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Our CR Living 5 Seasons | May 2016

TEAMING UP WITH OTHERS:

City Partnerships Increase Opportunities BIKECR EXTENDS EFFORTS • p. 8 JOINING FORCES FOR SAFETY • p. 10

POSTAL CUSTOMER ECRWSS City Manager's Office 101 1st Street SE Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52401

CI TY OF CEDA R RA PIDS W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

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PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID ST. JOSEPH, MI PERMIT NO. 335


Our CR MAY 2016

FROM THE CITY MANAGER • SPECIAL SECTION •

FROM THE CITY MANAGER

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3

Partnerships between the City and

NEWS YOU NEED TO KNOW • WATER QUALITY REPORT •

community organizations play an

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important role in our ability to enhance the safety and quality

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of life for our citizens, as well as save tax dollars by sharing resources. City employees work together with organizations such as Linn County, the Cedar

ON THE COVER: Participants of

Rapids School District, the Cedar Rapids Metro Economic

Cedar Rapids Parks and Recreation Live Healthy Iowa Track Championship compete at Kingston Stadium, owned by the Cedar Rapids School District. p. 4

Alliance, the Corridor Metropolitan Planning Organization, neighborhood associations, non-profit organizations, local businesses, and many more. In this issue you will read about just a few of these partnerships and how they benefit our residents and the entire City. Also in this issue is our annual Water Quality Report, which the City distributes to all residents each May. There are

CONNECT WITH CEDAR RAPIDS

120 employees in the Utilities Department – Water Division

www.Cedar-Rapids.org/Subscribe

who work to ensure the safety, quality, and reliability of the water you and your family drink. Through each water

City of Cedar Rapids Iowa Government

quality test (thousands each month), to every pipe repair, their job is to protect the public health and safety of our

@CityofCRIowa

citizens. This annual report provides a general overview of national water quality standards and shows how our water

CityofCR

compares. Review the numbers, call our water department if you have questions, and take time to appreciate the

City info on your smartphone

many people in our City who provide our residents, businesses and industries with clean, safe drinking water.

Text / Email alerts City Source Email Newsletter

Jeffrey Pomeranz Cedar Rapids City Manager

Interested In Advertising With Us? Contact the Our CR Communications Coordinator at 319-286-5742.

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One of the established values of the City of Cedar Rapids is stewardship. Stewardship involves protecting, conserving and managing city resources for your use now and into the future. One way we practice good stewardship is by engaging in partnerships that expand opportunities and use resources more efficiently. This issue highlights a few of our partnerships with public safety agencies, the school district, engaged citizens, and organizations across the area — benefiting our entire community.

PARTNERING FOR: G R O W T H

Safety Business Health SustainabilityKIDS Prevention EDUCATION RECREATION

MOVEMENT

COMMUNITY

Competition

W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

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PARTNERSHIPS

We are excited about all of the possibilities that exist through the shared use of the new facility.�

SHARING FACILITIES A national trend toward shared facilities between municipalities and school districts has risen in recent years as organizations including the American Academy of Pediatrics, National Physical Activity Plan, and American Heart Association have urged communities to expand access to facilities that provide low cost opportunities for physical activity. Cedar Rapids has been ahead of this trend for decades, identifying opportunities to share resources throughout the community for the benefit of all citizens.

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Find updates on the new recreation center on Facebook. Search Cedar Rapids Parks and Recreation.

T

he Cedar Rapids Parks and Recreation Department has used high school, middle school, and elementary school classrooms and gyms across the city to hold programs for individuals of all ages. From Sunday morning open gym to youth basketball and track, the use of existing school facilities has made it possible for recreation programs to be offered close to neighborhoods. On the flip side, the school district uses local parks and golf courses for high school cross country, tennis, and golf practices and competitions. This summer, the Northwest Recreation Center will open adjacent to Harrison Elementary School. The center replaces the Time Check Recreation Center that was destroyed by flooding in 2008. The new facility includes a gymnasium, two classrooms, a multi-purpose room, and game room. The gym can be separated into two playing surfaces. Harrison students will have access to one of the playing surfaces, or half of the gym, during school days for physical education classes and recess in inclement weather. Students will have a separate entrance and hallway so they do not interact with the general public using other areas of the recreation center at the same time. The school will also use the facility for evening music performances and other special events.

The Parks and Recreation Department will provide cultural arts classes, youth sports, before and after-school programs, summer/holiday break activities, and programming for senior citizens and individuals with disabilities. These activities include both indoor and outdoor programs. In addition, the City will use Harrison School classrooms as available for other activities. “We have had a long relationship with Cedar Rapids Community Schools. We’ve been appreciative of the times they have helped us, especially after the loss of the Time Check Recreation Center. Now we are excited about all of the possibilities that exist through the shared use of the new facility,” said Sven Leff, Parks and Recreation Director.

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PARTNERSHIPS To learn more about the MICRO Loan program, visit www.ecicog.org/micro or stop by the Cedar Rapids library.

PARTNERSHIP SUPPORTS LOCAL

Entrepreneurs 6

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Small businesses and innovative entrepreneurs are an important piece of our community. But until recently, people without the means to get a loan from a traditional financial institution had few options to turn their dreams into a reality.


T

hanks to a collaborative effort with the City of Cedar Rapids, the Greater Cedar Rapids Community Foundation, the East Central Iowa Council on Governments, SCORE, the Cedar Rapids Public Library, and various area financial institutions, the path towards business ownership is clearer than ever. This group has made it easier to connect entrepreneurs with the capital and resources they need to get started. The Cedar Rapids MICRO Loan program allows individuals to borrow between $1,000 and $10,000 for up to three years at 4 percent interest. But in addition to that start-up capital, the program offers help, mentoring, and resources to craft a compelling and well-researched business plan. And once a loan is approved, resources are in place to continue that support. All Cedar Rapids start-ups or expansions are eligible, but people with ideas for core neighborhoods are especially encouraged to apply. Cedar Rapids has come a long way since the flood of 2008, but we can’t become complacent. We need to ensure that our community attracts and maintains the best businesses and bright, motivated people. To be successful in that endeavor, we must continue to encourage entrepreneurism and make the tools to start a business more accessible to everyone. Successful entrepreneurs lead to increased job creation, new niche markets, and important innovation. It is essential that Cedar Rapids be a place where people feel supported in taking business risks, and the MICRO Loan Program enables our community to do that.

