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845.876.WOOD

www.williamslumber.com

RHINEBECK • PLEASANT VALLEY • HUDSON • HOPEWELL JUNCTION TA N N E R S V I L L E • R E D H O O K • H I G H FA L L S • H Y D E PA R K


A MASTERPIECE REMASTERED The Clark’s expanded campus creates an unforgettable setting for exceptional art. Explore a new Visitor Center, reconceived Museum Building, and a sweeping landscape design that transforms the 140-acre site. Celebrate the return of the Clark’s renowned French paintings after a three-year tour. CAST FOR ETERNITY: ANCIENT RITUAL BRONZES FROM THE SHANGHAI MUSEUM Through September 21 RAW COLOR: THE CIRCLES OF DAVID SMITH Through October 19 MAKE IT NEW: ABSTRACT PAINTING FROM THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, 1950–1975 August 2–October 13

OPENING JULY 4, 2014 7/14 CHRONOGRAM 1


Camphill Ghent

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A New Model for Independent and Assisted Living Camphill Ghent offers a unique opportunity for elders to live rich, fulfilling independent lives in a vibrant community. We are located in a beautiful rural setting, yet close to area attractions in Columbia and Berkshire counties. • Studios • One and two bedroom apartments • Two and three bedroom townhouses • A licensed Adult Home For more information, please call 518.392.2760 2542 State Route 66 Chatham, NY 12037 www.camphillghent.org

F I N D O U T M O R E AT

Kinderhook TOYOTA Honest, friendly uncomplicated service since 1967. Avoid the pressure and pushiness of typical car dealerships and visit us in rural Columbia County.

1908 State Route 9H, Hudson, NY (518) 822-9911 kinderhooktoyota.com facebook.com/kinderhooktoyota Options shown. ©2014 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., inc.

2 CHRONOGRAM 7/14


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7/14 CHRONOGRAM 3


Chronogram ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

CONTENTS 7/14

NEWS AND POLITICS

COMMUNITY PAGES

16 WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING

38 HISTORY REMIXED: KINGSTON

Minimum wage, worldwide weight problems, human-bound books, and more.

18 BEINHART’S BODY POLITIC: REPORT FROM TUNISIA

Larry Beinhart on Tunisia and the evolution of the Arab Spring.

FEATURE 20 HANDMADE-ON-HUDSON: THE INDIE CRAFT MOVEMENT

Lynn Woods reports on the lure of the Hudson Valley DIY scene.

HOME 26 A SPACIOUS LOG HOME IN CHICHESTER

Jennifer Farley profiles a contemporary take on the classic cabin.

33 HOME & GARDEN EVENTS

Hidden Gardens of Amenia, Innisfree Wildflower Walk, and more.

35 VARIEGATION: THE SPICE OF LIFE

KIDS AND FAMILY 46

DISPATCHES FROM THE NOT-SO-EMPTY-NEST

For parents whose children recently flew the coop, life is actually quite full.

WHOLE LIVING 80 THE NEW AGE OF DIGITAL FITNESS

Are apps, gadgets, and social media turning wellness into an out-of-body experience? Wendy Kagan explores the nexus of the physical and technological.

COMMUNITY RESOURCE GUIDE 69 TASTINGS A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 76 BUSINESS DIRECTORY A compendium of advertiser services. 83 WHOLE LIVING Opportunities to nurture mind, body, and soul.

THOMAS SMITH

Michelle Sutton on how to make the most of plants with imperfect leaves.

Susan Piperato explores the hip Ulster County city­—from its roots to right now.

6

20

Workspace at Blackcreek Mercantile in Kingston. HANDMADE-ON-HUDSON

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JUNE 27 – AUGUST 17, 2014

Seven inspired weeks of opera, music, theater, dance, film, and cabaret opera

EURYANTHE

By Carl Maria von Weber American Symphony Orchestra Conducted by Leon Botstein, music director Directed by Kevin Newbury July 25 – August 3 theater World Premiere

LOVE IN THE WARS

A Version of Heinrich von Kleist’s Penthesilea By John Banville Directed by Ken Rus Schmoll July 10–20

25th anniversary season

BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL SCHUBERT AND HIS WORLD WEEKEND ONE August 8–10 The Making of a Romantic Legend WEEKEND TWO August 15–17 A New Aesthetics of Music film series

SCHUBERT AND THE LONG 19TH CENTURY July 3 – August 3

live music, cabaret, and more

THE SPIEGELTENT

Hosted by Justin Vivian Bond July 3 – August 16

BARDSUMMERSCAPE 845-758-7900 | fishercenter.bard.edu

Image: Chris Stack and Birgit Huppuch. Photo by Julieta Cervantes.

25 YEARS BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL REDISCOVERIES

SCHUBERT AND HIS WORLD

The Bard Music Festival presents two extraordinary weeks of concerts, panels, and other special events that will explore the musical world of Franz Schubert.

weekend one | August 8–10

weekend two | August 15–17

program one The Legacy of a Life Cut Short Works by Schubert

special events “Path toward a Grand Symphony”: Schubert’s Octet and Schubert’s Kosegarten Liederspiel

program two From “Boy” to Master: The Path to Erlkönig Works by Schubert, Gluck, Rossini, and others

program seven Beethoven’s Successor? Chamber works by Schubert

special event The Song Cycle as Drama: Winterreise

program eight The Music of Friendship Chamber works by Schubert, Schumann, and others

The Making of a Romantic Legend

program three Mythic Transformations Works by Schubert and orchestrated song program four Goethe and Music: The German Lied Songs by Schubert, Mendelssohn, and others

845-758-7900 fishercenter.bard.edu

Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY Image: Franz Schubert by W.A. Rieder, 1825. ©IMAGNO/Lebrecht

program five Before Unspeakable Illness Chamber works by Schubert program six Schubert and Viennese Theater Operettas by Schubert and Franz von Suppé

A New Aesthetics of Music

program nine Late Ambitions Orchestral and choral works by Schubert and Berio program ten Fellowship of Men: The Male Choral Tradition Choral music by Schubert, Bruckner, and others program eleven The Final Months Chamber works by Schubert program twelve Schubert and Opera Semi-staged performance of Schubert’s Fierrabras 7/14 CHRONOGRAM 5


Chronogram ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

CONTENTS 7/14

ARTS & CULTURE

FOOD & DRINK

52 GALLERY & MUSEUM GUIDE

66 MILL HOUSE BREWING COMPANY

56 MUSIC: MAKE MINE DRY Peter Aaron interviews Magnetic Fields frontman Stephin Merritt. Nightlife Highlights include Music Mountain Festival; Mandolin Orange; Syracuse/Siegel Duo; DIIV; and Netsayi. Reviews of Children of the Rhythm by The Big Takeover; Skin and Bone by Maryleigh Roohan; and Such is Life by The Eric Starr Group.

60 BOOKS: THE GENIUS OF FAMILY Nina Shengold talks with Joseph Luzzi, author of My Two Italies.

64 POETRY Poems by Richard Donnelly, E Gironda, Jr., Derek Hawkins, LindaAnn Loschiavo, Ed Meek, Linda Melick, Checko Miller, James Nani, ooznozz, Imogene Putnam, Molly Reiniger, Karen Schoemer, Matthew J. Spireng, Asher Stern, Mary Vallo, and Trevor Wedemeyer. Edited by Phillip X Levine.

112 PARTING SHOT Tasha Depp at the Greene County Council on the Arts Catskill Gallery.

Holly Tarson profiles Poughkeepsie’s leader of the local craft beer movement.

THE FORECAST 88 DAILY CALENDAR Comprehensive listings of local events. (Daily updates at Chronogram.com.) PREVIEWS 87 Euryanthe runs from July 25-August 3 as part of Bard SummerScape. 88 Rosendale Theatre’s Music Invasion Film Festival begins on the Fourth of July. 89 The Phoenicia International Festival of the Voice returns on July 30. 92 SUNY New Paltz’s PianoSummer celebrates its 20th-anniversary season. 93 The Hudson Project music festival runs from July 11-13 in Saugerties. 99 Roswell Rudd’s Kerhonksen Trio performs in Woodstock on July 26. 100 Shadowland Theatre presents Unnecessary Farce from July 11-August 3. 101 “Mike + Doug Starn: Bambú Shots” is at the Kleinert/James Gallery until July 13. 102 The Wassaic Project Summer Festival returns for its seventh season August 1-3. 104 The Woodstock Playhouse presents its fourth season of summer repertory.

PLANET WAVES

CULINARY ADVENTURES

106 GOOD AS GOLD

70 GLUTEN-FULL

108 HOROSCOPES

Bread is on the rise in the valley. Brian PJ Cronin reports.

What are the stars telling us? Eric Francis Coppolino knows.

An egg-and-cheese sandwich at Bonfiglio & Bread in Hudson. CULINARY ADVENTURES

ROY GUMPEL

70

Eric Francis Coppolino on the value of cultivating self-esteem.

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EDITORIAL

What’s Ahead at Omega

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Perry dperry@chronogram.com BOOKS EDITOR Nina Shengold books@chronogram.com HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR Wendy Kagan wholeliving@chronogram.com POETRY EDITOR Phillip X Levine poetry@chronogram.com FOOD & DRINK EDITOR Peter Barrett food@chronogram.com MUSIC EDITOR Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com

July 20–25

EDITORIAL PINCH HITTER Jennifer Gutman

Mary K. Greer and Rachel Pollack reveal secrets of the

EDITORIAL INTERNS David King, Iana Robitaille PROOFREADER Lee Anne Albritton

tarot for fortune telling

CONTRIBUTORS Larry Beinhart, Stephen Blauweiss, John Burdick, Brian P. J. Cronin, Larry Decker, Eric Francis Coppolino, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Jennifer Farley, Celia Krampien, Ron Hart, Maya Horowitz, Annie Internicola, Jana Martin, Susan Piperato, Seth Rogovoy, Jeremy Schwartz, Tom Smith, Sparrow, Holly Tarson, Robert Burke Warren, Lynn Woods

July 25–27 Jack Kornfield and other experts teach how to bring mindfulness practices to children

PUBLISHING

July 27–August 1 Gurmukh Kaur Khalsa and friends explore the inspirational radiant power of women

FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky CEO Amara Projansky amara@chronogram.com PUBLISHER Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com

August 1–3

CHAIRMAN David Dell

Deborah King shows you how

Chronogram is a project of Luminary Publishing

to unlock the door to advanced energy healing

ADVERTISING SALES ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Maryellen Case mcase@chronogram.com

August 8–10

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Mario Torchio mtorchio@chronogram.com

Robert Peng and other leading experts reveal evidence of how faith can heal

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Robert Pina rpina@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Bonnie Dickson bdickson@chronogram.com

August 8–10

ADMINISTRATIVE

Cheryl Strayed and friends lead a creative exploration at the Omega Memoir Festival

BUSINESS MANAGER Ruth Samuels rsamuels@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107 Joni Kabana

MARKETING & EVENTS COORDINATOR Samantha Henkin shenkin@chronogram.com MARKETING & EVENTS INTERN Dorian Sinnott PRODUCTION PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Jaclyn Murray jmurray@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 PRODUCTION DESIGNERS Kerry Tinger, Mosa Tanksley PRODUCTION INTERN Amanda Schmadel OFFICE 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 | (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

MISSION Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Luminary Publishing 2014.

SUBMISSIONS

CALENDAR To submit listings, visit Chronogram.com/submitevent or e-mail events@chronogram.com. Deadline: July 15.

August 15–22 Bobby McFerrin and his inspiring

team guide a weeklong adventure in improvisational singing

August 22–24 Manisha Thakor unlocks key concepts to financial literacy fundamentals for women

OMEGA Rhinebeck, NY

Explore more at eOmega.org or call 800.944.1001

7/14 CHRONOGRAM 7


ON THE COVER

a world of delight

hosted by justin vivian bond cabaret u live music u dinner u dancing

july 3 – august 16 the richard b. fisher center for the performing arts at bard college

BARDSUMMERSCAPE 2014 july 3

justin Vivian Bond: Cool Babysitter july 4

Doveman:The Burgundy Stain Sessions’ Tribute to Lou Reed july 5

An Evening with Molly Ringwald Tickets $30–$50

july 11

Martha Wainwright july 12

Bridget Everett: Rock Bottom july 18 and 19

august 2

The Joey Arias Experience august 8

The Hot Sardines august 9

Cabaret Comedy Double Bill august 15

Amanda Palmer august 16

Justin Vivian Bond: The Drift june 27 – august 16

After Hours with Justin and Friends

Weimar New York

july 10 and 17

Bindlestiff Family Cirkus

july 31 – august 14

Meow Meow

july 26 and 27

july 25 and 26 august 1

Late Night Local Midsummer Dancing Kinder Spiegel

For a complete list of events: 845-758-7900 | fishercenter.bard.edu Bard College Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

DoubleVision Elisa Pritzker | mixed-media photography on cotton paper | 20” x 20” | 2014 It would technically be an exaggeration to say that Elisa Pritzker has been an artist all her life, but not by much. Born in Argentina, she was eight-years old when she discovered her passion. Soon her parents arranged to send her to the Superior School of Visual Arts, a special art school at the local university. “They were kid courses, but in the environment of college,” Pritzker says. She recalls being surrounded by college-age art students and their work, and “really wanting to grow up” so she could go to art school. Today, Pritzker lives in the Hudson Valley, where she resides and works in a distinctive Antoni Gaudí-inspired home in Highland. She works mostly in three mediums: sculpture, mixed-media photography, and installation. The different media allow her to experiment with new ideas to keep her engaged. “I’ve been doing art for 40 years,” she explains. Pritzker strives to create what she calls an openness in her artwork. “I want people to come into my world,” she says, often drawing inspiration from the pristine landscapes of the Hudson Valley. Like many artists, Pritzker’s creative process is defined more by inspiration than by method. “It all happens organically—I let the environment talk to me,” she says, adding, “My mind and my heart are already open to discovering objects in an artistic way.” Pritzker takes inspiration from an eclectic group of artists, including Louise Bourgeois, Frida Kahlo, and Hieronymus Bosch. She’s drawn to them not only for their imagery, but also for their passion for their art. Similarly, in her own work, beauty isn’t her main concern. “Nature is already beautiful,” Pritzker explains. “I try to put my mark on it.” That mark often comes in the form of a zipper, usually attached to natural objects as in DoubleVision, which she says is about “opening up into the uncanny mystery of the natural world.” “It’s all about nature,” Pritzker says. “About going beyond what you see.” The zipper is a recurring motif in her work, evoking a sense of discovery. She explains that zippers encourage you to “go further than what you are seeing.” The open zipper suggests that there’s more going on than you can see at first glance, and, in considering what’s underneath, you learn to think about nature in a different way. Pritzker hopes her art will encourage people to “protect and be a bigger part of nature.” “Art always has a secret part,” Pritzker continues. “There’s mystery in nature.” It’s that mystery that Pritzker hopes her audience will ponder, and it’s a mystery that even she doesn’t fully understand. “I don’t have all the words to explain it,” she admits. “If I understood, I wouldn’t work, I would talk about it.” Pritzker’s work will be presented in the group exhibit “18 Ways of Looking at a Tree,” at Vassar College’s Palmer Gallery, until September 4. (845) 437-5370; Palmergallery.vassar.edu. —David King CHRONOGRAM.COM

Photo: Cory Weaver

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WATCH a video interview with artist Elisa Pritzker by Stephen Blauweiss.


CHRONOGRAM.COM

DAILY DOSE: The Latest & Greatest in the Hudson Valley Each morning we greet you with news of what to do, like the upcoming La Guelaguetza festival (above). Plus, every Monday, Vanessa Geneva Ahern of Hudson Valley Good Stuff posts on her recent discoveries across the region. THOMAS SMITH

SLIDESHOW: Kingston Street Life We sent Thomas Smith out to capture the pulse of street life in Kingston and our wunderkind photograph came back with a cross-section of New York State’s first capital so bounteous we could not fit it all in our pages. JENNIFER MAY

I love my kids!

“I just want my body BACK!” PODCAST: Chronogram Conversations Our weekly podcast pairs editor Brian K. Mahoney with the people who make the Hudson Valley tick. This month: A three-way conversation about craft with mystery authors Alison Gaylin (above), Marshall Karp, and Steve Hamilton. DEBORAH DEGRAFFENREID

There are some things exercising will never correct. But a “Mommy Makeover” will!

845-294-3312 VIDEO: Elisa Pritzker Filmamker Stephen Blauweiss visits multimedia artist Elisa Pritzker at her Gaudi-inspired home in Highland to talk about the recurring motifs of nature and zippers in her work.

Francis V. Winski, MD

winskicosmeticsurgery.com

7/14 CHRONOGRAM 9


N E W E P I S O D E E V E R Y T H U R S D AY

Meet the people who make the Hudson Valley tick.

Nick Hand

Natalie Merchant

Heather Maloney

Editor Brian K. Mahoney hosts Chronogram Conversations, a podcast of in-depth chatter with Hudson Valley movers and shakers.

Subscribe for free on

Roses are Red Violets are Blue

Orange you glad

we have colors for you?

328 Wall Street Kingston, NY 331-7780

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35 Mill Hill Road Woodstock, NY 679-2251

800 Main Street Poughkeepsie, NY 452-1250

ESTEEMED READER “I once was lost, but now am found / Was blind, but now I see.”
 —“Amazing Grace” “I am not my body; it is an instrument for my use.”
 —Alfred Orage Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: The drive into the city flowed as though greased with grace. I worked hard to stay present to my breath and the wheels on the road as I made my way down the Thruway, the Palisades, over the bridge, along the Hudson River, and slid into a perfect parking spot on the Upper West Side with ample time to spare before my business meeting. Stepping from the car, I felt the change in the pace and energy from country to city, and quietly took in the impressions of St. John the Divine Cathedral above the steep cliffs across Morningside Park. Children played soccer in the field below and I savored their Brownian movements around the field in pursuit of the ball. I took in the statue of Washington and Lafayette shaking hands, feeling the significance of their friendship. With ample time before my meeting, I sauntered through the sunny city streets and stopped for a pour-over at my favorite coffee shop. The meeting was good and I made my way back, but when I arrived at the place I had parked, I didn’t see my car. I looked up and down the street to see if I had misplaced it, without result.The impressions of the place had been so vivid, I felt sure I knew precisely where I had parked, and the car simply wasn’t there. Realizing my car had most likely been stolen, I watched my pleasant state become clouded, like black ink poured into a vessel of clear water. But then I realized this was a fine test of whatever presence of mind I possessed, and I sat on a bench next to a man reading and eating a sandwich. The book was about enneagram personality types, which seemed like it might be meaningful, but then I noticed the stack of other books beside him—with titles like Job Skills 101, and Seven Secrets of Effective Interviewing—and decided not to strike up a conversation. Instead, I began to consider my situation, and determine what to do. Recovering from the shock, I was surprised to feel a sudden lightness, like the car going missing had lifted a load—there was a freedom in being relieved of my accustomed vehicle. Now, I realized, I would need to transport my body on my own legs, and other means—I would need to take a subway and a bus to get home. The sense of the scene and the park sprung back into vivid focus, but differently than before. Now, there was a quiet soberness, and gravity in the looking. Steeling myself for action, I called 911 and the operator said I should probably check to see if my car had been towed by the city before reporting it stolen. So I called the traffic police, and began to describe the vehicle to the operator, its color and make and model. As we spoke I walked along the street, and there it was—my car—parked one small block further, just below the statue of Lafayette and Washington shaking hands. “I have something strange and interesting to tell you,” I said to the operator, sounding sardonic, even to myself. “I found my car.” She was kind, and didn’t rub it in. I nearly collapsed in the recognition that my seeming state of wakefulness had in fact been so illusory that I didn’t notice where I parked my car. It was like I was the butt of the joke about what you get when you play a country and western song backwards (you get your dog back; you get your girlfriend back; you get your truck back…). Sitting in the familiar cracked leather seat, smelling the old-car smell, noting the layer of dust on the dashboard, I saw everything about it with fresh eyes. Despite feeling quite silly at having misplaced the car, I felt both affection and indifference to the object that had been lost and found in a space of 15 minutes. Like everything, “car” has an inner meaning also. It is a vehicle that transports a person, and interacts with other cars on the road, much like the persona, and even the body, transport a being, interacting with the experiences of life. Losing my car was like being briefly stripped naked, my essential being exposed to the elements like a mewling babe. Regaining it revealed that I am not my car, or its driver, or fuel; I am the one who is conveyed. —Jason Stern


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7/14 CHRONOGRAM 11


INTERNATIONAL DANCE CENTER TIVOLI NY

KAATSBAAN

the Hudson Valley’s cultural park for dance professional performances creative residencies ®

Extreme Ballet

the Academy of Dance workshops & special events

Extreme Ballet® Summer Student Showcases Session I July 12 Session II August 2 Session III August 23

at noon, open to the public, no charge

BALLETNEXT August 30, 7:30 pm with ABT principal ballerina Michele Wiles

WWW.KAATSBAAN.ORG facebook.com/kaatsbaan

STURGILL SIMPSON

Colonial Kids’ Camp

July 28 – August 1 Ever wonder what life was like 300 years ago? Join us and find out! 9am – 3pm daily, perfect for ages 9-12 Non-members $300, Members $250 Registration is limited. huguenotstreet.org/camp-huguenot

Artists on the Street

Saturday, August 9, 2014 10am – 6pm Free and open to the public Watch renowned Hudson Valley painters create work inspired by our museum houses and landscapes. A children’s art area will be available. Open Every Day • 88 Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY • (845) 255-1660 • huguenotstreet.org

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Chronogram Seen

Clockwise from top: Kurt Rhoads and Rex O’Reilly in Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival’s production of “Two Gentlemen of Verona” (photo: William Marsh); Big Gay Hudson Vallley’s Summer Picnic at Locust Grove; Carlos Santana at Bethel Woods (photo: Kevin Ferguson); Jennifer Mueller/The Works at Kaatsbaan (photo: Greg Cary) Titus Andronicus frontman Patrick Stickles performing at BSP Kingston (photo: Jennifer Maharry).

7/14 CHRONOGRAM 13


The Crafter’s Manifesto People get satisfaction from being able to create/ craft things because they can see themselves in the objects they make. This is not possible in purchased products. ¶ The things that people have made themselves have magic powers. ¶ They have hidden meanings that other people can’t see. ¶ People usually want to keep and update the things they make. Crafting is not against consumption. It is against throwing things away. ¶ People seek recognition for the things they have made. Primarily it comes from their friends and family. This manifests as an economy of gifts. ¶ People who believe they are producing genuinely cool things seek broader exposure for their products. This creates opportunities for alternative publishing channels. ¶ Work inspires work. Seeing what other people have made generates new ideas and designs. ¶ Essential for crafting are tools, which are accessible, portable, and easy to learn. ¶ Materials become important. Knowledge of what they are made of and where to get them becomes essential. ¶ Recipes become important. The ability to create and distribute interesting recipes becomes valuable. ¶ Learning techniques brings people together. This creates online and offline communities of practice. ¶ Craft-oriented people seek opportunities to discover interesting things and meet their makers. This creates marketplaces. ¶ At the bottom, crafting is a form of play. —Ulla Engeström, Hobbyprincess.com

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W

LAUREN THOMAS

Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note Let’s Get Small

e’ve been crafty for quite some time. The Hudson Valley has been a hub for making since the 19th century—making cement in Rosendale (for the Brooklyn Bridge, among other formidable structures), making hats in Beacon, making food for New York City, making collars in Troy, making microchips in Fishkill. Since the exodus of the manufacturing base from the region in the second half of the 20th century, however, the idea that the Hudson Valley is a place where large-scale making happens is mostly a nostalgic one (with the notable exception of IBM).What’s sprung up in its place in just the past couple years is a small-scale maker’s movement that is a microcosm of the DIY transformation of the post-industrial landscape throughout the US. (Lynn Woods documents this movement in “Handmade-on-Hudson” on page 20.) The maker’s movement is not a back-to-the-land, throw-your-own misshapen-pots-and-make-burlap-sack-clothes affair. The current generation of crafters are creating (choose one or more of the following): furniture, ceramics, clothes, leather goods, stationery, natural skin-care products, etc. that are handmade and design-savvy. As Stella Yoon, one of the founders of the Hudson River Exchange craft fair, told me, “The definition of craft has evolved—10 years ago, the line started to blur between fine art and craft. Now there’s a crossover between design and craft.” For instance: Kingston-based Blackcreek Mercantile sells its wooden bowls and cutting boards through retail outlets and its sculptural outlets through galleries. Where do you draw the line between craft and art, and does it matter anymore? Nowhere is this maker’s movement more apparent in the region than in Hudson, where locally focused retail shops have popped up next to the city’s many antique stores. Hudson has the highest self-employment rate in NewYork State— almost 10 percent—and ranks 83rd in the country in self-employment. It’s a melting pot of the American maker’s movement, from milliners creating handmade vintage-style hats like Behida Dolic Millinery; to outsider artist Earl Swanigan, who sells his whimsical animal portraits on the street; to bespoke blacksmithing at Metal by David DeSantis; to the impeccable outpost of modernist woodworking, jewelry, and design that is Chris Lehrecke’s Warren Street showroom. Hudson also has Etsy. The e-commerce craft giant opened a satellite office in a converted mill in 2012, where 40 young Etsy staffers spend their days tapping at keyboards on large maple-topped group desks. Etsy sourced most of its furniture from local stores, and the maple desks were made by Rob Williams of Grain, a local woodwork and design studio. Etsy’s digital reach is also a game changer for the contemporary makers. Between selling their wares at an everincreasing number of craft fairs and connecting to customers via their online shops (which often function as a personal blog as well as sales platform, telling the story of maker and made in one fell swoop), makers can opt out of costly physical retail spaces. What’s fueling this youthful maker’s boom? Surely the lack of good jobs for creatives in the workforce at large is a factor driving people to opt out of the corporate sphere for DIY jobs. There’s also the increasing desire for things that are not mass produced, things made by people who can you tell you a story about their creation. (This applies to the farm-to-table movement and the craft brewing and distilling renaissance as well.) And what about play? As Finnish maker and crafter Ulla Engeström has suggested, crafting is really a form of play. So ask yourself this question: Is your job a form of play? Wouldn’t it be cool if it was?


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According to documents released by Edward Snowden, the National Security Agency intercepts global communications to retrieve large collections of images, then used in advanced facial recognition programs. Gathering millions of images daily, the NSA has significantly increased its use of facial recognition as a means of locating and tracking individuals suspected of terrorist activity. The documents suggest that the agency now considers image communication of equal importance as written and oral. Other local and national enforcement agencies have used drivers’ licenses, Facebook, and passports in their identification programs, but the NSA has exclusive access to private communications. Certain groups are concerned about what this could mean for Americans’ privacy. Though the agency requires court approval for images obtained through surveillance, Congress has yet to issue laws specifically protecting privacy for face-recognition data. The precision of the technology itself is also in question. The NSA’s facial recognition software has produced some impressively accurate results, but not without occasional, glaring errors. Sources: New York Times, Washington Times

After several months of analysis, Harvard scientists have concluded that a 19thcentury French text in the university’s library is bound in human skin. Residing in Harvard’s Houghton Library since 1934, Des destinées de l’ame is Arsène Houssaye’s meditation on the soul and the afterlife. The writer presented his treatise to friend and bibliophile Dr. Ludovic Bouland in the mid-1880s, and Bouland subsequently bound the text with skin from the back of an unidentified female mental patient. In a handwritten note he added to the book, Bouland stated, “A book about the human soul deserved to have a human covering.” Anthropodermic bibliopegy—the binding of books with human flesh—was in fact a quite common practice as early as the 16th century. With techniques like peptide mass fingerprinting, and with specific information regarding the book’s origins, scientists ruled out of the possibility of it being bound with the skin of more common sources such as sheep or cattle. Harvard believes to hold at least one other anthropodermic book, a French translation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses in its Countway Library’s Center for the History of Medicine. Sources: New York Times, Houghton Library Blog In an effort to encourage the uninsured to seek coverage under the Affordable Care Act, hospitals across the country have begun cutting charity care to their lowerand middle-income patients. The new law has significantly reduced federal aid given to hospitals that treat the poor and uninsured, placing a financial strain on many medical centers and leading them to charge co-payments, regardless of a patient’s insurance coverage or income. Though some centers still offer financial aid to those at or below the $11,670 poverty line, the changes have proven difficult for patients with low annual incomes, for whom even low-cost ACA plans are too expensive or who simply aren’t aware of coverage options. Many fear that rather than drive patients to sign up for coverage under the new law, cutting charity care will only discourage them from receiving important medical care altogether. New insurance policies have also created problems for hospitals in the 24 states that have not yet expanded Medicaid—they now receive considerably reduced federal aid and no Medicaid payments to make up the difference. Source: New York Times Could Facebook be the new frontier for law enforcement officials? After a four-year investigation, the NYPD has used Facebook evidence to carry out the largest gang takedown in New York City history. On June 4, the department indicted over 100 alleged members of three warring gangs, the Make It Happen Boys and their ally Money Avenue, and the rival 3 Staccs. Of the members indicted 40 were arrested, 39 were already in jail, and the remainder are still at large; most are teenagers or young 20-somethings. Criminal charges include murder, both fatal and nonfatal shootings, stabbings, and robberies. The NYPD’s 200-page indictment is reported to reference the word “Facebook” at least 300 times and to have uncovered 75 to 80 percent of its evidence from posts or correspondences on the social media site. Said one suspect in an online exchange, “Once we take down one from your block, we’ll be good.” Some city locals have referred to the gang members as “Facebook dummies,” claiming that they assisted in their own arrest by recklessly posting incriminating information online. Source: Vice News 7/14 16 CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Five months after Colorado became the first state to allow the sale of the drug for recreational use, law enforcement officials, doctors, and legalization opponents are highlighting a series of recent problems as cautionary tales for states reconsidering their marijuana laws. In Denver, a man raved about the end of the world and fatally shot his wife just hours after buying a package of marijuana-infused candy. Supporters argue that this case is an anomaly; opponents say it’s just the tip of the iceberg. Some hospital officials say they are treating growing numbers of children and adults sickened by potent doses of edible marijuana, while sheriffs in neighboring states complain of an influx of stoned drivers. Supporters point out that violent crimes in Denver are down this year, and the crime rate over all is down by about 10 percent. There is still little hard data available, though, and because of the lag in reporting health statistics, it may take years to understand the societal impact of legalized marijuana. Source: New York Times It might be time to move to Seattle. While President Obama’s proposal to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 remains blocked by congressional gridlock, the famously liberal city struck a blow against income inequality when its city council voted unanimously to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. The victory did not come without concessions—a last-minute addition to the regulation allows employers to pay a lower training wage to teenagers. Councilwoman Kshama Sawant, one of the country’s few elected socialists, offered amendments intended to force big businesses to pay the higher wage sooner and strip out the training wage, but they were voted down. Despite the concessions, advocates hope that the council’s actions will lead other cities to consider similar measures. Local businesses have already threatened to sue. Source: Los Angeles Times A new study combining three decades of data from 188 countries, published in the medical journal Lancet, found that not one country has reduced its obesity rate in 33 years and nearly 30 percent of the world’s population is overweight or obese. Women are more likely to be obese than men, especially in poorer countries. While there are patterns, obesity is not evenly distributed by region, ethnic group, or national income levels. Thirteen percent of the world’s obese people live in the US, and 62 percent live in poor or middle-income countries. Asia remained relatively unaffected, while the Middle East saw the greatest increases. Africa was especially random; island nations like Mauritius and the Seychelles had obesity rates nearly 10 times those of Ethiopia and Burundi. Relatively prosperous South Africa had the highest female obesity rates, but obesity was also surprisingly high in poor nations, like South Sudan. Source: New York TimesLast year, the percentage of students who defaulted on their loans in two years reached 10 percent—the highest rate in almost two decades, according to the Department of Education. The problems caused by the excessive debt aren’t limited to just financial difficulties, though; several studies have shown that debt is also associated with mental and physical health problems, particularly in young people. A study from Northwestern University linked debt to high blood pressure as well as poor self-reported mental and general health. Studies have long shown links between debt and depression, and the psychological issues associated with debt can lead to broader health problems, like poor dietary choices, low physical activity, and substance abuse. Source: Time Compiled by David King and Iana Robitaille


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Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

REPORT FROM TUNISIA

I

n December 2011, a fruit peddler in Sidi Bouzid, a medium-size town in the hilly center of Tunisia, set himself on fire to protest the casual abuses of the police and bureaucrats of an impenetrable, authoritarian, and corrupt state.   Ordinarily, this would have been a small, barely noticed event. The government-controlled media might have mentioned it along with local news like traffic accidents and criminal arrests, without context or meaning. However, without anyone noticing it, technology had changed the world of communication, and with it, it seemed, the world of politics. Pictures of the protest were taken, and transmitted, with cell phones. They were posted on Facebook and other social media sites. The story was e-mailed, tweeted, and blogged about.Word of mouth had received a major electronic enhancement. Person-to-person communication had broken the bonds of geography. Chat was now national. Actually, it was transnational—it had gone global.  Demonstrations began. Every act of repression went viral. The Arab Spring had been born. It was astonishing. The people of North Africa and the Middle East had never known selfrule. They’d never been able to say or read or hear what they really thought, without fear of arrest. They’d gone from autocracies to being colonies of foreign powers, and after the European powers were forced out, they were replaced by emirs, kings, and presidents-for-life. In every case, they were police states with arbitrary justice and without real individual rights. And they were still, for the most part, client states of some foreign power—the United States, the Soviet Union, their old colonial masters—and of the financial interests of those powers. Even worse, these postcolonial nations failed to develop economically. Their elites normally became extremely rich while the vast majority struggled, and across the board, about 40 percent lived at or below the poverty line—defined, of course, much lower than in the West. Suddenly, these people had lost their fear. They were speaking out. Demonstrating. Dictators—those presidents-for-life—began to fall and flee. There had been the collapse of the Soviet Union, with Eastern Europe bursting out of the commie closet into the sunlight of democratic capitalism. Obviously we were watching round two of Victory of Our Way of Life. The whole world was happy. At least the Western establishment. And their media. Then came the first wave of elections. Who would these new democratic leaders be? It was all so thrilling. And then they turned out to be Islamists! The Ennahda Party in Tunisia. The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt. Oh, that was disturbing. Probably anti-American. Part of the whole our-values-vs.their-values schism between freedom and repression. Actually, nobody got very upset over the Ennahda Party. It was odd to pronounce. It didn’t sound scary. But “Muslim Brotherhood,” that had a sort of beyond-bordersoperate-everywhere-against-the-West sound to it. Meanwhile, one of the worst of dictators still standing, Bashar al Assad,

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came up with a brilliant propaganda ploy. He was stuck in a narrative about citizens nonviolently seeking redress from the oppression of a dictator who enforced his will with the most notoriously vicious secret police in the world. It was not good. President Obama said “Assad must go” in a way that made it sound way less controversial than the existence of climate change. He released the most radical and dangerous inmates from Syria’s political prisons in order to make the opposition appear more dangerously radical. Yes, they picked up arms. And the Western media picked up on it. The New York Times itself ran a series of stories that explained that the opposition to Assad was a very mixed bag; some of the elements of the opposition did dreadful things, and perhaps were the sorts that we, here in America, would want to take over Syria. Meantime, Assad got support from Russia, which was looking to muscle flex anywhere in the world; Iran, since the rebels were largely Sunni; and the Gulf States, who are disturbed by the idea of any autocrat falling from power. The story was beginning to change. From the people (good) against the dictators (evil), to Islamists, who might be fanatics determined to destroy the West like on 9/11 (not so good), against autocrats, who at least are stable—and Western powers have been quite happy dealing with such folk for a time, a much more ambiguous tale indeed. The basic idea of democracy is that miserable compromise with the promise of relief through ballots is a better deal than insisting on righteousness and demanding a trial by fire. However inept and ideologically irritating Egypt’s President Morsi was, the option for unelecting him was obviously and clearly ready to arrive. It required only some patience. That was one of the major reasons to have a revolution. Instead, Morsi was removed the old-fashioned way: a military coup led by General Sisi, who did it in the name of democracy. It was one of the great Orwellian moments of recent years. The media took it quite seriously and chewed over how a coup against an Islamist probably was the true democratic alternative. Because, well, they were Islamists and having been elected didn’t change that one damn bit. The general declared all of the Muslim Brotherhood to be terrorists. He outlawed them and began rounding them up and throwing them in jail. Including Morsi, who is imprisoned still. The new narrative—the-Mediterranean-in-renaissance Arab Spring— was gone. The old narrative, War on Terror, was back. That justified entirely new dictators or retaining the old autocrats. But in order to get there, it unleashed one of the most terrible of genies, the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy. Yes, North Africa and the Middle East are being torn apart by barbarians with automatic weapons, murdering for power, for money, often killing in the name of Allah, but mostly, it seems, because they can. The joy of murder, the sheer thrill of executing your most hateful other—once individuals can find a group that supports such blood lust—should not be underestimated. Except for Tunisia. Where the Arab Spring was born. And it lives, still.


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Clockwise from top left: Dan Votke of Blackcreek Mercantile in Kingston; jeweler Rebecca Peacock; Crystal Moore of Lock & Key Leathers wears one of her bags; Paul Kucera of White Barn Farm in New Paltz.

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Craft

Paula Kucera knitting at White Barn Farm in New Paltz

HANDMADE-ON-HUDSON THE INDIE CRAFT MOVEMENT BY LYNN WOODS

PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS SMITH

T

hree years ago, Danielle Bliss and Joe Venditti were art school graduates struggling to find satisfying work when they started Wishbone Press. Working out of a loft in Kingston’s Shirt Factory, they design and print cards, coasters, business cards, wedding invitations, and the like on four antique letterpresses. Their bold, eye-catching designs and messages keyed to the tastes of the under-30 crowd updates an archaic printing technology with wit and whimsy. Besides an offbeat, hand-produced product, the couple are savvy marketers, deeply connected to the crafter community and also with their customers via Etsy. They network extensively through social media and curated a crafts fair last December in Uptown Kingston called the Hullabaloo. Despite the long hours and risks, “when you own your business and are doing something you love, it’s satisfying,” says Bliss. “People are finding a lot of value in handmade things. They don’t want to support factories in China.” DIY Country The indie craft movement is transforming the Hudson Valley into an artisan stronghold, and many of the crafters are people like Bliss and Venditti, who pursued their vision because they had absolutely nothing to lose and, by dint of talent, hard work, and frugal living, are living out their dream. Cheap space and a vibrant community of artists, artisans, and creative entrepreneurs are a definite lure, and many discover that the area’s farms and thriving food culture

make upstate living more satisfying than Brooklyn. “Friends from New York City wonder how I can adapt to this rural, small-town living, but it nurtures me,” says Melissa Auf der Maur (bassist for Hole and Smashing Pumpkins), who moved to Hudson from the city with her partner Tony Stone, a filmmaker, six years ago. The couple are the creative directors of Basilica Hudson, a reclaimed factory in Hudson that hosts cultural events, including the Farm & Flea crafts fair. Much as in the 1960s, “people are returning to the land and wanting to be independent from an infrastructure they do not trust,” Auf der Maur says. Many crafters adhere to a do-it-yourself ethos that defies entrepreneurial conventions. Mary Ahern, owner of Angel Hill Apothecary, who makes natural skin-care products from plants foraged from her family’s 140-acre farm in Chatham, is not anxious to expand, though demand is growing. Although she plans to hire someone to help with the harvesting and packaging, Ahern will continue to concoct her products—a process that involves drying the plants and infusing them in 100 percent organic hemp oil—herself. “I enjoy that aspect of making a really pure product,” she says. Ahern regards other similar crafters not as competition but as part of her community. “Everyone’s pretty small,” she says. “We all learn from each other, and everyone’s very supportive.” Quality Reigns The craze for the handmade, be it knitted, sewed, crocheted, felted or woven, printed, painted or silk screened, carved or turned on a lathe, salvaged and 7/14 CHRONOGRAM FEATURE 21


The indie craft movement is transforming the Hudson Valley.

Above: Rebecca Peacock making jewelery in her Kingston studio Below: The tools of the trade for Rebecca Peacock

forged, harvested from a field and mixed with edible oils, thrown on a potter’s wheel, or glazed and fired, is clearly a reaction to the bland mechanization and chain-store standardization of daily life.Too many hours spent at the computer, lack of interesting, well-paid work and job security, as well as resistance to massmarket consumerism, with its labor exploitation, waste, and cheap, disposal products, are spurring a backlash. “It’s a real paradigm shift,” says Sherry Jo Williams, proprietor of Culture+Commerce, who formerly worked in the corporate sector as a designer and stylist but now is committed to promoting the two dozen crafters represented in her Hudson store. “People are willing to have less money, have a better quality of life, and spend more money on fewer things. It’s a consensus in some sense that what you’re eating and where your T-shirt was made matters.” In one sense, what’s old is new again, given that the Hudson Valley has long been associated with crafts. Crafts People, a rustic complex representing 500 artisans in West Hurley, was founded by Rudy Hopkins, a ceramicist, in the 1960s. Its shelves of glazed pottery, glass ornaments, chimes, candles, wine racks, wooden toys, rocking chairs, silver jewelry, and the like reflect a traditional aesthetic that’s long been a mainstay of area gift stores. The Woodstock-New Paltz Art & Craft Fair has been held twice yearly at the Ulster Fairgrounds for the past 33 years, drawing thousands to New Paltz each Memorial Day and Labor Day weekend. But the indie craft movement is different from the crafts renaissance of the 1970s. For one, it has urban roots, growing out of the “Stitch and Bitch” knitting groups that cropped up in big cities a decade ago and the Renegade Craft Fair, first held in Chicago in 2003 (it attracted 250,000 people and has subsequently mushroomed into 11 cities). It has an edgier aesthetic, which values originality over slick perfection, and combines irreverence with the warm and homey, functionality with DIY production, and meticulous skill with wild experimentation. 22 FEATURE CHRONOGRAM 7/14

The Etsy Factor It also is deeply indebted to the Internet, which enables a crafter working out of her home to sell all over the world. The launch of the e-commerce craft emporium Etsy in 2005 spread the handmade gospel to the hinterlands, enabling makers in obscure corners of the country to tap into the global marketplace. Etsy, which generated $2.35 billion in sales in 2013, represents a million individual sellers who fit into one of three categories: supplies, vintage, and handmade. Eighty-eight percent are women. According to Etsy’s member stories specialist Michelle Traub, these one-person start-ups are “independent, self-sufficient, and want to stay that way,” in contrast with “stereotypical Silicon Valley entrepreneurs who want to quickly grow as big as possible.” In fact, Etsy, which is headquartered in Brooklyn, has a foothold in the Hudson Valley and is helping showcase the region as a crafts hotbed. In 2012 it opened a customer service annex in a converted warehouse in Hudson, which is furnished with maple-top desks made by local woodworker Rob Williams. Etsy founder Rob Kalin plans to convert a former mill building in Catskill into artisan workplaces with a general store selling the crafts produced on site. It would also consist of a restaurant serving locally sourced produce and a hotel with residential space—making crafts the engine of economic development and tourism. Crystal Moore of Lock & Key Leathers is one of the thousands of crafters whose business wouldn’t have been possible without Etsy. The 2012 college graduate, who recently relocated to Kingston with her husband from Oneonta, said she has “always been a maker” and learned her craft by working for a textile designer. Her leather and canvas bags, which are dyed and waxed for a distressed look, cost $195 to $325, but nonetheless have proved popular with students, with a loyal cohort based in California. “They write to me and say they’re saving up for this bag, and a few months later they’ll buy it,” she says. The Internet enables Moore to do all the marketing herself. “I’ll put a new item on Etsy, Instagram it, blog about it, pin the bag on Pinterest, and go back to Etsy and see where my hits came from,” she said. Her blog enables her to “market stuff from my point of view,” which includes sharing her interests in motorcycles, cars, and food. Customers “want to know who you are, see what you’re eating, and where you’re going. It makes them feel more special.” The fact that the bag they bought was “exclusive to them,” rather than bearing the imprint of a well-known brand, is also important. “If there’s a little bit of money in the bank and I’m doing it all myself, that’s true happiness,” she says. Fair Thee Well Besides Etsy, crafts fairs—ranging from small-scale gatherings of community vendors held in the local fire hall to carefully curated extravaganzas—are an essential component of the culture. Unlike trade shows, these grassroots events charge affordable fees and forge a sense of community. Notable recent examples here in the Hudson Valley include the aforementioned Hullabaloo and Hudson’s Basilica Farm & Flea, which was held over last Thanksgiving weekend and attracted 3,500 visitors. Founder Auf der Maur, who describes it “as an alternative to the big-box Black Friday nightmare,” said the event will be annual. Fairs are popping up all over the place this summer, including the second annual Hudson River Exchange in late June; Bazaar-on-Hudson, which was inspired by the Brooklyn Flea and will be held at The Living Room in Cold Spring Sundays through the end of July; and the Phoenicia Flea at the boutique hotel Graham & Co. on July 26 and 27.


A sheep at White Barn Farm in New Paltz

Paula Kucera spinning yarn at White Barn Farm in New Paltz

The fairs have proved lucrative for some. “Celebrities are out shopping at the local fairs. It’s not just my neighbor and my mom going to these things,” notes Kingston-based jeweler Rebecca Peacock, who three years into founding her business was able to quit her day job. But Peacock, who forges her pieces from recycled metals sourced at refineries that process discarded jewelry, says it’s not only the rich and famous who are buying her stuff. “It’s almost going back to the 1880s, when shoes were really expensive and you kept those pairs of shoes and resoled them. People want less fake jewelry. Instead, they’re choosing that one really beautiful thing. It’s a move back to quality.” Patrick Turiello, co-owner of LayerXLayer, a husband-and-wife company that makes heavy canvas bags and backpacks from their Kingston loft, said a chance encounter with an actress who had started a company of compostable diapers at the Brooklyn Flea led to a large order. The couple farmed it out to a unionized New Jersey factory, doing the hand-sewn finishes themselves. LayerXLayer also sells through a distributor in Japan, where there’s “a real interest in American-made products, especially vintage,” he says.While factory manufacturing may seem anathema to the notion of handmade,Turiello said he and his wife, Leah Fabish, both art school graduates who started the company after they couldn’t find jobs in their fields, consider themselves primarily designers. “We were makers because we had no choice,” he says. “We had to decide whether we wanted to spend 60 to 70 hours a week making stuff or turn it into a real business.” The realities of the money economy have caused “a lot of people to transition from ‘Hey, I want to do this thing’ into turning it into a business,” he adds. While some of their colleagues are committed “100 percent to making the thing, we like a little of both.” Doing small-scale manufacturing wasn’t possible before, but today factories are much more flexible in taking small orders, he said. LayerXLayer bags are sold in Japanese department stores, further defying small-is-beautiful notions of handmade.

