Page 1

election 2012 / who’s got the best prescription for health? OCTOBER 4, 2012

Sign of neglect “Once heritage places are lost, they – and all they represent – are lost to future generations.”

The Starlight Drive-In sign two years ago, when “CityNews” began agitating for its preservation... and now, flopped, face down and broken. Photos by Silas Brown

So waxes the ACT Government’s information sheet on the virtues of the Heritage Act 2004, illustrated with a gleaming picture of the Starlight Drive-In sign. Well, despite all the words and good intent, the gorgeous 1957 iconic sign has gone. The victim of weather, vandals, who knows? Two years ago this

paper campaigned for its preservation, our readers reminisced shamelessly and the ACT Government and the National Film and Sound Archive offered to help. In February, it gained a heritage listing. But no one did anything. And now, the last of its kind, it lies broken, flat on its face in a field, lost to future generations. What a shame.

Open 7 days | Free parking

MaCQUarie CityNews  October 4-10  1


2  CityNews  October 4-10


CityNews  October 4-10  3


4  CityNews  October 4-10


news / cover story

citynews.com.au / Volume 18, Number 37

Run ends for heritage drive-in movie sign THE 55-year-old, recently heritage-listed Laura Edwards Starlight Drive-In sign in Watson may have reports been damaged beyond repair after tipping from its rusted plinth and crashing through an adjacent fence. An inspection by a “CityNews” reporting team revealed that one side of the sign appeared to be completely missing and the underside had been impaled by a signpost it fell on to. The iconic sign, which was erected in 1957 and used to mark the entry to the drive-in from the Federal Highway, secured heritage protection by the ACT Heritage Council in February after heavy campaigning by “CityNews” and the community to acknowledge the sign’s cultural value. The sign was on the property of an apartment development, whose strata-title committee was the original applicants for the heritage listing. “CityNews” first reported the deteriorating condition of the classic, American-style cinema sign in October, 2010. It was the only drive-in sign in Australia still in its original position. In a statement of heritage significance, the ACT Heritage Council wrote in February: “The sign is important as evidence of a distinctive custom of the drive-in theatre era which is no longer practised in the ACT.” But last week “CityNews” discovered the three-metre-high, double-sided sign had fallen on to a nearby fence, and looked to be damaged beyond repair with one panel missing and a large hole in the second panel. It was unclear when the sign had fallen, but it appeared to be the result of heavily rusted screws holding it in place. It’s also likely recent heavy winds may have

The original entrance to the drive-in. The sign can just be seen on the left.

The Starlight Drive-In in the late ‘50s.

contributed to the fall of the ageing steel frame. Applicable heritage guidelines under the Heritage Act 2004 state the guiding conservation objective is that the sign “shall be conserved and appropriately managed in a manner respecting its heritage significance and the features intrinsic to that heritage significance.” The ACT Heritage Council was unavailable for comment on the sign’s maintenance. The Starlight Drive-In was one of the first drive-ins in Canberra when it opened in 1957. In its glory days, Starlight could hold up to 1180 cars and offered two shows a night. The evening would include the news and cartoons before the main film. Many Canberrans have fond memories of the theatre, including Judi Sindel who attended the opening in 1957 as a four-year-old. “From then on mum and dad took my two sisters, my brother and me to the drive-in about twice a week for the duration of my childhood. I then started going there on dates as a teenager in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s,” she says.

CityNews  October 4-10  5


election 2012 / comment

Not too late for a little ‘kiss and tell’! With an election pending, it’s a shame ACT politics does not have a Tanner-like kiss and tell to air the dirty linen of the parties, writes MICHAEL MOORE JUST as former Finance Minister Lindsay Tanner exposed the shenanigans behind the removal of Kevin Rudd in his recent book of essays, it would be great to have an insight into the rise and rise of Katy Gallagher, Zed Seselja and Meredith Hunter. The transition from Jon Stanhope to Katy Gallagher was seamless enough. However, as constantly as Andrew Barr and Simon Corbell reinforce their support for her as Chief Minister, observers would note that both of these Ministers always had at least a reasonable claim to the top job. Corbell was first elected in 1997 and is the longest-serving Labor MLA in the Assembly. Andrew Barr has served competently as a Minister over two terms of the Assembly and, although he represents the right wing of the Labor Party, has always effectively managed to cross the factional boundaries. For an outsider looking in, the Labor Party seems in harmony. The leadership is without question and there are no indications of the same internal rancour that has been exposed federally by Tanner. The ACT jurisdiction has the advantage of being much smaller and all elected members and candidates understand that divisiveness within the party is a sure formula for losing an election. Some of the candidates also have a clear insight into the level of scheming and any dirty laundry. Angie Drake, one of the Labor candidates in Molonglo, was working for Katy Gallagher before her ascendancy to Chief Minister. She is already running an effective campaign, but has her work cut out to compete with Corbell and Barr for the third seat in Molonglo. Even harder for Drake will be to wrestle the fourth seat from the Greens or the Liberals! The other interesting candidate with understanding of conspiracy is Mick Gentleman, who’s running in Brindabella. Gentleman served one term in the Assembly before narrowly missing out retaining his seat at the last election. This time he does not have to compete with John Hargreaves, a popular Labor member in the electorate, who is retiring. The Liberals are not without their own internal factions. When Seselja came to power as Leader of the Opposition, it is certainly true

that Brendan Smyth had much more experience. Smyth was elected to the Assembly in 1998 after serving in the Federal Parliament as Member for Canberra in 1995 and 1996. Although the longest serving Liberal MLA, and the only one to have Ministerial experience, he serves as a loyal deputy. Jeremy Hanson sits in the wings wearing the cloak of the pretender to the throne. It is his first term and he knows better than to disrupt party unity by any whiff of a leadership challenge this close to an election. However, there is not much doubt that Hanson will move on the leadership if Seselja is not successful in bringing the party to power. It might not be in the first few weeks after the election – but it is inevitable. The Greens supposedly have no leader. Meredith Hunter was elected “Parliamentary Convenor” at the start of the current Assembly when the Greens won four seats with all first-term MLAs. The surprise was that the role did not go to Shane Rattenbury, who had been the outstanding candidate in the election campaign. Since that time, Rattenbury has performed well as Speaker. However, he was in a role that effectively prevented him from challenging for the leadership. The machinations that went on to elevate Hunter and contain Rattenbury would make interesting reading to an outsider. Was it a decision that was taken on a gender basis? Caroline Le Couteur is the highest-risk candidate for the Greens as she holds their second seat in Molonglo, but all indications are that she is no more a kiss and tell party member than Amanda Bresnan in Brindabella. It is not too late. Surely someone with a party-political background is feeling jaded enough to point the finger. It does not have to be a full book – but a small exposé would certainly add interest to the election and provide an insight into the personalities of those who lead the three main parties and who are looking for voters to support them. Michael Moore was an independent member of the ACT Legislative Assembly (1989 to 2001) and was minister for health.

Who’s got the best prescription for health? Page 15

letter Burden shifts in rates ‘tsunami’ THE Greens supported a Labor policy change that shifts the entire burden of conveyancing stamp duty to annual payments by householders. Of the policy options offered this was the most extreme. Perhaps people are waking up to that, that it is not a fear campaign. The disingenuous arguments of the small increases are only based on the first year; there are 20 years of these increases. The extended phase in period is a clue as to the impact. Similarly, Katy Gallagher claiming there are winners, they can disappear as quickly as a minor change in percentages or exemptions, just as this whole change was made. If you tweak the rates someone is going to pay more. I have been involved in tax, public finance and distributional analysis. Clearly, as the Quinlan report 6  CityNews  October 4-10

noted, replacing $358.3m of revenue will cost each household an average extra $2076 (year 10). The fatal flaw is an assumption that property value and household income is linked, clearly this breaks down for retirees and pensioners and others. The average rate was proposed to be $3867 pa in 10 years (it is $1294 now). For pensioners, for example, their rates are more than 1.3% of their income and unless their land value is more than $390,000 they are not eligible for rates deferral either. The cute graphic in the Quinlan report looks like a breaking wave, for many it might seem like a rates tsunami which will arrive each year, and it will be getting bigger each year.

 

Martin Gordon, Flynn


8  CityNews  October 4-10


the gadfly

From loss, Julia rises ALL the media commentary about the rise of Julia Gillard’s popularity – and that of her government – has centred around the carbon price and its failure to frighten the horses.

