmond and provides area info to attendees; 1 FTE

Administration & Communication

Director

Manages social media, email newsletter, website, event calendar and digital publications; 1 FTE

Leads staff and Board members to elevate Edmond tourism; 1 FTE

Tourism is Oklahoma’s third largest industry. — Edmond has more than 40 miles of multi-purpose trails. — Edmond features 13.4 miles of Historic Route 66 and includes several attractions including the 1889 Territorial Schoolhouse and the famous Blue Hippo.

CONTACT Jennifer Seaton- Tourism Director Ph (405) 341-4344 jseaton@VisitEdmondOK.com www.VisitEdmondOK.com @VisitEdmond

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural and recreational facilities, and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural and recreational facilities, and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by increasing efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring internal and external financial partnerships.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by increasing efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring internal and external financial partnerships.

GOALS

GOALS

Increase Sunday–Wednesday hotel room nights.

Promote Edmond as a premier visitor destination.

Determine appropriate spending levels for event support and sponsorships.

Increase Visit Edmond’s financial resources and support for events coming to Edmond.

Develop strategic partner alliances to promote Edmond to visitors.

Develop marketing plan.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Increase visibility through www.VisitEdmondOK.com, social media, Travel OK, Google, TripAdvisor, Yelp, Etc.

Performance measures include promoting art on Visit Edmond’s social media, email newsletter and website, collaborating with eight departments on a wayfinding plan and RFQ, partnering with the Oklahoma Tax Commission to collect lodging tax from hotels and short term rentals following approval by the Visit Edmond Tourism Advisory Board and City Council, updating the Visit Edmond Grant Program as needed, and implementing digital media and social media advertising.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Host quarterly hotel meetings with Edmond hotel general managers and directors of sales to collaborate and discuss upcoming events and conferences. Promote Edmond to potential visitors through ads, travel shows & associations. Distribute Event Support Program applications to area event directors to apply for funding. Meet with the tourism board of directors to review applications and reward funds. Regularly speak at professional meetings to inform and motivate partners about Edmond Tourism and cultivate strategic alliances.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

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Visit Edmond 130093 Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

19,890 468,135

478,652 500 22,217 501,369

488,225 500 22,661 511,386

497,989 500 23,114 521,603

507,949 500 23,577 532,026

518,108 500 24,048 542,656

BUDGET YEAR

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

449,831 1,262 22,390 473,482

575,000 500 20,000 595,500

273,843

169,369 -

169,369 -

150,632 -

66,470 -

(34,702) -

(128,700) -

(237,468) -

747,325

764,869

637,504

652,001

577,856

486,901

403,326

305,188

273,244 4,816 137,693 -

275,201 4,200 141,796 -

290,533 1,250 106,025 -

313,546 2,950 98,300 -

332,737 2,950 99,950 -

330,802 2,950 103,591 -

338,917 4,700 117,553 -

346,759 5,200 134,211 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

415,753

421,197

397,808

414,796

435,637

437,343

461,170

486,170

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

(162,203)

100,000 (168,054)

65,000 (154,064)

(170,735)

(176,920)

(178,259)

(179,624)

(181,016)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(162,203)

(68,054)

(89,064)

(170,735)

(176,920)

(178,259)

(179,624)

(181,016)

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

447,058 1,187

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES

-

-

-

-

169,369

275,618

150,632

66,470

(34,702)

(128,700)

(237,468)

(361,999)

169,369

275,618

150,632

66,470

(34,702)

(128,700)

(237,468)

(361,999)

TOTAL ESTIMATED USES

747,325

764,869

637,504

652,001

577,856

486,901

403,326

305,188

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services General Fund Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) EPWA Economic Development Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

60,757 2,285 99,161 0 162,203

55,936 2,118 110,000 168,054

55,936

68,605 2,130 100,000 170,735

64,747 2,173 110,000 176,920

66,042 2,216 110,000 178,259

67,363 2,261 110,000 179,624

68,711 2,306 110,000 181,016

146

2,118

96,010 154,064

-

-

-

-

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CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND The Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund has been established to account for 20% of all monies received from the sale of lots and interments in accordance with state law. Monies received must be used to purchase lands for cemeteries and for making capital improvements. Interest earned may be used for improving, caring for maintaining the existing cemetery and beautifying cemetery property.

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Fund Budget Summary

Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

37,430 646 38,076

33,000 300 33,300

33,300

33,000 400 33,400

33,000 500 33,500

33,000 500 33,500

33,000 500 33,500

33,000 500 33,500

62,314

100,390 -

100,390 -

133,090 -

165,890 -

198,790 -

231,690 -

264,590 -

100,390

133,690

133,690

166,490

199,390

232,290

265,190

298,090

-

500 100 -

500 100 -

500 100 -

500 100 -

500 100 -

500 100 -

500 100 -

33,000 300

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

-

600

600

600

600

600

600

600

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

177 100,213

133,090

133,090

165,890

198,790

231,690

264,590

297,490

100,390

133,090

133,090

165,890

198,790

231,690

264,590

297,490

100,390

133,690

133,690

166,490

199,390

232,290

265,190

298,090

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Restricted (Reserve for Capital Improvements) Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfall*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Transfers - EE Debt Golf Course Fund Arcadia Lake Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

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REAL PROPERTY FUND The Real Property Fund has been established to accumulate resources for future real property acquisitions of the City. Initially financing was provided by a one-time transfer of $463,230 reserved for land acquisition in the Capital Improvements Fund. Current funding is being provided by transfers from the Hospital Sale Trust Fund.

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Real Property Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

1,300

1,400 1,400

1,500 1,500

1,500 1,500

1,500 1,500

1,500 1,500

128,005 -

128,005 -

127,805 -

127,705 -

127,705 -

127,705 -

127,705 -

128,018

129,305

129,305

129,205

129,205

129,205

129,205

129,205

13 -

1,500 -

1,500 -

1,500 -

1,500 -

1,500 -

1,500 -

13

1,500

439,500

1,500

1,500

1,500

1,500

1,500

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

-

-

438,000 -

-

-

-

-

-

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

-

-

438,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

128,005

127,805

127,805

127,705

127,705

127,705

127,705

127,705

128,005

127,805

127,805

127,705

127,705

127,705

127,705

127,705

128,018

129,305

129,305

129,205

129,205

129,205

129,205

129,205

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

2,878 2,878

1,300 1,300

125,140

1,300

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services General Fund Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

150

1,500 438,000

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HOSPITAL SALE TRUST FUND This fund accounts for the proceeds received from the 1981 sale of the Edmond Memorial Hospital. Its only revenue source is interest earnings from the investment of the proceeds. The interest earnings may be used for capital improvements as determined by the City Council and the proceeds may be used for projects only as approved by a vote of the citizens of Edmond.

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Hospital Sale Trust Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Interest Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

212,037 212,037

10,000 10,000

7,515,060

7,724,897 -

7,727,097

7,734,897

2,200 -

2,000

10,000 (2,315) 7,685

10,000 10,000

10,000 10,000

10,000 10,000

10,000 10,000

10,000 10,000

7,724,897 -

7,292,582 -

7,300,582 -

7,308,582 -

7,316,582 -

7,324,582 -

7,732,582

7,302,582

7,310,582

7,318,582

7,326,582

7,334,582

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

2,000 -

2,200

2,000

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

-

-

(438,000)

-

-

-

-

-

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

-

-

(438,000)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7,724,897

7,732,897

7,292,582

7,300,582

7,308,582

7,316,582

7,324,582

7,332,582

7,724,897

7,732,897

7,292,582

7,300,582

7,308,582

7,316,582

7,324,582

7,332,582

7,727,097

7,734,897

7,732,582

7,302,582

7,310,582

7,318,582

7,326,582

7,334,582

-

-

438,000 438,000

-

-

-

-

-

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services General Fund Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

152

2,000

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TAB PAGE INSERT

CAPITAL PROJECTS


CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS


ART IN PUBLIC PLACES Ordinance purpose is to provide means to fund the acquisition of works of art by the City and which art shall be in the City’s collection, to create a Visual Arts Commission (VAC), to provide a means to select works of art for the collection, to provide for the display of the collection, and to provide for the maintenance and repair of the works of art in the collection (Ord.2653, 1, Oct.8, 2001).

The Visual Arts Commission worked with Edmond Electric in the pilot test of the Outside the Box program to select artworks for four new utility box wraps installed in 2020. — 260-Current number of pieces in the City’s public art inventory. — During 2020, the demand for public art greatly increased and the Visual Arts Commission partnered on 17 new art pieces.

CONTACT Cinda Covel- Art Liaison Ph (405) 359-4554 Cinda.Covel@edmondok.com

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Fund Budget Summary

Art in Public Places Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

1,000 103,000 104,000

1,000 103,000 104,000

1,000 103,000 104,000

1,000 103,000 104,000

BUDGET YEAR

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

3,316 329,780 333,096

1,000 103,000 104,000

253,000 254,000

1,000 103,000 104,000

31,828

96,744 -

96,744 -

65,244 -

166,974 -

268,832 -

370,647 -

472,419 -

364,924

200,744

350,744

169,244

270,974

372,832

474,647

576,419

5 8,265 416,935 -

15,000 200,000 -

25 15,000 563,475 -

25 15,000 802,475 -

25 15,000 703,975 -

25 15,000 589,975 -

25 15,000 534,975 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

425,205

215,000

698,500

578,500

817,500

719,000

605,000

550,000

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

163,227 (6,202)

269,000 (6,000)

419,000 (6,000)

578,500 (2,270)

817,500 (2,142)

719,000 (2,185)

605,000 (2,229)

550,000 (2,273)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

157,025

263,000

413,000

576,230

815,358

716,815

602,771

547,727

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

96,744

248,744

65,244

166,974

268,832

370,647

472,419

574,146

96,744

248,744

65,244

166,974

268,832

370,647

472,419

574,146

364,924

200,744

350,744

169,244

270,974

372,832

474,647

576,419

1,205 4,997 6,202

1,000 5,000 6,000

1,000

2,270 2,270

2,142 2,142

2,185 2,185

2,229 2,229

2,273 2,273

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

1,000

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Restricted (Reserve for Capital Improvements/Self-Insured) Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Transfers - EE Debt Golf Course Fund Arcadia Lake Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

154

15,000 683,500

5,000

6,000

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CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT FUND The Capital Improvements Fund has been established to account for major capital improvements and ADA (Americans’ with Disability Act) projects that are finance by the General Fund and other designated sources.

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Fund Budget Summary

Capital Improvements Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

(14,633) 650,000 635,367

108,500 5,000 113,500

113,500

2,500 2,500

2,500 2,500

2,500 2,500

2,500 2,500

-

108,500

5,000

1,299,117

224,264 -

224,264 -

20,051 -

22,401 -

24,751 -

27,101 -

29,451 -

1,934,484

337,764

337,764

22,551

24,901

27,251

29,601

29,451

1,379 193,074

100

100

150

150

150

150

150

3,142,268 -

555,000 -

500,000 200,000 -

400,000 -

400,000 -

400,000 -

400,000 -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

3,336,720

555,100

967,713

700,150

400,150

400,150

400,150

400,150

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

1,626,500 -

450,000 -

650,000 -

700,000 -

400,000 -

400,000 -

400,000 -

400,000 -

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

1,626,500

450,000

650,000

700,000

400,000

400,000

400,000

400,000

224,264

232,664 -

20,051 -

22,401 -

24,751 -

27,101 -

29,451 -

29,301 -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

224,264

232,664

20,051

22,401

24,751

27,101

29,451

29,301

1,934,484

337,764

337,764

22,551

24,901

27,251

29,601

29,451

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay General Government Streets & Highways Parks & Recreation Downtown Development Economic Development Public Safety Community Development Other Capital Outlay: Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Transfers - EE Debt Golf Course Fund Arcadia Lake Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

156

967,613

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2000 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS TAX FUND The 2000 Capital Improvements Tax Fund has been established to account for capital improvements as recommended to the City Council by the Capital Improvement Projects Advisory Board. The improvements are being financed by a permanent three-fourths cent sales tax approved by the voters December 12, 2000. In addition, this fund accounts for payment of principal and interest due each year on the outstanding balance of sales tax revenue bonds. There are five bond issues outstanding with total indebtedness of $34,921,489 as of June 30, 2020. It is anticipated as we implement the new 2017 Capital Improvement Tax Fund, these funds will work together to meet the capital needs of the community.

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Fund Budget Summary

2000 Capital Improvement Tax Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR Projected Budget FY 21-22

FY 22-23

Projected Projected Budget Budget FY 23-24 FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

14,298,084 600,032 133,326 15,031,442

14,180,249 200,000 60,000 14,440,249

17,191,025

14,584,046

175,452 15,234,498

14,875,727 200,000 2,000,000 17,075,727

15,173,241 200,000 15,373,241

15,476,706 200,000 15,676,706

15,786,240 200,000 15,986,240

16,101,964 200,000 16,301,964

24,277,836 -

24,277,836 -

40,000,000 4,967,045 -

11,469,093 -

4,151,054 -

4,479,231 -

9,267,679 -

32,222,467

38,718,085

39,512,334

62,042,772

26,842,334

19,827,760

20,465,471

25,569,643

23,281

200 35,000

200 35,000

200 35,000

200 35,000

200 35,000

200 35,000

200 35,000

239,878 6,543,170 134,234 47,415 418,844 6,853 -

300,000 7,028,400 3,000,000 3,000,000 -

632,171 18,937,266 230,668 1,145,260 3,145,260

6,300,000 11,550,000 17,000,000 -

300,000 11,737,500 3,000,000 -

300,000 7,177,188 1,500,000 -

300,000 3,769,117 2,000,000 -

300,000 4,613,345 -

7,194,769 1,249,817

7,164,646 1,347,546

7,194,769 1,187,546

6,525,400 656,496

5,741,400 1,510,294

4,656,600 1,387,877

3,535,000 1,270,000

3,640,000 1,132,250

475,000

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay: General Government Streets & Highways Parks & Recreation Downtown Development Economic Development Public Safety Community Development Other Capital Outlay: Debt Service: Principal Retirement Interest Interest on Construction Debt New Debt Service EE Debt Service (P&I) Other Debt Service: TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

1,715,771

-

-

125,959

-

-

-

-

-

15,858,261

21,875,792

34,349,870

42,067,096

22,324,394

15,056,865

10,909,317

9,720,795

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

8,000,000 (86,370)

(8,355,419)

(195,419)

(8,506,583)

(366,886)

(291,664)

(288,475)

(269,245)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

7,913,630

(8,355,419)

(195,419)

(8,506,583)

(366,886)

(291,664)

(288,475)

(269,245)

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Restricted (Reserve for Capital Improvements) Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Edmond Electric Fund Golf Course Fund Arcadia Lake Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

5,069,939

5,069,939

19,207,897

3,416,935

24,277,836

8,486,874

4,967,045

11,469,093

4,151,054

4,479,231

9,267,679

15,579,603

32,222,467

38,718,085

39,512,334

62,042,772

26,842,334

19,827,760

20,465,471

25,569,643

90,419 105,000 8,160,000 8,355,419

90,419

329,083 17,500 8,160,000 8,506,583

136,886 230,000 366,886

199,164 92,500 291,664

238,475 50,000 288,475

249,245 20,000 269,245

86,370 (0) 86,370

158

5,069,939 (102,894)

105,000

195,419

5,069,939

3,679,939

3,679,939

2,245,000

2,245,000

6,399,154

471,115

799,292

7,022,679

13,334,603

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ROADWAY IMPROVEMENT FUND The Roadway Improvements Fund has been established to account for street construction and improvement projects as approved by the voters on May 10, 1994. The improvements were financed by a temporary seven-eight cent sales tax totaling $2,495,703. The remaining funds have been expensed out over the years and FY20 was the last year to utilize this fund.

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Fund Budget Summary

Roadway Improvement Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

265 265

-

58

-

-

-

-

-

11,498

11,761 -

11,761 -

11,819 -

11,819 -

11,819 -

11,819 -

11,819 -

11,762

11,761

11,819

11,819

11,819

11,819

11,819

11,819

1 -

-

-

-

-

-

-

58

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

-

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11,761 -

11,819 -

11,819 -

11,819 -

11,819 -

11,819 -

11,819 -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11,761

11,761

11,819

11,819

11,819

11,819

11,819

11,819

11,762

11,761

11,819

11,819

11,819

11,819

11,819

11,819

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Transfers - EE Debt Golf Course Fund Arcadia Lake Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

11,761

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2017 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS TAX FUND The 2017 Capital Improvements Tax was approved by the voters in April 2016 and the tax commenced April 1st, 2017 and will run for ten years, unless extended by the voters. This fund replaced the 2012 Public Safety Center - Capital Improvements Tax Fund which was established to account for the capital construction costs of a new Public Safety Center and other capital improvements. Fund expenditure planning and project review are conducted by the Capital Improvement Project Advisory Board. Their recommendations are forwarded to the City Council for their approval.

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Fund Budget Summary

2017 Capital Improvement Tax Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

9,532,056 529,818 10,061,874

9,452,691 25,000 9,477,691

9,450,378

9,722,696

9,847,696

9,917,150 75,000 9,992,150

10,115,493 50,000 10,165,493

10,317,803 25,000 10,342,803

10,524,159 25,000 10,549,159

10,734,641 25,000 10,759,641

15,307,763 -

15,307,763 -

10,088,298 -

8,201,410 -

2,729,483 -

71,419 -

10,181,193 -

19,512,252

24,785,454

25,155,459

20,080,448

18,366,903

13,072,286

10,620,578

20,940,834

82,895 26,991

2,500 2,500

5,000 1,500

2,500 2,500

2,500 2,500

2,500 2,500

2,500 2,500

2,500 2,500

131,364 366,437 141,452 30,248 3,281,846 -

510,000 7,438,000 6,460,000 600,000 -

200,000 800,000 8,500,000 350,000 1,800,000 -

200,000 2,680,000 2,500,000 10,000,000 -

200,000 7,000,000 5,500,000 -

200,000 -

200,000 14,000,000 -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

125,000

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay: General Government Streets & Highways Parks & Recreation Downtown Development Economic Development Public Safety Community Development Other Capital Outlay: Debt Service: Principal Retirement Interest Interest on Construction Debt New Debt Service EE Debt Service (P&I) Other Debt Service: TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

3,676,000 9,200,911 1,791,272 4,315 2,482,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4,061,234

15,013,000

17,160,998

11,655,000

15,385,000

12,705,000

205,000

14,205,000

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

(143,255)

(208,815)

2,372,016 (278,179)

(224,038)

(252,419)

(295,868)

(234,385)

(182,973)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(143,255)

(208,815)

2,093,837

(224,038)

(252,419)

(295,868)

(234,385)

(182,973)

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Restricted (Reserve for Capital Improvements) Committed for Other Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Other Purposes) Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Transfers - EE Debt Golf Course Fund Arcadia Lake Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

15,307,763

9,563,639

10,088,298

8,201,410

2,729,483

71,419

10,181,193

6,552,861

-

-

-

-

-

-

15,307,763

9,563,639

10,088,298

8,201,410

2,729,483

71,419

10,181,193

6,552,861

19,512,252

24,785,454

25,155,459

20,080,448

18,366,903

13,072,286

10,620,578

20,940,834

134,545 8,710 143,255

143,815 65,000 208,815

139,179

169,038 55,000 224,038

172,419 80,000 252,419

175,868 120,000 295,868

179,385 55,000 234,385

182,973 182,973

162

139,000

278,179

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TAB PAGE INSERT

EPWA UTILITY FUNDS


EPWA UTILITY FUNDS


EDMOND PUBLIC WORKS AUTHORITY EPWA FUND The EPWA Utility Funds are used to account for the cost of providing all utility services (electricity, water, wastewater, drainage, solid waste) to the citizens of Edmond funded with the revenue generated by the charges for services billed and collected through the utility billing process. The costs incurred include personnel, operations and maintenance of the utility services and capital outlay costs necessary to adequately develop and maintain a high level of service in for our customers. The fund also accounts for the operations of the Arcadia Lake recreational facilities. The operations and the Lake facilities are financed through user fees and General Fund and Park Tax Fund transfers.

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FUND BUDGET SUMMARY

Public Works Authority Funds

FY20-21 Prior Year Actual

Adopted Year Budget

Current Year Revised

BUDGET YEAR

Projected Budget

FY 19-20

FY 20-21

FY 20-21

FY 21-22

FY 22-23

Projected Budget Projected Budget FY 23-24

FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses & Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues

55,504 1,890,044 159,834,106 6,465,716 2,286,861 170,532,230

1,620,899 167,225,105 861,100 590,053 170,297,157

151,926 1,620,899 168,312,844 1,876,721 274,346 172,236,736

1,681,208 165,334,152 665,000 595,295 168,275,655

1,620,382 169,638,429 645,000 622,877 172,526,688

1,625,422 173,259,145 645,000 639,228 176,168,795

1,625,422 176,230,707 645,000 697,038 179,198,167

1,625,422 179,309,990 645,000 708,063 182,288,475

OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

0 6,749,570 168,285,494 345,567,294

7,443,115 207,637,119 385,377,391

73,500,000 7,443,115 207,637,119 460,816,970

7,048,391 182,897,446 358,221,492

5,892,500 171,868,698 350,287,886

4,735,234 173,664,454 354,568,483

3,712,164 174,229,214 357,139,545

3,992,631 179,730,534 366,011,640

DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Electric Utility Water Utility Solid Waste Utility Wastewater Utility Arcadia Drainage PWA Sewer Impact PWA Economic Development Revenue Bond Funds payment TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

73,259,889 20,785,630 6,652,769 76,297,335 1,186,180 595,217 1 204,038 3,076,137 182,057,197

96,050,899 24,727,115 6,955,939 21,947,860 1,196,764 2,604,494 350,000 3,434,004 157,267,075

76,810,155 101,095,583 6,955,939 66,396,022 1,174,113 2,486,701 1 350,000 3,434,004 258,702,518

92,094,494 35,834,010 7,447,758 20,890,870 1,467,921 2,644,898 135,533 4,357,935 164,873,419

81,668,807 27,257,845 7,662,581 23,954,978 1,358,785 2,067,891 135,533 4,665,823 148,772,243

86,255,187 28,570,531 7,769,655 20,765,869 1,359,055 1,805,711 135,533 6,189,812 152,851,353

84,555,427 33,256,972 7,935,747 20,171,908 1,370,028 1,823,508 135,533 10,000 149,259,123

86,607,726 33,648,351 8,106,921 21,278,763 1,387,502 1,829,959 135,533 10,000 153,004,755

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below) NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

19,225,978 (46,252,932) (27,026,955)

27,307,498 (39,380,367) (12,072,869)

27,295,420 (39,464,035) (12,168,615)

26,500,332 (42,087,208) (15,586,876)

18,965,610 (42,081,566) (23,115,956)

21,197,923 (44,973,674) (23,775,751)

16,136,240 (40,293,497) (24,157,257)

16,451,964 (41,039,485) (24,587,521)

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purpose) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES

94,224 7,348,891 207,637,119 215,080,234

7,290,470 208,746,977 216,037,447

7,048,391 182,897,446 189,945,837

5,892,500 171,868,698 177,761,198

4,735,234 173,664,454 178,399,688

3,712,164 174,229,214 177,941,378

3,992,631 179,730,534 183,723,165

4,273,098 184,146,266 188,419,364

TOTAL ESTIMATED USES

424,164,386

385,377,391

460,816,970

358,221,492

350,287,886

354,568,483

357,139,545

366,011,640

ESTIMATED USES

* LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Expenses DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services General Fund-Sales Tax Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) - exp to each fund Edmond Economic Development Fund (EEDA) Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

122% 444 91% 332

7,721,957 1,068,288 1,113,116 334,168 952,586 5,209,788 14,179,329 4,255,489 3,318,212 100,000 8,000,000 46,252,932

123% 447 106% 387

106% 388 61% 224

6,904,348 1,151,011 848,000 391,875 1,136,666 7,007,937 14,180,249 4,342,932 3,317,349 100,000 39,380,367

6,904,348 1,135,919 942,762 385,873 1,136,666 7,007,937 14,180,249 4,342,932 3,327,349 100,000 39,464,035

164

102% 373 83% 303

8,885,149 1,207,415 990,000 317,634 1,243,895 7,236,892 14,875,727 4,383,979 2,846,516 100,000 42,087,208

101% 367 91% 332

8,384,029 1,266,969 631,000 323,960 1,293,791 7,370,763 15,173,241 4,391,659 3,146,154 100,000 42,081,566

99% 361 88% 321

8,551,710 1,329,495 1,310,000 330,467 1,340,388 7,395,316 15,476,706 4,399,492 4,740,100 100,000 44,973,674

100% 366 95% 346

8,722,744 1,395,144 631,000 337,076 1,388,855 7,524,956 15,786,240 4,407,482 100,000 40,293,497

101% 369 95% 346

8,897,199 1,464,093 631,000 343,818 1,439,180 7,646,601 16,101,964 4,415,631 100,000 41,039,485

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EPWA REVENUE BONDS FUND The EPWA Revenue Bond Funds are utilized to account for the construction costs and improvement costs related to utility system capital improvements funded by the sale of Public Works Authority revenue bonds. In addition, the Bond Funds account for payment of principal and interest due each year on the outstanding balance of revenue bonds.

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FUND BUDGET SUMMARY

Revenue Bonds Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

143,288 143,288

75,000 75,000

6,683,979

6,827,267

7,146,899 7,221,899

75,000

75,000 75,000

75,000 75,000

75,000 75,000

75,000 75,000

75,000 75,000

7,146,899 7,221,899

7,181,666 7,256,666

5,810,308 5,885,308

4,437,575 4,512,575

3,199,038 3,274,038

3,264,038 3,339,038

75,000

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service: Principal Retirement Bond Interest Expense Trustee Fees Debt Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

2,466 -

50,000 -

50,000 -

150,000 -

150,000 -

10,000 -

10,000 -

10,000 -

2,623,363 450,308 3,076,137

2,718,104 665,900 3,434,004

2,718,104 665,900 3,434,004

3,710,659 497,276 4,357,935

4,158,424 357,399 4,665,823

6,033,410 146,402 6,189,812

10,000

10,000

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below) NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

3,395,769 3,395,769

3,393,771 3,393,771

3,393,771 3,393,771

2,911,577 2,911,577

3,218,090 3,218,090

4,876,275 4,876,275

-

-

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7,146,899 7,146,899

7,181,666 -

7,181,666 -

5,810,308 -

4,437,575 -

3,199,038 -

3,264,038 -

3,329,038 -

7,181,666

7,181,666

5,810,308

4,437,575

3,199,038

3,264,038

3,329,038

TOTAL ESTIMATED USES

6,827,267

7,221,899

7,221,899

7,256,666

5,885,308

4,512,575

3,274,038

3,339,038

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Edmond Economic Development Fund (EEDA) Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

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EDMOND ELECTRIC Edmond Electric’s mission is to provide high quality electric service at a competitive price responding to our customers’ needs with trustworthy service. Edmond Electric is Oklahoma’s largest communityowned electric utility. As a publicly owned power company and a city department, Edmond Electric returns profits to the community annually. Our profits support vital city services such as police, fire, streets and parks. Because of Edmond Electric’s support, our community maintains a high quality of living yet has one of the lowest sales tax rates in the state for a city our size. Edmond Electric provides fast, reliable service and a reliability rating of over 99%.

DIVISIONS Substation Crew

Service Crew

Perform daily/ monthly inspections and maintenance on substation equipment.; 3 FTE

Main focus is service connections and emergency calls; 9 FTE

Line Crew 1

Line Crew 2

Main focus is underground and overhead construction; 10 FTE

Main focus is underground and overhead construction; 13 FTE

System Efficiencies Crew

Administrative Support Staff

Main focus is equipment efficiency and locating underground utility lines; 7 FTE

Three Administrative Specialist II and one Administrative Supervisor; 4 FTE

Operations Central Warehouse

Engineering/ CAD/GIS

CONTACT

Maintaining sufficient material for the various departments and conducting inventory within fiscal year; 3 FTE

Provides a variety of engineering, design, drafting and mapping services for Edmond Electric;

Glenn Fisher- Director Ph (405) 216-7660

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Edmond Electric is the largest municipally owned elelctric utility in Oklahoma. — Edmond Electric staff volunteered over 500 hours in the community. — Lineman wear 45 lbs. of gear when climbing electric utility poles.

https://www.edmondok.com/224/ Edmond-Electric

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

System Reliability

System Reliability

GOALS

GOALS

Continue Automated Metering Infrastructure implementation

Continue Automated Metering Infrastructure implementation (In Progress)

Continue Substation Modernization

Customer owned Distributed Generation. (Complete)

Begin Pole Integrity and Attachment Survey

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Meter Data Management and AMI field communications in place and ready for electric and water meter deployment.

Move AMI project to system wide meter rollout stage. Replace T2 and relays at Danforth, Relay and other upgrades at Garber.

Programs and processes in place to accommodate Distributed Generation (wind and solar)

Issue RFP for survey services, hire contractor and begin survey.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

58-1-0

58-1-0

58-1-0

58-1-0

58-1-0

58-1-0

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Electric Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR Projected Budget Projected Budget Projected Budget Projected Budget FY 21-22

FY 22-23

FY 23-24

FY 24-25

FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

219,439 98,581,319

93,485,263 200,000 423,934 94,109,197

93,949,751 200,000 447,647 94,597,398

94,416,571 200,000 461,110 95,077,681

94,885,712 200,000 474,167 95,559,879

95,355,195 200,000 484,167 96,039,362

59,764,955

188,412 66,257,870

188,412 66,257,870

87,528,718

86,971,307

89,336,444

86,796,200

87,109,934

156,947,809

164,088,180

165,027,601

181,637,915

181,568,705

184,414,125

182,356,079

183,149,296

5,989,472 1,421,283 54,945,171 6,078,535 4,825,429 -

6,135,433 1,251,300 63,620,378 13,119,788 11,924,000 -

5,995,120 1,314,170 58,332,712 6,135,153 5,033,000

6,297,351 1,210,300 60,883,826 13,663,017 10,040,000 -

6,666,367 1,250,800 61,492,664 7,211,976 5,047,000 -

6,598,581 1,270,800 62,107,591 7,280,215 8,998,000 -

6,692,918 1,220,800 62,728,667 7,435,042 6,478,000 -

6,781,090 1,320,800 63,355,954 7,510,882 7,639,000 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

73,259,889

96,050,899

76,810,155

92,094,494

81,668,807

86,255,187

84,555,427

86,607,726

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

(17,241,638)

8,935,000 (9,623,728)

8,935,000 (9,623,728)

8,160,000 (10,732,114)

(10,563,454)

(11,362,738)

(10,690,718)

(10,806,254)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(17,241,638)

(688,728)

(688,728)

(2,572,114)

(10,563,454)

(11,362,738)

(10,690,718)

(10,806,254)

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

53,797 95,352,232 1,616,535 160,291 97,182,855

97,222,459 200,000 219,439 97,641,898

-

150,000

97,802,198 409,682

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Wholesale Electric Purchases Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES * LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Expenses

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

94,224

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

94,188

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

66,257,870 66,446,282

67,348,553 67,348,553

87,528,718 87,528,718

86,971,307 86,971,307

89,336,444 89,336,444

86,796,200 86,796,200

87,109,934 87,109,934

85,735,316 85,735,316

156,947,809

164,088,180

165,027,601

181,637,915

181,568,705

184,414,125

182,356,079

183,149,296

68% 249 73% 267

69% 252 70% 254

89% 324 113% 412

4,271,346 684,000 59,271 154,151 3,886,421 86,449

3,762,423 511,000 138,293 165,000 893,153 3,966,482 87,377

3,762,423

100,000 8,000,000 17,241,638

100,000 9,623,728

100,000

511,000 138,293 165,000 893,153

3,966,482 87,377

9,623,728

170

92% 337 85% 309

94% 345 97% 354

91% 333 89% 325

91% 333 91% 334

89% 326 88% 321

4,961,526 480,000 52,538 165,000 897,940 4,000,000 75,109

4,588,153 631,000 53,589 175,000 932,711 4,000,000 83,000

4,679,916 1,310,000 54,661 180,000 929,857 4,000,000 108,304

4,773,515 631,000 55,754 185,000 945,449 4,000,000 -

4,868,985 631,000 56,869 190,000 959,400 4,000,000 -

100,000 10,732,114

100,000 10,563,454

100,000 11,362,738

100,000 10,690,718

100,000 10,806,254

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WATER RESOURCESWATER Water Resources has three (3) divisions: 1. Water Production: Comprised of the Edmond Water Treatment Plant, water towers, storage tanks, and water pumping stations. 2. Water Wells: Charged with operation and maintenance of the City’s 56 water wells. 3. Wastewater Treatment: Consisting of the Coffee Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant and 9 lift stations.

