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Chronogram arts.culture.spirit.

contents 2/13

news and politics

community pages

16 frack Watch: Confusion Reigns in DEC Review Process

38 Falling in Love again: Rhinebeck, Red Hook, and Tivoli

With New Yorkers divided on the fracking ban, the state tries to please both sides.

18 while you were sleeping A map reveals data about residents with handgun permits, Mexican drug traffickers grow marijuana in US National Forests, and Americans spend billions on energy drinks. Catch up on what you may have missed.

19 beinhart’s body politic: The Joys of Secession

24 Inside Villa Sofia The historic Hudson home makes for the perfect romantic weekend getaway.

29 The Prefab: Blu Homes Breezehouse

The elegant, sustainable modular housing model comes to the East Coast.

31 The Question: How Can I downsize? There's an art to living in less space without feeling cramped.

Medicine & HEaling 35 No Gain In Nerve Pain: Hypotheses for Treating Neuropathies

There are a variety of ways to treat nerve pain, no matter your preferred health route.

48

Rediscover the best kept secrets of these charming, historic towns.

60 Pleasure + Business: Warwick, Sugar Loaf, and Chester

Community equals success in the delightfully remote Warwick Valley.

Weddings and Celebrations 67 Dress Your Best: Trends and Classics for WEdding Day Attire Sartorial experts in the Hudson Valley provide tips on what to wear for the big day.

Larry Beinhart investigates Lincoln's place on the list of great presidents.

home

whole living guide 86 Keepers of the TAo

The age-old Chinese practices of qi gong and tai chi—and an émigré spiritual teacher—are still kicking in the Hudson Valley.

Community Resource Guide 20 summer Camps A listing of summer fun-time destinations for kids. 75 Valentine's Day Gift Guide Ideas for what to get your sweetheart. 81 tastings A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 82 business directory A compendium of advertiser services. 88 whole living Opportunities to nurture mind, body, and soul.

The paintings of Kyle Staver are at John Davis Gallery this month. Detail of Trapeze, oil on linen, 68" x 58", 2012. gallery & museum guide

4 ChronograM 2/13


Announcing The Warren Kitchen & Cutlery Once-A-Year Cookware Sale. TWO DAYS of the lowest prices on the Hudson Valley’s best selection of all types of Professional Cookware at 20-50% OFF.* Cast Iron • Non-Stick • Stainless Steel • Aluminum Copper • Sauce Pans • Fry Pans • Roasting Pans Rissotto Pots • Stock Pots • Grill Pans • Saute‘ Pans Sauciers • Woks • Paella Pans Soup Pots • Tagines

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Chronogram arts.culture.spirit.

contents 2/13

arts & culture

food & Drink

48 Gallery & museum GUIDe

76 American Idyll: Building a Regional Food System at Glynwood

50 music: Far From Farewell Jay Ungar and Molly Mason lead a tour of the newly renovated Ashokan Center, where the couple oversees renowned music and dance camps. Nightlife Highlights include Superhuman Happiness, Alexander Turnquist, Twin Berlin, Jazz Vespers, and Robbie Burns Night at the Rhinecliff Hotel. Reviews of Optimistic Voices by Ann Osmond and Dennis Yerry; Quietly Falling to Pieces by Spiv U:K; and Trailer Songs by Steve Almaas.

54 books: Walkabout Nina Shengold speaks with Michael Perkins about his literary wanderlust, using aphorisms from his new book to guide the way.

56 book reviews Robert Burke Warren reviews Give me Everything You Have: On Being Stalked by James Lasdun, and Anne Pyburn Craig reviews The Water Witch by Juliet Dark. Plus Short Takes.

58 Poetry Poems by Benny Boy, C. E. Pertchik, Dina Peone, Eleie Fibonacci, Garrett De Temple, George W. Doran, Joe Frey, Justin Hyde, Lea Springstead, Louis N. Altman, Michael Sciarretta, Millie Falcaro, Opal Wood, Priscilla Lignori, Steve Clark, Timothy Ennis, and Zephyr Hrechdakian. Edited by Phillip X Levine.

112 parting shot

The Putnam County hamlet of Garrison is home to Glynwood, a nonprofit organization dedicated to sustainable agriculture in the Hudson Valley.

the forecast 94 daily Calendar Comprehensive listings of local events. (Daily updates at Chronogram.com.) PREVIEWS 93 Lucas Handwerker's modern mystery evenings have been compared to 19thcentury parlor performances with their elegant explorations into the human mind. 95 Jay Blotcher interviews Tony award-winning singer and actress Linda Lavin. 96 Bard hosts "The Future of Tibet," a two-hour panel discussion on February 23. 97 Philosopher and public intellectual Simon Critchley speaks at EMPAC in Troy. 99 The Beacon Film Festival: Freeze Frame features work by local filmmakers. 100 Matisyahu plays an acoustic set at Bearsville Theater on February 16. 102 Protest violence perpetrated against women at a "One Billion Rising" event. 103 Floyd Patterson II stars in the one-man show "Paul Robeson".

planet waves 106 Water sign Theater

Eric Francis Coppolino discusses the relationship between water and astrology.

108 horoscopes

What are the stars telling us? Eric Francis Coppolino has the answers.

deborah degraffenreid

Carol Rizzo's The Boy with the Valentine Balloon is the featured illustration.

6

24

The parlor of Villa Sofia, David Usborne and Juan Carretrro's Italianate home in Hudson. home

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BARDAVON PRESENTS

EDITORIAL Editorial Director Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com creative Director David Perry dperry@chronogram.com Books editor Nina Shengold books@chronogram.com health & wellness editor Wendy Kagan wholeliving@chronogram.com

The Capitol Steps Sat. Feb. 23, 8pm - Bardavon

Poetry Editor Phillip Levine poetry@chronogram.com music Editor Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com food & drink Editor Peter Barrett food@chronogram.com EDITORIAL assistant Jennifer Gutman jgutman@chronogram.com EDITORIAL intern Carolyn Quimby proofreaders Lee Anne Albritton, Tom Whalen

MET LIVE IN HD: VERDI’S

MET LIVE IN HD: WAGNER’S

contributors Larry Beinhart, Jay Blotcher, Eric Francis Coppolino, Anne Pyburn Craig, David Morris Cunningham, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Michael Eck, Jennifer Farley, Roy Gumpel, Annie Internicola, Josh Kopin, Sharon Nichols, Lindsay Pietroluongo, Fionn Reilly, Anne Roderique-Jones, Gregory Schoenfeld, Jeremy Schwartz, Sparrow, Robert Burke Warren, Lynn Woods

Sat. Feb. 16, 1pm - Bardavon

Sat. Mar. 2, 12pm - UPAC

PUBLISHING

RIGOLETTO

PARSIFAL

FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky publisher Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com chairman David Dell

BEETHOVEN | MOZART | PROKOFIEV

HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC

Sat. Mar. 16, 8pm - Bardavon

George Thorogood

& THE DESTROYERS Tue. Mar. 19, 8pm - UPAC

Chronogram is a project of Luminary Publishing advertising sales advertising director Maryellen Case mcase@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Mario Torchio mtorchio@chronogram.com account executive Robert Pina rpina@chronogram.com account executive Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com

david sedaris

account executive Jack Becker jbecker@chronogram.com ADMINISTRATIVE director of operations Amara Projansky aprojansky@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x105 business MANAGER Ruth Samuels rsamuels@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107

MET LIVE IN HD: ZANDONAI’S

FRANCESCA DA RIMINI ENCORE

Sat. Mar. 23, 12pm - Bardavon

Fri. Apr. 5, 8pm - Bardavon

technology director Michael LaMuniere mlamuniere@chronogram.com marketing coordinator Samantha Henkin shenkin@chronogram.com

Lewis

HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC

Black

Sat. Apr. 6, 8pm - Bardavon

Sun. Apr. 28, 7pm - UPAC

MARQUEZ | REVUELTAS | PIERNÉ

THE RANT IS DUE

BARDAVON • 35 Market Street • Poughkeepsie, NY • Box Office 845.473.2072 UPAC • 601 Broadway • Kingston, NY • Box Office 845.339.6088 Ticketmaster 800.745.3000 • ticketmaster.com • www.bardavon.org Dr. Edwin A. Ulrich Charitable Trust

Jane W. Nuhn Charitable Trust

Dr. Jeffrey Perchick Memorial Fund

PRODUCTION Production director Jaclyn Murray jmurray@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 pRoduction designers Kerry Tinger, Adie Russell Office 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

MISSION

Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Luminary Publishing 2013

SUBMISSIONS

calendar To submit listings, e-mail events@chronogram.com. Deadline: February 15. fiction/nonfiction/POETRY/ART www.chronogram.com/submissions

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rkel Design TD3 2990

Dwell and Dwell Homes are registered trademarks of Dwell Media, LLC

Atlantic Custom Homes Open House Weekend

For 66 years Lindal Cedar Homes has led the industry with our legendary building Atlantic Custom Homes - Open House Weekend materials, innovative spirit, distinctive and The Lindal Experience - our Saturday &Sun. Sunday, February 9& 10, 10am –architecture 5pm Sat. & February 5th & 6th, 2011 10AM - 5PM personal delivery Visit our 3600sflifestyle Classic Lindal Cedar Homessystem. Model. Relax in the Great Room, enjoy some refreshments, and ask us about our warm, modern For 66 years Lindal Cedar Homes has led the industry with our legendary building designs in Classic Lindal, Lindal Elements, and Turkel Design Lindals for the Dwell Homes Collection. Learn about our exciting, new modern designs, Lindal Architects Collaborative, by highly regarded US and Canadian architects: Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture, Marmol Radziner, Altius Architecture, Bates Masi+ Architecture, Carney Logan Burke, & David Vandorvort.

Come to the Open House andarchitecture see Lindal’s exciting designs in materials, innovative spirit, distinctive andnew The Lindal Experience - our Modern architecture warmed by wood the Classic Lindal, “Modern A-Frame” Series and the warm, modern personal lifestyle deliveryservices system.provided Customization by Turkel Design Home Building Seminar First named the Dwell Homes Collection Dwell Homes Collection. TurkelBuilding/Green Designs forto the Modern architecture warmed by wood Saturday, Customization February 11am – 1pm Featured23, in the 2009 TIME Green Design 100 services provided by Turkel Design Visit two Lindal Cedar Homes. This free Seminar gives you a realistic overview of the entire process of designing and creating your own energy Independently distributed by: ‘Green Approved Product’ in our Only NAHB industry Independently distributed by: named First to land thethrough Dwellconstruction Homesand Collection efficient custom home, from buying finishing. Reservations are needed, please call 888-558-2636 or email info@LindalNY.com to reserveinyour seat. Featured the 2009 TIME Green Design 100 Atlantic Custom Homes Atlantic Custom Homes Independently distributed by: Only ‘Green Approved Product’ in our industry 2785 9Spring, -NAHB Cold Spring, NY 10516 2785 Atlantic Rte 9 - Rte ColdCustom NY 10516 Homes 888.558.2636 Independently distributed by:

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on the cover AN ADVISOR WHO KNOWS YOU WANT YOUR

PERSONAL BELIEFS REFLECTED IN YOUR INVESTMENTS. A Merrill Lynch Financial Advisor can help you develop a customized strategy with a focus on making the world better — while investing in a way that actually seeks competitive returns. Call today to learn more. Amy D. Pender, CSNA Financial Advisor (845) 431-2202 Merrill Lynch 2649 South Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 http://fa.ml.com/amy.pender

Babes in theWood Julianna Swaney | Watercolor and pencil on paper | 2012 The Bull Symbol, Merrill Lynch Personal Investment Advisory, Merrill Lynch Wealth Management and The Power of the Right Advisor are trademarks or registered trademarks of Bank of America Corporation. Investing involves risk. Neither Merrill Lynch nor its Financial Advisors provide tax, accounting or legal advice. Please review any planned financial transactions or arrangements that may have tax, accounting or legal implications with your personal professional advisors. Banking products are provided by Bank of America, N.A., and affiliated banks, members FDIC and wholly owned subsidiaries of BAC. Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated, a registered broker-dealer and member SIPC, and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation (“BAC”). Investment products:

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ARAEE4EA-12-12

May Lose Value Code 470253PM-1212

Thirty-year-old Julianna Swaney has an old soul. Perhaps, even, a timeless one. “I’ve always been interested in fairy tales and folk tales,” she says.The Portland, Oregon-based artist doesn’t point to a specific author or time period, though. Swaney prefers the dateless, anonymous stories that have woven their way into the cultural consciousness. The featured cover piece Babes in the Wood—which looks like the Brothers Grimm and Tim Burton teamed up to create a version of American Gothic—was inspired by an old folk song of the same title. The lyrics tell of two children who get lost in the woods, die, and are covered with leaves by two birds. “It’s kind of a spooky story, and kind of sad,” Swaney says. “I think that’s what I like in a fairy tale.” Swaney’s sketch/watercolor pieces (she draws first in pencil and then fills in with watercolor paint) are wistfully sad.The delicate drawings are set against starkly minimal landscapes, and filled in with monotone color palates of muted browns and greys. But Swaney chooses not to take the Babes in theWood tale to its tragic end—she catches it in medias res. “I’ve never been interested in the ends of [fairytales],” she says. “I always like the part where the main characters are wandering around lost in the woods and strange things happen to them. That’s where I find the magic in the stories.” Characters are central in Swaney’s work, with the majority of her sketchpaintings depicting people and animals, often interacting with one another. “Animals are wild and unpredictable things—you don’t know how they’re going to act,” she says. “The people are often really quiet and refined looking, and they’re often being confronted by wild animals.You’re not really sure how the situation is going to go, how they’re going to be changed.” This theme, Swaney admits, is almost an obsession in her work. Swaney’s interest in drawing animals has resulted in some interesting side work. In addition to selling her prints online and doing private commissions, Swaney designs logos and wedding invitations. “I get requests from people who want to have themselves represented as animals,” she says, adding that some also want their pets with them on the card. Currently, Swaney has more illustration projects than ever, and she worries it’s taking a toll on her art. But, in the spirit of her characters, who serendipitously meet, interact, and change one another, Swaney realizes the wonderful reciprocal arrangement of the work. “People ask me to do things I’ve never done before,” she says. “It helps to push myself and draw something I think I couldn’t have done. Then I can use it later.” Julianna Swaney’s work is part of the group show “Fireside Fables,” which is up at Roos Arts in Rosendale until February 9. Roosarts.com. —Jennifer Gutman chronogram.com Watch a video slideshow of Swaney’s work by Stephen Blauweiss.

