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FROM THE PUBLISHERS OF

HOME CORE LIVING IT UP DOWNTOWN

VALUES

SOME LIKE IT HOT A SMART AND SEXY THERMOSTAT

PRESTO! CHANGO! FURNITURE THAT LEADS A DOUBLE LIFE

NICHE GARDENING CREATE THAT COZY COURTYARD


Wimberg Landscaping has been servicing residential properties for 33 years Design • Installation • Maintenance

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Visit our website

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FEATURES

CORE VALUES: Living it Up Downtown

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52

58

Viva l’Italia!

Urban Revival

Old World New View

Italian modern design lends itself to a nofuss interior at Adams Place.

Eclectic style and great design sense resurrects an Over-the-Rhine row house .

Traditional touches meet contemporary styling in this Eden Park gem.

FROM THE PUBLISHERS OF

HOME CORE LIVING IT UP DOWNTOWN

VALUES

SOME LIKE IT HOT A SMART AND SEXY THERMOSTAT

PRESTO! CHANGO! FURNITURE THAT LEADS A DOUBLE LIFE

NICHE GARDENING CREATE THAT COZY COURTYARD

ON THE COVER:

Discover la dolce vita on page 46. PHOTO BY RYAN KURTZ

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CINCINNATI HOME | SUM M E R 2014


Great Design. Quality. Value Serving the greater Cincinnati area for 28 years with great quality lines such as Calligaris, W.Schillig, Calia-Nicoletti, Domicil, Mobican, BDI, Skovby, Ekornes-Stressless, Elite, Lazar, and many more. Stop by and visit our beautiful new showroom!

Visit us online at bovafurniture.com CINCINNATI 12130 Royal Point Drive (Across from Kings Auto Mall) Cincinnati, OH 45249 T: 513.247.9100

HOURS: Mon-Fri: 10a-7p Saturday: 10a- 5p Sunday: Closed


DEPARTMENTS 13 | Style & Innovation 14 | NEW & NOTEWORTHY The Sustainability Partnership of Cincinnati offers homeowners a one-stop shop . Plus, ďŹ nd designer tips on organizing within limited space.

18 | PALETTE Give tight spaces a big look with color, texture and lighting.

22 | AT THE TABLE Fun pairings offer new ways to present city taste favorites.

26 | Tech Talk A smart thermostat and its smart alarm companion bring brains and beauty to home systems.

30 | Lighting Chandeliers offer the element of surprise.

34 | Fine Furnishings Clever design results in furniture that gives ďŹ rst and second impressions.

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38 | Kitchen & Bath

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Read our hot guide to the latest in oven technology.

42 | Outdoor Living Cozy courtyard spaces are made in the shade (and sun).

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64 | Designing People Meet architect Rob Busch of Drawing Dept.

68 | The Fundamentals Make sense of water heater options.

74 | Resources Find the designers, furnishings and more seen in our pages.

80 | A Final Look Why we love living downtown

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CINCINNATI HOME | SUM M E R 2014


The most exquisite collection of fine linens and accessories for the bed, bath and table. Fine Linens • Nursery & Baby • Unique Gifts for the Home • Elegant Lingerie A Cincinnati Landmark Since 1907

7809 Cooper Road in Historic Downtown Montgomery 871-4050 or 1-800-634-4369 info@gattlescincinnati.com


HOME

FROM THE EDITOR

HOMECOMING

F

FOR THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS, downtown Cincinnati has felt like one big

homecom happy homecoming. People are moving in and moving back. Staying put. Even retiring to new downtown condos and townhouses. My adult children have hom on its urban streets, where they walk or bike to work and to made their homes concerts, plays, pubs and parks. Their friends are doing the same. Making a hom M home inside the city core might mean downsizing from a sprawling subu suburban ranch to the limits of a luxury loft that calls for clever, double-duty furniture, or to an open-plan penthouse that demands a no-fuss interior so you can enjoy a sweeping view. It might mean that a simple, streamlined kitchen is de rigueur because most nights you’ll find yourself sampling the newest downtown dining options. Or it might mean you’re cozying up in an urban courtyard with friends, sampling the best in locally crafted brew. You’ll find inspiring design ideas in this issue that put you firmly in touch with these ‘core values.’ Throughout our photo features, you’ll discover how designers and homeowners are all about experiencing beauty and a sense of home within the confines of the city. An overriding theme of great design for smaller spaces puts us in lockstep with the surrounding downtown renaissance. Even our Designing People profile of Rob Busch lets us take a peek into the design philosophy of Drawing Dept, the firm that created the great new interiors of Boca and Sotto, which happily reside in the cityspace vacated by Maisonette and La Normandie. The hype is often about how downtown is renewing itself and revving up, and that’s true. We see it every day. But it has been and always will be one big, bustling neighborhood where the stuff of life happens. Sounds like home to me. Here’s to the inspiration you’ll find in our pages!

HOME

Carew Tower • 441 Vine Street, Suite 200 Cincinnati, OH 45202-2039 (513) 421-4300 CINCINNATIMAGAZINE.COM

PUBLISHER John Lunn EDITOR Sue Goldberg ART DIRECTOR Danielle Johnson CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Coleen Armstrong, Arielle Goldberg, Marnie Hayutin, Karen Maslowski, Jen Hogan Redmond CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Daylight Photo, Gary Kessler, Ryan Kurtz PRODUCTION MANAGER

Jenny Dapper CUSTOM PUBLISHING & CREATIVE SERVICES INTERNS

Rayshaunda Byrd, Caitlin Lamb, Sarah Mullins, Grant Vance MARKETING DIRECTOR Chris Ohmer DIGITAL MEDIA EDITOR Amy Brownlee

SALES ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Ivy Bayer SENIOR ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES

Maggie Wint Goecke, Matt Reis ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES

Christie Goetz, Lisa Lawrence, Jenny Swain SENIOR OUTSIDE ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE

Laura Bowling ADVERTISING & MARKETING DESIGNER

Jen Kawanari

BUSINESS OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Missy Beiting BUSINESS COORDINATOR Erica Birkle

EMMIS COMMUNICATIONS CHAIRMAN/CEO Jeffrey H. Smulyan CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER/ CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Patrick M. Walsh EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/ GENERAL COUNSEL J. Scott Enright

EMMIS PUBLISHING LP PRESIDENT Gregory T. Loewen VICE PRESIDENT/EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Mary Melton

Marian Conicella

VICE PRESIDENT OF FINANCE Melinda Marshall SENIOR MANAGER, DIGITAL MEDIA Craig Bowen PUBLISHING ACCOUNTANT Marianne Isaacs

WE WANT TO KNOW

Tell us about the great design you appreciate in and around the city, whether it’s your personal living space, a favorite building or a recent architectural or interior design project. Take a moment to drop us a line and let us know if we can share your great spaces with our readers. You can reach us at HOME@cincinnatimagazine.com.

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CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

PHOTOGRAPH BY RYAN KURTZ

Sue Goldberg Editor

VICE PRESIDENT/NATIONAL SALES


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CONTRIBUTORS

COLEEN ARMSTRONG taug ht h ig h

school English for 31 years and also established a solid career as a freelance writer while still in the classroom. The author of The Truth About Teaching: What I Wish the Veterans Had Told Me assists would-be authors in completing/ publishing their own books—and has happily been a Cincinnati Magazine contributor since 1986, with a strong home and garden emphasis.

Photographer GARY KESSLER engages clients in his Cincinnati studio and on location across the globe. Gary is a partner in Motoring In Focus, a blog centered on motoring lifestyle and events.

RYAN KURTZ is a commercial, advertis-

RAYSHAUNDA BYRD is a senior at Xavier

ing and editorial photographer. His client base includes BHDP Architecture, GBBN Architects, MSA Architects, plus a broad range of corporate and media clients.

University majoring in English, minoring in psychology and interning at Cincinnati Magazine. A Florida native, she has learned to love Cincinnati and call it home.

CAITLIN LAMB is a junior Mass Commu-

KATHLEEN DOANE is a retired senior

editor of Cincinnati Magazine and former assistant features editor of The Cincinnati Enquirer. “Despite the fact that I grew up in a succession of 100-year-old farmhouses in Warren County, my love affair with old buildings really began when I started working and devoted countless lunch hours to driving around Cincinnati’s older neighborhoods. I decided back then that there’s no better window into a city’s past and personality than its architecture.”

nications student at Miami University and interns at Cincinnati Magazine. She currently writes for The Miami Student. After graduation she plans to pursue a career in journalism or editing.

KAREN MASLOWSKI has worn a multi-

tude of hats throughout the last 35 years, including kitchen and bath designer, writer, lecturer, teacher and business owner. The grandmother and mother of three daughters notes, “The best job I ever did was to help three amazing women make their way in the world.”

In addition to a strong arts background with studies at UC DA A P, ARIELLE GOLDBERG has written for many local outlets, including the Cincinnati Herald and the University of Cincinnati alumni magazine. She studied journalism at UC, earning the Society of Professional Journalists’ Best Student Journalist award. Her day job entails covering employee news for a local financial institution.

time Cincinnati Magazine contributing writer. A former art magazine editor, she has spent the last 22 years doing a wide range of freelance work for magazines, newspapers, private businesses, online publications and nonprofit organizations.

MARNIE HAYUTIN has been writing

BOB SCHEADLER is a lifelong resident of

home and garden stories for Cincinnati Magazine for nearly 15 years, exploring everything from our legacy of stained-glass windows to our hidden modern architecture gems. After a long career in print, she recently made the leap to digital media, helping clients create quality content for their websites.

Cincinnati and currently resides in OTR. He spent a handful of great years at Ohio University studying Fine Arts. Bob enjoys creative and collaborative endeavors. When he’s not working at Daylight Photo doing commercial photography, he is making art, biking around the city and gardening with his wife.

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CINCINNATI HOME | SUM M E R 2014

JENNIFER HOGAN REDMOND is a long-


You deserve the Best

From the finest in American hand-crafted furniture to little treasures and unique gifts. There’s something for everyone!