DIVISIONS ICE

Laboratory

PM on electrical equipment & cabinets, repairs on plant controls and electrical systems; 4 FTE

Performs compliance testing, provides technical assistance to plant operations, maintains accuracy-traceability; 6 FTE

Maintenance

Wells

PM and repairs on equipment & machinery, operates, takes inventory and cares for tools & equipment; 5 FTE

Provides preventative & corrective maintenance at water wells, towers, tanks & booster stations, performs well rehabilitation; 5 FTE

WRRF Operations

WTP Operations

Preventative maintenance, monitors & controls plant flow rates, daily checks of equipment & processes for effective plant operation; 7 FTE

Conducts plant rounds, checks plant equipment, janitorial services for buildings, maintains chemical dosages & performs lab work, monitors our SCADA system; 12 FTE

You can fill an 8-oz glass of water approx. 15,000 times for the same cost as a 6-pack of soda. — Our Lab was accredited by DEQ to perform Bac-T testing in house. Bac-T are tests for coliform & e-coli. — The water on Earth today is the same water that has been here for almost 5 billion years, so you could be drinking the same water that a dinosaur did.

CONTACT Director of Water Resources Ph (405) 216-7696 Water Treatment Plant Ph (405) 216-7690

Coffee Creek Water Resource Recovery Facility Ph (405) 216-7675 www.edmondwater.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in land fill waste.

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in land fill waste.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain, and develop a skilled, diverse, and inclusive workforce.

Infastructure- Give the same level of importance and attention to the maintenance of infrastructure as to new infrastructure.

GOALS

GOALS

Develop a responsible water use and water conservation educational program that will increase the efficiency and long-term sustainability of Edmond water resources by reducing peak outdoor water use by 10% through 2022 (with OSU Extension) (Complete)

Develop a responsible water use and water conservation educational program that will increase the efficiency and long-term sustainability of Edmond water resources. Maintain existing infrastructure utilizing reliability centered maintenance through pro-active maintenance.

Improvement Opportunity Program for Employees. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Educational Programming specifically for largest outdoor water users.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Educational programming through community meetings, workshops, and site visits.

Capture all preventive and corrective maintenance work performed in Cityworks.

Meet with Supervisors to get input on program, develop Procedure Documentation for Program.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

47-0-0

47-0-0

47-0-0

47-0-0

47-0-0

47-0-0

(Includes Water Plant, Water Wells, and Wastewater Plant.)

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FUND BUDGET SUMMARY 563332Water Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR Projected Budget Projected Budget Projected Budget Projected Budget FY 21-22

FY 22-23

FY 23-24

FY 24-25

FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Taxes License & Permits: Water Tap Fees Capacity Fees Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue

1,707 -

-

1,926

-

-

-

-

-

289,522 878,017 30,767,501 1,764,779 2,001,569

275,000 780,000 32,979,773 200,000 315,707

275,000 780,000 33,174,773 502,477

310,000 800,000 34,611,933 150,000 123,063

281,948 767,204 37,372,177 150,000 125,966

288,094 766,098 39,416,902 150,000 127,869

288,094 766,098 40,787,916 150,000 171,617

288,094 766,098 42,206,916 150,000 171,617

Subtotal - Revenues

35,703,095

34,550,480

34,734,176

35,994,996

38,697,295

40,748,963

42,163,725

43,582,725

0

65,373,121

72,447,753

60,000,000 72,447,753

57,946,552

49,718,310

52,575,910

54,745,844

57,599,302

101,076,217

106,998,233

167,181,929

93,941,548

88,415,605

93,324,873

96,909,569

101,182,027

2,749,424 856,430 4,392,042 12,279,707 508,027 -

2,807,587 1,023,132 5,118,979 13,217,000 2,560,417 -

2,807,586 1,023,132 4,932,401 89,772,047 2,560,417

2,907,878 899,075 4,629,999 21,710,000 5,687,058 -

3,059,976 917,010 4,805,343 9,710,000 8,765,516 -

3,035,909 934,893 4,956,747 5,410,000 14,232,982 -

3,096,768 957,688 5,129,631 5,410,000 18,662,885 -

3,158,938 990,905 5,303,534 5,610,000 18,584,974 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

20,785,630

24,727,115

101,095,583

35,834,010

27,257,845

28,570,531

33,256,972

33,648,351

TRANSFERS: Sales Tax In Additional Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

14,179,329 0 (22,022,163)

14,180,249 (22,225,281)

14,180,249 (22,320,043)

14,875,727 (23,264,955)

15,173,241 (23,755,091)

15,476,706 (25,485,204)

15,786,240 (21,839,535)

16,101,964 (22,251,772)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(7,842,834)

(8,045,032)

(8,139,794)

(8,389,228)

(8,581,850)

(10,008,498)

(6,053,295)

(6,149,808)

OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service Debt Issuance Costs Debt Reserves

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES * LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Expenses

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Edmond Economic Development Fund (EEDA) Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

72,447,753 72,447,753

74,226,086 74,226,086

57,946,552 57,946,552

49,718,310 49,718,310

52,575,910 52,575,910

54,745,844 54,745,844

57,599,302 57,599,302

61,383,868 61,383,868

101,076,217

106,998,233

167,181,929

93,941,548

88,415,605

93,324,873

96,909,569

101,182,027

203% 741 175% 637

1,582,758 76,720 158,119 83,445 16,869 3,092,023 14,179,329 2,832,899 22,022,163

215% 784 163% 594

1,308,709 80,304 75,000 85,965 66,800 3,600,983 14,180,249 2,827,271 22,225,281

174

167% 609 48% 174

1,308,709 80,304 169,762 85,965 66,800 3,600,983 14,180,249

2,827,271

22,320,043

138% 504 87% 317

1,795,453 96,407 160,000 89,425 66,800 3,751,848 14,875,727 2,429,296 23,264,955

136% 496 107% 390

1,787,377 100,975 91,213 66,800 3,850,453 15,173,241 2,685,032 23,755,091

134% 490 105% 383

1,823,125 105,772 93,037 66,800 3,857,471 15,476,706 4,062,293 25,485,204

137% 499 108% 395

1,859,587 110,809 94,898 66,800 3,921,201 15,786,240 21,839,535

141% 514 114% 415

1,896,779 116,099 96,796 66,800 3,973,333 16,101,964 22,251,772

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SOLID WASTE The Solid Waste Utility’s vision is to continuously improve solid waste services for the benefit of delivering “Trustworthy Service” to citizensSolid Waste department delivers safe, high quality, cost effective trustworthy solid waste collection service to our customers. Department focuses on streamlined solid waste route management and promotes safe vehicle operations with employee safety incentive programs. The department is accelerating use of new technologies to continuously improve delivery and lower cost of service to our customers.

DIVISIONS Residential

Commercial

Services all residential addresses and maintains carts and inventory; 14 FTE

Services all commercial addresses and maintains large containers and inventory; 5 FTE

Customer Service Coordinator 1 FTE

We service as many as 10,000 containers on some days? Each container is 96 Gallons of trash. That is a total of 960,000 gallons of trash on one day! — This results in over 500,000 lbs. of trash picked up in one day!

CONTACT Bobby Masterson Ph (405) 216-7785

Jeff Pittman Ph (405) 216-7743

bobby.masterson@ edmondok.com

jeffrey.pittman@ edmondok.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

Environmental Stewardship- Protect our natural resources through promotion and enhancement of green infrastructure.

GOALS

GOALS

Operational times per route. We average the operational time per route. When times exceed a preset threshold then the route is audited. If the house count reached above 1100 then the route will be redesigned. (In progress)

Implement a program to deter, track and assist in the prosecution of illegal dumping. Cameras have been acquired and sites for first deployment are being selected. Trial placements to begin in May.

Driver efficiencies are averaged as carts per minute and for commercial drivers it is averaged as containers per hour. Drivers are given their ratings each month and are expected to maintain the group average. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Document and track “hot spots” for illegal dumping issues. Secure video evidence of illegal dumping. Identify times, dates and offenders.

Drivers are all monitored for at fault accidents and complaints. Both issues are addressed proactively and are part of their annual review discussions. (In progress)

Refer as appropriate to Code enforcement for follow-up.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Operational times per route. We average the operational time per route. When times exceed a preset threshold then the route is audited. If the house count reached above 1100 then the route will be redesigned. Driver efficiencies are averaged as carts per minute and for commercial drivers it is averaged as containers per hour. Drivers are given their ratings each month and are expected to maintain the group average.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

20-0-0

20-0-0

20-0-0

20-0-0

20-0-0

20-0-0

(Includes Solid Waste Administration, Residential, Commercial, Recycling, and Roll Off.)

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FUND BUDGET SUMMARY

Solid Waste Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR Projected Budget Projected Budget Projected Budget Projected Budget FY 21-22

FY 22-23

FY 23-24

FY 24-25

FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue

10,695,588 270,770 5

10,753,981 67,600 -

10,753,981 76,062

11,466,175 68,000 -

11,695,602 68,000 -

11,929,512 68,000 -

12,168,103 68,000 -

12,411,465 68,000 -

Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

10,966,363

10,821,581

10,830,043

11,534,175

11,763,602

11,997,512

12,236,103

12,479,465

-

10,070,778

11,485,209

11,485,209

12,370,816

13,193,084

13,968,322

14,752,157

15,522,184

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

21,037,140

22,306,790

22,315,252

23,904,991

24,956,686

25,965,834

26,988,260

28,001,649

DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

1,640,549 338,608 4,673,612 -

1,701,561 506,599 4,747,779 -

1,701,561 506,599 4,747,779 -

1,911,212 497,797 5,034,136 4,613 -

1,999,147 511,066 5,147,639 4,728 -

1,976,088 524,716 5,264,005 4,846 -

2,008,711 538,758 5,383,311 4,967 -

2,042,989 553,204 5,505,637 5,091 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

6,652,769

6,955,939

6,955,939

7,447,758

7,662,581

7,769,655

7,935,747

8,106,921

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

(2,899,162)

(2,988,497)

(2,988,497)

(3,264,149)

(3,325,784)

(3,444,022)

(3,530,329)

(3,659,035)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(2,899,162)

(2,988,497)

(2,988,497)

(3,264,149)

(3,325,784)

(3,444,022)

(3,530,329)

(3,659,035)

ESTIMATED USES

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11,485,209 11,485,209

12,362,354 12,362,354

12,370,816 12,370,816

13,193,084 13,193,084

13,968,322 13,968,322

14,752,157 14,752,157

15,522,184 15,522,184

16,235,693 16,235,693

TOTAL ESTIMATED USES

21,037,140

22,306,790

22,315,252

23,904,991

24,956,686

25,965,834

26,988,260

28,001,649

* LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Expenses

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Edmond Economic Development Fund (EEDA) Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

105% 382 120% 439

682,984 923,757 139,341 746,128 369,068 37,885 2,899,162

114% 417 124% 454

591,904 973,367 108,258 852,564 45,509 376,450 40,445 2,988,497

178

114% 417 124% 454

591,904 973,367 108,258 852,564 45,509 376,450 40,445 2,988,497

114% 417 123% 450

762,524 993,736 113,086 929,201 48,169 383,979 33,453 3,264,149

119% 433 127% 464

719,646 1,043,068 115,321 969,097 50,035 391,659 36,958 3,325,784

123% 449 132% 480

734,039 1,094,861 117,655 1,010,694 49,882 399,492 37,399 3,444,022

127% 463 135% 494

748,720 1,149,240 120,008 1,054,161 50,718 407,482 3,530,329

130% 475 138% 504

763,694 1,206,350 122,408 1,099,486 51,466 415,631 3,659,035

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WATER RESOURCESWASTEWATER Water Resources has three (3) divisions: 1. Water Production: Comprised of the Edmond Water Treatment Plant, water towers, storage tanks, and water pumping stations. 2. Water Wells: Charged with operation and maintenance of the City’s 56 water wells. 3. Wastewater Treatment: Consisting of the Coffee Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant and 9 lift stations.

DIVISIONS ICE

Laboratory

PM on electrical equipment & cabinets, repairs on plant controls and electrical systems; 4 FTE

Performs compliance testing, provides technical assistance to plant operations, maintains accuracy-traceability; 6 FTE

Maintenance

Wells

PM and repairs on equipment & machinery, operates, takes inventory and cares for tools & equipment; 5 FTE

Provides preventative & corrective maintenance at water wells, towers, tanks & booster stations, performs well rehabilitation; 5 FTE

WRRF Operations

WTP Operations

Preventative maintenance, monitors & controls plant flow rates, daily checks of equipment & processes for effective plant operation; 7 FTE

Conducts plant rounds, checks plant equipment, janitorial services for buildings, maintains chemical dosages & performs lab work, monitors our SCADA system; 12 FTE

You can fill an 8-oz glass of water approx. 15,000 times for the same cost as a 6-pack of soda. — Our Lab was accredited by DEQ to perform Bac-T testing in house. Bac-T are tests for coliform & e-coli. — The water on Earth today is the same water that has been here for almost 5 billion years, so you could be drinking the same water that a dinosaur did.

CONTACT Director of Water Resources Ph (405) 216-7696 Water Treatment Plant Ph (405) 216-7690

Coffee Creek Water Resource Recovery Facility Ph (405) 216-7675 www.edmondwater.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Economic Development- Revitalize and encourage development of commercial areas. (i.e. downtown, the south Broadway corridor, the Route 66 corridor, and the I-35 Corridor).

High Performing Government- Use technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation. Infastructure- Give the same level of importance and attention to the maintenance of infrastructure as to new infrastructure.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain, and develop a skilled, diverse, and inclusive workforce.

GOALS

GOALS

Establish and implement process for creating asset management and preventive maintenance work order system for existing assets and new construction.

2013 Water & Wastewater Master Plan project will maximize the area served along the I35 & 33rd corridor and be completed by early 2020. (Complete) Improvement Opportunity Program for Employees. (In progress)

Maintain existing infrastructure utilizing reliability centered maintenance through pro-active maintenance.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Reduce the number of lift stations in the system by replacing the 33rd and 40th lift stations into one new lift station.

Identify all data needs for assets when updating in the system (nameplate data, PM requirements, warranty information)

Meet with Supervisors to get input on program, develop Procedure Documentation for Program.

Capture all preventive and corrective maintenance work performed in Cityworks.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

47-0-0

47-0-0

47-0-0

47-0-0

47-0-0

47-0-0

(Includes Water Plant, Water Wells, and Wastewater Plant.)

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FUND BUDGET SUMMARY

Wastewater Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR Projected Budget Projected Budget FY 21-22

FY 22-23

FY 23-24

Projected Projected Budget Budget FY 24-25 FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits: Wastewater Tap Fees Capacity Fees Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue

-

-

350 717,315 19,920,179 2,387,771 1,037

510 565,389 23,296,892 255,000 -

Subtotal - Revenues

23,026,652 -

-

-

-

-

-

510 565,389 23,296,892 750,000 -

1,080 570,128 22,300,680 120,000 -

1,102 570,128 23,081,396 100,000 -

1,102 570,128 23,885,867 100,000 -

1,102 570,128 24,718,495 100,000 -

1,102 570,128 25,580,264 100,000 -

24,117,791

24,612,791

22,991,888

23,752,626

24,557,097

25,389,725

26,251,494

13,500,000 45,582,041

13,622,549

11,757,681

7,938,859

8,082,011

9,688,542

OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

22,555,389

45,582,041

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

45,582,041

69,699,832

83,694,832

36,614,437

35,510,307

32,495,956

33,471,736

35,940,036

1,288,295 257,530 1,745,808 65,375,683 7,630,020 -

1,318,165 465,161 3,290,610 4,000,000 12,873,924 -

1,227,597 324,600 2,969,901 49,000,000 12,873,924

1,290,962 444,119 2,439,564 4,340,000 12,376,225 -

1,359,921 472,291 2,150,191 7,600,000 12,372,575 -

1,348,303 444,489 2,217,152 4,400,000 12,355,925 -

1,375,871 455,014 2,286,273 3,700,000 12,354,750 -

1,402,445 473,165 2,357,628 4,700,000 12,345,525 -

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service Debt Issuance Costs Debt Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

76,297,335

21,947,860

66,396,022

20,890,870

23,954,978

20,765,869

20,171,908

21,278,763

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

1,037,818 (3,337,574)

(3,676,261)

(3,676,261)

(3,965,886)

(3,616,470)

(3,648,076)

(3,611,286)

(3,687,542)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(2,299,756)

(3,676,261)

(3,676,261)

(3,965,886)

(3,616,470)

(3,648,076)

(3,611,286)

(3,687,542)

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES * LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Expenses

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Edmond Economic Development Fund (EEDA) Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

45,582,041 45,582,041

44,075,711 44,075,711

13,622,549 13,622,549

11,757,681 11,757,681

7,938,859 7,938,859

8,082,011 8,082,011

9,688,542 9,688,542

10,973,731 10,973,731

124,179,132

69,699,832

83,694,832

36,614,437

35,510,307

32,495,956

33,471,736

35,940,036

198% 723 57% 209

756,925 32,356 270,997 24,547 16,027 2,117,765 118,957 3,337,574

183% 667 172% 628

776,805 55,971 190,000 41,825 29,408 2,458,474 123,778 3,676,261

182

55% 202 19% 71

776,805 55,971 190,000 41,825 29,408 2,458,474

123,778

3,676,261

51% 187 47% 173

852,974 68,512 315,000 45,226 50,000 2,528,543 105,630 3,965,886

33% 122 29% 105

805,010 71,875 46,131 50,000 2,526,769 116,685 3,616,470

33% 120 33% 121

821,110 75,406 47,054 50,000 2,547,344 107,162 3,648,076

38% 139 41% 149

837,533 79,113 47,995 50,000 2,596,646 3,611,286

42% 153 44% 160

854,283 83,007 48,955 50,000 2,651,297 3,687,542

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ARCADIA LAKE Arcadia Lake provides quality outdoor recreational experiences such as, camping, boating, swimming, hiking/biking, fishing, hunting and picnicking to the community. The lake offers 5 different parks which includes day use, boat dock, fishing docks, pavilion rentals, beaches and various trails to hike or bike or ride your horse. Various programs are offered throughout the year: Storybook Forest, Eagle Watch, Kids Fishing Derby, Deer hunts, as well as educational programs.

DIVISIONS Fee Collection

Maintenance

Assists customers, rents campgrounds, pavilions, sells merchandise, assists programs; 3 FTE, 5 PTE, 13 Seasonal

Maintains grounds, upkeep of equipment, assists with setting up programs, trash pickup; 5 FTE, 1 PTE, 8–10 Seasonal

The lake has about ½ million visitors each year. — The American Bald Eagle winters at Arcadia Lake each fall and winter. Guests are welcome to join us to see them in their natural habitat.

CONTACT Main Number Ph (405) 216-7470 www.arcadialakeok.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior through public education and outreach to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in landfill waste.

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior through public education and outreach to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in landfill waste.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

GOALS

GOALS

Search for New Revenue Sources. (In progress)

Search for New Revenue Sources- Compare to other like size lakes.

Provide Quality Maintenance Services. (In progress)

Provide Quality Maintenance ServicesMaintain campgrounds to high level.

Provide premier parks system with outstanding park facilities. (In progress)

Provide premier parks system with outstanding park facilities- Research new software for camping facilities.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Visit State campsite convention to identify future directions of camping grounds.

Create RFP and research software companies.

Visit National Campground convention.

Hire seasonals to learn software both old and new to accommodate customer in a timely manner.

Continue visual inspections at all sites, roadway, and facilities.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

8-5-24

10-5-24

10-5-24

10-5-24

10-5-26

10-5-26

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FUND BUDGET SUMMARY

Arcadia Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

1,518,900 1,000 49,264

1,549,279 1,000 50,249

1,568,246 1,000 51,254

1,611,870 1,000 52,279

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue

1,244,880 (1,798) 103,873

1,187,000 7,500 54,907

1,500,000 7,500 54,907

1,489,118 1,000 48,298

Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

1,346,955

1,249,407

1,562,407

1,538,416

1,569,164

1,600,528

1,620,500

1,665,149

551,496

286,449

206,052

220,570

167,520

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

1,272,455

1,237,752

1,550,752

2,089,912

1,855,613

1,806,580

1,841,070

1,832,669

767,055 104,858 314,267 -

779,507 109,682 307,575 -

739,239 110,645 324,229 -

878,294 167,635 421,992 -

915,608 117,185 325,992 -

912,178 120,885 325,992 -

928,651 115,385 325,992 -

946,625 114,885 325,992 -

1,186,180

1,196,764

1,174,113

1,467,921

1,358,785

1,359,055

1,370,028

1,387,502

-

(74,500)

(11,655)

(11,655)

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS TRANSFERS: Transfers In-General Fund Transfers In-Park Tax Fund Transfers Out (See detail below)

369,435 (467,366)

448,478 (514,715)

248,478 430,000 (503,621)

203,028 (538,570)

224,279 (515,055)

494,942 (721,897)

(303,522)

(310,286)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(97,931)

(66,237)

174,857

(335,542)

(290,776)

(226,955)

(303,522)

(310,286)

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES * LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Expenses

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Edmond Economic Development Fund (EEDA) Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

-

(11,655) (11,655) 1,272,455

-1% (2) -1% (3)

160,566 30,514 15,028 19,236 242,022 467,366

-

(25,249) (25,249) 1,237,752

-1% (5) -1% (5)

175,609 36,222 30,000 14,406 20,000 238,478 514,715

186

-

-

-

-

-

-

551,496 551,496

286,449 286,449

206,052 206,052

220,570 220,570

167,520 167,520

134,880 134,880

1,550,752

2,089,912

1,855,613

1,806,580

1,841,070

1,832,669

25% 90 33% 120

175,609 21,130 30,000 8,404 20,000

248,478

503,621

16% 60 14% 52

216,282 40,508 35,000 13,752 30,000 203,028 538,570

11% 42 11% 40

204,120 42,429 14,027 30,000 224,479 515,055

11% 38 11% 39

208,203 44,445 14,307 30,000 424,942 721,897

10% 38 10% 37

212,367 46,562 14,593 30,000 303,522

8% 30 8% 29

216,614 48,787 14,885 30,000 310,286

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DRAINAGE UTILITY Drainage Utility is one of the three divisions comprising the Engineering Department. It is funded by the storm water drainage system service charge that is collected through the utility billing system. Drainage Utility focuses on all aspects of storm water drainage including storm-water planning, floodplain management, and environmental protection of Edmond’s waterways.

DIVISIONS Stormwater Management

Stomwater Quality

Drainage/stormwater detention studies, FEMA CRS, field surveys, design specs/ contract bids; 3 FTE

Implements NPDES program, construction inspections, water sampling, citizen complaints, public outreach; 2 FTE

We have distributed to Edmond residents 842 rain barrels & 230 compost bins since the beginning of the annual rain barrel and compost bin rogram (2016 – 2021). — We typically run approximately 7,000 Public Service Announcements about floodplains and flood insurance each year.

CONTACT Ph (405) 359-4772 https://edmondok.com/278/ Stormwater-Quality-Management

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Use technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

GOALS

GOALS

Develop an online, interactive mapping application to help City staff and the public identify Edmond’s watersheds and current regulatory floodplains. (Complete)

Reorganize sections of the Engineering Department webpage to improve flow and accessibility to infomation.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Complete remaining edits to mapping application.

Create new central webpage to host all 5 of Engineering’s interactive mapping applications by Q4 or June 30, 2022

Work with Marketing Dept. to create new webpage to host new application.

Reorganize Stormwater Quality’s webpages based on content, and add new webpages detailing residential and commercial inspections/enforcement procedures by Q4 or June 30, 2022.

Create new content for new webpage. Publish webpage after “Letter of Determination” has been received from FEMA prompting the City of Edmond to adopt the new floodplain maps from FEMA. Completion date unknown since approval depends on receipt of letter from FEMA and approval by SWAB and City Council.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

5-0-0

5-0-0

5-0-0

5-0-0

5-0-0

5-0-0

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FUND BUDGET SUMMARY

Drainage Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

1,980,983 50,000 -

2,020,603 50,000 -

2,061,014 50,000 -

2,102,235 50,000 -

2,144,280 50,000 -

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue

4,840 1,853,725 281,745 20,086

1,785,000 55,000 -

2,160,396

1,840,000

1,840,000

2,030,983

2,070,603

2,111,014

2,152,235

2,194,280

-

11,875,901

10,877,315

9,941,866

9,638,866

9,632,433

9,643,053

1,785,000 55,000

Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

10,595,752

11,875,901

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

12,756,148

13,715,901

13,715,901

12,908,298

12,012,469

11,749,880

11,784,668

11,837,333

483,256 6,023 26,900 79,037 -

534,144 31,700 183,650 1,855,000 -

493,851 30,450 107,400 1,855,000

568,098 34,900 176,900 1,865,000 -

596,791 28,900 177,200 1,265,000 -

589,261 28,900 177,550 1,010,000 -

599,658 35,900 177,950 1,010,000 -

610,634 30,950 178,375 1,010,000 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

595,217

2,604,494

2,486,701

2,644,898

2,067,891

1,805,711

1,823,508

1,829,959

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

(285,030)

(351,885)

(351,885)

(321,534)

(305,712)

(311,736)

(318,107)

(324,596)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(285,030)

(351,885)

(351,885)

(321,534)

(305,712)

(311,736)

(318,107)

(324,596)

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES * LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Expenses

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Edmond Economic Development Fund (EEDA) Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11,875,901 11,875,901

10,759,522 10,759,522

10,877,315 10,877,315

9,941,866 9,941,866

9,638,866 9,638,866

9,632,433 9,632,433

9,643,053 9,643,053

9,682,779 9,682,779

12,756,148

13,715,901

13,715,901

12,908,298

12,012,469

11,749,880

11,784,668

11,837,333

550% 2,006 1349% 4,924

267,378 4,941 12,536 174 285,030

585% 2,134 364% 1,328

288,898 5,147 42,000 3,128 2,894 9,818 351,885

190

591% 2,158 383% 1,399

288,898 5,147 42,000 3,128 2,894 9,818

351,885

490% 1,787 335% 1,223

296,389 8,252 3,607 2,894 10,392 321,534

466% 1,699 406% 1,482

279,722 8,622 3,679 2,894 10,795 305,712

456% 1,665 455% 1,660

285,317 9,011 3,752 2,894 10,762 311,736

448% 1,635 450% 1,643

291,023 9,420 3,827 2,894 10,942 318,107

441% 1,611 449% 1,640

296,844 9,850 3,904 2,894 11,104 324,596

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TAB PAGE INSERT

OTHER ENTERPRISE FUNDS


OTHER ENTERPRISE FUNDS


KICKINGBIRD GOLF CLUB KickingBird Golf Club opened in May of 1971 making it the City of Edmond’s oldest golf facility. KickingBird has an 18-hole championship golf course, lighted driving range, full service pro shop and a restaurant. Our mission is “To provide patrons with a well-manicured golf course, excellent customer service, high quality amenities and a valuable golfing experience.” In May of 2021, we will be celebrating our 50th Anniversary. We will be closing on July 1, 2021 for our largest golf course improvement project ever. (New clubhouse, tournament hall, short game practice area, expanded driving range, new greens and a new irrigation system.)

DIVISIONS Pro Shop

Cart Barn/ Driving Range

Process transactions, inform customers of activities, help customers with purchases, help facilitate golf tournaments; 6 PTE, 1 Seasonal

Pull out/put up carts, wash carts, pick up range balls, clean bathrooms, fill sand bottles and detail carts; 2 PTE, 5 Seasonal

Restaurant

Maintenance

Prepare food, process customers, stock beverages, clean tables, stock supplies and wash dishes; 1 FTE, 6 PTE

Maintain the golf course mowing, weedeating, fertilizing, weed control, fixing equiment and course prep; 5 FTE, 1 PTE, 1 Seasonal

Golf Admin. Management of employees & volunteers, coordinate golf tournaments, golf associations, golf instructional programs, budgeting, daily deposits, employee scheduling, payroll etc; 4 FTE

The southeast corner of our driving range is the second highest point in Oklahoma County and the highest point in Edmond. — There are more than 2 Million Range Balls hit on the driving range each year and over 6,700 of “The Bird’s” famous hamburgers sold. — KickingBird Golf Club celebrated its 50th Anniversary in May of 2021.

CONTACT Brian Soerensen Ph (405) 216-7421

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Economic Development- Revitalize and encourage development of commercial areas. Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural, historical, and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident satisfaction. High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement, and maintain improvements to cultural, historical, and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident satisfaction.

GOALS

GOALS

Generate enough revenue to cover operational expenses. (In progress)

Improve golf course condition and enhance landscaping.

Improve golf course condition and enhance landscaping. (In progress)

Upgrade the physical assets of our facility and improve amenities.

Upgrade the physical assets of our facility and improve amenities continued to 2022. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Have the new greens seeded with 007 bent grass before the end of October.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Begin demolition and dirt work the by end of July and start construction on the new clubhouse and tournament hall by mid August.

