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SIDEKICK MARTIAL ARTS MAGAZINE

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April-2014

www.sidekickpublication.com ALL THE ACTION YOU CAN READ

ALLEN WOODMAN

SAMURAI TO SERVE SANDOKAN TECHNIQUES

LES KIERSNOWSKI BUGEIKO TAIJUTSU

FEDERICO DINATALE

GEORGE HAJNASR

JKD JUST A NAME HENRY BINERFA

FLEXIBILITY TRAINING KAJUKENBO TECHNIQUES

THE HISTORY AND LEGEND OF

BOB GOMEZ

FRANK DUX


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PUBLISHER´S MESSAGE

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nd so let it begin. This year 2014 has already begin with a huge BANG! As a martial artist for more than 40 years of experience and training, I have always wanted to be a positive promoter of martial arts and its community. SIDEKICK The Martial Arts Magazine was my original concept to help in this process. The idea for this industry magazine is to not follow what others have done but, to lead people to the next level of understanding within their own diverse school of training. I first began SIDEKICK Publications with its first inaugural issue in May 1993. Since then we have grown in to a worldwide publishing house that focuses on the content and not the filler. This new edition of SIDEKICK The Martial Arts Magazine will be a quarterly issued formatted magazine with profiles and interviews from some of the top martial artist in the word. Along with featured interviews with celebrities and masters of distinctive arts but also training tips, health and healing as well as articles of understanding and history of arts, systems and school from around the globe. With this first re-issue of the magazine we are stepping up the pace and quickly becoming the historians of this generation for the martial arts community. We of course cannot do this alone and need your valued support. Not only with interesting articles and photos layouts but with sponsorships and advertising that will increase interest and sales in your own product and services. As a leading authority on martial arts we hope to challenge all our readers to become more involved with your community around you. Tournaments, seminars and events in your area are always in need of your support and attendance. Support your local events and your local martial artist. We at SIDEKICK Magazine will do our part to help promote and support Local, Regional, National and International events with coverage of stories, promotions and events and the people that make them happen. Please read and follow our FREE Digital magazine every month we publish. Find your own voice with us at your side and discover the world of martial arts that you may not have even known existed. Thank you for reading and we hope to see you here next issue of SIDEKICK The Martial Arts Magazine. Allen Woodman Owner / SIDEKICK Publications

PUBLISHER /EDITOR Allen Woodman EDITOR -IN-CHIEF Henry Binerfa C. CONTRIBUTORS Les Kiersnoswki Frank Dux Gustavo Peloi Henry Binerfa Art Camacho Bob Goméz George Hajnasr Allen Woodman TRANSLATIONS Yisel Viamontes Alcides Cervantes Daryanis Tamayo Fuente. The publisher and directors of the magazine do not represent the opinions or information of the collaborators or contributors there in. All articles are submitted by the authors and or their agents or representatives. The publicity included inside the pages of the magazine is only and exclusive responsibility of the advertisers. Many of the techniques of the martial arts can be dangerous, please training them only under the guide of a professor or expert. SIDEKICKPUBLICATION@YAHOO.COM

www.sidekickpublication.com Tel: (619) 823-8819 En español: Tel: (702) 539 3192

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CONTENTS COVER STORY

Isuue Number 1

8 A SAMURAI... TO SERVE

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THE HISTORY AND LEGEND OF FRANK DUX

16 FLEXIBILITY

30 KAJUKENBO

TRAINING PART 1

32 SANDOKAN 46 DANA

ABBOTT

36 JKD JUST A NAME

42 BUGEIKO

TAIJUTSU


Original Since “1976“! e h T March 15th.....New York April 12th.....Indiana May 17th......California August 16th.......Texas September 6th.......Georgia October 4th.........Seattle, Washington 6

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A Samurai

…To Serve By: Allen Woodman

W

hen martial artists think of a warrior figure that exemplifies the meaning of their training and their art, they usually think of a traditional Japanese Samurai, an eloquently dressed and immaculately armed warrior of Feudal Japan. The mental picture is of a Japanese warrior wearing an overstated ensemble of weapons and armor, including the most prized possession of a Samurai, the Katana or Sword. The samurai, steeped in the culture and tradition of Japanese feudal periods, is the most recognized image of a true warrior. Bushi warriors, and those of the Samurai class, were distinctively heralded as the pre- eminent authorities on warfare and honed skills of battle. Peasants would bow at the sight of a samurai approaching to show great honor and respect to the warrior even if the samurai was only passing by. 8

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The stories and legends of the Japanese Samurai have been woven into the fabric of American martial arts society and we hold the samurai to a higher than human standard. The Samurai deserve recognition for great battles fought with much honor. The fact remains, that in today’s martial arts community, the samurai is considered a master warrior to be emulated by martial arts instructors and practitioners of the arts.

reigned. Samurai were more like security guards and police, than a military force that went to battle. Not that the samurai didn’t see battle, quit the opposite. Samurai were often sent at a moment’s notice to dispatch orders given by their Oyabun or head master. The Samurai class had a code of ethics and honor, termed the Bushido “The Way of the Warrior” The Bushido was a spoken, and later written, set of rules and moral conduct that provided the Samurai with a standard that guided their behavior along their chosen path of training and warriorship. The rules were never to be broken under any circumstance, and were to be obeyed by all Samurai regardless of which house they protected or under who’s rule they stood.

The true origins and the ideologies of the Japanese Samurai class and its individual Bushi or Ronin warriors has been somewhat misconstrued by the martial arts community. The purpose of the Samurai class was to train hard in anticipation of the honor of being chosen by a master or warlord. The Samurai system as a whole was developed by the barons of feudal Japan to aid in the protec- The term Bushi or warriors from tion of the house in which they the traditional Japanese language


translates to “One who battles” or there are three characters that “A person of war”. make up the word. Bushido began in the 8th cen- The characters put together tury1, and was formalized as mean “way of the warrior”. But early as the 13th century. we need to look at each character to understand their greater meaBushido was a code of conduct ning. The character “BU” means for the Samurai and served as a warrior, or something to do with model of behavior for the Samu- the military. You see four strokes rai and other social classes. Du- on the left side and towards the ring the relative peace of the bottom and they appear to be Tokugawa Shogunate, the Samu- sheltered by a roof. These strokes rai had time on their hands, and form the basis of the Japanespent much of that time pursuing se kanji for the word “stop”, but other interests, such as becoming when the roof is included, it bescholars. comes “honest” or “righteous”. If we take a look at the Japanese Kanji which are the adopted logographic Chinese characters for the word Bushido, we find that

The second character, “SHI,” looks much like the kanji for “earth” and is often mistaken as such by grade school children.

