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QUALITY R E I N F O RC E YO U R QUALITY CO M M I T M E N T TO A QUALITY WELL-DESIGNED HOME

R E I N F O RC E YO U R RCEO I NMFM OIRT C YO R A MEE N T U TO CWOEML LM- IDT EMSEI G N TN ET O AO M E D H WELL-DESIGNED HOME

Windows and doors made with people in mind at every step. Windows and doors made with people in mind at every step. Windows and doors made with people in mind at every step.

R H I N E B E C K • H U D S O N • H O P E W E L L J U N C T I O N • TA N N E R S V I L L E R E D H O O K • P L E A S A N T VA L L E Y • H I G H F A L L S • H Y D E PA R K R H I N E B E C K • H U D S O N • H O P E W E L L J U N C T I O N • TA N N E R S V I L L E R E D H O O K • P L E A S A N T VA L L E Y • H I G H F A L L S • H Y D E PA R K RU HR I NH EO B EMCEK’ S• PHO U SDSSIO E LI L LJIUANMCSTLI O NB • ETRA.NDNI S EC RO S VVI E L LREM A R V I N . C O M EXPLORE YO BN I L I•T IHEO S PAETWW UM R E D H O O K • P L E A S A N T845.876.WOOD VA L L E Y • H I G H F A L L S • H Y D E PA R K E X P LO R E Y O U R H O M E ’ S P O S S I B I L I T I E S AT W I L L I A M S L U M B E R . D I S C O V E R M A R V I N . C O M E X P LO R E Y O U R H O M E ’ S P O S S I B I L I T I E S AT W I L L I A M S L U M B E R . D I S C O V E R M A R V I N . C O M Williams_Rhinebeck_Living_Ad_July.indd 1 Williams_Rhinebeck_Living_Ad_July.indd 1 Williams_Rhinebeck_Living_Ad_July.indd 1

7/9/19 4:21 PM 7/9/19 4:21 PM 7/9/19 4:21 PM


CELEBRATING

Ten Years

Don’t struggle through another winter alone. Introduce yourself to Woodland Pond, and discover the companionship and company you are missing. Our residents find it easy to stay connected, build friendships and engage in life, regardless of the season.

Call today to schedule a visit. Learn how you can secure one of our last remaining apartments and spend your winter in the company of some of the warmest, most interesting people we know — our residents.

Mid-Hudson Valley’s Premier Continuing Care Retirement Community 100 Woodland Pond Circle, New Paltz, NY 12561 | 845.256.5520 | wpatnp.org

11/19 CHRONOGRAM 1


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MILAN CASE STUDY IS A MODERN RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT LOCATED MINUTES FROM RHINEBECK, NY WITH HOMES DESIGNED BY AWARD WINNING ARCHITECT JAMES GARRISON Each home is placed within the environment to maximize the enjoyment of the natural beauty, and minimize the disturbance to the surroundings. 3,256 square feet / 4 bedrooms / 4.5 baths Lots from 7 - 17 acres Saltwater heated pool, studio/garage, pantry, media room, fireplace, screened in porch

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info@milancasestudy.com 11/19 CHRONOGRAM 3


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Warren Kitchen & Cutlery For The Holidays. The Hudson Valley’s Most Complete Kitchen Emporium! Professional cutlery from around the world • Cookware • Bakeware • Grilling Tools Glassware and Barware • Kitchen Appliances • Serving Pieces and Accessories • Coffee Makers • Unique Kitchen Gadgets • Coffees, teas, chocolates and spices

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Gift wrapping available. Expert sharpening on premises.

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6934 Route 9 Rhinebeck, NY 12572 Just north of the 9G intersection 845-876-6208 Hours: Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30, Sun 11–4:30


Clarkson University’s Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries Igniting citizen science, user-inspired research and development, and education through collaboration and creative innovation to inspire sustainable solutions for estuary and freshwater ecosystems throughout the Hudson Valley and across New York state Offering K–12 environmental and STEM education programs, public and family programs, and graduate programs Gallery and Headquarters 199 Main Street, Beacon, NY Water Ecology Center 199 Dennings Avenue, Beacon, NY

Campuses in Potsdam, Schenectady, Beacon & New York City — Undergraduate & Graduate Education — Executive & Professional Certifications — Research — K–12 Programs

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Photo: NYC Dance Project

6 CHRONOGRAM 11/19

KAATSBAAN cultural park for dance • tivoli ny


HELSINKI ON BROADWAY in association with

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Large Display of Casual Patio Furniture Custom Inground Pool Installation Open Year Round Salt Water Spas Available

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Grand. Finale.

• 2-Bedroom Ranch Style and 2-Bedroom Townhome • Starting in the high $500,000s

Your Ticket to Country Elegance May Expire Soon! The Gardens at Rhinebeck are like a wish list for today’s discerning homeowner. The ideal location just 90 minutes from the City. Country living and recreation, plus cosmopolitan culture and entertainment. A beautiful, maintenance-free lifestyle in a community like no other. It’s no wonder that over the last eight years nearly every unit has quickly sold. These will be the final new homes in a unique development – the last approved condo community in Rhinebeck. Stop by for a cup of coffee and claim yours now, before the curtain falls. The complete offering terms are in Offering Plans available from the sponsor. File nos CD17-0040 and CD-17-0041. Equal Housing Opportunity. Sponsor: Rhinebeck Gardens Group, LLC, 29C Hudson View Drive, Beacon, New York 12508

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GOODBYE JOINT PAIN HELLO FREEDOM ENJOY LIFE PAIN FREE. LEAVE KNEE AND HIP PAIN BEHIND. CMH orthopedic specialists perform hip and knee replacements using the state-of-the-art robotic Stryker Mako System that is far more precise than conventional surgery. Precision robotic joint replacement surgery at CMH means: • • • • •

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Stryker Mako System


11 19

november

From left: Jenny Hayward, Caitlin Nagel, and Maggie Wynn at Fuschia Tiki Bar in New Paltz. COMMUNITY PAGES, 60 Photo by Roy Gumpel

FRONT MATTER

HOME & GARDEN

12 On the Cover: Pete Souza 16 Esteemed Reader 19 Editor’s Note 20 In Memoriam: Pauline Uchmanowicz 21 TMI Project Essay 22 Chronogram Conversations Recap

40 So Last Century

ART OF BUSINESS 28 Weaving a New Crop Hempire State Growers Hudson Valley, a new co-op of hemp farmers, allows members to pool their resources and see larger profits.

FOOD & DRINK 232 Secret Spot: Home/Made Hudson Partners in life and party-planning, Leisah Swenson and Monica Byrne are building a devout following for their pocket-sized brunch hotspot Home/Made Hudson.

Musician-designers Hilary Davis and Jordan Moser build a temple to Mid-Mod sensibilities out of a Mount Beacon A-Frame.

HEALTH & WELLNESS 48 CBD Crazed As CBD products fly off the shelves everywhere from gas stations to wellness boutiques, we peek at the science behind the hype.

OUTDOORS 56 Who’s Hunting Now? As the popularity of hunting declines and the deer population soars, we look at a cross-section of local hunters who are sticking by the sport.

COMMUNITY PAGES

74 A Helping Hand

by Michael Frank

Amidst a fraught reality of immigrant detention, deportation, and political bullying, several community leaders in the Hudson Valley are fighting back against federal policies targeting immigrants.

80 Un/Natural Selection

by Medea Giordano

Like dreams dripping with cryptic symbolism, Chris Buzelli’s distorted biomorphic illustrations blend the innocuous and the bizarre in order to scrutinize our assumptions.

60 Nocturnal Magic: New Paltz It’s nighttime in New Paltz. The traffic may have died down, but the restaurants and watering holes are open late, and the town is still churning.

37 Sips & Bites Six foodie adventures for November.

features

HOROSCOPES 108 Wisdom Ripe for the Plucking Lorelai Kude scans the skies and plots our horoscopes for November.

84 Food, For Thought

by Peter Aaron

The Palestinian Hosting Society, which began as a way to share Palestinian cultural identity, has developed into a way to return agency to a displaced people.

11/19 CHRONOGRAM 9


Apply time-tested practices to live a happier and more conscious life.

philosophyworks.org/hudson

The School of Practical Philosophy offers a journey of self-discovery that guides students towards understanding their own innate wisdom and an appreciation of the underlying unity connecting us all. Topics covered include: The Wisdom Within, The Art of Listening, Awareness, A Remedy for Negative Feelings, Unity and Diversity, Beauty. Classes are offered in: HAMLET OF WALLKILL, NY Tuesdays 7–9PM, 10 sessions starting January 14, 2020 BEACON, NY at the Howland Cultural Center, Saturdays 10–12PM, 10 sessions starting January 18, 2020 GARDINER, NY at the Stone Wave Yoga, Wednesdays 7-9 pm, 10 sessions starting January 15, 2020 Register online or in person for this 10–week introductory course. There is no charge for this introductory course. For information and registration go to philosophyworks.org/hudson or call 845-895-9912 What I’m looking for is not out there, it is in me. — Helen Keller

A conservation focused community in Rhinebeck, NY Four estate-sized parcels with unique modern homes 16 to 26 acres with views and water features Priced from $1,550,000

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10 CHRONOGRAM 11/19


11 19

The kitchen of Jordan Moser and Hilary Davis gutted and redesigned the home’s open kitchen then filled it with an eclectic assortment of refurbished finds. “It makes us so happy to bring old, forgotten objects back to life,” says Davis. HOME & GARDEN, PAGE 40 Photo by Deborah DeGraffenreid

november

ARTS

THE GUIDE

89 Books

97 In his one-man show “Shiva Arms,” actor/writer Doug Motel pirouettes through 11 roles and a sine graph of grief and hilarity.

Six local literary picks for your November reading from the experts at Chatham Bookstore, Postmark Books, Rough Draft, Spotty Dog, Golden Notebook, and Oblong Books.

91 Music Album reviews of Tempest in a Teacup by Blueberry; Deepscape by Jay Anderson; Dossier by Patrick Higgins; and Pleased to Meetcha! by The Acquaintances.

92 Poetry Poems by Cary Abrams, Gary Barkman, Richard R. Binkele, Sophie Cohen, Treisha Edwards, Bob Grawi, Juliet Gresh, Gilles Malkine, Kate Minford, Ze’ev Willy Neumann, Samantha Spoto, Sharon Watts, and Lee Clark Zumpe. Edited by Philip X Levine.

99 Teabag-painting, Insta-famous artist Ruby Silvious is renowned for embracing unorthodox found materials in her small-scale work. 100 With a goose for mayor and a wily Rhymester, the whimsical new musical “JAMOT” playfully explores the nature of time. 101 Suzannah Cahalan dives into mental illness in her new book The Great Pretender. 103 A gallery guide for November. 106 Six live music shows to pencil in from Grandmaster Flash to Patty Griffin.

112 Parting Shot Melissa McGill’s Red Regatta project dotted the Venice lagoon with red-sailed boats.

11/19 CHRONOGRAM 11


on the cover

alt covers Top: Cover Plate #3, a urethane and metal sculpture by Terry Mason, from the Barrett House exhibition “New Directions 2019.” Bottom: Father Frank, a photograph by David McIntyre.

Barack Obama in Luang Prabang, Laos, 2016. PETE SOUZA

Urban Dictionary defines the term throw shade as “To say a rude or slick comment toward another person with little or no one else catching the insult except who it was directed toward.” But no one who peruses Shade: A Tale of Two Presidents (Little, Brown, and Company), former Chief Official White House Photographer Pete Souza’s latest book, is likely to miss the shade being thrown within its pages. Featuring over 100 images captured during Souza’s tenure with President Obama juxtaposed with recent news headlines and tweets from the office’s current occupant, the book chronicles the differences between the Obama and Trump administrations. The starkness of those differences, as one might imagine, is striking. And although in the book Souza allows the contrasts to speak for themselves—a news item about Trump’s Muslim travel ban sits next to a photo of Obama shaking hands with children at a Baltimore mosque; a headline about Trump revoking Obama-era climate policies appears alongside a shot of Obama in discussion with adventurer Bear Grylls at a melting Alaskan glacier—there’s no doubt that there are great stories behind these pictures. Born and raised in coastal Massachusetts, Souza studied communication at Boston University and Kansas State University and began his media career in the 1970s with Kansas’s Chanute Tribune and Hutchinson News. He next worked for the Chicago Sun-Times before becoming an official photographer for President Ronald Reagan’s administration (19831989; he was also the official photographer at Reagan’s funeral in 2004). Souza’s relationship with Obama began during the future president’s first year as a senator and continued throughout his two White House terms. Shade is his sixth book of Obama photos, and he took time to answer the questions about it below via email. In an evening cosponsored by Oblong Books, Pete Souza will give a visual presentation followed by a Q&A session at the Bardavon in Poughkeepsie on November 3 at 7pm. Tickets are $38 and $60 and include a paperback copy of Shade. (845) 473-2072. Bardavon.org. —Peter Aaron 12 CHRONOGRAM 11/19

Chronogram The concept behind Shade is different than the other books of the mainly candid photos you took during your time with President Obama. How did you come up with the idea for this book, and what made you want to do it? The book is an extension of the posts I began doing on Instagram only days after the [Trump] inauguration in 2017. After shading Trump for a year, I thought a book would be a good record of the reckless behavior by the current president. What drew you toward photography as a medium, and what age were you when you first started taking pictures? I originally went to Boston University with the hopes of becoming a sportswriter. I took my first photography class during my junior year and I knew right away that’s what I wanted to do. But it took me five years before I was any good at it. You entered the photojournalism field in the 1970s, the decade of Watergate. How did coming of age as a photojournalist in the climate of that heady era shape your work when it comes to political subjects? Watergate was long past by the time I started my photojournalism career. And I don’t think it really affected me one way or the other. I never intended to make photographing politicians my career; it just sort of happened. In addition to serving as the Chief Official White House Photographer for President Obama, you also served in that capacity for President Ronald Reagan. Ideologically the two presidents were certainly very different, but as subjects was there anything that they shared? What were the main similarities and differences between them, as far as the way they liked to work with you for pictures? The one similarity between Obama and Reagan is they both had fairly even-keeled dispositions. Which I think is a good trait in a president. Reagan was in his 70s when I started working at the White House (I was in my 20s). I wasn’t the chief photographer, so my access to him wasn’t the same as it was with Obama. With the latter, I had known him for four years before he became president. I was a seasoned photojournalist and a few years older than him. I may not be the best photographer in the world, but I believe I was the best person to be his White House photographer. Of all the images in Shade, which is your favorite? Asking a photographer to choose their favorite picture is like asking a parent to choose their favorite child.

Chronogram


LIVE ARTS BARD 2019 BIENNIAL

Where No Wall Remains NOVEMBER 21–24, 2019

A four-day festival featuring nine new performances and installations by contemporary artists from the Middle East and the Americas.

FISHERCENTER.BARD.EDU 845-758-7900

Before the Wall by Samar Hazboun

an international festival about borders

11/19 CHRONOGRAM 13


adams fairacre farms

Our Reputation is GROWING! adamsfarms.com

14 CHRONOGRAM 11/19

POUGHKEEPSIE

KINGSTON

NEWBURGH

WA P P I N G E R

Route 44 845-454-4330

Route 9W 845-336-6300

Route 300 845-569-0303

Route 9 845-632-9955


EDITORIAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR David C. Perry dperry@chronogram.com DIGITAL EDITOR Marie Doyon mdoyon@chronogram.com ARTS EDITOR Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR Wendy Kagan health@chronogram.com HOME EDITOR Mary Angeles Armstrong home@chronogram.com POETRY EDITOR Phillip X Levine poetry@chronogram.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Anne Pyburn Craig apcraig@chronogram.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Phillip Pantuso ppantuso@chronogram.com

contributors Winona Barton-Ballentine, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Lisa Di Venuta, Michael Eck, Morgan Y. Evans, Medea Giordano, Crispin Kott, Amy Krzanic, Lorelai Kude, Jamie Larson, David Levine, David McIntyre, Kesai Riddick, John Rodat, Anna Sirota, Sparrow, Carl Van Brunt, Kaitlin Van Pelt

PUBLISHING FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky CEO Amara Projansky amara@luminarymedia.com PUBLISHER Jason Stern jstern@luminarymedia.com CHAIRMAN David Dell

media specialists Brian Berusch bberusch@chronogram.com Susan Coyne scoyne@chronogram.com Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com Kelin Long-Gaye k.long-gaye@chronogram.com Jordy Meltzer jmeltzer@chronogram.com Kris Schneider kschneider@chronogram.com Anne Wygal awygal@chronogram.com SALES DEVELOPMENT LEADS Thomas Hansen thansen@chronogram.com SALES MANAGER / CHRONOGRAM SMARTCARD PRODUCT LEAD Lisa Marie lisa@chronogram.com

marketing ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Samantha Liotta sliotta@chronogram.com MARKETING SPECIALIST Victoria Levy victoria@chronogram.com

interns EDITORIAL Claudia Larsen MARKETING & SALES Rommyani Basu SOCIAL MEDIA Sierra Flach

administration CUSTOMER SUCCESS & OFFICE MANAGER Molly Sterrs office@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107

production PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Kerry Tinger ktinger@luminarymedia.com; (845) 334-8600x108

EXPERIENCE THE HUDSON VALLEY’S MOST ICONIC RESORT Snuggle up beside a wood-burning fireplace, ice skate in our grand open-air pavilion, and enjoy farm-to-table cuisine from award-winning chefs—all included in your overnight rate. Rejuvenate with a nature-inspired treatment at The Spa at Mohonk Mountain House—ranked the #1 resort spa in the U.S. by Condé Nast Traveler.

Join us on our mountaintop and feel your stresses melt away.

PRODUCTION DESIGNERS Kate Brodowska kate.brodowska@chronogram.com Amy Dooley amy.dooley@chronogram.com

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Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Luminary Media 2019.

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11/19 CHRONOGRAM 15


esteemed reader by Jason Stern

And letting go your last breath, would you feel satisfaction from knowing that you have done everything possible in this life to ensure that you are constantly present, always vibrating, always waiting, like the son is waiting for the seafaring father? —Gurdjieff

A WHOLISTIC EDUCATION IN DUTCHESS COUNTY NOW ENROLLING EARLY CHILDHOOD - 5TH GRADE

Our Waldorf-trained teachers bring our academic curriculum to life through storytelling, art, movement, music, and engagement with the natural world. Call to schedule a tour of our farm and schoolhouses.

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Bruce offers dental services such as implants, root canals, periodontal treatments, and Invisalign braces, but he also goes one step further. “Transcend means to go beyond normal limits. I also wanted to go beyond my limits in terms of different protocols,” he says. “I’ve invested in a lot of equipment that makes my job more interesting and help others.” State-of-the-art technology allows him to offer magical improvements in care like one-visit crowns and laser fillings.

16 CHRONOGRAM 11/19

Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: It’s not every month that one has a birthday, but it is every year that two Chronogram veterans both have a birthday in November. Editor Brian and I have, without fail, turned the same age within a few days of one another every November for the past 22 years that we’ve worked as colleagues in publishing. Wishing one another a happy birthday has become as commonplace as “good morning.” When we began exchanging birthday wishes, we were young. Now, as the saying goes, we are no longer young. We have aged in parallel, though not always together. Brian leaves this column here, but as the ramen master in the Japanese masterwork, Tampopo, said to the glistening piece of pork on the edge of the bowl, “see you soon.”  Birthdays are random and contrived. Why should the repetition of a day in a month in a season be a meaningful marker arousing all manner of anxiety, satisfaction, and generalized self-consideration? In any case, they do. So I ask, how do I get in front of the experience and enact a more or less conscious and intentional experience. How do I make the occasion of a birthday something meaningful? A few years ago, I visited the tombs of some Sufi saints in Uzbekistan. The places had palpable atmospheres, pulsing with force. They had this in common, and yet the quality of each was unique. For instance, the atmosphere around the tomb of Khwaja Muhammad Baba Samasi vibrated with an overwhelming impulse of love. It was so strong that I couldn’t tell if I was loving or being loved. Whereas the tomb of Khwaja Muhammad Baha’uddin Naqshband Bukhari emanated a grounded substance of peace that seemed to enshroud the whole complex in an otherworldly stillness.  Inasmuch as I was struck by the force of presence around what appeared to be no more or less than beautiful and harmonious architectural monuments built around long-since-interred dead saints’ bodies, I couldn’t ignore the implication that the force of a person’s life might survive their temporal existence and continue to exert an appreciable influence in the material world in linear time. Was the atmosphere the result of so many pilgrims’ prayers and meditations accumulating over hundreds of years? Was the place the tombs were located some kind of geomantic power-spot? Or was I feeling the emanations of the body of the interred saint? Or some combination of these factors? Once dead, a person’s life, from the standpoint of the still-living, is instantaneously taken out of time. It is as though the ending of a life puts a cap on it, and it becomes complete. This is a matter of perception, but what if a life is actually existing perpendicular to linear time within a more encompassing dimensional order? In this sense, a person’s life is a singular geometric unit, a long inner body comprised of all moments aggregated as a simultaneous event.  This is what I am considering on the approach of my birthday in the middle of November. Is it possible to be present in an expanded moment, or at least in more of my life at once? I know how to be present in a moment. I inhabit my body through sensation, my heart as awareness in feeling, my mind in thought, and then I bring them together in a balanced and harmonized state. But what about an expanded present moment? Could I also be present 10 years ago and 10 years hence, at my first inhalation at birth and at the last exhalation at death, all at once? And would the force of this larger presence open the possibility of being of service in a larger, even super-temporal context? I’m going to give it a try on my birthday, and I suspect that a presence that can encompass a larger time scale arises from a place that is also a source of compassion and wisdom, which, together with love, are what the world needs.  —Jason Stern


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BARDAVONPRESENTS

Pete Souza SHADE: A Tale of Two Presidents

Sun. November 3 at 7pm - Bardavon

JOSH GATES Live!

from Travel Channel’s Expedition Unknown Fri. November 15 at 8pm - UPAC

s Hip Hop : People, Places & Thing Fri. November 8 at 7pm - UPAC

Hot Tuna w/ Larry Campbell & with Marty Stuart Teresa Williams

Thu. Dec. 5 at 7:30pm - Bardavon

BARDAVON 35 Market Street - Poughkeepsie • 845.473.2072 UPAC 601 Broadway - Kingston • 845.339.6088 SUPPORT FROM Oblong Books

BARDAVON.ORG TICKETMASTER.COM 11/19 CHRONOGRAM 17


Poughkeepsie keep it relevant.

At Poughkeepsie Day School, we design learning experiences that captivate students and expand their sense of the world.

Open house on November 14, 9am Please RSVP at

DR. ARI ROSEN, D.O. Traditional and Cranial Osteopathy for Children and Adults Treating children for: ear infections, birth trauma, difficulty nursing, colic, concussion, sports injury, headache, neck and back pain

admissions@poughkeepsieday.org 845.462.7600, ext. 201 Poughkeepsieday.org 260 Boardman Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12603

POUGHKEEPSIE EST. 1934

845.687.7589 Stone Ridge, NY StoneRidgeHealingArts.com

DAY SCHOOL PreK– Grade 12

Over 20 years of experience

Fresh Produce • Bakery • Cider Donuts Jane’s Homemade Ice Cream

15 RT 299 West, New Paltz, 845-255-8050 Open Daily, March-December, 9:00am - 6:30pm 18 CHRONOGRAM 11/19

Thanksgiving: -Fresh produce for that perfect dinner -Specialty Foods & Table Decorations -Bakery: Let us do the baking for you— Call and Order now! Christmas: -Christmas Trees & Handmade Wreaths -Poinsettias grown in our own Greenhouses -Tree Trimmings & Gifts


editor’s note

by Brian K. Mahoney

Off Somewhere

I

t’s November. Hunting season. Over 10 million hunters will take to the woods and kill about six million deer, though this massive culling will not be nearly enough to manage the population of 30 million whitetail in this country. That verb, manage—how easily it slots into place in the sentence, as if the deer living in the spaces between our houses and cities and highways were a lab experiment gone wrong. As if an Adam-and-Eve pair bolted a fence and begat a rogue species bent on eating all the hostas. That “management” is done by the five percent of our friends and neighbors who head off with gun or bow to kill. As contributing editor Phillip Pantuso found out (“Who’s Hunting Now?” page 56), most of these folks view themselves as conservationists and sustainability advocates, and they approach taking life as—well—a deadly serious matter. For the other 95 percent of us, deer are just a nuisance— destructive browsers in our backyards and potential automotive body work bills on our roads. As one of the 95 percent (though I did go hunting once, see below), I reconsider my encounters with deer. 1. The summer of my sophomore year of high school, I spent a week upstate with some classmates working in the kitchen of a camp for deaf children. The camp was run by the Marist Brothers, who taught us at Archbishop Molloy in Queens. You gotta hand it to the Brothers—in offering select students the “opportunity” to toil in the scullery, they didn’t need to hire a dishwashing crew. And the fresh air was good for our spiritual development, or some such. My friends and I jumped at the offer, of course. Aside from a couple hours around mealtime, we ran amok on the Brothers’ vast property in West Park: playing epic games of nocturnal Ringalario, building campfires by the shore of the Hudson River, racing golf carts down wooded embankments. (We even conned Brother Declan into taking us to the video store in Kingston, where we rented the German art film Has Anybody Seen My Pants? in which a Texas farm boy inherits a hotel in Germany that he soon finds out, after his pants disappear, is a brothel. We told Brother Declan it was an art film anyway.)

As the week progressed, our feral antics pointed toward their logical conclusion: someone getting hurt. Namely me. The final night of camp we decided to split into two squads and wage a water balloon war. The weather was warm and rainy and the collective mood tense. After a few scattered skirmishes, I snuck up on the enemy base by myself and right as I was about to pounce, balloons in hand, I slipped on the shale slope and punctured my kneecap on the rocks below. As I lay there bleeding, I saw something moving along the tree line. This city kid, not familiar with wildlife, thought it must be a dog. But it was a deer—my first deer!—stock still and staring at me. As the balloons rained down amid gleeful yelps, I thought I saw something like empathy in the deer’s sad expression. I wondered if it had seen other injured deer crumpled in a similar manner, but without comrades to whisk them off to the hospital. 2. Four years later. Turtle and I are tripping on acid, taking in some truly spectacular fall foliage along the Ashokan Reservoir in his beat-up Honda, the leaves practically breathing in saturated yellows, reds, and oranges. On a side road off a side road, we pass a deer that’s been hit by a car. Its front legs are broken and it’s pinwheeling a bloody circle on the side of the road. I tell Turtle we need to go back and perform an act of mercy. We turn around. The deer is thrashing less than it was a minute ago. I approach and it does a quick spin its blood circle. I squat down and it looks at me resignedly but very much alive. I go back to the car and ask Turtle for his tire iron. Turtle says he doesn’t have one. Turtle says all of this is a bad idea. Turtle refuses to get out of the car. I root around in the trunk of the car for a bat or a pipe or something but only find Turtle’s dirty laundry. And a Swiss Army knife.  My plan is to use the awl, the leather punch, to puncture the deer’s trachea with one swift blow. I take a deep breath, clench the knife in my fist, awl protruding between my index and middle finger, and walk over to the deer. The deer is empty-eyed and dead. Turtle and I spread a trash bag over his back seat and throw the deer in there and drive over to Scott’s house. Scott’s a hunter and knows how to butcher deer for meat. 

