Page 1


Marvin offers design choices like beautiful wood species options that can be stained to complement your décor, Interior Shades that fit seamlessly into new windows, and a wide selection of hardware choices.

Williams Lumber & Home Center

Williams Lumber is clearly the best choice when it comes to choosing & installing Marvin windows or doors for your home. Visit our displays in Rhinebeck, Hudson and Pleasant Valley to start dreaming of the possibilities.

WILLIAMS

Lumber & Home Centers

Rhinebeck • Hudson • Hopewell Junction • Tannersville • Red Hook • Pleasant Valley • High Falls • Hyde Park

www.williamslumber.com

845-876-WOOD


Wish you were sleeping like this?

Instead of sleeping like this?

We have a solution!

Nearly

80%

kes rnal stro of noctu ibuted to ttr can be a e Sleep iv Obstruct a Apne

If you’re affected by constant daytime fatigue or unexpected weight gain, you may be suffering from obstructive sleep apnea. Dr. Claudia Patch and Dr. Bethany Wong offer proven oral appliance therapy as an alterantive to CPAP treatment at the Tischler & Patch Dental Practice, serving the great Hudson Valley, NY area.

Non-invasive, proven effective, and covered by most medical insurance plans. FREE CONSULTATION

121 ROUTE 375, WOODSTOCK, NY

(845) 679-3706

TISCHLERDENTAL.COM 10/16 ChronograM 1


SEEKING

Restauranteur/Entrepreneur TO O P E N A C O U N T R Y - S T Y L E C A F É / E AT E R Y High Falls Emporium, 10 Old State Route 213, High Falls, NY

Developer/Owner of High Falls Emporium will provide a partial cooperative build out, and support for this great venture in the corner, most visible unit. T H E H I G H FA L LS E M P O R I U M . C O M

Text Ron at 718.344.8571 (no calls please)

or email ron_faia@yahoo.com

2 ChronograM 10/16


modern

At are proud AtLindal Lindalwe wethe arevery very proudthat thatfor forover over70 70years yearswe we Explore Possibilities...

have havebeen beenproducing producinghomes homesthat thatare aremodern modernininspirit spiritand and warm in nature. warm in nature.

Home Building/Green Building Seminar At Experience and Saturday, October 22, 2016 lives 11AM – 1PM Atthe theheart heartof ofthe theLindal Lindal Experience livesprogress progress and

tradition, tradition,inspiration inspirationand andpredictability predictability––the thecutting-edge cutting-edge

This free Seminar gives youthe a time-honored realistic overview architecture architectureisisdelivered deliveredthrough throughthe time-honoredbuilding building ofofLindal Cedar and by aalifetime ofsystems the entire process of designing and systems Lindal Cedarhomes homes andbacked backed bycreating lifetime structural warranty. structural your own warranty. energy-efficient custom home, from Lindal has designed over buying landHomes through and finishing. LindalCedar Cedar Homes hasconstruction designedand andproduced produced over 50,000 homes, built throughout the world in every 50,000 homes, are builtneeded, throughoutcall the world in everyclimate, climate, Reservations 845-265-2636 or on every type of terrain, and in every regulatory environment. on every type of terrain, and in every regulatory environment. email Info@LindalNY.com to reserve your in seat. Since the introduction of its modern design program 2008,

Since the introduction of its modern design program in 2008, Lindal Lindalhas hasbeen beenthe themodern modernsystems-built systems-built‘prefab’ ‘prefab’home homeofof choice clients. We willfor beour happy to speak with you about the choice for our clients.

services we offer,speak including free sitetheevaluations We with services Wewill willbe behappy happytotospeak withyou youabout aboutthe serviceswe we offer, including free site evaluations and site visits, and site visits,free and free design program. offer, including siteour evaluations and site visits,and andour our free freeDesign DesignProgram. Program.

Atlantic Custon Homes, Inc. Atlantic AtlanticCustom CustomHomes, Homes,Inc. Inc. Stop by our classic Lindal model at: Stop by our Classic Lindal model Stop by our Classic Lindal modelat: at: 2785 Route Spring, NY 10516 2785 Route Spring, NY 10516 2785 Route999• •Cold • Cold Cold Spring, NY 10516 888.558.2636 • 845.265.2636 888.558.2636 • 845.265.2636 888.558.2636 • 845.265.2636 Info@LindalNY.com Info@LindalNY.ocm Info@LindalNY.com www.HudsonValleyCedarHomes.com www.HudsonValleyCedarHomes.com www.HudsonValleyCedarHomes.com

10/16 ChronograM 3


new york state

SHEEP & WOOL FAMILY FESTIVAL

October 15th & 16th

Hundreds of Sheep, Llamas & Alpacas, Petting Zoo, Fiber Artists & Crafts, Children’s Activities, Wine & Cheese, Specialty Foods, Cooking Demos & Much More! RAIN or SHINE! Dutchess County Fairgrounds - Rhinebeck, NY

4 ChronograM 10/16

$3 OFF Offer applies to admission. Not to be combined with any other offer. Must present this ad to receive offer. Expires 10/16/16. Coupon Code 15

www.sheepandwool.com | 845-876-4000


SUNY NEW PALTZ DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER SERIES PROUDLY WELCOMES …

DR. HOLLY ATKINSON Senior On-Air Medical Correspondent and Chief Medical Editor, HealthiNation

HEALTH AND HUMAN RIGHTS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2016 7:30 P.M., SUNY New Paltz Lecture Center 100

Dessert reception follows event. Advanced ticket purchase recommended.

TICKETS AND INFORMATION: www.newpaltz.edu/speakerseries

Will Call opens one-hour prior in the Lecture Center lobby. SPONSORS: Buttermilk Falls, Campus Auxiliary Services, Central Hudson, The Dorsky Family & The Dorsky Foundation, Health Quest, Liberty Mutual, M&T Bank, Northwestern Mutual, Sodexo, SUNY New Paltz Foundation, and Ulster Savings Bank.

DISTINGUISHED

SERIES

Parker Theatre Box Office (845) 257-3880 Monday – Friday, 11:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. September 19 – October 16 October 31 – November 3

SPEAKER

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

Your public university

10/16 ChronograM 5


BARDAVON PRESENTS

HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC

THE MET: LIVE IN HD - WAGNER’S

IN THE TRADITION

TRISTAN UND ISOLDE

Elfman /// Korngold /// Mahler

encore /// Nina Stemme stars as Isolde

Saturday October 8 at 8pm - Bardavon

Saturday October 15 at 1pm - Bardavon

The Havana Cuba All -Stars Sunday October 23 at 7pm - Bardavon

Sunday November 6 at 7pm - Bardavon

BARDAVON - 35 Market St. Poughkeepsie • 845.473.2072 | WWW.BARDAVON.ORG UPAC - 601 Broadway Kingston • 845.339.6088 | WWW.TICKETMASTER.COM Rhinebeck Bank, WMC Health/Mid- Hudson Regional Hospital, Dr. Edwin Ulrich Charitable Trust, Norman & Jeannie Greene Fund of the Poughkeepsie Public Library District, Irving & Gloria Schlossberg Family Fund of the Community Foundations of the Hudson Valley, Premier Medical Group and WMHT

L N

Don’t miss a (delightfully slower) beat.

AUTUMN

is better upstate. Find new content everyday.

UPSTATER.COM

GRAND OPENING!

October 7-10th

Always Neu it could be... Rediscovered, upcycled & made beautiful just for you Vintage Clothing Handmade Items Linens and Bedding as well as Furnishings Friday- Sunday 10am-6pm alwaysneu.com • 2440 RT. 28 Glenford, NY • 845-303-0091 6 ChronograM 10/16

Subscribe for home delivery today:

upstater.com/subscribe


adams fairacre farms

Providing the best fruits and vegetables, dairy products, meats, cheeses, honey and more from over

30

LOCAL FARMS

adamsfarms.com

POUGHKEEPSIE

KINGSTON

NEWBURGH

WA P P I N G E R

Route 44 845-454-4330

Route 9W 845-336-6300

Route 300 845-569-0303

Route 9 845-632-9955

FALL IS HERE SALE!

ARLINGTON

WINE & LIQUOR 718 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie ∙ arlingtonwine.net ∙ 1-866-SAYWINE

20% OFF

ANY CASE(S) OF 750ml Non-sale Wine IN-STORE ONLY

Excludes restricted wine & champagne. In store items only, not responsible for out of stock items. Discount does not apply to liquor, champagne, restricted or large format items, ports, sherries, vermouth, .187 or .375 wine, gift sets or baskets. Not applicable to delivery, shipping or phone orders. NO exceptions made. Must present coupon at time of purchase, cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotions. Expires 11/1/16

75¢ OFF

ALL WINE MAGNUMS

SALE AND NON-SALE ITEMS! (1.5 LTRS.) IN-STORE ONLY

Applicable on any item...NO LIMITS! Choose any of your favorite & reduce them. Example Sale $10.99-Sale $10.24. Everyday Discounted Prices - $9.99 - Sale $9.24. Not applicable to delivery, shipping or phone orders. NO exceptions made. Must present coupon at time of purchase, cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotions. Expires 11/1/16

10/16 ChronograM 7


Chronogram arts.culture.spirit.

contents 10/16

view from the top

home & Garden

14 on the cover

40 home: isles of the forever wild

Laura Battle’s drawing Antonyms.

18 while you were sleeping Evil cats, fake fish, the death penalty hits an all-time low, and more you may have missed in the news recently.

19 beinhart’s body politic Larry Beinhart on why the rich just can’t be trusted with money.

Art of business 20 The stories behind local business. This month: The Emerson Resort and Spa, The Falcon, Willow Wood, 394 Main, and Red Cottage.

EDUCATION

Irene O’Garden and Jon Pilmeier’s Georgian estate, Windswept, in Garrison.

59 garden: shade gardens

A conversation with Victoria Coyne of Victoria Gardens.

weddings 50 a grand adventure

Is there a better place to get married than the Hudson Valley?

Food & Drink 78 life of pie How two pizza nerds took their obesession to the next level via Kickstarter.

23 making meaning

whole living

84 the evolution of O+

Hillary Harvey surveys different approaches to early childhood education.

Community pages 30 Kingston: K-Town comeback The little city that could continues its entrepreneur-driven renaissance.

54 new paltz: timeless & evolving History and modernity intermingle in the shadow of the Shawangunks.

The Kingston-based festival of health and art goes national to change healthcare.

Community Resource Guide 81 tastings A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 82 business directory A compendium of advertiser services. 88 whole living Opportunities to nurture mind, body, and soul.

30

Ain’t I a Woman, a mural at the corner of Franklin and Furnace Streets in Kingston, created by jetsonorama and Jess X Chen for the 2015 O+ Festival.

Franco Vogt

community pages

8 ChronograM 10/16


THE LEGENDARY

BEARSVILLE THEATER PRESENTS FRI 10/4 An Evening with GRAHAM NASHTHIS PATH TONIGHT TOUR THURS-SUN 10/13-16 WOODSTOCK FILM FESTIVAL

MON 10/17 THE RECORD COMPANY

FRI-MON 10/21-23 THE WOODSTOCK INVITATIONAL LUTHIERS SHOWCASE

SAT 10/29 BRAND X

SUN 10/30 THE SECURITY PROJECT

BEARSVILLE THEATER, WOODSTOCK, NY TICKETS & INFO: BEARSVILLETHEATER.COM

A BUDDHIST APPROACH TO COMPASSION & RESILIENCE October 21-23

Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, David Kaczynski, and Michaela Haas

WOMEN’S HEALTH SYMPOSIUM

Suffering is inevitable in life. But how we respond to it can be the difference between more suffering and a

Saturday October 29, 2016 Stone Ridge, NY

path to healing and happiness. Join Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, David Kaczynski, brother of the “Unabomber,” and author Michaela Haas and discover various ways to find compassion,

Jason Elias Suzy Meszoly Bengt Robbert Grandmother Threecrow Susun Weed Susan Willson

www.WomensHealthSymposium.org

forgiveness, and resilience in difficult times. Learn to transform adversity into a force for greater good as you enjoy a welcoming community, nutritious meals, and much more on Omega’s Rhinebeck campus.

WORKSHOPS | RETREATS | CONFERENCES ONLINE LEARNING | GETAWAYS

RHINEBECK, NY

Mind Body Connection, Green Medicine, Wise Nutrition, Ormus Monotomic Gold, Spirituality & Awareness, Thermography, Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine, Classical Homeopathy, Energetic Healing

Explore more at eOmega.org/resilience or call 800.944.1001

10/16 ChronograM 9


Chronogram arts.culture.spirit.

contents 10/16

arts & culture

the forecast

62 Gallery & museum GUIDe

92 daily Calendar Comprehensive listings of local events. (Updated daily at Chronogram.com.)

68 music: Dean jones

A profile of the Grammy-winning producer and ex-Fighting McKenzies trombonist.

91 The Woodstock Film Festival screens dozens of films October 13-16.

Nightlife Highlights includes shows by Ben Neill, Peter Case, and Maceo Parker.

93 “Byrdcliffe’s Legacy” examines the creative history of Woodstock, though October 9.

Reviews of Anando el Tiempo by Carla Bley, Andy Sheppard, and Steve Swallow;

95 The Hudson Valley Philharmonic performs movie music on October 8.

Whispers of Love by Pony in the Pancake; and Quiet in the Head by Quiet in the Head.

72 BOOKS: booking it Books Editor Nina Shengold reflects on 12 years of drinking from the deep well that is the Hudson Valley’s river of words (also the title of her book on the subject).

74 book reviews

97 FilmColumbia screens new movies by Ken Loach and Pedro Almodovar. 99 Beth Gill Dance performs its dreamy dancescapes at Bard’s Fisher Center. 101 One-man showstopper James Lecesne returns in “Extraordinary Measures.” 103 Design*Sponge founder Grace Bonney reads from her new book in Rhinebeck. 105 The Terrapin Craft Beer Experience puts NY State food and drink front and center.

Reviews of The Fat Artists and Other Stories by Benjamin Hale, and Eleven Hours

planet waves

by Pamela Erens. Plus Short Takes.

106 election 2016: it’s time to grow up

76 Poetry Poems by Gary Alderson, Sydna Altschuler Byrne, Richard Donnelly, E. Gironda, Jr., Ian Haight, Brandon Hansen, Alexis Hill, Courtney Kiesecker, Joe Klarl,

6

PREVIEWS

Eric Francis Coppolino looks at the astrological conditions of the election.

108 horoscopes

What’s in our stars? Eric Francis Coppolino knows.

Kerry Nicole McCaffrey, Jahvni Mundra, Barbara Sheffer, Lisa St. John,

112 parting shot

R. Subtler, Monique Tranchina, and Lauren Yaro. Edited by Phillip X Levine.

62

Eye in the Sky, a digital print by Carl Van Brunt, on display this month at Theo Ganz Gallery in Beacon.

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

10 ChronograM 10/16

Four autumnal monoprints by Mikhail Horowitz.


Inner Exercises Group Work Movements

Gurdjieff’s Teaching:

AN ApproACh to INNer Work

Gurdjieff’s teaching, or the Fourth Way, is a way of developing attention and presence in the midst of a busy life. Each person’s unique circumstances provide the ideal conditions for the quickest progress on the path of awakening. Using practical inner exercises and tools for self-study, the work of self-remembering puts us in contact with the abundant richness of Being.

Meetings at Kleinert Gallery, Woodstock NY For information call 845/527-6205 Woodstock www.GurdjieffBeing.com / NYC www.GurdjieffBennettNYC.com

Drs. Maureen and Jeffrey Viglielmo Biological Dentistry

The beautiful smile we create with you is the gateway to a healthy body As biological dentists we provide safe mercury removal, biocompatible restorations and customized periodontal therapy.

56 Lucas Avenue, Kingston (845) 339-1619 • drvigs.com 10/16 ChronograM 11


EDITORIAL

HUMMINGBIRD JEWELERS

Editorial Director Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com creative Director David Perry dperry@chronogram.com Books editor Nina Shengold books@chronogram.com health & wellness editor Wendy Kagan wholeliving@chronogram.com Poetry Editor Phillip X Levine poetry@chronogram.com music Editor Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com Kids & Family Editor Hillary Harvey kidsandfamily@chronogram.com contributing Editor Anne Pyburn Craig apcraig@chronogram.com editorial intern Hannah Phillips proofreader Barbara Ross contributors Mary Angeles Armstrong, Christine Ashburn, Larry Beinhart, Eric Francis Coppolino, Larry Decker, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Fen Fenton, Mark Gerlach, Roy Gumpel, Mikhail Horowitz, Susan Krawitz, Timothy Malcom, Jana Martin, Sharon Nichols, Fionn Reilly, Jeremy Schwartz, Sparrow, Michelle Sutton, Franco Vogt

W E I N V I T E YO U TO V I E W T H E

SETHI COUTURE COLLECTION T R U N K S H OW O C TO B E R 8 T H - 9 T H

PUBLISHING FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky CEO Amara Projansky amara@chronogram.com publisher Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com chairman David Dell Chronogram is a project of Luminary Media advertising sales (845) 334-8600x106 director of product development & sales Julian Lesser jlesser@chronogram.com account executive Robert Pina rpina@chronogram.com account executive Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com account executive Anne Wygal awygal@chronogram.com ADMINISTRATIon business MANAGER Phylicia Chartier office@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107 director of events & special projects manager Samantha Liotta sliotta@chronogram.com minister without portfolio Peter Martin pmartin@chronogram.com PRODUCTION Production manager Sean Hansen sean@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 pRoduction designers Linda Codega, Nicole Tagliaferro, Kerry Tinger Office 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 | (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

MISSION Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents Š Luminary Media 2016.

12 ChronograM 10/16


SUNDAY COMMUTE UlSTEr COUNTY All WEEk lONg You’re always connected, so why not skip the commute? Don’t just dream about leaving the city – discover how other business professionals are increasingly calling Ulster County, NY home, and how you can too! UlsterForBusiness.com

7038_green_skip_commute_chrono_lrg_vF.indd 1

Why Ulster? • 90 miles from NYC • Desirable Quality of Life • Gorgeous Landscapes • Charming Towns & Villages • Lower Costs • Educated Workforce • World-Class Recreational & Cultural Scene • Growing Tech Sector

9/20/16 12:40 PM

10/16 ChronograM 13


on the cover

Antonyms laura battle | graphite on grey paper | 2015

L

Comfortable Clothing Inspired by the Great Outdoors

1585 Main Street • Pleasant Valley, NY 12569 • (845) 635-2220 www.pleasantvalleydepartmentstore.com • email: PVMill2@aol.com

APPLE BIN Farm Market

• Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches • Apple Cider Donuts All Year • Pies, Muffins, Local JB Peel Coffee • Homegrown Fruits, Local Produce • Plants, Trees • Gluten Free Products

Route 9W - 810 Broadway, Ulster Park, NY (845) 339-7229 www.theapplebinfarmmarket.com 14 ChronograM 10/16

aura Battle starts simply when painting and drawing—by dividing up a rectangle. “Through dividing and dissecting the properties that are inherent in a rectangle, images start to appear,” Battle says. But a rectangle does not get filled with a cicada-themed oil painting from thin air. Battle is still the artist behind the work, but her process is far from uniform. “On the one hand, an artist’s path is logical. On the other, it’s intuitive,” Battle explains with a laugh. “It can’t be pinned down to a formula.” Battle does not always know what images will appear once she begins working. She lets her mind wander, unleashing her ideas onto the blank space. Created symbols become emblems of an instant mythology. Speaking with Battle is a bit like an interdisciplinary study. Battle’s working process, which she calls “obsessive,” borrows ideas from science and mathematics. A methodological approach in division and spatial relations on the canvas blends with a more sociological stance on representing culture through visual symbols. “I don’t connect myself to any single movement or group,” Battle says. Her pieces could be seen as an expansive reflection on abstract expression, showcasing formal artistic ideas from Josef Albers’s color theory and Rudolf Arnheim’s analysis of composition. “I look for connections between art, architecture, textiles, landscape, cultures, different time periods—I try to find ways in which things intersect,” explains Battle. The cover drawing, Antonymns, is two spirals in reverse direction with antonyms positioned excactly in opposition to each other. When she started the piece, Battle had no idea that the last two words she added, always and never, would be upside down to each other. Intersections are a large part of her work. Studying her art is like looking at a patchwork quilt or playing “I Spy.” A letter is positioned alongside a hazy representation of the universe. Squares that look like a kitchen backsplash are painted next to what looks like an outline of a cicada. “I try to make things that have a specific intention and meaning, but people bring their own experience to the things I make and add to that conversation,” says Battle. Images build up, becoming even more complexly layered as viewers experience her work. Battle references Annie Besant and Charles Webster Leadbeater’s spiritually meditative writing on art when talking about the viewer experience. “I like to think that the viewing of my art is like Besant and Leadbeater’s Thought Forms,” says Battle. “It simply becomes an optically charged mental space, in which you can almost dream into the picture and connect with something outside yourself.” Her latest exhibit, “The Power of the Center,” is open weekends from 1pm to 5pm through October 16 at The Barn at Meadowbrook Farm, 71 Starbarrack Road, Red Hook. Portfolio: Laurabattle.com. —Hannah Phillips


BRINGING COMMUNITY TOGETHER

with GOOD FOOD, GOOD TUNES & GOOD TIMES!

THE LEGENDARY

DESIGN-BUILD • 845.471.1047 • baxterbuilt.com

BEARSVILLE THEATER OCTOBER SHOWS 10/4 GRAHAM NASH 10/13-16 WOODSTOCK FILM FESTIVAL 10/17 THE RECORD COMPANY 10/21-23 WOODSTOCK INVITATIONAL LUTHIERS SHOWCASE 10/29 BRAND X 10/30 THE SECURITY PROJECT

JOIN US AT THE

Play giant Jenga, order a meal from our new menu or enjoy drinks with friends around our communal firepit!

TICKETS AVAILABLE THRU TICKETMASTER,

BEARSVILLETHEATER.COM OR 845.679.4406 291 TINKER ST, WOODSTOCK, NY

10/16 ChronograM 15


“A true original.” —Vogue

n e e w o n o r Ch

INGSTON om K P S B + 9 2 CT. s.c SATURDAY, O m − chronogramevent on.co

BSPKingst

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 28 16 ChronograM 10/16

esteemed reader Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: I feel a subtle, renewed vigor during this transition of seasons as the thick heat of summer makes way for crisper air. Autumn is my favorite season. It may be because I am approaching the moment of my solar return, preparing to be reborn after an arduous journey around the sun. The transition also portends an event in another cycle; what we, in this nation state, in a small part of the Northern Hemisphere of the planet we call Earth, in a solar system quite distant from the center of the Milky Way galaxy, call The Election. We call the nation state the United States, which conveniently abbreviates to US, which we call ourselves, that is, “us.” The strangeness of this, of course, extends to requiring all the other human beings breeding like a mass of bacterium on the surface of this ill-fated planet existing within the artificial and arbitrary borders of other nation states, and who might otherwise be referred to as “them,” to refer to us as US as well. This civic event called The Election is not accompanied by any cosmic or celestial activity as are many mostly religious holidays like, say, Christmas, which marks the moment after the solstice when the sun (or son) begins shedding more light resulting in longer days. No,The Election is an artificial, constructed occasion. Not only in its lack of connection to an objectively occurring cosmic cycle, but also in the many-times proven disparity between The Election’s actual function and its ostensible purpose: namely, the citizens of US selecting by popular vote a leader for the executive branch of their government. During this season we all—all of us—can’t help having The Election in mind, so thoroughly is it broadcast in all its pornographic banality like a Miley Cyrus halftime show or an execution-style police shooting in some inner city. Indeed, the action and results of the event seem to us and US to be significant. As it was in my mind as well while I walked along a side street in my hometown on one of the aforementioned bright, cool, sunny days (which day reminded me in fact of a particularly delicious apple farmers grow on this part of the planet, called Honey Crisp) that my attention was caught by the title of a worn paperback in the window of a used book shop. The title was How to Spot a Fraud. I’m a sucker for how-to books. I always want them, and often buy them, because I love the prospect of knowing the means of actualizing things. This is not to say I often read the how-to books I buy, and even less often do I put the instructions they contain into practice, but I feel a certain comfort in knowing I have on my shelf such titles as How to Disappear Completely and Never Be Found, The Complete Guide to Safecracking, and How to StartYour Own Country. So when I saw the book in the window, even as I was thinking about The Election on a delicious, cusp-of-autumn day, I had to have a look. The introduction, I found, was not incongruent with the title, and in fact went quickly to the heart of the matter. I feel impelled to reproduce some paragraphs from the introduction of this slender tome, because the message is a salient antidote to the malaise of collective quasi-psychosis in the season of The Election: The truth needs few words, and it always eventually comes to seek expression in action. In action, it reveals itself. Possession of the truth brings certainty. Certainty brings confidence, and confidence clears the way for action. Fraud, on the other hand, needs to be covered over. Words are a good cover, because they’re cheap, and because we all believe in words. We’re so used to judging a person by their words that we often neglect to consider what they’ve actually done. If we catch someone out, they can always excuse themselves with more words. And they will get away with it, until we arrive at that point where we no longer believe in words alone, where we can recognize the truth. A fraudster knows, even subliminally, what they are. Inside, they know that they’re deceiving. They feel a sort of nakedness, but they don’t feel shame. Their nakedness can be hidden with excuses for a long, long time, and so frauds become very good at finding the right excuse to conjure the illusion not only that they’re not in the wrong, but rather that they are the wronged party. To create the illusion of truth means to create an illusion of certainty, and that means to create confidence based on a lie. This confidence can only result in damaging and dangerous action. That is why truth is the basis of constructive action, and fraud is the basis of destruction and deterioration, whether in society, in families, in personal relationships, in our hearts, and in our spiritual lives. How to Spot a Fraud, Joseph Azize, Beech Hill Publishing, 2015 —Jason Stern


lauren thomas

Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note Letter to Adeline*

F

irst, congratulations. You made it—you are incarnated. That may not seem like a big deal to you, but scientists estimate that the odds of you being born are one in 400 trillion. (The eggheads got to this crazy calculation by factoring in the chances of survival of a continuous lineage of more than 100,000 generations of your ancestors, who had to survive natural disasters, poor nutrition, woolly mammoth attacks, innumerable wars, the bubonic plague, the Inquisition, and, in your mother’s case, growing up with three older brothers, which I can assure you was no picnic.) Not to get bogged down in numbers, but consider this:Your mom will produce about 100,000 eggs in her lifetime; your dad will make about 4 trillion sperm. (I know it’s gross to think about your parents in this way, but bear with me.) The chances of one of those eggs and one of those sperm getting together are basically zero, which makes you kind of a miracle. I know your parents think this without any mention of permutations and combinations, but I’m just providing a dash of scientific rigor, because the rest of the stuff I’m about to tell you is completely my own snappedoff perceptions of the universe. To wit: You’re lucky. So extremely lucky. There are 350,000 kids born each day and you had the good fortune to be born white and upper middle class in the country that is the dominant power on the planet.You’re going to live in a nice house, go to good schools, eat well, and be utterly spoiled by your parents and extended family.You’re a woman, so you won’t make as much money as your male peers and you’ll be subject to the underlying layer of sexual harassment that’s the misogynist background noise of our society, but still, you’ve got a pretty sweet set-up. So be aware of your privilege. Don’t get bogged down by it—I’m not suggesting you need walk the Earth in rags with a begging bowl to atone for the crimes committed by our ancestors—but understand what it means to be a relatively rich white person living on a planet populated by mostly poor nonwhite people whose abject circumstances you can never truly understand. The bright and shiny side of your privilege is that you have the opportunity to chase your wildest dreams. Do that.While you’re doing that, I suggest always choosing the more difficult path. The hard stuff, whether it’s calculus or marathon running, is the most rewarding, and builds something known as character. And don’t worry about outcomes so much—the juice is in the doing. This is sometimes boiled down to the aphorism “life is a journey, not a destination.” Which is true (as all clichés are true), but doesn’t quite capture why you should work so hard: It will help you explain you to yourself and help establish a self you are comfortable with, for we are what we do. In an essay on Kafka (more on him when you’re a bit older), David Foster Wallace suggests that the central joke in Kafka’s work is that “the horrific struggle to establish a human self results in a self whose humanity is inseparable from that horrific struggle. That our endless and impossible journey toward home is in fact our home.” Life is hard anyway you slice it. So do the hard stuff, and do it well, and enjoy the struggle, because you can’t avoid it. Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional. Related to the above: participation trophies are bullshit. Participation means you showed up. If you win, great! If you lose, that’s fine as well. In the 30 years I played competitive athletics, I ended up with only a handful of trophies. But the few that I have remind me of how rare and special victory is and how hard it is to achieve. Don’t accept meaningless trinkets designed to puff up your ego.

Read books. All kinds of books. Read self-help books and read the novels of Marcel Proust and Margaret Atwood and Salman Rushdie and Toni Morrison. Read blogs and cereal boxes and bits of old newspaper pulled from inside walls. Don’t ever hurt animals. I kicked my dog once when I was 10—the dog did nothing to deserve it; not that there was anything the dog could have done to deserve it—and that casual cruelty haunts me to this day. Besides, people who hurt animals when they’re kids grow up to be serial killers. Make things with your hands, whether it’s a construction paper Mobius strip or plasma-welded sculpture.Your aunt Lee Anne promises to cherish every art project you give her. Taste everything three times before you decide you don’t like it. And don’t be one of those kids who doesn’t eat vegetables. Vegetables are delicious. And to that point: You should probably be a vegetarian. (I refer you back to my admonition against injuring animals.) We don’t need to eat animals to survive, and the conditions most animals live and die in before they become our food are abysmal. I’m a carnivore, that’s true, but that’s just an old habit I can’t seem to break. If you don’t start, you don’t have to stop. Listen to the music of the universe. The most important song ever written was John Cage’s 4’33”, which is not really a song at all. (But it is one of the only songs I know by heart, and I can play it on any instrument. ) Live fearlessly, but also learn how to fend off possible attackers with household items. And despite whatever your parents might tell you, masturbating is okay. To take the late Whitney Houston completely out of context: Learning to love yourself is the greatest love of all. View everyone you meet as a potential ally. If you approach people in that spirit, by the time you’re my age you’ll have amassed an army of collaborators. And to be clear: The idea that we live in a meritocracy where advancement is based on ability is a great lie told by the capitalist plutocrats who rule the world. You need to work hard, yes, but you also need to know people. A lot of people. Don’t tell your parents I told you this, but try a drug or two, when you’re a bit older. (Some of them might be legal in New York by then.) They won’t hurt you in calibrated doses, and they’ll hopefully shift your perspective. But remember to get high on life, too. Fall in love as often you can stomach it, love wholeheartedly, and love whomever you want. And there’s no way for you to wrap your mind around this at your age, but trust me: Life is short. I know it seems long, but before you know it you’ll be walking away from my funeral pyre thinking, “Jeez, seems like just yesterday Uncle Brian taught me how to make a gin gimlet just the way he likes it.” So don’t waste your time doing things you don’t want to do, or with people you don’t want to be with. It’s just not worth it. So, back to those long odds of you being born. The fact of your mere existence is proof that the Age of Miracles has not passed. You’re clearly here for a reason. I look forward to watching you figure out what that is. Let me know if you need any help. *My niece, Adeline, came screaming into the world on September 23, 2016. 10/16 ChronograM 17


Nesnad/wikimedia.org

You’re not always eating what you think you are. Ocean conservation advocacy group Oceana recently reported that one-fifth of over 25,000 seafood samples worldwide were wrongly labeled. In analyzing 200 studies from 55 countries, they found that seafood fraud is a widespread business. “People purchasing seafood to eat are the ones most impacted by this type of activity from a health and sustainability standpoint,” Oceana report author and senior scientist Kimberly Warner said. Asian catfish is generally the substitute, marketed as 18 different fish types, including tuna, perch, and red snapper. Some countries like Italy and Brussels have had large-scale fish-related fraud. In Italy, 82 percent of the 200 tested samples were mislabeled. Half of the substitutes were from an at-risk fish species. In studying New York City sushi, Oceana found that 100 percent of the sushi restaurants they tested served customers mislabeled fish. Source: Time A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences may have found a connection between air pollution and Alzheimer’s disease. The study examined 37 people in Manchester, England and Mexico aged three to 92. It saw a link between particles of magnetite, a magnetic iron oxide, and dementia. The study mirrors findings from an earlier study on ozone involvement in Alzheimer’s published in 2015, and previous research on traffic’s effects on older men and women’s brain functions. Though our brains naturally form magnetite, the magnetite deposits from the NAS study were markedly larger and more spherical than the norm. Minerals like magnetite, platinum, cobalt, and nickel are naturally occurring. But inhaling fuel emissions from car exhausts and industrial power plants cause these elements to rapidly grow inside the brain. Inhaling these elements over long periods attack the central nervous system, then the brain. Pollutants have already been linked to other brain development impairments, lung disease, stroke risk, and heart disease. People should not be exceedingly worried about the pollution’s connection to Alzheimer’s, as doctors cite exercise, healthy diet, and no smoking as combatants against dementia. Source: Guardian (UK) All wages are not created equally. There is a worldwide discrepancy between mens’ and womens’ wages. According to the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development, the pay gap is at approximately 18 percent overall in the UK, US, and Australia. A new study revealed that women ask for pay raises just as frequently as their male counterparts. Three university business professors from the Cass Business School in London, the University of Warwick in the UK, and the University of Wisconsin found that women were 25 percent less likely than men to receive that pay raise when asking. Though the study focused on 4,600 workers in Australia only, it is a good way to envision the worldwide pay gap problem, according to its authors. “We were expecting to find evidence for this old theory that women are less pushy than men,” said co-author Andrew Oswald, a professor of economics 18 ChronograM 10/16

and behavioral science at Warwick University in the UK. “But the women and the men were equal.” The study also revealed that younger women had greater success in gaining raises, a potential power shift for the future of pay negotiations. Source: Fortune A recent academic study has found a connection between CEOs and employees that goes beyond the workplace. After analyzing over 2,000 companies’ voting data, three business professors found that employees tend to financially support presidential candidates that their bosses do. Ilona Babenko, professor at Arizona State University, Viktar Fedaseyeu of Bocconi University in Italy, and Song Zhang from the University of Lugano and the Swiss Finance Institute conducted the report. “Our evidence indicates that CEOs are a political force, with potentially important implications for firms they manage and for the nature of democracy,” the report states. Some CEOs actively sought donations from employees, and other alignments were more subconscious. Employees felt that noncompliance with the higher-ups would threaten their jobs or overall industries. The report analyzes eight election cycles from 1999 to 2014. This election season has changed some aspects of employees following their leaders. Intel’s chief executive Brian Krzanich recently cancelled an event for Donald Trump, saying that the event became a fund-raiser without his knowledge. Some executives have become quieter in their donation campaigns, fearing reactions against their businesses based on political endorsements. Source: New York Times A recent book, Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer, by Peter Marra and Chris Santella explores cats’ less than adorable effects on the environment, animal populations, and their humans. An estimated 60 million to 100 million stray cats are to blame. These feral felines breed extensively, then decimate local populations of birds and small animals like mice, lizards, and rabbits. Outdoor cats can also spread toxoplasmosis, a disease caused by the gondii parasite, to their owners via litter boxes. The parasite is transmitted through feces. American cats produce 1.2 million metric tons of feces, which can spread through contaminated water supplies and undercooked meat from previously infected livestock. Toxoplasmosis has been linked to smallscale flulike sickness, and more recently, mental disorders like depression and bipolar disorder. The book does not aim to dissuade people from loving their pets, focusing on informing them about their cats’ outdoor activities affecting their indoor lives. Source: New York Post The death penalty may reach its end soon, as execution rates in the United States hit a 25-year low. There have only been two executions since May 1, and many states have been reducing the number of individuals that have been sentenced to death. The Associated Press estimates that there will be 19 executions by the end of this year in the United Sates, the nation’s lowest amount since 1991. Only Texas, Georgia, and Missouri have been regularly enforcing the death penalty, yet Texas has stopped four executions in the past month. There were only two new death sentences last year in Texas. Many states, like Ohio and Oklahoma, have been struggling with finding suppliers for the proper execution drugs. Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer have concluded that the death penalty may be unconstitutional. “I think the death penalty is fading away,” Ginsburg said recently. California has the highest number of inmates on death row, a figure standing at 746 inmates in early August. But California hasn’t executed anyone in 10 years. Many of those on death row nationwide committed their crimes 30 years ago, according to death penalty lawyer and Southern Center for Human Rights President Stephen Bright. Source: the Associated Press People aren’t reading the same things at the same pace that they used to in the United States. According to the National Endowment for the Arts, the number of American adults reading literature including plays, poetry, novels, and short stories, has fallen to a three-decade low. In 2015, 43 percent of adults read at least one work of literature for pleasure. Reading has been shown to impact a person’s ability to feel empathy. In experiencing a text, the reader is granted access to a different place and point of view than their own. The NEA study focuses on reading outside of schoolwork, and does not account for things like tweets, Facebook statuses, or Tumblr posts. These mediums did not exist when the NEA surveys began tracking readership in 1982. This year’s data shows a drop in readership across the board. It seems that if a person wants to experience the Middle Ages and fantastical adventure, they will watch “Game of Thrones” instead of reading it. Source: Washington Post Compiled by Hannah Phillips


Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

THE RICH, ENTREPRENEURS, & POLITICAL PROMISES

T

he rich can’t be trusted with money. This is true. I mean it’s not theory. It’s not attitude. It’s not a bumper sticker. It’s the facts, the events, speaking out. Look at the chart of the share of income going to the top 1 percent or the top 0.1 percent over the last 100 years. Note the spikes: those moments when the rich quickly grab whole new slices of the national pie. Coming out of World War I, the top marginal tax rate was 70 percent. In the 1920s it was cut down to 24 percent. There was a boom. The share going to the rich shot up. It turned into a bubble. Even a double-bubble bubble. It ended with the Crash of 1929. Massive bank failures. The Great Depression. The next spike occurred in 1936. Under Roosevelt, with taxes up and spending up even more, a recovery was going full steam ahead. But the sort of people who weep and whine about deficits now did so then. It seemed to make sense. The upward momentum seemed set to continue. Roosevelt cut spending. It wasn’t so much that more went to the top, it was less going to the rest. The recovery came to a dead stop, then headed down. After that, the share of the economy going to the richest among us went into a long, slow downward glide—until Reagan in the 1980s. It was “Morning in America” again! Until it ended on Black Monday, October 19, 1987. It was a worldwide crash. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 22.6 percent, the largest one-day decline in history. By then, the Savings & Loan Crisis was underway. Sixteen hundred banks failed. The bailout cost $160 billion. Back then, it seemed like a lot. Then came a recession. The next big spike came in Clinton’s second term. A Republican Congress pushed him to cut the capital gains tax from 28 percent to 20 percent. All right-wing think tanks herald this as the true cause of Clinton’s economic success. But recovery and growth were already after George H. W. Bush’s tax hike and were continuing with Clinton’s tax hike. What the capital gains tax cut actually did was mark the moment when the dot-com boom turned into the dot-com bubble, which turned into the Crash of 2000, followed by the recession in George W. Bush’s first term. Bush responded by cutting taxes on the rich.Twice. Economists will tell you there was a recovery. But there was an inexplicable mystery: it was a “jobless recovery,” something never seen before. Mysterious. Inexplicable. Actually, there were two economies. One for the rich. Booming. One for the rest. In persistent recession. It all came to a climax with the Crash of 2008. With stupendous bank failures. A $900 billion public bailout. And a secret $27 trillion one to keep the financial industry alive and thriving. It was followed by the Great Recession. Everyone has wondered why the recovery from the Great Recession has been so anemic. The answer is very simple. The Great Depression reversed direction when taxes were raised on the rich. The Reagan-Bush recession reversed direction when George H. W. Bush raised taxes on the rich, and continued when Clinton raised them again. After the Crash of 2000, George W. Bush cut taxes. The result was a new boomto-bubble for the rich, big enough that the gross numbers masked the fact that the recession continued for the rest of the economy. History, the facts, suggests that the thing to have done was to raise taxes after the Crash of 2008. That may sound counterintuitive. Illogical. Worse, heresy. But that’s the way it’s worked in the past. But the Bush tax cuts had been written so that they

could not be immediately reversed. Plus Obama’s economists were mathematical model people, not reality based. And Ben Bernanke, head of the Federal Reserve, was a monetarist, who believed that if you gave bankers unlimited money they would use it wisely for the good of all, instead of just to make money for themselves. So, yes, they cushioned the fall. Obama managed to get in some spending. Which helped. But it was not until he was finally able to end the Bush tax cuts that the upward trend really began. Yet, here we are again, hearing the cry, “Tax cuts! Tax cuts! Tax cuts will set the economy roaring! Tax cuts will bring jobs.Yadda-yadda-yadda! Cut taxes for corporations, on the rich, on capital gains, on unearned income, on the inheritance of the children of multi gazillionaires! That will unleash the entrepreneurial spirits of the great American entrepreneurs!” In the 1950s, when the top marginal tax rate was 90 percent, the American economy was booming! We built cars. Air travel became common. Telephones became universal. Cities rose higher. Suburbs spread out. From the mid `60s through the end of the `70s—with a top marginal tax rate around 70 percent—the economy continued to grow, in spite of the Vietnam War, in spite of the Oil Crisis, in spite of inflation. Some of the inventions from that era: microprocessors, liquid crystal displays, word processors, pocket calculators, digital cameras, e-mail, laser printers, personal computers, portable computers, compact discs, the Ethernet, MRIs, cell phones, the artificial heart, supercomputers, and roller blades. Let us not underestimate inventors, innovators, and entrepreneurs. Ronald Reagan famously said that after he made a movie that took him up into the high tax brackets, he had a disincentive to make another movie and would turn them down. Does anyone, even devout conservatives, think the world is worse off because we missed a sequel to Bedtime for Bonzo? In reality, most people in the arts do it for the art. And for the glamour (depending on the art). And they’re happy for the money if there is some. But art does not disappear with high tax rates. Most people in the sciences aren’t there for the big bucks.They’re there for something else. The people who started Apple and Microsoft did so when taxes were much higher—with far fewer loopholes—than they are today. Will an entrepreneur refuse to take a dollar if he has to give half of it away? Seventy cents away? Even 90 cents away? There are plenty of entrepreneurs who bet their life savings on ideas that never pay off. There are entrepreneurs who go into war zones—like Mother Courage—to sell a few trinkets. Don’t underestimate entrepreneurs.They are brave. Hardy. High taxes won’t stop them. They don’t need low taxes to get them off their asses. One more thing. The growth rates since the big tax cuts of the Reagan years, which still set the standard for where we are now, have never been as high as when we had the high rates under Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, and Ford. If you are looking for a correlation between tax rates and growth, between tax rates and high employment, between tax rates and high salaries and wages—it’s counterintuitive, it’s not what you’ve been told, it’s not logical, it’s just factual— higher rates correlate with better conditions. The lower rates correlate with instability, crashes, recessions, and lower incomes for normal people. Go figure. Go vote. 10/16 ChronograM 19


Bryan Firestone

Fun-Only Zone

Art of Business

Mari Kirwood Bird has been applying her unique gift for combining fine workmanship, color and design sensibilities into custom interiors for a couple of decades; in the past eighteen months, she’s been decorating fun-loving humans. At her boutique Willow Wood, she’ll help you nail the perfect look for leisure. “I’ve always been known for my love of the old classics of Palm Beach attire: Jack Roger sandals, Indian tunics, the whole well-traveled preppy thing,” she says. “Willow Wood is everything for fun and travel, no work clothes included—just everything you need for a country weekend, a Caribbean beach vacation, the ski slopes and apres-ski.” Kirwood Bird scopes out the latest resort looks on wintertime retreats to Lake Placid for skiing and Delray Beach and the Keys for sunshine. “Maybe that’s where I get my love of resortwear,” she says. “I felt this was something Rhinebeck would enjoy and have as much fun exploring as I did.”

Facebook.com/Willowwoodlifestyle

Stop by, pause, refresh

The Emerson Resort and Spa is more than just a luxury compound introducing travelers to the beauties of the Catskills, with a New American restaurant (Woodnotes Grill), splendid boutiques and the world’s largest kaleidoscope. Marketing director Tamara Murray wants locals to know they’re welcome too. “As we go about our business we see people curled up on the patio with a book or bringing a laptop to the library and some are from the community—we love that! Come for dinner, come for a walk; we’d love to see you!” Or come for a spa experience you won’t find anywhere else: a new menu rolled out September 1 features vegan nail care, signature hot and cold stone treatments, and the “Emerson Integrative Massage” package, a twohour custom-designed in consultation with a therapist and drawing on the spa’s wide selection of treatment modalities “for the spa connoisseur.”

Emersonresort.com

Everything Else But

394 Main in Catskill is as much fun for espresso and eggs Benedict as for lunch, dinner, or apres-theater bar bites—but don’t go in there looking for white bread. “We do a lot with organic stone ground local flour, a lot of croissants and scones, and I think we may be the only place around with sfogliatelle,” says Gil Bagnell. “But occasionally someone asks for white bread and we have to say, ‘Sorry, no.’

Facebook.com/394Main 20 art of business ChronograM 10/16


Q&A

with Jennifer Grimes of Red Cottage

Rent-a-Dream

Before there was AirBnB, before the region started racking up “coolest town” awards, Jennifer Grimes was brokering brief stays in magazineworthy Catskills properties to eager visitors; 11 years later, Architectural Digest drools over her portfolio (“5 Reasons Why We Want To Try Red Cottage,” April 2016.) We asked her for the story. In 2005, you were a self-admitted real estate novice who barely knew a hamlet from a town; two years later, you were founding Red Cottage. What inspired you? Red Cottage is more lodging than real estate, but frankly I knew nothing about either when I took a stab at renting my weekend pad (a little red cottage!) on Craigslist in 2007. I had some luck, guests were having a ball, so my neighbors started asking me to rent their houses too. When I was canned from Wall Street, I was available to turn this into a proper business. As the financial markets tanked, more people started traveling locally, while homeowners started panicking about carrying two mortgages and were asking us to set up their wonderful Upstate homes as rentals. So the recession is really responsible for Red Cottage’s success. How do you locate the properties? We’ve never solicited homeowners, they’ve all approached us, often through word of mouth from other homeowners, which is wonderfully validating. We on-board about 10 percent of the properties and you can always tell when photos of a winner land in the inbox, because we all gather round the computer and ooh and aah over them. That’s what you want in a vacation, right? Something out of your routine that makes your heart race a little. Perhaps that’s something sleek with modern furnishings, or a rural farmhouse with a bright kitchen and big dining table. The portfolio originated in Claryville and fanned out through Sullivan and Ulster Counties. Now we have some dreamy listings over the river in Hudson, a town I’ll use any excuse to visit. The other part of our secret sauce is that I have a real estate brokerage, Country House Realty, and we can advise buyers which houses are particularly rentable. Redcottageinc.com

Rafael Quirindongo

Savoring memories, making new ones

Over the past decade, the Falcon in Marlboro has forged a reputation for drawing top-tier talent thanks to excellent acoustics, Tony Falco’s warm hospitality, and the love shown by audiences at the donation box (there’s never a cover charge.) Now, the club has thrown open its Falcon Underground Taproom/Beer Garden, a second performance space integrating the scenic glory of the Marlboro Falls Along with local eats and libations, visitors can feast on musical history: the Avalon Archives

Museum of Roots and Rock’n’Roll, which had been in need of a new home. “It has more of a nightclub feel,” owner Tony Falco says of the new space. “And the museum is amazing: we have a Dylan guitar, a Jorma guitar, an amp from The Last Waltz, a bass that was played at Woodstock. So much music history has happened around the Hudson Valley. So many icons.” Stop by for a craft beverage and a Wednesday night singer/songwriter session.

Liveatthefalcon.com

10/16 ChronograM art of business 21


College now. Why wait?

Learn how starting college early helps students innovate, accelerate and excel. Attend a Discovery Day open house this fall to experience Bard College at Simon’s Rock first hand. You’ll see the campus, meet students, faculty and staff, and get a feel for life at Simon’s Rock including classes, dorm life, and social activities. And you’ll find out why The Princeton Review’s Best 380 Colleges rates academics at Simon’s Rock higher than Harvard and Princeton.

YOU’RE INVITED: DISCOVERY DAYS, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22 & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12

simons-rock.edu 800.235.7186 admit@simons-rock.edu

High School. Reimagined.

The nation’s first two-year high school for boarding and day students. Imagine a high school with classmates as intellectually curious as you are, teachers who are also college professors, and an academic program that prepares you to enter college two years early. Located on the campus of Bard College at Simon’s Rock.

OPEN HOUSE: FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11 simons-rock.edu/academyinfo 800.235.7186 bardacademy@simons-rock.edu 22 education ChronograM 10/16


Education Students in the play yard at Primrose Hill School in Rhinebeck.

