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2 CHRONOGRAM 8/14


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8/14 CHRONOGRAM 3


Chronogram ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

CONTENTS 8/14

VIEW FROM THE TOP

COMMUNITY PAGES

8 ON THE COVER

34

NEW PALTZ: DOWNTOWN & GOWN

Steve Lambert’s Sand Ocean Sky—The Commons. Video online at Chronogram.com.

David King explores the historic town­—from the college to the Shawangunks. Plus: Photo essay by Thomas Smith.

9 DIGITAL TABLE OF CONTENTS A guide to exclusive content on Chronogram.com.

KIDS AND FAMILY

10 ESTEEMED READER

42 EMBRACING BOREDOM

Jason Stern explores the unifying power of faith.

14 EDITOR’S NOTE Brian K. Mahoney settles into the sweetest season.

CONTINUING EDUCATION

NEWS AND POLITICS

47 OPEN ENROLLMENT IN LIFE

16 WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING

Hillary Harvey talks to parents and educators about the benefits of boredom in encouraging creativity in the lives of over-stimulated children.

Swimming in the Hudson, medical marijuana, Archie Comics banned, and more.

Anne Pyburn Craig surveys the possibilities for continuing education in the Hudson Valley and finds that you can learn something new every day.

18 BEINHART’S BODY POLITIC: DEMOCRACY: HERE TODAY, GONE TOMORROW?

WHOLE LIVING

Larry Beinhart on democracy and the free market.

74 LYME LESSONS

HOME

22 AN ARCHITECT-DESIGNED STUDIO IN ANCRAM

Jennifer Farley profiles an Susan Roth’s studio retreat.

One doctor finds that Lyme disease has a lot to teach us about epidemics, chronic illnesses, and a medical establishment in dire need of a paradigm shift.

29 HOME & GARDEN EVENTS

COMMUNITY RESOURCE GUIDE

68 TASTINGS A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 70 BUSINESS DIRECTORY A compendium of advertiser services. 77 WHOLE LIVING Opportunities to nurture mind, body, and soul.

Columbia-Greene Garden Party, Dutchess County Fair, and more.

31 PINCH ME AGAIN AND AGAIN, AND I WILL REWARD YOU Michelle Sutton on how to get the most out of your garden with proper pruning.

6

81

4 CHRONOGRAM 8/14

The Masterpieces of Polish Cinema film festival begins August 10 at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck and Woodstock. Pictured above, Andrzej Wajda’s Ashes and Diamonds (1958). FORECAST


25 YEARS

BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL REDISCOVERIES

SCHUBERT AND HIS WORLD

The Bard Music Festival presents two extraordinary weeks of concerts, panels, and other special events that will explore the musical world of Franz Schubert.

weekend one | August 8–10 The Making of a Romantic Legend

weekend two | August 15–17

program one The Legacy of a Life Cut Short Works by Schubert

special events “Path toward a Grand Symphony”: Schubert’s Octet and Schubert’s Kosegarten Liederspiel

program two From “Boy” to Master: The Path to Erlkönig Works by Schubert, Gluck, Rossini, and others

program seven Beethoven’s Successor? Chamber works by Schubert

special event The Song Cycle as Drama: Winterreise

program eight The Music of Friendship Chamber works by Schubert, Schumann, and others

program three Mythic Transformations Works by Schubert and orchestrated song program four Goethe and Music: The German Lied Songs by Schubert, Mendelssohn, and others program five Before Unspeakable Illness Chamber works by Schubert

845-758-7900 fishercenter.bard.edu

Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

program six Schubert and Viennese Theater Operettas by Schubert and Franz von Suppé

A New Aesthetics of Music

program nine Late Ambitions Orchestral and choral works by Schubert and Berio program ten Fellowship of Men: The Male Choral Tradition Choral music by Schubert, Bruckner, and others program eleven The Final Months Chamber works by Schubert program twelve Schubert and Opera Semi-staged performance of Schubert’s Fierrabras Image: Franz Schubert by W.A. Rieder, 1825. ©IMAGNO/Lebrecht

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Chronogram ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

CONTENTS 8/14

ARTS & CULTURE

FOOD & DRINK

52 GALLERY & MUSEUM GUIDE

66 TRAIL MIX: THE RAIL TRAIL CAFÉ

56 MUSIC: THE PONTIFFS OF POP Peter Aaron interviews Bishop Allen’s Justin Rice. Nightlife Highlights include Hudson Music Festival; Joy of Jazz Week; Catskill High Peaks Festival; Summer Hoot; and Hudson Valley Jazz Festival. Reviews of Thirty by If, Bwana; Lovesick by Lovesick; and Here & There by The KC Four & More.

60 BOOKS: MURDER, THEY WROTE Nina Shengold talks literary death and dismemberment with mystery writers Alison Gaylin, Steve Hamilton, and Marshall Karp.

62 BOOK REVIEWS Jana Martin reviews can’t and won’t (stories) by Lydia Davis. Anne Pyburn Craig reviews Getting A Life with Asperger’s: Lessons Learned on the Bumpy Road to Adulthood by Jesse A. Saperstein.

64 POETRY Poems by Liz Bonhag, Wade Clemente, Katie Cohan, Margaret Ferrec, Amy Galloway, Bri Gangi, A. J. Huffman, William Joel, Simone Perry, Brittany Rubio, Mary Rubio, H. D. Stubblefield, Edwin Torres, and Eileen Van Hook. Edited by Phillip X Levine.

104 PARTING SHOT Renowned photographer Fred Stein gets a tribute at Oblong Books in Rhinebeck.

50

From “Plums in the Icebox,” an exhibition of paintings by Theresa Drapkin at Cornell Street Studios in Kingston this month. GALLERY & MUSEUM GUIDE

6 CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Karen B. Angel profiles the new eatery on the Wallkill Valley Rail Trail.

THE FORECAST 82 DAILY CALENDAR Comprehensive listings of local events. (Daily updates at Chronogram.com.) PREVIEWS 81 A retrospective of Dick Polich’s foundry work opens at the Dorksy Museum. 82 NECC’s Chef and Farmer Brunch returns to Millerton August 10. 83 ps21’s Dance Festival runs throughout the month of August in Chatham. 86 Arm-of-the-Sea Theater stages its Esopus Creek Puppet Suite August 22-24. 87 Cynthia Hopkins performs at Mount Tremper Arts on August 15 and 16. 91 Michael Lindsay-Hogg exhibits paintings at BCB art in Hudson this month. 92 “Peter and the Wolf” at Maverick Concerts in Woodstock on August 9. 93 The Jack DeJohnette Trio plays a benefit for Family of Woodstock on August 16. 94 Rock, Rattle, & Drum Pow Wow returns for its eighth year August 9 and 10. 96 Kingston Artist Soap Box Derby returns this August 24 to Kingston.

PLANET WAVES 98 THE VEXING ISSUE OF SELF-ESTEEM Eric Francis Coppolino on the value of cultivating self-esteem.

100 HOROSCOPES

What are the stars telling us? Eric Francis Coppolino knows.


EDITORIAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Perry dperry@chronogram.com BOOKS EDITOR Nina Shengold books@chronogram.com HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR Wendy Kagan wholeliving@chronogram.com

MUSIC EDITOR Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com EDITORIAL PINCH HITTER Jennifer Gutman EDITORIAL INTERNS David King, Iana Robitaille PROOFREADER Lee Anne Albritton CONTRIBUTORS Karen B. Angel, Larry Beinhart, Stephen Blauweiss, Anne Pyburn Craig, Larry Decker, Eric Francis Coppolino, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Michael Eck, Jennifer Farley, Ron Hart, Hillary Harvey, Maya Horowitz, Annie Internicola, Jana Martin, Jeremy Schwartz, Tom Smith, Sparrow

PUBLISHING FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky CEO Amara Projansky amara@chronogram.com PUBLISHER Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com CHAIRMAN David Dell Chronogram is a project of Luminary Publishing ADVERTISING SALES ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Maryellen Case mcase@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Mario Torchio mtorchio@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Robert Pina rpina@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com ADMINISTRATIVE BUSINESS MANAGER Ruth Samuels rsamuels@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107 MARKETING & EVENTS COORDINATOR Samantha Henkin shenkin@chronogram.com MARKETING & EVENTS INTERN Dorian Sinnott PRODUCTION PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Jaclyn Murray jmurray@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 PRODUCTION DESIGNERS Kerry Tinger, Mosa Tanksley PRODUCTION INTERN Amanda Schmadel OFFICE 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 | (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

MISSION Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Luminary Publishing 2014.

SUBMISSIONS CALENDAR To submit listings, visit Chronogram.com/submitevent or e-mail events@chronogram.com. Deadline: August 15.

aug sept oct

POETRY EDITOR Phillip X Levine poetry@chronogram.com

What’s Ahead at Omega August 17–22

Jon Gabriel shows you a

transformative, diet-free approach to weight loss

August 24–29

Stanislav Grof and other experts

share leading-edge healing breath practices

August 29–September 1 Krishna Das and friends offer

musical inspiration at the 10th annual Ecstatic Chant weekend

September 5–7

Sonia Choquette helps

you tune in and develop your innate intuition

September 5–7

Tara Bennett-Goleman and Daniel Goleman guide you to

freedom from self-defeating habits

September 7–12

Sharon Salzberg and friends help women become the kind of leaders the world needs now

September 19–21

Elizabeth Lesser and other

pioneers offer new perspectives at Women/Men: The Next Conversation

October 7–10

Bert Hellinger and Sophie Hellinger teach how to untie the

knots that bind us to trauma

You’ll find these and more than 340 diverse and innovative workshops, conferences, and professional trainings on Omega’s 200–acre Rhinebeck, New York campus.

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Explore more at eOmega.org or call 800.944.1001

8/14 CHRONOGRAM 7


C H R O N O G R A M B L O C K P A R T Y. C O M

ON THE COVER

Sand Ocean Sky—The Commons Steve Lambert | Mixed Media | 40” x 90” | 2009

Tank you to our parners and sponsors! HEALTH QUEST CATSKILL ART & OFFICE SUPPLY BSP KINGSTON THOMAS F. CINGEL, DDS BUTTERMILK FALLS INN & SPA RADIO WOODSTOCK 100.1 LAGUNITAS BREWING COMPANY MEDICAL AESTHETICS OF THE HUDSON VALLEY RE>THINK LOCAL SUNY ULSTER KINGSTON UPTOWN BUSINESS ASSOCIATION CITY OF KINGSTON KINGSTON LAND TRUST THE FISHER CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS AT BARD COLLEGE

If there’s one thing Steve Lambert learned as an undercover security agent at Stanford University’s bookstore, it’s that anyone—a history professor, a freshman’s dad on Parents Weekend, an ex-felon—can try to steal a pen. After each incident, he would sit down with the offender and discuss the attempted theft often born of some psychological conflict, according to Lambert. The meetings tended to end constructively: “Maybe today can be a turning point,” he would suggest. Lambert retired his badge years ago, but conversation remains at the core of his work. The artist/activist creates public pieces that ask viewers to consider their value systems as consumers. Advertising is a frequent subject. “I consider myself ‘media-agnostic,’” he says. “I use whatever material will work best for me.” For Lambert, this is signage; he critiques advertising using its own methods. Sand Ocean Sky—The Commons is one of a series of arrow signs Lambert fashioned and photographed around Los Angeles. The signs are witty—one reads “No Trespassing” outside of a gated home, another “You are Still Alive” beside a large cemetery—and consider how we perceive and value public space. Lambert also fights advertising with software—his web application Add-Art replaces online advertisements with art. For Lambert, his work isn’t about feeding a message to his audience. It’s about discussion and exchange. “[In college] I would see art in galleries, stuff that looked fun to make, but not so fun to look at. It was great when I realized that art could be whatever I wanted it to be.” The desire to make art “fun” for both artist and audience has created works that require interactivity. Lambert’s piece CapitalismWorks For Me! True/False is a giant traveling scoreboard, with two buttons inviting passersby to agree or disagree. It looks and feels like a game show: bright, colorful, competitive. But Lambert is more interested in stories than scores. He recalls one man who voted false in Times Square: “He was so frustrated with the broad inhumanity of economic inequality that all he could do was cry. For the piece to cause that kind of profound response felt like an incredible achievement far beyond what I ever expected.” In 2008, Lambert collaborated with theYes Men on The NewYork Times Special Edition, distributing 80,000 fake copies of only “best-case scenario” news across the country. “The point,” he says, “wasn’t to make all of those things a reality, but to enjoy walking toward them.” For Lambert, walking is talking. Lambert occasionally sets up a table with a hand-painted sign that promises, “I will talk with anyone about anything. Free!” The mobile table has proven popular; Lambert says discussions have run the gamut, from weather to Native American agricultural techniques. Whatever the subject, the artist wants to walk and talk with you. Steve Lambert currently teaches in the New Media Program at SUNY Purchase and works from his studio in Beacon. Information on his work and upcoming exhibitions can be found on his site: Visitsteve.com. —Iana Robitaille CHRONOGRAM.COM WATCH a video interview with artist/activist Steve Lambert by Stephen Blauweiss.

8 CHRONOGRAM 8/14


CHRONOGRAM.COM

Performances by:

DAILY DOSE: Your Hudson Valley To-Do List Each morning we greet you with news of what’s happening in the region and what events you shdoul be planning to attend—like the upcoming Artists Soapbox Derby (above), which returns to Kingston’s Rondout on August 24

Visit our neighbors!

Stop in Uptown Kingston businesses for great deals, specials, and more The whole community is involved! Be sure to check out some of our neighbors in Uptown during the block party on August 16! Kingston for great deals, specials, and more! 1

2

3

N. FRONT ST.

4

| 31 NORTH FRONT ST

WALL ST.

Amanda’s On Wheels • Lakeside Licks • Black 1. BLUE57 | 57 NORTH FRONT ST Forest Flammkuchen Co. • Pippy’s Hot Dog 2. BOITSON’S | 47 NORTH FRONT ST Truck Black-eyed Suzie’s • Arkansas Tom’s Bbq 5

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5. OPA! GYROS | 333 WALL ST

at

6. GARGOYLE’S | 330 WALL ST VIDEO: Steve Lambert Filmmaker Stephen Blauweiss traveled to the Beacon studio of artist/activist Steve Lambert to chat with him about the intersection of art, politics, and advertising. Lambert’s work appears on this month’s cover.

| 329 WALL ST

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9. STOCKADE TAVERN | 313 FAIR ST to benefit Angel Food East 10. SISSY’S CAFÉ | 324 WALL ST

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14. KINGSTON CANDY BAR | 319 WALL ST 17

| 316 WALL ST

16. OUTDATED CAFÉ | 314 WALL ST 17. ELEPHANT | 310 WALL ST 18. VINCENZO’S PIZZERIA | 305 WALL ST | 303 WALL ST

SLIDESHOW: New Paltz on the Rocks For this month’s Community Pages, photographer Thomas Smith chronicled life in New Paltz. This month’s digital-only photo essay documents a group of young adults learning to rock climb in the Mohonk Preserve.

18 19

20. HV LGTBQ CENTER | 300 WALL ST 21. DUO BISTRO | 50 JOHN ST 22. RENE’S BISTRO | 39 JOHN ST

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25. HUDSON COFFEE TRADERS | 288 WALL ST

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26. LE CANARD ENCHAINE | 276 FAIR ST

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VIDEO: Carolyn Marks Blackwood Landscape photogrpaher Blackwood, who produces films in her spare time (Philomena, The Duchess) talks with filmmaker Stephen Blauweiss about her current show at the Albany Institute of Art.

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8/14 CHRONOGRAM 9


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10 CHRONOGRAM 8/14

“Holy Love refers to the fact that when you really suspend all comparisons, all judgments, and all opinions, you will experience reality as an unalloyed positive value through all the sense modalities. It is pure goodness and its expression is always goodness.”
 —A. H. Almaas, Facets of Unity Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: We wandered through the tight, shadowed alleyways of the Arab market, or souk, looking for the entrance to the Kotel, the Western Wall of the oldest Jewish temple in the world, in Jerusalem. Here and there a sign would appear in Hebrew, English, and Arabic, and we would go in that direction, only to find ourselves in some deserted section of the Old City. Finally, after several reversals, at last the entrance appeared. We descended a labyrinthine staircase with high stone walls and came through the gauntlet guarded by soldiers and metal detectors. It was intimidating, but as we left the narrow area and stepped into the expanse of the plaza, I was confronted by something like an invisible force field. It wasn’t repellent but rather felt like the atmosphere had become palpably dense. I looked down at my son, who’s nine, and he looked back inquisitively. “Do you feel that?” I asked him. He nodded. “What is it?” “I don’t know…” he said. “Energy.” A few thousand people were gathered in growing density as we moved closer to the ancient wall, which rises 60 feet above the plaza. Many were praying with fervor and intensity, rocking rhythmically with their prayers; some were singing or chanting, and others prayed quietly, with a force of concentration. The place had the quality of a beehive, with so many workers busy making a certain kind of energetic honey that could be felt and even almost tasted in the atmosphere. After offering our own prayers, foreheads pressed against the ancient stones of the wall, we went through a gate and covered bridge into the area called the Temple Mount on the other side of the wall. This is the place of Dome of the Rock and the Al-Aqsa Mosque. The Dome of the Rock is perhaps the single most impressive intact building I have beheld, so complex in its overall design and detail. It is a work of almost unfathomable grace and sacred geometry built in 700 CE around the foundation stone of what was the holy of holies in King Solomon’s temple. For Muslims it is the sacred site of Mohammed’s Shob-e-Miraz, or Night Journey. Groups of men and women were gathered all around the plaza, some reading aloud from the Quran, others chanting verses in beautiful, resonant eastern melodies.Visitors went in and out of the dome, and then came the call to prayer, the haunting chant of Allahu Akbar, La Illaha Il Allah, Mohammed rasul Allah (Allah is great; There is no God but Allah; Mohammed is the Prophet of Allah). As the call came, people streamed into the mosque to pray. The atmosphere had a different quality from the other side of the wall, but it was equally intense. Later, we walked a few blocks to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, where Jesus is said to have been buried and then rose again. The church is magnificent, albeit schizophrenic, because it is shared by every denomination and reflects all their unique architectural styles. As we arrived, the Coptic Christians were chanting in an alcove toward the rear of the church.Their voices were deep and resonant, and at first we thought they were chanting in Hebrew, for it surely was no western language, nor was it Arabic.Then we realized it was Coptic, the latest stage of the Egyptian language that the Coptics, the earliest if not original Christian sect, still use for their liturgy. Soon the Roman Catholics arrived on the far side of the church, fired up the pipe organ, and began to chant their mass in Latin. It effectively overwhelmed the Coptics in their corner, though to their credit, they persisted and were still praying long after the Catholic service was concluded and the congregation dispersed. Later, at a cafe we talked. “The Jews, Muslims, and Christians look different, but when they pray they are all doing the same thing,” my son observed. From our vantage point, all the religious people performing their rites were, with the special emanations of their prayers, making a kind of energetic honey—a nectar that is unusual and fine—and through the results of their continuous practices over thousands of years, have helped make Jerusalem a place that can only be called holy. This honey-making, we felt, emanating the stuff of a more fully human inner life, is fundamentally good; even while, at the level of politics, people of different religions and ethnicities struggle to destroy one another’s existence. At this level of real prayer (or meditation, or conscious work, or mindfulness) there is only one effort, which is to emanate in a way that is balanced and human, so as to create a finer atmosphere for ourselves, for one another, and to fulfill our part in nourishing the cosmic harmony. —Jason Stern


8/14 CHRONOGRAM 11


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Chronogram Seen Photos by Roy Gumpel

On July 12, Chronogram hosted Full Moon Bocce at Pete and Toshi Seeger Riverfront Park in Beacon. Four hundred people showed up to dance, drink, and play bocce under the super moon. More photos at Facebook.com/Chronogram.

8/14 CHRONOGRAM 13


ROY GUMPEL

Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note Sweet Season

The editor organizing a 28-team bocce tournament during Chronogram’s Full Moon Bocce at Pete and Toshi Seeger Riverfront Park in Beacon on July 12.

A

s a young, melancholic poet, autumn was my favorite time of year. I suffered through long, sunny summers waiting for that blessed season. It wasn’t the beauty of fall’s riotous Technicolor display I cherished, of course. Leave that to the tourists and the normals. The changing of the leaves was a sign of nature’s imminent decay, and I sulked about in a cable-knit sweater like an archduke of rapturous sadness, reveling in the wonder of impermanence and desperately hoping that girls would sense the depth of my inner life and find my brooding thrilling. Suffice to say, I did not date cheerleaders. (Note to all you cheerleaders: This is no knock on you. I just didn’t ever run into you walking through the woods at dusk reciting verses from The Waste Land. You were probably at practice, or happy hour, or finding new ways to tie your hair up with those oversized scrunchies and hair clips that were so popular in the `80s. To be fair, I never ran into girls of any sort in the crepuscular forest, not even the poetesses. No doubt they were at happy hour as well.) That type of dolorous ego-gazing only takes you so far. Like to about 25, maybe 30 years of age if you’re pushing it, and you have a deep collection of tweed jackets, a trust fund, an advanced degree in literature, or you live in your parents’ basement. Any two of those four should be enough to carry you all the way to the grave in a pose of entropic pensiveness. When I gave up on sorrow, I needed to find a new favorite season. Fall was too freighted with embarrassing memories of my own pretension and I couldn’t quite bring myself to muster the unalloyed enthusiasm for pumpkin picking, candied apples, and college football required by true devotees of autumn. If I had not re-enacted the Agony of Defeat highlight from the opening montage of “Wide World of Sports” the first time I tried snowboarding, perhaps winter might have been the ticket. 14 CHRONOGRAM 8/14

And as for spring, forget it—it’s mostly hype. A couple of crocuses as a sign that the dark, cold winter is behind us and I’m supposed to swoon? What about the mudfest of March? The tepid shittiness of April? The late frosts of May? Spring is going to need to work harder than that to win me over. If ever a season overpromises and underdelivers, it’s spring. This leaves summer, that sublime season whose pleasures I denied for so long. Which makes it sound like the season of last resort, but this is so not so. Before my phase as a poetaster, back when I was but a wee lad, I wholeheartedly indulged in the luxuriousness of July and August, running wild with the neighborhood kids, playing every ball and board game ever invented and making up new ones as well. The long days stretched out like the pure possibility of fun and adventure. Though I sit at a desk full-time and cannot roam free through the sultry, sunny days like a feral youth, I still treasure this time of sultry, sunny days outside my window. Summer is the time of year when joy feels baked into the blood. The birds are singing the sun up at 5:30 and there’s even enough time after work to worship that fiery orb that gave rise to life on Earth for a couple hours. The giddy excitement of just existing outside in shorts and a T-shirt is irresistible. The season feels like all possibilities realized. This is all just to say: Summer will be over before you realize. Gather ye swims in the ocean, bicycle rides on the rail trail, pageants of puppetry, al fresco dinners, wiffle ball tournaments, drive-in movies, music festivals, epic water balloon fights, visits to the farmers’ market, performances of outdoor Shakespeare, Chronogram block parties, soapbox derbies, and hootenannies. It’ll be winter soon enough, and you’ll be getting Rosebud out of the garage. Spoiler alert: Rosebud is the sled.


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Editor Brian K. Mahoney hosts Chronogram Conversations, a podcast of in-depth chatter with Hudson Valley movers and shakers.

The event will take place in the in the Cary Institute auditorium. For more information, call (845) 677- 7600 x 121. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. (photo: Larry Weaner Landscape Associates)

our trails are open for the season From April 1 to October 31 our grounds are open from sunrise to sunset. We invite visitors to explore parts of our 2,000-acre campus. Hike along Wappinger Creek, picnic among native ferns, bike our internal roadways, or watch birds in a sedge meadow. (photo: David Markman)

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© MICHAELA REHLE / REUTERS

According to recent energy reports, Germany and the United Kingdom generated record-breaking levels of solar electricity in the sunny weeks of June. The Solar Trade Association of the UK has claimed that the state has nearly doubled its solar capacity since July of last year; of the 530,000 solar photovoltaic (PV) systems now in the UK, 510,000 of them are installed in small, private homes. Germany boasts a whopping 1.4 million PV systems, on June 9 having generated 23.1 gigawatt-hours (GWh)—a little over half of its total electricity demand. The entire continent has increased its installed solar capacity by 16 percent since last year, with Italy, Romania, and Greece also making strides in renewable energy. The Earth Policy Institute in Washington has suggested that China, the US, Canada, and Japan also saw huge growth in 2013. After having raised its PV capacity to 11.3GW, China now stands second behind Germany as a generator of solar power. The US augmented its output from 4.8 to 12GW—a margin of 65 percent. The solar industry is expected to continue growing by at least 20 percent a year, encouraging job creation and providing clean energy to consumers. Source: Guardian (UK) You might think twice about jumping in the Hudson on a hot day this month. Riverkeeper recently released its annual “How’s the Water?” report and revealed that the quality of swimming conditions in the Hudson River varies depending on where and when you’re in the water. With the aid of scientists from CUNY Queens College and Columbia University’s Lamont Doherty Earth Conservatory, Riverkeeper collects water samples to test for Enteroccus, a bacteria linked to sewage and fecal contamination. The nonprofit uses the results of these tests to determine the safety of water in the Hudson River and its tributaries. According to the report, 8 percent of Mid-Hudson samples failed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria for safe swimming. While Poughkeepsie waterfronts are impressively clean—92 percent of samples from Waryas Park and 97 percent at the Water Treatment Plant tested safe—the Newburgh boat launch failed in over half of its samples. Smaller tributaries also returned disappointing results; 100 percent of samples taken from the Wallkill River in Orange County and New Paltz failed to meet EPA standards. Water samples were three times more likely to fail if collected after rainfall, suggesting a need for improved waste and sewer management. Source: Poughkeepsie Journal According to the 2014 UN Millennium Development Goals report, India is home to one-third of the 1.2 billion extreme poor worldwide. In addition to a high prevalence of poverty, the country saw 1.4 million children die before reaching the age of five in 2012—more than half the under-five deaths of any other—as well as 17 percent of global maternal deaths. Although poverty rates across Southern Asia have fallen since the 1990s, India’s improvement has been much slower than that of other countries. Between 1994 and 2010, it only saw a reduction in poverty from 49.4 percent to 32.7 percent. Despite its high levels of poverty and low standards of living, South Asia has seen a marked increase in school enrollment and literacy in the past few years. From 1990 to 2011, the region’s youth literacy rates grew from 60 to 80 percent. The Indian government under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has acknowledged poverty as its greatest challenge but is confident that it will be overcome. Source: Times of India 8/14 16 CHRONOGRAM 8/14

On Saturday, July 5, New York became the 23rd state to legalize the medical use of marijuana. The State Assembly and Senate passed the bill in June, but not before careful debate. Legislators wanted to be sure that the bill, while subscribing to increasing evidence of the drug’s medical benefits, would clearly discourage and condemn attempts to defraud the system for recreational purposes. The piece of legislation permits the treatment of 10 serious conditions with cannabis, including cancer, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, and epilepsy. New Yorkers who suffer from such conditions are relieved by the bill, but some fear it will take too long to implement—before marijuana becomes available for treatment, the state’s health department will spend 18 months drafting regulations for its production and distribution. Governor Cuomo signed the bill into law with the assertion that “if there is a medical advancement, then we want to make sure that we’re bringing it to New Yorkers.” He was clear, however, on the bill’s stringency: it will be a felony for doctors to knowingly prescribe the drug to anyone unregistered or ineligible, and the governor has the right to terminate the program the moment any threat to public safety is detected. Sources: CNN, Daily News The Bank for International Settlements (BIS) in Basel, Switzerland has released an annual report warning that record-low interest rates and high levels of debt in emerging markets could lead to another financial crisis. According to the organization, which represents central banks around the world, investors have driven up the prices of stocks and assets in an attempt to earn returns, creating dangerous new economic bubbles. Many perceive financial markets to be in a particularly “euphoric” period, but the BIS report suggests that keeping interests rates so low could perpetuate increasing debt levels—the same phenomenon that ultimately led to a global crisis in 2007. The BIS believes governments should take more action to improve the productivity of their economies and that banks should raise capital to hasten recovery from the recent crisis. The report also criticizes global corporations, which, in spite of booming stock markets, haven’t been focusing on long-term investment. While low-interest capital may seem like an attractive and immediate means of market growth, national central banks fear that relying on debt—especially in a global economy that is still recovering—is taking too great a risk. Sources: Financial Times (UK), New York Times Douglas Chase of Acton, Massachusetts, was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2011. He was able to get treatment, but only in Boston, which meant he had to take a long ambulance ride into the city. Since he was a veteran of the Vietnam War, his wife, Suzanne, tried to move his medical care to the Veterans Affairs hospital in nearby Bedford. They waited about four months and never heard anything. Chase died in August 2012. In June of this year, he got a letter from the VA in Bedford, saying he could now call to make an appointment to see a primary care doctor. At the bottom of the letter it read: “We are committed to providing primary care in a timely manner and would greatly appreciate a prompt response.” Following her husband’s death, Suzanne Chase applied for funeral benefits, but was denied. The reason: her husband had never been treated at a VA hospital. Source: CBS News State media censors in Singapore have banned the sale of an Archie comic book for its frank presentation of gay marriage, a matter that remains socially taboo and illegal in Southeast Asia’s most developed state. Singapore’s Media Development Authority (MDA) censored the comic book, first published in January 2012, earlier this year. The comic in question was the third installment in Archie: The Married Life, one of several spinoff series in the multifarious Archie universe, which features the wedding of Kevin Keller, a gay soldier who was introduced as the Obama administration was deliberating the end of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. In its guidelines for imported publications, the MDA prohibits comics and other illustrated material that depict or discuss “alternative lifestyles or deviant sexual practices.” The country ranks 149th of the 179 countries listed in the 2013 Press Freedom Index, earning it the distinction of having the least free press of any developed economy in the world. The news broke just days after Archie was killed off by taking a bullet meant for Kevin, now a senator campaigning for gun control. Source: Time Compiled by David King and Iana Robitaille


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DION OGUST

Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

DEMOCRACY: HERE TODAY, GONE TOMORROW?

T

here’s a small host of organizations that watch and rank democracies. At the moment, there’s a bunch of books and all sorts of huffing and puffing that there are wolves at the door, on the roof, sneaking down through chimney, or even already inside, ready to blow down the houses of democracy. In very broad strokes, here’s the story. At the beginning of the last century there were only about 10 democracies in the world. If your definition of democracy requires universal suffrage, then there were none. According to Michael Mandelbaum, writing for the US State Department, “by mid-century the number [of democracies] had increased to 30, and 25 years later it remained there.” It’s hard to tell which of the Latin American and Caribbean countries are included in that count. Most of their democracies were temporary affairs, usually overturned by military coups, which were frequently backed by the United States. It’s also hard to tell which of the postcolonial African and Asian countries might or might not be counted. Most of the newly liberated African and Middle Eastern nations passed swiftly from democracies to autocracies. Then, in 1989, the Berlin Wall came down. The nations of Eastern Europe quickly broke from Moscow, tossed out the ruling Communists, and instantly became democracies. That was followed by the collapse of Soviet Union into 15 separate countries. All of them, including Russia, announced they would become democracies. The Cold War had been won. It is impossible to overstate the confidence, the certainty, the sense of virtue and moral superiority that came from swilling down the full flagon of victory. “The triumph of the West, of the Western idea, is evident first of all in the total exhaustion of viable systematic alternatives to Western liberalism,” wrote political scientist Francis Fukuyama in “The End of History?”, written when he was deputy director of the State Department planning staff during the first Bush Administration. “What we may be witnessing in not just the end of the Cold War, or the passing of a particular period of postwar history, but the end of history as such: that is, the end point of mankind’s ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government.” There were still two large blocks of resistance: the Arab world and Communist China (along with a few Southeast Asian nations of not much consequence). In America’s glory days, before TV was even in color, our leading food product was Wonder Bread, the whitest of sliced, packaged, white breads. Its slogan was “Wonder Bread builds strong bodies 8 ways.” Well, free markets do the same for democracy, according to Mandelbaum, in four different ways: 1. Free markets require the institution of private property, “itself a form of liberty.” 2. “Free markets generate wealth.” Which is true. They also generate extreme instability, which led to the whole mess with Nazis and Fascists, and free markets contributed hugely to the power of Communism while it lasted. Dangers aside, the theory is that people with money have the time for politics and insofar as “wealth” means creating a middle class, that’s the group that’s regarded as the bedrock of democracies. 3. “The free market is the core of civil society.” Civil society is defined as organizations separate from government that constitute balancing forces. There might be some truth to that. Unfortunately the examples Mandelbaum gives are religious associations (which obviously pre-exist market economies and currently exist in all sorts of autocracies), professional associations

18 CHRONOGRAM 8/14

(which all came into being long ago and far away), and labor unions (which free market systems work hard to destroy—look at the United States today or before FDR). 4. “The free market cultivates two habits that are essential for democratic politics. One is trust.” Obviously Mandelbaum missed the first day of capitalism class where they teach caveat emptor, or “buyer beware,” and never dealt with Hollywood, which is where Ronald Reagan learned “trust but verify,” which means that nothing counts unless it’s in the contract and that nothing is true until it happens. The other “market-fostered habit that is crucial is compromise.” Is that the only way to figure out that a compromise is better than a fight to the death? Perhaps. “Ah, so,” said the mega-strategists of the West, China has already begun to move toward a market system. The prevailing ideology actually ran deeper than the Mandelbaum-type precursor theories. Free-dom and Free-Markets were something between synonyms and Siamese twins. Try to cut them apart and all meaning would be lost and both halves would die. Free markets would necessarily lead to democracy which would necessarily make them our buddies. The Chinese turned that inside out. They went all in on capitalism, but stayed totally authoritarian in government. It was not supposed to work. But it did. Actually, it was worse. The economies of China, and the China Lites, like Vietnam and Singapore, have been outperforming the United States, Western Europe, and Japan. A large part of the secret of their success is their state-driven economies. The state picks target sectors, gives financial and technical support, and practices protectionism. This is how Japan and South Korea established themselves. So did the United States in the 19th century. They require business choices to be made in the interest of the well-being of the nation. In the US and Britain, that’s ideological heresy and a political anathema, because corporate and financial interests are powerful enough to insist that policies should only be made for their own good. As for the Arab situation, the belief was that one good regime change was all that was needed. The flourishing free market democracy that would automatically ensue would be so attractive that all the neighbors would rush to imitate it, like 1950s American consumers running out to compete for the latest home appliances. They actually doubled down and had two invasions— Afghanistan and Iraq. By then, the War on Terror was in full bloom. So when the Arabs revolted from the ground up, the mechanisms for counterrevolution were all geared up and ready to come out shooting. Which they did. Meantime, after a bout of extreme gangster capitalism, the Russians were delighted to have an authoritarian leader who would create some level of order. The five post-Soviet states of Central Asia went directly to authoritarianism and the Southern Caucasus and the East Central European states did not do too much better. Finally, there was the Crash of ’08. The Great Democracies, particularly the US and the EU, proved themselves to be the grip of some great ineptitude. Or to be in service to the banks. Or have logjammed themselves with politics that only work when the water’s high and everything is rushing along of its own volition. Disillusion has set in. Are we ready to seek out better models? Commiecapitalist China? Action figure Putin? The corporate-ready city state of Singapore? That is, if we’re not to apathetic to vote.


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2nd Annual Chronogram Block Party August 16, 4-11pm Wall Street between North Front and John Streets, Kingston

Photo credits left to right: David Morris Cunningham, Mike Amari, Bob Krasner

Join us for the second-annual Chronogram Block Party! Last year, 3,500 people helped us celebrate 20 years of Chronogram with our first bash. The free, family-friendly event is now a yearly opportunity for Chronogram readers to get together and enjoy some music, fun, food and drink, and community in front of the magazines offices in the historic Stockade District in Uptown Kingston.

LIVE MUSIC 4:15pm Opening procession down Wall Street with the Rosendale Improvement Association Brass Band & Social Club. The band is comprised of professional and amateur musicians who make music together with instruments of all shapes and sizes. 5:00pm Ratboy Jr. The Hudson Valley “kindie” duo of Tim Sutton and Matt Senzatimore play fun, upbeat tunes the whole family can enjoy. 6:00pm Breakfast in Fur These New Paltz psychedelic folk-rockers channel equal parts Sigur Ros, and the Beach Boys via ethereal harmonies. 7:00pm The Tins This three-piece indie outfit crafts tight melodies that recalls sounds from The Kinks to Animal Collective. 8:00pm Ikebe Shakedown Groove to some bumping bass and slick riffs with this hornheavy Brooklyn-based Afro-Funk collective. 9:30pm Bishop Allen Fronted by actor Justin Rice and OkCupid cofounder Christian Rudder, these Kingston-based pop-rockers kick off their “Lights Out” tour at the Block Party. 11:00pm Lagunitas Dance Party at BSP Kingston Join Lagunitas Brewing Company for a free after-hours dancing at BSP Kingston, with live Afropop and Latin jazz beats from Woodstock’s own Mambo Kikongo.

STREET ENTERTAINMENT Bindlestiff Family Cirkus Join members of the cirkus for some Vaudevillian, old-timey circus entertainment: clowning, unicycling, fire-eating, and more! Catskill Art & Office Supply DIY Art Tent 5-8pm Try your hand at some sidewalk art, sport a few temporary tattoos, grab a small canvas to paint and bring home, and design your very own Chronogram cover. And before you call it a night, unroll our giant scroll and leave us a message. Dunking Booth 5-8pm Aim for the target to benefit Angel Food East, a nonprofit organization that serves daily, hot meals to Ulster County residents living with HIV and AIDS. Plus: All-day, free massages from Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa and a Beach Ball Drop at 10pm.

FOOD TRUCKS Grab a bite from one (or several) of our food trucks. Local eats from Black-Eyed Suzie’s (changing seasonal menu), Black Forest Flammkuchen Co. (German-style flatbread ), Pippy’s Hot Dog Truck (bespoke hot dogs and sides), Amanda’s on Wheels (gourmet sandwiches and sides), Arkansas Tom (traditional BBQ), and Lakeside Licks (soft-serve ice cream and sundaes).

BEER, WINE, & CIDER GARDEN Enjoy adult party beverages among friends old and new, with select brews and bottles from Lagunitas Brewing Company, Keegan Ales, Whitecliff Vineyard & Winery, and Doc’s Draft Hard Cider from Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery.

EXCLUSIVE DISTILLERY TASTING From 6-9pm, sample local spirits from Black Dirt Distillery, Catskill Distilling Company, Hudson Valley Distillers, Dutch’s Spirits, and Coppersea Distillery in an exclusive event at Stockade Martial Arts, 302 Wall Street. Tickets are $10 and available on Eventbrite. Only 300 tickets available.

For updates and more information, visit ChronogramBlockParty.com 20 CHRONOGRAM 8/14


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The House

Artist’s Retreat AN ARCHITECT-DESIGNED STUDIO IN ANCRAM By Jennifer Farley Photographs by Deborah DeGraffenreid

W

hen painter Susan Roth elected to convert the tractor garage of her Craftsman-style 1987 farmhouse in Ancram into a 500-square-foot art studio, she decided to invest enough in the project to hire an architect. Roth is a self-taught painter who used to work in the computer industry in New York. Since retiring in 2004, she has devoted herself to painting, and had a show in July at Manna Dew Café in Millerton, one of her favorite restaurants. Roth and husband Matt Cohen, a retired attorney, bought their fourbedroom, two-and-one-half bath home in Ancram, located in the southeastern section of Columbia County, in 2000. With a population of about 1,500, and a location that’s 20 miles from Hudson and 50 miles from Albany, Ancram’s become a popular retreat for people who own second homes; Roth and Cohen also keep an apartment in Manhattan. “I had been painting for years in a narrow breezeway off the kitchen,” says Roth. “That space has large windows facing north, with a view of farmland plus mountains in the distance, so I had some idea of how I wanted the studio to be oriented. There, I could only see a sliver of the scarlet oak I planted in honor of my late mother; now, it takes center stage of the view from my new studio!” 22 HOME CHRONOGRAM 8/14

One of Roth’s friends had hired Millbrook-based Sloan Architects PC to renovate an old farmhouse in Milan, and recommended the husband-and-wife firm. So Roth contacted Michael Sloan, and although the project wasn’t large, the architect, who has designed several visual arts centers, was excited about the opportunity to make the most of the view and light. Sloan said he also felt that he and Roth communicated well, and for that reason the studio project might be great for the firm’s portfolio, to help attract future small-project clients who might otherwise hesitate to hire an architect. Old Ancram, the Hoysradts, and Designing with Resale in Mind “As soon as Susan showed me the space, I knew we could really do something great with the view,” says Sloan. “But we did a lot more than just throw up a few casement windows and finish an empty shell. She really let us run with the design. She’s an artist and respects that type of creativity in others.” The Roth-Cohen home sits on land that had belonged to the locally prominent Hoysradt family for 12 generations. It was built for Pat and Helen Hoysradt by their son, a local builder. The Hoysradt parcel dates to 1796 and the original farmhouse can be seen from the Roth-Cohen home on Poole Hill Road. The Hoysradts currently live in a house built on one of the last parcels of the family tract.


Above: A view of the living room from the second floor. Below: Belen Millan and Frank Marrazzo preparing a mean in the kitchen. Opposite: Susan Roth’s painting studio viewed at dusk. This page: Three views of the interior of Roth’s studio.

8/14 CHRONOGRAM HOME 23


Above: The tree Roth planted in memory of her mother stands across the field from her studio. Below: A recent opening at Roth’s studio.

24 HOME CHRONOGRAM 8/14


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The town takes its name from the Livingston Homestead in Anchoram, Scotland; the aristocratic Livingston family was granted 160,000 acres in this part of the Hudson Valley by the English Crown in 1686, including the 27,000 acres that now comprise Ancram. The Hoysradt property was part of that grant. Ancram used to be called “Scotchtown” due to the large number of Scottish immigrants who relocated to the area in the 18th century.The town’s metal forge made the huge chain stretched across the Hudson River near West Point to block British ships during the American Revolution. “Coming from New York, I really appreciate being able to peek at the farm life here—people living off the land and eating local. There is a peacefulness to life here; the countryside totally inspires my work; people are genuine. We enjoy going to farmers’ markets. When we dine out, it’s Manna Dew or Nine in Millerton, or Red Devon, a farm-to-table market café in Bangall. And we love Hammertown, a home and lifestyle store in Pine Plains,” says Roth. Sloan says that the project location in Ancram, with all its early-American nuance, appealed to him, too. ”I’m descended from a family that has been in Millbrook since the 1700s,” says Sloan. “A good architect can work with any style, but what you want to do with a contemporary addition like this is to create a space that, first of all, serves the client’s needs, then looks right for the area in some way, and, finally, you also want to have designed something that makes sense for resale. Susan’s art studio might someday be someone else’s home office, or a music room. Attached but separate, there’s no need to trudge through the snow to get to it in the winter, either.” The Details Roth declined to say how much she spent on transforming the third garage bay into a first-class art studio, only adding that, due to unforeseen circumstances, the project went over budget. The studio was built by Reed Construction; some of the crew had constructed the main house 35 years earlier. “Without my husband’s support, this would have never happened. He had a keen sensitivity to my need for a private workspace,” says Roth. The couple traveled to northern India in 2011 and southern India in 2012, in part to provide Roth with inspiration for the vivid colors and fairly abstract shapes characterizing her most recent paintings. Sloan said that the architect’s fee for a project like this would run about 10 percent of the total cost because it did not involve complex custom millwork or bespoke bronze hardware casting—common requests for his firm—which would push the design fee closer to 20 percent. “We recommend clients familiarize themselves with our work, and also that of other architects, and perhaps get several proposals before committing. You want to make sure you and the architect are a good fit,” says Sloan. “Similarly, good architects don’t just draft a project and hand it over to the contractor; they keep track of the construction side of things, including making sure costs stay in line. In some instances, hiring an architect may actually save the client money.” The Roth studio features large aluminum storefront windows made by YKK AP America, Inc. The track lighting fixtures were manufactured by Lightolier. The floor is plywood, with a clear finish, so any paint spills won’t be tragic. The cathedral ceiling is faced with pine boards. And to keep the room comfortable in all seasons, behind the neat façade is an abundance of sprayed foam insulation. Roth and Sloan both stressed the importance of the cathedral ceiling to the overall style and functionality of the studio. “I like to work large, and the high ceiling gives me plenty of space to display works in progress, which is important to me because I typically work on several pieces at the same time,” says Roth. “The cathedral ceiling also enhances and softens the quality of the light entering the space,” says Sloan. “That’s why most visual arts centers have as much interior volume as possible, because when you have low ceilings and small windows, the light can be rather harsh, as opposed to diffuse. In Susan’s studio, she can really see the colors with which she is working very clearly and accurately.” To see examples of Roth’s artwork, visit Susanrothartist.com. To learn more about Sloan Architects, go to Sloanarch.com.