3. My roommate Corey invites me to go hunting with some friends. Corey’s family owns the side of a mountain in the Catskills. I’m the only one in the hunting party who’s never held a gun before. I’m given a five-minute tutorial and told not to point the gun at anyone, probably not any deer either. But if I do see a deer, I’m to take a deep breath, point, and squeeze the trigger as I exhale.  At 7am, each of us heads off in a different direction with our rifle and a six-pack of beer. I sit under a tree for three hours and read Brothers Karamazov as I drink beer. I see no deer. Later, back at the hunting cabin, I’m told you’re not supposed to read a book while hunting. You’re just supposed to sit there and wait. But, I counter, when I’m waiting for the bus I sit and read, and no one seems to mind. Why is this different? 4.  There are 4,000 vehicle-deer collisions a day in the US. Driving to Westchester from Kingston last week, I count a total of six dead deer on the side of the road along the thruway, Interstate 84, and the Taconic. Each looks more mangled than the next, reminding me of Lewis Thomas’s words to describe roadkill: “mysterious wreckage.” When I get home, I dig out the essay from, “Dead in the Open,” and find this: “It is simply astounding to see a dead animal on a highway,” Thomas writes. “The outrage is more than just location; it is the impropriety of such visible death, anywhere. You do not expect to see dead animals out in the open. It is the nature of animals to die alone, off somewhere, hidden. It is wrong to see them lying out on the highway; it is wrong to see them anywhere.”

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in memoriam

Pauline Uchmanowicz (1957-2019) Happiness Studies

Singing around a campfire you might miss happiness, squished between envy and sorrow. Or find it

beside you, matter-of-factly, watching a red-tailed hawk catch pigeons and rats,

a retriever fetching sticks racing back and forth

from your shared park bench. But if whistled at, happiness bonds: with you on tiptoe

lifting curtain rods to hang drapes, or flat-backed

positioning drip pans to change

oil, tasks completed then together together to clink steins,

toasting sand dunes and starlight.

—Pauline Uchmanowicz

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or the January 1999 issue of Chronogram, Pauline Uchmanowicz wrote a profile of Dawn Walker, aka the Flower Lady, a noted local floral designer. In the process of reporting the piece, Pauline accompanied Walker on a pre-dawn visit to Manhattan. After six hours running around to various markets in the Flower District, and driving back and forth to New York City, Pauline decided that she would volunteer to assist Walker the day of the wedding: “Around 5:30 pm, somewhere along Rt. 32, I promised Dawn I’d assist her the day of the wedding. When we got to my place, the Flower Lady came in, and, convincing me to take some lisianthus, completed her first design of the weekend, an elegant arrangement in a green porcelain vase.” In the course of the piece, Pauline included quotes from writers and texts as various as Katherine Mansfield, Samuel Delany, Dr. Andrew Weil, and the Dictionary of Occupational Titles. (Did Pauline actually own a copy of the Dictionary of Occupational Titles? Why?) This was the first piece she wrote for the magazine. Pauline’s taut, literate, Joan Didion-meetsgirl-next-door prose was the voice I had been searching for in our fledgling magazine without knowing it. Pauline’s pieces became the ones I directed new writers to reference when asked about our house “style.” Pauline was just getting started. Over the next decade, Pauline was a frequent contributor, writing close to a hundred articles for Chronogram. She wrote about recycling initiatives and puppetry collectives, modern dance and psychiatric history. She cooked with chefs like Corinne Trang. She taught civics lessons in her long pieces on her beloved Rosendale, charming

20 CHRONOGRAM 11/19

portraits of its eccentric inhabitants and municipal foibles. She profiled writers like Nick Flynn, Tobias Wolf, and Gail Godwin. She wrote dozens of book reviews. She hiked up Indian Head mountain (elevation 3,373 feet) with the Adirondack Mountain Club. She planted crops with a 95-year-old Clintondale farmer. She broke bread with the Mid-Hudson Vegetarian Society. I assigned Pauline a piece on dog adoption and she wound up arranging an animalthemed poetry reading to benefit the SPCA. Pauline was so unusually kind, so unremittingly generous, I often wondered if she was trying to right the karmic balance for some dastardly deed in her past. But that was just who Pauline was—she was as empathetic in her writing as she was in person. To be profiled by her was to be seen, grokked, as her grateful subjects often told me after reading her pieces about them. She brought the verbal precision and emotional range of the poet to general interest reporting. In addition to moonlighting for the magazine, Pauline was an English professor at SUNY New Paltz and an accomplished scholar and poet. (As her poem, “Happiness Studies,” reprinted here, attests.) She was also a conduit for a stream of students and recent grads in whom she saw potential. The writers who came to Chronogram via Pauline have contributed hundreds of pieces to the magazine—and continue to do so. She was an ardent champion of promising talent and loved to nurture it. If Pauline read this, should would probably email me: “Brian, what you wrote about me was so touching. Are you writing? Are you writing enough? I’m expecting great things from you.” —Brian K. Mahoney


TMI Project Essay

Nam MyoHo Renge Kyo

by Kesai Riddick

In alignment with TMI Project’s mission to empower people and bring about change through true storytelling, Black Stories Matter seeks to raise awareness around issues of inequality and injustice and inspire people to take action. Black Stories Matter elevates the underrepresented true stories of the Black experience in America—the full spectrum—the triumphs, humor, beauty, and resilience. Kesai Riddick participated in the inaugural Black Stories Matter performance in 2017. This is an edited version of the story he performed. To learn more or to sign up for the TMI Project podcast launching in 2020, visit Tmiproject.org.

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rowing up not knowing my dad meant not knowing my masculine self, my blackness, who I am as a person. The only memory I had of my dad was from when I was 18 months and learning to walk. I started late.  I grew up in the East Village. My mom took me to Tompkins Square Park and let me walk around the entrance of 8th St. and Avenue A. I remember her telling me, “Go, run to your daddy.” I looked up and saw him there, my father, squatting down with his arms opened wide to catch me.   I don’t remember seeing him again. As a kid, my mom did her best to support me and my emotional needs. At seven years old, she enrolled me in therapy with a kind and gentle man named Roy. During my 45-minute sessions, I did whatever I wanted which meant I played video games. Roy asked me how I was feeling and how my day went. I never felt pressured to talk and I wasn’t afraid of being judged or criticized.  For the last 15 minutes, Roy would ask me to put the game aside. Then, we’d sit down and have a conversation. He’d set out a cup of Skittles and we’d get into it. I’d tell him about everything that was happening at school and at home.  One day I told him how upset I was because my brothers knew who their fathers were but I didn’t. It seemed totally unfair. The more I spoke about not knowing my dad the angrier I became. I was accessing untapped emotions. I began to cry and lash out. Before I knew it, I was throwing things around the room, exploding with rage. Roy allowed me to act out for a while before he told me to stop. After, I sat in my chair, crying, and asked, “Why has my dad left?”  Despite my emotional turmoil, I appreciated the relationships I had with other men growing up. I felt fortunate to have an uncle who was like my surrogate father and filled a masculine role in my life. It was through him I first learned about Buddhism. Right away, I was attracted to its teachings of self-reliance and awakening to my true self.  When I was 14, I suddenly transformed from a small brown child into a tall black man. My mom, who is white, wanted me to have a black upbringing and grow up “black.” I never bought into that because it wasn’t authentic. I have a white mother, a white uncle, and a white older brother. Even though I never viewed myself as being white, I never viewed myself as being black either.  I saw myself as being me, Kesai.  I was reintroduced to Buddhism at 19 by a bartender at a concert hall where I worked. I told him I already knew a little about Buddhism from my uncle.  “Have you ever heard of Nam MyoHo Renge Kyo?”

he asked. “By chanting Nam MyoHo Renge Kyo,” he explained, “You can realize whatever dreams you have and actualize your absolute happiness.” I never heard of Buddhism expressed that way. I decided to give chanting a try. I chanted for a brief period of time and developed a dedicated practice a few years later. I never prayed to be reunited with my dad. Maybe once or twice it came up, but I never spend a significant amount of time chanting about it. Then something interesting happened in the spring of 2008. I was scrolling through MySpace (as I said, it was 2008) when a message appeared from my estranged brother, Bajun. My mother told me I had another brother, but I never met him. Bajun asked me if I want to meet. I immediately messaged back, “Yes!” Later that month, I met Bajun and our brother Copez. Copez was getting married, and he asked me if I wanted to attend his wedding. He said our father would be there too. In that moment, I understood what the bartender was trying to tell me when he said that Nam MyoHo Renge Kyo would help me realize my dreams. At 28, I was finally going to meet my dad! I didn’t know what to expect when meeting my father again. My mom never talked about him. I had no details about who he was as a person. Subconsciously, I had resolved I would never meet him and therefore didn’t give him much thought. So, when the opportunity to meet him presented itself, I did my best to remain impartial. My sister and I went to the church where my brother was getting married. I tried to keep my expectations in check, but I couldn’t help it, this was it! I was excited.  I walked up a flight of stairs and there he was. My father. He sat at a table in a tuxedo, looking dapper and elegant. As soon as I saw him, I spun around and belted out in sheer joy, “My dad! Wow!” I was thrilled. We embraced, sat down and immediately started talking. I thought my dad would be this animated, kinetic individual. Instead, he was reserved and introspective. I have that attribute as well, but I never knew I got it from him. A lot was passed down genetically. We didn’t have much time before the ceremony, but at that moment I felt like a huge, essential missing piece of my life had been filled.  ***** Now, my dad and I meet about four times a year for coffee. He’s hesitant and cautious when we’re together as if he’s apologetic and doesn’t want me to have any hard feelings toward him. The first couple of meetings were awkward, but I conveyed my appreciation for just being there with him and let him know I didn’t have expectations. Once he got more comfortable, he shared stories from his childhood and from when he was serving in Vietnam. Reuniting with him is an ongoing process.  I’m in therapy again and sometimes think about my sessions with Roy. I’m glad I was given the space as a kid to sort out all of my rage, sadness, and confusion. Roy created a safe place for me to talk about my father and my feelings surrounding the lack of connection.  Looking back, I think the outburst I had in Ray’s office when I was eight years old was critical. I had an emotional breakdown that turned into an emotional breakthrough. Expressing those feelings finally helped me be at peace not knowing my dad. It left me with an awareness that continues to help me now, as I’m slowly getting to know him.  My happiness isn’t dependent on knowing my father, it’s dependent on knowing me.

When I was 14, I suddenly transformed from a small brown child into a tall black man. My mom, who is white, wanted me to have a black upbringing and grow up “black.” I never bought into that because it wasn’t authentic. I have a white mother, a white uncle, and a white older brother. Even though I never viewed myself as being white, I never viewed myself as being black either. I saw myself as being me, Kesai. 11/19 CHRONOGRAM 21


22 CHRONOGRAM 11/19


Chronogram Conversations Inclusive Community Development at Clarkson University’s Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries Photos by Anna Sirota Any public forum on economic development, community planning, and gentrification in the Hudson Valley is bound to be robust, and October’s Chronogram Conversation was no exception. Held on a brisk Tuesday evening at Clarkson University’s Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, by 6:30pm the room was full with a mix of citizens and journalists, economists, and social scientists, who mingled over hors d’oeuvres from Bread Alone and local wine. They were in for a substantive, erudite discussion. The five panelists were Kevin O’Connor, CEO of RUPCO; Joe Czajka, senior VP for research, development, and community planning at Pattern for Progress; Sarah Salem, Poughkeepsie Ward 2 councilmember; Robyn Hannigan, provost of Clarkson University; and Jeffrey Anzevino, land use advocacy director for Scenic Hudson. Anzevino distilled the issue in his introductory remarks: “There’s a lot of life in these cities. But we’re failing the people who live here.” The conversation built on our feature on economic development initiatives in the October issue of Chronogram, “Space Race,” published in collaboration with The River, and it was not light on specifics. After noting the irony that many employees working on Beacon’s bustling Main Street probably couldn’t afford to live there, Czajka discussed the need for job creation that keeps pace with change in our growing cities. “Eighty percent of firms in the Hudson Valley employ fewer than 10 people,” Czajka said. “We need to look at incentives for small business to create more sustainable jobs that pay a living wage.” He also noted that workforce development should start earlier, to create better results and ensure all communities benefit. “Diverse communities make for creativity,” he said. One way to create more jobs and boost productivity is by increasing the value add of products already made locally, Hannigan said. She pointed to Iceland as an example. There, businesses have developed ideas to use the meat, oil, skin, bones, and innards of cod to increase export value by 100 percent while the annual catch has fallen by 45 percent. Salem, who described their role as “being a listener,” was focused on how local communities can work together, noting how some municipalities have leveraged their aggregate buying power to move to green energy providers, while keeping costs affordable for consumers. Audience questions broadened the discussion. How can we ensure that people of color are full participants in the development of the Hudson Valley? How do we meet the needs of rural communities? How can we finance affordable housing solutions that don’t require the beneficence of some large-scale developer? The panelists all agreed that there is no “magic bullet” to ensure equitable development; rather, a patchwork of policies, economic development, fair housing requirements, and other initiatives would be required. The work is just getting started. —Phillip Pantuso

Top: Clarkson University’s Beacon Institute for Rivers & Estuaries. Middle: Pattern for Progress’s Joe Czajka, Scenic Hudson’s Jeff Anzevino, and RUPCO’s Kevin O’Connor. Bottom: Poughkeepsie Common Councilmember Sarah Salem and Clarkson University’s Robyn Hannigan. Opposite, Clockwise from top: Charles Glasner chatting with Sarah Salem; Hudson Valley Parent Publisher Terrie Goldstein and Clarkson University President Tony Collins; Lynn Freehill-Maye; Beacon Instutue for Rivers & Estuaries Education Coordinator Brigette Walsh and Jordy Meltzer of Chronogram; the Conversation at BIRE was a near sell-out.

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art of business

WEAVING A NEW CROP Hempire State Growers Hudson Valley by Jamie Larson

Amy Hepworth of Hempire State Growers and her crew harvesting hemp. Photo by Gerry Greco

28 ART OF BUSINESS CHRONOGRAM 11/19


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o matter what is being grown, the story of farming in America is plagued by the leitmotif of shrinking profit margins. As hemp becomes the latest cash crop in New York, a group of experienced Ulster County farmers have joined together to change the narrative. Hempire State Growers Hudson Valley is a new co-op of local, organic hemp farmers founded by twin sisters and seventhgeneration farmers Amy and Gail Hepworth. Based out of their Hepworth Farm in Milton, Hempire was born soon after hemp farming was legalized last year in New York. Their mission is to help independent smallscale farmers like themselves seize control of the capital produced by their new hemp crops before it’s gobbled up by big-money corporate agricultural interests. “If we are going to be responsible for growing a multibillion dollar industry why should the money just go right to the investment capital holder?” says Gail Hepworth. “We believe farmers deserve more.” Along with providing a network for material and intellectual support to assist the cultivation of organic hemp, Hepworth says the co-op gives Hudson Valley farmers the opportunity to pool their resources and see larger profits whether they want to sell their crop at harvest or stay invested until it’s sold as processed crude oil or later yet as distilled CBD consumables. “A lot of our farmers are at risk every year of going under,” says Gail Hepworth. “The market doesn’t care and there’s a lack of understanding. There’s an increase in demand on farmers without an increase in profits. If we don’t get together on this now, hemp is going to be no more profitable for farmers than corn or onions.”

11/19 CHRONOGRAM ART OF BUSINESS 29


A Risky Plan Amy Hepworth took over operations of the family farm, founded in 1818, after graduating from Cornell. Gail left home and was a successful biomedical engineer for 25 years before returning to the soil 10 years ago. In 2008 Amy Hepworth came up with a risky plan. Despite the recession, she began buying abandoned nearby farmland and leased more still from developers whose housing plans dried up. She convinced her sister to come back to the farm to help. The expansion plan worked, and Hepworth Farm organic produce is now a common sight throughout the lower Hudson Valley. Because of Amy’s agricultural expertise and Gail’s business acumen, when the Hepworths got into hemp they were immediately approached by investors who wanted to give them millions in startup capital to run a large-scale hemp-growing operation. But the deal involved losing autonomy over their farmland and they turned the money down, opting instead to form Hempire State Growers. Over the past year, Amy has convinced members or her local community of farmers to come together and create the cooperative. Some farmers were all in, while others just offered land on their farms for Hempire to manage. Gail says the co-op is offering members market diversification by selling not just raw hemp but different CBD options, and vertical integration, so farmers can “capture profits from seed to sale.” “This is a crop and crops need farmers,” Gail says. “To farm hemp commercially you need experience. That’s the strength of the co-op. We have the experience. Amy knows a lot about this plant and our farmers are learning fast.”

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—Gail Hepworth Sharks & Big Pharma From the politicians in Albany to the farmers themselves, no one yet knows what’s to come for the versatile crop. It’s unclear where the state will come down when it finally determines how it will regulate CBD, but Gail’s pulled in consultants to the business from her corporate past who are ready to address operational and governmental issues as they arise. “This industry isn’t easy and it’s shark-infested,” Gail says “The FDA hasn’t landed yet on regulations and the genetics aren’t stable yet either. We are hoping when everything settles, this isn’t something Big Pharma wants to control. We have recruited talent who understand how to adapt to changes in policy, and we will be ready for whatever they throw at us.” The co-op includes an action committee to help with legislation and hired COO Florence Rondeau-Chang who, Hepworth says, has 25 years of experience in corporate operations. The organization is currently made up of the Hepworths’ neighboring farms (growing slowly but intentionally this important first season) but Gail says they feel a sense of obligation to make their membership open to all serious, established regional farmers looking for the type of support they’re offering. “We’re talking about a farm-to-table community that’s 20 years in the making,” she continues. “Agriculture has created the fabric of our regional identity,” Gail says. “The strength and draw of our farms is in their diversity, and hemp is now a part of that weave. We just wouldn’t let an opportunity like this miss us.”


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Bop to Tottom

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334 Wall St. (845) 802-5900 Boptotottom.com The corner store that is a cornerstone. 10 8

Snowflake Festival Coming December 6th For more info: kingstonuptown.org

Exit 19

11

309 Wall St. (845) 514-2485 Exitnineteen.com A unique and ever-changing emporium of home furnishings, art, lighting and gifts.

Oak 42 34 John St. (845) 339-0042 Oak42.com A clothing and lifestyle boutique offering fashion, home goods, and accessories.

Hamilton and Adams

13

32 John St. (845) 383-1039 Men’s apparel, skin care, gifts, and more. 12

Kingston Opera House 275 Fair St. (845) 331-0898 Potterrealtymanagement@gmail.com Commercial storefronts and 2 levels of handicap accessible offices. Leasing property to tenants. Call Potter Realty Management.

Potter Realty 1 John St. (845) 331-0898 Potterrealtymanagement@gmail.com Leasing office and commercial space in Uptown Kingston.

14

Crown 10 Crown St. (845) 663-9003 10crownstreet.com Lounge featuring bespoke libations, seasonal cocktails, along with local beer and wines. This directory is a paid supplement.

11/19 CHRONOGRAM ART OF BUSINESS 31


This page: Smoked salmon and chevre tartine on grilled Sparrowbush levain. Opposite: The dining room at Home/Made Hudson. 32 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 11/19


food & drink

Secret Spot HOME/MADE HUDSON by Amy Krzanik

A collaboration with

T

he hottest new spot in Hudson is reservation-only and serves brunch two days a week. Home/Made Hudson, at 119 Warren Street, is a small space (formerly The Shaker bar) that is currently only open on weekends. That’s because the dynamic duo who run it, married couple Leisah Swenson and Monica Byrne, are in-demand event planners who host functions at their Brooklyn warehouse, Atelier Roquette, as well as off-site both in New York City and upstate. But this month, things are changing. As their hectic summer event schedule winds down, Byrne and Swenson have given up the lease on their city site, recently closed on a mini-farm in Germantown, and will now have more time to spend at Home/Made. But the couple are used to change, as the evolution of their business has had some dramatic twists and turns. Swenson, a former stage manager for live theater, and Byrne, whose background is in the culinary arts and floral design, first opened for business in 2006 in Red Hook, Brooklyn. “We called it Tini Wine Bar because it was very small,” says Swenson. “We had two hot plates, a toaster oven, and a panini grill from Target. Monica once cooked a seven-course meal for Valentine’s Day with a hot plate and cast-iron skillet.”

They then moved down the street, to a bigger place with a back yard, but it still sat only 20 people. In March of 2012, the building caught fire and they rebuilt. Then came Hurricane Sandy in October of that same year and the restaurant got wiped out again. In 2013, the couple opened their current event space and catering business, Atelier Roquette. Hankering for Ancram Byrne and Swenson were catering a wedding in Ancram in 2008 when they fell in love with Columbia County. After becoming weekenders, they found Home/Made Hudson’s current location two years ago. “We looked in and saw that the bar was in place; every other place we’d built out from scratch. We didn’t realize there was no kitchen,” Byrne laughs, “but we’d already talked ourselves into it. In two weeks, we closed the restaurant in Red Hook [Brooklyn] and moved up here.” The couple and their Instagram-famous pup (Blaze, a Golden Retriever) also rent the apartment upstairs and use the restaurant’s backyard space to prep for events and grow fresh herbs. “This space serves two purposes,” says Byrne, “a base of operations for catering, and a showroom for our aesthetic and style.” As the duo have slowly shifted their focus 11/19 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 33


Clockwise from top left: Home/Made is known for its fresh-baked pastries. Home/Made’s Byrne and Swenson are in-demand wedding caterers and floral arrangers. They use the restaurant’s back garden as a prep space. Home/Made Hudson’s cheese board.

upstate, so has their business. Swenson now says more than half of their events are held locally. It allows their business, which already offers the services of food, design, flowers, and rentals, to provide even more help to clients, including hair, makeup, and other advice. The two have come to know the area better and can help visitors find more of what they’re looking for right where they are. The addition of the Germantown farm (lovingly dubbed Farmette Roquette on Instagram) will eventually allow for some small rehearsal dinners and brunches in the property’s barns, along with creative workshops, and, once spring arrives, will serve as a site for the couple to grow some of the flowers and herbs they use in their wedding and restaurant business. Simple Meets Sophisticated As winter approaches, Byrne and Swenson will have more time to focus on Home/Made and hiring staff, which is in short supply throughout the region. For now, the restaurant is only open when its two owners can be there. Instead of serving as many people as possible, Byrne says, they want only to serve as many as can have a good time dining there. “When we’re open, we’re able to take really, really good care of people,” she says. Adding unexpected touches, like steamed milk with your coffee and other little approaches, make guests feel special. She says she wants 34 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 11/19

customers to feel like they had a 45-minute vacation when they dine with them. “I love simple food prepared well,” says Byrne. “Rustic pieces of toast, cheese, and produce, but I’m obsessive about attention to detail. Europeans have done this for generations. Something simple, done well, can be transcendent.” Some of the items on Home/Made’s menu change weekly, and Byrne will add specials based on what’s fresh in the region. Perfectly ripe local peaches with basil from the back garden, toasted dark bread and a spreadable sheep and goat cheese from Tasmania ($14) were offered on the day I visited. Some menu staples, though, are always available. Egg scrambles come in a handful of choices ($14.50) including wild mushrooms and fontina; truffle and Parmesan Reggiano; and smoked salmon, dill, and goat cheese. Thick toasts with a parade of toppings, each more delicious sounding than the next, can be ordered with cardamom pecan honey butter or the restaurant’s own citrus ricotta. There’s also the spicy yet sublime n’duja with ricotta spread on local Sparrow Bush levain. An open-faced BLT, prepared the Home/ Made way, has been a hit, says Byrne. The sandwich begins with Sparrow Bush bread, to which is added thick double-smoked bacon, local tomatoes, basil aioli, and fresh greens ($14.50). Add a Letterbox Farm egg to it (or anything else) for three dollars more. Another

popular item is the tomato cobbler ($14.50), a savory twist on the dessert dish, made with slow-roasted tomatoes, caramelized onions, and gruyere, and topped with fresh herb biscuits. (Swenson will strongly suggest adding an egg to this dish if asked.) Those with a sweet tooth will not feel left out, as Byrne, a former pastry chef, supplies a rotating selection of scones, biscuits, and coffee cake with whichever fruits are freshest. But there’s a good chance you’ll opt for one of Home/Made’s famous cinnamon buns, which Byrne says have a cult following. “They’re as big as your head,” she says, and are served warm, in a bowl, with cream cheese frosting melted right into it. Come late November, Swenson and Byrne hope to expand the restaurant’s hours to include dinner service. Home/Made has a full liquor license, and later hours would allow its selection of organic and biodynamic wines (one standout is the Soellner Gruner Veltliner 2017 Wogenrain, Austria, $11 a glass; $38 a bottle), local craft beers and ciders (a 500ml bottle of Suarez Family Brewery Merkel Cherry Beer, $20, is a tart, pink, adventure), liquors from upstate distilleries, and specialty cocktails to share the spotlight. Just be forewarned, much like their weekend brunches, reservations will fill up quickly. Home/Made Hudson, 119 Warren Street, Hudson. Homemadehudson.com


The Hudson Valley’s Premier Restaurant & Event Space

Brunch •Lunch •Dinner •Events 1379 US 9, Wappingers Falls, NY 12590 | @heritagefooddrink | 845.298.1555 | www.heritagefooddrink.com

2019 BEST OF THE H U DS O N VA L L E Y

WINNER

O U T D O O R

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387 SOUTH STREET HIGHLAND, NY 12528 (845) 883-0866 facebook.com/gunkhaus

11/19 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 35


We are proud to be offering the freshest local fare of the Hudson Valley, something that is at the core of our food philosophy. OPEN 5 DAYS A WEEK

Serving breakfast & lunch all day 8:30 - 4:30 PM Closed Mondays and Tuesdays CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS

845-255-4949 2356 RT. 44/55 Gardiner NY 12525 VISIT US ONLINE

www.miogardiner.com

of Full Line uts C ld o C ic n Orga king o o C e and Hom ssen Delicate

79 Main Street New Paltz 845-255-2244 Open 7 Days

Local Organic Grass-Fed Beef • Lamb • Goat • Veal • Pork • Chicken • Wild Salmon

No Hormones ~ No Antibiotics ~ No Preservatives Custom Cut • Home Cooking Delicatessen Nitrate-Free Bacon • Pork Roasts • Beef Roasts Bone-in or Boneless Ham: smoked or fresh Local Organic Beef • Exotic Meats (Venison, Buffalo, Ostrich) • Wild Fish

Voted Best Indian Cuisine in the Hudson Valley

Red Hook Curry House ★★★★ DINING Daily Freeman & Poughkeepsie Journal ZAGAT RATED

HUNDI BUFFET

NEW PALTZ, NY

TUESDAY & SUNDAY 5-9PM

4 Vegetarian Dishes • 4 Non-Vegetarian Dishes includes: appetizers, soup, salad bar, bread, dessert, coffee & tea All you can eat only $16.00 • Children under 8- $10.00 28 E. MARKET ST, RED HOOK (845) 758-2666 See our full menu at www.RedHookCurryHouse.com

845-255-1203 | NEW PALTZ, NY

w w w.iloveschat zis.com Mon: 3pm-10pm | Wed-Sat: Noon-12am

OPEN EVERY DAY Lunch: 11:30am-3:00 pm Dinner: 5:00pm-10:00pm Fridays: 3:00pm - 10:00pm

Sun: 11am-10pm | Closed: Tuesday SOUPS - BURGERS - SAUSAGES

Catering for Parties & Weddings • Take out orders welcome

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202 MAIN ST. POUGHKEEPSIE, NY | 845-454-1179 MON: 3PM - CLOSE | TUES - SAT: 12PM - CLOSE | SUN: 11AM - CLOSE

36 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 11/19


sips & bites Applestone Meat Open in Hudson

The future of farm-to-table meat selling is now open for business in Hudson. In August, Applestone Meat opened its second 24-hour automated butcher shop at 21 Green Street. (Its headquarters is in Stone Ridge.) The clean, well-lit shop has seven automat-style vending machines stocked with everything from sausage and roasts to fillets and 120-day aged prime steaks. There is also a human attendant present from 11am to 6pm to help Luddite carnivores navigate the future of farm-to-table tech. While the machines themselves might at first seem imposing, the quality of the products therein is validated by the reputation of owner Joshua Applestone. Cofounder of Fleishers Craft Butchery in Kingston in the early 2000s, Applestone is oft credited as a pioneer of the whole-animal butchery trend within the farm-to-table movement. Applestonemeat.com

Prepare to Hibernate

Runa Bistro in New Paltz

New Paltz hasn’t seen a French restaurant since Loup Garou closed in the late `90s. Runa is a long-overdue addition to the town’s dining scene, overseen by Clare Hussain, a hospitality veteran who took over the historic farmhouse that formerly housed the Village Tea Room. Like Tea Room owner Agnes Devereaux, Hussain is Irish; the menu however, is classic French, with chef Ryan McClintock in the kitchen. The vibe is comfortable and casual at Runa Bistro, which aims to give a casual and comfortable dining experience with elevated, high-quality meals. Lunch includes smoked salmon tartine with capers, shallots, cucumbers and dill aioli for $13. The weekend brunch includes bistro staples like crepes ($14), fines herbes omelette ($13), and croque monsiuer ($14). Dinner entrees include duck breast au poivre, with grapefruit gastrique, wilted frisée, and roasted root vegetables ($28), and steak frites ($28). Runabistro.com

Hudson Valley Restaurant Week

November 4-17 Over 200 restaurants are participating in this year’s Hudson Valley Restaurant Week, all offering three-course dinners for $32.95 and some also offering three-course lunches for $22.95. Some newcomers to the roster include Joe & Joe in Nyack, Locali in Mount Kisco, and Little Drunken Chef in White Plains. Terrapin in Rhinebeck, a longstanding participant, is offering entrees such as its fetishized barbecued duck quesadilla with mango-avocado salsa on their lunch menu and maple-brined pork chops with Calvados apple demi-glace on their dinner menu. Valleytable.com

Red Hook & The Chocolate Festival November 2 Red Hook & The Chocolate Festival is a daylong free festival featuring chocolate galore, with chocolate wars, chocolate Olympics, chocolate arcade, and chocolate fun-do. Live music will play in the streets as you explore the chocolate vendors and tastings, check out the various competitions and cooking demos, and search for the special guest: Willy Wonka himself. Dutchesstourism.com

Willow by Charlie Palmer

Celebrity chef and restaurateur Charlie Palmer—River Cafe, Aureole, Charlie Palmer Steak—has partnered with Mirbeau Inn & Spa to create Willow, a sumptuous new eatery in Rhinebeck. Open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily, Willow offers a journey into Palmer’s signature progressive American cooking infused with classical French techniques, and is overseen by Hudson Valley native and rising culinary star Thomas Burke. For breakfast, you can enjoy a $10 grain bowl with farro, avocado, and radish tossed with Banyuls vinaigrette. Lunch includes steak frites with béarnaise sauce for $28. Dinner entrees include caramelized Mary’s chicken with sunchoke, spinach puree, pickled trumpet mushrooms, and truffled chicken jus for $27. Rhinebeck.mirbeau.com —Claudia Larsen & Jamie Larson (Applestone)

1202 ROUTE 55 LAGRANGEVILLE, NY 12540

T: 845.452.0110 DAILYPLANETDINER.COM S U N -T H U R S 6A M -1 1 P M F R I & S AT 6 A M - 1 2 A M

11/19 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 37


WHAT ARE YOU HUNGRY FOR?

MMMMENU CHRONOGRAM SMARTCARD’S GUIDE TO PARTNER RESTAURANTS

BISTRO TO GO

MARbLED MEAT SHOP

Serving the community for 25 yearS, BiStro to go offers daily housemade, chef-prepared entreeS, vegan and vegetarian Specials, SoupS, and a full-Service Bakery with all homemade deSserts.

marbled meat Shop in cold Spring offers new york State grasS fed and paStureraised meatS, american farmStead cheeSeS and provisions, and a hearty lunch menu.

CAFE MIO

THE ROOST

KINGSTON

GARDINER

COLD SPRING

STONE RIDGE NEW TO CHRONOGRAM SMARTCARD!

always in Season, cafe mio SourceS ingredientS from within a 5-mile radius. this cozy Spot diShes up a farm-to-taBle Brunch that could compete with the trendiest Brooklyn eatery.

from chicken and waffleS, to Signature Sandwiches and Salads, to Stumptown coffee, Boylan’S SodaS, and kagan meatS, the roost haS optionS for all palateS.

FUCHSIA TIKI BAR

RUNA BISTRO

NEW PALTz NEW TO CHRONOGRAM SMARTCARD!

NEW PALTz NEW TO CHRONOGRAM SMARTCARD!

dig the whimSical island viBeS at new paltz’S little piece of paradiSe. Serving up fun, tropical mixed drinks and asian-inSpired apps like crab rangoons and SuShi rollS.

proudly offering french cuisine featuring locally Sourced meat and produce. french onion Soup, crepes, ratatouille, and a kids menu. open for Brunch, lunch, and dinner.

HERITAGE FOOD + DRINK

VEGETALIEN

heritage food + drink Serves up a wide variety of Seasonal cuisine including wood-fired meatS, housemade charcuterie, adult grilled cheeSe, and more.

locally-Sourced, 100% plant-BaSed café and juice Bar, vegetalien is located on main Street in Beacon. the menu changeS BaSed on Seasonal ingredientS, Sourced from a variety of farmS in the hudson valley.

WAPPINGERS FALLS

BEACON

USE THE APP --> PICK YOUR RESTAURANT --> GET UP TO 50% OFF YOUR ORDER. IT’S THAT SIMPLE.

DOWNLOAD THE APP IT’S FREE!

(AT PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS, CHECK THE APP FOR CURRENT DEALS. AVAILABLE IN THE APP STORE AND GOOGLE PLAYSTORE.) 38 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 11/19


THE

PANDORICA RESTAURANT 165 Main St, Beacon (845) 831-6287

Doctor Who themed restaurant serving a varied international menu. Many gluten free, vegetarian and vegan options.

thepandoricarestaurant.com

Locations 20 Garden St. Rhinebeck NY (845) 516-5197 338 Route 212 Saugerties NY (845) 247-3665

w w w. b u n s b u r g e r s n y. c o m

Farm-to-table, all-vegetarian, Indian meals based on the ancient dietary practices of Ayurveda.

Mon–Sat: 11-9pm, Sun: 11-4pm 94 South Robinson Ave., Newburgh, NY | 845-245-6048

U-PICK

FA R M M A R K E T • CA F É • B A K E R Y • P E T T I N G Z O O • ART SPACE 1 4 2 1 R O U T E 9 H G H E N T N Y • LOV E A P P L E FA R M . C O M

11/19 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 39


Hilary Davis and Jordan Moser on their Eero Saarinan “Womb Chair” under the Arc Lamp, made by the Guzzini brothers in Italy. Moser found the iconic Midcentury Modern lamp on Craigslist in the dead of winter. “It had seen better days,” Moser remembers. “The head had been ripped off, the sockets removed—it was in pieces.” Still, he drove up to Woodstock in his Honda Civic “with fingers crossed” and was able to score the piece for $125. “For a moment it seemed like it wasn’t going to fit in the back,” he recalls However, after some dissembling, he was soon driving down the thruway with the lamp hanging out the back window. After an additional $20 investment and a “night doing surgery,” he was able to surprise Davis with a new lamp arcing over the living room. “That was my favorite part,” says Moser. “She got so excited; we did a little dance in the living room.”

40 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 11/19


A corner of the home’s living room is devoted almost exclusively to Midcentury Modern design pieces. “We love that MCM is functional and practical, yet has a fun, playful side that inspires us to live better,” says Moser. “After World War II there was such hope for the future— new manufacturing techniques and materials like plywood, plexiglass, and plastic had been invented. Ambitious designers were eager to implement them into affordable furniture for the growing middle class.”

W

hen Hilary Davis and Jordan Moser embrace the aesthetics of a particular era, they don’t do it half-heartedly. Case in point: After fully refurbishing the A-frame cabin they bought on Mount Beacon, they went gaga for Midcentury Modern design, and the house is a showcase for the couple’s ever-growing, eclectic collection of pieces from that “playful, more idealistic era.” Over the past three years, Davis and Moser have scoured the four corners of the Hudson Valley. They’ve searched through basements and antique shops, through yard sales, Craigslist, and eBay, all to rescue the neglected, rejected artifacts— futuristic furniture, whimsical light fixtures, distinctive art, and even bygone technology of the optimistic, utopian post-World War II era. There might have been a hint of the lengths Davis and Moser would go to in restoring both their home and its contents, in one of their other collaborations—the synth rock band Tygersounds. Emulating the buoyant tone of the '80s, the trio “takes some of the cooler sounds from the decade,

adds a modern twist to the vocals, and leaves out the cheese,” explains Moser, who plays synthesizer and sings. Davis, who also plays synth as well as electric violin, sees the correlation. “I think it’s the same reason that we’re drawn to Midcentury Modern design; the band is a kind of sonic equivalent—it’s nostalgic.” Like Tygersounds, their home is a creative collaboration. It’s where Davis’s eye for style and formal design education meets Moser’s dogged persistence in tracking down pieces and then painstakingly refurbishing them. “It’s not about buying the most expensive or famous pieces,” explains Davis. “It’s more, ‘Do we love the story behind it? Do we love the character? Do we love the intention of the designer who made it, or even just how the shape makes us feel?’” Through their joint vision and combined talents, the couple have assembled a home where each restored piece has its place in a comfortable, authentic whole. “It’s so meaningful to us to have an original piece,” says Davis. “Even if we have to find something and fix it up. We feel like we’ve saved it for its historical value.”

the house

So Last Century

TWO MUSICIAN-DESIGNERS EXPLORE MIDCENTURY MOTIFS IN BEACON By Mary Angeles Armstrong Photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid

11/19 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 41


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42 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 11/19


A frame of possibility It was the Hudson Valley’s effusive atmosphere of creative experimentation that led Davis and Moser upstate. Previously residents of the East Village, the two first stopped in Beacon on their way to Fishkill for a friend’s winter solstice party. “We had heard about Dia, Main Street, and the Roundhouse,” explains Davis, who originally hails from Minneapolis. They loved the region’s abundant natural resources, the plethora of independent, creative businesses, the farm-to-table food scene, and the area’s rich musical roots. “There’s an entrepreneurial, exciting spirit in the Hudson Valley,” says Moser. “If you want to do something cool, you can do it. It’s affordable and the community is open to it” They continued to explore the wider region on weekends, but during their jaunts they were always drawn back to Beacon. “Every time we visited Beacon, we discovered a new hike, brewery, or cozy spot that made it harder to leave,” remembers Davis. When they realized a part-time commute from Beacon to the city was doable both work in the advertising field: Davis as a graphic designer; Moser as a sound engineer—they crunched the numbers and realized buying a home in the area was actually feasible. “We thought we were going to find a cute 1950s, industrial-era home with a fenced-in yard within walking distance to Main Street,” remembers Davis. “But we weren’t connecting to any of the houses or the architecture in town.” After months of looking, they heard about a place on Mount Beacon—a neighborhood they hadn’t even realized existed. “As we drove up the mountain for the first time, we thought, ‘we can’t live all the way up here, we’ll need to get a car.’” However, from the moment they first walked into the house, they loved it. Built in 1990, the three-bedroom, two-bath Swiss-style ski chalet was an architectural novelty. Even though the rooms were filled with dilapidated furniture, the refrigerator still contained rotting food, and beach balls hung from the ceiling rafters, the two could see evidence of the original ownerbuilder’s craftsmanship. The open first-floor living room, dining room, and kitchen were centered around a giant bluestone fireplace— built from stones gathered from the surrounding property, they later discovered— that reached all the way to the double-height knotty pine vaulted ceilings. “We loved how the surrounding nature was integrated into the house,” says Davis.

The couple painted an accent wall in the first-floor guest room to add a pop of green. Originally they’d thought to decorate the home with a “rustic-modern vibe” and collected trunks, weathered crates, and paintings from upstate flea markets. After deciding on a different aesthetic for a majority of the house, they conceded to decorate the guest room with their upstate finds, including an antique trunk, oil paintings, and a collection of maps.

11/19 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 43


Years of neglect had left the house in a sorry state. It needed a new roof, the exterior siding had been torn up by woodpeckers, the chimney needed repair, and many of the windows needed replacing. Even though it would require extensive rehabilitation, the couple felt they had to rescue it. “We wanted to restore it to its former glory,” says Moser. In 2016, the two took the plunge. They bought the home, let go of their tiny apartment and sold “all our furniture from Ikea that we knew wouldn’t survive the move,” says Davis. She even quit her corporate job and the two put their band on hold just so they could focus on the house. “We were in over our heads for sure,” explains Moser. “But it was also very exciting.”

The dining room features a glass dining table designed by furniture designer-turned-shipbuilder Adrian Pearsall, Verner Panton single-injection plastic chairs, and a Louis Polson PH-5 pendant lamp. “We love the personalities of the designers from that era and the stories about their projects and artistic endeavors. They were all renaissance people,” says Davis.

44 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 11/19

Penchant for Whimsy The next few months were spent sleeping on an air mattress in the middle of the floor while they oversaw the home’s overhaul. Their real estate agent, Jon Miller of Jon Car Realty, connected them to local contractors to repair the exterior damage and the two tackled as much of the interior work as they could handle themselves. Inside, they ripped up the carpets and worked with Strictly Hardwood to restore the hardwood floorboards throughout the open firstfloor living, dining, and kitchen areas, as well as an adjacent office and guest room. Then they repainted all the walls and replaced every light fixture, both upstairs and down. The couple tore out the existing kitchen and in its place created a sleek monochrome enclave with playful pops of color. They added walls of gray cabinets, off-white counters and new appliances, incorporating intermittent touches of orange paint for flair. When a chandelier wouldn’t fit into their dining room, Moser deftly disassembled the piece and the two hung the individual pendants from a cement track in the ceiling to create track lighting over the countertops. He took a similar innovative approach with the second-floor loft space, open to the living area below. By reappropriating acoustic soundproofing panels from a Manhattan studio, he created a home studio filled with instruments and recording equipment. The remaining second floor has a large master suite with vaulted ceilings, a full bathroom, and a walk-in closet running the length of the house. As the couple restored the house, they began to explore ways they might furnish it. With little left from their Manhattan apartment, they started frequenting retailers for ideas but were disappointed in the quality of materials they found. However, while shopping, Moser was always drawn to the same distinctive colorful, playful motif. Moser didn’t even realize there was a name for what he liked until Davis pointed out all the pieces he gravitated to originated from the Midcentury Modern design movement. “The designers of that era were all multimedia artists and renaissance people,” explains Davis. “They would design furniture, houses, lighting, and all sorts of different things.” One night the couple asked each other, “What if we just decorate everything this way?” Rather than buying knockoffs, they began searching for pieces they could both afford and refurbish. While they’ve found many original pieces to match their idiosyncratic home (“Good thing we got that car,” says Moser), what they’ve really discovered is a vein of inspiration. “Sometimes we find a piece and then we immediately get ideas for what goes around it,” he explains. “We find a chair or a sofa and then, all of a sudden we have a shape or a color scheme to work from.” That, in turn, sends them back out searching. “It inspires play,” says Moser. “It lifts you up to be surrounded by objects that were designed to be fun. It makes you happy.”


HAPPILY TUCKED-IN

KITCHEN | BATH | CLOSETS | TILE 747 NY-28 KINGSTON, NY 12401 (845) 331-2200 | hello@CabinetDesigners.com

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ELLIMAN ON THE MARKET Millbrook, NY Historic Silverbrook Farm Approx. 53.4 acres | Stable/Barn $1,995,000 Web# 5092536

Susan Parshall M: 212.877.6179

Putnam Valley, NY Nature Enthusiasts Paradise Approx. 5.25 acres | Pond $575,000 Web# 4940703 Melanie Shepard M: 203.515.8388 New Paltz, NY On the Base of Mohank Mountain Approx. 1.43 acres | Great Room $385,000 Web# 4960735 Mary Jean Staudohar M: 914.474.7250

elliman.com 101 KING STREET, CHAPPAQUA, NY 10514 | 914.238.3988 © 2019 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

11/19 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 45


A shelf in Davis’s home office. She works in the advertising industry in Manhattan. “I’ve always loved art and making things, but I’m not a painter or illustrator,” she says. “Working in design allows me to bring together different styles of illustration and photography then add typography to communicate a message.”

Left: Moser turned the home’s second-floor loft space into a home office. “This is where I spend most of my time mixing music for my work or just focusing on my own stuff,” he says. “It also doubles as a cozy nook when friends come to visit.”

46 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 11/19


ABOUT US

J. McManus & Son, Inc. has been providing home improvement services in the Hudson Valley for over 50 years.

OUR SERVICES

Metal Rooong • Gutters • Skylights Custom Sheet Metal Fabrication and more...

8457955159 | 9147553991 info@jmcmanusandson.com 161 Willow Tree Road, Milton, NY 12547

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A refurbished bluestone fireplace sits at the home’s center. It was the first thing the couple noticed on their initial visit. “We’ve had so many adventures and good times exploring areas and finding cool stuff to fill the house,” says Davis. The white Haeger antelope sculpture was a regift from friends in Brooklyn who received it as a thank-you present from a drag queen who had crashed on their couch. “I know we’ve picked out a cool piece when the kids who come over are obsessed with it or crawling all over it,” says Moser. “Everyone wants to interact with it.”

11/19 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 49


health & wellness

CBD CRAZED IS THERE SCIENCE AND SUBSTANCE BEHIND THE HYPE? By Wendy Kagan

S

ome people turn to cannabidiol, or CBD, for relief from anxiety or pain—but for Alison Jensen, experimenting with the cannabis extract was about the pursuit of pleasure. “After my last long-term relationship crashed and burned, I found myself deciding who I wanted to be as I aged,” she says. “I was entering my mid-60s, and I knew that I wanted to bring more pleasure into my life.” She tried online dating with varying degrees of disaster and success. When the computer algorithm matched her with a medical marijuana farmer from Long Island last year, she didn’t find a soulmate but she did get a brief peek into the world cannabis production. Around the same time, she happened upon a CBD-infused vaginal lubricant online that piqued her interest. 50 HEALTH & WELLNESS CHRONOGRAM 11/19


“All

the female journalist reviewers said the same thing, which was varying degrees of ‘wonderful’ and ‘the best sex ever,’” she says. But it was messy to apply, so with the farmer’s help and some research, she learned how to make her own sex enhancer with CBD and coconut oil. Jensen (not her real name) shared it with female friends in her Hudson community, who quickly came back saying, “This is amazing, I want more—and by the way, I put some on my achy knee and it really helped.” As Jensen created a sensation among her peers with the lubricant, a similar explosion of interest was happening around CBD wellness products across the country. The CBD craze is still in full swing, fueled largely by anecdotal stories of its purported superpowers. You’ve likely heard from popular media that CBD is the answer to almost anything that ails you. The top four uses include anxiety, pain, insomnia, and seizures—but some turn to the extract for depression, PTSD, addiction recovery, and even cancer treatment support. Yet while researchers see a lot of promise in CBD for conditions like these, so far there’s little scientific evidence that it can help with any of them—except seizures. Last year, the FDA approved a purified CBD extract called Epidiolex to treat rare seizure disorders after three clinical trials proved its safety and efficacy. More trials are on the way, as the push toward marijuana’s legalization is gaining momentum and removing a lot of the stigma that hindered research in the past. In the meantime, what’s a CBD-curious consumer to do? We can proceed with caution— learning how to watch out for scam CBD, how to find products that uphold safety and integrity, and how CBD works in terms of dosing and individual effectiveness. “We need to temper our expectations,” says Neal Smoller, PharmaD, owner of Village Apothecary in Woodstock and founder of WoodstockVitamins.com. “A lot of people believe they can go anywhere, buy any product, take a single dose, and their life will change.” As a holistic pharmacist, Smoller considers it his mission to protect customers from faux quality and bogus claims. “If the supplement industry is the Wild West from a quality perspective, then CBD is Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome,” he warns. “The quality standards that are supposed to be applied to supplements don’t really apply to CBD because of their weird legal ambiguity. And nobody really follows supplement regulations anyway, so there are a lot of problems with that.” With the CBD industry projected to reach $16 billion in the US by 2025, it’s high time we get some clarity around the subject. (Without the marijuana high, naturally.)

Navigating CBD, from Oils to Gummies There’s a lot we don’t know yet about CBD. But we do know that it’s one of more than 100 cannabinoids, or closely related compounds found in the cannabis plant. Our bodies naturally produce cannabinoids, which interact with the endocannabinoid system—a collection of receptors found throughout the brain and body. Although this system is poorly understood, it’s believed to help create homeostasis (balance) in the body and regulate sensitivities such as pain, inflammation, anxiety, sleep, and more. CBD often plays second fiddle to its sexier sibling, tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC—the psychoactive cannabinoid in pot that makes you high. Even though it’s chemically similar to THC, CBD will not get you stoked or give you the munchies—nor is it addictive. And while THC is a highly controlled substance, CBD is, for the most part, legal. The 2018 Farm Bill established that CBD is lawful in the US as long as it meets two requirements: It’s derived from the hemp plant (rather than the more potent marijuana plant) and it contains less than 0.3 percent of THC. Yet some states and municipalities have tighter controls around the substance. And while CBD in foods was in vogue in New York a couple of years ago, it’s verboten at the moment (goodbye, CBD-infused coffee, brownies, even cheeseburgers). There’s still a dizzying array of CBD varieties on store shelves—whether it’s tinctures or oils, lotions, gel caps, vaping, or gummy bears. Gummies are cute, but it’s hard for manufacturers to standardize how much CBD each one contains. Vaping carries risks, as we’re seeing a series of vaping-related injuries and deaths in the news these days. “I like the liquid tincture because you can really dial in the dose,” Smoller says. “Tinctures are also going to offer the lowest cost. As a yardstick, high-quality CBD should cost 10 cents or less per milligram. If you’re spending more, you’re getting ripped off.” You can also apply CBD-infused lotions topically for pain—or, like Jensen, for pleasure. But beware of companies that add a tiny bit of CBD to pain-relief products like Biofreeze (camphor and menthol) just so they can overcharge for it. Even if you stick to oral tinctures, the options don’t end there. There’s CBD isolate, which is almost 100 percent CBD and doesn’t include the terpenes, waxes, and essential oils that naturally occur in the hemp plant. (Terpenes are the plant compounds that give weed its pungent aroma and taste.) Some say that CBD isolate lacks the therapeutic “entourage effect” that you get when all the plant compounds work in concert. That’s why many prefer CBD distillate, or broadspectrum CBD, which offers the full cocktail of compounds and no more than 0.3 percent of THC. Perhaps the most popular choice, full-

“We need to temper our expectations. A lot of people believe they can go anywhere, buy any product, take a single dose, and their life will change.” ­—­Neal Smoller, PharmaD spectrum CBD includes every compound except THC, making it safe for drug testing while still offering the entourage effect. Shannon Flynn, a writer and teacher from Highland, has tried various forms of CBD from oils to gummies, with mixed results. After enduring both heart surgery and a car accident, she suffered from intercostal rib spasms for years. “I found that if I put topical CBD directly on those ribs, the spasms would stop,” she says. “That was a miracle. I’ve also found that taking it orally helps me a lot with anxiety and sleep. One dropperful before bed, and I’m out.” However, CBD did not have any effect on her severe pain from gout. “I had to take steroids and opiates for that,” she adds. Meanwhile, she’s noticed a lack of consistency in the quality of CBD products. Since she has a medical marijuana card, she can purchase prescription-grade cannabis products from a dispensary. Not surprisingly, she finds that over-the-counter CBD products often fail to provide the same level of integrity. “I’d rather know that a lab was hybridizing it for me and making it really perfect,” she says. “You can buy CBD in the health food store, but do you really know how it was made?” 11/19 CHRONOGRAM HEALTH & WELLNESS 51