10 ChronograM 2/13


For tickets and information, visit blogs.vassar.edu/vrdt or bardavon.org Or call (845) 437-5541, (845) 473-2072, or (800) 745-3000

we invite you to a sneak peek of spring

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Saturday, March 2nd at 8:00pm, and Sunday, March 3rd at 3:00pm

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performances

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showcases and open rehearsals

Extreme Ballet

ballet and flamenco classes special events Exciting Spring 2013 Season UpStream Showcases RIOULT Isis Egyptian - Isis to Isadora and a special event May 25 with Vivo Flamenca/Carlota Santana to join our email list send an email to pgrkaats@bestweb.net

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esteemed reader Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: When I was young, there was an elderly fellow I visited for coffee and conversation. He was a lonely man who had failed in the conventional life-games, so he became a teacher of philosophy.This was good, because he liked to give advice and have the company of admirers. Once, when I was feeling depressed, I brought him my problem: “I feel aimless,” I complained. “What should I do?” He didn’t hesitate to answer. “Give a public talk on aimlessness.” “But,” I spluttered, “but...” But there was no real argument I could give, as this antidote to my malaise was perfect. For a few weeks after this chat, I contemplated the suggestion. It was a paradox. I couldn’t give a talk feeling so lost and depressed, but giving the talk was clearly the rope leading out of depression. Also, I was aimless because I didn’t know how to have an aim. I hoped I could learn if I made a study of aiming. Perhaps the effort to bring it all together, to stand in front of people and say something useful on the subject, would yield in both directions. So I began to ponder. The slap in the face came as I realized that the answer wasn’t only intellectual. I had to find and “ponder” the problem of aimlessness in my body and emotions also. I found the state of aimlessness had its related body posture—slumped back and pouty, bored facial expression—and more importantly, it also had an associated emotional state. Finally, I realized I needed some leverage to motivate action—a deadline. So I asked the owner of a local coffee house if I could give a talk. When he asked what the topic would be and I told him aimlessness, he looked at me as though I hadn’t finished my sentence. He was clearly certain I was one of the unbalanced people that irritate coffee shop owners with inane questions. Finally he assented. “Sure,” he said, and turned away. Though I was owed a refill, I bought another coffee and left the money on the counter. I wrote and rewrote that lecture, to the point that when it was time to give the talk I was able to set aside my notes and speak naturally. A few people came for the talk, others looked up occasionally from their books or games of chess while I discoursed. At the end there were no questions from the audience. Despite the lukewarm response to that talk, I had my cure. The effort to prepare and give the talk disturbed my torpor and gave me some insight into the nature of the illness. It also gave me a new experience and a new tool—meditation on a subject or question until its answer is revealed. This practice is sometimes called pondering. Pondering is kind of like meditation, but more active and creative. With pondering, or “weighing” as the etymology suggests, there is an effort to focus on something without being distracted by what arises, while at the same time incorporating what arises into the subject itself. All manner of discoverers have used this method, a method that could be considered alchemical. By “alchemical” I mean that the state of the subject is changed in the pondering process. A subject that starts out unclear becomes elucidated, clarified. It goes from opaque to transparent, and insight begins to flow—changing state from earth element to water element. And finally the subject gains energy and becomes radiant or enlightened (from water to fire). Ramana Maharshi, an Indian saint of the last century, suggested that there is really only one question worth pondering, and further, that every other question is an aspect of this one. It is the question of the self: Who am I? It is a pondering of oneself. Among yogi teachers, Maharshi was unusual in the simplicity of his instructions. Just sit and ask this one question, and whatever answer arises, set it aside. What remains when there are no answers left—a disposition or state of consciousness that is unattached to anything in particular—is itself the answer to the question. As with Maharshi’s self-inquiry, pondering is not only a weighing, but also a giver of weight. I am reminded of the Egyptian Book of The Dead’s description of the test of a soul to be able to proceed to the next level after death.The deceased’s soul is weighed on a great scale—against a feather. If it is heavier, he is allowed to pass. If not, a netherworld demon consumes the soul in question and the journey of that soul ends then and there. —Jason Stern 12 ChronograM 2/13


letters

What a difference a day makes...

All Our Eggs in One Basket Case

I was expecting the resident left-wing radical of Chronogram, Larry Beinhart, to open the new year with something typical of his intolerant, rude, condescending, hate-filled, and factually incorrect style of writing and I wasn’t disappointed at all. In the January issue Beinhart used poetry to describe the philosophy of the 50 percent of Americans he hates: If you have a Glock, rack it. If you’re living on shale, frack it. If there’s a union, crack it. If a program works, attack it. Faced with science, go quack it.

FRIDAY, 9:00 AM

Okay. This is the way Chronogram discusses politics. A lot like Congress, huh? But I feel compelled to offer my own poem to describe Marxists like Beinhart. If you have a fetus, crack it. If a program fails, expand it. If you see an entrepreneur, attack it. If you see a worker, tax it. If science doesn’t satisfy you, falsify it.

FRIDAY, 4:00 PM

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Beinhart does however contribute something. He makes us aware that our legislators, when all is said and done, are just people with flaws. Painfully onesided individuals like Beinhart do make their way to Congress. Chronogram readers should demand a more balanced approach by the magazine which currently puts all its eggs in one political basket case.

BRuce DaviD KuReK D.D.S., P.c., FaGD

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1

9/11/12 11:50 PM

chronogram.com Video: Villa Sofia House Tour Ever see a bathroom so nice that you felt compelled to sneak away from a dinner party with a date to enjoy a bottle of wine in it? With the Villa Sofia’s clawfoot tub facing out to the upper deck’s view across the Hudson Valley to the Catskills in the distance, that’s not uncommon. David Usbourne, US editor of the Independent, leads a tour of his glamorous four-story historic home, highlighting some of its 19thcentury features, like the formal drawing room and wood parquet floors.

Audio: A Chat With Linda Lavin Listen to the complete audio interview of Jay Blotcher’s charming talk with Tony award-winning songstress Linda Lavin, which previews Lavin’s upcoming cabaret show at Hudson’s Club Helsinki on February 10, part of the club's Helsinki on Broadway series.

Photos: Internationally Renowned Photojournalist Gilles Peress View a selection of photos by Bard’s visiting professor of human rights and photography that are featured in the exhibit “Art or Evidence: The Power of Photojournalism” at Union College’s Mandeville Gallery in Schenectady. The exhibit includes 12 black-and-white photographs from his portfolio “Flashpoints,” including conflicts in Northern Ireland, Iran, Rwanda, and Bosnia from the 1970s through the ‘90s.

Plus... Footage of the mysterious Master Kwan (featured in this month’s Whole Living section) teaching a qi gong class, a slideshow of more whimsical pieces by February cover artist Julianna Swaney, and previews of tracks from our CD reviews and music videos for our Nightlife Highlights picks. Also, more pictures of the people and places you love by our Community Pages photographer David Morris Cunningham (which includes Warwick, Sugar Loaf, Chester, Rhinebeck, Red Hook, and Tivoli this month), and a selection of trailers for feature films, documentaries, and music videos screening at the Beacon Film Festival: Freeze Frame.

2/13 ChronograM 13


chronogram seen

Clockwise from top left: Midge Ure with Right the Stars at the Bearsville Theater on January 12. Photo: Erik Lamont Obed Calvaire of the Jean-Michel Pilc Trio at the Falcon on January 4. Photo: JamesRicePhotography.com Mulder Construction workers perform a deep energy retrofit to a 65-year-old house in Rosendale, sponsored by a NYSERDA grant to Verdae LLC, as part of a workshop on January 12. Photo: Manna Jo Greene Yung Wu performs at the triple-header Feelies show at BSP Lounge on January 19, along with East of Venus and Wild Carnation. Photo: Andrew MacGregor Christina Vargas, Aaron Rezny, and Abbe Aronson at the Chronogram Covers Show at Hudson Valley Coffee Traders in Kingston on January 18. Photo: Hudson Valley Good Stuff Pete Seeger and Jim Scott perform at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation at Rock Tavern on January 19. Photo: Lisa Kimball Opposite: A midnight kiss on Wall Street at Uptown Kingston's 1913 New Year's Eve Celebration. Photo: Andrew MacGregor 14 ChronograM 2/13


2/13 ChronograM 15


rob donnelly

Confusion Reigns in DEC Review Process By Lynn Woods

B

y the end of February, it’s possible the New York State Department of Conservation (DEC) will approve and implement regulations for hydraulic fracturing, bringing the state a step closer toward allowing the first horizontal wells to be drilled. But with public resistance to natural gas drilling increasing with each passing month, such an outcome isn’t likely. Indeed, mistrust of the state’s ability to review the impacts of fracking—much less monitor the industry should the ban on drilling be lifted—is growing each day, thanks to a process critics charge is mired in secrecy, convoluted, and seems ever more piecemeal and reactive. Indeed, in its efforts to appease all sides, the state seems to be digging a deeper hole for itself. Rather than complete the massive environmental review—it’s called the supplemental draft generic environmental impact statement, or SDGEIS—and then issue proposed regulations, the DEC chose to fast-track the process in the fall of 2011 by releasing its proposed regulations of the industry while it was still reviewing the SDGEIS. “It’s putting the cart before the horse,” says Katherine Nadeau, water and natural resource program director for Environmental Advocates of New York. The SDGEIS still had not been completed when revisions to the regulations were released last November and subjected to a 30-day public comment period, which ended January 11. That forced the public to comment on the DEC’s proposed rule making with incomplete information as to the agency’s own findings of fracking’s environmental impacts. The short duration and timing of the public comment period prompted protests from environmental groups and elected public officials and spurred a special hearing by three state Assemblymen. One testifier at the hearing was Carl Chipman, supervisor of the Town of Rochester, who noted the constraints of complying with Open Meetings laws, coupled with the holidays and officials’ end-of-the-year accounting tasks, made it impossible for elected officials to hold the necessary public meetings. Chipman is a member of Elected Officials of New York, which sent a letter to Governor Cuomo demanding a 60day extension. The group is threatening legal action if the request isn’t granted. Beyond the environmental concerns, Chipman says he’s worried about the burdens fracking would put on municipalities, which would have to deal with the road damage from the heavy truck traffic, safety hazards to school buses, and an increase in accidents. Because under the proposed regulations the chemicals transported by the trucks won’t have to be disclosed, in the event of an accident involving a spill towns won’t have any information about the best way to deal with it, said Chipman. “The DEC says it’s up to the local government to handle the protocol on these things, which is insane,” notes