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AUGUST 16 Art House Upstate Films, Woodstock A documentary by photographer and filmmaker Don Freeman, Art House explores the phenomenon of artists designing and crafting their own homes.The film reveals how artists apply the creativity and inventiveness of their respective disciplines to construct houses, allowing themselves to live inside their art. Freeman profiles such famous homes as Frederic Church’s Olana, Henry Mercer’s Fontill, and the Woodstock artists’ colony Byrdcliffe.The film will screen at 2pm. (845) 679-207 Woodstockguild.org

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AUGUST 16 Morning Light Innisfree Garden, Millbrook The creation of artist Walter Beck and his landscape architect, Lester Collins, Innisfree Garden is a vision of 20th-century design. Arrive one hour before sunrise for special opportunity to admire and photograph the garden’s flowers in the golden morning light—seasonal highlights will include lotus, water lilies, and mallows. Spend the rest of the day strolling the garden’s paths, finding peace in its careful balance of water, earth, and sky. (845) 677-8000 Innisfreegarden.org

AUGUST 19-24 Dutchess County Fair Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck New York’s second-largest county fair returns with 162 acres of beautiful themed gardens. The fair’s horticulture building, home to some of the most impressive flower and garden shows in the HudsonValley, will put on a program of events with a “Backyard Paradise” theme this year. Admire the displays of local florists and landscapers, and attend workshops such as “Rainwater Harvesting,” “Pond Maintenance,” and “Design Ideas for Your Yard or Garden.” Open 10am to 10pm daily. (845) 876-4000 Dutchessfair.com

AUGUST 31 Columbia-Greene Garden Party Ludlow Homestead, Claverack For celebrity talent agent Brian Swardstrom and actor/writer Peter Spears, restoring historic Hudson Valley estates has become something of a hobby.Their home at the Ludlow Homestead is a stunning example, and this year it will play host to the AIDS Council of Northeastern New York’s annual garden party. The upscale event will offer gourmet refreshments, a silent auction of one-of-a-kind items, and the rare opportunity to visit the property and its gardens. 3 to 6pm. (518) 434-4686 Aidscouncil.org 8/14 CHRONOGRAM HOME 29


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The Garden

Clockwise from top left: Geraniums, marigolds, and zinnias all benefit from having their spent flowers pinched or snipped off.

Pinch Me Again and Again, and I Will Reward You By Michelle Sutton Photos by Larry Decker

W

hen you buy your petunias, geraniums, and other annuals from a good grower in May, the plants are bushy and prolifically blooming. By midsummer, they often look leggy and the blooming has dropped off. A sense of personal failure can set in: “What happened to my beautiful flower boxes/flower pots/annual beds?” I believe that this experience with annuals is the reason why a lot of people give up on gardening and decide they “don’t have a green thumb.” But it’s not their fault. Plants should come with instruction—much more instruction than “Sun or Shade” and “18 inches tall.” My fantasy is that every garden center, box store, and nursery would have an in-house educator who you could see on your way out for pithy advice delivered in an infectiously enthusiastic fashion. Oh—and they would not be trying to sell you products you don’t need. This is not altogether a fantasy; in the Hudson Valley, we are lucky to have independent garden centers and plant nurseries that provide hands-on education (and we should support those that do!). Snips for Success Keep in mind that in greenhouse production, the grower has provided those annuals with the ideal conditions of light, quality potting mix, fertilizer, water, and lots and lots of pinching. It takes some fussing on your part to keep the plants looking like they did the day you brought them home. A huge part of that fuss is 1) pinching back stems in order to keep the plant bushy by encouraging lateral branching and 2) pinching off, or deadheading, spent flowers.

When we pinch off spent flowers, the plant says to itself, “I didn’t get to set seed; I gotta produce more flowers, stat!” Petunias are an example of a plant that benefits from both pinching stems and deadheading flowers. Fortunately, pinching and deadheading are relaxing and gratifying because they work so well. For my pinching I use a pair of $12 microblade pinching shears that is designed for this purpose. It makes it easy to home in on the right place to snip and to not overdo—if I use larger pruners for pinching, I sometimes inadvertently snip adjacent flowers or stems. The pinching shears are precise and fun to use. On the other end of the spectrum from tiny shears, I’m reminded of my beloved, irreverent herbaceous plants professor, Dr. Lyons, and what he taught us to do when faced with a bed of petunias that had become leggy and sparsely blooming. We newbies watched, mouths agape, as he brought out the weed whacker and used it to shear off the top half of all the petunias. The plants looked like heck for about 10 days, but after the whack and some deep watering and a modest infusion of granular fertilizer, the petunia beds rebounded like a hundred purple rising Phoenixes. If your annuals are really far gone like the petunias of Dr. Lyons’s class, you can consider a hard prune, via weed whacker or other, less dramatic means. Mohonk Mountain House Greenhouse Grower Cheryl Hearty says, “I have noticed that new gardeners especially are hesitant to prune annuals and perennials. It is okay to prune plants that are straggly, floppy, too tall, or look awful after blooming heavily. Have faith that your plants will come back better than before!” 8/14 CHRONOGRAM HOME 31


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The question arises, where to cut? Think junctures. For pinching stems, go back to just above a juncture where a lateral stem meets the main stem. For deadheading flowers, study your plant to observe the difference between how flower buds and seed pods look, so that you don’t inadvertently remove flower buds. For deadheading flowers, I like to snip back to a juncture as well, like where the flower stalk meets the main stem on a petunia or a geranium. Some people just pop off the dead flowers and don’t worry if a flower stalk is left behind. That’s fine, too, depending on your aesthetic preferences. Self-Cleaning Annuals (with a Question Mark) Annuals breeders are seeking to provide the market with “self-cleaning” plants, those whose spent flowers drop off naturally and don’t require pinching. The ubiquitous Supertunia series of petunias is supposed to be self-cleaning, but I find that for optimum summer-long bloom and fullness I still have to deadhead flowers and cut back stems to keep the plants bushy. Cheryl Hearty says, “I have had the same experience with petunias—keeping them trimmed and well fed throughout the summer keeps them looking fresh. A few annuals that I think truly are self-cleaning, however, are alyssum, lantana, New Guinea impatiens, the Sunpatiens (a series of impatiens for full sun), the Superbena series of verbena, and the ‘Gartenmeister Bonstedt’ fuchsia (most other fuchsias tend to require deadheading). I am also a huge fan of foliage plants like coleus, alternanthera, ornamental sweet potato vine, and purple heart/setcreasea because they add color and texture and are very low maintenance.”’ Some annuals “bury their dead,” meaning new flowers come on quickly and hide faded flowers, so no pinching or deadheading is necessary. These include the excellent Artist series of ageratum, African daisies, and creeping zinnias. Perennials and Pinching Perennials can be pinched and deadheaded too. I asked Cheryl Hearty about the perennials she finds most worth her effort. She says, “I guess I am a bit of a neat freak, so I make an effort to regularly deadhead perennials. Disease prevention is important, especially with peonies; petals that fall on leaves can cause a Botrytis [fungal] infection.” She continues, “Shearing back plants like catmint, dianthus (pinks), and candytuft after bloom is very much worth the effort because they come back quickly and look much less ratty. There are many perennials that have the capacity to rebloom if you kept them deadheaded, like yarrow, daylilies, veronica, salvia, coreopsis, and black-eyed Susans.” Hearty says, “Some perennials have interesting seed pods that are ornamental and worth leaving on. Two of my favorites are pasque flower and gas plant. The pasque flowers have a fluffy seed pod that is quite beautiful, especially after a rain, when tiny droplets of water cling to them and sparkle in the sun. The gas plant has an interesting star-shaped pod that turns brown but looks great until the end of the season.” (Wear gloves when working with gas plant, however, as flowers and leaves can cause a skin rash.)

The Cornell Flower Growing Guides advise you on whether to pinch or deadhead more than 250 types of annual and perennial flowers. So for instance, for snapdragons: “Pinch tips when plants are 2 to 4 inches tall to produce more flower spikes. Cutting flowers as they mature will encourage plants to produce more flowers later in the season. Deadhead to prolong flowering.” For the biennial foxglove: “Deadhead when about three-fourths of the flower spike has faded. Cut back to basal rosettes after flowering has finished. Leave a few flower spikes if you want plants to reseed.” This kind of specificity around the pinching and deadheading, and all facets of plant culture, makes these guides a treasure. Resources Cornell Cooperative Extension Gardening Site Gardening.cornell.edu Cornell Flower Growing Guides Tinyurl.com/lz6ve4a Mohonk Mountain House Greenhouse Tinyurl.com/k68xer7

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Top row from left: Amanda and Alex excavate and sift the earth for an archaeological dig at Historic Huguenot Street in New Paltz; Paris Leach, Bryan Moon,and Madi Taylor head to the Moriello Pool; Carissa Cancel and Andrew Frey. Middle row from left: Cheyenne and Chelsie await their next group at Historic Huguenot Street where the two give guided tours; Chris and Mary celebrating their anniversary in New Paltz; Emma Huibregtse enjoys a cup of ice cream in downtown New Paltz after skydiving in Gardiner. Bottom row from left: Jack’s Rhythms; Allison Duffy on Main Street.

34 NEW PALTZ CHRONOGRAM 8/14


Thomas Smith takes in the view from the West Trapps in the Mohonk Preserve.

Community Pages

DOWNTOWN & GOWN NEW PALTZ

PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS SMITH

Y

ou can’t truly understand New Paltz until you take a stroll down Main Street.The central thoroughfare winds it sinewy way from Thruway Exit 18 past a couple of strip malls and then to the heart of downtown, a cluster of 100-year-old buildings leaning toward the Wallkill River. This eclectic community of restaurants, boutiques, record shops, bars, and spectrum of sophisticated-to-funky retail stores reflect New Paltz’s two main character traits: college town and tourist destination. Walking down the sidewalk past Elting Library you come to P&Gs, a bar and restaurant that’s a favorite of the college students who occupy the town from August to May every year. Then there’s the Main Street Bistro, a standingroom-only breakfast spot on weekends. Further along, you’ll pass the Groovy Blueberry, a clothing store specializing in tie-dye apparel. At the bottom of the hill there’s Water Street Market, an open-air shopping center stocked with galleries, gourmet food stores, restaurants and bars, and the massive Antiques Barn. The micro-bar Jar’d is a favorite watering hole for locals. Across the Wallkill River Main Street turns into Route 299, cutting through the rich farmland that has been plowed and planted for centuries since before the town’s founding by local Native American tribes. And in the distance, the Shawangunk Ridge rises above the land, dominating the view. The New Paltz that we know grew out of the dreams and labor of 12 French Huguenot families seeking a safe haven from the religious persecution they faced in their homeland. Following in the footsteps of the Pilgrims, the Huguenots took the perilous transatlantic voyage to find refuge in the New World.They settled briefly in Kingston before establishing their New Paltz home in 1678. They purchased 30,000 acres of land along the Wallkill River from the local Esopus Tribe, divided the property amongst the families, started their own church, and built their first houses out of wood before constructing more permanent dwellings out of stone. Those houses still stand (forming the backbone of the Historic Huguenot Street historic district), and the church they founded still has an active congregation, but today New Paltz is an eclectic mix of agriculture, academia,

tourist trap, and Woodstock-lite. Above all else, it is a quintessential college town. For the past several years, SUNY New Paltz has been in a near constant state of expansion, spilling onto former apple orchards to accommodate the demand for new housing and facilities, boosting the local economy. This hasn’t been without controversy, as tensions have mounted recently over tax incentives from Ulster County for the college’s proposed Park Point housing project. The Town Planning Board has blocked the project from moving forward and the developer sued the town in June. The town won’t be facing any shortage of farmland soon however, as venerable family farms thrive in New Paltz. Wallkill View Farm, along the bank of the river, farms some of the same land the Huguenots did. It is joined by other family farms, including Dressel Farms and Jenkins and Lueken Orchards, whose pick-yourown-apple orchard is a popular tourist draw in the fall. Tourists flock to the town to take advantage of the hiking, biking and rock climbing opportunities at Mohonk Preserve, as well as the swimming, hiking and biking at Minnewaska State Park. A symbol of the town recognized around the world, the unvarnished natural beauty of the Shawangunk Ridge has always inspired in its residents a sense of awe and environmental stewardship. In the early 2000s, committed residents of the town waged a “Save the Ridge” campaign to protest a proposed housing development on the ridge. This land was later added to Minnewaska State Park. A generation earlier grassroots pressure helped convince the state to establish a park at Lake Minnewaska. Grassroots activism was also integral to stopping the construction of a Wal-Mart in town in the mid `90s. With its white rocky ridges rises out of lush forest and protected status, its no wonder that the Nature Conservancy describes the Shawangunk Ridge as one of the Earth’s “Last Great Places.” In the autumn, the leaves turn all imaginable shades of red, yellow, and orange, and when the sun sets over it just right the view can leave even the most hardened cynic understanding why this place touches so many different people. —David King 8/14 CHRONOGRAM NEW PALTZ 35


This page: Diving into the pool at the Ulster County Fairgrounds. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Kyle Ryan, Eric Mann, Alexander Peyser, and Liam Browne; Lifegaurd Mary Torsone; Kerry Kotalik and Isabella Carlini; Amelia Crisafi.

36 NEW PALTZ CHRONOGRAM 8/14


8/14 CHRONOGRAM NEW PALTZ 37


Top row, left to right: Nina, Toro, and Naia Personius in downtown New Paltz; Isiah Wynn catches a lift from John Pederson; Jae Ki Cho and Sijeo Kim visit New Paltz from New York City. Middle row left to right: Rebecca, Sylas, Brian, and Sebastian at Water Street Market; A New Paltz historical marker in front of Elting Library; John House and his daughter Magnolia at Water Street Market. Bottom row: Sam Boergesson plays a game of chess at Water Street Market.

38 NEW PALTZ CHRONOGRAM 8/14


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10 Things to Know About

New Paltz

New Paltz was founded by French Huguenots in 1678. Seven of the stone houses built by the families on what is now called Huguenot Street are preserved and managed by the Huguenot Street Historical Society. It has been called the oldest continuously inhabited street in the country. President Franklin Roosevelt was a direct descendent of one of the town’s founders, Antoine Crispell, one of the 12 original patentees often referred to as The Duzine (French for “dozen”). The Roosevelts visited New Paltz several times, and after her husband’s death in 1945, Eleanor came every year to lecture at the college. New Paltz was briefly catapulted into the national spotlight in February 2004 when mayor Jason West, in an act of civil disobedience, violated state law and married 25 samesex couples, just four months after a Massachusetts court ruling had turned marriage equality into a hot button issue in the middle of a closely watched presidential election. In popular culture, New Paltz is named as the town Baby’s (Jennifer Grey) friend Penny Johnson goes to for an illegal abortion in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing.

Above: Russ Chapman putts for birdie on the New Paltz Public Golf Course. Below: Rock climber Duncan Spatz rappels down the cliff at the Mohonk Preserve.

Like all college towns, New Paltz is home to a variety of bars and restaurants, but its most enduring is P&Gs, originally opened in 1947 in a former dance hall. The restaurant has become a local landmark, and is a favorite of students, as well as motorcyclists. The Bakery, located on North Front Street, has been the village’s go-to spot for pastry and conversation for over 30 years. Recently, new bakeries have opened, including Dohnut in Water Street Market, Lagusta’s Luscious chocolate shop on North Front Street, and Moxie Cupcake on Main Street. SUNY New Paltz has been consistently ranked as one of the best public colleges in the country, appearing on “Best Value” lists from Princeton Review and US News and World Report. It’s also earned a spot on the High Times’ Top 10 counterculture colleges. Family run farms have been a backbone of the town since its founding. One of the most popular is Walkill View Farm, run by the Ferrante family, which is well known for its pumpkin picking in the fall. The Mohonk Preserve and Minnewaska State Park are technically separate parks, but these contiguous properties protect nearly 30,000 acres of land. According to the 2012 census, New Paltz has a total population of 14,003. The SUNY New Paltz website lists the total number of graduate and undergraduate students as 7,658.

40 NEW PALTZ CHRONOGRAM 8/14


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8/14 CHRONOGRAM NEW PALTZ 41


Kids & Family

EMBRACING BOREDOM ENCOURAGING CREATIVITY THROUGH IDLENESS Story and Photo by Hillary Harvey

W

hen Dahlia’s high, bright voice calls “I’m bored, Daddy,” into the home office, Jeffrey Davis shrugs and replies, “Well, do something.” This has happened only twice in her five years. Dahlia seems to know it won’t have much consequence, aside from a little guidance toward a self-directed activity. “Seriously, the worst thing I could do as a father is to intervene and start trying to entertain her,” says Davis, an author, speaker, and creativity consultant.

42 KIDS & FAMILY CHRONOGRAM 8/14


Still, the dog days of summer take on new meaning when you’re dogged with bored kids.With the feeling of slowly passing time playing arm candy to a lack of engagement and low mood, boredom can feel a lot like depression. But is boredom something that should be cured? Psychologists say it actually serves a purpose. In order to be productive, the brain needs rest, and the tuned-out trance serves as a little nap. It filters over- or under-stimulating activities and is a signal to switch focus. But parents often feel like they’re doing a bad job if their kids are bored, and that’s often in the marketing. “From the best way to teach your child to read by age two, to how to make your nine-year-old the next David Beckham, parents are inundated with inappropriate expectations about what children can and should do,” explains Cheryl Demuth, who has a master’s degree in early childhood leadership from Bank Street and is the owner of Hillside Nursery in Kingston, a play-based learning program for six weeks through age three, in Kingston. “Superstar achievement will create a superstar life! But a child, and an adult, can be happy, healthy, and wildly successful without being the smartest, having the most friends, or being the best at everything.” Busyness vs. Idleness It’s a fine line to walk between competitive busyness and helping children to realize their own lively ambitions. “Guilt plays a big role in parents’ behavior,” says Edith Bolt, one of two head teachers at Hillside. Parents are often busy and need the kids to be otherwise occupied. They can be workaholics or addicted to screens themselves, but offering children TV and video games is a temporary solution that digs people into a deeper hole. “We live in a culture where screens are a part of our everyday life, and it’s important to teach children a balance between entertainment and personal fulfillment,” Demuth suggests. That means parents need to make friends with boredom too. Perhaps the real fear behind keeping our kids busy is our own fear of solitude. Parents see their children as an extension of themselves, so there can be a projection of loneliness and social rejection when the kids are just enjoying time to themselves. “Creativity doesn’t always look creative,” says Bolt. “It can happen in the mind, and we don’t always see that.” A child staring off into space can look like boredom, but there can be a whole world imagined. Bolt, who has a master’s degree in early childhood education, assures that boredom is not usually a sustained state for children, but she knows how difficult it can be for parents to maintain trust that their children can cope with the difficulty it presents. Teachers, too, fall prey to fixing it. “But children do need a certain amount of struggle to grow,” Bolt says. “It sounds harsh, but the best way to get kids to play, pretend, and create is to ignore them,” says Demuth. “Of course, not in a neglectful way! But in a way that sends a message that they need to figure out how to entertain themselves.” It’s actually nurturing. In much the same way parents encourage their babies with thumb-sucking and stuffed animals, older children need encouragement to self-soothe too. “A parent should not be responsible for constant companionship or entertainment for their child,” Demuth says. In working to overcome boredom, kids are developing an important set of tools: self-reliance, risk taking, time management, problem solving, and how to control impulses and develop an inner life. “It’s a little different from children at home alone,” Bolt explains. “When children become bored in the classroom, they can become more difficult to handle. They push limits, break rules, so teachers will try to keep them busy because that’s an easier way to deal with a classroom of children.” However, for parents, mimicking that perpetual busyness can be debilitating at home. “If you truly want to keep a child from becoming creative, treat them like they’re an adult—set unachievable expectations and keep them entertained constantly,” Demuth warns, ironically. She advises checking in regularly to see whether parents are teaching busyness or self-realization. “If a parent is overwhelmed with activities, then the child likely is too.” Cultivating Creativity Sometimes complaints of boredom stem from an inability to imagine an activity, either because a child is so used to being scheduled by adults or has grown accustomed to passive activities like screen time and toys that play by themselves. But sometimes the complaints reflect a child’s desire to refuel by reconnecting with the parent. “There’s a difference in the quality of complaint

MOUNTAIN LAUREL WALDORF SCHOOL

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Mountain Laurel Waldorf School offers developmentally appropriate, experiential approch to education to inspire life-long learning and enable each student to fully develop their capacities.

inspired learning WWW.MOUNTAINLAUREL.ORG 16 SOUTH CHESTNUT, NEW PALTZ, NY

845 255 0033 8/14 CHRONOGRAM KIDS & FAMILY 43


Open House All Grades October 12th, 10 am – 4 pm High School Open House November 1st, 10 am – 1 pm

Nurturing living connections... early childhood through grade12 Situated on a 400-acre Biodynamic farm in New York’s Hudson Valley, Hawthorne Valley’s integrative curriculum is designed to meet the unique needs of the developing child.

Day and Boarding Programs • Accepting Applications 518-672-7092 x 111 info@hawthornevalleyschool.org WALDORF SCHOOL | www.hawthornevalleyschool.org 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 12075 | 518-672-7092 x 111

PRESCHOOL THROUGH 2ND GRADE. ROLLING ADMISSIONS ADMISSIONS.

www.ymcaulster.org

Education Inspired by the Waldorf Philosophy, in the Village of Rhinebeck.

AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAMS NEW PALTZ • HIGHLAND • MARLBORO • KINGSTON

WELCOME TO OUR 8 ACRE CAMPUS! 23 Spring Brook Park Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-1226

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“Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.” - Socrates

www.primrosehillschool.com •

Across from Dutchess County Fairgrounds 44 KIDS & FAMILY CHRONOGRAM 8/14

507 Broadway, Kingston

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

For details: Contact Kayleigh Buboltz, Childcare Director, 845-338-3810 x116 For Registration: Contact Althea Loglia, Camping & Childcare Registration, 845-338-3810 x115 Applications and more information can be found at www.ymcaulster.org

DON’T MISS THE YMCA/WILWTYCK PRO-AM

SCHOLARSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENT - MONDAY, AUGUST 18 $150.00 Amatuers / $200.00 Pros. Pre-register by visiting ymcaulster.org or call Linda Nalepa @ (845) 338-3810 Ext. 104, email: Lnalepa@ymcaulster.org


when a child needs attention versus a child who needs to be guided toward play,” Demuth says. Oftentimes, parents can include the child in practical things like cooking and the garden, so children feel a useful part of the family. Dahlia often asks for a stroller ride, her signal to Davis that she wants to relax but be with him too. They’ll walk and trade invented stories. Just as he would with his clients (Davis helps artists and businesses shape their stories), he thinks resourcefully about any creative challenges that come into his home. “Dahlia is more than a client, of course,” he says, “but, in many ways, when I can objectively see the situation, there’s less attachment to things that otherwise could go downhill, emotionally, pretty quickly.” He often asks himself what patterns he’s helping Dahlia to create. “What pattern would I set, if I step in and start entertaining her or put a screen in front of her to mollify her boredom? Wouldn’t that create the pattern of boredom?” For Dahlia, downtime comes naturally, like a rhythm, each afternoon. After she’s spent time with a friend, a caregiver, or at school, she goes upstairs to her “exploratorium” and acts out with her dolls and ponies some of the experiences she’s just had. Beneficial Downtime It’s that sort of processing that Kerin and Sebastian Smith are cultivating in their children, Jayla and Ezra. They live intentionally—considering their choices, focusing on the things they love—and a big piece of that is building downtime into the family’s schedule. “It’s getting out and having different types of experiences—social, artistic, intellectual,” Kerin says. “Then the important piece is creating the space to process it, create something, or just be with it.” It results in a sort of parallel play at home, where each member of the family is absorbed in his/her own task. As artists themselves (Kerin studied printmaking at RISD and Sebastian is a graphic designer), the Smiths know that creativity strikes when there’s the ability to be still. When working on a project, Sebastian keeps paper by the bed, knowing that the act of lying down allows him to process from the day and produce ideas. Equipping their home with tools, toys, and art supplies, they set the stage for things to happen. “Having a well-organized and curated space is critical for all of us,” Kerin says. “The materials have to be clean, accessible, and in a predictable place. So when there’s time, they can pick it up at their own pace.” In a culture where bragging about a level of overwhelm is the norm, the Smiths are taking the time to promote stillness. It stems from an early-parenthood epiphany. “Reflecting on when Jayla was born, I was very conscious of the fact that I wasn’t going to be a parent who talks to her all the time,” Kerin says, referring to the conventional wisdom that babies need constant engagement with their caregiver to thrive in language and development. “I realized that she’d learn that sometimes things are quiet. I felt less guilty as I saw the value of that.” Eleven years later, Jayla is skilled in verbal communication and critical thinking. She has an interest in bird watching, her drawings of them detailed and patient. “She gained the ability to sit still and focus for hours at a time,” Kerin says. “That’s a really powerful skill.” Ezra’s boredom comes up mostly in the car, and it presents an opportunity for the Smiths to engage a bit. “He’s more seduced by screen time,” Kerin says. So they limit it, filter what he’s exposed to, and follow it up with other media. If it’s an animal show, they get books on animals. “There’s not a lot of bartering. He watches a show, and then we transition to another activity,” Kerin explains. It’s a work-in-progress, and the Smiths have moments when their intentions aren’t actualized. “It would be way easier to hand him an iPod, but it’s not the route we want to take. I don’t want it to be that every time he wants to relax, he gets stimulated by an outside source.” For the Smiths, it’s not about boredom; it’s about encouraging stillness. As Demuth frames it, “Boredom is the tunnel you walk through to get to know yourself—how you cope and how you think about the world.” It’s not the crime of bad parents; it’s a motivator. And rather than alleviate it, we can stand back and watch creativity spark.

engaging, bilingual education for curious, creative kids

Visit our website for Open House schedule Preschool, Prek/Kindergarten Bridge, and Elementary

1656 Route 9D | Cold Spring, NY 10524 | 646.295.7349 info@manitouschool.org | manitouschool.org

Meet Maribeth and over 300 other rescued farm animals

Weekends 11amonly 4pm

7 miles west of downtown Woodstock

35 Van Wagner Rd, Willow www.WoodstockSanctuary.org 845-679-5955

RESOURCES Tracking Wonder Trackingwonder.com Hillside Nursery Hillsidenursery.net 8/14 CHRONOGRAM KIDS & FAMILY 45


continuing & professional

EDUCATION Information Sessions Wednesday, August 20

4-7 pm at the Business Resource Center, Kingston www.sunyulster.edu/ce

Fall 2014:

Learn More. Earn More. Grow More. FREE! Information Sessions • August 20, 4-7pm

CASAC • 5pm Energy Efficiency Career Paths and Certifications • 5:30pm Advanced Manufacturing • 5:30pm

MSSC Certified Production Technician • online Math for Water Operators • September 2 BPI Building Analyst • September 8 Basic Sailing 101 • September 9 Grade A Water Operator Certification • September 10 Karuna Reiki • September 15 Pharmacy Technician • September 15 Gluten-Free Exploration • September 22 Web Development Series • September 22 CASAC • September 23 Pollinators: The Reason for a Flower • September 24 Etsy Workshop • September 24 Apple Basket Weaving • October 8 QuickBooks • October 8 iPhone/iPad Fine Art Photo Workshop • October 11 Planet Mandala Workshop • October 11 Personal Trainer • October 18 Home Staging • October 22

For more details call 845-339-2025 Register online at www.sunyulster.edu/ce

SOUTH KENT SCHOOL

OPEN HOUSE 845.339.2025

Register Online www.sunyulster.edu/ce

Monday, October 13th • 9am-1pm Visit campus, meet students and faculty, learn about our innovative academic programs and join us for lunch.

To RSVP or for more info contact: admissions@southkentschool.org or (860) 927-3539 x201 40 Bulls Bridge Road, South Kent, CT 06785 Grades 9-12 & PG | Boarding & Day

www.southkentschool.org 46 CONTINUING EDUCATION CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Excellence for Boys South Kent School’s curriculum is based in rigorous academic, physical, and spiritual challenges tailored to the individual student. Our goal is to place each young man into the best college or university that meets his needs. South Kent’s Center for Innovation (CFI) A 130-acre, hands-on outdoor laboratory, the CFI has students solve real world problems with a focus on sustainability, applied technology and human expression. Students work together to design and construct campus buildings, cultivate organic gardens and orchards, and gain experience and appreciation for the world in which they live.


Continuing Education

Students watch Darren’s Fisher’s demonstration of a foldforming technique at the Center for Metal Arts in Florida.

Open Enrollment in Life By Anne Pyburn Craig

L

ife inevitably offers us continuing education, be it a whole new discipline to conquer, a song that leads us into a previously unappreciated genre, or “Dang, sleeping on the ground is a lot tougher at 47 than it was at 19.”You’re enrolled whether you like it or not; you may as well enjoy the grownup perk of choosing your own core curriculum. Ghandi’s advice to “learn as though you were to live forever” has been endorsed by cutting-edge research indicating that lifelong cognitive activity inhibits the formation of beta-amyloids, protein fibers that have been implicated as a cause of Alzheimer’s. Just as with physical fitness, using it is the best defense against losing it. Amy Loewenhaar-Blauweiss half jokingly refers to herself as the “poster child” for continuing education. “I had my first college-level experience after age 30,” she says. “I had been designing curriculum, training teachers, and teaching English as a second language at several schools in New York City, and no one had bothered to ask what my degrees were. The powers-that-be from Albany came down to observe and asked if I’d come up to Albany and train their own trainers. But they wanted to know where I’d gone to school. When they found out I was essentially a high school dropout, they said I’d have to be fired! We brokered a deal where the school was able to retain me with the caveat that I enroll in college immediately. That was exactly 20 years ago, and I’ve been in school in one form or another ever since.” Loewenhaar-Blauweiss completed undergraduate studies and two master’s degrees at the New School for Social Research, and went on to complete a double doctorate in psych and philosophy at the Professional School of Psychology. Currently, she’s enrolled in courses to become certified as an alcohol and substance abuse counselor. “Every course of study you embark upon fills you out more as a person and makes your tool kit that much more useful,” she says. Today, she teaches Language and Thinking intensives to incoming Bard College students and offers women’s transformational writing workshops held at Kingston’s Outdated Café using related techniques; a writing prompt for the adult class might reference St. Augustine’s Confessions, a poem by Rilke, and Step Four of the Twelve Steps. “What can seem frighteningly highbrow becomes accessible with just a tiny little portal,” she says.

Return to the Source And that’s just one dish on an eclectic menu of continuing education choices available to residents of the Hudson Valley. Intrigued by sustainability, health, higher consciousness, and the link between body and mind? Check out the hundreds of courses offered at the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies in Rhinebeck, where Deepak Chopra was teaching before he became worldwide news. New offerings there include Mindfulness and Education and Veterans, Trauma, and Treatment. “We often find that someone may have tried something as a kid—let’s say, they loved art but did not go on to study for an MFA, so the art falls away and they realize they miss it,” says Omega’s manager of external communications, Chrissa Pullicino. “Omega is a great place to dabble and try things on, to continue the process of lifelong learning outside of how you define professional success, although a lot of our offerings can enhance career pathways, too. People come when they’re at a crossroad; they want to align ethics and action, they’re seeking deeper meaning and purpose.” If this sounds like you, don’t let tuition worries hold you back. “We realize Omega can be costly, and we’re working on ways to make it accessible,” says Pullicino. “We have tiered pricing—pay what you can afford, with no questions asked—and we’re always expanding our free and low-cost digital offerings through E-Omega.” Seasonal staffers get room and board and access to some 2,000 staff classes. Affordable and cutting-edge adult learning is also available through SUNY Ulster’s Department of Continuing and Professional Education. Enrollment has stayed strong in life-enhancing classes such as yoga, art, and cooking, and Associate Dean Christopher Marx says career enhancers in fields like sustainable building and clean energy are well enrolled too. “People say, ‘Where are the green jobs?’ We’re seeing the companies that are actually building them. Local professionals and businesses are embracing this as an area they see as important and vital. Those studies got off to a great start, then they declined and there was a plateau, but now it’s booming again. And more than once we’ve had a student looking for employment end up sitting next to a business owner. It’s great synergy.” 8/14 CHRONOGRAM CONTINUING EDUCATION 47


Mount Saint Mary C

Mount Saint Mary College NEWBURGH, NEW YORK

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Register today for an information session or transfer event! www.msmc.edu/infosession or call 845-569-3223

A remarkable, diverse community ! where the whole student thrives A College Preparatory School for boys grades 7-12 (day students); grades 9-12 & PG (boarding students)

Open House • Tuesday, November 11, 2014 and Monday, January 19, 2015

(845) 855-4825 • www.trinitypawling.org A

COMMITMENT

TO

CHARACTER

us! Come visit Fall Open House Sat., Oct. 18 at 9 a.m.

48 CONTINUING EDUCATION CHRONOGRAM 8/14

260 Jay Street • Katonah, NY 10536 914.232.3161 • admissions@harveyschool.org

www.harveyschool.org Harvey is a coeducational college preparatory school enrolling students in grades 6–12 for day and in grades 9–12 for five-day boarding.


Everywhere the Signs Ever wish you were bilingual? Consider American Sign Language, spoken by over two million people in the US, currently the fourth most studied language at colleges and universities. Learning any new language is the cognitive equivalent of a superfood; learning to sign adds a spatial dimension, creates opportunities for helping the hearing-impaired, and opens up your conversational options in situations that require silence or are too loud for comfortable conversation. The Signing Studio is now offering classes in the Hudson Valley ranging from basic through advanced to Mommy and Me, at MaMa in Stone Ridge, so that you and your baby can continue your education together. Want to get hands-on with art? Metalwork, from delicate jewelry crafting to blacksmithing, is taught at all levels from raw beginner to master classes at the Center for Metal Arts in the Village of Florida. If you prefer softer media, FiberFlame in Rhinebeck and Saugerties offers classes in painting, sculpture, and the popular Music Together family program, as well as their signature specialty of fiber arts. The Rosendale School of Arts is offering watercolor, glass painting, collage, and photo documentary courses this fall. The Woodstock Guild folks will instruct you in ceramics, jewelry making, voice, and writing at their historic Byrdcliffe Colony digs. The Woodstock School of Art offers classes in multiple disciplines on a site used for art instruction since 1906. And these are but a few of the options out there; no matter where you are in the Hudson Valley, you probably can’t swing a cat without it landing among folks busy expanding their artistic chops. Lifelong Learning No Longer the Exception Getting physical about your continuing education keeps your body limber along with your mind.Yoga and movement classes are popular throughout the region; pick your flavor, there’s a teacher near you. Too tame? The Rosendalebased Alpine Endeavors will get you up to speed on rock climbing, ice climbing, alpine climbing, and mountaineering. Horseback riding, from beginner skills on up to jumping and dressage, is also widely and well taught. Almost any adult learning could be considered spiritually beneficial. Those specifically seeking spiritual insight will find retreats and beginner-level classes in meditation and Buddhism at the area’s plentiful monasteries, like Zen Mountain Monastery in Mount Tremper. Seekers traveling a Christian path can find much to contemplate at places like Linwood Spiritual Center in Rhinebeck, Mariandale in Ossining, and Mount Alvernia in Wappingers Falls. When it comes to continuing your education, you really can’t lose. If current trends continue, those who consider their schooling complete in their late teens or early 20s may one day soon be the exceptions, and seekers of new learning the rule. This wheel’s on fire. And it’s road-worthy. A program begun by a group of retired educators at the New School in the early 1960s spread to places like Harvard and Duke, and in the early ‘80s, collaboration began with the also swiftly growing travel-based Elderhostel program. With the realization of potential came a name change to Lifelong Learning Institutes; today, the rechristened Road Scholar organization offers literally hundreds of educational travel opportunities, from the Hudson Valley to Africa and Antartica. Continuing ed doesn’t just refurnish your cranium, it expands your social world with like-minded company, all without standardized testing and cafeteria food. So dip a toe.You may, like Loewenhaar-Blauweiss, find yourself diving in and swimming farther than you ever thought you could. RESOURCES Alpine Endeavors Alpineendeavors.com Center for Metal Arts Centerformetalarts.com Fiber Flame Fiberflamestudio.com Linwood Spiritual Center Linwoodspiritual.org Mount Alvernia Mtalvernia.org Omega Institute Eomega.org Signing Studio Signingstudio.com SUNY Ulster Continuing Education Sunyulster.edu/continuing_education Woodstock Guild Woodstockguild.org Woodstock School of Art Woodstockschoolofart.org Zen Mountain Monastery Zmm.mro.org

Satya

Yoga Center SatyaYogaCenter.us

bringing it together:

Yoga teacher training with Sondra Loring, Sarah Willis & Liz Levine

September 2014–June 2015 Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck, NY

Kick up your Metal Arts Skills at the Center for Metal Arts

INTRO AND MASTER CLASSES Blacksmithing, Foldforming & Jeweler’s Arts

FOLDFORM BOOT CAMP with Charles Lewton-Brain August 1-4

MUSEUM & GIFT SHOP TOURS Saturdays 10am-2pm

Center for Metal Arts

Register online for classes: www.centerformetalarts.com 44 Jayne St. Florida, NY 845-651-7550

DUTCHESS COMMUNITY COLLEGE OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES

Continuing Education

Art | Music | Photography Holistic Health Beer & Home Brewing Journaling | Languages Teen Classes Career Training

Fall registration underway! (845) 431-8910 | sunydutchess.edu/cfweb

Canterbury School An independent Catholic coeducational boarding and day school for grades 9-12

a deeper knowledge a world of possibilities

OPEN HOUSE Saturday, October 11, 2014

101 Aspetuck Avenue • New Milford, CT 06776 • admissions@cbury.org • 860-210-3832 • www.cbury.org

8/14 CHRONOGRAM CONTINUING EDUCATION 49


VISIT UPSTATE HOUSE ONLINE VISIT UPSTATE HOUSE ONLINE

upstater.com upstater.net upstater.net

Your real real estate-obsessed estate-obsessed best Your best friend. friend. Your real estate-obsessed best friend. BEACON 3D MAY 15 - OCT 15

MAY 10

upstater.net

upstater.net Life and real estate north of New York City. Blogging every day.

Life and real estate north of New York City. Blogging every day.

Life and real estate north of New York City. Blogging every day.

What’s happening right now on upstater:

JUNE 14 JULY 12 AUGUST 9 SEPTEMBER 13 OCTOBER 11 NOVEMBER 8

THE RELOCATORS

DECEMBER 13

galleries & museums

Kary and Mark made the move from the Big City to the little city of Beacon. Follow them as they navigate their new life.

WINDOWS ON MAIN STREET AUG 9 - SEP 13

a non-profit organization

promoting the arts in

BEACON INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL SEPT 12 - 14

beacon for

more than

LIGHTING OF THE BEACONARTS & CITY OF BEACON UPCYCLED BICYCLE TREE: DEC 13

a decade

LIGHTING OF THE BEACONARTS & BEACON HEBREW ALLIANCE BICYCLE MENORAH: DEC 16-24

visit us online for art news and upcoming events beaconarts.org

FIVE-FIGURE FRIDAYS Teensy cabins, fixer-uppers, abandoned churches, lake-front cabins, dilapidated Victorians—all under $100,000.

TOWN OF THE WEEK We know you want to get to know every upstate town, village, and hamlet possible.

UPSTATER DESTINATIONS What to do? Where to go? Flea markets, gay tourism, food fests, UFOs, historic houses, and so much more.

HOUSES GALORE! Whether you’re seriously thinking of moving or just a voyeur, we riffle through the listings and share our notable finds.

50 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Facebook.com/BeaconArts.org

@BeaconArts #2sat #beaconny


ARTS &

CULTURE

Evening II, Carolyn Marks Blackwood, Archival Pigment Print, 2013 Photographs by Carolyn Marks Blackwood will be shown through September 7 as part of the “Summer Exposure” exhibit at the Albany Instutue of Art.

8/14 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 51


galleries & museums

galleries & museums

Untitled, Papiara Tukiki called Avingait (Many Lemmings), 2012. Part of the “Cape Dorset and Points South” exhibit at Theo Ganz Gallery through August 17. Photograph courtesy Dorset Fine Arts/Toronto.

510 WARREN ST GALLERY

BOSCOBEL

510 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-0510. “Paris, Giverny and the Loire Valley: Personal Impressions.” August 9-August 31. Opening reception August 9, 3pm-6pm.

1601 ROUTE 9D (BEAR MOUNTAIN HIGHWAY), GARRISON BOSCOBEL.ORG. “CURRENT” 2014 Sculpture Exhbition. Through November 17.

7TH STREET PARK

28 DOGGUMS WAY, KERHONKSON BRADFORDGRAVES.COM “Outdoor Sculpture Exhbition.” More than 200 works. Through October 31.

7TH STREET, HUDSON. Artists’ Marketplace. CCCA is teaming up with the Hudson MusicFest to present live music and an art marketplace. SatURDAY, August 9, 10am-4pm.

ALBERT SHAHINIAN FINE ART GALLERY 22 EAST MARKET STREET SUITE 301, RHINEBECK 876-7578. Annual Summer Salon. Through August 31.

THE ART AND ZEN GALLERY 702 FREEDOM PLAINS RD. SUITE B6, POUGHKEEPSIE. Photography of Eileen Quinn. Through August 30.

ART SOCIETY OF KINGSTON OM THE STRAND, KINGSTON. “Celebrations.” A solo exhibition of the work of Carol Pepper-Cooper. Pepper-Cooper is ASK’S “Distinguished Artist of 2014”, and has been awarded this solo exhibition in their main gallery. August 2-30.

ARTBAR GALLERY 674 BROADWAY, KINGSTON 430-4893. “In Nature’s Quarries.” Sculptures and wall works tby Daniel Giordano. August 2-August 30.

ARTSPACE 71 PALATINE ROAD, GERMANTOWN GERMANTOWNARTSPACE.COM “Syria: Then and Now.” Peter Aaron’s photos of Syria. August 16-September 7. Opening reception August 16, 5pm-7pm.

ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER 24 SECOND STREET, ATHENS (518) 945-2136. “Road Kill.” Through August 10.

BARD COLLEGE: CCS BARD GALLERIES PO BOX 5000, ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON 758-7598. Anne Collier. Through September 21. “Amy Sillman: one lump or two.” Through Sept. 21.

BARRETT ART CENTER

BRADFORD GRAVES SCULPTURE PARK

CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY 622 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1915. “A Nod to the Past.” Paintings by Mark Beard, Bruce Murphy, James O’Shea, and photographs by David Halliday. Through August 17.

CHESTERWOOD 4 WILLIAMSVILLE ROAD, STOCKBRIDGE, MA (413) 298-3579 EXT. 25210. “Contemporary Sculpture at Chesterwood 2014: Selected Works by Albert Paley.” Through October 13.

COLUMBIA COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1 NORTH FRONT STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-4417. “Watercolors by Lynne Bolwell.” Through August 31.

COLUMBIA COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS 209 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 671-6213. “A Body of Work.” This exhibit glorifies the human figure (nude and/or clothed). Through Sept. 19.

COPPER-FINN GALLERY 24 FRONT STREET, MILLBROOK 416-8342. Retrospective Exhibition for Artist Judy Malstrom. Through Sept. 7.

CORNELL STREET STUDIO 168 CORNELL STREET, KINGSTON 679-8348. “Plums in the Icebox.” Featuring new pastel work by Theresa Drapkin. Sultry scapes, August florals, fruits and nudes. August 8-31. Opening reception August 8, 6pm-8pm.

CRAWFORD HOUSE 189 MONTGOMERY STREET, NEWBURGH 561-2585. “Made in Newburgh.” This exhibit aims to highlight the manufacturing history of Newburgh. Visitors can glimpse into the history of the city’s industries and how they shaped Newburgh. Through August 30.

CROSS CONTEMPORARY ART

55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-2550. “John Nieman: Art With a Story.” Interactive exhibit of paintings. August 1-31. Opening reception August 1, 6pm-8pm.

81 PARTITION STREET, SAUGERTIES 399-9751. “Collection.” Works by Judy Pfaff, Robert Mangold, Sir Terry Frost, Albrecht Dürer, Gregory Crewdson, Mark Kanter, Heather Hutchison, Brenda Goodman and Rebecca Purdum. August 1-31. Opening reception August 1, 4pm-9pm.

BCB ART

DUCK POND GALLERY

116 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-4539. “You Game? I’m game.” New paintings, drawings, and sculpture by Michael Lindsay-Hogg. August 9-September 7.

128 CANAL STREET, TOWN OF ESOPUS LIBRARY, PORT EWEN 338-5580. Works by Anderson Center for Autism students. August 2-30.

BEACON 3D

3671 ROUTE 212, SHADY 679-5432. “Summer Group Show.” Contemporary fine art, sculpture garden and pottery. Through August 31.

164 MAIN STREET, BEACON. “Beacon 3D.” The work of 12 sculptors exhibited in this year’s public outdoor sculpture event. Through October 15.

BERKSHIRE MUSEUM 39 SOUTH STREET, PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS (413) 443-7171. “Butterflies.” Experience the live Butterfly Pavilion, filled with vibrant native and exotic species of butterflies. Through September 1.

BETHEL WOODS CENTER FOR THE ARTS 200 HUROADROAD, BETHEL 454-3388. “America Meets the Beatles!” Unseen photos of the Fab Four’s 1st U.S. visit by LIFE photographer Bill Eppridge & Beatlemania Memorabilia from the Rod Mandeville Collection. Through August 17.

52 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 8/14

ELENA ZANG GALLERY

THE EMPORIUM ANTIQUES & ART CENTER 319 MAIN STREET, GREAT BARRINGTON, MA (413) 528-1660. “Wake Up Assemblage.” Multimedia collage by Florin Ion Firimita. Through August 7.

EXPOSURES GALLERY 1357 KINGS HWY, SUGAR LOAF 469-9382. “Cuba: Forbidden Fruit.” Works by photographer Nick Zungoli. Through December 31.

FLETCHER GALLERY 40 MILL HILL ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-4411. “Lowell Miller: Sculpture.” Works in bronze, ceramic, wax and cement. August 30-September 28.