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Finding Real-Deal CBD, and Weeding Out Imposters If you know what to look for, you can indeed find quality CBD without a prescription. First, watch out for faux quality. “A lot of brands are providing a fake appearance of quality and transparency by posting a couple of their test results online,” says Smoller. “But these tests are often incomplete or outdated, or they’re not testing for the right thing.” Since cannabis is a hyperaccumulator, it’s a magnet for pesticides, herbicides, heavy metals, and other contaminants in the soil. Organic farming doesn’t always ensure purity either, because hemp plants can grow mold or fungus on them. Good testing will certify that your CBD doesn’t contain intruders like these. A few local growers and producers are taking steps to uphold higher standards in CBD quality and testing—like High Falls Hemp. “We farm our own material, so we know where it’s coming from,” says Rick Weissman, a retired Wall Street executive who founded the small-scale, 13acre operation in High Falls with his wife, Tricia. “That’s one way we ensure quality and reliability. We also test everything on three levels. We test the plant material first; then we test the CBD distillate that we make from it. And after we make the distillate into our finished product, we test that as well.” Seeing the test results for yourself is easy: Every vial of tincture or tube of lotion from High Falls Hemp has a QR code on the label that you can scan with your phone to view the lab reports for that product. Such transparency is rare in the CBD world. In Columbia County, Hudson Hemp is a large-scale operation that prides itself on organic and sustainable practices. This summer, the womenowned business opened the farm for tours in a spirit of communitybuilding. “People were able to walk through our operation, talk to the farmers, see what we’re feeding our plants and what we’re feeding our soil,” says Melany Dobson, the company’s VP of Brand Development. On the processing side, they use certified organic ethanol for the cold extraction process—“not because we need to, but because we care about the environmental impact,” says Dobson. Hudson Hemp has a product line called Treaty, which is a collection of four CBD formulas enhanced with

Our bodies naturally produce cannabinoids, which interact with the endocannabinoid system—a collection of receptors found throughout the brain and body. plant extracts. While you won’t find published reports from their thirdparty lab testing, certificates of analysis and test results are available by request. Savvy consumers need not be shy about asking for them. Just as important as quality and testing is getting the dosage right, and dosing can vary wildly from person to person. “Depending on how big you are and whether you have a mild or a severe issue, factors like these will affect what your starting dose should be,” says Weismann from High Falls Hemp, whose website has information on dosing. “There’s no one-sizefits-all.” Weissman discovered this the hard way, as it took him about a year to find the correct dose to alleviate his chronic knee pain (he’s now pain free). While one person might respond to as little as 10 milligrams of CBD oil, someone else might need 10 times that amount or more. A good rule of thumb is to start low and increase the dose over time until you get the desired effect. Side effects can include dry mouth, low blood pressure, and drowsiness. And CBD is not for everyone; Smoller estimates that for 10 to 15 percent of people, it won’t work or it will require a dose that’s too large to be affordable. As for Alison Jensen, she’s still going strong using CBD in the pursuit of pleasure and joy. While she considers her vaginal lubricant an essential bedside tool, she also finds a salve in CBD for her arthritic hips and knees. “When I see it’s going to rain, and I know that’s going to affect my mobility and pain level, I slather it on,” she says. And like many dog owners, she claims that CBD helps to ease separation anxiety for her pooch. “It’s saved my shoes, my remote, my sunglasses.” That’s happiness right there. RESOURCES High Falls Hemp Highfallshempny.com Hudson Hemp Hudsonhemp.com Neal Smoller, PharmaD WoodstockVitamins.com

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urious and creative minds flourish in an academic setting where compassion and joy are an integral part of the learning culture. When students are engaged in a classroom environment that nurtures social intelligence and emotional wellbeing alongside critical thinking and concrete academic skills, children develop a secure foundation for success both at school and in the wider world. “When you put a child at the center of their own learning, teachers aren’t just dictating knowledge for standardized tests, they’re creating an experience,” says Maria SteinMarrison, director at The Manitou School, an independent, bilingual school in Cold Spring for students in grades pre-K through eighth. At The Manitou School, an emphasis is placed on using mindfulness, restorative justice, and selfawareness to help develop well-rounded students who will grow up to be compassionate adults. “We see each child as an individual learner and aim to discover what they need in order to learn best individually and within a group setting.” Buzzwords abound when it comes to teaching

methods. For instance, some schools promote solely child-led or project-based learning as the cornerstone of their curriculum while others teach to the standardized tests. Though there have been varying levels of success with these models, not all students succeed with the same method. “Some children thrive with project-based learning, others through Socratic questioning, while others need a direct delivery of information,” Stein-Marrison says. “At Manitou, we don’t subscribe to one way of thinking; we learn about the children and use whichever educational approach works best.” By doing so, students feel as though they’re in a safe space. When they know their input matters, confidence is cultivated and a culture of inclusivity, kindness, and courage can be created. By fostering these habits, not only do students and teachers create a more positive learning environment, where more time is spent teaching than on classroom management, but these practices also impact the students’ lives outside of school. “Social and emotional development are as important as academic development,” Stein-

Marrison says. “When students come to us from other schools, we ask the parents if they’ve noticed a change at home, and many will say that their child is coming home excited to talk about what they’re learning at school. They’re more engaged. They’re developing compassion for the world and have a desire to be active in the community. They’re curious and excited about learning.” When a student’s social and emotional intelligence are thriving, they perform better academically, too. When a child is taught how to overcome bias, approach conflict with compassion, and create a culture of belonging, they can apply these techniques to all parts of their lives as they grow. “Society will always need creative thinkers who collaborate well and communicate clearly; who are team players with critical thinking and reasoning skills,” SteinMarrison says. “By giving our students the tools to lead purposeful, compassionate, joyful lives, we are teaching them to bring meaning into whatever endeavor they choose.” Manitouschool.org 11/19 CHRONOGRAM HEALTH & WELLNESS 55


outdoors

56 OUTDOORS CHRONOGRAM 11/19


WHO'S HUNTING NOW? By Phillip Pantuso Photos by Winona Barton-Ballentine

T

Leon Vehaba, is the farm manager at Poughkeepsie Farm Project and holds a master's degree in sustainable development. He took up hunting because he wanted to be more involved in the production of the meat he consumed.

he early 1820s in the United States were known as the Era of Good Feelings. The British had recently been defeated, for the second time, in the War of 1812, and the Founding Fathers were passing leadership of the nation on to a new generation. It was a period of optimism and self-reflection. With the fight for freedom seemingly won for good, what would it mean to be an American in the future? One popular cultural figure of the day who suggested an answer was Natty Bumppo, star of James Fenimore Cooper’s five-part frontier epic, the Leatherstocking Tales. Inspired in part by the explorer Daniel Boone, Bumppo was a white man raised by Native Americans in late-18th century upstate New York, with hunting, scouting, and survival skills so finely honed that he was known as “Deerslayer.” As the US entered a period of expansionism and idealism, Americans were increasingly drawn to characters like Bumppo—folk heroes whose resourcefulness and rugged individualism modeled a newly independent way of being. One of the basic building blocks of that was hunting. Hunting distills many of the contradictions about our national mythology. Previously the province of British aristocracy, in America hunting has been democratic and aspirational, and it helped forge a sense of self-reliance and a back-to-the-land ethos that are at the core of our national identity. It has also revealed unpleasant truths about our capacity for overconsumption, environmental incaution, and disregard for suffering. “Can we ever fully understand our nation’s character if we do not begin to recognize the indelible mark left upon it by our love of the hunt?” writes Philip Dray in his 2018 book The Fair Chase: The Epic Story of Hunting in America, which traces the history of hunting in America and its influence on everything from westward expansion to modern conservation efforts. That hunting is now so divisive reflects changing attitudes about guns, animals, and the culture that grew up around the sport. Between four and six percent of Americans hunt today, the lowest percentage in the nation’s history, though some 70 percent say they approve of it. Combined, America’s roughly 12.5 million hunters spend between $3.5 and $5 billion annually on taxable hunting merchandise, of which hundreds of millions flow directly to conservation efforts through the Pittman-Robertson Act, an excise tax on hunting gear and license fees passed in 1937 that is the largest funding source for state wildlife agencies. There were 571,046 people with hunting licenses in New York for the 2017-18 season, the most recent for which the NY Department of Environmental Conservation has data—slightly up from the previous year, though the overall trend since 2006 has been flat. The fault lines that run through our oldest recreation are wider than ever, riven by cultural and political divides. Hunting is certainly in decline, but many of those who still hunt today are motivated by the same things hunters have always been motivated by: a desire for self-reliance, communing with nature, and transcending the quotidian humdrum of daily life. With that in mind, here is a portrait of who’s hunting now, told through five stories of modern New York hunters. 11/19 CHRONOGRAM OUTDOORS 57


Middletown resident Quanda Dottin represents the fastest-growing demographic in hunting: women, which now make up 10 percent of New York State hunters.

I.

Women are the sport’s fastest-growing demographic, representing about 10 percent of licensed hunters in New York. Since 2011, Middletown resident Quanda Dottin has been in their number. Growing up in Brooklyn, Dottin never thought she’d one day pick up a .22 rifle, kill a deer, and feed her family with it. But after moving to Orange County, a neighbor shared some venison he’d prepared with her, and Dottin decided to join his hunting party next time they went out. “It was six white guys in a shack drinking beer, and I’m drinking chardonnay,” she says. “Six, seven hours, I did exactly what they told me to do. Then a deer came up and I popped it.” Dottin recalls feeling she “won a prize,” but the experience connected to something deeper. All her life, she’d valued self-sufficiency, the ability to earn herself what she used. Two years earlier, she’d started growing most of her own vegetables; hunting for meat felt like a logical extension. “If you want something, you have to know how to procure it,” she says. It’s been three years since Dottin hunted; the gun violence plaguing African American communities, in particular, sickened her to the point that she “couldn’t hear a gunshot,” she says. But she vows to get back out when this year’s regular season opens on November 16. As her two daughters head into their teenage years, she eventually wants to take them with her, to pass down the sport and its lessons. “I’m just trying to bring it back for them,” Dottin says. “You gotta take care of your own household. ‘If you want to eat that, you should be able to go and get that.’ That’s how it goes.”

II.

Kortright resident Dick Sanford has been hunting in the Catskills for nearly half a century, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. Over that time, the eastern US has added millions of acres of trees, a greening of the landscape that has brought humans and animals into closer contact and transformed hunting in the region; whereas small game used to be common prey, now it’s mostly deer that are hunted, due to lack of open space. Deer transcend the various perspectives on hunting and our relationship to nature. Mysterious, ethereal, and graceful, deer have also overpropogated in the absence of apex predators like wolves and mountain lions, wreaking havoc on gardens and farms and causing more than 3,000 vehicle crashes per day in the US. Nonlethal attempts at population control, such as 58 OUTDOORS CHRONOGRAM 11/19

contraception and relocation, have failed; many wildlife managers now say the most effective way to control deer numbers is with hunting. Few hunters, though, want to be cast in the role of exterminators. Sanford primarily hunts deer now because that’s what’s available, and because he and his wife “love venison, and there’s only one way to get it.” It’s the continuation of a family tradition, sure, but for Sanford, formerly the owner of the Catskill Mountain News, hunting is mostly just a good excuse to be in the woods, which connects him to a regional heritage that is all but dying out. Sanford, who uses a Ruger M77 bolt-action rifle, identifies strongly with the culture around hunting and the outdoors and laments its decline today, which he traces to a populace that spends most of its time indoors and questions about the proliferation of guns in society more broadly. Sanford believes that groups like the NRA give hunters a bad rap, and he supports stronger gun control (including banning handguns), a position shared by a growing number of hunters nationwide.

III.

Like Sanford, Tyler—a hunter based in Stone Ridge who requested his last name not be used—spent much of his childhood in the woods. But he grew up with an aversion to hunters because his parents, who were anti-gun, wouldn’t let him play in the forest during hunting season. “There are so many contradictions I have to live with,” Tyler says. “How do I reckon that I am a hunter, and I also don’t like hunters?” The transformation was gradual. Collecting roadkill for nature crafts— bags, tools, and threads made of hides, bone, and sinew—begat an interest in taxidermy, and then eventually in bow hunting. Tyler focuses on what he calls the “spiritual aspects” of hunting; for him, it’s a way of accessing an older, more primitive self, and bringing that into communion with his modern identity. “When I go out to hunt, I feel those two conflicting sides,” he says. How to reconcile them? Tyler’s still searching for an answer, but it’s not transcendence or escapism. “I want to feel that clash,” he says. “Obviously, this—humanity—isn’t working, but throwing it away is what we do to our garbage.” Tyler uses a compound bow that can get an ethical kill shot out to 20 yards. Unlike most other bowhunters, he does not use a tree blind. Deer


must come to him, and getting to the right position requires knowing where the deer will come from, what time of day, and from which direction. “You’re setting up a circumstance so that something can happen,” he says. “I have to pay attention to all these different factors so that it can.” It’s like the difference between starting a fire with a lighter—I command this fire to be here—versus starting one with sticks, which necessitates a relationship to the wood, to the weather, to your body, so that you can invite it into existence. When everything aligns and a buck presents itself broadside, Tyler then listens for an answer. Is the deer willing? It’s a weird thing to ask, he admits. “But if I get that no, I have to listen to it, even if it feels silly and I can’t explain it.”

IV.

The artist Joe Johnson is one of many so-called “adultonset hunters,” those without a background in the sport who come to it out of a desire to be more connected to their food and the land. Becoming a serious hunter over the past five years taught Johnson how little he actually knew about the natural world. “But it’s an emotional relationship, not an intellectual one,” he says. “It’s deeper than human thought or theory. It’s what’s real.” Many hunters speak of a primordial knowledge awakened in them by the chase. Most of us are estranged from the production sources of our food, clothing, and household items. That distance allows us to maintain illusions about our impact on the environment, and to forget inconvenient, even ugly, truths. “But there’s no exchange on this planet where nothing dies in order for you to live,” Johnson says. “Hunting taught me that.” The concept of the “fair chase”—the ethical, sporting, and lawful pursuit of game—acknowledges a type of contract between predator and prey. When the fair chase hunter takes an animal off the land, he or she feels an obligation to return something to it, Johnson says, which is one reason so many hunters become conservationists. The cycle reconnects the hunter to the source of their food, and inculcates respect for the manner of its production. “When you kill something, it’s very, very serious,” Johnson says. “That’s why hunting is such an adrenaline rush: You’re at the moment of most consequence, and we just don’t live that in daily life. When you’re at that moment and you see the animal die, it hurts. For me, it’s a religious moment and it carries a deep significance.”

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Leon Vehaba knows firsthand the destruction deer can cause: He’s seen it at the Poughkeepsie Farm Project, where he is farm manager. That’s not why he became a hunter, but is it why he joined the deer management program at the Mohonk Preserve, which grants special dispensation to deer hunters to help mitigate overbrowsing in the Shawangunk Mountains. Vehaba comes from a long line of refugees; his grandfather, an Egyptian Jew, was kicked out of Israel. His father was a butcher, and Vehaba took up hunting because he wanted to be more involved in the production of the meat he consumed. “My dad growing up told us the one thing they can’t take away from you is your education,” Vehaba says. “These skills are very important. When the apocalypse happens, you want those people around you who can help you survive. Being that kind of person is a very strong part of my identity.” After starting out using a shotgun, Vehaba switched to bowhunting several years ago. He says it requires much more training to get an ethical kill shot—a single broadside shot that pierces both lungs or the heart—and he’s honed his skills for years to be able to reliably get it. Hunting “comes from a place of sustainability and respect,” says Vehaba, who has a master’s degree in sustainable development. Vehaba is thoughtful about the practice and ethics of hunting, and he rejects the stereotype of the hunter who “just likes to go out and kill stuff. Those people are few and far between—most are conservationists, have tremendous respect for the animal, and love to be out in the woods. There’s all sorts of people out there.”

REUNITE!

SHOW YOUR FAMILY THE MAGIC OF THE CATSKILLS!

FROST VALLEY YMCA JOIN US SEPTEMBER TO JUNE AT TWO GREAT LOCATIONS! Who says camp is just for the kids? For generations, countless families return to Frost Valley for their annual reunions. TEL 845-985-2291 EMAIL info@frostvalley.org WEB frostvalley.org

11/19 CHRONOGRAM OUTDOORS 59


Main Street at dusk.

60 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 11/19


community pages

nocturnal magic New Paltz at Night by Lisa Di Venuta Photos by Roy Gumpel

Y

ou might know New Paltz for its college campus. Maybe you’ve driven down Main Street on your way to the Mohonk Mountain House or the trails of Minnewaska State Park and the Mohonk Preserve. New Paltz is a rural town with the frenetic energy of a small city; it’s home to students and transients and artists and academics. During the day, the streets are chaotic. Traffic builds up from the New York State Thruway; students rush to and from class, professionals drive back and forth to work. At dusk, this momentum comes to a lull, but don’t be fooled: New Paltz isn’t going to sleep. You catch your breath and watch the sun set, over the mountains, the sky peppered with streaks of gold and violet, before settling into the dark. It’s nighttime. Restaurants and watering holes are open late, the town is still churning, but more relaxed. Main Street branches off into quaint side streets that turn into rail trails and footpaths. The town evokes a quiet, nocturnal magic. You can start off the evening eating vegan mac and cheese at Commissary and end up drinking beer at Snug Harbor, an anchor to a hard night out. SUNY New Paltz students gravitate towards bars with patio seating, huddled around a chiminea, drinking and chatting comfortably, like it’s their own backyard. Nights in New Paltz offer a glimpse into its singular culture through adventures you’ll relive with hazy nostalgia, convinced you were given the keys to a secret society or a private party. Through candid photographs of bar crawls and garden parties, this series is a portal to the town’s afterhours ambience. Welcome to New Paltz at night.

11/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 61


Nightlife is integral to New Paltz’s artistic identity. It beckons transplants from New York City and neighboring municipalities, creators looking to manifest their vision in a place that simultaneously inspires it. Communal hubs like B-Side Grill, Bacchus, and the multifaceted Water Street Market embody the town’s spirit of innovation, offering a salon-like atmosphere for people to converge, turning any given into a rural, bohemian version of WeWork. Those who find their creative apex at night will find inspiration in wonky, drunken antics set to a backdrop of beatific stars.

The outdoor patio at Huckleberry

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B-Side Grill

Mariel Fiori La Voz; Radio Kingston

“Kingston is experiencing rapid change right now, so I see that it could head in several different directions. What I would like to see in five years is a truly diverse and inclusive community, where currently underrepresented communities occupy positions of power throughout the power structure, and where there are no more negative aspects of gentrification.�

64 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 11/19

The patio at The Parish at Water Street Market


P&G’s Restaurant & Bar

Every generation has its own version of New Paltz nightlife. The few remaining bars from the 1970s attract erstwhile residents and new patrons alike. They fuse with their contemporary neighbors, places like Huckleberry (a Brooklynesque gastropub) and the retro burger joint B-Side Grill. The iconic building at the corner of Main and North Chestnut used to be home to Neko Sushi and before that, McGuinn’s pub. Now it’s home Lola’s Café, an affable spot serving funky boutique wines. Clubs may close, but the music goes

on. Oasis and its subterranean lounge, Cabaloosa, were mainstays of youth culture in New Paltz for a decade, hosting Battle of the Bands competitions, comedy shows, and jazz. Both closed in 2018. Anywhere else, they’d leave a dearth of live entertainment. Instead, indie music devotees conjured new venues, inspired by memories of nights spent jamming at Oasis. There are openmic nights in Peace Park. Crossroads, a community organization cofounded by two SUNY New Paltz seniors, now hosts house parties.

11/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 65


62 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-0101 62 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-0100

www.bsidegrill.com New Paltz’s hidden tropical escape, serving island style since 2019. Sample the largest rum selection in the Hudson Valley.

215 Main St., New Paltz, NY 845-332-2109

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fresh fish market & seafood restaurant new paltz | 845-255-1717 | gadaletos.com

Come rock your body, mind, and soul! Multiple types of classes for all levels, plus special events, workshops, & trainings. Sweat, tone, & strengthen your muscles, while finding balance, calm, & community.

FOR ALL. ALWAYS. Open 7 days a week. See you on the mat! find us on facebook and instagram

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nprockyoga.com 66 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 11/19


“Everyone loves it here because we have a diverse population with an atmosphere that resembles Southern hospitality. But we need to honor and nurture that and figure out how to use our attributes to thrive and continue being forerunners of progress, and not allow in projects that seek to destroy or deplete our natural resources and change our landscape far beyond what makes Kingston such an attractive city in the first place. The money is not that important of an exchange for something so precious.”

The billiard hall at Bacchus

New Paltz is deceptively small: The plethora of bistros and bars may induce sensory overload for the unsuspecting visitor orbiting the town’s worldly cuisine, where you can find everything from Thai, farm-totable, sushi, Indian, authentic Italian and Mediterranean fare, grass-fed burgers, and burritos. There are sports bars, Irish pubs, hip wine bars, late night coffee shops, and dive bars. Dive in. Follow your instincts: You’ll end up

somewhere that suits your taste, and imbibe with strangers who, by the end of the night, become close friends. The duality of New Paltz allows raucous partiers and subdued introverts to coexist. Music echoes from bars and clubs every night of the week, sirens luring you to dance and drink until last call. Step outside for a more low-key vibe, relax, look at the stars, and watch the world go by while you nurse a craft beer.

11/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 67


Denizen Theater

Les Jones and Simeon Tuttle at Inquiring Minds Bookstore.

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It’s a walkable town, like a hip Manhattan neighborhood—imagine Greenwich Village or Hell’s Kitchen, with more trees. SUNY students roam the streets at night with an unquenchable thirst for adventure, for the next party. Their youthful vigor propels New Paltz, their energy pulsating throughout the community. Restaurants and bars are open late to satisfy student whims, but everybody benefits from a town that never sleeps. These people and places alchemize the spirit of New Paltz. You will inevitably find what you didn’t know you were looking for. One night in New Paltz is enough to make you feel like you’ve lived here forever. It welcomes you to add color to its mixed-media collage, a town constantly on the precipice of change, with a vast recollection of what came before.


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914.475.0113 stacieflint.com 11/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 69


Join the Conversation

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Pumpkin Pie · Pecan Pie · Apple Pie · Cherry Pie · Apple Dumplings Pumpkin Cheesecake · Dinner Rolls · Cookie Platters

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Chronogram Conversations, in partnership with The River and Radio Kingston, presents:

Immigration Advocacy in the Hudson Valley

Proceeds to benefit immigrant defense organizations Join us as we discuss the efforts of the Ulster Immigrant Defense Network and many others to safeguard undocumented residents in our area. Read Michael Frank’s article “Helping Hand” on page 74 which profiles local immigrant activists.

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Jessie Stanko bartending at Jar’d

Because of New Paltz’s indisputable legacy, new establishments can emerge, and serve trends on a cocktail tray without a hint of inauthenticity. Jar’d Wine Pub and Fuchsia Tiki Bar indulge in the cultural zeitgeist of 2019, catering to those who crave novelty along with aperitive spirits. Jar’d opened in 2013, just before wine bars became a national obsession. Its cozy location in the Water Street Market means you can’t bring 10 friends along to sip organic, sparkling rosé, making the experience even more appealing. It’s exclusive in this sense yet eschews the highbrow sommelier attitude that may turn young people off from wine culture. Jar’d even serves kombucha, which is as New Paltz as it gets. Fuchsia Tiki Bar takes a note from 1930s

cocktail culture, another reemerging nightlife trend. It’s a tropical paradise in the heart of New Paltz, giving patrons the sense that they’ve entered a portal to another dimension. Decorated with palmetto-print wallpaper and hot pink countertops, the bar gives patrons a genuine feel for the Polynesian bars of yesteryear. Fuchsia’s owners worked for months to craft recipes using fresh ingredients, deviating from the overly saccharine flavors found in cocktails from chain restaurants like P.F. Changs. Is it a coincidence that tiki bars, first popular during the Great Depression, are back in vogue during the Trump administration? Who’s to say, but you can visit Fuchsia Tiki Bar for a taste of escapism, which is always in style when the world feels haywire. 11/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 71


1. Arrowood Outpost

3 Church Street (845) 419-2185 arrowoodfarms.com Using pristine water from Rosendale's historic limestone caves and rich New York terroir, we cultivate our very own hops and grain with love and care.

10. Holistic Natural Medicine: Integrative Healing Arts

2. B-Side Grill

169 Main Street (347) 988-0178 holisticnaturalmedicineny.com Holistic Natural Medicine is a unique acupuncture center integrating traditional Chinese medicine with a modern clinical approach.

3. Bacchus

71 Main Street (845) 255-5872 hudsonvalleygoldsmith.com We create custom, one-of-a-kind fine jewelry including engagement and wedding rings ​using recycled precious metals, conflict-free diamonds, and unique gemstones.

62 Main Street (845) 256-0100 bsidegrill.com Classic American comfort food with a twist for every appetite. B-Side is a combo breakfast and burger joint. The holy grail of budget dining in this college town. 4 South Chestnut Street (845) 255-8636 bacchusnewpaltz.com Bacchus is a restaurant and brewery with hearty food, tasty beer and wine, a billiards room, live music, and a warm, neighborly atmosphere.

4. Burrito Burrito

62 Main Street (845) 256-0101 Fresh, simple, delicious.

5. Denizen Theatre

10 Main St Suite 501 (845) 303-4136 denizentheatre.com Denizen Theatre presents gripping, professional live theater year-round, focusing on provocative new works that explore what it means to be human and inspire often ignored conversations.

6. Diamond Car Wash

526 Main Street (845) 256-0986 facebook.com/DiamondCarwashNPZ We are a 24-hour automatic, self-serve dog and car wash. We also offer vacuums, carpet shampooer, and vending.

7. Fuchsia Tiki Bar

215 Main Street (845) 332-2109 fuchsiatikibar.com New Paltz's hidden tropical escape, serving island-style since 2019. Sample the largest rum selection in the Hudson Valley.

8. Gadaleto's Seafood Market & Restaurant 246 Main Street #1 (845) 255-1717 gadaletos.com Fresh fish market with adjacent full-service restaurant showcasing wildcaught and sustainable seafood.

9. Historic Huguenot Street

81 Huguenot Street (845) 255-1660 huguenotstreet.org At Historic Huguenot Street, visitors experience over 300 years of history across seven stone-house museums, a reconstructed 1717 church, the European community’s original burying ground, and a replica Esopus Munsee wigwam.

11. Hudson Valley Goldsmith

12. Imperial Guitar & Soundworks

2A Cherry Hill Road (845)255-2555 imperialguitar.com Musical Instruments: new, used, vintage. Pro Audio: design, sales, install. Repairs, restorations, rentals, appraisals, guitar discussions, fun.

13. Jack's Meats & Deli 79 Main Street (845) 255-2244 Butcher shop.

18. New Paltz Rock Yoga

215 Main Street (845) 256-0138 nprockyoga.com Come rock your body, mind, and soul! We offer multiple types of classes for all levels always, plus special events, workshops, and trainings. You'll sweat, tone, and strengthen your muscles while finding balance, calm, and community. Open seven days a week. See you on the mat!

