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C I T Y OF E D M O N D , O K L A H OM A BUDGE T AND F I NANC I AL PL AN FISCAL YEAR 2 0 1 8 – 1 9


THE CITY OF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA BUDGET FY 18-19 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION: Budget Message………………………………………………………………………………………………….. i-xv BUDGET SUMMARIES: Budget Summary - All Funds ..................................................................................................................................... 1 Summary of Revenues by Source-General Fund ........................................................................................................ 2 Summary of Revenues by Source-EPWA Funds ........................................................................................................ 3 Fund Graph-Combined Budgets-All Funds ................................................................................................................ 4 Fund Graph-Total Estimated Revenue-All Funds ....................................................................................................... 5 Fund Graph-Total Direct Cost by Function-All Funds ............................................................................................... 6 Fund Graph-Total Other Uses Reserves ..................................................................................................................... 7

GENERAL FUND: Fund Description ........................................................................................................................................................ 8 Fund Budget Summary ............................................................................................................................................... 9 DEPARTMENT DETAIL: General Government ..........................................................................................................................................10 - 11 City Council ........................................................................................................................................................12 - 13 Parks and Recreation ..........................................................................................................................................14 - 15 Street Maintenance & Construction ....................................................................................................................16 - 17 Court Services/Municipal Court .........................................................................................................................18 - 19 Senior Citizens Center ........................................................................................................................................20 - 21 Social Agencies ..................................................................................................................................................22 - 23 Community Development & Preservation Agencies ...........................................................................................24 - 25 Emergency Management.....................................................................................................................................26 - 27 Cemetery .............................................................................................................................................................28 - 29 Community Image (Code Enforcement & Urban Forestry) ...............................................................................30 - 31 Planning & Zoning..............................................................................................................................................32 - 33 Festival Marketplace ...........................................................................................................................................34 - 35


THE CITY OF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA BUDGET FY 18-19 TABLE OF CONTENTS Building Services ................................................................................................................................................36 - 37 Downtown Community Center ...........................................................................................................................38 - 39 Historical Society................................................................................................................................................40 - 41 Edmond Electric Economic Development Fund .................................................................................................42 - 43 Parks Special Events Fund ................................................................................................................................. 44 – 45

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS: Fund Descriptions ...............................................................................................................................................46 - 50 Fund Budget Summaries and Detail: Senior Citizens Fund ....................................................................................................................................... 51 – 52 Community Development (Planning) Fund .................................................................................................... 53 – 54 Asset Forfeiture Fund .....................................................................................................................................55 - 56 Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fund ...............................................................................................................57 - 58 Police Public Safety Limited Tax Fund ..........................................................................................................59 - 60 Hospital Sale Trust Fund .................................................................................................................................61 - 62 Real Property Fund ..........................................................................................................................................63 - 64 Convention & Visitors Bureau Fund .............................................................................................................. 65 – 66 Ambulatory Services Fund.............................................................................................................................. 67 – 68

CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS: Fund Budget Summaries and Detail: Capital Improvements Fund ..............................................................................................................................69 - 70 Roadway Improvements Fund ..........................................................................................................................71 - 72 1996 Capital Improvements Tax Fund..............................................................................................................73 - 74 Art in Public Places Fund .................................................................................................................................75 -76 Cemetery Care Fund ........................................................................................................................................ 77 – 78 Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund......................................................................................................................... 79 – 80 Parks Tax Fund .................................................................................................................................................81 - 82 2000 Capital Improvements Tax Fund..............................................................................................................83 - 84


THE CITY OF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA BUDGET FY 18-19 TABLE OF CONTENTS 2012 Public Safety Center - Capital Improvements Tax Fund........................................................................ 85 – 86 2017 Capital Improvements Tax Fund..............................................................................................................87 - 88

EPWA UTILITY FUNDS: Fund Description ...................................................................................................................................................... 89 Funds Budget Summaries ......................................................................................................................................... 90

FUND DETAIL: Electric Utility ...................................................................................................................................................91 - 92 Water Utility ......................................................................................................................................................93 - 94 Solid Waste Utility ............................................................................................................................................95 - 96 Wastewater Utility .............................................................................................................................................97 - 98 Arcadia Lake....................................................................................................................................................99 - 100 Drainage Utility .............................................................................................................................................101 - 102 EPWA Sewer Impact .....................................................................................................................................103 - 104 EPWA Revenue Bonds ................................................................................................................................. 105 – 106 EPWA Economic Development ....................................................................................................................107 - 108

OTHER ENTERPRISE FUNDS: KickingBird Golf Course Fund .......................................................................................................................109 - 110 YourGovShop Fund ........................................................................................................................................111 - 112 Public Transportation – CITYLINK ..............................................................................................................113 - 114

INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS: Fund Descriptions ..........................................................................................................................................115 - 116 Fund Budget Summaries and Detail: Liability/Tort Claims Fund (Risk Management) .............................................................................................117 -118


THE CITY OF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA BUDGET FY 18-19 TABLE OF CONTENTS Workers’ Compensation Reserve Fund (Risk Management) .........................................................................119 - 120 Employee Group Insurance Fund ..................................................................................................................121 - 122 Vehicle Maintenance Fund ............................................................................................................................123 - 124 Administrative Support Services Fund ...........................................................................................................125- 126

