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Chronogram ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky

PUBLISHER

Jason Stern

EDITORIAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Brian K. Mahoney ART DIRECTOR

David Perry NEWS & POLITICS EDITOR

Lorna Tychostup ASSOCIATE EDITOR

news and politics 20 THE WAR ON TERROR Mark Danner analyzes the open-ended battle vs. "evil." 26 WEAPONS OF MASS DECEPTION Lorna Tychostup interviews Danny Shechter.

Susan Piperato CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Jim Andrews MUSIC EDITOR

Sharon Nichols BOOKS EDITOR

community notebook 32 FOR THE LOVE OF GINSENG Jen May profiles ginseng expert Robert Beyfuss. 34 IN UNISON Sam Baden visits Unison Arts Center on its 30th anniversary. 36 ART OF BUSINESS Ann Braybrooks mills about at Antique and Vintage Woods.

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38 SUSTAINABILITY Susan Piperato talks population growth with Mike DiTullo.

arts & culture 40 PORTFOLIO Brian K. Mahoney visits the Kingston studio of painter Joe Concra. 44 LUCID DREAMING Beth E. Wilson reviews a show of abstract art at Yellow Bird. 46 GALLERY DIRECTORY A list of what's hanging around the region. 50 MUSIC Sharon Nichols interviews local living legend Pete Seeger. 54 BOOKS Nina Shengold relates the agony and ecstasy of the book tour. 56 BOOK REVIEWS Books by Akiko Busch, Erin Quinn, Dakota Lane, and more. 64 FICTION One Mississippi by Jack Kelly. 70 POETRY Poems by Afarin, D.C. Albertini, Barbara Darr, D. Dougherty, Dwayne Esposito, V.A. Leikin, Carl Morton, and Tasha Sudan.

Nina Shengold WHOLE LIVING EDITOR

Lorrie Klosterman POETRY EDITOR

Phillip Levine COPY EDITOR

Andrea Birnbaum EDITORIAL INTERNS

Marleina Booth-Levy, Brianne Johnson, Max Shmookler PROOFREADERS

Laura McLaughlin, Joyce Reed, Barbara Ross

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Yulia Zarubina-Brill PRODUCTION COORDINATOR

Kiersten Miench PRODUCTION DESIGNERS

Jim Maximowicz, Julie Novak DESIGN ASSISTANT

Lorie Kellogg

PUBLISHING ADVERTISING SALES

Jamaine Bell, Ralph Jenkins OFFICE MANAGER

Lisa Mitchel-Shapiro

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interiors 73 ARTICLES, PRODUCTS, AND SERVICES FOR THE HOME.

food 86 TRICKS OF THE TRADE Pauline Uchmanowicz tours the Culinary Institute. 89 TASTINGS A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it.

Molly Maeve Eagan TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR

Justin Zipperle MARKETING & DISTRIBUTION

Tamara Zipperle SALES & MARKETING ASSISTANT

Matthew Watzka

business services

CONTRIBUTORS Emil Alzamora, Sam Baden, Ann Braybrooks, Eric Francis Coppolino, Greg Corell, Frank Crocitto, Michael Croswell, DJ Wavy Davy, Mike Dubisch, Hillary Harvey, Mike Jurkovic, Jack Kelly, Susan Krawitz, Jason Kremkau, David Malachowski, Jennifer May, Dane McCauley, Dion Ogust, Robert M. Place, Anne Pyburn, Fionn Reilly, Martha Rich, Brian Rubin, Jane Smith, Sparrow, Rebecca Stowe, Pauline Uchmanowicz, Rose Marie Williams, Beth E. Wilson, Vladimir Zimakov

12 4 BUSINESS DIRECTORY A compendium of advertiser services.

ALL CONTENTS COPYRIGHT 2005

16 4 AD INDEX How to contact the advertisers found in these pages.

LU M I N A R Y

whole living guide 98 THINK BEFORE YOU PINK Rose Marie Williams examines the cancer industry. 102 INNER VISION Robert M. Place offers a primer on the Tarot 104 FRANKLY SPEAKING Frank Crocitto links movement and meaning. 106 WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY Products and services for a positive lifestyle.

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OFFICE ASSISTANT

the forecast 137 DAILY CALENDAR Listings of over 500 local events. Plus preview features.

planet waves horoscopes 158 THE ANTI-9/11 Eric Francis Coppolino on eclipses. Plus horoscopes.

PUBLISHING ADDRESS

314 Wall St. Kingston, NY 12401 845.334.8600 fax 334.8610 www.chronogram.com info@chronogram.com SUBMISSIONS

chronogram.com/submissions CALENDAR LISTINGS

dwellings 166 MID-HUDSON REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

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parting shot 168 BETHANY A silver gelatin print with thread by Melissa Zexter

Calendar listings are a free service to our community. NOVEMBER 2005 DEADLINE October 13 SUBSCRIPTIONS $36 / 12 issues ADVERTISING RATES Available upon request.


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On the Cover

Tomfoolery

denise orzo | 2004 encaustic on birch panel, 23" x 23"

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hild psychologist Bruno Bettelheim might have been presaging the paintings of Denise Orzo when he wrote, “The monster a child knows best and is most concerned with is the monster he feels or fears himself to be.” Orzo’s recent series of work features schoolgirls in often frenzied motion—schoolgirls on the run; schoolgirls with multiple faces, as if shaking their heads in defiance; schoolgirls with hair braids tied together in a ring; schoolgirls with legs akimbo, arms windmilling—as if the girls were attempting to distract themselves from some (inner?) demon. The layered encaustic medium Orzo uses acts as a distortion device, however, and the figures in her paintings seem trapped in wax, like bugs in amber caught mid-flight. Orzo believes encaustic possesses an edgy energy. “The medium lends itself to making things look crazy,” she says. While Orzo confided that “kids can be scary and mean and startlingly violent,” her depictions of schoolgirls explore the essential duality of childhood, what Orzo calls the “inno-sinister” nature of kids, “When you watch kids play, they have their own logic. Kids can be manipulative and destructive and innocent and helpless.” Orzo had a solo exhibition at Kingston’s Wright Gallery in April. Tomfoolery is being exhibited as part of the group show “Encaustic Works 2005” at the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art at SUNY New Paltz (co-curated by Chronogram art critic Beth E. Wilson), through December 11. (845) 257-3844.

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Editor’s Note Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

5 1 8 . 6 9 7 . 3 5 0 0 HOME FURNISHINGS AND TEXTILES

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hen we last redesigned Chronogram in October, 1999, we went big. We added entire sections to the magazine (including the now renamed News & Politics), created a new logo, foolishly revamped our calendar (it didn’t work and you told us, so we changed it back), changed the physical size of the mag from its former puny dimensions to its current robust magnitude, and ran a stunningly ugly image on the cover to announce our arrival. (See photo above.) Fast-forward six years. We are redesigning and reorganizing once again. Welcome to ever-evolving Chronogram. Unlike our ‘99 redesign—when our intent was to be as bold and brassy as possible—the new changes are more subtle. What we’re now attempting is less a reconception than a clarification and an amplification. The metaphor that comes to mind is that of musical arrangement. We’ve taken a good tune and rescored it, stripping down the sonic clutter and allowing the naked sweetness of the rhythm and melody to be heard. But the song, as they say, remains the same. (Nota bene: Though the majority of the work on the current redesign has been done, we are still tinkering with a few elements, including a new logo, so stay tuned.) Perhaps you’ve noticed slight tweaks over the past few months—how the text has moved away from the inside margins, or the appearance of gray bars on the outside edges of our directory pages. (We also added an Ad Index recently, making it easier to contact the advertisers in these pages.) This month, bigger changes are afoot. First and foremost, we’ve reorganized the magazine for greater clarity. The Backbone section (so-called because when we created it in ‘99 it held the majority of the magazine’s editorial) is no more, and its contents have been relocated to more thematically appropriate sections of the magazine. (For instance: Frankly Speaking, Frank Crocitto’s column of practical wisdom, has been moved to our mind/body/spirit section, Whole Living.) We’ve also created an omnibus Arts & Culture section, new home to our coverage of books, music, and the visual arts. The Community Notebook has been expanded, and now encompasses our local-business profile—the Art of Business; and Susan Piperato’s column on sustainable issues, formerly known as Life in the Balance, is now simply titled Sustainability. We’ve also added to two new wrinkles to the magazine that we’re very excited about. We’re launching a dedicated fiction feature with this issue, due in part to the wonderfully enormous number of short-story submissions we received for the Literary Supplement. Jack Kelly’s “One Mississippi,” which won honorable mention in our fiction contest juried by Dave King, appears on page 64. We encourage you to submit your short stories of 6,000 words or less: fiction@chronogram.com. The other cool new wrinkle we’ve added is the Portfolio, created to give more emphasis in these pages to the work of local artists. Each month, we’ll feature the work of a different artist, complete with a studio shot and an interview. The paintings of Joe Concra appear on page 40. And lastly, a note of thanks to art director David Perry, who has shepherded this redesign process with much good sense and a mighty sensibility. What you see in these pages is his fine work. P.S. Chronogram turns 13 with this issue.

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APPAREL & ACCESSORIES FOR WOMEN & CHILDREN O P E N I N G

M I D - A P R I L

531 WARREN ST. HUDSON, NEW YORK

—Brian K. Mahoney

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Letters

Shielding Camp Casey

To the Editor: I appreciate the issues that Lorna Tychostup raised in her thoughtful article (“When Peace is War,” 9/05) in which she referred to my press release that I and other Iraq Human Shields were joining the Crawford encampment. I believe that the three Human Shields who joined Camp Casey had legitimate contributions to make to it. Cindy Sheehan has always talked about the grief of both US and Iraqi mothers as a result of this war, and we could personally bear this out. My release stated: “We have met bereaved Iraqi mothers and grieving US mothers and their tears are the same. Coming to Crawford to stand with Cindy Sheehan is our statement that...no more mothers here or in Iraq should have to grieve over their children because of the illegal war in Iraq.” Faith Fippinger, a US Human Shield who stayed through the bombing, told a women’s circle at the Camp about working in hospitals during Shock and Awe and meeting a woman who lost both her arms in the bombardment. The woman had just given birth. She could not stop crying. She said: “I’ll never know what it’s like to hold my baby.” Faith told us that 1,800 American mothers are the same—“they’ll never be able to hold their children again.” Faith and I are both under prosecution by the Treasury Department for our travel. This is not our individual plight but our entire country’s and also Iraq’s—that US citizens are forbidden to travel to countries proscribed by our government. This makes it much easier to demonize the people of those countries and much easier to destroy them. The human essence of the camp existed in the small, chance, one-on-one encounters that went on continuously among its participants, and the Shields were only a few more of the many stories that flowed in from all over. Cindy Sheehan was a powerhouse of commitment, eloquence, and serenity, and the joy of supporting her permeated the encampment. The Camp was not susceptible to any group diverting its message.The grief of those whose children had been killed, their determination to honor these children and hold this administration accountable for their deaths, did not admit any manipulation. In Camp Casey, it seemed to me that we all got it right. Judith Karpova, Kerhonkson

Eschewing the Real?

To the Editor: Your article “When Peace IsWar” [9/05] was shocking. It did not belong in Chronogram. Karl Rove said this week, “There is no real anti-war movement.” That I understand. Your article, I do not understand. Chronogram has tended to be real. My regrets. Chuck Davis, Woodstock

The Problem of Mastery

Just wanted to say how informative and thought provoking the article “When Peace is War” [9/05] was for me. A couple of points that stuck out for me. I agree with the article that each opposing side shouting louder than the other accomplishes nothing but more dissent. It is time to agree to disagree yet work towards the common goal of humane treatment for all. I was sadly informed of the segment of peace workers who are up just for the party....I guess they can be found everywhere on the Earth and not just on Skakedown St. Plus, the first hand knowledge and interviewing by the author of the further devastation that would ensue upon removing our troops was quite sobering. I often yearn for the ancient time when humanity lived in mystical participation with the Earth in order to survive within the paradox that life feeds on life. No life force wishes to die and yet all life forces will die as it is the cycle: birth—life—death 16


into rebirth. When humanity truly lived in the mystery of the present moment, there was little or no time to implement the dominant/oppressor paradigm that has been so destructive. Yet there was much more time to celebrate being alive, being grateful to find something to eat, a safe place to sleep. And of course even then, nothing was perfect. There is no utopia on Earth; “heaven and hell” coexist simultaneously.Yet, something major shifted for us when we mastered fire and agriculture and it is in the very concept of “mastery over” wherein the problem lies, I believe. Serpentessa, New Paltz

Department of Corrections

In our 9/05 issue, we incorrectly credited photos in a feature on Hudson Beach Glass, "Glass Beacon." The photos (see above) were taken by Jason Kremkau, who is a frequent contributor. More of his work can be seen on page 36 of this issue.

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Esteemed Reader In their incompleted state human beings thought they were awake when they were really moving about in a state of hypnotized sleep. They thought they had will but they had no real will. They thought they were free but they were really slaves. They thought they had something called “I” but they had no real I, only a multitude of petty selves with different desires and different aims. In their state of “waking sleep” humans voyaged from birth to death aboard a ship of fools. The captain was asleep, the steersman was drunk, and the navigator had forgotten the aim of the voyage. Any fool on board could push the steersman aside and try to steer the ship. The great human agglomerates that called themselves nations were just as much at the mercy of the fools in their midst as were individual men and women. The technological Titanic, modern society, was proceeding full speed ahead into the fog, but there was no one in control. Under these circumstances it would not be surprising if the vessel hit a rock or an iceberg. The surprising thing was that it stayed afloat at all. —Robert De Ropp

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steemed Reader of Our Magazine: Recently, in a local esoteric circle of some note, the simile was proposed that the human situation is like one who inherits a Maserati convertible, having no idea what a car is, that it can take one places, and do so at varying speeds, with the top up or down depending on the weather. Instead the proverbial inheritor puts it to the best use he knows. He is a gardener and so he tears off the top, fills the car with dirt and grows flowers. Now you might suggest that gardening and flowers are good and useful things, and I will not disagree. I will only point out that this instrument—the Maserati convertible—has other possibilities also. With a certain kind of high-octane fuel it can perform very nicely in places called roads, and can be quite useful for transportation. The situation of a human born into the world is very much like this. We are delivered in bloody, goopy packages with not an owner’s manual in sight. There is no such text for parents, let alone for ourselves personally as we reach responsible age. Sure, there a lot of ideas that fly around about how to care for and raise children, and there are a lot of ideas about what a person’s life is for, and what he or she is to learn, acquire, and achieve, but there is no definitive description outlining the fundamental design and possibilities of a person. Animals at least seem to be bound to their nature to such an extent that they cannot but live their fundamental design. Sure, they can learn some new tricks. But when push comes to shove a horse is a horse. People are a different animal. We are variable entities that can live at various levels of being. Looking around we can see that there are those (and it may even be us at times) that live at the level of a worm, seeking only the most basic satisfactions of comfort and physical satiation. Or we may subsist at the level of a sheep, finding solace as part of the herd (even as we are being shepherded to shearing, or the slaughterhouse). No, a human being does not naturally live in ensconced at the level of full human-ness. Being human is not par for the course of being born and becoming a responsible and productive member of society. Instead it is something that must be developed through persevering work. There are many qualities that we have within us, like the capabilities of the car in the simile, that can be brought to a much higher level of refinement and realization. These are capacities that we may we believe we already possess but in fact are mere simulacra of what they are in their fullness. Capacities like Love—but love that doesn’t depend on attraction or requisition; Will—but will that isn’t based on passing impulses and desires; Consciousness—but consciousness that isn’t fleeting moments of wakefulness amid a vast sea of dreams. Particularly during these dark times, real humans and people in the process of becoming such are desperately needed. It behooves us to find an owner’s manual for our instrument and, understanding that it is a vehicle with immense unknown capacities, learn how to “drive.” —Jason Stern

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THE WAR ON TERROR TAKING STOCK OF THE FOREVER WAR Not another simplistic discussion on whether we are safer in the post9/11 era, Mark Danner reviews just where America and the world stand after President Bush announced he would rid the world of “evil” and fight the good fight against the “global war on terror.”

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eldom has an image so clearly marked the turning of the world. The demise of the World Trade Center gave us an image as newborn to the world of sight as the mushroom cloud must have appeared to those who first cast eyes on it. The sheer immensity and inconceivability of the attack had forced Americans instantaneously to jump out of security, out of the everyday, out of life and had thrust them through a portal into a strange and terrifying new world, where the inconceivable, the unimaginable, had become brutally possible. In the face of the unimaginable, small wonder that leaders would revert to the language of apocalypse, of crusade, of “moral clarity.” Speaking at the National Cathedral just three days after the attacks, President Bush declared that while “Americans do not yet have the distance of history…our responsibility to history is already clear: to answer these attacks and rid the world of evil.” “The enemy is not a single political regime or person or religion or ideology,” declared the National Security Strategy of the United States of America for 2002. “The enemy is terrorism—premeditated, politically motivated violence perpetrated against innocents.” Not Islamic terrorism or Middle Eastern terrorism or even terrorism directed against the United States: terrorism itself. Within days of the attacks, President Bush had launched a “global war on terror.” The US has now completed four years of this war. Four years after the attack on Pearl Harbor, US troops ruled unchallenged in Japan and Germany. During those 48 months, Americans created an unmatched machine of war and decisively defeated two great enemies. By what “metric”—as the generals say—can we measure the progress of the global war on terror four years on?

THE BIRTH OF AL QAEDAISM Four years after the collapse of the towers, evil is still with us and so is terrorism. Terrorists have staged spectacular attacks, killing thousands, in Tunisia, Bali, Mombasa, Riyadh, Istanbul, Casablanca, Jakarta, Madrid, Sharm el Sheik and London, to name only the best known. Last year, they mounted 651 “significant terrorist attacks,” triple the year before and the highest since the State Department started gathering figures two decades ago. One hundred ninety-eight of these came in Iraq, Bush’s “central

front of the war on terror”—nine times the year before. And this does not include the hundreds of attacks on US troops. Al Qaeda, according to the president, has been severely wounded. “We’ve captured or killed two-thirds of their known leaders,” he said last year. And yet however degraded Al Qaeda’s operational capacity, nearly every other month, it seems, Osama bin Laden or one of his henchmen appears on the world’s television screens to expatiate on the ideology and strategy of global jihad and to urge followers on to more audacious and more lethal efforts. This, and the sheer number and breadth of terrorist attacks, suggest strongly that Al Qaeda has now become Al Qaedaism—that under the American and allied assault, what had been a relatively small, conspiratorial organization has mutated into a worldwide political movement, with thousands of followers eager to adopt its methods and advance its aims. Call it viral Al Qaeda, carried by strongly motivated next-generation followers who download from the Internet’s virtual training camp a perfectly adequate trade-craft in terror. Nearly two years ago, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld, in a confidential memorandum, posed the central question about the war on terror: “Are we capturing, killing or deterring and dissuading more terrorists every day than the madrassas and the radical clerics are recruiting, training and deploying against us?” The answer is clearly no. As the Iraq war grows increasingly unpopular in the United States—scarcely a third of Americans now approve of the president’s handling of the war, and 4 in 10 think it was worth fighting—and as more and more American leaders demand that the administration “start figuring out how we get out of there” (in the words of Senator Chuck Hagel, a Republican), Americans confront a stark choice: whether to go on indefinitely fighting a politically self-destructive counterinsurgency war that keeps the jihadists increasingly well supplied with volunteers or to withdraw from a post-Saddam Hussein Iraq that remains chaotic and unstable and beset with civil strife and thereby hand Al Qaeda and its allies a major victory in the war on terror’s “central front.” Americans have managed to show ourselves, our friends and most of all our enemies the limits of American power. Instead of fighting the real war that was thrust upon us on that incomprehensible morning four years ago, we stubbornly insisted

BY MARK DANNER 20 NEWS & POLITICS


on fighting a war of the imagination, an ideological struggle that we defined not by frankly appraising the real enemy before us but by focusing on the mirror of our own obsessions. And we have finished - as the escalating numbers of terrorist attacks, the grinding Iraq insurgency, the overstretched American military and the increasing political dissatisfaction at home show—by fighting precisely the kind of war they wanted us to fight.

FREEDOM, OPPRESSION, AND TAKING SIDES

hundreds of thousands of American troops to Saudi Arabia after Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait, Al Qaeda seized on the perfect issue: the “far enemy” had actually come and occupied the Land of the Two Holy Places and done so at the shameful invitation of the “near enemy”—the corrupt Saudi dynasty. But how to “re-establish the greatness of this Ummah”—the Muslim people—“and to liberate its occupied sanctities”? On this bin Laden is practical and frank: because of “the imbalance of power between our armed forces and the enemy forces, a suitable means of fighting must be adopted, i.e., using fast-moving light forces that work under complete secrecy. In other words, to initiate a guerrilla warfare.” Such warfare, depending on increasingly spectacular acts of terrorism, would be used to “prepare and instigate the Ummah…against the enemy.” The notion of “instigation,” indeed, is critical, for the purpose of terror is not to destroy your enemy directly but rather to spur on your sleeping allies to enlightenment, to courage and to action. It is a kind of horrible advertisement, meant to show those millions of Muslims who sympathize with Al Qaeda’s view of American policy that something can be done to change it.

Alexander Demianchuk/REUTERS

credit

Standing before Congress on Sept. 20, 2001, George W. Bush told Americans why they had been attacked. “They hate our freedoms,” the president declared. “Our freedom of speech, our freedom to vote and assemble and disagree with each other.” As for Al Qaeda’s fundamentalist religious mission: “We are not deceived by their pretenses to piety. We have seen their kind before. They are the heirs of all the murderous ideologies of the 20th century. By sacrificing human life to serve their radical visions—by abandoning every value except the will to power—they follow in the path of fascism, and Nazism, and totalitarianism. And they will follow that path all the way, to where US HELPED TO CREATE GLOBAL TERRORISM it ends: in history’s unmarked grave of discarded lies.” But Al Qaeda was not the Nazis or the Soviet Communists. Al Qaeda controlled When the Soviet Red Army occupied Afghanistan in 1979, the United States beno state, fielded no regular army. It was dedicated to achieving its aims through guer- lieved supporting the Islamic insurgents would be an excellent way to bleed the Soviet Union. “It was July 3, 1979, that rilla tactics, notably a kind of spectacular President Carter signed the first directive terrorism carried to a level of apocalyptic for secret aid to the opponents of the brutality the world had not before seen. pro-Soviet regime in Kabul,” Zbigniew Mass killing was the necessary but not Brzezinski, Carter’s national security adthe primary aim, for the point of such viser, recalled in 1998. “And that very terror was to mobilize recruits for a politiday, I wrote a note to the president in cal cause and to tempt the enemy into which I explained to him that in my reacting in such a way as to make that opinion this aid was going to induce a mobilization easier. Soviet military intervention.” It was a And however extreme and repugnant strategy of provocation, for the gambit Al Qaeda’s methods, its revolutionary had the effect of “drawing the Russians goals were by no means unusual within Isinto the Afghan trap. The day that the lamist opposition groups throughout the Soviets officially crossed the border, I Muslim world. “If there is one overarchwrote to President Carter: We now have ing goal they share,” wrote the authors of the opportunity of giving to the USSR the Defense Science Board report, “it is its Vietnam War.” the overthrow of what Islamists call the To the Saudis and other Muslim re‘apostate’ regimes: the tyrannies of Egypt, gimes, supporting a “defensive jihad” to Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Jordan, and the free occupied Muslim lands was a means Gulf states. The United States finds itto burnish their tarnished Islamic creself in the strategically awkward —and dentials while exporting a growing and potentially dangerous—situation of bedangerous resource (frustrated, radical ing the longstanding prop and alliance young men) so they would indulge partner of these authoritarian regimes. their taste for pious revolution far from Without the US, these regimes could home. not survive. Thus the US has strongly Among the thousands of holy taken sides in a desperate struggle that warriors making this journey was the is both broadly cast for all Muslims and wealthy young Saudi Osama bin Laden, country-specific.” who would set up the Afghan Services The broad aim of the many-stranded Bureau, a “helping organization” for Salafi movement, which includes the Arab fighters that gathered names and Muslim Brotherhood of Egypt and the contact information in a large database Wahhabis of Saudi Arabia and of which or qaida which would eventually lend Al Qaeda is one extreme version, is to its name to an entirely new organizareturn Muslims to the ancient ways of tion. Though the Afghan operation pure Islam—of Islam as it was practiced by the Prophet Muhammad and his early A WAX FIGURE OF OSAMA BIN LADEN SITS ATOP 200 WAX HEADS, PART OF THE was wildly successful, as judged by its followers in the seventh century. Stand“APOTHEOSIS OF TERROR” EXHIBITION IN LOMONOSOVO, RUSSIA IN 2004. American creators, it had at least one unexpected result: it created a global ing between the more radical Salafi groups and their goal of a conservative Islamic revolution are the “apostate regimes,” jihad movement, led by veteran fighters who were convinced that they had defeated the “idolators” now ruling in Riyadh, Cairo, Amman, Islamabad and other Muslim one superpower and could defeat another. The present jihad took shape in the backwash of forgotten wars. After the Soviet capitals. All these authoritarian regimes oppress their people: on this point Al Qaeda and those in the Bush administration who promote “democratization in the Arab army withdrew in defeat, the United States lost interest in Afghanistan, leaving the mujahedeen forces to battle for the ruined country in an eight-year blood bath from world” agree. Many of the Salafists, however, see behind the “near enemies” ruling over them a which the Taliban finally emerged victorious. In the gulf, after the fantastically bloody “far enemy” in Washington, a superpower without whose financial and military sup- eight-year war between Iran and Iraq, Saddam Hussein forced the Iranians to sign a port the Mubarak regime, the Saudi royal family and the other conservative autocra- cease-fire, a “victory” that left his regime heavily armed, bloodied and bankrupt. To pay for his war, Saddam had borrowed tens of billions of dollars from the Saudis, cies of the Arab world would fall before their attacks. When the United States sent NEWS & POLITICS 21


Kuwaitis and other neighbors, and he now demanded that these debts be forgiven and that oil prices be raised. The particularly aggressive refusal of the Kuwaitis to do either led Hussein, apparently believing that the Americans would accept a fait accompli, to invade and annex the country. The Iraqi army flooding into Kuwait represented, to bin Laden, the classic opportunity. He rushed to see the Saudi leaders, proposing that he defend the kingdom with his battle-tested corps of veteran holy warriors. The Saudis listened patiently to the pious young man—his father, after all, had been one of the kingdom’s richest men—but did not take him seriously. Within a week, King Fahd had agreed to the American proposal, carried by Richard Cheney, then the secretary of defense, to station American soldiers—“infidel armies”—in Saudi Arabia. This momentous decision led to bin Laden’s final break with the Saudi dynasty.

TERROR IS RECRUITMENT Terror is a way of talking. Those who employed it in such an unprecedented manner on 9/11 were seeking not just the large-scale killing of Americans but to achieve something by means of the large-scale and spectacular killing of Americans. The 9/11 attacks were a call to persuade Muslims who might share bin Laden’s broad view of American power to sympathize with, support or even join the jihad he had declared against the “far enemy.” “Those young men,” bin Laden said of the terrorists two months after the attacks, “said in deeds, in New York and Washington, speeches that overshadowed all other speeches made everywhere else in the world. The speeches are understood by both Arabs and non-Arabs—even by Chinese. [I]n Holland, at one of the centers, the number of people who accepted Islam during the days that followed the operations were more than the people who accepted Islam in the last 11 years.” To this, a sheik in a wheelchair shown in the videotape replies: “Hundreds of people used to doubt you, and few only would follow you until this huge event happened. Now hundreds of people are coming out to join you.” Grotesque as it is to say, the spectacle of 9/11 was meant to serve, among other things, as an enormous recruiting poster. The 9/11 attacks seem to have been intended at least in part to provoke an overwhelming American response: most likely an invasion of Afghanistan, which would lead the United States, like the Soviet Union before it, into an endless, costly and politically fatal quagmire. For the jihadists, luring the Americans into Afghanistan would accomplish at least two things: by drawing the United States into a protracted guerrilla war in which the superpower would occupy a Muslim country and kill Muslim civilians—with the world media, including independent Arab networks like Al Jazeera, broadcasting the carnage—it would leave increasingly isolated those autocratic Muslim regimes that depended for their survival on American support. And by forcing the United States to prosecute a long, costly and inconclusive guerrilla war, it would severely test, and ultimately break, American will, leading to a collapse of American prestige and an eventual withdrawal—first, physically, from Afghanistan and then, politically, from the “apostate regimes” in Riyadh, Cairo and elsewhere in the Islamic world. In Afghanistan, bin Laden would be disappointed. The US military initially sent in no heavy armor but 22 NEWS & POLITICS

instead restricted the American effort to aerial bombardment in support of several hundred Special Operations soldiers on the ground who helped lead the Northern Alliance forces in a rapid advance. Kabul and other cities quickly fell. America was caught in no Afghan quagmire, or at least not in the sort of protracted, highly televisual bloody mess bin Laden had envisioned. But bin Laden and his senior leadership, holed up in the mountain complex of Tora Bora, managed to survive the bombing and elude the Afghan forces that the Americans commissioned to capture them. During the next months and years, as the United States and its allies did great damage to Al Qaeda’s operational cadre, arresting or killing thousands of its veterans, its major leadership symbols survived intact, and those symbols, and their power to lead and to inspire, became Al Qaeda’s most important asset.

“Are we capturing, killing or deterring and dissuading more terrorists every day than the madrassas and the radical clerics are recruiting, training, and deploying against us?” —Donald Rumsfeld “THERE IS NO WAR HERE” It was Oct. 27, 2003, and I stood before what remained of the Baghdad office of the International Committee of the Red Cross. In the distance, I heard a second huge explosion, saw rising the great plume of oily smoke; within the next 45 minutes, insurgents attacked four more times, bombing police stations throughout the capital, killing at least 35. Simultaneity and spectacle: Qaeda trademarks. I was gazing at Zarqawi’s handiwork. Behind me, the press had gathered, a jostling crowd of aggressive, mostly young people bristling with lenses short and long, pushing against the line of young American soldiers, who, assault rifles leveled, were screaming at them to stay back. The scores of glittering lenses were a necessary part of the equation, transforming what in military terms would have been a minor engagement into a major defeat. “There is no war here,” an American colonel told me a couple of days before in frustration and disgust. “There’s no division-on-division engagements, nothing really resembling a war. Not a real war anyway.” It was not a war the Americans had been trained or equipped to fight. With fewer than 150,000 troops - and many fewer combat soldiers—they were trying to contain a full-blown insurgency in a country the size of California. The elusive enemy—an evolving, loose coalition of a score or so groups, some of them ex-Baathists from Saddam Hussein’s dozen or so security agencies, some former Iraqi military personnel, some professional Islamic insurgents like Zarqawi, some foreign volunteers from Saudi Arabia or Kuwait or Syria come to take the jihad to the Americans—attacked not with tanks or artillery or infantry assaults but with roadside bombs

and suicide car bombers and kidnappings. Iraq, bin Laden declared, had become a “golden opportunity” to start a “third world war” against “the crusader-Zionist coalition.” Amid the barbed wire and blast walls and bomb debris of post-occupation Iraq, you could discern a clear strategy behind the insurgent violence. The insurgents had identified the Americans’ points of vulnerability: their international isolation; their forced distance, as a foreign occupier, from Iraqis; and their increasing disorientation as they struggled to keep their footing on the fragile, shifting, roiling political ground of postHussein Iraq. And the insurgents hit at each of these vulnerabilities, as Begin had urged his followers to do, “deliberately, tirelessly, unceasingly.”

ALLIES & INSURGENTS Insurgents in Iraq and jihadists abroad struck America’s remaining allies. First they hit the Italians, car-bombing their base in Nasiriyah in November 2003, killing 28. Then they struck the Spanish, bombing commuter trains in Madrid on March 11, 2004, killing 191. Finally they struck the British, bombing three London Underground trains and a double-decker bus this July, killing 56. It is as if the insurgents, with cold and patient precision, were severing one by one the fragile lines that connected the American effort in Iraq to the rest of the world. With car bombs and assassinations and commando attacks, insurgents have methodically set out to kill any Iraqi who might think of cooperating with the Americans, widening the crevasse between occupiers and occupied. They have struck at water lines and electricity substations and oil pipelines, interrupting the services that Iraqis depended on, particularly during the unbearably hot summers, keeping electrical service in Baghdad far below what it was under Saddam Hussein—often only a few hours a day this summer—and oil exports 300,000 barrels a day below their prewar peak (helping to double world oil prices). Building on the chaotic unbridled looting of the first weeks of American rule, the insurgents have worked to destroy any notion of security and to make clear that the landscape of destruction that is Baghdad, should be laid at the feet of the American occupier, that unseen foreign power that purports to rule the country from behind concrete blast walls in the so-called Green Zone but dares to venture out only in tanks and armored cars. The insurgents in Iraq have presided over a catastrophic collapse in confidence in the Americans and a concomitant fall in their power. It is difficult to think of a place in which terror has been deployed on such a scale: there have been suicide truck bombs, suicide tanker bombs, suicide police cars, suicide bombers on foot, suicide bombers posing as police officers, suicide bombers posing as soldiers, even suicide bombers on bicycles. While the American death toll climbs steadily toward 2,000, the number of Iraqi dead probably stands at 10 times that and perhaps many more; no one knows. Conservative unofficial counts put the number of Iraqi dead in the war at somewhere between 25,000 and 30,000, in a country a tenth the size of the United States.

ATTEMPTING TO SPLIT A COUNTRY APART The Kurds in the north, possessed of their own army and legislature, want to secure what they believe are their historic rights to the disputed city of Kirkuk, including its


oil fields, and be quit of Iraq. The Shia in the south, now largely ruled by Islamic party militias trained by the Iranians and coming under the increasingly strict sway of the clerics on social matters, are evolving their oil-rich mini-state into a paler version of the Islamic republic next door. And in the center, the Baathist elite of Saddam Hussein’s security services and army—tens of thousands of well-armed professional intelligence operatives and soldiers—have formed an alliance of convenience with Sunni Islamists, domestic and foreign, in order to assert their rights in a unitary Iraq. They are in effective control of many cities and towns, and they have the burdensome and humiliating presence of the foreign occupier to thank for the continuing success of their recruitment efforts. In a letter to bin Laden that was intercepted by American forces in January 2004, Zarqawi asked: “When the Americans disappear—what will become of our situation?” As Zarqawi described in his letter and in subsequent broadcasts, his strategy in Iraq is to strike at the Shia—and thereby provoke a civil war. “A nation of heretics,” the Shia “are the key element of change,” he wrote. “If we manage to draw them onto the terrain of partisan war, it will be possible to tear the Sunnis away from their heedlessness, for they will feel the weight of the imminence of danger.” Again a strategy of provocation—which plays on an underlying reality: That Iraq sits on the critical sectarian fault line of the Middle East and that a conflict there gains powerful momentum from the involvement of neighboring states, with Iran strongly supporting the Shia and with Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Jordan and Syria strongly sympathetic to the Sunnis. In the midst of it all, increasingly irrelevant, are the Americans, who have the fanciest weapons but have never had sufficient troops, or political will, to assert effective control over the country. If political authority comes from achieving a monopoly on legitimate violence, then the Americans, from those early days when they sat in their tanks and watched over the wholesale looting of public institutions, never did achieve political authority in Iraq. They fussed over liberalizing the economy and writing constitutions and achieving democracy in the Middle East when in fact there was really only one question in Iraq, emerging again and again in each successive political struggle, most recently in the disastrously managed writing of the constitution: how to shape a new political dispensation in which the age-old majority Shia can take control from the minority Sunni and do it in a way that minimized violence and insecurity—do it in a way, that is, that the Sunnis would be willing to accept, however reluctantly, without resorting to armed resistance. This might have been accomplished with hundreds of thousands of troops, iron control and a clear sense of purpose. The Americans had none of these.

A BEREFT BUSH ADMINISTRATION The sun is setting on American dreams in Iraq; what remains now to be worked out are the modalities of withdrawal, which depend on the powers of forbearance in the American body politic.

But the dynamic has already been set in place. The United States is running out of troops. By the spring of 2006, nearly every active-duty combat unit is likely to have been deployed twice. The National Guard and Reserves, meanwhile, make up an unprecedented 40 percent of the force, and the Guard is in the “stage of meltdown,” as Gen. Barry McCaffrey, retired, recently told Congress. Within 24 months, “the wheels are coming off.” For all the apocalyptic importance President Bush and his administration ascribed to the Iraq war, they made virtually no move to expand the military, no decision to restore the draft. In the end, the president judged his tax cuts more important than his vision of a “democratic Middle East.” The administration’s relentless political style, integral to both its strength and its weakness, left it wholly unable to change course and to add more troops when they might have made a difference. That moment is long past; the widespread unpopularity of the occupation in Iraq and in the Islamic world is now critical to insurgent recruitment and makes it possible for a growing insurgent force numbering in the tens of thousands to conceal itself within the broader population. Sold a war made urgent by the imminent threat of weapons of mass destruction in the hands of a dangerous dictator, Americans now see their sons and daughters fighting and dying in a war whose rationale has been lost even as its ending has receded into the indefinite future. Of the many reasons that American leaders chose to invade and occupy Iraq - to democratize the Middle East; to remove an unpredictable dictator from a region vital to America’s oil supply; to remove a threat from Israel, America’s ally; to restore the prestige sullied on 9/11 with a tank-led procession of triumph down the avenues of a conquered capital; to seize the chance to overthrow a regime capable of building an arsenal of chemical and biological weapons - of all of these, it is remarkable that the Bush administration chose to persuade Americans and the world by offering the one reason that could be proved to be false. The failure to find the weapons of mass destruction, and the collapse of the rationale for the war, left terribly exposed precisely what bin Laden had targeted as the critical American vulnerability: the will to fight. We cannot know what future Osama bin Laden imagined when he sent off his 19 suicide terrorists on their mission four years ago. He was wrong about Afghanistan, and there has been no uprising in the Islamic world. One suspects, though, that if he had been told on that day that in a mere 48 months he would behold a world in which the United States, “the idol of the age,” would be bogged down in an endless guerrilla war fighting in a major Muslim country; its all-powerful army, with few allies and little sympathy, would find itself overstretched and exhausted; its dispirited people demanding from their increasingly unpopular leader a withdrawal without victory—one suspects that such a prophecy would have pleased him. Bin Laden has suffered damage as well. Many of his closest collaborators have been killed or captured, his training camps destroyed, his sanctuary

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NEWS & POLITICS 23


Faleh Kheiber/REUTERS

AN IRAQI NATIONAL GUARD SOLDIER LEADS ARRESTED SUSPECTS DURING OPERATION LIGHTNING IN BAGHDAD, JUNE 7, 2005.

occupied. But Al Qaeda was always a flexible, ghostly organization, a complex worldwide network made up of shifting alliances and marriages of convenience with other shadowy groups. Now Al Qaeda’s “center of gravity,” such as it is, has gone elsewhere. In December 2003, a remarkable document, “Jihadi Iraq: Hopes and Dangers,” appeared on the Internet, setting out a fascinating vision of how to isolate the United States and pick off its allies one by one. The truly ripe fruit, concludes the author, is Spain: “In order to force the Spanish government to withdraw from Iraq the resistance should deal painful blows to its forces...(and) make utmost use of the upcoming general election. We think that the Spanish government could not tolerate more than two, maximum three blows, after which it will have to withdraw.” Three months later, on March 11, 2004 - 3/11, as it has come to be known—a cell of North African terrorists struck at the Atocha Train Station in Madrid. One hundred ninety-one people died—a horrific toll but nowhere near what it could have been had all of the bombs actually detonated, simultaneously, and in the station itself. Had the terrorists succeeded in bringing the roof of the station down, the casualties could have surpassed those of 9/11. In the event, they were quite sufficient to lead to the defeat of the Spanish government and the decision of its successor to withdraw its troops from Iraq. What seems most notable about the Madrid attack, however—and the attack on Jewish and foreign sites in Casablanca on May 17, 2003, among others—is that the perpetrators were “home-grown” and not, strictly speaking, Al Qaeda.

24 NEWS & POLITICS

“After 2001, when the US destroyed the camps and housing and turned off the funding, bin Laden was left with little control,” Marc Sageman, a psychiatrist and former CIA case officer who has studied the structure of the network, has written. “The movement has now degenerated into something like the Internet. Spontane-

The US has now completed four years of this war. Four years after the attack on Pearl Harbor, US troops ruled unchallenged in Japan and Germany. During those 48 months, Americans created an unmatched machine of war and decisively defeated two great enemies. ous groups of friends, as in Madrid and Casablanca, who have few links to any central leadership, are generating sometimes very dangerous terrorist operations, notwithstanding their frequent errors and poor training.” We have entered the era of the amateurs. Those who attacked the London underground whether or not they

had any contact with Al Qaeda manufactured their crude bombs from common chemicals (including hydrogen peroxide, bleach and drain cleaner), making them in plastic food containers, toting them to Luton Station in coolers and detonating them with cell-phone alarms. One click on the Internet and you can pull up a Web site offering a Recipe—or, for that matter, one showing you how to make a suicide vest from commonly found items, including a video download demonstrating how to use the device: “There is a possibility that the two seats on his right and his left might not be hit with the shrapnel,” the unseen narrator tells the viewer. Not to worry, however: “The explosion will surely kill the passengers in those seats.” In launching a war on Iraq that we have been unable to win, we have done the one thing a leader is supposed never to do: issue a command that is not followed. A withdrawal from Iraq, rapid or slow, with the Islamists still holding the field, will signal, as bin Laden anticipated, a failure of American will. Those who will view such a withdrawal as the critical first step in a broader retreat from the Middle East will surely be encouraged to go on the attack. That is, after all, what you do when your enemy retreats. In this new world, where what is necessary to go on the attack is not armies or training or even technology but desire and political will, we have ensured, by the way we have fought this forever war, that it is precisely these qualities our enemies have in large and growing supply. Mark Danner is a professor of journalism and politics at the University of California at Berkeley and Bard College and the author, most recently, of Torture and Truth: America, Abu Ghraib and the War on Terror.


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WEAPONS of MASS DECEPTION AN INTERVIEW WITH DANNY SCHECHTER Akin to riding a wild bull, Lorna Tychostup goes one on one with the fast talking, innovative, visionary media critic Danny Shechter, who'd like to see progressives take a deeper role in forcing media accountability and responsibility.

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ieman Fellow in Journalism at Harvard University, radio news director turned CNN and Emmy Award winning ABC news producer, Danny Schechter is now an award-winning independent investigative journalist and filmmaker, as well as an outspoken author. One of America’s most prolific media critics, the former corporate-media insider takes on his own industry in Weapons of Mass Deception, a documentary film that takes viewers behind the scenes of the media coverage of the Iraq war. Breaking through what Schechter calls “so-called ‘objective reporting,’” he challenges the media’s complicity with the Bush administration in framing the Iraq war. A hard-hitting yet personal film, WMD looks at how the Pentagon helped shape media coverage and asks why the American audience lapped it up. Calling their nonstop coverage of the Iraq war their finest hour, American TV networks pointed to the use of embedded journalists and new technologies that permitted viewers to see a war up close for the first time. But Schechter charges the media promoted and acted as head cheerleader for a war in which some reporting was “sanitized, staged, and suppressed”; a war where Americans were given reasons for fighting that were never questioned by mainstream media; a war that was seen via the media differently in different countries. Schechter, author of Media Wars: News at a Time of Terror, The More You Watch The Less You Know and News Dissector, dared to ask “Why?” “Self-embedded” in his living room, Schechter fastidiously tracked TV coverage of the Iraq war daily and wrote thousands of words about the coverage for Mediachannel.org, the world’s largest online media-issues network. Collecting his columns, blogs, and articles, he published, Embedded: Weapons of Mass Deception (Prometheus Books). According to Schecter, when it became clear that Embedded was being “buried” by the media, he decided to make a film on the topic. Drawing back the curtain of the mainstream media and its democracy-threatening link to the government purveyors of information, WMD features footage from inside Iraq, the media, and tracks the media war through February 2004. Schechter will be on hand to answer questions after a screening of Weapons of Mass Deception on October 9 at 1pm, at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck. Chronogram senior editor, Lorna Tychostup, interviewed Schechter via phone at his Manhattan office at Globalvison, the television and film production company he co-founded 16 years ago.

Lorna Tychostup: Weapons of Mass Deception begins by discussing the difference between “journalism” and “coverage.” Can you explain the difference? Danny Schechter: Coverage can be pointing the camera at something, at a press conference, at a bomb going off, at a bunch of tanks rolling down the road and you can report on what you are watching and seeing. Journalism attempts to put information in context. It attempts to add a dimension of reporting so that you find out what else is going on, what is the back story to it, offer some assessment, analysis, context, etc. And that is what is often lacking. LT: How would you define journalism? DS: Journalism is an effort to report on news, on the news of the day. It is an effort to try to explain what is going on, to find out what is going on, first of all. Check the accuracy of the claims by government agencies and the like, and also to offer some perspective. Different countries have different styles of journalism, but ours tends to be a news story with the five W’s and an H—who, what, where, when, why, and how. That is [our] classical approach to journalism—an effort by the press, which has been given a First Amendment protection to serve the public interest—to be a check on power. Not only tell us what is going on, not only to inform us, but also to bring out information that other people want hidden. LT: What is “independent” journalism? How does it fit into the definition? DS: We are living in an age of corporate domination of big media. Larger and larger companies controlling the information system—publishing, television, radio, print; often companies that are not really primarily committed to journalism but they are in the media business. They are into advertising, entertainment, and other forms of communication. Reporting is a small part of it. Sometimes their [business] priorities take priority over their journalistic interests. LT: Independent journalism, how does it fit into this? DS: In corporate hierarchies and structures, reporters report to their bosses. Priorities often are set at the top of a hierarchy. Independent journalists, can be but not always are, separate from those structures, initiate their own stories, work as freelancers, or work for publications that are not dominated by big media cartels. For example, the

INTERVIEW & PHOTOS BY LORNA TYCHOSTUP 26 NEWS & POLITICS


PRISONERS OUTSIDE THE BAGHDAD CENTRAL COURT BUILDING IN THE HEAVILY FORTIFIED GREEN ZONE RETURNING TO DETENTION UNDER AN AMERICAN MILITARY ESCORT, IN LATE JULY, 2004. THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN DESPITE RESTRICTIONS AGAINST PHOTOGRAPHING IN AND AROUND THE CENTRAL COURT BUILDING.

New Yorker is a corporate publication. It is owned by Condé Nast but has a reputation for independent writing. So journalists like Seymour Hersh appear in the New Yorker and they are a lot more critical in their outlook—which is another characteristic of independent journalists—than journalists who work for big corporate organizations. When you work in a big structure, you tend to conform to what is expected of you and the priorities. If someone says, “OK, we are going to spend 80 percent of our resources covering entertainment and only 5 percent of our resources covering the world, if you want to work in that organization, that is what you do. Journalists don’t initiate a lot of their own stories. They’re assigned to cover stories. They’re told how much time they have, and how to do it. There are certain templates of coverage. That is why there is so much similarity in coverage, why it all sort of looks alike. LT: From what I saw on the ground in Iraq, people I spoke to on military bases for example, some journalists who went there to do embeds were told by [their] editor back in the states, “This is the story we want, go out there and find it.” DS: Precisely, because there is a lot of conformity and uniformity in the media. Assignment editors in New York are watching what their competitors are covering. If their competitors are covering something, they want to be covering the same thing. They don’t want to be nominally out-scooped [and] tend to cover the same stories in the same way. Often those stories are responding to initiatives of and spin by the government. There is not much room for independent investigation or critical analysis. Also, in America, there is supposedly a line drawn between commentary and reporting—“just the facts, ma’am,” and not offer any perspective on it. In England and other countries, journalists are expected to offer perspective. Collecting the facts is not just the whole job. And of course, when you collect facts, sometimes you leave certain facts out. You decide what’s important and what isn’t important. LT: In most recent American journalism they are tending to do the European thing—whether you are listening to Bill O’Reilly or Amy Goodman, you’re getting someone’s opinion, you’re getting their agenda, their perspective—as opposed to the facts. DS: It is not “as opposed to the facts.” You are getting some of the facts, some of the news. It may not be possible to get all of the news. You’re covering something that is breaking or a current story. All journalism makes decisions—influenced by culture, by corporate views, by the wisdom of editors and people running media organizations about what’s important.

LT: What about Robert Fisk, or the Guardian— DS: But Robert Fisk is a columnist, an opinion writer. His reporting is put in the perspective of commentary at the Independent. British journalists have a different tradition than our tradition. In the Telegraph, the Times of London owned by Rupert Murdoch, you tend to get more of a conservative spin. In the Guardian, more of a left liberal spin; [it] gives you diversity of perspective. In our country, if you look at the punditocracy, they’re overwhelmingly white, male, older, based in Washington, DC, writing for elite media newspapers and publications, and other voices don’t get heard as much. LT: Does this have to do with ratings? With power? In Weapons of Mass Deception you say that the media sources before the war were 73 percent prowar and 3 percent antiwar. DS: Why is it like this? People don’t realize that there is a media industry [that] runs like an industry. It tends to settle on what the story is and cover it. We’ve seen an example in another direction where Katrina happens, reporters are in New Orleans and suddenly they’re seeing that the government response is inept and improper. They’re beginning to ask tougher questions about it. We begin to see discussion about race and class. LT: Katrina is an excellent example, because reporters were actually there—seeing with their own eyes, hearing, smelling, touching, as opposed to the war in Iraq where [reporters] are holed up in hotels and driving around in armored vehicles. That is a bold and extraordinary thing to be doing in Iraq, but how much truth are they getting? DS: There is a piece today in the LA Weekly that sees a shift underway. The initial [Katrina] reporting was seen as very feisty, uncontrolled and honest. It is now being replaced with a lot more politicians, “experts,” government voices. And the voices of the victims/people who are actually suffering are shrinking in terms of overall coverage. There tends to be fashion in media. Media pulls you up—media pulls you down. For example, when the war in Vietnam started, most of the media were supportive of the war. But as journalists went out into the villages and the hamlets they began to see there was a big gap between what the government was saying and what they were seeing. We have the same thing today in Iraq—a big credibility gap [and] a lack of explanation. People really don’t know how to interpret what they are seeing... There is very poor reporting on who is resisting the Iraqi government now. What do NEWS & POLITICS 27


THE AFTERMATH OF A SUICIDE CAR BOMBING OUTSIDE BAGHDAD’S ASSYRIAN CHURCH, AUGUST 1, 2004, PART OF A SERIES OF ANTI-CHRISTIAN BOMBINGS THAT DAY THAT KILLED 12 AND WOUNDED 61.

they want? What do they stand for? What is their leadership structure? Who is Zarqawi? How real is this? There is a lot of murkiness here. So things are labeled and defined in ways they turn out not to be accurate. When a war happens, there are often two sides to the war, but our coverage has been one-sided. We don’t even attempt to get sound bites or comments from the “other” side. We don’t even know who they are. There was a reporter for CBS who was covering the “other side.” Because he covered them, he was accused of being part of [the insurgency] and is now in Abu Ghraib prison and CBS is trying to free him. What I am looking at is the media coverage. If in the media, out of 800 experts on the air, only six are challenging the course of the war—aren’t there other voices that could have been on the air? Of course there were, saying that this was a bad idea. There were 30 million people marching against the war. But what they were saying was not really given much airtime. You have the replacement of a journalistic approach by a propagandistic approach, jingoism displacing journalism. Media became an advocacy force for the war, justifying [but] not looking critically at it in any consistent way. The American people bought into it because of the fear, the chance that we were under attack because of 9/11, because Saddam was part of it, that we were at risk of nuclear attack, all the message points that the administration used to mobilize us to war. The question is: Does the media have any responsibility to look at any of these claims and to question them? 28 NEWS & POLITICS

LT: Before the war, a producer from NBC came to interview me because I was going to Iraq. At some point when I returned she told me, “Soon this anti-war coverage will have to stop, because the war is more profitable to cover.” DS: Nobody in the corporate level will admit to that. LT: Phil Donahue was on MSNBC. I received an e-mail from Jeff Cohen [senior producer of “Donahue” and until the year 2002, an MSNBC on-air contributor] asking that everyone please watch. Phil’s first show, he had on former Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu and he asked some really tough questions. Four or five days later, there is poor Phil sitting at a desk with two stacks of papers in front of him, one bigger than the other. Holding up the larger pile he says, “These are letters from the people who said I was rude to the former Prime Minister.” He holds up the smaller pile and says, “These are letters from people who wrote thanking me for finally asking the tough questions never asked on TV.” His message to me, was, “OK guys, start sending me the cards and letters.” We keep blaming the media. But who is watching the media? The people who are happy with Phil’s message aren’t writing cards and letters. The “let’s-burn-our-TV” folks didn’t even know Phil was on. The squeaky wheel gets the oil and the people on the right seem to be very well oiled. DS: The Netanyahu people—there is a whole lobby for Israel. They’re very organized, monitor


all media coverage, they complain about everything all the time. LT: Yes, but it wasn’t just that. In five months Phil is off the air. DS:: Phil had the highest ratings on MSNBC. According to Cohen, MSNBC and NBC became very nervous about the range of viewpoints on Donahue’s show. They wanted to rein Phil in. They began to insist for every one antiwar person they wanted to have two prowar people. But even that wasn’t acceptable to them. Their principle competition Fox, was doing much better. Phil was doing well vis-a-vis the other shows on MSNBC, but MSNBC wasn’t doing very well on cable against Fox. So it began to try to outfox Fox—get rid of the liberals and bring in a bunch of conservatives—Scarborough, Michael Savage. [MSMBC] saw themselves as competing with Fox, that’s why Phil was pushed out. They claimed his ratings were not doing well, but he was actually doing pretty well vis-a-vis the network; but [not] in terms of [MSNBC’s] competitors. MSNBC’s solution: Drop Donahue and pick up the flag. If you watched MSNBC before and during the invasion—after Donahue was terminated and several rightwingers were hired—no one waved the flag more than they did. They even outfoxed Fox News.” MSNBC has been the third cable network for a long time. It doesn’t do well. Its programming philosophy keeps bouncing back and forth. Ashley Banfield [was] working for them, made a speech at Kansas State University critiquing the coverage of the war and her contract was not renewed. Peter Arnett worked for National Geographic, hired by NBC, reporting for MSNBC and NBC. A small group called Free Republic targeted him… made an extremely vicious email campaign… attacking him through the executives at NBC and MSNBC. It was effective because [the executives] buckled to the pressure. They claimed that all these e-mails were actually evidence of public concern when in fact there was concern by a self-interested, hardright organization that uses this tactic and uses it effectively. Most progressives don’t watch television. They listen to Amy Goodman, read radical publications, find publications that they agree with, and aren’t really involved very much in the larger media culture. That is one of the problems. As a result they are not aware of why public opinion is being influenced. Media issues are very central to our democracy. We have to become more aware of what is going on in the media to have more impact on the media. When I worked at “20/20,” I would hear a lot more [often] from angry conservatives, because they mobilized mass mailings. Whereas, stories that I did that were progressive—very few people wrote [letters]. A story we did on Israel was called “Under Israel’s Thumb.” It was about the conditions of Palestinians where we only looked at three issues: water, land, and medical care. That was it. The guideline was: We will speak to Israeli officials to comment specifically on the points we are talking about. No ideological debate, no PLO, etc—just what exactly is happening on the ground.