August 2 August 9 August 24 Saturdays Sundays Ongoing Ongoing

www.stormking.org

SUMMER

EXHIBITION WEEKENDS June 15–September 1

SUMMER F E ST I VA L August 1–3 Art, Bands, Film and Dance

LAST

SATURDAYS MAY – OCTOBER Interactive art, Outdoor film and more

See the work of over 70 emerging artists in the unique architecture of our historic grain elevator. Be one of the first to collect works by these up and coming artists. M a x o n M i l l s , 3 7 Fu r n a c e B a n k R d , Wa s s a i c , N Y Fo r e v e n t d e t a i l s , d i r e c t i o n s , a n d m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n , v i s i t :

W A S S A I C P R O J E C T. O R G #WASSAIC @WASSAICPROJECT

Alice Neel/ Erastus Salisbury Field Painting the People JULY 5 THROUGH NOVEMBER 2

BENNINGTON MUSEUM 75 Main Street, Bennington, Vermont benningtonmuseum.org | 802.447.1571 20 minutes from The Clark, 30 minutes from Mass MoCA Alice Neel (1900-1984), Jenny Brand, 1969 (detail), ©Estate of Alice Neel, Brand Family Collection

THE

new BENNINGTON MUSEUM — Get into It! 8/14 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 53

galleries & museums

STORM KING ART CENTER


FRIENDS OF HISTORIC KINGSTON 63 MAIN STREET, KINGSTON 339-0720. “Kingston: The IBM Years.” Photos, recollections and machines spotlight computer giant’s 40-year presence. Through October 31.

GALERIE BMG 621 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1677. “New Paintings.” Lisa Corinne Davis. Through September 1.

GALERIE GRIS 66 MAIN STREET, COLD SPRING 809-5838. “Primary Forces” by Brigitte Freed and “Wallpaper: New Botanicals” featuring wallpapers, by Julie Ann Mann. August 1-31. Opening reception August 1, 6pm-9pm.

GALLERY 66 NY 66 MAIN STREET, COLD SPRING 809-5838. “Primary Forces” by Brigitte Freed and “Wallpaper: New Botanicals” featuring wallpapers, by Julie Ann Mann. August 1-31. Opening reception August 1, 6pm-9pm.

GALLERY ON THE GREEN 7 ARCH STREET, PAWLING 855-3900. Arc of Light. Works by William Mutell. Through August 16.

GOOD PURPOSE GALLERY 40 MAIN STREET, LEE, MA (413) 394-5045. Duet in Color. An exhibit of works by Charles Steinhacker & Linda Clayton. Through August 10.

HENRY A. WALLACE VISITOR CENTER FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT HISTORIC SITE, HYDE PARK 486-7770. “Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection.” August 8-September 4. Opening reception August 8, 5:30pm-7:30pm.

HOTCHKISS LIBRARY 10 UPPER MAIN, SHARON, CT (860) 364-5041. Ralph Della Colpe: Paintings. Through August 6.

HUDSON HIGHLANDS NATURE MUSEUM’S OUTDOOR DISCOVERY CENTER MUSER DRIVE, CORNWALL 534-7781. “Art in the Wild, Naturally Inspired Trailside Creations.” 12-artist installations around the Museum’s Pond Trail. Through August 31.

HUDSON VALLEY LGBTQ COMMUNITY CENTER, INC.

galleries & museums

300 WALL STREET, KINGSTON 331-5300. “Essential Moments: Photographs by B. Docktor.” Through September 30.

JOHN DAVIS GALLERY 362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5907. Brenda Goodman, Maud Bryt, Bruce Gagnier, Jane Culp, Susanna Heller and Dave Hardy. Brenda Goodman will be showing paintings in the main galleries with Maud Bryt (Bronzes) in the sculpture garden and Bruce Gagnier (paintings), Jane Culp (paintings, Susanna Heller (paintings and Dave Hardy (sculpture) in the Carriage House. Through August 10.

KINGSTON MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART (KMOCA) 103 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON KMOCA.ORG. Bits and Pieces. New work by Undine Brod, Giselle Potter, and Joseph Heidecker. August 2-31. Opening reception August 2, 5pm-8pm.

DOWNTOWN BEACON MAIN STREET, BEACON. BEACONWINDOWS.ORG Windows on Main Street: 35 local artists install work in storefront windows. August 9-September 13. Opening reception August 9, 6pm-8pm, Bank Square Coffeehouse.

MANITOGA RUSSEL WRIGHT DESIGN CENTER, GARRISON 424-3812. Melissa McGill’s “Palmas” Surround Sound Installation. Through October 1.

MARK GRUBER GALLERY 17 NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ 255-1241. “Summer in the Hudson Valley.” A group salon style show. Through August 30.

MATTEAWAN GALLERY 464 MAIN STREET, BEACON 440-7901. “Booksmart.” Theresa Gooby, Brece Honeycutt, Bjorn Meyer-Ebrecht, August Ventimiglia. August 9-31. Opening reception August 9, 6pm-9pm.

THE MOUNT 2014 Sponsors Include:

Daily Freeman, Basch & Keegan, LLP, Markertek, M & T Bank, Augustine Nursery, Bruderhof, Klock Kingston Foundation, Millens Recycling, Spiegel Brothers Paper Company, Catskill Hudson Bank, Health Alliance of the Hudson Valley, Herzog’s Home Center, Kingston Dental Associates, Mainetti, Mainetti & O’Connor, P.C., Medical Associates of the Hudson Valley, Mountain Valley Manor Adult Care Home, Stewart’s Shops, TheCommunityGuide.net, Wells Fargo Advisors LLC, Kenneth K. Beesmer, Ulster Savings Bank

54 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Fall forArt

presented by Jewish Federation of Ulster County

Juried Art Show, Sale & Cocktail Reception

Thursday, September 4th 6 pm - 9 pm • $40.00 admission Wiltwyck Golf Club, Kingston, NY 845-338-8131 • info@fallforart.org

FallforArt.org

2 PLUNKETT STREET, LENOX, MA (413) 551-5111. “SculptureNow.” Through October 31.

OLD CHATHAM COUNTRY STORE AND CAFÉ 639 ALBANY TURNPIKE ROAD, OLD CHATHAM (518) 794-6227. Works by Caroline Kaars Sypesteyn.” August 3-September 3. Opening reception August 3, 5pm-7pm.

ONE MILE GALLERY 475 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON 338-2035. “The Illustrated Gallery.” An art exhibit highlighting the illustrative in art. August 2-30. Opening reception August 2, 6pm-8pm.

ORPHIC GALLERY 53525 STATE HIGHWAY 30, ROXBURY (607) 326-6045. “Instrumental Desire: Strings Attached.” Hybrid musical instrument sculptures, collage/drawings, performances, and audio-visual installations by Ken Butler. Through August 24.

PALMER GALLERY AT VASSAR COLLEGE 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE PALMERGALLERY.VASSAR.EDU. “18 Ways of Looking at a Tree.” Through September 4.

PS 209 3670 MAIN STREET, STONE RIDGE PSPACE209@GMAIL.COM. “Surface Tension.” John Ferro, Kathi Robinson Frank, MP Landis, and Josette Urso. Through August 10.


RED HOOK CAN NORTH BROADWAY, RED HOOK (845) 758-6575. “Red Hook Sculpture Expo.” Fourteen sculptures by eight artists, working with granite, steel, iron, wood and marble dust. Through November 21.

SAFE HARBORS OF THE HUDSON 111 BROADWAY, NEWBURGH 562-6940. “Works by Artist Bruno Krauchthaler.” Through March 31, 2015.

SANFORD SMITH FINE ART 13 RAILROAD STREET, GREAT BARRINGTON, MA (413) 528-6777. “New Works by Karen LeSage.” The exhibition will feature LeSage’s large, atmospheric, minimal landscapes in vivid, luminous colors. August 8-Sept. 14. Opening reception August 9, 4pm-6pm.

SPENCERTOWN ACADEMY ARTS CENTER 790 ROUTE 203, SPENCERTOWN (518) 392-3693. “Dreams & Digressions.” New paintings by Kris Galli. Through August 10.

STAR HOUSE GALLERY 77 CORNELL STREET #316, KINGSTON. “Parallel Places.” Features the paintings of Owen Harvey and Michael Hunt. Through August 9.

THE CHATHAM BOOKSTORE 27 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-3005. “Street Paintings Mostly from Melbourne.” Photographer Wendy Noyes shows photographs of walls, alleyways, and doors in Melbourne, Australia. Through August 31.

THE LOFTS AT BEACON 39 FRONT STREET, BEACON 831-7867. “Energy Fields.” With work by Sarah Barker, Marieken Cochius, Judy Thomas and Anna West. Through August 23.

THE RE INSTITUTE 1395 BOSTON CORNERS ROAD, MILLERTON (518) 567-5359. “The Rosebud Roar.” Works by Guy Walker, Julie Seidl, Richard Tinkler. Through September 6.

THEO GANZ STUDIO 149 MAIN STREET, BEACON (917) 318-2239. cThrough August 17.

THOMAS COLE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

galleries & museums

218 SPRING STREET, CATSKILL 518-943-7465. “Thomas Cole & Frederic Church: Master, Mentor, Master.” Through November 2.

THOMPSON GIROUX GALLERY 57 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-3336. “Still Life with Sculpture.” Through August 10.

TIVOLI ARTISTS GALLERY 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI 757 2667. “Small Works Show.” Through August 17.

UNFRAMED ARTIST GALLERY 173 HUGUENOT STREET, NEW PALTZ “Luminous Hudson Valley.” Through August 10.

VALLEY VARIETY 705 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-0033. “Odds and Ends, Take One.” A group exhibition featuring works of four Upstate NY artists—Peter Acheson, Susan Meyer, Jill Shoffiett and Jeff Starr. Through September 7.

VASSAR COLLEGE: THE FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5632. “Faces and Figures in Self-Taught Art. Over 100 works by self-taught artists.” Through August 31.

WILDERSTEIN PRESERVATION 330 MORTON ROAD, RHINEBECK 876-4818. “Wilderstein & The White House: Fascinating Connections Between the Estate and US Presidents.” Through October 31.

THE WILLIAMS COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 15 LAWRENCE HALL DRIVE, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA (413) 597-3055. “The Prendergasts and Flowers.” Through August 24. “Mitchell, Benglis, Wilke.” Through October 26. Franz West.” Through January 25, 2015. “Material Friction: Americana and American Art.” Through January 25, 2015.

IN FLUX

WIN MORRISON REALTY 63 JOHN STREET, KINGSTON 339-1144. “Paintings by Barry DeBaun.” August 23-November 30. Opening reception August 23, 1pm-5pm.

LONGYEAR GALLERY

THE WILLIAMS COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2940. “Secrets of the Heart, Water, and Space.” Through August 17.

GALLERY HOURS FRI, SUN, MON 11-4PM, SAT 11-6PM

WOODSTOCK JEWISH CONGREGATION 1682 GLASCO TURNPIKE, WOODSTOCK 679-2218. “Summer Arts Invitational 2.” Features works by Gertrude Abramson, Martha Hill, Marilynn Rowley and David Hornung. Through August 24.

WOODSTOCK SCHOOL OF ART 2470 RTE. 212, WOODSTOCK 679-2388. “Angeloch Under Glass.” Works on Paper by Robert Angeloch. Curated by Paula Nelson & John Kleinhans. Through September 6.

26 of the area’s finest artists under one roof. New group exhibitions monthly.

CHRISTOPHER MOORE August 1-25 OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 3-6PM

785 MAIN ST, UPSTAIRS IN THE COMMONS MARGARETVILLE 845-586-3270 LONGYEARGALLERY.ORG

8/14 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 55


Music

The Pontiffs of Pop Bishop Allen

By Peter Aaron Photograph by Fionn Reilly

56 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 8/14


E

stablished in 1636, Harvard University is America’s oldest and most prestigious institution of higher education. Eight US presidents and numerous international heads of state are among its esteemed alumni, along with 335 Rhodes Scholars and 62 living billionaires. Its list of affiliated faculty, students, and staff includes the names of nearly 150 Nobel laureates and such famous attendees as Bill Gates,Yo-Yo Ma, W. E. B. Dubois, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Leonard Bernstein, e. e. cummings,William S. Burroughs, T. S. Elliot, Mark Zuckerberg, and Ted Kaczynski. And, perhaps somewhat less known, is the fact that the Ivy League school in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is also the birthplace of the acclaimed indie rock band Bishop Allen. “I’ve always wanted to write the kind of songs that are frank and noble, in the American vernacular,” says singer and guitarist Justin Rice, who co-founded the group with guitarist Christian Rudder, a fellow Harvard student, in the early 2000s. “I mainly try to write lyrics that share moments. But I want them to be very conversational, like a Joan Didion essay.” With three critically applauded albums and, literally, a dozen EPs (more on those later) already under their belts and a new full-length, Lights Out (Dead Oceans Records), set to drop this month, Bishop Allen has accrued a devoted fan base with its brainy, unapologetically melodic brand of contemporary pop. It’s the kind of sweet, cheery sound that’s made the band a natural choice for sitcom soundtracks during its 11-year existence. But in Bishop Allen’s approach there also lurks a distinctively clever type of wordcraft that’s, yes, confessional and literate a la Rice’s stated MO, but sometimes at odds with his group’s sugar-and-sunshine delivery: “Go on, black hole / and tear the sky to pieces / Go on, black hole / tell me you’ve had enough / No sun, no stars / No, only emptiness above,” coos Darbie Nowatka, the band’s other vocalist and Rice’s wife, above the blissful synths of the new disc’s “Black Hole.” Such lachrymose lyrical specimens might make one wonder just how hard the network nabobs who’ve sourced the outfit’s tunes for TV placement have been listening. “I kinda grew up in this country-club culture,” says Rice, 37, about his Dallas, Texas, upbringing. “My dad’s a lawyer, my mom works for charities. I went to an all-boys private school where we had to wear uniforms. It was good for me as a little kid. But by the time I was 15, I wanted to get out.” And as has been the case for so many other alienated teenage musicians of the last four decades, it was Rice’s discovery of punk rock that pointed the way. “Nirvana was a really powerful influence on me and my friends when they first hit,” explains the singer, who played in his first bands during high school. “But when they got bigger and the preppy kids embraced them, we felt like they’d been coopted. So we started digging deeper. Fugazi became the next key band. They were popular but still far enough from the mainstream, and they had this strong sense of politics and a DIY aesthetic. Dallas is a lot of shopping malls, pretty bland and modern. Except for [fabled nightlife district] Deep Ellum, where I started hanging out as a teenager, going to punk shows. It was intense sometimes; there was this whole SHARPs-versus-Nazi skins rivalry between groups of people who’d go to the same shows [SHARP is an acronym for Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice], so there’d be fights sometimes. I always thought it was so stupid, how people who were there to see the same bands wanted to fight each other. But I guess the punk scene has always been this weird confluence of thugs and art school kids.” Rice entered Harvard in 1995 to major in comparative literature and film production. It was in an English 10a class that he and Rudder met. “[Rudder] was clearly the other ‘weird kid’ and I noticed him right away,” Rice says. “But we didn’t actually talk until we ran into each other at a Jawbreaker show.” Like Rice, Rudder sensed an immediate kinship. “When you’re in a really small class and you see someone you haven’t met before wearing T-shirts with the logos of the same obscure hardcore bands you’re into, you think, ‘Hey, I should really get to know this guy,’” recalls Rudder, who hails from Little Rock, Arkansas. “So when we finally did talk, right away I felt an immediate connection.” The pair started their own hardcore band, the Pissed Officers, who began playing locally and releasing small-batch vinyl. Of crucial importance was the duo’s stint as DJs on Harvard radio station WHRB’s punk/indie program, “Record Hospital.” “WHRB is a commercial station, not funded by the school,” explains Rice. “But it was run by these amazing, cool people who were really into interesting music. As a DJ there, you had to take part in what were called ULAs, or Universal Listening Assignments, which were weekly meetings where you’d sit down with a box of records relating to a certain genre and study them. So one week it might be all about 1960s garage bands, or maybe free jazz or proto-punk bands. I remember one ULA that was all about Ohio underground music. So there was this real effort to create a body of knowledge about underground music to pass along to the following generations.” The Pissed Officers evaporated after three years, and following graduation Rice and Rudder roomed together off campus. Also on premises was then-aspiring film director Andrew Bujalski, who is now cited as the godfather of the amateurish, microbudget indie genre dubbed mumblecore. The director cast his roommates—neither of whom had acted in films before—in his first two comedies, Funny Ha Ha (2002) and Mutual Appreciation (2005). “It’s hard to articulate what makes me think a nonprofessional actor will fare well on screen, but I suppose a lot of it has to do with my own personal rap-

port with them,” Bujalski says. “If our communication is strong, then I should be able to get the bare bones of what I need on screen, and if they have the natural charisma of a Justin or a Christian, the rest of the work is done for me.” Rice would go on to develop a parallel calling as an actor in such films as Let Them Chirp Awhile (2007), Nick and Nora’s Infinite Playlist (2008), and Alexander the Last (2009), and the web series “Dead & Lonely.” “Music has always been Justin’s heart and soul, and the acting a kind of happy byproduct of that career,” Bujalski observes. “He belongs to a great tradition of musicians-asactors—from Meat Loaf to Tupac, they’re pretty damned reliable on screen! I assume it’s something to do with their innate senses of rhythm.” But around the time he and Rudder were making their early film forays, something else came into Rice’s life that would also alter its course. “I got a Tascam 4-track,” he says. “I’ve never been the best musician per se, but all of a sudden I discovered how to focus on isolated moments and invent songs by layering different instruments and parts. Christian and I would work up 20 songs and maybe two or three of them would make us say, ‘Hey, this sounds like something.’”That something would be Bishop Allen, named for Bishop Allen Drive, the Cambridge street the twosome lived on during their communal creative renaissance. Their musical approach had changed dramatically, moving from the youthful thrash of the Pissed Officers to a sound that hints at Pavement’s more tuneful interludes and even Simon and Garfunkel. In order to devote themselves wholly to the new project, Rice and Rudder decamped to Lynchburg, Virginia. “We wanted to live somewhere really cheap where we could just concentrate and make a record,” Rice says about the effort behind Charm School (Champagne School Records), the band’s 2003 debut. “When we were making that album I realized what mixing was all about, and learned how to get a natural sound in the bedroom we recorded it in. Pretty soon, Christian and I thought it would be great to play the music live.” With Lynchburg not being known for its club scene, the band relocated to Brooklyn in May 2003 and recruited players to flesh out their ranks. Charm School elicited glowing reviews from Rolling Stone and NPR’s “Weekend Edition,” and the band began touring heavily, not taking a break for the next three years. The “break” turned out to be a project that saw Bishop Allen self-releasing a new four-song EP every month in 2006, each of them titled for the month of its release (although August is a 14-song live disc). What, exactly, was the reasoning behind such a ridiculously high-bar-setting campaign? “We’d toured a lot and started work on our second album [2007’s Bishop Allen and the Broken String, on Dead Oceans Records], but it just wasn’t coming together,” says Rice. The EP project opened another door when “History of Excuses” from March was used in an episode of NBC’s “Scrubs.” Since that windfall, Bishop Allen’s music has been picked up by numerous television shows and film sound tracks. “It became clear to us early on that music licensing was a really good way for a band to stay afloat,” Rice says. Rudder, though, has done pretty well for himself outside the band: In 1999, he and some friends started SparkNotes, a study-guide website they eventually sold to Barnes & Noble for a reported $3.5 million, and in 2004 he and the same crew launched the popular online dating service OkCupid. “It’s a pretty crazy pendulum,” says the entrepreneur, who currently lives in Austin, Texas, about balancing work with rock. “I wish I was able to contribute more [to the band], but I love doing it because it’s not just a ‘hobby band’ to me—I still define myself as a person who plays in Bishop Allen.” Rice and Nowatka, who also serves as the band’s graphic designer, met in Brooklyn and were married in 2009, shortly after the release of third album Grrr… (Dead Oceans). “Darby had never thought of herself as a singer, but I’d hear her singing to herself sometimes and thought she sounded really good,” remembers Rice. “When we were making the EPs there were some songs I thought would be great with a female voice, so I talked her into doing them. She’s been in the band ever since.” The couple moved to Kingston that same year, and, to keep musically active during the six-year hiatus Bishop Allen has been on since touring for Grrr…, started the side project Last Names, which in 2012 released 40 free, download-only cover tracks—nearly one a week—and an album of originals, Wilderness (Independent). After the lengthy lull, however, the flagship band has returned with Lights Out, a set Rice describes as having “a new palette, more electric. There are a lot of analog synths on this record. And it’s much easier to dance to than our other albums.” To promote the album on an upcoming 40-show tour, he’s put together a new Bishop Allen lineup that features Hudson Valley stalwarts John Rosenthal (ex-Giraffes) on bass and co-producer Matthew Cullen on guitar. “Cutting the cord and moving to Kingston was a gamble for me and Darbie, but it turned out to be great,” says Rice. “We didn’t expect to meet so many like-minded people—we definitely don’t miss New York. People talk about [the region] going ‘full Williamsburg’ someday, and if that happens we’ll just move farther away [from New York]. But right now, everything has us feeling like we’re in just the right place.” Bishop Allen kicks off its US tour at the Chronogram Block Party in Kingston on August 16. Lights Out will be released on August 19 on Dead Oceans Records. Bishopallen.com. CHRONOGRAM.COM LISTEN to “Why I Had To Go” by Bishop Allen, from their new album, Lights Out.

8/14 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 57


NIGHTLIFE HIGHLIGHTS

Handpicked by music editor Peter Aaron for your listening pleasure.

JOY OF JAZZ WEEK August 6-9. Presented by the Catskill Jazz Factory in conjunction with the 23A Arts Initiative, this appetizing series kicks off at Bard College’s Spiegeltent with “Harlem on the Hudson”—an evening curated by bassist Rodney Jordan that organizers say will be “in the style of the classic [1940s] Minton’s Playhouse sessions.” The series’ subsequent “Harlem on the Mountaintop Experience” sessions will be held at the Last Chance Tavern and the Catskill Mountain Foundation’s Orpheum Film and Performing Arts Center and will be highlighted by a master class and a performance by piano great Marcus Roberts and his trio. Other acts slated to appear are Walking Distance, the Benny Benack III Quartet, and the Charenee Wade / Chris Pattishall Quartet. Check website for schedule and ticket prices. Annandale-on-Hudson and Tannersville. (518) 628-4424; Catskilljazzfactory.org.

HUDSON MUSIC FESTIVAL

SUMMER HOOT

August 8-10. “New York State’s largest free outdoor music festival” simply refuses to die, and even continues to proliferate. Though still centering mainly on up-and-coming artists, this year’s presently growing roster nevertheless does include some recognized regional names. Confirmed to appear at the town-wide, multiple-venue musical strollathon are Peter Sando, Pony in the Pancake, the Last Conspirators, the Warp / the Weft, the Grape and the Grain, the Brighton Beat, Black Mountain Symphony, Ras Majesty, the Matchbox Architects, NY Jazz Force, the Paisley Fields, Hoochie Coochie Men, Carl Mateo, the Bohemian Slackers, and, yes indeed, Mr. Funky Pants. Visit website for updated artist schedule and list of venues. Free. Hudson. Hudsonmusicfest.com.

August 22-24. The always-anticipated counterpart to the Ashokan Center’s jubilant Winter Hoot, this families-welcome, folk-leaning fest features food, contra dancing, arts and crafts, kids’ activities, and other fun, besides some exemplary live music. Naturally, the center’s Jay Ungar and Molly Mason and Mike & Ruthy will play, as will David Bromberg, Robert Sarazin Blake, Milton, Spirit Family Reunion, the Simi Stone Orchestra, Kristin Andreasson, Chris Merenda, Jay Collins and the Kings County Band, the Saints of Swing featuring Renee Bailey, Burnell Pines, John Cohen, the Bright Siders, Breathe Owl Breathe, Anais Mitchell and Jefferson Hamer, and many more. Camping is encouraged and onsite lodging is available. $50 (weekend pass). Olivebridge. Homeofthehoot.com.

CATSKILL HIGH PEAKS FESTIVAL August 10-20. The tagline of this five-years-and-climbing chamber music summit fits well: “Music with Altitude!” The 10-day festival is directed by world-renowned cellist Yehuda Hanani and offers concerts, lectures, films, and master classes by distinguished faculty artists and outstanding young international musicians. The events will take place at the Orpheum Theater in Tannersville and the Doctorow Center for the Arts in Hunter, plus additional Hudson Valley and Berkshires locations. This year’s theme is the music of Italy, and as such the centerpiece concerts are “Years of Pilgrimage” (August 10), which focuses on how Italian composers inspired Mendelssohn, Byron, and other famous visitors, and features Hanani, pianist Michael Chertock, and Met mezzo-soprano Lucille Beer; the main work of the second concert, “Souvenir de Florence” (August 17), is Tchaikovsky’s musical impression of the titular city. $25, $30 (student and senior rates available). Visit website for a full schedule of events and locations. (518) 392-6677; Catskillhighpeaksmusic.org.

58 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 8/14

HUDSON VALLEY JAZZ FESTIVAL August 14-17. In a further example of overflow from our yearly June summer concert festival roundup is this growing jazz celebration founded in 2009 by Warwick drummer Steve Rubin. Held at various regional venues, this year’s installment includes bassist Steve Swallow, drummer Adam Nussbaum, saxophonist and flutist Eric Person, keyboardists Pete Levin and Richard Kimball, and vocalists Judi Silvano and Gabriele Tranchina, among others. But the standout concert for 2014 is undoubtedly the August 16 engagement by the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra at the Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center. Founded in 1966 as the Thad Jones / Mel Lewis Jazz Orchestra by trumpeter Thad Jones and drummer Mel Lewis, the hugely innovative outfit has included some of jazz’s top players and is recognized as one of the most influential big bands of all time. See website for ticket prices and a full schedule of events and locations. Hudsonvalleyjazzfest.org.



CD REVIEWS IF, BWANA THIRTY (2014, INYRDISK RECORDS)

Three decades is a damn long time to be making music. Especially when it’s the kind that challenges most listeners— music that, for many, challenges the very concept of what constitutes “music” in the first place. You have to be doing it for your own amazement, first and foremost, while operating on the theory that if you put it out there in the universe, through the right channels, eventually others with big and brave ears will dig it as well. And that’s just what Orange County sound artist Al Margolis has been doing under the If, Bwana moniker since 1984, with outstanding sonic results. Released 30 years to the day of the very first If, Bwana recording session, the hefty, three-CD Thirty comprises over three hours of mesmerizing musique concrete and droning electroacoustic atmospherics. This eye-snappingly colorful, hand-made, three-pocket package is out in a limited run of 99 copies via the Canadian imprint Inyrdisk, and its 12 epic-length tracks include new and remastered pieces from ultrarare cassettes. Much of the diced-’n’-sliced source material for these audio collages was laid down by Margolis’s deeply adventurous fellow travelers, such as violinist/violist Jason Kao Hwang and vocalist Thomas Buckner. The bassoon has been a recent inspiration for Margolis, and thus the instrument features heavily on three of these works: “All of My Bassoons,” “Ross Bassoon 2,” and “Kat Lib Bday Bassoon.” Of special note are Kingston vocalist Lisa Barnard Kelley’s unsettling contributions to “Lisa, Fluteless.” Inyrdisk.com. —Peter Aaron

Celebrating 30 Years

Violinmaker • Restorer • Dealer Diploma, Geigenbauschule, Mittenwald, Germany, 1974

LOVESICK LOVESICK (2014, INDEPENDENT)

This debut from Kingston’s Lovesick deftly assimilates the Americana of the Catskills and Mississippi Delta into a greasy, fuzzed-out garage-punk mosaic of lasciviousness, longing, murder, and redemption. The trio of Mike Amari (guitar/vocals), Adam Armstrong (drums), and Eli Walker (bass) has an aesthetic drawn equally from the early 2000s garage-punk revival and the hootenanny of the late Levon Helm’s beloved Midnight Rambles. The opening salvo, “Discover,” is a heaving, stuttering instrumental with several violent tempo changes amid the wonderfully chaotic maelstrom of sound. “I’m a Monster” is a track the band aptly describes as a “Roseanne Cash-meets-Violent Femmes, twangy sort of thing.”The addition of a demented “96 Tears”-like carnival organ really puts it over the top, with Amari growling out snotty punk couplets like “Baby I’m a loser / Ah, baby I’m a loser / but that don’t mean I’m not gonna win.” 
“Atlantic City Girls” spins the harrowing tale of a serial killer loose on the boardwalk, told from the murderer’s perspective. Armstrong’s crashing cymbals and Walker’s laconic, distorted bass line are the perfect counterpoint to Amari’s bloodthirsty entreaties. It’s the perfect lead-in to the six-song EP’s finale, the gospel-inflected “Walter.” Simple, finger-picked notes and pleading slide tell the story of a man slipping off this mortal coil. The pastoral feeling of his final journey is punctuated by some massive, Zeppelin-esque, heavy blues riffage. This little snake charmer of record is just a taster for an upcoming full-length platter and a tour. Lovesickny.bandcamp.com. —Jeremy Schwartz

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Mostly Kodály MUSIC CLASSES THE KC FOUR & MORE HERE & THERE (2014, INDEPENDENT)

Jazz. Dark nights. Clinking glasses. Small talk between the beats. Assignations. Declarations. Salutations. Live jazz, at least, hovers in a sonic atmosphere that hums with the same aliveness that fuels the music. Here & There, the recent double disc from the KC Four & More, takes you to that place. If it was 20 years ago, it would have been a smoky dive, but now the joint serves organic and caffeine sits just fine alongside the bourbon. Leader Harvey Kaiser pretty much kills on the reeds here, tackling stuff from heroes like Louis Armstrong, Benny Golson, Hoagy Carmichael, John Coltrane,Thelonious Monk, and LesterYoung,as well as his own pen. Steve Haas joins in the fray on drums, Allen Murphy is on bass, and Mike Kull is on piano. This is not a pioneering record. Nothing new happens. Nothing new, that is, outside the endless invention of jazz in the hands of solid players. The buzz of life in the background (some from the High Falls Café) distracts little, adding more by its very community. “Struttin’ with Some Barbecue,” “Nature Boy,” “Lester Leaps In,” “Stardust.” The titles may be familiar, but that doesn’t prevent Here & There (also recorded in Italy and Poughkeepsie) from being an absolutely sweet listen that will turn any car, kitchen, or bedroom into an intimate nightclub—chatting pals and all—the moment you press play. Wonderful. KCSoundHV@verizon.net. —Michael Eck CHRONOGRAM.COM LISTEN to tracks by the bands reviewed in this issue.

Beginning this Fall Zoltán Kodály, composer, musician, and creator of the Kodály Method.

Classes at the brand new Montgomery Art and Music School @Montgomery Montessori School in Montgomery, NY

For details/registration, visit ScherMusicStudio.com or call 845-202-3217

Your work deserves attention. Which means you need a great bio for your press kit or website. One that’s tight. Clean. Professionally written. Something memorable. Something a booking agent, a record-label person, a promoter, or a gallery owner won’t just use to wipe up the coffee spill on their desk before throwing away. When you’re ready, I’m here.

PETER AARON Music editor, Chronogram. Award-winning music columnist, 2005-2006, Daily Freeman. Contributor, Village Voice, Boston Herald, All Music Guide, All About Jazz.com, Jazz Improv and Roll magazines. Musician. Consultations also available. Reasonable rates.

See samples at www.peteraaron.org. E-mail info@peteraaron.org for rates. I also offer general copy editing and proofreading services, including editing of academic and term papers.

8/14 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 59


PHOTO OF ALISON GAYLIN BY FRANCO VOGT

Books

MURDER, THEY WROTE SERIAL KILLERS MARSHALL KARP, ALISON GAYLIN, AND STEVE HAMILTON By Nina Shengold

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urling up on the beach with a book is a time-honored summertime pleasure.While some readers may enjoy shaking sand from a hardcover copy of Proust or a paperback romance, the go-to vacation read for many includes a high body count. Murder and surf go together like fried clams and tartar sauce. The Hudson Valley may be light on surf, but murderous writers proliferate: Even a casual roundup of the usual suspects includes, among others, Alison Gaylin, Carol Goodman, Steve Hamilton, Marshall Karp, C.E. Lawrence, Jenny Milchman, Maxine Paetro, Wendy Corsi Staub, Sebastian Stuart, Kim Wozencraft, and uber-prolific late grandmaster Donald E. Westlake. Why? To solve the mystery, I met with Alison Gaylin, Steve Hamilton, and Marshall Karp, who all have new books out this summer. Gaylin’s Stay With Me (Harper, 2014) is the third in her Shamus Award-winning Brenna Spector series. Let It Burn (Minotaur, 2014) is Hamilton’s 10th entry in the much-lauded Alex McKnight series, set in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Karp is a serial writer of serials, publishing four books starring LA cops Lomax & Biggs before joining James Patterson for NYPD Red; both the series launch and NYPD Red 2 (Little, Brown, 2014) were New York Times #1 bestsellers. Just before we meet at outdated: an antique café, a violent thunderstorm jumps uptown Kingston, unleashing rain so torrential the gutters flow white. Hamilton is first to arrive, a black umbrella angled over his lamb’s-wool corona of hair. He’s wearing a tropical yellow shirt and shorts, unfazed by the downpour. Gaylin enters next, in a red summer dress, flashing a smile as she refurls her folding umbrella. Then Karp rushes in, shaking off a golf umbrella and spouting one-liners about parking meters, his timing pure Borscht Belt. We order cold drinks and sit down to chat about homicide. It’s hard to imagine a friendlier trio of authors. Whatever deep inner demons their genre of choice may reflect, they seem to be getting it out of their systems on paper. Each of them took different paths to writing crime fiction, and each has carved out a unique swath of turf.

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Gaylin’s books feature smart, complex women who juggle impossible pressures as well as they can. Her first novels, Hide Your Eyes and You Kill Me, featured an intrepid preschool teacher who sees things she shouldn’t. Next came stand-alones Heartless and Trashed and the Brenna Spector series, which features a private investigator with hyperthemistic syndrome, a rare form of total recall, and an at-risk teenage daughter. Gaylin’s also written a young-adult novel, Reality Ends Here, and collaborated with Megan Abbott on graphic novel Normandy Gold, which they’re developing for television. Gaylin grew up in suburban Arcadia, California. At 10, she picked up a copy of Helter Skelter. “I thought it was a book about the Beatles,” she says, laughing. Mesmerized, she moved on to other true-crime classics: In Cold Blood, The Executioner’s Song. “It’s that whole feeling of what human beings are capable of, looking under that rock,” she says. “I always liked the feeling of being scared.” As a theater major at Northwestern, she wrote plays and fiction, noting, “Everything I wrote ended up with someone getting killed in it.” After college, she did a brief stint as a tabloid reporter for The Star, where her assignments included going undercover as a TV extra, covering the bar mitzvah of “Wonder Years” star Fred Savage and crashing David Hasselhoff’s wedding. She polished her journalism cred with a master’s degree from Columbia, and kept writing fiction in Abigail Thomas’s Tuesday Night Babes workshop. Thomas urged her to expand a macabre story into a mystery novel. Five years later, Gaylin finished Hide Your Eyes. It didn’t sell. Editors loved her characters, but the plot didn’t thicken. Gaylin embarked on a rigorous structure tutorial, reading more than 100 mysteries while she and her husband, filmmaker Mike Gaylin, lived in Mexico. This time she got it right: Hide Your Eyes was nominated for an Edgar Award for best first novel. Steve Hamilton’s first Alex McKnight book, A Cold Day in Paradise, won both the Edgar and Shamus Awards. He won a second Edgar for The Lock Artist; another stand-alone, Night, takes place in a hardscrabble Kingston, New York.


Hamilton was born near Detroit. “But if you live in Michigan, you go north every summer,” he says. “It’s a different world up there. The Upper Peninsula could be its own state, its own country.” The mystery bug bit him early. “I grew up on Alfred Hitchcock books and Agatha Christie,” he says. Then he read Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and “my favorite, Jim Crumley. When I found the hard-boiled American crime fiction, I thought, ‘This is it!’ Because the writing is so good.” At 12, he sent his first story to Ellery Queen magazine; it was politely rejected. He studied computer science in college, and spent 31 years working for IBM in Kingston and Poughkeepsie. When did he start writing full-time? Hamilton takes a breath. “Yesterday. Literally.” His quiet bombshell is met with a chorus of congratulations and clinking iced coffee and milkshake glasses. Cutting the day-job cord was “a combination of happy and terrifying. Before, this was this cool thing I did on my own time—I got to go to conferences with the coolest people I ever met. It was a secret life that’s not a secret anymore.” With a full-time job, a wife, and two kids, “my own time” usually meant late at night, when he’d stay up writing for “two or three hours, or whatever it takes.” Karp points out that writing is not always done at the desk—ideas often pop up while walking the dog, or in the shower. Gaylin agrees. “I don’t know what it is about the shower.” Karp nods sagely. “The shower’s the best.” Hamilton has more breaking news: He just finished writing a screenplay of The Lock Artist for producer Shane Salerno. Karp flashes a grin and says, “Mazel tov. They’ll fuck it up.” He should know. On his website, Karpkills.com, Karp confesses that “the fictional characters I murder are based on real people I worked with in Hollywood. Killing them on the page is totally legal and extremely cathartic.” Television wasn’t his first career. As a smart Jewish kid whose dad owned a candy shop in West New York, New Jersey—even his hometown’s a punchline—Karp was expected to become a dentist. Luckily, he flunked college biology. “You want your dentist to know the difference between a tendon and an elbow,” he quips. He switched to a major in English. After graduation, he answered an ad for a copywriting job. “I could always write,” he says. “I grew up when you wrote letters to people.” His girlfriend worked in advertising, and he got hired. “Holy shit, someone was paying me to write stuff!” he exclaims. “I wrote a tuna fish can label. Some people think I should go back to that.” He worked his way up to an executive position, supervising the creative

department, but missed doing what he loved most. He started writing plays, and one called “Squabbles” was produced and published by Samuel French. After a bidding war between ABC and CBS, he started developing TV pilots, but held on to his day job. “In my 40s, I realized the life I was living was orchestrated by a 20-year-old kid. ‘My girlfriend’s in advertising? I’ll go with that.’ I realized I didn’t want that 20-year-old to plan the second half of my life. I asked myself, ‘What do I want to do when I’m 60?’ And I wanted to be in Woodstock writing a murder mystery.” Karp took time off from work, figuring it would take him six months. (“Ha!” he says loudly.) He planned to go back in September 2001. Then his daughter, who worked near the World Trade Center, went missing for several hours. It turned out she’d hopped a ferry to safety, but the experience shook him so thoroughly that he decided to quit advertising. Though he was now writing nearly full-time, he still did some freelance consulting, sometimes for fellow ad man James Patterson. “I pitched him The Rabbit Factory over lunch, and Jim said, ‘It’s good, but it doesn’t have to end there.’ He suggested a twist, and another twist. It was like a master class.” Karp sold The Rabbit Factory and three more Lomax & Biggs comic thrillers (Bloodthirsty, Flipping Out, and Cut, Paste, Kill). Then Patterson invited him to collaborate on Kill Me If You Can, and on NYPD Red, which features a male/ female detective team with an uneasy romantic history who work for an elite celebrity squad (“In New York, the one percent get better service. Even when they’re dead”). “I’m living the life I hoped I could get when I was 45,” Karp says, beaming. Though he keeps the details of working with Patterson close to the vest, it’s clear they enjoy it. Karp unspools an off-color tale about rewriting a sex scene, sending a customer scuttling for the door with protective arms around her two children. “They’re hiding their kids from you, Marshall,” says Alison Gaylin. Steve Hamilton laughs, and Marshall Karp gives a cheerful shrug. “That’s me. Always too loud for the room.” Alison Gaylin is appearing with Wendy Corsi Staub 8/1 at 7pm, Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck, and 10/9 at 6pm, Word Café, Kingston (Wordcafe.us). CHRONOGRAM.COM LISTEN to an unexpurgated conversation with Marshall Karp, Alison Gaylin, and Steve Hamilton, moderated by Nina Shengold, on the August 7 episode of the Chronogram Conversations podcast, available via iTunes.

8/14 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 61


SHORT TAKES Fiction comes in many flavors. Six new books from Hudson Valley independent authors and small presses offer a delicious summer picnic.

BLAUSTEIN’S KISS STORIES BY JUDITH FELSENFELD EPIGRAPH, 2014, $14.95

Blurbed by the late, great Grace Paley, Felsenfeld’s invigorating debut collection has had a long journey to print. Seven of these elegantly crafted stories have been published in literary journals; “The Lover” was broadcast on NPR’s “Selected Shorts.” Many are set along the Hudson, from Riverdale to Rhinebeck. Rich with telling details (cold cream, nicotine patches, sponge cake) and spring-loaded dialogue, Felsenfeld’s stories offer the music and textures of life fully lived.

NEW WATER: TWELVE STORIES ANTHONY ROBINSON BLUESTONE BOOKS, 2013, $8.95

Many rivers run through it. This sparkling collection by novelist and retired SUNY New Paltz professor Robinson begins with falling drizzle and ends at a quarry pond covered with autumn leaves. In between, readers encounter golden trout streams, treacherous ski slopes, Navy ships—and a college town called New Falls. Robinson’s stories of small-town American life look at familiar terrain with fresh eyes; there’s always an unpredictable fork in the road, or a waterfall.

THE ARIMASPIA: SONGS FOR THE RAINY SEASON THOMAS MCEVILLEY, PREFACE BY CHARLES BERNSTEIN MCPHERSON & COMPANY, 2014, $20

Classical scholar and contemporary art critic McEvilley brewed this heady infusion of epic poem, erotic novel, and Menippean satire. Published posthumously by nonpareil Kingston literary press McPherson & Company, The Arimaspia is a rara avis in spiraling flight. For those attuned to its high frequency, this prodigious cerebral romp is sheer joy; in the words of Peter Lamborn Wilson, “like holding The Symposium in one hand and The Count of Monte Cristo in the other.”

IT’S A NIGHTMARE (THE GOLD STONE GIRL, BOOK 1) NICOLE QUINN BLUEBARNPRODUCTIONS, 2014, $11

Being the weird girl is never easy, but in a dystopian future where women are breeding stock and domestic pets, it’s a nightmare. A magical foundling born inside a willow tree, Mina is raised by canny off-gridders who teach her to value herself and feign compliance. But talent will out, and her transformative gifts threaten the ruling Night Mare and her copper-skinned son. Quinn’s feminist hallucination weaves gorgeous imagery and dimensional characters with glints of dark humor.

ONE HUNDRED MILES FROM MANHATTAN CHRIS ORCUTT HAVE PEN, WILL TRAVEL, 2014, $12.95

In the opening chapter of this “modern novel in ten points of view,” a restive trophy wife named Caprice Highgate morphs from bored adulteress to vigilante coyote hunter after literally shooting herself in the foot. Tongues wag...but the local gossips have highthread-count dirty laundry of their own. Orcutt’s layered saga of a horse-country town 100 miles north of the Upper East Side may set his Dutchess County neighbors wondering—eagerly or anxiously—”Am I in this?”

TWO HUSBANDS—ONE WIFE BARBARA REINA AUTHORHOUSE, 2013, $16.95

Astronaut Eric Scheil returns from a voyage to Saturn with his partner missing and chunks of his memory gone. He starts cutting-edge Flashback Therapy with Dr. David Conner, who married Eric’s lost love Julia. As the men explore new recovered-memory technologies, Eric manipulates David and Julia back into the past and prevents them from meeting. Which time frame will stick? Saugerties journalist Reina’s romantic time-travel thriller starts in midaction and never lets up.

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can’t and won’t (stories) Lydia Davis

Farrar Straus Giroux, 2014, $26

T

his new collection of stories from Lydia Davis, who lives in Rensselaer County, is a witty, warmhearted stunner. It’s packed with 115 pieces, from as short as nine words to as long as 29 pages, all written with Davis’s trademark precision and formal inventiveness, but conveying an enormous range of emotions. Davis, winner of the 2013 Man Booker International Prize, and a prominent translator of Flaubert and Proust, is a master craftsman of language. For Davis fans, the writer is clearly on her game here—lucid, sly, tragicomic, deft, with brilliant variations of form and length. But this collection is also a poignant commentary on the human condition, with a tenderness that resonates long after a story ends; for readers left cold by her previous books, this may be the come-to-Davis moment. In “The Seals,” one of the longer stories, the narrator mourns the loss of her complicated older sister, querying her own memories as she ponders the attachment. It’s a meditation on the nature of love and what keeps us separate, told in prose that’s devastatingly precise: “But her coolness was the sound of her own fear, her preoccupation with what was happening to her, not anything against me.” “I’m Pretty Comfortable, But I Could Be a Little More Comfortable” is composed entirely of 67 one-line, minor complaints, such as “My seat doesn’t have a back,” “When I toast the raisin bread, the raisins get very hot,” and “He calls me when I’m working.” These comical little irritations take on deeper meaning as they accumulate, until the last line, “The clock is ticking very loudly,” delivers a quiet punch to the gut: As we focus on a dry orange, tempus fugit. “The Language of the Telephone Company” satirizes the nonsensical authority of corporate rhetoric in nine words: “The trouble you reported recently / is now working properly.” The different types of stories in this collection give it a satisfying scope—one can pick and choose, each time discovering something new. Along with the longer stories and the canny one-liners, Davis includes delightful prose pieces excerpted from the letters of Gustav Flaubert, stories inspired by the dreams of herself and her friends, and a group of stories written as letters of complaint—in Davis’s skilled hands, this is a whole new genre. “Letter to the President of the American Biographical Institute, Inc.” starts routinely enough, with the usual thanks, then takes a comic turn: The award sent to the letter writer was addressed to someone with a different name. “Of course, it may be that you do not have my name wrong but that you are awarding your honor to an actual Lydia Danj,” speculates the befuddled writer. The whole complaint series is remarkable, revealing worlds about our own transparency. As we go about our business, we’re far more interesting than we realize—particularly if Davis happens to be watching. The sheer intelligence of Davis’s prose, and the brilliant way she scaffolds ordinary moments on to original forms, speaks to a writer who cares immensely about her work. She is as inspired by the movements of cows in a neighboring pasture (as in “The Cows”) as the letters of Flaubert. Her language can be as undecorated as Beckett, as virtuoso as O’Connor, as playful as Donald Barthelme—all writers she’s been compared to by critics. But Lydia Davis forges her own path, and generations of writers to come may consider themselves lucky to be compared to her. —Jana Martin


Experience What will you experience at Mirabai?

