__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Police Department

Annual Report July 1, 2015 - December 31, 2016


Vision A community where citizens and police work together, in harmony, to achieve the highest standards of public safety.

Mission In partnership with the community, we will reduce the levels of crime, fear, and disorder through evidence-based community policing strategies. We embrace transparency and accountability, provide exceptional service, and are committed to a culture of excellence.

2


Table of Contents Vision2 Mission2 Message from the Chief of Police

4

Core Values

6

Concord Quick Facts

7

2016 Organizational Chart

8

2016 Highlights

10

2017 Goals

11

Operating Expenditures

12

2016 Comparison to 10 Year Average

13

Statistical Data

14

Administration Bureau

16

Patrol Bureaus

18

Patrol Bureau East

20

Adam District Baker District East Investigations

Patrol Bureau West

22

Charlie District David District West Investigations

Special Operations Division

24

Major Crimes Division

26

2015-16 CPD on the Move

28

Promotions CPD Retirees Active Military & Deployment

2015-16 Commendations

3

30


Message from the

Chief of Police I am pleased to share with you the 2015/2016 Annual Report for the Concord Police Department. Much has been accomplished over the last 18-months, as you will read in the following pages. As a public safety provider, it is very important that we share the results of our work with the public. This Annual Report is one of the ways we do just that. I hope you find it informative. This is the first annual report to be published in the last few years. It is my intention to continue publishing these reports on an annual basis. The City of Concord’s fiscal year, like the rest of North Carolina, runs from July 1st to June 30th. However, crime statistics and other performance measures are typically reported to the state and federal government on a calendar year basis. In this report – and future reports – we will provide financial and budgetary information based upon the prior fiscal year (ending June 30th), while providing crime statistics and other operational information for the prior calendar year (ending December 31st). Although statistically modest, Concord experienced a reduction in Part 1 crime in 2016. This reduction is compelling considering that crime increased in some parts of our state and in several large metropolitan areas across the country in 2016. Dispatched calls for service and self-initiated activity both increased in 2016. I commend the officers, detectives, sergeants, and support staff for working hard on behalf of our community and successfully executing our evidenced-based community policing strategy. The department experienced significant growth over the last 18-months. We took advantage of state funding to add nine school resource officers to our elementary schools and a sergeant to supervise the entire school resource officer program. Newly constructed city infrastructure spurred additional growth. A full time officer was added to city hall and four officers and a sergeant were added to provide an almost 24/7 presence at the Concord Regional Airport’s new 4


commercial terminal. Four officers and a sergeant were added to supplement patrol staffing. When filled, these positions will be used to create a proactive policing unit in late spring 2017. Other accomplishments include bicycle patrols, re-designed patrol vehicles, body worn cameras, and a re-alignment of the department’s organizational structure. We introduced a new fleet of patrol bicycles last summer as a means to enhance our engagement with the community. More bicycles and bicycle patrols will be added in 2017. Department staff participated in a survey and expressed interest in a new vehicle design. They overwhelmingly voted to return to a classic black and white look. Former Chief Guy Smith led an effort to purchase body cameras for every officer. In March 2016 we completed testing, negotiated a multi-year contract for video storage, and deployed body cameras citywide. Finally, we reorganized to match our patrol and investigative efforts around geographic areas of responsibility to improve accountability. I am so very proud of the men and women of this department who dedicate their lives to providing Concord’s citizens, visitors, and businesses with a variety of public safety services. I am also proud of the strong and effective relationships that we have with other city departments; our local, county, state, and federal law enforcement partners; and our community, business, and faith based organizations. We could not achieve our mission without these partnerships. None of the progress and achievements outlined in this report could be possible without the unwavering support of Mayor Scott Padgett, City Council, City Manager Brian Hiatt and his staff, and the citizens of this great community. On behalf of the heroes I have the privilege to work with every day, thank you for your continued support.

Gary J. Gacek Chief of Police Concord, NC

5


Core Values COMPETENCE

INTEGRITY

RESPECT

We are prudent stewards of the public’s grant of authority and resources. We are accountable for the quality of our performance and the standards of our conduct.

We recognize the complexity of police work and exercise discretion in ways that are beyond reproach and worthy of public trust. Honesty and truthfulness are fundamental elements of integrity. It is our duty to earn public trust through consistent words and actions. We are honest in word and deed.

We hold life in the highest regard. We treat all citizens and colleagues with dignity and respect, and are fair and impartial as we perform our duties. We openly and effectively communicate with the public and each other by sharing information and soliciting feedback to accomplish the department’s vision and mission.

COURAGE

LEADERSHIP

RESTRAINT

We place the safety of others before our own and accept our moral responsibility to take action against injustice and wrongdoing. Coworkers are expected to take prudent risks on behalf of the public.

We seek to influence human behavior to achieve organizational goals that serve the public while developing individuals, teams and the organization for future service. We accept our responsibility to be leaders, both within the community and among our peers, and for the actions of our colleagues and ourselves. We are all responsible for the performance, reputation and morale of the department.

We use the minimum force and authority necessary to accomplish a proper police purpose. We demonstrate self-discipline, even when no one is listening or watching.

6


Concord Quick Facts Concord's history dates back over 200 years and serves as the county seat of Cabarrus County. In the late 1700s, there was a disagreement between the German and Scotch-Irish settlements in the area over exactly where the county seat of the newly formed county of Cabarrus should be located. A compromise was eventually reached, and the new city was founded in 1796 on a 26 acre site.

