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and kids too!

EAT. SLEEP. REPEAT. A guide to feeding and napping in the first year

LITTLE KIDS GIVING BIG

teach your child about philanthropy

REAL PAPA

column by Bob Herzog

2015


Your Partner in

Nurturing and Caring for Children

From Birth Through the College Years Physicians Stephen I. Pleatman, MD Ronna Y. Schneider, MD Carla C. Barreau, MD Jennifer F. Ringel, MD Robert P. Wallace, MD Melissa A. T. Wallace, DO Tina M. DuMont, MD Amanda S. Lee, MD Kristin L. Kaltenstadler, MD Karen H. Yeh, MD Aimee M. Reeder, MD

Nurse Practitioners Eileen M. Bens, RN, CPNP, IBCLC Shari M. Kehres, MSN, CPNP, IBCLC Lindsi M. Meek, RN, PNP-BC Photos by Essenza Studio & Gallery

Mason-Montgomery 9600 Children’s Dr. Mason, OH 45040

Liberty Township 7335 Yankee Rd. Liberty Township, OH 45044

Forest Park 752 Waycross Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45240

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TA B L E O F CONTENTS

FEATURES

44

EAT. SLEEP. REPEAT. Sail through baby’s first year with our guide to feeding, napping, and everything in between.

56

ALL GROWN UP

Because playing dress-up in Mom’s and Dad’s accessories is half the fun of being a kid.

64

LEARNING TO GIVE

You can encourage your children to build a generous spirit through community service.

70

WHO IS YOUR HERO?

The youngest students at Blue Ash Elementary tell us whom they admire the most.

COVER & THIS PAGE: Photographs by Annette Navarro. Styling by Tamia Stinson. Hair by Phillip Nathaniel Saunders. Models courtesy Wings Model Management. (Above) See the look on page 63. (Cover) Dolce & Gabbana floral print dress, $310, Nordstrom. Polka dot moccasins, $42, The Spotted Goose.

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P H OTO G R A P H BY A N N E T T E N AVA R R O


TA B L E O F CONTENTS

24

DEPARTMENTS

12 EDITOR LETTER 15 THE FIRST WORD 16 Baby Talk 20 Ask Dr. Mom 22 Viewpoint 24 Real Papa 28 Play 30 Gear 32 Celebrate 36 Spaces 38 Style Mama 40 Good Ideas 42 All About Mom

75 THE A TO Z GUIDE 76 Pregnancy 78 Infant 82 Toddler 86 School Age 88 Health & Wellness

32

92 Childcare & Education

16

94 THE LIST 94 Childcare & Education 107 Medical Care 110 Party Places

112 YOU KNOW

YOU’RE A MOM WHEN...

28 30 8

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PREPARING STU DE NTS TO

Hillsdale Campus Cincinnati, Ohio 45227

Doherty Campus Cincinnati, Ohio 45206

THRIVE ••••••••••••••

At Seven Hills, child-centered teaching is at the head of our Program, a warm and nurturing atmosphere is at its heart—and children experience the joy of learning.

7hills.org

New Early Childhood Center opening Fall 2015 For more information or to schedule a tour, visit 7hills.org or call 513.728.2400. Seven Hills, for students age two through grade 12


Carew Tower • 441 Vine Street, Suite 200 Cincinnati, OH 45202-2039 (513) 421-4300 CINCINNATIMAGAZINE.COM/BABYGUIDE

PUBLISHER

Ivy Bayer EDITOR

Kara Renee Hagerman ART DIRECTORS

Brittany Dexter, Danielle Johnson, Jen Kawanari ART ASSISTANT & STYLIST

Tamia Stinson DESIGN CONSULTANT

Grace E. Saunders CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Aaron M. Conway, Anna Jones/OMS Photography, William Manning, Annette Navarro

SALES ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Tammy Vilaboy SENIOR ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES

Maggie Wint Goecke, Matt Reis ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES

Christie Goetz, Lisa Lawrence, Jenny Swain SENIOR OUTSIDE ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE

Laura Bowling ADVERTISING & MARKETING DESIGNER

Emily Nevius BUSINESS OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Missy Beiting BUSINESS COORDINATOR Erica Birkle

ART & PRODUCTION MANAGER

Julie Whitaker CUSTOM PUBLISHING & CREATIVE SERVICES INTERN

Kyley Fredrick MARKETING DIRECTOR

Chris Ohmer DIGITAL MEDIA EDITOR

Amy Brownlee DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL OPERATIONS

Amanda Boyd Walters

EMMIS COMMUNICATIONS CHAIRMAN/CEO Jeffrey H. Smulyan CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER/CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Patrick M. Walsh EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/ GENERAL COUNSEL J. Scott Enright

EMMIS PUBLISHING LP PRESIDENT Gregory T. Loewen VICE PRESIDENT/EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Mary Melton VICE PRESIDENT/NATIONAL SALES Marian Conicella VICE PRESIDENT OF FINANCE Melinda Marshall SENIOR MANAGER, DIGITAL MEDIA Craig Bowen PUBLISHING ACCOUNTANT Marianne Isaacs

The Baby Guide & Kids Too is a registered trademark of Emmis Publishing L.P.

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We are Muddy Creek Kids!

Small practice with two Board Certified Pediatricians & two Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioners with caring and compassionate staff ensures excellent continuity of care while still offering: • Same day and Saturday morning sick visits • Separate well and sick entrances • Onsite certified lactation specialist • Diabetes care • “Meet the Doctor” appointments for new parents/patients • Online patient portal allows 24-hour access to your child’s records, healthcare visits, appointments, forms, as well as patient education resources!

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Family-centered care from birth to college, where we treat your kids like our kids!


EDITOR LETTER

WAKE UP! I KNOW, YOU’D LOVE NOTHING MORE THAN TO CURL UP UNDER THE COVERS

right now, close your eyes and drift off to a deep, uninterrupted slumber that lasts six, seven, maybe even eight blissful hours. But you’re a parent. You have a tiny human being who would rather party (or have a pity party) all night long while you stumble around, barely conscious and a bundle of nerves, desperate for any way to just get the kid to go to sleep. I’ve been there. When my son was a baby, we weren’t friends when nighttime rolled around. I remember rocking, walking, dancing with him in my arms, even taking him for a drive (which worked, until I tried to transfer him to his crib). He either cried or looked at me, wide awake and ready to play. We made it through, and you will too. Now 5, he’s a fantastic sleeper. Eating, however, is another story. Because new parents have so many questions about sleeping and eating, we dedicated 12 pages in this issue to those topics. “Eat, Sleep, Repeat,” on page 44, includes a primer on various sleep-training methods, as well as valuable advice about safe sleeping. Also, learn how to properly freeze breast milk and make your own baby food, and when to start finger foods (with some healthy options). Now that my son is ready to start kindergarten, we’ve moved onto other lessons. One at the top of my list: learning to give to others. His pre-K class donated boxes of cereal to a local food pantry and we unload toys to the local Goodwill, but I always wonder what else I can do to show him the importance of community service. The story “Learning to Give,” on page 64, answers those questions and helps you to instill a generous spirit in your young kids. Teaching your newborn to sleep, persuading your picky toddler to try new foods, encouraging your preschooler to help others—each lesson is as important as the last. Even when it’s challenging (like when you’re tired of being tired), you will be bursting with love for that little human being—and remember, she won’t be little for long. Best wishes,

Kara Renee Hagerman

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PHOTOGRAPH BY AMANDA BARBOSA-PHOTOGRAPHER


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LIFE WITH A LITTLE

SNEAK PEEK

LITTLE ROWAN Frimming looks dapper every day thanks to his stylish mama, Courtnee Garr. We talk fashion and beauty with the florist in Style Mama. We also get a dad’s perspective, a super sweet one, from beloved TV personality Bob Herzog. Plus, get the goods on baby gear and gift ideas and learn the latest news about food allergies. PH OTO G R A PH BY A N N E T TE N AVA R R O

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THE EDITOR F1RST LETTER WORD BABY TALK

INDIA HEADBAND, $15

“The knot can be pulled on this headband as it needs to be larger for a growing girl.”

WHITE FUR HOODIE, $60

“It’s by far our biggest seller. It’s really cute with a sundress but also works well for winter.”

LITTLE THREADS

Project Runway alum Althea Harper has launched an irresistable line of baby clothing. —ELIZABETH

MILLER WOOD

NO MATTER HOW HARD ALTHEA HARPER SEARCHED FOR

the perfect outfits for her daughter Lilias, now 1, she just wasn’t satisfied. Everything was too pink or too frilly or just plain overdone. “It’s just not easy to create a unique look for your baby,” says the Season 6 Project Runway runner-up. So she took matters into her own hands and recently launched Lilias & Love, a baby line she describes as edgy, funky, and glamorous. The line stocks sizes up to 24 months, but custom orders are available up to 6T. “The prints are a little more girl-based,” Harper says, “but we’re actively trying to expand.” The University of Cincinnati DAAP grad designs her all-organic goods out of her home in Oakwood, in Dayton. Style-savvy mommas can snag her looks on the Lilias & Love Etsy site or at the Oakwood Farmers’ Market this summer. May we recommend the impossibly adorable slouchy hats? Your baby will be the envy of playgroup. liliasandlove.com

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SKULLY DRESS, $58

“This dress is both fashionable and functional. The custom-printed skulls and pom-pom neckline are on trend.”

FAIRY PRINCESS ROMPER, $48

“Another top-selling item. A mystical print on organic jersey that is comfortable. It’s easy for the child to move.” P H O T O G R A P H S B Y TA I C H E N


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THE F1RST WORD

NATALIE MARQUIS’S SON MAX

BABY TALK

1

2

3

4

5

HAPPY FEET

Handmade baby moccasins that are cute and comfortable. — M I C H E L L E B R A N D S T E T T E R

BUILD YOUR BOND

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SIMPLY ENTER your child’s birth date, and Pro Parenting will send once-a-day, age-appropriate activities to foster quality connections with your child. The activities require only basic household items (think magnets and raisins) and are customized for newborns through 5-year-olds. 2 0 1 5

has exceptionally huge feet. After dealing with ill-fitting shoe after ill-fitting shoe, she finally stumbled on a pair of moccasins that didn’t squish Max’s big little toes. Her excitement was short lived, however; the shoes were too expensive to keep Max stocked. Marquis showed the shoes to her mother, who is a seamstress. “My mom took one look at those shoes and said,‘I can make those,’ which she has said my whole life about everything.” Before she knew it, her mom had made three pairs. MaxMoccs was born. The shop, in Fairfield Township, runs off of Etsy, where you can browse through dozens of patterns, colors, and styles of little leather shoe. Each shoe takes about an hour to make, not counting time spent with packaging and delivery. They’re handmade using leather and a bit of elastic for the ankles (plus, for some shoes, acrylic paint splatters). Now your little one’s feet can be comfortable and stylish at any size. etsy.com/shop/maxmoccs 1

MARIGOLD YELLOW MARY JANE LEATHER SHOES $28

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BLUE AMERICA LEATHER MOCCS $33

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CHAMPAGNE LEATHER MOCCS $28

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PEACH LEATHER MOCC SANDALS $28

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ROBIN’S EGG BLUE LEATHER MOCCS $28

The app is an extension of the website ProductiveParenting. com, which was founded in 2009 by locals Emily Rempe, a physical therapist, and Susan Dineen, an early childhood educator. The duo conducted numerous focus groups with parents to determine what people needed in terms

of a tool to facilitate productive interaction with their children. The resounding response? Simplicity and usability. “My passion is truly just for developing positive relationships between parents and children through the context of play,” Rempe says. —E.M.W. productiveparenting. com

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY MAXMOCCS


THE F1RST WORD B ASK AB DR. Y TA MOM LK

ALLERGY ALERT

S TAT S

While the recommendations haven’t changed yet, a recent study may impact when parents introduce peanuts to their children.

6%

A STUDY PUBLISHED IN THE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE IN

February 2015 has perplexed parents of children with peanut allergy and those who worry about their children developing this potentially life-threatening disease. The new research seems to indicate that feeding some children peanut products at a young age may actually prevent peanut allergy. In 2000, the recommendation was to avoid these foods until age 3. So what are parents to do? We asked Amal Assa’ad, M.D., pediatric allergist, researcher, and mother of three, how to make sense of this study and what it really means from a practical standpoint. —JENNIFER HOGAN RE D M ON D

PERCENTAGE OF CHILDREN AGED 0–2 WHO SUFFER FROM A FOOD ALLERGY

33.3%

WHAT SHOULD PARENTS KNOW ABOUT THIS STUDY?

The children entering the study were between 4 to 11 months old A: with severe eczema and a history of egg allergy. This is a selected population predicted to be at risk to develop peanut allergy. There are many definitions for children who are at risk but in this study, this is the criteria used. All lived in England. Also, two thirds of the children entering the study had not developed any positive skin test to peanuts. They were not yet sensitized to peanuts. Importantly, this is a study for prevention, not for a cure.

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ONE IN THREE CHILDREN HAVE A FOOD ALLERGY, AND THE NUMBER OF CHILDREN WITH PEANUT ALLERGY MORE THAN TRIPLED BETWEEN 1997 AND 2008

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y T U E S D AY B A S S E N


WHAT DID THE NEW RESEARCH DISCOVER?

In the study, one group ate peanut products several times a week and another didn’t eat them at all. At the initial feeding of peanuts, 13 percent of the children had mild skin reactions. Those kids didn’t eat peanut anymore. Of the group that was being fed peanuts, 3 percent had mild reactions at home. Those were not fed peanuts anymore. In the end, after five years, out of the nearly 600 children in the study, of those who were fed peanuts, only 1 percent were allergic to peanuts compared to around 20 percent from the group that avoided peanuts completely. I think that the study has concluded that telling families with children who are at risk to develop peanut allergy to avoid peanut totally is not the right thing to do. It may predispose them to actually develop it. Having this child consume peanut early in life may be best. That’s really the message of the study.

A:

SO WHAT SHOULD PARENTS DO?

First, there is no change in the current recommendation that someone who has the food allergy should avoid the food. If you know your child has an allergy to peanut, do not give him peanut! Desensitization studies are considered treatment, and this is still in the research arena. This issue is still contentious in the allergy community. The recommendations for when to introduce milk, eggs, and peanut changed in 2008 but resulted in confusion. But then there was only proof that avoiding the allergen didn’t prevent the allergy. Now they’ve proved that eating the food may prevent the allergy. This study does not make a recommendation. This is what we’ve been working on. The NIH and other organizations are working on formal recommendations that we hope will be useful. Parents who are concerned about this should consult an allergist.

A:

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THE F1RST WORD VIEWPOINT

MARY BETH PLATEN,

LAURA WILLIS, mother of three, homeschooling parent

mother of two, public school teacher

HOMESCHOOLING Traditional school setting or teach your children at home? Two moms sound off. — J E N N I F E R H O G A N R E D M O N D

“IT IS WONDERFUL THAT we live in an age when we have so many choices,” says Platen. While she respects the many options available, she sees the benefits of a traditional school setting daily. THE CLASSROOM IS great for socialization and “exposure to other learners who are very different from themselves—and that means socially, academically, and from a socio-economic standpoint,” she says. “Students learn to put aside their differences and become unified. That is probably one of the biggest positives.” AN INTELLECTUALLY gifted child may also benefit from the enrichment programs many schools provide. Some districts also incorporate a communitybased approach through after-school programs and other special-interest classes. PLATEN TOUTS THE professional growth and development teachers seek as an added advantage. “Teachers are learning to differentiate their instruction to meet the needs of all learners,” she says.

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3.4%

THE PERCENTAGE OF students homeschooled in America in 2012, according to a government study. This was an increase from 2.9% in 2007.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS ARE WELL

equipped to educate children with special needs, Platen says. Children with learning disabilities or cognitive developmental delays receive specialized instruction from experts. FAMILIES INTERESTED IN HOME-

schooling should investigate state requirements. Willis recommends The Ultimate Guide to Homeschooling, by Debra Bell, for guidance. She relies on personal and professional evaluations to gauge academic performance.

WILLIS ENJOYS THE freedom homeschooling provides for travel, family time, creative learning, and a curriculum tailored to her children. The family’s experience with Montessori school was good, but four years ago they chose homeschooling to better fit their lifestyle and budget. “My husband travels for work and we thought that rather than that being a negative to family life, we could homeschool and travel with him,” she says. WILLIS DETERMINES THE daily agenda for her young children and they participate in a weekly co-op for science, writing, and enrichment classes. If a child has trouble in an area—her daughter had difficulty with reading before homeschooling—they turn the focus there. She is now reading above her grade level. SOCIALIZATION AND community involvement come naturally. The kids play sports at the local school. Willis and her husband also organize a Destination Imagination group with nearby children to teach team problem solving. “Our house has become the central hub of the neighborhood,” she says.


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THE F1RST WORD

SAVOR THE MOMENT

BREAL ABY TA PAPA LK

BY BOB HERZOG

THE PHENOMENON SOUNDS LIKE SOME-

thing I might describe during a medical story in the midst of a newscast. It’s “what’s going around.” It’s called Baby Talk. Not everyone catches it, of course. Some people are apparently immune. I, most unfortunately, am not one of those people. I am, let’s just call it, susceptible.

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Now, this isn’t “goo-goo ga-ga” baby talk. The symptoms of this condition present themselves not in talking like a baby, but in the way one talks about babies. Phrases like “little little” and “baby baby” pop up frequently. Those most likely to catch this ailment appear to be those who have children who are at least kindergarten age. These are often parents I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y R YA N S N O O K


who once swore they would never use phrases like “They grow up so fast,” but they now long for that new baby smell. My youngest child is in the second grade. My oldest is a sophomore in college. The time span to get from one to the other seems like the blink of an eye. They are a daily before-and-after picture that I struggle to comprehend is even possible. They grow up so fast. I have family and friends who are expecting or who have recently welcomed a baby into the world, and I find myself envious. As they deal with late nights and poopy diapers, the stress that comes with every cough and the worry accompanying every bump on the noggin, I look at their tired eyes with a bit of longing. It’s hard to convey just how quickly that time goes. Babies, well, just don’t stay babies very long. They’re “little little” for what will eventually seem a heartbeat. They’re “baby babies” so briefly. You will have a morning when the spit-up splashes your recently drycleaned suit. Some of your baby’s afternoon number two will end up on your thumb instead of a Wet One, and without anywhere else to put it, you’ll wipe it on your jeans—and you won’t care. You’ll go without sleep. You’ll worry. You’ll fret. And the last thing you should do is wish that time away. Before you know it that baby will be in school for a full day. That baby will want to watch a scary movie. That baby will want to borrow the keys. That baby will be packed up and moving on. It sounds like a country song, something by Kenny Chesney or Trace Adkins. It’s “There Goes My Life” and “You’re Gonna Miss This.” And one day those songs will come on the radio when you’re driving your car all alone, and you’ll cry. They’re not “little little” for long. They grow up so fast. There’s no cure for this kind of Baby Talk. Well, maybe grandkids—someday.

Bob Herzog is a co-anchor on Good Morning Cincinnati at Local 12 WKRC-TV. His Dance Party Friday segment is popular, as are his hilarious song parodies (His adaptation of Frozen’s “Let It Go” went viral). He lives on the West Side, where he grew up, with his wife, Cali, and their four children.

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FINDING THE POTENTIAL.

TRAINING WITH THE CHILDREN’S THEATRE OF CINCINNATI DEVELOPING THE TALENT.

EXPANDING THE RANGE.

From introducing children to the world of musical theater (drama, vocal music and dance) to honing the skills of accomplished student performers, The Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati teaching artists instill the techniques and principles behind the art of musical theater. We offer group classes and private lessons for students ages 3 through 18 at our facility.

Visit www.thechildrenstheatre.com to view the class schedule and get registered today. CREATING THE PASSION.

2015-2016 TOURING SEASON

September 21 – November 6, 2015

September 21 – November 6, 2015

November 23 – December 22, 2015

February 1 – March 24, 2016

February 1 – March 31, 2016

February 1 – March 31, 2016

February 1 – May 31, 2016

April 11 – May 31, 2016

Contact us at 513.569.8080 ext.20 or www.thechildrenstheatre.com/artreach.