BU - Warrior, military, chivalry, arms

The character for earth has a longer base which extends out past the middle horizontal lines. The character (SHI) represents a gentleman. SHI is also defined as samurai, but you would not use this character alone to mean samurai. It is interesting that the character for samurai utilizes the character for earth within it. The final character, “DO,” is familiar to most people in the martial arts. It is the ending character for most major styles and disciplines. For example, Aiki”do”, Ju”do”, Sei”do”, Hapki”do”. DO is understood to mean “the Way” (so “the way” of Aiki for example). The word Bushido came into general usage in Japan in the 17th century. The word owes its common usage in the Japanese language, as well as its introduction in the West’s lexicon, to the 1903 publication of Nitobe Inazo’s book, Bushido: The Soul of Japan. Dr. Inazo wrote:

SHI - Gentleman, samurai

“…Bushido, then, is the code of moral principles which the samurai were required or instructed to observe…More frequently it is a DO - Road-way, street, journey, way, code unuttered and unwritten…It was an organic growth of decades course, moral, teachings and centuries of military career.” growth of decades and centuries of military career.” 1 As defined in the recent authorized publication “Samurai Bushido Origins of modern day martial arts” written by Grant Miller BA. MA. Published by SIDEKICK Publications 2013

We first find the characters BUSHI used in a book of early history of Japan written in 797, the Shoku Nihongi. There is a chapSIDEKICK

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ter in this book which covered the year 721 and the term Bushi is used here (these are the same two characters we know of today). The reference to this word was about the ideal warrior also being a poet. There is an abundance of literature during the periods of the 13th through 16th centuries on Bushido. This is when the code heavily emphasized loyalty and devotion. There was no higher goal than to risk one’s life for his leader and to die a warrior hero’s is right to die, to strike when it is No oath is necessary. “Propriety death. right to strike.” carried beyond bounds becomes a lie.” When the Meiji Government came into power and the Meiji 2. Courage. A virtue only in the Restoration began in 1868, the- cause of righteousness. Death for 6. Honor. A vivid consciousness re were huge sweeping changes an unworthy cause was termed a of personal dignity and worth is brought throughout all Japan. It dog”s death. “It is true courage to implicit in the word honor. “Dispelled the end of the Shogunate live when it is right to live, and to shonor is like a scar on a tree which time, instead of effacing rule and the samurai way of life, die only when it is right to die.” only helps to enlarge.” the age of the sword ended. 3. Benevolence. Love, affection The Seven Principles of Bushido for others, sympathy and nobility 7. Loyalty. Only in the code of of feeling are regarded as the hi- chivalrous honor does loyalty asBushidō or “Way of the Warrior” ghest attributes of the soul. “Be- sume importance. In the conflict is a term of common usage since nevolence brings under its sway between loyalty and affection the the late 19th century. It describes whatever hinder its power just as code never wavers from the choice of loyalty. “A samurai was oblia uniquely Japanese code of con- water subdues fire.” ged to appeal to the intelligence duct adhered to by samurai since time immemorial, and loosely 4. Politeness. A poor virtue if it is and conscience of his sovereign analogous to Western concepts actuated only by a fear of offen- by demonstrating the sincerity of of chivalry. Bushido encompas- ding good taste. Rather it should his words with the shedding of ses a system of moral principles. stem from a sympathetic regard his own blood.” It embodies a code of daily living for the feeling of others. “In its for the samurai. Those instructed highest form politeness approa- The Samurai that was once the character of feudal Japan, becain the code are expected to disci- ches love.” me the woven remnant of a culpline themselves according to it. The seven principles of budo are: 5. Veracity. “Truthfulness.” Lying ture that would long carry the was deemed cowardly, and it was samurai deeds in the fabric of 1. Rectitude. Correct judgment regarded as dishonorable. Indeed society. or procedure for the resolution the word of a samurai guaranteed of righteousness. “To die when it the truthfulness of an assertion. The meaning of the word samu-


rai was the truest definition of service to one’s lord or master. This word samurai became the definition of the true sense of duty to others, above all else. Firstly, it was the responsibility or duty of the samurai to protect his master or house lord, his oyabun. Secondly, his duty was transferred to the safety of those within the house walls, the family. Thirdly, it was the duty of each samurai to sustain and protect the group or other samurai within the overlords command. Fourthly, it was the safety and protection of the community that was protected under the Shogunate rule. This is the aspect of the meaning of the word samurai that is missed by many of today’s martial artist. The image we have of the samurai as a great Japanese swordsman and warrior scholar is not the true image of a samurai, and it does not portray who the samurai really were or what they actually stood for. The definition of the term samurai and the actual meaning which should be derived from the makeup of the Kanji translates “To Serve”.

have learned the techniques, and Our goal must be to protect and “To Serve” is the true meaning learned to serve, that we will have to nurture the family, communiof samurai, and this is where mastered our chosen art form. ty and friends protected under our martial arts training should the Bushi household. As martial begin and end, as servants of one We must add the true meaning of artists we often pursue only another. Learning technique is samurai to our martial studies if the values of a single faction of not enough. It is only after we those studies are to be complete. the samurai, one of honed skill SIDEKICK

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and tactics to dissuade an enemy upon encroachment. However, this was only a single part of the Samurai’s education and life affirmation.

lly the only way to grow, and having a willingness to be taught by, and to teach others, is what the martial arts should be all about. The secret to learning comes with sharing, but we all tend to If today’s martial arts instructors build walls around our martial understood the real value of the arts school, business, organizatrue samurai code, more would tions and events because it takes choose the path of Bushi and not so much time and hard work to just the outward appearance of succeed, and, we are warriors, the Samurai’s pomp and stately willing to fight to keep what we manner. have built. With a true understanding of the Samurai we are allowed to see the positive goals we should be striving for. Together the martial artists of today need to stand up for their country, communities, and their families, and this is done by serving on another. Service often entails sacrifice and is what should make up the fabric of martial arts. As martial artists, we need to practice the The Seven Principles of Bushido beginning in our own martial community, and within the martial arts industry as a whole. We must begin to reinstate the code, or see it lost to all in the sweeping changes of our society. In our humble opinions, this is an area we need to work on. We need to learn to protect and support one another, instead of always competing with one another in our separate systems and styles of training. As traditional martial artists, we tend to seek out like minded individuals who are willing to share their art. Sharing ones art is rea12