The Gospel of Handmade At the other extreme are the DIY proponents—crafter teachers and authors spreading the gospel of handmade. Cal Patch was a designer at Urban Outfitters who quit to start her own indie craft store on the Lower East Side before it was fashionable and then realized she could attract more customers by teaching them how to knit. Patch, who moved to Accord in 2008—she and her boyfriend have a mini homestead where they tend a garden and keep chickens—published a book, Do-It-Yourself Clothes: Patternmaking Simplified, and she continues to teach sewing and patternmaking, mainly at retreats located throughout the US. Teaching women how to design patterns and sew clothing that fits their particular body is a form of empowerment, which is helping the maker movement penetrate the mainstream, she believes. “Women who take my classes up here aren’t hipsters. They’re people who don’t want to buy their clothes at Walmart anymore,” says Patch. Both Patch and Sally Russ, whose Sew Woodstock store sells sewing supplies and handmade clothes as well as hosts a sewing co-op, cite Alabama Chanin as the inspiration for a new model of clothing manufacture. The company, which was founded by designer Natalie Chanin after she left New York and returned to her hometown in Alabama, hires local women, including former unemployed textile workers, to hand stitch and embroider dresses made from organic cotton jersey. The dresses, which take weeks to sew, sell for thousands of dollars, a price tag that supports paying a fair wage. But Chanin also does something else that’s unique: She open sources her designs by giving workshops around the country and selling her pattern books and fabrics. Fans who can’t afford a $5,000 Alabama Chanin dress at Barney’s have the option of making it themselves. Chanin’s vision to “bring systems of making to life,” as she puts it, is an ambition shared by at least two indie craft businesses in the area. Jonah 7/14 CHRONOGRAM FEATURE 23


Tara DeLisio and Jonah Meyer of Sawkille Co. in Rhinebeck

24 FEATURE CHRONOGRAM 7/14


Meyer, whose eight-person shop is based in Kingston, said he’d like to someday hire 100 employees. Meyer was a sculptor who made custom furniture before he created a brand by opening a showroom in Rhinebeck, which turned his distinctive handcrafted aesthetic, a mix of the traditional, modern, and whimsical, into a lifestyle, supported by a blog and website (business partner and wife Tara DeLisio was a key contributor to these developments). Today they operate Sawkille Co., which represents other furniture and craft makers as well. His high-end, heirloom-quality pieces are crafted of East Coast hardwoods sustainably harvested and hand finished. Blackcreek Mercantile & Trading Company is another Kingston-based company that hopes to bring back handmade manufacturing. It currently employs several part-timers who assist co-owner and maker Josh Vogel in the production of hand-carved cutting boards, kitchen tools, and natural cutting board oil, which is formulated from locally sourced bee propolis, the gluelike substance in the hives. Blackcreek sells its wares exclusively on a wholesale basis, including custom kitchen utensils for high-end, artisanal stores located as far afield as California, Paris, and Japan; national media coverage of the company has led to a book deal. Vogel said the competition is fierce; diversification of their product line and strategic, targeted marketing that seeks to build relationships helps them weather the various trends. “You have to pour your heart into what you’re doing and the quality has to be there,” says Vogel. That sense of deep engagement with the material, of honest and elemental making, touches on the fundamental appeal of craft: authenticity. The New Pioneers For all its trumpeting of sincerity and goodness, the world of handmade is guilty of a snobbishness that borders on the xenophobic, according to Alexandra Dewez, owner of Harvey’s Counter, a shop full of handmade goods in Hudson. Typically, customers show “a sudden lack of interest” when she informs them that the cool metal light that resembles an anchor studded with tiny bulbs they admire is from India. “Why should it be less worthy than something a Bard graduate made by hand? Not everyone in Central Asia works in a sweatshop or huge factory,” says Dewez. Tiny collectives of women in Asia or Africa who make everything by hand and “thankfully through technology found an agent connected to Hudson” are involved in no less worthy an enterprise, and in such cases, each sale “really has an impact on their lives.” Then there’s the fundamental problem of attrition and the sheer exhaustion and struggle of surviving in an economy based on efficiency. Paula Kucera owns White Barn Farm in New Paltz, where she has a shop selling yarn hand spun and hand dyed from wool sheared off her own sheep. “A lot of people burn out, because what they do is not sustainable in this money-driven world,” she said. Plus, in her many years of holding classes in knitting, felting, plant dying, and sewing, she’s found people are inconsistent: Someone will be “voracious about knitting for three years, then one day they put it down and don’t want to do it.” A new yarn shop opening up nearby can whittle down her potential pool of customers by half. To keep going, it’s a matter of “finding out what’s important, what you value, and what works for you. I may be shifting things around, start attending fiber festivals, go directly to the customers as a way to bump up sales.” As in decades past, many crafters will likely burn out. But today, the choices are fewer and the stakes are higher, thanks to the growing dominance of multinational corporations, notes Auf der Maur. She nonetheless has hope that a fundamental shift is under way. “In the city, most people can’t avoid the propaganda that’s everywhere, but here in the Hudson Valley we have isolated pockets of independent-minded communities,” Auf der Maur says. “Craft and the effort of individual handmaking is a symbol of the future. What the world needs right now is a pair of hands.” She added that crafters’ inventiveness, work ethic, and entrepreneurial drive reflect the essence of being American. “Americans are pioneers who take risks and do weird and original things with a lot of will,” she said. “A big part of the spirit in handmade is that people are taking their destiny into their own hands. There really is no choice.”

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The House

Stony Clove Retreat A SPACIOUS LOG HOME IN CHICHESTER By Jennifer Farley Photographs by Deborah DeGraffenreid

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hen Frank Marrazzo met his future wife Belen Millan in a bar in Spain, she was on a bad date with a man she now refers to as “the Octopus,” because it seemed like he was all hands. Marrazzo bought a drink for the beautiful brunette, a native of Andalusia who attended Mount Holyoke College as an undergrad and holds a master’s in international affairs from Columbia, and not long afterward the couple married. Back then, Marrazzo was working in construction management and Millan was working in advertising, both in New York. Soon, they decided they wanted to start a business together, and eventually founded a private foreign exchange program for teenagers that today secures educational and hosting arrangements for about 300 teenagers from around the world annually. They have two daughters, ages 8 and 11, and divide their time between a 5,080-square-foot six-bedroom, four-bath log home in Chichester, New York, a hamlet of Shandaken, and Malaga, Spain. “Our first connection to Chichester was through owning a small weekend place that we bought with some other people. We knew we loved the area, so we began looking for some property upon which to build a main residence.We bought this land in 2001; at the time it was a 72-acre parcel, which we have since subdivided,” says Marrazzo. “We kept 52 acres, and our house, which sits at the highest point on our property, at an elevation of about 1,450 feet, has views for miles.There’s no one above us. Our house is the highest around here, and in theory, we could hike the ridge all the way to Woodstock.” The property excavation to build the home began in 2002, the same year Belen became pregnant with their first child. 26 HOME CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Charming Chichester Chichester borders Phoenicia and is located in a mountainous valley within the Catskills National Park; its northern boundary borders Greene County. The hamlet was founded in 1863 by the sons of the contractor who built the Catskill Mountain House, who were looking to establish a furniture factory; eventually, the area became settled by factory workers. In 1939 the furniture factory went out of business and the whole village was put up for auction; it’s been in the hands of private owners ever since. There are two major creeks that run through the hamlet; the Marrazzos live on Stony Clove Road, which takes its name from Stony Clove Creek. The driveway from the road to the Marrazzo house is almost half a mile long. “Aside from the terrific unspoiled wilderness feel of the area, and the wonderful neighbors, the best thing about owning a home in Chichester is the opportunity to belong to the Chichester Property Owners Association,” says Marrazzo. “It’s like a private club, with about 100 members, representing about 35 different families, mostly descended from people who owned summer places here in the 1940s.” The Chichester Property Owners Association costs about $300 a year in membership dues, and maintains a rustic clubhouse on the creek with swimming docks and picnic facilities. There are several big annual events every year, including an Independence Day cookout. “Hiking down to the clubhouse is our daughters’ favorite thing to do,” says Belen. “It’s about three-quarters of a mile away, but we can get there from our property, and it’s just been a really fun way to explore together.”


Above: A view of the living room from the second floor. Below: Belen Millan and Frank Marrazzo preparing a mean in the kitchen.

7/14 CHRONOGRAM HOME 27


Clockwise from top: Family room near kitchen area; the upstairs office overlooks the living room; the master bedroom, with fireplace and patio; Marrazzo in the upstairs office; the stylish master bathroom.

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Less Log, More Master Bed & Bath Like Skriloff, whose home was featured in Chronogram in March of this year, the Marrazzos love living in a log home, but otherwise seek to avoid the associated kitschy design bromides, such as a chandelier made of antlers. “We wanted to cut back on some of the log interior-design features by adding more sheetrock, metal, and other contemporary construction elements. Allen helped us transform our place from so-so to great on the inside,” says Millan. Skriloff recommended the Marrazzos erect a freestanding closet in the large downstairs bedroom to create a feel of intimacy in a large space and also to add storage space. A dining table made from reclaimed barn timber was deemed too small for the open-concept kitchen, dining, and living area, and was chopped in half to create the vanity used in the master bath. The existing stove hood was similarly deemed too small and replaced with a much larger model; some of the downstairs exposed pine beams were encased in metal purchased from Universal Metal Fabricators Inc. in Kingston, formerly known as Universal Road, to give the house a more loftlike look. Large panels of sheetrock, painted in bright colors that pick up tones in the landscape, were also added to some interior walls. The upstairs guest bedroom was converted into an artist’s studio for Millan, ending its rather illustrious winning streak as a baby-making retreat. “We’ve had several pregnancies happen as a result of staying in that guest room. People from the city would come up and tell us they are early risers, and then they would get here and we wouldn’t see them until noon or so,” laughs Marrazzo. “I think it has something to do with being so close to nature up here, plus we do have a lot of privacy.” July is their busiest month. Not only are there a number of students in the US and Europe actively participating in various types of exchange programs, some home based and some involving sleepaway and other types of summer camp, but Marrazzo must also interview potential host families for the forthcoming school year. “We wanted our daughters to grow up bicultural, and so far, so good,” Marrazzo says. “They go to school at the Lycée Français and then spend a few months in the Shandaken public school system, but it’s becoming more difficult to do that as they get older. We decided that we would be spending less time in the Catskills, and so we’ve just begun to think about downsizing. The house is not listed yet, but we’re thinking about it, and in the meantime, we plan to have a very busy summer, and invite over everyone we know to enjoy this place while we still own it.”

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A Log Home Felt Right They chose log home construction because “we felt it would best blend in with the roughness of the Catskills,” says Millan. The exterior of the house is pine log but, for the most part, the house is much like a standard post-andbeam, with large windows to bring the nature inside. The couple alternated living in Manhattan and the Catskills, but soon they were able to move in, and for several years the family lived year-round in Chichester. During that time, Millan discovered R&F Paints in Kingston, and began painting encausticly with beeswax using R&F’s acclaimed handmade pigments, much loved by Hudson Valley artists. A prolific and recognized encaustic painter, Belen has given a number of classes and seminars at various venues in the Hudson Valley, and exhibited in the US and Europe. She maintains an artist’s website, Belenmillan.com. “We were very busy with the children and building our exchangestudent enterprise, and the house was big with wonderful views, and we had lots of parties and lots of houseguests,” says Marrazzo. “But by 2009 we realized that we weren’t using parts of the house as well as we could, and that we really wanted to create a master bedroom and bath downstairs that would be very private and romantic. That’s when we found Allan Skriloff, an expert space planner with a log home in Mount Tremper, whom we basically met via word of mouth through a Tinker Street business owner in Woodstock.”

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Home & Garden Events

JULY 3 Hudson Valley Garden Association Outing: Wethersfield Wethersfield Farm, Amenia Join HVGA for a guided tour of the vast three-acre garden at Wethersfield Farm in Amenia. Garden staff will lead the tour through the Italian-inspired three-acre formal garden featuring topiary, terraces, and a sculpture collection. Wethersfield is the 1200-acre former country estate of Chauncey D. Stillman, a noted philanthropist, architectural enthusiast, and heir to a vast banking fortune. Its scenic house and grounds are one of the Hudson Valley’s best-kept secrets. 6pm-8pm. (845) 418-3640; Hvga.org JULY 5 Wildflower Walk Innisfree Garden, Millbrook Innisfree Garden, the vision of artist and teacher Walter Beck and landscape architect Lester Collins, is a landmark of 20th-century design. The 185-acre garden invites visitors to find peace as they wander its paths, enjoying a union of modernist aesthetics with traditional Chinese and Japanese gardening principles. On July 5, join Audubon Society naturalist George Petty on a tour of the garden’s most beautiful seasonal wildflowers. The tour begins at 11am. (845) 677 8000; Innisfreegarden.org.

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JULY 12 10th Anniversary Secret Garden Tour Saugerties This year’s 10th-annual Secret Garden Tour will feature six private gardens in Saugerties that participants can visit on a self-driven tour. The celebration of the event’s 10th anniversary will include a scavenger hunt with prizes, as well as a special fixed-price lunch from the Saugerties Farmers’ Market. All proceeds will benefit the Boys & Girls Club and the Ulster County SPCA. Tickets in advance through July 11, or day of at 201 Washington Avenue. Tours 10:30am to 4:30pm. (845) 246-0710; Village.saugerties.ny.us. JULY 12 Hidden Gardens of Amenia Amenia The Garden Club of Amenia hosts its 17th-annual tour of some of Amenia’s hidden, little-known gardens. The tour will feature 15 flower and technical gardens, including East West Bamboo Farm and Olde Forge Organics. Each with its own set of hosts, the must-see gardens promise brilliant palettes and breathtaking Hudson Valley landscapes. Tours begin at Four Brothers Pizza Inn and will run 10am-4pm, rain or shine. Ameniagardens@gmail.com; Ameniagardens.com. JULY 23-27 HITS-on-the-Hudson Horse Show HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties The HITS-on-the-Hudson Horse Show celebrates 10 years in Saugerties. Boasting 10 competition rings, HITS Saugerties welcomes equestrians of all levels—ponies carry tomorrow’s stars only a couple rings away from Olympic hopefuls who sit atop some of the sport’s most famed horses. Each week, the champions of each division are honored in a special Parade of Champions Ceremony. All proceeds from the gate go directly to Family of Woodstock. 8am-3pm. (845) 246-5515; HitsShows.com. 7/14 CHRONOGRAM HOME 33


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The Garden

Clockwise from top left: Invasive goutweed; Hakonechloa grass lights up the shade; variegated shrubs will tend to “revert” to all green leaves

Variegation:The Spice of Plant Life

By Michelle Sutton Photos by Larry Decker

M

argins, streaks, dots, splashes, mottling, stripes: Variegation in plants makes them distinctive. Variegated plants are those plants that catch your eye because sections of their leaves are deficient in, or void of, chlorophyll. While usually the variegation is white, cream, or yellow, sometimes it is pink, red, or purple if there is a strong presence of the pigment anthocyanin in the leaves. (Flowers, stems, and other plant parts, even seeds, can be variegated, but in this piece we focus on foliage.) Not everyone finds variegation pleasing; it has to be handled judiciously like a strong spice in cooking—more about how to do that later. Natural and Assisted Variegation can come about in several principal ways: 1. A small number of plants, like certain cacti, agave, and palms, are naturally variegated and always appear thus in nature. Their variegated status is stable and their seed can be expected to produce plants that “come true”—that is, that the progeny will reliably be variegated as well. 2. Most variegated plants are mutants that were discovered and propagated, often by leaf cuttings; they rely on human intervention to keep them going. If you try to grow one of these plants from seed, the progeny won’t likely be variegated. 3. Some variegation is the result of viruses that create interesting streaks and other patterns, often without otherwise harming the plant. The “tulipomania” of 17th–century Holland was a craze for tulips whose petals were pleasingly streaked with color due to something called a mosaic virus. Plant propagators

and marketers will still capitalize on otherwise innocuous viruses to get interesting-looking new cultivars onto the market. Just a Pinch Will Do It’s not uncommon for new gardeners, who are just learning about plant disease symptoms such as yellowed foliage, to find variegated plants distasteful. A rack of multiples of the same variegated plant in a commercial setting can look like a plant sick ward. Variegated plants shine when they are the singular oddball in a sea of more conventional leaf color. One of them goes a long way, the exception being variegated ornamental grasses like Morning Light maiden grass or zebra grass— their silvery or white stripes don’t seem to preclude using them in masses. Also, variegated plants tend to be an acquired taste. I appreciate them more and more with time. Whereas flowers come and go, variegated plants give you an extra dash of color in the garden all season long. That said, I look about my gardens and I don’t have very many variegated plants … does that make me a hypocrite? Actually, I think that’s because my gardens are mostly in full sun, and I prefer to use variegated plants in the shade, where their yellow, cream, or white colors bring light to the space. In the sun, I find the variegated colors can bleach out. It’s the same reason I don’t use white flowers against a white house.Wherever I use variegated plants, I make sure there is dark foliage and/or a dark house or other background nearby for contrast. I generally prefer larger-leaf variegated plants; “cutleaf ” plants are already so showy by virtue of their finely cut leaves that adding variegation seems like visual overkill. Also, if the flower of a plant is very showy and held close to the leaves, jazzy leaf variegation seems like unwelcome competition for the eyes. 7/14 CHRONOGRAM HOME 35


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Life and real estate north of New York City. Blogging every day.


Caring for the Spicy In terms of sun versus shade, what do the plants themselves prefer? The lack of chlorophyll has double-edged consequences; the chlorophyll in the green parts of the leaves needs adequate sunlight to do its job, but if the variegated parts—especially those with white tissue—get too much sun, they can burn up from lack of protective pigmentation. In general, variegated plants suffer from less vigor than their all-green counterparts. They grow more slowly and tend to be more prone to insect and slug damage. But as to whether they prefer sun or shade, it depends on the plant. Some variegated plants with thicker leaves, like those of succulents, irises, and boxwood, fair better in full sun than do variegated plants with thinner leaves, like caladiums—but you can’t generalize across the board. If a default preference had to be specified, for most variegated plants it would be sun in the morning, shade in the afternoon. At any rate, you can expect to need to give these guys extra attention— whether it be putting diatomaceous earth around your variegated hosta to keep the slugs away, giving the plants extra good soil preparation before they go in so they are not starting out life stressed, or making sure that your variegated shrubby dogwood in the sun gets adequate mulch and water. Another common maintenance need for variegated plants is to prune out stems that have reverted to all-green; this is especially common with variegated shrubs (see photo of ‘Green and Gold’ euonymus). The reverted, all-green stems have their full quotient of chlorophyll, are thus more vigorous, and if not pruned out will soon come to dominate the chlorophyll-deficient variegated stems. As you go about town on foot, notice the once-variegated shrubs that are now almost all green, with just a few remaining stems of variegated glory getting choked out. Some Favorites—and One That Is Truly Evil In Highland Park Arboretum in Rochester, there is a young variegated tulip tree, a memorial tree to a boy who died tragically at 13, that lives vividly in my memory of most striking plants. It has a small cream-colored splotch in the middle of most of the leaves, and the splotches vary jauntily from leaf to leaf. In a former client’s garden outside Rochester, we planted a variegated lilac shrub in a large salt-glazed pot under a pergola. Lilacs are very hardy, and the salt-glazed pot is meant to overwinter outdoors. Even though the lilac will only bloom for a short time, the interesting foliage with splashes of golden yellow make it a worthy focal point. Variegated hakonechloa (ha-con-ah-CHLO-ah) grass is one of the most striking ornamental grasses, with its bright-green-and-gold striped leaves. It is short in stature and is one of those exceptions to the “use sparingly” rule, and indeed, one often sees it in masses. It prefers part shade and illuminates shady places like no other plant. Toad trillium (Trillium sessile) is a part- to full-shade woodland wildflower with leaves that are mottled with patches of yellow, lighter green, or white. It’s one of those naturally variegated native plants. It’s considered a spring wildflower, but there’s one on my property that keeps its handsome foliage for many weeks after it blooms, well into summer. Now here’s a variegated plant to avoid at all costs. It’s commonly known as goutweed or bishop’s weed or snow-on-the-mountain (see photo). It should be known as acid-rain-in-your-heart, because if it gets into your garden, it will run rampant and Sisyphean labors to get rid of it will ensue. The Latin name is Aegopodium podograria ‘Variegatum’. There is an all-green version (Aegopodium podograria, no ‘Variegatum’) that is even more invasive, but when the variegated form sets seed, the new seedlings can be green. Wind can disperse that seed and cause heartache for you and your neighbors. There are so many other variegated plants that look more attractive and don’t spread invasively—avoid the goutweed! Resources Augustine Nursery AugustineNursery.com Northern Dutchess Botanical Gardens NDBGonline.com

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Clockwise from top left: Sari Botton and Brian Macaluso get breakfast from Outdated Cafe; Shawny and Kiera; Claire and John Murphy celebrate their anniversary; Catherine Franklin, Colleen Connor, Anderson Connor, Lula Connor, and Patrick Connor at the Kingston Farmer’s Market; Chris Gallo and Heather Williams outide BSP; Amy, Giordana, and Jana outside Duo; Theresa Widmann; Alfie and Dan Glass.

38 KINGSTON CHRONOGRAM 7/14


Community Pages

HISTORY REMIXED KINGSTON

BY SUSAN PIPERATO PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS SMITH

K

ingston has all the makings of a fine city: nearly four centuries of dramatic history; well-preserved architecture; remarkably-stillaffordable building stock; easy proximity to other Hudson Valley highlights; and an elegant waterfront at the mouth of the Rondout, Esopus, and Wallkill rivers. But since IBM closed its doors in 1995, taking away 7,100 jobs, Kingston’s attempts to reinvent itself haven’t quite coalesced. Until now. Kingston’s fortunes seem to rise and fall sharply. Its downtown area— “The Strand” in the Rondout district—was settled by the Dutch in 1610. But dealings between the Dutch and the Esopus Indians were uneasy— sometimes even murderous—so uptown’s Stockade district was built in 1658 to protect the settlers. Even so, bloodshed continued on the farmland surrounding the stockade for the next century. In 1777, the newly independent New York State capital was moved from Albany to Kingston to protect the seat of government from the British. Ironically, following the Battle of Saratoga, it was Kingston that the humiliated British troops attacked. Legend has it that the British burned Kingston down on October 16, 1777, after being provoked by a cannon firing from the Rondout Creek redoubt, where a trading post was established in 1610, followed by a fort in 1614.

7/14 CHRONOGRAM KINGSTON 39


Justin Miranda and Jen Ropiecki on their way to BSP in Kingston.

40 KINGSTON CHRONOGRAM 7/14


Clockwise from top left: Katy Dwyer and her daughter Maggie; Jenise, Santino, Julianna, and Johnny outside Dominick’s Cafe; Jason and Megan visit the Stockade District from their home in Ellenville; Gilat Aharon, Katie Fountain, Andrea Parker, Ally Perry, Marcy Lannis and Myah Lannis celebrate outside BSP; Jennifer Bosch and her son Tristan at the Kingston Farmers’ Market; James and Catherine Doran visit the Rondout Harbor in Kingston from their home in the Berkshires; Iggy, Hillary, Sabine, Owen, and Zoe Harvey; Yevgeniya Khatskevich and Julie Price at the Kingston Farmers’ Market.

The Stockade’s 116 houses, 103 barns, two schools, academy, 46 barracks, 17 storehouses and shops, court house, and Dutch church were all torched. But New York State’s records were safely smuggled out in the skirt of the wife of Provincial Congress delegate Christopher Tappen. Of the original stone houses, 41 were rebuilt and still stand. Over 50 American Revolutionary soldiers lie buried at the Old Dutch Church. Kingston was officially formed when Rondout Village merged with the Stockade in the early 1800s, and the mile-long road between them became what’s now Broadway. Kingston’s abundant bluestone and materials for cement and brickmaking made it an industrial center until the early 1900s, when Portland cement and bluestone won out. Kingston thrived for a time in garmentmaking and small machinery manufacturing, but was floundering when IBM arrived in 1955, bringing with it 40 affluent years. Kingston is finally discovering its vibrancy as a small city (population 23,711 in 2012), attracting artists, entrepreneurs, and millennials escaping overpriced big cities. Today Kingston has burgeoning foodie, arts, and music scenes, successful festivals, and new industries including leather goods, fashion, solar-powered boats, handcrafted furniture, and multimedia. It’s also acquired a brand of hipness, symbolized by the spray-painted red goats that appeared mysteriously uptown in 2012 (later spreading to Miami Beach, Missouri, Michigan, Canada, and, perhaps not surprisingly, Williamsburg, Brooklyn). Some saw vandalism, others saw graffiti art, but Mayor Shayne Gallo recognized the red goats as a free branding campaign (because of which, the tattooist-and-artist duo responsible for them only got community service). A marketing expert couldn’t have come up with a better symbol for Kingston. The goat, after all, is not only stubborn, but also indefatigable—like Kingston’s true believers—and red is the most vibrant color there is. These days, it finally looks like—as Kingston native and former Mercury Rev guitarist Adam Snyder titled his 2006 album set in Kingston—this town will get its due after all. Long live the red goat.

7/14 CHRONOGRAM KINGSTON 41


Marc Brooks and Casey Smith jam on Wall Street.

Steve Ladin tests out an antique lawnmower.

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10 Things to Know About

Kingston

Purveyors of fine wine and spirits since 1960 Mon. thru Sat. 9-9, Sun 12-6 15 BOICES LANE, KINGSTON Next to Office Depot

845.336.5155

When red goat graffiti appeared uptown in 2012, a Kingston Times editorial admonished the city for failing to “embrace its inner goat.” None has embraced it more than the “stubbornly independent” Kingston Film Festival, which made the goat its logo. The festival’s Season 3 runs August 15-17, presenting feature, short, experimental, big-budget, microbudget films, documentaries, animation, and trailers. Each offering must contain a Kingston component: director, writer, actor, or setting. You know a city’s made it when the creative and famous adopt it. Latest case in point: Bishop Allen. This indie band relocated from Brooklyn about a year ago. Its new record, Lights Out, to be released in August, includes the single “Start Again,” and a music video that traces the band’s day through its new hometown. Check out Bishopallen.com. Kingston’s never looked so cool. IBM’s pulling out of Kingston in 1995 has long been bemoaned. Now, at the Fred J. Johnston Museum (corner of Wall and Main Streets), Friends of Historic Kingston offers closure with “Kingston: The IBM Years,” an exhibit and accompanying book. The exhibit explores IBM’s creation of new neighborhoods and achievements like the SAGE air defense system, and features 50 IBMers’ oral histories, early electric typewriters, and vintage photographs. Tired of wandering lonely through the supermarket? Stock up on produce while meeting new people on Saturdays at the Kingston Farmers’ Market. The market runs year-round: outdoors on upper Wall Street from Memorial Day through Thanksgiving on Saturdays, 9am-2pm, and every other Saturday December to April in the basement of the Old Dutch Church. Nearly 40 vendors offer local produce and products, including artisanal whiskey, cheese, honey, juices, soaps, and cured venison.

Wine Tastings Every Saturday from 1PM - 4PM

The downtown Parisian-style Kingston Night Market, founded last year, is the next-best thing to escaping to the City of Light. Held downtown at the end of Broadway on the third Friday of each month from 6 to 10pm, the Night Market’s quirky offerings include an antiques market, live music, free wine and food tastings, craft activities, photo booth, and Tarot reader.

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Oscar Montoya tricks his opponant at a friendly soccer match in Newburgh.

44 KINGSTON CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Kingston attracts the biggest crowds for its Art Walk, held on the first Saturday of each month year-round, 5 to 9pm. More than 20 art galleries located uptown, downtown, and on and off Broadway open their doors, along with artists’ studios, featuring live music, theater, historical reenactments, and refreshments. A shuttle bus sponsored by Arts Society of Kingston, located on lower Broadway, offers rides for $1 per person. A former gourmet desert, Kingston’s uptown has become a foodie mecca of restaurants emphasizing the local in both food sources and community building. Uptown’s ultramodern Elephant Wine Bar offers award-winning tapas and wine selections; old New York-style Boitson’s aims to please everybody with hamburgers, veggie burgers, oysters, and foie gras; Stockade Tavern, recently named one of America’s top 20 bars by Esquire magazine, features bartenders who are every bit as excellent as the Prohibition-style cocktails they serve; and Duo Bistro features homemade smoked meats, breads, and pastries. Downtown, try Dolce, serving innovative breakfast and lunches featuring gluten-free crepes and homemade English muffins. The 24.5 miles of railroad tracks between Kingston and Phoenicia are the subject of a legal and political battle between Ulster County Executive Michael Hein, who seeks to turn much of the corridor into a rail trail, and Catskill Mountain Railroad, which operates seasonal tourist trains on separate tracks in Kingston and Phoenicia, and looks to extend service between the two areas. Catskill Mountain Railroad’s lease expires in 2016. Kingston’s resurgence is being built by fearless entrepreneurs like Michael and Theresa Drapkin, who relocated from New York City to found downtown’s Kingston Wine Co. (65 Broadway). Dedicated to creating a “strong cultural narrative that weaves together wine and food in context,” the Drapkins offer a wide variety of activities related to wine and food, including a monthly wine share, 10-minute wine classes, and collaborative events with local restaurants. Kingston’s music scene has taken off, in part thanks to Backstage Productions, housed in Keeney’s Theater, an early-1900s vaudeville and movie theater on Wall Street. BSP Lounge features performances by local bands (Felice Brothers) along with nationally recognized indie bands like Kurt Vile, Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, and Sean Ono Lennon’s Ghost of the Saber Toothed Tiger. Behind the lounge is a dance studio offering classes in everything from hip-hop to hula hoops, and the original theater, which hosts large groups.


Voted #1 Seafood Restaurant in the Hudson Valley!

Casual Waterfront Dining, Located on the Historic Kingston Waterfront

1 Broadway, Kingston N.Y. 845.340.8051

elephant 310 Wall Street Kingston, NY (845) 339-9310 Tues-Sat 5-10pm

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Casual Waterfront Dining, Located on the Hudson River 7 Main Street, Catskill, N.Y. 12401 (518) 943-5088 www.portofcallcatskill.com

Still cooking butt after all these years!!! and belly and blood sausage and liver and bones

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7/14 CHRONOGRAM KINGSTON 45


Kids & Family

DISPATCHES FROM THE NOT-SO-EMPTY NEST By Robert Burke Warren Illustration by Celia Krampien

W

hoever coined the term “empty nest syndrome” did not think it through. It’s a handy descriptor of parents depressed by their kids leaving home, but, like many buzzwords and buzz phrases, it’s inaccurate. For one thing, the nest isn’t empty. Children depart, yes, but parents remain home, awash in memory and complex emotions, affixed to caregiving habits that they must break, and looking at themselves through different, sometimes clearer, lenses. Certainly emptiness can factor into the situation, in the forms of grief and loneliness, but other feelings also cross the threshold: anxiety, annoyance, excitement, and even pride. It’s a significant time, and anything but empty. But, for the sake of convenience, we’ll call the following Hudson Valley parents Empty Nesters, whose lives, nevertheless, are quite full.

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education for curious, creative kids

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Natural, yes, but the so-called empty nest can bring real trouble to a family, particularly marriages in which partners have been invested in child rearing to the detriment of individual needs, or avoiding a breakup to spare their kids anguish. (“Staying together for the kids, yes,” says Mark of this commonplace phenomenon. “Nancy and I are staying together for the cats.”) In the wake of her own daughter’s departure for college a decade ago, therapist Natalie Caine, MA, recognized strife among her circle of fellow parents. Many, like her, were transitioning to childless households, and struggling in various ways. Depression, resentment, and regret abounded, and Caine wanted to help. She started Empty Nest Support Services, and has been counseling parents ever since. This July 4-6, she’ll be co-conducting the workshop “Beyond the Empty Nest” at the Omega Institute in Rhinebeck. “The emptiness after a child leaves can actually be a wake-up call,” Caine says. “There’s a fabulous opportunity to find out who you are, and who you are not. From there, parents can begin to build inner resources, like courage, and outer resources, like travel, or a new career, or reconnecting with friends. I help parents make that new path happen. People use the workshop to get out of patterns, or find parts of themselves that are dormant, parts they didn’t even know they had; we get those to rise up. And everyone gets to tell their stories in a supportive group, which is great, because people feel isolated. In fact, the most common question I get is: ‘Is this normal?’” Not only are empty nest-related problems normal, they are becoming more familiar with the US divorce rate on the rise, even among long-term couples who’ve raised families together. (Ironically, statisticians link this to an improving economy. Getting divorced is expensive, and during the downturn,

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Graphic designer Mark Lerner and calligrapher Nancy Howell, of Phoenicia, have experienced a myriad of emotions since their twins, Lukas and Edith, headed off to their respective colleges—Lukas to Johns Hopkins, Edith to Barnard—in autumn of 2012. Almost two years on, the couple looks back with a mix of nostalgia and, increasingly, relief. “We all sat in a Häagen Dazs near the Barnard gates,” Nancy recalls of the day they said good-bye to Edith, “and the tears were just flowing. ‘The last ice cream before she leaves!’ Afterward, the vacuum created by the kids being gone was immediately replaced with anxiety.” “Nancy and I were both really sad,” says Mark, “and most worried about our kids’ social lives, about them being lonely. They were pretty happy with their peer groups at Onteora High School. Sure enough, it took them a while to find their niche among new people. It was a rough first year for both of them, and for us, but we all hung in. Nancy and I kept saying, ‘When do we stop worrying about the kids?’ But when they returned for Thanksgiving and Christmas vacations, it struck us, in a good way, how much they’d changed.” “They were so much more confident,” Nancy says, with a bittersweet smile. “Like they needed us a lot less. It was really great, even though I was expecting a huggy homecoming and it wasn’t that way. But now, we’ve all adjusted. Mark and I sleep later, and he’s playing a lot more music. He took up cello last year. [Mark and Nancy are veterans of several NYC bands.] And the kids have their separate lives; they’re not part of our new routine.There are even times during vacations when they get on our nerves, and vice versa.” “But these are firstworld problems,” Mark says. “It’s a natural trajectory.”

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Meet us! Call (845) 834-3342 to schedule a visit. www.circleoffriendspreschool1.com

Honoring each child for who they are, and helping them evolve in their own unique way. Each day there are opportunities for creative, open ended art, block play, dramatic play, reading, telling stories, singing songs, sensory and texture tray experiences, outdoor play, and more.

The Signing Studio ANDR EA JORDA N TA DDUNI Teaching adults & children to sign for over 20 years

Mommy/Daddy and Me Signing Studio Wednesdays 11:15am | July 9 - Aug 27 | 9 Classes | $115 for entire course! Learn how to use American Sign Language with your baby, even before they can speak! Builds vocabulary • Reduces frustration • Improves communication skills

Basic Sign Language Tuesdays 6pm-7:30pm | July 8 - Aug 26 | 9 Classes | $125 for entire course! Basic sign language class. Open for all age groups and skill levels.

To register email: andrea.jordan@yahoo.com Include the class name, your child’s name and age. Classes held at MAMA: 3588 Main St, Stone Ridge. www.signingstudio.com

7/14 CHRONOGRAM KIDS & FAMILY 47


Saturdays & Sundays 11am - 2:30pm

SHARE THE LOVE! Catskill Animal Sanctuary Meet Rescued Animals Take Vegan Cooking Classes Rest & Relax at The Homestead Sanctuary Tours Saturdays & Sundays 11am - 2:30pm

Catskill Animal Sanctuary 316 Old Stage Road Saugerties, NY 12477 845-336-8447

www.CASanctuary.org

Scher Music Studio Piano, Voice & Music Theory Lessons

Fun, Interactive Musical Skills & Development based on the renown Kodály Method. Singing, Moving, Music Games, Solfege, Kinesthetic Beat Awareness and more! The Kodály Method introduces musical concepts through experiences such as listening, singing, or movement. It is only after the child becomes familiar with a concept that he or she learns how to notate it. Concepts are constantly reviewed and reinforced through games, movement, songs, and exercises.

SUMMER MUSIC CAMP $295/week | 6-10 year olds | 9am-3pm FIRST SESSION June 23-June 27 SECOND SESSION July 14-July 18 THIRD SESSION August 4-August 8

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MUSIC CLASSES Beginning this Fall Classes at the brand new Montgomery Art and Music School @Montgomery Montessori School, Montgomery, NY 12549

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ScherMusicStudio.com or call 845-202-3217 48 KIDS & FAMILY CHRONOGRAM 7/14


many couldn’t afford it.) Lachlan Brooks, only child of Cheryl Taylor, an illustrator, and Alan Brooks, a writer and software designer, called home to Mt. Tremper last winter with sobering information: Several of her fellow firstyears at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts were seeing their parents’ marriages crumble from afar. “It was her way of checking on us,” Alan laughs. “We homeschooled Lachlan,” says Cheryl, “so we’re really close-knit. We’d never even had a babysitter. We already knew we needed to keep lines of communication open with her, but we realized, especially in light of that call, we needed to focus on us, too. Here at home, Alan and I had broken our family habit of having a sit-down dinner together, which we’d always done with Lachlan. Now we do it as a couple, every night.” Additionally, Cheryl has resumed her career as an illustrator, which she’d put on the back burner to homeschool Lachlan, and Alan has begun developing apps and moving ever closer to the guitar that beckons from his workspace. The Brooks-Taylors also use social media, as do the Lerner-Howells, to stay in touch. “I never thought I would get into texting,” Cheryl says, “but it’s been a convenient way to stay connected. Lachlan can dash off a line or two between classes, or send a photo of a current project, and we can share home news, or send her a quick snap of her kitty sleeping on her desk chair. Texting, e-mail, and the phone all certainly help close the distance.” When asked if their experiences with their departing kids mirrored how things went down with their own parents, both couples said no. “We’re the ‘hovering generation,’” says Nancy. “My parents were clueless, they didn’t even

“There are even times during vacations when they get on our nerves.” —Mark Lerner know where I applied to college, and that was normal. There was no big family involvement.” “It’s partly because higher education is so expensive and competitive, more so than ever before,” adds Mark. “The cost of everything is through the roof, even if you’re getting help. That necessitates more involvement from parents.” Cheryl echoes the same story: “For me, there was no parental involvement in schoolwork, or encouragement for college,” she says. “That’s not to say they didn’t care, but the parenting style was much more casual. In the last few decades there’s been a lot more emphasis on parenting styles, on the importance of early education, and also higher education for everyone. That it continues to be a huge growth market is proof enough.” “We’re way more involved with Lachlan than my parents were with me or my siblings,” says Alan. “I was raised in a large family—eight kids. My dad worked two or three jobs his whole life, so our time with him was limited. Lachlan appreciates how different it is for her. Kids know the score.” But parents, either blinded by sadness or exhilaration when their child moves out, sometimes do not know the score. “My bottom-line message to couples,” says Natalie Caine, “is ‘Get to know yourself.’ Reassess your marriage. One person may be very excited about a child leaving, while their spouse will be grieving. Yet, you can find commonality and help each other out. Keep your windows open. When one closes, lift another.”

Meet Maribeth and over 300 other rescued farm animals

Weekends 11amonly 4pm

7 miles west of downtown Woodstock

35 Van Wagner Rd, Willow www.WoodstockSanctuary.org 845-679-5955

A SUMMER OF FUN AWAITS AT YMCA DAY CAMPS! CAMP SEEWACKAMANO - SHOKAN, NY Fun-filled outdoor camp. Nestled on 37 wooded acres with ponds, hiking trails & playing fields. Sessions run June 30 - August 29. CAMP WILTMEET - LENAPE ELEMENTARY, NEW PALTZ Campers’ days are filled with small group and large group activities, specials (arts & crafts, sports/games) and recreation. Sessions run June 30 - August 22. CAMP STARFISH - KINGSTON YMCA

Enriching, fun and affordable–Campers follow a daily schedule, which includes sports, games, swim lessons, fitness classes, gardening, and academics! July 7 - August 15.

To register: aloglia@ymcaulster.org • 338-3810 x115 or visit ymcaulster.org 7/14 CHRONOGRAM KIDS & FAMILY 49


Through November 9, 2014

Chromolithograph of Frederic Edwin Church, The Icebergs (1861), published by Charles Risdon, 1864, oil over chromolithograph, 20 5/8 x 35 9/16 in., Collection Olana State Historic Site, NYSOPRHP, OL.1988.744

The Olana Partnership Summer Party:

ICEBERGS IN AUGUST HORS D’OEUVRES INSPIRED BY CHURCH’S PAINTING, CRAFT BEERS, LOCAL WINES, SILENT AUCTION & SUNSET

Saturday, August 16 | 6-8pm galleries & museums

Olana’s East Lawn Hudson, NY 518.828.1872 | www.olana.org

July 12 July 19 July 20 Saturdays Sundays Ongoing Ongoing

STORM KING ART CENTER

www.stormking.org 50 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 7/14


ARTS &

CULTURE

IBM electric typewriters nearing the end of the two-mile-long assembly line in the Kingston plant, c. 1956. Courtesy of IBM.

7/14 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 51


galleries & museums

Road Kill Coat, Bob Braine, photograph, 2010 Part of the “Road Kill” exhibition at the Athens Cultural Center through August 10.

510 WARREN ST GALLERY

510 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-0510. “More Drama.” New work by Peggy Reeves. July 4-31. Opening reception July 5, 3pm-5pm.

galleries & museums

ALBERT SHAHINAIN FINE ART GALLERY

BYRDCLIFFE COLONY 3 UPPER BYRDCLIFFE WAY, WOODSTOCK 679 2079. “Katharine L. McKenna: American Painter.” Through July 27.

CANAJOHARIE LIBRARY & ARKELL MUSEUM

ANN STREET GALLERY

2 ERIE BOULEVARD, CANAJOHARIE (518) 673-2314. “A View from the Shore: Winslow Homer’s Impressions of the Coast.” Features 35 original prints including wood engravings, lithographs, and etchings. The exhibition is drawn from the permanent collection of the Syracuse University Art Collection, and focuses on the illustrious career of Winslow Homer as a draftsman and printmaker. Through August 24.

THE ART AND ZEN GALLERY

622 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1915. “Nurture Nature.” Through July 13.

ARTSPACE

59 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-9957. “The Space Between: Redefining Public and Personal in Smartphone Photography.” Through August 31. “Work in Progress on in Progress Work.” A group exhibition. Through August 31.

22 EAST MARKET STREET SUITE 301, RHINEBECK 876-7578. “Annual Summer Salon.” July 19-August 31. Opening reception July 19, 5pm-7pm. 104 ANN STREET, NEWBURGH 784-1146. “Peter Cody: A Retrospective.” Through August 2. 702 FREEDOM PLAINS ROAD SUITE B6, POUGHKEEPSIE 473-3334. “Photography of Eileen Quinn.” July 26-August 30. Opening reception July 26, 4pm-7pm.

CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY THE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK

71 PALATINE ROAD, GERMANTOWN ARTSPACE@GTEL.NET. “Celebrate Summer.” July 3-19. Opening reception July 3, 5pm-7pm.

CHESTERWOOD

ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER

COLUMBIA COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS

24 SECOND STREET, ATHENS (518) 945-2136. “Road Kill.” Through August 10.

4 WILLIAMSVILLE ROAD, STOCKBRIDGE, MA (413) 298-3579 “Contemporary Sculpture at Chesterwood 2014: Selected Works by Albert Paley.” Through October 13. 209 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 671-6213. “America’s Vanishing Landscape.” Mixed-media works by C. Michael Bufi. Through July 12.

BARBARA PREY GALLERY

CRAWFORD HOUSE

BARD COLLEGE: CCS/HESSEL MUSEUM OF ART

189 MONTGOMERY STREET, NEWBURGH 561-2585. “Made in Newburgh.” This exhibit aims to highlight the manufacturing history of Newburgh. Visitors can glimpse into the history of the city’s industries and how they shaped Newburgh. Through August 30.

71 SPRING STREET, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA (516) 922-7146. “Barbara Ernst Prey: American Contemporary.” Through July 4. PO BOX 5000, ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON 758-7598. “Anne Collier.” Through September 21. “Amy Sillman: One Lump or Two.” Through September 21.

BARRETT ART CENTER

55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-2550. “Photowork ‘14 National Juried Photography Show.” Through July 12.

BEACON 3D

164 MAIN STREET, BEACON BEACONARTS.ORG. “Beacon 3D.” Featuring the work of 12 sculptors in public outdoor sculpture event. Through October 15.

DUCK POND GALLERY 128 CANAL STREET TOWN OF ESOPUS LIBRARY, PORT EWEN 338-5580. “Cardio-chromes.” Deborah Di Pietro, photography. July 5-26. Opening reception July 5, 5pm-8pm.

EXPOSURES GALLERY 1357 KINGS HIGHWAY, SUGAR LOAF 469-9382. “Cuba: Forbidden Fruit.” Works by photographer Nick Zungoli. July 12-December 31. Opening reception July 12, 7pm.

FOVEA EXHIBITIONS

BEACON ARTIST UNION

506 MAIN STREET, BEACON 222-0177. “The Aquatic Life.” Carla Goldberg. Through July 6.

143 MAIN STREET, BEACON 765-2199. “War and Memory.” Eleven internationally accomplished photojournalists join eleven military veterans to combine art and photography. Through July 26.

BERKSHIRE MUSEUM

FRIENDS OF HISTORIC KINGSTON

39 SOUTH STREET, PITTSFIELD, MA (413) 443-7171. “Butterflies.” Experience the live Butterfly Pavilion, filled with vibrant native and exotic species of butterflies. Through September 1.

63 MAIN STREET, KINGSTON 339-0720. “Kingston: The IBM Years.” Photos, recollections, and machines spotlight computer giant’s 40-year presence. Through October 31.

BETHEL WOODS CENTER FOR THE ARTS

GALERIE BMG

200 HURD ROAD, BETHEL 454-3388. “America Meets the Beatles!” Unseen photos of the Fab Four’s first US visit by LIFE photographer Bill Eppridge & Beatlemania Memorabilia from the Rod Mandeville Collection. Through August 17.

12 TANNERY BROOK ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-0027. “New Photographs by Kim Kauffman and Paintings by Lila Bacon.” Through July 27.

BETSY JACARUSO STUDIO & GALLERY

707 EAST MAIN STREET, GROUND FLOOR, MIDDLETOWN 333-2385. “Layers.” Laura Breitman, Jonathan Talbot, Lisa Zukowski. Through August 15.

43 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK 516-4435. “Topographies: Mapping History & Time.” Through July 7. “Essence of the Valley.” New works from Betsy Jacaruso and the Cross River Artists. Through August 31. Openng reception July 19, 5pm-7pm.

BOSCOBEL

1601 ROUTE 9D (BEAR MOUNTAIN HIGHWAY), GARRISON BOSCOBEL.ORG. “Current 2014 Sculpture Exhbition.” Through November 17.

BRADFORD GRAVES SCULPTURE PARK

28 DOGGUMS WAY, KERHONKSON BRADFORDGRAVES.COM “Outdoor Sculpture Exhbition.” More than 200 works. Through October 31.

52 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 7/14

THE GALLERY AT ORMC GALLERY 66 NY 66 MAIN STREET, COLD SPRING 809-5838. “Form and Fantasy.” Features Cali Gorevic and Polly King. The back gallery features Heidi Ettinger and Judith Foster in “Turbulence and Tranquility”. Through July 27.