BECOME PART OF OUR WORLD

© Disney

2015-2016 MAINSTAGE SEASON

The Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati 91st Season featuring an underwater Disney favorite, a beloved holiday classic, heads into its

world-premiere musical and everyone’s favorite ogre!

a

www.thechildrenstheatre.com

CONNECT WITH US

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! 513.569.8080


THE F1RST WORD PLAY

TAKE IT OUTSIDE Kids can learn and discover while burning off energy at these five out-of-the-ordinary Cincinnati playgrounds. —SARAH

M. MULLINS

1

HIGHFIELD DISCOVERY GARDEN

2

At Highfield Discovery Garden, kids can climb in a dream tree house and be on the lookout for animal sculptures. The park has seven gardens, including a vegetable garden where little ones can water the plants and the Trolley Garden, where they can be a train conductor. As you explore, be sure to watch the model trains as they run through the trees.

Woodlawn, greatparks.org/parks/ glenwood-gardens

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CAROL ANN’S CAROUSEL

What’s more fun than catching ladybugs? Climbing onto a larger-than-life version, of course! Befriend the creatures, including the Cincinnati Cicada and Zoo Baby Elephant, at Smale Park’s brandnew carousel, which takes you on a ride overlooking the river. After that, check out the park’s rock-climbing wall and misty fog to run through on summer days. Downtown, mysmaleriver

frontpark.org/carousel

P H O T O G R A P H B Y A A R O N M . C O N WAY


HIGHFIELD DISCOVERY GARDEN

3

WASHINGTON PARK

Zigzag through the water jets on a hot afternoon, hop on the canal boat (aye aye captain!), and make your way to the top of the castle, where you’re king of the woooorld! Washington Park is an allin-one park for the entire family, with special events like City Flea. It’s perfect for puppies, parents, and busy toddlers, and no kid will ever want to leave. Over-the-Rhine,

4

CINCINNATI NATURE CENTER PLAYSCAPE

A tree house, a garden, a teepee, oh my! It’s the one place Mom and Dad will allow jumping in puddles and sloshing through mud. The PlayScape is 1.6 acres of forest, fields, and creeks where little ones can listen for birds and dig in a sand pit. Gear up with an old pair of shoes and get ready to explore nature.

Milford, cincynature.org

5

PARKY’S FARM

Hear animal sounds come to life inside Parky’s barn, full of pigs, llamas, and cows. Inside the Playbarn you’ll find climbing ropes, a ball pit, and slides to whip down. The outside activities include pony rides, a double-decker playground, and Parky’s Ark, an interactive water park perfect for cooling down.

Winton Woods, greatparks.org/ learn/parkys-farm

washingtonpark.org

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THE F1RST WORD GEAR

DRINK UP Ready to switch to a sippy cup? Here are five options with great features.

EVEN BEFORE YOU’RE ready to say bye-bye to the bottle, you can introduce a sippy cup. Start at 6 to 9 months, try different options, and give your baby time to transition (cups with handles are helpful at first). Be sure the cups you buy are BPA-free. Sippy cups are great on the go, but otherwise offer them at mealtime only. Dental experts recommend using them in moderation and moving up to a big-kid cup as soon as your little one is ready.

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1

GROWS WITH BABY OXO Tot sippy cup set (also comes with a training cup lid), oxo.com, $7.99


2

3

ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY

STURDY AND SPILL-PROOF

Klean Kanteen Sippy Spout–equipped cup Park + Vine, $17

Munchkin Miracle 360˚10-ounce sippy cup target.com, $15

4

5

MOM’S FAVORITE FOR ON-THE-GO

SOFT SPOUT FOR LITTLE MOUTHS

The First Years Take & Toss Variety Bag with cups, bowls, forks, and spoons babiesrus.com, $12.99

Thermos Blue Foogo vacuuminsulated sippy cup diapers.com, $15.05

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THE F1RST WORD gifts

CELEBRATE

JANOD CONFETTI GUITAR MiCA 12/v, $42

FOLKMANIS DRAGON HAND PUPPET Joseph-Beth Booksellers, $16.50

Once T ime UP

ON

A

IN A MAGICAL LAND

M AT T I LY N WAS TURNING FOUR

COME CELEBRATE WITH US! FEBRUARY 20TH, 2015 | 2-4PM ELMIRA PUBLIC LIBRARY RSVP TO SARA 202.204.2394

ALMOST SUNDAY RAINBOW INVITATION (digital file) almostsunday.com, $18

DEA+BEAN WOODLAND BOOK INVITATIONS (15) deaandbean.com, $40

STRAW SHERIFF’S HAT Cappel’s, $7.95

POM-POM PARTY HAT

Camargo Trading Company, $20

KING’S CROWN Cappel’s, $3.75

party hats

DOWN ON THE FARM INVITATIONS (12) jillybeardesigns.com, $45

invitations

upon

Mattilyn's Birthday

JELLYCAT FARM TAILS BOOK Joseph-Beth Booksellers, $16.50

PARTY TIME

Planning your little one’s big birthday celebration? We’ve got gifts and goodies for three fun party themes. — TA M I A S T I N S O N

treats

CONFETTI CAKE POPS

MINI CASTLE CAKE

3 Sweet Girls Cakery, $3.50 each

Trix & Treats Sweets, $35

Camargo Trading Company, $30

LOLLIPOP TOWEL TREAT Arrietty, $4.50

Camargo Trading Company, $9

farm

rainbow

FARM ANIMAL COOKIES (12) Trix & Treats Sweets, $15

accessory

LINED COWBOY BOOTS

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PRINCESS SOCKS storybook PHOTOGR APHS BY ANNA JONES/OMS


Custom Birthday Cakes • Cupcakes • Pastries • Decorated Cookies Tea Room & Café available for Children's Tea Parties, Showers, Birthday Parties, Mother & Daughter Teas

2015 Winner “Best Bakery” and “Best Desserts” ~ City Beat • Zagat Rated “Extraordinary to Perfection” “Best Dessert in the World” — BonBonerie Opera Cream Torte ~ Cincinnati Magazine

2030 Madison Road, O’Bryonville •

513-321-3399

bonbonerie.com


Every baby is unique. So is every birth. That’s why so many moms choose Premier Health. We provide comprehensive maternity services including prenatal care and specialists in high-risk pregnancies, the only accredited natural birthing center in the state of Ohio located within a hospital, four Level II special care nurseries, and one of the state’s most experienced Level III neonatal intensive care units. Our highly trained physicians and experienced staff champion personal birthing plans that match the needs and expectations of mothers-to-be. So we have everything you need for your own unique bundle of joy. That’s how Premier Health is leading with care for moms and babies around the region. To find a physician or to schedule a tour of a Premier maternity suite, visit PremierHealth.com/maternity.

P-C-MAT50715-Maternity_BabyGuide_12" x 10"_Ad.indd 1


5/13/15 4:21 PM


THE F1RST WORD BABY SPACES TA LK

CLIMB EVERY MOUNTAIN

To inspire a sense of adventure and keep the family active, Andrew and Rachel Peters built a rock-climbing wall in their preschooler’s bedroom. —ELIZABETH

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MILLER WOOD

FOR THE PETERS FAMILY, IT’S ALL ABOUT

adventure. So when the idea came to build a rock wall in their 4-year-old’s bedroom, there wasn’t much hesitation. “We do anything we can to encourage adventure,” says Andrew Peters, the mastermind behind the DIY project that was completed in late 2014. Measuring 12 feet by eight feet, the mountain-themed rock wall was a natural extension of the family’s overarching vision for the Anderson Township home they built in 2011, which was to facilitate playing between their four children, ages 4 months to 6 years. And thus far, that vision has been successful. “They spot each other and practice new moves with each other,” Peters says. “We try to PHOTOGRAPH BY WILLIAM MANNING


ALL HANDS ON DECK Using their garage as a “design” studio, the Peters family laid out three sheets of four-foot-by-eight-foot fiberboard, which were then cut into mountain peaks. The kids pitched in to help paint the mountains blue.

600-B Reading Rd, Mason

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398-0353

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train them in encouragement, and this is a really practical way to cheer each other on.” The wall is outfitted with real rock climbing holds—not kid-friendly substitutes—that are strong enough to bear adult weight. (Peters and his wife, Rachel, have been known to try a few moves themselves.) The rock pattern was designed to accommodate different levels of skill, and they plan to add more holds as the kids get older. “We’re not a climbing family,” Peters claims, though he did climb Mt. Rainier last year. “It’s more about being active.”

We are always open for open play! the best place for birthday parties! includes unlimited play time for everyone! jumpandjacks.com • 513-779-5867 7102 Office Park Drive West Chester 45069

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THE F1RST WORD STYLE MAMA

COURTNEE GARR

Mother of five and owner of Paperwhites & Whimsy Events and Floral, Garr mixes motherhood with style and sensibility.

YOU’RE BEAUTIFUL AND COMFORTABLE WITH WHO YOU ARE. HOW DO YOU DO IT? A sense of humor helps! But seriously, once I realized I can’t control all things, life got a lot easier and more enjoyable. WHAT KIND OF LOOK ARE YOU GOING FOR NOW? I’m drawing a lot of inspiration from Lucy Liu’s character on Elementary—minimal, sporty, edgy. It’s that mix of high and low labels, like a Rag and Bone skirt with an H&M tee. THIS CHAP! TELL US ABOUT HOW YOU DRESS HIM. Rowan just turned 1 in March! I think I approach dressing him like I dress myself. I love unexpected color and mixing patterns. I prefer shopping in the more gender-neutral sections, using leggings instead of pants, and finding clothes with a vintage quality. FAVORITE PIECES IN YOUR WARDROBE? A pleated chiffon skirt with a pop of neon, a floral shirt dress from Anthropologie, a vintage embroidered Mexican blouse, and flared jeans (. ..so glad I didn’t get rid of those in my last closet purge!). CAN YOU ENCOURAGE OTHER MOMS IN THE STYLE REALM? It can be a real struggle. I minimized my beauty routine. From start to finish, I can be ready in under 25 minutes. There are days when I force myself to make the effort. But once I do, I never regret it. — L I Z B E L L YO U N G

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P H OTO G R A P H BY A N N E T T E N AVA R R O


since 1904

Fine Linens • Gifts • Accessories • Nursery • Sleepwear CLOUD B

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THE F1RST WORD GOOD IDEAS

BRINGING HOME BABY (TO YOUR PET) Soon little Fido will need to share the spotlight, and it’s bound to be an adjustment—for everyone. Most pets, especially dogs, will eventually bond beautifully with your little bundle of joy, but here’s a checklist to help the transition go more smoothly. — E L I Z A B E T H M I L L E R W O O D

BEFORE BABY’S ARRIVAL Speak to your pet often about “little sibling” in a positive tone—perhaps even in conjunction with a treat or a walk—so that when you introduce your baby, your pet will already have a positive association with that name. The Humane Society suggests spending gradually less time with your pet prior to baby’s arrival so that the shift in attention isn’t quite so dramatic post-birth. If your pet is a momma’s boy, work on strengthening his relationship with dad. When baby arrives, it will be mom’s attention that is most divided, so dad can help keep the pet company. Introduce new baby smells by dabbing on baby oil or powder for your pet to sniff. Familiarize your pet with baby sounds, like the music of a mobile or a recording of crying. Give your pet frequent nail trims so that he gets used to the routine.

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Get a thorough veterinarian checkup to make sure your pet won’t pose any health threats to your baby.

AFTER BABY’S ARRIVAL While baby is still in the hospital, bring home a hat or blanket with the baby’s scent for the pet to become familiar with. Hire a dog walker (even a neighbor kid) to ensure your pet maintains a regular walk schedule. Don’t allow the pet to lick baby’s face at a young age. Saliva can spread germs into the baby’s mouth or eyes. Make the nursery an off-limits zone until you feel comfortable. It’s best to never leave your pet unsupervised with baby. Be aware of unusual behavior that could signal your pet isn’t coping well: urinating indoors, getting into the trash, or unwarranted growling. Scold bad behavior quickly and firmly.

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y B E N K I R S C H N E R


UNIVER SIT Y OF CINCINNATI MEDIC AL CENTER W E S T C H E S T E R H O S P I TA L

Baby on Board. We take pride in the babies we deliver every day – from those healthy, full-term bundles of joy to those pre-term babies full of fight and strength. We are here to make sure you have the healthiest baby possible – whether you have a routine delivery or need the most advanced care available in the region.

To schedule a tour of our spacious, private labor and delivery suites, please call: (513) 584-BABY (2229)

UCHealth.com/BabyBearcats


THE F1RST WORD ALL ABOUT MOM

PLUM LUCK

Lip colors with plum-y undertones are a cool accent for summer fashion, and there’s a shade out there that’s flattering on everyone.

FACEING AFTERNOON DELIGHT LIPSTICK brideface.com $20

BUXOM BERRY BLAST LIP CREAM Sephora $19

SEPHORA COLLECTION RASPBERRY BLAST Sephora $13

FLAT OUT FUN Chasing after little ones can be exhausting, but you don’t have to sacrifice style for comfort. These chic-yet-practical flats offer the best of both worlds, and at every price point.

TOMS CLASSIC ALPARGATA SATIN SLIP-ON $53.95

FRENCH SOLE LEAGUE SKIMMER FLAT $179.95

KATE SPADE NEW YORK GO FLAT $278

BP MOVEOVER POINTED TOE FLAT $49.95

All available at Nordstrom

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LIPSTICK PHOTOGR APHS BY ANNA JONES/OMS


eat. sleep. repeat. SAIL THROUGH YOUR BABY’S FIRST YEAR WITH OUR GUIDE

TO FEEDING, NAPPING, AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN.

BY AMY BROWNLEE / PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANNA JONES/OMS


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EATING IN THE FIRST YEAR Keeping your baby happy and well fed is one of the most satisfying (and challenging) jobs a parent can have. And it’s extra tricky because each stage of infancy has its own rules—few things stay the same for longer than a couple of months. Start with our guide to eating in the first year, where we cover everything from freezing breast milk to steaming broccoli. Bon appetit!

5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT FORMULA IT’S OK TO TRY DIFFERENT KINDS. Brand name formula samples will come at you from all directions: from the hospital, your doctor, even through the mail. But you don’t have to stay loyal to any of them. Store brands (like Target’s Up and Up) will cut your formula costs in half, so try them out early on.

1

IF YOUR BABY HAS GAS, IT MIGHT BE THE FORMULA. Formula isn’t always the culprit for a baby’s gas pain, but it often is. Try a different version— maybe even soy-based—to rule it out.

2

THAT STUFF DOES NOT KEEP. Baby formula is highly unstable, so it doesn’t keep well out of refrigeration (even unused formula should only be in the fridge for up to 24 hours). And if your baby leaves any unfinished for more than one hour, the rest must be thrown out to prevent the spread of bacteria.

3

DON’T BUY IN BULK—NOT YET, ANYWAY. It might take time to figure out what kind of formula works for your newborn. So hold off on the trips to Costco until the dust settles.

4

0–3 MONTHS

O S T H O S P I T A L S T O D AY U N D E R stand the importance of nursing, and many will help you try to nurse right after your baby is born. Ask about lactation consultants on staff who can visit your room and assist with latch problems, positioning, and other common issues. And don’t be afraid to ask about formula if nursing isn’t working out. Your baby’s ability to gain weight and thrive is paramount.

M

YOU CAN PREP FOR THE DAY. It won’t be long before you figure out your little one’s eating needs. You can prepare a day’s worth of formula in the morning and divvy it out for each feeding to save time.

5


47 3–6 MONTHS

BACK TO WORK? IF YOU’RE STILL NURSing, you’ll become well acquainted with your breast pump. While you’re at it, become acquainted with your rights: Federal law requires that employers provide “reasonable break time” and private space for an employee to express breast milk for her nursing child. And no, they’re not allowed to send you to a bathroom .

B

STORING AND FREEZING BREAST MILK: DOS AND DON 'T S DO start pumping a couple weeks before returning to work to build up a supply. DO store refrigerated milk dairy case-style, with the oldest items in the front. DON’T freeze more than

one or two bottle’s-worth at a time. You’ll have to thaw it all at once. DO freeze your milk if you pump more than your baby can eat in a day. DO label your milk with the date and amount.

DO plan to bring a small soft-side cooler to store your milk at work if there’s no on-site refrigerator. DO follow these storage guidelines for how long to keep pumped breast milk... At room temperature: 4–6 hours; In a cooler

with ice packs: 24 hours; Refrigerated: 3–8 days; Frozen: 6–12 months. DON’T microwave breast milk; it can create “hot spots” and cause severe burns.


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FIRST AID FOR CPR AND CHOKING If your child begins choking, follow these Red Cross steps for First Aid and CPR: 1 Check for responsiveness and any severe injuries or bleeding. 2 Call 911 (if alone, give 2 minutes of care first). 3 Give five back blows between the shoulder blades with the heel of one hand (use your forearm and leg to support an infant face down). 4 Give five abdominal thrusts: For a child, use a fist above the navel; for an infant, place two fingers in the center of the chest below the nipple line and compress breastbone about 1 ½ inches. Support the head and neck and keep them lower than the chest. 5 Continue sets of five back blows and chest thrusts until the object is forced out.

If child loses consciousness, begin CPR: 1 Call 911 (if alone, give 2 minutes of care first). 2 Move the child to his back (supporting the head), tilt the head back slightly and lift chin. 3 Quickly check for breathing (do this for no longer than 10 seconds); gasping is not breathing. 4 Give two rescue breaths (for a child, pinch the nose shut and seal your mouth over his; for an infant, seal your mouth over his nose and mouth). 5 Blow air for one second; be sure you can see the chest rise. 6 If the chest does not rise, give 30 chest compressions (for a child, push about 2 inches deep with your hand; for an infant, push about 1 ½ inches deep with two fingers). Push fast, at least 100 compressions per minute 7 Look for and remove object if seen (do not blind sweep a child’s mouth; you may push the object deeper). 8 Continue CPR until the child regains consciousness or emergency personnel take over.

6–9 MONTHS

HE FIRST THING YOU SHOULD remember about introducing pureed food is spacing. Your baby is trying all of these items for the very first time, so wait three days before introducing another new ingredient so that you can isolate any potential allergens. The second thing is that you don’t have to start with rice cereal; babies love avocado, sweet potato, applesauce—anything they can gum.

T


!

9–12 MONTHS

N T R O D U C I N G “ R E A L F O O D ”—T H AT is, non-mushy stuff—is lots of fun for parents and children alike. Toward the middle and end of the fi rst year, most babies have a couple of teeth to work with. So give them something to chew! We’ve never met a baby who didn’t like Cheerios, but you should also consider the main food groups: protein, vegetables, fruits, grains, and dairy. Here are some examples of great first foods in each group:

I

PROTEIN

VEGETABLES

FRUIT

Peas, steamed or boiled

Apple, stewed and diced

Whole wheat or multi-grain toast

Green beans, steamed or boiled

Banana, diced

Ground beef

Eggplant, roasted

Scrambled egg yolks (add whites after pediatrician signs off)

Mango, diced

Cooked pasta (try wagon wheel shapes!)

Sweet potato, roasted

Tomatoes, diced

Lentils Beans

Carrots, roasted or steamed

Babies who are new to chewable foods have a wealth of options at their tiny fingertips. But hold off on introducing some foods, either because they present a choking or foodborne illness hazard or because they’re just plain unhealthy.

GRAINS

Chicken(roasted or poached, skin and bones removed)

Berries, halved

FOODS TO AVOID

Avocado, diced

Broccoli, steamed and cut

CHOKING HAZARDS Nuts (The American Academy of Pediatrics now says that there is no evidence that delaying the introduction of certain foods prevents allergies. But most nuts are still choking hazards.) Grapes and small tomatoes Anything sticky, such as peanut butter

Fruit is usually a first foods slam-dunk, as most babies love the sweetness.

Hot dogs Popcorn Hard candy Fibrous or hard vegetables (these should be cooked and cut into small pieces)

FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS AND ALLERGIES Honey (can harbor Clostridium botulinum, which causes botulism; babies are too young to fight it off) Egg whites Fish and shellfish Wheat

Try serving veggies first, when your baby is at her hungriest.

HEALTH Fruit juice (most fruit juices have way too much sugar for little tummies and, if consumed at night, can actually cause tooth decay)


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BABY GOURMET On its face, making your own baby food seems very simple: Just cook the ingredients and blend them together, right? The real trick, though, is to make food that your baby will love to eat, and that’s where ingredient ratios come in. Here are some of our favorite fruit, vegetable, and grain combinations:

1 cup cooked oatmeal + ½ cup plain yogurt + ½ cup unsweetened applesauce

1 cup unsweetened applesauce + ½ cup steamed and pureed green beans

½ cup steamed peas + 1 cup unsweetened applesauce

½ cup steamed spinach + ½ cup plain yogurt + ½ cup roasted sweet potato

1 cup roasted sweet potato + ¼ cup steamed spinach + ¼ cup unsweetened applesauce

1 cup canned pumpkin + ¼ cup steamed spinach + ¼ cup mango

1 cup of cooked oatmeal + ½ soft banana

1 cup pureed orange slices + ½ cup canned or cooked chickpeas

½ cup steamed corn + ½ cup roasted squash

1 cup roasted butternut squash + ¼ cup stewed pears

½ cup canned or cooked white beans + ½ cup roasted sweet potato

½ cup steamed baby carrots + ½ cup roasted sweet potato + ¼ tsp cinnamon


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KEEP CALM And find the pacifier.