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of competing with one another. We may end up with less school, less events, less organization and businesses. But those we do have would be much more successful. I think we need to take to heart the words of an ill fated L.A. motorist, “Can’t we all just get along.” Too often, we let politics; ego, finances and fear determine our actions instead of following the Bushido code. We, as a united martial arts family, need to cast aside these constraints and One area we have seen where the become the modern day samurai participation of martial artists is we are meant to be. imperative is attendance at martial arts events. Over the past few Together we must begin the jouryears we have seen a steady decli- ney of serving, not ourselves, ne in attendance. Tournaments, but our martial family, and then seminars and other martial ga- spread that out to include our entherings have waned and even tire communities. Of course, we failed due to a lack of adequate start at home by serving our faparticipation or nonexistent su- milies, which is hard to do when pport from local martial arts you work full time and also run groups. These events are usually a martial arts school, business held to bring groups and schools organization or event, but, if we together in friendly competition team up, we can succeed. Do you or for training. However, we of- run a small school you wish you ten find reasons not to attend or could grow, partner up with anoeven to travel one city over to ther small school and add one show support. another’s art to your curriculum and grow together. Have a smaIn these difficult economic ti- ll tournament you want to grow. mes, the financial burden often Find another tournament and decides what we can and can’t combine the two. Have an orgado. But there is a solution to this nization that takes too much of challenge and it will allow all of your time, combine it with an us to succeed. The solution is organization that has extra time combining our resources and joi- to give. Are you really good a ning together within our schools, certain aspects of your business, our organizations, our busines- but not at other’s? Find someone ses and with our events. This is who compliments you and team a touchy subject, but the mar- up. tial arts community would have much more success if we were We all need to stand up and suwilling to work together instead pport our local and regional


events, including seminars, tournaments and martial arts gatherings. If you can’t afford the event financially take it upon yourself to arrange a trade so you can attend the event by contributing your talents.

help promote events to pay for entrance to the an event. We never leave a door closed when there is an opportunity to gather together with martial artist. We can’t resist listening to stories of old days, when times were so different. We never tire of the old If our economy doesn’t improve school methods of training and quickly, these ideas will become the war stories that come from mandatory for survival, so why competition amongst friends. don’t we embrace the samurai’s code today and let go of the po- These are the bonds that we shalitics, ego, finances and fear and re in our martial endeavors and join together for success. ones that we should keep tight for the sake of own posterity. We often teach free seminars or The development of our martial

arts and its techniques may differ from school to school, and the rules of competition may differ slightly. I may sell martial arts widgets and you may sell martial arts thing a ma jigs, but the real meaning is all the same, to practice and promote martial arts. Let’s start today by reaching out to other martial arts instructors, students and masters alike. Let’s open our minds to different ways of doing things and at the same time return to the past by embracing the Bushido Code of the samurai once again.

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Flexibility Training Part I

By: Lic. Henry Binerfa

DEFINITION: “Flexibility is the natural biological ability men have to perform full range of motion, due to the mobility to articulate and elasticity of the muscles, ligaments and tendons by itself and under external influences, partially conditioned by coordination”. FORMS OF FLEXIBILITY TRAINING: 1. Passive Flexibility 2. Active Flexibility 3. General Flexibility 4. Specific Flexibility 5. Stretching.

ge of motion about a joint due to the protagonist’s contraction and the antagonist’s stretching. General Flexibility: it is known as the main joint systems’ development (humeral-scapula, femoral-lame, and spinal-cord).

Specific Flexibility: it refers to the development of a specific joint which determines the success Passive Flexibility: it refers to the maximum ran- in a sport modality (E.g. the hurdler with the ge of motion a sportsman develops under exter- femoral-lame joint, the crawlswimmer with the nal strength (partner, additional weight, devices, humeral-scapula). tools, etc.), due to the capacity of stretching or the antagonists’ relaxation. Stretching: it is a tension-relaxation-extension method. Practicing this method helps the body Active Flexibility: it refers to the maximum ran feel its benefits. 16

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IMPORTANCE OF FLEXIBILITY

• It helps to prevent injures (elastic muscle, better carries raised mechanical weight).

• Its betterment, adjusted to the demands of martial arts, brings about a positive action on the de- • It is achieved faster with daily training, velopment of the physical features that control efficiency (strength, velocity, resistance, etc.), • The optimal age goes from 11-14 years then; a and the technical abilities. well-graded training work will be enough to keep the reached level of mobility (Jurgen Wuineck• Itis an essential issue of the training sessions. Optimal training).

METH OD OLO G I CA L PRINCIPLES FOR TRAINING FLEXIBILITY It must be trained: • Daily and continually, without large scale interruptions. • After a well-thought warm up session; never after a hard practice of general resistance nor under muscle weariness.

• The slow-downs within the practice sessions must be devoted to relaxation.

• Its improvement is kept longer after active practice than after passive flexibility training.

• Extension must reach the maximum limit seve- • To reach the maximum ral times and progressively level, extension must be exceed it. practiced in several directions. • During the specific training of a given sport, its • To carry out active flexiimprovement turns mo- bility, some weigh exercimentary for about 10 mi- ses can be done in the free nute; after a stretching segment. practice session, long term slow-downs must be avoided. SIDEKICK

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Active Flexibility. Exercise Guide

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3 Let’s start the exercise with feet together (Photo 1), and we flex the trunk to the front to try to touch the floor with the tips of our fingers (Photo 2), then with our fists (Photo 3) and the palms of the hands (Photo 4). Then, we will do the same to the front (Photo-2-3-4), sides (Photo-5,6-7) and backward (Photo-8,9-10). It is important to note that we should never bend our knees. They can be executed of 15 to 25 repetitions.


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Photo -11 We cross legs and we took the ankles. We perform flexion trying to touch our chest with the knee. Can be performed of 15 to 25 repetitions. Then, change the foot that crossed in front and repeat the exercise.

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We sit on our heels and grab both ankles, then stretch your legs stuck trying to leave the chest to the thighs. We can perform 5-10 reps.

HENRY BINERFA CASTELLANOS (Camaguey, Cuba, 1981) College degree in Cuba of Physical Culture and Sports, author of several books in spanish most notably, El Arte de Usar el Cuerpo y la Mente, EnciclopedĂ­a del ShinKaiDo Ryu Tomo I y Tomo II, Budismo Zen para tu Alma, El gran libro de los Renzoku Waza del ShinKaiDo Ryu. Black Belt 1er Dan en TaekwonDo ITF Black Belt 1er Dan en TaekwonDo WTF Black Belt 4to Dan en KaienDo Creator of system ShinKaiDo Ryu, Black Belt 8vo Dan.

