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Police Department 2017 Annual Report

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Core Values

LEADERSHIP

COMPETENCE

We are prudent stewards of the public’s grant of authority and resources. We are accountable for the quality of our performance and the standards of our conduct.

COURAGE

We place the safety of others before our own and accept our moral responsibility to take action against injustice and wrongdoing. Coworkers are expected to take prudent risks on behalf of the public.

INTEGRITY

We recognize the complexity of police work and exercise discretion in ways that are beyond reproach and worthy of public trust. Honesty and truthfulness are fundamental elements of integrity. It is our duty to earn public trust through consistent words and actions. We are honest in word and deed.

We seek to influence human behavior to achieve organizational goals that serve the public while developing individuals, teams and the organization for future service. We accept our responsibility to be leaders, both within the community and among our peers, and for the actions of our colleagues and ourselves. We are all responsible for the performance, reputation and morale of the department.

RESPECT

We hold life in the highest regard. We treat all citizens and colleagues with dignity and respect, and are fair and impartial as we perform our duties. We openly and effectively communicate with the public and each other by sharing information and soliciting feedback to accomplish the department’s vision and mission.

RESTRAINT

We use the minimum force and authority necessary to accomplish a proper police purpose. We demonstrate self-discipline, even when no one is listening or watching.

2017 Christmas Parade

Mission In partnership with the community, we will reduce the levels of crime, fear, and disorder through evidence-based community policing strategies. We embrace transparency and accountability, provide exceptional service, and are committed to a culture of excellence. 2


Table of Contents CORE VALUES

2

MISSION

2

VISION

3

MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF OF POLICE

4

2017 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

6

CONCORD QUICK FACTS

7

2017 HIGHLIGHTS

8

2018 GOALS

10

OPERATING EXPENDITURES

12

THREE YEAR COMPARISON

12

TEN YEAR COMPARISON

13

STATISTICAL DATA

14

PATROL BUREAU

16

OPERATIONS BUREAU

18

ADMINISTRATION BUREAU

22

COMMENDATIONS

24

ON THE MOVE

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PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

Vision A community where citizens and police work together, in harmony, to achieve the highest standards of public safety.

ANNUAL REPORT Project Manager: Captain Robert Ledwell Project Coordinator: Sergeant Larry Hubbard FRONT/BACK COVER PHOTOS: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

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: OT OS

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Message from the Chief of Police

PH

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. LA

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G TO HO

I am pleased

to share with you the 2017 Annual Report for the Concord Police Department. The department experienced some successes and had to overcome some challenges in 2017. In this message I will touch upon some of those. I hope you explore this report and appreciate as much as I do the body of work that was accomplished this past year. In 2016 we experienced a modest reduction in Part 1 Crime. In 2017 we set out to continue that downward trend, setting a goal of a 5% violent crime reduction and a 10% property crime reduction. In the following pages you will see that the men and women who dedicate their lives to keeping Concord safe far exceeded our own internal expectations.

The community is why and for whom we exist. The foundation of our Vision and Mission is based upon this premise. Our ability to succeed as an organization and be effective in what we do is largely dependent upon partnering with the community, and developing and maintaining community trust. If there is a common theme to, and purpose for this report, it is community outreach and engagement.

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In March we partnered with Cabarrus County Schools, Cabarrus County EMS, Concord Fire, and NC Highway Patrol to provide hundreds of Central Cabarrus High School students the “VIP for VIP” driver safety training. In May and September we hosted our first two Youth Police Academy sessions, attended by over 60 local students between the ages of 12-16. In May and June we partnered with Parks and Recreation for their Bicycle Rodeo at Flowe Park and Build a Bike event at the Boys and Girls Club. In October and November we partnered with Cabarrus County EMS and the Cabarrus Health Alliance to conduct “Community Conversations” in order to educate the public about the dangers of opioids and heroin. In response to terror incidents targeting houses of worship, we hosted several safety seminars beginning in November. We continued to host public Crime and Safety meetings to share the results of our efforts and to provide the community with an opportunity to discuss topics of mutual concern. Lastly, we enhanced our presence on social media as a mechanism to better engage the