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Jesse A. Saperstein Penguin, 2014, $15

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enerations of parents, educators, and counselors have speculated on what is going on with a child who’s acting out. Jesse A. Saperstein wastes no time in telling us: He was that kid, growing up in the Dutchess County suburbs, and here’s what it was like to be him. The gap between child and adult, between authority and “disruptive influence,” causes so much grief in itself that, had Saperstein accomplished little else, his work would be invaluable. But that’s far from the only communication gap he addresses. With clarity, honesty, and compassion for all concerned, the author of bestselling memoir Atypical: A Life with Asperger’s in 20 1/3 Chapters takes us on another journey to the other side of the interface between “neurotypical” individuals and people on the autism spectrum. The book is written as self-help for people with Asperger’s, and it makes a great read for anyone who’s ever wondered what having Asperger’s feels like from inside. Right from the introduction, in which Saperstein makes a strong and excellent case for SpongeBob being on the spectrum, we know we are in the hands of that all-too-rare creature: a brilliant wiseass with malice toward none. His light touch with potentially heavy subjects is sheer fun to read. Saperstein’s wealth of suggestions about taking the helm of one’s own life would make a great life-skills curriculum for any young adult. Poor time management, scam artists, credit card debt, and video game addiction are stretches of modern quicksand that can trap any unwary youth. Adjusting to college life, handling romantic rejection, and coping with job interviews are near-universal challenges for bright, sensitive kids, and Saperstein’s advice is spot-on. On topics like transcending the scars left by bullies and healing rifts between siblings, he offers practical ideas that are all the more profound for their simplicity. Blunt, and kind-hearted about the ways in which typical Asperger’s behaviors impact interaction with other human beings, he has the gift of seeing the issues involved from both sides at once. On Asperger’s-specific points, like how and when to disclose a diagnosis, getting the most out of a support group, and becoming an effective self-advocate, he takes the difficulties head-on, neither shaming anyone involved nor letting them off the hook. Saperstein’s view is potentially transformative, its kindness remarkable coming from a member of a group struggling with 80 to 90 percent unemployment and a nearly infinite range of misunderstandings. His message of self-acceptance paired with accountability goes to the core of becoming an actual adult; the fact that he takes his own “symptoms” (like special interests and moments of flamboyantly unusual behavior) in stride and uses the reactions of others as opportunities makes him an outstanding role model for anyone living with the challenges he describes—or, indeed, for anyone with a pulse. Without belaboring the point, he reminds us that some traits common to people with Asperger’s are gifts—the knack for meticulous detail, the honesty that can seem nearly obsessive—and urges his fellow Aspies to build on these and take life head-on. In building a bridge and crafting a common language for people of all abilities, Jesse A. Saperstein challenges us all to make a better world. Appearing 8/9 at 3pm at Millerton Library Annex; 8/10 at 4pm at Merritt Books, Millbrook; 8/29 at 7pm at Oblong Rhinebeck. —Anne Pyburn Craig

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Word Café

a master class for readers and writers a writing series hosted by Chronogram books editor Nina Shengold

with guest teachers Abigail Thomas, Valerie Martin, Mark Wunderlich, Beverly Donofrio, Amitava Kumar, Alison Gaylin, Laura Shaine Cunningham, Jana Martin & Greg Olear, Carol Goodman, Sari Botton, Kiese Laymon, and Joseph Luzzi TIME: Thursdays 6pm-7:30pm DATE: September 4 - November 30 PLACE: outdated: an antique café

To register for classes or for more information, go to website: wordcafe.us or email: wordcafeus@gmail.com Sponsored by:

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COST: $15 single class; $150 series of 12

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8/14 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 63


POETRY

Edited by Phillip X Levine. Deadline for our September issue is August 5. Send up to three poems or three pages (whichever comes first). Full submission guidelines: www.chronogram.com/submissions.

Even nothing is something, it’s nothing.

From “Small Things”

—Wade Clemente (6 years)

the single mitten the only sock —p

FOR HENNING

BEAUTY WAS A REQUISITE FOR ARRIVING

Strands of soft wind pull back the corners of your mouth, a small pink clamshell opening.

i lose myself playing the dark for a glare at worms—beauty devoured as dirt before the game is lost i played a game

Daddy and I tell you good morning, and raise you up high into the golden air. You laugh and I swear the mountains tumble. —Liz Bonhag

THE CLOT Unheralded, the shark swims up the bloodriver The big man fanged, stem bitten. Days pass before he understands, weeks before he walks, months before he utters my name. Circling, the shark is undeterred. The big man swims upstream never quite arriving. Fins brushing his legs. —Amy Galloway

it reminded me how i used to have fun getting lost in what i was told was beauty—if i hadn’t seen beauty with my own game i came across this globe over these many years to search for what i was given what i had been in the gyration of this earth this lifetime called worm i traveled these years taking time to unravel my open spears my listening at odds with my digging i wrote a game i played something i knew in my crackled voice a revealing that faces me in my glass handtooled by my son—i was beauty in his eyes tall beauty for him what he saw i had been—before i found him he found me before i knew i was to be found before i came across this globe underneath the ground a worm for my son whose beauty—was my digging —Edwin Torres

BREATHING

ON SECOND THOUGHT

Outside, a man lights a cigarette. In the restaurant, I lift a spoon. A couple walks by the window arguing. The cook in the kitchen is humming. Someone spits on the pavement. I am aware of breathing in and out. The man, pacing, lights another cigarette. My bowl is empty, glazed with coconut milk.

My lungs were once jars filled with pretty petals, words drenched in honey and sprinkled with sugar crystals, but somehow my tongue has withered and my teeth taste like sawdust, spewing bland truths and now I suddenly realize why we savor the lies.

—Elizabeth Brulé Farrell

64 POETRY CHRONOGRAM 8/14

—Brittany Rubio

10 CENTIMETERS AS MEASURED BY THE MIDWIFE’S HAND PENNED BY THE WRITER’S HAND With woman I write the story of a birth rebirth a circle inside a circle outside a circle to see I close my eyes to hear I become silent Her noises come— The breath steadies— My eyes trained on the shadow My hand holds the instrument loosely on the page My hands are the instrument to measure her openness. It is not a diagram on a page or even the words written here. It is not string crocheted around a rock or stitched into cloth to describe the circumference the way it was when we were learning to gauge. It is the dynamic opening of a physical soul and it hurts like hell. How far do we open and for how long? Long after our cervix has closed and the afterpains have stopped pulsing. Long after we have played milkmaid and our weight has returned and we live in our bodies for ourselves again. And long after the pencil grip and the pen has left the page and the book is closed. A circle inside a circle outside a circle. —H. D. Stubblefield


THE BATTLE

EXPEDITION

MEMORIAL DAY TRAIN (OF) THOUGHTS

The largest part of the battle is coming face to face with the blank document. No,

The muscles of your shoulder are hills and valleys. My eyes trace the ink forest outline, its dells glowing softly in the grey morning light.

stop thinking about it my smile forces the sky agape my fingers m o u s e around yours I want to caper with ghosts ; they seem to be circling you (do you want to walk?) I want to chase you Monday is wearing its Sunday best the babysitters are sprawled across rooftops sipping beer and the parents are here with us all plastic forks and gold watches—bellies and egos full i watch the man with rusted eyes and calloused fingers smoke a cigarette—only the filter love makes you desperate see: resourceful he seems to be having more fun than we are every day is memorial day for him, at least (is that what you’ll tell your kids?) Probably. I just want to eat snow cones and hold your hand there’s no poetry there, sorry. There are no pools in the hotels guarding central park, either maybe the plaza / to be wealthy, well… I don’t want to love more equal or lesser value (I thought we were in come-down love) i don’t want to tell you that love is the come-down stop thinking about it

The largest part of the battle is coming face to face with the full page, the soggy path, discovering your breadcrumb trail infantile, endless, and right where you left it. No, The largest part of the battle is learning to yoyo loneliness using just thumb, index, and pointer finger. Bucking up with a slight tug. Yes, The largest part of the battle is certainly baring eye contact after committing truth, holding the hand of a sister to drag her into the eyesight of searchlights where the mirrors are cemented in judgment and oh how shrunken the dining room table becomes. I am sorry that my head feels like a mason jar of fireflies. I only want to write something new, something impersonal, some forget-me-not. —Mary Rubio

UNSPOKEN Say nothing or, if that’s too hard, say less than what you said before. Restrain the will to speak your mind; be kind to those whose ears are near. It’s best to keep your tongue still. Too many words have passed your lips. Too many lies, half-truths that spin the world by counter-turns, and burn to ashes all that’s real; ashes, long before they touch the ground.

The air is cold but tiny firecrackers explode beneath your skin, melting the tundra between your body and mine into a deep blue sea. It is not always easy to reach me, through the squalls and past the breakers, but your pursuit means the world. —Katie Cohan

WALLS China has a great one Berlin tore theirs down Humpty fell right off his and you, you breached the one around my heart —Eileen Van Hook

—Bri Gangi

TIME IS NOT THE NET Time is not the net. Time is for us now a perpetually rushing wave and we are constantly taken under.

THE PATH OF PROGRESS High rise. Tower of steel. Monument to commerce echoes empty at midnight, sleeps alone. —A. J. Huffman

SIN TITULO tonight my eyes are not my eyes as I search for someone else in every face —Simone Perry

Time is the water around me the sea I cannot yet escape. I thrash escalating my fears by disturbing matter at higher frequencies but time never changes. I remain submerged in both its joys and pains. These are the nearest elements as buoyant and inflated as I am all coined and caught, pulled and soon buried. Here, self-control is a relentless siren and treading does not sustain me. Time is rushing, perpetual, water and only the Mystery above my diaphragm keeps me floating. Soon I will rise and know what I trust: some do escape. And there is indeed a net wider than the sea. —Margaret Ferrec

—William Joel 8/14 CHRONOGRAM POETRY 65


Food & Drink

caption tk

Trail Mix

The Rail Trail Café

By Karen B. Angel Photographs by Roy Gumpel

T

here’s a loud buzz coming from the Wallkill Valley Rail Trail these days, and it’s not just the bugs. An organic, vegetarian eatery where rail-trail users can relax and refuel sprouted in Rosendale in early May, the brainchild of Brian Farmer and Tara Johannessen. Customers have been coming ever since—on foot, on bikes, on horseback, and even in cars. Farmer and Johannessen launched the Rail Trail Café through a Kickstarter campaign that netted $6,600 and plenty of community support, including a donated pizza oven and an initiative by Rosendale residents to repair a rutted stretch of rail trail leading to the café. The couple’s timing was perfect. The Wallkill Valley Rail Trail is getting more use than ever thanks to recent rehabilitation efforts—including the reopening last summer of the trestle bridge that spans the Rondout Creek in Rosendale, creating an unbroken 24-mile stretch from Gardiner to Kingston. “This is so frickin’ pleasant,” says Jordan Lear, 43, a Montrealer vacationing in Rosendale who discovered the café while on a bike ride. “It’s beyond a good idea—it’s brilliant. It feels like you’re on holy ground.” The 96-square-foot café is nestled under a canopy of tall trees in a clearing about a mile south of the trestle bridge. The couple built the café car themselves, incorporating materials donated by friends and local builders, including aged oak for the body and clear polycarbonate roofing that floods the space with light. Red shutters charmingly frame the window where orders are taken. The car is just large enough to house a conventional oven, a refrigerator, a freezer, and workspace for two people. The wood-fired pizza oven, designed for maximum efficiency and festooned with clay tree roots, was donated by local pizza-oven builder Shawn DeRyder. There are tables decorated with candles and daisy-filled vases as well as strategically placed 66 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 8/14

tree stumps. Citronella torches ward off the bugs, and a netted space is in the planning stages. The menu features a variety of hyperfresh, delectable, and aesthetically pleasing dishes, such as salads, burritos, steamed dumplings, and, of course, pizza. Dishes will shift depending on the availability of local produce, with green-corn tamales debuting this month. In addition to prepared food, the couple sells produce and freshly baked bread and pastries on Saturday mornings. Prices on the menu range from $2 for a cider pop to $8 for pizza. “It’s an oasis in the woods,” says Fishkill architect Robert Marshall, 62, who recently brought his two dogs, Shadow and Maestro, to listen to Big Joe Fitz & the Lo-Fis, one of several music acts that will play at the café over the summer. Throughout the afternoon, about 50 people stopped by to hear the band and sample the fresh fare. “Everyone’s talking about farm to table—well, they’re growing it right here,” says Big Joe Fitz, 65, of Rosendale, as his guitarist, Mark Dziuba, 53, bicycles up with a guitar strapped to his back. The idea for the café took shape after Farmer and Johannessen bought a 1.6-acre parcel of land on Stone Mountain Farm in Rosendale nine years ago. The 200-acre Stone Mountain has communal vegetable gardens and abuts the Wallkill Valley Rail Trail. On the couple’s property, called Farmer’s Table Farm, they built a 1,500-square-foot solar-powered wood cottage and planted the tiny seedlings known as microgreens, leafy greens, heirloom vegetables, grains, and herbs—“high-value crops,” Farmer says, which the couple sells wholesale. Farmer’s Table is about a quarter of a mile north of where the café now stands on land leased from Stone Mountain. “Working in our garden, we could see hundreds of people biking and hiking on the rail trail on weekends,” says


Opposite: The Rail Trail Café is a 96-square-foot shed just off the Wallkill Valley Rail Trail. Above: Hikers, bikers, and horseback riders stop by for pizza, dumplings, and salads.

the aptly named Farmer, 52, an agricultural consultant who grew up in Tennessee and moved to the Hudson Valley in 1981 to study at the Creative Music Studio in Woodstock. “We wanted to create a space where people could come off the trail and a farm-based business where we could do value-added things.” Johannessen, 48, who grew up on a Stone Ridge goat farm and has a master’s degree in language-arts teaching from Bard College, was influenced by her extensive travels in Asia. “It’s very common to find little cafés on trails or in remote places there,” she says. She also was informed by childhood memories of a beloved Marbletown Park concession stand whose Italian ices and corn dogs tasted particularly delicious after a dip in the Esopus Creek. The pairing of refreshment with a natural setting like the rail trail is “organic and authentic,” says Bill Bannan, 56, a jazz-brunch organizer from High Falls. “I’m wondering why no one thought of it before.” The café’s food draws praise for its presentation as well as its taste. “Look how colorful and beautiful it is,” says David Miller, 55, a software account executive from East Fishkill, eying a red-bean, sweet-potato burrito packed with fresh mixed greens. “It’s a rainbow of vegetation.” A salad bursting with baby lettuce, sunflower and buckwheat greens, pea shoots, and roasted beets and pumpkin seeds was a sweet and nutty confection. Even without shitake mushrooms—all of which had been snapped up—the steamed dumplings were a satisfying blend of cabbage, kale, onions, and ginger that tasted even better plain than with the sesame-ginger shoyu dipping sauce. The burrito managed to meet the exacting standards of an 11-year-old boy. “It’s very flavorful, with the perfect amount of sour cream,” says Zhou Corzine of New Paltz, who had biked to the café with his parents and also scarfed down some pizza. “I love the fact that the microgreens are harvested

right over there,” chimes in his mom, Martha Cheo, 51, adding that she got her son out on his bike only by dangling the promise of excellent pizza. The wood-fired pizzas already have a loyal following. Toppings such as wild-greens pesto, baby turnips, and zucchini squash impart that just-picked flavor. Among the drinks, the rosewater lemonade is a standout. “It’s just what I want now!” declares Xuemei Dunda, 44, of Kingston, who had stumbled across the café on a stroll down the trail. Farmer and Johannessen sometimes have to hustle to keep up with the demand. The wait for food can be on the long side, but as Farmer puts it, “People are here to chill. They’re not in a rush.” Adds Johannessen, “What’s been happening is that parents are bringing a bottle of wine and relaxing while their kids play and laugh. It’s a very informal atmosphere, and the kids don’t have to be muzzled.” For those who crave private dining, two red picnic tables are set up in a meadow across the trail. There’s also a hitching post to secure the “horse regulars,” as Farmer calls them, who receive free treats. (Dogs also get free treats.) Business has been brisk enough that the partners are envisioning another Kickstarter campaign this fall to finance a performance space and additional seating in the meadow. “We thought, ‘Could this ever work?’” says Ron Frank, 63, a day trader from Saugerties who is friends with the couple and brought his wife and stepdaughter to eat pizza and hear Big Joe Fitz. “Well, it’s working, and we’re delighted. I’m thrilled to see the rail trail being used this way.” The Rail Trail Café is located just off the Wallkill Valley Rail Trail on Stone Mountain Farm in Rosendale, about a mile south of the Rosendale trestle bridge. The Rail Trail Café is open weekends through mid-October: Friday from 5 to 8pm, and Saturday and Sunday 9am to 8pm. If it’s raining, the café will be closed. (845) 399-4800; Railtrailcaferosendale.com 8/14 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 67


tastings directory Classic Italian Food Prepared with Considerable Refinement Private Parties | Catering COMING SOON:

Outdoor Courtyard Garden Dining Tuesday - Sunday, 5pm-10pm 22 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3055 www.puccinirhinebeck.com

Cafés Bistro-to-Go 948 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 340-9800 www.bluemountainbistro.com

Delis Jack’s Meats & Deli 79 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2244

Restaurants Kitchenette 1219 Route 213, High Falls, NY (845) 687-7464 www.kitchenetterestaurant.com

LaBella Pizza Bistro 194 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2633 www.labellapizzabistro.com

Main Course 175 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2600 www.maincoursecatering.com Restaurant, Bar, Bakery & Catering

Monday Nights are Neighbor Nights!

1219 Route 213, High Falls

Come in for dinner and enjoy a slice of cake or pie for dessert on us!

(845) 687-7464 www.kitchenetterestaurant.com With two locations in NYC, we are so excited to now be a part of the Hudson Valley Community.

Thirsty Thursday Nights Enjoy homemade artisan pizzas with a pint of any craft beer for $14! All refill pints $4.50!

The River Grill

Nestled on Newburgh's historic Waterfront with picturesque views of the Hudson Valley and the magnificent Hudson River, The River Grill takes pride in offering outstanding food and superlative service. The river grill is open every day of the week Serving lunch & dinner

40 Front Street | Newburgh 845.561.9444

www.therivergrill.com

Come and enjoy an extraordinary dining experience! 68 TASTINGS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Osaka Restaurant 22 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7338 or (845) 876-7278 74 Broadway, Tivoli, NY www.osakasushi.net Foodies, consider yourselves warned and informed! Osaka Restaurant is Rhinebeck’s direct link to Japan’s finest cuisines! Enjoy the freshest sushi and delicious traditional Japanese small plates cooked with love by this family owned and operated treasure for over 19 years! For more information and menus, go to osakasushi.net.

Puccini Ristorante 22 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3055 www.puccinirhinebeck.com

Suruchi Indian Restaurant 5 Church Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2772 www.suruchiindian.com

that you know and love at Terrapin Restaurant. Terrapin’s professional event staff specializes in creating unique events to highlight your individuality, and will assist in every aspect of planning your Hudson Valley event.

Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro 6426 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3330 www.terrapinrestaurant.com custsvc@terrapinrestaurant.com Voted “Best of the Hudson Valley” by Chronogram Magazine. From far-flung origins, the world’s most diverse flavors meet and mingle. Out of elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh, and dynamic: dishes to delight both body and soul. Serving lunch and dinner seven days a week. Local. Organic. Authentic.

The Hop 458 Main Street, Beacon, NY www.thehopbeacon.com

The Rhinecliff 4 Grinnell Street, Rhinecliff, NY (845) 876-0590 www.therhinecliff.com reception@therhinecliff.com Farm to table Gastropub on the Hudson, beautifully restored historic railroad hotel. Outdoor seating, riverside patio. Favorites include – Ploughman’s Board, Steak Frites, Grilled Ribeye, Fish ‘N’ Chips, “Sticky Toffee Pudding.” Extensive wine/beer list. Bkfast & Dinner Daily (Lunch- Memorial Day - Labor Day) Sat Brunch & Sunday Live Jazz Brunch. Off-premise catering . Weddings/Special events. All rooms enjoy river views, pvt balcony’s.

The Would Restaurant 120 North Road, Highland, NY

Terrapin Catering & Events

(845) 691-9883

6426 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 889-8831 www.terrapincatering.com hugh@terrapincatering.com Local. Organic. Authentic. At a Terrapin event, you can expect the same high quality, award-winning cuisine and service

www.thewould.com

Wine Bars Jar’d Wine Pub Water Street Market, New Paltz, NY www.jardwinepub.com∑


Coop erative ly Owne d • Comm u n i t y Fo c u s ed Woven Roots Farm Lee & Tyringham, MA

Community Matters. Shop Co-op. www.berkshire.coop 42 Bridge Street • Great Barrington, MA • 413.528.9697

Craft Beer & Artisanal Fare

458 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-8676 www.thehopbeacon.com

8/14 CHRONOGRAM TASTINGS DIRECTORY 69


business directory

Accommodations Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa 220 North Road, Milton, NY (877) 7-INN-SPA; (845) 795-1310 www.buttermilkfallsinn.com

business directory

Animal Sanctuaries Catskill Animal Sanctuary 316 Old Stage Road, Saugerties, NY (845) 336-8447 www.CASanctuary.org Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary Willow, NY (845) 679-5955 www.WoodstockSanctuary.org

Antiques Hyde Park Antiques Center 4192 Albany Post Road Hyde Park, NY (845) 229-8200 www.hydeparkantiques.net

Architecture BuildingLogic Inc (845) 443-0657 www.BuildingLogicInc.com Richard Miller, AIA 28 Dug Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4480 www.richardmillerarchitect.com

Art Galleries & Centers Bennington Museum 75 Main Street, Bennington, VT (802) 447-1571 www.benningtonmuseum.org Center for Metal Arts 44 Jayne Street, Florida, NY (845) 651-7550 www.centerformetalarts.com/blog Dorsky Museum SUNY New Paltz 1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3844 www.newpaltz.edu/museum 70 BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/14

sdma@newpaltz.edu Longyear Gallery 785 Main Street, Margaretville, NY (845) 586-3270 www.longyeargallery.org Mark Gruber Gallery New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241 www.markgrubergallery.com Motorcyclepedia Museum 250 Lake Street (Route 32) Newburgh, NY (845) 569-9065 Omi International Arts Center 1405 County Route 22, Ghent, NY www.artomi.org Storm King Art Center (845) 534-3115 www.stormkingartcenter.org Uptown Gallery and Kingston Festival of the Arts 296 Wall Street, Kingston, NY www.kingstonfestival.org Wassaic Project Wassaic, NY www.wassaicproject.org Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2079 www.byrdcliffe.org events@woodstockguild.org

Art Supplies Catskill Art & Office Supply Kingston, NY: (845) 331-7780 Poughkeepsie, NY: (845) 452-1250 Woodstock, NY: (845) 679-2251 www.catskillart.com White Barn Farm 815 Albany Post Road, New Paltz, NY (914) 456-6040 www.whitebarnsheepandwool.com

Artisans Art Murphy www.artmurphy.com

Attorneys Traffic and Criminally Related Matters. Karen A. Friedman, Esq., President of the Association of Motor Vehicle Trial Attorneys 30 East 33rd Street, 4th Floor New York, NY (845) 266-4400 or (212) 213-2145 k.friedman@msn.com www.newyorktrafficlawyer.com Representing companies and motorists throughout New York State. Speeding, Reckless Driving, DWI, Trucking Summons and Misdemeanors, Aggravated Unlicensed Matters, Appeals, Article 78 Cases. 27 Years of Trial Experience.

Audio & Video Markertek Video Supply www.markertek.com

Auto Sales & Services Fleet Service Center 185 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4812 Kinderhook Toyota 1908 New York 9H, Hudson, NY (518) 822-9911 www.kinderhooktoyota.com

Beverages Binnewater (845) 331-0504 www.binnewater.com

Book Publishers Monkfish Publishing 22 East Market Street, Suite 304, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4861 www.monkfishpublishing.com

Bookstores Barner Books 3 Church Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2635 www.barnerbooks.com

Mirabai of Woodstock 23 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2100 www.mirabai.com Olde Warwick Booke Shoppe 31 Main Street, Warwick, NY (845) 544-7183 www.yeoldewarwickbookshoppe. com warwickbookshoppe@hotmail.com

Broadcasting WDST 100.1 Radio Woodstock Woodstock, NY www.wdst.com

Building Services & Supplies Associated Lightning Rod Co. (518) 789-4603; (845) 373-8309; (860) 364-1498 www.alrci.com Cabinet Designers 747 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2200 www.cabinetdesigners.com Glenn’s Wood Sheds (845) 255-4704 H. Houst & Son Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2115 www.hhoust.com Herrington’s Hillsdale, NY: (518) 325-3131 Hudson, NY: (518) 828-9431, www.herringtons.com John A Alvarez and Sons 3572 Route 9, Hudson, NY (518) 851-9917 www.alvarezmodulars.com L Browe Asphalt Services (518) 479-1400 www.broweasphalt.com Millbrook Cabinetry & Design 2612 Route 44, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-3006 millbrookcabinetryanddesign.com


N & S Supply www.nssupply.com info@nssupply.com Williams Lumber & Home Centers (845) 876-WOOD www.williamslumber.com

Business Services Tracking Wonder - the art & science of captivating creativity Jeffrey Davis, Founder, Accord, NY (845) 679-9441 www.trackingwonder.com We build business artists. We help people build up online & offline audiences, master their work flow, and author captivating books without falling into traps of rigid thinking. 5 consultants + website team. Upcoming event: Your Brave New Story Intensive, Mohonk Mtn Resort, Oct 27-31.

Cinemas

Dance Lessons Got2LINDY Dance Studios (845) 236-3939 www.got2lindy.com

Durants Tents & Events 1155 Route 9, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-0011 www.durantstents.com info@durantstents.com Durants Tents is a complete party rental company serving the Hudson Valley. Our professional staff prides themselves on quality products, dependability and service. Our extensive selection and vast inventory makes us uniquely qualified to accommodate your event needs, from office and convention to the back lawn or the ballroom.

New York State Sheep & Wool Festival www.sheepandwool.com/workshops

Upstate Films 6415 Montgomery St. Route 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-2515, 132 Tinker Street, Woodstock (845) 6796608, NY (845) 876-2515 www.upstatefilms.org

Woodstock Invitational LLC Bearsville Theater, Woodstock, NY www.woodstockinvitational.com

Craft Galleries Crafts People 262 Spillway Road, West Hurley, NY (845) 331-3859 www.craftspeople.us Representing over 500 artisans, Crafts People boasts four buildings brimming with fine crafts; the largest selection in the Hudson Valley. All media represented, including: sterling silver and 14K gold jewelry, blown glass, pottery, turned wood, kaleidoscopes, wind chimes, leather, clothing, stained glass, etc.

Stephen Fabrico Ceramic Designs: Ceramic Studio established in 1980 76 Church Street, Bloomington, NY (845) 853-3567 (2 miles North of Rosendale) Functional pottery, garden objects, bird houses, feeders, baths, planters, garden sculptures (Various sizes). Garden tours by appointment. Call for details and directions.

Custom Home Design Atlantic Custom Homes 2785 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY www.lindalny.com

find out at the Dragonsearch workshop series

effective advertising for FACEBOOK & TWITTER SEPTEMBER 17TH 2014 EARLY BIRD ONLY $30

845.915.5086

Our community managers will walk you through the do’s and don’ts of social ads. You’ll leave confident to run your own campaigns.

Farm Markets & Natural Food Stores Adam’s Fairacre Farms 1240 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 569-0303, 1560 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-6300, 765 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-4330 www.adamsfarms.com Berkshire Co Op Market 42 Bridge Street Great Barrington, MA (413) 528-9697 www.berkshire.coop

DEALS Find deals with these local merchants and more.

Hawthorne Valley Farm Store 327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7500 www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org storeadmin@hawthornevalleyfarm.org A full-line natural foods store set on a 400-acre Biodynamic farm in central Columbia County with on-farm organic Bakery, Kraut Cellar and Creamery. Farm-fresh foods include cheeses, yogurts, raw milk, breads, pastries, sauerkraut, and more. Two miles east of the Taconic Parkway at the Harlemville/ Philmont exit. Monday-Sunday, 7:30am to 7:00pm.

AMAL’S | NEW PALTZ

Authentic Middle Eastern Cuisine

Hudson Valley Farmers Market Pitcher Lane, Red Hook, NY Mother Earth’s Store House 1955 South Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 296-1069, 249 Main Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-9614, 300 Kings Mall Court, Route 9W, Kingston, NY (845) 336-5541

ANOTHER FORK IN THE ROAD | RED HOOK From comfort food to culinary adventures

Visit chronogramdeals.com to save 50% to 90%* *To receive discount, deal must be purchased at chronogramdeals.com

8/14 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY 71

business directory

Quail Hollow Events (845) 679-8087 or (845) 246-3414 www.quailhollow.com

Tech Smiths 45 North Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 443-4866 www.tech-smiths.com

ADVERTISE ON SOCIAL MEDIA?

Events

Rosendale Theater Collective Rosendale, NY www.rosendaletheatre.org

Computer Services

should I


www.motherearthstorehouse.com Founded in 1978, Mother Earth’s is committed to providing you with the best possible customer service as well as a grand selection of high quality organic and natural products. Visit one of our convenient locations and find out for yourself!

Pennings Farm Market & Orchards 161 South Route 94, Warwick, NY (845) 986-1059 www.penningsfarmmarket.com Sunflower Natural Foods Market 75 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5361 www.sunflowernatural.com info@sunflowernatural.com

Financial Advisors Third Eye Associates, Ltd. 38 Spring Lake Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 752-2216 www.thirdeyeassociates.com

Gardening & Garden Supplies

business directory

Mac’s Agway 68 Firehouse Lane, Red Hook, (845) 876-1559, 145 Route 32 North, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0050 Northern Dutchess Botanical Gardens 389 Salisbury Turnpike, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2953 www.NDBGonline.com The Crafted Garden (845) 858-6353 www.thecraftedgarden.com

Graphic Design Annie Internicola, Illustrator www.aydeeyai.com

Home Furnishings & Decor Asia Barong Route 7/199 Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington, MA (413) 528-5091 www.asiabarong.com

Home Improvement Gentech LTD 3017 US Route 9W, New Windsor, NY (845) 568-0500 www.gentechltd.com

Interior Design New York Designer Fabric Outlet 3143 Route 9, Valatie, NY (518) 758-1555 www.nydfo.myshopify.com

Jewelry, Fine Art & Gifts Dreaming Goddess 44 Raymond Avenue Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2206 72 BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/14

www.DreamingGoddess.com Hudson Valley Goldsmith Academy Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-5872 www.HudsonValleyGoldsmith.com Hummingbird Jewelers 23 A. East Market Street Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4585 www.hummingbirdjewelers.com hummingbirdjewelers@hotmail.com

Kitchenwares Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6208 www.warrenkitchentools.com The Hudson Valley’s culinary emporium for anyone who loves to cook or entertain. A selection of fine cutlery, professional cookware, appliances, barware and serving pieces. An assortment of machines for fine coffee brewing.  Expert sharpening on premises. Open seven days. 

Landscaping Augustine Landscaping & Nursery 9W & Van Kleecks Lane Kingston, NY (845) 338-4936 www.augustinenursery.com Coral Acres, Keith Buesing, Topiary, Landscape Design, Rock Art (845) 255-6634 Webster Landscape Sheffield, MA (413) 229-8124 www.websterlandscapes.com

Lawyers & Mediators Ranni Law Firm 148 North Main Street, Florida, NY (845) 651-0999 www.rannilaw.com Schneider, Pfahl & Rahm, LLP Woodstock: (845) 679-9868, New York City: (212) 629-7744, www.schneiderpfahl.com

Marketing DragonSearch (845) 383-0890 www.dragonsearchmarketing.com dragon@dragonsearch.net

Musical Instruments Francis Morris Violins Great Barrington, NY (413) 528-0165 www.francismorrisviolins.com

Organizations Hudson Valley Current www.HudsonValleyCurrent.org

Performing Arts Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Bethel, NY (800) 745-3000 www.bethelwoodscenter.org Falcon Music & Art Productions 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro, NY (845) 236-7970 www.liveatthefalcon.com Helsinki on Broadway 405 Columbia Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-4800 www.helsinkihudson.com Kaatsbaan International Dance Center 120 Broadway, Tivoli, NY (845) 757-5106 www.kaatsbaan.org www.facebook.com/kaatsbaan Maverick Concerts 120 Mavervick Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-8217 www.MaverickConcerts.org Performance Spaces of the 21st Century (518) 392-6121 www.ps21chatham.org ps21@taconic.net Saratoga Performing Arts Center www.spac.org Tannery Pond Concerts Darrow School, New Lebanon, NY (888) 820-1696 www.tannerypondconcerts.org The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio 339 Central Ave, Albany, NY (518) 465-5233 www.thelinda.org The Linda provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personnel with world-renowned artists, academy award winning directors, headliner comedians and local, regional, and national artists on the verge of national recognition. An intimate, affordable venue, serving beer and wine, The Linda is a night out you won’t forget.

The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College Annandale-on-Hudson, NY (845) 758-7900 www.fischercenter.bard.edu

Pet Services & Supplies Hurley Veterinary Hospital 509 Hurley Avenue, Hurley, NY (845) 331-7100 www.hurleyveterinaryhospital.com Pet Country 6830 Rt. 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-9000

Photography Artcraft Camera & Digital 300 Plaza Road, Kingston, NY (845) 331-3141 www.artcraftcamera.com Deborah DeGraffenreid Photography www.DeborahDegraffenreid.com Fionn Reilly Photography Saugerties, NY (845) 802-6109 www.fionnreilly.com

Picture Framing Atelier Renee Fine Framing The Chocolate Factory, 54 Elizabeth Street, Suite 3, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-1004 www.atelierreneefineframing.com renee@atelierreneefineframing.com A visit to Red Hook must include stopping at this unique workshop! Combining a beautiful selection of moulding styles and mats with conservation quality materials, expert design advice and skilled workmanship, Renee Burgevin, owner and Certified Picture Framer, has over 26 years experience. Special services include shadow-box and oversize framing as well as fabric-wrapped and French matting. Also offering mirrors.

Pools & Spas Aqua Jet 1606 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-8080 www.aquajetpools.com

Real Estate Mondello Upstate Properties West Market Street, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-5555 www.mondellorealestate.com Paula Redmond Real Estate Inc. (845) 677-0505 (845) 876-6676 www.paularedmond.com

Schools Canterbury School 101 Aspetuck Avenue New Milford, CT (860) 210-3832 www.cbury.org admissions@sbury.org Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-5343 www.caryinstitute.org Dutchess Community College Poughkeepsie and Wappingers Falls (845) 431-8000 www.sunydutchess.edu Harvey School 260 Jay Street, Katonah, NY (914) 232-3161 www.harveyschool.org admissions@harveyschool.org


Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7092 www.hawthornevalleyschool.org info@hawthornevalleyschool.org Located in central Columbia County, NY and situated on a 400-acre working farm, Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School supports the development of each child and provides students with the academic, social, and practical skills needed to live in today’s complex world. Also offering parent-child playgroups and High School boarding. Local busing. Nurturing living connections, from early childhood through grade 12.

Montgomery Montessori School 136 Clinton Street, Montgomery, NY (845) 401-9232 www.montgomeryms.com Mount Saint Mary College 330 Powell Avenue, Newburgh, NY (845) 569-3225 www.msmc.edu Mountain Laurel Waldorf School 16 South Chestnut Street New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0033 www.mountainlaurel.org

info@primrosehillschool.com Located on 7 acres in the village of Rhinebeck with a farm, Primrose Hill School is currently accepting applications for our mixed age kindergarten, 1st and 2nd Grades. Please inquire if you are interested in grades 3 and higher.

Historic Huguenot Street Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1660 Town Tinker Tube Rental Bridge Street, Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-5553 www.towntinker.com

Transportation Royal Chariot Car Service (845) 876-3000 www.royalchariotcarservice.com

Weddings Dream Ceremonies (845) 255-5726 https://www.facebook.com/ dreamceremonies1 yiskah7@gmail.com Through poetry and prayer from many traditions, Jessica will help you create the ceremony of your dreams! Interfaith, Multicultural, Spiritual: Weddings, Vow Renewal, Baby Naming, Rites of Passage. Rev. Jessica (Yiskah) Koock, MA, was ordained by the Universal Life Church Monastery in 1990.

Wine & Liquor Kingston Wine Co. 65 Broadway on the Rondout, Kingston, NY www.kingstonwine.com Miron Wine and Spirits 15 Boices Lane, Kingston, NY (845) 336-5155 www.mironwineanspirits.com

Workshops

South Kent School 40 Bulls Bridge Road South Kent, CT www.southkentschool.org

Children’s Media Project

SUNY New Paltz www.newpaltz.edu

Hudson Valley Photoshop Training, Stephen Blauweiss

SUNY Ulster 491 Cottekill Rd, Stone Ridge, NY www.sunyulster.edu/CampUlster Campulster@sunyulster.edu The Manitou School 1656 Route 9D, Cold Spring, NY (646) 295-7349 www.manitouschool.org

business directory

Primrose Hill School Elementary and Early Childhood Education inspired by the Waldorf Philosophy 23 Spring Brook Park, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-1226 www.primrosehillschool.com

Tourism

www.childrensmediaproject.org

(845) 339-7834 www.hudsonvalleyphotoshop.com

Writing Services Peter Aaron www.peteraaron.org info@peteraaron.org Wallkill Valley Writers

Trinity - Pawling School 700 Route 22, Pawling, NY (845) 855-4825 www.trinitypawling.org

New Paltz, NY (845) 750-2370 www.wallkillvalleywriters.com khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com

Wild Earth Wilderness School New Paltz / High Falls area, (845) 256-9830 www.wildearthprograms.org info@wildearthprograms.org

Write with WVW. Weekly workshop meetings. New series begins Fall 2014. Registration information available at www.wallkillvalleywriters.com or by email: khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com. 8/14 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY 73


whole living guide

LYME LESSONS

ONE DOCTOR FINDS THAT LYME DISEASE HAS A LOT TO TEACH US ABOUT EPIDEMICS, CHRONIC ILLNESSES, AND A MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENT IN NEED OF A PARADIGM SHIFT.

by wendy kagan

illustration by annie internicola When Dr. Richard Horowitz talks about Lyme disease, the words come tumbling out with a fiery urgency. It’s an urgency pent up from 25 years of working in the trenches with chronically ill people suffering from a dizzying array of symptoms. A practice in Hyde Park, in the heart of New York deer-tick country, gives Horowitz what he calls a “bull’s-eye view” of an epidemic. He’s the doc that “The Today Show” calls when they need an expert to expound on Lyme—and the one that the weak and the pain-wracked come to find when they can’t get relief anywhere else. Here, Horowitz talks about his new book, Why Can’t I Get Better: Solving the Mystery of Lyme & Chronic Disease (St. Martin’s, 2013)—and lessons gleaned from treating over 12,000 patients to date. How did your work with Lyme disease patients turn into a book about treating not just Lyme, but also all manner of chronic illnesses? What people need to realize first is that Lyme is the number one spreading vector-borne epidemic worldwide. I estimate that we have two or three million cases per year in the United States, and that number is going to keep growing. But it’s not just a local disease—it’s global. In China, they say that 6 percent of the population has Lyme disease: That’s 78 million people [with Lyme] on the other side of the world. Next, we need to recognize that Lyme is a disease on its own, but it’s also mimicking a host of other diseases. The majority of people who come to see me who’ve not had a diagnosis of Lyme have been diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, early dementia, or autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and multiple sclerosis, with Lyme at the base of why they’re sick. Lyme is the great imitator of all these chronic diseases. People might be surprised to learn that 75 percent of our healthcare costs and deaths in the United States are due to chronic disease—but our health-care system doesn’t have a chronic disease model. I’m presenting one with this book. There’s a lot of controversy in the medical field today over whether or not Lyme is a chronic disease. The medical establishment is now debating: Is Lyme a persistent infection or not? Several recent studies suggest that it can be persistent—and my own clinical experience confirms that finding. Yet with any new disease, there’s always going to be controversy. Right now with Lyme it’s two groups of doctors—those with the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and those with the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS). IDSA says that the blood tests for Lyme are reliable and that it’s easy to diagnose, easy to cure. ILADS, of which I am a founding member, says the tests are not reliable, and it’s not easy to cure—and not just because of Lyme disease but because of all these other tick-borne infections that are also getting into the body. The patients who come to see me haven’t just been infected by Borrelia 74 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 8/14

burgdorferi, the spirochetal bacteria that causes Lyme. They’ve often been infected as well by co-infections that can be bacterial, viral, or parasitic. When Lyme gets together with these other co-infections, it behaves very differently. So rather than “chronic Lyme,” I prefer to use the term MSIDS—or Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome. For Lyme patients with chronic symptoms, “Lyme-MSIDS” is more appropriate, because it’s not always just Lyme that is causing these symptoms. If Lyme is the great imitator, mimicking dozens of other disease pathways, then how do you know you have Lyme and not something else? There’s a constellation of symptoms that you see very often with Lyme disease: fatigue, stiff neck, headache, joint pain, nerve symptoms like tingling or numbness, sleep problems, memory problems or brain fog, and mood disorders like depression and anxiety. You might see cardiac symptoms like chest pain and rapid palpitations. In kids it’s known to cause gastrointestinal symptoms, mood disorders, problems in school like attention deficit disorder (ADD), and cognitive difficulties. A host of people will get neurological symptoms like dizziness, light sensitivity, sound sensitivity. It causes every psychiatric manifestation you can imagine, including schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, Turret’s syndrome, depression, anxiety—all of these have been described in the medical literature by Lyme disease. Misdiagnoses happen, but there are certain signs that it’s Lyme. One sign is that you’ll have good and bad days—the symptoms will come and go. Also, you can get symptoms that migrate around the body—the muscle pain and joint pain. We don’t usually see migratory joint pain with chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, and rheumatoid arthritis. The third point is that you may have nerve symptoms like tingling, numbness, or burning that tend to come and go, or move around the body. In women, symptoms will get worse around their menstrual cycle. Another sign is that when you take antibiotics the symptoms go away, but then the symptoms come back when the antibiotics are over. Or vice versa: You get worse on the antibiotics as the spirochetes are dying off. These are the classic signs. The last point is, you’ve done a blood test, and if you have any one of five bands on the Western blot, then bingo! You’ve been exposed to Lyme. People look for the bull’s-eye rash, or erythema migrans (EM) rash, but half of the people don’t get a rash at all, and sometimes the rash doesn’t look like a bull’s-eye. Maybe 15 percent of people get a bull’s-eye rash. Can you talk about some of the other tick-borne co-infections that many of us are getting—perhaps without even knowing? The big ones are babesia, ehrlichia, anaplasma, and bartonella. Many Lyme patients may also have parasites—and if you have babesiosis, which is caused by a malaria-type organism called babesia, it affects your immune system’s ability


8/14 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING 75


The Sedona Method‰ Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy Discover how to effortlessly turn fear, loss, grief, stress, trauma, addiction, spiritual crisis, and any other life challenge into courage, joy, peace, love, creativity, abundance, self mastery, life mastery and flow. The Sedona Method is an elegantly simple yet remarkably profound and effective way to effortlessly dissolve any obstacle to having the life that we all desire. For the only certified and authorized Sedona Method coaching support in the Hudson Valley call The Accord Center, 845 626 3191. Phone sessions are available. Find more information and testimonials at www.theaccordcenter.com

©2014

“My job is working with dis-harmonic patterns and imbuing wellness” - Jipala R. Kagan L.Ac Accepting new clients Practice expanding

TRANSPERSONAL ACUPUNCTURE 10 Years in Practice

Call: (845) 340 8625 Accepting insurances: Empire BCBS

www.transpersonalacupuncture.com

John M. Carroll H ,T ,S C EALER

EACHER

PIRITUAL

OUNSELOR

“ Miracles still do happen.” —Richard Brown, MD Author Stop Depression Now “ John Carroll is a most capable, worthy, and excellent healer of high integrity, compassion, and love.” —Gerald Epstein, MD Author Healing Visualizations

Check John’s website for more information johnmcarrollhealer.com or call 845-338-8420

Quantum Healing Hypnosis Therapy * Release paralyzing emotional holds and fears, Obtain missing information, insights, and a comprehensive healing; * Access the root causes of physical, emotional, relationship, and financial issues, bring these issues to peace and resolution.