END OF THE FIRST PART CONTINUED ON NEXT ISSUE ...


THE HISTORY AND LEGEND OF BY ALLEN WOODMAN

FRANK

DUX

Frank William Dux is born in Toronto, Canada, in 1956, and immigrated to the United States in 1963 the son of Holocaust survivors, growing up in the then Martial Art world’s legendary “Valley of Champions,” the California, San Fernando Valley. Where he took advantage of auditing and being mentored by what has been considered the greatest martial art generation of all time, with schools run and operated by Ed Parker, Bong Soo Han, Chuck Norris, Joe Lewis, Tadashi Yamashita, to name just a few greats.

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COVER STORY spin off of The Black Dragon Society (Kyūjitai; 黑 龍會; Shinjitai: 黒龍会 kokuryūkai) established, in 1901, in China, a formerly prominent paramilitary, he name Frank Dux is made internationally re- ultra-nationalist right-wing group in Japan as well nowned by the 1988 Canon International the- as the Chinese Black Dragon Societies (i.e. Hop Si atrically released and syndicated motion picture Tong, etc).

MARTIAL ART “LIVING LEGEND”

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“Based upon true events in the life of Frank Dux” entitled: Bloodsport: . A quarter of a century later, the film remains still in syndication and is therefore a Cult Classic, with its success attributed to then 1988 groundbreaking never seen before choreography and camera techniques invented by Frank Dux & Bloodsport’s Directory of Photography, David Worth .

THE ULTIMATE CHAMPION INSPIRES THE BRAND NAME UFC The Kumite championship and Black Belt magazine article is corroborated by fight footage , photographs inset in the article as well as prominent internationally recognized and respected martial art masters and eyewitnesses, several appearing in documentaries such as “Put Up Your Dux” by JBM Films .

The feature film debuts Jean Claude Van Damme who portrays Frank Dux trained in the secret ways of the Ninja that honors his “Shidoshi” in the Amongst those appearing in the JBM film is forlegendary “Kumite” by winning it all and defeat- mer USKA World Champion Victor Moore who ing his opponents in world record time . competed against and bested the Best of The Best in Sport Karate (1960-s—1970’s) that includes, Joe The Frank Dux story is described as the “Ultimate Lewis, Chuck Norris, Mike Stone, etc. Moore in Movie of the Ultimate Martial Art Contest” the film and in an article for New Mexico newspaper, Artesia Daily, describes Frank Dux as his most Notably, with him being featured in the Novem- memorable fight and only person he could not deber 1980 issue of Black Belt magazine Frank Dux feat for which Moore nicknamed him “The Ultibecame the first publicly acknowledged and inde- mate Fight Champion”. pendently verified western born and trained Martial Artist to have championed the legendary elite In the proposed Reality TV series promo, The SeAsian no-holds-barred/mixed martial art event. cret Weapon, Goliath Films & TV Entertainment, Martial Art Sport Karate legend Fred Brewster as This event is more popularly called amongst other well as Museum of Sport Karate curator Gary Lee things, like Vale Tudo, “The Kumite”. (when appearing on the KCAA-Kinckin-it, Dan Hect Radio Show); describes Frank Dux as “the Kumite (組手) in Japanese means sparring. fastest and hardest hitting striker in his era if not of all time;” that Brewster faced off against ; this popWhile not a publicity seeking organization contrary ular opinion is shared on camera by many fighters to popular myth “The Kumite” organizers, in 1980, and The Secret Weapon producer that also prothe Black Dragon Fighting Society & International duced Bloodsport II, Michael Corscione . Fighting Arts Association (IFAA) are far from being secret . Especially, when they are an affiliate/ The respect of other fighters in the 1970’s and SIDEKICK

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1980’s culminates in Frank Dux being coined in the no-holds-barred full contact martial arts world, the “Ultimate Fight Champion” from which the Mixed Martial Art Ultimate Fight Championship aficionado’s and its founders, ergo ten time undisputed Brazilian Jujitsu World Champion, Higan Machado, attribute the league owes its inspiration and UFC name to , a fact why Frank Dux is also titled: “The Godfather of Mixed Martial Arts” -- whose unprecedented 16 world records and championship titles holds him out to be referred to as the “Babe Ruth of Martial Arts” by Martial Art magazines and Martial Art Halls of Fame .

ally popular through the film Bloodsport. In 1975, Frank Dux defied Martial Art tradition and thus had become renowned for fighting in a Full Contact Kumite event in embroidered bicycle/ board shorts rather than customary martial art uniform and thereby, inspiring others to follow suit.

What makes this fashion statement historically significant and attributable to Frank Dux is his fighting in shorts is not motivated by aesthetics or functionality but was committed as his form of visible protest, weary of the politicking associated with one wearing an indigenous martial art uniform and then being subjected to hearing if one prevailed or URBAN SLANG: were defeated “This style is better than style rhetoric;” Dux advocating: “The true spirit the Kumite Mixed Martial Arts and Bloodsport’s wide appeal (No-holds-barred/Mixed Martial Arts) is founded observably placed Frank Dux at the forefront of upon the observable fact that victory is not deterpop culture with his very name incorporated into mined by any one particular martial art style but by urban slang: the execution of it by the participant.” To Be Frank Duxed is:

I doing this and risking suspension as well as stripping away of his World championship title, Frank 1. Similar to being knocked out in world record Dux plays a pivotal role in breaking down centufashion by swift Frank Dux roundhouse kick to the ries of prejudice since until the 1980 publicizing of head; 2. It can apply to, quick losses in gambling, Dux rein as IFAA/Black Dragon undefeated World fighting, sports games, or rejection to name a few; Champion anyone not Asian and, in terms of Jap3. A party who passes out right after a single shot anese martial arts not “Koryū” (古流) (traditional of tequila; 4. It can also be used in the verb form: Japanese martial art established prior to Meiji Res“Frank Duxing It,” in which the losing/rejection is toration), is generally thought of as being, “infepre meditated - usage example: “John really got rior.” Frank Duxed the other night, he went in all in at poker on the 1st hand and lost with a pair of twos” . During his rein as Champion, Frank Dux is nicknamed by the Chinese audience “Fa Ma” (trans. “The Flying Horse”) given his incredible hang time CREATING FASHION TRENDS: and defining trait of making use of one of any number of powerful jumping kicks by which to finish off Notably, Frank Dux is inducted into numerous his opponents as they were falling, Dux trademark . International Sokeship Councils and Martial Art The high flying kicks were adapted for Bloodsport Halls of Fame as a “Living Legend” . by Jean Claude Van Damme who is trained for the role and choreographed by Frank Dux. Most all of which share the common belief Frank Dux initiated the fashion trend of mixed martial art Frank Dux figuratively launching Van Damme’s fighters competing in embroidered bicycle shorts film career and returning to rely upon Dux talent or board shorts as depicted on screen and the mov- and expertise in similar thematic films, Lionheart ies poster, in 1988. The fashion trend is made glob- and The Quest. 24