GREENE COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS GALLERY 398 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-3400. “Ad Infinitum.” Installation Art Exhibition. July 5-September 1. “Connected Vision.” July 5-September 1. Opening Reception, July 12 5-7pm.


galleries & museums

Presenting An Ever Changing Display of Beautiful and Exciting Local Art Work See Our Schedule at

www.saintfrancisgallery.com The Gallery Supports Philanthropic Works in Kenya through the SAWA SAWA Foundation, Inc

Route 102 (Next to the Fire Station) South Lee, MA • (413) 717-5199 Open Fri–Mon 11:00am – 5:30pm

FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION

Material Friction: Americana and American Art

June 28-August 12

Please join us for our Artists’ Reception On July 6th from 3pm to 6pm. Music and Lite Fare Open Friday-Monday 11 am-5:30pm

June 12–Dec 14, 2014

FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION June 28-August 12

Please join us for our Artists’ Reception On July 6th from 3pm to 6pm. Music and Lite Fare Open Friday-Monday 11 am-5:30pm Free Admission wcma.williams.edu Summer hours: Open every day 10am–5pm Thursdays 10am–8pm

7/14 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 53


GROOVY BLUEBERRY SCULPTURE PARK

1 WATER STREET, NEW PALTZ 256-0873. “Love More: Sculpture at Love Regatta.” A two-part sculpture by JWB. Through October 31.

HOTCHKISS LIBRARY

10 UPPER MAIN, SHARON, CT (860) 364-5041. “Ralph Della Colpe: Paintings.” Through August 6.

HUDSON OPERA HOUSE

327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-4181. “DeVries’ whathaslightodowithdarkness.” Through September 7.

HUDSON VALLEY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART

1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 788-0100. “Art at the Core: The Intersection of Visual Art, Performance, and Technology.” Works that lend themselves to narrative interpretations. The selected artists employ traditional art materials as well as new technology, video, and performance to look to art as addressing the very core of our everyday lives, our “weltanschauung”. Through July 27.

IMOGEN HOLLOWAY GALLERY

81 PARTITION STREET, SAUGERTIES (347) 387-3212. “Works by Mara Held and Margrit Lewczuk.” Ms. Held’s paintings on panel and paper share the gallery space with Ms. Lewczuk’s acrylic paintings on linen and delicate paper collages. Through July 13.

JOHN DAVIS GALLERY

362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5907. “Group Show Featuring Martha Diamond.” With seven solo shows (sculpture, painting, and photography): Lisa Sanders in sculpture garden, Joseph Haske, Douglas Degges, Betsy Crowell, Pamela Cardwell and Jock Ireland in the Carriage House. Through July 13.

KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY MUSEUM

94 BROADWAY, NEWBURGH 569-4997. “Photography as Fine Art.” Creative photography by Tom Doyle and Mel Kleiman. Through July 31.

KINGSTON MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART (KMOCA)

103 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON KMOCA.ORG. “Anne Arden McDonald, Eleanor White, Laura Moriarity: Material, Strata & Synthesis.” July 5-31. Opening reception July 5, 5pm-8pm.

KLEINERT/JAMES ARTS CENTER

34 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2079. “Mike + Doug Starn: Bambú Shots.” Renowned photographers whose work addresses concepts of permanence versus fragility, growth and decay, and the effect of time on vitality. Through July 13. Closing reception July 12, 4pm-6pm. “Bash II.” Two-part exhibition of recent works by emerging and internationally recognized contemporary artists. July 19-September 1.

LAUREN CLARK FINE ART

galleries & museums

25 RAILROAD STREET, GREAT BARRINGTON, MA (413) 274-6400. “New Frontiers in Pop Art.” Featuring the work of Maurice “Pops” Peterson. July 12-August 3. Opening reception July 12, 4pm-7pm.

LYNDHURST

635 SOUTH BROADWAY, TARRYTOWN (914) 631-4481. “Three Parlors Exhibition.” Through November 2.

M GALLERY

LONGYEAR GALLERY GALLERY HOURS | FRI, SUN, MON 11-4PM, SAT 11-6PM 26 of the area’s finest artists under one roof. New group exhibitions monthly.

SPATIAL INTERPRETATIONS New work by Janice DeMarino JULY 4-28

OPENING RECEPTION

350 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-2189. “Deeply Rooted.” Focus on the interpretive process and individual expression that becomes a work of art. Raymond J. Steiner and Patrick Milbourn’s. Through July 6.

MARK GRUBER GALLERY

17 NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ 255-1241. “Home.” Featuring paintings of New Paltz and the Hudson Valley with that degree of illumination that only this master can attain. Works by Jane Bloodgood-Abrams. Through July 12.

MATTEAWAN GALLERY

464 MAIN STREET, BEACON 440-7901. “A Habitation and a Name.” Krista Svalbonas. Through July 6.

MID-HUDSON HERITAGE CENTER

317 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 485-8506. “Vive La Guelaguetza: A ​ n Encounter With Oaxaca.” Through July 19.

THE MOUNT

2 PLUNKETT STREET, LENOX, MA (413) 551-5111. “SculptureNow.” Through October 31.

SATURDAY, JULY 5, 3-6PM

NEW GROUP SHOW BY LONGYEAR ARTISTS

THE MOVIEHOUSE GALLERY

785 MAIN ST, UPSTAIRS IN THE COMMONS, MARGARETVILLE 845-586-3270 | LONGYEARGALLERY.ORG

NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM

48 MAIN STREET, MILLERTON THEMOVIEHOUSE.NET. “Organic: The Farmers & Chefs of the Hudson Valley.” Through July 31. 222 MADISON AVENUE, ALBANY (518) 574-5877. “Best of SUNY 2014.” Through August 31.

OLANA STATE HISTORIC SITE

5720 ROUTE 9G, HUDSON (518) 828-0135. “Preserving Creative Spaces: Photographs from The Historic Artists’ Homes and Studios Program.” Through November 2.

Over 475 Bikes

250 Lake Street Newburgh NY 12550 - 845 569 9065

85,000 Sq. Ft.

OLD CHATHAM COUNTRY STORE AND CAFÉ

639 ALBANY TURNPIKE ROAD, OLD CHATHAM (518) 794-6227. “Opening Reception for Artist Barbara Willner.” Through July 2. “Susan Story Exhibit.” July 3-30. Opening reception July 6, 3-5pm.

ORANGE HALL GALLERY

SUNY ORANGE, MIDDLETOWN 341-4790. “Works by Sri Chinmoy.” Through July 10.

Our Collection Features: Harley Davidson, Racers, Police, Military, 1880s & up, Choppers, 1901-1953

ORPHIC GALLERY

53525 STATE HIGHWAY 30, ROXBURY (607) 326-6045. “Instrumental Desire: Strings Attached.” July 4-August 24. Opening reception July 4, 5pm-7pm.

THE OUTSIDE IN Hours: Friday - Sunday 10-5 Admission: Adults $11 Children $5 Under 3 Free

1922 Ace 4-Cyl

249 FERDON AVENUE, PIERMONT 398-0706. “Photographs by Grace Knowlton.” These architectural photographs from the Corner Series by Grace Knowlton are a unique and original collection of never-before-exhibited works printed on anodized aluminum. Through August 30.

PALMER GALLERY

WWW.MOTORCYCLEPEDIAMUSEUM.ORG

54 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 7/14

VASSAR COLLEGE, POUGHKEEPSIE PALMERGALLERY.VASSAR.EDU. “18 Ways of Looking at a Tree.” An art exhibition that explores the myriad creative responses possible for a single subject. Through September 4.


PS 209 3670 MAIN STREET, STONE RIDGE PS209ARTGALLERY.BLOGSPOT.COM. “SURFACE Tension.” July 5-August 10. Opening reception July 5, 5pm-7pm.

RED HOOK CAN NORTH BROADWAY, RED HOOK 758-6575. “Red Hook Sculpture Expo.” Through November 21.

RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE 80 EAST RIDGE, RIDGEFIELD, CT (203) 438-5795. “1980s Style: Image and Design in The Dorsky Museum Collection.” Through July 13.

RIVERWINDS GALLERY 172 MAIN STREET, BEACON 838-2880. “The Sky’s the Limit.” Through July 7.

ROELIFF JANSEN COMMUNITY LIBRARY 9091 ROUTE 22, HILLSDALE (518) 325-4101. “Sue Brody: Ceramics.” Through July 19.

ROOS ARTS KINGSTON 43 NORTH FRONT STREET, KINGSTON (718) 755-4726. “Sarah Mattes: By the Clock.” Through July 26.

SAFE HARBORS OF THE HUDSON 111 BROADWAY, NEWBURGH 562-6940. “Works by Artist Bruno Krauchthaler.” Through March 31, 2015.

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART 1 HAWK DRIVE, NEW PALTZ NEWPALTZ.EDU/MUSEUM. “Along His Own Lines: A Retrospective of New York Realist Eugene Speicher.” Through July 13.

SPENCERTOWN ACADEMY ARTS CENTER 790 ROUTE 203, SPENCERTOWN (518) 392-3693. “Dreams & Digressions.” New paintings by Kris Galli. Through August 10.

ST. FRANCIS GALLERY 1370 PLEASANT STREET, SOUTH LEE, MA (413) 717-5199. “Complexity of Experience-Engaging Reality.” Group show. Through July 27.

STOREFRONT GALLERY 93 BROADWAY, KINGSTON THESTOREFRONTGALLERY.COM. “Marshall Borris: Portraits.” July 5-26. Opening reception July 5, 5pm-8pm.

THE RE INSTITUTE 1395 BOSTON CORNERS ROAD, MILLERTON (518) 567-5359. “Place.” Through July 19. 149 MAIN STREET, BEACON (917) 318-2239. “Vertical Landscapes.” Susan English. Through July 6.

THOMAS COLE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

Michele Riddell

THRU OCT 11

Unframed Artists Gallery

O P E N S AT & S U N 1 - 5 P M & B Y A P P O I N T M E N T 173 Huguenot Street, New Paltz | (845) 255-5482 | unframedartistsgallery.com

218 SPRING STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-7465. “Thomas Cole & Frederic Church: Master, Mentor, Master.” Through November 2.

THOMPSON GIROUX GALLERY 57 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-3336. “Still Life with Sculpture.” Through August 10.

Alice Neel/ Erastus Salisbury Field Painting the People

TIVOLI ARTISTS CO-OP 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI 758-4342. “Reimagined.” Through July 20.

TIVOLI ARTISTS GALLERY

JULY 5 THROUGH NOVEMBER 2

60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI 757-2667. “ReImagined: Recycled & Discarded Materials Transformed.” Through July 20.

UNFRAMED ARTIST GALLERY 173 HUGUENOT STREET, NEW PALTZ 255-5482. “Luminous Hudson Valley.” Through August 10.

BENNINGTON MUSEUM 75 Main Street, Bennington, Vermont benningtonmuseum.org | 802.447.1571

UNISON 68 MOUNTAIN REST ROAD, NEW PALTZ 255-1559. “Sculpture Garden & Fissures.” Open through December 31. Opening reception July 6, 4-6pm.

20 minutes from The Clark, 30 minutes from Mass MoCA

UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM, UALBANY 1400 WASHINGTON AVENUE, ALBANY (518) 442-4035. “Mary Reid Kelley: Working Objects and Videos.” Through October 12.

VALLEY ARTISANS MARKET 25 EAST MAIN STREET, CAMBRIDGE (518) 677-2765. “Drawings, Ink on Paper by Leslie Fuller.” Through July 22.

VALLEY VARIETY 705 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-0033. “I Feel Lucky.” Work by Frank Yamrus. Through July 6.

Alice Neel (1900-1984), Jenny Brand, 1969 (detail), ©Estate of Alice Neel, Brand Family Collection

THE

new BENNINGTON MUSEUM — Get into It!

“FORM & FANTASY” EXHIBIT

a new exhibit at

VASSAR COLLEGE: THE FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5632. “Faces and Figures in Self-Taught Art.” Over 100 works by self-taught artists. July 11-August 31.

WILDERSTEIN PRESERVATION 330 MORTON ROAD, RHINEBECK 876-4818. “Wilderstein & The White House: Fascinating Connections Between the Estate and U.S. Presidents.” Through October 31.

JULY 4 THRU JULY 27

THE WILLIAMS COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART

RECEPTION FOR ARTISTS FRIDAY, JULY 4 6-9 PM

15 LAWRENCE HALL DRIVE, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA (413) 597-3055. “Mitchell, Benglis, Wilke.” Through October 26.

WIRED GALLERY

featuring

11 MOHONK ROAD, HIGH FALLS (682) 564-5613. “First Generation.” Works by 13 foreign-born artists based in mid-Hudson Valley. With solo show by Mary Anne Erickson, “Vanishing Roadside.” Through July 13.

WOODSTOCK SCHOOL OF ART 2470 ROUTE 212, WOODSTOCK 679-2388. “Angeloch Under Glass.” Works on Paper by Robert Angeloch. Curated by Paula Nelson & John Kleinhans. July 19-September 6.

Cali Gorevic and Polly King 66 Main St., Cold Spring, NY 845-809-5838 w w w. g a l l e r y 6 6 n y. c o m

Regular Hours: Thursday Sunday, 12-6 pm

7/14 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 55

galleries & museums

THEO GANZ STUDIO


Music

Make Mine Dry Stephin Merritt

56 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 7/14

By Peter Aaron Photograph by Fionn Reilly


T

he summer sun is marking its return in a big way this afternoon, the kind of mid-’80s boiler that Hudson hasn’t seen in a year. But beneath the umbrella of the coffeehouse courtyard where Stephin Merritt sits, it’s not the glare that’s testing the comfort level: It’s the humidity. True, we’re not into the dreaded dog days of August yet, but the mugginess is nevertheless bothersome, a sticky steam bath that makes movement a less-than-enticing proposition. Thankfully, we don’t have to move. For the moment. And there’s a bonus: After a few minutes of conversation, Merritt’s famously cool, deliciously dry wit has reduced the oppressive air to so many harmless cubes of ice. Or it least it feels like that. Cocktails, anyone? Not today. It’s mint iced tea for Merritt—perhaps surprising to some of his fans, since the singer-songwriter’s work as the genius behind, most notably, the Magnetic Fields, is well spiked with bittersweet tunes about the demon drink. “Last year, after decades of sitting around in bars writing songs about drinking in bars, I stopped [drinking],” he confesses in his trademark measured monotone. “I thought it would improve my lung function. It hasn’t. Actually, the drinking songs on the new [side project] Future Bible Heroes record were written after I’d quit. But, really, the worst thing about my not drinking is that it hasn’t made much of a difference overall for me. It is cheaper, though. And it’s kept me out of trouble—in some ways.” Whatever kind of trouble Merritt’s alluding to, it’s hard to figure when, exactly, he’d have a spare second to get into it. In addition to his crushing catalog as a solo artist and with his bands the Magnetic Fields, the 6ths, Future Bible Heroes, and the Gothic Archies, as well as myriad other recording and touring projects, the composer dubbed “the Cole Porter of his generation” by Time Out NewYork also regularly writes music for film, TV, and theater. The weekend before our interview, he presented a new minimusical at a broadcast of NPR’s “This American Life” from the Brooklyn Academy of Music; not long before that, he performed a solo ukulele accompaniment to Todd Browning’s 1927 silent The Unknown at the San Francisco Film Festival and did the music for choreographer Rashaun Mitchell’s dance piece “Performance.” Next, he’s off to DJ and judge short films at the Provincetown Film Festival. Does the 49-year-old force of nature ever allow himself a day of rest? “Actually, I took a day off yesterday,” he confesses. “I helped my friend bring his dog to the vet and I put all my CDs in alphabetical order. That was my relaxing day.” Not exactly the kind of respite one equates with the rock-star life. But, then again, it’s hard to picture the droll dean of snide indie snark lounging poolside or swinging a wedge out on the golf course. Merritt was born in Yonkers and raised mainly in the Boston area by his single mother, a teacher and physical therapist. “When I was 23, we counted everything up,” he recalls, “and by then, I had lived in 33 different places.” He didn’t meet his father, folk singer Scott Fagan, until just last year, at a screening of a documentary about Fagan’s mentor, songwriter Doc Pomus. Merritt says the meeting was, predictably, “complicated.” (Fagan, who composed the music for the pioneering 1968 Broadway rock opera “Soon,” recently held a Kickstarter campaign to fund an album of covers of his son’s songs.) “My mom was big on Shakespeare, and she exposed me to his plays as early as possible—not that they stuck with me,” admits Merritt. “But I guess that’s where I got my love of the theater and stage sets.” Moving around so much as a child unsurprisingly made it tough to forge friendships, especially for a natural outsider, and it was literature and music that became Merritt’s closest early companions, the latter in particular. The Beach Boys and Phil Spector were formative heroes, for their sublime songs and arrangements. “The Beatles, Queen, Fleetwood Mac, the Bee Gees … I consider myself lucky to have grown up in an era in which you had all these bands with multiple singers and great songwriters,” he says. Perhaps the most immediate influence on Merritt’s brand of skewed-but-hummable pop was Abba. “As a composer, Irving Berlin is my model,” offers the songwriter. “But, yes, as far as contemporary pop music goes, for me Abba is the pinnacle.” It was the Nordic foursome that inspired him, at age 14, to begin making the four-track recordings with a cheap synthesizer that sowed the seeds of the lo-fi electro/chamber pop sound he eventually took to soaring heights with the Magnetic Fields, et al. Although Merritt’s circle of high school friends was small, it included the older sister of Claudia Gonson, who sings in Future Bible Heroes and has contributed vocals and drums to the Magnetic Fields (though just the latter on stage; live percussion and loud sounds are painful to Merritt, who suffers from a hearing condition called hyperacusis). “Stephin and I met in 1983,” says Gonson, who is also Merritt’s long-time manager. “My sister walked in the door with him, and I happened to be sitting at the piano and playing. He immediately sat right down next to me and started playing, and we’ve been great friends ever since. I’m pretty outgoing and he’s very reserved, so with us I think it’s a case of ‘opposites attract.’ He named his publishing company Gay and Loud for the two of us [laughs], the second part being me. [Merritt is, as Wikipedia puts it, openly gay.] He’ll come up with these crazy, off-the-wall ideas for projects, which as a manager I sometimes have to explain to him are impossible to do. But then

again, a lot of them sound ridiculous at first and then Stephin persists and they turn out to be brilliant. The best example is 69 Love Songs [1999, Merge Records].” Although the Magnetic Fields had released five critically adored albums prior—including two featuring vocalist Susan Anway, 1990’s Distant Plastic Trees and 1991’s The Wayward Bus (since reissued as a twofer), and 1994’s Brian Wilson-endorsed The Charm of the Highway Strip (all on Merge)—it was the insanely ambitious and, er, cunningly titled three-disc breakthrough 69 Love Songs that cemented Merritt’s genius and won him the undying ears of aficionados of erudite pop. Number 465 in Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time, the opus was originally intended to be a musical revue a la Stephen Sondheim (another Merritt muse), but, owing to logistics, has only been performed live a handful of times. The biting, bitter words of those “songsabout-love songs”—“I Don’t Believe in the Sun,” “I Think I Need a New Heart,” “No One Will Ever LoveYou,” “How Fucking Romantic”—are delivered in Merritt’s downcast bass voice and Gonson’s surreally carefree chirp against a gray-hued synth pop/ cabaret backing that plays like Kurt Weil meets Ian Curtis. Since that masterwork’s ascension, the Magnetic Fields have released four more exalted offerings, 2004’s i, 2008’s Distortion, 2010’s Realism (all Nonesuch Records), and 2012’s Love at the Bottom of the Sea (Merge); a new album is planned for 2015. And then there are the side bands. The 6ths, a project that sees Merritt’s songs sung mostly by an ever-changing cast of vocalists, has produced two albums: 1995’s Wasps’ Nests (London Records), featuring performances by Lou Barlow (Dinosaur Jr., Sebadoh), Dean Wareham (Galaxie 500, Luna, Dean & Britta), Georgia Hubley (Yo La Tengo), and others; 2000’s Hyacinths and Thistles (Merge) ups the ante with cameos by Odetta, Gary Numan, Melanie, Bob Mould, and Soft Cell’s Marc Almond. The Gothic Archies, a self-described “bubblegum-goth band” (geddit?), is the duo of Merritt and Magnetic Fields accordionist Daniel Handler, who is perhaps better known by his literary pen name: Lemony Snicket. “Mr. Merritt’s songs are romantic but scathing, ambitious but compact, experimental but catchy, and heartbreaking but artful,” says the novelist, who with the Gothic Archies has recorded three albums, contributed music to the audiobook versions of his own best-selling A Series of Unfortunate Events books and Neil Gaiman’s Coraline, and soundtracked Nickelodeon’s “The Adventures of Pete & Pete.” Future Bible Heroes is the trio of Merritt (lyrics, instruments), Gonson (voice), and Christopher Ewen (melodies, instruments), and has thus far waxed three albums of sickly subversive electro-dance pop, all of which were recently repackaged as the box set Memories of Love, Eternal Youth, and Partygoing (Merge). 2013’s Partygoing is defined by Merritt as “a party album about aging, suicide, loss, and despair.” A colorful candy shop of percolating synths and happy vocals, its aim would seem to be to get blissful revelers shaking their booties to movers like “Sadder Than the Moon,” “Digging My Own Grave,” and “Let’s Go to Sleep (And Never Come Back)”—only to have the lyrics creep up, sink in, and stomp all over their buzz. Another plum track is “Keep Your Children in a Coma,” whose blackly amusing lines suggest modern parents place their kids in a stupor because “You can’t let them go to school / for fear of bullying little beasts / And you can’t take them to church / for fear of priests.” Humor aside, Merritt’s themes tend to focus on those two most ageless absolutes: love and death. “Sticking to [universal] topics like those allows me to get on to what I want to say without having to overly explain anything,” he says. “I have no wish to express myself personally. I don’t think that’s necessary to enjoy the music. It doesn’t matter to me if [Abba song] ‘The Winner Takes It All’ is about Björn Ulvaeus’s divorce from Agnetha Fältskog or about Benny Andersson’s divorce from Frida Lynstad.” A former editor at SPIN and Time Out NewYork, Merritt recently wrote the text for 101 Two-Letter Words (Norton Books), a book for Scrabble and Words with Friends players. With illustrations by the NewYorker cartoonist Roz Chast, the rhyme-rich tome is due out in October. Lately, the lyricist has found inspiration in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the official listing of all mental diseases recognized by the American Psychiatric Association. “It reminds me of [British death metal band] Carcass, who get a lot of their lyrics from medical manuals,” says Merritt with a hint of a smile. “Those are some of the best lyrics in popular music.” After six years in LA, Merritt moved to Hudson in 2012, lured to town by the “pornography” of the local real estate ads. “I went to LA because I wanted to make my own Hollywood musical,” says the composer, who created a musical adaptation for Gaiman’s Coraline and is currently developing productions for both the Public Theater in NewYork and the National Theater in Washington, DC. “One of my ambitions in life is to have my own theater,” says Merritt. “To have my own stage to perfect my work on would be wonderful.” Overly ambitious,you think? Just give him time. Stephin Merritt will perform at Club Helsinki in Hudson on July 25 at 9pm.Tickets are $15 in advance and $18 day of show. Helsinkihudson.com. Houseoftomorrow.com. 7/14 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 57


NIGHTLIFE HIGHLIGHTS

Handpicked by music editor Peter Aaron for your listening pleasure.

MANDOLIN ORANGE MANDOLIN ORANGE July 9. North Carolina folk duo Mandolin Orange—Andrew Marlin (guitar, vocals) and Emily

July (violin, 9. North Carolina folk duo Mandolin Orange—Andrew (guitar, and Frantz vocals)—got together in 2009 after meeting up at a Marlin local Chapel Hillvocals) jam session. Emily Frantz (violin, vocals)—got together in 2009 after meeting up at a local Chapel Hillof Since then, the pair has released three fine albums, the newest being last year’s This Side jam session. Since then, the pair has released three fine albums, the newest being last Jordan, which picked up critical acclaim in the roots/Americana press. This summer, the twoyear’s This Sidethe of Jordan, pickedpast up critical acclaim roots/Americana press. some is set to join ranks ofwhich folk legends and present at in thethe Newport Folk Festival—but This they summer, set tothey’ll visit join the ranks of folk legends pastfor and the of before head the up twosome to Rhode isIsland the Seligmann Center thepresent Arts foratone Newport Folk Festival—but before they head up to Rhode Island they’ll visit the Seligmann the Orange County venue’s intimate Seligmann Studio all ages shows. Twain opens. 7pm. $15. Center for(845) the Arts for one Kurtseligmann.org. of the Orange County venue’s intimate Seligmann Studio all Sugar Loaf. 469-9459; ages shows. Twain opens. 7pm. $15. Sugar Loaf. (845) 469-9459; Kurtseligmann.org.

DIIV

MUSIC MOUNTAIN FESTIVAL

July 14. Brooklyn indie band Diiv has certainly been rocking all right the blogs—Pitchfork, Altered Zones, etc., etc.—with its icy blend of shoegazey post-punk psych. Signed to the Captured Tracks label, the trio, which here plays BSP Lounge, began as a side project of singer-guitarist / fashion model Zachary Cole Smith’s other outfit, the arguably poppier Beach Fossils. According to the group’s own blog, Diiv is “gonna be doing a short, intimate US tour in July to work out a bunch of new songs before we [finish] recording them this summer. Smaller venues always means crazier shows, but it also means these are all gonna sell out fast so buy tix in advance. We’re gonna be joined by Regal Degal and Lodro, literally the two best NYC bands right now. New stage show, but still our same old clothes.” So now you know. (Justin Townes Earle sings July 5; Midlake plays acoustic August 1.) 9pm. $15, $20. Kingston. (845) 481-5158; Bspkingston.com.

July 6, 13, 20, 27. Now celebrating its 85th year, the Music Mountain chamber series takes place in the 335-seat Gordon Hall (named for founder Jacques Gordon). The 2014 season kicked off last month and runs through September 14; July’s dates include: clarinetist Alexander Fiterstein, cellist Nicholas Canellakis, pianist Michael Brown, and violinist Miranda Cuckson perform Beethoven and Messiaen (July 6); the Dover String Quartet and pianist Jonathan Yates perform Beethoven, Ullmann, and Mozart (July 13); the Orion String Quartet and pianist Peter Serkin perform Haydn, Brahms, and Dvorák (July 20); and the Harlem String Quartet and pianist Misha Dichter perform Mozart, Chick Corea, and Schumann. (See website for later series dates.) 3pm. $30, $35. Falls Village, Connecticut. (860) 824-7126; Musicmountain.org.

NETSAYI July 19. Zimbabwean contemporary folk chanteuse Netsayi, who plays MassMoCA’s Dre Wapenaar Pavilion this month, gained attention singing solo a cappella in London’s clubs and backstreets. The albums Chimurenga Soul and Monkey’s Wedding saw her reputation fan out across the rest of the United Kingdom, leading to a 40-date UK tour in support of Grammy Award-winning legends Ladysmith Black Mambazo. In 2010 she returned to her hometown of Harare to form the band Black Pressure, before going on to perform on NPR and tour the US. Compared to Joan Armatrading and Angélique Kidjo, the jubilant Netsayi fronts an energetic band that performs using handcrafted native African wooden instruments. 8pm. $12, $16, $20. North Adams, Massachusetts. (413) 662-2111; Massmoca.org. 58 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 7/14

SYRACUSE/SIEGEL DUO July 9, 16, 23, 30. Hudson Valley bassist Rich Syracuse and drummer Jeff “Siege” Siegel have been playing jazz together for years, perhaps most notably with pianists Lee Shaw and the legendary Mose Allison. But they’ve also been active independently of each other; Siegel leads his own on again/off again quartet, and Syracuse has performed in a duo with Shaw and with Medeski, Martin & Wood keyboardist John Medeski. Lately, the rhythm section has been holding down a weekly residency at Catskill Mountain Pizza Company that sees them with different guest players every session. Here’s the rundown of their accompanists this month: organist Pete Levin and guitarist Pete Einhorn (July 9), pianist John Esposito (July 16), singer-pianist Nina Sheldon (July 23), and a “very special” keyboardist TBA (July 30; check website). 8pm. Donation requested. Woodstock. (845) 679-7969; Facebook.com/catskillmountainpizzacompany.


CD REVIEWS THE BIG TAKEOVER CHILDREN OF THE RHYTHM (2014, INDEPENDENT)

Having seen this New Paltz blue beat band open for a latterday version of the mighty Skatalites, this reviewer can personally testify to the Big Takeover’s ability to create a dancehall inferno with its high-octane take on reggae, ska, and rocksteady. It’s a pleasure to report their new long-player does not disappoint. In a perfect world, this seamless blend of pop and Jamaican rhythms of various vintage would rule the airwaves and algorithms. This is ebullient, hip-shaking fare to perfectly soundtrack any outdoor summer night. The Big Takeover came on the scene in 2008 with a lineup that featured commanding, Jamaican-born front woman Nee Nee Rushie and flame-throwing blues guitarist Johnny Klenck. With Klenck having since departed to pursue a more hard-blues direction in Tennessee, The Big Takeover has gone into a straightforward pop reggae sound that could very well bring the band broader success. The horn section of Andrew Vogt (trombone) and Chas Montrose (saxophone) is propulsive; the current string section, José López (guitar) and Rob Kissner (bass), gives “off-beat riddim” and counterpunch; the buoyant timekeeping by Hector Becerra (drums) anchors whatever reggae style the band is working in a given song. The dominant aspect is Rushie’s superconfident, soulful vocals. The singer has full command of her instrument and is particularly potent on “Down with the Ship” and the smoldering skanker “No Way.” The band will play at the Falcon in Marlboro on July 12. Bigtakeoverband.com. —Jeremy Schwartz

MARYLEIGH ROOHAN SKIN AND BONE (2014, FAKE CHAPTER RECORDS)

First, there’s the voice. MaryLeigh Roohan boasts an awesome vocal instrument—it’s alternately a trumpet, a saxophone, and a lead guitar. Close your eyes and ignore the lyrics (for a moment). You don’t need a lyric sheet to get where Roohan is going. Hers is a naturally evocative instrument, packed with passion and yearning and a plaintive edge that in and of itself speaks volumes in this ode to melancholy heartbreak that, indeed, leaves nothing to the imagination but skin and bone. But then there’s more, because the 23-year-old Skidmore College grad also happens to be a terrific composer and lyricist. She commands some broad musical territory, including blues, country, folk, pop, rock, even a bit of Latin jazz. Producer Jason Brown smartly forefronts Roohan’s vocals, and employs his own multi-instrumental talents (bass, mandolin, violin, keyboards, percussion) as well as those of guitarists Meg Duffy and Joel Brown, drummer Chris Carey, organist Tim Peck, and cellist Andrew Brown, merely to serve the songs. There are some obvious touchstones here—a bit of Bonnie Raitt, some Sharon Van Etten, and a few influences that Roohan herself acknowledges, including Paul Simon, Dan Auerbach (Black Keys), and Etta James. But in a funny way, although she sounds nothing like him, Roohan reminds me more of Kurt Cobain than anyone else—the rawness and pain of the voice; the dark, minor-key quietude of the melodies; the go-for-brokeness of her expression. Call it folk-grunge—except in her case, it’s a whole lot prettier. Maryleighmusic.com. —Seth Rogovoy



THE ERIC STARR GROUP SUCH IS LIFE
 (2014, BRONX BOUND RECORDS)

There is no such thing as “natural” singing, only those affectations that come more naturally than the others. On some profound level, everybody is faking everything. Keep this in mind when you are tempted to consider a bearded folky more “real” than a diva, and when you encounter vocal jazz. No genre is more ridiculed for its pretensions and its passé associations: swanky sophistication and all the laughs of the lounge. On Such is Life, the drummer Eric Starr (who composes the songs sung by his brother, Nelson) does not demur these vocal jazz stereotypes; he embraces them, from the melancholic philosophical ruminations of the title track—“Such is Life, such complex schemes and such simple dreams”—to the back-cover image of a sweaty cocktail next to a drum stick. Starr has the arranging chops to carry off an album of exquisite, wide-ranging chamber jazz, veering from the swing of “Can Spring Be Far Behind” into the bossa nova of “Dream Me Part I,” the half-time funky rock of “Dream Me Part II,” and the urban cacophony of “Commotion.” Once you are inured to his jazz manners, Nelson Starr turns out to be an elegant, clean, low-cheese singer (and a great pianist). A fine set of players in Iain Bellamy (sax), Ike Sturm (bass), and the ETHEL string ensemble fill out Eric Starr’s pallete, and the range and resolution of his imagination is truly stunning. Ericstarrgroup.com. —John Burdick

Celebrating 30 Years

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Close Encounters With Music presents

italian-themed concerts talks | master classes

scarlatti · boccherini · rossini paganini · verdi · tchaikovsky stravinsky · vivaldi

AUGUST 10-20

The Doctorow, Hunter NY Sunday | August 10 | 2pm

The Orpheum, Tannersville NY Sunday | August 17 | 2pm

Years of Pilgrimage

Souvenir de Florence

Lucille Beer, Michael Chertock, Yehuda Hanani...

Elmar Oliveira, Axel Strauss Festival Orchestra...

23A 23Arts INITIATIVE

CHRONOGRAM.COM LISTEN to tracks by the bands reviewed in this issue.

Concert Tickets: $25 | 800.843.0778 | www.catskillhighpeaksmusic.org

Master classes/lectures free to the public 7/14 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 59


Books

THE GENIUS OF FAMILY Joseph Luzzi Conjures Two Italies By Nina Shengold Photograph by Roy Gumpel

60 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 7/14


J

oseph Luzzi is handy with chopsticks. The Italian Studies professor and author of My Two Italies (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2014) suggested meeting at Murray’s, a Tivoli eatery run by Bard graduates. When I arrive, Luzzi is standing outside, a bella figura in charcoal suit jacket, pale pink shirt, and faded jeans. The café is closed, so we go to Osaka, the Japanese restaurant next door. The incongruity of discussing a book that starts with “the smell of frittata” while eating sushi makes him smile. I spot a Band-Aid on his thumb, a homely touch that softens his dark-browed handsomeness.   My Two Italies’ title refers to the pull between the hardscrabble south of Luzzi’s Calabrese heritage and the northern Italian Renaissance culture of his professional passions. (“I yearned for the Italy of Dante and Michelangelo, not the one of sharp cheese and salted anchovies,” he writes.)  There’s also the dichotomy of Italian and Italian-American identities. The first child born in America after his parents and four older siblings immigrated, Luzzi can claim ties to both, though his preference is clear: “Dante described his quest for the elusive Italian language as the hunt for a fragrant panther that knew its way around the woods; Snooki in leopard print advertised her ethnic identity with decidedly less mystery.”   The book itself has a dual identity.  Part family memoir, part cultural study, its twin strands intertwine like a traditional Calabrian Easter bread. “It’s ostensibly about Italy, but it’s also about American families,” Luzzi says, dredging a tuna roll in soy sauce. “It’s a story of immigration. So many of us have stories of parents and grandparents that shape us.” The book proposal he sold was primarily a cultural history, with family vignettes interspersed.The first chapter he wrote centered on Silvio Berlusconi, Italy’s scandal-plagued prime minister. But early readers found the family stories most compelling, and the book’s balance began to shift. (Berlusconi is still in the mix, but he doesn’t show up until chapter five.) Instead, the book opens with an Easter dinner at which Luzzi’s pet rabbit became the entree.  Even as a child, young Joe knew this wasn’t the norm in suburban Rhode Island, where his neighbors had “vacuumed Pontiac Bonnevilles and pine-scented air fresheners.” Instead of a neatly mowed lawn, his father filled every square inch with vegetable gardens, which he tended with old-country stubbornness even after a stroke left him partially paralyzed. Pasquale Luzzi was a prisoner of war in Germany; his captor’s niece became his lover and, after the war ended, his wife. When she got pregnant, he stole a bicycle and escaped before the baby was born. Back home, he set his sights on Yolanda Crocco, a local landowner’s daughter. He courted her with serenades and gifts of candied almonds. Then he broke into her house and held her at gunpoint, declaring, “I’m going to rape you.”  Yolanda fended him off, brandishing scissors. When neighbors arrived, he swore he hadn’t touched her, but was enacting a ritual acchiapare (“to grab”) to dishonor his victim so she’d have to marry him. He was accused of violenza carnale (carnal violence); a village judge ruled that unless Yolanda consented to marriage, he’d be imprisoned.  Unable to bear the thought of him suffering on her account, she agreed. She was just shy of 15 years old. The details of this violent courtship were new to Luzzi, though he knew his father had been held captive by a blond German. “You grow up and there are these family stories floating around, but you don’t probe,” he says. “I probed, because I was writing this book.” Pasquale is no longer alive, but Luzzi interviewed his mother extensively. “The most surprising thing she said was that she’d been ‘happy and carefree’ in the old country.  Nothing had ever shocked me more—it was like saying, ‘You have an extra head on your shoulder.’” He also saw his volatile father—”a fierce, ethnic Lear roaring across the plains of old age”—with new eyes. “As a first-generation child, you want to fit in, you have your own axes to grind. I realized that, like Dante, my dad was truly in exile. He never acclimated to life in the US, never really spoke English. He was a landscaper who worked in a factory. He built a life for us, but it was a true sacrifice.”   Writing such personal stories was not always comfortable. “I’m a private person—I am by nature kind of reticent,” Luzzi explains. He was also concerned with his family’s privacy. “I didn’t take this lightly. To the best of my powers, it’s 100 percent accurate. First, I hope it reflects my profound love of

my family. Second, if you’re going to tell the story, you’ve got to tell the story.”  He picks up his green tea. “There are some crazy elements of my family’s history. So be it. But isn’t it better to have those stories written with generosity and a spirit of love, rather than radio silence?” He hoped to preserve a history, not settle scores. Nor does the author escape his own probing: “Perhaps I deceived myself in thinking that I could ever outrun my southern Italian heritage. Maybe, in the end, all that separated me from the Mezzogiorno was a few advanced degrees and the desire to tell my story to strangers.” Luzzi graduated from Tufts and earned master’s degrees in French and Italian literature from NYU and Yale, where he also completed his Ph.D. He’s taught at Bard for 12 years, often teaching Italian intensives in Florence. He also hosts public screenings of Italian films at Rhinebeck’s Upstate Films. Roberto Rossellini’s 1954 Voyage to Italy was so well received that he followed up with Fellini’s IVitelloni and the Taviani brothers’ Caesar Must Die. Luzzi celebrates these directors (along with de Sica, Bertolucci, Pasolini, and others) in A Cinema of Poetry: Aesthetics of the Italian Art Film (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014). His first book, Romantic Europe and the Ghost of Italy (Yale University Press, 2008), won the Modern Language Association’s Scaglione Prize for Italian Studies. Though gratified by the reception of these scholarly books, he also longed to write for nonacademic readers. My Two Italies broke new ground. A lifelong researcher, he marveled at going into his office “with just my computer—no books!” But “the moment any writer lives for is when the story dictates itself. When I remembered the smell of my mother boiling tripe downstairs, it all came back.”  Writing about his tumultuous childhood may have helped Luzzi open the door on the more recent past. Invited to write an essay for The NewYork Times, he chose the most personal story imaginable: the death of his first wife, Katherine Mester, in a car accident during her last month of pregnancy in 2007. The essay is a gutpunch: “Forty-five minutes before her death, she delivered our daughter, Isabel, a miracle of health rescued by an emergency cesarean. I had left the house that morning at 8:30am to teach a class; by noon, I was a father and a widower.”  Luzzi’s title, “I Found Myself in a Dark Wood,” cites the opening of Dante’s Divine Comedy.  Framing his grief and eventual reemergence within a larger context of darkness, he notes that Dante found his “heaven’s-eye view of human life” while mourning his exile. Just as the ghost of his Virgil serves as the poet’s guide through the underworld, Dante helped to lead Luzzi through his own circle of hell.  He was overwhelmed by readers’ responses to the essay.  Hundreds of comments poured in from people coping with loss, or describing how literature helped them through crises. Luzzi is now writing a book about Dante, based in part on the Times essay and “the idea of grief and rebuilding.” (He has since remarried, and is raising his daughter Isabel with second wife Helena Baillie, a classical violinist and colleague at Bard.) Though Dante provided a light in the darkness, Luzzi’s daily support through the depths of despair and the first years of raising a child was his family. He moved back to Rhode Island, where “my mother poured centuries of Calabrian nurturing into Isabel’s developing consciousness.”  My Two Italies ends with his first trip to Florence with his daughter, then four. As her pink sneakers smack against ancient cobblestones, “my body trembled with a joy I had never felt before, so powerful was the sense of relief—of survival—that we had made it through the long years after Katherine’s death, and now we were finally in Italy together.”  This sense of ongoing heritage was part of his impetus to write My Two Italies. “With each generation, that way of life becomes more and more remote. I wanted to set it down before it was forgotten, before it fades away,” Luzzi says. “I want my daughter to read this and think about where she came from, her people. I see the Calabrian in her, and I’m happy about that. There’s a toughness, a resilience, that helped rescue me when this terrible thing happened—the pull of that closeness. That sense of family is a huge part of my life, il genio di famiglia. It translates as the spirit of family, but also the genius.”   Joseph Luzzi will appear at Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck, 7/17 at 7pm;Tivoli Free Library, 8/4 at 7pm; Merritt Books in Millbrook, 10/4 at 2pm. 7/14 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 61


SHORT TAKES Hudson Valley writers declare independence in myriad ways. Here’s to rebels, renegades, and river dwellers from the Hudson to the Mississippi.

PETE SEEGER VS. THE UN-AMERICANS EDWARD RENEHAN NEW STREET COMMUNICATIONS, 2014, $15

The late great Seeger’s refusal to answer the “improper questions” of HUAC’s Communist witch-hunters is the stuff of legend. He refused the right to remain silent, and when grilled, answered simply that “I sang for everyone.” Celebrated biographer Renehan, a Seeger family friend, provides a timely reminder of the urgency of speaking truth to power. All publication royalties will benefit Clearwater; Pete would be pleased.

ADIRONDACK: LIFE AND WILDLIFE IN THE WILD, WILD EAST

Dept. of Speculation

EDWARD KANZE EXCELSIOR EDITIONS, 2014, $19.95

Born in the suburbs of Westchester, naturalist and licensed guide Kanze traveled far and wide before following the Hudson’s headwaters into the vast wilderness of Adirondack Park, where he raised his own family in the land of his ancestors. “We’re all river people—not just my family, but yours and everyone else’s,” he writes in this likeable hybrid of memoir, regional lore, and animal anecdote. “Rivers give rise to us. They flow with our history.”

F*CK ART, LET’S DANCE! AN EAST VILLAGE MEMOIR SALLY ECKHOFF WATER STREET PRESS, 2013, $17

Another take on the wild, wild east. Painter and former Village Voice critic Eckhoff arrived on the gritty streets of New York City in the late 1970s, determined to be an artist. In glib and sparkly prose, she paints a picture of 10 fascinating years in low-rent, high-energy Alphabet City, where art trumped creature comforts and every night was an adventure. From underground galleries to midnight egg creams, this is the legendary East Village of yore, brought to rollicking life.

HIDDEN HISTORY OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, NEW YORK ALLISON GUERTIN MARCHESE THE HISTORY PRESS, 2014, $19.99

South of the ‘Dacks and north of CBGBs, Columbia County shares some rebel DNA with both. When ex-New Yorker Marchese moved into a former stagecoach stop, she started literally digging into her new hometown’s history, unearthing pottery shards and old medicine bottles. That led to copious research for this lively book, filled with evocative photos of vintage amusement parks, Claverack College bohemians, and a foxy young Edna St. Vincent Millay.

NEW ORLEANS CARNIVAL KREWES: THE HISTORY, SPIRIT & SECRETS OF MARDI GRAS ROSARY O’NEILL, FOREWORD BY KIM MARIE VAZ THE HISTORY PRESS, 2014, $19.99

New Orleans native and Rhinebeck resident O’Neill offers a loving, exhaustively researched insider’s view of America’s most spectacular carnival. Mardi Gras is big business, from the street parades enjoyed by hordes of drunk tourists to secret balls and festivities representing all strata of local society. Though O’Neill’s family held rank in elite carnival courts, the inner workings of these secret societies are closely guarded. This is a rare view behind the mask, interspersed with oral histories and period photos.

WHY READ THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN?
 DENNIS DOHERTY NEW STREET COMMUNICATIONS, 2014, $15

SUNY New Paltz professor Doherty celebrates and contextualizes a literary classic bashed by political sensitivities from both ends. Nineteenth-century racists were offended by Twain’s portrayal of a white boy’s deep friendship with an escaped slave; some current readers bristle at his use of the word “nigger” (Doherty disdains the term “N-word,” preferring to face it head-on). His prescription? “Read this book keenly, and read it again. It will never cease yielding its dark riches, and will always help serve as a guide.”