public. While we have been active on the Nextdoor App and Facebook for some time, in September we launched our Twitter account, @ConcordNCPolice. Our followership is approaching 2,000 people and I look forward to seeing that number grow in 2018 and beyond. As previously mentioned, 2017 was not without challenges. Maintaining adequate staffing remains a critical concern for law enforcement leaders across the country and right here in North Carolina. Over the last few years enrollment in the state’s basic law enforcement training program (BLET) has dropped by as much as 50 percent, and many officers are choosing to leave the profession entirely. In 2017 we averaged fifteen vacancies. Despite tremendous effort by staff to close that gap, we ended the year in roughly the same position we started. I am hopeful that we will turn the corner in 2018 and be able to deploy our full complement of officers, as budgeted by City Council. The opioid and heroin epidemic that has spread across the United States has affected Cabarrus County and other parts of the state. I am proud of the work that has been accomplished so far; and, proud of the partnerships we have with local law enforcement agencies, Fire/EMS, and the Cabarrus Health Alliance, among other stakeholders. I know that success is not going to be measured by the number of arrests we make or the quantity of drugs seized. Rather, success should be measured by the significant reduction of overdoses and addiction in our community. This success can only be achieved through continued collaboration with all stakeholders and continued education about the dangers of these highly addictive substances. In 2017, international and domestic terrorism events shaped the way we provide security for NASCAR and other heavily attended events in the city. The bombing in Manchester, England occurred on May 22nd, less than a week before the city hosted three major racing events. That bombing changed how we protect the public during egress outside of the speedway venue. The mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada occurred on October 1, 2017, less than a week before the city hosted two major racing events and a country music concert. That shooting changed the way we protect large crowds inside open-air venues. Without disclosing sensitive security protocols, our efforts were replicated by other racing venues and the department was recognized by NASCAR executives at the safety and security summit held in the city in January, 2018. Despite the aforementioned challenges – staffing in particular – the department was able to improve upon its community engagement and outreach efforts, while significantly reducing crime and enhancing the quality of life for the citizens of this great city. Another year has come and gone. Looking back, 2017 was definitely interesting and rather successful. I am so very proud of my staff and for the support of the community working with us to keep Concord safe.

20 17 C

ab arr us Co un ty L

aw Day

Gary J. Gacek Chief of Police Concord, NC

D : IN TO PHO

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2017 Organizational Chart

Gary J. Gacek Chief of Police

Executive Assistants

Major Jimmy Hughes

Major Keith Eury

Patrol Bureau

Operations Bureau

Captain Vashon Clark

Captain Patrick Tierney

Adam Patrol District

Special Operations Airport Unit

Captain Todd McGhee

Community Outreach & Education Public Safety Unit

Baker Patrol District Robert Watson Code Enforcement

Captain John Tierney

David Patrol District

Captain Jeremy Baggarly Criminal Investigations Forensics & Property Control Major Crimes Vice & Narcotics SWAT

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Administration Bureau

Information Technology

Captain Robert Ledwell Office of Management, Analysis & Planning Crime & Strategic Analysis Planning & Logistics

Captain Alan Lee Support Services

Charlie Patrol District

Captain Deckster Barlowe

Deputy Chief Betty Stocks

Customer Service Recruiting & Training


Concord Quick Facts Demographics

Concord Tourism

POPULATION: 8  8,815 (estimated by NC State Demographer’s Office) (State’s 11th largest city in population)

MEDIAN AGE: 35.8 (U.S. Census Bureau)

1.4 million

SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENCES: 33,396 (U.S. Census Bureau) SQUARE MILES: 62.8 (State’s 7th largest city in land area)

PROVIDED BY CITY OF CONCORD GIS

Visitors

Concord Regional Airport

Overall Airport Operations

15.5 %

690,000+ Hotel Rooms Utilized

90 % 57 %

Allegiant Enplanements

1.2 % Hotel Usage

Concord’s share of Lodging in Cabarrus County

PROVIDED BY CABARRUS COUNTY CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

PROVIDED BY CONCORD REGIONAL AIRPORT

City Growth 2014-17 ANNEXATIONS: 2.005 square miles

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2017 Highlights Public Safety Academy Citizens received instruction on all functions of the department and given an in-depth look at the evidence-based policing philosophy.

Partnered with Cabarrus County Schools, Cabarrus County EMS, Concord Fire, and NC Highway Patrol to provide hundreds of Central Cabarrus High School students the

“VIP for VIP�

driver safety training.

Enhanced our presence on Nextdoor and Facebook and launched our Twitter account, @ConcordNCPolice. Our followership is approaching 2,000 people.

Over 60 local students completed Youth

8

Police Academy.


Partnered with Cabarrus County EMS and the Cabarrus Health Alliance to conduct “Community Conversations” in order to educate the public about the dangers of opioids and heroin.

New Position: 1 Parks Officer

In response to incidents targeting houses of worship, we hosted several safety seminars beginning in November.

Hosted public

Crime and Safety meetings to share

the results of our efforts and to provide the community with an opportunity to discuss topics of mutual concern.

CIT – Crisis Intervention Team

Partnered with Parks and Recreation for their Bicycle Rodeo at Flowe Park and Build a Bike event at the Boys and Girls Club.

Goal Every officer below the rank of captain to attend the 40 hour CIT training Trained in 2017 31 officers and 2 civilian employees Trained since 2008 138 officers and 13 civilian employees 9


ADAM DISTRICT Reduce Burglaries

Reduce reported burglaries by 10%. Reported burglaries for both 2016 and 2017 stayed consistent with 82.

Plan to reduce burglaries will consist of targeting those areas most affected by this crime. Data analysis will be conducted to ascertain best times and locations to concentrate efforts. Strategies to reduce this crime will consist of increase in visibility to include bike patrols, foot patrols, and heightened patrols.

