CIC Magazine 1/2021 English

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CIC – Conservation through the sustainable use of wildlife

CIC 2021/1 MAGAZINE 2020/2 1

Conseil International de la Chasse et de la Conservation du Gibier Internationaler Rat zur Erhaltung des Wildes und der Jagd International Council for Game and Wildlife Conservation


Publisher: CIC Headquarters H-2092 Budakeszi P.O. BOX 82, Hungary Phone: +36 23 453 830 Fax: +36 23 453 832 E-mail: office@cic-wildlife.org www.cic-wildlife.org

photo by Michiel Annert

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOCUS

DIVISIONS AND WORKING GROUPS

WILDLIFE WATCH

STORY HIGHLIGHT

CELEBRATION

MEDIA AND PUBLICATIONS


EDITORIAL D

espite the fact that it has been six months since my last editorial, I can say that this time has passed fairly quickly. I am sure that many of you will have been enjoying the slow easing of Covid restrictions, something which I hope is a signal that the end of this pandemic is near. For the CIC, even though our ability to travel still remains restricted, we have continued to be very active during the first half of this year. Conservation issues have not, unfortunately, disappeared like our social activities during this pandemic period. The most significant developments we have recently seen concern captive bred shooting. Those that have been following our work will have seen the considerable support we have received for our statement on captive bred lion shooting (CBLS) which we jointly released with Dallas Safari Club (DSC) last November. We are proud to say that the statement now has twelve co-signatories. On top of this, there is of course the decision we saw in South Africa in which the government stated their intention to end the captive bred lion industry. The CIC played a key role in this decision by contributing towards the High Level Panel report which lead to the news in question.

The abolishment of the captive bred lion industry can be considered a huge win for conservation itself, not just for supporters of sustainable use. Going forward, it is vital that we continue to provide clarity on issues like captive bred shooting if we are to educate the public on the real activities and processes associated with hunting. Other ongoing issues that we are continuing to address relate to countries looking to introduce bans on the import of hunting trophies. Once again, we saw the UK announce their intention to implement such a ban. We also saw a flurry of activity relating to Germany’s Green Party, and their manifesto plans to ban “trophy hunting.” It appears as though this trend is one that we will be frequently seeing in the years to come. There is no doubt that addressing these concerns will be an uphill battle, however with the future of hunting, sustainable use and human well-being at risk, it is vital that we remain focused on our task. One of the new initiatives that we introduced this year was the series of webinars that we held between March and May, in which we covered a broad range of topic areas relevant to the CIC. These webinars were exclusive to CIC members, and were hosted by various experts within the CIC Membership network. Despite the fact that this was the first time the CIC has organised webinars in this fashion, we were pleased to see many attendees during the eight webinars that we hosted. Based on this success, we plan on expanding this initiative further, so I would encourage you to stay tuned for further webinar announcements in the future.


Even though 2021 has already been eventful, it is fair to say the upcoming 67th General Assembly and Hungary’s One with Nature – World of Hunting and Nature Exhibition will provide an exciting end to this year’s activities. In particular, the theme of rurality which we will be exploring at the General Assembly is one that will hopefully bring new and interesting insight to members, attendees and the world of conservation. With rural wildlife, habitats and communities at risk in many countries, this theme is one that will be of huge significance for our future, and I invite you to visit us in Budapest to explore it with us. I am perhaps most looking forward to attending our social functions like the Gala Dinner, as it will give all of us a chance to catch up after what will have been over two years between General Assemblies. Those of you that have already registered for the General Assembly will also have an exciting event in the One with Nature exhibition to look forward to. For me personally, One with Nature will be a particularly special occasion. The exhibition is being held to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Hungary’s 1971 World Expo, a now renowned event which I was fortunate enough to attend. Being able to go back and revisit its anniversary as President of the CIC, which is also a patron of the exhibition, will be something very special indeed. Several countries and their state ministries responsible for wildlife management have already confirmed their attendance, and there will be countless exhibitors travelling in from all corners of the globe to host their own stands. Trophy exhibitions, bowhunting and falconry demonstrations, the use of virtual and augmented reality, and many cultural events all across Budapest are just some of the exciting things that you will be see as part of the exhibition. As I have mentioned before, being able to attend our General Assembly and One with Nature at the same time will truly be a unique experience. With many countries now allowing international travel, this will serve as the perfect opportunity for us to celebrate hunting and sustainable use together. We have a lot in store on top of what I have already mentioned, and I hope we will be able to enjoy these events together in September.

George Aman President of the CIC


Photo by Keyur Nandaniya

Focus

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What is Focus?

Focus places a spotlight on the most important developments for the CIC, as well as the wider world of hunting and sustainable use.

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Focus

State of International Hunting: Policy and Public Opinion It may not be surprising to hear that the first half of 2021 was an eventful one when it comes to matters related to international hunting. After all, this has been one of the hottest topics of discussion within wildlife management in recent years.

before looking to make any legislative changes. Speaking with stakeholders is an important and necessary step in order to fully understand the weight of any policies at hand. Unfortunately, instances like the one above highlight how governments often fail to take stakeholders into The developments we have seen will be familiar account, thereby putting wildlife and livelihoods to those that have been keeping up to date on the at risk. global state of international hunting. Even worse still, the voices of local communities Nations looking to restrict the trade of hunting from the less developed nations that are most trophies, failing to look at the implications for at risk from such decisions do not have a wildlife and rural communities, the ongoing sufficiently large platform to reach audiences and influence of animal rights activist groups – these policymakers in foreign countries without direct are all activities that we have seen before. involvement. The most recent and significant development, in terms of its scale and potential impact, was the United Kingdom (UK) Government announcing their commitment to ban the import of hunting trophies in May, 2021.

This leads to activities like we have recently seen in Germany, in which representatives of rural communities waged campaigns directed at Germany’s Green Party to have their voices heard.

Notably, the decision was made without any apparent consideration given to the UK consultation on the import and export of hunting trophies which allowed stakeholders to have their say on the topic, the results of which have still yet to be released.

In April, the Community Leaders Network (CLN) and Resource Africa, representing over 50 African rural communities including nine representatives from southern African countries, sent separate letters to the Green Party (Alliance 90/The Greens) expressing concerns over their plans to ban “trophy hunting.”

The consultation was held by the UK’s Department for Food, Environment and Rural Affairs between late 2019 and early 2020, with the aim of collecting evidence and data from the public on the scale and wider impacts of hunting trophies on inter alia wildlife conservation, the global economy, and human livelihoods.

