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Imagine thethe Imagine POSSIBILITIES POSSIBILITIES

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Lumber & Home Centers

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www.williamslumber.com

845-876-WOOD


Cosmetic Dentistry ■ Restorative Dentistry ■ General Dentistry ■ Implant Dentistry ■

A Passion for Excellence

www.TischlerDental.com Tischler Dental is one of only 7 dental offices in the US that are listed as "Leading Dental Centers of The World"

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EXPERIENCED DENTAL TEAM Our dental team has received numerous awards, titles and national recognitions for their commitment to exceptional care.

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10,000 sq. ft, custom designed, award-winning facility. We are a destination-dental facility and provide the utmost in concierge services for patients traveling from out of town.

Serving the Hudson Valley, our general dental, cosmetic, implant and sedation based dentistry practice offers the pinnacle of excellence in dental care. We can address a variety of dental concerns to improve both the health and appearance of your smile. We are conveniently located in the heart of the Hudson Valley in beautiful Woodstock, New York, less than two hours from New York City. If you are traveling from out of town, we provide all the assistance you need to get here. Destination Tischler Dental is at your service! At Tischler Dental, our dentists create customized treatment plans tailored to our patients’ specific needs, including sedation “sleep” dentistry for patients who are apprehensive. Contact us today to see how we can help you.

■ TEACHING CENTER

We frequently offer on-site seminars teaching about the latest advancements in dental technology.

845.679.3706 121 Rt. 375 Woodstock, NY 12498

6/15 CHRONOGRAM 1


Atlantic Custom Homes, Inc. 2785 Route 9 - P.O. Box 246 Cold Spring, NY 10516 Tel: 845.265.2636

Independent Distributor

E-mail: Info@LindalNY.com www.LindalNY.com www.HudsonValleyCedarHomes.com

Turkel Design for Lindal Cedar Homes - TD3 2340

CUSTOM HOMES

2 CHRONOGRAM 6/15

PREDICTABLE

WARM

MODERN

GREEN

QUALITY

INSPIRATION

SEMINARS


Vassar is one of the top cardiac care providers in New York State, with many critical services no other hospital in the region can offer. Don’t leave it to chance. Make it a choice. Find out more at TakeMeToVassar.org

“Take me to Vassar.”

6/15 CHRONOGRAM 3


a year ago

we started

something big. now it’s even

bigger. It’s been quite a year for us at MidHudson Regional Hospital. We have expanded services, improved technology

and made advances in the way we care for our community.

We are proud to announce the next evolution of care. We are now part of the new Westchester Medical Center Health Network. As the only comprehensive network born right here in the Hudson Valley, we’re bringing together the expertise of 2,800 physicians, over 250 community health partners and seven hospitals. All to provide you even more coordinated and integrated care. Together, we are advancing care. Here. To find out more, visit wmchealth.org.

westchestermedicalcenter.com/mhrh Westchester Medical center i Maria Fareri children’s hospital i Midhudson regional hospital good saMaritan hospital i Bon secours coMMunity hospital i st. anthony coMMunity hospital i Behavioral health center

4 CHRONOGRAM 6/15


7/15 CHRONOGRAM 5


ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

CONTENTS 7/15

VIEW FROM THE TOP

KIDS & FAMILY

14 ON THE COVER

50 TENTS & TANTRUMS

Carolita Johnson’s feminist cartoon alter-ego, Oscarina, quips didactic rebukes.

16 ESTEEMED READER Jason Stern fixes a flat, locates the inner lives of kids, and keeps a secret.

19 EDITOR’S NOTE Brian K. Mahoney and his wife keep their Summer Solstice sunset tradition alive.

NEWS AND POLITICS 22 WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING Nebraska bans the death penalty, airlines air meditation videos, and more.

COMMUNITY PAGES 24 BLACK DIRT BEAUTIES From farms to families, billiards to booze, Warwick is sleek and unique.

CONTINUING EDUCATION 54 HORIZON EXPANSION 101

23 BEINHART’S BODY POLITIC Larry Beinhart on the tipping scales that weigh public education against economic inequality.

Hillary Harvey breaks down a survival guide for festival-bound families.

The Hudson Valley places first in secondary education, from traditional graduate and undergraduate degrees to alternative college curriculums.

FOOD & DRINK 74 THE FEAST AT YOUR FEET

WELL-SPENT: SHOPPING

34 THE SUMMER FUN EDITION

WHOLE LIVING

Swimming, barbecues, camping, lawn games, picnics—we found the best gear for wherever the summer takes you.

HOME & GARDEN 38 HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS: ONE MILE

Eddie Mullins and Janet Hicks’ edgy art-laden abode at One Mile Gallery .

44 WHAT WE LEARN FROM PUBLIC GARDENS

Michelle Sutton finds respite in public horticulture.

6

40

Eve Fox finds free food, with three wild edibles to forage for this month.

86 SISTER HEALER

Wendy Kagan sits down with doctor-turned-Buddhist-nun Sister Dang Nghiem to discuss joy, meditation, and the art of being sick.

COMMUNITY RESOURCE GUIDE 79 TASTINGS A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 83 BUSINESS DIRECTORY A compendium of advertiser services. 90 WHOLE LIVING Opportunities to nurture mind, body, and soul.

The Who’s 1964/64 stage set in felt by Seja Vogel, in the home of Eddie Mullins and Janet Hicks.

HOME & GARDEN

6 CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Deborah DeGraffenreid

Chronogram


2015

BARDSUMMERSCAPE AUGUST

JUNE

25- 16

EVERYTHING BY MY SIDE

Seven actresses in seven white beds whisper vivid childhood memories to individual audience members among the midsummer trees. This dreamlike performance is the creation of celebrated Argentinean artist Fernando Rubio. July 9–12

THE WRECKERS

The American stage premiere of Ethel Smyth’s compelling, majestic opera depicts the consequences of murder, betrayal, and love, framed by a powerful display of orchestral writing and a brilliant use of chorus. July 24 – August 2

THE SPIEGELTENT Each weekend, host Justin Vivian Bond welcomes you to a realm of sophistication, spectacle, and glamour, in the company of world-class performers, musicians, and DJs. July 2 – August 15

MUSIC

This summer, director Daniel Fish (Rocket to the Moon, SummerScape 2005) creates a boldly intimate chamber production of this beloved musical classic . June 25 – July 19

Ethel Smyth’s

26th Season

BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL CHÁVEZ AND HIS WORLD This year, the Bard Music Festival turns to Latin America, exploring the musical world of Carlos Chávez, the most eminent Latin American modernist composer. August 7–9 and 13–16

FILM SERIES

OKLAHOMA!

OPERA

Rodgers & Hammerstein’s

CABARET

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

REINVENTING MEXICO

The SummerScape 2015 Film Series explores the relationship between realism, modernism, and nationalism in films from and about Mexico. July 11 – August 2

TICKETS START AT $25 | 845-758-7900 | FISHERCENTER.BARD.EDU Photo: The Sources of Country Music, Thomas Hart Benton, Courtesy of Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum; Louis Otey as Pascoe, Photo by Todd Norwood; Carlos Chávez, Photo by Carl Van Vechten; Everything By My Side, Maria Baranova; Spiegeltent, Photo by Cory Weaver; Burt Lancaster and Gary Cooper in Vera Cruz, United Artists/Photofest.

7/15 CHRONOGRAM 7


Chronogram ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

CONTENTS 7/15

ARTS & CULTURE

THE FORECAST

60 GALLERY & MUSEUM GUIDE

94 DAILY CALENDAR

64 MUSIC: BAD MOON RISING

Ambrosia Parsley traces her path from the cinematic success of “Goodnight Moon,” to her debut solo album, Weeping Cherry. Nightlife Highlights include Pink Martini, Swirlies, The Figgs Record Release Show, and Beacon Jazz Festival. Reviews of Homecoming by Bruce Katz Band; Brand New Day by Donna Lewis; and Falling Up by Rich Rosenthal.

68 BOOKS: CHARACTER STUDIES

Books Editor Nina Shengold sits down with musical matriarch Mary Louise Wilson to discuss her memoir, My First Hundred Years in Show Business.

70 BOOK REVIEWS Mikhail Horowitz reviews Mashi: The Unfulfilled Baseball Dreams of Masanori Murakami, The First Japanese Major Leaguer by Robert K. Fritts. Anne Pyburn Craig reviews Throne of Darkness by Douglas Nicholas.

72 POETRY Poems by Becca Hamilton Andre, Alden Burke, Laurie Byro, Ruth Dinerman, Therese Fischer, Alex Hochberg, Demetrios Michael Houtrides, Ada Johnston, Nick Magnanti, Susan Pittman, Jess Ptak, Judith Saunders, Barbara Sheffer, and Shane M. Thompson. Edited by Phillip X Levine.

120 PARTING SHOT Patriotic paintings by Richard Pantell show the Americanized human form.

68

Mary Louise Wilson under a hand-stenciled Saul Steinberg drawing. BOOKS

8 CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Comprehensive listings of local events. (Daily updates at Chronogram.com.) PREVIEWS 93 “The Wrecking Crew,” by Ethyl Smith is the first Bard Summerscape opera written by a woman. 95 Richard Thompson's four-day musical retreat, Frets and Refrains, returns for a fifth year with master classes. 97 The New Pornographers perform at Bearsville Theater on July 9. 98 Random House hops Off the Page at Basilica Hudson on July 11. 99 Icarus Meet Apollo is on display at Art Omi through September 27. 100 PianoSummer returns to SUNY New Paltz from July 11 through July 31. 101 The celebrated Powerhouse Theater returns to Vassar College for the summer. 102 The Annual Monastery Vinegar Festival is held July 11 and July 12. 104 The self-guided Phoenicia Art Studio Tour takes placec from July 17 to July 19. 108 CATCH Takes the Hudson brings the intentionally unorthodox to the Valley. 110 The Wassaic Project brings three days of psychedelic music and art to the Hudson Valley at the end of the month.

PLANET WAVES 114 KNOW WHEN YOU DON’T KNOW

Eric Francis Coppolino discusses the importance of admitting what you don’t know and cultivating curiousity.

116 HOROSCOPES

What are the stars telling us? Eric Francis Coppolino knows.


1 TAKE THE PLEDGE

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A program of:

DO YOU HAVE A LOCAL INDEPENDENT BUSINESS? Find out more about GO LOCAL Hudson Valley at 845-790-8110 or hello@rethinklocal.org

6/15 CHRONOGRAM 9


INTERNATIONAL DANCE CENTER TIVOLI NY

KAATSBAAN

the Hudson Valley’s cultural park for DANCE Celebrating 16 years of dance education -

Extreme Ballet ®

EDITORIAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Perry dperry@chronogram.com BOOKS EDITOR Nina Shengold books@chronogram.com HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR Wendy Kagan wholeliving@chronogram.com

The Kaatsbaan Academy of Dance training the next generation of dance professionals

POETRY EDITOR Phillip X Levine poetry@chronogram.com MUSIC EDITOR Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com KIDS & FAMILY EDITOR Hillary Harvey kidsandfamily@chronogram.com DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL STRATEGY Teal Hutton teal@chronogram.com EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Kelly Seiz EDITORIAL INTERNS Jessica Jones, Jake Swain PROOFREADERS Lee Anne Albritton, Barbara Ross CONTRIBUTORS Larry Beinhart, Stephen Blauweiss, Eric Francis Coppolino, Anne Pyburn Craig, Larry Decker, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Eve Fox, Mikhail Harowitz, Annie Internicola, Asako Kitaori, Jana Martin, Fionn Reilly, Sparrow, Michelle Sutton, Jesse Turnquist, Lynn Woods

PUBLISHING Professional performances creative/work residencies black-box dance theater large studios and housing for 40 dancers on a bucolic 153-acre site

WWW.KAATSBAAN.ORG

Gregory Cary

Kevin McKenzie Bentley Roton founders

FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky CEO Amara Projansky amara@chronogram.com PUBLISHER Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com CHAIRMAN David Dell Chronogram is a project of Luminary Publishing

Martine van Hamel

photo: Cynthia DelConte/Extreme Ballet

Inner exercises / Group Work / Movements

ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR OF PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT & SALES Julian Lesser jlesser@chronogram.com DIRECTOR, SPECIAL PROJECT SALES Maryellen Case mcase@chronogram.com

Gurdjieff’s Teaching:

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Mario Torchio mtorchio@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Robert Pina rpina@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Anne Wygal awygal@chronogram.com SALES ASSOCIATE Nicole Hitner nhitner@chronogram.com SALES & MARKETING INTERN Alex Simeoforides ADMINISTRATIVE

An ApproAch to Inner Work

BUSINESS MANAGER Peter Martin office@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107

Gurdjieff’s teaching, or the Fourth Way, is a way of developing attention and presence in the midst of a busy life. Each person’s unique circumstances provide the ideal conditions for the quickest progress on the path of awakening.

MARKETING & EVENTS COORDINATOR Samantha Liotta sliotta@chronogram.com

Using practical inner exercises and tools for self-study, the work of self-remembering puts us in contact with the abundant richness of Being.

MARKETING & EVENTS INTERN Laney Taliaferro PRODUCTION PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Daria Erdosy daria@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 PRODUCTION DESIGNERS Kerry Tinger, Mosa Tanksley OFFICE 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 | (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

MISSION

Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Luminary Publishing 2015.

Meetings at Kleinert Gallery, Woodstock NY For information call 845/527-6205 Woodstock www.GurdjieffBeing.com / NYC www.GurdjieffBennettnYc.com

10 CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Meetings at Kleinert Gallery, Woodstock NY

SUBMISSIONS For information call 845/527-6205

To submit listings, visit Chronogram.com/submitevent Woodstock CALENDAR www.GurdjieffBeing.com / NYC www.GurdjieffBennettnYc.com or e-mail events@chronogram.com. Deadline: July 15.


l a u n n A 3rd

2 Whole Blocks! Wall Street between Main & North Front Streets

STREET PERFORMERS AND MORE!

ANNA REXIA AND FRIENDS THE MANDALIAHS

Saturday

AUGUST 15 Kingston 4 - 1 1 P M

DUNKING BOOTH To benefit Ulster County SPCA FOOD TRUCKS

AFTER HOURS DANCE PARTY Featuring DJ Dave Leonard of JTD Productions

BEER & WINE GARDEN

BSP Kingston • 11pm-2am

DIY ART TENT Sponsored by Catskill Art & Office Supply BIKE VALET PARKING by Kingston Land Trust

ChronogramBlockParty.com | #ChronogramBlockParty

POP-UP MARKET • 5-9PM

Live Music

Wall Street between Main & John Streets

SIMI STONE • UPSTATE RUBDOWN • CAROLINE ROSE Shadowland Theatre presents the cast of “Woody Guthrie's American Song”

SPONSORED BY

6/15 CHRONOGRAM 11


12 CHRONOGRAM 6/15


ARTSCENE TV

Warren Kitchen & Cutlery’s

Summer Sale. The lowest prices of the year on everything for the kitchen!

Professional cutlery from around the world • Cookware Bakeware • Grilling tools • Glassware and Barware Kitchen Appliances • Serving pieces and accessories Coffee makers • Unique kitchen gadgets

A Conversation with Filmmaker Stephen Blauweiss Each month, filmmaker Stephen Blauweiss produces “ArtScene,” a monthly video web series with short segments on artists, galleries, and museums in the Hudson Valley. Check it out at Chronogram.com/TV. As told to Kelly Seiz

Videofreex

Guerilla Filmmakers

This major retrospective at the Dorsky Museum [closing July 12] was my first introduction to this pioneer Each month, filmmaker Stephen Blauweiss produces “ArtScene.” our monthly video web series with short segments on artists, galleries and museums in the Hudson Valley. Check it out at Chronogram. com/TV. ing video group. As someone involved in film for over 30 years, it was really exciting to learn about the political protest work they were doing in the `60s and early `70s, especially at this moment in time, with video so ubiquitous on YouTube and other various venues. It’s so interesting to have context from this group that pioneered the medium 40 years ago.They’re an important missing link in the evolution of video.

The Hudson Valley’s best selection of fine cutlery, professional cookware, appliances, serving pieces and kitchen tools.

Ze’ev Willy Neumann

Blacksmithing/Metalwork School

SUMMER AR SA -YE

FIVE DAY S

SAVIN%GS

UP TO

50

Y 15 THR JUL OU

Center for Metal Arts

~ LE

~

Ze’ev Willy Neumann is a conceptual wood sculptor who combined a year and a half of labor and 40 sheets of plywood to create The Love Knot, a twosculpture project in which he built two identical loveseats, one in Woodstock and one in Saugerties, meant to bring the two towns closer together. He has an event at the Saugerties Farmers’ Market coming up on July 25 called “Interchangeable Sculpture Show.”

OFF

19 ~ ONCE-A GH

Sculptor

Wednesday through Sunday • Expert sharpening on premises. • Great gifts for anyone who loves to cook or entertain. • Gift wrapping available.

The Center for Metal Arts is located in a beautiful old barnlike structure in the Orange County hamlet of Florida, where they teach blacksmithing and metalwork, crafting everything from jewelry to tools. It was really fun to go there and see their work in action, shaping the metal and firing the furnace, especially in this day and age. For someone who works so much on a computer, to see all of this hands-on artistry was really refreshing.

On The Cover Carolita Johnson: Cartoonist

Carolita Johnson, the latest Big Apple escapee and Hudson Valley newcomer, is a cartoonist for the NewYorker and has her own comic web series called “Oscarina.” The ongoing feminist cartoon project follows the main character as she addresses everyday inequality in her daily life. She and her husband / fellow cartoonist, Michael Crawford, have an upcoming show on July 11 at the Anvil Gallery at Tech Smiths in Kingston. Sponsored by:

6934 Route 9 Rhinebeck, NY 12572 Just north of the 9G intersection 845-876-6208 Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30, Sun 11–4:30

CHRONOGRAM.COM

Visit us on the web, or order on-line, at www.warrenkitchentools.com

WATCH ArtScene TV featuring Videofreex, Ze’ev Willy Neumann, Center for Metal Arts and Carolita Johnson.

7/15 CHRONOGRAM 13


SPACIOUS

ON THE COVER

NEW MODELS VIEW OUR FLOOR PLANS NOW

WITH LIMITED TIME PRE-CONSTRUCTION PRICING

From the low

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Call for an appointment to view our new 2 and 3 bedroom Townhome Floor Plans with optional finished basement and reserve your new home for early Fall occupancy. Or take advantage of our Closeout Sale and choose from among our remaining 2 bedroom-2 bath Townhomes in the current section of our exciting community. Now is the time to visit River Ridge, a hidden gem along the Hudson with unparalleled views of the river in historic Hyde Park, and select your new home. Start living the life you deserve.

Clubhouse is under construction and will be open this Summer!

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14 CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Dollar Carolita Johnson | ink on paper | 24” x 30” | 2012

Growing up in Queens, Carolita Johnson was oblivious to everything. Politics existed in the periphery, and drawing was a hobby best executed in Bic pen on computer paper. Now a cartoonist who regularly publishes in the New Yorker, Johnson has graduated to India ink and a Hunt nib on heavy bond paper. “I’m one of those people who buy pads of paper and then I’m afraid to waste them, so I have tons of unused pads! Oscarina gave me a chance to finally use some.” Oscarina, our July cover girl, was born in April 2011. She’s Johnson alterego, a pissed-off trailblazer bent on destroying the patriarchy with each sharp rebuke. Johnson decided to draw Oscarina as a young girl because she similarly noticed injustices in the world from an early age. It was after living in Paris for 13 years, attending women’s studies and sociology courses, that Johnson worked up the nerve to open her mouth and say something. “That’s me, I pipe up. All the time. If I were born in a different era, I’d probably be put away, either in a mental hospital or jail, or burned at the stake just for being annoying,” says Johnson. There are no Oscarina cartoons directly addressing what Johnson views as a lax, unsatisfying education system in the US. Education is the substratum of Oscarina; the perpetually scowling, pig-tailed little girl is Johnson’s sounding board for sharing what she has learned with the public. A large portion of Oscarina’s upset came out of the 2012 presidential election, which Johnson says she found “frightening and disgusting.” Oscarina swatted at Republicans and pointed angry fingers in their faces, but was left largely to pulling her pigtails in vexation. “When something bugs me, or when a funny thought crosses my mind, combine that with time, paper and pen, and you have a cartoon,” Johnson says. Humor is a principal component of Oscarina. Johnson believes that “if its funny, people will talk about it, bring it up at the bar, at work, on the bus, and spread the word.” Anvil Gallery at Tech Smiths in Kingston is showing Johnson’s favorite Oscarina cartoons, including Dollar, alongside fellow NewYorker cartoonist Michael Crawford’s paintings. The show will be exhibited July 11 through September 30. An opening reception is being held on Saturday, July 11 from 6 to 8 pm. Carolita.org —Jessica Jones CHRONOGRAM.COM WATCH a short film by Stephen Blauweiss about Mike Cockrill and his work.


LOCAL

BREWERY OMMEGANG SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

RE>THINK & HV Current CO>MIX starting at the Creative Co-op in Rosendale Thursday, July 16th 6:00-9:00PM 402 Main Street Rosendale, NY 12472 $5 members $10 non members Includes local food & drinks rethinklocal.org/events

STURGILL OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW W/SIMPSON

DECEMBERISTS

W/ LUCIUS

PRIMUS W/ DINOSAUR JR + GHOST OF A SABER TOOTH TIGER BONNIE RAITT W/ RICHARD JULIAN BRAND NEW

W/ THE FRONT BOTTOMS + KEVIN DEVINE AND THE GODDAMN BAND

BRAND NEW

W/ MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA + KEVIN DEVINE AND THE GODDAMN BAND TICKETS: DANSMALLSPRESENTS.COM, THE BREWERY OMMENGANG STORE, THE GREEN TOAD (ONEONTA), & THE STATE THEATRE BOX OFFICE (ITHACA)

LOCAL ‘s

A full-service veterinary medical facility, located in Kingston, in the Hudson Valley, New York. Dr. Todd Banister and the professional and courteous staff at Hoppenstedt Veterinary Hospital seek to provide the best possible care for Dogs, Cats, Exotic pets, Pocket pets, or any other house pet.

Summer Special HALF PRICE VETERINARIAN SUPERVISED BOARDING DISCOUNTED VETERINARIAN SUPERVISED GROOMING (Good through Labor Day)

PASSENTI

3040 Route 32 South, Kingston, NY (845) 331-1050

Copeland Funeral Home, Inc. A community resource that is dedicated to excellence in service and built on quality, sincerity, and trust.

• 162 South Putt Corners Rd New Paltz, NY 12561 (845)255-1212

copelandfhnp.com

OCT 2-4, 2015 A Celebration of Fine Craft, Art, Music, Food & More! Dutchess County Fairgrounds

www.artrider.com 7/15 CHRONOGRAM 15


ESTEEMED READER

WHAT’S AHEAD AT OMEGA July 12–17

Raylene Abbott and Alok Hsu Kwang-han Zen artists

July 17–19

Wisdom of Master Yogis

With Tao Porchon-Lynch, Madan Bali, and Lilias Folan

July 17–19

Seana Lowe Steffen

Founder of Restorative Leadership™ Institute

July 19–24

Carl Big Heart and Stephanie Flanders

Teachers of transformative ceremony

July 24–26

Tama Kieves

Award-winning career coach

July 26–31 Joe Cross

Creator and star of Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead

July 26–31

David Wilcox and Beth Nielsen Chapman Celebrated singer-songwriters

July 31–August 2 Joel Glanzberg

Seasoned permaculturalist

Explore creativity with a beginner’s mind

A revitalizing gathering with three yoga legends

Take a leadership leap with the art of trapeze

Embrace the sacred in everyday life

Create the work and life you love

Juice your way to personal transformation

Learn to write songs from the heart

Discover patterns in the living landscape

You’ll find these and more than 300 diverse and innovative workshops, conferences, and professional training opportunities on Omega’s 250+ acre campus in Rhinebeck, New York.

OMEGA RHINEBECK, NY

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16 CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Life is too short to take on the unnecessary. —Robert Fripp Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: Three things happened recently, events that are woven together in my being as a braided matrix. I can share two of these trials, and the third must remain a secret, as is only lawful. First:The Flat Tire “What was that noise?” a passenger asked from the back seat. No one could identify the loud bang, until a few minutes later when an unmistakable flubbering sound began to emit from the right rear of the car. We had a flat tire. The realization struck like an electric shock. A flat tire has a commensurate effect on one’s state—going along with taken-for-granted buoyancy, then pop, instantaneous deflation, followed by a full stop. At the time of the flat tire, I was on schedule for an appointment later in the evening, and had very little time to spare. I cursed, in German—“Scheisse!”—and then I realized the perfection of the event for staying collected. There was an inner pause, and an image arose, a picture of a Formula One pit crew springing into action. I knew where everything was—spare tire, wrench, jack—and went to it, sensing my body as I efficiently moved to the task. A passenger held the flashlight to illuminate the work in the cool darkness of the evening. I placed the jack and began to lift the car. In ten minutes, the flat tire was replaced with the spare and and we were driving again; a perfect answer to an unexpected question. I noticed an enlivening effect in myself, a focused concentration in these moments of apparently debilitating challenge. A flat tire is not a thing that anyone would wish for, and yet I found myself enjoying the occasion presenting an immediate need and requiring an immediate response. It evoked a balanced inner state of poise in which every thought, feeling, and action were directed to a singular purpose. Second:The Inner Life of Children What is your inner life? This is the question I posed to a group of 2nd graders.They were a bright, intelligent, and interested group of nine children, sitting before me in a circle on the floor of their classroom. Their drawings of saints from several traditions—the theme of their studies for the year—surrounded us on the walls, along with verses and poems, and crocheted and knitted handwork completed and in progress around the room. I had been invited to teach the children meditation. Meditation—because they had been studying saints, and the practice was one that those who attained the category of sainthood had most in common. “What is your inner life?” I asked them. And they began to raise their hands, as schoolchildren are trained to do, with answers at the ready: “It’s love; It’s my thoughts; It’s when I really want a cookie; It’s when I am looking at my mom, and she’s looking at me, it’s like we have a secret , but neither one of us needs to say what it is…” were some of the things they said. I loved these answers, which said they saw their thoughts and emotions as inner events, and they were all true, and I also saw I way to invite them into another kind of perception. “Take a look at your hand—the one you’ve been raising when you have an answer,” I suggested. “Do you see you hand?” “Yes,” they answered. “Now, can you sense your hand from the inside, at the same time as you’re looking at it?” There were a few moments of silence, and soon some exclaimed, “Yes!” as it dawned on them that they could both see their hands and sense them at the same time. For others, the experience was less available. “Try this,” I suggested, “look really hard at your hand, focus on it… now look at and sense just your thumb… now your pointer finger… now your middle finger” and so on, until they put their attention on each finger, and then the front and back of the palm. “Now can you sense your hand?” I asked them, having completed this brief exercise with attention and awareness. “Yes!” they all shouted, without raising their hands. A final question remained. “If you can see your hand, and you can sense you hand, who is the one that is seeing and sensing?” We left the conversation there to attempt to meditate. Like a shoreline between the land and sea, the boundary between inner and outer experience came into focus. The inquiry invoked a larger question: Can we live in two worlds at once, or even three? Third:The Train Doesn’t Stop at This Station All I can say about this is to quote the teacher J.G. Bennett—“The voice of the reconciling force is silence; the action of the reconciling force is silence.” —Jason Stern


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LETTERS The Feminine Vernacular To the Editor: On page 114, in the June 15, 2015, issue of Chronogram, a wonderful magazine I must say, I read a review of the sci-fi film Ex Machina. I would first like to point out that the review (written by a man) was about a film that was written and directed by a man; and secondly that the film was about a man who is seduced by a female robot; a female robot that has been programmed with the male employee’s sexual preferences. Sexual predilections acquired through nefarious means of privacy intrusion when the employee was on the Internet. Is this every guy’s dream? Or every geek’s dream? To have a female programmed to his personal and specific likes and dislikes? I suspect that might be the case. Does this film (or even this review) apply to females? Is the world around the reviewer, which the reviewer creates quite clearly, in his article “Life With and Within the Robot,” a world seen primarily through male eyes? Yes it is. And therefore, it doesn’t equate or transfer or translate equally into the female vernacular. Think about that in reverse. A brainy, computer-talented, female employee is singled out by a genius-Geek female employer who is rich and powerful, who lives and works in a magnificent hideaway where, by spying and collecting data on what the female employee views (when said employee goes onto the Internet), the employer has created and programmed a handsome male robot out of the specific sexual likes and dislikes of the female employee. And then the male robot does its version of the Free Willy thing, leaving the female to die. How does that sit as a translation that would be acceptable by a major film studio, such as Disney? I adore sci-fi! Lets be clear about that, I will take it any which way it comes, whether it’s in a book, short story, magazine article, on tape, on film, or in a poem. But it’s primarily male, from Hitchhiker’s Guide to StarWars and then over to Avatar, just like the New York Times crossword puzzle is primarily male. And therefore, the script of Ex Machina, like every other covert version of the Barbie-versus-Roger Ramjet fairytale, falls into an expected role scenario where your reviewer, and the film itself, promotes a set of strictly segregated mores which continually put men and women into culturalized straitjackets where they will ultimately fail. And even when we get the powerful acting of bilingual Sigourney Weaver in Alien, what do we get? We get one female fighting another female. As terrific a film as it was, the only thing that was missing from that subjugating fantasy was the mud. For a change, wouldn’t it be great to have a woman review a male-based sci-fi thriller? And vice versa, a male writer review a female-based sci-fi thriller? Or maybe reviews written by a female writer and a male writer set side by side. Now, that could be exciting and informative. Aria Creek, Beacon Lost Possibilities Model: Kelly Boungard To the Editor: The May issue made me think of what was left unsaid.The fascinating profiles of AlejanHair Cut: Mark Ferraro dro Jodorowsky and Leon Botstein brought home the point that each of these creative, Color/Style/Makeup: Jennifer Donovan sensitive people descend from ancestors that fled the Cossacks and the Nazis. Each of Photographer: Kimberly Carroll them lost relatives in the pogroms and the Holocaust, and the world is a lesser place for what those lost relatives might have contributed to society. Perhaps another Botstein would have made a medical breakthrough, or another Jodorowsky might have penned a 292c Fair Street profound novel. We’ll never know. Kingston, NY For many Jews, such as myself, we can only lament the lost possibilities. The cur(845) 338-0191 www.leshag.com rent issues in Israel/Palestine have become the new prism from which the Gentile community perceives Judaism. And that’s a shame. (I am neutral on that issue, having deep sympathies for both sides.) I hope that one day, Jews will once again be seen in the global community as producers of avant-garde cinema, thought leaders on postsecondary liberal arts education, and many other issues. Thank you, Leon and Alejandro, for keeping the torch alive. David Sterman, Gardiner Darn Cats! To the Editor, I enjoyed your story “Little Red Bird” [Editor’s Note, 5/15] so much. Thank you for AlongAlong with with our full lines of ImmuneSchein our full lines of ImmuneSchein writing it and for saving the Little Red Bird! ,MRKIV*PM\MV[IEVISǺIVMRK ,MRKIV*PM\MV[IEVISǺIVMRK You are right about outside cats. They are hyperpredators, not only killing a stagƽ45+ organic loose leafleaf teas, ƽ45+ organic loose teas, gering number of birds every year, but countless other defenseless creatures as well. ƽKMJXMXIQW ƽKMJXMXIQW The American Bird Conservancy—Abcbirds.org—sides with you (and me!) and has a ƽFIEYXMJYPXIE[EVIEGGIWWSVMIW ƽFIEYXMJYPXIE[EVIEGGIWWSVMIW website encouraging keeping cats indoors. Again, thanks for writing such a good and timely story. I look forward to your next one and to your next issue of Chronogram! Melinda Taylor, via e-mail Star of the Stars 446 Main NY NY 12472 446 MainSt., St.,Rosendale Rosendale 12472 I sing monthly praise to the wise man you feature each and every month in the pages of immuneschein@gmail.com immuneschein@gmail.com Chronogram. Of whom do I speak? Chronogam’s Eric Francis! Myrna Hilton,Woodstock

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Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note The Longest Day

LEE ANNE ALBRITTON

The sunset over the Catskills viewed from “Million Dollar View” at the Mohonk Preserve on June 21.

W

e all have our personal traditions—planting the vegetable garden the same weekend each May, doing the NewYork Times crossword on Sunday morning, picking pumpkins at the same farm each fall, Christmas shopping on Black Friday, that kind of thing. These recurring activities provide a meaningful measure of the unruly spill of our existence, a refuge from the daily tyrannies, a way to mark time. For those of us who have eschewed the “traditional” traditions and sacraments of our forebears, these idiosyncratic outings might be as close as we get to ritualized activity. Picking pumpkins = going to church. Like a religion, traditions are not so difficult to get started: All you need is one person with an interesting idea. Also like a religion, traditions are difficult to sustain over time. There’s the problem of constant attrition and recruitment of attendees, organizational imperatives, and founding ideas that grow stale with age. Among the traditions Lee Anne and I have cultivated is watching the sunset on the summer Solstice from a little field with a panoramic view of the Catskills at the Mohonk Preserve. This tradition is so longstanding that Lee Anne and I have different memories of how it started. Lee Anne believes it was her idea, hatched when she was hiking and had come upon the incredible vista. My recollection differs only in as much as it was my idea, thought up after biking past the spot. (My case is bolstered—in my mind, at least—by the fact that I remember getting the notion to do this from overhearing people at a nearby table in a restaurant explain that they had a solstice tradition of their own which involved hiking up to the fire tower with their grown children and drinking a bottle of champagne. Then Lee Anne tells me that I’m referencing her memory as my own. She was the one who overheard the champagne story. I’m reminded of a line from a Wilco song: “We used to have a lot of things in common / but you know now we’re just the same.” Our lives and memories bleed together. I’m not upset by this.)

We’ve watched the sun go down on the longest day of the year at Million Dollar View with dozens and dozens of people over the years, with our besties who lived nearby, friends from out of town just passing through, near-strangers we invited who showed up once and then were never seen again. Most of the original crew is gone: Joe and Megan moved to Albany, then Cincinnati, where Joe now practices Buddhism; Dan, whose top-ofbucket list goal was to get high in all 50 states, took a job counting turtles in Humboldt; Mark and Riddi are in Santa Cruz with two whip-smart kids, Sol and Isla; Pilar married an English veterinarian and lives a bright and beautiful life in the suburbs of Philadelphia; Keith, who showed up with his guitar and led us in sing-alongs after busking his way up from North Carolina, is somewhere in the wind. Lee Anne and I can still be found each year at our ritual site. We still lay out a picnic, drink wine, and eat cold fried chicken. We still trace the trajectory of that great ball of fire as it plunges behind the hills and marvel at how long the pale yellow-blue light holds fast in the sky. We still wait for the fireflies to set the tall grass blinking like Christmas lights. This year, an afternoon deluge of almost Noachian proportions kept most everyone away, some of us still showed up as the sky cleared, enacting the sacred mysteries of our secular tradition. Taylor rode his bicycle, got lost in two swamps, and showed up an hour late covered in mud with a saddlebag full of melted ice, cans of beer, and cheese and salami. Robin, in from Tampa on business, was a first-timer who took our tradition like an old hand. Shazam, our beautiful dog, rolled in the grass adorably. We few, we lucky few, sat and remembered (not always accurately I am told) past evenings like this one when we laughed and sang and uttered any absurdity that entered our heads. And we did some of that stuff, too. It’s our tradition. 7/15 CHRONOGRAM 21


ated with food. Greg Foran, head of Wal-Mart’s US operations, announced in June that theft and “unknown shrinkage” have been named urgent elements to be handled by the corporation. This “unknown shrinkage” was identified after first-quarter earnings were announced, and it could be the result of mistakes in inventory as well as customer and employee theft. Sources: Reuters, Time The Lancet reported in June that the global diabetes rate rose 45 percent from 1990 to 2013, Type 2 being the most prevalent. This rise can be directly correlated to the rise in global obesity rates. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funded the study, the largest-ever analysis of global disability, which drew on more than 350,000 data sources in 188 countries. Proportions of populations living with any given disorder in a year were calculated to measure the overall burden of disability; it was found that numbers of people living with disability have gone up as a result of population growth and aging. Diabetes, as a share of the overall burden of disability, moved to No. 7 in 2013 from No. 10 in 1990. In China, the prevalence of diabetes rose 56 percent over the period of the study; 71 percent in the US; 60 percent in Saudi Arabia; and 52 percent in Mexico. Saudi Arabia has the most extensive rate of diabetes, with 17,817 cases per 100,000 people in 2013. Globally, rates of communicable diseases such as malaria are declining while rates of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cancer are on the rise. Source: New York Times Source: Taymaz Valley/flickr (http://bit.ly/1RHpSum

The Supreme Court ruled eight to one in June that workplace discrimination law was violated in 2008 when Samantha Elauf was denied employment at Abercrombie & Fitch based on her decision to wear a hijab. Elauf was backed by the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission when she sued the company; this is the third time Abercrombie has been sued concerning headscarves. At the time of Elauf’s application, the company enforced a strict “look policy” that banned head coverings and hired employees based on attractiveness. The policy has since been adjusted to allow for individual expression, yet Abercrombie still claimed that they did not have to make accommodations for Elauf because she did not request any. The Court ruled that religious needs may be gauged indirectly by employers in relation to company policies, and that prospective employees need not speak of their religion. Source: Huffington Post Nebraska is the first conservative state in over 40 years to ban the death penalty, joining Washington, D.C., and 18 other states. Lawmakers voted 30 to 19 in May in favor of the ban on grounds that the death penalty is inefficient and expensive, overriding Republican Governor Pete Ricketts’s veto that would keep capital punishment intact. No one has been executed in Nebraska since 1997. It is unclear whether or not the 10 men on death row in Nebraska will be given lethal injections; Governor Ricketts has been adamant about carrying out their sentences. Connecticut, New Mexico, and Maryland are three states that have abolished the death penalty, but only for crimes committed after the repeal was passed. Sources: New York Times, Journal Star, NPR Over 40 million chickens and turkeys have died or been slaughtered since December in the largest outbreak of avian flu in the US to date. The H5N2 strain of bird flu is currently a low risk to humans, but precautions are being taken to prevent contamination; it is unclear how fatal this particular strain of bird flu could be to humans. Asian H5N1 flu virus, proven lethal to humans, is the parent of the three strains of avian flu currently found in the US. Health officials have required cullers and barn workers to wear protective gear, and advised all who have come in contact with affected poultry operations to take Tamiflu, a flu preventative. Calamity has wracked the egg industry as a result of the mass poultry massacre; prices of wholesale eggs have doubled since May and prices of eggs have risen in grocery stores. To help soothe worried bakeries and restaurant owners, the USDA has allowed pasteurized eggs to be imported from the Netherlands. Health officials are hopeful that the heat of summer will help kill the H5N2 virus and allow poultry flocks to repopulate. Sources: New York Times, NPR, USDA Theft typically represents 1 percent of any retailer’s sales. For Wal-Mart, that 1 percent translates to $3 billion in losses from the $300 billion in revenue it pulls in each fiscal year from its 4,555 locations nationwide. Half of the theft problem is associ22 22 CHRONOGRAM CHRONOGRAM 6/15 7/15

Living on a noisy street can be stressful and sleep depriving, and new studies suggest it can be fattening as well. Swedish researchers studied 5,000 people in Stockholm and found that those with the biggest waistlines reside on busy blocks, near airports, or close to train tracks—the heaviest living near all three. It’s not only stress eating that contributes to the phenomenon of noise-induced weight gain. Noise pollution also augments the amount of cortisol in the endocrine system, a hormone that stimulates abdominal fat growth. The most the study has to say regarding preventative tips is to “sleep on the quiet side of the house,” an option that is likely unavailable to anyone plagued by potentially fattening noise pollution. Source: Grubstreet Criticism aimed at the Red Cross accuses the organization of using donated funds—a total of $488 million—inefficiently when responding to the debilitating effects of Hurricane Sandy on Haiti in 2010. Critics sifted through memos, e-mails from top officers, and exclusive accounts from a dozen insiders to source their scathing account of the organization’s mismanagement of funds. The most shocking discovery: after two project announcements dedicated to building permanent homes in Haiti, the organization’s permanent home count settled at a total of six. That number looks even more starkly incongruous when considering that the Red Cross has claimed it has provided homes for over 130,000 Haitians. Sources: Slate, ProPublica For those that break out into hot sweats at the mere thought of flying, there’s good news. British airways and the Mindfulness Institute have teamed up to provide anxious flyers with a series of meditation videos. The videos are to be shown before a flight while the nervous passenger is still in the terminal, midflight to lull away any surfacing nerves, and just before landing. The videos even incorporate the potentially perspiration-inducing plane noises into the calming exercises. British Airways has also provided an online course titled “Flying with Confidence” to relax panicking passengers before they enter the terminal. Source: PFSK In 2010, the US threw away 133 billion pounds of food. That’s 31 percent of the available food supply. That enormous amount of food waste is part of what Trader Joe’s former president Doug Rauch says compelled him to launch Daily Table, a new not-for-profit supermarket located in Boston that sells only expired and discarded foods. According to Rauch, plenty of food that is technically expired is still edible. Those little black stamps that mark “best by” dates on food packaging are not food safety dates, they are meant to aid stores in cycling their produce. So food that has passed the date isn’t bad—just less fresh. Daily Table sells a slew of heavily discounted food, including a carton of a dozen eggs for 99 cents. Shoppers are reportedly paying just $30 for a week’s worth of enough groceries to feed their families. Sources: USDA, Grubstreet, Dailytable —Compiled by Jessica Jones and Jake Swain


DION OGUST

Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

A RISING TIDE SINKS ALL BOATS

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he official mythology of America’s rising inequality is that it is the result of natural economic forces. The market is doing it. Low-cost foreign labor and technological progress in less developed countries has driven down the wages of “unskilled” labor. It’s a great theory. It assigns blame to those foolish, inept, lazy, bad choicers who decided to be unskilled. They’re just getting what they deserve. Even better, it says that the solution is not about power and politics, constraining the rich or corporations. It’s up to you. Just go out and get the right education and you are statistically guaranteed to have a higher income. Also, we are constantly told, a better educated workforce is what America needs to compete in this era of increased international competition. If this theory was true—or even if it was false, but our leaders really believed in it—there would be an inverse ratio. As income inequality gets worse, the commitment to public education, especially public higher education, would go up.Yet exactly the opposite has happened. America turned from a belief in relative egalitarianism to radical redistribution of wealth toward the rich.The moment of change is surprisingly precise. All the numbers change direction around 1980, the onset of the Age of Reagan. Before that, a student could earn enough from a summer job to pay for a state or city college. From then to now, the cost “surged 1,120 percent” (Bloomberg Business News). While the costs went up, the relative value declined. The pressure against wages and benefits was rising higher. Better educated, middle wage workers were next. According to the Economic Policy Institute, except for the late 1990s, “The wages of middle-wage workers were totally flat or in decline over the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s.” It’s kept rising. Now its reached what used to be the top professions, like doctors and lawyers. A story in the in the NewYork Times on June 17 noted that “for the last four years, less than 60 percent of law-school graduates have found full-time jobs requiring a bar qualification.” Yet the insistence that education is the key, the solution to everything, has not slackened a bit. It has intensified. Why? As the costs went up, and the value decreased, we invented a new system to finance it—student loans. Banks made loans and got the profits. But the government guaranteed them and removed all risk for the banks. The loans came with far more liability for the students than any normal loan. “Bankruptcy will usually not cancel student loans, and the government has the power to seize income tax refunds and garnishee wages as needed. Some parents who guaranteed student loans that have defaulted find the money taken out of their Social Security checks” (“The Hefty Yoke of Student Loan Debt,” NewYork Times, February, 20, 2014). The loans were sold in a way that hid risks and the extreme liability and disarmed any resistance. They were offered, as if they were gifts, along with college acceptance letters (Oh, moment of joy!) as part of financial “packages” that would enable to the student to attend. In this environment, for-profit schools grew faster than mold. They made the same high-income promises that everyone else does. Their failure to deliver is beyond belief: “The Department of Education reports that 72

percent of for-profit colleges produced graduates who earned less than high school dropouts.” Social and economic class play a very important part in this system. The higher up a student’s family is, the less likely they are to borrow. But the more likely they are to choose an institution that will really help them in life and the more likely they are to succeed. If a student dropped out, therefore not getting the benefits of a degree, they still owed what they borrowed. If a school took their money, then went out of business, the students still owed their loans. In sum, the richer you were, the less you were affected. Words mislead. Actions speak truth. Strip away what’s said, look at what’s been done, and it becomes clear that higher education has become another  gigantic system to transfer wealth from the 90 percent to the one percent. (Is this similar to how the unleashed mortgage business led to the housing bubble?) Student loan debt is now over $1.2 trillion. The default rate is higher than any other form of consumer debt. According to the Wall Street Journal, 31.5 percent of debtors are at least a month in arrears. The weight of student loans is having a depressing effect on the entire economy. Graduates, or dropouts, with debts, don’t buy homes.They live with parents. They don’t even buy cars. So they can’t leave even if they want to. There is, at last, some pushback. Elizabeth Warren, among others, has called for debt relief. Obama is campaigning for universal free community college. That would cut the cost of a four year degree in half and also give people a chance to learn how to cope with school. The bloom is off the rose. Don’t worry. There will be new devices that insure that education will continue to be used as a way to transfer wealth from those who need it the most to those who have accumulated the most. John Hartley, who lists himself as a World Economic Forum Global Shaper on Huffington Post, announced, “A novel funding concept is sweeping the college education funding system by storm. Income Sharing Agreements.” What is an ISA? A student gets money from a rich person, then signs over a portion of their future income for 10 years, 20 years, for life. Of course it wont be a student and one rich person, ISAs will be packaged, like mortgages, sliced and diced, and then sold as investment vehicles. Richard Vedder, Adjunct Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, is thrilled that it will bring market forces into play. People who pursue subjects that investors favor will give up less of their income. This will select for “good” areas of study. He specifies only one, petroleum engineer, then poses the rhetorical query: “Isn’t this “unfair” to those wanting to be librarians, teachers, social workers, etc., since they would have to forego more of their incomes to satisfy the human capital contract?” Then he answers, “Not really. Society puts a relatively low value on those jobs.” Society? Or people who think that profit taking is the only value?   Is this just another Wall Street Journal, right wing think tank fiscal wet dream? ISAs have already been endorsed by two of the more prominent presidential candidates, Chris Christie and Mark Rubio. I promise you, if you or your children, want to sell a piece of themselves to the 1/10th of the one percent to go to college, our nation will see to it that they can do it.  7/15 CHRONOGRAM 23


Community Pages

BLACK DIRT BEAUTIES WARWICK VALLEY AND SUGARLOAF BY ANNE PYBURN CRAIG PHOTOS BY CHRISTINE ASHBURN

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armhearted, wonderful, sleek, unique: It’s hard to overpraise the Warwick Valley. An hour and a world from Manhattan, clever planning, educated entrepreneurial energy, and a welcoming spirit have kept this landscape unspoiled while nurturing the endeavors and souls of local and transplanted creatives alike. There’s a Shangri-La feel to this valley ringed by rich black dirt farmland. Early settlers must have felt it in the very air; they christened hamlets with names like Amity and Edenville. Moderns concur: Warwick was recently named a Top 10 Weekend Getaway by the website Stylecaster, right along with fabled places like Laguna Beach. Yet Warwick hasn’t a snobbish bone in its body. The village website (the town of Warwick is a village of the same name, two more villages, and several hamlets) highlights an article titled “Discover a World of Adventure in Warwick, NY.” One might expect glib self-promotion; the link leads to a local third grader’s articulate tribute to the Albert J. Wisner Memorial Library. The town website’s local history page frankly confronts the unfairness of early dealings with the Lenni Lenape. Blended genius and decency empowers Warwickian greatness. Longstanding traditions—the making of wine and cider, the teaching of art and music of every genre, the fostering of individual and community wellness, the retailing of fashion-forward goods for the home and body—just keep improving. Community celebrations are cunningly organized. Applefest, with its national top-100-events status, is kept to one day, because shutting down the 24 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 7/15

streets for an entire weekend is a pain. But that’s far from the only celebration Warwick has up its sleeve. The Warwick Summer Arts Festival, happening across a variety of venues throughout the week of July 19-26, will be a community-wide explosion of exuberance: performances, master classes, and openings and shindigs highlighting every form of the fine and performing arts. Fun of every flavor is ongoing. Wine and Design offers “Paint It Forward” parties every month; paint and sip to help a local cause. Village Billiards hosts “Bands Billiards and Booze!” evenings; bring your favorite vinyl discs to spin in a sort of old-school DJ open mike night, then hear a live band free from 9 to 11:30pm. So cherished are the arts here that there’s an entire zone they rule. Sugar Loaf Artisan Village houses dozens of independent artists and crafters in a walkable array of shops and studios, many housed in 18th-century buildings. Sugar Loaf is a treasure trove: Oils, acrylics, watercolors, stained glass, photography, pottery, antiques, jewelry, woodworks, candles, soap, and sculpture are just some of the offerings. Browse, shop, and feast; they’ve got cooking down to an art here too, not to mention music, poetry, and comedy in a world-class performance center. So take your wanderlust to this enchanted valley for an adventure: shopping, wining, dining, a farmers’ market spree, a pilgrimage to the transreligious Pacem in Terris retreat center, a cutting-edge seminar at the Seligman Center. Treat yourself right: Make the sweetness of Sugar Loaf and the wonder of Warwick part of your turf.You’ll wonder what took you so long.