CHARLIE DISTRICT Reduce aggravated assaults

During 2017, aggravated assaults were up from 3 to 13. The 3 year average is 7.3. We will attempt to utilize education of offenders and officers in order to prevent recidivism of offenders. Officers will continue to receive and share information on counseling and other services with both victims and offenders.

Increase officer self-initiated activity

BAKER DISTRICT

Plan to increase discretionary time by 9%. Officer self-initiated activity was down 9% in 2017 and dispatched calls were down 4%. With fewer calls for service, officers will make better use of their discretionary time.

Community Engagement

DAVID DISTRICT

Assigned officers will attend at least four community meetings per year in their assigned beat. While they may not be working on every meeting date, we are striving to have the officers on hand to give the community the opportunity to meet their assigned officer and enable officers to have face-to-face contacts with those who are routinely in the neighborhood.

Officer discretionary time

Baker District goal is to increase foot patrols (park and walks) by +10% during 2018. Foot patrols give officers an opportunity

Cra

dy

In 2018 officers will be assigned a specific geographic area of responsibility within their patrol district. During the duty times officers will spend the majority of their time within their assigned beat which will enable them to monitor and recognize potential crime patterns and trends. The familiarity the officer will have with their specific patrol beat will enable them to develop effective solutions to address any issues facing the citizens within that particular area. The officers will be accountable for a smaller patrol area with the ultimate goals of decreasing criminal activity, lower response times, and increasing positive interactions between citizens and the officers that patrol their neighborhoods.

to be out of the car talking with citizens. Positive interactions lend an opportunity for the C officers to better know the 17 20 community in which they serve. They give the community an opportunity to speak with officers and give citizens a chance to relay any concern of crime, fear of crime, or disorder to an individual officer. We have come a long way with park and walks and intend to continue them. Their effectiveness is obvious in the crime statistics.

an

GEOGRAPHIC BEAT INTEGRITY

wl

2018 Goals

Reduce motor vehicle larceny

Goal is to continue the reduction of larceny of motor vehicles.

Additionally, plan to reach out to the Fullerton Neighborhood and the new Parkside at Skybrook North Neighborhood, encouraging them to become recognized neighborhoods. By becoming a recognized neighborhood, each community would become officially recognized by City Council and commit to collaborate with city staff to identify solutions to any issue that may arise within their neighborhood. Muck Run for Charity

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PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT ANALYSIS AND PLANNING (OMAP)

Vice & Narcotics Unit

Continued implementation of revised policy and procedures.

Vice & Narcotics officers will continue working to identify individuals supplying and selling illegal narcotics within the community.

Full implementation of new staff scheduling software in the Spring. Improvement of fleet inventory tracking and assignments.

SPECIAL OPERATIONS Airport Unit

Assess and address unit needs for equipment, training, and staffing to ensure operational preparedness.

Facilitate a smooth transition to a new airport police sergeant.

Public Safety Unit

Continued participation with community engagement events such as VIP for VIP and the Governors Highway Safety initiative events. Utilize location-based traffic crash, crime, calls for service, and enforcement data to establish effective and efficient methods for deployment of our law enforcement resources in an effort to reduce traffic crashes and crime within our city.

Continue to track and investigate the opioid/heroin overdoses that occur within our city to support the multi-agency/discipline approach being implemented to address the opioid crisis.

SWAT

Continue to develop tactics and best practices for providing security at large open-air venue events.

Assess and address any future team needs for equipment, training, and staffing to ensure operational preparedness.

SUPPORT SERVICES

Enhance recruitment strategies to attract well-qualified applicants for police officer positions. Implement the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) to collect and report crime data to the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI).

Street Crimes Unit

Develop an information management system to organize complaints from citizens and requests for assistance from the district captains to allow for problem tracking and overall accountability.

Work to support patrol operations by providing a highly visible, proactive, multi-disciplinary policing presence aimed at stopping and preventing street-level crime and disorder.

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Operating Expenditures Capital 6%

Cost Allocations 4%

Debt Service 5%

Operations 17%

TOTAL 2017 EXPENDITURES $20,275,498

Personnel 68%

PHOTO: INDEPENDENT TRIBUNE/JAMES NIX

2017 Cabarrus County Law Day

Three Year Comparison Compared to the three year average, Total Part I Crimes have been reduced.

Three Year Average Compared to 2017 Crime Criminal Homicide

2015

2

2016

5

Average

5

2017

-75%

16.00

9

-44%

50.00

33

-34%

53.00

57

8%*

127

123.00

101

-18%

298

349

333.33

296

-11%

659

568

467

564.67

404

-28%

118

112

118

116.00

72

-38%

13

17

18

Robbery

44

58

48

Aggravated Assault

47

56

56

Total Violent Crimes

106

136

Burglary

353

Larceny Theft Motor Vehicle Theft

4.00

% Change

1

Forcible Rape

Arson

12

2014

8

7

10

8.33

4

-52%

Larceny From Motor Vehicle

516

470

585

523.67

410

-22%

Shoplifting

882

981

761

874.67

669

-24%

Total Property Crimes

2,536

2,436

2,290

2,421

1,855

-23%

Total Part I Crimes

2,642

2,572

2,417

2,544

1,956

-23%

*This increase was a result of the implementation of the Domestic Violence Intimate Partner program.