Their concerns centred on how such a ban would undermine the ability and rights of rural communities to manage their own wildlife resources to generate benefits for wildlife and livelihoods.

Following the release of this news, the CIC urged the UK Government to first release the results of the DEFRA consultation before taking any further action, whilst also encouraging them to consult and hold discussions with the stakeholders from the countries that would be affected by such a ban

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The Resource Africa letter added that a lack of consultation with African countries and people, as well as a disregard for the scientific evidence behind their wildlife management strategies, was one of the major issues amongst animal welfare organisations that have significant influence in foreign countries.


Focus

A similar letter was also sent to the Green Party by the German Delegation of the CIC and Deutscher Jagdverband, in which they stated that an end to regulated hunting would only cause harm to rural communities and the protection of wildlife species.

have also said that such attacks deter people from pointing out when misleading information is being spread.

Many of us may already be aware of the strong support that these organisations have amongst certain segments of the public, and in turn state policymaking, however the secondary effects of their campaigns are now starting to emerge.

The article outlined the support that groups such as the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting and Born Free have received from well-known celebrities and members of the UK Parliament. In conjunction with these groups, and through the use of emotion-based argumentation, these celebrity supported causes have led to a skewed perception of international hunting, one that seemingly dismisses the real conservation successes associated with the practice.

While death threats and online abuse may signal a bad turn for the future of reasonable discussions on international hunting, there does appear to be While what we have seen in the UK and Germany somewhat of a silver lining. is nothing new, one factor that should not be ignored is the influence that animal welfare Alex Morss, renowned science journalist and organisations are having on the global landscape ecologist, published an article in The Guardian of wildlife management, including international earlier this year on celebrities undermining global hunting and the trade of hunting trophies. conservation efforts.

Scientists and conservationists have started to speak on the abuse that they have received for publicly advocating against a ban on the trade of hunting trophies. It can be argued that these incidents of abuse, which have gone as far as death threats, are driven by organisations that choose to put the spotlight on and argue against international hunting based on emotions, rather than wildlife science.

Even though the story itself may be disheartening, this type of news coverage has, up until recently, rarely featured in prominent international news publications. This shows that the ongoing efforts to sensitise people to the realities of international One notable example of this was the abuse hunting, such as the CIC’s Debunking the Myths directed at Dr. Amy Dickman, senior research series, appear to be having an impact. fellow at Oxford University and well-known lion conservationist. The abuse she experienced It seems likely that the recent trends involving included comments calling her a “paid international hunting will continue to unfold and mouthpiece” and a “monster”; the actor and spread to other countries. animal rights campaigner, Peter Egan, even called her reputation as a researcher into question by Going forward, it is important that conservation organisations, community representatives and stating that she is “a very limited scientist.” other stakeholders work together to educate It was stated that these incidents of abuse were people on this topic. This may be a difficult task, fuelled by “myths driven by emotion and morality however with wildlife and millions of livelihoods that ignore critical facts.” Not only that, scientists at risk, it is one that is absolutely necessary.

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Photo by Francesko de Tommaso

Divisions and Working Groups

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What is Divisions and Working Groups?

Take a closer look at the latest activities from the CIC Divisions (Applied Science, Policy & Law and Culture) and Working Groups (Artemis and Young Opinion).

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Applied Science

Large Carnivore Monitoring in the Carpathians Joint report by the CIC & the Carpathian Convention It is an unfortunate truth that the size and connectivity Carpathians, during the Fifth Forum Carpaticum on of large carnivore habitats is being challenged by the the 15th of October 2018 in Eger, Hungary. development of infrastructure in the Carpathian region. The CIC took on the lead in this project, at the initiative of Prof. Dr. Klaus Hackländer (President The presence of large carnivore species in human- of its Applied Science Division), together with Dr. dominated landscapes also presents us with another Jacqueline Frair (Deputy President of the Applied problem; human-wildlife conflict. This causes Science Division of the CIC), and Prof. Ovidiu a host of problems ranging from human caused Ionescu (Expert of the CIC and of the Large mortality (and vice versa), as well as habitat loss and Carnivore Initiative for Europe (LCIE)). fragmentation. This report, which is the first of its kind, is a big It is clear then that proper management strategies step towards implementing a truly transboundary are needed to protect and conserve large carnivore monitoring scheme in the Carpathian region. In doing populations in the Carpathian region. This requires so, we should be able to implement more coordinated the need for data on the size, status and distribution and effective large carnivore management plans in of a particular target species. future. The issue up till now has been a distinct lack of coordination between countries in regards to large carnivore monitoring. Not only were we unaware of the methodology used in an area ranging from the Czech Republic to Ukraine, national reports on monitoring were often published in local languages as well, if published at all.

While there is still a lot of work to achieve this goal, the report suggests that Carpathian-wide large carnivore monitoring based on biogeographical regions rather than political units is within reach. As an advocate for conservation through sustainable use, the CIC will continue to support large carnivore conservation all across the world. The hunting community will be key in this regard going forward, as their aim will always be to conserve nature and wildlife species for future generations, while considering the livelihoods of local communities.

That is why the CIC and the Carpathian Convention came together to publish a new report, Large Carnivore Monitoring in the Carpathian Mountains, which compares the different monitoring methods used in seven different countries in order to build towards a transboundary monitoring scheme. The CIC would like to thank all those that contributed to the making of this report and we look The idea to establish such a report was first initiated forward to seeing where its findings will lead for the at a workshop on the standardisation of monitoring future of large carnivore management. procedures for large carnivore populations in the

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Applied Science

ONE WITH NATURE

WORLD OF HUNTING AND NATURE EXHIBITION HUNGARY 2021

THE WORLD’S LARGEST NATURE EXHIBITION IN 2021

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25 SEPTEMBER – 14 OCTOBER 2021 HUNGEXPO, BUDAPEST T H E CO U N T R I E S O F T H E WO RL D IN T RO D UC E T HE M S E LV E S WO R L D CH A M P I O N TRO P H I ES S PECI A L GAME SPECIES A T HO U SA ND Y E A R S O F H UN TI N G I N TH E CA R PATH I A N B A S I N D E M ON STRATI O NS B Y F A LCO N E R S, GREYH O UN D CO UR SE R S A N D A RC HE R S N ATUR E A N D G A M E M A N AG EM EN T O U R E N E M Y: T H E POAC HER T R E A S U R E S O F NATI O N A L PA R K S HU N G A RY’S LA RG E S T D I S PLAY AQ U A RI U M CO N F E R E N C E S, P R E SE NTAT I O NS A ND SC I E N TI F I C EV EN TS O N S US TA I N A B I L I TY G A M E G A S TRO NO MY AV E N U E D O G S H OW – I NT RO DU CING T HE D O G S O F TH E WO R L D V I RT U A L R E A L I TY G A M ES, F A LCO N S I M U LATO R E XHI BI T IO NS, CO NC E RT S, F I L M S, CULTURA L EV EN TS A N D EXCI TI N G AT TRACT I ONS FAIRS: FEH OVA+ A N D OM É K EQ UES TR I A N EV EN TS