NASCAR attendance 2015

190,532

2016

203,303

The city was named Concord, meaning "harmony," to reflect the spirit in which the issue was settled. When you look at Concord today you see the wonderful mixture of progress and heritage and the perfect blend of business, industrial, and residential life. Concord is the home of attractions such as the Charlotte Motor Speedway and Concord Mills Mall. The city is progressive in meeting the ever changing needs of its citizens while maintaining its small town charm.

Carolina Rebellion attendance 2015

66,000

2016

85,000

NHRA attendance 2015

48,843

2016

84,752

City Growth 2015-16

Population: 85,428 (estimated by NC State Demographers office) (State’s 12th largest city in population) Median age: 35.5 (U.S. Census Bureau) Single Family Residences: 33,137 (U.S. Census Bureau) Square Miles: 6  1.354 (State’s 7th largest city in land area)

Annexations: 1.39 square miles

7


2016 Organizational Chart

Executive Assistants

Gary J. Gacek Chief of Police

Deputy Chief Betty Stocks Administration Bureau

Captain Alan Lee Support Services Division

Major Keith Eury

Major Doug Wilhelm

Patrol Bureau East

Patrol Bureau West

Captain Vashon Clark

Captain John Tierney

Adam District

Charlie District

Captain Patrick Tierney Special Operations Division

Captain Bobby Ledwell Major Crimes Division

Recruiting & Training

Code Enforcement

Forensics & Property Control

Customer Service

Community Outreach & Education

Major Crimes

Public Safety Unit

Vice & Narcotics

S.W.A.T.

Captain Jimmy Hughes

Captain Todd McGhee

Captain Deckster Barlowe

Baker District

David District

East Investigations

West Investigations

Management Analysis & Planning Crime & Strategic Analysis Planning & Logistics Information Technology 8


cord Police n o C Staffing

Reason for Reorganization

Chief of Police

1

Office of the Chief

2

Administration Bureau

17

Patrol Bureau East

64

Patrol Bureau West

54

Special Operations Major Crimes

75 18

The desicion to re-organize and the resulting restructuring were not taken lightly. The decision to restructure came after several months of assessment, which included formal and informal meetings and conversations with a variety of coworkers, city management, and the community. Chief Gacek conferred with his staff and conducted a significant amount of research before concluding that a re-organization would make the department even more efficient and effective.

These changes are being made because we have the right ingredients to make the Concord Police Department a model agency and shining example of 21st Century policing at its best. With a new recipe for re-organization, we are confident we will get there.

• Delineate administrative and operational components more clearly • Hold executive and command staff more accountable, while giving them the resources and authority they need to be successful • Provide true ownership over geography, while providing operational support that is accountable and responsive to the needs of patrol • Improve the way we communicate with each other by creating a structure that significantly reduces assumptions as to who is going to be responsible for what • Develop closer relationships between patrol and investigative functions • Consolidate the planning function for special events and off duty employment • Engage in strategic planning, and become more inclusive of others within the organization understanding our shared future


2016 Highlights Public Safety Unit participated in 18 educational events such as bike safety classes. Parking Enforcement issued over 2,400 parking citations in the center city area for violations. The traffic enforcement officers participated in 14 multi-agency checking stations culminating in 38 arrests of intoxicated drivers. Community Outreach and Education Unit conducted numerous visits to daycares to teach students about gun safety, stranger danger, and about how the police work within their communities. Also in partnership with the city of Concord Parks and Recreation and the Cabarrus County Boys and Girls Club officers assisted with summer camps where they interacted with over 300 students. Property and Evidence Section received over 5,500 items for storage. Code Enforcement Division conducted almost 9,000 inspections. Each officer averaged over six inspections per day.

CIT

(Crisis Intervention Team) GOAL: every officer below the rank of captain to attend this 40 hour class

2015

32 officers

2016

19 officers

Total officers trained since 2008: 107

New Positions Street Crimes Unit 4 police officers 1 sergeant Concord Regional Airport 4 police officers 1 sergeant Community Outreach & Education 9 school resource officers 1 SRO sergeant City Hall 1 officer

10


2017 Goals Patrol Bureau Adam District

Increase community awareness to reduce victimization and to improve police/community communication.

Baker District

Achieve a sustainable reduction in youth crime and disorder through cooperation with juvenile justice officials. The district will also work to successfully reduce the amount of property crimes, such as larcenies from vehicles and burglaries, by 10%.

Charlie District

Decrease the overall number of property crimes district-wide. Also the district officers will work with the established communities and residents to obtain a 50% usage of Nextdoor.com to better communicate with its residents.

Code Enforcement Division’s objectives

for 2017 are to begin the enforcement of the new sign standards set forth by City Council, increase efforts to correct and/ or remove vacant and sub-standard homes. The division will also attempt to increase their enforcement capabilities within center city neighborhoods in an effort to improve the overall quality of life.

David District

Increase traffic enforcement and security checks in the Concord Mills / Bruton Smith Blvd. area by 10% and to develop partnerships with those newly established residential developments.