Ten Year Comparison Compared to the ten year average, all Crime Categories have been reduced. The total violent and property crimes are the lowest in the past 20 years.

Part I Crimes Ten Years Comparison Crime

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Average

7

7

7

5

2

3

7

2

5

5

5.0

1

-80.0%

21

26

21

16

14

22

14

13

17

18

18.2

9

-50.5%

Robbery

102

88

73

58

40

45

53

44

58

48

60.9

33

-45.8%

Aggravated Assault

101

49

85

63

52

41

56

47

56

56

60.6

57

-5.9%

Total Violent Crimes

231

170

186

142

108

111

130

106

136

127

144.7

101

-30.2%

Burglary

479

537

539

356

461

479

442

353

298

349

429.3

296

-31.1%

2,467

2,435

2,603

2,405

2,629

2,559

2,223

2,057

2,019

1,814

2,321.1

1,483

-36.1%

252

257

253

185

152

157

119

118

112

117

172.2

72

-58.2%

21

16

6

24

11

21

6

8

7

10

13.0

4

-69.2%

3,219

3,245

3,401

2,970

3,253

3,216

2,790

2,536

2,436

2,290

2,935.6

1,855

-36.8%

3,080.3 1,956

-36.5%

Criminal Homicide Forcible Rape

Larceny Motor Vehicle Theft Arson Total Property Crimes

Total Part I Crimes

3,450 3,415 3,587 3,112 3,361 3,327 2,920 2,642 2,572 2,417

2017 % Change

PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

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Statistical Data 3,518

3,784

5,123

Reports Taken

Vehicle Accident Reports

Arrests

4,547

27,758

Field contacts

Property Checks

13,334

43,878 Vehicle Stops

42,172 Dispatched Calls

Citations Issued

66,052 Officer Initiated Calls

28,807 Warnings Issued

108,224 Total Calls for Service

PARKING CITATIONS STATS 2,858 Issued 216 Voided

2017 NASCAR Hauler Parade

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1,922 Paid 916 Unpaid

$30,870 Collected $40,260 Outstanding Fees & Penalties

PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY


Charlotte Motor Speedway Events Attendance

PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

SOURCE CHARLOTTE MOTOR SPEEDWAY

NHRA 74,382

NASCAR 175,937

Carolina Rebellion 85,252

World Finals 41,783

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Patrol Bureau

The Patrol Bureau is the first line of response provided by the Concord Police Department. Under the command of Major Jimmy Hughes, the Patrol Bureau is responsible and accountable for leadership, performance, efficiency, and general good conduct of the department. Major Hughes delegates responsibilities of patrol as prescribed by the Chief of Police. Major Jimmy Hughes

ADAM DISTRICT

8.6

Within the district, there are nine educational institutions and seven recreational parks and facilities. With 29 officers assigned, Adam District has community partnerships with eight established neighborhoods. Major employment and businesses within the district include ACN, Carolinas HealthCare System NorthEast and the Carolina Mall. After seeing a moderate increase in Aggravated Assaults in 2016. At the conclusion of 2017 Aggravated Assaults within Adam District decreased.

10 %

17.5

Square Miles

Burglaries

27 %

23,800+

Residential Population

Property Crimes

26 % Part 1 Crimes

16

1,000+ Hours of Foot Patrols

16,000+

Residential Population

9%+

increase Self-initiated Activity

BAKER DISTRICT

Aggravated Assaults

37 % Violent Crimes

22 % Property Crimes

Within the district there are seven educational institutions as well as six recreational parks and facilities. Baker District has ten active neighborhood partnerships and is home to the Hartsell Ballfield complex, host of numerous AAU baseball tournaments and championships.

21 % 3 Year Average Part 1 Offenses

For the second year, Baker District achieved double digit decreases in both violent and property crimes.

Violent Crimes

26 %

Square Miles

25 %

PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

1,400+ Hours of Foot Patrols

170+ Hours of Bike Patrols


PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

CHARLIE DISTRICT

20.7

The district is a mixture of commercial and residential areas. As in 2016, Charlie District continues to see a rise in both commercial and residential construction within its boundaries. After experiencing a 96% increase of incidents of burglaries in 2016, Charlie District officers actively worked to lower the number of burglary incidents in 2017.