MY CLEAN DOG Amy Simpson started working as a groomer at My Clean Dog in 2015 after moving to Cedar Rapids from Illinois. But Amy is no dog grooming novice—she has been grooming dogs for over 11 years, and owned her own grooming business in Illinois. So when the owners of My Clean Dog mentioned selling the business to focus on their other business, Amy knew it was an opportunity she couldn’t pass up. She looked to a local bank for a loan, and was referred to the MICRO Loan program. Using resources from the MICRO Loan partners, Amy was able to secure a loan to purchase the business. “Getting my loan was a very smooth process,” said Simpson. “Everyone I worked with was very helpful and motivated to see me succeed.” Amy now has four groomers on staff and business is growing. She hopes to add more groomers and possibly purchase the building she is currently renting in the next few years.

If you want to improve your SCORE in business,

call SCORE.

Let us share our expertise at no cost to you.

319-362-6943 2750 First Avenue NE Cedar Rapids, IA 52402

www.scorecr.org

W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

We are in partnership with Mt. Mercy ENACTUS group in sponsoring Seminars. Please contact East Central Iowa SCORE if you have any questions about the procedure to process MICRO loans.

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PARTNERSHIPS

RIDING FARTHER,

TOGETHER: BikeCR Committee Invites Collaboration, Participation

C

reating a sustainable, bike-friendly community takes a partnership of committed individuals; those who spend time on and off the road to invest in activities, policies, and educational outreach for the entire community. For the BikeCR Committee, this partnership blends City services with residents and businesses passionate about enhancing cycling opportunities in Cedar Rapids.

committee, which is made up of representatives from local bike shops, Linn County Trails Association (LCTA), the Corridor Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), the City of Marion, bike-friendly local corporations, and residents passionate about advocating for a bike-friendly community. The dialogue connects planning efforts with interested stakeholders across the community. "Participating in BikeCR gives us insight into the City's plans for bicycle facilities, and an opportunity to influence those plans,” says John Wauer, a member of Linn County Trails Association. “We can then keep our members better informed on upcoming bicycle facility projects.”

Outreach, collaboration, and communication are all prongs in the committee’s wheel, and members meet monthly to discuss upcoming bike facility projects, plan events that bring cyclists together, and bring attention to issues.

Staff and citizens creatively offered a unique way to introduce new protected bike lanes to the community last summer. Volunteers and staff collaborated on a “pop-up demonstration” that temporarily transformed a block of 3rd Avenue downtown into a traffic layout complete with pavement markings, showing off how the new protected lanes would look. The effort led to increased awareness on how the lanes function, before the paint was even applied to the pavement later that fall.

“The BikeCR committee wouldn’t be possible without community interest and involvement,” says Traffic Engineer Ron Griffith, who helps lead the monthly meetings. “Special events and outreach are only possible through the collaboration of a committed group of individuals, and the committee works hard to bridge the efforts of local government, citizens, and organizations.” City of Cedar Rapids Traffic Engineering leads the monthly

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BIKECR COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS Doubled the miles of trails and bikeways since 2009 from 24.9 miles to 50.4 miles

Comprehensive Trails Plan – adopted in Feb. 2012; map update in May 2014

First on-street bike project in 2009 – Sharrows on 33rd Ave SW

Assisted with RAGBRAI XL accommodating over 20,000 cyclists in CR – July 2012

Bicycle Ambassador Program established in May 2009

Integral in MPO full-time Multimodal Transportation Planner position filled in 2013

Bicycle Friendly Community status – 2009-Honorable Mention; 2012 & 2014-Bronze

Complete Streets Policy and Design Guidelines adopted in July 2014

Free bicycle parking in cooperation with LCTA at the Downtown Farmers' Market and various events since 2009

“Having a bike-friendly community has so many benefits,” says Tony Burnett, owner of Bike Rags and Red Ball Printing, who has been involved in Bike to Work activities for five years. “Healthy communities mean happy and economically sound communities.” One of the most popular campaign events every year is Bike to Work Week in May, which is spearheaded by a working task force of individuals made up from the BikeCR committee, City staff, and various community representatives. The week includes special events for cyclists, public awareness campaigns and education, and opportunities for the public to learn more about the benefits that result from being a bike-friendly community. "There are more people on bikes and more enthusiasm in general," says Bike2WorkConsultants founder Nikki Northrop Davidson, who has been involved with BikeCR since its inception, and who partners with a variety of organizations and special events focused on bike education and encouragement. "I enjoy all the riding I do, personally and with groups. There is a like-mindedness, moving naturally and being part of a tribe.''

Iowa’s first permanent green bike lanes in Sept. 2014 Iowa’s first protected bike lanes in Sept. 2015

Green Bike Lanes

The green increases visibility of the intersection and alerts motorists and cyclists to potential areas of conflict. Motorists must first yield to cyclists prior to passing through a green bike lane. Visible on 3rd Street and 3rd Avenue SE, and 42nd Street NE.

Sharrows and Super Sharrows

Indicates a “Shared Use Lane.” Helps identify where people riding bikes should safely be positioned on the road in order to avoid “dooring,” and reminds drivers to watch for bikes. Motorists may drive their vehicles as normal but should give cyclists at least three feet when passing. Super Sharrows indicate where cyclists may use the full travel lane. Sharrows are visible on Bever Avenue SE. Super Sharrows are visible on 4th Avenue SE.