DEPARTMENT DETAIL: General Government ......................................................................................................................................127 - 128 City Treasurer ............................................................................................................................................... 129 - 130 City Manager .................................................................................................................................................131 - 132 Public Safety Communications ......................................................................................................................133 - 134 Information Technologies ..............................................................................................................................135 - 136 Financial Services ..........................................................................................................................................137 - 138 Human Resources ..........................................................................................................................................139 - 140 City Clerk ......................................................................................................................................................141 - 142 Facility Maintenance......................................................................................................................................143 - 144 Legal Services................................................................................................................................................145 - 146 Engineering ....................................................................................................................................................147 - 148 Market and Public Relations ..........................................................................................................................149 - 150 Public Works Administration ........................................................................................................................151 - 152 Operations Central Warehousing ...................................................................................................................153 - 154 Utility Customer Service................................................................................................................................155 - 156 Fleet Management Fund ............................................................................................................................... 157 – 158 Field Services Fund .......................................................................................................................................159 - 160

PERSONNEL................................................................................................................................................................ CAPITAL OUTLAY ………………………………………………………………………………………………….


Introduction Tab


The annual and very popular Street Overlay Program has an allocation of $3.3M in the 18-19 budget, and the outer four years of the Plan also include similar allocations adjusted for inflation. Next year’s budget will also include a new $1M allocation to begin the repair/replacement of concrete streets in the community. Future budgets identify the expansion of facilities at Cross Timbers, intersection improvements on Danforth between Thomas and Fretz, golf course improvements, intersection improvements at Coltrane and Covell, and the implementation of railroad Quiet Zones. 2012 Public Safety Center—Capital Improvements Fund Revenues and expenditures associated with the design and construction of the Public Safety Center were accounted for in this temporary fund (pages 85-86) which is being closed in the current budget. The remaining balance was split between the 2000 CIP and the new 2017 CIP fund from this same repurposed tax. 2017 Capital Improvements Fund The 2012 Public Safety Center sales tax above was repurposed by voters to a capital projects fund for a ten-year period that started in April of 2017. A Citizens Task Force identified many improvement projects for consideration using these funds. The Capital Improvement Project Advisory Board was recently expanded to include members from this task force, and this Board now reviews and makes recommendations for projects from both of our capital improvement funds. This fund is designed to address the project recommendations that came out of the task force discussions. Current projects underway include the relocation of Fire Station # 2 from the current location on Broadway to near the northeast corner of Kelly & 15th on the west side of the railroad tracks to improve response times. Another major project is the joint development of a new Tennis Center with the Edmond Public Schools, near the northwest corner of the same 15th & Kelly intersection. This complex will be one of the largest facilities in the region, with 10 indoor courts and up to 24 outdoor courts. Other projects being developed include the initial engineering for intersection improvements at Danforth & Sooner, trail extensions to improve access to the new Spring Creek Trail, and the expansion of Gracelawn Cemetery. Our people are working with the Urban Board to identify the initial steps that should be pursued in the Downtown Master Plan. Concept lighting for the Broadway, Festival Marketplace, and the railroad underpass will be the first project to move forward. The expansion of Animal Welfare Facility at Cross Timbers is a $4M project that should be under construction in the 18-19 budget. This project will double the animal capacity and modernize workflow processes. The Citizens Task Force also focused on the need to take care of our current Park assets, which will involve renovating many of our existing ball fields and sports complexes. The initial sites for these improvements will be the Hafer Park and Service-Blake facilities.

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xv


Budget Summary Tab


General Fund Tab


Special Revenue Funds Tab


Capital Project Funds Tab


EPWA Utility Funds Tab


Solid Waste 2018-2019 Departmental Summary DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION The Solid Waste Utility’s vision is to continuously improve solid waste services for the benefit of delivering “Trustworthy Service” to citizens. Solid Waste department delivers safe, high quality, cost effective trustworthy solid waste collection service to our customers. Department focuses on streamlined solid waste route management and promotes safe vehicle operations with employee safety incentive programs. The department is accelerating use of new technologies to continuously improve delivery and lower cost of service to our customers. GOALS 1. 2. 3. 4.

Provide quality and consistent customer service to internal and external customers. Reduce maintenance costs/overtime within the department. Improve overall department performance with emphasis on work practices review and routing efficiencies. Reduce departmental maintenance costs.

5. 6.

Improve department safety by reducing number of vehicle accidents. Promote continuous improvement within the department.

7.

Make necessary changes in equipment to modernize the fleet.

S T A F F I N G (FT-PT-S) Current Level 20-0-0

Year 1 20-0-0

Year 2 20-0-0

Year 3 20-0-0

Year 4 20-0-0

*Includes Solid Waste Administration, Residential, Commercial, Recycling, and Roll Off

95

Year 5 20-0-0


Wastewater Treatment 2018-2019 Departmental Summary

DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION Wastewater Treatment is a division of the Water Resources Department. It is comprised of the Coffee Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant and Lift Stations. The overall mission of Water Resources is: “To meet the water and wastewater needs of Edmond’s customers by providing effective, efficient, and trustworthy water and wastewater services.” The Wastewater Treatment Division provides operations, maintenance, and monitoring of the Coffee Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant and 9 lift stations. Divisional staff is eight (8) persons. Those positions, and divisional performance measures, are included in the Water Resources Departmental Summary information. GOALS 1. 2. 3. 4.