16 ChronograM 2/13

the supervisor. “The local government isn’t involved in the decision-making process, yet the responsibility for all the problems falls back on us. It’s a one-way street.” He and other municipal officials are also worried about fracking’s impact on the local economy. He noted that the SDGEIS failed to address the potential negative socioeconomic impacts. “In my town, we’re supported by agriculture and tourism. Fracking would have a negative impact on these types of jobs.” Furthermore, the towns likely won’t see any substantial increase in the tax base, since the oil and natural gas companies lease the land. Another target for criticism is the state’s ongoing health impact assessment, which was belatedly announced last fall after concerned citizens, including leading health professionals, blasted the DEC for failing to address the potential health impacts of fracking in its initial environmental review. Bowing to public pressure, the DEC commissioned the state’s Department of Health (DOH) commissioner, Dr. Nirav Shah, to review its internal documents. It also hired three outside environmental health professionals as consultants. Critics said the three consultants, while widely respected, have too little time to review the data. And no one’s sure what data they’re reviewing, since the DEC has refused to reveal the internal documents. A better option would have been a comprehensive health impact assessment, the “gold standard” developed by the Centers for Disease Control, says Kathy Nolan, regional director for the High Peaks at Catskill Mountainkeeper. “If you try to do an internal review of internal documents on a short time frame with no public involvement, you haven’t improved the process.” The DEC has extended its deadline for the final version of the SDGEIS and proposed rules by 90 days, to enable Dr. Shah and the consultants to complete their health impacts assessment. The DEC would not specify how far in advance the SDGEIS would be finalized before the release of its final regulations on February 27, but according to an industry spokesperson, the time period is 20 days—arguably not much time to incorporate any particular concerns raised by the health assessment report into the regulations. The DEC also has to issue its guidelines for well permits—and presumably respond to 204,000 comments delivered to DEC’s Albany headquarters by Sean Lennon and Yoko Ono on January 11. (The comments are in addition to the 80,000 comments received in the DEC’s previous review.) It’s all very confusing, say activists. “Different documents are running on different time frames, and there may be a third one for the revised SDGEIS,” says Nolan. The agency could simply let the statuary deadline for its final rule-making on February 27 expire. It would then have to reissue a draft SGDEIS, as Nolan suggested, and

hold more public hearings. “Our frustration is over the repeated delays,” says Brad Gill, executive director for the Independent Gas and Oil Association of New York, an industry group. “We’ve been living with delays for four and a half years now. The regulatory uncertainty and legislative hostility means that NY is not open for business.” DEC spokesperson Emily DeSantis notes that the DEC is committed to an objective assessment of the health and safety impacts. “If DEC decides that hydraulic fracturing cannot be safely done in NewYork, these regulations will not have any practical effect and the process will not go forward,” she wrote in an e-mail. “If DEC decides that the process can be done safely, these regulations would be adjusted in accordance with the health and safety requirements and issues addressed in the Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement.” Such reassurances fail to placate fracking opponents, who point to numerous weaknesses in the revised proposed regulations. A few examples: while the setback requirements for well pads from residences, schools, and other structures was extended from 100 feet to 500 feet, that distance “doesn’t seem to be based on any clear rationale,” according to Nolan. Nolan says her research indicates aquifers may be interconnected up to 4,000 feet. She notes that some Western states with 600-foot setbacks are considering increasing the distance. The proposed regulations would also allow drilling over aquifers that aren’t currently supplying drinking water, putting at risk clean water sources for the future, says Nadeau. She adds that another problem is that the rules continue to exempt fracking wastewater—the chemicalladen flowback water that comes back up the well after it has been drilled and the brine that is produced when the well is operational—as hazardous waste, despite the fact that “a lot of it would qualify.” Municipal sewage plants are still being proposed as a possible way to dispose of the waste, despite the ecological disaster caused by this method of disposal in Pennsylvania, which subsequently banned the practice. Nolan says the certain contamination of some aquifers from fracking isn’t worth the supposed economic benefits. “I don’t see any reason to follow through when, like being in a chess game, you see there’s a checkmate down the road,” she says. “That’s the situation here. “It’s very difficult to get good results if you don’t have a good process,” she added. “The regulations so far are not adequate. Unless we see something substantially revised and changed in the process in February, we don’t have what the DEC and Governor Cuomo have promised us, which is a really scientific approach to [assessing] the impacts of fracking in New York State.”


fionn reilly

Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note Concept Album

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elcome back my friends, to the show that never ends. This month, it’s Chronogram as LP. (In case the kiddies out there don’t know what I’m talking about, LPs are those pieces of vinyl wrapped in thin cardboard sleeves that your dad keeps in boxes in the attic and wistfully equates with his lost and misspent youth.) The album metaphor is apt, methinks, for despite the obsolescent air surrounding these vinyl relics, they are physically large and pleasing to hold on a purely tactile level, aside from any aesthetic considerations or soul-ennobling profundity their content may contain. In the era of the mp3, we can skip from Bon Iver to Beethoven to Beyoncé on iTunes with ease. Just load your 10,000 tracks into your computer, hit shuffle, and stream your 38.6 days of music, bouncing from one disconnected morsel to the next. Extend this to Facebook, Twitter, Tivo, podcast subscriptions, and reality becomes your mixtape (another hoary bit of technology). It’s now possible to be digitally connected in every way, with access to all viewpoints and ideas, and still retreat into a personally curated solipsism of your own music, friends, and politics. The LP isn’t all things to all people. It’s a full-length artistic statement by one person or a group of people at a particular moment in time—a metaphor in music. Most aren’t exceptional. They’re fair to middling, like most of us. But some LPs very much tilt toward Art. Without unpacking too much of that baggage, I’ll quote David Foster Wallace on the subject: “The plain fact is that good art is magical and precious and cool.” I hope that Chronogram sometimes rises to the level of magical, precious, and cool for our readers. Here’s your long-playing magazine experience. Cover Art A saying about a book and its cover comes to mind. In the digital space, this is ever more a practical reality. Songs and albums are now often (choose your own adventure: bought, streamed, pirated) without the cover art ever being seen by the consumer. With LPs, the art and object were part and parcel of the listening experience. Think of The Wall: Gerald Scarfe’s ominous white brick façade opening onto a gatefold of more daunting white brick with holes provided for the demons to crawl through—Mother did it need to be so high?—the visual distillation of Roger Water’s fever dream of anxiety. This month, Julianna Swaney’s whimsical Hansel and Gretel-like drawing sets the tone for the February issue. Swaney explains her influences to Jennifer Gutman in On the Cover (page 10). Liner Notes What you’re reading currently is this album’s stand-in for liner notes—the explanatory essay undergirding the endeavor and often giving thin creative material the veneer of respectability, even inevitability, with the aid of verbal gymnastics. The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences even gives a Grammy each year for “Best Album Notes.” This honor has been almost exclusively reserved for scholarly exegeses on jazz giants like Erroll Garner and Miles Davis. The last time anything slightly off-topic won was in 1976, when journalist Pete Hammill got the nod for his mad stab at explaining Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks. Here’s Hammill’s first sentence: “In the end the plague touched us all.” Yowza. Does anyone even read liner notes anymore?

Mystery Every great album needs a whiff of mystery.Why was Paul walking barefoot on the cover of Abbey Road? What does the synchronicity between Dark Side of the Moon and TheWizard of Oz signify—was Pink Floyd trying to tell us something about the flying monkeys? Our mystery man this month is Master Kwan, an aged Taoist master who some claim to be his early 90s, though to see the man do tai chi, you’d never believe it. Is he really the soldier, Peking Opera Star, and Golden Gloves boxer described in the fantastical book Chronicles of Dao? Wendy Kagan investigates in “Keepers of the Tao” (page 86). Death What is life but a brief squawk in the face of inevitable death? The Flaming Lips certainly tapped into that with the bouncy psychedelia of Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots, with the eponymous heroine doomed but determined. Simon Critchley, author of The Book of Dead Philosophers, has spent quite some time ruminating on how we shuffle off this mortal coil. Prior to a talk at EMPAC in Troy this month, Critchley talks with Sparrow about the difference between death and taxes, among other topics, in “Funny Stories About Death” (page 97). Subversion Subversion needn’t always be as straightforward as a Dead Kennedy’s record. Sometimes it comes in unexpectedly commercial forms, like Lady Gaga’s Born ThisWay, which brought the fight for LGBTQ equality to Top 40 radio. And then, sometimes subversion can come out of left field, as in the work (and life) of Michael Perkins. An author and journalist, Perkins’s recent book, Life Sentences:Aphorisms & Reflections, is filled with zingers that unsettle our preconceived notions. Here’s Aphorism 484: “We don’t drive cars; they drive us.” Perkins explains why walking is a subversive act to Nina Shengold in “Walkabout” (page 54). Bonus Material This is how the record companies get you to buy stuff you didn’t know you needed—until they told you it existed: the double live album at Budokan, that rare unreleased track that’s now tacked on to the Greatest Hits release. The Smiths nailed the crass merchandising angle of this expertly in “Paint a Vulgar Picture,” imagining a record meeting at which the execs plan to cash in on the death of one of their stars: “Re-issue! Re-package! Re-package! / Re-evaluate the songs / Double-pack with a photograph / Extra track (and a tacky badge).” At Chronogram, of course, we give it all away, but we still have plenty of bonus material. In the past year, we’ve been plotting and scheming how to enhance Chronogram.com. Since we relaunched a few months ago, we’ve taken every opportunity to deepen the printed stories online. (This is in addition, of course, to our roster of bloggers who post fresh content daily, and our curated calendar listings that not only tell you what’s going on, but guide you toward what you want to do.) This month, we’re featuring video exclusives shot by Stephen Blauweiss of our house profile, the Villa Sofia in Hudson, and of the work of cover artist Julianna Swaney.You’ll also find streaming tracks from the CDs we’re reviewing this month, as well as a wealth of other material. Take a look at the Digital Table of Contents (page 13) or look for the call-outs at the end of articles indicating what types of goodies await on the site. (Shameless self-promotion:You can find a devastatingly charming and informative video of me giving a guided tour of the new Chronogram.com if you visit this column online.) 2/13 ChronograM 17


David Snyder / national park service

Americans spent more than $10 billion on energy drinks in 2012. The FDA is currently investigating reports of serious injuries and deaths that may be linked to the high caffeine levels found in these beverages. The marketing strategies for energy drinks, which claim that their products offer more than just the benefits of caffeine, allow them to charge a premium. The European Food Safety Authority—who completed a 2009 safety study giving Austrian company Red Bull a clean bill of heath—reported that the claims made about benefits of energy drinks lacked proper scientific support. Energy drinks market that they contain large amounts of nutrients in an effort to sell their products to health-conscious consumers. For example, 5-Hour Energy boasts 8,333 percent of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamin B12, and 20 times the recommended intake of Vitamin B6. Despite these large, attention-grabbing numbers, health experts have said huge added dosages do not provide any benefits. Source: New York Times

Mexican drug traffickers are using America’s national forests to expand their marijuana growing operations. Since drug traffickers were first detected on Forest Service land in California in 1995, the activity has spread to 20 states and 67 national forests, which are being destroyed by growers who cut down trees and pollute the ground and water with chemicals. In 2011, there were 6.2 million marijuana plants found and destroyed nationwide in national forests, which is more than double the amount in 2004, according to data from the Drug Enforcement Administration. During a raid of Wisconsin’s Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in August, more than 8,000 marijuana plants were seized and seven arrests were made, with at least six tied to Mexico. In August, Operation Mountain Sweep targeted marijuana crops on public lands in several Western states, including California. Benjamin Wagner, the US attorney of the Eastern District of California, said about 578,000 plants worth more than $1 billion were removed. Source: USA Today

A deal struck by Congress to avoid the fiscal cliff raised taxes on the highest-earning Americans, while about 99.3 percent of households experienced no change in income taxes. The Tax Policy Center estimates the federal tax rate for an average family in the top one percent will increase from 28 to 36 percent, which is the highest rate since 1979. The tax code includes two new surcharges, including a 3.8 percent tax on investment income and a 0.9 percent tax on regular income. In combination with the 2010 health care law, taxpayers with $1 million in income will, on average, pay $168,000 more in taxes, and their share of the overall federal tax burden will climb from 20 to 23 percent. The new tax code will demand billions more from the wealthy—about $600 billion over 10 years—while the tax burden on everyone else is left almost unchanged. However, economists are divided on the effect these tax increases will have on income growth and income inequality for the middle and lower class. Despite being taxed less, those classes have bounced back slower from the recession than the wealthy. The Tax Policy Center’s Roberton Williams said, “I’d still rather be rich, even if I’m getting taxed much more than a low-income person.” Source: New York Times

In March 2012, the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) was granted authority by the Justice Department to gather, monitor, and store massive datasets about Americans using “predictive pattern-matching,” or analyzing suspicious patterns of behavior, for up to five years. According to the Wall Street Journal, who originally reported the story, the NCTC now has access to entire government databases, including flight records, casino-employee lists, and the names of Americans hosting foreign-exchange students, among other information. Datasets can also be turned over to foreign governments for analysis. This method of data collecting is reminiscent of the Department of Homeland Security’s intelligence-gathering “Fusion Centers,” and the Pentagon’s DARPA initiative, Total Information Awareness—a post-9/11 pre-crime surveillance of public and private databases—which is now defunct due to civil liberty concerns. Source: Slate

Neighborhoodscout.com, an online research and analysis group, ranks Newburgh as the ninth most dangerous city in the United States. The group compiled the 100 most dangerous cities in America with a population of 25,000 or more, based on the number of violent crimes—murder, forcible rape, armed robbery, and aggravated assault—reported to the FBI per 1,000 residents. According to the data, Newburgh is only safer than 4 percent of the cities in the US, with a crime rate of 64 per 1,000 residents. In comparison to other New York communities, more than 99 percent have a lower crime rate than Newburgh. The group’s analysis found that the chance of becoming a violent crime victim in Newburgh per 1,000 residents is 1 in 55. The group found East St. Louis, Illinois to be the most dangerous city in America, followed by Camden, New Jersey and Flint, Michigan. The rankings are based on crime-to-population ratio, which explains why larger municipalities, like New York City, are not on the list. 
 Source: YNN, Neighborhoodscout.com

In the wake of the Newton, Connecticut school shooting, the Journal News, a Gannett daily, sparked controversy when they released a map with the names and addresses of Westchester and Rockland county residents with handgun permits. “New York residents have the right to own guns with a permit and they also have a right to access public information,” said Janet Hasson, president and publisher of the Journal News Media Group. Through social media, the map has been viewed nearly 1.2 million times, received hundreds of comments on multiple websites, and received national news coverage on ABC News, Fox News, and CNN. The newspaper received complaints that gun permit owners felt unsafe and violated, and some people even threatened staff members. Connecticut real estate agent and blogger Christopher Fountain published the names, addresses, and contact information for the Journal News’s publisher, editor, and staff members who worked on the map. Readers of Fountain’s blog supplied information about other newspaper employees, which he also published. Fountain believed the paper was equating legal gun owners “with some crazed, tormented devil up in Newton and putting the two together. And I was offended by that and I wondered how they’d like it if their addresses were published.” The Journal News took down the interactive map in mid January after the passage of gun legislation in Albany. “While the new law does not require us to remove the data, we believe that doing so complies with its spirit,” Hasson said. Source: Journal News, The Nation, Huffington Post