There’s also been a nod to Tony Abbott’s bully boy character and the swingeing cuts to health and education by the Liberal State Governments. Sure, these are factors. But in their obsession with the Parliament House in-fighting, I believe the commentators have neglected the most important element: the death of the Prime Minister’s father, John Gillard. In a single stroke, Julia was transformed in the public mind from an other-worldly and somewhat mechanical figure to a real human being, torn by the same grief that we all feel at the loss of a loved one. She was not afraid to show it, yet she made no particular claim on our heartstrings. She came home early from an APEC Conference, but she bore her grief in the privacy of the family circle. There was no formal funeral for Mr Gillard since he had willed his body to science. And when she reappeared at a State Labor Conference it was as a daughter publicly recovered and prepared to get on with the job in the way her father would have wished. The bond between them was very strong. And I couldn’t help but feel that, by his passing, John had bestowed on his daughter his final and most precious gift: entrée to the hearts and minds of the Australian people. It is extraordinary that at just such a time Julia’s two principal opponents – Tony Abbott and

Robert Macklin comments

Kevin Rudd – should have stumbled in the same emotional arena. Abbott first declined to deny he had punched a wall beside a young woman’s face. Had it been almost any other politician the story would have fizzled out. But it fit the Abbott persona like a (boxing) glove; and it just didn’t seem like the sort of thing a woman (or anyone else) would make up. Then Kevin Rudd paraded his wares on the ABC “7.30” program in a way that jarred. It looked as though he was taking advantage of Julia Gillard’s absence and his brother Greg caught the moment effectively when he described Kevin as “rattling his cage” to remind his colleagues of his availability. Perhaps this was unkind, but once again it fitted the protagonist’s public persona. The overall effect is that, for the first time in a year, people are opening their minds to the possibility of a Gillard-led government with a real chance of re-election. She has caught their attention and it’s now up to her to persuade a majority that her policies of nation building, while offering a hand up to the masses, is preferable to Abbott’s conservative approach that would cut spending and build up reserves for a rainy day. But will it really be Tony Abbott who leads the Coalition to the next election? Frankly, I doubt it, but the speed of change in Australian political life is so bewildering these days that only a fool would tie his reputation to a firm prediction. robert@robertmacklin.com

CityNews  October 4-10  9


news

sport

Top folk to keep a watch

The ticket price of success...

Kathryn Vukovljak reports

For years we have been crying out for major sporting events to come to Canberra, says TIM GAVEL

A SERIES of crimes close to home inspired Gordon couple Mark and Sheila Lynch to start up a branch of Neighbourhood Watch – and their efforts have won them an award. The couple were given the ACT Neighbourhood Watch Member of the Year Award for creating and growing the Gordon NHW. “We were so proud and honoured,” says Mark. “I mean, some people have been doing this for 30 years and we’re pretty new at it. “But we’ve always felt it was going well because we increase our membership every month. And, of course, you can’t do it without a great team – we have a good mix of young professionals in their 30s, right up to a 79-year-old. And we have some 83-yearolds delivering the newsletter for us!” Sheila came up with the idea of starting Neighbourhood Watch following a spate of crime in the area. “Tyres were being slashed, windows broken, that sort of thing,” says Mark. “We also witnessed a rather brutal crime in a nearby house where some boys were attempting to break in, and shouting threatening things. “We put ourselves forward as witnesses, but nothing really came of it, and it got us thinking.

Neighbourhood Watch award winners Mark and Sheila Lynch.  “We contacted the ACT NHW, and they said they’d love to help us get started in Gordon as there was nothing like that down here.” Mark and Sheila started by creating flyers and hand-delivering them to every home in Gordon – 2800 in all. Neighbourhood Watch is about liaising with police and the community, says Mark, but he believes that awareness is paramount, too. “We now produce a newsletter for every home in the suburb to maintain awareness,” he says. “We try not to focus too much on crime and making it negative.

Photo by Silas Brown

We cover people like the RSPCA, the Fire Brigade and Tuggeranong Men’s Shed. “Sheila also arranged sponsorship from LJ Hooker, which has been wonderful. “I just think it’s so important to get to know your neighbour and look after each other,” says Mark. “I’ve had calls from elderly ladies who are afraid to go out at night or don’t know their neighbours, and they just want me to know they’re there. Mark says that he and Sheila definitely feel they’re on the right track. “If we can make people feel part of the community, and feel safer, then we’re connecting people and we’re doing our job,” he says.

WHEN major sporting events, such as Wallaby tests, golf, and first-class cricket, are advertised for Canberra, ticket sales have not been high and the crowd attendance is often poor. So it will be fascinating to see what happens next year when Canberra is flooded with major events. For instance, in the three weeks from January 29 to February 17, there are four, possibly five, significant sporting fixtures in Canberra. The Prime Minister’s XI take on the West Indies on January 29, with the possibility that the match could be the first to be played under lights at Manuka. Eight days later, the Australian team plays the West Indies at the same ground, under lights, in the first international involving the Australian men’s cricket team

in Canberra. There is the Australian Ladies’ Golf Open at Royal Canberra February 11-17, featuring some of the biggest names in women’s golf with the tournament part of the US LPGA tour; and the Brumbies start their Super 15 season at Canberra Stadium against Queensland on February 16. There is also the possibility of an AFL pre-season match between GWS and Essendon around this time. I would love to see every event packed out. For that to happen, ticket prices need to be reasonable. It’s all very well to have these events on in Canberra, but if it’s too costly to go, then why bother? So I make this plea to sporting organisations: be reasonable in pricing tickets and you will get a crowd.

Here’s to the Tradies THANK goodness for the Tradies’ Club. I am not a huge fan of pokies, but if they are going to be part of our lives let’s put the proceeds to positive use. That’s exactly what the Tradies are doing with women’s sport. When the CFMEU pulled out of sponsoring the Raiders, there was uncertainty about whether the money would be lost to sport. Those fears were unfounded with the Tradies putting the money into our top three women’s sporting teams; the Canberra Capitals, the ACT Meteors and Canberra United in the W League. The money provided won’t allow the women’s teams to become fully professional; far from it, but it will allow them to be competitive. Gaining sponsorship, particularly for women’s sport, must be hard work. However, I am also hearing from other sporting organisations that it’s not easy gaining corporate sponsorship at the moment.

Tough time for Trevor THE departure of Trevor Thurling from the Canberra Raiders has flown under the radar. He didn’t get a chance to play a farewell game. His season was crippled by injury and he didn’t get a contract for next year. We often look at the glamour of professional sport, but see little of the work that goes on behind the

10  CityNews  October 4-10

scenes; the hours of training and the months of rehabilitation from injury. That has been Trevor’s life this year. It’s been frustrating, to say the least. I loved watching him play; he always gave everything, but injury prevented him from achieving all that he could have. He will be a great buy for the Queanbeyan Blues in the Canberra Raiders’ Cup.


CityNews  October 4-10  11


Australian Home Heating Association / advertising feature ‘Wood heaters are an easy target; it’s difficult to pass legislation to stop bushfires and dust storms.’

Stop the political attack on wood heaters DRAFT legislation before the Legislative Assembly will effectively ban the sale of wood heaters in the ACT, says the Australian Home Heating Association.

Association general manager Demi Brown says the legislation is the “thin edge of the wedge” and, if successfully passed into law, will lead to the eventual banning of wood heaters altogether in the ACT. “Wood heating has excellent environmental credentials in preference to creating heat using fossil fuels,” she says. “It is a low-cost alternative to expensive fossil fuels and the health issues caused by wood heating are somewhat exaggerated.” The association has launched a dedicated campaign website at ThinEdge.com.au, providing an alternative point of view to assist ACT residents to make an informed decision about the future use of wood heating and how they can take action to oppose the proposed legislation. The first piece of draft legislation, the Environment and Construction Occupations Legislation (Wood Heaters) Amendment Bill 2012, was introduced earlier this year by Amanda Bresnan, a Member for Brindabella and the ACT Greens Health Spokesperson. The Bill calls for new, stricter emissions and efficiency standards that wood heaters must meet before they can be sold in the Territory or installed in an ACT residence. “The ACT Greens propose to reduce the allowable emission level from the current national standard of 4g/ kg to 1g/kg,” says Ms Brown. “That’s a big change. Only 10 of the current wood

12  CityNews  October 4-10

heater models sold in the ACT out of the current roughly 350 models can achieve this standard. “Reducing emission levels to 1g/kg and introducing an efficiency requirement of 65 per cent would require more than 95 per cent of current models to be re-tested or removed from sale. “It is aimed at severely restricting the sale of wood heaters in the ACT by making the majority of existing models non-compliant. This will affect 95 per cent of the current wood heaters available.” In July, Simon Corbell, Minister for the Environment and Sustainable Development, and Member for Molonglo, issued a media release signalling his intention to prohibit wood heaters altogether in the new Molonglo Valley Development (with the exception of Wright). “Viability of businesses will be affected, jobs are at stake, and the rights of ACT residents to simply burn wood to stay warm will be rescinded,” says Ms Brown. The AHHA has consulted with Ms Bresnan and Minister Corbell in writing and through face-to-face meetings. “Our concerns regarding the proposed legislation, the impact that it will have on the wood-heating industry, and the facts noted on the website have all been put to both members,” says Ms Brown. “However, it is our belief that these representations have had no impact. “The AHHA is not against the attainment of improved emission standards. Far from it. “The association is committed to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of burning wood as a source of heat. “Firstly, combustion heaters are far more efficient than open brick fireplaces.