Community Outreach and Education Unit will

increase the number of certified Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) instructors during the summer break. The unit will also designate some School Resource Officers (S.R.O.) to develop and implement summer camps that address high school aged youth. Additionally, the unit will finalize and present a “Youth Police Academy” with the first block of instruction being techniques of traffic Investigation. 11


Operating Expenditures Total Expenditures

2015 $18,392,473 Cost Allocations Capital Outlay Operations

3% 3%

Capital Outlay

Personnel Services

15%

5%

Cost Allocations

Debt Services

6%

2016 $18,014,601 4% 4%

Operations

73%

27

10

11

10

5 4 3

Ea st Ad O f m fic in e o ist f ra th tio e n Ch Bu ie Co M re f . m a m jor au un C ity rim O Pu & u es Co b E t nc Co lic du rea or de Sa ca ch d E fe tio Re nf ty n gi orc U on e ni al me t Ai nt rp or t

Bu ol rtr

&

Pa

Pa

rtr

ol

Bu re

au

re au

W

es

t

30

Amery’s Army Teddy Bear donation

12

Personnel Services 72%

15%

2016 Salary Costs $10,911,088

%

Debt Services


2016 Comparison to 10 Year Average

Chief Gacek speaking at a crime and safety meeting

Compared to the ten year average, these Part I crimes have seen a reduction in incidents.

 -24%

Total Part I Crimes

   -28%

Robbery

-17%

Aggravated Assaults

-21%

Capt. Clark receiving Logan Service Award

 

Burglary Downtown Summer Concert Series

-24%

Halloween Candy Crawl

   -24%

Larceny

-40%

Property Crime

Motor Vehicle Theft

-19%

-27%

Violent Crime

Arson

13


Statistical Data Calls For Service

Traffic Stops

120,000

50,000

100,000 40,000

80,000 30,000

60,000 20,000

40,000

10,000

20,000

0

0

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Calls For Service 2015 † 2016

Traffic Stops 2015 † 2016

-4%

-6%

13.8%

48.5%

Arrests 2015 † 2016

Part 1 Crimes 2015 † 2016

Arrests Arrests

Part 1 Crimes

15,000

4,000 3,500

12,000 3,000 2,500

9,000

2,000 6,000

1,500 1,000

3000

500 0

0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

14


Statistical Data 2007 – 2016 Uniform Crime Report Numbers % change 2016 2015-16

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

7

7

7

5

2

3

7

2

5

5

21

26

21

16

14

22

14

13

17

18

6%

Robbery

102

88

73

58

40

45

53

45

58

48

-17%

Agg. Assault

101

49

85

63

52

41

56

47

56

56

Burglary

479

537

539

356

461

479

442

353

298

349

17%

Larceny Theft

855

778

687

616

873

796

688

658

566

468

-17%

Larceny From MV

770

758

856

761

899

775

508

516

470

585

24%

MV Theft

252

257

253

185

152

157

119

118

112

117

4%

21

16

6

24

11

21

6

8

7

10

43%

Shoplifting

842

899

1,060

1,028

857

988

1,027

882

981

761

-22%

Violent Crimes

231

170

186

142

108

111

130

107

138

127

-8%

Property Crimes

3,219

3,245

3,401

2,970

3,253

3,216

2,790

2,535

2,434

2,290

-6%

Total Part I Crimes

3,450

3,415

3,587

3,112

3,361

3,327

2,920

2,642

2,572

2,417

-6%

Population

68,249

71,071

79,673

81,370

79,521

80,386

81,461

83,279

85,428

87,452

2%

Crime Murder Rape

Arson

           

Officer Trey Brown and K9 Rico

15


Administration Bureau The Administration Bureau is responsible for numerous aspects of the department outside of normal patrol and investigative functions. The bureau reviews policies and procedures to ensure they are up to date with current laws and court rulings. Budget oversight Deputy Chief Betty Stocks is also a major component of the Administration Bureau, as it is responsible for its management and preparation. Other areas the Administration Bureau is responsible for include: staffing, grants, facilities management, information and vehicle technology, strategic planning, career development program, secondary employment and the administering and planning of promotional processes.

SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION The Support Services Division is responsible for recruiting new officers, conducting the hiring process, managing training for all officers to include state mandated inservice, and coordinating the career development program. The division also includes the records management section, fleet management, and customer service. From July 1, 2015 through December 31, 2016, 36 new officers were hired. However with attrition from retirements, resignations and terminations, the department lost 28 officers within the same time frame. Support Services Division goals for 2017 are to improve retention and decrease the turnover rate to approximately 6% which should put the department at around five vacancies. Also to train the department’s records staff in preparation for the state transition to National IncidentBased Reporting System (NIBRS), which is currently scheduled for implementation January 1, 2019. And finally to increase the Telephone Reporting Unit (TRU) reporting to approximately 16% by the end of 2017. Currently reports taken by TRU are at 7-8% monthly. OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT, ANALYSIS AND PLANNING This component of the department is responsible for research, analysis, project management, tactical and strategic planning, and creating partnerships with community organizations and other government agencies. The Office of Management, Analysis and Planning (OMAP) manages two aspects for the department: PLANNING AND LOGISTICS The Planning and Logistics sergeant is responsible for planning, scheduling, and coordinating department personnel and resources for secondary duty employment, special events, and any other gatherings or events as directed by the chief of police. He is also responsible for planning, coordinating, preparing, and publishing department orders, directives, surveys, and other information intended for department-wide dissemination. Finally, the Planning and Logistics sergeant is responsible for researching and applying for alternate sources of funding. The grant management process includes but is not limited to monitoring grant awards, expenditures, compliance, and periodic reporting as required by a grantor.