Protected Bike Lanes

Healthy communities mean happy and economically sound communities.” -TONY BURNETT, Owner, Bike Rags and Red Ball Printing

A cyclist is protected from the travel lane by planters, curbs, or parked vehicles. Protected bike lanes separate cyclists from moving vehicles, create a more comfortable experience for those riding bikes, and decrease incidents of “dooring.” A parking protected bike lane appears on 3rd Avenue, between 6th Street SW and 3rd Street SE.

GET INVOLVED WITH BIKECR!

BikeCR Committee meets the 3rd Wednesday of each month at 8:30 a.m. at the City Services Center (500 15th Avenue SW). Or email traffic@cedar-rapids.org to sign up for the quarterly Bike Lane newsletter. W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

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PARTNERSHIPS Kevin Techau (United States Attorney for the Northern District of Iowa), Al Fear (Cedar Rapids Police Department Police Officer), and Patrick Reinert (Assistant United States Attorney for the Northern District of Iowa) are three members of the Eastern Iowa Heroin Initiative. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/easterniowaheroininitiative.

P A RT N E R SH I P S PR OM OTE

SAFER COMMUNITY 10

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Partnerships expand cooperation and communication among law enforcement agencies, increasing productivity and avoiding duplication of investigative efforts. Police officers understand that by working together with other local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies, the Police Department multiplies the number of resources, intelligence information, and strategies that improve the Department’s ability to serve the community.

I

n January, the Police Department formed a Police Community Action Team, or PCAT, that has been deployed in at-risk neighborhoods to address crime and quality-of-life issues. The goal is to be visible in the community, engage with citizens while on foot or bicycle patrol, and to understand and identify root causes of neighborhood issues. PCAT is an extension of efforts by police officers and their participation in various task forces. The Cedar Rapids Police Department has partnered with the United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Iowa for the Eastern Iowa Heroin Initiative which has a three-pronged approach to combating the spread of opioid and heroin abuse: prevention, prosecution, and treatment. Local police officers are part of the Drug Enforcement Administration Task Force that involves the investigation of the highest level of domestic and international narcotics traffickers. Police combat gun violence with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Safe Streets Task Force and United States Marshals Service Task Force. These long-term, proactive task forces focus on violent crime and the apprehension of violent fugitives. Potential threats to homeland security are the focus of the Joint Terrorism Task Force, which includes the investigation of crimes such as wire fraud and identity theft. In addition, officers are assigned to the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force which enhances investigative responses to offenders who use the Internet, online communication systems, or computer technology to sexually exploit children. All of these partnerships promote a safer community for residents and visitors.

W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

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NEWS YOU NEED TO KNOW

E-I-E-I-O

B

ig changes have come to Old MacDonald’s Farm this year. The landmark feature at Bever Park once housed bears and monkeys; however, due to the need for more naturalized exhibit space for animals, the zoo area has slowly transitioned to farm animals and waterfowl. In recent years Old MacDonald’s Farm was a spectator activity, but this season kids can get up close and personal. Baby pigs, miniature goats, lambs, calves, ducks, and chickens call the farm home until October and people can pet and feed them for the first time. Many special events and recreational programs are planned throughout the summer. Find details about the farm at crrec.org.

GET READY FOR SUMMER! Splash pads open May 21 at Cedar Valley, Cleveland, Daniels, Hayes, Hidder, Jacolyn, Noelridge, Redmond, Time Check, and Twin Pines parks. Noelridge Aquatic Center opens for Memorial Day weekend, and all outdoor pools kick off their summer season on June 2. Check for pool schedules at crrec.org.

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HIGH-IMPACT PROJECTS SLATED FOR 2016 PAVING FOR PROGRESS YEAR

T

he City of Cedar Rapids is planning to tackle more than 30 road improvement projects this season funded by the local option sales tax. The City is entering its third construction season in the Paving for Progress campaign and has completed approximately 40 projects across the community to date (approximately 15 miles of roadway), investing approximately $26.2 million as of February 2016. All projects that were scheduled to be completed in Fall 2015 were successfully completed. Construction, while at times an inconvenience, is also necessary in order to transform a road. Below are anticipated road impacts this summer that, once complete, will play key roles in improving our road network: • 42nd Street NE from I-380 to Wenig Road • 42nd Street NE from Edgewood to 42nd Street • 74th Street NE from White Ivy Place to C Avenue • B Avenue NW from Highland Drive to 8th Street • Edgewood Road SW from E Avenue to F Avenue Roadway • McCarthy Road SE from 19th Street SE to Memorial Drive SE • Oakland Road NE from H Avenue to J Avenue

• Seminole Valley Road NE from Fords Crossing to 42nd Street NE (Phase 1, utilities) • West Post Road NW from Gordon Avenue to Plainview Drive (Phase 1) • Collins Road NE Northland Road and Twix Town Road* • 1st Avenue resurfacing and utility improvements between 27th Street and 29th Street, and between 34th Street and 40th Street* *Not fully funded through the local option sales tax

For a full list of Paving for Progress projects, please visit CityofCR.com/PavingforProgress.

PERMITS NEEDED FOR SAFE HOME IMPROVEMENTS Cedar Rapids’ Building Services Department would like to remind residents of important safety and code requirements when it comes to summertime home improvement projects. Many homeowners may not realize that some common summertime home improvement projects require a permit, including decks, sunrooms, three season porches, re-roofing projects, windows, and siding. Call 319-286-5831 to learn more. 13 W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G


REMEMBER TO

RESIDENT

Leave Room for Lucy:

Appreciation Day

Between your GARBY, CURBY and YARDY carts.

Saturday, June 4

Between your carts and mailbox.

Between your carts and telephone poles.