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Artemis On behalf of WG Artemis of the CIC The Hungarian Diana Club of Lady Hunters cordially invites you to the

VI. Women and Sustainable Hunting Conference 22-25th September 2021 Tata – Pannonhalma “New challenges” The 6th Women and Sustainable Hunting Conference (WaSH VI) will be held in Tata, Hungary within the framework of the upcoming CIC General Assembly and Hungary’s One with Nature – World of Hunting and Nature exhibition. The theme for the conference will be “New challenges,” which will look to address some of the prevailing issues in the world of hunting and sustainable use. The preliminary program and the keynote speakers below give a small taste of what we will have in store. Those attending the 67th General Assembly or the One with Nature exhibition will have the perfect opportunity to attend the WaSH VI conference prior to the start of both of these events. On behalf of the conference organizing committee, we look forward to seeing you soon. We value our long-standing personal encounters, and we hope you will join us at the WaSH conference! Beatrix Bán Chairman of the Organizing Committee of WaSH VI, Deputy President of WG Artemis Soňa Chovanová Supeková Honorary Chairman of WaSH, President of WG Artemis

Preliminary program (changes possible)

Keynote speakers

22th September Welcome to Hungary On-site registration 19:00 Welcome dinner in Hotel Gottwald****

FALCONRY KNOWLEDGE AS A CONSERVATION TOOL. Tula Stapert

(H-2980 Tata, Fekete út 1.)

23th September WaSH VI International Conference 9:00 Opening ceremony President of the CIC, George Aman President of WG Artemis, Soňa Chovanová Supeková Keynote speakers 19:00 Gala dinner in Hotel Gottwald**** 24th September Excursion to Archabbey of Pannonhalma Visit the Archabbey and the botanical garden with lunch and chocolate tasting 25th September Breakfast

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Netherlands

THE ROLE OF NATURE CONSERVATION IN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT. Miklos Lorant Hungary, Kiskunsag National Park

URBAN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT. Adrienn Csokas PhD Hungary, Magyar Agrár- és Élettudományi Egyetem (MATE)

GAME MEAT CONSUMPTION AS A WAY TOWARDS THE ACCEPTANCE OF HUNTING Soňa Chovanová Supeková Slovakia, Club of Slovak lady Hunters


Artemis Other keynote speakers and online options are currently being developed. Possible topics: a) New challenges in wildlife management (ASF, COVID, etc.) b) The risk of communications for hunters through social media and networks – results of an international survey c) Trophy culture (measurement systems, effect on the gene pool of the hunted species, historical review, potential development)

Participation fee for the WaSH VI is 430 EUR. This includes accommodation for 3 nights, all food and beverages are inclusive (including beer and wine) and the excursion with lunch and chocolate tasting. Please, note, that the participation fee doesn’t include the airport transfer! Other options for participation are currently under consideration. Accomodation: Hotel Gottwald**** is located next to the M1 Highway and offers 4-star accommodation with a spa centre in Tata. The Hotel features a bar, shared lounge and garden. Providing a restaurant, the property also has a seasonal outdoor swimming pool, as well as an indoor pool and a fitness centre. The accommodation provides a 24-hour front desk, airport transfers, room service and free WiFi throughout the property. HOTEL GOTTWALD**** H-2890 Tata, Fekete u. 1., Hungary www.gottwald.hu Pannonhalma: The Archabbey, which has a history of more than a thousand years, is part of the World heritage from 1996 – looking back to this history the spiritual richness and the traditional hospitality provide an enchanting atmosphere, which shapes the time spent here into a pleasant experience. The excursion includes a guided tour in the Archabbey and in the fantastic Herbal Garden with lunch and tasting of Benedictine herbal chocolate. Archabbey of Pannonhalma H-9090, Pannonhalma, Vár 1., Hungary www.pannonhalmifoapatsag.hu/en

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Policy & Law

Trade Them to Save Them? Written By: Shane Mahoney

The fate of the rhino may rest on the decision of whether or not to allow commercial trade in rhino horn. In the early 20th century, there were an estimated half million rhinos on Earth. By 1970, there were approximately 70,000 and, today, only about 28,000 rhinos survive in the wild. Three species, the Sumatran, Javan, and Black rhino, are listed by IUCN as “Critically Endangered.” Greater OneHorned and White rhinos are listed, respectively, as “Vulnerable” and “Near Threatened.” Having roamed the earth for forty million years the fate of these animals is now inextricably tied to global trade decisions, one more indication of how much their world, and the world of wildlife conservation itself, have changed. Humans, for medicinal and aesthetic reasons have coveted rhinoceros horn for thousands of years; a lust for rhino horn is nothing new. In Greek mythology, rhino horn was believed to facilitate water purification. In the 5th century AD, ancient Persians believed the horn could be used to detect poisoned drinks. This belief found favor in the Royal Courts of Europe and persisted among Europe’s elite into the 18th and 19th centuries. In China, the ornamental use of rhino horn dates back to the 7th century. In the 16th century, Chinese pharmacists prescribed dissolved rhino horn powder for snakebites, hallucinations, typhoid, headaches, vomiting, and “devil possession.” Currently, it is illegal to trade in rhino, though it is today more valuable per ounce than gold, diamonds, or cocaine. While poaching numbers have decreased since their peak in 2015, too many rhinos are still being killed. In South Africa, for example, a rhino is killed for its horn every 22 hours. The latest numbers, from February 2021, show that rhino populations, especially in key strongholds such as Kruger National Park, have fallen dramatically. Despite intensified enforcement efforts, public awareness campaigns, global petitions, celebrity advocacy, increasing media attention and political pressure, the situation with rhino poaching remains critical.