Law Enforcement Memorial Day

16

CRIME ANALYST The department’s crime analyst is responsible for collecting, collating, analyzing, disseminating, and evaluating crime data to identify emerging trends, patterns, and changes in criminal activity using mapping and analytical software. The analyst prepares crime data that is used to make recommendations for deployment and resource allocation, measures and forecasts long-term public safety activities related to problem solving, intervention, and crime reduction efforts.


2016 Recruiting Open House

Hiring Report

4

1

24

3

21

1

2

1

3

3

9

4

1

12

7

27

Separation Report

Black

Male

Female

3&4Q 2015

6

2

7

1

8

2016

17

3

17

3

20

Total

White

11/21/2016 6/21/2016 11/21/2016 5/9/2016 2/15/2016 6/21/2016 3/28/2016 1/4/2016 11/21/2016 11/21/2016 9/26/2016 9/12/2016 2/1/2016 2/15/2016 2/15/2016 12/5/2016 11/7/2016 1/4/2016 11/21/2016 8/15/2016 10/24/2016 8/1/2016 6/21/2016 8/29/2016 8/29/2026 11/21/2016 8/29/2016

Sex Hispanic

Race

2016 Boyce, Daquan Brown, Zach Cline, Curtis Costin, Eric Cruse, Tracy Diley, Kory Frantz, Courtney Griener, Jason Guiterrez, Paulina Haberny, Brian Holmes, David Hynson, Corey Jamieson, Matt Johnson, Dorian Johnson, Khalif Julian, Jeremy King, Ian Lowder, Jonathan Mertz, David Nydes, Ben Parrish, Hobie Patrick, Joe Riddick, Fred Roth, Tyler Stamey, Ashlyn Walter, Lucas Ward, Spencer

Total

6

Military

1

Prior LE

8

MBA

22

1

BA

2016

HS

8

Female

3& 4Q 2015

Prior Experience

Education

Male

8/17/2015 10/26/2015 9/14/2015 10/12/2015 7/20/2015 8/17/2015 8/3/2015 11/23/2015 10/26/2015

Sex Hispanic

Compton, Jordan Cox, Eric Dover, Paul Frank, CJ Gacek, Gary Garrow, Caleb Hartman, Julia Newcomb, Larry Wroblewski, Ben

White

3& 4Q 2015

Black

Race

AA

New Hires

Retirement of Major Doug Wilhelm and Officer Larry Rucker

Customer Service Records

Fleet Report

2015

2016

Reports Taken

469

292

Vehicles Purchased

Calls Dispatched

883

996

Purchase Cost

Telephone Reporting Unit

2015 Miles Traveled

Processed by Records - Daily Records Review Incident Reports

4,426

4,288

Arrest Reports

5,240

5,001

Accident Reports

4,020

4,181

Citations

2016

2,200,673

2,117,354

24

38

$641,419

$1,060,483

Vehicles Surplused

15

31

Surplused Revenue

$40,448

$83,349

11,150

Field Contacts

4,520

17

Recruiting photo


Patrol Bureaus

WEST • Comprised of Charlie and David Districts. • Serves a population of 40,834 citizens over 34 miles. This is a population density of 1,200 people per square mile. • 40 patrol officers, 8 Sergeants, 2 Captains • 1 Investigative Sergeant and 2 Investigators

18


EAST • Comprised of Adam and Baker Districts. • Serves a population of 40,715 citizens over 26 miles. This is a population density of 1,566 people per square mile. • 48 patrol officers, 8 Sergeants, 2 Captains • 1 Investigative Sergeant and 4 Investigators

19


Patrol Bureau East The Patrol Bureau East encompasses the historic sections of the City of Concord. During 2016 the eastern bureau experienced a 17% overall decline in Part I crimes. Violent crimes in the eastern bureau declined by 9% while property crimes declined by 17% compared to 2015. This was Major Keith Eury accomplished by utilizing crime statistics and intelligence to ensure that officers were in locations at or near the times that most of the criminal acts were being committed. One significant change during 2016 was the addition of an Investigative Unit that was solely responsible for investigating criminal activity within the boundaries of the eastern bureau. With the addition of the Investigative Unit and maintaining an open line of communication between the patrol districts, information exchange proved to be the necessary key to not only prevent crime, but to apprehend those that had committed the acts. During 2016, violent crime arrests increased 27%, however property crime arrests decreased by 17%. During the summer of 2016, the department implemented a new bike patrol program. In the early stages of the program, many of the department’s school resource officers were utilized for bike patrols while area students were out of school on summer vacation. The bike patrols were concentrated in densely populated neighborhoods that mainly exist within the eastern bureau. The eastern bureau saw the benefits of the bike patrols with enhanced officer presence in areas historically more susceptible to crime and disorder. Response regarding the bike patrols from the eastern bureau residents have been positive. Residents appreciated the extra patrols and being able to get to know the officers by putting a name and face together.

The eastern bureau also oversees many diverse events within the city. During the course of the year the eastern bureau is the location for many city sponsored events such as the downtown concert series, arts festivals and the annual Christmas Parade. Consists of two patrol zones and an investigative unit: ADAM DISTRICT Adam District has an area of approximately 8.6 square miles and has a residential population of over 16,000. Within the district, there are nine educational institutes and seven recreational parks and facilities. With 29 officers assigned to the patrol district, Adam District has community partnerships with eight established neighborhoods. Major employment and economic facilities within the district include ACN, Carolinas HealthCare System NorthEast and the Carolina Mall. BAKER DISTRICT Baker District encompasses and area of approximately 17.5 square miles and has a residential population of over 23,800 residents. There are seven educational institutes within the district as well as six recreational parks and facilities. Baker District has 10 active neighborhood partnerships and has 29 officers serving the district. Baker District is also home to the Hartsell Ballfield complex that has on several occasions been the host of the numerous AAU baseball tournaments and championships. EAST INVESTIGATIONS Consists of a supervising sergeant and four investigators.