“Secondly, AHHA members work actively to improve the design of combustion heaters to reduce emissions. “Lastly, the stated position of the AHHA is the correct use of wood heaters by their owners will vastly reduce the emission of visible smoke and invisible particulate matter. “We work with various levels of government in Australia implementing an education campaign designed to improve operating standards, and we are continually doing research and development to improve emissions. “We have offered this service to the ACT Government but, to date, they have ignored the suggestion. “Ms Bresnan and Mr Corbell believe that wood heaters cause air-quality problems in the ACT. By restricting the operation of wood heaters they believe that these problems will be alleviated. “But there are many sources of air quality problems. Eliminating air-quality problems is not as simple as banning wood heaters; there are many sources of fine particles in the air including: diesel cars and trucks, industry, motor vehicles, dust storms, burn-offs, bushfires, lawn mowers and many other sources. “Wood heaters are an easy target; it’s difficult to pass legislation to stop bushfires and dust storms. “Particulate matter generated by the few wood heaters in the ACT (approximately 3000 in a population of some 375,000 people) is a minor concern for people suffering from respiratory problems.” More information at ThinEdge.com.au Authorised by Demi Brown, general manager, Australian Home Heating Association, 6/26 Stirling Street, Thebarton, SA 5031, call (08) 8351 9288 or email admin@thinedge.com.au

Wood fire... “a low-cost alternative to expensive fossil fuels and the health issues caused by wood heating are somewhat exaggerated,” says Demi Brown.


CityNews  October 4-10  13


14  CityNews  October 4-10


election 2012 / health

Who’s got the right prescription for Health? Katy Gallagher says she’s a stayer and has no plans to leave the Health portfolio if re-elected at October 20’s election. Her Liberal opposite Jeremy Hanson can’t see the health system improving without a change of government. Only one of them can be right. The patient LAURA EDWARDS reports “HEALTH has been a political football – it’s got a lot of bad press,” says Minister for Health Katy Gallagher. But Gallagher is resolute that, if reelected on October 20, she won’t be stepping down from her role as Minister, a position she has held for six years. “I think I’ve got staying power,” she says. “Many others wouldn’t have stuck around and I believe if you get health right, and if you get jobs right, this city really will be something special.” But Liberals health spokesman Jeremy Hanson says he is “extremely concerned” with the culture of the health system, and believes it won’t improve without a change of government. Labor has delivered what Gallagher calls a “comprehensive” health plan ahead of this month’s election, with key commitments including a new northside sub-acute hospital at the University of Canberra, a new birthing centre at Calvary Hospital and $20 million to provide more cancer outpatient services. Gallagher says a health system under her leadership will focus on “a complete rebuild of the health system”. “We’re only four years into what is probably a 10 to 12-year program of reform and that’s really about making possible somewhere where people want to go, and have places in the community for those who don’t need to be in hospital to go,” she says. “It’s about how we provide services, so in the last four years we’ve opened a new adult mental health unit, we’ve opened stage one of the women’s and children’s hospital, we’ve opened new operating theatres, new wards, we’re building community health centres, we’ve got a new public hospital.” However Hanson believes the culture of health won’t improve without a change of government. “We saw that culture lead to the emergency department scandal where [a former executive] was doctoring emergency data results on a massive scale,” he says. “To change the culture, you’ve got to start with leadership at the top. I’ve got energy, I’ve got the drive, and the preparedness to change the culture and the preparedness to tell the truth.”

Katy Gallagher... “You won’t find a health system in the world that doesn’t need to improve, there’s always pressure.”

Jeremy Hanson... “I accept there’s no quick fix. I realise there’s a lot of hard work to be done.”

The Canberra Liberals have announced a $7 billion plan for the health system, including a new north Canberra sub-acute hospital, urgent care clinics in Tuggeranong and Gungahlin, $5m to support general practices and $1m a year to go towards preventative health measures. Hanson believes the urgent-care clinic in particular will help “ease emergency waiting times.” “At the moment we’ve got reports of people waiting as long as 20 hours for surgery,” he says. “The clinics will be like an outpost of the emergency department, with X-ray and pathology. Everyone knows doctors and nurses work best together.” Hanson believes the most “unresolved” issue in health is the data doctoring scandal, where a Canberra Hospital executive admitted to altering hundreds of medical records in an attempt to improve waiting time records. But Gallagher, who was cleared of any misconduct in the affair by the auditorgeneral after revealing her sister worked with the disgraced executive, says she has “no regrets” in her handling of the issue. “You know these are matters for judgement. I stood aside, I identified the potential for a conflict of interest and, frankly, regardless of the reasons for doing that, that would have been the same outcome,” she says. “All that’s left to do now is the records need to be amended, and the true picture

given and that is happening, and the individual who has done it has resigned. I’m not sure there’s anything you can do other than tell everyone what’s happened, fix it, and then support the people who have been affected by it.” Admitting the role as Minister for Health has given her “more than a few grey hairs”, Gallagher also says it has also been a “great privilege”. “When people go back and write the journals of history in Canberra I think they will see in my time as health minister I made the most comprehensive plan for the health system and I’ve stuck around to implement it,” she says. “You won’t find a health system in the world that doesn’t need to improve, there’s always pressure, there might be different areas of pressure, ours is the emergency department and elective surgery... but you also have to look at the system as a whole, and it’s much more than that, much more.” Hanson agrees there’s no “quick fix” of the health system. “What I’ve tried to do is put out a paper that had a long-term view that stretched out to 2020 where we see the peak demand from our ageing and growing population,” he says. “And what you’re seeing now is some of the policies we’ve put forward and there will be others that actually will help to realise that strategy. But I accept there’s no quick fix. I realise there’s a lot of hard work to be done.”

letter Needles-in-prison decision: a fallacy, not a policy IN August, the Chief Minister announced the Government would examine a needle-andsyringe model based on a one-for-one swap. It said, in part, that the strategy would, on a trial basis, cover steps to cut off the supply of drugs in the prison and allow access to a needle-andsyringe program. Vital to the outcome of this issue is agreement by corrective services because the

relevant enterprise agreement requires consultation and agreement between the relevant parties, not simply consultation. Reportedly, the ACT Corrections Minister, Chris Bourke, is to trial phone jamming at the AMC to help stop organised criminal activity. Prisoners say mobile phones keep them in touch with family members, but authorities say unscrupulous use

aids criminal activity. What’s this? On the one hand the Government is going to aid criminal activity by not only ignoring illegal drugs in a place of correction, but give users the instruments which not only assist ongoing drug use, but are the main cause of the spread of hepatitis C (needles and syringes). This isn’t a policy – it’s a fallacy.



Colliss Parrett, Barton CityNews  October 4-10  15


Canberra Confidential Why printers dream of donkeys THERE’S good money to be made from donkeys it seems. ACT electoral commissioner Phil Green has announced the names of the 74 optimists trying for the 17 spots in the Legislative Assembly on October 20. Under the ACT’s Robson rotation method, which reduces the effect of “donkey” voting straight down the list, the order of the printing of candidates’ names within each column will vary on each ballot paper. All of which adds up to a printer’s dream: the two five-member electorates of Brindabella and Ginninderra are each printed in 60 different ways, while the seven-member electorate of Molonglo is printed in a staggering 420 different ways.

Inside story AN impatient fashionista has been peeking in on the progress of the Zara store in the Canberra Centre, and sent this “through the keyhole” snap of the store, which still resembles a construction site despite rumours it will open early October. It’s enough to get “CC” excited though – just think how many racks of clothes can fit in that huge space...

Out of the Parlour

Britt bolts to Sydney THAT’S the Face of Canberra Racing Brittney McGlone in a squeeze with Olympic sprinting phenomenon Usain Bolt. “CC” hears from the horse’s mouth that our Britt, herself a 400-metre hurdler, had a “secret rendezvous” with the fastest man on the planet over the weekend. Apparently, she has known Usain for a while and caught up with the sprinter during his secret visit to Sydney.

Top advice, Jayson DESIGNER Jayson Brunsdon was in town last week, and in the midst of showing off his latest collection of glamorous frocks at Canberra Centre’s spring/ summer launch, he let ladies in on his number one fashion tip: “Less is more. Always take something off before leaving the house.” And without missing a beat, quickly adding: “Not your top, of course.” Glad he clarified that one.