62 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Jenny Offill

Knopf, 2014, $22.95

I

n Dept. of Speculation, Dutchess resident Jenny Offill’s second novel, a stressed, sleep-deprived novelist repairs her career and marriage by a strategic retreat from the New York cultural world to a rural, insular one. Free from bedbugs, art stars up-in-arms about kindergarten admissions, and vexing inquiries about her unwritten second book, she can raise her daughter where the antics of a new dog and the simple drama of the weather draw her wholehearted attention. The move to the country is prompted by her husband’s straying. She doesn’t condemn him. Partly blaming herself, her own frazzled self-absorption, she even feels grateful for things having been happy as long as they were. Her tip-off that something is going on was his question to her, “When was the last time you were happy?” Offill’s experimental approach has the reader peering into a quiet tempest and straining slightly to discern the story’s twists. Battles rise in terse whispers as the couple’s child sleeps nearby. Lyrical scraps of personal history move with an impatient cadence—the project of attaining clarity in a messy situation goes hand in hand with that of decluttering. These trim units of memory flash more brightly for their bumpy transitions, which have the effect of levering the emotional pitch and leaving us searching out peripheral narrative strata: “‘You’ve made me a cartoon wife,’ she tells him. ‘I am not a cartoon wife.’” Quotes from writers and thinkers of various stripes are summoned liberally throughout (e.g., Berryman, Rilke, St. Anthony, Anaxagoras). “Little bits of poetry stick to her like burrs,” says Offill’s narrator. These nuggets of light orbit the wife’s psyche, seeming to guide her from the margins. An unnamed rabbi tells us, “Three things have a flavor of the world to come: the Sabbath, the sun, and married love.” The wife considers the ancient rite of marriage from all sides, not unlike her beloved pre-Socratic sages and Zen masters applying themselves to mind-bending paradoxes. The selections sometimes impart the air of a self-help tract—perhaps playing on the notion of one, a speculative endeavor aimed at a double crisis of adultery and writer’s block. These shards of wisdom are nonetheless tooled to specific uses by our protagonist’s erudite imagination. A quirky spin on Einstein’s words, for instance, gives the impression he worried about the moon disappearing if people did not look at it. Outer space and domestic space are not entirely separable in this book. The husband owns a telescope, and because he has described her rival as “outdoorsy,” the wife fumes as she pictures him teaching the other woman constellations. The cosmos pervades her mental life, but this does not mollify her anguish. She is ghostwriting a schlocky history of the space program for an arrogant astronaut, and she veers into speculation about astronomer Carl Sagan’s extramarital impulses. The mirror in the sky, as it were, validates her Yeatsian mantra: “Things fall apart.” The progress of the wife’s novel is hinted at through sporadic instances of MFA-advisor-style criticality which she directs at herself. Noting that correctly using verb tenses and articles is crucial, she may be alluding to issues in anchoring her own constantly probing text. Near the onset we learn of a Buddhist teaching that says out of 121 states of consciousness, only three (the ones we normally occupy) involve misery and suffering. Later, we glimpse the wife’s revising process—“Too many crying scenes”—and laud Offill’s wondrous transforming of tears into starlight. —Marx Dorrity


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The Cloud of Unknowing: Stories Mimi Lipson

Yeti Books, 2014, $14

U

lster County-based writer Mimi Lipson first appeared in Chronogram in 2008, when she won that year’s fiction contest with “Minivan.” The heartbreakingly funny tale of love, epilepsy, and mechanical disasters has been joined by 13 other stories in The Cloud of Unknowing. It’s a delightful collection. Many of these tales are connected, featuring members of the fictional Schultz family. “Minivan” focused on the daughter, Kitty, and her nut-job man-child of a boyfriend, Isaac; here we get to know Kitty even better, along with her parents and brother, as well as Isaac, who, given the choice between havoc and harmony, will always go with havoc. But everyone within these pages is fascinating, palpable, and fully formed. In her quiet and easy way with prose, Lipson has a gift for revealing details. She reveals much about the children, Kitty and Jonathan, by first focusing on their parents. In “Lou Schultz,” their father, a Slavic languages professor, takes them on an ill-conceived Florida vacation, like an outsider’s take on Sunbelt tourism: “The week’s theme, he decided, would be unapologetic leisure: motels, swimming pools, sunshine, and Donald Duck. He’d brought along a mycology guide, and he even hoped to get in a little mushroom hunting.” Instead, they get kicked out of Disney World, much to Lou’s relief. In the subtle, well-paced “Moscow, 1968,” the mother, Helena, is now owner of a ramshackle, three-family house “on the Cambridge-Somerville line. She’s both self-sufficient and naive, a dismaying combination to son Jonathan, who can only watch as his mother’s relationship to Chechen tenants turns from landlady to dupe. The book and its title story take their name from a 14th-century mystical Christian text that proposed the only way to grasp the Divine was to stop thinking about it; that only by stripping away all ideas and abandoning any preconceptions can a person finally connect—via the heart itself—to God. In many of these stories, a character dips into a state of muddled perception, and then somehow comes out on the other side endowed with a new sense of grace. In the title story, Kitty is now an aimless but smitten Reed college student. Suffering from an untreated and worsening bout of pelvic inflammatory disease, she slips into a feverish, oblivious cloud. (This is the best use of PID in a short story I’ve ever seen. Actually, it may be the only use I’ve ever seen, but you’d be hard pressed to find a better one.) Delirious, Kitty imagines she’s talking to the cat, Windex: “Later, she remembered standing in the kitchen, talking to Windex. ‘Oh Kitty,’ the little gray cat said. ‘You’re moribund.’ ‘What does that mean?’ she asked. And then she was being helped into an ambulance. A roommate had found her passed on in the kitchen floor.” On so many levels, Lipson gets it right: We’ve been waiting for this poor girl to get herself to a doctor; and her moment of self-awareness, when the clarity of her condition finally breaks through her own mental fog, is delivered by a cat named after a window cleaner. It’s just one of the many clever gems in this intelligent, charming, big-hearted book. —Jana Martin

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POETRY

Edited by Phillip X Levine. Deadline for our August issue is July 5. Send up to three poems or three pages (whichever comes first). Full submission guidelines: www.chronogram.com/submissions.

My favorite character in Star Wars is The Force. —Asher Stern (9 years)

I no longer fit in that box —p

NURSERY RHYME

—ON THE TRAIN TO SLOAN KETTERING

HI, SUMMER IS KU-ING

In the hickory, daycare dock Us kids running up and down the clock

a boot-back Kerouac

A lady visits, watches me skip Sees me jump and sees me trip

Green gowned catalpa poses with white corsages, a June graduate.

at the window

Sees me hug my bear on my mat, Sucking my thumb and my bear’s blue hat

watches the river rattle on by a hard grey rain spinning like a spider

Let’s play peek-a-boo! I’m a runaway bunny, but I’m a bear, too

Orange poppies pop out from green cocoon phalluses, bees about to buzz. Sunbathing black snake stirred on the stream-smoothed stones, hisses French kisses.

Can the lady play with me? We can go hide, behind that tree.

—the train door slams—

I don’t know that she lived here With her girl, and her son, and their daddy dear,

the carny red sky retreats

My hammock’s cocoon curving in a deep-slung arch, smiling between trees.

before I was born. Eighteen years, and then cancer torn

sometimes the ripple of a tree.

These childhood de-lights, fireflies playing peek-a-boo. The night is winking.

—E Gironda, Jr.

—Checko Miller

IN THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE

TAG

1. This much you know: for every positive number, there’s a negative stretching to infinity in either direction and in between: cero, nol, nothing. Of course, there’s a question as to whether it really exists. It’s there because we put it there. We like the idea as long as it doesn’t apply to us. Anyway, it’s necessary. If you take one away from one, what’s left? Look, you have to start somewhere. This is what comes before the beginning and at the end: 0

It used to be A game of catching Up. The little kid A little bit behind.

through. Look! I squirt my juice out the straw, I’m the runaway bunny, watch me draw. Why is she so still? Her eyes on the yard, on that hill I blow bubbles, or slide and scrape my knees. In hospice, her husband’s fingers she squeezed, with her other hand on a sucking tube, gently, clearing his mouth I must tiptoe to the lady guest, ’cause rabbits never shout Minutes later, her children’s daddy was gone. Watch me! I can do cartwheels on the lawn! She had to tell her daughter her daddy has died. I blow on a pink balloon and stretch its rubber wide. I’m a brave Pooh Bear Indian Chief. She plays the Hide and Seek of grief —Imogene Putnam

TWENTY YEARS IN SIX LINES “He fell into a deep sleep.” The luster of the flagon upon yond wild Catskills has seduced me to partake in his liquor. Oh devilish nectar, sweet Hollands who quench a thirsty soul and flow through my body until I am dreaming and I wake to new earth beneath my feet. —Derek Hawkins

2. Or maybe it’s where we come from and go to— where we go through. Nowhere we know before we get there or after we arrive. —Ed Meek

64 POETRY CHRONOGRAM 7/14

You set the pace Gold and glistening Bright and beautiful Bearing the baton. Who knew I’d be the one To take the lap Simple and constant Plodding and true. No victory in this upset Gold long gone— Baton abandoned A fading you, waving In the distance. —Mary Vallo

I’ll ask a daisy, but I’d rather ask you— Love me? Love me not? —Trevor Wedemeyer


INTO THE WILD

WEEKEND WALK

TALES OF THE KINGSTON HOUSING AUTHORITY

Into the wild, she grew a spirit animal. It kept her heart safe from human thought. She let go of her mind, she grew fur. She kept moving. She never stopped. She swam, she fought, she flew.

Don’t call it nature, this mown meadow path around the pond,

Stuffy but not sweaty the apartment breathes moist and slow. Mom sleeps on the brown, corduroy couch surrounded by mess Toys on the floor. Unwashed clothes on armrests Cody and Cole sleep under blankets one room away and outside in the parking lot, Eric and Devin point a 12-gauge shotgun and 9mm rifle at each other an explosion and buckshot the size of green peas pepper holes into the bedroom wall in the morning mom stuffs tissue inside the holes so wasps and yellow jackets cannot enter

She grew 100 feet tall And chopped down trees with her teeth. Her breath brought fear into the hearts of farmers. She was a crop-destroyer, an animal-killer. She was no longer human at all, Except for one pinkie toe that refused To grow fur. Her mind was quiet. It had gone. It was reduced to three simple thoughts, Food Sleep Mate One day a little red bird landed on her shoulder, too young to know to be afraid. It pecked at her a little. She happened to glance Directly into its eyes. She felt a feeling. Kinship. And they lived happily ever after, together forever. The mountains grew behind the trees. —Molly Reiniger

OLD LOVE I halved my heart the day we met and never got it back there in Quintilla’s on the pier while I joked and you laughed you took the best part of me but no even that’s not true I waited ages to make it whole and saved the best for you —Richard Donnelly

RIPPED He was a favorite among good wives Of Hudson Valley. We’d flirt, lock eyes At church when Dame Van Winkle—who contrived To cause unhappiness—would stiffly rise to beautify The Eucharist line. My heart exulted To read his note: “Let’s run away!” Surprise! A lady’s never been so insulted. Such tumult when Rip’s twenty-year nap resulted.

easement acres with dairy silos in the hill creases and distant watchful estates. Though bobolinks rise from the grass, knitting new flight patterns, we keep to the trail, ending where we began, at the gravel lot, nothing unleashed. —Karen Schoemer

STAY TUNED FOR: How his shocking sudden death saved his brother’s life. How his shocking How his sudden How his death suddenly saved his brother who had a life whose life was saved by the shocking sudden death of his other brother who was sometimes sudden but hardly ever shocking. —Linda Melick

CELL PHONE, POETRY READING After the cell phone rang and the poet came down into the audience and took it from the hands of its owner and returned to the stage, he lifted it to his mouth and leaned toward the microphone and spoke into the cell phone and microphone at the same time

—James Nani

NOW BEAR WITNESS TO AN EXCLAMATORY PUDDLE OF GEE-WHIZ! I SAW THE BEST MINDS OF MY GENERALIZATION wearing halos of fog, opening their eyes with a burst of surreal an’ shattering the beacon of light with a splatter of the gray matter... afterwards it all became so fug’n trite. I’m phrasing perfect with a hint of propulsive barb’d barkin’ - Man, I am aching to blather, shit man, it’s more than butt-cheek chatterit BBBBBBBBBButt bubbles with a puhcussive tootin’; a howl absurd! I raise a cup & say cheers t’ Allen Ginsberg “O BLOATED BLUES an’ DECIBELS DANCE t’BALLYHOO’d BE-BOP FLUNG An’ BOMBS BUSTIN OPEN with Gear’s CLAWING t’BE AIRBORNE”, Yes, he SITs IN a SPACE SHARE’d with us; finger snappin’ & poetry clappin’ from a heavenly ladder’s rung…

to the microphone and waited, but there was no further sound from the cell phone, neither ringing nor speech.

A MAD HATTER’s CHINA TEACUP is filled with continuous soft crackling liveliness of effervescence… and buoyed by the holy soul jelly roll that moves through here now. So let us praise and bestow upon him, a heartfelt bow before we etch on the walls of my primitive pome cave Our beatnik chorale reverberation of “AND HOW!”

—Matthew J. Spireng

—ooznozz

reading his poem that had been interrupted from beginning to end and, after the applause, remained silent and held the cell phone

—LindaAnn Loschiavo 7/14 CHRONOGRAM POETRY 65


Food & Drink

caption tk

Poughkeepsie on Tap

Mill House Brewing Company

By Holly Tarson Photographs by Thomas Smith

P

oughkeepsie and beer go way back. The Dutch started brewing beer in the Hudson Valley almost four hundred years ago. In the 1830s, Matthew Vassar made his fortune in the brewery business in Poughkeepsie before founding the college that bears his name. Using wild hops that grew here with abandon, Vassar’s “Albany Ale” is the stuff of legend among local beer drinkers. Fortunately, local craft beer is mounting a resurgence, and Mill House Brewing Company in Poughkeepsie is leading the way. It started when siblings Eric and Amanda Baxter and their father, Bob, wanted to revitalize some property on Mill Street.They reached out to longtime friends Chris and Daniel Crocco, who have definite restaurant cred—Daniel is a CIAtrained chef; Chris is a well-respected owner/manager. The Crocco brothers opened Brasserie 292 in 2011, just a couple blocks away on Main Street. The Mill House team soon expanded to include Jamie Bishop and Larry Stock as brewmasters. The Baxters and Croccos had been enjoying Bishop and Stock’s homebrews for years, so bringing them onboard and opening a brew pub was a natural evolution. It’s a beautiful thing when talent and camaraderie go so well together. Mill House Brewing Company opened just six months ago, and already their Velvet Panda stout has won an award and lines are forming out the door. It’s easy to see why. Exposed brick walls and original fireplaces meet wrought-iron lighting and a marble-topped bar. There’s outdoor seating on the terrace and two upstairs rooms comfortably hold ample farm tables (excellent places for private parties). The welcoming dining room includes plush round booths with amazing acoustics—even when the bar is bustling, you can talk with friends without resorting to shouting. 66 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Through the glass wall separating the open kitchen from the vaulted-ceiling brewery, enormous gleaming steel tanks rise out of view. The brewing process starts right here, with the making of vast amounts of wort, the barley water concoction from which all things beer will evolve. A wood-fired oven and charcuterie carving station hint at the savory treats to come. You might catch a whiff of smoke wafting in from out back, which only makes you more eager for a cold beer and whatever is coming out of that smoker. The deli case just inside the front door bursts with house-made sausages, smoked ribs and duck bacon, house barbeque sauce, and rub. It’s all available for retail sale and leaves no doubt there’s some quality craftsmanship going on here. With six craft beers on tap, it’s hard to choose (most varieties, $3/9 ounces.; $5/16 ounces) A flight of five, 4-ounce glasses ($10) is a great start. The impressive Köld One, a German-style hybrid, crosses the line between ale and lager. The Alpha is an amber ale that’s brilliantly smooth and an immediate friend to everything on the menu. The Zoe (named after Bishop’s Belgian great-grandmother, a beermaker herself) is a dark, all-Belgian malt that’s complex and higher in alcohol (8% ABV) than the others. (Zoe goes for $6/half, $8/full) And certainly don’t miss out on the Velvet Panda, a stout run through a nitrogen line (instead of CO2, used with the other beers). The nitrogen makes smaller bubbles, which translates into a soft, thick richness in the brew and delivers a satisfying very dark beer. The surprise of the day was the Queen City Blueberry Cream Ale. Cream ale was one of the first American beer styles, and this one is a call-back to pre-Prohibition brews. Queen City is a light-bodied but very flavorful beer with a suggestion of blueberry.


Opposite: Christian Astorga pours one of MHBC’s six craft bews on tap. This page, clockwise from left: Mixing the signature Pink Panty Dropper cocktail; the MHBC sausage platter; Executive Chef Dan Crocco in the kitchen.

The brew masters have been friends since fifth grade. Bishop and Stock worked in sales and construction, respectively, and brewed beer for fun, thanks to a home brew kit Bishop received from his wife as a birthday gift. “She created an animal,” says Bishop. “By batch three I was brewing way more beer than I could drink.” Now these “two best friends trying to brew better beer,” as Bishop describes them, are turning their hobby into a livelihood. They’re brewing large quantities with commercial tools. “Think of it as going from driving a VW to a Porsche!” It’s clear they’re having a blast. “We just took our base Alpha Amber Ale and dry hopped it with chamomile flowers for a five-gallon one-off batch,” Bishop says. Coming soon: the Pine Tar, made with Colorado Blue Spruce tips from trees in Bishop’s yard, just like Ben Franklin and George Washington used, he says. The Pine Tar promises to be a locavore’s dream, Hudson Valley terroir in a pint. “As a brewer, those are the things that get me going,” Bishop says. Beer finds its way into menu items, too, thanks to the deft skills and palate of Chef Daniel Crocco. The menu is salty and smoky, but it’s a far cry from bar food. “We have everything that’s good with beer,” Crocco says. He brings his fine-dining technique to the fast casual environment, producing intense flavors on demand. The KO Wings ($9) are brined for a day in the Köld One. They get the house rub (same for the ribs) before they are smoked. Finally, they’re deep fried and tossed with barbeque sauce made with Kilt Spinner beer. It’s a lot of work for a wing, but it’s what sets them apart from all those other wings you’ve eaten and long ago forgot. The All American Burger ($11) is the biggest seller, but if you don’t try the

ribs, you’ll be missing out (half rack/$18, full rack/$26). “Basically, all the barbeque stuff that we do, we try to keep it as original and craft as possible,” Crocco says. “Barbeque is an art.” He uses a variety of wood in the smoker, including beer-soaked oak chips that are byproducts of brewing the Kilt Spinner. It all contributes to flavorful ribs that are topped (not glopped) with the Kilt Spinner sauce that’s tangy, smoky, and just a little sweet. The wood-fired brick pizza oven does double duty, cranking out MoroccanSpiced Lamb Ribs ($10) and Flank Steak Skewers ($10), as well as a variety of pizzas ($13-$16). The Steak Skewers are a particular treat. Think Thai satay inspired and then think again. They are easy-to-eat tender, still pink in the middle, served on a bed of arugula, and topped with a cashew sauce that packs a tiny kick. After the last morsel of steak is gone, you’ll want to eat up all the cashew goodness you can on those bitter greens. We can’t ignore the sausage: Pale Ale and Cheddar Brat, Merguez, HickorySmoked Bayou Sausage, and Kielbasa ($11-15). They’re all tempting. If you can’t possibly eat another bite, buy these on the way out the door and you’re set for dinner tomorrow. Things are ever-evolving at Mill House (wholesale beer and sausages, anyone?) and there’s always something new on tap. Be sure to stop in for their re-creation of Vassar’s “Albany Ale” this fall. It’s all good news for Poughkeepsie and beer drinkers alike. With locally grown hops now available (thanks to Dutchess Hops) and Blue Collar Brewing opening in Poughkeepsie in August, it appears the brewpub trend is gaining traction in the Queen City. We can all drink to that. 7/14 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 67


Voted Best Indian Cuisine in the Hudson Valley

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The River Grill We use Farm Fresh Vegetables! 194 Main Street, New Paltz 845-255-2633 www.LaBellaPizzaBistro.com

Nestled on Newburgh's historic Waterfront with picturesque views of the Hudson Valley and the magnificent Hudson River, The River Grill takes pride in offering outstanding food and superlative service. The river grill is open every day of the week Serving lunch & dinner

40 Front Street | Newburgh 845.561.9444

www.therivergrill.com

Come and enjoy an extraordinary dining experience! 68 TASTINGS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/14


tastings directory Bakeries The Alternative Baker 407 Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-3355 lemoncakes.com 100% all butter scratch, full-service, smallbatch, made-by-hand bakery. Best known online for our breakfast egg sandwiches, scones, sticky buns, Belgian hot chocolate, lunch sandwiches (Goat Cheese Special is still winning awards) & all vegan soups. Completely committed to allergy & dietary special requests of all natures. Wedding cakes too. Lemon Cakes shipped nationwide. Closed Tues/Wed but open 7am for the best egg sandwiches served all day. For twenty years now! NY Times says “Worth a detour.”

The Bakery 13A North Front Street, New Paltz, NY 255-8840 ilovethebakery.com

Ella’s Bellas Bakery 418 Main Street, Beacon, NY (845) 765-8502 ellabellasbeacon.com

Cafés Bistro-to-Go 948 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 340-9800 bluemountainbistro.com

Delis Jack’s Meats & Deli 79 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2244

Restaurants Annarella Ristorante 276 Malden Turnpike, Saugerties, NY (845) 247-7289 annarellaristorante.com

Elephant 310 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-9310 elephantwinebar.com

LaBella Pizza Bistro 194 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2633 labellapizzabistro.com

Mariner’s Harbor 1 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 340-8051 marinersharbor.com

Osaka Restaurant 22 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY, (845) 876-7338 or (845) 876-7278, 74 Broadway, Tivoli, NY osakasushi.net Foodies, consider yourselves warned and informed! Osaka Restaurant is Rhinebeck’s direct link to Japan’s finest cuisines! Enjoy the freshest sushi and delicious traditional Japanese small plates cooked with love by this family owned and operated treasure for

over 19 years! For more information and menus, go to osakasushi.net.

Red Hook Curry House 28 E Market Street, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-2666 redhookcurryhouse.com

Suruchi–A fine taste of India 5 Church Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2772 suruchiindian.com Homemade Indian cuisine served in a beautiful, serene setting in the heart of New Paltz. Includes Local, Organic, Gluten-Free. Fine Wine, Craft Beer. Buffet Dinner Wednesdays (a la carte available). 10% Discounts for Seniors, Students, and Early Birds (1st hour weeknights). Monday/Wednesday/Thursday 5-9pm, Friday 5-10pm, Saturday Noon-10pm, Sunday Noon-9pm.

Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro 6426 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3330 terrapinrestaurant.com custsvc@terrapinrestaurant.com Voted “Best of the Hudson Valley” by Chronogram Magazine. From far-flung origins, the world’s most diverse flavors meet and mingle. Out of elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh, and dynamic: dishes to delight both body and soul. Serving lunch and dinner seven days a week. Local. Organic. Authentic.

Craft Beer & Artisanal Fare

458 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-8676 www.thehopbeacon.com

eclectic wines, craft beer, pizzettes and tapas sunset deck on the rail trail wed-mon 1pm-12am tues 4pm-12am sunday $5 mimosas ALL DAY tuesday 25% off wine bottles wednesday $5 sangria www.jardwinepub.com water street market, new paltz

The Hop 458 Main Street, Beacon, NY thehopbeacon.com

The Rhinecliff 4 Grinnell Street, Rhinecliff, NY (845) 876-0590 therhinecliff.com reception@therhinecliff.com Farm to table Gastropub on the Hudson, beautifully restored historic railroad hotel. Outdoor seating, riverside patio. Favorites include – Ploughman’s Board, Steak Frites, Grilled Ribeye, Fish ‘N’ Chips, “Sticky Toffee Pudding.” Extensive wine/beer list. Breakfast & Dinner Daily (Lunch- Memorial Day - Labor Day) Saturday Brunch & Sunday Live Jazz Brunch. Off-premises catering . Weddings/Special events. All rooms enjoy river views, private balconies.

The Stewart House at the Athens Hotel Bar and Dining Room Open for Dinner at 4pm: Wednesday - Sunday RIVER GARDEN BAR IS NOW OPEN

www.stewarthouse.com | ( 5 1 8 ) 4 4 4 - 8 3 1 7 www.shakespeare-on-the-hudson.com 2 NORTH WATER ST

ATHENS, NEW YORK

The Stewart House 2 North Water Street, Athens, NY (518) 444-8317 stewarthouse.com

The Would 120 North Road, Highland, NY (845) 691-9883 thewould.com

Wine Bars Jar’d Wine Pub Water Street Market, New Paltz, NY jardwinepub.com 7/14 CHRONOGRAM TASTINGS DIRECTORY 69


Culinary Adventures

Gluten-Full BREAD IS ON THE RISE IN THE HUDSON VALLEY By Brian PJ Cronin Photographs by Roy Gumpel

I

t is morning in the Hudson Valley and the ovens are full of bread. Long and crusty baguettes, sour and pungent rye, foccacia shot through with herbs and olives. Hearths are being fired, challah is being braided, sourdough starters are greedily devouring sugars as they ferment in buckets and tubs, expelling gassy bubbles into the morning air. The long, dark night of supermarket bread is over. The last few years have seen an explosion in the number of artisanal bakeries in the Hudson Valley, putting quality breads in the eager hands of more and more people. But nestled high in the Shawangunk Mountains, one small town has been enjoying handmade breads for almost a hundred years. The Postmaster’s Pumpernickel The Cohen family moved to Ellenville from the Bronx in 1920 and opened up Cohen’s Bakery in a stately brick building downtown. There, they baked bread for generations of Ellenville residents, including their famous raisin pumpernickel bread: sweet and toothsome, the pumpernickel bread for people who think they hate pumpernickel. You can still walk into Cohen’s Bakery today and buy a loaf of that pumpernickel, as well as rye breads, rugelach, and bagels made using the same recipe the bakery was using in 1920. It’s an invaluable piece of the Hudson Valley’s culinary history, and it was almost lost forever. In 2003 Ruby Cohen, son of founder Harry Cohen and sole proprietor of the bakery for 45 years, was searching the Valley for someone to sell the bakery to. Perhaps it was a symptom of the low-carb Atkins craze that was inexplicably sweeping the country at the time, but no one wanted to buy it. It fell to Bill Tochterman, Ellenville’s retired postmaster, to step in and buy the bakery in order to keep it from closing down. Today, Cohen’s Bakery is operating in much the same way it has been for the past 94 years, with

70 CULINARY ADVENTURES CHRONOGRAM 7/14

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a few exceptions. They now make a line of low-gluten breads for the everincreasing number of customers who have difficulty tolerating gluten. And in addition to their wholesale business, they ship their famous breads all over the world, especially to former customers and Ellenville residents who have left the Hudson Valley. As Andrea Smith, who runs the bakery’s wholesale and shipping business, explains, “I mail a lot of bread to Florida.” An Early Leader Cohen’s Bakery was one of the Valley’s few outposts of artisanal, handmade bread for years until Daniel Leader opened up Bread Alone in Boiceville in the early 1980s. Originally a chef working in some of New York City’s finest French restaurants, be became bored with what he called “fancy food for high society.”When the restaurants closed for August vacation every year, he’d follow his French colleagues back to their home country. It was in France that Leader fell in with a group of bakers and discovered his true calling. “I really like food that everyone can enjoy,” he says. “Bread crosses all economic lines, all cultural lines, all ethnic lines. Everyone seems to love bread.” There wasn’t anyplace else in the Hudson Valley selling organic, Europeanstyle breads when Bread Alone opened in 1983. He wasn’t sure how people would react to his bread. Unbeknownst to him, there was a hidden customer base just begging to be tapped into. “We were fortunate because back in the ‘80s there were a lot more Europeans with second homes in the Catskills,” he says. “Most of our original customers were Polish, Russian, French, or Italian. They immediately got it. I didn’t have to educate them.” Bread Alone quickly grew into a miniempire, adding locations in Woodstock and Rhinebeck and distributing their bread to markets and restaurants throughout the region. Today, Leader is considered one of the country’s preeminent bakers, has written several celebrated books for home


Opposite: Kalamata olive bread at Bread & Bottle in Red Hook. Above: Bill Tochterman and Megan Nolan at Cohen’s Bakery in Ellenville.

bakers, and has managed to successfully scale up Bread Alone’s production capabilities without any sacrifice of flavor or integrity. “We’ve been very disciplined about our production,” Leader says. “Actually, I think our product is better than ever now.” Sheila Buff, author of the recently published A Food Lover’s Guide To The HudsonValley, agrees. “I think it helps that they really only do bread,” she says. “They don’t do too many cakes, cookies, whatever. When you focus on just making bread, you’re going to get a better product.” Buff credits Bread Alone with whetting the Hudson Valley’s appetite for artisanal bread, as well as the steady increase of farmer’s markets throughout the past 30 years. “People began having more access to good bread through the markets, instead of having go all the way to the bakery,” she says. A Knead for Bread It was at a farmers’ market that Simone Williams first saw the need for handmade bread. She was looking for a way to teach her three-year-old son about farms and where food comes from, when she hit upon the idea of setting up at farmers’ markets and selling cheeses from many of the Valley’s small-batch cheesemakers who were too busy and short-staffed to attend the markets themselves. As she went from market to market with her son, she sampled the bread being sold. She was not impressed. “I thought, ‘Geez, this bread is terrible,” Williams recalls. “There’s got to be better bread out there that I can sell instead of this.” Her search led her to the breads of Highland’s David Meltzer, which she began selling alongside her selection of cheeses. When Meltzer told her that he was closing up his Highland shop, she saw an opportunity. “I told him, ‘We need to partner up because I can’t let you go out of business.Your bread is too good’.” They rented a space at the old high school in Beacon, managed to squeeze a

commercial oven through the door (“We had about that much room on either side,” she recalls, holding her fingers a whisker’s width apart), and All You Knead was born. Meltzer did all the baking,Williams handled all the business. They were successful enough that they soon opened a storefront on Beacon’s Main Street. Then one day Meltzer told Williams he was moving on. She had little prior baking experience. So for two weeks, she watched him bake. She watched his hands. She watched him do everything. “The last thing he said before he left was, ‘Call me if you need anything,’” she says. “And I never did. Three years later, we’re still here. I would not accept going out of business.” If anything, All You Knead’s breads are even better than they were when the shop first opened. The small storefront quickly sells out their daily batches of baguettes, sourdough loaves, and hearth breads, much to the disappointment of those who come late in the day. On a recent afternoon, an elderly woman stopping by the bakery was crestfallen to learn that the bakery did not currently have any of its gorgonzola pecan bread. Williams suggested that she try the jalapeno cheddar bread instead. “Well, eventually,” she said to Williams, leaning in for emphasis, “what I would like to do is try them all.” Better Late Than Never “I think we’re getting there,” says Tarah Gay of Kingston’s Outdated Café about the Hudson Valley’s flourishing bakery scene. When they first opened two years ago, Gay was surprised how hard it was to find bread that lived up to her standards. “We couldn’t find anything that looked or tasted like it was made by hand, and it made a really big difference when we found one that was,” she says. “We make everything else here ourselves by hand, so why use bread that wasn’t?” The bread they discovered was from Bonfiglio & Bread in Hudson. Like All You Knead, Bonfiglio & Bread was founded when Rachel Sanzone and 7/14 CHRONOGRAM CULINARY ADVENTURES 71


Clockwise from top left: Bonfiglio & Bread owners Gabriele Gulielmetti and Rachel Sanzone outside their bakery and cafe; baguettes and brioche at Bonfiglio; the front counter at Bonfiglio.

72 CULINARY ADVENTURES CHRONOGRAM 7/14


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Gabriele Gulielmetti realized that there was a lack of quality bread in their town. Although they had no professional training, they soon began baking bread and selling it out of their apartment every day at noon. When people began lining up at their apartment at 11:45 am, they realized they might be on to something. They now run a successful café and bakery on Hudson’s main thoroughfare, Warren Street, and sell their breads, bialys, and croissants throughout the region. While Gay mainly attributes Bonfiglio & Bread’s success to the quality of its product, she also thinks that more and more people in the Hudson Valley are finally ready to pay a little bit more for real bread. “Where I grew up in Burlington, Vermont, handmade bread was a common thing,” she says. “It’s all we had. And I think now New York’s finally headed that way.” And no one agrees with that sentiment more than Daniel Leader himself, who once hoped his bakery’s success would spur local amatuer and professional bakers alike to follow his lead and take breadmaking into their own patient and well-floured hands. “I’m very optimistic about the Hudson Valley,” he says. “But honestly, I thought this was all going to happen twenty years ago.” Cohen’s Bakery 89 Center Street, Ellenville (845) 647-7620 Cohensbakery.com Bread Alone 3962 Route 28, Boiceville (845) 657-6057 45 E. Market Street, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3108 22 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock (845) 679-2108 Breadalone.com

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All You Knead 308 Main Street, Beacon (845) 440-8530 Outdated Cafe 314 Wall Street, Kingston (845) 331-0030 Bonfiglio & Bread 748 Warren Street, Hudson (518) 822-0277

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business directory

Accommodations Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa 220 North Road, Milton, NY (877) 7-INN-SPA; (845) 795-1310 buttermilkfallsinn.com Spruceton Inn West Kill, NY sprucetoninn.com

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Animal Sanctuaries Catskill Animal Sanctuary 316 Old Stage Road, Saugerties, NY (845) 336-8447 CASanctuary.org Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary Willow, NY (845) 679-5955 WoodstockSanctuary.org

Antiques Hyde Park Antiques Center 4192 Albany Post Road, Hyde Park, NY (845) 229-8200 hydeparkantiques.net

Architecture BuildingLogic Inc (845) 443-0657 BuildingLogicInc.com Richard Miller, AIA 28 Dug Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4480 richardmillerarchitect.com

Art Galleries & Centers Bennington Museum 75 Main Street, Bennington, VT (802) 447-1571 benningtonmuseum.org Center for Metal Arts 44 Jayne Street, Florida, NY (845) 651-7550 centerformetalarts.com info@centerformetalarts.com The Center for Metal Arts is part of a working studio offering intro and master classes in working with metals in Florida’s 1890’s Icehouse. Workshop details and registration are online at centerformetalarts.com. The Center for 76 BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Metal Arts is open for self-guided tours on Saturdays from 10-2, and weekdays by appointment.

Clark Art Institute Williamstown, MA (413) 458-2303 clarkart.edu Dorsky Museum SUNY New Paltz 1 Hawk Drive New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3844 newpaltz.edu/museum sdma@newpaltz.edu Gallery 66 66 Main Street, Cold Spring, NY (845) 809-5838 gallery66ny.com Longyear Gallery 785 Main Street, Margaretville, NY (845) 586-3270 longyeargallery.org Mark Gruber Gallery New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241 markgrubergallery.com Motorcyclepedia Museum 250 Lake Street (Route 32) Newburgh, NY (845) 569-9065 Olana State Historic Site (518) 828-0135 olana.org Omi International Arts Center 1405 County Route 22, Ghent, NY artomi.org Phoenicia/Shandaken Studio Tour shandakenart.com Saint Francis Gallery Route 102, South Lee, MA (413) 717-5199 saintfrancisgallery.com Storm King Art Center (845) 534-3115 stormkingartcenter.org Unframed Artists Gallery 173 Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-5482 unframedartistsgallery.com

Uptown Gallery and Kingston Festival of the Arts 296 Wall Street, Kingston, NY kingstonfestival.org Vassar College: The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 437-5632 fllac.vassar.edu Williams College Museum of Art wcma.williams.edu Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2079 byrdcliffe.org

Art Supplies Catskill Art & Office Supply Kingston, NY: (845) 331-7780 Poughkeepsie, NY: (845) 452-1250 Woodstock, NY: (845) 679-2251 catskillart.com R & F Handmade Paints 84 Ten Broeck Avenue, Kingston, NY (800) 206-8088 rfpaints.com

Artisans culture + commerce project 428 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-9219 cultureandcommerceproject.com

Attorneys Traffic and Criminally Related Matters. Karen A. Friedman, Esq., President of the Association of Motor Vehicle Trial Attorneys 30 East 33rd Street, 4th Floor New York, NY (845) 266-4400 or (212) 213-2145 k.friedman@msn.com newyorktrafficlawyer.com Representing companies and motorists throughout New York State. Speeding, Reckless Driving, DWI, Trucking Summons and Misdemeanors, Aggravated Unlicensed Matters, Appeals, Article 78 Cases. 27 Years of Trial Experience.

Audio & Video Markertek Video Supply markertek.com

Auto Sales & Services Fleet Service Center 185 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4812 Kinderhook Toyota 1908 New York 9H, Hudson, NY (518) 822-9911 kinderhooktoyota.com

Beverages Binnewater (845) 331-0504 binnewater.com

Books Monkfish Publishing 22 East Market Street, Suite 304, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4861 monkfishpublishing.com

Bookstores Mirabai of Woodstock 23 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2100 mirabai.com Olde Warwick Booke Shoppe 31 Main Street, Warwick, NY (845) 544-7183 yeoldewarwickbookshoppe.com warwickbookshoppe@hotmail.com

Building Services & Supplies Associated Lightning Rod Co. (518) 789-4603, (845) 373-8309, (860) 364-1498 alrci.com Cabinet Designers 747 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2200 cabinetdesigners.com Glenn’s Wood Sheds (845) 255-4704


H. Houst & Son Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2115 hhoust.com Herrington’s Hillsdale, NY: (518) 325-3131 Hudson, NY: (518) 828-9431 herringtons.com John A Alvarez and Sons 3572 Route 9, Hudson, NY (518) 851-9917 alvarezmodulars.com L Browe Asphalt Services (518) 479-1400 broweasphalt.com Millbrook Cabinetry & Design 2612 Route 44, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-3006 millbrookcabinetryanddesign.com N & S Supply nssupply.com info@nssupply.com Williams Lumber & Home Centers (845) 876-WOOD williamslumber.com

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Cinemas Rosendale Theater Collective Rosendale, NY rosendaletheatre.org Upstate Films 6415 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck (845) 876-2515 132 Tinker Street, Woodstock (845) 679-6608, NY upstatefilms.org

Clothing & Accessories Rhinebeck Department Store 1 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-5500 rhinebeckstore.com Theresa & Co. 303 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-4202

Computer Services Tech Smiths 45 North Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 443-4866 tech-smiths.com

Crafts People 262 Spillway Road, West Hurley, NY (845) 331-3859 craftspeople.us

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Stephen Fabrico Ceramic Designs: Ceramic Studio established in 1980 76 Church Street, Bloomington, NY (845) 853-3567 (2 miles North of Rosendale) Functional pottery, garden objects, bird houses, feeders, baths, planters, garden sculptures (Various sizes). Garden tours by appointment. Call for details and directions.

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Dance Lessons

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Tracking Wonder - The Art & Science of Captivating Creativity Jeffrey Davis, Founder, Accord, NY (845) 679-9441 trackingwonder.com

Craft Galleries

Got2LINDY Dance Studios (845) 236-3939 got2lindy.com

Farm Markets & Natural Food Stores Adam’s Fairacre Farms Newburgh, NY: (845) 569-0303 Lake Katrine, NY: (845) 336-6300 Poughkeepsie, NY: (845) 454-4330 adamsfarms.com Apple Bin Farm Market Route 9W, 810 Broadway Ulster Park, NY, (845) 339-7229 theapplebinfarmmarket.com Berkshire Co Op Market 42 Bridge Street, Great Barrington, MA (413) 528-9697 berkshire.coop Hawthorne Valley Farm Store 327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7500 hawthornevalleyfarm.org storeadmin@hawthornevalleyfarm.org A full-line natural foods store set on a 400-acre Biodynamic farm in central Columbia County with on-farm organic Bakery, Kraut Cellar and Creamery. Farm-fresh foods include cheeses, yogurts, raw milk, breads, pastries, sauerkraut, and more. Two miles east of the Taconic Parkway at the Harlemville/ Philmont exit. Monday-Sunday, 7:30am to 7pm.

Hudson Valley Farmers Market Pitcher Lane, Red Hook, NY 7/14 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY 77


Pennings Farm Market & Orchards 161 South Route 94, Warwick, NY (845) 986-1059 penningsfarmmarket.com Sunflower Natural Foods Market 75 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5361 sunflowernatural.com info@sunflowernatural.com

Financial Advisors Third Eye Associates, Ltd. 38 Spring Lake Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 752-2216 thirdeyeassociates.com

Gardening & Garden Supplies Mac’s Agway 68 Firehouse Lane, Red Hook, NY (845) 876-1559, 145 Route 32N, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0050

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Northern Dutchess Botanical Gardens 389 Salisbury Turnpike, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2953 NDBGonline.com The Crafted Garden (845) 858-6353 thecraftedgarden.com

Graphic Design Annie Internicola, Illustrator annieillustrates.com

Hardware Stores Herzog’s True Value Home Center Kingston Plaza, Kingston, NY (845) 338-6800 herzogs.com

Home Improvement Gentech LTD 3017 US Route 9W, New Windsor, NY (845) 568-0500 gentechltd.com

Interior Design New York Designer Fabric Outlet 3143 Route 9, Valatie, NY (518) 758-1555 nydfo.myshopify.com

Jewelry, Fine Art & Gifts Dreaming Goddess 44 Raymond Avenue Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2206 DreamingGoddess.com Hummingbird Jewelers 23A East Market Street Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4585 hummingbirdjewelers.com hummingbirdjewelers@hotmail.com 78 BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Kitchenwares Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6208 warrenkitchentools.com

Close Encounters With Music (800) 843-0788 cewm.org Creative Theatre: Muddywater Players

The Hudson Valley’s culinary emporium for anyone who loves to cook or entertain. A selection of fine cutlery, professional cookware, appliances, barware and serving pieces. An assortment of machines for fine coffee brewing.  Expert sharpening on premises. Open seven days. 

Route 17M, Monroe, NY (845) 294-9465 CTMWP.org

Landscaping

Helsinki on Broadway

Augustine Landscaping & Nursery 9W & Van Kleecks Lane Kingston, NY (845) 338-4936 augustinenursery.com Coral Acres, Keith Buesing, Topiary, Landscape Design, Rock Art (845) 255-6634 Webster Landscape Sheffield, MA (413) 229-8124 websterlandscapes.com

Lawyers & Mediators Ranni Law Firm 148 North Main Street, Florida, NY (845) 651-0999 rannilaw.com Schneider, Pfahl & Rahm, LLP Woodstock: (845) 679-9868 New York City: (212) 629-7744 schneiderpfahl.com

Marketing DragonSearch (845) 383-0890 dragonsearchmarketing.com dragon@dragonsearch.net

Musical Instruments Francis Morris Violins Great Barrington, NY (413) 528-0165 francismorrisviolins.com

Organizations Hudson Valley Current HudsonValleyCurrent.org

Performing Arts Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Bethel, NY (800) 745-3000 bethelwoodscenter.org Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Inc

Katonah, NY (914) 232-1252 caramoor.org

Falcon Music & Art Productions 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro, NY (845) 236 7970 liveatthefalcon.com 405 Columbia Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-4800 helsinkihudson.com Kaatsbaan International Dance Center 120 Broadway, Tivoli, NY (845) 757-5106 kaatsbaan.org facebook.com/kaatsbaan Tannery Pond Concerts Darrow School, New Lebanon, NY (888) 820-1696 tannerypondconcerts.org The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio 339 Central Ave, Albany, NY (518) 465-5233 thelinda.org The Linda provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personal with worldrenowned artists, Academy Awardwinning directors, headliner comedians and local, regional, and national artists on the verge of national recognition. An intimate, affordable venue, serving beer and wine, The Linda is a night out you won’t forget.

The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College Annandale-on-Hudson, NY (845) 758-7900 fischercenter.bard.edu

Pet Services & Supplies Pet Country 6830 Rt. 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-9000

Photography Artcraft Camera & Digital 300 Plaza Road, Kingston, NY (845) 331-3141 artcraftcamera.com Deborah DeGraffenreid Photography DeborahDegraffenreid.com Fionn Reilly Photography Saugerties, NY (845) 802-6109 fionnreilly.com

Picture Framing Atelier Renee Fine Framing The Chocolate Factory, 54 Elizabeth Street, Suite 3, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-1004 atelierreneefineframing.com renee@atelierreneefineframing.com A visit to Red Hook must include stopping at this unique workshop! Combining a beautiful selection of moulding styles and mats with conservation quality materials, expert design advice, and skilled workmanship, Renee Burgevin, owner and Certified Picture Framer, has over 26 years experience. Special services include shadow-box and oversize framing as well as fabricwrapped and French matting. Also offering mirrors.

Pools & Spas Aqua Jet 1606 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-8080 aquajetpools.com

Real Estate Catskill Farm Builders catskillfarms.blogspot.com Paula Redmond Real Estate Inc. (845) 677-0505, (845) 876-6676 paularedmond.com

Recreation Cold Spring Custom Kayaks Cold Spring, NY (914) 382-6068 csckayaks.com

Schools Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-5343 caryinstitute.org Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7092 hawthornevalleyschool.org info@hawthornevalleyschool.org Located in central Columbia County, NY and situated on a 400-acre working farm, Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School supports the development of each child and provides students with the academic, social, and practical skills needed to live in today’s complex world. Also offering parent-child playgroups and High School boarding. Local busing. Nurturing living connections, from early childhood through grade 12.

Montgomery Montessori School 136 Clinton Street, Montgomery, NY (845) 401-9232 montgomeryms.com Montgomery Montessori encompasses students from PreK-8th grade. We believe that every child has the right to go to a school that is a perfect match for them. Montessori is a philosophy with the fundamental principle that a child learns best within a social environment,


which supports each individual’s unique development. We are committed to the “whole child” approach to education as well as the enrichment of the mind, body, and spirit. 

Mount Saint Mary College 330 Powell Avenue, Newburgh, NY (845) 569-3225 msmc.edu Mountain Laurel Waldorf School 16 South Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0033 mountainlaurel.org Primrose Hill School Elementary and Early Childhood Education inspired by the Waldorf Philosophy 23 Spring Brook Park, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-1226 primrosehillschool.com Located on 7 acres in the village of Rhinebeck with a farm, Primrose Hill School is currently accepting applications for our mixed age kindergarten, 1st, and 2nd Grades. Please inquire if you are interested in grades 3 and higher. Contact (845) 8761226 or info@primrosehillschool.com.

The Manitou School 1656 Route 9D, Cold Spring, NY (646) 295-7349 manitouschool.org Wild Earth Wilderness School New Paltz / High Falls area, NY (845) 256-9830 wildearthprograms.org info@wildearthprograms.org

Specialty Food Stores Clinton Cheese and Provisions 2411 Salt Point Turnpike, Clinton Corners, NY clintonprovisions.com

Summer Camps Renaissance Kids 1821 Route 376, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 452-4225 renkids.org

Tourism Historic Huguenot Street Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1660 Town Tinker Tube Rental Bridge Street, Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-5553 towntinker.com

Transportation Royal Chariot Car Service (845) 876-3000 royalchariotcarservice.com

Stoutridge Vineyard 10 Ann Kaley Lane, Marlboro, NY (845) 236-7620 stoutridge.com

Weddings Dream Ceremonies (845) 255-5726 facebook.com/dreamceremonies1 yiskah7@gmail.com Through poetry and prayer from many traditions, Jessica will help you create the ceremony of your dreams! Interfaith, Multicultural, Spiritual: Weddings, Vow Renewal, Baby Naming, Rites of Passage. Rev. Jessica (Yiskah) Koock, MA, was ordained by the Universal Life Church Monastery in 1990.