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Craig and Carolynn Reis, owners

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STYLE & INNOVATION

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STYLE & INNOVATION

PHOTO COURTESY ANNE MARTIN MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

N E W & N O T E WO R T H Y

PA L E T T E

AT T H E TA B L E

Radiant Orchid, Pantone color of the year, is captured here in luxurious Birdsong wallpaper by York Wallcoverings.

SU M M E R 2014

| CINCINNATI HOME

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STYLE & INNOVATION

N E W & N O T E WO R T H Y

GREEN AND GROWING The Sustainability Partnership Of Cincinnati

A NEW PARTNERSHIP recently made its debut at the Cincinnati Home & Garden Show with a display that showcased energy-efficient technology, sustainably produced building materials and ideas for well-managed landscapes. The Sustainability Partnership of Cincinnati (TSP), formed in 2012, is a consortium of locally owned, community-focused companies that emphasize sustainability practices in design, construction and landscaping. What made the thought of partnering so appealing? “The involved companies are all locally owned, small businesses,” notes Heather Curless, an architect and president of Greener

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CINCINNATI HOME | SUM M E R 2014

Stock. “Working together as a group has allowed us to share in the expense of outreach opportunities that would not have been feasible for us as individual companies, such as the 2014 Cincinnati Home & Garden Show exhibit.” TSP is part of a growing number of organizations whose mission is led by a triple bottom line: people, planet and profit. Their knowledge base includes experience in LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification, sustainable building materials, solar energy, wind energy, rain gardens, green roofs, living walls, permeable pavement and environmental law. The businesses bring a range of

experiences and proven expertise in building, construction, landscaping and more to the table. Current partners include Barefoot Design, EcoEnvironments, Green Building Consulting, Green Cincinnati Education Advocacy, GreenBau design + build, Greener Stock, Green Streets Environmental Services, Marvin’s Organic Gardens, One Small Garden, Patterned Concrete of Cincinnati and Tepe Services. The group is currently breaking ground on a net zero/passive house project. See tspcincy.com for updates and to register for the organization’s email newsletter. — S U E G O L D B E RG

PHOTOGRAPH BY RYAN KURTZ

The Sustainability Partnership display at the 2014 Cincinnati Home & Garden Show


THE FUTURE OF LIGHTING IS LED SEE IT AT A&S LIGHTING TODAY!

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STYLE & INNOVATION

N E W & N O T E WO R T H Y

NEAT TWEAKS A RUN-OF-THE-MILL POWDER room or cluttered kitchen pantry transform into purposeful spaces with these designer tips.

Start from scratch. Paige Castellini of Castellini Interior Design says her clients are recognizing the benefits of scaling down. Your smallest spaces can easily become catchalls for gadgets and items you no longer need. For example, when is the last time you actually used that strawberry huller? How about that artisan yogurt maker? When you give away items you no longer use, you’ll find new possibilities for the spaces previously occupied by clunky, niche gadgets. Starting with a blank slate leaves room for the articles you really need in a room.

2 Drawers, drawers, drawers. While typical in a kitchen or bathroom, drawers are underused in other areas of the home. Renan Menninger of RM Interiors, Inc. says drawers can be a huge time saver, allowing easy, organized access to everything you need. Try drawers in the closet to organize shoes, belts and ties. Hide drawers in living-room seating and furniture to store media, electronics and remote controls. Add small drawers in your pantry for easy access to spices, baking supplies and small appliances. Consult a pro to help you think outside the box and customize an organizational unit to fit your room’s specs.

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No one to claim your leftovers? Donate your used items to a local organization such as St. Vincent de Paul by calling 513-421-CARE for a free pick-up, or drop off at one of their many thrift store locations (svdpcincinnati.org).

3 Aim higher. Small spaces with high ceilings have untapped storage potential. Think creatively; mount your bicycle from the ceiling, organize storage in the attic or add high shelves, advises Castellini. For the kitchen, she says, “take cabinets all the way to the ceiling, even stacking cabinetry and using the space above a standard cabinet to store things you use less often.”

4 Find your niche. Niche shelves in the bathroom, hallway, kitchen or entryway offer unexpected, visually interesting storage spaces. Employ creative lighting techniques to showcase your collections of photographs and travel treasures, or go functional and stack extra towels and toiletries in the bathroom for guests. Wallpaper or paint the inside of a niche shelf for a splash of color or texture. Most important, make sure your shelves are in a strategic location. Since they’ll become semi-permanent fixtures, they should be practical in size and location. — A R I E L L E G O L D B E RG

ABOVE: PROJECT BY WOLF CUSTOM TILE & DESIGN; PHOTO COURTESY MATTHEW COLLINS; BELOW: COURTESY HOLTHOUSE ENTERPRISES, LLC

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STYLE & INNOVATION

PA L E T T E

SMALL SPACES: BIG LOOK Give Small Spaces A Sense Of Grandeur With These Style Strategies

1

Go bold. The 2014 Pantone color of the year is Radiant Orchid, a vibrant lilac hue. The bold shade of purple packs a lot of personality, so just a little will spruce up any room.

2 Achieve balance. When working with an attention-grabbing color, it’s best to keep the rest of your room in the neutral zone. But neutral doesn’t have to mean boring—choose interesting textures and shapes to add pizazz.

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CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

PHOTOS COURTESY ANNE MARTIN MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

1


The Overlook at Eden Park • Stunning River Views • Best Floor Plans in the City • 3 Bedrooms, 2 ½ Baths - 3,100 Sq. Ft. • Huge 500+ Sq. Ft. Verandas • Brand New Finished Units Available Now! Perfect for the buyer looking for luxurious and spacious one level maintenance-free living. Call Bryan Bailin at (513)620-6277 for a showing! www.overlookatedenpark.com


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STYLE & INNOVATION

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PHOTOS (TOP AND BOTTOM RIGHT) COURTESY ROBIN VICTOR GOETZ/WWW.GORVGP.COM; (BOTTOM LEFT) COURTESY CRATE AND BARREL

PA L E T T E

3 Let it shine. Choose bold, overscale lighting fixtures to add visual interest and dimension to your space, says Amy Schuermann of Amy Schuermann Interiors. From bathrooms to entryways, you can use a ceiling or wall fixture as a focal point in any small room. 4 Get your glow on. “The wallpaper now is not the wallpaper your grandma had,” Schuermann says. The newest wall coverings and upholstery fabrics incorporate metallics to achieve a classic look with a modern twist. Try a gray base with silver metallic accents to create shine and glow, opening up a small powder room. 5 Choose the straight and narrow. Cabinets look especially sleek and elongate a room when you choose long, simple hardware to accentuate their horizontal and vertical lines. 6 A room with a view. Wall art with interesting form, color or texture can transform a ho-hum area into a space that wows. 7 Overscale to upscale. Small rooms don’t have to be limited to small furniture. Play with proportion and choose furniture that seems to “float” above the floor. Look for chairs, sofas and tables that create an airy, negative space underneath. 8 Put a rug on it. Go with rugs that really cover your floor space, Schuermann suggests. This will create the illusion that the room has more square footage than it actually does. — AG

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CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

5

6


Simplicity is the new luxury.

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The 2014 Bosch kitchen. Perfektion in every detail. It’s an appreciation for a higher standard. It’s about not compromising either form or function. And it’s about being willing to rethink perfection, to make the best even better. This is the Bosch kitchen. It’s the realization of pure and purposeful European design. For life on your terms. See the 2014 Bosch kitchen at theapplianceloft.com

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© 2014 BSH Home Appliances. *Mail-in rebate via Bosch VISA® prepaid card. Cards are issued by Citibank N.A. pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. and managed by Ecount, a Citibank company. Cards can be used anywhere Visa Debit Cards are accepted. Offer valid through August 31, 2014. Offer not valid at Lowe’s, Sears and Best Buy.


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LOCO FOR LOCAL

SPICE TURNTABLE + EXOTIC SPICES/FLAVORS FROM COLONEL DE The Martha Stewart Collection square stainless steel spice rack holds 20 of your favorite seasonings in airtight jars, $79.99, Macy’s Fountain Place, 505 Vine St., macys.com; Colonel De Gourmet Herbs and Spices (pictured: paprika, coffee shop sugar and ginger), Findlay Market, colonelde.com

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CINCINNATI HOME | SUM M E R 2014

PHOTO (LEFT) COURTESY OF MACY’S

IT’S EASY TO WORK A TASTE OF THE QUEEN CITY into every meal if you know where to look. Entertain out-of-towners by showing them around the city without leaving your dining room. Try these irresistible pairings. — AG


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A CREATIVE CONFECTION FROM ABBY GIRL SWEETS + CUPCAKE PEDESTALS Pedestals, $2.95 each, Crate and Barrel, Kenwood Towne Place, 5901 E. Galbraith Road, crateandbarrel.com; Cupcakes, $2.75 each or six for $15, Abby Girl Sweets, 41 W. Fifth St., abbygirlsweets.com

MONOGRAMMED MUGS + COFFEE EMPORIUM SUMATRA SILIMAKUTA Mugs, $8 each, Anthropologie, Kenwood Towne Centre or anthropologie.com; Coffee, one pound for $13.95, Coffee Emporium, 110 E. Central Parkway, coffee-emporium.com

TOTALLY CENTERED FLORAL CENTERPIECE FROM ADRIAN DURBAN FLORIST Top off your table with a fresh, seasonal arrangement. From $30. Adrian Durban Florist, 3401 Clifton Ave., adriandurban.com

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FROM TOP: COURTESY ABBY GIRL SWEETS CUPCAKERY; CRATE AND BARREL; COFFEE BEANS AND MUGS PHOTOS COURTESY MURRAY PHOTOGRAPHY

LOCO FOR LOCAL


TECH TALK

LEARNING SOMETHING NEW EVERY DAY Smart Thermostat And CO/Smoke Alarm Offer Beauty, Efficiency And Safety 26

CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

Two new devices from Nest give us a look at things to come. NEST THERMOSTAT

Imagine waking up freezing in the middle of the night. Instead of rolling out of bed to crank up the heat, you turn up the thermostat from under the covers using an app on your smartphone. Or, let’s say you get chilled working at your computer. With

PHOTOS COURTESY OF NEST

HOME


UNCOMPROMISED VIEWS

FROM EVERY ROOM WORK | PLAY | SLEEP

WELCOME TO OUR HOME The life, luxury and extraordinary views must be experienced to realize our full grandeur. If you are looking for a home offering uncompromised amenities and the most spectacular views of the Cincinnati skyline, call us today to schedule your personal tour. We promise we’ll exceed your expectations!