The show went on at 10 at night. At 8:30 mailbags began to arrive. I was in the front offices and a big truck came in— LT: The next morning? DS: No. That night before it aired thousands of letters arrived denouncing a segment that no one had seen! The right make media a priority, they train people to be on the media, they reinforce each other through what is called an echo-chamber effect. On the left [you have] 20 people/40 opinions. LT: In the beginning of the antiwar movement people came out to these rallies. Middle America came out and all they heard was Vieques, this and that—a diluted message. You have antiwar people complaining they aren’t getting any coverage by the media. But weren’t they getting coverage by the media? Is there a clear message coming from the antiwar faction these days? DS: There is a message. Cindy Sheehan, like her or not, is trying to get American troops withdrawn from Iraq. Her basic politics is: “troops out.” A lot of people who supported her supported her as a dissenter against Bush. They put it into partisan terms: She is challenging Bush. But [they don’t support] what she actually wants. The Democrats don’t want what she wants either. The politics of her message weren’t really clearly presented. A lot of people from antiwar groups, PR firms, and others have attempted to get perspectives into the media and they failed. The ombudsman from the Washington Post said, “We downplayed all the demonstrations. We put them into the back of the paper. We downplayed the amount of people that were there. We distorted the news, basically.” This was an admission by their own media monitor—a former veteran Washington Post reporter. So yes, could the antiwar side do a better job of communicating its messages? Absolutely. Is it divided among different groups and different factions with different political ideas? Yes. Is there a basic consensus about opposition to the war? Yes. But if you look at the American left, over the last 20 years, they can get it up for two big mobilizations [each year]—the “March on Washington”—as if this is the most effective way to protest… Could it be more effective? I believe so. You have to look at why it is that progressives have very few media assets and very few ways to reach the public. LT: How could it be more effective? DS: We need investment. Look, I run an independent media company going on 18 years. A lot of our films get rejected on the basis of “its not for us.” Not because the work is bad, but because the networks don’t want to run them. I was lucky to get Weapons of Mass Deception on the Independent Film Channel. PBS rejected it with no explanation. It was nominated for an International Documentary Association Award—one of the top awards for documentary films makers. It won three film festivals, got a lot of great reviews, it’s been seen in Japan, Australia, the Middle East, Europe, and we just sold it in France. But [it’s tough] getting NEWS & POLITICS 29


73 Main St., New Paltz • (845) 255-3899 Mon.-Sat. 11am-7pm; Sun. 11am-6pm

it out [in the US], getting support from progressives to distribute it. Look at Michael Moore’s film Fahrenheit 9/11. Who got behind it? MoveOn.org. These groups [said], “Go see Fahrenheit 9/11 the first weekend, it is really important.” I tried to get support for my film and it wasn’t there. Why? Because my film was not partisan. It wasn’t just Bush bashing. It was raising deeper questions about our media institutions. Many politicians are reluctant to criticize the media. They want to get on the media. They spend all their time raising money to buy ads. MoveOn raised $60 million [that] went into the mainstream media, not into independent media, not into building up voices on the other side to balance the disproportionate voices on right or center right. This is the problem. Most people on the left see power in America as being the government, President Bush; that’s who runs things in their view. But in the world of globalization the corporate world is really dominant. Who is the corporate world? The front face of it is the large media conglomerates. Our whole economy is driven by marketing and advertising. But most people don’t see the importance of that. During the big demonstration in New York, there was a group that wanted to picket CNN—because of their unbalanced coverage. Organizers of the march said, “Don’t do that.” Why? Because “you will alienate them.” They are already alienated, they are already not going to cover you, and they didn’t. There was some coverage but it really didn’t get into the ideas of what is animating the antiwar movement. I wrote my book to try to make this case: A: that this war could not have happened without the media; and B: that people who want to end the war and challenge the way things are have to get involved in the fight for media and democracy. LT: [I’ve been editing] for Chronogram for the last 6 years. I started the News & Politics section and am trying to infiltrate people’s minds. Just like you, I am not taking a side. I am sick of the left and the right, of Democrats and Republicans. DS: [At] Mediachannel.org we are trying to engage in a post-partisan debate and discussion. I am trying to do something very different. When my book Embedded came out it didn’t get reviewed anywhere. I’ve written six books and all of them have been reviewed and commented on, and [Embedded] got buried. I thought, “This isn’t working” so I decided to make a film about this. I couldn’t find anybody to fund the film, including anyone on the left. I put up my own money. LT: Why is that? DS: Because the foundations and funders were nervous about challenging a popular war while it is going on. LT: Even progressives? DS: Progressives. Yes. They don’t think the media is the key issue. I do. They don’t see the media as central. I do. They will agree with you if you talk with them, say “yeah, yeah, media is terrible.” But they are not really involved in it. I worked inside

30 NEWS & POLITICS

the media, bringing my experience working at ABC News, CNN, and commercial radio to the mix here. I know something about it because it has been part of my life for 30 years. And I am trying to be a voice in the media to try to call for reform, integrity, and honesty. Obviously, I didn’t go to Iraq so that is a limit. But I was there to cover the coverage that we saw; I tried to watch a tremendous amount of it. I got support from people in other countries who sent me footage and allowed me to use it in the film. From South Africa, Germany, France, Canada, England, Al Jazeera, etc. I am trying to focus on the media side of it. LT: You spoke earlier about diversity, but within that diversity, where is the legitimacy? Is any form of independent media—people who just write whatever they want to write—supposed to be considered a legitimate news source? I don’t think the majority of Americans are interested in hearing people’s rants or their personal perceptions. When we are talking about news, I do want to hear facts. DS: What are the facts and who decides what they are and and how are they determined? The facts of Robert Fisk are different from the facts of Judith Miller from the New York Times. They are both journalists working for mainstream media outlets. They see the same thing and come away with two different takes on it. It is deceptive because on the one hand you would think there is some sort of objective truth here, and there isn’t necessarily. And that is why understanding the factions, the people, who they are, what they represent, what the interests are involved in it—it is a layered, complex mosaic. We need more sophisticated journalism instead of simplistic sound bites. LT: The attack is always against the corporate media. I don’t care if the media is independent or corporate. It all should be questioned. Not just the big targets of the corporate media, but all [the media]. DS: I question all of these people every day, or I try to. I just laid out a critique to you about people who are activists and are aligned with the Democratic Party and are not raising critical issues. That is certainly an independent position. I felt that the most important media to look at was the TV media because it is where 80 percent of Americans get their all news. So you want to look at: what are the sources, what are they watching, what are they thinking about what they are watching, and what are the images and the impressions and the reinforcement, what point of view is coming through on television? When I began working on this thing I embedded myself in my living room, slipping the dial from channel to channel to get at information that wasn’t being reported. LT: You say that media is not objective—can’t be objective. It is about point of view. You and I, everyone involved in the media, has a point of view, and a majority of the people follow along with what they already believe. DS: I have a lot of experience that I am drawing on here. I am not simply putting forth an agenda.


MOHAMMED (LAST NAME WITHHELD) HOLDS A PICTURE OF HIS 7-YEAR-OLD SON, WHOM HE CLAIMS WAS ABDUCTED BY COALITION FORCES AFTER THEY WERE DETAINED WHILE DRIVING IN BAGHDAD.

I feel that you are pissed off—not at me—but at the left, the knee jerk, polemical kind of people who are not really reporting, not really looking at what is really going on, want a simplistic, or contentious, or sloganized-view of the war. You’re saying that it is not really journalism. But we also have to make distinctions between people who have, in a sense, put their lives on the line to be there. I didn’t in this case. You did. LT: About the people on the fringes who get the voice—like the religious right. They are on the fringe. I don’t think they represent the majority of Americans. But they get the voice, the microphone shoved in their face. DS: Why? They get the voice because the right wing has invested in the Christian Broadcasting Network, the Moonies in the Washington Times. They have think tanks and they put a lot of effort and energy into influencing the whole media discourse in America. If you look at the top 10 right-wing foundations, media is number one and two on their list. If you look at the left-wing or liberal foundations, media is not on the list. I think that is why people on the progressive side are losing. LT: What can they do? DS: I make the argument in my book and the film: “You have heard from me and now it is your turn. Make the media an issue. Force media accountability and responsibility.” I’ve written another book, a manifesto about media with suggestions about concrete things to do. I’ve created a website with 1,300 affiliates to discuss what to do—what is wrong with the media, and how can we fix it. I want other voices because I believe in diversity of expression. I believe I am trying to offer a way forward to look at these issues. And what has happened? These issues I started raising that no one would talk to me about, I am getting [them] on the air, other countries are running the film. It is a sign that this is resonating with the public. NEWS & POLITICS 31


COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK

for the love of ginseng text and photos by jennifer may

DR. ROBERT BEYFUSS IS OBSESSED WITH GINSENG. He is also

obsessed with other things, like studying deer ticks and hunting wild turkeys, but on his off-time there is nothing he would rather do than tend his forest garden of ginseng plants—well, maybe hitting a winning home run in the oldtimers’ softball league he’s played with for 16 years, but other than that, there’s definitely nothing he likes better than growing, digging, drying, grinding, and ingesting ginseng. Beyfuss lives in a small red house that hasn’t changed much since he bought it from two priests several years ago. The cupboards are still filled with the plates, cups, and cutlery the priests left behind and the bottom of one of the closets is packed with nearly-full leftover liquor bottles. His mantle is decorated with framed photographs of family, friends, and former interns, and hanging on a living room wall is a large botanical illustration of one of his ginseng plants. He commissioned the artist to visit the plant in his garden several times during one growing season, and in the fall Beyfuss temporarily unearthed it so the artist could sketch its roots. He loves the illustration so much he had its likeness tattooed on his upper arm. It was a 50th birthday present to himself. “Cheaper than a sports car,” he says. Canisters of powdered ginseng line the shelves in his kitchen, alongside glass

32 COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK

jars of whole fresh ginseng roots that are distilling in amber-colored vodka. In the fridge a brown paper bag holds roots ready to be dried or soaked. Another bag is stuffed into a closet—dried roots ready to grind. On his kitchen table is a notebook filled with years’ worth of meticulous observations. And in his computer are thousands of photographs: hunting ginseng, digging ginseng, individual roots, study gardens, leaves with blight, root rot, healthy berry clusters, and every single ginseng plant in his garden—including aboveground images of each transplanted root, along with follow-up images of the numbered and labeled plants as they grow and mature. Beyfuss’s introduction to ginseng came when he was 10 years old. A fisherman used to give him a dime for every root he found in the woods. In the early 1980s Beyfuss wrote his master’s project at Cornell on “The History, Use and Cultivation of American Ginseng.” He has been studying it ever since. Today he is the Agriculture and Natural Resources Program Leader of Greene County’s Cornell Cooperative Extension and he regularly presents talks on ginseng across North America. Much of his research involves interviewing people who have been working with ginseng for generations, and his hunts often lead him through Kentucky. Because old wild roots command a significant price, gatherers are notoriously tight-lipped about their best hunting grounds, although Beyfuss’s


OPPOSITE: THE SEED CLUSTER OF A GINSENG PLANT; ABOVE: GINSENG ROOTS DISTILLING IN VODKA; DR. ROBERT BEYFUSS IN HIS GINSENG GARDEN.

interests are scientific, not monetary. Poaching from commercial growers is such a serious threat that ginseng farmers guard their plots with security systems, lights, cameras, motion sensors, and dogs. To gain their trust, Beyfuss sits himself down in local bars—wearing a sleeveless shirt—and casually buys drinks for the roughest, toughest old-time Kentuckians. His exposed tattoo acts as a beacon and the libations act as a charm. “Pretty soon they talk to the Yankee,” he says. It is believed that by ingesting a plant that has lived for so many years, the plant’s life energy, or chi, is transferred to the person who eats it. Another reason people take American ginseng is to help them cope with emotional or physical stress. The older and gnarlier the root, the more chi the plant is thought to have accumulated. Age is determined by counting the rings on the neck of the plant between the root and the leaves: One scar is formed each growing season. Ginseng has an uncanny ability to lie dormant for 20 years, however, so counting rings reveals only a minimum age. Historically, ginseng is one of America’s oldest exports. Fur trappers used to hunt and harvest the wild roots, and at the turn of the century there were 5,000 ginseng farms under lathe houses in New York State. Today a pound of dried wild or wild-simulated ginseng roots from the northern Catskill Mountains sells for between $500 and $1,500, depending on the quality and age. The really old roots—those 25 years and older—demand the highest prices. Beyfuss has seen individual 80-year-old roots selling for $10,000 in Chinatown. Ginseng is also cultivated commercially: heavily monitored under shade cloths, and copiously sprayed with pesticides. But these conditions generate smooth, fat, and not at all gnarly roots. While the availability of this cultivated ginseng has increased over the years, the price it commands has dropped and many commercial growers now find themselves storing thousands of pounds of dried roots they can’t sell. But the demand for wild and wild-simulated roots remains strong. Beyfuss himself does not sell ginseng. He studies it, grows it, processes it, and takes pleasure in sharing his knowledge and teaching others how to set up

growing operations for commercial or private use. He has sold thousands of copies of his booklet, The Practical Guide to Growing Ginseng, and has spoken to as many people about it. His research regarding moisture, pH, and calcium requirements is responsible for changes in the way ginseng is grown all over the world. While it is not the easiest plant to grow, cultivating wild-simulated plants is an option for people who own otherwise unused forest. On a small to large scale, crops can be a way to supply oneself with a top-quality health product, supplement an income, or become a modest income on its own. On a tour through Beyfuss’s ginseng garden, to my untrained eye, the forest looks like any other forest in the Catskills. But here the forest floor is dotted with white tags beside bushy plants. The leaves look like hickory, a bit like poison ivy, a little like wild raspberry, and they could be mistaken for young ash trees. Considering that sometimes the leaves grow in divisions of three and sometimes in fours or fives that the plant may be rather tall or it may be quite short, or that the leaves may be serrated or smooth, round or pointed, it is overall a difficult plant to recognize—although the trained eye can spot one in an instant. Personally, Beyfuss regularly takes his own teas, powders, and elixirs on rotation throughout the year. Environmentally, he promotes forest crops as a way to make use of woodland while protecting watersheds. Socially, he has invested 25 years of study toward developing a way for rural people to earn extra income from land that otherwise might be taken from them due to rising taxes and associated costs. Despite losing a second wife to his botanic passion (she left him two weeks prior to the launch of the first ginseng festival he organized), Beyfuss believes in the healing properties of the plant with all his heart. In moments of stress he finds peace in a few drops of liquid gold. The Fourth Annual Catskill Mountain Ginseng and Medicinal Herb Festival will be held on Sunday, October 9, at Catskill Point in Catskill from 10am to 5pm. Admission is $4. At noon Beyfuss will present a workshop on how to grow ginseng in the woods. For more information, contact the Heart of Catskill at (518) 943-0989, or Robert Beyfuss at rlb14@cornell.edu. COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK 33


Photo provided

COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK

in unison by sam baden

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS: PETER PITZELE, DENNY COOPER, AND STUART BIGLEY, CIRCA 1976.

O

n May 7, hundreds gathered at the Julien Studley Theater to hear the music of a reunited Amy Fradon & Leslie Ritter, Happy & Artie Traum, Gilles Malkine & Mikhail Horowitz, and, performing solo, Natalie Merchant. The occasion was a benefit for New Paltz’s Unison Arts Center, in celebration of its 30th anniversary. It all started back in 1975, when then-Westport, Connecticut-based painter Stuart Bigley noticed a 14-acre property adjacent to his friend Peter Pitzele’s house on Mountain Rest Road in New Paltz up for sale. The property’s chief features were, as Bigley puts it, “a family farmhouse and a funky metal barn.” Worried that a developer would purchase the land and plop down a subdivision, the two plotted instead “a utopian community for artists.” In some ways that has happened, but a lot more has gone on as well. The farmhouse would become Bigley’s residence, while the barn, literally in his backyard, underwent years of renovation to serve as a combination art gallery and performance space. It is no larger than an average high school classroom—but this same classroom-size space has featured performances by Allen Ginsberg, Wavy Gravy, Richie Havens, Mose Allison, Dewey Redman, and Rory Block, among others. This smallness creates what comedian and Bard College Communications Director Mikhail Horowitz calls an “instantaneous and monstrous reciprocity,” a connection between performer and audience more personal than what can be shared in an auditorium. Bigley and Pitzele called their creation, and the ideas it would go on to embody, the Unison Arts Center. “It just came to both of us at the same time,” he says. “A great name for people working together.” Pitzele first used the barn space as the Friends of the Mountain School, an alternative educational facility. The school’s students included Pitzele’s then 34 COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK

five-year-old daughter. He ran it from 1976 until 1978, when it closed due to lack of funds. In 1979, Bigley, Pitzele, and others redirected their efforts toward assisting a mutual friend, Garyan Butler, who had been put in charge of the local leg of the torch relay for the 1980 Lake Placid Winter Olympics. Butler, his sister, and a handful of other people called the property their home during this period. Following the Olympic torch project and the dissolution of his marriage, Pitzele parted ways with Bigley, and thus with Unison. For the better part of 30 years, the Center has been the sole concern of Bigley and his wife, Helene, who entered Stuart’s life, and thus Unison’s, in 1980. In its earliest days, the Center was a “mom-and-pop” operation, which Stuart insists “would have fallen apart” without Helene. In recent years, Helene has taken more of an interest in her pottery, passing many of the tasks involved in running Unison to a dedicated group of part-time staffers and a committed board of directors. The Center continues to be a vital force for community art and social change, and offers a wide array of services for the New Paltz community. Over the past 30 years, Unison has come to offer summer children’s arts camps, which have operated in some form since its inception; a sculpture garden, started five years ago; several yearly concert series, including an annual classical guitar series that features such luminaries as Sharon Isbin and the Ossad brothers; and workshops on everything from Tai Chi Chuan to bluegrass guitar to basketweaving. The concert series and art exhibits are accomplished with the help of local colleges (both SUNY New Paltz and Ulster County Community College), local businesses, members, and the New York State Counsel on the Arts (NYSCA).


John Talutto

BEHIND THE SCENES AT UNISON: (TOP ROW): LUZ DEROSA, SLADE PLANTINGA, AMOS NEWCOMBE, JOANNE TALUTTO, STUART BIGLEY, KITTY BROWN (BOTTOM ROW): FRED MAYO, KATHY MAZZETTI, SUSAN SCHER.

Susan Scher, president of the board of birectors, worries that this official support won’t be enough to take Unison to those who need it most—those who would not be impacted by the arts otherwise. She bewails the lack of young people on the board, but acknowledges, “it takes time before you realize, in a profound way, that you have to give back to your community.” Though the majority of his time goes to running the Center, Bigley remains an artist first and an arts administrator second. He claims no innate leadership skills. “A painter does not necessarily make a great arts administrator, but NYSCA has given a lot of help.” Two NYSCA grants of $25,000 each, awarded in the early ‘90s, “professionalized the place,” providing the funds necessary to add restrooms and offices to the Center. As he puts it, his skill is “taking the suggestions of others and turning them into programs.” The most unlikely of these programs has been Unison’s commitment to Japanese folk art. In 1996, Bigley was among a delegation of New Paltz residents sent to the village of Osa Cho, New Paltz’s Japanese “sister city.” While there, he developed a friendship with the artist Fumiko Tamake. Tamake was offered a solo show at Unison, but insisted instead that she curate a show of work by a variety of artists and craftspeople from Osa Cho. Unison has since hosted a number of Japanese artists, particularly the needlepoint artist Tomiko, who has returned many times to teach a master class at Unison. Another point of pride for Bigley is Unison’s continuing classical guitar series, for which he gives most of the credit to Tom Humphrey. Humphrey, a luthier from Gardiner, brought the idea for the series to Unison, and it started with a bang. In April of 2004, Unison hosted the first American performance of the Ossad family of Brazil—some eight musicians lead by the brothers Sérgio and Odair, who are widely considered the world’s finest classical guitar duo. The family would go on to a critically acclaimed tour of the United States, after

having made their American debut at Unison. The sculpture garden is situated on some five acres and surrounds the Center on three sides. The brainchild of Denis Cooper, a friend and mentor to Bigley for some 40 years, it was born in a kind of “a-ha” moment. Cooper had been visiting the space in the middle of winter, using the conference room to put together one of his own projects. Looking out the back window, he espied a rock outcropping through bare trees, and said to Stuart, “We must do something with this space.” With Cooper’s pledge of $2,500 a year for five years, the sculpture garden today includes several permanent and temporary pieces, including Mayday, Four Horsewomen of the Apocalypse by Ellenville’s Matt Pozorski, a work in welded steel that features four naked women ascending towards heaven together, riding atom bombs. The pieces fit into the landscape, some more literally than others; Jay Bedient’s Gabion, named for the kind of rocks of which it is composed, mimics the undulations of the gentle hills throughout the sculpture garden. Unison belongs to the German tradition of the kunsthalle, or a place in which art is displayed temporarily—not for the profit of its creators but for the joy of the viewer, who is more a participant than a passive ticketholder. Though both Scher and Bigley are interested in seeing Unison grow to include a real theater, with a seating capacity in the hundreds rather than the dozens, both agree the Center’s charm lies in its smallness. The “full-time hobby” of the Bigleys and a handful of others, Unison has come a long way from its humble beginnings as an anti-gentrification device dreamed up by a pair of hippie artists. Though he may never have enough time to pursue his painting, for Stuart Bigley, “Unison is an art form—a big, kinetic sculpture that I’ve been working on for the last 30 years.” For information on upcoming Unison events, go to www.unisonarts.org. COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK 35


COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK the art of business

BARN RAISERS ANTIQUE AND VINTAGE WOODS

The wood you see may have a past. That chopping block in your neighbor’s kitchen may have been made from a salvaged hunk of wood from an old bowling alley. The floor beneath you may have been made from mushroom wood, the wood that once lay beneath the bedding in a dark, aromatic mushroom-growing facility. The tongue-and-groove paneling in your friend’s living room? It could have also been made from mushroom wood. It could be cypress—or a mix of cypress, chestnut, hemlock, and other woods—that achieved its character by being partially decomposed by humus, the organic stuff in soil. “We attempt to salvage all types of woods,” says Dale Mitchell, who started Antique and Vintage Woods in 1997 with his partner in life and business, Marilyn Miklau. “Before people like us came along, all of this wood would have been thrown into a dump and become part of a landfill. Now, when we salvage the wood, it can become a beautiful floor or piece of furniture. We give a second life to materials rather than throw them away. Essentially, we’re saving trees. We reduce the need to cut trees and waste them.” This June, after eight years of providing salvaged and reclaimed building materials to contractors, architects, and homeowners, Mitchell and Miklau opened their first off-site showroom, in Pine Plains. (AVW clients include the architect James M. Crisp, the Museum of Modern Art, Robert DeNiro, and Eartha Kitt.) Inside, customers can see how the company’s wood products are used for flooring, restoration, and furnituremaking. In addition to the chopping block and the mushroom-wood items, there are examples of “true antique” products made from old barn beams that have been resawn. “Reproduction old-growth” floors are made from Eastern white pine with saw marks that give it a rustic look. Yet another kind of flooring is made from salvaged roadside or yard trees.

ann braybrooks 36 COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK

photos by

jason kremkau


SACRED OBJECTS Dale Mitchell and Marilyn Miklau, the partners who

run Antique and Vintage Woods, are proud to be involved in the “Green Earth Concept,” a term used by the lumber and building industry to promote the recycling of old and historically significant materials. By salvaging and reclaiming the wood from abandoned barns and bowling alleys—and other disused structures—fewer trees are cut down and fewer building materials are added to landfills or burned. Beside being a “green” building material, old wood can be beautiful and unique. Its quality, strength, and stability are often superior to wood that has recently been milled. Many customers are eager to use reclaimed and salvaged wood in their building projects because it has an intriguing history. One such piece can be found in the AVW showroom. “This is a high-relief carving from what we think is the Ming Dynasty,” says Mitchell, referring to an intricately carved piece of wood resting on the floor. “We’re not sure about the species. It could be Chinese chestnut, which is extremely rot-resistant. “The temple was brought to the US 20 years ago, and it sat in a field, uncovered, while the owners and attorneys argued over it. Once the argument was settled, they decided that the wood was so deteriorated that the temple could not be rebuilt. We were called in to salvage what remained. We used two 50-foot flatbed trucks to carry the wood. We salvaged about 300 small pieces and 30 beams.” At some point, a designer or architect will figure out how to use the temple wood in a new setting. For now, a few pieces can be glimpsed in Pine Plains.

OPPOSITE: HEMLOCK AND CYPRESS PREVIOUSLY USED FOR MUSHROOM CULTIVATION ARE REPURPOSED AT AVW; ABOVE: WOOD SALVAGED FROM A CHINESE TEMPLE.

“Often roadside and yard trees can’t go to an ordinary sawmill because they may have metal in them,” says Mitchell. “If a saw blade costs between ten and fifteen thousand dollars, you wouldn’t want to hit anything and damage the blade. We cut the salvaged trees with a blade that costs about $60. We can easily replace it if it hits metal.” At the big sawmills, the logs are fed through a hopper, and everything is mechanized. At Antique and Vintage Woods, the workers physically load a log—the trunk of one of those Eastern pines—onto a saw with a forklift. “We may spend two hours cutting the wood, whereas it might take the mill 10 minutes. It’s labor-intensive versus machine-intensive. We can take a log and preserve the center cuts, which can be three feet wide in the center. A machine, on the other hand, slabs off the top, bottom, and sides before it is cut into boards. The mills waste wood that way. We don’t.” Mitchell didn’t start out a woodsman. After having taught math at a private school for many years, he wanted to try a new career. Since his housing had been provided by the school, he also needed a place to live. Mitchell decided to not only build a home for himself and his family, but also develop land that he owned in Kent, Connecticut, which overlooked the Housatonic River. “I joined with the Housatonic Valley Association and decided to do an intense development on my land," says Mitchell. "I built 30 houses on 17 acres, all of which contained passive solar applications.” When Mitchell was working on the houses, which would be called Brookwoods Homes, he decided to install wide-plank wood floors instead of carpet.

After searching locally, he found just the right wood in Pennsylvania. “One half of the houses had oak trim and floors. The other half had cherry trim and floors. In 1984, when we opened the model homes built in conjunction with Northeast Utilities, we received a two-page spread in the Home section of the New York Times. As a result, we had lots of people coming to visit the model homes. Many were not interested in the homes themselves. They were interested in all that old wood.” Mitchell used the excess inventory to start New England Wholesale Hardwoods in Kent. The business moved to Pine Plains in 1985. Today his son Brad runs NEWH, while Mitchell and Miklau oversee Antique and Vintage Woods. At the showroom, Miklau cultivates design services and direction, which includes helping customers choose colors from the Sutherland Welles line of natural stains. Altogether, 13 people work for the company, which Mitchell and Miklau hope to expand by opening showrooms throughout the Northeast. Says Mitchell, “We opened the showroom in Pine Plains to teach people how they can use recycled and reclaimed woods in different parts of their houses. I’ve always been interested in preserving things and not destroying the environment. I’m not against development. I’m interested in intelligent development. You can slap something together that will fall down in a few years—or you can do something tasteful and with quality.” Antique and Vintage Woods is located on Rt. 199 in Pine Plains. (518) 398-0049; www.antiqueandvintagewoods.com. COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK 37


Sustainability BY SUSAN PIPERATO

Peak into the Past Michael Croswell

An Interview with Mike DiTullo of Mid-Hudson Pattern for Progress

As controversy grows surrounding various proposed residential waterfront developments throughout the region—along with the resulting population influx they will attract, and their potential impacts on local environment and infrastructure—Mid-Hudson Pattern for Progress, a nonprofit policy, research, and planning institute think-tank, has discovered some surprising statistics. Based on US census figures from 1960 to 2000, says Pattern's president Mike DiTullo, most of the region’s cities’ populations peaked in the mid-20th century, declined steadily until the 1990s, and are now on the rise. We can avoid further sprawl, he says, by promoting smart growth and increasing housing units in urban, town, and village centers, fulfilling the Hudson Valley’s historical carrying capacity, to take on 46,000 more people. Kingston, for instance, says DiTullo, peaked in 1960 at 29,260, and now has room for 5,996 more; Poughkeepsie peaked in 1950 with 41,023 and has room for an additional 10,849; Hudson peaked in 1930 at 12,337 and can take on 5,041 more; Newburgh peaked in 1950 at 31,956 and is 3,544 below capacity; and Beacon and Peekskill are at full capacity. DiTullo talked to Chronogram about what these past population figures might mean to our future. How do you know when population is at its peak? When we looked at the US census numbers and the populations of these various cities throughout the 20th century, we noticed that, with most cities here, their populations peaked in 1950. Then [according to] the 1960, ’70, ’80, and ’90 census, in every single one of the cities the population declined every decade. However, in the 2000 census we saw that turn38 COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK

ing around—Poughkeepsie, Newburgh, Peekskill, and Kingston started to once again gain population. But there’s still plenty of capacity there. As we indicated in our report, right now the cities still have room for 46,000 more residents based on their peak populations. That’s just a very simple observation. As [former Yankees manager] Casey Stengel used to say when someone would question him, “Just check the box score.” Well, this is the box score. Were you surprised to discover how much more populated this area was? No. I was born and raised in Poughkeepsie; I grew up in the ’50s and ’60s, and I, as [did] tens of thousands of other Hudson Valley residents, experienced this [decline]. I was a first-generation Italian-American, born in a small, inner-city neighborhood. When I was seven, like so many others, my family moved to the suburbs. Now, [I see] sprawl outpacing population three and four times. The Hudson Valley population, throughout the entire 1990s, increased 8 percent, just a little over half a percent per year—yet land consumption and development increased by 27 percent. So we’ve used 27 percent more land to accommodate just 8 percent more people—bulldozing cornfields and cutting down forests, and so on. So, what does that mean? That you have to have more tolerance and have higher density and mixed uses, so that in the same neighborhood there can be residential [buildings], offices, light industry, commercial centers, and public buildings. These are traditional neighborhoods. These are the cities that our parents and grandparents grew up in.


What about the complaints that the influx of population is driving up housing costs and making rentals disappear, so that a lot of people, especially the young, are leaving the area? The young professional demographic wants to move into urban areas, whether small cities like Kingston or Poughkeepsie, or small villages like New Paltz or Warwick—small, vibrant [communities] where you walk out your door and [find] coffee shops, art galleries, places to eat, insurance agencies, and you can pick up a newspaper. We’re seeing other cities taking advantage of that and providing those amenities, so the young workforce is moving into those communities. We need to attract young professionals, 24 to 35 years old. If that workforce isn’t attracted to the Hudson River Valley or doesn’t stay here, then we’re never going to have sustainable economic growth, because it starts with the workforce. All we’re saying is, perhaps we need to develop a strategy or a policy here in the Hudson River Valley that would at least afford opportunities for people to move into urban settings if they desire. Where do older people fit into this picture? Every seven seconds a baby boomer turns 55. And as baby boomers age, they want amenities, more of a community setting—they don’t want to live on five-acre lots in 4,000-square-foot homes. We need to develop housing product and housing styles for them where there’s higher density and mixed use. Then they’ll be more motivated to move away from their single-family homes, which opens up housing stock for younger people. There are thousands of four-bedroom 2,500-square-foot homes with just two older people living in them because they don’t have any alternative. Do you really see a lot of opportunity here for professionals? Oh, yes. The economy [here] has never been better. There are over a million people working; the unemployment rate regionally is only 3.8 percent, retail sales, housing starts, income levels—all have been increasing over the past three years. In most cases, Hudson Valley employment numbers have been outpacing national numbers. Without a doubt they’re outpacing New York State numbers. However, there’s a soft underbelly with those economic numbers—and that is the urban areas. If Dutchess County’s unemployment rate is 3.5 percent, the City of Poughkeepsie’s is going to be 9 or 10 percent. If Orange County’s [rate] is 4 percent, the City of Newburgh’s is going to be 12 or 14 percent. We need to develop incentives that will encourage development and investment in urban areas. Now more than ever it’s time to reconsider and realign our views on cities. Traditionally, cities have been the most productive, most sustainable centers of our economy. We need to get back to that core principle as it relates to economic as well as quality-of-life development. Small cities like Poughkeepsie, Kingston, Newburgh—their infrastructures are already in place. They have water and sewer, streets and streetlights, underground utilities in many cases, school systems. When you go way out into the [country], you have to create all that from scratch. That’s one reason local taxes are so high. So why not utilize the resources that we already have? It’s almost like recycling. Sure, they might need some upgrading; sure, you may have to increase capacity. But the fact is, they already have water and sewer systems and other utilities in place. Is making room for 46,000 more people inevitable? According to the 2000 census, we’re already seeing an increase in population. We see the cities eventually coming back to their peak population. It may not happen before the next census, but it will in the next 20 years—say, by 2020, if not sooner. Among the smaller cities there are substantial revitalization proposals—in Kingston, Poughkeepsie, Newburgh, Peekskill—that include thousands of residential units. That’s an indication the development community has confidence that people are going to come back. When the Hudson Valley was developed 200 years ago, the cities and towns were along the river, so we’re sort of going back to that. What are the worst- and best-case scenarios associated with the population influx? Worst-case is we continue the trend of tremendous sprawl: houses on two-acre lots with no community feeling, people driving 30, 40, 50 miles a day to earn a paycheck. Best-case scenario is a place where people live, shop, recreate, and worship, if they please. We have communities where an individual can do all those things within a half-mile walking distance. In Poughkeepsie on Main Street they’re redeveloping second, third, and fourth stories of some of the commercial buildings into residential units. Many people who’ll live in those units will work in downtown Poughkeepsie in law offices, retail, the downtown government facility, the cultural centers, the Poughkeepsie Journal. Right now, for the people who work downtown, there’s not a lot of opportunity for them to live there. That’s going to change. For more information, visit www.pattern-for-progress.org.

Free, no-obligation personal or business planning analysis Specializing in education, insurance, and retirement planning Serving the needs of individuals, businesses, and professionals Bryan K. Kaarlsen, CLU Financial Representative 550 Stony Brook Ct. Newburgh, NY 12550 845 569 1425 x125 845 569 1803 fax Northwestern Mutual Financial Network is the marketing name for the sales and distribution arm of The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company (NM), Milwaukee, WI, and its subsidiaries and affiliates. Financial Representative is an agent of NM (life insurance, annuities and disability income insurance). There may be instances when agents of NM represent companies other than NM or its affiliates.

COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK 39


CHRONOGRAM

40


OCTOBER 2005

ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM

“I thought until 1963 that the main job in the world was to help the meek inherit the earth. So, I worked with unions, the communist party, the civil-rights movement. When I read Silent Spring, I realized the meek might inherit the earth eventually if we kept on working hard, but they’d inherit such a poisonous garbage dump, it wouldn’t be much fun to inherit.” —Pete Seeger

Dion Ogust

“Good Samaritans,” Page 50

41


Portfolio

Joe Concra

Writing in these pages in our September, 1999 issue, Todd Paul described Joe Concra’s (then) latest painting series—balloons in various stages of untethering and deflation—as possessing an “ineffable sadness.” Six years on, the objects have changed (houses of cards this time), but the moody melancholy remains. The stench of human failure—mechanical, emotional, and political—is the pungent aroma that wafts off of Concra’s work. I interviewed Concra at his Kingston studio in early September about various painting-related topics. His responses appear on the page opposite. Recent paintings by Joe Concra will be exhibited at Van Brunt Gallery, 460 Main Street, Beacon, October 8-31. (845) 838-2995; www.vanbruntgallery.com. —Brian K. Mahoney

The Ring, oil on canvas, 74” x 82”, 2003

42 PORTFOLIO

The Loudest Yeller, oil on canvas, 74” x 82”, 2004


ONE FINE DAY Every day I paint, so if it’s not going well, which is 364 out of 365 days of the year, you just keep working. It’s about work. You get up in the morning, you paint all day, whatever happens, happens, and hopefully something leads to something. You never start with a good idea. You just start with working. The idea comes later. There’s never a finished painting that doesn’t have four or five paintings underneath it that were complete failures. If I hit one out of 75, I’m really happy. SOMETHING NEW You do one thing, you’re happy with it, but within that one thing you see an avenue to explore something else. With the card series, just like the balloons or just like the boats, after that first one, you keep exploring it, how far you can bring it until you get to the point where you feel like you’ve exhausted the idea. I’m not tired of making [card paintings]. I keep trying to convince myself I’m tired of making them. Isn’t it time for something new? I’ve got an idea: I’ll make an elephant floating out of the picture on balloons. Just to get myself out of it. CREATING A WORLD Hopefully, I can put you in this world I’ve created for a short amount of time. Let’s face it: There’s so much going on, there’s so much information— TV, the Internet, walking down the street. If you have the guts to stand in front of a painting as a viewer—which I think takes an incredible amount of decision making to begin with—if I can keep you there, if I can get you to stop and look, that’s pretty good. I got somebody to slow down and take a look at a fixed spot on a wall. NOT OVERDOING IT There’s a great quote that my friend Tram told me that I’m not sure who to attribute it to: “It takes two people to make a great painting: one person to make it and one person to tell him to stop.” Sometimes you don’t know when to stop. COMFORT & SADNESS I don’t want to be completely comfortable in these places. Maybe that’s why they’re so sad. If anybody really looks at these paintings and is happy, I’d be shocked. I don’t expect everyone to get it and like it. But I am happy making them.

Assumption, oil on canvas, 74” x 82”, 2005 PORTFOLIO 43


Lucid Dreaming BY BETH E. WILSON

Abstract Thought

MARRIAGE OF SILVER AND GOLD, RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ, PAINTED WOOD CONSTRUCTION, 1992, 110” X 116”

There’s an immense smorgasbord of contemporary abstract art on view now at Yellow Bird Gallery in Newburgh. A group show of work by some 65 members of American Abstract Artists (and a few guests), it’s an at times overwhelming experience, crowding the walls of Yellow Bird’s unique, multilevel space. But I’m getting ahead of myself. The story actually starts almost 70 years ago, when American Abstract Artists (AAA) was first formed in 1936. At the time, abstraction was seen primarily as something of an elite, avant-garde European practice, one that opposed in many ways the down-to-earth pragmatism—and fundamentally representational—nature of American art. Thomas Hart Benton’s robust paintings and murals celebrated a vigorous, populist myth of America that easily charmed and delighted its audience, one that could hardly have been expected to respond quite so favorably to the introspective philosophical and intellectual rigors demanded by nonobjective painting and sculpture. (In the 1920s, for example, there was an infamous court proceeding in which the Museum of Modern Art appealed the decision of a customs official that Constantin Brancusi’s sleek, abstract sculpture Bird in Space was not a work of art, and that the museum should pay a tariff on the importation of raw materials—the brass—that makes up the work. MoMA won, and abstract art had its first legal foothold in the US.) 44 LUCID DREAMING

Making abstract art was, and remains, something of an uphill battle. It’s work that challenges many commonly held perceptions about art, negating the representational and narrative “hooks” that normally provide a point of entry into the work, instead presenting a reductive, purely visual experience, one that is often hard to figure out. (Who would guess that Mondrian’s colorful Neo-Plasticist geometry was predicated on his fervent belief in Theosophy, and its emphasis on the use of abstract form to elevate the spirit?) Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this group show, given the AAA’s history, is seeing the way in which the context and raison d’etre for abstraction has shifted—quite radically—over the past 70 years. Formed as a kernel of resistance to the dominant representational paradigm, by the late ‘40s it looked as though they were winning the argument, as Abstract Expressionism emerged as the first internationally successful, American-born art movement. But of course the pendulum began to swing back after a bit, as Pop Art in the ‘60s brought back representation through the familiar imagery of newspapers, magazines, and television. Minimalism emerged as a sort of entropic response to abstraction (and was not much loved by the now “establishment” taste of critics like Clement Greenberg), but by the ‘70s all bets were off, as the age of postmodernism caught hold.


As I write this now, abstraction has morphed from being an oppositional aesthetic, to being simply one possibility among many in the infinite toolbox of visual effect. Bad boy Damien Hirst blithely shifts gears from pickling sharks to painting polka dots to having studio assistants execute (bad) photo-realist paintings in his name, and somehow it’s all the same to the collectors who vie to purchase the work. But the artists in AAA today seem to be a different sort—less flash-in-the-pan, less obsessed with fitting in with the current artworld fads, and more interested in pursuing their own thoughtful paths through art, in an abstract mode. Don Voisine, the president of the group, sees its role as a steady, safe place for artists to come together to share a common

luminosity; to Roger Jorgenson’s Democracy, which presents the viewer with a large field of overlapping, angular white forms—with alternating red or blue triangles at their inner corners that makes the work an overtly political statement on the last election. In organizing this exhibition, AAA has attempted to create something more cohesive than has traditionally been the case in their democratically-run group shows, where each member could submit one work across the board. This time, they’ve invited an outside curator, Jill Connor, to weave the work together into a more meaningful whole. While only 65 of the organization’s 85 members are represented, the sheer numbers and the wildly disparate approaches to abstraction in

affinity. “Whatever goes in and out of fashion, it’s good to know there’s always a community of people working along the same lines,” he told me at the Yellow Bird opening. Yet even with this common starting point, the 65 artists represented in this sprawling exhibition are difficult to summarize. While primarily an exhibition of painting, Voisine says he’s interested in having the group promote abstraction beyond just two-dimensional work. The range of approaches here range from Voisine’s own untitled immaculately rendered, geometric painting to Raquel Rabinovich’s River Library No. 21, a collage of Indian paper encrusted with sediment from the Ganges River, to Manfred Mohr’s untitled geometric computer animation, to Tom Doyle’s large sculpture Innishkeen, a dominating presence in sassafras and oak. While much of the work depends largely upon disinterested, purely visual/aesthetic criteria for its comprehension, there are a few works that push the envelope toward referential (if not representational) meaning. Compare Julian Jackson’s Bill’s July, a field of fuzzy, muted squares and rectangles in a number of shades of light yellow and yellow-orange, which plays Hans Hofmann’s old game of push-pull with a beautiful sense of shimmering summer light and

use throughout the show seem to constantly test the logic of Connor’s tentative curatorial groupings, resulting in something of an overall grab-bag effect—although granted, one that offers some nice moments of flow between the works in certain passages of the exhibition. Perhaps the problem lies not in the work, but in the radically altered field(s) of meaning within which abstraction exists today. It seems unfair to even put on the same playing field works like Cecily Kahn’s small but beautiful Intercept, which gracefully combines intentional geometry with accidental biomorphic effect, an exercise in pure painterly expressiveness, with James Seawright’s Orion, a cubic sculpture in metal and plastic that includes two constantly swiveling concave mirrors/radar dishes, and that speaks to a much more futuristic sensibility. If modernism can spawn postmodernism, is it possible that abstraction is birthing “postabstraction” as well? In conjunction with the exhibition, Yellow Bird will be hosting two panels this month: one featuring a group of artists in the show (on October 1), the other a roundtable discussion by a group of critics (on October 30). It should be interesting to hear these two panels weigh in on the challenging issues facing the very status of abstraction today.

OPTICAL SIMULATIONS, GROUP EXHIBITION OF WORK BY AMERICAN ABSTRACT ARTISTS, THROUGH NOVEMBER 12 AT YELLOW BIRD GALLERY, 19 FRONT STREET, NEWBURGH. (845) 561-7204; WWW.YELLOWBIRDGALLERY.COM.

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LUCID DREAMING 45


46

gallery directory


galleries ALBANY INSTITUTE OF HISTORY AND ART

CLASS OF 1929 GALLERY

125 WASHINGTON AVENUE, ALBANY. (518) 463-4478.

EISENHOWER HALL THEATRE, WEST POINT. 938-2782.

“Rodin.” Obsession-Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation. October 15-December 31.

“Canvas and Sculpture by Timothy Touhey.” Through October 30.

ALDRICH CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM 258 MAIN STREET, RIDGEFIELD, CT. (203) 438-4519.

COFFEY GALLERY 330 WALL STREET, KINGSTON. 339-6105.

“Emil Lukas: Connection to the Curious.”

“Totems/Reliquaries.” Barbara Arum, sculptures and Suzanne Neusner, fiber arts. October 1-October 30.

“Sarah Morris: Los Angeles.” Through October 9.

Reception Saturday, October 1, 5-7pm.

“Fred Wilson: Black Like Me.” “Lisa Sigal: A House of Many Mansions.” Through January 8, 2006.

D & H CANAL MUSEUM 23 MOHONK ROAD, HIGH FALLS. 687-9311.

“All Media Show.” Through October 30.

ART GALLERY AT ROCKEFELLER STATE PARK PRESERVE 180 BEDFORD ROAD, TARRYTOWN. (914) 631-1470 EXT. 12.

“Whispered Wisdom.” Through October 22.

THE ART UPSTAIRS 60 MAIN STREET, PHOENICIA. 688-2142.

“Found Objects and Lost Arts.” Group show. Through October 9.

DIA 3 BEEKMAN STREET, BEACON. 400-0100.

“Dia’s Andy: Through the Lens of Patronage.” Works by Andy Warhol. “In and Out of Place: Louise Lawler and Andy Warhol.” Includes images of work by Andy Warhol. “Vera Lutter: Nabisco Factory, Beacon.” 4 large scale pinhole photographs of the factory. Through April 10, 2006. “Agnes Martin’s Early Paintings 1957-67.” Through December 1.

BCB ART 116 WARREN STREET, HUDSON. (518) 828-4539.

“Modern Day.” New artwork by Rodney Alan Greenblat. October 1-November 13.

EARL FEIDEN

Opening Saturday, October 1, 6-8pm.

“The Camera Had A Nervous Twitch.” An interactive video installation. Through October 15.

162 MAIN STREET, BEACON. 679-8825.

“Transparency.” Group show. October 8-January 14, 2006. Opening Saturday, October 8, 12-7pm.

FARFETCHED GALLERY 65 BROADWAY, KINGSTON. 339-2501.

“Visions of Glory.” David Stoltz, Mary Gravelle, Jessica Price. October 1-30. Reception Saturday, October 1, 5-10pm.

gallery directory

BEACON FIREHOUSE GALLERY

661 BROADWAY, KINGSTON. 331-2230.

BETSY JACARUSO STUDIO AND GALLERY 54 ELIZABETH STREET, RED HOOK. 758-9244.

“Double Exposure.” Photographers Leopold Quarles and Betsy Jacaruso. Through October 22.

FENIMORE ART MUSEUM ROUTE 80, LAKE ROAD, COOPERSTOWN. (888) 547-1450.

“Eugene & Claire Thaw Collection of American Indian Art.” Through December 31.

BONNIE ANDRETTA FINE ART, INC. 415 WARREN STREET, HUDSON. (518) 828-1024.

“The Glorious Kaaterskill Clove.” New paintings by Thomas Locker. Through November 30.

FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER VASSAR COLLEGE, POUGHKEEPSIE. 437-5632.

“Danish Paintings of the 19th Century.” Rarely seen Danish works. Through December 18.

THE CATSKILLS GALLERY 106 PARTITION STREET, SAUGERTIES. 246-5552.

“Primitive Visions: Paintings of Images From Ancient Cultures.” Patty Hanson. Through October 1.

CATSKILL MOUNTAIN FOUNDATION ART GALLERY MAIN STREET, HUNTER. (518) 263-4908 EXT. 211.

“Unearthed.” A celebration of sculptural and functional ceramic arts. October 1-November 13. Opening Saturday, October 1, 4-6pm.

FRIENDS OF HISTORIC KINGSTON MUSEUM MAIN STREET, KINGSTON. 339-0720.

“Julia Dillon Retrospective Exhibition.” May 7, 2006.

GALERIE BMG 12 TANNERY BROOK ROAD, WOODSTOCK. 679-0027.

“Photographs by Lori Nix.” Through October 3. “Coastal Pinholes.” Martha Casanave. October 7-November 7. Opening Saturday, October 8, 5-7pm.

THE GALLERY AT OPUS 40 CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK 59 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK. 679-9957.

“Regional Triennial of Photographic Works.” “Ambiguous Icons.” Jim Campbell. Through October 23.

CLARK ART INSTITUTE 225 SOUTH STREET, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA. (413) 458-2303.

“50 Favorites.” 50 works of art follow the Institute’s 50 years history. Through May 17, 2006. “The Clark: Celebrating 50 Years of Art in Nature.” Through September 4, 2006.

42 FITE ROAD, SAUGERTIES. 246-3400.

“Clamor Contender.” Interactive gallery installation and recycling project. October 1-October 30.

THE GALLERY AT R & F 506 BROADWAY, KINGSTON. 331-3112.

“Sentient Animals.” New encaustic paintings by Jan Harrison. October 1-November 26. Opening Saturday, October 1, 5-7pm.

GALLERY AT WORK

“Little Women, Little Men.” Folk art portraits of children. Through October 15, 2006.

268 FAIR STREET, KINGSTON. 331-5057.

“Winslow Homer: Making Art, Making History.” October 9-January 16, 2006.

Opening Saturday, October 1, 5-8pm.

“Painted Stories.” Works by Stacey Flint. October 1-November 1.

47


galleries GARRISON ARTS CENTER

KINDERWOOD DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE

23 GARRISON’S LANDING, GARRISON. 424-3960.

452 WEST MOUNTAIN RD, RIDGEFIELD, CT. (203) 393-1101 EXT. 166.

“Axis.” Wood fired ceramic sculpture by Tony Moore. Through October 2. “Barbra Koffsky: Monoprints.”

“Benefit the Good Friend Program of Green Chimneys.” Through October 23.

“Late Work by Peter Clark.” “Beth Bolgla.” October 22-November 13. Opening Saturday, October 22, 5-8pm.

GCCA CATSKILL GALLERY

KLEINERT/JAMES ART CENTER 34 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK. 679-2079.

“Portrait Group Show.” Through October 30.

398 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL. (518) 943 -3400.

KLYNE ESOPUS MUSEUM

“Pulp Visions.” Artworks created with paper as the primary medium. Through October 1.

“Esopus Goes to War: 1941-1945.” Through November 30.

ROUTE 9W, ULSTER PARK. 338-8109.

“James Dustin.” Solo exhibition. Through October 1. “Stuart M.Eichel.” Colorful paintings of historic firehouses, fire trucks captured in small towns around the northeast. October 8-November 12. “Fire!” Artworks about fire and firefighting. October 13-November 12.

MARIST COLLEGE ART GALLERY ROUTE 9, POUGHKEEPSIE. 575-3174.

“Marist Art Faculty Exhibition of Recent Works.” Through October 13.

Opening Saturday, October 15, 5-7pm.

MARK GRUBER GALLERY NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ. 255-1241.

GCCA MOUNTAINTOP GALLERY 5348 MAIN STREET, WINDHAM. (518) 734-3104.

“Catskills Crafts, Catskills Colors.” October 1-November 6.

“Eat Me.” Pictures of food. Through June 1, 2006. “Recent Paintings by Kevin Cook and Robert Trondsen.” Through October 19.

Opening Saturday, October 1, 2-5pm.

gallery directory

MAXWELL FINE ARTS GREENE COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS CATSKILL GALLERY 398 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL. (518) 943-3400.

1204 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL. (914) 788-7166.

“All Over the Place: Genesis.” Mixed media sculpture by Lori Nozick. Through November 20.

“Brooklyn to the Catskill.” James Dustin. Through October 1.

MILDRED I. WASHINGTON ART GALLERY HIPPOCRATES GALLERY 506 BROADWAY, STUDIO 5B, KINGSTON. (914) 388-4630.

Group show. Mandelbaum, Moor, and Carlson. October 1-31. Reception Saturday, October 1, 4-8pm.

HUDSON OPERA HOUSE

DUTCHESS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE, POUGHKEEPSIE. 431-8622.

“Performing, Visual Arts, and Communications Faculty Show.” Through October 11. “Vigilancia Estetica or Aesthetic Surveillance.” October 20November 15. Reception Thursday, October 27, 5-6:30pm.

327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON. (518) 822-1438.

“Life Lines.” Marilyn Reynolds. Through October 1.

MODO GALLERY

HUDSON VALLEY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART

506 WARREN STREET, HUDSON. (518) 828-5090.

1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL. (914) 788-7166.

“Decidedly Diva: Part II.” Anita Fields and Cheyenne Harris. Through October 30.

“Figure it Out.” Sculpture and video. Through March 31, 2006. “The Peekskill Project.” Paintings, sculpture, site-specific installations, and performances. Through October 16.

MORGAN LEHMAN GALLERY 24 SHARON ROAD, LAKEVILLE, CT. (860) 435-0898.

KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY MUSEUM

“Migrators.” Works by Karl Saliter. Through November 13.

90 BROADWAY, NEWBURGH. 569-4997.

“The Art of Robin Cobbs and Harriet Phillips.” Many media and styles. Through October 31.

MORRISON GALLERY 5 MAPLE STREET, KENT, CT. (860) 927-4501.

“Sculpture.” Peter Woytuk. October 1-November 3.

KEEGAN ALES BREWERY AND GALLERY

Opening Saturday, October 1, 2-5pm.

20 SAINT JAMES STREET, KINGSTON. 331-BREW.

“Blow Ups.” Large photographs Robert Lipgar. October 1October 31. Reception Saturday, October 1, 5-7pm.

MUROFF KOTLER VISUAL ARTS GALLERY ULSTER COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE, STONE RIDGE. 678-5113..

“Who are the Soldiers?” Sculpture by Gillian Jagger. October 1-31.

KIESENDAHL+CALHOUN ART GALLERY

Opening Thursday, October 6, 7pm.

192 MAIN STREET, BEACON. 838-1177.

“The Mind’s Eye.” Leonard Stokes and Laura Von Rosk. Through October 17. “Rouge.” Abstract paintings by Lindy Foss-Quillet. October 22-November 28. Opening Saturday, October 22, 5-7pm.

MUSEUM OF THE HUDSON HIGHLANDS FARMHOUSE GALLERY, KENRIDGE FARM, CORNWALL. 5345506 EXT. 204.

“Hidden Treasures of the Hudson Valley.” October 29-December 31. Opening Saturday, October 29, 1-4pm.

48


galleries NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM

STORM KING ART CENTER

9 GLENDALE ROAD, STOCKBRIDGE, MA. (413) 298-4100.

OLD PLEASANT HILL ROAD, MOUNTAINVILLE. 534-3115.

“The Art of the New Yorker: 80 Years in the Vanguard.”

“Richard Bellany and Mark di Suervo.” Through November 13.

“Windblown: Contemporary American Weathervanes.” Through October 30.

TIME AND SPACE LIMITED 434 COLUMBIA STREET, HUDSON. (518) 822-8448.

NORTH POINTE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER 62 CHATHAM STREET, KINDERHOOK. (518) 758-9234.

“Women’s Work.” Work created by women and the work of women. Through October 10.

“Works By Gary Masline and Kevin Kaszubowsk.” Through October 8.

TIVOLI ARTISTS’ CO-OP 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI. 757-2667.

NORTHERN EXPOSURES PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY

“Food Glorious Food.” Paintings, drawings, mixed media and collages of food. Through October 9.

63 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK. 679-334.

“Images Of The Catskills.” Michael Tischler. Through October 8.

UNISON ARTS AND LEARNING CENTER 68 MOUNTAIN REST ROAD, NEW PALTZ. 255-1559.

RICHARD SENA GALLERY 238 WARREN STREET, HUDSON. (518) 828-1996.

“Photography by Patricia Nolan & Steven Jennis.” Through October 10.

“Yoshikatsu Tamekane and Ichiyoh Haga.” Print maker and miniature architectural models respectively. October 9-November 6. Opening Sunday, October 9, 4-6pm.

“From Here On In.” Anna Cinquemani.

“Judy Sigunick Paintings & Monoprints.” Through October 2.

“Objects in Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear.” Isolde Kille. October 7-November 13.

“Outdoor Sculpture Garden.” Through October 31.

Opening Friday, October 7, 6-9pm.

VAN BRUNT GALLERY 460 MAIN STREET, BEACON. 838-2995.

RIVERWINDS GALLERY 172 MAIN STREET, BEACON. 838-2880.

“New Hudson River Paintings.” Colin Barclay. Through October 3.