ROOTS & WINGS / Rev Puja Thomson P.O. Box 1081, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2278 rootsnwings.com/ceremonies puja@rootsnwings.com Rev. Puja A. J. Thomson will help you create a heartfelt ceremony that uniquely expresses your commitment, whether you are blending different spiritual, religious, or ethnic traditions, are forging your own, or share a common heritage. Puja’s calm presence and lovely Scottish voice add a special touch. “Positive, professional, loving, focused, and experienced.”

business directory

SUNY New Paltz School of Fine and Performing Arts New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3860 newpaltz.edu/artnews

Vineyards

Wine & Liquor Miron Wine and Spirits 15 Boices Lane, Kingston, NY (845) 336-5155 mironwineanspirits.com

Workshops Hudson Valley Photoshop Training, Stephen Blauweiss (845) 339-7834 hudsonvalleyphotoshop.com

Writing Services Peter Aaron peteraaron.org info@peteraaron.org Wallkill Valley Writers New Paltz, NY (845) 750-2370 wallkillvalleywriters.com khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com Write with WVW. Weekly workshop meetings. New series begins Fall 2014. Registration information available at wallkillvalleywriters.com or by email: khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com. 7/14 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY 79


whole living guide

THE NEW AGE OF DIGITAL FITNESS ARE APPS, GADGETS, AND SOCIAL MEDIA TURNING WELLNESS INTO AN OUT-OF-BODY EXPERIENCE?

by wendy kagan

illustration by annie internicola

M

ike Olsen still has the polo shirt that he wore in 2008 when he was at his heaviest—283 pounds, to be exact. “It reminds me of an umbrella now, or a hammock,” he says. Six years later and 100 pounds lighter, thanks to a fitness and diet revamp that has melted the pudge off and replaced it with muscle, you’ll find him sporting different clothes—and one telltale gadget on his wrist. “It’s a Fitbit, and it’s one of my favorite tools,” says Olsen, 33, of New Windsor. “It keeps track of how many steps I take each day, how many miles I travel on foot, how many calories I burn, how many flights of stairs I walk up—I don’t know how it does that, it blows my mind—and how many minutes I’ve been active,” he says. “Oh, and it’s also a watch.” One of several motion-tracking wristbands on the market these days, the Fitbit helps him set and reach his daily goals, which are anything but modest.The five-footeleven, sixth-grade English teacher strives to take no less than 20,000 steps and burn 3,500 calories daily. “I don’t hit that every day,” says Olsen. “But at night if I feel my wrist vibrate to let me know I’ve reached my goal, it’s a great feeling.” Survival of the (High-Tech) Fittest These days, if you want to work out, plug yourself in. If you need to lose weight, log on. Time for boot camp? Boot up. Gadgets, apps, and social media tools for health and fitness are all the rage. Wearable activity trackers like the Fitbit, Jawbone, and NikeFuel are the accessories of choice for the fit and wannabe fit alike. (Despite a recall of its Fitbit Force model earlier this year after some customers complained that the device gave them rashes, Fitbit still leads the pack with 67 percent of market share.) Don’t want to invest in a multipurpose wristband or clip-on tracker? There’s a motion-tracking app for your Android, too, such as the free Pacer pedometer. For calorie counters, food-tracking apps like MyFitnessPal, Daily Burn, and My Diet Diary will crunch the numbers. There are even “smart scales” like the Withings Smart Body Analyzer, which do a lot more than give you your weight; they also measure your body mass index, heart rate, and air quality. (No, they don’t tell you your fortune.) As if to validate the runaway trend in health and fitness techware, Apple announced last month the creation of HealthKit, a new platform that will act as a single interface on your iPhone to assemble data about your health—everything from your sleep quality and weight to blood pressure and nutrition. The technology will become available to iPhone users in the form of a new Health app introduced with iOS8, due out this fall—and one of the most amazing features will be its ability to send critical health data directly to your doctor. Could this be the future of preventive care? Local digital entrepreneur Dan Stone believes that it is. Stone, who is a

80 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 7/14

principal at Evolving Media Network, a Kingston-based digital design-andbuild firm, has embraced the cyber health trend with the zeal of a tech geek— if not an exercise junkie. “I’m not trying to be superfit,” says Stone. “Instead, I’m using these devices to create more awareness.” Stone has three gadgets in his arsenal—a Fitbit Flex, a Withings scale, and a Withings blood pressure monitor. Each one costs about $100, but Stone says it’s a worthwhile investment to have key information about his health literally at his fingertips. As for HealthKit, Stone will be an early adopter. “I want to have all the data [that my gadgets collect] in one place, but to do that right now you have to engage in some hackery. What HealthKit will do is give you one centralized location to report the data.” If it all seems futuristic, Stone points out that the technology has been going in this direction since the advent of the personal computer in the 1970s. “It’s part of a whole movement called the Quantified Self—which is a group of people who focus on using computers to log personal information and aggregate data about themselves.”You might think of it as the Me Generation morphed into the Virtual Me Generation—a kind of cyber-navel-gazing that has the potential, if we use it right, to make us healthier in the long run. Real Foods & Online Inspirations Olsen may love his Fitbit, but initially, it was a much more primitive form of technology that helped him revamp his body. It was a security video camera. “I was at one of those Putt Putt mini-golf places, and I went inside to get my gear. I looked up and saw a very overweight, unhealthy-looking man from behind on the [surveillance monitor] screen. The first thing that came to my mind was, ‘Wow, that guy is really fat.’ But then I took a step forward and he took a step forward. I took a step backward and he took a step backward. I didn’t break down and cry,” says Olsen, “but it was the worst feeling ever, to know that was me. It was my rock bottom. I had a two-month-old daughter at home, and I didn’t want to be the dad who couldn’t play with her because he was too big to move. I knew from then on that I needed to drop weight and not feel like that and look like that.” Olsen’s initial, predigital attempts to change his diet and lifestyle resulted in slow progress. “I would drop 10 or 20 pounds, but then I’d get stuck and have to change something at the gym or in my diet,” he says. It took him four years to shed the first 50 pounds—but he dropped the last 50 pounds in just the past two years. In the end, it came down to food choices. “I was really able to lose a lot of weight and get healthy because of what entered through my lips. I’d been eating foods that were very unhealthy; as a new dad, it had been easier to go through the fast food drive-thru. Gradually, I changed that.When I made the commitment to eating real, whole foods, it was like taking Earth medicine.


7/14 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING 81


“My job is working with dis-harmonic patterns and imbuing wellness” - Jipala R. Kagan L.Ac Accepting new clients Practice expanding

TRANSPERSONAL ACUPUNCTURE 10 Years in Practice

Call: (845) 340 8625 Accepting insurances: Empire BCBS

www.transpersonalacupuncture.com

Transformational Energy Work Priscilla Bright, MA

Private practice in Rhinebeck & New Paltz, NY, and mid-town Manhattan. Phone sessions also available. Profound individual energy-healing work with the former School Dean of the world-renowned Barbara Brennan School of Healing and presenter at Omega Institute and NYC Open Center. • Reconnect with your intuitive inner awareness • Open blocked energies • Increase relaxation - decrease stress • Learn skills for energy self-care • Life-transitions - career issues - relationships www.priscillabright.com • priscilla@priscillabright.com • 845-417-8261 FREE INITIAL PHONE CONSULTATION

Quantum Healing Hypnosis Therapy * Release paralyzing emotional holds and fears, Obtain missing information, insights, and a comprehensive healing; * Access the root causes of physical, emotional, relationship, and financial issues, bring these issues to peace and resolution.

Mia McDermott RHINEBECK,NY Consulting Hypnotist Akashic Records Consultant mia@seeds-love.com ( 845)-264-1388

82 WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Conventional Hypnosis Therapies •

• • • • •

Alternative Cancer Treatments Pain Relief Anti-Aging Weight Loss Stress Management Child Hypnosis

Akashic Records Reading

I feel like a brand-new person.” Something else happened in the last two years that helped Olsen transform: He tapped into the power of social media. “Instagram is where I do most of my fitness and health posting,” he says. “I put my journey on there.” Olsen, who goes by the handle EatRightTrainRight, has about 1,000 followers on Instagram and posts about once a day; he also uses Twitter. “I’ll put up a recipe, a workout, or whatever I’m doing—whether it’s walking the bridge, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or taking the dog for a walk. I like to remind people that getting fit doesn’t have to mean going to the gym.” Social media keeps him accountable, and it also gives him a chance to see what like-minded individuals are doing. Such information-sharing has been invaluable. “People that I follow would post links on the negative aspects of wheat or sugar or alcohol. I was able to see, wow, this is why I’m not as healthy as I want to be—because I have this or that in my diet. I used to think I could eat a three- or four-dollar bag of pretzels after school, but that wasn’t a good choice. Now I’ll have almonds or bananas or Greek yogurt, something with real nutrition. Instagram brought all that to the surface.” Motivation, Yes—Accuracy, No Not everyone is waving their pompoms about the digital health and fitness craze. Keith Laug—a personal trainer and the owner of Hudson Valley Fitness in Beacon—views the new trend with cautious skepticism. He doesn’t use apps or gadgets himself, but quite a few of his clients come into his bootcamp classes or one-on-one sessions wearing activity trackers like the Fitbit or NikeFuel. “They have varying results, because the accuracy of these devices is not that great,” says Laug. One client used two different activity trackers when she went out for a run and got two totally different results. Another client’s wristband signaled that he reached his goal at eight in the morning, before he’d even started his workout. Laug has also seen gadgets get lost or broken, especially during activities that involve sweating or water. “A lot of clients will use one for a while and get something out of it, but then they’ll see the inaccuracies and it just turns into a fancy watch,” he says. “Every month, there’s another technology coming out, another app or wearable; they’re trying to tackle the inaccuracies, but it’s going to be hard to do,” adds Laug. “Especially when it comes to measuring your fitness levels. With that, you’re better off working with a trainer or fitness professional to get an accurate reading of where you’re at.” Offering the tech-expert point of view, Stone agrees that step-tracking technologies still have a good deal of kinks: “Your body has a lot of motions to it, so figuring that out through a gadget on your wrist isn’t easy.” But he ensures that other device features, like blood pressure monitoring and GPS, are trustworthy. And despite his grainof-salt talk, Laug concedes that apps, gadgets, and social media can be great motivational tools. “If it’s going to get you up off the couch and moving, I’m all for it,” says Laug. “But you shouldn’t be relying on it.” My Gadget, My Self As first-generation technology, digital fitness is still evolving; whether it’s a passing fad or here to stay remains to be seen.With the endless proliferation of apps and gadgets, it seems like any day now we’ll all have USB ports installed in the backs of our heads. A teched-out life is not for everyone—and many of us will prefer to tune into our own bodies without the help of a gadget. And clearly, not all of the devices will stick around; some will appeal only to a select geek population. One new wearable called the Lumo-Lift attaches to your lapel and lets you know when you’re slouching—kind of like a Virtual Mom. Is too much technology a bad thing? While the risk of radiation from most of these gadgets is minimal, many apps require the near-constant use of cell phones—which do put out serious radiofrequency energy that can impact health. But most of us have a cell phone attached like a fifth limb anyway. Why not get more out of it? As the science morphs and transforms, many people—including Olsen, who continues to inspire with his story—will take advantage of the selfknowledge that it offers. Sleep tracking, step counting, BMI indexing, heart rate monitoring—bring it on, says Stone. “Data like this might help you make better diet choices, get out for a walk, go to bed earlier, and really see the relationship between your health and the way you’re living your life.”


whole living guide

High Ridge Traditional Healing Arts

Acupuncture Herbal Medicine Qigong and Meditation Classes Allergies Women’s Health Weight Management

Carolyn Rabiner, L. Ac., Dipl. C.H. Board Certified (NCCAOM) 7392 S. Broadway (Rt.9) North Wing of Red Hook Emporium

Acupuncture

371A Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 546-5358 creeksideacupuncture.com Private treatment rooms, attentive oneon-one care, affordable rates, sliding scale. Accepting Blue Cross, Hudson Health Plan, No-Fault and other insurances. Stephanie Ellis graduated magna cum laude from Columbia University in pre-medical studies. She completed her acupuncture and Chinese medicine degree in 2001 as valedictorian of her class, and started her acupuncture practice in Rosendale that same year. Ms. Ellis uses a combination of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Classical Chinese Medicine, Japanese-style acupuncture, and trigger-point acupuncture. Creekside Acupuncture is located in a building constructed of non-toxic, eco-friendly materials.

Legga, Inc. New Paltz, NY (845) 729-0608

Aromatherapy Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 joanapter@earthlink.net

Assisted Living Centers Camphill Ghent 2542 State Route 66, Chatham, NY (518) 392-2760 camphillghent.org

Jennifer Axinn-Weiss, MFA, CHT

108 Main Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-4646 ivylodgeassistedliving.com

Newtoninstitute.org

845 876-8828 c 845 242-7580

Astrology Joyous Sky

Kingston, NY (845) 797-3458 planetwaves.net

(845) 340-8625 transpersonalacupuncture.com

With a Certified Life Between LivesÂŽ Practitioner Offering past life regression, medical hypnosis & sand play modalities for healing body, mind & spirit.

Clearmindarts.com | sandplay555@frontier.com

87 East Market Street, Suite 102, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-2424 highridgeacupuncture.com

Transpersonal Acupuncture

Journey Beyond Time

Ivy Lodge Assited Living

(845)246-2703 joyoussky.com

1772 South Road, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-6060

www.highridgeacupuncture.com

See also Massage Therapy

High Ridge Traditional Healing Arts, Oriental Medicine, Carolyn Rabiner, L Ac

Hoon J. Park, MD, PC

Some insurances accepted

Planet Waves

Body and Skincare

SINCE 2001

~Private treatment rooms ~Attentive one-on-one care ~Sliding scale rates ~Accepting Blue Cross Blue Shield, Hudson Health Plan and no-fault insurance

Dermasave Labs, Inc. 3 Charles Street, Suite 4, Pleasant Valley, NY (845) 635-4087 hudsonvalleyskincare.com

Stephanie Ellis, L.Ac. 371A Main Street Rosendale NY (845) 546-5358 www.creeksideacupuncture.com

7/14 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY 83

whole living directory

Creekside Acupuncture and Natural Medicine, Stephanie Ellis, L.Ac.

Animal Assisted Therapy

Red Hook, NY 845-758-2424


Counseling

Judy Swallow MA, LCAT, TEP

PSYCHOTHERAPIST • CONSULTANT

Rubenfeld Synergy® Psychodrama Training

~

25 Harrington St, New Paltz, NY 12561 (845) 255-7502

The Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy (845) 646-3191 theaccordcenter.com

Dentistry & Orthodontics The Center For Advanced Dentistry‚ Bruce D. Kurek, DDS, FAGD 494 Route 299, Highland, NY (845) 691-5600 thecenterforadvanceddentistry.com

Herbal Medicine & Nutrition Empowered By Nature

Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine... A collection of life-changing columns from the Publisher of Chronogram.

whole living directory

www.codhill.com

Available at independent bookstores throughout the Hudson Valley

1129 Main Street, 2nd Floor, Fishkill, NY (845) 416-4598 EmpoweredByNature.net lorrainehughes54@gmail.com Lorraine Hughes, Registered Herbalist (AHG) and ARCB Certified Reflexologist offers Wellness Consultations that therapeutically integrate Asian and Western Herbal Medicine and Nutrition with their holistic philosophies to health. This approach is grounded in Traditional Chinese Medicine with focus placed on an individual’s specific constitutional profile and imbalances. Please visit the website for more information and upcoming events.

Holistic Health Nestled in the heart of Ulster County’s Historic home town of Saugerties, New York, Ivy Lodge is a unique residence that offers support for gracious living. Private apartments, and handicapped accessibility throughout. Our Nurses, and 24 hour certified staff respectfully encourage residents to age in a place they’ll enjoy calling home. Traditional, Memory Support and Enhanced programs available. Tours Available 108 MAIN STREET, SAUGERTIES

IvyLodgeAssistedLiving.com

845-246-4646 • Communityliaisonnurse@Ivylodgeassistedliving.com

INTEGR ATE YOUR LIFE I T ’ S

A

B A L A N C I N G

A C T

HOLISTIC NURSE HEALTH CONSULTANT

Manage Stress • Apprehensions • Pain • Improve Sleep Release Weight • Set Goals • Change Habits Pre/Post Surgery • Fertility • Hypno Birthing Immune System Enhancement • Nutritional Counseling Past Life Regression • Intuitive Counseling Motivational & Spiritual Guidance

Breathe • Be Mindful • Let Go • Flow

H Y P N O S I S - C OAC H I N G Kary Broffman, R.N., C.H. 845-876-6753 • karybroffman.com 84 WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Cassandra Currie, MS, RYT‚ Holistic Health Counselor 41 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 532-7796 holisticcassandra.com

womenwithwisdom.com nplumer@hvi.net Nancy is an intuitive healer, spiritual counselor and long time yoga teacher. Would you like to relieve stress, anxiety, fear, pain and increase your vitality, joy, balance and connect to your True Self? Nancy guides one to release blocked or stuck energy that shows up as dis-ease/illness/anxiety/ discomfort/fear and supports one to open to greater self-acceptance, integration and wholeness.

Omega Institute for Holistic Studies (800) 944-1001 eomega.org

Priscilla Bright, MA Rhinebeck & Kingston, NY (845) 417-8261 priscillabright.com

Seeds of Love Rhinebeck, NY (845)-264-1388 seeds-love.com

Woodstock Mindfulness Woodstock, NY woodstockmindfulness.com Margaret@woodstockmindfulness.com

Hospitals Health Quest 45 Reade Place, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 283-6088 health-quest.org

Hypnosis

John M. Carroll

Clear Mind Arts Hypnosis

715 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 338-8420 johnmcarrollhealer.com

(845) 876-8828 clearmindarts.com sandplay555@frontier.com

John is a spiritual counselor, healer, and teacher. He uses guided imagery, morphology, and healing energy to help facilitate life changes. He has successfully helped his clients to heal themselves from a broad spectrum of conditions, spanning terminal cancer to depression.

Kary Broffman, RN, CH (845) 876-6753 Karyb@mindspring.com 18 plus years of helping people find their balance. As a holistic nurse consultant, she weaves her own healing journey and education in psychology, nursing, hypnosis and integrative nutrition to help you take control of your life and to find True North. She also assists pregnant couples with hypnosis and birthing.

Nancy Plumer, Energy Healing and Spiritual Counseling Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-2252

Massage Therapy Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 apteraromatherapy.com joanapter@earthlink.net Luxurious massage therapy with medicinal grade essential oils; raindrop technique, emotional release, facials, hot stones. Animal care, health consultations, spa consultant, classes and keynotes. Offering full line of Young Living essential oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, children’s and non-toxic cleaning products.

Meditation Zen Mountain Monastery 871 Plank Road, Mount Tremper, NY (845) 688-2228 mro.org registrar@mro.org


Osteopathy Stone Ridge Healing Arts Joseph Tieri, DO, & Ari Rosen, DO, 3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge; 138 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 687-7589 stoneridgehealingarts.com Drs. Tieri and Rosen are NY State Licensed Osteopathic Physicians specializing in Osteopathic Manipulation and Cranial Osteopathy. Please visit our website for articles, links, books, and much more information. Treatment of newborns, children, and adults. By appointment.

Pilates Rhinebeck Pilates 23 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-5686 rhinebeckpilates.com

Plastic Surgery Loomis Plastic Surgery 225 Dolson Ave #302 Middletown, NY (845) 342-6884 drloomis.com

14 Scotchtown Avenue, Goshen, NY (845) 294-3312 winskicosmeticsurgery.com

Psychotherapy Janne Dooley, LCSW, Brigid’s Well New Paltz, NY (347) 834-5081 Brigidswell.com Janne@BrigidsWell.com Brigid’s Well is a psychotherapy, coaching and supervision practice. Janne Dooley, LCSW specializes in childhood trauma, addictions, codependency, relationship issues and inner child work. women’s workshop series begins in September. Call or email for information or to set up a consultation.

Judy Swallow, MA, LCAT, TEP 25 Harrington Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-7502 hvpi.net

Kent Babcock, LMSW, CSW: Psychotherapy for Men in Mid-Life & Older Stone Ridge, NY (845) 807-7147 kentagram@gmail.com At 64, late in my career, I am focusing my practice on working with older men -- providing opportunities to examine life retrospectively, in the here and now, and also around issues concerning death and dying. I also

Retreat Centers

Treat your symptoms

Hoon J. Park MD P.C.

naturally

Garrison Institute Route 9D, Garrison, NY (845) 424-4800 garrisoninstitute.org garrison@garrisoninstitute.com Retreats supporting positive personal and social change in a renovated monastery overlooking the Hudson River. Featuring Lama Surya Das: Summer Meditation Retreat - The Natural Great Awakening, July 12-19.

Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-6897 menla.org menla@menla.org

Sign Language Andrea Jordan Tadduni Stone Ridge, NY andrea.jordan@yahoo.com signingstudio.com

Hoon J. Park M.D. is a New York State Board Certified Medical Doctor in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and a New York State Certified Acupuncturist. Most insurance accepted including Empire Plan, Medicare, most private insurances, No-Fault, and Workers Compensation. You deserve victory over pain.

Acupuncture Physical Therapy Pain Management

298-6060

1772 South Road, Wappingers Falls ½ mile south of Galleria Mall

www.victory-over-pain.com

John M. Carroll H ,T ,S C EALER

EACHER

PIRITUAL

OUNSELOR

“ Miracles still do happen.” —Richard Brown, MD Author Stop Depression Now “ John Carroll is a most capable, worthy, and excellent healer of high integrity, compassion, and love.” —Gerald Epstein, MD Author Healing Visualizations

Check John’s website for more information johnmcarrollhealer.com or call 845-338-8420

Tarot Tarot-on-the-Hudson: Rachel Pollack Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-5797 rachelpollack.com rachel@rachelpollack.com Readings. Workshops. Private Mentoring.

Yoga Clear Yoga Iyengar Yoga in Rhinebeck 17B 6423 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6129 clearyogarhinebeck.com Classes for all levels and abilities, seven days a week. Iyengar Yoga builds strength, stamina, peace of mind, and provides a precise framework for a yoga practice based on what works for you. Class on July 4th: All levels from 10-11.30am. Balance: A workshop with Sheila Bunnell. 2-4pm. $30 sign up at Clearyogarhinebeck. com/events

Satya Yoga Center Rhinebeck and Catskill, NY (845) 876-2528 satyayogacenter.us

Wo o d s t o ck Mi nd ful nes s Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction SUMMER 2014 COURSES

Wednesday Evenings 6:30-9:00pm July 9 - August 27

—OR—

Sunday Mornings

9:30am-Noon July 13 - August 24 (& 1pm Fri August 22)

EACH COURSE INCLUDES 8 CLASSES AND A RETREAT DAY 8/23

Introduction to Mindfulness Class July 2, July 7, July 21, or August 7 MBCT coming in September! SEE WEBSITE FOR CLASS TIMES, LOCATIONS, AND REGISTRATION

www.Woodsto ck M i nd ful nes s. c o m

Overeating and Food Addiction Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy • Dissolve the Pattern of Overeating and Food Addiction in 10 Sessions!!! • Experience a gentle, supportive and finally very effective approach to healing this issue. • Develop accelerated deep and abiding emotional healing skills. • Learn how to take your power back while enjoying a balanced and pleasurable relationship with food and your body. Phone and In Person sessions available • 845 626 3191 theaccordcenter@gmail.com • www.theaccordcenter.com

©2014

7/14 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY 85

whole living directory

The Winski Center for Cosmetic Surgery

specialize in working with those having or suspecting Asperger Syndrome.


NER!

IN RD W A W YA TON

LINDA LAVIN! PO

Y D AN K B B A CR D E M A PUL

SATURDAY, JULY 19 - SHOWTIME 8PM After a sold out performance last year, TV and Broadway Icon Linda Lavin returns to Helsinki on Broadway with an all new show with her big band led by the multi-talented Billy Stritch. Singing show tunes and American Songbook standards and Proudly supported by telling show biz stories are what Linda does best and she’s here for one unforgettable night of music and merriment. You won’t want to miss Linda Lavin! The club opens for dinner at 6PM or in the restaurant after the show at 9:30

HELSINKI HUDSON 405 Columbia St Hudson 518.828.4800 helsinkihudson.com

CONOR OBERST

w/DAWES + THE BASEBALL PROJECT

THE LINDA WAMC’S PERFORMING ARTS STUDIO

339 CENTRAL AVENUE ALBANY WOMEN WITH VOICES PRESENTS

A FOOD FOR THOUGHT FILM

FRIDAY AUGUST 1

OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW

JUL 17 /67

PM -RECEP PM- FILM

TAINA ASILI

NEUTRAL MILK HOTEL

AUG 1 / 8pm

ARE AVAILABLE AT

The Brewery Ommegang store, The Green Toad (198 Main St, Oneonta) and the State Theatre Box Office (107 W State St/MLK Jr St, Ithaca) ON-SITE CAMPING AVAILABLE (EXTRA FEE) • LAWN CHAIRS ALLOWED • NO OUTSIDE FOOD OR DRINK

656 COUNTY HIGHWAY 33, COOPERSTOWN, NY • (607) 544-1800 • OMMEGANG.COM 86 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/14

BROKE HOUSEWIVES OF NEW YORK

JUL 18 / 8pm

JUL 26 / 8pm

JENNIFER MCMULLEN PRESENTS

SUNDAY AUGUST 3 SAT. SEPTEMBER 6

ALBANY POETS PRESENTS...

AUG 2 / 8pm

SEP 6 / 8pm

ASBURY SHORTS

SYD STRAW SEP 12 / 8pm

NEW YORK SHORT FILM CONCERT

SEP 13 / 8pm

TICKETS ONLINE AT

THELINDA.ORG OR CALL 518.465.5233 x4


the forecast

EVENT PREVIEWS & LISTINGS FOR JULY 2014

Soprano Ellie Dehn sings the title role in Carl Maria von Weber’s “Euryanthe” at Bard ‘s SummerScape.

Romantic Revival After an entire century in absentia from the American public eye, Carl Maria von Weber’s 1823 dark opera "Euryanthe" is finally seeing its first stateside revival since curtain call at the Metropolitan in 1914. The string of performances at Bard College, July 25 through August 3, is part of Bard SummerScape, which this year celebrates one of Weber’s contemporaries: Viennese-composer Franz Schubert. “We decided to set the opera in a gothic Victorian world to emphasize the repression of female sexuality in a very patriarchal world,” explains director Kevin Newbury. The influential German Romantic opera chronicles the journey of the title character (played by soprano Ellie Dehn), who is accused of infidelity in the Victorian age. “Think The Scarlet Letter meets Edgar Allen Poe and Tim Burton. Hopefully the setting will emphasize this theme of repressed female sexuality and the male fear of it. For us, nature represents jealousy and envy and the architecture of the home represents love and security. How these two worlds blend together was a driving force in our design.” For Newbury, who had previously helmed a modernized update of Richard Strauss’s “Die Liebe der Danae” at the 2011 Bard SummerScape, working on “Euryanthe” proved to be an experience of discovery as both an auteur and opera enthusiast. “While I was familiar with Weber’s work, I had never heard 'Euryanthe' until Bard asked me to take a look at it,” he admits. “As soon as I heard the work, I knew I wanted to direct it.” He also understands why it has taken 100 years for the work to see a revival here in the US, given the multidimensional approach Weber took while creating the storyline, which is filled with many unexpected twists and turns that make the opera a lot trickier to transfer into a live setting. “Euryanthe has what many consider to be a problematic libretto, complete with

certain unstageable coups de theatres and potentially confusing plot points,” Newbury explains. “It was a fun challenge to find solutions to these problems. I think the centennial certainly factored into the decision to present the opera and the work certainly fits into the rarely performed category that Bard is famous for producing.” And while the opera was originally conspired over 190 years ago, the subjects of public shaming and the scrutiny of women are unfortunately as prevalent today as they were back then—something that particularly struck a chord with Newbury on a thematic level. “The piece feels wildly contemporary to me,” he says. “In many parts of the world, the question of what a woman does with her body is still the source of great conflict and suffering.” Though he had worn many hats as a composer, conductor, pianist, guitarist, and even a critic, it was his opera works that immortalized Carl Maria Von Weber as one of the founding fathers of Romanticism. And “Euryanthe” remains his crown jewel, particularly distinctive in its development of the leitmotif, a recurring musical phrase associated with a singular character. For Newbury, such historic significance only increases the momentum for its upcoming revival. “I think it is an incredibly exciting time in opera,” Newbury says. “There are many innovative companies, composers, and directors on the scene. I think audiences often crave the rich trajectory of a night at the opera—especially when the cast features good actors, and the production is theatrical and visually and emotionally engaging.” “Euryanthe,” part of Bard SummerScape, runs July 25-August 3 at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. (845) 758-7900; Fishercenter.bard.edu. —Ron Hart 7/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 87


TUESDAY 1 BUSINESS & NETWORKING Digital Salon 7pm. Casual gathering of individuals interested in the purposeful use of the technologies of literacy, technological literacy, and literal technologies. Beahive Beacon, Beacon. 418-3731.

DANCE Introduction to Belly Dance Class 7-8pm. First Tuesday of every month. No experience necessary! Come check out a real belly dance class in a relaxed setting to get a glimpse into the exciting and exotic art of belly dance. Artspace at Ed Dempsey Tattoos, Woodstock. 594-8673.

LITERARY & BOOKS Open Mike with Chrissy Budzinski 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

MUSIC The Big Takeover 6pm. A unique, vibrant, and lively interpretation of reggae, ska, rocksteady, and world music. Riverfront Park, Beacon. Beaconmusicfactory.com. Blues & Dance Party with Big Joe Fitz & The LoFis 7-9pm. Join Big Joe Fitz and the LoFis for the best blues and dance party in the valley. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Introdution to Classic Blues Dance 6:30-7:30pm. $75. 4-week series. Instructors Linda and Chester Freeman. Boughton Place, Highland. Got2lindy.com. Landscape Oil Painting Classes with Loman Eng 1:30-5pm. Six-session series. Explore the concepts and techniques of the Hudson River and Barbizon schools of painting through the presentations and demonstrations by the instructor. Composition, value, color, and light will be discussed. All skill levels welcome. Town of Esopus Library, Port Ewen. 338-5580.

THURSDAY 3 ART GALLERIES AND EXHIBITS Susan Story Exhibit Opening reception July 6, 3pm-5pm Old Chatham Country Store and Café, Old Chatham. (518) 794-6227.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS East Fishkill Community Library Photography Group 7pm. First Thursday of every month. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

DANCE Les Oeufs de Fabergé 7:30pm. $25. The Friends of Tannersville Organization (FOTO) and 23Arts Initiative (23Ai) will kick off their inaugural summer series with a ballet tribute to the Ballets Russes. The performance will be presented in conjunction with principal dancers from the Connecticut Ballet and students from Academy of Dance and

Pre-Operative Spine Education Sessions Noon. First Thursday of every month. Whether you are scheduled for spine surgery or are considering it, the spine education session is an opportunity for you and your loved ones to receive more information. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 204-4299.

KIDS & FAMILY Cruiser’s Play Group 12-3pm. This group for mamas, papas, and caregivers looking to meet other babies and toddlers (ages 6-18 months) for activities, socialization, and friendship. Do you have a crawling, cruising, or toddling baby? We have a lively conversations about Life, music, teething, sleep, babyproofing, pooping, and eating. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624.

MUSIC

MUSIC

Cafe Singer Showcase with Barbara Dempsey and Dewitt Nelson 7-9pm. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

Aston Magna: Music from a Turbulent 17th-Century England 8pm. $35/$30 seniors/$5 student rush at the door/$15 under 30s. Aston Magna Music Festival presents “Galliards, laments and sonatas before and after the English Civil War.” The music of Dowland, Lawes, Lanier, Purcell, Blow, presented by Deborah Rentz-Moore, mezzo-soprano; David Ripley, baritone; Peter Sykes, organ; Catherine Liddell, theorbo and lute; Daniel Stepner and Danielle Maddon; baroque violin; Laura Jeppesen, viola da gamba. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. (800) 595-4849.

John Hiatt & The Combo and Robert Cray Band, Red, White, and Blues Summer Gala 6pm. $110/$95. Food and open bar and silent auction, performance. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Matt Luczak, Jonas Bers, and Andrew Morelli 8:30pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

Bakklash and Friends 9:30pm. Classic rock. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Phish 7:30pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Energy Clearing & Balancing 7-8pm. $10-20. Energy clearing and balancing for greater health, relaxation, and weight loss. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

Steve Katz 8pm. $25/$20. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

Private Spirit Guide Readings with Psychic Medium Adam Bernstein 12-6pm. First Tuesday of every month. $40 30 min/$75 hour. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Mixed Media with Loel Barr 9am-4pm. $290/$30 lab fee. Through July 3. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

WEDNESDAY 2

Tisziji Munoz Quartet 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. West Point Band Independence Day Celebration 8pm. West Point Military Academy, West Point. Usma.edu.

Music Invasion Film Festival This fourth of July, the Rosendale Theatre celebrates America’s Independence Day with a British invasion. Beginning at 9:30am, the theater will host its third annual reading of the Declaration of Independence, followed by the British invaders themselves—The Beatles. To celebrate the film’s 50th anniversary, the theater will present a new restoration of A Hard Day’s Night. Over the weekend, the theater will also screen Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me, a documentary about the best band that never made it. Director Drew DeNicola and Phoenicia-based author of the just-published Alex Chilton biography Holly GeorgeWarren will host a postscreening Q&A. Martin Scorsese’s The Band documentary The Last Waltz will also screen, along with the festival’s closer, the Talking Heads concert film Stop Making Sense. (845) 658-8989; Rosendaletheatre.org.

KIDS & FAMILY Fandom Day 3-4pm. Gush about what you like with other people who like it, too. Age: 13/7th grade+. Doctor Who, Teen Wolf, the Walking Dead, Supernatural, Sherlock, Harry Potter, Benedict Cumberbatch, Homestuck, Hetalia, Marvel, Black Veil Brides, Minecraft, Attack on Titan, Vampire Diaries, Soul Eater, Bleach, Divergent, The Hunger Games, The Fault in our Stars, Nerdfighteria. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Natalie Merchant 8pm. Hear the distinctive, multiplatinum activist-musician perform at the Ulster Performing Arts Center. A resident of the Hudson Valley, Merchant recently released her sixth solo studio album and the first of entirely original works, Natalie Merchant. Ulster Performing Arts Center (UPAC), Kingston. 339-6088.

Hip Hop Dance 5:15-6:15pm. Join in the ever-popular weekly hip hop dance workshop taught by dancer and choreographer Anthony Molina. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Swingin’ Newburgh 7-7:30pm. First Thursday of every month. Beginner swing dance lesson provided by Linda and Chester Freeman of Got2Lindy Dance Studios. Swing Shift Orchestra plays 7:30-9pm. Newburgh Brewing Company, Newburgh. Got2lindy.com.

Paul Cebar Tomorrow Sound 8pm. A funky brand of world-beat-influenced rock ‘n’ roll. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

LITERARY & BOOKS

FILM

MUSIC Birds of Chicago Noon. A soulful mix of folk, country, rhythm & blues. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Burnell Pines 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Keir Neuginger 8pm. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Puccini’s La Rondine: the Met Live in HD 6pm. $25/$20/$18/$15. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Syracuse & Siegel 8-10:30pm. With special guests. Catskill Mountain Pizza Company, Woodstock. 679-7969.

THEATER The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

CHRONOGRAM.COM VISIT Chronogram.com/events for additional calendar listings and staff recommendations.

88 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/14

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Germantown Independence Day Fireworks 9:30pm. Gates will open at 4pm for picnicking, food, drink and other vender sales, children’s activities, and fire and safety demonstrations, as well as live music by local bands—McGroving and Camp Creek. Palatine Park, Germantown. Germantownny.org. July 4th BBQ, Golf Tournament, and Breakaway with Robin Baker 2-9pm. Come celebrate America’s independence with great food, great music, and good times. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

THEATER Creative Arts (ADACA) Tannersville and Brooklyn studios. The Academy of Dance at the Orpheum performs “Les Oeufs de Fabergé”, a tribute to Diaghilev and the traditional Russian ballet featuring students from the Academy of Dance and Creative Arts Tannersville and Brooklyn studios and professional dancers from the New Jersey and Connecticut Ballets. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-2000.

Author Ken Lifshitz 3pm. Presenting his newest novel Monoville. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Family Fun Night: Sidewalk Chalk 6:30-7:30pm. Festoon the library’s sidewalks with your family and friends. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

SPIRITUALITY

THEATER

HV: Create 8:30am. First Friday of every month. Designers, artists, writers, teachers, coaches, musicians, scholars, and other intellectually curious, creative-minded people gather for facilitated round-table conversations, riffs on creativity and work, Icarus Sessions, community announcements. Marbletown Multi-Arts, Stone Ridge. 679-9441.

13th Annual Berkshires Arts Festival 10am-6pm. $13/$11 seniors/$5 students. Art and craft workshops, demonstrations, talks, activities for children, a dining tent, and live musical and theatrical performances. Ski Butternut, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-2000.

Hudson River Sightseeing Cruise 5:45pm. Hosted by Clinton Cheese and Provisions. Regional cheese display & a complimentary glass of wine from the ship’s captain. Waryas Park, Poughkeepsie. 266-0700.

Sound Healing Group Session 6-7pm. $10-20. Receive powerful sound healing with Quartz Singing Bowls, tuning forks, and Om chant. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

FRIDAY 4 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Schubert and the Long 19th Century 7pm. $10. Bard SummerScape. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu. Workingman’s Death Film Screening 8pm. $5-$10. Today’s manual laborers are no longer celebrated with hymns of praise. They must be content with encouraging one another that backbreaking work is better than no work at all. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. Basilicahudson.com.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Laryngectomy Support Group 11am-noon. First Thursday of every month. The Laryngectomy Support Group offers opportunities for individuals facing laryngeal cancer and individuals treated for laryngeal cancer to share their experiences, learn about communication options (electrolarynx and/ or voice prosthesis) and participate in community awareness projects. This group is open to family members and caregivers. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-7391. Learn to Meditate and Discover the Living Buddhas in Your Family 5pm. Through July 6. Adults, with or without children, are invited to attend. Children ages 6 and over who would enjoy their meditation for at least 3-5 minutes are invited along with their parents or caregivers. Open to all, this family retreat weekend is for those with or without previous meditation experience. Won Dharma Center, Claverack. (518) 851-2581.

Phish 7:30pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Tracy Bonham 10pm. $15. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Hudson Valley Garden Association Outing: Wethersfield 6-8pm. $12/$8 members. Join HVGA for a guided tour of one of the Hudson Valley’s best kept garden secrets-Wethersfield Garden in Amenia, NY. Garden staff will lead us through the Italian-inspired, 3-acre formal garden featuring water, topiary, terraces, and sculpture collection. Wethersfield Gardens, Amenia. 418-3640.

SPIRITUALITY Private Raindrop Technique Sessions with Donna Carroll 11:30am-6pm. First Thursday of every month. $75/one hour. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

THEATER Three Viewings 8pm. Best known for her stint as Laura Holt alongside Pierce Brosnin on the hit-NBC series “Remington Steele,” Stephanie Zimbalist comes to the Hudson Valley in a staging of Jeffrey Hatcher’s play “Three Viewings.” Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

A Reading of the Declaration of Independence 9:30am. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. The Founding Documents Come Alive 10am. Actors from the Williamstown Theatre Festival conjure the spirit of a nation in the making. Catch their rousing and raucous reading of the Declaration of Independence and the British reply, then visit the galleries for a close look at the documents themselves. The Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, MA. (413) 597-3055. Othello 8pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Three Viewings 8pm. Best known for her stint as Laura Holt alongside Pierce Brosnin on the hit-NBC series “Remington Steele,” Stephanie Zimbalist comes to the Hudson Valley in a staging of Jeffrey Hatcher’s play “Three Viewings.” Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Doumbek Beginner Drum Intesive Seminar 5pm. Through July 7. Meditation, yoga, and vegan fare also included with stay. Harmony Farms, Goshen. Harmonyfarmny.com. Vegan Cooking with Chef Rami Through July 7. Beginner drum class, yoga and meditation included. Harmony Farms, Goshen. Harmonyfarmny.com.

SATURDAY 5 ART GALLERIES AND EXHIBITS Inarticulate Incorporated: Foyer Frottage 5-8pm. The Shirt Factory, Kingston. 340-4660.

DANCE Salsa Lesson and Latin Dance Party with Carlos Osorio 8pm. $12 at the door. Bring out your Latin spirit! Join Carlos Osorio, founder of the Cumbia Spirit School of Dance for a fun, all-levels salsa class and then dance the night away at Kingston’s most artful new event space. Wine available. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 331-3261.


MUSIC THE PHOENICIA INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF THE VOICE

STEPHEN WOLF

The Phoenicia Festival of the Voice will be held July 30-August 3.

On a High Note When the Phoenicia International Festival of the Voice returns to the Catskills this July, it will have raised the bar—about two octaves higher. Celebrating its fifth season this year, the festival welcomes countertenor Brian Asawa to its mainstage. Asawa is one of the world’s foremost countertenors, having brought his powerful, flexible, and impressively high vocal range to such world-class venues as the Metropolitan Opera, the Palais Garnier in Paris, and Madrid’s Teatro Real. Capable of singing within typically female vocal registers—contralto, mezzo-soprano, and sometimes even soprano—countertenors are today relatively rare. The festival will feature Asawa in this summer’s edition of “Voices of Distinction,” a program of some of the most exceptional vocal works of the Baroque period. The artist will also host a free lecture titled “The Art of I’castratti,” in which he will discuss the historic, long-abandoned practice of castrating young singers as well as the vocal aesthetic of a modern countertenor. Another high note of the festival, and an accent of this year’s Spanish theme, will be a staging of Gioachino Rossini’s “The Barber of Seville.” Based on Pierre Beaumarchais’s comic French play of the same name, the opera buffa is one of the most popular and widely performed operas in the world—few today can hear its overture without Bugs Bunny coming to mind. Festival Executive Director Maria Todaro and internationally acclaimed baritone and Phoenicia newcomer Lucas Meachem will top the bill, singing the principle roles of the beautiful Rosina and the clever Figaro. Phoenicia’s festival does not limit its many voices to the realm of classical song. Carey Harrison, a Catskills resident and award-winning novelist, actor, and playwright, will perform the world premiere of his new play “The Seven Favorite Maladies of Ludwig van Beethoven,” accompanied by international pianist and festival trustee

Justin Kolb. New Paltz-based storyteller McKenzie Willis will read from his new book Tales of the Rainbow Forest. And audience members themselves are invited to attend a series of two free workshops on shape note, a system of musical notation that associates pitches with shapes rather than key signatures or complex symbols. The workshops will be an opportunity for anyone to vocalize in harmony, regardless of prior musical knowledge. Aside from the international stars drawn to the region each summer, an intimacy with the audience and the local community is, and always has been, an essential element of the festival. The multivenue event features performances in a variety of local spots including Wesleyan Church, the Phoenicia Railroad Station, the Shandaken Theatrical Society Playhouse, and Mama’s Boy Coffee Shop (where Brian Asawa will host his lecture over a few lattes). The idea, say co-founders Maria Todaro and Louis Otey, is to turn the whole hamlet into a performance venue, with patrons able to walk from one program to the next—often stopping in a small restaurant or shop for a treat along the way. The festival’s contributions to its community have been noticeable, and it was named the 2012 Cultural Business of the Year by the Ulster County Regional Chamber of Commerce. The foundation is also involved in youth outreach: This year it founded the Catskills Academy of Performing Arts, a weeklong music program for 8-to-12-yearolds. Its loyalty to and involvement with the local community have been a major part of the annual event’s global popularity and success. The Phoenicia International Festival of the Voice returns with a Spanish flare this summer, July 30-August 3. Tickets: $25-$280. (845) 586-3588; Phoeniciavoicefest.org —Iana Robitaille 7/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 89


FAIRS & FESTIVALS 13th Annual Berkshires Arts Festival 10am-6pm. $13/$11 seniors/$5 students. Art and craft workshops, demonstrations, talks, activities for children, a dining tent, and live musical and theatrical performances. Ski Butternut, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-2000. Arts and Crafts Expo 10am-3pm. Water-color artists, jewelry crafters, and other crafters will be selling their works. Hopewell Depot Restoration, Hopewell Junction. Mcrudberg@optonline.net. Loril Moon Dream White and Medicine Mammals Presenting traditional Native American traditional and contemporary music, storytelling, dance demonstrations, and other wildlife programs. Mountain View Campground, Otis, MA. (413) 269-8928.

FILM Bringing Tibet Home 8pm. $8. Tibetan Center, Kingston. 383-1774.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Morning Yoga 10:15-11:15am. Beginners welcome. Bring your own mat. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

KIDS & FAMILY Fireflies 10am. Join environmental educator, Alicia Ocana to learn all about these intriguing bugs and their lifecycles. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781. Saturday Social Circle 10am-noon. First Saturday of every month. This group for mamas looking to meet other mamas, babies and toddlers for activities, socialization and friendship. Whether you are pregnant, have a new baby or older kids, we welcome you to join us on Saturday mornings for conversation, fun, and laughter over tea and homemade cookies. There is time for socialization so you can connect with old friends and get to know new ones. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624. Siegel Kline Kill PCA Day 5-9pm. $10/family. Old-fashioned games and races (horseshoe, sack-race, hoop-spinning, etc); two fun duck-herding demonstrations; an Independence Day themed story by a master storyteller; a Bonfire with s’mores; and much more. SIegel Kline Kill Conservation Area, Ghent. Clctrust.org.

LITERARY & BOOKS Poetry on the Loose Reading/Performance Series 3:30pm. Featuring Gina R. Evers. Seligmann Center for the Arts, Sugar Loaf. 469-9459.

MUSIC American Landscapes II: Music of the Americas 6:30pm. Benjamin Verdery, guitar. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Belleayre Festival Orchestra Performs The Music of Queen 8pm. $66/$56/26. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904. Ben Fields & Adrien Reju 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Celtic Night with the Irish Mafia 5pm. First Saturday of every month. Sean Griffin’s Irish Mafia and invited guests connect the Celtic tradition to Galicia, Spain. Elephant, Kingston. Elephantwinebar.com. Cincinnati Boychoir 7:30pm. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423. Crosby, Stills & Nash 7:30pm. $33.50-$88. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. An Evening of George M. Cohan 6:30pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. Locos Por Juana 9pm. Latin funk. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Music of the Band Blues Concert 4pm. $5 reserved seating. Featuring “Music of the Band” and more. Presented by Grammy-nominated, Blues Hall of Famers, Professor Louie and the Crowmatix, with the Rock of Ages Horns and special guests guitarist, singersongwriter Greg Dayton and the Green Room Show Choir. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-2000. Natalie Merchant 8pm. $40-$90. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Neon Moon 7pm. Country. Rondout Bay Marina, Kingston. 339-3917. Phish 7:30pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Sangeet Martand Pandit Jasraj 7-9pm. $55. It is a great honor to present Sangeet Martand Pandit Jasraj, the world-renowned vocalist and unparalleled living legend of Indian classical music. This summer benefit concert supports the charitable works of Shanti Mandir, a sanctuary nestled in the Hudson Valley. Following the concert Indian snacks and chai will be served. Shanti Mandir, Walden. 778-1008. Saturday Open Mike and Potluck 6pm. Featured performed: Will Galison. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

90 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Sloan Wainwright Band 8:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. The “The Band” Band 9pm. Classic rock. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Tom Chapin 8pm. $30/$25. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. The Woodstock Concerts on the Green 1-5pm. Village Green, Woodstock. Woodstockchamber.com.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS First Saturday Reception 5-8pm. First Saturday of every month. ASK’s openings are elegant affairs with wine, hors d’oeuvres, and art enthusiasts. These monthly events are part of Kingston’s First Saturday art events. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331. Historic House Tour 10am-noon. First Saturday of every month. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-3248. Old-Fashioned Style Lawn Party 5-8pm. Wilderstein’s summer celebration will feature an all-American vibe with cocktails and picnic fare, music, lawn games, house tours, and a huge silent auction. Wilderstein Preservation, Rhinebeck. 876-4818. Saugerties First Friday 6-9pm. Arm-of-the-Sea Theatre will present short performances on the street, Sawyer Motors has The Hot Rod Band playing at 5pm, music, great food, amazing art, and interesting merchandise. Downtown Saugerties, Saugerties. (845) 246-2800 x 1.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Third Annual Village of Tannersville Independence Day Parade 12-4pm. Join the village for a 4th of July celebration on Tannersville’s Main Street featuring crafts and music by the Squeeze Play Accordian Band. The parade will follow at 3pm, featuring floats, fire trucks and music from the Greene County Pipe Band. Downtown Tannersville, Tannersville. (518) 628-4424.