Super nosh, eh what? HOW the other half sup... a lucky silvertail at the A-list reception for VIPs at Bell Shakespeare’s curtain up of Moliere’s “The School For Wives” the other night was astounded by the quality and quantity of the fingerfood nibbles. “Those ghastly gherkins on Jatz crackers and mini-frankfurters in tomato sauce of yesteryear are but a fading memory,” he waxed, almost Shakespearean, to “CC”. In their stead “delicious mini-burgers, Singapore crab creations in tiny pastry bowls, scrumptious curry puffs” and on it went... Obviously a priceless experience and perhaps no coincidence that Bell was introducing Visa as a new sponsor. 16  CityNews  October 4-10

WHILE many Canberrans wait impatiently for Parlour Wine Room to reopen, news comes of a new addition to the Parlour/Knightsbridge Penthouse family and it’s to be called The Elk and Pea. Former Parlour chef Nick Parkinson, pictured, has joined with owner Bria Sydney to create The Elk and Pea. According to the venue’s facebook page, there will be “Central/South Americaninspired tucker for all to enjoy in the heart of Braddon”. “We’re so excited to be offering a feeding venue once more while Parlour Wine Room is still in the rebuild process,” the site says. It will offer breakfast, lunch, dinner and, of course, drinks. Set to open soon at 21 Lonsdale Street, Braddon. Parlour is planned to reopen at NewActon early next year.

Oh no, sober October WOWSERS of the world rejoice, there’s another tiresome month of abstemiousness ahead to taunt the unsuspecting drinking public. Hot on the heels of FebFast and Dry July is this month’s, wait for it, Ocsober. Of course, it’s all in a good cause... for Life Education Australia which delivers health, drug and alcohol education programs to children. If you really can’t resist, turn yourself in at www.ocsober.com.au

On top of manure OH how we love silly or misspelled signs at “CC” and this is a collector’s item. Gardening writer Cedric Bryant, a man sensitive to all-things-manure, spotted this one on the Federal Highway, past Watson and just before Majura Road “as one travels north to Sidney”, he cheekily writes. “Dung” might have been an easier spelling for the author.


scene

B ROUG YOU BY

H T TO

Canberra’s only locally-owned Subaru dealer

ROLFE SUBARU

At Floriade and NightFest VIP party

At Canberra Centre’s spring summer fashion launch, Floriade

Brendon Martin and Amanda Williamson

Claire Read and Vanessa Fernandez

Kathy Tricolas and Kelly Ryan

Deputy Chief Minister Andrew Barr, Sibella Court and Dianne Ireland

Trent Russell, Jenny Priest and Ian Hill

Nisha Navaratnam with Nandi and Nithya Chellappah

Sujie Song and Diana Hansen

Tracey Murray, Tero Blinnikka and Tasma Vyner

Audrey Roferos and Rebecca Bimbilovska

Laura Haddock, Anita Nallo, Victoria Schnabl, Samantha West and Francesca Droulias

Jane Cassidy with Colette and Claire Mackay

Leane Belmonte and Chris Tamvakis

Jean and Sarah Herring

Karen and Beth Clark

Jayson Brunsdon and Nicole Gibson

Melissa Grant, Jules Swinton and Danielle Leigh

Clinton and Andrea Hutchinson

CityNews  October 4-10  17


scene

ROLFE SUBARU AT PHILLIP & BELCONNEN

At the Burley Griffin Regatta launch, Hyatt Hotel

At Lifeline Canberra’s Hipsley Lane opening, Braddon

Chris and Melanie Cairns

Katrina Hayes, Lilli Owens-Walton, Katherine Govey and Sarah Baker

Jaime Svensson, Spero Cassidy and Mimmi Freebody

Brittany Champness, Natalie Robinson and Mark Eastwood

18  CityNews  October 4-10

Suzanne Mestou, John Ringwood and Natasha Zuvela

Sarah Cook, Yasmin Burraston and Alistair Coe MLA

Ian Freebody with Andrew and Suzi Maroc

Natalie Howson, Diane Kargas and Jodie Robinson

Brendon Prout, Kylie Krinas and Neale Guthrie

Virginia Edlington, Noni Markwick and Cynthia Brawis

Prof John Roberts, Shane Rattenbury MLA, Jeanie Bruce, Pauline Thorneloe and host Mike Zissler

Kerryn Pholi, Jen Large and Rose Stellino

Pamela Andrews, Dr Jeff Harmer and Madelaine Pavey

Kelly and Caleb Barry


CityNews  October 4-10  19


scene At the Independence of Botswana celebration, Deakin

Kellie Trevillian, Fazal Rehman Katawazai and Kerri Clark

Oratile Khama and Leonaitasi Kuluni

Botswana high commissioner Molosiwa Selepeng and wife Game

At the ‘ACTivated’ exhibition opening, CMAG, Civic

Mav and Dale Middleby with Rowan Hendersen

Helen Vaughan-Roberts and Corille Fraser

Sandra Lambert and Bill Wood

At the Gold Creek soiree, The Abbey, Gold Creek

Gil Miller, Natalie Nieuwenhuys and Andrew Hollands

Sam Newman, Donna Moulds, Craig Schmidt, Courtney Elliott and Michelle Mills

At Mission Australia race day, Thoroughbred Park

Toby Piper, Renee Dean and Tim Landley

Danielle Sayers, John and Kelly Burgess and Lauren Sayers

At ‘Spring Racing Charity Luncheon’, Hellenic Club

Bill and Joan Rolfe with Sue King

Sharon Feist, Lesley Lewis, Marion Langlar and Eileen Byran

More photos from these events / citynews.com.au/scene 20  CityNews  October 4-10


Melbourne Cup fashion

advertising feature

Bright news about neon Left, Peter Kaiser Magalia Coral shoe, $390, Peter Kaiser bag, $349, Franco Ferrari scarf, $485, Cynthia Bryson hat, $315, Escala.

Brighten up with hints of neon and fluoro for Fashions on the Field this year, but beware of going tradie-neon, warns Briony Young THE word on everyone’s lips this spring racing season seems to be neon, says Briony Young, sales and marketing manager at Thoroughbred Park, although she believes it will “hit with a bang and then die, the same way it did in the ‘80s”. Still, head for hot pink, cobalt and other hot hues, she suggests. “The fluoro will stand out, but be warned – make sure you only wear it as an accessory and not for a whole outfit,” says Briony. “You know those guys who work on the side of the road in the fluoro yellow? We don’t want to see that in Fashions on the Field!” This spring it’s about clean, simple lines that fit and flatter, says Briony. “Thanks to bootilicious divas such as Beyonce and the Kardashians, this is going to be the year where we’ll see curves embraced more than ever. Clever lines and tones in dresses will enhance your curves.” Other trends to look out for, says Briony, are ‘60s-style shift dresses a la Victoria Beckham (teamed with great legs), dresses with a spectacular cut at the back with a simple front, and hats – yes, hats are back. “My sources say that it’s the bigger the better, with bold bright colours and feathered plumes,” says Briony. “A 360-degree mirror check before you head out is a must!” There are pitfalls to watch out for, too, says Briony. “Dare I say it, ladies... beware of the peplum,” she says. “Yes, we’re thinking peplums are all the rage, but if you want to look fashion forward make sure your peplum is removable. “Don’t spend all your money on a trend that’s going to be gone, like the colour blocking craze from last year.” The biggest rule of Fashions on the Field, says Briony, is that it’s your own personal interpretation of what you think traditional racing fashion is. However, as we know, there are rules. “On beautiful sunny race days, don’t think you can enter Fashions on the Field with a shoulderless dress,” she says. “Match it with a jacket if you’re going on stage, otherwise save yourself the time and be a spectator. “I hate to sound like a bore, but it’s racing tradition and you wouldn’t do it in Melbourne. And don’t forget – keep the hemline around the knee and the nightclub outfits for the nightclubs. “I say it every year – it’s all about the package: sleek hair, perfect makeup and class all the way. “Choose the right fit for your body type, basic colours with great millinery and show off how you can style yourself.”

Right, Red Valentino Amadoi Black shoe, $575, Red Valentino bag, $699, Cynthia Bryson hat, $425, Escala. Left, Maretto Coral shoe, $348, Maretto bag, $569, Cynthia Bryson hat, $315, Escala.

CityNews  October 4-10  21


Melbourne Cup fashion

Hats are back! MILLINER Rachael Henson agrees that hats are back, and bigger and better than ever. “Ascot outlawed fascinators in the royal enclosure this year, so this might follow over to Australia,” she says. “I expect the hats will also be more substantial than in the past because the Duchess of Cambridge has brought so much focus back on hats and wears them so well.” It’s all about brights and florals too, she says. “The millinery suppliers have huge amounts of colour in all their straws, so we’ll be seeing lots of brights, like watermelon, this season. “I know the trends are important for Fashions on the Field, but I prefer to match colour and style to each individual person rather than follow trends too closely.” Call 6281 4792 or email rachael@ rachaelhensonmillinery.com.au.

Enchanting Gothic Handmade wine vintage velvet flowers with face veiling, $99, Rachael Henson Millinery.