The US government and tax experts estimate the practice of exploiting “like-kind exchanges,” or exchanging one asset for a similar one without taxation, diverts billions of potential tax revenue from the Treasury each year. Evidence from a recent federal trial in New York revealed that some major companies, like Cendant, Wells Fargo, and General Electric, may have pushed the boundaries of the tax break, which was originally meant to help farmers avoid capital gains taxes if they used the proceeds of asset sales to buy equipment replacements. However, the tax break has extended to others, like real estate developers, art collectors, and major corporations, who are receiving subsidies for rental truck fleets, investment property, vacation homes, and thoroughbred racehorses. Companies who sell an asset must also give a third party control of the money, or the tax break is invalid. This trial reveals a larger problem within the US tax system: there must be voluntary compliance on the part of taxpayers to follow the rules. President Obama said he will attempt to have broad reform in the tax code this year. However, George K. Yin, former chief of staff of the Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation, said taking away this tax break will be hard. “Tax expenditures are very similar to an entitlement program, so they’re easy to start," he said. "But once a tax break gets started, people think they’re entitled to it, so they are very difficult to end.” Source: New York Times

18 ChronograM 2/13 10/12

Compiled by Carolyn Quimby


dion ogust

Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

The Joys of Secession

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n the various races for the top spot on the list of great presidents, Abraham Lincoln always wins, places, or shows. If you see the movie, read a biography, or go to the library and do a quick survey of the books that cover that slice of American history, you'll see it was all about the Civil War, freeing the slaves, and his deep personal angst. Yet, there’s a whole other set of things he accomplished in office. If anyone were to take notice, it would get Mr. Lincoln an additional presidential ranking, say somewhere between #5 and #8, in that cluster with Teddy Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and James Madison. He pulled our country over the line, right into modern times. At its inception, the politics of the new country gravitated to two philosophical poles. Alexander Hamilton was in favor of commerce and industry. That required a stronger central government with greater economic powers, high tariffs, support for domestic industries, government spending, and a central bank. Government for the money grubbers, which would inevitably become government by the money grubbers. Thomas Jefferson advocated a decentralized agrarian republic based on a vision of clean living yeoman farmers, not the big money boys from the big cities. Jefferson definitely won on style points. His rhetoric was elegant, but his actual policies represented the interests of people like himself with large plantations dependent on slave labor. As for where the money was, in the decades ahead, cotton, the cash crop of the South, would come to represent half of the nation’s exports. By 1860, the value of the slaves they owned “exceeded the invested value of all of the nation’s railroads, factories, and banks combined.” (Industry and Economy During the Civil War, Benjamin T. Arrington, National Park Service.) Please forgive history the hash it has made out of party labels. Hamilton was a Federalist.The Southern slave owners were the Anti-Federalists.They became the Democratic-Republicans, and then the Democratic Party. After the Civil Rights Act of 1964, they morphed into the Republican Party. In the 1850s they were very much what Tea Party Republicans are today.They blocked everything and anything that might move the nation toward modern times: industry, banking, better infrastructure, a common currency, immigration, education, and even help for the people they were supposed to idolize, those yeoman farmers. Lincoln got very lucky—in a perverse sort of way. Before he was even inaugurated, the Southern states began to secede. They took their senators and representatives with them. That gave the new president the gift of a genuine majority, most of whom agreed with his positions and had endorsed his party’s platform. True, he had to raise an army, then fire a succession of inept commanders until he found Grant, Sherman, and Sheridan, but in terms of legislation, the obstructionists had moved themselves out of the way. Legislation that had been stalled for decades could now be passed. Even when Hamilton was the first Secretary of the Treasury and established a national bank, the United States only issued about 20 percent of the currency in circulation. Things didn’t get much better under the Second National Bank. It was destroyed by Andrew Jackson in 1836. After that, from 1837-1862, the federal government used only “hard money,” gold and silver coins, while statechartered banks issued their own currencies. Such banks had a 50 percent failure rate and an average lifespan of five years.

Lincoln established our first truly national currency. The Legal Tender Act of 1862 and the National Bank Acts of 1863 and 1864 put a whole financial system in place. National banks were established that would issue the new “legal tender,” money that was required to be accepted. For the first time the federal government had a monopoly on currency. It was paper money, “greenbacks,” and they became the type of money that we used, essentially unchanged, until 1971. He and the 37th Congress established the program of land grant colleges. These came to include Cornell University, MIT, Berkeley, Amherst, Rutgers, Purdue, the universities of Florida, Idaho, Kentucky, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Iowa State, Kansas State, Penn State, and on and on. They passed the Homestead Act. Anyone who wanted to be a yeoman farmer could head out to federal lands, file a deed on 160 acres, improve the property and live on it for several years, and it was theirs. Lincoln passed the first income tax. He created a Department of Agriculture. He started the Freedman’s Bureau which, after the war, would bring the first public education to most places in the South. Congress also passed the False Claims Act, for recovering damages from companies that defraud the government, establishing the basic legal precedent still in use. We live in a day and age in which free trade is to economists what the divinity of Jesus is to Christians. Paul Krugman put it this way: “If there were an Economist’s Creed, it would surely contain the affirmations, ‘I believe in the Principle of Comparative Advantage,’ and ‘I believe in free trade.’”The principle of comparative advantage was first articulated by David Ricardo. If the English had sheep, they ought to make woolens. The Portuguese had vineyards so they could make port. They could trade, end up drunk but dressed, with more economic efficiency than if they tried to do everything themselves. Alexander Hamilton thought that was a very bad idea. He thought Americans should make their own clothes, ships, guns, and books. High tariffs would protect newly hatched enterprises. The money collected by taxing imports could be used, in part, for roads, canals, and ports, which would help local businesses, and even subsidize them directly. Northern industrialists were for it. Southern slaveholders were against it. England, the richest, most industrialized country in the world, was very much in favor of free trade and they spread their money around to get American politicians to fight against tariffs. Lincoln moved the tariffs back up. He restored Hamilton’s program, protection, and support for domestic industry, a strong banking system and currency, and investment in infrastructure.Yes, many of those initiatives would be abused. Some of them would lead to the excesses of the Gilded Age. But all in all, along with choosing free labor over slavery, they laid the groundwork for America’s emergence as an industrial and financial world power. What is astonishing is how those divisions remain with us. Not just in policy, but in manner. The politics that are centered around Southern culture continue to do battle against change and modernity. They are still the politics of “No! Whatever you’re for, we’re against it!” They still want to tear the country down rather than accept change, especially if that change involves class and race. It might be nice if they did secede for awhile.While they were out, we could get the things done that need doing. Then they could come back in a few years, without the bother of all that war, of course. 2/13 ChronograM 19


Art, Music, Acting . . . and more!

summer ecology camp

Summer Camp Year-Round Classes & Private Lessons

Spring Break Camp (845) 452-4225 www.renkids.org

1821 Rte 376, Poughkeepsie, NY 12603

Cunneen-Hackett Arts Theatre HAVE FUN WHILE LEARNING THIS SUMMER

Tickets are available at childrensmediaproject.org Early Bird Tickets $10 (Before Feb 22nd)

Students/Children $5

Learn more at www.caryinstitute.org

Also visit childrensmediaproject.org for a list of our upcoming summer camps!

To see all classes and updates, visit sunyulster.edu/ce

Postal Customer

Kingston, NY 12401 One Development Court

continuing & professional

Registration is ongoing • Call 845-339-2025

Spring 2013:

ECRWSS

Nonprofit Organization US Postage PAID Kingston, NY 12401 Permit No. 48402

2801 Sharon Turnpike (Rte. 44)|Millbrook, NY 12545|845 677-5343

Continuing & Professional Education

summer camps

Campers are invited to explore the hills, valleys, ponds, and streams of our 2,000-acre campus. During each session children engage in scientific investigations, learn about local natural history, and participate in team building activities. One-week sessions are open for children entering grades 2-7, and a two-week session is open for youth entering grades 8-10. Register early as camp sessions are limited in size.

EDUCATION Open House Tuesday, January 15

5-7 pm at the Business Resource Center, Kingston Snow date, Wednesday, January 16

www.sunyulster.edu/ce

20 summer camps ChronograM 2/13

Poughkeepsie, NY March 2, 2pm

food,film & fun.

Learn More. Earn More. Grow More. Line Dance • February 14 Basic Bookkeeping • February 20 Amateur ‘Ham’ Radio – all ages • February 21 How to Start your own Business • February 21 Ballroom Dance • February 22 Web Development Series • February 26 Heartflower Qigong • February 26 Alexander Technique • March 1 History Witness - Memoir Writing • March 1 Android Development Series • March 1 Personal Trainer • March 2 Intro to Traditional Chinese Medicine • March 4 EKG Technician • March 4 Artist Books • March 4 Reiki 1 & Healing with Sound • March 5 Childbirth Education Teacher Certification • March 5 Holistic Practices in Lactation • March 7 Food Writing Workshop • March 9 Own & Operate a Bed & Breakfast • April 2 Home Staging • April 17 Ongoing CASAC Fast Track Building Performance Institute (BPI)

For more details call 845-339-2025 or visit www.sunyulster.edu/ce


Summer at Hawthorne Valley Kinder Camp Discover the magic of summertime at Hawthorne Valley! Your child will delight in the daily, seasonal rhythm of songs, stories, snack, nature crafts, and play. This day camp, for children ages 4 to 6, is from 9:00 to 1:00 Monday through Friday with an extended day option to 2:30.

Meadowlark Adventure Camp Adventures through the fields, forests, meadows, streams, and ponds. This day camp, for children ages 7 to 9, is from 9:00 to 2:30 Monday through Friday. For more information, please call Amy Flaum, 518-672-4465 x 111. Session 1: June 17 – July 5 • Session 2: July 8 – July 19 • Session 3: July 22 – August 9

Kids! Can! Cook! Kids really can cook... and cooking opens doors to healthier lifestyles — connecting children to the wonder and beauty of nature while learning about nutrition, food, farming, and traditional crafts. Cooking, gardening, animal care, carding, spinning, weaving, clay modeling, and woodworking are all part of Kids! Can! Cook! day camp. Time is also made each day for fun and play in field and stream! Kids! Can! Cook! is offered for children ages 8 to 13 in three 2-week sessions and runs Monday through Friday from 9:30 to 2:30. For more information, please call Caroline Smialek at 518-672-4465 x 232 Session 1: June 24 – July 5 • Session 2: July 15 – July 26 • Session 3: August 5 – August 16

During this on-farm residential camp, children live, play, and work on our active biodynamic farm while strengthening their bond to nature and to one another.

SUMMER WRITING PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS

House Campers, ages 8 to 11, feed the animals, collect eggs, garden, and ride horses. Nature projects, hikes, cook-outs, and swimming complete the experience. Field Campers, ages 12 to 15, experience the farm while working alongside the farmers and other professionals who grow, process, and cook healthy food. Campers are challenged to become “junior apprentices” and work with all branches of the farm including the bakery, dairy, and camp kitchen.

Unique programs where students make new friends, explore their interests and develop skills and confidence as writers, while working with passionate and experienced teachers.

Residential House & Field Camps include all vegetarian meals made with organic ingredients. For more information, please call Helen Enright, 518-672-4465 x 201.

Programs will be offered in two locations: SUNY New Paltz: Afternoon Programs for Upper Elementary Students: July 8-12, 15-19 & 22-26 Full-day Programs for Middle School Students: July 8-12 & 15-19 Full-day Programs for High School Students: July 8-12 & 15-19 Poughkeepsie Day School: Full-day Programs for Middle School Students: July 22-26 & July 29-August 2 www.newpaltz.edu/hvwp (845) 257-2811

1-Week Session: July 14 – July 19 • 2-Week Session: June 30 – July 12 3-Week Session: July 22 – August 10

A Day on the Farm Can’t come to one of our camps? Any time of year is a great time to visit Hawthorne Valley! Through our Day on the Farm program, we’ll help you design a custom, hands-on visit for your family, from a few hours to an overnight visit. www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org/day-farm Hawthorne Valley is a diverse nonprofit set on 400 acres of fields, forests, and rolling farmland in central Columbia County, NY. For more than 35 years, Hawthorne Valley has been educating children and adults, practicing and promoting sustainable agriculture, and supporting the arts.