Compliance with EPA and ODEQ Regulations, Reporting and Rules Implementation of the Water and Wastewater Master Plan Program Development Work Process Improvement

S T A F F I N G (FT-PT-S) Current Level 46-0-0

Year 1 46-0-0

Year 2 46-0-0

97

Year 3 46-0-0

Year 4 46-0-0

Year 5 46-0-0


Other Enterprise Funds Tab


Internal Service Funds Tab


THE CITY OF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA FUND DESCRIPTION -INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS-

LIABILITY/TORT CLAIM FUND The Liability/Tort Claim Fund has been established to account for direct and indirect costs for the payment of judgments and settled claims relating to torts and Workers’ Compensation. Financing is provided through billings to user departments.

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION RESERVE FUND The Workers’ Compensation Reserve Fund is a new fund established to meet the requirements of the State of Oklahoma to maintain a self-insured program. Transfer from the Liability/Tort Claim Fund should satisfy the legal requirements.

EMPLOYEE GROUP INSURANCE FUND The Employee Group Insurance Fund has been established to account for the direct and indirect costs of administering a self-fund and fully insured group health insurance plan. Financing is provided by the General Fund, Public Safety Tax Funds, Edmond Public Works Authority, City employees and interest earnings on fund investments. Costs associated with the plan include the payment of employee, dependent and retiree health, dental and vision claims, third party administrative costs, re-insurance (specific and aggregate), and insurance premium payments for catastrophic claims, COBRA administration, fully insured life, accidental death and dismemberment, long term disability insurance and Wellness Program expenses.

115


THE CITY OF EDMOND, OKLAHOMA FUND DESCRIPTION -INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS-

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE FUND The Vehicle Maintenance Fund was established to account for expenditures to maintain City vehicles. Financing is through billings to user departments.

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT SERVICES FUND The Administrative Support Services Fund was established to allocate administrative overhead costs to user departments of the City. Financing is through billings to user departments based upon applicable accounting methods.

FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND The Fleet Management Fund was established to accumulate resources for the replacement of vehicles and other equipment on a systematic basis. Financing is provided by fleet lease assessments from those funds that purchase City vehicles and equipment through the Fleet Fund.

FIELD SERVICES FUND The Field Services Fund has been established to provide street maintenance, water/wastewater line maintenance and traffic control systems maintenance. By combining the workforce, employees develop diverse skill sets. Financing is provided by the General Fund, Water and Wastewater Funds, based upon applicable cost accounting methods.

116


Personnel Tab


M E M O TO:

Larry Stevens, City Manager

FROM: DATE SUBJECT:

Lisa Goodpasture, HR Director April 13, 2018 2018-2019 HR Annual Budget Report

CC:

Steve Commons, ACM-Administration Warren Porter, Director of Finance

Since July 1, 2017, (to date) we have processed 3847 applications for full-time and part-time positions. We only accept applications when we have open positions. During this same period we hired 56 new full-time employees to fill existing vacancies and approved new positions. There were a total of 43 fulltime employees that separated from the City. Nineteen employees of the 43 that separted, retired from the City. Separation includes resignations, retirements, and discharges. Based on 751 full-time active positions, our turnover rate to date for FY 2017 is 5.8%. The turnover rate is the same as the last fiscal year. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the national turnover rate (for all industries) in November 2017 was 4.1%. As of November 2017, the average turnover rate for Oklahoma is 4.2%.

Labor Relations: 

General Employees: A comprehensive benchmark study was conducted this fiscal year. Salary data was gathered from all of the major cities in Oklahoma and equivalent cities outside of Oklahoma in order to compare our civilian positions and salary ranges to the average of the other cities included in the survey. These cities included: Moore, Norman, Stillwater Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Broken Arrow, Columbia, MO, City of Lawrence, KS, McKinney, TX, and Fort Smith AR. As a result of the benchmark information gathered from the Cities above, the City of Edmond salaries are consistent or above market with benchmarked cities. The City of Edmond is 3.35% above the overall average salaries of the benchmarked cities. The proposed FY 2018-19 budget includes funds for a 2% COLA for general employees pending City Council approval of the budget.

FOP: We are in the final year of a three year contract with the FOP, which began FY 2016-17 through FY 2018-19. The City and FOP’s negotiation team will open FY 2019-20 contract discussions approximately January 2019 or before. A priority of those discussions will be negotiating benchmark cities and gathering salary data from the agreed comparable cities in Oklahoma and equivalent cities outside of Oklahoma to compare Edmond’s sworn police positions to the average of the other benchmark cities. As we move forward, we believe we will be able to continue the productive relationship we have experienced in the past.

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The FY 2018-19 salaries are based on available revenues and City Council approved allocation of funds in each of the applicable years. Fiscal Year 2019 2.0% increase effective 07-01-18 2.0% increase effective 01-01-19 

IAFF: We are in the final year of a three year contract with the IAFF, which began FY 2016-17 through FY 2018-19. The City’s and IAFF’s negotiation team will open FY 2019-20 contract discussions approximately January 2019 or before. A priority of those discussions will be negotiating benchmark cities and gathering salary data from the agreed comparable cities in Oklahoma and equivalent cities outside of Oklahoma to compare Edmond’s sworn fire positions to the average of the other benchmark cities. Again, as we move forward, we believe we will be able to continue the productive relationship we have experienced in the past. The FY 2018-19 salaries are based on available revenues and City Council approved allocation of funds in each of the applicable years. Fiscal Year 2019 2.5% increase effective 07-01-18 2.5% increase effective 01-01-19

Since FY 2016 FOP and IAFF salary adjustments were based on the resolution of an additional tax issue concerning the 2000 public safety sales tax, which was brought to our attention a couple of years ago.