Making Meaning

Different Approaches to the Three Rs

C

hristine Good faces the children, prompting them to retell a story she told them yesterday about a boy and some curved lines. It leads to a hunt for all the curved lines they can find in the room: of their ears, of rose petals, and of chalkboard erasers. Then Good distributes a sheet of paper to each. They unroll fabric pouches that hold a pocket for each crayon, and draw curved lines free-form, and then again in a traditional C-shape across the bottom margin from left to right. “The essence of it is that from the picture, a letter emerges,” Good explains. It’s an early literacy lesson that’s quite different from what we might be used to. In recalling the story, the children are learning sequencing and how to build pictures in their minds (the basics of reading comprehension). In form drawing, students work with the shape of letters in a tactile way (the precursor to writing). All without an alphabet poster anywhere in the room. It brings images from the oral story onto the page through a holistic learning experience that builds over time, until students realize the connection between letter symbols and their sounds and shapes. “It’s the most exciting moment in first grade,” says Good. “You don’t even have to teach it; they come to it.” This is reading readiness at Primrose Hill School in Rhinebeck, where first graders are often not yet reading. Inspired by the Waldorf philosophy, preliteracy at Primrose Hill is developed by saturating children in language over the course of several grades through free play, puppet shows, storytelling, song, and learned verses. To introduce letters, Waldorf-trained teachers tell a story for each, incorporating eurythmy, a movement style that associates a gesture with the letter’s sound. Jordan Walker, enrollment coordinator at Primrose

Text and photos by Hillary Harvey Hill explains, “Guided by the observation that young children naturally imitate the world around them, the teachers carefully prepare the educational environment—that’s the way the teaching happens.” Reading and math are two of the first forms of abstract thinking that kids are asked to master, and a cultural anxiety around that has influenced how they’re taught. Benchmarks and timelines for learning these skills are expressed in Common Core standards, with an emphasis on decoding and computation emerging in kindergarten curricula. It’s causing critics to call kindergarten the new first grade. But some educators feel that, just like learning to walk or talk, learning to read, write, and problem solve are activities that kids are naturally compelled to do. So certain educational strategies embrace each child’s pace, and approach the three Rs through individualized scaffolding of a child’s natural curiosity. According to a report out of Sarah Lawrence College, “Reading Instruction in Kindergarten: Little to Gain and Much to Lose,” which draws upon a number of long-term studies, “Young children take years to build the foundation they need to be able to make sense of print. An important aspect of this process is being able to understand these abstract symbols. Children learn that real things can be represented by symbols when they play and use hands-on materials.” “I know there’s a fear around this because there is this societal pressure that earlier is better,” says Good. “But often the children, from my experience, who are not pushed to read too soon are better readers, and they often love it.” At the heart of the Waldorf strategy is a trust that, given time and rich, meaningful experiences in learning, children will unfold. “We’re not focusing on early 10/16 ChronograM education 23


Every Voice is Heard

With a typical class size of 10, our students and teachers build relationships that enrich learning and change lives. Small School… Big Opportunities… Endless Possibilities.

260 Jay Street • Katonah, NY 10536 • 914.232.3161 admissions@harveyschool.org • www.harveyschool.org A coeducational college preparatory school enrolling students in grades 6–12 for day and in grades 9–12 for five-day boarding.

COME VISIT US! SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22 AT 9 A.M.

The Kildonan School Empowering Students With Dyslexia Since 1969

Make the Change...

New for Fall

Small Metals with

Dan Neville Innovative & Contemporary Workshops on Blacksmithing and Small Metals 44 Jayne St. Florida NY 10921 • Register at CenterForMetalArts.com

Love School Again! • Daily 1:1 Orton-Gillingham tutorial • Co-ed, boarding/day school • Grades 2-12, PG

Camp Dunnabeck at Kildonan

(845) 373-2012 www.Kildonan.org

DISCOVER. ENGAGE. ENJOY.

81 Huguenot Street, New Paltz NY • (845) 255-1889 • huguenotstreet.org 24 education ChronograM 10/16


OPT IN Earn your  Master’s  Degree  and   New  York  State  Teacher  Certification   in One-Year* APPLICATION DEADLINES

January30th 29thand and April April 29th January 28th APPLY ONLINE

www.bard.edu/mat/ny *Two-year/ Part-time options available

Are you having to Opt Out of part of your child’s education? Why not Opt In to an education that fosters your child’s innate curiosity and passion for learning? Our tuition adjustment program is based on the ideal that an education that balances academics, art, and activities in nature should be accessible to all who value it. Interested? Schedule your tour today.

Contact us: mat@bard.edu 845-758-7145 www.bard.edu/mat/ny

www.primrosehillschool.com (845) 876-1226

Bard College

Open House

ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON, NY

October 8th, 11am-1pm www.randolphschool.org

THE

RANDOLPH SCHOOL

Nurturing a Sense of Wonder Each Child. Every Day.

Pre-K to 5th Grade

845.297.5600

Wappingers Falls

Now Enrolling PreK through 5th Grade Rolling Admissions

10/16 ChronograM education 25


intellectualization,” says Wendy Weinrich, a Waldorf-certified teacher for the past 20 years, whose early childhood school, Mountaintop, now in Saugerties, is just beginning its 10th school year. “When a child is ready, the concepts are easier to grasp.” When students hear the same story each day, they’re forming reading comprehension through building imagination. Teachers will notice them acting out the story’s themes in their play later, internalizing the lesson. “We take the children exactly where they are on their developmental journey and guide them,” says Christianna Riley, Primrose Hill’s kindergarten teacher. At its core, the Waldorf preliteracy approach holds space for children to develop curiosity around reading through experiential learning. At Primrose Hill, kids are not being taught to read; they’re being taught to discover reading.

Never in any other experience that I’ve had has there been such emphasis on becoming confident in who you are and who you are in this world.

FIONA KENYON, CLASS OF 2016 senior portrait by Fiona Kenyon

OPEN HOUSE

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9 during our

ANNUAL FALL FESTIVAL

Waldorf School | www.hawthornevalleyschool.org 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 12075 | 518.672.7092 x 111

Next Step College Counseling helps

GOT

?

Next Step College Counseling students discover and gain admission tohelps best-fit, affordable colleges students discover and while gain admission minimizing year stress. to best-fit,senior affordable colleges, while • Complimentary first consultation saving their parents money in the • 10% discount with this ad process.* • Flexible payment plan n Expert advice from a former Contact Next Step today! college admission director n Complimentary first consultation n 10% discount with this ad

step next college counseling

*Find out how today!

Sandra M. Moore, M.A.

Sandra M. Moore, M.A. Member HECA, IECA, IECA, NACAC NACAC 15 Main Street, Hyde Park, NY 845.242.8336 845.242.8336

smoore@nextstepcollegecounseling.com • www.nextstepcollegecounseling.com

Don’t Just Dream. Achieve.

smoore@nextstepcollegecounseling.com www.nextstepcollegecounseling.com

BE WHERE WE ARE. Distribution 750 distribution locations. Event flyers, brochures, catalogs, and more. We’ll help you get them out there. Delivering your print materials to the Hudson Valley, Berkshires, and beyond. 845.334.8600 | distribution@chronogram.com

26 education ChronograM 10/16

Reconstructing Math “We don’t take babies and make them learn verb conjugation charts, but they learn to speak. Yet we take eight-year-olds and make them memorize multiplication tables,” muses Holly Graff, a contributor to Playing with Math: Stories from Math Circles, Homeschoolers, and Passionate Teachers. She’s a certified teacher who tutors homeschoolers along with her own two children in Montclair, New Jersey. For Graff, math is a language, and math lessons are about fluency. She feels that a focus on calculation, arithmetic, and operations done with worksheets decontextualizes math from its purpose: to describe the natural world. Graff encourages a visual and physical exploration of mathematics through hands-on activities and games because her students discover the math concepts that way. For example, as a younger child, Graff’s daughter, Lucia, now 15 and in her 10th year of homeschooling, discovered while working with small, colorful tiles that a square number results in the formation of an actual square. It suited Lucia’s visual learning style better than a worksheet ever could. “With pencil and paper, some parts of your brain are taking a break,” Graff says with a smile. “Rather than presenting math as a set of steps to follow, like a recipe, I think of it as a vocabulary that you can manipulate to say whatever you need.” The thinking is similar to something Graff has formally offered before: a math circle. Locally, there’s the Bard Math Circle (BMC), which runs both on the Bard College campus in Annandale-on-Hudson and at local libraries. “It’s a noncompetitive math enrichment environment, and we bring in a lot of puzzles and games that are based on mathematics and logic,” says Japheth Wood, a visiting associate professor of mathematics at Bard who, along with Associate Professor Lauren Rose, runs the BMC. After each circle, there’s always a math artifact for kids to bring home. This summer at CAMP (Creative and Analytical Math Program) the focus was on fractals, so they folded paper into a Sierpinski triangle, an equilateral triangle with a self-referential pattern that was named for the Polish mathematicianWaclaw Sierpinski. Around Valentine’s Day, they make mathematical hearts. BMC is geared for the middle-school set, but the experiential learning happening in math circles is often well-suited to early childhood as well. BMC’s circle offers community and collaboration, and counterbalances some of the negative peer pressure that drives some kids, especially girls, away from mathematics. The idea is to explore math’s creative side, so students can take that inspiration back to the classroom with them. “If they nurture a joy of learning, which is one of our big goals,” says Wood, “then they’ll thrive in any sort of educational environment.” The first question presented at BMC is usually a hook to introduce a concept or technique in as accessible a way as possible. The following problems develop the idea, often growing in challenge. There’s usually more than one solution, depending upon the approach, and the theme being explored is a hint. The active learning happening at BMC, through discussion and problem solving, engages students in analyzing and synthesizing content.They’re developing a mathematician’s perspective, one of logic and experimentation. Volunteer undergraduates from Bard’s math department demonstrate solutions to BMC problems, opening up advanced concepts for participants. “A couple years ago, one of the Bard students solved almost every problem using different mathematical tables. I couldn’t believe how powerful it was—tables are not something I regularly relied on,” says Sheila Shaffer, a math specialist at Bailey Middle School in Kingston who has been attending the Teachers’ BMC since it started at the Kingston Library. Shaffer services students who


SOUTH KENT S C H O O L

Excellence for BOYS

OPEN HOUSE Columbus Day • Monday, October 10

www.southkentschool.org

Follow us:

f

40 Bulls Bridge Road • South Kent, CT 06785 • (860) 927-3539 • admissions@southkentschool.org • Grades 9-12 & PG

Woodstock day school nursery through grade 12

free

publicprograms Our Other Blue Planet: Earth’s Diverse Fresh Waters Friday, October 21 at 7 p.m.

Cary Institute freshwater ecologist Dave Strayer will provide insight into life in the world’s inland waters. Lake, rivers, streams, ponds, and wetlands cover less than 1% of Earth’s surface, yet they support a diversity of plants and animals. Seating is first come first served.

The Ecology of Lyme Disease Outdoor Program

Sunday, October 30 at 10 a.m. Cary Institute disease ecologist Rick Ostfeld will lead an outdoor program exploring the ecology of Lyme disease. Small mammal live-trapping, tree seed collection, and tick drag-sampling will be demonstrated. Register at www.caryinstitute.org/events. Participation is limited.

Learn more at www.caryinstitute.org

woodstockdayschool.org • 845-246-3744 ext. 103

2801 Sharon Turnpike (Rte. 44)|Millbrook, NY 12545|845 677-5343

1430 Glasco Turnpike , 1/4 mile East of Rte. 212 • Saugerties, NY 12477 10/16 ChronograM education 27


s t n e s e pr

n e n e e e w o w n o o n r o h r C Ch E R A M T H NoI nGwall street 3

N O T S G N I K P S B + 9 2 . T C O , Y A D t e e r t SATUR s l l a 323 w s

kingston

ne o J y k n a Sw + z e b y V man

DJs Sha

g a r D n ensto

y t r a P Dance

Que

h P + t ntes

o C e m ostu

C

th o o B oto

+ d o o PAKT F

m o c . s t n e v nograme

o r h c − m o ngston.c

BSPKi

28 education ChronograM 10/16

! e r o m

#chronoween


Paralegal Certificate Program Weekends at the Marist Poughkeepsie Campus Build a career in 24 weekends

For the past 27 years, the program has had ABA approval. It’s the only ABA approved certificate program in the Mid-Hudson Valley. Students are taught by practicing attorneys from the surrounding communities and learn the skills to attain successful Paralegal careers in law offices, corporate settings and public agencies. Contact Donna at donna.tompkins@marist.edu or 845-897-9648 for more info *Paralegals cannot give legal advice and are not permitted to practice law.

www.marist.edu/adult

Discover Livingston Street Socially Responsible Care and Education for the Young Child

www.LivingstonStreet.org | 845-340-9900

Top: Christine Good in the first grade classroom at Primrose Hill School. Bottom: Lead nursery teacher Pema Cliett with students during Primrose Hill School's Polish & Shine family event.

Livingston_Chronogram_4.2x2.8_1015.indd 1

struggle with math and teaches intervention classes. “My own math tool kit has expanded greatly by participating.” She feels that the math happening at math circles helps students and teachers have fun with it, and supports the Common Core standards being taught in classrooms. “Common Core requires understanding of why the procedures or algorithms work, which, in the long run, makes all math easier to understand.” For Graff, the “why” or meaning of math can be found in cultural context. She likes to connect students with the idea that math is a construct of generations of people who, through trial and error, described, recorded, measured, and built concepts important to the world. It’s how she encourages in her students mathematical thinking. Eventually, her younger daughter, Havilah, now three, and homeschooling friends might use knotted ropes to measure right angles like the Egyptians; discover through flower observations the Fibonacci sequence, where every number is the sum of the two preceding numbers; and measure object heights indirectly by measuring the length of their shadows. Right now, Graff simply looks for opportunities to immerse the day in math so Havilah can develop comfort and fluency. “It arises so naturally and organically,” she says. How many cookies does Havilah want? Can mama have one? Now how many does Havilah have? “Math is all about patterns: finding, creating, searching for patterns,” Graff says. “Counting is one of the earliest patterns we become aware of. But there are so many different kinds of patterns. Number theory is only one tiny slice of math.” Allowing Havilah to stumble upon her own epiphanies will help her to own the concepts. As with experiential-based reading readiness, developing mathematical thinking encourages children to feel that their learning is meaningful, so they can master new skills, like reading and math, by absorbing them on a deeper level.

9/18/15 9:40 AM

Your Week. Curated.

Broadway Photo booth at ChronoWeen

8DW EIGHT DAY WEEK

EVENTS TO YOUR INBOX EACH THURSDAY

sign up now  www.chronogram.com/8dw

10/16 ChronograM education 29


Community Pages

The monthly Kingston Night Marketin the Rondout.

comeback kid 
KINGSTON By peter aaron photos by franco vogt

I

n the early 2000s, there was much talk of Kingston, New York, becoming—please forgive this usage of perhaps the most loathsome marketing phrase of our generation—“the new Brooklyn,” with the city’s Uptown neighborhood serving as its nexus. And, back then, after years of decrepitude brought on by the manufacturing exodus that swept America in the 1980s and the departure of the local IBM plant in 1995, it appeared that a renewal was taking place. Here and there on Front and Wall Streets in Uptown’s Stockade district, lights were going on in the once-vacant shops. The missing teeth of Kingston’s cracked smile were being filled in with the odd, life-giving boutique, cafe, or gallery. But it didn’t take long for landlords to jump the gun. Getting greedy when they sensed gold in them thar ol’ buildin’s, they upped their rents to not-yet-sustainable levels, forcing out promising businesses and residential tenants. And then, of course, the Great Recession hit, smothering most of the remaining embers. Kingston’s rebirth looked about as dead as a daisy in December. Nearly a decade later, however, and the Kingston renaissance is here. This time for real, it seems. October’s returning 0+ Festival and other nationally publicized events and newly added attractions have helped to bring attention to the town, and a wave of arts- and small business-encouraging economic incentive programs, far-sighted investors, and a recent rush of activity by forwardthinking entrepreneurs are increasingly coming together to rekindle Kingston’s dormant flame. 30 COMMUNITY PAGES ChronograM 10/16

Still Standing Founded in 1651 by Dutch settlers, who called the outpost Esopus after one of the local Native American tribes, Kingston later became New York’s first state capital.The burgeoning village was chosen as the site of the new state’s government in 1777, when Albany, the intended center of leadership, was threatened by attack from British forces. Unfortunately, in October of that year the British invaded Kingston, burning much of it to the ground; today, however, many of the stone structures that escaped King George’s torch, such as the 1676 Senate House, the original functioning capitol building, do still stand. (The city commemorates the attack every other year with a reenactment of the 1777 burning; the next such event is slated for October 2017.) In addition to playing an active role in the Revolutionary War and serving as a major commercial port into the 19th century, Kingston provided a majority of the bricks, bluestone, and cement used in the construction of New York City. Unlike its comparable Hudson Valley companions, Beacon and Hudson, the pulse of the Ulster County seat does not course along a single main street. Instead, Kingston’s cultural and business life is divided among its three distinct districts—Uptown, Midtown, and the Rondout—which sometimes makes this city of 178,000 feel like three cities in one. Uptown, the oldest, is centered around the eight-block Stockade area.With the city’s largest concentration of historic stone buildings, including the 1852 Old Dutch Church, the neighborhood is further defined by its quaint covered


Outdated Cafe

Emily Glass at Blush Bridal.

10/16 ChronograM COMMUNITY PAGES 31


Oak 42 34 John Street A clothing and lifestyle boutique offering fashion, home goods, and accessories. Mon-Thurs: 11am-6pm Fri & Sat: 11am-7pm Sun: 11am-4pm (845) 339-0042 oak42.com

imagine

Our Goal KITCHENS....not just a place to

With Our an eye for detail bath [bath, bahth] KITCHENS....not just a place to Goal KITCHENS....not just To design the best Kitchens prepare food. It’s a place to meet, With an eye for detail With an eye for detail bath [bath, bahth] bath [bath, bahth] noun KITCHENS....not just a place to and the design expertise bath [bath, bahth] To design the best Kitchens prepare food. It’s a place to meet, prepare food. It’s a place With an eye for detail bath [bath, bahth] noun noun For the people actually live and the design expertise and thetogether design expertise 1. An essential partbahth] of your daily life. Relax and entertain to bring itaway all for our clients. Imagine kitchen both inviting and bath [bath, bath [bath, bahth] noun prepare food. It’s a place to meet, noun For the way people actually live and the design expertise A washing or immersion (as in water or steam) 1. An essential part of your daily life. 1. An essential part of your daily life. Relax and entertain Relax entertain thoughtfully designed to our fit every bring all together for our toto bring ititand all together for clients. bath [bath, bahth] daily noun to make the new Kitchen journey 1.noun An essential part of your and life.

or part of theYour Potential •itof Our Passion Great Prices Aallwashing immersion (as inwater water steam) AofAn washing or or immersion (as oror steam) 1. essential part ofbody. your daily life. Relax and entertain your lifestyle. Imagine toinnuance bring all together for•our clients. KITCHENS....not just a place to and to make the new Kitchen journey A washing or immersion (as in water or steam) 1. An essential part of your daily life. I soak in the bath for relaxation. 1.noun An essential part of your daily life. ofwashing all or part the body. Your Potential •Our Our Passion • Great Great ofAall or part of of the body. Your Potential • Passion • Prices or immersion (as in water or steam) Cabinet Designers invites you to Personal, Intuitive bath [bath, bahth] KITCHENS....not just a place to quality and style to fit your budget. KITCHENS....not just to meet, of or part of the body. washing or immersion (asininwater water orsteam) steam) washing or immersion (as or IAall soak in the bath for relaxation. An essential part of your daily life. prepare It’s a invites place IAThe soak in the bath for relaxation. of all or part of the body. Your Potential •food. Our Passion • Great Prices Cabinet Designers invites Personal, Intuitive 2.1. quality or state of being covered with a liquid bath [bath, bahth] Cabinet Designers to noun bath [bath, bahth] KITCHENS....not just a you place to I soak in the bath for relaxation. of all or part of the body. OUR EXPERIENCE bath [bath, bahth] ofIAall or part ofbath the body. washing or immersion (as inLET water or steam) and Less Overwhelming. prepare food. It’s a place soak in the for relaxation. Share your dreams with us and we will prepare food. It’s a place to meet, 2. The quality or state of being covered with a liquid Cabinet Designers invites you to noun bath [bath, bahth] 2. The quality or state of being covered with a liquid noun I soak in the bath for relaxation. 1. An essential part of your LET daily life. LET OUR EXPERIENCE Relax and entertain bath [bath, bahth] of all or part of the body. soak in the bath for relaxation. OUR EXPERIENCE noun and Overwhelming. bath [bath, bahth] 2.2.IThe quality or state of being covered with a liquid liquid prepare food. It’s aentertain place to you. meet, KITCHENS •Less BATHS • CLOSETS BE YOUR EXPERIENCE handcraft them into reality for The quality or state of being covered with a noun A washing or immersion (as in water or steam) 1. An essential part of your daily life. Relax and in our locally owned full service design center, soak in the bath for relaxation. Tap into Our Design Talent LET OUR EXPERIENCE 1. An essential part of your daily life. noun Relax and entertain bath [bath, bahth] 2.IThe or state of being covered with a liquid noun KITCHENS • BATHS • CLOSETS BE YOUR EXPERIENCE 1.quality An essential part of your daily life. 2. The quality or state of being covered with a liquid or owned part of the body. Your Potential • Our Passion • Great Prices Aallwashing immersion (as in water or steam) KITCHENS • BATHS • CLOSETS BE YOUR EXPERIENCE TILE • FLOORING • LOW VOC PAINT in our locally full service center, Tap into Our Design Talent Aof washing ororor immersion (as indesign water or steam) 1. essential part of your daily life. Relax and Your Potential Our Passion in The our locally owned full service design center, noun AAn washing immersion (as inlife. water or Tap Into Our Talent and 1. An essential part of your daily life. *entertain 2. quality or state of being covered with asteam) liquid I soak in the bath for relaxation. of all or part of the body. Your Potential • Our Passion • Great Prices KITCHENS • BATHS • CLOSETS BE YOUR EXPERIENCE 1. An essential part of your daily TILE • FLOORING • LOW VOC PAINT ininour locally owned full service design center, for Aall washing or immersion (as ininand water or ororowned part of the body. Your Potential • see Our Passion • Great Prices Your Potential OurVOC Passion our of locally full service design center, TILE •SUSTAINABLE FLOORING • LOW PAINT PRODUCTS washing or immersion (as water orsteam) steam) of part of the body. *yourself IAall soak in the bath for relaxation. Your Potential Our Passion See for Yourself 1. An essential part of your daily life. in our locally owned full service design center, washing oror immersion (as incovered water or steam) * and see for yourself of all or part of the body. Your Potential • Our Passion • Great Prices IAThe soak in the bath for relaxation. 2. quality state of being with a liquid TILE • FLOORING • LOW VOC PAINT in our locally owned full service design center, SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS of all in or the partbath of the body. I Asoak for relaxation. Your Potential Passion washing or immersion (as incovered water or steam) SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS *aOur of all orquality part of the body. IThe soak in the bath relaxation. 2. or state of being with liquid in our locally owned fullfor service design center, I soak in the bath for relaxation. 2.2.The quality or state of being covered with a liquid LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS of all or the partor ofstate the quality of being covered with a liquid IThe soak in bath forbody. relaxation. KITCHENS • BATHS • CLOSETS

LETUS USDEFINE DEFINEYOUR YOUR SPACE SPACE LET LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE LET US SPACE LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE

2.2. quality state being covered with aaliquid inThe our locally owned full service design center, quality or state of being covered with liquid IThe soak in theor bath forof relaxation. KITCHENS •with BATHS • CLOSETS Everything need for the room of your dreams Your one stop shop for everything 2. The oryou state of being covered a LOW liquid in quality our locally owned full service design center, TILE • FLOORING • VOC PAINT KITCHENS • BATHS •dreams CLOSETS Everything you need for the room of your in our locally owned full service design center, Your one stop everything 2. orowned state of being covered with a LOW liquid TILE • FLOORING •for VOC PAINT inThe ourquality locallyyou full service design center, KITCHENS •shop BATHS • CLOSETS Everything need for the room of your dreams for your home. SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS in our locally owned full service design center, Your one stop shop for everything TILE •service FLOORING •and LOW VOC PAINT Everything you need for the room of your dreams Established 1987 still growing. in our locally owned full design center, Everything you need for the room of your dreams for your home. PRODUCTS Your one stop shop for everything TILE •SUSTAINABLE FLOORING •and LOW VOC PAINT in Everything our locally owned full service design center, youFamily need for the room of your dreams Established 1987 still growing. your home. SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS owned and operated since 1987 and still growing. Everything need for thefor room ofcenter, your dreams in our locally owned full service design LETyou US DEFINE YOUR SPACE for your home. SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS Family owned and operated since 1987 and Visit ourfor 6,000 footof showroom and seestill the growing. difference. Everything you need thesquare room your dreams

LET USyou DEFINE YOUR SPACE Visit our 6,000 square foot showroom see the difference. Everything need forone the room of your dreams LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE Your stop shop forand everything LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE Everything you need roomshop of your dreams • Kitchens • Baths •DEFINE Closets • the Tile LET US YOUR SPACE Yourforone stop for everything LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE • Kitchens • Baths •need Closets • Tile Everything you the room of dreams for your home. Everything you need the room ofyour your dreams Yourfor one stop shop for everything • Flooring • Low VOC Paint •for Sustainable Products LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE Everything you need for the room of your dreams for your home. • Kitchens • Baths • Closets • Tile Everything you need for the room of your dreams Your one stop shop for everything • Flooring • Low VOC Paint • Sustainable Products LET US DEFINE YOUR SPACE •Flooring •• Baths • Closets • Tile •Kitchens Kitchens Baths for your home. Route New•for York 845-331-2200 Everything you the room of your dreams • 747 • 28 Low VOC Paint Products •Flooring Kitchens • Kingston Baths •need Closets • 12401 Tile for your home. 747 Route 28 Kingston New•Sustainable York 12401 845-331-2200 •www.cabinetdesigners.com •• Low VOC Paint Sustainable Products Everything you need for the room of your dreams •Flooring Low VOC Sustainable Products • Flooring Low VOC Paint • Sustainable Products • Kitchens • •Baths • Closets • Tile www.cabinetdesigners.com 747 Route 28 Kingston New York 12401 845-331-2200 • Kitchens • Baths • Closets • Tile 747 Route Route 28 Kingston Kingston York 12401 845-331-2200 • Kitchens •Located Baths • in Closets • Tile Products 28 New 12401 845-331-2200 the: • 747 Flooring Low VOC Paint •Closets Sustainable • •Kitchens •Located Baths • in • Tile Products Route New 12401 845-331-2200 the: www.cabinetdesigners.com • 747 Flooring • 28 LowKingston Paint • York Sustainable • Flooring •VOC Low VOC Paint • Sustainable Products www.cabinetdesigners.com www.cabinetdesigners.com • Flooring • Low VOC Paint • Sustainable Products www.cabinetdesigners.com • Kitchens • Baths • Closets • Tile 747 Route 28 Kingston New York 12401 845-331-2200 Located in the: • Kitchens • Baths • Closets • Tile 747 Route 28 Kingston New York 12401 845-331-2200 • •Kitchens •Located • in ••Tile 747 Route 28 Kingston New York 12401 845-331-2200 Located the: Kitchens •Baths Baths •Closets Closets Tile 747 Route 28 Kingston New York 12401 845-331-2200 • Flooring • Low VOC Paint • Sustainable Products Located in the: www.cabinetdesigners.com ••Flooring Sustainable Products Products Flooring •• Low Low VOC VOC Paint Paint •• Sustainable www.cabinetdesigners.com

www.cabinetdesigners.com • Flooring • Low VOC Paint • Sustainable Products www.cabinetdesigners.com • Kitchens • Baths • Closets • Tile • Kitchens • Baths • Closets • Tile

32 COMMUNITY PAGES ChronograM 10/16


Grounded Photo by Roy Gumpel

Derek Williams tending bar on the rooftop deck at Redwood Scott Neild at Clove & Creek

sidewalks. The sector is packed with coffeehouses and cafes (Outdated, Sissy’s Cafe, Uptown Coffee), music and book shops (Rhino Records, Rocket Number Nine Records, Half Moon Books), instrument suppliers (Saker Guitar Works, Stockade Guitars), art provision vendors (Catskill Art Supply), and antiques stores (Gargoyle). Bars and nightclubs include Elephant, the Stockade Tavern, Uncle Willy’s, and Two Ravens Tavern. Uptown is also home to intriguing boutiques such as Exit 19 (20th-century furnishings, art, lighting, and decorative objects), Ester Wine & Spirits, and Oak 42 (innovative designer clothing), and delectable dining options like Le Canard Enchainé (French fare), Stella’s (Italian favorites), DMZ (Asian-fusion tapas), and the new Redwood (creative comfort food). Another recent addition is Kovo Rotisserie (Greek-inspired casual cuisine), the sister bistro of the adjacent Boitson’s (classic comfort fare, raw bar). “Uptown has a really nice variety of places to eat at,” says Maria Philippis, the owner of both restaurants. “The shopping is great, and there are always good shows going on at [Wall Street music venue] BSP.” In the Middle of It All Midtown has long been Kingston’s diamond in the rough. The city’s thriving

economic heart for generations, it slid into blight in the 1970s when businesses began moving outward, toward the area’s big-box/mall quadrant, the Town of Ulster. Within the last few years, though, thanks to city-backed arts and business incentives, life has been moving back into Midtown, whose spine, the four-lane Broadway corridor, connects Uptown to the Rondout. Situated at 601 Broadway is the Ulster Performing Arts Center (UPAC), a former movie and vaudeville house built in 1927. Saved from demolition in 1977, it was taken over by the directors of Poughkeepsie’s Bardavon Theater in 2006 to present top acts in the fields of music, dance, comedy, and other entertainment, and continues as the district’s anchor of renewal. Speaking of anchors, a few blocks up from UPAC is the Anchor, a music venue geared toward live rock ’n’ roll, craft beers, and savory pub food. Around the corner, on St. James Street, is microbrewery Keegan Ales, which features live music and food as well. New and nearby are Peace Nation Cafe, which specializes in Latin American and vegetarian dishes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner; and PAKT Restaurant and Catering, which puts a health-conscious, locally sourced spin on traditional Southern cooking. Newer to Midtown’s gustatory landscape is the Beverly, a gastropub and 10/16 ChronograM COMMUNITY PAGES 33


Left, from top: Aaron Martine at Pakt in Kingston; Kelli Galloway at Hops Petunia; French Kiss Patisserie at Le Canard Enchaine; Brunette Wine Bar Above: Kay Cee Wimbush at YMCA Farm Project

cocktail bar in a turn-of-the-century tavern opened by Trippy Thompson and Jennifer Constantine, the couple behind Rosendale’s hip hang Market Market. “We wanted to have another spot, in Kingston, but one that was different [than the more brunch-and-lunch-oriented Market Market],” says Thompson. “We also wanted to be part of an area that was evolving—Uptown and the Rondout are great, but they’re already established. Midtown is funkier and still reinventing itself. People are really excited about what’s happening here, with all of the arts initiatives that are being launched.” Indeed, driving Midtown’s current burst of revitalization is the advent of the artist work/live loft buildings the Lace Mill (just across Foxhall Avenue from the Beverly), the Shirt Factory, and the forthcoming Pajama Factory and Brush Factory, all of them disused manufacturing buildings whose reclamations are being overseen by developer Mike Piazza. Further signs of the influx of artistic spirit into Midtown include the arrivals of two new galleries: ArtBar, on Broadway, and Greenkill, on Greenkill Avenue. There’s even a farm hidden away in the city’s midsection: The Kingston YMCA Farm Project, tucked in behind the Y and a radiology clinic off Pine Grove Avenue, educates and empowers young people by directly engaging them in sustainable food production on an urban farm.   Do the Strand The Rondout-West Strand Historic District—or as it’s also known, the Strand, or, most commonly, the Rondout—sits along the Rondout Creek, an estuary of the Hudson River. The section is populated with striking brick buildings that date from its 19th-century heyday as a shipping center. Once the tough realm of canal diggers, ice cutters, dockworkers, brick makers, and brewers, the area was a city unto itself before being officially incorporated into Kingston in 1872. The 1960s and ’70s saw vice and decay set in, but in the ’90s urban pioneers and restaurateurs began reinvigorating the neighborhood’s West 34 COMMUNITY PAGES ChronograM 10/16


Global or Local, Our Choices Matter

Begnal Motors 1. Family owned and operated in the Hudson Valley for over 40 years

1. Better fuel economy 2. Lower emissions 3. Less waste

2. Investing in our local infrastructure using local professionals and businesses 3. Keep it Local

Begnal Motors is now your exclusive Fiat dealer in the Hudson Valley 552 ALBANY AVENUE, KINGSTON 845-331-5080 WWW.BEGNALMOTORS.COM

Herzogs.com

Create the home you’ve always wanted with Herzog’s.

Live Beautifully!

Fishkill 1083 Route 9 845-296-0222

kingston PoughkeePsie 409 Manchester Rd. Kingston Plaza 845-338-6300 845-471-0133

1 Free Roll of AllPro Blue Painters Tape 1.5” Roll. MSRP $5.69

per gallon of Aura®, Regal®, Ben® and Arborcoat®

Coupon expires 11/30/2016. See store for details. Must present coupon to redeem.

Live beautifully!

!TAPE-CHRONOGRM!

Kick back with color!

10/16 ChronograM COMMUNITY PAGES 35


Proudly providing the Hudson Valley with instrument rentals, repairs and sales for 5 generations! can we change the address to 401B Sawkill Road, Kingston, NY 12401. Otherwise looks great! GIFTS • JEWELRY • CLOTHING • FASHION ACCESSORIES • SWELL STUFF

334 Wall Street, Kingston 845-338-8100

Hudson Valley Made Products For Your Home

Custom Flooring, Reclaimed Wood, Exterior Surfaces, Furniture & More 528 BROADWAY, KINGSTON, NY 845-331-6089 WWW.BARCONESMUSICONLINE.COM

401B Sawkill Road, Kingston, NY 12401 excelsiorwood.com

halloween at

Le Shag.

appointments strongly recommended walk-ins welcome

292c fair street kingston, ny (845) 338-0191 leshag.com model: erica brown hair & makeup: kara eletto

Styling the Hudson Valley for more than 25 years On the Kingston Waterfront, 17 W Strand St, Kingston (845) 331-4537 Open Mon. – Sat. at 11:30. Sunday at noon.

36 COMMUNITY PAGES ChronograM 10/16


BOUTIQUE 34 John Street Kingston, NY 845-339-0042 www.OAK42.com

10/16 ChronograM COMMUNITY PAGES 37


DESIGN FOR “POPULAR” MUSIC: POSTER ART BY MIKE KING ON VIEW OCTOBER 1-29, 2016 SATURDAYS 12-5 AND BY APPOINTMENT RECEPTION FOR ARTIST OCTOBER 1, 6-9PM 475 ABEEL STREET KINGSTON NY 12401 WWW.ONEMILEGALLERY.COM ONEMILEGALLERY@GMAIL.COM

FIND YOURSELF in our

F L O AT TA N K S Find out how daily f loatation therapy can help you

zephyrf loat.com (8 45) 853 - 24 0 0 111 G r e e n k i l l Av e n u e , K i n g s t o n N Y 1 2 4 01

Celebrating Two Years in Kingston

The best selection of vinyl in the Hudson Valley. Selling your vinyl? Talk to us first.

Painting by Sean Sullivan

ROCKET NUMBER NINE RECORDS

2016-17 YMCA School’s Out Program

The goal of the YMCA School’s Out Program is to provide County qualified supervision and create a pos YMCA of Kingston and Ulster environment for your child’s growth and development. Experienced counselors serve as positive Out Before/After School Program models School’s giving individualized attention and leading activities including sports, arts and crafts a homework help. Our School’s Out programs serve Kindergarten to Fifth Grade Students.

2016-17 YMCA Sc

New Paltz, Highland, AfterMarlboro, Care Program: Kingston, and Rondout of the YMCA School’s Out Program is YMCA of King

Before Care Program:

50 N. FRONT ST. UPTOWN KINGSTON 845 331 8217

Check our Facebook for upcoming in store events

The goal Locations: Locations: and Ulster Co New Paltz (Duzine)  New Paltz338-3810 (Lenape) x115for (845) • www.ymcaulster.org • 507 Broadway, Kingston, NY environment your child’s growth and develo  Highland  Highland 507 Broadway 1  Marlboro giving individualized attention Kingston, and NY lea  models Marlboro  Kingston (Edson)  Kingston (Edson) help. Our(Marbletown) School’s Out www.ymcaulst progra  Rondout  Rondout homework (Marbletown & Kerhonkson)

ALLEY CAT

Childcare Regi

Start Time: 7:00am

End Times: 6:00pm (Rondout—5:45pm)

Schedule:

Schedule:

3:00pm—Dismissed from Classrooms

3:15pm—First Choice* OCTOBER 29TH

KINGSTON’S ONLY JAZZ & BLUES VENUE Before Care Program: 7:00am—First Choice (Activity in Cafeteria OCTOBER 7TH or Gym)

Abraham and the Groove. 7:30am—Second Choice (Cafeteria or 60s to 80s R&B and more. Gym)

8:15am—Clean Up and8TH Wash Hands OCTOBER

Locations:

8:30am—Breakfast* Activity Saints ofor Swing   New Paltz (Lenape) 9:00am—Dismissal to Classrooms

with Miss Rene Bailey

participant receives a full breakfast  *Each at Highland their school!OCTOBER 15TH

D-Square Band

 Marlboro

  

SATURDAY

3:45pm—Snack and Assembly Alley Cat's Halloween party. 4:15pm—Second Choice* Prize for best costume,

drink specials all and night. 5:30pm—Cool Down Clean Up

DJ Crazy ??.or Organized Activity in *Homework Club GymParty or Cafeteria starts at 8. Call for additional shows

Program Pricing

Always check our Facebook line&up. AM Only for updates PM Onlyon ourAM PM

Afte

Kristyn Keller

P: 845-338-381

F: 845-338-042

kkeller@ymcaul

Locatio

Childcare Directo

 New

Kayleigh Buboltz

 High

P: 845-338-3810

kbuboltz@ymcauls

 Mar

Payment  Informa King  Kingston (Edson) $200/month $275/month $360/month 294 Wall Street, Uptown Kingston (845) 339-1300  $50 NON-REFUNDABLE dep at the time of enrollm $190/month $265/month $340/month  Ron  Rondout (Marbletown & Kerhonkson)required and will be applied to the June 5 Days a Week 4 Days a Week

38 COMMUNITY PAGES ChronograM 10/16

3 Days a Week

$170/month

$240/month

$290/month

2 Days a Week

$135/month

$195/month

$235/month

Drop In: Member *

$15/visit

$20/visit

$25/visit

tion if the child is still enrolled that point in time.

Financial Assistance is avai through August 12th. Please c

End Tim


HUDSON RIVER CRUISES from Kingston, NY

on the Rip Van Winkle

SIGHTSEEING CRUISES & PRIVATE CHARTERS All cruises depart from: 1 East Strand St., Kingston, NY

Oak 42

see cruise descriptions & BUY TICKETS online or call: ★

845-340-4700 800-843-7472 hudsonrivercruises.com

Strand block to help make the Rondout into the lively entertainment spot it is today. In addition to such attractions as the Trolley Museum of New York, the Hudson River Maritime Museum, and the Rondout Lighthouse (the Irish Cultural Center of the Hudson Valley, an outgrowth of the waterfront’s popular Hooley on the Hudson festival, is set to open in 2017), the area features a wealth of fine eateries, such as Ship to Shore (New American fare), Armadillo (Mexican), Brunette (wine bar with small plates), Ole Savannah (barbecue, craft beers), and mainstay Mariner’s Harbor (seafood). Quality shops include Clove and Creek, which sells locally handcrafted housewares and gifts; On the Hill Antiques, a multidealer emporium; and Hops Petunia, an award-winning floral shop focused on ground-breaking creations. Besides being such an easily walkable, self-contained district, the Rondout is a homey haven to several cozy inns. Unveiled last month is the Forsyth B&B, a renovated, two-story 1830s brick house located on Abeel Street, one block from the waterfront, that boasts four spacious and charming guest rooms, private baths, and a casual-chic mix of modern and vintage furnishings. “When we first visited Kingston we were just so struck by what a beautiful, interesting community it is, with just the right balance between the feelings of ‘city’ and ‘country,’” explains innkeeper Tamara Ehlin, an event planner whose husband, architect Charles Mallea, had a hand in the Forsyth’s redesign. “Every day when I wake up and walk out the door, I just kick myself at how lucky I am to live here.” Ehlin is also a pastry chef, and, yes, her confections are, if you will, the icing on a stay at the inn. Even more mouthwatering deliciousness awaits just up the shoreline. Opened at the former Hutton Brickyards this past summer is the Hudson Valley wing of Smorgasburg, the wildly popular outdoor market begun in Brooklyn in 2011 by business partners Jonathan Butler and Eric Demby. “We’d been eyeing the Hudson Valley for two or three years and had really wanted to do something up here,” says Butler, who with Demby also co-founded Brooklyn Flea in 2008 and has since exported the Smorgasburg concept—vendors selling artisanal and locally made food, crafts, and vintage goods, with a smattering of live music, at reclaimed industrial sites—to Downtown Los Angeles as well. Open Saturdays from 11am to 5pm through late October, the familyfriendly Smorgasburg Upstate was packed with attendees on its opening day and has continued to draw visitors from the Kingston area and beyond. “We’re so glad to see this historic place being used and preserved, instead of torn down and replaced with condos, which was what was being planned before we approached the city about doing Smorgasburg here. And it’s really been going great. You know—sitting on the bank of the Hudson River on a nice, sunny day, drinking local beer? There are definitely worse things in life.”

$2 Off

Discount applies to full price ADULT tickets only. May not be combined with any other offers. Coupon expires 12/31/16.

BUY TICKETS ONLINE OR CALL:

Our regular-priced Sightseeing Cruise

845-340-4700 ★ 800-843-7472 Must Mention Code: CHG16 hudsonrivercruises.com Sorry, no exceptions.

when ordering to receive discount!

845-340-4700 ★ 800-843-7472 hudsonrivercruises.com

The West Strand in the Rondout. Photo by Roy Gumpel

10/16 ChronograM COMMUNITY PAGES 39


The House

Isles of the Forever Wild Stewarding the Land in Garrison by Mary Angeles Armstrong photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid

40 home & garden ChronograM 10/16


Opposite: Irene O’Garden and John Pielmeier amongst the trees of “WindSweep”. The couple met in Minneapolis when they were both members of the Guthrie’s original second theater company, the Guthrie 2. Above: Designed by the architect William A. Boring, who also designed the Ellis Island Immigration Station, the 4,500-square-foot home sits on 15 acres of fields and woods gently sloping toward the Hudson.

W

henever I see old trees, I think, Where are the little ones? You’ve got to have little ones.” Irene O’Garden leads me through an alley of giant oaks at the northern edge of Windsweep, the 15-acre property she shares with her husband, author John Pielmeier. O’Garden is the author of children’s books, plays, and poetry (her latest collection, Fulcrum, is out this fall), as well as an artist and actress. Pielmeier is a playwright (“Agnes of God” and the stage adaptation of The Exorcist) and the author of the forthcoming novel Hook’s Tale—a fictional memoir of Peter Pan’s Captain Hook. Stewardship of land—planting of lindens and locusts, cherry trees and maples; the care of gardens; the preservation of wild spaces not just for the creatures that live there but for future life—is a charge O’Garden and Pielmeier have embraced since moving to the Hudson Valley 30 years ago. Both grew up appreciating the power and magic wild spaces offer. “I always felt a little like I was growing up on an island,” says Pielmeier describing his hometown of Altoona, Pennsylvania. Ten minutes from his house were the Allegheny Mountains, where his family spent most weekends hiking and enjoying the outdoors. O’Garden also realized the value of nature early. Growing up in Minneapolis with seven siblings, it was her escape. “Across the street from our house was this lovely wild place, the Minnehaha Creek. It was wonderful to go and have some solitude and quiet,” she recalls. Twenty-seven Acres In 1984, after living in Manhattan for seven years, their biophilia compelled them north, and they bought a small farmhouse in Cold Spring. “When we moved up here, there was no period of adjustment,” Pielmeier tells me. “On our first night we felt like we were home.”When 27 acres of land across their road went on the market, they purchased that parcel as well. They lived in the Cold Spring house

for 12 years. “It was a beloved first house and a wonderful retreat,” O’Garden recalls, but as writers working from home they eventually needed something bigger. Selling the house, however, meant also selling the 27 acres—a patch of wild woods they had grown to love and couldn’t stand to see divided and developed. “It felt like taking a pet to the slaughterhouse,” O’Garden remembers. That’s when Pielmeier and O’Garden approached the Hudson Highlands Land Trust, offering to donate the 27 acres. At first, the HHLT, formed in 1989, didn’t quite know what to do with the land. They briefly considered developing the land themselves so they could be in control of the amount and way it was developed. However, board member Lars Kulleseid had a better idea. Surrounding the 27-acre donation were more woods—also slated for development, but mostly still standing. Kulleseid, along with Executive Director Susan Bates, convinced four adjacent neighbors to purchase an additional 45 acres and donate it back to the land trust. Their efforts grew that initial 27-acre donation into a 72-acre forest preserve.The Clove Creek Project is the largest preserve established by the HHLT and laid the groundwork for future conservation efforts in the Highlands. Buried Treasures In 1996, the couple bought Windsweep, their Georgian style home in Garrison. Built by the artist Kenneth Fraiser in 1906 and named for the strong breezes that blow down the valley, the house had seen better days. (The sitting room had even been used to stable a horse.) “It’s funny,” O’Garden says, “when you’re looking at a house, and it’s not right, you think—Well, I’d need to move that wall or change that room, I can’t do that. But when you’ve found the right house you think—Well, we can just move that wall and change that room. We loved it in spite of its being a wreck.” 10/16 chronogram home & Garden 41


Above: O’Garden has a studio space in the attic for art projects. She began her career as an actress and then evolved into a writer and artist. One of her latest passions is calligraphy. All of her work focuses on “anything that amplifies the power of words,” she says. Right: O’Garden’s writing cottage nestled among trees on the property.

The house—now full of colorful, whimsical details that reflect the fertile imaginations of its owners—has been the couple’s main hobby for the past 20 years. At the entrance, a wall and a phone booth were removed and coffered ceilings and a skylit foyer were added to create the home’s main hallway. They hired the artist Thomas Donahue to paint murals throughout the house—including a floral motif along the entrance’s wainscoted walls and a forested guest bathroom upstairs. Donahue also created a tile mosaic reminiscent of the property’s bucolic landscape at the home’s threshold. Pielmeier’s downstairs office is decorated with memorabilia from his many plays and films, as well as homages to his two great influences: Robert Louis Stevenson and J. M. Barrie. A working fireplace is decorated with tiles depicting characters from Peter Pan; above is a framed letter from Stevenson. A downstairs closet with plenty of shelving and a lovely view was ingeniously combined with a small bathroom, to create a unique library/bath. The back wing of the house—a succession of open, airy kitchen and dining and sitting rooms with high ceilings and french doors—offers sumptuous western views. Spraypainted white by the previous owners, the sitting and dining rooms required careful restoration but yielded literal treasure. “When I first saw the rooms,” O’Garden says, “I had an image of myself up on a ladder, taking off the white paint.” When she and Donahue began their scraping, they uncovered gold leaf trim. Upstairs, the second floor has three bedrooms and additional office space. (Donahue carefully pulled cowboy-themed wallpaper from one bedroom and uncovered a handpainted peacock mural.) The master bedroom suite includes a working fireplace (stenciled with one of O’Garden’s poems), a bathroom with a large soaking tub, and French doors leading to a balcony. 42 home & garden ChronograM 10/16


Structure in Nature. Environmental architectural design and building for your residential or commercial project.

TE VE MORRI D E

I G N

Pools, Spas & Patio Furniture DISCOVERY · DESIGN · FABRICATION · CONSTRUCTION

stevemorrisdesigns.com | 845.417.1819

1606 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine (Next to Adams) • 336-8080 604 Rte 299, Highland (Next to Lowes) • 883-5566

www.aquajetpools.com Family owned and operated for over 30 years

Why Look At Four Walls...When You Can Look At Four Seasons!!! Come Visit Our Design Center • Six Sunrooms on Display

HUDSON VALLEY SUNROOMS

Serving the Hudson Valley Since 1984 GPS: 355 Broadway (Rt 9W), Port Ewen, NY (just south of Kingston)

Kingston, NY 845.339.1787 Beacon, NY 845.838.1235

www.hudsonvalleysunrooms.com

10/16 chronogram home & Garden 43


Above: The couple converted Fraiser’s original north facing painting studio into a large kitchen, adding an arch of windows and skylights over the kitchen sink. Right: A wall in the home’s entranceway. The artist Thomas Donahue hand painted murals throughout the house.