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Rhino horns are made of keratin, the same material found in human hair and fingernails. The center consists of dense calcium deposits and melanin that strengthen and protect the horn against sun exposure. While extensive testing has determined no medicinal value is associated with its consumption, rhino horn remains a common and prized ingredient in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), now practiced in 70 countries outside China and South-east Asia. In 1993, the Chinese government banned trade in rhino horn as part of an ongoing effort to end the use of endangered species in TCM. Taiwan and South Korea followed suit, also implementing bans. Despite this, traditional uses continue. Cultural practices die hard, don’t they? However, even ancient Chinese medical texts suggest botanical substitutes for rhino horn in the manufacture of traditional remedies. To leverage this cultural alternative, partnerships between TCM practitioners and international conservation communities have grown in recent years and many representatives are now working together to educate practitioners and consumers about the availability of acceptable substitutes for rhino horn. At the same time, they work to inform people of the conservation impacts of poaching and illegal trafficking of endangered animals. While this strategy offers some hope for a decline in the use of rhino horn in traditional Chinese medicine, two new markets have recently emerged to reinvigorate demand, and both are concentrated in Vietnam. Just ten years ago, there was no evidence of rhino horn use in that country. However, in the last decade the nation has experienced rapid economic growth, increased disposable incomes and a rapid increase in cancer rates. Vietnam now appears to be the leading destination for illegal rhino horn, which is being promoted in that country as a cure for cancer. IUCN’s Wildlife Trade Monitoring Network, TRAFFIC, refers to this as a “sensational urban myth.”


Policy & Law With a great international demand fuelling a thriving black market, many have asked the question, “Why not make rhino horn trade legal - regulate it, and render poachers and their illegal trade irrelevant?” After all, you don’t actually have to kill, or even harm, a rhinoceros to harvest its horn. It typically takes less than 10 minutes to safely de-horn a tranquilized rhino and the horn grows back and can then be trimmed or harvested regularly. Furthermore, dehorning is an effective disincentive to poachers. So, legal horn trade and rhino conservation would seem to make perfect partners. Perhaps.

more profit per hectare than any other form of agriculture, thus safe-guarding wildlife habitat, while simultaneously producing incentives and funding for conservation efforts. Those who are pro-trade also cite advances in DNA technology, which now make it possible to track a horn or its parts from rhino to consumer, thus increasing the likelihood of effective monitoring and trade regulation.

Both sides make compelling arguments. And while both sides also agree that more law enforcement is needed, there is general acknowledgement that enforcement alone is not enough. We need something International trade in rhino horn can be a contentious more and that something is an incentive to keep living topic. Established in 1975, the Convention on rhinos with us. Let’s pretend it is up to you. Should International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild we trade their horn to save them? Flora and Fauna (CITES) represents a binding international agreement established between 175 countries whose aim is to ensure that international trade in wild animals and plants remains sustainable and does not threaten their survival. CITES imposed its first global ban on international trade in rhino horn in 1977. In the past, CITES members have voted to reject new proposals to sell rhino horn, whether seized from poachers, obtained through natural deaths, euthanasia of problem animals, or harvesting from live animals. Why? Because many conservation groups share the view that any legal trade would stimulate demand, allow legal trade in horn to provide cover for illicit trade and thus complicate law enforcement efforts. They further point to wellknown political corruption in a number of selling and buying countries, and express strong doubts that legal regulation is even possible. Advocates for legal trade, argue differently, insisting that rhino horn is a renewable resource. They believe legalizing international trade would entirely undermine the black market, establish legitimate use and trade, promote economic growth, and positively impact human livelihoods in some of the world’s poorest countries; and do so without negative conservation consequences. If the sale of horn were legal, advocates argue, rhino ranching could yield

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Young Opinion

The Flying Vets Mongolia Mongolia is a country that is known for its diverse wildlife and rich cultural heritage. Mongolian nomadic herders are an integral part of this heritage - in fact, they are the world’s last traditional nomads.

As part of the effort to raise awareness and funds for The Flying Vets Mongolia, we have enlisted the help of long-time CIC and Young Opinion member Flurina Hammer, who will be taking part in the 2022 Mongol Derby to help kick-start the launch of this Unfortunately, the livelihoods of these herders are at project. risk. Without intervention, it is possible that their lifestyle, and its associated cultural elements (such as The Mongol Derby is an equestrian endurance race eagle hunting), may die out completely. that takes place annually in Mongolia, with countless people flying in from all over the world to take part. Wildlife diseases, Mongolia’s unpredictable climate and other factors are also threatening the country’s Every year, the event grabs the attention of prominent wildlife species, particularly those that are already media outlets and shifts their focus to Mongolia endangered. during the course of the race. This means that the Mongol Derby will serve as the perfect opportunity Recognising these threats, the CIC decided it was to promote The Flying Vets Mongolia to a broader time to take action. international audience. That is why we are excited to announce a brand new In the meantime, we will be keeping our members CIC project: The Flying Vets Mongolia! updated on the development of this project. Please keep an eye out for CIC newsletters, where we will In an effort to support Mongolian nomadic traditions be bringing you details on any new developments, in and livelihoods, as well as Mongolian wildlife, this addition to information on Mongolia, its people and project will look to introduce a flying veterinary its wildlife. service that can mobilize and support rural and remote areas of Mongolia. If you would also like to donate to The Flying Vets Mongolia project now, please visit the link here or There is no doubt that this initiative will be a huge through the QR code. undertaking, one that will require us to pool our In doing so, you would be directly assisting the resources and leverage the extensive CIC network. conservation of endangered species, as well as the That is why we will be launching a fundraising preservation of the traditions of Mongolian nomadic campaign, in which we will be collecting financial herders. Further details on how to donate (we will be contributions, in-kind donations and equipment to accepting cash, in-kind and equipment donations) facilitate the execution of this exciting new venture. can be found on our official website.

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Young Opinion

The Mongol Derby The Mongol Derby is a 1,000km horse race across Mongolia, also known as the longest and toughest horse race in the world according to the Guinness Book of World Records. The course is based on an ancient messenger system used by Genghis Khan, with the 1,000km distance covering large areas across the Mongolian steppe. The semi-wild derby horses are provided by the local nomadic herders, with riders changing their steeds every 40km at horse stations. There is no marked course and the race is limited to 10 days.