Personnel Budget: The proposed FY 2018-19 personnel budget (includes base, overtime, holiday pay, allowances, part time pay, FICA, Medicare & pensions – all 100 accounts) of $77,262,247 increased 6.2% $4,473,526 over the FY 2017-18 personnel budget of $72,788,721.

On-Line Application: We now have fully integrated from paper applications to only accepting on-line applications. On-line applications began in May 2016. On-line applications allowed us to leverage technology and enabled an applicant to submit an application electronically to the City which in turn let supervisors immediately view and better manage applications, along with tracking activity including notes, reviews, status changes, etc. All applications are electronically stored.

Year FY 18 (thru 04/08/18) FY17 FY16 FY15 FY14 FY13

Applications Received 3847 3823 2977 2598 2874 2485

% of Change 0.6% (Projected to hit 4900-28.2% increase) 28.4% 14.6% -9.6% 15.7%

Timesheets and Employee Online: The HR department continues the automation of processes, including paperless timesheets with electronic approval levels and Employee Online. By the end of September 2018 employees will have the capability to view/print bi-weekly payroll information, annual wage and tax statements and change basic employment information such as address and beneficiary information. Implementation of Police and Fire paperless timesheets will be completed by Spring of 2019. 2


Employee Training: The City of Edmond continues to place a high priority on training for employees at all levels within the organization. During this past year we have provided training opportunities through our partnerships with Francis Tuttle - Center for Municipal Excellence (CME) and Performance Management Training, the Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA), Municipal Electric Systems of Oklahoma (MESO), Oklahoma Municipal League (OML) and our internal Human Resources Department. Training will continue through these partnerships for this next fiscal year as well as selection of our own internal department subject matter experts to assist with offering/presenting customer service training and additional Performance Management/professional development courses.

Performance Management (leadership) Training Series continues: Three sessions completed to date. 123 participants completed this training.   

December 2015, 32-hour series, completed by 90 leaders Fall/Winter 2016, series condensed to 22-hours, completed by 15 participants Fall/Winter 2017, 22-hours, completed by 18 participants

BUILD-Brief, Useful, Individual, Leadership Development sessions offered to continue leadership training momentum. From January 2017-January 2018 there have been 297 participants. The 2018 BUILD offerings are below:  Communication for Success  City Council Agenda, using Agenda Quick to Prepare your items  Your employee is Retiring, Now what?  Personal Accountability  Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) & the Employee Assistance Program (EAP  How to handle Emotionally Charged Situations in the Workplace  Customer Service for Leaders  Budgeting  Weather Preparedness  Workers’ Compensation & Post Accident Testing

New! Talent Development (employee) Training Program for Emerging/Beginning Leaders: This training program is designed for non-supervisory employees that have the interest and potential to be future leaders in our City of Edmond organization. The city’s version of Succession Planning, Talent Development is a more accurate reflection of our culture. The goal is to create a workforce with more depth, and to provide employees with adequate tools to develop both personally and professionally.  Open to all full time non-supervisory employees that have interest and potential to be future leaders.  This program will provide a solid foundation that flows into the Performance Management (Leadership) Training Series. As such, employees that attended the Performance Management Training Series are not eligible to attend this program.  Talent Development will help build employee’s knowledge, skills, supervisory abilities and effectiveness, providing a pathway for possible advancement and higher salaries. It does not guarantee future promotion.  Selection to participate is via an application process. 30 employees will be selected to attend and evaluate this training.  Employee commitment to the obligations of this training is required (i.e., attendance, active participation, homework).

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

If this trial training program is successful, we intend to incorporate Talent Development into our ongoing training opportunities.

The Educational Resource Library on Ednet continues to grow. Leaders that miss BUILD sessions can go to the Educational Resource Library to watch the video. Leaders are encouraged to share this educational library with their employees. Information currently posted: Videos: Creative Bootcamp - Stefan Mumaw (November 2017) Transfer Center - Phone Etiquette Bob Chapman - Truly Human Leadership BUILD Session Videos BUILD Session 01 (January 2017): Building Trust BUILD Session 02 (February 2017): Coaching for Success BUILD Session 03 (April 2017): The Team Benefit BUILD Session 05 (May 2017): Goal Setting BUILD Session 06 (July 2017): Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion BUILD Session 07 (August 2017): Recruitment, Interviews and Backgrounds BUILD Session 09 (January 2018): Communication for Success Articles: Dr. Frank Benest - How Do I Hold People Accountable? 17 Strategies for Improving Collaboration

Center for Municipal Excellence (CME): Francis Tuttle Technology Center School District No. 21 and the City of Edmond formed a partnership for the purpose of providing a high quality, comprehensive, training program for the Municipal Services Professional Program. The program focuses on safety culture, professional aptitude, behavioral skills, customer service and cross-functional, operational readiness for Public Works employees. There are 45 employees who are participating in the Department of Labor (DOL) apprenticeship program: 4 Apprentices, 13 Tech I, 25 Tech II and 3 Specialist. The Specialist Level indicates that the employee has completed the program in its entirety and takes approximately 10 years to obtain. FY 2018-19 includes continuation of building on-line Blended Training opportunities as well as utilizing a CME training trailer to take training to remote locations to increase paid participation from outside municipalities. Long range goal is the continual and innovative skill development of Field Services Personnel to include re-certification of skill obtained. In FY 2017-18 Edmond and Francis Tuttle each agreed to fund $40,000 for operations for the fiscal year. Due to higher outside participation by other municipalities, the agreed upon Francis Tuttle/COE funding decreased for FY 2018-19 to $25,000.