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“The Godfather of Mixed Martial Arts” whose unprecedented 16 world records and championship titles holds him out to be referred to as the “Babe Ruth of Martial Arts” SIDEKICK

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FOUNDER FIRST NORTH AMERCICAN (USA, CANADA & MEXICO) NINJUTSU SYSTEMS DUX RYU NINJUTSU In 1975, Frank Dux found the very first truly “American System” of Ninjitsu: Dux Ninjitsu™ . It is based on combining what Dux Ryu (Dux proprietary fighting style with shinobi-no-jutsu curriculums of Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto-Ryu as well as traditional Kuden of Koga Yamabushi roots and methodology – thus, considered truly Dux own invention giving rise to the name “Dux Ryu Ninjitsu” aka “DRN” that also gives rise to first Mexican and Canadian Ninjutsu schools being co-formed by Enrique Flores Tovar (Mexico) as well as Raymond Cooper (Canada).

fighting that led to Frank Dux having formulated a highly exclusive proprietary technology he calls DUX FASST™ that is embraced and put in use by elite Black Ops, Special Forces and Law Enforcement, world-wide. -DUX is Latin for: Being 1st/ Leader of Leaders / Best of Best -FASST stands for Focus-Action-Skill-Strategy-Tactics. DUX FASST™ means to be a Leader of Leaders / Best of the Best through one being FIRST (1st) in Focus-Action-Skill-Strategy-Tactics.

This is an amalgamated martial art approach that does not replace one style for another since it is a problem solving technology in terms of how one trains in neutralizing a physical threat (Striking, Grappling, Weapon Disarm or Retention) as well In 1987, Frank Dux is officially granted the title as can be employed to promote financially sustainHanshi (範士 : はんし) considered a “teacher of able solutions that can fundamentally change inditeachers”. This title is used by many different arts viduals & society (i.e. enlightening and motivating for the top few instructors of that style, and is victims of aggression or substance abuse how to sometimes translated “Grand Master”. end the cycle of dysfunction, etc.) . Frank Dux is Sōke (宗家), a Japanese title meaning “head of the family,” who may grant his own Menkyo kaiden (免許皆伝) , a Japanese term meaning “license of total transmission.” It is a certificate that is granted by a school, ryū, or other organization meaning that the recipient has learned everything that the organization or school can teach, and is licensed to pass on all aspects of training. Given the observable fact “Ryu” 流, means literally “flow” as in “flows from” with the derived meaning of “mainstream” and infers a specific “style” , Frank Dux in naming his system Dux Ryu, he makes no pretenses of teaching koryu ninjutsu as early as 1975, before ninjutsu and ninja are popularized in the west, especially, the USA.

The DUX FASST™ technology bridges the gap between the Conditioned Reflex Response and attaining the desired Practiced Reflex Response, akin to what Japanese martial art masters refer to as “Mushin” (trans. “mind no mind”) .

FRANK “THE FLYING HORSE” DUX HALL OF FAME RECORDS

Inducted as a “Living Legend” in multiple Martial Art Halls of Fame (e.g. USA Martial Arts Hall of Fame 2008, Action Martial Art Magazine Hall of Fame, 2001; Golden Globe International Martial Art Hall of Fame, 1998; World Family Head of Sokeship Council, 1998; World Martial Arts Hall of Fame, 1996, etc.) , several record and verify his DUX FASST unprecedented accomplishments in addition to mass media reference sources and governmental In the late 1970’s Frank Dux claims to have made sanctioning sports regulating authorities that demajor breakthroughs investigating the science of termines these facts, as follows: 26

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FRANK DUX CHAMPIONSHIP TITLES -South African/ Martial Art Sports Authority (SA/ MASA) & Martial Arts & Games Committee South African (MA&GCSA) that area national government department of South African Government on par with South African Sports Council & Olympic Committee (SASC&OC), World MMA Council, Black Dragon Society-Kokoryukai/ Korean Imperial/International Fighting Arts Association – Black Dragon Fighting Society (IFAA); Shinja-matsu - Yokohama, Japan: -World Heavyweight No-Holds-Barred: Full-Contact Kumite San Soo Champion (1975 thru 1980) undefeated -International Fighting Arts Association – Black Dragon Fighting Society Freestyle Weapons/Forms Champion (1975 thru 1980) -World MMA council National Champion Mexico (1975-2013)

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FRANK DUX WORLD RECORDS 1975 - Most consecutive knockouts – 56.88 1975 - Fastest recorded Kumite knockout - 3.2 seconds88 1975 - Fastest recorded punch resulting in a knockout - .12 seconds 88 1975 - Fastest recorded kick resulting in a knockout - 72 MPH, 1975 - Shortest knockout time average for fight career - 1:20 sec 1975 - First to achieve IFAA Weapons/Forms score of a perfect “10” 1978 - First Kumite fighter to exceed 300 matches 1980 - First Kumite fighter to be undefeated with over 100 matches 1980 - Final Kumite fight record - 329 matches 1990 - Chi Kung Tug of War (Standing on one leg) - 66 people, Zug, Switzerland. 1993 - First and only martial artist to break bulletproof glass barehanded, International Martial Arts Festival, Bercy Stadium, Paris, France. 1993 - Multiple Champaign Bottle break, varying heights with a single kick, International Martial Arts Festival, Bercy Stadium, Paris, France. 1993 - Chi Kung Tug of War (kneeling position) - 23 people. Lausanne, Switzerland. 1993 - Bottle break (vertical palm heel) - International Martial Arts Festival, Bercy Stadium, Paris, France , , . 2010 – 100 man tug of war on one leg – Expo Artes Marciales, Mexico City 2013 –World MMA Council Longest Reigning MMA National Champion in World (ret.) – Mexico (1975-2013) 2013- 1st Martial Art Champion, inducted as “Galardon Inmortal” – Fundacion Cultural Galerias Plaza de las Estrellas Ortorga, Mexico City Mexico


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KAJUKENBO

-Bob G贸mez. -Ryan Bumagat.