THEATER Fireworks: Burlesque Comes to Beacon 10pm. $15/$10 in advance. Dogwood, Beacon. 202-7500. In Your Arms 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with vignettes by Douglas Carter Beane, Nilo Cruz, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, David Henry Hwang, Rajiv Joseph, Terrence McNally, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, & Alfred Uhry. Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5250. The Liar 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Three Viewings 8pm. Best known for her stint as Laura Holt alongside Pierce Brosnin on the hit-NBC series “Remington Steele,” Stephanie Zimbalist comes to the Hudson Valley in a staging of Jeffrey Hatcher’s play “Three Viewings.” Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. Shadowlandtheatre.org. Two Truths and a Lie 8pm. $20 preferred/$16/$12 in advance/$5 members. A time-tested parlor game hits the stage for an evening of American history-themed tall tales and torqued realities. Led by a hilarious troupe of Brooklyn storytellers, the audience has to decipher truth from lies— and the prize goes to the most successful tricksters. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES A Line that Dances 1pm. William Seaton. Seaton will present examples of effective but irregular rhythmic patterns and of significant variation in more formally predictable meters. Participants will experiment with consciously manipulating poetic beats. Seligmann Center for the Arts, Sugar Loaf. 469-9459. Swing Infusion 7:30pm basic lesson, 9pm bonus move. First Saturday of every month. $10. With instructors Linda and Chester Freeman. MAC Fitness, Kingston. 853-7377.

SUNDAY 6 FAIRS & FESTIVALS 13th Annual Berkshires Arts Festival 10am-4:30pm. $13/$11 seniors/$5 students. Art and craft workshops, demonstrations, talks, activities for children, a dining tent, and live musical and theatrical performances. Ski Butternut, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-2000. Beacon Flea Market 8am-3pm. A variety of items, including re-finished furniture, antiques, vintage purses, mid-century cookware, collectible vinyl, old books, handmade jewelry, and local crafts. Beacon Flea Market, Beacon. 202-0094.

FILM Schubert and the Long 19th Century 7pm. $10. Bard SummerScape. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu.

FOOD & WINE Hyde Park Food Truck Festival 12-7pm. First Sunday of every month. Hyde Park Chamber of Commerce, Hyde Park. 229-8612.

Rosendale Summer Farmers’ Market 2014 9am-2pm. Vendors include:Maynard Orchards, Good Flavor Farm; Three Sisters Farm, Wright’s Orchards; Twisted Jeanne’s, Ronnybrook dairy products and Bread Alone bakery goods, Immune Schein Elixir and Organic Teas, Vlume beeswax products; Bob’s Pickles and more. Rosendale Farmers’ Market, Rosendale. 658-8348.

KIDS & FAMILY Child Safety Seat Check Event 11am. First Sunday of every month. Come have your child’s seat checked by a nationally-certified technician who can also teach you everything you need to know about car seats. Health Quest Community Education, LaGrangeville. 475-9746.

LITERARY & BOOKS Words Words Words 3pm. $5. 7th-annual summer afternoon gathering of Hudson Valley authors, reading from and talking about their own work. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

MUSIC Alexis P. Suter’s Ministers of Sound 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. ​ he ​Calder Quartet T 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Cameron Brown and “Dannie’s Calypso” 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. An Evening of George M. Cohan 3pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. Middle and High School Student Vocal Concert 4pm. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423. Natalie Merchant 8pm. $90. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. The Perry Beekman Trio 11:30am-2:30pm. The Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinebeck. 876-0509. Roosevelt Dime 7:30pm. $15. Special guest Tall County. 8pm. Roots music. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. Sherri Buxton and Friends 7pm. $10. Spectrum Playhouse, Lee, MA. (413) 394-5023. Zappa Plays Zappa “Roxy & Elsewhere” 40th-Anniversary Tour 7pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Eskimo Kayak Rolling Clinic with The River Connection 5pm. $80. Overcome the urge to wet exit in the event of a capsize, add to your skill set and learn to roll your kayak in a controlled setting. A bomb-proof roll is a fundamental skill for the whitewater boater and a great confidence booster for the sea kayaker encountering rough water conditions. The River Connection, Inc., Hyde Park. 229-0595.

THEATER In Your Arms 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with vignettes by Douglas Carter Beane, Nilo Cruz, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, David Henry Hwang, Rajiv Joseph, Terrence McNally, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, & Alfred Uhry. Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5250. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

MONDAY 7 HEALTH & WELLNESS Cancer Support Group for Patients 2-3pm. Professional social workers and nurses lead discussions on ways to cope with illness and treatment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-6470.

Youth Ensemble Theater Summer Institute 9:30am-3:30pm. 3-week session. Students are provided with well-rounded training in acting and vocal technique, and stage movement, and each actor is given a unique role that is equal in size and importance. High Meadow School, Stone Ridge. 687-4855.

LITERARY & BOOKS Speaking of Books 7pm. First Monday of every month. Non-fiction book discussion group. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 471-6580.

MUSIC Open Mike Night with Jeff Entin 6:30-8:30pm. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Voodoo Orchestra North 8pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

NIGHTLIFE Monday Night Karaoke 9pm. Come and join us for a night of singing, laughing, and fun, Monday night at Rendezvous Lounge in Kingston. Bring a lot friends and have fun! Rendezvous Lounge, Kingston. 331-5209.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Tivoli Bays Family Canoe Trip 5:30pm. Join the DEC and the staff of the Tivoli Free Library for one of our highly popular annual paddles in the Tivoli Bays! Ages 6+. Canoes and life vests will be provided. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Deep Listening: Art/Science 2nd Annual International Pre-Conference Workshops Check website for specific workshops, times, and prices. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Campscui.active.com. The LOTR Advanced Lego Animation Camp 9:30am-3:30pm. $280. This 4-day camp is for those who want to learn semi-professional level stop-motion animation. We will recreate a scene from The Lord of the Rings with Legos, faithfully reproducing frame by frame in a technique called rotoscoping. Ages 12+. Flick Book Studio, Saugerties. 616-4635. Rosendale Mini Movies 10am-4pm. $295. Week-long camp. Participants learn the entire process of filmmaking, from brainstorming and scriptwriting to editing and adding special effects. Students will learn about media literacy and about different shots and camera angles to collaborate in groups to script, film, and edit short narrative videos. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480. Swing Dance Class $75. 4-week series. Beginner at 6pm, intermediate at 7pm, and advanced at 8pm. Art Society of Kingston, Kingston. Got2lindy.com. EFT & Law of Attraction Prosperity Circle 6pm. $15. Financial issues resolved quickly with 5,000-year-old technique. TG Parker, Kingston. 706-2183.

TUESDAY 8 BUSINESS & NETWORKING Solopreneurs Sounding Board 6:30pm. Second Tuesday of every month. Donation. Ad hoc advisory board meets group therapy for your work. Struggling with a work issue? Need a perspective shift? Take advantage of collective intelligence (“hive mind”) and an inspiring meeting place to work out creative solutions to problems. Think of this as a mash-up of an ad hoc advisory board and group therapy for your work. Come prepared to share and to listen. Open to any entrepreneur or intrapreneur — consultants, freelance creatives and artists included. Open to any work-related issue: getting clients, marketing, PR, funding, launching an idea, strategy, time management. Expertly facilitated by BEAHIVE founder Scott Tillitt and/or Lauree Ostrofsky. Beahive Beacon, Beacon. Beahivebzzz.com/events/ solopreneurs-sounding-board-2014-07-08/.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Yoga with Nita Noon. Levels I/II. Euphoria Yoga Center, Woodstock. 679-6766.

Meeting of End the New Jim Crow Action Committee 6-8pm. The End the New Jim Crow Action Network! (ENJAN) is a Hudson Valley network dedicated to fighting racist policies of racial profiling, police brutality, and mass incarceration (the “new Jim Crow”). New Progressive Baptist Church, Kingston. 475-8781.

KIDS & FAMILY

DANCE

Hudson Valley Science Outreach Camp 9am-3:30pm. Through July 11. Young scientists will stay busy each day exploring biology, physics and engineering, chemistry, doing experiments and hosting a science fair on the last day. Ages 3-5 grade. Red Hook Public Library, Red Hook. 758-3241.

New York City Ballet 8pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Yoga with a View 6-7:15pm. $17. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

Kool Kamp for Kool Kids 10am-4pm. Held on weekdays through August 22. There will be sports, games, arts and crafts, outdoors activities, and special trips and workshops. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469. Panorama: Week 1-Due East: An Exploration of Church’s Travels East 9am-3pm. $320 two weeks/$180 one week/$300 two weeks members/$160 one week members. Join us as we dive into eastern culture this summer at Olana. Children will work with artists to create an eastern-style journal, weave, create shadow puppets, and even meet a live camel. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Qi Gong Class at Sacred Space Healing Arts Studio 6-7pm. $10. Anyone at any age can practice Qi Gong regardless of their limitations whether mental or physical. It is our breath and intention that drives our internal alchemy, during which we maximize the internal use, generation, and storage of energy. Classes will be facilitated by Lorraine Hughes. Sacred Space Healing Arts Studio, Beacon. 416-4598.

LECTURES & TALKS Monthly Open House with Dharma Talk 7pm. Second Tuesday of every month. Shambhala Buddhist teachers talk on a variety of topics at our Open House. After community meditation practice. Meditation: 6-7pm, talk 7pm, followed by tea, cookies, and converation. Sky Lake Lodge, Rosendale. 658-8556.


FESTIVAL CONCERTS

Tickets: $29, $24 Symphony Gala: $39, $34 FACULTY GALA July 12 at 8:00 p.m. Bach, Schubert, Rachmaninoff, Brahms, Nielsen, Liszt, Tchaikovsky, Copland VLADIMIR FELTSMAN RECITAL July 19 at 8:00 p.m. Lionized by the New York Times as “quite simply an amazing pianist”, Feltsman performs a powerhouse program that celebrates Schumann. JACOB FLIER GALA Nine First-prize winners return to celebrate PianoSummer’s 20th Anniversary July 26 at 8:00 p.m. Mozart, Brahms, Scriabin, Chopin, Liszt, Bach, Rachmaninoff

Box Office 845.257.3880 Online tickets available at: www.newpaltz.edu/piano Information: 845.257.3860

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2014 Summer Music Festival

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Vladimir Feltsman, Artistic Director

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SYMPHONY GALA WITH THE HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC Vladimir Feltsman, conducting August 1 at 8:00 p.m. Verdi - “La forza del destino”, Shostakovich - Symphony #1, and a piano concerto performed by the 2014 Jacob Flier Piano Competition winner, TBD

Music that Moves You “One of the 8 most amazing outdoor music venues in the world” — CNN

INSTITUTE EVENTS

Recitals, piano competitions, master classes, lectures – all open to the public. Visit www.newpaltz.edu/piano for a complete schedule

Cécile McLorin Salvant

July 5 Patti LuPone July 25 The David Grisman Sextet July 26 Cécile McLorin Salvant July 13 Igudesman & Joo August 2 Pat Metheny Unity Group (< >) Bruce Hornsby with Sonny Emory, Campfire Tour 2014 Jazz Festival / Family Events / 4th of July / Classical / Broadway / Groundbreaking Sound Art

Igudesman & Joo

Get tickets now at caramoor.org or call 914.232.1252

7/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 91


Pre-Talk: Peter Martins 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

MUSIC Mancini Ensemble 8:30pm. Harmony Music, Woodstock. 679-7760. Student Vocal Recital with the Hotchkiss Chamber Choir 7:30pm. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423.

SPIRITUALITY Energy Clearing & Balancing 7-8pm. $10-20. Energy clearing & balancing for greater health, relaxation, and weight loss. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838. Sound Healing Group Session 6-7pm. $10-20. Receive powerful sound healing with Quartz Singing Bowls, tuning forks, and Om chant. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

THEATER The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Beginner Swing Dance Class 6:30-7:30pm. $75. Four-week beginners swing dance class for adults with professional swing dance instructors Linda and Chester Freeman. Wallkill Public Library, Wallkill. 895-3707.

Pre-Talk: Justin Peck 7pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

MUSIC

Maxwell: Summer Soulstice Tour 8pm. $40-$100. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

Meeting of Middle East Crisis Response 7-8:30pm. Woodstock Library, Woodstock. 679-4693.

Michael Musillami Trio with Kris Davis 7:30pm. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423. Old Man Markley Noon. Folk and bluegrass. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Syracuse & Siegel 8-10:30pm. With special guests. Catskill Mountain Pizza Company, Woodstock. 679-7969. Vaneese Thomas 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Writing Poetry, Short Story, Novel, Memoir or Creative Non-fiction (and Getting It Published) 6:30-8:30pm. $15/$60 series. 21 Cedar Way, Woodstock. 679-8256.

WEDNESDAY 9 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

New York City Ballet 8pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

FOOD & WINE Gourmet Meals for Picnics and Packed Lunches 6:30-9:30pm. $60. With just a little planning, you can make delicious healthy lunches and snacks to go. In this class, you’ll discover easy ways to prepare delicious meals that stay fresh and mess-free. Mostly vegetarian with meat and seafood add-ons. Valley Variety, Hudson. (518) 828-0033.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Stroke Support Group 11am-noon. Second Wednesday of every month. For patients and family members to share information, express concerns, and find support and friends. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-6319.

KIDS & FAMILY Family Fun Night: Crazy Hat Bingo 6:30-7:30pm. Wear your craziest, zaniest, most splendiforous hat while playing Bingo with your family. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Hip Hop Dance 5:15-6:15pm. Join in the ever-popular weekly hip hop dance workshop taught by dancer and choreographer Anthony Molina. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org. Tween/Teen Yoga 4:30-5:30pm. Wednesdays in July. Ages 9+. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Zombies 3-4pm. Do your—or your friend’s—zombie make-up and learn how to survive the apocalypse. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

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Kingston-Rhinebeck Toastmasters Club Second Thursday of every month, 7-9pm. Practice public speaking skills. Ulster County Office Building, Kingston. 338-5184.

The Relatives As Parents Program Support Group 6-7:30pm. Second Thursday of every month. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Poughkeepsie. 452-8440.

DANCE New York City Ballet 2 & 8pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

FILM Black Moon Film Screening 8pm. $5-10. Louis Malle meets Lewis Carroll in this bizarre and bewitching trip down the rabbit hole. After

PianoSummer The School of Fine & Performing Arts at SUNY New Paltz celebrates the 20th-anniversary season of PianoSummer, its international summer institute and festival devoted exclusively to piano music. Under the direction of renowned pianist and artistic director Vladimir Feltsman, the program pairs gifted students with worldclass musicians and teachers, offering private instruction, master classes, and student recitals and festival concerts open to the public. The festival kicks off on July 12 with a Faculty Gala concert featuring this summer’s seven instructors. Also programmed is the Jacob Flier Piano Competition, open to students under 35. A Symphony Gala closes the festival on August 1 with a piano concerto performed by the 2014 competition winner and the Hudson Valley Philharmonic, under the baton of Vladimir Feltsman. Students and faculty tickle the ivories at the McKenna Theatre, SUNY New Paltz. (845) 257-3880; Newpaltz.edu/piano.

Writers in the Mountains Journaling Class 10am-noon. $75/$60 early bird. Through August 12. Taught by Leah Schiff. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469.

DANCE

Hudson Valley Garden Association Monthly Meeting 7pm. Second Thursday of every month. Shawangunk Town Hall, Wallkill. 418-3640.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Night Writer’s Radio Lab 3-6pm. $150. Weekly through August 14. In Night Writers: Radio Lab, youth will brainstorm creative and journalistic topics, gain hands-on experience with audio recording and editing, and broadcast their pieces live on WVKR 91.3 fm. Youth will also host on-air discussion and debate during the Thursday broadcasts. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480.

Ulster County Photo Club Monthly Meeting 6:30-9pm. Following the monthly meeting, photographer Yvonne Gunner will talk about techniques, including image transfer, Photoshop, encaustic and shooting with an i-Phone. She will also share how she became involved in photography and relate a few stories about the people she has photographed including Bill Clinton, Nelson Mandela, and Kofi Annan. Town of Esopus Library, Port Ewen. Ucphotoclub.org.

BUSINESS & NETWORKING

Mandolin Orange with Twain 7:30pm. $15. North Carolina-duo Mandolin Orange melds earnest melodies, poignant lyrics, and deft musicianship to create music that reflects their roots and their essence. Seligmann Center for the Arts, Sugar Loaf. 469-9459.

Deep Listening: Art/Science 2nd Annual International Pre-Conference Workshops Check website for specific workshops, times, and prices. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Campscui.active.com.

Meeting of End the New Jim Crow Action Committee 6-8pm. The End the New Jim Crow Action Network! (ENJAN) is a Hudson Valley network dedicated to fighting racist policies of racial profiling, police brutality, and mass incarceration (the “new Jim Crow”). Family Partnership Center, Poughkeepsie. (845) 475-8781

THURSDAY 10

LECTURES & TALKS

Verdi’s Otello: the Met Live in HD 6pm. $25/$20/$18/$15. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

THEATER In Your Arms 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with vignettes by Douglas Carter Beane, Nilo Cruz, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, David Henry Hwang, Rajiv Joseph, Terrence McNally, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, & Alfred Uhry. Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5250. The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. New Actors Program Summer Youth Theater Production Workshop 10am-2pm. $400. Wed. Thurs. and Fri. for 6 weeks. Working towards a performance of Lysistrata. Seligmann Center for the Arts, Sugar Loaf. 469-9459. RSCLive: Henry IV Part II 7pm. $20. The third play in the histories covering the reigns of Richard II, Henry IV, and Henry V. In this play Shakespeare explores loyalty, betrayal, and growing old. The Moviehouse, Millerton. (518) 789-0022.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Deep Listening: Art/Science 2nd Annual International Pre-Conference Workshops Check website for specific workshops, times, and prices. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Campscui.active.com. The Garden in Watercolors Session I 10am-1pm. $45/$175 series/$145 series members. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926. Recycle & Reuse 9am-4pm. $215/$20 lab fee. 4 Wednesdays. Mixed media with Jenne Currie. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Summer Floral Design Workshops 6:30pm. $75. Whether you are an enthusiast interested in creating bouquets for yourself, an event, a bride, or toying with a career change; these hands on workshops will give you a great foundation of both the creative & technical side of floral artistry. Classes are for all levels starting beginner and accompanying advanced classes. Good Old Days Eco Florist, New Windsor. 562-2820.

skirting the horrors of a mysterious war being waged in the countryside, beautiful young Lily (Cathryn Harrison) takes refuge in a remote farmhouse, where she becomes embroiled in the surreal domestic life of an extremely unconventional family. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. Basilicahudson.com. Schubert and the Long 19th Century 7pm. $10. Bard SummerScape. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu.

KIDS & FAMILY Summer Parade Papercrafts 4:30-5:30pm. Master papermaker and pulp artist Ken Polinskie will work with students to create costumes and masks made out of recycled materials using techniques including papier-mâché, paper folding, origami, collage and painting with an emphasis on sculptural effects. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Cruiser’s Play Group 12-3pm. This group for mamas, papas, and caregivers looking to meet other babies and toddlers (ages 6-18 months) for activities, socialization, and friendship. Do you have a crawling, cruising, or toddling baby? We have lively conversations about life, music, teething, sleep, babyproofing, pooping, and eating. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624. Visual Arts for Toddlers 10-11am. 18 months to ages 3+. Artist Alison Fox awakens your child’s creativity with imaginative art workshops for toddlers and their caregivers. Children will create paintings, drawings, collages, prints, murals, and sculpture while exploring various media and techniques. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

LECTURES & TALKS Pre-Talk: Conversation with a NYCB Dancer 1pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. WCMA 101: Painting the Solution to the Mind/Body Problem 4-4:50pm. Dr. Joseph Cruz, Professor of Philosophy and Cognitive Science, explores the “mind/body problem,” one of the great challenges of science and philosophy. By offering us embodied experiences with minds that aren’t our own, can art help us resolve the mind/body split? The Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, MA. (413) 597-3055.

MUSIC Dead Empires 8:30pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

THEATER In Your Arms 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with vignettes by Douglas Carter Beane, Nilo Cruz, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, David Henry Hwang, Rajiv Joseph, Terrence McNally, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, & Alfred Uhry. Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5250. Love in the Wars 7:30pm. $25-$50. Bard SummerScape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Summer Repertory: Jesus Christ Superstar 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Deep Listening: Art/Science 2nd Annual International Conference on Deep Listening Deep Listening: Art/Science invites practitioners and scholars to consider the experience of this practice and its use in the creation of art, communication, collaboration, improvisation and education. This conference equally invites scientific and philosophical discussions about new and unexplored directions and applications as well as the efficacy of the practice of Deep Listening. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Conference@deeplistening.org. Simplifying the Landscape $370. 4 Thursdays with with Kate McGloughlin. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

FRIDAY 11 DANCE New York City Ballet 8pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Swing Salon 8-11pm. $12. The evening will feature a dance lesson from 8-8:30pm by professional swing dance instructors, Linda and Chester Freeman of Got2Lindy Dance Studios followed by an evening of dancing to classic and contemporary swing music. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 514-7989.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Pledge Anti-Bully Music Festival 12-9pm. $30. Celebrities from top-rated television shows like American Idol, The X-Factor, America’s Got Talent and The Voice will hit the stages in a show to stop bullying. The Castle Fun Center, Chester. 469-2116.

LECTURES & TALKS Artist’s Talk with Norm Magnusson 6:30pm. Speaking on “The Descent into the Political”. Byrdcliffe Kleinert/James Center for the Arts, Woodstock. 679-2079.

MUSIC Aston Magna Presents Vice Squad: Baroque Skirmishes with Alcohol, Tobacco, and Love 8pm. $35/30/seniors/$5 student rush at the door/$15 under 30s. J.S. Bach: Coffee Cantata and an Aria from Amore Traditore; Purcell: Songs of Love and Drink; Tobias Hume: Tobacco; Thomas Ravenscroft: Songs of Ale and Tobacco; Nicolas Bernier: Cantata, Le Caffé. With Teresa Wakim, soprano; Frank Kelley, tenor; Jesse Blumberg, baritone; with a musical ensemble led by Daniel Stepner. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. (800) 595-4849. Blues Guitarist Buddy Guy 8pm. $30-$105. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Cracked Ice 9:30pm. Soul and R&B. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Dennis DeYoung: Styx 8pm. $75. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Harpeth Rising 8pm. $20/$15. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Hotchkiss Chamber Choir 7:30pm. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423. Jim Hurst 8pm. $10. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. Little Caesar Band 9pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. The Music of Nathan Davis and Christian Wolff 8pm. $20. Performed by the International Contemporary Ensemble. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. New York Uproar 8pm. Blues. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Old Time Roots Music Festival 9pm. Featuring 13 Strings and a Two Dollar Bill, Intuitive Compass, and the Lost Dog Street Band. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.


MUSIC HUDSON PROJECT

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Kendrick Lamar headlines the Hudson Project in Saugerties July 11-13.

From Hippies to Hipsters Boasting 85 acts, including big-name headliners like Kendrick Lamar, The Flaming Lips, Bassnectar, and Modest Mouse, four traditional stages, one interactive stage, DJ stages, and glamping (luxury camping), the new festival from the production company MCP Presents aims to be more than just three days of music. Jonathan Fordin, the president and COO of MCP, explains that his company’s goal was focused more on “creating an environment—a getaway from the world.” Attendees will be able to take advantage of the event’s “experience area,” which will feature a wide variety of activities, including carnival rides, yoga, tai-chi and kung-fu lessons, a beer garden stocked with local breweries, barbecue zones, art installations from local artists, and a live broadcast of the last two matches of the World Cup. Of course, any music festival in the region, no matter how big it is, will always be playing second fiddle in the public consciousness to the now 45-year-old Woodstock Festival. The Hudson Project seems to have accepted this legacy; it will take place at Winston Farm in Saugerties, the site of Woodstock '94. Michael Lang, who organized the original Woodstock festival and its follow-up, represents the landowners. When MCP first approached him about holding a festival on the property, Lang was eager to support the project, explaining that he had “always wanted to bring music back there.” Lang says that after seeing the best and worst of the festival scene, he’s learned to “go with people who have experience,” which MCP certainly does, organizing several festivals each year, including ones in Dallas and New Orleans. Still, the Woodstock legacy presented unexpected challenges to MCP. The infamous overcrowding and inadequate utilities of the festival and its '94 follow-up had left many locals unusually skeptical of an event of this size, Fordin admits, adding that it had “made planning a whole lot harder that it probably should have been.” Undeterred, MCP went

ahead, and as a result, the Hudson Project has the “most coordination of any music festival” they’ve done. Security will be coordinating with local and state police to ensure a safe environment. Additionally, 400 toilets and 100 showers will be installed on site, along with medical tents and over 50 water stations to supply festival-goers with free drinking water. “Safety is our number one concern,” Fordin says, adding, “If the town ran out of food you could come to our festival and live for a week.” Such coordination does emphasize how much things have changed since 1969, where attendees scrawled notes on paper plates and stuck them to trees in an attempt to contact one another. The new festival will be a more high-tech affair (its FAQ page reassures customers that there will be phone charging stations throughout the site). The music has changed, as well. While some bands from the Hudson Project lineup will bring a familiar-but-updated sound of '60s-inspired rock (The Flaming Lips. Dr. Dog), many of the artists offer experimental, decidedly contemporary sounds, like Kendrick Lamar’s smooth confessional hip-hop and Four Tet’s dreamy folkelectronica. Lang acknowledges that there have been big changes in the festival scene. Even with the additional bells and whistles, MCP is only expecting about 20,000 campers and a few thousand more from offsite during the day, a far cry from the 400,000 at the original Woodstock. Still, even if attendance is lower and the experience isn’t as turbulent, there’s one thing that will remain the same. “We book what we’re passionate about,” Fordin says, and that’s something that hasn’t changed since Lang’s day. The Hudson Project festival runs from July 11 to July 13 at Winston Farm in Saugerties. Hudsonmusicproject.com. —David King 7/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 93


8DW EIGHT DAY WEEK

Second Friday Night Jams with Jeff Entin and Bob Blum 8:30-11pm. The duo, who have been playing together since before the term jam band was coined, will be playing and hosting something a little more experimental than the usual fare plus a few special guest joining in. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

Salsa Lesson and Latin Dance Party with Carlos Osorio 8pm. $12 at the door. Bring out your Latin spirit! Join Carlos Osorio, Founder of the Cumbia Spirit School of Dance for a fun, all-levels salsa class and then dance the night away at Kingston’s most artful new event space. Wine available. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 331-3261.

The Slambovian Circus Of Dreams 8:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Sonando 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

SPIRITUALITY

SIGN UP NOW EVENTS TO YOUR INBOX EACH THURSDAY

Full Moon Shamanic Journey and Manifesting 7-8pm. $10-20. Celebrate the full moon of Capricorn with Shamanic journey, drumming, and manifesting. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

THEATER

www.c h ro n og r a m . c om / 8 d w

Ku rt V i l e a t B SP Ki ng sto n .

Acting Out: One-Act Plays 8pm. Acting Out Coni Koepfinger; “Turbulance” aka “Ups and Downs”, directed by Mara Mills and Bob Zaslow; Flights of Fancy Schmancy, directed by Mara Mills. Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Peekskill. (914) 788-0100. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum 7pm. $7/$5 students. Spectrum Playhouse, Lee, MA. (413) 394-5023. In Your Arms 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with vignettes by Douglas Carter Beane, Nilo Cruz, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, David Henry Hwang, Rajiv Joseph, Terrence McNally, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, & Alfred Uhry. Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5250.

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The Liar 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. The Light Years 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Susan Stein Shiva Theater at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-4636. Love in the Wars 7:30pm. $25-$50. Bard SummerScape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. A Midsummer Night’s Dream 5pm. Youth performers 7-12 years take on Shakespeare. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. Newgenesisproductions.org. The Second Time Around 7:30pm. $20/$18 children and seniors. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476.

26th Annual

August 1, 2 & 3, 2014

Dodds Farm - Hillsdale NY over 40 acts on 4 stages

*Main Stage Concerts* *All day & into the night Dancing* *Family Stage, Activities 4 Kids, Food & Crafts* *Thurs Craft/Food Preview & Social Media School* Tom Paxton, Aoife O’Donovan, Grand Slambovians,The Duhks, Brother Sun, Perpetual e-Motion, The Clayfoot Strutters, Krewe de la Rue, Spuyten Duyvil, Hoopoe, many more www.FalconRidgeFolk.com - 866 325-2744 - Tix/Info

Moonlight and Magnolias 8-10:30pm. $22 includes dessert. A hyperventilating comedy. The Playhouse at Museum Village, Monroe. 294-9465. Summer Repertory: Jesus Christ Superstar 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Deep Listening: Art/Science 2nd Annual International Conference on Deep Listening Deep Listening: Art/Science invites practitioners and scholars to consider the experience of this practice and its use in the creation of art, communication, collaboration, improvisation and education. This conference equally invites scientific and philosophical discussions about new and unexplored directions and applications as well as the efficacy of the practice of Deep Listening. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Conference@deeplistening.org. Needle-Felting Workshop 10am-3pm. $85/$75 members. Learn to create your own life-like owl using soft curly locks and needle-felting techniques with Rachel Gerowe of Redbarn Originals. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

SATURDAY 12 ART GALLERIES & EXHIBITS

The stars don’t only come out at night...

11 days (and nights), with dozens of performances throughout Kingston, PLUS A Taste of Kingston, a fantastic chance to sample gourmet treasures from Kingston & the entire Hudson Valley.

KingstonFestival.org When you’re in Kingston, NY, be sure to visit The Uptown Gallery at 296 Wall Street

94 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Beacon Second Saturday Join a city-wide celebration of the arts held on the second Saturday of every month where galleries and shops stay open until 9pm, most of which are right along Main Street. In addition to displaying art from around the globe, the event often includes free gallery talks, live music, and wine tasting. Main Street, Beacon. Beaconarts.org.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Wallkill St. Patrick’s Day Parade Vendor Blender The Wallkill St Patrick’s Day Parade Committee is hosting our 2nd Vendor Blender in order to raise funds for our 30th St Patrick’s Day Parade. Popps Pavilion, Wallkill. 741-2947.

DANCE New York City Ballet 2 & 8pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Country Fair 10am-3:30pm. Crafters, food, and book sale. Otis Library and Museum, Otis, MA. (413) 269-0109. Green River Festival Presented by Signature Sounds, this celebration combines a spectacular lineup of over 30 acts on three stages, the best in local food, beer, and wine, handmade crafts, a dance tent, a wide array of kid’s activities and entertainment, and hot air balloon rides for Western Massachusetts’ largest outdoor event of the summer. Greenfield Community College, Greenfield, MA. (413) 775-1000. Newburgh Urban Market 10am-4pm. Washington’s Headquarters, Newburgh. Our great mix of high-quality offerings includes original handcrafted jewelry, furniture, clothing, and décor from local artisans; antiques and vintage collectibles; fair trade and repurposed items; fine local food, beverages and organic produce; and much more. Newburgh Urban Market, Newburgh. Newburghurbanmarket.com. Pledge Anti-Bully Music Festival 12-9pm. $30. Celebrities from top rated television shows like American Idol, The X-Factor, America’s Got Talent and The Voice will hit the stages in a show to stop bullying. The Castle Fun Center, Chester. 469-2116. Stone House Day 10am-4pm. $20/$15 seniors and students/$2 children 6-12/children 5 and under, free. Come explore several of America’s oldest private homes and take a trip back into history. The town of Hurley was settled in 1661. Tour guides in colonial attire. 1777 militia encampment, artillery demonstration and historic re-enactors. Sojourner Truth presentation, Colonial crafts for children and adults. Organ and violin recitals. Woodworker demonstrations at Hurley Heritage Society Museum. Hurley Reformed Church, Hurley. 331-4121.

FILM The Measure of All Things with Sam Green and yMusic 8:30pm. $25 preferred/$20/$15 in advance. Inspired by our collective fascination with The Guinness Book of World Records, filmmaker Sam Green traveled across the world to gather footage of record-holding (and nearly record-holding) people and places. The result is a fascinating “live documentary” film and performance featuring Green’s narration and an original live score by indie-classical chamber ensemble yMusic. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Morning Yoga 10:15-11:15am. Beginners welcome. Bring your own mat. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

KIDS & FAMILY Aesop Bops: David Gonzalez 11am. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. Create a Personal Flag 2-4pm. Inspired by work from Costa Vece, each student will create their own flag out of fabric and mixed media. Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Peekskill. (914) 788-0100. David Gonzalez 11am. $12/$10 children. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. Fire Trucks at the Library 11am-noon. Explore a fire truck and ask a fire fighter all of your questions. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Young People’s Concert 11am. Kim and Reggie Harris, Folksingers & Storytellers. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

LECTURES & TALKS Columbia County Historical Society Presents “The Great North River of New Netherland” 4-6pm. $10. “The Great North River of New Netherland.” The Hudson River and Dutch Colonization: A Lecture by Jaap Jacobs, University of St. Andrews. A reception will follow the lecture at the Pruyn House of 1766 in Kinderhook $30 for members or $45 non-members. Price includes lecture. Reservations necessary for reception. This program is supported by a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities and is part of this year’s Dutch New York: Fact and Fiction series Kinderhook Reformed Church, Kinderhook. (518) 758-9265.

LITERARY & BOOKS Nick Lyons Reading 5pm. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. 679-8000. Second Saturday Spoken Word 7pm. $7. Featuring poet Cornelius Eady with Rough Magic, a literary band, and author Sarah Micklem. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Kingston. 331-2884.

MUSIC Abby Hollander Band 8pm. $10. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. Belleayre Blues Show 8pm. $26-$66. Starring Buddy Guy with special guest Quinn Sullivan. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904.


The Big Takeover 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Bryan Gordon 8pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. Christian Wolff World Premeire 8pm. $20. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Christine Lavin & Don White 8pm. $30/$25. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Glenn Miller Orchestra 8pm. $38. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Ishwari Keller & Sruti Ram 7-9pm. $20. Call and response as they chant the names of the Divine with unsuppressed enthusiasm and distinctive harmonies. The Abode Retreat Center and Community, New Lebanon. (518) 794-8095. Jasper Quartet 8pm. Tannery Pond, New Lebanon. (888) 820-1696. Lara Downes 6:30pm. $25/$40/$50. Jazz solo piano, “Lady Day Remembered”. Piano interpretations of music made famous by Billie Holiday. Plus Impressionist gems from the year of her birth (1915) by Debussy, Prokofiev, and Fauré. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Leo B. 9pm. Acoustic. The Golden Rail Ale House, Newburgh. 565-2337. Mike + Ruthy 8pm. $20/$15 in advance. Folk. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Oakes & Smith 7:30pm. The duo perform an acoustic mix of folk and pop with voices blending in close harmonies. Knox Trail Inn, Otis, MA. (413) 269-4400. Peter Frampton and the Doobie Brothers 7:30pm. $26.50-$99.50. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Singer-Songwriter Otan Vargas 7pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Student Vocal Finale Concert with the Hotchkiss Chamber Choir 4pm. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423. The World of Richard Strauss: Kindred Paths 6:30pm. Zuill Bailey, cello; Natasha Paremski, piano. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Annual Fundraiser: Mane Event 10am-3pm. Come watch Western, English, Dressage, and Carriage Driving demos. See your favorite breeds, enjoy great food, and participate in a wide range of horsey activities. Especially for children: face painting, horseshoe making, games, pony rides, and more. We will be featuring a silent auction, raffles, lunch & snacks. High and Mighty Therapeutic Riding and Driving Center, Ghent. (518) 672-4202. Party with the Starns 4-6pm. Mike + Doug Starn: Bambú Shots closing party. Kleinert/James Arts Center, Woodstock. 679-2079. Tenth Annual Secret Gardens Tour 10:30am-4:30pm. $20. To benefit the Ulster County SPCA. Tour six private gardens in the Saugerties area. Saugerties Garden Tours, Malden. 246-0710. Ulster County Day 11am-1:30pm. Special discounted rate of $10 on guided house, studio, and landscape tour for Ulster County residents. Russel Wright Design Center, Garrison. 424-3812.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION 32nd Annual DeLisio Memorial Golf Tournament Entry fee includes: golf, cart, continental breakfast, lunch, dinner, music, and prizes, and most importantly a donation to Special Olympics. Woodstock Golf Club, Woodstock. 679-2914. Hudson-Athens Lighthouse Journey 10am. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181. Moonlit Walking Tour 8pm. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115. Safe Harbors Informational Tours 9am. The tours highlight how Safe Harbors’ transformative supportive housing, award-winning contemporary art gallery, and performing arts theater is instrumental to the revitalization of downtown Newburgh. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 562-6940. Summer Nature Hike 10am. Byrdcliffe Colony, Woodstock. 594-4863. Tenth Annual Secret Gardens Tour 10:30am-4:30pm. $30/$20 in advance. Visit 6 unique private gardens in Saugerties. Benefits Boys & Girls Club Saugerties Unit and SPCA. Special Anniversary Scavenger Hunt and special lunch menu at Farmers’ Market. Saugerties Garden Tours, Malden. 246-0710. Ulster Volunteer Restoration Workday 10am. Esopus Meadows Preserve, Esopus. Scenichudson.org.

THEATER Auditions for Equivocation 1pm. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum 2 & 7pm. $7/$5 students. Spectrum Playhouse, Lee, MA. (413) 394-5023.

The Gang Show 9:30pm. A contest for amateur performers with unique and unusual talents who are judged on a scale of one to ten. During the first 45 seconds of the performance, if any judge considers an act to be unworthy of scoring, he or she can bang the gong eliminating them from the contest. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. Gong, You’re Dead 7pm. $50. Dinner and show, presented by Murder Cafe. Vanderbilt House, Philmont. (518) 672-9993. In Your Arms 2pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with vignettes by Douglas Carter Beane, Nilo Cruz, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, David Henry Hwang, Rajiv Joseph, Terrence McNally, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, & Alfred Uhry. Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5250. The Light Years 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Susan Stein Shiva Theater at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-4636. Love in the Wars 7:30pm. $25-$50. Bard SummerScape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Make Me An Offer I Can Refuse $20. Air Pirates Radio Theater. Brothers Barbecue, New Windsor. 534-4227. A Midsummer Night’s Dream 5pm. Youth performers 7-12 years take on Shakespeare. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. Newgenesisproductions.org. The Second Time Around 7:30pm. $20/$18 children and seniors. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. Moonlight and Magnolias 8-10:30pm. $22 includes dessert. A hyperventilating comedy. The Playhouse at Museum Village, Monroe. 294-9465. Summer Repertory: Jesus Christ Superstar 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES AHA HeartSaver 1st Aid & CPR/AED Course 9am-3pm. $100. This course covers basic first aid, CPR techniques, maneuvers for choking victims and how to use an Automated External Defibrillator. Instruction provided for adult, child & infant. This course is suitable for daycare workers, construction workers, camp counselors and many other community professions. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 475-9742. Deep Listening: Art/Science 2nd Annual International Conference on Deep Listening Deep Listening: Art/Science invites practitioners and scholars to consider the experience of this practice and its use in the creation of art, communication, collaboration, improvisation, and education. This conference equally invites scientific and philosophical discussions about new and unexplored directions and applications as well as the efficacy of the practice of Deep Listening. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Conference@deeplistening.org. Digital Photography Intensive with Rob O’Neil 10am-2pm. $75. 2nd session on July 19th. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181. Photographing the Nude in Nature with Dan McCormack 10am-4pm. $150/$130 members/$450 series/$390 series members. This workshop will demonstrate how the figure may be seen as landscape, design, and part of Mother Earth. Different models and shooting sites are planned for each Saturday session. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Summer Floral Design Workshops 2pm. $75. Whether you are an enthusiast interested in creating bouquets for yourself, an event, a bride, or toying with a career change; these hands-on workshops will give you a great foundation of both the creative & technical side of floral artistry. Classes are for all levels starting beginner and accompanying advanced classes. Good Old Days Eco Florist, New Windsor. 562-2820. Vining Fruit & Trellising Structures 10am-1pm. $50. Different forms of trellising structures with a focus on such plants as Arctic Kiwi, Akebia, Passionfruit and Grapes. Hortus Conclusus, Stone Ridge. Hortus.biz.

SUNDAY 13 ART GALLERIES & EXHIBITS Open Studio Tours 1-5pm. Come to see the finished work of our 25 International Artists-in-Residence and additional events and installations completed during their residencies. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747.

7/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 95


DANCE Milonga des Artistes-Sunday Afternoon Tango with Ilene Marder 3pm. Second Sunday of every month. $12. Beginning Argentine Tango lesson followed by Milonga des Artistes-Dance to the irresistible music of DJ La Rubia Del Norte, playing Tango classics (with Latin, Swing breaks). Attending dancers include many friends and aficionados from across the Hudson Valley and Tri-State region. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. (845) 331-3261.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Green River Festival Presented by Signature Sounds, this celebration combines a spectacular lineup of over 30 acts on three stages, the best in local food, beer and wine, handmade crafts, a dance tent, a wide array of kid’s activities and entertainment, and hot air balloon rides for Western Massachusetts’ largest outdoor event of the summer. Greenfield Community College, Greenfield, MA. (413) 775-1000. The Monastery Vinegar Festival 11am-3pm. Our Lady of the Resurrection Monastery, LaGrangeville. Ourladyoftheresurrectionmonastery.webs.com. Pledge Anti-Bully Music Festival 12-9pm. $30. Celebrities from top rated television shows like American Idol, The X-Factor, America’s Got Talent and The Voice will hit the stages in a show to stop bullying. The Castle Fun Center, Chester. 469-2116.

FILM Schubert and the Long 19th Century 7pm. $10. Bard SummerScape. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu.

HEALTH & WELLNESS American Heart Association ACLS Renewal Course 8am-4pm. $150. This is a re-certification of the ACLS course. You must have a current ACLS certification to take this course. Course completion results in a two-year ACLS certification from the American Heart Association. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 475-9742. Homemade Holistic Health: A 10-Month Workshop Series 10am. Every fourth Sunday. $50/$450 for all ten. Our health represents a complex interaction between our physical body, environment, and ability to process emotional pressure. Holistic approaches to health are only as effective as their capacity to address these aspects in concert. Join Claudia for ten workshops over the course of the changing seasons. The Herbal Acre, Rhinebeck. (917) 992-9901.

KIDS & FAMILY Children and Families: Collective Wishes 1pm. Create a collective, temporary work of art inspired by Zhang Huan’s sculptures at Storm King. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115. Nancy Castaldo: “Sniffer Dogs” Book Launch Party 4pm. The League of Extraordinary Readers is a monthly author event series for kids ages 8-12 (and those who are kids at heart) with giveaways, snacks and fun at every event! Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

LITERARY & BOOKS Author, Photographer, and Percussionist Craig Harris 2pm. Presenting his book The Band: Pioneers of Americana Music, which chronicles the success and struggles of the five-piece group that countered rock’s rebellion, inspired scores of artists, and paved the foundation for today’s Americana groups. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300. Words Words Words 3pm. $5. 7th-annual summer afternoon gathering of Hudson Valley authors, reading from and talking about their own work. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

Taiko Masala 3pm. $20. Taiko Masala has thrilled audiences with performances of Japan’s traditional drumming —Taiko. By combining the training and discipline of Japanese martial arts with the precision and power of complex drumming, Taiko Masala brings visually stunning and breathless excitement to their performances. Century House Historical Society, Rosendale. 658-9900. The ​Enso String Quartet 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. The Tubes 8pm. $40. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Guided Cemetery Tours 2pm. Learn about notable Kingstonians as you view distinctive gravesites amid remarkable landscapes within the City of Kingston. Go to FOHK.org to learn exact meeting places and cemetery schedule. Friends of Historic Kingston, Kingston. 339-0720. Kayak Demo Day with The River Connection 2pm. $10. Throughout the paddling season the River Connection offers Try Before Buy Demos. Come join the River Connection Instructors and try out a variety of kayaks from manufacturers such as P&H, North Shore Kayaks, Valley Sea Kayaks, and Venture Kayaks. We have a large fleet and have a fleet boat for virtually every model we carry in our retail showroom, all available to try in our Private Harbor. The River Connection, Inc., Hyde Park. 229-0595. New Paltz Garden Club Tour 10am. Opus 40, Saugerties. NewPaltzGardenClub.org.

PETS Kingston Point Dog Park: the Friends of KPDP Fundraiser 3-6pm. $10 suggested. The event features: live music with 3’s a Crowd, Shaggy Dog Comedy and Song, silent auction, flea market, raffles, and finger food. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739.

SPIRITUALITY Guided Chakra Balancing Meditation with the Quartz Crystal Singing Bowls 1-2pm. $10-20. Celebrate the new moon of Cancer with meditation, energy balancing, and healing. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

THEATER Acting Out: One-Act Plays 5pm. Acting Out Coni Koepfinger; “Turbulance” aka “Ups and Downs”, directed by Mara Mills and Bob Zaslow; Flights of Fancy Schmancy, directed by Mara Mills. Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Peekskill. (914) 788-0100. Auditions for Equivocation 7pm. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. In Your Arms 2pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new musical with vignettes by Douglas Carter Beane, Nilo Cruz, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, David Henry Hwang, Rajiv Joseph, Terrence McNally, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, & Alfred Uhry. Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5250. The Light Years 2pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Susan Stein Shiva Theater at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-4636. Love in the Wars 2pm. $25-$50. Bard SummerScape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. A Midsummer Night’s Dream 5pm. Youth performers 7-12 years take on Shakespeare. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. Newgenesisproductions.org. Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

MONDAY 14 FILM Silent Film 6-7pm. Silent film with live piano accompaniment from Marta Waterman. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Cancer Support Group for Patients 2-3pm. Professional social workers and nurses lead discussions on ways to cope with illness and treatment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-6470. Yoga with a View 6-7:15pm. $17. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Yoga with Nita Noon. Levels I/II. Euphoria Yoga Center, Woodstock. 679-6766.