SLEEPING IN THE FIRST YEAR Did you know that newborn babies can (and should) sleep for up to 16 hours per day? That may seem like a lot, but unfortunately it’s only for one or two hours at a time. The older they get, the longer those stretches will be, and then you may find the need to “train” your baby to sleep through the night. We rounded up some sleep training schools of thought, handy gear (glow in the dark pacifiers!), and everything you should know about safely outfitting a crib. PACIFIER PH OTO G R A PH S CO U R T E S Y M A N U FAC T U R ER S

1

SUPERFAN Start ’em young.

NUK Trendline, toysrus. com

FIRST TIMER You might even get a few of these from the hospital. Philips AVENT Soothie, toysrus.com 15

2

PRO MOVE It snaps shut when dropped. Genius. RAZBABY

3

KEEP-IT-KLEEN, buybuybaby.com

OUT LIKE A LIGHT All pacifiers should glow in the dark. NUK

4

Night Glow, toysrus.com


52 M AT T R E S S PA D Invest in a mattress pad to place under your sheets to contain those inevitable messes.

SHEETS Make sure your sheets are made specifically for cribs and that they fit snugly.

SLEEP ESSENTIALS The most important thing about setting up your newborn’s crib is restraint. Of course, new parents want to give their baby a nice place to sleep. But don’t let unnecessary decorations put your newborn at risk. The safest crib is a “naked” crib with just the essentials: a mattress with a tightly fitted sheet. That’s it. Don’t add pillows, blankets, stuffed animals, or bumper pads, as all of these items carry a serious risk of suffocation for infants. Worried about your baby staying warm? Want to know about how to keep the mattress clean? Check out our illustrated guide to safe sleep.

SLEEP SACK The sleep sack—a blanket that zips or fastens around your baby—is the new gold standard for safe sleep.

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y M U T I/ F O L I O A R T


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!

CRIB BUMPERS

Stay away from these unnecessary hazards until your baby is big enough to avoid being trapped.

PILLOWS

!

You might think babies need pillows, but it’s more important that they don’t become trapped under one.

!

BOTTLE

Don’t put any baby to bed with milk or juice. The sugars can settle in their mouths and cause tooth decay.

!

STUFFED ANIMALS

They’re cute, but they can pose a suffocation risk for very small infants in a crib. Leave them on a shelf.

!

BLANKETS

Babies can become wrapped up or trapped in blankets. Keep her warm in a wearable sleepsack.


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TO SWADDLE OR NOT TO SWADDLE Safety updates on this ancient practice. E O P L E H AV E B E E N S W A D D L I N G T H E I R B A B I E S S I N C E P E O P L E started having babies. In more recent history, hospitals and pediatricians have taught that swaddling promotes safe sleep, since it encourages parents to place babies on their back (which is well documented as the safest position). But the practice—used for centuries by cultures all over the world—is not without risk. If swaddled incorrectly (too loosely or too tightly) a baby can become trapped in blankets and can suffocate or become overheated. A 2002 American Academy of Pediatrics study concluded that swaddled infants do sleep more soundly, but that they may actually be less able to rouse themselves, which can present its own dangers relating to SIDS. In fact, the AAP has such an exacting set of instructions for safe swaddling that many hospitals have stopped recommending it to new parents. The AAP concludes that adjustable sleepsack swaddles that restrain the arms but allow hip and chest movement are safest. And once a baby is able to roll over, parents must stop swaddling altogether.

P

I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y LY D I A N I C H O L S


SLEEP TRAINING SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT

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The Holy Grail of baby sleep is sleeping through the night. But many babies need help with developing a routine, learning how to fall asleep, or going back to sleep on their own if wakened. Once a few months have passed and your baby doesn’t need to eat every two to three hours, you can begin to think about sleep training. Here are some of the prevailing personalities and theories on this divisive topic.

CRY IT OUT/ THE FERBER METHOD THE READING: Solve Your Child’s Sleep Problems, Dr. Richard Ferber THE THEORY: Teaching your baby to self-soothe by allowing her to cry for a determined period of time without parent intervention.

ATTACHMENT PARENTING/NIGHTTIME PARENTING THE READING: The Attachment Parenting Book, Dr. William Sears THE THEORY: Responding to a baby’s need for dependency by practicing co-sleeping, babywearing, and other forms of bonding related to close physical proximity.

NO-CRY/NO-TEARS THE READING: The No-Cry Sleep Solution, Elizabeth Pantly THE THEORY: Rejecting the false dichotomy of choosing “cry it out” vs. “attachment parenting” by offering a third option built around a baby’s natural sleep rhythms.

BABY WISE THE READING: On Becoming Baby Wise: Giving Your Infant the Gift of Nighttime Sleep, Gary Ezzo THE THEORY: Focusing on how daily Eat-Wake-Nap cycles can help a baby develop predictable, successful sleep habits.

THE 5 ‘S’ SYSTEM THE READING: The Happiest Baby on the Block, Dr. Harvey Karp THE THEORY: Understanding a baby’s need for movements and behaviors that mimic the environment of the womb.


ALL GROWN UP ALLGROWN


Photographs by ANNETTE NAVARRO Hair by PHILLIP NATHANIEL SAUNDERS Styling by TAMIA STINSON Models courtesy WINGS MODEL MANAGEMENT

(ON BRANDON) Nordstrom cotton poplin dress shirt, $44.50, Nordstrom. Andy & Evan blue chambray suit, $129, Castle House. Merona fedora, $16.99, Target. Suede moccasins, $34.95, Gap. (ON JESSICA) Andy & Evan khaki cape, $79, Castle House. Embroidered chambray skirt, $19.94, Old Navy. Merona Bow handbag, $26.99; stretch bracelet with acrylic stones, $12.99; Target. Joyfolie Stella rain boots (with umbrella), $78, The Spotted Goose.

THEY WON’T STAY LITTLE FOR LONG, BUT PLAYING DRESS-UP IN MOM’S AND DAD’S ACCESSORIES IS HALF THE FUN OF BEING A KID. THE BABYGUIDE

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MAJOR ATTITUDE (ON JESSICA) Denim vest, $19.94, Old Navy. Convertible jeans, $27.96, Gap. Gold patterned jersey tank, $7, Old Navy. Mixed metal flower necklace, $16.99; beaded necklace, $16.99; Target. (ON BRANDON) Denim jacket, $39.95; Marled sweatshirt top, $24.95; khaki canvas slip-on sneakers, $24.95; Gap. Mayoral striped linen Bermuda shorts, $36, Castle House. (ON KINGSTON) Plaid shirt, $26.95, Gap. Appaman Houston heather sweater, $54, The Spotted Goose. Original Penguin Re-Pete cotton twill shorts, $28.80; Tucker + Tate braided belt, $14; Nordstrom. Suede moccasins, $34.95, Gap.

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COFFEE BREAK (ON SOPHIA) Peek Phoenix hooded knit-sleeve denim jacket, $48; Oh baby! Shot Through the Heart cotton top, $73.75; Nordstrom. Pull-on lined khakis, $26.95, Gap. Model’s own sandals. (ON JESSICA) Tea Collection striped harem pants, $44; Go Gently Baby screen-printed tee, $34; polka dot infinity scarf, $20; The Spotted Goose. Metallic color block sandals, $29.95, Gap. Metal aviator sunglasses, $19.99, Target.

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(ON KINGSTON) Nordstrom cotton poplin dress shirt, $44.50; BOSS Kidswear cotton and linen trousers, $132; Nordstrom. Urban Sunday suspenders, $22, The Spotted Goose. Stylist’s own tie.

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MADE IN THE SHADES (ON SOPHIA) Tucker + Tate sleeveless sweaterdress, $21.60, Nordstrom. Silk Road Bazaar Gator Zooties, $28, The Spotted Goose. Oversized cat-eye sunglasses, $14.99, Target.

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(ON JESSICA) Ruby & Bloom Lace Moto jacket, $58, Nordstrom. Uniform skirt in Rolled Oats, $14.94; lace-overlay high-tops, $22.94; Old Navy. Print-rolled socks in stone, $4, Gap. Surf sunglasses, $12.99, Target. (ON KINGSTON) Linen classic plaid blazer, $46, and shorts, $94, The Spotted Goose. Jersey polo in Pure Blue, $19.95, Gap. Xhilaration baseball cap, $12.99, Target. (ON BRANDON) Railroad Stripe Carpenter jacket, $39.95, Gap. Appaman cotton pants (part of two-piece suit), $155, Nordstrom. Ringer graphic tee, $16.95; Mix-media trainers in Elite Blue, $29.95; Gap. Merona weekender bag, $24.99, Target.

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learning TO G IVE

STARTING AT A YOUNG AGE, YOU CAN ENCOURAGE YOUR CHILDREN TO BUILD A GENEROUS SPIRIT THROUGH COMMUNITY SERVICE. BY SARAH STANKORB ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANKE WECKMANN

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S

O MUCH OF PARENTING REVOLVES AROUND TEACHING OUR CHILDREN RIGHT FROM WRONG: TELL THE TRUTH, APOLOGIZE FOR WRONGDOING, STOP HITTING YOUR SISTER—NOW. THIS CONSTANT MORAL INSTRUCTION IS AIMED AT ALTERING BEHAVIOR TODAY, BUT ALSO FOSTERING YOUNG PEOPLE WHO WILL EVENTUALLY MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICES ON THEIR OWN. WE ALL WANT TO RAISE CHILDREN WITH CHARACTER; HONEST, CARING KIDS. MOST OF US WANT OUR KIDS TO GROW UP TO MAKE THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE. Instilling care for the environment, animals, and people in need could be one of the most natural things a parent teaches a child. That doesn’t mean it won’t require intentional lessons. Beth Nowak is a former kindergarten teacher and the founder of Giving Families, a social enterprise that works to provide parents with fun and simple community service projects to do with young children. During her time as a teacher, Nowak witnessed how her students were “always trying to be helpful. If I said, ‘I need somebody to take this to the office,’ they would literally knock each other over trying to get to me first so they could be the helper.” At that age, “they haven’t learned how to be selfish,” she says. “They’re almost giving and helpful to a fault.” Nowak cites studies, like that of Felix Warneken and Michael Tomasello from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, that demonstrate children as young as 14 and 18 months attempt to help others, notably, without any reward. It’s ear-

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ly altruism—seemingly a built-in state. In a recent TEDx Talk, Nowak noted the ways we squelch that early impulse to help—we give rewards, like the caught-being-kind cards handed out at many schools. These cards, Nowak argues, instill in children a sense of entitlement, that they should be rewarded for helping others, not just do it because it’s the right thing to do. Parents also often “fi x” their children’s efforts. (Ever let a 2-year-old sweep the floor? It is certainly tempting to do it again.) And so, on one hand, we teach our kids that their help isn’t needed and then on the other, train them to expect payback for good deeds. Encouraging your kids to want to help others means not dampening their natural impulses. It also means letting them know (gently) about some of the world’s ills. Angela Laman, whose 12-year-old twins Hannah and Alexander founded Adopt a Book when they were 8, found that her children’s interest in helping others came about organically. She and her husband both have jobs in social ser-


volunteer WHERE CINCINNATI KIDS CAN

FARM WORK AT THE GIVING FIELDS WITH FREESTORE FOODBANK

Community farm that provides fresh produce to Northern Kentucky food pantries and soup kitchens. HOW TO HELP: Assist with planting, harvesting, and various maintenance activities (weekdays, weekends). WHO CAN HELP: Ages 5 and up, with one or more adult

BOOKS FOR CHILDREN WITH ADOPT A BOOK

vice fields, so justice issues were by default part of their discussions at home. The Lamans shared news articles with their kids, including one in 2011 about a local elementary school that was at risk of losing funding for books for students’ personal and school use. Because Hannah and Alexander were such avid readers, the issue spoke to them. It inspired what has become the registered nonprofit, run mostly out of the family’s garage and basement. Com mu n ity ser v ice during childhood may also pattern kids to be civically engaged adults. According to an independent sector “Giving and Volunteering in the United States” biennial survey, two-thirds of adults surveyed began volunteering when they were young. Not only are give-back habits often lasting, they can provide additional benefits. According to the Corporation for National and Community Service, young people who volunteer are more likely to feel connected to their communities and do better in school, and are less likely to adopt risky behaviors.

Collects children’s books and delivers them to kids in need. HOW TO HELP: Donate new or gently used books, or host a book drive within your community. WHO CAN HELP: Ages 5 and up, with one or more adult

GARDENING WITH GRANNY’S GARDEN SCHOOL

Develops programs to enhance classroom study while allowing children to experience nature and the satisfaction of growing their own food. HOW TO HELP: Help maintain flower and vegetable gardens by starting seeds, nurturing plants, and digging around in the soil. WHO CAN HELP: Ages 2 and up, with one or more adult

SNACKS FOR SENIORS WITH WESLEY COMMUNITY SERVICES

The Meals on Wheels department provides seniors with quality meals, as well as snacks they love. HOW TO HELP: Help stuff bakery boxes with seniors’ favorite snacks for a few hours twice a week. WHO CAN HELP: Ages 5 and up, with one or more adult

ENCOURAGEMENT CARDS WITH WESLEY COMMUNITY SERVICES

Provides support and meals to seniors to help them stay in their own homes as long as possible. HOW TO HELP: Help your child draw and/or write cards for seniors receiving delivered meals. WHO CAN HELP: Ages 2 and up, with one or more adult

ITEM SORTING WITH MATTHEW 25: MINISTRIES Provides basic necessities, skill development, and disaster relief across the U.S. and worldwide. HOW TO HELP: Sorting, matching, and evaluating donated products and goods. WHO CAN HELP: Ages 2 and up, with adult supervision

HANDS AGAINST HUNGER WITH A CHILD’S HOPE INTERNATIONAL

Serving orphan and vulnerable children locally and worldwide by preventing and treating malnutrition and dehydration. HOW TO HELP: Volunteers assemble packets of ingredients to feed one starving child for one year. WHO CAN HELP: Ages 5 and up, with one or more adult Visit VolunteerUWGC.org for the complete list and more opportunities, along with links to these organizations.— S . S .

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That said, James Youniss, a developmental psychologist at Catholic University of America who studies the benefits of community service and volunteering, notes that the vast majority of research (if not all) concerning the impact of service on empathy and cognitive change has focused on high school and college-aged young people. Youniss points out there has not yet been research that definitively points to the benefits of service among extremely young children. Yet at least locally, the founders of our biggest philanthropic kid ventures did start young. When they were just 7 years old, Amy and Emma Bushman founded Bake Me Home, which makes and distributes cookie mix and baking supplies to families leaving the shelter system to move into their own homes. Their mother Alison says she had almost selfish reasons for supporting their good work at fi rst—she was focused on the lessons her own daughters would learn: to appreciate what they had and understand more about the world around them. But she explains, “what I realized, and why I think we have been as successful as we have, is that there are so many parents out there who are just hungry for the same thing.” Bake Me Home even had to change its mission statement to note its work promoting volunteerism during its second year of operation because so many families were coming to them looking for ways to serve. At Ronald McDonald House Charities of Greater Cincinnati, children as young as 6 can volunteer with their families. Volunteers keep the House running, says Elise Hyder, director of volunteers. She’s witnessed how much children love to help, to feel like they are making a difference. “I think it really opens the eyes of the healthy children, to see kids with all kinds of challenges are just like them,” Hyder says. Yet for work at Ronald McDonald House Charities, volunteers need a certain level of maturity and independence. “To get the most out of it, they need to be a little bit older,” Hyder says.

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YOU DON’T HAVE TO TEACH THEM LATER [TO GIVE TO OTHERS], WHEN THEY’RE OLDER. YOU JUST HAVE TO WATER SEEDS THAT ARE ALREADY THERE.

—BETH NOWAK, GIVING FAMILIES


local kids • GIVE BIG •

W h e n N o w a k h e rs e l f sought to volunteer with her own young children, she found a few opportunities as far flung as Arizona, a few chances at church (that filled up quickly), and online lists that rattled off “100 things you can do with your kid to give back.” A list of a hundred things she wasn’t doing “only played into my mother’s guilt,” she says, leaving her overwhelmed and frustrated. Today, through Giving Families, she offers monthly subscriptions with simple ideas, mailed to families, to help them do their own service projects, like making valentines to hand out at a local nursing home (with resources for how to find the right nursing home) or ways to participate in park cleanups without doing the larger volunteer events (which might be too labor-intensive and age-inappropriate for little ones). Nowak hopes through Giving Families, children will “really develop what they’re born with,” that tendency toward giving and helping. “You don’t have to teach them later, when they’re older,” Nowak says. “You just have to water seeds that are already there.”

ADOPT A BOOK Twins Hannah and Alexander Laman were 8 years old when they learned that many children regionally do not have books at home. In 2011 they founded Adopt a Book, and since that time they have collected and distributed more than 73,000 books. Hannah and Alexander are now 12 and their organization’s impact keeps growing. Adopt a Book currently has drop-off sites at local Mattress Firm stores and the Duke Energy Children’s Museum.

BAKE ME HOME Amy and Emma Bushman started volunteering, making breakfast with their mom at a homeless shelter, when they were just 4. As the girls grew older, they started making cookie mixes and gathering baking supplies to give to families as they left the shelter. Today, Bake Me Home has its own kitchen and office space in Mt. Washington. With the help of thousands of volunteers, Amy and Emma, now 14, also launched Picture Me Home, which coordinates family portraits for families in shelters, and Bake Me Back Home to deliver homemade cookies to servicemen and women overseas, as well as local veterans.

ELLIETHREADS Twins Ellie and Will Trubisky of Mariemont were born prematurely at Good Samaritan Hospital and spent their first 12 days in the NICU. During that time, their parents received two prayer blankets dropped off by local high school students. Those blankets remain precious mementos. Today, through Elliethreads, Ellie gives that same memento to others. Now 12, she makes, collects, and distributes prayer blankets to nursing homes, Good Samaritan’s NICU, and families she hears about through word of mouth. SHADES BY JESSIE Since February 2015, Jessica Loftus, age 4, has raised $1,700 for The Aubrey Rose Foundation by bedazzling and selling one-of-a-kind sunglasses. Jessica came up with the idea after her mother told her about the foundation and its work to financially support families with kids receiving care at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. It takes Jessica between five and twenty minutes to decorate each pair (her mom, Jennifer, later secures it all with Gorilla Glue). The Loftus family is close with several families who have spent time at the hospital with a sick child, and Jennifer’s sister also spent time hospitalized in her early years. Of course, Jessica is still quite young, but she understands how sad it can feel to have to live (even for a time) at the hospital.“She knows that what she does with the shades helps these families,” Jennifer explains,“and she will tell you that it makes her happy that she can help.” — S . S .

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AND

because he flies around and saves people. because they are awesome and fly around with capes without being tired.

—KRISHNA KANAPURAM, KINDERGARTEN

[Martin Luther King] He was in the Navy.

HE GOT TO SAVE MY COUNTRY. Every time he came over, he gave me a toy. He gave me chocolate too.

because I want to try and stand up for my country.

—KIERSTEN LUCAS, SECOND GRADE

—CHLOE BURDEN, FOURTH GRADE

SH LU E A S AT B T N E D ST— T ST U HE MO U N G ES M IR E T T H E YO D D A E K Y S E WE A HOM TH TA RY W ELEMEN

She plays games with me and reads books and plays Barbies and does crafts.

—NORA PRICE, FIRST GRADE

When I cry, she makes me feel better. We spend a lot of time together on the playset. —GLADYS HILL, SECOND GRADE

I want to play first base when I grow up, and when I watch him he inspires me. Some plays, when he gets the ball, he has to throw it to the pitcher instead of taking it himself and I didn’t know that— he taught me that.

—ANUJ MEHTA, FOURTH GRADE

because he’s always looking out for me. He takes us to fun places like Kings Island.

—CHLOE BEAMER, FIRST GRADE


be ca u

My teacher,

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because she watches out for you when you cry. She always listens to you. She’s really nice to you.