Number of Paid Rounds Played-increase by 10% over FY20’s amount of 40,000. Average Dollar per paid player-increase over FY20’s amount of $50.73.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

11-17-15

7-5-7

11-17-16

11-17-16

11-17-16

11-17-16

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Golf Course Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

175,000 40,000 215,000

1,809,500 2,716 43,984 1,856,200

2,537,450 5,000 48,458 2,590,908

2,537,450 5,000 48,538 2,590,988

2,537,450 5,000 48,619 2,591,069

231,280

682,637

BUDGET YEAR

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Capital Lease Proceeds Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

680 1,802,248 7,566 55,619 1,866,113

1,995,700 5,200 54,011 2,054,911

14 2,105,000 6,100

-

437,762

1,601 359,475

1,601 359,475

398,804

92,545

2,303,875

2,415,987

2,528,233

613,804

1,948,745

2,487,810

2,822,268

3,273,706

1,071,757 408,251 161,942 61,254 -

1,098,203 467,010 186,625 70,000 -

1,096,467 467,010 203,998 70,000

779,432 229,055 94,205 88,000 -

1,153,708 489,060 179,025 27,000 -

1,152,423 567,610 180,525 83,000 -

1,169,138 569,410 180,525 78,000 -

1,185,693 567,610 180,625 78,000 -

1,703,204

1,821,838

1,837,475

1,190,692

1,848,793

1,983,558

1,997,073

2,011,928

56,043 2,167,157 -

(103,098)

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

100,000 (339,594)

100,000 (391,954)

100,000 (391,954)

1,000,000 (330,567)

125,000 (328,050)

125,000 (397,972)

125,000 (267,559)

125,000 (273,567)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(239,594)

(291,954)

(291,954)

669,433

(203,050)

(272,972)

(142,559)

(148,567)

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES * LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Expenses

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

-

-

-

-

1,601

-

-

-

359,475 361,076

302,195 302,195

398,804 398,804

92,545 92,545

2,303,875

2,415,987

2,528,233

613,804

19% 70 19% 68

200,493 42,297 18,886 361 77,557 339,594

15% 54 14% 52

254,030 43,653 17,349 500 76,422 391,954

194

18% 67 19% 68

254,030 43,653 17,349 500 76,422 391,954

43% 157 6% 22

199,916 45,056 20,034 500 65,061 330,567

(103,098) (103,098) 1,948,745

-6% (20) -5% (18)

188,675 46,505 20,434 500 71,936 328,050

-

-

-

-

-

-

231,280 231,280

682,637 682,637

1,113,211 1,113,211

2,487,810

2,822,268

3,273,706

9% 33 10% 37

192,450 48,004 20,843 500 136,175 397,972

26% 96 32% 116

196,245 49,554 21,260 500 267,559

43% 157 52% 188

200,225 51,157 21,685 500 273,567

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CITYLINK PUBLIC TRANSPORATION The mission of Edmond’s public transportation service, Citylink, is to provide quality, reliable, affordable, customer-friendly transportation service to the residents of Edmond for access to employment, shopping, medical, education and social destinations. Citylink is operated by RATPDev USA, Inc through a 5-year agreement with the Edmond Public Works Authority. Citylink utilizes 12 transit buses to operate 4 local fixed routes, and a door-to-door paratransit service within the Edmond city limits, Monday through Saturday. It also provides 12 daily round trips between Edmond and Oklahoma City, Monday through Friday.

EMPLOYEES:

1–2

Citylink provided over 188,355 trips in 2020 - maintaining full service during the COVID Pandemic. — All Citylink services are fare-free, including the Express Link to OKC and Paratransit.

CONTACT Ph (405) 359-4694 https://www.edmondok.com/205/ Citylink-Edmond

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Infrastructure- Plan, design, implement and maintain transportation infrastructure that allows easy connections throughout the city and between different modes of transportation.

Infrastructure- Plan, design, implement and maintain transportation infrastructure that allows easy connections throughout the city and between different modes of transportation.

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Economic Development- Revitalize and encourage development of commercial areas. (i.e. downtown, the south Broadway corridor, the Route 66 corridor, and the I-35 Corridor).

GOALS

GOALS

Create a 3 to 5-Year Citylink Operations and Financial Plan. (In progress)

Initiate process for designing and constructing a transit center.

Continue marketing and communications with citizens, EPTC, UCO and private-partners. (In progress)

Assist with the process of the mobility plan.

Continue to seek funding for operations, capital needs and the Edmond Multimodal Transit. (In progress)

Meet and discuss needs of different people regarding the mobility plan.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Meet those persons involved with the transit center to discuss details/needs.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Develop and implement marketing strategies and educational tools to attract and maintain riders.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

0.5-0-0

0.5-0-0

0.5-0-0

0.5-0-0

0.5-0-0

0.5-0-0

197

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CITYLINK Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

15,000 2,584,227

2,482,442 2,500 18,000 2,502,942

1,124,078 2,500 18,000 1,144,578

832,996 2,500 18,000 853,496

833,996 2,500 18,000 854,496

834,996 2,500 18,000 855,496 (86,646)

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

1,263,015 353,681 18,567 12,000 1,647,263

2,589,418 2,500 15,000 2,606,918

2,566,727

-

578,301

879,681

879,681

1,602,209

2,275,205

1,535,614

752,485

2,225,564

3,486,599

3,463,908

4,105,151

3,419,783

2,389,110

1,606,981

768,850

64,833 100,866 1,555,492 -

43,474 163,600 1,888,088 -

43,397 192,715 1,879,193 -

57,241 154,000 1,582,312 300,000 -

60,375 153,500 1,629,396 300,000 -

59,910 153,500 1,675,965 -

61,259 153,500 1,724,961 -

61,595 153,500 1,775,427 -

1,721,191

2,095,162

2,115,305

2,093,553

2,143,271

1,889,375

1,939,720

1,990,522

2,500

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

700,000 (324,692)

400,000 (146,394)

400,000 (146,394)

400,000 (136,393)

400,000 (140,898)

400,000 (147,251)

400,000 (153,906)

400,000 (160,881)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

375,308

253,606

253,606

263,607

259,102

252,749

246,094

239,119

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

879,681 879,681

1,645,043 1,645,043

1,602,209 1,602,209

2,275,205 2,275,205

1,535,614 1,535,614

752,485 752,485

2,225,564

3,486,599

3,463,908

4,105,151

3,419,783

2,389,110

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES * LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Expenses

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

53% 195 65% 239

14,070 310,622 324,692

63% 230 89% 326

15,678 127,682 3,034 146,394

198

62% 226 86% 314

15,678 127,682 3,034

146,394

91% 332 102% 372

20,844 112,201 3,348 136,393

134% 490 82% 297

19,672 117,811 3,415 140,898

88% 322 46% 168

20,065 123,702 3,483 147,251

(86,646) (86,646) 1,606,981

-10% (37) -5% (19)

20,467 129,887 3,553 153,906

(982,553) (982,553) 768,850

-115% (419) -56% (205)

20,876 136,381 3,624 160,881

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YOUR GOVSHOP YourGovShop’s mission is to aggregate material purchase for member cities to obtain discounted pricing. Our plan is to generate sufficient revenues through supplier rebates to cover its operational costs and generate a profit. Financial activity and results of operations will be monitored separately. Profits generated (if any) from the plan will be used to offset the expenses of the City’s Purchasing department or to expand this joint purchasing program in other areas.

CONTACT Brenda Mayer Ph (405) 359-4533 Brenda.Mayer@edmondok.com

GOALS 1. Generate sufficient revenue to cover cost of operations. 2. Increase awareness and participation in the program through marketing. 3. Expand our customer base annually.

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YourGovShop Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Inter-governmental Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

66,578 8,493 75,071

50,000 1,500 51,500

98,680

50,000 1,500 51,500

50,000 1,500 51,500

50,000 1,500 51,500

50,000 1,500 51,500

50,000 1,500 51,500

-

371,502

411,140

411,140

452,825

440,087

435,303

431,697

428,031

446,573

462,640

509,820

504,325

491,587

486,803

483,197

479,531

36,360 13 14,816 -

34,588 900 37,500 -

34,588 900 37,500 -

35,047 1,200 37,500 -

36,334 1,200 37,500 -

35,156 1,200 37,500 -

35,216 1,200 37,500 -

35,277 1,200 37,500 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

51,189

72,988

72,988

73,747

75,034

73,856

73,916

73,977

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

18,610 (2,854)

18,750 (2,757)

18,750 (2,757)

12,026 (2,517)

18,750 -

18,750 -

18,750 -

18,750 -

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

15,756

15,993

15,993

9,509

18,750

18,750

18,750

18,750

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

96,378 2,302

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Special Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES

411,140 411,140

405,645 405,645

452,825 452,825

440,087 440,087

435,303 435,303

431,697 431,697

428,031 428,031

424,304 424,304

TOTAL ESTIMATED USES

446,573

462,640

509,820

504,325

491,587

486,803

483,197

479,531

* LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Expenses

548% 1,999 1160% 4,235

788% 2,875 712% 2,598

459% 1,675 794% 2,900

855% 3,119 577% 2,106

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Total Transfers Out:

2,854 2,854

2,757 2,757

2,757

2,517 2,517

200

2,757

845% 3,085 773% 2,823

-

838% 3,060 783% 2,859

-

831% 3,034 776% 2,832

824% 3,007 768% 2,804

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TAB PAGE INSERT

INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS


INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS


ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT SERVICES The Administrative Support Services Fund has been established to allocate administrative overhead costs to user departments of the City. Financing is provided through billings to user departments based upon applicable cost accounting methods.

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Admin Support Services Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

5,000 370,000

73,650 300,000 35,000 2,500 411,150

75,123 300,000 35,000 2,500 412,623

BUDGET YEAR

Projected Projected Budget Projected Budget Budget FY 23-24 FY 24-25 FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Licenses and Permits Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

28,350 443,662 49,603 114,366 635,981

50,000 285,000 30,000 5,000 370,000

50,000 285,000 30,000

76,625 300,000 35,000 2,500 414,125

78,158 300,000 35,000 2,500 415,658

79,721 300,000 35,000 2,500 417,221

-

7,262,522

4,096,305 -

4,096,305 -

3,379,938 -

80,664 -

(5,266,049) -

(10,414,399) -

(15,145,013) -

7,898,502

4,466,305

4,466,305

3,791,088

493,287

(4,851,924)

(9,998,741)

(14,727,792)

DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: General Government City Treasurer City Manager Central Communications Information Technology Financial Services Human Resources City Clerk Facility Maintenance Legal Services Engineering Marketing Public Works-Administration Operations Central Warehouse Utility Customer Service

246,964 43,730 1,296,332 2,683,907 6,066,679 936,291 902,944 252,423 1,720,188 744,744 2,380,115 804,653 819,891 250,347 3,990,063

288,599 68,120 1,391,383 2,998,500 6,638,143 1,181,846 1,248,181 288,603 2,260,128 1,001,153 2,604,990 942,856 833,601 249,073 3,198,079

288,599 44,007 1,335,032 2,528,893 6,638,143 994,405 1,180,106 242,711 2,107,605 998,595 2,485,325 828,989 821,109 240,494 2,857,371

289,700 1,767,014 2,828,115 7,305,777 1,498,264 1,072,318 238,155 2,449,053 1,054,206 2,893,049 964,784 909,180 267,711 3,260,526

285,000 1,610,568 2,825,898 7,747,572 1,557,141 1,024,701 242,439 2,492,821 1,079,592 3,020,595 1,047,808 928,079 281,496 3,438,940

110,000 1,628,970 2,803,323 8,249,078 1,561,044 1,022,327 245,313 2,552,769 1,066,851 2,985,748 999,937 905,084 282,952 3,467,833

110,000 1,595,360 2,871,126 8,022,142 1,590,423 1,024,382 247,076 2,567,684 1,070,909 3,024,611 1,016,497 919,235 286,192 3,600,445

110,000 1,649,175 2,886,572 8,078,859 1,617,296 1,039,866 250,954 2,561,305 1,076,310 3,078,227 1,031,728 939,866 291,913 3,654,188

ESTIMATED USES

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

23,139,270

25,193,255

23,591,384

26,797,852

27,582,650

27,881,229

27,946,082

28,266,259

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

19,672,914 (335,841)

23,009,255 (504,735)

23,009,255 (504,238)

23,352,082 (264,653)

22,093,750 (270,437)

22,595,166 (276,411)

23,082,396 (282,587)

23,550,044 (288,977)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

19,337,073

22,504,520

22,505,017

23,087,429

21,823,314

22,318,754

22,799,809

23,261,067

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4,096,305

1,777,570 -

3,379,938 -

80,664 -

(5,266,049) -

(10,414,399) -

(15,145,013) -

(19,732,985) -

4,096,305

1,777,570

3,379,938

80,664

(5,266,049)

(10,414,399)

(15,145,013)

(19,732,985)

7,898,502

4,466,305

4,466,305

3,791,088

493,287

(4,851,924)

(9,998,741)

(14,727,792)

1 87,104 40,527 153,142 55,067 335,841

56,389 222,000 177,246 49,100 504,735

89,679 188,111 177,248 49,200 504,238

0 63,314 152,239 49,100 264,653

66,053 155,284 49,100 270,437

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

202

68,922 158,389 49,100 276,411

71,930 161,557 49,100 282,587

75,089 164,788 49,100 288,977

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RISK MANAGEMENT SERVICES The Risk Management Department has and will continue to help prevent losses for the City. If a loss does occur, Risk Management will continue to look for ways to minimize costs. We continue to focus on the four main areas of greatest expenses for the City: workers compensation, property and subrogation, torts, and insurance. Our listed goals explain our plan of action, which provide the means to track and monitor throughout the year.

MISSION STATEMENT To provide a comprehensive risk management program that contributes to the health, safety and protections of employees, citizens and visitors, while also protecting the City’s physical and financial resources.

EMPLOYEES:

3

We have certified over 400 employees in 1st Aid/CPR/AED over the last 5 years. — PW We provide Safety services to all City Departments. — We handle over 100 claims a year.

CONTACT Ph (405) 359-4607 https://www.edmondok.com/157/ Risk-Management

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

High Performing Government- Enhance effective communication within the department and with internal and external customers.

Financial Responsibility- Provide fiscal stability by obtaining multiple insurance policies with low deductible/retention in an attempt to keep the City’s exposure on large claims to a minimum.

GOALS

GOALS

Provide safety data and safety training to departments that they in turn can use to help reduce accidents and injuries while both on and off the job.

Provide safety training for departments to help reduce accidents and injuries. Obtain mulitiple lines of insurance from A rated insurance companies witht eh llowest deductibel/retention available with the best pricing.

Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization along with improving communication within the department.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Provide safety training monthly to increase the safety awarenesss of employees.

Provide data to the departments quarterly that includes information on injuries and accidents to allow them to focus on past trends in an effort to prevent them from reoccurring.

On an annual basis, compare current/expiring insurance policies to proposed policies being offered by exisiting and new insurance providers.

Provide safety training/classes monthly to enhance the safety awareness of employees. Communicate issues that are taking place or are coming up with other departments and with the City in general.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

205

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Risk Management Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

10,000 150,000 160,000

10,000 150,000 160,000

10,000 150,000 160,000

10,000 150,000 160,000

BUDGET YEAR

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

14,622 52,618 191,959 259,199

25,000 150,000 175,000

150,000 175,000

10,000 150,000 160,000

3,090,664

2,928,563 -

2,928,563 -

4,160,932 -

3,615,672 -

3,036,154 -

2,437,893 -

1,828,641 -

3,349,863

3,103,563

3,103,563

4,320,932

3,775,672

3,196,154

2,597,893

1,988,641

321,523 14,915

316,406 10,175

323,198 11,600

337,892 25,425

353,429 17,054

348,309 21,225

353,551 16,425

358,765 16,425

(632,214) (141,144) (115,930) (797,965) 3,462,858 -

(781,000) (225,000) (165,000) (860,000) 4,193,000 -

(781,000) (225,000) (165,000) (860,000) 2,242,510 -

779,000 225,000 165,000 930,000 131,200 -

817,950 225,000 165,000 957,900 132,750 -

842,489 225,000 165,000 986,637 137,750 -

867,763 225,000 165,000 1,016,236 132,750 -

893,796 225,000 165,000 1,046,723 132,750 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

2,112,042

2,488,581

546,308

2,593,517

2,669,083

2,726,410

2,776,725

2,838,459

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

1,741,076 (50,335)

1,657,681 (54,004)

1,657,681 (54,004)

1,951,053 (62,796)

1,990,047 (60,482)

2,029,876 (61,727)

2,070,473 (63,000)

2,111,883 (64,304)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

1,690,742

1,603,677

1,603,677

1,888,257

1,929,565

1,968,149

2,007,473

2,047,579

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,928,563

2,218,659

4,160,932

3,615,672

3,036,154

2,437,893

1,828,641

1,197,760

2,928,563

2,218,659

4,160,932

3,615,672

3,036,154

2,437,893

1,828,641

1,197,760

3,349,863

3,103,563

3,103,563

4,320,932

3,775,672

3,196,154

2,597,893

1,988,641

38,776 2,141 8,555 863 50,335

41,659 2,164 7,681 2,500 54,004

41,659 2,164

47,254 2,272 11,470 1,800 62,796

44,597 2,386 11,699 1,800 60,482

45,489 2,505 11,933 1,800 61,727

46,399 2,630 12,172 1,800 63,000

47,327 2,762 12,415 1,800 64,304

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

25,000

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Workers Compensation Claims Tort Claims Vehicle and Other Property Claims Insurance Premiums Other Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

206

7,681 2,500

54,004

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WORKERS’ COMPENSATION RESERVE FUND The Risk Management Department operates a self-insured Workers’ Compensation program. To continue operating the program, State of Oklahoma Insurance Commission is requiring the City of Edmond to either post a security deposit or make an appropriation into a segregated workers’ compensation fund. The amount of the appropriation must be at least the average amount of workers’ compensation losses paid during the preceding three years. Based upon the latest actuarial study, our required reserves should be $1,691,000.

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Workers' Compensation Reserve Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Charges for Services Interest Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

43,928 43,928

1,500 1,500

1,500 1,500

20,000 20,000

25,000 25,000

25,000 25,000

25,000 25,000

25,000 25,000

1,946,482

1,990,215 -

1,990,215 -

1,991,715 -

2,011,715 -

2,036,715 -

2,061,715 -

2,086,715 -

1,990,409

1,991,715

1,991,715

2,011,715

2,036,715

2,061,715

2,086,715

2,111,715

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

194 -

-

-

-

-

-

-

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Workers Compensation Claims Tort Claims Vehicle and Other Property Claims Insurance Premiums Other Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

-

194

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,990,215

1,990,215

1,991,715 1,991,715

1,991,715 1,991,715

2,011,715 2,011,715

2,036,715 2,036,715

2,061,715 2,061,715

2,086,715 2,086,715

2,111,715 2,111,715

1,990,409

1,991,715

1,991,715

2,011,715

2,036,715

2,061,715

2,086,715

2,111,715

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

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HUMAN RESOURCES/ EMPLOYEE GROUP INSURANCE FUND The Human Resources (HR) Department is dedicated to providing high quality, trustworthy service. We strive to attract, develop, motivate and retain a productive and diverse workforce within an inclusive work environment by: • Attracting and retaining a quality workforce by providing a competitive benefits package along with comprehensive programs to assist and promote employee well-being; • Providing friendly trustworthy service to all internal and external customers; • Providing sustainable benefit products and services responsive to and valued by employees.

DIVISIONS Employee Health Clinic

Employee Health Benefits/Wellness

The clinic provides free primary care services to include, lab draws, prescriptions and personal health assessments.

Group Health, Dental, Vision, FSA, Long-term Disability, Life Insurance and other Voluntary Plans/Benefits

Average total lives on the City’s group health insurance plan 1,960.

CONTACT Group Insurance - Ammy Butler Ph (405) 359-4557 Employee Health Clinic Sherry Altenburg Ph (405) 359-4634

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Employee Group Insurance Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Charges for Services Interest Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

11,636,937 62,710 11,699,647

11,333,730 33,000 664,523 12,031,253

11,333,730 33,000 664,523 12,031,253

12,776,651 30,000 665,000 13,471,651

13,032,183 30,000 665,000 13,727,183

13,292,828 30,000 665,000 13,987,828

13,558,683 30,000 665,000 14,253,683

13,829,857 30,000 665,000 14,524,857

3,710,747

3,422,789 -

3,422,789 -

3,490,860 -

4,200,066 -

4,354,084 -

3,891,817 -

2,756,354 -

15,410,394

15,454,042

15,454,042

16,962,511

17,927,249

18,341,912

18,145,500

17,281,211

242

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges: Claims Insurance Premiums Health Clinic Wellness Program Other Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

9,704,128 1,059,419 649,711 (6,228) 573,823 11,981,094

10,014,835 1,066,933 664,523 20,000 467,284 -

9,648,177 1,122,292 691,862 20,000 474,128 -

10,293,750 1,228,513 675,073 20,000 538,535 -

10,985,074 1,326,451 685,952 20,000 549,455 -

11,725,564 1,432,217 705,409 20,000 560,557 -

12,518,901 1,546,437 725,449 20,000 571,895 -

13,369,057 1,669,787 746,090 20,000 583,475 -

12,234,075

11,956,959

12,756,371

13,567,432

14,444,247

15,383,182

16,388,909

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

(6,511)

(6,223)

(6,223)

(6,074)

(5,733)

(5,848)

(5,964)

(6,084)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

(6,511)

(6,223)

(6,223)

(6,074)

(5,733)

(5,848)

(5,964)

(6,084)

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3,422,789

3,422,789

3,213,744 3,213,744

3,490,860 3,490,860

4,200,066 4,200,066

4,354,084 4,354,084

3,891,817 3,891,817

2,756,354 2,756,354

886,218 886,218

15,410,394

15,454,042

15,454,042

16,962,511

17,927,249

18,341,912

18,145,500

17,281,211

6,511 6,511

6,223 6,223

6,223 6,223

6,074 6,074

5,733 5,733

5,848 5,848

5,964 5,964

6,084 6,084

** GASB Statement 45-Other Post Employment Benefits (OPEB) per the December, 2014 Actuarial Study's assumption of 30% utilization by retirees and 50% utilization by spouses of covered retirees amounts to $2,180,240 in the 6th year we have this obligation and anticipated approximately $5.2 million in OPEB Unfunded Liability.

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VEHICLE MAINTENANCE Vehicle Maintenance is an ASE Certified Blue Seal Facility. Vehicle maintenance delivers high quality, cost effective best in class trustworthy service to our customers. The department provides repair and preventative maintenance support services for the City’s approximately 600 vehicles and equipment. Employees are responsible for maintaining and repairing vehicles/ equipment, ordering and installing parts, tire repair and tire replacement. The department also provides “on call” mechanic available when the shop is not open who provides emergency repair service for any type of vehicle/equipment.

EMPLOYEES:

13

DIVISIONS Superintendent

Shope Foreman

Supervision, budget management, administrative, parts management; 1 FTE

Daily operations and parts management; 1 FTE

Administration

Dispatcher

Work order processing, accounting, scheduling, data entry; 1 FTE

Scheduling, work load management, data entry; 1 FTE

Technicians

Welder & Fabricator

Vehicle service and repair; 7 FTE

1 FTE

Vehicle maintenance services and repairs all tyes of vehicle from tractor to firetrucks and everything in between.

Tire Technician 1 FTE

CONTACT Bobby Masterson Ph (405) 216-7785

Rick Everett Ph (405) 216-7681

bobby.masterson@ edmondok.com

rick.everett@ edmondok.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

GOALS

GOALS

Increase the awareness of city’s personnel in the need to support the preventive maintenance service program for vehicle/ equipment so that safety standards are continually met, liabilities are reduced and an overall reduction in maintenance costs can be achieved. (In progress)

Upgrade the existing G.P.S. units that are currently being used in the city fleet vehicles to enhance the reporting capabilities, accuracy and data availability to more effectively manage the fleet.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Work with city departments to obtain vehicles/ equipment that will be utilized to their maximum potential and remove obsolete and under-utilized vehicles/equipment from inventory. (In progress)

Complete all upgrades to the units by August 2022.

Draft specifications that combine the needs of the division and the financial aspects of the purchase together so as to ensure the most cost-effective purchase. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Reduce the number of replacements that require supplemental funding for replacement. (tracked by comparison year to year.) Increase G.P.S. coverage. This allows vehicle monitoring that reports idle time, hazardous driving, and unnecessary usage to reduce expenses and liability.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

11.35*-0-0

11.35*-0-0

11.35*-0-0

11.35*-0-0

11.35*-0-0

11.35*-0-0

*.65 split with Fleet Management Fund.

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Vehicle Maintenance Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

1,372,646 4,727 8,200 1,385,573

1,490,240 4,869 8,200 1,503,309

1,534,947 4,869 8,200 1,548,016

1,573,484 4,869 8,200 1,586,553

1,613,176 4,869 8,200 1,626,245

537,294

708,691

981,859

1,330,791

1,756,880

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Charges for Services Interest Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

944,878 4,466 3,538 952,883 498,089

1,054,577 4,589 8,200 1,067,366 530,037 (235,168)

1,054,577 4,589 8,200 1,067,366

530,037 (235,168)

1,450,971

1,362,235

1,362,235

1,922,867

2,212,000

2,529,875

2,917,344

3,383,125

1,087,378 903,487 578,189 458,289 -

1,047,366 980,865 746,020 460,291 -

1,015,514 980,865 746,202 460,291 -

1,059,382 1,015,675 1,142,270 473,542 -

1,107,526 1,036,648 1,176,538 484,761 -

1,087,125 1,066,631 1,211,834 498,922 -

1,100,890 1,066,631 1,249,189 498,922 -

1,113,589 1,066,631 1,285,635 498,922 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

3,027,343

3,234,542

3,202,872

3,690,869

3,805,473

3,864,512

3,915,632

3,964,777

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

2,067,209 (195,969)

2,556,975 (179,044)

2,556,975 (179,044)

2,670,494 (193,801)

2,760,340 (185,007)

2,854,135 (188,708)

2,947,649 (192,482)

3,044,074 (196,326)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

1,871,240

2,377,931

2,377,931

2,476,693

2,575,332

2,665,428

2,755,167

2,847,748

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

505,624 505,624

537,294 537,294

708,691 708,691

981,859 981,859

1,330,791 1,330,791

1,756,880 1,756,880

2,266,095 2,266,095

1,450,971

1,362,235

1,362,235

1,922,867

2,212,000

2,529,875

2,917,344

3,383,125

175,703 20,266 195,969

155,786 23,258 179,044

155,786 23,258 179,044

166,203 27,598 193,801

156,857 28,150 185,007

159,995 28,713 188,708

163,194 29,287 192,482

166,453 29,873 196,326

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Fuel & Lube Expense Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

530,037 (235,168) 294,869

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT (INTERNAL SERVICE) This department details the general, non-specific operating costs for the Administrative Support Service Departments listed on the following pages.

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FUND BUDGET SUMMARY

Internal Service Funds Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR Projected Budget FY 21-22

FY 22-23

Projected Projected Budget Projected Budget Budget FY 23-24 FY 24-25 FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue

118,400 28,350 13,246,232 554,770 750,393

50,000 12,905,442 249,682 827,723

50,000 12,905,442 195,166 931,523

9,860,000 73,650 14,685,036 203,384 825,700

75,123 15,059,710 158,514 825,700

76,625 15,366,621 208,526 825,700

78,158 15,672,583 208,526 825,700

79,721 15,985,030 208,526 825,700

Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

14,698,145

14,032,847

14,082,131

25,647,770

16,119,047

16,477,472

16,784,967

17,098,977

25,334,105 7,262,522

29,851,120 (235,168)

29,851,120 (235,168)

23,031,754 537,294

30,499,946 708,691

25,531,718 981,859

20,949,202 1,330,791

16,116,279 1,756,880

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

47,294,772

43,648,799

43,698,083

49,216,818

47,327,684

42,991,050

39,064,960

34,972,136

2,112,042 194 11,981,094 3,027,343 5,188,673 7,883,440 23,139,270

2,488,581 12,234,075 3,234,542 5,317,515 10,312,381 25,193,255

546,308 11,956,959 3,202,872 6,073,281 16,937,108 23,591,384

2,593,517 12,756,371 3,690,869 5,305,571 10,643,533 26,797,852

2,669,083 13,567,432 3,805,473 4,542,547 10,895,674 27,582,650

2,726,410 14,444,247 3,864,512 4,651,660 10,878,252 27,881,229

2,776,725 15,383,182 3,915,632 4,202,289 11,064,143 27,946,082

2,838,459 16,388,909 3,964,777 5,006,969 11,227,493 28,266,259

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

53,332,057

58,780,349

62,307,912

61,787,713

63,062,859

64,446,310

65,288,053

67,692,866

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

39,369,550 (3,620,616)

47,023,914 (4,922,968)

47,101,338 (4,922,461)

48,237,244 (4,457,711)

46,404,611 (4,155,859)

48,002,889 (4,267,636)

48,477,590 (4,381,338)

49,626,358 (4,500,224)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

35,748,934

42,100,946

42,178,877

43,779,533

42,248,752

43,735,253

44,096,252

45,126,135

29,321,083 530,037

26,463,772 -

23,031,754 -

30,499,946 -

25,531,718 -

20,949,202 -

16,116,279 -

10,139,309 -

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Risk Management Fund Workers' Compensation Reserve Fund Employee Group Insurance Fund Vehicle Maintenance Fund Fleet Management Fund Field Services Fund Administrative Support Funds

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations** Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls*) TOTAL OTHER USES TOTAL ESTIMATED USES * LEVEL OF EMERGENCY RESERVES: Percentage of Total Revenue Number of Days of Revenue Percentage of Total Expenses Number of Days of Revenue DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

505,624

537,294

708,691

981,859

1,330,791

1,756,880

2,266,095

29,615,952

(235,168)

26,969,396

23,569,048

31,208,637

26,513,578

22,279,993

17,873,159

12,405,404

47,199,075

43,648,799

43,698,083

49,216,818

47,327,684

42,991,050

39,064,960

34,972,136

-1.24% (5) -0.43% (2)

1,851,783 776,767 160,147 374,487 457,432 3,620,616

2.76% 10 0.83% 3

2,440,076 863,780 640,000 402,452 576,660 4,922,968

216

2.93% 11 0.83% 3

2,440,076 897,060 606,111 402,454 576,760 4,922,461

2.36% 9 1.11% 4

2,546,546 889,803 70,000 372,462 578,900 4,457,711

4.77% 17 1.51% 6

2,257,900 935,148 379,910 582,900 4,155,859

6.31% 23 2.00% 7

2,303,058 983,169 387,509 593,900 4,267,636

8.16% 30 2.61% 10

2,349,119 1,034,060 395,259 602,900 4,381,338

10.30% 38 3.25% 12

2,396,106 1,088,054 403,164 612,900 4,500,224

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CITY CLERK The City Clerk’s office will continue to provide diverse administrative services to support city departments. Internal services include city clerk responsibilities, records administration and management, issuance of permits and licenses, payment processing, and Gracelawn Cemetery records management.

There are over 120 active medical marijuana certificates of compliance in City limits. — In fiscal year 2020-2021, there were 161 active liquor licenses in City limits. — The City Clerk’s Office worked with IT and Gracelawn Cemetery staff this year to launch a public facing interactive map containing Gracelawn Cemetery burial records.

CONTACT Ph (405) 359-4545 edmondok.com/155/City-Clerk

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in landfill waste.

High Performing Government- Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization (i.e. between departments, with the City Council, with Boards and Commissions, etc).

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in land fill waste.

GOALS

GOALS

Work with IT Department on implementation on new Permitting, Licensing, and Land Management system.