View from the Crow’s Nest By knocking down walls and adding skylights, the couple created a large studio from the third floor attic. Their latest innovation—a hatch in the middle of the attic ceiling—leads to a small balcony at the apex of the home’s roof. Here, there are spectacular views of West Point and the Hudson Highlands across the river, as well as a bird’s-eye view of the intricate patchwork of woods and gardens that has grown around them. Five years ago, Pielmeier and O’Garden approached the HHLT again, this time to protect Windsweep with a land conservation easement. It’s another way to share their land, even after they’ve gone. That impulse—to plant seeds, protect them, and watch them grow—also inspires O’Garden’s work as a poetry educator. “It continues to surprise me that nature isn’t a part of every kid’s life,” she says. The “River of Words” program, started by the poet Robert Haas and administered locally through the HHLT, aims to rectify this problem by connecting children to their local watershed through poetry and art. Through it, O’Garden goes into local schools, leads students on nature walks, and mentors them to write about their experience. The program cumulates with the “Poetry Trail”—an event where participant’s poems are hung, gallery style, throughout nature preserves along the Hudson. Back downstairs, in a corner of the second floor, is a small collection landscape paintings by the original owner, Kenneth Fraiser. O’Garden and Pielmeier discovered the canvases rolled up in an outbuilding and had them professionally restored. The paintings provide a visual record of Windsweep, showing how, over the past 110 years, the fields of the former asparagus farm have transformed back into woods. They are poetic evidence to the fact that a few people, with some creativity, can protect and reclaim what’s wild for the generations to come. 44 home & garden ChronograM 10/16


The Country’s Largest Display of Unique Slabs and Burls

They don’t make furniture like they used to. We do!

From custom kitchens to handcrafted beds and rocking chairs, our master artisans have been building heirloom furniture since 1926. We mill our own hardwoods and use fine woodworking techniques like hand-wedged spindles, drawknife edges and hand rubbed finishes for furniture that will last for generations. It’s a slight difference in price that makes all the difference between furniture that winds up as a treasured antique or as landfill.

Berkshire Products

Sheffield, MA 413-229-7919 BerkshireProducts.com

Wingdale, NY: 16 Dog Tail Corners Rd. Dover Plains, NY: Factory Store 2549 Rt. 22 Chadds Ford, PA: 299 Rt. 202

huntcountryfurniture.com

Country Home The perfect driveway for your

The look and feel of crushed stone, without the upkeep. Call today for a complimentary consultation.

Flood a room with natural light Make the most of your panoramic views and create an eye-catching focal point by incorporating 90-Degree Corner Windows in your home.

Residential & Commercial DRIvEwAYS | PARkINg LOTS | TENNIS COURTS | PRIvATE ROADS

Classic Asphalt Paving • Decorative Finish Options

518.479.1400 518.479.1400

www.bRoweasphalt.Com

ATTENTION TO DETAIL • SUPERIOR QUALITY • CRAFTSMANSHIP • CUSTOMER CARE • FUNCTION

We share your passion.® Hillsdale, NY: 518.325.3131· Lakeville, CT: 860.435.2561· Millerton, NY: 518.789.3611 Hudson, NY: 518.828.9431· Chatham, NY: 518.392.9201· Sheffield, MA: 413.229.8777

www.herringtons.com· 800.453.1311· WINDOW & DOOR SPECIALISTS

10/16 chronogram home & Garden 45


Garden

Shade Gardens A Conversation with Victoria Coyne By Michelle Sutton Photos by Larry Decker

Shade plants in the nursery at Victoria Gardens in Rosendale

A

t the corner of Route 213 and Cottekill Road in Rosendale, partially atop an ancient (375 million years old) limestone ledge dotted with fossils, you’ll find the retail nursery, garden gift shop, and landscaping division base of Victoria Gardens (Victoriagardens.biz). Thirty years ago, fresh from her horticulture studies, Victoria Coyne started a landscaping business. In 2003, she bought the Rosendale property, which came with an abandoned cement block building that Victoria’s late husband, Wayne Waddell, rebuilt into a gorgeous, highceilinged, wood-framed garden gift shop that opened in 2007.The shop is so beautifully constructed and laid out that it feels like a high-end experience, but without the steep prices. The nursery is set up like a garden, with plants grouped together according to their growing conditions. “Because of the way the nursery is laid out, if you have a garden that’s in full sun, you won’t accidentally fall in love with a plant that needs shade,” Coyne says. “You can look at the flowers, colors, and textures instead of squinting at the tags, trying to figure out if it will survive in your garden.” Longtime nursery manager Russel Wiser can help you get to the right section, where you’ll find your options are many. For instance, the nursery has more than 500 varieties of deer-resistant plants, many of them suitable for shade. Shade gardens are one of Coyne’s specialties, and Victoria Gardens designs, installs, and maintains many of them every year—the majority of them in deer country. What are the biggest misconceptions people have about shade gardens? Victoria Coyne: Many people think if you have shade, you can only grow hosta. There are so many things beyond hosta, and lots of plants that deer leave alone— hellebores, columbine, goatsbeard, waxbell, Japanese forest grass—the list goes on and on. Sometimes people are challenged in understanding the differences in shade—that some shade is dry shade and some shade is moist shade. Dry shade is the biggest challenge, like under sugar maples where the roots are exceptionally shallow. There are plants like epimedium and andromeda that thrive in dry shade; we have 12 different varieties of andromeda. Hostas also are champs in dry shade, but they are not deer resistant.

46 home & garden ChronograM 10/16

How do you keep deer at bay? VC: There are two main approaches: install a tall deer fence around the perimeter of your property, or use deer-resistant plants in combination with spraying repellent. We have extensively field tested Deer Defeat, which is made locally in Red Hook, and now we use that exclusively. Unlike other repellents that we had to reapply after every rain shower, Deer Defeat holds up through the rain; we only have to apply it every three weeks. Also, the deer don’t seem to get used to this repellent, so we no longer have to continually switch brands. Unless there’s a perimeter fence, our crews don’t leave a job site without spraying repellent because deer are habitual—they will come back to the place where they remember there’s something tasty. They will try any new plants, even the “deer-resistant” ones (they’ll spit them out), but if we spray plants with Deer Defeat, they won’t even nibble. In terms of plant selection, we don’t sell anything as “deer resistant” until we observe that directly. A lot of times nurseries or growers will label things deer resistant that I’ve found Ulster County deer love. For that reason and for all our plants, when we consider adding a plant to our stock, we try a few out first and do our field testing so we can speak to the plant’s merits from experience. What is the one shade plant you feel everyone should have? VC: Hellebores, also called lenten roses. They are deer-resistant perennials; the foliage is beautiful and evergreen. The flowers come in countless expressions (from light pink to chartreuse to black, from singles to doubles, with spots and ruffles or without), they emerge in March (through the snow if need be), and they bloom for several months or more. I want everybody to have them. Even if we have a full-sunblasted client, we will plant a tree so we can get some hellebores in [laughs]. How should shade garden beds be prepared? VC: Don’t skimp on building the beds. If you just go in under a maple and start digging, that won’t work, because the new plants won’t be able to compete with the shallow tree roots. You want to build up the soil gradually—three inches initially, and replenish each year—so that you can plant your perennials and they’ll have a chance to establish before shallow tree roots colonize the new soil. Avoid putting


YOU WOULDN’T GET YOUR HAIRCUT AT A STORE THAT SELLS TRACTOR EQUIPMENT

THEN WHY WOULD YOU BUY PET SUPPLIES AT THAT SAME STORE?

Pet Country PET FOODS & SUPPLIES

well-being of your pet. If pets could talk, they’d EVERYTHING FORme THE FUN & WELL-BEING OF YOUR PET. say, “take toCARE, the country... Pet Country!”

If pets could talk, they’d say, “take me to the country... PET COUNTRY!”

6830 Rt. 9 (just south of the 9G junction) Rhinebeck 845-876-9000 Mon-Sat 9am-6pm • Sun 9am-4pm • Closed Tuesdays Shop Local—We’re your neighbors!

GLENN’S SHEDS Custom-built Firewood Sheds

THIS

OR THIS

Visit the web-site to see our full line of firewood sheds.

GLENNSSHEDS.COM 845.328.0447 10/16 chronogram home & Garden 47


Dichotomy HOME LLc. A unique gallery of one-off handmade artisan furniture, furnishings, and lighting!

Earn

the “Warehouse” Door 21 99 South Third Street Hudson, NY 12534 Fri - Sun 11:00 - 5:00 & by appt. www.chrisungaro.com • (845) 240-5834

with EVERY PURCHASE

Do you want to save 80% on your County, Town, and School taxes? Ask me how. • • • • •

Land Use Consultant Forest Tax Law Planning Wetlands Mitigation Environmental Permits Real Estate

JOSHUA TREE, INC.

(845) 661-1952 1475 Route 19, Elizaville, NY www.joshuatreeforestry.com JoshKowan@gmail.com

Showroom: (845) 255-2022 wcwkitchens.com Featuring Homecrest, Crystal, Shiloh Cabinetry

! Play your cards right. ! !

!

If you want a professional job, hire a professional.

Family owned and operated for over 50 years. 518.851.9917 ! ALVAREZMODULARS.COM!

!

CRDesign

ONLINE Read the entire issue online. Plus, check out these extras!

Keep in touch! Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. @Chronogram

8DW

8-DAY WEEK

SA FE • E F FE C T IV E • GUARANT E E D

web tv

Our weekly events newsletter keeps you in the loop and delivers Chronogram’s top picks of what to do every Thursday! Sign up now at Chronogram.com/8dw Monthly web series exploring the artists, galleries, and museums of the Hudson Valley. Hosted by Chronogram Editor Brian K. Mahoney and produced by independent filmmaker Stephen Blauweiss. Chronogram.com/TV

Commercial & Residential Services (845) 565-5566 HollenbeckPestControl.com Your local family owned pest control company 2 Years in a Row Times Herald’s Readers Choice Award Winner for Best Pest Control

48 home & garden ChronograM 10/16

Combining your favorite parts of Chronogram with exclusive web-only content. Get your fix online or on-the-go with your smartphone or tablet! Chronogram.com Your Chronogram horoscope fix is now weekly! Check out what’s happening for you in the stars. Chronogram.com/horoscopes


Victoria Coyne

Let’s Create Your Dream Spaces.

845.224.5936 jjones.iw@gmail.com quality without question www.ingrainedbuildingconcepts.com

IBC_1-8 Ad_Chrono_01016.indd 1

soil against or near the trunk, because that can interfere with the vascular system of the trunk, which is just under the bark. For soil amendment, we like Dynamulch, made locally by Croswell Enterprises in Kingston. It’s an organic hybrid of compost and bark mulch that looks like beautiful dark soil. We mulch everything to retain moisture, keep the weeds down, add organic matter, and give the gardens an attractive look. I don’t use synthetic landscape cloth, by the way, to suppress weeds except for under pebbles/stones, like around a pool. We do not use it in garden beds ever, because the beautiful mulch on top of it breaks down and becomes beautiful soil that doesn’t get to the plant roots! Also, weeds grow in that beautiful soil and when you go to pull up the weeds, here comes that cloth because the roots of the weeds found their way through the cloth—it’s always a mess.You can use thick layers of landscape paper, newspaper, or cardboard instead—something that will compost and disappear. What are some other considerations? VC: To know whether you have sun or shade conditions, ask, “When does it get sun?” If the site gets sun in the morning only, it’s appropriate for a shade garden. If it gets sun in the hot western afternoon light, that’s sun, even if it’s sunny only for a few hours. If the only trees you have are old and you have a high canopy like I do with the mature oaks on my property, to have a shade garden you’ll need to plant a layer of understory trees—things like dogwoods, redbuds, or silverbells. For any perennial, I group in masses of three, five, or seven rather than planting things like polka dots so that the garden looks more naturalistic. Think in terms of lots of textural changes, so if you have round-leaved hosta, add feathery-leaved ferns, astilbes, goatsbeard, and the like to vary texture. I am enamored of using bright chartreuse and variegated foliage plants sparingly in the shade to brighten up the garden.When working with dry shade, I’ve had success using soaker hoses under the mulch.When a tree that’s providing shade for a garden dies, you have to move the plants. Lastly, take time to observe and analyze your site up front, and if you’re struggling trying to figure things out, a one-time consult with a professional can really clarify and open things up for you.

A Private Tour of Hudson Valley Gardens, Without Ever Leaving Home About.com gardening expert and Lake Katrine resident Marie Iannotti recently published an eBook, A Gardener’s Tour of the Hudson Valley. Over 30 gardens are highlighted, including the gardens of Olana in Hudson, Innisfree in Millbrook, and Stone Crop in Cold Spring. The book entices would-be visitors to explore the birthplace of American landscape design, our beautiful valley. The book is available for a limited time for $2.99 on Kindle.

9/12/16 12:31 PM

Quatrefoil Inc. |

| www.quatrefoil.us

Shop

hudson n

e

w

y

o

r

k

• lifestyle antiques • arthudsonantiques. galleries • clothing • restaurants net

hudsonantiques.net Hudson Antiques Dealers Association

The Cord King Firewood

Specializing in kiln dried hardwoods Offering firewood from managed, renewable forests for over 15 years Guaranteed full cord SARAH & JEFF VIOLA 845-797-6877 cordkingllc@gmail.com www.cordkingfirewood.com

“Let the KING throw a log on your fire!” 10/16 chronogram home & Garden 49


Bring Us Your Dreams. Whether intimate or extravagant, our thoughtful planning assistance, world-class cuisine and extraordinary setting will ensure your wedding becomes a cherished memory.

Book your event now! MUSIC • BAR • CATERING • CHEF’S TABLE PRIVATE PARTIES • REHERSAL DINNERS

ON PREMISE PARTY HOSTING 100 PEOPLE, OFF PREMISE 1,000 PEOPLE | BOOK ONLINE OR PHONE US!

353 MAIN ST. CATSKILL, NY 518•943•5500 | NYRESTAURANTCATSKILL.COM

VisitBearMountain.com (845) 786-2731

Your Wedding, Your Vision, Our Pleasure.

Located 45 minutes north of New York City

helsinkihudson.com 405 Columbia St Hudson NY 518.828.4800 Photo Credit: The Ramsdens GSI16_BMI_Ad_Chronogram_4-2x5-825_20160914.indd 1

Planning an Event?

9/14/2016 4:31:02 PM

As New York State’s oldest surviving theater, history lives in the walls and halls of the Hudson Opera House. In the spring of 2017, and for the first time in over half a century, you will have the opportunity to become a part of the living history of Hudson by hosting your own special event in the beautifully restored, 1855 theater. To learn more about our rental packages for your wedding, corporate or special event, please call us or visit hudsonoperahouse.org.

A HUDSON VALLEY VINTAGE RENTAL FIRM & BOUTIQUE RETAILER WEDDING & EVENT DESIGN Hudson NY • 347 615 5528 northcountryvintage@gmail.com • northcountryvintage.com

DON’T MISS OUR

HUDSON OPERA HOUSE CENTER FOR THE ARTS 327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON NY 12534 | (518) 822-1438 | hudsonoperahouse.org

50 weddings & celebrations ChronograM 10/16

Holiday Gift Guide in the November & December Issues To advertise contact sales@chronogram.com


Weddings

Meryl Gordon rides her horse Lucky down the aisle on her parent's horse farm, High & Mighty Stables, in Ghent on May 21, 2016.

A Grand Adventure Planning a Hudson Valley Wedding By Anne Pyburn Craig

Photos by Jesse Turnquist

P

lanning a wedding can make you feel like you’ve been dropped into a parallel universe. There’s an enormous apparatus of advice, trendspotting, and marketing out there, one that you may have never paid any attention to in the past, and suddenly it is reaching fondant-scented, meticulously calligraphed tendrils in your direction, asking endless questions. Afternoon or evening? Cake or cupcake? Pastels or metallics? Band or DJ? Flawless, photogenic dyads gaze adoringly at one another against an endless variety of pictureperfect backdrops. Even people who think the idea of a wedding sounds great can be daunted. No-fuss types may be tempted to run away screaming. The good news is, you don’t start from there, buffeted by the winds of What’s Hot and What’s Not, any more than you have to adhere to the oldschool model in which just about every wedding resembled the same movie with a different cast. Start from who you are and how you connected, think through what brings you mutual joy, and mull over the specific intentions you bring to this occasion of celebrating your union; sprinkle this with any dreams either of you may cherish about the celebration itself. There. There’s your basic movie, unlike anyone else’s, a script you can use to guide the choices that follow. Two general rules apply to all of the following decisions: Know your budget and have plenty of lead time. The Hudson Valley is something of a premiere wedding destination; according to the 2015 Real Wedding Survey published by The Knot, it is also the third-spendiest in the nation, behind only New York City and Chicago. People, according to The Knot, spend over $50,000 on 10/16 ChronograM weddings & celebrations 51


Julia and Jonathan Whittaker at The Hill outside of Hudson on October 5, 2013.

their Hudson Valley weddings. That doesn’t mean you can’t have a stunning wedding here for far, far less; we have beautiful town parks to rent, complete with picnic grills, and creative, good helpers at a wide range of price points. It simply means that if you want drop-dead estate-level elegance with all the trimmings—yeah, we’ve got that, in spades and in style. But whatever you can afford or want to do, assume that it may well be booked a year in advance. Where will your story unwind? The Hudson Valley offers choices you won’t find anywhere else. Several centuries of historic architecture and epic scenery are just the beginning. Would you like a mountaintop with miles and miles of views unfolding? A cozy rustic barn? A waterfall? An elegant estate? Postindustrial chic? How about chartering a boat and marrying on the water? Not only are all of these readily available, they can be found and customized to suit just about every party size, budget plan, and degree of formality you require. Narrow your search down online, then make visits to your top choices; bring a camera, and arrange to meet with whoever handles weddings there to get all of your questions answered. Do you want an “elopement”-style luncheon for 25 or an old-fashioned gathering of the clans out to third cousins twice removed? Are most of them local or will they need accommodations? Are they folks who’d enjoy splitting a big rental house or would they be better off somewhere with maid service and continental breakfast? The actual ceremony and reception are your movie, in accordance with your personal preferences; making your supporting cast comfortable according to their preferences to whatever extent you can manage it will ensure they’ll show up fresh as daisies and happy as clams. Who are the co-stars in this production? Choosing an officiant is one of the most important decisions you’ll make. Although having a friend or family member do the honors is trending somewhat, experts caution that there’s an art to this ceremonial stuff and someone you may love spending time with may nonetheless lack the public speaking skills, gravitas, and ability to roll with whatever circumstances arise that a professional will bring to the occasion. 52 weddings & celebrations ChronograM 10/16

Local choices vary widely, from traditional religious folk of all sorts to interdenominational and nature-based officiants and justices of the peace, each with his or her own style and way of working. Like and yet unlike any other important relationship, your officiant should be someone you feel that “click” of empathy with.This should also be the case if you’re hiring a wedding planner or coordinator. It’s nice if you like your florist or your caterer but more important that you love their work. Officiants, planners, and coordinators, on the other hand, need to be people you can roll with under stress, people whose vision of your Big Day blends seamlessly with your own. They need to be good listeners. Once chosen, the right officiant or planner may well be able to help you with other choices as well. Being in the professional wedding world, they’re well positioned to know who’s a gifted and not overwhelmingly bossy photographer, which caterer hires great staff, and what DJ service knows how to rock the dance floor. When you interview these folks for yourself, be very specific about your wants and needs and budget. You’re embarking on a great adventure together, but it is neither a journey into a vast trackless wasteland nor a rigid grid laced with too much signage and a cop car on every corner. Think of it, rather, as a top-grade canvas that can be blank—leaving every detail to you—or complete with an outline exactly as detailed as you need it to be. Because that’s the main thing about a Hudson Valley wedding. (Besides, of course, the aforementioned stellar scenery and architecture.) We have an incredible talent pool. Whether you want everything vegan and green or voluptuous and brassy, you can have it done that way and done well. Chamber orchestra, folkie, or techno? Posed photo sets, inspired candids, or a wellproduced video narrative? Vintage floral, country casual, or chic sleek? Our hosts, celebrants, caterers, musicians, designers, limo drivers, and nannies are a warm, smart, sophisticated crew who find their bliss is creating your bliss, your way. After all, it’s your love story.


A Memory to Last a Lifetime

Everything You Need for an Exquisite Event!

Imagine the day you always dreamed of ...

1155 ROUTE 9 WAPPINGERS FALLS, NY 845-298-0011 532 TEMPLE HILL RD NEW WINDSOR, NY 845-391-8700 98 1/2 MILL PLAIN RD DANBURY, CT 203-744-2295 71 ETHAN ALLEN HIGHWAY RIDGEFIELD, CT 203-544-7368

w w w. d u r a n t s pa r t y. c o m

10/16 ChronograM weddings & celebrations 53


The view of New Paltz from the Testimonial Gateway Tower at Mohonk Preserve Foothills

54 community pages ChronograM 10/16


Community Pages

Jon and Valentina Alvaro at Water Street Market.

timeless & evolving new paltz

By anne pyburn craig PHOTOs by christine ashburn

N

ew Paltz is iconic. From Key West to Nome, from Berkeley to London, you’re likely to run into people who know the place. Heck, you may even see a P&G’s T-shirt. “Ah, yeah, New Paltz,” your new friend will say with a smile. “Back in the day…” But this is something of a paradox, because the odds are good that the current crop of young folk inhabiting the town will be saying “back in the day” about 2016 as they bump glasses with new friends in far-flung locales 20 years hence. New Paltz is timeless and constantly evolving. So let’s start with a good time to visit, which is anytime, but particularly now. “Fall is a peak time of year, with the foliage changing, and the dry hot summer we’ve had should make for radiant colors,” says Kathy Combs, head of the New Paltz Chamber of Commerce. “Minnewaska State Park and Mohonk Preserve are booming; the BnBs are booked solid.” (Don’t fret, you’ll find lodging in nearby towns easily enough.) That fabulous backdrop made up of the park and the preserve are a big part of the New Paltz wow factor. The Shawangunks are world-class climbing, jewel-toned lakes and miles of carriage roads; many a young collegian has fallen so hard for the Gunks that they’ve decided this was forever home. Being a smart bunch, New Paltzians are versed in the ways of open space preservation and blessed with organizations that work hard at it: the Mohonk Preserve, already large, has recently firmed up plans for its Foothills Project, adding 837 acres of farmland, marsh, and historic structure. There’s a trail connectivity plan and some low-key visitors’ amenities are in the works; construction is slated to begin next year.

Then there’s downtown. Ah, downtown: fabulous pub crawls (live music fills the streets from three or four places on any given weekend evening), quirky indie retailers peddling everything from tie dye and skater gear to art, antiques, imports and fine jewelry. “Every single storefront downtown on Main Street is occupied and people are thriving,” says Combs. “Our business people are comfortable and that makes for a really welcoming atmosphere.” With, of course, plenty to eat. Restaurants, bakeries, tea rooms, and classic pubs offer a world atlas of cuisine, much of it locavore and house-made. Whether you’re a vegan or a steak-eater, whether you hanker for a great soup, a gluten-free cupcake, an herbal tea, some hot wings or a craft cocktail, somebody in New Paltz will be thrilled to make your bliss happen. Certainly, SUNY New Paltz takes some of the credit for the robust business district—both in the form of student and parent dollars, and when alumni who decide to stick around apply their educated creativity to starting a dream business. The college, a notable hotspot for revolutionary thought in the `60s and `70s (even into the 80s, name bands were easy to book for Spring Weekend celebrations in what was then called the Tripping Fields) has since pulled up its socks and become a stronghold of both culture and tech innovation. (US News andWorld Report lists it as number 5 of its top public colleges for 2017.) In New Paltz, even the oldest of what is old gets refreshed. Historic Huguenot Street, the oldest street in the US with original stone houses intact, has always been a place to visit and contemplate; a society of Huguenot descendants has long managed it and offered historic tours and reenactments. But like much else about this town, they’re not resting on their laurels. 10/16 ChronograM community pages 55


THE

DORSKY SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART

IN/ANIMATE Recent Work by Myra Mimlitsch-Gray

C O - W O R K I N G S P AC E

Myra Mimlitsch-Gray, Clove Oval, 2010, copper, brass

Through December 11

Private & Shared Space • Become a Member

Home to 40+ Local Entrepreneurs Business • Arts • Healing

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

WWW.N EWPALTZ.E DU / M USE U M

o n e e p i c p l a c e . c o m • i n fo @ o n e e p i c p l a c e . c o m 8 4 5 - 2 3 2 - 0 4 02 • 1 2 2 M a i n S t . N e w Pa l t z

New Paltz

Huguenot Street School Programs Historic Huguenot Street We would love to accommodate your group! We can run many of our school programs with a group of eight or more. Come and immerse your students in the lives of children who lived on Huguenot Street 300 years ago. Enjoy hands-on experiences through historically-inspired activities (adaptations and modifications can be made for the needs of your class depending on age and ability). Our school programs have been recognized by the NYS Cultural Education Department for adhering to the leading NYS standards and Common Core standards. Homeschoolers are welcome! There is a playground close by for younger siblings if needed and a picnic grove on site if your group wants to have lunch on our historic grounds. 81 Huguenot Street, New Paltz (845) 255-1660 huguenotstreet.org/school-programs 56 community pages ChronograM 10/16


New Paltz band Ashes of the Phoenix at the Taste of New Paltz.

“Huguenot Street used to be more of a school field trip or strictly tourist destination, but they have really turned it around,” says Combs. “After all, they were the original community’s Main Street, and with their innovative programming they’re turned it back into that. They have community celebrations like Christmas tree lighting and trick-or-treat; they’ve intentionally brought in a young, vibrant staff and it shows in the creativity.” Creativity could be this town’s middle name; it’s certainly its hallmark. Consider the adventures of Nicole Langlois and her partner Julia J. Robbins in the creation of One EPIC Place. The two women, a holistic business coach and a health coach, took over an elegant former funeral home at the top of downtown and founded their coworking center (EPIC stands for Empowering People, Inspiring Change) in December of 2015. “It wasn’t that an idea was born in this form and we made it happen, it grew organically from a need we had ourselves,” says Langlois. “Professional space is so costly. This is like a magnet, and it has been formed by the community that’s been drawn to it. Someone would come in and say, ‘well, I’m a chef, how can you help me?’ We have rooms for artists, a music studio with a piano, voice, dance, yoga, film and acting schools, treatment rooms. We have been so lucky—they are such beautiful businesses.” One EPIC Space hosts workshops, meetings, gatherings and classes of all sorts, and has recently given a home to one of New Paltz’s long lived arts institutions: the Arts Community. Founded in 1975 with the mission of making art accessible to all, the Arts Community folks found EPIC a perfect fit and a shot in the arm. “We have 40 members,” says Nicole, “in business, arts and healing. There’s a lot of unexpected collaboration—I just saw a massage therapist and a graphic designer bartering Epic Points.”

Top: Tyler Beatrice at Root Note Music. Bottom: Alex Futtersak and Caryn Byllott.

10/16 ChronograM community pages 57


RICHARD MILLER ARCHITECT

sustainable design & historic rehabilitation Certified Passiv Haus Consultant

Eclectic wines, craft coctails, craft beer & tapas Happy Hour Monday—Friday, 3 to 6 $5 mimosas all day Sundays www.jardwinepub.com water street market, new paltz

Serving the Hudson Valley and NYC for thirty years.

RichardMillerArchitect.com 845.255.4480

79 Main Street New Paltz 845-255-2244 Open 7 Days

of Full Line uts C ld o C ic n Orga king o o C e and Hom ssen Delicate

Local Organic Grass-Fed Beef • Lamb • Goat • Veal • Pork • Chicken • Wild Salmon

No Hormones ~ No Antibiotics ~ No Preservatives Custom Cut • Home Cooking Delicatessen Nitrate-Free Bacon • Pork Roasts • Beef Roasts Bone-in or Boneless Ham: smoked or fresh Local Organic Beef • Exotic Meats (Venison, Buffalo, Ostrich) • Wild Fish

Elizabeth Berin Interiors

CREATIVE

WRITING WORKSHOPS U s i n g A m h e r s t Wr i t e r s & Artists Method

New Paltz..." line to "Helping discerncover the world for 25 years." design consultation, strategy, organization, staging

Kate Hymes, Leader (845) 750-2370 Elizabeth Berin 212 380 1770 • 845 633 8089 interiors@berin-design.com NEW PALTZ

Helping discerning travelers discover the world for 25 years Vacations, Tours, Cruises, Business Travel Division 43 North Chestnut St. New Paltz, NY | 845-255-7706 newpaltztravel.com

58 community pages ChronograM 10/16

WEEKLY WORKSHOPS 10-weeks • 3-hour sessions Thursday Evenings Sunday Afternoons

WRITE SATURDAYS All day writing workshops

CONSULTATIONS & INDIVIDUAL CONFERENCES www.wallkillvalleywriters.com khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com

Copeland Funeral Home, Inc. 25 years in Business A community resource that is dedicated to excellence in service and built on quality, sincerity, and trust.

h•g 162 South Putt Corners Rd New Paltz, NY 12561 (845)255-1212

copelandfhnp.com


MOUNTAIN LAUREL WALDORF SCHOOL

Young children are filled with joy and enthusiasm. Participating wholeheartedly in everything around them, they learn naturally through imitation and imagination. Our kindergarten - loving, warm and secure - reflects this view of children. In it, a small child can make a gentle transition from life at home to the coming grade school years.

We are enrolling now for early childhood through eighth grade. 16 South Chestnut, New Paltz, NY | 845 255 0033 | www.mountainlaurel.org

Willow Realty Hudson Valley Real Estate - Ulster County Real Estate

1857 Brick Federal Farmhouse on 54 acres Overlooking the Wallkill River in Gardiner

Price: $1,850,000 | MLS: 20162329

Impeccably and honestly restored and furnished to its era 11 foot ceilings, elaborate and true moldings and trim 6,490 Sq Ft. - 3rd floor studio Privately set way back from the road, on the Wallkill River Horse barn and fenced paddocks Completely renovated guest house 33 Gibbons Lane, New Paltz, NY Laurie@WillowRealEstate.com

845-255-7666 10/16 ChronograM community pages 59


Top: 1799 House, Huguenot Street Bottom: Cafeteria Coffee House on Main Street

60 community pages ChronograM 10/16


Gatehouse Gardens Bed and Breakfast

HUDSON VALLEY GOLDSMITH Bed, Breakfast ... and so much more!

Located on beautiful Gatehouse Road, next to the Testimonial Gateway. Gatehouse Gardens is a very peaceful and private setting bordering The Mohonk Preserve. Rates starting at $120. AMENITIES INCLUDE:

Heated Swimming Pool Hot Tub Air Conditioning Private Entrances

Private Patio/Decks Secluded/Wooded Location Private Baths/Kitchen BBQ Grills Hiking Trails

Best Jewelry Store 2015 & 2016 845-255-8817

GatehouseGardens.com info@gatehousegardens.com

Custom one-of-a-kind fine jewelry made from recycled precious metals and conflict free diamonds. Handmade in front of you in any style. HUDSON VALLEY GOLDSMITH HUDSON GOLDSMITH HUDSONVALLEY VALLEY GOLDSMITH 71A Main Street, New Paltz HudsonValleyGoldsmith.com | 845•255•5872

Best Jewelry Store 2015 & 2016

Best Jewelry Store 2015 & 2016

Best Jewelry Store 2015 & 2016

one-of-a-kind fine jewelry CustomCustom one-of-a-kind engagement and wedding bandsmade made from from recycled Custom one-of-a-kind fine jewelry made from recycled precious metals and conflict free precious metals and conflict-free diamonds. Handmade in front of you in any style.

Custom one-of-a-kind fineand jewelry made from recycled precious in metals conflict free diamonds. Handmade front of you in any style. recycled precious metals and conflict free diamonds. Handmade in front of you in any style. 71A Main Street, New Paltz HudsonValleyGoldsmith.com 845•255•5872 Street, diamonds. Handmade71A inMain front ofNew youPaltz in any style. HudsonValleyGoldsmith.com | 845•255•5872

71A Main Street, New Paltz HudsonValleyGoldsmith.com 845•255•5872 71A Main Street, New |Paltz

HudsonValleyGoldsmith.com | 845•255•5872

The newly renovated Wooster Science Hall at SUNY New Paltz.

ECO-SALON & SPA

Hair Sculpting • Ammonia-Free Haircolor • Formaldehyde-Free Smoothing Treatments Body Waxing • Shellac Manicures & Luxury Pedicures Fume-Free Nail Enhancements • Individualized Skincare • Therapeutic Massage 2 South Chestnut St, New Paltz, NY (845) 204-8319 | Online Booking: lushecosalon.com

It’s hard to imagine a better addition to a business district where even a shopping destination is envisioned and executed to be a community center full of truly fine goods and festivities, as the Water Street Market has become. Combs, who managed landmark restaurant P&G’s for 15 years, has only one issue with the town: where to fit more cool stuff. “I think we’re on the crux of evolving still more,” she says. “Structures that were once private homes are office space, have been added onto, and we’re still out of room. Businesses want to move into the area and we simply can’t accommodate them. How do we grow? What is the character of our landscape? How do we go forward? To preserve the good, we need to move carefully and collectively, and we do—for example, the man who’s turning the old Frito-Lay compound into a Hampton Inn has a projected open date of November, and it took him seven years and hundreds of thousands of dollars to come up with a plan that was acceptable. And we need him. As I said, the BnBs are booked, we’ve put additions on additions. Even 800 square feet of business space is hard to find. And I’d like to see the opportunity for more of the people that come through on the way to the Gunks to be able to get out of those cars and take a look around.” 10/16 ChronograM community pages 61


2016 SEASON hudson valley Premiere!

Oct • 7–23

The Night Alive By Conor McPherson Directed by Melisa Annis

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE. MADE IN THE HUDSON VALLEY. (845) 647-5511 • 157 Canal Street, Ellenville, NY 12428 • shadowlandstages.org SPONSORED IN PART BY

Saturday, October 22 & 29 Halloween event for all ages from 3 - 5:30 pm: Costume contest Apple bobbing contest Pumpkin carving contest Pumpkins, cider & donuts available The Art Bus - Arts & Crafts (artbus.org)

A Sense of Place the art of

Allen Blagden ‘57 & Tom Blagden, Jr. ‘69 left: Tom Blagden, Jr. right: Allen Blagden

presents

MEDIA SPONSOR

First Annual Haunted House from 5:30 - 8 pm: A wicked tour of the home of the Byrdcliffe founders Ralph and Jane Whitehead, with spooks and scares. Age suggestion is 14 and over. Children Children $5 • Adults $10 moreinfo: www.woodstockguild.org

September 10 - October 9, 2016

845.679.2079 11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, ct | Open Daily | 860.435.3663 | hotchkiss.org/arts

62 arts & culture ChronograM 10/16


arts &

culture

A 2012 show poster for Grizzly Bear, part of the exhibit “Design for ‘Popular’ Music: Poster Art by Mike King,” through October 29 at One Mile Gallery in Kingston.

10/16 ChronograM arts & culture 63


galleries & museums

Robert Cronin’s 1958 painting Red Houses, part of the exhibition “Robert Cronin: Now ‘n Then,” at David M. Hunt Library in Falls

galleries & museums

Village, Connecticut, October 8 through October 29. 2 ALICES 311 HUDSON STREET, CORNWALL-ON-HUDSON 534-4717. “Possession: Steven Strauss.” Exhibit of paintings. October 1-December 12.

BYRDCLIFFE KLEINERT/JAMES CENTER FOR THE ARTS 36 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2079. “Byrdcliffe’s Legacy: Handmade in the 20th Century.” Through October 9.

AKIN LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 378 Old Quaker Hill Road, PAWLING 855-5099. “6th Annual Meeting Past Art Exhibition.” 90 contemporary artists. Through October 23.

CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY 622 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1915. “Abstraction.” Group show. Through October 16.

ALBERT SHAHINIAN FINE ART GALLERY 22 EAST MARKET STREET SUITE 301, RHINEBECK 876-7578. “The Long View: The Luminous Landscape 2016,” October 6-December 4. Opening reception October 8, 5pm-7:30pm.

CATALYST GALLERY 137 MAIN STreet, BEACON 204-3844. Michael X. Rose & Dave Tree. October 1-30. Opening reception October 8, 5pm-8pm.

THE ALDRICH CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM 258 MAIN Street, RIDGEFIELD, CT (203) 438-4519. “Engaging Place.” Site-specific commissions. Through February 5, 2017.

THE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK 59 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-9957. “Race, Love, and Labor.” Through October 16.

ARTISTS’ COLLECTIVE OF HYDE PARK 4338 ALBANY POST ROAD, HYDE PARK (914) 456-6700. “Autumn Blaze Group Art Exhibition.” Through October 31. ARTS MID HUDSON 696 DUTCHESS TURNPIKE, POUGHKEEPSIE 454-3222. New Yorker Cartoonists of the Hudson Valley. Featuring the work of Liza Donnelly and Michael Maslin. Through October 30.

CHRIS DAVISON GALLERY 302 NORTH WATER STREET, NEWBURGH 1.917.825.5709. “Sensing Place.” Group show. Through October 31. CLERMONT STATE HISTORIC SITE 1 CLERMONT AVENUE, GERMANTOWN (518) 537-4240. “Vigil: A Space for Memory.” A site-based installation by Leigh Davis. Through October 16.

ASHOKAN CENTER 477 BEAVERKILL ROAD, OLIVEBRIDGE 657-8333. “Illustrating Hidden Treasures: Botanical Art by Wendy Hollender.” Through October 30.

COLUMBIA COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS 209 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 671-6213. “A Stitch in Time: The Fiber Show.” Through October 31.

ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER 24 SECOND STREET, ATHENS (518) 945-2136. “It’s Elementary: Lessons from the New Baltimore Schoolhouse.”

CORNELL STREET STUDIO 168 CORNELL STREET, KINGSTON 679-8348. “Urn Your Keep.” A collection of original drawings by Mario Pollan. October 1-31.

ATLAS INDUSTRIES 11 SPRING STREET, NEWBURGH 391-8855. Silent Shout. A group show curated by Lacey Fekishazy. Through October 31.

CROSS CONTEMPORARY ART 81 PARTITION STREET, SAUGERTIES 399-9751. “Melinda Stickney-Gibson: Drawings.” Through October 23.

THE BARN AT MEADOW FARM 71 STARBARRACK ROAD, RED HOOK. “The Power of the Center.” Paintings by Laura Battle. Through October 16.

DARREN WINSTON BOOKSTORE 81 MAIN STREET, SHARON, CT (860) 364-1890. “Colin McLain: Spy vs. Spy.” Through October 9.

BARRETT ART CENTER 55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-2550. “New Directions ‘16.” Juried by Heather Pesanti. Through November 5.

David M. Hunt Library 63 Main Street, Falls Village, CT (860) 824-7424 “Robert Cronin: Now ‘n Then,” October 8 through October 29, 2016. Opening Reception October 8, 4-6pm.

BCB ART 116 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-4539. “Scheherazade.” A cycle of lyrical abstract paintings by Antonio Alvarez. Through October 23. BERTELSMANN CAMPUS CENTER BARD COLLEGE, ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON. “Photographs of Educated Youth: Images of the Chinese Youth Sent to the Countryside during the Cultural Revolution 1966–1976.” Through December 31. BETSY JACARUSO STUDIO & GALLERY 43 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK 516-4435. “His Eyes Were so Blue.” Mimi Graminski solo show, installation of mixed media. October 1-30. Opening reception October 15, 5pm-7pm.

64 arts & culture ChronograM 10/16

DIA:BEACON 3 BEEKMAN STREET, BEACON 440-0100. “Robert Irwin, Excursus: Homage to the Square3.” Site-specific work. Through May 31, 2017. DUCK POND GALLERY 128 CANAL STreet, TOWN OF ESOPUS LIBRARY, PORT EWEN 338-5580. Cross River Fine Art Annual Show. Featuring 18 Hudson Valley watercolorists. October 1-29. EMERGE GALLERY & ART SPACE 228 MAIN STREET, SAUGERTIES 247-7515. “96.8 Miles: Brooklyn to Saugerties.” A group exhibition of artists from Brooklyn. October 7-31.


FA L L FACTO RY SA L E O C T.

1 5 TH

1 1 - 6 P M

&

O C T.

1 6 TH

1 1 - 4 P M

50 - 80 % O FF FACTO RY G L A S S

C A S H O N LY

|

3 1 0 F I S H K I L L AV E . U N I T 1 1 , B E A C O N , N Y

|

B L O W I N G

S ECO N DS D E M O N S T R AT I O N S

W W W. N I C H E M O D E R N . C O M / C H R O N O G R A M - F S 2 0 1 6

half moon theatre at

THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA—MARRIOTT PAVILION THE

DORSKY

BRADLEY WALKER TOMLIN A Retrospective

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART

10th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION WITH BROADWAY STARS SETH RUDETSKY & LAURA OSNES OCT 22 PATTIE CANOVA: TAROT TALES & PSYCHIC GLIMPSES OCT 28 & 29 MARY TESTA & MICHAEL STAROBIN: A CABARET EVENING NOV 18 & 19

Bradley Walker Tomlin, Number 8, 1949, oil on canvas

Through December 11 Opening reception: Saturday, September 10, 2016, 5-7 p.m.

For tickets and more information:

845-235-9885 www.halfmoontheatre.org 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park NY

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

WWW.N EWPALTZ.E DU / M USE U M 10/16 ChronograM arts & culture 65


Beacon

Robert Irwin Excursus: Homage Chelsea 3 to the Square

Giclees of original oil paintings by artist Nadine Robbins juicyoysters.com

Mouthwatering. Sexy. Salty. Luxurious.

Dia:Beacon 3 Beekman Street Beacon New York 845 440 0100 www.diaart.org

Sites

Affiliates

Chronogram ad for Oct. for NRG_Layout 1 9/6/16 4:39 PM Page 1

GEAR INSTRUMENTS VINYL RECORDS LESSONS LIVE SOUND REPAIRS

LIFESTYLE RENTALS

North River Gallery Equine Images Between Transcendent and Earthly Realms by Ellen Lynch September 24 – November 1, 2016

Opening Reception Saturday, September 24, 4:00 - 7:00pm

woodstockmusicshop.com

TWO SUPER AWESOME LOCATIONS

6 Rock City Road Woodstock, NY 845-679-3224

Hudson Valley Mall Kingston, NY 845-383-1734

Hours: Friday, noon - 7pm • Saturday, 11am - 5pm Sunday, 10 am - 2pm, also by appointment

North River Gallery 34A Main Street, Chatham, New York, 12037 • 518.392.7000 www.northrivergallery.com

Your work deserves attention. Which means you need a great bio for your press kit or website. One that’s tight. Clean. Professionally written. Something memorable. Something a booking agent, a record-label person, a promoter, or a gallery owner won’t just use to wipe up the coffee spill on their desk before throwing away. When you’re ready, I’m here.

PETER AARON

Music editor, Chronogram. Award-winning music columnist, 2005-2006, Daily Freeman. Contributor, Village Voice, Boston Herald, All Music Guide, All About Jazz.com, Jazz Improv and Roll magazines. Musician. Consultations also available. Reasonable rates.

See samples at www.peteraaron.org. E-mail info@peteraaron.org for rates. I also offer general copy editing and proofreading services.

66 arts & culture ChronograM 10/16

Follow us for more arts, culture, and spirit. instagram.com/chronogram


THE ENCHANTED CAFE 7484 S BROADWAY, RED HOOK 518-1915. “Deep Trance Art: George Guarino.” Through October 31. FIELD LIBRARY 4 NELSON AVENUE, PEEKSKILL (914) 737-1212. “Paul Moro: The Peekskill Paintings 1926-1937.” Through October 29. FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER AT VASSAR COLLEGE 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5237. “Celebrating Heroes: American Mural Studies of the 1930s and 1940s from the Steven and Susan Hirsch Collection.” Through December 18. FRIENDS OF HISTORIC KINGSTON 63 MAIN STREET, KINGSTON 339-0720. “The Friends of Historic Kingston Celebrates 50 Years.” Through October 29. THE GALLERY AT R&F 84 TEN BROECK AVENUE, KINGSTON 331-3112. “Beyond the Day Job: Artists Who Work at R&F.” Through October 15. GARRISON ART CENTER 23 GARRISON’S LANDING, GARRISON 424-3960. “Sean Scully: Book.” Through November 6. HOTCHKISS LIBRARY 10 UPPER MAIN, SHARON, CT (860) 364-5041. An Art Exhibition of Tom Schiller and Henry Miller. October 1-December 2. HUDSON OPERA HOUSE 327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-4181. “Bar-Carolle.” Zoé Bellot transforms decayed pianos into piano bars. October 7-November 13. HUDSON VALLEY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 788-0100. “Word”. Group show. Through December 17. HUDSON VALLEY LGBTQ COMMUNITY CENTER, INC. 300 WALL STREET, KINGSTON 331-5300. “Opening Reception: Paintings by Stuart Bigley.” October 1-November 21. INKY EDITIONS 112 S FRONT STreet, HUDSON (518) 610-5549. “The Art of the Chop.” Fine art prints by Wolf Kahn, Sol LeWitt, and others. Through October 30.

JOHN DAVIS GALLERY 362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5907. “Fran Shalom: New Work.” Also showing Bruce Gagnier, Sculpture; Lois Dickson. Paintings; William Stone, Home is Where the Hearth Is; Gabriel Phipps, Paintings; and Miriam Bloom, Wherever You Roam. Through October 9. JOYCE GOLDSTEIN GALLERY 16 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-2250. Works by Deborah Ellis. Through October 29. KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY MUSEUM 94 BROADWAY, NEWBURGH 569-4997. “Peace.” The visual arts and poetry of The Boys and Girls Club of Newburgh, the Newburgh Armory Unity Center Saturday Art Program, local artists, members of the community, and the Hudson Valley Poets. Through October 31. KENT ART ASSOCIATION 21 SOUTH MAIN STREET, KENT, CT (860) 927-3989. Fall Juried Art Show. Through October 11. KLEINERT/JAMES ARTS CENTER 34 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2079. Works by Valerie Hammond. October 14-November 27. Opening reception October 22, 4pm-6pm. LIMNER GALLERY 123 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-2343. “A Show of Heads.” October 20-November 19. MANITOGA/THE RUSSEL WRIGHT DESIGN CENTER 584 ROUTE 9D, GARRISON 424-3812. “Ecstatic Light.” Illuminated paintings of 2016 resident artist Peter Bynum. Through November 14. MARK GRUBER GALLERY 17 NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ 255-1241. Works in Oil. Works by James Cramer and John A. Varriano. Through October 8. “Nature’s Patterns.” Patings by Hardie Truesdale. October 15-November 19. Opening reception October 15, 5pm-7pm. THE MUROFF KOTLER VISUAL ARTS GALLERY @ SUNY ULSTER 491 COTTEKILL ROAD, STONE RIDGE 687-5113. “The Correspondence Show.” Curatorial installation by Steve Clorfeine. October 23-November 30. North river GALLERY 123 WARREN STREET, chatham (518) 392-7000. “Equine Images Between Transcendent and Earthly Realms.” Ellen Lynch. Through November 1. OLANA STATE HISTORIC SITE 5720 ROUTE 9G, HUDSON (518) 828-0135. “Capturing the Cosmos.” Explores the influence of the great German Naturalist Alexander von Humboldt on Frederic Church. Through November 6.