So Very Vintage pale blue and red velvet ribbon headband, $90, Rachael Henson Millinery.

Brown, pleated crinoline with vintage watermelon ribbon and vintage button, $180, Rachael Henson Millinery. 22  CityNews  October 4-10


 / advertising feature

Individuality and glamour THE races are a time for a touch of glamour, according to Maria Ramsden from vintage boutique The Darling Sisters.

“I love to see a romantic look with florals or a ‘20s style dress with beautiful beading,” says Maria. “We have some lovely special-occasion dresses in store at the moment which are gorgeous and affordable. “Anything goes for the races as long as it’s elegant and classy, but I think it’s interesting the way ladies put their outfits together – it’s how you wear a dress to flatter your shape and how you accessorise it that makes it special.” The Darling Sisters, Unit 9, 7 O’Hanlon Place, Gold Creek Square, Nicholls. Email thedarlingsisters@gmail. com.

Above, Cobalt blue Bettie Page dress, $148, The Darling Sisters. Left, Pink and grey spotty Bettie Page dress, $140, The Darling Sisters.

CityNews  October 4-10  23


24  CityNews  October 4-10


arts & entertainment

Robert Macklin Ho-hum to J.K. Rowling

Tree takes to the prospect of ‘War’ I’M lucky to catch Sharon Tree. Helen Musa Trained in classical piano, with reports a postgraduate qualification in how to teach singing, It’s an ambitious production she’s been pretty much the directed by Ron Dowd, for Canberra’s SUPA Productions, and it’s been testing busiest voice teacher in musicians and the resources of Canberra, since arriving from the SUPA, which prides itself on doing Queensland eight years ago. “different” musicals.

She’s so busy that she rarely has time to step into the theatrical world, as she did as director for The Q’s awardwinning production of Willy Russell’s “Blood Brothers”. But now Tree is taking to the stage again as musical director of Jeff Wayne’s cult 1978 work “War of the Worlds”.

Just to give you a taste, Act I deals with the coming of the Martians, while Act II shows Earth under the invading forces. Songs include “Horsell Common and the Heat Ray”, “Brave New World” and “Dead London”. It’s pretty epic stuff, epic enough to have attracted Liam Neeson and

Richard Burton to the central role of The Journalist. “War of the Worlds” is perfectly suited to Tree because, as she says, “a lot of the story is told through the music”. With just six actors, headed up by a commentator character played by Joseph McGrail-Bateup as The Journalist and three backing vocalists, she rejoices in leading an orchestra of 27, four synthesiser players, a six-piece rock band and a 17-piece string orchestra. “It’s magnificent,” she exults as she tells me how the music crosses over rock and classical traditions. If you know anything about “War of the Worlds”, you’ll be aware that the

orchestra and the upstage filmscape of events, based on HG Wells’ 1898 novel, could well upstage the cast. Tree calls it “more like a theatrical concert”. They’re doing Jeff Wayne’s 2006 touring version that he brought to Sydney, which has introduced a whole new generation to a space-age musical that their parents (and maybe even grandparents) enjoyed. And is the show just for sci-fi followers? Certainly not, Tree assures me. Her own father is normally averse to sci-fi, but after hearing some of the music, he said he wouldn’t just come to see it once – he’d come twice. Jeff Wayne’s “War Of The Worlds”, ANU Arts Centre, October 12-27, bookings to 6257 1950.

Joseph McGrail-Bateup as The Journalist in “War of the Worlds”.  Photo by Nick Brightman

Soloists’ sleepover at Yarralumla THOSE sophisticates, the Southern Cross Soloists from Brisbane, gave selected music-lovers a taste of their talents at Government House last weekend. Governor General Quentin Bryce, who had been their patron since her days as Governor of Queensland, told us she’d been missing them. Not to worry, the entire ensemble was invited for a sleepover at Yarralumla on Sunday night – and yes they’d brought their pyjamas.

Meyne Wyatt and Harriet Dyer in “The School for Wives”.

Bell’s winner with ‘Wives’ BELL Shakespeare certainly knows how to bring the best out of classic comedy. “The School For Wives” was directed with great flair and an eye to utilise all that makes theatre unique. The staging and music facilitated the performances with a delicate efficiency, adding to the production setting of a ‘20s film set. The actors attacked Justin Fleming’s apt translation with precision and confidence. The result was a production that seemed as if it was written and conceived in 2012 rather than nearly 400 years ago. John Adam’s performance was all the more admirable considering he only recovered his voice at 6pm. Every aspect of his performance demonstrated an ease and lightness that created a real connection with the audience, other characters and situations. Harriet Dyer’s Agnes was bursting with sexual energy while responsive to her repressive surroundings.

theatre

“The School For Wives” By Moliere, translated by Justin Fleming and directed by Lee Lewis Bell Shakespeare At Canberra Theatre Centre until October 6. Reviewed by Joe Woodward

“1942” – it’s got Shortis and Simpson and musos Ian Blake, Dave O’Neill, Jon Jones and Peter J Casey hopping, as they take us back to the days of the Tivoli, smoky nightclubs, Changi, and even “desolate Darwin”. At the Canberra Southern Cross Club in Woden, Friday, 8.30pm, October 12, 8.30pm, bookings to 6283 7288 COINCIDENTALLY, it’s the swing music of the 1940s that’ll be on the collective minds of the Glenn Miller Orchestra, directed by Rick Gerber, when it performs at the Canberra Theatre at 7.30pm on October 20. There’ll be 25 musicians, singers and dancers on stage. Bookings to 6275 2700 or www.canberraticketing.au

Helen Musa

Irena Reedy will do when she plays “Prospera” in Daramalan Theatre Company’s production. At McCowage Hall, Daramalan College, 7.30pm, October 24-27, bookings to 6245 6351.

IS there too much burlesque in Canberra? Even as Jorian Gardner’s burlesque extravaganza gears up to hit the Courtyard Studio from October 10-13, The Abbey, in Nicholls, is hosting The Stage Door Johnnies, billed as “hand-picked from The Burlesque Hall of Fame in Las Vegas,” from October 9-10, with acrobatics, dance and a “very cheeky striptease”.

THE Griffyn Ensemble is back at Belconnen Arts Centre, 5pm, October 13, with “Behind Bars”, music written and performed in concentration camps and prisons, ranging from Messiaen to Johnny Cash. Bookings to griffyn.iwannaticket. com.au

arts in the city

IT’S bound to be a more sedate affair when country music lovers line up to see James Blundell and The Sunny Cowgirls at The Abbey on October 13. Bookings to www.theabbey.com.au “HELEN Mirren did it,” the directorial blurb reads. No, we’re not talking about getting it all off (Mirren did that in her youth when she appeared in the 1968 Aussie film “Age of Consent”), but rather having a woman play the lead character of Prospero in “The Tempest” as Year 11 student

THE Marsden Arts Group of mixed media artists celebrate 10 years of art-making together with their appropriately-titled show “10” at Watson Arts Centre, 1 Aspinall Street, until October 14. Meet the artists at 11am, Sunday, October 14. SEVEN members of the newish Gungaderra Community Arts Program are staging an exhibition and sale of original art and jewellery, with music by Madeleine Novarina and Joshua Waterhouse, at Gungaderra Homestead, Mapleton Avenue, Harrison, 11am-5pm, October 13 and 14.

The play had moments of uncomfortable reminders that some aspects of gender critique have not changed. The wife needing to be “submissive” to the husband and a number of other lessons being taught at this school might appear absurd until one considers that much of the world’s population still regards these lessons as holy truths. With a superb cast, an excellent translation and some of the finest theatre direction seen on a Canberra stage, “The School For Wives” is a “must-see”! CityNews  October 4-10  25


arts & entertainment

Credibility comes to a futuristic fantasy “Looper” (MA)

Grammy-nominated Peruvian group Novalima.

The rhythm of life returns By Helen Musa “PURA Vida” – we’ve told you before that it means “pure life” in Spanish and something like “she’ll be right, mate” in the Costa Rican vernacular. Here in Canberra, of course, it’s Frank Madrid’s Latin showcase, seen for the last couple of years on Stage 88 at Floriade. Now, in what Madrid tells “CityNews” will be its last Floriade appearance, “Pura Vida” winds up on Sunday, October 7, with Chilean singer Francisca Valenzuela, Latin funk group Gang of Brothers, Colombia’s Malalma with electronica, funk, salsa and hip-hop and Grammy-

26  CityNews  October 4-10

nominated Peruvian group Novalima. Madrid says the idea of the program, which “takes Latin fever to new heights”, is to break down barriers and get local audiences familiar with “what contemporary Latin American music is all about”. Assuming Madrid achieves his aim, the plan will be to move the event into the steamier, more tropical months of the year, to stand on its own where the international acts he’s bringing into town – some of them Grammy winners – will be given centre stage. “Pura Vida”, Stage 88, Commonwealth Park, noon to 5pm, October 6 & 7. Free entry.