—MAYA NORTHROP, SECOND GRADE

because they are very nice and they bring light to my life. They let me go on trips and buy me cool stuff. They teach me good life lessons.

—ALEXANDER KATZMAN, FOURTH GRADE

R H OW M AT T E O N E S E R O. B E CA U VE A H LD HA U O H S

L IT T L E ,

E V E RYO N

E

Sometimes I think of my favorite superstar.

is my hero because that’s really cool.

—AARALYN SMITH, SECOND GRADE

[Mrs. Wellage], because if I didn’t learn anything I wouldn’t know anything and she gives us recess. Also, she lets us have choice time, so we can write a book, list, poem, or postcard. —BRADY EAGAN, FIRST GRADE

because she does everything for me. She goes to the grocery store, takes care of the dog, and tucks me in at night.

—ALYSSA UHLMAN, FIRST GRADE

They inspire me to make music.

—LAUNA NIENABER, THIRD GRADE


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Rookwood Internal Medicine and Pediatrics 4101 Edwards Rd., Second Floor Cincinnati, OH 45209 Sardinia Family Medicine 7109 Bachman Rd. Sardinia, OH 45171 West Internal Medicine and Pediatrics 3301 Mercy Health Blvd., Suite 445 Cincinnati, OH 45211 White Oak Primary Care 6350 Cheviot Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45247

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THE A TO Z

GUIDE Expert advice about each stage, from pregnancy to preschool, and helpful resources including childcare and medical care.

MEAN GREEN Smoothies are a great way to get kids to eat their veggies. Find two yummy recipes on page 88.

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WHAT IS A HIGHRISK PREGNANCY?

STAGES: PREGNANCY

TO FIND OUT, WE asked Dr. Montiel Rosenthal, director of Maternity Services at the University of Cincinnati Department of Family & Community Medicine.

A pregnancy becomes high-risk when issues are present, either with Mom or baby.

THE NATURAL BIRTH

IN MOM

WANT TO PURSUE A NATURAL CHILDBIRTH? The first

• Needing to take certain medications

More women are exploring less-invasive options. — K I M B E R LY

K E N N E DY

step is finding a healthcare practitioner you trust who supports your decision. Next, research the possibilities. We talked to Pam Bartlett, registered nurse at Family Beginnings Birthing Center at Miami Valley Hospital, about two options you might consider, as well as the importance of education. WHY DO WOMEN SEEK NATURAL BIRTHING METHODS?

“We have definitely seen an increased number of people looking for natural birth options. People want family to be involved and present, and intermittent fetal monitoring to establish that heart rates are in normal range. Women want support in labor, with breathing and relaxation techniques and position changes.” WHAT ARE A COUPLE OPTIONS?

Water birth. “Water is a very relaxing medium. Women want the baby coming out into the water. It’s a smooth transition: mom is very calm and relaxed, with no medication on board. Baby comes out, gets a breath, nurses effectively, and has a good bonding time with mom.” Midwifery care. “A midwife is concerned about nutrition, physical exercise, and the safety and security in the home, as well as progression of the pregnancy. You can seek a provider that has the same values in care that you have. It’s a holistic approach.”

• Diabetes • High blood pressure • Alcohol/drugs • Obesity • A previous problem pregnancy

WITH BABY • Genetic conditions • Inadequate growth

The physician will see Mom more often, keep a close eye on how well baby is growing, and make recommendations. The baby’s delivery may need to be in a facility with a neonatal intensive care unit. Or, “babies with major congenital anomalies, like spina bifida or hypoplastic heart, may be delivered at Cincinnati Children’s, where there is an operative team and neonatologist immediately available,” Rosenthal says. — K . K .

WHAT ELSE SHOULD PARENTS CONSIDER?

“Childbirth education is very important. Families need to be educated in methods of relaxation and coping, and any of the options [Lamaze, Bradley, hypnobirthing, yoga] are effective. It’s about surrending to the birth process.” CHECK IT OUT

Family Beginnings: miamivalleyhospital.org/ familybeginnings Midwives: midwife.org/find-a-midwife Doulas: cincinnatidoulas.org and dona.org

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THE CHRIST HOSPITAL H E A LT H N E T W O R K

THE DOCTORS YOU TRUST FOR THE EXPERIENCE OF YOUR LIFE

The relationship between a woman and her OB/GYN is one based on trust, respect and compassion – this is the person you will rely on most as you welcome your baby into the world.

Mason

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Call to schedule an appointment with one of our providers:

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That’s why The Christ Hospital Health Network provides such a wide range of experienced care providers in many locations throughout the Greater Cincinnati area, so you can find the doctor who will deliver the birthing experience you want with the expert care you deserve.


THE A TO Z GUIDE STAGES: INFANT

MAKING IT WORK

How to achieve harmony when you’re back at the office and breastfeeding. — K I M B E R LY UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT,

Pumping

women have the right to express breastmilk at work. Continuing the breastfeeding relationship will increase your productivity and morale and decrease your absenteeism because baby will be healthier. Best of all, each day when you go home, you get to snuggle up with baby, reestablishing that breastfeeding bond. We worked with lactation consultant Charla Payne of The Christ Hospital and one of her clients, Cindy Wurzelbacher, to develop these great suggestions for working moms.

Have your supplies ready each day. Utilize a let-down trigger, like an article of clothing or a video of baby on a smartphone. Many women appreciate a hands-free bra that holds a double pump in place while they eat lunch or read a book. Use breastmilk storage guidelines at medela.com.

Talk to your employer

Wurzelbacher recommends open communication while pregnant, expressing what breastfeeding means to you. Payne suggests articulating your plan for making it work and the benefits to your employer. Once you return to work, be respectful of your boss’s expectations and your coworkers’ needs, Wurzelbacher says. Scheduling

Flexibility and creativity are key! Most women need to empty their breasts eight times a day to maintain supply. So, you may need to pump once if gone for six hours, twice if eight hours. If supply drops, consider galactagogues, herbs that increase lactation.

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Bottles

Introduce a bottle three to four weeks after delivery and be consistent to facilitate the switch to a caregiver. Use a newborn-flow nipple for the duration of bottle-feeding to replicate milk flow from a breast. Be proactive

Find a way to make it work. Set a six-month goal, and then increase it. Network with other women who have been successful. Some women can’t successfully use a pump. They can continue breastfeeding when they’re at home, however, because it’s still beneficial for the baby. “It’s not all or nothing,” Payne says. “We’re all doing the best we can, and we need to support all women.” “There are challenges,” Wurzelbacher says. “Just be persistent and follow your heart.” I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y N ATA L I E A N D R E W S O N


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THE A TO Z GUIDE STAGES: INFANT

SPOTTING POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION

New risk factors and screening methods make prediction and diagnosis easier.

POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION IS A TREAT-

Screening

able medical condition affecting around 12 percent of women during the year after childbirth. It differs from “baby blues,” where women may feel overwhelmed and weepy for several days after delivery because of sudden hormone fluctuations. Michelle Zamudio, a midwife at The Christ Hospital, gave us the facts about PPD.

A PHQ-9 depression screening may be administered at the first prenatal visit and a month before delivery. An Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale is administered at discharge and all postpartum visits. Ask for these screenings, especially if you have PPD risk factors. The prenatal exam is critical, Zamudio says, as sometimes-undiagnosed risk factors appear, such as thyroid disease. Women with risk factors need help early so treatment can work before delivery. They also need to see their physician one week after delivery instead of the typical six, and phone check-ins may be required.

Symptoms

PPD symptoms are lingering and more intense, beginning a couple of weeks postpartum. They may include: irritability, intense sadness, hopelessness, unexplained crying, change in appetite, difficulty sleeping or concentrating, guilt about not feeling joyful, disconnection from family, no interest in outside activities, difficulty taking care of herself or the baby, inability to bond, or thoughts of harming herself or the baby. Risk Factors

Risk factors for PPD fall into three categories: mental health, notably a history of depression or PPD; medical health issues, such as anemia or thyroid disease; and external factors, including a weak support system, stressful life event, previous difficult pregnancy, being a young mom, unexpected delivery outcome, and even difficult infant temperament (needy or grumpy).

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Treatment

Treatment options include therapy, medication, supplements, and support groups, like the local group A Lighter Shade of Blue (ALighterShadeofBlue.com). “If [a mom] has thoughts of harming herself or her baby, that is a medical emergency, and she needs to call 911 or go to the emergency room,” Zamudio says. If you recognize other symptoms, call the medical provider immediately, as well as the Lighter Shade of Blue 24-hour hotline at (513) 931-9276. “Women don’t ask for help very well,” Zamudio says. “That’s why we get the family in here and say, ‘Don’t wait for her to ask for help!’” — K . K .


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THE A TO Z GUIDE STAGES: TODDLER

CONSCIOUS DISCIPLINE Moving from conflict to cooperation. — K I M B E R LY

READY FOR A PARADIGM SHIFT?

Conscious Discipline is a unique program that challenges what we think we know about parenting—yet it makes more sense. Developed by Dr. Becky Bailey, founder of Loving Guidance, Inc., Conscious Discipline grows out of a solid understanding of psychology and brain research. Originally popularized in the education world and now entering the parenting lexicon, Conscious Discipline should be on your radar. Implementation requires thoughtfulness and practice; it’s a process. Amy Speidel, Loving Guidance Associate and certified parent coach, gives us the details. What does “Conscious Discipline” refer to? It means, how we adults discipline ourselves, the consciousness around our

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emotional state… We model for the child how one works through a conflict toward resolution, instead of teaching, When the world doesn’t go your way, yell at it.

How is it different from other discipline methods? The hallmark of Conscious Discipline is that we discipline ourselves first before having an experience with the child. So, although we all yell at our kids, I’m going to stop, pay attention to where I want to go with this, and then help you get regulated, so you’re more likely to cooperate.

What’s the best way to praise a child? We’ve learned to say, I’m so proud of you, and I like the way you did that. The child interprets that as, You’re proud of me, You like what I did. We flip it: You did it. You stuck with your homework until you were done. That was responsible of you. Now the child believes they are responsible. When they do something that is not responsible, they’ve violated their own value structure instead of disappointing you.

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y N ATA L I E A N D R E W S O N


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THE A TO Z GUIDE Tell us about showing empathy and giving two positive choices.

STAGES: TODDLER

What we want to do is focus on hope. So, whatever it is they want, you put that first. For example, a child asks for a cookie and you say, We will have cookies after dinner. The child says, No, I want a cookie now. You don’t have to say no. Instead, say, You seem disappointed. We will have cookies after dinner. Now you may have an apple or an orange. Which do you choose?

Bailey feels we overuse punishments. Consequences are not the same as punishment. Logical consequences are provided as a way to reflect on the choice a child has made, both positive and negative. The consequence is the outcome of what you’ve chosen—it isn’t just punishment. You always want to state the posi-

2 WAYS TO STAY CALM 1

STAR: Stop, Take a breath, And Relax.

tive choice [and the consequence]: If you put away your toys when you’re done, then you’ll be able to play with them tomorrow. If you choose to leave them out, then I will put them away, and you will not be able to get them out tomorrow.

Bailey says your leverage with your child is in your relationship. It’s about keeping the child in a safe-enough experience to make a connection, so they can pick up the tools they need to self-regulate. When we sustain that connection through upset, children can regulate faster, because we’re the vehicle. When we sever that connection by being angry or by shaming them (What were you thinking, or I told you not to touch that), we break the vehicle that moves them toward choosing a better option.

Drain: Extend arms in front like faucets. Tighten fists and tense muscles. Open fists, relaxing and saying, ssshhh.

2

For books, videos, tips, and seminars, visit the Parents page at consciousdiscipline. com.

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STAY SAFE THIS SUMMER

Secondary drowning is a rare (and sometimes fatal) condition occurring one to 24 hours after a child has taken water into the lungs during water play. The child may appear fine. But even a small amount of water can hamper the lungs’ ability to oxygenate the blood and may later cause symptoms of lethargy, difficulty breathing, coughing, or chest pain. • If you witness any of these symptoms after a

near-drowning incident, head for the emergency room. “Doctors will get a chest x-ray and monitor oxygen levels to provide the best supportive care,” says Thomas Krzmarzick of the Soin Pediatric Trauma and Emergency Center at Dayton Children’s Hospital. He emphasizes: “Always watch your child closely when they are around water…even buckets and toilet bowls…because actual drowning occurs far too often!”

Shopping carts are the source of thousands of serious injuries each year from falls. Never allow a child: • to ride on the outside of the cart • to push a cart carrying another child

• to ride in the cart basket, as they may stand up!

Lawnmowers cause more than 10,000 serious childhood injuries (some fatal) each year. “The damage done in this type of accident can be extensive, requiring multiple surgeries and years of recovery. The potential for infection is also very high,” Krzmarzick says. • Stop mowing if a child enters the area, partly because flying debris is dangerous. • Look before backing up. • Never tow a child or allow a ride, as they may return whenever you mow. “Children want to play with Mommy or Daddy and forget instructions to stay away,” Krzmarzick says. —K.K.

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THE A TO Z GUIDE STAGES: SCHOOL AGE

KEEPING WATCH IN THE DIGITAL AGE The importance of limits on e-media. — K I M B E R LY

K E N N E DY

FOR THOSE WHO HAVEN’T PUT PARENTAL

controls on electronic media yet, can we talk? I’ve heard parents say, I see what they’re doing, or at some point you have to trust them. I’ve also seen nice kids download explicit music and podcasts, under a parent’s nose, with pornographic content so vulgar it would make Grandma’s eyes roll back into her head. I’ve seen families devastated by their good kid accessing pornography. And I’ve heard of teen boys who think it’s funny to tell a young girl to Google “Pornhub.” “With kids who are little, it’s more about choosing when and how much time” is spent on e-media, says David Zucker of Cincinnati Psychological Services. With older kids, the issue becomes “bad screen choices, and what you do when you’re home alone.” As for illicit content, Zucker says that some children will do more and more while others will get bored with it. As kids get older, monitoring multiple accounts and devices can suck your energy away from your family—yet parental controls can automatically report potential problems. WHY ISN’T TRUST ENOUGH?

“Because kids are kids,” Zucker says. “Kids are impulse driven. They don’t choose to make bad decisions; they just do what feels good or is exciting.” That’s what parents are for, he says, to help when they’re making bad choices. Zucker would limit access to violent content, like first-person-shooter games. “The effects we’re worried about are that we’re interacting in a way that devalues people,” he says. Plus,

TIME LIMITS

Time restrictions help children balance e-media with other activities and assure homework doesn’t suffer. As for “educational” apps, Zucker says, “There’s something special about Mom and Dad teaching their kids as opposed to the screen doing it.” He also suggests teaching kids about appropriateness, such as no e-media at mealtime or bedtime. Your goal is to gradually teach your child to self-regulate their usage. Techy kids can easily access your passwords and find workarounds, so use multiple layers of parental controls plus regular monitoring. It’s a matter of safety—not an invasion of privacy. If you see red flags, you’ll have a starting point for conversations that reaffirm your family values.

Search: “10 Best Parental Control Apps” at tomsguide.com.

Funamo and Norton Family Safety: content filter, time and shopping restrictions, message and location monitoring, inappropriate content alerts

Sharing your device: Kids Corner (Windows Phone) and Kids Place (Android) give kids a separate environment with apps you choose.

Open DNS: filter for your household router; blocks categories you choose from all connected devices. Easy setup; doesn’t slow connection. — K . K .

RESOURCES

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“pornography doesn’t offer a realistic view of human sexuality.”

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Ciara Bravo

Big Time Rush, Nickelodeon

Carlon Jeffery

A.N.T. Farm, Disney

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THE A TO Z GUIDE HEALTH & WELLNESS

SO SMOOTH

Get your kids excited about green smoothies. — K I M B E R LY K E N N E D Y

“GOING GREEN” WITH YOUR SMOOTHIES IS A FUN

food adventure, and you get a nutrition boost by adding a handful of greens. Here are a few tips: Spinach can add a bitter note. Plus, some nutrients in raw spinach aren’t well absorbed by the body. So to get the health benefit, you need to add ingredients with vitamin C to absorb iron and fat for vitamin K. Kale is a better choice with its milder flavor and bounty of good stuff, including protein, healthy fats, vitamins K and C, calcium, and lutein. It also has fat- and cancer-fighting elements. To prepare, wash and remove thick veins from leaves; tear into quarter-size pieces for easy measuring. Registered dietitian Whitney Rich, with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, says to choose healthy ingredients; it’s not a milkshake. Plus, watch portion size: snack-size for a snack, larger for a meal. To get your kids excited about tasting, it’s best to get them involved. Don’t sneak the greens in, says Rich. Have your kids taste the kale and tear it up. Try saying, How many green fruits and vegetables can you name? Let’s add a little salad to give our smoothie a fun color. “Taste test the smoothie together and make it fun, maybe a cool cup and a fun straw,” Rich says. No pressure! But if they do try it, say, Great job for trying it!

HAVE A HEALTHY SNACK REGISTERED DIETITIAN Whitney Rich, with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, recommends focusing on fresh and minimally processed foods. Also, “snacks need to be snack-size—not meal-size,” she says. She suggests mixing it up and being creative, like fruit/ veggie kebabs or fun containers, and avoiding fruit snacks and rollups, which have tons of additives and are bad for teeth. “Not everything will

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TRY THESE RECIPES Each makes 2 small servings. ½ cup milk (regular, coconut, or almond) ¼ cup orange juice ¼ cup kale, well packed ¾ cup chopped frozen peaches 1 tsp. honey

½ cup milk ¼ cup plain lowfat yogurt ¼ cup kale ½ cup chopped frozen pineapple 4 in. of frozen banana, sliced

be perfect,” Rich says, “but be aware of what your kids are eating and try to make the best choices as often as possible.”

• snack bars with fiber and eight or fewer grams of sugar • graham-cracker sandwich with cream cheese or nut butter

Fresh ideas • fresh fruit (mandarin oranges, frozen grapes, apple slices with nut butter) • child-sized handfuls of edamame or low-salt nuts (not honey roasted) • vegetables (cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, snap peas, baby colored peppers) • kid-made trail mix with nuts • sandwich half

Dips for veggies or whole-grain crackers • salsa • nonfat yogurt with seasonings and even salsa • hummus • Laughing Cow mini cheese dip After-school treat at home • mini pizza with veggies on whole-grain sandwich round or half English muffin — K . K .

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FAST FOOD LOWERS TEST SCORES

WHAT IS MYOSITIS?

If you need a reason to cut back, here it is. IT’S EASY TO FALL INTO THE FAST FOOD RUT

when we’re shuttling kids from activity to activity. But a December 2014 study lead by Kelly Purtell of Ohio State University suggests less is best. More than 11,500 fifth graders were surveyed about food consumption and tested in reading, math, and science. Students were retested in eighth grade. Children who ate fast food four to six times per week or every day (20 percent) showed significantly lower academic gains than students who ate no fast food (29 percent) the week before the survey. Researchers accounted for socioeconomic factors, amount of exercise, and television viewing. One explanation is that fast food may lack nutrients that facilitate cognitive development; plus, high-fat, highcarb diets decrease cognitive ability. “These results suggest fast food consumption should be limited as much as possible,” Purtell says. — K . K .

LEARN ABOUT A CONDITION THAT SEEMS SCARY, BUT IS FAIRLY COMMON.

WHEN JARROD’S parents awakened him one morning, something seemed terribly wrong: their toddler refused to walk and winced when he was touched. Alarmed, they made an appointment with Dr. Christopher Bolling of Pediatric Associates in Crestview Hills. During the examination, Bolling discovered that Jarrod had suffered a cold the week before. Diagnosis? Myositis, or temporary inflammation of muscle tissue—caused by the virus. Pediatricians see this quite often, says Bolling, though more severe symptoms, like inability to walk, are less common. Although medications and serious inflammatory conditions can cause myositis, viral and bacterial infections (like strep) are most common, with symptoms occurring either during or several weeks after the illness. Fortunately, treatment is simple: allow the virus to run its course, or treat bacteria with antibiotics. Bolling ordered x-rays and blood work to rule out more serious illness. Jarrod was up and walking within the week—and his parents were relieved! — K . K .

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WHAT IS PROJECTBASED LEARNING?