PAINTERS RESTAURANT 266 HUDSON STREET, CORNWALL-ON-HUDSON 534-2109. “Scott Ackerman: Paintings.” October 9-November 30. FISHER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS AT BARD COLLEGE 60 MANOR AVENUE, ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON 758-7900. “Woven: In Process.” An exhibition of photographs by Tanya Marcuse. Through November 20. RITZ THEATER LOBBY 107 BROADWAY, NEWBURGH 784-1199. “Through the Eyes of the Cornerstone Newburgh’s Ole Faithful.” Through October 31. ROOST STUDIOS & ART GALLERY 69 MAIN STREET, NEW PALTZ 8456751217. “Recent Work by Peter Sheehan.” Through October 10. SAmuel dorsky museum of art SUNY new paltz, new paltz. newpaltz.edu/museum “Bradley Walker Tomlin: A Retrospective.” Through December 11. “In/Animate” Recent work by Myra Mimlitsch-Gray. Through December 11. SAUNDERS FARM 853 OLD ALBANY POST ROAD, GARRISON Facebook.com/pages/SaundersFarm-Garrison-NY. “Collaborative Concepts Farm Project 2016.” Large outdoor sculpture exhibit. Through October 29. SELIGMANN CENTER FOR THE ARTS 23 WHITE OAK DRIVE, SUGAR LOAF 469-9459. “Nomina Magica.” Jesse Bransford. Through January 9, 2017. SEPTEMBER 449 WARREN STREET #3, HUDSON. “Blue Jean Baby.” Group show. Through October 16. SIMON’S ROCK COLLEGE: DANIEL ARTS CENTER 84 ALFORD ROAD, GREAT BARRINGTON, MA (413) 644-4400. “Trailing Off.” A solo exhibit by Brooklyn painter Robin Williams. Through October 7. SPENCERTOWN ACADEMY ARTS CENTER 790 ROUTE 203, SPENCERTOWN (518) 392-3693. Works by Painter Scott Thomas Balfe and Photographer Jane McWhorter. Through October 9. STEVENSON LIBRARY BARD COLLEGE, ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON. Blooks: The Art of Books that Aren’t. An exhibition of 38 historic book-shaped objects on display, originally in the Grolier Club exhibition. Through October 30. Theo Ganz Studio 149 Main Street, Beacon (917) 318.2239 An exhibition of Carl Van Brunt digital art. October 8 through November 6. Opening reception Saturday October 8, 6pm-8pm. THE RE INSTITUTE 1395 BOSTON CORNERS ROAD, MILLERTON (518) 567-5359. Works by Matt Magee, Guy Walker, and Sandy Moore. Through October 29. THOMAS COLE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 218 SPRING STREET, CATSKILL 518-943-7465. “Jason Middlebrook: Nature Builds/We Cover.” Comtemporary installation. Through October 30. THOMPSON MEMORIAL LIBRARY VASSAR COLLEGE, POUGHKEEPSIE Vassar.edu. “Shakespeare at Vassar.” Through December 7. TIVOLI ARTISTS GALLERY 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI 845 757 2667. Marie Cole: Landscape: Remembered and Imagined. An exhibition of paintings and pastels. Through October 31. TREMAINE GALLERY AT THE HOTCHKISS SCHOOL 11 INTERLAKEN ROAD, LAKEVILLE, CT (860) 435-3663. Allen and Tom Blagden. Through October 9. UNFRAMED ARTISTS GALLERY 173 HUGUENOT STREET, NEW PALTZ, 12561. “Truth Out.” A multimedia event. Social, political, and emotional truths. Through November 13. VASSAR COLLEGE: THE FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5632. “When Light Touches Paper.” Works by graphic artist Barbara Beisinghoff. Through October 16. WALLKILL RIVER SCHOOL AND ART GALLERY 232 WARD STREET, MONTGOMERY 457-ARTS. Nancy Reed Jones and William Noonan Solo Shows. Also featuring emerging artist Emilio Escalera. October 1-30.

ONE MILE GALLERY 475 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON 338-2035. Design for “Popular” Music: Poster Art by Mike King. October 1-29. Opening reception October 1, 6pm-9pm.

WIRED GALLERY 1415 ROUTE 213, HIGH FALLS (682) 564-5613. Getting Closer: An Intimate Landscape. Nine hand-picked Hudson Valley based photo artists explore landscape via the highways and by-ways of the region in a unique and exciting variety of styles, visions, and presentations. Curated by Steve Gentile. October 22-November 20.

ORANGE HALL GALLERY SUNY ORANGE, MIDDLETOWN 341-4790. “Birds: Enduring Feathered Creatures.” Through October 30.

WOODSTOCK SCHOOL OF ART 2470 RTE. 212, WOODSTOCK 679-2388. Instructors Exhibition. Works by WSA instructors. Through October 8.

10/16 ChronograM arts & culture 67

galleries & museums

JAMES BARRON ART 4 FULLING LANE, KENT, CT (917) 270-8044. “Fifty Years After.” A group exhibition bringing together talented photographers Gordon Parks, Carrie Mae Weems, Mickalene Thomas, and LaToya Ruby Frazier. Through October 16.

ORANGE HALL GALLERY AND LOFT, SUNY ORANGE THE CORNER OF WAWAYANDA AND GRANDVIEW AVENUES, (GPS: 24 GRANDVIEW AVE.), MIDDLETOWN 341-4891. “My Journey As An Artist: Works by Jeannette McGee.” October 14-31. Opening reception October 14, 5:30pm-7:45pm.


Music

Manchild in the Promised Land Dean Jones By Peter Aaron Photo by Fionn Reilly

68 music ChronograM 10/16


I

t’s often said that music keeps you young. Besides engaging your ears and perform with such busy local bands as the Fighting McKenzies, Earmite, Big exercising your emotions, music can massage your memory, transporting Sky Ensemble, and Uncle Buckle. In 2000 he founded Dog on Fleas, whose you back to the time you first heard a particular song or album, serving present lineup also includes drummer Chris Cullo and bassist (and current as a ready reminder of a specific period of your life. And, arguably, no one Rosendale Town Council member) John Hughes, shortly after he’d begun knows this secret of eternal youth better than those of us who are musicians working as the one-man-band accompanist for Saugerties’s magical Armourselves—the big kids who’ve never had to grow up and get real jobs. Except, of-the-Sea Theater puppet-and-mask troupe, a position he still holds. “It’s a perhaps, for the subset who actually make music for kids. That particular breed challenge, which is always fun,” says Jones, who can be seen seated stage-side of musician has it doubly good. For not only do they get to stave off that, as Ian at the company’s performances, playing a minimal drum kit, trombone, and MacKaye called it, adult crash by spending time making noise with their peers, other instruments, creating sound effects, and at times even narrating. “[The their profession also gives them license to run wild within the playground of organizers] usually write the script first and bring me in later. It’s really loose their own inner child. and I get to improvise a lot.” “I’ve always loved hanging out with musicians—musicians like to play, after Somewhere along the way, Jones turned his passion for tinkering around all,” says singer-songwriter and musical polymath Dean Jones. “I can get really with his four-track into a professional recording facility: No Parking Studios, so ridiculous when I’m making music. I’m not afraid of making an ass of myself. named because it abutted the entryway of the Rosendale Police Department. I enjoy it.” “There was also a guy named Whitey who lived next door and would get pissed If you’ve lived in the Hudson Valley for the last decade or so and have been if we peed near his trailer,” the producer reminisces. “But being next to the going to gigs or listening to locally recorded music, you’ve very likely seen or police station meant the security was good.” Nevertheless, in 2011, so as to give heard Jones at play. An indispensable Whitey, the cops, and the bands he was component of the scene, Jones, who working with more space, Jones and a specializes in trombone, keyboards, group of musician-carpenter buddies and vocals but easily holds his own on willing to barter their services in whatever other instrument he happens exchange for recording time built the to pick up, has performed with dozens studio’s present home, a straw-baleof bands. “For a little while there I constructed building in his Tillson was in eight bands at once,” he says. back yard. One of the new facility’s The best known by far of all Jones’s first client acts was the Minneapolisprojects is the kids’ music crew Dog based children’s Americana duo the on Fleas, which has released six albums Okee Dokee Brothers. that get heavy play on “kindie” radio “We were looking for a producer and remains a favorite at street fairs to take us out of our comfort zone and other family-friendly events. But and rough things up a bit with our Jones’s membership in bands is just one music,” says the group’s singer and facet of what he does. This, if you will, guitarist, Joe Mailander. “We heard dean of Upstate music, is also a busy In a wall of Dean Jones’s No Parking Studio in Rosendale, a porthole fashioned from an old about Dean and we knew he was session player and Grammy-winning LP opens to display the core of its straw-bale construction. really unconventional, that he focuses producer/engineer who has overseen on energy and mood. He can really get and appeared on literally hundreds of inside a song and a boil it down to the recordings, as well as a solo artist who recently released his fourth album, the simplest thing, to figure out what will make it sound the best. Working with charming In My Dreams. him, it felt like we were really going out on a limb—and it was totally worth Jones, 50, had a Hudson Valley connection before he ever got here. The it.” No doubt: The resulting album, Can You Canoe?, won a Grammy for Best youngest of three children whose father worked for a wire-manufacturing Children’s Album in 2013. “The whole thing was shocking,” says Jones about firm, he was born and raised in rural Simcoe, Ontario, the hometown of The getting the news of the award. “I hadn’t even been paying attention at all to Band’s Rick Danko. “It’s a dinky, little town,” he says. “I could walk to school, the Grammys and then I saw that people were posting about it on Facebook.” and the county fair happens there.” His sister was into Queen and other classic Did he go to the awards ceremony? “Nah, that would’ve meant buying a suit rockers and his brother, a Beatles fan, played piano; Dean started lessons on and all that stuff.” In the wake of Can You Canoe?, Jones has received three the ivories at age eight, taking up trombone soon after. “My brother was kind additional Grammy nominations, one for his further involvement with the of a klepto, and this trombone was one of the instruments that just ‘showed up’ Okee Dokee Brothers on 2014’s Through the Woods (he also produced 2016’s in the house one day, so that’s how I started with it,” says Jones with a laugh. Saddle Up) and two for twiddling the knobs on 2015’s Dark Pie Concerns by “I never excelled at piano lessons, but I understood theory and I could play by Gustafer Yellowgold and Trees by Molly Ledford and Bill Kelly. He also worked ear. My parents had a lot of interesting stuff in their record collection—Bach, on the forthcoming Let All the Children Boogie, an all-ages David Bowie tribute Harry Belafonte, calypso. And in Toronto [an hour-and-a-half away] there was album that will benefit LGBT youth advocacy group It Gets Better (a record always great music going on.” When Jones was in middle school, his father release concert at Lincoln Center is planned for this month). took a job in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and the family moved there. “There “One of the coolest things that ever happened to me was at this one time was a really great college radio station nearby, and I’d listen to it late at night when I was playing a show with Arm-of-the-Sea,” recounts Jones, a married when I was supposed to be asleep,” he recalls. “I’d keep notebooks under the father of two. “This person from the audience came up to me and said ‘Hey, covers and write down the names of the bands I heard, which was a lot of aren’t you the guy from Dog on Fleas? I really love this one song you guys play pretty out stuff, like Can.” He started writing punk rock songs and had bands and I listen to it with my kid every night at bedtime.’ I can’t remember what in high school with names like the Blue Cheese Hats and Lobster Illusion. song it was [laughs], but that really hit me, how cool it was that I did something “Besides just writing and playing songs, I was really into sound,” says the studio that inspires somebody and triggers something in them.” maven. “I remember figuring out how to use a walkie-talkie set to amplify my For Jones, after nearly 30 years in the Hudson Valley, what’s the best thing acoustic guitar.” about making and recording music for and with music kids of all ages? “I love Upon enrolling at SUNY New Paltz in 1988 to major in communications, it when we’re working and all of sudden there’s that ecstatic feeling of ‘Oh my Jones felt an instant affinity for the region. “I saw that there was a lot of God—that’s something I’ve never heard before!’” he says. music and dance going on, a lot of people doing creative stuff,” he says. “Plus there’s the mountains!” Deciding to stick around after college, he went on to In My Dreams is out now. Dogonfleas.com. 10/16 ChronograM music 69


nightlife highlights Handpicked by music editor Peter Aaron for your listening pleasure.

Peter Case plays at The Low Beat in Albany on October 13.

Ben Neill’s Manitoga October 1. Trumpeter and composer Ben Neill and his brass ensemble return to Manitoga, the home of designer Russel Wright, to once again present Neill’s site-specific work celebrating the historic structure and its surroundings. Mirroring Wright’s design and the siting of the sleek midcentury modern house, Manitoga is, according to Neill, “a very harmonious blending of architecture and the natural environment.” During the performance benefiting the continued operation of the facility, which is now an arts and design center, Neill and the other musicians will move through its wooded grounds playing their specially constructed “mutantrumpet” and “phonemophones.” Intrigued? Get thee to Garrison. 4pm. $45 general public, $20 children under 18, $35 members, $125 for performance and reception with artists. Garrison. (845) 424-3812; Visitmanitoga.org.

Peter Case October 13. Singer-songwriter Peter Case, who here makes his way back to the Low Beat, hit the Los Angeles rock scene in the late 1970s with protopunk/power pop bands the Nerves and the Breakaways and found further fame in the 1980s with the Plimsouls. (Perhaps you remember their performance of the classic “A Million Miles Away” in Valley Girl.) Case went solo in 1986 and has since moved mainly in a semi-acoustic, story-oriented, folk-based style that’s garnered him the reputation of being a “songwriter’s songwriter” (no less than Bruce Springsteen is a big admirer). And with good reason his fans are unwavering; when Case was faced with major heart surgery in 2009, a group of them even organized benefit shows to help out with expenses. (Walter Salas-Humara wails October 15; Shonen Knife cuts in November 1.) 7pm. $15. Albany. (518) 432-6572; Thelowbeat.com.

Maceo Parker October 16. “Maceo! Blow your horn!” So went the famous command of his one-time boss, the immortal James Brown, when it was time for the Godfather of Soul’s number one saxophonist to take a solo. And, indeed, Maceo Parker’s solos are hallmarks of some of Brown’s greatest recordings—“Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag,” “I Got You (I Feel Good),” “Cold Sweat,” “Sex Machine,” and “Mother Popcorn,” to name a few. Besides working with Brown and leading 70 music ChronograM 10/16

his own bands on and off, Parker, who blows into Infinity Music Hall this month, was also a crucial member of Brown’s leading funk disciples, Parliament and Funkadelic, and later worked with Prince and recorded with Keith Richards, De La Soul, Living Colour, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Bryan Ferry, Deee-Lite, Ani DiFranco, and many others. Can you say “legend”? (Delbert McClinton delivers October 24; Eric Johnson jams October 27.) 7:30pm. $39, $59. Norfolk, Connecticut. (866) 666-6306; Infinityhall.com.

Weird Owl October 21. From Brooklyn come Weird Owl, formed in 2004. The outfit’s stoned droning crosses Pink Floyd and Crazy Horse-saddled Neil Young with the head-nodding heaviosity of newer acts like Dead Meadow and Black Mountain. Although the Owl’s nest is in the south, the group has a bit of a local connection in that the majority of their third album, 2009’s Build Your Beast a Fire, was recorded and mixed with Bishop Allen’s Justin Rice at his Drawing Room studio in Kingston. On the wings of their fourth full-length, 2015’s Interstellar Skeletal, the neo-psychedelic warlords touch down at Snug Harbor (aka Snug’s) for this levitational evening organized under the “Hudson Valley Psych Fest Presents” banner of the area’s foremost drone rockers, It’s Not Night: It’s Space, who share the bill along with River Cult. 10pm. $4. New Paltz. (845) 255-9800; Facebook.com/snugsnewpaltz.

Pitchfork Militia/Tulula/Shadow Witch October 29. Here’s a bankable bill of Hudson Valley underground music if ever there was. Now in their second decade, cowpunkers Pitchfork Militia are led by mad-scientist instrument maker Peter Head, who seems to always have his busy hands in myriad musical projects. Tulula was founded by singer-songwriter and Chronogram contributor Jason Broome and also features Bongos bassist Rob Norris; the group crafts literate, occasionally melodic, post-Pavement/VU indie sounds. Stoner metal quartet Shadow Witch, who recently unveiled their debut album, are fronted by frenzied former Voodelic vocalist Earl Walker Lundy. The three acts converge at the Anchor for this night of solid rock action. (Nathan Kalish and Rodney the Pie Man serve a slice of roots rock October 11; the Hooten Hollers and Red Neckromancer whoop it up October 16.) 9:30pm. $5. Kingston. (845) 853-8124; Theanchorkingston.com.


cd reviews Carla Bley / Andy Sheppard / Steve Swallow Anando el Tiempo (2016, ECM Records)

Although during her 60-plus-year career Carla Bley has previously recorded in small settings, the Woodstock pianist and composer is first identified with the ambitious modern big band work of influential epics like 1971’s Escalator Over the Hill and 1974’s Tropic of Cancer. But that’s fine: An artist who plays for keeps, which Bley surely is, revels in the opportunity to challenge and overturn expectations, which she surely does, on this set with saxophonist Andy Sheppard and her longtime life partner, bassist Steve Swallow.The moody Anando el Tiempo is the third outing by the threesome, after the comparatively playful Songs with Legs (1995) and Trios (2013). The album’s title comes from its opening suite of three pieces, written, Bley says, to represent stages of recovery from addiction and inspired by a friend’s successful struggle. The first, “Sin Fin,” is imbued with the air of reflective resignation that comes with an individual’s acceptance of their condition; the wistful “Potación de Guaya,” monochromatically brushed with Sheppard’s yearning lines, evokes the “shared sorrow felt by everyone affected”; and the scale-climbing “Camino el Volver” conjures the jubilant reawakening of said addict’s reemergence into the light. The album’s remaining compositions are “Saints Alive!,” another inward-looking interlude, this one home to beautifully sad solos by Swallow and Sheppard; and “Naked Bridges/Diving Brides,” a devilish offering that contrasts Sheppard’s wandering horn against the interlocking underpinning of Bley and Swallow. The sparse, gorgeous Anando el Tiempo is another fine item in Bley’s oeuvre, and makes for perfect late-night or early morning company. Ecmrecords.com. —Peter Aaron

Pony in the Pancake Whispers of Love (2015, Independent)

Activated in 2003 by cousins Dan Prockup (drums) and Rob Flynn (lead and rhythm guitar, vocals) as a basement jam session of James Brown, Grateful Dead, and Merle Haggard covers, Pony in the Pancake have been a mainstay on the Capital District music scene ever since. Anyone who’s had the pleasure of witnessing their live show has felt the sweet spot where the propulsion of the Velvet Underground, the wideeyed romanticism and surf twang of the Beach Boys, and the elliptical grooves of Krautrock intersect. The band likes to call their style “True Wave.” Pony in the Pancake, or PiP, as they are sometimes known, have gone through some lineup changes over the years; the current combo includes Steve Hegener (bass) and Ben Garrett (lead and rhythm guitar). The songs on Whispers of Love touch on lost love, new love, and summer, and the band brings an ethereal mix of melancholy, wisdom, and innocence to its work. The production has a gauzy, lo-fi feel, with the synths, guitars, and drums pleasantly bleeding into one another. According to Flynn, the group “hate[s] overproduction and will never make a non-lo-fi album, unless Brian Eno offered to produce them.” Nearly every track on this album is a winner, but the bright guitar chug of “With You” is a highlight, as is “Carrie,” a lament to a dead lover. Whispers of Love and the rest of PiP’s catalog is available for free on Bandcamp, because, says Flynn, “we received it from nature.” Ponyinthepancake.bandcamp.com. —Jeremy Schwartz

Quiet in the Head Quiet in the Head (2015, Independent)

ROCKET NUMBER NINE RECORDS

The best selection of vinyl in the Hudson Valley. Selling your vinyl? Talk to us first.

chronogram.com Listen to tracks by the artists reviewed in this issue.

50 N. FRONT ST. UPTOWN KINGSTON 845 331 8217

Painting by Sean Sullivan

Hailing from Hudson, Quiet in the Head might seem anything but. Risk-taking, expressive improvisation is the forte of this classical acoustic trio, which consists of Jonathan Talbott on violin, Seamus Maynard on guitar, and Jonah Thomas on cello. Occasionally, guest musicians step in, drummer Otto Hauser and bassist Terence Murren among them. Exploring a multitude of world music textures, their ultimately uncategorizable originals slap the face of timid music, and might be offputting to more mainstream, cautious listeners who can’t appreciate klezmer right next to gypsy, Middle Eastern next to tango, or Eastern European next to jazz.Yet these polished performers know exactly what they are doing, and they play with a “whether you like it or not” attitude. The result is music that is as structured as it is strange. The album starter, “Revenge of the Swamp Donkey,” reveals the group’s agenda (as well as the donkey’s) with wickedly foreboding musicianship. At eight-and-a-half minutes, this piece is a prime example of QITH’s ability to switch things up with constantly morphing melody, tempo, energy, and dynamics. The 10 additional tunes follow along the same vein of diversity in an exciting and unique display of savvy craft. It will be interesting to observe how their music continues to evolve in the future, so keep an ear out for upcoming local shows and recordings, and be brave enough to dive into this intrepid trio. Quietinthehead.com. —Sharon Nichols

Check our Facebook for upcoming in store events

10/16 ChronograM music 71


Books

BOOKING IT

12 Years of Hudson Valley Literary Bounty By Nina Shengold

T

his is my 150th issue as Chronogram’s books editor, and my last. Since 2004, I’ve had a vantage point with a spectacular view of the Hudson Valley’s burgeoning literary scene. I’m insanely grateful, and—not to roll out my Oscar speech—I want to thank Chronogram editor Brian Mahoney for sending me up the cliff. My first approach to Chronogram wasn’t graceful. A playwright and recovering ex-TV writer who’d ditched New York for Ulster County, I often picked up the local arts and culture mag with the great covers. At a friend’s urging, I submitted a piece for its 2003 Literary Supplement. A genial fellow named Brian called me to explain that my personal essay about swimming wasn’t quite right for, um, a fiction contest, but he liked the writing. Would I be interested in doing a profile of NewYorker cartoonist Danny Shanahan? Of course I said yes, and Danny—a wry, hilarious interviewee—made me look good. I got hired again, this time to profile novelist Scott Spencer. By now, Chronogram was receiving more books by local authors than its annual Book Review roundup could hold. Brian decided to launch a monthly books section and, over lunch at the Main Street Bistro in New Paltz, invited me on board as books editor. It would be the first steady job I’d held since leaving Manhattan, and I was ambivalent. I told him I’d think about it. I drove home to a blinking message machine. After two years of knocking on doors, my agent had an offer on my first novel,Clearcut, from Random House imprint Anchor Books. Of course, I said yes again, to Random House and to Chronogram. What better way to learn about the book publishing industry? Brian and I agreed to keep the focus solidly local. Our terrain was a loosely sketched “Mid-Hudson Valley” that stretched north to the Capital District, east to the edge of the Berkshires, south to the Tappan Zee Bridge, and west to the Catskills.The books we’d review and the authors I’d profile could be connected to this magic zone by the author’s home, subject matter, and/or upcoming events in local bookstores. I figured I’d interview the writers who taught at Vassar, Bard, and SUNY New Paltz, and then we’d run out. I was so, so, so wrong. There’s an old and, as far as I know, unsubstantiated statistic that the Hudson Valley has more artists per capita than anyplace else in America. Thing is, I believe it. The literary community that was budding in 2004 is now in riotous full bloom, with more writers moving here every year. Thanks to Chronogram, and the book I collaborated on with my longtime colleague, photographer Jennifer May (River of Words: Portraits of Hudson Valley Writers, SUNY Press, 2010), I’ve interviewed more than 200 of them, with portraits by Jen, Roy Gumpel, Dion Ogust, and Franco Vogt, among others. I joined a protest with Pete Seeger, met John Ashbery in stocking feet in his kitchen, interviewed John Sayles at Upstate Films and John Patrick Shanley between rehearsals at the Powerhouse Theatre, fed Susan Orlean’s hens, hiked to the Saugerties lighthouse with Jon Bowermaster. There were lunches and endless cups of coffee at local cafés and in writers’ homes. Carol Goodman served me high tea, Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya rustled up chicken vindaloo, Abigail Thomas baked a cake, and Anne Gorrick sent me home with a jar of homecanned blackcap raspberry jam. I got so many books signed by interviewees that I added a new wall of bookshelves. (Among my treasures: a hand-painted flyleaf angel by Nancy Willard, the copy of Angela’s Ashes waggishly autographed by Malachy McCourt when his brother Frank had to join our interview by phone, and the mystery signed by late grandmaster Donald E. Westlake, “For Nina.You ask too many questions.”) I do, and the answers I’ve gotten reveal many truths about writing. First and foremost: There’s no right way to do it. Every writer carves out his or her set of work habits, which may change with every new project, or not. Some, like the überprolific Robert Kelly and T. C. Boyle, start every morning with words; others write in infrequent bursts or in caffeine-fueled marathon binges. Some blast out messy first drafts and revise them for years; Carey Harrison eschews rewriting at all, saying it “disimproves” the original impulse. Jo Ann 72 books ChronograM 10/16

Beard won’t begin her next sentence until she’s perfected the one in her head. Some writers let their work marinate while they garden (Carole Maso, Paul Russell) or tend bees (Mark Wunderlich). Nick Flynn swims. Esmeralda Santiago rings temple bells. Sunil Yapa holes up in faraway places; Ashley Mayne wrote a whole book on a log in the woods. There are writers who read each day’s work to their partners and writers who keep their own counsel. Some two-writer couples negotiate worktime/ chore exchanges, as Stephen O’Connor and Helen Benedict did when their children were young. Cornelius Eady and Sarah Micklem share a kitchen table in their New York apartment, but have his-and-hers bungalows at their Greene County getaway. Two backstories dominate: writers who grew up surrounded by books, and writers who found and clung to them like a life raft. I often focus on biography and process because the true stuff of writing is a mysterious alchemy, invisible even to those who cast spells. Our life experience is both bellows and fuel. One question I always ask authors is how they came to live in the Hudson Valley. The literary diaspora shares some migration patterns with other artists, creatives, and freelancers freed from the urban grind by emerging technologies. I hear the same stories a lot: Came up for a weekend to visit friends, rented a summer place, stayed. Second kid didn’t fit in the Brooklyn apartment. Uprooted by 9/11.Went to college here, moved away, then moved back. Grew up here, dammit, and never left. It’s easy to see why someone not yoked to a nine-to-five workweek would choose to write in a place of magnificent natural beauty that’s only a few hours from publishing’s company town. A writer can easily bop down the river by train for an editorial meeting and be home by the time the stars shine over Bannerman Castle. But there’s more in the mix than proximity and scenic views. The artistic community here is a powerful draw. Authors come from all over the country to participate in the region’s many spectacular literary festivals and reading series, including the Woodstock Bookfest (née Woodstock Writers Festival) and its bookish cousins in Cold Spring, Hudson, Millbrook, Red Hook, Spencertown, and Warwick, or the Festival of Women Writers in the Catskills’ own Book Village, Hobart. Some come to teach and set down local roots; the Bard Fiction Prize alone has rewritten a slew of address books. If the Hudson Valley is a magnet for writers, it’s also (and not incidentally) chock-full of readers. When independent bookstores around the country started to fold under pressure from big-box and online retailers, the region’s resilient booksellers found ways to survive and even expand, offering author readings and book signings, gallery shows, performances, classes, open mikes, and other experiences you can’t get with 1-Click. There are literary events almost daily in local cafes and bars, community centers and colleges, at our vibrant public libraries, at the riverfront chapel in Cold Spring, at historic houses and Poets’ Walk Park—even in Rosendale’s Widow Jane Mine, where the Subterranean Poetry Festival just celebrated its 26th year. It’s been an ongoing joy to watch all this grow from my post on Chronogram’s masthead. I owe a special debt of gratitude to the talented writers who’ve written such stellar reviews on my watch, including Peter Aaron, Jay Blotcher, Greg Correll, Anne Pyburn Craig, Marx Dorrity, Lee Gould, Mikhail Horowitz, Susan Krawitz, Djelloul Marbrook, Jana Martin, Hollis Seamon, William Seaton, Pauline Uchmanowicz, Robert Burke Warren, and more. And Chronogram will continue to publish book reviews and profiles of local literati. It’s part of the magazine’s DNA, hardwired into its genes. For the past 12 years I’ve been telling anybody who’d listen that I had the world’s best day job. I’ll miss it like crazy. But every writer’s dream job is writing her own books, and I have two to finish: a nonfiction book about a year of daily walks on the Ashokan Reservoir, and a long-postponed second novel. Maybe someone will interview me for Chronogram.


Row 1: Carey Harrison (Roy Gumpel); Daniel Pinkwater (Jennifer May); Edwidge Danticat (Jill Krementz); Amitava Kumar (Jennifer May) Row 2: John Patrick Shanley (Jennifer May); James Lasdun (Jennifer May); Mat Johnson (Jennifer May); Susan Orlean (Jennifer May) Row 3: Elisa Albert (Roy Gumpel); John Ashbery (Jennifer May); David Rees (Jennifer May); Ashley Mayne (Peter Barrett) Row 4: Gretchen Primack (Deborah DeGraffenreid); Ed Sanders (Jennifer May); Da Chen (Jennifer May); Robin Palmer (Jennifer May) Row 5: Holly George-Warren (Jennifer May); Frank, Malachy, and Alphie McCourt (Jennifer May); Chinua Achebe (Jennifer May); Joanne Beard (Roy Gumpel)

10/16 ChronograM books 73


SHORT TAKES Life’s darkest events can ignite brilliant writing. These new books by Hudson Valley authors light the way.

DYING IN DUBAI: A MEMOIR OF MARRIAGE, MOURNING, AND THE MIDDLE EAST Roselee Blooston Apprentice House/Loyola University Press, 2016, $16.99

It’s hard to imagine a tenser journey than the one in this riveting memoir’s opening pages. Playwright Blooston and her son are on a 14-hour flight to Dubai, where Jerry, her husband of 24 years, has had an aneurysm. Arriving to an upturned world, she faces unthinkable loss in a culture whose rules she can’t fathom. Appearing 10/6 at 6m, Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck; 11/6 at 3pm, The Golden Notebook, Woodstock; 11/16 at 7pm, Barnes & Noble, Kingston.

PATRICIDE

The Fat Artist and Other Stories

D. Foy STALKING HORSE PRESS, 2016, $18.95

Brutally abused by both of his parents, Foy’s haunted narrator battles addiction, relationships, and “my father’s giant Voice” like a gonzo gladiator. This raw-whisky novel by the acclaimed author of Made to Break is a rough ride in a golden chariot; Foy’s sentences soar. “Then a velveteen roar mounted in his head, a hundred thousand sirens singing in the belly of a dreaming cave.” Appearing 10/22 at 4pm, The Golden Notebook, Woodstock, with Shelly Oria and Nelly Reifler.

DP: DISPLACED PERSON Margarita Meyendorff Baroness Books, 2016, $15

Rosendale actress/singer Meyendorff spins an engrossing tale of life in motion. Born in a displaced persons camp in postwar Germany, “Mourka” grew up in Nyack, surrounded by émigré Russians and her aristocratic parents’ despair. She found salvation in performing, and as she moves from Rudolf Nureyev’s dressing room to foil-wrapped go-go dancing and hilarious `70s theater tour to telling her story, onstage and in print, we applaud every step. Appearing 11/13 at 4pm with Laura Shaine Cunningham and Nina Shengold at The Golden Notebook, Woodstock.

THE FIRE THIS TIME: A NEW GENERATION SPEAKS ABOUT RACE edited by Jesmyn Ward Scribner, 2016, $25

Broad, deep, and painful, this collection of writings on race is essential reading. National Book Award-winner Ward sought community after Trayvon Martin’s killing; rereading James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time ignited this book. Vassar professor Kiese Laymon’s fierce, loving tribute to his grandmother joins poems by Jericho Brown and Natasha Trethewey, Kevin Young’s takedown of Rachel Dolezal’s fraudulent blackness, Edwidge Danticat’s moving “Message to My Daughters,” and more. Read this, burn, and hope.

WALK THROUGH WALLS Marina Abramovic Crown Archetype, 2016, $28

Born in Yugoslavia, Abramovic survives her domineering mother’s beatings; makes art with fire, snakes, blood, and endurance; joins forces with German artist Ulay, and breaks up with him on the Great Wall of China, becoming so famous that 750,000 people line up to look at her in a piece called The Artist is Present. A polarizing persona, the Hudson performance artist dedicates her memoir “to FRIENDS and ENEMIES.” To acolytes, Abramovic is a galvanizing force; to scoffers, caveat emptor’s new clothes. She is undeniably present.

SUDDENLY SINGLE AFTER 50 Barbara Ballinger and Margaret Crane Rowman & Littlefield, 2016, $35

After collaborating on books about kitchen design and family businesses, Dutchess County writers and longtime friends Ballinger and Crane get personal, sharing “our story and everywoman’s story of losing a spouse or a life partner,” one to divorce, one to widowhood. Subtitled “The Girlfriends’ Guide to Navigating Loss, Restoring Hope, and Rebuilding Your Life,” their useful, list-filled book covers topics from rage and grief to eating alone in restaurants, household chores, and midlife dating.

74 books ChronograM 10/16

Benjamin Hale

Simon & Schuster, 2016, $26

B

enjamin Hale is a ruthless, gifted storyteller. The seven tales in The Fat Artist may not be for the squeamish, but they’re delicious reads. You might call his characters troubled: These are people who tend to wreak havoc, but given their lives, you can’t hardly blame them. Not too many softhearted or thriving folk dwell in these pages. Instead, they’re sad, puzzled, disturbed, and often tormented by some internal quandary that leads to violence—which leads back to the very state of mind they were trying to escape. But Hale takes such palpable delight in his craft and, at times, his prose has such as silkiness, that reading him feels like settling in for a really great horror movie. You know something dreadful is coming, but you can’t help watching it unfold. Hale teaches at Bard College and is a senior editor at the esteemed literary journal Conjunctions—worth mentioning because Hale comes by his substantial trickster skill honestly: He works hard. His terrific yarn moderne, “Venus at Her Mirror,” starts with a winning first line: “The Representative was dead.” Give that one as a prompt in a writing class, say, and you might get some fascinating offshoots. In Hale’s case, it’s death as practical if perverse dilemma: The person first privy to this morbid fact is Mistress Delilah, the Representative’s former personal dominatrix, otherwise known as a self-aware, morally fluid but conflicted woman named Rebecca Spiegel. Hale writes, “The years had puffed him out and he was not really her client anymore, but her friend, confidant, sometime benefactor, the most complicated lover she’d ever had.” Considering that he’s now died in her company in an apartment in a Washington, DC, highrise, complicated is an understatement. Thus begins a glorious flashback of unsparingly fleshy, flaccid details, which spurs the decision to write a To-Do List. Naturally. “Venus” contains hilarious writing, where the mounting pressure of how to dispose of a dead body, still in nipple clamps, is compounded by a shitty ex-husband, a dying shih tzu, and a rising identity crisis between Rebecca and her dominatrix persona. The stream of consciousness as she sits in an armchair mulling over her options is cinematically hilarious. But even visually, as black type on a page itself, it’s right, and perhaps that’s a bit of metafiction coming out in Hale. On paper, the text runs across and down nonstop. There’s no paragraphing to take a breath; it rambles as thoughts tend to do, particularly if dealing with a dead body that happens to also be a US Representative. But if Hale pens reckless people in extreme scenarios, he does it meticulously. When a crowbar hits a body, he’s right on target with the sound: “strangely muted, a dull, flat sound of metal smacking flesh.” One gets the sense this writer is a stickler for accuracy, whether it’s a rhino-hide bullwhip (ouch) or a satellite flare. In the wild, apocalyptic, “If I Had Possession Over Judgment Day” (also the title of a song by blues great Robert Johnson) the sky is graced with the eerie appearance of Iridium flares, named after the company that built the satellites causing them. This enjoyable bit of cosmic trivia functions as a pleasant deception, a nerdy door into a tale of utter human chaos—including the crowbar treatment. By the end, those satellites provide a strangely comforting juxtaposition. They may look unnerving, but at least they travel in a predictable trajectory. That’s more, at least in this book, than we can say about ourselves. —Jana Martin


Eleven Hours Pamela Erens

Tin House Books, 2016, $15.95

A

woman in labor enters a New York City maternity ward just before Christmas. Though she wears a jeweled band on her left ring finger, she’s come alone. Lore Tannenbaum’s pregnancy has been medically uneventful, but emotionally harrowing. She discovered that her best friend, the person who introduced her to the baby’s father, has been having an affair with him for the past three years. A children’s speech therapist new to the city, her only labor companion is steely determination. Despite an elaborate birthing plan, she’ll soon realize nothing about childbirth is predictable. Franckline, the Haitian nurse assigned to her, is pregnant as well, though her husband doesn’t know this yet. Her traumatic pregnancy history includes a miscarriage and a stillbirth, and she fears she won’t see this child alive either. The birth’s unfolding brings events that challenge both women to the core, and connect them in an ageless, timeless dance. In another writer’s hands, the premise could have read like chick lit, but with this author at the helm, it’s another creature altogether. Childbirth is hardly a fresh subject for a book, but like Hudson Valley part-timer Erens’s previously published pair of highly acclaimed novels (The Virgins and The Understory), Eleven Hours veers quickly from the well-trodden literary path. Fairly short at under 200 pages, the meat of the book consists primarily of two interwoven viewpoints, and swings from riveting present tense to compelling past. Shifts and jumps like these are often frowned upon in novel writing, but the point-of-view switches feel integral here, and the front story seems electrically fueled by the past. Additionally, there are no chapter divides, which contributes to the imperative feeling of the pace and adds to the sense (not unlike actual labor) of increasing urgency in the story’s progression. Erens offers poignant and poetic signposts of the birth process. In early labor, Lore’s cervix feels like “a pit of a fruit—apricot, a peach—that is being pried apart to release something new: a juice, or a green shoot.” As the process of labor starts to quicken, “The pressure inside her is tremendous; the baby pushes against her back as if it wants to come out that way, and Lore too pushes, without wanting to, fiercely, needing to relieve the pressure; something is looking for an exit; get it out, get it out, get it out!” Despite deep focus on Franckline and Lore, they aren’t the only characters whose thoughts the reader is privy to. We are also offered interior glimpses of minor players: an orderly, an intern, an elderly man in the hospital hallway. These additions make Eleven Hours less just a birth story and more a way of using childbirth as a point of entry for an Our Town-style meditation that allows the inhabitants of the discrete world of the hospital to offer insights into mortality, love, life, and loss. Does the title of the book refer to the time it takes Lore to give birth, or to a tired intern’s stoic realization that this is the span of time he has between shifts? I think the author might say both. This book will be enjoyed by readers who appreciate well-wrought prose, dimensional characterization, and story-first book structure. Though not the best read during pregnancy, it is highly recommended for anyone who has been touched by the miracle of birthing—or the experience of being human. —Susan Krawitz

PUBLISHING SERVICE Empowering Authors Since 2006 Your Complete Self-Publishing Solution

GET PUBLISHED NOW!

Novels Children’s Books Poetry Nonfiction Cookbooks Business Memoirs Academic Coffee Table Books Family Legacy Publishing

Free Consultation

Publishing & Ebook Packages Editorial Support Design Print & Distribution Marketing & PR

No Obligation

Personalized Service Seasoned Publishing Team Competitive Rates

22 East Market Street • Rhinebeck NY 12572 845.876.4861 info@epigraphps.com www.epigraphps.com

10N Chestnut Street, Beacon

TAS T I N G ROOM HOURS Fri

4-8 pm ' Sat 2-8 pm ' Sun 2-6 pm

www.DenningsPointDistillery.com

10/16 ChronograM books 75


POETRY Ode To A Macaroon A macaroon goes in my mouth and I taste the splendor of crunchiness, The true sweetness. Like a mini sandwich With just the right crunch and A unique cream in the middle. With many different colors to marvel at, The famous French pastry Gives satisfaction to my empty stomach

The Artist Hold those darts —steady— ready to let them loose. I wear these balloons, filled with crayon-colored dreams and syrupy acrylic aspirations, to burst over my canvas skin. Pop as many as you wish. But don’t you worry about my heart; Small —punctured— red stains my breast but one more hole will not kill me. —Courtney Kiesecker

Edited by Phillip X Levine. Deadline for our November issue is October 5. Send up to three poems or three pages (whichever comes first). Full submission guidelines: www.chronogram.com/submissions.

Real actors, not people —p

Longing for something to savor. Messy as it can be The focus is on the enriching flavor, Which makes you nod in approval. Enjoy it For the present will soon Become the past. —Jahnvi Mundra (10 years)

Saturday Poetry Workshop: What Have You Learned? I learned … that a huge weight lifted off my shoulders just moves to land hard on my heart. I wish I felt empty. I learned that time moves according to memory and not the other way around. I could say I learned how to navigate the miasma of hospitals and jargon and cancer but– Anyone can learn that. I learned that the diagnostic differential is really what they call it–just like on T.V. I learned that a janitor covering me with our worn Mexican blanket as I slept on the final chair-bed next to you is what finally made me cry. —Lisa St. John

You Should Have This You left a poem In the street Near your place Where you knew I’d be walking.

Cannonsville in the Catskills, New York Cannonsville, NY, was flooded in 1964 to make way for the Cannonsville Reservoir.

I left the office open all weekend nothing was taken I was offended

If you haven’t noticed the mists on mountains let me remind you of their drifts like ghostly drapes over cliff and pine and fountain. Tonight, the storm has come to gather heavy heat then leaves in quiet lightning pulsing orange clouds like a heartbeat or something. The reservoir is still— you can almost hear the sunken towns, a fish swims through a bright red barn as a flash illuminates the name of the long dead farm. Ah, time is precious, friend— if you haven’t noticed the mists on mountains, let me remind you of their drifts over cliff and pine and fountain.

—Richard Donnelly

—Kerri Nicole McCaffrey

On a sheet printed with several others, Folded, an arrow and a star above The one That moved me. The first stanza somehow always Already committed to memory As when we walked together: Light from a distant building reflecting, Blinding you for one instant As if being Photographed. —R. Subtler

Open

76 poetry ChronograM 10/16

Labor Day, Upstate NY The familiar great blue heron visits again on Labor Day, Passing overhead with lazy sweep of wings And raspy cry, Before settling at water’s edge to tiptoe In the chilly shallows where The deer and the bear slaked their summer thirsts. A hurricane threatens from the south, Wetting the empty strands from Daytona to Montauk, Summer crowds vanished Like the newly dead. The great blue heron, too, is soon to go, Chasing the hummingbirds toward Mexico. Rummaging in the drawer this morning To fetch that forgotten sweat shirt, Suddenly welcome again. —Gary Lee Alderson


Near Gupo Station

Kitchen Haiku

Chasing the Wind

Up at 3 A.M. for an early train drive down a street of young women sitting in pink-lit windows waiting for a college boy or lonely husband tired of varicose veins.

A large slotted spoon separates “save” from “don’t save” like a dream catcher

In the Bible These characters The Christians Become self aware And realize they’re in the book And then it ends

What one leans and whispers to a co-worker isn’t likely about positions that feel good if an old man gave a tip or how many times a week she lies watching ceiling stains of mold waiting for the last heavy sigh and collapse into her slack arms.

I will make a soup selecting vegetables whose flavors embrace

Head tilted up, as if offering her throat while watching TV above her window perhaps she volunteers to heat green tea.

Broccoli florets like tiny green Bonsai plants— internal wisdom

Spinach adds iron to nutritious lentil soup; Are we healthy yet? The mug in your hand awaits the next hot liquid; The promise of warmth Use a pot holder; the blue enamel kettle has a wire handle

—Ian Haight

—Sydna Altschuler Byrne

A Swimmer’s Mind

Atlas

LAP ONE: Did I close the garage door? I hope I closed the garage door. Ugh, water up my nose. Why do I have to share the lane with Captain Splashy McSplash Splash?

I’ll draw out a map of each and every place I long to take you.

LAP TWO: I regret everything I ate for lunch… riding kind of high now. I should eat healthier—quinoa, kale, cauliflower… Who am I kidding. I’ll probably just have a Kit Kat. LAP THREE: Trump’s face looks like it’s made of Silly Putty. Weird. Oh, God, I hope he doesn’t get elected president. Did I close the garage door? LAP FOUR: Here comes Splashy McSplash Splash again. How can a person have that much hair on his back. Gross. My shoulder hurts now. LAP FIVE: My goggles are foggy. Is this my fourth or fifth lap? Shoot. I have to catch up on Veep. I love that show. LAP SIX: This water feels nice.

—Lauren Yaro

The Piano Lesson a moth floats across warm summer grass hesitates—then flies away disappearing into a peeling white sky on the driveway a cat casts a momentary shadow crows call out in a fluttering rain of wings —petals of sunlight falling. —E Gironda, Jr.

LAP SEVEN: Where should we go this weekend?

Moon Language

LAP EIGHT: That cloud looks like a Scottish terrier.

We should still love the moon even on nights it isn’t full.

LAP NINE: stroke breath stroke breath stroke breath stroke breath LAP TEN: I definitely closed the garage door. —Barbara Sheffer

—Joe Klarl

Frames Days sealed with goodnight kiss are unbattered frames We pass through. Friction Glances and sweet nothings wedge something between Soft touches and singed sheets. —Elsewhere, bolts slip-turn, doors dangle from hinges and shadows close in slivers of illuminated pathways littered in pages— Pinched bones creak out our room into living room So heavy hands can sob black ink, Smooth blots into pure form and Puppet lines to careful arcs Stranger’s knock hiccups the air but doesn’t pop Bubble world in I Finish words still fresh and Lip trace them. Vibrations Ripple on plasma-memory walls we decorate each Year with new blocks and shapes Stuck in broken squares. I don’t fear the silence seeping through The other room. The door is left Ajar so fractured space can give light. —Monique Tranchina

Phase These were the kids who’d try to pick the white out of TV static Play in traffic while the parents laughed They grew up wondering what it was that made the cars go But were too afraid to ask They thought that all you had to do to float Was get in the water And they couldn’t stop watching the wheeled potter They thought they were crazy, But didn’t know the truth in the loose leaf Written by someone who lived too long, And was too long beat Everybody’s a sinking boat, And the kids think the water looks nice, but this is a crisis that has nowhere else to go —Brandon Hansen

—Alexis Hill

10/16 ChronograM poetry 77


Food & Drink

A variety of slices made from recipes in The Pizza Book. Clockwise: Corn + Scallion, Pesto, Taco Pie, Kale + Sausage, Mushroom, Porchetta, Classic, and Pancetta + Slow Tomato

Life of Pie

Quint & Bernstein’s The Pizza Book By Fen Fenton Photos by Tom Eberhardt-Smith

M

ost cookbook authors compile recipes, secure an agent and a book deal, and publish their tome for the anonymous masses. But The Pizza Book, written and self-published by Aaron Quint and Mike Bernstein, has achieved much more than that—it’s created a community. Quint, 34, grew up in Brooklyn as an indoor kinda kid, more interested in playing on computers than scraping his knees outside. But in his family, a love for food was probably inevitable; his grandfather used to run a Jewish deli. He also grew up near the Brooklyn Bridge in downtown Brooklyn—a heartland for the charred aroma and timelessly strong taste of thin crust pies. “There was definitely always a love for food in my family,” says Quint. He graduated from Brandeis University in 2005 with a BA in art history, moved to Manhattan, where he got a job as a programmer for a small agency. Bernstein, 38, has a similar story. He grew up on Long Island, with most of his food memories associated with Jewish holidays. This was where he was first exposed to the bounties we share when we come together for a meal: “There’s just something about putting that [food] down on the table in front of someone and they know you’ve put a lot of effort into it,” says Bernstein. “It’s like the high you’re always chasing when you’re preparing and serving food.” Bernstein—like most humans—also really just loved eating pizza of any shape or form as a kid: “My life can be measured in slices,” he writes in the first few pages of the book. His earliest pizza memories entail sharing giant slices with his brother and dad, witnessing (and eating) from the constant frozen-pizza-dinner inventory at his home, and making bike ride pit stops at local pizza joints on his way to friends’ houses. After graduating with a degree in philosophy and art from NYU in 2001, Bernstein worked as a middle school computer science teacher in downtown Manhattan before receiving an MFA in design and technology in 2005 at Parsons. Pizza Nerds And if it wern’t for programming, Bernstein and Quint might never have met. The agency Quint worked for shared the building with another IT company, which employed one of Bernstein’s longtime friends, Todd Cavallo. Cavallo introduced the two. 78 FOOD & DRINK ChronograM 10/16

Although they worked as programmers by day, Bernstein and Quint discovered that a love for food, specifically pizza, was deeply rooted in both of their lives. So in 2006, when Cavallo stumbled upon a recipe for pizza that was meticulously broken down, he sent it over to Bernstein, who then showed it to Quint. The recipe was from a pizza chef’s website and blog; he had moved from the Northeast down to Florida, and wanted to break down what made the pizza up north so good. The recipe was fully analyzed on his site, explaining what each ingredient brought to the finished product. The chef especially emphasized fermenting the dough for a few days, but more on that later. This in-depth analysis sparked an interest for two programmers like Quint and Bernstein, who also loved making pizza at home for friends and family. They started tweaking it in their free time, and after that, pizza recipes and techniques became a common infatuation, one worth scribbling several pages of notes about for the next 10 years. About four or five years ago, says Quint, he and Bernstein began collaborating, and started playing with the idea of creating a pizza eBook with their research. As their notes kept expanding, they decided that they wanted to compile their work into something more substantial than an eBook, but didn’t necessarily have the money to back the idea. So in 2015 they crowd-sourced, and launched a Kickstarter campaign in hopes of getting “funded” with $28,000. The project, with 1,105 backers, raised over $50,000. “We were definitely surprised by the support,” says Quint, “We were expecting, with nerves, to get ‘funded,’ which was 28K.” But what they got was almost double what they expected and in a much shorter time period. Kingston resident Kale Kaposhilin is a backer of The Pizza Book. He donated $80 to Bernstein and Quint’s Kickstarter campaign. Kaposhilin is a macher in the Hudson Valley tech community, a principal at Evolving Media Network and a co-founder of Hudson Valley Tech Meetup and CatskillsConf, the annual tech be-in that brings together innovators, developers, and entrepreneurs at the Ashokan Center. (It’s happening this month: October 21 to 23.) What stirred Kaposhilin to donate money to the Kickstarter campaign? “I believe in supporting great work that also tries to support community develop-


Aaron Quint gets the perfect mozzarella melt for the photo shoot finished pie.

ment,” he says. And Kaposhilin didn’t just buy one copy for himself; he bought a second, for his mother to read and then to share with her friends. “The book itself has incredible recipes but also teaches people to come together, make something together, and be here together,” he says. A Focus on Home Cooking The book’s focus is aimed at teaching home cooks how to make pizza in a downto-earth, approachable format, by home cooks—these guys have no culinary training. The master template of how to make a pizza is easy enough for a firsttime maker to follow.There’s even an ice breaker section in the beginning that’s titled “You’re Going to Fuck Up Some Pizzas,” to put minds at ease before they dig into the recipes. The Pizza Book also reflects the minds of two programmers, with their technical, seminerdy way of explaining how a basic pie is made.Their hope is to encourage readers to think a bit deeper about something like pizza— a food that’s central to our culture. Like the Florida chef, they too believe that every ingredient—and the method of adding to each of them—plays an important role in the product. This is why they devote pages 52 pages just to explain technique and the role of ingredients before they offer a recipe. And the dough itself is slightly different than most at-home versions; it stresses that the key to making a good pizza is dough fermentation. Fermentation requires cooks to let the raw dough sit for two to five days, which seems long for an at-home cook to wait but, in the end, has immeasurable results. “Often there’s this other flavor component missing and that’s the flavor that comes from all of the compounds that are produced during fermentation,” says Bernstein. Along with the hint of an appealing sour flavor balance, fermentation helps cooks achieve the chewy finesse in a parlor pie. The rest of the book goes through different variations of the master template recipe, with toppings ranging from “The Best Fucking Meatball” to pickled corn. Quint’s favorite is the “Radicchio + Sausage + Honey,” while Bernstein, despite his love for the classic Margherita, is drawn to the “Everything Bagel” pie, a prebaked Everything Bagel-seasoned crust that’s smeared with cream cheese and topped with smoked salmon, capers, and chives.