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Born on the island of Taiwan in 1963 Bob Gomez and his family moved to the US when he was 2 years old. He knew nothing about the martial arts until the early 70’s when his Dad, Rick Gomez, tried to get him interested in sports as a child, but quickly learned that he was too small for football, too short for basketball, and had too short of an attention span for baseball. Then his dad took him to see a new “karate” movie playing in town, and Bruce Lee’s “Enter The Dragon” changed his life. He was ten years old. Bob began training at Gaylord’s Kenpo/Karate in Fremont, California, under (Professor) Bill Gifford and (Professor) Greg Lagera. In 1978 Bob rejoined (Great Grand Master) Charles Gaylord at Fremont Dragons in Fremont, California, training under (Grandmaster) Pete Morales, (Professor) Bill Sills, and (Professor) Bill Gifford. While money continued to

8 be an issue and he eventually had to leave the Fremont Dragons, Bob continued to practice Kajukenbo “Old School” style. At 17 Bob became an accelerated high school student and was able to sign up for a Tae Kwon Do class at Ohlone Junior College in Fremont, California, taught by (Master) Connie Miller. He trained there for about two years and received his green belt before the classes were eliminated from the junior college curriculum. Throughout, he never stopped working out with his martial arts friends in garages. In 1988, finally on his own and with a decent job, he joined Golden Dragon School of Karate at the Newark Pavilion in Newark, California, with which he has been affiliated ever since. Training under (Grandmaster) Pete Morales, (Professor) Bill Sills, (Professor) Brian Yoshi, (Professor) Mark Davis, (Sigung) Casey McPartland, Bob received his student black belt in 1991, his First Degree Black Belt in May of 1992, his Second Degree in December of 1993, Third Degree and Kajukenbo Association of America Instructor’s Certificate in August of 2003, and his Fourth Degree in December of 2009. While taking a short hiatus from teaching, fellow Golden Dragon and (Professor) Shawn Hayes asked if Bob would be interested in helping him start his own school. Hayes Martial Arts, specializing in Kajukenbo and Balintawak, officially opened in 2007 at the Newark Pavilion in Newark, California. Bob was awarded the Head Instructor position in 2009, and left the school to teach privates in 2010. Since then he has continued to teach privates, attend seminars, learn Balintawak from Professor Hayes, and do Old School Kajukenbo workouts. Special thanks to Soke James Neiman for the use of his dojo: Shugyo Aikido Dojo. Photographer, Stanley Fontillas

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SANDOKAN Les Kiersnowski

understanding of the arts by using science. He then discovered that search for full understanding of the human body that led him to kinetic energy and kinetic movements so he started researching both anatomy and kinesiology. Understanding and knowing how the human body works pointed him towards physics. He began researching Physics and Newtonian Laws. The missing puzzle pieces that he was looking for were answered by science. Master Keirsnoski started developing my own system based on science and he named it Sandokan.

Grandmaster Les Kiersnoski started his training in the martial arts in 1971 with a traditional Japanese Kyokushin style. When he began he automatically fell in love with the art as well as its traditions, philosophy and conditioning so at that point he knew he was going to dedicate his life to martial arts. Master Les trained in Kyokushin nonstop six or seven days a week until 1979 at which time he moved to the United States and settled in Philadelphia, PA. Upon settling he extensively searched for Kyokushin dojos – the closest one he could find was 2 hours away in New York City so he began his travels and continued training in Kyokushin. While in doing that for many years, Master Keirsnoski thought he had a full understanding of how each basic move and technique works in all the arts he had been training. But there was still something missing. Grandmaster Les began an eleven year long research study in human anatomy and tried to find the complete

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The Sandokan system comprises an understanding of martial science, biomechanics, and gravity and how the human body works, functions and reacts. Sandokan is a result of direct application of research and experience into human sciences of motion, force production, fitness, conditioning, kinesiology, physiology and physics. This system views body movement from a scientific vantage point, and judges whether a technique or method is efficient or inefficient, not based on some category of which is “the best� in any given style. Instead, it is judged in terms of scientific pragmatism, with the knowledge of balance, coordination, and body alignment, so that the student may safely deliver a strike while simultaneously maximizing his or her focus on optimum power. The Sandokan Art is a unique blend of practicle and effecient techniques that blend the basic nneeds of use with the implamentation of correct movement and placement. The following is a small example of the basic techniques and application of the Sandokan system.


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SANDOKAN Continued...

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Grandmaster Les Kiersnoski is the founder and head instructor of teh Sandokan art. He has authored the only book on the subject as well as produced 3 high quality DVDs to introduce the entire Sandokan martial arts ssytem to the world. We at SIDEKICK Publications woudl encourage any pratictiner of martial arts to purchase any of these items and support Grandmaster Les Kiersnoski and the Sandokan System.

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It Is What It Is, Just a Name!

By George Hajnasr

it takes to defend myself in all situations at any given time or place, and not being limited to any Today many Jeet Kune Do practitioners might do range. Punching, kicking, trapping, hand to hand what the late Bruce Lee (Founder of Jeet Kune Do) combat, knife defense, gun defense, club defense, did, and some might do what he said. Some mi- self defense or even ground fighting are all technight believe in teaching someone “how to fish, or ques that can be applied seeing a good JKD practigiving them a fish,” but at the age of eight I followed tioner uses every part of their body to their fullest what Lee said and what he did and actually lear- and very well rounded, giving mixed martial arts ned to “operate the a boat” enabling me to go deep its true meaning. sea fishing. To express myself honestly and totally without being limited to one group or a particular Many practitioners under the same name who way of applying JKD to its fullest, using whatever claim to teach Jeet Kune Do seem not to agree with 36