First Bicycle Patrol - 2016 NASCAR Hauler Parade

20


With the implementation of Adam District’s bike patrol program, the district’s larger neighborhoods were divided into bike patrol response zones. During 2016 Adam District conducted over 690 hours of bike patrols and over 440 hours of officer foot patrols.

Adam District Crime

2015

2016

51

57

12%

15

24

60%*

869

723

-17%

95

82

-14%

149

116

-22%

112

57

-49%

Violent Crime Aggravated Assaults Property Crime Burglary Theft/Larceny Checkpoints

Captain Vashon Clark

In 2016, Adam District officers increased their self-initiated activity by 36%. During 2016 Baker District conducted over 660 hours of foot patrols and over 1,800 hours of bike patrols. Baker District’s 18% overall decrease in crime is attributed to the practice of data-driven policing which allowed resources to be deployed in the appropriate areas during times where criminal activity was more prone to occur.

% Change

     

*Adam District saw a moderate increase in violent crime in 2016 as opposed to 2015 that is predominately attributed to an increase in aggravated assaults. The vast majority of the aggravated assaults that occurred within the district during 2016 occurred between individuals that were known to each other. Along with the rise in incidents, the district arrests for aggravated assaults also saw an increase of 29%.

Baker District Crime

2015

2016

Violent Crime

59

44

-25%*

Robbery

20

10

-50%*

Property Crime

558

462

-17%

Theft/Larceny

159

112

-30%

24

19

-21%

141

87

-38%

Motor Vehicle Theft Checkpoints

% Change

     

*Baker District experienced great success with it's efforts to reduce crime within it's boundaries. The district experienced double digit reductions in both violent and property crimes in 2016 as compared to 2015.

Captain Todd McGhee

In 2016, Baker District officers increased their self-initiated activity by 18%.

East Investigations 2016 Case Type Fraud Sex Offenses

111

Cleared 31

% Cleared 28%

8

7

88%

Missing Person

46

46

100%

Robbery

12

6

50%

Assault

9

5

56%

Burglary

78

41

53%

7

4

57%

Arson

21

Assigned


Patrol Bureau West The Patrol Bureau West covers a land mass of over 34 square miles with a full time population of approximately 40,000. The western bureau ended 2016 with a 9% increase in Part I crimes, with the main increase in the areas of property crimes which increased 10%, mainly due to rises in incidents Major Doug Wilhelm such as burglaries and larcenies from vehicles. The bureau successfully saw a 7% decrease in the occurrence of violent crimes during 2016 as compared to 2015. As with the eastern bureau, the addition of an Investigative Unit that focused primarily with incidents occurring within the western bureau, provided a new resource in battling the rise in property crimes. To attack the increase in burglaries, mainly within Charlie District, patrol officers and west investigators used crime statistics to determine the times where the majority of residential burglaries were taking place. Information obtained through reported incidents and investigations, found that there were certain days of the week that a residential burglary would occur. Using this information, patrol officers were distributed to the proper locations during these times in attempts to curtail the actions. This effort successfully produced a 33% increase in burglary arrests within the bureau as 2016 came to a completion. Another area of concern that was a focus of the western bureau was curtailing the number of larcenies from motor vehicles, specifically within the areas immediately surrounding Bruton Smith/ Concord Mills Boulevard areas. As with the eastern bureau, bike patrol officers were utilized to patrol the parking areas of hotels, restaurants and shopping areas during high peak hours. Western investigations and patrol officers maintained open communications with other local law enforcement agencies and shared intelligence on possible suspects and similar methods that were being used. Habitat for Humanity Key Ceremony

22

The western bureau not only saw a reduction in the number of violent crimes committed in 2016, the arrests for the number of violent crimes that were committed increased 33% as compared to 2015. Consists of two patrol zones and an investigative unit: CHARLIE DISTRICT The 26 officers assigned to Charlie District are responsible for patrolling and responding to calls in an area of approximately 20.7 square miles. The district is a mixture of commercial and residential areas and has a residential population of over 27,400 residents. However, Charlie District continues to see a rise in both commercial and residential construction within its boundaries. DAVID DISTRICT David District has 26 officers assigned to its area of responsibility. The district had been predominantly commercial, however over the last several years residential construction has increased. It is estimated that David District currently has approximately 14,000 permanent residents. David District is the home of Concord Mills Mall, Concord Regional Airport, Charlotte Motor Speedway, Z-Max Drag way, and Great Wolf Lodge along with numerous other commercial attractions. WEST INVESTIGATIONS Consists of a supervising sergeant and two investigators.


In 2016 Charlie District officers increased foot patrol operations within its neighborhoods and business areas. Charlie District performed over 700 hours of foot patrols, along with security checks and bike patrols, increasing the districts

community engagement.

Charlie District Crime

2015 13

16

23%

Robbery

3

9

200%*

Aggravated Assaults

6

3

-50%

269

388

44%

Burglary

52

102

96%**

Motor Vehicle Theft

26

24

-8%

55

25

-55%

Checkpoints

In 2016, Charlie District officers increased their self-initiated activity by 28% and conducted over 9,000 residential and commercial security checks. In 2016 David District conducted over 521 hours of foot patrols and have begun to utilize bike officers to supplement patrol in many areas near Concord Mills Mall to increase community engagement.