TIME travel offers filmmakers a thematic field wellenough ploughed yet able to be fresh because its impossibility leaves the field open to any kind of invention. Writer/director Rian Johnson’s complex screenplay is indeed fresh, its dramatic structure restrained rather than inflated by the cop-out option of monsters from outer space. In 2044, Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) has a lucrative and easy job awaiting sudden appearances in a Kansas cornfield of bound and hooded men whom he immediately shoots with a blunderbuss, rolls on to their stomachs and removes bars of silver bullion as payment for terminating somebody the criminal fraternity has sent back from 30 years hence. One day the arrival from the future is packaged differently. The subject (Bruce Willis) is Joe himself. This turns the drama around a new corner. And it is good. The cornfield belongs to widow Sara, possessed of telekinetic powers and her son Cid. Johnson is setting us up to unravel more tangles on the way to a bloody denouement that rejects convention. Admirably designed and staged, “Looper” is futurist fantasy credible beyond normal expectations. At Dendy, Hoyts and Limelight

“Arbitrage” (MA) THIS enigmatic title is apparently the financial industry’s term for “a duplicitous means of making a profit by playing both sides”. Hedge-fund magnate Robert (Richard Gere) has more wealth than he needs for a luxurious lifestyle, a delectable wife (Susan Sarandon) and a daughter Brooke (Brit Marling) who runs the firm’s investment arm with total probity and admirable efficiency. Robert is hiding problems. He has set up his discreet and enthusiastic hotsy-totsy with a fashionable art gallery and an apartment. He has borrowed against the prospect of a nine-digit funds injection from somebody who’s being coy about signing on the dotted. On the night of his 60th birthday, having drunk too much, he is driving when his mistress dies in a spectacular accident. Robert may occupy a position traditionally reserved

Dougal Macdonald cinema

for the hero. But once we see the dimensions of his concealed selfish dishonesty, we kinda hope he will get a fitting comeuppance. We’d like to see 24-carat creep Robert banged up and the key thrown into the ocean. But you don’t become that rich without big smarts and toughness. Filmgoer, take comfort. One person in Robert’s milieu is stronger, smarter and better motivated than he. Which makes an involving film even better. At Dendy and Greater Union

“On the Road” (MA) UNFAMILIAR with the antics of the Beat Generation and not having read Jack Kerouac’s seminal novel of that name, I approached Walter Salles’s film of it with a clear head uncomplicated by any sense of obligation to identify its real-life characters for you here. I found it good, transcending a bum-numbing 155 minutes. Its foundation combines parts of the US landscape not often seen in mainstream cinema with observations of young men and women learning to survive freedom during major social, intellectual and economic changes in war’s immediate aftermath, underpinning the eternal complexities of relationships. The story covers Kerouac’s years when his doppelganger Sal (Sam Riley), wanting, even needing, to write a book, observes America’s natural and built environments in the company of young men and women unwittingly developing the Beat Generation subculture. They drive gas-guzzlers from the heyday of American car-making – Hudsons, Lincolns, Buicks – along roads less travelled, steal food from wayside stores, drink perhaps more than was good for them, possibly lay the foundations of the ‘60s sexual revolution by enjoying sex with numerous partners of various erotic preferences, encounter the collapse of relationships, deliver and sustain emotional abuse. As a cinema experience, it ticks all the good boxes. At Dendy


arts & entertainment

An eloquent attack on wowsers opera

“Albert Herring” By Benjamin Britten, directed by Caroline Stacey, conducted by Rick Prakhoff At The Street, season closed. Reviewed by Helen Musa

“THE grave’s fine and private place/but horribly cold and horribly chaste,” Benjamin Britten’s librettist Eric Crozier writes in imitation of Andrew Marvell.

Landini pizza, mushroom, ricotta and rocket. 

Photos by Silas Brown Owner Joe Pelle.

The ricetta for a perfect pizza I’VE been to Ricetta in Manuka three times – twice for coffee and once for lunch. Lunch was the best because they got my coffee order right and I loved my fungi and truffle oil pizza. Ricetta means “recipe” in Italian and this new venture is on Palmerston Lane, where Manuka Fine Foods used to be. It’s a bakery, café and pizzeria rolled into one. Many of the 20 pizzas on the menu are truly Italian and a welcome change from the standard (and, I’ll admit, popular) fare served at some pizza joints, like the “Hawaiian” or “the lot” – a pizza base groaning under a load of so many ingredients you can’t taste any particular one. Ricetta is more refined – simple recipes created with quality ingredients. Early starters can opt for a breakfast pizza ($12 or $14) like the Rusticana,

Wendy Johnson

creeps up on you after you’ve indulged in heavy food at midday. dining Ricetta has five other breakfast dishes (available all day), including prosciutto egg cups ($14) and made with a tomato base, egg and sliced Italian scrambled eggs, roasted potatoes, Italian sausage sausage. The famous Margherita heads the line-up and toasted Italian bread $16), which my friend of tomato-based pizzas ($12 or $14). Pizzas with no ordered. I was underwhelmed by the presentation – sauce include a sea salt, herbs and extra virgin olive the eggs seemed rather pale and the sausage looked oil ($7.50) and one with marinated salmon pieces, overly greasy (she confirmed it was a bit fatty). buffalo mozzarella and red hot chillies ($14). The dining experience is much more than just Ricetta’s pizzas are individual sizes and mine had a tasty food. It’s about surrounds, service and vibe. paper-thin crust. The funghi ($12) was generous with On this front, I believe Ricetta needs to fine-tune mozzarella cheese, mushrooms and a decent drizzle its recipe. I found the décor sparse and uninviting. of truffle oil. Made in Ricetta’s massive pizza oven, The display of pastries didn’t make me drool and, imported from overseas, it came to the table piping perhaps, it needs a splash of colour or artwork. Who hot and you could instantly smell the divine oil. knows? I’m no interior designer… just a person who My friend’s meal hadn’t arrived, so she encouraged eats out – a lot. me to get stuck in since this is not a pizza you want Ricetta isn’t licensed or BYO. Shop 13-14, Palmerston to eat cold. It was perfect for lunch and I was happy Lane, Manuka; open 7.30am to 5.30 pm, TuesdayI wasn’t going to be hit by that sinking feeling that Sunday. Call 6295 2778.

That pretty well sums up the theme of the springtime operatic comedy, “Albert Herring”, an eloquent attack on wowsers the world over and a marvellous choice for a group of local students and instrumentalists to practise their chosen art. With musical preparation by Alan Hicks and an expert concertmaster in Barbara Jane Gilby, the required level of sophistication of instrumental and vocal flexibility is achieved. Director Caroline Stacey has a field-day with Britten’s chosen target, small-town English life, as she pokes fun at the jodhpur-clad Lady Billows, the vicar, the school ma’am, the mayor, the police sergeant and all the other characters that help to make the life of innocent greengrocery clerk, Albert, a misery. Robert Shearer’s light tenor perfectly captures the tender, apprehensive Albert, later transformed into a confident young man about to embark on the world. As Sid the butcher, Albert’s life-loving mate, Rohan Thatcher injects an earthier quality. Julia Wee excels as the officious, puritanical housekeeper Florence Pike, while Rachel Thoms throws herself into the sneering, domineering Lady Billows with vocal gusto. Krystle Innes, as Albert’s mother, effectively shows what he is getting away from, while Elora Ledger’s sympathetic portrayal of Nancy supports Shearer. Imogen Keen’s fantasy-creation of balloon-like costumes for the children create an off-the-wall image of youth and Gillian Schwab’s overhanging baskets of fruit help fill the black space of the stage and double as lanterns. With double-casting in most roles, on the preview night when I saw it, the Saturday and Sunday night cast were performing.

Grown-up Rowling not so likeable IF the author of the Harry book review “The Casual Vacancy” Potter phenomenon had By J.K. Rowling (Little Brown). insisted her first venture Reviewed by Robert Macklin into adult fiction be published under a nom de plume it would have sold quite respectably in Britain. However, her publishers demanded the J.K. Rowling brand, and you can understand why. Under a different name I strongly doubt that it would have garnered overseas sales. It’s an unexceptionable story of class warfare in an English village. None of the characters is at all likeable and the plot – replacing a member of the Parish Council who dies in the opening pages – is thin to the point of transparency. It should not have taken an additional 500 to reach its ho-hum conclusion. The author is most comfortable, it seems, with those sections concerning the teenage schoolkids.

They’re a ghastly bunch and so over-written I found myself skipping to return to the adults. Unfortunately, they’re not much better.