Digitize records, applications, permits, licenses, etc. and clear out expired records. (In progress)

Digitize records, applications, permits, licenses, etc. and clear out expired records.

Streamline Processes for Medical Marijuana Certification. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Develop tutorial worksheets of the basics of Cityworks for City Clerk’s Office reference

Update information on the website and include a new page specific to Medical Marijuana with updated information from Building, Planning, and Fire

Clear out expired records. Digitize all non-permanent records.

Clear out expired records.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

2-1-0

2-1-0

2-1-0

2-0-0

2-0-0

2-0-0

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: City Clerk

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

204,947

Materials & Supplies

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21 214,303

Current Year Revised FY 20-21 179,311

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

153,955

162,639

162,513

167,276

171,154

BUDGET YEAR

2,369

3,000

3,000

6,400

2,800

5,800

2,800

2,800

45,107

71,300

60,400

77,800

77,000

77,000

77,000

77,000

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

75,685

123,915

123,915

113,822

116,100

118,420

120,789

123,204

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

328,108

412,518

366,626

351,977

358,539

363,733

367,865

374,158

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

75,685 75,685

122,503 1,412 123,915

122,503

111,918 1,904 113,822

114,157 1,943 116,100

116,439 1,981 118,420

118,768 2,021 120,789

121,143 2,061 123,204

Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out

220

1,412

123,915

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CITY MANAGER The City Manager’s office has primary responsibility for both the day to day administration of Edmond’s city government, including all city departments and operations, and also the carrying out of City Council policies and directives.

STATEMENT OF VALUES • The City of Edmond exists only to provide SERVICES, and our internal mission of Trustworthy Service Through Continuous Improvement reflects our constant dedication to this reality. • We are committed to our thoughts, words, and actions reflecting our eight core values of Accountability, Communication, Customer Service, Inclusion, Innovation, Integrity, Professionalism, and Teamwork. • We intend to lead by example in the development of our organization to provide quality public services while balancing cost effectiveness and responsiveness. • We will work to create and maintain effective partnerships with elected officials, employees, and members of our community (customers). In Sept 2019, we launched a community engagement platform that consists of short surveys and polls in order to gain resident feedback on city projects. — We have a combined total of 152 years of local government experience with our employees.

CONTACT City Manager- Larry Stevens Ph (405) 359-4500 Larry.Stevens@EdmondOK.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Economic Development- Revitalize and encourage development of commercial areas.

Economic Development- Revitalize and encourage development of commercial areas.

Infrastructure- Plan, design, implement and maintain transportation infrastructure that allows easy connections throughout the city and between different modes of transportation.

Infrastructure- Plan, design, implement and maintain transportation infrastructure that allows easy connections throughout the city and between different modes of transportation.

GOALS

GOALS

EIdentify a location and source of funds for a 2nd library. (In progress)

Identify a location and source of funds for a 2nd library.

Acquire public open space(s) for parks. (In progress)

Acquire public open space(s) for parks. Develop an action plan to meet the current and future needs of Arcadia Lake.

Develop an action plan to meet the current and future needs of Arcadia Lake. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Identify and engage key stakeholders for a location of a second library in Edmond.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Identify and engage key stakeholders for a location of a second library in Edmond.

Select potential parcels for park land acquisition, research ownership, and determine viability.

Select potential parcels for park land acquisition, research ownership, and determine viability

Develop a multi-year list to address maintenance needs at Arcadia Lake.

Develop a multi-year list to address maintenance needs at Arcadia Lake.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

9-1-0

9-1-0

9-1-0

9-1-0

9-1-0

9-1-0

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: City Manager & ACM of Operations

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

1,096,521

Materials & Supplies

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21 1,071,444

Current Year Revised FY 20-21 1,056,090

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22 1,382,446

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

1,303,670

1,276,514

1,288,738

1,301,578

4,384

19,532

23,485

19,435

19,535

23,935

17,435

17,735

195,427

300,407

255,457

365,133

287,363

328,521

289,187

329,862

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

150,189

163,210

163,210

158,620

161,792

165,028

168,329

171,696

1,446,521

1,554,593

1,498,242

1,925,634

1,772,360

1,793,998

1,763,689

1,820,871

144,431 5,758 150,189

157,255 5,955 163,210

157,255 5,955 163,210

152,362 6,258 158,620

155,409 6,383 161,792

158,517 6,511 165,028

161,688 6,641 168,329

164,922 6,774 171,696

Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

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FACILITY MAINTENANCE We deliver high quality, cost effective, best in class trustworthy service to our customers. The department provides a clean, safe, quality working environment for City of Edmond employees and the public by maintaining, repairing, cleaning and improving City facilities. The department tracks processes and procedures through use of Cityworks for asset management and timely response to the needs of internal and external customers. This encompasses 60 different City of Edmond divisions and over 600,000 square feet of occupied working space. The Facility Maintenance Department’s service is to ensure a safe and comfortable working environment for our customers.

We take care of 600,000 square feet of occupied space for about 80 different departments — Develops and bids all contracts associated with building maintenance and improvements and oversees around 40 service contractors providing work for the City.

CONTACT Jerry Cullum Ph (405) 216-7730

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior through public education and outreach to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease inlandfill waste.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

GOALS

GOALS

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Upgrade facility lighting to reduce energy consumption and labor costs. (Complete)

Truck stock is inventoried, and parts and materials inventory reports are analyzed by end of year.

Establish a permanent inventory stock for all Facility Maintenance vehicles to support work site efficiency.

Establish a permanent inventory stock for all Facility Maintenance vehicles to support work site efficiency. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES A minimum of 25 light fixtures are replaced with LED lights by end of year. Truck stock is inventoried, and parts and materials inventory reports are analyzed by end of year.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

14-0-0

14-0-0

14-0-0

14-0-0

15-0-0

15-0-0

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Facility Maintenance

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Personal Services

725,630

794,028

Materials & Supplies

221,044

Other Services & Charges

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

709,157

807,017

842,921

846,833

867,266

888,755

256,250

189,498

256,486

253,350

262,386

266,368

257,500

1,208,950

BUDGET YEAR

773,514

1,209,850

1,385,550

1,396,550

1,443,550

1,434,050

1,415,050

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

331,257

416,839

416,839

367,027

374,585

382,330

390,268

398,307

2,051,445

2,676,967

2,524,444

2,816,080

2,867,406

2,935,099

2,957,952

2,959,612

262,826 22,313 21,077 14,340 10,700 331,257

323,865 26,284 18,000 25,690 23,000 416,839

323,865 26,284 18,000 25,690 23,000 416,839

277,111 27,451 39,465 23,000 367,027

282,653 28,677 40,255 23,000 374,585

288,306 29,964 41,060 23,000 382,330

294,072 31,315 41,881 23,000 390,268

299,853 32,735 42,719 23,000 398,307

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

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MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS The Marketing/Public Relations Department has several different functions, including media relations, public information, marketing and communications, design and maintenance of the website, graphic design, social media, photo/video production and television programming for the government access channel, Edmond Life TV, internal and external special event coordination. Our mission statement is “Providing timely, accurate information through professional, creative communication.” Our purpose is to keep our citizen/customers informed about city issues, programs, services, activities, accomplishments and plans.

DIVISIONS Marketing & Public Relations

Visit Edmond

Lead public communication efforts for the organization; 7 Employees

Promote tourism for Edmond; 4 Employees

As of March 2021, the main City of Edmond social media accounts have over 95,000 followers across seven platforms. — Our department as won 30 regional and national awards for excellence in communications. — Two-time reigning selection as “Best Decoration” for the City of Edmond Chili Cook-Off

CONTACT Ph (405) 359-4531 https://www.edmondok.com /327/Marketing-Public-Relations

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior through public education and outreach to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease inlandfill waste.

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior through public education and outreach to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in landfill waste.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain and grow a skilled and inclusive workforce through training, performance management, accountability, and succession planning.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain and grow a skilled and inclusive workforce through training, performance management, accountability, and succession planning.

GOALS

GOALS

Expand upon current public education and outreach methods for encouraging water conservation efforts within the City of Edmond specific to outdoor watering. (In progress)

Expand upon current public education and outreach methods for encouraging water conservation efforts within the City of Edmond specific to outdoor watering. Enhance the user experience on the City of Edmond website and social media accounts.

Enhance the user experience on the City of Edmond website and social media accounts. (In progress)

Support efforts to recruit and retain quality employees by creating and enhancing employee enrichment opportunities and promoting organizational culture.

Support efforts to recruit and retain quality employees by creating and enhancing employee enrichment opportunities and promoting organizational culture. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Promote outdoor water conservation with at least one weekly social media post between June – September.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Create new website content for Conservation University that can also be utilized a minimum of two times during the year in our utility newsletter.

Create video pieces to promote the workplace culture and benefits. Host one-on-one website trainings with department editors to expand pool of people making updates.

Create new button designs on website to improve user experience. Create at least one “fun” new initiative for employees to build morale and community.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

11-0-0

11-0-0

11-0-0

11-0-0

11-0-0

11-0-0

(Currently staffed with 5 of the 5 funded & approved positions. Included CVB.)

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Marketing

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

612,251

Materials & Supplies

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21 603,206

Current Year Revised FY 20-21 590,489

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

623,134

659,658

655,787

672,347

687,578

BUDGET YEAR

8,242

30,250

21,400

32,250

28,750

34,750

34,750

34,750

184,159

299,400

207,100

299,400

349,400

299,400

299,400

299,400

Capital Outlay

-

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

74,132

112,963

112,963

64,838

66,134

67,458

68,806

70,182

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

878,785

1,055,819

941,952

1,029,622

1,113,942

1,067,395

1,085,303

1,101,910

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

70,250 3,882 74,132

108,831 4,132 112,963

108,831

60,263 4,575 64,838

61,468 4,666 66,134

62,698 4,760 67,458

63,951 4,855 68,806

65,230 4,952 70,182

Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out

232

4,132

112,963

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY The Information Technology (IT) department is responsible for implementing technology solutions that enable departments throughout the city to provide efficient, high quality services to the citizens of Edmond. The IT Department is comprised of two teams. These teams are Infrastructure Support and Application Support which includes Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Together , these teams support the City’s underlying network, enterprise applications and hardware with over 800 users and their associated desktop computers, laptops, and mobile devices.

DIVISIONS Infrastructure Support

Application Support

Network hardware (servers, network switches, routers, fiber, pcs, etc.) and operating systems and applications; 11 FTE

Includes Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Enterprise based applications ie AMI, Court, Finance, WorkoOrder, Permits; 8 FTE 550+ PC’s, 320+ Laptops & Tablets 800+ users, 50 miles of Fiber. 200+ monitored network devices, 230+ servers — Enterprise applications including Finance, HR, Public Safety, Customer Information System (CIS), GIS, Public Works/ Electric Asset Management (Cityworks), Permitting, Licenses, Court, AMI 100+ Department specific applications

IT Administration Director, Admin Tech and Public Works Systems Technology; 3 FTE

CONTACT Main Number Ph (405) 359-4636 Contact.IT@edmondok.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Infrastructure- Give the same level of importance and attention to the maintenance of infrastructure as to new infrastructure.

Infrastructure- Give the same level of importance and attention to the maintenance of infrastructure as to new infrastructure.

High Performing Government- Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

High Performing Government- Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

GOALS

GOALS

Support Fiber Expansion for AMI, ITS and Remote City Facilities (Water Resources & Electric) (In progress)

Expand Support Fiber Expansion for AMI, ITS and Remote City Facilities (Water Resources & Electric)

Support Wireless Communication expansion for AMI, ITS and Other City Facilities (In Progress)

Support Wireless Communication expansion for public use in City Parks Implement Cityworks PLL - Configuration, Data Conversion, Systems Integrations, E Plan Review, Portal Integration

Implement Cityworks PLL - Configuration, Data Conversion, Systems Integrations, E Plan Review, Portal Integration (In Progress)

Implement Policies and procedures - Perform a Risk Management Assessment to include a Business Impact Analysis

Implement Policies and procedures Implement replacement IT Asset and Help Desk Management System (In Progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Installation of Fiber in identified locations for AMI gateways and Water Resources Facilities

Installation of Fiber in identified locations for AMI gateways and Water Resources Facilities

Installation of Wireless Network in identified locations

Installation of Wireless Network to support identified locations for AMI and Electric Facilities

Go-live of Cityworks PLL including electronic plan review, customer portal and systems integration etc.

Completion of identified tasks for Implementation of Cityworks PLL - ie Configuration, Data Conversion, Portal Integration etc.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

20

20

20

20

20

20

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Information Technology

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

2,250,591

Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21 2,314,256

Current Year Revised FY 20-21 2,314,256

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22 2,524,902

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

2,642,343

2,604,502

2,646,350

2,685,516

313,208

436,050

436,050

370,050

430,050

400,050

400,050

400,050

2,754,099

3,412,837

3,412,837

3,985,825

3,925,179

4,094,526

4,160,742

4,178,293

748,781

475,000

475,000

425,000

750,000

1,150,000

815,000

815,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

183,826

251,673

251,773

226,727

231,303

235,973

240,741

245,610

6,250,505

6,889,816

6,889,916

7,532,504

7,978,875

8,485,051

8,262,883

8,324,469

164,400 2,154 15,005 2,267 183,826

231,621 2,262 16,290 1,500 251,673

231,621 2,262

211,490 2,375 11,362 1,500 226,727

215,719 2,494 11,590 1,500 231,303

220,034 2,618 11,821 1,500 235,973

224,434 2,749 12,058 1,500 240,741

228,924 2,887 12,299 1,500 245,610

236

16,290 1,600

251,773

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LEGAL SERVICES The Edmond City Attorney is appointed by the Mayor and City Council to direct the management of all legal matters for the City. The Legal Services office provides legal assistance to the Mayor and Council, the Edmond Public Works Authority and other City departments. The office also provides assistance to various committees, boards and city agencies. The City Attorney or the Assistant City Attorney(s) represents the City in all litigation in Edmond Municipal Court, Oklahoma County District Court, Apellate Courts, and the Federal Court System. Risk Management, a division of the City Attorney’s office, handles subrogation recovery, liability, and property insurance.

DIVISIONS Legal Services

Risk Management

Provides legal assistance to the Mayor and Council; departments; boards and agencies; 4 FTE

Handles subrogation recovery, liability, property and other insurances; 3 FTE

Our City Attorney attends weekly Rotary Club meetings and is involved in various other civic organizations and speaks at the Citizens Police Academy twice a year. — Attends over 100 Municipal Court Sessions per year.

CONTACT Main Number Ph (405) 359-4350

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

GOALS

GOALS

Improve communication within the department. (In progress)

Improve communication within the department. (In progress)

Review City Ordinances and policies and procedures to ensure compliance with all applicable laws to assist the Police Dept, Municipal Court, Planning Dept, Risk Management and other city departments in providing for the safety and general welfare of our employees and citizens. (In progress)

Review City Ordinances and policies and procedures to ensure compliance with all applicable laws to assist the Police Dept, Municipal Court, Planning Dept, Risk Management and other city departments in providing for the safety and general welfare of our employees and citizens. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

At least on semi-annual basis, perform reviews with Police, Court and Planning department staff.

At least on semi-annual basis, perform reviews with Police, Court and Planning department staff.

On weekly basis, ensure the requests for assistance from citizens and employees have been responded to in a thorough, efficient and professional manner.

On weekly basis, ensure the requests for assistance from citizens and employees have been responded to in a thorough, efficient and professional manner.

52 weekly meetings: 1 with PD, 2 training sessions with HR and monthly meetings with Planning and Court..

52 weekly meetings: 1 with PD, 2 training sessions with HR and monthly meetings with Planning and Court..

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

4-0-0

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Legal Services

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

611,325

Materials & Supplies

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21 571,372

Current Year Revised FY 20-21 572,514

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

623,695

648,190

634,314

638,420

643,036

BUDGET YEAR

2,681

9,375

8,875

9,375

9,475

9,375

9,375

9,375

130,737

420,406

417,206

421,136

421,927

423,162

423,114

423,899

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

49,832

59,675

59,675

66,998

68,337

69,705

71,099

72,520

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

794,576

1,060,828

1,058,270

1,121,204

1,147,929

1,136,556

1,142,008

1,148,830

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

45,903 3,929 49,832

55,678 3,997 59,675

55,678 3,997 59,675

58,835 8,163 66,998

60,011 8,326 68,337

61,212 8,493 69,705

62,436 8,663 71,099

63,684 8,836 72,520

Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out

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PUBLIC WORKS ADMINISTRATION Public Works Administration provides a call center for Public Works, handles the recording of field work and asset history, payroll, budget management, and accounts payable for Field Services, Solid Waste and Facility Maintenance, analyzes the quality of data, and facilitates accurate reporting and assistance to division heads.

MISSION STATEMENT Our mission is to deliver high quality, low cost, best in class, services to its customers. Our vision for achieving this mission includes the development of five-year strategic operating plans, a commitment to continuous improvement, professional growth, and all other available resources that support our ability to achieve our mission.

EMPLOYEES:

10

PW Administration receives, processes and dispatches thousands of emails and telephone requests every month for Facility Maintenance, Streets, Traffic, Wastewater and Water. — PW Administration utilizes a work order management system called Cityworks to track 100% of Public Works maintenance of the city’s infrastructure and buildings.

CONTACT Keith Stewart Ph (405) 216-7674

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain and grow a skilled and inclusive workforce through training, performance management, accountability, and succession planning.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain and grow a skilled and inclusive workforce through training, performance management, accountability, and succession planning.

High Performing Government- Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

GOALS Consolidate and expand Public Works emergency plans to produce a comprehensive plan for response to weather events, manmade events or pandemic. (In progress)

GOALS

Develop new or improved processes which support a paperless work environment. (In progress)

Develop a paperless work order process for Facility Maintenance.

Achieve American Public Works Association Re-accreditation.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Complete review of policy manuals, update per best practice recommendation, and provide documentation to the APWA accreditation review team by December 15, 2021.

Review all Public Works emergency, continuity of operations and pandemic plans, and update as necessary. Create fillable work order forms and implement digital leave requests for all Field Services employees.

Select hardware for field use with fillable forms, provide staff training, and implement assess pilot program.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

10-0-0

10-0-0

10-0-0

10-0-0

10-0-0

10-0-0

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Public Works Administration

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

790,554

Materials & Supplies

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21 783,327

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

775,883

809,564

850,015

837,489

856,535

875,636

BUDGET YEAR

2,799

9,524

7,584

11,666

10,014

11,195

6,200

7,630

26,539

40,750

37,642

87,950

68,050

56,400

56,500

56,600

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

197,127

253,234

253,234

220,288

224,693

229,187

233,771

238,446

1,017,018

1,086,835

1,074,343

1,129,468

1,152,772

1,134,271

1,153,006

1,178,312

189,556 7,571 197,127

245,246 7,988 253,234

245,246

212,483 7,805 220,288

216,732 7,961 224,693

221,067 8,120 229,187

225,488 8,283 233,771

229,998 8,448 238,446

Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

244

7,988

253,234

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OPERATIONS CENTRAL WAREHOUSE The Operations Central Warehouse core services include: •

Purchasing material following all City of Edmond Purchasing Department policies.

Maintaining inventory stock levels to provide uninterrupted workflow for all departments utilizing Operations Central Warehouse services.

Providing a record of materials received and transferred to trucks or issued to work orders.

Operations Central Warehouse performs regularly scheduled inventory counts and audits

MISSION STATEMENT The Warehouse mission is to provide high quality warehouse service at a competitive cost that supports the missions of Electric, Public Works, and Facility Maintenance departments with trustworthy service.

EMPLOYEES:

3

The operations Central Warehouse maintains over 4 million dollars worth of materials for Edmond Electric and Public works.

CONTACT James Davis Ph (405) 216-7721 james.davis@edmondok.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

GOALS

GOALS

Provide high quality warehouse service. (Complete)

Provide high quality warehouse service. Provide training opportunities for departmental personnel.

Provide training opportunities for departmental personnel. (Complete)

Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization. (Complete)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

We strive to meet each customer with a smile and keep plenty of material on hand and organized for quick service our customers needs.

We strive to meet each customer with a smile and keep plenty of material on hand and organized for quick service our customers needs. Due to the covid 19 training opportunities were not as available other than watching a few training videos.

We are in the process of renewing our forklift certification’s this month with 1 employee having completed with an updated certification and the other’s following up this month.

We strive to meet with other departments to be in the loop as to get materials ordered for upcoming jobs and needs to keep in stock as not to interfere with their work schedules.

We strive to meet with other departments to be in the loop as to get materials ordered for upcoming jobs and needs to keep in stock as not to interfere with their work schedules.

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STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Operations Central Warehousing

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

236,535

Materials & Supplies

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

225,918

235,919

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

245,986

259,521

257,927

263,717

269,438

BUDGET YEAR

1,126

6,330

3,200

4,650

4,650

7,450

4,650

4,650

12,685

16,825

1,375

17,075

17,325

17,575

17,825

17,825

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

42,805

202,635

202,635

44,274

44,959

45,659

46,372

47,100

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

293,152

451,708

443,129

311,985

326,455

328,611

332,564

339,013

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

28,734 6,992 1,097 5,982 42,805

34,307 7,132 150,000 1,196 10,000 202,635

34,307 7,132 150,000 1,196 10,000

25,734 7,274 1,266 10,000 44,274

26,248 7,420 1,291 10,000 44,959

26,774 7,568 1,317 10,000 45,659

27,309 7,719 1,344 10,000 46,372

27,855 7,874 1,371 10,000 47,100

Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out

248

202,635

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PUBLIC SAFETY COMMUNICATIONS Professionally committed to providing quality emergency communications services for the City of Edmond and surrounding areas.

DIVISIONS 911 Emergency Communications

Technical Services Division

Processes emergency and non-emergency calls for public safety services; 21 FTE

Provides telephone, cell phone, radio & computer aided dispatch services; 3 FTE

Information & Alarm Services Oversee the City’s False Alarm Ordinance; 1 FTE

Dispatchers and call takers save seconds, seconds save lives! — Dispatchers and call takers are the first, first responders!

CONTACT Ph (405) 359-4338

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain, and develop a skilled, diverse, and inclusive workforce.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain, and develop a skilled, diverse, and inclusive workforce.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

GOALS

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Attract and retain long term, career-minded employees. (Complete) Process emergency calls within 30 seconds (ready for dispatch) and dispatch calls within 30 seconds (once calls are ready to dispatch). (Complete)

GOALS Ensure Public Safety Dispatchers, Call Takers, and Supervisors maintain and expand skill levels while having the opportunity to learn new methods, theories, and technologies.

Provide at least 24 hours of recurring training to each employee in the communications center. (Complete)

Provide emergency dispatch services in the least amount of time while maintaining the integrity of information.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Employee tenure increases as only 1 FTE left during the past year. 2 new FTE’s hired.

Seek alternate funding sources for operations, special projects, and unanticipated events in an effort to mitigate direct costs to the City.

Individual and department call processing and dispatching are within stated goals. All employees received more than 24 hours of training.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES All PS Dispatchers, Call Takers and Supervisors receive at least 24 hours of recurring training each evaluation year. Ensure candid performance management dialogue and timely step increases. Ensure that service meets established standards. All department supervisors attend at least one BUILD session per year. Process incoming emergency calls for service and have them ready for dispatch within 30 seconds. Dispatch emergency calls for service that are ready for dispatch within 30 seconds.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

9-1-0

9-1-0

9-1-0

9-1-0

9-1-0

9-1-0

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Public Safety Communications

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

2,121,468

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21 2,129,467

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

2,001,150

2,234,774

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

2,347,559

2,324,569

2,367,157

2,409,488

Materials & Supplies

102,476

92,143

79,030

141,851

60,849

61,264

86,649

59,764

Other Services & Charges

459,963

514,890

448,713

417,490

417,490

417,490

417,320

417,320

Capital Outlay

-

262,000

-

34,000

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

392,224

412,871

412,871

368,624

375,996

383,517

391,187

399,010

3,076,131

3,411,371

2,941,764

3,196,739

3,201,894

3,186,840

3,262,313

3,285,582

371,360 20,864 392,224

391,731 21,140 412,871

391,731

346,436 22,188 368,624

353,364 22,632 375,996

360,432 23,085 383,517

367,640 23,547 391,187

374,993 24,017 399,010

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

252

21,140

412,871

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ENGINEERING Facilitate the orderly growth of the community by providing quality planning, design, and construction of the public infrastructure. Increase the protection of life and property from flooding and improve the quality of stormwater runoff that enters Edmond’s waterways.

MISSION STATEMENT To facilitate the orderly growth of the community by providing quality planning, design, and construction of the public infrastructure.

DIVISIONS Civil Engineering

Engineering Plan Review

Technical services and expertise as it relates to the city’s infrastructure and capital improvements; 8 FTE

Reviews proposed plans for residential and commercial construction; 3 FTE

Traffic Management

Engineering Inspections

Manages vehicle, pedestrian, and bicycle traffic for safety and efficiency; 6 FTE

Inspection services during construction of public utilities, roadway, and drainage structures; 8 FTE

450+ plan reviews are processed annually. — 643 Barrels & 198 Compost bins have been distributed since the beginning of the program (2016- 2020).

CONTACT Civil Engineering - Steve Manek Ph (405) 359-4770

Traffic Mngmt. - Tom Minnick Ph (405) 359-4775

Plan Review - Mariah Fields Ph (405) 359-4766

Engineering Inspections - Ken Miner Ph (405) 359-4773

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Use technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

GOALS

GOALS

Develop an online, interactive mapping application to help City staff and the public identify Edmond’s watersheds and current regulatory floodplains. (Complete)

Improve process for recording and providing vehicular crash data to internal departments.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Reorganize sections of the Engineering Department webpage to improve flow and accessibility of infomation.

Complete remaining edits to mapping application.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Work with Marketing Dept. to create new webpage to host new application.

Generate list of inefficiencies that occur when pulling/sorting accident data from accident software, and design program scripts to address the inefficiencies by Q2.

Create new content for new webpage. Publish webpage after “Letter of Determination” has been received from FEMA prompting the City of Edmond to adopt the new floodplain maps from FEMA. Completion date unknown since approval depends on receipt of letter from FEMA and approval by SWAB and City Council.

Create new central webpage to host all 5 of Engineering’s interactive mapping applications by Q4 or June 30, 2022. Reorganize Stormwater Quality’s webpages based on content, and add new webpages detailing residential and commercial inspections/enforcement procedures by Q4 or June 30, 2022.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

30-0-0

30-0-0

30-0-0

30-0-0

30-0-0

30-0-0

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Engineering

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

2,309,369

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

2,418,565

2,343,300

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22 2,688,899

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

2,832,320

2,789,748

2,836,386

2,884,152

Materials & Supplies

32,324

76,600

64,600

92,250

73,950

79,100

68,650

71,700

Other Services & Charges

38,422

109,825

77,425

111,900

114,325

116,900

119,575

122,375

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

429,632

646,460

645,861

531,966

543,036

554,365

565,961

577,831

2,809,747

3,251,450

3,131,186

3,425,015

3,563,631

3,540,113

3,590,572

3,656,058

343,735 16,006 19,450 39,867 10,574 429,632

508,913 20,711 54,000 48,236 14,600 646,460

508,913 54,001 20,111 48,236 14,600

469,046 26,214 22,106 14,600 531,966

478,426 27,462 22,548 14,600 543,036

487,994 28,772 22,999 14,600 554,365

497,755 30,147 23,459 14,600 565,961

507,710 31,593 23,928 14,600 577,831

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

256

645,861

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FINANCIAL SERVICES Financial Services directs the day-to-day accounting functions, accounts payable, importing of financial data, bid process, city-wide credit cards and investments and money handling. Our department creates a 5 year budget and our Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.

MISSION STATEMENT The Mission Statement for the Financial Services Department is: “To provide quality management of financial information”

EMPLOYEES:

9

One of our staff members played basketball with Dennis Rodman. — Our department tracks and reconciles over $1 billion in gross cash transactions per year. — Our department wrote over 7,870 checks in 2020.

CONTACT Kathy Panas Ph (405) 359-4521

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain and grow a skilled and inclusive workforce.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain and grow a skilled and inclusive workforce.

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in land fill waste.

Environmental Stewardship- Encourage environmentally sustainable behavior to support an increase in resource conservation and a decrease in land fill waste.

GOALS

GOALS

Timely maintenance & completeness of general ledger. (In Progress)

Simplify locating records within Finance. Compose training documentation that can be used inside and outside the Finance department.

Provide meaningful and relevant training opportunity to every member of the Finance department. (In progress)

Go paperless.

Simplification of locating records within finance. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Organize and/or archive old electronic files.

Communicating expectations within staff.

Evaluate the cost versus benefits of purchasing new electronic storage solutions versus utilizing existing methods.

Plan quarterly meetings with UCS & Finance to find ways to better communicate with each other on changes, goals, procedures, etc. Reduce paper documentation and increase electronic storage vs manual and/or paper storage.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

7.7*-0-0

7.7*-0-0

7.7*-0-0

7.7*-0-0

7.7*-0-0

7.7*-0-0

*Staffing level includes the Financial Services, Treasury, and Purchasing Departments. .3 of the Purchasing Manager is accounted for in the YourGovShop budget.

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Financial Services

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

720,859

Materials & Supplies

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21 738,038

Current Year Revised FY 20-21 739,090

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

994,100

1,045,896

1,032,218

1,051,161

1,070,390

BUDGET YEAR

3,945

13,700

10,000

14,963

12,262

19,862

20,119

20,381

211,487

430,108

245,315

489,201

498,983

508,964

519,143

526,525

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

371,053

404,226

404,228

342,242

349,086

356,067

363,189

370,452

1,307,344

1,586,072

1,398,633

1,840,506

1,906,227

1,917,111

1,953,612

1,987,748

366,458 4,595 371,053

399,428 4,798 404,226

399,428

337,220 5,022 342,242

343,964 5,122 349,086

350,843 5,224 356,067

357,860 5,329 363,189

365,017 5,435 370,452

Other Services & Charges

Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

260

4,800

404,228

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HUMAN RESOURCES The Human Resources (HR) Department is dedicated to providing high quality, trustworthy service. We strive to attract, develop, motivate and retain a productive and diverse workforce within an inclusive work environment by: •

Promoting and recruiting the best qualified, diverse workforce committed to excellence.

Fostering employee engagement through performance management.

Supporting training and alignment to the city’s mission, core values, and strategic initiatives.

Providing sustainable benefit products and services, responsive to and valued by employees.

Managing the city’s employee payroll in full compliance, timely and accurately.

DIVISIONS Employment Recruitment

HR Administration

Responsible for identifying, attracting, interviewing, hiring and onboarding the best qualified employees; 1 FTE

Responsible for providing the overall employment experience by implementing workforce management and employee development; 3 FTE

Program/Training /Development

Benefits

Provides educational offerings to employees to develop skills and knowledge to enhance performance and growth; 1 FTE

The administration, management, and planning of the day-today operations of the City’s group benefits and wellness programs; 1 FTE

In 2020 Payroll processed 21,000 payroll checks. — HR processes an average of 4,000 applications per year.— During 2020, employees and their family members made 2974 clinic visits, received 2673 labs, 504 injections, and 6638 prescriptions, all FREE of charge to employees.