CHILDCARE & EDUCATION

HIT A HIGH NOTE

Music can boost a child’s intelligence. Here’s how. — K I M B E R LY

K E N N E DY

RESEARCH SHOWS MUSIC DOES BOOST BRAIN POWER

in a way that can increase academic success. But does it boost IQ? Some say yes, some no. Here’s what we feel confident saying: LISTENING TO MUSIC

It can improve a child’s concentration and ability to learn. As a bonus, music is said to increase creativity and productivity while decreasing anxiety and depression; this could result from the positive effects it has on mood. PERFORMING MUSIC

Performing develops and enhances logic, math, and language skills. And there’s a positive correlation between learning to play an instrument and improved literacy and math skills. Educational songs help children remember random data. Music education also increases spatial reasoning, the ability to interpret drawings, plans, and models—a skill applicable in science, technology, and design fields. How does it do all of that? Well, learning to perform music is abstract thinking: You must decode visual symbols, apply knowledge of fractions, translate this info into precise motor operations, and recognize sound patterns, among other things. So, enhancement of any of these component skills will undoubtedly lead to greater academic success. But a brain boost is not the reason we play music. It allows for creative expression, taking us to another realm, reducing stress; it enriches our lives, giving us joy and a sense of self-worth. It’s fun—and that’s reason enough for most kids!

WITH PROJECTbased learning, students investigate topics of interest to them— which makes them highly motivated to learn. Teachers choose topics based on observations of student interests during discussions, intertwining multiple subjects, including the arts, into each project. During investigation periods, students often work in groups and can spend as much time as they want on an aspect of interest. “We don’t stop the learning or that excitement,” says Laura Carr, executive director of The Compass School. They may visit an expert in the field, taking a list of questions and sketching what they observe. Carr’s preschoolers visited a pilot, who showed them the cockpit and engine of a plane and how the propellers move. Students report their findings to each other, while teachers ask open-ended questions instead of lecturing. Creative and hands-on experiences help them understand abstract concepts, which aids in knowledge retention. With real-world materials and applications, “project-based provides meaning to learning,” Carr adds. — K . K .

Visit activitytree.com to find classes. Select “music” for the activity and enter zip code.

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Rigorous PREPARATION. JOYFUL environment. Students who find SUCCESS in any world.

THIS IS MY DAY

GREETED

12 FAMILIES

RECEIVED

5

TOOK NATURE

WALK

FOUND BIRD’S

NEST LEARNED NEW

SONG ABOUT

COLORS COMPLETED BUBBLE WRAP

HUGS

ART PROJECT Michelle, EC teacher Max ‘29

Early Childhood (18 months) l Pre-Kindergarten l Montessori Kindergarten l Grades 1 - 12 l Before and After School Care Enrichment Clubs l Youth Sports l Summer Programs New Early Childhood Center Opening Fall 2016 (513) 979-0220

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5/11/2015 10:47:15 AM


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the

LIST

From preschool to party places, we provide resources for Cincinnati parents.

CHILDCARE & EDUCATION When you need childcare or early education, the Cincinnati region offers many top-notch facilities. Our list is just a sampling. Some of these schools provide additional programs, however, our list is tailored to include information up to preschool age.

DOWNTOWN

CINCINNATI HILLS CHRISTIAN ACADEMY (CHCA) OTTO ARMLEDER CAMPUS 140 W. Ninth St., downtown, (513) 721-2422, chca-oh.org CHCA is a vibrant, caring, and informed learning community, dedicated to each child’s academic and spiritual growth. CHCA carefully tends to students’ academic, social, emotional, physical, and spiritual development, building an unshakable foundation for lifelong learning and faith. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 26, waiting list Hours: 8 am–2:45 pm Extended care: 3:10–5:30 pm Style of teaching: Christian; Thematic Units with Responsive Classroom Approach, guided by NAEYC and OELCS Meals: Breakfast, morning/ afternoon/after-school snacks, hot or boxed lunches available Child/ teacher ratio: 6:1 ages 3–4, 7:1 ages 4–5 Awards or designations: ISACS accredited Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $9,545; call for endowment information (See also CHCA North Campus)

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GO CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER 400 New St., downtown, (513) 381-3111, brighthorizons.com/pg cincinnati Open to all current Procter & Gamble employees, this Bright Horizons childcare facility has developmentally appropriate educational environments to empower children to become lifelong learners. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 196, spots available Hours: Mon–Fri, 7 am–6:30 pm, 2 to 5 days a week Style of teaching: Developmentally appropriate practices Meals: Full-time cook provides breakfast, lunch, and snacks Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 5:1 toddlers, 10:1 preschool and pre-K Awards or designations: Please call Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: Call for information

VISIONS EARLY LEARNING CENTER/CHILDREN, INC. 425 Ezzard Charles Dr., downtown/ West End, (513) 651-2229, children inc.org Serving young families and children from economically disadvantaged neighborhoods, VISIONS/

Children, Inc. is dedicated to helping children achieve success through innovative educational excellence, compassionate family support, and collective community leadership. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 125, waiting list Hours: 7 am–5:15 pm Meals: Breakfast, lunch, and snacks Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 7:1 toddlers, 10:1 preschool Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited; 4 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $185–$240/week, United Way and state funding available

PEASLEE EARLY LEARNING CENTER/CHILDREN, INC. 215 E. 14th St., Over-the-Rhine, (513) 381-2378, childreninc.org Serving young families and children in Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine and surrounding areas, Peaslee Early Learning Center/Children, Inc. is dedicated to helping families who work or attend school achieve success through innovative educational excellence as their children move toward kindergarten readiness. Various


enrichment activities are available to the children and their families through partnership with the Peaslee Neighborhood Center. Peaslee offers compassionate family support and utilizes collective community leadership to bring cutting-edge best practices to the community. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 40, spots available Hours: Mon–Fri, 7 am–5 pm Style of teaching: Constructivist, Creative Curriculum, Alignment with Ohio Early Learning and Development Standards Meals: USDA-approved, nutritionally balanced breakfast, lunch, and snack Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 6:1 toddlers, 10:1 preschool Awards or designations: 3 stars, Ohio’s Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: Contract with Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services for subsidized child care and parents pay assigned co-pay; $250/week for infants, $210/week for toddlers; $175/week without tuition assistance UPTOWN/CENTRAL

ARLITT CHILD AND FAMILY RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER 47 Corry Blvd., Clifton, (513) 5563802, cech.uc.edu/centers/arlitt/ preschool-information In thoughtfully designed classrooms with various learning centers, Arlitt offers several opportunities for children to explore materials to construct and extend their knowledge. Arlitt is one of the most culturally diverse and inclusive preschools in the country, and is one of two preschools in the area with a nature playscape. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 119, waiting list Hours: Mon–Thurs, 8:15–11:45 am or 12:45–4:15 pm; or full day Mon–Fri, 7:45 am–5:15 pm Style of teaching: Constructivist Meals: Nutritionally balanced snacks and lunch, breakfast available with full-day enrollment Child/teacher ratio: 10:1 Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited; 4 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $2,400/year or $226/week for full-day care; serves children through Head Start

ABBREVIATIONS/ ACRONYMS

ACSI Association of Christian Schools International AMS American Montessori Society AWSNA Association of Waldorf Schools of North America CMS Cincinnati Montessori Society

THE CHILDREN’S HOME OF CINCINNATI PRESCHOOL PROGRAM 5014 Madison Rd., Madisonville, (513) 272-2800, thechildrenshome cinti.org/preschool With a 40-acre campus featuring walking trails and a water play area, The Children’s Home maintains family-oriented spaces to provide a nurturing environment, ensuring comfort and a foundation for success. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 20, spots available Hours: 7 am–5:30 pm Meals: Breakfast, lunch, and afternoon snack provided Child/teacher ratio: 10:1 Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited; 5 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality; aligned with OELCS Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: Accepts child care vouchers through Ohio Dept. of Job and Family Services

CINCINNATI EARLY LEARNING CENTER (CELC): EAST WALNUT HILLS 1301 E. McMillan, East Walnut Hills, (513) 961-2690, celcinc.org/eastwalnut-hills.aspx CELC is a nonprofit, nationally accredited United Way agency managing six childcare centers in the Greater Cincinnati region. By partnering with the family and providing low child-to-staff ratios, CELC offers a high-quality early learning experience. Ages: 12 weeks–5 years Capacity: 115, waiting list Hours: Mon–Fri, 7 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Developmental and constructivist approach Meals: Breakfast, lunch, snacks Child/ teacher ratio: 3:1 infants, 6:1 toddlers, 10:1 preschool Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited; 5 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $190–$275/week

CINCINNATI EARLY LEARNING CENTER (CELC): FUTURE ENVIRONMENTS CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER/EPA 123 W. Nixon St., Clifton, (513) 4872730, celcinc.org/future.aspx CELC is a nonprofit, nationally accredited United Way agency managing six childcare centers in the Greater Cincinnati region. By partnering with the

CPS Cincinnati Public Schools ISACS Independent Schools Association of the Central States NAC National Accreditation Commission NAEYC National Association for the Education of Young Children

family and providing low child-to-staff ratios, CELC offers a high-quality early learning experience. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 53; waiting list for infants is 3–6 months, toddler and preschool classes 0–2 months Hours: 6:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Developmental and constructivist approach Meals: Breakfast, lunch, snacks Child/teacher ratio: 3:1 infants, 6:1 toddlers, 10:1 preschool Awards or designations: 4 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $181–$271/week

COUNTRY HILLS MONTESSORI 4900 Babson Place, Oakley, (513) 271-2808, chmschools.com/oakley Country Hills Montessori has seven locations in the Greater Cincinnati area, each within healthcare centers to facilitate intergenerational learning, promoting inclusiveness and collaboration across generations. Other locations: West Chester, Eastgate, Montgomery, Harrison, Springboro, and Ft. Thomas. Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 20, spots available Hours: Half-day, full-day, and extended-day options available Extended care: No Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Snacks provided, parents pack lunch for extended program Child/teacher ratio: 7:1 or lower Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $3,000–$5,800

HYDE PARK PLAY SCHOOL 3846 Drake Ave., Hyde Park, (513) 631-2095, thehydeparkplayschool. com Degreed staff in a secure residential area foster creative and educational experiences, including introductions to Spanish, signing, yoga, computers, and on-site field trips. Ages: Infant, toddler, preschool Capacity: 132; waiting list, 2–3 months for toddlers, 1 year for infants Hours: Mon–Fri 6:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Traditional Meals: Morning and afternoon snacks, hot lunch Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 5:1 toddlers, 10:1 preschool Awards or designations: Members of NAEYC and CAEYC Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $245–$289/week

NAIS National Association of Independent Schools

ODE Ohio Department of Education

NCA CASI North Central Association Commission on Accreditation and School Improvement

OELCS/OELDS Ohio Early Learning Content/ Development Standards

NECPA The National PEJE Partnership Early Childhood for Excellence in Program Accreditation Jewish Education OAIS Ohio Association of Independent Schools

RAVSAK Jewish Community Day School Network

SACS CASI Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (NCA CASI and SACS CASI are the accrediting bodies of AdvancED) WECAN Waldorf Early Childhood Association of North America

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dents with disabilities: No Cost: $4,750–$11,950

PLEASANT RIDGE PRESBYTERIAN PRESCHOOL

KENNEDY HEIGHTS MONTESSORI CENTER (KHMC)

6120 Ridge Ave., Pleasant Ridge, (513) 631-8135, kennedyheights montessori.org KHMC is a not-forprofit parent cooperative school teaching respect, peace, relationships, honesty, and compassion to an economically and racially diverse student body. Ages: 3–6, expanding to include 2-year-olds in the 2015–’16 school year Capacity: 72, spots available Hours: Morning and afternoon classes Mon–Fri, 2½ hours Extended care: 7 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Morning and afternoon snacks, hot lunch Child/ teacher ratio: 9:1 Awards or designations: 3 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality; United Way agency partner Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: Tiered income scale, half-day program $375–$439/ month; accepts daycare vouchers and United Way scholarships

MERCY MONTESSORI

2335 Grandview Ave., East Walnut Hills, (513) 475-6700, mercy montessori.org Mercy Montessori is a private, independent, Catholic Montessori school that builds on a child’s innate instinct to learn through one’s senses, to help each child fall in love with learning at the child’s own pace. Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 96, spots available Hours: Mon–Fri 8:45–11:45 am Extended care: 11:45 am–5:30 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Morning and afternoon snacks, hot lunch available or brown bag for extended care Child/teacher ratio: 10:1 Awards or designations: Accredited by OCSAA, ODE, and AMA Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: Sliding scale, $2,864–$9,488

THE NEW SCHOOL MONTESSORI

3 Burton Woods Lane, North Avondale, (513) 281-7999, newschool montessori.com Centrally located, the historic Mitchell Mansion provides the backdrop for a holistic education. Surrounded by wooded play yards and gardens, students benefit from a nurturing environment where Montessori-credentialed staff members support high academic and personal achievement. Ages: 3–4 Capacity: 48, spots available Hours: Parttime, 7:30 am–1 pm; full-time, 7:30 am–3 pm Extended care: Until 6 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Healthy chef-prepared lunch with vegetarian options, extended-day snack Child/teacher ratio: 8:1 Awards or designations: The only Montessori school in Cincinnati accredited by the American Montessori Society; additional ISACS accreditation as well Enrolls stu-

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5950 Montgomery Rd., Pleasant Ridge, (513) 631-0170, prpc.org/ nurseryschool.php PRPPS is an early childhood education program designed to enhance each child’s growth in developmentally appropriate ways. Teachers respect each child’s different gifts and learning styles and emphasize active learning experiences. Ages: 2½–5 Capacity: 75, waiting list Hours: Preschool classes 2, 3, or 4 days a week, 9:15–11:45 am or 12:20–2:50 pm (Fridays: 9:15–11:45 am) Extended care: Early drop-off 8:30 am, no afternoon extended care Style of teaching: Constructivist Meals: Snack Child/teacher ratio: 12:3 toddlers, 18:3 preschool, 20:3 pre-K Awards or designations: 4 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $1,250–$5,390 with scholarship opportunities

THE SEVEN HILLS SCHOOL

Hillsdale Campus: 5400 Red Bank Rd., Madisonville; Doherty Campus: 2726 Johnstone Place, East Walnut Hills, (513) 728-2400, 7hills. org Through a combination of research-based planning, close observation of each child’s needs, and years of experience at the Early Childhood level, Seven Hills’ expert teachers have established an early learning program that guides curious children through new experiences—forming foundations for lifelong learning. In addition to this child-centered orientation to teaching, Seven Hills Early Childhood students take regular classes in Spanish, drama, library, physical education, and music. Ages: 2–6 Capacity: 132 (both campuses) Hours: Half-day and full-day options, 3-day and 5-day options; contact the Admission Office for details Extended care: 7:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Experiential, child-centered Meals: Lunch and snack includes healthy options such as whole grains, organic milk, fresh whole fruits Child/teacher ratio: 5:1 2-year-olds, 10:1 pre-K and kindergarten Awards or designations: NAIS, ISACS, OAIS, State of Ohio Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $6,328–$18,133

THE SUMMIT COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL

2161 Grandin Rd., Hyde Park, (513) 871-4700, summitcds.org A private, Catholic, and independent school, The Summit’s Montessori program fosters a child’s independence, understanding, and academic achievement through observation, preparation, and support of individual liberty. Ages: 2–6 Capacity: More than 200 children in Montessori program, including kindergartners; rolling admission based on availability Hours: Multiple program options; 2,

3, or 5 half-day programs, 8:15–11:15 am or 12:15–3:15 pm; or full day, 8:15 am–3:15 pm Extended care: 7 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Lunch provided for all-day Montessori Child/teacher ratio: 12:1 ages 3–6 Awards or designations: More than 50 years of Montessori education, AMS-certified teachers, Montessori toddler program includes Spanish and Orff Music Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $4,150–$16,820 depending on program

UC EARLY LEARNING CENTER (ELC)

3310 Ruther Ave., Clifton, (513) 9612825, uc.edu/elc Serving UC and the community, ELC focuses on the physical and cognitive development of children through self-directed play. Planned environments expose children to math, literacy, art, music, and science. Ages: 3 months–age 5 during school year (and ages 5–8 summertime) Capacity: 149; waiting list, typically 6–12 months for children under 3 Hours: Mon–Fri 7 am–6 pm Extended care: Yes Style of teaching: Constructivist Meals: Catered lunch with full menu that varies quarterly, including fruits and vegetables; also offers breakfast and snacks Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 5:1 toddlers, 10:1 preschool, 15:1 school-aged children Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited since 1993; 4 stars, Ohio Step up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $188 (preschooler)–$264 (infant)/week; discounted rates for UC students and employees

THE WILLOW TREE HOUSE DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL

2651 Highland Ave., Corryville, (513) 281-8733, thewillowtreehouse.com An independently-owned-and-operated daycare and preschool, Willow Tree House offers an academic all-day preschool setting with play-based curriculum and low child/teacher ratios. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 68, spots available Hours: 6:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Play-based curriculum Meals: Breakfast, lunch, and snacks provided Child/teacher ratio: 12:1 older children, 4:1 infants Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $157–$220/week

XAVIER UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI LAB SCHOOL

3800 Victory Pkwy., Evanston, (513) 745-3424, xavier.edu/montessori Established in 1966, the Lab School educates children from many cultures and diverse communities, using a rich curriculum based on methods and philosophy of the Montessori Teacher Education Program. Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 48, waiting list Hours: Mon–Fri 9 am–12 pm, multiage groupings; all-day kindergarten 9 am–3 pm except Friday afternoons Extended care: 12–5:30 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Both school and


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Moving lip and tongue muscles helps babies master pre-speech vocalizations.

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Each Primrose School is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools and The Leader in Educational Child Care are trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. ©2015 Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved. See primroseschools.com for ‘fact’ source and curriculum detail.