Mike Bernstein stretches a pie.

Bernstein and Quint’s central focus is providing readers with recipes made by home cooks, for home cooks. As they tested out recipes, the authors distributed early drafts to their friends, each with a different oven and kitchen tools. Unlike editing the recipes out of a traditional test kitchen, followers of The Pizza Book were able to provide disparate, crowdsourced feedback; together, their voices helped Quint and Bernstein finish the book. (The book also features the lush and luscious photography of Tom Eberhardt-Smith, whose own Kickstarter book of photos, Diner Porn, has been featured in this magazine.) The Pizza Book has gotten people to join and exchange conversation. In the middle of making the cookbook, Quint moved upstate to Kingston, and Bernstein transplanted to the DC Metro area. Over the course of the three years they worked on the book, the recipes were first tested out of Quint’s home. Quint remembers saying, “I would call everyone I knew in the neighborhood and be like, ‘Okay, I’m about to make 20 pizzas today. Don’t come over until 6pm.’ And at 6pm, after we were done shooting photos, people would come over and bring beer. And there would be pizza, and they’d hang out for another four hours. It really felt like a community.” With over 1,400 copies already sold, Quint and Bernstein are playing with the idea of creating another cookbook with a similar format: a master recipe of a certain food or dish (with the breakdown of techniques and ingredients) and several variations to accompany it. They have yet to nail down a solidified idea for the food or dish of choice. For now, they are planning events and reaching out to media to promote the book and using the individual word-of-mouth to spread their ideas to a larger readership. They believe that making better at-home pizza can be for everyone, and encourage their readers to e-mail them pizza questions if they arise. “We really want the people who buy into dive in and do it,” says Bernstein, “because we know that they can.” Copies of The Pizza Book can be purchased from Bernstein and Quint’s website, Store.make.pizza (an eBook is $24 and a printed version is $39), or at Fleisher’s in Kingston. Bernstein and Quint hope to expand their sales out to bookstores in New York City and the DC area soon. 10/16 ChronograM FOOD & DRINK 79


magnifique T H E O N LY F R E N C H Y O U N E E D T O K N O W

money that works You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model… Buckminster Fuller The Hudson Valley Current is a new complementary currency. If you’re a business owner, entrepreneur, free lance or self-employed and aren’t working as much as you could or you have unmet needs, the Current can help you. The system lets businesses like yours support and patronize each other without spending US Dollars. This new source of available funds helps use the full capacity of your business and allows you to put your Dollars to other uses. That is how the Current unlocks local abundance for your business and our whole community. All-Day Breakfast, Lunch Creating a local currency is entirely& legal —there are Brunch alternative currencies springing up all over the United Weekend 9am - 3pm States and the world. Members exchange the Current on a secure website; one Current (~) equals one Saturday Nights Wine Bar & Desserts Dollar ($). How your business utilizes Currents is entirely up to you—you can employ a variety of terms such as Current-Dollar splits, limited time frames, or specific goods or services that you will sell for Currents. 99 Liberty Street, Newburgh (845) 565-4616

99libertystreet.com

money that money thatworks works

T H E B O C U S E R E S TA U R A N T ciarestaurantgroup.com | 845-471-6608

1946 Campus Drive (Route 9), Hyde Park, NY On the campus of The Culinary Institute of America

Bocuse_SEPT2016-Chronogrm_FINAL_REV.indd 1

It’s like electronic banking! A password protected login.

Your Current balance is here.

Younever neverchange change things things by something, build a new model… You by fighting fightingthe theexisting existingreality. reality.ToTochange change something, build a new model… Buckminster Fuller Buckminster Fuller The Hudson Valley Current is a new complementary currency. If you’re a business owner, entrepreneur, free The Hudson Valley Current is a new complementary currency. If you’re a business owner, entrepreneur, free lance or self-employed and aren’t working as much as you could or you have unmet needs, the Current lance or self-employed and aren’t working as much as you could or you have unmet needs, the Current can help you. The system lets businesses like yours support and patronize each other without spending can help you. The system lets businesses like yours support and patronize each other without spending US Dollars. This new source of available funds helps use the full capacity of your business and allows you US newtosource available fundsthe helps use unlocks the full capacity of your for business and allows to Dollars. put yourThis Dollars other of uses. That is how Current local abundance your business and you toour putwhole your community. Dollars to other uses. That is how the Current unlocks local abundance for your business and our whole community. Creating a local currency legal alternative currencies springing over the United You never change thingsisbyentirely fighting the—there existing are reality. To change something, build a up newallmodel… Creating a local is entirely legal—there are alternative currencies up all theone United States and the currency world. Members exchange the Current on a secure website;springing one Current (~)over equals Buckminster Fuller States the world. Members exchange theisCurrent website; one Current (~)ofequals Dollarand ($). How your business utilizes Currents entirely on up atosecure you—you can employ a variety termsone Theas Hudson a utilizes new complementary currency. If you’re a business owner, entrepreneur, free Dollar ($). HowValley yourCurrent business Currents up to or you—you can employ a variety of terms such Current-Dollar splits,islimited time frames, is or entirely specific goods services that you will sell for Currents. lance or self-employed andlimited aren’t working as much as you could or or you have unmet needs, such as Current-Dollar splits, time frames, or specific goods services that you willthe sellCurrent for Currents.

money that works LOCAL MONEY money that works works FOR LOCAL PEOPLE

cannever help you. Thethings system lets businesses like yours support and patronize each other without spending You change You never change things by by fighting fightingthe theexisting existingreality. reality.To Tochange changesomething, something,build buildaanew newmodel… model… USPay Dollars. This new source of available funds helps use the full capacity ofCreate your business another member. Go shopping. your own and ad. allows you Buckminster Fuller It’stolike electronic banking! Buckminster Fuller put your Dollars to other uses. That is how the Current unlocks local abundance for your business and A password protected login. It’sThe like electronic banking! Your Current balance isowner, here. entrepreneur, free Hudson Valley Current is a new complementary currency. If you’re a business our whole community. The Valley is is a new complementary currency. Ifsystem you’re athat business owner, entrepreneur, TheHudson Hudson ValleyCurrent Current an working antidote to much an entrenched keeps localneeds, businesses at afree A password protected login. lance or self-employed self-employed and aren’t as as could ororyou unmet the Your Current balance isup here. lance or and aren’t working as much asyou you could youhave have unmet theCurrent Current Creating a local currency is entirely legal —there are alternative currencies springing allneeds, over the United The Hudson Valley Current is a Local Nonprofit that disadvantage and drains money from the local economy. Using the Current will improve our community can help you. The system lets businesses support each spending States and theThe world. Members exchangelike theyours Current on networks a and secure website; oneother Current (~)community equals one can help you. system letsencouraging businesses like yours support andpatronize patronize each otherwithout without spending by increasing prosperity and interdependent of local businesses and US Dollars. This new source of available funds helps use the full capacity of your business and allows you Dollar ($). How yoursource business utilizes Currents isfunded entirely up to can employ a variety of terms US Dollars. This new ofnonprofit available funds helps use primarily the fullyou—you capacity of your business and allows you members. The Current is a project, by small fees for membership and to putas your Dollars to other uses. That isis how the Current unlocks local abundance for your business and such Current-Dollar splits, limited time frames, or specific goods or services that you will sell for Currents. to put your Dollars to other uses. That how the Current unlocks local abundance for your business and transactions. our whole community. 9/19/16 9:10 AMcommunity. our whole Creating a local currency is entirely legal—there are alternative currencies springing up all over the United Creating a local currency is entirely legal—there are alternative currencies springing up all over the United States and the world. Members exchange the Current on a secure website; one Current (~) equals one It’s likeand electronic banking! States the world. Members exchange the Current on a secure website; one Current (~) equals one Dollar ($). How your login. business utilizes Currents is entirely up to Current you—you canisemploy a variety of terms A password protected Your balance Dollar ($). How your business utilizes Currents is entirely up to you—you can here. employ a variety of terms such as Current-Dollar splits, limited time frames, or specific goods or services that you will sell for Currents. such as Current-Dollar splits, limited time frames, or specific goods or services that you will sell for Currents.

STIMULATES THE REGION’S ECONOMY

and PROVIDES OPPORTUNITIES

to CREATE MORE WEALTH

It’s like electronic banking! If you’re aout business owner, entrepreneur, HudsonValleyCurrent.org freelance or self-employed and It’s like electronic banking! Find more A password protected login. or join the beta test: Your Current balance is here. A password protected login. Your balance is here. aren’t working as much as you or you Current have unmet needs, theNY CurDEMO: Wed. Feb. 12, Santa Fecould Restaurant, 11 Main St. Kingston, rent can help your business. The Current lets ~businesses like yours supHudsonValleyCurrent.org ~ hello@HudsonValleyCurrent.org P.O. Box 444, Accord, NY 12404 port and patronize each other without spending US dollars. This new source of available funds helps use the full capacity of your business Pay another member. Go shopping. Create your own ad. and allows you to put your dollars to other uses. That is how the CurPay another member.local abundance Go shopping. Create your own ad.comrent unlocks your business and our whole The Hudson Valley Current is an antidote to for an entrenched system that keeps local businesses at a disadvantage and drains money from the local economy. Using the Current will improve our community munity. It is a trading mechanism that works alongside the US dollar.

by increasing prosperity and isencouraging networks of local andbusinesses communityat a The Hudson Valley Current an antidoteinterdependent to an entrenched system thatbusinesses keeps local members. The Current a nonprofit project, funded primarily byCurrent small fees membership and disadvantage and drains ismoney from the local economy. Using the will for improve our community START PARTICIPATING TODAY transactions. by increasing prosperity and encouraging interdependent networks of local businesses and community Pay another Go shopping. Createfees your own HudsonValleyCurrent.org members. The member. Current is a at nonprofit project, funded primarily by small for ad. membership and transactions.

MONEY MADE BY LOCAL TRADE

The Hudson Valley Current is an antidote to an entrenched system that keeps local businesses at a disadvantage and drains money from the local economy. Using the Current will improve our community by increasing prosperity and encouraging interdependent networks of local businesses and community Pay another member. Go shopping. ad. members. The Current is a nonprofit project, funded primarily by smallCreate fees your for own membership and Pay another member. Go shopping. Create your own ad. transactions.

The Hudson Valley more Current or is an antidote an entrenched system that keeps local businesses at a Find out join thetobeta test: HudsonValleyCurrent.org disadvantage and drains money from the local Using the Current improve community The Hudson Valley Current is an antidote to economy. an entrenched system thatwill keeps localour businesses at a Feb. 12, Santainterdependent Fe Restaurant, 11ofMain St. Kingston, NY byDEMO: increasingWed. prosperity encouraging networks local businesses and disadvantage and drains and money from the local economy. Using the Current will improve ourcommunity community members. Current isand aor nonprofit project, funded primarily small fees forAccord, membership and HudsonValleyCurrent.org ~ hello@HudsonValleyCurrent.org ~of P.O. Box 444, NY 12404 hello@hudsonvalleycurrent.org Rosendale, NYby HudsonValleyCurrent.org by increasing prosperity encouraging interdependent networks local businesses FindThe out join the beta test: HudsonValleyCurrent.org A more DIGITAL CURRENCY FOR THE GREATER GOODand community transactions. members. The Current is a nonprofit project, funded primarily by small fees for membership and DEMO: Wed. Feb. 12, Santa Fe Restaurant, 11 Main St. Kingston, NY transactions. To learn more, visit gofundme.com/satisfyhunger

HudsonValleyCurrent.org ~ hello@HudsonValleyCurrent.org ~ P.O. Box 444, Accord, NY 12404

845-658-2302 Find out more or join hudsonvalleycurrent.org the beta test: HudsonValleyCurrent.org DEMO: Wed. Feb. 12, Santa Fe Restaurant, 11 Main St. Kingston, NY

HudsonValleyCurrent.org ~ hello@HudsonValleyCurrent.org ~ P.O. Box 444, Accord, NY 12404 80 FOOD & DRINK ChronograM 10/16

Find out more or join the beta test: HudsonValleyCurrent.org


tastings directory

Bakeries Alternative Baker

407 Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-3355 www.lemoncakes.com Open 7am Thurs.–Mon.; Closed Tues.– Wed. Small-batch, all from scratch, handmade all-butter baked goods–this is our focus for twenty years. We also offer glutenfree and other allergy-friendly options, plus made-to-order award-winning sandwiches. All-vegan vegetable soups in season, an array of JB Peel coffees and Harney teas, artisanal drinks, plus our highly addictive Belgian Hot Chocolate, also served iced! Special-occasion cakes made to order. Seasonal desserts change through the year. Unique wedding cakes for a lifetime’s treasure. All “Worth a detour”—(NY Times). Truly “Where Taste is Everything!”

Ella’s Bellas Bakery

418 Main Street, Beacon, NY (845) 765-8502 www.ellabellasbeacon.com

Butchers Jack’s Meats & Deli

79 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2244

Cafés Apple Pie Bakery Café

Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY (845) 905-4500 www.applepiebakerycafe.com

Bistro-to-Go

948 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 340-9800 www.bluemountainbistro.com Gourmet take-out store serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week. Featuring local and imported organic foods, delicious homemade desserts, sophisticated four-star food by Chefs Richard Erickson and Jonathan Sheridan. Off-premise full-service catering and event planning for parties of all sizes.

Catering Pamela’s on the Hudson

(845) 562-4505 www.pamelastravelingfeast.com

Restaurants Alley Cat Restaurant

294 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-1300

American Bounty Restaurant

Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY (845) 451-1011 www.americanbountyrestaurant.com

The premier Sushi restaurant in the Hudson Valley for over 21 years. Only the freshest sushi with an innovative flair.

American Glory BBQ 342 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 822-1234 www.americanglory.com

The Bocuse Restaurant Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY (845) 451-1012 www.bocuserestaurant.com

Cafe Le Perche 230 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 822-1850 www.cafeleperche.com

Cafe Macchiato 99 Liberty Street, Newburgh, NY (845) 565-4616 www.99libertystreet.com

Diego’s Taqueria 38 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 338-2816 www.diegoskingston.com

Voted Best Indian Cuisine in the Hudson Valley

Red Hook Curry House ★★★★ DINING Daily Freeman & Poughkeepsie Journal ZAGAT RATED

HUNDI BUFFET

TUESDAY & SUNDAY 5-10PM

4 Vegetarian Dishes • 4 Non-Vegetarian Dishes includes: appetizers, soup, salad bar, bread, dessert, coffee & tea All you can eat only $12.95 • Children under 8- $7.95 28 E. MARKET ST, RED HOOK (845) 758-2666 See our full menu at www.RedHookCurryHouse.com

OPEN EVERY DAY Lunch: 11:30am-3:00 pm Dinner: 5:00pm-10:00pm Fridays: 3:00pm - 10:00pm

Catering for Parties & Weddings • Take out orders welcome

The Hop at Beacon 458 Main Street, Beacon, NY www.thehopbeacon.com

The New York Restaurant 353 Main Street, Catskill, NY (518) 943-5500 nyrestaurantcatskill.com

Osaka Restaurant 22 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY, (845) 876-7338 or (845) 757-5055, 74 Broadway, Tivoli, NY www.osakasushi.net Foodies, consider yourselves warned and informed! Osaka Restaurant is Rhinebeck’s direct link to Japan’s finest cuisines! Enjoy the freshest sushi and delicious traditional Japanese small plates cooked with love by this family owned and operated treasure for over 20 years! For more information and menus, go to osakasushi.net.

Red Hook Curry House 28 E Market Street, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-2666 www.redhookcurryhouse.com

Ristorante Caterina de’Medici Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY (845) 451-1013 www.ristorantecaterinademedici.com

Wine Bars Jar’d Wine Pub Water Street Market, New Paltz, NY www.jardwinepub.com

Offering French food here in the Valley using locally sourced ingredients and bread made in our own wood fired oven. Please join us for a meal and Happy Hour in the courtyard or historic dining room.

Front cafe open at 7am for Coffee and Pastries. Weekday Brunch. Lunch Tues.-Sun. Dinners Wed. - Thurs. 5-8pm, Fri & Sat 5-10pm. Happy Hour Wed- Sat 5-7pm.

230 Warren Street • Hudson, NY 12534 • cafeleperche.com • 518-822-1850 10/16 ChronograM FOOD & DRINK 81


business directory

Accommodations Bear Mountain Inn

99 Service Road, Bear Mountain, NY (845) 786-2731 www.visitbearmountain.com

Gatehouse Gardens B & B New Paltz, NY (845) 255-8817 ww.gatehousegardens.com

Antiques Hudson Antiques Dealers Association Hudson, NY www.hudsonantiques.net hudsonantiques@gmail.com

Architecture

Attorneys Jacobowitz & Gubits (845) 778-2121 www.jacobowitz.com

Traffic and Criminally Related Matters. Karen A. Friedman, Esq., President of the Association of Motor Vehicle Trial Attorneys 30 East 33rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY, PO Box 93, Clinton Corners , NY (845) 266-4400 or (212) 213-2145 newyorktrafficlawyer.com k.friedman@msn.com

Audio & Video Markertek Video Supply www.markertek.com

Auto Sales

Richard Miller, AIA

28 Dug Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4480 www.richardmillerarchitect.com

Steve Morris Designs

business directory

156 Broadway, Port Ewen, NY (845) 417-1819 www.stevemorrisdesigns.com

Art Galleries & Centers After Eden Gallery

453 Main Street, Beacon, NY (845) 649-4469 www.afteredengallery.com

Dia: Beacon, Riggio Galleries 3 Beekman Street, Beacon, NY (845) 440-0100 www.diaart.org

DM Weil Gallery

208 Bruynswick Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-3336

Dorsky Museum

SUNY New Paltz 1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3844 www.newpaltz.edu/museum sdma@newpaltz.edu

Mark Gruber Gallery

Begnal Motors

552 Albany Avenue, Kingston, NY (888) 439-9985 www.ltbegnalmotor.com

Beverages Binnewater/Leisure Time Spring Water (845) 331-0504 www.binnewater.com

Books 22 East Market Street, Suite 304, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4861 www.monkfishpublishing.com

Broadcasting WDST 100.1 Radio Woodstock Woodstock, NY www.wdst.com

Building Services & Supplies Baxter

(845) 471-1047 www.baxterbuilt.com

Berkshire Products, Inc.

North River Gallery

Cabinet Designers

One Mile Gallery

475 Abeel Street, Kingston, NY (845) 338-2035 www.onemilegallery.com

Ryan Cronin Gallery

10 Main Street, New Paltz, NY www.ryancroningallery.com

Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2079 www.woodstockguild.org events@woodstockguild.org

Art Supplies Catskill Art & Office Supply

Kingston, NY: (845) 331-7780, Poughkeepsie, NY: (845) 452-1250, Woodstock, NY: (845) 679-2251

Artists John T. Unger Studios Hudson, NY (231) 584-2710 www.johntunger.com

Nadine Robbins Art

www.nadinerobbinsart.com

3572 Route 9, Hudson, NY (518) 851-9917 www.alvarezmodulars.com

Joshua Tree Inc.

1475 Route 19, Elizaville, NY (845) 661-1952 www.joshuatreeforestry.com

L Browe Asphalt Services (518) 479-1400 www.broweasphalt.com

Millbrook Cabinetry & Design

2612 Route 44, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-3006 www.millbrookcabinetryanddesign.com

N & S Supply

www.nssupply.com info@nssupply.com

Quatrefoil

www.quatrefoil.us

884 Ashley Falls Road, Sheffield, NY www.berkshireproducts.com 747 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2200 www.cabinetdesigners.com

Cord King

(845) 797-6877 cordkingllc@gmail.com

Excelsior Wood Products LLC 401B Sawkill Road, Kingston, NY excelsiorwood.com

Glenn’s Wood Sheds (845) 255-4704

H Houst & Son Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2115 www.hhoust.com

Herrington’s

Hillsdale, NY: (518) 325-3131 Hudson, NY: (518) 828-9431 www.herringtons.com

Herzogs True Value Home Center Kingston Plaza, Kingston, NY www.herzogs.com

Hollenbeck Pest Control

273 Quassaick Avenue, New Windsor, NY (845) 542-0000 www.hollenbeckpestcontrol.com

Ingrained Building Concepts (845) 224-5936

82 business directory ChronograM 10/16

Willow Wood

38 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4141 willowwoodlifestyle@gmail.com

Co-working Space One Epic Place

122 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 232-0402 oneepicplace.com

Computer Services Tech Smiths

45 North Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 443-4866 www.tech-smiths.com

Custom Home Design and Materials Atlantic Custom Homes

2785 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY www.lindalny.com

Education

WCW Kitchens

3 Cherry Hill Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2022 Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2002

Williams Lumber & Home Center 6760 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-WOOD www.williamslumber.com

Carpets & Rugs

Monkfish Publishing

New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241 www.markgrubergallery.com 29 Main Street, Suite 2B, Chatham, NY www.northrivergallery.com

John A Alvarez and Sons

Anatolia-Tribal Rugs & Weavings

54G Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5311 www.anatoliarugs.com anatoliarugs@gmail.com Hours: Thurs.-Mon. 12-5pm. Closed Tues. & Wed. Established in Woodstock 1981. Offering old, antique and contemporary handwoven carpets and kilims, from Turkey, Afghanistan, Iran, Central Asia, in a wide range of styles, colors, prices. Hundreds to choose from, in a regularly changing inventory. Also, Turkish kilim pillows. We are happy to share our knowledge about rugs, and try and simplify the sometimes overcomplicated world of handwoven rugs.

Cinemas Rosendale Theater Collective Rosendale, NY www.rosendaletheatre.org

Upstate Films

6415 Montgomery St. Route 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-2515, 132 Tinker Street, Woodstock (845) 679-6608 (845) 876-2515 www.upstatefilms.org

Clothing & Accessories Karina Dresses

329 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0717 www.karinadresses.com

Neu Solutions

2240 Route 28, Glenford, NY (845) 303-0091 www.alwaysneu.com

Next Boutique

17 W Strand Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-4537 www.nextboutique.com

OAK 42

34 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-0042 www.oak42.com

Pleasant Valley Department Store

1585 Main Street, Pleasant Valley, NY www.pleasantvalleydepartmentstore.com

Bard MAT

Bard College (845) 758-7151 www.bard.edu/mat mat@bard.edu

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-5343 www.caryinstitute.org

Center for Metal Arts

44 Jayne Street, Florida, NY (845) 651-7550 www.centerformetalarts.com/blog

Harvey School

260 Jay Street, Katonah, NY (914) 232-3161 www.harveyschool.org

High Meadow School

Route 209, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-4855 www.highmeadowschool.org

Hotchkiss School

11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, CT (860) 435-3663 www.hotchkiss.org/arts

Kildonan School

Amenia, NY (845) 373-2012 www.kildonan.org admissions@kildonan.org

Livingston Street Early Childhood Community Kingston, NY (845) 340-9900 www.livingstonstreet.org

Marist College

3399 North Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 575-3000 www.marist.edu

Mountain Laurel Waldorf School

16 South Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0033 www.mountainlaurel.org

Next Step College Counseling

Hyde Park, NY (845) 242-8336 www.nextstepcollegecounseling.com smoore@nextstepcollegecounseling.com

Primrose Hill School - Elementary and Early Childhood Education inspired by the Waldorf Philosophy 23 Spring Brook Park, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-1226 www.primrosehillschool.com

Randolph School

Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 297-5600 www.randolphschool.org


South Kent School

Graphic Design & Illustration

40 Bulls Bridge Road, South Kent, CT (860) 927-3539 x201 www.southkentschool.org

Annie Internicola, Illustrator

SUNY New Paltz

Luminary Media

New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3860 www.newpaltz.edu

www.annieillustrates.com

314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 334-8600 www.luminarymedia.com

Woodstock Day School

1430 Glasco Turnpike, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-3744 x103 www.woodstockdayschool.org

Event Services/Spaces Durants Tents & Events

1155 Route 9, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-0011 www.durantstents.com info@durantstents.com

Hudson Opera House

327 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 822-1438 www.hudsonoperahouse.org

North Country Vintage Hudson, NY (347) 615 5528 northcountryvintage.com

Events Barn of Terror

25 ThruView Farm Road, Lake Katrine, NY www.thebarnofterror.com

Dutchess County Fairgrounds www.dutchessfair.com

Film Columbia

Chatham, NY (518) 392-3446 www.filmcolumbia.com info@filmcolumbia.com

Glimmerglass Film Days

Cooperstown, NY www.glimmerglassfilmdays.org

O+ Festival

OrCA Music Festival

The Chance, Poughkeepsie, NY (800) 300-6722 4orca.org

Women’s Health Symposium

Stone Ridge, NY www.womenshealthsymposium.org

Woodstock Invitational LLC

Bearsville Theater, Woodstock, NY www.woodstockinvitational.com

Woodstock Sessions

woodstocksessions.com

Farm Markets & Natural Food Stores

L Salon

234 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-0269 www.thelsalonny.com

Le Shag.

292 Fair Street, Kingston, NY (845) 338-0191 www.leshag.com

Locks That Rock

1552 Route 9, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 227-4021 28 County Rt. 78, Middletown (845) 342-3989 locksthatrock.com

Lush Eco-Salon & Spa

2 South Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 204-8319 www.lushecosalon.com

Home Furnishings & Décor Clove & Creek

73 Broadway, Kingston, NY www.cloveandcreek.com

Dichotomy Home

16 Dog Tail Corners Road, Wingdale, NY (845) 832-6522 www.huntcountryfurniture.com

Interior Design Elizabeth Berin Interiors (845) 633-8089 berin-design.com

Jewelry, Fine Art & Gifts Bop to Tottom

299 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 338-8100

Crafts People

Dreaming Goddess

810 Broadway, Ulster Park, NY (845) 339-7229 www.theapplebinfarmmarket.com

44 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2206 www.dreaminggoddess.com

Hawthorne Valley Farm Store

Geoffrey Good Fine Jewelry

327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7500 www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org

238 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (212) 625-1656 www.geoffreygood.com

Sunflower Natural Food Market

Hudson Valley Goldsmith

Clarkes Family Farms

2086 Route 44/55, Modena, NY (845) 901-7442 www.clarkesfamilyfarm.com

Financial Advisors Third Eye Associates Ltd.

38 Spring Lake Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 752-2216 www.thirdeyeassociates.com

Florist Hops Petunia

73 B Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 481-5817 www.hopspetunia.com

Poughkeepsie, NY www.midhudsonciviccenter.org

Musical Instruments

71A Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-5872 www.hudsonvalleygoldsmith.com

Hummingbird Jewelers

23 A. East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4585 www.hummingbirdjewelers.com hummingbirdjewelers@hotmail.com

Marisa Lomonaco Custom Jewelry Beacon, NY www.marisalomonaco.com

Lighting

528 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 331-6089 www.barconesmusiconline.com

5 Hanna Lane, Beacon, NY (212) 777-2101 www.nichemodern.com

Museums Motorcyclepedia Museum

250 Lake Street (Route 32), Newburgh, NY (845) 569-9065

Aqua Jet

1606 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-8080 www.aquajetpools.com

Woodstock Music Shop

6 Rock City Road, Woodstock (845) 679-3224 1300 Ulster Avenue, Kingston (845) 383-1734 www.woodstockmusic.com

Real Estate Kingston’s Opera House Office Bldg. 275 Fair Street, Kingston, NY (845) 399-1212 Contact Bill Oderkirk (owner/manager) 3991212@gmail.com

Organizations The Avalon Initiative

Upstate House

(518) 672-4465 www.edrenewal.org

www.upstatehouse.com

Upstater

Hudson Valley Current

www.upstater.com

(845) 658-2302 www.hudsonvalleycurent.org

Record Stores Rocket Number Nine Records

257 Main Sreet, New Paltz, NY www.newpaltzchamber.org

50 N Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-8217

Recreation

www.rethinklocal.org

Hudson River Cruises

1 East Strand Street, Kingston, NY (845) 340-4700 www.hudsonrivercruises.com

UlsterForBusiness.com

YMCA of Kingston

Total Immersion Swim Studio

507 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 338-3810 www.ymcaulster.org

37 Kleinekill Drive, New Paltz, NY (914) 466-5956

Zephyr Float

Performing Arts

111 Greenkill Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 853-2400 zephyrfloat.com

Bardavon 1869 Opera House

35 Market Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2072 www.bardavon.org

Shoes Pegasus Comfort Footwear

Center for Performing Arts

New Paltz (845) 256-0788 Woodstock (845) 679-2373 www.PegasusShoes.com

661 Rte. 308, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 232-2320 www.centerforperformingarts.org

Specialty Foods

Club Helsinki Hudson

405 Columbia Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-4800 www.helsinkihudson.com

Water Oracle

Half Moon Theatre

41 E. Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-8327 www.thewateroracle.com

Kaatsbaan International Dance Center

Hudson Valley Sunrooms

2515 South Road, Poughkeepsie, NY www.halfmoontheatre.org

Sunrooms

www.facebook.com/kaatsbaan www.kaatsbaan.org

The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio

355 Broadway, Port Ewen (Ulster Park), NY (845) 339-1717 www.hudsonvalleysunrooms.com

339 Central Ave, Albany, NY (518) 465-5233 www.thelinda.org The Linda provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personnel with world-renowned artists, academy award winning directors, headliner comedians and local, regional, and national artists on the verge of national recognition. An intimate, affordable venue, serving beer and wine, The Linda is a night out you won’t forget.

Shadowland Theater

157 Canal Street, Ellenville, NY (845) 647-5511 www.shadowlandtheatre.org

Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center 1351 Kings Highway, Sugar Loaf, NY (845) 610-5900 www.sugarloafpac.org

Pet Services & Supplies Pet Country

Niche Modern

Pools & Spas

Barcones Music

Ulster County Office of Economic Development

Apple Bin Farm Market

Farms

Mid-Hudson Civic Center

Gargoyles, Ltd

1240 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 569-0303, 1560 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-6300, 765 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-4330 www.adamsfarms.com

75 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5361 www.sunflowernatural.com info@sunflowernatural.com

1348 Route 9W, Marlboro, NY (845) 236-7970 www.liveatthefalcon.com

Re>Think Local

262 Spillway Road, West Hurley, NY (845) 331-3859 www.craftspeople.us Representing over 500 artisans, Crafts People boasts four buildings brimming with fine crafts; the largest selection in the Hudson Valley. All media represented, including: jewelry, blown glass, pottery, turned wood, kaleidoscopes, wind chimes, leather, clothing, stained glass, etc.

Adam’s Fairacre Farms

The Falcon

exit nineteen

Hunt Country Furniture

The Chocolate Factory, 54 Elizabeth Street, Suite 3, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-1004 www.atelierreneefineframing.com renee@atelierreneefineframing.com A visit to Red Hook must include stopping at this unique workshop! Combining a beautiful selection of moulding styles and mats with conservation quality materials, expert design advice and skilled workmanship, Renee Burgevin, owner and CPF, has over 25 years experience. Special services include shadow-box and oversize framing as well as fabricwrapped and French matting. Also offering mirrors.

291 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-4406 www.bearsvilletheater.com

New Paltz Chamber of Commerce

330 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (215) 629-1700 www.gargoylesltd.com

Atelier Renee Fine Framing

Bearsville Theater

Door 21, 99 South Third Street, Hudson, NY (845) 240-5834 www.chrisungaro.com 309 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 514-2485

Picture Framing

6830 Rt. 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-9000

Photography Fionn Reilly Photography Saugerties, NY (845) 802-6109 www.fionnreilly.com

Tourism Historic Huguenot Street

Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1660

New Paltz Travel Center

43 North Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-7706 www.newpaltztravel.com

Wine, Liquor & Beer Arlington Wine & Liquor

18 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie, NY (866) SAY-WINE www.arlingtonwine.net

Denning’s Point Distillery

10 North Chestnut Street, Beacon, NY www.denningspointdistillery.com

Writing Services Peter Aaron

www.peteraaron.org info@peteraaron.org

Organizations Wallkill Valley Writers

New Paltz, NY (845) 750-2370 www.wallkillvalleywriters.com khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com

10/16 ChronograM business directory 83

business directory

Kingston, NY www.opositivefestival.org

Hair Salons

Music


whole living guide

The Evolution of O+

An alternative Health Exchange by timothy malcolm illustration by annie internicola

H

annah Mohan arrived at the O+ Festival in 2013 ready to play—and get her teeth cleaned. The lead vocalist and guitarist for the indie pop band And the Kids was looking forward to the weekend-long Kingston event during which musicians and artists perform in exchange for free health care. She wasn’t looking forward to being reminded that she should have her wisdom teeth extracted. “I didn’t have coverage at the time,” says Mohan, echoing the reality of many musicians and artists who don’t necessarily have traditional health insurance. But, in the spirit of the festival, her dentist made her an offer: Bring And the Kids back to Kingston to perform and, while visiting, he would extract her wisdom teeth for free. That simple transaction, which bridges the medical and creative communities, is the foundation of O+ (pronounced O-positive). The 2016 festival, which includes performances by singer Sondre Lerche, Kaki King, and Chaos Chaos, takes place October 7 to 9 in Kingston. The foundation of O+ was laid at a party in 2010, when painter Joe Concra listened to dentist friend Dr. Thomas Cingel talk about the challenge of bringing one of his favorite bands to Kingston. At the time, there wasn’t a devoted venue anchoring the Uptown Kingston music scene, and Wall Street had its share of empty storefronts. How could a bunch of people get a band in Kingston? Cingel had an unusual thought: He could clean their teeth. Concra and fellow Kingstonians Alex Marvar and Denise Orzo ran with the thought, calling musical and medical friends to organize a festival in which musicians and artists would perform in exchange for health care. The festival was founded at a time when, according to a Future of Music Coalition survey, 33 percent of musicians said they didn’t have health insurance, twice the average of uninsured Americans. “It was straight up, like, ‘We didn’t have access to health care, and this would be a good way to get this going,’” says Concra. The first O+ Festival, organized in less than three months, was in October 2010 with 35 bands, 15 visual artists, and about 50 health care providers. Three years later, Mohan was told by her O+ dentist to return to Kingston for a wisdom teeth extraction. Her dentist? Dr. Thomas Cingel. “That meant the world to me,” says Mohan about Cingel’s empathy. “I just feel like the whole [O+] community understands worth and value and love.” O+ is hoping those feelings can expand both year-round and nationwide. What began as a weekend-long festival in Kingston has become a movement to keep creative people healthy, from New York to Petaluma, California. 84 whole living ChronograM 10/16

COMMUNITY-CENTRIC CARE Dr. Mark Josefski was one of the first physicians involved in the planning of the 2010 O+ Festival. The Kingston native and attending physician at the Institute for Family Health’s Kingston Family Health Center was asked if he might be interested in contributing his services to the inaugural event. Josefski and other physicians, nurses, and specialists—including chiropractors, social workers, psychiatrists, acupuncturists, aromatherapists, and reiki healers—work during the festival at the clinic inside Kingston’s Old Dutch Church. Any musician, artist, or O+ volunteer can receive free consultation and treatment simply by signing up at the church during the festival. Dental appointments must be arranged in advance. At a typical consultation, which may last up to 45 minutes, the patient discusses with a nurse his or her physical situation and family history. The nurse will also inform the patient of the services available at the clinic. Sometimes the services, such as the simple touch of a massage therapist, are foreign to patients. “People who are on the road will certainly have chronic issues they’re dealing with,” says Shannon Light, a registered nurse and contracted travel nurse, and the nurse-in-charge at the O+ clinic. “Our lead massage therapist has a special place in her heart for drummers. She can just lay her hand on someone’s shoulder for 10 seconds to know if they’re a drummer or not.” The musicians and artists who receive care at O+ remember it well. Anna Fox Rochinski, lead vocalist and guitarist of the psychedelic indie rock band Quilt, says she felt a connection with energy therapist and aromatherapist Anne Vermilye. “I look forward to meeting with her again in Kingston as soon as my schedule opens back up,” says Fox Rochinski. Other musicians and artists sometimes can’t wait that long, something O+ organizers realized after the very first festival in 2010. Then, practitioners and O+ organizers received frequent e-mails from artists, asking questions about health issues they were experiencing on the road. Armed with those e-mails, organizers and practitioners knew the next step was making O+ a year-round effort, which meant linking patients to systems that afforded them health care outside of the festival. So starting at the 2011 O+ Festival, Josefski and others were actively helping insured and uninsured musicians and artists access the Institute for Family Health’s network, which spreads from New York City to Albany and charges patients on a sliding scale while helping them navigate insurance benefits, es-


10/16 ChronograM whole living 85


From our backyard to your doorstep.

Subscribe for home delivery today: upstatehouse.com/subscribe

86 whole living ChronograM 10/16

pecially related to the Affordable Care Act. The Institute also links patients —including O+ performers—with social workers, who help them apply for programs such as Medicare, Medicaid and family planning. By giving musicians and artists that link to year-round care, O+ began to evolve from a one-shot festival to a siren that attracts performers from across the country to receive care. “For a weekend we provide a window for the artists and musicians and volunteers who participate,” says Josefski. “And what we’re really trying to do now is help people access the systems that exist.” O+ alumni enrolled in the Institute for Family Health’s network are given the O+ Institute Access Card, which serves as a reminder to take advantage of the Institute’s services. Artists and musicians can also sign up for a BandAid RX pharmacy discount card, which allows them to fill prescriptions and receive discounts at more than 64,000 pharmacies nationwide. O+ also organized four bike rides that began at the 2014 festival. And part of the 2015 festival included a one-day wellness expo and conference with 45 booths and four seminars, including one on the nationwide opioid epidemic. The success of O+—granted 501(c)(3) nonprofit status in 2014—in uniting the Kingston community revealed a template that other communities could use in helping to solve their local health care issues. So in 2013 O+ launched its first Chicago festival. Two years later, the festival spread to the San Francisco suburb of Petaluma. This year it launched the Bronx Health + Wellness Expo, a one-day combination of health education, screenings, yoga, martial arts, dance, and live music. And in May 2017 O+ will expand to the Boston suburb of Haverhill, Massachusetts. All of this happened because the signs were clear that creative people needed year-round care. “We were so surprised with how successful year one was,” says Concra, who says besides sending e-mails about health issues to O+ organizers, artists would also send e-mails to other artists extolling the O+ model. “That’s how this has been able to grow. This really is a grassroots movement based on localism, and based on people listening to each other.” STANDING BY ITS MISSION Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, more than 16 million previously uninsured Americans have gained health coverage, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services. But high deductibles and a limited range of care options have either cramped the newly insured, or have deterred some uninsured from shopping the marketplace. Thus, O+ organizers say the ACA has only made its mission more important, since through O+ Kingston, performers—even if they’re uninsured—get linked to the Institute for Family Health, providing them social workers who help them navigate available programs. O+ is searching for similar partnerships with federally qualified health centers in Petaluma and Haverhill, and is in discussions with one in Chicago. Meanwhile, 115 performers and volunteers received care during the 2015 O+ Chicago festival. In Petaluma in 2015, 97 performers and volunteers received care, and practitioners handed out 263 vouchers that performers could exchange for care with specific O+-affiliated volunteer providers outside of the festival. In Kingston, 94 practitioners volunteered to treat 222 patients in 2015. Concra says O+ communities typically blend robust music and art scenes with open dialogue about how to change the health care system, though their size, composition, and needs could be extremely different. “The neighborhood in Chicago is a different animal than Haverhill, Massachusetts, but the thing that doesn’t change is the one-on-one personal interaction, and the desire to change the system,” Concra says. Ultimately, O+ provides a platform for people across America to discuss how to treat all members of the creative community, regardless of insurance status. “The reason it’s so successful for us is we use art and music as an approach to health care. We make it fun for people to discuss wellness,” Concra says. “We throw a big party, and we throw big parties across America, and everyone in the community goes, ‘Oh wow, what a cool idea.’ “And this is all only since the health insurance companies took over the system,” he adds. “If we’re relying on each other, we can do more. If we’re relying on massive corporations to do things, it’s not the best idea.”


Happy Renew Year. Join our hands-on, hearts-in, multigenerational, ecological, embodied, Jewish spiritual community.

U P C O M I N G R E T R E AT S

KolHai.org

(845) 477-5457 hello@kolhai.org

HUDSON VALLEY JEWISH RENEWAL

Patient Focused Healthcare for the Proactive Individual

ra Co u g e 

ol

e

Transpersonal Acupuncture

 C ha

ng

e

C haos

Specializing in Acute & Chronic Physical Pain Emotional & Spiritual Wellness

NOV

o i ce  W h Ch

3 - 6

Awake at the Bedside: Radical Compassion in Palliative and End of Life Care

John M. Carroll H ,T ,S C EALER

EACHER

PIRITUAL

“ John Carroll is a most capable, worthy, and excellent healer of high integrity, compassion, and love.” —Gerald Epstein, MD Author Healing Visualizations

Real Love

with Sharon Salzberg & Sylvia Boorstein

DEC

16 - 18

Voice as Practice: Instrument of the Heart with Meredith Monk

For more information, visit garrisoninstitute.org/calendar For our full calendar of more than 100 retreats and programs in the year ahead, check our website. For inspiration and insight, visit our blog.

garrisoninstitute.org 14 MARY’S WAY, ROUTE 9D

AT

GLENCLYFFE GARRISON, NEW YORK 10524 845.424.4800

Special Fall Rate - 2 sessions at 20% off ($30 savings)

OUNSELOR

“ John is an extraordinary healer whom I have been privileged to know all my life. Miracles still do happen.” —Richard Brown, MD Author Stop Depression Now

8 - 11

Buddhist Contemplative Care Symposium

Jipala R. Kagan L.Ac. Call Today 845-340-8625

TranspersonalAcupuncture.com 291 Wall St., Kingston

DEC

PATRICE HEBER

BODY-MIND CENTERING PRACTITIONER ®

Hands-on Healing for Embodied Health Body-Mind Centering Cellular Touch Cranio-Sacral and Polarity Therapy

See John’s website for schedules of upcoming classes and events.

275 Fair Street, Kingston, NY patriceheber@gmail.com | 845-399-8350

johnmcarrollhealer.com or call 845-338-8420

INTEGR ATE YOUR LIFE I T ’ S

At the ONE & ONLY

TOTAL IMMERSION SWIM STUDIO TI Adult Freestyle Workshops Offered Every Day Owned and operated by TI Founder, Head Coach

OVER

42 YEPEARIERNSCE EX

TERRY LAUGHLIN

Open: 7am - 7 pm 7 days a week

With TI Coaches: Alice & Betsy Laughlin, Ray Bosse, retired USMA coach, Carsten Stoever, Shane Eversfield.

CALL or EMAIL NOW swimstudio@totalimmersion.net 37 Kleinekill Drive, New Paltz, NY 12561

914 •• 466 •• 5956 hvtiss@gmail.com

A

B A L A N C I N G

A C T

HOLISTIC NURSE HEALTH CONSULTANT

Manage Stress • Apprehensions • Pain • Improve Sleep Release Weight • Set Goals • Change Habits Pre/Post Surgery • Fertility • Hypno Birthing Immune System Enhancement • Nutritional Counseling Past Life Regression • Intuitive Counseling Motivational & Spiritual Guidance

Breathe • Be Mindful • Let Go • Flow

H Y P N O S I S - C OAC H I N G Kary Broffman, R.N., C.H. 845-876-6753 • karybroffman.com 10/16 ChronograM whole living 87


whole living guide

Acupuncture Creekside Acupuncture and Natural Medicine, Stephanie Ellis, L.Ac. 371A Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 546-5358 www.creeksideacupuncture.com Private treatment rooms, attentive oneon-one care, affordable rates, sliding scale. Accepting Blue Cross, no-fault and other insurances. Stephanie Ellis graduated magna cum laude from Columbia University in pre-medical studies. She completed her acupuncture and Chinese medicine degree in 2001 as valedictorian of her class and started her acupuncture practice in Rosendale that same year. Ms. Ellis uses a combination of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Classical Chinese Medicine, Japanese-style acupuncture and triggerpoint acupuncture. Creekside Acupuncture is located in a building constructed of nontoxic, eco-friendly materials.

Transpersonal Acupuncture (845) 340-8625 www.transpersonalacupuncture.com

Aromatherapy Joan Apter, Aromacologist (845) 679-0512 www.apteraromatherapy.com joanapter@earthlink.net Raindrop Technique, Emotional Release Raindrop, Neuro-Auricular Technique (NAT), Vitaflex for humans and Horses, dogs, birds and cats. Health consultations, natural wellness writer, spa consultant, classes, trainings and keynotes. Offering full line of Young Living Essential oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, children’s and non-toxic cleaning products. Consultant: Prepare for Surgery, Heal Faster with healing statements for surgery and holistic approaches to heal faster!

Astrology Planet Waves Kingston, NY (845) 797-3458 www.planetwaves.net

Body Work

Dentistry & Orthodontics Dental Office of Drs. Jeffrey & Maureen Viglielmo 56 Lucas Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 339-1619 www.drvigs.com

Tischler Dental Woodstock, NY (845) 679-3706 www.tischlerdental.com

Funeral Homes Copeland Funeral Home Inc. 162 South Putt Corners Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1212 www.copelandfhnp.com

Herbal Medicine & Nutrition Empowered By Nature 1129 Main Street, 2nd Floor, Fishkill, NY (845) 416-4598 www.EmpoweredByNature.net lorrainehughes54@gmail.com Lorraine Hughes, Registered Herbalist (AHG) and ARCB Certified Reflexologist offers Wellness Consultations that therapeutically integrate Asian and Western Herbal Medicine and Nutrition with their holistic philosophies to health. This approach is grounded in Traditional Chinese Medicine with focus placed on an individual’s specific constitutional profile and imbalances. Please visit the website for more information and upcoming events.