OMPA: OMPA sponsors a professional speaker to present on-site to our employees with its annual All Employee Training. The three (3) hour presentations are focused on customer service techniques, selfmotivation and leadership skills. OMPA is also host to a statewide annual Public Power conference held in April of each year that our electric and utility employees attend.

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MESO: MESO presents five (5) customer service sessions throughout the fiscal year directly to our employees. Each session is 1.5 hours in length and is presented twice for staggered attendance.

Computer Training: We currently have computer software training scheduled in May and June 2018 for Microsoft Word and Excel programs. We have contracted with Francis Tuttle Technology Center to provide two classes for each program on the entry level and advanced level; a total of eight (8) classes. Twelve (12) students are enrolled to attend each class. We will continue to review the need for computer training for FY18-19.

Other Training: 

 

New Hire Orientation Sessions – There are three Phases of New Hire Orientation in place for the onboarding process of new employees. Total hours of all three phases when complete is 12 hours of learning about the responsibilities as an Edmond employee as well as the city’s mission, core values, customer service expectations and team building skills. Crucial Conversations Training – Scheduled one to two times a year to train for communication skills for all levels of employees. Crucial Accountability Training – We are currently evaluating this training course as a follow-up to Crucial Conversations.

Health Benefits: We have made several changes to the health insurance offerings for the 2018 calendar year to continue to stay ahead of the increasing medical /Rx trends. In addition to the current two plan levels of health insurance (what we call “standard” and “enhanced”), we have added an ACO (Accountable Care Organization) plan effective 01-01-2018. The ACO offering is a high-performance network utilizing the Integris facilities and providers which helps avoid waste, drive members to seek appropriate care, as well as lowers overall claims cost. All three plans offer different premiums, co-pays, deductibles etc. to allow employees to effectively choose a health plan that meets their individual needs. Employees realized the value of the additional third plan as almost a third of the City employee population selected the ACO plan option for the 2018 calendar year. We continue to look at cost saving measures related to this major expenditure and benefit for our organization and employees. Healthcare costs and all services related to those costs continue to rise. However, we are seeing an increasing awareness and sense of ownership from employees regarding the need to be vigilant in the use of those benefits. Claims Cost Expenses Gross Medical Paid Claims Specific Stop Loss Recoveries

2016 Annual $ 6,007,737.84 $ (1,112,066.65)

Net Medical Claims Net RX Claims Dental Claims Vision Claims Administration Costs Stop Loss Premiums Total

$ $

4,895,671.19 2,371,912.90 $ 659,769.17 $ 99,736.00 $ 427,848.86 $ 592,578.06 $ 9,047,516.18

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2017 Annual $6,815,663.98 $(813,067.62)

2017 PEPM

$6,002,596.36 $2,484,527.05 $679,049.97 $98,973.00 $457,678.99 $723,769.20 $10,446,594.57

$ 658.83 $ 272.70 $ 74.53 $ 10.86 $ 50.23 $ 79.44 $ 1,146.59


NOTE: PEPM – Per Employee Per Month The City’s total claims cost per employee per month for 2017 is $1,146.59. National data for 2017 has not yet been released, however The City’s cost is higher than the National average, but remains lower than the municipal average for 2016. The National average for 2016 is $1,024 per employee per month and the Municipality average is $1,155 per employee per month. Health Care Reform Law, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010: Federal health care reform law imposes new fees on health insurance carriers and self-funded plans to fund a new entity known as the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). The City’s Fee for 2016 was $4,226.20. This fee is based on per member per year count on the health plan at a rate of $2.26 for the 2016 plan year. Under current law, the fee is effective for plan years after September 30, 2012 and before October 1, 2019 and will continue to increase each year. Section 1341 of the Affordable Care Act established a transitional reinsurance program to stabilize premiums in the individual market inside and outside of the Marketplaces. Under current law, transitional reinsurance program will collect contributions from health insurance issuers and certain selfinsured group health plans in the 2014, 2015 and 2016 benefit years to fund reinsurance payments to issuers of non-grandfathered reinsurance-eligible individual market plans, the administrative costs of operating the reinsurance program, and the General Fund of the US Treasury. This fee is no longer required following the 2016 payment. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) added section 6055 and 6056 to the Internal Revenue Code, which requires that large employers (defined as having 50 or more full-time employees) report each calendar year that they are meeting the regulations required to provide affordable and credible health insurance to full-time employees working 30 or more hours per week. These reporting obligations are intended to provide detailed health care coverage information to the IRS for each covered person. At the end of the year, taxpayers and their dependents must be able to prove they were participating in a qualified health plan, either through a Health Care Exchange or through their employer’s qualified health care benefits. For calendar year 2017, all large employers (50 or more full-time employees) are required to report. The City issued 819 Form 1095-C’s for the 2017 calendar year to comply with this code. Wellness Programs: The wellness program is well received by our City employees. In August of 2017 the City held the bi-annual Wellness Fair. There were 293 employees attend and 47 vendors on-site. We will continue to hold a bi-annual Employee Wellness Fair as part of our effort to promote employee health and wellness. The next fair will be held in 2019. The fair provides valuable information from participating vendors and interactive services and screenings related to health, eye care, hearing, vision, chiropractic care, fitness, safety etc. Other events we have throughout the year include:     