Downtown Farmers' Market | Greene Square Park

Let Lucy be your 36-inch reminder to help make solid waste collection a bit safer and more efficient.

ters, police Meet firefigh ff d other sta officers an gns vehicles, si Explore city t en and equipm urby, tt ots O o, C Meet masc ff ru cG M Yardy and

LEARN MORE AT: www.CityofCR.com/garbage

PRICE APPLIANCE

1/

Don’t make excuses, make a difference.

2

A ND

FREE TIRE DROP-OFF JUNE 1, 2016 AUGUST 31, 2016

Take the City Manager’s 1 Bag Challenge and help us put litter in its place. www.CleanUpCR.com 14

00.00

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Use the red coupon (sent with your utility bill) to drop off your items at either Linn County Solid Waste Agency location during normal business hours. Full details, including a list of accepted items, is available at www.CleanUpCR.com.


J AVENUE WATER TREATMENT PLANT

NORTHWEST WATER TREATMENT PLANT

WATERQUALITY

R E P O R T | 2015

We work around the clock to ensure your drinking water is of the highest quality. This report illustrates the scrutiny water undergoes before and after it leaves our facilities. Serving the City of Cedar Rapids, the City of Robins, the Glenbrook Cove Subdivision of Marion and the Poweshiek Water Association.

W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

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MANY TACTICS, ONE GOAL:

IMPROVED

WATER QUALITY Nationwide the spotlight is shining on water quality, and Cedar Rapids citizens have leaders and City staff committed to providing safe, reliable drinking water each time you turn on your faucet today and well into the future. For this reason, Cedar Rapids is actively engaged with a variety of projects and programs that will keep your water safe from source to tap. Middle Cedar Partnership Project (MCPP)

Stormwater Cost-Share Program

The MCPP, led by the City of Cedar Rapids and 15 partner organizations, provides technical and financial assistance to producers and landowners who wish to implement conservation practices to help nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus stay on their land and out of our waterways. By improving conditions upstream, Cedar Rapids, which pulls its water supply from shallow alluvial aquifers along the Cedar River, will eventually see reductions in nitrate levels in the City’s source water.

When precipitation falls on our city, it runs across hard surfaces – like rooftops, sidewalks, driveways, and roads – and carries pollutants into local waterways. A new program will provide Cedar Rapids citizens with financial (up to $2,000) and technical assistance to implement stormwater best management practices — like rain gardens, permeable pavement or soil quality restoration — on their properties. These practices help water enter the soil where vegetation acts as a natural filter, removing many of the pollutants before the water reaches our streams, rivers and lakes.

www.CityofCR.com/MCPP

www.CityofCR.com/Stormwater

Green Infrastructure Pilot Projects

Watershed Management Authorities (WMA)

Starting in 2016, City staff will also be installing four green stormwater infrastructure pilot projects. Green infrastructure — rain gardens, permeable pavement, bioswales, and green roofs — works by slowing down runoff and spreading it out over the land, allowing it to slowly soak into the ground where plants and soil naturally filter out pollutants.

A watershed is the area of land where all of the rainwater drains to a common outlet. What happens within a watershed directly affects the quantity and quality of runoff entering streams, rivers and lakes. The City is involved as a collaborative partner with two WMAs which work to conduct watershed assessments, implement watershed improvement projects, and educate communities about flood risk and water quality concerns.

There is no silver bullet or single solution to protecting the City’s drinking water supply and keeping Iowa’s waterways clean, safe, and manageable. Collaboration with a wide variety of committed partners allows efforts and resources to be utilized where they will be most effective. We all share common goals and working together we can all celebrate shared successes. 16

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Educational Information Nitrate

A dissolved form of nitrogen found in fertilizers and sewage by-products that may leach into ground water and other water sources. Nitrates occur naturally in some waters. Over time, nitrates can accumulate in aquifers and contaminate ground water. Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant, ask for advice from your health care provider.

Lead

Our drinking water contains little or no lead when it leaves our treatment plants. However, lead can leach into the water during overnight contact with the lead solder and brass faucets in some homes. Because of that, the CRWD collects and analyzes special samples quarterly from area homes to more frequently monitor the distribution system. Our tests show that most homes are at or well below the 15 parts per billion (ppb) — or 15 micrograms per liter of water — standard set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for annual compliance monitoring. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The CRWD is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking and cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. The following state-approved laboratories can test your water for lead: State Hygienic TestAmerica Keystone Labs Laboratory Cedar Falls, IA Newton, IA Oakdale, IA 319-277-2401 641-792-8451 800-421-4692 Additional information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline, 800-426-4791.

At-Risk Populations

It's important to be aware that some people may be more vulnerable than the general population to contaminates in drinking water. Immuno-compromised persons — those undergoing cancer chemo-therapy or organ transplants, the elderly, infants or people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders — can be especially susceptible to infections. We ask anyone who is immuno-compromised to seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. Guidelines from the EPA and Centers for Disease Control on appropriate steps to lessen the risk of infection by microbial contaminants are available form the National Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

Water Value

Cedar Rapids residents enjoy water rates that are among the lowest in the state. $3.94 Buys You 1,000 Gallons of Clean Water:

E S

ENGINEERING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT $0.36

W

M $

WATER SOURCE (WELLS) $0.46

D

METER AND CUSTOMER SERVICE $0.57

W

DISTRIBUTION AND STORAGE $0.92 WATER TREATMENT $1.63

Questions?

If you have questions or concerns about our water quality or this report, we invite you to attend one of two upcoming public meetings: Saturday, June 4, 7:30 a.m. - noon, Downtown Farmers' Market Thursday, June 16, 5 - 7 p.m., NewBo City Market, 1100 3rd Street SE You are also welcome to bring questions to any of the regular City Council meetings, which are held at City Hall at 101 1st Street SE. These meetings are announced in The Gazette, and a schedule of future meetings can be viewed at www.cedar-rapids.org. For more information on this Water Quality Report or for copies of our monitoring reports (CRWD’s or USGS’), contact the Cedar Rapids Water Department at 319-286-5900.