% Change

Violent Crime

Property Crime

Captain John Tierney

2016

      

*Charlie District did see an increase in violent crime in 2016 compared to 2015, especially in the area of robbery. By pooling information and intelligence between Charlie District officers, West Investigations and the Major Crimes Division, 7 arrests were made. One particular subject was responsible for robbing commercial pharmacies on more than one occasion. The subject was ultimately charged with all of the robberies he was responsible for in Charlie District as well as those committed in two other jurisdictions. ** To attack this problem, Charlie District worked with probation and parole and the other patrol districts to research individual’s residing within the district who were currently on probation for burglary or recently released from custody. By identifying these individuals, several offenders were later apprehended for numerous residential and business break-ins. Charlie District officers also worked to lower the amount of property crimes by engaging the community to make them aware of how to better protect their homes and property, and by data analysis to place manpower in the appropriate areas at the times the incidents were being committed.

David District Crime

2015

2016

Violent Crime

15

10

Robbery

7

5

Aggravated Assaults

7

4

Property Crime Captain Deckster Barlowe

In 2016, David District had a total of 24,865 overall calls for service. Of the total CFS, over 16,000 were officer initiated calls which accounted for over 64% of the districts calls.

739

717

Larceny from MV

170

211

Larceny

180

147

6

0

Checkpoints

% Change

  -43%  -3%  24%*  -18%  -100%*  -33%

-29%

*David District saw a moderate increase in the number of vehicle break-ins during 2016. It is estimated that approximately 80,000 vehicles enter David District each day. In an effort to lower the amount of vehicle break-ins, David District officers conducted over 520 hours of foot patrols and began using officers on bike patrols, specifically in the parking lots of Concord Mills Mall to detect and deter any individuals committing this offense. Officers also attempted to educate the public about locking their vehicles and securing their belongings. Of the 211 incidents, 112 vehicles were unlocked with valuables in immediate view.

West Investigations 2016 Case Type Fraud Sex Offenses Missing Person

23

Assigned

Cleared

% Cleared

103

16

16%

6

5

83%

14

14

100%

Robbery

5

2

40%

Burglary

78

41

53%


Special Operations Division The Special Operations Division is responsible for providing operational support by using a variety of specialized teams, intervention Captain Patrick Tierney strategies, and tactics. This division partners with the patrol bureaus, select Cabarrus County schools, and the communities we serve. This division strives daily to work collaboratively to reduce the levels of crime, fear, and disorder in neighborhoods; improve the quality of life for Concord’s citizens, visitors, and businesses; and have a positive and lasting impression on the lives of student aged youth. The division consists of officers assigned to the airport, Public Safety Unit, Code Enforcement Unit, and Community Outreach Unit. In the summer of 2016, the division began the training of officers to implement new bike patrols. Many of the first officers that were trained, were school resource officers that were being used to supplement regular patrol functions while students were out of school for the summer. After the completion of the officer’s training, teams of bike patrols were inserted into areas with denser populations and high commercial area such as Concord Mills Mall. Once the startup of the program was completed, many patrol officers were trained and provided bikes and equipment for their vehicles so the bicycles could be carried with them on normal patrol. Since the inception of the bike program, officers have logged over 2,000 hours of bike patrols. Residents have reacted positively to our bicycle patrols and enjoy getting to know the officers patrolling their neighborhoods.

AIRPORT UNIT The department’s Airport Unit consists of a sergeant and four officers. The officers assigned to the Airport Unit are responsible for enhancing safety at Concord Regional Airport. The unit responds to emergency and non- emergency calls for service such as, but not limited to, checkpoint alarms, incidents, prohibited items and security breaches. This Airport Unit patrols the airport using a combination of foot, bicycle, and motor vehicle patrols, and conducts frequent inspections of secure and non-secure areas. In 2016, the airport saw a considerable increase in all aspects of air travel compared to 2015. Overall takeoffs and landings up 12%. Allegiant Airlines - Operations up 37% - Enplanements up 34% - Passengers up 46% CODE ENFORCEMENT DIVISION The Code Enforcement Division consists of one manager and six enforcement officers. The Code Enforcement Division is responsible for planning, developing, coordinating, and executing the enforcement of the city code and ordinances as set forth by City Council. Code Enforcement officers conduct field inspections of properties and public facilities for violations of minimum housing, zoning, and historic preservation standards as codified by city code.

Code Enforcement Stats 3&4Q 2015

2016

% Change

1476

2301

56%

86

1020

1,086%

16

10

-38%

175

33

-81%

15

73

387%

62

115

85%

18

15

-17%

Sign Regulation

21

N/A

Stagnant Water

8

6

-25%

Vehicles - Front Yard Parking

119

187

57%

Vehicle Violations

561

961

71%

Zoning Violations

74

55

-26%

184

N/A

Case Type Property Nuisance

(30-161)

Investigations Basketball Goals or Obstructions Garbage & Waste (Leaves, etc)

Livestock Minimum Housing Standards Parking of Commercial Vehicles

24

Weekly Signs Removed

          


COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND EDUCATION UNIT The Community Outreach and Education Unit is comprised of a sergeant and 18 school resource officers. The purpose of the unit is to ensure a safe and secure environment for students, faculty and others who work and visit our schools, while providing educational programs to the students. Community Outreach officers also provide operational support to the patrol bureau during periods when school is not in session. Chick-Fil-A Lego Building Contest Public Safety Unit leading the NASCAR Hauler Parade

SWAT Training

PUBLIC SAFETY UNIT The Public Safety Unit consists of a sergeant, three officers assigned to traffic, a center city officer, a city hall officer, an officer assigned to park patrol, a parking enforcement officer and 12 school crossing guards. SWAT The SWAT team consists of two commanders, three team leaders, and 16 operators. The team is responsible for evaluating search warrants and assessing the risk associated with executing the warrants as codified by department policy and procedure. The team also executes search warrants deemed “high risk� and any other warrants as directed by the chief of police. Finally, the SWAT Team provides the department with a highly motivated, technically and tactically proficient special operations team capable of responding to a variety of critical incidents and resolving them with minimum risk to officers, suspects, and innocent parties. 25


Major Crimes Division The Major Crimes Division is responsible for providing the patrol bureaus with operational support through the investigation, relentless follow-up, and case management of felony crimes that are complex and severe in nature; providing forensic and other crime scene services; Captain Bobby Ledwell assisting in the collection and storage of evidence and other property coming into the department’s possession; managing property control and identification processes and records; conducting vice and narcotics related investigations; and investigating any other crimes as directed by the chief of police. During 2016 the Investigative Section of the bureau achieved a 68% clearance rate of cases that it was assigned, including successful arrests in assigned homicides. The Vice/Narcotics Section faced the challenge of the rising abuse of heroin and other types of opiates by individuals, many of which resulted in overdoses. By conducting proactive investigations, the Vice/Narcotics Section saw it’s seizure of heroin, and opiate type narcotics, rise from 19.6 grams in 2015 to 946 grams in 2016. This rise is consistent with statistics on both the state and national levels with the increase in opioid abuse on the rise in many communities. One of the goals the Vice/Narcotics Section for 2017 will be to implement a system to track drug overdoses in the city to better identify trouble spots, and facilitate a more proactive response.

INVESTIGATIONS SECTION The Major Crimes Investigations Section consists of one sergeant and four investigators. The section is responsible for investigating major criminal cases such as homicide, sexual assault, serious assaults, crimes against children and the elderly, and any crime deemed to be exigent in nature.

2015 General Investigations July 1 - December 31

Case Type Fraud

Assigned

Cleared

% Cleared

122

42

34%

Sex Offenses

84

64

76%

Missing Person

73

73

100%

Robbery

50

32

64%

Assault

41

29

71%

Burglary

36

17

47%

Homicide

4

3

75%

Arson

5

2

40%

2016 General Investigations January 1 - April 24 Assigned

Case Type

Cleared

% Cleared

Fraud

78

14

18%

Sex Offenses

26

23

88%

Missing Person

26

23

88%

Robbery

12

10

83%

Assault

8

5

63%

Burglary

10

5

60%

Homicide

2

2

100%

Arson

3

1

33%

2016 Major Crimes April 25 - December 31

Case Type The Forensics Section also saw an overall rise in its activities in 2016 compared to the previous year. The section was able to make suspect fingerprint identifications from criminal incidents on 103 cases during 2016 compared to 9 in 2015. The amount of digital examinations for the section remained consistent with 86 devices being examined compared to 85 in 2015. A goal of the Forensics Section in 2017 is to continue to increase technologies in our Digital Forensics Section to match growing caseloads with criminal cases involving digital evidence.

26

Fraud Sex Offenses Missing Person

% Cleared

Assigned

Cleared

0

0

39

29

74%

1

1

100%

Robbery

16

11

69%

Assault

6

3

50%

Burglary

13

7

54%

Homicide

3

2

67%

Arson

0

0


VICE/NARCOTICS INVESTIGATIONS SECTION The Vice/Narcotics Section is responsible for the proactive investigation of crime such as the sale and manufacturing of illegal narcotics, gambling, prostitution and the gathering of gang intelligence. The investigator officer responsible for ABC investigations is responsible for ensuring that local establishments selling alcoholic beverages are compliant to the state regulations and have updated and proper permits.

Drugs Seized Drug

2015

Methamphetamine Marijuana Cocaine

210 grams

188.5 grams

14,052.4 grams

209,239.7 grams

24,300.25 grams

5,717.74 grams

Heroin Prescription Meds FORENSIC INVESTIGATIONS SECTION The Forensic Investigations Section consists of a sergeant and an investigator. Both investigators are certified through the International Association of Identification. The primary duties of the section are processing major crime scenes for physical evidence, the appropriate storage of evidence and establishment of the chain of custody. The section also processes items for evidence (DNA, fingerprints, trace evidence) and submits evidence to State Crime Lab. PROPERTY AND EVIDENCE SECTION The Property and Evidence Section is responsible for maintaining secure custody of property and evidence that comes into the possession of the department. The section consists of two civilian custodians both certified through the International Association of Property and Evidence.