24 %

13.6

Square Miles

Burglaries

55 %

14,000

Residential Population

Vehicle Theft

22 % Larceny

25 % Aggravated Assaults

1,000+ Hours of Foot & Bike Patrols

Square Miles

300+ Hours of Foot Patrols

27,400+

Residential Population

28 % Burglaries

17 %

6%

increase Self-initiated Activity

Property Crimes

DAVID DISTRICT Previously, David District had been predominantly commercial, however over the last several years residential construction has continued to increase. David District is home to numerous commercial attractions that include Concord Mills Mall, Concord Regional Airport, Charlotte Motor Speedway, and Great Wolf Lodge During 2016, David District experienced numerous incidents of larcenies from motor vehicles which culminated in an end of the year increase of 24%. The district began to concentrate patrols and vehicle stops in areas near Concord Mills Mall to include hotels and Concord Mills Blvd in order to deter criminal activity. This tactic, along with increased foot and bike patrols, and an increase in officers self-initiated activities, decreased larcenies, vehicle theft and burglaries. Aggravated assaults in David District decreased, however unrelated incidents of rape and robbery increased.

9%

increase

15

total Violent Crimes Up from 10

Self-initiated Activity

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Operations Bureau

The Operations Bureau is be responsible for providing operational support to the Patrol Bureau via a variety of specialized teams, intervention strategies, and tactics. Commanded by Major Keith Eury, this bureau partners with patrol, schools, and the community and works collaboratively to reduce the levels of crime, fear, and disorder in neighborhoods; improve the quality of life for Concord’s citizens, visitors, and businesses; and have a positive and lasting impression on the lives of student aged youth. Major Keith Eury PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

CODE ENFORCEMENT DIVISION

The Code Enforcement Division consists of one manager, a senior code enforcement officer and six enforcement officers. The Code Enforcement Division is responsible for planning, developing, coordinating, and executing the enforcement of the city code and ordinances as set forth by City Council. Other duties of the division include: conducting field inspections of properties and public facilities for violations of minimum housing, zoning, and historic preservation standards, receive and investigate complaints regarding substandard housing conditions, hazardous conditions, improper use of dwellings and commercial structures, nuisance conditions, and other code related issues on public and private property within the city.

Code Enforcement Stats Case Type

2016

2017 % change

Property Nuisance

2292

2209

-4%

Investigations (not counted until end of Q4 2015)

1020

1234

20%

BB Goals / Obstructions

10

31

210%

Garbage & Waste (bulk piles, leaves & etc)

33

91

175%

Minimum Housing Standards

115

68

-41%

6

9

50%

Miscellaneous (livestock, stormwater, etc.)

73

98

34%

Parking Violations (tickets, commercial vehicles, etc.)

70

293

318%

Vehicle - Front Yard Parking

187

350

87%

Vehicle Violations (junk & abandoned)

906

892

-2%

Zoning Violations (signs, permits, COC's, etc.)

55

124

125%

Stagnant Water

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COMMUNITY OUTREACH & EDUCATION

The Community Outreach and Education Unit is comprised of a sergeant and 18 school resource officers. The unit’s ultimate responsibility is to ensure a safe and secure environment for students, faculty, and others who work and visit our schools, while providing educational programs to the students. Community Outreach officers also provide operational support to the patrol bureau during periods when school is not in session. PHOTO: HHP/HAROLD HINSON


PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

& PROPERTY CONTROL CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION FORENSICS The Forensics & Property Control is comprised of a sergeant, The Criminal Investigations Division is comprised of one captain, three sergeants, and 12 investigators. The division is responsible for providing the Patrol Bureau with operational support through the investigation, relentless follow-up, and case management of felony crimes that are complex and severe in nature; providing forensic and other crime scene services; assisting in the collection and storage of evidence and other property coming into the department’s possession; managing property control and identification processes and records; conducting vice and narcotics related investigations; and investigating any other crimes as directed by the chief of police.

Criminal Investigations Case Assignments Case Type

Assigned

Assaults w/ weapon

11

Aggravated Assault

6

Arson

2

Burglary Cyber Bullying / Stalking Fraud Homicide

123 7 208 2

Missing Persons / Runaways

72

Rape

10

Robbery

21

Stalking

2

Shoot Into Occupied Property

10

In 2017 the division was assigned 905 cases, which included incidents of homicide, serious assaults and crimes against women and children.

two forensic investigators, and two civilian property control custodians. The section is responsible for the operation of all identification systems, the maintenance of criminal, fingerprint, and photographic records, forensic examination of friction ridge skin impressions, documents and surveillance video as well as crime scene and other evidentiary support to the department. The section continues to conduct complex forensic crime scene investigations, while providing training and equipment to crime scene technicians assigned to the patrol bureaus. In 2017, forensic investigators made 110 suspect identifications from prints obtained while processing crime scenes. Many of these identifications led to the clearance of criminal cases and suspect arrests. A crucial responsibility of Forensics & Property Control is maintaining secure custody of property and evidence that comes into the possession of the department. Both civilian custodians maintain certification from the Association of Property and Evidence.

MAJOR CRIMES The section is responsible for investigating major criminal cases such as homicide, sexual assault, serious assaults, crimes against children and the elderly, and any crime deemed to be exigent in nature.