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Where Our Water Comes From

The City of Cedar Rapids obtains its drinking water supplies from shallow vertical and collector wells constructed in the sand and gravel deposits along the Cedar River. Those deposits form an underground water-bearing layer called an alluvial aquifer. Because of continuous pumping of the City’s wells, most of the water in the aquifer is pulled from the river. The rest of the water is supplied as water percolates up from a deeper bedrock aquifer or down from the top of the ground. Our drinking water from those wells benefits from natural filtration through the riverbank. This natural sand filtration has proven to be a beneficial pretreatment to water before it reaches the City’s two conventional limesoftening facilities.

How We Protect the Quality of Our Drinking Water

The Cedar Rapids Water Division continues to work with state and federal agencies to monitor and assess our watershed. The Cedar River watershed covers more than 6,500 square miles upstream of Cedar Rapids and extends into southern Minnesota. Source water assessment identifies potential sources of contamination to the water we use to treat for drinking water purposes. Although efforts are made on many fronts, farm-field runoff continues to be a primary concern and risk for contamination of our source water. We continue to actively monitor the watershed and have initiated a watershed protection program. (If you are interested in reviewing our source water assessment or any monitoring results, please contact the CRWD at 319-286-5900.)

How We Treat Our Water

Our treatment process involves a multibarrier approach to protect our drinking water from the source to your tap. This includes source water monitoring; well-head protection; riverbank restoration; treatment processes of softening, filtration and disinfection; as well as distribution-system monitoring and maintenance.

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Horizontal Collector Well

Vertical Well

Clay

Cedar River

Groundwater Dispersion Through Alluvial Sand

Limestone Bedrock

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Bedrock Aquifer


Treatment Process Highlights Ammonia

Lime

Out to Homes and Businesses

In from Wells

Chlorine Carbon Dioxide Out to Storage Fluoride Phosphate

UV Disinfection

1

2

Aeration

Recarbonation and Chlorination

The CRWD lowers water pH by adding carbon dioxide and adds chlorine to disinfect the water. The chlorine helps ensure our water’s microbiological safety by killing disease-causing organisms. The CRWD also adds a trace amount of ammonia to form chloramine to help the disinfection process.

Filtration

6

Fluoridation and

Phosphate Addition

After UV disinfection, the CRWD adds fluoride to promote children’s dental health. Phosphate is also added to chemically stabilize the water and lessen the possibility that lead will leach out of pipes and into tap water. 7

5

Distribution

From here, finished water is pumped directly into the distribution system. The distribution system includes water storage tanks and more than 600 miles of water main pipes that deliver water to homes and businesses.

Water is then passed through a sand and gravel filter bed, removing any remaining suspended matter.

Softening

The CRWD adds slaked lime to the water. This softens or reduces the minerals that typically make water “hard.” Excessive hardness increases soap use, deposits scale in water heaters and boilers, interferes with some industrial processes, and sometimes gives water an unappealing taste and odor. Resulting lime residual materials are removed and applied to farmland as soil conditioner or used as fill in approved land reclamation projects.

3

4

Once water has been drawn from the wells into the City’s treatment plants, it undergoes aeration. Raw or untreated water is allowed to cascade down a series of trays, increasing the surface area of the water and promoting the exchange of gases. Aeration also removes undesirable gases such as radon. Aeration is similar to the natural process that occurs when a stream flows through rapids or over falls.

UV Disinfection 8

Reserves

Water not immediately consumed flows into storage tanks for use when demand exceeds plant pumpage. Water stored in elevated tanks helps stabilize pressure in the distribution system and serves as an emergency reserve for fire protection.

Next, the water enters the ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection system where special lamps emit ultraviolet light into the water. The UV energy instantly damages the genetic material of any microorganisms in the water, eliminating their ability to reproduce and cause infection. Following UV disinfection, water passes through a contact tank where time is provided for the chlorine compound created in Step 3 to complete the disinfection process. W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

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Water Quality Findings This table summarizes required water quality monitoring results for regulated parameters that were detected in the 2015 calendar year. A comprehensive report of all water quality testing is available from the Water Division. WATER TREATMENT PLANTS - FINISHED WATER INORGANIC CHEMICALS

J AVE. PLANT

UNITS

MCL

MCLG

RANGE

NW PLANT

AVG

RANGE

AVG

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT

Nitrate

mg/L

10

10

1.60 - 5.82

3.41

3.2 - 6.48

4.65

Run-off from fertilizer, leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

Nitrite

mg/L

1

1

0.0 - 0.09

0.05

0.0 - 0.03

0.02

Run-off from fertilizer, leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

Fluoride

mg/L

4

4

0.15 - 0.92

0.71

0.11 - 0.89

0.69

Water additive which promotes strong teeth; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

Sodium

mg/L

NA

NA

10.1 - 16.4

12.6

9.0 - 14.8

11.6

Erosion of natural deposits; added to water during treatment process

Sulfate

mg/L

NA

NA

29.2 - 40.0

34.3

27.8 - 40.0

33.8

Erosion of natural deposits

Chloride

mg/L

NA

NA

27.5 - 37.0

31.6

25.8 - 34.0

30.0

Erosion of natural deposits, runoff

Arsenic

μg/L

10

10

0.50 - 0.78

0.63

0.19 - 0.43

0.33

Erosion of natural deposits

COMMON HERBICIDES

J AVE. PLANT

UNITS

MCL

NW PLANT

MCLG

RANGE

AVG

RANGE

AVG

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT

Atrazine

μg/L

3

3

0.0 - 0.2

0.04

0.0 - 0.2

0.04

Runoff from fertilizer used on row crops

Metalachlor

μg/L

Unregulated

Unregulated

0.0 - 0.2

0.03

ND

ND

Runoff from fertilizer used on row crops

Analysis for the following Herbicides revealed No Detects(ND) at either plant distribution system entry point: Cyanazine, Alachlor, Metribuzin, Butylate, Trifluralin, Acetochlor, Desethyl Atrazine, Desisopropyl Atrazine, Siamazine, Ametryn, EPTC, Prometon, Propachlor, Propazine, Dimethenamid, Butachlor RADIOLOGICAL