“Hudson Valley In A Box.” Elisa Pritzker. October 6-November 7.

WINDHAM FINE ARTS

Reception Saturday, October 8, 4-7pm.

5380 STATE ROUTE 23, WINDHAM. (518) 734-6850.

“A Passing Glimpse.” Works by Anthony Brownbill, Christine Hartman, and Leo Loomie. Through October 30.

ROSENDALE CAFE 434 MAIN STREET, ROSENDALE. 658-9048.

“Scansville: Faces, Places, and Ideas.” October 1October 31.

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM SUNY NEW PALTZ, NEW PALTZ. 257-3844.

“Nianhua.” Chinese New Year prints from the 19th and 20th centuries. Through November 6.

WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION

gallery directory

“Time and Tide.” Pastels by Eline Barlclay. Through October 3.

28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK. 657-6982.

“In The Realm of Imagination.” Paintings , Prints and Sculpture. Through October 30. “Beautiful Landscape Paintings.” Works by Robert Selkowitz. October 8-October 30. Opening Saturday, October 8, 4-6pm.

“Encaustic Works 2005.” “Juxtapositions: Selections from the Metals Collection.” Through December 11.

ZAHRA STUDIO GALLERY 496 MAIN STREET, BEACON. 838-6311.

“Spray Paint 2005.” Airbrush in Modern Art. Through October 1.

SHAKER MUSEUM AND LIBRARY 88 SHAKER MUSEUM ROAD, OLD CHATHAM. (518) 794-9100.

“Notable Neighbors: The Shaker Legacy in Columbia County.” Through October 31.

“Neo-Dia-Dada.” Recent artwork by Robert Paschal. October 11-October 30. Reception Saturday, October 15, 5-9pm.

49


Dion Ogust

Music

BY SHARON NICHOLS

Good Samaritans

Arlo Guthrie and Pete Seeger sing for the Hudson River

PETE SEEGER

“Arlo, folk songs are serious.”—Pete Seeger to Arlo Guthrie

“It’s a contest between people who want to talk, and people who wish they’d shut up.” He laughs. In addition to the meeting, there’s a potluck and sing-

At the end of an hour long interview with Pete Seeger, the musical legend and

ing into the wee hours. Run by volunteers, the club takes guests out on free

political and environmental activist laughs and says to me, “This is my habit. I

sails from the Beacon harbor on a smaller version of the sloop Clearwater

can run off at the mouth for hours. It was a family joke. ‘All I did was ask Pop

called the Woody Guthrie, named after Seeger’s old colleague and activist

who was Queen Elizabeth, and two hours later, he was still talking.’”

buddy. The sloop’s deck is desperately in need of repair. Another commit-

Pete Seeger has plenty to talk about at the age of 86. Few can claim a life so

tee is trying to build a floating swimming pool to put in the Hudson, now

extraordinary, and his brain is bursting with political and historical informa-

that the river is safe enough to swim in. “It’ll have to be very lightweight, so

tion, as well as the details of his own experiences. He talks about Sojourner

it can be pulled out of the water every October and pushed into the water

Truth, the Wizard of Oz, Rosa Luxemburg, the melding of musical genres,

every May,” Seeger explains. The Beacon River Pool will be located just off

being on “The Dick Cavett Show” with James Brown, Barbara Walters, com-

the north shore of Riverfront Park and will be open to the public. water NELLIEThe MCKAY

munism, birth control in Thailand, and the origins of the English language.

quality at the site is one of the best in Dutchess County, and the pool will be

He quotes Plato and Dr. Seuss just moments apart. Every tidbit of information

partially submerged, allowing river water to flow through.

is enjoyable, and I could listen for another hour. But today I mostly want to

Most Chronogram readers should be familiar with Pete Seeger as a folk

hear about the upcoming benefit concert at Beacon High School with Arlo

singer and political activist; he was a major contributor to folk and protest

Guthrie, where Seeger will be a guest performer. They are raising money for

music in the 1950s and ‘60s, writing well-known songs such as “If I Had a

two Hudson River projects—the sloop Woody Guthrie and a river pool in

Hammer,” “Waist Deep in the Big Muddy,” “Turn, Turn, Turn,” and “Where

Beacon. Proceeds will be split, half going to each cause. Seeger tells how his

Have All the Flowers Gone” before being blacklisted in the McCarthy Era.

involvement began with the Clearwater group, which has worked to highlight

He had hooked up and traveled with Woody Guthrie many years earlier, the

pollution in the Hudson River and clean it up.

author of the now-famous song “This Land is Your Land.” Becoming close

“Here in the little town of Beacon, about 14,000 population, we’ve had a

friends with that family, Seeger has known Guthrie’s son, Arlo, since he was

little Clearwater club on the waterfront. It started when the sloop Clearwater

in diapers. Arlo has had a stupendous career in his own right, his most famous

started sailing. In 1971, we had one friend on the city council, and he said,

work being “Alice’s Restaurant,” a story song that lasts over 18 minutes. A

‘You know the old diner on the waterfront? It’s just been rotting away. We

satirical protest against the Vietnam War, it’s based on Guthrie’s own experi-

were going to bulldoze it, but if you want to fix it up and use it as a meeting

ence being rejected for the draft. A 1969 film was based on this story. Guthrie

place, go ahead.’ I’m sure his colleagues at City Hall said, ‘Why’d you give

is now on tour celebrating the 40th anniversary of “Alice’s Restaurant,” and

those hippies our building?’ He probably said, ‘We can keep an eye on them

he will bring this work to the Beacon benefit along with some other gems.

this way.’” Seeger goes on to describe their meetings, which he says have

No doubt “City of New Orleans” will rear its head, the concert coming close

met as regular as church on the first Friday of every month for over 30 years.

on the heels of the Hurricane Katrina tragedy.

50 MUSIC


ARLO GUTHRIE

I’m unable to catch an interview with the

being an environmental one. It was the classic

touring Guthrie, but Seeger fills me in a bit

book by Rachel Carson called Silent Spring,

on some details of the upcoming concert.

originally published in 1962. “I thought until

“Arlo is the main thing,” he says. “He gets

1963 that the main job in the world was to

the whole crowd singing. He’s a very, very

help the meek inherit the earth. So, I worked

conscious performer, and I’ve seen him take

with unions, the communist party, the civil

a song and develop it, and work on it until

rights movement. I tell people I’ve been a

it’s honed to a fine edge. And he makes sure

communist since age seven when I read

he keeps that fine edge on it. The pauses in

Ernest Thompson Seton, who was a nature

it, the tone of voice when it rises or falls, he’s

writer and held up the American Indian as

an absolutely superb performer. The greatest

an ideal. All of our ancestors were tribal com-

opera singer in the world doesn’t pay as close

munists. When I read Silent Spring, I realized

attention to his or her voice as Arlo does.

the meek might inherit the earth eventually if

When the ‘60s were over, a lot of people said,

we kept on working hard, but they’d inherit

‘Well, now I guess all those protest singers

such a poisonous garbage dump, it wouldn’t

are gone,’ but Arlo just got bigger audiences

be much fun to inherit.”

all the time. Went from singing for 5,000 to 30,000.”

Seeger admits that he’s more optimistic and enthusiastic about America in general

The elderly Seeger admits his own voice is

now than ever before. “I’m now convinced

about 90 percent gone. “I called Arlo on the

that if there’s a human race in 100 years, it’s

phone the other day and I said, ‘Don’t count

going to be saved by tens of millions of small

on me for any solos.’ What I do these days is

things going on. Small religious groups, small

I find a song the whole crowd knows and I

scientific groups, small sports groups, small

get them singing. I’ve done this all my life, but

cooking groups, small artistic groups, theater

I’ve had to depend on it more and more in

groups, publications, choruses. There are

the last 10 years. It may be an old spiritual, it

thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands,

may be a pop song. I often get people singing

of Samaritan-type organizations around the

a Clearwater version of Irving Berlin’s “Blue

country. When somebody asks me, ‘What

Skies” or “Over the Rainbow.” I’ve written

church do you belong to?’, I say, “I belong

a new song about Dr. King. Arlo doesn’t

to a Samaritan-type church called the Beacon

know it, but I’m sending him the words and

Sloop Club. We believe in doin’ good.”

the chords so he can help accompany me

The benefit concert takes place at Beacon

on the piano. I’ll probably be doing six or

High School,101 Matteawan Road, Beacon,

seven songs, maybe ten. We sang one or two

on Saturday, October 15, at 8pm. In addition

songs in Toronto a year ago, but we used to

to Pete Seeger, Arlo Guthrie will be joined

sing together every year, a whole batch of

by Gordon Titcomb and Guthrie’s son, Abe.

concerts. It’ll be fun, ‘cause I haven’t sung

Tickets range from $19 to $60 and can be

with Arlo for awhile. We’ll fill the beautiful,

purchased online at www.riverpool.org,

new auditorium at the Beacon High School.

or by phone at (845) 838-0094. Tickets can

It seats about a thousand.”

also be purchased at the Dutchess County

Seeger sings to me repeatedly during our

Arts Council, 9 Vassar Street, Poughkeepsie;

interview. He sings one of Guthrie’s hilarious

World’s End Bookstore, 474 Main Street, Bea-

little songs. He sings the four verses of Bill

con; Hudson Beach Glass, 162 Main Street,

Steele’s “Garbage” in its entirety. I ask him

Beacon; Dutchess Stadium on Route 9D in

what was the catalyst that pushed him from

Fishkill; and Yarn Swift, Poughkeepsie Plaza

being a political activist all those years into

Mall, Route 9D. MUSIC 51


NIGHTLIFE HIGHLIGHTS

BY DJ WAVY DAVY

THE PIXIES October 2. A ground-breaking Boston combo, the Pixies nailed a crossover fan base with four albums of pop-with-attitude. After hits like “Here Comes Your Man,” in 1992 they went out with a bang (the first time) opening for U2’s “Zoo” tour. Black Francis (ne Charles Thompson) rocked the underground scene as Frank Black, and Kim Deal re-formed the Breeders, with twin sister Kelly. If experience is timeless, this show is a no-brainer for Pixies fans, even after 13 years. Presented by the Bardavon at UPAC. 8pm. $35 ($75 gold circle.) Kingston. (845) 473-2072. WWW.BARDAVON.ORG

BLUES 2000 AND 5 October 7-9. And they’ve been living on blues power for 10 years! Mike Moss’s B2K presents a consistently top-shelf roster of outstanding headliners and blistering bar bands. This year choose from almost 30 acts, including Bobby Radcliff, the Kane Brothers, Bill Perry, Professor Louie and dozens of others. Vendors, including a Keegan Ales tasting party, spontaneous jams and electric/acoustic open mikes set the stage for three rocking days at the Nevele Grande. 4pm. $30/20. Ellenville. (845) 985-9407. WWW.BLUES2000.COM

KATY TAYLOR/AMY FRADON October 8. Readers of this space know our affinity for the clear and pure voices of these two chanteuses. Fradon effortlessly drifts from folk to classical to jazz. Taylor, equally diverse and gifted, specializes in Celtic and medieval vocals. The setting of Christ the King Episcopal Church will no doubt enhance the tonal bliss of their combined harmonies. This is also a release event for Taylor’s new CD Welcome Brigid, a collection of songs, chants, and prayers to welcome and embrace divine feminine energy. 8pm. $12 suggested donation. Stone Ridge. 845-687-8961. WWW.KATYTAYLOR.COM

JUDAS PRIEST/ANTHRAX October 11. At their age, can they still rock ‘til the dawn? Metal fans unite and find out when Rob Halford and the original Priest roll into the Mid-Hudson Civic Center in support of their 15th studio album, Angel of Retribution (Epic.) Openers Anthrax are a favorite at the Chance, who produces this show. There are reunion tours, and then there’s this Cerberus of a rock event. Earplugs, please! (Upcoming at The Chance: Les Claypool Oct. 22 and Kings X Oct. 29.) 7pm. $50, 45, 40. Poughkeepsie. (845) 471-1966. WWW.THECHANCETHEATER.COM

NEW ORLEANS HURRICANE RELIEF CONCERT October 14. Jazz-At-Bard promoter Raisa St. Pierre came up slinging Creole food in the East Village, so no wonder she picked up the baton for this benefit soiree. In the spirit of charity, three well-known Big Easy acts, including Tin Men, Coco Robicheaux and the incredible New Orleans Klezmer All-Stars, converge at Bard College’s Olin Hall for one night rock and roux with purpose. All proceeds benefit Hurricane Katrina relief efforts. 7pm. $20 suggested donation. Annandale-on-Hudson. (845) 758-7456. WWW.BARD.EDU/JAZZATBARD

JOHN HALL & GULF STREAM NIGHT October 15. Hall is a consummate artist, rarely separating experience from performance. His new CD, Rock Me on The Water (Siren Songs), was written as Hall sailed from Kingston (NY) to Havana (Cuba) then back to the US. The wonderfully tropical songs are already in rotation on WDST and Hall promises reggae versions of past hits as well at this Towne Crier gig. He’s joined by a rhythmic new band including drummer Peter O’Brien, bassist Bobby MacDougal, percussionist Joakim Lartey and vocalist Melanie Hall. The Kennedys open. 9pm. $20/$17.50. Pawling. (845) 855-1300. WWW.JOHNHALLMUSIC.COM

SONANDO/MAMBO KIKONGO October 21, 29. Our Halloween wish list would include both these bands in one night, but we’ll just hit The Alamo twice this week. No biggie, as their caliente cucina throws out delicious comidas, and owners Scott and Bruce know from hot, so they’ve booked the best bands around with the Latin sound. Sonando tears up the oak on Friday the 21st with merengue, son and salsa. Mambo in the following Saturday for the irresitible Afro-Cuban jazz of Mambo Kikongo. They call it “Day of the Dead,” but their dance floor will be mas vida! 10pm. $5 (no cover with dinner.) Rosendale. WWW.EATATHEALAMO.COM.

52 MUSIC


CD REVIEWS BRIAN WILLSON: THINGS HEARD UNHEARD DEEP LISTENING, 2005

Brian Willson’s new CD, Things Heard Unheard (a title I nominate for “Best of Century” thus far) documents the collective improvisations of percussionist Willson, bassist Dominic Duval, and pianist Yuko Fujiyama during a single night of recording in Brooklyn. While influenced by world music, the trio works primarily in the “free jazz” improvisational style as pioneered by Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane, and Cecil Taylor (Duval’s a current member of Taylor’s trio). There’s no notated music and few harmonic, tempo, or structural guidelines to strangle creativity. The 10 pieces range from a minute and a half to 10 minutes in length. These are not toe-tapping “tunes” but “to be or not to be” dramatic soundscapes chronicling these master musicians’ heartbeats and synaptic bursts as they invent and respond in the moment. Highlights: “Fractals” showcases Fujiyama’s multioctave virtuosity in turbulent dialogue with bombastic Willson; “Dear Charlie” is a drum solo featuring waves of cymbal splashes and tom-tom bursts leading unexpectedly to a quiet undertow; “Bit by Bit” is the “jazziest” piece with a hint of traditional trio-playing. In true free jazz fashion, attentive listeners will complete the performances of these unbounded works through the interpretive readings of their own momentary moods and knowledge bases. —Dane McCauley

JOHN HALL: ROCK ME ON THE WATER SIREN SONG, 2005

Venerable singer/songwriter John Hall has a new CD which is a veritable travelogue of a journey he took with his 39-foot sailboat, Athena, out of Kingston. The Jackson Browne-penned title track sounds like it was made for the reggae treatment; like a flat stone skipping over a still pond, its melody bounces over sunny upbeats. “Banks of the Hudson” is a new tune that sounds decades old—a fine, long overdue ode to our geological anchor. “I Need a Break (From My Vacation)” is one of those songs everyone can relate to and wishes they had written, and “Another Sunset” is simply gorgeous. With this CD—recorded locally at Millbrook Sound Studios—Hall has a crew of killer musicians onboardthat includes ace drummer Peter O’Brien, and even country star Steve Wariner shows up for duty. The best has to be Hall himself and his way with melody; whether it’s in his writing, playing, or singing, he’s rarely been better. The only fault here is a hint of elitism; truth be told, the majority of listeners can’t take weeks off from work and ride around in a sailboat. But here’s to hope; this is music to dream by. www.johnhallmusic.com. —David Malachowski

THE KENNEDYS: HALF A MILLION MILES APPLESEED RECORDS, 2005

Quite simply, I love The Kennedys because they invite us all to celebrate their 10 years together—livin’, lovin’, giggin’, tourin’. In the exuberant title track, “Namaste,” “let the divine in you recognize the divine in me” sets the tone of my whole day. The chugging “Midnight Ghost” revives the wide-open mind and spirit of Kerouac’s America. “Listen” and “Live” cool me when I’m set to boil. I love the crisp, breezy clang-jangle of Pete’s guitars and Maura’s vocal effervescence. Even cover versions of Richard Thompson’s plaintive “How Will I Ever Be Simple Again” and Dylan’s iconoclastic “Chimes of Freedom” sound like Kennedys songs. How many artists can achieve that? Unafraid to mix philosophy, spirituality, love, and artistry with a folk-rock backbeat is what makes this duo a positive force on all things human. I love The Kennedys because, like their previous seven discs—especially Stand, Life Is Large, and, the still compelling debut, River of Fallen Stars—I can listen to every song and feel like I’m crossing those many miles right alongside them. The Kennedy’s will open for John Hall at Towne Crier, 130 Route 22, Pawling, on October 15. www.kennedysmusic.com. —Mike Jurkovic MUSIC 53


Books

STUMPING FOR CLEARCUT “DO LOTS OF SPIRITUAL WORK,” SAID MY WRITERS’ GROUP COLLEAGUE RON NYSWANER, WHEN HE FOUND OUT THAT ANCHOR BOOKS, THE PUBLISHER OF MY FIRST NOVEL, CLEARCUT, WAS SENDING ME OUT ON A BOOK TOUR. “IT’S A HUMBLING EXPERIENCE.” NYSWANER TOOK HIS ACCLAIMED MEMOIR, BLUE DAYS, BLACK NIGHTS, ON THE ROAD IN THE FALL OF 2004. AS BAD LUCK WOULD HAVE IT, SEVERAL OF HIS PREARRANGED EVENTS COINCIDED WITH PRESIDENTIAL DEBATES; HIS BOSTON ENGAGEMENT WAS DURING GAME THREE OF THE RED SOX’S TRIUMPHANT WORLD SERIES. THAT WOULDN’T HAPPEN TO ME.

M

y earthy tale of a 1970s love triangle, set in the backwoods counterculture of the Pacific Northwest, had won advance praise from Publishers Weekly and Kirkus Reviews; it was nominated for Nerve.com’s Henry Miller Award for Best Literary Sex Scene. More good reviews followed: Entertainment Weekly, Time Out New York, the Washington Post. It looked like a hit. So when my publicist—I had a publicist!—faxed me a seven-page National Tour schedule, with flight and hotel information, car service pickup times, bookstore contacts, media bookings, and even a literary escort service, I was in heaven. There were 15 destinations: on the West Coast, in the Hudson Valley, Manhattan, and Philadelphia. My head was filled with visions of room service, minibars, adoring crowds seeking my signature. It didn’t take long to realize that I was not, in fact, the Rolling Stones on tour, and that people don’t line up to buy just-released first novels, unless they are personal friends of the author. I never had fewer than 10 in the room, though once or twice I achieved double digits only by counting myself and the bookstore employee who’d introduced me. My largest crowd was about 25, scattered over 200 folding chairs at Portland’s vast Powells City of Books. But as booktour veteran Laura Shaine Cunningham said, “When

by Nina Shengold photos by Jennifer May 54 BOOKS

you’re out of town, if there are more of them than there are of you, you’re doing well.” Here’s the unsung secret of book touring: No one shows up. Though a Powells employee told me they rent an auditorium for the 600-700 Chuck Palahniuk (Fight Club) fans who mob his hometown readings, I know celebrated authors whose events have drawn crowds of one at midwestern Borders and shopping malls. So why do publishers do it? If only a handful of people turn up and buy books, why shell out thousands of dollars for airfare, hotel rooms, and minibar tabs? “The number of people who actually sit in the seats is the least of it,” says literary escort Eileen Maloney, who’s driven scores of authors around the mountainside maze of Seattle. “It’s a ripple effect. Someone tells someone who tells someone else, and the book builds a buzz.” “You’re building an author’s reputation, getting the stores excited so they’ll handsell the book, hitting the local media while you’re in town,” offers Russell Perreault, director of publicity for Random House’s Vintage/Anchor imprints. “We want to show stores we’re behind the book, that we’ll go the extra nine yards to promote it.” Not all authors like touring. “They get exhausted,” says Perreault. He cites the grueling routine of one-night stands, early flights, and overstuffed media schedules. “Most authors are not early risers.” Touring also takes time away from writing, and taps different talents. Perreault quotes Empire

Falls author Richard Russo as saying, “I’m used to staring at the wall in an empty room, not talking to strangers about what I do.” But tours are important to bookstores as well as to publishers trying to pump up a book’s reputation. Oblong Books in Rhinebeck has a special shelf displaying books by authors scheduled to appear in the coming months. Events Coordinator Carrie Majer says, “Nine times out of ten, people stop at that shelf.” After a reading, unsold books are displayed with “Autographed Copy” stickers in prominent places around the store. After hit events, such as Oblong’s recent signings with Nick Flynn and Victor Navasky, customers come in almost daily for signed copies, saying, “I heard it was fabulous.” It’s also worth noting that a weeklong out-oftown book tour costs significantly less than a singlecolumn ad in the New York Times Book Review, where advertising rates can top five figures. But the main benefit of book tours is not commerce; it’s human connection. “It allows people to be in close contact with authors and have these wonderful encounters, to ask the questions they want and express what they feel,” asserts Majer. “Book tours keep writers in touch with their audience.” Mine certainly did. My adventure began at Ariel Booksellers in New Paltz, where the window display featured Clearcut above the latest Harry Potter. Most of the two dozen audience members were friends. I read three short selections, my voice shaking with nerves. When I sat down to sign my first pile of


NINA SHENGOLD SIGNING COPIES OF HER DEBUT NOVEL CLEARCUT AT THE BLUE MOUNTAIN BISTRO IN WOODSTOCK ON SEPTEMBER 9.

books, I realized I had no pen. Two days later, I hugged my daughter Maya at 5am and climbed into a Lincoln Town Car with tinted-glass windows. Half an hour from the airport, we blew a tire; I hoped this would not be an omen. My San Francisco hotel was literally on the same block as the deli where I’d worked the graveyard shift, after the postcollege walkabout in the Northwest that inspired my novel. It was poignant to retrace the footsteps of my younger self, but I didn’t have time to dwell on it: I was reading that night at A Different Light, in the Castro, where rainbow flags fluttered on every street corner and a transvestite starlet stood waving to cars. There were ten in the audience; nine were old friends. I was installed at a table next to a rack of adult XXX DVDs and gift books displaying bodacious male pecs. Though my book has bisexual elements, I imagined the customers wondering who let this straight girl in here. The next morning I flew to Portland, elated to see that the airport bookstore had Clearcut in stock. The hotel was elegant, its doorman inexplicably dressed as an English Beefeater. I opened the door to my suite and burst out laughing. Obviously someone had mistaken me for Jackie Collins: The bed was big enough for three, heaped with jungle-print pillows in front of an eight-foot gilt mirror. Powells City of Books was just as outsized. Imagine The Strand, with its vaunted “eight miles of books,” crossbred with a big-box Barnes & Noble. Hundreds of people were milling around, buying

new and used books on a weeknight. It made my heart glad. My audience included former Sierra Club president Michael McClosky, and a few former treeplanters who knew the world of my novel firsthand. I answered lots of questions, and signed unsold stock while a bookseller told me that the previous night’s reader, Periel Aschenbrand, drew over 100 people with her protest memoir The Only Bush I Trust Is My Own; she’s photographed nude on its cover. (Ms. Aschenbrand also preceded my reading in Seattle, where she drew similar crowds. “I’m not sure it’s the quality of her writing,” one bookseller deadpanned.) My crowd in Seattle was small but unique. A middle-aged woman led off the Q&A by calling my characters drug-addicted hippies. “People think hippies were heroes, but they were criminals who sold drugs to pregnant women and babies.” Oh, I thought. Right. You’re insane. Unwinding at the hotel, I opened the complimentary Seattle Times on my room service-tray to a review of my novel (thank God it was positive!). I did three more readings in Washington, interspersed with taped interviews for three radio stations and lunch with the book critic of the PostIntelligencer. The first was on Bainbridge Island, a breathtaking ferry ride across the Puget Sound, with the Olympic Mountains—the site of my novel—blazoned across the horizon. I read with a retired Navy shipbuilder promoting his thriller

about a presidential assassination attempt; it hadn’t occurred to the cheerful events planner that this might be an unholy wedlock of Red and Blue states. The Navy guy was a consummate raconteur, charming the audience blind. I sold three or four books. The ferry ride back to the city was glum. My mood didn’t improve when the hotel’s smoke alarms went off at heart-stopping volume, and panicked guests pounded downstairs in bathrobes at 3am. Next up: a suburban mall bookstore that opened onto a food court. My patter was getting smooth. The last stop was scenic Bellingham, near the Canadian border, where I met more treeplanters, a playwright who knew my theatre anthologies, a friend of a friend, and a few new fans. I’m doing this the old-fashioned way, I thought on the moonlit drive back to Seattle, selling the merchandise book by book. The breakout event was my reading/book party on September 9, sponsored by Golden Notebook at the Blue Mountain Bistro in Woodstock. Over a hundred people came out to celebrate: my editor; old friends from out of state; my parents, daughter, and visiting nephew; my colleagues at Actors & Writers and Chronogram; even my family dentist. Gazing out at that overflow crowd of so many people I love was a once-in-a-lifetime, indelible high. When it comes to book touring, the wisdom of one of my favorite books comes to mind: There’s no place like home.

Nina Shengold will read at the Woodstock Film Festival 10/2 and at Merritt Books in Red Hook 10/8. For more information: www.ninashengold.com.

BOOKS 55


SHORT TAKES Had it with apples? Give the teacher one of these juicy children’s books by Hudson Valley authors and illustrators.

Gullboy: The Inconceivable Life of Franco Pajarito Zanpa Wade Rubenstein Counterpoint Books, September, 2005, $24.95

THE UGLY PUMPKIN BY DAVE HOROWITZ PENGUIN GROUP, AUGUST 2005, $15.99

Rosendale resident Horowitz, award-winning author of A Monkey Among Us and Soon, Baboon, Soon, uses his signature rhythmic style to spin a jaunty, colorful tale of an “Ugly Duckling” pumpkin who must find his place in the holidays. See Out & Aloud for author event listings.

TEN PIGS FIDDLING BY RON ATLAS, ILLUSTRATED BY STACIE FLINT AMBERWOOD PRESS, OCTOBER 2005, $16

In this antic counting book, a houseful of animals fills the air with unexpected sounds: Mice meow, cats burp, and owls burp like fish. New Paltz painter Stacie Flint’s vivid illustrations practically burst off the page with joy.

MONSTERS UNDER THE BED BY MERCER MAYER PENGUIN GROUP, JULY 2005, $15.99

An empowering rout of every three-to-five-yearold’s worst enemy: monsters! Mercer Mayer, author of over 300 books, has come out with yet another beautifully illustrated tale about a boy who takes his biggest fear into his own hands.

RIPPED-UP RHYMES RHYMES BY GINA TUCCI, COLLAGES BY SHEILA BELLER YOSHPE ABNER KOHN, JAY STREET PUBLISHERS, 2005, $10

A delightful, home-sewn quilt of poems that beg to be read aloud, and three-dimensionallooking collage illustrations constructed from fabric scraps and sewing notions, including a naughty zipper. Designed by Chronogram’s Yulia Zarubina-Brill.

HARRIET THE SPY, DOUBLE AGENT BY MAYA GOLD DELACORTE PRESS, SEPTEMBER 2005, $15.95

Working under the “secret agent name” Maya Gold, a notorious local author penned this lively new adventure for Louise Fitzhugh’s timeless heroine. Aspiring young spies may enjoy unearthing a mysterious cache of Marbletown names in Harriet’s East 87th Street neighborhood. See Out & Aloud for author event listings.

PEACH GIRL: POEMS FOR A CHINESE DAUGHTER JOAN I. SIEGEL AND JOEL SOLONCHE POETWORKS/GRAYSON BOOKS, $11.95

Orange County poets Siegel and Solonche have created a labor of love with this collection of graceful, intelligent poems about their daughter, many previously published in national magazines and anthologies. Authors’ proceeds from the book are donated to Chinese orphanages.

56 BOOKS

I

t could only happen in the world of magical realism. A scavenging seagull finds a latex bag of love, and soon after, hatches one mighty weird chick. A loser named Ernesto Zanpa hears the strange creature crying one night, names it Franco after his father, and takes it home to raise. What follows is an outrageous fable set in a modern-day Coney Island that’s a far cry from the seaside getaway our grandparents cherished. It’s become a seedy, timeworn wreck, where Russian mobsters outnumber the fun-seekers—the perfect backdrop for this earthy farce. The seagull/human hybrid has white feathers instead of hair, the legs of a human, and the wings of a bird. But despite his birdlike appendages and appetite for raw fish, inside his pointed, pigeon chest beats a warm-blooded heart. His arrival completely alters his benefactor’s life: To support the child, Ernesto shucks his listless ways and becomes a workaholic cook, gathering a supportive family of boardwalk characters around them. Franco reaches maturity at an avian pace; in just one year, he’s teenage-size and facing teenage problems, a fact his father doesn’t seem to notice. Gullboy is itself a Coney Island freak show. The story is subplot-heavy, packed with tales of social outcasts and their crooked, lonely lives. There’s Venus, Ernesto’s venal wife, and Uncle Sammy, her Internet pimp; Irv, the lawyer who sees dollar signs instead of feathers on Gullboy’s wings; and Tatiana, the true-hearted secretary with a couple of twisty secrets. Characterization is where this author really shines: He’s a shapeshifter on the page, with a great ear for dialect and a painter’s eye for visual detail. Rubenstein has been a lawyer, which explains his spot-on depiction of that character. But he’s also convincing as a surgeon, a cook, a teenage girl, an old Jewish man, and an Hispanic gangbanger. The characterizations are remarkable, making each subplot a richly textured addition. A native of Brooklyn, Rubenstein is currently a Rhinebeck resident who’s trained with boxer Floyd Patterson in New Paltz and written for the Taconic newspapers. (The chapter-heading illustrations are by another Rhinebeck resident, New Yorker cartoonist Danny Shanahan.) Impressively, Gullboy is Rubenstein’s first novel, and the story owes an obvious debt to such literary antecedents as Franz Kafka, Tom Robbins, and John Kennedy Toole (in fact, A Confederacy of Dunces has a walk-on role in this book). The lineage is deserved—Rubenstein can really write. This is a keenly observed story, packed with grit, belly laughs, and tears. (A note to the squeamish: This author doesn’t shy away from observing every part of the human experience, including the lavatory kind.) Despite the huge roster of characters, Rubenstein doesn’t stint on conclusions. The ending is Dickens at his darkest: His characters all seem to end up with what they deserve, if not what they want. There’s even a scene where two of the most repugnant players off each other, a bittersweet denouement that resounds throughout the book’s finale. But could a Gullboy find love, happiness, and acceptance in a world of rotting boardwalks and ramshackle carnival rides? Could someone stay slender and healthy on a diet of fried dough and Nathan’s hot dogs? When Franco was a baby, a doctor offered to fix his “deformed” arms surgically. But Ernesto refused, hoping that one day his son would be able to fly. And will he? You’ll have to read the book to see. However, I’ll make one disclosure: The Gullboy’s real purpose doesn’t seem to be to take flight, but to show others their own wings. —Susan Krawitz


No Lights, No Sirens: The Corruption and Redemption of an Inner City Cop

Robert Cea HarperCollins, 2005, $22.95

R

ob Cea entered the NYPD training academy gung-ho and eager, with an inquisitive mind and a consuming passion to make the streets safer. What he encountered on those streets—and in dealing with the realpolitik of the department and the court system—nearly killed him. Zealous and alert, Cea had a knack for figuring out which folks on the street were “strapped.” Figuring that concealed weapons had to be dealt with, he’d pursue and tackle those folks, only to find that “I just knew from the way he acted” didn’t meet a legal definition of probable cause. His cases kept getting tossed out. Until he figured out that just a few little words of perjury made all the difference in the world. No Lights, No Sirens moves like an Amtrak train through a nightmare. Cea reports on the absolute underside of the urban American experience, and it’s grotesque: Heroin is cheap, life is cheaper, and the way to make the grade as a protector and servant is to become better at running game on the bad guys than they are at running it on you. Predictably, this leads to a certain blurring of distinctions, and Cea finds his idealism—and his fairytale love affair with an upscale financial analyst—receding into the distance, sacrificed to his adrenaline addiction. The style is intimate, full of New York cop-speak that Cea doesn’t bother to explain—he knows that if we keep listening, we’ll get it, and we do. The often gory details are vivid. The moral dilemmas are continuous and soul-shattering. And despite a laundry list of broken rules—he trades heroin to junkies for information, leaves his gun on the ground at his feet as he ecstatically plumbs a gin-mill wench, and gets his picture taken in playful poses with a corpse at a homicide scene—“C” has a heart and a conscience, and the more he ignores the latter, the more the former hurts him. Things come to a head in a hurry. Mia, the foxy financial analyst, has an abortion rather than have a baby with a husband by whom she feels utterly abandoned. Cholito, Cea’s favorite informant, is killed. And the suspicions of the Internal Affairs officers, for whom Cea has less use than the thugs, fall on him. In a consummate irony, the man who perfected his “test-i-lying” skills is being framed. Hitting adrenaline-junkie bottom, he seeks redemption, using his finely honed intuition in a harrowing pursuit of a vicious serial rapist, almost getting killed. It’s the end of the line, and Cea knows it, although he finishes a couple more years playing more by the book. When he retires, it is as a decorated hero. Cea, who now lives in New Paltz, had to wait 10 years for the statute of limitations to run out, so that he could not be prosecuted for the things he describes in gut-twisting detail. But it seems unlikely that the mean streets have gotten any mellower. And although he makes it clear that he’s not apologizing for police as a species, his book raises fascinating questions about the ideals involved in crime and punishment. Are there any? Are they even imaginable, down where the blood flows in the gutter? There are probably people still locked in cells who would scoff, but Cea’s biggest problem as an officer was the idealism and underlying sensitivity that made him so eager to do it right. If being good at doing good means that you’re required to become really good at being bad, the moral conundrums can become more than the human soul can bear. No Lights, No Sirens is not a pretty book, but it’s heroic in its honesty. —Anne Pyburn

MON - SAT 11:30 - 7:30,

BOOKS 57


OUT & ALOUD

A

n eclectic sampling of upcoming literary events.

CURATED BY PHILLIP LEVINE. Send your events listings to outaloud@chronogram.com. MONDAY, 10/3, 7PM Bradford Morrow’s Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series; 10/3 Mayra Montero, author of Captain of the Sleepers. Introduced by Mary Caponegro. Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, Bard College, (845) 758-1539. Free.

SATURDAY, 10/8, NOON-8PM OUTLOUD Festival, Readings by: The Alchemy Club (12-2:45pm); Rilla Askew, Paul Austin, Eddie Bell, Ed Blair, Patricia Eakins, Donald Lev, Peter Martin, Hugh Ogden, Bob Richards (1-5pm); Mikhail Horowitz & Gilles Malkine (7pm); The Studio, Main Street (Route 55), Grahamsville. $5.

SATURDAY, 10/8, 3PM, 5PM Reading and book signings; 3pm Maya Gold, Harriet the Spy, Double Agent; 5pm Nina Shengold, Clearcut (Anchor Books); Merritt Bookstore, Vol. II; 7496 South Broadway, Red Hook. (845) 758-2665; www.merrittbooks.com. Free.

SATURDAY, 10/15, 2PM Woodstock Poetry Society: Memorial Reading for Poet Mauro Parisi w/Robert Milby, Manna Jo Greene, Susan Ruckdeschel, Teresa Marta Costa, Ted Gill, Guy Reed, Will Nixon, Phillip Levine; Woodstock Town Hall, 76 Tinker Street; Hosted by Phillip Levine; www.woodstockpoetry.com; Free.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY, 10/15-16 Woodstock Mountain Poetry Fest II; Sat:8pm $10: Hettie Jones, Janine Pommy Vega, Andy Clausen; Sun: 7pm $10 Wildflowers Poetry Magazine Reading w/Donald Lev, Roberta Gould, Ziska~Chavisa Woods, Shiv Mirabito; 8pm $10 Peter Lamborn Wilson & Ira Cohen, Louise Landes Levi On Sarangi; Presented by Shivastan; Colony Cafe, 22 Rock City Road, Woodstock. (845) 679-5342.

TUESDAY, 10/18, 7:30PM Poetry reading & open mike: Teresa Marta Costa & Barbara Adams. Cross Street Atelier/Gallery, 7 Cross Street, Saugerties. (845) 3316713; Hosted by Teresa Costa. $3 suggested.

SATURDAY, 10/22, 2PM Reading and book-signing. Dave Horowitz, The Ugly Pumpkin; Oblong Books & Music, 6420 Montgomery Street (Route 9), Rhinebeck. (845) 876-0500; www.oblongbooks.com. Free.

SATURDAY, 10/29, 2PM Book-Signing and Children’s Cut Paper Workshop, Dave Horowitz, The Ugly Pumpkin, reading and demonstration cut-paper illustration. Participants can make their own Halloween creations. Ages 5+ to adult. Sign-up begins 10/1. Mohonk Preserve Visitors Center, New Paltz. (845)255-0919. Reading free; $3 materials fee.

EVERY MONDAY, 7PM Spoken Word Open Mike: Poetry/Prose/Performance w/features. 10/3 Companions (book release) w/ Shirley Powell, Mildred Barker, Marylin Barr, Nancy Beard, Barbara Boncek, Susana BouquetChester, Kathryn Cloonan, Arlene G. Cohen, Teresa M. Costa, Theresa Czern, Peggy Friedman, Roberta Gould, Don Lev, Phillip Levine, Shirley Powell, Bonnie Richardson, Judith Saunders, Matthew J. Spireng, Mary Stevens, Phil Sullivan, Erich Werner; 10/10 Richard Loranger, Carey Harrison; 10/17 Trinity Overmyer, Miriam Stanley; 10/24 Tim Shields, Matthew J. Spireng; 10/31 Will Nixon; Colony Cafe, 22 Rock City Road, Woodstock. (845) 6795342; pprod@mindspring.com. Hosted by Phillip Levine. $3.

58 BOOKS

Pride & Politics: The Tale of a Big Story in a Small Town Erin Quinn Hudson House Publishing, 2005, $17.95

T

here’s nothing like being in the right place at the right time, especially if you’re a newspaper reporter whose controversies usually run to franchise coffeehouses and broken sewer pipes. A whopper of a story—like New Paltz Mayor Jason West’s decision to marry 25 same-sex couples on February 24, 2004—gives her readers the chance to find out just how good she is. And Erin Quinn, who writes for the New Paltz Times, is very good indeed. Quinn’s book Pride and Politics: The Tale of a Big Story in a Small Town, arises from her award-winning coverage of the weddings and their aftermath. It was a febrile time for New Paltz, where the hopes and fears of gay activists and conservative local politicians brewed with special intensity in the months before the presidential election. It’s easy to forget how quickly the same-sex marriage controversy boiled over. On February 25, 2004 (after the Massachusetts Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples had a constitutional right to marry), George Bush endorsed a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriages. Two days later, following the lead of the Mayor of San Francisco, West married gay couples in the parking lot of the village hall. On March 2, Ulster County D.A. Don Williams brought criminal charges against West for marrying couples without valid marriage licenses. The next day, longtime village trustee Bob Hebel brought a civil suit against West requesting that he be removed from office. Quinn, a mother of three, got little sleep that spring. One of the most appealing narrators I’ve met in a long time, she dashes to keep up with the story: Her sweater seems perpetually crusty with baby spit-up, her hair not quite dry, and her ballpoint out of ink. But the national media, which pounces on New Paltz like a duck on a junebug, makes everyone a little discombobulated. So do the illustrious sorts who come to town. When presidential candidate Ralph Nader calls on the eve of his speech at SUNY New Paltz, Quinn’s backing out of her driveway, kids in tow, and no note-taking paper in sight. (The pace of Quinn’s prose is just as likeably headlong. The evening I read Pride & Politics, I kept making bargains with myself—just one more chapter, then bed—but the narrative kept lolloping on, and I followed.) Pride & Politics is what my grandmother would have called a book of good countenance. Quinn is candid about her own left-leaning politics (she’s a member of the Green Party), but she’s no polemicist. A native New Paltzian, she gives a fair shake to all the characters in this drama: Each emerges as flawed and brave, admirable and stubborn. Her representation of D.A. Williams, who had West arraigned on criminal charges, is especially subtle. Inevitably, the figure who dominates the story is charismatic West, the 26-year-old Green party candidate nobody expected to be elected mayor in the first place. If his actions on February 27, 2004, were motivated by an affection for Billiam van Roestenberg and Jeffrey McGowan, the first couple married that day, afterward, as the “cult of Jason” grew, his motivations became harder to read, his wisdom less sure. When a Baptist church congregation from Kansas rolled into town shrieking against New Paltz’s “sodomite zeitgeist,” the young mayor needed prodding to meet with them. “I really didn’t know who Jason was, or what he would become,” Quinn writes. “I only knew that in his presence, you could taste potential. Like a lick of mint or the hot steam of Irish tea, this young man, with all of his foibles and personal failings, was positioned on a trajectory that could only rise.” —Jane Smith


The Orpheus Obsession Dakota Lane Harper Tempest, June 2005, $16.99

T

here are certain books we keep as reminders of who we are and where we’ve been. As we display them on our shelves for the world to see, we are in essence baring pieces of our souls. They are books we read over and over again, in bits and pieces, to calm our minds. Dakota Lane has written a book that will likely serve this purpose for many teenagers as they turn into adults, reassuring them that everyone goes through obsessive love at least once and comes out the other side. In The Orpheus Obsession, the object of desire is an alternative rock star named Orpheus. Lane’s protagonist is 16-year-old Anooshka Stargirl, a borderline manic-depressive who lives with her emotionally unstable mother just outside Woodstock. Her father lives in India, and her older sister, Zoetrope Zallulah (ZZ) Moon, has moved to New York City. Anooshka’s only other companion at home is a beloved parakeet named Zack. Faced with a summer of meaningless social meandering and waitressing for tourists, Anooshka finds solace in the connection she makes with Orpheus’s music. After a chance meeting in a garden maze, Anooshka begins to see him as a vulnerable human being like herself. Her curiosity leads her to his online blog, which convinces her they are psychically connected. Restless and bored at home, Anooshka travels to the city to pursue her obsession. But when Orpheus returns her interest, and fantasy turns into reality, the fragile Anooshka learns one of life’s hardest lessons. While as an adult it’s hard to remember ever falling for lines such as, “You’re so complex. You’re like oxygen,” Lane is adept at painting that naivete into a real character, who also inspires us with her wide-eyed passion. Reading The Orpheus Obsession is like jumping back into the adolescent mind and absorbing all of life’s experiences in colorful, passionate bursts of energy. Lane’s ability to create and maintain this world is astounding. “I can sometimes hear a color, see a sound,” Anooshka says. “Why else would we feel emotion in our bodies? I could never explain that to anyone, and in this one simple line I feel Orpheus gets it.” Interlaced with photographs and lyrics, Orpheus is also a journey into writing as an art form, with a literary quality that is sorely lacking in much popular young adult fiction today. Among the Harry Potter and Sweet Valley High knock-offs saturating the market are a few struggling gems by writers like Lane, who have worked hard to hone their craft, and are giving it back to the next generation honestly, in all its messy, complex glory. Lane’s characters are acutely human: observant, sensitive, and flawed. Anooshka is both naive and wise; her mother is both kind and brutal. Orpheus is grounded, yet lost. Teens and adults alike will appreciate the intellectual undercurrent of this novel, as Lane loosely recreates the original Greek myth of Orpheus, a great musician and poet whose songs charmed wild beasts. But according to legend, when Orpheus received a chance to save his wife, Eurydice, from the underworld, his ego caused him to lose her forever. In Lane’s version, with its New York underworld, Anooshka and her Orpheus are destined to a similar fate. Dakota Lane’s first novel, Johnny Voodoo, was published in 1996 by Delacorte, and gained a cult following, as well as accolades as an ALA Best Book for Young Adults. She is currently working on a graphic-novel series. With her ability to transcend the emotional and visual world of life’s most painful years, Lane is on her way to becoming a consistent, reassuring voice in the world of young adult fiction. —Molly Maeve Eagan BOOKS 59


60 BOOKS


The Darwin Conspiracy John Darnton Alfred A. Knopf, 2005, $25

J

ohn Darnton has done a nearimpossible thing: to craft a thriller, using Charles Darwin as a foil, yet sidestep the current religious brouhaha about evolution. Well, not entirely. By the end of the book it’s clear that science and common sense are still safe, even as Darwin himself is peeled open as a near-plagiarist, possible murderer, and all-around nervous wreck. It’s hard to tell, though, if the scholarship and historical theorizing that saturate this story constitute some meaningful ideas on the author’s part, or if they’re just there to serve the story. The novel is flat-out engrossing, and deftly weaves present-day amateur detectives, young Darwin’s voyage of discovery, and his last, troubled days. The Darwin Conspiracy is really a serial cliffhanger, and guaranteed to agitate the reader at the end of every chapter the way the genre should. Darnton even manages to include a real cliffhanging scene, an act of wit on the author’s part, but absolutely crucial to the plot. I was lured in by the prospect of exposing Darwin, the brilliant thinker, the heroic disruptor of sacred cows (turns out they’re just cows!) as—a villain. I also admit I was worried (is this thickly disguised antiscientism?), but ultimately it’s just a tease. The mystery’s the thing, and it’s jim-dandy. Of course, few fundamentalists will be taken in. Anything short of outright refutation and denunciation of evolution is seen as coddling poor Charlie, but a few might be fooled by the title, and will squirm with delight as the clues pile up and Darwin’s own daughter, Lizzie, begins to revile him. Have at thee, rationality! Even so, materialistic science is not undone. Hudson Valley resident Darnton, a 35-year veteran of the New York Times, won a Pulitzer Prize for his reportage on Poland under martial law. His description of the original voyage of the Beagle, with shipboard details, revelatory jungle excursions, insect discoveries, and professional jealousies, is memorable, even thrilling. The sleuthing subplot has Darwin’s “lesser” daughter emerging from dim history and struggling to reconcile the father she idolizes with his accomplishments, and possible crimes. It’s highly effective, but relies on a literary device that’s problematic. Evoking this young girl (and then woman) by tracing the arc of her tragic life, her filial devotion and unappreciated brilliance, is an original and plausible way to enter Darwin’s life and times. Darnton says all the right things, even when Lizzie is merely advancing the plot. He wisely shows feminist subtext sparingly, and without demagoguery. But the author (male, middle-aged) attempts a Herculean task: writing as a 19th-century girl, one from a literary, well-heeled family. It was a time when well-formed sentences were expected, even from females. Juggling all this requires exquisite balance and excruciatingly precise word choices. While Lizzie is credible overall, and effective as an ensemble character, she doesn’t quite come through as an adolescent girl. I longed for a few just-so stumbles in that formidable syntax, some juvenile choices in her diary prose, something to reveal the stifled inner life and emotional depth of such a unique character. There is none of the occasional panic that accompanies the transit to womanhood in any age. At no time is Darnton incorrect with Lizzie’s voice, but she carries too much of the story to remain at arm’s length emotionally. We need this book. Darwin changed everything, deflating our conceit about human importance and elevating our knowledge. His careful observations turned pieties about “God’s creation” into a rich, ever-evolving, as it were, engagement with the natural world. He was not, even so, a “god,” or even demiurge, and The Darwin Conspiracy elevates his accomplishment while examining, with Darwinian attention to detail, his feet of clay. —Greg Correll BOOKS 61


The Uncommon Life of Common Objects Akiko Busch, Illus. George Skelcher Metropolis Books, New York, 2005, $27.50

I

don’t think there are many people living in America today who would deny that we are a nation in thrall to its stuff. Obsessed as we are with having things, we don’t tend to spend much time thinking about them in any guise other than that of “possession.” So it is refreshing and welcome to come across a book that ponders the nature of our relationships with inanimate objects. Disguised as a series of essays on design, The Uncommon Life of Common Objects is really a series of meditations. Dutchess County resident Akiko Busch, editor of Design Is and author of Geography of Home: Writings on Where We Live, begins with the question, “What gives ordinary objects their value?” It’s a good question, and the notion of pausing to think about some of the things that inhabit our lives—a telephone, a mailbox, a stroller, a vegetable peeler—seems deliciously subversive. Busch gives these “common objects” their due, in terms of the emotional and symbolic roles they play in our lives, calling them “our partners in experience,” the “witnesses and accomplices” of our lives. She also points to the sometimes hazy line between possessor and possessed. Who hasn’t felt, at one time or other, enslaved by some object, or helpless without another? Each of the 12 essays is accompanied by an elegant pencil drawing, in color, by George Skelcher. The essays can be as different in tone as the objects are different in their design and purpose. “The Mailbox,” for example, is really an essay on trust, on rural neighborliness (or the lack thereof), and on the poetry of design; while her essay on the vegetable peeler is really about design as an act of generosity and love. Busch’s sense of humor is on the subversive side, too, dry and understated. In my favorite essay, “The Cereal Box,” Busch explores “the ‘eat and learn’ phenomenon.” She tells us about the “Spoonfuls of Stories” series launched by Cheerios, and the “snack books” attached to various products, such as The Oreo Cookie Counting Book. Taking it a step further, Busch wryly ponders, “Could gourmet cuisine not be used to further adult literacy by pairing certain foods with specific writers—sliced hams, cod roe, toasted cheese with Samuel Pepys or a croissant with Colette? Later in the day, one might even engage in a drink-and-learn phenomenon—rum cocktails with Hemingway, gin and tonic with Cheever.” Busch is not afraid to make philosophical and sociological leaps, some more successful than others. Her afterword essay, “The Golden Slipcover,” in which she talks about her mother’s aphasia, is a moving meditation on the purposefulness of frivolity, and our sometimes inadequate means of communication. Less successful is the essay on backpacks, based, as it is, on Busch’s premise that what we carry within them is “essential.” Busch misses her opportunity here to consider the difference between the necessary and the desirable. Making the desirable seem essential is, of course, what advertising and marketing are all about, and perhaps it is an element of design worth thinking about, too. Although Busch sometimes makes rather sweeping generalizations, and jumps to some farfetched conclusions, in the end, it’s really not necessary to agree with her, or to accept her ideas; one has only to accept her felicitous invitation to join the discussion, to take a look at “stuff” not merely in terms of its stated purpose, but also in terms of what place it serves in our lives, and in society as a whole. Busch invites us to not just have our things, or use them, or be used by them, but to think about them. And, in terms of design, isn’t thinking what our brains are for? —Rebecca Stowe 62 BOOKS


BOOKS 63


Fiction

ONE MISSISSIPPI

BY JACK KELLY ILLUSTRATIONS BY VLADIMIR ZIMAKOV

Z

ab leaves a message on my voice mail. I drive to a pay phone and wait an hour and a half. I’m reading Dear Abby for the third time. My mother won’t come to our wedding unless we invite her boyfriend and he’s alcohol dependent and blah blah blah. The phone finally rings. Zab’s lined up a real estate deal in Salt Lake City. Real estate is code for jewelry. A cherry, he says. We agree to meet next week at a Best Western in the Beehive State.

I fly into Salt Lake on a beautiful June afternoon. The air out there is so damn clean, the mountains, everything. I pick up a cab, the driver goes three-fifty easy, bleached hair and chin whiskers. She doesn’t get out to open the trunk. “Throw your bag in the back, sugar, and sit up here with me.” As we circle toward the airport exit, my rear end feels damp. “I’m so sorry,” she says. “I spilled a whiskey sour, I thought it had dried. You want one?” I open the Thermos and pour the plastic lid half full. “I have six kids and they’re all geniuses,” she tells me. “Chuckie’s getting his MBA next year from BYU. Gonna make big money. You believe in fate?” she asks. I don’t know. “You believe folks go wacky on the full of the moon?” She likes to talk. I read that research showed the full moon thing is a crock. “Wrong,” she says. “I seen it every month. Loony tunes.” She laughs so hard she swerves into the head-on lane but there’s nothing coming. Is that fate? Are our lives steered by tabloid astrology? Zab is watching CNN. He’s a news junky. Things are bad in Russia. He tells me about a place in the suburbs, K. Kalin & Son. It’s in a strip mall, minimal security, nice inventory. Only one son? I ask. Son or sons, he says, what the hell’s the difference? Zab is thin-skinned. He takes me out there in a rented Town Car. It’s & Son. Only child. At least I had my sister. When I was little and things went sour with Pop, Karen and I used to pull our conspiracies over our heads and wait out the storm. I miss her. Zab lets me off, I push open the thick glass door. I’m wearing the new seersucker I bought for this, the horn-rim glasses, the mustache and goatee I’ll shave afterward, fancy cufflinks, an Oyster Perpetual on my wrist. We specialize in watches. Some of them are worth as much as an expensive car, but they’re easy to transport, easy to fence. A young man shows me his pearly teeth. Mr. Kalin? No, no, he died, like, eight years ago. The father? No, the son. His wife’s family runs the business now, the Langdorffs. Oh. The guy’s scrubbed, crew-cut. I wonder if he’s a Mormon. We talk watches. The crystal is cut from a solid block of sapphire, he tells me. Some of them are good down to four thousand feet. I tell him I’m thinking of upgrading to a President model. We talk fluted bezels, high-polish bombé bezels, diamond lugs, white gold, yellow gold, ice-blue dial, platinum bracelet with brush finish. Options. The gab lets him know I know watches, puts him at ease. He shows 64 FICTION

me his stock. I’m counting 30, 40 watches, 10 grand and up. Nice. No men with guns in sight. I’ll think it over, I tell him. Okay, I say to Zab. He drives us to a supermarket. I wander the rows in the parking lot until I spot a Taurus with a wad of keys hanging on the ignition. Lot of people leave them. A fuzzy frog clings to the back window with suction cup feet. The interior smells like cherry soda. I toss the pink cardboard Christmas tree from the window as I wheel out of the lot. I park a couple of blocks from the motel. I’m on the second level off the courtyard. I change and go down to the pool. I have a routine, stomach crunches, push-ups, stretching. I can hold a handstand five minutes. When I’m done I dive in and swim a couple of laps. Underwater I hear a hum, I guess from the filter, but it sounds as if the whole earth is vibrating, as if I’m down four thousand feet. I go sit on one of the deck chairs. The sun is hot and I can see snowy peaks floating in the blue. I was having some personal problems that spring. My wife and I had split, not for the first time. She wanted stability, predictability, I don’t blame her. I was running around trying to put together middleman deals in high-grade hydro pot. Other things. Drinking way too much, alcohol dependent I guess. Plus Karen’s cancer had really twisted my head around. In May I experienced a couple of episodes. I don’t know what to call them, kind of the opposite of blackouts. As if somebody suddenly cranked up the juice of reality. They scared me. There’s mental illness in my family. It’s not like coming down with a cold. Your sanity goes, brother, you go. So I was feeling adrift there in Salt Lake. Adrift in my life. Alone. Zab is not a friend of mine in any sense. I don’t like the guy. He claims he has an IQ of 180, but I don’t believe it. A woman in a blue bikini comes down the metal steps from the second tier. She’s thin, but not bad looking. Petite, you would say. The little girl with her, maybe seven, is carrying an inflated dragon. She drops it in the shallow end and pushes it back and forth with her toes. The woman sits in the second chair over from mine. She spends some time smearing lotion on her legs, running her hands up them as if she were pulling on stockings. She’s wearing a hat with a floppy brim. She opens a thick book. The girl eases into the pool step by step. Even in the shallow end the water is up to her armpits. She clasps her hands on top of her head and squints at the sun.