Why am I participating in the Mongol Derby? The Mongol Derby is an extraordinary challenge and a once in a lifetime experience which allows you to experience Mongolian culture at its roots. The derby is all about horsemanship, physical and mental strength, as well as getting out of your comfort zone while riding through the stunning landscape of Mongolia. Being passionate about horses and the outdoors, I couldn’t resist taking up this challenge and throwing myself into the unknowns of the Mongolian steppe. As a long time CIC member and hunter that deeply cares about wildlife and wildlife conservation, I also saw this as the perfect opportunity to raise funds for The Flying Vets Mongolia project. The Mongol Derby is a magnificent way to experience the country’s culture – unfortunately, this culture is severely at risk. Unless we act now, we may lose the wildlife and cultural heritage that makes Mongolia so great. I hope you will join me in donating to this project, so that future generations can experience Mongolia as we can now. Flurina Hammer

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Photo by Dominik Mecko

Wildlife Watch

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What is Wildlife Watch?

Wildlife Watch gives readers some insight into the world of trophy evaluation, and the work of our Trophy Evaluation Board (TEB).

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Wildlife Watch

Our Network Due to the restrictions imposed by the Covid-19 pandemic, we have not been in a position to organise any TES training courses since the last magazine edition. Nevertheless, there are many courses and events in the pipeline so a busy period awaits us! With more than 750 active measurers in the network, the number of trophy evaluations entered into the Trophy Evaluation Database (TED) continued to increase despite the pandemic. Many, many thanks to everyone who evaluated trophies and submitted their entries to the database during this difficult time! You will be able to find more about these and other record species in the CIC Trophy Record List that will be released at the World Hunting Exhibition ‘One with Nature’ this autumn.

STJs Roman Dziedzic (PL), Josef Feuereisel (CZ), Dušan Krajniak (SK) and , Miloslav Vach (CZ) at the International Trophy Evaluation.

Finally, thanks to our STJs Miloslav Vach (CZ), Josef Feuereisel (CZ), Dušan Krajniak (SK) and Roman Dziedzic (PL) who organised an international evaluation in Židlochovice Chateau, Czech Republic on June 19. Two gold level, and very likely record setting, trophies were evaluated!

International Trophy Evaluation held in Czech Republic

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Wildlife Watch

Trophy Evaluation Board Meeting After postponing the meeting to spring 2021 due of the pandemic last year, the Trophy Evaluation Board of the TES finally held their annual meeting from 18-19 August online. Organized on the Zoom platform, the meeting was attended by 24 participants who represented 15 countries. On this occasion, the TEB Co-Chairman Tony Dalby-Welsh thanked everyone for his re-election for another term, which was done via circular means last year. The agenda was packed with topics, including the possibility of organizing CIC trainings online, Handbook updates, as well as updates to the policies relating to the renewal of CIC cards. Eventually, the productive deliberations resulted in 11 decisions of the TEB that are still to be approved by the CIC Executive Committee. Upon approval, all decisions will be posted onto the Trophy Evaluation Database. Dear measurers, please make sure to read through them in order to stay up to date! The CIC HQ would like to give a huge thanks to everyone who attended the meeting and actively contributed to the discussions!

The TES in numbers: Active CCMs/STJs: 691+61 Countries in the TES: 30 Measurements in the TED: 22,410

Trophy Evaluation Board Zoom Meeting 2021

The TEB strongly encourages all hunters to have their trophies evaluated by a Certified CIC Measurer in order to enhance research possibilities and encourage a more wholesome approach to the evaluation, regardless of the trophy’s potential to reach a medal limit. If you have any questions about the above information, or the CIC TES in general, please contact Luna Milatović, CIC Conservation Officer, at l.milatovic@cic-wildlife.org. Luna Milatović

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Wildlife Watch

In the Spotlight Knut Øyvind Marås Norway 2021-STJ-001

Knut Øyvind Marås is the newly appointed Senior Trophy Judge What role does trophy evaluation play in the management of wildlife in Norway? Hunting is highly respected by the people of Norway. 10% of the Norwegian population are hunters, with 5% being female! This is also reflected in answers to surveys conducted by the authorities every 3 years on people’s opinions on hunting. For instance, in 2020, 78% of respondents answered that their view of hunting is either very positive or positive. Similarly, 88% answered that they have very good or good trust that hunting in Norway is practiced in a humane and responsible manner. How do you see trophy measuring in Norway? Considering the abovementioned respect for hunting, it’s a great pleasure to both be a hunter and a trophy measurer in Norway. Our climate is pretty tough, and we are not allowed to feed animals during the winter time. The strongest animals survive, and these are the ones we should manage in the best way. A good trophy shouldn’t be based on luck, but good deer management. My opinion is that hunters are increasingly seeing the value of having older animals in the population. Twenty years ago, a good buck in Norway was considered to be a heavy one. For most of the hunters, antlers had no value. Traditionally, the reason for hunting was to bring meat back home. Nowadays we hunt mostly for recreational purposes, with a focus on meat, trophies and health. Last year, hunting in Norway provided an unbelievable 22 million dinner portions! The role of trophy measurers as influencers must not be underestimated. We spend a lot of time focusing on this theme, either directly to hunters or in magazines and articles. As a trophy measurer, the hunt is the essence of our activities. In order to maintain its acceptance, we must include the younger generations in hunting. We must think about how we take trophy pictures and show respect for the life we have just taken. Our activities must be transparent, with no hidden aspects. Doing this in an honest way is the only way we can carry on with our hobby and our lifestyle. What was the impact of the pandemic on trophy measuring activities and what do you foresee in the upcoming (hopefully!) post-pandemic period? During the pandemic, trophy measuring activities were naturally reduced compared to a regular year in Norway. Normally we have about 800 trophies measured. While I don’t have the exact numbers for the last season, I’m sure they are lower. I trust that when things go back to normal again, a lot of trophies will show up at our hunting exhibitions. One thing is for sure, the Norwegian hunters have been very active in the forest and up in the mountain during this pandemic.

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Wildlife Watch

“Knut’s passion is roebuck hunting. He has been to Scotland more than 50 times to hunt roebuck.”

“Knut’s daughter, Amanda, was 7 months old when she went hunting with her parents for the first time.”

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Photo by Luke Tanis

Story Highlight

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What is Story Highlight?

In Story Highlight, we provide our take on the biggest and most current issues that we are currently working to address.