CityNews  October 4-10  27


28  CityNews  October 4-10


puzzles page Joanne Madeline Moore your week in the stars / October 8 - 14

ARIES (Mar 21 – Apr 20)

There’ll be plenty of opportunities to improve your professional life this week. Use your intuition to get on the same wavelength as your colleagues, plus find practical ways to make your work space more aesthetically pleasing. Enthusiasm and confidence are high, so make the most of your abundant Aries talents. Avoid getting drawn into petty power plays on Sunday.

TAURUS (Apr 21 – May 20)

Are you confused about which path to follow in the future? Pay close attention to your nightly dreams. They are full of creative ideas and symbolic wisdom that will lead you in the right direction. Taurean painters, writers, musicians, photographers and performers will feel particularly inspired this week, as you tune into the magical muse within. Romance is also in the air.

GEMINI (May 21 – June 21)

It’s the perfect time to clean, de-clutter and beautify your domestic space. Attached Twins – if you are having partnership problems, be proactive about finding solutions. Singles – with Mars in your relationship zone (until November 17), don’t be shy about pursuing someone you fancy. Friends and finances are a messy mix on the weekend, so keep them separate.

General knowledge crossword No. 380 Across Down 3 Who was the Australian prime minister 1983-91 (3,5)? 7 Name a renowned breed of Australian sheep dog. 8 Name a strong, bitter, green-coloured, aromatic liqueur. 9 What is an alternative term for a tap? 10 What do we call a person deliberately named after another? 11 To run unclothed through a crowd is to do what? 14 What is a way in which a thing may be viewed? 17 Name a person who gathers harvest grapes. 18 Which large lizard is found in tropical America? 19 What describes a person recently married? 20 Name the Australian landscape painter, seven times winner of the Wynne prize, Elioth ... 21 Name an alternative term for the Christmas season.

Solution next week 1

CANCER (June 22 – July 22)

Cancers can be very defensive, but perhaps it’s time to discard your crusty Crab shell and show the world your caring, sharing side? This week, a relationship has the chance to deepen and become more meaningful. So don’t be afraid to let your guard down and get close to someone special. Singles – look for lasting love with a charming Capricorn or a sexy Scorpio.

2

3

4

5

6

7 8 9

LEO (July 23 – Aug 22)

This week you need to reign in your extravagant side, temper your indulgences, and learn the lessons of moderation and balance (especially at work). The Sun and Jupiter encourage you to make hasty moves, but be careful you’re not just jumping from the frying pan into the fire. Try to walk the middle path, Lions; too much of anything will only get you into trouble.

1 What, legally, is a failure to meet financial obligations? 2 Name a pale yellow New Zealand cheese. 3 What do we call one who avoids traditional conventions of behaviour, dress, etc? 4 What is a woman who inherits considerable wealth? 5 Which term describes the power to operate an electrical device? 6 What is a constituent part of a whole? 11 Which number is known by the Roman numeral LXX? 12 Name a term which implies transformation. 13 What is one who is skilled in determining the essential features of a thing? 14 To reconstruct on a smaller scale is to do what? 15 What do we call a substance that gives nourishment? 16 Name another term for a TV station.

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

VIRGO (Aug 23 – Sept 22)

Virgos are natural critics, but it’s time to criticise less and encourage more as you celebrate small successes. With Venus vamping through your sign (until October 28), you’re in the mood to shimmer and shine socially as you radiate charm and subtle sensuality. Plus the Sun and Jupiter bless business deals and financial transactions, so start negotiating now.

LIBRA (Sept 23 – Oct 23)

Hey Libra – loose lips sink ships! With impulsive Mars in your communication zone (until November 17), you’re in the mood to talk first and check details later, but skip over minor matters at your peril this week. Focus on the facts – and avoid changing your mind every five minutes. The Venus/Pluto trine favours getting deep and meaningful with loved ones.

SCORPIO (Oct 24 – Nov 21)

17 18 19 20 21

Sudoku medium No.90

Solution next week

The more you shake up your usual routine, the better the week will be. With Saturn moving slowly through your sign, avoid being too hard on yourself – and don’t be over-sensitive to the criticism of others. Instead, heed the advice of birthday great Eleanor Roosevelt: “No-one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” It’s time for Scorpios to shine!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 – Dec 21)

You start the week at a cracking pace, as the Sun and Jupiter jump start your Sagittarian motor (and increase your impatience). Slow down or you’ll blow a fuse! With lucky Jupiter in your partnership zone, joint ventures are favoured. Be inspired by John Lennon (born on October 9): “A dream you dream alone is only a dream. A dream you dream together is reality.”

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 – Jan 19)

The spotlight is on your professional performance, as Jupiter and the Sun stimulate your work zones. Exciting opportunities are on the horizon, so keep your eyes and ears open. If you combine a positive outlook with a solid work ethic, you’ll be unstoppable. Are you worried about money? The more creative and canny you are with cash, the more your bank balance will grow.

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 – Feb 18)

Aquarians are restless for adventure. Outdoor activities appeal, plus it’s the perfect time to plan your next holiday. On Sunday you’ll surprise others with your idiosyncratic ideas and spontaneous schemes. You’re in the mood to ruffle a few feathers as you go looking for fun and excitement, but be careful who you target – some people will definitely not be amused!

PISCES (Feb 19 – Mar 20)

Have you fallen in love with a perfect angel? You’re idealising your partner, but try to love their human side as well (flaws and all). Soon they’ll come tumbling down from the pedestal you’ve put them on, and that’s when the real relationship will begin. Single Fish – look for someone who you can really talk to. Deep and meaningful communication is the key to lasting love.  Daily astrology updates at www.twitter.com/JoMadelineMoore Copyright Joanne Madeline Moore 2011

Solutions

Crossword No.379 B U L L D O G S

U D D H A A E S T G I M P E T U U E L E O C T O R Y O B S I O P O R A D I C U E R A N A C O N D A J I E T S A P P H I R E B E L S

Sudoku hard No.89

F I E O R G E S N C T R O N E R E R V E R E A F E S U M E T R E E P E E R E Y N O D S

CityNews  October 4-10  29


garden

Flowers say it’s time BUXUS or box hedging plants are now showing lots of new growth and flowers and this is one time to ignore the flowers and trim the plant into shape. Normally the advice is to prune evergreen plants immediately after flowering, Buxus being the exception. Years ago, the advice given for Aussie plants was not to feed, water or prune. The idea was that these plants have adapted over millennia to natural conditions. However, those giving this advice did not take into account the huge variation in soils once we modern folk started developing gardens and amending soils. So, today’s advice is to prune, feed and water Aussie plants the same as any other. On pruning, the advice I like to give is prune immediately after flowering and do not take more than one third off at any one time. Many plants will respond to much heavier pruning with little ill effect. But some – in particular Aussie plants – can resent a too heavy hand with the shears or hedge clippers. So, up to (but not more than) one third off at any time. Apply a good organic plant food to the soil to boost the “take off” of new growth. Neutrog Seamungus, a combination of seaweed and chook poo (from free-range hens) is ideal and is classified as organic. With glorious spring weather, the new shoots will soon start appearing. Pruning has the effect of producing more branches, resulting in denser growth and with flowering plants, more flowers the following season. OCTOBER is also the ideal month for pruning conifers (and in March). It is vital not to prune conifers too hard and never into the old wood. While most evergreen shrubs will bounce back if one gets carried away, not so conifers. If you do cut into the old wood you will end up with

30  CityNews  October 4-10

October is pruning time for many plants, says gardening writer CEDRIC BRYANT a hedge of “old wood” with no greenery. I had one inquiry some years ago about a beautiful conifer hedge. The gardener did not know about pruning and cut right back into the hedge leaving bare timber. The inquiry was: “Could we paint the bare stems with the same Hedges need to be colour as the top and narrower at the top to back of the hedge to allow even sunlight to take the bareness away”! the whole plant. It is important with all evergreen hedges, whether pittosporum or conifer, to shape the top narrower than the base. This allows for even sunlight to the whole plant. If the hedge bulges out at the top, dieback can result at the bottom half of the hedge. DURING the forthcoming long weekend (October 6-8), I will be discussing pruning on the three “T’s”, Timing, Techniques and Tools. These talks will be in the Actew’s Look ‘N Learn Pavilion at Floriade, from 12.30pm, on the Saturday to Monday. The emphasis will also focus on the right tree for the right place, particularly in relation to overhead power lines.


to shape the Buxus

CIRCUS OZ WINNERS

Winners of the five double passes to see Circus Oz are: Sarah Byrne, of Hughes; Brenden Taylor, Dunlop; Judy Scott, Lyons; Barbara McCauley, Belconnen and Emma Heaney, Nicholls.

It is time to clip box and all other hedges.