Monthly wellness luncheons with speakers on health and wellness related topics Annual Flu Shots On-site mammograms Walking challenges Self Defense Classes

Employees that participates in the Wellness Program can earn points by completing a physical health assessments (PHA), annual physicals, eye and dental exams, cancer screenings, and participating in charity walk/run events, wellness luncheons, blood drives, etc. Points earned can be cashed in for wellness merchandise, gift certificates, etc. 6


Employees that participate in the Wellness Fitness Program can earn days off of work (16 hours per year) for completing the fitness requirements.

Employee Health Clinic, opened August 13, 2014. City of Edmond, Employee Health Clinic Two Year Comparison 2016

2017

Clinic Visits Avg # of appt’s per month

2589

2745

215

255 (hours expanded July 2017)

Injections

405

487

RX Orders

4818

5915

Telephone Encounters

2416

2918

Labs

2304

2416

Employee Visits

372 EE's, total of 1666 visits, 65%

386 EE's, total of 1706 visits, 62%

Spouse Visits

135 Spouse, total 531 visits, 25%

163 Spouse, total 657 visits, 24%

Dependent Visits

165 Dep, total of 392 visits, 27%

158 Dep, total of 382 visits, 14%

Acute Cond Treated

2799

3194

Chronic Cond Treated

2530

2723

PHA Reviews

284

317

Preventive Services

268

321

Unused Appointments

291

369

Referrals

263

327

No-Shows Overall Increase in Visits

38

17

11%

6.25%

Enhancements During 2017:    

Beginning July 1, 2017, Thursday hours were added, the clinic is now open five days a week. PHA Live debuted. Patients now have access to a video addressing their personal PHA results. The patient portal at www.careatc.com and the mobile app have been enhanced/upgraded. The choice for "Acute" appointment has been removed and replaced with "I'm Not Feeling Well." When calling the Patient Access Center two new options were added, a bilingual line and a selection for "technical" questions.

CareATC Initiatives for FY 2018-19 Include:  

A new patient portal is being developed which will have a new look and feel as well as several enhancements The PAC (Patient Access Center) will be installing new software to enhance the patients experience 7


A custom CareATC check-in app will be offered in 2018

Employee Health Clinic cost 01-01-15 – 12-31-15: $532,054 ($9000 Facility Care Cost, not included) Employee Health Clinic cost 01-01-16 – 12-31-16: $547,481 ($9000 Facility Care Cost, not included) Employee Health Clinic cost 01-01-17 – 12-31-17: $589,926 ($9840 Facility Care Cost, not included) Proposed budget for Health Clinic FY 2018-19 $651,410 (includes 9840 Facility Care Cost) The Employee Health Clinic continues to provide services at no cost to employees, their family members (dependents, age 2 & up) and retirees covered by the benefits plan.

Physical Health Assessment (PHA) Event: The 2018 PHA Event will be held on 06-21-18 through 06-23-2018. During the 2017 PHA event, there were 206 draws. City of Edmond PHA Event History Location: 2015 Totals: 171

2016 167

2017 206

2018 Employee Satisfaction Survey - Your Opinion, it Matters!: Employee satisfaction is the level of contentment an individual feels toward their job. It is important for the City to monitor and understand satisfaction levels. To get a clear accurate picture of the employee climate, to ensure job satisfaction, engagement and plan for the future, the City conducts an employee survey once every two years. The City partnered with National Research Center, Inc., (NRC) in 2016 to conduct an employee survey and will again partner with NRC to conduct the December 2018 survey. The survey will also provide an objective data comparison from 2016 to 2018 and benchmark comparison against other Cities. In December 2016 NRC, administered the 2016 Employee Satisfaction Survey, cost: $9,438.00. 2018 proposed budget: $10,000. Recommended Position/Increases/Decreases/Changes: Included with this report is a detailed listing of the recommended position requests received and reviewed by the Personnel Review Committee. This Committee, made up primarily of rank and file employees, meets annually to review requests from departments for new positions, both additions as well as position changes due to departmental reorganization. Budgeted positions for FY 2017-18 was at 749. Due to the changing needs of various departments, two additional positions were approved in FY 2017-18, one position was reclassified from part-time to full-time, and one position was removed from the budget bringing the total of authorized full-time positions to 751. If the attached personnel changes are approved for FY 2018-19, this will bring our total number of authorized full-time positions to 771.