19. Redeemer New Paltz

90 Route 32 South (845) 255-0051 redeemernewpaltz.org A progressive Christian community that welcomes all people; grounded in scripture and nurturing mind, heart, spirit, and body as we share Christ's welcome with the world.

20. Ridgeline Realty

40 Marabac Road, Gardiner (845) 255-8359 ridgelinerealty.net NYS licensed real estate broker with a local office located in Gardiner, that provides commercial and residential real estate services for both buyers and sellers in the Shawangunk Ridge and surrounding area.

21. Runa Bistro

14. Lagusta's Luscious

25 N Front Street (845) 633-8615 lagustasluscious.com Founded in 2003, Lagusta’s Luscious artisanal chocolates combine a deep commitment to social justice, environmentalism, and veganism with a love of bold flavor and obsessive commitment to artisan techniques.

15. Mark Gruber Gallery

New Paltz Plaza (845) 255-1241 markgrubergallery.com Since 1976, the gallery has exhibited the finest local artists, bridging traditional Hudson River School themes with contemporary ones. We also offer museum-quality custom framing.

16. Mohonk Mountain House

1000 Mountain Rest Road 844-859-6716 mohonk.com At Mohonk, everything you need for an unforgettable Hudson Valley getaway is at your fingertips. With so much included in your overnight rate, spend more time making memories than planning for them.

17. Mountain Laurel Waldorf School

16 S Chestnut Street (845) 255-0033 mountainlaurel.org We are part of a worldwide association of Waldorf schools dedicated to bringing forth the full creative potential of each child.

10 Plattekill Avenue (845) 419-5007 runabistro.com A French bistro dining experience.

22. Salix Intimates

Water Street Market, Second Floor, 10 Main Street, Suite 424 New Paltz 845-633-8028 www.salixintimates.com Eco-friendly, sustainably made, ethically sourced lingerie, loungewear, and lifestyle items. Offering sizes up to 40H, free in-store bra fittings, discrete shipping for online orders.

23. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art

1 Hawk Drive (845) 257-3844 newpaltz.edu/museum Museum at SUNY New Paltz with works by well-known artists from the Hudson Valley and around the globe.

24. Schatzi's Pub & Bier Garden

36 Main Street (845) 255-1203 iloveschatzis.com Local craft beer and elevated pub fare served in our homey restaurant and beer garden. Visit Schatzi's Pub, now on both sides of the Hudson!

25. Stacie Flint Art

StacieFlint@yahoo.com (845) 255-2505 stacieflint.com Artist, painter, commissioned portraitist, and illustrator known for color and energy, based in New Paltz.

This directory is a paid supplement. 72 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 11/19

26. SUNY New Paltz

1 Hawk Drive (845) 257-7869 newpaltz.edu A four-year, public liberal arts college.

27. The Bakery

13a North Front Street (845) 255-8840 ilovethebakery.com Old-school bakery/cafe since 1981 with desserts and a coffee bar, plus a lunch menu and outdoor seating.

28. The Masterpiece Massage

234 Main Street, Suite 5 "The L Salon" (845) 250-ADAM themasterpiecemassage.com Like nothing you've experienced before. Tailored to your individual needs, an artful blend of sports massage, energy work, and luxury.

29. The Parish Restaurant

10 Main Street #327 (845) 255-4205 theparishrestaurant.com A restaurant for everyone with an emphasis on New Orlenas cuisine and local ingredients. Best view in town and a friendly, upbeat vibe.

30. Ulster Savings Bank

226 Main Street (845) 255-5470 ulstersavings.com/ A local community bank, with locations throughout the Hudson Valley.

31. Valentina Custom Frame

7 Taylor Street 845 419 2647 valentinacustomframe.com A unique place in the village that offers high-quality custom framing, museumquality archival mats, 99% UV conservation glass, frame restoration services, and gallery which features local and foreign artwork.

32. Wallkill View Farm Market

15 NY-299 (845) 255-8050 wallkillviewfarmmarket.com Farm market with fresh produce, delicious bakery, and Thanksgiving decor. Starting Thanksgiving weekend: Beautiful Christmas trees, wreaths, homegrown poinsettias,and holiday gift showroom.

33. Wild Earth Programs

2307 Lucas Turnpike (845) 256-9830 wildearth.org Wild Earth’s programs are designed to remember and return to our natural human blueprint to form strong connections to self, each other, and the Earth.

34. Woodland Pond at New Paltz

100 Woodland Pond Circle (845) 256-5600 wpatnp.org Let the art, history, and energy of the area inspire you and the varying levels of all-inclusive individualized care support you for a lifetime of confident living.

This directory is a paid supplement.


Sponsored

11/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 73


A HELPING HAND Advocating for Immigrants’ Rights in the Hudson Valley by Michael Frank Photos by David McIntyre

“To fail to resist is to be complicit.” —Father Frank Alagna, cofounder of the Ulster Immigrant Defense Network

O

ne morning in early December 2016, Father Frank Alagna had a disturbing epiphany. The 74-year-old Episcopal priest had just finished presiding over the Spanish-language mass at Holy Cross/Santa Cruz in Midtown Kingston, the bilingual church where he has been priest-in-charge for the past decade. Nearly three years later, sitting in the rectory behind the cathedral, Alagna’s voice shakes and his eyes well with emotion as he recalls that day. “I’m sorry. It makes me so angry,” he says as he clears his throat and wipes his face with the back of his hand. “I had to tell my congregants, Latino congregants, people who I care so much about, and people I could see were profoundly afraid, of an urgent need.” Alagna explains that he had to warn parents that they must get legal documents giving friends or other family members custody of their children in case they were detained by ICE. “I have never had such a horrible experience in my 48 years as a priest, having to communicate this kind of reality.” Today Alagna is one of several leaders in the Hudson Valley who are fighting back against what they view as unjust federal policies target74 FEATURE CHRONOGRAM 11/19

ing immigrants. He heads what has become the Ulster Immigrant Defense Network, which is a consortium of groups including Nobody Leaves Mid-Hudson, the Worker Justice Center, Rural & Migrant Ministry, and others. UIDN runs multiple workshops for attendees from both sides of the river, with specific programs, such as helping undocumented students and their teachers know how to get the most from their education, and broader outreach ranging from understanding rights as workers to how to get access to healthcare. UIDN is hardly alone. Other grassroots organizations, such as the Columbia Sanctuary Movement, have also sprung to life, providing pragmatic help to immigrants mostly based in and around the city of Hudson, such as rides to doctor’s appointments or advice about housing. Meanwhile, existing nonprofits, such as Catholic Charities and the Worker Justice Center, have both grown in their strength and influence across the Hudson Valley. Catholic Charities is bolstering its roster of attorneys providing pro-bono legal advice, while Worker Justice successfully advocated in Albany for legislation such as the Green Light Bill, which lets people without a social security number apply for a driver’s license, register a car, and—crucially for the safety of all drivers, according to a 2018 study by AAA—obtain car insurance. Worker Justice also pushed for passage of the Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act, which guarantees a right to work no more than 60 hours per week, and a right to have at least one day off a week.

A collaboration with


EVERY THIRD THURSDAY HOLY CROSS/SANTA CRUZ EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN KINGSTON HOSTS A FOOD AND CLOTHING GIVEAWAY FOR ASYLUM SEEKERS AND THEIR FAMIIES. 11/19 CHRONOGRAM FEATURE 75


Light in the Darkness Much of this action came as a counterweight to Donald Trump. Though Mariel Fiori, founder of La Voz magazine in 2004, laughs when she says that there were “woke white people when I participated in my first immigration march in 2006.” Fiori, who immigrated from Argentina two decades ago, notes that Latinos had been marginalized long before 2016, and even if it took this administration to wake up more community members in the region, she’s profoundly heartened by what she’s witnessed. For instance, she says, “Jewish people really came out strong. They saw what happened in the Holocaust and persecution of Latinos touches them very deeply.” Alagna agrees, and notes that as a first step, right after Trump was elected, he reached out to Muslim, Jewish, and other Christian sects in Kingston and beyond and got 21 regional clergy to petition the Kingston Common Council and the mayor to help push the town to become a sanctuary city. It was merely symbolic, Alagna admits. Sanctuary for a city is conceptual, and even as New York State’s Supreme Court ruled last year that local police cannot detain ICE suspects and that jails cannot hold someone beyond when they would ordinarily be released, an Albany Times Union report this past spring found it’s routine for police in the Capital Region to inquire about immigration status when pulling over drivers for minor infractions—or for no probable cause whatsoever. Preventing local cops or administrators from helping ICE is beyond the jurisdiction of cities, and can only be enshrined by state legislation, which is currently pending. Which leaves it to private citizens to act, Alagna says. “Jesus says to help the least of our brethren, whatever form they come in.” But what does sanctuary look like? “I had in mind this Hunchback of Notre Dame model, of literal sanctuary in our places of worship,” he says, but once UIDN began, with a hastily convened meeting in February 2017, where Alagna was expecting about 20 volunteers and 120 people showed up at his church, his vision grew. “I realized we could build something far more comprehensive. All that energy,” Alagna says of UIDN’s small army of volunteers, “was the grace. The light to be found in this darkness.”

FATHER FRANK ALAGNA OF HOLY CROSS/SANTA CRUZ EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN KINGSTON IS THE COFOUNDER OF THE ULSTER IMMIGRANT DEFENSE NETWORK

76 FEATURE CHRONOGRAM 11/19

The Regional Economy and Immigration Forget Alagna’s sentiment. If you live in the Hudson Valley, what does this attack on immigration mean for our tax base, and for the local economy? From 2017 to the fall of 2019, the Trump administration has instituted a broad crackdown on immigrants, documented as well as undocumented, according to Syracuse University’s massive database (TRAC) that quantifies and counts arrests, incarcerations, and deportations. Since Trump took office, new court filings to begin deportation proceedings have spiked: They were up 23 percent to 340,000 last year, and 2019 will easily crest 400,000. At that pace, 2019 enforcement will be 50 percent higher than it was in 2016. Regionally, ICE has heavily targeted people coming in and out of courthouses, or appearing to testify on behalf of defendants on trial, with arrests up 1,700 percent since 2016 through 2018, according to an early 2019 report by the Immigrant Defense Project. This is a policy that a regional ICE official, Thomas Decker, defended recently, saying ICE is targeting felons. However, Syracuse’s TRAC shows that despite Trump’s repeated rhetoric of going after gang members, through June 2019, arrests of immigrants with criminal records is a minuscule 2.8 percent, compared with over 16 percent a decade ago, and 25 percent back in 1999. Locally and nationally, ICE is arresting mostly non-criminals, and, as was detailed in a recent New York Times Magazine piece,


CECILIA CORTINA SEGOVIA IS A HUMAN TRAFFICKING SPECIALIST AT THE WORKER JUSTICE CENTER IN KINGSTON.

ICE is armed with high-tech tools to track people and deceptive tactics to apprehend them. A July 25 piece in the Intercept shines a bright light on these practices. And you can see exactly how ICE works by using New York’s Immigrant Defense Project web tool, which highlights most of ICE’s busts in the region dating back to 2013, as well as how frequently agents lied about their identity, used fake Facebook ID’s, and pretended to be contractors hiring workers.  If all the above is simply carrying out the law, the result is straining the regional economy. According to a 2017 Fiscal Policy Institute Study, there are roughly 105,000 undocumented immigrants over the age of 16 in the region, generating $3.4 billion in spending power and $1.5 billion in taxes, according to New American Economy’s estimate of the 18th and 19th Congressional districts. That economic engine is stalling, however, because the Brookings Institution finds that the foreign-born population in the US in 2017-2018 grew by only 203,000, the slowest rate since 2007, while they also find that the nativeborn birthrate is at an 80-year-low. An economy withers without workers, and another study by Brookings found that the nation is on the cusp of having more seniors than children for the first time in 240 years. According to a 2019 report by the Economic Innovation Group (EIC), we live at ground zero for this crisis, with some of the weakest population growth in the nation across the Hudson Valley. EIC suggests nothing short of the exact opposite of Trump’s policies, vouching to bring in vastly more foreign-born workers to rural areas to reverse this slide, because, for the most part, in addition to a zero or negative birthrate, young people are fleeing rural America at an accelerating pace. The Face of Advocacy Meanwhile there are at least 100,000 immigrants in the Hudson Valley already, and some Americans are choosing to help them. But every one of those advocates’ stories is different. “Coming to the United States wasn’t a dream,” recalls Cecilia Cortina Segovia, a human trafficking specialist at the Worker Justice Center in Kingston, “In fact, it was more like a necessity.” When gang violence erupted in Baja

California, where she was working with her Americanborn husband as an outreach manager to establish an urban farming coalition in the city of La Paz, they decided they had to flee north. “One day we were listening to the gunshots outside the house. We heard them every single night. And I was holding my nine-month-old baby. I had to do what was best for him,” says Segovia. Segovia was born in Mexico. But she isn’t the stereotypical penniless migrant displayed on TV. Fiori of La Voz says too often there’s an immediate air of pity, or spite, against LatinX immigrants, and an expectation that every immigrant is poor and uneducated. “We are individuals. We are not a monolith. Some of us came here with PhDs.” Fiori notes that advocates like Segovia, who has a bachelor’s in educational communication and has a history working for nonprofits, is the face of something more nuanced. “Thanks to Mr. Trump, more white people are woke to what’s going on. But what’s important now is agency—the LatinX community is advocating for itself.” For Segovia, that translated to continuing the kind of battle she waged in Mexico, helping to push for social justice. “When I immigrated in 2014, I was amazed— and not in a good way—even as someone with a decent understanding of English, of how hard this process was. I couldn’t imagine someone who doesn’t speak the language navigating the paperwork.” Segovia began volunteering with Worker Justice in 2015, which has offices in Rochester, Kingston, and Hawthorne and fights against wage theft among blue collar workers in fields such as farming and restaurant jobs. Now, as an expert in human trafficking, she says that it’s mostly not cases of prostitution, but something more like slavery. She cited a current case in which a restaurant worker in the lower Hudson Valley was recruited and smuggled to the US, then forced to work long hours with low pay, and to shell out for his lodging. Eventually when he got hurt on the job, his boss threatened to turn him over to immigration. Segovia says while current New York State law helps somewhat, the problem is at the federal level. She cites a 2014 Urban Institute study, which shows that in 71 percent of the cases of human trafficking the victim entered the US on a legal visa. “They come legally,” Segovia 11/19 CHRONOGRAM FEATURE 77


emphasizes. But she says victims often have no network when they arrive—they only know the trafficker and the promise of a making a quick buck for the duration of their visa, and even if they’re in the US legally, they’re highly vulnerable. And, Segovia explains, too often they’re encouraged to overstay their visas, “And the trafficker says, ‘Don’t worry, I’ll take care of it,’ but does nothing.” Now the victims have become undocumented and are further enslaved to the trafficker, afraid to report the crime and expose themselves. In the present environment, these victims are going to stay cowering in the shadows, she says. Victor Cueva, an attorney with Catholic Charities, sees these kinds of cases all too frequently, and he says despite the rhetoric, the Trump administration is making protecting other immigrants, especially women who are victims of domestic violence, far harder. In September, Cueva was working on gaining amnesty for one of his clients, who was the target of sexual assault. But in July the Justice Department overturned existing amnesty law that had protected family members who were targeted as a group, and last year a similar law that protected victims of sexual predation was also overturned. Cueva, 30, works throughout the Hudson Valley. He says that the Trump Administration is constantly trying to make the job of helping immigrants harder. He has one client whose undocumented husband cannot speak on her behalf, for fear of showing up at court, even though he has powerful testimony that could help his client’s case. Cueva notes that even veterans and active-duty military are under assault by Trump’s actions. One lesser-known policy, parole in place, was designed so that veterans and military who’d married immigrants wouldn’t have to worry during deployment about their spouses going through legal immigration paperwork. But Trump is abolishing the program, which luckily Cueva heard about in time to expedite a green card for the spouse of a military client. “This was someone who fought in Iraq. You’d think we’d want to keep this law.”

GLORIA MARTINEZ IS A COFOUNDER OF THE COLUMBIA COUNTY SANCTUARY MOVEMENT.

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A Knock at the Door While Cueva and Segovia work on specific administrative remedies, and Alagna’s day to day seems to focus on concrete needs, such as shelter, frequently advocacy takes the form of triage—like throwing your body at the barricades. Gloria Martinez, 29, and Bryan MacCormack, 30, are co-founders, along with Juan Basilio Sanchez, and his son Juan Simon Sanchez, of the tiny Columbia County Sanctuary Movement. Martinez says the four founded CCSM, “Because there was really nothing like this in our community in Hudson,” and because despite having temporary protected status as the victim of domestic violence and a refugee of the Salvadoran Civil War, Martinez’s mother was repeatedly threatened by immigration officers who said that they would deport her. Such threats were hardly idle; Martinez’s uncle was deported in 2017. Then, on March 5 of this year, ICE agents tried to arrest two undocumented immigrants in MacCormack’s car as he drove them from an appointment at Hudson City Court. But MacCormack, who’d been studying the law as part of know-your-rights training he and other CCSM volunteers have been teaching to migrants, was well aware that the ICE agents didn’t have a judicial warrant signed by a judge. The cell phone video of that day, where MacCormack calmly tells ICE officials that his lawyer is on the way and that they don’t have a right to search the car or to arrest him or his passengers, went viral and was seen over 50 million times worldwide. It galvanized support for CCSM, Martinez says, and while she doesn’t only want the organization to be known for that one bold act of resistance, she notes that it was crucial for spreading the message that everyone has rights and that they have to know what they are.


VICTOR CUEVA IS AN ATTORNEY WITH CATHOLIC CHARITIES.

Green Shoots Even in the face of what Father Alagna sees as gross injustice, there’s hope. UIDN regularly packs workshops with participants from as far south as Rockland and up to Greene County. And he mentions something that echoes Cueva’s perspective, even though Cueva is a recent immigrant and Alagna was born in the US: “We’re always learning,” Alagna says. “We want to help, but we have to have our ears open to know how.” Mariel Fiori of La Voz says to achieve that mission, these groups need to incorporate more people like Cueva. “There’s this catchphrase of ‘diversity and inclusion.’ Diversity is when you get invited to the party. Inclusion is when you decide it’s your party.” Cueva is pleased to be the face of immigrants advocating on their own behalf, but what he sees as just as important is that his other community, of lawyers, understands and wants to help undocumented and documented immigrants. Cueva graduated from a program called the Immigrant Justice Corps (IJC), a national organization that provides legal services to immigrant families. His class was the first to ex-

pand services to the Hudson Valley. “Now we’re rolling out nationwide,” Cueva says. “Something that started here is going to spread across the country, and there’s this fellowship and it’s super competitive, with lawyers from the top law schools that are hand-picked.” Cueva explains that he’s also spearheading a complementary effort to recruit retired attorneys and pro-bono lawyers who don’t know immigration law but want to help. And he has peers doing identical IJC recruiting in Westchester and in Albany. “We’re going to be able to provide immigration representation in places that have never had it, from Sullivan up to Greene counties,” Cueva says. “We want to provide this service because there are so many people who need help and have never known how to even ask for it.” Even so, CCSM’s Gloria Martinez says there’s a constant struggle to pay the bills, and that raising money for advocacy and applying for grants is daunting. Most of the organizations profiled here rely heavily on private and grant funding. Alagna says UIDN’s already spent over $30,000 in 2019 on transportation costs alone. But Alagna, along with everyone interviewed for this story, noted that the backbone of each

one of these organizations isn’t just check writers, but people willing to donate time. “I was sitting with a group of volunteers,” he says, recounting one evening two years ago, early in UIDN’s formation. “I asked everyone why they wanted to help.” He went around the room and some Christians mentioned Jesus’s teachings. Some Jews said it was their turn to give back to non-Jews who put their lives on the line during the Holocaust. “And others who identified with no faith said this is what it means to be a good human being,” Alagna says. “I’m the one whose job it is to say what it means to be holy, and it dawns on me they’re teaching me what holiness means.” Alagna adds that his own conscience tells him that in times of crisis failing to act is to be complicit in the crime. Members of all four advocacy groups say that they see resistance in both large and small ways throughout the region. Alagna smiles and acknowledges the broad upwelling of support. “We’re learning what it means to be a community, we’re learning who our neighbors are, and we’re opening our hearts to what it means, regardless of religion or no religion, to help each other.” 11/19 CHRONOGRAM FEATURE 79


portfolio

UN/NATURAL SELECTION The off-kilter animal underworld of Chris Buzelli

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ooking at Chris Buzelli’s illustrations is like viewing the world through a dream lens. He has turned DJ Khaled into a ringmaster and Kesha into a rainbow angel for Rolling Stone; he dressed a bird in armor for a Planadvisor story on protecting businesses and their clients; and he personified stress as a bifurcated brain for Science News. Recently, he created the largest illustration the New York Times has ever printed, with a constellation timeline for a story about night tennis. Buzelli, who lives in the East Village and weekends in West Saugerties, didn’t always feel like his illustrations were so dreamy. In fact, for a while he felt like he had “lost the balance between the commercial aspect and making a piece of art for myself,” he says, until an ACL injury confined him to his fifth-floor walk-up apartment. “I was stuck up here and I just said I’m not doing that stuff anymore,” Buzelli says, referring to his illustrations at the time, which he described as “people in business suits on cell phones on rocket ships. All of the overused metaphors, or overused imagery.”  He used that time to find his way back to his illustrator roots, where his love for art came first. “Instead of just solving the problem for the art director, I started to make it more for myself. In those two or three weeks that I was stuck up here, I think I created five new paintings and it sort of become the basis of my work now. My career sort of happened then.” Growing up in the Chicago suburbs, Buzelli spent weekends watching Bill Alexander’s show “The Magic of Oil Painting” with his grandfather and painting in the elder’s TV repair workshop. Buzelli credits those days spent with his grandfather as his motivator in pursuing art, as well as the encouragement of his mother, who told him he had to re-enroll in a high school art class he had quit because he wasn’t getting along with the teacher. “Without those two things, I highly doubt I’d be doing what I’m doing,” he says. All of Buzelli’s illustrations—from the tennis

player constellations of the New York Times piece to the animal-centric SVA Subway Series, which he says is a favorite—including any revisions, are done on paper with oil paints and later scanned digitally. “I’ve learned not to use certain colors because they take forever to dry—like white, so a lot of my whites are the white of the board. Usually with oil paint you build up. I’m doing the opposite. I’ve learned ways around it.” he says. Animals are a frequent theme in Buzelli’s illustrations, though that wasn’t always the case for his professional work. During his break for his ACL injury, he went back to using animals like he did when he was younger. “It opened up a whole new avenue for me in terms of visual language. My concepts weren’t as strong [but] when I started using animals, the actual action and the verb of the piece became so much more apparent and important,” Buzelli says. You can find Buzelli’s illustrations on book covers, posters for ad campaigns, merchandising, and branding. Editorial, though, of which he has created pieces for Variety and the Washington Post, among others, he considers his bread and butter. “I’ve really come to love editorial illustration because it’s got this basic element where you get this text and you try to come up with a visual solution to communicate. I whip out 30 or 40 thumbnail sketches, getting them down on paper without thinking that they’re bad or good,” he says. “It happens so fast that there’s not a lot of time for others to have input. For me, it’s the most honest sort of form of commercial art.”  Though creative jobs can be extremely fulfilling for an artist, they are, at the end of the day, a job. “The trick is to hide a little bit for yourself in it,” Buzelli says. “I think that’s what I was missing those first seven to 10 years. I forgot that this could be art. It’s not just about pleasing the art director and doing a job. In order to have a longer career, you really need to figure out a way to make it for yourself as well.” —Medea Giordano

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS / OIL ON BOARD / 2014 / FOR PLANSPONSOR 80 PORTFOLIO CHRONOGRAM 11/19


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NEW PERSPECTIVE / OIL ON PAPER / 2009 / FOR EDIBLE HUDSON VALLEY

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SIA / OIL ON BOARD / 2016 / FOR ROLLING STONE 11/19 CHRONOGRAM PORTFOLIO 83


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SKULLKITTIES / OIL ON WOOD / 2017 / TALON GALLERY SHOW


MIRAGE CARTOGRAPHY / OIL ON BOARD / 2010 / WRAPAROUND CD COVER FOR PAUL MARK

LEFT: FAIRY TALE EVOLUTION / OIL ON BOARD / 2013 / COVER FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MAGAZINE RIGHT: THE PATRIOT / OIL ON WOOD / 2017 / TALON GALLERY SHOW

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arts profile

Food, For Thought Mirna Bamieh’s Palestinian Hosting Society By Peter Aaron

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Photos from The Table, an interactive food installation, part of Everyday Forms of Resistance Assembly, at Ujazdowsku Castle for Contemporary Art, Warsaw, Poland. October 5, 2019.


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koub, also known as gundelia, is a spiny, perennial, herbaceous plant native to higher altitudes in the Middle East. To many Westerners it probably wouldn’t look like much; a scrubby, thistle-like weed that grows in rocky terrain and has long, thin, floppy leaves resembling those of a dandelion. To generations of Palestinians, however, akoub is a traditional delicacy, a staple crop with healthful properties whose young stems are said to taste like a combination of asparagus and artichoke when cooked. The mountainous regions of the Palestinian State where akoub mainly grows, however, have been occupied by Israel since the 1967 Six-Day War, making it illegal for Palestinians to forage for the plant (the harvesting of thyme and sage are likewise controlled by Israel). The suppression of a food source, and the cultural implications that go along with that—the erasure of customs and collective memory surrounding an indigenous cuisine—are the focus of the Palestine Hosting Society, a project created by Palestinian artist and cook Mirna Bamieh.