J AVE. PLANT

NW PLANT

UNITS

MCL

MCLG

RANGE

AVG

RANGE

AVG

Radon

pCi/L

300 pCi/L

0 pCi/L

37 - 67

53.3

19 - 37

28.5

Erosion of natural deposits

COMBINED RADIUM

pCi/L

5 pCi/L

0 pCi/L

NA

<1

NA

<1

Erosion of natural deposits

Radium -228

pCi/L

5 pCi/L

0 pCi/L

NA

<0.6

NA

<0.5

Erosion of natural deposits

Gross Alpha

pCi/L

5 pCi/L

0 pCi/L

NA

<0.9

NA

0.7

Erosion of natural deposits

TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON (TOC)

J AVE. PLANT

NW PLANT

RANGE

AVERAGE

VIOLATION

RANGE

AVERAGE

VIOLATION

1.77 2.21

1.9

NO

1.73 2.27

1.92

NO

Credits Received for TOC Removal

Treatment technique requires the Running Annual Average (RAA) of credits given for TOC removal be at least 1

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT Naturally present in the environment

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM MONITORING Lead and Copper Rule

UNITS

ACTION LEVEL (AL)

MCLG

RANGE

90%

SAMPLES EXCEEDING AL

VIOLATION

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT

Lead

μg/L

15

0

0.0 - 17.0

3.2

4.0

2

NO

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits

Copper

mg/L

1.3

1.3

0.0 - 0.12

0.06

0.07

0

NO

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits

Total Coliform Rule

JAN

FEB

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

Total # Samples/Month

104

104

104

104

107

104

104

108

104

104

104

104

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

# Positive Coliform Samples/Mo. Meets Monthly MCL of <5% Positive Coliform

Disinfectant

Units

MRDL

MRDLG

Range

Average

Violation

Total Chlorine Residual

mg/L

4

4

2.4 - 4.0

3.48

NO

DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

20

95%

J AVE. PLANT

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT

Naturally present in the environment

POSSIBLE SOURCE Water additive used to control microbial growth

NW PLANT

Units

MCL

MCLG

RANGE

AVG

VIOLATION

RANGE

AVG

VIOLATION

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM)

μg/L

80

NA

0-0

0

NO

0 - 2.6

0.443

NO

By-product of chlorinating drinking water

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

μg/L

60

NA

0-0

0

NO

0-0

0

NO

By-product of chlorinating drinking water

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POSSIBLE SOURCE


UCMR2 (UNREGULATED CONTAMINANT MONITORING RULE) NITROSAMINE COMPOUNDS

J AVE. DISTRIBUTION AREA

J AVE. PLANT

EPA Method 521 N-nitroso-dimethyl amine (NDMA) μg/L

NW DISTRIBUTION AREA

NW PLANT

RANGE

AVG

RANGE

AVG

RANGE

AVG

RANGE

AVG

0.0032 - 0.0056

0.004

0.0038 - 0.0059

0.005

0.0000 - 0.0027

0.001

0.0000 - 0.0097

0.005

NO CURRENT REGULATORY MCL - EPA mandatory sampling and analysis to determine contaminant occurrence nationally and establish regulatory MCLs

UCMR3 (UNREGULATED CONTAMINANT MONITORING RULE)

J Ave. Treatment Plant J Ave. Distribution Area NW Treatment Plant NW Plant Distribution Area

1,4 Dioxane μg/L

Chlorate μg/L

Chromium 6+ μg/L

Total Chromium μg/L

Total Molybdenum μg/L

Total Strontium μg/L

Total Vanadium μg/L

Total Cobalt μg/L

Seven Specific Hormones μg/L

Six Specific Perfluorinated Compounds μg/L

Seven Specific Volatile Organic Compounds μg/L

Method

EPA 522

EPA 300.1

EPA 218.7

EPA 200.8

EPA 200.8

EPA 200.8

EPA 200.8

EPA 200.8

EPA 539

EPA 537

EPA 524.3

Range

0.0 - 0.12

ND

1.3 - 2.0

1.5 - 1.9

1.0 - 1.7

58 - 69

0.95 - 1.5

ND

ND

ND

ND

Average

0.030

ND

1.7

1.7

1.4

64

1.2

ND

ND

ND

ND

Range

NA

ND

1.3 - 1.9

1.5 - 1.8

1.1 - 1.7

55 - 69

0.94 - 1.5

ND

ND

ND

ND

Average

NA

ND

1.7

1.7

1.5

63.5

1.2

ND

ND

ND

ND

Range

0.0 - 0.078

ND

1.4 - 1.9

1.6 - 2.1

0.0 - 1.3

69 - 75

1.1 - 1.2

ND

ND

ND

ND

Average

0.038

ND

1.6

1.8

0.88

73.3

1.2

ND

ND

ND

ND

Range

NA

ND

1.3 - 1.8

1.5 - 2.0

1.1 - 1.6

63 - 70

1.1 - 1.3

ND

ND

ND

ND

Average

NA

ND

1.6

1.7

1.5

66

1.2

ND

ND

ND

ND

MCL

NA

NA

NA

100

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NO CURRENT REGULATORY MCL - EPA mandatory sampling and analysis to determine contaminant occurrence nationally and establish regulatory MCLs

TREATMENT TECHNIQUE INDICATORS J AVE. PLANT

Treatment technique requires that turbidity of Combined Filter Effluent (CFE) not exceed 1.0 NTU at any time