Clockwise from top: Appalachian Trail Thru-Hikers at Bellvale Farms Creamery in Warwick; picnickers at Warwick Valley Winery; Jennifer Marie and Daniel Wicker in Warwick.

7/15 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 25


Out for a walk on East Market Street in Rhinebeck.

Clockwise from top: Kings Highway in Sugar Loaf; Linda Mensch enjoying lunch at the Conscious Fork in Warwick; Micheal DiMartino, Chef/Owner Landmark Inn in Warwick.

26 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 7/15


GPS

1371 King's Highway Chester, NY 10918

Sugar Loaf is a Hamlet amidst Orchards & Vineyards in New York's beautiful Hudson Valley

THURSDAYS July and August Concerts on the Lawn @7pm

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7/15 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 27


VAN GOGH AND NATURE JUNE 14–SEPT 13

WILLIAMSTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS CLARKART.EDU

WHISTLER’S MOTHER JULY 4–SEPT 27

Van Gogh and Nature is made possible by the generous contributions of Denise Littlefield Sobel and Diane and Andreas Halvorsen, with major support from Acquavella Galleries and the National Endowment for the Arts. Whistler’s Mother is presented in collaboration with the Lunder Consortium for Whistler Studies. The exhibition is generously supported by a grant from The Lunder Foundation and by Katherine and Frank Martucci. Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890), A Wheatfield, with Cypresses (detail), 1889. Oil on canvas, 72.1 x 90.9 cm. The National Gallery, London, bought Courtauld Fund, 1923 Image © The National Gallery, London 2014. James McNeill Whistler, Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist’s Mother) (detail), 1871. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Image © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY.

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31 Main Street Warwick, NY 845.544.7183

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Top: Pacem In Terris Sculpture Garden in Warwick; Pennings Farm Beer Garden in Warwick.

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Clockwise from top: Clay Dolls at J. Hengen Jewelry and Ceramic Design in Sugar Loaf; Sugar Loaf Mountain Herbs; Jewelry Making Class at J. Hengen Jewelry and Ceramic Design; Clay Sculptures at J. Hengen Jewelry and Ceramic Design; Mary Endico of Endico Watercolor Originals in Sugar Loaf.

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Top 10 Things to Know About Warwick & Sugar Loaf One of Warwick’s early industries, iron mining, played a significant role in the American Revolution; the chain that kept British warships from sailing up the Hudson was forged in Warwick. You can hike to abandoned mines—ask at the Sterling Forest State Park Visitors Center and they’ll direct you. The 4.3-mile hike also includes Sterling Lake and a fire tower with panoramic views. Warwick playwright and actor Kevin Anthony Ryan was a semistarving Manhattan actor in the 1980s before he settled in the valley and became beloved town clown Oakie Doakey. His new work, “The Stations of George Reeves’ Cross,” which debuts at the Warwick Community Center July 24-26, has been called “brilliant” by the foremost George Reeves historian. Suicide or murder? Check out this slice of Surrealist history and find out. Surrealism lives on in Sugar Loaf, too. The Seligmann Center at the Citizens Foundation is the onetime home of Swiss Surrealist Kurt Seligmann, and many events there are dedicated to Surrealist heritage. Then there are the Citizens Foundation initiatives devoted to local economics, health care, and place making. Way to keep it real. The Warwick Valley Railroad may have been small, but it was definitely the Little Engine That Could. Its arrival in 1862 cut the eight-hour travel time to New York City in half, changing everything. It was also the first railroad to carry fresh milk in refrigerated tankers. Milk is still making news in Warwick. A beloved local dairy, Schuller’s, just changed hands from one family to another family; Warwick residents will be able to get fresh cold milk (free of hormones and antibiotics of course) on their doorsteps every morning from the new management, Moore Dairy and Distributors. In real bottles. The Village of Warwick rocks a cherished historic preservation district with everything from a pre-Revolutionary stone tavern to a funky brick gas station on display; don’t miss the row of Victorian-era “painted ladies” adorning Maple Avenue. Speaking of history, the 1760 Burt Farmhouse on Galloway Road is still occupied by direct descendants of builder Daniel Burt. We’re talking 12 generations who’ve made Warwick home. And speaking of cutting edge, ribbons were recently cut on the solar array that now powers the farm—panels, of course, arrayed on a barn so that the historic farmhouse would stay intact.

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One of Warwick’s many finely tuned specialties is wonderful wine. Warwick Valley Winery and Distillery, Demarest Hill Winery, Clearview Vineyard, and Applewood Winery are artisanal and lovely operations where you’ll be welcomed to visits, tastings, special events, and live music. Check out Doc’s Cidery at Warwick Valley to get the scoop on how a historic Hudson Valley specialty is revitalizing apple farming and taking the country by storm. As you might expect in an area famed for high-quality soil, farmto-fork is also huge in this valley. The farmers’ market, topflight and diverse, is a 22-year-old institution that draws nearly 40,000 shoppers (not all at once, they note) on Sundays to partake of everything from arugula to strawberry rhubarb pie, with a livemusic soundtrack. Restaurants, from the all-vegan Conscious Fork to Eddie’s Roadhouse, serve the freshest of the fresh with pride and creativity. Take a Black Dirt Farm Tour to get familiar with the roots. At Pacem in Terris, you can visit the home of the philosopher/ artist Frederick Franck, a Netherlands native who saw art as meditation, practiced dentistry with Albert Schweitzer, and authored 35 books, the best-known being The Zen of Seeing. Touring the grounds and enjoying Franck’s “Icons” in the sculpture garden is free all summer long.

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7/15 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 33


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Well Spent: The Summer Fun Edition

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igh season in the Hudson Valley is a special kind of wonderful, from the glories of your own backyard to the wild beauty all around us. Make it even better with these summertime picks.

By Jana Martin

Get Your Outdoors On Spin your golf game From Mohonk to Warwick,Yorktown Heights to Saugerties, disc golf has taken hold up here. Fun hazards aside (thick trees, deep cliffs), it’s a great way to hone your skills and get goaloriented. Equip yourself with a regulation discs made by Innova at Cabin Fever Outfitters in Rhinebeck, $9.99-$18.99. Cabinfeveroutfitters.com

Put their mettle to the pedal There’s nothing more summer-timey than kids pedaling around furiously on their new bicycles. Berkshire Bike and Board in Great Barrington and Pittsfield and durable steeds to get your tykes started. Liv Blossom girl’s bike for ages three to six, or Scott Voltage bike JR 16 for ages three to six, both $249.99. Berkshirebikeandboard.com

Fly the retro toy skies Fill the summer skies with the toys of an old-fashioned childhood. Remember those balsa-wood airplanes? Complete with the red rubber band that makes the propeller go, you’ll find them at Catskill Mountain Country Store in Tannersville and Windham. Or go for that young aboriginal vibe with a wooden boomerang. Both flying things are handcrafted in the USA. Airplanes, two to a pack, $5.99; Boomerangs, $9.99-$21.99. Catskillmtncountrystore.com

Blaze a fast trail Whether a beginner or a seasoned, foot-sure expert, there’s nothing like going for a run through the natural beauty of the woods.Your reward for the effort is a stunning dose of scenery and loads of fresh air. Log the miles in cushy Hoka One Ones or more streamlined La Sportivas; Rock and Snow in New Paltz has tons of choices. For men or women: Hoka One One Stinson, $160; or La Sportiva Bushido, $125. Rockandsnow.com

Get in the water Explore the beauty of the Hudson Valley and get some major exercise by getting in a kayak. Mountain Tops Outfitters in Beacon will put together everything you need—and they’ll match whatever price you find. Wilderness Systems Pungo 120, approx. $875; Bending Branches Sunrise fiberglass shaft paddles are made for those over six feet tall, and those under; $99; Harmony Adult FlexFit vest, $89.99. Mountaintopsoutfitters.com

Set up camp If you haven’t taken the family camping, you’re in for a treat: There are countless campgrounds, from primitive to amenity packed. Kenco Outfitters in Kingston has everything you need, including family tents so easy to set up that a toddler could do it—at least theoretically. Six-person North Face Kaiju tent, $399; four-person Eureka Sunrise 4 tent, $199.99. Atkenco.com

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Lawn party all the time Tote that quiche, float that duck Tote your essentials in style with these weatherproof, waterproof, bad-moodproof bags from Bop to Tottom in Kingston. Plastic perforated and woven pool totes in all sorts of fun, candy colors, $43-$45. And while you’re at it, toss a gigantic rubber duck into the pool for a goofy conversation starter. Giant duck, $19. Boptotottom.com

The sweet sound of lawn games In summer, when the back lawn becomes the parlor, the houseguests inevitably arrive. Entertain the visiting droves with charming, handsome amusements from Valley Variety in Hudson: traditional, handcrafted Henley horseshoes, $225; handmade backgammon set, $160; or a nautical flag domino set, $100. Then go take a much-deserved nap. Valleyvariety.com

Bottoms up Nothing like a good cocktail that’s made en plein air. Shop Little House in Woodstock has a whole slew of accoutrements for hot-weather mixology. Vintage glasses, set of two, $12; Toyo-Sasaki glass pitcher, $28; Woodland Wonder acrylic tray by IMM Living; $58; stainless steel drink stirrer / muddler, $13.50; Summer Cocktails book, $22.95. Shoplittlehouse.com

Look good, feel good Let’s not overdo the rugged look.You can be breezily chic covering up that bathing suit in sweet cotton tunics for women, or smart linen shirts for men, from Willow and Brown in Livingston Manor. The shop stocks refreshingly wellcurated styles. Rock Flower Paper women’s cotton tunics in prints or pintucks, S-L, $38-$46; men’s cotton linen shirts in solids and plaids, M-XXL, $82. Willowandbrown.com

Spread out and eat green Forget about those environmentally hostile picnic products that make us think twice about dining al fresco—Winter Sun & Summer Moon in Rhinebeck has a whole slew of bio-happy, eco-friendly picnic pieces that are BPA free, microwave and dishwasher safe, and goodlooking, too. Bento box, $22; Eau Good water bottle, $22; large lunch bowl, $26; lunch box, $26; all by black + blum. Wintersunsummermoon.com 36 SHOPPING CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Top: Handcrafter Henley horseshoes from Valley Variety in Hudson. Bottom left: BPA-free Bento box by Black+Blum from Winter Sun & Summer Moon in Rhinebeck. Bottom right: Woodland Wonder acrylic tray by IMM Living from Shop Little House in Woodstock.


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The House

Home Is Where the Art Is

Above: Eddie Mullins and Janet Hicks in their living room, with art by Derek Erdman.

Below: An opening crowd at One Mile Gallery.

ONE MILE

By Lynn Woods Photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid

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n Doomsdays, the new indie film by Kingston resident Eddie Mullins, two drifters break into deserted vacation homes, drinking the booze, emptying out the kitchen cupboards, snoozing on the beds, and smashing a car in the driveway with a crowbar. Described by Mullins as “a postapocalyptic comedy,” the film has won six awards and gotten kudos from Variety and the NewYork Times, which praised the film for its off-kilter melancholy (“Wrapping an existential question in the random rhythms of the road movie, Doomsdays comes at you sideways”) and probing the central anxiety of our time: “When the world has passed the environmental tipping point…how long can the chains of civility hold?” Though the setting is unspecified, it’s easily recognizable as the Catskills, and part of the fun of watching Doomsdays is identifying the various locales, even as one might wince at the violence done to the series of woodsy properties. The one domicile that escapes the damage is a brick-and-stone charmer with yellow-trim Italianate windows, where Dirty Fred, a brainy, lazy, whiskeysipping opportunist, gets a respite in the bed of his new love and cohort, Reyna. (Tagging along, but wary of settling in, is his partner in crime, Bruho, a gruff sociopath in a hoodie, and their chubby sidekick, Jaidon.) Anyone participating in the Kingston gallery scene will instantly recognize the building as One Mile, the gallery and home of Mullins and his partner, Janet Hicks. Since opening in 2011, it’s become an icon of the creative energy that is transforming the most obscure corners of Ulster County. One Mile 38 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 7/15

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Sea creatures by Andrea Mihalovic and two works on paper by Susan Minot. The police car is a mirror from the Dutchess County Fair.

Fantasy, a work by Neal Hollinger. The work on the left is by Genesis Chapman.

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The kitchen features a 1978 Bally Playboy pinball machine.

Eddie’s guitars, a pachinko game, and a work by Julie Hedrick.

40 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Gallery has shown some of the area’s edgiest art, often imported from the city, and its openings, spilling out from the subterranean gallery space onto the terraced bluestone patio, are among the most fun. Partly that’s because of the novelty of the setting: One Mile is located on a narrow road that snakes along the Rondout Creek, past a row of ancient, mostly abandoned frame houses, in the shadow of a 100-year-old railroad trestle. Particularly when a train is rumbling overhead, one feels submerged in the weird, industrialflavored folk Americana of David Lynch’s Eraserhead. What might otherwise be construed as just another depressed Appalachian river valley with circa 1910 industrial artifacts, faded but still mighty, becomes magical, a sublime theatrical backdrop looming beyond the candlelight, glinting glasses, and whirlpools of conversation. And partly it’s because of the disarming ministrations of gallery owner Hicks, whose cosmopolitan stylishness lends an appealing sophistication while her native Californian friendliness puts visitors instantly at ease. Despite having a full-time job in the city—she negotiates contracts and licensing deals on behalf of the estates of blue-chip artists (including Picasso, Matisse, and Warhol) represented by her company, Artists Rights Society—Hicks’s commitment to the gallery has greatly enriched the local art scene, as has Mullins’s filmmaking activities. (Mullins, who has been coming to the Catskills for years, mainly to fly fish in Phoenicia, spends most of his time upstate, where he has been working on two new film projects, one a detective story, the other a Western.) Both made their way to New York City from elsewhere: Hicks grew up in California, studied art history at the University of Oregon, and came to New York in 1997 to work for an architectural theory magazine. Mullins grew up in Richmond, Virginia, where he was obsessed with horror films before discovering the French New Wave at a film festival at the University of Richmond and falling in love. After studying film at New York University, he worked at ABC News, got a graduate degree in literature at Northwestern University, and worked as a tractor driver on a Northern California farm, then as a stringer and teacher in Buenos Aires, before settling down in New York and making his living as a film critic.


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Work by Genesis Chapman on the left, a painting by Maria Kozak and a street banner from a Matthew Barney show.

In 2009, Hicks and Mullins moved in together in Park Slope and began shopping for a weekend house upstate. They were drawn to the area’s historic architecture, and the building on the Rondout Creek fit the bill perfectly: Formerly owned by a sculptor who maintained a studio on the ground floor, it was built in 1790—ancient beams are exposed in the second-floor kitchen and living room space, which is filled with original art—but the house “wasn’t so precious that we couldn’t renovate it,” Hicks notes. They didn’t know a soul when they first arrived, but an article in the New York Times that profiled their new weekend home created an opening. Neighbors Lisa Padovani, a successful costume designer from the city, and her husband, Paulo Redaubengo, a stone mason, introduced themselves; Padovani did the costumes for Doomsdays, while Redaubengo designed and built One Mile’s stone patio. Another couple who visited after reading the article was Justin Rice, front man of Bishop Allen, and his wife, Darby. Mullins had attended many of Bishop Allen’s concerts in the city and was a fan. Rice and his wife subsequently bought a house in Kingston, and Rice plays Dirty Fred in Doomsdays. “We arrived at just the right moment,” says Mullins, noting the Stockade Tavern and Boitson’s restaurant opened around the same time. Musically speaking, he’s more culturally immersed than he was in the city: “I see more musical acts at [Uptown Kingston venue] BSP because its programming is so good,” he says. “And there’s no cutthroat race for tickets or traveling to a distant venue in Bushwick.” The gallery also created many connections. “Having a business here has been amazing,” said Mullins. “We knew everybody very quickly by setting up shop—if you build it, they will come.” Mullins’s longtime acquaintance with Tod Lippy, editor of Esopus magazine, led to the gallery’s biggest coup: the representation of artist-photographer Mark Hogancamp, whose life and art was chronicled in the documentary Marwencol (currently the inspiration for a Hollywood film in development). On disability ever since he was brutally beaten in a nearby bar over a decade ago, Hogancamp takes photographs of lifelike tableaux of dolls and props he sets up in the miniature, circa World

War II Belgian village he constructed on his property. Taking on Hogancamp was a complex venture, given the artist’s disability and rising fame. Hicks and Mullins buy groceries and cigarettes for Hogancamp (who, like the characters in Doomsdays, doesn’t drive), drive him down to exhibits of his work in the city, and otherwise lend their support. One Mile’s current show, “Haunted Summer,” features the work of seven women artists inspired by the paranormal and horror films. (They range from the nightmarish, Gothic-style graphite drawings of Amanda Nedham to Mollie Mckinley’s spooky photograph of two transparent women in white standing on the seashore to Sarah Gamble’s collage of eyes peering through a cosmic spray.) The gallery also frequently shows the artwork of musicians, including Grasshopper of Mercury Rev, Lee Renaldo, founding member of Sonic Youth, and Rachel Blumberg, the original drummer for The Decemberists—an interest stemming from their own backgrounds as musicians: Hicks played drums in an all-girl band in the early 2000s, and Mullins, a guitarist, scored and performed the scintillating, rootsy autoharp music in Doomsdays. Mullins’s and Hicks’s brick house on the outskirts of one of the Hudson Valley’s hipper districts may seem like an outlier, but the distance to Uptown isn’t that far. Mullins sometimes walks to the Stockade District along South Wall, perhaps stopping at his friends’ house on the way back home. Or he’ll head to the bus depot to catch a cab after hanging out at the Stockade Tavern. “All the things people dislike about this place were things I loved,” Hicks says. “It feels like a different century.” Compared to the din of Brooklyn, the passing train is white noise, and they usually sleep through the night (though they wish the engineer wouldn’t slam on the horn quite so loud as the cars cross the trestle). Some day, they’d like to purchase the dilapidated building next door to expand the gallery and show larger work. In the meantime, Hicks has her eye on a small clearing on the steep forested hill behind their house, which is approached by a set of stone stairs. “It’s a great place for us to do archery,” she says. 7/15 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 43


The Garden

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What We Learn from Public Gardens Open-Air Classrooms for Plant Lovers By Michelle Sutton Photos by Larry Decker Horticultural Utopias Public gardens include arboreta (plural of arboretum) and botanical gardens. Historically, arboreta have focused on curated collections of woody plants (trees and shrubs), while botanical gardens have had a broader focus, featuring showy gardens and/or collections of both woody plants and herbaceous (nonwoody) plants. Many public gardens began as private gardens by people who were passionate plant collectors. Increasingly, college campuses are declaring themselves to be and/or formally registering as arboreta, maintaining their trees as collections with plant labels, databases, educational programs, and master plans. Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson is an exciting example of this; the entire 550-acre Bard College campus was dedicated as an arboretum in 2007. The most exciting aspect of my own horticulture education was any time I came in contact with public gardens. I worked and studied in the Virginia Tech Hahn Horticulture Garden, interned at the Holden Arboretum in Ohio, and went on field trips to see dozens of public gardens. I got to live my dream job when I worked in the education department of Cornell Plantations, the arboretum, botanical garden, and natural areas of Cornell University in Ithaca. The magic of being able to walk around world-class gardens whenever I stepped outside my office never faded. I love the public gardens with big budgets; they can do outrageous displays and ambitious research. I also love those smaller ones that are underfunded or in decline. I often find them to be the most inspiring, because they are perme44 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 7/15

ated with the love of those tireless volunteers who are keeping them going. In either case, be they world-class or regional and scrappy, there is so much one can learn from public gardens. They are a key part of my ongoing education in horticulture. Happy Immersion One of the best ways to learn plants is to visit a public garden in your region at regular intervals throughout the growing season. Or even better, you can volunteer to work in a specific garden or in the greenhouse. Orange County Arboretum in Hamptonburgh has more than 50 active greenhouse volunteers. They are trained by horticulturist Pete Patel, who says, “Learning plants is a business of repetition: working with them, seeing how they grow and react to different circumstances, and seeing the tags over and over with the Latin and common names.” In addition to offering a popular volunteer program, the Arboretum hosts educational programs for school groups—more than 1,300 kids a year—on composting, good bugs / bad bugs, aquatic studies, bee hives, and how to plant a plant. Patel says, “The dedicated volunteer instructors really excel at these children’s programs.” In turn, volunteers get an education—informally, by working in the gardens and with the public, but also by taking adult education classes for free, in things like pruning, deer-resistant planting, and horticultural arts. A public garden can be a place to bring your skills and passions and have the freedom to create something really neat.


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Public gardens show us ways of putting plants together for best ornamental effect.

To continue his own education, Patel visits public gardens and takes classes and trainings at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx. “The staff instructors there are people at the top of their field and have access to tremendous resources,” he says. “I enjoy the plant collections, but I learn the most from direct contact with those professionals who take us behind the scenes.” Patel’s favorite botanical garden is the 28-acre Wave Hill, also in the Bronx. It’s similar in size to the Orange County Arboretum (35 acres). Patel resonates with the mission of Wave Hill (especially, “to explore human connections to the natural world through programs in horticulture, education and the arts”). He hopes to cultivate, over time, the Wave Hill qualities of beauty, intimacy, and horticultural playfulness at the Arboretum. Plant Relationships At public gardens you can observe how plants are used in relation to one another for best ornamental effect, see how plants are sited based on their cultural needs (e.g., which ones are suited for lowland wet spots), and be introduced to new plants. Arboreta and botanical gardens are the ideal places to learn plant identification; they frequently arrange their collections to help you in your plant-ID studies. For instance, at the Orange County Arboretum, you can see a dawn redwood tree growing alongside a bald cypress tree so you can study the subtle differences between the two oft-confused species. You’ll note, for example, that the dawn redwoods have “armpits”—i.e., where the branch meets the trunk, there is a telltale hollow beneath that juncture. (By contrast, bald cypress branches swell slightly where branch meets trunk.) Public gardens often feature collections of the same genus—oaks, maples, rhododendrons, etc.— that make it easier for students of horticulture (formal or otherwise) to compare and contrast the many different species or varieties. Other collections will have an educational theme, such as the urban tree collection at Cornell’s arboretum that displays the toughest trees for urban use in that region. Recently I took my mother to see Stone Crop Gardens in Cold Spring, which describes itself as a “Plant Enthusiast’s Garden.” Along with a terrific garden map, they graciously provided us a “bloom list” that corresponded 48 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 7/15

to numbered stakes in the various containers and flower beds. Most public gardens are not able to keep all their plants labeled at all times; it’s a laborintensive proposition and even the sturdiest of labels have a way of breaking and disappearing. The “bloom list” approach with numbered stakes at Stone Crop is a great compromise (although they do have permanent labels on many plants as well). When you do see plant labels, you may be seeing a display label or an accession tag. A display label usually has the bare bones of ID information: binomial Latin name, common name, and perhaps plant family. An accession tag has more information, often including the nursery from which the plant came, the geographic origin of the species, and an accession number. For instance, the accession number 2001-185A would tell you that this was the 185th plant accepted into the collection in 2001, and the A indicates that it is part of a group of others of the same species, labeled B, C, etc. (If there is no letter, that means there was only one of its species acquired at that time.) Stone Crop excels at many things, including serious plant collecting and sophisticated design. It’s stunningly beautiful at every turn. One of their gardens I find delightfully plant-geeky: the Systematic Order Beds. Each bed features a plant order and representatives of plant families within that order. For instance, there’s a pea order (Fabales) bed that contains plants from the four families (Fabaceae, etc.) within the order. When I was there, beautiful false indigo plants (members of the Fabaceae family) were in bloom in white and purple spikes in that bed. For someone interested in botany, botanical nomenclature, and/or plant taxonomy, this garden will be of special interest. Lastly, public gardens present us with ideas for new ways of using plants. When I worked at the botanical garden at Cornell, my office overlooked the groundcover collection. Many visitors had thought of groundcovers in a very limited way—the ivy, the pachysandra, the periwinkle. This garden showed how many different kinds of plants, including hostas, ferns, and lady’s mantle, could be used as groundcovers. Weeds could rarely find purchase among all that lush foliage. Elsewhere in the botanical garden, talented staff integrated edible plants like herbs, dark purple kale, and brightly colored Swiss chard into the flower borders to great effect, giving visitors ideas to take home.


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Kids & Family

TENTS & TANTRUMS A FESTIVAL SURVIVAL GUIDE FOR FAMILIES Text and photos by Hillary Harvey

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hen I looked over again at the stroller, I could immediately see, even through that ocean of darkness, that my two-year-old son was gone. “Where’s Iggy?” I shouted over the music to my group. I began frantically scanning their blank faces until my 11-year-old started to cry and clutched her little sister tightly. My husband’s flashlight was already beaming between people on the hill where the kids had been playing at sunset. “We’ll stay with the kids here while you look,” my friend said, corralling my daughters close to his. I turned in the opposite direction, trying to decide where Iggy might go. Among the thousands of people, the pathways between their blankets presented hundreds of options, and a rush of overwhelm threatened to flatten me. I suddenly wished I hadn’t dressed Iggy in dark clothes that morning, or that we’d left before the last band. Then, I was walking toward the light of the food truck court, and unexpectedly, Iggy appeared in the middle of it, wandering slowly. I hurried toward him, and when I pressed my face to his, he was still silently trying to recognize me. 50 KIDS & FAMILY CHRONOGRAM 7/15

What was I thinking? When I approached Ani DiFranco to buy a CD after her set on a small stage at my first Clearwater Festival, I knew I preferred that experience to seeing music in anonymous concert spaces. Even in the mud of Woodstock ’94, I was happier than at some smoky bar. I loved seeing A Tribe Called Quest and the Beastie Boys, my favorite bands at the time, take turns on a Lollapalooza stage. I loved looking at the festival lineup on the drive there, friends in each other’s laps and stuffed into the car’s hatchback. It was just how Woodstock, the town that raised me in the folds of drum circles formed on the village green, probably always wanted it to be. Festivals hold promise in their paper wristbands. We walk their grounds because there’s the possibility of happening upon something amazing. It might be the only time we go camping with a group of friends. It might be the only time we eat fried dough. And we bring our kids with us because a festival is a micro-utopia, where a community is built around similar interests and goals, even if just for the weekend, and where the boundary lines between people are more penetrable. It’s not like the stuff that’s labeled “family fun,” but is really just for the kids. Festivals are about exposure and discovery, but also about spending time together. Just like when you travel, festivals take you out of your element and into the adventure of finding a bathroom or something the kids will eat, which ultimately knits your group tighter as you experience something together. That’s what I was thinking about when I rented the alumni house at Bennington College with friends, so our families could spend a weekend with bluegrass and art at FreshGrass, held each September at MASS MoCA. We hoped to discover new music, new food, and to have some time together to play outside. Living the Weekend Pass FreshGrass is a big festival, so we chose a go-to spot in the back, where the sound of our tantrums, games, or quick getaways would dissipate quickly before bothering anybody. It turned out to be right behind the food truck that sold mac-and-cheese spring rolls, a score unto itself. One of us was always there, enjoying whatever happened on the main stage, while others meandered off on personal missions. Between the food, the open museum, and the three stages of music, we never even made it to the kids’ tent. Because we had weekend passes, we picked our moments—when there was something we wanted to catch, or a good time of day for the kids to enjoy it—and we stayed only as long as the kids were happy. Going to a festival as a family is about balance. Sometimes the kids need to do what the parents want; sometimes the parents do what the kids want. We got to know our limits, and scheduled departures so it didn’t leave our festivaling on a sour note. There was a moment when my 11-year-old and I found a spot at the small stage in Courtyard D, and Valerie June’s music reverberated against the old brick factory walls. My daughter smiled, engulfed in this new music, with the hush of hundreds of bodies around us, and we watched the blue sky darkening above us like a James Turrell art piece. It proved addictive. Ultimately, the thing we love about going to festivals together is the experience of being with so many people. As my friend Jenny says, “You have to believe that there’s something wonderful that you will see, hear, experience—not in spite of—but because there are so many people.” When FreshGrass got dark, the family next to ours pulled out glow sticks to share. We enjoyed the hayride at the Hawthorne Valley Fall Festival because we were sitting across from smiling strangers. At the Winter Hoot, a small festival in a compact space that’s more like a sprawling party, we let the kids travel in a pack, and coordinated watching the gaggle with the other adults we knew or met there. When the Summer Hoot family next to ours pulled out inflatable beach balls (brilliant because they can be easily stored), we joined in the game and made festival friends. We had first walked around the Ashokan Center, exploring the little village vendor area, making a mental note of our food options, blacksmithing demo times, and sweet treats that we’d mete out at various junctures throughout the day to keep the kids reaching. We pointed out landmarks so they could feel oriented and always find us if


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we got separated. Then we settled into a spot on the hill, where we could see the two stages, as well as the kids’ tent at the top, full of activities and volunteers. It was the perfect perch, where the kids could ebb and flow between watching the festival from afar or rumbling into the crowd to get in on the action, as the mood struck over the hours we spent there. When we left FreshGrass for the last time, Iggy in arms and the girls in tow, I spied a little one just entering, wearing a glow-in-the-dark skeleton costume. Aha!

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The Magical, Musical Night Something beautiful happened when the singer Elizabeth Mitchell was organizing the kids’ tent at the Newport Folk Festival in 2013. Musicians who were playing that weekend did half-hour sets in the tent while the main stage was being reset for the next band. It wasn’t especially advertised, just a mention in the info section of the website, with more on hand at the actual festival. But for Hurley resident Ruthy Ungar of the band, Mike + Ruthy, the kids’ tent was where it was at. “It ended up being these really intimate sets,” Ungar smiles, remembering its mellow vibe. “You could hang out in that one spot for the whole weekend and continually see bands.” When Ungar and Merenda were on tour a decade ago with The Mammals, she’d marveled at the huge teen scene at the roots festivals in Michigan. “They weren’t coming because so-and-so had a hit song,” Ungar says. “They came because they’d been coming since they were five, and they wanted to see their festival friends.” It inspired them to organize the Winter and Summer Hoots at the Ashokan Center in February and August. There’s a campsite at the Ashokan Center that’s dedicated to burying music deep into kids’ cells. Originally called the Noisy Campground, the name was changed when a blogger suggested a more apt name: The Magical, Musical, All-Night Campground. That’s often a major choice for Ungar’s family: camp or hotel? It can be helpful to have your own space at night, but the idea of a festival is to become immersed in the world that’s created there. “Sometimes camping is better than you thought it would be,” Ungar muses. “You want kids falling asleep to live music played by their neighbor. That’s something everyone should do.” Having grown up going to lots of festivals with her folk musician parents, Lyn Hardy and Jay Ungar, and stepmom, Molly Mason, Ungar credits those early experiences with her love of music. She didn’t even want to play the fiddle until she was in her 20s. “But then it was all there,” she says. “It’s different when your whole family does something together. You just kind of absorb it.” At Newport, Ungar strapped her toddler, Opal, to her back while playing on stage with husband Mike Merenda. Their son, Willy, played banjo, and with his suit and bowler hat, he quickly became a festival celebrity. “There were core moments where he was a kid, though.” Ungar recalls how he’d also ask to go home. “It’s the gamut of total involvement and having the best time, and then the pit of despair. But that’s a five-yearold at home, too. You have to ride that wave with them.” In Ungar’s must-pack festival kit, along with a small towel (because you never know), an umbrella (often a life-saving device), and ear protection (which can also help with sleep), is some way to take pictures. “They’ll want to know they were there when they were that little.” Even if Ungar didn’t work at and organize festivals, she would still go often with her family. “Festivals are a kind of social magnet. People come and they bring positive energy and intention . . . and kids can feel that. I think they need to feel that: a peaceful, joyous gathering of strangers and friends. It always strengthens my faith in humanity. We all need more community-building experiences like that.” RESOURCES: Clearwater Festival Clearwaterfestival.org FreshGrass Freshgrass.com/families Hawthorne Valley Fall Festival Hawthornevalleyfarm.org The Hoot Homeofthehoot.com Lollapalooza Lollapalooza.com Newport Folk Festival Newportfolk.org


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OP S E E H T

10 Bridge St, Phoenicia, NY

M averick CONCERTS

1916 2015 100th Season of Music in the Woods

Sat., July 11, 8 pm • Perry Beekman Trio Sun., July 12, 4 pm • Cypress String Quartet Sat. July 18, 11 am • Young People’s Concert: Bari Koral Family Band Sat., July 18, 8 pm • Jazz at the Maverick: Eldar Djangirov Trio Sun., July 18, 4 pm • Cassatt String Quartet Fri., July 24, 7 pm • Actors & Writers Sat., July 25, 8 pm • Steve Gorn, Indian Ragas Sun., July 26, 4 pm • Latitude 41 Piano Trio Sat., Aug. 1, 8 pm • Jazz at the Maverick Fred Hersch, Jazz Piano Sun. Aug. 2, 4 pm • Escher String Quartet Sat. Aug 8, 11 am • Young People’s Concert: Miró Quartet Sat., Aug. 8, 6 pm • Miró Quartet

Memorial Day Weekend - Sept 30th

845-688-5553 www.towntinker.com

120 Maverick Road • Woodstock, New York 800-595-4849 • www.MaverickConcerts.org

If only...

they could shop for themselves!

Pet Country Pet Country

The largest, most well-stocked pet food and supply center under one roof. 9,000 sq. ft. of commercial, super premium, natural and holistic dog andmost catwell-stocked foods, aspet well horse and The largest, foodas and supply center under one roof. 9,000 sq. ft. farm feeds, bird, small animal and aquarium of commercial, super premium, natural and supplies. Everything for&the care, fun Theholistic largest, well-stocked pet foodand and dogmost and cat foods, as well as horse and PET FOODS SUPPLIES farm feeds, bird, small animal and aquarium well-being of your pet. If pets could talk, supply center under one roof. 9,000 sq. ft. they’d supplies. Everything for the & care, fun and EVERYTHING FOR THE FUN WELL-BEING OF YOUR PET. say,of“take me to CARE, the country... Country!” commercial, super premium,Pet natural and

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7/15 CHRONOGRAM KIDS & FAMILY 53


Continuing Education

A detail from Golden Boulevard, a painting by HM Saffer, II, a faculty member at Art School of Colombia County. Hmsaffer.com

HORIZON EXPANSION 101

CONTINUING EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES BY JESSICA JONES AND JAKE SWAIN

S

chool is not for everyone. Dusty blackboards, dry lectures, and stringent schedules are not always conducive for a meaningful, lasting education. Realistically, how many high school graduates can say that they actually remember how to complete a math proof or what the proper format is for a critical essay? Rather than fleetingly memorizing information to pass a test, build a base of knowledge on your own terms with continuing education programs throughout the Hudson Valley. The environment in which you learn can make a world of difference to what you absorb; staring at a Powerpoint presentation about scuba diving will not give you the same perspective as squeezing into a wet suit and sinking into a dive pool. With hundreds of programs open to students of all ages, the time is ripe for busting out the old bucket list, or realizing what disciplines nourish your vitality. Get feedback in a collective workshop on the memoir it took you eight years to conceive, forge jewelry for your loved ones in a smithy, or filter your vacation photos without the help of Instagram. Almost anything can be accomplished with expert guidance and the will to learn, and all you have to do is try. Write for Life The need to craft narratives is part of human nature. If we feel something, we want to say something. With our singular knack for using symbols to express thoughts, writing is an obvious outlet for congested brains to unravel, explain, and understand the phenomena around us. We want validation for our inter-

54 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 7/15

pretations of the world, and for writers, this is especially consequential. The Wallkill Valley Writers community wants to be your sounding board. During their weekly workshops in New Paltz, students write, read to each other, listen attentively, and collaborate on each other’s work.Workshops begin with a freewrite to help students shed clutter from their psyches and get to the root of what they want to share. (845) 750-2370; Wallkillvalleywriters.com Wholesome Beginnings Take authority on health and wellness amid the frightful processed ingredients and soaring obesity rates nationwide with a course at SUNY Ulster in Stone Ridge. Classes in all disciplines are available through Ulster’s continuing education program every semester. If you are already in shape, help others harness their body’s full potential by becoming a nationally certified personal trainer. Take a 62-hour certification program through World Instructor Training Schools and become an active, positive force for change by learning to promote and integrate exercise into everyday life. Online orientation for the Personal Trainer course begins July 1. New at Ulster this year is a two-day Holistic Practices in Lactation course meant to help mother’s implement nonpharmaceutical approaches during pregnancy, birth, and breastfeeding. Nutrition, gut healing, homeopathy, and home remedies will be addressed during the course under the guidance of Jennifer Tow, who has 23 years experience with hands-on, intensive, holistic health care for mothers. (845) 339-2025; Sunyulster.edu


Enthronement Ceremony

Pure Spirituality

The Traditional Golden Enthronement of His Holiness the IX Kyabgon Jedrung Rinpoche at Shyalpa Monastery in Kathmandu

Three-day retreat with the Dzogchen master His Eminence Shyalpa Tenzin Rinpoche at Omega Institute in Rhinebeck, NY August 14–16, 2015

Nov 2, 2015: arrive in Kathmandu Nov 3 & 4: Enthronement and visit Boudnath Stupa Nov 5: Feast Offering and visit Monkey Temple Nov 6: day-trip to Lumbini, Nepal Nov 7: Departure

“True spirituality begins with purity of intention. When one’s motivation is pure, the results of one’s practice will always be positive.” — Shyalpa Tenzin Rinpoche

JOIN A PILGRIMAGE IN NEPAL

For further information: 1-315-449-2305 www.buddhafield.us

free

publicprograms The Return of Predators to Urban America Friday, July 10 at 7 p.m.

Roland Kays of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences will discuss how coyotes and other carnivores are adapting to life near people. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

For further information: 1-800-944-1001 or register at: www.eomega.org

The Olana Summer Party

ICEBERGS IN AUGUST Saturday, August 8

The Invaders Around Us Wednesday, July 15 at 6 p.m.

Kali Bird will lead a family-friendly walk exploring invasive plants and animals that inhabit our backyards, fields, forests, and streams. Register at http://www.caryinstitute. org/events/invaders-around-us.

our trails are open for the season We invite visitors to explore parts of our 2,000-acre campus. Hike along Wappinger Creek, picnic among native ferns, bike our internal roadways, or watch birds in the sedge meadow.

Learn more at www.caryinstitute.org 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Rte. 44)|Millbrook, NY 12545|845 677-5343

FREDERIC CHURCH’S OLANA HUDSON, NY WWW.OLANA.ORG/ICEBERGSINAUGUST

Image Credit: Frederic Edwin Church, The Icebergs (detail), 1861, oil on canvas, 64 1/2 x 112 1/2 in., Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Norma and Lamar Hunt. Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art

7/15 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 55


2015 Summer Music Festival

June 20 - August 2

“One of the 8 most amazing outdoor music venues in the world” — CNN

Carolina Eyck

Stephen Powell & Orchestra of St Luke’s

July 4 Pops, Patriots and Fireworks July 4th Spectacular July 11 La Favorite by Gaetano Donizetti Plus pre-opera concerts & conversations July 12 Out of Thin Air: Real and Surreal Music from Copland House with Carolina Eyck, thereminist

Gabriel Kahane & Rob Moose

July 18 Caramoor Jazz Festival Presented in collaboration with Jazz at Lincoln Center July 30 Gabriel Kahane & Rob Moose The Ambassador and more August 2 Festival Finale The Power of Brahms and Tchaikovsky

Tickets & info: caramoor.org / 914.232.1252 / Katonah, NY

Punctuating Space:

The Prints and Multiples of Richard Artschwager

JUNE 26 — SEPTEMBER 6, 2015

The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center Vassar College 124 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, New York fllac.vassar.edu | 845-437-5632 Richard Artschwager, Pregunta I, 1983, painted wood in two parts with steel hardware. Publisher: Multiples, Inc., NY, Edition: 6. Courtesy Marian Goodman Gallery, NY

56 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 7/15


Photo courtesy SUNY New Paltz A New Paltz student working with a 3D printed robohand, designed and built at SUNY New Paltz’s Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center.

Teaching Tech 3-D printing is a transformative technology. Its impact is being felt more and more in a growing number of disciplines—even the most unlikely industries are embracing the innovation that 3-D printing could provide. For example, some food companies think the incorporation of the technology into the culinary world will be as significant as the introduction of the microwave into household kitchens. But now you can keep up with the changing technological landscape that surrounds our world. SUNY New Paltz will be giving courses in 3-D printing this July. The campus is home to 30 desktop 3-D printers as part of its MakerBot Innovation Center. Dean of the School of Science and Engineering, Dan Freedman, urges potential students to “just approach it like any other learning exercise: start with the most basic, simple stuff, and don’t be afraid to fail.” He understands the hesitance and anxiety that is involved in embracing brand new technology. “This can be a little overwhelming, and there’s a lot of terminology that gets tossed around,” he explains. “But in the end it’s really just assembling simple things into complex things.” (845) 257-3454; Newpaltz.edu Hammer Time Fixate yourself in front of the flame during blacksmithing and small metals workshops under the counsel of seasoned craftsmen this summer and fall at the Center for Metal Arts. The formula for Valyrian steel may not be discovered, but it could be possible to surpass the talents of Gendry, King Robert Baratheon’s bastard blacksmithing son of “Game of Thrones” fame. Beginner classes are available in blacksmithing, hammer and pendent making, soldering, riveting, enameling, and texturing. Patrick Quinn, a lead blacksmith/fabricator, will teach a one-day workshop on October 3 where students will craft a hand-forged bottle opener. The Center for Metal Arts is continuously updating their workshop schedule, so when one class fills up, another will shortly open. (845) 651-7550; Centerformetalarts.com

Post-Impressive Art In our progressive world, artistic skills are quickly becoming more marketable, viable career options—no longer career paths for your parents to fret over. Expand skills picked up in high school or during personal downtime at Dutchess Community College with courses in writing, photography, painting, and music. Even those not geared toward art-making will find courses available at Dutchess each semester. In The Art of Photography course the Rule of Thirds, Golden Ratio, and Golden Spiral will be covered along with camera basics. An Introduction to Adobe Lightroom will walk students through the essentials of this photography software such as customizing desktops, editing techniques, and importing photos. A new class, Post Impressionist Landscape Painting, will use photos from greats such as Cezanne and Van Gogh as inspiration for students to emulate and craft their own masterpieces. (845) 341-8000; Sunydutchess.edu Secrets of the CIA We’ve all always wanted to wear a chef’s hat. Those towering papal cylinders that somehow seem to contain within them all the powers and gravitas of a professional chef: the virtuosic knife skills, pan flipping mastery, stoically steady seasoning hands, and extensive knowledge of flavor combinations. But, unfortunately for the untrained home cooks among us, the hats are nothing more than upscale hairnets. That doesn’t mean the secrets of cooking gourmet-level food are unavailable to the general public, to be cultishly kept among a handful of tall-hated chefs. The Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park is offering a smorgasbord of daylong summer classes called Saturday Kitchens. Each class—and there are dozens of them—focuses on one particular type of cuisine. There are classes in Indian food, breakfast food, artisan bread baking, knife skills, and Mediterranean cuisine, just to name a few. Each class will include instruction from expert CIA chefs, a delicious lunch, a free CIA logo apron and Master Collection kitchen utensil, and, of course, the chance to don a sugar-what chef’s hat. (800) 888-7850; Enthusiasts.ciachef.edu 7/15 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 57


THECENTERFORPERFORMINGARTS (845) 232-2320 • www.centerforperformingarts.org ATRHINEBECK For box office and information:

June 26 - July 12 8pm Fri & Sat (6/27 only) 3pm Sat (7/4 & 7/11 only) & Sun Tickets: $27/$25 $ 22 - ALL SATURDAY matinees

The Stories We Tell:

Hudson Valley Artists 2015 Curated by Mary K. Lombino

July 17-19 8pm Fri & Sat • 3pm Sat & Sun Tickets: $27/$25

July 24 - August 16 8pm Fri & Sat 3pm Sun Tickets: $27/$25

SATURDAYMORNINGFAMILYSERIES SATURDAYS AT 11 AM • Tickets: $9 adults; $7 children in advance or at the door

Monster Intelligence Puppet Show • July 11

Perry Meigs, Untitled 2 (Spring 2011), 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24 in.

Robin Hood by Hampstead Stage Company • July 18

Through November 8, 2015

Shrek, Jr. with Kids on Stage • July 25 & August 1 The CENTER is located at 661 Rte. 308, 3.5 miles east of the light in the Village of Rhinebeck

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

See you at The CENTER!

WWW.N EWPALTZ.E DU / M USE U M

Canterbury School

July 20-24, 2015 Ages 6 to 12

New Milford, Connecticut

$185

Working With Masters A unique musical experience! 5-day intensive 8:45 AM to 3:30 PM For information or to register, contact: Justin Kolb, Director of Education 845-586-3588 J.kolb@phoeniciavoicefest.com Register now. Program limited to 20.

Have you ever wondered whether you’re truly getting through to your child, students or business associates? Would you like to communicate more effectively? The science of face reading, with John Carroll holds the answer.

3-Day Intensive Morphology Workshop: Sept. 18,19 & 20 Join John for a class on this ancient science that dates back 4,000-5,000 years to ancient Egypt and is used as a diagnostic tool in the medical world in France. The face you were born with reveals the temperament and personality you were given in this lifetime. fri:

5pm- 9pm, sat: 9am-5pm, sun: 9am-4pm, 715 Rt. 28, Kingston Cost: $350

Please call John’s office at (845) 338-8420 to reserve your space in class.