Mia McDermott RHINEBECK,NY Consulting Hypnotist Akashic Records Consultant mia@seeds-love.com ( 845)-264-1388

76 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Conventional Hypnosis Therapies •

• • • • •

Alternative Cancer Treatments Pain Relief Anti-Aging Weight Loss Stress Management Child Hypnosis

Akashic Records Reading

to get rid of parasites. If someone comes into my office and says, “I’ve got day sweats, night sweats, fever, chills,” it may be babesia. Over 80 percent of the time with babesia, Lyme and babesia are transmitted together. If you have Lyme and babesia, you’re much sicker. Your fatigue, memory problems, and joint pains are much worse. Babesia is not treated with antibiotics—it’s treated with antiparasitic drugs. Or if you have nerve pain, neuropathy, with tingling and burning, then it could be due to Lyme, or it could be due to bartonella, which can make nerve pain worse. There’s also a new infection called Borrelia miyamotoi—it’s the relapsing-fever borrelia.You can get a bull’s-eye rash due to this other strain, but your Lyme test will come back negative. They’re finding 10 to 20 percent of the ticks in the Northeast are containing Borrelia miyamotoi, and the number is growing. If you think Lyme is a bad epidemic, wait until you see what’s about to happen in the next 10 years with Borrelia miyamotoi. You suggest in your book that with Lyme-MSIDS, as well as other chronic diseases, there’s not just one cause but many factors that go into it. Can you explain? Unfortunately in medical school we learned Pasteur’s postulate—that there’s one cause for one disease—but that was the 1800s. Now we have all these different infections and toxins getting into people’s bodies. We have 300 to 500 environmental toxins getting into people’s bodies every day. There are heavy metals like lead, mercury, and arsenic, which can cause symptoms like nerve pain. People are dealing with inflammation, difficulties with sleep, hormones thrown off, and low adrenal function, which isn’t going to help them get better. So my personal belief is that we need to look at prevention models that are going to be very different from what we’re doing now in medicine. We need to look at chronic infections, toxins, inflammation, and bacteria in the gut—the microbiome. I believe that in years to come we’re going to find that many of the chronic diseases we’re now labeling, like Alzheimer’s and autism, may in fact end up being Lyme-MSIDS. Researchers have already found borrelian spirochetes in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. In France, doctors are finding that autistic kids have Lyme and other infections that are responding to antibiotics. These kids’ autistic symptoms are going away with antibiotics! There’s a lot that we don’t know, but I think infections and toxins are not being adequately looked at as some of the factors that are causing diseases like dementia, Parkinson’s disease, and ADHD [attention deficit hyperactivity disorder]. A lot of literature now shows that environmental toxins and infections can cause many of these types of symptoms. You say that you’ve come up with a solution to treating Lyme and other chronic illnesses with the 16-point MSIDS model that you present in your book. Can you talk about that? I created the 16-point MSIDS model to help people, with their doctor, to become their own medical detective. It’s a multifactorial model that looks at many overlapping causes for why people remain ill.The model comes out of my integrative approach to medicine, meaning that I use both classical regimens, including antibiotics, and also a lot of natural regimens, including herbs, diet, and detoxification pathways. Even if you don’t have Lyme disease but you have fibromyalgia or MS or chronic fatigue, you might still have heavy metals or toxins in the body.You might still have problems with detoxifying chemicals from the environment, or problems with inflammation or falling asleep. In order to get better, you have to look at the entire picture of healing the body from infections, toxins, and other factors. It’s like having 16 nails in your foot—you’re not going to get better by pulling out just one nail.You have to pull out all 16. I believe the MSIDS model is going to be a road map for people with chronic diseases who are not getting better with standard medical therapy. I’m creating an MSIDS app right now for people to use the 16-point model to figure out why they’re ill and how they can get better. And then I believe we need to open up centers for chronic disease—I call them Chronic Disease Centers of Excellence—which I will hopefully be opening up in the next few years. We need to get to the source of the problems if we’re going to be dealing with these epidemics of chronic diseases that are now affecting the 21st century. We’re looking at epidemics of autism, Alzheimer’s, cancer, Lyme disease. The incidence of Alzheimer’s is expected to triple in the next 30 years; it’s going to break the health-care bank. To have guidelines that say “we don’t know what’s wrong with you,” as we have today with Lyme disease in our health-care system—that’s unacceptable. We can do better than that.


whole living guide

Overeating and Food Addiction Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy • Dissolve the Pattern of Overeating and Food Addiction in 10 Sessions!!! • Experience a gentle, supportive and finally very effective approach to healing this issue. • Develop accelerated deep and abiding emotional healing skills. • Learn how to take your power back while enjoying a balanced and pleasurable relationship with food and your body. Phone and In Person sessions available • 845 626 3191 theaccordcenter@gmail.com • www.theaccordcenter.com

©2014

MINDFULNESS-BASED STRESS REDUCTION You can’t stop the waves, but you can learn how to surf! Stephanie Speer, M.A.

Acupuncture

Assisted Living Centers ENROLL NOW FOR 8 SESSION PROGRAM

Creekside Acupuncture and Natural Medicine, Stephanie Ellis, LAc

Private treatment rooms, attentive one-on-one care, affordable rates, sliding scale. Accepting Blue Cross, Hudson Health Plan, no-fault and other insurances. Stephanie Ellis graduated magna cum laude from Columbia University in pre-medical studies. She completed her acupuncture and Chinese medicine degree in 2001 as valedictorian of her class and started her acupuncture practice in Rosendale that same year. Ms. Ellis uses a combination of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Classical Chinese Medicine, Japanese-style acupuncture and trigger-point acupuncture. Creekside Acupuncture is located in a building constructed of non-toxic, eco-friendly materials.

Hoon J. Park, MD, PC 1772 South Road Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-6060

Transpersonal Acupuncture (845) 340-8625 www.transpersonalacupuncture.com

Animal Assisted Therapy Legga, Inc. New Paltz, NY (845) 729-0608

Aromatherapy Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 joanapter@earthlink.net See also Massage Therapy

Early Registration Discount Available

September 30 to November 18

2542 State Route 66, Chatham, NY (518) 392-2760 www.camphillghent.org

Ivy Lodge Assited Living 108 Main Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-4646 www.ivylodgeassistedliving.com

Astrology Planet Waves Kingston, NY (845) 797-3458 www.planetwaves.net

Body and Skincare Dermasave Labs, Inc. 3 Charles Street, Suite 4, Pleasant Valley, NY (845) 635-4087 www.hudsonvalleyskincare.com

Chiropractic

Tuesday Evenings, 6:30-8:30pm Stone Ridge Healing Arts, Stone Ridge, NY Individual Instruction and On-site Workshops also available www.stephaniespeer.com 845.332.9936 stephaniespeer@earthlink.net

INTEGR ATE YOUR LIFE I T ’ S

A

B A L A N C I N G

A C T

HOLISTIC NURSE HEALTH CONSULTANT

Manage Stress • Apprehensions • Pain • Improve Sleep Release Weight • Set Goals • Change Habits Pre/Post Surgery • Fertility • Hypno Birthing Immune System Enhancement • Nutritional Counseling Past Life Regression • Intuitive Counseling Motivational & Spiritual Guidance

Breathe • Be Mindful • Let Go • Flow

H Y P N O S I S - C OAC H I N G Kary Broffman, R.N., C.H. 845-876-6753 • karybroffman.com

Dr. David Ness (845) 255-1200 performancesportsandwellness.com Dr. David Ness is a Certified Chiropractic Sports Practitioner, Certified Active Release Techniques (ART®) Provider, and Certified Kennedy Decompression Specialist. In addition to traditional chiropractic care, Dr. Ness utilizes ART® to remove scar tissue and adhesions from injured muscles, ligaments, tendons, and nerves. Dr. Ness also uses non surgical chiropractic traction to decompress disc herniations in the spine. If you have an injury that has not responded to treatment call Dr. Ness today.

WOMEN IN TRANSITION

TRANSFORMATIONAL WRITING WORKSHOPS

Weekly workshops combining powerful writing techniques with innovative therapeutic modalities

New Groups Forming in September PLEASE CONTACT FOR MORE INFORMATION Amy Loewenhaar-Blauweiss, MA, MA, Psy.D, CHT

ablauwei@bard.edu or 212- 627-5861 Held at:

314 WALL STREET, KINGSTON NY 12401 8/14 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY 77

whole living directory

371A Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 546-5358 www.creeksideacupuncture.com

Camphill Ghent


Counseling

Summer fashion is the Great Concealer!

The Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy (845) 646-3191 www.theaccordcenter.com

Dentistry & Orthodontics Holistic Orthodontics ‚Dr. Rhoney Stanley, DDS, MPH, Cert. Acup, RD 107 Fish Creek Road, Saugerties, NY www.holisticortho.com

“I just want my body BACK!”

Herbal Medicine & Nutrition Empowered By Nature

No one needs to know what’s going on behind the shades. Perfect time for an eyelift...call today!

whole living directory

845-294-3312 Francis V. Winski, MD

winskicosmeticsurgery.com

1129 Main Street, 2nd Floor, Fishkill, NY (845) 416-4598 www.EmpoweredByNature.net lorrainehughes54@gmail.com Lorraine Hughes, Registered Herbalist (AHG) and ARCB Certified Reflexologist offers Wellness Consultations that therapeutically integrate Asian and Western Herbal Medicine and Nutrition with their holistic philosophies to health. This approach is grounded in Traditional Chinese Medicine with focus placed on an individual’s specific constitutional profile and imbalances. Please visit the website for more information and upcoming events.

Holistic Health

Jennifer Axinn-Weiss, MFA, CHT

Clearmindarts.com | sandplay555@frontier.com 845 876-8828 c 845 242-7580

Newtoninstitute.org 78 WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Rhinebeck

Omega Institute for Holistic Studies (800) 944-1001 www.eomega.org

Seeds of Love Rhinebeck, NY (845)-264-1388 www.seeds-love.com

Hospitals Health Quest 45 Reade Place, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 283-6088 www.health-quest.org

Hypnosis Clear Mind Arts Hypnosis (845) 876-8828 www.clearmindarts.com sandplay555@frontier.com

Massage Therapy Joan Apter

41 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 532-7796 www.holisticcassandra.com

(845) 679-0512 www.apteraromatherapy.com joanapter@earthlink.net

John M. Carroll

Luxurious massage therapy with medicinal grade Essential Oils; Raindrop Technique, Emotional Release, Facials, Hot Stones. Animal care, health consultations, spa consultant, classes and keynotes. Offering full line of Young Living Essential oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, children’s and non-toxic cleaning products.

John is a spiritual counselor, healer, and teacher. He uses guided imagery, morphology, and healing energy to help facilitate life changes. He has successfully helped his clients to heal themselves from a broad spectrum of conditions, spanning terminal cancer to depression.

With a Certified Life Between Lives® Practitioner Offering past life regression, medical hypnosis & sand play modalities for healing body, mind & spirit.

Nancy is an intuitive healer, spiritual counselor and long time yoga teacher. Would you like to relieve stress, anxiety, fear, pain and increase your vitality, joy, balance and connect to your True Self? Nancy guides one to release blocked or stuck energy that shows up as dis-ease/illness/anxiety/discomfort/ fear and supports one to open to greater self-acceptance, integration and wholeness.

Cassandra Currie, MS, RYT‚ Holistic Health Counselor

715 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 338-8420 www.johnmcarrollhealer.com

Journey Beyond Time

www.womenwithwisdom.com nplumer@hvi.net

Kary Broffman, RN, CH (845) 876-6753 Karyb@mindspring.com 18 plus years of helping people find their balance. As a holistic nurse consultant, she weaves her own healing journey and education in psychology, nursing, hypnosis and integrative nutrition to help you take control of your life and to find True North. She also assists pregnant couples with hypnosis and birthing.

Nancy Plumer, Energy Healing and Spiritual Counseling Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-2252

Mindfullness Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction: Stephanie Speer, M.A. (845) 332-9936 www.stephaniespeer.com

Woodstock Mindfulness Woodstock, NY www.woodstockmindfulness.com Margaret@woodstockmindfulness. com

Osteopathy Stone Ridge Healing Arts Joseph Tieri, DO, & Ari Rosen, DO, 3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge; 138 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY


(845) 687-7589 www.stoneridgehealingarts.com Drs. Tieri and Rosen are NY State Licensed Osteopathic Physicians specializing in Osteopathic Manipulation and Cranial Osteopathy. Please visit our website for articles, links, books, and much more information. Treatment of newborns, children, and adults. By appointment.

Past-Life Regression Dasi Amrita Healing: Rachel Sillman Hudson and Catskill, NY (978) 460-1063 www.dasiamritahealing.com dasiamritahealing@gmail.com Rachel is a Spiritual Life Coach, Hypnotist/Regression Therapist and Energy Healer. Based off of years of study and training around the world, Rachel uses a variety of techniques to help you travel to the depths of your subconscious mind. Healing pastlife traumas and discovering sacred truths will bring you more balance and creativity. The time to find and empower your own inner healer starts now!

Plastic Surgery 225 Dolson Ave #302 Middletown, NY (845) 342-6884 www.drloomis.com

Winski Center for Cosmetic Surgery, The 14 Scotchtown Avenue, Goshen, NY (845) 294-3312 www.winskicosmeticsurgery.com

Psychotherapy Judy Swallow, MA, LCAT, TEP 25 Harrington Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-7502 www.hvpi.net

Kent Babcock, LMSW: Psychotherapy for Men in Mid-Life & Older Stone Ridge, NY (845) 807-7147 kentagram@gmail.com At 64, late in my career, I am focusing my practice on working with older men -- providing opportunities to examine life retrospectively, in the here and now, and also around issues concerning death and dying. I also specialize in working with those having or suspecting Asperger Syndrome.

Retreat Centers Garrison Institute Route 9D, Garrison, NY (845) 424-4800 www.garrisoninstitute.org garrison@garrisoninstitute.com

Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-6897 ext. 0 www.menla.org menla@menla.org



  



          

      

Spirituality Jewish Federation of Ulster County Kingston, NY (845) 338-8131 www.fallforart.org info@fallforart.org

HolisticOrthodontics for Children & Adults ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Tarot Tarot-on-the-Hudson‚ Rachel Pollack Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-5797 www.rachelpollack.com rachel@rachelpollack.com Reading, Workshops, and Private Mentoring.

Psychics Intuitve Photo Readings (212) 229-8092 www.IntuitiveDannah.com Dannah@intuitivedannah.com.

Gentle Forces No Extractions Cranial Sacral Adjustments ALF Appliances Invisalign

Dr. Rhoney Stanley 107 Fish Creek Rd, Saugerties (845) 246-2729 | (212) 912-1212

Wo o d s to ck Mi nd ful nes s FALL 2014

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Sunday Mornings 9:30am-Noon • September 21 - November 19 COURSE INCLUDES 8 CLASSES AND A RETREAT DAY

Workshops Mesayok Medicine Spiral (845) 831-5790 www.eileenohare.com

Yoga Clear Yoga Iyengar Yoga in Rhinebeck 17b 6423 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6129 www.clearyogarhinebeck.com Classes for all levels and abilities, seven days a week. Iyengar Yoga builds strength, stamina, peace of mind, and provides a precise framework for a yoga practice based on what works for you.

Introductory 3 Hour Mindfulness Class August 24th or September 7th SEE WEBSITE FOR CLASS TIMES, LOCATIONS, AND REGISTRATION

www.Woodsto ck M i nd ful nes s. c o m

Treat your symptoms

Hoon J. Park MD P.C.

naturally

Acupuncture Physical Therapy Pain Management

Hoon J. Park M.D. is a New York State Board Certified Medical Doctor in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and a New York State Certified Acupuncturist. Most insurance accepted including Empire Plan, Medicare, most private insurances, No-Fault, and Workers Compensation. You deserve victory over pain.

Satya Yoga Center Rhinebeck and Catskill, NY (845) 876-2528 www.satyayogacenter.us

1772 South Road, Wappingers Falls ½ mile south of Galleria Mall

298-6060

www.victory-over-pain.com

8/14 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY 79

whole living directory

Loomis Plastic Surgery

Retreats supporting positive personal and social change in a renovated monastery overlooking the Hudson River. Featuring Creating a Compassionate World: The Power of One, with Roshi Bernie Glassman, September 12-14, and The WellBehaved Building: Developing Community, Well-Being and Resilience in Buildings, October 8-10.


THE LINDA WAMC’S PERFORMING ARTS STUDIO

339 CENTRAL AVENUE ALBANY A FOOD FOR THOUGHT FILM AUG 21 /67

PM -RECEP PM- FILM

AN ALL WHITE AFFAIR

PILLOW TALK

JENNIFER MCMULLEN PRESENTS

AUG 23 / 9pm

SEP 6 / 8pm

EROTIQUE NOIRE

ASBURY SHORTS NEW YORK SHORT FILM CONCERT

DERRICK HORTON AND THE JAY STREET BAND

SEP 13 / 8pm

SEP 20 / 8pm

SEP 27 / 8pm

BOOGIE FOR BOB

MELISSA FERRICK

SEP 28 / 3pm

OCT 3 / 8pm

TICKETS ONLINE AT

THELINDA.ORG OR CALL 518.465.5233 x4 Maverick concerts

Music in the Woods 1916-2014 Sat., Aug. 2, 11 am • Young People’s Concert

Sat., Aug. 2, 6:30 pm • Fred Hersch, jazz piano Julian Lage, guitar Sun., Aug. 3, 4 pm • The Modigliani Quartet Fri., Aug. 8, 8:30 pm • Steve Gorn & Friends Sat., Aug. 9, 11 am • Peter & the Wolf

Sat., Aug. 9, 8 pm • Perry Beekman & Friends

Sun., Aug. 10, 4 pm • Amernet String Quartet Jon Klibonoff, piano Sat., Aug. 16, 6:30 pm • Actors & Writers Sun., Aug. 17, 4 pm • Trio Solisti Sat., Aug. 23, 6:30 pm • Chamber Orchestra Concert Sun., Aug. 24, 4:00 pm • The Jupiter String Quartet Ilya Yakushev, piano Sat., Aug. 30, 8 pm • Jazz at the Maverick Anthony Wilson Guitar Qrt. Sun., Aug. 31, 4:00 pm • Pacifica String Quartet

Sat., Sept. 6, 8 pm • Happy Traum & Friends Abby Newton, David Amram

120 Maverick Road • Woodstock, New York 845-679-8217 • www.MaverickConcerts.org 80 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/14


the forecast

EVENT PREVIEWS & LISTINGS FOR AUGUST 2014

Iron Man While working toward his master’s degree in metallurgy at MIT, Dick Polich became involved with a Ford and Rockefeller Foundations-funded program to unite technology and art. He subsequently founded Tallix Foundry in 1968 and began a 40-year career of casting bigname artists’ pieces into major works of metal. He has worked with Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Frank Stella, and Hudson Valley resident Martin Puryear, among many others. The Dorsky Museum at SUNY New Paltz presents “Dick Polich: Transforming Metal Into Art,” curated by Daniel Belasco. The show will feature 11 works by collaborating artists, a documentary about Polich’s foundry, and a presentation of the materials and techniques of contemporary foundry work. The exhibition will run August 27 to December 14, with a public reception September 6 from 5 to 7pm. (845) 257-3844; Newpaltz.edu/museum. —Iana Robitaille

Lamp on Table, Roy Lichtenstein, bronze, painted and patinated, edition 3/3, 74” x 34 3/4” x 18”, 1977. Private collection © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

8/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 81


FRIDAY 1

Carbon Leaf 9pm. Celtic-tinged indie rock. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

Inside the Mind of a Master 2pm. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279.

Stage, fun-filled Activities 4 Kids tent, an international food court and an array of vendors. Dodds Farm, Hillsdale.

HV: Create First Friday of every month, 8:30am. Designers, artists, writers, teachers, coaches, musicians, scholars, & other intellectually curious, creative-minded people gather for facilitated round-table conversations, riffs on creativity & work, Icarus Sessions, community announcements. Marbletown Multi-Arts, Stone Ridge. 679-9441.

Carl Maria von Weber: Euryanthe 7pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Les Miserables 8pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

DANCE

The Chain Gang 9pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 2298277.

Columbia County Historical Society Pop Up Museum 9am-1pm. Copake/Hillsdale: The Great Outdoors! As early as the 1860s, summer boarders were arriving in the area. Today, with Catamount Ski Area, Copake Lake and Taconic State Park - residents of Copake and Hillsdale know to have fun. Share your object or story of the great outdoors. Copake-Hillsdale Farmers Market, HIllsdale. (518) 758-9265.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Bolshoi Ballet: Don Quixote 8pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. The Connecticut Ballet Celebrates Latin Dance 8pm. Join the Connecticut Ballet for a presentation of duets, company works and premieres choreographed by a special assemblage of Latin choreographers working in contemporary ballet and dance. Onteora Club Theatre, Tannersville. (518) 589-5190.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS 26th Falcon Ridge Folk Festival The fest boasts concerts and workshops in natural amphitheater settings, hours of dancing on their astonishing 9000 square foot floor, a delightful Family Stage, fun-filled Activities 4 Kids tent, an international food court and an array of vendors. Dodds Farm, Hillsdale. Saugerties First Friday 6-9pm. Featuring live music, an Arm of the Sea Theater performance, and edible treats and tastings. Downtown Saugerties, Saugerties. 247-3164.

Cathy Young 5pm. Acoustic. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739.

Chris Cubeta & The Liars Club 7pm. With Jeff Wilkinson & the Shutterdogs and Emily Easterly opening. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Crawdaddy 9pm. $10. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. David Kraai with Fooch Fischetti 6pm. David Kraai doles out two sets of fine country folk music with the help of Fooch Fischetti on pedal steel and fiddle. The Andes Hotel, Andes. 676-3980. Doug Tuttle with Jeb Barry Opening 6:30pm. $10. Chesterwood, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3579 ext. 25210. Kids Can Too! 11:30am. $5. Bang on a Can faculty and fellows perform an interactive music-making concert for kids and families in MASS MoCA’s Club B-10. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) MoCA-111.

The Liar 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Much Ado About Nothing 5pm. Teen performers 14-17 yrs take on Shakespeare. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. Newgenesisproductions.org. Summer Repertory: West Side Story 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Art With Marsha: Ages 12-16 9:30am-12:30pm. $180. This class will focus on observing and capturing nature’s form, colors and tonal relationships. Particular emphasis will be placed on light and color, using pastels, water-based paints and acrylics on paper and canvas. The Treehouse, New Paltz. 255-0345.

FILM Movie Night: Internet Cat Video Festival 10pm. $12/$10. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Search Inside Yourself Through August 3. With Mirabai Bush and Gopi Kallayil. Garrison Institute, Garrison. 424-4800.

KIDS & FAMILY

Much Ado About Nothing 5-7:30pm. $8. New Genesis Productions Youth Theatre presents Shakespeare’s Much Ado directed by Lesley Sawhill with teen actors 14-17 years. Beatrice & Benedick, and Hero & Claudio hope you will join them for an evening of witty wooing. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. 657-5867. Summer Writers’ Intensive 10am-3pm. $325. Instructor: Jenny Wai-Lan Strodl. Ages 13+. Days are filled with individualized writing instruction, one-on-one editing, structured free writing time, and outdoor summer activities including daily pool time. OMI Art Camps, Ghent. (518) 728-9256.

LECTURES & TALKS Artist Nina Katchadourian 6:30pm. A photographer, videographer, installation artist, and deep thinker, Katchadourian studies objects and reorders them to produce unexpected meanings, resulting in a combined intellectualism and semiotic hilarity. Kleinert/James Arts Center, Woodstock. 6792079. Effect on Local Business 12pm. Len Cane. Part of the lecture program called “Kingston IBM Conversations” to complement their IBM Gallery Exhibit. Informal talks will feature former IBM employees and other community members who participated in the oral history interviews that were conducted as part of the exhibit. Friends of Historic Kingston, Kingston. 339-0720. Preview Award Dinner with Charles Lewton-Brain 6:30-8:30pm. $20. Dinner with foldforming pioneer Charles Lewton-Brain announcing the 2014 Lewton-Brain Foldform Competition winners. Catering is by none other than local favorite farm-to-table Black Dirt Gourmet / W.Rogowski Farm. Center for Metal Arts, Florida. 651-7550.

LITERARY & BOOKS 18th Annual Sharon Summer Book Signing 6-8pm. $30. Featuring more than 30 nationally known and regional authors and illustrators. Includes an open wine bar and summer hors d’oeuvres. Hotchkiss Library, Sharon, CT. (860) 364-5041.

MUSIC Alisa Weilerstein with the Ariel Quartet 8pm. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. (914) 232-5035. Bang on a Can After-Hours Special 10pm. Bang on a Can festival performers hold late-night jam sessions in The Chalet, MASS MoCA’s summer beer garden. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) MoCA-111. Belleayre Jazz Club – Le Jazz Hot 8pm. $26. Django Reinhardt Festival All-Stars. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904.

CHRONOGRAM.COM VISIT Chronogram.com/events for additional calendar listings and staff recommendations.

82 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Alessandra Belloni

The Big Latch On 10am-noon. Big Global Latch On at New Baby New Paltz. Last year, 14,536 women and their children came together and breastfed simultaneously as part of the Big Latch On in 2013. Come to New Baby New Paltz on Friday August 1st to help us beat last year’s record. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624.

NECC’s Chef and Farmer Brunch This August 10, the North East Community Center’s fourth annual Chef and Farmer Brunch, sponsored by No. 9 Restaurant, will showcase the talent of the Hudson Valley’s hottest farm-to-table chefs under tents in Railroad Plaza, Millerton. Their farmers’ market inspired menus will feature seasonal produce donated by local farms. The brunch consists of dishes, tastings, and cocktails provided by 20 chefs from local restaurants, as well as wine and beer from local microbreweries. Participating businesses include Jacuterie, The Farmer’s Wife, John Andrews, Chef’s Consortium, Copake Country Club, Number 9, Pine Plains Platter, Route 7 Grill, and Hillrock Distillery. The brunch will benefit NECC’s food and social service programs. (518) 789-4259; Neccmillerton.org. The Marquee 9:30pm. $5. The Anchor, Kingston. 901-9991. Meow Meow 8:30pm. $25-$40. The spectacular crowd-surfing queen of song returns for an explosive evening of music, politics, mayhem, and magnificence, dragging “cabaret kicking and screaming into the 21st century”. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750. Midlake with Elijah & The Moon 8pm. $18/$15. Acoustic. Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. 481-5158. Music with Glenn Kotche of Wilco 4:30pm. Wilco’s Glenn Kotche performs under Natalie Jeremijenko: Tree Logic. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) MoCA-111. O Sole Mio!: A Mediterraen Fiesta 8pm. Opera with full orchestra. Parish Field, Phoenicia. Phoeniciavoicefest.org. Richard Shindell 8pm. $30/$25. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. The Temptations and The Four Tops 7:30pm. Motown. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Tony Leon and Son Latino 8pm. Latin. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Vintage Vinyl 9:30pm. Celebrate classic rock and roll. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

SPIRITUALITY Buddhism and Addiction Recovery 7-8:30pm. $120/$96 members/$30 individual session/$25 individual session members. Teachers:Lama Losang (David Bole) and Bill Alexander. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 3.

THEATER Amelia 7pm. $15/$5 children. A play of the Civil War by Alex Webb/ Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-4246. Employee of the Year 8pm. $20. Presented by 600 Highwaymen. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

Communing With the Masters 9:30am-12:30pm. With painting instructor, Marianne Van Lent. Athens Cultural Center, Athens. (518) 945-2136. Crossing to Scotland in The Catskills Three-day retreat for cello. Shokan, Shokan. 657-7093. Summer Haiku: Encountering the Poetry of Earth Through Aug. 3. With Clark and Priscilla Lignori. Zen Mountain Monastery Sangha House, Mount Tremper. 688-2228.

SATURDAY 2 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Red Hawk Bear Mountain Pow Wow Bear Mountain State Park, Bear Mountain. 786-2701.

COMEDY Andrew Dice Clay 8-10:30pm. $59.50/$79.50/$89.50. Andrew Dice Clay is “The Undisputed Heavy Weight King of Comedy.” Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. Berkshire Comedy Festival 8pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

DANCE Dancing in the Square 7-10pm. Bring your dancing shoes, your picnic blankets and lawn chairs, and settle in for a night of fun and nostalgia for all ages. Kinderhook Memorial Library, Kinderhook. Villageofkinderhook.org. Extreme Ballet Session II Showcase noon. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 2 or 10. Salsa Lesson and Latin Dance Party with Carlos Osorio 8pm. $12 at the door. Bring out your Latin spirit! Join Carlos Osorio, Founder of the Cumbia Spirit School of Dance for a fun, all levels salsa class and then dance the night away at Kingston’s most artful new event space Wine available. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 331-3261.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS 26th Falcon Ridge Folk Festival The fest boasts concerts and workshops in natural amphitheater settings, hours of dancing on their astonishing 9000 square foot floor, a delightful Family

Hospital Auxiliary Antique & Flea Market 9am-4pm. The market, which will be held for the 46th year, offers an assortment of goods ranging from unusual antiques and fine handcrafted pieces to random hidden treasures. Margaretville Hospital, Margaretville. Kingstonregionalhealth.org. Love Soul Psychic Weekend 12-8pm. $30. Love Soul PSYCHIC FAIR! 10+ gifted readers 20 minutes readings Angels, Medium, Intuitive, Tarot, Palm readings Late readings until 8pm! Crystal Connection, Wurtsboro. 888-2547.

FILM Silent Holy Stones 8pm. $8. Tibetan Center, Kingston. 383-1774.

FOOD & WINE Culinary Uses of Summer Herbs 1-3pm. $10/children under 12 free. Join Julie Cerny, farm education director and garden manager for The Sylvia Center in Kinderhook, NY to learn the culinary uses of herbs and the common and uncommon benefits. The workshop will include instruction on how to grow herbs, and how they work together to prepare meals that the whole family will enjoy. A sampling of the herbs and recipes will be provided. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 109. Putnam County Wine & Food Fest 11am. $35/$30 in advance. Showcasing New York’s most renowned wine producers, breweries, food, arts and crafts, fresh produce, an eclectic mix of music, and even a flea market. Grounds of Patterson Flea Market, Patterson. (800) 557-4185 Ext. 3.

HEALTH & WELLNESS BBT Bootcamp 8:30-9:15am. $10. BBT stands for Balanced Body Transformation. 45 minutes of a fun, dynamic, effective, and body sculpting circuit training class. The class incorporates callisthenic, cardio, core, strength, plyometric, and resistance exercises set up in an interval training style. Dietz Stadium, Kingston. 616-8479. Morning Yoga 10:15-11:15am. Beginners welcome. Bring your own mat. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

KIDS & FAMILY Beautiful, Beneficial Bats! 10am. Learn about the bats of New York and the survival challenges they face. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 5347781. Free Kids Paint-Out 1-4pm. Thomas Cole National Historic Site, Catskill. 518-943-7465. Much Ado About Nothing 5-7:30pm. $8. New Genesis Productions Youth Theatre presents Shakespeare’s Much Ado directed by Lesley Sawhill with teen actors 14-17 years. Beatrice & Benedick, and Hero & Claudio hope you will join them for an evening of witty wooing. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. 657-5867. Saturday Social Circle First Saturday of every month, 10am-noon. This group for mamas looking to meet other mamas, babies and toddlers for activities, socialization and friendship. Whether you are pregnant, have a new baby or older kids, we welcome you to join us on Saturday mornings for conversation, fun and laughter over tea and homemade cookies. There is time for socialization so you can connect with old friends and get to know new ones. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624.

LECTURES & TALKS De-Bunking the Myths of New York History: Brian Jay Jones Lecture on Washington Irving 4pm. $10/$7 members. Brian Jay Jones will speak on the life of Washington Irving, author of Legend of Sleepy Hallow and Rip Van Winkle and the satire History of New York written in 1809. In his lively talk, Jones will dispel the myths that surround the area, almost entirely of Irving’s invention. Kinderhook Reformed Church, Kinderhook. 518-6401. Washington Irving and the (Re)Creation of Dutch New York 4-6pm. $10$45 reception$30 reception members. Sponsored by the Columbia County Historical Society, presented by Brian Jay Jones. Post lecture reception at the Merwin House in Kinderhook. Kinderhook Reformed Church, Kinderhook. (518) 758-9265. Science in Art 11am. Lecture with David Dunlop. From ancient Greece to the 21st century here is an explanation of how art works with science. Q&A to follow. The White Gallery, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-1029.

LITERARY & BOOKS Annual Used Book Sale Hotchkiss Library, Sharon, CT. (860) 364-5041.


DANCE ps21 DANCE FESTIVAL

Parsons Dance will perform at the ps21 Dance Festival in Chatham this month.

A Smorgasbord of Dance Since its inception in 2006, ps21 in Chatham has presented high quality, internationally acclaimed dance companies each summer, but this year tops all as they expand into a month long festival. There’s something for dance aficionados of all tastes, with performances, classes, events for children, stories about dance, and dance films. In addition dance education, the ps21 mission includes bringing the community together on its land. The site is located on a 50-acre apple orchard, and attendees are encouraged to bring a picnic and enjoy the grounds—which extends to the dancers, as they reside on-site in a guesthouse adjacent to the dance studio during their stay. Opening the festival on August 1 and 2 is Los Angeles’ Lionel Popkin Dance, bringing their evening-long Ruth Doesn’t Live Here Anymore, a fun, poignant, and informative work involving fabric that pays homage to early modern dance icon/pioneer Ruth St. Denis, who employed the occasional bolt of fabric in her works. Accordionist extraordinaire Guy Klucevsek will be playing his original score live. A dance professor at UCLA, Popkin will teach a Skinner Releasing Technique class on August 2, utilizing natural movements to promote flexibility and alignment, and the company will also present an interactive performance for children illustrating the joys of moving to music. The Jamal Jackson Dance Company (JJDC) was created in 2004 after Jackson’s stint with Ballet International Africans. Born in Brooklyn, he studied with the Batoto Yetu Dance Company in Harlem and teachers as varied as renowned jazz dancer/choreographer Fred Benjamin, and Mali’s Ba Issa Diallo. His blending of African, hip-hop, and modern dance yields profound and glorious results. Employing four percussionists and nine dancers, Jackson’s company moves with crispness and spiritual and emotional commitment to his choreography, clearly seen in the evening-long Bask In the Shade, which they will bring to ps21 on August 15 and 16. Elegantly tackling economic and social disparities and differences between traditional and modern values, the work celebrates those differences. Says Jackson, “As we broaden our perspective, the lines of these categorizations blur and more productive conversations

occur about uniqueness rather than difference, redefining ideas of community and blurring divisive lines while celebrating the beauty of individual cultures. I want the audience to sit inside these concepts and see how their own identity has been defined or manipulated. I want them to bask in it.” The JJDC will also be offering an African dance, drum, and textile workshop for kids 8 to 18, culminating in a performance on August 15. Tokyo native Takehiro U0eyama will bring his always visually magnificent New York City-based TAKE Dance, performing three works. The high-spirited Somewhere Familiar Melodies, danced to Japanese pop songs, sprang from Ueyama feeling “torn apart” after the 2011 Japanese earthquake/tsunami. To comfort himself, he listened to the music of his childhood, which brought joyful memories and inspired choreography. Ueyama will also be premiering two works on August 22 and 23; a collaboration with Chatham residents sharing stories about local life and danced to a soundtrack of their voices, and a work where the same choreography will be performed to two different pieces of music. In addition, there will be a workshop for intermediate to experienced dancers. Closing the season for the ninth year is internationally renowned Parsons Dance on August 29 and 30. Founded by David Parsons in 1985, among the works the company will be presenting are Whirlaway‚ a collaboration with legendary New Orleans musician/ composer Allen Toussaint, and The Introduction, a series of eight solos highlighting each dancer’s individual style, culminating with the entire ensemble onstage together. The score by cellist Rubin Kodheli is also fine-tuned to each dancer. Parsons’s famed solo, Caught, to music by King Crimson’s Robert Fripp, will spellbind as the dancer appears to fly. This piece alone is worth the price of admission. Company members will also teach a workshop in Parsons’s style on August 30. The ps21 Dance Festival runs August 1 to 30. Tickets to performances, films, and classes range in price from $12 to $55. Some events are free. ps21, Chatham. (518) 392-612; ps21Chatham.org. —Maya Horowitz 8/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 83


MUSIC The Bang on a Can Marathon 4-10pm. $24/$15 students/$5 members/$35 concert + museum admission. 6 hours of a boundary-busting festival finale, featuring more than fifty musicians and composers, chamber music with Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, and Steve Reich’s newest composition “Radio Rewrite,” a remix of two songs by Radiohead. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) MoCA-111. Belleayre Jazz Club: Legends of Hard Bop 8pm. $36. Featuring The Cookers All Star Jazz Band. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904. Blue Food 9:30pm. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739. Cathy Young 8pm. Acoustic. Two Boots, Red Hook. 758-0010. Celtic Night with the Irish Mafia First Saturday of every month. Sean Griffin’s Irish Mafia and invited guests connect the Celtic tradition to Galicia, Spain. Elephant, Kingston. Elephantwinebar.com. Daryl Cox 9pm. Country. The Golden Rail Ale House, Newburgh. 565-2337. David Kraai & Amy Laber 10am. Country folk music plus more than 30 farmers and food purveyors from around the region, with every type of fresh, local food imaginable, kids’ and family events, culinary demonstrations & sustainability talks. Pleasantville Farmers Market, Pleasantville. (914) 205-4545. Debbie Davies Band and the Chris Cain Band 8:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. Devin Daversa 8:30pm. 50s and 60s rock. Piano Wine Bar, Fishkill. 896-8466. Ed Palermo Big Band’s Second Annual Beach Party 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. First Saturday Open Mike and Potluck featuring Carla Ulbricht 6pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Folk-rock Quintet Donna the Buffalo 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Gaia Roots World Music Ensemble 7pm. Folkloric Afro-Caribbean and West African sounds with its world music and dance ensemble. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Gleb Ivanov: Piano 8pm. Tannery Pond, New Lebanon. (888) 820-1696. Heaven’s Paradise on Earth: Music of the Spanish Renaissance 11:30am. St. Francis De Sales Catholic Church, Phoenicia. 688-5617. Jay & Molly 8pm. $30/$25. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

Steve Black 8pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 2298277. The Winery Dogs, Charm City Devils, The Chris Mahoney Project 7pm. $22.50-$35. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. This is Jazz...This Is Not Jazz 8pm. Chris Crocco and Ian Froman. Beacon Theater, Beacon. 226-8099. Young People’s Concert 11am. Marc Black, singer-songwriter, is a Woodstock legend whose music blurs the line between adult and children’s entertainment. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

NIGHTLIFE DJ: AndrewAndrew 10pm. $12/$10. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS First Saturday Reception First Saturday of every month, 5-8pm. ASK’s openings are elegant affairs with wine, hors d’oeuvres and art enthusiasts. These monthly events are part of Kingston’s First Saturday art events. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331. Historic House Tour First Saturday of every month, 10am-noon. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-3248. Ride on the Water: Classic Motorbike Show Swap Meet 1pm. $10. Benefit for the Autism Society of Hudson Valley. Features live music, comedy and DJ’d music. Rondout Bay Marina, Kingston. 339-3917.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Hiking In the Shade 10am. Expect a moderate hike with some steep slopes. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079.

SPIRITUALITY Buddhism and Addiction Recovery 10:30am-noon & 3:30-5pm. $120/$96 members/$30 individual session/$25 individual session members. Teachers:Lama Losang (David Bole) and Bill Alexander. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 3. Meditation Instruction 2pm. 60-minute class requires no previous meditation experience. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012. Soul Community Feast 8-10pm. $15. Nourish your body, mind & soul! Community gathering, Organic Food, Metaphysical conversations & Laughters with new friends & old souls, Music & more... $15 Reservation & Payment required in advance. Crystal Connection, Wurtsboro. 888-2547.

Jazz at the Maverick 8pm. Fred Hersch, piano, with Julian Lage, guitar. 8pm. $50/$40/$25. Fred Hersch, piano, Julian Lage, guitar. Catering, wine, and beer from Yum Yum. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

THEATER

The Joey Arias Experience 8:30pm. $25-$40. Singer, comedian, performance artist, and bona fide New York City icon Joey Arias takes patrons on a journey of scandalous wit and sleek style, reviving a rich musical history. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750.

The Barber of Seville 8pm. In this operatic romantic comedy, the themes of first love, class warfare, gender roles, and mistaken identity are seamlessly woven together as each character fights for the things that they want the most in this world... even if they have to tell a few little white lies along the way. Parish Field, Phoenicia. Phoeniciavoicefest.org.

Lindsey Webster Band 9pm-midnight. $10. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Lionel Richie with CeeLo Green $34.50-$163. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Mister Ian & The Blue Rays 8-11pm. Members Ian Bennett plays sax, harp, and vocals; Ritch Colan plays guitar and vocals; Brad Scribner plays drums; and Vyts Lauraitis plays bass. The group specializes in Chicago, West Coast, and Jazz Blues. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Music Omi Concert 5-7pm. Omi invites visitors to experience a unique concert of new global music, presented under a big tent by the Charles B. Benenson Visitor Center in the The Fields Sculpture Park. Enjoy an afternoon of unforgettable new music collaborations amidst over 80 works of contemporary sculpture on 120 acres of rolling farmland, wetlands and wooded areas. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. The New Black Eagle Jazz Band 6:30pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. Outdoor Brazilian Concert with Matuto 6-8pm. $18-$25. Drawing on Northeastern Brazil’s folkloric rhythms and on deep Americana music, the international music Matuto crafts appealing, rootsy and philosophical tales of love, self discovery and true peace. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Playing in Traffic 8pm. $15. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. Premik Russell Tubbs 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Singer and Composer Dave Hall 5-6pm. $10. Singer and composer Dave Hall premieres his new work “Ancram Suite” and other original songs. “Ancram Suite” is a musical impression of Ancram in Columbia County and its life. Roeliff Jansen Community Library, Hillsdale. (518) 325-5020.

84 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Amelia 7pm. $15/$5 children. A play of the Civil War by Alex Webb/ Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-4246.

Workshop Performance and Reading of Clarimonde 1:30pm. Opera from composer Frédéric Chaslin and librettist P.H. Fisher. St. Francis De Sales Catholic Church, Phoenicia. 688-5617. Employee of the Year 8pm. $20. Presented by 600 Highwaymen. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. (413) 443-7171. Inside the Mind of a Master 4:45pm. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279. Knockout: The Story of Cus D’Amato 7pm. Premiere showing of an original theatrical production of Catskill’s legendary boxer trainer. MountainView Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Les Miserables 8pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Much Ado About Nothing 5pm. Teen performers 14-17 yrs take on Shakespeare. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. Newgenesisproductions.org. Summer Repertory: West Side Story 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES The Passions and Suffering in the Christian Spiritual Tradition 8:30am-5pm. $65/includes breakfast and lunch. This program will explore the nuanced ways in which the passions and suffering are understood in the Christian spiritual tradition. Mons Nubifer Sanctus, Pine Hill. 254-4872.

Photographing the Nude in Nature with Dan McCormack 10am-4pm. $150/$130 members/$450 series/$390 series members. This workshop will demonstrate how the figure may be seen as landscape, design and part of Mother Earth. Different models and shooting sites are planned for each Saturday session. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Summer Acting Workshop Weekly through August. offers beginning and experienced actors the opportunity to improve their skills through scene study, improvisation, and movement sessions. Starr Library, Rhinebeck. Miragetheatercompany.org. Swing Infusion First Saturday of every month. $10. Basic lesson at 7:30 and a bonus move at 9pm with instructors Linda and Chester Freeman. MAC Fitness, Kingston. 853-7377. Photographing the Nude in Nature with Dan McCormack 10am-4pm. $450/$390 members series/$150 class/$130 class members. Participants can sign up for one session, or for the entire series. Bring camera, many rolls of film, extra batteries and memory cards, tripod, sunblock, bug repellent, towel and plenty of water. Unison, New Paltz. Unisonarts.org/news/ai1ec_event/photographing-thenude-in-nature/?instance_id=15446.

SUNDAY 3 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Red Hawk Bear Mountain Pow Wow Bear Mountain State Park, Bear Mountain. 786-2701.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS 26th Falcon Ridge Folk Festival The fest boasts concerts and workshops in natural amphitheater settings, hours of dancing on their astonishing 9000 square foot floor, a delightful Family Stage, fun-filled Activities 4 Kids tent, an international food court and an array of vendors. Dodds Farm, Hillsdale. Beacon Flea Market 8am-3pm. A variety of items, including re-finished furniture, antiques, vintage purses, mid-century cookware, collectible vinyl, old books, handmade jewelry, and local crafts. Beacon Flea Market, Beacon. 202-0094. Bon Odori New Paltz Dance Festival 11am-7pm. Dance, music, drumming, Japanese martial arts, food, vendors and exhibitions. Hasbrouck Park, New Paltz.

Aspire to Inspire: A Gospel Celebration 1:30pm. Phoenicia Wesleyan Church, Phoenicia. 688-5276. Black Violin 8pm. Unique fusion of classical music and hip-hop. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Blue Food 9:30pm. Harmony Music, Woodstock. 679-7760. Blues Happy Hour with Mr. Roper 6-9pm. Uncle Willy’s Tavern, Kingston. Brunch with Alexis P. Suter & The Ministers of Sound 10am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Camila Meza & Fabian Almazan 7pm. Jazz and folk. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Carl Maria von Weber: Euryanthe 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Four Tops 7pm. $30-$95. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Jeff Marx Memorial COncert 4-7pm. $10. Proceeds from the concert will go to the Jazz Foundation of America’s Jazz Musicians Emergency Fund. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Masters of the Baroque 4-6pm. Cellist Yehuda Hanani and pianist Lydia Artymiw. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA. (413) 458-0524. Modigliani Quartet of Paris 4pm. $50/$40/$25. Saint-Saëns: String Quartet No. 1, Op. 112 Schumann: String Quartet in A Major, Op. 41, No. 3 Ravel: String Quartet in F Major. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Parsonsfield at Cold Spring Summer Music Series 6:30-8:30pm. Enjoy the river, the music and bring a picnic basket and a blanket. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. Coldspringchamberareachamber.org. Penderecki String Quartet 3pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. Rascal Flats 7pm. With Sheryl Crow and Gloriana. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Richard Shindell 7:30pm. Songwriter. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300.