NW PLANT

SOURCE OF CONTAMINANT

UNITS

MCL

RANGE

AVERAGE

VIOLATION

RANGE

AVERAGE

VIOLATION

NTU

1.0

0.03 - 0.19

0.04

NO

0.04 - 0.20

0.06

NO

J AVE. PLANT

Treatment technique also requires that no more than 5% of Combined Filter Effluent (CFE) samples exceed 0.3 NTU monthly

Soil runoff

SOURCE OF CONTAMINANT

NW PLANT

% > 0.3

VIOLATION

% > 0.3

VIOLATION

0%

NO

0%

NO

Soil runoff

Source Water Monitoring: Source Water assessment identifies potential sources of contamination to the water we use to treat for drinking water purposes. Although efforts are made on many fronts, farm-field run-off continues to be a primary concern and risk for contamination of our source water. Total Coliform

E. coli

Cryptosporidia

Giardia

Lead μg/L

Copper μg/L

Zinc μg/L

Manganese μg/L

Iron μg/L

Sodium mg/L

9

<1

ND

ND

ND

0.1

0.2

270

80

14.7

2013 Annual Average

108

<1

ND

ND

ND

2.4

0.9

348

87

13.9

2014 Annual Average

181

<1

ND

ND

ND

2.5

1.0

228.1

46.1

13.0

2015 Annual Average

720

<1

ND

ND

ND

2.8

0.95

214.9

65.1

11.9

2012 Annual Average

Acronyms: ND: Not Detected MRDL: Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level NR: Not Regulated mg/L: Milligrams per liter or parts per million μg/L: Micrograms per liter or parts per billion pCi/L: Picocuries per liter MCL: Maximum Contaminant Level MCLG: Maximum Contaminant Level Goal NA: Not Applicable NTU: Nephelometric Turbidity Unit MRDLG: Maximum Residual Disinfection Level Goal The following is an important message from the Environmental Protection Agency: Drinking water, including bottled water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. That’s because as the water we draw from — lakes, rivers, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells — travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it picks up naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material. It can also pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 800-426-4791 or visiting the website at www.epa.gov/ogwdw. Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses and parasites, which can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea and associated headaches. W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

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Frequently Asked Questions What is the hardness of Cedar Rapids water? Cedar Rapids water is considered moderately hard, with values of 6-8 grains per gallon or 100-140 mg/L total hardness as calcium carbonate.

reducing the risk of dissolving lead or copper into the drinking water. It has been tested extensively and no health or safety concerns have been identified.

What is the fluoride concentration and why is it added? Fluoride is added during the treatment process to help prevent dental cavities. The optimal concentration is maintained at 0.7 parts per million (ppm) with a range of 0.6-0.9 ppm as recommended by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

My water throughout the entire house tastes and smells musty or stale. Is it OK to drink? Sometimes in low-use areas or dead-end main areas, the water does not get circulated as it should. Where this is the case, the distribution crew can be notified to flush hydrants in the area to help bring in fresh water.

My water smells terrible at the kitchen tap. What could be wrong? Many times gases in the drain trap are displaced upward when running water goes down the drain. It is easy to mistake the odor as coming from the running water when it is coming from the drain. Try pouring a mild bleach solution down the drain and letting the tap run full force for two to three minutes. This should flush the system clean. My toilet tank and inside of my dishwasher are stained dark brown to black. Is my water safe to drink? The dark staining is likely due to the corrosion-control chemical added during treatment. Its purpose is to lay a protective coating on the insides of pipes so water never comes in contact with the pipe, thereby

This morning I began seeing black particles and debris in my water and it looks yellowish. Do you think I have a broken pipe somewhere? Most times when water discoloration or particles show up all of a sudden, it is because a hydrant or valve has been opened in the area. This happens often in the spring and fall, when street department crews are cleaning the streets or the fire department is testing hydrants before winter weather hits. This generally settles back down and clears on its own within 24-48 hours and is more of an aesthetic issue than a health concern.

Glossary Action Level (AL) The concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow. Arsenic The EPA recently lowered the arsenic Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) to 10 ppb. Trace amounts of arsenic are occasionally detected in your drinking water at levels well below this more stringent standard. Arsenic is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems.

Immunocompromised A physical condition in which the human immune system becomes less capable of warding off illness or infection. Inorganic Composed of or involving organisms (or their remains or products) that are not living. Examples of inorganic substances include minerals, rocks and salt.

Coliform A bacteria originating in the digestive system of mammals. Its presence in water alerts lab technicians that disease-causing agents may be present.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (MCLGs) as feasible, using the best available treatment technology.

Compliance Following all rules and regulations defined in the Safe Drinking Water Act and maintaining water quality below MCLs.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Contaminant One of a variety of natural or man-made physical, chemical, biological or radiological substances whose presence in public water systems may cause adverse health effects to consumers.

Maximum Residual Disinfection Level (MRDL) The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Detection The positive identification of the presence of a particular contaminant. Detection of a contaminant does not necessarily represent a serious health risk to consumers if the concentration is below the MCL.

Maximum Residual Disinfection Level Goal (MRDLG) The level of drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Disinfection Killing the larger portion of microorganisms in water, with the probability that the disinfecting agent kills all disease-causing bacteria. Drought A period of unusually persistent dry weather that persists long enough to cause serious problems such as crop damage and/or water supply shortages. Filtration A treatment process that physically removes particles from water as the water passes through a medium. Groundwater The supply of fresh water found beneath the earth’s surface, usually in aquifers. Groundwater is often used to supply wells and springs.

22

Herbicide A chemical agent used to kill plants, especially weeds. Used widely in agriculture.