2017 Major Crimes Case Type Homicide

% Cleared 0%

Arson

25%

Burglary

22%

Aggravated Assault

54%

Sex Offenses

74%

Robbery

36%

Fraud

32%

Missing Person

97%

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SPECIAL OPERATIONS Division

The Special Operations Division is responsible for providing operational support by utilizing a variety of special teams, intervention strategies, and tactics. In 2017, the division continued it’s partnership with the Patrol Bureau and in other areas of the community to increase the quality of life within the city. The overall goal of Special Operations is to reduce levels of crime, fear of crime, and disorder while improving the quality of life for the citizens and businesses of Concord, as well as it’s visitors.

AIRPORT UNIT

The unit is comprised of a sergeant and four officers that are responsible for enhancing the safety for visitors and employees of the Concord Regional Airport. In addition to responding to emergency and non-emergency calls for service, the unit protects the airport from security breaches by using a combination of foot, bicycle and motor vehicle patrols while conducting frequent inspections of secure and non-secure areas.

PUBLIC SAFETY UNIT

The Public Safety Unit consists of one sergeant, four traffic officers, one center city officer, one city hall officer, one park patrol officer, one parking enforcement officer along with 12 school crossing guards. The Public Safety Unit is responsible for enhancing traffic safety activities as well as providing an enhanced visible presence in Concord’s Center City, city hall and the parks and greenways.

School Resource Officers at National Night Out events

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STREET CRIMES UNIT

The newly formed Street Crimes Unit presently consists of two sergeants and two officers with six additional officers coming in 2018. During the execution of their duties, the unit provides highly visible and proactive policing throughout the city aimed at stopping and preventing street-level crime and disorder, while assisting patrol resources through evidence-based community policing strategies. The unit will be deployed in areas dictated by the needs of district captain’s utilizing tangible crime and data analysis. The ultimate goal of the unit is to facilitate safe, sustainable neighborhoods and public spaces within the City of Concord.

VICE & NARCOTICS

The Vice/Narcotics Unit is comprised of one sergeant and four officers. It is responsible for the proactive investigation of crime such as the sale and manufacturing of illegal narcotics, gambling, prostitution, and the gathering of gang intelligence. The officer assigned to ABC Enforcement is responsible for ensuring that local establishments selling alcoholic beverages are compliant to the state regulations and have updated and proper permits.


SWAT

Due to the increased percentage of overdoses and deaths during 2017, the division implemented a tracking process for the number of opiate related incidents. Data collected by line officers was used by Vice and Narcotics to make arrests and build cases against narcotics dealers. Once the information was collected and analyzed, “Operation Grey” was conducted targeting heroin dealers that resulted in 20 arrests, four search warrants, and 82 criminal charges. During 2017, Vice & Narcotics seized over 23 firearms and over $87,000 in cash in the course of charging numerous subjects for narcotic related offenses.

$87,000+ Cash

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Operation Gray

The Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team consists of two commanders, three team leaders, and 16 operators. The team is responsible for evaluating search warrants and assessing the risk associated with executing the warrants as codified by department policy and procedure. The team also executes search warrants deemed “high risk” and any other warrants as directed by the chief of police. Finally, the SWAT Team provides the department with a highly motivated, technically and tactically proficient special operations team capable of responding to a variety of critical incidents and resolving them with minimum risk to officers, suspects, and innocent parties. PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

20 Arrests

4 Search Warrants

82 Criminal Charges

Firearms SWAT tryouts

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Administration Bureau

The Administration Bureau of the Concord Police Department consists of Deputy Chief of Police Betty Stocks and such support staff as deemed necessary by the Chief of Police. The Administration Bureau is responsible for numerous aspects of the department outside of normal patrol and investigative functions. The bureau reviews policies and procedures to ensure they are up to date with current laws and court rulings. Budget oversight remains a major component of the Administration Bureau, as it continues to be responsible for budget management and preparation. Other responsibilities of the Administration Bureau include: staffing, grants, facilities management, information and vehicle technology, strategic planning, career development program, secondary employment, and the administering and planning of promotional processes. Promotion of MPO John Parker to rank of Sergeant

Deputy Chief Betty Stocks

SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION

700

on average

Walk-in customers assisted/month

MBA

Prior LE

Military

Total

4 10

0

15

3

30

AA

HS

6 16

BA

2 24

Separation Report

Black

Hispanic

Male

Female

Total

Sex

White

Race

Prior Experience

Education Female

8

Male

2017

20

Hispanic

Support Services Division goals for 2018 are to increase recruitment efforts and employment applications by 30% by implementing department based job fairs, open house sessions, and other strategies. Another goal of the division is to complete the implementation of the new federal reporting system National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) for collecting and reporting data on crimes to the FBI.