Holistic Health Cassandra Currie, MS, RYT‚ Holistic Health Counselor 41 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 532-7796 www.holisticcassandra.com

embodyperiod 439 Union Street, Hudson, NY (415) 686-8722 www.embodyperiod.com

John M. Carroll 715 Rte 28, Kingston, NY (845) 338-8420 www.johnmcarrollhealer.com

Patrice Heber

Kary Broffman, RN, CH

275 Fair Street, Kingston, NY (845) 399-8350

(845) 876-6753 Karyb@mindspring.com

88 whole living ChronograM 10/16

Hospitals Health Quest

45 Reade Place, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-8500 www.health-quest.org

MidHudson Regional Hospital

Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 483-5000 www.westchestermedicalcenter.com/mhrh

Hypnotism Seeds of Love

Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 264-1388 www.seeds-love.com

Osteopathy Stone Ridge Healing Arts

Joseph Tieri, DO, & Ari Rosen, DO, 3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-7589 www.stoneridgehealingarts.com Drs. Tieri and Rosen are NY State Licensed Osteopathic Physicians specializing in Osteopathic Manipulation and Cranial Osteopathy. Please visit our website for articles, links, books, and much more information. Treatment of newborns, children, and adults. By appointment.

Resorts & Spas Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa

220 North Road, Milton, NY (877) 7-INN-SPA (845) 795-1310 www.buttermilkfallsinn.com

Retreat Centers Garrison Institute

Route 9D, Garrison, NY (845) 424-4800 www.garrisoninstitute.org info@garrisoninstitute.org Retreats supporting positive personal and social change in a renovated monastery overlooking the Hudson River. Featuring the Buddhist Contemplative Care Symposium: Radical Compassion in Palliative and End of Life Care, November 3-6; and Meredith Monk: Voice as Practice, December 16-18.

Omega Institute Rhinebeck, NY (800) 944-1001 www.eOmega.org

Spirituality AIM Group

6 Deming Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5650 www.sagehealingcenter.org

Kol Hai

(845) 477-5457 kolhai.org

Thermography Breast Thermography Full Body Thermography Susan Willson, RN, CNM, CCT

Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-4807 www.biothermalimaging.com ACCT approved clinic, offering non-invasive Breast and Full Body thermography in a warm, personal environment, since 2003. Full Body Thermography highlights areas of chronic inflammation and organ dysfunction before they become established disease. Breast thermography shows abnormalities 8-10 years before tumors will show on a mammogram, allowing for much gentler options to rebalance the body and prevent a tumor becoming established. Susan was the first to offer Thermography in the Hudson Valley. She uses the latest medically calibrated camera and Board Certified Thermologists for interpretation.

Yoga Anahata Yoga

35 North Front Street, Kingston, NY facebook.com/anahatakingston

The Hot Spot

33 N. Front St. (Lower Level), Kingston, NY http://hotspotkingston.com (845) 750-2878 hotspotkingston@gmail.com The Hot Spot is the only yoga studio in the mid-Hudson Valley offering AUTHENTIC BIKRAM Hot Yoga. Bikram Yoga is a series of 26 postures and 2 breathing exercises, practiced in a room heated to 105 degrees, to stretch, strengthen, and detoxify the entire body. You will work hard; you will sweat; and you will feel amazing! Group classes and private yoga sessions available. Please see website for class schedule.

Woodstock Yoga Center

6 Deming Street, Woodstock, NY www.woodstockyogacenter.com (845) 679-8700 woodstockyogacenter@gmail.com Woodstock Yoga offers a range of yoga asana steeped in Indian tradition, with a foundation rooted in the healing and transformative powers of Yoga. Owner Barbara Boris and other talented teachers offer decades of experience and a wide range of classes and styles, plus events, workshops and private sessions.


LOCAL “Shifting just 10% of spending to local businesses would keep an additional $475 million in the Hudson Valley each year.” —Indie Impact Study

Y O U R B R A N D , I L L U M I N AT E D . L U M I N A RY M E D I A . C O M

Take the pledge to shift 10% of your current spending here: golocalhudsonvalley.org

DIGITAL STRATEGY. WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT. BRAND DEVELOPMENT. GRAPHIC AND WEB DESIGN. EVENT PRODUCTION. BUSINESS STRATEGY.

10/16 ChronograM whole living 89


THECENTERFORPERFORMINGARTS (845) 876-3080 • www.centerforperformingarts.org ATRHINEBECK For box office and information:

Sept. 30 – Oct. 9 8pm Fri & Sat • 3pm Sun Tickets: $22

35TH ASBURY SHORT FILM CONCERT OCT 1 AT 8PM

ROOTS MUSIC SERIES: KAIA KATER OCT 7 AT 8PM

A corrupt businessman trying to get ahead in Washington D.C. hires a newspaperman to tutor his brassy chorus girl mistress but gets more than he bargained for when he discovers a little bit of learning can be a dangerous thing. An Up In One Production, written by Garson Kanin, directed by Diana di Grandi.

DAISYCUTTER ALBUM RELEASE SHOW OCT 14 AT 8PM

Oct. 14 – Nov. 6 NICK BARR 50 YRS IN THE MAKING OCT 15 AT 8PM

FOOD FOR THOUGHT MILK OCT 20 AT 6PM RECEPTION 7PM FILM

ANDREA GIBSON WITH SARAH KAY OCT 17 AT 8PM

WOMEN WITH VOICES: THE DOOR NEXT DOOR OCT 22 AT 6PM

339 CENTRAL AVENUE ALBANY NY 12206 518-465-5233 THELINDA.ORG

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW OCT 29 AT 8PM AND MIDNIGHT

8pm Fri & Sat • 3pm Sun Tickets: $27/$25

Book by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan and music and lyrics by Mel Brooks. An Up In One Production, director/choreographer: Kevin Archambault, music director: Jeri Burns, producer: Diana di Grandi.

SATURDAYMORNINGFAMILYSERIES SATURDAYS AT 11 AM • Tickets: $9 adults; $7 children in advance or at the door

THE WIZARD OF OZ

THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW

October 22

October 29

by CENTER Players on Tour

By CENTER Players on Tour

The CENTER is located at 661 Rte. 308, 3.5 miles east of the light in the Village of Rhinebeck

See you at The CENTER! FC2016_Chronogram_Ad.qxp_Layout 1 8/4/16 12:03 PM Page 1

17th

FILM COLUMBIA 10.24 2 –30.2016 24

CHAT A HAM AT &HUDSON

90 forecast ChronograM 10/16


the forecast

event PREVIEWS & listings for october 2016

Thirsty, a biopic about drag star Thirsty Burlington, screens at this year's Woodstock Film Festival.

Celluloid Heroes From a love story about a visually impaired novelist featuring Alec Baldwin and Demi Moore to Jim Jarmusch’s new documentary about influential rock-and-roll band The Stooges (Gimme Danger), the Woodstock Film Festival includes a brimming roster of movies, panels, speakers, and music. The world premiere of Blind kicks off the festival. The film was directed by Michael Mailer, son of writer Norman Mailer. Baldwin and Mailer will take part in a question-and-answer session at the showing. “The wonderful thing is that just about all of the filmmakers are going to be here,” says Meira Blaustein, co-founder and executive director of the Woodstock Film Festival. “It’s going to be this wonderful gathering of so many thought-provoking, bold, creative filmmakers who will come here from all over and converse in Woodstock, and the surrounding areas.” Showings and events take place at eight locations in Woodstock (Upstate Films, the Woodstock Playhouse, Bearsville Theater, and the Woodstock Community Center), Rosendale (Rosendale Theatre), Saugerties (Orpheum Theatre), Rhinebeck (Upstate Films), and Kingston (BSP Kingston). Some highlights from the festival include Loving by Jeff Nichols (Take Shelter, Midnight Special), about an interracial couple who were arrested in 1958 for miscegenation. Their appeal led to the Supreme Court’s landmark civil rights decision Loving v. Virginia in 1967. A trilogy of films called American Epic, narrated by Robert Redford, about music and electrical sound recordings circa 1920s, will also be shown. The three-part series includes interviews with musicians like Jack White, Nas, T Bone Burnett, Taj Mahal, and others. Actress Amber Tamblyn’s directorial debut, Paint It Black, explores two women from different backgrounds encountering devastating loss. Local 16-year-old Jack Fessenden premieres his first feature, Stray Bullets, boasting an impressive cast of indie movie A-listers including James Le Gros and Kevin Corrigan. Margo Pelletier’s biopic Thirsty chronicles the life of drag star Scott Townsend, aka Thirsty Burlington, who will be on hand for a Q&A after the screening.

Many of the festival participants return to the region to screen new projects, like brothers Todd and Jedd Wider, who produced Beyond Conviction, which screened at the 2006 festival. “It’s one of our favorite places,” the brothers wrote of Woodstock via e-mail in a joint statement. “The changing of the seasons in this part of the country is especially beautiful, and Woodstock is such a vibrant, interesting town with artistic and creative people everywhere.” The Wider brothers, based in New York City, directed a documentary at this year’s festival called God Knows Where I Am, about a woman succumbing to mental illness. The movie was shot in New York and New Hampshire. “The Woodstock Film Festival is an important, vibrant film festival where the spirit of independence and creativity is explored and honored,” the Widers wrote. “The festival understands the importance of creativity and thinking differently, and brings films to Woodstock that one might not get a chance to see in the local multiplex.” In addition to films, several informational panels and discussions are offered, including titles like “Producers on Producing,” “Women in Film and Media,” and “Music for Film,” all of which will be held at the Kleinert/James Center for the Arts. There’s also a “master class” with writer and director Catherine Hardwicke, director of the movie Twilight, and a panel called “Actor’s Dialogue” featuring actor Karen Allen, who was in Raiders of the Lost Ark, Scrooged, and Animal House, among other films. The Woodstock Film Festival helps independent filmmakers network and gain exposure, provides the Hudson Valley with a diverse cultural experience, and delivers education, entertainment, tourism, and an economic “engine” to the local community, Blaustein says. “It’s not just about going to see great films,” says Blaustein. “It’s about really immersing yourself and getting to know everything there is to know about them, and meeting the filmmakers, and meeting the subjects, and meeting the actors.” The Woodstock Film Festival runs October 13 to 16. Woodstockfilmfestival.com. —Mark Gerlach

10/16 ChronograM forecast 91


SATURDAY 1 ART Art Walk Kingston 1-5pm. Celebration of the arts and the local community. Locations across Kingston. Artsmidhudson.org.

Comedy Jena Friedman Comedy Show 8-10pm. $22/$16 in advance/$28 preferred/$10 students. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111.

Dance Ballet des Ameriques 2pm. $25-$50. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown. (914) 631-3390. Emily Coates, Choreographer 7:30-8:30pm. $20/$10 children and student rush with ID. A showcase performance of “Incarnations.” Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 10.

Fairs & Festivals 3rd Annual Mid-Hudson Marketplace 11am-5pm. Shop, sample and celebrate homegrown artists, crafters, farmers, mom & pop shops, and makers of all types. Nostrano Vineyards, Milton. 234-5283.

Film Where to Invade Next 6-9pm. Old Chatham Quaker Meeting, Old Chatham. (518) 766-2992.

Health & Wellness SoulCollage® Autumn Workshop 1-5pm. $45. Curtis Counseling, Coaching & Case Management, Rhinebeck. (914) 420-2438.

Kids & Family Museum Storytelling: Family Tours 10-11:30am. Tom Lee engages with Olana’s collection to invent stories. Ages 5+. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 105. Mystwood at Wild Earth First Saturday of every month, 10am-3:30pm. Mystwood is a nature connection program for 6-9 year olds that uses elves, fairies, wizards, and magic as storytelling and teaching tools. Wild Earth, New Paltz. 256-9830. The Poetics of Forgiveness 7pm. A month long community art project. Henry Hudson Riverfront Park, Hudson. Woolly Bear Caterpillars 10am. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781. YMCA Farm Expansion Work Weekend 10am-3pm. YMCA Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonymcafarmproject.org/.

Literary & Books The Art of the Cheese Plate 3-6pm. Author Tia Keenan appearance and local cheese tasting. bluecashew Kitchen Pharmacy, Rhinebeck. 876-1117. Poetry and Poety Things 4-5pm. As part of Art Walk Kingston, Poetry and Poety Things, with Holly Christiana, Allan Stevo, Chris Wood. Peter Coates on koto. Paintings by Joshua Stern. Refreshments afterward. Lace Mill Main Gallery, Kingston. 399-4437.

Music 35th Asbury Short Film Concert 8pm. The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio, Albany. 518-465-5233. The Barn Cats 9pm. Funk. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739. Ben Neill Brass quintet and electronics. Manitoga, Garrison. 424-3812. chronogram.com These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

92 forecast ChronograM 10/16

Ben Neill’s MANITOGA for Brass Quintet and Electronics 4pm. $45/$35 members/$125 concert and reception. Manitoga/The Russel Wright Design Center, Garrison. 424-3812. Bob Dylan Tribute Concert 8-10pm. $12 advance/$15 door. A concert to benefit the Artists’ Collective of Hyde Park; Hyde Park United Methodist Church, Hyde Park. 914-456-6700. Dead on the Tracks 8:30-11:30pm. Dead On the Tracks is a five-piece Tribute to The Grateful Dead performing authentic sets of Grateful Dead and related material from Bob Dylan, Phish, Neil Young, and more. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Derek Knott 7pm. Original music. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775. Huichica East $50/$90 one day. Featuring Phosphorescent, Bill Callahan, Vetiver, and many more. Chaseholm Farm, Pine Plains. Ticketfly.com/ event/1272859-huichica-east-pine-plains. Eric Comstock & Barbara Fasano: Masterful. Magical. Married 8pm. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. Four Nations Ensemble: Nocturne for the King of Spain 7:30pm. Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA. (413) 458-2303. The Gaels’ Honour: Early Music for Voice and Harp from Gaelic Scotland and Ireland 8pm. Skinner Hall at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7319. Girls On Top 9:30pm. $5. Motown/R&B. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Groovy Tuesday Band 8pm. Acoustic. Pamela’s on the Hudson, Newburgh. 562-4505. Helluva Town: A New York Soundtrack 8-9:15pm. $20/$10 for patrons 21 and under. Performers Eric Comstock and Barbara Fasano close out Tom Andersen’s 2016 Words and Music Series with this sparkling and sophisticated cabaret evening. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (800) 838-3006. Music of Three Centuries 8pm. $10/$7 senior citizens, faculty, staff, alumni/students free. A piano recital by Andrew Ranaudo. Orange Hall Theater, Middletown. 341-4891. Old Time Stringband Music and Early Country Blues 7:30pm. Featuring The Down Hill Strugglers, John Cohen and the 4 o’clock FLowers. Tompkins Corners Cultural Center, Putnam Valley. 528-7280. The Quartet 8pm. $20/$10 students. The group features Stuart Quimby (flute), Tony Kieraldo (piano), Terence Murren (base), and Peter O’Brien (drums). Spencertown Academy Arts Center, Spencertown. (518) 392-3693. Roy Zimmerman performs “This Machine” 7 & 9pm. $25. The Barn at Egremont Inn, South Egremont, MA. (413) 528-9580. Slam Allen 8pm. $15. Unique blend of soul and blues. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. Sundad 10am. $10. Cantine memorial field, Saugerties. 246-5890. Toshi Reagon & BIGLovely 7pm. Gospel blues. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Winard Harper and the Jeli Posse 8-10:30pm. $15. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits First Saturday Reception First Saturday of every month, 5-8pm. ASK’s openings are elegant affairs with wine, hors d’oeuvres and art enthusiasts. These monthly events are part of Kingston’s First Saturday art events. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331.

Ghostories 7:30-9pm. $35-$250. An evening of spooky storytelling by an exciting list of actors including Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Hilarie Burton, Mary Stuart Masterson & Griffin Dunne. All proceeds to benefit Astor Services for Children & Families.The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 871-1171. The Peach Tree: Handmade Jewelry 12-4pm. Come meet the artist, see her at work and purchase that special piece of beautiful handcrafted jewelry. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

Outdoors & Recreation 1658 Stockade National Historic District Walking Tour 1pm. $10/$5 under age 16. Narrated walk through New York’s largest intact early Dutch settlement and neighborhood where the state was born in 1777. Includes tour of c.1812 Johnston House interior featuring 18th and early 19th-century furnishings and decorative arts. Friends of Historic Kingston, Kingston. 339-0720. 16th Annual Tivoli Street Painting Festival 9am-5pm. A day-long “paint-in” by artists of all ages along Broadway. Materials provided, including oil pastel chalk, an 8’ X 8’ pallet of pavement, beautiful weather, live local acoustic music by Joe Tobin’s Acoustic Medicine Variety Show and much, much, more. Squares allocated first come, first serve. Tivoli Village Hall, Tivoli. Tivoliny.org. Tree-torials 3-5pm. $20/$15 members. Frederic Church planted thousands of trees while living at Olana. Join us on July 16th to learn all about these native and exotic specimen trees on a walk through our winding carriage roads. Ages 5+. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 105.

Swing Dance Lesson 11am-12:30pm. $120/$200 pair. 6-week series. The class will focus on the fundamentals of swing dancing, primarily the six-count steps which encompass the East Coast swing dance style. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

SUNDAY 2 ART Art Walk Kingston 1-5pm. Celebration of the arts and the local community. Locations across Kingston. Artsmidhudson.org. Mari-Claire Charba 2-4pm. She will discuss the overlapping, intersecting and merging of art, theater and performance art, especially in the 1960’s New York City with its American roots at Black Mountain College in the 1950s with John Cage and his innovative creation: “Work in Theater No.1.” Woodstock Artists Association and Museum. 679-2940.

Dance Just Dance First Sunday of every month, 12:30-2pm. $10. DJ activated non-stop contagious expression. SkyBaby Yoga & Pilates, Cold Spring. 265-4444.

Fairs & Festivals High Falls Flea Market 9am-4pm. Art, antiques, collectibles, crafts and unique treasures. Grady Park, High Falls. 810-0471.

Film Nobody’s Perfect 1:30pm. Local filmmaker Dana Weidman’s new documentary. She will be available for Q and A after the screening. Upstate Films, Rhinebeck. 876-2515.

Theater

Health & Wellness

Born Yesterday 8-10pm. $22. Witty, timely comedy about money, politics and sex— a lighthearted look at abuse of power and bribery in relationships and politics. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3030.

Kestrel: Autumn Discovery at Wild Earth 10am-3:15pm. $240 series. This fall, we will gather in the forest to play games, tell stories around the fire, craft, track, build and so much more. Ages 7–10. Wild Earth, New Paltz. 256-9830.

Alive! 55+ and Kickin’: Off Broadway comes to Hyde Park 3-5:30pm. $50-$95 VIP M&G access with Golden Circle Seating. ALIVE! is a moving musical testament to overcoming adversity and living victoriously at any age. Featuring solid gold singers 55 years and older. Soulful, emotional, funny, and powerful. Conceived and written by Vy Higginsen and Ken Wydro, and directed by Mr. Wydro. ALIVE! features a unique blend of gospel, jazz, R&B and pop music Ecolab Theatre at the Marriott Pavillion - Culinary Institute of America, Hyde Park. 663-0643.

Vibrancy & Resilience Qigong Practice Through October 7. Waterfall Qigong Style with Steven Michael Pague. Enhance your qigong practice or discover qi anew in this revitalizing workshop. Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001.

God of Carnage 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

Lectures & Talks

Mad Forest 8pm. $18/$16/$10. Mad Forest is a gripping account of life before, during, and after the Romanian Revolution told from the perspective of citizens young and old, wealthy and working-class. Parker Theater, New Paltz. Newpaltz.edu/theatre.

Kids & Family YMCA Farm Expansion Work Weekend 10am-3pm. We will be expanding our growing space. All ages and levels of experience are welcome. We have tools for all ages and sizes. YMCA Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonymcafarmproject.org/. Dharma Sunday School First Sunday of every month, 12:30-2pm. A unique Buddhist-oriented class for children ages 5+. Come and explore concepts like kindness, compassion, gratitude and generosity through readings, creative activities, community building, movement, and meditation. SkyBaby Yoga & Pilates, Cold Spring. 265-4444.

Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet 1pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Fall Fruits: A Tasting an Workshop 2-5pm. $42. Learn how to grow delicious fruits naturally. Lee Reich, New Paltz. Leereich.com/workshops.

Workshops & Classes

Music

Drawing and Painting from the figure 9am-noon. $150.00. This course is for anyone who wants to learn how to approach the figure. Great for beginning students looking to dWoodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Ats Mid Hudson Grants and Funding Information Sessions 1-3pm. Howland Public Library, Beacon. Artsmidhudson.org. Learn to Read the Tarot with Robert M Place 11am-1pm. $100. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-0180.

"Hendrix of the Sahara" Vieux Farka Touré performing at Woodstock Sessions. Includes seminar, vinyl, dinner, and event poster. For more info and tickets visit Woodstocksessions.com. Abendmusik 2pm. This early music string ensemble showcases rarely performed repertoire composed during and after Europe’s Thirty Years War, as it relates to the cultivation of 17th century German style. Skinner Hall at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7319. Barbara Dempsey & Company 12-2pm. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.


ART "BYRDCLIFFE'S LEGACY"

George Ault's watercolor Autumn Hillside from 1940, courtesy of the Historic Woodstock Art Colony. Collection of Arthur A. Anderson.

Arty, but Crafty Etched on the bay window of the Kleinert/James Center for the Arts in Woodstock is the phrase “It All Started Here.” “What all started here?” one may ask. The Kleinert’s new show, “Byrdcliffe’s Legacy: Handmade in the 20th Century (An Ode to Nature & Place),” answers that question. The exhibition runs through October 9. “Byrdcliffe’s Legacy” begins with a photograph of Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead, who founded the Byrdcliffe Arts and Crafts Colony in 1902. (“Byrdcliffe” is derived from the combined middle names of Whitehead and his wife.) In the photo the founder looks startled, as if interrupted in a reverie. What was Whitehead’s daydream? Perhaps the century of art that succeeded him. Byrdcliffe is now the oldest-operating arts colony in America. Bolton Brown was a key figure in the early colony: He scouted Woodstock as a location, and served as chief lithographer to the artists—until Whitehead fired him. Brown also produced more than 100 prints for George Bellows, who bought a house in Woodstock in 1920. A Bellows lithograph, Love of Winter, shows a group of celebrants in the center of town—like the Woodstockers who still gather on Christmas Eve awaiting Santa’s arrival. (The print doubled as a Christmas card.) One of Brown’s own lithographs, At My Gate, conveys the expansive Catskills sky on an aimless summer day. But Byrdcliffe was a crafts colony as well as a utopian home for artists. The show, curated by Sylvia Wolf, Tina Bromberg, and Karen Walker, includes a pair of elegant andirons designed by Brown, plus a bowl he made. Zulma Steele, one of the original colonists, is represented by a monotype, two vases, a painting, and a commanding dropfront desk with iris panels. “Byrdcliffe’s Legacy” includes all the crafts the original colony taught: ceramics, weaving, woodworking, photography, jewelry, printing, metalwork. “The philosophy is that everything you made to use should also be beautiful, to touch, to wear, to sit on,” explains Wolf. The show collects nearly 200 pieces drawn from the

Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild, the Dorsky Museum, the Woodstock Historical Society, the Woodstock Artists Association, and private collectors. “Byrdcliffe’s Legacy” proceeds chronologically, offering a speedy tour of 20th-century art: the Arts and Crafts movement, the Ashcan School, Art Deco, Danish Modern, Abstraction Expressionism, Fluxus, Pop. Most of the current luminaries of the Woodstock art world are here—Judy Pfaff, Milton Glaser, Mary Frank, Donald Elder—but the salon arrangement emphasizes collectivity rather than individual “stars.” Nonetheless, certain pieces stand out. An untitled ink drawing by Philip Guston, of two leaves, creates an image that is both empty and monumental. Leaves, Trunks & Vines is a photogram Jared Handelsman made by standing in the woods with a large sheet of photographic paper, allowing moonlight to expose the negative. The black-andwhite image—unframed, tacked to the wall—is simultaneously literal and abstract, with a vibrating moon-magic. “It’s just perfect,” Wolf says. As a teenager in the 1960s I met John G. Ernst, who’d trade his latest watercolor for a bottle of whiskey. Seeing his work now, I notice the exquisite command of color, the syncopation of the lines. Ernst’s style falls somewhere between Zen calligraphy and newspaper cartoon. “Byrdcliffe’s Legacy” has a domestic air; the Kleinert/James gallery resembles a big, quirky living room. I see almost no influence of the heroic Hudson River School, with its transcendent light-bedazzled vistas. Instead, the descendants of Byrdcliffe strove to create livable art: paintings, chairs, and bowls that fill in the spaces of daily life. “Byrdcliffe’s Legacy: Handmade in the 20th Century” remains at the Kleinert/James Cetner for the Arts in Woodstock through October 9. (845) 679-2079; Woodstockguild.org —Sparrow 10/16 ChronograM forecast 93


Ben Neill’s MANITOGA for Brass Quintet and Electronics 4pm. $45/$35 members/$125 concert and reception. Manitoga/The Russel Wright Design Center, Garrison. 424-3812.

Literary & Books

Jean-Michel Pilc Solo Piano 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Music

Just Dance! First Sunday of every month, 2:30-4:30pm. $10. Each month we have a DJ providing the beats and vibrations to set us on a journey of self expression. This is not guided in any way. It is an open dance party for all ages. SkyBaby Yoga & Pilates, Cold Spring. 265-4444. Leon Russel 8pm. $85/$48. Rock. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

Emma Donoghue,The Wonder, in Conversation with WAMC’s Joe Donahue 6-8pm. Part of the White Hart Speaker Series. The White Hart Inn, Salisbury, CT. 876-0500. Corey Dandridge’s World of Gospel Residency 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Honey Ear Trio 8pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Music as my Life’s Work with Andrew Ranaudo, Pianist 10am. Master class. Orange Hall Room 23, Middletown. 341-4891.

Theater

Sunday Brunch: Big Joe Fitz & The Lo-Fis 11am-2pm. Blues. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Acting Classes for Adults Voice Theatre 6-9:45pm. $60 series. 4-week series. Culminating in performance, the class focuses on the art of acting. We will examine character, rehearsal techniques, given circumstance and actor creativity. Scene study & improvisation. Taught by Shauna Kanter. Acting Class Voice Theatre, Woodstock. 679-0154.

Outdoors & Recreation

Workshops & Classes

Singer-Songwriters Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen 7pm. $68-$138. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown. (914) 631-3390.

Screech Owl: Autumn Soaring at Wild Earth 10am-3pm. $240 series. We will safely explore the elements and build lasting friendships with each other and the land as we nurture the village the children have enriched each summer at camp. Wild Earth, New Paltz. 256-9830.

Where Does a Play Come From? Where Does it Go? 6-8pm. Playwriting workshop with Amie Brockway. Mondays through Nov. 21 (no class Oct. 31). In this class instructor and students will explore first impulses for writing a play, and the creative process from page to stage. Open Eye Theater, Margaretville. 586-2727.

Theater Born Yesterday 3-5pm. $22. Witty, timely comedy about money, politics and sex— a lighthearted look at abuse of power and bribery in relationships and politics. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3030. God of Carnage 2-4pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Good Dirt 3-4:30pm. $15-$20/$5 with student ID. A Storyhorse Documentary Theater piece based on transcribed conversations with Hudson Valley Farmers. written by Jeremy Davidson directed by Mary Stuart Masterson. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandaleon-Hudson. 758-7900. Mad Forest 2pm. $18/$16/$10. Mad Forest is a gripping, account of life before, during, and after the Romanian Revolution told from the perspective of citizens young and old, wealthy and working-class. Parker Theater, New Paltz. Newpaltz.edu/theatre. Masters of Illusion 7pm. Ulster Performing Arts Center (UPAC), Kingston. 339-6088.

MONDAY 3

TUESDAY 4 Film Eat That Question: Frank Zappa in his Own Words 7:15pm. $7/$5 members. Rosendale Theater Collective, Rosendale. 658-8989.

Health & Wellness Essential Wellness: Healthy Living through Nature with Adam Bernstein First Tuesday of every month, 7-8:30pm. Learn how to take charge of your health and well-being naturally by using essential oils as the foundation of a complete wellness program. Kingston’s Opera House Office Bldg., Kingston. 687-3693. Journey to Life After Loss 5:15pm. Grief support group. Red Hook Public Library, Red Hook. 758-3241. Reiki Share First Tuesday of every month, 6:30-8pm. For Reiki practitioners to replenish your reserves. Dreaming Goddess Sanctuary, Poughkeepsie. 473-2206.

Lectures & Talks College Financial Aid: What You Need to Know about the 2017-18 FAFSA and More! 6-7:30pm. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Movement & Strength First Monday, Thursday of every month, 7-8:15pm. $20/bulk discounts available. For individuals that want to improve their balance, strength, and total overall body movement and range of motion. All strength and fitness levels welcome. Diamond Gymnastics, Poughkeepsie. 416-2222.

Rise of the Robot: Surgical Advancements and Options 5:30-7:30pm. Dinner with a Doctor series. Learn how Health Quest Medical Practice general surgeons Drs. John Choi, Lee Farber and Pranat Kumar use high-tech robots to help them perform minimally invasive surgery right here in the mid-Hudson Valley. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 554-1734.

Lectures & Talks

Literary & Books

Health & Wellness

Emma Donaghue: The Wonder 6pm. In conversation with WAMC’s Joe Donahue. The White Hart Inn, Salisbury, CT. (860) 435-0030. chronogram.com These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

94 forecast ChronograM 10/16

Open Mike 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Music Big Joe Fitz and the Lo-Fis First Tuesday of every month, 7-10pm. Big Blend of jazz and blues. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. The Chapel Restoration Music Series First Tuesday of every month, 4-5:30pm. Classical music series with world-renowned musicians. Chapel of Our Lady Restoration, Cold Spring. Chapelrestoration.org.

Club Draw 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. An Evening with Graham Nash 8pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. The Hot Sardines 7:30pm. $34.50. Take a blustery brass lineup, layer it over a rhythm section led by a stridepiano virtuoso in the Fats Waller vein, and tie the whole thing together with a one-of-theboys front woman with a voice from another era. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

Literary & Books Marrow: A Love Story By Elizabeth Lesser 7pm. Reading, Q&A and book signing. Sponsored by The Golden Notebook. Kleinert/James Arts Center, Woodstock. 679-2079. Roselee Blooston: Dying in Dubai 6-8pm. A memoir of love, loss, reckoning, and renewal, set against the backdrop of a Rodeo Drive-on-Mars desert city. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Living with Alzheimer’s for the Early Stage Caregiver 3-5pm. A free educational program by the Alzheimer’s Association Hudson Valley Chapter. Valley Vista, Highland. Info@alz.org.

Music

Make Your Own Skirt with Cal Patch 11am-4pm. $105. Make a skirt in one day! Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. Dropforgeandtool.com/workshops-list/makeyour-own-skirt.

Black Violin 7:30pm. $20-$39. Blend of classical, hiphop, rock, R&B, and bluegrass music. Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945.

WEDNESDAY 5 Film Eat That Question: Frank Zappa in his Own Words 7:15pm. $7/$5 members. Rosendale Theater Collective, Rosendale. 658-8989.

Music Graham Nash: This Path Tonight Tour 8pm. $48-$95. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown. (914) 631-3390. Drummer Bryan Kopchak 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. The Falcon Underground Songwriter Sessions 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Jazz on the Hudson with Lillie Howard and Co. 7-10pm. An awesome lineup of A-list jazzers play with Grammy nominated, legendary vocal stylist Lillie Bryant Howard. Billy Joe’s Ribworks, Newburgh. 565-1560.

Workshops & Classes Encaustic and Paper 9am-5pm. $400. Through Oct. 7. Instructor: Cynthia Winika. The Gallery at R&F, Kingston. 331-3112. Songwriting with Kevin Briody 7:30-9pm. Weekly through Nov. 30. Take your poetry or thought and learn the elements of songwriting. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

THURSDAY 6 Health & Wellness Healing Energy from Around the World with Jason Elias, MA, LAc, LMT, Dipl OM, Dipl CH 7-8:30pm. Free. Marbletown Community Center, Stone Ridge. Rvhhc.org.

Abbie Gardner with Marc Douglas Berardo 8pm. Turning Point Cafe, Piermont. 359-1089.

Eric Burdon & the Animals + Edgar Winter Band 8pm. $58-$98. Rock. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. First Thursday Singer Songwriter Series 7-9:30pm. Hosts Maureen and Don welcome Done Lowe, Frank Critelli, and The Reverberators Unplugged. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Lapalux 8pm. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. (518) 276-3921. Middle-Stage Music Social First Thursday of every month, 2-3:30pm. People with middle-stage Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia and their family caregivers are invited to this free opportunity to socialize in a safe environment. Refreshments will be served. Preregistration is required. This program is supported in part by a grant from the New York State Department of Health. Wingate at Ulster, Highland. (800) 272-3900. Reuben Wilson Combo 7pm. R&B. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Woodstock Day School Open House 4-5 pm. Harvest Festival 5-7 pm. Call for a tour or reservation. Saugerties. 30th Annual Dutchess County Executive’s Arts Awards 5:30pm. Cocktail hour, seated dinner and awards presentation. Villa Borghese, Wappingers Falls. Info@artsmidhudson.org.

Theater Drinking Habits 12-3:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com.

Movement & Strength First Monday, Thursday of every month, 7-8:15pm. $20/bulk discounts available. For individuals that want to improve their balance, strength, and total overall body movement and range of motion. All strength and fitness levels welcome. Diamond Gymnastics, Poughkeepsie. 416-2222.

NT Live: The Deep Blue Sea 7-10pm. $21/$18 members. Terence Rattigan’s devastating masterpiece contains one of the greatest female roles in contemporary drama. Starring: Helen McCrory. Directed by: Carrie Cracknell (Medea). The Moviehouse, Millerton. (518) 789-0022.

Kids & Family

Workshops & Classes

Astronomy Night 7:30-10:30pm. Raj Pandya and Amy Bartholomew of the SUNY New Paltz Department of Physics & Astronomy offer a planetarium show at the John R. Kirk Planetarium, followed by telescope observing. Coykendall Science Building, New Paltz. 257-7869.

Building off the Wheel with Cheyenne Mallo 7-9pm. $220 for WSW members / $245 nonmembers. Shake things up by throwing on the wheel and building off of it! Women’s Studio Workshop, Rosendale. 658-9133.

Lectures & Talks First Thursdays in the Archives First Thursday of every month, 12-2pm. Welcoming visitors to learn more about the library’s special collections. These tours provide an insider’s glimpse at rare menus and documents, as well as sneak peeks of newly discovered materials. Culinary Institute of America (CIA), Hyde Park. 452-9430.

FRIDAY 7 Clubs & Organizations Anniversary Gala: Celebrating Forty Years of Philanthropy 5:30pm. $150. The Foundation will celebrate its 40th anniversary by recognizing SUNY Ulster’s sixth President, Dr. Alan P. Roberts, The Chateau, Kingston. 331-4386.


MUSIC HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC

Rachel Barton Pine is the featured violinst with the Hudson Valley Philharmonic on October 8.

The Big Score Music and the movies have gone together since before the age of the recorded sound track. During the silent era, solo pianists and sometimes even small orchestras colored the air in early movie houses by providing live accompaniment to the films of the day; when sound was added to movies with the advent of talking pictures, it was no coincidence that music was a key component of the first feature-length talkie, 1927’s The Jazz Singer. Recordings of popular pieces from the classical canon were used early on to enhance the impact of cinematic scenes—much like how, later, hit songs of the 1960s and ’70s would famously find their way into the films of Quentin Tarantino and others—and many of the most esteemed composers of the early 20th century found work with movie production studios. This long, symbiotic relationship between the two mediums serves as the theme of “HVP: In the Tradition,” a specially curated concert by the Hudson Valley Philharmonic at the Bardavon in Poughkeepsie on October 8. “Film scores are the one place today where symphonic music has a huge audience,” says Randall Craig Fleischer, the orchestra’s conductor and music director. “They represent a different tradition from the standard concert repertoire, but stylistically they’re still close enough [to the classical music most orchestras mainly perform].” “HVP: In the Tradition” presents the music of three composers whose art straddles the boundary between the silver screen and the concert hall: Danny Elfman (born 1953), Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897-1957), and Gustav Mahler (1860-1911). Elfman rose to prominence in the early 1980s as the leader of the new wave band Oingo Boingo, and eventually moved into film scoring in emulation of his idols Bernard Herrmann and Nino Rota; his compositional credits include Grammy-winning score for Batman (1989) and

“The Simpsons” theme. “HVP: In the Tradition” will feature two movements from his concert series Serenada Schizophrana, which yielded some of the music for Deep Sea 3D (2006). Austrian composer Korngold, another of Elfman’s influences, is acknowledged as one of the pioneers of film music and is best known in that realm for his scoring of The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938). The Bardavon program includes his Concerto for Violin, Op. 35 in D major, which references segments of his music from Another Dawn (1937), Anthony Adverse (1936), and The Prince and the Pauper (1937). Mahler, another Austrian icon, was actually a mentor to the child prodigy Korngold. Although he didn’t live to see the full flowering of film music, much of his work is in the public domain and often appears on sound tracks. The Mahler piece selected by the Hudson Valley Philharmonic for “In the Tradition” is his Symphony No. 4 in G Major, which was recently used in Inside Llewyn Davis (2013) and TV’s “Fargo” and “Boardwalk Empire.” “I’m a big rock ’n’ roll fan, and I always tell people who haven’t attended a symphonic concert that I feel the same rush hearing this music performed as I do when I see U2 or Santana or any big rock band,” says Fleischer. “There’s nothing like the feeling of hearing and seeing it played live by a group of 75 people in a hall like the Bardavon. It’s incredibly powerful. It’ll make your spine tingle and put a knot in your heart.” The Hudson Valley Philharmonic will present “HVP: In the Tradition” at the Bardavon Opera House in Poughkeepsie on October 8 at 8pm. Tickets are $35 to $57 ($20 students on day of show only). Ticket holders are invited to a preconcert talk by Fleischer with soloists and/or members of the orchestra at 7pm. (845) 473-2072; Bardavon.org. —Peter Aaron 10/16 ChronograM forecast 95


Fairs & Festivals Fall Health Fair 7-11am. Flu shots will be available. Screenings include: balance assessment, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), bone density screening, cholesterol screening (10-12 hour fasting required), oxygen pulse oximetry and pulmonary function testing. More than a dozen informational tables will be set up and free refreshments will be offered. Margaretville Hospital, Margaretville. Kingstonregionalhealth.org. O+ Festival This year’s festival in which artists and musicians receive complimentary health and wellness care as a thank you for the donation of their talent features more than 60 bands, open mike, more than 30 artists and their works, a parade, health services and more. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Opositivefestival. org/kingston.

Film Back to Las Villas: Documentary Film 7pm. Latin historic. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The War Around Us 7-9pm. The free film tells their true story as they witness and cover one of the most disturbing wars of our time. Sponsored by: Middle East Crisis Response. Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Catskills, Kingston. Mideastcrisis.org.

Literary & Books Book Signing: Las Villas of Plattekill & Ulster County 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Booksigning Event 5-7pm. Francesca Pratten signs Two Lives, Many Dances, about her parents, provocative dance partners on the 1940’s nightclub circuit. Greene County Council on the Arts Gallery, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. Gary Allen presents Can It: The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

Music Cuboricua Salsa Band 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Theater Born Yesterday 8-10pm. $22. Witty, timely comedy about money, politics and sex— a lighthearted look at abuse of power and bribery in relationships and politics. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3030. Community Playback Theatre First Friday Performance 8-10pm. $10. Enjoy true audience stories played back with humor and empathy. Using music, movement and narrative, this troupe of improv actors taps into underlying truths of daily life to provide an evening of engaging theatre and community affirmation. Boughton Place, Highland. 691-4118. Drinking Habits 12-3:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com. The Night Alive 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org. Sly Fox 8pm. $23/$20 students and seniors. Presented by Performing Arts of Woodstock. Ben Jonson’s classic Volpone transplanted to Gold Rush Era San Francisco. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079. St. James’ Graveyard Tours 7-8pm. $17/$7 for children 5-12. Local actors portraying “residents” of this 200-year-old cemetery. St. James’ Episcopal Church, Hyde Park. 229-2820. 39 Steps 8pm. $20/$17 Friends of GP/$10 students with ID. Ghent Playhouse, Ghent. (518) 392-6264.

Workshops & Classes Preparing Real Food for Busy Families and Why it Matters 10-11:30am. $15. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Unwind with Melia 6:30-8pm. $20. Unwind is a myofascial release class SkyBaby Yoga & Pilates, Cold Spring. 265-4444.

SATURDAY 8

DJ Doe 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Art Galleries and Exhibits

Edgar Winter Band 8pm. $40-$55. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185.

Michael X. Rose & Dave Tree Opening reception, 5pm-8pm Catalyst Gallery, Beacon. 204-3844.

Music & Poetry Potluck 6-9pm. Join us in the Poetry Barn for an intimate house concert by singer-songwriter Maria Sebastian & and poetry reading by her husband, poet Perry Nicholas. Poetry Barn, West Hurley. (646) 515-0919.

Hummingbird Jewelers View the Sethi Couture Collection at their Trunk Show. Hummingbird Jewelers. Rhinebeck. 876-4585.

Orlando Marin Orchestra 8-10:30pm. $15. The only orchestra leader from New York’s golden era of mambo who still performs regularly. Bean Runner Cafe, Peekskill. (914) 737 -1701. Roots Music Series: Kaia Kater 8pm. The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio, Albany. 518-465-5233. Rosie Dias: A Tribute to Amy Winehouse 9:30pm. $10. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. To Hell and Black 8-10pm. $25/$35. A world-class reincarnation of the ultimate come-back album in Rock history, AC/DC’s Back in Black. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. chronogram.com These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

96 forecast ChronograM 10/16

Quilts in the Valley 11am-4pm. Wiltwyck Quilter's Guild. Rondout Valley Middle School, Stone Ridge.

Comedy Vic DiBitetto 8pm. $29/$39. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039.

Dance Hudson Valley Dance Festival 2 & 5pm. The festival, produced by and benefiting Dancers Responding to AIDS, is a program of Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS and features different genres of dance. Historic Catskill Point, Catskill. Dradance.org.

Fairs & Festivals 18th Century Autumn Festival 11am-3pm. $4/$3 seniors/children free. Demonstrations of meat smoking, pressing apples into cider and hearthside cooking. Hands–on activities include dipping candles, making cornhusk dolls and dried apple wreaths. Senate House and Museum, Kingston. Beacon Second Saturday Second Saturday of every month. Second Saturday is a city-wide celebration of the arts. Beaconarts.org Downtown Beacon, Beacon.

Fall into Chesterwood 1-7pm. A two-day festival featuring hot air balloon rides (weather permitting), a beer hall, music, pumpkin carving contest and apple pie bake-off. Chesterwood, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3579 ext. 25210. Great Pumpkin Walk & Lighting 6-8pm. Bring your best carved pumpkin and candle to Go Greene Car Wash/Sunoco 6360 Rt 23A, Tannersville and enter to win. Registration 6-7pm, Lighting 7:30, Awards 8pm. Awards for scariest, funniest, craziest and most creative pumpkin. Downtown Tannersville, Tannersville. (518) 858-9094. O+ Festival This year’s festival in which artists and musicians receive complimentary health and wellness care as a thank you for the donation of their talent features more than 60 bands, open mike, more than 30 artists and their works, a parade, health services and more. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Opositivefestival. org/kingston.

Shakespeare Discussion Group 11am. The group will discuss A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Red Hook Public Library, Red Hook. 758-3241. Woodstock Poetry Society & Festival Reading 2pm. Featuring Katherine Burger and Rebecca Daniels, followed by open mike. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. 679-8000.

Music 2016 Leaf Peeper Concert: Classically Romantic 7:30-10:30pm. $25/$35 premium/students free/Season tickets $80/$120. Mozart and Schubert. Our Lady of Hope, Copake. (413) 644-0007. Annual Lennon Bday Beatle Bash 8-11pm. Featuring open mike with Pete Santora. A.I.R. Studio Gallery, Kingston. 331-2662. August West 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Warwick Children’s Book Festival 11am-4pm. Sixty prominent authors and illustrators of children’s and young adult books will gather on Railroad Avenue in Warwick to autograph and sell their books, Railroad Avenue and Green, Warwick. 986-1047.

The Brighton Beat 9:30pm. Afrobeat, jazz, funk. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

Food & Wine

Dark Star Orchestra 8pm. $39. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown. (914) 631-3390.

Celebrate Our Love of the Hudson Valley 1-4pm. $125. A fun-filled afternoon of music, food and wine. Clinton Vineyards, Clinton Corners. 266-5372.

Kids & Family Artemis Moon Girls at Wild Earth 10am-3:30pm. $850 series. At Artemis Moon, your 9-14 year old daughter will experience a variety of earth and arts skills with an adventurous, loving group of girls and women mentors in a fun and safe social container. Wild Earth, New Paltz. 256-9830. Atlatl Boys: Awakening Our Human Blueprint at Wild Earth 10am-3:30pm. $850 series. 7 Saturdays, 2 Overnights. This monthly program for 9–14 year old boys will challenge, excite and deepen connections to nature, self and community. Wild Earth, New Paltz. 256-9830. Family Hootenany Second Saturday of every month, 10-11am. $5. Beacon Music Factory (BMF), Beacon. Https://clients.mindbodyonline.com/classic/ home?studioid=41760. Longyear Farm Day: Woodstock Land Conservancy “Fun” Raiser Event 12-6pm. $8/$20 families. Enjoy local food, music and farm activities. Longyear Farm, Woodstock. (646) 271-0821. Tales of the Hudson Valley 11am & 4pm. $12/$10 members/$6 children/$22 families. A live reader’s theater performance adapted from Washington Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.” The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989.

Lectures & Talks The Mysterious Stone Sites in the Hudson Valley of New York and Northern New Jersey 4-6pm. Author Linda Zimmerman will discuss her book that explores the stone chambers, rock formations, standing stones and other non-natural sites found through the Hudson Valley. Julia L. Butterfield Memorial Library, Cold Spring. 265-3040.

Literary & Books Indie Author Day 12:30pm. Aspiring authors are invited to join us to learn about self-publishing, promotion, and more. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Marrow: A Love Story By Elizabeth Lesser 6pm. Reading, Q&A and book signing. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500. Mobsters and Mayhem 2pm. Adult storyteller, Lorraine Hartin-Gelardi. Dutch’s Spirits, Pine Plains. (518) 398-1022.

The Crossroads Band 8:30pm. Classic rock. Whistling Willie’s, Cold Spring. 265-2012.

The DMajor Project’s Album Release Party 8pm. $10. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. The Gibson Brothers 7:30pm. $30/$25. Bluegrass. Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945. Hudson Valley Philharmonic: In the Tradition 8pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Le Pompe Attack 8pm. $15. Jazz. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Michael Franti Pink October Event 8pm. Proceeds benefit the Radio Woodstock Cares Foundation with a portion of the proceeds going to benefit breast cancer research locally at the Dyson Center for Cancer Care in Poughkeepsie. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. Nancy Allen Lundy and Douglas Martin 4pm. Songs by John Cage, Ruth CrawfordSeeger, Aaron Copland, Benjamin Britten, and Samuel Barber. Followed by reception. Kleinert/James Arts Center, Woodstock. 679-2079. Petey Hop Alone with the Blues 6:30pm. Village Market and Bakery, Gardiner. 255-1234. Queen of the Hudson 7pm. $25/$20 in advance. Jing Li, cello and Victoria Schwartzman, piano. Atlas Industries, Newburgh. 391-8855. The Saints of Swing 8pm. $15. Jazz. Alley Cat Blues and Jazz Club, Kingston. 339-1300. Soul City Motown Revue 8:30-11:30pm. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Suite for the Summer Rain/Dance of the Yellow Leaf 8-10pm. $18/$12 in advance/$24 preferred/$10 student. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111. T.J. Santiago 1pm. Blues. Bertoni Gallery, Sugar Loaf. 469-0993. Vassar College Orchestra 8pm. Eduardo Navega, conductor. Skinner Hall at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7319. Willow Blue 8:30pm. Covers. Piano Piano Wine Bar, Fishkill. (909) 547-4266.


FILM FILMCOLUMBIA FILM FILMCOLUMBIA

captions tk

Clockwise from top left: All the Worlds a Screen; Julieta; Fire At Sea; By Sidney Lumet; Forgotten Farms; Animation for Grownups.

FilmColumbia The 17th annual film festival returns to Chatham and Hudson. James Ivory will introduce a restored anniversary edition of his Oscar-winning film Howards End at the kickoff celebration on October 22. Richard Dreyfuss, Parker Posey, and Julianna Margulies will be acting as hosts for the event’s cocktail party and silent auction. The festival runs through October 30 and will showcase a salute to Cuban cinema alongside a series of other recent releases, panels, and kids programs. “We give filmgoers the opportunity to see the year’s top-notch independent and foreign films, often well before they are released,” says the festival’s co-artistic director and executive Peter Biskind. Ken Loach’s Cannes Film Festival award-winning I, Daniel Blake, Paul Verhoeven’s Elle, and Pedro Almdóvar’s Julieta will be screened, along with dozens of other films at locations in Chatham and Hudson. Filmcolumbia.org 10/16 ChronograM forecast 97


Open houses

Dance

Primrose Hill School Open House 11 am-1 pm. Primrose Hill School, Rhinebeck. 876-1226.