Pesticides Any substance or chemical applied to kill or control pests, including weeds, insects, algae, rodents and other undesirable agents. Radioactivity The spontaneous decay or disintegration of an unstable atomic nucleus, accompanied by the emission of radiation. Radon Radon is a radioactive gas that you can’t see, taste or smell. It is found throughout the U.S. Radon can move up through the ground and into a home through cracks and holes in the foundation. Radon can build up to high levels in all types of homes. Radon can also get into indoor air when released from tap water from showering, washing dishes and other household activities. Compared to radon entering the home through soil, radon entering the home through tap water will, in most cases, be a small source of radon in indoor air. Radon is a known human carcinogen. Breathing air containing radon can lead to lung cancer. Drinking water containing radon may also cause increased risk of stomach cancer. If you are concerned about radon in your home, test the air in your home. Testing is inexpensive and easy. Fix your home if the level of radon in your air is 4 picocuries per liter of air (pCi/L) or higher. There are simple ways to fix a radon problem that aren’t too costly. For additional information, call your state radon program (800-838-5992) or call the EPA’s Radon Hotline (800-767-7236).

Microbial A group of microorganisms such as bacteria, protozoa and viruses.

Surface water All water naturally open to the atmosphere and all springs, wells or other collectors that are directly influenced by surface water. Water located close to the earth’s surface.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) A unit of measure used to determine the clarity of drinking water.

Treatment Technique (TT) A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Organic Of, pertaining to or derived from living organisms. Organic matter contains carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Examples include humans, plants and animals.

Turbidity Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system.

Particulates Of or relating to minute separate particles.

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Violation Exceeding the MCL of a contaminant regulated by the federal government; failure to properly monitor regulated contaminants would also be considered a violation.


CITY SERVICES DIRECTORY

! Emergency line

CITY SERVICE

LOCATION

PHONE

EMAIL ADDRESS

Animals

900 76th Avenue Drive SW

319-286-5993

AnimalControlMgmt@Cedar-Rapids.org

Assessor

City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW

319-286-5888

CedarRapids.Iowa.Assessors.com

Bid Opportunities

City Hall, 101 1st Street SE

319-286-5021

Bid-Purchasing@Cedar-Rapids.org

Building and Housing Codes

City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW

319-286-5831

D.Kolosik@Cedar-Rapids.org

Buses

Ground Transportation Center, 450 1st Street SE

319-286-5573

CRTransit@Cedar-Rapids.org

Fire Safety Inspections

713 1st Avenue SE

319-286-5166

CRFire@Cedar-Rapids.org

Garbage, Recycling and Yard Waste Collection

City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW

319-286-5897

SolidWaste&Recycling@Cedar-Rapids.org

Housing Assistance Programs

City Hall, 101 1st Street SE

319-286-5872

HSG-Admin@Cedar-Rapids.org

Land Development

City Hall, 101 1st Street SE

319-286-5822

DevelopmentService@Cedar-Rapids.org

Park Rentals

Ambroz Recreation Center, 2000 Mt. Vernon Road SE

319-286-5731

Ambroz@Cedar-Rapids.org

Potholes and Street City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW Maintenance

319-286-5802 286-5826 !

Street@Cedar-Rapids.org

Recreation Programs

319-286-5731

Ambroz@Cedar-Rapids.org

Sewer Backup or Problems City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW

319-286-5802 286-5826 !

Sewer@Cedar-Rapids.org

Traffic Signals, Signs and Markings

City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW

319-286-5802

Traffic@Cedar-Rapids.org

Utility Billing

City Hall, 101 1st Street SE

319-286-5900

WaterMail@Cedar-Rapids.org

Ambroz Recreation Center, 2000 Mt. Vernon Road SE

For more information about the City of Cedar Rapids and its services, call 319-286-5080 or visit www.Cedar-Rapids.org.

CITY COUNCIL

To leave a message for a City Council member, call 319-286-5051. To find your district, go to www.Cedar-Rapids.org and navigate to Local Government > City Council, then click on Elections and locate the Find Your District link.

Ron Corbett

Pat Shey

Ralph Russell

MAYOR

DISTRICT 3

AT LARGE

Kris Gulick

Scott Olson

Ann Poe

DISTRICT 1

DISTRICT 4

AT LARGE

Scott Overland

Justin Shields

Susie Weinacht

DISTRICT 2

DISTRICT 5

AT LARGE

Ron.Corbett@Cedar-Rapids.org

Kris.Gulick@Cedar-Rapids.org

S.Overland@Cedar-Rapids.org

Pat.Shay@Cedar-Rapids.org

Scott.Olson@Cedar-Rapids.org

Justin.Shields@Cedar-Rapids.org W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

Ralph.Russell@Cedar-Rapids.org

Ann.Poe@Cedar-Rapids.org

Susie.Weinacht@Cedar-Rapids.org

23


Local Mom | Local Doctor | Real Answers

Dr. Shearer and her daughter

Katie Shearer, MD, of UnityPoint Clinic® is a parent herself, so she understands you want the best for your child. She provides real answers to your questions, doesn’t trivialize concerns, and treats your child like she does her own. To learn more about Dr. Shearer, watch her video at unitypoint.org/doctor.

UnityPoint Clinic Pediatrics offers early morning, evening and weekend appointments, because you can’t choose when your child gets sick. We are the largest and most experienced team of pediatricians in Cedar Rapids, and have two convenient locations that offer same-day appointments. LOCATIONS UnityPoint Clinic Pediatrics Hiawatha 1075 N. Center Point Road (319) 743-1440

UnityPoint Clinic Pediatrics Cedar Rapids 855 A Avenue NE, Suite 300 (319) 368-9301

unitypoint.org 24

OUR CR

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Our CR - May 2016  

Explores how City partnerships increase opportunities. Also includes the 2015 Water Quality Report.

Our CR - May 2016  

Explores how City partnerships increase opportunities. Also includes the 2015 Water Quality Report.

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