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Story Highlight

South Africa’s Captive Bred Lion Decision is a Triumph for Conservation On 2 May, 2021, South Africa accepted a High Level Panel recommendation to end the captive bred lion industry within the country, a decision which was broadly praised by all walks of life, from the wider public to conservation organisations alike. While some have suggested that this move is solely a big win for animal right’s supporters, the role that hunting and sustainable use supporters had in influencing this decision should also be recognised. The reason for this is simple. Captive bred lion shooting (CBLS), a key component of the captive bred lion industry, has been largely condemned by hunting and sustainable use organisations as the practice is not representative of responsible, sustainable, fair chase hunting. The universal nature of this viewpoint amongst sustainable use organisations was highlighted by the support for the CIC and Dallas Safari Club’s joint statement condemning CBLS which was released in November, 2020. In fact, ten organisations joined as co-signatories of this statement after its initial publication, with the supporting organisations representing the interests of hunters and people in the United States, United Kingdom, Russia, Germany, the Nordic and African regions, as well as other areas of the globe. The CIC itself has been firmly committed to ending this practice for many years. In 2018, two South African hunting associations were expelled from the CIC Membership Network due to their associations with, and support for, the captive bred lion shooting industry. These organisations were the Professional Hunters’ Association of South Africa (PHASA) and the Confederation of Hunting Associations of South Africa (CHASA). Furthermore, the CIC played a leading role in advancing the efforts that led to the recent decision on the captive bred lion industry decision in South Africa. In June and October, 2020, the CIC submitted written responses to the High Level Panel consultation, giving input on inter alia the issues related to the shooting of animals bred in captivity. These responses were put together with the assistance of the CIC’s Policy and Law Division. CIC Deputy Director General, Mark Ryan, also gave a presentation to the High Level Panel in October, outlining these same issues to panel participants. In addition, Dr. Ali Kaka (former CIC Ambassador for Africa) gave his views on “captive lion breeding for hunting” on behalf of the CIC at a South African Parliamentary Colloquium in August, 2020. There, he suggested that the practice breaks moral and ecological bases and boundaries, while damaging the reputation of both hunting and South Africa.

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Story Highlight

As supporters of responsible, sustainable, fair chase hunting, we recognise that activities such as CBLS damages the reputation of regulated hunting programmes, and the benefits they produce for conservation and human well-being. Therefore, South Africa’s decision on the captive bred lion industry can only be seen as a great success for all conservation organisations, including the CIC and other supporters of sustainable use. While this news is a great step for South Africa’s wildlife management, there is still more that can be done in the implementation of the captive bred lion recommendation going forward. In part, this can be achieved by adopting parameters for the future of lion hunting in South Africa that encapsulate the principles of both fair range and fair chase. Fair range should be defined as an area in which the process of hunting an animal is in a wild area of public or private land which is bigger than the natural home-range of a species. The environmental and/or man-made conditions and technologies, regardless of circumstance, should also allow the animal a realistic chance to evade a potential hunter or predator on the hunt, and facilitate that the animal is able to evade and survive in that habitat from being hunted for the duration of its lifespan. Fair range should hold animals that: were born and raised from a self-sustainable population; have not been manipulated by selective breeding; occur in their natural territory. Within the context of escape-proof, fenced enclosures, the CIC defines fair chase as hunting an animal that exists as a naturally interacting individual of a wild sustainable population within an ecologically functional system, where the spatial (territory and home range) and temporal (food, breeding and basic needs) requirements of the population of which that individual is a member are met. The CIC would encourage South Africa to adopt these definitions when implementing the captive bred lion recommendation, in order to ensure that any remaining hunting activities are conducted in a responsible and sustainable manner.

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JOINT STATEMENT On

Captive Bred Lion Shooting

The undersigned organizations, each advocating for the conservation of nature through the sustainable use of wildlife: 1) RECOGNIZE that the practice of shooting lions bred in captivity has otherwise been referred to as “canned lion hunting”, “captive bred lion hunting”, or using combinations thereof; 2) AGREE that whatever the terminology used; and whether legal or illegal; the practice is not consistent with the definition of responsible, sustainable, fair chase hunting; 3) HIGHLIGHT that the practice is contrary to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Resolution WCC-2016-Res-013 on ‘Terminating the hunting of captive-bred lions (Panthera leo) and other predators and captive breeding for commercial, non-conservation purposes’; 4) EMPHASIZE that the shooting of lions bred in captivity damages the reputation of all hunters; 5) CALL ON any Governments that allow the legal shooting of lions bred in captivity, to consider the wider implications to responsible, sustainable, fair chase hunting; 6) COMMIT to discouraging members of signatory organizations from engaging in the practice of shooting lions that have been bred in captivity; The signatories agree that this statement may be amended, as further information becomes available, should the signatories jointly agree on and sign the revised text. encou Other organizations in agreement with this statement are encouraged to join as co-signatories. Organizations are invited to contact one of the existing signatories should they be interested in joining.

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George Aman

Mark Little

President International Council for Game and Wildlife Conservation

President Dallas Safari Club

Ludo J. Wurfbain

Eduardo de Araoz

President Rowland Ward Ltd.

President International Professional Hunters' Association

Gray N. Thornton

Danene van der Westhuyzen

President & CEO Wild Sheep Foundation

Mike Angelides Vice-President African Professional Hunters Association

Dr. Volker Böhning

CEO African Operators' and Professional Hunters' Associations of Africa

Aramileva Tatiana President Russian Association of Hunters and Fishermen

James F. Arnold

President German Hunting Association

President Boone and Crockett Club

Ernst Weidenbusch

Christian Jensen

President Bayerischer Jagdverband e.V.

President Nordisk Safari Klub

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67TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY ONE WITH NATURE RURAL VOICES, GLOBAL RESPONSIBILITIES 25-29 SEPTEMBER 2021 BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT OUR WEBSITE: https://www.events.cic-wildlife.org/general-assembly

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REGISTRATION: https://membership.cic-wildlife.org/events/th-cic-general-assembly


INTERNATIONAL JOURNALISM SYMPOSIUM CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABLE USE OF WILDLIFE RESOURCES

LOCATION

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

INTERNATIONALCONFERENCES

SEPTEMBER 25, 2021 HUNGEXPO CONFERENCE CENTRE BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

Please send us a short paper (500words) explaining why it ’s important to bridge the gap between rural and urban areas, and how it could contribute to better conservation, wildlife management and use of natural resources.

Symposium participants are cordially invited to attend the international conferences, as well as the One with Nature - World of Hunting and Nature Exhibition:

FIELD TRIP

SEPTEMBER 24, 2021 BÖRZSÖNY, KIRÁLYRÉT

Selected participants will be eligible for reimbursement of their travel expenses. Papers should be sent to Gabriella Kanyok g.kanyok@cic-wildlife.org

CIC - One with Nature Rural Voices, Global Responsibilities September 26 - 28, 2021 For more information, please visit:

https://www.events.cic-wildlife.org/general-assembly

Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management (CPW) Wildlife Forum September 26 -27, 2021 For more information, please visit: https://www.cpwwildlifeforum.com/

DEADLINE: AUGUST 20TH

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Photo by Saketh Upadhya

Celebration

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What is Celebration?