LSD

2016

19.66 grams

946.7 grams

672.3 dosage units

164.5 dosage units

95 dosage units

Forensics Type L atent Fingerprint Cases Resulting Identifications

2015

2016

40

201

9

103

Crime Scene Investigations

50

70

Electronic Devices Examinations

85

86

20.7

46.5

Pounds of Illegal Narcotics Disposed Of Dosage units of controlled substances in pill form

1,595

Millitimeters of illegal liquid anabolic steriods

5,505

Firearms Disposed Of

27

6


2015-16 CPD on the Move Promotions

Rank of Deputy Chief

Rank of Major Keith Eury January 2016

Betty Stocks January 2016

Rank of Captain

Rank of Sergeant

Deckster Barlowe April 2016

Vashon Clark April 2016

Todd McGhee April 2016

Patrick Tierney April 2016

Curtis Anderson March 2015

Matthew Greer March 2015

Lance Brooks April 2016

Tony Chastain April 2016

Ramon Gonzalez April 2016

Patrick McClaskey April 2016

Aytch Perkins April 2016

Brian Pizzino April 2016

Denan Sabanija April 2016

Chris Gorman March 2015

Christy Jones March 2015

Vance McGee March 2015

Jim Payne March 2015

Anthony Vandevoorde March 2015

Rank of Master Police Officer 28


2015-16 CPD on the Move Promotions Code Enforcement Division

Robert Watson Code Enforcement Manager March 2015

Chuck Brock Sr. Code Enforcement Officer May 2015

Active Military & Deployment Ofc. Timothy Carlson US Army Active Reserve DEPLOYED

Ofc. Vance McGee US Army Active Reserve

Ofc. Ryan Mangum US Army Reserve

Ofc. Jim Payne US Army Reserve

Ofc. Amanda Mayberry US Army Reserve

Ofc. Alejandro Ramos USAF

Ofc. Matthew McLester US Army Reserve

Ofc. Luis Rodriguez USMC Active Reserve

CPD Retirees MPO Anthony Atwell Community Outreach & Education 26 years

MPO Rick Smith Community Outreach & Education 29 years

Captain Michael Greene Patrol 27 years

Bill Dickens Code Enforcement 12 years

Major Wendell Rummage Administration 28 years

Major Gary Hatley Administration 17 years

MPO Keith Smith Patrol 22 years

MPO Robert Danner Patrol 15 years 29


2015-16 Commendations Officer of the Year 2015 Officer Garron Lawing Officer Lawing was selected as Co-Worker of the Month for 2015 for rendering aid to a shooting victim on July 5th, 2015. Upon locating the victim, Officer Lawing used his training and applied direct pressure to a wound that could have proven life threatening for the victim. EMS commented that the actions taken by Officer Lawing contributed to the victim surviving the trauma. Officer Lawing was also recognized as Co-Worker of the Month for December 2015 for his efforts to arrest several individuals responsible for a number of Breaking and Enterings in Charlie District.

Officer of the Year 2016 Officer Luis Paul Rodriguez Officer Rodriguez was recognized as Co-Worker of the Month twice in 2016. In January, Officer Rodriguez was recognized after he purchased dinner with his own money for a local homeless person that is regularly seen walking on Cabarrus Avenue. After giving the gentleman the food, Officer Rodriguez engaged him in conversation which promoted a positive relationship between the gentleman and Officer Rodriguez. In September, Officer Rodriguez was selected by the Commendations Committee for the assistance he provided to Kannapolis Police Department during a death investigation. On September 1, 2016, Kannapolis Police Department (KPD) was investigating the death of a 17 year old female. While trying to make a positive identification of her, KPD met with her parents and discovered they did not speak English. KPD contracted Concord Police Department to inquire if a Spanish-speaking officer was available to assist. Officer Rodriguez was available and responded. Officer Rodriguez had the difficult task of translating to the parents that it was believed their daughter was deceased and would need them to go to the hospital to positively identify her. Officer Rodriguez followed the family to the hospital and translated again as the parents identified their daughter. Officer Rodriguez was more than willing to help during the incident and impressed everyone with his professionalism and compassion he showed to the family. The family was appreciative of Officer Rodriguez.

30


2015-16 Commendations Life Saving Award

March 2016: Officers Pizzino and Chiarlonzio Performing CPR on an unresponsive individual prior to the arrival of first responders that contributed to the person surviving.

March 2016: Officers Cox and Mangum Giving first aid to an individual involved in a vehicle accident whose sustained a life threatening injury.

December 2016: MPO McGee Rendering lifesaving aid to individual suffering from a gunshot wound.

Officer of the Month July 2015

Ofc. Garron Lawing

September 2015 Sgt. David Alexander, MPO Chris Carpenter, Ofc. Bradley Parker

2016 Jo Atwater Award Officer Ron Ferrell Officer Ferrell was recognized for both his professional demeanor and his personal compassion for members of the community.

October 2015

Ofc. Phillip Shuffler

November 2015

Sgt. Denan Sabanija

January 2016 Ofc. Brandon Banker, Ofc. Michael Lopez, Ofc. Luis Paul Rodriguez March 2016

Detective Chris Smith

May 2016

Sgt. Brian Schiele

June 2016

Sgt. David Alexander, Ofc. Bradley Parker

July 2016

MPO Clay Hall

August 2016 Detective Larissa Beaver, Detective Christy Jones Septemter 2016

Ofc. Luis Paul Rodriguez

October 2016

Sgt. Lance Brooks

November 2016

Ofc. Caleb Garrow

December 2016

Sgt. Phillip Carlton

31


41 Cabarrus Ave W Concord, NC 28025 www.concordnc.gov/Police

Profile for City of Concord NC

Concord NC Police Annual Report 2015-16  

City of Concord NC - Police Department Annual Report

Concord NC Police Annual Report 2015-16  

City of Concord NC - Police Department Annual Report