Black

2017

Sex

White

Race

The Support Services Division is responsible for recruiting new officers, conducting the hiring process, managing training for all officers to include state mandated in-service, and coordinating the career development program. The division also includes the records management section and customer service. In 2017, 30 new officers were hired. As with 2016, attrition from retirements, resignations, and terminations resulted in the department losing 29 officers within the same time frame.

Customer Service

22

Hiring Report

22

5

2

22

7

29

Telephone Reporting Unit (TRU)

83 Reports Conducted Customer Service Representative


PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT, ANALYSIS AND PLANNING The Office of Management, Analysis and Planning (OMAP) is responsible for research, analysis, project management, tactical and strategic planning, fleet management, and creating and maintaining partnerships with community organizations and other government agencies. OMAP manages two aspects for the department:

CRIME ANALYST The crime analyst is responsible for collecting, collating, analyzing, disseminating, and evaluating crime data to identify emerging trends, patterns, and changes in criminal activity using mapping and analytical software. The analyst prepares crime data that is used to make recommendations for deployment and resource allocation, measures and forecasts long-term public safety activities related to problem solving, intervention, and crime reduction efforts.

PLANNING AND LOGISTICS This aspect of OMAP includes one sergeant that is responsible for planning, scheduling, and coordinating department personnel and resources for secondary employment, special events, and any other gatherings or events as directed by the chief of police. The sergeant is also responsible for planning, coordinating, preparing, and publishing department orders, directives, surveys, and other information intended for department-wide dissemination. Finally, the Planning and Logistics sergeant is responsible for researching and applying for alternate sources of funding. The grant management process includes but is not limited to monitoring grant awards, expenditures, compliance, and periodic reporting as required by a grantor.

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Commendations Co-worker of the Year Officer Angel Gonzalez

Officer Angel Gonzalez has been awarded the distinction of being Officer of the Year for the Concord Police Department for 2017. This honor has been bestowed upon him for the hard work and dedication he exhibited throughout the year. Officer Gonzalez was first selected for Co-worker of the Month in May for the work he did during a child sexual assault investigation. Officer Gonzalez’s patience and tenacity were instrumental in gaining a confession from the suspect in this case, which ultimately led to his conviction.

In June, Officer Gonzalez was selected as Co-worker of the Month for the work he did in solving an armed robbery in Baker

district. Officer Gonzalez was thorough in his investigation and did not stop interviewing the victim and suspects until he was satisfied that he had obtained truthful and accurate information which culminated in the arrest of the offenders involved.

Finally, in December Officer Gonzalez was asked to assist a teammate with a stolen vehicle investigation. After reviewing some video and looking over the notes, Gonzalez went to speak to a contact he had in the community. While there, he noticed a vehicle parked a few houses down from where he was, and on a hunch decided to go talk to the people standing outside near the car. One of the people standing there then said, “You’re here about the stolen vehicle aren’t you?” From there Officer Gonzalez was able to identify and locate a suspect and gain a confession. Officer Gonzalez has been recognized for his personal motivation, excellent teamwork and the professionalism that he displayed over the duration of the calendar year of 2017. His exemplary job performance demonstrates his dedication to this department and more importantly to the public to which we all serve.

Life Saving Award & Valorous Medal (Civilian) MPO Corey Hynson & Rodney Smith, Concord Parks and Rec – Logan Center Supervisor

On January 12th, 2017, City of Concord employees Rodney Smith and Officer Corey Hynson were recognized by the Mayor, City Council and Police Chief Gary Gacek for their life saving efforts in December 2016. During a basketball game, 16 year old Tyler Brock collapsed as he was coming off the basketball court. Officer Hynson was on-site providing security for the athletic events. Officer Hynson quickly reached Tyler and checked for a heartbeat and breathing. Tyler presented no signs of life. Officer Hynson initiated CPR on Tyler and radioed for medical assistance from Concord Fire and Cabarrus EMS. Rodney Smith was able to locate the facility’s AED. After a cycle of CPR by Officer Hynson, the AED was activated and applied to Tyler. After one shock by the AED, Tyler regained a heartbeat and was transported to a local hospital for an unknown heart condition.

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Rodney Smith was presented the Valorous Conduct Award by Chief Gary Gacek. This is the highest award of recognition that a citizen can be awarded by the Concord Police Department. Officer Cory Hynson was awarded the Life Saving Award. Tyler and his family attended the City Council meeting also.


Jo Atwater Continuous Core Values Award Winner Deputy Chief Betty Stocks

On April 13, 2017, Concord City Council recognized Deputy Chief Betty Stocks with the 2017 Jo Atwater Continuous Service Award. The Jo Atwater Service Award is the highest professional honor a City of Concord coworker can receive. Each year nominations are accepted to honor one coworker who best embodies the City of Concord’s core values and commitment to serving others in the community. Deputy Chief Stocks has served the citizens of Concord for over 27 years in various roles with the Concord Police Department and volunteer work within the community. As a life long resident of Concord, Deputy Chief Stocks has consistently remained committed to serving and protecting others within her community.