THE A TO Z GUIDE

parents provide healthy, nutritious snacks; nut-free environment Child/ teacher ratio: 8:1 Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited, AMS elementary certification, fully affiliated member of AMS since 1968, early childhood classrooms led by two certified Montessori teachers with master’s degrees Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $4,575–$5,340 NORTH

BLUE ASH EDUCATIONAL BUILDING 10149 Kenwood Rd., Blue Ash, (513) 891-1723, blueashchildcare.com Children of all ages enjoy 11,000 square feet of indoor space and seven acres of outdoor play areas, including a Discovery Forest and Children’s Garden. Staff has combined 346 years of experience at this location. Ages: 6 weeks–K, up to age 10 for beforeand after-school care Capacity: 334; waiting list for 6 months–2 years, spots available for others Hours: 6 am–6:45 pm Extended care: Beforeand after-school care available for school-aged kids Style of teaching: NAEYC-aligned, follows Erik Erikson’s theories of psychosocial development Meals: Breakfast, lunch, and snacks include fresh fruit and vegetables, whole-wheat or whole-grain pastas and breads Child/teacher ratio: Follows state ratios Awards or designations: Hamilton County Public Health Department Clean Kitchen Award since 2011, fully compliant with ODE, advanced level in Ohio’s Drug Free Safety Program Enrolls students with disabilities: No Cost: $165–$254/week

THE CAMPUS AT KIDS FIRST 7900 E. Kemper Rd., Blue Ash, (513)

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629-5437, thecampuskf.com Along with indoor and outdoor discovery and fun, children of all ages participate in physical education classes every day to help instill a healthy fitness habit and mind-body connections. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 96, limited spots available Hours: 6:30 am–6:30 pm Style of teaching: Emergent curriculum with themed study units Meals: Lunches catered by The Veg Head with natural, organic, and gluten-free options; breakfast and snacks provided Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 7:1 toddlers, 9:1 preschool and pre-K, 12:1 kindergarten Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $112–$308/week

es that encourage inquisitiveness and self-expression so children can feel comfortable exploring and learning. Ages: 6 weeks–6 years Capacity: 47; waiting list for infants, spots available for other ages Hours: 9 am–12 pm, 12:30–3:30 pm Extended care: 7:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Snacks including fresh fruit provided, parents provide packed lunch Child/teacher ratio: 3:1 infants, 7:1 toddlers and preschool Awards or designations: Member of IMC, JEAMS Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $4,160–$8,860

CENTRAL MONTESSORI ACADEMY

7350 Dixie Hwy., Fairfield, (513) 874-8500, cincinnatichristian.org CCS is a nondenominational, independent Christian school with flexible class options. Teachers follow a Houghton-Mifflin curriculum with thematic units, plus include weekly Bible lessons. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 20 preschool, 24 Transitional Kindergarten; spots available Hours: Preschool Tues and Thurs, 8:15–11:45 am; Transitional Kindergarten Mon, Wed, and Fri or Mon–Fri, 8:15–11:45 am or 11:45 am–3:15 pm Extended care: 7:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Christian-based with traditional approach utilizing some Montessori elements Meals: Hot lunch available for full-day preschool, nutritious snacks each session Child/teacher ratio: 10:1 preschool, 12:1 Transitional Kindergarten Awards or designations: AdvancED accredited, ACSI, licensed by ODE Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $2,496–$7,416

1904 Springdale Rd., Springfield Twp., (513) 742-5800, central montessoriacademy.com CMA offers an integrated curriculum plus an education of the heart, nurturing each child’s self-confidence, creativity, and entrepreneurial spirit. This authentic Montessori experience includes self-correcting materials and a natural playground. Ages: 2½–6 Capacity: 100, spots available Hours: Mixed-age classes 3, 4, or 5 days a week; half-day mornings 8:30 am–12 pm, full day 8:30 am–4 pm Extended care: 7 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Nutritious snacks, parents provide lunch Child/teacher ratio: 12:1 Awards or designations: Affiliated with AMS, member of OAIS, AMS, and CMS Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $4,705–$9,320

CHAI TOTS EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER

7587 Central Parke Blvd., Mason, (513) 234-0777, chaitots.com The only Jewish Montessori in Ohio, Chai Tots provides small, family-like class-

CINCINNATI CHRISTIAN COUGAR CUBS PRESCHOOL

CINCINNATI EARLY LEARNING CENTER (CELC), HARRISON

498 S. State St., Harrison, (513) 367-


2129, celcinc.org/harrison.aspx CELC is a nonprofit, nationally accredited United Way agency managing six childcare centers in the Greater Cincinnati region. By partnering with the family and providing low child-to-staff ratios, CELC offers a high-quality early learning experience. Ages: 18 months–12 years Capacity: 52, spots available Hours: Mon–Fri 6 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Developmental and constructivist approach Meals: Breakfast, lunch, snacks Child/ teacher ratio: 6:1 infants/toddlers, 10:1 preschool Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited; 4 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $170–$195/week

CINCINNATI HILLS CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

CHCA North Campus: 11312 Snider Rd., Symmes Twp., (513) 247-0900, chca-oh.org CHCA is a vibrant, caring, and informed learning community dedicated to each child’s academic and spiritual growth. CHCA carefully tends to students’ academic, social, emotional, physical, and spiritual development, building an unshakable foundation for lifelong learning and faith. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 48, limited spots available Hours: Mon–Fri, 8:30–11:30 am or 12–3 pm Extended care: 7:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Christian; Thematic Units with Responsive Classroom Approach, guided by NAEYC and OELCS Meals: Breakfast, snacks, hot or boxed lunches available Child/teacher ratio: 8:1 Awards or designations: ISACS accredited Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $6,875–$12,995 (See also CHCA Otto Armleder Campus, downtown)

THE COMPASS SCHOOL

9370 Waterstone Blvd., Montgomery, (513) 683-8833, thecompassschool. com As partners in learning, teachers follow an emergent curriculum based on the children’s interests, allowing them to experience a particular interest in great detail and thus build an enthusiasm for knowledge. Ages: Infant–6 years Capacity: 156; spots available for all ages Hours: 2-, 3-, or 5-day programs, full or half days, infants full-day only Extended care: Up to age 12, 6:30 am–6:30 pm Style of teaching: Reggio Emilia–inspired, project-based approach Meals: Morning and afternoon snacks, catered lunches Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 7:1 toddlers, 10:1 preschool Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $350– $1,300/month

CORNERSTONE CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL

7600 Princeton Glendale Rd., Liberty Twp., (513) 874-7870, cornerstone church.org/preschool CCP’s committed and long-term staff provide enrichment opportunities for chil-

dren through a developmentally appropriate curriculum, along with an involved parent auxiliary. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 224, spots available Hours: 2-day, 3-day, or 4-day classes, 9:30 am–12 pm or 12:45–3:15 pm Extended care: No Style of teaching: Child and teacher-directed Meals: Snacks, peanut-free school Child/ teacher ratio: 12:2 3-year-olds, 14:2 4-year-olds, 15:2 5-year-olds Awards or designations: 3 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $1,080–$1,665

CREATIVE TOTS

6408 Thornberry Court, Mason, (513) 770-6776, creativetotsmason. com; 7803 Laurel Ave., Madeira, (513) 272-2223, creativetots.com Balancing the traditional and innovative, Creative Tots is a private, ninemonth preschool program embracing the fine arts, following a child’s natural interests to inspire success and increased self-confidence. Ages: 18 months–5 years Capacity: 66–120; in Mason, spots available in toddler, early 3s, and pre-K programs, waiting list for K-Prep; in Madeira, spots available in toddler morning classes and pre-K afternoon classes, waiting list for all other programs Hours: Madeira: toddler and pre-K classes Mon–Fri 9–11:30 am, pre-K Mon–Fri 12–2:30 pm; Mason: varies by age group Extended care: Yes, enrichment programs including music, art, soccer, Spanish, dance, and yoga until 1 pm Style of teaching: Constructivist approach with Montessori activities, aligned with Howard Gardner’s approach to multiple intelligences Meals: Parents provide lunch and snacks; Mason location is an allergy-safe facility Child/teacher ratio: Madeira: 6:1 toddlers, 7:1 early 3s, 8:1 preschool and pre-K; Mason: 6:1 toddler, 8:1 preschool, 10:1 pre-K and K-Prep Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: Madeira: $2,100–$11,000; Mason: $2,160–$11,000

CRÈME DE LA CRÈME PRESCHOOL

5324 Natorp Blvd., Mason, (513) 4594300, cremedelacreme.com With 24 centers throughout the nation, Crème offers a spacious learning center with separate novel enrichment rooms featuring unique programs such as music, theater, library, TV studio, and gym. Your child rotates activities throughout the day, balancing learning with movement. Ages: 6 weeks–6 years, up to 12 for after-care Capacity: 300, spots available in some classes Hours: Half-day program 8:30 am– 12:30 pm or full day Extended care: 6:30 am–6:30 pm Style of teaching: Team teaching, primary and enrichment teachers Meals: Well-balanced meals prepared fresh daily; snacks offered throughout the day, including a Travel Treat for the road Child/ teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, up to 10:1

kindergarten, always exceeds state guidelines Awards or designations: AdvancED accredited, NAEYC affiliated Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $470–$1,494/month

THE GARDNER SCHOOL OF BLUE ASH

9920 Carver Rd., Blue Ash, (513) 985-9444, thegardnerschool.com This private franchise school offers a safe academic preschool experience where students focus, develop, practice, and reflect on developmentally appropriate activities, including infant sign language and computers for ages 3 and older. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 210, spots available for some classes Hours: 7 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Traditional and Montessori blend Meals: Well-balanced lunch and two nutritious snacks daily Child/teacher ratio: 5:1 infants, 6:1 toddlers, 7:1 2-yearolds, 12:1 3-year-olds, 14:1 4 and up Awards or designations: Cincinnati Family Best of Parenting 2010–2011 Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $243–$315/week

GINGERBREAD ACADEMY

4215 Malsbary Rd., Blue Ash, (513) 793-4122, gingerbreadacademy.net Through hands-on learning experiences in a nurturing and enriching environment, children’s growth is fostered with benefiting the whole child in mind, especially promoting a positive self-concept. Ages: 6 weeks–K Capacity: 180; waiting list of 10–12 weeks depending on age group Hours: Mon–Fri 6:30 am–6 pm with open door policy for drop off and pick up Style of teaching: Constructivist curriculum, aligned with OELC standards Meals: Tuition includes hot lunch plus morning and afternoon snacks Child/teacher ratio: Follows state standards for child/teacher ratios; additional staff includes full-time floaters to classrooms; 4:1 infants Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: Available upon request

GOOD SHEPHERD NURSERY SCHOOL

7701 Kenwood Rd., Kenwood, (513) 891-1733, gsns.info Acting as a bridge between home and school, GSNS offers concerned and experienced teachers who help encourage your child’s strengths and guide their overall development. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 150, contact for availability Hours: 2-day, 3-day, or 4-day classes, 9–11:30 am or 12:30–3 pm Extended care: No Meals: Nutritious snack served daily Child/teacher ratio: 7:1–9:1 Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $125–$190/month

KIDDIE ACADEMY OF MASON

6202 Snider Rd., Mason, (513) 2390699, kiddieacademy10.reachlocal. net/academies/mason A national franchise, Kiddie Academy com-

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99


THE A TO Z GUIDE bines character education and standards-based learning curriculum, enabling children the opportunity to make decisions and explore at their own pace, empowering them to learn and grow. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years (up to age 12 during summer) Capacity: 186, spots available Hours: 6:30 am–6:30 pm Extended care: Yes Style of teaching: Trademark Life Essentials program Meals: Family-style dining; food made on location Child/teacher ratio: 5:1 infants, 7:1 toddlers, 12:1 preschool, 18:1 schoolage Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $240– $286/week

KINDER GARDEN SCHOOL 10969 Reed Hartman Hwy., Blue Ash, (513) 791-4300; 5900 West Chester Rd., West Chester, (513) 874-3100; kindergardenschool.com With a focus on holistic education involving the child, staff, and family, local and family-owned Kinder Garden Schools offer a fully supportive, fertile, and fun setting to cultivate curiosity and grow the complete child. Ages: 6

weeks–school age (including private grades 1, 2, and 3 at West Chester location) Capacity: 156 Blue Ash, 155 West Chester, spots available Hours: 7 am–6 pm Extended care: Yes Style of teaching: Montessori and traditional Meals: Morning and afternoon snacks provided; parents provide lunch, option for catered lunch at West Chester Child/teacher ratio: 15:2 Awards or designations: Best of Parenting Preschool (2012 and 2013); 1 star, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $190–$280/week

KING OF KINGS PRESCHOOL AND KINDERGARTEN 3621 Socialville-Foster Rd., Mason, (513) 398-6089, koklcms.org/ecem. php This Christian preschool program is designed to provide a secure environment fostering responsible, caring, creative, spontaneous, happy, and independent children in a developmentally appropriate way. Ages: 2–5 Capacity: 86, spots available Hours: Morning, afternoon, or fullday options, 1 to 5 days per week Extended care: No Style of teaching: Christian-based traditional school Meals: Snacks provided, parents provide balanced lunch Child/teacher ratio: 5:1 2-year-olds, 6:1 3-yearolds, 7:1 4-year-olds, 8:1 5-year-olds Awards or designations: NLSA En-

rolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $875–$3,770

LADS AND LASSIES COMMUNITY PRESCHOOL 225 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming, (513) 761-5211, ladsandlassiespreschool. org The project-based curriculum at Lads and Lassies creates authentic learning through student-led, indepth investigations incorporating life skills, combined with daily writer’s and reader’s workshop and art studio time. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 72, waiting list Hours: Classes 9–11:30 am or 12:30–3 pm, 3 or 4 days/week Extended care: No Style of teaching: Project approach and Reggio Emilia Meals: Pre-K children pack lunch once a week, children bring snacks Child/teacher ratio: 10:1 Awards or designations: 4 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $1,512–$2,160

LIBERTY BIBLE ACADEMY PRESCHOOL 4900 Old Irwin Simpson Rd., Mason, (513) 754-1234, libertybibleacademy. org LBAP provides a Christ-centered environment which is socially and emotionally nurturing and intellectually engaging, giving children the opportunity to love God, love others, and love learning. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 54, spots available, open enroll-

Where Your Heart & Art Meet! • Birthday Parties • Holiday Fun • Ladies Night Out • Handprint Keepsakes • $12-18 Party Packages • Summer Art Camps

MADEIRA • 7754 Camargo Road (Minutes from Kenwood Towne Centre) 513.561.1888 • MadPotterCincinnati.com 100

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ment Hours: 2-day, 3-day, or 5-day classes, 8:30–11:30 am Extended care: 7 am–6 pm; also, afternoon enrichment program 11:30 am–3:30 pm Style of teaching: Traditional, teacher-created based on OELCS Meals: Hot lunch provided by Tano’s Bistro and Catering Child/teacher ratio: 7:1 preschool, 12:1 3-year-olds, 14:1 4-year-olds Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $304–$480/month

LIBERTY HEIGHTS PRESCHOOL 7904 Princeton Rd., Liber ty Twp., (513) 759-8430, liber ty heights.org/#/ministries/libertyheights-preschool At LHP, children experience a theme-based curriculum each month in a print-rich environment to facilitate reading readiness. Learning includes dramatic play, science and nature, culture, and sign language. Ages: 12 weeks–5 years Capacity: 250, spots available depending on age and class Hours: September through May, Mon–Thurs 9 am–4 pm; classes 9:30 am–12 pm or 1–3:30 pm Extended care: No Style of teaching: Christian-based kindergarten prep Meals: Parents provide snacks Child/teacher ratio: 5:1 babies, 12:2 toddlers, 12:2 age 3, 14:2 ages 4–5 Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $100–$170/month

LITTLE SPROUTS LEARNING CENTER 11177 Springfield Pike, Springdale, (513) 771-4444, littlesprouts.info A ministry of the Springdale Church of the Nazarene, Little Sprouts is a ninemonth preschool offering learning opportunities through active play and discovery, including reading, art, science, and health and safety. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 60, spots available Hours: 2- or 3-day programs, 9:30–11:45 am or 12:15–2:30 pm Extended care: No Style of teaching: Developmental and hands-on Meals: Families provide class snacks on a six-week rotation Child/teacher ratio: 15:2 Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $100/month any program

MAPLE KNOLL MONTESSORI CHILD CENTER 1100 Springfield Pike, Springdale, (513) 782-2498, mapleknoll.org/ childcenter.php A private Montessori preschool, Maple Knoll has helped children since 1977 learn through their senses while engendering respect, independence, self-motivation, and inner discipline. The intergenerational program provides beneficial interactions between the children and Maple Knoll nursing care facility residents. Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 33, spots available Hours: Multiage group classes

$20 discount on each additional group class taken!

The Place You Begin: • Music Pups – Music for ages birth to 4 with a caregiver

Mon–Fri, 8:30–11:30 am, 12:30–3:30 pm, or full day, 8:30 am–3:30 pm Extended care: 8 am–5:30 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Snacks provided, parents provide lunch Child/teacher ratio: 11:1 Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $4,428–$8,343

THE POTTER’S HOUSE CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER 6101 Princeton Glendale Rd., Liberty Twp., (513) 785-2855, pottershouse cdc.com For 20 years, Potter’s House has provided a motivating atmosphere and nurturing Christian environment to strengthen each child’s innate talents. Using developmentally appropriate curriculum encourages maturity and growth for the whole child. Ages: 6 weeks–6 years Capacity: 267; waiting list for nursery, spots available in other classes Hours: Full-day childcare plus nine-month preschool 2, 3, or 4 days per week, morning and afternoon classes Extended care: 6:30 am–6 pm, also available for school-aged children Style of teaching: Christian Meals: Breakfast, hot lunch, and snack daily Child/teacher ratio: 5:1 infants, 6:1 12–18 months, 7:1 18 months–age 2 1/2, 8:1 ages 2½–3, 12:1 3-year-olds, 14:1 4–5 year-olds Awards or designations: ELDS aligned Enrolls students with disabilities: Case

Music, Dance, Acting, Gymnastics in one location.

The Place You Stay: • Private Music Lessons for all ages

• Leap and Learn – Dance for ages 2 & up

• Dance Classes in ballet, tap, jazz, hip hop, Bollywood, Irish, and competitive

• Tumble Bears – Gymnastics for ages 2 & up

• Acting Classes • Gymnastics • Cheer • Tumbling

Sign Up for Any Program and Waive the $30 Administration Fee! Coupon must be presented at time of registration.

513.829.2345 • WestChesterAcademy.com

8107 Market Place Drive • West Chester, OH 45069 THE BABYGUIDE

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disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $3,850–$9,750

by case Cost: $125–$175/week parttime, $125–$222/week full-time

PRIMROSE SCHOOL

9175 Governors Way, Symmes Twp., (513) 697-6970; 8378 Princeton Glendale Rd., West Chester, (513) 8700630; 5888 Snider Rd., Mason, (513) 336-6756; also has Dayton locations; primroseschools.com Primrose is an accredited private preschool franchise which provides an educational, healthy, and happy childcare experience with enthusiastic teachers who promote integrity, fairness, and social responsibility. Ages: Infant–K Style of teaching: Montessori and teacher-led approach Extended care: After-school Explorers Club for ages 5–12 Awards or designations: AdvancED accredited Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, on case-by-case basis Meals: Yes, nutritious meals and snacks featuring fruits, vegetables, whole grains Symmes Township: Capacity: 160 Hours: 6:30 am–6:30 pm Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 6:1 toddlers, 7:1 early preschool, 8:1 early preschool II, 11:1 preschool, 12:1 pre-K, 18:1 kindergarten Meals: Degreed culinary chef prepares all meals from scratch Cost: Varies by program West Chester: Capacity: 182, spots available Hours: 6:45 am–6:30 pm Child/ teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 4:1 young toddler, 6:1 toddler, 7:1 early preschool I, 8:1 early preschool II, 12:1 preschool, 12:1 pre-K Cost: $105–$285/week depending on class and schedule Mason: Capacity: 185, spots available Hours: 6:30 am–6:30 pm Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 5:1 young toddler, 6:1 toddler, 7:1 early preschool I, 8:1 early preschool II, 11:1 preschool, 12:1 pre-K Cost: $139–$300/week depending on class and schedule

ROCKWERN ACADEMY’S EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CENTER (ECEC)

8401 Montgomery Rd., Kenwood, (513) 984-3770, rockwernacademy. org Rockwern Academy’s ECEC follows general developmental and Jewish curriculum to keep the youngest children wide-eyed with wonder and smiling, simultaneously building emergent literacy, experiential learning, physical development, and social skills. Ages: 18 months–K Capacity: 90, waiting list for 2-year-old program, spots available for others Hours: 3-day and 5-day options, half-day and full-day Extended care: 7 am–6 pm (Fri until 5 pm) Style of teaching: Child-centered, Jewish education including Hebrew Meals: Hot lunch available Child/teacher ratio: 12:3 18-month class, 10:2 age 2, 11:1 age 3, 12:2 age 4 and up Awards or designations: RAVSAK and PEJE affiliated Enrolls students with

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SHARONVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH WEEKDAY NURSERY 3751 Creek Rd., Sharonville, (513) 563-8278, sumcns.org By providing a positive, developmentally appropriate nine-month curriculum including hands-on enrichment activities, the program helps children to become confident and successful learners and decision makers. Ages: 2–5 Capacity: 220, waiting list for some classes Hours: 2-day, 3-day, or 4-day programs depending on child’s age, half-day programs 9 am–12 pm or 12:40–3:40 pm Extended care: No Style of teaching: Christian Meals: Snacks available Child/teacher ratio: 7:1 2-year-olds, 8:1 3-year-olds, 9:1 4-year-olds, 12:1 5-year-olds Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $145–$226/month

SYCAMORE COMMUNITY SCHOOLS: MAPLE DALE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 6100 Hagewa Dr., Blue Ash/Montgomery, (513) 686-1726, sycamore schools.org Children in multiaged groupings are fostered within safe, challenging, and joyful environments to facilitate growth in pre-academic and social skills. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 60, waiting list Hours: Mon–Thurs, 9:15–11:45 am or 1:15–3:45 pm Extended care: No Style of teaching: Follows OELCS guidelines Meals: Onsite kitchen serves breakfast and lunch daily, including whole grains, low-fat dairy, fresh produce, and low-sodium products Child/ teacher ratio: 12:1 Awards or designations: Finalist for Best Preschool, Best of the North by Cincy Magazine (September 2013) Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $2,650

TERRY’S MONTESSORI SCHOOL 425 and 435 Crescent Ave., 209 Wyoming Ave., 415 Poplar Ave., Wyoming, (513) 761-3836, terrysmontessori. com Family-owned-and-operated, Terry’s offers a unique, homelike setting in four different houses where children can float freely from room to room following their interests, cultivating a healthy self-image for each child. Ages: 6 weeks–6 years Capacity: 14 infants, 40 2½–4 year olds, 45 3½–6 year olds; open enrollment, waiting list when necessary Hours: Half day or full day (4 or 5 days a week) Extended care: 7 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Breakfast, lunch, and snacks Child/teacher ratio: 3:1 infants and toddlers, 4:1 2½–4-year-olds, 7:1 3½–6-year-olds Awards or designations: Member of AMS and CMS Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $1,015–$1,400/ month