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one another about who they learned or studied with. You get all crazy because you want to learn Bruce Lee’s art ,but it seems like everyone does it differently. You ask yourself, why? I am going to tell you why? Bruce Lee has developed the most aggressive fighting arts to date because he uses all arts and is not bound by any of them. A JKD practitioner can adapt and fit into any situation at any given time, and that’s what makes JKD unique and different. It is not a style, a system or a set way of practicing a technique. It is not based just on technique, but on theoretical principles, philosophies and actual applications that fit in real life street situations. Bruce Lee’s unfortunate passing left such a big legacy behind that many of his original students never got to learn the complete art, as he was changing it throughout the years of Jeet Kune Do’s development. Many of the first generation students went out and spread his art the way it was presented to them through the three schools that he had. Some followed his original teaching, which in its early stage required the study of Wing Chun Gung Fu, and later as he progressed he changed it to Jeet Kune Do. So why do many practitioners call it different names such as Jeet Kune Do, Jeet Kune Do Concept or Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do? What is the difference? There is no real difference; the only difference I see is that most are not united. In other words, some took a different approach to how they should apply JKD, whether they decided to add different arts to it, improve on it or just stick to the original teachings of the Jun Fun Gung Fu years, which consist of a very strong base and foundation of Wing Chun Gung Fu as I did. I have taken all of Bruce Lee’s principles, methods and theories, and taken from whoever wanted to teach me JKD and martial arts the best way they knew how, and created my own expression of Jeet Kune Do, which is called Jeet Kune Do: The System Without a System®. Does that make it a wrong or different way of applying JKD? Absolutely not, but am I doing JKD, you bet!!! Just like the founder said, how can I express myself totally and completely? And he also said, ”You think

a fight is just one kick, one blow?” So what I think is that you don’t need to stick to one particular way of doing a technique or movement; neither is it based on any person’s set ways of doing JKD. What makes Jeet Kune Do: The System Without a System®, unique? It is NOT. It is just another name, it can be wiped out at any giving time and it is not bound by any particular way. Unfortunately, because of politics, the name is simply different. Also, what gives me knowledge to express myself? What is JKD and what is not ?My skills were compiled by learning from over ten of the top original students of Bruce Lee, and hours of private classes and over 28 years of Martial Arts experience A black belt holder in various styles of Martial Arts ,which made me realizing what works and what doesn’t ,This question is what drove me to write a book with over 460 pages on the art of JKD and producing a complete DVD series on JKD. Just as Bruce Lee intended, I absorbed what is useful, rejected what is useless, and added what is essentially my own. I SIDEKICK

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have a very informative website dedicated to Jeet Kune Do, packed with everything I have absorbed over the years and learned from others who have a love for JKD.

ple used horses to travel and they used knives and swords in combat. Fortunately we don’t do that any more and we don’t miss it. Jeet Kune Do is a process of growing and constantly improving. It takes the form of whatever works, no matter what style it is. Jeet Kune Do is the only non-classical Chinese It does not become that style because style tends to martial art available today; it is also known as separate people from each other. They might think “Scientific Street Fighting.” their style is the only answer for combat, but every style has its weak points. In Jeet Kune Do, we take Jeet Kune Do translates from Cantonese to “The the stronger points out of that style and use whateWay Of The Intercepting Fist.” Jeet means to stop ver works from it and we are not bound by it. or intercept, Kune means fist or style, and Do means the way. It was founded by the late Bruce Jeet Kune Do does not beat around the bush; it gets Lee around 1965, and was accepted and recogni- directly to the point. Jeet Kune Do is a ‘cutting away zed around the world. Unfortunately with his pas- process’. A diamond cutter cuts away at the rough, sing on July 20th, 1973, he left a big legacy behind. losing almost half of it until the beauty and brillianJeet Kune Do is very direct. It does not remain the ce of a diamond is revealed. Jeet Kune Do is one’s same. It must change as time changes. It is not rigid self-expression outside all fixed patterns. It is a but is fluid, also it favors simplicity and directness. system with no system. You express the technique. You don’t act out the technique, you become the Jeet Kune Do can be changed and improved upon technique. Don’t become the product of that techas time proceeds. Some moves used thousands of nique - you don’t hit. Let “it” hit without even thinyears ago might not work in today’s society. Peo- king of hitting. Don’t concentrate on just one thing.

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If you do, you are going to miss all the glorious things around you. Jeet Kune Do takes the easy way out with the least amount of energy. Jeet Kune Do doesn’t use any fancy or unnecessary stands, because in real fighting none of the fancy stances work. It might look good, but looking good will not help in real situations. Just simply express yourself through any unsophisticated movement. Other martial artists are limited to one style. The student is doing the system through them. They are copying everything the instructor shows them. They, in return, are the products of that style. You do it their way only, and it cannot be changed. Heaven forbid the student changes or modifies their particular style. By that I mean you are very limited. Jeet Kune Do (JKD) uses no way because “when ever there is a way there lies the limitation.” You use what works in a real fight. You can change, modify, and add to it, and so “that way it is a continuous growth.” Also you should always keep in mind that “with an empty cup you can gain totality”. Absorb whatever works with the least amount of energy. That doesn’t mean that Jeet Kune Do The system without a system ® is all over the place like some people might think. What it means is that you are free in your martial art to train in different styles or cross train, as I have demonstrated in my book. Don’t be surprised because a good Jeet Kune Do practitioner will flow from one system to another system. If you wish to lean towards one system then that’s your prerogative, but your limiting yourself. Some situations might be in kicking range, others might be in punching range, and some in trapping range or even ground range. If you lack one of these ranges you will lose no matter how skillful you are in one style of martial arts. A good JKD practitioner uses it all, you name it, you should grasp it! The student must still learn the basics and fundamentals. So what I think is that you don’t need to stick to one particular way of doing a technique or movement; neither

is it based on any person’s set ways of doing JKD. But to look and move like Bruce Lee you must follow it step by step just like any other art, even though you have to go back and learn that rehearsed routine, learn what is behind it, take few punches and learn to fight on the ground. That way, you are not limited to just punching and kicking and you are not a fish out of water. To walk the same path that he walked you must follow his principles, methods and theory that he left us. Once you understand and become these principles, then you liberate yourself from any particular way of doing JKD. As long as the essence of JKD is presented in an honorable and respectful manner, what difference does it make what you call it? It was never meant to be called anything because its founder never believed in styles or systems. It is what it is, Jeet Kune Do, so we can refer only to whether you’ve learned it from different instructors or from the founder himself. This should not change the true meaning or what lies behind Jeet Kune Do, which is to simply express yourself honestly. “If people say Jeet Kune Do is different from “this” or “that,” then let the name of Jeet Kune Do be wiped out, for that is all it is, just a name. Please don’t fuss over it. “(Bruce Lee Tao of Jeet Kune Do.) Peace, Love, JKD ”I DO NOT BELIEVE IN SYSTEMS NOR METHODS” SIDEKICK

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Bugeiko aims to work different aspects of ancient warrior martial traditions, thus the apprentice has a possibility to develop his mental and physical skills, always, searching self-development and overcome, addressing himself to a way of no-violence – Ahimsa. The central basis of the training points to the right way to relate and behave in the practice. Soon, the student enters in Taigeiko Art, corporal science practiced by a gymnastic in which people can improve their health and increase their vital orga-