58 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 7/15

www.cbury.org | admissions@cbury.org | 860-210-3832

CREATIVE

WRITING WORKSHOPS U s i n g A m h e r s t Wr i t e r s & Artists Method

Kate Hymes, Leader (845) 750-2370

NEW PALTZ

WEEKLY WORKSHOPS

10-weeks • 3-hour sessions Thursday Evenings Wednesday & Sunday Afternoons

WRITE SATURDAYS All day writing workshops

CONSULTATIONS & INDIVIDUAL CONFERENCES www.wallkillvalleywriters.com khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com


Blacksmiths forge collaborative sculpture with Jake James at The Center For Metal Arts.

A Holistic Curriculum Two-hundred and fifty serene acres in Rhinebeck are the oasis of the Omega Institute, an organization devoted to holistic learning and spiritual growth. The Institute offers hundreds of classes focusing on creativity, health, healing, relationships, sustainable living, and more. Classes at Omega focus on values and mindfulness that often go ignored in our hectic everyday bustling. For example, nature-based philosopher Daniel Vitalis will hold a series of immersionexperience workshops in October designed to bring out your wild, authentic, natural self. His course will lay out strategies and tactics to aid students in navigating an increasingly toxic world. Vitalis will also work with his students to develop individualized health and personal development strategies, allowing them to discover the foods and chemical compositions biologically suited to each individual. (845) 944-2002; Eomega.org The Art Academy The Hudson Valley is home to legions of artists. Chances are, if you live in the area, at the very least you’re an art-enthusiast. If so, that enthusiasm can blossom into an avidity for artistic creation with summer art classes at the Art School of Colombia County in Harlemville. Classes in printing, oil painting, photography, and Sumi-e (East Asian brush-painting) are only a few of the 13 classes offered throughout the months of July and August at the campus. Of particular interest is the return of Tim Ebneth, a Hudson Valley artist, to the school, who will instruct a mixed media course this month. His course will focus on mastering various media including charcoal, acrylic, oil, and graphite—but will also explore the difficult and slippery question of how an artist becomes inspired. (518) 672-7140; Artschoolofcolombiacounty.org

CATCH GREAT NEW THEATRE ON ITS WAY TO THE WORLD

Under the Sea Aquaman, Poseidon, Ariel—they can all breath underwater. Fortunately for us land-dwellers, the scuba suit was invented circa 1800, so now we can also experience what it’s like to plunge under the spuming sea into the world of coral reefs and clownfish (region depending). On July 7 and September 16, SUNY Orange in Middletown will be offering scuba diving lessons. Basic scuba and skin diving skills will be taught to prepare the student for open water diving, and eventual international certification. If classes in scuba diving seem too far off the deep-end, SUNY Orange also offers a plethora of classes in arts and crafts, computing, language, music, and workplace skills. (845) 343-2858; Sunyorange.edu Music Masters Camps Sitting in a circle among ambitious songwriters and watching Steve Earle sing, picking at the strings of his guitar, seems as unlikely as playing with the Allman Brother’s Band—but neither scenario is pure fantasy. The Full Moon Resort in Big Indian is offering 13 once-in-a-lifetime music masters camps designed to bridge the gap between audiences and artist. Each camp has one or more world-class artists on staff as counselors that hold lectures, jam sessions, classes, and panels. The camps are either academically oriented, focused on music theory and master classes, or have a more social, festive feel. Each session is four days long and held throughout July and August. (845) 254-8009; Musicmastercamps.com

V A S S A R & N E W Y O R K S TA G E A N D F I L M P R E S E N T

POWERHOUSE THEATER J U N E 2 6 - AU G U S T 2 / O N T H E VA S S A R C A M P U S P O W E R H O U S E .V A S S A R . E D U / 8 4 5 - 4 3 7- 5 5 9 9

7/15 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 59


galleries & museums BARRETT ART CENTER

55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-2550. “Photowork ‘15 National Juried Photography Exhibition.” Through August 8.

BEACON 3D

164 MAIN STREET, BEACON. “Beacon 3D.” Twenty artists will exhibit their work in the third annual outdoor public art event. Through October 15.

BEACON ARTIST UNION

506 MAIN STREET, BEACON 222-0177. “Kirsten Lyon: Bits & Pieces.” Through July 5.

BEACON INSTITUTE’S CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION AND EDUCATION 199 DENNING’S POINT, BEACON 838-1600. “Following Rivers.” Photography exhibit by Alison M. Jones. Through October 3.

BETHEL WOODS CENTER FOR THE ARTS

200 HURD ROAD, BETHEL 454-3388. “Written in Stone: Sculptures by Harry Gordon.” Through October 12.

BETSY JACARUSO STUDIO & GALLERY

43 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK 516-4435. “Essence of the Valley.” Featuring fresh botanicals and luminous landscapes by Betsy Jacaruso and the Cross River Fine Artists. Through July 31.

BLUE HILL GALLERY, COLUMBIA-GREENE COMMUNITY COLLEGE 4400 ROUTE 23, HUDSON (518) 828-4181. “Dot Chast Retrospective Art Show.” July 2-August 28. Opening reception July 9, 6-8pm.

CAFFE A LA MODE

1 OAKLAND AVENUE, WARWICK 986-1223. “Works by Bruce Young.” Graphite portraiture, pen and ink. Through July 31.

CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY

622 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1915. “Earth Sky Dream.” A group exhibit featuring artists Linda Newman Boughton, Chris Freeman, Laura Von Rosk, Bruce Murphy, Vince Vella and Jane Bloodgood-Abrams. Through July 12.

CHATHAM MEADOWS

101 HARMON HEIGHTS ROAD, CHATHAM. “Chatham Meadows.” Summer sculpture show. Through August 14.

COLDWELL BANKER VILLAGE GREEN REALTY

268 FAIR STREET, KINGSTON 331-5357. Group Show: Wired Gallery Online Artists Showcase. Through July 5.

COLUMBIA COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS

209 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 671-6213. “Bodyworks: Cars, Trucks, Bikes & Tattoos.” Featuring the work of area artists in all mediums showing off their “bodies of work.” Through July 25.

COOPER-FINN GALLERY Rich Corozine, John Willy and Me To the Blaskets, Dingle Peninsula, 1972 part of the exhibit “Richard Corozine: Meetings with the Remarkable.” Through July 5 at Wired Gallery in High Falls.

24 FRONT STREET, MILLBROOK 605-1150. “Mail Art Exhibit.” Post-card sized art from around the world. Through July 31.

CROSS CONTEMPORARY ART

81 PARTITION STREET, SAUGERTIES 399-9751. “Catherine Howe: Supreme Fiction Prints and Reverse Paintings.” July 3-26. Opening reception July 3, 5-8pm.

DIA:BEACON 510 WARREN ST GALLERY 510 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-0510. “Abstract Thoughtography: Images by Jonathan Pazer.” Through July 26.

ALBERT SHAHINIAN FINE ART GALLERY 22 EAST MARKET STREET SUITE 301, RHINEBECK 876-7578. “Yale Epstein: Essential Forms.” Through July 12.

AMERICAN GIFTS GALLERY & SHOWROOM 62 E MARKET STREET, RED HOOK 758-1653. “Plein-air Paintings by Barbara Masterson.” Through July 15.

ANN STREET GALLERY 104 ANN STREET, NEWBURGH 784-1146. “You are Here.” Group exhibition investigating cartography. Through July 25.

ANVIL GALLERY AT TECH SMITHS 45 NORTH FRONT STREET, KINGSTON TECH-SMITHS.COM/ANVIL-GALLERY. Exhibit by New Yorker Cartoonists Michael Crawford and Carolita Johnson. July 4-September 30. Opening reception July 11, 6-8pm.

ART SOCIETY OF KINGSTON 97 BROADWAY, KINGSTON 338-0333 “Pastels Illuminated.” Group pastel show. July 4-25. Opening reception July 11, 5-8pm.

ARTS UPSTAIRS 60 MAIN STREET, PHOENICIA 688-2142. “Works by Harper Blanchet.” July 18-September 13.

ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER 24 SECOND STREET, ATHENS (518) 945-2136. “Taking Root.” Juxtaposing historical artifacts with contemporary art, curated by Carrie Feder, tells the tale of colliding worlds and the American journey. Through July 26.

60 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 7/15

3 BEEKMAN STREET, BEACON 440-0100. “Robert Irwin, Excursus: Homage to the Square3.” Landmark site-specific work. Through May 31, 2017.

DOG HOUSE GALLERY

429 PHILLIPS ROAD, SAUGERTIES 246-0402. “An Abstract Vision.” Abstract landscapes. Works on handmade paper and raw canvas with acrylic and collage. July 11, 4-7pm and July 12, 10am-6pm.

DUCK POND GALLERY

128 CANAL STREET, TOWN OF ESOPUS LIBRARY, PORT EWEN 338-5580. “James Martin: Drawings and Watercolors.” July 4-25. Opening reception July 11, 5-8pm.

EAST FISHKILL COMMUNITY LIBRARY

348 ROUTE 376, HOPEWELL JUNCTION 226-2145. “East Fishkill Community Center Art Class Exhibition.” Through July 31.

THE EMPORIUM ANTIQUES & ART CENTER

319 MAIN STREET, GREAT BARRINGTON, MA (413) 528-1660. “Works by Ken Otsuka.” July 2-30.

FIELD LIBRARY

4 NELSON AVENUE, PEEKSKILL (914) 737-1212. “Jo-Ann Brody: Musings: Worksin Clay.” Through July 31.

FOYER OF THE MINDY ROSS GALLERY, KAPLAN HALL, SUNY ORANGE

CORNER OF GRAND & FIRST STREETS, NEWBURGH 341-9386. “Newburgh Waterfront in Earlier Days.” Photographs displayed with the help and cooperation of City of Newburgh Historian, Mary McTamaney. Through July 30.

FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER AT VASSAR COLLEGE

124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5237. “New Works by Sculptor and Painter Richard Artschwager.” Through September 6.

FRG OBJECTS & DESIGN

217 WARREN STREET 2ND FLOOR, HUDSON (646) 483-9109. “Vault.” Sean-Paul Pluguez allows us into a creative compartment where even seemingly mundane objects have an aura of value. Through August 30.


PLAN YOUR ME-TIME WITH US 8DW EIGHT DAY WEEK

EVENTS TO YOUR INBOX EACH THURSDAY

CATALYST GALLERY 137 MAIN ST. BEACON NY

My Life With The Weather Beings Paintings by T. Donovan JULY 11 – AUGUST 1

sign up now  www.chronogram.com/8dw

| TDSTUDIO.NET

| 917-974-7303

gallery hours: wed–sat. 1pm -7pm

Crawford Gallery of Fine Art

Still Life

EXHIBITION AND SALE ALL MEDIUMS (NOT THE USUAL BOWL OF FRUIT)

JULY � rd -�� st r eception J uly �� th �:��-�:��

Summer Classes are in progress

One day crash courses in painting, sketching, drawing 60 minutes to better painting

WORKSHOPS, TALKS, EXHIBITIONS JOIN OUR EMAIL LIST FOR EVENTS

Artists: for future “calls” join the email list cgfa@hvc.rr.com 65 MAIN STREET, PINE BUSH, NY (845) 744-8634

FOLDFORMING FOR VESSELS

FOUR WAYS TO ATTEND

JULY 24 6:30PM: Farm-to-Table Dinner with celebrated Charles Lewton-Brain, at the Seligman Center in Sugar Loaf, NY. Catering by Black Dirt Gourmet. $25 JULY 24-26: Hands-on, lecture & demo in foldforming topics with Charles Lewton-Brain at the Center for Metal Arts in Florida, NY. Audit, student & day passes available. Register online. For dinner reservations, or to register www.centerformetalarts.com

CENTER FOR METAL ARTS 44 Jayne St, Florida, NY 845-651-7550 Register online at www.centerformetalarts.com

7/15 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 61


FRIENDS OF HISTORIC KINGSTON

63 MAIN STREET, KINGSTON 339-0720. “Jervis McEntee Retrospective.” Through October 31.

THE GALLERY AT R&F

84 TEN BROECK AVENUE, KINGSTON 331-3112. “Encaustic/Form II.” Sculpture exhibit by Susan Spencer Crowe. Through July 24.

GALLERY 66 NY

66 MAIN STREET, COLD SPRING 809-5838. “Finding Power: Women of Courage, Passion and Character.” Paintings, collages and sculptures by Maureen Winzig, Leslie Fandrich and Helen Hosking. Through August 2. Opening reception July 3, 6pm-9pm.

GRAND CRU BEER AND CHEESE MARKET 6384 MILL STREET, RHINEBECK 876-6992. “Works by Ruth Wetzel.” July 8-August 8. Opening reception July 11, 5pm-8pm.

ONE MILE GALLERY 475 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON 338-2035. “Haunted Summer.” Featuring six female artists whose work explore fear, the paranormal, horror and occult ritual. Through July 10. “Let’s go Away for Awhile” runs from July 11 through August 8. Opening reception July 11, 6-9pm.

ORANGE HALL GALLERY SUNY ORANGE, MIDDLETOWN 341-4790. “River Valley Artists Guild Summer Exhibition.” The River Valley Artists Guild displays 60+ artworks and handmade crafts. Through July 23.

THE PALATE CAFE 34 MAIN STREET, PINE BUSH 744-4817. “Botanical Paintings by Roberta Rosenthal.” Through August 31.

PALMER GALLERY

398 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-3400. “Microcosm Reception.” Through July 25.

VASSAR COLLEGE 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5370 “Art from the Class of 1965.” This exhibition features large-scale oil paintings as well as watercolor, acrylic, pastel, sculpture, pottery, weaving, a conceptual installation and photography by 19 artists. Through July 16.

HOWLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY

PHOENICIA ART STUDIO TOUR

GREENE COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS GALLERY

313 MAIN STREET, BEACON. “Anderson Center for Autism’s Expressive Outcomes: Art Works 2.” An exhibition of work created by adult artists in Anderson Center for Autism Expressive Outcomes. July 11-August 2.

HUDSON BEACH GLASS

162 MAIN STREET, BEACON 440-0068. “Gitmo at Home, Gitmo at Play.” Photographs by Debi Cornwall. Through July 5.

HUDSON OPERA HOUSE

327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-4181. Photographs by James Autery. Through August 2.

HUDSON VALLEY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 788-0100. “Seven Deadly Sins: Lust.” Through July 26.

HYDE PARK LIBRARY

2 MAIN STREET, HYDE PARK 229-7791. “Photography by Larry Keller.” Through July 15.

JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY: THE SCHOOL

MAIN STREET, PHOENICIA SHANDAKENART.COM. Phoenicia Art Studio Tour. Over 30 Studios, galleries, art parks and events on a free self-guided tour through the scenic Catskills town of Shandaken. July 17-19.

R WELLS GALLERY 725 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (607) 760-4305. “Studies in Modesty.” Large-scale sculptures. Through July 17.

RED HOOK CAN NORTH BROADWAY, RED HOOK 758-6575. “Hudson Valley Landscapes Now.” Through July 19.

RIVERWINDS GALLERY 172 MAIN STREET, BEACON 838-2880. Bubble Makers. New paintings by Dana Wigdor. July 11-August 12. Opening reception July 11, 5pm-8pm.

SELIGMANN CENTER FOR THE ARTS

25 BROAD STREET, KINDERHOOK (518) 758-1628. “Five Decades: El Anatsui.” Through August 29.

23 WHITE OAK DRIVE, SUGAR LOAF 469-9459. By Chance. A meeting of minds, materials, and meaning. New works by Lisa Breznak, Mimi Czajka Graminski, and Rive Weinstein. Through July 30.

JOHN DAVIS GALLERY

SIMON’S ROCK COLLEGE: DANIEL ARTS CENTER

362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5907. “Nick Carone: Fictitious Image.” Painting, drawing and sculpture representing heads and the figure. Also showing Isidro Blasco, “Tilted”; Kiki Smith, “Each Day”; Rachel Ostrow, “Nothing but Love Songs”; and Valerie Hammond, “​ Lure.” Through July 19.

KAPLAN HALL, MINDY ROSS GALLERY

THE CORNER OF GRAND & FIRST STREETS, NEWBURGH 341-9386. “The Majestic Hudson: River, Highlands, Tributaries: Photographs by Greg Miller.” Greg Miller’s artistry in photography is shown through his keen sense of light and perspective. This solo show includes panoramic views of the magnificent Hudson River and environs. Through July 16.

KINGSTON MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART (KMOCA)

103 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON KMOCAINFO.WORDPRESS.COM. “Recent Works by Susan Siegel, Debra Priestly, Frank Young.” July 4-30. Opening reception July 4, 5-8pm

LIMNER GALLERY

123 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-2343 Works by Jim Garmhausen, Terry Tapp, and Axelle Kieffer. Through July 11. “Slowinski” paintings and drawings from July 18 through August 30.

MARK GRUBER GALLERY

17 NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ 255-1241. “A Shared Passion.” This exhibit celebrates the landscape of the Hudson Valley, with pastels by Marlene Wiedenbaum, PSA, and oil paintings by James Coe. Through July 11.

MATTEAWAN GALLERY

464 MAIN STREET, BEACON 440-7901. “Strange Geometries: Greg Slick.” Through July 5. “de•con•struct” featuring work by Janice Caswell, Emily Hass, Ryan Sarah Murphy, Cat Poljski, and Krista Svalbonas. July 11 through August 30.

THE MAXON MILLS

37 FURNACE BANK ROAD, WASSAIC WASSAICPROJECT.ORG. “Deep End.” Wassaic Project’s eighth annual exhibition, draws inspiration from J. G. Ballard’s post-apocalyptic short story.Through September 20.

MOHONK PRESERVE

MULTIPLE PARKING AREAS, NEW PALTZ MOHONKPRESERVE.ORG. Robert Lobe’s “Field Studies.” Six large-scale works installed in a variety of outdoor locations in the Preserve and the Visitor Center. Through October 18.

THE MOVIEHOUSE GALLERY

48 MAIN STREET, MILLERTON (518) 789-0022. “Speaking to Nature: The Sculpture of Henry Klimowicz.” Through July 9.

NORTH RIVER GALLERY

29 MAIN STREET, SUITE 2B, CHATHAM (202) 466-3700. “An Artful Life on the Farm: Sculpture and Works on Paper by American Folk Artist Lavern Kelley.” July 18-August 17. Opening reception July 18, 4-7pm.

OLANA STATE HISTORIC SITE

5720 ROUTE 9G, HUDSON (518) 828-0135. “River Crossings.” Through November 1.

62 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 7/15

84 ALFORD ROAD, GREAT BARRINGTON, MA (413) 644-4400. “Eternal: Daniel Fish.” A video installation. July 6-18.

THE CHATHAM BOOKSTORE 27 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM 518-392-3005. “Landscape–Up Close and Far Away.” Judith Vargas Warren. July 8-August 28. Opening reception July 17, 5-7pm.

THE RE INSTITUTE 1395 BOSTON CORNERS ROAD, MILLERTON (518) 567-5359. Judy Pfaff and Gillian Jager. Through July 30.

THEO GANZ STUDIO 149 MAIN STREET, BEACON (917) 318-2239. “From a Sister’s Closet.” Recent sculpture by Judy Sigunick. Through August 2.

THOMAS COLE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 218 SPRING STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-7465. “River Crossings.” Thirty artists including Chuck Close, Maya Lin, Martin Puryear, Cindy Sherman, and Kiki Smith. Through November 1.

THOMPSON GIROUX GALLERY 57 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-3336. “Fusionera.” Group exhibition featuring Erin Beaver, Adam Brent, Dan Devine, Barry Gerson, Ned Snider, Josephine Turalba and Hazel Weatherfield. Through July 19.

UNFRAMED ARTISTS GALLERY 173 HUGUENOT STREET, NEW PALTZ, 255-5482. “Vibrant Vision.” Thirty local, state, and international artists express their vibrant love of color in their visual art. Individual artists are available for questions during Gallery hours. Through September 7.

WALLKILL RIVER SCHOOL AND ART GALLERY 232 WARD STREET, MONTGOMERY 457-ARTS. Solo exhibits by Lorraine Furey and Sal Russo. Opening reception on July 11, 5-7pm.

WILDERSTEIN PRESERVATION 330 MORTON ROAD, RHINEBECK 876-4818. “Modern Sculpture & the Romantic Landscape.” Outdoor sculpture exhibit featuring Mark Bennett, Laura Cannamela, Andy Fennell, Robert Filipek, Mimi Graminski, Jennifer Harris, Steve Jennis, Nicholas Kahn & Richard Selesnick, Melora Kuhn, and William Logan. Through October 31.

WIRED GALLERY 11 MOHONK RD, HIGH FALLS 876-4818. “Richard Corozine: Meetings with the Remarkable.” Through July 5 “Material Message,” curated by Josephine Bloodgood. Opens Saturday, July 11

WOODSTOCK SCHOOL OF ART 2470 ROUTE 212, WOODSTOCK 679-2388. “Instructor’s Exhbition.” Works by the School faculty. Through Sept. 5.


SHADOWLAND THEATRE

The Hudson Valley’s Destination for Engaging, Professional Theatre

July 10 through August 2 by Ken Ludwig Shadowland continues its string of successful farces with this love letter to the theatre. An aging couple of still-ambitious has-beens are given one last chance at stardom, in Ken Ludwig’s comic delight, MOON OVER BUFFALO. Starring Tony nominee and (SNL alum) Denny Dillon

Moon Over Buff alo

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WWW.SHADOWLANDTHEATRE.ORG 845-647-5511 • Ellenville, NY

BARDAVON PRESENTS HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC 15-16 SEASON

Music Director / Conductor Randall Craig Fleischer AMRAM • SHOSTAKOVICH BARBER • RAVEL • SIBELIUS STRAVINSKY • BRAHMS • BLOCH • BERNSTEIN MOZART • BERLIOZ • HANDEL and much more... ON SALE NOW!

An Artful Life on the Farm:

Sculpture and Works on Paper by American Folk Artist

postcard for Folk Art_Layout 1 6/10/15 3:16 PM Page 1

N o rt h R i v e r G a l l e ry

laverN Kelley July 18 auGust 15, 2015 opeNiNG receptioN

Saturday July 18, 4 - 7pm Guest curator Sydney L. Waller will be in attendance

BUENA VISTA SOCIAL CLUB Friday October 30 at 8pm - UPAC - Kingston NY

summer Gallery hours 10 percent of proceeds of this show will be donated to the Columbia Land Conservancy

North river Gallery

Friday noon–7pm Saturday 11am–5pm Also by Appointment

29 Main Street, Suite 2B Chatham, NY 202.466.3700 twp@northrivergallery.com • www.northrivergallery.com

BARDAVON - 35 Market St Poughkeepsie • 845.473.2072 - WWW.BARDAVON.ORG UPAC - 601 Broadway Kingston • 845.339.6088 - WWW.TICKETMASTER.COM

RHINEBECK BANK / THE DR JEFFERY PERCHICK MEMORIAL FUND / WMHT 7/15 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 63


Music Bad Moon Rising Ambrosia Parsley By Peter Aaron Photo by Fionn Reilly

64 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 7/15 54 6/15


S

inger-songwriter Ambrosia Parsley may be best known for the spooky [the songs] up. It was the Bush years and there was no shortage of material— noir of her old band Shivaree’s 1999 hit “Goodnight Moon.” And her solo and it all happened to rhyme.” By Shivaree’s fourth album, 2007’s Tainted Love: debut, the Brechtian pop outing Weeping Cherry, just released in the US on Mating Calls and Fight Songs (Zoe Records), a collection of tunes connected Barbes Records, may have been fueled by periods of profound sadness and may with socially and sexually abusive artists (Phil Spector, Rick James, Ike Turner, be, according to her, “basically conversations with dead people.” But lest anyone others) and recorded while the front woman was pregnant with her son Lucius, get the idea she’s some kind of fatalistic bummer-goth diva, Parsley insists that the band was feeling like it had run its course. “The records were coming few for her the act of creating music has been increasingly—dare she say it—fun. and far between, bolts would fall off and need to be replaced,” says Parsley, “I’ve never had so much fun making a record,” she says. “Making this one was alluding to the group’s constant lineup changes. “I hated being in videos—I’d full of moments when [she and her collaborators] were really ‘talking’ to each much rather play Scrabble with my bandmates. Plus, yeah, it took me a minute other as musicians. But even though I try to play in the light more and more, to adjust to my new life as a mother.” I’m still constantly drawn to what’s under the bed.” So she pulled the plug on the Shivaree name, settled into being a mom, And when it comes to her family background, there’s some pretty dramatic and even got a barber’s license. She, Lucius, and her spouse, who works in stuff under that bed. Parsley’s grandfather, a coal miner and union organizer, music publishing, continued to commute between their New York apartment moved the clan from their generations-long and Phoenicia house. “Our first [local] place was “With that song Chris West Virginia home to the Los Angeles area after in Willow,” says Parsley, who has since sung on learning his immediate future wasn’t looking so projects by Mocean Worker, TV on the Radio’s and Phil saw a germ of good. “He skipped out on a hit,” Parsley says. David Sitek, and others. “It was the golden “He was at a company picnic and someone there days, when record companies were throwing something happening there told him he was going to be killed. So he took money around, so we had a little bit to put the hint and went out to California. He found a down—before real estate prices got crazy up and pushed me to keep place in Reseda, which became like a teeny-tiny here, like they are now.” Still, she never stopped West Virginia after my five uncles and all of their going, even though I felt like writing and working on her own music, getting families followed him and his family out there. together regularly to record with McGough and Which was where he lived out his life—until I didn’t have any ideas left. two of their former Shivaree co-conspirators, the black lung finally got him.” Around Parsley’s multi-instrumentalists Chris Maxwell and childhood house there was music, mostly But it turned out great, and Phil Hernandez. As the music production country, in line with the family’s Appalachian duo the Elegant Too, Maxwell and Hernandez it made me braver and less have worked with such clients as Yoko Ono, roots, which was played via eight-track tapes: Dolly Parton, George Jones, Bobby Goldsboro. Ray Davies, They Might Be Giants, John Cale, “I loved [Goldsboro’s] ‘Honey,’” the singer worried about always having and various film, commercial, and television recalls. “But I also loved Kiss and my mom’s something already prepared concerns. Pointer Sisters albums. My dad’s brothers all “Ambrosia’s vision as an artist is really unique, sang and played shitty guitar—like I do,” Parsley I think,” Maxwell, who relocated to West when I go into the studio.” Saugertiessaysin 1998 says with a laugh. after Parsley introduced him Although she “always sang and wrote songs, for as far back as I can remember,” to the area. “She comes at it from more of a literary angle, rather than just being the internationally charting Shivaree would actually be her first band. a straight songwriter. Her songs are these cool little stories.” It’s 11 such stories “Everything happened really fast with that,” she explains. “I met [keyboardist] that form Weeping Cherry, which was supported by a successful PledgeMusic Danny McGough at a party in 1997 and [guitarist] Duke McVinnie just happened campaign and released in France in 2013. Many of the tales are bittersweet, to be crashing on Danny’s couch at the time. We wrote three songs together given that the year of the album’s making was fraught with the losses of several right away and suddenly we had a band. But, really, Shivaree was always more of family members and friends, including ex-Shivaree drummer George Javori, a collective than a band per se, with members coming and going and different whose funeral at sea is vividly memorialized in the poignant “Catalina.” For people playing on different songs on the records.” The nucleus of the project Parsley, an exacting writer known for taking lengths of time to work out her moved to New York upon signing with Capitol for 1999’s fantastically titled I songs, the release brought with it a breakthrough in the form of “Rubble,” a Oughtta Give You a Shot in the Head for Making Me Live in This Dump. Among the track that was created in-the-moment with the record button on. “Usually, set’s smoky, twangy, sexy tracks was “Goodnight Moon,” which got picked up we work until things feel like they aren’t moving anywhere and then we quit for use in an Italian watch commercial, leading to platinum sales of the disc for the day,” she remembers. “But with that song Chris and Phil saw a germ of there and gold sales in France and Portugal. “[The song] got really big in Italy, something happening there and pushed me to keep going, even though I felt so we went over there to play,” Parsley says. “The audience expected us to like I didn’t have any ideas left. But it turned out great, and it made me braver do exactly what was on the album, and they seemed to be pretty confused, and less worried about always having something already prepared when I go because we when got [on stage] Duke turned his ring modulator on and we into the studio.” and started doing all of this weird, freaky stuff. They didn’t like that. [Laughs.] “[Parsley’s] voice has a really special sound,” says singer-songwriter Joan But then we played ‘Goodnight Moon’ and suddenly everything was okay.” The Wasser aka Joan As Policewoman, who, like AA Bondy (Verbena) and Marc act went on to accrue a healthy following in the “wine-drinking” countries of Anthony Thompson (Chocolate Genius), appears as a guest player on Weeping Europe during the early ’00s, although at the time it didn’t seem there were Cherry. “It’s not about being a powerhouse; it’s more nuanced. The sounds and many radio programmers listening back in the States. arrangements that Chris and Phil came up with for the record are amazing. Among those in the US who were listening, however, were several high- I tend to appreciate anyone doing anything really well while using a classic powered TV and film producers. “Goodnight Moon” made its way into the sound, and Ambrosia just writes such well-crafted songs.” series “Dawson’s Creek” and was tapped by Quentin Tarantino for 2004’s “With this album I just wanted to make something really pretty,” says Parsley. Kill Bill:Volume 2 (a re-recorded version of the song would appear in 2012’s “But, more than anything, I want people to think about the dead friends I’m massively grossing Silver Linings Playbook). In 2004, Parsley took a yearlong gig singing about. That’s what makes them present for me. It’s what makes them on Air America radio’s “Unfiltered,” a show hosted by Rachel Maddow, Public live again.” Enemy’s Chuck D, and Parsley’s friend, comedian Lizz Winstead. The segment, sometimes live and sometimes recorded, was called “Ambrosia Sings the News” Ambrosia Parsley will begin a monthly residency at Rockwood Music Hall in New York and ran for nearly 50 episodes. “It was crazy and a lot of fun,” she says. “My on September 16. Weeping Cherry is out now on Barbes Records. Facebook.com/ husband and I would get all the newspapers, go to a coffee shop, and I’d write AmbrosiaParsley. 7/15 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 65


PINK MARTINI

NIGHTLIFE HIGHLIGHTS Handpicked by music editor Peter Aaron for your listening pleasure.

July 8. Self-described “little orchestra” Pink Martini hasn’t visited these parts in a while, but the timing of this appearance at the Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center is perfect. Why? Because the Portland, Oregon, group’s cocktail of jazz, classical, Latin, and classic pop sounds is just the right match for a laid-back summer eve at the Orange County venue. The eight-piece ensemble was assembled in 1994 by band leader and pianist Thomas Lauderdale, who states that “Pink Martini is a rollicking around-the-world musical adventure. If the United Nations had a house band in 1962, hopefully we’d be that band.” Get your exotica on, Hudson Valley. (“Footloose: The Musical” runs July 23-26.) 7:30pm. $55-$70. Chester. (845) 610-5900; Sugarloafpac.org.

SWIRLIES

ISLE OF KLEZBOS

July 1. Boston band Swirlies ended up very different sonically than the way they started out. After forming in 1990 as a Go-Go’s tribute act (?!), the group refocused on shoegaze when founding guitarist Damon Tutunjian and bassist Andy Bernick discovered My Bloody Valentine. Despite releasing albums only sporadically since their 1990s heyday (the last was 2009’s download-only Swirlies’ Magic Strop: Gavin’s March to the Sea) and enduring numerous lineup changes (Tutunjian and Bernick remain), Swirlies continue, and will make this July tour stop at the Half Moon—fitting, since erstwhile drummer (and Fat Cat Records US main man) Adam Pierce is a local resident. With Breakfast in Fur. (SmashCrashBash!! #20 with Cellular Chaos and Dead Unicorn blows up July 3; Palm and Jobs jam July 24.) 9pm. $7. Hudson. (518) 828-1562; Thehalfmoonhudson.com.

July 10. With one of our favorite band names ever, all-female klezmer band Isle of Klezbos is no novelty-concept act. The veteran New York group is one of the most acclaimed and esteemed klezmer units around today, approaching “tradition with irreverence and respect” and headlining at clubs and festivals around the world. In addition to their recently working with Jill Sobule and Scissor Sisters, the clarinet/sax/trumpet/flugelhorn/accordion/drums ensemble’s music has been featured on “CBS Sunday Morning,” CNN’s “World-Beat,” PBS’s “In the Life,” and Showtime’s “The L Word,” and other films, TV shows, and radio broadcasts. No strangers to playing in the Hudson Valley, the band here returns to our region for a much-looked-forward-to show at the Rosendale Cafe. (Krewe de La Rue does the Cajun two-step July 3.) 8pm. $10. Rosendale. (845) 658-9048; Rosendalecafe.com.

THE FIGGS RECORD RELEASE SHOW

BEACON JAZZ FESTIVAL

July 10. Hook-happy power pop trio the Figgs have been at it for nearly 30 years, recording and touring on their own as well as backing up Graham Parker and Tommy Stinson. This month, the Saratoga Springs-born outfit—singer/guitarist Mike Gent, bassist Pete Donnelly (who’s also in the revamped NRBQ), and drummer Pete Hayes—celebrates the release of their 12th studio album, Other Planes of Here, with this high-powered hit job at the Low Beat. If you dig hummable bubblegum melodies with crunchy chunks of tough guitar—think the Jam, the Buzzcocks, or Paul Collins’s Beat—well, then, you are in for quite a tasty treat here. Opener TBA. (Eternal Crimes, Home Body, and Slowshine rock July 9; the Yellow Dress, Better Pills, and the Firs appear July 13.) 9pm. $10. Albany. (518) 432-6572; Thelowbeat.com.

July 25. What with the recent advent of clubs like Quinn’s, the Town Crier, and the Dogwood, as well as last month’s Beacon Riverfest, it’s clear that Pete Seeger’s hallowed hometown is building on his musical legacy. Now add to that the inaugural Beacon Jazz Festival, which debuts late this month at the city’s recently christened Pete and Toshi Seeger Riverfront Park. Along with free wine and cider tastings via local artisans and craft beer and food from local breweries and eateries, the festival will present music from Sun of Goldfinger (featuring Tim Berne, David Torn, and Ches Smith), the Karl Berger/Ingrid Sertso Quartet, George Coleman Jr.’s Rivington Project, the International Brass and Membrane Corps, Mike Dopazo and the HV All-Stars, and DJ Grady Salter. Noon. $45 ($35 in advance), $65 VIP. Beacon. (845) 337-1342; Beaconarts.org.

66 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 7/15


CD REVIEWS

ROCKET NUMBER NINE RECORDS

BRUCE KATZ BAND HOMECOMING
 (2014, AMERICAN SHOWPLACE MUSIC)

The modern guitar blues can seem like a game of finesse, infinitesimally subtle variations on stock themes, and back-channel gestures, jokes, and boasts among insiders. Its musical materials and its lyrical personae have been winnowed to a single truth, asserted so many times for so long that the guitar blues becomes, like the Elizabethan sonnet sequence, a cloistered game of microreference and very marginal claims to originality and style. Keyboardbased blues is another story.The piano in particular functions as a conduit through which all kinds of fresh winds jostle the blues out of its deep, comfortable rut: Expanded harmonic moves creep in from jazz, new groove possibilities from gospel and from Latin. In the hands of a consummately fluent stylist like Bruce Katz (Gregg Allman Band, Delbert McClinton), the blues come to life with their rich and rightful confluence of regional and historical variations and musical possibilities, with difference and with color. The Bruce Katz Band’s newest CD, Homecoming, is a rollicking history lesson. As he moves between originals and covers, between the old (a delightfully retro reading of Lightnin’ Hopkins’s “Sante Fe Blues”) and the newer (the Allman-esque “It’s a Bad Time”), Katz proves himself a high adept at the remote, oldworld idiosyncrasies and mysteries of blues that so enchant the younger indie scene, and of the modern, funk- and jam-leaning blues as well. Homecoming’s lesson is an enlightened inclusivity. Americanshowplacemusic.com. —John Burdick

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DONNA LEWIS BRAND NEW DAY (2015, PALMETTO RECORDS)

You know Donna Lewis. Everyone does. Maybe not the name, but you know that song. The one that followed you everywhere in the late `90s whether you liked pop music or not. “I Love You Always Forever” still gets radio play, but you would never know this was the same Lewis responsible for the new release Brand New Day. For starters, the music is played by (and sounds like) a progressive jazz trio consisting of David King on drums, Reid Anderson on double bass, and Ethan Iverson on piano (arranger and producer David Torn also plays guitar on some tracks). The result is an acrobatic balance between the ambitious chanteuse and subtle, but sometimes avant, jazz. Lewis walks the musical tightrope with dexterity in both breadth of vocal expression and phrasing. Precious falsetto breaths meld seamlessly into warmer voicings. Improvisational, childlike whispers interplay with full-throated lady lungs. To add even more dichotomy to the album, Lewis’s three original compositions (including a remake of her big hit) are spread amidst eight cover songs. Neil Young, David Bowie, and Burt Bacharach break bread with Damien Rice, Gnarls Barkley, Anotonio Carlos Jobim, Harry Nilsson, and Chocolate Genuis. Despite the lack of originals, the improvisational interpretation, song choice, and the extreme character of Lewis’s voice all come together to encapsulate a complete and creative work. The songs were recorded at the Clubhouse in Rhinebeck and mixed at the Isokon in Woodstock. Album artwork is from the Widow Jane Mine in Rosendale. DonnaLewis.com. —Jason Broome

RICH ROSENTHAL FALLING UP (2015, INDEPENDENT)

About five years before his family moved north, Poughkeepsie guitarist Rich Rosenthal had his mind blown.When he was just 12 years old, the Bronx-born musician, thanks to his mentor and guitar teacher Dave Moreno, began attending performances by some of the paragons of free jazz: Cecil Taylor, Sun Ra, Ornette Coleman, the Art Ensemble of Chicago. Challenging stuff for a young kid. But Rosenthal was up for challenges, pursuing his musical studies and dreams despite unsupportive parents, struggles with drugs and depression, and decades of supporting himself as an MTA pipefitter and Metro-North train repairman. In the 2000s, amid making his name via gigs with revered neighbors Joe McPhee, Pauline Oliveros, David Arner, Joe Giardullo, and others, the guitarist made his recording debut on saxophonist Giardullo’s 2007 album Red Morocco. Now Giardullo returns the favor, appearing alongside bassist Craig Nixon and drummer Matt Crane on Falling Up, Rosenthal’s inaugural set as a leader. The six extended tracks here—four originals plus Steve Lacy’s “No Baby” and Jimmy Lyons’s “Wee Sneezawee”—are shrouded in a distinctly mysterious mist spiked with occasional ensemble dissonance and Rosenthal’s razor barbs. The icy octaves of “Powder Hysteria” open the set and bring to mind the great John Abercrombie, another upstate jazz guitarist, while the suitably named “Eternal Meltdown,” with its fuzz-seared lines by Rosenthal and expansive passages by Nixon and Crane, closes it out. A rewarding debut offering, and one that portends of more excellent recordings to come. Richrosenthal.tumblr.com. —Peter Aaron CHRONOGRAM.COM

LISTEN to tracks by the bands reviewed in this issue.

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7/15 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 67


Books

CHARACTER STUDIES MARY LOUISE WILSON TAKES CENTER STAGE by Nina Shengold Photo by Asako Kitaori

68 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 7/15


Y

ou know her face. Maybe you’ve seen her on Broadway, in her Tony Award-winning turn as “Big Edie” Beale in “Grey Gardens,” or the current hit revival of “On the 20th Century.” Maybe you saw “Full Gallop,” her award-winning portrait of fashion icon Diana Vreeland, or caught her as Bruce Dern’s sister-in-law in “Nebraska.” Maybe you recognize her from reruns of the 1970s sit-com “One Day at a Time.” Add one more laurel to Mary LouiseWilson’s wreath: author of the sparkling memoir My First Hundred Years in Show Business (Overlook Press, 2015). Show-business memoirs are not a rare breed. But most are written by stars, imbued with the luster (or taint) of celebrity. What sets Wilson’s apart is her unique voice—bone-dry, hilarious, literate—and sharp-eyed gaze at the working life of a character actor. It’s all here: The humiliating auditions, group dressing rooms, out-of-town meals, panicked understudy performances, nourishing friendships with fellow travelers, and always, always, the crippling doubt about the next job. Character actors are the secret backbone of stage and screen; it’s no accident that their awards category is Supporting Actor. They’re the indispensible pros whose work other actors admire, but who pass nimbly under the radar of our fame-obsessed culture. The highest accolade for a character actor may be the title of the documentary that award-winning writer/producer Ron Nyswaner recently made about Wilson, She’s the Best Thing In It. (It’s a compliment she plans to take to her grave: It’s engraved on a tombstone in her family plot.) The film, which premiered at South by Southwest, is coming to Woodstock this fall. Wilson lives in Stone Ridge, in a classic white farmhouse with a scarlet front door like a bright slash of lipstick. It’s one of those front doors that no one ever uses: A flagstone path leads past a breathtaking perennial garden to a side door off the porch. It seems apt that this consummate character actor always enters her house from the wings. Wilson appears barefoot, wearing jeans and a T-shirt that says PEP. Her unruly hair is pulled back with a simple headband. At 83, she wears no makeup, her only adornment a chic pair of amber tortoiseshell glasses. She looks great. “Coffee?” she asks as she ushers me into her kitchen. Full disclosure: I’ve been here before. I know Wilson through local theater company Actors & Writers, and a long-running writers’ group that often gathers at this very table, under the giant Saul Steinberg drawing one of Wilson’s designer friends hand-stenciled onto the wall. I’ve heard her read excerpts from “this memoir thing” for years. Even so, I’m stunned by the finished book. My First Hundred Years in Show Business begins at a read-through of the Public Theatre’s 1989 “Macbeth,” at which Wilson, playing the First Witch, finds out the director is giving her biggest speech “to the younger, prettier witch.”Times have been lean for the actress: “The past few years, the only parts I was getting called to read for were washroom attendants and bag ladies on television. I was even going up for parts against actual bag ladies. I had gone from featured roles on Broadway to playing parts labeled ‘Woman’ with lines like ‘Hello.’ So I was telling myself,Well, at least I’m first witch, and then this director took away the one thing that made me first: the chestnut speech.” It is, in screenwriting jargon, the inciting incident. At the first rehearsal break, Wilson beelines to a pay phone and calls a lawyer about getting rights to a book she and playwright Mark Hampton have dreamed of adapting: Diana Vreeland’s D.V. The six-year saga of Wilson and Hampton’s attempts to write and stage “Full Gallop,” from its first reading at SUNY New Paltz to its triumphant off-Broadway opening, frames the memoir. “I started out to write a primer for people writing one-person shows. It was a long trip; we were turned down a lot,” Wilson explains. “I showed it to several friends, and their eyes glazed. They all said, ‘You’re not in it.’ So I thought, ‘Oh, they want more show-business stories.’” She had plenty of those, all juicy. But going deeper was hard. “I was ashamed of my career and I didn’t even realize it. Other people look at me and say, ‘You’ve had all these successes,’ but there was about 30 years in the middle where I wasn’t doing much. I felt I had to fill in where I was before we started writing “Full Gallop.” But it never occurred to me I’d have to write about what it was like to be me all those years.” The issue wasn’t writing, but self-revelation. Wilson had already written essays for the New Yorker and the New York Times, plus the seven hilarious short plays in “Theatrical Haiku” (Dramatists Play Service, 2011).

Comic plays, she says, “pop out of your ear full-grown, like what’s-hername, Athena. I’m a great observer of people and behavior, and I just write it down.” But writing about herself “was so painful—again, like giving birth, not from the ear.” Several times she gave up altogether, but kept going back to the well. As a child, Wilson “was always writing. I wrote poems for all occasions.” She recites one she penned for the Fourth of July: “Bang, bang, bang, / Here comes the gang.” She was seven. In later years, “Miss Jenkins the English teacher was always putting huge exclamation points on my papers. I remember one about Jane Eyre: ‘She lived in an orphanage until adultery.’ But Miss Jenkins thought I had something.” Still, Wilson did not see herself as a writer. “It all had to do with getting attention. I’m a laugh addict.” That was no easy feat in her family. The youngest of three children, Wilson was raised in New Orleans, where, she writes, “I was fascinated by the women my mother invited to our house to play bridge: elegantly dressed ladies with their little hats, their bright red lips and nails, their husky voices and phlegmy smoker’s coughs. The way the metal clasps on their purses clicked open and closed importantly, their lipsticked cigarettes smashed in ashtrays.” When her family wasn’t chafing under her mother’s drinking and chronic despair, they were competing for laughs. Wilson’s brother Hugh was her chief rival; sisterTaffy generally sniffed from afar. A brilliant scholar, Hugh eventually became a flamboyant but closeted gay man. In the 1950s, his adoring kid sister followed him to the Greenwich Village apartment he dubbed “Fuschia Moon.” Wilson writes, “He saw me as his acolyte, I saw him as my savior.” Though she worked in offices, including a stint as architect Marcel Breuer’s receptionist, Hugh’s witty circle encouraged Wilson to perform. In 1957, she was hired by legendary director Jose Quintero for Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town.” “The pay was $27 a week. I played Second Dead Lady and Lady in the Audience Who Asks the Stage Manager if There Is Any Culture in Grover’s Corners.” After that, she replaced Bea Arthur in “The Threepenny Opera” and, at neighbor George Furth’s urging, auditioned for the soigné Julius Monk revue at Upstairs at the Downstairs. To her astonishment, she was hired, joining a club scene where she rubbed elbows with up-and-comers like Barbra Streisand, Woody Allen, and Lenny Bruce. She went on to play Liza Minnelli’s best friend in the short-lived “Flora the Red Menace” and Tessie Tura in “Gypsy” with Angela Lansbury, whom she understudied. Playing Ado Annie on an “Oklahoma!” tour with John Raitt, Wilson met and married aging character man Alfred Chibelli. (They weren’t especially compatible; at one point she told “Chibbie” the new musical he’d been cast in was a dud, but “Man of La Mancha” lasted “longer than our marriage.”) Wilson is thrilled to be back on Broadway in “On the 20th Century,” lavishing praise on the ensemble cast. “I’m not lonely. I’m in a family, a family that loves me. What more could you want?” Still, eight shows a week takes a toll. “I have no life,” she says cheerfully. “I sleep for nine hours. Then I make a grocery run, nap. Then there isn’t time to cook.” She cherishes Mondays off, when she gets to spend time in the garden she calls “my therapy.” Retirement is nowhere in sight. She’s appearing this fall in David LindsayAbaire’s new play “Ripcord,” first developed at Vassar’s Powerhouse Theatre. And she plans to keep writing, including some fiction and a full-length play. My First Hundred Years in Show Business “made me feel ready to write. I will say that now I feel like a writer.” “Laura Shaine Cunningham gave me some great memoir advice: ‘The more it would embarrass you to see it in print, the more likely it is to be published.’ That was so helpful,” says Wilson. “I didn’t ever think I’d be writing about my husband, or my black lover—my younger, black, transvestite lover—but it’s good copy. I wrote about some of the most mortifying things, but by writing about it, I got over it.” She smiles. “And now that it’s done? Oh my god! I’m a happier person. I’m part of the human race.” Appearing Saturday, 7/11 at 6pm, Kleinert/James Center for the Arts, Woodstock, sponsored by Golden Notebook, and Monday, 7/27 at 7pm in conversation withWAMC’s Joe Donahue at the Morton Memorial Library, Rhinebeck, sponsored by Oblong Books & Music. Admission $10 (applies to purchase of book). 7/15 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 69


SHORT TAKES Is that a novel in your beach bag, or are you just glad to see me? New fiction by Hudson Valley authors to savor in deck chairs, hammocks, and rooms with a view.