EAST

CHILDREN’S MEETING HOUSE MONTESSORI SCHOOL

927 O’Bannonville Rd., Loveland, (513) 683-4757, cmhschool.com Through gentle guidance and carefully prepared environments, CMHM supports students in self-direction and independence to educate the whole child physically, cognitively, socially, and emotionally. Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 30 half-day preschool, 14 all-day preschool; spots available Hours: Mon–Fri, half-day 8:30–11:30 am or full-day 8:30 am–3 pm Extended care: 7 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Children bring sack lunch following nutritional guidelines outlined in parent handbook Child/teacher ratio: 10:1 halfday preschool; 7:1 all-day preschool Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $6,460–$9,560

CHILDREN’S VILLA EARLY LEARNING CENTER

1160 St. Rt. 131, Milford, (513) 8318115, milfordpreschool.com For more than 30 years, Children’s Villa has provided a daycare and developmental preschool environment with varied opportunities for hands-on learning, supporting free expression and fostering age-appropriate development. Ages: 3 months–6 years Capacity: 95; waiting list Hours: Year-round nursery school Mon–Fri, 9–11:30 am, available as stand-alone program 2–5 days a week Extended care: 6:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Play-based, child-centered Meals: Nutritionally balanced, home-cooked meals and snacks prepared by on-site cook; incorporates weekly cooking days, offering children nutritional education Child/teacher ratio: 3:1 infants, 6:1 toddlers and preschool, 8:1 pre-K Awards or designations: 2011 Clermont County Community Choice Awards: #2 Daycare Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: Full day, $175–$225/week, five percent discount if paid monthly, discounts available for regular parent volunteers; two mornings a week, $180/month; three mornings a week, $200/month

CINCINNATI COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL

6905 Given Rd., Indian Hill, (513) 979-0220, countryday.net CCDS’s Pre-Primary program focuses on child-centered activities allowing for exploration, investigation, communication, and problem-solving. Parents can opt for an experiential environment with mixed ages or a structured environment with sameaged children. Specials are provided and include music, movement, swimming, and outdoor education. Ages: 18 months–5 years Capacity: 140, possible spots available Hours: Early Childhood Program 3 or 5 days, 8:30–11:45 am; pre-K (Montessori or traditional) 5 days, 8:30–11:45 am Ex-


tended care: Flexible options, 7:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Montessori or traditional pre-K available Meals: Yes Child/teacher ratio: 6:1 younger children, 9:1 older children Awards or designations: Approved by AMS, ISACS, and ODE Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $6,370–$18,525

CINCINNATI NATURE CENTER PRESCHOOL

4949 Tealtown Rd., Milford, (513) 8311711, cincynature.org/teacherschool programs Children explore diverse habitats outdoors during all seasons: making discoveries, practicing stewardship, and building self-confidence. Observant teachers facilitate children in both collaborative learning opportunities and autonomous responsibility and decision-making. One of two preschools in the area with access to a nature playscape. Ages: 3–5, mixedage groups Capacity: 60, openings in Mon, Wed, Fri classes Hours: Nine-month preschool: Mon, Wed, Fri, 8:30–11:30 am; Tues, Thurs, 8:30– 11:30 am; Tues, Thurs, 12:30–3:30 pm; or Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30–3:30 pm Extended care: No Style of teaching: Nature-driven, Inquiry and Montessori-based Meals: Healthy snacks provided Child/teacher ratio: 8:1 Enroll students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $2,820–$4,250

CINCINNATI WALDORF SCHOOL

Main Campus: 6743 Chestnut St., Mariemont, (513) 541-0220; Mashewa Farm Campus: 7550 Given Rd., Indian Hill, cincinnatiwaldorfschool.org CWS is an independent school offering both a classroom and outdoor preschool experience. Calm, warm, and loving environments ensure a child’s early experience of school is joyful and engaging, providing a strong foundation

for intellectual growth. Ages: 3–4 years Capacity: 12 per day per campus, call for availability Hours: 2, 3, or 5 consecutive morning classes, 8:15 am–12 pm Extended care: Available on main campus until 6 pm Style of teaching: Waldorf Meals: Nutritious and organic snacks provided, parents provide lunch Child/teacher ratio: 6:1 Awards or designations: Member of AWSNA and WECAN Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, as long as CWS can meet the child’s needs Cost: $3,899–$7,393

GARDEN MONTESSORI SCHOOL

1318 Nagel Rd., Cherry Grove, (513) 474-4933, gardenmontessorischool. com GMS provides the foundation for a lifetime of learning, nurturing a child’s curiosity, concentration, and sense of responsibility by providing structure, freedom, and action. Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 47, waiting list Hours: 3- or 5-day program, 9:15 am–12 pm Extended care: 7 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Children pack lunch, morning and afternoon snacks provided for extended-care children Child/teacher ratio: 8:1 Awards or designations: Member CMS Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $440–$895/month

MONTESSORI CENTER ROOM

2505 Riverside Dr., East End, (513) 321-3282, montessoricenterroom. com MCR is a parent-owned nonprofit organization that has been offering preschool education for 50 years. The child-centered environment promotes independence and responsibility for self while building confidence and self-esteem. Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 50, waiting list Hours: Half-day classes Mon–Fri, 8:30–11:30 am, allday kindergarten Extended care: 7:30 am–5:30 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Snacks provided,

children pack lunches Child/teacher ratio: 10:1 Awards or designations: AMS affiliated Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $4,900

ST. LOUIS SCHOOL

250 N. Broadway, Owensville, (513) 732-0636, stlparish.org This Catholic parochial school supports the importance of parents as the primary influence in a child’s religious education. The program emphasizes the development of the whole person, recognizing the dignity, abilities, and gifts of every child. Ages: 3–4 Capacity: 44, spots available Hours: Mon, Wed, 8:30–11 am; Tues, Thurs, Fri, 8:30–11 am or 12:30–3 pm Extended care: Yes Style of teaching: Catholic, traditional Meals: Lunch provided Child/teacher ratio: 11:1 Awards or designations: Accredited by the Archdiocese Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $1,150–$1,650

ST. URSULA VILLA SCHOOL

3660 Vineyard Place, Columbia-Tusculum, (513) 871-7218, stursulavilla. org A coed Catholic elementary school in the Ursuline tradition, St. Ursula Villa School fosters academic excellence by nurturing the whole child in a Christ-centered commitment to society. Ages: 2–5 Capacity: Varies by program, total capacity 145 Hours: Toddler class 2 mornings a week, 8:15–10:45 am; half- or full-day options for 3–4-year-olds, 3 or 5 days a week, half-day option 8–11 am and full-day option 8 am–3 pm Extended care: 7:30 am–6 pm, preschool– grade 8 Style of teaching: Montessori or traditional Meals: Students pack nut-free lunches Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 toddlers, 9:1 average for early childhood program Awards or designations: Recognized as a School of Contribution by Children,

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THE A TO Z GUIDE Inc. Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $2,046–$9,636

THE VILLAGE PRESCHOOL 6137 Salem Rd., Anderson Twp., (513) 232-9966, thevillagepreschool.net Classes combine teacher-directed learning with independent child-led activities to promote a child’s most important learning asset—curiosity. Ages: 2½–5 Capacity: 110, spots available Hours: Classes 1–3 days a week, 9–11:30 am or 12:30–3 pm, plus enrichment classes on Thurs and Fri Extended care: No Style of teaching: Traditional play-based Meals: Children may pack lunch for Lunch Bunch twice a week and Lunch with Legos once a week Child/teacher ratio: 10:2 3-year-olds, 16:2 4- and 5-year-olds Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $577–$2,065 WEST

A CHILD’S GARDEN 5427 Julmar Dr., Covedale, (513) 451-0330, achildsgarden.us Located on the campus of St. Anton-

inus Church and School, A Child’s Garden is a nine-month preschool program offering an integrated and interactive approach to learning, promoting self-discovery through touching, experimenting, and exploring. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 137, waiting list Hours: Mon, Wed, Fri or Tues, Thurs options, 9–11:30 am (or 12:30 pm) or 12–2:30 pm Extended care: No Style of teaching: DAP (developmentally appropriate practices) with Creative Curriculum, aligned with NAEYC Meals: Nutritious snacks provided Child/ teacher ratio: 10:1 3-year-olds, 12:1 4- and 5-year-olds Awards or designations: 5 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $165–$245/month

DATER MONTESSORI ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2840 Boudinot Ave., Westwood, (513) 363-0900, datermontessori. cps-k12.org A magnet program within CPS, Dater Montessori is an inclusive, diverse, and supportive community where children learn to become independent thinkers and considerate citizens equipped to surpass academic expectations. Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 168, waiting list Hours: Half-day program, 9:15–11:50 am, or full-day program Extended care: Limited

spots for after-school care from 12–3:45 pm, early drop off 7–8:45 am for small fee Style of teaching: Mixed-age Montessori Meals: Lunch served family-style, no charge for preschool Child/teacher ratio: 12:1 Awards or designations: 5 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, two classes through early childhood Cost: $3,200–$6,200 per year, paid monthly; sliding scale grants available

WINTON HILL CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER 6331 Center Hill Ave., Finneytown, (513) 634-5437, brighthorizons. com/pgwintonhill Open to all current Procter & Gamble employees, this Bright Horizons childcare facility has developmentally appropriate educational environments to empower children to become lifelong learners. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 122, spots available Hours: Mon–Fri, 6:30 am–6 pm, 2 to 5 days a week Style of teaching: Developmentally appropriate practices Meals: Fulltime cook provides breakfast, lunch, and snacks Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 5:1 toddlers, 10:1 preschool and pre-K Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: Call for information

Make sure what your child learns this year lasts for years to come. Give your child everything needed to prepare for school and for life with Life Essentials.SM

• Quality care for ages 6 weeks to 12 years • State-of-the-art Academy including a computer lab • Master and bachelor degree lead teachers with experience • Summer camp and before & after school programs • Infant, toddler, & preschool programs • Private full day kindergarten • Secure web cameras in every room • Hot, nutritious lunch and snacks served daily • Secure entry doors with touch screen • Age appropriate academic curriculum • Part-time and flexible schedules available • NAEYC® Accreditation

513-234-0699 6202 Snider Road • Mason, OH 45040 • www.kiddieacademy.com/Mason 104

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY

COUNTRY HILLS MONTESSORI 960 Highland Ave., Ft. Thomas, (859) 442-0500, chmschools.com/ ft-thomas Country Hills Montessori has seven locations in the Greater Cincinnati area, each within healthcare centers to facilitate intergenerational learning, promoting inclusiveness and collaboration across generations. Other locations: West Chester, Eastgate, Montgomery, Oakley, Springboro, Harrison Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 30, spots available Hours: 3- or 5-day programs; morning 9–11:30 am, afternoon 12:30–3 pm, fullday kindergarten Extended care: No Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Snacks provided, parents pack lunch for full-day program Child/teacher ratio: 7:1 Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $3,000–$5,800

GARDENS AT GREENUP CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER/ CHILDREN, INC. 133 E. 11th St., Covington, (859) 2614282, childreninc.org Serving young families and children in collaboration with Welcome House, Gardens at Greenup/Children, Inc. is dedicated to helping working families achieve success through innovative educational excellence as their children

move toward kindergarten readiness. Gardens offers compassionate family support and utilizes collective community leadership to bring cutting-edge best practices to the community. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 18, spots available Hours: Mon–Fri, 7 am–5 pm Style of teaching: Constructivist, High Scope curriculum Meals: USDA-approved, nutritionally balanced breakfast, lunch, and snack Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 5:1 toddlers, 8:1 preschool Awards or designations: NAC accredited; 4 stars, Kentucky STARS for Kids Now Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: Sliding scale fees with United Way or state funding available and parents pay assigned co-pay; $155–$165/week without tuition assistance

MONTESSORI EARLY LEARNING ACADEMY/CHILDREN, INC. 419 Altamont Rd., Covington, (859) 491-1455, childreninc.org Montessori Early Learning Academy/Children, Inc. is dedicated to helping working families achieve success through innovative educational excellence as their children move toward kindergarten readiness. It offers compassionate family support and utilizes collective community leadership to bring cutting-edge best practices to the community. Beginning in May

2015, Early Head Start will be offered at the Center for infants and toddlers. In August 2015 Children, Inc. will partner with Ludlow Independent School District to offer a blended program of public preschool and full-day education and care. Ages: Infants–kindergarten Capacity: 80, spots available Hours: Mon–Fri, 6:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Montessori and traditional Meals: USDA-approved, nutritionally balanced breakfast, lunch, and snack Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants and toddlers; 10:1 ages 3–kindergarten Awards or designations: NAC accredited; 3 stars, Kentucky STARS for Kids Now Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: Sliding scale fees with United Way or state funding available and parents pay assigned co-pay; $145–$160/ week without tuition assistance

NEWPORT PRESCHOOL CENTER/CHILDREN, INC. 30 W. Eighth St., Newport, (859) 431-2075, childreninc.org Newport Preschool Center is a collaborate effort with Newport Independent School District to provide full-day preschool. The Center is dedicated to helping working families achieve success through innovative educational excellence as their children move toward kindergarten readiness. Newport Preschool Center offers compas-

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THE A TO Z GUIDE sionate family support and utilizes collective community leadership to bring cutting-edge best practices to the community. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 40, spots available Hours: Mon–Fri, 7 am–5 pm, year round with a full- or half-day option Style of teaching: Traditional High Scope curriculum Meals: USDA-approved, nutritionally balanced breakfast, lunch, and snack Child/teacher ratio: 10:1 Awards or designations: NAC accredited; 4 stars, Kentucky STARS for Kids Now Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: Sliding scale fees with United Way or state funding available and parents pay assigned co-pay; $140/week full day/full time, $100/week half days without tuition assistance

NORTHERN KENTUCKY MONTESSORI ACADEMY

2625 Anderson Rd., Crescent Springs, (859) 331-3725, nkmacade my.org The mission is to educate children to become respected citizens of the global community by providing a Montessori education of unparalleled quality. Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 78 Hours: 8:15 am–3:15 pm Extended Care: 7:45 am–5:45 pm Style of Teaching: Authentic Montessori Meals: Lunch and snack provided Child/teacher ratio: 14:1 Awards or designations: Member of American Montessori Society Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $6,000–$8,877

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER

MEP 147 Nunn Dr., Highland Heights, (859) 572-6338, earlychildhood center.nku.edu Serving children of students and faculty at NKU and the community, the ECC works collaboratively with parents and university departments to benefit children as they experience the joys of childhood. Ages: 12 months–5 years Capacity: 15, ages 12–30 months; 30, ages 30 months–5 years; waiting list with priority given to NKU students Hours: Half-day, 7 am–12:30 pm; full-day, 7 am–6 pm for 2, 3, or 5 days a week Style of teaching: Play-based, Reggio Emilia Meals: Breakfast and afternoon snack provided, parents provide lunches Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 toddlers, 8:1 preschool Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited; 2 stars, Kentucky Stars for Kids Now Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $50–$250/week

PRINCE OF PEACE SCHOOL

625 Pike St., Covington, (859) 4315153, popcov.com Featuring small classes, a diverse urban population,

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and an active parent association, POPS offers a nurturing atmosphere promoting self-respect and respect of others and the environment. Ages: 3–5 Capacity: 40, spots available for 3- and 4-year-olds Hours: Half-day, 7:50–11 am with after-care until dismissal; full-day, 7:50 am–2:45 pm Extended care: 7 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Catholic, Montessori Meals: Breakfast and hot lunch available daily; students can also pack lunch Child/teacher ratio: 10:1 Awards or designations: Diocese of Covington, Montessori teachers are AMS certified Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes, case by case Cost: $3,845–$4,885

TREASURE HOUSE CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER/ CHILDREN, INC. 203 W. Rivercenter Blvd., Covington, (859) 669-2770, childreninc.org A federal center sponsored by the IRS and General Services Administration, Treasure House/Children, Inc. is open to government employees and the community, and is dedicated to helping children achieve success through innovative educational excellence, compassionate family support, and collective community leadership. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 115; waiting list, some preschool spots available Hours: Mon–Fri, 6:15 am–5:30 pm Style of teaching: Montessori and traditional Meals: Nutritionally balanced meals and snacks Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 6:1 toddlers, 10:1 2-year-olds, 12:1 3- to 6-year-olds Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited; 4 stars, Kentucky Stars for Kids Now Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $160–$185/ week, United Way or state funding available

TRENT MONTESSORI 305 Park Ave., Newport, (859) 4913223, trentmontessori.com Trent provides an authentic nine-month preschool Montessori experience to help children meet their developmental and social needs so they may reach their greatest potential and become successful members of the community. Ages: 3–6 years Capacity: 60; ongoing waiting list, parents can place child on waiting list when gender is known Hours: Mon–Fri, 9–11:45 am or 12:45–3:30 pm Extended care: 7:30 am–5:30 pm Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Parents pack nutritious lunch and provide one week of nutritious, pre-packaged snacks Child/teacher ratio: 10:1 Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $4,050

DAYTON

BOMBECK FAMILY LEARNING CENTER 300 College Park, Dayton, (937) 229-2158, udayton.edu/education/ cel/bombeckcenter Providing care and education for children through mutual respect, reflective practice, and research, the Bombeck Center is a unique learning environment and demonstration school for UD’s School of Education and Allied Professions. Space available for nursing mothers when visiting. Ages: 6 weeks–5 years Capacity: 126, waiting list with priority given to UD family, students, and alumni Hours: Mon–Fri, 7:30 am–6 pm Style of teaching: Child-directed, based on Montessori, Reggio, other childhood theorists, and Catholic Marianist teachings Meals: Nutritious snacks and lunches provided Child/teacher ratio: 4:1 infants, 5:1 toddlers, 8:1 preschool Awards or designations: NAEYC accredited; 5 stars, Ohio Step Up to Quality; Top Child Care Center, Dayton Business Journal Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $213–$270/week

COUNTRY HILLS MONTESSORI 325 E. Central Ave., Springboro, (937) 748-0868, chmschools.com/ springboro Country Hills Montessori has seven locations in the Greater Cincinnati area, each within healthcare centers to facilitate intergenerational learning, promoting inclusiveness and collaboration across generations. Other locations: West Chester, Eastgate, Montgomery, Oakley, Harrison, and Ft. Thomas Ages: 3–6 Capacity: 32, waiting list Hours: 3- or 5-day programs; morning 9:15–11:45 am, afternoon 12:45–3:15 pm; fullday 9:15 am–3:15 p.m Extended care: No Style of teaching: Montessori Meals: Snacks provided, parents pack lunch for full-day program Child/teacher ratio: 8:1 Enrolls students with disabilities: Case by case Cost: $3,000–$6,200

FAIRMONT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH PRESCHOOL 3705 Far Hills Ave., Kettering, (937) 299-3539, fairmontchurch.org/ preschool.html A self-supporting nonprofit preschool for more than 50 years, Fairmont Presbyterian offers a Christian atmosphere to provide enrichment and support as your child grows and gains independence. Ages: 3–4 Capacity: 46, spots available Hours: 2- or 3-day programs Mon–Fri, 8:45–11:30 am Extended care: No Style of teaching: Christian-based Meals: Snacks offered Child/teacher ratio: 8:1–10:1 Enrolls students with disabilities: Yes Cost: $855–$1,125


MEDICAL CARE Obstetrician and pediatrician groups to take care of you and your little one’s medical needs.