“Seeing our ingredients sold as ‘Israeliproduced’ ingredients is a very hard thing for Palestinians to see,” explains Bamieh via Skype from Warsaw, where she’s in residence for an “installation kitchen” to study and share recipes and information related to Eastern European fermentation techniques. “It reminds us about losing our land and not having power over our own existence.” She created the Palestine Hosting Society in 2017 to preserve and share Palestinian recipes and, by extension, the cultural identity they represent, in the face of the constant, state-imposed displacement that threatens them. For the project, Bamieh stages on-site performance pieces centered around the preparation and serving of meals she’s learned to create via oral tradition. She calls these performances “tables,” and the world premiere of her newest table, titled Menu of Dis/appearance, will be presented locally by Bard College and Murray’s in Tivoli this month. “[The performance] is about the politics of disappearance—disappearance of memory, land, food practices, the body,” she says. “But it’s also

about climate change, because climate change affects all of those things as well.” Born in 1983 in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Bamieh is the oldest of four children. Meals and their preparation were central to her family’s life. “I think for all Arabs, food is close to our hearts,” says the artist. “My mother is Lebanese [her father, a native Palestinian, is a doctor], so she brought us the dishes that she had learned from my grandmother. When I was little, I was in the kitchen with her all the time, there was always experimentation with the different recipes. The kitchen was like a lab, a place of fascination.” There were also indicators early on that art would become a calling. “I was always drawing, and I’d take my drawings to show to my father when he came home from work,” she recalls. “He would ask me, ‘What did you draw today?’ Both my father and my mother were very encouraging for me to express myself with art.” Bamieh’s entry into the art world was through the back door. After earning a BA in psychology at Birzeit University in Ramallah and an MFA in Fine Arts from Bezalel Academy for Arts 11/19 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 87


“As Palestinians, we are made to feel like guests in our own country, we cannot move around freely. With the tables, we are taken out of the passive role. We become the hosts.” —Mirna Bamieh

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and Design in Jerusalem, she worked in arts administration, writing grants and proposals, teaching, and curating at a gallery. Encounters with the politically oriented visual and sculptural “art of resistance” of Palestinian refugee Mustafa al-Hallaj and the “constructed situations” (which utilize human performer-interpreters) of Berlinbased Tino Sehgal, however, left her burning to make the leap to creating art full-time. In 2013, she left her gallery gig to take part in an arts work-study forum in Beirut. “I thought to myself, ‘If I want to be an artist, I have to do this,’” she says. “It was a daring decision, and I knew I would need strength. But, little by little, I kept going, and I’ve never stopped.” The ever-building momentum has produced a diverse portfolio of abstract work that includes video installations, film, mixed media, and curatorial projects like 2015’s Maskan Apartment Project, which invited outside artists to create works for display in the rooms of an apartment in Beit Sahour, Palestine. A breakthrough that reconnected her with her culinary passion came while she was pursuing a diploma in professional cooking as a way of supplementing her income. “The director of the training program said to me, ‘You should do a project that puts art and food together’,” says Bamieh. “I really liked that idea, and it made me start thinking about how I could do that.” Her thoughts led to 2016’s Potato Talks, a public performance piece staged on the street in several countries that featured seated participants peeling a potato as they told a story, one on one, to a seated viewer. Potato Talks, it turned out, would be the progenitor to the ongoing and more involved work of the live-art Palestinian Hosting Society. To prepare for each of the project’s individual presentations, Bamieh ensconces herself for weeks at a time in a chosen Palestinian city or village. There, she meets and lives among the locals and learns about each area’s food culture, much of which is in danger of vanishing due to limited agricultural access and the rise of mass-marketed food. While in residence she researches the recipes that have for generations been at the heart of local life, listening to

and gathering the stories of the elders who teach her how to properly prepare each dish according to age-old methodology—all the while taking into consideration how the dishes and their ingredients are connected to the geographical, historical, and sociopolitical life of the community. The final phase of the process is an intimate, interactive “dinner performance” in which she and her crew of collaborators serve an audience of 50 to 60 guests a sumptuous meal using their acquired knowledge, discussing the backstories behind each dish, and encouraging conversation about the food and the issues it relates to. Although the project by turn also speaks to the relationship between food, identity, and politics on a universal scale, according to Bamieh her initial impetus was the desire to find a way to empower Palestinians by giving them a way to reclaim some of their heritage. “Because of the political situation, as Palestinians we are made to feel like guests in our own country, we cannot move around freely,” she says. “With the tables, we are taken out of the passive role. We become the hosts.” Thus far, Bamieh has presented her themed PHS projects mainly in Palestine itself under such titles as Our Nablusi Table, Our Jerusalem Table, The Wheat Feat, The Edible Wild Plants Table, Trails of Taste-telling, and A Wondering in Flavors: The Old City of Jerusalem, a table, a tour and a map. Part of this month’s Live Arts Bard Biennial “No Wall Remains” festival, which centers on the subject of borders, the threeday local premiere of Menu of Dis/appearance will present dishes from Palestinian cities and villages, as well as others that were preserved in Palestinian refugee camps outside Palestine and encompass the inter-generational food habits and memory of the Palestinian diaspora. “Food is a great way to learn something new about another culture,” says Murray’s chef Rachel Lauginiger, who has been assisting Bamieh in cultivating the perishable locally sourced ingredients needed for the performance (Bamieh, she says, is “bringing along a suitcase full of dried ingredients from Palestine”). “Mirna came over a couple of months ago to meet with me about planning the meals, and we got to know each other pretty well when it turned out we were both on the same train heading into the city one day. Everyone at Murray’s is really excited to be working with her on the event, and I’m personally excited because I really love Middle Eastern food. The red tahini is something I’ve never tried before. I’m really looking forward to that.” From her end, Bamieh is clearly looking forward to her taking her table to Tivoli, too. “For Palestinians, this is a way to put our food back on the table,” she says, her voice crackling with excitement through your arts editor’s PC speakers. “It reminds us all that food belongs to everybody.” Mirna Bamieh’s Palestinian Hosting Society will present Menu of Dis/appearance at Murray’s in Tivoli on November 21-23 at 7:30pm. Tickets are $35. Seating is limited. Fishercenterbard.edu.


books STAFF PICKS

While here at the magazine we all like to think of ourselves in a charmingly bookwormish light, it recently occurred to us that, despite our own voracious appetite for the written word, there may be other local luminaries even betterqualified to hand-select your reading lists. Humility is part of our charm, so this month we decided to step aside and let the local Hudson Valley book-slingers pick their favorite new volumes for your November reading pleasure.

Our Dogs, Ourselves: The Story of a Singular Bond Alexandra Horowitz SCRIBNER, $28

This clever and thoughtful book will charm anyone who loves or appreciates canines. Horowitz, a Taghanic resident, explores a wide range of subjects, such as ownership and overpopulation, sometimes pointing out the inconsistencies in our relationship with dogs. There is plenty of laughter in this book as well. In one chapter, we follow the author’s stealthy record keeping of the oftenabsurd things people say to their dogs while out for a walk. The perfect holiday gift for the dog lover in your life. Recommended by Dianne Ortmann of the Chatham Bookstore.

The Swallows Lisa Lutz BALLANTINE, $27

Part-time Elizaville resident Lisa Lutz has been a reader favorite with her Spellman Files series, as well as standalone novels How to Start a Fire and The Passenger. Her latest literary mystery, The Swallows, is the twisted tale of a boarding school where things are not what they seem. When Alex Witt arrives to teach at Stonebridge Academy she has no idea what she’s in for. A total page-turner! Recommended by Suzanna Hermans of Oblong Books & Music in Millerton and Rhinebeck.

Girl to City: A Memoir Amy Rigby SOUTHERN DOMESTIC, $17

Fake Like Me Barbara Bourland GRAND CENTRAL PUBLISHING, $14.99

We’re big fans of Barbara Bourland’s I’ll Eat When I’m Dead, in which she hilariously skewered the fashion world and Insta-celebrity culture, so we were already on board for Fake Like Me, her brilliant follow-up novel. Its Hudson Valley setting is just icing on this witty and suspenseful cake. The heroine of Fake is a budding young painter painfully desperate to be part of Pine City, the SoHo art world’s “cool kids” table. After years of work, she lands an invitation to their remote upstate retreat. Her persistent self-doubt and Pine City’s dark secrets quickly gel into a deeply thoughtful literary thriller. Recommended by Jesse Post of Postmark Books in Rosendale.

Catskill resident Amy Rigby’s memoir Girl to City is a love letter to New York of the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s in all its difficult, gritty glory, but also to the punk music that flourished there and started her thinking, “Maybe I can do that, too.” Turns out she could and she did. You’ll be in awe of the shows she’s seen and the bands she’s toured with, but she’s honest about the difficulties of the music industry and life in the city—it makes you root for her all the more during her addictively readable adventures. (Full disclosure: Amy works here, but her book is great even if she didn’t.) Recommended by Kelley Drahushuk of Spotty Dog Books & Ale in Hudson.

This Land: How Cowboys, Capitalism, and Corruption are Ruining the American West Christopher Ketcham VIKING, $29

Foxfire Living: Design, Recipes, and Stories from the Magical Inn in the Catskills Eliza Clark, Tim Trojian HARPER DESIGN, $45

It’s rare that one encounters a design book that effectively and evocatively combines a relatable, down-to-earth story; stunning photography; and a practical how-to guide. Eliza Clark and Tim Trojian, owners of The Foxfire Mountain House in Mount Tremper, do just that with Foxfire Living. This book serves as an inspiration to every couple—or individual—hoping to transform their solitary, rat-race lives into ones of meaningful (if still all-consuming) labors of love. The authors share how their dream of renovating and operating a hotel became a reality, and combine beautiful images of their property and food—shot by their daughter, a pro photographer—with helpful insider tips. Any book with a “Learn from Our Mistakes” section has our vote. Clark and Trojian will celebrate the publication of their book with a launch party and signing at Rough Draft on November 22.  Recommended by Amanda and Anthony Stromoski of Rough Draft Bar & Books in Kingston.

What our Earth needs most pressingly right now is a new Edward Abbey or Rachel Carson to shed light on the few corners of the globe that currently remain pure and free from mankind’s destructive footprint. For the 500 million acres of public lands in our country, that environmental warrior is respected journalist and Margaretville resident Christopher Ketcham, whose book This Land makes the case for protecting the areas so vital to the ecosystems that depend on them. Ketcham rips the lid off the US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management, whose job it is to protect these areas but instead has caved to the interests of industries intent to plunder resources from lands already stressed from unnecessary grazing and recreational development. Written in a personable style, Ketcham is a brilliant tour guide to the grievously vulnerable wonders of the still wild American West. The Golden Notebook will host Christopher Ketchum for a reading and signing on November 24 at 3pm. Recommended by James Conrad of The Golden Notebook in Woodstock.

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The best selection of vinyl in the Hudson Valley. Selling your vinyl? Talk to us first.

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music Blueberry Tempest in a Teacup (The Shaz Records) Blueberrylounge.com You might think of “tea” these days as the cultural phenomenon of collecting as much steaming hot gossip on others as possible. Perhaps that inspired Gwen Snyder Siegal’s thrilling new Blueberry album Tempest in a Teacup, but I’d wager that the truth is something more cerebral, multi-faceted, and personal, like the album itself. While this collection of songs has many tracks that could and should be on many a modern adult alternative podcast, there is zero filler. Few current songwriters can create such convincing and fully realized settings from track to track as the Woodstock-based Blueberry can. Engaging, killer songs like the self-assuranceversus-a-witch-trial pomp of “Burn” or the storybook persistence of the dreamy-ballad-meetsZep-soul of “Keep On” make this far more than background music. Coproduced by Gwen and Kenny Siegal and recorded by Matthew Cullen at Old Soul and Allaire Studios, the album is bursting with theatrical melodic life while still sounding crisp and smooth. “Been Awake” breezes in, reminiscent of the drifting along of the Odelay-era Beck song “Jackass” before settling into something jazzier. The record’s numerous supporting cast members—from Rasputina’s Melora Creagor to Jessie Chandler, Adam Widoff, and many more—make the proceedings a very Alice in Wonderland-tea-party affair, in a gloriously enjoyable manner that never overshadows Gwen as the principle musical force here. —Morgan Y. Evans

Jay Anderson Deepscape

Patrick Higgins Dossier

The Acquaintances Pleased to Meetcha!

(SteepleChase Records) Steeplechase.dk

(Other People Records) Otherpeoplerecords.com

(Independent) Theacquaintances-hv.com

New Paltz bassist Jay Anderson’s new album puts the prolific artist back in the role of bandleader after decades of support playing. Deepscape is a kind of curriclum vitae, convincingly covering the waterfront: Anderson and crew create then punctuate great planes of tense atmosphere in Morton Feldman’s “Rothko Chapel”; swing with easy bravado through Keith Jarrett’s “Southern Smiles”; and skitter and trill gleefully in Branford Marsalis’s “The Mighty Sword.” But there are some delightful outliers: Anderson’s lyricism as a player is highlighted on Billy Joel’s (yep) “And So It Goes,” and the version of the Pee Wee King-Redd Stewart classic “Tennesse Waltz,” performed as a duet by Anderson and harmonium player Frank Kimbrough, is primed and ready for the next Nick Cave-scripted Western. The titular track is a drone-y improv that I could have listened to for another 15 minutes, and “Momentum” is a moody piece with marvelous interplay by Billy Drewe (alto sax) and Kirk Knuffke (cornet). —John Rodat

Hudson avant-garde guitarist and composer Patrick Higgins’s collaborations with his long-time foils in the New York band Zs and the likes of Arto Lindsay and Miho Hatori, not to mention the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra and other ensembles that have performed his works, are justly revered. But running through his many fruitful collaborations is the underlying feeling that he truly flourishes as a player when he’s on his own. Untethered from settings that necessitate his allowing fellow musicians their space, the unaccompanied Higgins revels in the opportunity to stretch out and shift the music according only to his own internal twists and whims. If you’ve caught his shamanic solo performances, you’ll have a sense of this. If not, Dossier, a four-movement solo suite of guitar and live custom electronics, will give you one. Dark, sprawling, and apocalyptically atmospheric, it’s packed with pinsand-needles tension that springs a surprise around every corner. Transformative listening. —Peter Aaron

Americlectic. It’s a totally ace marketing term. I’m surprised no one else came up with it before. Hudson Valley trio the Acquaintances own it, both in terms of coinage and employment. The group’s long-in-coming debut disc, Pleased to Meetcha!, bears the epithet out, opening and closing like a lighthearted Grateful Dead tribute before veering into solid NRBQ territory with a clutch of bar-band pop songs. Occasionally things veer a little too close to “da blooz,” with “Venus and the Crescent Moon” copping half-baked Hot Tuna; but the handclap-driven “The Rose Knows” makes up with a harmony-laden, Rockpile-inspired delivery and taut, yet expansive soloing from guitarist Jeff Entin. The penultimate “Notes on the Door” is relaxed and lengthy, with clean six-string tones echoing Jerry Garcia’s jazzier outings—a nice setup for the workingman’s charm of the capstone, “Southern Folk.” Drummer Larry Balestra and bassist Bob Blum complete the combo. —Michael Eck

11/19 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 91


poetry

EDITED BY Phillip X Levine

Space Man

with the tree now gone all that is left to collect the rain is the hole —p

He glares into the sun His eyes glimmering with rejection The universe falls around him He falls through the air, Landing on a bed of rocks He forces off the ground, Eyes adjusting to the unknown light. Then he sees the stars He pries his way to the sky And flies. —Ryan Alejandro Kraeher (10 years)

Fieldwalking, 2019 The grass that yesterday hit my shins now tickles my thighs And the sun on my lips how I long to have it closer than my body inside my skin Devour it like an apple fresh off the branch which too holds light and still hums with its energy And the grass screams in greens and yellows and reds that just brush its tips tomorrow will be gone Hold fast today this morning at least just now —Kate Minford

Shoes Eating shoes, we’re okay stuffing throats with leather. Weeks go on, tasting better, we’re comfortable with the stiffness. One foot nailed to ground, we settle in we look around. It’s not so bad living in one room. Hold tight, we can make the four corners a metaphor. Light is dark is light, without windows no one calls Nice or Mean or Night. Chewing forever, we’ve turned our four corners into an approximation. Throwing head back to spit, grounding firm into nail into ground, we can reach Wall One. Brown leather, blood and salted, I think we made something beautiful. I cry looking at the spots. —Juliet Gresh

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In the Road Driving over the Rupert mountain to town, dirt farm road, surrounded by corn fields, cows grazing in the morning light, mist rising off the ponds. Not another car on the road as I careen around curves, car pounding over ruts. Come upon a flock of wild turkeys in the road, perhaps twenty-five, large Toms with their tail feathers spread wide, smaller ones. They seem in no rush to scurry off as my car approaches. I slow down. Stop. Eventually, they scatter, off into the fields, moving hurriedly. I drive on. Yesterday, driving to town to mail a letter, make the 7 A.M. mail pick-up, I wind up behind a manure truck. Caked thick in excrement, a heavy layer of it covering the entire body of the truck, dried to a dark brown over time, the truck weighed down by its load. Its odor drifts back towards me. The driver going about forty, seemingly in no rush to deliver his load to some field, restore the nutrients his crop has taken from the land. I follow at a respectful distance. Eventually, he turns off into a newly cut hayfield. Sunday morning, near Whitehall, I came up behind two horse-drawn buggies carrying Amish. I slowed down, not wanting to spook their horses. The clip-clop of the horses’ hooves on the asphalt the only sound. The solemnity of their world, draws me within. At the crossroads, they turn. The beautiful faces of the bonneted women startle me. —Cary Abrams

First Love

The Pink Shell, Fort Myers

I am reverting to poetry because it’s easy— You don’t have to buy paint, or stretch canvas… You don’t have to tune up, or replace strings… It’s a welcoming warm mantle for an old soul. Like finally returning home, after a long sea voyage… I’m glad to have found it again. It’s easy as π.

she was hungry, once all of us were at that age

—Bob Grawi

now she reminisces in her sleeveless blouses sweating away blistering summers beneath the tiki bar cradling her margarita like an orphaned kitten the slothful sea sweeps her toes at the edge of the world while coquinas wriggle underneath the soles of her feet —Lee Clark Zumpe


This End Up You once told me you’d end up in a cardboard refrigerator box under an overpass. “Oh Neil” I laughed. You loved to make me laugh.

You were caught DUI and no one posted bail. Weeks later you showed up at my door. “I’m sorry.” I let you in. We ate tuna fish sandwiches on the patio. In the end I had to let you go.

You tucked me in poking the comforter snugly around my arrow-straight body. “Let me papoose you.” I giggled. I imagined you doing this with your daughter years ago. Did she giggle too?

You packed up your life. Embedded like tree rings in a trunk, stowed away memories for the ride. “I wish you well” I thought. If not, Doctor Smirnoff is always on call.

I picture you swinging your son up onto tall hemlock shoulders. “You can be my scout.” Did he whoop with glee? A fault line split you right down the middle. Camouflaged.

You slump at the wheel in a Walmart parking lot in Cottonwood, AZ. Three days later a Ford Escape is your coffin, windows rolled up. “Oh Neil” I don’t cry. You deserve a more poetic ending.

I insisted we rescue tadpoles from the plastic-lined pond. “Billions!” I marveled. Catch and release, with creaky knees, iPad camera and bucket, into the wild just down a country road from God’s little acre you created.

In the bed of your pickup, a strawberry moon rises cool breeze from a shooting star scent of desert bloom we don’t have back east. One last tilt of the bottle. Yes that will work.

In the Beer Hall (Nashville, 2014) The old couple couldn’t dance They stepped stiffly Trying to remember What step came next What the order was They missed when they grabbed sometimes They did not smile But stared into the air around them As though concentrating on their memory Of what to do next They did not stop As though if they did, The world would stop turning Dancing is a serious business Something that must get done They had worked out the moves They had agreed on the order Worked out a sequence They must get through They must finish proudly Regardless of the music Or what others were doing They had no grace They had no rhythm They had only the belief It was so essential It was so beautiful They finally disappeared Fading into the background Of the dance —Gilles Malkine

—Sharon Watts My Brother

What I Learn in My Waking State

My brother is a ginger. I don’t know where he got his hair. My brother has a sharp jawline. I can’t remember the color of his eyes. My brother smokes cigarettes. Once I saw him smoke behind the translucent door of a public bathroom. The smoke became a cloud, and behind the cloud there were his eyes, looking at me. I don’t know why I was looking at him. My brother is older. He likes to teach me new things. Sometimes when I don’t behave he hits me. He hurts my face but nowhere else. I hide the marks from my parents beneath my clothing. My brother takes me to school. He walks me to my classroom. My brother looks at me from the door. He watches me take my seat in the third row. My brother remembers that desk. Later when he finds me there, he teaches me to be quiet lying on that desk. I can’t remember what he looks like. Only how he smells. I would look at a photograph to remind myself, but I have none. I do not have a brother.

There are times when we wake in the middle of the night, whisper stories into the dark cavern of our bedroom’s belly, move like magnets across the mattress and make love.

—Sophie Cohen

Once, people lived like this, he says, by the light of the moon, taking sleep in shifts to see what they could not see before. There comes a moment during one of these hours when I know— soon I will return home to find it has been stripped of its homeness: the TV will be pulled from the mount above the mantle; the records will unlearn their melody as they are thrown from their orbit; And then, the soft brown of his eyes— which once looked deep into mine as if to say You are the first constellation I find in the bloom of stars— will be carried away in a blink. —Samantha Spoto

Full submission guidelines: Chronogram.com/submissions 11/19 CHRONOGRAM POETRY 93


LIGHTFIELD ARTS “PHOTO + SYNTHESIS” AT HUDSON HALL

In the 19th century, Hudson River School artists saw our region’s beauty as evidence of the Divine and worried about the industrialization and deforestation that had already begun. Lightfield Arts’ exhibition takes an Anthropocene view of the valley through the work of seven artists illuminating our biome from new perspectives, including Sarah Bird and Tim Davis. Trees are the focus; viewed through the lens of contemporary photography, the science of tree ring research, and the art of data visualization. Works by historic Hudson River oil painters such as Asher B. Durand and a video by the Young Photographer’s Workshop are also on view. Through December 21

94 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 11/19

Fall, a photograph by Christopher Griffith, part of Lightfield Arts “Photo + Synthesis” exhibition at Hudson Hall.


the guide

November 26 27 28 29 30 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 November 2: John Malkovich at UPAC November 3: “The Magic Garden” at Colony November 7: Deborah Hanlon at Helsinki Hudson November 9-10: “Shiva Arms” at Denizen Theater November 15: Suzanne Cahalan at Murray’s in Tivoli November 14-17: “Just Another Matter of Time” at Bridge Street Theater November 22: JB Smoove at Paramount Hudson Valley November 23-24: Hudson Valley Hullabalo November 24: Hudson Valley Free Day at Dia:Beacon November 29-December 1: Basilica Farm & Flea in Hudson Through December 2: Ruby Silvious at Woodstock Art Exchange

For comprehensive calendar listings visit Chronogram.com/events. 11/19 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 95


CATSKILL MOUNTAIN FOUNDATION presents

Homage to Bach The Knights Chamber Orchestra

TONALISM:

PATHWAY FROM THE HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL TO MODERN ART

In this concert, The Knights perform a large range of music influenced by Bach, from modernist giants such as Stravinsky to American folk/pop icon Paul Simon.

Saturday, November 30, 2019

8:00 pm

Tickets Purchased Ahead: $25; $20 seniors; $7 students At the Door: $30; $25 seniors; $7 students

“These two dozen musicians from Brooklyn ... playfully combine early music with avant-garde, great classics with world music— constantly blowing away audiences because this mix is simply irresistibly refined.” —Hamburger Abendblatt (Germany)

Doctorow Center for the Arts

7971 Main Street, Village of Hunter, NY To purchase tickets, visit www.catskillmtn.org Or call 518-263-2063

96 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 11/19

Birge Harrison, Lawrence River Sunset, n.d., oil on canvas, New York State Museum, Historic Woodstock Art Colony: Arthur A. Anderson Collection

AUGUST 28 – DECEMBER 8, 2019 SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

W W W.NEWPALTZ.EDU/MUSEUM


theater

Love Goes to Buildings "SHIVA ARMS" AT DENIZEN THEATER November 9 & 10 Denizentheatre.com Enter the world of “Shiva Arms,” where a hilarious and eye-opening group of Los Angelenos ride out a hurricane of human emotions and learn a medley of life lessons in an unsuspecting California apartment building. Doug M=otel brings his one-man show to Denizen Theatre in New Paltz November 9 and 10. When tragedy strikes, the residents of Shiva Arms review memories of their late residential manager, offering a window into their personal lives while leaving the audience both pensive and rolling-on-thefloor laughing. During the second half of the show, the audience witnesses a heartwarming yet chaotic funeral filled with love, passion, and a dead seal rolling downhill toward an unaware 91-year-old. Rosendalian Doug Motel is the writer, creator, and actor who plays the 11 characters of “Shiva Arms,” all of whom are addressing an invisible “Doug Motel” as the plot’s main mode of movement. Motel morphs mind and body for each character, changing his breathing, walking, and mannerisms to suit their idiosyncrasies. B-movie actress Bambi—a woman who lives with two cats and longs to be abducted by aliens—is in no way similar to Ronald—a wise, elderly man in a wheelchair who has died, come back to life, and committed himself to running a movielending library from his apartment as a way to bring people joy. Shiva Arms’ Australian handyman, Ian, heard the meaning of life while going 50 miles per hour on a surfboard. “You have to let the spirit find you, you have to let inspiration find you,” he says, and perhaps this is Motel’s way of bringing his own creative methods to light. Motel woke up one morning and began his daily writing exercise, which is filling three pages to the brim of whatever comes to mind, even if its’ nonsense. But before he knew it, Motel was writing “and I am walking into the theater to watch Doug Motel’s new show and there are three black boxes on the stage…” and soon enough Motel was talking to himself in different character’s voices, recording everything and taking the best material he could find. This natural creative force gave birth to “Shiva Arms” in a way that Ian would approve of. In 1988, Motel suffered the loss of Lynea Kokes, a friend he continues to admire more than anyone in the world. She was murdered on her first day as manager of a Los Angeles residential building. The tragedy serves as the jumping-off point for “Shiva Arms.” “When you have a friend that is murdered, people either use it to affirm a belief that they have about how horrible the world is,” says Motel, “or these use it to bring other people with them to a greater place of expansiveness.” The “Shiva Arms” performances at Denizen are a benefit for the Maya Gold Foundation, which promotes teenage mental health and empowering youth. (Maya Gold was a New Paltz teen who took her own life in 2015.) Doug Motel will perform “Shiva Arms” on November 9 at 8pm and November 10 at 3pm at Denizen Theater in New Paltz. Tickets are $25. VIP admission is $50, which includes meet a greet with board members and an artist’s reception. —Matthew Praman-Linton 11/19 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 97


Rosendale, NY 1 2472 | 845.658.8989 | rosendaletheatre.org JOKER FRIDAY 11/1 – MONDAY 11/4 + Dance Film Sunday: Roman Baca’s Exit 12 THURSDAY 11/7, 7:15pm. $6 matinees at 1pm Moved by War SUN 11/10, $12/$10/$6, 2pm on WEDNESDAY 11/16 + THURSDAY 11/17 FIDDLER: MIRACLE OF MIRACLES Sunday Silents: FW MURNAU’S, TUESDAY 11/12 + WEDNESDAY 11/13, 7:15pm. NOSFERATU: A SYMPHONY OF Dharma Film Series: KUNDUN SUNDAY 11/17, HORROR SUNDAY 11/3, 2pm. Judy

FRIDAY 11/5 – MONDAY 11/18 + THURSDAY 11/21, 7:15pm. $6 matinees at 1pm on WEDNESDAY 11/20 + THURSDAY 11/21

THE POLLINATORS WEDNESDAY 11/6, 7:15pm. Panel discussion follows the film. DOWNTON ABBEY FRIDAY 11/8 – MONDAY 11/11 + THURSDAY 11/14, 7:15pm. $6 matinees at 1pm on WED + THUR

Q&A with Robert Thurman. $10/$8, 3pm

National Theatre: ALL 11/24. $12/$10, 2pm

ABOUT EVE SUNDAY

Hudsy TV: THE

COMMONS WED 11/27, 7pm HUNG WITH CARE SATURDAY 11/30, 9:30pm. HUNG With Care contains adult themes and attendees must be 18+. $30/$35/$15

MVP movementpictures.com hudson valley production

CONTENT CRE ATION COMMERCIALS • CRE ATIVE 6 4 6 . 25 8 . 7 9 95

KATE MCGLOUGHLIN

REQUIEM FOR ASHOKAN, THE STORY TOLD IN LANDSCAPE November 16 – January 4 Opening Reception: Nov. 16, 2-4 pm Artist’s Talk and Reading: Nov. 16, 4 pm Children’s Program “Help Me Tell the Story”: Nov. 23, 2–4 pm Panel “Vanishing Olive” Nov. 30, 2–4 pm

Olive Free Library 4033 Route 28A, West Shokan olivefreelibrary.org Free and open to the public

Your work deserves attention. Which means you need a great bio for your press kit or website. One that’s tight. Clean. Professionally written. Something memorable. Something a booking agent, a record-label person, a promoter, or a gallery owner won’t just use to wipe up the coffee spill on their desk before throwing away.