THE UNFORTUNATES SOPHIE MCMANUS FARRAR STRAUS & GIROUX, 2015, $26

Is the title of this scalpel-sharp debut novel by Vassar grad McManus ironic? Depends how you define “fortune.” Cecelia Somner epitomizes old-money privilege, impulsively buying her son George the oceanfront mansion next door as a wedding gift, but misfortune reigns. CeCe is ill, literally in bed with Big Pharma, while George drains the family coffers to fund his appalling opera. The one percent never looked worse. Appearing with Rebecca Dinerstein 7/10 at 7pm, Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck.

Mashi: The Unfulfilled Baseball Dreams Of Masanori Murakami, The First Japanese Major Leaguer

TEQUILA MOCKINGBIRD CARTER RATCLIFF STATION HILL OF BARRYTOWN, 2015, $18.95

Celebrated art critic Ratcliff and Barrytown’s uberliterary Station Hill Press take a runway strut on the wild side. Libidinous, irresistibly confident supermodel Fiona Mays casts her smoldering American Tomboy gaze over a cultural landscape of body-obsessed fashionistas, thuggish Russian oligarchs, and bonehead art collectors. This sparkling comic cocktail bears bookjacket blurbs by John Ashbery and the editors of Interview and Art in America; now that’s provenance.

LOVE, JUSTICE, AND OTHER DECEPTIONS SHORT STORIES BY WALTER KEADY CASTLETREE BOOKS, 2015, $20

In the opening story, “Mary Hughes’ Holiday,” the parish housekeeper who’s been solemnly declared “the acme of feminine respectability” in a village pub goes to Galway for her first-ever holiday and comes back a new woman. In the last, “Variations on Winning,” a lottery ticket changes the odds for two mismatched couples. A great deal of life is lived in the 18 stories between, cleverly woven by Keady, an Irish expatriate and former priest who now lives in Millbrook.

DIARY OF A PUERTO RICAN DEMIGOD EDWIN SANCHEZ AMAZON, 2015, $15.95

Scooped up by a megarich sugar daddy from his one and only Broadway gig, “street cute” chorus boy Javi Rivera spends the next 20 years living large. Now his partner’s traded him in for a younger model, and he’s getting a heavy dose of reality training. Award-winning playwright Sanchez gives great phrase—he may be the first novelist ever to use “Elaine Stritch” as a verb—and his divinely resilient narrator is hilarious and affecting company.

SECOND CUTTING TOM NOLAN RING OF FIRE PUBLISHING, 2014, $12.99

Teenage Kevin O’Malley, uprooted from Queens when his cop father takes a state trooper job in upstate New York, peels out on his bike—his only mode of escape till his driving permit comes through—and wipes out on loose gravel. A local farmboy and his alluring, polio-stricken sister tend Kevin’s wounds, and open up new worlds of longing, love, and loss. This pungent, eventful coming-of-age story gets both the 1950s details and the timeless hormones just right.

BERMUDA GOLD LEE SLONIMSKY MOONSHINE COVE, 2015, $12.95

When Bronx-based private investigator J. E. Rexroth is hired by a high-strung wife complaining about phone harassment, he’s expecting a dull matrimonial case. Instead, he’s drawn into a whirlpool of high-stakes international intrigue stretching from the Catskills to the Caribbean: offshore clone funds, Afghan heroin, ritual murder, and more. Red Hook author Slonimsky is a poet and hedge fund manager; both hats serve him well in this smart, twisty tale with a serious undertow.

70 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Robert K. Fitts

University of Nebraska Press, 2014, $28.95

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n April 15, 1947, Jackie Robinson became the first African American in the 20th century to cross the baselines in a Major League Baseball game. But in a much less ballyhooed way, September 1, 1964, was also a landmark date in the annals of the National Pastime. On that evening, a young Japanese southpaw, Masanori “Mashi” Murakami, took the mound for the San Francisco Giants against the Mets at Shea Stadium. As reported by Robert K. Fitts in his excellent account of Murakami’s career, the New York fans, who were notorious for their refusal to cheer opposing players—“They even booed Willie Mays when the starting lineups were announced”—made a very vociferous exception in this case: “The answer was simple. They knew they were witnessing history.” While no doubt familiar with the plethora of Japanese players who have starred in the American big leagues in recent years—Ichiro Suzuki, who broke George Sisler’s longstanding record for most hits in a season; Hideo Nomo, who tossed two no-hitters; and Hideki Matsui, MVP of the 2009 World Series, among others—today’s casual fan would probably draw a blank at the mention of Masanori Murakami. And yet Mashi, as the first son of Nippon to play in the Majors, blazed the trail—at least symbolically—for Suzuki, Nomo, Matsui, and all the rest. But the irony of his achievement is that, through no fault of his own, it also closed the door on American importation of Japanese ballplayers for the next 30 years, due to complicated baseball politics that resulted in a “hands off” policy for US teams hoping to sign Japanese talent. The difficulties facing foreign players (gaijin senshu) in Japan have long been noted: Failure to adapt to cultural and social differences—whether of language, diet, or behavior—has derailed the career of many Americans trying to make it stick with the Hanshin Tigers or Seibu Lions. (The bad manners exhibited by ex-Yankee Joe Pepitone, to take one extreme example, were so outrageous that his surname entered the Japanese language as a derogation.) But in the States, Murakami was himself a gaijin senshu, and he had many obstacles to overcome. In addition to problems caused by the language barrier and the very un-Japanese American approach to baseball, he was distracted and discouraged by continuing contractual hassles between the Giants and his Japanese club, the Nankai Hawks. Through it all, Murakami comported himself with dignity, boyish enthusiasm, and unflagging good cheer, whether experiencing the highs—a 1965 season in which he won four games and saved eight more for the Giants—or his nadir, a return to Japan in 1966 that saw his talent (and the fans) momentarily desert him. Fitts, a Milan resident who has explored the singular culture of Japanese baseball in two previous books, provides a graceful overview of Murakami’s life both inside and outside the baselines, and ample context for the reader to understand the arcana of the Japanese game and the cultural basis for the tough decisions that Mashi had to make. Robert Fitts, Masanori Murakami, and official historian for Major League Baseball John Thorn will appear 7/3 at 7pm, Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. —Mikhail Horowitz


Throne of Darkness Douglas Nicholas

Simon and Schuster, 2015, $16

I

t’s always delightful to watch a child grow into an adult, as hints of potential become fully realized strengths and learning deepens into expertise. That’s the very treat in store for readers of Nicholas’s trilogy, which began with Something Red (2012) and The Wicked (2014). In the opening paragraphs of the third book, Throne of Darkness, we meet our young hero, Hob, in the middle of a pitched battle for his life against tough odds. Happily, his teachers have been good, his wit is quick, and his ally Jack is not far away. Even those who’ve never before encountered the good-natured and multitalented little troupe making its way through the intrigues and dangers of 13th-century England will be drawn in at lightning speed. The opening battle is just a skirmish in a larger challenge: Molly, the matriarch of this traveling band, has gained considerable renown as someone who can resolve problems that baffle—even terrify—the heads of church and state alike. Her success in vanquishing especially nasty evils is making it harder and harder to maintain the relative anonymity of a simple group of traveling minstrels and healers. Now Molly has been summoned by an agent of Rome, an interesting turn of events indeed for one whose allegiance is to the Great Mother and to Gaelic Ireland. For Molly is, wouldn’t you know, the legendary Queen Maeve herself. When the Catholic Church reaches out to the likes of her, you know things must have gotten mighty weird. And indeed they have. Molly’s sensible desire to keep a low profile and bide her time is about to collide with the intricate power politics of the times. It seems that even the mighty Church, albeit well supplied with money and assassins, can’t figure out how to deal with troublesome, treasonous King John and his alliance with necromancy. It’s a delicate problem. Had Molly the choice, she might prefer not to get involved, and not to embroil her loved ones—her warrior consort Jack Brown, her fierce and lovely granddaughter Nemain, and Hob himself, a young man about to become a father to Nemain’s baby—in a dispute in which, from her point of view, there really are not any good guys. But it’s useless trying to sidestep one’s destiny. The church has noticed that Molly’s methods of dealing with otherworldly evil seem markedly more effective than their own exorcisms and wafting incense. They’ll hold their collective noses and strike bargains with a sorceress if that’s what it takes, and they’re not above some vicious arm-twisting. Thus are our friends thrust into the middle of a truly epic mess, one that will require steadfast courage, skills both mortal and magical, quick wits and deep love. They must make haste across the lovely, haunted countryside to a battle with an uncertain outcome, encountering simple English country folk and Moorish sorcery with equal aplomb. An award-winning poet and Rosendale resident, Nicholas has a gift for making us feel at home in these distant times and climes. The intrigue is many-faceted, the vivid landscape is a poem brought to life, and the monsters are scary as hell. The power players are, satisfyingly, no better than they should be; the tenderness of his half-Christian, half-pagan wandering band is new as today. Throne of Darkness is history as it should have happened. —Anne Pyburn Craig

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Mirabai of Woodstock

Nourishment for Mind & Spirit ®

23 Mill Hill Rd Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2100 Open Daily 11 to 7

Books, sacred objects and workshops that can change your life in ways you’ve never imagined. Since 1987, always a new experience.

www.mirabai.com 7/15 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 71


Food & Drink

The Feast at Your Feet

L-R: Purslane; wineberries; wood sorrel.

Three Wild Edibles to Forage for This Month Story and photos by Eve Fox

W

hether you live in a town or out in the woods, food is never far in the Hudson Valley—if you know where to look. Wild edibles abound here. I’ll never forget the thrill I felt the first time I sniffed the distinctive odor of a wild garlic plant I’d yanked out of the dirt on the lawn of the Woodstock Children’s Center during recess. And the novelty hasn’t worn off yet. In fact, my interest in foraging has only grown. Whether I’m searching the forest floor for trout lily’s spotted leaves and delicate yellow flowers or scanning the streambed for the rich green of wild ramps, I am always eager to see what Mother Nature has cooking. For me, foraging is an oddly addictive mix of relaxation and excitement. Spending time outdoors helps clear my mind while the “hunt” for whatever plant I’m looking for at that moment adds little zaps of electricity to my walk in the woods. I’ll never forget the rush I felt upon discovering a whole hillside of wild ramps—my heart was beating wildly. If you have kids in your life, searching for wild edibles is a fantastic way to kindle their interest in nature, provide a vividly memorable frame for the seasons, and teach them about some of the many plants—native and not—in our ecosystem. But perhaps most important is the fact that these foods are full of flavor— they taste distinctly alive in a way that even garden-grown foods often do not. Roll in the Clover Take wood sorrel, a wild edible whose leaves and small flowers have a fresh, lemony flavor with a mild, appealing chalkiness that adds a bright note to salads and pestos. It’s another of the plants I ate as a child—a tradition that appears to be alive and well, judging by my six-year-old son’s stories of eating it at recess. He and his friends call it lemon clover and I’ve also heard it called sour grass—both perfect names, if a tad less sophisticated than wood sorrel. Wood sorrel is a member of the Oxalis family (Oxalis means “sour”) and is high in oxalic acid—as are a number of other greens, including spinach, chard, 72 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 7/15

broccoli, and rhubarb. Oxalic acid is considered toxic when consumed in large quantities because it inhibits the absorption of calcium. It should be avoided by people suffering from kidney stones, arthritis, and gout. However, just as with spinach and broccoli, wood sorrel is very good for you—it’s packed with Vitamin C—when eaten in moderation, so do not deprive yourself of its fresh, lemony flavor unless you have one of the above conditions. The variety near me has delicate stems that are covered with tiny hairs if you look really closely. Trios of folded heart-shaped leaves and small yellow flowers complete its elegant look. Some varieties have white flowers and others have no flowers at all. The stems can be green or reddish. There are no poisonous look-alikes to worry about—the only thing that might trick you is clover which is also edible if rather more boring in taste. Once you recognize it, you will start to see wood sorrel constantly as it grows pretty much everywhere. Wood sorrel is absolutely delicious in a hearty, composed salad of sweet, waxy Yukon Gold potatoes, hearty hard-boiled eggs, tender, baby lettuce, thin slices of salty Parmesan cheese drizzled with a traditional shallot vinaigrette (recipe below). I also add fresh basil or dill if I have it on hand. Nutritious Weed Purslane is another foraging favorite—a succulent, low-growing plant that you’re probably familiar with if you do any gardening as it’s a very common weed. Known as verdolaga in Spanish, semizotu in Turkish and pourpier potager in French, purslane is packed with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, and has the highest Omega-3 content of any leafy green. It’s so full of goodness that Michael Pollan actually called it one of the two most nutritious foods on Earth in In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto. Pollan writes: “Wild greens like purslane have substantially higher levels of Omega-3s than most domesticated plants.” His other top pick, lamb’s quarters, is also a common weed. In addition to being a nutritional powerhouse, purslane is downlight tasty with a mild lemony flavor that has just a hint of pepper and a pleasing texture


The makings of a wood sorrel salad.

that is half-chewy, half-crunchy. I like it so much that I actually plant it between the rows of my garden though the wild stuff that grows between my paving stones always seems to do better than the plants I grow from the tiny black store-bought seeds. I love it in salads of all kinds but perhaps best in a super simple one with ripe tomato, some hunks of feta or goat cheese, a little thinly sliced onion, a glug of good olive oil, a drizzle of aged balsamic vinegar, a sprinkling of sea salt, and a generous grind of black pepper.The sweetness of the juicy tomato pairs beautifully with the crunchy, lemony purslane and the cheese adds a rich, creamy element that makes it even more addictive. But don’t stop there, because purslane is very versatile—you can eat it pickled; in a chopped Middle Eastern salad; in tacos; with garlic, yogurt, and salt, in potato salad or cucumber-yogurt salad. It’s also tasty cooked, and there are many cultural interpretations to draw from—sautéed with potatoes and olive oil in a Greek preparation, slow-cooked with lamb and spices in a Moroccan stew, and more. Flavorful Fugitive When you’re ready for dessert, try wineberries—a beautiful, jewel-like relative of the raspberry that grows wild on roadsides and in forests throughout our region and ripens in late July to early August. Native to Japan, northern China, and Korea, wineberries were introduced to North America and Europe in the late 1800s and quickly escaped from cultivation to become a flavorful fugitive. They may be invasive but wineberries taste way too good to yank up by the roots. Their flavor is delightful—similar to that of a raspberry but a little bit tarter and juicier. Unlike dusky raspberries, wineberries are lightly sticky to the touch. The berries are protected by a hairy, red calyx—a remainder of the flower that blossomed in the spring. As it grows, the calyx opens and peels back until the berry is fully exposed and ready to pick. Like all invasive species, they spread readily—by seed, by sucker, and by rooting the tips of their canes where they touch the ground. Happily for us, there are no poisonous look-alikes in North America. (Words to the wise: Long pants and sleeves are recommended as protection from thorns, keep an eye out for poison ivy as it seems to like similar spots, and make sure to check for ticks.) Other than just eating them by the juicy handful, I like to make a tangy, sweet sorbet with them. Sometimes I add some lemon balm leaves to the water

and sugar when I make the simple syrup—they add a citrusy, herbaceous note to this treat. You can also make wineberry jam, cobbler, crisp, crumble, ice cream, and more. Check out local foraging expert Dina Falconi’s wonderful book Foraging & Feasting:A Field Guide &Wild Food Cookbook if you’d like a little more guidance and inspiration. Go forth to forage and feast! Wood Sorrel, Yukon Gold and Egg Salad with Baby Lettuces & Shallot Vinaigrette Serves 2 Ingredients * 2 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, scrubbed and baked (you can also steam or boil them if you prefer) then cubed * 1 small head of butter lettuce, washed, dried, and torn into bite-sized pieces * Handful of fresh dill, rinsed and dried, stems removed, roughly torn * 2 cups wood sorrel, washed and dried with any tougher stems removed * 2 hardboiled eggs, peeled and sliced * 1/4 cup shaved Parmesan cheese (optional) For the vinaigrette * 1/4 cup organic olive oil * 1/4 cup white balsamic vinegar (you can also use red wine vinegar or lemon juice) * 2 tsps honey or maple syrup * 2 tsps Dijon mustard * 1 small shallot, finely chopped * 1 tsp sea salt * Several grinds of black pepper Directions 1. Make the vinaigrette—make it ahead of time if possible to give the flavors time to develop. Place all the ingredients in a jar with a lid and stir or shake well until mixed. 2. Compose the salad. Lay the lettuce leaves out on the plates, top with the cubed, warm potatoes, sliced eggs, fresh dill and wood sorrel then dress it all generously. Serve with a loaf of crusty bread and lots of soft butter. 7/15 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 73


Summer is Here! Stop in to celebrate the season with great food and drink in a relaxed, comfortable atmosphere. Our banquet room is open and available for special events and parties. Make your reservation today.

Hours: Sun 11-9 • Mon-Thur 12-9 • Fri/Sat 12-10 N Front Street, Kingston 845-802-0883 FrogmoreTavern.com

Wild Wineberry & Lemon Balm Sorbet Serves 4

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Ingredients * 3 cups wineberries, stems removed, rinsed and dried * ¼ cup organic sugar * ¼ cup water * A large handful of lemon balm leaves, washed and dried (optional) * Ice water for blending Directions 1. Lay the clean, drained berries in a single layer on a cookie sheet and place in the freezer until frozen through. It’s best to do this and the next step (simple syrup) the night before you plan to make the sorbet. 2. Make the herb-infused simple syrup—combine the water, sugar and herbs in a small, heavy-bottomed saucepan and heat over a medium flame until it reaches a boil. Turn it off and let cool completely, then strain out the leaves and put the simple syrup in the fridge to chill fully. 3. When the berries are frozen and the simple syrup is cold, make the sorbet by placing them both in the bowl of a food processor or blender and blend until smooth, adding small spoonfuls of ice water, as needed to aid in the process. Eat immediately—it melts quickly.

74 TASTINGS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/15


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7/15 CHRONOGRAM TASTINGS DIRECTORY 75


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SUNDAY HIKES 3rd Sundays, 9:30 am START @ 65 Broadway Join Kingston Wine Co. + Kingston Land Trust to hike and tour the Kingston Greenline. After the hike, enjoy a refreshing glass of wine! Event is free.

EAT HEALTHY & ENJOY EVERY MOUTHFUL. KI NG ST O NWI NE . CO M

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Voted Best Indian Cuisine in the Hudson Valley

Red Hook Curry House ★★★★ DINING Daily Freeman & Poughkeepsie Journal ZAGAT RATED

HUNDI BUFFET

TUES DAY & SUNDAY 5-10PM

4 Vegetarian Dishes • 4 Non-Vegetarian Dishes includes: appetizers, soup, salad bar, bread, dessert, coffee & tea All you can eat only $12.95 • Children under 8- $7.95 28 E. MARKET ST, RED HOOK (845) 758-2666 See our full menu at www.RedHookCurryHouse.com

OPEN EVERY DAY Lunch: 11:30am-3:00 pm Dinner: 5:00pm-10:00pm Fridays: 3:00pm - 10:00pm

Catering for Parties & Weddings • Take out orders welcome

76 TASTINGS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Vegetarian Fare

Craft Beers

Charcuterie

4076 Albany Post Road • Hyde Park, NY • 12538 845-229-TAPS (8277) • www.hydeparkbrewing.com


tastings directory Bakeries Ella’s Bellas Bakery 418 Main Street, Beacon, NY (845) 765-8502 ellabellasbeacon.com

The Alternative Baker 407 Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-3355 lemoncakes.com 100% all butter scratch, full-service, smallbatch, made-by-hand bakery. Best known for our lemoncakes, scones, sticky buns, Belgian hot chocolate—both hot and iced, sandwiches (Goat Cheese Special is still winning awards). Plus a whole menu of allergy-friendly treats. Special occasion and wedding cakes that are a direct reflection of the couple. Our lemon cakes shipped nationwide. Closed Tues/ Wed but open 7am for the best egg sandwiches ever!

Butchers Fleisher’s Craft Butchery 307 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 845-338-MOOO fleishers.com

Jack’s Meats & Deli 79 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2244

Cafés

Frogmore Tavern 63 North Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 802-0883 frogmoretavern.com

566 Route 94, Warwick, NY (845) 986-5444 landmarkinnwarwick.com 22 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY, (845) 876-7338 or (845) 757-5055, 74 Broadway, Tivoli, NY osakasushi.net Foodies, consider yourselves warned and informed! Osaka Restaurant is Rhinebeck’s direct link to Japan’s finest cuisines! Enjoy the freshest sushi and delicious, traditional Japanese small plates cooked with love by this family-owned and operated treasure for over 20 years! For more information and menus, go to osakasushi.net.

Red Hook Curry House

The Would Restaurant 120 North Road, Highland, NY (845) 691-9883 thewould.com

Yobo Restaurant Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 564-3848 yoborestaurant.com

Dohnut

Yum Yum Noodle Bar

Elephant 310 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-9310 elephantwinebar.com

Fetch Bar & Grill 48 Main Street, Warwick, NY (845) 987-8200 fetchbarandgrill.com

“BEST “BEST SUSHI!” SUSHI!” Chronogram Chronogram & & Hudson Valley Magazine Valley Magazine PFM_Chrono_2015_5 5/15/15Hudson 3:52 PM Page 1 “4.5 “4.5 STARS” STARS” Poughkeepsie Poughkeepsie Journal Journal

Rated Rated “EXCELLENT” “EXCELLENT” by by Zagat Zagat for for 20 19 years

Worth getting up for! Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 13 - September 19 The Pawling Green on Charles Colman Blvd Events sponsored by The Book Cove Music sponsored by Petite pawlingfarmersmarket.org

20 Grist Mill Lane, Gardiner, NY (845) 255-4151 tuthillhouse.com

2356 Route 44/55, Gardiner, NY (845) 255-4949 miogardiner.com

Restaurants

osakasushi.net osakasushi.net

Tuthill House

Café Mio

314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0030 outdatedcafe@gmail.com

74 Garden Broadway 22 St. (845) (845) 757-5055 876-7338

28 East Market Street, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-2666 redhookcurryhouse.com

Gourmet take-out store serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week. Featuring local and imported organic foods, delicious homemade desserts, sophisticated four-star food by Chefs Richard Erickson and Jonathan Sheridan. Off-premise full-service catering and event planning for parties of all sizes.

Outdated

TIVOLI RHINEBECK

Osaka Restaurant

458 Main Street, Beacon, NY thehopbeacon.com

26 Main Street, Milton, NY (845) 795-5550 facebook.com/fridasbakerycafe

22 St. 74Garden Broadway (845) (845) 876-7338 757-5055

Landmark Inn

948 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 340-9800 bluemountainbistro.com

Frida’s Bakery & Café

RHINEBECK TIVOLI

4076 Albany Post Road, Hyde Park, NY (845) 229-8277 hydeparkbrewing.com

The Hop

(845) 464-0756

JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Hyde Park Brewing Company

Bistro-to-Go

Water Street Market, New Paltz, NY

OSAKA

275 Fair Street, Kingston, NY yumyumnoodlebar.com

Specialty Food Shops Kingston Candy Bar 319 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 901-0341 kingstoncandybar.com

Love the Chef Inc. lovethechef.com

Savor the Taste 527 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (845) 417-6776 savorthetasteoilandvinegar.com

Wine Bars Jar’d Wine Pub Water Street Market, New Paltz, NY jardwinepub.com 7/15 CHRONOGRAM TASTINGS DIRECTORY 77


POETRY

Edited by Phillip X Levine. Deadline for our August issue is July 5. Send up to three poems or three pages (whichever comes first). Full submission guidelines: www.chronogram.com/submissions.

The Snail

I’m a God-fearing atheist. —p

The snail slithers and slithers and slithers and stops at the leaf. —Demetrios Michael Houtrides (6 years)

YELLOW

MORNING VISITOR

Yellow is vulnerable. It’s child-like, like the color of the buttercups placed beneath my chin in the summer when I was a kid, like the faint shadows of their petals reflecting off the pale of my skin. If your chin turns yellow, you like butter. Yellow is as innocent as my unclothed shoulder, fifteen years old, newly tanned and freckled from a June sun.

The sun shone through the glass, tossing light through the air And bobbing like a cork in the midmorning sun The King and Queen looked on in shock Now there was a girl where there once was none.

Like playing with weeds in the yard, a shoulder like this is considered to beckon, draw him in and say yes without really saying anything at all. It’s said the victim is never the guilty; try telling that to groups of high school students in a cafeteria the Monday after it all went wrong, explaining to a man who says, Well, she did it to herself. She shouldn’t have worn that. It wrapped to one side, bared my left shoulder, hugged my upper body tight in its threads. It met my denim at the hip. It gave him permission to not ask permission. It’s supposed to matter that I said no even after he was inside me, that he didn’t finish until he decided it was over, threw me on the ground and picked me up after, holding me, making me question if I wanted it all along. I know him. We watched a movie, exited out onto the pavement, didn’t make it out from a bush near the unloading dock until he took what he wanted. That shoulder, it found me pushed against a concrete wall, jeans torn at the knee and wet black puddles running through the foundation on my cheeks.

What witchcraft is this? The King yelled, afraid His legs turned to wet rags and he fainted. Never fear, my dear! Said the iron hearted Queen, This cathedral has not yet been tainted. Come live with us, child, the Queen said with much haste, A princess you’ll be and a prince’s hand you’ll take! Just climb down from that chair, as unseemly it is Stop floating and leave it to break. The girl stayed a-mute, and afloat in the chair. The Queen clapped her hands, and a servant appeared His clothes made of chessboards, face as blank as a wall, Doused the King with a jug, who then popped up much cheered. Yes, do join us, dear girl, added King to his wife We have not a daughter to claim ours. You’ll have whatever you wish, whatever it ‘tis From a gold plated tray to a garden of flowers.

It didn’t matter if my no was stuck in the bottom of my throat; his story was first. It didn’t matter if I was fifteen and alone or hanging with the wrong crowd. It didn’t matter if I was wearing a dress, a shirt, a towel, a pantsuit, Superwoman’s cape. I am a woman. I put it on and it was yellow.

The girl listened to this, but stayed high as a plane And looked into each of the bright faces Pale sun filled up the room, and each minute dragged on Would she thank King and Queen for their graces?

—Jess Ptak

I’m so grateful to you, o kind Sir and good Miss The girl said, in a voice like a bird’s, It’s been such a long time since I met someone so Very kind I can’t put it to words.

CARNIVAL

But I’m sorry to say I can’t take your request. I’m Really finding travelling quite fun. And she said Bye, goodbye, and Poof! Way she flies, Out into the midmorning sun.

we were driving a cruise ship down I-87 as the typhoon hit us over the head, double take, followed by your screaming and the shutters of your sister’s iPhone blinking strobe lights. your hands were bones, giving me a gift but it wasn’t my birthday, and you weren’t my Secret Snowflake; if snow fell, it fell on your side of the world, not mine. in dreams we were able to hold onto ourselves— in real life we lost our bones and organs whenever we saw each other like a shy, lonely foster child jumping from one broken home to the next. in dreams we were able to love freely, and we did it so well we could have owned the word “love” and held it in our pockets.

—Ada Johnston (14 years)

LIST OF UNFINISHED PROJECTS 1. —Alex Hochberg

if you had asked me why I felt like I was losing myself, I would have given you something close to an answer. you always deserved the truth, but even in my dreams I couldn’t help but hesitate.

I am a wordless writer, a soundless echo, a brainless genius, a childless mother, a pathless hiker, a visionless observer, a waterless swimmer.

—Nick Magnanti

—Barbara Sheffer

78 POETRY CHRONOGRAM 7/15


LIVING IN THE BODY OF A FIREFLY

GOD OF MUTANT GENES

AN ODE TO WEEDS

Cotton mouthed, hung over, I wake up in my sooty dress somehow ashamed to be seen in the utter waste

Give us strength, oh Lord, to endure your reckless intervention in our earthly lot, your ceaseless careless energies, for you move in mischievous ways. Like Puck, you relish preposterous effects {polydactyl cats and chicken with teeth). For your disruptive indifference, thanks: it may yet, someday, save us all.

Violet— Your purple petaled smile catches my eye from down below, a brightness so eager to please.

of daylight. The barbecue with all those mint juleps on the verandah was intense but I strayed too long on the edge of a glass. I long for a quiet train trestle, wood and paint chipping off, not those city lights where I am one of millions. I’m not fooled by the low murmurings of the river, cattails to luxuriate in, but danger in the deep-throated baritone of frogs. Damselflies are entirely self-involved and bossy, known to eat out of their own behinds. Never mind, there’s safety in numbers. A neighbor has an easy split in a porch screen and as I’m on a tear of wild nights before I die, I’ve set my sights on their cathedral ceiling. In the sway of tall grasses his youngest cups her hands around me to pray. I am coveted in the moist chapel of fingers. Tonight, I’ll hang around until they are all half lidded-drowsy. I’ll skitter down to her favorite blanket where she’ll wish upon me like I am the last star falling, the last creature on earth. —Laurie Byro

FREE OF THE SPOTS Spots flutter like feathers off the beast as white as snow. Each spot its own story. But the beast wanted to be free of the stories...of the past. Dark as ash from a flaming fire. Soft like petals on a thorny rose. The spots became beautiful butterflies. Floating and flying. A gentle breeze tickled the beast as white as snow, carrying the spots. Whipping and whirling. The spots gained speed. Like a blizzard in the frosty February sky. Like amber leaves in chilly October winds. Spots spun...slithered. and swirled. The beast was clean. Clean of the charcoal spots that once littered his body. Like fresh foam brought by a roaring tide. His white fur smiled. A silent sigh escaped the beast’s mouth. He was free. Free of the spots. Free of the stories...of the past. —Therese Fischer (14 years)

—Judith Saunders

EVENTIDE O, to kiss this late summer last-of-the-peaches sunlight as I kissed you, slow lingering, this exact now shatters the river’s tea-stained brown —an alchemist’s dream: water into gold—puddles of it shiver then fade. O, don’t go. Tomorrow will be a different song. —Ruth Dinerman

VAST On my chest Your small breath Water On a sheet. I do not see With you Between A still Simple Flower In a book. On/off Day/night Shadows reached Asymptotically.

Honeysuckle— You promise to open soon, with your familiar yet foreign flavor, my palette you will appease. Mustard— With your spicy, heart-shaped green, a reminder that the truest of loves is ridiculously bitter-sweet. Dandelion— You are my soldier of hope, making my mouth water for a piercing crunch of your healing, sword-like leaves. Wild leek— Wild, like me, with parts both mild and deliciously pungent, I love you, despite my dirty knees. —Becca Hamilton Andre

HOW I WANNA DIE I got nothing left crying in the car like a helpless babe hungry for young, bouncing breasts, hungry for creamy goodness—I want you to funnel milk down my throat until I am and nothing like a grazing cow quietly waiting for the slaughter you call me by name but remember I am a poor bastard feasting in fields of grass bleached from the sun lost and without any ground it’ll be easy to hang me by my feet, let the blood pool in my soft little head tenderizing pudgy fat, tearing up the carpet to pluck out my heart, all I’m worth but I don’t need it, just leave my eyes so I can watch you slog back all the succulent flesh glued to your fingers and stuffed in your mouth you are hungry and I am nothing but meat —Alden Burke

The outline of your body Never ending. No future Union Only imagination Indistinguishable from a crowd of stars. —Shane M. Thompson

RAIN DANCE Chicken in the crockpot Beagle on the couch Willie Nelson serenades the sun behind the clouds. Rain snaps like a snare drum Drainpipe rings the bell Your letter on my desktop proves that all is well. —Susan Pittman 7/15 CHRONOGRAM POETRY 79


S PE C I A L A DV E RT I SI N G S E CTI O N

Restaurant Guide The Hudson Valley is home to a multitude of artisanal restaurants, tailored to any imaginable culinary craving. Start or end a night on the town with a local cheese plate, a gourmet burger, or a farm-to-table masterpiece.

Kingston

Catskill

Armadillo Bar & Grill No matter the season you’ll find a reason to love the Armadillo Restaurant If you like Southwestern or Mexican cuisine, stop by The Armadillo Restaurant today and try our

fresh grilled fajitas,

vegetarian dishes, grilled fresh fish, as well as other tasty seasonal dishes. Everything is lovingly home made from scratch using the best quality, freshest ingredients and produce. Including the salsa and chips. Tucked away on a quiet industrial street near the historic waterfront district of Kingston, Armadillo will wow you with their legendary Margaritas. You and your well behaved pup are welcome on the deck in the summer months and when the weather gets cooler the cozy dining room is a great place to settle in for a wonderful meal with friends and family. We look forward to seeing you! 97 Abeel Street, Kingston (845) 339-1550 armadillos@hvc.rr.com www.armadillos.net 80 RESTAURANT GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Maybelle’s Maybelle’s. Comfort food. Refined. Located in Catskill, NY serving breakfast, lunch & dinner 5 days a week. The menu is locally sourced & changes each week with the bounty of the Hudson Valley. Currently serving craft brews from some of the best brewers in the country. Stop by, try something familiar in a way you’ve never imagined before! 355 Main Street, Catskill • (518) 719-1800 www.maybellesny.com


Kingston

Tannersville

Bistro-to-Go & Blue Mountain Bistro Catering Feel Good Food! That’s what we make at Bistro-to-Go and Blue Mountain Bistro Catering. Just ask our customers. Whether they’re dining in our sunny cafe, bringing dinner home to share with friends and family, or celebrating at a wedding we’re catering, they will tell you how we’ve made their lives easier and tastier with our fresh food, prepared by chefs who care and know how to coax the most out of the bounty of the Hudson Valley and beyond. Whether you’re buying it, eating it or sharing it, the food we create will make you feel good because we’re committed to preparing the best food available. Our inspiration is the Mediterranean way of eating with flavors derived from fresh herbs, garlic, and olive oil. We call it “slow cooked fast food” and we love making it. We have also loved being part of the vibrant Hudson Valley community for over 20 years. Whether you’re hosting a large wedding, a small dinner party, or a family reunion, Richard and Mary Anne Erickson and their staff are committed to helping you “Celebrate 24-7”. 948 Route 28, Kingston (845) 340-9800 bluemountainbistro.com

Villa Vosilla Taste of Italy in the Catskills The Villa Vosilla welcomes you to a return to simpler and happier times. Its unique “Taste of Italy in the Catskills” has been a celebration for everyone to enjoy for 52 years~a flavor of Italy without the travel or expense . There is nothing commercial about this working family owned and operated resort located in artsy Tannersville. It is purely a place with heart and a family enthusiastic about its business. Intimate and boutique, it has become an Italian landmark with a focus on memories, food, music and song. The European tradition of serving guests as family began May of 1964, as accordions played and guests fillled the Villa kitchen. Today’s guests continue to experience the warmth of the 4 generation old world hospitality at Villa Vosilla’s Ladoria Ristorante. In the style of Italy, the Chef creates daily changing menus utilizing local and Italian quality products. The flavor is pure, fresh, and real the way Italian food should taste. Ladoria Ristorante serves the local community with advance dinner, dance, show reservations. An entire social season features sensational Italian entertainment. Why not, stay the night at a special rate? Where else can you ballroom dance the night away? It is a perfect setting for special occasions and events. The family and staff, passionate about weddings, will personalize your Overnight or Destination Wedding with customizable entertainment throughout the entire weekend. The winter season features contemporary sounds, but whatever the season, Italian comfort food is prepared with love and served graciously from the heart. But if you are searching for a unique experience, visit during the “Taste of Italy in the Catskills”. As the Villa cordially welcomes you to the warmth of family and to the warmth of their home~you know you have arrived. 6302 Main Street, Scenic Byway Rt 23A Tannersville, NY 518-589-5060

Dancing Cat Saloon & Catskill Distilling Co. 2037 State Route 17B Bethel, NY (845) 583-3141 www.DancingCatSaloon.com Dancing Cat Saloon, paired with Catskill Distilling Company, provide for a unique dining experience in Bethel, NY. The fare is casual to elegant. Outside dining at the restaurant and Distillery - tours and tasting in Distillery. Located across from the original Woodstock Festival Site in Bethel, NY. Trip Advisor Award Winner Dancing - Dog Friendly! For weekly events visit facebook.com/dancingcatsaloon.

Love Bites 69 Partition Street, Saugerties (845) 246-1795 At Love Bites Cafe, it’s not just about celebrating the bounty of the Hudson Valley, it’s also about having fun! Chef/owner Mark Grusell’s off-the-wall culinary New American lobster soft style, along with awesome scramble with chili dusted goat cocktails and quite possibly the cheese medallion best coffee in town, is sure to excite the pleasure - seeker in all of us. And if breakfast or lunch isn’t enough, come for dinner on the first Friday of every month when it’s Thai night, Love Bites style. Open Thurs-Tues 8:30am-5:00pm. 7/15 CHRONOGRAM RESTAURANT GUIDE 81


Kingston

Windham

local burrata, heirloom cherry tomatoes w/ mint, basil & garlic pistou

Elephant Food & Wine The Elephant evolution is complete. They’ve added a real live stove! That means entrees, desserts, a tasting menu, a few extra seats and they now accept reservations. Don’t worry, Elephant still has tapas, pork belly tacos, snails and an awesome burger! There’s just more things to try and more ways to try them. It’s like an elephant on steroids! Come hungry, thirsty and often ‘cause it’s Elephant and it’s always delicious! Check them out on facebook for news, info, menu changes and photos. Open Tuesday – Saturday 5pm-10pm. Call for reservations after 2pm (845) 339-9310). Check us out on facebook 310 Wall Street, (Uptown) Kingston (845) 339-9310 elephantwinebar.com

Fleisher’s Craft Butchery 307 Wall Street, Kingston (845) 338-MOOO @fleishers #CraftButchery Founded in 2004, Fleisher’s Craft Butchery has reinvented the old fashion butcher shop. Their expert butchers custom cut locally sourced whole beef, pork, lamb and chicken, making every dish you cook healthy and flavorful. Fleisher’s works directly with farmers and slaughterhouses to provide the best alternative to factory farmed meat with protein that’s not just better tasting, but better for the animals, our community and the land we share. With transparency and traceability fueled by passion for sustainable, humane food systems, these butchers are here to help you cook delicious meat!

Global Palate Restaurant 1746 Route 9W, West Park (845) 384-6590 globalpalate@gmail.com globalpalaterestaurant.com The Global Palate is dedicated to giving their customers all-natural, hormone free meat, wild or organic fish and poultry from local farmers. The majority of the vegetables we use are gardened locally such as our own garden, RSK Farms, & Maynards Farm. Think globally act locally, Chef-Owner: Jessica Winchell. Dinner: Wed - Sat 5-9 pm, Sun 5-8pm, Brunch: Sun 10-2. Closed Mon. & Tues. 82 BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Windham World Cup Mountain Bike Racing Returns to Windham NY! Top cyclists from around the world will return once again to Windham, N.Y. on August 6-9 for the 2015 UCI Mountain Bike World Cup presented by Shimano. Windham will be the only United States World Cup race. Having hosted the event four of the past five years, the Windham World Cup has attracted tens of thousands of visitors (including nearly 5,000 professional and amateur athletes) from more than 40 countries and six continents to watch the best cyclists in the world challenge the Windham Mountain courses or to participate in the amateur races themselves. This year, Windham is one of only four sites to host both disciplines on the race circuit: Olympic Cross-Country (XCO), a loop of narrow, rocky paths through forests and streams and Downhill (DHI) where riders race the clock on a treacherous descent. The Windham World Cup courses epitomize the legendary aspects of “East Coast riding” in the U.S. The latest addition to the many new amenities at Windham Mountain Resort is the Windham Mountain Bike Park, which features half-dozen trails including a pump track and skills park that will allow the casual cyclist to ride alongside the elite athletes during the World Cup festival. In addition to the elite races, there is a full schedule of community events including an indoor/outdoor expo, a block party in downtown Windham, a concert, Race the World amateur cross-country and downhill races, a Kids’ Fun Race and more. For more information, visit Racewindham.com


business directory Alternative Energy Hudson Solar 845-876-3767 hvce.com

Antiques Fairground Shows NY

P.O. Box 3938, Albany, NY (518) 331-5004 fairgroudshows.com

Hudson Antiques Dealers Association Hudson, NY hudsonantiques.net

Pay it Forward Community Thrift Store - A Division of Community Action of Greene County, Inc. 7856 Route 9W, Catskill, NY (518) 943-9205 cagcny.org5 fohle@cagcny.org

Gently used and vintage clothing, jewelry, furniture, housewares, and collectibles. From shoe shine boxes to mohair suits, you never know what you will find. All proceeds benefit the programs of Community Action of Greene County, Inc., a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization serving Greene and neighboring counties since 1967. All donations are tax deductible.

Architecture Irace Architecture

Warwick, NY (845) 988-0198 iracearchitecture.com

Richard Miller, AIA

Art Galleries & Centers Bennington Museum

75 Main Street, Bennington, VT (802) 447-1571 benningtonmuseum.org

Clark Art Institute

Williamstown, MA (413) 458-2303; clarkart.edu

Crawford Gallery of Fine Art 65 Main Street, Pine Bush, NY (845) 744-8634

Dorsky Museum

SUNY New Paltz 1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3844 newpaltz.edu/museum

Eckert Fine Art - CT Inc. 34 Main Street, Millerton, NY (518) 592-1330 eckertfineart.com

Exposures Gallery

1357 Kings Highway, Sugar Loaf, NY (845) 469-9382 exposures.com

Open Wednesday to Sunday, 11 to 5. Internationally recognized and the Hudson Valley’s pre-eminent landscape photographer, Nick Zungoli’s work has been widely collected since 1979 when he opened Exposures Gallery. To date, he has sold over 50,000 prints to corporations and celebrities such as Steven Spielberg and Quincy Jones. Along with images from the Hudson Valley, his new special exhibit, “Mekong Journal,” can be viewed this season. Visit online at exposures.com for photo workshops in Sugar Loaf and Italy.

Mark Gruber Gallery

New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241markgrubergallery.com

North River Gallery

29 Main Street, Suite 2B, Chatham, NY northrivergallery.com

Phoenicia Art Studio Tour

247 Broad Street Hollow Road, Shandaken, NY shandakenart.com

Rivercrossing rivercrossings.org

Sierra Lily

1955 South Road Square, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 297-1684

Millbrook Cabinetry & Design

Vassar College: The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center

N & S Supply

4 2nd Street, Cold Spring, NY tdonovan450@gmail.com

Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 437-5632 fllac.vassar.edu

Art Supplies Catskill Art & Office Supply

Kingston, NY: (845) 331-7780, Poughkeepsie, NY: (845) 452-1250, Woodstock, NY: (845) 679-2251

Attorneys Traffic and Criminally Related Matters. Karen A. Friedman, Esq., President of the Association of Motor Vehicle Trial Attorneys 30 East 33rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY (845) 266-4400 or (212) 213-2145 k.friedman@msn.com newyorktrafficlawyer.com

Representing companies and motorists throughout New York State. Speeding, reckless driving, DWI, trucking summons and misdemeanors, aggravated unlicensed matters, appeals, article 78 cases. 27 years of trial experience.

Audio & Video Markertek Video Supply markertek.com

Auto Sales & Services Fleet Service Center

185 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4812

Kinderhook Toyota

1908 New York 9H, Hudson, NY (518) 822-9911 kinderhooktoyota.com

Books Monkfish Publishing

22 East Market Street, Suite 304, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4861 monkfishpublishing.com

Bookstores Mirabai of Woodstock

23 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2100 mirabai.com

Olde Warwick Booke Shoppe

31 Main Street, Warwick, NY (845) 544-7183 yeoldewarwickbookshoppe.com warwickbookshoppe@hotmail.com

Broadcasting WDST 100.1 Radio Woodstock Woodstock, NY wdst.com

Building Services & Supplies Associated Lightning Rod Co.

(518) 789-4603, (845) 373-8309, (860) 364-1498 alrci.com

Cabinet Designers

747 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2200 cabinetdesigners.com

Glenn’s Wood Sheds (845) 255-4704

H. Houst & Son

Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2115 hhoust.com

Herrington’s

23 Spring Brook Park, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-1226 primrosehillschool.com

nssupply.com info@nssupply.com

Events

Paul G Fero Plaster and Paint 731 Oliverea Road, Big Indian, NY (845) 254-4175

Artrider Productions

All kinds of plaster work and repair. Unique fresco; beautiful, durable colored plaster. All types of paint and finishes, some finish carpentry.

Robert George Design Group

Woodstock, NY artrider.com

Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Inc Katonah, NY (914) 232-1252 caramoor.org

27 West Market Street, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-7088 robertgeorgedesigngroup.com

Center for Performing Arts (See Rhinebeck Center...)

Williams Lumber & Home Centers 6760 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-WOOD williamslumber.com

Lumber, building materials, millwork, paint, kitchen, hardware, plumbing, electrical. Williams Lumber and Home Centers has been meeting the needs of the Hudson Valley for 69 years. Williams provides unsurpassed excellence in service, quality, and price, seven days a week. Rhinebeck, Hudson, Hopewell Junction, Tannersville, Red Hook, Pleasant Valley, High Falls, and Hyde Park.

Cinemas

661 Rte. 308, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 232-2320 centerforperformingarts.org

Dan Smalls Presents

656 County Highway 33, Cooperstown, NY (607) 544-1800 Dansmallspresents.com

Kaatsbaan International Dance Center facebook.com/kaatsbaan kaatsbaan.org

Olana State Historic Site Partnership

Rosendale Theater Collective

(518) 828-0135 olana.org

Rosendale, NY rosendaletheatre.org

Phoenicia Festival of the Voice

Upstate Films

Phoenica, NY (888) 214-3063 phoeniciavoicefest.com

6415 Montgomery Street, Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2515; 132 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-6608 / (845) 876-2515 upstatefilms.org

Windham World Cup racewindham.com

Woodstock Peace Festival

Clothing & Accessories

Woodstock, NY woodstockpeacefestival.org

Lea’s Boutique

33 Hudson Avenue, Chatham, NY (518) 392-4666

Farm Markets & Natural Food Stores

My Sister’s Closet

Adam’s Fairacre Farms

1385 Kings Highway, Sugar Loaf, NY (845) 469-9681 mysistersclosetsugarloaf.com

1240 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 5690303, 1560 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-6300, 765 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-4330 adamsfarms.com

Rooster Tees

1 Kavalec Lane, Warwick, NY facebook.com/RoosterTeesLLC

Hawthorne Valley Farm Store 327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 518-672-7500 hawthornevalleyfarm.org

Willow Wood

38 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4141 willowwoodlifestyle@gmail.com

Late Bloomer Farm & Market

3100 Route 207, Campbell Hall, NY (845) 742-8705 latebloomerfarm.com summerset@frontiernet.net

Computer Services Tech Smiths

45 North Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 443-4866 tech-smiths.com

Area’s best-kept secret! Farm store well stocked & open all year. Everything grown here with love & without chemicals or locally & carefully sourced. Winter CSA, Summer CSA Farm Card, U-Pick, Spring organic seedling sale, farm dinners & events, petting zoo, local crafts & outdoor furniture, and more. Know where your food comes from. Follow us on Facebook.

Craft Galleries Crafts People

262 Spillway Road, West Hurley, NY (845) 331-3859 craftspeople.us

Representing over 500 artisans, Crafts People boasts four buildings brimming with fine crafts; the largest selection in the Hudson Valley. All media represented, including: sterling silver and 14K gold jewelry, blown glass, pottery, turned wood, kaleidoscopes, wind chimes, leather, clothing, stained glass, etc.