Open Sunday 2-4 and by appointment. Tim Hinde | 513-615-5850 | Tim@RobinsonSIR.com

SouthShoreNewport.com


TECH TALK

a few clicks at the keyboard you change the temperature from the next room. Or you’re on your way home from a trip and want the house toasty on your arrival. A few taps on your phone, and it’s all good. If you think about your thermostat at all, you don’t associate it with the word “sexy.” There are other programmable thermostats, most of them less expensive. But like the beauty queen who has an IQ of 175, the Nest Learning Thermostat has both good looks and brains. Designed by the same guy who helped design the Apple iPod, the Nest Thermostat is not only functional but also elegantly simple. At first glance it looks like nothing more than a black glass dome surrounded by a stainless steel bezel. Press the dome, and it turns on a bright 24-bit color LCD display showing the room temperature. Twist the ring to change the temperature, or tap the device to view an extensive menu of options. So what makes Nest so smart? Let’s count the ways. First, it connects to your Wi-Fi connection. From there, you’re linked to a secure online Nest account. Using your computer, smartphone or any mobile device, you can program Nest to maintain specific temperatures, temperature ranges and different types of programs. Nest thermostats have the capacity to learn too. They eventually come to know your daily schedule and adjust the temperature in the house to accommodate your presence or absence via a motion detector that senses when no one is in the house. This Auto-Away feature adjusts the temperature accordingly, saving energy and money. The Airwave feature turns on the air conditioner fan before the cooling unit kicks on, spreading cool air throughout the house and saving actual cooling time. If the thermostat location is in direct sunlight, Nest adjusts, making sure the home’s temperature is not affected. Nest also sends you a monthly report card on how much energy you used.

Using your computer, smartphone or any mobile device, you can program Nest to maintain specific temperatures, temperature ranges and different types of programs.

FIND NEST PRODUCTS AT: Home Depot, Lowes, Target, Apple, Best Buy and at Nest.com; Nest Learning Thermostat: Approximate retail price is $249; Nest Protect Smoke + Carbon Monoxide: Approximate retail price is $129

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CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

NEST PROTECT: SMOKE + CARBON MONOXIDE (CO)

A companion product, the Nest Protect, works with the Nest Learning Thermostat and also connects to the Internet via your home’s Wi-Fi. According to the National Fire Protection Agency, 73 percent of smoke alarms that failed to activate during home fires had dead, missing or disconnected batteries. Nuisance alarms, like those triggered by smoky broilers, were the leading reason for disconnected smoke alarms. Nearly two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in properties without working smoke alarms. Nest Protect offers a few features that make nuisance alarms easier to deal with. In the “why didn’t I think of that” department, Nest Protect displays the battery power strength via a color-changing light ring on the device. Turn your lights out at night, and the device shows its light briefly as a power check. Green indicates full power; yellow is a warning that the battery is losing strength. If the battery becomes weak, instead of an irritating, never-ending chirp, the Nest Protect speaks to you with a human voice, warning you ahead of time to buy new batteries. In the “I REALLY should have thought of that” department, the Nest Protect also includes a motion detector. Burning the bacon or accidentally turning that pot of veggies into pure carbon is no longer a three-alarm catastrophe that sends you running for a step stool and yanking out the battery. Instead, a simple wave in the direction of the detector will turn it off. Another handy feature is the pathlight option. Motion turns on the softly lighted ring, white for this function. Should the Nest Protect detect smoke or elevated CO levels, the ring turns red, a horn sounds, and alerts are sent to the Nest account and to your smartphone. So even if you aren’t home you will know there’s a problem. If a home with a gas furnace also has a Nest thermostat, the device signals the furnace to automatically shut off when CO levels are detected. Yep, brainy and beautiful. — K A R E N M A S L OWS K I

PHOTOS COURTESY OF NEST

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More than a century of combined design experience

Interior design and space planning for principal residence, vacation property, remodeling and relocation. Cincinnati and nationwide. Formerly of Closson’s.

I love to work with my clients’ collections and heirlooms and am sensitive to their individual expressions. Their spaces truly reflect their own personalities and lifestyles, not mine.

Design is not just what it looks like. Good design is also how well it works. Let’s work together to give you the best of both.

My goal is to create an environment for my clients that visually delights and relates to their lifestyle. It’s the intersection of beauty and function that makes a successful design.

Kent Shaw

Cal Weigold, Jr., ASID

Christie Crawford

Kenton Shaw Interior Design 513.478.4527 kentonshawdesign@gmail.com

The Discerning Eye 513.236.8522 c.weigold.asid@fuse.net

allied member ASID Crawford & Company 513.378.3836 ccsavage@fuse.net

at

1981 Madison Road, O’Bryonville


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LIGHTING

GRAND DAMES OF LIGHTING

Drama And Appeal Of Chandeliers Add Excitement In Any Room

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CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

PHOTO COURTESY OF HOFFMAN & ALBERS INTERIORS

Chrome-ямБnished, four-light chandelier from the Jardine Collection, Kichler Lighting


INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING WALLPAPER REMOVAL DRYWALL & PLASTER REPAIR DECKS & FENCING POWER WASHING ALUMINUM & VINYL SIDING 2-YEAR WARRANTY LOCAL REFERENCES LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

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LIGHTING

2

THINK OF A CHANDELIER and words such as majestic and grand come to mind. We expect to see these beauties in a ballroom or banquet hall—but what about a chandelier hanging in a walk-in closet, a bathroom or even an outdoor patio? Finding chandeliers in unexpected and nontraditional spaces speaks to today’s design zeitgeist—a blend that mixes traditional with contemporary or preserves the past with a nod to the present. The rising appeal of using the fixture in non-traditional spaces is noted by those in the trade. “The trend started within the last 10 years and has gained popularity,” says Ann Hoffman, principal of Hoffman & Albers Interiors. Matthew Streuer of LightingOne Cincinnati describes chandeliers as having the ability to dress up a bathroom or closet area while adding sophistication and elegance. Chandeliers can be used to add an antique or modern touch to any space depending on what options you feel drawn to. Bertie Ray III of Switch Lighting & Design specializes in modern lighting and finds that despite clients having more traditional-style homes, they often look to merge that traditional design sensibility with modern pieces. When deciding on placement, there are several elements to consider. “The most important thing to remember is to keep the size of the chandelier in proportion to the room and the piece that it’s going over,” Hoffman notes. Ceiling height, size, color, and other light fixtures present are also important factors to consider when choosing the right chandelier. Mini chandeliers, or chandelettes, are commonly seen in today’s design applications. These smaller-scale chandeliers are frequently placed in bathrooms, closets and even kitchens. Crystal chandeliers are also popular, adding a bit of “bling” and sparkle to that special space. Take a look at the range of options here for a little extra inspiration. — R AYS H AU N DA BY R D

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1

4

3

1 U.H.O. series from KOVACS; available at Switch Lighting & Design

2 Kichler Celestial; available for order at Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery

3 Schonbeck Roman Empire; available for order at Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery

4 Sevres-style, eight-arm, porcelain chandelier; previously sold at Cowan’s Auctions

5 Paper Chandelier XL by Studio Job for Moooi; available for order at Voltage

5


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FINE FURNISHINGS

DOUBLE DUTY Furniture Design That Rocks A Small Space

WHETHER YOU ARE decorating a vacation condo or just looking to get the most out of snug square footage, the task of choosing stylish pieces that won’t overcrowd your space can be tough. A few simple changes can make a big difference—like choosing a light-colored lampshade over a dark one or using full-length mirrors to give the illusion of depth in any room, says Karen Sacksteder, owner of Sacksteder’s Interiors in New Trenton, Ind., and Kenwood. Furniture can go smaller scale, she suggests, with choices such as a love seat-style sofa rather than a bulky one, or a bombé chest over an open-leg table. (Think extra storage.) Luckily, many industrial designers recognize the need for furniture that performs double-duty, so you can have a great blend of form and function in any room.

1 Light opens up a room, but marry a lamp to versatile shelves and you break it wide open. Adjustable shelves on the Bibliotheque Nationale floor lamp perform as a side table for drinks, books and other items—without taking up more floor space, says Susan Kurtz, interior designer at Voltage in Oakley. A USB plug in the base also makes it a convenient place to charge electronics. 2 Kurtz points out the benefits of the Softwall, which allows you to divide your space without sacrificing any of it. Keep it clean and simple, or fun and organic. Use it to store magazines and mail, or add pictures for a decorative touch.

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1 2

3

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1 Bibliotheque Nationale floor lamp, designer Philippe Starck; photo courtesy FLOS 2 Softwall, designers C. Gerhards and A. Glücker; available in two sizes, photo cour-

tesy of B&B Italia 3 Skovby #73 dining table; photo courtesy Skovby, available at Bova Furniture 4 Joli Nesting Ottomans; photo courtesy Hooker Furniture


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3 Open floor plans mean you might need to be a little resourceful when it comes to designating space. Praddy Mangat, owner of Bova Furniture in Symmes Township, recommends this smart table by Skovby. Raise it electronically to dining-table height, or use it as an extra table when entertaining guests. 5 4 “Everyone always forgets about nested tables,” Sacksteder says. “They give you so much extra space for entertaining, and then they stow away.” Nesting cube ottomans are a fun take on traditional nested tables. “Storage ottomans are also a great addition to sectionals,” notes Craig Reis, owner of Best Furniture Gallery in Ft. Thomas, Ky. “We have a storage ottoman in our own home, and it always amazes us just how much we can fit inside.” The Hooker Furniture pieces seen here offer extra seating that disappears when no longer needed, or, if used separately, offer extra storage for blankets, throws and more. 5 “During the Depression, Murphy beds were used a lot because there were bigger families living in small spaces,” says Andrea Holthouse Benedic of Holthouse Enterprises, LLC. “It’s neat to see a reemergence of these now, with people using them in lofts and studio apartments, as well as in small, prefabricated homes.” With its sleek design, Nuovoliola 10 blends smoothly into any room. The bed can be easily stashed by day, revealing an accent wall with a convenient shelf and a sofa.