Payroll Responsible for the bi-weekly processing of payroll for full-time, part-time and seasonal employees; 2 FTE

CONTACT HR Main Number Ph (405) 359-4685 HumanResources@edmondok.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

High Performing Government- Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

GOALS

GOALS

Full implementation of a Human Resource Information System. A stand alone, all in one automated system that includes recruitment/onboarding, payroll, benefits/ online enrollment, performance management/ performance evaluation. (In progress)

Full implementation of a Human Resource Information System. A stand alone, all in one automated system that includes recruitment/onboarding, payroll, benefits/ online enrollment, performance management/ performance evaluation.

In partnership with Marketing, create content to revamp the Human Resources (HR) website to place more focus on the city’s organizational culture and benefits of working for the city. (In Progress)

In partnership with Marketing, create content to revamp the Human Resources (HR) website to place more focus on the city’s organizational culture and benefits of working for the city.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Meeting HRIS implementation timelines

Meeting HRIS implementation timelines

Human Resources to provide Marketing & Public Relations Department with content to revamp the HR website.

Human Resources to provide Marketing & Public Relations Department with content to revamp the HR website.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

8-0-0

8-0-0

8-0-0

8-0-0

8-0-0

8-0-0-

(Includes all of the HR Department)

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Human Resources

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

821,691

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21 801,299

Current Year Revised FY 20-21 735,577

FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

833,382

825,919

814,245

827,200

842,684

BUDGET YEAR

Materials & Supplies

10,752

30,300

27,947

33,100

32,300

41,600

30,600

30,600

Other Services & Charges

69,469

415,550

415,550

204,804

165,450

165,450

165,550

165,550

1,032

1,032

1,032

1,032

1,032

1,032

1,032

1,032

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

254,886

260,240

260,240

213,197

217,461

221,810

226,246

230,771

1,157,830

1,508,421

1,440,346

1,285,515

1,242,162

1,244,137

1,250,628

1,270,637

250,180 4,706 254,886

255,315 4,925 260,240

255,315

208,000 5,197 213,197

212,160 5,301 217,461

216,403 5,407 221,810

220,731 5,515 226,246

225,146 5,625 230,771

Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Out TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

264

4,925

260,240

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UTILITY CUSTOMER SERVICE Utility Customer Services is comprised of three (3) service divisions: Financial Services, Contractual Services and Customer Services. We provide billing services for electric, water, sewer, solid waste collection, and drainage. Our goal is to provide you with highquality customer service.

DIVISIONS Financial Services

Contractual Services

Utility billing and reconciliation of financial transactions; 6 FTE

Establish new utility services, service order management, active and inactive collections; 9 FTE

Customer Services Operate inbound call center and payment center; 15 FTE

New Accounts processed 10,268 new move in requests in 2020. — Utility Customer Service corresponded to 17,604 emails in FY2020. — For 2020 there were 2858 customer’s to sign up for Auto Draft and 179 for Levelized.

CONTACT Non-Emergency Number Ph (405) 359-4541 https://www.edmondok.com/659/ Utility-Customer-Service

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

Financial Responsibility- Promote fiscal stability by gaining efficiencies, mitigating costs, identifying new revenue opportunities, and exploring financial partnerships both internal and external.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain and grow a skilled and inclusive workforce through training, performance management, accountability, and succession planning.

High Performing Government- Recruit, retain and grow a skilled and inclusive workforce through training, performance management, accountability, and succession planning.

GOALS

Quality of Life- Plan, design, implement and maintain improvements to cultural, historical and recreational facilities and programs to enhance resident and visitor satisfaction.

Enhance our Energy Audit Program. (In Progress) Enhance our eCity functionality to allow additional promotion and marketing to our customers. (In progress)

GOALS Enhance our eCity functionality and new .Link Enterprise to allow customers access to on demand readings, electronic forms & online billing options.

AMI/MDM implementation to enhance customer communications. (In progress)

AMI/MDM implementation to enhance customer communications.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Installation of the Meter Data Management system and begin the installation of Automated Meters in the field.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Installation of the Meter Data Management system and begin the installation of Automated Meters in the Field.

Continued training and certification of the staff. Adding Water Audits to the Energy Audit Program.

Maintain a debt rate for inactive collections below 3%. Answer 98% of the total call center calls presented to Utility Customer Service.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

32-0-0

32-0-0

32-0-0

32-0-0

32-0-0

32-0-0

(Includes Utility Customer Service.)

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DEPARTMENT BUDGET SUMMARY

DEPARTMENT: Utility Customer Service

FUND: ADMIN SUPPORT SERVICES

EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION

Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Personal Services

2,902,736

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

1,971,421

1,816,315

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22 1,985,601

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

2,102,665

2,094,933

2,148,365

2,202,108

Materials & Supplies

195,991

183,050

177,200

188,050

204,050

193,050

223,050

223,050

Other Services & Charges

891,336

1,043,608

863,856

1,086,875

1,132,225

1,179,850

1,229,030

1,229,030

Capital Outlay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Debt Service

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,196,224

1,000,997

1,000,997

812,283

828,528

845,099

862,001

879,240

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

5,186,288

4,199,076

3,858,368

4,072,809

4,267,468

4,312,932

4,462,446

4,533,428

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

1,099,516 39,639 31,526 25,543 1,196,224

969,512 31,485 1,000,997

969,512

795,356 16,927 812,283

811,263 17,265 828,528

827,488 17,611 845,099

844,038 17,963 862,001

860,918 18,322 879,240

Transfers Out

268

31,485

1,000,997

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FLEET MANAGEMENT Fleet Management provides administrative support in the most cost-efficient manner to all City departments who operate city owned vehicles/equipment. The department manages the fleet replacement fund and establishes budget figures for each fiscal year for fuel, parts accounts, car wash expense and vehicle/ equipment replacement. The department manages the bid process for new vehicle and equipment. Personnel are committed to exploring all means in which to aid departments in meeting the needs of their customers and the public sector.

EMPLOYEES:

3

DIVISIONS Superintendent

Shope Foreman

Fund management, asset aquistion and disposal, asset tracking, fuel management

Asset tracking, fuel management;

Administration Asset tracking & data entry

The City of Edmond has over 640 pieces of rolling stock in the fleet.

CONTACT Bobby Masterson Ph (405) 216-7785 bobby.masterson@edmondok.com

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

High Performing Government- Improve communication and collaboration throughout the organization.

High Performing Government- Utilize technology and software in a manner that boosts efficiency, increases transparency, and fosters innovation.

GOALS

GOALS

Increase the awareness of city’s personnel in the need to support the preventive maintenance service program for vehicle/ equipment so that safety standards are continually met, liabilities are reduced and an overall reduction in maintenance costs can be achieved. (In progress)

Upgrade the existing G.P.S. units that are currently being used in the city fleet vehicles to enhance the reporting capabilities, accuracy and data availability to more effectively manage the fleet.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Work with city departments to obtain vehicles/ equipment that will be utilized to their maximum potential and remove obsolete and under-utilized vehicles/equipment from inventory. (In progress)

Complete all upgrades to the units by August 2022.

Draft specifications that combine the needs of the division and the financial aspects of the purchase together so as to ensure the most cost-effective purchase. (In progress)

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Reduce the number of replacements that require supplemental funding for replacement. (tracked by comparison year to year.) Increase G.P.S. coverage. This allows vehicle monitoring that reports idle time, hazardous driving, and unnecessary usage to reduce expenses and liability.

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STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

.65*-0-0

.65*-0-0

.65*-0-0

.65*-0-0

.65*-0-0

.65*-0-0

*Split with Vehicle Maintenance

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Fleet Management Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Charges for Services Interest Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

24,255 212,481 159,100 395,836

33,635 150,593 184,228

33,635 96,077 103,800 233,512

34,345 98,657 133,002

34,345 48,645 82,990

34,345 98,657 133,002

34,345 98,657 133,002

34,345 98,657 133,002

12,995,806

12,505,515 -

12,505,515 -

12,851,910 -

13,579,325 -

14,042,834 -

15,325,008 -

16,619,467 -

13,391,643

12,689,743

12,739,027

12,984,912

13,662,315

14,175,836

15,458,010

16,752,469

79,524 6,597 127,844

73,874 7,500 176,820

72,367 7,500 176,820

75,004 7,500 161,820

77,700 7,500 161,820

75,487 7,500 161,820

75,742 7,500 161,820

76,002 7,500 161,820

2,317,415 427,524 528,649 1,701,121 -

1,185,000 590,400 430,000 2,853,921 -

1,185,000 526,126 1,251,547 2,853,921

1,400,000 907,549 255,000 2,498,698 -

915,000 610,181 615,000 2,155,346 -

950,000 628,486 615,000 2,213,367 -

350,000 647,341 615,000 2,344,886 -

1,135,000 666,761 615,000 2,344,886 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

5,188,673

5,317,515

6,073,281

5,305,571

4,542,547

4,651,660

4,202,289

5,006,969

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

4,334,753 (32,208)

6,169,151 (60,411)

6,246,575 (60,411)

5,951,962 (51,978)

4,974,470 (51,404)

5,852,465 (51,632)

5,415,611 (51,865)

5,688,555 (52,102)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

4,302,545

6,108,740

6,186,164

5,899,984

4,923,066

5,800,833

5,363,746

5,636,453

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Fire - 653121 Police - 653122 Electric - 653032 All Other Departments Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Reserve for Fire Reserve for Police Reserve for Electric Reserve for All Other Funds Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls) TOTAL OTHER USES

3,174,515 1,419,361 1,109,185 6,802,454

3,174,515 1,419,361 1,109,185 7,777,907

3,438,236 1,712,164 357,587 7,343,924

2,133,513 1,309,726 319,642 9,816,444

1,007,186 1,100,885 108,377 11,826,386

(112,366) 884,503 573,145 13,979,726

(453,085) 742,471 381,370 15,948,710

(1,683,189) 529,652 149,350 18,386,140

12,505,515

13,480,968

12,851,910

13,579,325

14,042,834

15,325,008

16,619,467

17,381,953

TOTAL ESTIMATED USES

13,391,643

12,689,743

12,739,027

12,984,912

13,662,315

14,175,836

15,458,010

16,752,469

17,966 800 13,442 32,208

19,303 1,108 40,000 60,411

19,303 1,108 40,000 60,411

10,672 1,306 40,000 51,978

10,072 1,332 40,000 51,404

10,274 1,359 40,000 51,632

10,479 1,386 40,000 51,865

10,689 1,414 40,000 52,102

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

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PUBLIC WORKS FIELD SERVICES Field Services is responsible for the maintenance and upkeep of all public roads, water distribution, including meter reading and customer service in the field. The department is responsible for the wastewater collection systems within the city limits and ensures compliance with DEQ regulations. Field Services is also responsible for guardrails, signage and signal systems, curbs and gutters, pipe crossings, drainage systems in the right of way, and city owned sidewalks. Additionally, the division assists in maintenance in undeveloped areas and partners with Oklahoma County for rural arterial roadway improvements through inter-local agreements.

DIVISIONS Streets/ Traffic Maintenance

Utility Line Wastewater

Maintains city-owned streets, sidewalks, traffic signals and signage, ROW, and stormwater drainage systems; 33 Employees

Maintains the wastewater collection systems, including preventive maintenance to ensure DEQ compliance; 15 Employees

Utility Line Water

Utility Meter Services

Maintains the water distribution systems and inspects all water meter and driveway installations; 20 Employees

Responsible for reading utility meters and providing customer service in the field; 15 Employees

Field Services oversaw the collection of almost 1 million cubic yards of brush, resulting from the October 2020 ice storm. — Field Services maintains over 100 signalized intersections, 26 signalized school zones and over 13,000 street signs. — Field Services averaged 1,200 Request for Service and 2,700 Work Orders completed every month in 2020.

CONTACT Main Number Ph (405) 216-7770 https://edmondok.com/ 589/Public-Works

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2021

2022

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees and citizens.

Infrastructure- Give the same level of importance and attention to the maintenance of infrastructure as to new infrastructure.

Infrastructure- Plan, design, implement and maintain transportation infrastructure that allows easy connections throughout the city and between different modes of transportation.

Safe Community- Support a safe and inclusive environment for all Edmond employees

GOALS

Expand Support Fiber Expansion for AMI, ITS and Remote City Facilities (Water Resources & Electric)

GOALS

Consolidate and expand Public Works emergency plans to produce a comprehensive plan for response to weather events, manmade events or pandemics. (In progress)

Support Wireless Communication expansion for public use in City Parks

Complete Phase I of the traffic sign replacement program and develop plan for Phase II. (In progress)

Implement Cityworks PLL - Configuration, Data Conversion, Systems Integrations, E Plan Review, Portal Integration

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Implement Policies and Procedures - Perform a Risk Management Assessment to include a Business Impact Analysis

Review all Public Works emergency, continuity of operations and pandemic plans, and update as necessary.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Installation of fiber in identified locations for AMI gateways and Water Resources Facilities

Determine and locate signs remaining for replacement and replace those signs.

Installation of Wireless Network in identified locations Go-live of Cityworks PLL including electronic plan review, customer portal and systems integration etc.

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ORGANIZATION CHART

STAFFING (FT-PT-S) CURRENT YEAR

YEAR 2022

YEAR 2023

YEAR 2024

YEAR 2025

YEAR 2026

85-0-0

87-0-0

87-0-0

87-0-0

87-0-0

87-0-0

(Includes Meter Services, Street, Traffic, Water Line, and Wastewater Line)

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Field Services Fund Prior Year Actual FY 19-20

Adopted Year Budget FY 20-21

Current Year Revised FY 20-21

BUDGET YEAR FY 21-22

Projected Budget FY 22-23

Projected Budget FY 23-24

Projected Budget FY 24-25

Projected Budget FY 25-26

202,942 5,000 207,942

204,501 5,000 209,501

206,071 5,000 211,071

207,652 5,000 212,652

ESTIMATED RESOURCES: REVENUES: Estimated FEMA Reimbursment Taxes Inter-governmental Licenses and Permits Fines & Forfeitures Charges for Services Interest Investment Income Capital Lease Proceeds Miscellaneous Revenue Subtotal - Revenues OTHER RESOURCES: Debt/Loan Proceeds Restricted Prior Year Reserves Assigned Prior Year Reserves (Council Projects) Committed Prior Year Reserves Unrestricted Prior Year Reserves

8,081 196,500 128,963 281,430 614,974

198,500 5,000 203,500

3,092,317

4,377,696 -

4,377,696 -

(2,843,601) -

7,012,504 -

7,327,980 -

7,647,167 -

7,970,116 -

3,707,292

4,581,196

4,581,196

7,222,793

7,220,446

7,537,481

7,858,238

8,182,768

5,600,954 911,589 1,370,898 -

6,834,566 1,483,185 1,994,630 -

6,620,374 1,413,688 8,903,046 -

7,170,970 1,578,083 1,894,480 -

7,524,184 1,452,810 1,918,680 -

7,446,744 1,482,003 1,949,505 -

7,574,761 1,509,332 1,980,050 -

7,684,868 1,537,525 2,005,100 -

TOTAL ESTIMATED COSTS

7,883,440

10,312,381

16,937,108

10,643,533

10,895,674

10,878,252

11,064,143

11,227,493

TRANSFERS: Transfers In Transfers Out (See detail below)

11,553,597 (2,999,752)

13,630,852 (4,118,551)

13,630,852 (4,118,541)

14,311,652 (3,878,408)

14,586,004 (3,582,795)

14,671,248 (3,683,310)

14,961,460 (3,785,440)

15,231,803 (3,892,430)

NET TRANSFERS IN (OUT)

8,553,845

9,512,301

9,512,311

10,433,244

11,003,208

10,987,938

11,176,021

11,339,372

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4,377,696

3,781,116

(2,843,601)

7,012,504

7,327,980

7,647,167

7,970,116

8,294,647

4,377,696

3,781,116

(2,843,601)

7,012,504

7,327,980

7,647,167

7,970,116

8,294,647

TOTAL ESTIMATED USES

3,707,292

4,581,196

4,581,196

7,222,793

7,220,446

7,537,481

7,858,238

8,182,768

DETAIL OF TRANSFERS OUT: Administrative Support Fleet Lease Assessment Fee Fleet Management Fund Insurance Assessment Vehicle Maintenance Fees Field Services Sales Tax (EPWA) Arts in Public Places Fund General Fund Revenue Bond Funds (EPWA) Additional Transfers Total Transfers Out:

1,612,826 687,522 119,620 191,724 388,060 2,999,752

2,217,105 805,227 418,000 193,159 485,060 4,118,551

2,217,105 805,217 418,000 193,159 485,060 4,118,541

2,316,342 824,217 70,000 179,849 488,000 3,878,408

2,040,641 866,709 183,446 492,000 3,582,795

2,081,454 911,742 187,114 503,000 3,683,310

2,123,083 959,500 190,857 512,000 3,785,440

2,165,553 1,010,203 194,674 522,000 3,892,430

TOTAL ESTIMATED RESOURCES

198,500 5,000

203,500

9,860,000 201,394 5,000 10,066,394

ESTIMATED USES DIRECT COSTS BY FUNCTION: Personal Services Materials & Supplies Other Services & Charges Capital Outlay Debt Service

OTHER USES: Reserve for Employee Obligations Reserve for Council Special Projects Reserve for Capital Improvements Committed for Other Purposes Reserve for Other Restricted Purposes Restricted (Reserve for Specific Fund Purposes) Unassigned (Res for Emergencies & Shortfalls) TOTAL OTHER USES

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TAB PAGE INSERT

DEBT SERVICE FUND


Debt Service Schedule Capital Improvements Debt

1% of issue or

FY2020 Series 2010 P I Series 2013 P I Series 2014B P I

FY2021

FY2022

FY2023

FY2024

FY2025

FY2026

FY2027

$ $

1,430,000 105,222

$ $

1,475,000 63,971

$ $

1,515,000 21,513

$ $

1,375,000 167,475

$ $

1,415,000 125,625

$ $

1,460,000 82,500

$ $

1,500,000 45,600

$ $

1,530,000 15,300

$ $

1,700,000 656,400

$ $

1,760,000 588,400

$ $

1,830,000 518,000

$ $

1,875,000 476,825

$ $

1,940,000 407,000

Series 2021 (Refunding 2012 & 2014) P I

$ $

1,720,400 34,483

$ $

2,366,400 27,869

$ $

1,186,600 5,577

Proposed Debt Issuance $40M paid over 15 yrs @ 2.4% P I (Per S Commons est for FY21-22)

$

960,000

$

960,000

$ $

1,000,000 960,000

$ $

1,000,000 936,000

$ $

1,000,000 912,000

$ $

1,000,000 912,000

$

8,141,896

$

7,251,694

$

7,044,477

$

4,281,000

$

4,260,250

$

4,258,250

Total P I

$

5,434,097

$ $

2,035,000 310,000

$ $

2,140,000 208,250

$ $

2,245,000 101,250

Reqd Reserves $ 1,390,000

$

1,434,939

$

2,245,000

shared with EPWA 32%/CIP 68%

$

5,427,996

6,525,400 1,616,496

5,741,400 1,510,294

no reserves req'd

5,656,600 1,387,877

3,035,000 1,246,000

3,140,000 1,120,250

$

3,679,939

3,245,000 1,013,250

Wastewater Debt Series 2016 P I Series 2017 P I

FY2020 FY2021 (92% WW/8% Water) $ 755,000 $ 780,000 $ 1,589,125 $ 1,562,200

FY2022 $ $

810,000 1,526,350

FY2023 $ $

850,000 1,484,850

FY2024 $ $

895,000 1,441,225

FY2025 $ $

940,000 1,395,350

FY2026 $ $

2027-2033

2034-2040

2041-2047

985,000 1,347,225

$ $

8,415,000 7,892,750

$ 11,285,000 $ 4,992,700

$ $

$ $ $

31,825,000 38,106,700 86,239,450

$ 42,220,000 $ 27,596,613 $ 86,094,313

$ $ $

14,635,000 1,631,950

$

Reqd Reserve 2,360,100

66,525,000 12,703,512 95,495,462

$

10,177,350

2041-2048 $ 3,135,000 $ 6,895,700 WW Totals $ 12,374,825

Water Debt FY2020 Water OWRB 2005C P $ 191,102 I $ 5,101 OWRB Refi-Bank of America P $ 1,220,000 I $ 274,918 ORF-18-0006-DW P&I $ 234,568 Water Totals $

1,925,689

$ 3,260,000 $ 6,784,100 $ 12,386,300

$ 3,355,000 $ 6,684,875 $ 12,376,225

$ 3,455,000 $ 6,582,725 $ 12,372,575

$ 3,560,000 $ 6,459,700 $ 12,355,925

$ 3,705,000 $ 6,314,400 $ 12,354,750

$ 3,850,000 $ 6,163,300 $ 12,345,525

FY2021

FY2022

FY2023

FY2024

FY2025

FY2026

2027-2033

2034-2041

$ $

191,102 4,119

$ $

191,102 3,151

$ $

191,102 2,182

$ $

191,102 1,216

$ $

95,551 244

$ $

1,260,000 239,740

$ $

1,300,000 203,418

$ $

1,340,000 165,952

$ $

1,380,000 127,342

$ $

1,420,000 87,588

$ $

1,460,000 46,690

$ $

535,000 7,651

$

865,456

$

1,258,758

$

1,258,758

$

1,258,758

$

1,258,758

$

1,258,758

$

8,811,306

$

9,440,683

$

2,560,417

$

2,956,429

$

2,957,994

$

2,958,418

$

2,862,141

$

2,765,448

$

9,353,957

$

9,440,683

Debt Service Schedule

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Debt Service Schedule EPWA Bonds

FY2020

FY2021

FY2022

FY2023

FY2024

2014 Refi 03B & 04 P I

$ $

1,058,104 235,150

$ $

1,116,939 180,888

$ $

1,161,059 135,299

$ $

1,209,824 87,909

$ $

1,265,010 38,528

2015 Refi P I

$ $

1,595,000 504,150

$ $

1,660,000 430,750

$ $

1,740,000 345,750

$ $

1,835,000 256,375

$ $

4,210,000 105,250

$ $

809,600 16,227

$ $

1,113,600 13,115

$ $

558,400 2,624

$

4,207,935

$

4,515,823

$

6,179,812

2021 Refunding P I

Reqd Reserves $ 2,496,505 shared with EPWA 52%/48%

$2,269,935

No reserves req'd

$

3,392,404

$

3,388,577

shared with EPWA 32%/CIP 68%

Sources for EPWA Bonds Electric Water Sanitation San-Adm Wwater Arcadia Lk Golf

Electric Water Sanitation San-Adm Wwater Arcadia Lk Golf Totals

2.576% 83.435% 1.035% 0.110% 3.614% 6.990% 2.240% 100.000%

87,397 2,830,436 35,106 3,747 122,612 237,120 75,986 3,392,404

2.579% 83.435% 1.038% 0.110% 3.624% 6.978% 2.236% 100.000%

87,377 2,827,271 35,157 3,737 122,788 236,469 75,778 3,388,577

2.580% 83.436% 1.039% 0.110% 3.628% 6.973% 2.235% 100.000%

108,551 3,510,922 43,710 4,637 152,661 293,425 94,029 4,207,935

2.579% 83.436% 1.038% 0.110% 3.626% 6.976% 2.235% 100.000%

116,470 3,767,803 46,883 4,978 163,740 315,003 100,945 4,515,823

2.221% 83.307% 0.629% 0.138% 2.198% 8.714% 2.793% 100.000%

137,256 5,148,236 38,885 8,511 135,809 538,538 172,578 6,179,812

Debt Service Schedule

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Governmental Long Term Debt: •

2010 Series Sales Tax and Utility System Bonds, dated December 20, 2010, issued by the Edmond Public Works Authority, secured by utility revenues and pledged sales tax, interest rate at 2.84%, final maturity July 1, 2021. Used for Capital Improvements. 2013 Series Sales Tax and Utility System Bonds, dated May 14, 2013, issued by the Edmond Public Works Authority, secured by utility revenues and pledged sales tax, interest rate at 1.68%, final maturity July 1, 2023. Used for Capital Improvements. 2014B Refunding Series Sales Tax and Utility System Bonds, dated December 9, 2014, issued by the Edmond Public Works Authority, secured by utility revenues and pledged sales tax, interest rate at 2.25%, final maturity July 1, 2026. Used for Capital Improvements. 2021 Refunding Series Sales Tax and Utility System Bonds, dated April 2, 2021, issued by the Edmond Public Works Authority, secured by utility revenues and pledge sales tax, interest rate at .94%. Final maturity 7-1-2023. Used for Capital Improvements.

Business-type Long Term Debt: •

2015 Refunding Series Sales Tax and Utility System Bonds, dated April 2, 2015, issued by the Edmond Public Works Authority, secured by utility revenues and pledged sales tax, interest rate at 1.87%, final maturity July 1, 2023. Used for Utility Capital Improvements. 2016 Series Sales Tax and Utility System Bonds, dated July 5, 2016, issued by the Edmond Public Works Authority, secured by utility revenues and pledged sales tax, interest rate at 3.00% to 5.00%, final maturity July 1, 2046. Used for Utility Capital Improvements. 2017 Series Sales Tax and Utility System Bonds, dated October 19, 2017, issued by the Edmond Public Works Authority, secured by utility revenues and pledged sales tax, interest rate at 3.00% to 5.00%, final maturity July 1, 2047. Used for Utility Capital Improvements.

Notes Payables: •

2005 C Series Construction Drinking Water SRF Promissory Note to Oklahoma Water Resources Board, original issue amount of $3,726,484, secured by utility revenues and pledged sales tax, final maturity September 15, 2024. Used for Water Capital Projects. 2013 Refunding General Sales Tax Revenue Note to Bank of America, original issue amount $16,085,000 secured by utility revenues and pledged sales tax, interest rate of 2.86%, final maturity of July 1, 2026. Used for Water Capital Projects. 2018 Series Construction Drinking Water SRF Promissory Note to Oklahoma Water Resources Board, original issue amount of $19,000,000, secured by utility revenues and pledged sales tax, interest rate of 2.36%, final maturity, September 15, 2040. Used for Water Capital Projects.

Debt limits are reported in our Comprehensive Annual Financial Report located on our website at: https://www.edmondok.com/301/Financial-Services.

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Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) Fiscal Years 2022 – 2026 Introduction This document provides a comprehensive plan of capital improvements that are to be undertaken by the City of Edmond over the next five (5) years. Cost estimates and financing methods for the improvements are included and are referenced by individual project. The development of the City’s Capital Improvement Plan is one of the more complex and multi-faceted processes of the City. Striking a balance between the needs and interests of the residents and the financial capacity of the City is a challenging proposition. For this community vision to have meaning, it must be accompanied by deliberate planning that leads the organization and community to its desired future. This requires clearly defined goals, proactive strategies, committed leadership, effective management and above all, the resources to carry out these plans and objectives. The City’s capital budget will include all capital projects funds and all capital resources. The capital budget will be prepared annually although the projects may span out on an on-going, multiyear plan. The multiyear CIP is reviewed annually and is updated and approved by City Council during the budget process.

What is a Capital Improvement Plan? •

A CIP is a multi-year document that summarizes the capital needs of a community over a specific time period. It outlines the individual capital projects, their strategic value and relationship to the community’s long-term goals and objectives as well as the fiscal impact that they pose to the community. A CIP (Capital Improvement Plan) is not a wish list, rather it is a realistic plan designed to fulfill the strategic goals and objectives necessary to achieve the mission and vision of the community.

Why have a Capital Improvement Plan? • • • • •

Informs the employees, departments, elected officials and the public of an entity’s intent to invest in its infrastructure and community. Represents a long-term financial plan and identifies resources or financing strategies that an entity plans to use to fund the plan. Establishes priorities and serves as a planning document or blueprint for an organization’s investment in capital infrastructure both short-term and long-term. Provides a breakdown of major project costs and phasing as necessary. Does Not appropriate money for years 2 through 5.

Capital Improvement Plan Prioritization Strategy • • •

Preserve the past by investing in the continued upgrade of City assets and infrastructure. Protect the present with improvements and/or additions to facilities, roads, and capital investments. Plan for the future of the organization.

What is a Capital Project? Capital includes all long-lived infrastructures such as water facilities, sewers, streets, parks and buildings along with major equipment like fire trucks, vehicles, backhoes and fixtures. Many of the larger Capital Project can span several years.

Funding Considerations In all communities, the cost associated with capital projects far outweighs the available resources necessary to pay for them; in short there is not enough money. This requires prioritization of the

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projects based upon their perceived impact on the community. Due to the vast number of individual desires, it is near impossible to satisfy everyone and requires a collaborative effort to create situations where the benefits are shared equitably with community stakeholders. In addition, dedicated revenues will, in most cases, determine which projects get funded. For example, the Water/Wastewater Fund may only contribute towards capital projects that improve water and wastewater projects.

Sources of Funding There are five primary funding sources for capital improvements: • • • • •

Cash Funding (revenue sources such as sales tax) State/Federal funding (public grants) Private Funding (developmental impact fees or charitable donations) Bond Issuance Note/Loan Debt Issuance

The current CIP is funded primarily from three sources: cash funding, bond issuance, and grants.

Capitalization Criteria • • • • • • •

The asset is owned by the City of Edmond. The expected useful life of the asset must be longer than one year or extend the life on an existing asset by more than a year. The cost of the asset must be greater than $7500.00 (per item). The asset must be tangible. On-going repairs and general maintenance are not capitalized. Land purchases are booked into our system but will not be depreciated. New purchases-All costs associated with bringing that asset into service will be capitalized such as consulting fees, engineering fees, and special equipment for vehicles.

Conclusion Our Capital Improvement Plan plays an important role in helping our city reach its strategic objectives. It is equally important to consider the funding and economic considerations. Prudent financial stewardship should be based on cost minimization and long-range capital preservation.