KIDS & FAMILY OK Go Project: Advanced Level Stop-motion Animation Camp 9:30am-3:30pm. $280. This 4-day camp is intended for those who want to learn semi-professional level stopmotion animation. We will take on the amazing music video of OK Go, Here It Goes Again, recreating a part of the video, using a variety of materials from clay to pipe cleaners, faithfully reproducing frame by frame in a technique called rotoscoping. Flick Book Studio, Saugerties. 616-4635. Viking Wire Weaving Bracelet Workshop 4-6pm. $5. Ages 10+. Participants will make a copper wire bracelet using this very simple technique which produces a long cord of intricately woven wire that is most commonly used as jewelry. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

MUSIC Open Mike 6pm. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

NIGHTLIFE Monday Night Karaoke 9pm. Come and join us for a night of singing, laughing and fun. Bring a lot friends and have fun! Rendezvous Lounge, Kingston. 331-5209.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Annual Grace Golf Tournament and Gala 6pm. $125/$175/$100 dinner only. The event, which includes a golf tournament, lunch, dinner, and auction, is a major fundraiser for Grace Church with proceeds to be used to help support outreach programs throughout the community and world-wide. The benefit dinner begins at 6 p.m. with a cocktail hour and open bar, followed by a sumptuous three-course gourmet dinner and piano music by Peter Muir. Millbrook Golf and Tennis Club, Millbrook. 677-3810.

THEATER Auditions for Equivocation 7pm. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Basic Painting with Karen O’Neil 9am-4pm. $370. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Creedence Clearwater Revival Adult Boot Camp 7-10pm. Mondays through Sept. 1. Beacon Music Factory, Beacon. 202-3555. Handcolored Linoleum Printmaking 9am-4pm. $290/$30 lab fee. Through July 16 with Carol Zaloom. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Little Rock Academy & String Camp $400/$350 siblings. Paul Green Rock Academy for ages 5-7. 5-day session. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

RSCLive: Henry IV Part II 1pm. $20. The third play in the histories covering the reigns of Richard II, Henry IV, and Henry V. In this play Shakespeare explores loyalty, betrayal, and growing old. The Moviehouse, Millerton. (518) 789-0022.

Rhinebeck Mini Movies 10am-4pm. $550. Through July 25. Participants learn the entire process of filmmaking, from brainstorming and scriptwriting to editing and adding special effects. Students will learn about media literacy and about different shots and camera angles to collaborate in groups to script, film, and edit short narrative videos. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480.

The Second Time Around 2pm. $20/$18 children and seniors. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476.

EFT & Law of Attraction Prosperity Circle 6pm. $15. FInancial issues resolved quickly with 5,000 year old technique. TG Parker, Kingston. 706-2183.

Summer Repertory: Jesus Christ Superstar 2pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

BUSINESS & NETWORKING

Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

Digital Salon 7pm. Casual gathering of individuals interested in the purposeful use of the technologies of literacy, technological literacy, and literal technologies. Beahive Beacon, Beacon. 418-3731.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Locos Por Juana 7pm. Latin urban orchestra. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Ashokan Guitar Camp Through July 17. Offers guitarists of all levels an opportunity for real immersion and growth on the instrument, while providing an atmosphere conducive to connecting with other guitarists for shared music-making, wisdom, wizardry and fun. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Queens of the Stone Age 8pm. $39.50-$59.50. With special guest Brody Dalle. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

Gardiner Library Fiction Writers’ Workshop 6-10pm. Second Sunday of every month. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

MUSIC Boris Berman 7:30pm. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423. Dover String Quartet 3pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. Ensō String Quarte 4pm. $50/$40/$25. Strauss: Scherzo from the String Quartet in A Major Erwin Schulhoff: Five Pieces for String Quartet Mozart: Piano Quartet in E-Flat Major Franz Schmidt: Quintet in G for Strings and Piano Left Hand (1926). Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Gabriel Butterfield Band 7:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. Greg Westhoff’s Westchester Swing Band 7:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. The Judith Tulloch Band 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

96 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/14

TUESDAY 15

Dutchess County Tourism’s 30th Anniversary Party 5:30pm. $150/$250/$500. Culinary Institute of America (CIA), Hyde Park. 463-5447. Community Holistic Healthcare Day 4-8pm. Third Tuesday of every month. A wide variety of holistic health modalities and practitioners are available. Appointments can be made on a first-come, first-served basis upon check-in. Marbletown Community Center, Stone Ridge. Rvhhc.org.

KIDS & FAMILY Media Monsters Summer Camp $150. Ages 7-10. Weekly through August 19. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

LITERARY & BOOKS Open Mike with Chrissy Budzinski 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

MUSIC Big Joe Fitz & The LoFis Blues & Dance Party 7-9pm. Join Big Joe Fitz and the LoFis for the best blues and dance party in the valley. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Wine & Tasting Dinner to Benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital $125. Featuring chefs from Rhinebeck’s Calico Restaurant & Patisserie. Trump National Golf Course, Hopewell Junction. 223-1600.

SPIRITUALITY Chakra Meditation Group 6-7pm. $15. Led by Dianne Weisselberg, LMSW, Certified Chakra Healer. These guided meditations vary from session to session and are an opportunity to center, align, and infuse yourself with the vibrational energy of one or more Chakras. There is time for connection and reflection in the group as well. Namaste Sacred Healing Center, Woodstock. 679-6107. Energy Clearing & Balancing 7-8pm. $10-20. Energy clearing & balancing for greater health, relaxation, and weight loss. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838. Sound Healing Group Session 6-7pm. $10-20. Receive powerful sound healing with Quartz Singing Bowls, tuning forks, and Om chant. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

THEATER The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Gardiner Media Monsters 2-4pm. $150. 6-session film camp. Youth will engage in collaborative digital storytelling to create a script that they then bring to life using stop-motion animation! Youth with also get the chance to try human animation as well as make a short music video and a “behind-thescenes” video. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480.

WEDNESDAY 16 HEALTH & WELLNESS Breast and Ovarian Cancer Support Group 7pm. Third Wednesday of every month. Support Connection, Inc. offers a Breast and Ovarian Cancer Support Group. Open to women with breast, ovarian, or gynecological cancer. There are many common factors to any cancer diagnosis. Join other women who have been diagnosed as we discuss all stages of diagnosis, treatment, and post-treatment. Advance registration required. Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel. (914) 962-6402. Makoplasty Seminar 6pm. Come find out if MAKOplasty partial knee resurfacing or MAKOplasty total hip replacement is right for your medical needs. Fishkill Ambulatory Surgery Center, Fishkill. 483-6088.

KIDS & FAMILY Duct Tape Stuff 3-4pm. Make things out of duct tape. Age: 13 or 7th grade and up. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Family Fun Night: Coral Reef Mural 6:30-7:30pm. Create a mural of a coral reef to hang on the library wall for all to see. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Flash Mob at Olana: A Night of Viewing Fireflies 8-10pm. $5. Let’s see if we can crack the “Morse Code” of fireflies to recognize some of the different flash patterns used by certain species to find and recognize each other. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872. Hip Hop Dance 5:15-6:15pm. Join in the ever-popular weekly hip hop dance workshop taught by dancer and choreographer Anthony Molina. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org. Music & Creative Movement 10-11am. Preschoolers to ages 5+. Join local singer, songwriter, choreographer, and dancer Abby Lappen for weekly fun exploring creative arts through music and movement. Parent participation is encouraged. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

MUSIC Annie & The Hedonists Noon. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. David Bromberg & Larry Campbell 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Enchanted Island: the Met Live in HD 6pm. $25/$20/$18/$15. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.


free

publicprograms Hudson Valley Invaders Hike Wednesday, July 9 at 5:30 p.m.

Educator Kali Bird will provide insight into the origins and ecological impacts of plant and animal invaders, including what you can do to manage them in your own yard. Register online at http://hudsonvalleywalk.eventbrite. com.

Field Biologist Documentary Friday, July 25 at 7:00 p.m.

This light-hearted film follows a 22-year-old on his journey to Costa Rica, where he is beginning his conservation-oriented study of tropical birds. A Q&A with director Jared Flesher will follow the film. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

our trails are open for the season From April 1 to October 31 our grounds are open from sunrise to sunset. We invite visitors to explore parts of our 2,000-acre campus. Hike along Wappinger Creek, picnic among native ferns, bike our internal roadways, or watch birds in the sedge meadow.

Learn more at www.caryinstitute.org 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Rte. 44)|Millbrook, NY 12545|845 677-5343

TANNERY POND CONCERTS 2014

ArtisticDirector: Director: Christian Christian Steiner Artistic Steiner Artistic Director: Christian Steiner May 24

6pm

Dover String Quartet Alon Goldstein piano

June 21

8pm

Axel Strauss violin Ilya Poletaev piano

July 12

8pm

Jasper String Quartet

August 2

8pm

Gleb Ivanov piano

August 23 8pm

Trio Virado flute, viola, guitar

Sept. 6

8pm

Ji

Sept. 27

6pm

Paul Huang violin Louis Schwizgebel piano

piano

Performances at Darrow School in New Lebanon, NY www.tannerypondconcerts.org or 888-820-1696

7/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 97


OUT NOW! INCLUDING THE SINGLE “MUG SHOT” FEATURED IN THE VERONICA MARS MOVIE

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.SAYMAXOHHH.COM

Why Not Tube the Esopus?

The Playhouse at Museum Village

2014 SEASON

The Hudson Valley’s Dessert Theatre Agatha Christie’s classic

And Then There Were None May 2-18 Gone With the Wind gone crazy!

Moonlight & Magnolias July 11-27 The Tony Award-winning musical

Route 17M, Monroe, NY Box Office: 845-294-9465 www.CTMWP.org

25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee September 12-28

rosen dale theatre 408 Main street rosendale, nY 1 2472 845.658.8989 rosendaletheatre.org

become a fan today

10 Bridge Street, Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-5553 www.towntinker.com Memorial Day Weekend to September 30

98 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/14

July 4 A ReAding of the Declaration of inDepenDence fRee, 9:30 Am July 4–7 RosendAle TheATRe’s music invAsion feATuRing a harD Day’s night, Big star, the last Waltz & stop Making sense $7, vARious Times July 12 fun! summeR fAmily seRies: dAvid gonzAlez peRfoRms aesop Bops $12, 11:00 Am July 12 the gang shoW $5, 9:30 pm July 13 dAnce film sundAys: Marta renzi Dances $10, 2:00 pm July 29 Tmi pRoJecT: Voices in action $15, 7:00 pm plus nighTly films citizen koch, Belle, peace, loVe & MisunDerstanDing, colD in July, the iMMigrant


MUSIC ROSWELL RUDD’S KERHONKSON TRIO AT THE KLEINERT/JAMES CENTER FOR THE ARTS

TK

Roswell Rudd will perform with Heather Masse and Rolf Sturm at the Kleinert/James on July 26.

Whatta Honk As the father of free jazz trombone, Roswell Rudd is responsible for some of the most innovative music of our time. Since rising to prominence in the early 1960s as a member of the highly influential New York Art Quartet and alongside other heroic groundbreakers like Cecil Taylor, Steve Lacey, and Archie Shepp, he’s made music that’s frequently filled with visceral challenge. Now, however, Rudd faces some challenges of his own. Recently diagnosed with prostate cancer, he still plans to keep performing as long as he feels up to the task. And currently the Ulster County resident maintains he’s doing well while preparing for the July 26 appearance by his new Kerhonkson Trio at the Kleinert/ James Center for the Arts. “Yeah, I’m feeling pretty good,” he says via phone. “I’ve been following through on my other plans, and I’m really excited about doing the gig.” The occasion marks the debut of the trio, which in addition to Rudd features his neighbors Heather Masse on vocals and Rolf Sturm on guitar. “[The trio] comes at a great time,” the trombonist enthuses. “I couldn’t ask for two more talented associates to start a new project with. Having people you can hang out with musically makes working on new material so enjoyable, and it can give you a new angle when you’re playing standards.” Standards make up the focus of Rudd’s latest album, Trombone for Lovers (2013, Sunnyside Records), which topped many jazz best-of-the-year lists, including the vaunted NPR Music Jazz Critics Poll. Released on his 78th birthday, the set pairs the self-dubbed “Incredible Honk of Kerhonkson” with such consummate comrades as fellow trombonist Steven Bernstein, vocalists Masse, Bob Dorough, and Fay Victor, keyboardist John

Medeski, and guitarist Gary Lucas. A standards album was something Rudd had long considered but never attempted before, and Trombone for Lovers offers surprising takes on evergreens from the spheres of pop and rock (Santo and Johnny’s “Sleepwalk,” the Beatles’ “Here, There and Everywhere”) as well as jazz (“Autumn Leaves,” “Struttin’ with Some Barbeque”). “These were things that had gone into my body, music I’d heard on the radio or on the street,” explains Rudd. “I thought, ‘As long as this is in me, why not let it come out?’ It’s another piece of the puzzle.” For the Kleinert concert, the horn man plans a set list of “some new things and probably some familiar things that we’ll put some new touches on.” Augmenting the trio of Rudd, Masse (a regular guest on NPR’s “A Prairie Home Companion” and a member of the Wailin’ Jennys), and Sturm (who’s worked with David Johansen and Jorma Kaukonen) for the performance will be bassist Mark Helias and, according to Rudd, possibly a drummer. “It amazes me how much energy and wisdom are in each of these musicians,” Rudd says. “Playing with them is a beautiful way to keep growing.” Roswell Rudd’s Kerhonkson Trio will perform at the Kleinert/James Center for the Arts in Woodstock on July 26 at 8pm. Tickets are $20 ($18 for members). (845) 679-2079; Woodstockguild.org. —Peter Aaron CHRONOGRAM.COM LISTEN to “Funky Little Sweet Things,” a track off Roswell Rudd’s Trombone for Lovers.

7/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 99


Lottie and the Manatee 6pm. Acoustic. Taste Budd’s Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. Sarah McLachlan 8pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Syracuse & Siegel 8-10:30pm. With special guests. Catskill Mountain Pizza Company, Woodstock. 679-7969.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION HITS-on-the-Hudson IV Horse Show 8am-3pm. $5/under 12 free. World-class equestrian show jumping. All proceeds from the gate go directly to Family of Woodstock, Inc., a non-for-profit organization serving Ulster County. View website for schedule of events. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-5515.

THEATER The Danish Widow 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599.

Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band 8pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Karl 2000 8:30pm. Pop standards, Russian folk tunes, punk jazz. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

THEATER All the Gallery’s a Stage 4pm. See what happens when Williamstown Theatre Festival actors dig into the museum collection to find inspiration for a new site-specific performance. Come along on a roving show that infuses the galleries with a fresh creative buzz. The Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, MA. (413) 597-3055. The Danish Widow 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Third Annual Hudson Valley Chalk Festival 9am-7pm. July 18-July 20. 21 professional artists from around the US will celebrate a 500-year-old art tradition originating on the streets of Italy. Local artists will also participate in the Hudson Valley’s only chalk festival. Water Street Market Antiques Center, New Paltz. 255-1403.

FILM Peace, Love & Misunderstanding 7:15pm. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989.

LITERARY & BOOKS Author Event: Alena Smith “Tween Hobo: Off the Rails” 7pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500. Naomi Fata presents Beyond Head Knowledge: Knowing Christ Who Satisfies Our Hearts 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

The Garden in Watercolors Session I 10am-1pm. $45/$175 series/$145 series members. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Hudson Valley Food Truck Festival 3-10pm. Many Hudson valley food trucks showing of their delicious foods. Great music, entertainment, and a beer & wine garden. Cantine memorial field, Saugerties. 399-2222.

KIDS & FAMILY Summer Parade Papercrafts 4:30-5:30pm. Master papermaker and pulp artist Ken Polinskie will work with students to create costumes and masks made out of recycled materials using techniques including papier-mâché, paper folding, origami, collage and painting with an emphasis on sculptural effects. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Bubble Trouble with Jeff Boyer 6:30-7:30pm. Jeff juggles bubbles, sculpts and builds with bubbles, makes fog-filled bubbles and more. Jeff Boyer takes bubbles to the max in this one-man bubble extravaganza. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Cruiser’s Play Group 12-3pm. This group for mamas, papas, and caregivers looking to meet other babies and toddlers (ages 6-18 months) for activities, socialization, and friendship. Do you have a crawling, cruising, or toddling baby? We have lively conversations about life, music, teething, sleep, babyproofing, pooping, and eating. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624. Model Buildings Class 3-4:30pm. Peter Theodore will teach children how to build their very own model building that can become part of a village. These buildings will be displayed at the library when completed. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Visual Arts for Toddlers 10-11am. 18 months to ages 3+. Artist Alison Fox awakens your child’s creativity with imaginative art workshops for toddlers and their caregivers. Children will create paintings, drawings, collages, prints, murals, and sculpture while exploring various media and techniques. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

MUSIC Barbara Dempsey & Dewitt Nelson’s Cafe Singer Showcase 7-9pm. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. David Bromberg & Larry Campbell 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

100 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/14

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum 7pm. $7/$5 students. Spectrum Playhouse, Lee, MA. (413) 394-5023.

Moonlight and Magnolias 8-10:30pm. $22 includes dessert. A hyperventilating comedy. The Playhouse at Museum Village, Monroe, N.Y. 294-9465.

Summer Floral Design Workshops $75. Whether you are an enthusiast interested in creating bouquets for yourself, an event, a Bride, or toying with a career change; these hands on workshops will give you a great foundation of both the creative & technical side of floral artistry. Classes are for all levels starting beginner and accompanying advanced classes. Good Old Days Eco Florist, New Windsor. 562-2820.

FOOD & WINE

The Danish Widow 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599.

The Second Time Around 7:30pm. $20/$18 children and seniors. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476.

Improv Class with Ann Citron 7pm. EVERY Wednesday - Improv Class at 7:00 pm with Ann Citron Creative Co-op, Rosendale. 527-5672.

Schubert and the Long 19th Century 7pm. $10. Bard SummerScape. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu.

THEATER

Love in the Wars 8:30pm. $25-$50. Bard SummerScape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye 8pm. $5-10. An intimate, affecting portrait of the life and work of groundbreaking performance artist and music pioneer Genesis Breyer P-Orridge and his other half and collaborator, Lady Jaye. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. Basilicahudson.com.

Zepparella 7:30pm. $15. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966.

Les Miserables 8pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

THURSDAY 17

Vickie Russell: Campfire Sing Along 9pm. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (800) 772-6646.

Laugh 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new play written by Beth Henley. Susan Stein Shiva Theater at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-4636.

Love in the Wars 2pm. $25-$50. Bard SummerScape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

FILM

Singer-Songwriter Showcase 8-10:30pm. Third Friday of every month. $6. Acoustic music by three outstanding singer-songwriters and musicians at ASK GALLERY, 97 Broadway, Kingston 8-10:30 pm Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0311.

Summer Repertory: Jesus Christ Superstar 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

Unnecessary Farce This year, Ellenville’s Shadowland Theatre—the only Actors’ Equity theater in Ulster County—celebrates its 30th mainstage season. In 2013, the theater completed a one milliondollar restoration project, including renovation to its façade, lobby, and theater proper. Marking the anniversary and its second successful season postrenovation, Shadowland now presents an expanded, seven-show mainstage season. “Unnecessary Farce,” an outrageous comedy written by Paul Slade Smith, will make its regional premiere under the direction of Brendan Burke this month. Set in a dingy motel, the play concerns an embezzling mayor and his beautiful secretary, the two rookie cops trying to videotape them from the adjacent room, and ensuing confusion as to who’s taping who and who ends up in handcuffs. Performances run July 11 to August 3, Thursdays-Saturdays at 8pm and Sundays at 2pm. (845) 647-5511; Shadowlandtheatre.org. The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

Vernon Benjamin Presents History of the Hudson River Valley: From Wilderness to the Civil War 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

Love in the Wars 8:30pm. $25-$50. Bard SummerScape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

MUSIC

Moonlight and Magnolias 8-10:30pm. $22 includes dessert. A hyperventilating comedy. The Playhouse at Museum Village, Monroe. 294-9465. Summer Repertory: Jesus Christ Superstar 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Library Knitters 7-8pm. Third Thursday of every month. Sit and knit in the beautiful Gardiner Library. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Twin Maples Country Estate: Designing a Garden to Complement the House 10am-noon. $60/$50 members. Join horticulturist Deb Munson for an in-depth tour behind the gardening scenes at Twin Maples, a beautiful estate garden located in Salisbury, CT. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

FRIDAY 18 ART GALLERIES & EXHIBITS Phoenicia/Shandaken Studio Tour 11am-5pm. July 18-20. 30+ artisans an dfine artisans in every style from primordial to post-postmodern throughout the Phoenicia and Shandaken areas. Arts Upstairs, Phoenicia. 688-2142

DANCE Salsa Dance Night 9:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

ASK for Music July 8-10:30pm. $6. Hear some of the finest singer songwriters in the Hudson Valley perform in a gallery setting. Featured are Alice Brightsky and Dean Batstone. Event hosted by Michael and Emmy Clarke. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331. Aston Magna: Italian Trio Sonatas 8pm. $35/$30 seniors/$5 student rush/$15 under 30s. Music by Corelli, Vivaldi, Rossi, Stradella, Pernucio and Muhly. With Daniel Stepner and Joan Plana, baroque violins; Laura Jeppesen, viola da gamba; Michael Sponseller, harpsichord. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. (800) 595-4849. EagleMania: The World’s Greatest Eagles Tribute Band 8-10pm. $29-$34.50. EagleMania has emerged as a major act throughout the East Coast, performing to soldout audiences everywhere they go. The band consists of an ensemble of veteran musicians whose goal is to faithfully reproduce the Eagle’s repertoire, music they love to sing and play. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. Les Paul’s Trio 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Lukas Nelson and the Stinsons 7pm. Roots rock hoedown to beenfit FarmOn! Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Pam Tanowitz Dance 8pm. $20. Featuring an original score by David Lang, Caroline Shaw, and Hannah Lash performed live by the FLUX Quartet. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Pete Seeger Memorial 7pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Procol Harum $85/$70. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Singer-Songwriter Chris Walsh 8pm. Main Street Restaurant, Saugerties. 246-6222.

Twelfth Night 5pm. Youth performers 12–14 years take on Shakespeare. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. Newgenesisproductions.org. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Portrait Painting from Life 9am-4pm. $290/$60 model fee. Through July 20 with Lois Woolley. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

SATURDAY 19 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Voices of Diversity 12-2:30pm. Third Saturday of every month. A social network for LGBTQ people of color. Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center, Inc., Kingston. 331-5300.

DANCE Salsa Lesson and Latin Dance Party with Carlos Osorio 8pm. $12 at the door. Bring out your Latin spirit! Join Carlos Osorio, Founder of the Cumbia Spirit School of Dance for a fun, all-levels salsa class and then dance the night away at Kingston’s most artful new event space Wine available. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. (845) 331-3261. Summer Contradance Dance and BBQ Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Third Annual Hudson Valley Chalk Festival 9am-7pm. July 18-July 20. 21 professional artists from around the US will celebrate a 500-year-old art tradition originating on the streets of Italy. Local artists will also participate in the Hudson Valley’s only chalk festival. Water Street Market Antiques Center, New Paltz. 255-1403. Repair Cafe: New Paltz 10am-3pm. Repair Cafe is a free community meeting place to bring a beloved but broken item to be repaired. Bring just about anything except gas-engines and bicycles. Mechanical, electrical & electronic, digital, things made of wood, clothing, dolls & stuffed animals, jewelry, knife/tool sharpening, and a take-apart table for kids. New Paltz United Methodist Church, New Paltz. (646) 302-5835.

FOOD & WINE Sylvia Center’s Farm-to-Table Benefit Dinner 6-9pm. $150. Guests can expect a delicious buffet dinner featuring seasonal and local ingredients prepared by the chefs of Great Performances, NYC’s premier catering company. Proceeds from the dinner will benefit The Sylvia Center’s programs for youth in Columbia County. Katchkie Farm, Kinderhook. (518) 758-2166.


ART MIKE + DOUG STARN: BAMBÚ SHOTS

At Ten and Twenty Weeks, Mike + Doug Starn, installation.

Named After a Cheech and Chong Album I first saw Big Bambú on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum in 2010. Looking up at the densely built jungle gym of 5,000 bamboo poles (which was actually titled “You Can’t, You Don’t, and You Won’t Stop”) I found myself wondering: How did the Starn brothers convince the most important museum in the US to trust them? The issue of trust is central to Big Bambú. To build the structure, Doug and Mike Starn seek out rock climbers, because of their ease with heights and familiarity with knots. The team of builders learn to trust one another, and to trust the bamboo (first used for construction 5,000 years ago in China). As visitors climb the structure, they must believe that the thousands of knots supporting them will hold. It’s rare that an art lover is asked to trust her life to a sculpture. One might call Big Bambú a network of faith, a trust machine. “Mike + Doug Starn: Bambú Shots” at the Kleinert/James Gallery in Woodstock documents Big Bambú since its origins in 2008. (The Starn brothers were photographers before they began erecting scaffolding.) Looking at pictures of the rock climbers / builders—many of them with long hair or beards—I was reminded of Occupy Wall Street, another collective “art installation” that grew organically in response to practical needs. Big Bambú has no blueprint. The Starns give a description of the width and height they’re looking for, choose the location, and allow the workers a maximum of freedom. One of these builders was Derin Tanyol, curator of the Kleinert show (although she prefers to call herself the “organizer”); she worked on the installation at the Venice Biennale in 2011. This show was her idea. “I saw the photographs of Big Bambú as a body of work; they are not simply snapshots,” Tanyol remarks. This is the first photographic exhibition documenting Big Bambú.

Some of the photographs offer vistas from the bamboo towers. One photo resembles a tribal hut in the sky above Manhattan, looking out on Central Park and the skyline. It might be a bucolic postapocalyptic postcard of Balinese villagers camping atop the abandoned Metropolitan Museum. Fernand Léger, the French Communist artist, often painted construction workers laboring within a lattice of steel beams, as if to suggest that all humans inhabit a network of mutual support. A photo of 11 builders, standing together in the sky, enmeshed within a lattice of bamboo, seems to quote Léger. Other pictures focus on the structure of Big Bambú. Against the sky, with no sense of scale, the installation becomes abstract, evoking a geometric bird’s nest, or a three-dimensional Jackson Pollock canvas. Also in the show are two bamboo sculptures. The larger one, mounted on the wall above the stage at the Kleinert, looks like a Laotian pipe organ from the third century BC. The progenitors of Big Bambú, Doug and Mike Starn, are identical twins born in 1961 in New Jersey. They have been collaborating on artworks since they were 13. “When I think about Mike and Doug Starn, I think of them as one artist,” notes Tanyol. “They never disagree in public. They are famous for finishing each other’s sentences.” The highly collective enterprise of Big Bambú emerges from a collective of two. Mike and Doug Starn (plus a team of rock climbers) will appear at the Kleinert Gallery on Saturday, July 12, at 4pm for the closing party. “Mike + Doug Starn: Bambú Shots” will be at the Kleinert/James Gallery in Woodstock until July 13. (845) 679-2079. Woodstockguild.org. —Sparrow 7/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 101


Wine Farmers’ Market 1-4pm. Come for the tastings, wine shopping, and fun! A portion of sales will benefit charities, including Scenic Hudson. Hudson Valley Wine Market, Gardiner. 255-0600.

HEALTH & WELLNESS ASHI Babysitting Preparedness Course 9am-3pm. $45. The course is led by nationally certified instructors who also have experience as emergency responders in both professional and community environments. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 475-9742. Morning Yoga 10:15-11:15am. Beginners welcome. Bring your own mat. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

KIDS & FAMILY Movie Matinee: The LEGO Movie 2-4pm. An ordinary LEGO construction worker, thought to be the prophesied ‘Special’, is recruited to join a quest to stop an evil tyrant from gluing the LEGO universe into eternal stasis. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Gala Orchestra Concert by the Windham Festival Chamber Orchestra 8-10pm. $35/$32 seniors/$30 Contributors/$5 students. Featuring incomparable Zuill Bailey on cello, baritone Christopher Feigum and conducted by Robert Manno. Featuring: Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Mahler, Schumann, and Manno’s own selections from his opera, “Do Not Go Gentle.” Windham Civic and Performing Arts Center, Windham. (518) 734-3868. The ​Harlem String Quartet 6:30pm. Jazz. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Helsinki on Broadway: Linda Lavin 8pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Lucky House 8pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. Lucy Kaplansky 8pm. $30/$25. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

Laugh 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new play written by Beth Henley. Susan Stein Shiva Theater at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-4636. Les Miserables 8pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Love in the Wars 2 & 8:30pm. $25-$50. Bard SummerScape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Othello 8pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. The Second Time Around 7:30pm. $20/$18 children and seniors. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476.

Author Event: Joseph Luzzi: “My Two Italies” 7pm. The child of Italian immigrants and an awardwinning scholar of Italian literature, in My Two Italies Joseph Luzzi straddles these two perspectives to link his family’s dramatic story to Italy’s north-south divide, its quest for a unifying language, and its passion for art, food, and family. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

MUSIC Albert Cummings Blues Band 8:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. Annual Gala Orchestra Concert by Windham Chamber Festival Orchestra 8-10pm. $35/$32 seniors/$30 contributors/$5 children. Robert Manno will conduct the Windham Festival Chamber Orchestra, featuring the acclaimed cellist Zuill Bailey and Metropolitan Opera baritone Christopher Feigum. The program includes selections from Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Mahler, Schumann, Bartók, Mascagni and Manno. Windham Civic and Performing Arts Center, Windham. (518) 734-3868. Brian Carrion 8pm. With banjo player Mike Perrupatu and mandolin player Ryan O’Shea, these three voices sing in perfect 3 part harmony and blend a different mix of instruments to cover all kinds of music from classic rock and bluegrass to alternative and folk. Elsie’s Place, Wallkill. 895-8975. Chris Bergson Band 7pm. Opener: Defunct Radio Circus. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Country Star Gretchen Wilson 8pm. $26-$66. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904. Foghat, Live 8-10pm. $35/$43/$55. The band tours relentlessly because they love to play, which is evident in the passion and fun they have on stage during every live performance. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039.

102 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Schubert and the Long 19th Century 7pm. $10. Bard SummerScape. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu.

Pet First Aid, CPR & Disaster Preparedness Course 10am-2pm. $45. This course is ideal for all pet owners and pet caregivers. This unique course covers common health and safety-related issues for dogs and cats, first aid basics, CPR, choking maneuvers for pets, when to seek professional care and disaster planning steps for your pet. Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel. 475-9742.

KIDS & FAMILY Children and Families: Happenings 1pm. Take a chance and take part in a lyrical happening. Families are invited to create fantastic objects using large and soft forms from reflective and colorful materials. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

LECTURES & TALKS

Author Joseph Luzzi: My Two Italies 7pm. With topics ranging from the pervasive force of Dante’s poetry to the meteoric rise of Silvio Berlusconi, Luzzi presents the Italians in all their glory and squalor, relating the problems that plague Italy today to the country’s ancient roots. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

FILM

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Young People’s Concert 11am. Elizabeth Mitchell & Family. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Third Annual Hudson Valley Chalk Festival 9am-7pm. 21 professional artists from around the US will celebrate a 500-year-old art tradition originating on the streets of Italy. Local artists will also participate in the Hudson Valley’s only chalk festival. Water Street Market Antiques Center, New Paltz. 255-1403.

Rosendale Summer Farmers’ Market 2014 9am-2pm. Vendors include: Maynard Orchards, Good Flavor Farm; Three Sisters Farm, Wright’s Orchards; Twisted Jeanne’s, Ronnybrook dairy products and Bread Alone bakery goods, Immune Schein Elixir and Organic Teas, Vlume beeswax products; Bob’s Pickles and more. Rosendale Farmers’ Market, Rosendale. 658-8348.

Water Wars 10:30am-12:30pm. $0-$7. Ready to get wet? Come spend the morning with the firefighters of South Schodack Fire Department. Learn to operate a real fire hose! Can you fill the big barrel with water the fastest? After the challenge every “junior firefighter” will receive a special prize. Then come inside the Museum and try the new virtual first responder fire truck experience! Get ready to learn how to “put the wet stuff on the red stuff” at the Museum. FASNY Museum of Firefighting, Hudson. (518) 822-1875.

Wanderings & Wonderings 3pm. Join artist Katarina Jerinic on an imaginative exploration of Storm King. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

Beacon Flea Market 8am-3pm. A variety of items, including re-finished furniture, antiques, vintage purses, mid-century cookware, collectible vinyl, old books, handmade jewelry, and local crafts. Beacon Flea Market, Beacon. 202-0094.

FOOD & WINE

Seano’s Circus Spectacular 10am. Followed by an open workshop. Trunks, tricks, toys and more—come explore the world of Circus with Seano the teaching Clown. Seano has been entertaining and educating for the sheer fun and delight in seeing people explore this unique craft. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Astronomy with Bob Berman 8-9pm. Astronomy author, columnist, and radio host Bob Berman will present a live, hands-on exploration of the science, lore, and wonders of the summer sky. Appropriate for all ages, this narrated stroll through our galaxy will be a one-hour outdoor program if skies are clear, or a colorful indoor presentation if cloudy. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

SUNDAY 20 FAIRS & FESTIVALS

The Wassaic Project Summer Festival Founded in 2008, the Wassaic Project is a nonprofit organization that creates and promotes fluid, contemporary visual and performing arts. The project’s founding program is its summer festival, a free annual event that features innovative and experimental visual art, music, and dance. Taking a nonconformist approach to art and its presentation, the festival breaks free of traditional white-walled galleries to host exhibitions in a grain elevator, an 1850s hotel, a barn, and the hamlet’s historic train station. This year, the festival returns for its seventh summer, from August 1 to August 3. As always, participants are encouraged to camp out on the Wassaic Project’s campus and experience a weekend of communal, alternative art. Enjoy the festival and additional summer programs such as exhibitions and film screenings at the Maxon Mills, Wassaic. (347) 815-0783; Wassaicproject.org. Netsayi 8pm. $20 preferred/$16/$12 in advance. This Zimbabwean contemporary folk star is among the most captivating and original singer-songwriters to emerge on the world music scene in a decade. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111.

Selected Shorts with Kate Burton, Jane Curtin, and Parker Posey 8pm. $20-$50. Featuring performances of spellbinding short stories at this taping for the hit public radio series. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

One World, Many Rhythms African Harp Performance 4pm. Kinderhook Memorial Library, Kinderhook. (518) 758-6192.

Moonlight and Magnolias 8-10:30pm. $22 includes dessert. A hyperventilating comedy. The Playhouse at Museum Village, Monroe. 294-9465.

Original Music by Derek Knott 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Summer Repertory: Jesus Christ Superstar 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900.

Pam Tanowitz Dance 8pm. $20. Featuring an original score by David Lang, Caroline Shaw, and Hannah Lash performed live by the FLUX Quartet. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Witkowski Piano Duo 7:30pm. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS

Twelfth Night 5pm. Youth performers 12–14 years take on Shakespeare. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. Newgenesisproductions.org. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

Martin Van Buren National Historic Site Celebration Celebrate the 40th anniversary of the designation of Lindenwald, the home of President Van Buren, as a national historic site. Kinderhook Farmers’ Market, Kinderhook. Nps.gov/mava/planyourvisit/events.htm.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

SPIRITUALITY

Photographing the Nude in Nature with Dan McCormack 10am-4pm. $150/$130 members/$450 series/$390 series members. This workshop will demonstrate how the figure may be seen as landscape, design, and part of Mother Earth. Different models and shooting sites are planned for each Saturday session. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Acupuncture Clinic 12-4pm. $35-50. With the acclaimed Acupuncturist, Amy Hausman, L.Ac. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

THEATER The Danish Widow 2pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum 2 & 7pm. $7/$5 students. Spectrum Playhouse, Lee, MA. (413) 394-5023.

Antique Appraisal Day 9am-2pm. $8 per item/$20 three items. Four experienced appraisers. Kinderhook Memorial Library, Kinderhook. (518) 758-6192.

Summer Floral Design Workshops 2pm. $75. Whether you are an enthusiast interested in creating bouquets for yourself, an event, a bride, or toying with a career change; these hands on workshops will give you a great foundation of both the creative & technical side of floral artistry. Classes are for all levels starting beginner and accompanying advanced classes. Good Old Days Eco Florist, New Windsor. 562-2820.

Kids’ Open Mike 6pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

LITERARY & BOOKS Words Words Words 3pm. $5. 7th-annual summer afternoon gathering of Hudson Valley authors, reading from and talking about their own work. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

MUSIC The Baseball Project and Happiness 2pm. Explore Alyson Shotz’s Mirror Fence (2003) and experiment with reflective building materials in a handson workshop. Organized with Ground Control Touring. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115. Big Joe Fitz & the Lo Fis 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. James Taylor and the All-Star Band 7pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Johnny Rawls 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Killswitch Engage, After The Burial, Ringworm, Code Orange Kids 6:30pm. $30. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. Northern Week Through July 26. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333. Omi Improvisers Orchestra 7pm. 7-9pm. Featuring special guests Karl Berger and Ingrid Sertso. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 392-4747. The Orion String Quartet 3pm. $60. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. The Parnas Duo 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Boice Brothers 100th Anniversary and Benefit 12-4pm. Benefits the Hudson River Stewards Program. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 265-8080. Open House Blue Cliff Monastery, Pine Bush. (845) 213-1785 x1.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Guided Cemetery Tours 2pm. Learn about notable Kingstonians as you view distinctive gravesites amid remarkable landscapes within the City of Kingston. Go to FOHK.org to learn exact meeting places and cemetery schedule. Friends of Historic Kingston, Kingston. 339-0720.

PETS Pet 1st Aid, CPR & Disaster Prep 10am. $45. This unique course covers common health and safety-related issues for dogs and cats, first aid basics, CPR, choking maneuvers for pets, when to seek professional care and disaster planning steps for your pet. Course results in 3-year certification. Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel. 475-9742.


SPIRITUALITY

MUSIC

Guided Chakra Balancing Meditation with the Quartz Crystal Singing Bowls 1-2pm. $10-20. Celebrate the new moon of Cancer with meditation, energy balancing, and healing. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

Dayna Kurtz: Residency at The Falcon 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Intuitive Energy Healing & Reiki 1 Training 2-3:30pm. $40-$60. Become an energy healing, or for current healers, receive a booster attunement for $25. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

THEATER The Danish Widow 2pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Laugh 2pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. A new play written by Beth Henley. Susan Stein Shiva Theater at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. (845) 437-5599 Les Miserables 3pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Love in the Wars 2pm. $25-$50. Bard SummerScape. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Second Time Around 2pm. $20/$18 children and seniors. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. Moonlight and Magnolias 3-5:30pm. $22 includes dessert. A hyperventilating comedy. The Playhouse at Museum Village, Monroe. 294-9465. Summer Repertory: Jesus Christ Superstar 2pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Twelfth Night 5pm. Youth performers 12–14 years take on Shakespeare. Little Globe Outdoor Theater, West Shokan. Newgenesisproductions.org. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

MONDAY 21

Jeff Entin’s Open Mike Night 6:30-8:30pm. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

NIGHTLIFE Monday Night Karaoke 9pm. Come and join us for a night of singing, laughing and fun. Bring a lot friends and have fun! Rendezvous Lounge, Kingston. 331-5209.

THEATER Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES The Figure in the Landscape $290/$60 model fee. Through July 23 with Chris Seubert. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Rosendale from Script to Screen 10am-4pm. $295. Through July 25. In this workshop, you’ll join media professionals and former Broadway actor Nancy Nelson Ewing to create dramatic works through multi-media platforms. Students will learn the entire process of media production to bring their words and ideas to life in projects including: stopmotion animation, live-action film, traditional theater, and radio/music production. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480. EFT & Law of Attraction Prosperity Circle 6pm. $15. FInancial issues resolved quickly with 5,000 year old technique. TG Parker, Kingston. 706-2183.

TUESDAY 22 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS 2nd Annual David Fletcher Community Service Award Luncheon 11:30am-2pm. $50. Jewish Family Services of Ulster County’s luncheon honoring Frank L. Cardinale, Chairman of the Ulster County Democratic Committee, and Anne L. Cardinale, recently retired Director of the Ulster County Office for the Aging, for their many years of service to our community. Wiltwyck Golf Club, Kingston. 331-0700. Meeting of End the New Jim Crow Action Committee 6-8pm. The End the New Jim Crow Action Network! (ENJAN) is a Hudson Valley network dedicated to fighting racist policies of racial profiling, police brutality, and mass incarceration (the “new Jim Crow”). New Progressive Baptist Church, Kingston. (845) 475-8781.

DANCE

HEALTH & WELLNESS

CaravanKids Summer Workshop 9:30am-3:30pm. $350 full day/$225 half day. Through July 28, 4-8 years. Creative Movement, CaravanKids Summer Workshop will expose children to the wonderful world of dance in an inspiring fun-filled way. In honor of Pete Seeger, the workshop will include clogging and Americana dance as well tales and stories that Pete loved to tell and sing. Stone Mountain Farm, New Paltz. 256-9300.

Qi Gong Class at Sacred Space Healing Arts Studio 6-7pm. $10. Anyone at any age can practice Qi Gong regardless of their limitations whether mental or physical. It is our breath and intention that drives our internal, alchemy, during which we maximize the internal, use, generation, and storage of energy. Classes will be facilitated by Lorraine Hughes. Sacred Space Healing Arts Studio, Beacon. 416-4598.

FILM Cold in July 7:15pm. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Cancer Support Group for Patients 2-3pm. Professional social workers and nurses lead discussions on ways to cope with illness and treatment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-6470. Meditation: The Path of the Heart 7:30pm. Woodstock Reformed Church, Woodstock. 679-6610. Yoga with a View 6-7:15pm. $17. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Yoga with Nita Noon. Levels I/II. Euphoria Yoga Center, Woodstock. 679-6766.

KIDS & FAMILY Doctor Who? 6:30-7:30pm. Bring the family for an evening of traveling through space and time. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Drawing Class 4-5:30pm. Ages 9-14. This class will work on developing fundamental drawing skills through lessons that will be followed by corresponding creative projects. 4-part series. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Panorama: Week 2-Nature as the Artist’s Palette 9am-3pm. $320 two weeks/$180 one week/$300 two weeks members/$160 one weeks emembers. During the week we will use nature as the palette of inspiration for the artwork we create. We will dabble in a variety of media, use nature to create art and work with artists and culinary chefs throughout the week. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872. Tracy Bonham’s String Camp at Paul Green’s Rock Academy Through July 25. Tracy will work with kids to create a string ensemble that arranges and performs works by artists such as David Bowie, Radiohead, Led Zeppelin, Devo, Arcade Fire and the Talking Heads. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

KIDS & FAMILY Simmons Wildlife 5:30-6:30pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

MUSIC Mina Perry 7:30pm. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423. MOMIX 8pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

SPIRITUALITY Energy Clearing & Balancing 7-8pm. $10-20. Energy clearing & balancing for greater health, relaxation, and weight loss. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838. Sound Healing Group Session 6-7pm. $10-20. Receive powerful sound healing with Quartz Singing Bowls, tuning forks, and Om chant. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

THEATER The Danish Widow 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Gardiner Media Monsters 2-4pm. $150. 6-session film camp. Youth will engage in collaborative digital storytelling to create a script that they then bring to life using stop-motion animation! Youth with also get the chance to try human animation as well as make a short music video and a “behind-thescenes” video. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480. Writing Poetry, Short Story, Novel, Memoir or Creative Non-fiction (and Getting It Published) 6:30-8:30pm. $15/$60 series. 21 Cedar Way, Woodstock. 679-8256.

WEDNESDAY 23 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Meeting of End the New Jim Crow Action Committee 6-8pm. The End the New Jim Crow Action Network! (ENJAN) is a Hudson Valley network dedicated to fighting racist policies of racial profiling, police brutality, and mass incarceration (the “new Jim Crow”). Family Partnership Center, Poughkeepsie. (845) 475-8781.

FILM Cold in July 1pm. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. 2 Autumns, 3 Winters 6-7:30pm. Arman is 33 and ready to make a change. When he literally bumps into Amélie—slightly cynical but nevertheless lovely—he’s dead-set on making a connection with her. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

FOOD & WINE Salads From the Sidelines to the Main Course 6:30-9:30pm. $60. Make the most of the abundance of fresh vegetables and herbs available during the summer months. Whether preparing as a main course, or as a side, gain practical skills (and nutritional information) to replace processed foods with whole food salads and healthy homemade dressings. We’ll feature recipes for everyone, including those with gluten and dairy-free preferences. Valley Variety, Hudson. (518) 828-0033.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Educators Retreat Through July 27. Blue Cliff Monastery, Pine Bush. (845) 213-1785 x1. Knitting Circle for Women with Cancer 6:30-8pm. Fourth Wednesday of every month. Great comfort is found by many in the time-honored practices of knitting and crocheting. Knitting circles offer women a place to gather around a common interest. In this monthly group for women with cancer, Support Connection provides the time and space for women to begin or finish a knitting or crocheting project. Rekindle the joy of creating while spending time with other women who have experienced cancer. Open to people living with breast, ovarian, or gynecological cancer. Pre-registration is required. (914) 962-6402 or (800) 532-4290. Support Connection, Yorktown Heights.

KIDS & FAMILY Family Fun Night: Meet the Coast Guard 6:30-7:30pm. Find out what the Saugerties Coast guard does and how they help you! Meet at the Coast Guard Station. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Mythbusters 3-4pm. Put urban myths to the test and decide whether they are fact or fiction. Age: 13 or 7th grade and up. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

MUSIC The Baseball Project 8pm. A rock ‘n’ roll super-group featuring members of R.E.M., Dream Syndicate, Hindu Love Gods, and Young Fresh Fellows Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Buried in Blue Duo 7pm. Acoustic. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Quickstep noon. Lively fiddle tunes, lonesome folksongs, and fancy footwork. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Syracuse & Siegel 8-10:30pm. With special guests. Catskill Mountain Pizza Company, Woodstock. 679-7969.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION HITS-on-the-Hudson V Horse Show 8am-3pm. $5/under 12 free. World-class equestrian show jumping. All proceeds from the gate go directly to Family of Woodstock, Inc., a non-for-profit organization serving Ulster County. View website for schedule of events. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-5515.

THEATER The Danish Widow 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES The Garden in Watercolors Session I 10am-1pm. $45/$175 series/$145 series members. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926. Summer Floral Design Workshops 6:30pm. $75. Whether you are an enthusiast interested in creating bouquets for yourself, an event, a Bride, or toying with a career change; these hands on workshops will give you a great foundation of both the creative & technical side of floral artistry. Classes are for all levels starting beginner and accompanying advanced classes. Good Old Days Eco Florist, New Windsor. 562-2820.

THURSDAY 24 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Meeting of Middle East Crisis Response 7-8:30pm. Woodstock Library, Woodstock. 679-4693.

DANCE Paul Taylor Dance Company 8pm. $20-$75. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

FILM No Man’s Land (Terra De Ninguem) 8pm. $5-10. Paolo, a mercenary, narrates and performs his own history, constructing a record which slowly reveals in its turns of phrase and mismatched events, a series of doubts and contradictions. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. Basilicahudson.com. Cold in July 7:15pm. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. Schubert and the Long 19th Century 7pm. $10. Bard SummerScape. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu.