Custom Home Design and Materials Atlantic Custom Homes

2785 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY lindalny.com

Education

Hillsdale, NY: (518) 325-3131 / Hudson, NY: (518) 828-9431 herringtons.com

Ashokan Center

John A Alvarez and Sons

Center for Metal Arts

3572 Route 9, Hudson, NY (518) 851-9917 alvarezmodulars.com

Primrose Hill School - Elementary and Early Childhood Education inspired by the Waldorf Philosophy

2612 Route 44, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-3006 millbrookcabinetryanddesign.com

477 Beaverkill Road, Olivebridge, NY 44 Jayne Street, Florida, NY (845) 651-7550 centerformetalarts.com/blog

Pawling Farmers Market

Charles Colman Boulevard, Pawling, NY pawlingfarmersmarket.org

Pennings Farm Market & Orchards 161 South Route 94, Warwick, NY (845) 986-1059 penningsfarmmarket.com

Sunflower Natural Foods Market 75 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5361 sunflowernatural.com info@sunflowernatural.com

Warwick Valley Farmers Market Warwick, NY warwickvalleyfarmersmarket.org

Financial Advisors Third Eye Associates, Ltd 38 Spring Lake Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 752-2216 thirdeyeassociates.com

7/15 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY 83

business directory

28 Dug Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4480 richardmillerarchitect.com

Terence Donovan


Gardening & Garden Supplies The Crafted Garden (845) 858-6353 thecraftedgarden.com

Graphic Design

Dutchess Tourism

dutchesstourism.com

Go>Local

rethinklocal.org

annieillustrates.com

Kingston Library

Le Shag. 292 Fair Street, Kingston, NY (845) 338-0191 leshag.com

One on One Salon 23 East Market Street Suite D, Rhinebeck, NY oneoneonesalon.com

Home Furnishings & Décor Ethan Allen Route 32, 94 North Plank Road, Newburgh, NY (845) 565-6000

Newhard’s 39 Main Street, Warwick, NY (845) 986-4544

Bfree Boutique Warwick, NY shopencoredecor.com

House of Tuki

55 Franklin Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0507 kingstonlibrary.org

Kingston’s Opera House Office Building 275 Fair Street, Kingston, NY kingstonoperahouse.com

Sugar Loaf Chamber of Commerce Sugar Loaf, NY sugarloafnychamber.com

Wallkill Valley Writers

New Paltz, NY (845) 750-2370 wallkillvalleywriters.com khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com Write with WVW. Creative writing workshops held weekly and on some Saturdays. Consultations & Individual conferences also available. Registration/ Information: wallkillvalleywriters.com or khymes@ wallkillvalleywriters.com.

YMCA of Kingston

507 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 338-3810 ymcaulster.org

Catskill, NY houseoftuki.com

Hunt Country Furniture 16 Dog Tail Corners Road, Wingdale, NY (845) 832-6522 huntcountryfurniture.com

Insurance Devine Insurance Agency 58 North Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-7806 devineinsurance.com

business directory

422 Main Street, Catskill, NY nrichards@villageofcatskill.net

Annie Internicola, Illustrator

Hair Salons

Interior Design LAD Interiors

Performing Arts Bard College Public Relations

Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY (845) 758-7900 fischercenter.bard.edu

Bardavon 1968 Opera House 35 Market Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2072 bardavon.org

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Bethel, NY (800) 745-3000 bethelwoodscenter.org

Pawling, NY ladinteriors.com

Jewelry, Fine Art & Gifts Dreaming Goddess 44 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2206 DreamingGoddess.com

Frazzleberries 24 Main Street, Warwick, NY (845) 988-5080 frazzleberries.com

Hudson Valley Goldsmith 11 Church Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-5872 hudsonvalleygoldsmith.com

Kitchenwares Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 895-2051 warrenkitchentools.com

Landscaping Augustine Landscaping & Nursery 9W & Van Kleecks Lane, Kingston, NY (845) 338-4936 augustinenursery.com

Music Daryl’s House 130 Route 22, Pawling, NY (845) 289-0185 darylshouseclub.com

Musical Instruments Francis Morris Violin Great Barrington, NY (413) 528-0165 francismorrisviolins.com

Imperial Guitar & Soundworks 99 Route 17K, Newburgh, NY (845) 567-0111 imperialguitar.com

Organizations Buy In Greene

buyingreene.com/catskill

84 BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Photography

Catskill LDC

Fionn Reilly Photography

Saugerties, NY (845) 802-6109; fionnreilly.com

Kenro Izu Studio kenroizu.com

Picture Framing Atelier Renee Fine Framing

The Chocolate Factory, 54 Elizabeth Street, Suite 3, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-1004 atelierreneefineframing.com renee@atelierreneefineframing.com A visit to Red Hook must include stopping at this unique workshop! Combining a beautiful selection of moulding styles and mats with conservation quality materials, expert design advice and skilled workmanship, Renee Burgevin, owner and CPF, has over 20 years experience. Special services include shadow-box and oversize framing as well as fabric-wrapped and French matting. Also offering mirrors.

Pools & Spas Aqua Jet

1606 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-8080 aquajetpools.com

Printing Services Beacon Fine Art Printing Beacon, NY (914) 522-4736 beaconfineartprinting.com

Real Estate Catskill Farm Builders

catskillfarms.blogspot.com joybhart@aol.com

Lawrence O’Toole Realty 30 John Street, Kingston, NY lawrenceotoolerealty.com

River Ridge at Hyde Park

The Falcon 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro, NY (845) 236-7970 http://liveatthefalcon.com/

Audioccult

84 Alford Road, Great Barrington, MA masslivearts.org

Maverick Concerts 120 Mavervick Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-8217 MaverickConcerts.org

Mid-Hudson Civic Center Poughkeepsie, NY midhudsonciviccenter.org

Shadowland Theater 157 Canal Street, Ellenville, NY (845) 647-5511 shadowlandtheatre.org

Tannery Pond Concerts Darrow School, New Lebanon, NY (888) 820-1696 tannerypondconcerts.org

Record Stores 267 Main Street, Beacon, NY audioccult@gmail.com 50 N Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-8217

Recreation Apple Greens Golf Course 161 South Street, Highland, NY applegreens.com/

Schools Canterbury School

101 Aspetuck Avenue, New Milford, CT (860) 210-3832 cbury.org admissions@sbury.org

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio 339 Central Avenue, Albany, NY (518) 465-5233 thelinda.org

(845) 356-2514 gmws.org

Pet Services & Supplies Hoppenstedt Veterinary Hospital 3040 Route 32 South, Kingston, NY (845) 331-1050 hoppvet.com

Pet Country 6830 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-9000

Montgomery Montessori encompasses students from PreK-8th grade. We are a learning community where children are inspired to realize their academic, personal, and social potential to become global citizens. The historically proven Montessori education model supports the whole child, creates lifelong learners, and educates for peace. The resulting academic excellence is supported by a prepared classroom environment that inspires self-paced, individualized discovery, and love of learning, as well as respect for self, others, and the environment.

Mount Saint Mary College

330 Powell Avenue, Newburgh, NY (845) 569-3225 msmc.edu

Trinity - Pawling School 700 Route 22, Pawling, NY (845) 855-4825 trinitypawling.org

Shoes Pegasus Comfort Footwear

New Paltz (845) 256-0788 and, Woodstock (845) 679-2373, NY PegasusShoes.com

Tourism Town Tinker Tube Rental Bridge Street, Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-5553 towntinker.com

Tutoring Hudson Valley eTutor

(845) 687-4552 scienceteachersonline.com Need help with science or nursing classes? Fulfill Regents lab time with NY State Certified Biology & Earth Science teachers. Learn from certified teachers, college professors & other educators highly trained in their field. Access assistance through an educational online platform. Live, Personalized, Private Education. Learn more with Hudson Valley eTutor at ScienceTeachersOnline. com or call 845-687-4552.

Weddings

Rocket Number Nine Records

2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-5343 caryinstitute.org

The Linda provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personnel with world-renowned artists, academy award winning directors, headliner comedians and local, regional, and national artists on the verge of national recognition. An intimate, affordable venue, serving beer and wine, The Linda is a night out you won’t forget.

136 Clinton Street, Montgomery, NY (845) 401-9232 montgomeryms.com

Joy Barnhart Realtor

45 Rolling Ridge Road, Hyde Park, NY (845) 889-8880 RiverRidgeAtHydePark.com

Mass Live Arts

Montgomery Montessori School

Green Meadow Waldorf School Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7092 hawthornevalleyschool.org

Located in central Columbia County, NY and situated on a 400-acre working farm, Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School supports the development of each child and provides students with the academic, social, and practical skills needed to live in today’s complex world. Also offering parent-child playgroups and High School boarding. Local busing and regional carpools. Nurturing living connections, from early childhood through grade 12.

Hotchkiss School

11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, CT (860) 435-3663 hotchkiss.org/arts

Historic Huguenot Street

Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1660

Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2079 byrdcliffe.org events@woodstockguild.org

Wine & Liquor Kingston Wine Co.

65 Broadway on the Rondout, Kingston, NY kingstonwine.com

Miron Wine and Spirits

15 Boices Lane, Kingston, NY (845) 336-5155 mironwineanspirits.com

Nostrano Vineyards

14 Gala Lane, Milton, NY (845) 795-5473 nostranovineyards.com

Shawangunk Wine Trail shawangunkwinetrail.com

Workshops Hudson Valley Photoshop Training, Stephen Blauweiss (845) 339-7834 hudsonvalleyphotoshop.com

Wine and Design Warwick

Warwick, NY wineanddesign.com/location/warwick-ny/home

Writing Services Peter Aaron

peteraaron.org info@peteraaron.org


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7/15 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY 85


whole living guide

SISTER HEALER

DOCTOR-TURNED-NUN SISTER DANG NGHIEM OFFERS INSPIRATION ON THE PRACTICE OF JOY AND THE HEALING MAGIC OF MINDFUL BREATH.

by wendy kagan

illustration by annie internicola

W

hen Sister Dang Nghiem came to the United States at 16 after a troubled childhood in post-war Vietnam, her grandmother sent her off with three instructions: She should get a good education, raise her younger brother to be a good person, and then become a nun so that she could transcend her suffering and help others do the same. The first two came naturally, but she was a bit flummoxed by the nun part of the equation. It wasn’t until after “Sister D” earned college and medical school degrees and began practicing as an MD that the path to the third goal unfolded. For years, she’d suffered the traumatic aftereffects of childhood sexual abuse by her uncle. When her partner, John, died suddenly, she knew she had to change her life; she gave up medicine and moved to Plum Village monastery in southwest France. Ordained as a Buddhist nun by Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh in 2000, she is now actively carrying out her grandmother’s last injunction. Sister D’s story and dharma teachings leap to life in her books Healing: A Woman’s Journey from Doctor to Nun (Parallax, 2010) and Mindfulness as Medicine: A Story of Healing Body and Spirit (Parallax, 2015). With joy and humor she explores the interplay between Western and Eastern medicine, the nature of interbeing, and her trials with neuro-Lyme disease. During a Miracle of Mindfulness Tour in which 75 fellow monks and nuns will visit Blue Cliff Monastery in Pine Hill, she will help lead a Mindfulness Retreat (August 31–September 5) and “Day of Mindfulness” (September 6). Sister D spoke to me by phone from Magnolia Grove Monastery in Batesville, Mississippi. You’ve lived through sexual abuse, life-changing loss, and a severe chronic illness.Yet you say that we always have a chance to create a beautiful past. How does this work? Usually when we think about the past we yearn for it or regret over it, and we suffer because of that yearning or regret. But when we learn to live deeply in the present moment with kindness, with love, then this present moment becomes the past that has that kindness, that love.You see this moment in which you and I are talking? In half an hour it will become the past.With mindfulness practice, we are able to actively build a past that’s not something we regret over or yearn for, but something that we create by living this very moment. It’s very proactive. Also, we know that the past is not gone, really. Whatever we do, however we think or are in this moment, it reflects the past. The past is right in the present moment. If there are wounds, we don’t need a time machine to go back and change things; we can heal our wounds in the present moment. If you’ve been abused, hurt in some way, you heal the wound by the way you say things to yourself, positively, and by the way you do things for yourself and for others, with more kindness, affection, and forgiveness. When you heal in the present moment, the past is healed. It’s something very concrete that we can do. Many people don’t realize that. 86 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 7/15

How is mindfulness good medicine? A cultivated mind brings a lot of happiness and peace. An uncultivated mind brings chaos and disorder—it moves in the direction of entropy. The Buddhist practice is all focused in the mind; we take care of the mind, because the mind will produce speech and bodily reactions. So we take a moment to be more aware of our body. For instance, here [at the monastery], when we hear the sound of the activity bell or the sound of the phone ringing, we take a moment to breathe in and breathe out, to smile and relax. If you do that for a few days you recognize how much tension you carry in your body. It becomes so “normal” for us that we think that’s the way it is. But really we should take a moment to slow down, breathe, and listen to the body—to recognize there’s so much stress and tension and a lot of pain that’s going on chronically. In the last four and a half years with chronic Lyme disease, I have not taken one painkiller. I sit down or lie down and breathe with it, instead of being so scared of it. Whatever you give to your body, it becomes addicted in that way. Every time I have pain, I do that and it passes. I’ve learned to be there for my disease. Instead of being afraid or trying to defeat it, I’ve learned to live in harmony with it. It’s not easy every day, but it would be almost impossible without the practice that I have. There’s a lot of new science about the benefits of meditation, but it’s a struggle for many people to start or maintain a practice. Can mindfulness help? When you think of meditation, you think of sitting on a cushion, and people think it’s unrealistic these days or exotic, only for spiritual people. But when you look at meditation, there are two main elements, just like a bird with two wings—one is stopping, and the other is looking. Stopping means stopping the mind from running back to the past or towards the future. It’s being in the here and now, just as it is. Looking means looking into what is, and to understand its roots and causes so you know how to go forward with it. Mindfulness is meditation; it has both elements of stopping and looking. When you’re walking and you’re aware that you’re walking, your mind is in the present moment. Because you’re aware that you’re walking, you realize that you’re still healthy—maybe you have a health condition, but in this moment, you can walk.With mindfulness you can practice meditation throughout the day. When you learn to be aware of your body, you also become more aware of your feelings, thoughts, and perceptions; you become more sensitive. Things will arise. You will hear yourself thinking negatively or remembering something in the past. And then you simply breathe and relax that thought or perception.You learn to be there for what is. You write about the importance of not pushing pain away but being with it, with love and compassion.


7/15 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING 87


HOLISTIC GYNECOLOGY T R E AT I N G W O M E N Ages

10

100

Stone Ridge Healing Arts 3457 Main St., Stone Ridge, NY jenna@jennasmithcm.com (845) 430-4300

INTEGR ATE YOUR LIFE I T ’ S

A

B A L A N C I N G

A C T

HOLISTIC NURSE HEALTH CONSULTANT

Manage Stress • Apprehensions • Pain • Improve Sleep Release Weight • Set Goals • Change Habits Pre/Post Surgery • Fertility • Hypno Birthing Immune System Enhancement • Nutritional Counseling Past Life Regression • Intuitive Counseling Motivational & Spiritual Guidance

Breathe • Be Mindful • Let Go • Flow

H Y P N O S I S - C OAC H I N G Kary Broffman, R.N., C.H. 845-876-6753 • karybroffman.com

John M. Carroll H ,T ,S C EALER

EACHER

PIRITUAL

Loving speech, you suggest, is very healing. Not just a naïve notion, it, too, has science on its side. Yes. When I went to India and worked with children there, I asked them, what is the percentage of water that makes up your body weight? The children said 65 or 75 percent. Then I told them about the Japanese scientist [Masaru Emoto] who wrote about the hidden messages in water. When he had water in a petri dish and spoke harshly over it, the water couldn’t form crystals at all—it was very broken. When he spoke kindly over the water, it formed very beautiful crystals. He took photographs of them. So I asked the children, if your body is 70 percent water, then how would you like to speak to your body? They said things like, “I love you so!” Another child said, “You are stupendous!” It’s wonderful to reach children in that way, to raise their awareness. If you say something harsh to yourself or to somebody, then immediately you release stress hormones; negative speech causes a stress response in our body. If we do this many times a day, day after day, we’ll be unhappy and sicker. With positive speech, we’ll release serotonin, oxytocin—hormones for positive feelings. The way we think, speak, and touch our body directly affects the course of our illness. As a doctor, I never put two and two together. It takes a spiritual life. These are the insights I have learned from the Buddha, from my teacher [Thich Nhat Hanh], but also from my own practice. It helps me to cope with whatever comes, including my disease. Mind-body dualism is a very Western mode of thinking. Why do so many medical doctors overlook the connection between mind and body? I think it’s because Western medicine is so young; as you grow older, you have a broader view. In Eastern medicine you learn to see everything as a whole, interconnected.We have psychosomatic illnesses and they’re very real. I talked in [my new] book about women in Cambodia [in the time of the Khmer Rouge] who went blind because they watched their children and husbands being torn, being killed right in front of them. There was nothing wrong with their eyes or their optic nerves, but they couldn’t see. More or less all of our illnesses can be worsened by psychological factors; and if you have a mental illness, a physical illness can worsen it. The body and mind are very connected. I think Western medicine has begun to be more aware of that. I talk a lot in the book about interbeing, which is a practice of acknowledging the interconnectedness of our body and mind, and of how we affect each other. We think of ourselves as separate, but we’re not. We “inter-are.”

OUNSELOR

“ Miracles still do happen.” —Richard Brown, MD Author Stop Depression Now “ John Carroll is a most capable, worthy, and excellent healer of high integrity, compassion, and love.” —Gerald Epstein, MD Author Healing Visualizations

Check John’s website for more information johnmcarrollhealer.com or call 845-338-8420 715 State Route 28, Kingston NY and West 72nd Street New York, NY

88 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 7/15

If we become blind to our suffering, then when it comes up it’s like a tsunami. It’s overwhelming and we’re swept away by it. But if you learn to be mindful you will see your suffering in bits and chunks. When a painful thought arises, you have your mindful breath and you can relax your body with a smile. You allow yourself to take a moment, and your body and mind can relax.When you take care of it in small doses, suffering becomes manageable. Pain is inevitable, but suffering is optional. If you have a mind, a body, then you will have painful thoughts and perceptions. Are you willing to suffer over it? That’s optional. Happiness is a practice, peace is a practice. Suffering is a practice too—we practice it very diligently! We allow our thoughts to rewind and repeat themselves. We allow ourselves to think negatively about ourselves and others. It becomes a habit, and that’s why suffering perpetuates itself. But if you think of everything as a practice, then you see that you have a choice.You see that the other way hasn’t worked out very well.Then you say, okay, I’ll cultivate joy a little more.

Are we moving toward a better place with modern medicine? Mindfulness is now implemented more and more in medicine, and offers concrete practices that professionals can use to help their patients. Many doctors have come to practice with us. In 2013 we went to Harvard Medical School and there were 1,000 people [in attendance]; we did walking meditation on the street, we had mindful meals. We have retreats for health-care professionals in our home monastery. More and more doctors and health-care professionals are becoming aware of the practice and doing their best to implement it in their lives and share it with their patients. I’m very optimistic about it. Learn about the Miracle of Mindfulness Tour and Blue Cliff Monastery events at Tnhtour. org and Bluecliffmonastery.org.


UPCOMING RETREAT

ONLIN E Read the entire issue online. Plus, check out these extras!

MEDICINE BUDDHA HEALING RETREAT PHAKYAB RINPOCHE, ERIC ROSENBUSH, ROBERT THURMAN, & MARK EPSTEIN AUGUST 24TH - 30TH, 2015

WITH

This retreat features daily yoga, meditation, physical and mental techniques for health & healing, general discussions, Q&A, Tibetan rituals and empowerments and their explanations, free time for spa treatments & hiking and much more, all within Menla’s enchanted hidden valley!

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web tv

Monthly web series exploring the artists, galleries, and museums of the Hudson Valley. Hosted by Chronogram Editor Brian K. Mahoney and produced by independent filmmaker Stephen Blauweiss. Chronogram.com/TV

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Combining your favorite parts of Chronogram with exclusive web-only content. Get your fix online or on-the-go with your smartphone or tablet!

ROSEN DALE TH EATRE 408 Main Street Rosendale, NY 1 2472 845.658.8989 rosendaletheatre.org

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JULY 4

A READING OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE FREE, 9:30 am

JULY 12 DANCE FILM SUNDAYS $10 3:00 pm Your Chronogram horoscope fix is now weekly! Check out what’s happening for you in the stars. Chronogram.com/horoscopes

JULY 24 COMEDY 2NITE MARKET, $5, 9:00 pm JULY 25 HUDSON VALLEY PROGRAMMER’S GROUP ROCKS IN MY POCKET, $7, 5:00 pm JULY 26 NATIONAL THEATRE FROM LONDON MAN AND SUPERMAN, $12, 3:00 pm NIGHTLY FILMS

PITCH PERFECT 2, TOMORROWLAND, INSIDE OUT

7/15 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING 89


whole living guide

Astrology

Acupuncture Creekside Acupuncture and Natural Medicine, Stephanie Ellis, L.Ac. 371A Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 546-5358 creeksideacupuncture.com

Planet Waves Kingston, NY (845) 797-3458 planetwaves.net

Private treatment rooms, attentive one-

and other insurances. Stephanie

Kent Babcock, LMSW Stone Ridge, NY (845) 807-7147 kentagram@gmail.com

Ellis graduated magna cum laude

At 65, as an older therapist, I now work

from Columbia University in pre-

exclusively with men—mid-life and

medical studies. She completed her

older. I counsel men who are taking

acupuncture and Chinese medicine

stock of their lives, supporting them

degree in 2001 as valedictorian of

in the here-and-now to reassess the

her class and started her acupuncture

past and re-contemplate the future.

practice in Rosendale that same

I also have a particular interest

year. Ms. Ellis uses a combination

and expertise in Asperger’s

of Traditional Chinese Medicine,

Syndrome, diagnosed or not.

Classical Chinese Medicine, Japanese-

Sliding scale.

on-one care, affordable rates, sliding scale. Accepting Blue Cross, no-fault

Counseling

style acupuncture and trigger-point acupuncture. Creekside Acupuncture is located in a building constructed of non-toxic, eco-friendly materials.

Hoon J. Park, MD, PC 1772 South Road, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-6060 Transpersonal Acupuncture (845) 340-8625 transpersonalacupuncture.com

Aromatherapy Joan Apter 29 Orchard Lane, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-0512 apteraromatherapy.com joanapter@earthlink.net See also Massage Therapy

Dentistry & Orthodontics Tischler Dental 121 Route 375, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-3706 tischlerdental.com

Fitness Centers Class Master 13 North Avenue #8, Pleasant Valley, NY (845) 723-4932 myclassmaster.com

Healing Centers Jenna Smith Stout 3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 430-4300 jennasmithcm.com

90 WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Herbal Medicine & Nutrition Empowered By Nature 1129 Main Street, 2nd Floor, Fishkill, NY (845) 416-4598 EmpoweredByNature.net lorrainehughes54@gmail.com Lorraine Hughes, Registered Herbalist (AHG) and ARCB Certified Reflexologist offers Wellness Consultations that therapeutically integrate Asian and Western Herbal Medicine and Nutrition with their holistic philosophies of health. This approach is grounded in Traditional Chinese Medicine with focus placed on an individual’s specific constitutional profile and imbalances. Please visit the website for more information and upcoming events.

Holistic Health Cassandra Currie, MS, RYT‚ Holistic Health Counselor 41 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 532-7796 holisticcassandra.com John M. Carroll 715 State Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 338-8420 johnmcarrollhealer.com John is a spiritual counselor, healer, and teacher. He uses guided imagery, morphology, and healing energy to help facilitate life changes. He has successfully helped his clients to heal themselves from a broad spectrum of conditions, spanning terminal cancer to depression.

Kary Broffman, RN, CH (845) 876-6753 Karyb@mindspring.com New Hope Reiki 20 Hamilton Street, Kingston, NY (315) 694-1359 facebook.com/newhopereiki

Omega Institute for Holistic Studies 150 Lake Drive, Rhinebeck, NY (800) 944-1001 eomega.org

Hospitals Health Quest 45 Reade Place, Poughkeepsie NY (845) 454-8500 health-quest.org MidHudson Regional Hospital of Westchester Medical Center Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 483-5000 westchestermedicalcenter.com/mhrh

Hypnosis Clear Mind Arts Hypnosis Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-8828 clearmindarts.com sandplay555@frontier.com In a safe and supportive space, adults and children find tools to help dissolve emotional tangles and heal. Inner exploration though Hypnosis and Expressive Art brings greater clarity, a renewed sense of purpose and wisdom. Sand play bridges meditation, symbol formation and Jungian Principles to bring integration beyond words. Offering Medical Hypnosis, Life Between Lives™ and Certification in Hypnosis.

Massage Therapy Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 apteraromatherapy.com joanapter@earthlink.net Luxurious massage therapy with medicinal grade Essential Oils;


Release, Facials, Hot Stones. Animal care, health consultations, spa consultant, classes and keynotes. Offering full line of Young Living Essential oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, children’s and non-toxic cleaning products. Consultant: Prepare for Surgery, Heal Faster with healing statements for surgery and holistic approaches to heal faster!

Meditation Rangrig Yeshe (860) 435-9904

Mindfulness Woodstock Mindfulness Woodstock, NY woodstockmindfulness.com margaret@woodstockmindfulness.com

Osteopathy Stone Ridge Healing Arts Joseph Tieri, DO, & Ari Rosen, DO, 3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-7589 stoneridgehealingarts.com Drs. Tieri and Rosen are NY State Licensed Osteopathic Physicians specializing

in

Osteopathic

Manipulation and Cranial Osteopathy.

Retreat Centers Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-6897 ext. 0 menla.org menla@menla.org

Spirituality AIM Group 6 Deming Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5650 sagehealingcenter.org Blue Cliff Monastery 3 Mindfullness Road, Pine Bush, NY (845) 213-1785 bluecliffmonastery.org

Yoga Anahata Yoga 35 North Front Street, Kingston, NY facebook.com/anahatakingston Clear Yoga Iyengar Yoga in Rhinebeck 17b 6423 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6129 clearyogarhinebeck.com

“Grandma” Moses, and others

Yankee Magazine

Best of New England 2015 - Editor’s Choice

“Best Museum Makeover”

Bennington Museum

ART | HISTORY | INNOVATION

75 Main Street • Bennington, VT benningtonmuseum.org

Fundraisers with screenings for

Mountain View Studio • 20 Mountainview Avenue, Woodstock Thursday, July 9 at 7:30 pm • $20 (food & wine included, silent auction)

Mint • 1 West Strand, Kingston

Thursday, July 30 at 7:30 pm • $20 (food included, cash bar, silent auction)

www.LostRondoutProject.com

beginner classes. Iyengar Yoga

Healing energy for body, mind, and spirit.

builds strength, stamina, peace framework for a yoga practice based

information. Treatment of newborns,

on what works for you. July 4 class

children, and adults. By appointment.

10-11.30am. Weekend workshop with Manouso Manos, Friday July 24-26.

Resorts & Spas

Outsider, Visionary, and Folk Art

works by Mose Tolliver, Joseph Yoakum, Gayleen Aiken,

New Hope Reiki

of mind, and provides a precise

Gardens at Rhinebeck 301 Ivy Trail, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 516-4261 Gardensatrhinebeck.com

Inward Adorings of the Mind

seven days a week, including weekly

Classes for all levels and abilities,

links, books, and much more

Copeland Funeral Home Inc. 162 South Putt Corners Road, New Paltz, NY (845)255-1212 copelandfhnp.com

July 3 through November 1

Sacred Fire Foundation Margaretville, NY sacredfirefoundation.org/ancientwisdom-rising

Please visit our website for articles,

Residential Care

Stephen C. Warren (1824-1905)Memory Ware Tower (detail) Mixed media, West Hartford, Vermont, 1894. Bennington Museum Collection, Museum purchase with support from Mark Barry and Sandra Magsamen, Marc and Fronia W. Simpson

Raindrop Technique, Emotional

Grassroots Ar t

Chronogram Ad 060915_Layout 1 6/10/15 4:29 PM Page 1

Information at clearyogarhinebeck.com

NP Rock Yoga 215 Main Street, New Paltz, NY nprockyoga.com info@nprockyoga.com

Treating all creatures large and small.

Greta Mickey RMT Cell: 315-694-1359 – greta.mickey@gmail.com facebook.com/newhopereiki

We offer a variety of classes, including hot yoga, throughout the week. All levels, ages & sizes are welcomed. New or experienced—our classes are all about where you are now. We have well trained, knowledgable, powerful, and insightful teachers to assist you

Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa 220 North Road, Milton, NY (877) 7-INN-SPA (845) 795-1310 buttermilkfallsinn.com

in having the greatest experience

Foot Spa & Tea Bar 36A South sSreet, Warwick, NY (845) 986-7174

-the more you get on the mat with us,

possible no matter what your level of practice. 10 percent of our profits always go to Springs of Hope Kenya the more you make a difference for yourself and a child in Kenya. 7/15 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY 91


2 0 1 5 tannery pond concerts

PEACE. LOVE. ARTS. YOU!

2015

T H E PA V I L I O N

KID ROCK

WITH SPECIALGUESTS FOREIGNER & PACKWAY HANDLE BAND

NEIL YOUNG WITH PROMISE OF THE REAL

JUly

03 17 24 01 07 23 01 19 JUly

& SPECIAL GUEST PUSS N BOOTS

JUly

BRAD PAISLEY

WITH JUSTIN MOORE & MICKEY GUYTON

3 DOORS DOWN & SEETHER

WITH WE ARE HARLOT

FLORIDA GEORGIA LINE

WITH THOMAS RHETT & FRANKIE BALLARD

ZAC BROWN BAND CHICAGO & EARTH, WIND & FIRE JACKSON BROWNE WITH SPECIAL GUESTS LARRY CAMPBELL & TERESA WILLIAMS

JUly

DEF LEPPARD

WITH STYX & TESLA

JUly

KIDZ BOP KIDS

JUly

TONY BENNETT & LADY GAGA

AUG

PETER CETERA

AUG

LYNYRD SKYNYRD

AUG

RASCAL FLATTS

SEPT

SEPT

11 18 25 02 14 30 06

JULY 18 8PM Brooklyn Rider AUGUST 1 8PM Miró Quartet AUGUST 15 8PM Jeremy Denk SEPT. 5 T. Palmer & Vonsattel & E. Arron SEPT. 26 6PM A. Semenenko & I Firsova

AUG

WITH THE HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC

AUG

WITH THE MARSHALL TUCKER BAND

AUG

WITH SCOTTY MCCREERY & RAELYNN

SEPT

VAN HALEN

WITH KENNY WAYNE SHEPHERD BAND

VISIT BETHELWOODSCENTER.ORG FOR FULL CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Performances are held in the Tannery of Mount Lebanon Shaker Village and Darrow School, New Lebanon, New York 888 820 1696 or www.tannerypondconcerts.org

THE EVENT GALLERY

JULY

DAVE MASON’S TRAFFIC JAM

12 12 17 24 14 SEPT

VIC DIBITETTO

– THE ITALIAN HURRICANE

WITH FRED RUBINO & TIM HAYES

KAREN MASON

BRADSTAN CABARET SERIES

BLUES AT BETHEL WOODS

FEATURING THE CHRIS O’LEARY BAND, SLAM ALLEN, DEBBIE DAVIES, & MIDNIGHT SLIM

THE ULTIMATE BRADSTAN REUNION

S. SAMUELSON, J. MACDONALD, L. TUBO, B. GENS, S. WING & J. QUINLAN

BRADSTAN CABARET SERIES

THE MUSEUM IN THE SPECIAL EXHIBITION GALLERY

THREADS

BRADSTAN CABARET SERIES

SHANDELEE MUSIC FESTIVAL EILEEN MOON, CELLO KRISZTINA WAJSZA, PIANO VICTOR VILLENA, BANDONEON SUNDAYS WITH FRIENDS

OCT

SOUTHSIDE JOHNNY & THE ASBURY JUKES

nov

THRU DEC

FROM THE VINTAGE CLOTHING COLLECTION OF ANDY HILFIGER

29 04 18 07 22 oct

THE PRINCETON NASSOONS

oct

31

CONNECTING ’60s & MODERN ROCKWEAR

AUG

CHRISTINE EBERSOLE

LAURA FRAUTSCHI, VIOLIN JOHN NOVACEK, PIANO SUNDAYS WITH FRIENDS

oct

NOV

nov

ARTS & EDUCATION MOONLIT MOVIE MONDAYS PROJECT: IDENTITY SESSIONS PLAY: THEATER PLAY: MUSIC FLICKS

THRU SEPT 14 THRU NOV 13 JULY 06-AUG 01 AUG 10-AUG 22 OCT 03-DEC 06

FESTIVALS

HARVEST FESTIVAL

SUNDAYS

LIVE WELL, BE WELL YOGA FESTIVAL

AUG 30-SEPT 27 SEPT 12

THE WINE FESTIVAL

OCT 03

SAVE THE DATE! ANNUAL HOLIDAY MARKET

THE CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL

OCT 10

DEC 05 & 06

TICKETS AT BETHELWOODSCENTER.ORG

Download

Our APP

By Phone 1.800.745.3000 | Bethel Woods Box Office Ticketmaster.com | Info at 1.866.781.2922 Bethel Woods Center for the Arts is a not-for-profit cultural organization that inspires, educates, and empowers individuals through the arts and humanities. All dates, acts, times and ticket prices subject to change without notice. All ticket prices increase $5 on the day of show.

92 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

28 CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS AT TWO HISTORIC SETTINGS ON THE HUDSON

MAY NOVEMBER 2015 MAY-NOV 2015 THE THOMAS COLE SITE & FREDERIC CHURCH’S OLANA FOR TICKET & SHUTTLE INFO:

RIVERCROSSINGS.ORG

Major funding for River Crossings was provided by The Moore Charitable Foundation, the New York State Council on the Arts, New York State's Empire State Development and the I NY Division of Tourism under Governor Andrew Cuomo's Regional Economic Development Council Initiative, Tiger and Caroline Williams and The Bay & Paul Foundations. Additional support is provided by Ed Herrington, Inc., the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area, the Village of Catskill, the County Initiative Program administered by the GCCA, the Columbia County Tourism Department, Jennifer Krieger, and Chas Miller. The companion book and related public programs were funded by Tiger and Caroline Williams, Furthermore: a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund, and the National Endowment for the Arts.


Todd Norwood

the forecast

EVENT PREVIEWS & LISTINGS FOR JULY 2015

The Wrecking Crew

Louis Otey as Pascoe in Ethel Smyth’s opera The Wreckers, at Bard SummerScape from July 24 through August 2.

It’s about time! This summer, Bard Summerscape presents its first opera by a woman. It’s also the first opera in English to be staged at Bard. “The Wreckers” by Ethel Smyth opens Friday, July 24. Though composed in 1904, this is its American debut. Traveling through Cornwall in 1886, Smyth learned about “wreckers,” desperadoes who would extinguish the lights in lighthouses, causing ships to crash, then loot the stranded cargo. Her opera adds a twist to this practice: A charismatic minister named Pascoe convinces his town to wreck ships, and to consider their cargo the bounty of the Lord. But someone has been setting fires to warn away the ships (spoiler alert!): the minister’s wife Thirza and her adulterous lover Mark. When they confess their affair, the town chains them in a cave, the tide surges in, and they are drowned—onstage, in the finale. (How will the director depict the drowning? No one at Bard is telling, but they hint at a visual tour de force.) Orchestral music can effortlessly convey the movement of water—in this case, an ocean that is both benefactor and villain. The music is lush and melodic, with echoes of sea chanteys. At times, Smyth draws on the Methodist hymnal to portray Pascoe’s fervent devotion. Ethel Smyth is the only woman whose work has been produced by the Metropolitan Opera. “The Wreckers” is considered her masterpiece. Bard President Leon Botstein writes: “The final scenes of Acts I and III are particularly on a par with the finest moments in the operatic repertory.” Though not a musical revolutionary, Smyth was an astute social critic. She depicts a society led by a madman, who’s also a clergyman!—a radical vision in 1904. Six years after writing “The Wreckers,” Smyth would join the women’s suffrage movement, composing “The March of the Women,” an anthem of the suffragettes. After participating in a coordinated series of window smashings in 1912, she served two months in Holloway Prison. Ten years later, Smyth was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. This is director Thaddeus Strassberger’s sixth production at Bard. He suggested staging “The Wreckers” after hearing some of its music performed by the American Symphony Orchestra at Avery Fisher Hall in 2007. (The ASO, conducted by Botstein, will accompany the Bard performances.) Strassberger was attracted by the story of fundamentalism run amok. “Free from religion, people have a gut feeling as to what’s right and wrong,” he observes. “And this Wesleyan revivalist religion is justifying actions that people in the community instinctively feel are wrong.” Strassberger, who also works as a set designer, is known for his strongly visual staging, often with rich colors and several levels of simultaneous action. Though it looks like an exploding airplane, the Fisher Center has excellent acoustics, designed by Yasuhisa Toyota. The yearly opera is its only full-scale production. The proscenium is raised, the orchestra pit expanded. This is one of the few halls in the United States that can accommodate a huge sound—an orchestra of over 60 pieces, a chorus of over 40 voices—in an intimate space. (Because the opera houses in New York City are “dark” in the summer, dozens of first-rate singers appear in the Bard chorus.) I asked Strassberger why there are so few operas in English. “We have the great American musical,” he replied. “‘Chicago’ and ‘A Chorus Line’ are amazing musical works of theater. There’s no difference between a musical and opera, other than what people standing outside the experience call it.” “The Wreckers” will be at the Fisher Center of Bard College July 24-August 2. (845) 758-7900; Fishercenter.bard.edu. —Sparrow 7/15CHRONOGRAM CHRONOGRAMFORECAST FORECAST93 93 7/15


WEDNESDAY 1 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Coxsackie Earth Day Movie Series First Wednesday of every month, 6-8pm. Free environmental movies/documentaries. Jeffrey Haas, Coxsackie. (518) 478-5414.

DANCE

Dancing at Dusk: Israeli Folk Dancing 5-7pm. $10/$5 children. Learn circle, partner, and line dances, representing different ethnic aspects of Israeli folk dance. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

FOOD & WINE

Community Potluck Supper 6pm. Seligmann Center for the Arts, Sugar Loaf. 469-9459.

KIDS & FAMILY

Dungeons & Dragons 4-6pm. Calling all adventurers! Whether you’re a Halfling or an Orc, a Human or an Elf, you’re invited for an epic D&D adventure. For kids and teens ages 10 and up. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Stop Motion Animation Class 3:30-5:30pm. Ages 7-11. Meets three consecutive Wednesdays. Young filmmakers recreate the story of Little Red Riding Hood. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

MUSIC

Kid Rock 6:45pm. With special guest Foreigner. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. The Random Concept 7pm. Psychedelic rock. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Sam Reider’s Uptown Trio Plays Bob Dylan 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Mighty Mares July 2, 9am-1pm. $200. A week-long program for women. Come let the horses be your therapy. Learn to ride, drive, communicate, develop partnership, and discover the power of the horse & human connection. High and Mighty Therapeutic Riding and Driving Center, Ghent. (518) 672-4202.

SPIRITUALITY

Amma Sri Karunamayi Amma, speaking to all faiths, brings her message of peace, selfless service, divine love, and compassion. Silent Meditation Retreat Wednesday, July 1st, 8am-6pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Private Soul Listening Sessions 12-6pm. $40/$75. Celestial Channel Kate Loye. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

THEATER

Jupiter: A Play About Power 7:30-9pm. $10. Superhero Clubhouse, artists-in-residence at Catwalk Institute, present “Jupiter,” a multi-disciplinary duet performance exploring issues of energy policy in the face of climate change. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Unbuilt City 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. Powerhouse@vassar.edu.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Book Making & Farm Inspired Art 10am-noon. $80-$120/$20 materials fee. 6 weeks, ages 10-16. We will be creating various art pieces inspired by nature and farm life using a multitude of methods, culminating in a self-made book. Mettabee Farm, Hillsdale. (518) 567-5123. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

94 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Excavating History 10am-4pm. $70/$65 members. Ages 15+. Join School of the Art Institute of Chicago Art professor, artist, writer, and museum educator Rebecca Keller for a daylong workshop. This workshop focuses on the idea of history, and specifically personal history, and guides participants through the process of turning personal histories into writing and artworks. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

THEATER

Male & Female Nude Figure Workshop 7-10pm. $150. Five Wednesday evening sessions.Draw, paint (water-based), modeling clay, collage, or use another medium of your choice (no photography) to depict the human form in a relaxed, supportive environment. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550.

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! 7:30pm. $25+. Part of Bard’s SummerScape 2015. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandaleon-Hudson. 758-7900.

Tango at the Pavilion 6-8pm. $14/$5 open dance. Join Nina Jirka, of Tango New Paltz, and learn how to Tango. Come for an hour-long lesson from 6pm7pm and stay for open dance from 7pm8pm. Bring water and comfortable shoes for dancing. All ages welcome. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

THURSDAY 2 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Exodus: Newburgh Extension First Thursday of every month, 6-8pm. A prison re-entry support group (formerly known as the New Jim Crow Committee). The Hope Center, Newburgh. 569-8965.

FOOD & WINE

Afternoon Tea 1:30-4:30pm. $37.50. Tea service includes a variety of tea sandwiches, scones with clotted cream and preserves, delicious desserts, and a variety of fragrant teas all served in the most exquisite vintage china. The Tea is preceded by a tour of the historic Rosen House. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Holistic Self-Care Class 7-8:30pm. Conversing With The Language of Symptoms with Katy Bray. Marbletown Community Center, Stone Ridge. 687-0880. Tick Talk: Panel Discussion 7-8:30pm. A panel of experts will gather to discuss the latest information on managing ticks and the illnesses they cause. DesmondFish Library, Garrison. 424-3020.

KIDS & FAMILY

Heroes of the Animal Kingdom 1pm. Meet a variety of fascinating live animals and learn how they help us as well as each other. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Shipwrecked: The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (as told by Himself) 8-9:30pm and 2-3:30pm. $34/$15 under age 15. Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Donald Margulies celebrates the power of storytelling in this true (and un-true) theatrical adventure. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

MUSIC

An Evening with David Crosby 8pm. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Jane Ira Bloom 7pm. Opener: The Out of Towners. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. John Simon and The Greater Ellenville Jazz Trio 7pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Mike Milazzo 8pm. Acoustic. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. Project Trio 7-9pm. $15/$24/$32/40. A high energy chamber music ensemble of virtuosic composer/performers. Blending their classical training with eclectic variety of musical inspirations, this floutist, cellist, and bassist leverage their performances with improvisational freedom. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. The Wiyos 8pm. Original blend of music inspired by the early American musical idioms of the `20s and `30s, including blues, country, ragtime, gospel, and swing. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

Desire 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! July 5, 7:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

The Unbuilt City 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. Powerhouse@vassar.edu.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Playing with Voice and Rhythm with Pete Blum and Bill Ross First Thursday of every month, 8-9pm. $10. An opportunity for musicians and those with no prior musical training at all to explore some of the basic ways that we can communicate non-verbally through the beautiful medium of pure vocal tones and rhythmic improvisations. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Summer Camp Revamp for Grown-Ups 10am-3pm. By June 2nd, $290/ June 16th, $335/ June 24th, $360. Imagine yourself stretched out on a yoga mat, sunbeams dancing through stained glass, or rolled on your belly, pen in hand. MaMa, Stone Ridge. 687-8890.

FRIDAY 3 ARTS AND CULTURE

“Jaclyn Davidson Trunk Show” 1-8pm. Jaclyn Davidson is exhibiting her gorgeous collection of pieces created from recycled wrought iron, textured steel, gold and diamonds. Open Concept Gallery, Cold Spring. 260-0141.

DANCE

Beginner Swing Dance Classes 6:30-7:30pm. $80/series. Beginner Swing Dance Class Series in Newburgh. New series starts every four weeks. No experience or partner needed. Taught by professional teachers Linda & Chester Freeman of Got2Lindy Dance Studios. APG Pilates, Newburgh. 236-3939.

FILM

Blade Runner Noodle Night 7pm. Noodle soup created by chefs Nicole LoBue and Carrie Waldman will be served out of Basilica’s courtyard kitchen which was originally inspired by the noodle bar in Blade Runner. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050.

FOOD & WINE

Krewe de la Rue 8pm. $10. Cajun band born out of our local fiddle and dance community. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. Pianist Simone Dinnerstein 7pm. $30/$60 reserved seating. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Roosevelt Dime 8:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. Sailing Stone 9:30pm. Acoustic. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. Seth Glier 8pm. Folk. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Simone Dinnerstein, Piano 7-9pm. $30-$60. A benefit performance for Maverick Concerts. J.S. Bach: Goldberg Variations, BWV 988. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Slam Allen’s Tribute to BB King 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Vickie Russell: Campfire Singalong 9pm. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (800) 772-6646.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS

4th of July BBQ 5-9pm. With Breakaway featuring Robin Baker. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

SPIRITUALITY

Private Angelic Channeling and Past Life Regression 11:30am & 3pm. $125/90 minutes. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

THEATER

Desire 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Seussical The Musical 8pm. $27/$25/$22. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Unbuilt City 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. Powerhouse@vassar.edu. Hudson Air Radio Theater 8pm. $20/$15 PS21 members/$10 students with ID. Classic and contemporary radio theater live on stage. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Taste NY at Todd Hill Outdoor Farmer’s Market Taste NY at Todd Hill, Poughkeepsie. Ccedutchess.org/agriculture-horticulture/ taste-ny-market-at-todd-hill-1.php.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

KIDS & FAMILY

Healing Circle to Nourish Your Soul First Friday of every month, 6:30-8pm. $35. A sacred circle to connect, explore, and expand. Acupuncturist and intuitive healer Holly Burling will guide you through a soulful healing experience­—acupuncture, meditation, aromatherapy, crystals, mantras and writing in a beautiful and serene setting. SkyBaby Yoga & Pilates, Cold Spring. (646) 387-1974.

Shipwrecked: The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (as told by Himself) 8-9:30pm and 2-3:30pm. $34/$15 under age 15. Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Donald Margulies celebrates the power of storytelling in this true (and un-true) theatrical adventure. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

MUSIC

Aston Magna Music Festival 2015: Wind Power: Schubert, Boccherini, Mozart 8-10pm. $30-$35. “Wind Power” features Schubert’s monumental Octet for winds and strings; Boccherini Quintet and duos from Mozart’s “The Magic Flute.” Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. (800) 875-7156.

African Dance First Friday of every month, 6:15-7:45pm. Marbletown Multi-Arts, Stone Ridge. 750-6488.

Summer Camp Revamp for Grown-Ups 10am-3pm. By June 2nd, $290/June 16th, $335/ June 24th, $360. Imagine yourself stretched out on a yoga mat, sunbeams dancing through stained glass, or rolled on your belly, pen in hand. MaMa, Stone Ridge. 687-8890.

The Crossroads Band 7pm. Classic rock. Lia’s Mountain View, Pine Plains. (518) 398-7311. Dave Matthews Band 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Kid Rock 7pm. $20. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388.

SATURDAY 4 DANCE

Benefit Ballroom Dance First Saturday of every month, 7:30pm. Proceeds go towards our scholarship fund. Music Institute of Sullivan & Ulster Counties, Inc. MISU, Ellenville. 399-1293.