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Five Year Capital Outlay by Funding Source Description

Fund

FY21-22

FY22-23

FY23-24

FY24-25

FY25-26

1 Street Rehab Resurf & Reconst

General Fund - Street & Alley Subtotal General Fund 001073

1,320,000 1,320,000

1,550,000 1,550,000

1,100,000 1,100,000

900,000 900,000

807,500 807,500

2 EOC Furnishings Misc Equipment

General Fund - Emergency Management General Fund - Emergency Management Subtotal Emergency Management 001014

30,000 35,000 65,000

35,000 35,000

. 35,000 35,000

35,000 35,000

35,000 35,000

3 Entrance Signs

General Fund - Land Betterments Subtotal Streetscape/Med. Comm Image 001163

40,000 40,000

20,000 20,000

20,000 20,000

20,000 20,000

20,000 20,000

4 Gate/Fencing at Training Center

Assest Forfeiture - Federal Assest Forfeiture - Federal Subtotal Assesst Forfeiture 115004

20,000 130,000 150,000

-

-

-

-

5 Gate/Fencing at Training Center

Assest Forfeiture - State Subtotal Assesst Forfeiture 115005

76,000 76,000

-

6 Retaining wall at CSV Admin/Building C Additions Fire Station #3 Renovation/Architectural Fees Holmatro Combinaton Tool Drone Interface With OKCFD Extractor Station #3 & #1 Defibrillator-Lifepak 15 SCBA Compressor

Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Subtotal Fire Public Safety Fund 121

-

-

7 Mitch Park Playground Improvements Mitch Park Skate Park Improvements Mitch Park Renovation of Ballfirelds & Courts Mitch Park Signage for Entrances & Bldg Letter Mitch Park Amphitheater Improvements Arcadia Development of Carl Reherman Park Arcadia Restroom & Pavilion upgrades Arcadia Road reconstruction, RV Pads, erosion control Arcadia Dock Upgrades Kickingbird Pickleball improv, indoor light, court resurface Neighborhood Parks Splash Pad II Construction Neighborhood Parks Downtown Detention Park Neighborhood Parks resurface basketball cours, lights/cover Mitch Neighborhood Parks Refurbish Stephenson per Master Plan Neighborhood Parks Pavilion add'ns & renovations Neighborhood Parks Neighborhood Playgrounds Hafer Park Pelican Bay Roof and other improvements Hafer Restroom and Pavilion.Dock Upgrades Bickham-Rudkin Restroom add'n & rebuild Pavilion Bickham-Rudkin Veterans Memorial Edmond 66 Implementation of Master Plan Other Festival Market Improvements Other Park Signage Edmond Center Court Bleachers, shade, misc improvements Edmond Center Court PA System

Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

900,000

-

-

-

2,200,000 28,000 10,000 78,000

250,000 -

2,000,000 40,000 40,000

78,000

2,316,000

328,000

78,000 30,000 2,188,000

978,000

39,000 75,000 114,000

350,000 50,000

250,000

250,000

250,000

250,000

100,000 50,000 150,000

100,000

100,000

350,000

50,000

25,000 75,000 25,000

50,000 100,000 25,000

300,000

500,000

25,000

25,000

25,000 50,000

1,425,000

1,150,000

1,200,000

50,000

100,000 50,000

250,000 25,000 350,000

100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000

50,000 600,000

25,000 100,000 75,000 25,000 200,000 500,000

.

50,000 75,000 25,000 50,000

-

-

78,000

50,000

50,000 25,000 150,000

25,000 25,000 25,000 150,000

Subtotal Parks Tax Fund 116

1,450,000

1,800,000

8 Utility Vehicle Replacement

Cemetery Care Fund Subtotal Cemetery Care Fund 118015

23,000 23,000

-

9 ARPA

American Rescue Plan Act Project Subtotal ARPAP Fund 224001

12,000,000 12,000,000

-

10 Intersection Improvements

Roadway Improvements Fund Subtotal Roadway Improvements Fund 335007

-

-

-

-

-

11 Street Construction Costs

1996 Capital Improvement Fund Subtotal 1996 Capital Imp. Tax Fund 337001

-

-

-

-

-

Subtotal VAC Fund 123004

563,475 563,475

802,475 802,475

703,975 703,975

589,975 589,975

534,975 534,975

13 ADA Improvements

Capital Improvements Fund Subtotal Capital Improvements Fund 331001

400,000 400,000

400,000 400,000

400,000 400,000

400,000 400,000

400,000 400,000

14 Reconst. & Resurfacing of Streets Kelly & Danforth Intersection Imp Kelly-Danforth to Coffee Creek Intelligent Traffic Systems III * Intelligent Traffic Systems IV Trails Danforth - Thomas to Fritz* Covell & Coltrane Intersection Imp Traffic Signal at Cheyenne Middle School ADA Sidewalk - 2nd Street Sooner Road Bridge (N of Covell)* Hafer Park Ball Field Improvements Kickingbird Clubhouse Improvement Golf Course Maint. & Water System Veteran's Memorial

2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2000 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2000 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2000 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2000 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2000 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2000 Capital Improv Tax Fund

3,500,000 -

3,587,500 6,250,000 1,900,000 3,000,000

3,677,188 -

3,769,117 -

3,863,345 -

12

Art

Visual Art Fund

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2,800,000 3,000,000 500,000 1,750,000 17,000,000 -

-

-

-

-

12,000 12,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3,500,000 1,500,000 -

-

750,000 -

2,000,000

-

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Five Year Capital Outlay by Funding Source Description Downtown Infrastructure Imp. Cross Timbers Facility Expansion Capitalized Consulting Costs

Fund 2000 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2000 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2000 Capital Improv Tax Fund Subtotal 2000 Capital Improv. Tax Fund 338001

FY21-22

6,000,000 300,000 34,850,000

300,000 15,037,500

2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2018 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund 2017 Capital Improv Tax Fund Subtotal 2017 Capital Improv. Tax Fund 340001

800,000 3,000,000 3,000,000 2,500,000 200,000 1,800,000 350,000 11,650,000

650,000 2,030,000

7,000,000 -

-

-

-

-

-

200,000 -

200,000 -

15,380,000

200,000 3,500,000 2,000,000 12,700,000

200,000

14,200,000

16 Elec Dist Construction Machinery & Tools Furniture/Office Equipment AMI/Communication Equipment Substation Projects Testing Equipment Hardware/Software Systems Luminance/Lighting Construction

PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund Subtotal PWA Electric Utility Fund 562032

5,086,000 16,000 16,000 1,550,000 3,290,000 50,000 32,000 10,040,000

3,410,000 6,000 6,000 150,000 1,380,000 75,000 20,000 5,047,000

5,369,000 6,000 6,000 150,000 3,435,000 12,000 20,000 8,998,000

5,170,000 6,000 150,000 1,120,000 12,000 20,000 6,478,000

4,141,000 6,000 15,000 3,445,000 12,000 20,000 7,639,000

17 New Meter Installs Existing Line Replacement New Water Wells New College Water Tower Water Plant Phased Improvements Master Plan Engineering I-35 Tower Modification New veh for Technologist Pump Replacement Well pumps, motors & Services

PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund Subtotal PWA Water Utility Fund 563332

200,000 4,400,000 3,000,000 1,600,000 510,000 9,710,000

200,000 4,600,000 100,000 510,000 5,410,000

200,000 4,600,000 100,000 510,000 5,410,000

200,000 4,800,000 100,000 510,000 5,610,000

*State Grant Projects - City only cost listed 15 Danforth and Sooner* 2nd and Bryant Improvements 2nd and Blvd Traffic Signal at Covell & I35 Interchange Kelly Imp. 15th & Kelly Intersection Tennis Center Trail Development Hafer Park Improvements Stephenson Park Development Kickingbird Clubhouse Improvements Soccer Complex Improvements Capitalized Construction Costs Gracelawn Cemetery Development Expansion of Animal Shelter Police Arcadia Lake Station Fire Station Remodeling *State Grant Projects - City only cost listed

18 Machinery & Tools Equipment

Solid Waste Fund

Subtotal Solid Waste Fund 564344

19 Master Plan Engineering Oak Tree Elect & Odor Control Upgrades Coffee Creek Road Elect. Upgrades Camera Replacement for WWLM Replacement Grinder Units Replacement Pump Program Existing line replacement

PWA Wastewater Utility Fund PWA Wastewater Utility Fund PWA Wastewater Utility Fund PWA Wastewater Utility Fund PWA Wastewater Utility Fund PWA Wastewater Utility Fund PWA Wastewater Utility Fund Subtotal PWA Wastewater Utility Fund 565352

20 Turtle Creek Det. Pond 9th & University Easements 9th & University Sewer Design 29th Street Easements 29th Street Study Ridgecrest STS Design Morning Star/Crossbow STS Rankin Feasibility Study Rankin Sewer Design Rankin Easements Pine Oak Feasibility Det Pond D Rehab Design/ESMNTS Det Pond D Rehab Det Pond E Rehab Design/ESMNTS Det Pond F Rehab Design/ESMNTS Det Pond G Rehab Design/ESMNTS Det Pond H Rehab Design/ESMNTS

Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility

4,000,000 11,500,000.00 200,000 500,000 1,000,000 4,000,000 510,000 21,710,000 2,050 2,563 4,613

1,000,000 400,000 40,000 100,000 100,000 2,700,000 4,340,000

FY22-23

2,500,000 200,000 10,000,000

2,101 2,627 4,728

FY23-24

300,000 8,977,188

2,154 2,692 4,846

FY24-25

300,000 6,069,117

FY25-26

300,000 4,913,345

14,000,000 -

2,208 2,760 4,967

2,263 2,829 5,091

100,000 3,600,000 3,700,000

100,000 4,600,000 4,700,000 750,000

1,000,000 3,500,000 100,000 3,000,000 7,600,000

1,000,000 100,000 3,300,000 4,400,000

-

1,050,000

750,000 20,000 120,000

750,000 20,000

40,000 100,000 1,030,000

100,000 10,000

10,000

10,000

40,000

40,000

120,000

-

-

20,000 45,000 -

20,000 50,000 -

40,000 20,000 50,000

Subtotal Drainage Utility Fund 568038

1,865,000

1,265,000

1,010,000

1,010,000

20,000 50,000 1,010,000

21 Machinery & Tools

KickingBird Golf Course Fund Subtotal KickingBird Golf Course Fund 570750

88,000 88,000

27,000 27,000

83,000 83,000

78,000 78,000

78,000 78,000

22 Document Imaging Lease

Admin Support Services-General Govt. Subtotal Admin Support Services 652052

42,000 42,000

42,000 42,000

42,000 42,000

42,000 42,000

42,000 42,000

23 Radio/Communication Equipment

Admin Support Services-Central Communications Subtotal Admin Support Services 652541

34,000 34,000

-

-

-

-

45,000 650,000

282

10,000

120,000 20,000 40,000

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Five Year Capital Outlay by Funding Source Description 24 Audio/Visual Equipment Upgrades

Fund Admin Support Services-Marketing Subtotal Admin Support Services 652058

FY21-22 10,000 10,000

FY22-23 10,000 10,000

FY23-24 10,000 10,000

FY24-25 10,000 10,000

FY25-26 10,000 10,000

25 Furniture/Office Equipment/IT Equipment

Admin Support Services-IT Subtotal Admin Support Services 652060

425,000 425,000

750,000 750,000

1,150,000 1,150,000

815,000 815,000

815,000 815,000

26 Furniture/Office Equipment

Admin Support Services-HR Subtotal Admin Support Services 652591

1,032 1,032

1,032 1,032

1,032 1,032

1,032 1,032

1,032 1,032

27 Motor Vehicle Fleet Replacement

Fleet Management Fund (All divisions) Subtotal Fleet Management Fund 653

3,957,227 3,957,227

4,761,647 4,761,647

5,061,247 5,061,247

4,295,527 4,295,527

4,406,853 4,406,853

Total Capital Outlay $ 108,524,367 $ 64,105,262 $ 53,076,894 $ 31,848,318 $ 46,896,590 FIVE YEAR TOTAL $ 304,451,431

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TAB PAGE INSERT

PERSONNEL


M E M O TO:

Larry Stevens, City Manager

FROM: DATE SUBJECT:

Lisa Goodpasture, HR Director April 08, 2021 2021-2022 HR Annual Budget Report

CC:

Steve Commons, ACM-Administration

Since July 1, 2020, (to date) we have processed 2906 applications for full-time and part-time positions. We only accept applications when we have open positions. During this same period we hired 38 new full-time employees to fill existing vacancies and approved new positions. A total of 33 full-time employees separated from the City. Ten employees of the 33 that separated, retired from the City. Separation includes resignations, retirements, and discharges. Based on 788 full-time active positions, our turnover rate to date for FY 2021 is 4.30%. If you exclude retirements the turnover rate is 3.00%. At this time last year the City’s turnover rate was at 3.49%. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the national turnover rate (for all industries) in February 2021 was 6.2%. As of February 2021, the average turnover rate for Oklahoma is 4.4%. Labor Relations: General Employees: A comprehensive benchmark study will be conducted in April 2021. Salary data is gathered from all major cities in Oklahoma and equivalent cities outside of Oklahoma in order to compare our civilian positions and salary ranges to the average of the other cities included in the survey. These cities included: Moore, Norman, Midwest City, Stillwater, Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Broken Arrow, Columbia MO, Lawrence KS, McKinney TX, and Fayetteville AR. Also, included in the benchmark study will be UCO and Edmond Public Schools. The City conducts a benchmark study every two years to ensure the City’s pay is aligned to market. The proposed FY 2021-22 budget includes funds for a 1.5% COLA for general employees pending the results from the benchmark study. The goal of this study is to assist the City in determining if pay adjustments are necessary to address unjustified gaps in pay or issues relating to misalignment with market-based compensation levels, salary compression, or gaps that may impact recruitment or retention. IAFF and FOP: The four-year collective bargaining agreement for the International Association of Firefighters (IAFF) and Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) commenced on July 1, 2019 and will remain in effect until June 30, 2023. We have a great respect for the IAFF and FOP Presidents and Negotiation Teams and if needed, throughout the year we mutually engage in productive discussions on policy changes, issues and sharing of information. The FY 2019 thru FY 2023 FOP and IAFF salaries are based on available revenues and City Council approved allocation of funds in each of the applicable years.

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Fiscal Year 2019 1.0% increase effective 07-01-19 1.0% increase effective 01-01-20 Fiscal Year 2020 1.0% increase effective 07-01-20 1.0% increase effective 01-01-21 Fiscal Year 2021 1.0% increase effective 07-01-21 1.0% increase effective 01-01-22 Fiscal Year 2022 1.0% increase effective 07-01-22 1.0% increase effective 01-01-23 Recommended Position/Increases/Decreases/Changes: Included with this report is a detailed listing of the recommended position requests received and reviewed by the Personnel Review Committee. This Committee, made up primarily of rank and file employees, meets annually to review requests from departments for new positions, both additions as well as position changes due to departmental reorganization. Budgeted positions for FY 2020-21 was at 787. Four of these positions were temporary over-hires approved for Fire and Water Resources, which will drop before the end of the year due to attrition. An additional 3 positions for Engineering, 1 position for Finance and 1 position for Water Resources were approved after the budget was calculated, bringing the total of authorized full-time positions at the end of FY20-21 to 789. If the attached personnel changes, are approved for FY 2021-22, this will bring our total number of authorized full-time positions to 810. Personnel Budget: The proposed FY 2021-22 personnel budget (includes base, overtime, holiday pay, allowances, part time pay, FICA, Medicare and pensions – all 100 accounts) of $89,426,980 is an increase of 5.9% or $5,011,609 over the FY 2020-21 personnel budget of $84,415,371. Pension The City’s contribution to meet the normal cost of the pension plan and amortize the unfunded actuarial liability over 30 years is $3.656 million, or 11.68% of participant payroll. This is a decrease of .34% of payroll from last year’s contribution requirement. The decrease is principally the result of (1) investment earnings on the actuarial value of assets being less than the long-term assumed rate of return, more than offset by the impact of increasing the member contribution rate to 6.0% of pay as of 1/1/2021. The plan was amended effective July 1, 2020 to increase the City’s contribution from 9.82% to 11%. The plan was also amended effective January 1, 2021 to increase the member contribution rate from 5.25% of pay to 6.0% of pay. Employee’s contribution of 5.25% has not increased in over 30 years. Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee (DEI): The City is committed to supporting diversity, equity and inclusion. With Council approval the City Manager is recommending to hire a DEI Officer. The Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer will be a leader, advisor, advocate, catalyst for change and resource focused on infusing DEI into all programs and activities. The DEI Officer will report to the City Manager and collaborate closely with Human Resources. Employee Training: The City of Edmond continues to place a high priority on training for employees at all levels within the organization. Prior to the pandemic, training opportunities were offered through our partnerships with Francis Tuttle - Performance Management Training, the Oklahoma Municipal

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Power Authority (OMPA), Municipal Electric Systems of Oklahoma (MESO), Oklahoma Municipal League (OML), contracted trainers and our internal Human Resources Department. In March 2020, COVID-19 safety protocol was implemented, these trainings were paused. In June 2021, we anticipate initiating training and continuing these partnerships for this next fiscal year as well as selection of our own internal department subject matter experts to assist with offering/presenting customer service training and additional Performance Management/professional development courses. Edvance Branding: Over the past few years, several new professional development initiatives have been launched to help train and build City of Edmond employees into a high performing organization. As these now successful programs have launched, they have been given different names and have been branded differently. In an effort to streamline the programs into one brand, we have renamed these under the name Edvance. Edvance allows the HR, City Manager, and the Marketing department to continue delivering these great programs to our employees and have a tool to help in the recruitment of new employees. The programs are as follows: Edvance Academy (formerly Edmond Academy) Edvance Labs (new initiative) Edvance Leadership (formerly Performance Management Training) Edvance Talent (formerly Talent Development) Edvance Trainings (includes all one-session training classes) Edvance Academy: The City Manager and Marketing department organizes the Edvance Academy program. Edvance Academy gives employees opportunities to learn more about other City Departments, meet new people, and gain a more comprehensive understanding of the City of Edmond. Edvance Academy is an educational and informational program for City of Edmond employees – no matter how long they have been with the organization or what their job title is. The 5-day program will include tours of departments, demonstrations, and interactive activities. Formerly known as Edmond Academy, this program was piloted in 2019 with 20 employees. The program was scheduled to kick off in May 2020, however due to the pandemic the program will be rescheduled after July 1, 2021. Edvance Labs: Graduates of Talent Development and Edmond Academy are being offered the unique opportunity to work together on City projects. Through Edvance Labs, graduates of Talent Development and Edmond Academy will get to tackle problems that our organization faces and provide recommendations on how to solve them. These problems may be outside their specialty area, which will give the City the fresh perspective necessary to provide creative recommendations. Lab initiatives for 2020 included: Employee Performance Reviews: How to increase their effectiveness Pros and Cons of 360-degree feedback Volunteering in Edmond - Stronger Together Employee (Satisfaction) Survey Tool - Is A Revamp Needed? Lab initiatives for 2021 have not yet been determined.

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Edvance Leadership: In 2014, the Performance Management Focus Group, Employee Survey Results Focus Group and members of CI identified Supervisory Training as a priority within the organization. In partnership with Francis Tuttle (FT), a customized curriculum was developed, and the training was mandated/initiated in 2015. Annually, Francis Tuttle delivers 5 of the 8-session series. Three sessions are delivered by internal presenters, to include the City Manager, City Attorney and Human Resources Director. 151 participants completed this training to date. • 2015, 32-hour series, 90 attended • 2016, series condensed to 22-hours, 15 attended • 2017, 18 attended • 2018, 14 attended • 2019, 14 attended • 2020, cancelled due to pandemic • 2021, to be offered October 2021 through January 2022 Edvance Talent: The 8-session series training program is designed for non-supervisory employees that have the interest and potential to be future leaders in our City of Edmond organization. The city’s version of Succession Planning, Talent Development is a more accurate reflection of our culture. The goal is to create a workforce with more depth, and to provide employees with adequate tools to develop both personally and professionally. In 2018, 73 applications were received, 30 employees were selected/graduated. In review of the 2018 participant feedback and the consistent high ratings received on program content, City Council approved funding ($44,000) to offer this training program to employees after January 1, 2020. •

In 2020, 37 applications were received, 30 employees were selected to attend May through July 2020. Due to the pandemic, this training was postponed/rescheduled June through September 2021.

Edvance Trainings: Edvance Trainings cover a variety of topics to enhance an employee’s skills and knowledge as well as their personal wellbeing. Customer Service, Personal Conduct, Management, Safety, Health & Wellness, Computer Skills, BUILD and DISC are the types of sessions offered to all employees at the City. BUILD-Brief, Useful, Individual, Leadership Development sessions offered to continue leadership training momentum. From January 2017-February 2020, 28 BUILD sessions have been offered, 846 attendees. New, selected sessions will be open to both leaders and employees. Anticipated to resume in Summer 2021. • The Emotionally Intelligent Leader • Organizational Spirit, Philosophy & Culture (open to leaders and employees) • Customer Service Recovery (open to leaders and employees) • Attitude & Initiative; Higher Attitude and Develop Initiative • Inclusion: Interacting with Customers Displaying Disorders (open to leaders and employees) • New Hire On-Boarding

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• • •

City-Wide SOFTWARE Strategies that promote Efficiency & Organization (open to leaders and employees) Getting Started with Microsoft Teams, Zoom and other on-line platforms How to Supervise Remote Workers

The Educational Resource Library on Ednet continues to grow. Leaders that miss BUILD sessions can go to the Educational Resource Library to watch the video. Leaders are encouraged to share this educational library with their employees. As of March 2020, there are 20 Edvance Trainings (BUILD session) videos, 7 other training videos, two articles and two infographics posted. DISC (Dominance, Influence, Steadiness and Conscientiousness): The DISC Assessment + 3.5 hour training session is designed to provide a comprehensive view of each participants communication/behavior interaction style and insights on how to leverage their style and adapt to others to enhance working relationships and foster successful outcomes. From August 2018-February 2020, Sixteen (16) DISC sessions have been provided, 144 participants. DISC sessions are anticipated to resume in summer 2021. Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA): OMPA sponsors a professional speaker to present onsite to our employees with its annual ‘All Employee Training’. The three (3) hour presentation is focused on customer service techniques, self-motivation, and leadership skills. Oklahoma Municipal Alliance (formerly called MESO): As part of our relationship with OMA, we contract with them to present five (5) customer service sessions throughout the fiscal year directly to our employees. Each session is 1.5 hours in length and is presented twice for staggered attendance. The time frame of the sessions and purpose of staggering the class is to give our employees a greater opportunity to attend important lessons on providing customer service. While the training is targeted to our utility employees, it is usually open to all our employees to attend. COVID 19 constraints have limited our access to onsite training, but other options of delivering training, such as virtual are being reviewed. Computer Skills Training: FY 2021-22 we are exploring opportunities to partner with Francis Tuttle VoTech to provide training to our employees on software programs (MicroSoft Office – Word, Excel, Power Point) that are regularly utilized within our organization. Training would enhance an employee’s knowledge of the software to improve their job performance. Onboarding and New Hire Training: New Hire Orientation Sessions – There are three Phases of New Hire Orientation in place for the onboarding process of new employees. Total hours of all three phases when complete is 12 hours of learning about the responsibilities as an Edmond employee as well as the city’s mission, core values, customer service expectations and team building skills. Crucial Conversations for Supervisors: FY 2021-22 we are exploring opportunities to provide ‘Crucial Conversations’ training to our supervisory personnel. This training reviews skills and techniques for people to utilize when they need to approach situations of performance problems, confrontation, or disagreements between two or more people. We are anticipating approximately 24 supervisors to complete this training. Health Benefits: The City continues to offer the current three plan levels of health insurance, what we call “Standard”, “Enhanced” and “ACO” (Accountable Care Organization) for January 1, 2021. All three

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plans offer different premiums, co-pays, deductibles etc. to allow employees to effectively choose a health plan that meets their individual and/or family needs. To continue to stay ahead of the increasing Medical/RX trends the City made the following changes for the 2021 calendar year: 1. 2. 3.

Increased premium on the ACO and Standard plan by 2% for employee and City on all tiers; Increased premium on the Enhanced plan by 3% for employee and City on all tiers; Increased premium on the Standard plan from $65 to $80 and Enhanced plan from $99 to 125 per month for the employee only tier.

Employees continue to realize the value of the ACO plan as enrollment continues to grow and is now the plan with the most enrollees. We continue to look at cost saving measures related to this major expenditure and benefit for our organization and employees. Healthcare costs and all services related to those costs continue to rise. However, we are seeing an increasing awareness and sense of ownership from employees regarding the need to be vigilant in the use of those benefits. Claims Cost Expenses Gross Medical Paid Claims Specific Stop Loss Recoveries Net Medical Claims Net RX Claims Dental Claims Vision Claims Administration Costs Stop Loss Premiums Total

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2019 Annual 4,864,671.75 (571,815.43) 4,292,856.32 2,971,473.84 872,963.44 107,157.00 467,033.50 993,577.92 9,705,062.02

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2020 Annual 6,671,987.00 (360,257.49) 6,311,729.51 2,260,557.09 807,306.61 107,850.00 505,673.06 1,142,706.62 11,135,822.89

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2020 PEPM 707.98 (38.23) 669.75 239.87 85.66 11.44 53.66 121.25 1,181.65

NOTE: PEPM – Per Employee Per Month The City’s total cost per employee per month for 2020 is $1,181.65 which is up from 2019 at $1,009.26. National data for 2020 has not yet been released; however, the City’s cost is just over the National average for 2019 of $1,097.72 per employee per month. The Municipality average for 2018 was $1,183.44 per employee per month. Health Care Reform Law, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010: Federal health care reform law imposes new fees on health insurance carriers and self-funded plans to fund a new entity known as the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). The City’s Fee for 2019 was $5029.20. This fee is based on per member per year count on the health plan at a rate of $2.54 for the 2019 plan year. On December 20, 2019, the President extended the PCORI fee for an additional 10 years. Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) section 6055 and 6056 to the Internal Revenue Code, the City issued 855 Form 1095-C’s for the 2019 calendar year to comply with this code. Wellness Programs: The wellness program is well received by our City employees. In 2020, we held 2 flu shot events, 2 mobile mammogram events. Employees that participate in the Wellness Program can earn points by completing a physical health assessments (PHA), annual physicals, eye and dental exams, cancer screenings, and participating in

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charity walk/run events, wellness luncheons, blood drives, etc. Points earned can be cashed in for wellness merchandise, gift certificates, etc. Employees that participate in the Wellness Fitness Program can earn up to 16 hours of time off work per year for completing the fitness requirements. Employee Health Clinic: The Clinic opened August 13, 2014 and continues to provide services at no cost to employees, their family members (dependents, age 2 & up) and retirees covered by the benefits plan. Fiscal Year FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22

Budgeted $641,354 $673,422 $670,977 $620,000 $666,410 $662,054 $664,523 $675,073

Cost $603,468 ($9000 Facility Care Cost included) $513,792 ($9000 Facility Care Cost included) $601,388 ($9000 Facility Care Cost included) $628,396 ($10,680 Facility Care Cost included) $662,174 ($10,680 Facility Care Cost included) $656,512 ($8757 Capital Cleaning included) *TBD ($8757 Capital Cleaning included) *TBD ($8757 Capital Cleaning included)

*FY20/21 Total Cost estimated: $691,862.40 (increase due to COVID Test Kits and Testing) **Recommendation to Council Note: The monthly Flat Rate Fee went into effect 12/01/18 (Flat Rate does not include PHA, Flu Shots, Immunizations or COVID Test Kits/Testing). The current flat rate annual fee is $627,976.08. The FY21/22 flat rate fee is $633,470.87 (1.50% increase) Personal Health Assessment (PHA) Conducted by CareATC The 2020 PHA event was cancelled due to the pandemic. In-clinic, by appointment, 436 PHA reviews were completed. The 2021 PHA Event is scheduled for Thursday, 09/16/21 through Saturday, 09/18/2021.