KIDS & FAMILY Summer Parade Papercrafts 4:30-5:30pm. Master papermaker and pulp artist Ken Polinskie will work with students to create costumes and masks made out of recycled materials using techniques including papier-mâché, paper folding, origami, collage and painting with an emphasis on sculptural effects. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Cruiser’s Play Group 12-3pm. This group for mamas, papas, and caregivers looking to meet other babies and toddlers (ages 6-18 months) for activities, socialization, and friendship. Do you have a crawling, cruising, or toddling baby? We have a lively conversations about life, music, teething, sleep, babyproofing, pooping, and eating. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624. Visual Arts for Toddlers 10-11am. 18 months to ages 3+. Artist Alison Fox awakens your child’s creativity with imaginative art workshops for toddlers and their caregivers. Children will create paintings, drawings, collages, prints, murals, and sculpture while exploring various media and techniques. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

LECTURES & TALKS WCMA 102: A Look Behind the Slide 4pm. Stefanie Solum, Associate Professor of Art. Looking at art offers us powerful insights into historical and contemporary life, but what can we learn from decoding a work of art? Taking a sharpie to projected images of iconic works of art, we will unpack their structural underpinnings. Then we’ll head to the galleries to put fresh insights to work. The Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, MA. (413) 597-3055.

LITERARY & BOOKS Saugerties in the Hudson River Valley 6:30-7:30pm. Vernon Benjamin, author of The History of the Hudson River Valley from Wilderness to the Civil War, will be at the library to do a reading from his book. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Writers Read 5:30pm. Fourth Thursday of every month. $3. Literary reading series featuing at least two poets/writers. David Giannini, Becket, MA. Davidgpoet@gmail.com.

MUSIC Joe McPhee and Chris Corsano 8:30pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Priya Mayadas 7:30pm. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423.

THEATER The Danish Widow 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Moonlight and Magnolias 8-10:30pm. $22 includes dessert. A hyperventilating comedy. The Playhouse at Museum Village, Monroe. 294-9465. Summer Repertory: The Three Musketeers 8pm. $26-$38. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

FRIDAY 25 ART GALLERIES & EXHIBITS Gallery Talk 12pm. Art Center curator Mary-Kay Lombino will lead an informational discussion of the Faces and Figures in Self-Taught Art exhibition, sharing her unique curatorial perspective on the show as a whole and exploring selected works in detail. Vassar College, Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-7690.

7/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 103


CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

MUSIC

Hudson Valley Garden Association Bus Trip to Wave Hill 7:30am-3:30pm. $48. Join HVGA for a guided tour primarily focused on seasonal highlights. This tour will give an overview of Wave Hill’s extensive collection of rare and unusual plants, carefully cultivated into 13 designed garden areas, along with a general history of the property. Wave Hill, Bronx. 418-3640.

Crossing to Scotland in The Catskills Three-day retreat for cello. Shokan, Shokan. 657-7093.

Annual Cocktail & Artist Residency Performance with Composer Ben Neill 7pm. $25/Manitoga members free. 2014’s Artist Residency program continues with the premiere of Ben Neill’s Manitoga for brass quintet and electronics, featuring trumpets sculpted into the forms of letters by artist Carol Szymanski. Cocktails and light fare will be served. Space is limited. Manitoga, Garrison. 424-3812.

DANCE Paul Taylor Dance Company 8pm. $20-$75. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

KIDS & FAMILY Arm of the Sea Theater: The Rejuvenary River Circus 7-8pm. This Circus is an allegorical tale featuring gorgeous masks and puppet characters, a bio-morphic set design and live original music. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

LECTURES & TALKS

SATURDAY 26 ART GALLERIES & EXHIBITS Studio Visits 2-4pm. $50. With Julia Santos Solomon and Melinda Stickney-Gibson. Woodstock. (845) 679-2079

DANCE Paul Taylor Dance Company 3 and 8pm. $20-$75. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Salsa Lesson and Latin Dance Party with Carlos Osorio 8pm. $12 at the door. Bring out your Latin spirit! Join Carlos Osorio, Founder of the Cumbia Spirit School of Dance for a fun, all levels salsa class and then dance the night away at Kingston’s most artful new event space Wine available. Uptown Gallery, Kingston. 845 331 3261.

Gallery Talk: Faces and Figures in Self-Taught Art Noon. Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5237. Author Event: Judith Felsenfeld “Blaustein’s Kiss” 7pm. At this event Hudson Valley resident and author Judith Felsenfeld will read from her new collection of short stories, “Blaustein’s Kiss,” followed by an audience Q&A and book signing. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

MUSIC Carl Maria von Weber: Euryanthe 7pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Dangling Success 9pm. Jazz-funk dance party. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. The Erik Lawrence Quartet 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Lionel Richie with CeeLo Green 7:30pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Magnetic Fields’ Stephin Merritt 9pm. Singer/songwriter. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. The “The Band” Band 8pm. Classic rock. Turning Point Cafe, Piermont. 359-1089. Tom Freund + Friends 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Tom Paxton 8pm. $60/$50. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Native Butterfly House Open House and Reception 5-7pm. Nibble on hors d’oeuvres while learning about beautiful New England butterflies and moths, and find out how you can attract native pollinators to your garden at home. Project Native, Housatonic, MA. (413) 274-3433.

THEATER The Danish Widow 8pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Jack Spicer’s Billy the Kid 8pm. $20. The Theatre of a Two-Headed Calf. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Les Miserables 8pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Liar 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Moonlight and Magnolias 8-10:30pm. $22 includes dessert. A hyperventilating comedy. The Playhouse at Museum Village, Monroe. 294-9465. Summer Repertory: The Three Musketeers 8pm. $26-$38. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. A Walk on the Moon 8pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5250.

104 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/14

Blue Food 9:30pm. Harmony Music, Woodstock. 679-7760. The Bush Brothers 9-11:30pm. Whether it’s the high energy of a bluegrass tune or the tight sweet harmonies of a ballad or an original song coupled with awesome instrumentals, this promises to be an awesome night of eclectic Americana music and song. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

Woodstock Playhouse 2014 Season The Woodstock Playhouse will present its fourth season of summer repertory productions with four shows. After beginning in June with “Spamalot,” productions for July and August include Andrew Lloyd Webber’s rock opera “Jesus Christ Superstar,” July 10-20, a musical adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’s classic novel, “The Three Musketeers,” July 24-26, and Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim’s iconic love story “West Side Story,” July 31-August 10. The 25-member summer cast are Actors’ Equity Association guest artists—recent graduates and current students of America’s finest musical theater programs. The summer repertory is staged in an intimate 321-seat theater in the heart of Woodstock, allowing theatergoers an elevated sensory experience of live performance featuring rising Broadway performers. (845) 679-6900; Woodstockplayhouse.org.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Hudson River Kayak Getaway Tour with The River Connection 5pm. $60. A quick trip after work or on the weekend. The Getaway tour is a great way to unwind and meet other paddlers. Getaway guided kayak tours will depart from the River Connection Boathouse located at the Hyde Park Landing Marina. The River Connection, Inc., Hyde Park. 229-0595.

Belleayre Festival Opera 8pm. $26-$76. Gaetano Donizetti’s “Lucia Di Lammermoor”. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. (800) 942-6904.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Midsummer 2014: Metamorphoses 9am-9pm. This year the theme of our Midsummer Festival is Greek Mythology. We have a wonderful two days of speakers, panels, music and art events related to the rich history of mythology in ancient Greece. Center For Symbolic Studies, New Paltz. 658 8540. Newburgh Urban Market 10am-4pm. Washington’s Headquarters, Newburgh. Newburghurbanmarket.com 10am-4pm. Our great mix of high quality offerings includes original hand crafted jewelry, furniture, clothing, and décor from local artisans; antiques and vintage collectibles; fair trade and repurposed items; fine local food, beverages and organic produce; and much more. Newburgh Urban Market, Newburgh. Newburghurbanmarket.com. Otis Arts Festival 9am-3pm. Farmington River Elementary School, Otis, MA. (413) 269-4674.

KIDS & FAMILY 8th Annual Tannersville Crazy Race Festival 11am-4pm. Vendors will line both sides of Main Street with all-day live DJing and races. Racers can build the cars of their wildest imagination, using anything from flower pots to Santa sleighs to garbage cans. Downtown Tannersville, Tannersville. (518) 628-4424.

LITERARY & BOOKS Friends Used Book Sale 10am-4pm. Member preview from 8:30am to 10am on Saturday. Most hardcover & trade paperback books are $1 each, standard paperback books are 50¢ each or 3/$1, children’s books are 25¢ each. All book sale proceeds benefit the Plattekill Public Library. Plattekill Library, Modena. 883-7286. Laura Ludwig Presents Performance Art and Poetry 6:30pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775. Poetry Reading 6pm. Featuring Marianna Boncek, Thom Francis, Mike Jurkovic, Mary Panza, Cheryl A. Rice and Rebecca Schumejda. Half Moon Books, Kingston. 331-5439.

Chris Raabe 8:30pm. Pop, soft rock. Piano Wine Bar, Fishkill. 896-8466. Days of the New, Remedy 7pm. $16-$18. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. Faceless, Hyngd, Stifled 7:30pm. $10-$15. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. Grand Finale Concert 7:30pm. Featuring Witkowski Piano Duo, Luiz de Moura Castro, Priya Mayadas. The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT. (860) 435-4423. Johnny Fedz & Friends 10:30am. Blues. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Kenny Rogers with The Hudson Valley Philharmonic 8pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Lisa Gutkin Band: The Culture Hopping Express 7:30pm. Buffet at 6:30pm. A unique blend of acoustic music from a variety of ethnic traditions, set to American blues, funk, and rock beats. Knox Trail Inn, Otis, MA. (413) 269-4400. Mose Allison Project featuring Richard Julian 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. One World, Many Rhythms Drum Circle 4pm. Kinderhook Memorial Library, Kinderhook. (518) 758-6192. Reality Check 7pm. Classic rock. Ice House on the Hudson, Poughkeepsie. 232-5783. Shaktipat: Ecstatic Grooves, Hypnotic Kirtan, Tribal Drumming Fourth Saturday of every month, 8pm. Come join a growing community of ecstatic warriors united in the thunder of pulse, voice, and spirit! Raise your voice in hypnotic kirtan, move your body to the sacred rhythms, drum your way to ecstasy, and help create a collective sacred space. MaMa, Stone Ridge. 687-8707. Steve Gorn & Friends 8pm. A Twilight Concert of Indian Ragas. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. The Stillhouse Rounders 8pm. $10. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048.

Tom Paxton 8pm. $60/$50. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. The Woodstock Concerts on the Green 1-5pm. Village Green, Woodstock. Woodstockchamber.com.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Firemen’s Convention Parade 2pm. Village Square, Kinderhook. (518) 758-9220.

THEATER The Danish Widow 2pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Jack Spicer’s Billy the Kid 8pm. $20. The Theatre of a Two-Headed Calf. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Les Miserables 8pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Moonlight and Magnolias 8-10:30pm. $22 includes dessert. A hyperventilating comedy. The Playhouse at Museum Village, Monroe, N.Y. 294-9465. Summer Repertory: The Three Musketeers 8pm. $26-$38. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 8pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. A Walk on the Moon 2pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5250.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Photographing the Nude in Nature with Dan McCormack 10am-4pm. $150/$130 members/$450 series/$390 series members. This workshop will demonstrate how the figure may be seen as landscape, design and part of Mother Earth. Different models and shooting sites are planned for each Saturday session. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Summer Floral Design Workshops 2pm. $75. Whether you are an enthusiast interested in creating bouquets for yourself, an event, a Bride, or toying with a career change; these hands on workshops will give you a great foundation of both the creative and technical side of floral artistry. Classes are for all levels starting beginner and accompanying advanced classes. Good Old Days Eco Florist, New Windsor. 562-2820.

SUNDAY 27 DANCE Ajkun Ballet Theatre Company 7:30pm. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Beacon Flea Market 8am-3pm. A variety of items, including re-finished furniture, antiques, vintage purses, mid-century cookware, collectible vinyl, old books, handmade jewelry, and local crafts. Beacon Flea Market, Beacon. 202-0094. Midsummer 2014: Metamorphoses 9am-9pm. This year the theme of our Midsummer Festival is Greek Mythology. We have a wonderful two days of speakers, panels, music and art events related to the rich history of mythology in ancient Greece. Center For Symbolic Studies, New Paltz. 658 8540.

FILM Schubert and the Long 19th Century 7pm. $10. Bard SummerScape. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu.

FOOD & WINE Rosendale Summer Farmers’ Market 2014 9am-2pm. Vendors include: Maynard Orchards, Good Flavor Farm; Three Sisters Farm, Wright’s Orchards; Twisted Jeanne’s, Ronnybrook dairy products and Bread Alone bakery goods, Immune Schein Elixir and Organic Teas, Vlume beeswax products; Bob’s Pickles and more. Rosendale Farmers’ Market, Rosendale. 658-8348.

KIDS & FAMILY Children and Families: Forest Ramble 1pm. Discover the forested areas of the Art Center. Investigate the habitats of the forest floor, identify the creatures that make a rotting log their home, and explore the transitional world between field and forest. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115. Ferdinand and Friends: A Musical Menagerie! 11:30am. Join Ferdinand and his raucous coterie of furry and feathered friends in this enchanting journey through classic tales. Colorful creatures will be brought to life with a violin, flute, double bass and narrator. Music by SaintSaens, Honegger, Ridout, Prokofiev and more. Mountain Top Arboretum, Tannersville. (518) 628-4424.


MONDAY 28

LITERARY & BOOKS Author Event: Gary Bass “The Blood Telegram: Nixon, Kissinger, and a Forgotten Genocide” 4pm. Blood Telegram provides the first full account of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger’s secret support for Pakistan in 1971—as it committed shocking atrocities in Bangladesh, which led to war between India and Pakistan, shaped the fate of Asia, and left major strategic consequences for the world today. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500. Friends Used Book Sale 10am-2pm. Member preview from 8:30am to 10am on Saturday. Most hardcover & trade paperback books are $1 each, standard paperback books are 50¢ each or 3/$1, children’s books are 25¢ each. All book sale proceeds benefit the Plattekill Public Library. Plattekill Library, Modena. 883-7286. Words Words Words 3pm. $5. 7th- annual summer afternoon gathering of Hudson Valley authors, reading from and talking about their own work. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

MUSIC Carl Maria von Weber: Euryanthe 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Galactic 8pm. $43/$38. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Harlem String Quartet 3pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. John Cleary 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Julie Corbalis and Pat Kelly 6pm. Acoustic. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Latitude 41 4pm. American Landscapes VI: Platt and Dvorák. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Leo B. 6pm. Acoustic. The Golden Rail Ale House, Newburgh. 565-2337. Marc Cohn 8pm. Folk-rock singer songwriter. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Toby Keith 7pm. $31.50-$101. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Guided Walking Tour 2pm. $5/children free. Hurley Heritage Society, Hurley. 338-1661. Hudson Valley Renegades Family Fun Night 5pm. Dutchess Stadium, Wappingers Falls. 838-0094. Kayak Demo Day with The River Connection 2pm. $10. Throughout the paddling season the River Connection offers Try Before Buy Demos. Come join the River Connection Instructors and try out a variety of kayaks from manufacturers such as P&H, North Shore Kayaks, Valley Sea Kayaks and Venture Kayaks. We have a large fleet and have a fleet boat for virtually every model we carry in our retail showroom, all available to try in our Private Harbor. The River Connection, Inc., Hyde Park. 229-0595.

SPIRITUALITY Guided Chakra Balancing Meditation with the Quartz Crystal Singing Bowls 1-2pm. $10-20. Celebrate the new moon of Cancer with meditation, energy balancing, and healing. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

THEATER The Danish Widow 2pm. $40. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse. A new play written and directed by John Patrick Shanley. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Les Miserables 3pm. $27/$25 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Moonlight and Magnolias 3-5:30pm. $22 includes dessert. A hyperventilating comedy. The Playhouse at Museum Village, Monroe, N.Y. 294-9465. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. A Walk on the Moon 2pm. $30. Presented by Vassar & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater. Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5250.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Abstract Comics 9am-4pm. $120. With Meredith Rosier. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

DANCE SummerDance on Tour! 9:30am-3:30pm. $850 all three sessions/$325 single sessions. SummerDance on Tour! exposes students ages 9+ to a wide variety of dance forms and styles that will expand their perceptions and vocabulary in the world of dance while piquing performance skills. Classes are for all levels, and include modern technique, Americana, Afro-Brazilian, Bollywood, Indian folk, rhythm/tap, swing, improvisation, and ballet. Stone Mountain Farm, New Paltz. Vcoffice@vanavercaravan.org.

Energy Clearing & Balancing 7-8pm. $10-20. Energy clearing & balancing for greater health, relaxation, and weight loss. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838. Sound Healing Group Session 6-7pm. $10-20. Receive powerful sound healing with Quartz Singing Bowls, tuning forks, and Om chant. The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing, New Paltz. 546-7838.

THEATER The Liar 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Cancer Support Group for Patients 2-3pm. Professional social workers and nurses lead discussions on ways to cope with illness and treatment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 483-6470.

Gardiner Media Monsters 2-4pm. $150. 6-session film camp. Youth will engage in collaborative digital storytelling to create a script that they then bring to life using stop-motion animation! Youth with also get the chance to try human animation as well as make a short music video and a “behind-thescenes” video. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480.

Meditation: The Path of the Heart 7:30pm. Woodstock Reformed Church, Woodstock. 679-6610. Yoga with a View 6-7:15pm. $17. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Yoga with Nita Noon. Levels I/II. Euphoria Yoga Center, Woodstock. 679-6766.

KIDS & FAMILY Summer Writers’ Intensive 10am-3pm. Through August 1. $325. Instructor: Jenny Wai-Lan Strodl. Ages 13+. Days are filled with individualized writing instruction, one-on-one editing, structured free writing time, and outdoor summer activities including daily pool time. OMI Art Camps, Ghent. (518) 728-9256.

LITERARY & BOOKS Mystery Mondays Book Discussion 11am-noon. Arlington Branch Library, Poughkeepsie. 454-9308.

MUSIC Dayna Kurtz: Residency at The Falcon 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

NIGHTLIFE Monday Night Karaoke 9pm. Come and join us for a night of singing, laughing and fun. Bring a lot friends and have fun! Rendezvous Lounge, Kingston. 331-5209.

THEATER The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Foundation Painting 9am-noon. Weekly through August 25. With Chris Seubert. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Intensive Watercolor 9am-4pm. $290/$60 model fee. Through July 30 with Richard Segalman. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Little Rock Academy & String Camp 11am-2:30pm. Through August 1. $400/$350 siblings. Paul Green Rock Academy for ages 5-7. 5-day session. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333. Rhinebeck From Script to Screen 10am-4pm. $295. Week-long camp. In this workshop, you’ll join media professionals and former Broadway actor Nancy Nelson Ewing to create dramatic works through multi-media platforms. Students will learn the entire process of media production to bring their words and ideas to life in projects. Children’s Media Project, Poughkeepsie. 485-4480. EFT & Law of Attraction Prosperity Circle 6pm. $15. FInancial issues resolved quickly with 5,000 year old technique. TG Parker, Kingston. 706-2183.

TUESDAY 29 DANCE Bolshoi Ballet: Don Quixote 8pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

KIDS & FAMILY Summer Writers’ Intensive 10am-3pm. $325. Instructor: Jenny Wai-Lan Strodl. Ages 13+. Days are filled with individualized writing instruction, one-on-one editing, structured free writing time, and outdoor summer activities including daily pool time. OMI Art Camps, Ghent. (518) 728-9256.

LECTURES & TALKS Stock Car Talk with Tommy Johnson 6-7pm. Accord Speedway stock car driver Tom Johnson will discuss and show off his car and talk about racing. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

SPIRITUALITY Chakra Meditation Group 6-7pm. $15. Led by Dianne Weisselberg, LMSW, Certified Chakra Healer. These guided meditations vary from session to session and are an opportunity to center, align and infuse yourself with the vibrational energy of one or more Chakras. There is time for connection and reflection in the group as well. Namaste Sacred Healing Center, Woodstock. 679-6107.

WEDNESDAY 30 DANCE Bolshoi Ballet: Don Quixote 8pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Turn Up the Heat: Flamenco Style 8pm. Parish Field, Phoenicia. Phoeniciavoicefest.org. (845) 586-3588

KIDS & FAMILY CSI: Saugerties 3-4pm. Try your hand at forensics! Age: 13 or 7th grade and up. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Family Fun Night: Drum Circle 6:30-7:30pm. Decorate your instrument and join us for a huge drum circle. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Hip Hop Dance 5:15-6:15pm. Join in the ever-popular weekly hip hop dance workshop taught by dancer and choreographer Anthony Molina. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org. Music & Creative Movement 10-11am. Preschoolers to ages 5+. Join local singer, songwriter, choreographer, and dancer Abby Lappen for weekly fun exploring creative arts through music and movement. Parent participation is encouraged. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Summer Writers’ Intensive 10am-3pm. $325. Instructor: Jenny Wai-Lan Strodl. Ages 13+. Days are filled with individualized writing instruction, one-on-one editing, structured free writing time, and outdoor summer activities including daily pool time. OMI Art Camps, Ghent. (518) 728-9256.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS The Wassaic Project Summer Festival Annual, multi-disciplinary celebration of art, music, dance, and community featuring over 70 artists, 15 bands, film screenings, dance performances, and much more. The Wassaic Project, Wassaic. (347) 815-0783.

FILM Los Angeles Plays Itself Film Screening 8pm. $5-$10. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. Basilicahudson.com. Schubert and the Long 19th Century 7pm. $10. Bard SummerScape. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu. Holistic Enthusiasts 6-8:30pm. $5 non members. Network together, learn, and share your experiences. Gaia’s Garden Retreat, Warwick. Holistichv.org.

KIDS & FAMILY Summer Parade Papercrafts 4:30-5:30pm. Master papermaker and pulp artist Ken Polinskie will work with students to create costumes and masks made out of recycled materials using techniques including papier-mâché, paper folding, origami, collage and painting with an emphasis on sculptural effects. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Cruiser’s Play Group 12-3pm. This group for mamas, papas, and caregivers looking to meet other babies and toddlers (ages 6-18 months) for activities, socialization, and friendship. Do you have a crawling, cruising, or toddling baby? We have a lively conversations about life, music, teething, sleep, babyproofing, pooping, and eating. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624. Model Buildings Class 3-4:30pm. Peter Theodore will teach children how to build their very own model building that can become part of a village. These buildings will be displayed at the library when completed. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Summer Writers’ Intensive 10am-3pm. $325. Instructor: Jenny Wai-Lan Strodl. Ages 13+. Days are filled with individualized writing instruction, one-on-one editing, structured free writing time, and outdoor summer activities including daily pool time. OMI Art Camps, Ghent. (518) 728-9256. Visual Arts for Toddlers 10-11am. 18 months to ages 3+. Artist Alison Fox awakens your child’s creativity with imaginative art workshops for toddlers and their caregivers. Children will create paintings, drawings, collages, prints, murals, and sculpture while exploring various media and techniques. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

LECTURES & TALKS

Storytelling with Janet Carter 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

WCMA 103: Staging the Gallery, Visual Research in Set Design 4pm. David Morris, MFA, Assistant Professor of Theatre thinks about art objects as source material for a set design process: how the choice of an early American arm chair can affect an actor’s posture, or a Hudson River School painting might become the emotional touchstone for an entire scenography. The Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, MA. (413) 597-3055.

MUSIC

MUSIC

Carl Maria von Weber: Euryanthe 2pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Cultura Profética 8pm. $28. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Living with Elephants 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Syracuse & Siegel 8-10:30pm. With special guests. Catskill Mountain Pizza Company, Woodstock. 679-7969. Zephyr Woodwind Quintet Noon. Classics for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and French horn. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION HITS-on-the-Hudson VI Horse Show 8am-3pm. $5/under 12 free. World-class equestrian show jumping. All proceeds from the gate go directly to Family of Woodstock, Inc., a non-for-profit organization serving Ulster County. View website for schedule of events. HITS Showgrounds, Saugerties. 246-5515.

THEATER Othello 7pm. Presented by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES The Garden in Watercolors Session I 10am-1pm. $45/$175 series/$145 series members. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926. Summer Floral Design Workshops 6:30pm. $75. Whether you are an enthusiast interested in creating bouquets for yourself, an event, a Bride, or toying with a career change; these hands on workshops will give you a great foundation of both the creative & technical side of floral artistry. Classes are for all levels starting beginner and accompanying advanced classes. Good Old Days Eco Florist, New Windsor. 562-2820.

David Torn and Dean Sharp 8:30pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Gina Sicilia 7pm. Opener: Jim Hayes. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Paula Cole 7:30pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300.

NIGHTLIFE Trivia Night with Paul Tully and Eric Stamberg 7-9pm. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Tivoli Bays Family Canoe Trip 4pm. Join the DEC and the staff of the Tivoli Free Library for one of our highly popular annual paddles in the Tivoli Bays! Ages 6+. Canoes and life vests will be provided. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771.

THEATER Summer Repertory: West Side Story 8pm. $28-$36. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-6900. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 7pm. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Boscobel.org. Unnecessary Farce 8pm. This laugh-a-minute comic gem follows two rookie cops and a pretty accountant trying bust their mayor in an ill-fated undercover sting operation. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

DANCE

The Art of Cut Paper: Scherenschnitte 10am-3pm. $85/$75 members. Join cut-paper artist Pamela Dalton for a fun, hands-on workshop on the art of Scherenschniite (cut paper). Students will learn simple techniques and create multiple Scherenschniite, executed in the style of the Pennsylvania German tradition. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Bolshoi Ballet: Don Quixote 2pm. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Dynamic Embryology and Morphology A four-day seminar with Dutch embryologist Jaap van der Wal. The Nature Institute, Ghent. (518) 672-0116.

THURSDAY 31

7/14 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 105


Planet Waves

LIZANNE WEBB

BY ERIC FRANCIS COPPOLINO

Good as Gold

J

uly is the month when Jupiter changes signs to Leo. Jupiter takes about 12 years to go around the Sun, so it spends about a year in each sign. It’s been in Cancer since last summer, and quite a time it’s been. During this phase we’ve lived through some genuinely challenging astrology that is, as I write, letting go of its grip. That’s happening exactly while you may be finally getting a grip. Jupiter is what’s called “exalted” in the sign Cancer, meaning that it’s a very strong placement, which I believe has offered protection from what otherwise could have been considerably more difficult. One of Jupiter’s roles in the solar system is to attract inbound objects such as comets and little asteroids, which prevents them from hitting the Earth. Jupiter can work a similar way in astrology. To my perception Jupiter in Cancer has also been about guiding us in the direction of keeping matters focused on an emotional level. That’s a fine line to walk in a world that tends to deny feelings and create situations where it seems like vulnerability is dangerous or impossible. Then, as much as people claim to want others to be present in their feelings, or even to express them, they can get just as freaked out when they meet someone who actually does that. Now Jupiter is about to change signs, from water sign Cancer to fire sign Leo. This happens July 16, with another peak soon after on July 24, when the Sun makes its one and only conjunction to Jupiter in Leo for this cycle. Now is the time to adjust to the new environment, drink up this rare energy with every cell and put it to creative use. In my perception, the core message of Jupiter in Leo is about focusing on self-esteem. This is directly related to courage. It’s my observation that the most troubling spiritual crisis of our society and our time in history involves self-esteem, which you might think of as self-respect, and which I will do my 106 PLANET WAVES CHRONOGRAM 7/14

best to demonstrate is really about cultivating a healthy relationship to yourself and your existence. Courage, or coming from the heart, is integral to this. A Review: End-to-End Retrograde Inner Planets We have just experienced more than six months of consecutive retrograde inner planets. This is fairly rare. Inner planets, because they’re closer to the Earth, are retrograde a lesser percentage of the time than are the outer planets. They tend to have more pronounced effects, and they speak to topics that are more readily accessible and that seem more personally relevant. Sometimes inner planet retrogrades happen simultaneously and other times they spread out throughout the year. And sometimes they come on one at a time, like in The Five Chinese Brothers. Since the Capricorn solstice, first Venus, then Mercury then Mars, then Mercury again, have been retrograde, end to end. No sooner did one retrograde conclude than another one began. This pattern ends/ended on July 1, when Mercury stationed direct in Gemini. Inner planet retrogrades put us into contact with inner reality. They bring up the past, they resurrect unresolved material and have a way of peeling back the layers to show us what’s in there. Also, when an inner planet makes a retrograde in a certain sign, it sets the theme and tone of that planet through the next cycle. Let’s take them one at a time, in short format. Venus retrograde in Capricorn (December 21, 2013 through January 31, 2014) described the highly structured ways most people think of “love.” Structured means packing all kinds of rules around feelings—such who is supposed to relate to who and why or why not, and how and when, and trying to dance to expectations that others have on you, or that you have of them. Think of how easy it is for people to go into scandal mode, even when nobody is being harmed and everything is perfectly legal.


This transit was also a challenge to all the judgment and guilt that normally attends loving or sexual relationships. Much of that judgment and guilt is fed to us by family members, religion and peers who got it from their families and religion. Then it’s reinforced by culture and represents the toxic emotional brew that so many people simmer in. The response is generally to adopt a public relations position of prudery and purity, then go for the wild debauchery when nobody is looking, a nearly perfect identikit of Venus retrograde in Capricorn. The question we are left with is: are your feelings really your feelings, or are in some way obliged to follow emotional and social choreography, or go into guilt/scandal mode if you do not? These are questions that require real awareness, because our conditioned responses are typically so automatic and self-righteous. Mars retrograde in Libra (March 1 through May 19) was a study in gender and projection. It peeled back a few layers revealing how much emotional garbage the sexes project on one another. We got a look at how the supposed differences between the sexes are greatly exaggerated. Any time you hear someone saying that one sex is fundamentally different than the other, that’s time to stop and question whether it’s vaguely true, and to notice whether it’s part of a marketing campaign. It might be true, though I’m suggesting a moment of reflection—because it might not be. There was something to this transit about dashed hopes in relationship and how angry so many people are that relationships don’t work out for them. There was something about owning one’s disappointment and anger and not projecting that onto others. And Mars retrograde in Libra (and its ongoing presence there in direct motion, which transitions this month) is about owning your own desire and not projecting it onto others—as if they are the only ones who feel these things and somehow you do not. One brief thought about the three Mercury retrogrades this year. They all involve Mercury’s movement between water signs and air signs, starting on the watery side and retrograding back into the air sign. The Mercury retrograde that ended on March 1 began in Cancer (a water sign) and ended in Gemini (an air sign). The message here is that you cannot think with your emotions. It’s necessary to feel and to think, and to know the difference—and to apply an appropriate response when you have the chance to do so. There’s also a message about the difference between emoting and feeling; emoting is output mode, feeling is input mode—it really is that simple. We are about to move into new territory. This month two elements of the grand cross that’s been the defining factor of 2014 astrology move on to new signs—Jupiter ingresses Leo on July 16 and Mars ingresses Scorpio on July 25. Put simply, the grand cross is over, though the Uranus-Pluto square I’ve written about many times in this space continues well into next year. More on that another time.

the main line of energy that supports life and consciousness. It is possible to block or afflict the vital force but not to make it go away. You might think of self-esteem as having a connection to one’s own vitality and sense of one’s own existence, and the lack of self-esteem as blockage to that connection. The problem is that this thing in the way appears as a lack of some kind, when it may be that what has to happen is that a blockage must be removed and one’s own natural energy allowed to flow. It’s just that there are so many judgments around that flow of vital energy—of really being alive—that the judgments become part of the blockage, which appears as a lack. Think of Jupiter as the place where you invest your faith. It’s the place where you expect to get a result of some kind, without having to do much except allow yourself to be who you are. The most effective ways to block that are guilt, denial and deception. But if those are seen as some kind of helpful thing, serving some kind of purpose, then one might not want to address them. That’s exactly what I think the core problem is. We all possess innate vitality, which we’re taught to suppress; then the means of suppression are sold back to us as productive, helpful or socially beneficial in some way. I’m suggesting that if you struggle with self-esteem issues, you might look at what you value as a good thing that is really blocking your access to your own strength and awareness. Cultivating self-esteem might begin with a reevaluation of all those “good things”—the things that supposedly make one socially acceptable, but which really involve self-denial and suppressing one’s desire to live. One other aspect of this is avoiding what people know might help them. Obviously there are many injuries and insults that we collect in life, some of them truly significant, and a source of ongoing pain. There are ways to address, resolve, and heal these issues. Humans are amazingly resilient and you can be sure that people have healed from much worse than you’ve been through. I have heard people say many times, “I don’t want to go to therapy because I’m afraid to find out what is in there” (i.e., learn about myself). When it comes to therapy, healing or support, this is the, “What will come first, the chicken or the egg?” question. Will I pluck up some self-esteem and do something for myself that will help me, or will I recognize that I am struggling and then do something in an effort to make my life better? This can be applied to relationships as well. Is the equation, “I will get out of this relationship when I feel better about myself,” or is it, “I really need to make some room in my life and use that space to get myself sorted, and get a little closer to myself”? There are many who would benefit from the affirmation, “I really need a little time between my relationships, maybe a lot of time, and I can give myself that. I’ve lost track of who I am and I want to find out.” Who you surround yourself with is crucial to your self-esteem. Some people will affirm your value and your beauty and you will learn from them. Some will tear down your value and your beauty (for many reasons) and you will learn just as well from them. However, beyond choosing who your examples are, it’s dangerous to invest your self-esteem in relationships because they tend to change so often, and can be so unpredictable. Jupiter in Leo is saying: set an example for yourself. Within you is a source of life and of value that is yours to draw upon, invest in, have faith in and access as a source of inner love. It’s saying become your own teacher. Become your own student. Devote yourself to teaching and learning. This is the gold standard of self-esteem.

Will I pluck up some self-esteem and do

something for myself that will help me, or will I recognize that

I am struggling and

then do something in an effort to make my life better?

Jupiter in Leo: The Gold Standard of Self-Esteem Jupiter in Leo is to me an image of self-esteem. It’s an image of valuing oneself, and of allowing that sense of value to grow and expand. It’s difficult to describe the self-esteem problem because it’s so widespread, and because so many people take it for granted in their own lives. It’s a kind of ever-present cultural toxin that fades into the background, then seems to run the show. It does this by setting a low standard of what one’s own life and ideas are worth. It is this standard that we need to raise for ourselves and put out as an example to others. Let’s look at the astrology first. Leo, as the sign ruled by the Sun, is the backbone of the zodiac. It is a symbol that represents the idea of vital force, or

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ARIES (March 20-April 19) Embrace the ever-present chaos factor. There is no getting around this; in fact it’s so close to your core, and enmeshed in our time of history, it’s what you want to indulge rather than avoid. Chaos can go two ways—toxic or creative. Creative would mean accepting that who you are is constant work in progress, and that the ability to change rather than be stuck is a sign of vitality. Meanwhile, you are approaching a replay of opportunities that you may have missed earlier this year, and now you will be able to do more about them. You have more space in your life, and in your mind. Ultimately this will become a matter of commitment, but not in the usual sense, involving someone else. This is about commitment to yourself and to devoting yourself to who you are and what you do. Other people may be involved, but in truth there is just one moving part, which is you allowing yourself to feel passion. Ultimately this will be the factor that gets you beyond any contradictions, within yourself or within your environment, and which becomes the galvanizing factor in your psyche. Therefore, allow yourself to feel strongly about something you really want to experiment with. Allow yourself to take action and to bring your body and soul into the experiment. And remember—it is an experiment; or rather, you are.

TAURUS (April 19-May 20) You may have too much to sort out emotionally, or exclusively so. If you want to resolve it, you’ll need to make some observations and come to deeper understandings like a scientist would, and then slowly integrate them. I am suggesting that you try an approach that differs from the usual “don’t keep your feelings up in your head” advice that goes around, though for a reason—you seem to have so much happening that you need a method of evaluation. One thing you can evaluate is the priority level of any given situation or its sub-parts. You cannot do this based on an emotional response or reaction alone. There are things going in your environment that are wholly the property of others, that have an influence on your life and that you have to address and adapt to. And in such a situation, the emotional level is not going to be helpful. Now, there are mental traps you need to be aware of, and one way to know you’re in one is when you find yourself going around and around. That is not evaluation, thought or observation. It is the emotions trying to run the mind. Over the next two months some situations in your personal life that have long seemed intractable are going to move. This will build gradually rather than all at once, as will your clarity.

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GEMINI (May 20-June 21) The biggest mistake you could make is not trusting yourself. This can be projected and disguised many different ways, and I suggest you be vigilant about them. I will give you an example. You might have an idea about what is right for you, but then get distracted by some form of, “Another person would approve of this decision that I am making for myself.” Then the cover story becomes your own seeming hesitation, when in reality, the underlying issue is that you’re basically serving two masters. Now, you might ask who the prototype is for this other master. Your solar chart suggests that it’s something about needing to have your father’s approval. This topic is some old stuff, and it appears to run in your family. The thing is that it does not necessarily take its original form in the way that it’s manifesting currently. Indeed, it can seep into any relationship dynamics, especially if they take any form of the parental model. The thing is, we hardly know any other model, and many people are not interested—they just want to be told what to do. The first step out of this pattern is going beyond exactly that. You have your own opinions. You have your own ideas. You even trust them. If you get into an argument with yourself, pause and ask yourself and ask who, exactly, are the parties to this debate. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Now that you’ve taken a tour of your supposed psychological tendencies, you can claim who you are in the most positive sense. Growth and healing are not just a quest for fixing what is wrong with you, nor are they about making yourself acceptable to others on their terms. They are about identifying the best of who you are and putting that very quality forward. You could say that you need to believe in yourself first in order to do this. Or you could experiment with the idea that asserting your strongest, best qualities will help you discover the reasons to believe in yourself. One approach is theoretical; the other is practical. It will be worth daring; it will be worth the small risk that’s involved, and worth persisting for a while. With the Sun and then Jupiter entering your neighboring sign Leo, you’re about to have a lot of support on the theme of feeling good about yourself. You may not feel it today, though I think in a matter of a few weeks you will surprised at how much has changed in your approach to self-understanding. A rising tide raises all boats, and when you see certain boats rise you may even make the connection that they are rising along with your positive affirmation of who you are; your self-respect will have effects that you did not dream possible.


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LEO (July 22-August 23)

You seem to have a choice of responsibility in name only, or responsibility without a name. Either way, you’re being asked to step up to something larger; you are hearing a calling, though it’s complex and not easy to translate. What happens comes down to how you interpret that calling, and how you choose to respond. There’s considerable tension involved in the whole situation, and you may be feeling it pull on you, perhaps threatening to pull you apart, without recognizing it’s there, much less knowing what exactly it is. If so, I suggest you carefully review any situations that seem to compete with one another, and any elements of your life where factors within them seem to compete. As you do this, notice what you determine is not subject to change or to movement, and what you determine is. Your assessment may or may not be correct, though it will help if, for example, when you determine something cannot change, you ask yourself why it cannot change. If you determine something can change, notice what you do about that—whether you invest energy in making the change. Back to my original premise: Responsibility in name only is easy to control and requires no flexibility. Responsibility without a name requires your full commitment both to flexibility and exchanging the concept of control for something much more productive, which is influence.

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VIRGO (August 23-September 22) You’ve said many times that you want people around you who are more sensitive and whose feelings are closer to the surface. Yet how do you respond when you actually encounter them? I suggest you observe yourself carefully over the next few weeks and see what you notice. You have a few choices for what to do. One is to go into paralysis mode—to freeze up, to put on a façade, to go passive. Another is to push them away. Neither of these is likely to be what you want, but they’re fairly typical responses to those who in some way “threaten” us by being willing to feel. Another is to engage with them directly, no matter how uncomfortable it may make you. In this context, uncomfortable equates to vulnerable. I am describing one of the core crises of our culture, one that is largely being driven by our relationship to technology. In the world as it is, it’s easy to avoid just about anything, it’s easy to have the feeling of control (for example, by ignoring someone’s communications) and therefore easy to weave yourself into a state of isolation. In this sense, obsession with text messages is not so different from obsession with porn. One of the prices you pay to get out of this is allowing authentic contact to happen when you have the opportunity, which always happens today, not tomorrow.

LIBRA (September 22-October 23) This month, two planets describing forces that have shaped and even seem to have defined your existence move onto other signs. Jupiter exits the cardinal cross and ingresses Leo, which represents a windfall or step up in the world. Your point of view shifts from parental to peer-to-peer. More significantly, Mars will exit Libra, where it’s been since early December, and ingress Scorpio. Mars plus Libra has been an odd mix—maybe one of the strangest in astrology; we’ve all had to live with it, and you’ve experienced it most directly. Putting it politely, this transit has been provocative. The result has been to put you into contact with a new dimension of who you are. You may not have changed your boundaries much, but you discovered what they are, and you discovered that you need to work with them consciously. The deeper question is about what motivates you, what drives you, what values exist on the level of breathing, and this I reckon you’ve made some progress understanding. You have one more quest before you fully engage this energy. It involves exaggerated feelings, and recognizing when they are in some way taking over your mind. You must be able to safely handle intensity, passion, lust, and the drive for experience. But that’s different from anything exaggerated.

SCORPIO (October 23-November 22) So—what good is fear? I mean obsessive fear, anxiety, worry, and panic? What purpose has it served during the past few seasons, besides providing a way to burn up energy? I know these emotions are rampant, and they’re unusually considered something that cannot change. Now, one option is that you can compromise with fear, which will basically leave you stuck. Or you can take a stand within yourself. Fear is actually a toxic form of desire, and the antidote to fear is clear, bold desire. Like many things, I know this logic is reversed by the world (such as, “if I were only unafraid, I could allow myself to desire”). Yet it’s easy to see that this is self-defeating. Desire is the starting point. Consider the outcome you want in any situation. This is the most important factor. Once you know that, the steps and the logic leading to it will become clear. If the steps do not become obvious, go back to your stated decided outcome, consider it carefully, and make sure it’s what you want, and make sure it’s described in a legible way. Make sure there are no hidden compromises involved. What you’re about to discover is that you want more from life, and to accomplish that, you must be willing to admit that it’s true.

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 22) As Jupiter shifts into fire sign Leo for a one year visit, you will discover you’re your horizons are expanding vastly. This is partly a factor of having resolved or removed yourself from so many past agreements, engagements and entanglements. Your sense of time, of distance, of your own potential and of devotion to your talents are all about to go into expansion mode, as is your faith in yourself (or your higher power, however you prefer). The key now is finding out what this new phase of your life has to offer you before getting involved in anything that might limit your options. The opportunities and the temptations to limit yourself will be disguised as something else. Someone or some situation may call on you to compromise a core value in a covert way. It might seem minor at first. For hypothetical example, you may do your best work at night, an old fact of which you’re fully aware. But being absorbed in your work evenings might not be tenable to a relationship partner. That can lead to tension or to conflict, which can be distracting you from exploring something you know is essential. You know what is right; one question is whether you will you see this as what it really is. Remember—you have yet to discover what life is about to offer you. Keep your options open. CAPRICORN (December 22-January 20) In the many months that Mars has been traveling through your 10th house of achievement and reputation, you’ve become more sensitive than ever to the opinions of other people in your life, and have discovered that all power and influence are based in relationships. This has come at the expense of allowing others more influence in your life than you really want. You will now need to maintain awareness of those relationships and how they work while being more brassy, doing more of what you want and worrying less what people think. This is a fine line to walk, since you still may have the idea that your reputation is on the line. Yet you know that you cannot allow the bounds of your reality to be determined by others. There is a solution set to this seeming paradox, which is that people tend to respect those who are confident even if they don’t agree with them, or even like them. Rather than worrying whether others in some way object to you, pay attention to how they are in fact responding. If someone objects, notice how you handle it. Do you immediately want to yield to them, or do you ask yourself whether they are entitled to an opinion, and what that opinion counts for? Think of this as the next stage of leadership. It’s one where politics matters, but only to a limited degree. AQUARIUS (January 20-February 19) Now is the time to go from working on relationships to actually experiencing them. The difference could be emphasized more, though it tends to disappear into the haze. Now, it will rise like the Sun over your life. While you could identify a psychological dimension to anything, that recognition may be for the sole purpose of avoiding it. There will still be a strong temptation to analyze certain things till they are very nearly lifeless, which is part of a well-established pattern in the lives of many people. It often serves a purpose, which is to siphon off passion, and to create a seemingly sophisticated rationale for denial. I suggest you get the energy flowing in the opposite direction—toward passion, funneling vitality into your interests and your relationships rather than away from it. Take any opportunity not to analyze, to say you don’t know and have that be OK, even to take the risk of not caring about the motives of others. If you’re wondering about other people, pay attention to their actions and you will have more than enough information to work with. On a similar vein, I suggest you notice how obvious the choices you want to make really are. They require relatively little thinking and absolutely no overthinking. If something requires analysis, focus it on one question—whether something is in accord with your values. Remember—your values are intuitive. PISCES (February 19-March 20) Many factors have compelled you to stay focused in the moment, while also getting more in touch with the longer view of your existence. It’s true, to connect with that longer view you’ve had to climb what seems like an endless mountain, never seeming to reach the top. However, it seems like every now and then you turn around and get a look at the territory behind you and figure out how far you’ve come and what you’ve really accomplished. In doing this you’ve made progress getting out of the nether world of “what might happen” in exchange for being clear about what is happening and what you want to do. The use of time is essential to maturity. Here on Earth, it’s not merely that time is finite for any individual; there’s also the not-so-small matter of not knowing how long life will last. That contradiction causes more problems that most people are aware of; for many it prevents them from making any real commitments. It’s only by being able to handle these two variables at once that you can make any actual progress. This month, Mars moves in your favor by entering water sign Scorpio after its nearly endlessly complex trip through Libra. This will allow you to take advantage of many factors that in the past seemed to only hold you back. Remember—your past problems are your future assets.


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Parting Shot

Hair/Weed Synthesis, Tasha Depp, digital collage 2014

Two young boys, laughing, painted on the surface of a weathered toilet seat cover. A small, green weed, brushed onto a crushed, white jug. These are the works of Catskill artist Tasha Depp, whose paintings and drawings examine quotidian images from nature and explore, in her own words, “vision in both a physical and ideological sense.” Looking at one of her pieces we see what is, at face value, a plastic piece of trash—but we are invited to consider where it came from, who left it there, and how we determine what is ready to be thrown away. Depp creates art that carefully evaluates the relationship of humans to their environments, subtly commenting on patterns of consumption and management of waste. Her process is conscious of this relationship; rather than typical, destined-for-the-archives canvases, she opts for found alternatives—a cereal box 112 CHRONOGRAM 7/14

or the visor of a motorcycle helmet. Depp’s hands are never at rest, drawing or painting with whatever tools she may have on hand, be they a sketchbook and pen or digital tablet. Tasha Depp has exhibited her work across the Hudson Valley, New England, and New York City. Her first solo show, “Connected Vision,” will run July 5 through September 1 at the Greene County Council on the Arts Catskill Gallery, and will display a series of the artist’s drawings, paintings, and occasional syntheses of the two. “Ad Infinitum,” a group installation co-curated by Depp, will be on display alongside the exhibit. Depp’s show opens July 12 with a reception from 5 to 7pm, on Main Street in Catskill. (518) 943-3400; Greenearts.org. —Iana Robitaille


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July 2014 Chronogram  

The July 2014 issue of Chronogram. Published by Luminary Publishing.

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