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6 Sometimes you need to think outside the box when trying to make the most of a space. Benedic recommends this quirky piece, Trick, which includes a table and two chairs that, when fitted together, form a bookcase. Use the white or orange wood table as a workplace, or fill the many nooks with books, objet d’art or other sundries. 7 You may not need a traditional dining table taking up precious space 24/7 in that new loft. But if entertaining guests is on your to-do list, this console table is a great find. Unfold it and add leaves to reveal a table that seats 12, making it a good choice for any home—large or small—that could use some extra seating from time to time. “It is a great alternative to unfolding those rickety card tables for Thanksgiving and dinner parties,” says Liz Mease of Mease Interiors. “It’s really a cost saver too, because you are getting two great pieces for one price.”

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Multifunctionality is the name of the game. “This modular cocktail table integrates storage with cube-style seating,” notes Amy Schuermann of Amy Schuermann Interiors. The cube provides clever extra seating that stores away when not in use, and the shelves offer a perfect niche for storing magazines, books or displaying decorative touches. — CA I T L I N L A M B

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5 Nuovoliola 10; photo courtesy Clei/Resource Furniture 6 Trick, designer Sakura Adachi; photo courtesy Campeggi 7 Goliath

Console/Dining Table; photo cour tesy Resource Furniture 8 Rectangular cocktail table, 40 custom finishes, ottoman

optional; photo courtesy Hickory White


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KITCHEN & BATH

SO HOT!

A Quick Guide To The Latest In Oven Technology

Thermador Professional Series Pro (above) Grand Commercial Depth Dual Fuel Steam Range and (left) Single Oven

Gas vs. Electric

This age-old question boils down to broiling…and roasting, and braising. Gas is a moist heat; electric is a dry heat, notes Daryl Fox, sales manager at Hagedorn Appliances in Erlanger, Ky. Chefs who mostly use their ovens to roast meats prefer the moister heat of gas. The cookie-bakers among us generally go for electric ovens. There’s another reason bakers prefer electric ovens. Electric offers a more consistent heat. Gas ovens can vary plus or minus 5 degrees. Electric ovens typically vary only plus or minus 1 degree, so you can count on that 350° setting to be accurate.

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Dual-Fuel

The most popular range option, according to Fox, is the perfect compromise in the gas vs. electric debate. Dual-fuel ranges offer the precision of gas for the burners—burners that cool down as you lower the gas—along with the consistent heat of electric baking for the oven. Convection

This technology employs a fan to circulate the heat evenly throughout the

PHOTO COURTESY THERMADOR

TODAY’S OVEN TECHNOLOGY is smart and efficient, but may be just a little misunderstood. Not to worry, though. This primer will guide you in selecting the perfect new oven, or help you use the one you have more effectively. Plus, see the sidebar for a headsup on a couple of the newest bell-and-whistle innovations.


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KITCHEN & BATH

Bosch Benchmark Steam Convection Oven

helps eliminate the need for excess oils and fats. Plus, leftovers taste better because the cooking method prevents the food from losing moisture in the reheating process. Steam-convection combination ovens offer the best of both worlds: healthful steam cooking with the efficiency delivered by the convection’s air circulation. Thermador boasts that you can cook a 14pound Thanksgiving turkey to moist perfection in just 90 minutes. Speed-Cook

Fast-cooking ovens combine microwave and convection technology to cook foods up to 15 times faster. Speed is great, but the real fun is the geek factor. The TurboChef, for example, offers hundreds of preprogrammed settings to ensure that food comes out perfectly cooked. Wood-Fired Pizza

—Daryl Fox, Sales Manager, Hagedorn Appliances

oven. Experts say you want to look for “true convection,” or “European convection,” which features an electric heating element around the fan, and that’s the heat the fan circulates in convection mode. Standard convection simply blows around the heat that comes from the traditional heating elements. The movement of air cooks food faster at lower temperatures. It also eliminates hot and cold spots in the oven, so you can bake three trays of hors d’oeuvres simultaneously without burning the bottom tray and undercooking the middle tray. Plus, you can cook a variety of foods without worrying that your potatoes will come out tasting like your turkey.

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Convection has been around forever, and most people already have convection settings on their ovens. Using them is another story. Fox estimates only 20 percent of people who have convection ovens actually use them. “Most people are afraid of convection because they don’t know how to use it,” Fox says. “Just cook things 25 degrees less for about the same amount of time that you would normally cook it. Then you’ll adjust from there.” Steam

Cooking with heated steam promises healthier meals. Steam-cooked foods retain more of their vitamins, and the steam

Bells & Whistles • There’s an app for that. GE is joining

companies like LG, Dacor and Samsung with smartphone- and tablet-based oven technology. GE’s newest ovens are paired with an app that allows users to control oven functions right from their phones. “You can turn your oven on, adjust the temperature and have it preheated before you get home,” Fox says. • Real swingers. Side-swinging oven

doors have been popular for years in commercial kitchens, and now they’re gaining traction in residential ovens. Bosch is the newest to embrace the technology, Fox says, with its first sideswing wall ovens coming out this year. Anyone who has ever splattered lasagna sauce or dropped a glob of pizza cheese and watched it fuse to the hot oven door knows why this is a good thing. — M A R N I E H AY U T I N

PHOTO COURTESY BOSCH

Most people are afraid of convection because they don’t know how to use it.

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OUTDOOR LIVING

THINKING INSIDE THE BOX Plan An Urban Courtyard 42

CINCINNATI HOME | SUM M E R 2014

WHEN TRISH NEVERMAN DESIGNED a courtyard garden in Mt. Adams, she opted for a display of soft, lush greenery atop its 10-foot block wall. Gorgeous. Thoughtfully chosen specimen plantings wouldn’t crowd the space, and a remote and timed drip irrigation system made it easy to maintain because, she recalls, “who was ever going to scale that steep barrier?” Welcome to the world of natural retreats, where things can get complicated in a hurry. “There is a misconception that small spaces are simple to landscape,” says Neverman, a designer with Bzak Landscaping in Milford. “But the pitfalls are actually more numerous than they think.” So what else needs to be determined when planning a smaller outdoor space? Here are the fundamental steps to take you through the process.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TEPE SERVICES

HOME


HOME

OUTDOOR LIVING

Everything you put into this space must pay its rent. That means having a solid, lasting merit and being worth the cost.

• Consult a landscape professional.

He/she will guide you through backstage essentials like drainage (water must flow away from plantings, not stick around to form puddles), sustainability (plants should thrive), soil composition (minerals, organic matter, air and water), air circulation and sun versus shade (different plants require different doses). Also, they’ll incorporate eye-catching highs and lows, so your trees and shrubs don’t resemble lines of identical tin soldiers, and year-round appeal, so you aren’t staring at a wasteland come December. “Everything you put into this space must pay its rent,” says Susan Fox, landscape architect at Natorp’s in Mason. “That means having a solid, lasting merit and being worth the cost. You can’t invest in a plant, for example, that looks good only three weeks out of the year.”

how you’ll be using this garden, and then design it accordingly.”

• Reconsider your walls. Most home-

owners assume at first that brick or stone is the only way to go, but other possibilities abound. Like iron gates. Or cedar, redwood, bamboo, picket or reclaimed wood fencing. Even a series of teak trellises or arborvitae hedging can look stunning. Next, think about what sounds you might need to mask. Traffic? Train whistles? Wind? A nearby air conditioner? Do you yearn for a fountain, or will the gurgling be too loud within tight quarters? Your view is important as well. A 19th century church is far more captivating, of course, than any parking lot or construction site. Gauge your wall heights. One major perk of creating a courtyard is hiding things you’d rather not see.

• Define your purpose. What are you try-

• Don’t overfill. Outdoor “rooms” with

ing to achieve here? An attractive private patio? A sunbathing haven? An oasis with cozy seating for morning coffee or evening chitchat? “It’s easy to make mistakes,” admits Mark Tepe, landscape designer at Tepe Services in Western Hills, “unless you figure out in advance exactly

sofas, armchairs, end tables, rugs and lamps are still the rage—but not in a space with the dimensions of a one-car garage. You won’t want to dazzle the eye with four different flower colors, either, warns Fox, any more than you’ll want four different couches in red, yellow, blue and

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green squatting inside your family room. “Think about three separate areas of the same color to tie everything together,” advises Tepe. “Color splashes in pillows will mean keeping them to a minimum in flower selections.” Most courtyard gardens look best with minimal furnishings anyway, adds Gabe Rice, owner of Renaissance Garden Ornament in Oakley. Perhaps just a bistro table, two chairs and a hammock. “It’s very much about the old ‘less is more’ rule,” he explains. “Keep it peaceful, not frenetic and jarring.” • Embrace the process. Professionals ask

a lot of questions, so allow enough time for contemplation rather than just providing rapid-fire answers. “Taking things slowly and making careful choices,” agrees Tepe, “will pay you back in terms of pleasure and relaxation for many years to come.” “I love seeing the ‘aha” expression on clients’ faces right after I’ve prodded them a bit or suggested something that achieves their goals perfectly,” adds Fox, “even though it may be 180 degrees away from what they originally thought they wanted.” — C O L E E N A R M ST RO N G

PHOTO COURTESY OF ELEGANT EARTH; AVAILABLE AT RENAISSANCE GARDEN ORNAMENT

—Susan Fox, landscape architect, Natorp’s


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[ C O R E VA L U E S ]

BY Coleen Armstrong PHOTOGRAPHS BY Ryan Kurtz

VIVA L’ITALIA! ITALIAN MODERN DESIGN LENDS ITSELF TO A NO-FUSS INTERIOR

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Sofa, chairs, ottoman and pillows from B&B Italia. Cowhide rug from Voltage showroom. Just a few large pieces give the space a roomy feel.