FICTION 65


“She can swim very well,” the woman says. “I taught her when she was a baby. Her father said not to, but I just tossed her in. Babies swim by instinct. It’s the best way to learn.” The girl isn’t swimming, she’s carrying on a whispered conversation with the dragon. The woman’s oversized sunglasses make her face look small. “I’m getting ready for my real estate exam,” she says, nodding at the book. “The way the 30-year fixed is going, I figure it’s a good way to earn some money. We just bought a house ourselves, out in Draper, and we’re waiting to close. That’s what gave me the idea.” “Everybody’s always moving.” “You bet they are.” Her short hair sticks out from under the hat in unruly curls. She turns a page in the book. The girl goes under. Time passes. Ripples carry the dragon toward the middle of the pool. I bolt upright in my chair. I can’t see the girl. I stand. She’s face down in the deep end. I take one step toward the edge, a flame of panic igniting in my chest. She kicks and surfaces. The woman looks at me and smiles. “Told you,” she says. “Her name’s Rosa. After Rosa Parks. We’re white—her father was, too—he died just before Christmas -- but I admire the hell out that woman. Wouldn’t sit in the back of the bus. You know?” “I’ve heard of her.” “I’m Tammy. You here on business?” Is she testing the waters? Or is she just being friendly? I glance at her tanned legs. “Jojo. Business and pleasure.” “That’s the idea, mix ‘em up.” “The crash driver’s here.” Zab has approached from behind. “Why don’t you come up and meet him.” I look at him. He talks in code over a pay phone and blabs in front of a stranger. Some I.Q. “I’ll be there,” I say. “What’s a crash driver?” she asks me when he’s gone. She’s the curious type. “That guy?” I say. “He’s loony tunes. It’s been a pleasure talking to you, Tammy.” “Likewise.” She slips her sunglasses off so I can see her eyes. They pierce my soul, the way women’s eyes often do. She smiles and I smile back. I put on slacks and a teeshirt and go down the walkway to Zab’s room. The crash driver is Lonnie. His face is stamped with a million bad dreams. His eyes, his voice, the way he sits on the bed with his elbows on his knees, the way he holds his cigarette, it’s so goddamn obvious. “Where’d you do time?” I say. “Ely, over in Nevada.” “He’s a friend of Willie Rodriguez,” Zab says. “Who’s Willie Rodriguez?” “You know, from Albuquerque. Lonnie’s clean. No drugs, right kid? No pills. He’s born again.” “By the grace of God,” Lonnie says. Great. I’ve been inside county jails a couple of times, but never more than three months, never in a state facility. You soak up a prison smell in there, a cop can sniff you from a block away. We drive out again in the Town Car, me in the back seat watching through the smoked window as the stucco houses and optometrist shops glide by. “Through a glass darkly,” I say. “What’s that mean?” “What are you talking about?” Zab says. “I’m asking him, the Bible pumper. Now we see through a glass darkly, but then face to face. What the hell’s that supposed to mean?” “Means what it says.” Lonnie chuckles. Zab says something about the wide, wide streets. Lonnie’s explaining how they’re like that because Brigham Young wanted to be able to do a one-eighty with a team of oxen. Lonnie’s not a Mormon, but he says he admires them. Fellow Christians. “I don’t believe there ever was a Christ,” I say. “There’s no historical evidence Jesus ever existed. It’s a big fairy tale.” “Don’t start,” Zab says. “You turn the other cheek in the joint?” I ask Lonnie. “Look,” Lonnie says. “Come on, you guys. We’ve got work.” Zab pulls into the parking lot by 66 FICTION

K. Kalin & Son. “You’re going to be over there driving the Town Car,” he tells Lonnie. “I’ll be in a white Taurus here. The whole thing takes exactly one minute. Jojo goes in, we all start counting. One Mississippi, two Mississippi. At 60 Mississippi, Jojo comes out. We both roll, nice and easy.” “And if something goes wrong, when do you take off without me?” I ask Lonnie. “I don’t know, when?” “Doomsday,” Zab says, “and not even then. Right, Jojo? Never.” I told him to call me Jojo on this job, I don’t know why. It’s a monkey’s name and I guess I felt more or less like a monkey those days.

The whole time we’re on the case, I’m only half paying attention. I keep thinking about Tammy. I have an urge to rush back to the motel and pound on her door. I can’t shake the idea that she’s a chunk of my future in danger of breaking off and drifting away. How it works, you have one guy to drive the car, one guy to go in, one guy, the crash car. When you make your getaway, the crash car follows in case of pursuit. Zab and I have done half a dozen of these. He always recruits a local guy for the crash car and pays him a straight fee. We cruise the route twice. Zab notes every light, every stop sign, turn here, turn here. Keep the speed even. This is where we switch to the Town Car. When we’re done we’ll drop Lonnie across town and head for the airport. Two hours after it goes down, Zab and I will be in different cities. Do I like robbing jewelry stores? I don’ t know. There’s a lousy edge you get before you go in, and a big rooster-in-the-morning feeling afterward. While it’s going down it’s just scenery rushing past. You’re not doing anything, it’s just happening to you. You know it’s your voice, your feet on the floor, but you don’t connect to it the way you do to everyday reality, which a lot of people


think is the only reality. You feel the heft of the sawed-off in your hand, but it’s so light you could throw it through the ceiling. You’re eleven feet tall and you can run the hundred yard dash in two seconds, leap tall buildings. Maybe that’s the attraction, that wild sensation. But it’s not what you would call pleasant. I’ve only fired one warning shot, that was on my first job. I did it just to see if I could, just to see people react. It was a rush. A shotgun going off in a jewelry store makes a hell of a noise, I’ll tell you. My ears were still ringing an hour later. People will say it’s the money. A job like this, you walk away with three or four hundred thousand in take. Even fenced at thirty cents on the dollar, it’s a good chunk of change. But I blow most of it buying gifts for the wife, for my niece and nephews, friends. I party, stay drunk a week, maybe take a month in the islands. The money doesn’t last and it doesn’t get me anywhere. It doesn’t change who I am. We stop at a Red Lobster for tails and popcorn shrimp and bottles of Sam Adams. Lonnie complains to Zab I’m eyeballing him. “He eyeballs everybody,” Zab says. “I’m gonna pray for you, man,” Lonnie tells me. Moron. After dinner, Zab drops me at the motel and goes to take Lonnie home. I’m the young and the restless. I’m thinking a lot about the job, but not in the right way. You have to imagine it going down smoothly. I keep seeing all the ways it could turn south. I see myself losing it. What do you lose when you lose it? Control? Connection with reality? I don’t know. But the idea starts to eat at me. A kind of claustrophobia builds inside me. I can’t breathe. I had spotted a bar just up the road, the Wildcat. I make a plan. I’ll stroll up there, have a few drinks, dampen the sensation before it gets away from me. It’s a mild pastel evening. On the walkway outside my room, I look down at the pool, at the way the water makes the turquoise swim. It fascinates me and makes me feel queasy. I’m standing there staring when Tammy opens her door. She invites me in. “You remember Rosa,” she says. “You want a beer?” Clothes are scattered around, toys, stuffed animals. The dragon, deflated, is draped over the top of an open suitcase. I smell shampoo. Rosa is on the bed drinking juice out of a little box. She waves to me as if she has spotted me a long way off. “We’re just going to watch ‘Jeopardy,’” Tammy says. “Sit down.” The loping theme song is already on. “It’s our favorite show,” Rosa says. Tammy hands me a beer and takes the chair, I sit on the bed with the little girl. They’re starting the opening round—Historic Heroes, TV or not TV, “G”eography, How Soon We Forget. “Did you meet your crash driver?” We exchange a look over that. She knows something or she’s toying with me. It doesn’t matter. I like her. What is Georgia? Right. Geography for four hundred. This river in India is considered holy by Hindus. “What’s the Ganges?” Tammy says. “I like ‘Jeopardy’ because when it comes down to it, life is about asking the right questions, not about giving the right answers.” I laugh at this nonsense and she joins me, her eyes sparkling. Suddenly I think I could love this woman. I feel as if we fit, as if we’re already family. We could live together and ask the right questions forever. How soon for two hundred. This male chauvinist was defeated in a notable 1973 tennis match with Billie Jean King. “Who’s Bobby Riggs?” I say. “You know your forgotten people.” Lines run from her nose to the corner of her lips when she smiles and traces of them remain when her face relaxes. Years are passing, for her and for all of us. Losing a husband must be a killer. Karen’s death certainly gave me a flash of what’s behind the curtain. How soon we forget, six hundred. His cars appeared in ‘Back to the Future’ but his company went broke. “Who is Santa Claus?” Rosa guesses. None of the contestants can think of John DeLorean. I know it, but don’t say. I don’t like people who act bright. To have a kid and see her change, see her blossom like the flowers in a fast movie, what would that do to me? Is that my silver destiny? This lead singer of Jefferson Airplane sang ‘Somebody to Love.’ “Grace Slick.” Tammy says. “Who is?” Rosa corrects her. Her mother croons, “Do-on’t you need somebody to love?” The idea of family spooks me. Pop was a brooder, a man of a thousand disappointments. He would shower me and my sister with blackness. One Christmas Eve he went off the merry-goround and tore the tree down. Nice memory. My mother treated his tantrums as jokes. It was her defense, I guess. Karen was the only one on my side. I wish I had done more for her when

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she got sick. I wish I had said what I was thinking. “Did you say you worked in sales?” Tammy says. She’s handing me a second bottle of Bud. “No, I’m a consultant,” I say. “I talk to companies about employee motivation. What it comes down to: Work or you’re fired. Only we tell them how to say it nice.” “Interesting. You travel a lot?” “Wherever the job takes me.” “Have you been to the North Pole?” Rosa asks. “No, I haven’t.” “That’s where Santa lives. And my Dad is there. He’s not in heaven. Is he, Mom?” “I think he is, sweetie.” Rosa shakes her head. Double Jeopardy. Literature on Film, Old Testament Figures, Fictional Places, Famous Sparklers. Am I dreaming? Is this a fictional place? “I took the Bible as literature when I was getting my associates,” Tammy says. “There is some weird stuff in there. I have friends who are holy rollers and I always ask them, ‘Have you actually read the thing? Have you read Leviticus?’” “Religion is a racket.” “Who told you that?” She laughs and I know she’s way ahead of me. Lake Woebegon is right. I’ll try Famous Sparklers for four hundred. This forty-fivecaret blue stone has long been thought to have a curse on it. “The Hope Diamond,” Tammy says. “What’s the Hope Diamond?” “What’s soap-on-a-rope?” Rosa says and laughs wildly. “Do you think there’s hope?” Tammy asks me. “I guess you never know what’s coming down the pike.” “Is that what hope means, not knowing the future?” It’s the birthstone of those born in April. “I live day by day. I don’t know how else to do it.” What is the emerald? Correct. “To me, hope is praying without God.” Sparklers for a thousand. Weighing in at five hundred and sixty carats, this largest sapphire of its kind was formed some 2 billion years ago. Nobody can guess it. “Star of India,” I say, just before Alex Trebek. “Yea, Jojo!” Rosa cheers. She puts an arm around my neck and kisses my cheek. Her mother smiles again. “I’ve gotta get going,” I say. “No, you can’t,” Rosa whines. “Stay for Final Jeopardy at least.” Tammy frowns and smiles at the same time. The look stabs me in the heart. I stay. The category is Famous Criminals. Tammy looks at me and stifles a laugh. Asked why he robbed banks, he said, Because that’s where the money was. You have thirty seconds. “Willie Sutton,” I say over the tick-tock music. “Only he didn’t actually say it. He said the real reason he robbed banks was because he felt more alive inside a bank robbing it than he did at any other time in his life.” “Aren’t you smart.” Time’s up. Two of the contestants guess wrong. One gets it and, with twentysix thousand, four hundred dollars becomes our new champion. Tammy and I say our good-byes while Rosa turns somersaults on the bed. “You staying in Salt Lake long?” she asks. “Flying out tomorrow.” “Oh. Well, good luck.” Good luck. I walk over to the Wildcat. A couple of young dudes on the make are seated at the bar, four guys in suits and two businesswomen are finishing dinner. I drink two or three vodka and tonics and watch a beauty pageant on the television over the bar. Miss Belize looks good, but all these girls have too many teeth, like sharks dressed as women. I down a couple more drinks. Vodka has a numbing effect on me. It cleans out my head. Walking back to the motel, I notice the moon is full. The sudden sight of it creeping over the mountains makes me reel. The blacktop jumps up and scrapes my palms. In my room I leave the light off and lie on my bed. The glow from the pool angles through my window and throws a pattern of ripples on the ceiling. I keep expecting Tammy to tiptoe down and tap on my door. A fantasy of it fills me 68 FICTION

with aching life. I can see the white imprint of her bathing suit against her tan. I can imagine the two of us lying face-to-face and whispering secrets. But it’s after midnight. Somebody turns off the lights in the pool. I’m already awake when the clock radio erupts. The long wait has begun. The event is like a train way up the tracks. You see it coming, it seems like it will never arrive, then it rushes down on you all of a sudden. The morning’s chilly for swimming. In the lobby behind the glass walls, the business patrons are chowing down on the free continental breakfast—coffee, juice, pastries, miniature boxes of cereal. They stare at me staring at them. I plunge. The water is light as air, as if it’s carbonated. It doesn’t touch me. I inhale the chlorine, look up at the immaculate blue. I take some deep breaths and dive to the bottom. No hum now, utter silence, peace. I wait there until my lungs turn to stone. Then we’re riding in the Taurus, which still stinks of air freshener. We stop at a light. The taxi cab I rode over in pulls up beside us. The driver stares at me. She’s not jolly today. She scowls. Maybe Chuckie flunked out of school or maybe she had to deal with too many lunatics last night. Her mouth forms three nasty words. My window’s rolled up but I can almost read her lips. The light changes. Zab is going on about the fence, the split, how he’s going to credit part of my cut to an American Express card I use, but I’m not listening. My teeth are clenched. The anticipation is mounting the stairway to heaven, filling me with a loud, tense clangor of anxiety. I’m used to it. Zab mentions something he saw on the news last night. The ice cap is melting. Polar bears are floating far out to sea on slabs of ice, doomed. The future is going to hell. Can a man even exist four thousand feet down? If he can, does he need to know the time? Do the ticking seconds become even more important down there? We pass Danny’s Donuts, white enamel exterior, neon dunker in the window. A woman wearing emerald slacks is carrying a paper cup with a plastic lid. She has the self-composure of a realtor on her way to a closing. We pass the well-kept homes of Mormons, green grass and picket fences. A polar bear stares at me from a front yard, his face at once desperate and resigned. A cloth sack is folded in my pocket. I’m wearing sunglasses. Jesus Christ stands in front of a brick building, his white plaster arms outstretched. As we roll past, he lifts them toward me, calling me back. I heft the gun. Zab has found me a pump Remington Sidewinder with a pistol grip. He’s hacksawed the barrel to a manageable length. Very intimidating weapon, but easy to come by in any gun shop. I don’t want to kill anybody. I hit a plateau. I feel as if I could hold my breath forever. An excruciating calm descends on me. Every movement, even shifting my eyes, becomes deliberate. The drip of time slows. I watch each second gather and swell before it falls. I know the car is cruising at normal speed, but to me it seems we’re barely moving. A lawn sprinkler throws an iridescent arc into the air. Zab finally turns the car into the parking lot. Now the rush begins. Now a thousands bits of chrome light up, a miniature sun shining from each. Now the world turns to glass. Now a vibration starts inside my skull. Now I say a prayer without God. Now I think of Karen, see my father’s icy eyes on me. Now I am more alive than at any other time in my life. Lonnie has been following us in the Town Car. Zab checks to make sure he’s in position. We sweep to the curb. With the door open, I hesitate. Heels click, click on the cement. Tammy doesn’t look at me as she strides along the front of the store. She’s dressed in a crisp sky-blue business suit. She’s holding Rosa by the hand. Rosa glances in my direction and, for a split second, smiles. They turn in at the entrance of K. Kalin & Son, stepping forward to greet their reflections in the glass door. They disappear inside. The Hope Diamond was stolen from the forehead of a Hindu goddess. Life, they say, is like a vision in a dream. My mouth goes dry as ash. “ . . . ready?” Zab is saying. I tuck the weapon under my jacket. I step out. The sunlight is making jewels come alive in the sidewalk. The breeze descends from the white peaks and raises a sound like the swell of a pipe organ in church. I exchange a look with Zab. In that instant we are brothers, we are the only men on earth. He nods. I nod. One Mississippi.


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FICTION 69


POETRY

EDITED BY PHILLIP LEVINE. You can submit up to three poems to Chronogram at a time. Send ‘em if you got ‘em, either via snail-

mail or e-mail. Deadline: October 10. 314 Wall St., Kingston, NY 12401. E-mail: poetry@chronogram.com. Subject: Poetry. when he said “it doesn’t get any better than this” he was right and disappeared with a short popping sound —p

untitled

Poetry

To Yu. Brusovani

is Brussels sprouts when all I want is butter pecan ice cream. It is rock

“Let the dead ones attend to burying their own dead,”— A buddy told me, and I just smiled in reply. And, with that smile, I said to myself: “Why not? Let them bury themselves, it is worth a try.” A noose, a cudgel, the firefly flash of a blade— And the eternal peace, the corrupting peace… But how well, my friend, you pretend that you are alive, With a longing that is so endless, so full of grace. —V. A. Leikin (Translated from Russian by Yana Kane)

Hillary’s Choice Tall she stood above me as I looked cancer in the face at eye level ‘round the size and color of a very ripe plum; fierce, angry purple bright like bruises near pretty more reddish than black, ready to burst creeping in a slow flush down her breast, a predator ready to strike devious violator devouring monster undercover parasite pimple with a nipple up to no good made us wonder how she believed for so long (long enough to kill) that it was only a well mannered, well meaning tumor —Barbara Darr

70 POETRY

climbing on Everest for which I have no map. Free me to the beach and let me crush my reading rush with a paper back mystery. Wring and twist those stanzas tight until a stream of sense drops into a pool of clear insight. Read it loud, find clues hidden within the rhythm Read again those awkward strophes; find what missed when first eye met the poem. Grammar be not dammed for the sake of verse, but knocked askew like a giant block precariously resting on its corner. Tip-toe on, danger exists only in the future tense. Scant words simply rendered beckon like church bells. For in the paradox of wordplay lies passion and when written to the edge by its gravity we are held. —Carl Morton

But Who Reads Poetry Anyway? apparently invisible true believers in midnight rain worshipping anti-intellectuals lionesses with revolutionized minds rememberers and daydream dwellers protectorates of language admirers of emptiness perhaps, you. —D. Dougherty


View

Field Work

She’s one colossal failure to embody heart & misery, or misery vs. heart. Either way, she isn’t how I intend to love. Or should I explain what she is?

It seems late to find out yesterday

I’m freaked by a hallway, alarmed by a razor, a blond named anything, & fear never equals any linear sense. She doesn’t either. Or should I account for what she does?

he has a nickname like words for gay man in Spanish but he does not make

The measure of a life to be forgotten. The timed-out motions of approaching death. A head in blood on top of a desk.

fun of gay men he dances with them they are the better dancers. His car is

The bullet that enters behind the ear. The shot’s echo through concrete walls & open doors.

the sound of the door open the key waiting to be turned my car door is

Is it the rain that falls all day? Or is it sunny, & does the sky insist the matter is decay? She does.

open too every three sentences he looks at me directly, leans into my car shifting his

Or should I explain what she doesn’t? When, at last, will there be union? Failure might be her view—this way.

shorts at the knees like a man in dress pants sitting down. Took me a year

It might be mine—that way. It’s not our pleasure, & it’s no future obvious to me. Yes, distraction’s the fury, & it leans against our lives. —Dwayne Esposito

Hejab Sister, I look at you through black fabric, sweat and bloodied gauze. You’re nothing but expensive furniture with your child-like submission and post-feminist, ruthless obedience. You have no say with your silence. You forget woman should be heard and seen. “Woman is the nigger of the world,” I whisper behind my black fabric, sweat and bloodied gauze. —Afarin

to say hello but seemed late last month he mentioned his wife’s father, his wife, my phone number is on a piece of paper in his hand these two hours in this parking lot the chorus of his car and my mosquitoes. He has promised to invite me dancing we both like to dance no idea what he wants but if we dance and do not understand where his wife is I will choose another name and write a poem at least find a better way to describe two people in the

straighten, he leans against the flank of my car, stands up. It is like holding a piece of string between us like this —D.C. Albertini

untitled In order to let the walk take you, you must first go outside, past the rain full of the fields on which it is falling, song full of bird, water that swears it is a river. Go down to the banks where a car is growing rust at the crumbling edge, drawing slowly over the ghosts of its teenage owners. Slide in behind the broken wheel. Can you see the girl, her hair laid out on the grass in the shape of takeoff or landing, the trees above her head shuffling their leaves like cards? If our eyes which are the feeblest stars can’t see this try looking with them shut then get out of the wreck let the walk take you back upstream or down, til it tires of you, and turns home. —Tasha Sudan

summer moving so close to telling each other stories. I lean on my open door and

POETRY 71


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CHRONOGRAM

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declutter By Susan Piperato

Autumn is traditionally nesting time, when the house is spruced-up in preparation for winter. But often when we look inside, we don’t like what we see. Sometimes, come the end of a long, sun-filled summer, a home’s interior can look neglected and decidedly drab— not because of the décor, but because of the clutter that has accumulated. So before you consider decorating, heed the other d-word: declutter. Clutter happens to the best of us, whether it’s unrecycled materials piled up on the porch, photos that never made it into albums, old furniture waiting to be refinished in the garage, toys in corners, shoes under the bed, unfolded laundry on the sofa, junk drawers galore, or knickknacks you inherited from your grandmother but never figured out how to display. Whatever sort of clutter has possessed your home, you’re not alone—the need to declutter is nothing short of an international phenomenon. Googling “declutter” turns up more than 220,000 entries, while online booksellers list over 130 titles. “Declutter” became a household verb in part thanks to the growing industry known as professional organizing. The National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO), a nonprofit professional association founded in 1985, is the largest international association of professional organizers, with 3,200 members

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worldwide. NAPO’s membership includes organizing consultants, speakers, trainers, authors, and manufacturers of organizing products, with improving clients’ lives “using organizing principles” and educating the public about organizing solutions as its mission. For decluttering and organizing resources and local consultants, visit www.napo.net. Professional organizer Sue Story, proprietor of the Woodstock-based ClutterBusters, believes that the decluttering phenomenon goes hand in hand with the boom in home decorating. “Martha Stewart has to be given credit—she got a lot of people interested and then magazines like Real Simple got started on decluttering and organizing,” she says. “All the TV shows on home makeovers also helped. People are learning from them and taking more interest in their home’s appearance. Decluttering has snowballed—there are even national conventions devoted to it.” (ClutterBusters serves clients throughout the Hudson Valley; call (845-679-7995.) Most clutter stems from materialism, our desire to accumulate and acquire goods we probably don’t need—“Don’t buy another thing unless you really, really love it,” says Story—and leading far-too-busy lives, but clutter can also be emotional. Clutter often begins, Story believes, when things get difficult or people get overwhelmed, a fact born out by the testimonies of members of an online decluttering support forum (http://declutter.meetup.com/groups). But whatever the cause, the result is always a house so cluttered with useless, unsatisfying items that no one can visit. Story finds that all many clients need is companionship to declutter. One client’s clutter situation got so bad that “for an entire year, she only left the house to go to the store or to work,” Story recalls. “Finally, she called me. After working on her house together, she finally called some friends and went out. When we finished, she told me, ‘I don’t know why I paid a therapist all these years; we’ve accomplished so much.'” Clutter is a depressant, says Story. “It starts when people just get a bit depressed, I think, and they sort of let things go, or they just get really busy and let things go and then looking at the clutter depresses them,” she explains. “But then, because they’re depressed and overwhelmed, they let it go worse, and looking at it depresses them more, and it becomes a vicious cycle. And it just spirals and keeps getting worse. For some people, the problems just get out of hand because they get distracted. We all get distracted. The phone rings, we stop doing one thing and start doing another thing. Even I do it!” The secret to dealing with clutter, says Story, even among professional organizers, is to establish systems for dealing with it, and look for the light at the end of the tunnel. “Decluttering is making order out of chaos,” says Story, and finding hitherto unforeseen beauty and meaning in that order. “When I declutter for people I frequently uncover beautiful things they forgot they had. Recently, I found this beautiful old tin can in this woman’s house, and it now holds her jewelry and sits in a place of honor in the bathroom. Part of decluttering is decorating. If there are things particularly beautiful, that I love, I’m happy. If I’m surrounded by things that are ugly, that I don’t love, I’m not happy. And I don’t feel good about my surroundings when there’s too much clutter to enjoy nice things.” But the financial benefits of having a clutter-free home are perhaps even more important than the aesthetic value. According to the philosophy of feng shui, decluttering is basic to a full life because it means ridding our homes of stagnant chi, or life energy, and making room for new opportunities to come into our lives. “Feng shui ideas are so popular that the phrase is now a verb—‘Oh, have you had your house feng shuied?’” says Story. “Feng shui has to do with movement of energy and placement of things. Two things that really block energy are clutter and dirt; where there’s clutter, there’s always dirt because you can’t clean those areas. After I finish decluttering a room, and it’s all cleaned up, I always stand there with my client and savor it and I look at them and say, ‘Can you feel it?’ And they are always amazed at how much lighter everything feels. That feeling affects our entire lives—mental, emotional, financial, spiritual.”

TIPS FOR DECLUTTERING 1. SET REALISTIC GOALS. DON’T PLAN TO DECLUTTER YOUR ENTIRE HOUSE IN ONE WEEK. Give yourself a few months, suggests Story. “I’ll go into a house that’s really gone to hell in a rowboat, I know it won’t take two visits to do it. I’ll ask them, ‘Did it take two days to get this way?’ Some houses wind up being an ongoing project that need working on once or twice a week for months.”

2. SET DEADLINES. POST REMINDERS TO YOURSELF AROUND THE HOUSE AND STICK TO YOUR DECLUTTER DAY SCHEDULE.

3. ONE ROOM AT A TIME. FIRST, LIST WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE ROOM BY ROOM. Set priorities. Who needs help most? A work area? A child’s room? “Have a family meeting—who’s most frustrated by clutter? Their room needs attention first,” says Story. “If you live alone, which room feels worst?”

4. GET SUPPLIES. ALL YOU NEED, SAYS STORY, ARE SOME MARKERS, PLASTIC BINS, LABELS, AND TRASH BAGS OR PAPER BAGS WITH HANDLES. Label the bags as follows: Giving away (for family and friends); Charity; Recycling; Garbage; Keeping; Yard Sale (optional); and In Doubt. Whatever you keep or can’t decide about, pack it away in a clear plastic stackable bin and label it.

5. GET SUPPORT. IT’S ALWAYS EASIER TO DO ANYTHING WITH A GROUP. Rally a family member, call a friend, hire a professional organizer, or seek an online decluttering support group.

6. MAKE HOMES FOR EVERYTHING. THE APHORISM “A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING IN ITS PLACE” sounds old-fashioned, but couldn’t be more modern. When everything belongs somewhere, you feel in control of your life, says Story.

7. CLEAN UP AS YOU GO. ONCE THE SORTING IS OVER, THE CLEANING BEGINS—there’s no point putting orderly containers back on top of dirt. Continuing to clean up during every project will help maintain a clutter-free existence.

8. CELEBRATE! REWARD YOURSELF WITH SOMETHING YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED, once you’ve cleared space for it, or do something the clutter has made you miss—like cooking for friends or throwing a cocktail party.

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Winter Window Warmth By Susan Piperato

C

OME AUTUMN, both home makeover TV shows and redecorating aficionados themselves take their work inside, sprucing up the house for the long winter months by adding richer color and texture. But you don’t necessarily need to focus on interiors to find ways to add extra warmth to your decorating scheme. New fashions in window treatments can make your house look and feel cozier even when you gaze out the window at the bleak weather outside. In the past two years, interior shutters have become the hottest window fashion on the market. Among window treatment commercial centers surveyed recently by Drapers & Window Coverings magazine, interior shutters are generating more than 81 percent of their total window treatment sales. Part of the appeal of interior shutters is practical. Unlike blinds—which sag eventually, are difficult to clean, and feature unsightly cords that can be dangerous to small children—and drapes, which fade and need washing, interior shutters are low-maintenance and durable. They also provide effective insulation, which helps save on heating costs, along with the ability to regulate and block light unequalled by any other type of window covering: you have the option of eliminating sunlight completely and providing full privacy, or allowing partial sunlight and privacy, at the flick of a louver handle. Interior shutters can be costly—up to $200 or more per window—but are a good investment, adding to a home’s overall resale value. Plus, they never need replacement. And interior shutters look just as well as they operate; in fact, designers are currently touting them as “the ultimate window covering,” and for several good reasons. Installing interior shutters immediately transforms an ordinary window of any size, shape, and style into an ever-changing source of light and dark, a space in which mood and ambiance can easily be controlled. With their clean lines and simple, sleek good looks, interior shutters work well in both traditional and contemporary decors. Installed painted or varnished, they can complement, contrast, or highlight a room’s architectural details and wall color.

Interior shutters work well in any room, and can be dressed up in more formal rooms with a fabric valance or drapery. Best of all, say designers, interior shutters can be admired from both inside and outside—installing them throughout the front of your house makes for decidedly strong curb appeal. Interior shutters come in traditional (smaller, thinner louvers) and plantation (larger, thicker louvers). Choose full- or café size, and an outside mount for design detail, or inside mount to eliminate light leaks. Interior shutters come in varnished, painted, or unfinished wood; extruded vinyl; or Polywood, an engineered wood substitute made from solid resin with a baked-on paint finish. For do-it-yourself types, interior shutters are quickly and easily installed (although many home furnishing centers offer low-cost installation services), and the tools required are minimal. While a table saw makes cutting easy, you can actually accomplish all the necessary cutting with hand tools. Beyond that, all you need to do is drill holes and install screws. If you haven’t got the wherewithal for interior shutters, or you simply can’t imagine a window without colorful fabric surrounding it, you can still add warmth to both your room and its décor by layering window coverings. Window layering of three or even four coverings offers extra insulation and the option of varying privacy and light in the room. It can jazz up a room, whether your overall décor is contemporary and minimal or old world and sumptuous—and it keeps the warm air inside and the cold air out. There’s only one rule for window layering: Start light in both color and texture, building in color and texture as you move outward. For the bottom layer, try the newest rage—matchstick blinds, available unfinished or painted. Next, install a single or double curved metal curtain rod. The second layer should be a pair of sheer gauze panels chosen to contrast with or complement the blind. Add a third layer of silk on the outer rim of the double curtain rod, and top with brocade or velvet drapes on a decorative pole complete with finials and tie-backs. Pull open each layer of curtaining just enough to reveal the one beneath, and voila! Goodbye cold, hello coziness! 81


CHRONOGRAM

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CHRISTOPHER LEWIS

SCULPTURE AND DESIGN

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CHRONOGRAM

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Experience the Artistry...

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Food

tricks of the trade on tour at the culinary institute of america

A glorious September afternoon, it’s the eve of graduation weekend at the Culinary Institute of America. A sold-out 4 pm tour of the renowned college will soon commence in the “hospitality house” lobby of Roth Hall. Outside the main entrance, visitors-in-waiting stroll through just-completed Anton Plaza, where a nine-foot fountain encircled by flower-patterned, multicolored brickwork gushes water for the first time. Wrapped in a Mediterranean-inspired balustrade and replete with freestanding pilasters, gazebos, benches, and deftly manicured gardens, the 32,000 square-foot piazza affording magnificent views of the Hudson River and Catskill Mountains will be dedicated at a ribboncutting ceremony the next day. Anton Plaza (named for donors in the airport-food industry) constitutes the centerpiece of a multi-million-dollar renovation underway at the country’s premier culinary university. Founded in 1946 in New Haven, Connecticut, by Frances Roth and Katharine Angell, the CIA moved in 1972 to its current location in Hyde Park, the former Jesuit seminary St. Andrew-on-Hudson. Long-since converted Roth Hall currently houses three of the school’s five public restaurants (each run by a duo of am and pm professional chefs, who direct pupils), along with instructional kitchens, a bakeshop and a combined bookstore-gift shop. Complementing this main building’s redbrick façade, the newly adjacent plaza’s design projects grandiosity yet achieves function, crowning a multi-level parking garage constructed beneath. Above ground, on the north side of Roth, a waterfall engineered six months prior gently cascades. Nearing completion to the south, sandwiched between the CIA’s two stand-alone restaurants, the future administration building will house financial offices and a cooking theater, where prospective students will observe demonstrations. Spearheaded by Dr. Tim Ryan (’77), the first CIA alumnus and faculty member to become president of the college, recent upgrades aim to attract the public as much as students. (Approximately two-thirds of 2,300 enrollees in bachelor and associate degree programs live in the eight, well-appointed residents halls, landscaped with gazebo-dotted recreation areas, including a roof-shaded barbeque pit alongside the river.) Already the third-leading tourist destination in Duchess County, a quartermillion visitors take campus tours or dine in CIA eateries each year. According to senior communications manager Stephan Hengst (’00), the university is continuously honing its community focus. “We want patrons to have a full experience in our five restaurants—from start to finish,” he says. The CIA must compete with its own graduates, who routinely open regional restaurants, artisan cheese shops, wineries and catering facilities, enhancing the Hudson Valley’s reputation as a culinary locale.

by pauline uchmanowicz photos by hillary harvey

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(L-R) DINERS IN THE SPECIAL FUNCTIONS ROOM AT THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA; STUDENTS STUDYING WINE IN ONE OF THE CIA’S STADIUM-SEATING CLASSROOMS; CIA’S APPLE PIE BAKERY CAFE; (OPPOSITE) CHEF’S WINDOW AT THE CIA, LOOKING INTO A BAKERY CLASSROOM.

Acting as my private escort, Hengst leads me away from Anton Plaza along a glossy, copper-hued scored concrete walkway bounded by a row of black stanchions. Frank Sinatra plays on an outdoor sound system as we pass nearby iron benches stationed outside Ristorante Caterina de’Medici (also called Cola Vita Center for Italian Food and Wine), a mustard-colored stucco structure graced with green shutters and a red pantiled roof. A life-size stone lion guards the establishment’s foyer as the music shifts to Italian classical and the space opens to a cathedral-ceiling formal room with plush, upholstered chairs surrounding elegantly laid out tables, a reservation placard on each. Authentic, regional Italian cuisine is served in this main dining space, which expands through archways to a connecting chamber. The sumptuously decorated space would seem to indicate fancy-dress dining, but Hengst explains that the CIA’s restaurants are more causal than they once were. “It’s not like the days when if a man didn’t have a jacket we’d lend him one to dine,” says Hengst. Guests also may partake of selected menu items in Caterina de’Medici’s Al Forna, a ground-floor walk-in area with causal seating, including a bar that spans an open-kitchen, suitable for chatting-up the chefs of tomorrow. Steps away, alfresco dining is likewise optional in season on an umbrella-appointed terrace that overlooks lamppost-lined Italian herb gardens, Conrad Hilton Library (donated by the hotel-mogul family in 1992) directly in view beyond. Back inside, a private dining room upstairs (standard in all campus restaurants for parties of up to 12), is available in the Tower Room. Featuring operatic balconies and a cocktail alcove, its windows face the latest CIA construction site. Administrative headquarters (slated for December opening) will wrap around the existing Shunsuke Takaki School of Baking and Pastry and adjoining J. Willard Marriot Continuing Education Building. Within these walls, scores of professionals enroll in continuing education courses each year, and more than a thousand additional food enthusiasts take adult education courses under the tutelage of chef-instructors. Tuition ranges from $165 to $1,850. The hands-on curriculum includes a suite of one-day programs (followed by eat-what-you-cook meals), such as culinary foundations, world cuisines, healthy cuisine, garnishing, baking and pastry, and beverages. Two- to five-day intensives known as Culinary Boot Camps raise the culinary bar. For instance, in CIA “Basic Training” ($1,850)

recruits learn the fundamentals of kitchen terminology, knife skills and cooking methods. They also dine in four of the CIA’s on-campus restaurants, participate in wine tastings and pairings, and take a cooking practicum exam. Young chefs (ages 8 to 18) may enroll in specialized classes, such as Breakfast Favorites (turnovers, pastries, muffins, sweet breads, and quiche) and International Cuisine—from egg rolls to empanadas. Delicious smells fill pathways as Hengst and I next head for a courtyard that connects several buildings, including freestanding St. Andrew’s Café. “One of the popular misconceptions about CIA restaurants is if you don’t have a reservation six months in advance you won’t get in. That’s simply not true anymore,” Hengst explains. True, the eateries quickly fill during peak-season foliage-gazing months, but from November through August one can call and get a reservation the same night, he assures me. Contrary to another popular misnomer, children are also welcome in all CIA restaurants, though the communications director recommends St. Andrew’s, which features family-friendly menus, service, and prices. “It also caters to walk-ins, knowing families may make last-minute decisions about going out to dinner,” he says. Wheat-stenciled glass on the entrance doors, rattan furniture, potted plants in corners, blue-tinted accents, and jazz music gives the square-shaped dining room of cozy St. Andrew’s a tropical, casual feel. The fare mirrors the philosophy of fit-looking Chef Mike Garnero, who characterizes himself as “professionally and personally focused on nutrition.” Across the public square from the eatery, a set of stairs leads back inside Roth Hall, where chandelier-lit, sparkling linoleum corridors wend past skills kitchens mounted with large “show” windows that allow visitors to look upon chefsin-training. One of two dozen work-study students employed as professional guides, C. J. Austin, clad in check pants, her name stitched in Tuscan blue on her starched chef’s jacket, is conducting a tour, paused in a sun-splashed hallway beside a glass-covered model of the CIA campus. Fielding questions with ease and confidence, she explains the history of “flavor profiles,” using sarsaparilla as an example. Hengst and I meander past display cases lined with institutional memorabilia and peek in on several skills classes in progress, including the daunting Asian CuiFOOD 87


ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL OF THE JUST-COMPLETED 32,000-SQUARE-FOOT ANTON PLAZA AT THE CIA.

sine. We then duck into Apple Pie Bakery Café, a relaxed, folksy décor no-reservations restaurant. Open weekdays until 6:30 pm, it serves soup, salad, sandwiches, and baked goods to the breakfast, lunch, and early-dinner crowd. Patrons place orders at a counter and then CIA waiters deliver the food. This low-key atmosphere underscores the fact that along with celebrity alumni such as Sara Moulton (’77, executive chef and television host) and Anthony Bourdain (’78, bestselling food writer and television host) CIA graduates include executive chefs of Burger King and McDonald’s as well as CEO and founder of Chipotle Mexican Grill chain Steven Ells (’90). The remaining four restaurants serve between 150 and 200 patrons per night, he tells me, as we make our way to the oldest—the red-leathered, red-carpeted Escoffier. Featuring classical, multiple-course French cuisine served tableside off guéridons or under plate-cover clouches set down and lifted in unison, it also boasts a wall-size show window set in a yellow-brick arch. I watch enviously as a student expertly fillets a fish, a task that has always flummoxed me. To top off my tour, I meet a companion at the recently redecorated American Bounty Restaurant, specializing in seasonal dishes made from fresh, regional ingredients. I’m especially interested in pm head-of-command Anita Eisenhauser, the first female chef to run a CIA restaurant and touted as culinary revolutionary. Asked her vision, the 38-year-old answers: “To have a modern and dynamic education for the students, meaning I teach them the basics but allow them creativity in making contributions to the menu.” The restaurant’s efficient maitre d’ leads us through the oak-themed club-chair bar to the long, main dining room, where arched floor-to-ceiling windows flanked by stately drapery reveal a courtyard with a simple fountain. A stained-glass window depicting a fall-harvest cornucopia anchors the wall nearest our stand-alone, scotch-plaid banquette. In an adjoining eating area to our rear, tables face a show window, where a few feet away pâtissiers fashion the night’s dessert offerings. From more than 3,000 bottles on hand, all from American vintners, we select Leap Frog, a crisp, dry Napa sauvignon blanc. One of a team of student servers next bids us choose from a basket of artisan breads. Then a trio of cold soups (avocado, melon, and gazpacho) soon appears at our table, courtesy of the chef. We especially delight in the gazpacho, pine nuts providing nuanced flavor. For the next course we split a lobster salad, presented with peaches on a bed of seasonal greens and lightly drizzled in lemon-infused olive oil. My good-tasting entrée of salmon stuffed with spinach and marscapone cheese and poached in a sweet reduction is nicely paired with lightly fried sections of lotus root. My companion’s medallions of lamb (cooked to perfection) wrapped in chicken and accompanied by pureed potatoes is inventive, though less satisfying. Feeling full but not overly satiated, we decide to skip dessert and sample from the cheese cart, featuring artisan offerings from local producers Coach Farm, Old Chatham Sheepherding Company and Sprout Creek Farm. Dried cherries, apricots, grapes and almonds enhance the distinctive tastes of each variety, as do cups of strong coffee. Happy and well served, we exit American Bounty, heading for the parking garage. Above Anton Plaza an orange-wedge moon smiles in the sky like a symbol of hospitality. For more information on classes and dining at the Culinary Institute of America: (800) CULINARY; www.ciachef.edu. 88 FOOD


tastings directory BAKERIES The Alternative Baker “The Village Baker of the Rondout.” 100% Scratch Bakery. Stickybuns, Scones, Muffins, Breads, Focaccia, Tartes, Tortes, Seasonal Desserts featuring local produce, plus Sugar-free, Wheat-free, Dairy-free, Vegan, Gluten-free, and Organic Treats! Cakes and Wedding Cakes by Special Order. We ship our Lemon Cakes nationwide, $30 2-pound bundts. Open Thursday-Monday 8am-6pm; Sunday 8am-4pm. Closed Tuesday and Wednesday. Well Worth The Trip! 35 Broadway, at the historic waterfront district, Kingston. (845) 331-5517 or (800) 399-3589. www.lemoncakes.com.

CATERING Blue Mountain Bistro Catering Co. On and off-premise catering. Sophisticated Zagatrated food and atmosphere in a rustic country setting - wide plank floors, rough hewn beams and a stunning zinc bar. Chef-owner Erickson’s Mediterranean cuisine has garnered praise from Gourmet and New York Magazines to Hudson Valley Magazine (Best Tapas in the Hudson Valley 2004).1633 Glasco Turnpike,Woodstock, NY 12498. www.bluemountain bistro.com. (845) 679-8519.

Claudia’s Kitchen

Pad Thai Catering Delicious, affordable, and authentic Thai cuisine served with authentic Thai hospitality to your group of six or more. Lunch or dinner served in your home by Chef & Owner Nuch Chaweewan. Please call (845) 687-2334 for prices and information.

HOME MEAL DELIVERY Healthy Gourmet to Go (845) 339-7171.www.carrottalk.com. See Vegan Lifestyle in the Whole Living Directory.

PASTA La Bella Pasta Fresh pasta made locally. Large variety of ravioli, tortellini, pastas, and sauces at the factory outlet. We manufacture and deliver our excellent selection of pastas to fine restaurants, gourmet shops, and caterers throughout the Hudson Valley. Call for our full product list and samples. Open to the public Monday through Friday 10am to 6pm, Saturday 11am to 3pm. Located on Route 28W between Kingston and Woodstock. (845) 331-9130. www.labellapasta.com.

RESTAURANTS 23 Broadway A wine-friendly bistro with creative Mediterranean cuisine. Chef Rich Reeve has developed a menu featuring Spanish tapas, fine steaks, fresh seafood and pastas. In a restored historic building with

Aroma Osteria 114 Old Post Road, Wappingers Falls, NY 12590. (845) 298-6790.

Bacchus Celebrating our 28th Year! Enjoy creative cuisine with seafood and Southwest specialties in a casual, relaxed atmosphere. Offering a full salad bar; over 300 varieties of bottled beers, 13 on tap, plus a full wine list. Open Daily. Lunch 11am-4:30pm; Dinner 4:30-10pm. Weekend Brunch, late-night menu, and takeout available. 4 South Chestnut Street, New Paltz. (845) 255-8636.

Beso Located on Main St. in the heart of New Paltz is Beso, formerly The Loft. Spanish for “kiss,” Beso offers casual fine dining by owners Chef Chadwick Greer and Tammy Ogletree. Fresh, modern American cuisine, seasonally inspired by local Hudson Valley farmers. Get cozy in the intimate dining room under skylights and glowing candlelit tables, or sit at the bar for a more casual experience. Housemade pastas like Acorn Squash Raviolis, Hazelnut Crusted Halibut, or Braised Beef Short Ribs. And for dessert, Maple Mascarpone Cheesecake. Private parties, families, children welcome. Open for Dinner 5pm-10pm, 5pm-11pm Fri & Sat, closed Tuesdays, Brunch begins in August. (845) 255-1426 or website: www.beso-restaurant.com.

tastings

Personalized celebrations and weddings, using fresh local ingredients to create delicious and elegant menus. Homemade artisanal breads, Hudson Valley cheese, fabulous appetizers, meat and vegetarian entrées, out-of-this-world desserts. Claudia works one on one to custom design your menu, your party, your wedding or special event. (845) 868-7338 or (914) 475-9695. www.claudias catering.com.

exposed brick walls, brass-top bar, and a glassenclosed, temperature-controlled wine room. This is a casual, cool spot with big, bright, bold flavors, Zagat rated, and a CIA destination restaurant (SoHo and Kingston). Dinner Wednesday through Sunday; Brunch Sunday. www.23broadway.com, 23 Broadway, Kingston. (845) 339-2322.

Catamount Waterside Dining & Bar at Emerson Place Located near Phoenicia and Woodstock, Catamount Waterside Dining & Bar is a great place to experience the beauty of the Catskills while you enjoy mouth-watering food. Dine Waterside and take in the vistas provided by the Esopus Creek and Mt.Tremper as you choose from a menu that includes right-off-the-grill steaks, chops, chicken and fish, homemade pastas with delectable sauces, several dinner-sized salads, and irresistible desserts. The “Cat,” as locals call it, has a full bar including local micro-brews and international wines that can be taken out onto our streamside patio. Join us for dinner & cocktails for a fun and relaxed atmosphere that is children friendly. 5368 Route 28, Mt. Tremper, NY 12457. We are currently open for dinner 5:00 pm Wednesday through Sunday. Panoramic views are also the signature of weddings and banquets, featuring a beautiful outdoor pavilion. For reservations call: (845) 688-2444. www.emersonplace.com.

Catskill Rose Restaurant Four-star dining and catering in a comfortable and elegant dining room with antique art deco bar plus gorgeous gardens and outdoor dining. Chefs and proprietors Peter and Rose draw on years of creative experience to prepare the familiar and comforting to the classical and innovative. Soups and desserts made in-house from scratch. Route 212, Mt. Tremper. (845) 688-7100. www.catskillrose.com.

Cosimo’s on Union Ristorante & Bar The most unique modern Italian Restaurant in Orange County, featuring wood-fired pizza, gourmet

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Italian pasta dishes, and other specialties from our open-air kitchen. Homemade Desserts, Espresso, Cappuccino, Full Bar, Party Rooms on request. Private Wine Cellar Dining; New Expansion; On- & OffPremise Catering; Highly Rated, Zagat’s; Award of Excellence, Wine Spectator; Winner, Best of Hudson Valley 1994-1998; “5-Star Service”–Poughkeepsie Journal. Union Avenue, Newburgh. (845) 567-1556.

The Emerson at Woodstock Now open! The Emerson at Woodstock brings two inspired dining experiences to historic Woodstock. Ricks’ Bistro celebrates Woodstock’s agricultural past with hearty, wholesome dishes in a casual, laid back setting with a jovial bar serving the area’s best local beers, regional wines and created cocktails. The Riseley Room continues the culinary traditions established by the Emerson Inn. Guests enjoy an intimate, elegant setting as they savor meals created by Executive Chef Michel Nischan, a James Beard Award winning author and guest chef on “Oprah.” Open Tues.-Sat. Call for reservations. (845) 679-7500 or www.emersonplace.com.

The French Corner Routes 213 West and 209, Stone Ridge, just minutes from Kingston. Experience Chef Jacques’ menu, which features recipes using ingredients from his native Franche-Comte, France, combined with fresh seasonal products from Hudson Valley farmers. The French Corner dining room and bar are decorated with antiques and artifacts from Eastern France. Families and children are welcome, private dining room available. Dinner Tuesday through Sunday and Brunch Sunday. Closed Monday. (845) 687-0810.

and savor the cuisine and service that the Hoffman House has been providing to their customers for over 27 years. Open Monday through Saturday for lunch and dinner, 94 North Front Street, Kingston. (845) 338-2626.

Joyous Café Is it any wonder that Joyous Café is the most exciting new eating experience in Kingston? Whether it’s Breakfast, Lunch, or Sunday Brunch, the wonderfully prepared food and attentive service are outstanding. Open Monday through Friday 8 am - 4:30 pm Saturday 10 am - 2:30 pm and Sunday Brunch 10 am- 2:30 pm. Serving Dinner evenings of UPAC events. 608 Broadway, in The Heart of Broadway Theater Square, Kingston. (845) 334-9441.www.joyouscafe.com.

Kyoto Sushi 337 Washington Ave, Kingston, NY 12401. (845) 339-1128.

Luna 61 “Best Vegetarian Restaurant.” –Hudson Valley Magazine. “Food is simply delicious, four stars.” –Poughkeepsie Journal. “Imagine spicy Thai noodles, delicate spring rolls, and the best banana cream pie you’ve ever eaten. Join the Culinary Revolution.” –Dutchess Magazine. Luna 61 is relaxed and funky, candlelit tables, cozy, and romantic. Organic wine and beer. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Sunday: 5-9pm. Friday and Saturday: 5-10pm. Now Accepting Credit Cards. 61 East Market Street, Red Hook, NY 12571. (845) 758-0061.

Machu Picchu Peruvian Restaurant Gilded Otter

Hana Sushi Best authentic sushi in the Hudson Valley! Superb Japanese sushi chefs serve the best authentic sushi with extended Dining Area. Sit at the counter or tables and enjoy all your favorites from Chicken Teriyaki and Udon to Yellowtail and Special rolls. Eatin, take-out, and private room is available. Hours: Tuesday-Friday Lunch 11:30am-2:30pm. MondayThursday Dinner 5-9pm. Friday Dinner 5-10pm. Saturday Dinner 4:30-10pm. 7270 South Broadway, Red Hook, NY. (845) 758-4333. www.hana-sushi.com.

The only authentic Peruvian restaurant in Orange County, NY. Family owned and operated since 1990. Serving the community traditional dishes from the mountains and coast of Peru. Trained in Peru, our chefs make authentic dishes come alive. Wine list available. Serving Lunch and Dinner Sunday through Thursday 10am-10pm and Friday and Saturday 10am-11pm. Closed Tuesday. 301 Broadway, Newburgh. (845) 562-6478. www.machupicchu peruvianrest.com.

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A warm and inviting dining room and pub overlooking beautiful sunsets over the Wallkill River and Shawangunk Cliffs. Mouthwatering dinners prepared by Executive Chef Larry Chu, and handcrafted beers brewed by GABF Gold Medal Winning Brewmaster Darren Currier. Chef driven & brewed locally! 3 Main St., New Paltz. (845) 256-1700.

Main Course Four-star, award-winning, contemporary American cuisine serving organic, natural, and free-range Hudson Valley products. Open Lunch and Dinner Tues-Sun, & Sunday Brunch. Wed and Thurs nights, food & wine pairing menu available. Voted “Best Caterer in the Hudson Valley.” 232 Main Street, New Paltz. (845) 255-2600. Visit our Web site at www.maincourserestaurant.com.

Hickory BBQ Smokehouse

Marcel’s Restaurant

Located on historic Route 28 between Kingston and Woodstock, Hickory offers diners Hudson Valley’s finest barbecue and smokehouse cuisine such as ribs, pulled pork, smoked beef, fish and free-range chicken. Whether enjoying your meal by the fireplace in Hickory’s three-star dining room or sipping a cocktail at the wood bar, Hickory’s staff is trained to make you feel as comfortable as you would at home. Hickory also features several vegetarian options, steaks, homemade desserts, happy hour specials, a complete take-out menu, and catering and special events in our private dining room. You can enjoy live music featuring the area’s hottest bands on Friday and Saturday nights. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 743 Route 28 (3.5 miles from NYS Thruway Exit 19). (845) 338-2424. www.hickoryrestaurant.com.

Casual and comfortable dining, warm country inn atmosphere. Price range $13.95 - $32.95. Now offering daily 4-Course Prix Fixe specials starting at $15.95. House specialties : Pate Du Jour, Duck Laprousse Grand Marnier, Coquilles St Jaques, and Filet Tornodos. Marcels is proud to announce it is celebrating 33 years of fine food and service. Check out our web site for our seasonal menu@m arcelrestaurant.net or to check the date on our next jazz night. We have a complete take out menu, and catering is available. We have also recently added a vegetarian menu and a young guest menu. Our hours of operation are Thursday-Monday 5-10pm. Sundays 3-9pm. Located at 1746 Route 9W, West Park, NY. Call (845) 384-6700 to place an order or to make a reservation.

The Hoffman House

Mexican Radio

Located at the corner of the Stockade District in uptown Kingston, the Hoffman House is a National Historic Landmark, which during the 1600s served as a lookout for marauding Indians canoeing up the Esopus. Today, you can enjoy relaxed dining as you warm yourself near a soothing fireplace in winter or outside on patio in summer. Take a step back in time as you dine in one of Kingston’s oldest stone houses

537 Warren St, Hudson, NY 12534. cpmljs@ecoipm.com. (518) 828-7770.

Neko Sushi & Restaurant Voted “Best Sushi” Restaurant by Chronogram readers and rated four stars by Poughkeepsie Journal. Serving lunch & dinner daily. Eat in or Take Out. We offer many selections of Sushi & Sashimi, an exten-

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sive variety of special rolls & kitchen dishes. Live lobster prepared daily. Parking in rear available. Sun.Thurs.12-10pm; Fri. & Sat.12-11pm. Major credit cards accepted. 49 Main Streetin the Village of New Paltz.(845) 255-0162.

Osaka Japanese Restaurant Want to taste the best Sushi in the Hudson Valley? Osaka Restaurant is the place. Vegetarian dishes available. Given four stars by the Daily Freeman. 8 Garden St., Rhinebeck. (845) 876-7338 or (845) 876-7278. Visit our second location at 74 Broadway, Tivoli. (845) 757-5055.

Pastorale Bistro & Bar Eat up, Dress down, in this hip country bistro. High quality, sophisticated cooking that could fit in anywhere says the New York Times. Serving updated bistro classics in a 1760’s colonial. Bar with signature cocktails, lively ambience. Tuesday-Saturday dinner. Brunch & Dinner on Sundays 12-8pm. Summer Patio. Private dining for up to 50. 223 Main Street (RTE. 44), Lakeville, CT 06093. (860) 435-1011.

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Plaza Diner Established 1969. One of the finest family restaurants in the area. Extensive selection of entrees and daily specials, plus children’s menu. Everything prepared fresh daily. Private room for parties & conferences up to 50 people. Open 24/7. 27 New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz. Exit 18 off NYS Thruway. (845) 255-1030.