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Population vs Employee Growth 98,000.0

820 810

96,000.0

790

Population

94,000.0

780

92,000.0

770

90,000.0

760

88,000.0

740

750 730

86,000.0 84,000.0

Number of Employees

800

720 2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Population

2019-20

2020-21

2021-2022

710

Number of Employees

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FY20/21 Dept

Action

FY20/21 BUDGETED

787

Class

Change

010 010 001 010 010

1 1 2 1 1

added mid year added mid year added mid year added mid year added mid year

Water Resources Fire

-1 -3

ends with Montgomery retirement ends with addition of new positions

FY20/21 end

789

001 010 001 001 001 001 003 001 001 001 001 002 001 001 001 001

0 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 1 0 3 1 0 2 1

Ending Full Time

810

Position

FY21 MID YEAR CHANGES 561 NEW CIVIL ENGINEER 561 NEW ENGINEERING PLAN REVIEW SPEC 562 NEW ENGINEERING INSPECTOR 581 NEW TREASURY ANALYST 332 NEW WATER CONSERVATION COORDINATOR TEMP OVERHIRES:

320 171 72 331 600 582 50 600 370 370 440 41 41 334 340 591

FY22 PROPOSED RECLASS NEW NEW NEW NEW NEW NEW NEW NEW NEW RECLASS NEW NEW RECLASS NEW NEW

ADMIN SPEC II TO ADMIN SPEC III ASSOCIATE PLANNER ASST. SUPERINTENDENT ASST. SUPERINTENDENT PW TECHNOLOGY COORDINATOR PROCUREMENT FIREFIGHTER ADMIN TECHNICIAN ADMIN SPEC II LAKE MAINTENANCE WORKER II MAINT WORKER II TO MAINT WOKER III OFFICERS DIGITAL FORENSIC EXAMINER LAB TECH TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMIST SOLID WASTE TRUCK DRIVER DIVERSITY & INCLUSION OFFICER

TOTAL POSITIONS:

293

783 approved, 4 temp overhires

(replaces PT Admin Support)

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POSITION DEPT 530-Admin Services-City Clerk CITY CLERK/ART LIAISON MANAGEMENT ANALYST ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II ASSISTANT CITY CLERK ADMIN SUPPORT - PT (1)

POSITIONS INCR/ POSITIONS FY 20-21 DECR FY 21-22

Total 370-Arcadia Lake LAKE MANAGER PARK CREW LEADER FEE COLLECTION COORDINATOR ASST FEE COLLECTION COORDINATOR ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II PARK MAINTENANCE WORKER III PARK MAINTENANCE WORKER II FEE COLLECTION - PT (4) MAINTENANCE WORKER - PT (1)

-1 -1 1

1 0 move to 550 FY22 0 reclass 1 change of title

3

-1

2

8 1 1 1 2 6 1 1 1 0 1 1 16 0.55 0.55 1 1 1 3 0.8 1 2 1 4.8 1 1 2 15 2 21 25.8 1 2 0.4 3.4

550-City Manager CITY MANAGER ASST CITY MANAGER/ADMIN DIRECTOR OF MANAGEMENT SERVICES MANAGEMENT SERVICES MANAGER DIVERSITY & INCLUSION OFFICER SPECIAL PROJECTS COORDINATOR ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II STUDENT INTERN PART TIME(2)

1 1 1 0 0 1 1

1 1

2

-1

1

0 -0.05 -0.05

0

0

0 0

0

1 1

Total

5

2

Total

1 0.05 1.05

-0.05 -0.05

560-Asst City Manager/Public Works ASSISTANT CITY MANAGER/PUBLIC WORKS CDBG/PUBLIC TRANSIT 161-Urban Forestry DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY QUALITY URBAN FORESTRY PROGRAM SPECIALIST LANDSCAPE DESIGNER

1 1 1 0

1 1 1 1 0 4 0

Total 190-Building & Fire Code Services MANAGER OF BLDG SERVICES BUILDING INSPECTION SUPERVISOR BUILDING PLAN REVIEW/PERMIT SUPERVISOR FIRE PROTECTION SPECIALIST BUILDING INSPECTOR BUILDING PLAN REVIEW SPECIALIST COMMERCIAL PLAN REVIEW SPECIALIST ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT PERMIT CLERK III (BLDG PLAN REV SPEC) PERMIT CLERK II (BLDG SVC CLERK) PERMIT CLERK I (BLDG SVC CLERK) Total 400-CDBG Entitlement CDBG/PUBLIC TRANSIT Total 150-Cemetery CEMETERY MANAGER CEMETERY MAINTENANCE WORKER III CEMETERY MAINTENANCE WORKER II Total 541 - Communications DIRECTOR CC/EM TELEPHONE ADMINISTRATOR COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS SPEC II INFORMATION AND ALARM SPEC Subtotal 542 - Dispatch COMMUNICATION OPERATIONS MANAGER COMMUNICATIONS SHIFT/TRAINING SUPERVISOR COMMUNICATIONS SHIFT SUPERVISOR PUBLIC SAFETY DISPATCHER I & II EMERGENCY CALL TAKERS Subtotal Total 670-Central Warehousing - Public Works WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR WAREHOUSE WORKER ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II Total 020-City Council MAYOR - PT (1) COUNCILMEMBER - PT (4)

294

COMMENTS

1 1 1

-0.5

1 1 1 1 1 added FY22 4 1 added FY22

10 1 1 1 2 6 0 change of title 1 1 1 change of title 1 1 16 0.5 split with 191 0.5 1 1 1 3 0.8 Split with Dept 140 1 2 1 4.8 1 1 2 15 2 21 25.8 1 2 0.4 split with 320 3.4

1 1 1 1 move from 530 FY22 (title change) 1 added FY22 1 1 7 1 0 change in distribution 1 0.5 (new title) split with Parks 1 1


POSITION

POSITIONS INCR/ POSITIONS FY 20-21 DECR FY 21-22 COMMENTS 0.6 0.6 split with 320 0.4 0.4 split with 320 0.25 0.25 Split with 162 4.25 -0.5 3.75

DEPT UTILITY FORESTRY SERVICE SPECIALIST URBAN FORESTRY TECHNICIAN ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II 162-Code Inspections CODE INSPECTION SUPERVISOR CODE INSPECTOR CODE INSPECTOR/COURIER ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II Total

1 4 1 0.75 6.75 11

933-Visit Edmond DIRECTOR OF TOURISM GROUP SALES MANAGER CONFERENCE SERVICES COORDINATOR COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR Total 090-Downtown Community Center DCC BUILDING COORDINATOR DCC BUILDING ATTENDANT ASST DCC COORDINATOR - PT (0 eliminated FY22) Total 380-Drainage Utility STORMWATER ENGINEER HYDROLOGIST CAD TECHNICIAN WATER QUALITY SPECIALIST II WATER QUALITY SPECIALIST I Total 320-Electric Utility DIRECTOR OF ELECTRIC UTILITIES ELEC DISTRIBUTION SUPERINTENDENT ELEC DISTRIBUTION ENGINEER OR ASSOCIATE ENGINEERING/GIS MANAGER ELECTRIC CREW SUPERVISOR ELEC LEAD JOURNEY LINEMAN ELEC LINEMAN (All Classes) LINE LOCATOR COMMUNITY PROGRAM MANAGER ELECTRIC PROGRAM COORDINATOR CAD/GIS SPECIALIST UTILITY FORESTRY SERVICES SPECIALIST URBAN FORESTRY TECHNICIAN ADMINISTRATIVE SUPERVISOR ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST III ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II Total 140-Emergency Management DIRECTOR CENT COMM/EMER MGMT EMER MGMT COORDINATOR EMER MGMT RESOURCE SPECIALIST Total 561-Engineering DIRECTOR OF ENGINEERING SENIOR CIVIL ENGINEER PROJECT ENGINEER PROJECT MANAGER PROJECT COORDINATOR TRAFFIC PLANNER TRAFFIC ENGINEER - EIT I TRAFFIC ENGINEER - EIT II CIVIL ENGINEER - EIT ENGINEERING PLAN REVIEW SUPERVISOR ENGIN PLAN REVIEW SPECIALIST RIGH-OF-WAY COORDINATOR WORKZONE INSPECTOR CAD TECHNICIAN ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II Total 562-Engineering Inspections ENGINEERING INSPECTION SUPV ENGINEERING INSPECTOR Total Division Total 570-Facility Maintenance FACILITY MAINT SUPERINTENDENT FACILITY MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR FACILITY MAINTENANCE TECH II/HVAC FACILITY MAINTENANCE TECH I

1 1 1 1 4

0

1 1 1 1 4

1 0

1

1 1

1

1

2

0

1 1 1 2 1 6

1 -1 0

1 1 2 1 5 8 27 2 1 1 2 0.4 0.6 1 1 1.6 55.6

1 1 1 2 1 6 1 1 2 1 5 8 27 2 1 1 2 0.4 0.6 1 0 2.6 55.6 0.2 1 1 2.2 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 0 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 18 1 5 6 24

295

0 -0.5

1 4 1 0.75 Split with 161 6.75 10.5

1 1 2 3

split with 161 split with 161 reclass FY22 split with 670 - reclass FY22

1 1

0.2 Split with 541 1 1 2.2 Depts 561 & 562 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 reclass after budget calculations 2 added mid year FY21 1 2 added mid year FY21 1 1 1 1 1 added after budget calculations 19

2 2 3

1 7 added mid year FY21 8 27

0

-1 1

-2 3

1 1 0 reclass 6 reclass & transfer from 571


POSITION

POSITIONS INCR/ POSITIONS FY 20-21 DECR FY 21-22 Total 7 1 8

DEPT 571-Facility Maint/Custodians LEAD CUSTODIAN CUSTODIAN/DELIVERY DRIVER CUSTODIAN

Total Division Total

1 1 3 5 12

-1 -1 -3 -5 -4

0

0

COMMENTS

0 positions eliminated FY22 0 reclass & change to 570 0 positions eliminated FY22 0 8

180-Festival Marketplace FARMERS MARKET COORDINATOR - PT (1) FARMERS MARKET STAFF - S (2) Total Field Services Street FIELD SERVICES SUPERINTENDENT ASST. FIELD SVCS SUPERINTENDENT - STREET FIELD SERVICES SUPERVISOR - STREET CONTRACT COORDINATOR STREET FIELD COORDINATOR STREET MAINTENANCE WORKER III FIELD SERVICES SPECIALIST FIELD SERVICES TECHNICIAN II FIELD SERVICES TECHNICIAN I FIELD SERVICES APPRENTICE Total Field Services Traffic FIELD SERVICES SUPERINTENDENT ASST. FIELD SVCS SUPERINTENDENT - STREET FIELD SERVICES SUPERVISOR/SSM TRAFFIC SPECIALIST I TRAFFIC TECHNICIAN II TRAFFIC TECHNICIAN I TRAFFIC APPRENTICE Total Field Services Meter Services ASST. FIELD SVCS SUPERINTENDENT - ULM METER SERVICES COORDINATOR UTILITY SERVICES COORDINATOR UTILITY SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE METER READER Total Field Services Water Line Maint FIELD SERVICES SUPERINTENDENT ASST. FIELD SVCS SUPERINTENDENT - ULM FIELD SERVICES SUPERVISOR/ULM UTIL LINE MAINT WORKER (All Grades) FIELD SERVICES SPECIALIST FIELD SERVICES TECHNICIAN II FIELD SERVICES TECHNICIAN I FIELD SERVICES APPRENTICE Total Field Services Wastewater Line Maint FIELD SERVICES SUPERINTENDENT ASST. FIELD SVCS SUPERINTENDENT - ULM FIELD SERVICES SUPERVISOR/ULM UTIL LINE MAINT WORKER/WW FIELD SERVICES SPECIALIST FIELD SERVICES TECHNICIAN II FIELD SERVICES TECHNICIAN I FIELD SERVICES APPRENTICE Total Division Total 581-Finance DIRECTOR OF FINANCE ASSISTANT FINANCE DIRECTOR ACCOUNTING MANAGER UTILITY FINANCE ANALYST PROCUREMENT ANALYST TREASURY SPECIALIST FISCAL SPECIALIST-ACCT FISCAL SPECIALIST-AP PURCHASING MANAGER CITY TREASURER - PT (1) FISCAL SPECIALIST-PT (1) Division Total 050-Fire Public Safety Tax Fund FIRE CHIEF

0.38 0 2 1 1 1 1 8 7 5 26.38

0.08 0 1 1 2 0 4 8.08

0 1 1 5 8 15

0.32 0 1 6 1 7 4 2 21.32

0.22 0 1 2 0 6 2 3 14.22 85 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0.7

6.7

296

1

0.78

0.78

0.22

0.22

0.29

0.29

0.42

0.42

0.29

0.29 2

1 1

2

0

0.38 0.78 2 1 1 1 1 8 7 5 27.16

Split by # of positions in dept added FY22

Skill Based Pay Position Skill Based Pay Position Skill Based Pay Position Skill Based Pay Position

0.08 Split by # of positions in dept 0.22 added FY22 1 1 2 0 4 8.3

0.29 added FY22 1 1 5 8 15.29

0.32 0.42 1 6 1 7 4 2 21.74

Split by # of positions in dept added FY22

0.22 0.29 1 2 0 6 2 3 14.51 87

Split by # of positions in dept added FY22

Skill Based Pay Position Skill Based Pay Position Skill Based Pay Position Skill Based Pay Position

Skill Based Pay Position Skill Based Pay Position Skill Based Pay Position Skill Based Pay Position

1 1 1 1 1 added FY22 1 added mid year FY21 1 1 0.7 Split with Dept - 460

8.7 1


POSITION

DEPT

POSITIONS INCR/ POSITIONS FY 20-21 DECR FY 21-22 COMMENTS DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 2 2 ASST CHIEF - PREVENTION 1 1 ASST CHIEF - TRAINING 1 1 ASST CHIEF - EMS 1 1 SERGEANT/CAPTAIN - NON SUPR (EMS) 2 2 SERGEANT/CAPTAIN - NON SUPR (PREVENTION) 4 4 SERGEANT/CAPTAIN - NON SUPR (TRAINING) 3 3 FIRE BATTALION CHIEF 3 3 FIRE CAPTAIN - SUPPRESSION 15 15 FIRE LIEUTENANT - SUPPRESSION 9 9 FIRE APPARATUS DRIVER 24 24 FIREFIGHTER/RELIEF DRIVER 9 9 FIREFIGHTER 48 6 54 added FY22 TECHNOLOGY COORDINATOR 2 2 FIRE QUARTERMASTER 1 1 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 1 1 ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II 1 1

Total 153-Fleet Management FLEET MAINT/SOLID WASTE SUPERINTENDENT ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNICIAN - VEHICLE MAINT. Total 710-Golf Pro Shop DIRECTOR OF GOLF SECOND ASSISTANT GOLF PRO GOLF PRO SHOP CLERK - PT (7)

128 0.34 0.15 0.49

134

0

0.34 Split with Dept 110 & 344 0.15 Split with Dept 110 0.49

0.05 0.2 0.25

720-Golf Cart Barn FIRST ASSISTANT GOLF PRO GOLF CART/RANGE HELPER - PT (6)

6

0.05 Split with Div 750 0.2 Split with Div 750 0

0.2

Total 730-Golf Restaurant RESTAURANT SUPERVISOR RESTAURANT SHIFT LEADER - PT (1) RESTAURANT/BEVERAGE CART HELPER - PT (1) RESTAURANT HELPER - PT (1) GRILL HELPER/CUSTODIAN - PT (0) Total 740-Golf Maintenance GOLF COURSE SUPERINTENDENT 1st ASST TO GOLF SUPERINTENDENT 2nd ASST TO GOLF SUPERINTENDENT GOLF COURSE MECHANIC GOLF MAINTENANCE WKR I GOLF MAINTENANCE WORKER - PT (1)

0.2

Total

6

Total Division Total

0.95 0.8 0.8 1 3.55 11

750-Golf Administration DIRECTOR OF GOLF FIRST ASSISTANT GOLF PRO SECOND ASSISTANT GOLF PRO GOLF ACCOUNTING CLERK

591-Human Resources DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES PAYROLL SUPERVISOR EMPLOYMENT/TRAINING COORDINATOR HUMAN RESOURCES PROGRAM COORDINATOR BENEFITS SPECIALIST HUMAN RESOURCES TECHNICIAN II PAYROLL SPECIALIST ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II Division Total 610-Legal Services CITY ATTORNEY ASSISTANT CITY ATTORNEY II ASSISTANT CITY ATTORNEY I EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II-ATTY Total 200-Liability/Tort Claim (Risk) DIRECTOR OF RISK MANAGMENT OPERATIONS SAFETY SPECIALIST RISK MGMT CLAIMS COORDINATOR Total 600-Information Technology DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS SUPPORT MANAGER

0.2 Split with Div 750 0

1

1

1 1 0 1 1 4 1 1 1 3

297

1 1

0.2 1

0

1 1 1 1 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8

0.25

1 1 1 1 1 2

0

0 0

0

1 -1 0

0

6 0.95 Split with Div 710 0.8 Split with Div 720 0.8 Split with Div 710 1 3.55 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 1 1 1 reclass FY22 1 0 reclass FY22 4 1 1 1 3 1 1


POSITION

POSITIONS INCR/ POSITIONS FY 20-21 DECR FY 21-22 COMMENTS INFRASTRUCTURE SUPPORT MANAGER 1 1 NETWORK SPECIALIST 4 4 SYSTEMS ANALYST II 4 4 GIS ANALYST II 1 1 GIS COORDINATOR 1 1 DATABASE ANALYST 1 1 SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR 2 2 SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY COORDINATOR-CROSSTIMBERS 0 1 1 added FY22 CLIENT SYSTEMS SUPPORT ANALYST SUPERVISOR 1 1 CLIENT SYSTEMS SUPPORT ANALYST 3 3 ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNICIAN 0 1 1 added FY22 Total 20 2 22 580-Marketing & Public Relations DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS 1 -1 0 reclass after budget calculations MARKETING & PR MANAGER 0 1 1 reclass after budget calculations MARKETING & PR ASSISTANT 1 1 SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATOR 1 1 GRAPHIC DESIGNER 1 1 VIDEO/TV PRODUCTION COORDINATOR 1 1 JUNIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER 1 1 JUNIOR VIDEOGRAPHER 1 1 Total 7 0 7 080-Municipal Court COURT ADMINISTRATOR 1 1 ASST COURT ADMIN/PROGRAM COORD 1 1 DEPUTY COURT CLERK II 5 5 DEPUTY COURT CLERK I 2 2 MUNICIPAL JUDGE - PT (1) ASST MUNICIPAL JUDGE - PT (1) Total 9 0 9 061-Park Administration Depts 061,062,064 DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY QUALITY 0 0.5 0.5 (new title) split with Urban Forestry DIRECTOR OF PARKS & RECREATION 1 1 CONTRACT COORDINATOR 0.5 0.5 ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II 1 1 Total 2.5 0.5 3 062-Park Maintenance CONTRACT COORDINATOR 0.5 0.5 Split with 061 PARK MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR 0.7 0.7 Split with Dept 440 PARK CREW LEADER 2 2 PARK MAINTENANCE WORKER III 2 2 PARK MAINTENANCE WORKER II 4 4 Total 9.2 0 9.2 064-Recreation Programs/Facilities RECREATION PROGRAM MANAGER 1 1 RECREATION PROGRAM COORDINATOR 1 1 FRONT DESK ATTENDANT 1 1 CUSTODIAN 0.5 0.5 Split with Dept 120 RECREATION ARTS MEDIA SPECIALIST - PT (1) RECREATION BUILDING & PROGRAM ASST PT (1) Total 3.5 0 3.5 Division Total 15.2 0.5 15.7 440-Parks Tax (Mitch Park) PARK MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR 0.3 0.3 Split with Dept 062 PARK CREW LEADER 2 2 PARK MAINTENANCE WORKER III 1 1 2 reclass FY22 PARK MAINTENANCE WORKER II 4 -1 3 reclass FY23 Total 7.3 0 7.3 171-Planning DIR OF PLANNING & ZONING 1 1 PLANNER 2 2 PLANNER - LONG RANGE 1 1 SUSTAINABILITY PLANNER 1 1 ASSOCIATE PLANNER - LONG RANGE 0 1 1 added FY22 ASSOCIATE PLANNER 1 1 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 1 1 Total 7 1 8 191-Citylinks CDBG/PUBLIC TRANSIT 0.4 0.1 0.5 split with 400 - chg distribution FY21 Total 0.4 0.1 0.5 041-Police Depts 041 & 045 c POLICE CHIEF 1 1 c/u POLICE DEPUTY CHIEF (was Major) 2 2 u POLICE MAJOR (was Captain) 4 4 u POLICE CAPTAN (was lieutenant) 4 4 u POLICE LIEUTENANT (was Sergeant) 14 14 u DETECTIVE & DETECTIVE SERGEANT 16 16 u POLICE OFFICER & SERGEANT 81 3 84 added FY22 TECHNOLOGY SERVICES SUPERVISOR 1 1 TECHNOLOGY SERVICES TECHNICIAN 2 2

DEPT

298


POSITION DEPT TECHNICAL INVESTIGATOR DIGITAL FORENSIC EXAMINER PUBLIC INFORMATION SPECIALIST DETENTION SUPERVISOR RECORDS SUPERVISOR ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT DETENTION OFFICER II BAILIFF/WARRANT OFFICER DETENTION OFFICER I PROPERTY CLERK ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II RECORDS SPECIALIST CUSTODIAN

POSITIONS INCR/ POSITIONS FY 20-21 DECR FY 21-22 COMMENTS 3 3 0 1 1 added FY22 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 11 11 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 2 Total 154 4 158

045-Animal Welfare ANIMAL WELFARE SUPERVISOR ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II ANIMAL WELFARE OFFICER II ANIMAL WELFARE OFFICER I ANIMAL SHELTER SPECIALIST KENNEL TECHNICIAN PT (2)

1 1 2 2 3 Total Division Total

9 163

660-Public Works Administration DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS PWA ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II Total 120-Senior Citizens Center MANAGER OF SENIOR CENTER SENIOR CENTER SERVICES COORDINATOR SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITIES COORDINATOR ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST II CUSTODIAN DRIVER/AIDE - PT (1) Total 340-Solid Waste-Residential ROUTE COLLECTION MANAGER ROUTE COLLECTION SUPERVISOR LEAD SOLID WASTE TRUCK DRIVER SOLID WASTE TRUCK DRIVER Total 341-Solid Waste-Commercial ROUTE COLLECTION MANAGER ROUTE COLLECTION SUPERVISOR LEAD SOLID WASTE TRUCK DRIVER SOLID WASTE TRUCK DRIVER Total 342-Solid Waste-Recycling ROUTE COLLECTION MANAGER ROUTE COLLECTION SUPERVISOR Total 343-Solid Waste-Roll-Off ROUTE COLLECTION MANAGER ROUTE COLLECTION SUPERVISOR Total 344-Solid Waste-Administration FLEET MAINT/SOLID WASTE SUPERINTENDENT SOLID WASTE CUSTOMER COORDINATOR Total Division Total 641-Utility Customer Service UTILITY CUST SVC MANAGER CONTRACT SERVICES SUPERVISOR CUSTOMER SERVICES SUPERVISOR FINANCIAL SERVICES SUPERVISOR CUSTOMER SERVICES COORDINATOR CUSTOMER SERVICE REP II CUSTOMER SERVICE REP I Division Total 110-Vehicle Maintenance FLEET MAINT/SOLID WASTE SUPERINTENDENT SHOP SUPERVISOR MECHANIC WELDER/FABRICATOR SERVICE TECHNICIAN MECHANIC/DISPATCHER

1 1 1 7 10

1 1 2 2 3 0 4

9 167

0

1 1 1 7 10

1 1 1 1 0.5

1 1 title change 1 title change 1 0.5 Split with Dept 064

4.5

0

0.6 0 1 14.5 16.1

-0.6 0.85

0.25 0 1 3.5 4.75

-0.25 0.85

0.6

0 reclass mid year FY21 0.85 added mid year FY 21 1 3.5 Split with 340 5.35

0.1 0 0.1

-0.1 0.2 0.1

0 reclass mid year FY21 0.2 added mid year FY 21 0.2

0.05 0 0.05

-0.05 0.1 0.05

0 reclass mid year FY21 0.1 added mid year FY 21 0.1

2 2.25

0.33 1 1.33 22.33

0 3

1 1 1 1 0 11 16

2 -3 1

31

0

0.33 1 7 1 1 1

299

4.5 Depts 340-344 0 reclass mid year FY21 0.85 added mid year FY 21 1 16.5 Split with 341 - added FY22 18.35

0.33 Split with 110 1 1.33 25.33 Depts 641-643 1 1 1 1 2 re-organization mid year FY21 8 re-organization mid year FY21 17 re-organization mid year FY21 31 0.33 Split with Dept 153 & 344 1 7 1 1 1


POSITION DEPT ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNICIAN

POSITIONS INCR/ POSITIONS FY 20-21 DECR FY 21-22 COMMENTS 0.85 0.85 Split with Dept 153 Total 12.18 0 12.18

334 - Water Resources Division 352-Wastewater Treatment Plant DIRECTOR OF WATER RESOURCES SUPERINTENDENT OF MAINTENANCE SUPERINTENDENT OF OPERATIONS MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR LABORATORY/QUALITY ASSURANCE MANAGER INSTR CONTROLS ELECTRIC SUPERVISOR INSTR CONTROLS ELECTRIC TECHNICIAN ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMIST WATER RESOURCES TECHNOLOGIST ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT LABORATORY TECHNICIAN PLANT MECHANIC II PLANT MECHANIC WW WW PLANT SUPERVISOR PLANT OPERATOR/WW GENERAL MAINTENANCE WORKER Dept Total 332-Water Treatment Plant DIRECTOR OF WATER RESOURCES SUPERINTENDENT OF MAINTENANCE SUPERINTENDENT OF OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT INSTR CONTROLS ELECTRIC SUPERVISOR INSTR CONTROLS ELECTRIC TECHNICIAN MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR PLANT MECHANIC II WATER RESOURCES TECHNOLOGIST ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMIST WATER CONSERVATION COORDINATOR LABORATORY/QUALITY ASSURANCE MANAGER LABORATORY TECHNICIAN PLANT MECHANIC UTILITY PROGRAM SPECIALIST W PLANT SUPERVISOR PLANT OPERATOR GENERAL MAINTENANCE WORKER Dept Total 333-Water Wells DIRECTOR OF WATER RESOURCES SUPERINTENDENT OF MAINTENANCE SUPERINTENDENT OF OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR INSTR CONTROLS ELECTRIC SUPERVISOR INSTR CONTROLS ELECTRIC TECHNICIAN LABORATORY TECHNICIAN PLANT MECHANIC II PLANT MECHANIC WELL SUPERVISOR WATER WELL OPERATOR GENERAL MAINTENANCE WORKER Dept Total Division Total 460-YourGovShop Fund PURCHASING MANAGER Total Grand Total PART TIME EMPLOYEES (40) SEASONAL EMPLOYEES (85)

0.35 0.35 0.35 0.35 0.5 0.35 1.05 1.5 0.5 0.35 0.5 0.35 1.05 1 6 0.25 14.8 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.45 1.35 0.45 0.45 0.5 0.5 0 0.5 2.3 1.35 1 1 12 0.5 24.15 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.6 0.2 0.2 0.6 1 4 0.25 8.05 47 0.3 0.3 784

300

0.75

0.75

0.25 1 -0.8

0.45

-0.2

-0.2 1

0 24

0.35 0.35 0.35 0.35 0.5 0.35 1.05 2.25 0.5 0.35 0.5 0.35 1.05 1 6 0.25 15.55

split with 332 & 333 (reclass FY19) split with 332 & 333 split with 332 & 333 split with 332 & 333 split with 332 split with 332 & 333

0.45 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.45 1.35 0.45 0.45 0.5 0.75 1 0.5 1.5 1.35 1 1 12 0.5 24.6

split with 352 & 333 (reclass FY19) split with 352 & 333 split with 352 & 333 split with 352 & 333 split with 352 & 333

0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.6 0 0.2 0.6 1 4 0.25 7.85 48

split with 332 & 352 split with 332 & 352 split with 332 & 352 split with 332 & 352 split with 332 & 352

split with 332 - reclass FY 22 split with 332 & 333 split with 332 split with 332 & 333 split with 332 & 333

split with 333 & 332

split with 352 & 333 split with 352 & 333 split with 352 - reclass FY 22 added mid year FY 21 split with 352 split with 352 - reclass FY 22 split with 352 & 333

split with 333 & 352

reclass FY 22 split with 332 & 352 split with 332 & 352

split with 332 & 352

0.3 Split with Dept 582 0.3 808


TAB PAGE INSERT

APPENDIX A


April 19, 2021 Mr. Larry Stevens City Manager, City of Edmond 100 East First; P.O. Box 2970 Edmond, OK 73083-2970 Dear Mr. Stevens: City of Edmond’s EMSA subsidy for the upcoming fiscal year ending June 30, 2022 will be $660,020. This is a 0% increase over the 2021 subsidy. EMSA has been able to hold subsidy levels for 2022 flat due to careful consideration of expenses with a focus on cost control for 2022. EMSA’s budget will be presented for approval at the May 26th board meeting. If you have any questions about EMSA financial matters, please do not hesitate to call me at 918-596-3153 or email me at congerl@emsa.net. Sincerely,

Lora Conger, CFO

301

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M E M O TO: FROM: DATE

Honorable Mayor & City Council Cathi Linch, Chairman Community Agency Review Commission March 9, 2021

CC:

Community Agency Review Commission Members Larry Stevens Steve Murdock Kathy Panas Steve Commons

SUBJECT:

Recommended Funding for Community Agencies for FY 2021/22

The Community Agency Review Commission has considered all requests for funding for the 20212022 budget year. We recommend approval of funding for the agencies as set forth below. Total SOCIAL AGENCY Funding Recommendation: AGENCY REQUESTED U R Special Ministries, Inc. $ 25,000 Edmond Family Counseling $ 172,500 HOPE Center $ 170,000 Edmond Mobile Meals $ 80,000 Parents Helping Parents $ 15,500 Ministries of Jesus $ 70,000 Project 66 Food Pantry $ 50,000 Fostering Sweet Dreams Foundation $ 20,000 Oklahoma Baptist Homes for Children $ 7,500 Total:

$ 610,500

RECOMMENDATION $ 25,000 $ 172,500 $ 170,000 $ 80,000 $ 15,500 $ 70,000 $ 40,000 $ 15,000 $ 7,500 $ 595,500

Total COMMUNITY ENRICHMENT Funding Recommendation: AGENCY REQUESTED RECOMMENDATION Edmond Historic Preservation Trust $ 25,000 $ 25,000 Edmond Historical Society Museum $ 266,000 $ 266,000 Fine Arts Institute $ 60,000 $ 60,000 Edmond Round-Up Club $ 7,500 $ 7,500 Character Council of Edmond $ 6,000 $ 6,000 UCO Sport Performance (Endeavor Games) $ 20,000 $ 20,000 Liberty Fest $ 80,000 $ 40,000 YMCA Community Support $ 15,000 $ 15,000 Turning Point Ministries $ 50,000 $ 50,000 Lilyfield, Inc. $ 15,000 $ 15,000 Edmond Soccer Club $ 25,000 $ 25,000 Total: $ 569,500 $ 529,500 TOTAL RECOMMENDATION for 2021/2022: $ 1, 125,00

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This year’s recommendations for funding are based on a percentage cap, 3.03% allocation for Social and Community Enrichment Agencies. The board believes the percentage guidelines aid in keeping funding recommendations within the City’s budgetary concerns. The commission asks your approval of funding allocations to the above mentioned Social and Community Enrichment Agencies: UR Special, Edmond Family Counseling, Parents Helping Parents, Ministries of Jesus, Edmond Historic Preservation Trust, Fine Arts Institute of Edmond, Edmond Round-Up Club, UCO Sport Performance, YMCA Community Support Lilyfield Inc. These organizations requested the same level of funding as last year, which the commission recommends be granted. LibertyFest had requested $80,000 orginally, the same as amount as FY 20-21. The Commission recommends funding for LibertyFest to be $40,000 (100% decrease), since there was a deficit in funding for organizations from what what was requested combined. Additionally, they have funds leftover from last year’s cancelled 2020 event. The following Social and Community Agencies asked for an increase in funds above last year’s received allocations: The Hope Center, Edmond Mobile Meals, Project 66 Food Pantry, Fostering Sweet Dreams Foundation, Edmond Historical Society Museum, Character Council of Edmond Turning Point Ministries, and Edmond Soccer Club. Please note: Character Council of Edmond requested for $9,500 for FY 20-21, and they have received $4,750.02 to date. They are requesting $6,000 for FY 21-22, which is a decrease in request from from FY 20-21, but an increase from what was received FY 20-21. Oklahoma Baptist Homes for Children requested an amount of $5,000 for FY 20-21. The Community Agency Review Commission determined to provide them with an increase from their requested amount, to a total of $10,000, for FY 20-21. For this year, FY 21-22, they requested for $7,500, which is an increase in request from their FY 20-21 amount, but a decrease in what was recommended and provided to them ($10,000) from the Committee. There were no new applicants this year. The following Social and Community Agencies requested an increase in funding from last year: 1. Hope Center requested an increase of 6% in funding from the city (from $160,000 to $170,000). Hope center requests an increase due to an increase in need. Additionally, since most of their volunteers fall into the vulnerable age group, they had to stay home and Hope Center had to rely on paid employees more. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant increases in job losses among community members, which has increased the need for help with utility bills. The commission recommends that Hope Center be provided their requested amount, including the 6% increase, in full. 2. Edmond Mobile Meals requested an increase of 7% in funding from the city (from $75,000 to $80,000). Edmond Mobile Meals requests an increase due to an increase in need and services because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Edmond Mobile Meals shifted their

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delivery model to drive-thru, since both their clients and volunteers fall into the vulnerable group. They developed a “friendly-caller” program and “pen pal” program to help isolated groups feel more connected, in a safe manner. Most costly, they opened their services to clients that would not normally be using their services—during the pandemic they served those sheltering in place, not just their usual homebound groups. They also added a partnership with local restaurants to provide 2 hot meals a week and are now serving a total of 7 meals a week. Finally, they are pursuing an in-home vaccination program. The commission recommends that Edmond Mobile Meals be provided their requested amount, including the 7% increase, in full. 3. Project 66 Food Pantry requested an increase of 43% (from $35,000 to $50,000). Project 66 requests an increase due to the increased need because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the pandemic, they have been serving almost double now than previous years. The funds would be primarily used for programming and educational classes, and the creation of an Education Director position. The Commission recommends that Project 66 Food Pantry receive $40,000, an increase of 14%, instead of the requested 43% increase of $50,000. The Commission prefers to not fund job positions but does understand the need and amount of needed food has increased for Project 66 Food Pantry. 4. Fostering Sweet Dreams Foundation requested an increase of 100% (from $10,000 to $20,000). This organization has seen an increase in need, in providing additional support to keep kids out of foster care. They have seen a decline in volunteers since their volunteers are typically mothers who had to become teachers for their own children during the COVID-19 pandemic. Fostering Sweet Dreams Foundation is also flipping a house and then selling the house to raise for a down payment to purchase a building for their organization in Edmond. The requested increase in funding would be used to hire a parttime grant writer, whose role will be to seek out grants for tangible items they provide and to also pay off a new building. The commission recommends that Fostering Sweet Dreams Foundation receive $15,000 an increase of 50% instead of the requested 100% increase of $20,000. The Commission prefers to not fund job positions but understands their has been an increase in need and wishes to provide additional funding for their new building. 5. Oklahoma Baptist Homes for Children requested $7,500 for FY 21-22, an 50% increase in request from the $5,000 they requested in FY 20-21. Their request, however, is a decrease from what was recommended and provided during FY 20-21 by the Commission, which was $10,000. The request in increase is to reward boys for good behaviors and use the funds as “activity/ fun” money. The funds typically go back into Edmond because they choose to spend it within city limits. The commission recommends that Oklahoma Baptist Homes for Children be provided their requested amount, including the 33% increase, in full. 6. Edmond Historical Society Museum requested an increase of 4% (from $256,000 to $266,000). The increase in funding will go towards technological updates for the museum. Since many museums have had to adapt to virtual experiences, they stated they

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need to make several updates to keep up with an increasingly virtual world. Additionally, they have seen a significant increase in research requests, which also requires technology. The Commission recommends Edmond Historical Society Museum be provided their requested amount, including the 4% increase, in full. 7. Character Council of Edmond requested $6,000 for FY 21-22, a 26% increase from what was received FY 20-21, which was $4,750.02. For FY 20-21 they had requested $9,500, so the $7,500, although a 26% increase from what was received FY 20-21, is a 37 % decrease from what was requested in previous years ($9,500). The Commission recommends Character Council of Edmond be provided their requested amount, including the 26% increase, in full. 8. Turning Point Ministries requested an increase of 19% (from $42,000 to $50,000). This organization has seen an increase in clients—homes have doubled. They are running out of plots and are having to look to find a new neighborhood for future homes. Due to COVID-19, Turkey Trot was cancelled, and this resulted in a significant decline in donations since this is one of their biggest events for donations. Also due to the pandemic, building supplies have increased in price by about 20-30%. The funds would be used to cover these increasing costs to build and cover their loss of donation revenue, so they do not have to pass it down to future homeowners. The Commission recommends Turning Point Ministries be provided their requested amount, including the 19% increase, in full. 9. Edmond Soccer Club is requesting a 47% increase (from $17,000 to $25,000). The reason for their request for increased funding is to install ADA compliant sidewalks. We confirmed that the area they will be putting in the ADA sidewalks was not already included in a current city project to update sidewalks around the complex. The Commission recommends Edmond Soccer Club be provided their requested, including the 47% increase amount, in full.