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J

JEFF F HINKE HINKEL IS ON A CAMPAIGN to break down the perception that contemporary

styling ng mus must be cold and trendy. “Depending on the way things are designed, constructed cted and an upholstered,” he explains, “they can be quite timeless.” So when his longtime clients at Adams Place asked his advice on how to update theirr early 11990s condo, Hinkel suggested going with Italian modern—sleek, serene and sophis sophisticated. As owner of Voltage, in Oakley, Hinkel is an avid fan of Italy’s sophist makers and their superb craftsmanship, passed down through multiple furniture m generations. generatio generations Take the new kitchen, for example. The Poliform cabinetry is white, the same color as the original, but that’s where the similarity ends. This time, high-end modular storage includes two wall-like doors that slide open to reveal items such as a toaster oven, a cache of canned goods, a stack of cookbooks. No clutter left lying around—a place

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for everything and everything in its place. The method becomes even clearer upon examination of the countertops— glossy Caesarstone in taupe/charcoal, very monolithic (think 2001: A Space Odyssey), that seems to forbid even a wine glass carelessly left sitting near the sink. The dining area is equally uncomplicated, with a generally unadorned Poltrona Frau table and eight chairs by Cassina. Eight? Another miracle of minimalist design—even in a sparse space, you can still


Opposite page: Pillows, in the perfect shade of yellow, offer a nod to the bridge and draw the gaze outward. This page: (Clockwise from top) Laurana dining table by Enzo Mari for Poltrona Frau, chairs by Cassina. Heracleum II pendant light by Bertjan Pot for Moooi. Its ultra-narrow suspension wires make gentle rotation of leaves possible. Curved glass console table by Fiam Italia, vase by Martha Sturdy, antique African currency by Gerhardt Tribal Art and glass knot sculpture by Sklo. Wood-like textured cabinets by Poliform, red counter stools from Fritz Hansen’s Series 7, designed by Arne Jacobsen. It’s almost impossible to imagine that this kitchen was once hidden behind a solid wall. As a narrow galley, Hinkel recalls, it felt pretty much like a closet. Not anymore.

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host a surprising number of guests. Also, the eye quite naturally turns to the vast window, as it should, where the yellow Daniel Carter Beard Bridge provides an exterior sweep of color. The master bedroom and its adjacent sitting room are more vivid, with a large abstract painting against a gray wall. The low Maxalto four-poster bed is dressed simply, though, and a long runner accents a polished white concrete oor. The powder room has splashes of color as well, but its lines are still pristine. This condo is a work in progress, with other rooms yet to be addressed. For now, however, with plenty of time and energy to spare, the homeowners are free every morning to sit on one of their decks, sipping hot coffee, staring contentedly at the Ohio River and pondering their next step.

Adams Place/Adams Landing Developer: Benenson Capital Company Architect : William Turnbull Jr. (d. 1997) Builder: Tipton and Zaring Companies Year built: 1992 Interior design ďŹ rm/designers for this unit: Voltage Furniture/Jeff Hinkel and Shannon Riley Architectural style: Elegant traditional

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Opposite page: Bathroom mirror by Kartell, light fixture by Fontana Arte. Gray, textured wallpaper complements the bedroom’s lighter shade. This page: Bright color offers interesting contrast, but the overall feel is still restful. Note the minimal lighting. Bed and Apta chair both from the Maxalto collection by Antonio Citterio. Wallmounted reading lights by Viabizzuno, Tab floor lamp by Flos. Red rug by Kasthall. Vases by B&B Italia. Pillows and bed throw from Voltage showroom.

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[ C O R E VA L U E S ]

Two large windows in the living room let in morning light and provide the perfect vantage to observe activity at the north end of Washington Park. Musuraca’s and Messer’s design philosophy of mixing old and new can be seen throughout their home, evidenced here by the comfortable union of a Pottery Barn sofa, Mitchell Gold slipper chairs with a vintage London-made grandfather’s clock by Elliott, a Thomasville rosewood sideboard and an antique end table. The large abstract painting over the sofa, titled Design in the Sky II by Lisa England Schuster, adds a brilliant burst of color.

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BY

Kathleen Doane PHOTOGRAPHS BY

Ryan Kurtz

URBAN REVIVAL

RESURRECTING AN OVER-THE-RHINE ROW HOUSE

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R

RYAN MESSER AND AN JIMMY MUSURACA

subscribe to that ol old theater adage, the On the day that they show must go on. O moved into their 14th Street row house in Over-the-Rhine, they the threw a dinner party for 50 people—desp people—d people—despite the fact that carbanisters, the penters were still aattaching att bathrooms weren’t“q “quite”finished, and the kitchen appliances had been in place less than a day. Of course, if that kind of chutzpah hadn’t been part of their DNA, they never would have taken on the renovation of the gutted 1880s, four-story structure or possessed the courage, patience and vision to transform it into a showplace of urban living. When they purchased the building from Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. (3CDC) at the end of 2011, it had been earmarked as a good candidate for a singlefamily home, though it was hard to see the potential. The floors were full of holes; ceilings were missing, and the walls had been taken down to the brick. A single, crumbling

Above: A narrow dining area links the living room and kitchen. Seating around a traditional walnut dining room table consists of Philippe Starck transparent ghost chairs and a slategray linen banquette bench by Ballard Designs.

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Subtle, traditional touches in this modern kitchen include curved wooden strips on the cabinet glass doors, built-in cutting boards on either side of the stove, subway tile backsplash and white Carrera marble countertops. Musuraca built the range hood by using different moldings to match the woodwork and chose stainless steel appliances from General Electric’s CafÊ series. Caboche hanging pendants from Foscarini illuminate casual meals at the marble-top island. Barstools from Restoration Hardware.

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staircase at the back of the building provided the only access to upper floors. “That sounds scary, but we actually wanted to buy a shell of a building so we could develop it ourselves,” Musuraca says. The couple turned the third and fourth floors into a 1,500-square-foot, two-bedroom rental apartment, leaving 2,400 square feet on the lower floors for their own living space. The basement’s dirt floor was dug to add an additional 18 inches to house mechanicals, a laundry and ironing room and a large bedroom and living space for their 6-year-old son. Not surprisingly, there were some formidable obstacles. Although the original stairway was rebuilt, its use was restricted to the tenant. A new stairway, linking the basement, first and second floors, was constructed along the west wall, near the middle of the structure. In order to meet code requirements and keep enough space on the second floor for a dining room, the stairway had to be redesigned a couple of times to accommodate the needed switchback and landing. The interior design reflects Musuraca’s contemporary and Messer’s more traditional tastes by often placing the two styles side-by-side. For instance, a traditional walnut dining room table is paired with clear Philippe Starck ghost chairs. In the living room, an 1890 grandfather clock Messer purchased from a Carnegie estate in Pittsburgh and a Thomasville rosewood sideboard are balanced with the modern, straight lines of a cream-colored contemporary sofa and a pair of patterned, slipper chairs. “We wanted to create a warm, comfortable urban feeling where we, our son and friends could relax and enjoy themselves,” Musuraca says. “I believe we’ve done just that.”

Architect: Don Beck Builder: Craig Weis of CW Custom Homes Interior Design: James Musuraca

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Above: The elephant figurine was a wedding gift to Messer and Musuraca who were married in New York City last summer, then returned home for a colorful Hindu commitment ceremony in Washington Park. The “branchelier” by Bocci Vancouver in Messer’s first-floor office came from HighStreet design studio. Below: The entry foyer is home to an eclectic mix of styles and objects including a collection of lithographs; a red lacquer console table from Design Within Reach, which holds a vase by John Richard filled with dogwood blossoms; a branch lamp from West Elm; and a statue of a French bulldog from Z Gallerie, an homage to the family pet.


A love of nature is the inspiration for much of the artwork in the home, such as this photograph, Winter Forest, Yellowstone, Wyoming, taken by Tipper Gore, and a Waterford crystal bowl of deer antlers, collected from the Messer family farm in Rising Sun, Ind. The 18-inch deep windowsills are a reminder that this modern living space exists within an 1880s Federalist-style building.

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[ C O R E VA L U E S ]

Left: Console table in antique gold by Worlds Away, charging bull ďŹ gurine (vintage) and charcoal wallpaper all from HighStreet. Footstool in ostrich vinyl covered by Aaron Powell. Recessed lighting. Flooring is noir travertine in 3-inch hexagons from The Tile Shop. Oil painting circa 1650 by Murillo: Beggar Boys Eating Grapes and Melon.

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BY

Coleen Armstrong PHOTOGRAPHS BY

Daylight Photo

TRADITIONAL TOUCHES AMID CONTEMPORARY STYLING

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This page: White cabinets from Ikea, industrial-style faucet by Kohler. Granite counters are a gray-white swirl. “The gradients are not obtrusive,” Knotts notes. “They relate to the floor without actually being black.” The floor looks like hardwood, but is slip-resistant vinyl by Karndean. Opposite page: “These little-moment flower prints do not overwhelm other art selections which are just as interesting,” Knotts says.

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W

WHEN JAN WELSH FIRST GAZED out of

the three-paneled window in October 2012, she instantly knew she was home. Some 10 stories below lay one of downtown Cincinnati’s most charming residential neighborhoods, with street after street of vintage brownstones and turn-of-the-century Victorians. Welsh had spent time overseas, where historic European villages had always enchanted her. This Eden Park condo would feel like living in Switzerland, Germany or France. She immediately placed an offer, which was accepted. But there were some complicated issues to resolve. The condo hadn’t been updated since its construction back in 1989. So, true to form, wallpaper was everywhere, mostly stripes and florals, even inside the closets. And plentiful walls, dissecting the 2,400 square feet into a series of choppy little rooms, gave new meaning to the term shut-in. Even that ravishing village view was

Page 55: The marble-topped, oval tulip table is an Eero Saarinen reproduction. Twin chandeliers are from the Robert Abbey Bling Collection. Banquette and gray chairs from HighStreet. Open-back pair from Pedigree Interiors, a consignment shop.