Roasted Garlic at the Red Hook Inn Elegant environment, comfortable atmosphere, internationally acclaimed chef/owner, the Red Hook ‘Country’ Inn, located in the heart of historic Red Hook/Rhinebeck NY has it all. This 6 room Federal style colonial, built in 1842, offers guests a walk back in time as they enjoy modern amenities including luxury bedding, linens, jacuzzis, fireplaces and wireless internet. The dining room at the Inn, ROASTED GARLIC, features a mixture of French, American and Mediterranean menus with a focus on flavor and affordability. Meet Chef Nabil Ayoub and Hostess Patricia Holden as you enjoy charm, exquisite cuisine and warm hospitality.

Soul Dog Featuring a variety of hot dogs, including preservative-free and vegetarian hot dogs, chili, soup, sides, desserts & many gluten-free items prepared in-house. Open for lunch Mon-Fri 11am-4pm. Redefining the hot dog experience! 107 Main St., Poughkeepsie, NY. (845) 454-3254.

Wasabi Japanese Restaurant 807 Warren Street, Hudson NY, 12534. Open 7 days a week. (518) 822-1888.

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THINK before you

PINK DONATING WISELY DURING BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH OCTOBER CONJURES UP VISIONS OF SHINY RED APPLES, ORANGE JACK-O-LANTERNS, MULTICOLORED FOLIAGE, AND IN HONOR OF BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH, PINK RIBBONS, PINK PENS, AND MORE PINK. BUT WHEN IT COMES TO THE GREEN STUFF, AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION IS THE REAL GOLD STANDARD.

BREAST CANCER HAS BECOME A CHAMPION OF CHARITIES. In October, its adopted color, pink, is everywhere. You can run, walk, bike, climb, even test drive a car “for the cure.” Many retail companies claim to donate a percentage of profits “for the cure,” and numerous charitable organizations raise money for research. For three decades and through many avenues, Americans have generously donated billions of dollars to breast cancer research. Just what has been accomplished? Sadly, we have no cure. What we do have includes more diagnostic equipment, more invasive and expensive procedures, and a higher incidence of breast cancer. From 1950 to 1991 the incidence of breast cancer in the US increased 90 percent. That doesn’t mean there aren’t some dedicated researchers and phenomenal organizations out there doing their best, but the San Franciscobased Breast Cancer Action group urges donors to look beyond the pink ribbon philanthropy and join their Think Before You Pink campaign (www.thinkbeforeyoupink.org). They encourage us to put our money in places that will revolutionize breast cancer research, away from the current focus on screening and treatment, to prevention—which includes looking for causes in places that corporate supporters of “cancer awareness” might not favor. In The Cancer Syndrome, Ralph Moss, a former director of public relations at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, reveals a complex arrangement of interlocking committees and boards of directors between industry and research centers. Big corporations exert substantial influence over cancer funding, research, and advocacy, and some sponsor “awareness” fund-raising. But some, as illustrated here, benefit handsomely from the occurrence of the disease.

THE CANCER INDUSTRY Among the largest donors to cancer research are companies that profit either from its treatment or from selling products that contain carcinogenic chemicals. For example, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation was founded in 1993 by Evelyn H. Lauder, Senior VP of the Estee Lauder Companies, Inc., an international giant in the cosmetics industry. The foundation receives annual donations of a million dollars or more from within its own ranks (Estee Lauder Companies and Clinique, a subsidiary of Estee Lauder Cosmetics). Other donors include pharmaceutical or biotechnology giants like Roche, Aventis, and Genentech, all of which profit from their cancer drugs and treatments. AstraZeneca is another pharmaceutical that donates to Estee Lauder’s Breast Cancer Research Foundation, but it does much more. In fact, the concept of designating October as Breast Cancer Awareness Month was the brainchild of the Zeneca Corporation, as it formerly was known. AstraZeneca pays for and controls all media advertising about the October Breast Cancer Awareness campaign. But there is a conflict of interest between AstraZeneca’s income generating sources and its support of cancer awareness. It produces Nolvadex (tamoxifen), the most widely prescribed breast cancer drug, which in 1994 brought in $470 million, as reported by Monte Paulsen in Mother Jones, and which continues to earn hundreds of millions annually, though it’s being phased out in favor of a different lucrative drug. (The company’s earnings from all oncology drugs in 2004 were $3.4 billion.) Another example: It derived $300 million in 1994 from acetochlor, a carcinogenic herbicide implicated as a breast cancer risk. (In 2000, AstraZeneca sold its herbicide division to Dow Agorsciences.) Furthermore, since the late 1990s, AstraZeneca has bought and managed cancer treatment centers in California, Florida, and New York.

        98 WHOLE LIVING GUIDE


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The focus of the pharmaceutical industry’s research and awareness campaigns are on screening and treatment, not prevention. Less than five percent of the research money spent in this country addresses cancer causes. PUTTING ON A PRETTY FACE Cosmetics companies are among the most visible participants in the fight against breast cancer, garnering an excellent public relations image for this $35 billion industry. It knows well that image is everything. In this case, however, appearances are only skin deep. Health advocates find myriad toxic chemicals, dyes, fragrances, and preservatives in cosmetic and personal care products. Increasingly, these are suspect as health dangers. For example, paraben preservatives (used in many cosmetics, deodorants, and body sprays) mimic the hormone estrogen and have been found to accumulate in the tissue of women with breast cancer. Phthalate plasticizers, found in skin lotions and nail polish, are also hormone mimics, and have been removed from baby toys because of an association with birth defects. The FDA does not regulate the safety of cosmetic ingredients, and very little government or industry funding is designated to study the relationship of environmental toxins to cancer. A 2004 study by the Environmental Working Group, a nonprofit consumer advocacy organization, found that only 18 of 7,500 cosmetics had their ingredients fully tested for safety. The remaining 99 percent had never been fully tested for links to cancer and birth defects. A recent independent report co-sponsored by the Breast Cancer Fund and Breast Cancer Action, “State of the Evidence 2004: What Is the Connection Between the Environment and Breast Cancer?” details new links between environmental toxins and breast cancer. Breast Cancer Action and other advocacy groups believe it is time for the cosmetics industry to replace these toxic chemicals with safer alternatives, and to clearly list all ingredients. After years of pressure, Avon, Estee Lauder’s Mac and Clinique lines, and Procter and Gamble’s Max Factor and Cover Girl lines finally agreed to remove phthalates from their nail polish, but the battle over parabens continues. Breast Cancer Action continues to use media advocacy, public education, grassroots organizing, and shareholder activism to challenge companies like Avon (the largest corporate funder of breast cancer research) to be more candid about how much money is raised and spent, and to finance research on the environmental links to breast cancer. Avon’s Walks for Breast Cancer raise the most money, but costs associated with producing and advertising the events are taken from funds raised by the walkers—something that diminishes the direct application of hard-earned dollars to cancer research, little or none of which will research prevention. 100 WHOLE LIVING GUIDE

DETECTION IS NOT PROTECTION The State of the Evidence 2004 report also found exposure to ionizing radiation to be the most clearly established cause of breast cancer. The American Cancer Society (ACS) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) began promoting mammograms, which use radiation, in the early 1970s as a tool in the war against breast cancer. Today, mammography is AstraZeneca’s focus for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Yet as early as 1976, John Bailar III, then editor of the NCI’s journal, questioned the procedure. “The possible benefits of mammography have received more emphasis in the clinical literature than have its defects,” he said, adding, “mammography may eventually cause more deaths from breast cancer than it prevents.” Little, if any, research has followed up this concern, though it has been endorsed by other medical experts, including John Gofman, MD, PhD, founder of the Committee for Nuclear Responsibility (CNR) and author of Preventing Breast Cancer: The Story of a Major, Proven, Preventable Cause of This Disease; Janette D. Sherman, MD, toxicologist, patient advocate, and author of Life’s Delicate Balance, Causes and Prevention of Breast Cancer; and Samuel S. Epstien, MD, outspoken critic of the cancer industry and author of The Politics of Cancer and the recently published Cancer-Gate: How to Win the Losing Cancer War. Women are urged to get yearly mammograms with the claim that “Early detection is the best protection.” But, if something has been detected, then you have not been protected. There has been much controversy about when women should begin mammography screening for breast cancer. A report in the January 2004 Public Citizen Health Letter showed that screening women aged 40 to 49 resulted in an increase in deaths from breast cancer for the first 10 years after beginning screening, and a significant two-fold increase in breast cancer deaths after three years of screening. Women are not told this. If they are not given this information they cannot make the right choices about their own health. The ACS still encourages women to begin mammograms in their forties, and as early as their twenties for women of high risk, even though mammography is not effective for younger women with denser tissue. Dr. Sherman reminds women that “mammograms do not prevent cancer, they can only find an existing cancer.” Further, the cumulative radiation damage from yearly mammograms increases the risk of developing breast cancer later on. Incidentally, General Electric manufactures all the mammography equipment used in this country (and is heavily invested in the nuclear industry), and DuPont produces all the film. Both companies have been big supporters of the ACS. The ACS advises women with an inherited sensitivity to developing breast cancer (those


with BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutations), to combine annual mammograms with bi-annual clinical breast exams by a trained professional, beginning at age 25, even though these techniques can only find cancers at a relatively advanced stage, by which time malignant cells may already have spread. Two German radiologists from the University of Göttingen now say that women with inherited breast cancer risk should avoid frequent and early mammograms because the low-dose x-ray exposure is nearly three times more likely to cause gene mutation than conventional x-rays. They advise high-risk women to insist on other screening techniques. I clearly recall a panel discussion of experts at the second World Conference on Breast Cancer in 1999 in Ottawa, Canada, at which a young woman asked how ethical is it for women with a predisposition for breast cancer to begin mammography screening at a young age, when further damage from radiation exposure might hasten the onset of the disease. I do not recall her getting a satisfactory answer at that time, though I will never forget the poignancy of her question. Further, mammograms have only a 50 to 75 percent accuracy rate, with many false positives leading to anxiety, stress, overtreatment, and unnecessary medical costs. More frustrating is that many tumors are missed. Not all equipment produces highquality results, and interpretation is subjective. Studies published in 2000 and 2001 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute and in Lancet concluded that mammograms are no better than clinical exams in saving women’s lives. Fortunately, there are other options to mammograms. Ultrasound scans (sonograms) and MRIs are already recommended for women with dense breast tissue because they are more successful than mammography in identifying small tumors. Neither uses radiation, so they are particularly useful for highrisk women and for women who may have a recurrence of breast cancer. Thermography is another option, which can identify suspicious activity much earlier than mammograms. It is an FDA approved technology that uses infrared cameras to produce diagnostic images of temperature variations in tissue. (See “Beyond the Mammogram,” in Chronogram’s June 2005 issue.) THINKING BEFORE PINKING When you reach into your pockets this October, remember that virtually all breast cancer research today supports treatment, not prevention. There is no mention of environmental risk factors from toxic chemicals or of radiation, the best documented cause of breast cancer, in the hype provided by the big corporate sponsors. Dr. Kenneth Olden, Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health

Science (NIEHS), believes there is a need for new thinking in science, and encourages researchers to think outside the box. He reminds us that scientists will research whatever the grant money allows them to study. It is the funding agencies that control what studies receive grants. As individual consumers, we can assist a transition to research that is outside the box, and much needed. Think Before You Pink this October by asking how our donations will be used by cancer charities. What percentage goes to administrative and advertising costs? How much will be used to research the cancer link to toxic chemicals and radiation exposure? What are the links between the foundation you will be supporting and the corporations that promote pollution, whether pollution of the environment or of ourselves? Then donate to those that are leading the way to prevention, which is the real cure. Another choice is to direct your donations locally, to benefit individuals struggling with cancer in our own community. The Oncology Support Program at Kingston’s Benedictine Hospital (845-338-2500) is one example. It provides comprehensive support groups, educational presentations, consultations, and healing arts classes for cancer patients and their families. Hope Nemiroff is executive director of the Mid-Hudson based Breast Cancer Options (845-657-8221; www.breastcancerop tions.org). She reminds people that “breast cancer is not pink and feminine. It is painful, life-threatening, and real.” Her organization offers trained companions to go with patients to medical appointments and to help interpret medical tests and treatment options. It also sells calendars about risk reduction and safer product information ($10) and organizes health conferences covering many aspects of treatment options and environmental links to breast cancer. Breast cancer is a terrifying disease, and it is possible this fear is being exploited by companies that profit from cancer treatment, and by advertising to raise money “for the cure.” Environmental advocates are finally demanding to know how the money is spent, and why there aren’t more studies looking at the cancer link to toxic chemicals and radiation. Cosmetics companies that promote pink-ribbon fundraisers are being challenged to eliminate carcinogenic and mutagenic chemicals from their products. You can do your part by looking more deeply into where your well-intended donations are going, and supporting progress and accountability. Rose Marie Williams, MA, is president of the Cancer Awareness Coalition, Inc., (www.cacinfo.org), a grassroots organization based in New Paltz that is dedicated to raising awareness about environmental pollutants as risk factors for cancer and helping consumers substitute safer products and practices. WHOLE LIVING GUIDE 101


THE TAROT, DIVINATION, AND SPIRITUALITY SEEKING THE HIGHER SELF THROUGH ANCIENT SYMBOLISM

TEXT AND ILLUSTRATION BY ROBERT M. PLACE The Tarot is a deck of cards that can be used as a tool for developing intuition, and it is also more. The cards in a Tarot deck contain symbolic images that express a mystical philosophy, a philosophy that stems from the mentors of Western culture, Pythagoras and Plato, and that has been cherished by mystics and sages over the centuries. The philosophy is expressed not only in individual pictures but in the structure and organization of the deck. Effectively, the Tarot is a map of the spiritual universe, a mandala, divided into separate components but maintaining the pattern through the relationship of each component to another. When this philosophy and structure is understood and the cards are used as an intuitive device, a communication happens between the conscious self and a source of wisdom in the unconscious that I call the Higher Self. Used in this way, the Tarot is like a personal sage that one can converse with whenever guidance is needed. As day-to-day decisions are made from this place of wisdom, using the Tarot becomes a spiritual path. 102 WHOLE LIVING GUIDE

For those who are not familiar with the Tarot I will first describe the deck. The Tarot is a set of playing cards, much like a regular poker deck, but instead of having just four suits, the Tarot has a fifth suit, composed of a procession of 22 enigmatic images. The Tarot also differs in that its four minor suits feature the antique Spanish and Italian suit symbols—swords, cups, staffs, and coins—instead of spades, hearts, clubs, and diamonds, and, with the addition of the knight, it has four royal cards instead of three in each suit. However, it is essentially the addition of the fifth suit with its mysterious figures that makes a deck a Tarot and transforms it into a spiritual tool. This fifth suit is composed of the unnumbered Fool and 21 numbered trumps, some representing humans, such as the Magician and the Pope, and other allegorical or religious figures like the Wheel of Fortune and the Last Judgment. It is the trumps that have captured the modern imagination and account for the Tarot’s popularity and it is through the trumps that the Tarot expresses a timeless mystical philosophy.


Since the late 18th century, occultists have been drawn to the Tarot and have considered it an indispensable part of their magical equipment. To provide it with what they considered to be a suitable ancient pedigree, occultists have made up numerous spurious histories and associations for the deck. Most commonly, it was given an origin in ancient Egypt and said to be the creation of ancient Kabbalists or of Egyptian priests under the guidance of the mythical sage Hermes Trismegistus, a Hellenized version of the Egyptian god Thoth. The 22 cards in the fifth suit were said to derive from Egyptian hieroglyphs but also represent the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet as well as celestial and elemental symbols. Not all of the insights of the occultists were wrong, but these assertions are false. At their worst, the occultists’ associations have become a wall of confusion that blocks many from appreciating the mystical heritage that is preserved in the deck. Historic evidence indicates that the Tarot began in Renaissance Italy sometime between 1410 and 1442, when a set of trumps was added to the already existing four-suit deck. The most likely place of origin is Milan or Ferrara. The trumps, or trionfi, as they were called in Italian, were added to the deck to play a trick-taking game that is the ancestor of bridge. Unlike modern bridge, played with a four-suit deck, the Tarot has a natural trump suit that outranks the other minor suits. Game playing was the Tarot’s main purpose, but there is evidence that it was also used for divination. Because the Tarot was created primarily to play a game, we may think that the allegory told in its pictures is trivial and not worth all the attention that it has been given, but in the Renaissance, even a game was considered a suitable place to express a profound mystical allegory. Our English term “trump” is derived from the Italian trionfi, which was also the name of a type of procession or parade. This parade, called a triumph in English, originated in ancient Rome and was revived in the late Middle Ages. By the Renaissance it had taken on a mystical symbolic character and poets and visual artists commonly made use of its structure as an organizing principle. A triumph began with the character of lowest rank and each succeeding character trumped the one before, until the final trump was reached. In “I Trionfi,” a poem by the famous 14th-century poet Petrarch, we find an allegorical triumph taken to the ultimate mystical conclusion. In Petrarch’s poem, Lust is trumped by Virtue, who in turn falls victim to Death. Death is trumped by Fame, who also falls victim to Time. But, in the end, Time is conquered by the final mystical trump Eternity, which is the immortal realm of the soul and beyond time and death. The Tarot trumps are a related work of art based on the theme of the triumph. The Tarot’s allegory, like Petrarch’s poem, aims at the highest mystical truth. In the Tarot trumps, we find symbols of time (the Wheel of Fortune) and death (the Death card) in the center of the series. The final trump is the World, a mystical vision of the purified soul, represented by a beautiful nude in the center, surrounded by the symbols of the four evangelists—the lion, the bull, the eagle, and the man—which in Christian iconography represent the throne of God. When the soul dances on the throne of God, time and death are conquered. This final card, with its main character in the central position and the symbols of the four evangelists taking the four corners, captures the archetypal structure of a mandala, a map of the sacred world. In the mandala the center is the most sacred position, and the symbols in the four corners represent the fourfold mundane world, which is conquered yet enlivened by the central figure. The entire Tarot deck, with its five suits, embodies this same structure. The trumps are the mystical message of the center and the four minor suits can be associated, like the symbols of the four evangelists, with the four directions, the four seasons, the four elements, the four cardinal virtues, and other manifestations of the fourfold physical world. When this structure is appreciated, the Tarot can be used in divination to speak about every aspect of one’s life. This brings us to the use of the Tarot. The Tarot can be used for teaching and meditation but it is most commonly used for divination. Divination, however, is often misunderstood as fortune telling or predicting the future. I do not feel that foretelling the future is the best use of the Tarot. The root of the word divination is deus, which means God in Latin. Divination more accurately means a communication with the divine or the Higher Self. Instead of predicting the future, a Tarot reading works best when it speaks of the present. It can provide the greater kinds of insight, guidance, and wisdom that come from the Higher Self. Understanding the philosophy of the cards helps the communication and, used in this way, the Tarot helps us to make not only wise decisions but more enlightened decisions. In turn, each decision leads us further on the spiritual path. To learn more about using Tarot as a spiritual growth tool, pick up a deck at a mystical arts store or bookstore and consult Robert Place’s The Tarot: History, Symbolism, and Divination, or catch one of his lectures at Ulster Community College in November and December. For information, go to http://thealchemicalegg.com.

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WHOLE LIVING GUIDE 103


Frankly Speaking BY FRANK CROCITTO

Welcome to the Dance

Mike Dubisch

YOU’LL HEAR PEOPLE TALK SOMETIME ABOUT THE GOOD OL’ DAYS,

you know, when things were simple and there were only three TV networks and kids respected their elders and never used bad language or drugs. But no-stalgia is good-stalgia—and if you think things have gotten worse in the past 40 years, think for a moment how bad it’s gotten over the past 4,000 years. There was a time, for example, when physical movement—the human body in action—was understood to have meaning. It’s the same story with music, and with architecture. Music was once such a high art that you would hear it in a temple. The music of today for the most part bears no resemblance to what it once was, what it once meant. It’s the same story with mathematics and architecture. Mathematics and music were once linked, and you may remember that the architecture of the ancients was sometimes called frozen music. But if most people can recognize the difference between raga and rap, or between the Parthenon and Paramus, we’re generally less aware of this matter of movement. It’s something we take for granted, if looked at in an ordinary way. But if you consider that the human body, which is the perfect expression of the being, the being of the human being, that perfect expression has to move in space on the waters of time. And what it does is to inscribe something that is beautiful, liberated, graceful—or its opposite. Imagine for a moment that you’re a great cosmic cameraman, that you can pull back from your ordinary vision of life and see its movement on a different scale. You’ve seen time-lapse photography of, let’s say, a car driving through the night, with all its lights creating a glowing trail from one edge of the photo to the next. You can take imaginative aim at your life in the same way, and can see it as a single great creature moving from the day you’re born to the day you die. Such a cosmic snapshot would tell the story of your life, and it would be very revealing. For most of us, physical movement is utilitarian. Gestures are for doing things. These gestures become repetitive very quickly—the same gesture, day in and day out. It’s something we hardly pay any attention to. Now here’s something that ancient cultures knew far better than we do—there is power in movement, in gesture, and that power can either liberate or constrict, release or bind. A person can actually move toward liberation or, by performing the old repetitive gestures of everyday, mechanical life can fall into deeper bondage. 104 WHOLE LIVING GUIDE


This bondage can take place within the individual or within the society through which she mechanically roams. Because we witness certain gestures, certain movements in our early days, we are then condemned to take on not only the gesture but the inner life of the gesture. This sort of bondage is the very stuff that people come up against when they decide they want to change their inner lives. But because we’ve been the unwitting victims of a society in which movement has become mechanized, we’re trapped. The change of our inner lives is inextricably linked to a change in the way we move. If we can’t break out of mechanized routines of our physical existence, how do you expect to make an inner change? A person’s gestures, the movement of their body in time and space, leave the kind of traces we mentioned above. Viewed from afar, whether we know it or not, we are dancing through time and space. And the dance is either something lovely or flat-footed. Here’s an example: When I was growing up in Brooklyn, all through my youth and adulthood, over and over again, there was a gesture that I saw everywhere. It’s called a right cross. It’s what my friend Vince used to practice throwing in his days as an amateur fighter. It’s what another Brooklyn boy, a tough guy named Mickey Spillane, used to have his hardboiled detective Mike Hammer throw whenever he got in a fix. You grow up in Brooklyn, you know from right crosses. But consider for a minute what that gesture is just as gesture, what it indicates. It’s a gesture not only of antagonism but separation. It grows out of and feeds on anger. It may appear to hotheads like Mike Hammer (or any Hollywood hero you’d care to name) that it solves a problem, but you know it never does. It short-circuits everything. It’s ugly. And any movie or TV show that doesn’t have a hero with a good right cross was probably made in France. When we think of movement as dance, perhaps this notion of how movement has become as debased as music or architecture becomes more clear. And what could make this everyday, mechanical dance of ours something other than a clumsy, falling-down foxtrot in the Mickey Spillane tradition is if something new enters the picture. First, you need to realize the importance of movement, how it is that what we do with our bodies determines what we will be and what will become of us. Movement that breaks the utilitarian mold constricting our lives has to involve not just the body but the mind and emotions as well. It’s not what we think that’s going to make it possible to change ourselves, nor the way we feel, nor these utilitarian actions. One without the others won’t make any difference in your life, won’t allow you to change. But when all of you is there, when all of you realizes and expresses the harmony of movement that involves all three realms, then something can happen that’s not the same old, same old. Ancient traditions know this very well, which is why the formal manifestation of this knowledge is something we still call sacred dance. When you see sacred dance—take the Sufis’ dervish dancing for example—you see people moving in ways that may appear beautiful but can also seem bizarre, since they involve moving in ways that none of us in our locked-down worlds of mechanical movement have ever thought about, let alone attempted. A person who makes the effort to break the embedded habits of physical movement can begin to escape the dullness of everyday reactivity. After a while something new can set in. A different inner experience can take place that can open up a life to new experience. Your life is a dance, whether you know it or like it or not. Why settle for pratfalls and right crosses when the sublime beckons? Frank Crocitto is the founder and executive director of Discovery Institute in New Paltz.

CENTER FOR POSITIVE THINKING ® The Outreach Division of Guideposts

Founded by NORMAN VINCENT PEALE & RUTH STAFFORD PEALE invite you to tour the Visitor’s Center 66 East Main Street Pawling, N.Y. 12564 For hours and information, please call 855-5000 GROUP TOURS WELCOME

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whole living guide ACUPUNCTURE

AROMATHERAPY

Dylana Accolla, LAc

Joan Apter

Treat yourself to a renewed sense of health and well-being with acupuncture, herbal medicine, Chinese bodywork, and nutritional counseling. My emphasis is on empowering patients by teaching them how to practice preventative medicine. Great for gynecological problems, chronic pain, and managing chronic illness. Two locations: Haven Spa, 6464 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, and Woodstock Women’s Health, 1426 Route 28, West Hurley. (914) 388-7789.

Offering luxurious massage therapy, including Raindrop Technique, with therapeutic essential oils to relieve stress, boost the immune system, and address system imbalances. Natural animal care, individual consultations for a healthy home and personal concerns, spa consultant, classes, and keynotes. Essential Oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, children’s and home cleaning products from Young Living Essential Oils. For more information contact Joan Apter, CMT. (845) 679-0512. japter@ulster.net. www.joanapter. younglivingworld.com.

whole living directory

Acupuncture Health Care, PC Peter Dubitsky, L.Ac., Callie Brown, L.Ac., and Leslie Wiltshire, L.Ac. Mr. Dubitsky is a faculty member and the Director of Clinical Training at the Tri-State College of Acupuncture, and a member of the NY State Board for Acupuncture. Ms. Brown and Ms. Wiltshire each have years of acupuncture experience in private practice and in medical offices. We are all highly experienced, national board certified, NYS Licensed acupuncturists. We combine traditional Asian acupuncture techniques with a modern understanding of acupuncture and oriental medicine to provide effective treatments of acute and chronic pain conditions, and other medical disorders.In addition to our general practice we also offer a Low Cost Acupuncture Clinic which is available for all people who meet our low income guidelines. 108 Main Street, New Paltz, NY 12561, Phone 255-7178

Stephanie Ellis, LAc., Chinese Herbalist Specializing in chronic pain, infertility, digestive disorders, and pediatrics. Now certfied by Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in acupuncture treatment of people with cancer. Many insurances accepted, sliding scale. Evenings, weekends. In Rosendale since 2001, now with a new, expanded location at Rosendale Family Practice, 110 Creek Locks Road, (845) 546-5358.

Hoon J. Park, MD, PC For the past 16 years, Dr. Hoon J. Park has been practicing a natural and gentle approach to pain management for conditions such as arthritis, chronic and acute pain in neck, back, and legs, fibromyalgia, motor vehicle and work-related injuries, musculoskeletal disorders, and more by integrating physical therapy modalities along with acupuncture. Dr. Hoon Park is a board-certified physician in physical medicine and rehabilitation, pain medicine, and electrodiagnostic studies. His experienced, friendly staff offer the most comprehensive and individualized rehabilitative care available. Please call the office to arrange a consultation. New patients and most insurances are accepted. 1772 Route 9, Wappingers Falls, NY 12590. Half mile south of the Galleria Mall. (845) 298-6060.

ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE Judith Youett The Alexander Technique The Alexander Technique is a simple, practical skill that, when applied to ourselves, enhances coordination, promoting mental, emotional, and physical well-being. Improve the quality of your life by learning how to do less to achieve more. Judith Youett, AmSAT. (845) 677-5871.

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ART THERAPY Deep Clay with Michelle Rhodes, ATR-BC, LMSW See Psychotherapy.

ASTROLOGICAL CONSULTING Eric Francis: Astrological Consultations by Phone. Special discount on follow-ups for previous clients from the Hudson Valley. (206) 854-3931.eric@ericfrancis.com. Lots to explore on the Web at www.PlanetWaves.net.

BODY & SKIN CARE Absolute Laser , LLC The leaders in innovative skin care are now offering the Biomedic Facial. A gentle, clinical , deep cleansing facial, for all skin types. Absolute Laser offers commitment to beautiful skin through outstanding care and service. Offering Laser Hair Removal, Microdermabrasion, Vitalize Peel, and Fotofacial RF. The Fotofacial RF is the next generation in high-tech skin enhancement. These gentle, no downtime treatments are used to improve cosmetic appearance of the face, neck, hands, and body. The results are brighter, smoother, more radiant and luminescent skin. This process delivers results that skin care products alone cannot do! Recover and rediscover the youth and vitality of your skin. Call for a complimentary consultation: Janice DiGiovanni, (845) 876-7100. Springbrook Medical Park, Rhinebeck.

Blissful Beauty by Brenda Relax and revive with a professional beauty treatment from Brenda Montgomery, Licensed Aesthetician. Specializing in Burnham Systems Facial Rejuvenation, Belavi Facelift Massage, Anti-Aging facials, Acne treatments, and Body treatments. Also offering airbrushed makeup for a flawless, natural look for your next big event. Your skin is not replaceable; let Brenda help you put your best face forward! Call (845) 616-9818.

Made With Love Handcrafted lotions, crèmes, and potions to nurture the skin and soul! Therapeutic oils, salves, and bath salts made with the curative properties of herbal-infused oils and pure essential oils. No petroleum, mineral oils, or chemicals are used. Host a home party! Products available at Hudson Valley Therapeutic Massage, 243 Main Street, Suite 220, New Paltz. For a full product catalogue e-mail madewithlove@hvc.rr.com or call (845) 255-5207.


BODY-CENTERED THERAPY

CHILDBIRTH

Irene Humbach, CSW, PC

Catskill Mountain Midwifery

Body of Wisdom Counseling & Healing Services. By integrating traditional and alternative therapy/healing approaches, including Body-Centered Psychotherapy, IMAGO Couples’ Counseling, and Kabbalistic Healing, I aim to offer tools for self healing, to assist individuals and couples to open blocks to their softer heart energy, thereby increasing their capacity to cope, create in the world, and love. Offices in Poughkeepsie and New Paltz. (845) 485-5933.

See Midwifery.

Kary Broffman, RN, CH See Hypnotherapy.

Judy Joffee, CMN, MSN See Midwifery.

CHINESE HEALING ARTS Chinese Healing Arts Center

Rosen Method Bodywork Rosen Method is distinguished by its gentle, direct touch. Using hands that listen rather than manipulate, the practitioner focuses on chronic muscle tension. As relaxation occurs and the breath deepens, unconscious feelings, attitudes, and memories may emerge. The practitioner responds with touch and words that allow the client to begin to recognize what has been held down by unconscious muscle tension. As this process unfolds, habitual tension and old patterns may be released, freeing the client to experience more aliveness, new choices in life, and a greater sense of well-being. Julie Zweig, M.A., Certified Rosen Method Bodywork Practitioner. (845) 255-3566. www.RosenMethod.org.

bodhi studio Through bodywork one can connect with the body’s own inherent wisdom and self healing abilities. With skill, intuition, and care, we offer therapeutic massage, bodhiwork, Reiki, warm stone massage, aromatherapy, earconing, and a full range of ayurvedic treatments including Shirodara, Abyanga, and Swedna. Melinda Pizzano, LMT and Helen Andersson, D.Ay. Call for an appointment. (518) 828-2233.

BOTANICA Gypsy Janet Reverend Gypsy Janet has 30 years training and experience in SANTERIA and life long lessons in “Native American Ways” from her father, who is Mohawk. This is NOT your ordinary Botanica/Religious Supply Shop. Gypsy Janet makes unique Hand Crafted one-of-a-kind Spiritual Gifts, Ritual Supplies, Carved and Dressed 7 day candles. The shop is full of many surprises and there are also a Native American, Reggae, and Belly Dancer sections. Gypsy Janet also reads TAROT and TEA LEAVES, she can “Legally Marry” couples in NY State, and loves to personalize and setup your own SACRED ALTAR. New arrival just in time for Halloween: “Dia De Los Muertos” (Day of the Dead) novelties. The shop is located at 100 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, New York. (845) 679-2999.

CHIROPRACTIC Nori Connell, RN, DC Nori combines 28 years as a registered nurse with 18 years of chiropractic experience to offer patients a knowledgeable approach to removing the interferences in the body that lead to disease. She combines accredited techniques such as NeuroEmotional technique, kinesiology, and Network Chiropractic to work with the body’s innate intelligence and its ability for healing. Dr. Connell also offers workshops on natural health care for the family and is also one of the directors of Alternatives Health Center of Tivoli. (845) 757-5555. Also at Rhinebeck Cooperative Health Center. (845) 876-5556.

Dr. David Ness Dr. David Ness is a Certified Active Release Techniques® (ART) Provider and Certified Chiropractic Sports Practitioner® specializing in helping athletes and active people quickly relieve their pain and heal their injuries. In addition to providing traditional ® chiropractic care, Dr. Ness utilizes ART to remove scar tissue and adhesions in order to restore mobility, flexibility, and strength faster than standard treatments will allow. If you have an injury that has not responded to treatment, call Dr. Ness for an appointment today. (845) 255-1200.

Dr. Bruce Schneider New Paltz, New York 12561.(845) 255-4424.

COLON HYDROTHERAPY Connie Schneider, Advanced Level I-ACT Certified Colon Hydrotherapist

CHI GONG/TAI CHI CHUAN

Colon Hydrotherapy is a safe, gentle, cleansing process. Clean and private office. A healthy functioning colon can decrease internal toxicity and improve digestion; basics for a healthy body. New Paltz, NY. (845) 256-1516. See display ad.

Second Generation Yang

COUNSELING SERVICES

Spiritual alchemy practices of ancient Taoist sorcerers yielded these two treasures of internal arts. Chi Gong prepared the body to withstand rigorous training and overcome the battle with time. Tai Chi Chuan became the expression of the energy in movement and selfdefense. These practices have brought health, vitality, and youthfulness to myself and my students. The only requirement is determined practice of the principles and the will to persevere. Call Hawks, (845) 687-8721.

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BODYWORK

The Wu Tang Chuan Kung Association was founded by Doctor Tzu Kuo Shih and his family for the purpose of providing the American public with instruction in the ancient Chinese arts of Tai Chi Chuan, Chi Kung, and traditional Chinese Medicine. 264 Smith Avenue, Kingston. (845) 338-6045 or (203) 748-8107.

Elizabeth Cunningham, MSC Counselor, interfaith minister, and novelist, Elizabeth brings humor, compassion, and a deep understanding of story to a spirited counseling practice for individuals and couples. If you are facing loss, crisis in faith, creative block, conflict in relationship, Elizabeth invites you to become a detective and investigate your own unfolding mystery. 44 Schultzville Road, Staatsburg. (845) 266-4477. E-mail: medb44@aol.com.

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CRANIOSACRAL THERAPY

Healing, Pathwork and Channeling by Flowing Spirit Guidance

Craniosacral Therapy

It is our birthright to experience the abundance of the universe, the deep love of God, and our own divinity! It is also our birthright to share our own unique gifts with the world. We long to do it. So why don’t we? Our imperfections get in the way. As we purify, we experience more and more fully, the love and the abundance of God’s universe. We can have it in any moment. We can learn to purify our imperfections AND experience heaven on earth. Jaffe Institute Spiritual Healing; Pathwork; and Channeling available. Contact Joel Walzer for sessions. (845) 679-8989. www.flowingspirit.com.

A gentle, hands-on method for enhancing the body’s own healing capabilities through the craniosacral rhythm. Craniosacral aids in the release of stressrelated conditions such as anxiety, nervousness, insomnia, depression, digestive, menstrual, and other problems with organ function, breathing difficulties, and headaches. Increase energy, reduce pain, and improve immune system function. Effective for whiplash, TMJ, sciatica, fibromyalgia, scoliosis, arthritis, low back tension, and chronic pain. Also helpful for children with birth trauma, learning difficulties, chronic ear problems, and hyperactivity. Hudson Valley Therapeutic Massage, Michele Tomasicchio, LMT. (845) 255-4832.

DENTISTRY The Center For Advanced Dentistry Bruce D. Kurek, DDS, FAGD; Jaime O. Stauss, DMD Setting the standards for excellence in dentistry for more than 25 years, the Center for Advanced Dentistry attracts clients from throughout the northeast and abroad. Their client-centered approach to providing comprehensive dental services for adults and children includes “old school” care and concern combined with the latest technologies. The office is conveniently located 1.5 miles east of the NYS Thruway, exit 18. 494 Route 299, Highland. www.thecente rforadvanceddentistry.com. (845) 691-5600. Fax (845) 691-8633.

FENG SHUI

One Light Healing Touch: Healer Training School Join us for an empowering, life-changing, six-month, transformational training. This comprehensive program includes: Meditation, Visualization, Sound work, Breath work, Movement, Sacred Ceremony, Essential Grounding and Releasing Practices, and 33 Professional Healing Techniques. School starts September 23, 2005. Free special intro evening: Self-Healing with OLHT August 26 + September 9, 7:00-9:00pm; Special Introductory Weekend: Access Your Healing Potential August 27-28 and September 10 -11. (NYSNA CEU’s available). Ron Lavin, MA, founder and director of the international OLHT schools, is a respected spiritual healer with 26 years of experience. He heads seven OLHT schools in Germany and one in Rhinebeck, NY. He has worked with the NIH in Distance Healing for eight years. Appointments and Distance Healing sessions are available in Rhinebeck, NY. Call (845) 876-0259 or e-mail ronlavin@aol.com. www.OneLightHealingTouch.com.

DeStefano and Associates The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing A quaint healing center in a quiet part of downtown New Paltz. Specializing in Craniosacral Therapy, Stress Point Release through Chiropractic, Swedish & Sports Massage, Shiatsu, and Energetic Reiki. New offerings include meditation and nutritional counseling. 5 Academy Street, New Paltz. Call for an appointment. (845) 255-3337.

HEALTH FOOD

whole living directory

Barbara DeStafano has been the owner of DeStefano and Associates, an interior design business, for 18 years. She received certification in Feng Shui from the Metropolitan Institute of Interior Design and has completed advanced work with several Feng Shui Masters. Feng Shui is the perfect marriage to interior design. It brings a spiritual dimension to your space. Barbara can create a kind of beauty that touches your spirit, and brings balance and harmony to a level that transcends the superficial. Barbara is available for consultations, guest speaker engagements, and workshops. (845) 339-4601.

Pleasant Stone Farm Feng Shui Wei Designing Your Life with Feng Shui. The intuitive practice of Feng Shui balances your individual energy with your home or workplace and harmonizes the effect your surroundings have on all aspects of life: health, wealth, relationship, emotional well-being, mental clarity, peace, self-fulfillment. Sensitive, revitalizing personal and space clearings. Intuitive Feng Shui® certification. Free 15-minute phone consultation. Contact Sharon Rothman: 201-385-5598; www.fengshuiwei.com

Healing By Design Feng Shui consultations, classes. Explore how Feng Shui can increase the flow of abundance, joy, and well-being in your life. Create your home or office to support your goals and dreams. Contact Betsy Stang at bebird@aol.com. or (845) 679-6347.

HEALTH & HEALING

130 Dolson Avenue, Middletown, NY. pleasantstonefarm@usa.net. (845) 343-4040.

HEALTH PUBLICATIONS Hudson Valley Healthy Living A comprehensive directory of Mid-Hudson health services, products, and practitioners, along with articles on health issues of interest. Published biannually (April/October) by Luminary Publishing, Inc., the creators of Chronogram, 50,000 copies are distributed in the region throughout the year. Contents are also available on the Web at www.hvhealthyliving.com. See www.hvhealthyliving.com for advertising rates or call the HVHL sales team at (845) 334-8600.

HEALTHY EATING Cool Cover ™ See Business Directory: Food Serving Products.

Guidance of Spirit, Wisdom of Heart Heart-based Intuitive Healing, Karma Release with Crystals, Space Clearings & Blessings, Long Distance Healings, End-of –Life Transitions, Guided Meditation/visualization.Thursday evenings at 7:30pm. Self healing is a process of self-discovery. Within the space of the heart discover what you need to heal. Kate DeChard M.Ed. The Soul Sanctuary, 6052 B Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY12572.

HERBS Monarda Herbal Apothecary In honoring the diversity, uniqueness, and strength of nature for nourishment and healing, we offer organic and ecologically wildcrafted herbs using tradition as our guide. Certified Organic Alcohol Tinctures, Teas, Salves, Essential Oils, and more. Product Catalog $1. Workshops and Internships. www.monarda.net (845) 688-2122.

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HOLISTIC CENTERS Annette’s Heart and Soul Holistic Center Annette’s Heart and Soul is a non-profit, non-denominational ministry dedicated to helping you heal your heart and soul while enhancing your body. We have some of the most gifted spiritual counselors and body workers, who are fully trained in many areas. We offer fully accredited classes and much, much more. Twice a month we hold “Reunions,” getting in touch with those we have loved and lost. 500 Main Street, Beacon, NY 12508.(845) 440-0724.

HOLISTIC HEALTH Julie Barone Certified Holistic Health Counselor Live with vibrant energy! Whole foods nutrition and lifestyle consulting can help you kick the junk food habit, achieve better health, tune in to your body, and eat well for life. Individual programs are customized to your health goals. Special People Pet Wellness program for you and your pet. Whole foods cooking parties – fun, educational, and delicious! Free consultation. 845-338-4115 julieabarone@yahoo.com www.peoplepetwellness.com

whole living directory

Priscilla A. Bright, MA, Energy Healer/Counselor Specializing in women’s stress, emotional issues, and physical illness, including stress-related anxiety, depression, and physical burnout. Women in transition, businesswomen, mothers, all welcome. Experienced counselor. Faculty, Barbara Brennan School of Healing. Convenient offices in Kingston & New Paltz. Initial phone consultation no charge. (845) 688-7175.

Kary Broffman, RN, CH A registered nurse with a BA in psychology since 1980, Kary is certified in Ericksonian Hypnotherapy, Hypnobirthing, and Complementary Medical Hypnotherapy with the National Guild. She has also studied interactive imagery for nurses. By weaving her own healing journey and education into her work, she helps to assist others in accessing their inner resources and healing potential. Hudson Valley Healing Arts Center, Hyde Park. (845) 876-6753.

INTEGRATED ENERGY THERAPY Integrated Energy Therapy IET heals with the pure energy of SPIRIT and the gifts of the angels. Suppressed emotions, limiting beliefs, and past-life memories are cleared from the Energy Anatomy on a cellular level. Remember and LIVE the true expression of your soul’s purpose. Also combining Spiritual Guidance, IET, and Massage. 15 years experience. Dona Ho Lightsey, LMT, IET Master. New Paltz. www.learniet.com/dona_ho_lightsey.asp. (845) 256-0443.

INTERFAITH MINISTRIES Elizabeth Cunningham, MSC See Counseling Services.

Ione, Director, Ministry of Maat, Inc. Spiritual and Educational organization with goals of fostering world community. (845) 339-5776.

Reverend Kevin Kraft, Interfaith Minister

John Carroll is an intuitive healer, teacher, and spiritual counselor, who integrates mental imagery with the God-given gift of his hands. John has helped individuals suffering from acute and chronic disorders, including back problems and cancer. Remote healings and telephone sessions. Call for consultation. Kingston. (845) 338-8420.

Sacred Intimate Joyful. “Honor Tradition and Have the Ceremony You Want.” Together we develop a meaningful ceremony that expresses who you are while considering sensitive concerns. Personal attention to details ensures your needs are thoughtfully addressed and creates a joyful ceremony expressing your vision completely. Weddings, Unions, Renewals, Rites of Passage, and Spiritual Counseling. Hudson Valley Interfaith Fellowship. 89 N. Front Street, Kingston. (845) 338-8313. E-mail: Kevin@spirittus.org.

Spirittus Holistic Resource Center

JEWISH MYSTICISM/KABBALAH

John M. Carroll, Healer

See Workshops.

HYPNOSIS One-Session Hypnosis with Frayda Kafka Building on my success with smoking cessation in 1978, I have continued to help clients with weight loss, pain, childbirth, stress, insomnia, habits, phobias, confidence, and almost any behavior you can think of… Known for my easy, light manner and quick results, I have an intuitive knack for saying just the right thing at the right time so that a major shift can be initiated. Phone hypnosis, gift certificates, and groups are available. Please call me at (845) 336-4646. Offices in Kingston and Pleasant Valley. info@CallTheHypnotist.com or www.CallThe Hypnotist.com.

HYPNOTHERAPY Achieve Your Goals with Therapeutic Hypnosis Sharon Slotnick, MS, CHt. Increase self-esteem; break bad habits; manage stress; alleviate pain (e.g. childbirth, headaches, back pain); overcome fears and depression; relieve insomnia; improve study habits, public speaking, sports performance; heal through past-life journeys, other issues. Sliding scale. Certified Hypnotherapist and Counselor, two years training Therapeutic Hypnosis& Traditional Psychotherapeutic Techniques. (845) 389-2302. New Paltz, Kingston. See also Psychotherapy.

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Chabad of Woodstock Providing Jewish people from all backgrounds the opportunity to experience the depth and soul of the Jewish teachings and vibrant way of life. Offering Jewish resources, workshops, gatherings, and classes. Rabbi Yisroel Arye and Ilana Gootblatt, co-directors. (845) 679-6407. www.chabadof woodstock.com.

JIN SHIN-JYUTSU Kenneth Davis, CPLT See Psychotherapy.

MASSAGE THERAPY Joan Apter Offering luxurious massage therapy, including Raindrop Technique, with therapeutic essential oils to relieve stress, boost the immune system, and address system imbalances. Natural animal care, individual consultations for a healthy home and personal concerns, spa consultant, classes, and keynotes. Essential Oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, children’s and home cleaning products from Young Living Essential Oils. For more information, contact Joan Apter, CMT. (845) 679-0512. japter@ ulster.net. joanapter.younglivingworld.com.

bodhi studio See Bodywork.


whole living directory

Monarda Herbal Apothecary

CHRONOGRAM

Join us for medicine making and herbal studies in our outdoor classroom along the beautiful Esopus Creek. 2005 Herbal Internships Seasonal Herbal Workshops Weekday & Weekend Sessions Beginning in May 2005 with Jennifer Costa, Herbalist

Monarda Offers: FULL HERBAL PRODUCTS LINE CERTIFIED ORGANIC ALCOHOL TINCTURES PRIVATE CONSULTATIONS

Website Herbal Catalog: www.monarda.net E-mail: monarda@hvc.rr.com (845) 688-2122 PRINTED HERBAL PRODUCTS CATALOG: SEND $1 TO

1305 Old Route 28 Phoenicia, New York 12464

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Hudson Valley Therapeutic Massage Michele Tomasicchio, LMT, specializes in Integrative Massage—incorporation of various healing modalities: Swedish, Myofascial Deep Tissue, Craniosacral, and stretching to facilitate the body’s healing process. A session may include all or just one modality. No fault accepted. Gift certificates available. By appointment only. 243 Main Street, Suite 220 New Paltz. (845) 255-4832.

Shiatsu Massage Therapy Leigh Scott is a licensed Shiatsu Massage Therapist with 20 years experience and a former teacher at the Ohashi Institute in New York City. Leigh uses her skills and knowledge of Shiatsu, as well as Reflexology and Polarity, to give a very satisfying hour-long massage. (845) 679-3012.

MEDITATION Sivananda Ashram Yoga Ranch See Yoga.

Zen Mountain Monastery Offering year-round retreats geared to all levels of experience: introductions to Zen meditation and practice; programs exploring Zen arts, Buddhist studies, and social action; and intensive meditation retreats. South Plank Road, Mt. Tremper. (845) 688-2228.

MIDWIFERY

sity. Call Rhinebeck Cooperative Health Center: (845) 876-5556. www.drfrancescott.com.

NUTRITION Jill Malden, RD, CSW Prominent Nutritionist specializing in eating behavior and eating disorders for 15 years. Warm, nonjudgmental treatment. Understand the effects of nutrition on your mood, anxiety level, cravings, concentration, energy level, and sleep, in addition to body weight. Recover from your eating issues and enjoy a full life! 199 Main Street, New Paltz. (845) 489-4732.

NUTRITIONAL COUNSELING Julie Barone Certified Holistic Health Counselor Live with vibrant energy! Whole foods nutrition and lifestyle consulting can help you kick the junk food habit, achieve better health, tune in to your body, and eat well for life. Individual programs are customized to your health goals. Special People Pet Wellness program for you and your pet. Whole foods cooking parties – fun, educational, and delicious! Free consultation. 845-338-4115 julieabarone@yahoo.com www.peoplepetwellne ss.com

OSTEOPATHY Applied Osteopathy

whole living directory

Catskill Mountain Midwifery, Home Birth Services Give birth as you wish, in an environment in which you feel nurtured and secure; where your emotional well-being, privacy, and personal preferences are respected. Be supported by a tradition that trusts the natural process. Excellent MD consult, hospital backup. (845) 687-BABY.

Homebirth and Gynecology Practice of Judy Joffee, CNM This practice offers a unique and exquisite opportunity for woman care in a powerfully compassionate and sacred manner. I offer complete prenatal care focused toward homebirth. For the nonpregnant woman, individualized gynecological care, counseling, and self-determination await you. Also offering school, work, and general physicals for all ages. Call for consultation. (845) 255-2096.

NATURAL FOODS Sunflower Natural Foods Market At Sunflower we know the food we eat is our greatest source of health. Sunflower carries certified organic produce, milk, cheeses, and eggs; non-irradiated herbs and spices; clean, pure organic products to support a healthy lifestyle; large selection of homeopathic remedies. Sunflower Natural Foods is a complete natural foods market. Open 9am-9pm daily. 10am-7pm Sundays. Bradley Meadows Shopping Center, Woodstock.(845) 679-5361.

NATURAL HEALING Suzanne Meszoly & Associates, Inc. 174 Palentown Road, Kerhonkson, New York 12446. (845) 626-5666.

NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE Naturopathic Medicine Dr. Thomas J. Francescott, ND. Free Your Mind – Release Your Body – Energize Your Spirit! Solve health issues, enhance wellness, and gain awareness. Scientifically proven naturopathic solutions for challenging and/or chronic health concerns. I offer naturopathic expertise in a sacred space to help you feel better. Graduate of the prestigious Bastyr Univer-

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Joseph Tieri, DO, & Ari Rosen, DO. Drs. Tieri and Rosen are New York State Licensed Osteopathic physicians specializing in Cranial Osteopathy. As specialists in Osteopathic manipulation, we are dedicated to the traditional philosophy and hands-on treatment of our predecessors. We have studied with Robert Fulford, DO, Viola Freyman, DO, James Jealous, DO, and Bonnie Gintis, DO, and completed a two-year residency in Osteopathic Manipulation. We treat newborns, children, and adults. 257 Main Street, New Paltz, (845) 256-9884. 138 Market Street, Rhinebeck, (845) 876-1700. By Appointment. For more info call or visit www.applied osteopathy.com.

PHYSICIANS Aruna Bakhru, MD,FACP Dr. Bakhru is board certified in internal Medicine and is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. She also offers energy medicine by measuring the energy flow at the meridians. Herbal, homeopathic, nutritional, or flower remedies can be found, and tailor-made for your individual needs. It takes the guesswork out of spending hundreds of dollars at the health food store with out knowing if the product is helpful to you. Toxic emotions, thought patterns, chakra imbalances, dental issues can be identified and dealt with. Hidden toxins, energetic imprints of past infections, vaccinations, etc. can be uncovered. Poughkeepsie (845) 463-1044.

Women Care Center Empowerment through information. Located in Rhinebeck and Kingston. Massage and acupuncture available. Gynecology—treating our patients through the most up-to-date medical and surgical technologies available, combined with alternative therapies. Obstetrics—working with you to create the birth experience you desire. Many insurances accepted. Evening hours available. Rhinebeck (845)876-2496. Kingston (845) 338-5575.

PILATES Pilates of New Paltz We are a fully equipped studio of certified, experienced, caring instructors with the knowledge to challenge students while respecting their limitations (injury/illness, age, etc.). We are offering a special-


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package price for four introductory lessons and offer small group reformer classes and mat classes. We are open 6 days a week with a very flexible appointment schedule. (845) 255-0559.

PSYCHOLOGISTS James Cancienne, PhD Licensed Clinical Psychologist offering adult psychotherapy and couples counseling. Jungian-based psychotherapy for people in crisis, those with ongoing mental health difficulties, and those wishing to expand their personality and gain greater satisfaction from their relationships and work. Some insurance accepted and sliding scale. Hudson. (518) 828-2528.

Carla J. Mazzeo, PhD Licensed Clinical Psychologist offering psychodynamic psychotherapy for adolescents and adults. I have experience working with trauma, mood disturbances, sexual assault, depression, anxiety, grief/bereavement, eating/body image difficulties, alcohol/substance concerns, teenage problems, relationship difficulties, sexuality issues, or general self-exploration. Dream work also available. New Paltz location. (845) 255-2259. Reduced fee for initial consultation.

Mark L. Parisi, PhD Licensed psychologist. Offering individual psychotherapy for adults. Specializing in gay men’s issues, anxiety, depression, relationship concerns, adjustment, issues related to aging, disordered eating, body image, sexual identity, and personal growth. Medicare and some insurance accepted. 52 South Manheim Boulevard, New Paltz. (845) 255-2259.

Licensed psychologist. Insight-oriented, meaningbased, problem-focused, person-centered psychotherapy for adults and adolescents facing problems including, but not limited to, self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, life transitions, family issues, career concerns, depression, anxiety, loneliness, and bereavement. 199 Main Street, New Paltz. Free initial consultation. Sliding scale. (845) 257-3471.

PSYCHOTHERAPY Kent Babcock, LMSW Counseling & Psychotherapy Development of solutions through simple self-observation, reflection, and conversation. Short- or longterm work around difficult relationships; life or career transitions; ethical, spiritual, or psychic dilemmas; and creative blocks. Roots in yoga, dreamwork, spiritual psychology, and existential psychotherapy. Sliding scale. Offices in Woodstock and Uptown Kingston. (845) 679-5511 x4.

Deep Clay with Michelle Rhodes ATR-BC, LMSW. Individual, couple, parent and child, and group arts-based psychotherapy. “Dreamfigures” Clay Psychotherapy group for women. Expressive clay group and individual sessions for children and teens. A unique, creative, and grounding approach for crisis management, transitions, and deep healing. Sessions in Gardiner and NYC. (845) 417-1369. deepclay@mac.com.

Peter M. del Rosario, PhD Licensed psychologist. Insight-oriented, culturally sensitive psychotherapy for adults and adolescents concerned with: relationship difficulties, codependency, depression, anxiety, sexual/physical trauma, grief and bereavement, eating disorders, dealing with divorce, gay/lesbian issues. 199 Main Street, New Paltz. Free initial consult. Sliding scale. (914) 262-8595.

Rachael Diamond, CSW,CHt Holistically-oriented therapist offering counseling, psychotherapy, and hypnotherapy. Specializing in issues pertaining to relationships, personal growth, life transitions, alternative lifestyles, childhood abuse, codependency, addiction, recovery illness, and grief. Some insurance accepted. Office convenient to New Paltz and surrounding areas. (845) 883-9642.

Eidetic Image Therapy A fast moving, positive psychotherapy that gets to problem areas quickly and creates change by using eidetic (eye-DET-ic) images to promote insight and growth. The eidetic is a bright, lively picture seen in the mind like a movie or filmstrip. It is unique in its ability to reproduce important life events in exact detail, revealing both the cause and solution of problem areas. Dr. Toni Nixon, EdD, director. Port Ewen. (845) 339-1684.

Amy R. Frisch, CSWR Psychotherapist. Individual, family, and group sessions for adolescents and adults. Currently accepting registration for It’s a Girl Thing: an expressive arts therapy group for adolescent girls, and The Healing Circle: an adult bereavement group offering a safe place to begin the healing process after the death of a loved one. Most insurances accepted. Located in New Paltz. (914) 706-0229.

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Jonathan D. Raskin, PhD

Deep Clay Art and Therapy

Irene Humbach, CSW, CBT See Body-Centered Therapy.

Ione Author and psychotherapist: Qigong, Meditation, Hypnotherapy, and Dreams. Specializing in the creative process. Healing retreats, Local and Worldwide. (845) 339-5776.