Promoting social and cultural renewal through the integration of education, agriculture and the arts 327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 12075 | www.hawthornevalleyassociation.org

2/13 ChronograM summer camps 21

summer camps

Hawthorne Valley Farm Camp


New York Military Academy SUMMER PROGRAMS New York Military Academy SUMMER PROGRAMS ACADEMIC PROGRAM New York Military Academy has carefully designed a summer of achievement

AcADEMic PRogRAM

and growth in a structured, positive, learning environment to serve diligent,ofhard-working ACADEMIC PROGRAM Newand Yorkstudent-centered Military Academy has carefully designed a summer achievement students who are looking for personal growth and more active fun than typical summer schoolhard-working classes can and growth in a structured, positive, and student-centered learning environment to serve diligent, provide. students who are looking for personal growth and more active fun than typical summer school classes can •provide. Day & boarding students entering grades 9 -11 •• Morning classes and afternoon activities/outdoor Day & boarding students entering grades 9 -11 engagement •• Credit bearing courses taught in small-sized classesengagement Morning classes and afternoon activities/outdoor

July 7 - August 9 courses taught in small-sized classes • Credit bearing July 7 - August ADVENTURE 9 SUMMER PROGRAM A summer of fun, friendship challenge and opportunity for kids

who want to GET OUT THERE ANDPROGRAM DO this summer! Program includes an array of thoughtfully guided outdoor SUMMER ADVENTURE A summer of fun, friendship challenge and opportunity for kids activities and challenge opportunities, as well as a full schedule of adventure learning what New York Military who want to GET OUT THERE AND DO this summer! Program includes an array of thoughtfully guided outdoor Academy summer programs are famous is specially designedlearning to provide kids Military with a activities and challenge opportunities, as for. wellCurriculum as a full schedule of adventure whatpositive New York variety of opportunities for personal growth, mentored exercise, and just plain fun. Academy summer programs are famous for. Curriculum is specially designed to provide positive kids with a •variety Boarding Students Agesfor13-17 of opportunities personal growth, mentored exercise, and just plain fun. •• Two or Four Week Sessions Boarding Students Ages 13-17 July 7 - August 2

• Two or Four Week Sessions July 7 - August 2

summer camps

SUMMER ADVENTURE PRogRAM

JAZZ BAND PRogRAM EqUESTRIAN PROGRAM is a great opportunity to improve riding and horsemanship skills, while at the same time building self-esteem andPROGRAM confidence in a isfun, safe opportunity and friendlytoenvironment. Participants are offeredskills, the opportunity experience all EqUESTRIAN a great improve riding and horsemanship while at the tosame time build-

levels of riding disciplines - beginners welcome. participant will learn various aspects of horsemanship through instruction, ing self-esteem and confidence in a fun, safe andEach friendly environment. Participants are offered the opportunity to experience all riding time and care and responsibility for their own assigned horse. A guest instructor for clinics is planned for each session. A levels of riding disciplines - beginners welcome. Each participant will learn various aspects of horsemanship through instruction, riding Sunday morning. addition to thehorse. Equestrian planned for include riding show time will and be careperformed and responsibility for theirInown assigned A guestprogram, instructorother for activities clinics is planned eachswimming, session. A tennis, dance, bonfires, movie night, arts and crafts, bowling and off-site trips. riding show will be performed Sunday morning. In addition to the Equestrian program, other activities planned include swimming, •tennis, Boarding Students Agesmovie 12-17night, arts and crafts, bowling and off-site trips. dance, bonfires, •• One week sessions July - August 9 Boarding Students Ages 712-17

• One week sessions July 7 - August JAZZ BAND PROGRAM Two9 week summer music workshop for high school instrumentalists of all levels and advanced middle instrumentalists focusing on thesummer study ofmusic and performance jazz,school in soloinstrumentalists and small groupofsettings. JAZZschool BAND PROGRAM Two week workshop forofhigh all levelsThe andcurriculum advanced

will be divided into three areas focusing of focus:on1)the bebop bop, 2) modalof music, avant-garde ECM styles. Students middle school instrumentalists studyandof post and performance jazz, inand solo3)and small groupandsettings. The curriculum will focus on small group playing, reinforced by private lessons and classes on improvisation, music theory, and listening. Enwill be divided into three areas of focus: 1) bebop and post bop, 2) modal music, and 3) avant-garde and ECM styles. Students sembles will perform every week in a forum setting. A gala performance will take place at the end of the program. Students will focus on small group playing, reinforced by private lessons and classes on improvisation, music theory, and listening. Enwill also have the opportunity to participate master-classes attend concerts withplace faculty guestofartists. July 21 - Students August 2 sembles will perform every week in a forumin setting. A galaand performance will take at and the end the program. will also have the opportunity to participate in master-classes and attend concerts with faculty and guest artists. July 21 - August 2

Visit our website for additional information at www.nyma.org Visit our website for additional information at www.nyma.org 888-ASK-NYMA • NYMA 78 Academy Avenue, Cornwall on Hudson, NY

888-ASK-NYMA • NYMA 78 Academy Avenue, Cornwall on Hudson, NY

22 summer camps ChronograM 2/13

EQUESTRiAN PRogRAM


College Preparatory Preparatory School for AAACollege forboys boys College Preparatory School A College Preparatory School for for boys boys grades (day students) grades 7-12 (day students) grades A College Preparatory School for boys grades 7-12 (day students) gradesgrades 9-12 & & PG PG (day (boarding students) grades 9-12 (boarding students) grades 9-12 students) students) (845) 855-4825 www.trinitypawling.org grades 9-12 &7-12 PG•• (boarding students) (845) 855-4825 www.trinitypawling.org (845) 855-4825 www.trinitypawling.org (845) 855-4825 • www.trinitypawling.org grades 9-12 & PG (boarding students) Open House Monday, February 18, 2013 Formore moreinformation information or arrange contact (845) 855-4825 For or• to towww.trinitypawling.org tour, contact For more information arrangeaatour, tour, contact For more information or to arrange a tour, contact The Office Office of Admission The of Admission The For more information or to arrange a tour, contact The Office of Admission (845) 855-4825 • www.trinitypawling.org (845) 855-4825 855-4825 www.trinitypawling.org (845) • www.trinitypawling.org The Office of Admission (845) 855-4825 • www.trinitypawling.org (845) 855-4825 • www.trinitypawling.org

Bishop Dunn Memorial School

Want a unique learning opportunity for your Pre-K— 8th grader? Bishop Dunn, in partnership with Mount Saint Mary College, offers a one-of-a-kind quality education and an equally enriching summer camp.

Call 845-569-3494 to Schedule a Tour 50 Gidney Ave. Newburgh A

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TO TO TO O T

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A A AA

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The House

Inside Villa Sofia

Juan Carretero and David Usborne in the kitchen of their historic Hudson home, Villa Sofia.

Romantic Weekends Above A Former Speakeasy In Hudson By Jennifer Farley Photographs by Deborah DeGraffenreid

T

his is the fourth house we’ve owned in Hudson, the second one in which we’ve lived,” says David Usborne, the US editor of British national morning newspaper the Independent. Together with his partner of 11 years, architect Juan Carretero, the Manhattan-based journalist has also rented three apartments in the architecturally dense, slightly scruffy river town, known for the antiques shops and Federal-style buildings on its main thoroughfare, Warren Street. The couple sits in the pewter and cream parlor of Villa Sofia, an 1870 yellow clapboard Italianate four-story with bracketed cornices, a front porch, and a peek of river out the upstairs window. They bought 109 North Fifth Street in 2006 for an undisclosed sum. “We fell in love with the interior French doors, parquet floors, and location on a quiet street five minutes’ walk from everything,” says Carretero. They’ve spent “more than makes sense economically” on its updating. “I get itchy as soon as a house gets near finished, but we can’t really sell right now, because of the market, and I’m not sure we want to, anyway,” he adds. The Van Deusen Family Currently configured as a three-bedroom, three-bath plus office, Villa Sofia was built for a branch of the illustrious Van Deusen clan. The original owners had a successful grocery business back when Hudson was the 29th-largest US city. Extra-wide North Fifth Street anchored Hudson’s original parade route. In recent decades, it remained fairly respectable back when Warren Street “was still a dump,” says Carretero. But the most recent wave of gentrification began in 2007. He hopes they’ve swelled that uptick. Replete with architecture spanning three distinct centuries, and located on the rail line to New York, Hudson was always known for its lively red light district. The 20th century saw Hudson in a steep decline that started to reverse in the 80’s when creative types from Manhattan began to flock to its 24 home ChronograM 2/13

dirt-cheap lofts and storefronts. When Usborne and Carretero bought the approximately 3,300-square-foot villa on a double lot, it had been chopped into apartments above an illegal bar, or speakeasy, and there were two ill-considered contemporary additions on spaces now used as outside decks. After ripping up carpet, stripping paint, and tearing out drop-in ceilings, Usborne and Carretero wholly replaced the existing electrical systems and plumbing. Foam insulation was sprayed into the attic space; wall insulation, made from recycled denim, was blown into the walls. “The extra insulation proved a great investment. The house was very cold before,” says Carretero. “I think we paid about $3,000 for that, and it’s probably paid for itself in terms of energy savings already.” Two rusty ancient furnaces were ripped out and replaced with one $8,000 high-efficiency model. With help from a relative, the couple, who is not particularly handy, removed exterior asbestos tiles, because professional “asbestos abatement” was just too expensive. They almost broke up endeavoring to sand the wood parquet floors downstairs, using giant rented sanding machines. “Very easy to gouge, and so messy,” recalls Usborne. They splurged on custom cabinets for the kitchen but aren’t so thrilled with the butcher block countertops they chose “because they’re awfully sensitive to water,” laments Carretero, who would like to replace them with stone. The kitchen’s hardwood floor was badly damaged, so they hired a decorative painter from NewYork to paint it variegated stripes of grey. Carretero personally mixed the colors, in tones of “elephant to London mist,” describes Usborne, to match the interior wall shades, which Carretero also individualized. Upstairs, there are recessed halogen ceiling lights, tidy and efficient for creating spotlights. But Carretero doesn’t really like them. “We wanted a mix of old and new, obviously, but nowadays I don’t think recessed lights look right in a house of this age. If I did it over, we’d have all sconces.” The architect’s ruminations over the finer points of Villa Sofia’s renovation amuse the journalist.


Clockwise from top, the elegant rooms of Villa Sofia: library, bathroom, guest bedroom

2/13 chronogram home 25


caption

Street view of Villa Sofia in Hudson.

“You should see the way I lived before I met Juan,” says Usborne. “All the money, all the taste, everything, it’s all Juan. I’m just along for the ride.”

countryside—“someplace that looks like rural Sussex, where I grew up”—but Carretero, a true urbanite, thinks North Fifth is “rustic enough.”

Came To Interview The Dice Man, Then Never Really Left Usborne and Carretero met in Manhattan, introduced by friends. They came to Hudson on a working date early in their relationship. Usborne needed to interview George Cockcroft, author of the cult literary hit, The Dice Man, which he published under the pseudonym Luke Rhinehart. During the week, the couple lives in a 600-square-foot Gramercy Park apartment. Because their city footprint is so diminutive, Usborne and Carretero enjoy spreading out and entertaining houseguests in their weekend digs. The conventional bath off the master bedroom was converted into a walkin closet “because I’ll never have one in Manhattan,” says Carretero. A fourth upstairs bedroom was made into a grand master bath with an oversized soaking tub in the room’s center. “A couple, here for a dinner party, excused themselves after the first course, grabbed a bottle of wine, and came up here to take a bath,” laughs Usborne. “It’s that compelling.” Inspired by nearby Olana, the Calvert Vaux-designed masterpiece built for famed Hudson River School painter Frederic Edwin Church, Carretero recently added a Persian-type arch above the toilet stall. Emboldened by Usborne’s heretofore unknown enthusiasm for 19th century Yankee-meetsMorocco style, Carretero plans to have trompe l’oeil mosaics painted on the master bath’s walls, for a look that’s “decadent, sort of inside the harem.” Usborne has two adult children, both students, from his marriage. If they ever sell Villa Sofia, Usborne would theoretically like next to weekend in the real

For Breakfast, It’s Either Tanzy’s Or Haggis “Our favorite place to eat is Tanzy’s.We lived above it when we were renovating,” says Carretero, naming a shabby chic coffee shop on Warren St. “Best place in town for breakfast, plus, Tanzy’s owners also take care of Ramon, our pug, when we travel,” the Mexico City native added. “The Crimson Sparrow’s new. That’s where to go for dinner right now.” “We just had haggis for breakfast, twice!,” says Usborne, naming the marinated offal “pudding” celebrated by poet Robert Burns as the “great chieftain” dish of Scotland. The couple has just flown in from Edinburgh, where they have close friends. Scattered across the burl maple dining table—made for Usborne by his brother Robert, a master cabinetmaker who died in a ski avalanche—are glossy professional-caliber photographs of their recent trip to Rajasthan, India. “David followed the Romney and the Obama campaigns during the election—I barely got to see him—so we had these vacations planned as a reward,” says Carretero. Almost everything in the house came from Hudson stores. “We pick up a few things when we travel, but mostly those are gifts. Doing our shopping here has made us very popular,” says Carretero. “It’s a very interconnected weekendresidents group. Several of our friends from NewYork who first came to Hudson as our guests have since bought in town or in this general area,” says Usborne.

26 home ChronograM 2/13

chronogram.com Watch a tour of Villa Sofia led by David Usborne.


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The Prefab Blu Homes Breezehouse jeff smith

Reliable Power. Real Savings.

Utility rate hikes. Global climate change. Blu Homes just introduced their Breezehouse model for the first time on the East Coast.