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blocked from the galley kitchen by a solid wall. It had to go. Welsh called Matt Knotts, co-owner of HighStreet, who had worked on her previous residences. Her instructions this time were clear and concise: “I want it to look like a Manhattan penthouse!” Knotts complied. Together they first oversaw the wall removals within the living areas. One room was a home office lined with bookcases and sporting a narrow doorway. “Very claustrophobic,” Knotts recalls. “You would not want to spend much time in there.” A second was a closed-off dining room with another narrow doorway that in Matt’s eyes made no sense. A third was a tight, cramped sitting room. Now all three are a single expanse with separate conversation spots, each creating its own intimacy. No need to fill the place, Knotts cautions; better to let it breathe. No need to overwhelm guests with a showy décor, either; better to let multiple views of Cincinnati, Kentucky and Indiana take center stage. But he also managed to create a certain intrigue by combining traditional pieces, which Welsh had owned for years, with a contemporary flair. The magnificent marble, tulip-style dining table, for example, is accented by two glittering chandeliers. Now that Welsh has such cozy hamlets bordering her home, will her trips to Europe diminish? Perhaps. One thing is sure—each time she returns, she’ll find a similar flavor waiting to greet her.

Developer/Managing partner: John Peckskamp Architect: Denis L. Back & Associates Builder: Subsidiary of Dugan & Meyers Year built: 1989 Interior design firm/designer for this unit: HighStreet/Matt Knotts Architectural style: Contemporary/ transitional

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Clockwise: (From left) A great space for entertaining, Knotts says. Orange chair from Williams-Sonoma Home. Gray chairs reupholstered through HighStreet. Ottoman reupholstered by Aaron Powell. Cream rugs and lamps from HighStreet. (Above) Most 19th-century art was purchased at Cowan’s Auctions. Resting deer from Valerie Makstell Interiors. (Below) A soothing gray-and-cream palette accented by Old World art and accessories. Long sofa, Ralph Lauren pillows and mirrored cubes with wood edging by Uttermost. The guest room offers a custom-made headboard in faux crocodile by Aaron Powell. Mandarin mirrored-top end table by Worlds Away. Pillows and bedding by Sferra at Gattle’s.

SU M M E R 2014 | CINCINNATI HOME

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HOME

DESIGNING PEOPLE

ROB BUSCH

Founding Partner At Drawing Dept The Drawing Dept Team From left to right: Tess Hilgefort (seated), Ben Novosel, Kevin Kluender, Rob Busch, Ron Novak (seated), Evonne Morales

“I KIND OF STUMBLED INTO ARCHITECTURE,” says Rob Busch. “Since I always had an interest in buildings, construction, Legos and building blocks, the architecture and design program at the University of Cincinnati appealed to me.” Busch’s childhood interests pointed to a career choice with a clear path. After attending the College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning at the University of Cincinnati and working locally for another firm, Busch and longtime friend Ron Novak formed Drawing Dept in 2005. With several recent design awards on their shelves, the firm is making a name for itself, both locally and nationally.

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CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

PHOTOGRAPH BY GARY KESSLER


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HOME

DESIGNING PEOPLE

A Tall Order

Smart Design Steps

Rigor and attention to detail are the firm’s touchstone ideals in design. The firm’s LEED accreditation, Busch says, is becoming more important every year. “The days of hiring an architect just to make things pretty are long past us. Today, our clients come to us better informed and interested in making changes that are more sustainable, as well as more energy-efficient.” — K A R E N M A S L OWS K I

[ ABOUT ]

ROB BUSCH

66

[ACCORDING TO ROB ]

DESIGNER’S PLAYBOOK  Make it a team effort. “Each of the six people in our firm brings something critical to the table. This is not a oneperson endeavor; the saying ‘the whole is greater than the sum of its parts’ applies perfectly to our company. The quarterback both gets too much blame and too much praise. Drawing Dept is a team effort.”  Keep it clean, but inviting. “We like modern architecture with very clean lines. A lot of people associate modern design with austerity, an unappealing concept. But we believe modernism can incorporate warm and inviting materials that are real.”  Design sense that makes sense. “Natural and organic materials, textures, and sunlight—all the usual tools, but applied in a more modern way—comprise our design sensibility.”  Each space has a role. “Almost all of our clients now ask for open and social living, where whoever is cooking is part of the conversation— whether that conversation is about entertainment or family life. Where the living room was once the heart of every home, today’s heart is the kitchen. Its role has expanded, and open living spaces are important. Formal dining rooms are less important, and we now consider exterior space the largest room of the house.”

Born in Cincinnati, grew up in Oakley and Anderson Township. || Married to Susan for 20 years, with four children, ages 9–16, whom they are raising in Madeira. || Marathon Man On Busch’s 35th birthday he decided to start running. Twelve years later he’s still at it, having lost 30 pounds and averaging 30 miles a week. He’s run 27 marathons, including the ill-fated Boston Marathon in 2013, where his entire family waited at the finish line. (Busch finished well before tragedy struck, and the family was able to leave safely.) || Likes their Oakley office location because “It’s both professional and creative, blue collar and affluent, a really dynamic neighborhood.” And it’s less than a mile from where Busch grew up and attended St. Cecelia and Oakley Elementary schools. || Design Heroes John Senhauser, with whom he worked for 15 years, who Busch feels is a truly gifted designer; also David Niland, the late and influential designer and teacher at UC DAAP, who taught Busch during his senior thesis year. || Clientele for the firm include businesses such as Brazee Street Studios, Boca, Sotto, Fusian urban sushi bar and Tom & Chee; homeowners; and housing developers.

CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CINCINNATI USA CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

One recent project? Revamp the former space of two downtown landmarks, Maisonette and La Normandie, into two new restaurants—Boca and Sotto. Busch’s partner, Novak, led the Drawing Dept team, preserving much of the site’s integrity, perfectly illustrating their organic approach to design. “We left a lot of the existing materials because we wanted to celebrate them and to recognize the history of the site,” Busch says. “This makes for an honesty of expression that’s important to us; the ghosts of the past are still there.” Former diners may recognize the semi-circular, red banquette (Table 75) in Boca as a nod to the Maisonette spot where many VIPs and celebrities dined. Drawing Dept and the new owners wanted to preserve such details, while opening up the space to more light and energy. Where there was once a massive fireplace at La Normandie, Sotto now has a fabulous, circular wine pit, stocked with the restaurant’s impressive cellar.


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HOME

THE FUNDAMENTALS

POWER TO THE SHOWER

Select The Right Water Heater For Your Home

GE’s GeoSpring 50-gallon GE Hybrid water

Identify your needs Water heaters are rated based on gallons per minute (GPM) for tankless water heaters and gallons per hour (GPH) for storage-tank models, explains Ferguson’s Jared Brewer. Guidelines for sizing a water heater appropriate to your use are available online at http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/sizing-new-water-heater. When shopping for a water heater, consider also the annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) rating, recommends Jamie Gerdsen of Apollo.

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CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

Conventional Tank Heaters Conventional tank heaters heat water and store water in a steel cylinder for use whenever you turn on the faucet. Powered by gas, electric or oil (rarely), gas models are the most efficient in this category. • Pros: Hot water is readily available. • Cons: Tank heaters are large and not

very efficient. A typical gas tank unit is only 50 percent efficient, notes Gerdsen.

PHOTO COURTESY GE

GAS, ELECTRIC, TANKLESS, hybrid, solar, hamster-powered…OK, the last item is fictional, but there are plenty of options for heating the water in your home. Water heating capacity, efficiency, maintenance and purchase costs are factors to consider before selecting a system. Here’s what you need to know:


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HOME

THE FUNDAMENTALS

• Warranty: Most manufacturers offer a

six-year warranty on conventional tank water heaters, Brewer says. • Cost: Keidel’s Dave Westendorf esti-

mates the base price for a 50-gallon gas unit is $500, while a comparable electric unit is $350. (Note: Gas units must be vented with a chimney. If no chimney is available, a power vent is necessary so total cost is closer to $900.) Tankless Heaters Tankless (or instantaneous) water heaters are small and heat water as you need it. Point-of-use tankless heaters tend to run on electric power and can fit in a cabinet or closet and heat water in that room (such as the bath). Whole-house tankless water heaters are gas powered and provide hot water for an entire home.

water onto your floor. Tankless models are great for smaller households with less water use and fit in small spaces such as apartments or urban homes. • Cons: Annual service is required to re-

move calcium and mineral deposits, says Mark Wolf of Recker and Boerger. • Warranty: A 15-year warranty is available

for most tankless units.

Solar water heating systems have high efficiency ratings, long life and reduced carbon emissions.

tently warm climates and thus are not as popular in the Greater Cincinnati region, explains Westendorf. Units tend to be taller and wider than conventional heaters and not ideal for small spaces. They also tend to be a bit noisy, so avoid placing a hybrid water heater near bedrooms, Wolf adds.

• Cost: Tankless water heaters tend to be

• Warranty: A 10-year limited warranty

more expensive than conventional units. Navien tankless units run from $2,295 to $2,995 at Recker and Boerger. Rheem tankless units (without installation) at Keidel range from $1,278 to $1,420, plus a $100 isolation valve.

is available with the GE’s GeoSpring 50-gallon GE Hybrid water heater at Recker and Boerger.