When you’re ready, I’m here.

PETER AARON

Music editor, Chronogram. Published author. Award-winning music columnist, 2005-2006, Daily Freeman. Contributor, Village Voice, Boston Herald, All Music Guide, All About Jazz.com, Jazz Improv and Roll magazines. Musician. Consultations also available. Reasonable rates.

See samples at www.peteraaron.org. E-mail info@peteraaron.org for rates. I also offer general copy editing and proofreading services.

98 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 11/19


art

Ink and markers on stained, cracked egg shells by Ruby Silvious.

“It was a very innocent experiment,” artist Ruby Silvious recalls. “I had something like 30 followers.” She’s referring to 2015, when she decided to paint one picture a day on a teabag for the entire year. Two thirds of the way through the project, her images went viral on Instagram. The resulting book, 363 Days of Tea: A Visual Journal on Used Teabags (Mascot Books), was a hit. “Reclaimed Canvas,” Silvious’s show at the Woodstock Art Exchange, runs through December 2. Pictures on teabags seem impossible, because one imagines the surfaces being wet. And Silvious’s teabags do start out soggy. After each bag has yielded a cup of tea, she empties it, dries it, and irons it. Actually, unused teabags make poor canvases. “They’re too porous,” Silvious explains. She doesn’t prep any of her surfaces with gesso or any other underlayer. Silvious’s miraculous minimalism flourishes in the digital world, where there’s no sense of scale; a teabag is as large as a skyscraper on an iPhone screen. But in a gallery, one can closely admire her touch with a watercolor brush. (Yes, Silvious poetically chooses watercolors to decorate teabags, adding gouache only for white accents.) Her subject matter ranges widely, from snowbound crocuses blooming in her hometown of Coxsackie to visual puns to her “Museum Goers” series, where silhouetted art lovers gaze at teabag-scale versions of art masterpieces. “I want to try everything!” Silvious exclaims. Once a personal obsession becomes successful, it’s known as a “gimmick.” Before that, it’s merely a lonely and rather shameful ritual. A series of interlocking

obsessions creates these works: the desire to recycle everything in one’s life, the urge to post pictures on Instagram, and the compulsion to drink lots of tea. Besides teabags, Silvious chooses other unorthodox mediums: eggshells, fallen leaves, paper scraps. These studies are documented in her new book, Reclaimed Canvas: Reimagining the Familiar (Mascot Books). With pistachio shells, Silvious abandons her commitment to figurative art. The super-bright patterns she produces—with color markers—make the pistachio hulls look like tropical beetles. One of Sylvious’s intentions is to encourage other artists—particularly those with little money—to use nontraditional art materials. Through the Internet, she receives photos of new teabag paintings. “I do not mind if people copy me; go ahead!” she responds. “I must say, some are even better than me—and I commend them.” This year, Silvious began fashioning women’s dress shoes out of cardboard and paper. Influenced by Art Deco and Grimms’ Fairy Tales, they gleam with girlish sophistication. One of them appeared in Vogue Italia. At first, I didn’t recognize the two life-size kimonos as part of the show. It’s not obvious that each is composed of over 600 teabags pieced together, whose monoprints form a continuous pattern. (The brown stains of tea serve as muted coloration.) Besides, a kimono is huge compared to most of Silvious’s work. But small, persistent pieces eventually grow large; 363 minuscule paintings become a book. Silvious teaches us the fruitfulness of daily practice. “Reclaimed Canvas” runs through December 2 at the Woodstock Art Exchange. —Sparrow

Tea Time "RECLAIMED CANVAS" IN WOODSTOCK Through December 2 Woodstockartexchange.com

11/19 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 99


Theater John Malkovich at UPAC

theater

November 2 Hollywood A-lister John Malkovich began his career at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theater Company, and he’s no stranger to the stage, winning an Obie for his performances in Sam Shepard’s “True West” (1980) and Lanford Wilson’s “Balm in Gilead” (1984). His new project, “Just Call Me God,” is the story of a dictator giving his final speech in the last hour of his life. Paired with the musical talents of organist Martin Haselböck and the cowriting of author Michael Sturminger, Indie Cinema said that the play “is a must see for people interested in modern theater and for fans of Malkovich.” Bardavon.org

Books Running with Sherman at Oblong Books

November 2 A man and a donkey training and running together, that’s something you’d never expect to see in everyday life. Chris McDougall, however crazy it may seem, did just this to help rehabilitate a rescue donkey, Sherman, who he fostered. At his upcoming reading, McDougall will talk about Running with Sherman, and how an injured donkey taught him strength. Ticket sales will partially benefit the Hudson Valley Donkey Park in Ulster. Oblongbooks.com

Kids Stuff for Grownups “The Magic Garden” at Colony

Lucy Miller (the Lop-Eared Rabbit), Cassidy Maze Bua (Meg), and Martin McKeon (Time) star in Sandra Dutton and Scott Petito's new musical, "JAMOT: Just a Matter of Time."

Film Parasite at Upstate Films

Jam On It "JAMOT: JUST A MATTER OF TIME" November 14-17 Bridgest.org/jamot “JAMOT: Just a Matter of Time,” a new musical by Sandra Dutton and Scott Petito, will have its world premiere at Bridge Street Theatre in Catskill on November 14. Written by Dutton with music by Petito, the whimsical production follows a young girl named Meg as she learns what happens when time disappears. “She’s been told by her grandmother that she’s lost her curiosity, she’s studying too much,” says Dutton. “She’s sitting out in the garden and she finds herself getting a little dizzy and ends up in a maze where she learns that time has been beaten in a boxing match. And it is her job to find him because if she doesn’t, she’ll disappear.” Playwright and director Dutton is a renowned children’s book author who originally wrote “JAMOT” as a play before being convinced to turn it into a musical by a British composer. That first partnership didn’t come to fruition because the music was, well, too British. “This is an American play,” says Dutton. “I’ve always loved Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear and The Phantom Tollbooth and all these other books, but I wanted this to be very American. I didn’t want any kings and queens.” Instead of royalty, characters include various animals—the mayor is a goose—the mischievous Rhymester, and Time itself. And in an effort to give the music and production more of an American flavor, Dutton began collaborating with fellow Catskill resident Petito, a multi-instrumentalist and composer who’s worked with James Taylor, Pete Seeger, Jack DeJohnette, Don Byron, and Dave Brubeck. While the story may have a toe in the world of classic fairytales, Dutton says the inspiration 100 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 11/19

November 3 Who remembers the Chuckle Patch? How about the Story Box? (Sing along: “The stories are here / they’re all in here / from Crafty Fox to Goldilocks / the Story Box, the Story Box.” “The Magic Garden” aired from 1972-84 on WPIX in New York City, and the show’s hosts, Carole and Paula were delightfully musical surrogate parents for a generation of children. Incredibly, Carole and Paula are on tour, celebrating 65 years of friendship. Expect stories, songs, video clips, and special guest appearance by Sherlock, the beloved squirrel puppet. Colonywoodstock.com

came from reading about quantum mechanics and relativity. “It was the strangest thing,” says Dutton, who read authors and physicists Fred Alan Wolff and Heinz Pagels. “What would happen as I was reading, I would hear these strange phrases that were almost silly, funny interpretations of what was on the page. And I just thought, ‘This is very interesting.’” The Rhymester came from a decidedly more earthy inspiration: memories of reading legendary San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen’s correspondence with a remorseful armored truck robber. In addition to Dutton and Petito, “JAMOT” is led by producer Wayne Sheridan and choreographer Rachel Kappel, and features an expansive and talented local cast including Brian Dewan, Lucy Miller, and Leslie Ritter. “Just about all the main characters in my play I read for personally, because I really wanted them to get it,” Dutton says. “And it’s paid off. It’s just been such fun.” “JAMOT” is a play for adults and children alike, but is not recommended for kids under the age of five. The production was made possible through the Decentralization Program, a regrant initiative of the New York State Council on the Arts with support from Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, with funding administered by the Green County Council on the Arts. “JAMOT: Just A Matter of Time” is being staged November 14-17 at Bridge Street Theater in Catskill, Thursday-Saturday at 7:30pm; Sunday at 2:30pm. Tickets are $10 for ages 5-17 and $20 for everyone else. —Crispin Kott

Check for dates and times Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s latest is a more realistic narrative than his last two features, the dystopian class struggle of Snowpiercer (2013) and big-pig flick Okja (2017). Parasite is a satirical thriller with a large helping of dark comedy, exploring how a poor family slowly insinuates themselves in the lives of a rich family. Parasite took home the Palme d’Or at the Cannes earlier this year, the first Korean film to do so. Upstatefilms.org

Medium Deborah Hanlon at Helsinki Hudson

November 7 After the death of her four-year-old brother, then threeyear-old Deborah Hanlon embarked on a lifelong journey of discovery of science and self to find proof that life after death exists. An intuitive medium, Hanlon’s passion for teaching the living how to recalibrate after loss inspired her to open the Center for Being, Knowing, Doing in Newburgh and to teach workshops on meditation/visualization, intuitive development, mediumship, personal development, and energy awareness. Helsinkihudson.com

Cooking Vegan Thanksgiving Cooking Class

November 16 What if we all skipped the turkey this year? The Catskill Animal Sanctuary in Saugerties is hosting a three-hour cooking class with chef Sara Boan, coauthor of Compassionate Cuisine. Dishes on the menu include butternut squash and apple bisque with coconut bacon, savory mushroom and white bean wellington, garlic mashed potatoes with rich vegan gravy, and pumpkin crème brûlée. The class will be followed by a feast and a tour of the grounds, including an introduction to CAS’s friendly turkeys. Casanctuary.org

For comprehensive calendar listings visit Chronogram.com/events.


books

Comedy JB Smoove at Paramount Hudson Valley November 22 JB Smoove is best known as Leon from “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” but he’s got a long and hilarious list of comedy credits: “Saturday Night Live” writer, featured player on “Everybody Hates Chris,” and a star turn as Trucky in the blaxploitation satire Pootie Tang with Chris Rock. Returning to his roots in standup comedy after his Comedy Central special “That’s How I Dooz It,” Smoove is now touring cross country and performing to sold-out audiences. Paramounthudsonvalley.com

Arts & Crafts Basilica Farm & Flea November 29-December 1 Flea markets aren’t a new concept, but the handcrafted creations available at the annual Basilica Farm & Flea Holiday Market are definitely a cut above. Join the thousands who pilgrimage to Hudson to see what the makers are making now, from soap to sofas to spirits. Basilicahudson.org

Arts & Crafts HV Hullabaloo at Andy Murphy Midtown Neighborhood Center November 23-24 A carefully curated selection of craftspeople selling their work, Hudson Valley Hullabaloo returns to the Andy Murphy Rec Center in Kingston for its seventh year. The Hullabaloo stands out due to its focus on design and product quality in its vendors, rather than fitting a theme or aesthetic, which creates a diverse marketplace. Shop here for highquality craft direct from local Hudson Valley artisans, such as Bold Version Design Co, Willow Vale Farm, and So Handmade. Hvhullabaloo.com

Art Dia:Beacon Hudson Valley Free Day November 24 Hudson Valley residents can skip the $15 admission charge to view Dia’s massive collection of conceptual art on the last Sunday of the month, yearround. The eligible counties are: Albany, Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Orange, Putnam, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Sullivan, Ulster, Washington, and Westchester). Proof of residence is required. A new exhibition of Barry Le Va’s horizontally dispersed sculptures opens on November 9, but we go for Serra’s monumental steel sculptures and Heizer’s holes in the floor. And maybe some Dan Flavin neon too. Diaart.org

For comprehensive calendar listings visit Chronogram.com/events.

Call Me Crazy SUSANNAH CAHALAN AT MURRAY'S November 15 Oblongbooks.com Susannah Cahalan turned her mysterious and devastating illness into the best-selling memoir Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness. Six years later, Cahalan’s second book, The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Understanding of Madness, is being released by Grand Central Publishing on November 5. Cahalan, called “one of America’s most courageous young journalists” by NPR, has investigated a 50-yearold mystery behind a groundbreaking experiment that changed the course of psychiatry and our understanding of mental illness. Cahalan, who lives part-time in West Hurley, will talk about The Great Pretender in an event presented by Oblong Books and Music at Murray’s in Tivoli on November 15 at 6 pm. Tickets are $10, which can be applied toward the purchase of the book at the event.  —David Levine Most people haven’t had a chance to read your book yet, so can you give us a brief synopsis? It is born out of questions I didn’t tackle in my first book. In that book, I was misdiagnosed with a serious mental illness, when I had an autoimmune disease in my brain. It raised all these questions about, what does it mean to have a mental illness? What does that label mean? At one point during the publicity for Brain on Fire, I came across a study published in 1973. [Healthy researchers] went undercover in psychiatric hospitals across the country and all they did was exhibit very limited [fake] symptoms, like “I hear a voice,” and they were all diagnosed with schizophrenia. That study had a huge impact on mental health that we are still feeling today. I connected personally with that study and my own misdiagnosis. I wanted to learn more about this study’s author, David Rosenhan. As I investigated it over the past six years, the story pivoted, and the result is more of a mystery and investigation than I ever foresaw. Is it the mystery of how we define mental illness? Or whether we have a grasp on it at all? Perfectly said. The basic mystery is the author and the legitimacy of the study. Then it also becomes a look at the history of psychiatry, how much has changed since that study, how much have we grasped, and how much have we failed to grasp. While I was on [my first] book tour I did a lot of medical conferences and grand rounds. After one session, one of the doctors came up to me and said, “This sounds a lot like this woman we have here.” She had been in and out of the hospital for two years. I had been misdiagnosed for only one month. I remember thinking, could someone here have the same story that I did? I found out later she had been; she had the same illness I did. This raised questions of how many people are misdiagnosed, what do these terms even mean if they can be so porous.

What does the title, The Great Pretender, mean? I think there are three interpretations. The first is that the illness I had and others like it are called Great Pretender illnesses, because they mimic psychiatric conditions. And then you have David Rosenhan and his other— they called themselves pseudo-patients—who went undercover in psychiatric hospitals. They are kind of great pretenders. And ultimately, as questions are raised about the validity of the study, that term takes on new meanings. What themes do you want readers to take away from the book? What questions do you want answered? A lot of these are impossible questions. I hope that for the layperson it empowers them to feel more comfortable asking hard questions, especially of their doctors. Also, I think I illuminate the limitations of our knowledge, which can be a scary thing. In terms of the field reading it, I hope that they are able to understand their history better. I think to move forward and progress you need to understand the history, and this is an illumination of a history that was not truthfully told. My intention is to raise questions and to add to the conversation, not end the conversation. I don’t have the answers. Were you interested in mental health before your illness? I was always interested in behavior. I went through all these books I got to re-read for The Great Pretender, like I Never Promised You a Rose Garden, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Go Ask Alice, all these books were interesting to me, as they are to many people. But I don’t think I had an extraordinary interest in this until it actually hit me personally. Moving through this illness that was disabling for many months of my life was a profound experience. It ripped my life into a before and after. Everything about my life now is a direct after effect, an aftershock of the illness. You now live part-time in the Hudson Valley and parttime in Brooklyn. Did you work on the book here? I wrote a great portion of the book upstate, about 75 percent of the book. At Outdated, Village Coffee, Rough Draft—I was definitely using the Kingston coffee shops to get this book done, for sure. What will your presentation at Murray’s include? I haven’t done any [events] for this yet, so it will be an interesting challenge to figure out how to talk about this book. I have a lot of audio and visuals, so I hope to bring them in. But my favorite parts of book events are when the audience asks questions. For me it’s so fun to engage on that level. I hope it’s lively. I am excited to present this book to the community where I wrote so much of it. It feels really special. 11/19 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 101


11 JANE STREET ART CENTER SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9 LINDA MARY MONTANO TAKING THE FEAR INTO AND OUT OF AROUND DEATH: A WORKSHOP 1PM - 5PM, 11 JANE ST. ART CENTER GALLERY NORTH ADMISSION BASED ON SLIDING SCALE $34.00 TO $151.00 REGISTER AT WWW.11JANESTREET.COM SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16 ROBERT HITE ”IN THE SHALLOWS” IMAGINED HISTORIES: A CONVERSATION WITH THE ARTIST 7 PM, 11 JANE ST. ART CENTER GALLERY SOUTH FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17 ROBERT HITE ”IN THE SHALLOWS” CLOSING RECEPTION 5PM-8PM, 11 JANE ST. ART CENTER GALLERY SOUTH FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 11 JANE ST. ART CENTER 11 JANE STREET, SAUGERTIES NY 12477 WWW.11JANESTREET.COM

Holiday Pottery Show & Sale November 22– December 1 Open daily 10 – 5pm Closed Thanksgiving

Member Preview Sale Friday, Nov. 22, 1– 5pm Opening party for all Friday, Nov. 22, 5 – 7pm

Beacon TRAGIC

THE

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Chelsea Long-term view

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102 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 11/19

NOVEMBER 9 - DECEMBER 7 BAU GALLERY, 506 MAIN ST

OPENING RECEPTION NOVEMBER 9 FROM 6 - 9 PM BEACON, NY

ARTS CENTER & SCULPTURE GARDEN

Dia:Beacon 3 Beekman Street Beacon New York www.diaart.org

SCULPTURES PAINTINGS BAS RELIEFS

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connecting communities through the arts. PERFORMANCES • WORKSHOPS SCULPTURE GARDEN • GALLERY Join or donate today: unisonarts.org


exhibits

“SHAPE OF LIGHT” AT THE FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER

“Shape of Light” celebrates contributions by the Vassar College Advisory Council for Photography to the growth of the Art Center’s collection of nearly 4,500 photographs, 125 of which are on view. Given the deluge of photographic imagery engendered by the smartphone, curator Mary-Kay Lombino notes that “there is something to be said for seeing so many carefully selected works in one exhibition.” Chosen are highlights from the beginnings of photography through the present day, including jewels from the likes of Margaret Bourke-White, Gordon Parks, Alfred Stieglitz, Harry Callahan, and Cindy Sherman. Through December 15

Barbara Morgan’s 1940 photograph Martha Graham Letter to the World (Kick), part of the “Shape of Light” exhibition at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College through December 15.

HENRY KLIMOWITZ “METHOD FOR PROCEEDING” AT GARRISON ART CENTER

Not knowing what his finished piece will be is key to Henry Klimowitz’s process of alchemizing cardboard into sculptures—one cut, bend, fold, or hot glue drop at a time. “Like a wasp,” he says, incrementally accruing nested forms. Each emergent work begins with a germinating idea building from a single point to something natural looking but unclassifiable. Leading from one work to another at GAC: from the windows, where cardboard patterns of ovoid, leaf-like shapes filter light to accumulations that could be hanging vines or maybe not to fungi-esque configurations seemingly blossoming from the walls. Through November 10

“EUSTATIA” AT THE GLOBAL ART MUSEUM

Thinking globally and acting locally, a new art venue in Beacon is testing the waters of the Hudson Valley art scene. Five regional artists are featured in the Global Art Museum’s inaugural offering. Emil Alzamora, Joseph Ayers, Matt Kinney, Liao Yibai, and Michael Zelehoski are presenting decidedly 21st-century works filling multiple rooms of Eustatia, a High Victorian-style mansion overlooking the river. Prime examples of contemporary sculpture, video, multimedia, and painting are on display.  Through November, by appointment. (845) 309-9247

“SANCTUARY” AT KINGSTON CITY HALL

Works in this exhibition express over 40 artists’ interpretations of sanctuary. Everyone needs sanctuary; especially in these times, and shelter from the storm comes in many forms, depending on the imperatives of those seeking it. Kingston became a sanctuary city in 2017 and its website notes that this exhibition of stylistically varied small works in a wide range of media “hopes to create a space for a nuanced interpretation of sanctuaries, and what they mean to Kingston.” Artist, Isabel Cotarelo, whose piece is a colorful biomorphic abstraction, opines, “Sanctuary becomes real when kindness of mind/heart is present in a boundless energy to provoke change.” Through December 20.

ROBERT HITE AT 11 JANE STREET

Raised in rural Virginia and a teenager there in the turbulent ’60s, Robert Hite builds on memories of dirt roads, abandoned houses, and the people who lived in them. Over the arc of his career, Hite has evolved from being an abstract landscape painter to an artist who has mastered many other media including sculpture and photography. The rural house and what it entails remains at the center of it all. Along the way, Hite moved with his family to Esopus and won a Guggenheim. His most recent works–including examples of his detailed and distinctively crafted sculptures of houses as well as photographs of these evocative dwellings in natural settings—are on view as part of “In the Shallows” at 11 Jane Street in Saugerties. Through November 17

“UP NEXT” AT KLEINERT/JAMES CENTER FOR THE ARTS

The Hudson Valley has been attracting young artists since Thomas Cole moved here at the age of 21. Arlene Shechet, whose own work has often been reviewed in the New York Times, Art Forum, and Hyperallergic, has curated “UP NEXT,” which highlights pieces by 15 emerging talents. You may recognize some of the names: Daniel Giordano, whose quirky multimedia sculpture was recently shown in Mother Gallery’s “Soft Temple” show, and Padma Rajendran, whose work was featured locally in a solo show at WAAM. Schechet imparts that the exhibition “reflects her vision and sense of how these artists speak to each other through their work.” Through December 1

FRANC PALAIA AND BRIAN GILLETTE AT 40 CANNON STREET GALLERY

Two veteran artists are teamed up for “Urban Icons” at one of Poughkeepsie’s newest art spaces; both paying homage to visual urbanity. Palaia, a well-known muralist, photographer, and sculptor, is installing what appear to be substantial chunks of graffiti-laden walls from around the globe. Look for “found imagery that is seemingly chaotic, random, humorous, and political.” Gillette, a refugee from the wilds of advertising, utilizes multimedia skills honed there to create works that blend an “appreciation of a vintage past” and visions of “a radical future.” Fans of art that transgresses the real estate of the world’s metropolises will feel at home. Through December 31

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exhibits ERNEST SHAW AT AARON REZNY STUDIO

Ernest Shaw’s “No-Self” series conveys the mystery of personhood through self-portraits made by layering photography, ink, paint, and sculpture. The resulting facial montages never quite resolve, suggesting double or triple vision, yet attain a balance that evokes a singular presence. The frenetic line that chases after completion of the pictures also energizes. This holds true in Shaw’s “Lifeline” series— also on view at Aaron Rezny Studio in Kingston—in which invigorating mark making brings life to photos of dead flora. Compassion is his unifying theme: “Reverence to the ‘self’ and ‘not self,’ to our hearts, to the leaves.” Through December 30 No-Self, Ernest Shaw, photodrawing, 2019.

GARRISON ART CENTER

23 GARRISON’S LANDING, GARRISON “Method for Proceeding.” Henry Klimowicz. Klimowitz transforms cardboard into exotic and beautiful sculptural forms. Through November 10. “Holiday Pottery Show & Sale.” November 22-Decemebr 1.

TREAMINE GALLERY AT THE HOTCHKISS SCHOOL 11 INTERLAKEN ROAD, LAKEVILLE, CT “Flat File: Works on Paper by Cleve Gray.” Through January 12, 2020.

HUDSON BEACH GLASS GALLERY 162 MAIN STREET, BEACON

“Microcosm. Drawing and sculpture exhibit by Tanja Bos.” Through November 3.

11 JANE STREET ART CENTER

BEEKMAN LIBRARY

HUDSON HALL

“In the Shallows.” Robert Hite sculptures. Through November 17.

AARON REZNY STUDIO AT 76 PRINCE STREET

“Hudson Valley Nature Photography: Rails, Trails, & Vistas.” The exhibition will feature over 20 works on both metal and paper by Susan Bores. Through November 14.

“Photo + Synthesis: 2019 LightField Arts Exhibitof Visual Art.” New commissions of landscape photography, nineteenth century oil paintings, and a special data visualization piece about tree ring science. Through December 21.

“Ernest Shaw: Photo Drawings.” Through December 30.

BERKSHIRE BOTANICAL GARDEN

ALBERT SHAHINIAN FINE ART GALLERY

“Cynthia Wick: The Shape of Color.” Through December 1.

“Christie Scheele: Atlas Project/Forms of Water.” A major solo installation of paintings, monotypes, and collages that explore this artist’s visual integration of self, art, and the climate crisis. Through December 1.

BOSCOBEL

11 JANE STREET, SAUGERTIES

76 PRINCE STREET, KINGSTON

22 EAST MARKET STREET SUITE 301, RHINEBECK

11 TOWN CENTER BLVD, HOPEWELL JUNCTION

5 WEST STOCKBRIDGE ROAD, STOCKBRIDGE, MA

327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON

HUDSON RIVER MARITIME MUSEUM 50 RONDOUT LANDING, KINGSTON

“Rescuing the River: 50 Years of Environmental Activism on the Hudson.” Through January 1, 2021.

1601 ROUTE 9D (BEAR MOUNTAIN HIGHWAY), GARRISON BOSCOBEL.ORG.

HUDSON VALLEY MOCA

“Cross-pollination: An Evolution in Foliate Forms.” Through November 3.