W

hen most people think of modular housing, the first thing that comes to mind is neither luxurious elegance nor sustainability. Blu Homes, a company that just unveiled its “Breezehouse” model for the first time on the East Coast, is aiming to expand minds by pointing out the advantages of having your eco-friendly architect-designed dream home produced in their California factory and unfolded on site, complete with Energy Star appliances and eligible for LEED Silver certification. Developer Neal Costa partnered with the Blu crew to plan a dedicated development in Copake in Columbia County, and the Breezehouse already constructed would seem to embody design values long popular in choice Hudson Valley spots: Simple clean lines that don’t try to upstage the landscape, lots of glass to bring the outdoors in. The three-bedroom house on 24 acres is on the market for $1.6 million; the basic Breezehouse model, exclusive of land or extras, starts at $540,000. Blu Homes’ eight design variations range from studios and cottages to four bedrooms. An online “3-D Configurator” lets prospects choose a design and select preferred finishes before speaking with a consultant, who will help create a site plan to maximize solar-readiness. For an additional fee, Blu will assume the role of general contractor and manage the site prep and permitting aspects of the experience. The end result, framed in structural steel, features ecofriendly metal roof, high-performance insulation, and low thermal-emissive gas filled-windows; energy savings can reach 70 percent. Besides reducing your carbon footprint (trucking a complete home across the country may seem inefficient at first glance, but consider the many, many local hauling trips required for conventional construction), the heavy gauge steel framing incorporated in Blu Homes modulars is advertised as able to withstand “infrastructure challenges” such as hurricanes and earthquakes. Besides the unveiling of the upstate Breezehouse, the company held an “After Sandy: Rebuilding with Blu” event in Morristown, New Jersey late last month. “Our buyer was actually the one who discovered Blu Homes and traveled out to San Francisco to watch the factory process,” says Nancy Felcetto of Halstead Properties, the brokerage handling the Breezehouse debut. “The Blu Homes people are very creative and responsive—they listen well. And it’s fun being the first kids on the block to do this. “We work with a lot of people looking to relocate here either full time or in second homes, and then there are people looking to downsize,” says Felcetto. “We think a lot of those people might be intrigued by the Blu Homes concept. We’ve all seen modular homes before, but nothing like this—the building process is about a year shorter than stick-built and very clean, yet the house feels incredibly solid.” It’s long been the dream of many East Coasters to import this light and airy Californian home. But the Breezehouse is still unaffordable for most. We can dream, but this modern prefab is not yet a dream come true. Bluhomes.com —Anne Pyburn Craig

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HEATING FUEL COSTS SOARING?

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3647 Albany Post Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 (845)-471-0789 www.enjoywarmth.com Visit us at www.lennox.com © LENNOX HEARTH PRODUCTS, 2008. LENNOX DEALERS ARE INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED BUSINESSES.

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A Trusted Source of Discerning Clients and Sophisticated Designers for Nearly 40 Years! Visit our Staatsburg Village Showroom just south of Rhinebeck. It’s Worth the Drive From Anywhere! 845-889-4747

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There’s No Place Like Home

The Question How Can I Downsize?

There’s No Place Like Home

F

orbes magazine called it the “McMansion backlash. Or a rejection of the housing-tract boom that ate up exurban land like a rabid PacMan.” The trend toward smaller footprints has been building for a couple of years, fueled in part by the recession and in part by environmental concerns—and perhaps by a longing for efficiency and simplicity that was not served by cavernous great halls and dedicated media rooms. There’s a return to the awareness that too much of anything is not just burdensome, but in questionable taste. If a smaller home is in your future—or you’re living in one now—know that there is an art to living in less space without feeling cramped. We asked Monica Alt of Peaceful Living by Design and Annalee Pinnock of All Things Domestic for some tips on organizing and decorating the cozier nest.

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Master the art of letting go. “Americans are trained to believe stuff leads to happiness,” says Pinnock. “It never works, and unless you want to spend your life dusting tchotchkes, it’ll have the opposite effect.” It’s not just hoarders who can have a hard time with decluttering; Pinnock suggests bringing in a trusted friend or professional to help distinguish the “musts” from the “lusts.” Those things you keep need to be well organized. Alt suggests tall built-in shelving units with closed-door storage at the bottom, good-looking storage bins, and ottomans that double as chests to keep items you don’t use constantly handy but out of sight. Keep furniture in scale; be sure it doesn’t block visual or traffic flow. “Try to arrange the furniture along the walls as much as possible. Your goal is to open up the view into each room,” says Alt, “so avoid furniture placement that blocks your view.” Clean lines and functionality are key. Light is your friend. Keep window areas uncluttered and open, and consider a mirror on the opposite wall instead of a wall hanging or painting that will add to the visual clutter. Place your night-time lighting with care to make your smaller space warm and welcoming. When choosing accents, avoid cluttered visuals that can make even a tidy room feel messy. Dark colors, busy wallpaper, or too many contrasts can cramp your style. Alt recommends staying within the same color family. The art of living well in a small space is a challenge well worth mastering. Along with lower expenses and a smaller carbon footprint, the minimalist approach can free your energy to pursue your dreams. “Living in a tiny Manhattan studio, we became experts in making things disappear,” says Pinnock. “And it’s true—call it Zen or Feng Shui, but freedom from too much stuff really does help your mind stay clear.” —Anne Pyburn Craig 2/13 chronogram home 31


Now is the Time to Come Home to Corian®! With exciting promotions including a free* sink offer and deep discounts on many popular colors, you can transform your kitchen or bath with the original solid surface that homeowners and architects have trusted for over 40 years at a fraction of the standard price.

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NO ONE SHOULD HAVE TO LIVE IN PAIN WHEN YOU HURT, TOPRICIN CAN HELP

TOPRICIN IS PATENTED FOR THE TOPICAL TREATMENT OF NEUROPATHY

5% of Topricin Junior Sales are Donated to the Pediatric Cancer Foundations

Topricin® Pain Relief and Healing Cream technology has revolutionized treating pain through enhanced healing, with no chemicals, and no side effects…and is the only topical product patented for neuropathy. Unlike other treatments that simply mask pain, Topricin’s new technology actually helps to heal the damage that is causing the pain. Formulated with a combination of natural medicines in an odorless, paraben-free base, Topricin is known to reduce need/dependency for all classes of chemical-based oral pain pills and is the perfect product for chemo-induced neuropathy.

Topricin Pain Relief and Healing Cream, Topricin Foot Therapy Cream, and Topricin Junior can help those suffering with neuropathy get back to living the life they love with less pain—the safe, natural way.

Topricin: Providing doctors and patients with better options for treatment protocols in pain management since 1994. Headquartered in Rhinebeck, NY, available at fine retailers across the country, found in the 2013 PDR. www.topricin.com. 800-959-1007.

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34 medicine & healing ChronograM 2/13


medicine & healing

No Gain in Nerve Pain

Treating Neuropathy By Jennifer Gutman

I

magine the nervous system as a web of communication. Nerves are constantly sending signals to various parts of the body, like telephone lines feeding into homes throughout a neighborhood. Neuropathy is a breakdown in these communication lines—and the consequences are a bit more unsettling than a missed phone call. The Neuropathy Association estimates that over 20 million Americans (1 in 15 people) experience some form of neuropathy. Dr. Samuel Koszer, managing partner of eRiver Neurology of New York, with locations across the Hudson Valley, defines neuropathy as a “general term for a nerve degeneration that effects the human body.” Specifically, the damage occurs in the peripheral nervous system, or the motor, sensory, and autonomic nerves that connect the central nervous system to limbs and organs. Though about 30 percent of cases are of unknown origin, neuropathy is typically a byproduct of a larger issue. Until recently, the most common cause of neuropathy worldwide was leprosy. Now, diabetes is the number one cause. Approximately 30 percent of neuropathies stem from diabetes, with nearly 60 percent of all diabetic patients experiencing some form. According to Koszer, neuropathy “usually requires continuous treatment and often relief is incomplete—it’s often an evolving disorder that gets worse over time.” In the 2005 Harper’s article “The Pain Scale,” Eula Biss struggles with an incurable chronic pain. Asked to categorize it by choosing a number between zero and 10, she notes how a fundamental element of pain is not represented. “The pain scale measures only the intensity of pain, not the duration,” Biss writes. “This may be its greatest flaw. A measure of pain, I believe, requires at least two dimensions. The suffering of Hell is terrifying not because of any specific torture, but because it is eternal.” As with other forms of chronic pain, neuropathy is a disorder that has long-term effects that often develop from long-term habits. Dr. Alampur, a neurologist with Kingston Neurological Associates, notes another predominant lifestyle-based cause of neuropathy: alcoholism. Basic steps toward a healthier lifestyle, including diet and exercise, are key preventative measures for a disorder that has no known cure.

A Disorder of Variables: Causes and Symptoms Many cases of neuropathy, though, are out of the control of a healthy lifestyle, such as chemotherapy-induced neuropathy or trauma caused by accidents or repetitive motion, like carpal tunnel syndrome. There are also hereditary neuropathies that are incurable. To add to the variables of neuropathy’s forms and causes, the symptoms are also numerous and diverse. Most everyone has experienced a form of neuropathy at its mildest—recall the tingling sensation of your foot falling asleep. Symptoms, though, are often much more serious. Dr. Alampur notes that the most common symptom of neuropathy is numbness in both feet, which often results in imbalance and falling. “Your body’s relationship to three-dimensional space is lost,” she says. Lou Paradise, president and CEO of Topical BioMedics in Rhinebeck, felt residual pain from his repetitive movements while serving in Vietnam. “The pain was so severe that it felt like I was intentionally sticking my finger into an electrical socket—I felt jolting electrical pain from the tips of my fingers to my elbows,” he says.Topricin, a homeopathic anti-inflammatory pain relief cream, is the brainchild of Paradise’s neuropathic pain. Topricin targets toxins that build up around and damage tissue in the lymphatic system, which prevent capillaries from delivering nutrients that nerves need to stay healthy. “It relaxes the capillaries and immediately starts to heal the cells,” he says. Listen and Learn: Diagnosis and Treatment “The cornerstone of diagnosing neuropathy is really listening to the patient,” Koszer says. Identifying the symptoms is the first step to classifying the neuropathy and determining the appropriate treatment method. While diabetic neuropathy is treated as you’d treat diabetes itself—keep sugar intake down, monitor glucose, exercise—some treatment methods are tailored to specific forms of neuropathy. For immunological causes, such as infections from Lyme disease (a common form of neuropathy in this area, Alampur notes) or toxins from alcohol or other substances, Koszer recommends intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, which is when pooled antibodies from hundreds of people are given to the patient through 2/13 ChronograM medicine & healing 35


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an IV. He also suggests plasmapheresis, a form of dialysis which involves removing, filtering, and returning a patient’s blood. For more immediate relief, Koszer recommends neuropathic pain medication, such as Gabapentin or Pregabalin, which are safer alternatives to narcotics because they are less addictive, longer lasting, and have less severe side effects. Alampur avoids use of narcotics at all costs. For severe pain in the feet, a common neuropathic complaint, she suggests an ibuprofen gel lubricant. “If that doesn’t help, I go to the next step, which is lidocaine patches”—a stronger topical pain reliever. Alternative Methods: It’s All Connected Even in more conventional medical contexts, health consciousness remains a focus of treating neuropathy. “I always recommend exercise, and especially yoga to improve balance and flexibility,” says Alampur. Acupuncture also focuses on creating balance in the body by stimulating healthy circulation. According to Carolyn Rabiner of High Ridge Traditional Healing Arts in Red Hook, “There is some very encouraging research showing that [acupuncture] can be very helpful, and that it may stimulate nerve-growth factors.” In addition to responses in patients that are often immediate and sustained, Rabiner also notes that the treatment is appealing because “it’s been used for at least 2,500 years, and side effects are extremely rare.” Other treatment methods in Chinese medicine include moxibustion, or heat therapy, and Gua Sha, a type of massage that is done with a Chinese soup spoon. Like acupuncture, these treatments work to promote healthier circulation and reduce blockage and undernourishment of the tissues. Advanced Health & Injury Care, a multidisciplinary practice with locations in Carmel, Mahopac, Middletown, and Pleasant Valley, offers a year-old program that synthesizes conventional and alternative approaches. Medical doctors, chiropractors, and physical and massage therapists all contribute to the AHIC’s 12week neuropathy treatment program. Rehabilitation strategies include soft-tissue massage work and vibration therapy as well as using the ReBuilder—a neuroelectric stimulator that helps regenerate the nerve’s pathways. According to Practice Administrator Dr. Charles Marino, the ReBuilder sends a signal that mimics a nerve’s normal electrical signal and tries to retrain the damaged nerve. “We’re seeing about an 85-percent success rate,” Marino says. “Not just with less pain and tingling, but we see increased functionality.” With no medications or side effects, Marino feels it’s a good alternative for people who aren’t seeing results with other treatments. “The combination of using ReBuilder and doing other modalities is really making it more effective.” Susan Spiegel Solovay, a nationally certified medical hypnotist and instructor with an office in Hudson, incorporates another fundamental healing tool that’s often overlooked: the mind. “One of the underlying facts in medicine and healing is that the mind has a role to play,” says Solovay. By “offering mental pictures and positive healing suggestions,” Solovay says the hypnotic state can be reached, or the state between waking and sleeping which depends on both deep relaxation and focus. Herself a cancer survivor, Solovay’s main neuropathy work involves chemotherapy-induced pain. “When a person is diagnosed with an illness, most go into a state of anxiety, which is all about being strong and fighting, but it’s not about healing.” Though Solovay recommends hypnosis as a complementary treatment for neuropathy, reducing stress is ultimately what’s most important, no matter the method. “Some people say that 80 percent of an illness has a component—not cause—of stress that exacerbates it,” says Solovay. “Things happen in the body, but it’s the mind that interprets them.” “There is no evidence of pain on my body,” Biss writes about her phantom chronic pain in Harper’s. “No marks. No swelling. No terrible tumor. The X-Rays revealed nothing. Two MRIs of my brain and spine revealed nothing. Nothing was infected and festering, as I had suspected and feared. There was no ghastly huge white cloud on the film.” Neuropathy plagues in a similarly enigmatic way. Its forms, causes, and diagnoses are not obvious, but multilayered and sometimes even undetectable. If not fully curable, there are at least methods for alleviating neuropathic pain, as well as many knowledgeable health professionals in the Hudson Valley to help navigate the nervous system’s web of misfiring signals. Resources Advanced Health & Injury Care Advanced-hic.com eRiver Neurology of New York, LLC Eriverneurology.com High Ridge Traditional Healing Arts Highridgeacupuncture.com Kingston Neurological Associates Fromyourdoctor.com/kingstonneurology/health Susan Spiegel Solovay Hypnocoachny.com Topical BioMedics Topicalbiomedics.com