Hybrid Electric Heaters Hybrid water heaters use a heat pump in conjunction with standard electric elements to heat water. • Pros: Hybrid electric heaters are highly

efficient under the proper conditions and friendlier to the environment than those powered by natural gas. • Cons: These units work best in consis-

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CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

• Cost: $1,899 installed from Recker and

Boerger. Consumer Reports (2013) claims hybrid electric water heaters use about 60 percent less energy than standard electric heaters, however, so long-term cost to run the unit is less than a conventional system. Solar Water Heating System Water heaters powered by the sun have been used in this region since the 1970s, says Carl Adams, president of SunRock Solar. Systems require solar roof panels that ideally face south, though east and

west-facing panels can function well. A typical 80-gallon tank heats water on sunny days, but back-up electric or gas heat is required, either via a separate unit or integrated into a single tank, for sunless days. Outside temperature is irrelevant, Adams says. • Pros: Solar water heating systems have

high efficiency ratings, long life (some have lasted 20-plus years, says Adams) and reduced carbon emissions, according to A.O. Smith, the system available through SunRock Solar. Utility costs for water heating may be reduced up to 70 percent. • Cons: These systems cost more than con-

ventional options and require the installation of multiple parts. Tanks are larger than conventional models. • Warranty: Solar collectors typically

carry a 12-year warranty; tanks, six years; pumps, controls and installation, two years. • Cost: $8,000 average

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H O GA N R E D M O N D

PHOTO COURTESY SUNROCK SOLAR

• Pros: No worries of a large tank leaking


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HOME

RESOURCES

APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS Alamo Electronics

9572 Montgomery Road, Montgomery, 513-791-2300, alamoelectronics.com Electronics, home theater and audio, custom installation

The Appliance Loft

3209 Madison Road, Oakley, 513-533-0440, theapplianceloft.com Brands include Bosch, Dacor, Fisher Paykel, Liebherr and more

Best Buy

Multiple locations including 5555 Glenway Ave., Westwood, 888-229-3770, bestbuy. com Home theater, audio, appliances, smart tech

Hagedorn Appliances

4432 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, KY, 859-3426060, hagedornappliance.com Brands include GE, Sub-Zero, Wolf, Thermador, Viking and more

ARCHITECTS, BUILDERS, DEVELOPERS Beck Architecture

550 Liberty Hill, Prospect Hill Historic District, 513-651-5550, beckarchitects.com Architect

Benenson Capital Company

708 Third Ave., New York, NY, 212-8670990, benensoncapital.com Real estate investment, development and asset management; developer of Adams Landing

Capital Investment Group

226 W. Eighth St., Cincinnati, OH 45202, 513-241-5090, cigproperties.com Residential and commercial developments including SouthShore Condominiums

3612 Chadwell Springs, Cleves, 513-4671124, cwcustomhomes.net Builder

Denis L. Back & Associates

2128 Alpine Place, Walnut Hills, 513-8612776 Architect

Drawing Dept

Rob Busch, 3153 Madison Road, Oakley, 513-272-8099, drawingdepartment.com Architectural firm

Dugan & Meyers Construction

11110 Kenwood Road, Blue Ash, 513-8914300, dugan-meyers.com Builder, construction and construction management services

Great Traditions Homes

4000 Executive Park Drive, Suite 250, Sharonville, 513-563-4070, greattraditions homes.com Lifestyle-oriented homes in developments such as Harbour Town and The Vintage Club

Great Traditions Land & Development Company

4000 Executive Park Drive, Suite 250, Sharonville, 513-563-4070 Residential neighborhoods including Chestnut Hill, Eagle’s Watch and Legendary Run

GreenBau design + build

74

Greener Stock

Home Builders Association of Greater Cincinnati

Home Depot

9355 Holly Hill, Indian Hill, 513-831-2020, mariemontlifestyle.com Emery Park, Jordan Park and Nolen Park developments in Mariemont

415 Glensprings Drive, Cincinnati, 513851-6300, cincybuilders.com Builders association and producer of home shows including 2014 Homearama at Carriage Hill

John Senhauser Architects

John Senhauser, FAIA, 1118 Saint Gregory St., Mt. Adams, 513-381-1669, senhauser architects.com Architectural firm

Joshua One

1238 Grays Peak, Covington, KY, 513-8503476, joshuaone.com Technologyenabled development services

Metropolitan Design & Development

1440 Main St., Downtown, 513-241-2465/ 859-654-0705, mddliving.com Builder

Tipton Buildings

10532 Success Lane, Centerville, 937-8856300, tiptonbuildings.com Commercial construction, development and management company

Walker Homes

513-480-4247, walkerhomes.com, manhattanharbour.net Luxury homebuilder for Manhattan Harbour in Dayton, Ky.

ART 21C Museum Hotel Cincinnati

609 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-578-6600, 21cmuseumhotels.com/cincinnati Contemporary art gallery, hotel, civic center

Art Design Consultants

CW Custom Homes

513-784-0037, greenbau.net design and build firm

Greiwe Development Group

Green

CINCINNATI HOME | SUM M E R 2014

310 Culvert St., Downtown, 513-723-1222, adcfineart.com Fine art, framing, consulting and events

Cincinnati Art Galleries

225 E. Sixth St., Downtown, 513-381-2128, cincinnatiartgalleries.com Exhibitions, paintings, furniture, books, consignment

Malton Gallery

3804 Edwards Road, Oakley, 513-321-8614, maltonartgallery.com Fine art gallery and events

Pendleton Art Center

310 Pendleton St., Pendleton, 513-421-9791, pendletonartcenter.com Nurturing center to the needs of the artist, art exhibition space

Rookwood Pottery

1920 Race St., Downtown, 513-381-2510, rookwood.com Art tile, ceramics and artisan products

BUILDING MATERIALS/ HARDWARE Building Value

4040 Spring Grove Ave., Cincinnati, 513475-6783, buildingvalue.org Building materials reuse and deconstruction

3528 Columbia Parkway, Columbia Tusculum, 513-321-0567, greenerstock.com Specializing in natural, non-toxic and eco-friendly building products

Multiple locations including 3461 Joseph Road, Colerain, 513-923-9157, homedepot. com Appliances, hardware, smart tech

Lowes

Multiple locations including 5385 Ridge Ave., Columbia, 513-731-6127, lowes.com Hardware, smart tech

McCabe Lumber

118 Northeast Drive, Loveland, 513-6832662, mccabelumber.com Building materials, products, showroom

Menards

2865 Princeton Road, Hamilton, 513-737-9777, menards.com Home improvement store

The Tile Shop

513-554-4435, tileshop.com Tile and installation products for the home

FURNITURE Anthropologie

Kenwood Towne Centre, 513-793-6000, anthropologie.com House and home, clothing, shoes, accessories

Best Furniture Gallery

1123 S. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, KY, 859-441-2378, bestfurnituregallery.com Furniture and home décor

Bova

12130 Royal Point Drive, Symmes Township, 513-247-9100, bovafurniture.com Contemporary furniture

Cowan’s Auctions

6270 Este Ave., Carthage, 513-871-1670, cowanauctions.com Auction house

Crate and Barrel

CLOSETS/ ORGANIZATION California Closets

4900 Parkway Drive, Suite 130, Mason, 513-793-3055, californiaclosets.com Organizational systems for the home

Closets by Design

11319 Grooms Road, Blue Ash, 513-4696130, closetsbydesign.com Closet organizational systems

Solutions for Organizing Spaces 513-278-8565, solutionsfororganizingspaces.com Garage cabinets, flooring and home organization expertise

FINANCE Mortgage House of America

3530 Edwards Road, Hyde Park, 513-7936400, mortgagehouseofamerica.com Mortgage broker NMLS #1713

FLOORING Cawood Flooring Systems

10852 Millington Court, Blue Ash, 513-791-9662, cawoodflooringsystems.com Flooring and cabinetry products

Florida Tile

10840 Millington Court, Blue Ash, 513891-1122, floridatile.com Ceramic wall and floor tile

Hamilton Parker Company

2931 E. Kemper Road, Sharonville, 513276-4840, HPCincinnati.com Tile and building products

McSwain Carpets and Floors

8394 Beechmont Ave., Anderson, 513-474-5900, mcswaincarpets.com For additional locations, see website. Flooring, carpets and rugs

The Rug Gallery

9350 Kenwood Road, Blue Ash, 513-7939505, ruggallerycincy.com Flooring, carpets and rugs

5901 E. Galbraith Road, Kenwood Towne Place, Sycamore Township, 513-984-4555, crateandbarrel.com Housewares and home furnishings

Frontgate

5566 West Chester Road, West Chester, 1-888-263-9850, frontgate.com Furniture and home décor

House of France

3225 Madison Road, Oakley, 513-8719800, houseoffrance.com Furniture and interior design

Macy’s

Several locations including 505 Vine St., downtown, 513-361-4200, macys.com Furnishings, housewares and home décor

Main Auction Galleries

137 W. Fourth St., Downtown, 513-621-1280, mainauctiongalleries.com Auction house

Miller’s Bakery, Furniture and Bulk Foods

Daniel Miller, 960 Wheat Ridge Road, West Union, 937-544-8524 Handmade, custom Amish furniture

Morris Home Furnishings - Cincinnati

11765 Commons Drive, Springdale, 513-671-8888, morrisathome.com For additional locations, see website. Furniture and electronics

Restoration Hardware

7875 Montgomery Road, Kenwood, 513-984-0151, restorationhardware.com Luxury home furnishings

Verbarg’s Furniture & Design

8155 Montgomery Road, Kenwood Showroom, 513-794-1555 Furniture, draperies and bedding; Cincinnati’s exclusive Stickley dealer

Voltage

3209 Madison Road, Oakley, 513-871-5483, voltagefurniture.com Modern, contemporary furniture and lighting


HOME

RESOURCES

Williams-Sonoma

7875 Montgomery Road, Kenwood, 513793-3445, williams-sonoma.com Cookware and kitchen accessories at Kenwood location; for Williams-Sonoma Home, view bedding, lighting and furniture online.

Dwellings

Grace Jones, 2003 Madison Road, O’Bryonville, 513-321-6900, dwellingson madison.com Interior design services

HighStreet, Design Studio & Lifestyle Store

1401 Reading Road, First Floor, Downtown, 513-723-1901, highstreetcincinnati.com Interior design, furnishings, home accessories

HOME ACCESSORIES Adrian Durban Florist

Multiple locations including 3401 Clifton Ave., 513-241-2411, adriandurban.com Floral arrangements and gifts

Gattle’s

7809 Cooper Road, Montgomery, 513-8714050, gattlescincinnati.com Fine linens, tabletop and home décor

Pedigree Interiors

9889 Montgomery Road, Montgomery, 513-793-7387, pedigreeconsignments.com Consignment shop

Target

Multiple locations including 100 Rivers Edge, Milford, 513-831-5294, target.com Department store with a variety of goods including housewares and smart tech

Hoffman & Albers Interiors

9405 Kenwood Road, Kenwood, 513-7939100, hoffmanandalbersinteriors.com Interior Design services

Holthouse Enterprises, LLC

937-763-9703, holthouseenterprisesllc.com Interior design services

ID Cincinnati Furniture & Design

8180 Montgomery Road, Madeira, 513-8346210, yourhomeid.com Furniture and interior design

Mease Interiors

513-706-3067, measeinteriors.com Traditional and e-service interior design, custom window treatments, soft home accents

RM Interiors, Inc.