1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL “How We Live.” Through July 19, 2020.

1405 COUNTY ROUTE 22, GHENT

DIA:BEACON

JOHN DAVIS GALLERY

“Statues.” An exhibition of work by Francesca DiMattio. Through January 5, 2020.

3 BEEKMAN STREET, BEACON “Barry Le Va: Horizontally Dispersed Sculptures.” Long-term view.

“Claude Carone: Paintings.” Through December 1.

ARTS MID-HUDSON

DUCK POND GALLERY

JOYCE GOLDSTEIN GALLERY

“Dutchess Handmade Pop-Up Shop.” Locally made glass, jewelry, greeting cards, textiles, ceramics, wood, products, prints, paintings, home, decorating items and more. November 1-December 21.

“My Hearts Desire.” Mixed media by Ginny Ballard. Through November 29.

“Animals As Muse.” Through November 16.

EAST FISHKILL COMMUNITY LIBRARY

THE CORNER OF GRAND & FIRST STREETS, NEWBURGH

“A Little Relief: Linoleum and Woodblock Exhibit.” Works by Gina Palmer. November 1-30.

“Orange County: A Celebration of Its Culture, Land, and People.” Juried show by the Hudson Highlands Photography Club & Workshop. Through November 22.

ART OMI

696 DUTCHESS TURNPIKE, POUGHKEEPSIE

ASK GALLERY

97 BROADWAY, KINGSTON “Exactly Different.” Figurative sculpture. November 2-30. Opening reception November 2, 5-8pm.

ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER 24 SECOND STREET, ATHENS

“Homely.” Video, performance, and poetry. Through November 24.

BARRETT ART CENTER

55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE “New Directions 2019: 35th Annual National Juried Contemporary Art Exhibition.” Juror: Akili Tommasino, Associate Curator, Modern & Contemporary Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston. Through November 9.

BEACON ARTIST UNION

506 MAIN STREET, BEACON “Collapsed Time.” Recent work by Joel Werring and Pamela Zaremba. Through November 3.

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128 CANAL STREET, PORT EWEN

348 ROUTE 376, HOPEWELL JUNCTION

EMERGE GALLERY

288 MAIN STREET, SAUGERTIES 226-2145. “Petit: A Group Exhibition of Smaller-Sized Art.” November 2-December 1. Works by Gina Palmer. November 1-30.

FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER AT VASSAR COLLEGE 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE

“Shape of Light: Defining Photographs.” Featuring large-scale works. Through December 15.

GARDINER LIBRARY

133 FARMER’S TURNPIKE, GARDINER “Michael Gold: American Flag Photographs.” November 10-December 28. Opening reception November 10, 1pm.

362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON

19 CENTRAL SQUARE, CHATHAM

KAPLAN HALL, MINDY ROSS GALLERY

LIMNER GALLERY

123 WARREN STREET, HUDSON “The Show of Heads.” In this exhibition, 27 contemporary artists. present works based on and inspired by the human head. Through November 9.

LOCAL ARTISAN BAKERY

448 BROADWAY, KINGSTON, NEW YORK “Pop-Up Exhibition.” Featuring: Amanda Light, Kasmira Demyan, Not Just Rainbows (Logan Lapointe), Nicole Saunders, and Rita Bolla. November 2-December 30. Opening reception November 2, 4pm-7pm.

MANITOGA/THE RUSSEL WRIGHT DESIGN CENTER 584 NY-9D, GARRISON

“Michele Oka Doner: Close Your Physical Eye.” Through November 11.


exhibits

caption tk

Shigeko Kubota in her studio in 1972. Photo by Tom Haar

MARK GRUBER GALLERY

THE STEWART HOUSE

“43rd Annual Holiday Salon Show.” November 16-January 1. Opening reception November 16, 5pm-7pm.

“Without a Sail Without an Oar.” Works by Rosemary Barrett. November 8-30.

MILLBROOK LIBRARY

THOMAS COLE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

“5 Death Row Portraits.” Paintings by Peter Chaplin. Through November 30.

“Shi Guorui: Ab/Sense-Pre/Sense.” Landscape photographs. Through December 1.

MURROFF KOTLER VISUAL ARTS GALLERY AT SUNY ULSTER

THOMPSON GIROUX GALLERY

NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ

3 FRIENDLY LANE, MILLBROOK

491 COTTEKILL ROAD, STONE RIDGE

2 NORTH WATER STREET, ATHENS

218 SPRING STREET, CATSKILL

57 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM

“Collective Expeditions Art Exhibition.” Olivia Baldwin, Kyle Cottier, Sarah Potter, Elisa Pritzger and Greg Slick. Through December 13.

“Feinberg Giroux Parker Thielen.” Works by Jean Feinberg, Marie-Claude Giroux, Kingsley Parker, and Beth Thielen. Through November 17.

OLIVE FREE LIBRARY

TIVOLI ARTISTS GALLERY

“Requiem for Ashokan, The Story Told in Landscape.” Paintings by Kate McLoughlin. November 16-January 4. Opening reception November 16, 2pm-4pm.

“Melissa Katzman Braggins + Ted Braggins: Ink and Paper and Ceramics.” Through November 17.

ORANGE HALL GALLEY, SUNY ORANGE

68 MOUNTAIN REST ROAD, NEW PALTZ

4033 ROUTE 28A, WEST SHOKAN

24 GRANDVIEW AVENUE, MIDDLETOWN

“Hudson Valley Plein Air Festival.” Juried exhibition. Through November 25.

QUEEN CITY 15

317 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE “From Memory: Paola Bari and Carl Grauer.” November 1-30.

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART 1 HAWK DRIVE, SUNY NEW PALTZ

“Madness in Vegetables: Hudson Valley Artists 2019.” Through December 8. “Tonalism: Pathway from the Hudson River River School to Modern Art.” Through December 8. “The Ukiyo-e Movement: Gems from the Dorksy Museum Collection of Japanese Woodblock Prints.” Through December 8. “Paper Media: Boetti, Calzolari, Kounelis.” Through December 8.

THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA 1946 CAMPUS DRIVE, HYDE PARK

“State of Ate: New York’s History Through 8 Ingredients.” Through December 31.

SHIGEKO KUBOTA AT MOTHER GALLERY Kubota, who was married to Nam June Paik, was one of the key figures in the downtown video art scene of the 1970s. Exhibited at Mother will be works in Kubota’s “Duchampiana” series including her video of Duchamp and John Cage playing Chess. According to curator David A. Ross, there are two meanings to the exhibition title “Restored in Beacon.” First: the goal of the show at Mother Gallery (and that of the Shigeko Kubota Video Art Foundation) is to help re-establish Kubota as a major early innovator of video art. Secondly: the meticulous restoration of her work on view was accomplished by local Beacon artisans Jon Reichert and Kazumi Tanaka. November 2–December 15

60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI

UNISON

“Composed to Decompose.” Through July 31, 2020.

WILLIAMS COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART

15 LAWRENCE HALL DRIVE, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA “Michael Rakoeitz: The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist [Room Z, Northwest Palace of Nimrud].” Through April 19, 2020.

WIRED GALLERY

11 MOHONK ROAD, HIGH FALLS “Reflection.” Featuring works by Scott Michael Ackerman, Michelle Biondolillo-Keessen, Josephine Bloodgood, Damon, Fran Goodwin, Beth Humphrey, Victoria Kari, Sandra Nystrom, Joanne Pagano-Weber, Fran Sutherland, Lynne Tobin, Carl Van Brunt, and Dion Yannatos. November 1-24.

WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION AND MUSEUM 28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK

“Material World.” Through November 24. “Kate Collyer: To Last Frontiers.” Through November 24. “Associate Members Small Works.” Through November 24. “An Artistic Legacy: 1 + 1 + 1.” Through December 29.

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MAYA HAWKE November 7. While she’s popular for her acting roles as Robin in the Netflix series “Stranger Things” and Linda Kasabian in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Maya Hawke— the daughter of Ethan Hawke and Woodstock native Uma Thurman—is also a singer-songwriter. Since 2017 she’s been collaborating with Grammy-winning tunesmith Jesse Harris on a forthcoming album, and as a teaser she recently released a debut single featuring the songs “To Love a Boy” and “Stay Open.” To further hone her Feist-like musical style on stage, Hawke heads to Colony this month. Will Graefe opens. (Sammy Rae & the Friends groove November 14; Lula Wiles land November 20.) 7pm. $15, $20. Woodstock. Colonywoodstock.com. Photo by Savannah Lauren

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live music

GRANDMASTER FLASH Photo by Greg Cannon

November 8. Scratching, backspinning, punch phrasing—the bedrock elements of hip-hop turntablism—begin in the mid-1970s with Grandmaster Flash, the founding leader of rap pioneers Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. While perhaps the most illustrative showcase of the Jamaican-born Bronx DJ’s deft, signature cutting technique is 1981’s “The Adventures of Grandmaster Flash on the Wheels of Steel,” the group’s better-known follow-up hits “The Message” (1982) and “White Lines” (1983) are indelible landmarks of modern music. For this UPAC engagement, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee will present “Hip-Hop: People, Places & Things,” an audiovisual history of the artform he helped create. 7pm. $20. Kingston. Bardavon.org.

YELLOW EYES/FLESH PRISON/MTT LCZK

MOON DUO

November 9. As you wind down late October’s Halloween merriment, how about a devilish dose of black metal with an appetizer of hardcore and noise at the Anchor? Connecticut’s Yellow Eyes are making waves in the UK with their brand of dark, prog-flavored sounds, further citing such influences as Estonian choral music and Norweigan folk fiddling in an interview with British metal magazine Kerrang. Flesh Prison is a New York hardcore outfit whose cassette/digital releases sound suitably raw and tough. Local ambient/drone/noise artist Mtt Lczk kicks off this night of mayhem. (Red Beard Wall, Thunderchief, and Shadow Witch reign November 1; Charlotte Jacobs sings November 16.) 9:30pm. $5. Kingston. Theanchorkingston.com.

November 15. A spinoff of guitarist and vocalist Ripley Johnson’s other band, psychedelic warlords Wooden Shjips, the Portland, Oregon-based Moon Duo shares many of the former band’s spacey influences (e.g., Can, Hawkwind, Silver Apples). Ripley and synth player Sanae Yamada are sometimes joined by a drummer; at the time of this writing it’s not clear if they’ll be in trio or true-duo mode when they drone their way into BSP for their first time there. One thing is clear, however: This will be an evening of hypnotic, pulsing waves that will carry attendees to the outer edges of the universe. Open up and say, “Om.” With Garcia Peoples and Jeffrey Alexander. (Adult Mom and Fresh visit November 7; BSP presents Xlyouris White at the Beverly December 6.) 7pm. $20, $25. Kingston. Bspkingston.com.

PATTY GRIFFIN

CHITA RIVERA

November 12. The list of artists who’ve recorded folksinger Patty Griffin’s affecting and literate songs is staggering: Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris, Solomon Burke, the Dixie Chicks, Shawn Colvin, and Miranda Lambert are a few. But the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter herself, who broke through with 1996’s Living with Ghosts and here headlines Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, is arguably as compelling a performer as any of her songs’ other vessels. Her critically exalted, eponymous 10th album, which appeared last March, was recorded in her current home of Austin, Texas with the assistance of producer and long-time collaborator Craig Ross as well as her sometime partner and tourmate Robert Plant on backing vocals. Rose Cousins opens. 7:30pm. $39.50, $49.50. Troy. Troymusichall.org.

November 16. Interviewing the legendary Chita Rivera last year ahead of the shows she did at Bard College was a high point for your humble arts editor. This month the Broadway icon returns to the region to give two performances within the cozy quarters of Club Helsinki. For each of these solo shows, the Tony Award-winning dynamo will recreate signature moments from her storied career, including numbers from “West Side Story,” “Sweet Charity,” “Chicago,” “Kiss of the Spider Woman,” “Bye, Bye, Birdie,” “The Rink,” and “The Visit.” “Chita Rivera is more than a musical theater star,” writes the Associated Press. “She’s a force of nature.” (Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys alight November 8; Sherry Vine vamps November 17.) 7pm and 9pm. $135. Hudson. Helsinkihudson.com.

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Horoscopes By Lorelai Kude

WISDOM RIPE FOR THE PLUCKING There’s a saying in the Book of Daniel that “the wise will shine like the brightness of heaven,” and that is most true during November, when the wisdom we’ve been accumulating is given the chance not only to shine for ourselves but to be shared with others. This is not the same thing as being a smarty-pants or a know-it-all. This is the hard-earned lifewisdom of those who have loved and lost, those whose hearts have been stretched to the breaking point by giving the last and greatest measure of devotion. This wisdom is neither glib nor superficial and it is in great supply this month during the Sun’s transit through the deep and mysterious realms of Scorpio. This is the month to reach down into the bottomless recesses of the most secret places of your heart and come up with your own, authentic, unmistakably real and impossible-toignore truth. Don’t keep it to yourself. Your personal wisdom, ripe for the plucking, is fruit indeed for those who look to you for emotional and spiritual nourishment. Saturn in Capricorn’s sextile to Neptune in Pisces on November 8 signals confusion around authority and order. From the White House to the kindergarten classroom everybody may be asking: Who’s really in charge here? The Full Moon in Taurus November 12 signals the closing chapter of the denial playbook. The obvious is no longer ignorable. Venus in Sagittarius square Neptune in Pisces November 14 challenges us to differentiate between beautiful fantasies and outright deception. New Moon in Sagittarius November 26 begins a new dreams and adventure cycle. Neptune’s direct station in Pisces on November 27 signals those newborn ideas are ready to move forward. May your wisdom shine like the brightness of heaven, lighting the way for all to see during November!

BODHI YOGA . SPA. SOUL WORK.

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ARIES (March 20–April 19) Mars in romantic Libra through November 18 inspires partnership, but when Mars squares Saturn November 5 you’re challenged to imagine a relationship without hierarchal stratification or conventional boundaries. Can you do that without activating your need to win? Be your bravest self-November 8-9: Fight for what is right, fight fair, and, once Mars enters Scorpio November 19, fight to win. The movement of Mars from Venus-ruled Libra to Mars-ruled Scorpio takes you from romance to passion; by the opposition to Uranus November 24 you discover they aren’t necessarily always the same thing. Discernment is November’s great gift to you.

TAURUS (April 19–May 20) Venus in Sagittarius encourages Bacchanalian behavior and you’re the last one to object until Venus in Capricorn arrives November 25 and must pay the bill. If your resources allow bounty to be shared, do so and with joy. Just don’t go into debt buying party supplies, airplane tickets, and time shares! The Full Moon in Taurus November 12 brings to fruition a life chapter now ready to become your future’s fertilizer. Uranus in Taurus opposite Mars in Scorpio November 24 illuminates a unique, original aspect of yourself which asks to be nurtured and grown, not closeted in deference to conventionality. A practicing, professional astrologer for over 30 years, Lorelai Kude can be reached for questions and personal consultations via email (lorelaikude@yahoo.com) and her Kabbalah-flavored website is Astrolojew.com 108 HOROSCOPES CHRONOGRAM 11/19


Horoscopes

GEMINI (May 20–June 21) Mercury Retrograde in Scorpio through November 20 investigates the deepest secrets of the soul. The dearest of dreams is potential reality when Mercury trine Neptune November 25. Can you nurture a dream and keep a secret? The New Moon in Sagittarius November 26 urges you to both speak your mind and keeping your own counsel. Inspire the respect of others by pointedly not engaging in gossip and demonstrating integrity with your word. An exponential leap of faith is both required and empowered now: The strength and experience you’ve amassed speaks for itself, as do those whose trust you’ve earned.

CANCER (June 21–July 22) November 1 (All Saints Day) and 2 being true to yourself triumphs over tired and trite. What’s good for you is good for everyone in your world at the first Quarter Moon in Aquarius November 4. The Full Moon in Taurus November 12 connects you to your own earth-body and enables embodiment of the great Earth Mother. You’ve been to this rodeo before and you’ve learned to trust your inner child: Let that beautiful youth come out and play at the last Quarter Moon in Leo November 19. The New Moon in inspirational Sagittarius November 26 uplifts and emboldens.

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LEO (July 22–August 23) Leo’s all-powerful ruling planet the Sun in Mars-ruled Scorpio through November 22 empowers your quest for mastery of anything you turn your hand to this month. Your skills and competencies are like knives in a master chef’s kitchen and now is the time to sharpen them! Accountability for resources is important on the Taurus Full Moon November 12. Kick any residual bitterness to the curb: Last Quarter Moon in Leo November 19 prepares you to lead with magnanimity whatever family festivities you have planned. The Sun enters Jupiter-ruled Sagittarius November 22, kicking the joviality quotient up a significant notch.

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VIRGO (August 23–September 23) Someone’s playing True Confessions during Mercury Retrograde in Scorpio through November 20: Is that you or your partner? Or both? Secrets may be revealed, and yours may not be the biggest one. This year, “home for the holidays” may have an entirely new significance. Drops of kindness on your tongue is the best medicine; enlarging your heart for the sake of others is the best exercise. Delight and surprise yourself and others with unusual manifestations of your own original ideas, or your choices when it comes to the company you keep when Mercury trines Neptune November 28. Dream big!

LIBRA (September 23–October 23) Whether you’re flirting with a new person or a new business opportunity, Mars in Venus-ruled Libra through November 19 super-energizes relationship energy. Venus, Libra’s ruling planet, in adventurous Sagittarius through November 25 is less than discriminating about who gets invited to the party. Watch impulsive urges when good time-loving Venus in Sagittarius squares dreamy Neptune in boundary-less Pisces November 14, which is a great day to give a trusted Earth-sign friend custody of your wallet. Permission to play the proverbial field granted until Venus in practical Capricorn November 25 steers towards the safe shores of well-considered, sober choices.

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SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) While the Sun in Scorpio through November 22 you’re comfortably in tune with the cosmic flow. However, other people’s indecisiveness feels like a personal impediment to you while ruling planet Mars transits peace-loving Libra through November 19. Mars enters Scorpio November 19, restoring your natural balance, or at least you’re feeling less likely to allow other people’s problems to become overriding factors in your personal decision-making. Rethink attachments to transitive personal possessions on the Taurus Full Moon November 12; if you must let go of some of them at the Mars-Uranus opposition November 24, best to have detached in advance.

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 22) Ruling-planet Jupiter is finishing up his final month in Sagittarius during November and really wants to go out with a bang, not a whimper. Can you stand the noise? Does it sound like a huge, cheering crowd? You deserve the accolades and shine the brightest November 24, when Venus conjuncts Jupiter—right before the New Moon in Sagittarius November 26. All the energy you’ve invested into making that great leap forward during the past year is paying off now. Gather the harvest of your efforts: You’ll be living off this well-earned bounty for some time to come.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 20) Confusion around boundaries and who’s who in terms of authority and chain of command may muddle things around November 8, with Saturn’s sextile to Neptune in Pisces. The Taurus Full Moon November 12 invites you to ground yourself and embody calm, loving patience. Equilibrium and equanimity are restored by November 25 with Venus’s entry into Capricorn; originality, brilliance, and unique ideas which are also practical, scalable and repeatable reign when Venus in Capricorn trines Uranus in Taurus on November 28. You may be about to manifest your own great idea or a real-world miracle in an entirely non-supernatural way!

AQUARIUS (January 20–February 19)

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First Quarter Moon in Aquarius November 4 starts a new personal growth cycle. The seeds you plant this month have a long gestation period, but the spectacular display of maturity and wisdom at the end of the process is a full flowering well worth waiting for. The saying “bloom where you are planted” is true, but you do have a choice about where to plant yourself now. Where is the best soil for you? What nutrients will yield the optimum results? A detailed diagnostic evaluation of your deepest needs for a prosperous and sustainable future is possible now.

PISCES (February 20-March 19)

AGES 7-17

110 HOROSCOPES CHRONOGRAM 11/19

Ruling planet Neptune stations direct November 27 after his rather tedious retrograde since mid-June. Time to clean up vagaries and tidy the remnants of fanciful digressions. Promises made must be counterbalanced by promises kept: The universe has been keeping score even if you’ve lost count. Dreams are ready to move forward, now that they’ve been vetted for sustainability November 5-7. Saturn’s sextile to Neptune November 8 insists on clarifying confusion around shared ideas or who takes credit for what brilliant idea in the workplace. Venus’s square to Neptune November 14 challenges you to exchange the frivolous for the inspirational.


Ad Index

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11 Jane Street, Saugerties . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Gunk Haus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Primrose Hill School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

A & P Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Harney & Sons Fine Teas . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Pussyfoot Lodge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

The Abode of the Message . . . . . . . . . . . 53

Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School . . . . . . . 53

Putnam County Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Adams Fairacre Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

HCD, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Quattros Poultry Farm & Market . . . . . . . . 26

Alora Laser Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Health Quest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . back cover

Red Hook Curry House . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Aqua Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Helsinki Hudson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Red Mannequin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Ari Rosen - Stone Ridge Healing Arts . . . . . 18

Heritage Food and Drink . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Redeemer New Paltz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Arrowood Farm Brewery . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Herrington’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Ridgeline Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

B-Side Grill & Burrito Burrito . . . . . . . . . . 66

The Herwood Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Rocket Number Nine Records . . . . . . . . . 90

The Bakery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

The Rodney Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Bard College at Simon’s Rock . . . . . . . . . 54

Holistic Natural Medicine: Integrative Healing Arts . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Bardavon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Hotchkiss School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Rosendale Theater Collective . . . . . . . . . . 98

Beacon Natural Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

The Hudson Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Runa Bistro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Hudson Valley Properties . . . . . . . . . . 10

Hudson Hills Montessori School . . . . . . . . 54

Salix Intimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Hudson Valley Cancer Genetics . . . . . . . . 52

Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art . . . . . . . . . 96

The Birch School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

Hudson Valley Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Schatzi’s New Paltz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Bistro To Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Hudson Valley Goldsmith . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Schatzi’s Poughkeepsie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Blackcreek Mercantile & Trading Co. . . . . . . 24

Hummingbird Jewelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

School of Practical Philosophy . . . . . . . . . 10

Bliss Kitchen & Wellness Center . . . . . . . . 39

HV Phone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Stacie Flint Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Bodhi Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Imperial Guitar & Soundworks . . . . . . . . . 69

Stamell String Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Bop to Tottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Ingrained Building Concepts . . . . . . . . . . 48

Suffern Chamber of Commerce . . . . . . . . . 59

Buns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

J McManus & Sons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Sunflower Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Jack’s Meats & Deli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

SUNY New Paltz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Cabinet Designers, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Jacobowitz & Gubits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Third Eye Associates Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Cafe Mio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Jebah Baum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Traditions at Red Hook . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Cassandra Currie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

John A Alvarez and Sons . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Transcend Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Catskill Case Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

John Carroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Tuthilltown Spirits, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Catskill Mountain Foundation . . . . . . . . . . 96

Kaatsbaan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Unison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Clarkson University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Kary Broffman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Upstate Films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Clemson Brewing Company . . . . . . . . . . 66

Kasuri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Uptown Kingston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Clinton Shops Antique Center . . . . . . . . . 48

Kingston Consignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Valentina Custom Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

CO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

Kol Hai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Van Deusen House Antiques . . . . . . . . . . 26

Columbia County Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Living Arts Apprenticeship Program . . . . . . 96

Vegetalien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Columbia Memorial Health . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Liza Phillips Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Wallace and Feldman Insurance . . . . . . . . 30

The Country Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Love Apple Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Wallkill View Farm Market . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Crisp Architects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

The Luminous Heart Center . . . . . . . . . . . 52

WAMC - The Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Daily Planet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Manitou School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 55

Warren Kitchen & Cutlery . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Darkside Records & Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Marbled Meat Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

WDST 100.1 Radio Woodstock . . . . . . . . . 98

Daryls House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Mark Gruber Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Wild Earth Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

de Marchin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

The Masterpiece Massage . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Wildfire Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Dia: Beacon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Diamond Car Wash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Mid Hudson Regional Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inside back cover

Williams Lumber & Home Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inside front cover

Doane Stuart School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Mohonk Mountain House . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Wimowe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Douglas Elliman Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . 45

Montano’s Shoe Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Woodland Pond at New Paltz . . . . . . . . . .

Dreaming Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Mountain Laurel Waldorf School . . . . . . . . 66

Woods & Meadow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

The Falcon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Movement Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Woodstock Art Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Fall Kill Creative Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

My Cleaning Ladies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild . . . . . . . . . . . 96

Family of Woodstock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

N&S Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Fionn Reilly Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

NP Rock Yoga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Fisher Center at Bard College . . . . . . . . . 13

Olive Free Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Fluff Alpaca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Original Vinyl Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Frost Valley YMCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Orvis Sandanona Company . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Fuchsia Tiki Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

The Pandorica Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Gadaleto’s Seafood Market & Restaurant . . . 66

Parish Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Gardens at Rhinebeck . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

Pegasus Comfort Footwear . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Garrison Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Pet Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Glenn’s Wood Sheds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Peter Aaron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Green Cottage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Poughkeepsie Day School . . . . . . . . . . . 18

2

The Roost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

1

Woodstock Healing Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 YMCA of Kingston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Chronogram November 2019 (ISSN 1940-1280) Chronogram is published monthly for $100 per year by Luminary Publishing, Inc. 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401. Periodicals postage pending at Kingston, NY, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chronogram, 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401.

11/19 CHRONOGRAM AD INDEX 111


parting shot

Photo by Marco Valmarana

In the lagoon of Venice there’s a flash of color: groups of sailboats, all flying red sails. The red hues of the sails blend, and when reflected on the blue water, green hues become visible. This is the Red Regatta project of Beacon-based artist Melissa McGill. (Chronogram readers may remember McGill’s 2017 installation around Bannerman Castle, Constellation.) McGill choreographed the four Red Regatta events from May to September 2019 with the Associzaione Vela al Terzo Venezia, the Venetian yacht club. Each regatta was in a separate lagoon, and McGill and her team directed the 52 sailboats with radios. The regattas were comprised of traditional vela al terzo sailboats, each sporting handpainted red sails in shades that McGill developed herself in her studio. Overall, it took two years to complete, with the help of co-organizer Magazzino Italian Art in Cold Spring. McGill has a long personal history with Venice, which has been struggling recently: Predictions say that Venice may be underwater by 2100, and increasing tourism threatens to overwhelm normal Venetian life. “I have seen the city change dramatically over that time, and was inspired to create a vibrant artwork aiming to unite Venetians and visitors to celebrate the cultural and maritime history of the city, and call attention to the forces of climate change and mass tourism that threaten its future,” says McGill. —Claudia Larsen Photo by Jonathan Hoare

112 PARTING SHOT CHRONOGRAM 11/19


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