Join the CIC in celebrating the latest developments from the sustainable use community, as well as our partners and colleagues!

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Celebration

World Migratory Bird Day 2021 The CIC joined in celebrating World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD), 2021! The theme for this year’s WMBD was “Sing, Fly, Soar – Like a Bird!” with the campaign encouraging people to go out in nature to enjoy bird song and flight. President of the CIC, George Aman, released a video to commemorate the occasion and to promote the ongoing work of AEWA (The African Eurasian Migratory Waterbird Agreement) to conserve migratory birds. In the video, he highlighted the need for this initiative in today’s times, especially when considering the COVID-19 pandemic and our overall disconnect from nature, particularly those living in cities. In an additional statement, Mr. Aman emphasised the significance of our relationship with the natural world for the future of its conservation. “While simply appreciating nature and birds may in itself seem like a small gesture, we should not underestimate its importance for ongoing conservation SING, FLY, SOAR - LIKE A BIRD! efforts. It is only by knowing and WORLD MIGRATORY BIRD DAY 2021 understanding the nature around us that people can become interested in its conservation. This can be seen in the passion that hunters have for the conservation of wildlife and game species; as they are deeply in tune with nature, they understand what is at risk.” Illustration & Design: Sara Wolman

The CIC continues to support the work of AEWA and their World Migratory Bird Day, in order to raise awareness on the conservation of migratory birds around the world.

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Celebration

UN World Wildlife Day 2021 The CIC joined in celebrating UN World Wildlife Day 2021, which was being held under the theme of “Forests and Livelihoods: Sustaining People and Planet.”

wildlife resources remains an effective and tested wildlife management tool that has been shown to support forests, wildlife species and human well-being.

The aim for this year’s event was to raise awareness of the value of forests and their associated wildlife species, as well as the link between them and the livelihoods of indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs).

Whether it is through managing wildlife populations, or by funding anti-poaching initiatives, sustainable hunting programs generate a significant number of benefits for habitats and wildlife.

George Aman, President of the CIC, praised the thinking behind this year’s theme, “Placing the spotlight on forests and the people living in these areas is an excellent theme for World Wildlife Day. Looking to conserve forested areas and supporting indigenous peoples and local communities are two issues that go hand in hand. It is vital for conservation organisations like the CIC to support initiatives, such as sustainable use, that can generate benefits for both causes at the same time.”

Hunters are also known to be custodians of forests and forest wildlife. Feeding deer in the winter, regulating problematic species, managing overgrazing, maintaining fenced areas, planting trees – these are just some of the activities that hunters commonly engage in to help maintain forested areas. Countless people and IPLCs also depend on hunting and sustainable use as an essential part of their livelihoods and identities – some may be employed in the hunting sector, others may hunt for food or simply for cultural reasons.

It is often IPLCs that play a key role in conserving forested areas around the world, while also sustainably using the species that reside in them. Therefore, the economic, social and cultural well-being of such communities, in addition to the symbiotic relationship between humans and forests, is something that should be highlighted and improved going forward.

Perhaps most important of all is the role of sustainable use in protecting forested areas from land use changes. The biggest threat to biodiversity is the conversion of wild areas for agricultural use – this destruction in turn, would have a huge impact on those living in and around forests around the world.

Supporting processes such as sustainable use and wildlife trade will continue to allow individuals and organisations to support, utilise and benefit from forests. If outside forces prevent these forms of wildlife usage, it is then Unfortunately, global crises such as climate that we can expect the conversion of forests and change, biodiversity loss, and the effects wild areas for other forms of land use, such as COVID-19 are placing forests and IPLCs under agriculture. great threat. If our goal is to maintain and improve forest Considering this, it is vital that we continue to health and the well-being of those living in support forests through the use of a number of these areas, we should also look to support forms of wildlife management that can provide new and existing initiatives. a wide range of conservation, economic, social Conservation through the sustainable use of and cultural benefits. With roughly 200 to 300 million people living in or adjacent to forests while relying on the various ecosystem services provided by them, these are issues of huge relevance.

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For more information click on the link: https://iugb35.hu/

For more information click on the link: https://www.cpwwildlifeforum.com/

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Media and Publications

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What is Media and Publications?

A collection of the best CIC articles and publications over the past six months, in addition to other interesting stories that we would like to bring to your attention.

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Media and publications

COVID-19, Wild Meat and Wildlife Trade After over a year of COVID-19, travel restrictions and quarantines, it finally seems as if we are making progress towards returning to some form of pre-pandemic normality.

Biodiversity and Pandemics report, released in April this year, found that IPLCs are dependent on wildlife trade, and determined that it is illegal trade and unsustainable consumption that are the significant drivers of pandemic emergence.

Unfortunately, the wide-reaching issues that have emerged as a result of COVID-19 have created It was noted that legal trade carries some pandemic complicated problems that still require further risk as well. To combat this, they suggested research and discussion to fully resolve. reducing or removing certain species in wildlife trade that are identified by expert review as having One such issue relates to the pandemic’s origins. a high-risk of disease emergence, as opposed to Many believe that the virus emerged from a wet introducing a complete ban on all forms of trade. market; a marketplace selling fresh meat and fish produce among other perishable goods. In addition, the report argued that new health and safety measures (market clean-out days, increased Citing concerns over the supposed relationship cold chain capacity, biosafety, biosecurity and between COVID-19 and wildlife trade, we saw sanitation in markets) and disease surveillance many people calling for blanket bans on wildlife should be implemented to improve existing trade as a measure to prevent the emergence of wildlife trade operations. new zoonotic diseases. Land-use changes, agricultural expansion, and Many conservation organisations and individuals urbanization were the other main issues found were quick to dismiss these suggestions due to to relate to pandemic emergence. The report the larger socio-economic and biological risks highlighted the need to utilise effective habitat involved with such a strategy. Among those conservation measures in order reduce the risk of that published responses of this nature was the pandemics in this regard. Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management (CPW), of which the CIC is a Conservation through the sustainable use of member. wildlife resources may be one such habitat conservation tool to focus on going forward, The CPW stressed that maintaining healthy as it secures natural areas by incentivising and ecosystems is the best way to reduce risks of generating benefits for local communities residing zoonotic spillovers and future pandemics. They in them. added that persecution, including the killing of wildlife animals suspected of transmitting diseases, will not address the causes of the emergence or spread of zoonotic diseases. Broadly speaking, they also spoke about the importance of wildlife use for many communities, including indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs). This year, we have seen further evidence that adds to their conclusions. The IPBES Workshop on