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Go Red For Women Luncheon


photograph by Chris Cring

Community Pages

view from the ferncliff forest fire tower

Falling in Love Again Rhinebeck, Red Hook, Tivoli By Lindsay Pietroluongo Photographs by David Morris Cunningham

38 rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli ChronograM 2/13

T

he Hudson Valley is a destination for visitors from New York City who want a taste of “the country.”There is so much more than meets the eye, though, and out-of-towners and even locals miss a lot of the area’s best kept secrets. With new restaurants and shops opening up all the time and an array of historic settings, it’s a shame to glaze over these spots for the more popular and obvious stops. Rhinebeck is buzzing with patrons in its own delightful and gentle way. Red Hook has destination after destination that you can easily miss if you’re just mindlessly driving through. Tivoli is tucked away, happy to be out of the limelight, thrilled to welcome back its true fans and regulars who return time and time again. Gratifying above all else is how Rhinebeck’s purveyors have such a deep affection for their businesses’ home town. Luciano Valdivia, general manager of the recently opened Market St. restaurant, says, “[Owner] Gianni [Scappin] and all involved have fallen in love with Rhinebeck. The town is full of interesting people with great taste and a wonderful sense of community.We’re so happy to have been embraced by the town.” What’s nicer than dipping into a restaurant or boutique and having the owners, managers, and staff show their appreciation for their guests and express their fondness for their village? Dede and Steve Leiber opened Upstate Films at its Rhinebeck location in 1972. Behind the indie movie theater is a mission to show independent and foreign films rarely seen in the multiplex. Playing daily are movies that wouldn’t otherwise be shown, many of which attract underground niche audiences. To


Barbara Cooke at Joovay

Charlie Callejo at Terry’s Country Bake Shop

Rick, Creslyn, and Will at WKZE.

Sara Nussbaum at Warren Kitchen & Cutlery

find their next unconventional flick, the Leibers attend festivals, work closely with distributors, and pre-screen each movie. They find that all of the Hudson Valley—not just Rhinebeck—responds well to the cinema, and they took over the former Tinker Street Cinema as a second Upstate Films location three years ago. Filmmakers and screenwriters frequent Upstate Films for community-oriented events like the “Well Worth Watching” series and pre-screenings.

Foster’s Coach House Tavern is the second restaurant to ever open in Rhinebeck, cementing it as an authentic cornerstone of the town.Wally Foster purchased the venue before World War II and designed it to resemble a horse stable, complete with a tack room and upscale horse stalls where guests can dine. Originally, the menu was German, but it’s since been changed to offer seafood dishes and comfort food.

Local Luxuries Bask in the light of luxury at the Belvedere Mansion—the grounds have a pool for sunbathing, a pond for rowboating, a court for tennis, and a garden for strolling. Views of the Hudson River and the Catskill Mountains are unparalleled, dinner can be served fireside or underneath the stars, and newlyweds can sip Champagne with their nearest and dearest at the copper bar. Unwind for an hour, day, or long weekend at Omega, which lets guests choose from nourishing activities and treatments like yoga classes, diamond microexfoliation, and sauna sessions. Boldface names of the personal transformation movement like Ram Dass, Harville Hendrix, and Pema Chodron offer workshops at Omega’s rural campus from May through October. Continuing the theme of well-being, Rhinebeck Health Foods has been around since 1978 and is the area’s one-stop shop for everything organic and wholesome. Mosey on up to the juice bar, pick up homeopathic remedies, or stock your fridge with local cheeses and produce. “Small-scale” and “hushed” aren’t usually words associated with a department store, but then again, the Rhinebeck Department Store isn’t your predictably overwhelming, bustling shop. A little bit of everything is for sale, from men’s socks and ties and clothing for newborns to ceramic coffee mugs.To feed your inner gourmand, stop by Pure Mountain Olive Oil, which lets you taste flavored balsamic vinegars, olive oils, and sea salts before you buy, or bluecashew Kitchen Pharmacy, which has everything you never knew you needed for cooking and entertaining.

Small-Town Staples Market St. isn’t what you’d call cutting edge—it’s casual Italian done right. “Our goal wasn’t to re-invent the wheel,” Valdivia said. “We just want to make it the best we possibly can.” Market St.’s aspiration is to be a twice-a-week restaurant instead of a place people visit just for special occasions. “We’ve tried to create a beautiful space for our patrons,”Valdivia said. “With so much energy going into the food or ambiance or service, it’s often hard to find a restaurant that puts a great emphasis on all three.We don’t want to fall short anywhere. A great deal of care has gone into the details.” Arielle is a Mediterranean restaurant from its meals to its motifs, with decor circa the late 1800s. Champagne cocktails, Moroccan dishes, Greek flavors, and nods to Italian cuisine round out the menu. The Art Bar, a makeover of the former Zen Dog space, offers a first for Rhinebeck patrons: light and healthy Black Sea cuisine served in zakuski, which is Russian for “small bites,” similar to Spanish tapas. Tastes are taken from various cultures, including the Ancient Greeks, Slavs, Romans, Germanic Saxons, and Magyars. Staying true to its locality, though, most of the kitchen’s veggies hail from Hudson Valley farms. The bar reportedly boasts the largest selection of in-house infused vodkas outside of New York City. The Art Bar’s live music offerings are eclectic, and a substantial display of original art works are for sale. Pizzeria Posto has approached pizza in a truly Italian way. Why buy a runof-the-mill wood-fired brick oven when you can import one from Modena, Italy? Salads, antipasti, and a smattering of pies make up the compact menu. 2/13 ChronograM rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli 39


Bread Bakery • Cheeses • House-made Charcuterie • Beer & Wine Bar Tuesday night: Pizza night. $9.00 all you can eat. Sunday night: Trivia night. Italian Wine tasting Thursday Feb. 21st 6 - 9 pm $35.00 7496 South Broadway 12 - 9 pm Tuesday - Thursday Red Hook, New York, 12571 12 - 10 pm Friday & Saturday Phone 845-758-3499 4 - 9 pm Sunday Gift cards available. www.breadandbottle.net

(845) 876-3500 American Cuisine • Craft Beer • Fine Wine • Creative Cocktails. community pages: rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli

$16.00 2 course Prix Fixe Wednesday & Thursday Murder Mystery Dinner Sunday March 10th $35.00 6 pm 5:30 - 9:30 pm Wednesday - Thursday 5:00 - 10:30 pm Friday - Saturday 5:00 - 9:00 pm Sunday Dinner 7488 South Broadway, Red Hook, New York 12571 Phone 845.758.8260 – Fax 845.758.4013 www.flatironsteakhouse.com

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Rated “Excellent”~Zagat for 18yrs • “4.5 Stars”~Poughkeepsie Journal Jennifer B. Lewis at The Kid’s Shoppe

Stained Glass

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Morning by Elihu Vedder

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The Restoration of Elihu Vedder’s “Morning” Slide Presentation and Talk on Sat. Feb. 23rd, 3pm Lecture Series at “Hudson Chautauqua” 49A Eighth Street, (bet. Columbia & Warren Sts) Hudson NY 518-478-3660 for more info

Kathy Cassens at the Red Hook Community Arts Network

There’s also an affordable wine list. Simple food prepared deliciously—buon appetito! Two Boots in Red Hook is on the opposite end of the scale when it comes to atmosphere, but their food is on the exact same level. Upbeat, funky, and colorful, Two Boots has just as much zest (and the same cornmeal crust!) as it did when it opened in New York City in the late 80s. Celebrate the visionary Fisher Center’s tenth birthday in April, as Bard College plays host to a month-long assortment of dance, music and theater performances. On April 12, attend the Percussion and Students Concert, followed a few days later by the American Symphony Orchestra. More events include “An Evening with Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer,” a production of Euripedes’ “The Bacchae”, and a faculty dance concert. Over the summer, the owners of Flatiron Restaurant in Red Hook opened a less-formal eatery where Merritt Bookstore once was. Bread & Bottle is a retail bakery/wine bar that also sells cheese and house-made charcuterie, serves beer and is open from lunch through dinner. I know—it’s my version of heaven too. “I think what sets us apart is we make almost everything in-house,” Owner Jessica Stingo says. Bread & Bottle is a real family affair, with Stingo, her husband, and her brother-in-law running the show. Barbecue is hard to come by in New York, but Max’s Memphis BBQ hits the nail on the head every single time. Everyone who goes there goes back for their fall-off-the-bone barbecue wings, spicy crab cakes, and portions that will feed you for two more meals. Detox from your finger-licking meal by stopping into Rusty’s Farm Fresh Eatery, which has fresh squeezed, organic juice from purple carrots, Thai basil, elephant garlic, and Migliorelli Farm apples. Mac’s Farm and Garden World sells items like bird feeders, seasonal nursery items, and clothing that’s perfect for working outside. Mac’s is more than a lawn, garden, and pet supplier, though. Proving they’re part of the heart of Red Hook, the shop also supports fishing teams, soccer and softball teams, little leagues, and 4-H clubs.

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2/13 ChronograM rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli 41


Veronica Stork, Bonny Corrado, and Christine Houlihan at the Tivoli Free Library

Sizing Up a Sleepy Town Tivoli slows down for most of January and wakes back up when February rolls in. First constructed as a hotel and eventually turned into a bar, the Madalin Hotel was rebuilt after burning down in 1909 and restored to resemble its glory days. Now, except for the flat-screen TVs, the bar portion of the hotel looks like it did in the early 1900s. Larger than a bed and breakfast but smaller than a high-rise, the Madalin is perfectly quaint and cozy. Foodies chat about dinner on the wraparound porch during the spring and summer, weekenders stay up late at the tavern, and vintage circus posters on the walls reflect the Madalin’s fun and lighthearted vibe. Professional dancers can be thanked for founding the international Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, which provides choreographers with a space to experiment and train. Visitors are welcome to wander through the exhibition galleries and peruse the retail shops. After a two-and-a-half-week break in January, Panzur Restaurant and Wine Bar stretches its arms, yawns, and comes alive just in time for the most romantic day of the year. Special events are already planned for the rest of the wintertime, with the “A Tale of Two Hearts” tasting menu for Valentine’s Day and the “Havana Nights” family-style feast, which pays homage to owner and chef Rei Peraza’s Cuban grandmother. Peraza would like everyone to know that they’re welcome to enjoy a cigar on the front porch after indulging in his favorite dishes from childhood and classic Hemingway cocktails. View a slideshow of more Rhinebeck, Red Hook, and Tivoli photos at Chronogram.com.

RESOURCES

february events Wine Lovers’ Pairing Dinner - Feb. 11-13 Valentine’s Day Dinner - Feb. 14 Battle of the NYS Breweries 2013 8 breweries, 7 dinners... your votes choose the champion! Every Tues. beginning Feb. 19 Karaoke! Every Wed. at 10pm in Red Bistro

www.terrapinrestaurant.com 42 rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli ChronograM 2/13

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Affordable Self Storage Affordable-selfstorage.com Aroi Thai Aroirhinebeck.com Beekman Arms Antiques Beekmandelamaterinn.com Bread & Bottle Breadandbottle.net Bumble & Hive Bumbleandhive.com DC Studios Dcstudiosllc.com Dean Vallas—Studio 303 Deanvallas.net Fitness Fusion Realrydercyclestudio.com Flatiron Flatironsteakhouse.com Foam and Wash Carwash Foamandwash.com Gaby’s Cafe Gabyscafe.com The Gardens at Rhinebeck Rhinebeckgardens.com George Cole Auctioneers Georgecoleauctions.com Just Lean Back Justleanback.com Kumon Kumon.com Law Offices of Michel Haggerty Haggertylawoffices.com Oblong Books Oblongbooks.com Osaka Osakasushi.net Paula Redmond Paularedmond.com Pizzeria Posto Postopizzeria.com Rhinebeck Antique Emporium Rhinebeckantiqueemporium.com Rhinebeck Artist’s Shop Rhinebeckart.com Ruge’s Subaru Rugessubaru.com Satya Satyayogacenter.us Terrapin Terrapinrestaurant.com


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Chronogram is a rich looking magazine with excellent articles focusing on the Hudson Valley. This is where I want to show off my art. Its target market is mine. Because it stays around as a coffee table publication, it keeps me in the public eye. I love the way the ads look and I love the collaboration of the staff. My clients consistently tell me they see my ads in the magazine. Doris Cultraro, DC Studios, Custom Stained Glass, Rhinebeck, NY