Judith Blackstone, MA Subtle Self Work is a transformative practice integrating nondual spiritual realization, psychological healing, and awakening the energy/light body. Private sessions for individuals and couples, weekly classes, monthly meditation retreats, teacher/certification trainings. Judith Blackstone, MA, author of The Enlightenment Process and Living Intimately, director of Realization Center, Woodstock. www.Realization Center.com. (845) 679-7005.

Debra Budnik, CSW-R Traditional insight-oriented psychotherapy for long- or short-term work. Aimed at identifying and changing self-defeating attitudes and behaviors, underlying anxiety, depression, and relationship problems. Sliding scale, most insurances accepted, including Medicare/Medicaid. NYS-licensed. Experience working with trauma victims, including physical and sexual abuse. Educator on mental health topics. Located in New Paltz, one mile from SUNY. (845) 255-4218.

Martin Knowles, LCSW Taking a systemic approach to well-being and relationships for over 20 years, Martin Knowles works with individuals, couples and families in Uptown Kingston. His effective, down-to-earth style amplifies and encourages natural talents and resources, bringing out the best in each of us. 845-338-5450, ext. 301.

Elise Lark, LCSW, LMT Acorn Hill Healing Arts SYNtegration Therapy utilizes acupressure point and muscular releases, sensation awareness, active imagination, and body-centered dialogue to explore physical symptoms, behavioral patterns, and inner conflicts. Fast-acting, highly effective, it will give you the practical tools, insight, and direction needed to move forward in your life, now. Olivebridge. (845) 657-2516.

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Dr. Nancy Rowe, PhD, CET Heart Centered Counseling & Expressive Arts Therapy Emotional healing for children and adults using talk, imagery, sandplay, expressive arts, and/or movement. Background in transpersonal psychology, play therapy, family therapy, spiritual guidance, authentic movement, and expressive arts therapy. Offices in Woodstock and Kingston. Call Nancy, Call (845) 679-4827. www.wisdomheart.com.

that is surrounded my the Catskills’ pastoral beauty. Individually-tailored treatments are created by the European-trained staff who are skilled at delivering virtually all the Emerson Spa’s 40+ treatments. Men and women alike will enjoy the personalized attention they receive while enjoying experiences such as Ayruvedic Rituals, Aromatherapy Massage, DeepTissue and Four-Hand Massage, Hot Stone Therapy and Detoxifying Algae Wraps. Call (845) 688-1000 or visit our website at: www.emersonplace.com.

Change Your Outlook, Heal, and Grow Sharon Slotnick, MS, CHt.

SPIRITUAL

With combination of “talk” therapy for self-knowledge and hypnotherapy to transform negative, self-defeating thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Faster symptom relief. Feel better and make healthier choices. Sliding scale, Certified Hypnotherapist and Counselor. (845) 389-2302. New Paltz, Kingston. See also Hypnotherapy.

Richard Smith, CSW-R, CASAC Potential-Centered Therapy (PCT) alters thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that block growth. A psycho-dynamic approach incorporating NLP, EMDR, and hypnosis, PCT resolves addictions, trauma, limiting beliefs, and destructive behaviors. Twenty years experience and a gentle spirit guide you through an accelerated process of profound healing. Gardiner.(845) 256-6456. richardsmith csw@earthlink.net.

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Judy Swallow, MA, TEP Integrative body/mind therapist using Rubenfeld synergy and psychodrama in her work with individuals, couples, groups, and families. Inquire for workshops and training, as well as therapy. New Paltz. (845) 255-5613.

See Body-Centered Therapy.

Healing, Pathwork and Channeling by Flowing Spirit Guidance It is our birthright to experience the abundance of the universe, the deep love of God, and our own divinity! It is also our birthright to share our own unique gifts with the world. We long to do it. So why don’t we? Our imperfections get in the way. As we purify, we experience more and more fully, the love and the abundance of God’s universe. We can have it in any moment. We can learn to purify our imperfections AND experience heaven on earth. Jaffe Institute Spiritual Healing; Pathwork; and Channeling available. Contact Joel Walzer for sessions. Call (845) 679-8989 or visit our website at: www.flowingspirit.com.

Ione Egyptian Mysteries, Scarab Teachings™, Journeys to Sacred Sites. (845) 339-5776.

New York Region Pathwork Wellspring Evolutionary coaching using movement and breath to access and clear lifelong patterns and transform relationships. Rodney and Sandra Wells, certified by Gay and Kathlyn Hendricks. (845) 534-7668.

Julie Zweig, MA Verbal Body-Centered Psychotherapy utilizing doctoral level training in psychology and 15+ years of experience as a therapist, as well as the principles of Rosen Method Bodywork, but without touch. See also Body-Centered Therapy. New Paltz, New York. (845) 255-3566.

REBIRTHING Susan DeStefano Heart-centered therapy for healing the body, mind, and emotions. Improve relationships, release the past, heal the inner child through personal empowerment.(845) 255-6482.

SCHOOLS & TRAINING Institute of Transpersonal Psychology ITP is an accredited graduate psychology school offering clinical and nonclinical certificates, MA and PhD degrees. The curriculum combines mind, body, and spiritual inquiry with scholarly research and self discovery. Graduates have strong clinical skills and can communicate in a variety of complex relational circumstances. (650) 493-4430. itpinfo@itp.edu. www.itp.edu.

SHIATSU Leigh Scott See Massage Therapy.

SPAS & RESORTS The Spa at Emerson Place The Emerson Spa is open! This Asian-inspired design invites guests into an oasis of relaxation

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Bioenergetics/Hands-On Healing, Irene Humbach, CSW, CBT

The Pathwork is a way of life, a community of seekers, a school, and a philosophy. It is based in a profound set of teachings channeled over a 30-year period by Eva Pierrakos that show a way to live in this world with complete inner freedom and happiness. Learn more at Pathworkny.org, or (845) 688-2211.

Spirittus Holistic Resource Center See Workshops.

STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION Hudson Valley Structural Integration Structural integration is a form of soft tissue manipulation based on the lifelong work of Dr. Ida P. Rolf. It is a process-oriented whole systems approach that seeks to improve one’s health and vitality by balancing the body and re-establishing appropriate relationships. Benefits include feeling lighter, more energy, greater freedom of movement, relief from chronic pain, and positive psychological effects. We offer a safe place for exploration and work with sensitivity and compassion. Krisha Showalter and Ryan Flowers are certified practitioners of the KMI method. Rhinebeck,(845) 876-4654.

TAROT CARD READING Tarot Card Reading Need some direction in your life? Have a question that needs to be answered? Call Melissa for a confidential tarot card reading. Melissa is available for solo readings as well as private and corporate parties. Call Melissa today at 845-728-8474. Reasonable rates.

Tarot-on-the-Hudson Rachel Pollack Exploratory, experiential play with the Tarot as oracle and sacred tool, in a monthly class, with Certified Tarot Grand Master and international Tarot author Rachel Pollack. All levels welcome. Tarot Readings in person or by phone. Appointment/Info: rachel@ rachelpollack.com.(845) 876-5797. Rhinebeck. Also see ad.


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THERAPY Toni D. Nixon, EdD Therapist and Buddhist Practitioner Offering a unique combination of techniques that integrate therapeutic goals & spiritual practice. The basic principles of Buddhism and psychotherapy are concerned with the goal of ending human suffering. Both paths to liberation are through greater self-awareness, a broader view of one’s world, the realization of the possibility of freedom, and finding the means to achieve it. In essence, effective psychotherapy moves toward liberation, and Buddhist practice is therapeutic in nature. Eidetic Image therapy is a unique and powerful method that encourages the liberation of the mind and spirit from obstacles that block the way to inner peace. Specializing in life improvement skills, habit cessation, career issues, women’s issues, & blocked creativity. By phone, online, and in person. (845) 339-1684. www.eidetictherapy.com.

VEGAN LIFESTYLES

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Andrew Glick Certified Holistic Health Counselor/ Vegan Lifestyle Coach The single most important step an individual can take to help save the planet’s precious resources, improve and protect one’s health, and to stop the senseless slaughter of over 50 billion animals a year...is to Go Vegan. What could make you feel better about yourself than knowing you are helping the planet, your own health, and the lives of countless animals all at the same time? If the idea is daunting and seems undoable to you, then let your personal Vegan Lifestyle Coach take you through steps A to Z. Whether you’re a cattle rancher eating meat three times a day or a lacto-vegetarian wanting to give up dairy, it’s a process that can be fun, easy and meaningful. You can do it easily with the proper support, guidance and encouragement from your Vegan Lifestyle Coach. (845) 679-7979. andy@meatfreezone.org or www.meatfreezone.org. See display ad.

Healthy Gourmet To Go Try our colossal coconut macaroons dipped in dark chocolate or our delectable pan-seared cornmeal crusted homemade seitan cutlets over rosemary smashed potatoes with mushroom gravy. From oldfashioned home cooking with a new healthful twist to live/raw foods and macrobiotics, HGTG has dishes to please every palate. Weekly Meal Delivery right to your door. Organic, vegan, kosher. Baby Registry. Gift Certificates. Catering. www.carrottalk.com. (845) 339-7171.

WEDDINGS & COUNSELING Reverend Kevin Kraft, Interfaith Minister See Interfaith Ministries.

WORKSHOPS Back to Basics at “The Barn” Life Transformational Metaphysical Workshop Series begins August 5 in Gardener. Set in idyllic location - 130-year old renovated barn abutting Shawangunk Mountains, Author, Hand Analyst/Life Coach shares joyous process of Evolving Consciously. Discover your Life Purpose/Life Lesson through your unchangeable Soul Goal hidden in your unique fingerprint patterns! To register for this workshop, call (845) 256-1294 or visit our website at www.terrasoleil.com/workshops.

tion, monthly Nutrition, Astrology, and Reiki Study groups. We have a private healing room offering Reiki, Counseling, Hypnotherapy, and CranioSacral Therapy. We provide access to a holistic library, holistic referral network, and the holistic gift shop. 89 North Front Street, Kingston, New York. Visit our website at: www.spirittus.org or call (845) 338-8313. Kevin@spirittus.org.

StoneWater Sanctuary See Holistic Wellness Centers.

WOMEN’S GROUPS Honoring the Soul with Adele Marcus, LCSW-R, ACHT See Psychotherapy.

WOMEN’S HEALTH Women’s Health & Fitness Expo womensexpo@hotmail.com. (845) 338-7140.

WORKSHOPS Free Introductory Session to In Search of Your Myth Have you ever asked yourself, “Why can’t I really change?” What is the lens through which I see the world? What is inadvertently repeated within? Your perception of life is with you from birth and sets up the patterns you repeat indefinitely. They take form as something so unquestionable that you fuse with them and name them “myself.” These interpretations which you take as facts are distorted experiences that are called your myth. The work of *KAIROS is about the discovery of your myth and uplifting the quality of your life thereafter. KAIROS YOGA OF TRANSFORMATION weekend personalized workshops integrate several fields of knowledge: psychological astrology, contemplation, theater, art, mythology and yoga. The KAIROS work is not something you do, it is something you live. KAIROS: The Yoga of Transformation offers a FREE Introductory Session of In Search of Your Myth on Sunday, October 9, 2-5pm. *KAIROS means the quality of the moment. Learn more at our website www.kairosyoga.com or call Glen Wild Yoga Center (845) 436-0122.

YOGA Jai Ma Yoga Center Offering a wide array of Yoga classes, seven days a week, from Gentle/Restorative Yoga to Advanced. Meditation classes free to all enrolled. Chanting Friday evenings. New expanded studio space. Private consultations and Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy sessions available. Gina Bassinette, RYT & Ami Hirschstein, RYT, Owners. New Paltz. (845) 256-0465.

The Living Seed Sivananda Yoga offered five days a week. Serve, Love, Give, Purify, Meditate, Realize–Sivananda. 521 Main Street (Rte. 299, across from Econo Lodge), New Paltz. (845) 255-8212.

Satya Hudson Valley Yoga Center Satya Hudson Valley Yoga Center is located in the heart of Rhinebeck village, on the third floor of the Rhinebeck Department Store building. We offer classes for all levels, 7 days a week. There is no need to pre-register: we invite you to just show up. For more information, visit www.hudsonvalleyyoga.com or call (845) 876-2528.

Sivananda Ashram Yoga Ranch Spirittus Holistic Resource Center The Spirittus Holistic Resource Center is a healing environment where people gather to explore Spirituality, Health, and Holistic Living. Each month we host 25 + workshops. Weekly medita-

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77 acres of rolling hills and woodlands. Breathtaking views, hiking, and cross-country ski trails, organic garden, swimming pond, and sauna. Daily Sivananda Ashram Schedule of Yoga Asanas, Pranayama, and Meditation. Year-round Yoga vacations. Weekend Workshops on health, Yoga, and meditation.


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Karma Yoga residential programs. Yoga Teachers Training, September 7-October 5. Founded in 1974 by Swami Vishnu-Devananda. Woodbourne, NY. (845) 436-6492. YogaRanch@Sivanan-da.org or www.sivananda.org/ranch.htm.

Yoga on Duck Pond

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Grounded in the alignment of the inner and outer body, yoga can reduce your stress, reshape your body, recharge your mind. “Working with Donna is a spiritual and physical adventure for me. I experience a renewed sense of well-being, increased mobility, clarity of mind, and a natural diet adjustment. She is helping me change my life.” –Carlo Travaglia, sculptor. Donna Nisha Cohen, director and certified instructor, over 20 years experience. Stone Ridge. Classes Sunday through Friday. Call for times, and information on pre-natal and private sessions. (845) 687-4836.

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business directory ACTING

ART SUPPLIES

Sande Shurin Acting Classes

Catskill Art & Office Supply

Revolutionary new acting technique for Film/Stage/ TV. The book: Transformational Acting...A Step Beyond, Limelight Editions. The technique: Transform into character using current emotions. No recall. No forward imagining. Shurin private coaches many celebrities. The classes: Thursday eves. at 7pm, Woodstock. Master classes at the Times Square Sande Shurin Theatre. (917) 545-5713 or (212) 262-6848.

Traditional fine art materials, studio furnishings, office products, journals, cards, maps, and gifts. Creative services, too, at all three locations: photo processing, custom printing, rubber stamps, color copies, custom picture framing, and full-color digital output. Pushing the envelope and creative spirit for over 20 years. Woodstock store: (845) 679-2251; Kingston (845) 331-7780; Poughkeepsie (845) 452-1250.

ANTIQUE RESTORATION

Manny’s

Antique Clock Repair and Restoration Specializing in Grandfather clocks, Tubular chime clocks, European, Atmos and Carriage Clocks, Antique Music boxes. Pickup and delivery. House calls available. Free estimates. One year warranty. References available. For appointment call Ian D.Pomfret at (845) 687-9885 or email idp1@verizon.net.

ARCHITECTURE

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DiGuiseppe Architecture

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Inspired, Sensitive, and Luxurious…these are the words that describe the quintessential design work that is DiGuiseppe. The firm, with Design Studios in Accord, New York City, and Boca Raton, provides personalized Architecture and Interiors for each and every client. Whether the project is a Sensitive Historic Renovation, a Hudson Valley Inspired Home or Luxurious Interiors, each project receives the attention of the firm’s principal, Anthony J. DiGuiseppe, AIA RIBA, an internationally published architect and award-winning furniture designer. Accord (845) 687-8989, New York City (212) 439-9611 diarcht@msn.com, www.diguiseppe.com.

ART CENTERS The Living Seed

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The Living Seed Yoga Center offers Sivananda Yoga classes 7 days a week. All levels and ages welcome. Morning meditations are free. Yoga Day 2nd & 4th Sundays. Sauna. Art Gallery. Dance. Drum. Workshops. And so much more. Serve, Love, Give, Purify, Meditate, Realize Sivananda. 521 Main St. (Route 299) New Paltz (845) 255-8212. ww.thelivingseed.com.

Since 1962, big city selection and small town service have made Manny’s special. We offer a full range of art materials, custom picture framing, bookmaking supplies, and the best selection of handmade and decorative papers north of Manhattan. Manny’s, it’s more than just an art store. 83 Main Street, New Paltz. (845) 255-9902.

R & F Handmade Paints Internationally known manufacturer of Pigment Sticks and Encaustic paint right here in the Hudson Valley. Stop in for a tour of our factory, get paints at discounted prices, sign up for an Encaustic or Pigment Stick workshop, or check out bi-monthly exhibits in the Gallery. Open MondaySaturday 10am-5pm. 506 Broadway, Kingston. (845) 331-3112. www.rfpaints.com.

ART THERAPY Deep Clay Art and Therapy with Michelle Rhodes ATR-BC, LMSW See Psychotherapy in Whole Living Guide.

ATTORNEYS Law Offices of Andrea Lowenthal pllc Offices in Hudson and Manhattan, serving individuals and businesses throughout the Hudson Valley and New York City. Estate Planning (wills and trusts) and Elder Law (planning for you or your aging relatives), Domestic Partnerships (for GLBT families), Family Matters, Business Formations and Transactions, and Real Estate. Intelligent and sensitive approach to your personal and business legal matters. Please call 518-671-6200 or 917-301-6524, or email Andrea@LowenthalLaw.com

Schneider, Pfahl & Rahmé, LLP

Develop your creativity and learn the art of clay in a small Saturday class for adults with any experience level. Classes are taught by Doris Licht in a large, working pottery studio with gas kiln. Learn handbuilding, wheelthrowing, decorating, glazing, and kiln firing. Visit the showroom by appointment. Phone:(845) 679-5620.

Manhattan law firm with offices in Woodstock, provides legal services to individuals, institutions, professional firms, companies, and family businesses. Specific areas include: Real Estate, Estate Planning, Corporate, New Media and Arts, and Entertainment Law. Each matter is attended to by a senior attorney who develops a comprehensive legal plan with the client. (845) 679-9868 or (212) 629-7744. See website www.nycrealestateattorneys.com or www.schneiderpfahl.com.

ART GALLERIES

AUTOMOTIVE

Van Brunt Gallery

Roberti Motor Cars

Exhibiting the work of contemporary artists. Featuring abstract painting, sculpture, digital art, photography, and video, the gallery has new shows each month. The innovative gallery Web site, www.vanbruntgallery.com, has online artist portfoliosand videos of the artists discussing their work. 460 Main Street, Beacon, NY 12508. (845) 838-2995.

Specializing in previously owned SAABs. Over 150 pre-owned SAABs in stock at all times. Authorized SAAB service center. Large selection of new and used SAAB parts available. Prices range from $1,500 to $25,000. All cars warranteed bumper to bumper. (845) 339-SAAB. 385 Foxhall Avenue, Kingston, NY. www.roberti.com.

ART CLASSES Ceramic Classes


BEVERAGES Esotec Now Located in Tech-City Kingston, NY. Choose Esotec to be your wholesale beverage provider. For 20 years we’ve carried a complete line of natural, organic, and unusual juices, spritzers, waters, sodas, iced teas, and iced coffees. If you are a store owner, call for details or a catalog of our full line. sales@esotecltd.com. or www.esotecltd.com. (845) 336-3369.

Leisure Time Spring Water Pure spring water from a natural artesian spring located in the Catskill Mountains. The spring delivers water at 42oF year-round. The water is filtered under high pressure through fine white sand. Hot and cold dispensers available. Weekly delivery. (845) 331-0504.

BOOKSTORES Barner Books Used books. From kitsch to culture, Thoreau to thrillers, serious and silly. We have the books you read. Monday - Saturday 10-7pm, Sunday 12-6pm. Located at 69 Main Street, New Paltz, NY. (845) 255-2635. E-mail: barnerbk@ulster.net.

The Golden Notebook A feast for book lovers located in the heart of Woodstock, we are proud to be a part of Book Sense: Independent Bookstores for Independent Minds. In addition to our huge database, we can special order any book in or out of print. Our Children’s Store located right next door has an extensive selection of books and products exclusively for the under-14 set. We also carry the complete line of Woodstock Chimes. 25-29 Tinker Street, Woodstock. (845) 679-8000, fax (845) 679-3054. thegoldennotebook@hvc.rr.com. www.goldennotebook.com.

Mirabai of Woodstock

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The Hudson Valley’s oldest spiritual/holistic bookstore, providing a vast array of books, music, and gifts that transform, renew, and elevate the spirit. Exquisite statuary and other art works from Nepal, Tibet, Bali. Expert Tarot reading, astrological charts/interpretation available. 23 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock. (845) 679-2100. www.mirabai.com.

CARPETS / RUGS Anatolia Tribal Rugs & Weavings Direct importers since 1981–Natural-dyed Afghan carpets; Balouchi tribal kilims; Russian sumaks; antique Caucasian carpets; silk Persian sumaks; Turkish kilims. Hundreds to choose from 2’x3’ to 9’x12’. Kilim pillows, $20-$55. We encourage customers to try our rugs in their homes without obligation. Open 6 days a week 12-6pm. Closed Tuesdays. MC/Visa/AmEx. 54G Tinker Street, Woodstock.(845) 679-5311.

CHILDREN’S ART CLASSES The School for Young Artists An Extraordinary Art Experience! The School for Young Artists provides you with the tools, materials, instruction and support to achieve your goals. Our studio is about the joy of learning and the power of making art. Classes and individual sessions for children and adults. Call Kathy Anderson (845) 679-9541.

CINEMA Upstate Films Great International Cinema. Contemporary & Classic. 26 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-2515. www.upstatefilms.com.

CLOTHING Haldora Haldora, a family name from Iceland meaning Goddess of the Mountains. Haldora designs a lifestyle in women’s clothing and scarves— styles which are timeless, understated, and have a forgiving elegance. She designs and cuts her own line, then sends it to her seamstress where it is sewn locally in New York State. Her fabrics are mostly natural, including many kinds of silk, linens, and cotton in many colors, with wool added in winter. Also at Haldora, you will find other complimentary lines. In season, she has wool, cotton, and cashmere sweaters, which include Margaret O’Leary and Kincross Cashmere. Haldora carries a full line of Hanro of Switzerland undergarments and sleepwear. Shoes are also important to finish your look. Some of the lines carried are Arche, Lisa Nading, and Gentle Souls. Haldora also carries jewelry in a wide range of prices. Open Daily. 28 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, New York. (845) 876-6250. www.haldora.com.

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COLLEGES Dutchess Community College Dutchess Community College, part of the State University of New York (SUNY) system, was founded in 1957. The College offers an educational policy of access, quality, opportunity, diversity, and social responsibility. DCC’s main campus in Poughkeepsie is situated on 130 scenic acres with facilities that are aesthetically pleasing and technologically advanced. The College has a satellite campus, Dutchess South, in Wappinger Falls, and learning centers in Carmel, Staatsburg, and Pawling. (845) 431-8020. www.sunydutchess.edu.

Mount Saint Mary College An independent liberal arts college offering more than 30 undergraduate programs; graduate programs in business (MBA), education, and nursing; and noncredit courses. 2,500 women and men. Its beautiful campus overlooks the Hudson River and is conveniently located off I-84 in Newburgh. (845) 569-3222. www.msmc.edu.

CONSIGNMENT SHOPS Past ‘n’ Perfect A quaint consignment boutique that offers distinctive clothing, jewelry, shoes, and accessories, and a unique variety of high quality furs and leathers. Always a generous supply of merchandise from casual to chic, contemporary to vintage, with sizes from infant to adult. Featuring a diverse and illuminating jewelry collection. Open Tuesday to Friday 10am-5pm, and Saturday 10am-4pm. Conveniently located at 1629 Main Street (Route 44), Pleasant Valley, NY–only 9 miles east of the Mid-Hudson Bridge. (845) 635-3115. www.pastnperfect.com.

The Present Perfect

business directory

Designer consignments of the utmost quality for men, women, and children. Current styles, jewelry accessories, and knickknacks. Featuring beautiful furs and leathers. Open Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm, and Sunday 12-5pm. Located at 23G Village Plaza, Rhinebeck, NY 12572. (845) 876-2939.

COSMETIC & PLASTIC SURGERY M. T. Abraham, MD

HOLIDAY! An Annual Advertising Supplement in the November and December Issues of

Chronogram

Facial Plastic, Reconstructive & Laser Surgery, PLLC. Dr. Abraham is one of few surgeons double board certified and fellowship trained exclusively in Facial Plastic Surgery. He is an expert in the latest minimally invasive and non-surgical techniques (Botox™, Restylane™, Thermage™, Photofacial™), and also specializes in functional nasal surgery. Offices in Poughkeepsie, Fishkill, & Rhinebeck with affiliated MediSpas.(845) 454-8025,www.NYfaceMD.com.

CRAFTS Crafts People Representing over 500 artisans, Crafts People boasts four buildings brimming with fine crafts, the largest selection in the Hudson Valley. All media represented, including sterling silver & 14K gold jewelry, blown glass, pottery, turned wood, kaleidoscopes, wind chimes, leather, clothing, stained glass, etc. Open Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday 10:30am-6pm. 262 Spillway Road, West Hurley. (845) 331-3859.

DANCEWEAR First Street Dancewear First Street Dancewear in Saugerties, NY offers quality dancewear for Adults and Children. We have dancewear, knit warm-ups, ballet, jazz, tap shoes, gymnastics wear, skatewear, accessories, and gift items. We also feature a line of women’s active wear clothing suitable for Yoga and Pilates. Phone (845) 247-4517. www.firststreet dancewear.com.

DESIGN Actionpact Solutions Actionpact Solutions is your premiere, award-winning, full-service graphic, Web, and multi-media design firm located in Kingston, New York. We offer fresh, fun, and functional advertising and design solutions for businesses of all sizes. Make a pact for action and contact us today for your free consultation! Call (845) 532-5398 or email support@ actionpactsolutions.com.

Bluebird Artworks Studio Get your ugly mug on one of our beautiful ceramic mugs. Let Bluebird design for you. We can create elegant and efficient websites, clean business cards, effective print ads or just create a great logo. Visit

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the studio of multimedia artist Jonathan James. Use his web & graphic services. Buy a gift mug, a freeform crochet hat or a fine oil painting by artist Dahlia Nichols. A small studio with big ideas. 8 Tinker Street, Woodstock, behind Walkabout. (845) 679-4659. BluebirdArtworks.com or email mrwander@gmail.com.

DISTRIBUTION Chronogram Is Everywhere! Have you ever noticed that wherever you go, Chronogram is there? That’s because our distribution is so damn good. We can distribute your flyer, brochure, business card, or publication to over 800 establishments in Ulster, Dutchess, Columbia, Greene, Putnam, and Orange counties and now with new stops in Peekskill, Westchester County. Call us at (845) 334-8600 x107 or e-mail distribution@chronogram.com.

DIVORCE SERVICES Lois M. Brenner See Attorneys.

EDITING Manuscript Consultant See Literary.

EVOLUTION Discovery Institute To Know. To Understand. To Be. Offering intensive training in a living school of psycho-transformism in the tradition of G.I. Gurdjieff. (845) 255-5548. discover@bestweb.net.

FAUX FINISHES Faux Intentions

FINANCIAL SERVICES

business directory

Cat Quinn, professional decorative artist, setting the standard for excellence in Custom Faux Finishes for your home and business. With infinite possibilities, your walls, floors, ceilings, fireplaces and furniture can be transformed using my faux finishing techniques. A full spectrum of decorative finishes using plasters, glazes and many other mediums, help to fill your home full of your unique personality and spirit. Don’t miss the beauty and exhiliration of transforming the rooms you live and work in every day into spaces that reflect your sense of style. Portfolio showing a phone call away. (845) 532-3067.

Center for Financial Wellness, Inc. I don’t sell anything! I help you become financially independent – retire early, reduce your taxes, build an investment portfolio, do work that you love, get out of debt! Robin Vaccai-Yess, Certified Financial Planner™, Registered Investment Advisor, Fee-Only. Visit www.financiallywell.com to receive my free E-newsletter and to register for workshops. (845) 255-6052. www.financiallywell.com.

FOOD SERVING PRODUCTS Cool Cover™ CoolCover™ keeps food cool, fresh and visible for hours using patentpending air flow design. Perfect for entertaining at home, indoors and outdoors. CoolCover™ can be tipped back into stable, upright position for easy self serving. Clear, durable, food safe polycarbonate protects food from insects and pets. Great for everyday use as practical tool for healthy eating. No ice. 15 7/8” L x 11 7/8” W x 5 5/8” H. Price - $34.99. www.coolcover.us 800-601-5757.

FRAMING Catskill Art & Office See Art Supplies.

Manny’s See Art Supplies.

GARDENING & GARDEN SUPPLIES Blue Mountain Gardens Ulster County’s newest garden center specializing in unusual annuals, proven perennials, shrubs and vines and located next to Beyond The Pail, a fine gift store offering accessories for the gardening lifestyle. 3524 Rt. 32 North, Saugerties. Open daily 9am-6pm. (845) 246-6978.

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Mac’s Agway in Red Hook/New Paltz Agway Specializing in all your lawn and garden needs. We carry topsoil, peat moss, fertilizers, organics, grass seed, shavings, straw, fencing, pet food, bird seed, bird houses, and more. Mac’s Agway, 68 Firehouse Lane, Red Hook, NY (845) 876-1559; New Paltz Agway, 145 Route 32N, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0050. Hours for both locations: Monday-Friday 8am5:30pm; Saturday 8am-5pm; Sunday 9am-3pm.

Unlock the potentials of your site, home, or office to foster greater harmony, prosperity, spirit, health, and ecological integrity. Services include: Architecture, Planning, Commercial Interiors, Professional Seminars and Consultations. E-mail: ecoarchitect@hvc.rr.com or see www.JanusWelto nDesignWorks.com. (845) 247-4620.

HOME FURNISHINGS & GIFTS

The Phantom Gardener

White Rice

At Phantom we provide everything you need to create and enjoy an organic, beautiful landscape. Our dedicated and knowledgeable staff will help you choose from an unbeatable selection of herbaceous or woody plants, garden products and books. We offer professional design, installation, and maintenance services. Visit us! Rhinebeck, NY. 9am – 5pm daily. (845) 876-8606.www.thephantom gardener.com. See display ad.

531 Warren St, Hudson, NY 12534. (518) 697-3500. shaunwr03@aol.com.

GIFTS Earth Lore Walk into a World of Wonder: Amethyst and citrine geodes; Quartz crystal clusters, spheres, and obelisks; Moldavite and meteorite pendants; Designer jewelry from Amy Kahn Russell; Peyote Bird and WatchCraft; a dazzling array of Baltic Amber; a Thai rain drum from Woodstock Percussion; a sterling silver Buddha from Bali; fossilized salt lamps from the Royal Polish salt mines; tabletop fountains of Italian marble. These and other exotic Gifts from around the globe at Earth Lore. 2 Fairway Drive in Pawling, N.Y. Open Tues. thru Friday, 10 am-6 pm; Sat,10-5.

HORSEBACK RIDING LESSONS Frog Hollow Farm English riding lessons for adults and children. Solar-heated indoor, large outdoor, cross-country course, extensive trails. Summer camp, boarding, training, and sales. Emphasis on Dressage as a way of enhancing all horse disciplines. Holistic teaching and horse care. 572 Old Post Road, Esopus. (845) 384-6424. www.dressageatfrog hollowfarm.com.

Green Heron Farm, Inc. We offer riding instruction to children and adults beginner through advanced all year round in a safe, fun environment with qualified instructors. We also offer summer day camp for children. We are located 3 miles from the center of Woodstock. 446 John Jay Road. For more information call (845) 246-9427 or visit us at www.greenheronfarm.com.

HOUSE ORGANIZING

business directory

Sapphire The newly opened Sapphire is a unique gift shop like none other. Featuring handmade quality gifts of pottery, stained glass, jewelry, wooden bowls, bags, prints, cards, and home accents made by American and Hudson Valley artisans. Located in downtown Rosendale, Sapphire is open Monday, Thursday & Friday: 2-7:30pm, Saturday: 12-7:30pm, and Sunday: 12-5pm. Closed Tues. & Wed. 415 Main Street, Rosendale. (845) 658-3315. sapphireskyllc@ hvc.rr.com.

House Organizing

GLASSBLOWING

Barbara DeStafano has been the owner of DeStefano and Associates, an interior design business, for 18 years. She received certification in Feng Shui from the Metropolitan Institute of Interior Design and has completed advanced work with several Feng Shui Masters. Feng Shui is the perfect marriage to interior design. It brings a spiritual dimension to your space. Barbara can create a kind of beauty that touches your spirit, and brings balance and harmony to a level that transcends the superficial. Barbara is available for consultations, guest speaker engagements, and workshops. (845) 339-4601.

Glassblowing.com The glassblowing.com studio offers Beginner Workshops in both Glassblowing and Beadmaking. Lee Kind has been teaching glassblowing since 1990 and has the ability to make this hot medium safe for anyone to try. In addition to teaching, Lee creates a line of “one of a kind” lamps and lighting installations for both homes and businesses. For more information call (845) 297-7334 or www.glassblowing.com.

HAIR SALONS

Do you own your stuff or does it own you? Take back your home! Joyous hands-on support in de-cluttering given by an experienced teacher. Contact April Lynn Sponaugle, MS. (845) 795-5189. Free Consultation.

INTERIOR DESIGN DeStefano and Associates

INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDERS

Trends Hair Design Trends is a cutting-edge hair design center offering New York City styles at Hudson Valley prices, specializing in modern color, cut, and chemical techniques for men and women. Waxing and nail services available. Open Tuesday through Friday, 9am to 7pm; Saturday, 10am to 3pm. Gift certificates available. 29-31 West Strand, Kingston. (845) 340-9100.

Hudson Valley Internet

HOME DESIGNS

Webjogger

Eco-Arch Design Works Janus Welton, AIA, BBEI An award-winning design architect, offering over 15 years of Traditional Chinese Feng Shui expertise to her Ecological and Healthy Building Design Practice: combining Building Biology, Solar Architecture, and Feng Shui to promote “Inspiring and Sustainable” environments for the 21st Century.

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Local Internet access and commercial Web site hosting. Fast, reliable, easy to use, flexible pricing…Want more? How about: free software, extra e-mail, K56Flex support, personal web space, helpful customer service, and no setup charges. (845) 255-2799.www.hvi.net.

Blazing fast broadband Internet access. Featuring symmetrical bandwidth, superior personal attention and technical support, rock-solid security and reliability, and flexible rates. Complementary services include e-mail, Web hosting, accelerated dialup, server collocation and management, and customized networking solutions. Webjogger is a locally grown company with offices in Tivoli and Kingston. (845) 757-4000. www.webjogger.net.


LITERARY Bethany Saltman The long winter is the perfect time to get to work on your writing. I am a professor of writing & literature/ professional writer & editor who is available to help with your writing projects. I have over a decade of experience working with teens, grad students, professionals and editors. Call for a free consultation: (845) 688 -7015.

Magnetic North Studio Attention musicians - win one free day in our recording studio. To enter - email info@magnocd.com. All entries receive $50.00 discount toward studio time. Experienced recording, mixing, mastering, editing. Complete CD/DVD packages in any quantity. Magnetic North Studio - vintage analog warmth with digital precision. (845) 247-0113 www.magnocd.com

WVKR 91.3 FM Submit to Chronogram Seeking submissions of poems, short stories, essays, and article proposals. Accepting pieces of all sorts. With SASE, send submissions to Chronogram, 314 Wall Street, 2nd floor, Kingston, NY 12401. info@chronogram.com or check out our web site:www.chronogram.com.

Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. A listener-supported, non-commercial, student-run, alternative music station. Programming is provided by students and community members, and includes jazz, new music, folk, hip hop, polka, new age, international, blues, metal, news, and public affairs programming. WVKR Web casts at www.wvkr.org. (845) 437-7010.

Ione

MUSIC LESSONS

Writing workshops and private instruction for writers. (845) 339-5776.

Guitar and Bass Lessons

MAGAZINES Chronogram The only complete arts and cultural events resource for the Hudson Valley. Subscribe and get the lowdown first. Whether you live in the Hudson Valley or just visit, you’ll know what’s going on. Send $36 for yearly subscription to: Chronogram, 314 Wall Street, 2nd floor, Kingston, NY 12401. info@chronogram.com. www.chronogram.com.

MEDIATION & CONFLICT RESOLUTION A unique mediation practice for couples going through divorce, or families in conflict, with the innovative, combined services of two professionals. Josh Koplovitz has 30 years as a Matrimonial & Family Law Attorney, and Myra Schwartz has 30 years as a Guidance Counselor. This male/female team can effectively address all your legal and family issues. Use our one-hour free consultation to find out about us. (845) 331-0100.

Rodney Wells, CFP, Member AFM & NYSCDM If you’re separating, divorcing, or have issues with child support, custody, or visitation, choose mediation. On average, mediated agreements are fulfilled twice as often as litigated court decisions and cost half as much. I draw on my experience as a financial planner, psychotherapist, and pro se litigant to guide couples in a responsible process of unraveling their entanglements, preserving their assets, and creating a satisfying future. Cornwall, New Paltz, and NYC. (845) 534-7668. www.mediateddivorce.com.

MUSIC

NURSERIES See Landscape Products & Services.

PAINTING Professional Painting Co. Hire the best for residential and commercial painting. Our skilled staff uses quality materials and combines the necessary resources to complete each job to your satisfaction. Painting improves the appearance of your residence, protects your investment, and increases its value. Call Trevor at (845) 430-1290 or (845) 679-4232.

PERFORMING ARTS

business directory

Pathways Mediation Center

Guitar lessons: all levels and ages welcome. Electric or acoustic. Pop /rock / folk. Learn to play your favorite songs. Develop strength and co ordination. Learn music theory. Songwriters: move beyond generic chords. Lessons in your home or mine. Minnewaska / New Paltz area. Bibi Farber (845) 626-7944. www.bibifarber.com.

Powerhouse Summer Theater/ Lehman-Loeb Gallery Vassar College Box 225, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604. (845) 437-5902. befargislanc@pop.vassar.edu.

PERSONAL ASSISTANTS Personal Assistant Office and personal assistant more than able to provide full-spectrum support. Intelligent, dependable, industrious, discreet long-term resident can handle it all. Plan a travel itinerary or a dinner party? Organize a wardrobe or a year’s worth of accumulated clutter? Bring order to chaos? No problem. Treat yourself. Free yourself. Your style is my objective. Contact lucabra@earthlink.net or phone (518) 945-3311.

PET SERVICES & SUPPLIES

Burt’s Electronics Good music deserves quality sound! Avoid the malls and shop where quality and personal service are valued above all else. Bring Burt and his staff your favorite album and let them teach you how to choose the right audio equipment for your listening needs. 549 Albany Avenue, Kingston. Monday through Friday 9am-7pm; Saturday 9am-5pm; and Sunday 12pm-4pm. (845) 331-5011.

Drums of Woodstock The ultimate source for all your jammin’ needs. Check out our diverse collection of Djembe, Dun Dun, Conga, Bougarabou Drums, Didgeridoos, Rain Sticks, Chimes, and Hand-Held Musical Instruments. 77 Tinker Street, Woodstock, New York 12498. (845) 810-0442. www.drumsof woodstock.com.

Pussyfoot Lodge B&B The Pioneer in Professional Pet Care! Full house-petplant-sitting service, proudly serving three counties for 32 years. Experienced, dependable, thorough, and reasonable house sitting for your pets’ health and happiness. Also offering a cats-only resort with individual rooms. Extensive horticulture and landscaping knowledge in addition to domestic and zoo animal experience. Better Business Bureau Metro NY/Mid-Hudson Region Member. (845) 687-0330.

PET SITTING Why have your dog spend its day in a kennel, when it can stay comfortably at home and I’ll take care if it for you. Pine Bush, Walden, Newburgh, Middletown. (845) 406-8932.

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PHOTOGRAPHY

RESTAURANT SUPPLIES

France Menk Photography & Photodesign

Cool Cover ™

A fine art approach to your photographic and advertising requirements. Internationally exhibited. Major communications/advertising clients. My work is 100% focused on your needs. www.photocon.com. (845) 256-0603.

See Food Serving Products in the Business Directory.

SAILBOAT SALES & INSTRUCTION Great Hudson Sailing Company

Michael Gold Artistic headshots of actors, singers, models, musicians, performing artists, writers, and unusual, outlandish, off-the-wall personalities. Complete studio facilities and lighting. Creative, warm, original, professional. Unconditionally guaranteed. www.michaelgoldsphotos.com and click on to the “Headshots” page. The Corporate Image Studios, 1 Jacobs Lane, New Paltz. (845) 255-5255.

Purchase a new Beneteau sailboat from us and receive 20 hours of free instruction. We have sales offices in Mamaroneck and W. Haverstraw, NY. Our sailing school also offers sailing lessons in private or group sessions in three locations: W. Haverstraw, Kingston, Jersey City. Phone (800) 237-1557. www.greathudsonsailing.com.

SCHOOLS

Andy Wainwright

Anderson School

Creative photography of artwork, architecture, people, and products. Grant proposals require outstanding 35mm slides to be successful, and your web site can be improved with fresh and imaginative images. The impact of a stunning postcard/announcement should never be underesrtimated. Andy possesses cutting edge digital skills and 28 years of experience exceeding the client’s expectations. Spectacular lighting, all the tools, and an impassioned interest in your goals. Take a look: andywainwright.com. (845) 757-5431.

Anderson School is an educational residential community, serving children and adults (ages 5-21) with autism and related developmental disabilities, in Staatsburg, New York. Education and residential programs are designed to foster continuous growth, independence and social interaction. Students are accepted year-round. Funded by NYS Dept. of Education, OCFS and OMRDD. Contact Kate Haas (845) 889-4034 x534 or visit www.andersonschool.org.

Hudson Valley Sudbury School

business directory

Michael Weisbrot Studio Wedding Photography. Color and Archival, Museum-quality, B&W Photography. Customized packages. I’m an experienced professional whose work combines sensitivities of an artist with storytelling skills of a photojournalist. General commercial freelance. Studio and location. Portraits, Theatre. Custom B&W darkroom work. Exhibition Printing. Call for prices, samples, and appointment. mandm8377@usadatanet.com or (845) 338-0293.

PLUMBING & BATH

A radically different form of education based on the belief that children are driven by a basic desire to learn and explore. We trust that children, given the freedom, will choose the most appropriate path for their education. Our democratic School Meeting expects children to take responsibility for their lives and their community. Year-round admissions. Sliding-scale tuition. www.hudsonvalley school.org. (845) 679-1002.

High Meadow School

PRINTING SERVICES

Pre-kindergarten through 8th grade, committed to a child-centered education that engages the whole child. Intimate, nurturing, with small class size and hands-on learning. A program rich in academic, artistic, physical, and social skills. Fully accredited. Route 209, Stone Ridge, NY. Call Suzanne Borris, director. (845) 687-4855.

New York Press Direct

Maria’s Garden Montessori School

At NY Press Direct we exist for one reason - to delight our customers! What does that mean to you? Worry-free shopping for all your printing and fulfillment needs. Our solutions are leading edge in the industry. Our pricing is among the most competitive in the northeast region. Call John DeSanto or Larry Read for more information. (845) 457-2442.

Cultivating independence, confidence, compassion, peace, and a lifelong love of learning. Serving children 3 years through first grade in a one-room country schoolhouse surrounded by gardens, woodlands, and streams. 8:30 am-3:30 pm, with part time options for preschoolers. Half or full day kindergarten. Affiliated with the American Montessori Society. 62 Plains Rd., New Paltz, New York 12561. (845) 256-1875. info@mariasgarden montessori.com.

N & S Supply 205 Old Route 9, Fishkill, NY 12524. (845) 896-6291. cloijas@nssupply.com.

PUBLISHERS Monkfish Book Publishing Company Monkfish publishes books that combine spiritual and literary merit. Monkfish books range from memoirs to sutras, from fiction to scholarly works of thought. Monkfish also publishes Provenance Editions, an imprint devoted to elegant editions of spiritual classics. Monkfish books are available at your favorite local or online bookstores, or directly from us. Rhinebeck, NY. www.monkfishpublishing.com. (845) 876-4861.

Mountain Laurel Waldorf School

REAL ESTATE

Woodstock Day School

Willow Realty Willow Realty is a small, personalized Real Estate Agency in Ulster County, New York. We have access to all the properties in the Multiple Listing Service, but high-pressure tactics are not part of our sales kit. We have extensive experience in buyer agency and new construction. We listen to you!!! New Paltz. (845) 255-7666.

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At the Mountain Laurel Waldorf School, not only can all students do their best in academic basics, they can find and achieve a balance in rich programs of drama, speech, Spanish, Russian, painting, music, creative writing, woodwork, and more. Waldorf Education: for the head, heart, and hands. Nursery-8th Grade. 16 South Chestnut Street, New Paltz. Call Judy Jaeckel. (845) 255-0033.

Woodstock Day School, a state-chartered, independent school and member of NYSAIS, providing quality education for pre-school through high school students since 1972. Small classes and a 6:1 student-to-teacher ratio allow us to give each child the individualized consideration necessary for a positive learning experience. PO Box 1, Woodstock. (845) 246-3744. www.woodstockday school.org.


STONEWORK See Landscape Products & Services.

TATTOOS Pats Tats Since 1976, Pat Sinatra and her team create custom, one-of-a-kind tattoos in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere. Excellent portraits, tribal, gothic, Oriental, Americana, and realism. Gray, black, and color. Appointments are advised. Walk-ins available Tuesdays and Fridays. More than just a mark, it’s an experience! 948 Route 28, Kingston, NY 12401. (845) 338-8282. pat_sinatra@yahoo.com.

WEB DESIGN Actionpact Solutions See Design.

HDS Internet See Internet Service Providers.

Karen Williams Design Your creative solution... concept to completion. Web design, maintenance, domain registration and hosting for $80 per year for sites under 50MG. All sites are custom made for your individual needs. Free estimates.www.karenwilliams design.com. (845) 883-9007.

Curious Minds Media Inc. Want a website that works for you? We’ve got solutions to fit any budget, and we understand the needs of small businesses. Flash, E-commerce, database applications. CMM has what it takes to get you results. Mention this ad and receive 3 months FREE hosting! www.curiousm.com. Call now tollfree, at (888) 227-1645.

business directory

WEB DEVELOPMENT

WINE In Good Taste 45 Main Street, New Paltz, NY. (845) 255-0110. ingoodtaste@ verizon.net.

WRITING WORKSHOPS Wallkill Valley Writers Creative writing workshops in New Paltz led by Kate Hymes, poet and educator. Aspiring and experienced writers are welcome. WVW provides structured time, a supportive community and a safe place for you to fulfill the dream of writing your stories, real or imagined. Many writers find the community of a workshop benefits their work and keeps them motivated. (845) 255-7090. khamherstwriters@aol.com.

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the forecast

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FAMILY LIFE ON EARTH Strolling through Paris one evening a few years ago, my companions and I came across the most incredible art exhibit. Hung on the wrought-iron fence of the Luxemburg Gardens were the oversized, gorgeous aerial photos of Yann Arthus-Bertrand, from his series “Earth From Above.” Arthus-Bertrand spent a year shooting multifarious locations across the globe—Amazon rainforest, Asian steppes, African desert, Yankee Stadium—and then mounted public exhibitions of his work, accompanied by text examining the environmental problems of each locale. This month photographer Uwe Ommer brings a project of similar scope to BRIK Gallery in Catskill. Armed only with a Landrover, Rolleiflex camera, portable studio, one assistant, maps and guidebooks but without a phone, a GPS system, any spare parts, or a watch, Ommer visited 130 countries, traveling over 180,000 miles interviewing and photographing 1,000 families. The result, “1,000 Families,” is a collection of 1,000 life-size photographs, first exhibited in Cologne in 2000. Remarks by the subjects on their hopes and dreams for their families accompanied the show and were published along with the photos in 1000 Families: The Family Album of Planet Earth (Taschen). For the Catskill exhibition, 120 of Ommer’s photos will be on display in an outdoor space adjacent to BRIK Gallery through October 30. BRIK Gallery, 473 Main Street, Catskill. (518) 943-0145. —Brian K. Mahoney 138

Pres de Diffa, Niger, Uwe Ommer

EVENT LISTINGS FOR OCTOBER 2005

the forecast

the forecast


calendar SAT 1 ART ArtsWalk 2005 Call for times. Columbia County Council on the Arts Gallery, Hudson. (518) 671-6213.

Catskills Crafts, Catskills Colors 2-5pm. GCCA Mountaintop Gallery, Windham. (518) 734-3104.

Tivoli Street Painting Festival

Helen Avakian

9am-6pm. Village of Tivoli. 757-4279.

8-11pm. Acoustic, alternative, folk, original. Beech Tree Grill, Poughkeepsie. 471-7279.

Pumpkin Festival 9am-5pm. Barton Orchard, Poughquag. 227-2306.

Open House and Farm Tour 10am-3pm. Wisner Farms Dairy and Winslow Therapeutic Center, Warwick. 344-1234.

Tour of Unique Homes

2-5pm.. Sculpture. Morrison Gallery, Kent, CT. (860) 927-4501.

10am-3pm. Sponsored by Friends of Historic Rochester. The Museum, Accord. 687-9998. $20/$25 non-members.

Unearthed Opening

Used Book Sale

Peter Woytuk Opening

4-6pm. A celebration of sculptural and functional ceramic arts. Catskill Mountain Foundation Art Gallery, Hunter. (518) 263-4908 ext. 211.

Group Show Opening 4-8pm. Madelbaum, Moor, & Carlson. (914) 388-4630.

Blow Ups Opening 5-7pm. Large photographs by Robert Lipgar. Keegan Ales Brewery and Gallery, Kingston. 331-Brew.

Sentient Animals Opening 5-7pm. New encaustic paintings by Jan Harrison. The Gallery at R & F, Kingston. 331-3112.

Totems/Reliquaries Opening

Painted Stories Opening 5-8pm. Works by Stacey Flint. Gallery at Work, Kingston. 331-5057.

Contemporary Art Jewelry and Sculpture 5-9pm. Both Studio and Gallery, Kingston. 331-2976.

Visions of Glory Opening 5-10pm. Group show. Farfetched Gallery, Kingston. 339-2501.

Modern Day Opening 6-8pm. New artwork by Rodney Alan Greenblat. BCB Art, Hudson. (518) 828-4539.

Revel: An Art Affair With Flair 6:30-10pm. Silent auction, art, open bar, music. Women’s Studio Workshop, Rosendale. 658-9133.

CLASSES Soil Science 10am-12:45pm. 6 sessions. IES Continuing Education Program, Millbrook. 677-9643.

Perennial Garden Design Primer 10am-2:30pm. IES Continuing Education Program, Millbrook. 677-9643.

DANCE Belly Dancing by Sarah Bell 2pm. Arlington Street Fair, Poughkeepsie. (914) 874 - 4541.

English Country Dance 8-11pm. Lesson at 7:30pm. Hurley Reformed Church, Hurley. 679-8587.

Free-Style Frolic 8:30pm. Barefoot, Substance & Smoke free. Knight of Columbus Hall, Kingston. 658-8319. Adults $5/Teens, Seniors $2/ Children, Volunteers Free.

Quaker Fair 10am-4pm. Crafts, games, books, food, drink. Friends Meeting House, Cornwall. 565-8210.

Farm Fest ’05 10am-5pm. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. (518) 828-4417. $5.

Dillon’s Day 11am. Benefit for Dillon’s family. Red Hook Elks Club, Red Hook. 706-8273.

Adoption Day at the Catskill Animal Sanctuary 12-4pm. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447.

7th Annual Street Fair 12-7pm. Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie. 437-5831.

Grand Opening Baby Grand Café 3pm. Coffee, books, music. Baby Grand Café, Warwick. babygrandcafé.com.

Cocktail Along the Canal 5-8pm. Lock 16, Delaware & Hudson Canal, High Falls. 687-9311. $50.

Klezmer Summit: Hankus Netsky and Michael Alpert 9pm. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048.

Roomful Of Blues 9pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 8551300.

Thunder Ridge 9pm. Country rock. Hickory Smokehouse BBQ Restaurant, Kingston. 338-2424.

Big Kahuna 10pm. Dance, rock. Ramada Inn Newburgh, Ramada. 564-4500.

Ellison Starr 11pm. Alternative, folk, original, rock, singer/songwriter. Oasis, New Paltz. 255-2400.

THE OUTDOORS Brace Mountain Call for times. Strenuous hike. Call for meeting place. 462-0142.

Iron Mine Walk Harriman State Park 8am. 8-mile moderate hike. Parking Lot at McDonalds, Wappingers Falls. 876-4534.

Mushroom Walk 9am. Locust Grove, Poughkeepsie. 454-4500.

Shingle Gully/Ice Caves 9am. 5-mile strenuous hike. Call for meeting place, Ellenville. 532-9303.

FILM

North Lake Hike

Stranger: Bernie Worrell on Earth

10am. 5-mile moderate hike. Beach parking lot in North Lake. 635-5187.

5:30pm. Woodstock Film Festival. Woodstock Town Hall, Woodstock. 679-4265. $10.

Abortion Diaries & Speak Out: I Had an Abortion 7:30pm. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448. $6 / $5 / $8.

Mohonk Preserve Singles Hike – Bonticou Crag 10am-3pm. 7mile hike with rock scrambling. Meet at the Spring Farm Trailhead, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SPOKEN WORD

KIDS

Poetry Reading By Marilyn Reynolds

Dining with Dragonflies

4pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

10am. Museum of the Hudson Highlands, Cornwall. 534-5506 ext. 204.

MUSIC Mark Raisch 7-8pm. Jazz, swing, vocals, American Standards. Eisenhower Hall Theatre, West Point. 938-2782.

Eradicate and Testament 7:30pm. Heavy metal. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966.

Kurt Henry Band 7:30-10:30pm. Alternative, bluegrass, folk, fusion, reggae, world. Stone Ridge Center for the Arts, Stone Ridge. 687-8890.

Vassar College Women’s Chorus and Choir 8pm. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7404.

Frank Kimbrough & Joe Locke

EVENTS

8pm. Vibes & piano. North Pointe Cultural Arts Center, Kinderhook. (518) 758-9234.

It Takes a Village to Raise a Child

Northern Lights

Call for times. Anderson School Gala. Mid-Hudson Civic Center, Poughkeepsie. 889-4034 ext. 208.

8:30pm. Canadian artists Cellist Anne Bourne with dancer Yvonne Ng. Gallery at Deep Listening Space, Kingston. 338-5984.

8-10:30pm. Bluegrass. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. $14/$18.

the forecast

5-7pm. Barbara Arum, sculptures and Suzanne Neusner, fiber arts. Coffey Gallery, Kingston. 339-6105.

10am-3pm. Woodstock Library, Woodstock. 679-2213.

Ione’s 10th Annual Dream Festival

Robert Selkowitz 4pm. On his book, Painter’s Path. Catskill Center for Conservation and Development, Arkville. 657-6982.

Evening Photography Lecture Series 8pm. Kieth Carter: Reinventing the World. Center for Photography, Woodstock. 679-6337.

THEATER Hot Diggity Dog Family Radio Show 2pm. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Lower Depths 7pm. Fisher Center, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

A Chorus Line 8pm. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

A Story’s A Story 8pm. Cunneen-Hackett Theatre, Poughkeepsie. 486-4571.

Jesus Hopped The A Train 8pm. Stageworks Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

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The Conference of the Birds

THEATER

WORKSHOPS

8pm. Presented by the Present Company. Sunnyside Theatre, New Paltz. 255-9081.

Jesus Hopped The A Train

Reverse Arthritis the Natural Way

2pm. Stageworks Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

6:30pm. YMCA, Poughkeepsie. 471-9255.

WORKSHOPS

2pm. Fisher Center, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

9:30am-1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. $25/$17.

A Chorus Line

Make Your Own Native American Dream Catcher 10am-4pm. Pine Hill Farmers and Artisans Market, Pine Hill. 254-5469.