Chief’s Superior Leadership Award

Distinguished Service Award

Captain Todd McGhee & Captain Vashon Clark

Captain Deckster Barlowe & MPO Tim Mullins

This award is presented for leadership excellence in the pursuit of the department’s mission. In 2017, Captains Clark and McGhee directed efforts that resulted in noticeable crime reductions in their respective districts due to their leadership, planning, and implementation of evidence-based community policing strategies.

June 5, 2017.

These results are a testament to the excellent work that our officers do each day to implement strategies that reduce crime, fear, and disorder in the community. We congratulate Captains Clark and McGhee, and their hardworking team of officers and sergeants for their efforts in 2017.

Eventually, they were able to talk the individual into exiting his vehicle safely. Throughout the incident both Captain Barlowe and MPO Mullins worked to preserve the safety of the individual, the public and their fellow officers.

In 2017, Captain Clark led Adam District to a 37% reduction in violent crime, a 22% reduction in property crime and a 22% reduction in overall crime. Likewise, Captain McGhee led Baker District to a 27% reduction in violent crime, a 26% reduction in property crime, and 26% reduction in overall crime. As a whole, the department experienced an overall reduction in Part 1 crimes of 19% in 2017 after a 6% reduction in 2016.

On July 26, 2017, Captain Deckster Barlowe and Master Police Officer Tim Mullins received the department’s Distinguished Service Award. Both were given this award following an incident that occurred on

That evening both officers responded to a call to check the welfare of an armed individual suffering from a mental health crisis. Once located, Captain Barlowe and MPO Mullins began verbal communication with the individual which continued for the next 16 minutes. Knowing that the individual was suffering from a mental health crisis, they maintained their composure as not to escalate the situation.

Excellence in Police Service Award Sgt. Ramon Gonzalez – February

Sergeant Gonzalez was awarded the Excellence in Police Service Award following his investigative efforts that culminated in the arrest of several subjects responsible for 19 residential break-ins and 10 larcenies from motor vehicles in Baker District.

Officer Ryan Corl – April

Officer Corl received the Excellence in Police Service Award after diligently investigating a string of residential burglaries that culminated in the arrest of the offenders on numerous counts related to the incidents.

MPO Tracy Law – November

Master Police Officer Tracy Law was recognized for her continued dedication and commitment to the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) by being awarded the Excellence in Police Service Award.

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Stokes Lodge #32 Outstanding Service Award MPO Tracy Law

Master Police Officer Tracy Law was honored with the Stokes Lodge #32 Outstanding Service Award. Officer Law received the award for her efforts with Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training for officers of the department. The training teaches officers how to safely assist someone suffering from a mental health crisis.

Coworker of the Month – 2017 January

Ofc. Garron Lawing

February

MPO Brandon Banker & Ofc. Ryan Corl

March

Ofc. Jordon Compton

April

Ofc. Ryan Corl

May

Ofc. Angel Gonzalez

June

Ofc. Angel Gonzalez

July

Ofc. Ryan Corl

August

Det. Chris Smith

September

N/A

October Ofc. Josh Shaver, Ofc. Ronald Dorsey, & Ofc. Spencer Ward November

Ofc. Steven Williams

December

Ofc. Angel Gonzalez

Muck Run for Charity

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NASCAR Award of Excellence

In January, the City of Concord hosted the annual NASCAR Safety and Operations Summit at the Embassy Suites. The Concord Police Department and Charlotte Motor Speedway Security were recognized by NASCAR for their enhanced security efforts for the 2017 Bank of America 500 in October, which took place one week after the tragic shooting in Las Vegas. We are proud to work with all our partners to keep the public safe! In the attached group photo from right to left: Steve O’Donnell, Vice President of Racing Operations; Mike Helton, Vice Chairman of NASCAR; Concord Police Chief Gary Gacek, Tom Vesey, Charlotte Motor Speedway Security; and Mike Lentz, NASCAR Security Director.


On the Move 2017 Promotions Rank of Major Rank of Captain

Jimmy Hughes

Jeremy Baggarly

Rank of Sergeant

Aaron Myers

John Parker

Kelly Seagraves

Bradley Parker

Chris Smith

Ofc. David Callicutt 11 years

K9 Kilo 7 Years

Master Police Officer

Brandon Banker

Tim Carlson

Kenny Marckese

Retirements

MPO Thomas Purser 22 Years

Major Doug Wilhelm 21 Years

Jean Haskins 21 years

Active Military

MPO Timothy Carlson US Army Reserve

MPO Amanda Mayberry US Army Reserve

MPO Vance McGee US Army Reserve

MPO James Payne US Army Reserve

Ofc Luis Rodriguez USMC

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concordnc.gov/police 41 Cabarrus Ave. W Concord, NC 28025

Profile for City of Concord NC

Concord NC Police Annual Report 2017  

City of Concord NC - Police Department Annual Report

Concord NC Police Annual Report 2017  

City of Concord NC - Police Department Annual Report