The total Community Agency Review Budget for FY 2021-2022, is $1,141,642. The Commission’s recommendation for FY 2021-2022 is $1,125,000, representing an decrease of $123,989 or -10% over FY 2020-2021 funding amount of $1,248,989. On behalf of the Community Agency Review Commission, we ask for the City Council’s consideration and approval of these funding recommendations.

______________________________________

___________________________

Cathi Linch, Chairman Community Agency Review Commission

Date

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EEDA Budget Comparison (2020-2021) (2021-2022) EXPENSES EMPLOYMENT EXPENSES Salaries Contract Labor Benefits Payroll Taxes OFFICE/OVERHEAD EXPENSES Rent Utilities Building Insurance Ground Maintenance Janitorial Shared Employee Expenses Maintenance/Repairs/Upgrades Office Supplies/Furnishings Off-Site Storage/Carbonite Storage Postage Printing EEDA Insurance (2) Accounting/Audit Dues/Memberships/Subscriptions IT Equipment (Computers & iPads) IT Software /Subscriptions Miscellaneous Depreciation

2020-2021 334,988 2,500 84,000 26,000

TOTAL

22,416 5,500 800 2,500 1,500 3,000 7,500 3,100 1,700 250 800 700 20,000 8,000 3,050 2,500 2,000 1,656

TOTAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS Data Services (Cox: Cable-Internet-Phones -iPad wifi) Cell Phone (Monthly charges - JY, DY, SD, MW) Web Site TOTAL

7,200 4,000 10,000

CLIENT ASST/RECRUITMENT Airfare/Transportation Expenses Hotel Food-Client Assist/Recruitment Conference Registration Local Business, Civic Support & Assistance OKC Partnership Professional Development Recruitment - GEDT -OEDC Real Estate Assistance & Recruitment Misc.Incentive Requests (Was Sister Cities) TOTAL COMMUNICATION STRATEGY Marketing Abstracts Demographics/Fast Fact Cards(Buxton, ESRI) Community Marketing Streateries Assistance Program TOTAL EVENTS Economic Preview Marketing Forecast TOTAL

5,000 6,000 6,500 5,000 22,250 5,000 6,000 7,500 6,500 1,500

2021-2022

447,488

86,972

21,200

340,000 2,500 87,000 27,000 22,416 5,500 800 4,000 1,500 3,000 7,000 3,000 1,200 250 800 700 21,000 7,100 2,500 2,500 1,000 3,900 7,000 4,000 1,000

88,166

12,000

6,000 6,000 6,500 5,000 12,250

71,250

8,500 4,500 19,500

3,000 4,797 11,000 25,000

79,547

10,000 30,000 12,000 32,500

9,000 4,200

456,500

13,200

52,000 9,154 4,200

13,354

TOTAL EXPENSES

672,610

701,567

NON CITY REVENUES

-32,775

-29,740

2021-22 OPERATING BUDGET REQUEST

639,835

671,827

Misc. Incentive Requests Streateries Assistance Program REIMBURSEMENT OF MICROGRANT FUNDS

25,000 30,000 93,750

TOTAL BUDGET REQUEST

820,577

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FISCAL AND BUDGETARY POLICIES


FINANCIAL/BUDGET POLICIES Financial Reporting Entity The City’s accounting and financial reporting policies conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP). The City’s financial reporting entity comprises the following: Primary Government:

City of Edmond

Blended Component Unit:

Edmond Public Works Authority (EPWA)

Discretely Presented Component Units: Edmond Economic Development Authority Edmond Historic Preservation Trust Blended component units are separate legal entities that meet the GASB 14, 39 and 61 component unit criteria and whose governing body is the same or substantially the same as the City Council or the component unit provides services entirely to the City. The EPWA component unit funds are blended into the City’ by appropriate fund type to comprise part of the primary government presentation. The EPWA are reported as enterprise funds within the primary government presentation. The discretely presented component units are separate legal entities. Fund Financial Statements: Fund statements are organized into funds, each of which is considered to be separate accounting entities. Each fund is accounted for by providing a separate set of self-balancing accounts which constitute its assets, deferred outflows, liabilities, deferred inflows, fund equity, revenues, and expenditures/expenses. Separate financial statements are presented for the three major fund categories: governmental, proprietary and fiduciary. A fund is considered major if it is the primary fund of the City or meets the following criteria: a. Total assets and deferred outflows, liabilities, and deferred inflows, revenues or expenditures/expenses of that individual governmental or enterprise fund are at least 10 percent of the corresponding total for all funds of that category or type, and b. Total assets and deferred outflows, liabilities and deferred inflows, revenues or expenditures/expenses of the individual governmental fund or enterprise fund are at least 5 percent of the corresponding total for all governmental and enterprise funds combined. c. A fund not meeting the criteria of (a) and (b), however management has elected to report the fund as a major fund due to its significance to users of the financial statements. All remaining governmental and enterprise funds not meeting the above criteria are aggregated and reported as nonmajor funds. Measurement Focus and Basis of Accounting Measurement focus is a term used to describe how transactions are recorded withing the financial statements. Basis of accounting refers to when transactions are recorded regardless of the measurement focus applied. All governmental funds utilize a “current financial resources” measurement focus. Only current financial assets, liabilities, deferred outflows and inflows are generally included. These funds use ‘fund balance’ as their measure of available spendable financial resources at the end of the period. The proprietary fund utilizes an “economic resources” measurement focus. The accounting objective of this measurement focus are the determination of operating income, changes in net position, financial position, and cash flows. Proprietary fund equity is classified as net position.

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Basis of Accounting In the government-wide Statement of Net Position and Statement of Activities, and the proprietary fund financial statements the accrual basis of accounting is applied. This means revenues are recognized when earned and expenses are recorded when the liability is incurred or economic asset used. Revenues, expenses, gains, losses, assets and liabilities resulting from exchange and exchange-like transactions are recognized when the exchange takes place. In the governmental fund financial statements, the modified accrual basis of accounting is applied. Under this basis, revenues are recognized when “measurable and available”. Measurable means knowing or being able to reasonable estimate the amount. Available means collectible within the current period or soon enough thereafter to pay current liabilities. The City has defined “available” as collected within 60 days after year end. Budgetary Basis of Accounting The basis of accounting used for budget monitoring depends on the type of fund budgeted. Governmental funds (such as the General Fund) shall account for revenues on the budgetary basis when received in cash and charges to appropriations will be recorded when the encumbrance or commitment is created. Proprietary funds (such as the PWA and REC) shall account for revenue when billed and charges to expenditure budgets will be recorded when the encumbrance or commitment is created. Fiduciary funds are not budgeted because, by their nature, they do not represent City spendable resources. In accordance with state law, encumbered appropriations may remain open to pay proper claims against said appropriations until September 30 of the following fiscal year. All unencumbered appropriations remaining at year end are considered lapsed and no new encumbrances or obligations may be created subsequent to year end against these lapsed appropriations. Budget Balancing Policy It is the City’s policy to appropriate no more than the current year estimated revenues, including interfund transfers, for each fund, in the original budget for a given fiscal year. Compliance or departure from this policy shall be duly noted in the Budget Message submitted by the City Manager. Budgeting Basis and Control The City Manager presents the budget to City Council for formal adoption, prior to the beginning of the new fiscal year (see budget calendar for more details). Once adopted, the budget numbers are integrated into to our financial software. This control does not allow an encumbrance to incur if funds are not available. The department head personnel are responsible for reviewing through out the year and manage their department accordingly. The City Council’s goal is to adopt a balanced budget, in which current revenues are equal to expenditures. If a need arises to spend more money than available throughout the year, the department has the authority to present to City Council a budget amendment to amend the adopted budget and increase their budget authority. Once approved by City Council, the budget amendment is then entered into the financial software for use. The City Manager has authority to approve requests to move appropriated amounts from one object code to another object t within the same category level without presenting to the City Council. The budgetary category levels are: • • •

Personal Services Materials and Supplies Other Services & Charges

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• •

Capital Outlay Transfers Out

Budgetary Legal Requirements The budget process for all City funds (excluding those of the public trust authorities) is governed by 11 O.S. Sections 17-101 through 17-216. As such, the City will comply with all legal deadlines, public hearing and budget content requirements of the law. The budgets for the public trust authorities are governed by 60 O.S. Section 176.

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GLOSSARY AND ACRONYMS


CITY OF EDMOND FINANCIAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT GLOSSARY OF TERMS Accounting System – The total structure of records and procedures which discover, record, classify and report information on the financial position and operations of a governmental unit or any of its fund, balanced account groups, and organizational components. Accrual Basis – The basis of accounting under which revenues are recorded when earned and expenditures are recorded as soon as they result in liabilities for benefits received, regardless of the timing of related cash flows. Accrued Expenses – Expenses incurred but not due until a later date. Activity – Specific and distinguishable service performed by one or more organizational components of a government to accomplish a function for which the government is responsible. An example is Police is an activity within the public safety function. Agency Fund – A fiduciary fund consisting of resources received and held by the City as an agent for others. Allocate – To divide a lump-sum appropriation into parts, which are designated for expenditure by specific organizational units and/or for specific purposes, activities, or objects. Amortization – The gradual reduction, redemption, or liquidation of the balance of an account according to a specified schedule of times and amounts. Appropriation – A legal authorization granted by a governing body to make expenditures and to incur obligations for specific purposes. Arbitrage – With respect to the issuance of municipal bonds, arbitrage usually refers to the difference between the interest paid on the bonds issued and the interest earned by investing the bond proceeds in other securities. Arbitrage profits are permitted on bond proceeds for various temporary periods after issuance of municipal bonds. IRS regulations govern arbitrage of municipal bond proceeds. Audit – The examination of documents, records, reports, systems of internal control, accounting and financial procedures, and other evidence for one or more of the following purposes: a. To ascertain whether the statements prepared from the accounts present fairly the financial position and the results of financial operations of the constituent funds and account groups of the governmental unit in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year (financial audit). b. To determine the compliance with applicable laws and regulations of a governmental unit’s financial transactions (regulatory audit). c. To ensure proper internal controls are in place for the safeguarding of assets and utilizing a risk based approach to assess the appropriate areas (internal audit). d. To review the efficiency and economy with which operations were carried out and review effectiveness in achieving program results (performance audit).

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Audit Committee – Group of individuals assigned specific responsibility for addressing issues related to the independent audit of the financial statements on behalf of the entity under audit. Authority – A governmental unit or public agency created to perform a single function or a restricted group of related activities. Basis Point – Yields on municipal securities are usually quoted in increments of basis points. One basis point is equal to 1/100 of 1 percent. Bond – A written promise to pay a sum of money on a specific date at a specified interest rate. The most common types of bonds are general obligation and revenue bonds. These are most frequently used for construction of large capital projects, such as buildings, streets and utility infrastructure. Budget – A plan of financial operation embodying an estimate of proposed expenditures for a given period and the proposed means of financing them. Budget Adjustments – A legal procedure utilized by the City staff and City Council to revise a budget appropriation. Budget Document – The instrument used by the budget-making authority to present a comprehensive financial program to the appropriating body. At the City, we refer to ours as the City of Edmond’s Budget and Financial Plan. Budget Message – The opening section of the budget document, which provides the City Council and the public with a general summary of the most important aspects of the budget, changes from the current and previous fiscal years, and the views and recommendations of the City Manager. Budgetary Control – The control or management of a governmental unit or enterprise in accordance with an approved budget for the purpose of keeping expenditures within the limitations of available appropriations and available revenues. Business-Type Activities – One of two classes of activities reported in the governmentwide financial statements. Business-type activities are financed in whole or in part by fees charged to external parties for goods or services. These activities are usually reported in enterprise funds. Capital Budget – A plan of proposed capital outlays and the means of financing them. It is usually a part of the current budget. Capital Project Funds – Accounts for resources restricted for the acquisition or construction of specific capital projects or items. Cash Basis – A basis of accounting under which transactions are recognized only when cash changes hands. Cash Equivalent – In the context of cash flows reporting, short-term, highly liquid investments that are both (a) readily convertible to known amounts of cash and (b) so near their maturity that they present insignificant risk of changes in value because of changes in interest rates. Generally, only investments with original maturities of three months or less meet this definition. Cash Management – The management of cash necessary to pay for government services, while investing temporary cash excesses in order to earn interest revenue. Cash management refers to the activities of forecasting the inflows and outflows of cash, mobilizing cash to improve its availability for investment, establishing and maintaining banking relationships, and investing funds in order to achieve the highest interest and return available for temporary cash balances.

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Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting Program – Program sponsored by the Government Finance Officers Association to encourage and assist state and local governments to prepare high-quality comprehensive annual financial reports. The program has been in continuous operations since 1946. This program originally was known as the Certificate of Conformance Program. Component unit – Legally separate organization for which the elected officials of the primary government are financially accountable. In addition, component units can be other organizations for which the nature and significance of their relationship with a primary government are such that exclusion would cause the reporting entity’s financial statements to be misleading or incomplete. Comprehensive Annual Financial Report – Financial report that contains, at a minimum, three sections: 1) introductory, 2) financial, and 3) statistical, and whose financial section provides information on each individual fund and component unit. Cost – (1) The amount of money or other consideration exchanged for property or services. (2) Expense. Cost Accounting – That method of accounting, which provides for assembling and recording of all the elements of cost incurred to accomplish a purpose, to carry on an activity or operation, or to complete a unit of work or a specific job. Cost Allocation – The process to distribute or apportion costs to entities receiving a benefit of those costs, thus ensuring the full cost of delivery is measured. Those costs (indirect costs) along with an entity’s direct costs represent the full cost of the entity. Current Assets – Those assets that are available or can be made readily available to meet the cost of operations or to pay current liabilities. Current Financial Resources Measurement Focus – Measurement focus where the aim of a set of financial statements is to report the near-term (current) inflows, outflows, and balances of expendable financial resources. The current financial resources measurement focus is unique to accounting and financial reporting for state and local governments and is used solely for reporting the financial position and results of operations of governmental funds. Current Liabilities – Liabilities which are payable within a relatively short period of time, usually no longer than a year. Current Year Actual Estimate – A column in the Budget & Financial Plan document; the amount of revenues and expenditures projected to be collected or expended during the fiscal year. Current Year Budget – A column in the Budget & Financial Plan document; the sum of the original budget, plus amendments and the prior year encumbrance roll amounts. Cycle Billing – A practice followed by utilities, retail stores and other organizations with a large number of credit customers of billing part of the customers each working day during a month, instead of billing all customers as of a certain day during the month. Debt Service Fund – Receives all ad valorem taxes (property taxes) paid to the City as collected from each property owner by the County. Such taxes and any interest

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earned from the deposit of these taxes are used exclusively for the payment of principal and interest of the City’s general obligation bonds and judgments. Debt Services – The City’s obligation to pay the principal and interest of all bonds and other debt instruments according to a pre-determined payment schedule. Deferred Revenue – Resource inflows that do not yet meet the criteria for revenue recognition. Unearned amounts are always reported as deferred revenue. In governmental funds, earned amounts also are reported as deferred revenue until they are available to liquidate liabilities of the current period. Deficit – (1) The excess of the liabilities of a fund over its assets. (2) The excess of expenditures over revenues during an accounting period; or, in the case of proprietary funds, the excess of expense over income during an accounting period. Defined Benefit Pension Plan – Retirement plan having terms that specify the amount of pension benefits to be provided at a future date or after a certain period of time; the amount specified usually is a function of one or more factors such as age, years of service, and compensation. An example is the City’s pension plan. Defined Contribution Pension Plan – Retirement plan having terms that (a) provide an individual account for each plan member and (b) specify how contributions to an active plan member’s account are to be determined, rather than the income or other benefits the member or his or her beneficiaries are to receive at or after separation from employment. An example is the City’s 457 plan. Department – A department is a major administrative segment which indicates overall management responsibility for an operation or a group of related operations within functional area (e.g., Police Department, Fire Department, Parks and Recreation Department). Depreciation – The process of estimating and recording the lost usefulness, expired useful life or diminution of service from a fixed asset that cannot or will not be restored by repair and will be replaced. The cost of the fixed asset’s lost usefulness is the depreciation or the cost to reserve in order to replace the item at the end of its useful life. Designated Unreserved Fund Balance – Management’s intended use of available expendable financial resources in governmental funds reflecting actual plans approved by the government’s senior management. Direct Expenses – Those expenses which can be charged directly as a part of the cost of a product or service, or of a department or operating unit, as distinguished from overhead and other indirect costs which must be prorated among several products or services, departments, or operating units. Disbursements – Payments in cash/checks/electronic format. Division – The smallest organizational unit budgeted is the division. The division indicates responsibility for one functional area, and in many cases these functional areas are put together to demonstrate a broader responsibility. When this is done, the divisions are combined to make a department. For example, the Street Department is comprised of Street Maintenance, Street & Alley, Signs and Signal divisions. Economic Resources Measurement Focus – Measurement focus where the aim of a set of financial statements is to report all inflows, outflows, and balances affecting or reflecting an entity’s net assets. The economic resources measurement focus

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is used for proprietary and trust funds, as well as for government-wide financial reporting. It also is used by business enterprises and nonprofit organizations in the private sector. Encumbrances – Commitments related to unperformed contracts for goods or services. Enterprise Funds – Proprietary funds used to account for business-like activities provided to the general public. Entry – The record or act of recording of a financial transaction in its appropriate account. Expenditure – This term refers to the outflow of funds paid or to be paid for an asset obtained or goods and services obtained. This term applies to all funds. Note: An encumbrance is not an expenditure. An encumbrance reserves funds to be expended. Expenses – Charges incurred (whether paid immediately or unpaid) for operation, maintenance, interest and other charges. Fiduciary – An individual or institution that has a special relationship of trust with another person or group of people and is legally responsible for their assets. Fiduciary Funds – Used to report net assets and changes therein of assets held by the City in a trustee or agency capacity. These net assets are not available for operations of the City. Financial Structure – The Financial structure of the budget is organized by funds. The two types of funds utilized in this budget are Governmental and Proprietary. The Governmental and Proprietary Funds operates separately and independently from one another, therefore, they are budgeted separately and include separate financial statements. Fiscal Year – The time period designated by the City signifying the beginning and ending period for recording financial transactions. The City of Edmond has specified July 1 through June 30 as its fiscal year. Fixed Assets – Assets of a long-term character that is intended to continue to be held or used, such as land, buildings, improvements other than buildings, machinery and equipment. The City has further defined capital outlay as any item having a cost of $2,500 or more and a useful life of at least two years. There is no $2,500 floor for costs relating to the electric, water, and wastewater utilities that are adding to their distribution systems. Franchise Tax – This is a charge paid for the use of City streets and public right of way and is in lieu of all other municipal charges, fees, street rentals, pipe taxes, inspections and easement taxes. Function – A group of related activities aimed at accomplishing a major service or regulatory responsibility for which a governmental unit is responsible. For example, public safety is a function. Fund – Generally defined as a fiscal and accounting entity which has its own selfbalancing set of accounts recording cash and other financial resources, as well as any liabilities or residual equities or balances. Normally, funds are segregated for the purpose of carrying on specific activities or attaining certain objectives in accordance with special regulations, restrictions, or limitations. However, when appropriate, funds are made up of departments.

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Fund Balance – Fund balance is the excess of assets over liabilities and is therefore also known as surplus funds and with regard to proprietary funds, also known as retained earnings. Fund Type – One of eleven classifications into which all individual funds can be categorized. Governmental fund types include the general fund, special revenue funds, debt service funds, capital projects funds, and permanent funds. Proprietary fund types include enterprise funds and internal service funds. Fiduciary fund types include pension (and other employee benefit) trust funds, investment trust funds, private-purpose trust funds, and agency funds. General Fund – Primary operating fund of the City. Used to account for all activities except those legally or administratively required to be accounted for in other funds. It accounts for the costs of operating many of the City’s general basic services, such as street maintenance, parks and recreation and general government. Financing is primarily provided by City sales tax, franchise taxes and EPWA transfers, fines, licenses and permits, charges for services and interest earnings. The General Fund is reported as a major governmental fund for audit purposes. General Ledger – A book, file or other device which contains the accounts needed to reflect, in summary and in detail, the financial position and the results of financial operations of the governmental unit. General Obligation Bonds – Bonds that finance a variety of public projects, such as streets, buildings, and improvements. The repayment of these bonds is usually made from property tax, and these bonds are backed by the full faith and credit of the issuing government. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) – Uniform minimum standards of and guidelines to financial accounting and reporting. They govern the form and content of the basic financial statements of an entity and encompass the conventions, rules, and procedures necessary to define accepted accounting practice at a particular time. They include not only board guidelines of general application, but also detailed practices and procedures. They provide a standard by which to measure financial presentations. Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) – Ultimate authoritative accounting and financial reporting standard-setting body for state and local governments. Governmental Activities – Activities generally financed through taxes, intergovernmental revenues, and other nonexchange revenues. These activities are usually reported in governmental funds and internal service funds. Governmental Funds – Funds that account for the General Fund, Special Revenue Funds, Debt Service Fund and Capital Projects Funds. Government-wide Financial Statements – Financial statements that incorporate all of a government’s governmental and business-type activities, as well as its nonfiduciary component units. There are two basic government-wide financial statements: the statement of net assets and the statement of activities. Grants – Contributions or gifts of cash or other assets from another government to be used or expended for a specified purpose, activity, or facility. Hotel/Motel Tax – A tax levied upon the cost of occupancy of any room or space furnished by any hotel where such costs of occupancy is at the rate of three dollars ($3.00) or more per day. The law authorizes a room tax of 4% of hotel rate.

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Impact Fee – Fee charged to developers to cover, in whole or in part, the anticipated cost of improvements that will be necessary as a result of the development (e.g., parks, sidewalks). Income – A term used in accounting for governmental enterprises to represent the excess of revenues earned over the expenses incurred in carrying on the enterprise’s operations. Indirect Costs – (1) Those elements of cost necessary in the production of an article or the performance of a service which are of such a nature that the amount applicable to the product or service cannot be determined accurately or readily. (2) Those costs allocated from servicing departments or divisions. Examples of indirect costs are accounting, purchasing, human resources and information technology. Interfund Services – Sales or purchases of goods and services between funds and are reported as revenues and expenditures/expenses. Interfund Transfers – Flow of assets from one fund to another where repayment is not expected and are reported as Transfers In and Transfers Out. Internal Control – A plan of organization under which employees’ duties are so arranged and records and procedures so designed as to make it possible to exercise effective accounting control over assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenditures. Under such a system, the work of employees is subdivided so that no single employee performs a complete cycle of operations. Internal Service Funds – Proprietary funds used to account for business-like activities provided and charged to other funds or entities within the City. Investments – Securities and real estate held for the production of revenues in the form of interest, dividends, rentals, or lease payments. The term does not include fixed assets used in governmental operations. Investments are reported on fair value selected bases. Investments that do not have an established market are reported at estimated fair value as estimated by a broker/dealer. Levy – To impose taxes, special assessments, or service charges for the support of governmental activities. The total amount of taxes, special assessments, or service charges imposed by a government. Line Item Budget – A detailed expense or expenditure budget, generally classified by object within each organizational unit, and often, classified within each object as to authorized number of employees at each salary level within each job classifications, etc. Liquor Tax – A tax imposed on the gross receipts of a Licensee for the sale, preparation, or service of mixed beverages or from the sale of ice or non-alcoholic beverages and consumed on the premises of the permittee. Long-Term Debt – Debt with a maturity of more than one year after the date of issuance. Modified Accrual Basis – The accrual basis of accounting adapted to the governmental fund type spending measurement focus. Under it, revenues are recognized when they become both “measurable” and “available” to finance expenditures of the current period.” Expenditures are recognized when the related fund liability is incurred except for (1) inventories or materials and supplies which may be considered expenditures when consumed rather than when purchased; (2) prepaid insurance and similar items which need not be reported; (3) accumulated unpaid vacation, sick pay, and other employee benefit amounts which need not be

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recognized in the current period, but for which larger-than-normal accumulations must be disclosed in the notes to the financial statements; (4) interest on special assessment indebtedness which may be recorded when due rather than accrued, if approximately offset by interest earnings on special assessment levies; and (5) principal and interest on long-term debt which are generally recognized when due. Net Position– A term used in accounting for governmental enterprises to designate the excess of total revenues over total expenses for an accounting period. Net Working Capital – Current assets minus current liabilities. In budgeting, used to represent available savings of a fund for future budget needs. Nonoperating Expenses – Expenses incurred for nonoperating properties or in the performance of activities not directly related to supplying the basic services by a governmental enterprise. An example is interest paid on outstanding revenue bonds. Nonoperating Income – Income of governmental enterprises which is not derived from the basic operations of such enterprises. An example is interest on investments. Object or Object Code – Expenditure classification according to the types of items purchased or services obtained, for example, personal services, materials & supplies, and equipment. Operating Budget – A budget which applies to all outlays other than capital outlays. Operating Expenses – Proprietary fund expenses that are directly related to the fund’s primary service activities. Operating Revenues – Proprietary fund revenues, which are directly related to the fund’s primary service activities. They consist primarily of user charges for services. Operating Transfers – All interfund transfers other than residual equity transfers. Ordinance – A formal legislative enactment by the governing board of a municipality. If it is not in conflict with any higher form of law, such as a statute or constitutional provision, it has the full force and effect of law within the boundaries of the municipality to which it applies. Revenue raising measures, such as the imposition of taxes, special assessments and service charges, universally require ordinances. Original Budget – First completed appropriated budget; adopted budget. Overhead – See Indirect Costs. Performance Measures – Specific quantitative and qualitative measures of work performed as an objective of the department. Posting – The act of transferring to an account in a ledger the data, either detailed or summarized, contained in a book or document of original entry. Prior Year Actual – A column in the Budget & Financial Plan document; previous year’s audited financial results. Prior Year Encumbrance Roll – Encumbrances outstanding at the end of a fiscal year are added to the adopted budget to provide the necessary funding during the current year of those commitments. Program Goals – Description of the purpose or benefit the division/department plans to provide to the community and/or organizations it serves. Goals identify the end result the division/department desires to achieve with its activities, but goals are often ongoing and may not be achieved in one year.

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Proprietary Funds – Includes the Enterprise Funds and Internal Service Funds. Proprietary fund operating revenues, such as charges for services, result from exchange transactions associated with the principal activity of the fund. Public Authority – See Authority. Purchase Order – A document which authorizes the delivery of specified merchandise or the rendering of certain services and the making of a charge for them. Receivables – In governmental fund types, revenue accruals such as sales tax, franchise tax, and grants and other similar intergovernmental revenues as long as they are both measurable and available. Receivables in proprietary type funds consist of revenues earned at year-end and not yet received. Can be reported net of allowance for uncollectible accounts. Reserve – An account used to indicate that a portion of a fund’s balance is legally restricted for a specific purpose and is, therefore, not available for general appropriation. Reserved Fund Balance – Portion of a governmental fund’s net assets that is not available for appropriation. Resolution – A special or temporary order of a legislative body; an order of the legislative body requiring less legal formality than an ordinance or statue; a means of formally adopting policy. Restricted Assets – Assets of enterprise funds and business-type activities that are legally restricted as to their use. Retained Earnings – The accumulated earnings of an Enterprise or Internal Service Fund which have been retained in the fund and which are not reserved for any specific purpose. Revenue Bonds – Bonds whose principal and interest are payable exclusively from earnings of an Enterprise Fund. Sales Tax – A general “sales tax” is levied on persons and businesses selling merchandise or services in the city limits on a retail basis. The categories for taxation are defined by state law. Monies collected under authorization of this tax are for the use and benefit of the City; however, no city may pledge anticipated revenues from this source to secure the payment of funds or other indebtedness. The City levies a three and one-forth cent sales tax on taxable sales within the City. The sales tax is collected by the Oklahoma Tax Commission and remitted to the City in the month following receipt by the Tax Commission. Single Audit – Audit designed to meet the needs of all federal grantor agencies and performed in accordance with the Single Audit Act of 1984. Special Revenue Funds – Used to account for the proceeds of specific revenue sources that are legally or administratively restricted to expenditures for certain purposes. Statue – A written law enacted by a duly organized and constituted legislative body. Taxes – Compulsory charges levied by a governmental unit for the purpose of financing services performed for the common benefit. Trust Fund – A fiduciary fund consisting of resources received and held by the City as trustee, to be expended or invested in accordance with the conditions of the trust. Undesignated Unreserved Fund Balance – Available expendable financial resources in a governmental fund that are not the object of tentative management plans.

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Unearned Revenue – Specific type of deferred revenue that does not involve the application of the availability criterion, and therefore applies equally to both accrual and modified accrual financial statements. Unencumbered Balance – The amount of an appropriation that is neither expended nor encumbered. It is essentially the amount of money still available for fiscal year spending. Use Tax – Tax paid on goods purchased outside the City but used within the jurisdiction.

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