Pruning points • Climbing roses are excellent for growing through deciduous trees, even fruit trees, providing you use thornless varieties such as Rosa “Zephirine Drouhin”. Do not prune for at least the first two years to enable them to put on good upward growth, gently twining the stems through the branches of the tree. Use Velcro

tape to fasten the stems to the branches. • You do not have to wait until all the leaves of bulbs have died down before pruning the old leaves to ground level. This can be done six weeks after flowering. • Do not use pruning paint on wounds after pruning. This advice was cancelled some time

ago even though you may see such products on garden centre shelves. • If using hedge trimmers, cut with an upward motion from the base upwards. • Before you start pruning make sure all secateurs and clippers are sharp. Jagged cuts result in disease entering the plant.

CityNews  October 4-10  31


LAST 2 APARTMENTS

COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITIES ALSO AVAILABLE TO LEASE OR BUY

DISPLAY APARTMENT OPEN THIS WEEKEND Only two apartments remain at the newly constructed VUE The Residence at Anketell Street in Tuggeranong. Whether you’re looking for a great investment in the Tuggeranong Town Centre or a home that is ready to move into straight away, come and visit our display apartment this Saturday. The furnished apartment overlooks the beautiful central courtyard at the development and showcases the high quality of the VUE apartments.

VUE The Residence is situated within walking distance to the Tuggeranong Town Centre and presents a unique opportunity to live in a precinct that rises above anything else seen in Canberra’s south. VUE will be open this Saturday 6 October between 10am – 11.30am at 142 Anketell Street Tuggeranong. Secure a one bedroom apartment for $345,800.

REGISTER FOR NEW GEOCON PROJECTS AT geocon.com.au.


VUE DISPLAY APARTMENT

ABOVE: THE VUE DISPLAY APARTMENT OPEN THIS SATURDAY AT 142 ANKETELL STREET TUGGERANONG BETWEEN 10AM - 11.30AM.


34  CityNews  October 4-10


city molonglo valley

47 ROAD

DENSITY MULTI-UNIT (90-180)

parliament house

46

ST RE ET

UR IA

RR A

1

coombs

HIGH DENSITY MULTI-UNIT (106-212)

wright

42

7 9

10

2

11

3

10 9

41

39

4 5

MIXED USE (182-123)

1

40

6 5

8

2 3 4

5

6

7

36 4

6

5

25

5

2

17

5

4

3

16

7

6

34

14

15

9

8

21

CATALANO

3

8

4 5 6 7

11

9

10

25 22

23

21

20

19

18

17

16

15

14

13

12

19

11

18

12

17

13

ARGUS STREET 14 15

29

5

9

8

7

6

10

N

D

R

IV

E

1

AV EN UE

12

28

27

TO

HIGH DENSITY MULTI-UNIT (89-176)

16 15 14

17

14

1

15

16

14 13 12

15

16

3

2

13

25

8

9

11 10

MA X

7

6

5

4

JA CO BS

HY NP DU

5

7

6

21

9 10 11 12 13

8

14

19 18 17 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20

28

3

2

1

15

16

AV EN UE

HIGH DENSITY MULTI-UNIT (57-113)

5

4

ULYSSES CIRCUIT 4

3

2

1

6

18

7

8

10

11

8

9 7

9

6

16

10

5

7

6

ULYSSES CIRC UIT

4

6

10 9

4

5

8

7

15

14

13

5

7

8

12

11

6

10

COT TER ROA D

9

5

17

16

15

6

7

8

14

9

13

12

6

11

10

ULYSSES CIRC UIT

1

2

1

2

17

3

19

3

16

4

18

4

5

17

15

14

7

7

13

8

12

11

6

10

9

16

8

5

6

15

7

14

8

13

9

12

11

10

17

18

4 5 6

3

2

1

19

16

15

14

9

8

7

12

13

1

10

11

2

1

9

9

3

4

8

5

7

6

1

11

10

12

3

11

11 4

6

7

LINDSAY PRYO R STREET

10

13

5

9

6

8

7

17

16

15

14

13

3

4

5

12 6

7

8

12

9

11

10

MA X

1

14

6

1

2

3

5

12

14

4

2

2

8

COT TER

17

1

10 4

9

15

16

STREET

SERVENTY

10

18

5

2

3

3

1

2

6

HIGH DENSITY MULTI-UNIT (88-75) 1

7

8

9

10

12

AV EN UE

5

4

13

11

13

JA CO BS

ST RE ET

12

11

4

3

ST RE ET

8

4

5

2

1

4

11

RO R

3

9

3

3

2

17

ST RO M

10

13

1

5

CHELSWORTH STREET

3

2

3

2

4

PLUMWOOD STREET

11

1

STREET

DAVID FLEAY STREET

DUNPHY

2

STREET

DAVID FLEAY

SE RV EN TY

OUTDOOR SPACES THAT ARE MORE THAN AN AFTERTHOUGHT 29

19

CLOUSTON STREET

5

4

3

R

11

26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17

LINDSAY PRYOR STREET

6

2

28

STEVE IRWIN AVENUE

4

24

ULYSSES CIRCUIT

2

1

O

PETER CULLEN

19 18 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20

30

LACEWING STREET

7

JA CO BS

DIESENDORF STREET

4

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

5

4

3

2

17

21 20

ARGUS STREET

8

3

1

AMARYLLIS STREET

9

1

3

5

6

MA X

COMMUNITY FACILITY

2

MULTI-UNIT (18)

7

DAVID FLEAY STREET

2

1

13

29

1

30

8

15

1

1

18

29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22

XENICA STREET

A ROAD UR IA RR

ULYSSES CIRCUIT

16

34

31

12

G

27

PETER CULLEN WAY

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13

2

30

14

9

ULYSSES CIRCUIT

33

20 18 16 19 17 15

10

DIESENDORF STREET

PETER CULLEN WAY

32

21

22

10

14

9

11

23

9

20

16

3 4 5 6 7 8

24

8

32

22

11

2

1

7

23

10

12

13

CRESCENT 2

6

24

18

24

GORNALL STREET

TISHLER

1 20 19

1

4

27

JAMES McAULEY

TROMLO FOREST PARK

26

N

STREET

4

1

3

2

1

H

GO RN AL LS TR EE T

35

3

2

STREET

7

3

1

STREET

8

CROLL STREET

2

JO

38

MIXED USE (106-158)

AVENUE

BANJO PATERSON 1

FUTURE COOMBS

1

7

6

7

8

1

STEVE IRWIN AVENUE

11

12

13

6

5

4

3

2

CATALANO

1 14

STR EET

1 12

ST RE ET

5

6

7

W AY

8

9

10

ST RE ET

43

12 11

HIGH DENSITY MULTI-UNIT (43-85)

1

4

ST RE ET

3

13

HIGH DENSITY MULTI-UNIT (29-56)

TR UE BR IDG E

2

ST RE ET

1

CLINGAN

STROMLO FOREST PARK

TISHLER

PH ILIP HO DG INS

ST RE ET

1

PY AY DS LIN

ROA D

It’s quite a novel idea that when buying off the plan, the developer would place just as much importance in the outdoor spaces as the architecture. You might go as far as saying that it’s almost unheard of for an affordable development in Canberra. Well, that is exactly what GEOCON has done when designing Observatory Living and it’s proving to be quite a hit. Whether you’re a first homebuyer, a family or an empty nester, buying a home off the plan is a special time and GEOCON has set out to make it even more special by providing you with the peace of mind that when you take ownership of your new home, you will not only be able to admire the beautiful outdoor spaces but also live amongst them, share them with your neighbours and invite your friends and family to experience them with you.

The landscape plan for Observatory Living includes a central courtyard that is housed by seven buildings to create a micro climate for the amazing plants that will feature throughout the gardens. Observatory Living also includes sunken lounge areas with fire pits, a 25 metre red lap pool, which doubles as a water feature in the cooler months, shade structures and Australian natives that are designed to survive the heat of Canberra’s summer while also hardy enough to brave the cold winter mornings. The Observatory Living site is over 2 hectares in size which means that the team at Durie Design has been able to include more than 30 individual breakout areas throughout the development. This means there’s a space for everyone; whether you are looking to have an afternoon glass of wine, greet the day with a yoga session or toast marshmallows around the fire pit as the first signs of autumn appear.

The Observatory Living site also boasts the highest point in the new Molonglo Valley suburb of Wright so the amazing outdoor spaces are complemented by views to Parliament House, Telstra Tower, Parliament House, Mount Stromlo and the Captain Cook fountain at Lake Burley Griffin.

If you want to experience just how amazing the gardens at Observatory Living will be, don’t miss your opportunity to see GEOCON’s capsule garden at Floriade, weekdays from 9am – 5.00pm and weekends from 9am – 5.30pm. GEOCON’s display garden will be available for viewing until 14 October 2012 Commonwealth Park, Floriade. CityNews  October 4-10  35


36  CityNews  October 4-10

Canberra CityNews October 4, 2012  

AN ugly front cover this week tells an ugly tale of neglect around the preservation of the Starlight Drive-In sign, which appears to have gi...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you