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Capital Outlay Tab


Five Year Capital Outlay by Funding Source Five Year Capital Outlay by Funding Source Description 1 Furniture . Sirens

Fund Emergency Management Emergency Management Subtotal Emergency Management 001014

FY18-19

-

2 Street Rehab Resurf & Reconst

General Fund - Street & Alley Subtotal General Fund 001073

950,000 950,000

3 HVAC Replace

General Fund - Municipal Court Subtotal General Fund 001080

40,000 40,000

General Fund - Streetscap/Median Maintenance General Fund - Streetscap/Median Maintenance Subtotal General Fund 001163

85,000 45,000 130,000

4 Replace 3 Entrance Signs Street Rehab Resurf & Reconst

FY19-20

FY20-21 25,000

FY21-22

-

25,000

-

950,000 950,000

950,000 950,000

-

-

FY22-23 55,000 55,000

950,000 950,000 -

-

950,000 950,000 -

-

-

. -

-

-

-

-

. .

5 Station #1 Retaining Wall Defibulator - Life Pak Haz Mat Equipment Extractor Station #2 Art EMS Training Man. Exxtrication Equipment Replace SCBA Compressor

6 Mitch Park Playground Improvements Mitch Park Renovation of Ballfirelds & Courts Mitch Park Signage for Entrances & Bldg Letter Development of Carl Reherman Park Overlook Development Restroom & Pavilion upgrades Road reconstruction, RV Pads, erosion control Dock Upgrades Kickingbird GC Maintenance Blding Design/Const Splash Pad II Construction Downtown Detention Park Refurbish Stephenson per Master Plan Neighborhood Playgrounds Hafer Tot Lot Playground Hafter Restroom Upgrade Bickham-Rudkin RR in Pavilion Bickham-Rudkin New Playground by Pavillion Edmond 66 Implementation of Master Plan Equipment, Furn & Fixtures for Tennis Center Park Signage

Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Fire Public Safety Limited Tax Subtotal Fire Public Safety Fund 121 Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund Parks Tax Fund

15,000 20,000 42,240 10,000 36,000 123,240 250,000 100,000 100,000 50,000 -

76,000 75,000 -

-

83,600

91,900

30,000

-

-

151,000

30,000

83,600

50,000 141,900

250,000 50,000 -

500,000

500,000

500,000

100,000

100,000 150,000

-

50,000 950,000 500,000 25,000

500,000 50,000

50,000

200,000

200,000 -

50,000

50,000

500,000

500,000 25,000 1,175,000

100,000

25,000

Subtotal Parks Tax Fund 116

250,000 25,000

25,000

25,000

25,000

1,400,000

1,625,000

1,450,000

1,125,000


Five Year Capital Outlay by Funding Source Description

7 Intersection Improvements

8 Street Construction Costs

9

Art

Fund

FY18-19

FY21-22

FY22-23

6,993 6,993

-

-

-

-

1996 Capital Improvement Fund Subtotal 1996 Capital Imp. Tax Fund 337001

56,260 56,260

-

-

-

-

200,000 200,000

200,000 200,000

200,000 200,000

200,000 200,000

200,000 200,000

200,000 500,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

700,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

3,276,360 2,250,000 1,000,000

3,358,269

3,442,226

3,528,261

3,616,488

Visual Art Fund

Capital Improvements Fund Capital Improvements Fund Subtotal Capital Improvements Fund 331

11 Reconst. & Resurfacing of Streets Kelly & Danforth Intersection Improvements Covell Parkway - Fairfax to Griffin Intelligent Traffic Systems* Danforth - Thomas to Fritz Covell & Coltrane Intersection Improvements Sooner Road Bridge (N of Covell)* Danforth & Thomas Intersection & Roadway 15th & Broadway Intersection Improvements* Stephenson Park Improvements Golf Course Maint & Water System Museum Restoration Project Cross Timbers Facility Expansion Quiet Zone Capitalized Consulting Costs

FY20-21

Roadway Improvements Fund Subtotal Roadway Improvements Fund 335007

Subtotal VAC Fund 123

10 ADA Improvements HVAC Improvements-Library

FY19-20

2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2000 Capital Impr Tax Fund Subtotal 2000 Capital Impr. Tax Fund 338

5,000,000 1,200,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 750,000

500,000 715,000 217,000 300,000 8,258,360

200,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 2,700,000 5,000,000 300,000 18,558,269

1,500,000

300,000 8,442,226

300,000 3,828,261

300,000 6,166,488

*State Grant Projects - City only cost listed

12 2nd and Bryant Improvements Danforth and Sooner* 2nd and Blvd Covell and Air Depot Area Roadway Imp. Hafer Park Improvements Trail Development Kickingbird Clubhouse Improvements Soccer Complex Improvements Capitalized Construction Costs Gracelawn Cemetery Development Expansion of Animal Shelter Fire Station Relocation Police Arcadia Lake Station Fire Station Remodeling

2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund 2017 Capital Impr Tax Fund Subtotal 2017 Capital Impr. Tax Fund 340

*State Grant Projects - City only cost listed

500,000

2,500,000 1,000,000 400,000

3,030,517 1,300,000 5,000,000

3,000,000

500,000 200,000 1,500,000 4,000,000 1,500,000

11,200,000

-

2,500,000 200,000

2,500,000 200,000

1,000,000 7,000,000 200,000

7,030,517

2,000,000 10,200,000

200,000

2,000,000

8,600,000

3,500,000 8,700,000


Five Year Capital Outlay by Funding Source

Description

Fund

FY18-19

13 Elec Dist Construction Machinery & Tools Furniture/Office Equipment AMI/Communication Equipment Substation Projects Testing Equipment Luminance/Lighting Construction

PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund PWA Electric Utility Fund Subtotal PWA Electric Utility Fund 562