2X Double Hit: Dance Benefit Food Bank and Clearwater 4-8:30pm. $20. The Judith Tulloch Band performs a blend of music acoustic rock, with a hint of world music ambiance. The Gaslight Tinkers’ blend of global rhythms creates a joyously danceable sound around a African, Caribbean, funk, Reggae, and Latin grooves. No partner needed. Silent auction, raffles, food, drinks. St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Beacon. (914) 907-4928.

Outdoors & Recreation Lighthouse Tour 10am-2pm. Join HRMM and the Save the Esopus Meadows Lighthouse Commission for this special two-lighthouse tour. Take a cruise on board the Spirit on Hudson and stop at both lighthouses for interior guided tours, including to the towers of both. Enjoy a boxed lunch on the Spirit between lighthouses. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 265-8080.

Theater Born Yesterday 8-10pm. $22. Witty, timely comedy about money, politics and sex— a lighthearted look at abuse of power and bribery in relationships and politics. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3030. Drinking Habits 12-3:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com. The Night Alive 8-10pm and 2-4pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org. Sly Fox 8pm. $23/$20 students and seniors. Presented by Performing Arts of Woodstock. Ben Jonson’s classic Volpone transplanted to Gold Rush Era San Francisco. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079. St. James’ Graveyard Tours 7-8pm. $17/$7 for children 5-12. Local actors portraying “residents” of this 200-year-old cemetery. St. James’ Episcopal Church, Hyde Park. 229-2820. 39 Steps 8pm. $20/$17 Friends of GP/$10 students with ID. Ghent Playhouse, Ghent. (518) 392-6264.

Workshops & Classes Drawing and Painting from the Figure 9am-noon. $150.00. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. The Last Line 10:30am-1pm. $100. A craft and workshop class on approaches to bringing short fiction and nonfiction to completion,​​taught by acclaimed fiction writer and journalist Jana Martin. 4-part workshop. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. 679-8000. R&F Encaustic Mini Workshop 12-4pm. $65. A one-hour demonstration is followed by independent work time, giving participants a chance to experiment with the paint and tools. R&F Handmade Paints, Kingston. (800) 206-8088. Repair Cafe: Poughkeepsie 9am-noon. Bring a beloved but broken item to be repaired for free. First Evangelical Lutheran Church, Poughkeepsie. Repaircafehv.org.

SUNDAY 9 ART Hummingbird Jewelers View the Sethi Couture Collection at their Trunk Show. Hummingbird Jewelers. Rhinebeck. 876-4585. Quilts in the Valley 11am-4pm. Wiltwyck Quilter's Guild. Rondout Valley Middle School, Stone Ridge. chronogram.com These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

98 forecast ChronograM 10/16

Vampire Ballet! Sleeping Beauty 3pm. $12/$10 members/$6 children. Always dazzlingly theatrical, British choreographer Matthew Bourne does it again with Sleeping Beauty. Captured live at the Hippodrome (Birmingham, England) in HD in 2013, it will be on the big screen. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989.

Fairs & Festivals 22nd Annual Hawthorne Valley Fall Festival 10am-4pm. Artisans and vendors, live music, cider pressing, hay ride, scavenger hunt, children’s activities, puppet theater, and open house. Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School, Ghent. (518) 672-7092 ext. 111.

Kimberly with Bruce Hildenbrand 12-2pm. This High Falls based singersongwriter performs a variety of great originals. Kimberly’s resonant, soulful voice is perfectly accompanied by Bruce’s virtuosic guitar stylings. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. The Napoli-Shaut Sextet 5-8pm. $20. Jazz standards arranged in ways you’ve never heard them before. ARTBar Gallery, Kingston. 338-2789. Sunday Brunch: Saints of Swing 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Outdoors & Recreation Golf Tournament to Benefit Children with Autism $116. Twaalfskill Club, Kingston. Centerforspectrumservices.org.

Theater Born Yesterday 3-5pm. $22. Witty, timely comedy about money, politics and sex— a lighthearted look at abuse of power and bribery in relationships and politics. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3030.

TUESDAY 11 Health & Wellness Living with Lymphedema Support Groups 7pm. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 454-8500.

Lectures & Talks Engaging Lectures with Everyday Experts 7:15-9:45pm. John Michelotti, mycologist: The Future of Mushrooms, Health and Bioremediation. Joel Elder, distiller: Heirloom Grains in the Hudson Valley and the. Stephanie Hertel, herbalist, garden coordinator at the Anderson Center for Autism: Horticultural Therapy and Herbalism in Autism Spectrum Communities. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. Monthly Open House with Dharma Talk Second Tuesday of every month, 7pm. free. Shambhala Buddhist teachers talk on a variety of topics at our Open House. Second Tuesday of every month, after community meditation practice. Meditation: 6-7pm, Talk 7pm, followed by tea, cookies, and converation. Sky Lake Lodge, Rosendale. 658-8556.

Fall into Chesterwood 1-7pm. A two-day festival featuring hot air balloon rides (weather permitting), a beer hall, music, pumpkin carving contest and apple pie bake-off. Chesterwood, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3579 ext. 25210.

Drinking Habits 12-3:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com.

Music

High Falls Flea Market 9am-4pm. Art, antiques, collectibles, crafts and unique treasures. Grady Park, High Falls. 810-0471.

The Night Alive 2-4pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org.

Bodystorm: Women’s Circle 6:30-8:30pm. An embodyperiod. take on traditional talking circles, Bodystorm is a space of expression, deep listening, collective & embodied visioning, & movement. Facilitated by Jungian depth psychologist, Dr. Roxanne Partridge. Aletis House, Hudson. (415) 686-8722.

O+ Festival This year’s festival in which artists and musicians receive complimentary health and wellness care as a thank you for the donation of their talent features more than 60 bands, open mike, more than 30 artists and their works, a parade, health services and more. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Opositivefestival. org/kingston.

Kids & Family 7th Annual Family Bonfire Night 6-9pm. $15/$3 children. Includes music with Tenbrooks Molly, stargazing and marshmallow roasting. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Forsyth Nature Center Fall Festival 10am-4pm. Come to this very family-friendly event which features live music, a variety of children’s games, wagon rides, bounce houses, vendors, raffles, and, of course, the resident animals at Forsyth Nature Center. Visit recent additions Franklin, a young steer, and new goats Cliff and Norm. Forsyth Park, Kingston. 339-3053.

NT Live: The Threepenny Opera 1-4pm. $21/$18 member. By Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill, The Moviehouse, Millerton. (518) 789-0022. Sly Fox 2pm. $23/$20 students and seniors. Presented by Performing Arts of Woodstock. Ben Jonson’s classic Volpone transplanted to Gold Rush Era San Francisco. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Workshops & Classes 39 Steps 2pm. $20/$17 Friends of GP/$10 students with ID. Ghent Playhouse, Ghent. (518) 392-6264.

MONDAY 10 Literary & Books Author Bernie Ruberg 1pm. Noted local author and railroad historian Bernie Ruberg. Dutch’s Spirits, Pine Plains. (518) 398-1022.

River Otters & the Weasel Family 10am. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781.

Marjane Satrapi 5:30pm. Author of Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood. Vassar Chapel, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370.

Literary & Books

Open houses

Fran Wishnick Presents Craig Climbed a Tree: His Lifelong Struggle 4pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

South Kent School Call for time. 40 Bulls Bridge Road, South Kent, CT. (860) 927-3539.

Great Weather for Media-Reading 2-4pm. An afternoon of poetry and storytelling with contributors from their latest anthology “The Careless Embrace of the Boneshaker.” The reading will feature writers Roger Aplon, Shira Dentz, Janet Hamill, Erik Ipsen, Jane Ormerod, and John J. Trause, followed by an open mike. Seligmann Center for the Arts, Sugar Loaf. 469-9459.

Music Ace Frehley 7pm. $38-$58. Rock. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown. (914) 631-3390. An Evening with Graham Nash 7:30pm. $36-$66. Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945. Greg Westhoff’s Westchester Swing Band 5:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Sheila Jordan & Cameron Brown Duo 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Music

Gavin DeGraw & Andy Grammer 8pm. $34.50-$79.50. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

Workshops & Classes

Living with Alzheimer’s for the Early Stage Caregiver 3-5pm. A free educational program by the Alzheimer’s Association Hudson Valley Chapter. Valley Vista, Highland. Info@alz.org. Tea & Stones Second Tuesday of every month, 6:307:30pm. Each month we explore a different stone from our vast collection. You’ll learn about their healing qualities, some history and folklore and ways to incorporate them into our daily life. The evening always include a meditation while holding the stone to connect to it’s essence and to listen to it’s message for you personally. Please bring your tea mug, and a camp chair if you have one - seating is limited and if you bring a chair you are guaranteed a seat! Dreaming Goddess, Poughkeepsie. 473-2206. Woodstock Writers Workshops 6:30-8:30pm. $60 series/$15 session. For those who write or want to write poetry, short stories, novel, memoir, creative non-fiction, etc.—and get it published. Led by Iris Litt. 21 Cedar Way, Woodstock. 679-8256.

WEDNESDAY 12 Business & Networking

Thelonious Monk 99th Birthday Celebration 8pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Get Your Share of Government Contracts: Become MWBE Certified Now Topics include: What is MWBE Certification? Should I Get Certified? The Benefits of Certification Am I Eligible to Apply? What is the Certification Process? How Do I Get Expedited? Think Dutchess Alliance for Business, Poughkeepsie. 363-6432.

Workshops & Classes

Film

Monotype 9am-4pm. $345. Through Oct. 12. Students will explore the world of the unique print through demonstrations and hands on experimentation with ink, paper and press Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Life Animated 8pm. $12/$10 seniors and students with ID/$8 members. Showing followed by a Q & A with academy award winning director Roger Ross Williams. Upstate Films, Rhinebeck. 876-2515.

Corey Dandridge’s World of Gospel Residency 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

The Poetic Landscape 9am-4pm. $475. Through Oct. 14. This studio workshop will be most useful to pastel artists having some experience with the medium. With Elizabeth Mowry. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Kids & Family Teen Advisory Board Meeting Second Wednesday of every month, 4-5pm. Fre. Do you need to fulfill volunteer hours? Town of Esopus Library, Port Ewen. 338-5580 ext. 1003.


Lectures & Talks Painkiller Crisis: Stories and Advice from a Mom and Doctor 6pm. The heroin epidemic in the mid-Hudson Valley, sharing stories and advice on how to help people who fall into the throes of opioid addiction. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 876-3001.

Native Teachings & American Democracy 7pm. Professor Evan Pritchard of Center for Algonquin Culture talks about original political systems of Eastern Woodlands Native Americans & the roots of American democracy. Boughton Place, Highland. Mhsierraprograms@yahoo.com.

Music

Literary & Books

Jazz on the Hudson with Lillie Howard and Co. 7-10pm. An awesome lineup of A-list jazzers play with Grammy nominated, legendary vocal stylist Lillie Bryant Howard. Billy Joe’s Ribworks, Newburgh. 565-1560.

Elizabeth Lesser: Marrow: A Love Story 6-8pm. A mesmerizing and courageous memoir: the story of two sisters uncovering the depth of their love through the lifeand-death experience of a bone marrow transplant. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Jazz Sessions at The Falcon Underground 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970.

THURSDAY 13

Music Black Table 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Drinking Habits 12-3:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com. Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus 7:30-9:30pm. $20/$10 for patrons 21 and under. Steven Patterson, under the direction of John Sowle, plays all the roles in a virtuoso display of acting and storytelling artistry that will keep you on the edge of your seat. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (800) 838-3006. Mad Forest 8pm. $18/$16/$10. Mad Forest is a gripping account of life before, during, and after the Romanian Revolution told from the perspective of citizens young and old, wealthy and working-class. Parker Theater, New Paltz. Newpaltz.edu/theatre.

Business & Networking Hudson Valley Garden Association Monthly Meeting Second Thursday of every month, 7pm. Shawangunk Town Hall, Wallkill. 418-3640.

How Much Does College Really Cost? Why You Need to Know Sooner Rather than Later 6-7:30pm. Chatham Public Library, Chatham. (518) 392-3666. Breast Health: Prevention, Treatment, Survivorship 5:30-7:30pm. Dinner with Doctors series. Hear from Health Quest Medical Practice specialists about their multidisciplinary and comprehensive approach to breast health. Drs. Carolyn Nemec and Angela Keleher, with nurse practitioner Sara Winterleitner and social worker Elizabeth Bourne will talk about all aspects of care, including cancer prevention, diagnosis, surgery, follow-up, high-risk assessment and support. Coppola’s Ristorante, Hyde Park. Coppolas.net/ CoppolasRistorante/index.html. Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters 7:15-8:15pm. A free educational program by the Alzheimer’s Association Hudson Valley Chapter with information on how to recognize the 10 signs of Alzheimer’s. This program is supported in part by a grant from the New York State Department of Health. The Landing of Poughkeepsie, Poughkeepsie. (800) 272-3900.

Dance Dance of Universal Peace 7-8:45pm. $5-$10. Participatory simple circle dances and songs drawn from diverse sacred tradition. Sadhana Center for Yoga and Meditation, Hudson. (518) 828-1034. Zydeco Dance with ZydeGroove 7-11pm. $15/$10 with FT student ID. Lesson at 7pm, dance 8pm-11pm. White Eagle Hall, Kingston. (914) 388-7048.

Food & Wine Wild Game and Rare Beers 6pm. $95 all-inclusive. Culinary Institue of America— American Bounty Restaurant, Hyde Park. Ciachef.edu.

Food & Wine

Lectures & Talks

Marc Maron 8pm. $34/$29. Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945.

The Magnificent Seven 7:30pm. $6. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Return of the Electric Love (Take II) 8pm. Hudson-based artist Ephraim Asili will screen and discusses his recent film. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. (518) 276-3921.

Jack Hanna, Into the Wild 7pm. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown. (914) 631-3390.

Comedy

Woodstock Film Festival Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. For more information visit BearsvilleTheater.com or call 679-4406.

Behemoth 8pm. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050.

Kids & Family

Poughkeepsie Fellowship Tag Sale 9am-3pm. The sale will include a large variety of house wares, clothes, books, tools, decorative items, toys and plants. Refreshments, including home-baked goodies, will be available. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Poughkeepsie, Poughkeepsie. 471-6580.

Woodstock Film Festival Multiple showtimes. $10. Rosdendale Theatre, Rosendale. For more information call 658-8989.

Woodstock Film Festival Locations and showtimes across the region, from Rhinebeck to Rosendale to Saugerties. Woodstockfilmfestival.com

Cassoulet Four Ways 6pm. $95 all-inclusive. Culinary Institute of America—Bocuse Restaurant, Hyde Park. 471-6608.

Clubs & Organizations

Film

Film

Best of Hudson Valley Party 5:30-8:30pm. $50. This annual extravaganza celebrates the Best of Hudson Valley winners, including the top-rated restaurants, shops, services, and professionals - showcased in the October issue of Hudson Valley Magazine. Poughkeepsie Grand Hotel, Poughkeepsie. Hvmag.com/Hudson-ValleyMagazine/Best-of-Hudson-Valley-Party/ Homepage/.

FRIDAY 14

Theater

Health & Wellness Beth Gill Dance Formalist choreographer Beth Gill brings her dreamy, subconscious-heavy performance to the Fisher Center at Bard College this month. In “Catacomb,” dancers on stage group together and split apart, ranging in tone as they change positions. The routine is allencompassing and sensory, as viewers are meant to feel face-to-face with the dancers. They are not only watching, they are witnessing. “In the site-specific ‘Catacomb,’ Ms. Gill’s choreography spreads throughout the space like a web,” says Gia Kourlas of the New York Times. Lighting by Thomas Dunn, music by Jon Moniaci. From October 13 to 15 at Bard College’s Fisher Center. (845) 758-7900; Fishercenter.bard.edu.

David Kraai 7pm. Country. 7-10pm. David Kraai swings by this excellent brewery to dole out two sets of fine country folk music. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739.

The Night Alive

Intro to Guitar 2-3:15pm. Intro to guitar is for people who have never played but would like to learn. Taught by Charles Seymour, music educator and guitarist. Pre-Registration required. Town of Esopus Library, Port Ewen. 338-5580.

8pm. $23/$20 students and seniors.

Matinees and Music: The Corvettes Doo Wop Revue 2pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Open Mike Night with Jeff Entin 7-9pm. Jeff Entin welcomes musicians from all around the Hudson Valley. Bring your instrument and talent to the stage or enjoy dinner listening to the music. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org.

Sly Fox Presented by Performing Arts of Woodstock. Ben Jonson’s classic Volpone transplanted to Gold Rush Era San Francisco. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Workshops & Classes 5th Annual Hudson Valley Green Building Expo 5-8pm. Join us as US Green Building Council New York Upstate holds our 5th Expo. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. (315) 729-9067.

Arts Mid Hudson Grants and Funding

Red Dog Run 7pm. Opener: Dupont Brothers. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Information Sessions

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits

Using the Right Words for

Bingo Second Thursday of every month, 7pm. Beekman Fire Department, Poughquag. 270-9133. RUPCO: Celebrating 35 Years 11:30am-2pm. Keynote speaker: Paul Weech. The Chateau, Kingston. 331-4386.

5:30-7:30pm. Kingston City Hall, Kingston. Artsmidhudson.org.

Maximum Impact 2-4pm. $10. What to say and how to say it in your email and social media marketing. Standout subject lines: get open, get read and get results. Ulster Community College Camp Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Baby Magic Knitting, Crocheting & Meditation Circle Second Friday of every month, 7-9pm. This circle is for conscious, spiritual women who want to conceive or who are pregnant, as well as their supportive sisters, girlfriends and mothers. Open to knitters and crocheters at all levels, even beginners. White Barn Farm, New Paltz. 259-1355. Western Zen Retreat Through Oct. 19. Over the course of this five-day retreat you will investigate the question “Who am I?” within a standard retreat framework, using silent meditation in conjunction with a unique method of verbal inquiry. This format allows you to use words to go beyond words and thereby enter the main gate of Chan. Dharma Drum Retreat Center, Pine Bush. 744-8114.

Kids & Family Matthew Reinhart: LEGO Pop-Up 6-8pm. Recommended for Ages 6 to adult. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Literary & Books Gary Allen presents: Can It:The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Music Daisycutter Album Release Show 8pm. The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio, Albany. 518-465-5233. David Kraai 5-7pm. David Kraai swings by this brewery that specializes in handcrafted European style beer to dole out a concert of fine country folk music. Yard Owl Craft Brewery, Gardiner. 633-8576. Drew Bordeaux 9:30pm. Classic rock. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. The Five Creations - Group Harmony Acappella 8-10:30pm. $10. Take a trip back to the beginning of Rock & Roll. Bean Runner Cafe, Peekskill, United States. (914) 737 -1701.

10/16 ChronograM forecast 99


The Five Creations: Group Harmony Acappella 8pm. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Linda Purl: The Year of Magical Thinking 8pm. $25. The Barn at Egremont Inn, South Egremont, MA. (413) 528-9580. Ramblin’ Jack Elliott 8pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Ras T and Asheber Posse 8pm. $10. Roots rock reggae. The Lodge, Woodstock. 8456792814. Scott Sharrard & The Brickyard Band 7pm. Roots rock. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Theater Young Frankenstein 8-10pm. $27/$25. Young Frankenstein, the musical based on Mel Brooks’ comedy masterpiece. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Drinking Habits 12-3:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com. The Night Alive 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org. Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus 7:30-9:30pm. $20/$10 for patrons 21 and under. Steven Patterson, under the direction of John Sowle, plays all the roles in a virtuoso display of acting and storytelling artistry that will keep you on the edge of your seat. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (800) 838-3006. Macbeth 7:30pm. Presented by The Beacon Players. Beacon High School, Beacon. 838-6900. Mad Forest 8pm. $18/$16/$10. Mad Forest is a gripping account of life before, during, and after the Romanian Revolution told from the perspective of citizens young and old, wealthy and working-class. Parker Theater, New Paltz. Newpaltz.edu/theatre. Sly Fox 8pm. $23/$20 students and seniors. Presented by Performing Arts of Woodstock. Ben Jonson’s classic Volpone transplanted to Gold Rush Era San Francisco. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079. St. James’ Graveyard Tours 7-8pm. $17/$7 for children 5-12. Local actors portraying “residents” of this 200-year-old cemetery. St. James’ Episcopal Church, Hyde Park. 229-2820. 39 Steps 8pm. $20/$17 Friends of GP/$10 students with ID. Ghent Playhouse, Ghent. (518) 392-6264.

Workshops & Classes Pigment Stick Monotype 9am-5pm. $275. Two-day workshop with Cynthia Winika. The Gallery at R&F, Kingston. 331-3112. Understanding Dementia Related Behaviors & Effective Communication Strategies 10:30am-3:30pm. Always There Home Care, Kingston. 339-6683 ext. 3303. Woodcarving: Marine & Signboard 6-9pm. Fri. and Sat. Through Nov. 5. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 265-8080. chronogram.com These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

100 forecast ChronograM 10/16

SATURDAY 15 ART Arteast Open Studio Tour 11am-5pm. 40+ artists in the Pawling, Poughquag, Amenia area. 855-1676. John T. Unger Open Studio Tour 2-7pm. Come visit our new sculpture garden, gather round the fire for refreshments, and meet the artist. Sculptural Firebowls handmade by artist John T. Unger. (231) 584-2710.

Clubs & Organizations Poughkeepsie Fellowship Tag Sale 9am-3pm. The sale will include a large variety of housewares, clothes, books, tools, decorative items, toys and plants. Refreshments, including home-baked goodies, will be available. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Poughkeepsie, Poughkeepsie. 471-6580.

Dance Alice-in-Wonderland Follies: New York Theatre Ballet 11am-noon. $10/$5 children. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 10. Tap Dance Savion Glover and JazzSaxophonist James Carter 8pm. $34/$38/$48. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

Film Woodstock Film Festival Locations and showtimes across the region, from Rhinebeck to Rosendale to Saugerties. Woodstockfilmfestival.com Silent Film Series: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920) 7-9pmy Brown. Julia L. Butterfield Memorial Library, Cold Spring. 265-3040.

Food & Wine Movable Feast 6pm. $100/$150/$250. Start the evening off with drinks at 6, dinner at 7 and finish the festivities with a Winner-Take-All Raffle. You’ll meet wonderful new friends, eat delicious food and see some of the most exquisite homes Hudson has to offer. Benefits the Hudson Opera House. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181.

Kids & Family Tech-Take Apart Event 11am-1pm. Ever wonder what’s inside a computer, keyboard, or monitor?Bring your family down and learn what makes these things work! Light snacks provided. Ages 7 and up recommended. Marlboro Free Library, Marlboro. 236-7272. The Tenth Annual Mid-Hudson Woodworkers Show 10am-5pm. $3/children under 12 free. Displays of fine woodworking items, demonstrations of woodworking techniques, gifts for the children, cars and planes, raffle of selected fine woodworking items, learn to make a pen. Hurley Reformed Church, Hurley. Show.midhudsonwoodworkers.org.

Fairs & Festivals New York State Sheep & Wool Family Festival Hundreds of sheep, llama, alpacas, a petting zoo, crafts, children's activities, wine, cheese, food, demos, and much more! Rain or shine. At the Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. 876-4000.

Lectures & Talks Trip to Chagall Museum in High Falls 11am-noon. Using your own transportation, come join us Town of Esopus Library, Port Ewen. 338-5580.

Literary & Books Ellen Messer presents Back Rooms: Voices from the Illegal Abortion Era 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775. Kingston Spoken Word 7pm. $5. Featuring poet Kate Hymes and author Nina Shengold. Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Catskills, Kingston. 331-2884.

Music The MET: Live in HD—Wagner's Tristan und Isolde 1 pm. Nina Stemme stars as Isolde. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. 2016 Seven Freedoms Acoustic Music Cafe’ Series 2-3:30pm. When Amy Laber picks up her guitar and begins to sing, you sense a yearning soul with the courage to tell her story. Seven Freedoms Music & Records, Montgomery. 457-1463. Benjamin Clementine 8:30-10:30pm. $18/$12 in advance/$24 preferred/$10 students. The uncategorizable London-based singer-poet, pianist, and composer. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111. Chamber Orchestra Kremlin 6pm. $45/$25/$15 students. A panoramic program of Haydn, Tchaikovsky, and Shostakovich. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Chris O’Leary Band 7pm. Blues. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Complete Bach Cello Suites: Alisa Weilerstein, cello 3-5pm. $20-$85. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. (914) 232-1252. Dead on the Tracks 7pm. Grateful Dead. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Dylan Doyle Band 8:30-11:30pm. A unique musical interpretation that lies somewhere within the delta of rock, blues, and funk. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Jazz in GTown Presents The Freddie Bryant Brazilian Jazz Trio 7-8:30pm. $25. Clermont Vineyards & Winery, Clermont. (518) 537-5668. The Jon Bates Band 9:30pm. R&B, soul. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Justin Veatch Fund Presents: Live at The Fillmore 7pm. Classic rock. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039 ext. 2. Kenny Lee & the All Stars 8-10:30pm. $10. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. The Lowest Pair 8pm. $10. The duel banjo picking of Kendl Winter and Palmer T. Lee. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. Lucky Five 10am-noon. Great Barrington Farmers’ Market, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-8950.

Fall Open House 2016 & SUNY Financial Aid Day 9am-2pm. Ulster Community College Camp Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Outdoors & Recreation Hoots & Hard Cider 5pm. $10/$7 members. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781.

Spirituality Meditation Intensive 9am-4pm. $125. Meditation Intensive with Gurudev Nityananda, successor of the renowned meditation master Baba Muktananda. All are welcome. Includes a wholesome, homemade, vegetarian lunch. Shanti Mandir, Walden. 778-1008.

Theater Young Frankenstein 8-10pm. $27/$25. Young Frankenstein, the musical is based on Mel Brooks’ comedy masterpiece. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Drinking Habits 12-3:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com. Drinking Habits Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus 7:30-9:30pm. $20/$10 for patrons 21 and under. Steven Patterson, under the direction of John Sowle, plays all the roles in a virtuoso display of acting and storytelling artistry that will keep you on the edge of your seat. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (800) 838-3006. Macbeth 7:30pm. Presented by The Beacon Players. Beacon High School, Beacon. 838-6900. Mad Forest 2pm. $18/$16/$10. Mad Forest is a gripping account of life before, during, and after the Romanian Revolution told from the perspective of citizens young and old, wealthy and working-class. Parker Theater, New Paltz. Newpaltz.edu/theatre. MET Live: Tristan and Isolde 1pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Sly Fox 2pm. $23/$20 students and seniors. Presented by Performing Arts of Woodstock. Ben Jonson’s classic Volpone transplanted to Gold Rush Era San Francisco. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079. St. James’ Graveyard Tours 7-8pm. $17/$7 for children 5-12. Local actors portra “residents” of this 200-year-old cemetery. St. James’ Episcopal Church, Hyde Park. 229-2820.

Neil Alexander Quartet 8pm. Jazz and classical. Ritz Theater Lobby, Newburgh. 784-1199.

39 Steps 8pm. $20/$17 Friends of GP/$10 students with ID. Ghent Playhouse, Ghent. (518) 392-6264.

Nick Barr 50 Years in the Making 8pm. The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio, Albany. 518-465-5233.

Workshops & Classes

Sonic Love Bots 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Willow Blue 8:30pm. Covers. Piano Piano Wine Bar, Fishkill. (909) 547-4266.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits 300th Anniversary Celebration: Wedding Re-Enactment A re-enactment of the actual September 21, 1733 wedding of Francis Filkin to Cathrena Lewis Van Kleeck. The bride’s parents, Leonard Lewis and Lysbeth Hardenburgh, were the great (7 and 8 x) grandparents of Presidents George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush. This will be followed by a traditional “collation” or reception and display of church artifacts. Poughkeepsie Reformed Church, Poughkeepsie. Niche Modern Fall Factory Sale 11am-6pm. Lighting whoelsaler. Glassblowing demoonstrations. Niche Modern, Beacon. Nichemodern.com.

Community Clay Day Third Saturday of every month, 1-3pm. $6. Art Centro, Poughkeepsie. 454-4525. Consumer Empowerment Workshop 11am-12:30pm. Kingston Center of SUNY Ulster, Kingston. 339-2025. Drawing and Painting from the figure 9am-noon. 150.00. This course is for anyone who wants to learn how to approach the figure. Great for beginning students looking to develop a portfolio as well as seasoned artists ready to challenge themselves with the human form. Each four week session builds upon the last but can also be taken on their own. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Nightshades: Embodied Dreamwork 6:30-8:30pm. $25. Informed by the teachings of C. G. Jung, this experiential and embodied dream workshop guides you into meeting the dreamworld beyond the ego and analysis of your conscious mind. Facilitated by Dr. Roxanne Partridge. Aletis House, Hudson. (415)686-8722.


Repair Cafe: Rosendale 10am-2pm. If it’s broken, bring it. St. Peter’s Catholic Church, Rosendale. Repaircafehv.org.

SUNDAY 16 ART Arteast Open Studio Tour 11am-5pm. 40+ artists in the Pawling, Poughquag, Amenia area. 855-1676. John T. Unger Open Studio Tour 2-7pm. Come visit our new sculpture garden, gather round the fire for refreshments, and meet the artist. Sculptural Firebowls handmade by artist John T. Unger. (231) 584-2710.

Dance Chicken Dancearama with Linda Mary Montano 1-3pm. All ages are invited to join us at each “mini-endurance” and walk/dance/bawk/eat eggs/step with love feet and improvise safely and beautifully so we can mentor peacefulflying despite our vestigial wings. Remember, chickens were originally dinosaurs. Come costumed as a wild fowl. Re Seed Saugerties, Saugerties. Reseedsaugerties.com/chickendancerama/.

The Fabulous Hackers 3-5pm. These golfing buddies play favorites ranging from folk to classic rock to country intersperse with a growing list of original songs. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

Theater

Film

Young Frankenstein 3-5pm. $27/$25. Young Frankenstein, the musical based on Mel Brooks’ comedy masterpiece. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

The Shallows 6:30pm. Field Library, Peekskill. (914) 737-1212.

Latino Festival: Honoring the Laborers 3-6pm. $10. “Honorando Los Laboradores” celebrates the music of traditional Latino cultures. Tompkins Corners Cultural Center, Putnam Valley. 528-7280.

Auditions for Amadeus 7pm. County Players, Wappingers Falls. 298-1491.

Linda Purl: The Year of Magical Thinking 3pm. $25. The Barn at Egremont Inn, South Egremont, MA. (413) 528-9580.

Drinking Habits 12-3:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com.

Mark O’Connor Band 7pm. $34. With special guests Red Dog Run. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus 2-4pm. $20/$10 for patrons 21 and under. Steven Patterson, under the direction of John Sowle, plays all the roles in a virtuoso display

9th Annual Soup-a-Bowl Benefit for Poughkeepsie Farm Project 12-1:30 & 2-3:30pm. $35/$40 after Sept. 30/$10 ages 5-10/under 4 free. A familyfriendly luncheon featuring soup made and donated by select local restaurants, handmade pottery by local artisans, art, live music by the Roundabout Ramblers, raffle and silent auction, and more. Proceeds support the charitable and education programs of the Poughkeepsie Farm Project. Each ticket is good for one pottery bowl and a generous soup lunch with trimmings, including bread, beverages and dessert. Vassar Alumnae House, Poughkeepsie. 516-1100.

Lectures & Talks An Afternoon with Alan Cumming 3pm. In conversation with WAMC’s Joe Donahue. You Gotta Get Bigger Dreams: My Life in Stories and Pictures. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Literary & Books Julia Ain-Krupa presents The Upright Heart 4pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

Music Crystal Bowersox 8pm. Folk-country singer-songwriter. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Eugene Chadbourne 8pm. $10. 8pm. $10. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Corey Dandridge’s World of Gospel Residency 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Auditions for Amadeus 7pm. County Players, Wappingers Falls. 298-1491.

TUESDAY 18 Theatre The Night Alive 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org.

Health & Wellness Free Community Holistic Healthcare Day Third Tuesday of every month, 4-8pm. A wide variety of holistic health modalities and practitioners are available. Marbletown Community Center, Stone Ridge. Rvhhc.org/.

High Falls Flea Market 9am-4pm. Art, antiques, collectibles, crafts and unique treasures. Grady Park, High Falls. 810-0471.

Food & Wine

Andrea Gibson with Sarah Kay 8pm. The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio, Albany. 518-465-5233.

Theater

Annual Pumpkin Festival 12-5pm. Hudson Valley pumpkins all sizes & shapes, pumpkin pie, cider, & stone soup. Two solar powered music stages. Many free children’s activities, environmental displays. Beacon Sloop Club, Beacon. (914) 879-1082.

Equus Film Festival 4pm. Screening outstanding films from around the horse world, presented by High and Mighty Therapeutic Riding and Driving Center. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448.

Music

The Record Company 8pm. Bluesy. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

New York State Sheep & Wool Family Festival Hundreds of sheep, llama, alpacas, a petting zoo, crafts, children's activities, wine, cheese, food, demos, and much more! Rain or shine. At the Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. 876-4000.

Woodstock Film Festival Locations and showtimes across the region, from Rhinebeck to Rosendale to Saugerties. Woodstockfilmfestival.com

Movable Feast 6pm. $250/$150/$100. Head to 327 Warren Street for drinks and VIP tours of construction at 6. At 7:30, guests go to hosts homes for dinner. The evening ends back at the Opera House with dessert, a special screening of La Grande Bouffe and a Winner-Take-All Foodie Raffle. Benefits HOH. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181.

Mod Squad 8pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Fairs & Festivals

Film

Food & Wine

“Extraordinary Measures” Former acting director and teacher Paul Walker is hooked up to a life-sustaining respirator in the last week of his life. Friends and family stop by the ICU to say good byes and solve grievances. Intrinsic monologues, competition, and reflection—all delivered by one man. James Lecesne, best known for his one-man performance “The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey,” acts in this production on death and dying written by Eve Ensler and directed by Tony Seciale. “It is impossible not to be stirred by the emotional urgency behind ‘Extraordinary Measures,’” says New York Times reviewer Ben Brantley. Saturday, November 5, at the Garrison Institute. $35. (845) 424-4800; Garrisoninstitute.org. Opening of the American Center for Folk Music 4pm. The performance will feature folk legends John McCutcheon and Tom Chapin and WC Handy Award winner Joe Louis Walker. Long Dock Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. Still Corners 7pm. $12/$10 in advance. Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. 481-5158. Sunday Brunch: Times Square’s Classic A Cappella Doo Wop 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Tower Music Series Concert 3:30pm. Followed by a reception and display of church artifacts. Poughkeepsie Reformed Church, Poughkeepsie Wolff & Clark Expedition with John Abercrombie 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Niche Modern Fall Factory Sale 11am-6pm. Lighting whoelsaler. Glassblowing demoonstrations. Niche Modern, Beacon. Nichemodern.com.

Outdoors & Recreation Fall Foliage Hike 10am. $3-$7. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781.

of acting and storytelling artistry that will keep you on the edge of your seat. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (800) 838-3006.600.

Mad Forest 2pm. $18/$16/$10. Mad Forest is a gripping account of life before, during, and after the Romanian Revolution told from the perspective of citizens young and old, wealthy and working-class. Parker Theater, New Paltz. Newpaltz.edu/theatre. The Night Alive 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org. 39 Steps 8pm. $20/$17 Friends of GP/$10 students with ID. Ghent Playhouse, Ghent. (518) 392-6264.

MONDAY 17 Theatre The Night Alive 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org.

Dance Black Power of Hip-Hop Dance: on Kinesthetic Politics 7pm. Hip-hop dancer, choreographer, and scholar Naomi Bragin will be at EMPAC for a workshop on the dance style known as the Robot, Robotting, or Botting. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. (518) 276-3921.

Kids & Family Brown Bear, Brown Bear and Other Treasured Stories 10am. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Literary & Books Craig Nelson: Pearl Harbor: From Infamy to Greatness 6pm. The White Hart Inn, Salisbury, CT. (860) 435-0030. Open Mike 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775. The White Hart Speaker Series: Craig Nelson: Pearl Harbor: From Infamy to Greatness 6-8pm. A gripping and definitive account of the event that changed twentieth-century America—based on years of research and new information uncovered by New York Times bestselling author Craig Nelson. The White Hart Inn, Salisbury, CT. 876-0500.

Music Quinnsonic Electronic Music Society 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Nightlife Third Tuesday Queer Night Third Tuesday of every month, 7-11:30pm. Yoo hoo mid-Hudson queers! Community, fun, music and more. Dogwood, Beacon. Https://facebook.com/midhudsonqueernight/.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Barrett’s Bootleggers Bash 6pm. Historic fundraiser to benefit Barrett Art Center. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550. Fundraise with Paintbrushes 7-9pm. McCann Skating Academy Annual Ice Exhibition. Mid-Hudson Civic Center, Poughkeepsie.454-5800. History Tavern Trail: Prohibition Era Party 5:30pm. Dutch’s Spirits, Pine Plains. (518) 398-1022.

10/16 ChronograM forecast 101


THURSDAY 20

Workshops & Classes Arts Mid Hudson Grants and Funding Information Sessions 3:30-5:30pm. Red Hook Village Hall, Red Hook. Artsmidhudson.org. Living with Alzheimer’s for the Early Stage Caregiver 3-5pm. A free educational program by the Alzheimer’s Association Hudson Valley Chapter on October 4th, 11th, and 18th, Valley Vista, Highland. Info@alz.org. Make Your Own Leggings with Cal Patch 11am-4pm. $105. Cal Patch will show you how to draft a pattern for this wardrobe essential, based on your own measurements. Then we’ll stitch up a first draft fit sample, adjust our patterns if necessary, and proceed to make a pair of real­leggings. Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. Dropforgeandtool.com/ workshops-list/make-your-own-leggings.

WEDNESDAY 19 Business & Networking Selling to the Government 6-8pm. Lean How and What the Federal and State Governments buy, Certification for Small Disadvantaged/Women-owned/ HUBZone/Service Disabled Veterans businesses, Marketing to the Government Agencies, Subcontracting and Resources/ Assistance. Think Dutchess Alliance for Business, Poughkeepsie. 363-6432.

Kids & Family Brown Bear, Brown Bear and Other Treasured Stories 10am & noon. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Music Bickram Ghosh’s Drums of India 7:30pm. $30. Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945. Drummer Bryan Kopchak 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Jazz on the Hudson with Lillie Howard and Co. 7-10pm. An awesome lineup of A-list jazzers play with Grammy nominated, legendary vocal stylist Lillie Bryant Howard. Billy Joe’s Ribworks, Newburgh. 565-1560. Petey Hop Hosts Roots & Blues Sessions 7pm. Roots and blues. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Showcase Concert 7:30pm. $5/$10 family/$3 students. All of the performing ensembles of SUNY Ulster including; the Wind Ensemble, Community Band, Jazz Ensemble, String Ensemble and Choral Ensembles come together for a memorable night of music that showcases our student talent (formerly the Pops concert). Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. 687-5263.

Theater Tell Tale Harvest featuring Edgar Allan Poe 11:30am. Presented by Murder Cafe. Temple Beth El, Poughkeepsie. 454-0570. The Night Alive 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org.

Fairs & Festivals Hudson Valley Food Truck Festival Third Thursday of every month, 4:30-10pm. Local food trucks, live music, a great selection of microbrew beers & children entertainment. Cantine Memorial Field, Saugerties. 399-2222.

Film Food for Thought: Milk 7pm. Reception at 6:30pm The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio, Albany. 518-465-5233. Starless Dreams 8pm. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050.

Literary & Books Francine Prose: Mister Monkey 6-8pm. Author Francine Prose weaves an ingenious, darkly humorous, and brilliantly observant story. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Music Connor Kennedy & Minstrel 7pm. Opener: Dante DeFelice. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Emerging Artist Classical Music Series: Sage Boris 7:30-9pm. $15. Trumpeter Sage Boris sets out to explore the lyrical side of his instrument, w ARTBar Gallery, Kingston. 338-2789. Sammy Wags and Friends 8:30pm. Latin jazz trio. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Tony DePaolo 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Theater The Night Alive 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org. Drinking Habits 6-9:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com.

Workshops & Classes Arts Mid Hudson Grants and Funding Information Sessions 3-5pm. Ann Street Gallery, Newburgh. Artsmidhudson.org. Library Knitters Third Thursday of every month, 7-8pm. Sit and knit in the beautiful Gardiner Library. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Real Talk: Difficult Conference Questions about Race, Sex, and Religion The two-day conference asks: How can college be a safe and inclusive space for asking hard and uncomfortable questions essential to our democracy? Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. Hac.bard. edu/con2016.

FRIDAY 21

Workshops & Classes

Business & Networking

Arts Mid Hudson Grants and Funding Information Sessions 5:30-7:30pm. The Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock. Artsmidhudson.org.

3rd Hudson Valley Latino Forum Dutchess Community College, Fairview. 790-5004.

Tarot Wisdom Gathering Third Wednesday of every month, 6:308pm. $10. Join us at our monthly Tarot gathering. Dreaming Goddess Sanctuary, Poughkeepsie. 473-2206.

The 8th Annual Woodstock Invitational Luthiers Showcase and Tonewood Festival An alternative guitar show, featuring fine, contemporary, handmade acoustic guitars and stringed musical instruments, exhibited by their creators. There will be continuous live music, including luthier mini-concerts, demos and special appearances. See website for specific events and times. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. Woodstockinvitational.com.

chronogram.com These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

102 forecast ChronograM 10/16

Fairs & Festivals

Lectures & Talks Colin Haley Slide Show 8pm. Rock & Snow, New Paltz. 255-1311.

Our Other Blue Planet: Earth’s Diverse Fresh Waters 7pm. Cary’s Dave Strayer will provide insight into life in the world’s inland waters. Lake, rivers, streams, ponds, and wetlands cover less than 1 percent of Earth’s surface, yet they support a diversity of plants and animals. Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook. 677-5343.

Literary & Books Gabriel Squailia presents Viscera 7pm. A fantasy novel. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300. Storytelling with Janet Carter 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Music DJ Zesto 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. The Reverend Jefferson Band 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Singer-Songwriter Showcase Third Friday of every month, 8pm. $6. Acoustic Music by three outstanding singer-songwriters and musicians at ASK GALLERY, 97 Broadway, Kingston 8-10:30 pm Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0311. Third Friday Reggae! with Ayaaso 8-10:30pm. $10. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Theater The Night Alive 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org. Young Frankenstein 8-10pm. $27/$25. Young Frankenstein, the musical is based on Mel Brooks’ comedy masterpiece. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Drinking Habits 12-3:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com. 39 Steps 8pm. $20/$17 Friends of GP/$10 students with ID. Ghent Playhouse, Ghent. (518) 392-6264. St. James’ Graveyard Tours 7-8pm. $17/$7 for children 5-12. Local actors portraying “residents” of this 200-year-old cemetery. St. James’ Episcopal Church, Hyde Park. 229-2820.

Workshops & Classes A Buddhist Approach to Compassion and Resilience Call for times. Join Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, David Kaczynski, and Michela Haas to discover various ways to find compassion, forgiveness, and resilience in difficult times. Omega, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001. Color Consciousness Art Workshop 6-8pm. In this art workshop led by Fran Sutherland, you will learn and practice Josef Albers “color acting” science. Town of Esopus Library, Port Ewen. 338-5580. Real Talk: Difficult Conference Questions about Race, Sex, and Religion The two-day conference asks: How can college be a safe and inclusive space for asking hard and uncomfortable questions essential to our democracy? Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. Hac.bard. edu/con2016.

SATURDAY 22 ART Arteast Open Studio Tour 11am-5pm. 40+ artists in the Pawling, Poughquag, Amenia area. 855-1676. John T. Unger Open Studio Tour 2-7pm. Come visit our new sculpture garden, gather round the fire for refreshments, and meet the artist. Sculptural Firebowls handmade by artist John T. Unger. (231) 584-2710.

Dance Swing Dance $15/$10 students. Dance to the hot sounds of the jazz age. The Boilermakers are a favorite band of swing dancers. Free beginners’ dance lesson 8-8:30. Band plays 8:30-11:30. Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, Poughkeepsie. 471-1120.

Fairs & Festivals Meadowfest 11-3 pm. A festival of books and music, featuring workshops, readings, and games at High Meadow High School in Stone Ridge, NY. The 8th Annual Woodstock Invitational Luthiers Showcase and Tonewood Festival An alternative guitar show, featuring fine, contemporary, handmade acoustic guitars and stringed musical instruments, exhibited by their creators. There will be continuous live music, including luthier mini-concerts, demos and special appearances. See website for specific events and times. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. Woodstockinvitational.com.

Kids & Family Cupcake-a-Palooza 1-4 pm. $5. Join us for the sweetest event of the year hosted by Safe Harbors of the Hudson. Admission includes tastings, beverages, and a vote for public favorite. Ritz Theater Lobby, Newburgh. 784-1110 Wicked Woodstock 3-8pm. $10 Haunted House/$5 kids activities. Halloween event for all ages from 3-5:30 pm that includes a costume contest, an apple bobbing contest, a pumpkin carving contest, and the Art Bus. Age suggestion for the Haunted House is 14 and over. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Literary & Books Author Talk with Ellen Feldman and Ellen Messer Authors Ellen Feldman and Ellen Messer will talk with each other about the issues facing characters and real women, as seen in their two books, Terrible Virtue and Back Rooms: Voices from the Illegal Abortion Era. Merritt Bookstore, Millbrook. 758-2665. Grace Bonney: In The Company of Women 6-8pm. $35/includes book and tote. Join Grace Bonney, founder of the popular website & blog Design*Sponge, for an evening. Morton Memorial Library, Rhinecliff. 876-0500. Laurie Stone: My Life as an Animal, Stories 5pm. Join celebrated author, editor, and critic Laurie Stone as she reads from her upcoming novel, My Life as an Animal, Stories. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181.

Music Basking in the Baroque 7:30-10:30pm. $25/$35 premium/students free/Season tickets $80/$120. Baroque Arias and Duets. Cello Suites by Bach and Vitali. The Hillsdale Methodist Church, Hillsdale. (413) 644-0007. Zig-Zag Trio Melvin Gibbs, Vernon Reid, and Will Calhoun playing at Woodstock Sessions. For time and more info visit woodstocksesssions.com. Bansuri Concert 7-9pm. Pandit Rakesh Chaurasia will grace us with the divine music of the Indian classical flute, Bansuri. Accompanying him on tabla, Pandit Aditya Kalyanpur. Shanti Mandir, Walden. 778-1008. Cobert Operations 9:30pm. Pop, soft rock. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Community Drum Circle 12:30-2:30pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181. Dylan Doyle Alone with the Blues 6:30pm. Village Market and Bakery, Gardiner. 255-1234. Fleurine with the Boys from Brazil 7pm. Opener: Attila Vural. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.


Frank Vignola and Olli Soikkeli 8pm. Tribute to the great Django Reinhardt. They will be performing Django compositions and songs associated with the great legendary gypsy jazz guitarist. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. George Winston 8pm. $34.50. Solo piano concert. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Jimmy Lee 8:30pm. Classic rock. Piano Piano Wine Bar, Fishkill. (909) 547-4266. Karayroyoke 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Larry Coryell Trio 8pm. $15/$10 senior citizens, faculty, staff, alumni/students free. Larry Coryell, guitar; Steve Johns, drums; Daryl Johns, bass. Orange Hall Theater, Middletown. 341-4891. Matt Flinner Trio with Darol Anger 7pm. Folk. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Natalie Merchant and Friends: A Benefit Concert for the Maya Gold Foundation 7-9pm. $40/$50/$80. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 418-5227. Pitchfork Militia 8:30-11:30pm. With a blend of country, blues, rock and punk, the band terms itself “Apocabilly”. This rockin’ three piece is in turns funny, raging, satirical and silly. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

10th Anniversary Celebration: We’re Over the Moon 7-11pm. $45 and $75 show only/$600. Half Moon Theatre. Cocktail hour, performance dinner, and silent auction. Half Moon Theatre at the Culinary Institute of America’s Marriott Pavilion, Hyde Park, United States. 235-9885.

Home Building/ Green Building Seminar

Drinking Habits 12-3:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com.

needed. 265-2636

St. James’ Graveyard Tours 7-8pm. $17/$7 for children 5-12. Local actors portraying “residents” of this 200-year-old cemetery. St. James’ Episcopal Church, Hyde Park. 229-2820.