FILM

​ he ​Modigliani Quartet T 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

Schubert and the Long 19th Century 7pm. $10. Bard SummerScape. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu.

The U.S. Military Academy Band’s Jazz Knights 7:30pm. West Point Military Academy, West Point. Usma.edu.

FOOD & WINE

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Hyde Park Food Truck Festival First Sunday of every month, 12-7pm. Hyde Park Chamber of Commerce, Hyde Park. 229-8612.

Guided Cemetery Tours 2pm. Learn about notable Kingstonians as you view distinctive gravesites amid remarkable landscapes within the City of Kingston. Go to FOHK.org to learn exact meeting places and cemetery schedule. Friends of Historic Kingston, Kingston. 339-0720.

Rosendale Summer Farmers’ Market 2014 9am-2pm. Vendors include:Maynard Orchards, Good Flavor Farm; Three Sisters Farm, Wright’s Orchards; Twisted Jeanne’s, Ronnybrook dairy products and Bread Alone bakery goods, Immune Schein Elixir and Organic Teas, Vlume beeswax products; Bob’s Pickles and more. Rosendale Farmers’ Market, Rosendale. 658-8348.

SPIRITUALITY

KIDS & FAMILY

Buddhism and Addiction Recovery 10:30am-noon & 2:30-4pm. $120/$96 members/$30 individual session/$25 individual session members. Teachers:Lama Losang (David Bole) and Bill Alexander.

Children and Families: Shifting Perspectives 1pm. Explore Alyson Shotz’s Mirror Fence for an imaginative exploration of Storm King. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

Guided Chakra Balancing Meditation with the Quartz Crystal Singing Bowls 1-2pm. $5-20. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

Child Safety Seat Check Event First Sunday of every month, 11am. Come have your child’s seat checked by a nationally-certified technician who can also teach you everything you need to know about car seats. Health Quest Community Education, LaGrangeville. 475-9746.

THEATER

Much Ado About Nothing 5-7:30pm. $8. New Genesis Productions Youth Theatre presents Shakespeare’s Much Ado directed by Lesley Sawhill with teen actors 14-17 years. Beatrice & Benedick, and Hero & Claudio hope you will join them for an evening of witty wooing. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. 657-5867.

LECTURES & TALKS Reception for Preserving Creative Spaces: Photographs form the Historic Artists’ Homes and Studios Program 3-5pm. Remarks and a reception for Preserving Creative Spaces on view in the Coachman’s House Gallery. This exhibition of powerful photographic images depicting iconic American artists focuses attention on the National Trust’s Historic Artists’ Homes and Studios membership program. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 109.

LITERARY & BOOKS Annual Used Book Sale Hotchkiss Library, Sharon, CT. (860) 364-5041. Words Words Words 3pm. $5. 7th annual summer afternoon gathering of Hudson Valley authors, reading from and talking about their own work. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

MUSIC Ariel Ramirez’s Misa Criolla 4:30pm. Opera. Festival of the Voice grand finale. Parish Field, Phoenicia.

Amelia 5pm. $15/$5 children. A play of the Civil War by Alex Webb/ Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-4246. Inside the Mind of a Master 2pm. Shandaken Theatrical Society, Phoenicia. 688-2279. Knockout: The Story of Cus D’Amato 3pm. Premiere showing of an original theatrical production of Catskill’s legendary boxer trainer. MountainView Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Les Miserables 3pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Much Ado About Nothing 5pm. Teen performers 14-17 yrs take on Shakespeare. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. Newgenesisproductions.org. Summer Repertory: West Side Story 2pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

MONDAY 4 HEALTH & WELLNESS Cancer Support Group for Patients 2-3pm. Professional social workers and nurses lead discussions on ways to cope with illness and treatment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-6470.


AUG 6-23 WU HAN AND DAVID FINCKEL

AUG

INAUGURAL SEASON!

11-26 TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

108 Avenue of the Pines Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 518.584.9330

spac.org

TANNERY POND CONCERTS 2014

ArtisticDirector: Director: Christian Christian Steiner Artistic Steiner Artistic Director: Christian Steiner May 24

6pm

Dover String Quartet Alon Goldstein piano

June 21

8pm

Axel Strauss violin Ilya Poletaev piano

July 12

8pm

Jasper String Quartet

August 2

8pm

Gleb Ivanov piano

August 23 8pm

Trio Virado flute, viola, guitar

Sept. 6

8pm

Ji

Sept. 27

6pm

Paul Huang violin Louis Schwizgebel piano

piano

Performances at Darrow School in New Lebanon, NY www.tannerypondconcerts.org or 888-820-1696

8/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 85


LITERARY & BOOKS Speaking of Books First Monday of every month, 7pm. Non-fiction book discussion group. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 471-6580.

MUSIC Dayna Kurtz: Residency at The Falcon 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Josh Rutner Trio 8pm. Jazz. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Moody Blues 7:30pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. 518-584-9330. The Voodoo Orchestra North 8pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

NIGHTLIFE Monday Night Karaoke 9pm. Free. Come and Join us for a night of Singing, Laughing and Fun. Monday night at Rendezvous Lounge in Kingston. Starting at 9pm -? bring a lot friends and have fun! Rendezvous Lounge, Kingston. 331-5209.

THEATER Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

Joy of Jazz Week Artist residency led by legendary jazz pianist Marcus Roberts. The residency will host special jazz performances, events, lectures, workshops and lively late night jam sessions. Events held at various locations; sponsored by Catskill Jazz Factory. Doctorow Center for the Arts, Hunter. Catskilljazzfactory.org. Kiss and Def Leppard 7:30pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. 518-584-9330. Orange County Pop, Rock, & Doowop 6:30-8:30pm. Established by the beloved local character, The Gerry Godmother, this summer music series features both old-timey and contemporary local acts. Thomas Bull Memorial Park, Montgomery. 615-3830.

SPIRITUALITY Private Spirit Guide Readings with Psychic Medium Adam Bernstein First Tuesday of every month, 12-6pm. $40 30 min/$75 hour. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100. Sound Healing Group Session 6-7pm. $10-20. Receive powerful sound healing with Quartz Singing Bowls, tuning forks, and Om chant. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

The Art of Jewelry: Ages 8-12 9:30am-12:30pm. $180. A fresh foray into the decorative arts for both boys and girls, this week-long session will explore many different techniques for construction & design with teacher and jewelry designer Karen Capobianco. The Treehouse, New Paltz. 255-0345. Rhinebeck Multi Media Camp 10am-4pm. $295. Through August 8. Students will learn all kinds of different media, from digital storytelling and radio recording to stop-motion animation! Stop-motion animation techniques covered will include using various materials while working collaboratively on a short animated video. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480.

TUESDAY 5

JIM PEPPLER

Rosendale Kids Calling the Shots 10am-4pm. $295. Through August 8. Ever wish you could get the chance to be in charge? Learn all about the filmmaking process from media education professionals, from scripting and storyboarding to filming with different shots and camera angles to trying your hand at editing. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480.

EFT & Law of Attraction Prosperity Circle 6pm. $15. FInancial issues resolved quickly with 5,000 year old technique. TG Parker, Kingston. 706-2183.

THEATER The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

DANCE

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Introduction to Belly Dance Class First Tuesday of every month, 7-8pm. No experience necessary! Come check out a real belly dance class in a relaxed setting to get a glimpse into the exciting and exotic Art of Belly Dance. Artspace at Ed Dempsey Tattoos, Woodstock. 594-8673.

Beginner Swing Dance Class 6:30-7:30pm. $75. Four-week beginners swing dance class for adults with professional swing dance instructors Linda and Chester Freeman. Wallkill Public Library, Wallkill. 895-3707.

HEALTH & WELLNESS August Mindfulness Retreat Through Aug. 10. Blue Cliff Monastery, Pine Bush. Reiki Practitioner Share First Tuesday of every month, 6:30pm. The evening begins with a centering meditation, connecting to our Reiki guides and an opportunity to share about reiki experiences. Each attendee will have time on the reiki table to relax and take in the power of our healing hands. Open only to those who have received a minimum of Reiki l training. Dreaming Goddess, Poughkeepsie. 473-2206.

KIDS & FAMILY 2014 MiC Summer Youth Summit Through August 11. The MiC Youth Summit will bring together up to 30 teens from the U.S. and abroad, in a multi-faith, intercultural, music & media, once in a lifetime experience. Bard College at Simon’s Rock, Great Barrington, MA. (800) 235-7186. New Mother’s Social Circle 10am-noon. This group is for mamas looking to meet other mamas and babies (ages 0-8 months) for friendship, answers about your new baby, and socialization. (Siblings are welcome.) We have a different weekly discussion topic with Q & A. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624.

LITERARY & BOOKS Open Mike with Chrissy Budzinski 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

MUSIC Blues & Dance Party with Big Joe Fitz and the Lo-Fis 7-9:30pm. Big Joe Fitz and the Lo-Fis bring the best blues and dance party to High Falls the first and third Tuesdays of the month. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

86 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/14

WEDNESDAY 6 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS RAPP Coffee & Conversation First Wednesday of every month, 5:30-7:30pm. The Relatives As Parents Program (RAPP) implements monthly Coffee and Conversation support groups for grandparents and other relatives raising children. Immaculate Conception Church, Amenia. 914-3738.

DANCE Ajkun Ballet Theatre Company noon. Classical ballet with a contemporary sensibility. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

FILM Monty Python Live (Mostly) from London’s O2 Arena 6:30pm. $20. For the first time in more than three decades, comedy legends Monty Python will perform live on stage together this year. Broadcast from London’s O2 Arena, Monty Python Live (mostly) will play in cinemas around the globe. The Moviehouse, Millerton. (518) 789-0022.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES The Olana Landscape Trilogy 9am-4pm. $350 3 days/$125 per day. Artist Sandy Spring will lead this series of oil painting workshops for experienced oil painters utilizing the views from Olana. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 109.

THURSDAY 7 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS East Fishkill Community Library Photography Group First Thursday of every month, 7pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

DANCE Midsummer Dancing: Salsa Night $25/$20 in advance. Dancers Diane Lachtrupp and Johnny Martinez sashay back into the Spiegeltent for an evening of salsa dancing backed by fast, furious, and sensual Latin sounds. Dance instruction at 6:15pm; live band from 7–10pm. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750. Swingin’ Newburgh First Thursday of every month. Beginner swing dance lesson provided by Linda and Chester Freeman of Got2Lindy Dance Studios 7-7:30. Swing Shift Orchestra plays 7:30-9pm. Newburgh Brewing Company, Newburgh. Got2lindy.com.

FILM

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Swing Dance Class $75 series. Beginner 6pm-7pm, Intermediate at 7pm, and Advanced 8pm.Four-week series with instructors Linda and Chester Freeman. Art Society of Kingston, Kingston.

Writing Poetry, Short Story, Novel, Memoir or Creative Non-fiction (and Getting It Published) 6:30-8:30pm. $15/$60 series. 21 Cedar Way, Woodstock. 679-8256.

Gardiner Media Monsters 2-4pm. $150. 6-session film camp. Youth will engage in collaborative digital storytelling to create a script that they then bring to life using stop-motion animation! Youth with also get the chance to try human animation as well as make a short music video and a “behind the scenes” video. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480. Gazing into the Sacred Mirror: Intuitive Painting with Sheri Ann Ponzi 6:30-9:30pm. $160/series. A magical, mystical, intuitive energy painting journey for women who are ready to discover, honor, and celebrate their most divine, creative selves. This class is designed for women who know there is more to life than what they are currently experiencing~ those of us who long to honor and act on our own needs and desires. The Treehouse, New Paltz. 255-0345. The Olana Landscape Trilogy: 3 Day Workshop A Series of Oil Painting Workshops Utilizing the Views from Olana 9am-4pm. $350 3 days/$125 per day. Artist Sandy Spring will lead this series of oil painting workshops for experienced oil painters utilizing the views from Olana. Participants will paint ‘a distant view from Olana’ and ‘a near view from Olana’, focusing on capturing the sense of the majestic and the effects of luminism, plan and simplify a landscape painting, discuss scale, composition, how to establish focal points, and determine color, saturation, and temperature to convey sense of space, atmosphere, and luminosity. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 109. Positive Parenting Workshops for Parents, Caregivers and Professionals 10am-noon. $25. The two session educational series is designed to assist caregivers with learning their parenting style, how to react to and guide a child’s behavior and practice examples to demonstrate positive discipline. Family Partnership Center, Poughkeepsie. Tuesday Evening Painting Demos 7-9pm. Golden Acrylics/Williamsburg Oils with Patti Mollica. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Esopus Creek Puppet Suite Marlene Marallo and Patrick Wadden have been changing the world one giant puppet at a time for 32 years. Their Armof-the-Sea Theater company produces unabashedly optimistic shows of paint and papier mâché, largerthan-life puppets and masks with an exaggerated folkloric quality. Perfection is not the goal; they aspire to inspire. Accompanied by its resident band of musicians, the company performs at schools around the country and in its natural amphitheater in Tina Chorvas Park in Saugerties. Its annual pageant, the “Esopus Creek Puppet Suite,” puts puppets in the hands of local volunteers to bring the region’s history to life—this year, 20th-century Saugerties. The suite will begin August 22 at 8pm and will run through August 24, at Tina Chorvas Park. (845) 246-7873; Armofthesea.org. Divergent 3-5:30pm. Watch the movie Divergent. Rated PG-13. Raffle for The Hunger Games box set. Age: 13 or 7th grade and up. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

KIDS & FAMILY Family Fun Night: Talent Show 6:30-7:30pm. Sign up ahead of time to perform an act, or simply come to watch! Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Hip Hop Dance 5:15-6:15pm. Join in the ever-popular weekly hip hop dance workshop taught by dancer and choreographer Anthony Molina. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org. Zumba for Tweens and Teens 4:30-5:30pm. Ages 10-14. Wednesdays in August. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

MUSIC Harlem on the Hudson Experience 8pm. $25. Celebrate Catskill Jazz Factory’s Joy of Jazz Week as it kicks off its third annual artist residency at the Bard Spiegeltent with Harlem on the Hudson, a curated jam session featuring 20 of today’s best Jazz musicians and offering a program that recalls the classic jam sessions of the 1940s. Spiegeltent, Annandale. 758-7900. Jerry Douglas 8pm. Country. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. 518-584-9330. Syracuse & Siegel 8-10:30pm. With special guests. Catskill Mountain Pizza Company, Woodstock. 679-7969.

SPIRITUALITY Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism Classes 7pm. 90-minute program includes 30 minutes of Quiet Sitting Meditation followed by one of eight lectures on the history, practices and principles of the Karma Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012.

Louise Hay, You can Heal Your Life 7-9pm. Marbletown Community Center, stone ridge. 687-0880.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Bereavement Support Group 5:30-6:30pm. This expressive support group is open to the community and led by Adrienne London, LCSW-R. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-3101. Gentle Flow Yoga First Thursday of every month, 9:45am. 25.00. Intentionally set to 3-5 people so you enjoy the most hands on yoga experience. This gentle flow class is perfect for the more mature clientele. Each class will consist of: meditation, stretching, core strength, balance, and relaxation. The classes ends with an optional application of Living Essential Oils® to aid you into a deeper meditation. Tara Gregorio Holistic Healing, Cold Spring. (617) 512-9501. Laryngectomy Support Group First Thursday of every month, 11am-noon. The Laryngectomy Support Group offers opportunities for individuals facing laryngeal cancer and individuals treated for laryngeal cancer to share their experiences, learn about communication options (electrolarynxand/ or voice prosthesis) and participate in community awareness projects. This group is open to family members and caregivers. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-7391. Pre-Operative Spine Education Sessions First Thursday of every month, noon. Whether you are scheduled for spine surgery or are considering it, the spine education session is an opportunity for you and your loved ones to receive more information. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 204-4299.

KIDS & FAMILY Lego Club 6:30-7:30pm. We’ll supply the bricks, you bring the creativity! Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

LECTURES & TALKS Joseph Luzzi 7pm. The Bard professor and author reads from his new book, “My Two Italies.” Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Ragtime to Swing Masterclass 6-7pm. Catskill Jazz Factory 2014 artist-in-residence Marcus Roberts will lead this master lecture and discussion on the roots and evolution of jazz. Drawing upon the abundant talent of the 2014 residency program, Roberts will examine jazz’s early developmental period. Doctorow Center for the Arts, Hunter. (518) 263-2000.

MUSIC Belleayre Jazz Club: Hot Latin Nights II 8pm. $26. Featuring Alberto Solis and Gil Gutierrez. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904. Cafe Singer Showcase with Barbara Dempsey and Dewitt Nelson 7-9:30pm. Barbara and Dewitt welcome three individual performers to the Cafe Singer Showcase. Come hear some local talent and enjoy freshly prepared, made to order delicacies. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Damian Catera 8:30pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. JP Patrick & Friends 8:30pm. Blues, rock, jazz fusion. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Late Night Jam Session with Catskill Jazz Factory 10pm. Late night jam sessions at the Last Chance Tavern curated by Catskill Jazz Factory. Each night will have a unique theme. Last Chance, Tannersville. (518) 628-4424.

THEATER

Leda and Guilt Mountain 8:30pm. Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. 481-5158.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.


PERFORMANCE ART CYNTHIA HOPKINS AT MOUNT TREMPER ARTS

Cynthia Hopkins performs “A Living Documentary” at Mount Tremper Arts this month.

Portrait of the Artist as a Palindrome Cynthia Hopkins describes her work as “epic folkloric narratives.” Born in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, in 1972, Hopkins majored in American Civilization at Brown University, and went on to create six performance works, three of them composing the “Accidental Trilogy,” one theme of which was her struggle with alcohol and drugs. Often in her performances Hopkins adopts alter egos—cartoonish personalities in vaudevillian costumes. She has recorded eight albums on which she sings and plays accordion, piano, guitar, and musical saw. Hopkins’s band, Gloria Deluxe (1999-2009), combined German cabaret, folk, and country influences. In 2007 she founded a nonprofit organization called Accinosco (Accidental Nostalgia Company). She lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Hopkins’s show addressing global warming, “This Clement World,” appeared at Mount Tremper Arts in 2012. A full-scale performance of the work, with an 11-piece chorus and band, played the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. In her latest show, “A Living Documentary,” Hopkins plays five characters: a mumbling youth, a “celebrated American playwright,” a patron of the arts, a career development expert, and a Fat Lady. Hopkins will perform “A Living Documentary” at Mount Tremper Arts on August 15 and 16. (845) 688-9893; Mounttremperarts.org. —Sparrow Sparrow: Hello. Cynthia Hopkins: Can you hear me okay? I’m in a car, going to a wedding, with my husband. I’m surrounded by trucks! What was the genesis of “A Living Documentary”? I set out to make a piece about earning a living in the performing arts, which forced me to confront the unsustainable situation I was in: running a nonprofit company to produce large-scale works. Basically what the story tells was my decision to fold that company. To make this piece a “living documentary,” I didn’t spend any money on it, I didn’t hire anybody to work on it, so any money that I got paid, I used to live—in stark contrast to previous productions where I would fundraise, pay for a lot of personnel and equipment, and usually what would get cut would be my own salary. There’s been a lot of talk lately about the gentrification of New York City. When people ask, “Will the arts survive in New York City?” they don’t mean Laurie Anderson and David Byrne. They’re talking about people like you. That’s absolutely true. There’s that Patti Smith interview where she said if you’re a young artist making experimental work, New York is not the place you want to live right now— which is true. And I think it’s sad. But there’re plenty of other places to be. So in this piece you never appear as yourself? You’re always in character? I’m always a character when I speak. I sing a couple of songs live, as myself, in the middle of the piece.

And in those pieces you dress as yourself? Actually, I’m totally naked when I sing them. [Laughs.] So I’m really myself. Is that because you were thinking, “How do I dress as myself?” and you decided, “I’ll just be naked”? The piece is structured as a palindrome: The two halves of the piece are mirrors of each other, so the center needed to be a black hole. There is total blackness at the center—you just hear audio in the darkness—and flanking that black hole are the songs in the nude. I should tell you that I am a fanatical palindrome writer; I’ve written over 1,100 of them. One of my most recent palindromes is: “Star Wars: raw rats.” [Laughs.] Thanks! Did you always struggle with money, as an artist? Early on in my career I did a lot of other jobs and made a living that way; the artwork was separate. But as I started to produce these shows with the nonprofit company, it became a full-time job, which meant that I became a producer and fundraiser. I was spending as much time, if not more, doing what was peripheral to the art itself—and it was work I didn’t want to do. It’s interesting that the same problem appears over and over again, whether you’re a waitress or running a prestigious theater company: how to make money. I read some reviews of the show, and all of them mentioned that it doesn’t offer any solutions to this problem, but to my mind the show is the solution. “A Living Documentary” was made with me earning my living from it. So what I’m trying to imply, and what the career development character says explicitly, is that it is possible to make a living as an artist. You just have to insist upon profiting from your work, to say, “Yeah, if you pay me a sufficient fee, I’ll do the show. And if you won’t, I won’t.” I just realized that my day job, to make money, is this interview. It pays for me sitting in bed writing palindromes. You know, I’m going to have to jump off the phone here in a minute. We’re about to get to where we’re going. Oh, you’re at the wedding! Well, we’re not going to the wedding. We’re going to a rehearsal for the music for the wedding. I hope you get paid for it. Oh no, this is a gift.

8/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 87


8DW

Rhythm on the Riverfront Concert Series 6-8pm. Foundry Dock Park, Cold Spring. 473-4440 Ext. 273.

John Fogerty 8pm. $36-$111.50. Singer/songwriter. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388.

Scarecrow 7pm. Blues and hip hop. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

John Gorka 8:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300.

Sweet Summer Thursdays 6-10pm. Petey Hop will be hosting the Thursday music series with a different featured guest every week. The Garrison, Garrison. 424-3604.

EIGHT DAY WEEK

SIGN UP NOW EVENTS TO YOUR INBOX EACH THURSDAY

SPIRITUALITY Private Raindrop Technique Sessions with Donna Carroll First Thursday of every month, 11:30am-6pm. $75/one hour. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

THEATER Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Summer Repertory: West Side Story 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES The Olana Landscape Trilogy: 3 Day Workshop A Series of Oil Painting Workshops Utilizing the Views from Olana 9am-4pm. $350 3 days/$125 per day. Artist Sandy Spring will lead this series of oil painting workshops for experienced oil painters utilizing the views from Olana. Participants will paint ‘a distant view from Olana’ and ‘a near view from Olana’, focusing on capturing the sense of the majestic and the effects of luminism, plan and simplify a landscape painting, discuss scale, composition, how to establish focal points, and determine color, saturation, and temperature to convey sense of space, atmosphere, and luminosity. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 109.

FRIDAY 8 DANCE Black Lakes 8pm. $20. Katie Workum. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

Kurt V i l e a t B SP Ki ng sto n .

www.c h ro nog r a m . c om / 8 d w

Swing Salon 8-11pm. $12. The evening will feature a dance lesson from 8-8:30pm by professional swing dance instructors, Linda and Chester Freeman of Got2Lindy Dance Studios followed by an evening of dancing to classic and contemporary swing music. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 514-7989.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Over 475 Bikes

250 Lake Street Newburgh NY 12550 - 845 569 9065

85,000 Sq. Ft.

Our Collection Features: Harley Davidson, Racers, Police, Military, 1880s & up, Choppers, 1901-1953 Hours: Friday - Sunday 10-5 Admission: Adults $11 Children $5 Under 3 Free

Hudson Music Festival 6-11pm. With over 100 acts, representing more than 300 musicians, with over 125 performances. Venues throughout the City of Hudson. Visit our website for details and download our free mobile app. Hudson Music Fest, Hudson. (646) 584-4551.

HEALTH & WELLNESS AHA HeartSaver 1st Aid 6-10pm. $50. This course covers basic first aid for trauma and illness, maneuvers for choking victims and environmental emergencies. This course is suitable for day care workers, construction workers, camp counselors, students and many other community professions, and is first is ONLY. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 475-9742.

KIDS & FAMILY

1922 Ace 4-Cyl

Birds of Prey 11am. Join wildlife rehabilitator Tom Ricardi for his ever popular presentation on birds of prey, a program designed for all ages. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

LECTURES & TALKS

WWW.MOTORCYCLEPEDIAMUSEUM.ORG

Family Experiences noon. Bob Winrow. Part of the lecture program called “Kingston IBM Conversations” to complement their IBM Gallery Exhibit. Informal talks will feature former IBM employees and other community members who participated in the oral history interviews that were conducted as part of the exhibit. Friends of Historic Kingston, Kingston. 339-0720.

MUSIC Alexis Cole Ensemble 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. The Bad plus Joshua Redman 8pm. $29-$79. A double bill featuring artists who are shaping the contemporary jazz scene. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Belleayre Jazz Club: Hot Latin Nights II 8pm. $26. Featuring The Pedrito Martinez Quartet. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904.

The stars don’t only come out at night...

11 days (and nights), with dozens of performances throughout Kingston, PLUS A Taste of Kingston, a fantastic chance to sample gourmet treasures from Kingston & the entire Hudson Valley.

KingstonFestival.org When you’re in Kingston, NY, be sure to visit The Uptown Gallery at 296 Wall Street

88 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Catskill Jazz Factory Alumni Night 7:30pm. Featuring performances by the Caleb Curtis Quartet, the Benny Benack Quartet and the Charenee Wade Quartet with Chris Pattishall. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-2000. The Fixx 8pm. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Heather Christian & The Arbornauts 10pm. $12/$10. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750. The Hot Sardines 8:30pm. $25-$40. Jazz. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750.

King’s X, Joe Gareri, Blindman 7:30pm. $20-$25. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. Late Night Jam Session with Catskill Jazz Factory Aug. 9, 10pm. Late night jam sessions at the Last Chance Tavern curated by Catskill Jazz Factory. Each night will have a unique theme. Last Chance, Tannersville. (518) 628-4424. The Legacy of a Life Cut Short 8pm. $25. Pre-concert talk at 7:30pm. Dances, songs, and partsongs by Franz Schubert. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Lick the Toad 9pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 2298277. Moot Davis 6:30pm. Chesterwood, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3579 ext. 25210. The Pete Santora Show 8:30pm. Songer/songwriter. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739. The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Potluck & Free Concert in the Park - Summer Reading Program Wrap-Up Party! 6pm. Free. The last big BANG of our Summer Reading Program! Join us at the park for a barbeque dinner and family-friendly Irish music by the T. McCann Band! Bring the whole gang! FREE and open to the whole community. Please call 845-757-3771 or email tivoliprograms@gmail.com to sign up and tell us what dish you will bring to share. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Rat Race Choir, Empathy Entropy, Hammerdown, Blanco Diablos 7:30pm. $10-$15. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. Second Friday Jams with Jeff Entin and Bob Blum 8-11pm. Influenced by everything they heard, they play a wide variety of music with an almost infinite song list including many originals, with a bit of jam band attitude thrown in. The emphasis is on fun for both Jeff and Bob and the audience, with familiar, obscure, and original tunes and jams making the show. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Steve Gorn & Friends 8:30pm. $50/$40/$25. A Twilight Concert of Indian Ragas with Samarth Nagarkar, vocalist, and Samir Chatterjee, tabla. The master bamboo flautist and saxophone player returns to Maverick to perform classical Indian music on the bansuri bamboo flute. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Susan D 9:30pm. Classic rock. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Ultram, Peter Aaron/Brian Chase Duo, Clockwork Mercury 9pm. Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. 481-5158. Vance Gilbert 8pm. $25/$20. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Wine and Cheese Cruise to Bannerman Island Call for times and boat launch info. Bannerman Island Discovery Tours, Glenham. 831-6346.

SPIRITUALITY Introduction to Buddhism: A Weekend Teaching 7-8:30pm. $120/$96 (KTD Members)/$30/$25 (KTD Members) per individual session. Lama Losang presents the basics of Tibetan Buddhism in down-to-earth language with warmth, humor, and clarity. He covers a wide range of topics, answers questions, and leads sessions of sitting and walking meditation. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 3.

THEATER Honky-Tonk Highway 8pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Les Miserables 8pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Summer Repertory: West Side Story 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Communing With the Masters 9:30am-12:30pm. With painting instructor, Marianne Van Lent. Athens Cultural Center, Athens. (518) 945-2136.


SATURDAY 9 COMEDY Cabaret Comedy Double Bill 8:30pm. $25-$40. Erin Markey: Safety Gates are for Babies, and Jeffery Self & Cole Escola: Jeffrey & Cole Go To College. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750.

DANCE Barn Dance with Moonshine Holler & Peter Stix 7pm. $20. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448. Black Lakes 8pm. $20. Katie Workum. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Dance Omi Open Salon 5-7pm. With a diverse group of dancers from all over the world, Omi’s Open Salons allow residents to share their individual work with the public before exhibiting their collaborative projects later in the month. Taking place in the Studio Barns at Omi. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. Salsa Lesson and Latin Dance Party with Carlos Osorio 8pm. $12 at the door. Bring out your Latin spirit! Join Carlos Osorio, Founder of the Cumbia Spirit School of Dance for a fun, all levels salsa class and then dance the night away at Kingston’s most artful new event space Wine available. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 845 331 3261.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Hudson Music Festival 12-11pm. With over 100 acts, representing more than 300 musicians, with over 125 performances. Venues throughout the City of Hudson. Visit our website for details and download our free mobile app. Hudson Music Fest, Hudson. (646) 584-4551. Hunter Mountain German Alps Fest 11am. $12/children free. Traditional German-American foods, Schuhplattler Dancers, plus some new entertainers, plenty of vendors, plus fun activities for the kids. Fireworks Display Saturday Night. Hunter Mountain Resort, Hunter. (518) 263-4223. Newburgh Urban Market 10am-4pm. Our great mix of high quality offerings includes original hand crafted jewelry, furniture, clothing, and décor from local artisans; antiques and vintage collectibles; fair trade and repurposed items; fine local food, beverages and organic produce; and much more. Newburgh Urban Market, Newburgh. Newburghurbanmarket.com.

FILM Rooftop Films at Storm King 8pm. Experience an evening exploration of short films sited among the sculptures and rolling fields. For more information visit stormking.org/rooftop. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115. A Spell to Ward off Darkness 8pm. $5-$10. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050.

FOOD & WINE Fruition Chocolate New Product Launch Party 5pm. Please join us to celebrate the launch of our newest collection of chocolate bars at our workshop in Shokan. Open house. Cocktails and bites. Fruition Chocolate, Shokan. 657-6717.

Alloy Orchestra: He Who Gets Slapped 8:30pm. $25 preferred/$20/$15 in advance. Alloy Orchestra returns with a signature live score to the 1924 classic He Who Gets Slapped, the tragic tale of a brilliant scientist who loses his research — and his wife — to a dishonest man and becomes a circus clown with a very peculiar act. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111.

Byrdcliffe Family Music 4:30 & 7:30pm. The Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild, Bari Koral, and Paul Green Rock Academy are co-sponsoring a late-afternoon and evening of pop and rock with young and less-young music lovers in mind. Bari Koral, the Paul Green Rock Academy and the Five Points Band. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079. David Kraai & Amy Laber 2pm. Country harmonies, sweet banjo, tasty mandolin, twangy guitars and soulful harmonica. Seven Freedoms Music Center, Salisbury Mills. 497-7005. Dickey Betts & Great Southern 8pm. $71.50-$81.50. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. From “Boy” to Master: The Path to Erlkönig 1:30pm. Pre-concert talk at 1pm. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003.

The Grand Slambovian Circus of Dreams 8pm. $25/$20. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Jack & Heros 9-11:30pm. Members Chris Cernak and Sean Walker play juiced up folk rock. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Jazz at the Maverick: Perry Beekman & Friends 8pm. 8pm. $50/$40/$25. American Landscapes VII: The George Gershwin Songbook. Catering, wine, and beer from Yum Yum at this concert. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

Late Night Jam Session with Catskill Jazz Factory 10pm. Late night jam sessions at the Last Chance Tavern curated by Catskill Jazz Factory. Each night will have a unique theme. Last Chance, Tannersville. (518) 628-4424. Live Music and DJ: The Showgirls Dancy Pants Collective 10pm. $12/$10. Featuring Justin Vivian Bond and friends, this variety evening of cabaret and dancing is set to shine brighter than a disco ball. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750.

Family Concert with Roger Tincknell 1-3pm. Children’s songs and singing games. Isaac Walton Field, Otis, MA.

Mythic Transformations 8pm. $25. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Featuring works by Franz Schubert and Kurt Atterberg. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Conversation with Author and Journalist Fran Lebowitz 8pm. $25-$55. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Invention and Reinvention: Who Was Schubert? 10am-noon. Panel discussion. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003.

MUSIC Albi 8pm. Acoustic. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000.

t e r P

SUNDAY / AUGUST 31 / SHOWTIME 8PM

Hudson’s “In The Pink” with the return of the fabulous, flamboyant and forever fascinating Charles Busch. With brand new songs, brand new stories, and brand new gowns, Charles Busch puts a brand new face on cabaret. And with Catskill’s very own Tom Judson on the eighty eights you know you’re in for a magical night of music merriment and more!

Just Two: Michael Torsone & Robbie Germano 9pm. 9pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277.

Marcia Ball 8:30pm. Rhythm and blues. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300.

LECTURES & TALKS

k n i P n i ty

Gerry Malkin Quintet 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Dog On Fleas 11am. $12/$10 children. Family-friendly concert. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989.

Story Hour with Author McKenzie Willis 10-11am. Watch literature come to life with McKenzie Willis, author of the children’s book, “Tales of the Rainbow Forest.” Willis will lead an engaging interactive hour of story and song at the Wagon House Education Center. Best for ages 4-8. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

CHARLES BUSCH

Belleayre Jazz Club: Hot Latin Nights II 8pm. $26-$66. Bossa Nova & tango with the Romero Lubambo Quintet & Pablo Aslan Tango Orchestra. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904.

KIDS & FAMILY

Rosendale Theatre’s Fun! Summer Family Series: DOG ON FLEAS 11am-noon. $12/$10 kids. Comprised of Rosendalians Dean Jones, John Hughes and Chris Cullo, Dog on Fleas plays infectious music that is equal parts Cab Calloway and Woody Guthrie with a pinch of Spike Jones and Ray Charles topped-off with calypso, Cajun, highlife, soul, and reggae all stirred with Ringo’s drumstick. How could you not have fun? Packed with audience participation, this show offers an un-unforgettable good time. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989.

BY PO

Arc Iris Featuring Jocie Adams 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Lynn Kearney: Fire and Ice 7 & 9pm. Using standards, country and pop songs, and inspired by a Revlon lipstick color, Fire and Ice is a musical exploration of heat and cold, affection and rejection, hate and love. It’s hot and it’s cool. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill.

Music for Kids (and their Grown-Ups) 4:30 & 7:30pm. The Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild, Bari Koral, and Paul Green Rock Academy are co-sponsoring a late-afternoon and evening of pop and rock with young and less-young music lovers in mind. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 679-2079.

BACK

MAND

R DE PULA

The club opens for dinner at 6PM or in the restaurant after the show at 9:30

HELSINKI HUDSON 405 Columbia St Hudson 518.828.4800 helsinkihudson.com

CHATHAM

DANCE FEST AUGUST 1-30 2014 PERFORMANCES! FILMS! WORKSHOPS!

The Tent at PS21

Nelson Patton Duo 8-10pm. $5. Nelson Patton is an experimental duo. The music draws from rock, jazz, and orchestral tones, creating a wholly original sound. From compositionallyminded soundscapes to feel good rhythmic pulsations, the evening will leave you asking for more. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. 518-584-9330. Shadows and Light: An Evening of Joni Mitchell Music 8:30-11:30pm. $25/$20 in advance. Shadows and Light. An evening of music written by Joni Mitchell. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. The Song as Drama: Winterreise 5pm. $35. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandaleon-Hudson. 758-7003. The Spirit of Louis Concert 7:30pm. The Joy of Jazz Week culminates with Marcus Roberts & the Modern Jazz Generation, a 12-piece multi-generational ensemble, performing in “The Spirit of Louis” concert. Jazz master Marcus Roberts and his ensemble will explore and pay tribute to the musical influences and legacy of the late jazz great Louis Armstrong. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-2000. The Woodstock Concerts on the Green 1-5pm. Village Green, Woodstock. Woodstockchamber. com. Young People’s Concert: Amernet String Quartet & Friends 11am. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

Proudly supported by

2980 route 66 Chatham New York 518.392.6121 / PS21CHATHAM.ORG

rosen dale theatre 408 Main street rosendale, nY 1 2472 845.658.8989 rosendaletheatre.org

August 9

Fun! summer FAmily series: Dog on Fleas $12/$10, 11:00 Am

August 10 DAnce Film sunDAys: BollywooD: Dance in inDian cinema with Rajastahani Folk Roots $10/$6, 2:00 pm August 13 the FoRgotten kingDom From the huDson VAlley progrAmming group $7, 7:15 pm

August 23 nAtionAl theAtre From lonDon: a small Family Business $12, 2:00 pm Plus nightly Films: cheF, oBVious chilD, Venus in Fur, liFe itselF progrAmming suBject to chAnge, pleAse Visit our weBsite!

8/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 89


Young People’s Concert: ​Amernet String Quartet and Friends 11am. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS 8th Annual Motorcycle Benefit Ride 4pm. Proceeds to Benefit Chloe Bradford who has Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, & Jennie Lepera, who has rhabdomyosarcoma. New Hackensack Fire Company, Wappingers Falls. 297-3897. Discover Walden 8am-6pm. Walden’s business owners are joining together in solidarity to coordinate a day of discounts, sales, raffles, giveaways, fun activities, and the very first Traveling Tricky Tray. Downtown Walden, Walden. DiscoverWaldenNY.com. Weston Blelock honors Woodstock’s 45th Anniversary with Roots of Woodstock 7pm. Featuring music by Fish Castle. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Citizens’ Races at UCI Mountain Bike World Cup Kenda’s Race the World XC is part of the New York State MTB series and the Root 66 Series, GNH Lumber Kids’ Fun Race, Red Bull Berm Burners Pump Track Challenge, The Clif Bar Race the World DH. Windham Mountain Ski Resort, Windham. Racewindham.com. Volunteer Restoration Workday 10am-2pm. A great way to learn about native flora while removing invasive plants that hinder their growth. Today’s project: Wineberry, Barberry and Stiltgrass removal. Black Creek Preserve, Esopus. Scenichudson.org.

SPIRITUALITY Meditation Instruction 2pm. 60-minute class requires no previous meditation experience. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012. Introduction to Buddhism: A Weekend Teaching 10:30am-noon & 3:30-5pm. $120/$96 (KTD Members)/$30/$25 (KTD Members) per individual session. Lama Losang presents the basics of Tibetan Buddhism Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 3.

THEATER Honky-Tonk Highway 8pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Les Miserables 8pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Liar 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Summer Repertory: West Side Story 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Getting Known, Being Shown Through Aug. 10. With Ariel Shanberg and Carlos Loret De Mola. The Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-9957.

SUNDAY 10 DANCE Milonga des Artistes-Sunday Afternoon Tango with Ilene Marder Second Sunday of every month, 3pm. $12 at the door. NEW!!! What a great way to spend a wintery day! Come join us for the inaugural edition of MILONGA DES ARTISTES with your host and DJ Ilene Marder, founder of the 10 year old Woodstock Tango community. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 845 331 3261. Tango Lesson and Milonga des Artistes with Ilene Marder Second Sunday of every month, 3-7pm. $12. Beginning Argentine Tango lesson followed by Milonga des Artistes-Dance to the irresistible music of DJ La Rubia Del Norte, playing Tango classics (with Latin, Swing breaks). Attending dancers include many friends and aficionados from across the Hudson Valley and Tri-State region. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 331-3261.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Beacon Flea Market 8am-3pm. A variety of items, including re-finished furniture, antiques, vintage purses, mid-century cookware, collectible vinyl, old books, handmade jewelry, and local crafts. Beacon Flea Market, Beacon. 202-0094. The Beacon Sloop Annual Corn Festival 12-5pm. Hot fresh sweet corn, stone soup, fresh made chili and more. Music with David & Jacob Bernz, Mara Levine & Caroline Cutroneo, Hank Waji, Caroline Doctorow, Spook Handy, Howland Cultural Center Community Chorus, Kurt Hauck, Cosby Gibson. Children’s area, environmental displays, food & craft vendors. Pete and Toshi Seeger Riverfront Park, Beacon. The Beacon Sloop Club Annual Corn Festival 12-5pm. Free. The festival features fresh picked, readyto-eat corn. Dozens of perfromers, environmental displays, and free children’s activities.Pete and Toshi Seeger Riverfront Park, Beacon. 527-8671. Hudson Music Festival 12-6pm. With over 100 acts, representing more than 300 musicians, with over 125 performances. Venues throughout the City of Hudson. Visit our website for details and download our free mobile app. Hudson Music Fest, Hudson. (646) 584-4551.

90 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Hunter Mountain German Alps Fest 11am. $12/children free. Traditional German-American foods, Schuhplattler Dancers, plus some new entertainers, plenty of vendors, plus fun activities for the kids. Fireworks Display Saturday Night. Hunter Mountain Resort, Hunter. (518) 263-4223.

FOOD & WINE

Schubert and Viennese Theater 5:30pm. Pre-concert talk at 5pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Southern Week Through Aug. 16. Appalachian, Old-time, Cajun and Zydeco. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

Fourth Annual Chef and Farmer Brunch Proceeds from the popular sell-out event, featuring the Hudson Valley’s most accomplished chefs, benefit the North East Community Center’s (NECC) programs that are critical to the greater northern Dutchess County community. Millerton Farmers’ Market, MIllerton. (518) 789-4259.

St. Petersburg String Quartet 3pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126.

Millerton’s 4th Annual Chef and Farmer Brunch 11am-1pm. Sponsored by No. 9 Restaurant, the brunch will showcase the talent of the Hudson Valley’s hottest farm-to-table Chefs under tents in Railroad Plaza, Millerton. Their unique menus and cocktails will feature seasonal produce donated by local farmers. North East Community Center, North East. (518) 789-4259.

Years of Pilgrimage 2pm. Selections from the mercurial keyboard music of Baroque-era Domenico Scarlatti, to Luigi Boccherini’s luscious string works, the humor and exuberance of Rossini, the virtuosity of Paganini, and the genius of Verdi. Performing with Yehuda Hanani on cello and Michael Chertock on piano, Metropolitan Opera mezzosoprano Lucille Beer sings favorite coloratura arias that typify the bravura of Italian vocal tradition. Doctorow Center for the Arts, Hunter. (518) 263-2000.

Rosendale Summer Farmers’ Market 2014 9am-2pm. Vendors include:Maynard Orchards, Good Flavor Farm; Three Sisters Farm, Wright’s Orchards; Twisted Jeanne’s, Ronnybrook dairy products and Bread Alone bakery goods, Immune Schein Elixir and Organic Teas, Vlume beeswax products; Bob’s Pickles and more. Rosendale Farmers’ Market, Rosendale. 658-8348.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Homemade Holistic Health: A 10 Month Workshop Series Every fourth Sunday, 10am. $50/$450 for all ten. Our health represents a complex interaction between our physical body, environment and ability to process emotional pressure. Holistic approaches to health are only as effective as their capacity to address these aspects in concert. Join Claudia for ten workshops over the course of the changing seasons. The Herbal Acre, Rhinebeck. (917) 992-9901.

KIDS & FAMILY What’s All the Buzz About? 1pm. The summer landscape is alive with insects and their allies! Join an Environmental Educator from the Hudson Highlands Nature Museum to explore the miniscule world of insects at the Art Center. Learn who buzzes, whirs, chirps, and sings in fields and forest. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

LITERARY & BOOKS Words Words Words 3pm. $5. 7th annual summer afternoon gathering of Hudson Valley authors, reading from and talking about their own work. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

MUSIC Amernet String Quartet: Jon Klibonoff, Piano 4pm. $50/$40/$25. American Landscapes VIII, The World of Richard Strauss: Cherish the Émigrés. Mahler: Piano Quartet fragments, Dvořák: String Quartet No. 11 in F major, “American”, Schoenberg: Six Little Pieces, Op. 19, Erich Wolfgang Korngold: Piano Quintet. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. The ​Amernet String Quartet 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Before Unspeakable Illness 1:30pm. $35. Pre-concert talk at 1pm. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. Franz Schubert: Die Verschworenen 5:30pm. $25. Bard Summerscape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Goethe and Music: The German Lied 10am. $30. Works by many German composers. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. Greg Westhoff’s Westchester Swing Band 5:30pm. Swing, jump, big band. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Hot Club Of Cowtown 7:30pm. Western swing trio, with special guest The Edukated Fleas. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. 8th Annual Hudson Jazz Workshop Performance 3:30pm. $10/$8 members/students free. Featuring Armen Donelian, Marc Mommaas, with special guest Reggie Workman, the legendary jazz double bassist, along with the participants of the Hudson Jazz Workshop. There will also be a “Meet the Artists” talk before the performance at 3pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Jeffery Broussard & the Creole Cowboys 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Kings of Leon 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. KJ Denhert & Marc Von Em at Cold Spring Summer Music Series 6:30-8:30pm. Enjoy the river, the music and bring a picnic basket and a blanket. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. Coldspringchamberareachamber.org. New Paltz Musicales: An Afternoon of Opera 2-3:30pm. $10. The New Paltz Musicales Concert series invites you to join us for our “season opening” concert. The award recipients will be presented at the time of the concert. A brief reception with refreshments will follow the event offering an opportunity to great the students. All proceeds are used to support the performers and the concert series. Redeemer Evangelical Lutheran Church, New Paltz. 255-0051.