CINCINNATI/ NORTHERN KENTUCKY These practitioners are listed on Cincinnati Magazine’s 2015 Top Doctors list. To see the complete list, go to cincinnatimagazine.com/ topdoctors

Edgewood, KY 41017, (859) 341-2510

ERIC STAMLER

ANNE KAISER-ALBRINCK

Seven Hills Women’s Health Centers, 5885 Harrison Ave., Suite 3100, Cincinnati, OH 45248, (513) 922-6666

Trihealth Associates In Ob-Gyn, 440 Ray Norrish Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45246, (513) 671-7700

MEGAN KESSLER

OBSTETRICS

For Women, Inc., 10475 Reading Rd., Suite 307, Cincinnati, OH 45241, (513) 563-2202

JOHN DARPEL

SARAH LEWIS

Seven Hills Women’s Health Centers, 20 Medical Village Dr., Suite 302, Edgewood, KY 41017, (859) 341-2510

MEREDITH DONNELLY

Seven Hills Women’s Health Centers, 20 Medical Village Dr., Suite 302, Edgewood, KY 41017, (859) 341-2510

MICHAEL R. DRAZNIK

Michael R. Draznik, M.D., Inc., 2055 Reading Rd., Suite 480, Cincinnati, OH 45202, (513) 579-0707

KELLIE FLOOD-SHAFFER

UC Health Obstetrics & Gynecology, 222 Piedmont Ave., Suite 8000, Cincinnati, OH 45219, (513) 475-8588

MARIA GERBER

UC Health Obstetrics & Gynecology, 7675 Wellness Way, Suite 400, West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 475-8248

JOHN R. JACKSON

Seven Hills Women’s Health Centers, 20 Medical Village Dr., Suite 302, Edgewood, KY 41017, (859) 341-2510

PAUL JACOBS

Seven Hills Women’s Health Centers, 20 Medical Village Dr., Suite 302,

Trihealth: Group Health, 8245 Northcreek Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 246-7000

TED LUM Ted M. Lum, M.D., Inc., 2825 Burnet Ave., Suite 208, Cincinnati, OH 45219, (513) 221-6300

MAMATA NARENDRAN Obstetrics & Gynecology Associates, Inc., 3050 Mack Rd., Suite 375, Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 221-3800

LEANNE OLSHAVSKY The Christ Hospital Physicians - Obstetrics & Gynecology, 7545 Beechmont Ave., Suite B, Cincinnati, OH 45255, (513) 564-4000

MABLE ROBERTS Mt. Auburn Obstetrics & Gynecologic Associates, Inc., 2123 Auburn Ave., Suite 724, Cincinnati, OH 45219, (513) 241-4774

STEPHEN J. SCHUERMANN Trihealth Women’s Services Samaritan Obstetrics And Gynecology, 1149 Stone Dr., Harrison, OH 45030, (513) 367-6740

ROBERT J. STEPHENS Seven Hills Women’s Health Centers, 5885 Harrison Ave., Suite 3100, Cincinnati, OH 45248, (513) 922-6666

AMY THOMPSON Uc Health Physicians Office (Clifton), 222 Piedmont Ave., Suite 8000, Cincinnati, OH 45219, (513) 475-8588

MARIANNA VARDAKA Trihealth Women’s Services, 10495 Montgomery Rd., Suite 16, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 985-9017 PEDIATRICS (GENERAL)

CHRISTOPHER BOLLING Pediatric Associates Of Northern Kentucky, 2865 Chancellor Dr., Suites 225 And 120, Crestview Hills, KY 41017, (859) 341-5400

ELIZABETH BROWN Pediatricians Of Hyde Park, 3666 Paxton Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 871-0684 Not Accepting New Patients

CHRISTOPHER CUNHA Pediatric Associates Of Northern Kentucky, 2865 Chancellor Dr., Suites 225 And 120, Crestview Hills, KY 41017, (859) 341-5400

JEFF DRASNIN ESD Pediatric Group, 905 Main St., Milford, OH 45150, (513) 248-1210

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EVELYN JOSEPH Pediatricians Of Hyde Park, 3666 Paxton Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 871-0684 First Time Moms Only

TRACY V. TING

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229, (513) 636-4676

PIERRE MANFROY EDWARD GARVIN Pediatricians Of Hyde Park, 3666 Paxton Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 871-0684 Not Accepting New Patients

CAMILLE GRAHAM Mid-City Pediatrics, 8250 Kenwood Crossing Way, Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 948-8444 Not Accepting New Patients

AMY HEISEL St. Elizabeth Physicians Florence Pediatrics, 7370 Turfway Rd., Suite 200, Florence, KY 41042, (859) 2125025

JENNY HELLMANN Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229, (513) 636-4293 ER Only

ROGER HERMAN Anderson Hills Pediatrics, 7400 Jager Ct., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 232-8100 Not Accepting New Patients

Get your

Northeast Cincinnati Pediatric Associates, 11238 Cornell Park Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 530-0200

JONATHAN MUMMA Trihealth: Group Health, 7810 Five Mile Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 246-7000 Not Accepting New Patients (Except Newborns/Siblings of Established Patients)

WILLIE NG Hyde Park Pediatrics, 3330 Erie Ave. Suite 11, Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 321-0199

ANGELA RATH Trihealth: Group Health, 8245 Northcreek Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 246-7000

ASIM SHABBI West Side Adult And Pediatric Care, 7225 Colerain Ave., Suite 103, Cincinnati, OH 45239, (513) 681-3500

LIBBEY SPIESS Trihealth: Queen City Physicians, 6350 Glenway Ave., Suite 300, Cincinnati, OH 45211, (513) 481-9700

DAYTON Cincinnati Magazine’s Top Doctors list does not include Dayton, Ohio, physicians, but these groups serve that area and are worth a look. OBSTETRICS

KETTERING REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE

3533 Southern Blvd., Suite 4100, Kettering, OH 45429, (937) 395-8444, khnetwork.org/reproductive

OAK CREEK OB/GYN

2510 Commons Blvd., Suite 270, Beavercreek, OH 45431, (937) 4310200; 6438 Wilmington Pike, Suite 300, Centerville, OH 45459, (937) 848-4850; 10 Remick Blvd., Springboro, OH 45066, (937) 886-2705; oakcreekobgyn.com

PREMIER OB/GYN

630 N. Main St., Suite 200, Springboro, OH 45066, (937) 748-8516; 1 Wyoming St., Suite 3140, Dayton, OH 45409, (937) 748-8516; other area locations; premierhealthnet.com

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darahmedical.com • 855-293-5011 Delivery time - 24 to 48 hours! 108

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WRIGHT STATE PHYSICIANS

1 Wyoming St., Suite 4130, Dayton, OH 45409, (937) 208-6810; 725 University Blvd., Fairborn, OH 45324, (937) 208-6810; wrightstate physicians.org PEDIATRICS

CHILDREN’S HEALTH CLINIC AT DAYTON CHILDREN’S

730-C Valley St., Dayton, OH 45404, (937) 641-3500, childrensdayton.org

OHIO PEDIATRICS

7200 Poe Ave., Suite 201, Dayton, OH 45414, (937) 236-5396; 1775 Delco Park Dr., Kettering, OH 45420, (937) 299-2339; ohiopediatrics.com

PEDIATRIC ASSOCIATES OF DAYTON

5450 Far Hills Ave., Suite 110, Kettering, OH 45429, (937) 436-2866; 9000 N. Main St., Suite 332, Dayton, OH 45414, (937) 832-7337; 3140 Dayton Xenia Rd., Beavercreek, OH 45432, (937) 320-1950; pediatric associatesofdayton.com

PRIMED PEDIATRICS

5250 Far Hills Ave., Kettering, OH 45429, (937) 433-7991; 6520 Acro Ct., Centerville, OH 45459, (937) 291-6850; other area locations; primedphysicians.com

Northeast Cincinnati Pediatric Associates, Inc. cincinnatipediatrics.com Dedicated to the highest quality of pediatric medical care! • Flexible Hours Including Evenings & Saturdays • Online Scheduling Requests & Prescription Refills • Same-Day Sick Child Visits • Lactation Consultants & Clinical Counselors on Staff • Prenatal Visits & Tours Available for Expecting Parents Providers: Robert Evans, M.D. Denise Rankin, M.D. Balzer Sandrock, M.D. Pierre Manfroy, M.D.

Lea Kirkham, M.D. Scott Steinberg, M.D. Cindy Cook, M.D. Nicole Baldwin, M.D.

Landen/Mason 8185 Corporate Way • (513) 398-7171

Laura White, M.D. Emily Kelleher, M.D. Kathy Sorger, M.D. Cindy Allison, C.N.P.

Mary Raab, C.N.P. Laurie Freese, C.N.P. Ellen Glassmeyer, C.N.P. Kelly Griffith, C.N.P.

Blue Ash 11238 Cornell Park Dr. • (513) 530-0200

Carla Seemann, L.P.C.C. Vicki Gedert, PC-CR

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PARTY PLACES Want to plan the perfect birthday party? Here’s a list of a handful of spots around the region that can make your kid’s birthday dreams come true.

3 SWEET GIRLS CAKERY

7458 Montgomery Rd., Kenwood, (513) 984-1100, 3sweetgirlscakery. com Kids get to decorate cupcakes and enjoy other activities. Capacity: Maximum 14 guests Cost: $300/10 guests, $15 each additional guest

BEE ACTIVE ADVENTURE ZONE

1050 Cincinnati Mills Dr., Forest Park, (513) 563-2600, beeactive.biz Bounce and play on Bee Active’s nine giant inflatables and in the gymnastics play center. Capacity: Maximum 20 guests Cost: $150–$250

THE BONBONERIE

2030 Madison Rd., O’Bryonville, (513) 321-3399 ext. 3, bonbonerie. com Have a tea party with pinkies out, sip tea, and have a girly-fun time. Capacity: Maximum 40 guests Cost: $25/adult, $18/child

BOONSHOFT MUSEUM

2600 DeWeese Pkwy., Dayton, Ohio, (937) 275-7431, boonshoftmuseum. org Boonshoft allows you to enter the world of discovery and release your inner scientist. Capacity: Maximum 24 guests Cost: $165 members, $195 nonmembers/15 children; $10/additional child

BRAZEE STREET STUDIOS

4426 Brazee St., Oakley, (513) 3210206, brazeestreetstudios.com Calling all artsy and creative kids:

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you can enjoy a birthday filled with glass-fusing and art projects. Capacity: Maximum 16 guests Cost: $300–$400/10 children, $20–$40 each additional child

and tour the ballpark. Capacity: 20 guests Cost: $300/10 children and 2 adults, $15 each additional guest

CINCINNATI MUSEUM CENTER

3400 Vine St., Avondale, (513) 5597767, cincinnatizoo.org Our beloved zoo has more than 500 animal species, and party guests get a visit from two animal ambassadors. Capacity: Maximum 50 guests Cost: $275 members, $325 nonmembers

1301 Western Ave., Queensgate, (513) 287-7000, cincymuseum.org It’s one of the top ranked children’s museums in the United States. Climb, crawl, and interact within the museum’s grocery store, post office, and veterinary clinic. Capacity: Maximum 25 guests Cost: $200 members, $225 nonmembers

CINCINNATI NATURE CENTER

4949 Tealtown Rd., Milford, (513) 8311711, cincynature.org Take in nature at the Nature Center; walk the trails and play in the play scape. Capacity: Maximum 15 guests Cost: $225–$250

CINCINNATI PARKS

(513) 321-6070, cincinnatiparks.com/ index.php/natures-center-rentals A naturalist provides 90 minutes of activities and games to explore nature at one of the five nature centers of your choice. Capacity: 25 children, special accommodations for larger groups Cost: $125/10 children, $10/ additional child

CINCINNATI REDS HALL OF FAME

100 Joe Nuxhall Way, downtown, (513) 765-7923, reds.com Celebrate in the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame. Tour the museum, chow down on pizza,

CINCINNATI ZOO & BOTANICAL GARDEN

DRAKE PLANETARIUM

2020 Sherman Ave., Norwood, (513) 396-5578, drakeplanetarium.org Get creative by connecting and building in Drake’s Lego lab. Capacity: Maximum 25 guests Cost: $275/12 children, $14 each additional child

ENTERTRAINMENT JUNCTION

7379 Squire Ct., West Chester, (513) 898-8000, entertrainmentjunction. com Trek through the world’s largest indoor model train display, ooh and ahh at the model trains, and run through the A-MAZ-N Funhouse. Capacity: Maximum 50 guests Cost: $159–$699

FIRE MUSEUM OF GREATER CINCINNATI

315 W. Court St., downtown, (513) 6215553, cincyfiremuseum.com Create an adventure through the museum’s exhibits and safe house, learn fire safety tips, and explore firefighting


history. Capacity: Maximum 30 guests Cost: $175

Entertainment. Capacity: 25 guests Cost: $179–$239

$199–$479/up to 25 children, $10–$18 each additional child

GIRLS’ WORLD

MAD POTTER

7819 Cooper Rd., Montgomery, (513) 984-4475, girlsworld.com Hang out and celebrate your birthday at Girls’ World boutique. From makeover sessions to princess character visits, a perfect birthday party for a girly girl. Capacity: 12 guests Cost: $200

7754 Camargo Rd., Madeira, (513) 5611888 Choose from a selection of bisque ware and paint away. From pasta bowls and chip and dip platters to vases and mugs, the kiddos paint a new creation and the folks at Mad Potter will take care of the firing. Capacity: 20 Cost: $12–$18 per child

SKY ZONE

GREAT PARKS OF HAMILTON COUNTY (513) 521-7275, greatparks.org Hamilton County has various parks, among them Parky’s Farm and Sharon Woods, that can play host to a party. Enjoy the activities each park has to offer. Capacity: Varies Cost: Varies

KIDS FIRST SPORTS CENTER 7900 E. Kemper Rd., (513) 489-7575, kidsfirstsports.com Choose from a variety of party packages: swim, gym, or backyard. Have fun splashing, running, and playing at this facility, which is also home to the Hubbard Family Swim School. Capacity: Maximum 30 guests Cost: $255–$410/up to 20 children, $10/additional child

LASER WEB DAYTON 533 Miamisburg-Centerville Rd., Dayton, Ohio, (937) 435-2737, funat theweb.com Rack up points in the arcade or play laser tag. Also has a location in West Chester, The Web Extreme

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES BECOMING MOM 5685 Deerfield Blvd., Mason, OH 45040, (513) 770-6730, becomingmomspa.com Becoming Mom caters to expectant and trying mothers, offering spa services, ultrasounds, clothing, and pregnancy necessities.

BLUE COCOON 9393 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, OH 45242, (513) 791-1089, bluecocoonbaby. com Cincinnati’s premier lactation boutique, Blue Cocoon offers education, products, and events for nursing moms.

CHILDREN’S GARDEN PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO 8809-B Cin-Day Rd., West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 779-5200, childrensgardenphoto.com More than 20 years of professional experience; full-service studio with a variety of props, backgrounds, and floorto-ceiling windows; on one acre of beautiful scenery with dozens of sets.

THE CHILDREN’S THEATRE OF CINCINNATI 5020 Oaklawn Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45227, (513) 569-8080, thechildrenstheatre.com Educating, entertaining, and engaging young audiences through professional theatrical productions and arts education programming. MainStage productions at the Taft

NEWPORT AQUARIUM One Aquarium Way, Newport, (859) 392-2373, newportaquarium.com The adventures at the aquarium are endless. Guests enjoy the numerous aquatic exhibits and can head over to a party experience at GameWorks at Newport on the Levee. Capacity: Maximum 25 guests Cost: $24.74–$28.49/child

POGO PLAY 10870 Kenwood Rd., Blue Ash, (513) 432-5593, gopogoplay.com Run, jump, and play around in Pogo Play’s giant playground. Parties include private time in the inflatable rooms. Capacity: Maximum 20 guests Cost: $265–$430

PUMP IT UP 7724 Service Center Dr., West Chester, (513) 829-7867, pumpitupparty/ west-chester-oh Jump around in two rooms filled with massive inflatables, climb a rock wall, and play ball. Capacity: Maximum 40 children Cost:

Theatre, ArtReach tours, and Learning the Craft classes.

DARAH MEDICAL (855) 293-5011, darahmedical.com Your breast pump headquarters. Offers Medela, Hygeia, evenflo, Ameda, Tomy, and others.

ESSENZA STUDIO & GALLERY 746 St. Rt. 28, Milford, OH 45150, (513) 8315351, essenzastudio.com Whether a classic portrait or lifestyle image, an Essenza portrait is truly a reflection of the joy and love you have for your family.

GATTLE’S 7809 Cooper Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 871-4050, gattlescincinnati.com Gattle’s carries a great selection of baby gifts, clothing, bedding, and accessories. Specializing in the finest linens, lingerie, and gifts for the home since 1907.

MASON DANCE 600-B Reading Rd., Mason, OH 45040, (513) 398-0353, masondance.com Established in 1995, Mason Dance offers an excellent dance education by providing caring, trained instructors, spacious classrooms, and cushioned dance floors.

MERCY HEALTH— FAMILY BIRTHING CENTERS Mercy Health Anderson Hospital, 7500 State Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45255, (513) 624-4500; Mercy Health Fairfield Hospi-

11745 Commons Dr., Springdale, (513) 671-1333, skyzone.com Bounce off the walls—literally!—in Skyzone’s endless trampoline arena. Capacity: 35 Cost: $180–$200/10 children, $18–$20 each additional child

SUN ROCK FARMS 103 Gibson Ln., Wilder, (859) 7815502, sunrockfarm.org Milk goats, gather eggs, and visit with Sunrock Farms’ many animals. Capacity: Please call Cost: $240/12 guests, $12 each additional guest

TOTTER’S OTTERVILLE 4314 Boron Dr., Covington, (859) 4911441, tottersotterville.com At Totter’s, kids can pretend grocery shop, dig in a construction zone, and put on a puppet show. Capacity: Maximum 30 guests Cost: $12.99–$14.99/child

WEST CHESTER ACADEMY OF MUSIC 8374 Princeton-Glendale Rd. Suite 5, West Chester, (513) 829-2345, musiclessonsinwestchesterohio.com Your group can sing, dance, and play instruments at West Chester Academy’s musical birthday parties. Capacity: Maximum 20 guests Cost: $150

tal, 3000 Mack Rd., Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 870-7000; Mercy Health West Hospital, 3300 Mercy Health Blvd., Cincinnati, OH 45211, (513) 215-5000; e-mercy.com The childbirth experience at Mercy Health is comfortable, loving, and supportive. Maternity care includes spacious birthing suites, experienced nursing staffs, home visits, education programs, and support for breastfeeding moms.

MUDDY CREEK PEDIATRICS 6400 Thornberry Ct., Suite 610, Mason, OH 45040, (513) 398-3900, muddycreekpeds.com Muddy Creek Pediatrics provides top-notch pediatric care in a personal and comfortable setting.

SUBURBAN PEDIATRICS 9600 Children’s Dr., Building D, Mason, OH 45040; 7335 Yankee Rd., Liberty Twp., OH 45044; 752 Waycross Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45240; suburbanpediatrics.org A 40-yearold practice with three locations. Offers late day and weekend appointments. Prides itself on comprehensive care for its patients through college.

YMCA OF GREATER CINCINNATI 1105 Elm St., Cincinnati, OH 45202, (513) 362-YMCA, myy.org With 14 locations throughout Greater Cincinnati, the YMCA gives children and families the support and resources needed to be healthier, more confident, connected, and secure.

THE BABYGUIDE

2 0 1 5

111


THE LAST LAUGH MOMS TELL ALL

YOU KNOW YOU’RE A MOM WHEN... “You’re late everywhere you go, no matter how much you plan ahead.”

“You have zero shame hiding in the closet to eat a treat like chocolate or ice cream. Sometimes you just don’t want to share.”

“Friday rolls around and you think ‘oh cool, I get to wake up the same time tomorrow that I do every other day of the week.’ ”

“Complete strangers know embarrassing personal information about you because your child shares it with them. Frequently.”

“The bottom of your purse has one or a combination of the following: a sock, Band-Aid, fruit snack, Cheerio, used stickers, wipes, wet wipes, rocks and sticks that were treasures you were to keep, clean undies, dead flowers given to you by your kid, and a giant bottle of Tylenol.”

“On date night your husband randomly starts singing ‘Hot Diggity Dog’ and you finish the song.”

“You find yourself saying insane things like ‘No! We do not lick our friends!’ ”

“You haven’t showered or slept in days but you’ve never been happier in your life.” “You try to catch vomit with your bare hands.”

112

TH E BABYGUIDE

2 0 1 5

“You’re a pro at getting poop off of any surface.”

“You’re waiting in line somewhere without baby in tow, but you’re still rocking your hips back and forth as if you’re soothing someone.”

“Sniffing rear ends is second nature.”

“You’re all too comfortable with picking someone else’s nose and wiping it on your pant leg.”


We deliver more than just babies. That’s because we’re here for you every step of the way, from prenatal planning to delivery and beyond. At TriHealth, our goal is to partner with you so we understand your preferences for a happy and safe delivery. Maybe that’s why we deliver more babies than any other health care system in Greater Cincinnati.

• Obstetrics & Gynecology

Our skilled ob/gyn physicians, award-winning nurses, midwives and breastfeeding experts, along with maternity and parenting classes and birthing options, offer each family the opportunity to create a personalized birthing experience just right for them. It’s a promise we deliver. To learn more, visit TriHealth.com.

• High-Risk Obstetrical Care

• Fertility • Level III NICU at Good Samaritan Hospital • Level II Special Care Nursery at Bethesda North

• Nurse Midwives Deliveries at: Bethesda North Hospital Good Samaritan Hospital

TriHealth.com | 513 475 4500


The Baby Guide And Kids Too! 2015  

The Baby Guide And Kids Too! 2015 issue from the publishers of Cincinnati Magazine

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