Northeast Sustainable Energy Assoc. Green Buildings Open House 10am-4pm. Sustainable Living Resource Center, Cottekill. 331-2670.

Mohonk Preserve – Prescribed Burns at the Mohonk Preserve 2-4pm. Forest fire workshop. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SUN 2 BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Ione’s 10th Annual Dream Festival

The Conference of the Birds 8pm. Presented by the Present Company. Sunnyside Theatre, New Paltz. 255-9081.

MON 3 FILM M 5pm. Serial killer thriller. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448.

Joe Beck 8-11pm. Joyous Lake, Woodstock. 679-8100.

DANCE

SPOKEN WORD

Swing Dance Jam

Companions Anthology Book Release Party

House of Mirth Tour 1pm/3pm. Walk in the footsteps of Wharton’s heroine Lily Bart. Staatsburgh State Historic Site, Staatsburg. 889-8851.

Harvest Festival 12-5pm. Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center, Wappingers Falls. 831-8780.

Annual Blessing of the Animals

8-11pm. Rhinebeck Cantina Grille, Rhinebeck. 876-6816.

7pm. Colony Café, Woodstock. 6795342.

3pm. Clothing from the 1770‘s through the present. Rhinebeck Town Hall, Rhinebeck. 871-1777. $7.

From Black to Green and in Between Tea Time 3:30pm. Locust Grove, Poughkeepsie. 454-4500 ext. 17.

MUSIC Hudson Valley Chamber Music Circle 11am. A concert for children and students ages 12-15. Olin Hall, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7456.

Judy Norman Solo Acoustic 1-5:30pm. Playing at the Walk to Cure Diabetes. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 297-8600.

Vassar Chapel 3pm. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7404.

Pixies 7pm. Alternative. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 473-2072.

Sunday Night Jazz 7-11pm. Chowhound Café, Saugerties. 246-5158.

Acoustic Alchemy 9pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 8551300.

The Opposite of Sex 6pm. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8612. MUSIC

Open Mike Night With Buzz Turner 8pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 8551300.

Doug Wapner and the Roots 10pm. Acoustic, alternative, original, rock. Bacchus Restaurant and Bar, New Paltz. 255-8636.

SPOKEN WORD

12pm. Institute of Advanced Theology, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7279. $12/$10.

Democracy Now! Host/Producer Amy Goodman 5:30pm. College Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-7013.

Cupid.com Speed Dating Event 7pm. Single professionals, women ages 39-49, men ages 42-52. Cosimo’s Trattoria, Poughkeepsie. (877) 477-3328.

THURS 6

Reading with Mayra Montero

7pm. Author of Captain of the Sleepers, The Red of His Shadow, The Last Night I Spent With You, and The Messenger. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-1539.

From Island to Mainland: Varieties of Rationality 7:45pm. Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7512.

2pm. St. Paul‘s Lutheran Church, Wurtemburg. 876-7252.

Through the Ages Fashion Show

WED 5 FILM

The Sacraments of Mary Magdalene

MUSIC

Open Mike Featuring B Seth B

EVENTS

the forecast

3pm. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

5pm. Community Dream Weaving. Gallery at Deep Listening Space, Kingston. 338-5984.

6:30-9pm. Arlington Reformed Church, Poughkeepsie. 339-3032. $5.

TUES 4 ART 1st Fridays in Peekskill 5-8pm. Art galleries open late, music. Peekskill. (914) 734-2367.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT NDH Back School 6-8pm. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 871-3500.

EVENTS Hispanic Heritage Month 11am-2pm. Journey of the Americas. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8405.

ART Who Are the Soldiers? 7pm. Works by Gillian Jagger. Muroff Kotler Visual Arts Gallery, Stone Ridge. 687-5262.

MUSIC Michael McCarthy Duo 6-9pm. Lombardi‘s, Gardiner. 255-9779.

Ione’s 10th Annual Dream Festival 8:30pm. Jorrit Dijkstra & John Hollenbeck. Gallery at Deep Listening Space, Kingston. 338-5984.

CitiZen One 8:30-11:30pm. Acoustic, blues, contemporary, jazz, original, groovy new folk. The Depot, Cold Spring.

Mike Quick Band 9:30pm. Blues, r&b, soul. Corner Stage, Middletown. 342-4804. SPOKEN WORD

Heartbeats in the Muck 7:30pm. Painter’s Tavern, Cornwall. 534-5506 ext. 204.

Journey of the Americas 12-2pm. Arts, crafts, and music of Latin America. Dutchess Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8039.

MUSIC Richie Colan‘s Blues Night 8-11pm. Blues. Willow Creek Inn, Stone Ridge. 340-8510.

FRI 7 ART

1st Fridays in Peekskill 5-8pm. Art galleries open late, music. Peekskill. (914) 734-2367.

From Here On In

Open Mike Night

6-9pm. Anna Cinquemani. Richard Sena Gallery, Hudson. (518) 828-1996.

10:30pm. Snug‘s Tavern, New Paltz. 255-9800.

Objects in Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear

THE OUTDOORS

6-9pm. Isolde Kille. Richard Sena Gallery, Hudson. (518) 828-1996.

Indian Head & Twin Mountains 9am. Strenuous hike. Kaaterskill High Peak parking lot. 297-5126.

Fall Studio Sale: Ceramics and Jewelry

THE OUTDOORS

SPOKEN WORD

7-9pm. Byrdcliffe Art Colony, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Mohonk Preserve Singles Hike Escarpment Trail

Reading with John Barth

Innerscapes: In Here and Out There

9am-5pm. Meet at Thruway Exit 20, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SPOKEN WORD Nina Shengold, author of Clearcut

Call for time. Woodstock Film Festival, Woodstock. (212) 970-7546.

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Lower Depths

Tenth Annual Hawk Migration Workshop

7pm. Author of The Sot-Weed Factor, The Tidewater Tales, Lost in the Funhouse. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-1539.

Service: What It Really Means 7:15-8:30pm. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528. $20.

7-9pm. Works on canvas and paper by Thomas Froese. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. CLASSES

New Orleans Creole Cooking Class 6:30-9:30pm. Blue Mountain Bistro, Woodstock. 679-8519. $75.


Daniel Colish

LAURIE ANDERSON PERFORMS AT VARIOUS VENUES AROUND THE REGION THIS MONTH

Once dubbed “the world’s most famous performance artist” by the San Francisco Chronicle, Laurie Anderson rose into the limelight two decades ago through her use of sonic technology and state-of-the-art electronica, creating musical textures for her intelligent, mesmerizing, staccato spoken word. Collaborating with greats like William Burroughs, Andy Kaufman, Peter Gabriel, and Lou Reed, this experimental trailblazer

the forecast

ELECTRONIC TROUBADOUR never ceases to create work that is fresh, wry, and image-rich. Graduating magna cum laude and phi beta kappa as an art history student and obtaining an MFA in sculpture, Anderson has cranked out nearly a dozen albums since 1982. Some of her most cherished recordings include Mister Heartbreak, Big Science, and Strange Angels. She’s also composed soundtracks for several Spalding Gray films, voice-acted in an animated children’s film, hosted a PBS series, and produced a short film. But it is her multimedia stage performances that are perhaps the most memorable slices of her varied career. In 2003, Anderson became NASA’s first and only artist-in-residence, which inspired her most recent performance piece, The End of the Moon. Her first question to NASA was “Can I go up?” but the answer was no. She did, however, enjoy meeting scientists and designers, and the things she saw on NASA sites filtered their way into her work. In this piece, she combines violin solos, video imagery, and new electronic music to take a captivating cosmic look at the relationship between war, consumerism, spirit, and American culture. The overall theme is our perception of time, and how it affects and changes us. She wants to create what she calls “a communal dream.” Anderson is a storyteller, and she keeps huge notebooks of stories and fragments, journals she’s had since the age of 12. These are stories that she pulls out because she thinks they’ll make people laugh or cry, but almost never because they’re about herself. “I’m not trying to express myself. That’s not my goal at all. My collaboration is truly with the audience. Maybe part of that is flirting with the audience; part of it is having a kind of rapport with them.” For her own purposes, Anderson is relieved at growing technology, which means she doesn’t need to take two enormous trucks on tour anymore to carry her shrinking rig. These days she only needs two briefcases, which affords her a large amount of flexibility in creating new sounds. “I’m finally learning how to improvise,” she says. Anderson’s goal is to absorb the world and express it in a light way, not as a crushing work of art. She calls herself a troubadour. Once again, she’s picked the right word. Laurie Anderson will perform The End of the Moon at the Bardavon, 35 Market Street, Poughkeepsie, on Friday, October 28, at 8pm. Tickets are $42.50 adults, $39.50 student/senior, and $36.50 members. (845) 473-2072; www.bardavon.org. She’ll also be performing at the Joyous Lake, Woodstock, on Sunday, October 9, at 8pm. The event will benefit the Karma Triyana Dharmachakra Monastery. www.kagyu.org. —Sharon Nichols

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THE WORLD FAMOUS LIPIZZANER STALLIONS CANTER INTO POUGHKEEPSIE ON OCTOBER

12 & 13

PATTON'S HORSE The white Lipizzaner stallions trace their family tree back eight thousand years, to a time when humans dwelt in caves. They’ve been bred for intelligence, grace, tractability, and beauty, and with them has evolved an amazing interspecies relationship.

the forecast

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe said, “The horse is a wise animal. Let him show you the best and most natural way to accomplish a desired end.” For generations, the “end” desired by Spanish breeders was the ideal war horse. To survive, the Lipizzaners and their humans developed tricks that must have stunned any opponent who’d never seen them before. They crouch and spring like giant cats, maneuver on their hind legs, dip and glide like dancers. These moves, while obsolete on the battlefield (no doubt to the enormous relief of the horses), became the “airs above the ground,” the ultimate expression of the equestrian art of dressage. Besides athletic ability, these horses have character. King Ferdinand of Spain legally required that gentlemen ride only stallions; hence, a lot of effort went into creating a tractable breed. These horses have such couth, in fact, that they created a moment of peace in the midst of World War II; Germans and Americans agreed that saving the stallions was a higher priority than slaughtering each other. (George Patton rode a Lipizzaner.) Their star quality landed them in show biz—they’re sometimes referred to as “the most dexterous performing equines in the world,” with a hit Disney movie and the “World Famous” Lipizzaner Stallions, a 30-horse touring company, coming to the Civic Center in Poughkeepsie October 12 and 13. Shows at 7:30pm. Tickets: $26/$24/$21.(845) 454-3388; www.ticketmaster.com. —Anne Pyburn DANCE

FILM

SPOKEN WORD

Cajun Music and Dance

Mr. and Mrs. Smith

Hispanic Heritage Month

8:30-11:15pm. Featuring Backporch Rockers. Call for location. 384-6673.

8pm. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8050.

EVENTS

MUSIC

12-1pm. Latin American Literature. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8405.

Future Farmers of America Fall Festival

Greg Englesson

Call for times. Stissing Mountain High School, Pine Plains. (518) 398-7181.

11th Annual NY State Harvest Festival & Freedom Fair Call for times. Featuring speakers and musicians. Tall Pines Campground, Bainbridge. 486-7199.

Dutchess Heritage Quilt Show 10am-5pm. Dutchess Community College, Poughkeepsie. 471-1550 ext.159.

Literary Reception 12-1pm. Works read by Hispanic author Ritz Lounge. Dutchess Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8039.

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7-10pm. Original, alternative troubadour. Oasis Café, New Paltz. 255-2400.

David Temple 8pm. Classical guitar. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Grada 9pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 8551300.

Big Kahuna 9:30pm. Dance, rock. Kingston Holiday Inn, Kingston. 338-0400.

THEATER

Community Playback Theatre 8pm. Improvisation based on audience members‘ experiences and dreams. Boughton Place, Highland. 691-4118. $6.

Jesus Hopped The A Train 8pm. Stageworks Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

Rumors by Neil Simon 8pm. Presented by the Marist College Council on Theater Arts. Marist College, Poughkeepsie. 575-3133.

The Conference of the Birds 8pm. A new telling of the Sufi classic. The Sunnyside Theater, New Paltz. 255-9081.


Rob Shannon

the forecast

DANIEL HENRIQUEZ STARS IN THE STAGEWORKS PRODUCTION OF “JESUS HOPPED THE A TRAIN”

GOD & RIKERS We live in a time of conflict between the religious and nonreligious world theories. (Often one has the urge to kidnap the president of the US and “deprogram” him.) Stephen Adly Guirgis’s “Jesus Hopped the A Train” addresses this struggle. The play is set in Rikers Island; Angel Cruz is in prison for shooting Reverend Kim, the leader of a cult that brainwashed his best friend. There he meets Lucius Jenkins, a deeply religious serial killer. The characters are on 23-hour lockdown. “They can’t watch TV, they can’t listen to music, they can’t do drugs; they’re alone. And they can’t even conversate—to use one of their words,” notes director Danielle Skraastad. The only time they speak is in the yard, and even then there is “no contact”—they may not touch. So, by necessity, their relationship is verbal. The play takes place entirely in the yard. “You have the protagonist, Angel, and you have four antagonists: the correctional officer, Valdez; Lucius; Angel’s lawyer, Mary Jane; and God,” observes Skraastad. “God wasn’t cast.” Part of the task of directing is research. “You want to figure out what your characters are saying, first of all,” explains Skraastad. “When Angel says, ‘away from the cage,’ what does that mean? I had no idea.” A lawyer spoke to the cast about the legal issues of the play, and a corrections officer explained prison life. Skraastad also researched religion, to distinguish the nuances of various prayers, for example. “We actually end up having five very different belief systems on stage, where no one is really wrong, and everyone is trying to do the right thing,” she explains. Each hopes “to live a profound life.” The characters spar intensely, with a radical humor. The cast includes noted actors Charles E. Wallace (Lucius) and A-Meen Rasheed (Valdez). “Jesus Hopped the A Train” won the Edinburgh Festival Fringe First Award and the Detroit Free Press Best Play of the Year in 2001. The original New York production was directed by Philip Seymour Hoffman. This is the play’s regional premiere. Playwright Stephen Adly Guirgis was deemed “the best playwright in America under 40” by the New York Times; he has written scripts for “The Sopranos” and “NYPD Blue.” Guirgis’s plays have been produced on five continents. In 2004, Stageworks was donated a 40,000-square-foot industrial building in Hudson by Kaz, Inc. They quickly built the 100-seat Max and Lillian Katzman Theatre, and this is their first full season there. Stageworks is a not-for-profit, equity theater. “Jesus Hopped the A Train” runs September 21-October 9 (Wednesday through Sunday) at Stageworks, 41 Cross Street, Hudson. (518) 822-9667; www.stageworkstheater.org. —Sparrow

Chronogram 143


THE POCKETBOOK FACTORY WILL HOUSE A PLETHORA OF ARTWORK FOR ARTSWALK

WALKING THE ARTS A festival is a day when a town dances. ArtsWalk is the festival of Hudson, New York—now entering its 11th year.

the forecast

Windows on Warren Street is a mile of art in store windows—in some cases, inside the stores as well. Each block has a different focus: landscapes, abstraction, photography, textiles. Every artist who is a member of the Columbia County Council on the Arts (CCCA) is eligible for the show, which is unjuried. “This is what I love about the Artswalk—it’s all-inclusive! Every medium is represented,” says Carrie Haddad, chair of the Artswalk Committee. “But I have to say, the quality of the work gets better every year.” On the 200 block of Warren Street, Ken Smith, director of the Richard Sena Gallery, is organizing “Walk on Art,” a sidewalk project where 25 artists draw with chalk. More than 150 stores participate in Windows on Warren Street. Not one business said no. “I think it has really helped develop the town, as well,” Haddad remarks. “Because when we first did it, there were so many empty stores—just boarded up. And we’d call the building owners, and say, ‘Can you just hook up your electricity, so we can have one lightbulb in there?’ And then we would put a sign so it would look like a gallery, and the person would hang their work inside—and within months, somebody would have bought the building or rented the space. Because it looked so viable. I think we made the biggest impact, economically. And we weren’t really trying!” This is the third year ArtsWalk has used the Pocketbook Factory, donated by Eleanor Ambos. Each floor is 15,000 square feet. ArtsWalk’s first sculpture exhibit, “Encounters with Sculpture,” will be on the ground floor, curated by Jay Rohrlich. Rohrlich is a psychiatrist, sculptor, and author of Work and Love: the Crucial Balance. “Waves of Light: An Invitational Exhibition,” curated by Grzegorz Kepinski, presents 41 artists working in video, installation, photography, sculpture, and painting. “$1 Sidewalk Portraits” is an annual feature of ArtsWalk. “There’s elementary school kids that have easels, and they paint your portrait for a dollar,” Haddad explains. “And they’re third graders, so it’s all drippy paint, and funny-looking. It’s great.” ArtsWalk will also present Columbia County composer Jeffrey Lependorf’s “Two Tiny Operas and

OVER 600 EXHIBITORS Dawn to Dusk

Rain or Shine

Some Songs” at the Basilica Industria October 8 and 9. “It’s mostly a funny program,” Lependorf explains. “It is definitely not the sort of opera where people get stabbed in the back and instead of dying, sing.” One of the “tiny operas” is “The Shari Lewis Show,” written in 1998 as a requiem for the TV puppeteer. A soprano sings the role of Ms. Lewis, while wearing rubber dishwashing gloves, one of

October 8th & 9th Free Admission & Parking • No Pets

Rt 216 Stormville, NY (845) 221-6561 144

which represents Lamb Chop, the other Charlie Horse. The score is an electronic manipulation of “The Dance of the Sugarplum Fairies.” ArtsWalk will run October 1-10. The Pocketbook Factory will be open on weekends, plus Columbus Day. For maps, booklets, and other requests, visit CCCA’s office at 209 Warren Street. (518) 671-6213; www.artscolumbia.org. —Sparrow


The Miracle Worker 8pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. WORKSHOPS

Fall Foliage in Oil 10am. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

SAT 8 ART

Artists In The Garden 11am-4pm. Art show and sale. Vanderbilt Garden, Hyde Park. 266-5234.

Third Annual Woodstock Artist Studio Tour 11am-5pm. Various studios, Woodstock. 679-7843. $5.

Fall Studio Sale: Ceramics and Jewelry 12-6pm. Byrdcliffe Art Colony, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Ember Swift with Lyndell Montgomery 8pm. Zonyx Nightclub/Aegean Entertainment Complex, Poughkeepsie. 255-6500. $10/$15.

Katy Taylor with Amy Fradon 8pm. A cappella, Celtic, folk, traditional, medieval. Christ the King Episcopal Church, Stone Ridge. 687-8961. $12.

Vassar College Orchestra 8pm. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7404.

Broadway! Big Band Style 8-10pm. Big band, jazz, swing, musical theater. The Theatre at Beacon High School, Beacon. 838-6900 ext. 3321. $10.

K.J. Denhert 8-10:30pm. Folk, funk, jazz. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 2551559. $11/$15.

Annual John Lennon Birthday Beatle Bash with Pete Santora & Friends

Transparency

8-11pm. Artists In Residence Studio Gallery, Kingston. 331-2662.

12-7pm. Group Show. Beacon Firehouse Gallery, Beacon. 679-8825.

Anna Cheek Trio

Colony Art Co-op Reception 3-6pm. Many styles, genres and artists. Colony Arts Center, Woodstock. 6793448.

Beautiful Landscape Paintings

8:30pm. Acoustic, blues, folk, jazz, original, rock. Griffins Corners Café, Fleischmanns. 254-6300.

Betty and the Baby Boomers 9pm. Folk. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. $10.

4-6pm. Works by Robert Selkowitz. Woodstock Artists Association, Woodstock. 657-6982.

Marc Black and the Funky Sex Gods

Hudson Valley In a Box

Sloan Wainwright Band

9pm. Funk and swing. Joyous Lake, Woodstock. 679-0367.

4-7pm. Elisa Pritzker. River Winds Gallery, Beacon. 838-2880.

9pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

Coastal Pinholes

Project Mercury 9-11pm. Acoustic, blues, folk, original, rock. Hickory BBQ Steakhouse, Kingston. 338-2424.

Hudson Arts Walk 2005 Auction

Big Kahuna

6-7:30pm. Presented by the Columbia County Council on the Arts. Stair Gallery, Hudson. (518) 671-6213. DANCE

Swing Dance 7:30-11pm. Katrina Benefit Event. Reformed Church of the Comforter, Kingston. 236-3939.

Contradance 8pm. Peter Blue calling, music by Emily Schaad and Larry Unger. Woodstock Community Center, Woodstock. 246-2121. $8/$7.

9:30pm. Dance, rock. Kingston Holiday Inn, Kingston. 338-0400. THE OUTDOORS

Huckleberry Point Call for times. Easy hike. Elka Park. 339-7170.

Millbrook Ridge Trail Hike Call for times. Strenuous hike. Call for locations. 454-5441.

Sixteenth Annual Ridge Hike 6:30am-4:30pm. Strenuous 12-15 mile hike. New Paltz. 255-0919. $28/$20.

EVENTS

Gunks Bike Tour Benefit for the Gardiner Library Building Fund

Estate Auction

9am. 5, 25 & 40 mile courses. New Paltz. 255-1255. $25/$35 day of.

Call for times. George Cole Auctioneers, Red Hook. 758-9114.

Pumpkin Festival

SPOKEN WORD

Nina Shengold, Author of Clearcut

Call for times. Pine Bush Farmer‘s Market, Pine Bush. 744-6763.

Call for time. Merrit Bookstore, Red Hook. (212) 970-7546.

MUSIC

Gilded Age Players

The Midnight Ramble Call for times. Levon Helm Studios, Woodstock. 679-2744. $100.

Ione’s 10th Annual Dream Festival 10am-7pm. Composer Al Margolis Birthday Celebration. Gallery at Deep Listening Space, Kingston. 338-5984.

Music at the Market 10:30am-1:30pm. Featuring the Birdland Duo. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-4300.

Dutchess Community College Music School Faculty Group Concert 4pm. Benefit for the Scholarship Fund. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8916.

John Street Jam 7pm. Featuring Denise Jordan Finley. Reformed Church Annex, Saugerties. 246-2867.

MAA Cabaret 7:30pm. Jazz and originals. Hudson Sailing, Stone Ridge. 338-0889. $10.

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5-7pm. Martha Casanave. Galerie BMG, Woodstock. 679-0027.

2pm. Ann Satterthwaite and Andrew Reiser. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Book Reading and Signing With Larry Osgood

7:30pm. Author of Midnight Sun. Oblong Books and Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500. THEATER

Jesus Hopped The A Train 3pm/8pm. Stageworks Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things 2pm. Dia, Beacon. 440-0100.

Nice Jewish Girls Gone Bad 8pm. Backstage Studio Productions, Kingston. 338-8700. $15.

Rumors by Neil Simon 8pm. Presented by the Marist College Council on Theater Arts. Marist College, Poughkeepsie. 575-3133.

The Conference of the Birds 8pm. A new telling of the Sufi classic. The Sunnyside Theater, New Paltz. 255-9081.

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The Miracle Worker 8pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

The Voyage of Mary C. 8pm. Presented by the Mohonk Mountain Stage Company. St. Andrew‘s Church, New Paltz. 255-3102. WORKSHOPS

Basics of Dramatic Writing 9:30am-4:30pm. St. Andrew’s Church, New Paltz. 255-3102. $225.

Japanese Needlework 10am-4pm. With Aiko Tanaka & Raiko Shimura. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. $50 for members $60 for non-members.

Native American Storytelling, Drumming and Dancing 10am-4pm. Pine Hill Farmers and Artisans Market, Pine Hill. 254-5469.

SUN 9

Robert Osborne fell in love with the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop long before he ever realized he would be teaching music at her alma mater one day. “I was introduced to her work 25 years

ART

ago by another Pulitzer winner, Richard Howard. He thought I’d

Third Annual Woodstock Artist Studio Tour

enjoy it, and he was right. I fell in love,” says the Vassar College

11am-5pm. Various studios, Woodstock. 679-7843. $5.

Fall Studio Sale: Ceramics and Jewelry 12-6pm. Byrdcliffe Art Colony, Woodstock. 679-2079.

professor and baritone. Bishop did not go totally unrecognized in her lifetime—a Pulitzer prize, a National Book Award, and teaching at Harvard can hardly be considered the career of an unknown—but since her death in 1979, an ever-widening circle of admirers has grown.

Robert Selkowitz

“Last fall, we had an exhibit of her papers, photos and artwork,

2pm. Woodstock Artists Association, Woodstock. 657-6982.

and I began talking to people about doing a musical tribute,” says

Yoshikatsu Tamekane and Ichiyoh Haga 4-6pm. Print maker and miniature architectural models respectively. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

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CONFESSIONAL MUSIC

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

The Voice of the Silence

Osborne. “I had had a friend set some of her work to music 15 years ago, and I had heard that Amy Irving (pictured above) had put together a one-woman show using her work.” (Irving debuted the one-woman show “A Safe Harbor for Elizabeth Bishop” during the 2004 Powerhouse Theater season at Vassar; it opens at Primary Stages in New York City next spring.) The idea grew into a collaboration between Vassar’s music,

11am. Contemplative Meeting in the Temple. Lectorium Rosicrucianum Center, Chatham. (518) 392-2799.

English, and theater departments, and the results ought to be

Ione’s 10th Annual Dream Festival

on Friday, October 28, at 8pm by his colleagues, mezzo-soprano

something to hear, as Osborne is joined at Vassar’s Skinner Hall

5pm. Private Prayers/Public Rituals. Gallery at Deep Listening Space, Kingston. 338-5984.

Mary Nessinger and pianist Thomas Sauer, and by Amy Irving.

EVENTS

Two scenes from the play will be rounded out by 16 songs and a

Walk/Ride-A-Thon

duet, setting Bishop’s lines to music composed by notables like

Call for times. Benefit for the Winslow Therapeutic Center. Warwick County Park, Warwick. 986-6686.

Ned Rorem, John Hareison, Richard Wilson, and Tobias Picker,

Fine Art Market

have been drawn to her work,” Osborne muses.

11am-5pm. High Falls Firehouse, Stone Ridge. 338-0889.

Bluestone Festival

“Miss Irving,” says Osborne, “was very happy to do it again.”

among others. “It’s interesting—so many high-level composers The special faculty music concert is free. (845) 437-7294; http://music.vassar.edu. —Anne Pyburn

12-6pm. Speakers, exhibits, music, cruise, tours. Gallo Park, Kingston. 338-0895. FILM

Howard Fishman

Rumors by Neil Simon

The Education of Shelby Knox

8pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

2pm. Presented by the Marist College Council on Theater Arts. Marist College, Poughkeepsie. 575-3133.

5pm. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448. MUSIC

Sunday Afternoon Music

Mohonk Preserve Singles Hike – Bonticou Crag

2-5pm. Hosted by Judy Norman. UnCommon Grounds Coffeehouse, Wurtsboro. 888-2121.

10am-2pm. Moderate 6-mile hike and rock scramble. Meet at the Spring Farm Trailhead, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Faculty Concert

SPOKEN WORD

3pm. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7404.

Literary Brunch

Ellison Starr 6pm. Alternative, folk, original, rock, singer/songwriter. The Alamo, Rosendale. 658-3210.

Sunday Night Jazz 7-11pm. Chowhound Café, Saugerties. 246-5158.

Laurie Anderson 8pm. Benefit for KTD Monastery. Joyous Lake, Woodstock. 679-8100. $35/$30.

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THE OUTDOORS

12pm. Local authors read from new prose and poetry. High Falls Café, High Falls. 338-0889.

Gallery Talk for the Encaustic Works 200

The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things 2pm. Dia, Beacon. 440-0100.

The Conference of the Birds 3pm. A new telling of the Sufi classic. The Sunnyside Theater, New Paltz. 255-9081.

The Miracle Worker 3pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

The Conference of the Birds 8pm. Presented by the Present Company. Sunnyside Theatre, New Paltz. 255-9081.

2pm. Co-Curator Beth E. Wilson. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art. 257-2331.

WORKSHOPS

THEATER

Call for time. Enchanted Manor Inn, Woodstock. 679-9012.

Jesus Hopped The A Train 2pm. Stageworks Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

Living Food Seminar and Retreat

Children’s Art Workshop 11am-1pm. Kids create paintings with autumn produce as the subject. Call for location, High Falls. 338-0889.


WORKMEN QUARRYING LOCAL BLUESTONE, CIRCA

1875

BLUE-CHIP ROCKS Back in the day, bluestone was to Ulster County what gold was to California—less well-known, perhaps, but definitely a way to make your fortune. “The local economy was based on bluestone for about 100 years,” says Dennis Connors, organizer of the Bluestone Festival scheduled for Sunday October 9, noon to 6pm, at T.R. Gallo Park in Kingston. “It was a serious moneymaker. Two or three 10,000 people in the region during its heyday. From ports in the Rondout section of Kingston and Malden to the north, bluestone—an extremely durable and beautiful paving material—made its way to Manhattan, San Francisco, and even Paris. The bluestone of the Hudson Valley/Catskills region is approximately 385-360 million years old, and a

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guys could get together and open a quarry, and they had a cash product.” The industry employed

lot of the slabs quarried a century or so ago are five or six inches thick—built to last. The festival will offer plenty of fun along with the history—blues, traditional folk and bluegrass music featuring the Five Points Band, draft-horse team demonstrations of the transport of bluestone, and a historic cruise on the riverboat Teal. Two other intriguing crafts—a covered Pennsylvania Railroad barge from the North River Tugboat Museum and a Dutch sailing barge, the Golden Real—will be on display, along with tools used in milling, carving and transporting of bluestone and the work of bluestone-themed artisans and crafts folk will be there as well. For the real scoop, catch Hartwick College geologist Dr. Robert Titus when he lectures on bluestone at the Downtown Visitors Center at 1 pm. Peruse the exhibit of tools used in milling, carving, and transporting of bluestone, and take the self-guided tour. Aside from the boat ride, ($12 for adults), it’s free. 845-338-0895; djc7698@cs.com. —Anne Pyburn

MON 10 ART

Fall Studio Sale: Ceramics and Jewelry 12-6pm. Byrdcliffe Art Colony, Woodstock. 679-2079. EVENTS

Gala Benefit Concert 7:30pm. Benefit for the Marbletown Arts Association Scholarship Fund. Stone Ridge Center for the Arts, Stone Ridge. 687-4650. MUSIC

Ellison Starr 11pm. Alternative, folk, original, rock, singer/songwriter. Oasis Café, New Paltz. 255-2400. SPOKEN WORD

Open Mike Featuring B Seth B 8-11pm. Rhinebeck Cantina Grille, Rhinebeck. 876-6816.

3pm. Rose Garden. 486-7770. KIDS

Open Mike Night

After School Program for K - 2nd Grade

7pm. Featuring Richard Loranger and Carey Harrison. Colony Café, Woodstock. 679-5342. $3.

3:45-5pm. 6 weeks. Museum of the Hudson Highlands, Cornwall. 534-5506 ext. 204.

THEATER

MUSIC

Auditions for Into the Woods

Open Mike Night

7pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 758-9287.

10:30pm. Snug‘s Tavern, New Paltz. 255-9800.

TUES 11

Mark Egan, Jeff Ciampa Trio 8-11pm. Joyous Lake, Woodstock. 679-8100.

Eleanor Roosevelt Birthday Ceremony

EVENTS

Ornamental Tree Walk 1pm. Locust Grove, Poughkeepsie. 454-4500.

SPOKEN WORD

Migraine Help 6:30-8pm. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 871-4380.

Imagery & Healing 7pm. Benedictine Hospital-Administrative Services Building, Kingston. 657-8222.

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The Play of Ego 7:15-8:30pm. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528. $20. WORKSHOPS

Breathing Your Way to Good Health 7-9pm. Mirabai, Woodstock. 679-2100. $15/$20.

WED 12 FILM

American Splendor 6pm. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8612. MUSIC

Ione’s 10th Annual Dream Festival 10am-7pm. Composer Scott Smallwood Birthday Celebration. Gallery at Deep Listening Space, Kingston. 338-5984.

Joseph Calitri with Hector Becerra 10pm. Rock. Bacchus Restaurant and Bar, New Paltz. 255-8636. SPOKEN WORD

The Sacraments of Mary Magdalene 12pm. Institute of Advanced Theology, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7279. $12/$10. WORKSHOPS

Hormone Balancing Without HRT 6:30pm. Center for Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs, LaGrange. 471-9255.

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THURS 13 MUSIC

the Feel of Things (pictured above) at Dia: Beacon on Saturdays

Michael McCarthy Duo

and Sundays, October 8-23. Jason Moran provides live piano

6-9pm. Lombardi‘s, Gardiner. 255-9779.

accompaniment to multiple-screen projection. (845) 440-0100.

Ione’s 10th Annual Dream Festival 8pm. New Vangaurd Series. Gallery at Deep Listening Space, Kingston. 338-5984.

Mike Quick Band 9:30pm. Blues, r&b, soul. Corner Stage, Middletown. 342-4804.

Joseph Calitri with Hector Becerra 10pm. Rock. Bacchus Restaurant and Bar, New Paltz. 255-8636. SPOKEN WORD

The Blanding’s Turtle and How Wetlands Restoration an Really Work

MUSIC

Jazz at Bard Katrina Benefit Concert 7pm. Olin Hall, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7456. $20.

Eric Erickson 8pm. Acoustic, original, solo, traditional, vocals. Maia Restaurant, Poughkeepsie. 486-5004. 8pm. Lisa Barnard’s Dream Puzzle Dream. Gallery at Deep Listening Space, Kingston. 338-5984.

Geoff Muldaur

7:30pm. Painter‘s Tavern, Cornwall. 534-5506 ext. 204. WORKSHOPS

Toshi Reagon & Big Lovely

Dance Lessons

9pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

FRI 14 ART

Fall Studio Sale: Ceramics and Jewelry 12-6pm. Byrdcliffe Art Colony, Woodstock. 679-2079. BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Reinventing Ourselves Weekend retreat for women. Linwood Retreat Center, Rhinebeck. 687-2252. EVENTS

Dance Lessons 12-2pm. Latin American dances. Dutchess Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8039.

Learn to play Texas Hold’em 6:30-8:30pm. Ulster County Community College, Kingston. 339-2025.

SAT 15

Ione’s 10th Annual Dream Festival

8-10:30pm. Blues, folk, rock. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 2551559. $14/$18.

3-4pm. Latin American dances. Dutchess Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8039.

Dave Chapman and the Dilemma/Sun Pie 10pm. Acoustic, alternative, country, original, rock. Bacchus Restaurant and Bar, New Paltz. 255-8636. THEATER

Murder Mystery Dinner Show 6:30pm. GK‘s 80th Birthday. Blue Mountain Bistro, Woodstock. 679-8519. $45.

Club Riot 8pm. Dance theatre. Colony Café, Woodstock. 679-5342.

The Conference of the Birds

ART

Melissa Harris Open Studio 11am-6pm. Melissa Harris Studio, West Hurley. 340-9632.

Fall Studio Sale: Ceramics and Jewelry 12-6pm. Byrdcliffe Art Colony, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Fire! 5-7pm. Artworks about fire and firefighting. GCCA Catskill Gallery, Catskill. (518) 943-3400.

Stuart M. Eichel 5-7pm. Colorful paintings of historic firehouses, fire trucks captured in small towns around the northeast. GCCA Catskill Gallery, Catskill. (518) 943-3400.

Neo-Dia-Dada 5-9pm. Recent artwork by Robert Paschal. Zahra Studio Gallery, Beacon. 838-6311. BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

A Day with Psychic Ann Fisher

8pm. A new telling of the Sufi classic. The Sunnyside Theater, New Paltz. 55-9081.

9am-4pm. Ulster County Community College, Kingston. 339-2025.

The Miracle Worker

CLASSES

FILM

8pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Reiki I & II Certification

Fantastic Four

WORKSHOPS

10am-5pm. Become a certified Reiki practitioner. Woodstock. 336-4609.

8pm. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8050.

Reinventing Ourselves

Drawing Animals

Halloween Weekend Call for times. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 237.

148

JOAN JONAS AT DIA

Joan Jonas performs her site-specific piece The Shape, the Scent,

Call for times. Weekend Retreat for Women. Linwood Retreat Center, Rhinebeck. 687-2252.

10am-4:30pm. IES Continuing Education Program, Millbrook. 677-9643.


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DANCE

Free-Style Frolic 8:30pm. Barefoot, Substance & Smoke free. Knight of Columbus Hall, Kingston. 658-8319. Adults $5/Teens, Seniors $2/ Children, Volunteers Free. EVENTS

Hispanic Heritage Month Annual Gala Dinner Dance Call for time. Dutchess Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8039.

Crafts on John Street 9am-2pm. The Old Town Stockade Farmers‘ Market, Kingston. 338- 4629.

13th Annual Columbia County Golden Gathering 9:30am-12:30pm. Columbia-Greene Community College, Hudson. 657-8222.

Used Book Sale 10am-3pm. Woodstock Library, Woodstock. 679-2213.

AN INTERACTIVE, MULTIMEDIA EXHIBITION DEBUTS AT OPUS

Gem and Mineral Show

CLAMOR CONTENDER

10am-4pm. Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. 876-4001.

New York State Sheep and Wool Family Festival 10am-4pm. Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. 876-4001.

New Paltz Healing Arts Open House 11am-3pm. New Paltz Healing Arts, New Paltz. 255-2225.

International Wine & Food Fest 7pm. Benefit gala. North Pointe Cultural Arts Center, Kinderhook. (518) 758-9234.

Daniel Patrick Helmstetter wants to rewrite history. And he wants to do it in a radical way. Helmstetter has amassed a slew of phrase-clippings from a variety of 2005 publications for his interactive gallery installation called “Clamor Contender, Subtext: A Radical Idea.” Starting on Saturday, October 1 at the Opus 40 Gallery, people will be able to participate in a mass manipulation, according to their own experiential truths, of the media’s words in an attempt to redefine recent

KIDS

history. “What I’m trying to do is give people their own view of history in a way that will allow people

Sleepy Reptiles

the chance to examine current media hands-on,” says Helmstetter. “And do it in a way that unites

10am. Museum of the Hudson Highlands, Cornwall. 534-5506 ext. 204.

people instead of divides them.”

MUSIC

the forecast

40 IN SAUGERTIES THIS MONTH

Music at the Market 10:30am-1:30pm. Featuring the Lisa and the Leasebreakers. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-4300.

Animal and Children‘s Songs 11:30am-2pm. Westmoreland Animal Sanctuary, Bedford. (914) 666-8448.

The Stillwell Project 6pm. Variety of music. St. Mary‘s Hall, Kingston. 338-3972.

Benefit Concert For River Pool and Sloop Woody Guthrie 8pm. Featuring Arlo Guthrie and Pete Seeger. Theatre at Beacon High School, Beacon. 838-0094.

Madison String Orchestra 8pm. Church of the Messiah, Rhinebeck. 876-2870.

The project’s interdependent method of creation resembles that of a technique called the cadavre exquis or “exquisite corpse”—where each participant jots down a phrase on a piece of paper, and it is added to by each additional contributor. Opus 40, located in Saugerties, is the six-acre sprawl of traversable stone sculpture that Harvey Fite dedicated his life to creating out of an abandoned bluestone quarry. Helmstetter worked with Fite’s stepson Tad Richards, in renovating Fite’s barn into a gallery space in 2003. Helmstetter, 22, has been active within the realms of film production, web design, and authorship. His newest book, a compilation of writing from the past seventeen months, is entitled Seventeen Months of Me, and will be available for sale at the Opus 40 Gallery. “Clamor Contender, Subtext: A Radical Idea” will be open for collaboration on weekends from 12-5 throughout October—participants should feel free to bring their own 2005 media publicationclippings. There is a suggested donation of $6 to enter the park, which also permits access to the gallery and the Quarryman’s Museum. Visitors are invited to bring their late-summer harvests to the installation’s closing celebration on Sunday October 30. (845) 246-3400; www.danielpatrick.org; www.opus40.org. —Marleina Booth-Levy

Ernie Hawkins 9pm. Blues and gospel. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. $10.

John Hall and Band 9pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. $17.50. THE OUTDOORS

Breakneck and Taurus Check for times and meeting place. Strenuous hike. dave.ny3@verizon.net.

Catskill Doubletop Mountain Hike/Bushwhack Call for times. Strenuous hike. Frost Valley, Claryville. 454-5441.

Big Indian 9am. Strenuous hike. Catskills. 926-6208.

Slide Mountain 9am. Strenuous hike. Catskills. 635-5187.

Mohonk Preserve Rock Rift Hike 9:30am-1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Mohonk Preserve Singles Hike – Giant’s Workshop 9:30am-2:30pm. Moderate 6-mile hike with rock scramble. Meet at the West Trapps Trailhead, New Paltz. 255-0919.

150

The Woods of Our Valley 2pm. Hike. Hawthorne Valley Farm, Harlemville. (518) 781-0243.

The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things

Animals in Transition: Dying and Death

2pm. Dia, Beacon. 440-0100.

2-4pm. Mirabai, Woodstock. 679-2100. $15/$20.

SPOKEN WORD

Born Yesterday

Memorial Reading of Mauro Salvatore Parisi‘s Poetry

8pm. Presented by the Mohonk Mountain Stage Company. St. Andrew‘s Church, New Paltz. 255-3102.

2pm. Presented by the Woodstock Poetry Society. Woodstock Town Hall, Woodstock. 246-8565.

Book Reading and Signing With Daniel Wolff

7:30pm. Author of 4th of July, Asbury Park. Oblong Books and Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Woodstock Mountain Poetry Fest II 8pm. Colony Café, Woodstock. 679-8777. $10. THEATER

Esprit De Shorts 5:30pm/8:30pm. Actors & Writers 12th annual ten-minute play festival. Odd Fellows Theatre, Olivebridge. 657-9760.

The Colors of Our Lives 8pm. Presented Hudson River Playback Theatre. Woodstock Artists Association, Woodstock. 255-7716.

The Conference of the Birds

Women and Money and the Power of Prosperity 2-4pm. With life coach Denise Lewis. Sarabrae Women’s Spirituality Center, New Windsor. 227-3190. $30.

SUN 16 ART

8pm. A new telling of the Sufi classic. The Sunnyside Theater, New Paltz. 255-9081.

Fall Studio Sale: Ceramics and Jewelry

The Miracle Worker

12-6pm. Byrdcliffe Art Colony, Woodstock. 679-2079.

8pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. WORKSHOPS

Free How to Go Solar Workshop 11am-2pm. Sustainable Living Resource Center, Cottekill. 331-2670.

Art in Food and Food in Art 1-3:30pm. Mount Gulian Historic Site, Beacon. 831-8172.

MICHAEL TISCHLER: IMAGES OF THE CATSKILLS THE NORTHERN EXPOSURES PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY 63 Tinker Street Woodstock (845) 679-3344 Through October 8


AMY GOODMAN, HOST OF “DEMOCRACY NOW”

LEFT-WING DARLING Here’s what you need to know about Amy Goodman, darling of the left-wing media: In 1991, while covering the independence movement in East Timor, Goodman and fellow journalist Alan Nairn were badly beaten by Indonesian soldiers after they witnessed a massacre of Timorese demonstrators. Goodman and Nairn brought the struggle of the Timorese against the US-backed Indonesian government to the world. In 1996, as founded “Democracy Now,” a two-hour radio and TV program with a foreign-policy focus that she cohosts with Juan Gonzales; “Democracy Now” features interviews with newsmakers, scholars, and ordinary citizens. (Goodman’s combative interview with

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news director of Pacifica Radio affiliate WBAI in New York, she

President Clinton in the run-up to the 2000 election, when he called to argue for support of Gore instead of Nader, has been enshrined in the progressive media hall of fame.) In 2004, Goodman published her first book, Exception to the Rulers: Exposing Oily Politicians, War Profiteers, and the Media That Love Them, coauthored with her brother, David Goodman. At Vassar College on Wednesday, October 5, Goodman will discuss “Independent Media in a Time of War” at 5:30pm in the Villard Room of the College Center. (845) 437-7013; www.democracynow.org. —Brian K. Mahoney

CLASSES

MUSIC

Planting & Transplanting Trees & Shrubs

Animal and Children‘s Songs

10am-2:30pm. IES Continuing Education Program, Millbrook. 677-9643.

Call for times. Forsyth Park, Kingston. (914) 666-8448.

Reiki I & II Certification

Benefit for Hudson Valley Cerebral Palsy Association

10am-5pm. Become a certified Reiki practitioner. Woodstock. 336-4609.

3:30pm. Featuring Richie Havens. Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

DANCE

Sunday Night Jazz

Swing Dance Jam

7-11pm. Chowhound Café, Saugerties. 246-5158.

6:30-9pm. White Eagle Hall, Kingston. 339-3032. $5. EVENTS

Gathering of Old Cars 11am-4pm. Over 500 antique, classic, and custom cars. Staatsburg Historic Site, Staatsburg. 876-3554. FILM

Food and Film Screening of Bush‘s Brain 3-5pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-7116.

Chris Trapper 8pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 8551300. THE OUTDOORS

Ashokan High Point Call for times and meeting place. Strenuous hike. Catskill. 926-6208.

Catskill Giant Ledge Hike Call for times. Moderate 4-mile hike. Frost Valley, Claryville. 454-5441.

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Mohonk Preserve - Rock Rift

Open Mike Night

10am-3pm. Moderate 7-mile hike. Meet at the Spring Farm Trailhead, New Paltz. 255-0919.

10:30pm. Snug‘s Tavern, New Paltz. 255-9800.

SPOKEN WORD

Kindred Spirits Salon 2pm. Speakers, fruit, wine, cheese. Cedar Grove, Catskill. (518) 943-7465. $8/$5.

THE OUTDOORS

Mid Week Hike to Stissing Mountain Call for times and meeting place. Moderate 6-mile hike. 592-0204.

Woodstock Mountain Poetry Fest II

SPOKEN WORD

7pm. Colony Café, Woodstock. 679-8777. $10.

Oskar Panizza‘s Heavenly Tragedy

THEATER

The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things 2pm. Dia, Beacon. 440-0100.

Ione’s 10th Annual Dream Festival 2-6pm. Marathon of Dreamers- short performances. Gallery at Deep Listening Space, Kingston. 338-5984.

The Miracle Worker 3pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

The Conference of the Birds 8pm. Presented by the Present Company. Sunnyside Theatre, New Paltz. 255-9081.

German blasphemy and the struggle for literary freedom. Honors Center, SUNY New Paltz. 257-3933.

Cancer and Nutrition: What to Eat and Why 6:30-8pm. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 871-4380.

Nutrition and Cancer 7:15pm. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 657-8222.

The Mind in Solitude 7:15-8:30pm. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528. $20. THEATER

WORKSHOPS

The Wolf and the Seven Little Goats

Sing a New Song

7pm. John L. Edwards Elementary School, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

5:45-6:45pm. 6 sessions. Ulster County Community College, Kingston. 339-2025.

MON 17 CLASSES

Deer-Proofing Your Landscape 7-9pm. IES Continuing Education Program, Millbrook. 677-9643.

WORKSHOPS

Reverse Arthritis the Natural Way 11am. LaGrange Library, LaGrange. 471-9255.

Sing a New Song

7-9pm. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100. $15/$20.

FILM

LOST IN THE FUNHOUSE

MUSIC

Down by Law

What happens at the metaphysical carnival where a reader reads

Nina Sheldon

6pm. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8612.

what a writer writes? Celebrated postmodernist author and literary

WED 19

the forecast

Magic for Beginners

8-11pm. Joyous Lake, Woodstock. 679-8100.

Open Mike Featuring B Seth B 8-11pm. Rhinebeck Cantina Grille, Rhinebeck. 876-6816.

KIDS

After School Program for 3rd-5th Grade

theorist John Barth has tromped about this traveling amusement show since the early days of his prolific career. The author of The Sot-Weed Factor (1960), Lost in the Funhouse (1968), the

3:45-5pm. 6 weeks. Museum of the Hudson Highlands, Cornwall. 534-5506 ext. 204.

National Book Award-winning Chimera (1972), The Literature of

MUSIC

than a dozen other books, this colorful barker will read at Bard

5pm. From Static Community Description to Predictive Tool. Olin Language Center, Annandale-onHudson. 758-6822.

Melody Olsen/Lola Johnson

College on October 4.

10pm. Acoustic, alternative, original, rock, singer/songwriter. Bacchus Restaurant and Bar, New Paltz. 255-8636.

American colleges; many of his novels, novellas, and short

Cupid.com Speed Dating Event

SPOKEN WORD

7pm. Single Professionals, Ages 35-49. Hickory BBQ Smokehouse, Kingston. (877) 477-3328.

stories contain university settings and allude to works of literature.

Indigenous Wisdom in the Modern World

Influenced as well by the writings of Marshall McLuhan and other

SPOKEN WORD

Food Webs of the Past, Present, and Future

Open Mike Night 7pm. Featuring poets Trinity Overmyer and Miriam Stanley. Colony Café, Woodstock. 679-5342. $3.

Science and Religion in the Age of Galileo and Descartes 7:45pm. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7512. WORKSHOPS

Money and the Power of Prosperity 6:30-7:30pm. With Denise Lewis, Life Coach. Grinnell Library, Wappingers Falls. 227-3190.

Call for times. Speaker Malidoma Patrice Some. Ulster County Community College, Stone Ridge. $20/$15.

The Sacraments of Mary Magdalene 12pm. Institute of Advanced Theology, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7279. $12/$10.

Mid-Hudson Sierra Club Speaker Social 7:30pm. Author of Sweetwater.

Sweetwater Catering Hall, Kingston. 255-5528.

THURS 20

Reverse Arthritis the Natural Way

FILM

7pm. LaGrange Library, LaGrange. 4719255.

I Shot Andy Warhol

TUES 18 MUSIC

animate fiction. The widely read and anthologized Lost in the Funhouse: Fiction for Print, Tape, Live Voice is a montage of carefully ordered, interrelated short-story sequences, many intended to be heard as audio recordings or performed live. Critically acclaimed for versatility and technical virtuosity, Barth earned outstanding lifetime achievement awards from both the PEN/Malamud and the Lannan Literary associations in 1998. Best known for writing that self-consciously comments on how fiction is created and how reader and text interact, Barth does not attempt to convey reality in his metafictional works. Rather, the self-defined “concocter of comic novels” leads his typically farcical characters (drawn from history and mythology) through

go-round of labyrinthine plots, dark humor, bawdy wordplay, and

Michael McCarthy Duo

experimental forms (including diagrams), Barth reminds readers

The Strawbs

8-11pm. Blues. Willow Creek Inn, Stone Ridge. 340-8510.

media critics, Barth also has explored how technology might

MUSIC 6-9pm. Lombardi‘s, Gardiner. 255-9779.

Richie Colan‘s Blues Night

The Maryland-born Barth has taught English at various

a narrative hall of mirrors, where wrong turns and about-faces

8pm. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. $15.

8pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

Exhaustion, The Literature of Replenishment (1982), and more

8pm. Valerie Solanas story. Taylor Hall, Rm 203, Vassar College. 437-5632.

Mary Gauthier

Open Mike Night With Scott Sylvester

152

JOHN BARTH

5:45-6:45pm. 6 sessions. Ulster County Community College, Kingston. 339-2025.

8pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

Mike Quick Band 9:30pm. Blues, r&b, soul. Corner Stage, Middletown. 342-4804.

inevitably dead-end. In foregrounding fictional artifice on a merry-

of their own fictive lives. John Barth will read from his latest collection of stories, The Book of Ten Nights and a Night, at Bard College on Tuesday, October 4, at 7pm, Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center. Introduction by Bradford Morrow. (845) 758-1539. —Pauline Uchmanowicz

PERFORMANCES OF MAUREEN FLEMING’S DECAY OF THE ANGEL KAATSBAAN INTERNATIONAL DANCE CENTER 120 Broadway, Tivoli Sat., October 8, 7:30 pm Sun., October 9, 2:30 pm (845)757-5107 www.kaatsbaan.org


AARON FREEMAN AND MICKEY MELCHIONDO OF WEEN

WEEN YOUR MIND AND YOUR ASPHALT GROTTOS

Mention Ween, and strange reactions follow. A friend once said "they sound like retarded babies." Indeed bizarre, Ween transcends funny, and sometimes annoying. That said, the brothers Ween are genius musical chameleons, morphing from melancholy ballads, blistering Motorhead-inspired rock rages, drum-machine-laden weirdness, and even country/Western farce. No matter the tune,

the forecast

genres and styles, almost always overflowing with the strange, the

Ween's the group you never get sick of. (Unless, of course, you think they sound like retarded babies.) Mickey Melchiondo and Aaron Freeman met in junior high typing class, joined forces, and took on the pseudonyms Dean and Gene Ween, following the Ramones' example. Their debut, 1990's GodWeenSatan: The Oneness, musically runs the gamut, and 1992's Pure Guava features "Push Th' Little Daisies," Ween's cult-hit. This led to nine albums total, including Quebec and The Mollusk, ranging from gooey-funk, country, nautical, psychedelic, and everywhere in between. On their varied styles, Dean Ween has said, "We're trying to entertain ourselves. That's it. And we don't really care so much about other people. But the way it works is if you're having a good time and you're being honest, then it just transcends all that and people will dig it." Ween just released Shinola: Volume 1, a compilation of acoustic leftovers that never made it onto earlier CDs. For leftovers, the release feels as full as any of their others: weird, melodious, and funny. Live, Ween is true to their genre-bending core, jumping from Gene's soulfully crooned softer tunes to mosh-inspiring thrashes. This attracts a diverse group: Rastafarians, Goths, punks, Phishheads, all engulfed in smoke and light effects, often obscuring the band from view entirely. Ween embarks on a national fall tour, and hits Northern Lights in Clifton Park on October 25 at 7:30pm; tickets are $25. (518) 371-0012; www.northernlightslive.com. —Brian Rubin

153


SAT 22

SPOKEN WORD

Lyceum Presentation 12:30pm. Trix Bruce- Feelin’ the Sounds: Let Your Hands Do the Dance. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8050.

The 21st Century Hudson

5-7pm. Abstract paintings by Lindy FossQuillet. Kiesendahl+Calhoun Art Gallery, Beacon. 838-1177.

Beth Bolgla

The River and Its Secret Places: Critical River Habitats

Late Work by Peter Clark

THEATER

5-8pm. Garrison Arts Center, Garrison. 424-3960. 5-8pm. Garrison Arts Center, Garrison. 424-3960. CLASSES

Reiki I Certification & Attunements

Born Yesterday 8pm. Presented by the Mohonk Mountain Stage Company. St. Andrew‘s Chruch, New Paltz. 255-3102. WORKSHOPS

Positive Attitude Coaching & Training 9am-1pm. With life coach Denise Lewis. SUNY Ulster, Kingston. 227-3190. $99.

The Sacred Enneagram of Liberation 7-9pm. Mirabai, Woodstock. 679-2100. $15/$20.

FRI 21 BODY/MIND/SPIRIT

Yoga Ayurveda Weekend 10/21-23. Yoga, ayurveda, hiking, meditation. Catskill Mountain location. 679-2926. info@pondi.biz.

the forecast

Rouge

7:30pm. Painter‘s Tavern, Cornwall. 534-5506 ext. 204.

7:30pm. Garrison Institute, Garrison. 424-4800.

10am-2pm. Call for location. www.LumenOcculere.com.

Planting Under Trees 1-4pm. IES Continuing Education Program, Millbrook. 677-9643. DANCE

Love To Dance Party 7:30pm. Jewish Community Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-0430.

Fall Dance Performances 8pm. Featuring student choreography. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. EVENTS

Women, Gender, Science Call for times. Annual Women’s Studies conference. SUNY New Paltz. 257-2975.

Estate Auction

EVENTS

Call for times. George Cole Auctioneers, Red Hook. 758-9114.

Halloween Weekend

Halloween Pumpkin Carving Benefit

Call for times. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 237.