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Media and publications

While the IPBES report does well to shed light on what we already knew about the link between wildlife trade and pandemic emergence, we also saw some new evidence this year on the potential fallout that would occur should a blanket ban on wildlife trade be introduced. A paper entitled “Investigating the risks of removing wild meat from global food systems” released in the Current Biology journal looked at a possible future where wild meat would be banned and subsequently removed from food systems. They too stated that the loss of wild meat would lead to food insecurity in a number of countries, with developing nations particularly at risk. What is perhaps more interesting is the projected habitat loss and species extinction that would follow the removal of wild meat from food systems. It was estimated that 123,980 km of new agricultural land will be required to offset the loss of wild meat with domestic livestock and poultry alternatives. To give some perspective, this is roughly equal to the total land area of Nicaragua or Greece. 2

This enormous shift in land usage, and the associated destruction of natural or seminatural habitats and wild spaces, would have an enormous impact on biodiversity. It is suggested that up to 267 different species could be driven towards global extinction as a result of this land use conversion.

While this statistic may seem shocking, it is unsurprising given the circumstances at hand. WWF states that habitat loss is the main threat to 85% of all species on the IUCN Red List. With this in mind, the aforementioned destruction of habitats and subsequent extinction threat does not seem so unrealistic. The two studies mentioned here further add to the arguments that have been widely adopted by many conservation organisations. It is becoming clear that a blanket ban on wildlife trade would severely impact IPLCs and communities in developing nations, and that the appropriate solution to our pandemic preparedness problem is targeted solutions within the realm of wildlife management. Ultimately, it can be argued that the emergence of COVID-19 is as a result of our overall impacts on the earth. All too often, we fail to recognise that we, as humans, are the root cause of many of the problems we are currently facing, including zoonotic disease emergence. In fact, many issues that arise in the sphere of wildlife management stem from human activities such habitat loss, destruction and fragmentation. By understanding the origins and root causes of these issues, we can start to address them more effectively. At the same time, looking to introduce reactionary policies without understanding their wide-spread impacts and knock-on effects can be equally problematic. We have seen many instances where the spotlight has been placed on peripheral issues, such as wildlife trade, when the focus should be on the wider ecosystem issues, with a view to maintaining or improving biodiversity and human well-being.

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Media and publications

CIC World Game Cook Book “Love can be found through one’s stomach” is a saying that can be found in several languages. It can therefore be argued that the best way to safeguard hunting and the interests of hunters is by focusing on game meat. The latest trends in nutrition say that wild game is one of the foods of the future. Wild game meat is healthy and rich in nutrients. It is also organic and can be obtained humanely. Popularising game meat, as well as game dishes, is a good way for hunters to win the favour of the general public. In view of this, the Artemis Working Group of CIC will be bringing CIC members and broader audiences a unique publication - the CIC World Game Cookbook. This book, authored by Artemis President, Soňa Chovanová Supeková, started its journey just before the end of 2018. In collaboration with the CIC Director General, we asked National Delegations to send us typical recipes from their country. The main condition was that at least one ingredient should be wild game meat. As simple as this idea seemed at its inception, its implementation and time have shown that it is not so easy. It took two whole years of collecting recipes, sorting recipes and, for some countries, even cooking and photographing the finished dishes with assistance from a professional, Slovak chef, Petr Slačka. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected our work, as it has affected all areas of our daily lives and the lives of hunters. Nevertheless, I would like to announce to the esteemed members of the CIC that we can look forward to a truly exceptional book. The CIC World Game Cookbook will contain 205 original recipes from 62 countries across different five continents. Some of the recipes have been prepared by CIC members; some by professional chefs. We would like to thank all of them for their efforts and the work they have put in to obtain the materials for their country. The list of those who contributed to the book would be very long, and in terms of additional work, which unfortunately took place exclusively online, there have been hundreds of hours of work and thousands of emails. A big thank you also goes to all the staff at CIC Headquarters who helped to make it possible to launch the book during the 67th General Assembly of the CIC in Budapest and the One with Nature – World of Hunting and Nature exhibition. Soňa Chovanová Supeková, President of Artemis WG

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Media and publications

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Media and publications

The Economist Explains How Trophy Hunting Protects Africa’s Wildlife A new video released by The Economist breaks down the intricacies of “trophy hunting” and the role it plays in supporting wildlife conservation and human livelihoods across Africa.

talked about as a possible replacement for hunting activities) is simply not viable in all areas. In many cases, this leaves “trophy hunting” as the only way for rural communities to support themselves.

While the issues covered in this video may seem familiar to those working in this field, The Economist does an excellent job of explaining the finer details of international hunting to a broader audience.

Furthermore, The Economist addresses the recent trend in which countries (such as the United States and the United Kingdom) have looked to introduce bans on “trophy hunting” and the trade of hunting trophies. In response to this, they stressed that blanket bans are not the solution to Africa’s wildlife conservation problems.

They first give an overview of the current state of wildlife management in Africa, including the major encompassing threat of habitat loss (driven by urbanisation and the conversion of land for agriculture) and the lack of state funding available in African countries for conservation. “Trophy hunting,” or international hunting, is mentioned as a wildlife management tool that involves sustainably taking off individual animals to generate benefits for wildlife conservation, antipoaching, human livelihoods and more. The community based natural resource management model in particular was highlighted, in which communities are able to manage and benefit from the wildlife on their own lands; in this context, incentivisation was stressed as a key factor in getting communities engaged in conservation.

They conclude with the following statement, which does a good job of summarising the state of international hunting today: “While trophy hunting is no silver bullet, taking this conservation tool off the table, with no viable alternative, will place millions of acres of habitat and the species that rely on it at risk.” The CIC congratulates The Economist for producing a clear and concise video which accurately portrays the facts and science related to “trophy hunting.” We would strongly encourage you to watch the full video, which delves deeper into the topics mentioned above.

The video also touched upon the importance of supporting well-managed hunting programs, such as those seen in Namibia, in order to recreate the successes we have often seen through this method of wildlife utilisation. In terms of alternatives to international hunting, the narrator explains how photo-tourism (commonly Click on the logo to watch the video

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