A Summer Evening with Michael Feinstein 7pm. $60-$90. Featuring songs from the Great American Songbook. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

MONDAY 11 HEALTH & WELLNESS Cancer Support Group for Patients 2-3pm. Professional social workers and nurses lead discussions on ways to cope with illness and treatment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-6470. Yoga with a View 6-7:15pm. $17. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Yoga with Nita noon. Levels I/II. Euphoria Yoga Center, Woodstock. 679-6766.

MUSIC Dayna Kurtz: Residency at The Falcon 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Open Mike Night with Jeff Entin 6:30-8:30pm. Jeff Entin welcomes local musicians to Open Mic Night. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Opening Night: Gems from Three Centuries 8pm. Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

NIGHTLIFE

Citizens’ Races at UCI Mountain Bike World Cup Kenda’s Race the World XC is part of the New York State MTB series and the Root 66 Series, GNH Lumber Kids’ Fun Race, Red Bull Berm Burners Pump Track Challenge, The Clif Bar Race the World DH. Windham Mountain Ski Resort, Windham. Racewindham.com.

Monday Night Karaoke 9pm. Free. Come and Join us for a night of Singing, Laughing and Fun. Monday night at Rendezvous Lounge in Kingston. Starting at 9pm -? bring a lot friends and have fun! Rendezvous Lounge, Kingston. 331-5209.

Ice Cream Social 1-4pm. Delish homemade toppings, and ice cream generously donated by Stewarts. See you there! Free for members. Century House Historical Society, Rosendale. 658-9900.

The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

SPIRITUALITY A Day of Healing with One Light Healing Touch 10am-5pm. $150 (with lunch). Experience a powerful one-day training with OLHT. Release accumulated stress and emotional programming, explore hands-on healing. learn to access and strengthen your healing energies. This training enhances your immune system, clears emotional and physical blockages, increases understanding and awareness, and brings balance to your Body, Mind and Spirit. Healing Space, Stone Ridge. 687-2552. Guided Chakra Balancing Meditation with the Quartz Crystal Singing Bowls~ 1-2pm. $10-20. Celebrate the new moon of Cancer with meditation, energy balancing, and healing. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838. Guided Chakra Balancing Meditation with the Quartz Crystal Singing Bowls 1-2pm. $5-20. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838. Introduction to Buddhism: A Weekend Teaching 10:30am-noon & 2:30-4pm. $120/$96 (KTD Members)/$30/$25 (KTD Members) per individual session. Lama Losang presents the basics of Tibetan Buddhism in down-to-earth language with warmth, humor, and clarity. He covers a wide range of topics, answers questions, and leads sessions of sitting and walking meditation. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 3. Women’s Full Moon Gathering 7-8:30pm. $10. We will hold circle in the Ceremonial Tipi. Our Circle is a gathering of women, coming together to draw upon the powerful, rich energies of the full moon. Non-denominational group, with foundation rooted in honoring the Mother Earth and the light of the Goddess within each of us. Dreaming Goddess, Poughkeepsie. 473-2206.

THEATER Honky-Tonk Highway 2pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Les Miserables 3pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Summer Repertory: West Side Story 2pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Gardiner Library Fiction Writers’ Workshop Second Sunday of every month, 6-10pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Summer Stages: Youth Opera Experience $300 workshop/$100 transportation/$100 for Extended Day program. Youth Opera Experience returns for a third exciting year of singing, dancing and fun! Young people in grades 2-6 will participate in rehearsing, designing and performing the opera pastiche Rumpelstiltskin. Acting games, arts & crafts, dancing and singing, as well as a songwriting workshop with an opera professional are all a part of the fun. Meet and Greet Reception Sunday, August 10, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM Final Performance: Rumpelstiltskin Saturday, August 23, 11:00 AM Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. Bethelwoodscenter. org/events/detail/summer-stages-youth-operaexperience.

THEATER

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Color of Water: A Wilderness Exploration in Art and Nature Through Aug. 17. With Ryushin Sensei and Hojin Osho. Zen Mountain Monastery Sangha House, Mount Tremper. 688-2228. Fiber Frolic: Ages 8-12 9:30am-12:30pm. $180. This week-long workshop with artist and teacher Karen Capobianco will include all sorts of fiber techniques found in weaving, basketry and rug making. Some of the projects will include making your own simple tools for fiber work-- crazy baskets, hulahoop rugs, paper screens, tube knits, and more. The Treehouse, New Paltz. 255-0345. EFT & Law of Attraction Prosperity Circle 6pm. $15. FInancial issues resolved quickly with 5,000 year old technique. TG Parker, Kingston. 706-2183.

TUESDAY 12 BUSINESS & NETWORKING Solopreneurs Sounding Board Second Tuesday of every month, 6:30-9pm. Struggling with a work issue? Need a perspective shift? Take advantage of collective intelligence (“hive mind”) and an inspiring meeting place to work out creative solutions to problems. Beahive Beacon, Beacon. Beahivebzzz.com/ events/solopreneurs-sounding-board-2014-07-08/.

LECTURES & TALKS Monthly Open House with Dharma Talk Second Tuesday of every month, 7pm. free. Shambhala Buddhist teachers talk on a variety of topics at our Open House. Second Tuesday of every month, after community meditation practice. Meditation: 6-7pm, Talk 7pm, followed by tea, cookies, and converation. Sky Lake Lodge, Rosendale. 658-8556.

MUSIC Drake and Lil Wayne 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Instrumental Inspirations 8pm. Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Orange County Pop, Rock, & Doowop 6:30-8:30pm. Established by the beloved local character, The Gerry Godmother, this summer music series features both old-timey and contemporary local acts. Thomas Bull Memorial Park, Montgomery. 615-3830. Singer/Songwriter Jesse Harris 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Safe Harbors Informational Tours 9am. The tours highlight how Safe Harbors’ transformative supportive housing, award-winning contemporary art gallery and performing arts theater is instrumental to the revitalization of downtown Newburgh. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 562-6940.

SPIRITUALITY Chakra Meditation Group 6-7pm. $15. Led by Dianne Weisselberg, LMSW, Certified Chakra Healer. These guided meditations vary from session to session and are an opportunity to center, align and infuse yourself with the vibrational energy of one or more Chakras. There is time for connection and reflection in the group as well. Namaste Sacred Healing Center, Woodstock. 679-6107.

THEATER Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.


MUSIC/ART MICHAEL LINDSAY-HOGG IN HUDSON

Mick Jagger from The Rock & Roll Circus and Donkey/Clown/Man, two paintings from Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s show at BCB ART in Hudson.

Everywhere Man What term would you use to describe someone born to Hollywood royalty who came of age in the middle of Tinseltown’s golden era and Swinging London, and worked with both the Beatles and the Rolling Stones at their headiest 1960s heights, capturing them in two of the most iconic music films of all time, Let it Be and The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus? For director, author, and visual artist Michael Lindsay-Hogg, the term “Zelig” feels wholly inadequate. “Maybe ‘Zelig, but with more ideas,’” says a laughing Lindsay-Hogg, who will screen the latter film and read from his memoir Luck and Circumstance at Basilica Hudson on August 8 and host a reception for “Are You Game? I’m Game,” a showing of his latest artworks, at BCB ART in Hudson on August 9. Born in New York in 1940, Lindsay-Hogg got his start as a director in the mid ’60s on the British television pop music program “Ready Steady Go!” when he was 24. “My being around the same age as a lot of the musicians we had on the show was vital, I think,” he says. “We didn’t quite know we were in the middle of a cultural revolution at the time.” His TV connections and youthful hipness netted him gigs directing pioneering music videos for the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, which in turn led to the making of 1968’s BBC-TV special The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus. A long-shelved landmark of rock cinema, it features memorable appearances by the Stones, the Who, Jethro Tull, and the Dirty Mac, a thrown-together supergroup comprised of John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, Yoko Ono, and Mitch Mitchell. Next came the 1969 Beatles documentary Let It Be, which culminates with the Fabs’ now-legendary rooftop concert at the Apple Records office building in London—which was Lindsay-Hogg’s idea. “George

didn’t want to perform in public anymore at that point so we shot them playing in the basement, but it was obvious for the film they needed an audience to play off of,” the director recalls. “I suggested, ‘Hey, why don’t you do a concert on the roof? That way, the fans can see you but you won’t have to directly interact with anyone.’ Paul was into it, but right before they were supposed to play, George and Ringo said they didn’t want to do it. But if Paul and John were into something, the others would go along with it. John had been totally quiet, but at the last minute he just blurted out, ‘Fuck it, let’s do it.’ So they went out and played.” Lindsay-Hogg moved further into TV, film, and theatrical direction and took up painting in 1999. “I’m self-taught, so it’s all about going wherever it takes me,” he says. His mother was actress Geraldine Fitzgerald, and for years he assumed his biological father was her first husband, Sir Edward Lindsay-Hogg. But as Luck and Circumstance (Knopf, 2011) fascinatingly chronicles, the long-swirling Hollywood rumors were true: Michael’s actual father was none other than Orson Welles, who briefly lived with Fitzgerald. “Even if my life was presented as a fictional work, you’d say, ‘Oh, come on,’” he quips. “In writing the book I ended up knowing more about myself than I’d ever anticipated.” Michael Lindsay-Hogg will host a screening of The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus and read from Luck and Circumstance at Basilica Hudson on August 8 at 8pm. (518) 822-1050; Basilicahudson.com. Tickets are $10. “Are You Game? I’m Game” opens at BCB ART with a reception on August 9 at 6pm and runs through September 7. (518) 828-4539; Bcbart.com. —Peter Aaron 8/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 91


WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Gardiner Media Monsters 2-4pm. $150. 6-session film camp. Youth will engage in collaborative digital storytelling to create a script that they then bring to life using stop-motion animation! Youth will also get the chance to try human animation as well as make a short music video and a “behind the scenes” video. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480. Lithography with Ron Netsky $290+$15 supplies. Through Aug. 14. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Positive Parenting Workshops for Parents, Caregivers and Professionals 10am-noon. $25. The two session educational series is designed to assist caregivers with learning their parenting style, how to react to and guide a child’s behavior and practice examples to demonstrate positive discipline. Family Partnership Center, Poughkeepsie. Tea and Stones Second Tuesday of every month, 6:30-7:30pm. Come experience an hour of connecting to the magic of the mineral kingdom over a cup of herbal tea. Each month we’ll explore a different stone from our vast collection, we’ll learn all about their healing qualities, history and ways to incorporate them into our daily lives. Dreaming Goddess, Poughkeepsie. 473-2206.

The Relatives As Parents Program Support Group Second Thursday of every month, 6-7:30pm. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Poughkeepsie. 452-8440.

DANCE Midsummer Dancing: Swing Night $25/$20 in advance. Professional swing dancers Linda and Chester Freeman of Got2Lindy Dance Studios return to the Spiegeltent for a night of soulful swing dancing to the music of Eight to the Bar, a band known for its colorful mix of ’40s jazz and swing, ’50s jump blues, and more. Dance instruction at 6:15pm; live band from 7–10pm. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Bereavement Support Group 5:30-6:30pm. This expressive support group is open to the community and led by Adrienne London, LCSW-R. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-3101.

Man Forever and Mike Gamble 8:30pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Matt Schofield 8pm. $20. Opening act, Dylan Doyle. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. 518-584-9330. Powerman 5000, HED PE 7pm. $17-$20. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. Rhythm on the Riverfront Concert Series 6-8pm. Foundry Dock Park, Cold Spring. 473-4440 Ext. 273. Seventh Blues Pro Jam 8pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Sweet Summer Thursdays 6-10pm. Petey Hop will be hosting the Thursday music series with a different featured guest every week. The Garrison, Garrison. 424-3604.

Stroke Support Group Second Wednesday of every month, 11am-noon. Is for patients and family members to share information, express concerns, and find support and friends. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-6319.

The Frontmen with Bruce Mandel Opening 6:30pm. $10. Chesterwood, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3579 ext. 25210.

End of the Summer Pizza Party 3-4pm. Come eat pizza, listen to music, and play games with everyone else. Age: 13 or 7th grade and up. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Syracuse & Siegel 8-10:30pm. With special guests. Catskill Mountain Pizza Company, Woodstock. 679-7969. The U.S. Military Academy Band 6:30pm. The performance will showcase some of the finest music written for military band performed by one of the finest ensembles of the medium: the U.S. Military Academy Band. Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site, Hyde Park. Historichydepark.com.

SPIRITUALITY Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism Classes 7pm. 90-minute program includes 30 minutes of Quiet Sitting Meditation followed by one of eight lectures on the history, practices and principles of the Karma Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012.

THEATER The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Botanical Illustration: Colorful Garden Fruits and Berries with Colored Pencil 10am-4pm. $290/$260 members. 3-day class. Illustrator Carol Ann Morley will lead this intensive workshop that focuses on colored-pencil techniques for botanical illustration. Draw from the abundance of the summer garden and make intriguing compositions of fruit, berries and foliage. This is a playful workshop suitable for all student levels. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

THURSDAY 14 BUSINESS & NETWORKING Hudson Valley Garden Association Monthly Meeting Second Thursday of every month, 7pm. Shawangunk Town Hall, Wallkill. 418-3640.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Kingston-Rhinebeck Toastmasters Club Second Thursday of every month, 7-9pm. Practice public speaking skills. Ulster County Office Building, Kingston. 338-5184.

92 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/14

ASK for Music August 8-10pm. $6. Featured this month are Seth David Branitz (Seth Davis) and Dave Kearney. Refreshments are served. This event is hosted by Michael and Emmy Clarke. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331.

Four Guys in Disguise 9pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277.

KIDS & FAMILY

The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. 518-584-9330.

Amanda Palmer 8:30pm. $25-$40. Singer/songwriter. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750.

Dr. Dirty John Valby, Dan McRitchie, Mr. Will 7:30pm. $15-$20. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Hubbard Hall Opera Theater: Marriage of Figaro and Gianni Schicchi 8-10:30pm. $10-$35. Fully costumed and staged, with orchestra and English supertitles. Hubbard Hall, Cambridge. (518) 677-2495.

MUSIC

Belew-Levin-Mastelotto & Friends 9pm. $30/$25 in advance. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

Sensemeya Noon. Fusing hot Latin dance rhythms with the cool sophistication of jazz. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

MUSIC

IBM Club/Rec Center Noon. Gay Tavares. Part of the lecture program called “Kingston IBM Conversations” to complement their IBM Gallery Exhibit. Friends of Historic Kingston, Kingston. 339-0720.

Beethoven’s Successor? 8pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

DANCE

Zumba for Tweens and Teens 4:30-5:30pm. Ages 10-14. Wednesdays in August. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

LECTURES & TALKS

The Bar Spies 8:30pm. Classic rock. Whistling Willie’s, Cold Spring. 265-2012.

WEDNESDAY 13

Summer Reading Program Finale: The Jester Jim Show 7-8pm. Explore Jester Jim’s trunk of props as he juggles strange objects, does some crazy balancing, and cracks you up with his bizarre antics. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Wonderful Mammals of Fields and Forests 11am. In this program, designed for all ages, Rick Roth, conservationist and teacher, will encourage families to get to know the furry creatures that often live in our own backyards. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Hubbard Hall Opera Theater: Marriage of Figaro and Gianni Schicchi 8-10:30pm. $10-$35. Fully costumed and staged, with orchestra and English supertitles. Hubbard Hall, Cambridge. (518) 677-2495.

“Peter and the Wolf” at Maverick Concerts For the final Young People’s Concerts concert of the season, Maverick’s music director, Alexander Platt, will narrate a special performance of composer Sergei Prokofiev’s beloved fable with music, “Peter and the Wolf.” Arranged for chamber ensemble and performed by the Amernet String Quartet & Friends, the piece famously uses personified instruments in the orchestra to tell the story of young Peter and his animal friends, the Duck, the Bird, and the Cat, as they tussle with a hungry wolf. The performance will be held on August 9 at 11am at Maverick’s picturesque music barn in Woodstock. Admission is free for all young people under 16. Adults pay $5 each and receive a coupon for $5 off the price of any regular-season concert. (845) 679-8217; Maverickconcerts.org. Summer Moving Meditation Retreat: Create a Healthier Mind and Body 4pm. Through Aug. 24. Rev. Deoksang Jo from Korea and his teacher, Rev. Song from the Won Institute of Graduate Studies guide participants in Taoist practice for awakening the Spirit and deepening your meditation practice. Won Dharma Center, Claverack. (518) 8512581.

KIDS & FAMILY Model Buildings Class 3-4:30pm. Peter Theodore will teach children how to build their very own model building that can become part of a village. These buildings will be displayed at the library when completed. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

MUSIC Hubbard Hall Opera Theater: Marriage of Figaro and Gianni Schicchi 8-9:30pm. $10-$35. Fully costumed and staged, with orchestra and English supertitles. Hubbard Hall, Cambridge. (518) 677-2495. The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival Featuring Vanguard Jazz Orchestra and many others. Visit website for specific performances and times. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335. Jackson Browne 8pm. $40.50-$100. Solo acoustic. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Kenny Loggins 8pm. Country. Paramount Theatre, Middletown. 346-4195. Kenny Loggins Live on Stage! 8-10pm. $50, $65, $75 (plus tax/fees). Kenny Loggins almost needs no introduction with 12 platinum albums, a pair of Grammy’s, and hits on nearly every Billboard chart. His career has spanned four decades and Kenny shows no signs of slowing up. Who can forget his songs from Caddy Shack, Top Gun and Footloose. Pooh Corner, Peace of Mind, Celebrate Me Home, Whenever I Call You Friend, What a Fool Believes, This Is it, Footloose, I’m Alright, Danger Zone and his contribution to We Are The World are just a few highlights of Loggins’ versatile career. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039.

Vince Fisher 7-9:30pm. Vince plays favorites ranging from folk to classic rock to country intersperse with a growing list of original songs. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival Featuring Vanguard Jazz Orchestra and many others. Visit website for specific performances and times. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335. Jason Isbell 8pm. $30/$24 in advance. One-time Drive-By Trucker Jason Isbell writes open -hearted songs full of storm and drama, bursting with personal truths, and echoing with the southern sound of his Alabama upbringing. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111. Music From the High Peaks to Olana’s Orchard 6-8pm. $30/$25 members. Renowned faculty and international rising young artists perform in Olana’s orchard in an exuberant display of virtuosity and talent. Various chamber music combinations include cello chorus, solo and duo piano, quartets, sextets, and the High Peaks Festival Orchestra in Vivaldi’s Double Violin Concerto, Gershwin, and more. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 109.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Dancing Flowers: The Gardens of Jacob’s Pillow 4:30pm. $25/$20 members. Join garden designer Valerie Locher for a behind-the-scenes tour of these much admired gardens. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Singer-Songwriter Showcase Third Friday of every month, 8pm. $6. Acoustic Music by three outstanding singer-songwriters and musicians at ASK GALLERY, 97 Broadway, Kingston 8-10:30 pm Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0311.

SPIRITUALITY

The Vibe 8pm. Covers. Gail’s Place, Newburgh. 567-1414.

A Day of Healing with One Light Healing Touch 10am-5pm. $150 (with lunch). Experience a powerful one-day training with OLHT. Healing Space, Stone Ridge. 687-2552.

THEATER The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

FRIDAY 15

The Wood Brothers 9pm. Bluesy Americana. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. The Zombies 8-10pm. $30/$40/$50. The 2nd UK group following the Beatles to score a #1 hit in America, The Zombies infiltrated the airwaves with the sophisticated melodies, breathy vocals, choral back-up harmonies and jazzy keyboard riffs. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039.

FILM

SPIRITUALITY

Woodstock 8:30pm. $5. Bring your blanket, pack a picnic basket and watch Woodstock: The Director’s Cut on the historic field where the festival took place! Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. Bethelwoodscenter.org

Emotional Healing from Trauma 7-8:30pm. $120/ $96 (KTD members)/$30/$25 (KTD members) per individual session. Teachers: Lama Tsultrim Yeshe, James L. Knoll IV, M.D., Trish Malone and Kell Julliard. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext, 3.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Gate of Ease and Joy: Yoga Asana and Zazen Through Aug. 17. With Barbara Boris. Zen Mountain Monastery Sangha House, Mount Tremper. 688-2228. Voice as Practice Through Aug. 17. With Meredith Monk. Zen Mountain Monastery Sangha House, Mount Tremper. 688-2228.

KIDS & FAMILY Stargazing Program 8:45-10:45pm. Join us at the Mid-Hudson Astronomical Association at the Tivoli Memorial Park on Pine Street, as we pull out the telescopes and see what kinds of celestial bodies we can find in the night sky. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771.

THEATER Honky-Tonk Highway 8pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Les Miserables 8pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. A Living Documentary 8pm. $20. A comedic, no-nonsense reflection on the trials and tribulations of earning a living as a professional theater artist in the 21st century. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Othello 8pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.


MUSIC JACK DEJOHNETTE TRIO

The Jack DeJohnette Trio will play a benefit concert for Family of Woodstock on August 16 at the Bearsville Theater.

We Are Family “The Paul Butterfield Blues Band brought me up here actually,” says longtime Woodstock area resident and legendary jazz drummer Jack DeJohnette, calling from Switzerland the afternoon before playing the iconic Montreux Jazz Festival with the other members of his red-hot trio: saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and bassist Matthew Garrison. “A couple of players that I knew from Chicago—[multi-instrumentalist] Gene Dinwiddie and [drummer] Phillip Wilson—were playing with him,” he continues. “So my wife and I came up to visit. And we moved up here because they were here, but they wound up leaving. [DeJohnette laughs.] We’ve raised our daughters here. We really love the community and it remains one of our favorite places in the world.” And on August 16, the man who has kept time for some of the greatest leading men in jazz history, including Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Thelonious Monk, Stan Getz, Herbie Hancock, fellow Ulster County resident Sonny Rollins, and Keith Jarrett (whose trio with Jack and bassist Gary Peacock remains viable and active to this very day) to name but a few, gives back to the region he fell in love with almost 40 years ago when he brings his current trio to Bearsville Theatre for a special concert hosted by the renowned local music organization Jazzstock to benefit Family of Woodstock. “My wife Lydia has worked with them in the past, handling crisis management, and we’ve donated clothes to them,” DeJohnette says. “It’s a great organization and really helps a lot of people who are not so well off. This event is very important.” There will also be a silent auction held on the day of the show, all proceeds of which will be going to Family (ticket sales for the concert itself will be a partial donation). While DeJohnette hinted that he might have something to put up on the block, he is keeping mum about it.

“It’s a silent auction,” he says with a laugh. DeJohnette, who has worked with both Ravi’s parents, John and Alice Coltrane, as well as Matthew’s father, Trane’s longtime bassist Jimmy Garrison, in the past, is indeed quite excited to showcase the new directions his current trio is taking the three-piece format. “I originally put this trio together 20 years ago for a performance at the Museum of Modern Art in Brooklyn,” he explains, like a proud uncle. “We first played then, and we’ve been like family ever since. And being that I played with both their parents, there’s a connection there. Matthew’s worked extensively with so many names—John Scofield, Gary Burton, John McLaughlin, just to name a few—and he’s created quite a name for himself and has created a unique voice on the bass. He’s developed a style and a way of playing on the electric bass that sounds like an orchestra. And he uses electronics as well. And Ravi, I’ve been playing on and off with him for years and I’ve watched him develop his own voice as a composer and band leader.” Just don’t expect a proper studio recording by the Jack DeJohnette Trio anytime soon. According to its fearless leader, the three men are still in the exploratory phase of their work together as a unit and cutting an album is the furthest thing from their minds. “We’ll get to that,” DeJohnette promises. “Right now what’s important is playing the music and developing our voices as a unit. [Recording] is not the emphasis. We’ll do that when we feel we are ready. But the music we are making is developing in a really positive way and we’re having a lot of fun at it.” The Jack DeJohnette Trio will play a benefit concert for Family of Woodstock on August 16 at 8pm. Tickets are $25 in advance/$30 day of show. (845) 679-4406; Bearsvilletheater.com. —Ron Hart 8/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 93


WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Photoetching with Peik Larsen $290+$30 supplies. Through Aug. 17. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

SATURDAY 16 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Voices of Diversity Third Saturday of every month, 12-2:30pm. A social network for LGBTQ people of color. Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center, Inc., Kingston. 331-5300.

COMEDY Bob Newhart 8-10:30pm. $59.50/$79.50/$89.50. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. Comedian Ralphie May 8pm. $52/$39.50/$32. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335.

DANCE Salsa Lesson and Latin Dance Party with Carlos Osorio 8pm. $12 at the door. Bring out your Latin spirit! Join Carlos Osorio, Founder of the Cumbia Spirit School of Dance for a fun, all levels salsa class and then dance the night away at Kingston’s most artful new event space Wine available. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 845 331 3261.

Wondering What’s Happening to America 6:30-8:30pm. Dennis Speed. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Rory Block 8pm. $25/$20. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

MUSIC

Simone Dinnerstein: A Piano Solo 8-9:45pm. $25/$22 seniors/$20 contributors/$5 children. Windham Civic and Performing Arts Center, Windham. (518) 734-3868.

Beethoven and the Dawn of Romanticism 2pm. Doctorow Center for the Arts, Hunter. (518) 263 2000. Broadway’s Leading Man: Norbert Leo Butz 8pm. $26-$66. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904. Capowski 8pm. Alternative. Two Boots, Red Hook. 758-0010. David Rothenberg and Markus Reuter 9pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Debbie Fisher Band 8-10:30pm. Singer/songwriter. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Elysian Fields 8pm. $20 preferred/$16/$12 in advance. Composers Jennifer Charles and Oren Bloedow are MASS MoCA veterans and NYC indie music stalwarts, weaving dream pop and noir landscapes. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111.

Soul Rebels 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Tom Judson: Mostly from The Movies 7:30pm. An evening of words and music from cinema classics, cinema flops and everything in between. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill.

SPIRITUALITY Emotional Healing from Trauma 9-10:15, 10:30am-noon, 2:30-4, 4:15-5:45 & 7-8:30pm. $120/ $96 (KTD members)/$30/$25 (KTD members) per individual session. Teachers: Lama Tsultrim Yeshe, James L. Knoll IV, M.D., Trish Malone and Kell Julliard. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext, 3.

SUNDAY 17 DANCE Dance Alumni Share Works-In-Progress 2-4pm. Dance Omi Director Christopher K. Morgan will facilitate a showing of works-in-progress by Alumni of the Dance Omi Residency Program. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-4747.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Beacon Flea Market 8am-3pm. A variety of items, including re-finished furniture, antiques, vintage purses, mid-century cookware, collectible vinyl, old books, handmade jewelry, and local crafts. Beacon Flea Market, Beacon. 202-0094. International Celtic Festival 11am. $16/children under 12 free. Featuring fantastic entertainment from the Emerald Isles, plus world-class Irish-American bands and dancers. Dozens of authentic Irish vendors, traditional foods, and plenty of beverages and bagpipe competition. Hunter Mountain Resort, Hunter. (518) 263-4223.

FOOD & WINE

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Winds has hosted its Rock, Rattle,

Hurley Corn Festival 10am-4pm. $3. Crafts and antiques, vendors, food, children’s activities, demonstrations. Hurley Reformed Church, Hurley. 331-4121.

and Drum Pow Wow, an event mod-

Rosendale Summer Farmers’ Market 2014 9am-2pm. Vendors include:Maynard Orchards, Good Flavor Farm; Three Sisters Farm, Wright’s Orchards; Twisted Jeanne’s, Ronnybrook dairy products and Bread Alone bakery goods, Immune Schein Elixir and Organic Teas, Vlume beeswax products; Bob’s Pickles and more. Rosendale Farmers’ Market, Rosendale. 658-8348.

eled after traditional American Indian

KIDS & FAMILY

celebrations of music, dance, and

Ashokan Family Camp Though August 21. An all ages hands-on experience in music, dance, storytelling, puppetry, nature, crafts & goofiness. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

Rock, Rattle, & Drum Pow Wow For the past eight years, Healing

Inner Spaces 3-5pm. $10. Weaves opera, new music and improvisation, spoken word, painting, photography, video and installation into a singular visceral performance. Is a collaborative artistic project exploring the archetypal elements of sight, sound and imagination. Century House Historical Society, Rosendale. 658-9900.

song. The Berkshires nonprofit will host its ninth annual pow wow August 9 and 10. This year’s event will

International Celtic Festival 11am. $16/children under 12 free. Featuring fantastic entertainment from the Emerald Isles, plus world-class Irish-American bands and dancers. Dozens of authentic Irish vendors, traditional foods, and plenty of beverages and bagpipe competition. Hunter Mountain Resort, Hunter. (518) 263-4223.

Harney Fest 8am-5pm. This family-oriented event will feature live music, games, food, factory tours, and tea tasting classes. Raffle tickets will be available for sale to benefit the Pine Plains Free Library. Harney and Sons, Millerton. Harney.com/harneyfest.

KIDS & FAMILY Hula-hoop Party with The Mandaliahs 11am-12:15pm. $5-$14. Join The Mandaliahs for a day of interactive hula hoop entertainment. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Family Paint-In 12-4pm. Join us in creating a collaborative, community work of art - open to all ages. Works will be on Display in the gallery through Sept. 7. Ann Street Gallery, Newburgh. 784-1146. Uncle Rock 10am. Kids’ music. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

LECTURES & TALKS “Far Fairer Hopes”: Originality and Influence 10am-noon. Panel discussion. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. The Other Pakistan Talk by NY based artist/writer/radio interviewer Dr. Hazel Kahan about her personal story as a Jewish woman born in Lahore and her account of a current hugely inspiring project there. Woodstock Library, Woodstock. 679-4693. Sun Tour with the Mid-Hudson Astronomical Association 2-4pm. $5. Dr. Willie Yee will conduct a few exercises to demonstrate some aspect of our Sun, including the role of magnetism, and the features of the sun that can be seen with different kinds of equipment. This will be followed by an opportunity to safely view the sun through a variety of specialized telescopes. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 109.

94 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Words Words Words 3pm. $5. 7th annual summer afternoon gathering of Hudson Valley authors, reading from and talking about their own work. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

also enjoy beautiful feather fans by artist Patrick Scott, as well as the return of world-famous violinist and Native American flutist Arvel Bird. Also offering traditional crafts, storytelling, and food, the pow wow will

Chronogram Block Party 4-11pm. Free. Music includes Bishop Allen, Ikebe Shakedown, The Tins, Ratboy Jr., Breakfast in Fur, Rosendale Brass Band, members of Bindlestiff family Cirkus, beer and wine garden, distillery tasting, afterhours dance party with Mambo KiKongo. Uptown Kingston. Chronogramblockparty.com.

FOOD & WINE

LITERARY & BOOKS

leadership of champion Head Man way and Cory Jackson. Visitors can

Peachtopia! 11am-4pm. Join us for live music, a peach pie bake-off, peach face-painting, a peach-themed grill menu, and plenty of peach-picking. Fishkill Farms, Fishkill. 897-4377.

Art House, 2pm. $15/$12 Byrdcliffe. Photographer/filmmaker Don Freeman explores the handmade homes created and lived in by a dozen distinguished American artists. Upstate Films, Woodstock. 679-6608.

and jungle dress dances under the and Head Lady dancers Uri Ridge-

Newburgh Urban Market 10am-4pm. Washington’s Headquarters, Newburgh. Newburghurbanmarket.com.

FILM

performing fancy, traditional, grass,

Children and Families: Tour with Wally McGuire 1pm. Visitors of all ages are invited to enjoy a special tour with celebrated educator Wally McGuire. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

feature American Indians of all ages

run 10am to 8pm on Saturday and 10am to 6pm on Sunday, on the Adams, Agricultural Fairgrounds, MA. (413) 443-2481; Healingwinds.net. Eric Erickson 8pm. Acoustic. 8pm. Singer/songwriter. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Galvanized Jazz Band 6:30pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. Hubbard Hall Opera Theater: Marriage of Figaro and Gianni Schicchi 2-3:30 & 8-10:30pm. $10-$35. Fully costumed and staged, with orchestra and English supertitles. Hubbard Hall, Cambridge. (518) 677-2495. The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival Featuring Vanguard Jazz Orchestra and many others. Visit website for specific performances and times. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335.

Meditation Instruction 2pm. 60-minute class requires no previous meditation experience. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012.

THEATER Actors & Writers 6:30pm. Building on Maverick’s theatrical tradition and heritage, this creative group of acting professionals returns for an evening of memoirs by writers and performers past and present. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Honky-Tonk Highway 8pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

Jack DeJohnette Trio 8pm. $30/$25 in advance. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

Short Stories for a Summer Evening 4:30-6pm. $15. Actor Jeff Woodman reads. Cragsmoor Historical Society, Cragsmoor. 647-6384.

The Jazz Hounds 4-6pm. Playing the music of Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong. Beekman Library. 724-3414.

Knockout: The Story of Cus D’Amato 7pm. Premiere showing of an original theatrical production of Catskill’s legendary boxer trainer. MountainView Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901.

Justin Vivian Bond: The Drift 8pm. $25-$40. The Spiegeltent season closes in style with Justin Vivian Bond’s fresh new collage of spoken word and song, loosely inspired by Tennessee Williams’s The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone. Spiegeltent, Annandale. (914) 393-7750. Kings of Leon 7pm. $77.50/$36. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Late Ambitions 8pm. $25. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Lucky House Duo 8pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. The Matthew Finck/Jonathan Ball Project 8pm. $10. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048.

Les Miserables 8pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. A Living Documentary 8pm. $20. A comedic, no-nonsense reflection on the trials and tribulations of earning a living as a professional theater artist in the 21st century. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Bush Fruit & Berries 10am-1pm. An introduction to bush fruits and their maintenance with a focus on such fruits as currants, gooseberry, honeyberries and goji. Wild Earth, New Paltz. 256-9830.

MUSIC Luke Bryan 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Fellowship of Men: The Male Choral Tradition 10am. $35. Performance: Members of the Bard Festival Chorale, James Bagwell, choral director. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. The Final Months 1:30pm. $35. Works by Franz Schubert. Pre-concert talk at 1pm. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7003. Franz Schubert: Fierrabras 4:30pm. $25. Bard SummerScape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Hubbard Hall Opera Theater: Marriage of Figaro and Gianni Schicchi 2-3:30pm. $10-$35. Fully costumed and staged, with orchestra and English supertitles. Hubbard Hall, Cambridge. (518) 677-2495. The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival Featuring Vanguard Jazz Orchestra and many others. Visit website for specific performances and times. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335. Jazz in the Valley noon. $35-$55. Salsa meets jazz in this music festival. Waryas Park, Poughkeepsie. Jazzinthevalley.com. Keith Urban 7pm. $75.25/$36. With Jerrod Niemann and special guest Brett Eldredge. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Mike Clifford 4pm. Singer/songwriter. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Miró Quartet: Monumental Beethoven 3pm. Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Schubert and Opera 4:30pm. Pre-concert talk at 3:30pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Slam Allen Blues Band at Cold Spring Summer Music Series 6:30-8:30pm. Enjoy the river, the music and bring a picnic basket and a blanket. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. Coldspringchamberareachamber.org.

OMG Music Fest with Jacob Whitesides 7:30pm. $25-$95. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966.

Making Digital Negatives Through Aug. 17. With Morgan Post. The Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-9957.

Souvenir de Florence 2pm. $7-$30. This afternoon Italian showcase will feature the Festival Chamber Orchestra as well as Elmar Oliveira and Axel Strauss on violin, Michael Chertock on piano, Amadi Azikiwe on viola, and Yehuda Hanani and Thomas Landschoot on cello. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-2000.

The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. 518-584-9330.

Zen and the Art of Photography Through Aug. 17. With Douglas Beasely. The Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-9957.

St. Petersburg String Quartet 3pm. Michelle LaCourse, viola, Rhonda Rider, cello. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126.

The Music of Friendship 1:30pm. $35. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003.


Trio Solisti 4pm. $50/$40/$25. American Landscapes IX: Piano Trio Landmarks. Beethoven: Piano Trio No. 1, Op. 1, No. 1. Lowell Liebermann: Piano Trio No. 3, Op. 122 (2012), Brahms: Piano Trio No. 1 in B Major. 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Tours of Vanderbilt Formal Gardens 1-4pm. Free tours of the formal gardens by volunteers discussing the history of the gardens and the mission of the Vanderbilt Garden Association to rehabilitate and maintain the plants, shrubs, trees, and statuary in the gardens as they were in the 1930’s. Vanderbilt Garden Association Inc., Hyde Park. 229-6432. New Paltz Garden Club Tour of Stonecrop Gardens. 10am. Deyo Hall, New paltz, New paltz. 532-3853. Sunday Hikes Third Sunday of every month, 9:30am. Join Kingston Wine Co. + Kingston Land Trust to hike and tour the Kingston Greenline. After the hike, enjoy a refreshing glass of wine. Kingston Wine Company, Kingston. 340-9463.

SPIRITUALITY Emotional Healing from Trauma 9-10:15, 10:30am-noon & 2:30-4pm. $120/ $96 (KTD members)/$30/$25 (KTD members) per individual session. Teachers: Lama Tsultrim Yeshe, James L. Knoll IV, M.D., Trish Malone and Kell Julliard. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext, 3. Guided Chakra Balancing Meditation with the Quartz Crystal Singing Bowls 1-2pm. $5-20. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838. Theresa Caputo, Long Island Medium 3pm. $39.75-$99.75. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

THEATER Honky-Tonk Highway 2pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Knockout: The Story of Cus D’Amato 3pm. Premiere showing of an original theatrical production of Catskill’s legendary boxer trainer. MountainView Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Les Miserables 3pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

MONDAY 18 HEALTH & WELLNESS Cancer Support Group for Patients 2-3pm. Professional social workers and nurses lead discussions on ways to cope with illness and treatment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-6470.

MUSIC Catskill High Peaks Festival Concert 5:30pm. A concert of cello chorus (with 20 cellists!), string quartets, quintets and sextets and the Festival Orchestra. Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-4100. One World, Many Rhythms Latin Jazz/Salsa 4pm. Kinderhook Memorial Library, Kinderhook. (518) 758-6192. Ray Blue Trio 8pm. Jazz. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. The Voodoo Orchestra North 8pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

NIGHTLIFE Monday Night Karaoke 9pm. Free. Come and Join us for a night of Singing, Laughing and Fun. Monday night at Rendezvous Lounge in Kingston. Starting at 9pm -? bring a lot friends and have fun! Rendezvous Lounge, Kingston. 331-5209.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Community Holistic Healthcare Day Third Tuesday of every month, 4-8pm. A wide variety of holistic health modalities and practitioners are available. Appointments can be made on a first-come, first-served basis upon check-in. Marbletown Community Center, stone ridge. www.rvhhc.org. Qigong 7-8pm. $6. Pawling Library, Pawling. 855-3444.

LITERARY & BOOKS Open Mike with Chrissy Budzinski 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

MUSIC Big Joe Fitz & the Lo-Fis Blues and Dance Party 7-9:30pm. Big Joe Fitz and the Lo-Fis bring the best blues and dance party to High Falls. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Chicago & REO Speedwagon 7:30pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Goo Goo Dolls 7:30pm. $31.50-$105. With Daughtry and The Plain White T’s. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Miró Quartet: Extraordinary Quintets 8pm. Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Orange County Pop, Rock, & Doowop 6:30-8:30pm. Established by the beloved local character, The Gerry Godmother, this summer music series features both old-timey and contemporary local acts. Thomas Bull Memorial Park, Montgomery. 615-3830.

THEATER A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream 3pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Find Your Unique Essence Through Teaching Yoga 6:30-8pm. Jai Ma Yoga teacher trainers will teach two free asana, meditation, and pranayama practices this summer to help cultivate this connection. Jai Ma Yoga Center, New Paltz. 256-0465. Gardiner Media Monsters 2-4pm. $150. 6-session film camp. Youth will engage in collaborative digital storytelling to create a script that they then bring to life using stop-motion animation! Youth with also get the chance to try human animation as well as make a short music video and a “behind the scenes” video. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480. Tuesday Evening Painting Demos 7-9pm. Liquitex Acrylic paints and markers with Derek Leka. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Writing Poetry, Short Story, Novel, Memoir or Creative Non-fiction (and Getting It Published) 6:30-8:30pm. $15/$60 series. 21 Cedar Way, Woodstock. 679-8256.

Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism Classes 7pm. 90-minute program includes 30 minutes of Quiet Sitting Meditation followed by one of eight lectures on the history, practices and principles of the Karma Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012.

THEATER The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

THURSDAY 21 FAIRS & FESTIVALS Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org.

FOOD & WINE

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org. Summer Hoot A weekend celebration of beautiful tunes, local food and beer, handmade crafts, nature activities and fun for all ages Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

KIDS & FAMILY The Fabulous Snakes of Berkshire County 11am. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

LECTURES & TALKS The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story 7-8pm. A conversation with author Vivek J. Tiwary. Pawling Library, Pawling. 855-3444.

Hudson Valley Food Truck Festival 3-10pm. Many Hudson valley food trucks showing of their delicious foods. Great music, entertainment and a beer & wine garden. Cantine memorial field, Saugerties. 399-2222.

The Sage Project noon. Jerry Washington. Part of the lecture program called “Kingston IBM Conversations” to complement their IBM Gallery Exhibit. Friends of Historic Kingston, Kingston. 339-0720.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

LITERARY & BOOKS

Bereavement Support Group 5:30-6:30pm. This expressive support group is open to the community and led by Adrienne London, LCSW-R. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-3101.

Author Jesse Saperstein 7pm. Author of Getting a Life with Asperger’s: Lessons Learned on the Bumpy Road to Adulthood. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

Holistic Self-Care Class 7-8:30pm. “Accelerated Resolution Therapy Breathwork” with Amy Shuman. Family Traditions, Stone Ridge. 377-1021.

LECTURES & TALKS WCMA 104: Palate to Palette, the Aesthetics of Art and Wine 4pm. Using two very different landscape paintings as starting points, we’ll taste wine and talk art: how do notions of symmetry, balance, and structure apply to each? We’ll navigate the sequencing of impressions of the eye, nose, and palate. The Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, MA. (413) 597-3055.

LITERARY & BOOKS Author Jesse Saperstein 7pm. Author of Getting a Life with Asperger’s: Lessons Learned on the Bumpy Road to Adulthood. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

MUSIC Barbara Dempsey and Dewitt Nelson’s Cafe Singer Showcase 7-9:30pm. Barbara and Dewitt welcome three individual performers to the Cafe Singer Showcase. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

MUSIC Annual Variety Show 7:30pm. $20/$18 ages 62+ and under 12. Directed by Coach House member Barbara Jones, the show entertains with two hours of music and comedy. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. Anthony from Reality Check 9pm. Acoustic. The Quiet Man Pub, Peekskill. Thequietmanpublichouse.com. Beki Brindle 8-10:30pm. Blues. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Hubbard Hall Opera Theater: Marriage of Figaro and Gianni Schicchi 8-9:30pm. $10-$35. Fully costumed and staged, with orchestra and English supertitles. Hubbard Hall, Cambridge. (518) 677-2495. Jeremy Baum 8:30pm. Blues. Pamela’s on the Hudson, Newburgh. 562-4505. The Nutopians: Songs of John Lennon 8pm. $35/$30. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

Cymbals Eat Guitars, Dead Gaze 9pm. $12/$10. Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. 481-5158.

The Rambling Kind with Liz and Jim Beloff Opening 6:30pm. $10. Chesterwood, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3579 ext. 25210.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Hubbard Hall Opera Theater: Marriage of Figaro and Gianni Schicchi 8-10:30pm. $10-$35. Fully costumed and staged, with orchestra and English supertitles. Hubbard Hall, Cambridge. (518) 677-2495.

The Real Men 9pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277.

Breast and Ovarian Cancer Support Group Third Wednesday of every month, 7pm. Support Connection, Inc. offers a Breast and Ovarian Cancer Support Group. Open to women with breast, ovarian or gynecological cancer. There are many common factors to any cancer diagnosis. Join other women who have been diagnosed as we discuss all stages of diagnosis, treatment and post-treatment. Advance registration required. Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel. (914) 962-6402.

Music Week: Ages 8-12 9:30am-12:30pm. $180. Under artist Karen Capobianco’s instruction, students will choose to either work all week to make one large playable instrument or several small ones. The Treehouse, New Paltz. 255-0345.

Zumba for Tweens and Teens 4:30-5:30pm. Ages 10-14. Wednesdays in August. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

The Dutchess County Fair 10am. $15. The second largest county fair in New York State is the showplace for agriculture in Dutchess County. Over 144 acres of finely manicured gardens and grass create the beautiful setting for thousands of farm animals, agricultural exhibits and horticultural displays. Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. 876-4000.

SPIRITUALITY

Will you Still Love me Tomorrow? 6-8pm. Comedy. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

KIDS & FAMILY

TUESDAY 19

Princess Cabbage and Quiet House, Ash Daughter 8pm. $20. Mina Nishimura. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

FILM

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Taj Mahal 8pm. Blues and roots. 8pm. Blues and world roots. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

EFT & Law of Attraction Prosperity Circle 6pm. $15. FInancial issues resolved quickly with 5,000 year old technique. TG Parker, Kingston. 706-2183.