Call for times. Stone Ridge Orchard, Stone Ridge. 687-2587.

FILM

Mensa Admission Test

Caterina in the Big City 7:30pm. Junior high in Rome. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory 8pm. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8050. MUSIC

8:45am/12:45pm. Hosted by the MidHudson Mensa. Marlboro Public Library, Marlboro. 691-8009.

The Great Hyde Park Apple Dessert Cook-Off 11am. Hyde Park Farmers Market, Hyde Park. 229-6973.

Zydeco Pilots

Silent Auction and Antiques Appraisal

5-7pm. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331brew.

11am-3pm. Bevier House Museum, Marbletown. 338-5614. $5.

Die Fledermaus

Eyes Wide Open Fundraiser

7:30pm. Presented by the Opera Company of the Highlands. Festival Theatre, Blooming Grove. 562-5381.

7:30pm. Presented by the Dutchess Peace Coalition. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 876-7906.

Sons of Another Planet

An Evening of Comedy

8-10:30pm. Experimental, world. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

7:30-9:30pm. Benefit for the Pleasant Valley Rescue Squad and Pleasant Valley Fire Company. Arlington HS Auditorium, Lagrangeville. 635-2117. $10/$15.

Helen Avakian 8-11pm. Acoustic, alternative, new age, original, solo. Maia Restaurant and Lounge, Poughkeepsie. 486-5004.

Judy Norman CD Release Party and Concert 8-11pm. Acoustic/non-acoustic rock. UnCommon Grounds Coffeehouse, Wurtsboro. 888-2121.

A Women‘s Voice 9pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

The Ellison Starr Electric Band

Ione’s 10th Annual Dream Festival 11pm. Dream Stream with Zevin Polzin and Diana Slattery. Gallery at Deep Listening Space, Kingston. 338-5984. FILM

The Talent Given Us 7:30pm. A family drives cross country to reunite. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448. KIDS

Saturday Children’s Workshop

10pm. Acoustic, alternative, dance, funk, original, rock. Bacchus Restaurant and Bar, New Paltz. 255-8636.

10am-1pm. On the Hudson River‘s maritime history. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 338-0071 ext. 13. $13.

THEATER

MUSIC

Born Yesterday

The Midnight Ramble

8pm. Presented by the Mohonk Mountain Stage Company. St. Andrew‘s Chruch, New Paltz. 255-3102.

The Miracle Worker 8pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Working 8pm. Skits about blue-collar workers by the Pawling Theater Co. Pawling High School, Pawling. 855-1965.

154

ART

Call for times. Levon Helm Studios, Woodstock. 679-2744. $100.

Zydeco Pilots Call for times. Snug‘s Harbor, New Paltz. 255-9800.

Project Mercury 2-5pm. Acoustic, blues, folk, original, rock. Warwick Valley Winery, Warwick. 258-4858.

RUTH WETZEL THE PEARL ARTS GALLERY 3572 Main Street Stone Ridge (845) 687-0888 October 8 through December 3. Opening reception: Saturday, October 22, 5-9pm.


Denise Jordan Finley 7pm. Guitar. Unitarian Fellowship, Rock Tavern. (518) 598-8276. $10.

Die Fledermaus 7:30pm. Presented by the Opera Company of the Highlands. Festival Theatre, Blooming Grove. 562-5381.

Symphony Concert I: Quartetto Gelato 8pm. Bardavon Theatre, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Sonny & Perley 8pm. W/Mimi O‘Neil and Lincoln Mayorga. North Pointe Cultural Arts Center, Kinderhook. (518) 758-9234.

Kurt Henry Band 8-11pm. Artists In Residence Studio Gallery, Kingston. 331-2662.

Chris Smither 9pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

Ellison Starr 9pm. Alternative, folk, original, rock, singer/songwriter. The Gilded Otter, New Paltz. 256-1700.

Garnet Rogers 9pm. Folk. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. $15. THE OUTDOORS

Mt. Beacon Call for times and meeting place. Moderate hike. 592-0204.

Western Catskills Strenuous Backpack Call for times and meeting place. 2975126.

Intermediate Class in Herbal Divination 1:30-4:30pm. Call for location. 297-7877. $35. DANCE

Fall Dance Performances 8pm. Featuring student choreography. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Swing Dance to the Blue Saracens 8:30pm. Lesson at 7:30. Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, Poughkeepsie. 454-2571. $10. FILM

Caterina in the Big City 5pm. Junior high in Rome. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448. MUSIC

Music at the Market 10:30am-1:30pm. Featuring The Digits. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 9434300.

Die Fledermaus 2pm. Presented by the Opera Company of the Highlands. Festival Theatre, Blooming Grove. 562-5381.

Little Toby Walker 2-5pm. Acoustic, blues, ragtime, solo, swing, traditional, vocals. Warwick Valley Winery, Warwick. 258-4858.

Colorado Quartet performs Beethoven’s Opus 127 3pm. Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7425.

Interfaith Music Festival

Mohonk Preserve Singles Hike – Gertrude’s Nose

3pm. Vassar College Chapel, Poughkeepsie. 471-7333.

9:30am-3:30pm. 10-mile hike. Meet at the West Trapps Trailhead, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Woodstock Brass Quintet and Friends in Concert 4pm. First Congregational Church, Saugerties. 388-3826.

Children’s Health Conference

Unplugged Acoustic Open Mike

10am-12pm. Focus on allergies. Marbletown Community Center, Stone Ridge. 255-0836.

4-6pm. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. $6/$5 members.

Book Signing and Illustrated Talk

6pm. Alternative, folk, original, rock, singer/songwriter. The Alamo, Rosendale. 658-3210.

1-4pm. Hardie Truesdale, author of Adirondack High: A Hudson River Journey. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Author Akiko Busch 2pm. The Uncommon Life of Common Objects. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Tales of a Jewish American Prince 8pm. Performance piece written/ performed by Glenn Laszlo Weiss. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Ellison Starr

Sunday Night Jazz 7-11pm. Chowhound Café, Saugerties. 246-5158. THE OUTDOORS

Mohonk Preserve Singles Hike – Ice Caves 9am-4pm. 10-mile hike. Meet at the Hiker’s Lot at the Ellenville Firehouse, New Paltz. 255-0919. SPOKEN WORD

THEATER

Family Festival Programs 11am. The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8050.

The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things 2pm. Dia, Beacon. 440-0100.

Born Yesterday 8pm. Presented by the Mohonk Mountain Stage Company. St. Andrew‘s Church, New Paltz. 255-3102.

Breast Cancer Options Luncheon and Silent Auction 12-5pm. Wiltwyck Country Club, Kingston. 657-8222. $35.

Conversations at the SDMA 2pm. Dialogue with 5 artists from the Encaustic Works 2005 exhibition. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art. 257-2331. THEATER

The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things

The Miracle Worker

2pm. Dia, Beacon. 440-0100.

8pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

The Miracle Worker

Working 8pm. Skits about blue-collar workers by the Pawling Theater Co. Pawling High School, Pawling. 855-1965. WORKSHOPS

3pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Beginner‘s Magical Herbalism 101 9:30am-12:30pm. Call for location. 297-7877. $35.

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8pm. Skits about blue-collar workers by the Pawling Theater Co. Pawling High School, Pawling. 855-1965.

MON 24

10am-2pm. Woodstock. 679-2100.

SUN 23

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Reiki I Certification & Attunements

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the forecast

SPOKEN WORD

DANCE

Fall Dance Performances 3pm. Featuring student choreography. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

155


MUSIC

Open Mike Featuring B Seth B 8-11pm. Rhinebeck Cantina Grille, Rhinebeck. 876-6816.

Healing by Design: An Intro to Feng Shui 7-9pm. Mirabai, Woodstock. 679-2100. $15/$20.

WED 26

David Kraai 11pm. Acoustic, country, folk, original, solo, traditional. Oasis Café, New Paltz. 255-2400. SPOKEN WORD

FILM

Spiritual Cinema Circle Call for times. Dinner and film. Garden of One, Rensselaerville. (518) 797-3373.

Racial Visions Popularization of German anthropology in the early 20th century. Honors Center, New Paltz. 257-3933.

Spatial Population Dynamics of Changes Disease Vectors 5pm. Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-6822.

Open Mike Night 7pm. Featuring Tim Shields and Matthew J. Spireng. Colony Café, Woodstock. 679-5342. $3.

Producing Knowledge in the Early Modern Curiosity Collection

Ana en el Trópico 8pm. By Cuban-American playwright Nilo Cruz. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-3480.

The Complete Works of Shakespeare Abridged 8pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

FRI 28

SPOKEN WORD

Homeland Security Seminar 8:30-11:30am. Poughkeepsie Grand Hotel, Poughkeepsie. 454-1700 ext. 1000.

The Sacraments of Mary Magdalene 12pm. Institute of Advanced Theology, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7279. $12/$10. WORKSHOPS

Trends, Product Development and Sales

EVENTS

Frost Valley YMCA’s Quilting Weekend Call for times. Quilting workshops, demonstrations, presentations and displays. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 237.

The Breakthrough Café 6:30-10pm. The gourmet way to jumpstart innovation. Blue Mountain Bistro, Woodstock. 679-1066. $45. FILM

WORKSHOPS

9am-5pm. Three Essentials for a Successful Business in Craft. Catskill Mountain Foundation, Hunter. (518) 263-4908 ext. 211. $75.

Monotype

Imagine a Life That Soars

KIDS

9am. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

7-8:30pm. Empowerment Life Coaching. Rosendale Library, Rosendale. 658-9013.

The Art of Magic and the Magic of Art

7:45pm. Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7512.

TUES 25

THURS 27

CLASSES ART

Native Trees and Shrubs for Landscaping

FILM

Community Shape Note Sing 7pm. Songs from The Sacred Harp. Holy Cross Church, Kingston. 658-3485.

Open Mike Night

6:30pm. Viewing of The Prisoner of Azkaban, talk about art depicting magic. Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA. (413) 458-2303.

7:30pm. Presented by the Opera Company of the Highlands. St. George’s Episcopal Church, Newburgh. 562-5381.

Special Faculty Concert

Basquiat 8pm. Rise and fall of artworld star. Taylor Hall, Rm 203, Vassar College. 437-5632.

8pm. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7404.

Joel Rafael Band

10:30pm. Snug‘s Tavern, New Paltz. 255-9800.

MUSIC

SPOKEN WORD

6-9pm. Lombardi‘s, Gardiner. 255-9779.

Pregnancy and Back Care

Mike Quick Band

6:30-8pm. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 871-4380.

9:30pm. Blues, r&b, soul. Corner Stage, Middletown. 342-4804.

WORKSHOPS

SPOKEN WORD

Healing Through Authentic Poetry Writing for Women

A Panoramic Journey on the Hudson

5:15-7:30pm. 6 sessions. Ulster County Community College, Kingston. 339-2025.

7:30pm. Junior high in Rome. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448.

Die Fledermaus

5-6:30pm. Mildred I. Washington Art Gallery, Poughkeepsie. 431-8622.

MUSIC

Caterina in the Big City

MUSIC

Vigilancia Estetica or Aesthetic Surveillance

7-9pm. IES Continuing Education Program, Millbrook. 677-9643.

the forecast

THEATER

9pm. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. $10.

Michael McCarthy Duo

7:30pm. Painter‘s Tavern, Cornwall. 534-5506 ext. 204.

The Battlefield Band 9pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

Helen Avakian 9pm. Acoustic, alternative, folk, original. Gilded Otter, New Paltz. 256-1700.

Big Frank and the Bargain Bingers 9pm. Bluegrass, blues, country, rock, rockabilly. The B&B Lounge, Catskill. (518) 678-9643.

KEN POLINSKIE: THEN AND NOW Opening Reception Saturday, Nov. 5, 5-8pm

NICOLE FACCO/ MODO GALLERY 506 Warren Street Hudson (518) 828-5090 Through December 31

DOWNWARD FACING, KEN POLINSKIE,

GONE TO THE DOGS 156

2004


Big Kahuna

MUSIC

BODY/MIND/SPIRIT

10pm. Dance, rock. The Captain‘s Table, Monroe. 783-0209.

Music at the Market

Traditional Women’s Sweat Lodge

10:30am-1:30pm. Featuring Michael DeBenedictus. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-4300.

12pm. Acorn Hill Healing Arts, Olivebridge. 657-2516. Suggested donation: $55.

8pm. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. $25/$18 students and seniors.

Visionaries and Mystics

EVENTS

The Complete Works of Shakespeare Abridged

The Miró String Quartet

THEATER

Dracula

8pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

The Rocky Horror Show 8pm. Presented by the Marist College Council on Theater Arts. Marist College, Poughkeepsie. 575-3133.

Working 8pm. Skits about blue-collar workers by the Pawling Theater Co. Pawling High School, Pawling. 855-1965.

Rocky Horror Picture Show 10pm. Dutchess County Community College, Poughkeepsie. 431-8916. WORKSHOPS

Favorite Ballroom Dances 7-8pm. 5 sessions. Ulster County Community College, Kingston. 339-2025.

The Sacred Art of Relationships 7-9pm. Mirabai, Woodstock. 679-2100. $15/$20.

Swing Dance II 8:15-9:15pm. 5 sessions. Ulster County Community College, Kingston. 339-2025.

SAT 29 ART

Cat Rock Artists

Hidden Treasures of the Hudson Valley

8pm. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7404.

FILM

7:30pm. Presented by the Opera Company of the Highlands. St. George’s Episcopal Church, Newburgh. 562-5381.

The Talent Given Us

Blind Mice

MUSIC

Jackalope

Songs for a Mid-Autumn Sunday Afternoon

9pm. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. $10.

Odetta 9pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

Die Fledermaus

THE OUTDOORS

Mount Taurus 8

The Chester Duo

9am. 5-8 mile moderate hike. Call for meeting place. 255-1704.

Mohonk Preserve Singles Hike – Undivided Lot 10am-3pm. Moderate 7-mile hike. Meet at the Spring Farm Trailhead, New Paltz. 255-0919.

2pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Sunday Night Jazz 7-11pm. Chowhound Café, Saugerties. 246-5158.

Cliff Eberhardt

SPOKEN WORD

8pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

Rhea Anastas on Fred Sandback

THE OUTDOORS

1pm. Dia, Beacon. 440-0100.

J.L. Conrad Poetry Reading 2pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Book Signing and Children’s Cut Paper Workshop 2-3:30pm. Dave Horowitz, The Ugly Pumpkin. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. $5.

Plant Families

2pm/8pm. Presented by the Marist College Council on Theater Arts. Marist College, Poughkeepsie. 575-3133.

9am-1pm. IES Continuing Education Program, Millbrook. 677-9643.

Poe on Poe

The Rocky Horror Show

8pm. Actors & Writers reading of Edgar Allen Poe‘s tales and poems. Odd Fellows Theatre, Olivebridge. 657-9760.

8:30pm. Barefoot, Substance & Smoke free. Knight of Columbus Hall, Kingston. 658-8319. Adults $5/Teens, Seniors $2/ Children, Volunteers Free.

The Complete Works of Shakespeare Abridged

Samhain Dance Party

Working

Horrorween Dance Party

1-3pm. Denise Jordan Finley. Peekskill Coffee House, Peekskill. (914) 739-1287. 2pm. Presented by the Opera Company of the Highlands. St. George’s Episcopal Church, Newburgh. 562-5381.

CLASSES

9pm. Colony Café, Woodstock. 6795342. $5.

5pm. A family drive s cross country to reunite. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448.

9pm. Acoustic, folk, original. Hickory BBQ Smokehouse, Kingston. 338-2424.

THEATER

Free-Style Frolic

4pm. Le Pavillon, Poughkeepsie. 4732525. $125.

Die Fledermaus

1-4pm. Museum of the Hudson Highlands, Cornwall. 534-5506 ext. 204.

DANCE

7th Annual Food and Wine Dinner and Silent Auction

8pm. The Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. 8pm. Skits about blue-collar workers by the Pawling Theater Co. Pawling High School, Pawling. 855-1965.

Mohonk Preserve Singles Hike – Walkabout 3 9:30am-4pm. Strenuous 10-mile hike. Mohonk Preserve Visitor Center, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Olde Hurley Ghost Walk 4:30pm. Hurley Heritage Society Museum, Hurley. 331-0593. $3. THEATER

The Rocky Horror Show 7pm. Presented by the Marist College Council on Theater Arts. Marist College, Poughkeepsie. 575-3133. WORKSHOPS

Past-Life Connections in Astrological Chartwork 2-4pm. Mirabai, Woodstock. 679-2100. $15/$20.

MON 31 FILM

Film Screening: Mozart’s The Magic Flute 7:45pm. Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7512.

9pm. W/Studio Stu. Mezzanine, Kingston. 339-6925.

WORKSHOPS

MUSIC

Day of the Dead Dance Party

Write Saturday 8:30am-4pm. With Wallkill Valley Writers. New Paltz. 255-7090.

Open Mike Featuring B Seth B

10pm. W/Mambo Kikongo. The Alamo, Rosendale. 658-3300 EVENTS

Harvest Festival 10am-5pm. Ashokan Field Campus, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

Poltergeists, Pumpkins and Pigs 1-5pm. Celebrate Halloween. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447. FILM

The Talent Given Us 7:30pm. A family drives cross country to reunite. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448.

SPOKEN WORD

10am-12pm. Sustainable Living Resource Center, Cottekill. 339-1690. $25 + materials.

Will Nixon: „The Night of the Living Dead“ Poems

1-3pm. Sustainable Living Resource Center, Cottekill. 331-2670.

The Tenets and Practices of Buddhism 3:30pm. By the Venerable Lama Pema Wangdak. Buddhist Center, Philmont. (518) 672-5216.

Creepers and Crawlers

ART

10am. Museum of the Hudson Highlands, Cornwall. 534-5506 ext. 204.

Cat Rock Artists

7pm. Mount Gulian Historic Site, Beacon. 831-8172.

7pm. Colony Café, Woodstock. 679-5342. $3. THEATER

The Rocky Horror Show 12am. Presented by the Marist College Council on Theater Arts. Marist College, Poughkeepsie. 575-3133.

SUN 30

KIDS

Scary Stories in the Barn

8-11pm. Rhinebeck Cantina Grille, Rhinebeck. 876-6816.

Life Mask Workshop

Harvest Season Nature Mask Workshop

the forecast

10am-4pm. A variety of media. Cascade Farm, Patterson. 855-1676.

6pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-0100.

12-4pm. A variety of media. Cascade Farm, Patterson. 855-1676.

.com 157


Emil Alzamora

Planet Waves BY ERIC FRANCIS COPPOLINO

The Anti-9/11 Besides causing a lot of suffering and changing the course of history, one thing the September 11, 2001 attacks and Hurricane Katrina have in common is that both events were preceded by unusual sun-moon aspects exactly on the summer solstice.

Just four hours into the summer of 2001, there was a total solar eclipse in Can-

About four weeks later, with no additional security having been put in

cer. Occurring at the beginning of a season, with the sun’s annual northward place, four airliners were hijacked, some buildings were knocked down, 3,000 journey at a halt, daylight went out for four minutes and fifty-seven seconds. people died, and another phase of a long coup d’etat in the United States We can see from this why, in ancient times, eclipses were considered such

was accomplished. We know the story: massive shifts from civilian to military

powerful omens, and why we need to listen to them today.

budgets, a rapid gutting of civil rights, the rise of the national security state,

Coming on the first day of summer, the eclipse was positioned in an

the Patriot Act, and the beginning of what some hoped (and still hope) would

exact 90-degree aspect to the Sidereal Vernal Point (SVP)—more commonly be a world of perpetual war. called the Aries Point or the first degree of Aries. Because so many cycles came together at once with such exacting precision, the implication was that something unusual with far-reaching effects would soon be taking place. Note: Astrologers missed it. What some people noticed was the imminent meeting of Saturn and Pluto,

O

n the summer solstice of 2005, with the sun making its annual visit to the first degree of Cancer, the moon entered Capricorn. There was an

exact full moon on the first day of summer. With this aspect, the solar eclipse of June 2001 was reactivated. Eclipses

which is one of those aspects that changes the world every time it comes have a long shelf life, and they do something that planets don’t—they stay around, in an approximately 35-year cycle. Think of it: tiny, dense Pluto, the

still. They stand there waiting for a transit or a progression to come along

unstoppable force, and the vast, structured planet Saturn, the seemingly im- and set them off. Four years is a pretty good duration for an eclipse, but the movable object, meeting at 180 degrees. Something was bound to happen, solstice/total solar of June 2001 was no ordinary chunk of space debris. and it did.

158

With a full moon triggering the eclipse in 2005, we had reason to be con-

That aspect occurred on August 5, 2001, a day before the now infamous

cerned that something was developing this summer. One immediate result

August 6 Presidential Daily Brief, wherein the CIA informed the vacationing

was the transit bombings in London. Now, given that Hurricane Katrina has

president that Osama Bin Laden, the halfbrother of a Bush family business

made her appearance and the effects are beginning to be felt around the world

associate, was determined to hit targets inside the United States.

(gas is now about $6.50 per gallon in Paris), we have reason to be concerned


about what else that something includes. A full moon setting off the total solar

happened is so real that people are getting angry. While anger is a good start, it’s not

eclipse gives the feeling of a 180-degree a replacement for leadership. And leaderturn. Something has come to full fruition

ship is one thing that’s lacking in the United

since 2001, and something has reversed States right now. itself. Full moons often signify the breaking

To understand the astrology of the

of a deadlock, and this is what we are now Bush administration, 9/11, the Iraq war, and facing: a long-held deadlock shattered in Katrina, one can look to the four cardinal the mud. This time around, while ordinary people

signs (Aries, Cancer, Libra, Capricorn). For the moment the focus is on Libra and on

are again suffering and struggling and October 3, when we will have an eclipse of voluntarily throwing their bodies into a

the sun in that sign. This will accelerate the

grossly toxic disaster zone to assist others, process of karma that has finally been set reality has finally come home to roost at into motion. the front door of the political community.

Things will happen in government and

A massive region of the United States has

in society that we had no notion could go

been destroyed and its population has been down. What will shock us most is how fast scattered across the country, from Texas to

things can change and how fast we need to

New York City to Seattle. Evacuees are ev- adapt. It can be a very exciting time in hiserywhere. Because of this, it’s a local story tory, a great moment to be alive, if you go everywhere. Everybody knows somebody in

with the flow. The potential creativity, the

New Orleans. Just about anyone who travels

sense of adventure, the community and the

has been there.

sense of being alive are likely to be unlike

It is becoming painfully obvious that any other we’ve experienced. there was government neglect involved

As the spotlight is thrown onto Libra,

both before and after the disaster struck.

the central theme is justice—something

The money, the National Guard, the high- that for long periods of time is dormant in water Humvees are in Iraq. Why are they in

the American mentality and occasionally

Iraq? Because September 11 was exploited;

returns with a vengeance. My concern is

because Halliburton and the Carlyle Group that, if taken for its own sake, justice often and Chevron control the United States gov- becomes vengeance. And that is what we ernment; and because of a diversity of cir- need to beware of right now. Anger is an cumstances that has left us without an elec- appropriate response, but we need to toral process, living under an empire rather direct it. than in a republic. We could have handled

We have been lied to, our country has

a hurricane five years ago, but we’re not in

been ripped off, and our government is now

that business anymore. You now live in the

in debt and waging a huge war it can’t get out

United States of Homeland Security.

of, and at the same time, it cannot take care

One significant difference between 8/29

of its own people. As a result of all of this,

and 9/11 is that it’s more or less impossible thousands of our young people are dying to blame the former on an enemy and

for a lie in Iraq, at least 100,000 Iraqi civilians

launch a bombing campaign. (Although

have been killed, and now, Louisiana, Mis-

who knows, maybe Karl Rove will figure sissippi, and Alabama lay in waste. out a way.) That’s the usual response when

Fact: Those levees could have been fixed

something goes wrong in America, or when

long ago. Fact: They were not. Fact: The

we need to clear out the munitions stock-

money was spent on a private war. Fact:

piles and buy more from Boeing, General

Oil business cronies of the White House,

Dynamics, and Raytheon. We assert our as well as Halliburton, will rake in billions power, get out the yellow ribbons and on this disaster. beer, and watch it like the Superbowl or the Grand Ole Opry.

When this all hits home as one idea, it’s going to transcend politics entirely. And

But now, the illusion is failing. The city of

that moment is coming. The challenges, in

Houston has been turned into an evacuee

true Libra fashion, will be staying in balance,

staging area. The Houston Astrodome is a

keeping a grip on ourselves, and applying

refugee camp. Isn’t that weird? People are

reason. The larger issue is leadership—be-

camping out in $200 box seats.

cause the power vacuum that is appearing

Now something real has happened. It has

on the national level only reflects a power

happened at home, where we can notice it

vacuum that has existed in our minds for a

and where we can do something. What has long time.

159


Horoscopes by Eric Francis Coppolino www.planetwaves.net

ARIES March 20-April 19 What now unfolds is, in part, related to what others are going through and in part related to what you are experiencing. But in order not to take on what is not yours, you must remain some combination of discerning and nonjudgmental. Your primary commitment is being true to yourself, and remembering that allowing for change is one of the healthiest qualities any relationship can have. Then you will save yourself much unnecessary strife and energy. When you reassess the situation in a month, you’re likely to see it through entirely different eyes, and be far more agreeable to the changes that someone close to you has been going through. What is more noteworthy is that your own process of inward seeking and questing for self-understanding will go on for considerably longer, and you’ll be the one counting on the patience of someone close to you; so you would be wise to offer yours now.

TAURUS

April 19-May 20 The silver lining to what may feel like an unmitigated upheaval is that you’re now getting to balance out your priorities. It’s only because your homing instincts are so strong that you’re feeling this as something more tumultuous than it is. You have an equally potent affinity for change and for living fully in the state of being different

than others. If the events now unfolding are demonstrating nothing else, it’s that you are your own distinct individual, and one who can stand face to face with the world. You know that the roles or positions could just as easily be reversed. You can see some aspect of yourself in everyone—even if someone close to you is having difficulty doing the same thing. Sooner or later, they will learn, and if one of you feels reluctant to let go of the past, perhaps focus on this quality of mutual acknowledgment.

GEMINI

May 20-June 21 Miracles happen, though they often take a form different than we were expecting. Whatever shape or color the current divine gesture arrives in, I propose that you’re safe trusting, and allowing the situation to unfold. Remember that you’re not dealing with the kind of power imbalance that you’ve become accustomed to for so long. I cannot emphasize this point enough. In fact, you’re subject to neither the whims nor the influences of others at the mo-

ment, and are free to follow a calling that is obviously bigger and more glorious than anyone around you currently recognizes. In order to be free, you actually need to act as if you are free. Otherwise, it’s just another philosophical concept. The get real moment the world is experiencing arrives as particularly vivid for you, and what you may be experiencing as fear you certainly make up for in vision.

CANCER June 21-July 22 I cannot imagine that a solar eclipse in the 4th house of home and security is a great feeling for one born under the sign Cancer, but if you’re feeling stuck it may be just the medicine you need. What all of us need to remember now, particularly you, is that as brisk and unexpected as certain changes may feel, or as dramatic as the prospects may seem, protection surrounds and fills what is transpiring. You can take this message on many levels, but ultimately you will be convinced by the outcome. Therefore, spare yourself the worry and pay attention to how you feel and what you know must be done. Security comes in many forms, and the one that will suit you best at the moment is adaptability. This, you have available, and you also possess the rare human quality of initiative. So often, the world is waiting for you to take leadership, and such is true today.

160


Horoscopes by Eric Francis Coppolino www.planetwaves.net

LEO July 22-Aug. 23 The journey up a mountain can be distinctly different at the top than it was along the way to getting there. Certain obstacles may appear, and it’s important to think more carefully than ever about how to handle them. You have, however, the experience of the whole journey behind you. You’ve gained confidence in your own skill and leadership, which has been lacking at other times in your life. What you will now acquire is the talent for being able to reassess your goal while still keeping it firmly in mind. Perhaps your methods need to change; perhaps you will benefit from altering your timing; you may even decide that attaining one particular objective was not what you had in mind all along, but that something else is. In fact, what you’re really seeking may be waiting for you way down in the valley, where you are just as free to seek your contentment.

VIRGO Aug. 23-Sept. 22 You’re not the type to take huge risks, and we don’t need astrology to know that. You do, however, have your impetuous side, which is a good thing. At this point, an authentic degree of daring, even going beyond what you’ve ever known, is called for. It’s clear that the fortune you are seeking is neither cash nor credit, but rather a sense of inner completion. As such, the risk is likely to be seeing or experiencing yourself entirely outside the context of your relationships, and as authentically contained within yourself. In a world where everything is defined by its opposite, this is more daring than you may imagine. In a sense, you are challenging yourself to let go entirely of the petty games of give and take with which the world preoccupies itself. You are going to know what you look like without a mirror, and more to the point, you’re going to be sure that you exist.

LIBRA Sept. 22-Oct. 23 Once you accept the fact that there is no turning back, you will recognize how much you want to go forward. In truth, there is nothing more than an idea that stands between the past and the future, but it’s a powerful idea that’s not especially easy to let go of. You seem to have an investment in it, but what you may not recognize is that you’ve already got all you can from this particular way of thinking or living, which you can actually call your own. One particular relationship is providing a rather striking contrast to who and what you are, specifically in the way that someone close to you has chosen to use their power. In truth, this person has no power over you, and the strongest signal you can send, both to yourself and to them, is to live as if you’re free, because you are.

SCORPIO Oct. 23-Nov.22 Even your fears have a silver lining, because they point you to what you do not want. I would say that your worst nightmare is to be trapped in a situation where someone refuses to negotiate. Most of your life, you’ve been able to locate your power in any scenario because you understand psychology, and because people are susceptible to it. But now it seems you’ve run out of logic where it comes to understanding a particular relationship, and there is no further you can go. You would benefit from asking yourself how you would respond under similar circumstances, faced with similar contradictions. The issue at hand is specifically powerlessness, a standoff where nobody can really make a move. But there is nowhere to go; nothing to do. Empathy will show you the way to peace and understanding, and offer you contrast between what we really can call the old way and the new.

161


Horoscopes by Eric Francis Coppolino www.planetwaves.net

SAGITTARIUSNov.22-Dec.22 There are two approaches you can take to the situation, and I don’t recommend the direct confrontation. That will underscore differences more than common ground, and there are plenty of common interests of which to take advantage. There is in fact quite a contrast available between what you might call “new paradigm” and “old paradigm” thinking, and it’s rare that the choice has been so clearly visible. It may seem that everything you’ve been working toward all these months comes up in one enormous make-it-or-break-it moment, but I don’t see the stars being so arbitrary. No matter what happens, you’re going to make progress, particularly if you’re open to the realization that when anyone succeeds, you succeed. That being said, I don’t think the rewards for your considerable efforts will be symbolic; nor will they be limited to financial gain. The real treasure in this situation is a relationship or partnership of some kind.

CAPRICORN Dec. 22-Jan. 20 You may be inclined to wonder whether you are gaining or losing influence through the current turn of events, and much depends on how you interpret the developments and your role in them. There’s actually very little you need to do, but you will definitely need to make certain key decisions, and make them at just the right moment. One of the most crucial lessons of politics, which is most definitely involved in the game you’re playing, is that one does not do anything alone; there are always people assisting both in front of the scenes and behind them. The best possible outcome for you will involve a significant meeting or arrangement between two people whose relationship to you seems to be indirect. But since you’ll be a beneficiary of what develops, it would serve everyone for you to make sure as many situations as possible have positive outcomes. This will set the pattern for many months to come.

AQUARIUS Jan. 20-Feb. 19 You may be waking up to life being no joke, but I suggest you keep your sense of humor. The real challenge is not taking life seriously, but rather keeping your quest for adventure, and your willingness to take intellectual, creative and most important, amorous risks. This really is a case of nothing attempted, nothing gained, and the only thing that’s likely to be holding you back is the fear that you can lose everything. That’s entirely an illusion, which is based on another more or less equivalent fear: that of having nothing to gain. The point is, you’re looking too directly at your limitations and could put a lot more energy into opening your heart and mind to the possibilities and rewards of being willing to live a little faster and looser. To keep your integrity, all you need to do is tell the truth, particularly to yourself.

PISCES Feb. 20-March 20 Your charts portend a marriage or engagement of sorts, but you would be wise to monitor the ways in which the past factors into the equation. This remains true whether it’s a collective past between you and the person involved, or your own individual past and the many patterns that seem to follow you around. Consider carefully the extent to which you have lived in ways that subject you to the values of others. Consider the ways in which you have used your power, or failed to do so. While you may on one level be confronted with events beyond your control, the one thing you do have is the ability to choose, and this is no small miracle. You also have time to make up your mind, and don’t need to think in terms of an ultimate decision except, primarily, for what you need to free yourself of. And that, more than anything, is an idea you have about yourself.

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NY

845-338-7161

BROFFMAN, KARY

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-6753

GADALETO’S RESTAURANT & MARKET

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-1717

BUDD BUILT IRON WORKS

HILLSDALE

NY

518-325-3912

GAIA STUDIO AND GALLERY

RED HOOK

NY

845-758-2095

BURT’S ELECTRONICS

KINGSTON

NY

845-331-5011

GALARIE BMG

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-0027

BUTTERMILK FALLS INN & SPA

MILTON

NY

877-746-6772

THE GARRISON

GARRISON

NY

845-424-3604

CANCIENNE, JAMES

HUDSON

NY

518-828-2528

GARRISON ART CENTER

GARRISON

NY

845-424-3960

CAROL BARNSTEAD PHOTOGRAPHY

BEACON

NY

845-831-4144

GARRISON INSTITUTE

GARRISON

NY

845-424-4800

CARROLL, JOHN M.

HURLEY

NY

845-338-8420

GENERALE, DONNA

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-1777

CATSKILL ART & OFFICE SUPPLY

KINGSTON

NY

845-331-7780

GEORGE COLE AUCTIONEERS

RED HOOK

NY

845-758-9114

CATSKILL BALLET THEATRE

KINGSTON

NY

845-339-1629

GLASSBLOWING.COM

POUGHKEEPSIE

NY

845-297-7334

CATSKILL MOUNTAIN MIDWIFERY

COTTEKILL

NY

845-687-2229

GOLDEN NOTEBOOK

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-8000

CENTER FOR ADVANCED DENTISTRY

HIGHLAND

NY

845-691-5600

GREAT FOOD & CO

STAATSBURG

NY

845-229-0209

CENTER FOR CREATIVITY AND WORK

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-336-8318

GREENE COUNTY TOURISM

CATSKILL

NY

518-943-3223

CENTER FOR HOLISTIC DENTISTRY

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS

NY

914-245-4041

H HOUST & SON

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-2115

CENTER FOR PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT THROUGH MUSIC

LAGRANGEVILLE

NY

845-677-5871

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

AMERICUS

GA

229-924-6935,

CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-9957

HALDORA

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-6250

CENTER FOR POSITIVE THINKING

PAWLING

NY

845-855-5000

HAMMERTOWN BARN

PINE PLAINS

NY

518-398-7075

CHABAD OF WOODSTOCK

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-6407

HANA SUSHI

RED HOOK

NY

845-758-4333

THE CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-7990

HAND IN HAND - A HEALER’S CONNECTION

HOPEWELL JUNCTION

NY

845-897-3280

THE CHILDREN’S SCHOOL OF YOGA

ROCK HILL

NY

845-791-1553

HEALTHY GOURMET TO GO, INC.

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-339-7171

CHINESE HEALING ARTS

KINGSTON

NY

845-338-6045

HEAVEN AND EARTH

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-5777

CHOW HOUND

SAUGERTIES

NY

845-246-5158

HEAVENLY SENSE

CORNWALL

NY

845-534-1132

CHRONOGRAM

KINGSTON

NY

845-334-8600

HICKORY BBQ SMOKEHOUSE

KINGSTON

NY

845-338-2424

CLASSIC COUNTRY

EAST CHATHAM

NY

518-392-2211

HIGHLAND CAFE

HIGHLAND

NY

845-691-6913

CLASSIC DANISH DESIGN

AMENIA

NY

845-373-7238

HOFFMAN HOUSE TAVERN

KINGSTON

NY

845-338-2626

CLERMONT STATE HISTORIC SITE

GERMANTOWN

NY

518-537-4240

HONDA OF KINGSTON

KINGSTON

NY

845-338-5400

COCOON HOME

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-6862

HOON PARK, MD

WAPPINGERS FALLS

NY

845-298-6060

COFFEY GALLERY

KINGSTON

NY

845-339-6105

HOPPER CABINET CO.

EAST CHATHAM

NY

518-392-9692

COMMON FIRE

GERMANTOWN

NY

518-537-2172

HOULIHAN LAWRENCE LAVERY REAL ESTATE

EAST FISHKILL

NY

845-227-4400

COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES

ALBANY

NY

518-438-2826

HUDSON SAILING

STONE RIDGE

NY

845-687-2440

COMMUNITY PLAYBACK THEATRE

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-5613

HUDSON VALLEY CLEAN ENERGY, INC.

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-3767

COOL COVER

KINGSTON

NY

914-329-1414

HUDSON VALLEY ELECTROLYSIS

POUGHKEEPSIE

NY

845-473-4747

CORAL ACRES

GARDINER

NY

845-255-7281

HUDSON VALLEY LEARNING CENTER

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-4704

CORNWALL REALTY

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-471-2605

HUDSON VALLEY POTTERY

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-3190

COSIMOS

NEWBURGH

NY

845-567-1556

HUDSON VALLEY SCHOOL OF MASSAGE

HIGHLAND

NY

845-255-0013

COYOTE GRILL

POUGHKEEPSIE

NY

845-471-0600

HUDSON VALLEY SUDBURY SCHOOL

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-679-1002

CRAFTS PEOPLE

WEST HURLEY

NY

845-331-3859

HUDSON VALLEY SUNROOMS

BEACON

NY

845-838-1235

CRARY, ADAM

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-5739

HUDSONVALLEYWEDDINGS.COM

KINGSTON

NY

845-336-4705

CREATRIX

WEST HURLEY

NY

845-340-9632

HUGUENOT HISTORICAL SOCIETY

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-1660

CUNNEEN-HACKETT CULTURAL CENTER

POUGHKEEPSIE

NY

845-486-4571

HUMBACH, IRENE

POUGHKEEPSIE

NY

845-485-5933

THE CUP 13

ROCKHILL

NY

845-791-1958

HUMMINGBIRD JEWELERS

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-4585

CURIOUS MINDS MEDIA

GARDINER

NY

845-790-3357

IN GOOD TASTE

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-0110


SANTA FE

NM

505-660-6167

PROSPECT HILL ORCHARDS

MILTON

NY

845-795-2383

INQUIRING MIND BOOKSTORE

CATSKILL

NY

518-943-7772

Q-LLP

COLD SPRING

NY

646-642-9263

INSTITUTE OF ECOSYSTEM STUDIES

MILLBROOK

NY

845-677-7600

RAMBLING ROSE

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-3899

INSTITUTE OF TRANSPERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY

PALO ALTO

CA

650-493-4430

RED HOOK NATURAL FOODS

RED HOOK

NY

845-758-9230

IONE

KINGSTON

NY

845-339-5776

RHINEBECK ANTIQUES FAIR

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-1989

JACKS MEATS & DELI

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-2244

RHINEBECK COOPERATIVE HEALTH CENTER

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-5556

JACOBOWITZ & GUBITS

WALDEN

NY

845-778-2121

RHINEBECK FARMERS MARKET

RHINEBECK

NY

845-758-3535

JAI MA

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-256-0465

RHINEBECK WOMEN’S HEALTH

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-0494

JOHN BUCHANAN CARPET CO.

HYDE PARK

NY

845-229-7172

RINNHOFER, ANGELIKA

BEACON

NY

845-489-4156

JOSHUA FINN FURNITURE

HIGH FALLS

NY

845-687-8805

THE RIVER POOL

BEACON

NY

845-220-7669

JUICY

BEACON

NY

845-838-3443

ROBERTI MOTOR CARS

KINGSTON

NY

845-339-7222

KAATSBAAN INTERNATIONAL DANCE CENTER

TIVOLI

NY

845-757-5106

ROSE CROSSING

WANTAGH

NY

516-978-2260

KARMA TRIYANA DARMACHAKRA

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-5906

ROSENDALE CEMENT COMPANY

ROSENDALE

NY

845-658-3210

KASMIN PIRTLE

PINE PLAINS

NY

518-398-6298

ROSENDALE WARES

ROSENDALE

NY

845-658-7673

KEEPSAKE FARM MARKET & COUNTRY BAKE SHOP

HOPEWELL JUNCTION

NY

845-897-2266

ROY GUMPEL PHOTOGRAPHY

HIGH FALLS

NY

845-687-2109

KENT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

KENT

CT

860-927-1463

SAPPHIRE

ROSENDALE

NY

845-658-3315

KIESENDAHL AND CALHOUN CONTEMPORARY ART

BEACON

NY

845-838-1177

THE SANCTUARY

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-3337

KITCHEN DRAWER

HYDE PARK

NY

845-229-2300

SATYA YOGA CENTER, UPSTATE YOGA, LLC

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-2528

KOENIG, VICKI

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-2398

SAUNDERSKILL FARMS

ACCORD

NY

845-626-2676

KYOTO SUSHI

KINGSTON

NY

845-339-1128

SCHNEIDER, BRUCE

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-4424

LA Z BOY

KINGSTON

NY

845-342-6454

SCHNEIDER, PFAHL AND RAHME

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-9868

LAW OFFICES OF ANDREA LOWENTHAL

HUDSON

NY

518-671-6200

SCHNEIDER,CONNIE

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-256-1516

LEGGA INC

MINEOLA

NY

845-729-0608

SCHOOL FOR YOUNG ARTISTS

BEARSVILLE

NY

845-679-9541

LEISURE TIME SPRING WATER

KINGSTON

NY

845-331-0237

SHAKTI YOGA

KINGSTON

NY

845-679-0706

THE LIVING SEED

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-8212

SKI BUTTERNUT

GREAT BARRINGTON

MA

413-528-2000

LEWIS, CHRISTOPHER

KINGSTON

NY

845-612-3425

SKY MOVEMENT STUDIO

PEEKSKILL

NY

914-788-6535

LOOMINUS

BEARSVILLE

NY

845-679-6500

SKYDIVE THE RANCH

GARDINER

NY

845-255-4033

LOUNGE & LINGER

HIGH FALLS

NY

845-687-9463

SOLSTICE RESTAURANT

KINGSTON

NY

845-331-0812

LUNA 61

RED HOOK

NY

845-758-0061

SOMETHING SWEET DESSERT CAFE

MIDDLETOWN

NY

845-343-2233

THE LYCIAN CENTER

SUGAR LOAF

NY

845-469-2287

SOUL DOG

POUGHKEEPSIE

NY

845-454-3254

MAGGIE’S KROOKED CAFE & JUICE BAR

HUNTER

NY

518-589-6101

SPIRITTUS HOLISTIC RESOURCE CENTER

KINGSTON

NY

845-338-8313

MAIN COURSE

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-2600

ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL

POUGHKEEPSIE

NY

845-483-5000

MALDEN, JILL

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-256-1420

STANDARD GLASS OF POUGHKEEPSIE INC.

POUGHKEEPSIE

NY

845-462-1818

MANNY’S

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-9902

STEIN-WAY DOG TRAINING

GOSHEN

NY

845-294-6880

MARK GRUBER GALLERY

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-1241

STERLING PAINTING

NEW MILFORD

NY

845-988-1338

MARTIN KNOWLES

KINGSTON

NY

845-338-5450

STEVE MORRIS DESIGNS

KINGSTON

NY

845-679-7600

MERRITT BOOKSTORE

MILLBROOK

NY

845-677-5857

STORMVILLE AIRPORT - ANTIQUES SHOW

STORMVILLE

NY

845-226-4000

MEXICAN RADIO

HUDSON

NY

518-828-7770

SUNFLOWER NATURAL FOOD MARKET

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-5361

MEZZANINE BOOKS & CAFE

KINGSTON

NY

845-339-6925

SUNY CONTINUING & PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-257-2894

MID HUDSON CHIROPRACTIC

KINGSTON

NY

845-331-6233

SUNY ULSTER - OFFICE OF COMMUNITY RELATIONS

STONE RIDGE

NY

845-687-5262

MID-HUDSON REBIRTHING

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-6482

SWALLOW, JUDY

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-5613

MIRABAI

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-2100

SWEETHEART GALLERY

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-2622

MISTER SNACKS, INC.

AMHERST

NY

800-333-6393

TABLE ROCK BIKE

ROSENDALE

NY

845-658-7832

MOHONK IMAGES/ G. STEVE JORDAN GALLERY

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-6800

TAROT ON THE HUDSON

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-5797

MONARDA HERBAL APOTHECARY

PHOENICIA

NY

845-688-2122

TAYLOR CSW-R, MARY

WAPPINGERS FALLS

NY

845-298-7417

MONKFISH PUBLISHING

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-4861

TERRAPIN

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-3330

MOTHER EARTH’S STOREHOUSE

KINGSTON

NY

845-336-5541

TIGERLILY COMMUNICATIONS

NEWBURGH

NY

845-569-0363

MOUNT SAINT MARY COLLEGE

NEWBURGH

NY

845-561-0800

TIME AND SPACE LIMITED

HUDSON

NY

518-822-8448

MOUNTAIN LAUREL WALDORF SCHOOL

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-0033

TIMELY SIGNS

KINGSTON

NY

845-331-8710

THE MOVEMENT CENTER

KINGSTON

NY

845-331-0986

TISCHLER FAMILY DENTAL CENTER

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-3706

THE MOVING BODY

BEARSVILLE

NY

845-679-7715

TORCHES ON THE HUDSON

NEWBURGH

NY

845-568-0100

N AND S SUPPLY

FISHKILL

NY

845-896-6291

TOTAL IMMERSION SWIM STUDIO

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-4242

NATURAL GOURMET COOKERY SCHOOL

NEW YORK

NY

212-645-5170

TOWN AND COUNTRY RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

MILAN

NY

845-758-1979

NATURES PAVILION

KINGSTON

NY

973-831-5804

TUMBLING FALLS

ROUND TOP

NY

800-473-0519

NEKO SUSHI & RESTAURANT

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-0162

TYCHOSTUP,LORNA

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-9467

NESS, DAVID

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-1200

ULSTER BALLET COMPANY

SAUGERTIES

NY

845-247-4517

NET STEP

KINGSTON

NY

845-338-6640

UMAMI CAFE

FISHKILL

NY

845-896-1979

NEW SPIRIT OF WOODSTOCK

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-0008

UNISON ARTS & LEARNING CENTER

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-1559

NEW YORK PRESS DIRECT

MONTGOMERY

NY

845-457-2442

UP AND ONE PRODUCTIONS

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-5348

NEW YORK REGION PATHWORK

PHOENICIA

NY

845-688-2211

UPHOLSTERY UNLIMITED

HUDSON

NY

518-828-0500

NEW YORK STATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

COOPERSTOWN

NY

607-547-1426

UPSTATE FILMS

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-4546

NEWBURGH VETERINARY HOSPITAL

NEWBURGH

NY

845-564-2660

VAN BRUNT GALLERY

BEACON

NY

845-838-2995

NICHOLAS SIMILE

ROSENDALE

NY

845-658-3662

VARGA

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-4005

NICHOLS, SHARON

HURLEY

NY

845-340-0220

VASSAR BROTHERS MEDICAL CENTER

POUGHKEEPSIE

NY

845-431-5663

NIXON, DR TONI

PORT EWEN

NY

845-339-1684

VEGAN LIFESTYLE COACHING

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-7979

NOA LESSING FUSCO, LLC

CORTLANDT MANOR

NY

914-739-7360

THE VILLAGE TEAROOM

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-3434

NORTH PARK WOODCRAFT

HYDE PARK

NY

845-229-2189

VIOLET ALCHEMY

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-883-7899

NORTH POINTE CULTURAL CENTER

KINDERHOOK

NY

518-758-9234

VITAL HEALTH OF WOODSTOCK

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-657-9835

NORTHERN DUTCHESS HARDWOODS

RED HOOK

NY

845-758-2005

VITAMIN NAVIGATOR

LAKE HILL

NY

845-679-1127

NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL

NEWBURGH

NY

845-569-1425

WAINWRIGHT, ANDREW

RED HOOK

NY

845-757-5431

NUTSHELL REALTY

STONE RIDGE

NY

845-687-2200

WALZER, LAILA

MOUNT TREMPER

NY

845-679-7215

O II

BEACON

NY

845-831-0652

WARREN KITCHEN & CUTLERY

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-6208

OGUST, DION

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-4135

WASABI JAPANESE RESTAURANT

HUDSON

NY

518-822-1888

OLD DROVERS INN

DOVER PLAINS

NY

845-832-9311

WDST 100.1 RADIO WOODSTOCK

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-7266

ONE BOOK/ONE NEW PALTZ

ROSENDALE

NY

845-338-6725

WEBJOGGER INTERNET SERVICES

TIVOLI

NY

845-757-4000

ORIGIN COMMUNICATIONS

SEATTLE

WA

206-285-9615

WELLNESS CENTER OF HYDE PARK

HYDE PARK

NY

845-229-5560

OSAKA RESTAURANT

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-7338

WELLSPRING

CORNWALL

NY

845-534-7668

PANZAR, ELIZABETH

ACCORD

NY

845-626-8195

WESTON INSURANCE BROKERAGE INC

NEWBURGH

NY

845-566-3469

PASTORALE

LAKEVILLE

CT

860-435-1011

WHITE HORSE WINE & LIQUOR

RED HOOK

NY

845-758-6277

PATHWAYS MEDIATION CENTER

KINGSTON

NY

845-331-0100

WHITE RICE

HUDSON

NY

518-697-3500

PATS TATS

KINGSTON

NY

845-338-8282

WHITECLIFF VINEYARD

GARDINER

NY

845-255-4613

PAULINE OLIVEROS FOUNDATION

KINGSTON

NY

845-338-5984

WILLIAMS LUMBER & HOME CENTER

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-9663

THE PEARL GALLERY

STONE RIDGE

NY

845-647-5383

WILLSON, SUSAN

STONE RIDGE

NY

845-687-4807

PEGASUS COMFORT FOOTWEAR

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-2373

WKZE / 98.1

SHARON

CT

860-364-5800

PHANTOM GARDENER

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-8606

WOMEN’S CARE CENTER

RHINEBECK

NY

845-875-2496

PHOTOSENSUALIS

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-5333

WOODSTOCK ARTISTS STUDIO TOUR

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-7843

PILATES HUDSON

HUDSON

NY

518-929-0931

WOODSTOCK DAY SCHOOL

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-246-3744

PILATES OF NEW PALTZ

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-0559

WOODSTOCK DESIGN

WOODSTOCK

NY

845-679-9189

PIQUE BOUTIQUE

RHINEBECK

NY

845-876-7722

WOODSTOCK PERCUSSION

SHOKAN

NY

845-657-0425

PLANET WAVES

TALLAHASSEE

FL

206-567-4455

WOODSTOCK WOMENS HEALTH SPA

WEST HURLEY

NY

845-679-6699

PLAZA DINER

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-1030

WVKR

HIGHLAND

NY

845-437-7178

PLEASANT STONE FARM

MIDDLETOWN

NY

845-343-4040

YOGA ON DUCK POND

STONE RIDGE

NY

845-687-4836

NY

845-437-5902

ZEN MOUNTAIN MONASTERY

MOUNT TREMPER

NY

845-688-7993

NY

845-430-1290

ZWEIG, JULIE

NEW PALTZ

NY

845-255-3566

POWERHOUSE SUMMER THEATER/LEHMAN-LOEB GALLERY POUGHKEEPSIE PROFESSIONAL PAINTING CO.

WOODSTOCK

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INNER TRADITIONS \ BEAR & COMPANY

165


H O M E S

I N

T H E

M I D - H U D S O N

V A L L E Y

$ 8 5 / L I S T I N G . $ 2 1 5 F O R T H R E E . C A L L A C H R O N O G R A M S A L E S R E P R E S E N TAT I V E TO D AY TO L I S T YO U R P R O P E RT Y. D E A D L I N E : O C TO B E R 1 3 T H .

dwellings

DWELLINGS

166

GETAWAY COTTAGE

MOUNTAIN RETREAT

NESTLED IN THE WOODS

The cottage has all new hard wood flooring, new carpet in the sleeping loft, brand new kitchen, butcher block counters, new gas stove, new refrigerator & new cabinets. Park your car & cross the Mombaccus Creek over the foot bridge to your getaway cottage, enjoy the peace & tranquility of the creek as you are backed up to state land, NYSDEC marked trail head to Vernooy Kill Falls are just walking distance up the road. $149,900.Prudential Nutshell Realty (845) 658-3737. www.Nutshellrealty.com.

Nestled in the forest overlooking a pond, this charming, newly remodeled 2br cottage is the perfect mountain retreat. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, skylights & a wood burning stove create a cozy yet spacious feel. Part of your 2.9 acres is designated wetlands, including a beautiful pond. Escape to your own nature preserve convenient to the Gunks & Catskills. $165,000. Prudential Nutshell Realty (845) 658-3737. www.Nutshellrealty.com.

Immaculate home on private road nestled against a wooded hill in rear. Overlooking open front yard with seasonal mountain views. View could be year-round with some on-site clearing. Family room & office. Decks on front & rear. $267,500. Prudential Nutshell Realty (845) 658-3737. www.Nutshellrealty.com.

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120 PRISTINE ACRES

PRIME SPACE AVAILABLE...

Circa 1895 Victorian is priced to sell at $159,000! Located on Main Street of the village of Cairo in Greene County, a very active and growing community. Ideally situated for a professional and/or small business with separate entrance for offices and storefront. 8 rooms plus sunroom and 1.5 baths. In addition to all of this, a secluded backyard which borders beautiful Shinglekill Creek. Contact Linda (800) 473-0519

5 miles from the Poughkeepsie Metro North Station and 8 miles to the New Paltz exit off I-87. Build a luxury estate and surround yourself with your own private nature preserve or subdivide. Over 1/2 mile of road frontage on a quiet country road which meanders beside the Hudson River. Canoe and fish on your 6-Acre spring-fed pond or hike the miles of trails that traverse the property. Offered at $800,000. For pictures & maps go to: www.upstateland.netfirms.com or call(718)340-3031.

Prime advertising space for rent in Chronogram Dwellings! Chronogram Dwellings are a great way to display your property. Reasonable rates, month-long exposure! Call a dedicated sales rep today for more information. Luminary Publishing. (845) 334-8600. sales@chronogram.com.


dwellings

OVERHEAD DOORS, INC. SALES • SERVICE • INSTALLATION

SPECIALIZING IN QUALITY DOORS 168 Cornell Street • Kingston, NY 12401

Serving The Hudson Valley Since 1974 KINGSTON

RED HOOK

WESTCHESTER

CATSKILL

(845) 331-0191

(845) 758-0444

(914) 466-2685

(518) 943-2869

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Parting Shot

melissa zexter / bethany

B

rooklyn-based artist, professor, curator, and lecturer Melissa Zexter employs the antiquated art form of embroidery to interesting use in her work. Bethany, featured above, is a silver gelatin print that has been partially sewn over with thread. Using her prints as a platform, Zexter creates “colored textured drawings which serve as webs and grids over the photographs.” The results are combinative images which simultaneously scatter and concentrate their focal points. Zexter’s work will be exhibited in the group show “Portrait,” (also featuring work by Chuck Close and Alice Neel), at the Kleinert/James Arts Center in Woodstock through October 30. (845) 679-2079. For more images visit www.lesleyheller.com. Contact: Mzexter@aol.com.

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Chronogram Culinary Institute Tour | Interiors Supplement | Think Before You Pink

10/05


Chronogram October 2005