11am-1pm. This free siminar gives you an overview of designing and creating your own energy-efficient custom home. Atlantic Custon Homes, Cold Spring. Reservations

Instagram for Professionals and Businesses With Meighan O’Tool 1:30-3:30pm. $50. Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. Dropforgeandtool.com/workshopslist/instagram-for-professionals-andbusinesses.

Grace Bonney This digital-age Renaissance woman offers more than tips on destressing and DIY projects. Her taste making blog Design*Sponge features female empowerment. Bonney’s new book, In the Company of Women: Inspiration and Advice from Over 100 Makers, Artists, and Entrepreneurs (Artisan, 2016), contains intersectional creativity and entrepreneurship stories from dozens of women working on the cutting edge of their industries. Speaking alongside other New York-based business-women, including graphic design artist Paula Grief and resturateurs Elise Kornack and Anna Hieronimus, Bonney will be at the Morton Memorial Library in Rhinecliff Saturday, October 22, at 6pm. Tickets $35, including a book copy and specially designed totebag. Oblongbooks.com.

Music Adam Levy & The Mint Imperials 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Basking in the Baroque 3pm. $25/$22. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181. Classics on Hudson: Basking in Baroque 3-5pm. $22. Highlights include the music of Bach, Handel, Vivaldi, and other Baroque arias and duets of enduring popularity. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits

Theater The Night Alive 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org. Young Frankenstein 8-10pm. $27/$25. Young Frankenstein, the musical is based on Mel Brooks’ comedy masterpiece. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Kids & Family

Knock by Janet Hamill 2-4pm. Reading and release. Seligmann Center for the Arts, Sugar Loaf. 469-9459.

Yesterday: A Beatles Tribute 8-10pm. $40/$45. Relive all the hits like: “Nowhere Man,” “A Hard Day’s Night,” “Dizzy Miss Lizzy,” “Hey Jude,” and more! Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039 ext.2.

An Evening of TranceFormative Healing with Eda Zavala and Evry Mann $25/$60 series. Ancient shamanic healing work with contemporary creative approaches. Marbletown Multi-Arts, Stone Ridge. 750-6488.

NYS Craft Beer Experience $65/$26 designated drivers. Tasting of 40 beers from 20+ of New York State’s finest breweries, as well as tapas-style food pairings. Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro, Rhinebeck. 876-3330.

Cathy Gigante Brown presents Different Drummer 4pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

Woodstock Invitational Luthiers Showcase 8pm. $65/$50/$40. Featuring the String Sampler Concert, with Jerry Douglas (Solo), plus Special Guests Pierre Bensusan and Bucky Pizzarelli & Ed Laub. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

Spirituality

The Crown Maple Guide to Maple Syrup Tasting & Book Signing 11am-12:30pm. Crown Maple owner Robb Turner offers a comprehensive look into the world of maple syrup, complete with archival images and tutorials on the process. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Literary & Books

Women with Voices: The Door Next Door 6pm. The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio, Albany. 518-465-5233.

The Harvey School 9 am. Open House at Harvey School, a coeducational prearatory grade school enrolling students in grades 6-12 and 9-12. Katonah. (914) 232-3161.

Food & Wine

Family Art Day: Animal Art 12-3pm. In conjunction with the current exhibition in the Towbin Museum Wing All Creatures Great and Small we will explore the depiction of animals in art. Woodstock Artists Association and Museum, Woodstock. 679-2940.

Valerie Capers Quartet 8-10:30pm. $15. Dr. Capers has performed with Dizzy Gillespie, Wynton Marsalis, Mongo Santamaria, Tito Puente, Slide Hampton, Max Roach, and Paquito D’Rivera, Bean Runner Cafe, Peekskill, United States. (914) 737 - 1701.

Pioneering People Benefit Dinner + Concert Featuring Rufus Wainwright. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050.

Love it or Swap it 12-4pm. $25 donation to benefit Sinterklaas. Women’s clothing swap and sale to Benefit Sinterklaas. Bring up to 20 items of women’s clothing in good condition and go home with an equal number of treasures. Wonderful items for sale at newly expanded SinterStore. Rhinebeck Methodist Church Fellowship Hall, Rhinebeck. 758-9571.

A Brown Bear, A Caterpillar & A Moon 3pm. $18/adult free with child. Featuring evocative music, stunning visual effects and innovative puppetry, three of Eric Carle’s most treasured stories. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

The MET: Live in HD Mozart’sDon Giovanni 1pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Discovery Days: Bard College at Simon's Rock Open house. Bard College at Simon's Rock, Great Barrington, MA. Call (800) 235-7186 for more info.

High Falls Flea Market 9am-4pm. Art, antiques, collectibles, crafts and unique treasures. Grady Park, High Falls. 810-0471.

39 Steps 8pm. $20/$17 Friends of GP/$10 students with ID. Ghent Playhouse, Ghent. (518) 392-6264.

Workshops & Classes Create a Compelling Newsletter for your Creative Business with Meighan O’Tool 10am-noon. $50. Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. Dropforgeandtool.com/workshopslist/create-a-compelling-newsletter. A Buddhist Approach to Compassion and Resilience Call for times. Join Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, David Kaczynski, and Michela Haas to discover various ways to find compassion, forgiveness, and resilience in difficult times. Omega, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001. Drawing and Painting from the figure 9am-noon. 150.00. This course is for anyone who wants to learn how to approach the figure. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

SUNDAY 23 ART Arteast Open Studio Tour 11am-5pm. 40+ artists in the Pawling, Poughquag, Amenia area. 855-1676. John T. Unger Open Studio Tour 2-7pm. Come visit our new sculpture garden, gather round the fire for refreshments, and meet the artist. Sculptural Firebowls handmade by artist John T. Unger. (231) 584-2710.

Fairs & Festivals The 8th Annual Woodstock Invitational Luthiers Showcase and Tonewood Festival An alternative guitar show, featuring fine, contemporary, handmade acoustic guitars and stringed musical instruments, exhibited by their creators. There will be continuous live music, including luthier mini-concerts, demos and special appearances. See website for specific events and times. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. Woodstockinvitational.com.

Durham County Poets 7pm. Neo folk. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Havana Cuba All-Stars 7pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. John Abercrombie and the Putnam Valley Jazz Quintet 3-6pm. $15. Tompkins Corners Cultural Center, Putnam Valley. 528-7280. John Simon & The Jazz 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Metropolitan Hot Club 12-3pm. MHC is a gypsy jazz group that plays hot swing of the 30s and 40s. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

Theater The Night Alive 8-10pm. $34-$39. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org. Young Frankenstein 3-5pm. $27/$25. Young Frankenstein, the musical is based on Mel Brooks’ comedy masterpiece. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

10/16 ChronograM forecast 103


Drinking Habits 6-9:30pm. $60/$55 seniors. Accusations, mistaken identities, and romances run wild in this traditional, laugh-out-loud farce. Clove Creek Dinner Theaters, Fishkill. Clovecreekdinnertheater.com. NT Live: The Deep Blue Sea 1-4pm. $21/$18 members. Terence Rattigan’s devastating masterpiece contains one of the greatest female roles in contemporary drama. Starring: Helen McCrory. Directed by: Carrie Cracknell (Medea). The Moviehouse, Millerton. (518) 789-0022. 39 Steps 2pm. $20/$17 Friends of GP/$10 students with ID. Ghent Playhouse, Ghent. (518) 392-6264.

Workshops & Classes Repair Cafe: Gardiner 12-4pm. Bring a beloved but broken item to be repaired for free. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. Repaircafehv.org. A Buddhist Approach to Compassion and Resilience Call for times. Join Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, David Kaczynski, and Michela Haas to discover various ways to find compassion, forgiveness, and resilience in difficult times. Omega, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001. Sashiko Mending with Katrina Rodabaugh 1-5pm. $125. Sashiko is the perfect stitch to mend existing garments and embrace the creative opportunity in repair while extending the lifespan of our wardrobe. Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. Dropforgeandtool.com/ workshops-list/sashiko-mending.

MONDAY 24 Health & Wellness Medicare 101 2pm. Join the Center for Healthy Aging’s guest speaker Nina Lynch, an expert Medicare insurance counselor, for a step-bystep workshop for new enrollees and people considering changing coverage. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 876-3001.

Film 17th Annual Film Columbia Film festival. Check website for details and screenings. Filmcolumbia.com.

Music Corey Dandridge’s World of Gospel Residency 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Workshops & Classes Sculptural Wax $650. Through Oct. 28. Instructor: Kelly McGrath. The Gallery at R&F, Kingston. 331-3112.

TUESDAY 25

Workshops & Classes

Music

Herbal Magic Last Tuesday of every month, 6:30-7:30pm. Every herb has its own personal signature, its own magic, its own vibration, with healing properties for our physical, mental and spiritual benefit. Dreaming Goddess, Poughkeepsie. 473-2206.

Frank Cassara with Ralph Ferris 8pm. Frank Cassara, percussion, with Ralph Ferris, viola, and dancer Molissa Fenley. Ms. Fenley choreographs works by Glass, Xenakis, Cage, and others in an infusion of music and dance. Skinner Hall at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7319.

Woodstock Writers Workshops 6:30-8:30pm. $60 series/$15 session. For those who write or want to write poetry, short stories, novel, memoir, creative non-fiction, etc.—and get it published. Led by Iris Litt. 21 Cedar Way, Woodstock. 679-8256.

The Kurt Henry Band 8pm. Progressive rock. Catskill Mountain Pizza Company, Woodstock. 679-7969.

WEDNESDAY 26 Film 17th Annual Film Columbia Film festival. Check website for details and screenings. Filmcolumbia.com. The Human Thing 5pm. $16/$13. In Spanish with subtitles. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Ribbon Cutting Ceremony 6 pm. An opening ceremony at The L Salon in New Paltz. Mention this ad and get 10% off your next service. 256-0269.

Lectures & Talks Material Remains: Women and Textiles with Hallie Bond Scholar, New York Council for the Humanities 7-8:30pm. This lecture explores the fundamental changes affecting women’s lives, through textiles, over many generations. Rosendale Public Library, Rosendale. 657-9013. Poet Gold’s Poelodies 7pm. Spoken word and new music. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Music Elvis Costello and the Imposters 8pm. $49.50-$99.50. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Jazz on the Hudson with Lillie Howard and Co. 7-10pm. Billy Joe’s Ribworks, Newburgh. 565-1560. Nicole Atkins, Wolf! 7pm. $15/$12 in advance. Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. 481-5158.

THURSDAY 27 Business & Networking Happy Hour Yoga: Orange County Chamber of Commerce Last Thursday of every month, 6-7:30pm. $10-$15. Yoga by Wild Soul Yoga Studio. Hard Cider tasting by Angry Orchard. Orange County Chamber of Commerce, Montgomery. 457-9700.

Middle-Stage Music Social Fourth Thursday of every month, 2-3:30pm. People with middle-stage Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia and their family caregivers are invited to this free opportunity to socialize in a safe environment. Refreshments will be served. Preregistration is required. This program is supported in part by a grant from the New York State Department of Health. Wingate at Dutchess Recreation Room, Fishkill. 471-2655. WVKR DJ Bill Skillz “Diggin’ in the Crates Radio Roadshow” 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Workshops & Classes Creating More Compassionate Schools and Communities Through Emotional Intelligence 7-9pm. Presented by Shauna Tominey and Kathryn Lee of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence. In this workshop and discussion, teens and families will learn tools and strategies for managing the range of emotions we all have. Coykendall Science Building, New Paltz. 418-5227.

104 forecast ChronograM 10/16

New York Theatre Ballet 7:30-9:30pm. $30/$10 student rush and children. Under the artistic directions of Diana Byers. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 10.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show 8pm & midnight. The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio, Albany. 518-465-5233.

The Companion 7pm. $16/$13. In Spanish with English subtitles. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181.

Lectures & Talks Domestic Violence Conference 8:30am-12:30pm. Conference cosponsored by the Ulster County Interagency Council on Domestic Violence and the SUNY Ulster TMI Project. Ulster County domestic violence resources will be presented. Ulster Community College Camp Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Music

Lectures & Talks

Gary Trudeau in Conversation 6-8:30pm. Garry Trudeau in conversation with WAMC’s Joe Donahue on 30 Years of Doonesbury on Trump. The White Hart Inn, Salisbury, CT. 876-0500.

Dance

The Birds 7:30pm. Ulster Performing Arts Center (UPAC), Kingston. 339-6088.

Music

Literary & Books

SATURDAY 29

Short Films by Fede Álvarez 7pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181.

Ed Palermo Big Band: Ed Palermo is “The Whore from Livermore!” 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

Tips and Tricks in Watercolor Fourth Friday of every month, 10am1pm. $40. With instructor Claudia Engel. Betsy Jacaruso Studio & Gallery, Rhinebeck. 516-4435.

The 2016 Horror-thon 5:30pm. $6. Paramount Theatre, Middletown. 346-4195.

Hypercube 7pm. Artist Charles Atlas introduces a program of films that were influential in the development of his work-in-progress 3D video and performance work, Tesseract. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. (518) 276-3921.

chronogram.com

Workshops & Classes

The 2016 Horror-thon 1pm. $6. Paramount Theatre, Middletown. 346-4195.

Family History of Cancer: When Should I Worry? 5:30-6:30pm. Speaker: Jonathan Clyman, a board-certified genetic counselor at Vassar Brothers Medical Center Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 876-3001.

Technology, Artificial Intelligence and Waldorf Education 7:30pm. Presentation and conversation with Gary Lamb. Mountain Laurel Waldorf School, New Paltz. 255-0033 ext. 101.

Tarot Tales & Psychic Glimpses 7:30pm. Half Moon Theatre Company. Half Moon Theatre at the Culinary Institute of America’s Marriott Pavilion, Hyde Par. 235-9885.

17th Annual Film Columbia Film festival. Check website for details and screenings. Filmcolumbia.com.

Chris Smither 8pm. $25. Folk. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

Beacon Music Factory Night 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Young Frankenstein 8-10pm. $27/$25. Young Frankenstein, the musical is based on Mel Brooks’ comedy masterpiece. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Film

17th Annual Film Columbia Film festival. Check website for details and screenings. Filmcolumbia.com.

Health & Wellness

Theater

17th Annual Film Columbia Film festival. Check website for details and screenings. Filmcolumbia.com.

Film

17th Annual Film Columbia Film festival. Check website for details and screenings. Filmcolumbia.com.

Steve Chizmadia and The Accidental Gypsies 8-10:30pm. $10. Steve is an award winning Americana artist with strong roots in the singer songwriter Bean Runner Cafe, Peekskill, United States. (914) 737-1701.

Film

FRIDAY 28

The Beatles: From Liverpool to Abbey Road 6-8pm. Lecture. Town of Esopus Library, Port Ewen. 338-5580.

Film

Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds 8pm. $29.50. Brass- and gospel-infused R&B. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

An Evening with Joshua Bell and Alessio Bax $65-$250. A concert by world-renowned violinist Joshua Bell and pianist Alessio Bax. $65-$250. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Gratefully Yours: Tribute to The Grateful Dead 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Helga Davis 8pm. $26/$20 in advance. Helga Davis responds to Nick Cave’s Until with an intimate performance, solo with her loop station, inside the exhibition. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111.

Kids & Family Babysitting Preparedness 9am-3pm. $45. This course is for ages 12 to Adult. Successful completion of the course will result in a 2-year certification. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 475-9742. “I Spy” Halloween Trail 12-4pm. $7/$5. Have some spook-tacular family fun! Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781.

Lectures & Talks Author Marie White Small 5-7pm. Reading and discussing Stony Kill: A Novel. A conversation with Thomas Chulak from the bookstore and Q & A will follow a brief reading. The Chatham Bookstore, Chatham. 518-392-3005. Wicked Woodstock 3-8 pm. $10 Haunted House/$5 kids activities. Halloween event for all ages from 3-5:30 pm that includes a costume contest, an apple bobbing contest, a pumpkin carving contest, and the Art Bus. Page suggestion for the Haunted House from 5:30-8 pm is 14 and over. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Literary & Books Laura Ludwig: Poetry and Performance 6:30pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775. Scott Cohen’s Screenwriting Panel 2pm. $16/$13. Screenwriters: bring ten copies of 15 pages of your screenplay. Works read on a first come basis. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181.

Music Antioch Chamber Ensemble 8pm. Skinner Hall at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7319.


Blues Festival Featuring performances by: Eric Gales, Rory Block & Cindy Cashdollar, and Fred Scribner Midnight Slim Revival. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 866-781-2922. David Kraai & Amy Laber 8:30pm. Country. 8:30-11pm. Grand Cru Beer and Cheese Market, Rhinebeck. 876-6992. Eileen Ivers Band 7:30pm. $34. Celtic music. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Elgar’s Enigma Variations 8pm. $25-$35. Conducted by Leon Botstein. Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-on-Hudson. Gov’t Mule 8pm. $32.50-$55. Rock. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

SUNDAY 30

Health & Wellness Women's Health Symposium Featuring a variety of topics and speakers on women's health, including themography, energetic healing, wise nutrition, green medicine, acupuncture, homeopathy, and more. Stone Ridge. For more information visit WomensHealthSymposium.org.

Theater Young Frankenstein 8-10pm. $27/$25. Young Frankenstein, the musical is based on Mel Brooks’ comedy masterpiece. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Tarot Tales & Psychic Glimpses 5 & 8pm. Half Moon Theatre Company. Half Moon Theatre at the Culinary Institute of America’s Marriott Pavilion, Hyde Park, United States. 235-9885.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Halloween Open House 11am-8pm. Enjoy tea from The Water Oracle's autumn collection, tarot readings, treats, and raffles all day! Free divination workshop 6-8pm. The Water Oracle, Rhinebeck. 876-TEAS(8327).

Clubs & Organizations The Kingston Model Train and Railroad Hobby Show 10am-4pm. $6/$1 under age 12. The show will showcase the best in model train displays, memorabilia and related hobby items, for fun and for sale. Andy Murphy Rec Center, Kingston.

Josh Stark 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Labor of Love 8-10:30pm. $10. Jazz, blues, western swing, Latin and bluegrass. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Kids & Family “I Spy” Halloween Trail 12-4pm. $7/$5. Have some spook-tacular family fun! Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781.

Literary & Books Ellen Messer presents Back Rooms: Voices from the Illegal Abortion Era 4pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

Music The Security Project At Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. For time and ticket information visit BearsvilleTheater. com or call 679-4406. Elgar’s Enigma Variations 2pm. $25-$35. Conducted by Leon Botstein. Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-on-Hudson. Fear of Men 7pm. $12/$10 in advance. Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. 481-5158.

Marc Delgado with special guest Sandy Bell 8pm. $20/$18 members. Byrdcliffe Kleinert/James Center for the Arts, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Harvest Home 3pm. Albany Pro Musica sings mostly a cappella, selections that will surely warm your heart. Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945.

Sneed 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Mary Nessinger, mezzo-soprano 3pm. With Dominique Labelle, soprano, and Sara Laimon, piano. Featuring La Chanson d’Éve by Gabriel Fauré and Das Buch der Hängenden Gärten by Arnold Schoenberg. Skinner Hall at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7319.

Brand X Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. For time and ticket information visit BearsvilleTheater.com or call 679-4406. Vijay Iyer and Craig Taborn 8pm. Progressive jazz piano. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. (518) 276-3921.

Nightlife Electric Beef 9:30pm. $5. Halloween party with classic rock music. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Halloween Hoedown with Bovine Social Club 8pm. $15. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048.

Terrapin Craft Beer Experience Bringing the craft beer festival to a laid-back pace, this event offers an intimate setting and inviting ambiance inside a renovated Baptist church.Tastings of 40 beers from over 20 New York State breweries will be spread throughout the day from noon to three. Each room offers tasting stations with a group of four similar beer styles and tapas-style food pairings. Guests can relax, focusing on the food, beer, and atmosphere instead of a growing crowd. The only recommendation: Start with the light beer, then build your way up. Select a time for your tasting. Sunday, October 23, at Terrapin Restaurant in Rhinebeck. Tickets are $65 a person, Designated Driver tickets are an additional $26. (845) 876-3330. Terrapinresturant.com.

Halloween Party 8pm. Live funk, R&B & reggae concert, then at 11pm we transition into multiple DJs spinning a variety of hot music. The Lodge, Woodstock. 679-2814.

Rondout National Historic District Walking Tour Last Saturday of every month, 1pm. $10/$5 under age 16. Guided tour of Kingston’s historic waterfront area Ulster County Visitors Center, Kingston. Fohk.org.

Spirituality Hudson Valley Psychic Saturday Meetup 3pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Akashic Records Revelaed with June Brought Last Sunday of every month, 2-3:30pm. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Yiddish Folksbinene Troupe 1pm. The Award-winning National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene is the longest continuously producing Yiddish theatre company in the world. Sponsored by Ted Haendel in loving memory of Chane Yachness. Woodstock Jewish Congregation, Woodstock. 679-2218.

Halloween Open House 11am-8pm. Enjoy tea from The Water Oracle's autumn collection, tarot readings, treats, and raffles all day! Free divination workshop 6-8pm. The Water Oracle, Rhinebeck. 876-TEAS(8327).

7th Annual UlsterCorps Zombie Escape 10am. $25/$20 in advance/$15 group. 1K kids run, 5K zombie run, and a 1k fitness walk/hike. Williams Lake Project, Rosendale. 481-0331.

Spirituality

Young Frankenstein 3-5pm. $27/$25. Young Frankenstein, the musical is based on Mel Brooks’ comedy masterpiece. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

ChronoWeen: Nightmare on Wall Street 8pm. $12 advance, $15 at the door. For more info visit Chronogram.com or Bspkingston.com.

Outdoors & Recreation

Sunday Brunch: Saints of Swing 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Theater

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits

Dinner Dance for Syrian Refugees 6:30pm. $100. Proceeds from the evening will go to HIAS earmarked for Syrian refugees. HIAS works to resettle the most vulnerable refugees of all faiths and ethnicities from all over the world. Jewish Community Center, New Paltz. 255-9817.

Medieval & Spanish Blues: Guitar & Song with Claude Bourbon 4-6pm. $10. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Photos by Jennifer May

Workshops & Classes

Dance

Drawing and Painting from the figure 9am-noon. 150.00. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

New York Theatre Ballet 2:30-4:30pm. $30/$10 student rush and children. Under the artistic directions of Diana Byers. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 10.

Home Funeral Workshop 9:30am-4pm. $125/$150. This day is for those who are eager to reclaim death as a rite of passage in community. Yoga on Duck Pond, Stone Ridge. 687-4836. R&F Saturday Lab with Encaustic and Pigment Sticks 11am-4pm. $65. The Saturday Lab is a hands on workshop, giving artists a taste of what’s possible using R&F’s two paint lines. R&F Handmade Paints, Kingston. (800) 206-8088. Repair Cafe: Beacon 10am-2pm. Get some help with your Halloween costume at the last Repair Cafe of the month. Howland Cultural Center, Beacon. Repaircafehv.org.

Workshops & Classes Sunday Art Studios 11am-1pm. These Sunday morning programs are designed for local families, heritage and art tourists, and regular visitors who like to make art. Projects take about 30 minutes and are fun for all ages. Everyone leaves with a work of art. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext.105.

Fairs & Festivals High Falls Flea Market 9am-4pm. Art, antiques, collectibles, crafts and unique treasures. Grady Park, High Falls. 810-0471.

Film 17th Annual Film Columbia Film festival. Check website for details and screenings. Filmcolumbia.com. The 2016 Horror-thon 2pm. $6. Paramount Theatre, Middletown. 346-4195. Peter and the Farm 8pm. With director Tony Stone. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050.

MONDAY 31 Music Corey Dandridge’s World of Gospel Residency 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Travis Sullivan Trio 8pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Haunted Sleepover Halloween $100. Includes a bottle of wine and candle. Wallkill River School and Art Gallery, Montgomery. 457-ARTS.

10/16 ChronograM forecast 105


eric francis coppolino

Planet Waves by eric francis coppolino

Election 2016: It’s Time to Grow Up

T

he 2016 election was never closer than it is today, and that’s good news. Everyone wants it to be over. For two years we’ve been run through a nonstop political cyclone of vapid tirades, ignorant speculation and statistical prediction that vaporizes into raw emotion. Anything anyone says, whether political or not, is subject to being immediately reduced to a toxic substance, with just about everyone coming back in line for another cup. Mention the weather and it can become a debate about global warming denial. Mention going for a hike and that can turn into a discussion about hunting, which turns into a fight over the Second Amendment. Is everyone darker than an albino a potential terrorist? Republican candidate Donald Trump has laid back a little on his sexism and misogyny, only for that space to be taken up by Hillary Clinton supporters: any critique of her can be perceived as a statement against all women, everywhere. We’ve stopped wondering how Trump got as far as he did, which is similar to how Clinton got as far as she did (they just did, which suffices for our current mental environment). Now we’re about to have an election. In this article I intend to read two charts: that for Election Day, and another for the inauguration of the new president. I don’t intend to predict the winner, but rather to look at the conditions surrounding the election and the inauguration. Elections have been fairly calm since that fateful night in November 2000 when Al Gore won and George W. Bush was declared the winner. But they are contentious for many reasons, including the Supreme Court weakening protection for minorities, while those same people are being falsely accused of voter fraud. There remains some post-traumatic stress about how presidential elections might turn out, which has grown worse since the internet has taken over. The results of the Bush/Cheney presidency, which included botched, illegal wars as a result of 9/11, mass surveillance of the public by the NSA and the banking collapse of 2008, are warnings of what might happen if the election 106 planet waves ChronograM 10/16

does not go well. Now we have a contest between two candidates who are, if nothing else, well established slick operators, working in an environment that verges on explosive. The volatility is papered over by the American obsession with everything being hunky dory, underneath which is a thick layer of paranoia. If you’re reading this article and you live outside the United States, take a moment and be grateful. Dixville Notch, NH: First in the Nation Let’s take a look at the election chart. Because early voting and absentee voting start many weeks in advance of Election Day, there is no actual time for the first ballot being cast. The chart I use is for one minute past midnight on Election Day for a town called Dixville Notch in central New Hampshire. The 12 residents of that town gather at midnight, vote and announce the results. If nothing else, they are the first locale in the nation to complete the election process and to report a vote tally. The results of that voting are not predictive, but the chart is a symbolic commencement of the election process. Everything in astrology is ultimately a metaphor. I’ll refer to this chart as the election chart. First of all, it appears that the election actually happens. There has been some discussion among political astrologers that it might be called off, but I don’t see that. There is the potential for some chaos, mostly involving data and other electronic factors. Hacking incidents are reported in the news regularly; the internet-based voting system is far from immune from that problem. This chart’s first statement is that the election will be close—closer than most sources are currently predicting. After the nominating conventions, when Clinton had a clear lead, this seemed difficult to believe; today it’s easier. The near tie is illustrated by a rarely used, slow-moving point called Transpluto that’s rising to the degree in the election chart. Transpluto deals with everything that’s narrow, tight or restricted.


We might see a vote tally that’s reported as too close to call, in a sense The Inauguration Chart paralyzing the process. It’s almost certain that litigation will follow the election. The time the new president takes office is noon on January 20 following the The narrowness of Transpluto also describes the so-called discussion of the election. It’s easy to cast the inauguration chart; we always know when it’s issues. The problem is that what we think of as discussions are not oriented going to happen. Because the inauguration happens at a fixed time, the new president is always on actual problems and therefore cannot be oriented on solutions. In our safespace digital daydream, anything that is potentially offensive is filtered out or inaugurated with the Sun in Aquarius, with Taurus rising and with Capricorn on the midheaven. Everything else is variable. deemed a crackpot theory. Features of the 2017 inauguration include the Moon in Scorpio, many planets This election seems to be taking place on the level of junior high school class president, only instead of being a popularity contest, it’s about who hates in Pisces, and our friend the Uranus-Eris conjunction hiding in the 12th house whom a little less than they hate someone else. The process has been reduced (which is like a veil that conceals things). My impression is that this chart is describing the concealment of something huge. to voting out of fear of whomever one does not There is pageantry and fanfare; there is a most want. Those taking sides are both convinced that The president has limited excellent show. The show is the scrim that hides the world is in serious trouble if the other party actual, legitimate influence everything going on behind it. wins, and both sides may be right. The new Aquarius Sun gleams from on top of This chart looks like the shrill quality of the over the governance of the chart—and then in the next house over in Pidiscussion gets worse over the coming weeks, sces, a cluster of planets describe the public show, and that there is a steadily decreasing interest in the country, but thanks to and the public eating it up. The first time I saw understanding much at all. electronic media, this chart, my impression was that Bernie Sanders The second thing that jumps out is a descripwould be president; though now, barring some tion of the environment that looks deceptive and a huge image. truly strange circumstances, that’s not likely. mean. The conjunction of Neptune (illusion, fog, It’s almost like this chart is flaunting nostalgia and deceit) and Nessus (karma coming back, the This image is a mirage. and a sense of how good it is to be back in the results of a long chain of events) describe the psypast, while being in denial of the present. I believe that most of the time what chic climate. There is the genuine expectation of something dark happening. we call politics operates on the level of religion: that is, hope, belief and fear There is the open expectation of fraud. The full effects of the internet did not set in until the smartphone showed of the unknown. People tend to see what they already believe is there, and this up. This has had a dissembling effect on consciousness; everything got smaller, is particularly true of politics. The person who is sworn in knows how to exploit this factor in consciousshallower and more subject to immediate dismissal. Another message of the internet is that nothing is real. This is the first presidential contest in the age ness, and how to do it in a sly way. There is an indication the new president of the pocket computer. The impact of the digital age shows up boldly in this understands that their most significant official power is making appointments chart. Remember that we are in the time of the Uranus-Eris conjunction, the to the Supreme Court. The chart contains an endless well of consequences coming through this aspect of our era in history. The effects of this conjunction reach back to around 2011 and ahead to event, which people pretend not to understand. The flow of consequences about 2018. They can be summed up in this quote by a philosopher named feeds a bigoted, narrow, critical viewpoint that makes it nearly impossible to Eric McLuhan: “The body is everywhere assaulted by all of our new media, a think in a creative way. In order to solve national and global problems, it’s state which has resulted in deep disorientation of intellect and destabilization necessary to both be creative and to take some risks, and this chart describes of culture throughout the world. In the age of disembodied communication, every other approach. the meaning and significance and experience of the body is utterly transformed The Problems With Presidential Elections and distorted.” If you’re wondering about why everything everywhere seems so chaotic to When the US presidency is up for grabs, it distracts the country from other the point of unraveling, you might ponder this and see if it resonates. Say the issues for nearly two years. It seems important. Yet the conversation tends to words, “deep disorientation of intellect and destabilization of culture” a few go nowhere. The president has limited actual, legitimate influence over the governance times to yourself. It’s not the content of the internet but its architecture that’s of the country, but thanks to electronic media, a huge image. This image is a behind this effect. The mind is also assaulted, primarily by the robotic factor of the Internet mirage. There are three co-equal branches of government in the United States. (the Net is one gigantic robot). The news feed tells you what you have to Most real governance happens on the state, county and municipal level. The president is largely a figurehead. Because his or her power includes acthink about in the order you should think about it. Our machines are now our teachers of how not to think for ourselves, and in the election chart, this gets cess to the nuclear arsenal, a truly modern problem, that raises the stakes. Yet during an election we treat the presidency like it’s a hybrid between regent infused right into politics. For those curious, the aspect I’m looking at is the Aquarius Moon conjunct and superhero. In essence, the United States wastes two years listening to people lie about Pallas (the body politic; the public, under the influence of politics), sextile Uranus and Eris (the internet and its effect on consciousness). That is shorthand how they’re going to solve all our problems—and expecting them to do it. for “the public is now fully connected directly to the internet and therefore is Then it spends the next two years angry that no problems are being solved—a genuinely codependent state of affairs. Along the way, nobody actually stands easier than ever to manipulate.” The chart includes a dose of dark conspiracy theory (Mars in the last degree up to the government. For all the talk, we take it as it comes. I don’t think we will have sane civic life until more people have stood up to of Capricorn), which is also about rage at corruption. The problem with that their parents and claimed their lives as their own—which any therapist will tell rage is it has nowhere to connect to. When it’s expressed, it’s usually in a you is a rare phenomenon. Until then, the authoritarian miniature state (the partisan way (the other side is corrupt) even though everyone knows that the family) will be the model for the full-on authoritarian state (the government). issue reaches across party lines. I hate to break the news, but nobody is going to descend from above and All of this is set in an idealistic context, where there exists hope that somesolve our problems for us. We must do it together. how the process can work out well, and that the presidency itself is somehow a benevolent thing. There is still some association of the United States presidency chronogram.com with national parks, amber waves of grain and George Washington who did Read Eric Francis Coppolino’s weekly Planet Waves column. not chop down the cherry tree. 10/16 ChronograM planet waves 107


Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

ARIES

(March 20-April 19)

There are those moments when you must give up control over the course of events, and you’re veering into one of them now. You might find this helpful, because there are certain possibilities you may not have fully connected with, and those have a better chance of coming to the forefront if you’re not trying to hold everything together in the way that you have. Said another way, this is a time when you make some chaos work for you. This calls for the one thing that’s in the shortest supply on the planet right now, which is trust. By that I mean trust in the flow of time, in your development, and in your relationship to yourself. Those are the most significant factors that will help you align with the world around you, and it’s clear from your astrology that what you’re experiencing is not merely an inner trip. Your relationships, your professional calling and your physical environment are all involved. We are in an edgy moment right now, on many accounts. There is an abundance of fear going around, most of it directed at instability and lack of trust. You are now in the fortunate position of needing to trust yourself, and knowing that your faith in everyone and everything else flows from there. True, this is easier said than done, but you can do it.

TAURUS (April 19-May 20) As the next few weeks progress, you may feel as if you’re going to burst. The amount of activity, both physical and psychic, may push you toward the edge, particularly around the Full Moon on October 16. Even people who are not prone to anxiety may be feeling more of the stuff, though there are many ways to manifest and to express the same energy which fear is made of. The main point to remember is that there will be a lot of that energy moving, and that energy has to go somewhere. The more you express what you’re feeling in constructive ways, the better you will feel, and the more likely you’ll be to see the events of this time as an opportunity. The prevailing message is to lighten up and dance to the music. Venus in your opposite sign Scorpio is not exactly light and airy. This has you feeling deeply, and describes your investment in a relationship situation that you depend upon. Yet that’s secondary to your own experience of your feelings and your perceptions. Though this is always true, it’s particularly necessary to understand this now: Your state of mind colors and shapes your perception of the world around you more than any other factor. Therefore, work with your feelings as they emerge, and do what you need to do in order to feel good.

MARIS A

GEMINI (May 20-June 21)

LO M O N ACO

M ARISALOMON AC O . CO M

|

BE ACO N ,

N EW

YO R K

You must be careful what you commit to this month. During the Mercury retrograde into late September, you got a clue just how little it takes to create a misunderstanding. You need to be vigilant about this going forward. That means understanding your responsibilities and commitments under any contract you sign or promise you make. To put it bluntly, you must figure out how much power over you that any agreement gives the other party. From the look of your solar chart, that power will be lopsided in favor of others. The first step toward claiming it back is not giving any more away. Any situation where there is some question about this is likely to come to a head, so you will want to be prepared for any discussion in advance. You are not the type to submit to anything against your will; you’re too intelligent and you value your autonomy. Yet what’s unfolding in the current scenario involves old patterns that go back to parents and early caregivers, wherein you had to content yourself with having no influence over the course of events. This is no longer true. Yet most of your strength and volition will come from knowledge. Therefore, set no limits on what you know about your circumstances, your rights, or anyone with whom you’re dealing. For this is indeed your power.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) You have been working toward something, though you might discover that it was something other than what you thought. Whatever unusual developments arrive in your professional life, meet them full on and without hesitation. You have been preparing for this moment. It’s your chance to do two things. One is to break free of some pattern that’s kept you living or working one particular way for longer than you have wanted or expected to. The other is to meet people whom you perceive as powerful either on their level, on your terms, or both. You are done being intimidated by people, only to discover the daunting factor was in your own mind. Said another way, the genuine benefit of this time in your life is your opportunity to even out the playing field. If you remember that this is entirely psychological, it will be easier and more fun. Along the way, you’re likely to see an opening to an expanded reputation or a level of notoriety that far exceeds your hopes or expectations. Yet forthcoming aspects describe you discovering the ability to connect, emotionally and creatively, with something much larger than yourself. That something is usually experienced as intangible or as vanished into the landscape. You can feel it, hear it, and smell it, and you’re about to see what the heck it really is. 108 planet waves ChronograM 10/16


Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

LEO (July 22-August 22) You may need to work hard, though that’s also an invitation to work brilliantly. You will save yourself effort and get better results by applying intelligence first to any situation. Get a concept, an overview, a vision. Rather than a sense of direction, what you will benefit from is a concept of what you’re working toward. This might be more or less specific, lavishly detailed or less so. Let that guide you, in a loose and evolving way. It’s essential that all of your plans and even intentions be flexible enough to express themselves in a way that can actually manifest. One quality of our times is the environment changing so rapidly that it’s impossible to adapt. Rather, the thing essential to adapt oneself to is the sensation of constantly shooting the rapids. The beauty of speed is that small moves mean a lot. Momentum is doing most of the work; your role is to guide and direct. That’s the difference between working hard and working smart, as the old expression goes. There is plenty of energy coming out of the ground, and the fire-breathing dragon of time is hot and heavy at the moment. Therefore, settle into your seat and guide your craft, or if it suits you, step outside and walk.

www.seeds-love.com

VIRGO (August 23-September 23) Somehow recently the financial stakes went up, and it seems that you see more potential for yourself than usual. It’s a fact that you are now in a position to expand your income, though this will take a degree of personal commitment and dedication that you might decide is just not worth it. We live in the age of supposedly easy millions, which looms like a mirage over people’s hopes and dreams. The potential to be suddenly set for life gets in the way of all the steps that it takes to learn a trade, begin a business, work with partners, and manage modest resources efficiently. This is far from poverty consciousness: To the contrary, it’s about maximizing your access to what you already have, so that you can keep your projects going and build them up to a new level. This will invariably involve working with others, though you must be careful about the influence that people with whom you’re involved have on you. It will be easy to get carried away in the values of others if you don’t keep your focus on your own values and priorities. You are the creative engine that you need to harness and maintain. You are the person with the drive and the passionate curiosity. You don’t need those things from others.

LIBRA (September 22-October 23) You must take the lead in your relationships. By this I mean take a strong hand in setting the agenda in both business and personal partnerships. If you don’t, you could be subjected to the wild swings that other people take you through. Another approach could be to take a step back and be detached. Yet you are way too involved, and your circumstances are too sensitive, for you simply to let go of your control or of your influence. The main thing you will need is a strong degree of self-leadership and self-guidance. This is the only factor that you can count on to help you navigate your environment when the intensity level goes up (which it will mid-month). Let’s put this into terms suited to Libra. You depend on balance, but you cannot depend on others to help keep you in balance. Only you can do that for yourself. It will be tempting to look to others for support when they may be your most dependable source of chaos. This posture may leave you feeling like you’re on your own or out in the cold, but it will work better than any form of toxic togetherness. You have a much deeper agenda to cultivate and maintain your emotional independence. You’ve been working at this for a long time, and this is the perfect month to practice and learn.

SCORPIO (October 23-November 22) Though it will be tempting to use pressure or force on certain people who seem stuck, that would not help your situation. Instead, do something that’s relatively easy: let them know you want to understand where they’re coming from. Then really strive to understand their viewpoint and the emotional reality behind it. Your persistent focus on what matters will be an orientation point for others, and it will have a clarifying influence. You merely need to apply the penetrating quality of your mind, and keep the conversation low key. Ask questions and really have a sense whether you understand or not. This will be especially important in work situations where groups are involved. Groups can be entirely lost and either nobody in the group wants to admit it, or they are all following one another around blindly. You’re the one who has to see beyond this. That means recognizing patterns as they point to problems and then to solutions. This is closely related to creativity. Or rather, it’s identical, only you would substitute “puzzle” for “problem.” You are in a highly unusual position to see the potential in all the chaos that the world is drowning in. You might even be able to understand the spiritual crisis of the internet, because currently you have a sense of the scale of both the problem and the creative puzzle that it presents.

menstrual & sexual empowered embodiment from the depths up & out dr. roxanne partridge cht, depth psychologist, clinical hypnotherapist, relational sexuality practitioner see website for details on exclusive time to embody you & workshop schedule. www.embodyperiod.com

408 Main Street Rosendale, NY 1 2472 845.658.8989 rosendaletheatre.org TALES OF THE HUDSON VALLEY 10/8, 11:00 am & 4:00 pm,$12/$10/$6 children/$22 family of 4

NATIONAL THEATRE FROM LONDON

THE DEEP BLUE SEA 10/23, $12/$10 members, 3:00 pm

DANCE FILM SUNDAYS PRESENTS MATTHEW BOURNE’S

HEATHER BOOTH: CHANGING THE WORLD 10/25, $10, 7:30 pm

10/9, $12/$10 members/$6 children, 3:00 pm

STAGED SCREENPLAY READING “I DO TOO” BY NINA SHENGOLD

SLEEPING BEAUTY

(ELEE) SERIES INSPIRED BY TEDX 10/11, $10, 7:15 pm

10/26, Free Admission, 7:15 pm

WOODSTOCK FILM FESTIVAL

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW

10/13–10/16, multiple showtimes, $10

10/29, $10/$8 members and those in costume, 8:00 pm

“SHEILA DEE AND THE DAZZLERS” 10/18, Free Admission, 7:15 pm

MOVIES IN OCTOBER: Florence Foster Jenkins; Eat That Question: Frank Zappa in His Own Words; The Light Between Oceans; Woodstock Film Festival; Don’t Think Twice

10/16 ChronograM planet waves 109


Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

RHINEBECK (NEXT TO LIBERTY)

866 FILM NUT WOODSTOCK 132 TINKER ST

845 679 6608 BECOME A MEMBER

SIGN UP & RECEIVE OUR WEEKLY EMAIL @UPSTATEFILMS.ORG

Life Changes. Plan.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 22) Now would be the time to focus on increasing your income. You have the ideas, and you have the motivation. Most of all, you have the opportunity. It’s rare to put all of those factors together in the same place and time. That’s your direct opportunity to take advantage of what you’ve got available. Most of all this means focusing on actual tasks. It’s easy to get consumed by meaningless details, abstract plans, and list making. What you need to do to get this party started are the challenging, potentially difficult, but in any case actual tasks, with a beginning, middle, and end (with emphasis on the end). Know what must happen, and do that first. Know what you want to happen, and get to that a little later in the day. At the moment, you have the added advantage of some relative calm (particularly after the frenetic madness of the past month). So use that space and mental bandwidth wisely. It won’t last forever—though it’ll last long enough to help you make some progress toward your most valued goals. One last thought. That progress will come partly in the form of building things, and partly in the form of taking some things apart. The level of structure is the one to focus on, that is, the underlying layer: walls and doors rather than the furniture.

CAPRICORN (December 2-January 20)

THIRD EYE ASSOCIATES Life • Planning • Solutions TM

Celebrating 25 years of business 1552 Rt. 9 Wappingers Falls 845.227.4021

lOckS that rOck

LOCKSTHATROCK.COM

HAIR DESIGN

Like us on Facebook

You’re going through a phase of catching up with yourself. True, you’ve made plenty of progress the past couple of months, despite factors that would have deterred others. Yet you still need to gain some essential experience, so that you can focus your direction based on real information. It’s essential that you be willing to get your hands dirty, and essential that you not go into any project with the expectation that it will be easy. Many factors in your chart are insisting that you be willing to go deep, and that you be willing to embark on projects that you don’t know the destiny of. While everything is designed as a learning process, it must never stop there. It’s essential to engage with the worth in what you’re doing, and to make sure that you actually follow through to the point where something actually serves a purpose extrinsic to yourself. People are fed up with complication. That’s the mark of our times. Yet you know that getting a result is not as easy as tapping the screen on a phone, but rather more like the work that took to design and create the app. You don’t need simplicity as much as you need a broad perspective. Jupiter is here to help you, if only you’ll remember there’s more to heaven and earth than you may have believed previously.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February 19) This month comes in two distinct phases—before and after the Full Moon of October 16. Rather than arrive at phase two and wonder what you were so worked up about, I suggest you pace yourself and turn your squelch knob up to about eight. (Squelch is the thing on a two-way radio that suppresses background noise but allows through strong signals). There is plenty distracting you in your immediate environment, yet despite this you must persist in weaving your vision for the future. You have the added challenge of being motivated by something other than fear. It may well seem that not wanting things to go badly is a more powerful driving force than wanting them to go well. This could be especially true if you don’t quite have a clear notion of what “well” would be. And this is why you will benefit from focusing specifically on that idea. To do this you will need to rise above the fray of daily activity and get your mind to a clear place. I recommend altitude: a tall building, a mountaintop, a cliff side with a view, a bridge you love. Stay there long enough to take in the perspective and allow it to make an impression on you, so that you think different thoughts. You will be tapping into your “alt mind,” which knows more than your regular one.

PISCES (February 19-August 20)

HALLOWEEN OPEN HOUSE Special 2-Day Event, October 29-30, 11am-8pm

Enjoy teas from our autumn collection, tarot card readings, special treats and raffles all day long! Then join us for a free divination workshop from 6pm-8pm. Tarot/Psychic Readings • Fall Tea Sampling • Tea infused Treats & Samples Free Divination Workshop • Mini Reiki Energy Sessions • Raffle & More 41 E. Market St. Suite 4 Rhinebeck, NY 845-876-TEAS (8327)

thewateroracle.com

110 planet waves ChronograM 10/16

You must be discerning about your ideas, your talents, and your possessions. It’s true that you’re in a time of changing fortunes, and you don’t really know what each day will bring. You do have plenty to work with; yet you need to sift through your resources carefully and select the gems. Regarding your talents: it’s time to get an understanding of both what is worth the most—what aligns the most closely with your values—and what gives you the most pleasure. There are all kinds of things you can do, and might do, though it’s now necessary that you have a better match than ever before. When you come into that alignment, you will notice that others respond by coming into harmony with you. But, as every musician must tune his or her instrument to be in tune with the orchestra, you must maintain focus on yourself, which means feeling and listening to the notes that you play. To use another musical metaphor, there’s a big difference between an electric guitar and an acoustic one. An electric instrument can express more sounds with less effort, and tap into the power grid to shake the stadium or wake your neighbors. That’s the instrument you’re playing right now. Therefore, slow down, center yourself and allow the music (and art, money, love, and sex) to flow through you.


FAMILY

FARM

pick your own

Seventh-generation family farm, nestled in New York’s Hudson Valley. NOFA-Certified Organic Apples Squash • Pumpkins • Wagon Rides Cider Donuts • Corn Maze Low-Spray IPM Apples OPEN SAT & SUN, 10AM-5PM

September 17 though October 23 plus Columbus Day 2086 ROUTE 44/55, MODENA, NY CLARKESFAMILYFARM.COM 845-901-7442

10/16 ChronograM planet waves 111


Parting Shot

Leaves of Leaves: Four Monoprints Each October, I pick one day—one perfect day, the sun bronzing the woods and the air beginning to crisp at the edges—and sally forth to scoop up an armload of free art supplies, generously shed by maples, gingkos, hickories, oaks, and aspens, and strewn in random arrangements by the wind. I gather the leaves—the ones that still retain a bit of moisture, because the more sere they are the more prone they will be to crumble as you ink and press them—and take them into my studio. There, I will spend the morning, and sometimes the entire day, transforming them into fossils—emblems of ephemeral, once-green foliage, outlasting the autumn in which they fluttered and fell as images printed on paper. —Mikhail Horowitz 112 ChronograM 10/16


Mid Hudson Regional Hos& COLLABORATION [ [ EXPERTISEpital

“That’s why we chose MidHudson Regional Hospital. ” There are many different reasons why the area’s leading physicians choose to affiliate with MidHudson Regional Hospital and live in the Hudson Valley. And one reason they all agree on: the collaborative expertise that defines how we care for our patients. It’s one more way we’re advancing care. Here.

MidHudsonRegional.org

Westchester Medical Center Health Network includes: WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER I MARIA FARERI CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL I BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CENTER MIDHUDSON REGIONAL HOSPITAL I GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL I BON SECOURS COMMUNITY HOSPITAL I ST. ANTHONY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL HEALTHALLIANCE HOSPITAL: BROADWAY CAMPUS I HEALTHALLIANCE HOSPITAL: MARY’S AVENUE CAMPUS I MARGARETVILLE HOSPITAL


Health Quest / VBMC

“TAKE ME TO VASSAR.” Vassar is now a Level II Trauma Center with a specialized trauma team available 24/7. Don’t leave it to chance. Make it a choice. Find out more at TakeMeToVassar.org

Chronogram October 2016  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you