513-374-2858, West Chester, rm-interiors. com Interior design

HVAC/ENERGY Apollo

1730 Tennessee Ave., Bond Hill, 513-2713600, apollohome.com Heating, cooling, plumbing

Eco Environments

3295 Montgomery Road, Loveland, 513-489-4822, ecoenvironments.com HVAC, high-efficiency indoor climate control, geothermal and solar

Recker and Boerger

613 State Route 125, Anderson, 513-9429663, thecomfortzone.com Appliances, heating and air conditioning, water heaters and softeners

SunRock Solar

11311 Foremark Drive, Blue Ash, 513-7666025, sunrocksolar.com Photovoltaic systems, solar hot water systems and solar pool heating systems

Sacksteder’s Interiors

9797 Montgomery Road, Kenwood, 513-791-5022, sackstedersinteriors.com Interior design and furniture

Valerie Makstell Interiors

1050 W. Mehring Way, Queensgate, 513-2411050, valeriemakstellinteriors.com Interior design, furniture, accents and accessories

Z Gallerie

7900 Shelbyville Road, Louisville, KY, 502412-4457, zgallerie.com Interior design

KITCHEN & BATH Basco

7201 Snider Road, Mason, 513-573-1900, bascoshowerdoor.com Shower doors and enclosures

Bath Fitter

2526 Commerce Blvd., Sharonville, 513-733-1400, bathfitter.com Bath and shower remodeling

INTERIOR DESIGN Amy Schuermann Interiors

3165 Linwood Ave., Mt. Lookout, 513-8078870, amyschuermann.com Interior design services

Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery

11860 Mosteller Road, Sharonville, 513-3262999, ferguson.com Kitchen, bath and lighting design

Bello Designs

1981 Madison Road, O’Bryonville, with designers Christie Crawford, 513-378-3836; Kent Shaw, 513-478-4527; Cal Weigold Jr., 513-236-8522 Interior design, furnishings, home accessories

Castellini Interior Design

3732 Morris Place, 513-382-2171, castelliniinteriordesign.com Interior design services

Innerwood

21 Whitney Drive, Milford, 513-831-5990, innerwood.com Designs, fabricates and installs custom cabinetry and architectural woodwork

Keidel Supply Co.

1150 Tennessee Ave., Norwood, 513351-1600, keidel.com For additional locations, see website. Kitchen and bath, plumbing and building supplies, appliances

Design Within Reach

2360 Progress Drive, Stringtown, 859334-8500, dwr.com Interior design, furnishings, home accessories

76

Kelly Bros. Home & Design Center

CINCINNATI HOME | SUM M E R 2014

3502 Latonia Ave., Covington, KY, 859-5810400, kellybros.com Kitchen and bath cabinetry, Andersen windows, exterior and interior doors, trim

Wolf Custom Tile & Design

Northside, 513-505-7620, wolfcustomtile. com Residential improvements, commercial centerpieces, full range of custom renovation services

LANDSCAPING Barefoot Design

513-628-2911, barefootdesign.net Traditional and specialty landscaping

Bzak Landscaping

931 Round Bottom Road, Milford, 513-8310907, bzak.com Landscaping design and installation

LaMond Design

Symmes Township, 513-200-3358, lamonddesigncincy.com Landscape design/build company

Marvin’s Organic Gardens

2055 U.S. Route 42 South, Lebanon, 513-932-3319, marvinsorganicgardens.net Full-service landscape design company and garden center

Natorp’s Landscape and Natorp’s Nursery Outlet

8601 Snider Road, Mason, 513-398-4769, natorp.com Landscaping

Patterned Concrete of Cincinnati

9470 Le Saint Drive, Fairfield, 513-8709449, patternedconcrete.us Hardscape elements, stamped and dyed concrete, decorative overlays and permeable concrete

Pool and Spa Warehouse

10731 Reading Road, Cincinnati, 513-5540000, 5135540000.com Pools, spas, pool products and patio furniture

Renaissance Garden Ornament

3209 Madison Road, third floor, Oakley, 513-321-2430, rengarden.com Planters, garden sculpture, statuary and fountains

Run Jump-n-Play

8481 Duke Blvd., Mason, 513-701-7529, runjumpnplay.com Playsets and recreational equipment

Watson’s

7100 Houston Road, Florence, KY, 859371-9929, watsons.com For Sharonville location, see website. Outdoor living and home theater products

PAINTERS Certa Pro Painters

P.O. Box 20107, Cincinnati, 800-462-3782, 513-317-8201, certapro.com Interior and exterior residential and commercial painting

REAL ESTATE AGENTS Perrin March/Coldwell Banker

2721 Erie Ave., Hyde Park, 513-321-9944, CBWS.com Realtor, luxury properties

Lee Robinson/Sotheby’s

2724 Observatory Ave., Hyde Park, 513-8422225, sothebysrealty.com Realtor, luxury properties at Manhattan Harbour, St. James Place and other locations

Tepe Services

7021 Cleves Warsaw Pike, 513-941-4500, tepeservices.com Landscaping and landscape services

Wimberg Landscaping

5401 Hetzell St., Madisonville, wimberglandscaping.com, 513-271-2332 Lawn services and landscaping, design and installation

LIGHTING A & S Lighting

3140 Crescent Ave., Erlanger, KY, 859-7271111, a-s-electric.com Residential and commercial lighting, electric hardware and electric supplies

Lighting(one) of Cincinnati

9583 Fields Ertel Road, Loveland, 513-278-4001, lightingoneofcincinnati.com Interior and exterior lighting selections

Switch Lighting & Design

1207 Vine St., Gateway Quarter, 513-7218100, switchcollection.com Modern, architectural lighting

OUTDOOR LIVING Klimat Master Pools

2440 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights, KY, 859-572-0011, klimatmasterpools.com Custom pools and spas

One Small Garden

3 Given Lane, Terrace Park, 513-218-0573, onesmallgarden.com Raised beds, tables, sheds and accessories for small-space gardening

WATER Culligan Water

10860 Millington Court, Blue Ash, 513-7936640, culligan.com Water treatment solutions and service

WINDOWS/DOORS AE Door & Window Co.

1260 W. Sharon Road, Forest Park, 513742-1984, aedoorsales.com Residential windows, doors, garage doors

Eclipse Window Tinting

8060 Reading Road, No. 9, 513-821-5008, eclipseoh.com Residential, automotive and commercial window tinting

Overhead Door of Covington

2571 Ritchie Ave., Crescent Springs, KY, 859-341-6646, overheaddooronline.com Garage door sales

Stained Glass Overlay

4025 Dixie Highway, Elsmere, KY, 859-7274746, stainedglassbysgo.com Custom art glass design, fabrication and installation


Manhattan Harbour Riverfront Estates 42 New, Custom Homes, Fronting The Ohio River.

nha Ma

tes) u n i (8 mincinnati s e l i 3.5 m wntown C

t tan Harb o u r

To Do

Manhattan Harbour Riverfront Estates

Single Family Homes y First or second floor masters y 3,300 to 4,800 square feet y 2 & 3 car, attached garages y Riverview balconies

These luxury homes are like nothing else in the Greater Cincinnati region. Located on the banks of the Ohio River, you have an amazing, private connection with the River, including gorgeous views of the hills of Mt Adams, Eden Park, and the Cincinnati skyline. There are currently 27 homes available in 5 unique styles. When complete, there will be a total of 42 custom homes. For additional information, contact Lee Robinson at 513.842.2225.

y Beautiful rear yards

Contact:

In association with:

Lee Robinson

Walker Homes

513.842.2225

ManhattanHarbour.net

CRB, GRI, CRS, ABR, SRES


RAISING EXPECTATIONS and GARAGE DOORS for almost a century

Overhead Door Company of Northern Kentucky (513) 322-2506 (859) 912-7805 PROUDLY SERVING CINCINNATI & NKY SINCE 1921 Design a Garage Door for Your Home Online using our exclusive Door View software www.OverheadDoorOnline.com

Visit Our Showroom 2571 Ritchie Ave Crescent Springs, KY 41017 7:30-4:30 (Monday-Friday), 7:30-Noon (Saturday)


DEFINITELY NOT YOUR DAD’S GARAGE

Garage • Patio • Basement • Cabinetry • Flooring Residential and Commercial

www.SolutionsForOrganizingSpaces.com

513.278.8565 • 859.428.7095


HOME

A FINAL LOOK

LIVING IT UP

Why We Love Living Downtown IT’S EASY BEING GREEN IF

you live across the street from Washington Park. In fact, the restoration of the park was a major reason James Musuraca and Ryan Messer chose their particular property. “It’s the catalyst that has changed so many people’s perceptions of Over-the-Rhine,” Musuraca says. One family member, in particular, loves the park. Jacques, a 1-year-old French bulldog, socializes with his own community of OTR pals everyday at Washington’s dog park. —KATHLEEN DOANE From the Urban Revival feature interview

CLOSE PROXIMITY TO ALL

things cultural, competitive, culinary and congenial. “We’re near everything we enjoy,” says Jan Welsh. “Museums, concerts, plays, sporting events and restaurants, many within walking distance. And the time factor, the ease of not making a long trip to get there, is huge.” —COLEEN ARMSTRONG From the Old Meets New feature interview

Washington Park 2012 park renovation design team: BHDP Architecture, Human Nature, KLH Engineers, Kolar Design, M-E Companies, Inc., THP Limited

Music Hall Year completed: 1878 Architectural style: High Victorian Gothic Revival Architect: Samuel Hannaford

80

CINCINNATI HOME | SU M M E R 2014

PHOTOGRAPH BY SHAY NARTKER PHOTOGRAPHY


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See store for details. Some exclusions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on previous purchases. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Photos are for illustration purposes only and may not reflect actual product. Subject to credit approval. Offer ends 6/9/14.

Profile for Cincinnati Magazine

Cincinnati Home 2014  

Cincinnati Home 2014  

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