MUSIC RICHARD THOMPSON

Pamela Littky

A Guitarist's Guitarist Performs on Guitar “We’re in our fifth year now with the camp,” proudly proclaims British guitar hero Richard Thompson about Frets and Refrains, his acoustic guitar and songwriting camp held from July 6 through the 10th at the Full Moon Resort in Big Indian. “It’s a really great location, and we have great teachers, great students. Its absolutely idyllic and we just love to do it.” The four-day retreat is part of the Music Masters Camps series held every summer at the popular Catskills resort, whose current summer schedule also features workshops with King Crimson, Steve Earle and hard-rock power trio The Winery Dogs. For Thompson, the program running up at Full Moon serves as a wonderful remedy for a state where music education has taken a back seat to standardized testing in the public school system. “When politicians interfere with education, things go wrong drastically,” laughs Thompson. “And that’s what seems to be happening in the States. Administrators cut music and they cut arts because they think its peripheral to education. But its been proven over and over again that kids who do well in music also do well in mathematics and other subjects. Its very good for the structure of the brain. Performing music in a band or an orchestra is good for self-esteem. Education should be a whole package, not just concentrating on the three Rs.” What makes this season of Frets and Refrains even sweeter, however, is that it directly follows the release of Thompson's latest LP, Still, which was produced by Jeff Tweedy at Wilco's recording loft in Chicago. His 16th solo album, it is yet another great classic in a near half-century full of them, both as a solo act and a member of the massively influential English folk outfit Fairport Convention. For Thompson, who has largely helmed his own material but worked with some of the finest studio men in the business—including Joe

Richard Thompson plays a solo acoustic show at the Bearsville Theater on July 10.

Boyd, Mitchell Froom, Tom Rothrock, and Buddy Miller—through the years, letting an outside influence control the boards is an optimal way to keep a catalog as voluminous as his fresh. “When you’ve made as many records as I have, it's good to bring in different people sometimes,” he explains, “just to break the routine if you have a certain way of doing things and fall into the same patterns. It’s good to have someone like Jeff come in and approach you with other ideas and bring a different feel to a record.” As he's done each year, Thompson will bring the camp days to a close with a concert at the Bearsville Theater in Woodstock on the last day of camp. But where he will be supporting Still with his electric trio at festivals and concert halls across North America through August, here the guitarist will be performing "solo and acoustic." It's a format by which many of his most loyal fans prefer to see him, because of the way it places an emphasis squarely on the raw talent of Thompson's distinct voice and out-of-this-world guitar playing. “Acoustically, you can hear lyrics better, so if you’re telling a story you can bring the audience into it more,” Thompson explains. “And for someone like myself or, say, Bruce Springsteen, it reveals a whole different side. I love the fact that I could do both [acoustic and electric] and have that contrast. It keeps it interesting for me, and hopefully for the fans as well, to be able to turn up in two different guises.” Richard Thompson plays a solo acoustic show at the Bearsville Theater in Woodstock on July 10. Tickets: $35-$99. Bearsvilletheater.com —Ron Hart 7/15 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 95


FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Tannersville 4th of July Celebration 12-4pm. Parade at 3pm. All groups and organizations encouraged to join the parade. Crafts and music on Main St. noon to 4 pm. Music by Wyld Blu. Downtown Tannersville, Tannersville. (518) 858-9094.

FOOD & WINE

Pops, Patriots & Fireworks July 4th Spectacular 8-10pm. $30-$85/children half price. Celebrate the nation’s birthday at this dazzling, star-spangled evening full of patriotic music, picnics on the lawn, and fireworks. The Westchester Symphonic Winds conducted by Curt Ebersole and Broadway’s Ryan Silverman return to deliver another 4th of July that the whole family will love. Raindate: July 5. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

KIDS & FAMILY

New Paltz in the War for Independence 10am-4pm. Living historians will demonstrate marching and drilling, showing how arms at the time were handled and fired. Additional demonstrations and displays will reveal aspects of civilian life, including candle making, blacksmithing, woodworking, musket ball and cartridge manufacturing, and colonial cooking. Children can participate in reenactment military drills and various colonial games. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1889. Saturday Social Circle First Saturday of every month, 10am-noon. This group for mamas looking to meet other mamas, babies, and toddlers for activities, socialization, and friendship. Whether you are pregnant, have a new baby or older kids, we welcome you to join us on Saturday mornings for conversation, fun, and laughter over tea and homemade cookies. There is time for socialization so you can connect with old friends and get to know new ones. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624. Shipwrecked: The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (as told by Himself) 8-9:30pm and 2-3:30pm. $34/$15 under age 15. Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Donald Margulies celebrates the power of storytelling in this true (and un-true) theatrical adventure. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

MUSIC

Adam Tendler, Piano 6-8pm. $25-$50. A Maverick debut, Cowell and Cage. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Chris Bergson Band’s “BBQ Americana” 7pm. Opener: Hoochie Coochie Men. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Dave Matthews Band 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. 518-584-9330. David Kraai 7-10pm. Country folk. Birdsall House, Peekskill. . Independence Day Celebration with The West Point Band 8pm. West Point Military Academy, West Point. Usma.edu. Pianist Adam Tendler 6pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Robert Capowski 9:30pm-12:30am. free. Robert Capowski is an American guitarist/singer/songwriter based in the Hudson Valley. Going to be a great show! The Shelter, Rhinebeck. 876-1500. Woodstock Concerts on the Green 1-5pm. Village Green, Woodstock. Young People’s Concert: Elizabeth Mitchell & Family 11am-1pm. Up to $5. Smithsonian Folkways artist, with folk music for all ages. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

96 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS 4th of July Celebration Featuring food, music, and fun starting on the Rondout at 6 pm. Fireworks on the Rondout at dusk. Rondout Waterfront, Kingston.

First Saturday Reception First Saturday of every month, 5-8pm. ASK’s openings are elegant affairs with wine, hors d’oeuvres, and art enthusiasts. These monthly events are part of Kingston’s First Saturday art events. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Stockade District Walking Tour First Saturday of every month, 1pm. $10/$5 children. Walking tour highlights include viewing the many eighteenth century limestone houses still standing in the Stockade District. Friends of Historic Kingston, Kingston. 339-0720.

THEATER

Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm and 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Seussical The Musical 8pm and 3pm. $27/$25/$22. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Swing Dance First Saturday of every month, 7:30-10:30pm. $10. Basic lesson at 7:30 and a bonus move at 9pm with instructors Linda and Chester Freeman. MAC Fitness, Kingston. 853-7377.

SUNDAY 5 ARTS AND CULTURE

July Plein Air Paint Class Sundays, 9am-1pm. Includes 9am setup, artist’s painting demo, individual painting, picnic lunch from 12-1pm with critiques. Kowawese Unique Area, Plum Point. 487-2787.

DANCE

Swing Brunch First Sunday of every month, 10:30am2pm. $12.95. Eagle’s Nest 2 at Dinsmore, Staatsburg. 475-4689.

FOOD & WINE

Callicoon Farmers’ Market 11am-2pm. Callicoon Creek Park, Callicoon. Manager@sullivancountyfarmersmarkets.org.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Sound Healing and Yoga with Lea Garnier First Sunday of every month, 2-3:30pm. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

CocoMama! All Women! All Latin! All Jazz! 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Guitarist Frederic Hand and Flutist Paula Robiso 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Junior Brown 7pm. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Nashville’s Chasin’ Crazy 7:30pm. $25/$20/$15. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335.

LECTURES & TALKS

Time Travel Through American Art History 5:30-7:30pm. $10. Columbia County Council on the Arts, Hudson. (518) 671-6213.

MUSIC

Ariel Quartet and Dover Quartet 4:30-6pm. $20-$55. Performing two octects and two individual quartets, these exquisite powerhouses, both characterized by and celebrated for their soulful interpretations and youthful gumption, have prepared an explosive conclusion to this most festive weekend. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. Catch 6pm. $15. Brooklyn-based, hydra-headed, multi-disciplinary, rough-and-ready series of performance events—heads up the river to conquer the Hudson and possibly America. Pouring equal parts community, love, and refreshments along the way, Catch delivers an array of the finest artists. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050. Chasin’ Crazy $25/$20/$15. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Summer Nature & Design Camp Through August 7. Manitoga, Garrison. 424-3812.

SPIRITUALITY

Private Shamanic Spirit Doctoring 11:30am-6pm. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo 8pm. $98-$125. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

TUESDAY 7

Sunday Brunch: Saints of Swing 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

ARTS AND CULTURE

The Trout Quintet 11:30am-12:30pm. 23Arts artist-in-residence Tanya Gabrielian will lead the Initiative Chamber Ensemble, a quartet of some of New York’s best classical players. Differing from most typical quintets by the addition of the bass, the Trout Quintet is based on a piece of Lieder that Schubert wrote earlier in his career and is largely considered the most popular quintet ever written. All Souls Church, Tannersville. (518) 589-6953.

DANCE

Unplugged Sunday 6:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Adult Chess Club First Sunday of every month, 1:30-3:30pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

THEATER

Desire 2 & 7pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm and 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Seussical The Musical 3pm. $27/$25/$22. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Unbuilt City 2 & 7pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. Powerhouse@vassar.edu. Hudson Air Radio Theater 2pm. $20/$15 PS21 members/$10 students with ID. Classic and contemporary radio theater live on stage. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392.6121.

KIDS & FAMILY

Shipwrecked: The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (as told by Himself) 2-3:30pm. $34/$15 under age 15. Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Donald Margulies celebrates the power of storytelling in this true (and un-true) theatrical adventure. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

Slam Allen CD Release “Feel These Blues” 9pm. $15. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

MONDAY 6 FILM

Rumstick Road 8pm. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400.

KIDS & FAMILY

Rock Band Boot Camp $275. Week-long camp for ages 12-16. Beacon Music Factory, Beacon. 202-3555. Summer Camp Omi 2015 9am-3pm. $325 week/ $300 a week for 2 or more weeks. Summer camp for children ages 4 1/2-12. Camp Omi is a unique, artsbased day program where kids explore contemporary art and ideas through a variety of media and experiences. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. Week One Panorama: Elements of Art 9am-3pm. Through July 1. Youth will explore the eight elements of art through the prism of Frederic E. Church’s art, landscape, and architectural masterpiece Olana. Stretch your imagination and be inspired to create original projects through a variety of media focused on these themes. Learn techniques from artists and work with one of the artists featured in Olana’s En Plein Air Paint Out. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

MUSIC

Dido and Aeneas 8:15pm. An Opera Saratoga event. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

“Letters of all Sorts by Ori Alon” 7pm. Log out of your email, unplug your computer, and head over to Quinn’s for this performance art piece, in which participants are invited to clack out a letter on a typewriter. Quinn’s, Beacon. 202-7447.

New York City Ballet 8pm. Pre-performance talk one hour prior to show. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

FILM

The Incredibles 1pm. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Breast and Ovarian Cancer Support Group First Tuesday, Thursday of every month. Support Connection, Inc., a not-for-profit organization that provides free, confidential support services for people affected by breast and ovarian cancer. Open to women with breast, ovarian, or gynecological cancer. We all know there are many common factors to any cancer diagnosis. Join other women who have also been diagnosed as we discuss all stages of diagnosis, treatment, and post-treatment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. (800) 532-4290.

KIDS & FAMILY

Autism & ADHD Support Group First Tuesday of every month, 6:30pm. This support group is designed to meet the psychosocial needs of parents with children affected by autism and/or ADHD. Parents share challenges they face in raising a child with these disorders. Guest speakers and community leaders also share their expertise with parents. The program is facilitated by a licensed clinical social worker. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 454-8500.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Open Mike 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

MUSIC

Blues & Dance Party with Big Joe Fitz and the LoFis 7-9:30pm. Bring your dancing shoes and boogie down with the boys. Enjoy dinner on the patio and watch the sun set over the golf course. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Neil Alexander Presents Heavy Weather 7pm. Celebrating the music of Joe Zawinul. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Hudson River Evening Experienced Paddle 5:30pm. Paddle for 1.5-2 hours, 4-6 miles at an easy pace. PFD must be worn! Participants must have a kayak 13.5 feet or longer with 2 bulkheads. Waryas Park, Poughkeepsie. 452-7238.

PETS

Miraculous Expression: Creative Process Intensive with Hojin Osho 5pm. $400. Through July 12. Supported by deep self-study through zazen, the daily schedule, liturgy, and a week of intensive art practice, we will discover the continuous opportunity to release our grasp and thinking about our experience. By practicing letting go of the purpose or goal of our efforts, we contact the complete wonder of life— becoming not less, but more of who we truly are. Materials will be supplied. Zen Mountain Monastery, Mount Tremper. 688-2228.


MUSIC THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS AT BEARSVILLE THEATER

The New Pornographers perform at the Bearsville Theater on July 9 at 7pm

Backyard Blowout Any artist who’s ever spent several consecutive weeks on the road will tell you same thing: Being able to do a gig and then drive 10 minutes or so afterward to your own house, where you’ll be surrounded by your own stuff, and—wonder of wonders—actually be able to sleep in your own sweet, soft, and wonderfully familiar bed is the manifestation of a dream once thought unattainable. And for New Pornographers mastermind Carl Newman, a Woodstocker since 2009, this elusive dream will be realized on July 9, when his band once again headlines the just-down-the-road Bearsville Theater. “Yeah, it’s pretty great being so close by,” says Newman via phone. Just back from a European tour, he’s relishing his five-year standing as a local after having transferred to the Hudson Valley, like so many others, from New York. “Right now, I’m baking cookies for a Woodstock Day School benefit. Kind of just being a regular upstate guy, I guess. [Laughs.]”
Presently, the New Pornographers are touring on their sixth album, Brill Bruisers (Matador Records), which came out last August. The record once again sees the indie supergroup winning delirious applause for their ingenious intermingling of transcendent, Brian Wilson-worthy pop arrangements, crunchy guitar riffs, and soaring Association/Mamas and the Papas vocal harmonies. Its title—also the name of its lead-off track—though, isn’t an allusion to the hallowed 1619 Broadway songwriters' hive known as the Brill Building, although that would certainly be a logical guess given Newman’s flair for pop classicism. Instead, it’s a truncation of the song’s working title and a product of his penchant for alliteration. “Originally I was calling

it ‘Brilliant Bruisers,’ but then that got shortened to ‘Brill Bruisers’—just because it sounded cool,” says the singer-guitarist, who in his solo guise as A. C. Newman was profiled in the October 2012 issue of Chronogram. “When I’m writing songs, I’m much less concerned with what words mean than with how they sound. So, yeah, I love alliteration.” Underscoring the point, Brill Bruisers also includes the synth-squiggleinfused “Fantasy Fools” and the giddy, pounding “Dancehall Domine.” Formed in 1999 in the Vancouver area, Newman’s original home, the New Pornographers have since maintained a “slightly amorphous” lineup that also includes guitarist and singer Dan Bejar (Destroyer, Swan Lake), bassist John Collins (the Evaporators, Destroyer), keyboardist Ben Thurier, and alt-country queen Neko Case on vocals. Owing to conflicts with her own schedule, Case, who sings on Brill Bruisers, isn’t with the band on tour this time out; taking her place is rising local chanteuse Simi Stone. “You feel this weird pressure with hometown shows,” says Newman, who with the group played the Bearsville Theater once before, in 2010. “I’m guessing the neighbors are, like, ‘Carl’s in a band? I wonder what he does.’” They’ll find out this month. The New Pornographers will perform at the Bearsville Theater in Bearsville on July 9 at 7pm. Thao and the Get Down Stay Down will open. Tickets are $35. (845) 679-4406; Bearsvilletheater.com. —Peter Aaron 7/15 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 97


SPIRITUALITY

Private Spirit Guide Readings 12-6pm. $40/$75. Psychic medium Adam Bernstein. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

THEATER

The Unbuilt City 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. Powerhouse@vassar.edu.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

A Nod to Bobbleheads 6-8pm. $50. A 4-week workshop for teens ages 12-17 year olds. Art Centro, Poughkeepsie. Ceramics.artcentro@gmail.com. Woodstock Writers Workshops 6:30-8:30pm. $60 series/$15 individual classes. For those who write or want to write poetry, short stories, novel, memoir, creative, non-fiction, etc.—and get it published! Led by Iris Litt. 21 Cedar Way, Woodstock. 679-8256.

Pink Martini 7:30pm. 470/$55/$40. Featuring a dozen musicians, Pink Martini performs its multilingual repertoire with inspiration drawn from music from all over the world, crossing genres of classical, jazz, and old-fashioned pop. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335. Yonder Mountain String Band 8pm. $37/$47. Bluegrass. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

THEATER

Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Unbuilt City 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. Powerhouse@vassar.edu.

DANCE

New York City Ballet 8pm. Pre-performance talk one hour prior to show. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Feel Calmer, More Relaxed, and More Confident Using the Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) Second Wednesday of every month, 6:30-8:30pm. $67/$57 early reg. Jeff Schneider, New Paltz. 255-4175. Meditation and Intention Circle Second Wednesday of every month, 6:30-7:30pm. Susan Linich will guide you through a meditation on love of self. We will be actively working on issues of anger, forgiveness, and the impact of words on identity. Emotional Rescue, Poughkeepsie. 243-0168.

MUSIC

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Tango at the Pavilion 6-8pm. $14/$5 open dance. Join Nina Jirka, of Tango New Paltz, and learn how to Tango. Come for an hour-long lesson from 6pm7pm and stay for open dance from 7pm8pm. Bring water and comfortable shoes for dancing. All ages welcome. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

The Balkun Brothers 8pm. Blues. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185.

THURSDAY 9

Dancing at Dusk: Italian Folk Dancing Allesandra Belloni and I Giullari di Piazza 5-7pm. $10/$5 children. Take a fiery journey through the south of Italy featuring dances performed as ritual by the women of Southern Italy. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

BUSINESS & NETWORKING

Indian Classical Music 6-8pm. Steve Gorn and Ray Spiegel. St. John’s Episcopal Church, Kingston. 331-2252.

New York City Ballet 2 & 8pm. Pre-performance talk one hour prior to show. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Jimmie Dale Gilmore 7:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. Ladies Night Unplugged with KJ Denhert 8pm. Acoustic. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

98 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Sunset Sensations: A Unique Wine & Food Sampling Series 5:30pm. Enjoy samplings from Hudson Valley chefs, and wine pairings from around the world, in this popular year-long culinary series. Locust Grove, Samuel Morse Historic Site, Poughkeepsie. 454-4500.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Breast and Ovarian Cancer Support Group First Tuesday, Thursday of every month. Support Connection, Inc., a not-for-profit organization that provides free, confidential support services for people affected by breast and ovarian cancer. Open to women Off the Page Random House takes over Basilica Hudson on July 11 to bring books to life Upstate. There will be complimentary beach reads, interactive workshops, wine tastings, and a variety of book-inspired sessions meant to energize and instruct. Keynote speakers Ruth Reichl, food critic and bestselling author, and Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project, will help craft the day’s delights through lifestyle tips and treats. Reichl starts the day with a talk on life’s unassuming pleasures and a preview of her upcoming fall cookbook, My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Changed My Life. Food trucks, coffee, tea, and boxed lunches (available for preorder) will satisfy lunchtime cravings. Afternoon talks centered around spirituality, self and home improvement, and travel lead up to Rubin’s talk on happiness, in which she will be joined by Darling magazine’s editor-in-chief, Sarah Dubbledam. Off the Page will close with the Random House x Darling Dinner ($60) featuring an alfresco dining experience. Randomhousebooks.com/event/off-the-page

WEDNESDAY 8

Young Women’s Breast and Ovarian Cancer Support Group Second Wednesday of every month, 7pm. Support Connection, Inc., a not-for-profit organization that provides free, confidential support services for people affected by breast and ovarian cancer. Open to women who have been diagnosed with breast, ovarian or gynecological cancer at a young age. Join other women who were also diagnosed at a young age as we discuss issues pertaining to all stages of diagnosis, treatment and posttreatment. Support Connection, Yorktown Heights. (800) 532-4290.

Alexi Kenney & Renana Gutman 7-8:45pm. $15-$40. A two-time participant in our Evnin Rising Stars mentoring program for classical string musicians, violinist Alexi Kenney honed his distinctive poise and thoughtful repertoire, stoking the creative fire. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

Hudson Valley Garden Association Monthly Meeting Second Thursday of every month, 7pm. Shawangunk Town Hall, Wallkill. 418-3640.

DANCE

FILM Inside Bedford-Stuyvesant 8pm. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050.

FOOD & WINE Afternoon Tea 1:30-3:30pm. $32.50. Tea service includes a variety of tea sandwiches, scones with clotted cream and preserves, delicious desserts and a variety of fragrant teas all served in the most exquisite vintage china. The Tea is preceded by a tour of the historic Rosen House. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

with breast, ovarian or gynecological cancer. We all know there are many common factors to any cancer diagnosis. Join other women who have also been diagnosed as we discuss all stages of diagnosis, treatment and post-treatment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. (800) 532-4290.

Understanding Your Options for a Sucessful Conception Second Thursday of every month, 6-7:30pm. Assisting persons/couples understand fertility and options available to them. Hudson Valley Fertility, Fishkill. 765-0125 ext. 304.

KIDS & FAMILY

Atlantis: Legend of a Lost Civilization 1pm. Discover ancient Minoan culture, art, and archaeology. Crafts, activities and snacks. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Support Groups for Relatives Raising Children Second Thursday of every month, 6-7:30pm. The Relatives As Parents Program (RAPP) implements monthly Coffee and Conversation support groups for grandparents and other relatives raising children. The Coffee and Conversation support groups are designed to provide education and resources to address the needs and concerns experienced by relative caregivers. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Poughkeepsie. 452-8440.

LECTURES & TALKS

Forum on Crude Oil Transport in the Hudson Valley 6-9pm. The transport of the volatile, explosive, and toxic Crude Oil fracked in the Bakken Shale of North Dakota by rail, barge, and now a proposed pipeline presents a real danger to our communities. Explosions, leaks, and ruptures across the country are a warning to Kingston and the Hudson Valley of accidents just waiting to happen. Speakers

from Rivekeeper, Catskill Mountainkeeper, local elected officials, and special “skyped” report direct from North Dakota will help us understand the issues which include reasons to “keep it in the ground” and move to a just, renewable, and sustainable energy future. Kingston City Hall, Kingston. 246-3449.

MUSIC

Alexi Kenney & Renana Gutman 7-8:30pm. $15/$24/$32/$40. As a twotime participant in our Evnin Rising Stars mentoring program for classical string musicians, violinist Alexi Kenney honed his distinctive poise and thoughtful repertoir. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. Cultural Celebration with Latin Jazz with La Voz Featuring the talented pianist and composer Leo Genovese and his group, the Legal Aliens. Spiegeltent, Annandale. The Homegrown String Band 7:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. Jeff Entin Hosts Open Mike Night 7-9pm. Jeff Entin welcomes musicians from all around the Hudson Valley to Open Mic night. Bring your instrument and talent to perform or enjoy a tasty dinner listening to the music. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. John Simon and The Greater Ellenville Jazz Trio 7pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Murder by Death 8pm. $18/$15 in advance. Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. 481-5158. The New Pornographers with Thao And The Get Down Stay Down 8pm. $35. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Peter & Will Anderson Trio 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS

The Beach Boys 6pm. $155. Cocktails, a Hopkins Vineyard wine tasting, tropical treats from local restaurants, one-of-a-kind silent and live auction items, and live music by Carly & Eliza start the evening from 6pm–7:30pm, with a live auction and unforgettable show immediately following. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

THEATER

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 8-10:30pm. $32-$44. Fantastic adventures of the out-of-the-ordinary car that flies through the air and sails the seas. An eccentric inventor, Caractacus Potts sets about restoring an old race car from a scrap heap with the help of his children Jeremy and Jemima. They soon discover the car has magical properties ,including the ability to float and take flight. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Fernando Rubio: Everything by my side 5-7pm. $5. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Unbuilt City 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. Powerhouse@vassar.edu. The Winter’s Tale, by William Shakespeare 7:30pm. $15-$30. Performed by Walking the Dog Theater. Hawthorne Valley School, Ghent. (518) 672-7092. YouAreNowhere 8pm. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Intro to CinergE: Animal Communication & Energy Balancing for Animals 6-8pm. $25/$20. Animal communicator Cindy Brody. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.


ART ICARUS, MEET APOLLO

SASHA SICURELLA

“Icarus Meets Apollo,” an installation by Diann Bauer at Omi International Arts Center in Ghent through September 27.

Just Get On With the Climbing Diann Bauer has learned to embrace humanity’s erroneous nature. She understands that everything can change from one moment to the next, so there’s no point in giving up trying to succeed in our quest to become larger than ourselves. With the installation of her pavilion Icarus Meet Apollo at Omi International Arts Center in Ghent, she says she “espouses high ambitions for humans knowing full well that we will fall on our face pretty regularly.” Bauer’s various creations—paintings, drawings, sculptures, and installations to name a few—stand as markers for humans to witness as they plunge to and fro through the intricate facets of contemporary society. After studying art and architecture at Cooper Union and Goldsmiths College, Bauer began exhibiting her work at galleries such as the Deste Foundation and Benaki Museum in Greece, the Ian Potter Museum of Art in Australia, and Socrates Sculpture Park in New York. Icarus Meet Apollo was unveiled at Socrates in 2013, part of Bauer’s Emerging Artist Fellowship there. The inspiration for Icarus Meet Apollo came after Bauer viewed Victor Pasmore’s modernist “Apollo Pavilion” in England. Pasmore’s pavilion, composed of concrete, was built as a folly, created with optimistic spirit after the Apollo missions to the moon. Much as humans marked the moon, the “Apollo Pavilion” was also defaced—with graffiti. “This was a fate far from Pasmore’s ambitions,” says Bauer “but this interested me, even Pasmore himself had said that the graffiti in some ways ‘humanized’ the work.” The notion of combining high ambitions with human baseness sparked Bauer to introduce Icarus to Apollo. Icarus, hubristic legend of Greek mythology, drowned in the sea after he flew too close

to the sun and melted the wax of his wings. Apollo was the Greek god of sun, healing, and truth, the very things that destroyed Icarus. Bauer believes that his flight was worth taking because it drew a differentiating line between contemporary humans and their origins. Bauer says, “it is difference through our own making, through engineering. The reality of our ambitions as a species may lead to our individual demise, but this is not a reason to not have these ambitions and indeed actively pursue them.” From proposal to completion it took eight months to build Icarus Meet Apollo. The structure is comprised of plywood, out of necessity and because Bauer believes that “wood has a warmth that the [Apollo] pavilion did not have.” Quotes from Shakespeare, Italo Calvino, Sun Ra, Robert Moses, and Jane Jacobs are typeset across the surface of the sculpture, adding visual depth. “The texts all speak in some way to either our mental and technological ambition [‘basic instructions for leaving earth’—Sun Ra] in combination with the materiality in which we must execute these ambitions [‘do not go gentle’—].” Since June, Omi has featured Icarus Meet Apollo in the Education Omi Pavilion, which aims to integrate art with community. Icarus Meet Apollo is built to a child’s scale. “In terms of what I would like the children to get, is more a sense of ‘Wow, it’s a letter M as big as me!’ I don’t expect them to get the references. Kids who can read will either make their own sense of it, ask for help, or just get on with climbing and not worry about it.” Icarus Meet Apollo will be exhibited at Art Omi in Ghent through September 27. (518) 392-4747; Artomi.org. —Jessica Jones 7/15 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 99


FRIDAY 10 COMEDY

TMI Round 7: Tragedy + Time = Comedy 8pm. $20/$15 in advance. In true TMI Project style, participants of our first ever Comedic Monologue Writing Workshop, have mined true experiences from their lives and found hilarity in them. There is often humor in the most tragic circumstances, as the human experience pushes us to the edge, and the absurdity of it all cannot be ignored. Hearing the readers perform their comedic monologues promises to be a freeing and empowering experience that will have everyone rolling in the aisles! TMI Project Space, Kingston. 514-2745.

DANCE

Dutchess County Singles Dance $20. Fabulous music from `40s, `50s, `60s to the present by DJ Johnny Angel. A light dinner buffet with desert and coffee. Lesson at 7:30pm, dance 8pm-11:30pm. Elks Lodge #275, Poughkeepsie. Move: Live Tour 2015 8pm. $49.50-$79.50. Superstar siblings Julianne and Derek Hough will team up once again, dancing their way across the stage. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

Hurley Mountain Highway 7pm. Pop, soft rock. Brothers Barbecue, New Windsor. 534-4227. Isle of Klezbos 8pm. $15. This incarnation features Debra Kreisberg on clarinet and alto saxophone, Pam Fleming trumpet and flugelhorn, Shoko Nagai on accordion, and Eve Sicular on drums. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. The Nerds in Concert 6:30pm. $29. Chain of Fools will also make an appearance. Includes BBQ. Putnam County Golf Course, Mahopac. 808-1881. Reality Check 8pm. Classic rock. La Puerta Azul, Salt Point. 677-2985. Richard Thompson 8pm. $35-$99. Acoustic. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz & Aoife O’Donovan: “I’m With Her Tour 8-9:45pm. $46/$60/$78/$88. Three mainstays of the acoustic, folk and roots music world take their individual talents and harmonize

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

MassBliss Arts and Awareness Festival $90/$200 full-weekend/$25 and $25 music passes. MassBliss 2015 is an all-ages arts and awareness camping experience featuring live performances and immersive workshops in music, theater, yoga, meditation, and fitness. Ski Butternut, Great Barrington, MA. Massbliss.com.

KIDS & FAMILY

Abenaki Storyteller Joseph Bruchac 1pm. Joseph Bruchac is a writer and traditional storyteller from the Adirondack Region. He draws on his Abenaki Indian ancestry and other Native American traditions for a rich variety of lively stories. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Annual Children’s Day Parade 6pm. This year’s theme: Frozen. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. 481-7333. Cub’s Place Second Friday of every month, 6-7:30pm. Activities and support for children in grades K-5 and their parents dealing with a serious family illness or crisis. Children engage in age-appropriate supervised games and activities facilitated by a licensed clinical social worker. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 454-8500.

LITERARY & BOOKS

In a Nutshell Storytelling Night Every third Friday, 7pm. A night for tales, real and imagined. They can be anything! Something that happened to you while walking down the street, a noteworthy limerick, a piece of writing that’s ready to flee from the sheet, or even a tale you’ve read that deserves to be made audible for a reflective audience. Ten minute maximum. Michel’s Coffee Shop, Poughkeepsie. 454-5176. Readings/Book Signing: Marc B. Fried 6:45-8pm. Just released, Notes from the Other Side is an edited selection from 8 years of Fried’s entertaining and thought-provoking Shawangunk Journal newspaper column by the same name. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

MUSIC

Alejandro Escovedo and the Sensitive Boys 9pm. Roots/rock. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Bluebirds of Paradise 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

100 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 8-10:30pm. $32-$44. Fantastic adventures of the out-of-the-ordinary car that flies through the air and sails the seas. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Fernando Rubio: Everything by my side 2-4 & 5-7pm. $5. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Hollow 7:30pm. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. The Little Shop of Horrors 8pm. $20/$15 for students, members, seniors. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279. Moon Over Buffalo 8pm. $39/matinee $34. Shadowland continues its string of successful farces with this classic comedy by the great American farceur Ken Ludwig. A love letter to the theatre, this hilarious treat explodes with the escapades of a couple of still-ambitious hasPianoSummer An international institute and festival, PianoSummer draws people passionate about piano together to learn, respect, and revel in the multidimensional qualities of the art form under the guidance of artistic director and acclaimed classical pianist Vladimir Feltsman. Students join a diverse group of prestigious musicians and teachers, such as Susan Starr and Alexander Korsantia, to cultivate their musical identities in a professional setting. Private lessons with instructors, master classes, lectures and demonstrations provide an immersive experience. The public is welcome to the Faculty Gala, the Hung-Kuan Chen Recital, the Vladimir Ovchinnikov Recital, and the Symphony Gala with the Hudson Valley Philharmonic. All PianoSummer events take place in the Julien J. Studley Theatre at SUNY New Paltz from July 11 to July 31. Newpaltz.edu/piano/tix.html

New York City Ballet 7pm. Pre-performance talk one hour prior to show. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

together in this one-of-a-kind band. Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz, and Aoife O’Donovan, each accomplished solo artists in their own right, play sets of each other’s songs, covers and traditional songs in this dynamic performance. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. .

Second Friday Jam with Jeff Entin & Bob Blum 8-11pm. Influenced by everything they heard, they play a wide variety of music with an almost infinite song list including many originals, with a bit of jam band attitude thrown in. Special guest often show up and join in on the fun. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Soul Purpose 8pm. Motown/R&B. Unframed Artists Gallery, New Paltz. 255-5482. The Bar Spies 8pm. Classic rock. Mahoney’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, Poughkeepsie. 471-7026. Vickie Russell: Campfire Singalong 9pm. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (800) 772-6646.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Plein Air Artist Guided Walking Tou 10-11:30am. $12/$10 members/children under 12 free. Travel the Olana carriage roads, and explore the site’s farm complex, while seeing artists at work in the landscape. This tour, led by a Hudson River Region painter, is an exciting way to learn about the history of plein air painting and have meaningful conversations with the artists working in the field. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

SATURDAY 11

THEATER

beens given one last chance at their wildest dream: stardom. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

Rain 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical based on the short story by Somerset Maugham. Book by Sybille Pearson. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Seussical The Musical 8pm. $27/$25/$22. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Summer Shtick $20/$15 PS21 members/$10 students with ID. An evening of comedy and song. It will be comic mayhem with no mimes, no puppets, and just laughs when actors Nancy Rothman, Robert Zukerman, and friends take the stage. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392.6121. “The Winter’s Tale,” by William Shakespeare 7:30pm. $15-$30. Performed by Walking the Dog Theater. Hawthorne Valley School, Ghent. (518) 672-7092. YouAreNowhere 8pm. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400.

ARTS AND CULTURE

Sunset Tours of Manitoga 5:30-7:30pm. $75. Studio and Woodland Garden with Tom Krizmanic; space is limited. No discounts honored for these tours. Russel Wright Design Center, Garrison. 424-3812.

COMEDY

TMI Round 7: Tragedy + Time = Comedy 8pm. $20/$15 in advance. In true TMI Project style, participants of our first ever Comedic Monologue Writing Workshop, have mined true experiences from their lives and found hilarity in them. There is often humor in the most tragic circumstances, as the human experience pushes us to the edge, and the absurdity of it all cannot be ignored. Hearing the readers perform their comedic monologues promises to be a freeing and empowering experience that will have everyone rolling in the aisles! TMI Project Space, Kingston. 514-2745. “Weird Al” Yankovic 8pm. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

DANCE

New York City Ballet 2 & 8pm. Pre-performance talk one hour prior to show. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

2015 Mane Event 10am-3pm. 3rd annual fundraiser celebrating the powerful relationship between humans and equines through different disciplines and modalities. It will be a day of horsey activities, demos, exhibits, food, and fun for all ages. All funds raised will provide support for scholarships, programs, equipment, and care for our equine partners. High and Mighty Therapeutic Riding and Driving Center, Ghent. (518) 672-4202. 4th Annual Plein Air Paint-out Festival 4-6pm. There is an afternoon cocktail reception and exhibition at 4pm, and live auction of wet canvases at 5pm; Tickets for the reception include refreshments, exhibition-viewing and an auction paddle. Bob Bahr, editor of the e-newsletter PleinAir Today, will be present at the auction to judge works and select awards. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872. Beacon Second Saturday Second Saturday of every month. The BAUsters have something special this month - the celebration of 10 years of continuous monthly offerings. In honor of the event we have assembled an excellent show—a joint effort of all the represented BAU artists. Downtown Beacon, Beacon. Beaconarts.org. Chatham SummerFest 10am-4pm. The street fair, whose activities will take place on Main Street, Park Row and Hudson Avenue, regularly draws hundreds of visitors and showcases many varied local organizations as well as performers, artists, and vendors. Village of Chatham, Chatham. (518) 269-1057. A Fair Day in High Falls 11am-5pm. Town-wide street festival. Food, music, crafts, games, flea market, antiques market, children’s games, pie-eating contest, historical tours, local merchants and vendors, and dunking booth. Village of High Falls, High Falls. Highfallscivic.org. MassBliss Arts and Awareness Festival $90/$200 full-weekend/$25 and $25 music passes. MassBliss 2015 is an all-ages arts and awareness camping experience featuring live performances and immersive workshops in music, theater, yoga, meditation, and fitness. Ski Butternut, Great Barrington, MA. Massbliss.com. Monastery Vinegar Festival 11am-4pm. Based on a medieval monastic recipe, our organic-artisanal vinegars are crafted from a variety of wines, juices, and spices, as well as from pure local apple cider. During the Festival there will also be available other food products from the Monastery farm, gardens, and kitchen, as well as a book singing. Our Lady of the Resurrection Monastery, LaGrangeville. Ourladyoftheresurrectionmonastery.webs.com.


THEATER POWERHOUSE THEATER AT VASSAR

Buck Lewis

Carter Hudson and Beth Dixon in a rehersal for The Unbuilt City, part of the 2015 Powerhouse Theater season at Vassar College.

School’s Out, Theater’s In A collective sigh sounds from the campus of Vassar College when New York City-based actors, directors, writers, and designers arrive for the summer season of Powerhouse Theater which runs from July 1 through August 2. The buildings on campus are architecturally Hogwartsian and surrounded by tall trees, beds of flowers, and all the kinds of greenery an urban artist dreams of. But Powerhouse Theater doesn’t just attract artists from New York. Talent flocks from all across the country to Powerhouse Theater at the Vassar College campus during its summer months. “The ability to be part of something new is attractive to artists,” says Johanna Pfaelzer, artistic director of New York Stage and Film, the organization that runs Powerhouse. Nearly 250 professional actors and 50 apprentices come together for a five-week residency on the Vassar campus to form a thriving artistic community. This year, more than 25 theater pieces will be performed over the course of Powerhouse’s 31st season. The company chooses only original plays to be performed on its mainstage—a dedication to originality that requires Pfaelzer and the rest of Powerhouse’s staff to sift through over 200 scripts a year. Only two out of all of the submissions end up finding their way onto the playhouse’s mainstage (five more are performed as workshops). This year, the company is putting on Keith Bunin’s “The Unbuilt City,” directed by Tony Award-nominee Sean Mathias. The play takes place in a townhouse in Brooklyn Heights where the untold history of New York City is revealed by an elusive art collector. Beth Dixon and Carter Hudson star. The second mainstage performance, “The Light Years,” written by Hannah Bos and Paul Thureen, and directed by Oliver Butler, tells the haunted love story of a theatrical impresario that spans four decades called.

A few performances of interest that are appearing on Powerhouse’s smaller stages include a reading of “15 Minutes,” a musical by Rick Elice featuring “Dexter” star Michael C. Hall; and “Desire,” a collection of short plays based on six Tennessee Wiliams’ stories, directed by Michael Wilson. The program also works to bring together experienced artists and students that are trying to break into the world of theater and film. The students are a part of Powerhouse’s training program, which has cultivated the talent of a number of successful actors, directors, and writers. Included in the extensive list of notable alumni from Powerhouse is “How I Met Your Mother” star Josh Radnor. “When I was 19, the chasm between where I was and where they were felt enormous,” Radnor says in a video reflecting upon his apprenticeship. Radnor is speaking of the same anxiety and doubts felt by a number of aspiring actors, but coming from a former apprentice who successfully broke into the daunting world of acting, it is a comforting sentiment for current students to hear. Pfaelzer observes the positive impact that results from “students see[ing] how professional actors had to work at it. It’s reassuring and inspiring.” The artistic community and environment that forms around Powerhouse’s summer season is “imperative to the experience,” according to Pfaelzer—and both the students and professionals agree. Michael Wilson, the director of “Desire” and a Powerhouse veteran, says, “A lot of the appeal is the environment. The campus is very inviting and conducive to the kind of intensive work that bringing a play to fruition involves.” Powerhouse Theater’s summer season runs from July 1 to August 2 on the Vassar campus. Powerhouse.vassar.edu. —Jake Swain 7/15 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 101


FOOD & WINE

Art Omi Weekend: Dinner + Dancing Under the Stars 7pm-midnight. $100/$85 members. Enjoy dinner, drinks, and live music overlooking the firefly-lit sculpture park at Omi in the company of our artists-in-residence and upstate arts community. Then, kick off your shoes and grab a glass of wine from the open bar to celebrate the culmination of this years’ artists residency. Featuring Sambaland. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747.

KIDS & FAMILY

Bugs, Rocks, and Fossils 1pm. Geologists, entomologists and paleontologists will delight when Kirsty Morgan, a geologist and paleontoligist from London, brings her collection of curiosities. Red Hook Public Library, Red Hook. 758-3241.

LECTURES & TALKS

Betsy Ross: Life Behind the Legend 4-5:30pm. $10/$7 member. Drawing on new sources and bringing a fresh, keen eye to the fabled creation of “the first flag,” Marla R. Miller thoroughly reconstructs the life behind the legend of Betsy Ross. Miller’s enthralling portrait provides a close look at the famous seamstress who occupies a sacred place in American consciousness and her everyday life in Revolutionary War-era Philadelphia. The McNary Center, Kinderhook. (518) 758-9265.

Jazz at the Maverick: Perry Beekman, Guitar and Vocals 8-10pm. $25-$50. Lou Pappas, bass; Peter Tomlinson, piano. The Harold Arlen Songbook. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Joe Duraes & The Skills 7pm. Modern rock. Peekskill Coffee House, Peekskill. La Favorite by Gaetano Donizetti Orchestra of St. Luke’s 8-9:45pm. $20/$50/$70/$95/$110. La Favorite continues Caramoor’s track record of reviving the Parisian grand operas of the Italian masters. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. PianoSummer Faculty Gala 8pm. $29/$24. World-renowned pianists Vladimir Feltsman, Paul Ostrovsky, Phillip Kawin, Susan Staff, Robert Roux, Robert Hamilton and Alexander Korsantia perform Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Brahms, Bartók, and Ravel. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869.

current utility bill. Refreshments will be served. Call for address. Solar Open House, Kingston. (646) 302-5835.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION HITS Kingston Triathlon HITS Triathlon Series is a race series designed for seasoned triathletes, as well as first timers. All are invited to compete in the HITS Triathlon Series, from the beginner in the Open, to the experienced triathlete in the Sprint, Olympic, Half and Full. Kingston Point Beach, Kingston. Hitstriathlonseries.com/kingston-ny. Hudson River Experienced Paddle Morning launch from Quiet Cove River Front Park. Paddle north from Quiet Cove to our lunch spot at Vanderbilt’s Bard Rock. PFD must be worn! Participants must have a kayak 13.5 feet or longer with 2 bulkheads. Historic Hyde Park, Hyde Park. 452-7238.

MUSIC

Banda Magda 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Def Leppard $36.50-$148. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Dom Flemons Trio: American Old-time Folk Music 8pm. $25/$20 members/$15 students. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Eilen Jewell 9pm. Blend of noirish rockabilly, surf-tinged country, retro-rock and jazzy folk. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Glenn Miller Orchestra 7:30pm. $38. Jazz. Wine tasting at 6:45pm. 7:30pm. $38. Jazz. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Hudson’s Crew 9pm. Modern rock. Main Street Restaurant, Saugerties. 246-6222. Jazz at the Maverick 8pm. Perry Beekman, guitar and vocals, Lou Pappas, bass; Peter Tomlinson, piano. The Harold Arlen Songbook. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

102 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

YouAreNowhere 8pm. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400.

SUNDAY 12 ARTS AND CULTURE

“Art Omi Weekend: Open Studios.” 1-5pm. The work of 30 artists from 24 countries in one place. After our relaxing Country Brunch, take a short stroll down to the studio barns, and see what the artists have been working on for the past 4 weeks, along with additional events and installations to be announced. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. 350 Family Yard Sale 9am-4pm. Furniture, kids clothes & toys, housewares, and more. The Woodstock Jewish Congregation, Woodstock. 679-2218. 4th Annual Plein Air Paint-out & Festival: Creating Landscapes within the Landscape 10am-2pm. Join us for the fourth annual plein air festival which includes artists working onsite, “meet the artists” reception, exhibitions, award ceremony and a live auction, as well as an artist tent sale. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Random House’s Off the Page 9am-6:30pm. A unique event that brings books to life for a day of inspiration and fun in New York’s scenic Hudson Valley. Receive a complimentary tote bag filled with summer reads, goodies and gifts. Gretchen Rubin— the author of the blockbuster bestseller The Happiness Project—will end the day with an energizing conversation about habits and happiness, before guests adjourn for a delicious wine tasting of Hudson Valley favorites. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050.

The Winter’s Tale, by William Shakespeare 2pm. $15-$30. Performed by Walking the Dog Theater. Hawthorne Valley School, Ghent. (518) 672-7092.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Dia:Beacon Gallery Talk: Kelly Taxter on Fred Sandback 2-3pm. Kelly Taxter is an assistant curator at the Jewish Museum in New York, where she works with the deputy director of exhibitions and programs, Jens Hoffmann, on the museum’s contemporary art program. Dia:Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100. Lester Howard Reads Hip Hop Alphabet Rhymes 5-6:30pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

The Unbuilt City 2 & 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. Powerhouse@vassar.edu.

Monastery Vinegar Festival Monks, with their rigid daily routines and stringent discipline, are known for making some of the most celebrated beers and wines in the word. But, at Our Lady of the Resurrection Monastery (246 Barmore Road in Lagrangeville), the monks craft vinegar. Brother Victor-Antoine is the vinegar virtuoso behind the slow-fermented, artisan elixirs expertly made at the monastery. The vinegars are based on a medieval monastic recipe, and the monastery crafts nearly a dozen different all-organic varieties—this year’s newest being a beer vinegar. On July 11 and 12, you will have the opportunity to taste each variety, and bring home a bottle of your own, at the Annual Monastery Vinegar Festival. Last year’s festival was attended by several thousand people from all over the country, resulting in bottles being bought out fast. So attendees are encouraged to arrive early at 11am and stay until the festival winds down at 4pm. Ourladyoftheresurrectionmonastery.webs.com. Sin City 8:30-11:30pm. Cosmic Americana and rock n’ roll songs you know and love by Cash, Stones, Dead, Bonnie, Dylan, Ronstadt, Lucinda, The Band, Waylon and more. Featuring singer Carmen Senski, bassist Chuck Cornelis, and drummer Manuel Quintana. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Turkuaz 9pm. $15. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS

Awards Dinner for Grace Bakst Wapner and Douglas C. James 5:30-10pm. $125/$100 members. Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild will honor Douglas C. James and Grace Bakst Wapner for their significant contributions to the arts. An awards dinner will be held with cocktails, music, and a family-style dinner. Doug James will perform with pianist John Simon and bassist Bill Crow to form a trio of some of jazz’s most admired musicians. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079. Hawthorne Valley Declaration of Interdependence Celebration 6pm. $125+. Benefits the Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School and Hawthorne Valley Place Based Learning Center. Hawthorne Valley Farm, Ghent. (518) 672-4465 ext. 231. Solarize Kingston: Solar Open House 12-3pm. Find out about this non-profit community program that is making solar electricity simpler and more affordable for homes and small businesses. Folks from RUPCO will also be present to answer your questions about financing which will likely result in monthly payments lower than your

SPIRITUALITY

Private Animal Communication & Energy Balancing Sessions for Animals 11:30am-6pm. $75/60 min. Animal communicator Cindy Brody. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

THEATER

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 8-10:30pm. $32-$44. Fantastic adventures of the out-of-the-ordinary car that flies through the air and sails the seas. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

MassBliss Arts and Awareness Festival $90/$200 full-weekend/$25 and $25 music passes. MassBliss 2015 is an all-ages arts and awareness camping experience featuring live performances and immersive workshops in music, theater, yoga, meditation, and fitness. Ski Butternut, Great Barrington, MA. Massbliss.com.