INTRODUTION By Kyoshi Dinatale Bugeiko is an art whose aims are high. Besides, its martial aspect derivates and rescues ancient arts like BUDO, “warrior arts”, its work consists on rescue the martial spirit, working in the being human the warrior spirit. However, this warrior is not any warrior, he’s a warrior in search of peace and of the spirit raising, of win his difficulties, mistakes and deficiencies, overcoming his fears, rages and anguishes. And, mainly, he searches a way to become a better being human, solidary, harmonious, cult, polite, gentleman, integrated to nature with self-confidence, health, mysticism and pure heart. Bugeiko art aims to develop and integrate, jointly, three aspects in the apprentice; the physical, physical and spiritual, being prioritizing, essentially the work and development of the will. This does not restrict only as an emotion or physical aspect, but it extends to a work of energy agility, by activating the body centers energy. All that result an amplification of the general skills of the martial artist.

nic energy. Inside Bugeiko there are Kenjutsu Art (Japanese sword art), Jojutsu (Japanese stick art), Taijutsu (body to body combat), oriental history and philosophy, Zen meditation and much more. The apprentice tries the physical well-being and the increasing of mental stress. The mainly issue of the martial arts is not fight, but the conflict solutions which are part of our life. By a Bugeiko practice with humbleness, sincerity, conscience, and discipline, the Bugeiko apprentices acquire a big skill of mental and physical concentration, and they learn the most important of all lessons: the respect - for the masters, themselves and all people.

“A special transmission outside the scriptures, Not founded upon words and letters,Pointing directly to the human mind,Seeing into one’s nature and attaining Buddhahood.”

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BUGEIKO TAIJUTSU Renshi Gustavo Peloi Instructor Nilo Takahashi Okuyama.

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Interview to the Shihan

DANA ABBOTT

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When and how did you come to the practice of martial arts? I first discovered martial arts in 1965 when my older brother took me to Judo classes at UC Berkeley. We practiced falls for a season or two and then stopped due to economics. I did not practice martial arts again until I graduated from Arizona State University in 1978. I then joined a group of 20 at the local Police Athletic League (PAL) in Prescott, Arizona in a weekly ritual of practicing hand and foot techniques known at that time as Korean Karate. What motivated you to practice martial arts? There are many reasons why I wanted to practice the martial arts. Although the main reason was that I enjoyed the physical and mental discipline it offered. Since I also was a hyper active person I could easily put in 1000s of extra punches and kicks without fatigue. The more I practiced the more motivated I became. I would read and re-read Black Belt Magazine and say to myself, “One day…One day.” Why choose the sword as your ultimate weapon? During my training I was able to understand the techniques and perfect them at a faster rate. My instructor recognized my strengths and started me on the various weapons offered at that time. I began with the three sectional staff, then onto the tonfa, sai, kama and staff. Upon gaining an understanding of these weapons I was then introduced to the sword, which fit my hand the best. This is where I became more motivated thus increasing my workout times to about 3 hours a day. When do you decide to go and live in Japan? Several years later in 1984, I developed a sudden urge to take off for Japan and learn the sword from the masters. I was introduced to Nihon Taiiku Daigaku (Sport Science Japan University), known as the West Point of martial arts universities. Its Spartan training was just the medicine I needed. At first, the going was tough since they practiced SIDEKICK

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from dawn to dusk six days a week and of course tournaments on Sunday. What did you learn from Japanese lifestyle? I immersed myself into my kendo studies, which is part of the Japanese lifestyle and culture. Since no one spoke English and everyone there were serious kendo students. These students practiced kendo from a very young age. They all started practicing around the age of 5. I immediately came to the conclusion that if I did not learn the lifestyle I would never learn kendo. Thus I did not speak English for almost a decade. Can you tell us the difference between the Iaido, Kendo, and Chambara? I could talk about this for years. But to be brief: Iaido is the art of drawing the sword executing a cut and then sheathing the sword. This is where one learns the subtleties and ritual of the steel sword. Kendo is the sport of the sword using bamboo shinai. This is where one learns how to execute technique at full speed and power, which is challenging for most since it requires a lot of energy to practice. Chanbara is a modern version of kendo where instead of wearing kendo armor and striking with a shinai. Chanbara uses synthetic swords that allow you to fight and practice without all the cumbersome armor allowing for a more realistic approach.

sed samurai that dates back hundreds of years; all is learned through kendo and its intense training methods. Kendo makes the man and through kendo the next generation of Japanese children will understand how to live in society as a good and helpful citizen Can be adapted to modern life the code of Bushido?

Yes, it can easily be adapted to the code of Bushido. The clothes and fashion of Japan may change from century to century. The ancient code of the Of these three. Which one do you prefer? samurai warrior or the modern code of the Japanese Then you practice all three the choice is difficult. “salaryman� are and have mostly remained the To teach beginning American students, chanbara is same. best. Later then student understands the complexities of sword technique kendo is the best. Although What has it meant for you the way of the sword? when one is practicing Iaido that becomes a very involved art in itself. As a general rule kids in Japan The path one seeks to become a productive member mostly practice kendo and chanbara whereas adults of society and to oneself. It is well documented that are more apt to practice Iaido. For me they are all if one follows the path of the sword will also become self-reliant and not a burden to one’s peers. equal. Besides cutting. What else can be learned in Kendo? Since it is a way of life to be on the path of the focu 48

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His latest book is called, The 47th Ronin. Can you tell us something about it?


The 47th Ronin is a new published e-book which offers the digital approach to get the story to the reader by an easy download regardless of where in the world you are. The 47th Ronin is exclusive to e-books, iBooks and kindle. These adventurous tales of yesteryear fit on today’s electronic screens enabling consumers to view and read through their smart phones or tablets. This unique way to follow a storyline offers the best of all worlds in the digital era. Despite your busy schedule you will want to make time to read these stories in today’s multitasking world. I have written this collection of adventurous stories and spent years of study in Japan to master their language and swordsmanship. Thus, I was able to gain the knowledge to understand how the samurai lived and survived hundreds of years ago. Thank you very much for your time Grandmaster Abbott.This question is free for you to talk about what deemed. An honor to let me do this. OSS

BUY SIDEKICK

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SIDEKICK MAGAZINE  
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And so let it begin. This year 2014 has already begin with a huge BANG! As a martial artist for more than 40 years of experience and trai...

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