3,831,810 6,000 8,000 1,800,000 1,105,000 36,500 300,000 7,087,310

14 New Meter Installs Existing Line Replacement Master Plan Engineering Replacement of water leak correlator equipm Laboratory Equipment Fiber runs to main locations Service Cart ofr Maintennace AMI/Communication Equipment Well pumps and motors Well services

PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund PWA Water Utility Fund Subtotal PWA Water Utility Fund 563

1,100,000 220,000 185,000 7,010,000

15 Master Plan Engineering Fiber runs to main locations Replacement of CCTV cameras w/transporter Replacement Pump Program Existing line replacement

PWA Wastewater Utility Fund PWA Wastewater Utility Fund PWA Wastewater Utility Fund PWA Wastewater Utility Fund PWA Wastewater Utility Fund Subtotal PWA Wastewater Utility Fund 565

1,500,000 250,000 35,000 100,000 3,200,000 5,085,000

16 Willowood Rehab/Design Det Pond A Rehab Spring Hill STS Design/ESMTS/Constr. Cedar Ridge STS Ridgecrest Draninage Study Morning Star/Crossbow ESMTS Morning Star/Crossbow STS Tarus/Craig Drainage ESMTS Tarus Drainage Ripple Creek Det Pond ESMTS Ripple Creek Det Pond Rehab Pine Oak Feasibility 29th Street Feasibility Study Det Pond B Rehab Design/Constr. Rankin Feasibility Study Det Pond D Rehab Design/ESMNTS Det Pond E Rehab Design/ESMNTS Det Pond C Rehab Design/ESMNTS

Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility Drainage Utility

200,000 3,200,000 1,600,000 30,000 225,000 250,000

100,000 20,000

FY19-20 3,849,186 6,000 2,350,000 2,530,500 17,000 150,000 8,902,686

FY20-21

FY21-22

3,840,236 6,000 8,000 2,900,000 3,706,000 62,000 150,000 10,672,236

FY22-23

4,122,896 6,000 11,000 150,000 2,386,500 30,000 150,000 6,856,396

4,000,000 6,000 150,000 1,807,000 12,000 150,000 6,125,000

200,000 3,200,000 0

200,000 3,600,000 0

200,000 4,000,000 0

200,000 4,400,000 4,000,000

12,000 1,466,667 220,000 185,000 5,283,667

1,833,333 220,000 185,000 6,038,333

220,000 185,000 4,605,000

220,000 185,000 9,005,000

1,100,000

700,000

700,000

700,000

100,000 3,400,000 4,600,000

100,000 3,700,000 4,500,000

100,000 4,300,000 5,100,000

100,000 4,300,000 5,100,000

110,000 75,000

620,000 .

25,000

25,000 30,000 1,000,000 10,000 300,000 100,000

40,000 400,000 25,000

25,000 20,000 25,000

110,000

. Subtotal Drainage Utility Fund 568

1,485,000

310,000

665,000

20,000 595,000

130,000 20,000 110,000 285,000


Five Year Capital Outlay by Funding Source Description

17 Reel Grinder Greens Mowers - 2 Small Tractor Spray Unit Aerifier Bed Knife Grinder Greens Mowers

Fund

FY18-19

FY19-20

FY20-21

FY21-22

FY22-23

KickingBird Golf Course Fund KickingBird Golf Course Fund KickingBird Golf Course Fund KickingBird Golf Course Fund KickingBird Golf Course Fund KickingBird Golf Course Fund KickingBird Golf Course Fund Subtotal KickingBird Golf Course Fund 570

50,000

50,000

60,000

75,000

45,000

68,000 68,000

18 Document Imaging Lease

Admin Support Services-General Govt. Subtotal Admin Support Services 652

42,000 42,000

42,000 42,000

42,000 42,000

42,000 42,000

42,000 42,000

19 Install Bullet Resistant Glass/Wall in PSC

Admin Support Services-Facility Maintenance Subtotal Admin Support Services 652

20,000 20,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20 Audio/Visual Equipment Upgrades

Admin Support Services-Marketing/Channel 20 Subtotal Admin Support Services 652

10,000 10,000

10,000 10,000

10,000 10,000

10,000 10,000

10,000 10,000

21 Furniture/Office Equipment/IT Equipment

Admin Support Services-IT Subtotal Admin Support Services 652

600,000 600,000

400,000 400,000

400,000 400,000

400,000 400,000

400,000 400,000

22 Document Imaging Lease

Admin Support Services-HR Subtotal Admin Support Services 652

4,000 4,000

5,032 5,032

2,532 2,532

2,532 2,532

2,532 2,532

23 Machinery & Tools Motor Vehicle Fleet Replacement

Fleet Management Fund Fleet Management Fund (All divisions) Subtotal Fleet Management Fund 653

591,888 4,876,206 5,468,094

835,468 5,027,102 5,862,570

$ 39,710,883

$ 44,488,490

Total Capital Outlay $

60,000 25,000 50,000 18,000 27,000

508,110 3,778,843 4,286,953

48,745,116

FIVE YEAR TOTAL $ 231,398,956

171,316 3,068,828 3,240,144

$ 53,137,798

318,323 4,265,502 4,583,825

$ 45,316,669

City of Edmond, Budget and Financial Plan FY 18-19  
City of Edmond, Budget and Financial Plan FY 18-19