FOOD & WINE

Annual Monastery Vinegar Festival 11am-4pm. Learn about making artisanal vinegars, available for tasting and purchase as well as other foods from the Monastery. Bread, cheese, honey, preserves, tapenade, and relishes. Book signing including Organic by Francesco Mastalia and the Monastery’s cookbooks and other books. Our Lady of the Resurrection Monastery, LaGrangeville. Ourladyoftheresurrectionmonastery.webs.com. Art Omi Weekend: Country Brunch 11am-1pm. $50/$40 members. Omi honors our international artists-in-residence and celebrates with a country brunch on the lawn of Ledig House. Join us for mimosas, French toast, and fresh fruit to fuel up for a day of art-seeking before you head down to the Studio Barns. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747.

Fernando Rubio: Everything by my side 2-4 & 5-7pm. $5. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Callicoon Farmers’ Market 11am-2pm. Callicoon Creek Park, Callicoon. Manager@sullivancountyfarmersmarkets.org.

The Hollow 7:30pm. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476.

Meditation, Intention and Zero Point Healing Second Sunday of every month, 2-3:30pm. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

The Little Shop of Horrors 8pm. $20/$15 for students, members, seniors. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279. Rain 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical based on the short story by Somerset Maugham. Book by Sybille Pearson. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm and 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Seussical The Musical 8pm and 3pm. $27/$25/$22. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

MUSIC

Ambient Brunch Second Sunday of every month, 11am-1pm. With live soundscapes by Errant Space. Culture Cafe Bar, Beacon. 202-7800. The Art of North Indian Music 2pm. $25/$20 members/$15 students. Raga and Tala, Steve Gorn, bansuri flute, and Samir Chatterjee, tabla. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Bryan Lammers Band 6-8pm. R&B, Soul. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200. Chris Robinson Brotherhood 7pm. $38-$48. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown.


Cypress String Quartet 4-6pm. $25-$50. A dynamic dialogue between the past and the present, the performers and composers. 4pm. Beethoven: String Quartet No. 10 in E-flat major, Op. 74, the “Harp”, George Tsontakis: String Quartet No. 6 Antonin Dvořák: String Quartet No. 10 in E flat major, Op. 51. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Dido and Aeneas 8:15pm. An Opera Saratoga event. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Dido Drumming with Taiko Masala 3pm. $20. A traditional Japanese drumming concert combines the discipline of martial arts with the precision of drumming for a breathtaking performance. Bring a folding chair. The Snyder Estate Historic Site, Rosendale. Centuryhouse.org.

Guitar Camp $395-$595. Through July 16. Ashokan Guitar Camp offers guitarists of all levels an opportunity for real immersion, learning and growth with top teachers in a friendly and supportive environment. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333. Marji Zintz 1pm. Acoustic. Zephyr, Pine Hill. 254-8024. Out of Thin Air Music from Copland House with Carolina Eyck 4:30-6pm. $20-$60. Performing works by Copland, Martinu, Rózsa, and Shostakovich which explore the border between real and surreal. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. Sunday Brunch with Lee Falco & Friends 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Yacht Rock Revue 8pm. $37.50. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Experienced Paddle Tivoli, across the Hudson to the Esopus lighthouse in Saugerties for a shore lunch after going up the creek and back. Tivoli North Bay, Tivoli. Fitdoc@sprintmail.com. The Makers’ Market 2015 9am-3pm. Makers Market on the Railroad Green, Warwick. Hudsonhandmade.com. Minnewaska Distance Swimmers Association Swim Test 5:30pm. $20. Moriello Pool, New Paltz. 255-1700. Nature Walk with the Delaware Highlands Conservancy 1-2:30pm. Join the Delaware Highlands Conservancy for a free guided Nature Walk this summer at our office in Bethel. You’ll learn about what you see and hear on a hike on our woodland trail, led by one of our knowledgeable volunteers—and you’ll help us find the different plants and wildlife we have on the property. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 583-1010.

SPIRITUALITY

Chakras, Color and Creativity Workshop with Susan Shanti Gibian 1-3pm. $25 + $5 material fee. Using the ancient chakra system as a guide, Susan Shanti Gibian will work with participants to create a watercolor painting with a focus on color and energy. Discover how the creative process can bring a sense of relaxation and renewed vitality into your life. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.

THEATER

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 2-4:30pm. $32-$44. Fantastic adventures of the out-of-the-ordinary car that flies through the air and sails the seas. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Fernando Rubio: Everything by my side 2-4 & 5-7pm. $5. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Hollow 2pm. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. The Liar 7pm. Take one young man who cannot tell the truth, his manservant who cannot tell a lie, add two beautiful young women, a jealous lover, and then, kapow! Witness the hilarious consequences of David Ives’s adaptation of Corneielle’s classic comedy. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

The Little Shop of Horrors 2pm. $20/$15 for students, members, seniors. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279. Rain 2 & 7pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical based on the short story by Somerset Maugham. Book by Sybille Pearson. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm and 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Seussical The Musical 3pm. $27/$25/$22. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Unbuilt City 2 & 7pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. Powerhouse@vassar.edu. The Winter’s Tale, by William Shakespeare 2pm. $15-$30. Performed by Walking the Dog Theater. Hawthorne Valley School, Ghent. (518) 672-7092.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Ceramics Workshop: Cups, Cups, and More Cups 3-6pm. $180 members/$190 non-members. Through August 2. Tara Hagen will guide you through the process of making drink ware. Break cup-making down to the basics with demos on handles, rims, feet, and glazing. Personalized instruction and time to work independently provide a supportive structure for you to get creative with your work. Woman’s Studio Workshop, Rosendale. 658-9133. Your Hero’s Journey® Redux A Mythological Toolbox PlayShop Through July 17. Join Robert Walter, President of the Joseph Campbell Foundation, and the Spillian crew for an extraordinary, lifechanging week exploring the hero’s journey in our own lives. Spillian Retreat Center, Fleischmanns. (800) 811-3351.

MONDAY 13 FAIRS & FESTIVALS

350 Family Yard Sale 9am-2pm. Furniture, kids clothes & toys, housewares, and more. The Woodstock Jewish Congregation, Woodstock. 679-2218.

FILM

The Goonies: 2015 Flick Series 8:30pm. $8/$6 members/$5 children. Bring a blanket and some snacks, buy some popcorn, and dive into the treasure hunt while watching one of your favorite films. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

KIDS & FAMILY

Hudson Valley Shakespeare Summer Camp 9am-2:45pm. $350. A creative process-based theater camp for children ages 8-16 with an interest in the performing arts. Includes classes in theater games, improvisation, stage combat, text analysis, acting, and vocal production that provide an exciting opportunity to explore language characters, and acting techniques. Haldane Junior High School, Cold Spring. 809 5750 ext. 13. Time Travelers 8:30am-noon. $50/$200 week. Explore the past through games, historic simulations, crafts, and hands-on activities. Age: 7-9. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Week Two Panorama: Environmental Science for Explorers 9am-3pm. The Olana Partnership works in collaboration with the Taconic Outdoor Education Center to bring you this camp for aspiring scientists and explorers. Frederic E. Church loved natural history, nature, and ecology. This camp will be led by seasoned environmental educators who have a number of fun-filled experiments, play and expeditions planned inside Olana’s 250 acres. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

MUSIC

Langhorne Slim And The Law with Opener Johnny Society 9pm. $15. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS

Golf Tournament and Gala Dinner/Auction 7:30am-3pm & 6-9pm. $125 golf & lunch/$175 golf, lunch & dinner/$110 dinner. Join Grace Church for the 9th Annual Golf Tournament and Gala Dinner/Auction. The event will take place at the Millbrook Golf & Tennis Club, a beautiful private facility with a challenging course. Morning and afternoon flight times. Gourmet dinner with open bar to follow at 6 p.m. Honoree is Dr. Samuel Simon, President and co-founder of Hudson Valley Fresh. Grace Episcopal Church, Millbrook. 677-3064.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Ascension Essentials & Tools of Empowerment 6-8pm. $25/$20. With Kate Loye. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100. Ceramics Workshop: Wheel Throwing Crash Course (Session 2) 7-9pm. $160 members/$170 non-members. Through August 3. While the instructional focus of this class is an introduction to wheel throwing basics, Cheyenne Mallo welcomes all levels of experience to participate. If you’re already familiar with the process and just looking for a chance to warm up, brush up, or have some more focused work time, then you’ll benefit from Cheyenne’s superb guidance and feedback. Woman’s Studio Workshop, Rosendale. 658-9133.

TUESDAY 14 BUSINESS & NETWORKING

Solopreneurs Sounding Board Second Tuesday of every month, 6:30-9pm. donation. Take advantage of collective intelligence (“hive mind”) and an inspiring meeting place to work out creative solutions to problems. Think of this as a mash-up of an ad hoc advisory board and group therapy for your work. Beahive Beacon, Beacon. Beahivebzzz.com.

FILM

Movie Double Feature 8:30pm. Chulas Fronteras (USA, 1976, 58 min) and Del Mero Corazon (USA, 1978, 28 min.). PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Toy Story 1pm. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

KIDS & FAMILY

Hudson Valley Shakespeare Summer Camp 9am-2:45pm. $350. A creative process-based theater camp for children ages 8-16 with an interest in the performing arts. Includes classes in theater games, improvisation, stage combat, text analysis, acting, and vocal production that provide an exciting opportunity to explore language characters, and acting techniques. Haldane Junior High School, Cold Spring. 809 5750 ext. 13. Time Travelers 8:30am-noon. $50/$200 week. Explore the past through games, historic simulations, crafts and hands-on activities. Age: 7-9. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

LECTURES & TALKS

Monthly Open House with Dharma Talk Second Tuesday of every month, 7pm. free. Shambhala Buddhist teachers talk on a variety of topics at our Open House. Second Tuesday of every month, after community meditation practice. Meditation: 6-7pm, Talk 7pm, followed by tea, cookies, and converation. Sky Lake Lodge, Rosendale. 658-8556.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Hudson River Evening Experienced Paddle 5:30pm. Paddle for 1.5-2 hours, 4-6 miles at an easy pace. PFD must be worn! Participants must have a kayak 13.5 feet or longer with 2 bulkheads. Long Dock Park, Beacon. 452-7238. Safe Harbors Informational Tours Second Tuesday of every month, 9am. The tours highlight how Safe Harbors’ transformative supportive housing, awardwinning contemporary art gallery and performing arts theater is instrumental to the revitalization of downtown Newburgh. All attendees will be entered in a drawing to win tickets to an upcoming concert at the Lobby at the Ritz. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 562-6940.

THEATER

Residency & Work in Progress//Thank You For Coming: Play 7pm. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Chinese Brush Painting 7-9:30pm. $175/$32 material fee. With artist Linda Schultz. Three weekly sessions. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550.

WEDNESDAY 15 HEALTH & WELLNESS

Watercolor Painting Made Easy 6:30-8:30pm. Open to people living with breast, ovarian and gynecological cancers. Being creative is a wonderful way to relax, enjoy yourself, and focus your attention on whatever you’re creating. The program will be led by an experienced instructor from The Arts Alive Art School, which has specialized in “step-by-step” instruction for beginner, teen and adult art students in NY and NJ since 1998. Somers Public Library, Somers. (914) 962-6402.

KIDS & FAMILY

Dungeons & Dragons 4-6pm. Calling all adventurers! Whether you’re a Halfling or an Orc, a Human or an Elf, you’re invited for an epic D&D adventure. For kids and teens ages 10 and up. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Summer Camp 9am-2:45pm. $350. A creative process-based theater camp for children ages 8-16 with an interest in the performing arts. Includes classes in theater games, improvisation, stage combat, text analysis, acting, and vocal production that provide an exciting opportunity to explore language characters, and acting techniques. Haldane Junior High School, Cold Spring. 809 5750 ext. 13. Time Travelers 8:30am-noon. $50/$200 week. Explore the past through games, historic simulations, crafts and hands-on activities. Age: 7-9. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

LECTURES & TALKS

The Essentials of a Daily Practice 8pm. Do you have a daily spiritual or creative practice ? Join Maia D anziger, Loch Kelly, and Michael Stone for a talk about why a daily practice matters, and how it can change your life. Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001.

MUSIC

Caramoor@KMA: The Swingaroos 6:30-8:30pm. $15. Underground jazz band. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. Dave Mason’s Traffic Jam 8pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. Eric Hutchinson 8pm. $37. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Jennifer Grace 6:30pm. Arlington Business Improvement District Summer Concert Series. Vassar Alumnae House, Poughkeepsie. 437-7100. Julie Corbalis 8pm. Acoustic. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. PianoSummer: Hui Shan Chin Recital 7pm. $10. The evening recital features Beethoven, Schumann, Ravel, Bartok and Liszt. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869. Singer/Songwriter Eric Hutchinson 7:30pm. $37. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Strand Of Oaks 9pm. $15. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Upstate Rubdown “A Remedy” CD Release Event 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS

A Rosè Bastille Day Bash 6pm. Culinary Institute of America (CIA), Hyde Park. 452-9430.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

HITS-on-the-Hudson IV $5/children free. Horse show. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833.

7/15 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 103


THEATER

Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Stars In The Orchard 6:30-9:30pm. $50-$100. Master slide guitarist Don McGrory is playing the twilight cocktail hour, local luminaries “miscast” themselves in song and scenes and a live auction to support WAM Theatre’s philanthropic mission. WAM Theatre, Lee, MA. (800) 838-3008. The Winter’s Tale, by William Shakespeare 7:30pm. $15-$30. Performed by Walking the Dog Theater. Hawthorne Valley School, Ghent. (518) 672-7092.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Tango at the Pavilion 6-8pm. $14/$5 open dance. Join Nina Jirka, of Tango New Paltz, and learn how to Tango. Come for an hour-long lesson from 6pm7pm and stay for open dance from 7pm8pm. Bring water and comfortable shoes for dancing. All ages welcome. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Reading & Booksigning: Marc B. Fried 7-8pm. Sponsored by the Wallkill Public Library. Fried will read from his newest book, Notes from the Other Side. Shawangunk Town Hall, Wallkill.

MUSIC

The Scarlattis Bel Canto Young Artists 7-8:45pm. $15-$40. Alessandro and Domenico—father and son—produced an endless stream of masterpieces in miniature. The prolific Alessandro Scarlatti formed important links between the early Baroque Italian vocal styles and the classical school, and his son Domenico was one of the most admired musicians of the period. Young bel canto voices interpret their legacy in this special concert series, bringing the Scarlattis’ amazing works to life. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

HITS-on-the-Hudson IV $5/children free. Horse show. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833.

SPIRITUALITY

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Library Knitters Third Thursday of every month, 7-8pm. Sit and knit in the beautiful Gardiner Library. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Individual Oneness Blessings 5-7pm. Cathy Saulino. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100. Mediums Circle with Adam Bernstein and a Guest Psychic Medium Third Thursday of every month, 7-9pm. $25. Join me for our monthly guest Mediums Circle where myself, Adam Bernstein, and one other talented Medium will deliver messages from your loved ones in Spirit in a positive setting of love and validation. Kingston’s Opera House Office Bldg., Kingston. 687-3693.

Bat on a Unicycle by John Byer and Red Cubes by Ze'ev Willy Neumann" at Catskill Interpretive Center Art Park. Photo by Dave Channon

FRIDAY 17 ARTS AND CULTURE

Artists + Friends Potluck 6-9pm. Artists and friends share potluck and slide share on the third Friday of each month. Visual artists, performance, musicians, writers, poets, etc. 20 Slides in a powerpoint presentation on a flash drive, or just come and enjoy. First Presbyterian Church, Hudson. (518) 828-4275.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Kingston Night Market Third Friday of every month, 5-9pm. Pop-up street festival featuring local artists, makers, businesses, food vendors and non-profits. Lower Broadway, Kingston, Kingston. Nightmarketkingston.com.

FILM

Movies Under the Stars: The Monuments Men 8:30pm. Uptown Kingston, Kingston.

THURSDAY 16 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

FOOD & WINE

Exodus: Newburgh Extension Third Thursday of every month, 6-8pm. A prison re-entry support group (formerly known as the New Jim Crow Committee). Come join us to assist the new Exodus Transitonal Community in Newburgh, (a re-entry program for those being released from prison), as well as other matters related to Mass Incarceration. The Hope Center, Newburgh. 569-8965.

Afternoon Tea 1:30-3:45pm. $32.50. Tea service includes a variety of tea sandwiches, scones with clotted cream and preserves, delicious desserts and a variety of fragrant teas all served in the most exquisite vintage china. The Tea is preceded by a tour of the historic Rosen House. Explore the mansion and learn the history of the Rosen family. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

FOOD & WINE

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Third Thursday Luncheon Third Thursday of every month, 11:30am1pm. $6/$7 takeout. As part of Messiah’s Outreach Programs, each luncheon benefits a local organization to support its ongoing programs. Luncheon includes soup, sandwich, and delicious desserts. Church of the Messiah, Rhinebeck. 876-3533.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Breast Cancer Support Group Third Thursday of every month, 7pm. Support Connection, Inc., a not-for-profit organization that provides free, confidential support services for people affected by breast and ovarian cancer. Open to women with breast cancer. Join other women who have also heard the words “you have breast cancer” as we discuss issues pertaining to all stages of diagnosis, treatment and post-treatment. Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel. (800) 532-4290.

KIDS & FAMILY

Athena to Zeus: Greek Gods, Goddesses, Monsters, and the Magic of Mythology 1pm. Storyteller Jonathan Kruk tells exciting classic Greek Myths with lots of audience participation. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Summer Camp 9am-2:45pm. $350. A creative process-based theater camp for children ages 8-16 with an interest in the performing arts. Includes classes in theater games, improvisation, stage combat, text analysis, acting, and vocal production that provide an exciting opportunity to explore language characters, and acting techniques. Haldane Junior High School, Cold Spring. 809 5750 ext. 13. Time Travelers 8:30am-noon. $50/$200 week. Explore the past through games, historic simulations, crafts and hands-on activities. Age: 7-9. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

104 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Phoenicia Art Studio Tour This weekend-long event spanning all dozen or so hamlets in the town of Shandaken will take place from July 17 to July 19. The talents of over 30 artists from glass blowers to woodworkers will be showcased, including sculptor Dave Channon and art-carpenter John Byer. Tour-takers will not only have the chance to meet the artists, but see the studios they work in. Also open to all attendees will be the opportunity to hike along the banks of Esopus Creek while gazing on graceful sculptures installed in meadows and woodlands. The studio tour contains a number of wide-ranging events including readings from some of the regions most beloved writers, jazz concerts, and gallery receptions. The tour is free and self-guided. (845) 688-2977; Shandakenart.com Ginger Baker Jazz Confusion 7:30pm. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Harlem on the Hudson: Etienne Charles and Creole Soul 8-10pm. $25. Launching the Catskill Jazz Factory’s Harlem on the Hudson series is the Trinidadian trumpet player Etienne Charles, bringing a night of rhythm, groove, and soul! Charles’s Creole Soul project explores the musical connections between Afro-Caribbean, Creole, New Orleans, and American traditions. Spiegeltent, Annandale. Fishercenter.bard.edu John Simon and The Greater Ellenville Jazz Trio 7pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Reptar 8pm. $15. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Spero Plays Nyro: The Christine Spero Group 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Steve Earle and The Dukes 8pm. $45. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

THEATER Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 8-10:30pm. $32-$44. Fantastic adventures of the out-of-the-ordinary car that flies through the air and sails the seas. An eccentric inventor, Caractacus Potts sets about restoring an old race car from a scrap heap with the help of his children Jeremy and Jemima. They soon discover the car has magical properties including the ability to float and take flight. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Send for the Million Men 8pm. Performed by Joseph Silovsky. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400. The Winter’s Tale, by William Shakespeare 7:30pm. $15-$30. Performed by Walking the Dog Theater. Hawthorne Valley School, Ghent. (518) 672-7092.

Moving into Stillness: Running as Meditation with Zuisei Goddard 5pm. $300. Through July 19. This retreat is intended to go beyond the conventional approach to running as exercise. We’ll discuss intention to understand why we run, since this will very much determine if and how we do it. Then we’ll look at posture, breath, and cadence to see how these can improve our experience of this art. Finally we’ll explore running as a moving meditation. Zen Mountain Monastery, Mount Tremper. 688-2228.

KIDS & FAMILY

Harmony Yoga: A Musical Yoga Experience 10-10:45am. $60. 4-week series. Ages 3-6. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Summer Camp 9am-2:45pm. $350. A creative processbased theater camp for children ages 8-16 with an interest in the performing arts. Includes classes in theater games, improvisation, stage combat, text analysis, acting, and vocal production that provide an exciting opportunity to explore language characters, and acting techniques. Haldane Junior High School, Cold Spring. 809 5750 ext. 13. Time Travelers 8:30am-noon. $50/$200 week. Explore the past through games, historic simulations, crafts and hands-on activities. Age: 7-9. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Toddlers on the Trail: Stream Walk 10am-noon. $12 non-members. Join Natasha Piatrunia and explore what is along the stream on a hot summer day. Bring water and snacks. Please leave your pets at home. Children ages 2 to 6 are welcome. This program includes a 1.5-mile hike, and moves at a toddler’s pace. Reservations are required. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. West African Dance and Drum 1pm. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392.6121. Zoppè Family Circus 7pm. Great Barrington Fairgrounds, Great Barrington, MA. Gbfg.org.


LECTURES & TALKS

Longevity Secrets From Master Yogis 8pm. Learn about what’s really important in your yoga practice from three yogis who have more than 200 years of collective yoga experience. Tao Porchon-Lynch, 96, Madan Bali, 91, and Lilias Folan, 71, share the secrets of a long and vibrant life. Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Storytelling with Janet Carter 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

MUSIC

5 Plus 1 9:30pm. Classic rock. Harmony Music, Woodstock. 679-7760. Aston Magna Music Festival 2015: Eternal Seasons with Vivaldi & Bach 8-10pm. $20-$50. Violinist Edson Scheid and mezzo-soprano Deborah Rentz-Moore join Aston Magna’s ensemble for the season’s final event, “Eternal Seasons,” in a performance of Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons; J.S. Bach Cantata “Wiederstehe doch der Sünde” and other Bach selections. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. (800) 875-7156. Calidore String Quartet 8-10pm. $15-$40. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. Eternal Seasons 8pm. Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons; J.S. Bach Cantata “Wiederstehe doch der Sünde,” J.S. Bach Concerto in D Minor in a reconstruction as a concerto grosso by Daniel Stepner; Johann Christoph Bach, Motet “Ach, daß ich Wassers g’nug hätte.” Artists include mezzosoprano Deborah Rentz-Moore, and, in the Vivaldi, four solo violinists: Edson Scheid, Danielle Maddon, Julie Leven, and Daniel Stepner, who leads the Baroque ensemble. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandaleon-Hudson. 758-7003. Jeffery Gaines 7pm. Acoustic. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Neil Young & Promise of the Real 8pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Neil Young & Promise Of The Real with Guests Puss in Boots 8pm. $144.50-$204.50. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. PianoSummer Student Recital I 7pm. $10. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869. Singer-Songwriter Showcase Third Friday of every month, 8pm. $6. Acoustic Music by three outstanding singersongwriters and musicians at ASK GALLERY, 97 Broadway, Kingston. 338-0311. Story Slam 7pm. A monthly event featuring writers and storytellers from the Hudson Valley and beyond. On the third Friday of each month a pre-selected line-up of writers and storytellers will engage their audience with original works of fiction, creative non-fiction, essay and poetry. Taste Budd’s Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. X Band 8pm. $49.50. Punk. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

The Art of Noticing: An Illuminated Journal Retreat with Hojin Osho & Kerissa Battle 5pm. $350. Through July 19. Join field biologist and ecologist Kerissa Battle and Hojin Osho in a collaboration with the natural world and the creative process. We’ll study plants, animals and the land and then express in the form of an illuminated journal, the alive, spontaneous recordings experienced in the miracle of noticing. In turn we may begin to feel its profound effect upon our capacity to simply be where we are, as we are, completely, with all of our senses wide open. Zen Mountain Monastery, Mount Tremper. 688-2228. HITS-on-the-Hudson IV $5/children free. Horse show. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833.

SPIRITUALITY

An Evening of Spirit with James Van Praagh 8-10pm. $53/$63/$73. Internationally renowned medium and #1 New York Times bestselling author James Van Praagh takes the stage. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039.

THEATER

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 8-10:30pm. $32-$44. Fantastic adventures of the out-of-the-ordinary car that flies through the air and sails the seas. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. The Hollow 7:30pm. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. The Last Match 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Written by Anna Ziegler. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. The Little Shop of Horrors 8pm. $20/$15 for students, members, seniors. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279. Loving v. Virginia 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with book and lyrics by Marcus Gardley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Rip! The Musical 8pm. $26. A new musical based on Washington Irving’s Rip Van Winkle, created by Michael Berkeley and Ray Roderick. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Send for the Million Men 8pm. Performed by Joseph Silovsky. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400. The Winter’s Tale, by William Shakespeare 7:30pm. $15-$30. Performed by Walking the Dog Theater. Hawthorne Valley School, Ghent. (518) 672-7092.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

African Dance Third Friday of every month, 6:15-7:45pm. Marbletown Multi-Arts, Stone Ridge. 750-6488.

SATURDAY 18 COMEDY

Nick DiPaolo 8pm. $35. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Phoenicia Flea 11am-6pm. Parish Field, Phoenicia. Phoeniciaflea.com.

FOOD & WINE

Hudson Valley Wine Tours 11am-4pm. $75. Meet at the Metro North train station in Poughkeepsie at 11am and get whisked away for a day-long tour of Hudson Valley wineries. Hudson Valley Wine Market, Gardiner. 255-0600. Say Cheese, Part 2: Cottage Cheeses 5:30-7pm. $20/$35 series. Dena Moran of Olde Hudson and Peg Patterson of Dish Hudson, will present small batch, regional, mostly fresh cheeses—products of cottage industries, using perfectly paired platters, bowls, etc. DISH Hudson, Hudson. (518) 828-1792.

KIDS & FAMILY

Build Your Own Terrarium 3-5pm. $15/$10 members/accompanying adults free. F0r ages 3-6. A terrarium is a type of miniature ecosystem of plants; they are often kept as ornamental decoration, like an aquarium. This is such a fun project for little ones. We will provide all the materials and work on the floor, with dirt, rocks, and plants. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872. Kidz Bop Kids 4pm. $38.50/$64.00 VIP includes Meet & Greet. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

Zoppè Family Circus 1, 4 & 7pm. Great Barrington Fairgrounds, Great Barrington, MA. Gbfg.org.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Tim Powers: Chronicles in History 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

THEATER

Children’s Performance of Wizard of Oz Culminating performance of summer theatre camp. Performance takes place at Rosendale Street Festival. Rosendale, Rosendale. Rosendalechamber.org.

Breakneck Annie 2pm. Folk, traditional. D&H Canal Museum, High Falls. 687-9311.

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 8-10:30pm. $32-$44. Fantastic adventures of the out-of-the-ordinary car that flies through the air and sails the seas. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

Delicate Steve 9pm. $15. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

The Hollow 7:30pm. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476.

Jazz at the Maverick: Eldar Djangirov Trio 8pm. 8-10pm. $25-$50. A singular sonic imprint on an elegant array of standards and originals. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

The Last Match 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Written by Anna Ziegler. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599.

Jazz Festival 12-10pm. $30, $40, $50, $60, $70, $80, $90, $100, $110, Children under 18—half price. Annual day-long festival is a celebration for jazz enthusiasts of all ages and includes performances set throughout our picturesque gardens and grounds, fun activities for little ones, tours of the historic Rosen House at Caramoor, extensive food and beverage options, and more. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. .

The Little Shop of Horrors 8pm. $20/$15 for students, members, seniors. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279.

MUSIC

Lindsey Webster’s “You Change” CD Release 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. PianoSummer: Hung-Kuan Chen Recital 8pm. $29/$24. The evening’s program includes works by Bach-Busoni, Liszt, Chopin, Scriabin. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869. The THE BAND Band 8:30-11pm. $30/$25 in advance. Authentic, true-to-form renditions of theie legendary repertoire. This group of veteran musicians showcases the astounding breadth and depth of The Band’s distinctively original Americana music with classics such as “Up on Cripple Creek”, “The Weight” and “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” as well as deeper cuts from The Band’s vast catalog. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. The Villalobos Brothers 8pm. $25/$20 members/$15 students. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. West Point Band Presents Dancing Under the Stars 7:30pm. West Point Military Academy, West Point. Usma.edu. Windham Chamber Music Festival Gala Orchestra Concert 8pm. $35/$32 seniors/$30 contributors//$5 students. Conducted by Robert Manno. Featured artists include pianist Anna Polonsky and flutist Diva Goodfriend-Koven, each performing concertos by Mozart, along with the first performance in Windham of Schubert’s great Fifth Symphony. Windham Civic Center, Windham. (518) 734-3868. Wynonna & The Big Noise 8-10pm. $65/$80/$90. Five-time Grammy® winner and New York Times bestselling author, Wynonna Judd takes the Paramount’s Stage on with her new band, The Big Noise. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. Young People’s Concert: Bari Koral Family Band 11am. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

12th Annual Great Newburgh to Beacon Hudson River Swim 7:15am-3pm. $60/$25 ages 10-17. This benefit event funds maintenance and operation of the River Pool off the north shore of Pete and Toshi Seeger Riverfront Park, Beacon, NY. Volunteer Kayak Escorts registration is free. Newburgh/Beacon Waterfronts, Newburgh/Beacon. 784-1790. Hiking Slowly in the Shade 10am. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079. HITS-on-the-Hudson IV $5/children free. Horse show. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833.

Loving v. Virginia 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with book and lyrics by Marcus Gardley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Rip! The Musical 3 & 8pm. $26. A new musical based on Washington Irving’s Rip Van Winkle, created by Michael Berkeley and Ray Roderick. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm and 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Send for the Million Men 8pm. Performed by Joseph Silovsky. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400. The Winter’s Tale, by William Shakespeare 2 & 7:30pm. $15-$30. Performed by Walking the Dog Theater. Hawthorne Valley School, Ghent. (518) 672-7092.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Edible Landscaping 10am-1pm. $50/$300 for entire series. This course is a great introduction to the fruit plants of the world as well as the fruits in your own backyard. An intensive step-by-step class designed to introduce gardeners and food fanatics to the cultivation of flavorful ornamental plants such as Paw Paw, Goumi, Gooseberry, Medlar, and Artic Kiwi. Includes snack (fresh and preserved fruit from the gardens), tea and seedlings. Wild Earth, New Paltz. 256-9830. Intro to Small Metals: Pendant 9am-4pm. $120. Learn jewelry in steel and other materials with this great intro workshop to basic processes in small metal design. We will transfer images from paper to metal and make a pendant out of brass, copper or steel by cutting, drilling, filing, sanding, texturing and finishing. Students will bring printed images to class to influence the design of their pendants. Center for Metal Arts, Florida. 651-7550.

SUNDAY 19 FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Phoenicia Flea 11am-6pm. Parish Field, Phoenicia. Phoeniciaflea.com. Warwick Summer Arts Festival: Fusion Fest Week-long festival celebrating summer and 15 years of the arts in Warwick. See website for specific locations and events. Village of Warwick, Warwick. Warwicksummerarts.com.

FOOD & WINE

Callicoon Farmers’ Market 11am-2pm. Callicoon Creek Park, Callicoon. Manager@sullivancountyfarmersmarkets.org.

7/15 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 105


Sunday Afternoon Tea & Concert 2-3:45pm. Tour & Tea $37.50/Tour, Tea & Concert $53. Tour our Mediterraneanstyle villa showcasing the Rosen’s fine and decorative arts collection before relaxing in the Summer Dining Room for an Afternoon Tea with an array of tea sandwiches, scones with clotted cream and preserves, scrumptious desserts, a variety of aromatic teas and sparkling wine. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Community Sound Healing Circle Third Sunday of every month, 2-3pm. Facilitated by Jax Denise. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Yoga for Nepal 10am-5pm. $35+. A full schedule of yoga classes in the grand ballroom, a silent auction and holistic practices available throughout the day to raise funds and energetic healing for the people of Nepal. Locust Grove, Samuel Morse Historic Site, Poughkeepsie. 454-4500.

KIDS & FAMILY

Zoppè Family Circus 2 & 5pm. Great Barrington Fairgrounds, Great Barrington, MA. Gbfg.org.

MUSIC

Battle of the Blues Harps 7:30pm. With Dennis Gruenling, Steve Guyger and Chris O’Leary, featuring Doug Deming & The Jewel Tones. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Adult Chess Club Third Sunday of every month, 1:30-3:30pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Hike Hunter and Southwest Hunter We will hike up to the top of Hunter Mountain, where the tower atop the second highest Catskill peak affords great views of the area. From the Devil’s Path we will take a short detour down a shaded herd path to Southwest Hunter, one of several “bushwhack” 3500 mountains. We will rest and maybe cool off at Diamond Notch Falls. Hunter Mountain Resort, Hunter. . HITS-on-the-Hudson IV $5/children free. Horse show. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833. Minnewaska Distance Swimmers Association Swim Test 5:30pm. $20. Moriello Pool, New Paltz. 255-1700. Paddle the Wallkill River New Paltz to Rifton. 8.5 miles. Sojourner Truth/Ulster Landing Park, Saugerties. 497-1698. Vanderbilt Garden Monthly Interpreter Tour 1-4pm. Tours begin at the entrance to the gardens. The volunteer interpreters will discuss the history of the gardens, with a focus on the Vanderbilt ownership and the mission of the not-for-profit Vanderbilt Garden Association to rehabilitate and maintain the plants, shrubs, trees, and statuary in the gardens as they were in the 1930’s just prior to Mr. Vanderbilt’s death. Vanderbilt Garden Association Inc., Hyde Park. 229-6432.

Week Three Panorama: Farming and its Hudson Valley Roots 9am-3pm. Through July 24. Explore the rich history of Olana as a working farm in the 19th Century! Youth will engage in a variety of place-based, hands-on learning activities and art projects to develop their understanding of farming—both historical and current. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

MUSIC

PianoSummer: Jacob Flier Piano Competition First Round 3pm. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Summer Theater Institute 9am-3pm. $450. This two-week intensive is designed for current high school students, led by faculty, guest artists and graduated teaching assistants. The Institute is for students interested in learning more about theatre performance and production. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

TUESDAY 21 FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Warwick Summer Arts Festival: Fusion Fest July 26. Week-long festival celebrating summer and 15 years of the arts in Warwick. See website for specific locations and events. Village of Warwick, Warwick. Warwicksummerarts.com.

FILM

THEATER

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 2-4:30pm. $32-$44. Fantastic adventures of the out-of-the-ordinary car that flies through the air and sails the seas. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

Al Work All Play: The Pursuit of eSports Glory 8:30pm. $15. Screening will be followed by a live gaming broadcast hosted from ESL Studio’s in Cologne, Germany, produced by Experience & ESL Presents. This video gaming hybrid event features the first of its kind eSports documentary about the Intel Extreme Masters. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

Jennifer Koh, Nicholas McGegan and Orchestra of St. Luke’s 4:30-6:30pm. $15-$73. Nicholas McGegan leads the Orchestra of St. Luke’s for a performance of three unforgettable masterpieces, joined by high-octane violinist Jennifer Koh. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

The Hollow 2pm. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476.

The Lego Movie 1pm. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

The Last Match 2 & 7pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Written by Anna Ziegler. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599.

Schultze Gets the Blues 8:30pm. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Kids’ Open Mike 6:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill.

The Little Shop of Horrors 2pm. $20/$15 for students, members, seniors. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279.

Cassatt String Quartet 4pm. 4-6pm. $25-$50. Joan Tower: “Incandescent,” for string quartet Peter Schickele: String Quartet No. 1, “American Dreams” Schubert: String Quartet No. 14 in D Minor, “Death and the Maiden,” D. 810. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Gedeon Luke and the People 8pm. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185.

Sam Bush 8pm. $47.50. Bush has expanded the horizons of bluegrass music, fusing it with jazz, rock, blues, funk and other genres. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Sunday Brunchwith Alexis P. Suter & The Ministers of Sound 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Tenbrooks Molly 6-8pm. Americana, country. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200. Tenbrooks Molly presented by the Cold Spring Summer Sunset Music Series 6-8pm. FREE. Tenbrooks Molly (American, Country). Join neighbors and visitors for this free community concert at the beautiful riverfront park in Cold Spring. Enjoy the river, the music and bring a picnic basket and a blanket. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200. Tisziji Munoz Quartet with John Mdedski 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Loving v. Virginia 2 & 7pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with book and lyrics by Marcus Gardley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Rip! The Musical 3pm. $26. A new musical based on Washington Irving’s Rip Van Winkle, created by Michael Berkeley and Ray Roderick. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Rodgers and Hammerstein: Oklahoma! 7:30pm and 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Winter’s Tale, by William Shakespeare 2pm. $15-$30. Performed by Walking the Dog Theater. Hawthorne Valley School, Ghent. (518) 672-7092.

MONDAY 20

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS

2nd Annual Sal Cracchiolo Memorial Clambake Fundraiser 1-6pm. $35/$20 children/under 6 free. Hot dogs, hamburgers, sausage & peppers, chicken, corn on the cob, clams-raw & steamed-, mussels marinara and lots of other goodies, with live music. Black Rock Fish & Game Club, Mountainville. 401-2696. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

106 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Warwick Summer Arts Festival: Fusion Fest July 26. Week-long festival celebrating summer and 15 years of the arts in Warwick. See website for specific locations and events. Village of Warwick, Warwick. Warwicksummerarts.com.

KIDS & FAMILY

Creative Digital Photography 3:30-5:30pm. Through July 23. Ages 12+, using their own electronic devices, students will learn how to choose subject matter, shoot stunning photos, manipulate them and create a gallery using Instagram software with artist Tina Chaden. Athens Cultural Center, Athens. (518) 945-2136. Cut and Paste Collage Workshop 1-3pm. Through July 23. Ages 7-11, combine color, texture and shapes using found materials to create original works of art. Athens Cultural Center, Athens. (518) 945-2136.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Open Mike 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Handcrafts Night 6-9pm. Bring your own portable handcraft project of any type to work on, or come work on one of our group projects. Knitting, sewing, mending, drawing, collage, whittling-we want to see what you are working on. Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. Dropforgeandtool.com. Hudson River Evening Experienced Paddle 5:30pm. Paddle for 1.5-2 hours, 4-6 miles at an easy pace. PFD must be worn! Participants must have a kayak 13.5 feet or longer with 2 bulkheads. Long Dock Park, Beacon. 452-7238.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

FILM

KIDS & FAMILY

Woodstock Writers Workshops 6:30-8:30pm. $60 series/$15 individual classes. For those who write or want to write poetry, short stories, novel, memoir, creative non-fiction, etc.—and get it published! Led by Iris Litt. 21 Cedar Way, Woodstock. 679-8256.

Rock Band Boot Camp $275. Week-long camp for ages 12-16. Beacon Music Factory, Beacon. 202-3555.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Warwick Summer Arts Festival: Fusion Fest Week-long festival celebrating summer and 15 years of the arts in Warwick. See website for specific locations and events. Village of Warwick, Warwick. Warwicksummerarts.com.

FILM

Senna 7:30pm. $15. Lime Rock Drivers Club Film Series. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

HEALTH & WELLNESS.

Marge’s Knitting Circle Fourth Wednesday of every month, 6:308:30pm. Open to people living with breast, ovarian and gynecological cancers. The door to our Hope Room is open to those with unfinished knitting and crochet projects and those who want to learn a new craft. Support Connection, Yorktown Heights.

KIDS & FAMILY

Dancing at Dusk: Turkish Music and Bellydance 5-6pm. $10/$5 children. Songs from the Middle East: the music of Turkey, Egypt and more! Dance with your little ones to gorgeous melodies played on the oud (middle eastern style lute) and violin as well as percussion on the doumbek and riq. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

MUSIC

An Evening of Soul, Gospel, and Rhythm and Blues 6-8pm. Big Joe Fitz and the Lo Fi’s with special guest William Norman on piano. St. John’s Episcopal Church, Kingston. 331-2252. Piano Faculty Member Thomas Sauer 8pm. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 229-0425. PianoSummer: Jacob Flier Piano Competition Final Round 3pm. $10. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

HITS-on-the-Hudson V $5/children free. Horse show. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Solarize Kingston Community Workshop 6-7:30pm. Find out about this non-profit community program, endorsed by the Mayor and the Common Council, that is making solar electric simpler and more affordable for homes and small businesses. Meet the local companies who do the work, and get your questions answered. Learn about state incentives and federal tax credits. Folks from RUPCO will be present to answer your questions. Kingston City Hall, Kingston. (646) 302-5835. Tango at the Pavilion 6-8pm. $14/$5 open dance. Join Nina Jirka, of Tango New Paltz, and learn how to Tango. Come for an hour-long lesson from 6pm7pm and stay for open dance from 7pm8pm. Bring water and comfortable shoes for dancing. All ages welcome. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

THURSDAY 23

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Developing Auric Sight: How to See Auras around You and Others 6-8pm. $25/$20. With Lynn Walcutt. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

House/Lights 8pm. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400.

WEDNESDAY 22

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Warwick Summer Arts Festival: Fusion Fest July 26. Week-long festival celebrating summer and 15 years of the arts in Warwick. See website for specific locations and events. Village of Warwick, Warwick. Warwicksummerarts.com.

FILM

Aspen 8pm. Aspen is a film about a town famous in the 19th century for silver mining and now for its scenic splendor, mountains, skiing, hiking, music, intellectual activity and fashionable people. The film documents the daily life and activities of the people who live, work, visit and play in Aspen in the winter. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050.


AUGUST 6-9, 2015 WINDHAM MOUNTAIN RESORT WINDHAM, NEW YORK

UCI MOUNTAIN BIKE WORLD CUP DHI powered by XCO powered by RACE THE WORLD Fox Racing Shox DH Pro/Amateur DH Kenda’s XC Pro/Amateur XC GNH Kids’ Fun Race

FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT Outdoor Expo (Fri - Sun) Ride the Plank (Thurs, AUG. 6) Block Party (Fri, AUG. 7) Team FMX Motorcycle Stunt Show (Sat, AUG. 8) Ten Band a Pearl Jam Tribute (Sat, AUG. 8) Fireworks (Sat, AUG. 8) Live Entertainment & Kids Skills Park (Sun, AUG 9)

ADMISSION Adults: $10 / Kids: 12 & under FREE! Packages & VIP Admission Available

To register or for event information, visit:

RACEWINDHAM.COM WINDHAM.COM ®

- Zoppe -

an italian familycircus FRIDAY, JULY 17, 7pm • SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1pm, 4pm & 7pm SUNDAY, JULY 19, 2pm. & 5pm ENJOY CIRCUS ALLEY WITH GAMES, FOOD, AND MORE. OPEN 2 HOURS PRIOR TO PERFORMANCES!

S O A H C R A L U L L CE

TICKETS at www.gbfg.org $35 ADULTS $20 CHILDREN ages 12 and under GROUP RATES AVAILABLE Zoppe Circus uses only domestic animals - dogs and horses (often rescues). As family owned pets, the animals are raised, transported and housed with expert, loving care.

FLEET SERVICE CENTER

Professional automotive service

Mark Skillman, proprietor

185 Main Street, New Paltz

(845) 255-4812

161 SOUTH ST, HIGHLAND 845-883-5500 WWW.APPLEGREENS.COM

7/15 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 107


FOOD & WINE

Afternoon Tea House Tour, Tea & Garden Stroll 1:30-3:45pm. $32.50. Tea service includes a variety of tea sandwiches, scones with clotted cream and preserves, delicious desserts, and a variety of fragrant teas all served in the most exquisite vintage china. The Tea is preceded by a tour of the historic Rosen House. Explore the mansion and learn the history of the Rosen family. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

KIDS & FAMILY

Story Book Art 1pm. David Soman and Jacky Davis, the creators of New York Times bestselling series, Ladybug Girl, will read from their new books, and David will illustrate some of the characters. Then you will make your own book in a creative and fun workshop. Ages 5-12. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Reading/Book Signing: Marc B. Fried 6:30-7:30pm. Fried will read selections from his new book, Notes from the Other Side, a collection of his entertaining and thoughtprovoking Shawangunk Journal columns from the past 8 years. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

Tarzana 8pm. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400.

FRIDAY 24 COMEDY Rosendale Comedy Tonite Fourth Friday of every month, 9:30pm. Aspiring comics take to the stage. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989.

DANCE 4th Friday Swing Dance Fourth Friday of every month, 8-11:30pm. $15/$10 full time students with ID. Sponsored by Hudson Valley Community Dances. Beginners’ lesson 8:00-8:30 pm; Band 8:30-11:30 pm; Performance 9:30 pm. Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, Poughkeepsie. 454-2571.

LECTURES & TALKS

A Very Short Intro to Wagner’s Ring Cycle (and How to Put it On!) 7-8pm. In this lecture, with musical examples, Ben Woodward gives us a brief outline of the Ring’s genesis and storyline, and reflects on the challenges of putting it on in Fulham in 2014. Mountain Top Library, Tannersville. (518) 589-5023.

MUSIC

Ben Woodward 7pm. Classical/opera. Mountain Top Library, Tannersville. (518) 589-5023. Blake Mills 9pm. $20/$18 in advance. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Brad Paisley’s Crushing It Tour 7pm. $38.50/$83.50/$103.50. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Ethel Smyth: The Wreckers 7:30pm. $25+. Opera. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Performer Niall Jones from Catch 63 at The Invisible Dog, July 12, 2014 Photo by Simon Courchel.

MUSIC

Bucky Pizzarelli & Ed Laub Duo 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Saints of Swing 6pm. Outdoor garden concert. Elting Memorial Library, New Paltz. 255.5030. Łukasz Kuropaczewski Guitar in the Garden 7-8:45pm. $25. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Hiking in the Catskills with Robert Thurman 3-9pm. A perennial favorite, this fun and inspiring weekend of moderate to rigorous hiking will include a series of three lectures on introductory Buddhist philosophy and basic meditation techniques, including talks on The Holy Teaching of Vimalakirti. This unique program is meant to open your awareness and increase your ability to live in the moment with a greater sense of joy. Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center, Phoenicia. 688-6897. HITS-on-the-Hudson V $5/children free. Horse show. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833.

THEATER

The Light Years 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new play written by Hannah Bos and Paul Thureen. Developed and directed by Oliver Butler. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940 8pm. $32-$40. Poking antic fun at the more ridiculous aspects of “show biz” and the corny thrillers of Hollywood’s heyday, the play is a non-stop barrage of laughter as those assembled (or at least those who aren’t killed off) untangle the mystery of the “Stage Door Slasher.” Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

108 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Buddhist Practice and Addiction with Shugen Sensei 5pm. $350. Through July 26. In this retreat, we’ll examine addiction from the perspective of Buddhadharma, studying the disease of grasping and the antidotes that practice offers. Zen Mountain Monastery, Mount Tremper. 688-2228.

THEATER

Actors and Writers 7pm. An evening of short plays written by members of the company. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. The Little Shop of Horrors 8pm. $20/$15 for students, members, seniors. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279. The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940 8pm. $32-$40. Poking antic fun at the more ridiculous aspects of “show biz” and the corny thrillers of Hollywood’s heyday, the play is a non-stop barrage of laughter as those assembled (or at least those who aren’t killed off) untangle the mystery of the “Stage Door Slasher.” Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

Tarzana 8pm. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400.

JP Patrick & Friends 8:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

PianoSummer: Student Recital II 7pm. $10. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869.