DANCE

Bucky Pizzarelli & Ed Laub Duo 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

WEDNESDAY 20

Fierce Young Adults Cancer Support Group Third Wednesday of every month, 6:30-8pm. A support group that will be holding an ongoing program for young adults who have been directly affected by cancer. Uniquely, this group is inviting all teens and young adults with each of their own cancer experiences. The Cancer Resource Center of the Hudson Valley, Montgomery. 457-5000.

THEATER

FRIDAY 22

Syracuse & Siegel 8-10:30pm. With special guests. Catskill Mountain Pizza Company, Woodstock. 679-7969.

LECTURES & TALKS Monet: Painter, Plantsman 4pm. $20/$15 members. Colta Ives, Curator Emerita of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will explore Monet’s genius from the view of Monet’s outstanding horticultural achievement, the vast flower garden adorning his house and studio at Giverny, which lent inspiration to his activity as a painter. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

MUSIC The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Signature Brass Quintet noon. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

Jonny Lang 8pm. $30-$79. Blues guitarist and singer-songwriter. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Peter Evans and Sam Pluta 8:30pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. 518-584-9330. Rhythm on the Riverfront Concert Series 6-8pm. Foundry Dock Park, Cold Spring. 473-4440 Ext. 273.

THEATER Honky-Tonk Highway 8pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Justin Randolph Thompson’s Fit the Battle 6-8pm. The project is a commemoration and celebration of Paul Robeson’s in dialogue with the 65th anniversary of the 1949 Peekskill Riots. Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Peekskill. (914) 788-0100. Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Botanical Watercolor Painting 10am-4pm. $290/$260 members. Through Aug. 22. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926. Library Knitters Third Thursday of every month, 7-8pm. Sit and knit in the beautiful Gardiner Library. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

The Slide Brothers 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Sonic Soul Band 9:30pm. Harmony Music, Woodstock. 679-7760. Soul Fusion 8pm. Motown/R&B. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Third World with Royal Khaoz 9pm. $50/$35. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. The Wiyos 9pm. Original blend of music inspired by the early American musical idioms of the 1920s and ‘30s, including blues, country, ragtime, gospel, and swing. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

THEATER Arm-of-the-Sea Theater’s 2014 Esopus Creek Puppet Suite 8-9:30pm. $10/$5 children/$25 family of four. Arm-ofthe-Sea Theater’s annual hometown performance, The Esopus Creek Puppet Suite, fuses big band music with the visual enchantment of mask and puppet theater. Arm-of-the-Sea’s hybrid performance art folds together masked dancers, sung poetry, experimental roots music, and diverse forms of puppetry in a theatrical form of magical realism. Tina Chorvas Waterfront Park, Saugerties. 246-7873. Honky-Tonk Highway 8pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Collodion, Cameras and Contraptions Through Aug. 24. With Tom Delooza. The Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-9957.

8/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 95


SATURDAY 23 COMEDY Comedy in the Catskills III: Colin Quinn, Unconstitutional 8pm. $46-$66. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904.

DANCE Dance Omi Showing in The Fields 2-4pm. Omi’s Dance Residents show their finished pieces, created in collaboration with each other while in residence at Omi. Dancers from all over the world come to share ideas with one another and create unique pieces in Omi’s International Residency Program. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. Extreme Ballet Session III Showcase noon. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 2 or 10. Princess Cabbage and Quiet House, Ash Daughter 8pm. $20. Mina Nishimura. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

THEATER

LITERARY & BOOKS

SPIRITUALITY

Arm-of-the-Sea Theater’s 2014 Esopus Creek Puppet Suite 8-9:30pm. $10/$5 children/$25 family of four. Arm-ofthe-Sea Theater’s annual hometown performance, The Esopus Creek Puppet Suite, fuses big band music with the visual enchantment of mask and puppet theater. Arm-of-the-Sea’s hybrid performance art folds together masked dancers, sung poetry, experimental roots music, and diverse forms of puppetry in a theatrical form of magical realism. Tina Chorvas Waterfront Park, Saugerties. 246-7873.

Words Words Words 3pm. $5. 7th annual summer afternoon gathering of Hudson Valley authors, reading from and talking about their own work. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

Guided Chakra Balancing Meditation with the Quartz Crystal Singing Bowls 1-2pm. $5-20. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

Honky-Tonk Highway 8pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. The Liar 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Advanced Stopmotion Animation Immersive 9am-4pm. $240. Flick Book Studio, Saugerties. 616-4635.

MUSIC 2nd Annual Ice Cream Social & Outdoor Concert 4-6pm. $15-$23. Adirondack Creamery will supply the ice cream and Shorty King’s Rhythm Revue will delight audiences with their blend of jump, swing and R&B music. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Annual Variety Show 2pm. $@0/$18 ages 62+ and under 12. Directed by Coach House member Barbara Jones, the show entertains with two hours of music and comedy. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. Chris Cubeta & The Liars Club at Cold Spring Summer Music Series 6:30-8:30pm. Enjoy the river, the rock-indie music and bring a picnic basket and a

THEATER The 2014 Esopus Creek Puppet Suite 8pm. $10/$5 children/$25 family of 4. Arm-of-the-Sea Theater will present its annual outdoor performance spectacle. The production is inspired by events in local history and fuses live music with the visual enchantment of mask and puppet theatre. Tina Chorvas Waterfront Park, Saugerties. ArmoftheSea.org. Honky-Tonk Highway 2pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. National Theatre from London: Small Family Business 2pm. $12/$10 members. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989.

Salsa Lesson and Latin Dance Party with Carlos Osorio 8pm. $12 at the door. Bring out your Latin spirit! Join Carlos Osorio, Founder of the Cumbia Spirit School of Dance for a fun, all levels salsa class and then dance the night away at Kingston’s most artful new event space Wine available. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 845 331 3261.

Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org.

MONDAY 25 FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Summer Hoot A weekend celebration of beautiful tunes, local food and beer, handmade crafts, nature activities and fun for all ages Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

Cancer Support Group for Patients 2-3pm. Professional social workers and nurses lead discussions on ways to cope with illness and treatment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-6470.

MUSIC Annual Variety Show 7:30pm. $@0/$18 ages 62+ and under 12. Directed by Coach House member Barbara Jones, the show entertains with two hours of music and comedy. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. Baroque Italian Opera Arias and Duets 6:30pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. In the House of Don Manuel 6:30pm. $50/$40/$25. A chamber music concert celebrating the friendship of Manuel de Falla and Federico García Lorca. Catering, wine, and beer from Yum Yum at this concert. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Chris Jackson 8pm. Acoustic. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Hubbard Hall Opera Theater: Marriage of Figaro and Gianni Schicchi 2-4:30pm. $10-$35. Fully costumed and staged, with orchestra and English supertitles. Hubbard Hall, Cambridge. (518) 677-2495. Hudson Valley Freestyle Jame 8pm. $60.50/$50.50/$40.50. Mid-Hudson Civic Center, Poughkeepsie. 454-5800. Jay Collins & The Kings County Band 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Josh Groban 8pm. $38-$115. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Ladies Day Jazz Quartet 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Mary Ellen Nelligar: From Oz to Nuremburg 7:30pm. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. The Nutopians: Songs of John Lennon 8pm. $35/$30. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. The Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Sarah Fimm’s Sparkle Party 8pm. $20/$30 VIP. An art installation consisting of over 1,000 sparkling mirrors will encircle the balconied ballroom. Dancers, auction, food and drink, and live music will also b available. Alongside Fimm’s “sparkle” paintings, featured artists include Catherine Harms and Alissa Abello. All proceeds from the auction go to the SEVA foundation. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. Sarah@sarahfimm.com. Third Annual Garcia Fest 8-11pm. The duo have been playing music together since the early ‘70s and have been lifelong Deadhead. The emphasis is on fun for both Jeff and Bob and the audience with familiar, obscure, and jams from the Grateful Dead songbook making the show. There will be a special guest or two to join the fun. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

LITERARY & BOOKS Mystery Mondays Book Discussion 11am-noon. Mystery book discussions led by Suzanne Christensen. Arlington Branch Library, Poughkeepsie. 454-9308.

The Return of the Kingston Artist Soap Box Derby Since its inception in 1995, the Kingston Artist Soap Box Derby has been one of the city’s most unusual—and most beloved—annual events. Each year, a lineup of local artists design “nonmotorized kinetic sculptures” and roll them down Broadway in the Rondout district. Entries in the past have included a giant eyeball, a cart made entirely of sunflowers, a fully made bed, and a woman enjoying a bubble bath in a copper tub. Despite its local popularity, the derby has met some challenges and recently went on hiatus. To make this year’s comeback the best derby yet, organizers appealed to fans to support an online campaign that would help fund the event. The outrageous “not-quite-a-race” will return to the Kingston Waterfront on Sunday, August 24, at 1pm. (845) 339-2996; Kingstonartistsoapboxderby.com. Drawing for Beginners with Gary Finelli 10am-noon. $15. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181.

SUNDAY 24 FAIRS & FESTIVALS Beacon Flea Market 8am-3pm. A variety of items, including re-finished furniture, antiques, vintage purses, mid-century cookware, collectible vinyl, old books, handmade jewelry, and local crafts. Beacon Flea Market, Beacon. 202-0094. Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org. Summer Hoot A weekend celebration of beautiful tunes, local food and beer, handmade crafts, nature activities and fun for all ages Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

FOOD & WINE Rosendale Summer Farmers’ Market 2014 9am-2pm. Vendors include:Maynard Orchards, Good Flavor Farm; Three Sisters Farm, Wright’s Orchards; Twisted Jeanne’s, Ronnybrook dairy products and Bread Alone bakery goods, Immune Schein Elixir and Organic Teas, Vlume beeswax products; Bob’s Pickles and more. Rosendale Farmers’ Market, Rosendale. 658-8348.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Tony Trischka and His Band 8pm. $20. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048.

AHA ACLS Provider Course 8am-4pm. $300. Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support is an advanced, instructor-led classroom course that highlights the importance of team dynamics and communication, systems of care and immediate postcardiac-arrest care. It also covers airway management and related pharmacology. In this course, skills are taught in large, group sessions and small, group learning and testing stations where case-based scenarios are presented. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 475-9742.

SPIRITUALITY

KIDS & FAMILY

Meditation Instruction 2pm. 60-minute class requires no previous meditation experience. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012.

Children and Families: Monarchs, Milkweed & Migration 1pm. Meet the “king” of butterflies in its Storm King habitat. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

96 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/14

MUSIC Jeff Entin’s Open Mike Night 6:30-8:30pm. Join Jeff Entin as he welcomes local musicians to open mike night. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. The Voodoo Orchestra North 8pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

NIGHTLIFE Monday Night Karaoke 9pm. Free. Come and Join us for a night of Singing, Laughing and Fun. Monday night at Rendezvous Lounge in Kingston. Starting at 9pm -? bring a lot friends and have fun! Rendezvous Lounge, Kingston. 331-5209.

blanket. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. Coldspringchamberareachamber.org.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS

Colors of France 3pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Fore the Kids Golf Classic $145. Benefits Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County. West Point Golf Course, West Point. 938-2435.

Goldberg Variations by J.S. Bach 11:30am. String trio featuring Helena Baillie on violin, Maurycy Banaszek on viola and Raman Ramakrishnan on cello. All Souls Church, Tannersville. (518) 589-6953.

THEATER

Hubbard Hall Opera Theater: Marriage of Figaro and Gianni Schicchi 2-4:30pm. $10-$35. Fully costumed and staged, with orchestra and English supertitles. Hubbard Hall, Cambridge. (518) 677-2495.

The 2014 Esopus Creek Puppet Suite 8pm. $10/$5 children/$25 family of 4. Arm-of-the-Sea Theater will present its annual outdoor performance spectacle. The production is inspired by events in local history and fuses live music with the visual enchantment of mask and puppet theatre. Tina Chorvas Waterfront Park, Saugerties. ArmoftheSea.org.

Jupiter String Quartet 4pm. $50/$40/$25. The World of Richard Strauss: Interpreting Tradition. With Ilya Yakushev, piano. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

Mark Hummel’s Golden State Lone Star Review 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Metropolitan Klezmer 7:30pm. $20. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. Occidental Gypsy 10am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Serenade Quartet, H. Peter Stern Concert Series 2pm. Enjoy an afternoon of music by Mozart, Haydn, and more. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115. Zac Brown Band 7:30pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

American Girl Doll Sewing Class: Ages 7-12 9:30am-12:30pm. $175. What a great way to end the summer! We will spend 4 mornings hand-sewing creative new clothing and accessories for your American Girl with expert seamstress Debbie Reagan. You and your favorite doll will make new friends while making fun new doll items. All supplies and materials will be provided, just bring your doll. The Treehouse, New Paltz. 255-0345. Solarplate with Lisa Mackie $290+$30 supplies. Through Aug. 27. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Summer Stages: First Bows 9am. $150. Summer Stages is introducing a new weeklong, half-day program for the little ones called “First Bows.” Kids ages 4-6 will explore a variety of performing and visual arts through special activities, games and other creative projects. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. Bethelwoodscenter.org/events/detail/summerstages-first-bows.

Guided Walking Tour 2pm. $5/children free. Hurley Heritage Society, Hurley. 338-1661.

EFT & Law of Attraction Prosperity Circle 6pm. $15. FInancial issues resolved quickly with 5,000 year old technique. TG Parker, Kingston. 706-2183.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Change Makers 7pm. WAM Theatre’s fifth season celebration, benefit, and panel discussion on creating positive change through the arts, hosted by actress Jayne Atkinson. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.


TUESDAY 26 FAIRS & FESTIVALS Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org.

MUSIC ​C​hamber Orchestra Concert​ 6:30pm. In the House of Don Manuel​: An ​Extravaganza Celebrating the Friendship of Manuel de Falla and Federico. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Motley Crue 7:30pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Orange County Pop, Rock, & Doowop 6:30-8:30pm. Established by the beloved local character, The Gerry Godmother, this summer music series features both old-timey and contemporary local acts. Thomas Bull Memorial Park, Montgomery. 615-3830. Season Finale: Beethoven, Tsontakis, and Brahms 8pm. Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Song Circle Fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9pm. Our song circle is essentially that, a circle of chairs for instrumental musicians and singers. Taste Budd’s Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. Sundays with Friends Chamber Music Series 2pm. Liang Wang, Oboe, Philip Myers, French Horn, Joyce Yang, Piano. Works of Reinecke, Francaix, LeFrak, Ginastera, Saint-Saens and Bizet. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388.

SPIRITUALITY Chakra Meditation Group 6-7pm. $15. Led by Dianne Weisselberg, LMSW, Certified Chakra Healer. These guided meditations vary from session to session and are an opportunity to center, align and infuse yourself with the vibrational energy of one or more Chakras. There is time for connection and reflection in the group as well. Namaste Sacred Healing Center, Woodstock. 679-6107.

THEATER The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

WEDNESDAY 27 DANCE Ellen Sinopoli Dance noon. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

FILM Screening: The Dusty Stacks of Mom, a Poster Project 8pm. $5-$10. Followed by Q and A with Jodie Mack. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Bereavement Support Group 5:30-6:30pm. This expressive support group is open to the community and led by Adrienne London, LCSW-R. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-3101.

LITERARY & BOOKS Writers Read Fourth Thursday of every month, 5:30pm. $3. Literary reading series featuing at least two poets/writers. David Giannini, Becket, Massachusetts. Davidgpoet@gmail.com.

MUSIC Del McCoury Band 8pm. Bluegrass. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Fanna-Fi-Allah 7-9pm. $20. Bringing the magic of Pakistani Qawwali to the west in its traditional form, inherited directly from the grand masters. The Abode Retreat Center and Community, New Lebanon. (518) 794-8095. The Gil Evans Legacy: All Star Alumni Band 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Rich Robinson 7pm. $25-$35. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. Talibam 8:30pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

NIGHTLIFE Paul Tully and Eric Stamberg’s Trivia Night 7-9:30pm. Come join in on the fun and test your trivia knowledge. Paul and Eric lead three rounds plus a bonus question. Prizes awarded for first and second place. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Tivoli Bays Family Canoe Trip 3pm. Join the DEC and the staff of the Tivoli Free Library for one of our highly popular annual paddles in the Tivoli Bays! Ages 6+. Canoes and life vests will be provided. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771.

THEATER Honky-Tonk Highway 8pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

FRIDAY 29 DANCE

Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org.

Fifth Friday Dance Meet Up #3 8-10pm. $15/$10 members. Unison welcomes Metropolitan Hot Club for the third “Fifth Friday Dance Meet Up”. Dance lesson at 7:30, band will play from 8-10pm. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.

KIDS & FAMILY

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Zumba for Tweens and Teens 4:30-5:30pm. Ages 10-14. Wednesdays in August. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org.

LITERARY & BOOKS Storytelling with Janet Carter 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

MUSIC Niels Vincentz, Billy Hart & Cameron Brown 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Syracuse & Siegel 8-10:30pm. With special guests. Catskill Mountain Pizza Company, Woodstock. 679-7969.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION HITS-on-the-Hudson VII Horse Show 8am-3pm. $5/under 12 free. World-class equestrian show jumping. All proceeds from the gate go directly to Family of Woodstock, Inc., a non-for-profit organization serving Ulster County. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-5515.

Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org.

A Day of Healing with One Light Healing Touch 10am-5pm. $150 (with lunch). Experience a powerful one-day training with OLHT. Healing Space, Stone Ridge. 687-2552.

THEATER Honky-Tonk Highway 8pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Twelfth Night Theater Performance 8pm. $10. Comedy, drama, song and dance. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

SATURDAY 30 DANCE BalletNext 7:30pm. $30/$10 student rush and children. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 2 or 10.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org. Newburgh Urban Market 10am-4pm. Washington’s Headquarters, Newburgh. Newburghurbanmarket.com 10am-4pm. Our great mix of high quality offerings includes original hand crafted jewelry, furniture, clothing, and décor from local artisans; antiques and vintage collectibles; fair trade and repurposed items; fine local food, beverages and organic produce; and much more. Newburgh Urban Market, Newburgh. Newburghurbanmarket.com. Village of Brewster Film Festival 10am-10pm. $10. The VOB Film Festival is a three day independent film festival that features over 35 films from around the world. Village of Brewster (VOB) Film Festival, brewster. 278-0018.

LITERARY & BOOKS Laura Ludwig Presents Performance Art and Poetry 6:30pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775. Popa Chubby 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

MUSIC 11th Annual Wall Street Jazz Festival 5-11pm. Featuring 5 different jazz groups. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Peggity22@gmail.com. The Berkshire Ramblers 8pm. $25. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Jazz Pianist Fred Hersch: Solo Recital 8-9:45pm. $25/$22 seniors/$20 contributors/$5 children. Windham Civic and Performing Arts Center, Windham. (518) 734-3868.

Highmount Gets Hip: Brooklyn @ Belleayre 8pm. $26-$66. Featuring The Hold Steady, Junior Prom, more. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904.

Life After IBM noon. Don Moyer. Part of the lecture program called “Kingston IBM Conversations” to complement their IBM Gallery Exhibit. Friends of Historic Kingston, Kingston. 339-0720.

LECTURES & TALKS Gallery Talk: Vassar’s Hudson River School Paintings noon. Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5237.

The Alexis P. Suter Band 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

SPIRITUALITY

KIDS & FAMILY

MUSIC

THURSDAY 28

Zac Brown Band 7pm. $38/$89. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388.

EMEFE 8pm. $15/$10 in advance/$5 members. A ten-piece soulfunk-everything band on a mission to prove there are no bad days, only days that need a new soundtrack. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111.

Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism Classes 7pm. 90-minute program includes 30 minutes of Quiet Sitting Meditation followed by one of eight lectures on the history, practices and principles of the Karma Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012.

Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

Todd Londagin Band 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Village of Brewster Film Festival 6-11pm. $10. The VOB Film Festival is a three day independent film festival that features over 35 films from around the world. Village of Brewster (VOB) Film Festival, Brewster. 278-0018.

SPIRITUALITY

THEATER

Roomful of Teeth 8pm. $25/$20/$15. Listen for Hindustani and Persian singing styles, Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Caroline Shaw’s Ritornello with film, and compositions by MASS MoCA and FreshGrass favorite, Sam Amidon. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111.

Bill Staines 8pm. $20/$15. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

Jazz at the Maverick: Anthony Wilson Guitar Quartet 8pm. 8pm. $50/$40/$25. Wilson: The Seasons Suite. Featuring John Monteleone’s Four Seasons Guitars. Catering, wine, and beer from Yum Yum at this concert. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Jorma Kaukonen 9pm. Rock, blues, and roots. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Neon Moon 7pm. Country. Rondout Bay Marina, Kingston. 339-3917. Shanghai String Quartet 6:30pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 8247126. Summarily Dismissed 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Breakaway Featuring Robin Baker 9pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277.

The Woodstock Concerts on the Green 1-5pm. Village Green, Woodstock. Woodstockchamber. com.

Cinderella’s Tom Keifer 8pm. Singer/songwriter. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS

Jason Aldean 7pm. With Florida Georgia Line. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Robbie Dupree and Friends 8:45pm. $20. Opening act: Amanda Homi. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

Music Mountain Benefit Concert & Reception 3pm. $75. Featuring Shanghai String Quartet. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126.

SPIRITUALITY Meditation Instruction 2pm. 60-minute class requires no previous meditation experience. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012.

THEATER Honky-Tonk Highway 8pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Othello 8pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Twelfth Night Theater Performance 8pm. $10. Comedy, drama, song and dance. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES The World Observed Through Aug. 31. With Mary Ellen Mark. The Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-9957.

SUNDAY 31 FAIRS & FESTIVALS Beacon Flea Market 8am-3pm. A variety of items, including re-finished furniture, antiques, vintage purses, mid-century cookware, collectible vinyl, old books, handmade jewelry, and local crafts. Beacon Flea Market, Beacon. 202-0094. Harvest Festival: Rosehaven Alpaca Festival 11am-4pm. $2 parking fee. Rosehaven Alpacas and Friends bring live alpacas, exhibits, spinners and weavers to the Festival. A boutique will offer scarves, shawls, gloves, hats, jackets, dresses, skirts, sweaters and teddy bears. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. Bethelwoodscenter.org/events/detail/fiber-festival. Kingston Festival of the Arts Variety of performances and A Taste of Kingston. See website for specific events and times. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Kingstonfestival.org. Village of Brewster Film Festival 10am-6pm. $10. The VOB Film Festival is a three day independent film festival that features over 35 films from around the world. Village of Brewster (VOB) Film Festival, brewster. 278-0018.

FOOD & WINE Rosendale Summer Farmers’ Market 2014 9am-2pm. Vendors include:Maynard Orchards, Good Flavor Farm; Three Sisters Farm, Wright’s Orchards; Twisted Jeanne’s, Ronnybrook dairy products and Bread Alone bakery goods, Immune Schein Elixir and Organic Teas, Vlume beeswax products; Bob’s Pickles and more. Rosendale Farmers’ Market, Rosendale. 658-8348.

KIDS & FAMILY Children and Families: Workshop with Chakaia Booker 1pm. Join artist Chakaia Booker, whose sculpture A Moment in Time (2004) is now on view, for a special hands-on workshop. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

LITERARY & BOOKS Words Words Words 3pm. $5. 7th annual summer afternoon gathering of Hudson Valley authors, reading from and talking about their own work. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

MUSIC Cabaret with Charles Busch 8pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Concert and Lecture by Pablo Zeigler and Christopher O’Riley 7pm. $30/$35/$20/$7. Two to Tango will feature new and original compositions and arrangements. Doctorow Center for the Arts, Hunter. (518) 263-2000. Miranda Lambert 7pm. $70.75/$36. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Pacifica Quartet 4pm. $50/$40/$25. American Landscapes X: Celebrating Carter. Elliott Carter: Two Fragments for String Quartet, Mendelssohn: String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 80, Carter: String Quartet No. 5, Beethoven: String Quartet No. 16 in F Major, Op. 135 (“Muss es Sein?”). Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. ​ he ​Pacifica Quartet T 4pm. American Landscapes X: Celebrating Carter. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Pete Wagula: Acoustic Guitar Performance 2-4pm. Solo acoustic guitarist Pete Wagula offers an afternoon guitar concert that combines live instrumental guitar with his use of live looping. He covers blues, jazz, bottleneck and original pieces. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

SPIRITUALITY Guided Chakra Balancing Meditation with the Quartz Crystal Singing Bowls 1-2pm. $5-20. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

THEATER Honky-Tonk Highway 2pm. $39/$34. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

8/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 97


Planet Waves ERIC FRANCIS COPPOLINO

BY ERIC FRANCIS COPPOLINO

The Vexing Issue of Self-Esteem

J

upiter has taken up residence in Leo for the next year, which in our astrological microcosm is a real change of pace. Mars is now making its way through the last degrees of Libra; it will enter Scorpio next week and then form an exact square to Jupiter in early August. If Jupiter in Leo is about passionate expression of life, Mars in Scorpio joining forces with Jupiter is going to push that with a jolt. I have a thick folder full of charts for July and August with asteroids and notes drawn all over them, and every time I look at them my mind goes back to the topic of self-esteem. The more I consider this range of topics, and the more people open up to me about their reality, the more obvious it becomes to me that underneath our political, social, and economic crises (they are all related) is the issue of self-esteem. I’m even finding that this is relatively easy to explain—perhaps because people relate to the issue of not valuing themselves, and know that it has a way of taking over their lives. Yet one thing I am noticing is that lack of self-esteem takes so many forms that it’s often difficult to identify. Many of them are so encrypted into the culture, they are sold to us as normal. A great many others involve sexuality, which is sold to us as abnormal despite being the most normal thing in all of existence. In our society (and many others) sexuality is infused with guilt, to the point where most people cannot experience sexual expression without some infiltration of guilt, or a total seizure. This is a problem. One reason it’s a problem is that in order to heal your self-esteem, your creativity, and your sense of existence, you will need to tap into your core creative energy, which is also your sexual energy. I will offer a metaphor. Let’s say you’re driving or riding along in a car. The engine (of most cars anyway) is running on gasoline. In a human, this is the equivalent of vital force, which on the physical plane and a broad spectrum 98 PLANET WAVES CHRONOGRAM 8/14

of other nearby planes of reality is the same thing as sexual energy, desire, and impulse—the core vitality that procreates, co-creates, and all-around creates the human experience. When you turn on the CD player in the car, that is run by electricity. But the electricity making the music is created by a generating device that draws energy from the engine. If you turn on the headlights, same thing. If you turn on the wipers, same thing. If you charge your cell phone, same thing. In this way, all the nuances of that car are created from the same pool of energy at the core—the fuel running the engine, which burns and releases energy that can be used many different ways. If you cut off that core flow, then none of the peripherals work. Humans work the same way. The cutting off usually comes in the form of judgment. When we misinterpret or misunderstand that core energy reaction as bad, as sinful, as sick or as troubled; when we deem it a bad thing and are ashamed of it, then we start to choke off our vital force. I am aware of a few problems with applying my theory (which is not really my theory; I’m speaking for an old tradition), even if it happens to be valid. One is the reaction, “Are you saying that to address my self-esteem problem, I have to deal with my sexuality?” Yes, that is what I am saying; among other things, that will come up in the process. Another is the hot mess that is sexual and relational reality in our era. We do not live in a moment where it seems vaguely appealing to experience or express a higher level of consciousness on these themes. We live in violent, angry times, which people are papering over with iPhone apps and bits of glitz and glam to help them feel better for a moment. A lot of that paper is money. Once you peel off those layers, it’s necessary to address the shadow side of sexuality. It’s difficult to write a convincing marketing pitch for that, but I’ll


give it a sentence or two. Unprocessed shadow—guilt, shame, sexual injury, any form of secrecy connected to intimacy, the feeling of having skeletons in the closet, and many other forms of the stuff—all consume creative energy. Remember that plenty of our shadow material, maybe most of it, comes from our ancestors, in particular our parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents—not necessarily some wanderer in the Egyptian desert, but someone we’ve actually met. Many people realize that the core of their pain and misery involves a sexual injury. Some suspect it, and the suspicion comes and goes; it fades in and out, but it keeps coming back. However, there is not a wide variety of options where to go for help. And among those options, very few of them connect the different planes of reality—for example, emotional, mental, physical, creative, and psychic. I can give you an example of how this works in the most positive way. By now, everyone has heard of gay. Imagine someone is gay, which is their sexual orientation, but refuses to admit it or do something about it. How happy will they really be? The solution is to come out, which we all know means to be real about one’s sexuality. That is good for self-esteem and for everything else. What I am saying is that coming out is essential to resolving self-esteem issues. Yet we live with this strange pressure coming from somewhere—the pressure to be a puritan. I don’t see anyone walking around in those oldfashioned hats with black coats and huge buckles. But loads of people feel the pressure to be, or to act like, puritans. I can tell you exactly what this pressure is—it’s denial. Part of addressing denial means seeking assistance if you are struggling. I don’t have the answer for where to go if you want to get help. I can tell you that there are people who are capable of helping and willing to do so, though you have to network your way to them, or follow the synchronicity pattern, with clear intent. Yet the first thing you need to do is be honest with yourself. The second thing you need to do is find a few people with whom you can be open. Not just one person, though one is a start. You would have to go past any trust issues, fear of judgment, or personal shame and actually open up about how you feel. This is true whether there is a specific incident you can point to, or whether you’re addressing a sensation that is lurking below the surface of your personality. Healthy expression of, and values around, body and sexuality are core elements of self-esteem. If you’re trying to figure out where you stand with yourself, I have a few more ideas. I’ve said that lack of self-esteem takes many forms that are difficult to see. If we can see those forms, then it’s possible to do something about them. This is a key to deducing whether what you’re experiencing involves self-esteem. With each of these concepts I will include what I think is an appropriate response.

is an important element of self-esteem, and you will feel better about yourself if you carefully consider the implications of your choices.

Telling yourself and others that you’re stupid. It blows my mind how often I hear someone tell me how stupid they are. Even if someone doesn’t know something, or cannot figure something out, self-affirming one’s own supposed stupidity is not going to help. It’s actually possible to take the posture “I don’t know, and I’m going to figure it out, and if I cannot, I will find someone who knows.”

Insisting that others be as shut down as you are. Does it make you nervous when others express vitality, talent, or creativity? The answer is not to make anyone feel they must be less than you, or to undermine their opportunities by interfering. The more supportive you are of others, the better you will feel about yourself—and the more you will learn from them about how to be expressive. This is especially true when it comes to sex—you have the choice to insist that others shut down, or to support them, or to live and let live. You might say this is the ultimate measure—and expression—of self-esteem.

Unwillingness to help yourself. Many people suffer in silence and at the same time are consciously unwilling to help themselves, which often means refusing to seek help from others. There are many excuses—”I don’t trust therapists” or “Nobody will believe me,” or “It’s not that important anyway.” If you want to pluck up some self-esteem, make a choice to get help, stick to it for a while, and see what happens.

Unprocessed

shadow—guilt,

shame, sexual injury, any form of secrecy

connected to intimacy, the feeling of having skeltons in the

closet—all consume creative energy.

Lack of forethought. Do you plunge into things with no real concept of what is motivating you? Do you think through the potential consequences of your choices; for example, getting drunk in an abandoned factory with people you don’t know, getting married on the spur of the moment, putting a lot of money into an investment you have not carefully evaluated, or getting a serious operation without second and third opinions from other doctors? Forethought

Deciding in advance something will fail. Many people want to do new things but decide in advance that they will fail. They might even have an experience of failure that seemingly proves the point. Two points here: You don’t know if something will succeed unless you’ve tried it a few times. Also, anything that establishes itself in the world is the result of sustained, focused effort. The most successful people have “failed” a good few times. You might take on the motto “Nothing attempted, nothing gained,” or my favorite, “If you’re not fucking up, you’re not doing it right.” Obsession with trivia. What do you think about? What do you consciously not think about? Do you avoid important topics because they are too difficult or don’t seem to be fun? Do you emphasize petty issues, gossip, the price of things, and judgments about others? No guarantees, but you might find it satisfying to think about important, deep issues; people write books about them, many of which are deeply engaging and which will help you open your mind. If you find reading difficult, go slowly, and look up all the words you don’t know, one at a time. Using a dictionary is one of the secret keys to self-esteem.

Narcissism and pretension. Do you find yourself counting the ways you’re better than others, or more sophisticated than they are? This is a sure sign of insecurity, and it’s also a really great way to feel horrible about yourself. If you decide you want to do something else, you have a lot of options, such as asking people about themselves. Once you hear a person’s story (the equivalent of walking a mile in their moccasins), you may decide they are your equal. Deciding for other people that they don’t like you. You know that thing where people insist that everyone hates or disrespects them? Or that if they have a problem, that nobody will care? This is both evidence of low selfrespect and also stokes it. Why decide how others feel about you? Why not let them demonstrate their feelings? Anyway, it’s unlikely that people think about you as much as you think about you. You’re unlikely to get much bandwidth unless you give someone a reason to focus on you.

In all of these things, there is more choice than you may think. CHRONOGRAM.COM READ Eric Francis Coppolino’s weekly Planet Waves column.

8/14 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 99


Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

ARIES (March 20-April 19) You get to live a little bolder than usual, though I don’t mean impulsively. I mean taking thoughtful risks, knowing what you stand to lose and stand to gain. I also mean a commitment to development over time—at least one year, and maybe more. This is the kind of risk that involves taking a chance on what you want to see grow and develop in the world, what you might call a daring vision. Based on these criteria, casino gambling would not be included. It’s not nearly creative enough, plus there is too much risk for a very low potential for monetary or spiritual reward. There are all kinds of thrilling sports, and while you probably like them and would have lots of fun, your charts are describing something more. You want the kind of adventure that requires intelligence, passion, and the potential to learn and grow. I suggest you consider your options and then make contact with the long-term benefits of what you want to do, and aim your choices in the direction of what has lasting value. The way society is organized right now, there are few opportunities for intellectual risks, or rather, they are not especially popular or considered sexy. Don’t let that deter you. Eventually, wisdom will come back into style, and you’ll be in the right place at the right time.

TAURUS

(April 19-May 20)

Your charts describe a time of domestic bliss. For some that is a shack on the beach, and for others it’s a duplex on the Upper West Side. What is it for you? How do you want your home to be? Forget, for a moment, what you think you can afford, or what you think you deserve. Rather, let your imagination run free for a while and imagine the visuals, the quality of the light, the kinds of spaces you want. Imagine what will help you work, what will help you sleep, and what will improve your quality of life. Think about how you want to use energy and how you would therefore plan for the environmental footprint of wherever you would live. I am not sure of the context, but someone commented on the Planet Waves website, quoting one of their teachers, who said, “Space is intelligence.” I love when a three-word equation gives me something to think about for weeks (and this one may last for years). As you develop your ideas about physical space, your mind will change. They will evolve, in particular, away from the concepts of your parents. It is likely that your ideal living space is distinctly different from where you grew up, and now you get to think through what kind of space you want and, perhaps most significantly, where you want to be.

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GEMINI

(May 20-June 21)

You’ve been involved in some unusually deep soul searching in recent seasons of your life and working out some concept of your value. I would say that you’ve been through a time of making up your mind that life is worth living. That phase of reflection for its own sake has drawn to a close, and now is the time to come out of your shell and express yourself. You certainly have plenty going on in your mind, and I think you know or at least suspect that they are great ideas. Remember, thinking about an idea is not writing about that idea. Thinking about art is not making art. You could slip into a pattern where all you do is think about your possibilities, which is easy and self-satisfying. I’m suggesting that you get yourself busy making your ideas real. This is a translation from imagination to physical form, which you might think of as the great leap of humankind. One interesting attribute of your solar chart is that when you fire up your own creative process, you will invite collaborators. They may be of a higher caliber than you’re expecting and may in many ways surpass your own current abilities. That would be a perfect scenario, since you have a lot to say and you also have a lot to learn about how to say it.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22)

Money requires focus, and several recent astrological events are hinting strongly at a state of abundance—and that you must match the emphasis of the planets with your own effort and awareness. This calls for a vision, which is a way of saying an elaborated set of goals. Most people respond to the notion of anything financial, or even the meekest reference to money, with worry and irritation. I suggest you go in the other direction, which would be bold intrigue. Consider that how you feel about money is a reflection of how you feel about yourself, notice what that sensation is, and then begin to make any necessary adjustments. Remember, though, that the larger theme of resources is involved, and financial resources are just one type. Many other kinds are necessary. Among them all is having faith in yourself. This is not a thing possessed but rather a skill that you cultivate, exercise and develop. By resources I mean to include them all, and to suggest that you have what it takes, whatever you are doing and whatever is required. Have faith that there is plenty to go around in the world. This is one vivid moment in your life when if you seek abundance you will find it. And you will be finding it for a reason, for a purpose, which you know and which is up to you to express.


Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

LEO (July 22-August 23) You have every advantage leaning in your favor, yet you may still feel insecure. In the past you might have worried about bad things happening, not having enough, or whether you could take care of the people you’re responsible for. Insecurity 2.0 is about wondering whether you have what it takes to live up to your own potential. You may feel a sense of promise that life is offering, but you don’t know how to manifest it. You may have so many options available that you don’t know what to choose—and you know that if you choose them all, you may be spread too thin. Let’s go back to the beginning—all those factors working for you, described by the Sun, Mercury, and Jupiter in your sign (and a spectacular New Moon beginning the Sun’s run through Leo). That all points to something new, though I would ask if you’re carrying some regret or sense of loss from the past. Are you thinking, “Life cannot be as good as it might have been”? That would fit the scenario. I assure you that it can be, though it will be necessary to call forth some passion and courage from within. This cannot be applied from the outside. It’s the part of a goal that has nothing to do with the goal—it has everything to do with you.

VIRGO

(August 23-September 22)

You may be wondering why relationships have to be so challenging. You may even be wondering if they need to be that way. I think that mostly this involves the various rules and definitions we put around connecting with others, which include various regulations around sex. There’s also a kind of seeming “unconsciousness” hanging like a fog over the whole region of life where people connect emotionally and sexually. It is this slumber from which humanity needs to awaken. Mixed in with the fog are all kinds of moralism, judgment, expectations, and unresolved baggage from the past, and from past generations. By this measure, waking up is not especially appealing, as these are the things to which one usually awakens. On a good day there is also love, passion, and desire, and though these would rightfully be the incentive to connect, they’re not exactly in style right now. They involve something real and tactile, and where there is the risk of not being in control all the time. And if there is one thing our society is addicted to at this moment, it’s control. Where does this leave you? I would say it leaves you free to evaluate what you want, which I think is going to take some honesty and a risk. You might also evaluate what you are wholly willing to offer—which will definitely take some honesty and a risk.  

LIBRA (September 22-October 23)

Mars has finally left your sign, which changes a relationship dynamic that seems like it’s been stuck for months. The actual dynamic that changes is a resounding message of looking to yourself for the fulfillment that, in the past, you would seek only in relationships. We have this idea, perpetuated by generations before us (but basically a romantic concept) that we must seek completion in another person. This is a setup for incomplete people seeking completion with one another and never finding it. This is so taken for granted that people who do not play this game are considered weird, and those who work toward a sense of inner fulfillment and resilience have relatively little to discuss with others who avoid this whole topic. That is a disclaimer—reaching into yourself for your opposite polarity may have the effect of alienating you from certain people who play a mean game of gotta-be-normal. Yet other factors in your astrology suggest that you are so resplendent, visible, and bold that you are a powerful example for your friends. You have the chance to deepen your relationship to yourself and to find a place where your relationships to others are not based on a neurotic need for self-completion. Hold that energy and you can have experiences of actual sharing and exchange rooted in being a whole person who appreciates the company of other whole people.

SCORPIO (October 23-November 22)

After spending eight months in a strange and sensitive angle of your chart (known as the solar 12th house), your ruling planet, Mars, has ingressed your sign. This may have arrived with the sensation of your ear pressure equalizing after a fast elevator ride. And you may suddenly have the added confidence of knowing what you want. In consciousness and in biology, the human experience is driven by desire. It has all kinds of names, with various inflections of good and evil attached to them, though they amount to the same thing. That thing is the desire to live and to experience life, and it’s likely that you’ve been infused with this sensation in a whole new way. The question is how you respond and/or react. Lately you seem more given to the moralistic/control side of the spectrum than is useful. It would be helpful to recognize when you’re judging yourself and others for something that is either natural or not harming anyone. You may feel some need to live up to an image; that is, to be perceived a certain way for the sake of your reputation. If there’s a devil, this is it. While you must always be mindful of integrity, that is different from any form of obsession over what people may think about you. There is only one person who needs to respect you, and that is you—with any luck, just for being real. 8/14 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 101


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SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 22)

Focus on your plans, by which I mean specific plans to go specific places or do specific things. Did I say specific? Most people work with general plans, such as “I will be a musician,” or “I will be rich,” or “Someday I will write something.” Or to give another example, “Someday I won’t have to do this job I don’t like.” The combined action of Mars and Jupiter is calling for you to focus your self-knowledge into a course of action. Remember that this does not need to be a “permanent commitment” or “what you want to do for the rest of your life.” It’s what’s significant now that your soul is calling for you to do now. There may be a place involved, though not necessarily. If you are getting information about a place, I suggest you test your theory and actually go there. In general I would say the theme of your solar chart is to test your theory. If you are into a particular art form or method of personal expression, design a project that you bring to completion—make sure you choose your scale so you can go from start to finish in a few weeks or months, rather than something designed to go on for years. You will both benefit and build confidence from the feeling of intending and then achieving. Then do something new.

CAPRICORN (December 22-January 20)

You may have this idea that you’re on the right track but heading toward an obstacle of some kind. You might also consider what could intervene long before that obstacle materializes. Said another way, nothing is certain; everything exists in a state of potential or of probability. Those factors are changing constantly as various factors blend and new factors emerge. It would be mighty healthy of you to think in some concept other than what you want as the guaranteed outcome. It’s not only how often this leads to misery. The fact that there is no absolute certainty is your best ally right now, because it keeps your potential open. Most people get panicky if they make contact with their potential or have anything less than the illusion of control. You don’t need illusions of anything right now; you need to be in the moment, responding to your environment, and aware of your feelings. Notice the ways in which you limit yourself, whether it’s with language (such as how you speak to yourself or describe your possibilities) or by trying in any way to limit the range of your emotions. I suggest you have a long talk with yourself about the concept of appropriate. If you have a tendency to cram yourself into a box, this is the one. There is such a thing as appropriate, but it’s a lot more inappropriate than you may think.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February 19)

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102 PLANET WAVES CHRONOGRAM 8/14

Kingston • Highland Marlboro • Newburgh • Wallkill

You have a whole new world of relationships opening up with Jupiter spending the next year in your opposite sign Leo. That’s likely to manifest as more and as better, though I suggest you keep your eye on a few factors. For example, notice when a situation you’re in does not offer you space to live up to your potential as you feel it. Jupiter is likely to arrive with a longing for freedom. You certainly have the option to hunker down and wait for it to pass by—or you can respond in a creative way. Another theme of this transit involves making sure that people are who you perceive them to be. You’re likely to see many wonderful attributes in people, and I suggest that you get to know them well enough to see past your own projections. Note, this is the projection of the style of seeing only the best in people. This may be true, with some of them, though because Jupiter (especially in Leo) is so closely associated with image and appearance, it will be very helpful to make a policy of going past those layers, and actually getting down to the substance of who someone is. At the same time, your charts are calling on you to act, speak and choose from an authoritative place of confidence and commitment. May the world rise to meet you.

PISCES (February 19-March 20)

This can be one of the most productive times in your life. You have many options. You have tremendous freedom, in part because you’ve invested so much in mastering your skills—though freedom is also an invitation to choose carefully. Best of all, your energy is running strong and solid, and all you need to do is maintain yourself with basic movement, good food, water, and as much sunlight as possible and you will remain in good spirits. With Jupiter in Leo, your sixth house of service and wellbeing, the two go together. There may have been times when you’ve resented how much you offer to the world, and you’ve noticed how little a great many people offer back, to anyone. Now that has been flipped on its head. You are the example of what is possible, and you are an inspiration to many people who might not believe it otherwise. You don’t need to say much about this, unless you have an appropriate occasion. In offering yourself, you improve your life and the lives of others. Yet you also do something on the meta level, which is to demonstrate that this is a viable way of life for many who want nothing more than to offer themselves in some way. Meanwhile, I would remind you again: choose what you want to do the most, and make sure you include that in your business plan.   Read Eric Francis daily at PlanetWaves.net.


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8/14 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 103


© Fred Stein. Use of this image for any purpose requires proper authorization from the Fred Stein Archive.

Parting Shot

Einstein Princeton 1946, Frank Stein. Fred Stein turned to photography in 1933 to support his family after fleeing Nazi Germany. He wound up a pioneer of the small Leica camera. The Leica’s mobility allowed him to roam the streets, spontaneously documenting the lives of the people he met, first in Paris, then in New York City. There was no pretension in Stein’s approach—he observed people living in poverty and in luxury with the same sensibility and curiosity, combined with a knack for capturing complex episodes in a single frame. Stein would adapt this new technique to his studio, where he was

104 CHRONOGRAM 8/14

able to capture the same striking intimacy in portraits of larger-than-life figures such as Marlene Dietrich, Salvador Dali, and iconic photos of Albert Einstein. A retrospective of his work, Fred Stein: Paris New York, was published in 2013 by Kehrer. His son, Peter Stein, will host a screening of his new short film about his father’s life and work at Oblong Books & Music in Rhinebeck on August 3. (845) 876-0500; Oblongbooks.com. —David King


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August 2014 Chronogram  

The August 2014 issue of Chronogram. Published by Luminary Publishing.

August 2014 Chronogram  

The August 2014 issue of Chronogram. Published by Luminary Publishing.

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