SPIRITUALITY

Singin’ in the Rain 8pm. $27/$25. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

John Simon and The Greater Ellenville Jazz Trio 7pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000.

Mina Thomas 8pm. Safe Harbors’ welcomes the Hudson Valley native for a night of Jazz. Mina is a trained Jazz/Gospel Singer, recording artist, actress, song-writer and spoken word poet. Ritz Theater Lobby, Newburgh. 784-1199.

HITS-on-the-Hudson V $5/children free. Horse show. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833.

SATURDAY 25 CATCH Takes the Hudson Intentionally unorthodox, this flamboyant group of nomadic performers wants to stagger its audience by blowing the lines between artistic disciplines. Expertly toeing the fine line between opacity and art, “CATCH is a carefully curated grab bag,” according to Caleb Hammons, co-curator of CATCH. On July 5, the performer’s extravagance will juxtapose Basilica Hudson’s traditional bones to further jar viewers. Performer R. B. Schlather, an up-and-coming Hudson Valley opera director, will be showing his opera that minimizes the traditionally grandiose art form to a contemporary, relaxed scale. CATCH encourages their performers to strip away formalities in front of an audience that is receptive to everything outlandish. As Hammons says, “We like to think of every show as a snapshot of what is happening in contemporary performance.” Catchseries.org

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Warwick Summer Arts Festival: Fusion Fest July 26. Week-long festival celebrating summer and 15 years of the arts in Warwick. See website for specific locations and events. Village of Warwick, Warwick. Warwicksummerarts.com.

FILM The Big Lebowski 8pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

FOOD & WINE Dinner with Charles Lewton-Brain 6:30-9pm. $25. Celebrated Canadian author, educator, and artist-innovator Charles Lewton-Brain is your dinner guest at a “Dinner with Charles”. Farm-to-table evening catered by Black Dirt Gourmet, with great local food, wine and a fascinating dinner guest. Dinner includes the premier viewing of winners to the 2015 Foldforming Competition. Center for Metal Arts, Florida. 651-7550.

KIDS & FAMILY Family Circus with Light Up Troy 7:30pm. $18/$15 PS21 members/$10 students/$5 children under 12. Top circus artists from the Montreal National Circus School bring juggling, acrobatics, clowning, and other surprises that will take your breath away. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Magician Jim Snack 1pm. Jim Snack not only amazes and amuses- he makes you a part of the action. Jim will offer a workshop for ages 10 to 12 years old after the performance for a $5 fee. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Jessi Mason & the Mainlines 9:30pm. Contemporary. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Jon Batiste and Stay Human 8-10pm. $46-$88. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. Jon Sebastian 8pm. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Peter Prince & Moon Boot Lover 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Piano Summer Master Class: Vladimir Ovchinnikov 2:30pm. $10. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869. Robert Capowski and Friends 9:30pm. The Shelter, Rhinebeck. 876-1500. Soul Singer Bettye LaVette 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Teri Roiger, John Menegon, and Wayne Hawkins 6-9pm. Lekkers, Stone Ridge. 687-9794.

NIGHTLIFE

Late Night/Date Night Fourth Friday of every month, 6-9pm. Join us for our monthly late night, open studio session for adults only. Fiberflame Studio, Rhinebeck. 679-6132.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Hiking in the Catskills with Robert Thurman 8am-9pm. A perennial favorite, this fun and inspiring weekend of moderate to rigorous hiking will include a series of three lectures on introductory Buddhist philosophy and basic meditation techniques, including talks on The Holy Teaching of Vimalakirti. This unique program is meant to open your awareness and increase your ability to live in the moment with a greater sense of joy. Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center, Phoenicia. 688-6897.

ARTS AND CULTURE

“Wanderings & Wonderings” 2pm. Join atists Alan and Michael Fleming on an imaginative exploration of Storm King Art Center. Storm King Art Center, New Windsor. 534-3115.

DANCE

Learn to Swing Dance Workshop Last Saturday of every month, 6-7:30pm. $30/$25 pre-register. APG Pilates, Newburgh. 236-3939.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Tannersville Crazy Race & Festival 11am-4pm. Build a racer from a garbage can, flower pot or anything you can imagine and race down Main St. All day, food, crafts and music by the popular band Wyld Blu. Downtown Tannersville, Tannersville. (518) 858-9094. Warwick Summer Arts Festival: Fusion Fest July 26. Week-long festival celebrating summer and 15 years of the arts in Warwick. See website for specific locations and events. Village of Warwick, Warwick. Warwicksummerarts.com.

FOOD & WINE

Annual Chicken Barbecue 5:30-6:30pm. $15/$13 seniors and veterans/$10 children and over age 90. Reformed Church of Shawangunk, Wallkill. 895-2952.

KIDS & FAMILY

Hands-On Boscobel for Girl Scouts 9:30am-1:30pm. $8 adult/$5 scouts. Girl Scouts are invited to a variety of activities will be offered including a guided house tour, hands-on activities and all-day access to grounds and trails. Under age 12. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Silly Billy 11am. Silly Billy combines magic with oodles of comedy. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Kingston’s Fourth Saturday Spoken Word 7pm. $5. Featuring Judith Kerman and Graduates of the Mayapple Writers Workshop. Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Catskills, Kingston. 331-2884. Laura Ludwig Presents Poetry and Performance Art 6:30pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.


T K L The place to be this summer!

2015 Teen Summer Reading Program

Red Carpet Premiere Party Friday, July 10, 2pm-4pm Come dressed in your fanciest attire and see the videos our teens have created throughout the past year. The Teen Summer Reading Program runs from July 10-Aug. 19.

Teen Art Lab

(3 Sessions): Monday-Thursday July 13-30, 10am-2pm

Other events take place:

Fridays, 2pm-4pm, in July Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 2pm-4pm, in August Open to teens, ages 12-19

55 Franklin Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0507 www.kingstonlibrary.org

au‡gustart festival WOMEN’S STUDIO WORKSHOP ‡ ROSENDALE

August 7 – 29, 2015

con[temporary]

video installation performance

free outdoor ART festival www.wsworkshop.org

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

7/15 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 109


MUSIC

Accordion Solos and Duos 8pm. $25/$20 members/$15 students. Guy Klucevsek, composer/ accordionist, with guest Alex Meixner. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Arrival From Sweden: The Music of ABBA 8-10pm. $35/$40. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. . Beacon Jazz Festival 12-6pm. $45/$65 VIP. Presented by Six String Productions, the festival will offer a wealth of musical talent, as well as a Hudson Valley distillery tasting event. Local craft breweries, cideries and wineries will be also be providing their own offerings, along with local artisan chefs providing food to complement the event. Riverfront Park, Beacon. Beaconjazz.com.

hiking will include a series of three lectures on introductory Buddhist philosophy and basic meditation techniques, including talks on The Holy Teaching of Vimalakirti. This unique program is meant to open your awareness and increase your ability to live in the moment with a greater sense of joy. Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center, Phoenicia. 688-6897.

HITS-on-the-Hudson V $5/children free. Horse show. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833. The Rondout National Historic District Tour Last Saturday of every month, 1pm. $10/$5 children. This tour traces the rapid transformation of Kingston’s waterfront area from farmland into a thriving maritime village

SUNDAY 26 ARTS AND CULTURE

“Sinful Sunday xxx” 3-5pm. $20/$15 members. A Bacchanalian farewell to the Lust exhibition with open sessions of live figure drawing of a nude model. We will lavish you with sketching materials and a wine coupling session with Dylan’s Wine Cellar master, Steve Zwick. HVCCA, Peekskill.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATION

Repair Café Fourth Sunday of every month, 12-4pm. The Repair Café features tools and materials to help attendees make the repairs they need on furniture, small appliances, housewares,

Breakaway Featuring Robin Baker Last Saturday of every month, 8-11:30pm. Music ranges from rock n roll, R&B, standards, and pop songs. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

Hiss Golden Messenger 9pm. $15. With opener Mail The Horse. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Holy Crow Jazz Band 8pm. $10. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. James Maddock Band 8:30pm. With Chris Barron. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. PianoSummer: Vladimir Ovchinnikov Recital 8pm. $29/$24. The evening’s program includes works by Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff and Mussorgsky. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869. Steve Gorn: Bansuri flute 8-10pm. $25-$50. The healing breath of the sacred. With Samarth Nagarkar, vocals, Ray Spiegel, tabla, Rohan Prabhudesai, harmonium. Indian Ragas. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Tony Bennett & Lady Gaga 8pm. $42-$113. In celebration of their new collaborative jazz album Cheek To Cheek, the pair of icons will join forces. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. West Point Band: Songs of the Long Gray Line 7:30pm. West Point Military Academy, West Point. Usma.edu.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Mid-Summer Cocktail Manitoga, Garrison. 424-3812.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Hiking in the Catskills with Robert Thurman 8am-9pm. A perennial favorite, this fun and inspiring weekend of moderate to rigorous CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

110 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Kansas 8pm. $70. Progressive rock super group. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Latitude 41 4-6pm. $25-$50. Beethoven: Piano Trio in D major, Op. 70, No. 1, “Ghost” Daron Hagen: Duo for Violin and Cello (1997) Felix Mendelssohn: Trio No. 1 in D Minor, Op. 49. 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

Music Omi Improvises 3pm. An afternoon impromptu showcase of the new residents varied talents. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747.

Dialogues des Carmélites by Francis Poulenc 8-9:45pm. $20-$110. An excursion from Bel Canto: With Dialogues of the Carmelites, Caramoor branches out from its core repertory of “bel canto” opera to present a 20th-century masterpiece–precisely the opera that has, more than any other written after World War Two, attracted the great singing actresses of the standard repertory. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

Ed Bear: Wave Farm Artist in Residence 8pm. $5. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006.

Il Matrimonio Segreto (The Clandestine Marriage) 1-5pm. $45. Buffet lunch and hilarious comedy opera. Altamura Center for the Arts, Jewett. (518) 610-3332.

Marji Zintz 1pm. Acoustic. Zephyr, Pine Hill. 254-8024.

Cinderella’s Frontman Tom Keifer 8pm. $75/$60/$55. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

Dylan, The Band, and the 60’s Folk Scene 11am-noon. Professor Louie will lead his friends and fellow musicians John Platania and Miss Marie in a free afternoon of folk music and sing-alongs for all ages. Mountain Top Arboretum, Tannersville. (518) 589-3903.

Ethel Smyth: The Wreckers 2pm. $25+. Opera. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

The New Baroque Soloists 11:30am-12:30pm. A Chamber quintet accompanied by soprano vocalist Catharine Rogers join 23Arts on behalf of Baroque Brass for an afternoon of Bach, Quantz, and more. The New Baroque Soloists will be led by Ben Woodward, Artistic Director of the Fulham Opera. All Souls Church, Tannersville. (518) 589-6953.

Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos, WHOSE?, neon, cables, 2014

Wassaic Project Every summer since 2008, the low-key hamlet of Wassaic transforms into a psychedelic amalgamation of art, dance, music, and film for the three-day long Wassaic Project Summer Festival (July 31-August 2). The festival focuses on emerging and innovative talent whose work is on display in the most unlikely places. One of the last remaining wood-crib grain elevators in the country has been converted into an art space, and a cattle-auction ring acts as the project’s movie theater. The art itself, being the product of young artists with a penchant for experimentation, is as radical as the setting it’s displayed in. For example, a rusted dumpster lying on its side with teal light streaming out of its carved-out bottom makes up Kelly Goff’s piece, Dumpster. In total, the exhibit features more than 70 artists—not including the 15 bands scheduled to play. Attendees are encouraged to stay at the on-site campground and party all three culture-crazed nights away for a $60 camping fee ($40 if you make your reservation in advance). The festival takes place at The Maxon Mills in Wassaic. Admission is free. Wassaicproject.org and Hudson River port when it became the terminus of the Delaware and Hudson Canal 1828. Ulster County Visitors Center, Kingston. 340-3566

THEATER

The Little Shop of Horrors 8pm. $20/$15 for students, members, seniors. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279. The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940 8pm. $32-$40. Poking antic fun at the more ridiculous aspects of “show biz” and the corny thrillers of Hollywood’s heyday, the play is a non-stop barrage of laughter as those assembled (or at least those who aren’t killed off) untangle the mystery of the “Stage Door Slasher.” Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

Singin’ in the Rain 8pm. $27/$25. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Auditions for Campobello 1pm. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Tarzana 8pm. Simon’s Rock College: Daniel Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-4400.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Intro to Book Arts with Erin Sweeney 10am-4pm. $130. No experience needed. A little folding, a little sewing—we’re going to do it all in this one day workshop. Starting with very simple one-sheet books, we’ll perform magic with single sheets of paper, making a myriad of models to be used again in later constructions-all based on the accordion fold. Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. Dropforgeandtool.com/workshops-list/bookarts-72515.

clothes and textiles, jewelry, lamps and lighting, artwork, crockery, toys and more. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

DANCE

America 7:30pm. Leonard Ajkun’s newest contemporary ballet performed by Ajkun Ballet Theatre. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. American Travelling Morrice 5:30pm. The Red Lion Inn, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-5545.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Warwick Summer Arts Festival: Fusion Fest Week-long festival celebrating summer and 15 years of the arts in Warwick. See website for specific locations and events. Village of Warwick. Warwicksummerarts.com.

FOOD & WINE

Callicoon Farmers’ Market 11am-2pm. Callicoon Creek Park, Callicoon. Manager@sullivancountyfarmersmarkets.org.

MUSIC

Back to the Garden 1969 7pm. Celebrating the music and spirit of of the Woodstock Music Festival. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Brothers of the Road 6-8pm. Allman Brothers covers. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200. Eroica Trio 4:30-6pm. $19-$59. From some of the great masterpieces of the Western World to custom pieces arranged for and by Eroica, this performance is incredibly diverse offering something for everyone. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

A Program of J.S. Bach, Ken Thomson and J. Brahms 2pm. $25/$20 members/$15 students. Ashley Bathgate, cello and Karl Larson, piano. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392.6121.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Hiking in the Catskills with Robert Thurman 8am-noon. A perennial favorite, this fun and inspiring weekend of moderate to rigorous hiking will include a series of three lectures on introductory Buddhist philosophy and basic meditation techniques. Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center, Phoenicia. 688-6897. HITS-on-the-Hudson V $5/children free. Horse show. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833. Minnewaska Distance Swimmers Association Swim Test 5:30pm. $20. Moriello Pool, New Paltz. 255-1700. Mycology Walk: Identifying Local Edibles 2-3pm. $10/$5 members. The Mid-Hudson Mycological Association will introduce participants to foraging and the ecology of forest mushrooms. Long pants and sturdy walking shoes required. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872. Nature Walk with the Delaware Highlands Conservancy 1-2:30pm. Join the Delaware Highlands Conservancy for a free guided Nature Walk this summer at our office in Bethel. You’ll learn about what you see and hear on a hike on our woodland trail, led by one of our knowledgeable volunteers—and you’ll help us find the different plants and wildlife we have on the property. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 583-1010.

SPIRITUALITY

Akashic Records Revealed with June Brought Last Sunday of every month, 2-3:30pm. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

THEATER

The Little Shop of Horrors 2pm. $20/$15 for students, members, seniors. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279. Singin’ in the Rain 3pm. $27/$25. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Auditions for Campobello 7pm. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.


WEDNESDAY 29

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Healing with Mental Imagery 2-4pm. $25/$20. With uthor Dr. Gerald Epstein. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

MONDAY 27 KIDS & FAMILY

‘Kids Rock’ Boot Camps $275. Week-long camp for ages 10-11. Beacon Music Factory, Beacon. 202-3555. Puppet Show Summer camp $250. A Puppet Show Camp starts with a ‘mini’ puppet show and concludes with a children’s performance for parents and siblings. Each child will take his puppet home to make many more shows. Beacon Art Studios, Beacon. 728-2542. Rock Band Boot Camp $275. Week-long camp for ages 12-16. Beacon Music Factory, Beacon. 202-3555. Week Four Panorama: The Mysterious Benedict Society Visits Olana 9am-3pm. Through July 31. Trenton Lee Stewart’s children’s novel series “The Mysterious Benedict Society” celebrates youth who develop their special skills (rather than super powers.) Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Actress Mary Louise Wilson 7pm. Sharing her memoir My First 100 Years in Show Business. Morton Memorial Library, Rhinecliff. 876-2903. Mystery Mondays Book Discussion 11am. Discussing The Ice Princess, by Camilla Läckberg. Led by Suzanne Christensen and Ellie Charwat. Boardman Road Library, Poughkeepsie. 485-3445.

MUSIC

Heart 7:30pm. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Joe Carozza Trio CD Release Event 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. PianoSummer Recital: 2015 Jacob Flier Piano Competition 7pm. $10. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869.

TUESDAY 28 FAIRS & FESTIVALS

American Travelling Morrice 11:30am. Hawthorne Valley Farm Store, Ghent. (518) 672-7500.

FILM

The Mighty Ducks 1pm. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Strangers on a Train 8:30pm. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

KIDS & FAMILY

Curtains Up! Theater Improv 1-3pm. Through July 30. Ages 7-11, explore your creativity and spontaneity while learning the basics of Improvisational Theatre through games and movement with actress Jessica Iva Coons. Athens Cultural Center, Athens. (518) 945-2136. Secret Agent Lab: Mad Science of the Mid-Hudson 1-4pm. Calling all sleuths and agents! This camp is part forensics and part spy science; uncover the science in evidence gathering and analysis. For grades 3–6. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Writing for Environmental Change 3:30-5:30pm. Through July 30. Ages 12+, gather together in a writing workshop to develop short pieces inspired by the four elements: earth, water, fire, air. Guided by stories from Native American and other indigenous cultures that have been traditional guardians of the environment, students will create pieces that speak to earth’s protection with writer Neil Smith. Athens Cultural Center, Athens. (518) 945-2136.

MUSIC

PianoSummer Master Class: Alexander Toradze 2:30pm. $10. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869.

FILM

Throw Momma from the Train 8:30pm. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

KIDS & FAMILY

Secret Agent Lab: Mad Science of the Mid-Hudson 1-4pm. Calling all sleuths and agents! This camp is part forensics and part spy science; uncover the science in evidence gathering and analysis. For grades 3–6. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

MUSIC

Dancing at Dusk: Greek Dancing The Band Ethos with Kostas Psarros 5-6pm. $10/$5 children. Explore rebetiko (Greek blues) as well as other styles and regional genres of Greek music hailing from the islands to the mountains. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. The English Beat 8pm. $40. Ska, reggae, pop and punk backing band. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Ethel Smyth: The Wreckers 2pm. $25+. Opera. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Phoenicia Festival of the Voice 8pm. $25. Voices of Distinction- Broadway, pop, folk, jazz. Parish Field, Phoenicia. PhoeniciaVoiceFest.org. Pure Joy 7pm. Arlington Business Improvement District summer concert series. Holy Trinity, Poughkeepsie. 452-1863.

Gabriel Kahane & Rob Moose The Ambassador and More 7-8:45pm. $15-$40. With one foot in the tradition of chamber music, and the other firmly planted in forward-looking folk tinged with a daring harmonic sensibility and mordant lyricism, the two will offer up a dozen of Kahane’s songs interspersed with works by Franz Schubert, Benjamin Britten, Jerome Kern, and John Adams in a performance. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

In a Nutshell Storytelling Night Every third Friday, 7pm. A for tales real and imagined. They can be anything! Something that happened to you while walking down the street, a noteworthy limerick, a piece of writing that’s ready to flee from the sheet, or even a tale you’ve read that deserves to be made audible for a reflective audience. Ten minute maximum. Michel’s Coffee Shop, Poughkeepsie. 454-5176.

Harlem on the Hudson: Heatin’ up the Hudson 8-10pm. $25. Trombonist Chris Washburne and his acclaimed group Syotos return to Bard with the Brazilian pianist André Mehmari. Syotos pushes the genre of Latin jazz, combining Afro-Cuban, funk, jazz, gospel, and contemporary classical music. The stellar band will be joined by special guest André Mehmari. Spiegeltent, Annandale.

Ethel Smyth: The Wreckers 7:30pm. $25+. Opera. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

John Simon and The Greater Ellenville Jazz Trio 7pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Phoenicia Festival of the Voice 8pm. $25. A Little Night Music- Sondheim Ron Raines and Susan Powell. Parish Field, Phoenicia. PhoeniciaVoiceFest.org. PianoSummer Student Recital III 7pm. $10. Nadia & Max Shepard Recital Hall, New Paltz. 257-2700.

Tedeschi Trucks Band 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Trio Mio 7-9:30pm. Trio Mio is the “world’s only four piece trio!” Driven by singer songwriter guitarist Fran Palmieri, and ably complemented by drummer and vocalist Robert Muller, guitarist and vocalist Bruce Hildenbrand, and bassist and vocalist Steve Massardo, the group plays dance-friendly songs about life and love. Terri Massardo occasionally joins the “trio” with her beautiful vocals. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

THEATER

Richard Wilson with Violinist Joseph Genauldi 8pm. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 229-0425.

NY Horse & Pony Show (VI) $5/children free. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833. Tango at the Pavilion 6-8pm. $14/$5 open dance. Join Nina Jirka, of Tango New Paltz, and learn how to Tango. Come for an hour-long lesson from 6pm7pm and stay for open dance from 7pm8pm. Bring water and comfortable shoes for dancing. All ages welcome. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

THURSDAY 30

NY Horse & Pony Show (VI) $5/children free. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833. Oklahoma 8pm. $32-$40. The classic American musical and first Rodgers & Hammerstein collaboration, having set the standards and rules of musical theatre still being followed today. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Souvenir: A Play by Stephen Temperley 5pm. STS Playhouse, Phoenicia. 688-2279.

FRIDAY 31

DANCE

American Travelling Morrice 10:15am. Old Chatham Country Store and Café, Old Chatham. (518) 794-6227

FILM

Murder on the Orient Express 8:30pm. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

FOOD & WINE

Burger and Beer Bash 6-10pm. $40. The event will include local vendors grilling up signature sliders, sides and more. Enjoy live music, beer, desserts and side dishes, on the beautiful Hudson River. Shadows On the Hudson, Poughkeepsie. 486-9500.

MUSIC

Amina Figarova Group 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Bill Kirchen 8pm. Melding of rock, blues, country, bluegrass and swing. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. The Bush Brothers 9-11:30pm. Their music is a combination of traditional country, bluegrass and gospel music fused with contemporary acoustic sounds delivered with great vocals and instrumental solos. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. The Duhks 7:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300.

DANCE

American Travelling Morrice 4pm. Crossroads Brewing, Athens. Crossroadsbrewingco.com.

FILM

Buster Keaton’s The General 8:30pm. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Movies Under the Stars: Beetle Juice 8:30pm. Forsyth Park, Kingston. 338-3810, x 102.

KIDS & FAMILY

Storyteller Mime Motoko 1pm. Storyteller Motoko enchants children of every age with folktales from her Japan leavened with music, mime, and humor. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

LECTURES & TALKS

Latte Lecture: American Composers and American Critics 10am. Mama’s Boy Cafe, Phoenicia. 688-3050.

LITERARY & BOOKS

19th Annual Sharon Summer Book Signing 6-8pm. $30. Sip wine, sample hors d’oeuvres, and purchase the latest titles from thirty-two authors and illustrators hailing from the tri-state area. Hotchkiss Library, Sharon, CT. (860) 364-5041.

MUSIC

Hélène Grimaud 8-9:30pm. $35-$59. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. . John Menegon 3Rio 6-9pm. Lekkers, Stone Ridge. 687-9794. KJ Denhert & The New York Unit 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Phoenicia Festival of the Voice 6pm. $25. The Medium: Gian Carlo Menotti Victoria Livengood stars. STS Playhouse, Phoenicia. 688-2279. PianoSummer: Symphony Gala with the Hudson Valley Philharmonic 8pm. $39/$34. One special evening includes Mahler’s Adagietto from Symphony No. 5, a performance by the 2015 Jacob Flier Piano Competition winner, and Brahms’ Symphony No. 4 finishing off the program. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-7869. Roomful of Blues 8pm. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. The Slackers with Opener Los Thujones 9pm. $20. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. A Summer Evening at the Rosens’ Cocktails, Dinner & Concerts 5-6:15pm. $82. Experience what it was like to be a guest of the Rosens at one of their celebrated soirées. Enjoy a social cocktail hour in the Sense Circle Garden before entering the magnificent Music Room for a brief presentation on the Rosen Family and a short theremin concert and demonstration, followed by an elegant and dinner on the stunning East Porch. The evening ends with an uplifting performance in the Venetian Theater. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION NY Horse & Pony Show (VI) $5/children free. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-8833.

THEATER Noir 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with music by Duncan Sheik, book by Kyle Jarrow, lyrics by Kyle Jarrow and Duncan Sheik. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Oklahoma 8pm. $32-$40. The classic American musical and first Rodgers & Hammerstein collaboration, having set the standards and rules of musical theatre still being followed today. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Singin’ in the Rain 8pm. $27/$25. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Souvenir: A Play by Stephen Temperley 2pm. STS Playhouse, Phoenicia. 688-2279.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Herbs for the Brain: Clarity, Focus, Memory, Mood 2-5pm. $30/$25. With author Susun Weed. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

7/15 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 111


A Worldof Delight

HOSTED BY JUSTIN VIVIAN BOND cabaret u live music u dinner u dancing

june 26 – august 15

the richard b. fisher center for the performing arts at bard college

BARDSUMMERSCAPE 2015 July 2

summertime swing with eight to the bar July 4

martha wainwright July 9

leo genovese and the legal aliens July 10

the wau wau sisters July 11

spencer day July 16

etienne charles and creole soul July 17 and 18

weimar new york July 24

stephin merritt

July 30

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kate pierson August 13

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July 25

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2015

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112 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/15

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7/15 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 113


Planet Waves

ERIC FRANCIS COPPOLINO

BY ERIC FRANCIS COPPOLINO

Know When You Don’t Know

O

n my short to-do list of book projects, I have a concept for one called Know When You Don’t Know: A Guide to Investigative Reporting and Life. I know that not everyone aspires to be an intrepid journalist. The little joke in there is that life is kind of like an investigative reporting project. We’re repeatedly put in situations where we don’t have full information, or where people are deceiving us in some way, and that leaves just one practical solution—to get to the bottom of things. In our current environment of information overwhelm, this kind of awareness is indispensible. Yet, for this to work, you would need some hint that you’re not working with all you need to know, in order to get you started. Generally that’s going to come from you. I think about this concept a lot—how to know when you don’t know. For most people I run it past, it’s like a Zen koan, similar to “What is the sound of one hand clapping?” In this case, we could ask, “What happens when you rub one brain cell together?” Personally, I don’t find knowing when I don’t know to be paradoxical. It’s usually as simple as coming across a word in a book or article, being aware that I don’t know what the word means (or that I am uncertain), and stopping to look it up. But I am gathering that this is an unusual approach. It’s seemingly easier to guess the meaning of a word than to look it up. Really, skipping the look-up step is just lazy. To know when you don’t know, you must be on your toes. If you’re a news reporter, awareness of your knowledge level on any topic is the essence of your work. The difference between knowing and not knowing could be a libel suit, or ruining someone’s reputation, or cashing in your trust with the public, or with your editor.

114 PLANET WAVES CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Good reporters have to know the difference between knowing and not knowing. We also have techniques that help us notice. To give one easy example, when two people in authority give you conflicting versions of the same story, you know you have some finding out to do. One of them is wrong, or their accounts add up to something that neither of them is saying. Or you may discover a document that contradicts what you’ve been told. You learn something, though you then have the job of debunking what is not true, and establishing what is true. All of this happens while you don’t know for sure. Once you know that you don’t know, you can get busy figuring out what is true. That’s often an adventure. Asking a question that does not have an obvious answer can lead you to unusual places and to real discoveries. Yet, it’s not possible to be lazy and do this, or to have willful ignorance, the opposite of which is curiosity. Along with that is the factor of being willing to admit that you don’t know, which does seem to be difficult for people. In fact that may be one of the biggest barriers: feeling stupid because one does not know, which, in turn, seems to prevent one from finding out. Isn’t it refreshing when someone poses a question to an expert of some kind, and they think about it, and admit they don’t know the answer? The reason it’s such a happy thing is that it’s honest, and that in turn opens up a space where real knowledge, or at least a real question, can enter. There’s little difference between the two. Mercury Square Neptune: That Was Intense Through May and most of June, we experienced a Mercury retrograde. That involved Mercury making an unusually long-lasting square aspect (90 degrees) to Neptune in Pisces.


Typically, this aspect will last a few days. Thanks to the Mercury retrograde, wherein Mercury stays in a narrow band of the zodiac for a while, the current square has lasted for about two months. It is likely to have effects extending into the future, potentially associated with decisions you made in late spring and early summer. Mercury retrogrades are growing more intense, as we surround ourselves with Mercury-ruled devices and merge with them evermore intimately. Many factors in the world are insisting that we proceed through life with increasing clarity. Yet Mercury square Neptune illustrates the brain fog that can take over when there is too much data, conflicting data, or a mental sphere that blocks awareness of your feelings and your body. There are also integrity questions that become more pronounced. A lot of people are saying a lot of things. Who is telling the truth? Whose job is it to find out? One manifestation of knowing when you don’t know is recognizing when someone may be lying to you. For much of my investigative reporting career, I covered fraud. Fraud is when one party intentionally and knowingly deceives another, and gains a profit from that deception. Fraud is a self-concealing crime, so the courts allow those who have been subjected to it some extra leeway when it comes to assembling the facts that lead to its discovery. But once a fraud victim is aware there’s a problem, they take on part of the burden; they have an obligation to take action or, after a while, forfeit their right to do so. Therefore, knowledge is power, but it also imparts responsibility. I believe that the responsibility piece is much of why many people don’t want to know when they don’t know. And this is why so much pretending happens.

2. You notice something that you don’t understand. Let’s say you’re reading a book or an article and you come to a word you don’t recognize. The moment you notice that you don’t recognize the word, you know that you don’t know. Then what do you do? Do you look it up in the dictionary? Do you guess, or make up a meaning for the word? Once you start looking up words you don’t know, it can become addictive. You suddenly want to know the meaning of every word that you admit you don’t understand. Why? Because you learn something and that feels good.

Isn’t it refreshing when someone poses a

question to an expert

of some kind, and they

think about it, and admit

3. You are presented with conflicting information. This might be about the safety of something, the cost of something, or any facts that someone presents you with. They might conflict with what you already knew (or thought you knew). Or you have two sources telling you two different things. Once you notice that the sources or their information conflicts, you know that you don’t know. When you set out to resolve the conflict, you are on the path to finding out.

4. You’re angry. Anger is important. It’s an internal barometer, an indicator of how you’re responding to your environment, including to people. Sometimes anger is about having information that you don’t want, and sometimes it’s about sensing something that you don’t know. Your emotions might indicate an instinct that someone is withholding something or lying. If you feel anger, stop and question what it’s about, if you can muster up the presence of mind. You may discover there is something that you need to know.

they don’t know the answer?

How to Know When You Don’t Know First, let’s ask: what does it mean to know when you don’t know? I think this comes in two shades: lack of awareness and willful ignorance. Lack of awareness can be addressed by simply noticing your environment. Your environment is giving you feedback all the time. People say things to you. Do you listen to what they say? You can take this a step further, into intentionally cultivating curiosity and mindfulness. Assuming one is interested, it’s pretty easy to cultivate these states of mind. Most of what will get in the way is laziness and sloppy thinking. There are techniques to get past that, but the desire is a necessary ingredient. Willful ignorance is more difficult to address. It’s one of the most serious problems that the world now faces. In truth, all ignorance is willful—the word has as its root in the verb to ignore. Don’t tell me; I don’t want to know (what’s in my food, my air, that contract, that person’s intentions, and so on). It must be OK, or they wouldn’t spray it on my food. The college would never let students live in dioxin-contaminated dorms. This kind of thing. He’s wearing a suit; he must be telling the truth. Let’s assume you’re curious and not willfully ignorant. Let’s assume that you’re willing to take responsibility for knowledge when it comes to you. And let’s assume that you can get past the nervousness of admitting the extent of what you don’t know. After all, there is plenty, and were you to acknowledge that you might feel like you’re standing at the edge of a cliff. It’s not just a feeling. You actually are. So, with that in mind, here are a few techniques for knowing when you don’t know. 1. You have a question. Is it really that simple? Yes it is, mates. You’re wondering something, and it has a question mark tacked onto it. It might begin with the word “why” or “when,” “where” or “how,” “what” or “who.” You know you want to know. As long as you don’t suppress that, you will know that you don’t know. The question is, do you have the guts to ask the question? And what do you do with the answer?

5. You’re confused. So many people spend so much time confused, they don’t even notice when it’s happening. It helps to notice when you’re confused, which is similar to being mentally lost. Consciously acknowledged confusion can be addressed by choosing to seek information. It helps to keep digging until you feel a sense of resolution. 6. You discover something that makes no sense. We’ve all had that experience where someone tells us a story and the whole thing fits together except for one little thing. You have the choice to overlook that bit, or to stop and see what it’s about. One problem is that so many things seem to make no sense that it hardly seems worth sorting anything out. But if you live willfully with what is senseless, that’s a form of ignorance. 7. You discover how little you know. You might think you knew a lot about a subject or a person, then you make a discovery that opens up a whole new realm of existence. Here again, you have the choice to enter that realm, or to pretend it does not exist. Standing at the Edge Conscious existence involves a relationship to the unknown. There is so much we don’t know that in order to maintain some sanity, we need to either acknowledge this fact or pretend that something else is true. There is strength in facing the unknown as a willing gesture. There’s humility to this, yet there is also an unusual kind of bravery that it calls forth. Some truly brave people get to the place where they want to know anything, no matter what it may be or how it may affect them. They view all of life as an encounter with the unknown. Some of the people society respects the most have lived this way. It is considered a rare trait. Yet, I think that everyone is capable of embracing the mystery of existence. Sometimes this is a matter of preference. Sometimes, it’s a matter of necessity, such as when a struggle for survival is involved. Respect for the unknown is its own thing, as apart from wanting to enter the unknown. If you can look into that space and see one glimmer of light, know that it’s your mind that is perceiving something other than darkness. CHRONOGRAM.COM READ Eric Francis Coppolino’s weekly Planet Waves column.

7/15 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 115


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Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

ARIES (March 20-April 19) By now you’ve figured out that you have to break a few rules to get anything done—and it certainly seems you have plans for what you want to accomplish. Here are some guidelines for breaking rules. First, make sure you try the conventional channels and methods first. This includes knowing what rules or guidelines you’re expected to follow. Then, your next strategy would be to negotiate. See if you can engage others in a give-and-take process where your mutual interests are supported. Your astrology is suggesting that you have significant room to alter some important agreement, particularly one that you entered within the past two years. In fact, your astrology suggests that tuning up this contract or understanding is a high priority, and the sooner you get to it the better. All of that said and done, you might have to bend the rules to accomplish something. If so, stick to rules that are somehow contradictory or vague. Make sure you understand the consequences of your actions. And, if possible, be subversive. Avoid direct challenges or any show of bravado. Most of all, be fair. Do what you need to do, at minimum, and skip the extras. Right now, psychology is your most useful tool. You’re well-positioned to assess where others are at, and you have every right to put that information to good use.

TAURUS (April 19-May 20) You seem to be stretching your creative capacities. There is some bold adventure ahead of you, and you will be reaching for it in many different ways in the coming months and into the coming year. This is healthy; and as you know, it’s long overdue. Your chart suggests you’re venturing in the direction of taking sincere risks and accepting uncertainty about what you’re doing and how it will be received. This suggests declaring your freedom from expectation and predictability. Even if you don’t consider yourself an artist, this is how you’ll be living for a while. And this entails one special fact: You might get to the place where your creativity seems to run out. This is something you could consider an authentic initiation. You will have several options; the most viable one seems to be going back to the source of your inspiration. Yet, in any event, you will need to take chances. You will need to be open to revision. You will need to address the nature of what it means to be stuck creatively so that you have dependable ways to get out of that place and back into the flow of your ideas—and of your life. On some level, the topic of sex is related. In order to be fun and nourishing, you need to take your eroticism beyond familiar territory. That is the story of your life.

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You’ve been spun around so many times the past couple of months, you may be completely disoriented and have no idea what to believe. Of course you’ve learned a lot along the way, at least by process of elimination. You can cross a good few things off your list of what to worry about, or wonder about. You have a much clearer sense of who you can trust. Yet still, all of this has been leading you to a decision, and that time has arrived. You now get to make up your mind. There’s a commitment involved in this, and you may feel pressured to make an affirmative statement when you’re still facing some doubt or hesitation. But is your uncertainty valid? Do you really lack any necessary information? Go over your facts carefully. Account for what you want to believe, but understand that your beliefs could be unfounded and warrant investigation. Make an inventory of everything you don’t know, and then start to answer your own concerns. What you may discover is that the thing you’re really doubting is your own thought process. Your perceptions and assessments are sharper than you may think. The only thing you have to watch out for is the distinct feeling of wanting something to be true. That is your indicator of caution. Take a balanced approach. Be as objective as you can. What’s true is true. What is not, is not.

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This month and for the next few months, diligently apply yourself to enhancing your income. The key to doing so will be understanding the value of your work, your time and your intelligence, and connecting that with opportunities that seem to be waiting for you. What may surprise you, however, is how direct you need to be to materialize things. By direct, I mean having clear intentions, which you put into clear ideas, and then speak to others directly. This may seem confrontational to you, and in a way any clear transaction is—even if it’s also amicable. I suggest you err on the side of being forward and stating your terms quickly. But this will only work if you’re absolutely self-assured of what you’re doing and its actual worth to others. This you must estimate carefully; and know your facts. Do not guess. Work out your reasoning carefully and be ready to answer questions. You may never need to reveal any background data, though it will boost your confidence to know exactly where you’re coming from. In order to really succeed, your efforts need to be scalable. Part of what you’ll be learning is how to get results that are, at first, in proportion to your efforts, then which exceed your efforts. You may have qualms about the concept of profit; if so, I suggest you let go of them promptly.


Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

LEO (July 22-August 23) Venus and Jupiter in your sign are reminding you that you have only to gain by daring to be yourself. Allowing yourself to exist openly and freely will draw to you much of what you are seeking. Yet there also seems to be some appeal or temptation for you to conceal your true essence—to hide yourself, your talent, your feelings. These conflicting impulses may seem like you must maintain a dangerous balance of some kind. I would propose, however, that your fears are speaking more loudly than is appropriate, and that you may be giving them more attention than they deserve. Ask yourself what you think you have to lose by asserting yourself in a bold and beautiful way; by really daring to live. Could it be some concern that any gains you make, any progress, any blossoming of yourself, is transient? That you could come into possession of something that you then have to give up? That to do anything on Earth, you must reckon with that thing ending? It’s worth considering this, even if only as a thought exercise. At the moment, your charts suggest that you are at an early stage of discovery, and of gathering your creative gifts into true strength. Meanwhile, work with the idea and the feeling of transience. It’s essential to let go, to move on, and to willingly embrace the unknown.

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VIRGO (August 23-September 22) You’re working toward a discovery that will change the course of your current life. It looks as if you’ll get evidence of something that you were not sure was even possible—even something you may have never considered. Yet you will have tangible proof of what you’re capable of, which I suggest you take to heart. That is to say, accept and make friends with what amounts to a giant clue about yourself, while you’re holding it in your hands. Then, over the next few months, you will be invited into a process of refinement. You may determine that this clue was just a statement about your potential, and now you’re faced with the responsibility of making that potential into something real and lasting. While you do this, you’ll have the distinct advantage of knowing that you’re not guessing what your capabilities are. Yet the mind works in strange ways, and it’s always possible to deny something even when you have tangible proof of its existence. I suggest you not fall for this game. Allow in no doubt and remind yourself of what you’re capable of. It will help if you assert your leadership skills in some way. If you find yourself in some circumstance that demands you bring your talent forward, you will thrive under the pressure and have no choice but to affirm your gifts and debunk your doubts.

LIBRA (September 22-October 23) Venus, the planet associated with your sign, stations retrograde later this month. This describes you in a position of greater visibility and contact with the public. Yet it appears to be pushing the question of how much exposure you want; how well known you want to be. It might seem like putting your work out in public is really like baring your soul. Are you ready to face any scrutiny that you may encounter on the way? Yet, if you peel back the question, you may discover something a bit startling. It seems like there’s one thing in particular you’re afraid people will find out about you. You might be cloaking this with a diversity of concerns unrelated to the core issue. That, in turn, could be creating interference with getting your work done, which no doubt involves some contact with the wider community. If you get to the root of the matter, it will be possible to actually do something about it. So I would ask, what is this one fact about yourself that you positively dread people finding out? It could be some element of your history, some doubt, some association you have. You might be trying to hide something that a parent or grandparent was paranoid about. Figure out what this is, give it a name, and then try something daring: Tell the world.

SCORPIO

(October 23-November 22)

Saturn is back in your sign for a brief visit. It spent two years with you from late 2012 to late 2014, putting you under some pressure to get real and grow up. This was essential. Scorpio is a water sign, but it’s not the one that’s known for its ability to flow easily. Therefore, these phases where you’re confronted with necessity are vital to your growth and progress. Now, Saturn is calling on you to clean up some longstanding issues involving partnership, particularly if some kind of contract is involved. Look for the nexus where sex meets money—for example, household partnerships, relationships with ex-partners where finances are still involved, work relationships where there’s an erotic component. You’re likely to be confronted by some element of the relationship that seems stuck or intractable. What you’re really meeting up with is the aspect of yourself that resists change and flow, and therefore, progress. This might have the potential for a head-on collision, when in fact what would benefit you the most to understand the nature of your own resistance. Is it necessary to push back so hard against potential movement? Is it necessary to hesitate as a way of life? You owe yourself better than struggling with the flow of creativity, pleasure and money through your life. You can now make some progress working this out.

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7/15 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 117


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You are being offered a vision for your life—something that’s both far-reaching and wide. You may have the feeling that what you’re thinking is too idealistic or impractical, though over the next few weeks, you will get some proof that it’s really neither. It is, however, your lot in life to be the person who connects your dreams to some tangible plan of action. Though Sagittarius has the reputation for being broad-minded and unconcerned with the details, you know by now that you must attend to the specifics if you want anything to actually happen. You cannot just hope for the best or leave things to others. That said, the translation from your vision to what actually manifests may involve a scaling down of your total vision. This is temporary. What I’m seeing is an exercise in prioritizing the most important thing you want to accomplish, and then breaking that down into steps and making it happen. This is merely a prototype. Pay close attention to what you’re doing, how you’re doing it, and what gets results. Learn the method while you’re developing that method. For example, if you want to record an entire CD, start with getting one song right. If you have an idea for a novel, do it first as a short story. This will give you a sense of accomplishment on many levels. Then have faith—bigger things are on the way.

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You have the strength of your convictions—but as Robert Anton Wilson said, convictions make convicts. What would benefit you and close partners the most is your flexibility—such as working with options rather than all-or-nothing scenarios. You will benefit from having alternatives around the timing of certain things you want to happen. And it includes taking an open-ended approach to resolving apparent conflicts. While there may be some sparks flying, most of the friction is coming from inside of you. For the next couple of months, your ruling planet Saturn is making a final return to Scorpio before moving on to Sagittarius for a twoyear stay. This shift is helping you see all that you’ve left unsaid. This includes the implications of information you’ve gathered that you have not taken fully on board, much less shared with others. You are entering a time in your life when you can afford to have no secrets—by which I mean no secrets in intimate situations. Indeed, your willingness to reveal yourself is the measure of your desire to be close to others. When you find yourself stockpiling information for future use, you can be sure that you’re preparing for an unnecessary confrontation. You have so much to offer, and so much to receive. An open heart and an open door are the only way to share in the beauty of life.

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118 PLANET WAVES CHRONOGRAM 7/15

(January 20-February 19)

You have some unusual relationship opportunities available to you. This is true even if you’re in a committed partnership. You might, however, begin by assessing the extent to which your idea of commitment is a hedge against allowing unscripted events to unfold. The very thing you want is what’s unplanned and unpredictable. I know that kind of thing can send waves of panic through people these days. You can look at that and see how ridiculous it is—or you can play along. In any event, if you’re wondering where any energy blocks are lurking, it’s around the necessity for expected outcomes. Hold open your possibilities and you will see your life begin to flow in new directions. Enter every situation with a sense of adventure, and appreciate the fact that you have no idea how it’s going to turn out. That’s your best friend right now. This is especially true in some situation that is calling for your leadership. It’s probable that this scenario goes back about two years. You now have to wrap up the final steps in a process, which must be completed before you’re really free to move on. You have your work cut out for you, but make sure you’re specific about what needs to be done, for whom, and by when. You are not in an open-ended commitment; to the contrary, you are now embarking on the real work of completion.

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PISCES (February 19-March 20) Make the most of every situation in your life. Make the most of every day. Involve yourself in what you do with full commitment. As you do this over the next few weeks, certain people and scenarios are going to have the sensation of opening the way to the future. There are no guarantees, but you will feel that resonance, and it’s worth noticing when you do. Meanwhile, the personal security question that has been nagging you the past two months or so is now coming to a head. You have a decision to make about what is really in your best interests. Before you get there, you have to decide what your best interests really are. This would be a good place to pause, so that you give yourself some time to assess your priorities. You’re at one of those junctures where you must update your files and make sure that every goal you have is really something you still want. Don’t be afraid to decide that something is no longer working for you. Be bold about what options you have to get things working better. Through this process, you will need to be responsive to your own inner feedback. More than that, keep your focus on your creative and erotic impulses. They contain the most valuable information about what you want, and what actually offers you some grounding and stability. Remember: Listen to yourself.


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Parting Shot

Patriots, Richard Pantell, oil on canvas, 50” x 40” According to Richard Pantell, all of the figures in Patriots are celebrating their country. “America is a diverse country,” he explains. “There are all kinds of ways to be patriotic.” The demonstrators in the background might be voicing disapproval of the United States, but in Pantell’s eyes, that’s an expression of a deep fondness for one’s nation—an urge to improve the country by voicing complaints about its present condition. Pantell’s art is often politically subversive—his painting No It Isn’t Very Funny was even removed from an art gallery because people deemed it offensive. Depicted in the controversial piece is a homeless man rummaging through trash for food as his pants are falling down, a scene Pantell had really witnessed.

120 CHRONOGRAM 7/15

Patriots is the fourth addition to his “Bather Series,” the first having been painted in 1986. Pantell is adamant about basing his subjects on real people and realistic body types—making his work an antithesis to the idealized images of fashion magazines and the media. Pantell’s art is a celebration of diversity, and is intended to inspire people to feel comfortable being themselves. Patriots is on display throughout the month of July at Bearsville Graphics / Karrick Fine Art in Woodstock. Pantell will also be having a solo exhibition at the same venue from September 26 to October 25. (845) 684-5476; Bearsvillegraphics.com. —Jake Swain


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T:8.625”

T:11.875”

Those special requests on your birth plan — they’re standard practice here. The Neugarten Family Birth Center at Northern Dutchess Hospital is dedicated to providing a safe, holistic and family-centered birthing experience. We combine the advanced medical and surgical offerings of a hospital with the progressive options of a birthing center. This unique approach by the physicians and midwives on the medical staff of NDH, as well as birth center nurses, supports an extremely personalized experience for you and your loved ones. To learn more about how we can help you have the kind of delivery you want, visit healthquest.org/NDHBirthCenter.

Celebrating 30 years

as the first birth center in New York.

6511 Springbrook Avenue, Rhinebeck, NY 12572

Accessibility/TTY: (800) 421-1220

Chronogram July 2015  
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