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2/13 ChronograM rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli 45

community pages: rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli

Most people would grimace at the thought of working alongside their sibling, nevertheless trying to run a business with one. Chelsea Streifeneder opened the Red Hook location of Body Be Well Pilates in 2009. Last fall, Streifeneder opened a second location in Catskill with her younger sister Shannon, a certified Pilates teacher, and she couldn’t be more pleased. “It’s amazing and the best thing ever,” she says. “She is so smart, and an amazing teacher. I am the luckiest person to have her at Body Be Well Pilates. She knows me so well and gets the business. I couldn’t run both locations without her.” In 2006, Streifeneder graduated from Bard College with a Bachelor’s degree in both writing and dance. Dancing eventually took its toll when Streifeneder was faced with back and hip problems. While in Prague, she was introduced to and fell in love with Pilates. Streifeneder attended the Pilates Sports Center in Los Angeles, California, where she completed the Pilates Teacher Training Program. Why Pilates? For Streifeneder, it’s not an exercise regiment but a way of life. “Pilates helps everyone,” Streifeneder says. Clients have raved that it has helped them do everything from lose weight and hike again to pick up their children without feeling pain. For Streifeneder, her back is kept in tip-top shape and her dancing-related problems have practically disappeared. “[Pilates] also helps me stay fit so I am able to train my clients as much as I do,” Streifeneder says. Plus, it’s something that people can do for the rest of their lives. While movements may have to be adapted as people age, Pilates can be performed by just about everyone, young and not-so-young. Instead of depending on staunch repetition like many East Coast Pilates studios, Body Be Well focuses on mind-body orientation and esoteric training. Every class is different, and props are used in conjunction with moves, keeping returning members from growing bored. Toning balls ranging from one to three pounds, stretch bands, foam rollers, stability balls, and springs are incorporated to present east coast classes with components of west coast style. Learn the basics of ballet at Burn at the Barre, prepare for your summer surf lesson with the Cardio Springboard class, or amp up your workout with the Group Reformer Circuit Class. Setting themselves even further apart from other studios is Body Be Well’s certification programs and workshops. Students can complete a teacher certification program or take continuing education workshops for credit. The studio’s method of teaching blends the time-honored system developed by Joseph Pilates with the modern principles that Streifeneder values. You can even create your own class at Body Be Well. If there’s something you want to learn but that the studio doesn’t offer on a regular basis, you can design a Pilates session yourself. Sports teams that want to improve their athleticism, bridal parties trying to slim down before the big day, or businesses that want an alternative to humdrum team building can contact Body Be Well for an entirely customized class. Bodybewellpilates.com


galleries & museums

THE

DORSKY SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART

François Deschamps, Amadou Allaye Dibo, 2011

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

PHOTO-RAPIDE: FRANÇOIS DESCHAMPS and MALIAN PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY JANUARY 23 – APRIL 14, 2013 THE DORSKY COLLECTS: RECENT ACQUISITIONS 2008-2012 JANUARY 23 – JUNE 23, 2013 OPENING RECEPTION FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 5–7 PM

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

WWW.NEWPALTZ.EDU/MUSEUM

46 galleries & museums ChronograM 2/13


culture

galleries & museums

Courtesy of the artist; Contemporary Fine Arts, Berlin; and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York. 

arts &

Dorian Gray, Norbert Schwontkowski, oil on canvas, 2011. From the exhibit “Painting Between the Lines” at Williams College Museum of Art February 16 through June 9, 2013

2/13 ChronograM galleries & museums 47


galleries & museums Carla Goldberg, Water, mixed-media painting. From “Nature as Metaphor,” showing at Gallery 66 NY in Cold Spring February 1 through 23.

GALLERY 291 291 MAIN STREET, KINGSTON 340-8625. “Artwork by Joe Pimentel.” Watercolor and colored pencils on paper. Through March 15.

GALLERY 66 NY 22 EAST MARKET STREET SUITE 301, RHINEBECK 876-7578. “16th Anniversary Exhibition & Collectors Show.” February 1-March 24. Opening reception February 16, 5pm-8pm.

66 MAIN STREET, COLD SPRING 809-5838. “Nature as Metaphor.” Mixed media paintings by Carla Goldberg & sculptural ceramic forms by Leigh Taylor Mickelson. February 1-23. “Mouvement d’Amour.” A group show that features art relating to all forms of love; real, sensual, requited, and abstract. February 2-24.

THE ALDRICH CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM

GARRISON ART CENTER

258 MAIN STreet, RIDGEFIELD, CT (203) 438-4519. “Wendell Castle: Wandering Forms. Works from 1959-1979.” Through February 20.

23 GARRISON’S LANDING, GARRISON 424-3960. “The Shifting.” An exhibition of paintings by Liliane Tomasko. Through March 3.

THE ART AND ZEN GALLERY

HUDSON COFFEE TRADERS

702 Freedom Plains Road, Suite b6, POUGHKEEPSIE. “Works by Joseph Spinella.” February 16-March 30.

288 WALL STREET, KINGSTON 338-1300. “The Chronogram Covers Show.” Twenty years of magazine covers. Through February 28.

ARTS UPSTAIRS

HUDSON OPERA HOUSE

ALBERT SHAHINAIN FINE ART GALLERY

60 MAIN STREET, PHOENICIA 688-2142. “Californian Rock ‘n’ Roll Photographer Peter Stupar.” Through February 10. “All You Need Is Love.” Group show. February 16-March 10.

BARRETT ART CENTER 55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-2550. “A Celebration of Color.” This exhibition focuses on the technical, creative, and expressive role of color in art. February 2-March 2. Opening reception, Saturday, February 2, 3-5pm.

BCB ART 116 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-4539. “Winter Group Show 2013.” Through March 3.

BEACON ARTIST UNION 506 MAIN STREET, BEACON 222-0177. “Bigger bau Group Exhibition.” Through February 23. “Neu Bau.” Exhibition of the new represented bau artists. February 9-March 3.

BETSY JACARUSO STUDIO 54 ELIZABETH STREET, RED HOOK 758-9244. “Art For the Heart.” Through February 28.

THE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK 59 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-9957. “I Am (Richard Nixon).” Adie Russell lip-syncs to recorded interviews. Through March 31. “The Web is a Lonely Place, Come Play.” A multimedia exploration of the internet. Through March 31.

COLUMBIA COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS 209 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 671-6213. “Faces of Columbia County.” Portraits by Cynthia Mulvaney. Through March 10. “Furgary: Hudson Boat Club.” Work by CCCA en plein air artists and photographers commemorating the architecture and views of the iconic Furgary landscape. Through March 15.

DUCK POND GALLERY

327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-4181. “Scenic Hudson 50th Anniversary Photography Exhibition.” Through February 16. “Columbia County Council on the Arts 17th Annual Juried Art Show.” Painters, sculptors, photographers, and paper/mixed media artists. February 23-March 23. Opening Reception, Saturday, February 23, 5pm-7pm.

HUDSON VALLEY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 788-0100. “The Power of Place.” Group exhibition of works by members. Through April 28.

HUDSON VALLEY LGBTQ COMMUNITY CENTER, INC. 300 WALL STREET, KINGSTON 331-5300. “The Work of Chris Gonyea.” Works by artist-in-residence Chris Gonyea. February 2-March 31. Opening reception, Saturday, Feburary 2, 5pm.

HURLEY MOTORSPORTS GALLERY 2779 ROUTE 209, KINGSTON 338-1701. “Esopus Views: Landscape Paintings by Robert Alan Pentelovitch.” Through April 30.

JAMES COX GALLERY 4666 ROUTE 212, WILLOW 679-7608. “Bruce North: Pause for a Moment.” A selection of 35 watercolor landscapes and figurative genre scenes. Through February 28.

john davis gallery 362 1/2 warren street, hudson (518) 828-5907. “Kyle Staver.” Paintings, prints, reliefs. Through February 28. Opening Reception, Saturday, February 2, 6pm-8pm.

KAPLAN HALL SUNY ORANGE, NEWBURGH 431-9386. “Living in a Material World.” Featuring Chinese and Chinese-American contemporary women artists Gao Yuan, Cui Xiuwen, Cai Jin, Hu Bing, Mimi Kim, Xin Song, Nina Kuo, Feng Jiali, Hui Zhu. Through March 29.

128 CANAL STreet TOWN OF ESOPUS LIBRARY, PORT EWEN 338-5580. “Elements Envisioned: Works on Paper.” Works by Steve Mulvey. Through February 23. Opening reception, Saturday, February 2, 5-8pm

KENT ART ASSOCIATION

EXPOSURES GALLERY

KLEINERT/JAMES ARTS CENTER

1357 KINGS HighWaY, SUGAR LOAF 469-9382. “Light in the Valley.” Color panoramas of the Hudson Valley by Nick Zungoli. Through May 19.

FLAT IRON GALLERY 105 SOUTH DIVISION STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 734-1894. “Habitats.” Ceramic sculpture and mixed media by Marlene Ferrell Parillo. February 1-March 17.

FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER AT VASSAR COLLEGE 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5237. “Recent Acquisitions: Works on Paper.” Additions to the permanent collection. Through March 30.

FRONT STREET GALLERY

21 SOUTH MAIN STREET, KENT, CT (860) 927-3989. “The Student Show.” Works by secondary education students. February 23-March 3. 34 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2079. “Byrdcliffe Annual Members Show: Together Again.” Work by Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild’s artist members. Curated by the Byrdcliffe Exhibition Committee. Through February 10. “The Animals Look Back at Us.” February 23-March 11.

LOOK|ART GALLERY 988 SOUTH LAKE BouLeVarD, MAHOPAC 276-5090. “Winter: A Group Show.” New work from Look Gallery artists. Through February 10. “New Juried Exhibit.” February 23-March 17.

MAD DOOLEY GALLERY

21 FRONT STREET, PATTERSON (917) 880-5307. “Artists’ Explorations: Contrasting Visions.” Through March 3.

197 MAIN STREET, BEACON 702-7045. “Family.” Patti Reller, Catherine Welshman, Theresa Gooby, Sharon Watts. February 9-March 24. Opening reception, Saturday, February 9, 6pm-9pm.

GALERIE BMG

MAIN STREET

12 TANNERY BROOK ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-0027. “Photoencaustics.” Featuring encaustic photographs by Rita Bernstein, Christa Kreeger Bowden, Hope Kahn, Leah Macdonald, and Kara Taylor. Through February 11.

48 galleries & museums ChronograM 2/13

MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-3400. “The Glow Show.” A storefront exhibition of light-based and video work by New York City and Hudson Valley artists. February 23-April 30. Opening reception February 23, 6:30pm-9:30pm.


MARK GRUBER GALLERY

Cosmic Daughters sacred Grandmothers

17 NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ 255-1241. “Doug Maguire, James Cramer.” Through March 16.

MID-HUDSON HERITAGE CENTER

paintings by Sadee Brathwaite

317 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 485-8506. “Express/Identify: African American Photography.” Through February 16.

Feb 11 - March 8

MIKEY TEUTUL’S WOLFGANG GALLERY

oPeNiNG ReCePTioN:

40 RAILROAD AVENUE, MONTGOMERY 769-7446. “Mutual Reflect: Personal Reflex.” Laina Mason & Olivia Merchant. February 1-March 2. Opening reception February 2, 6pm-9pm.

Wed., Feb 13, 5:00-6:30pm

Mildred i. Washington

MILDRED I. WASHINGTON ART GALLERY

art gallery

53 PENDELL ROAD, POUGHKEEPSIE 431-8610. “Cosmic Daughters Sacred Grandmothers: Paintings by Sadee Brathwaite.” A comprehensive resonance of the universal womanhood concept. February 11-March 8. Opening Reception, Wednesday, February 13, 5-6:30pm.

Washington Center, Room 150, 53 Pendell Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 431-8610

OMI INTERNATIONAL ARTS CENTER 1405 COUNTY ROAD 22, GHENT (518) 392-4747. “Skyline Adrift.” Cuban art and architecture in a site-specific installation. Through May 13.

ORANGE HALL GALLERY

Time Space, oil oN CaNvas, 38” x 28“

GalleRY HouRs: Mon - Thurs 10am - 9pm, Fri 10am - 5pm

SUNY ORANGE, MIDDLETOWN 341-4790. “The North East Watercolor Society 2013 Members’ Show.” February 11-March 22.

RONDOUT MUSIC LOUNGE 21 BROADWAY, KINGSTON 481-8250. “Works by Sharon Stelluto.” Inspired by the energy of life and the natural world, her artwork depicts organic concepts by using biomorphic shapes. Through February 28.

ROOS ARTS 449 MAIN STREET, ROSENDALE (718) 755-4726. “Fireside Fables.” An exhibition of illustration and sculpture from eight artists inspired by traditions of folk and fairy tales, storytelling, and communion with nature. Through February 9.

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART 1 HAWK DRIVE, NEW PALTZ Newpaltz.edu/museum. “Photo-Rapide: Francoise Deschamps and Malian Portrait Photography.” Through April 14. Opening Reception, Saturday, February 2, 5-7pm.

SELIGMANN CENTER FOR THE ARTS

galleries & museums

23 WHITE OAK DRIVE, SUGAR LOAF 469-9459. “Warwick Drawing Group.” A Salon-style drawing exhibit. February 1-27. Opening reception, Sunday, February 3, 1pm-3pm.

SOHN FINE ART 6 ELM STREET, STOCKBRIDGE, MA (413) 298-1025. “The Proserpine Path.” Exhibition of photographic work by Eric Korenman. Through March 4.

STOREFRONT GALLERY 93 BROADWAY, KINGSTON TheStorefrontGallery.com. “Wind Shifts: Boxes & Other Artifacts.” Works by Joan Monastero. February 2-23. Opening reception, Saturday, February 2, 5pm-8pm.

THE ARTISTS’ COLLECTIVE OF HYDE PARK 4338 ALBANY POST ROAD, HYDE PARK (845)489-6529. “Art from the Heart” A new art cooperative with members from 2 to 82-years-old. February 2-24. Opening reception, Saturday, February 2, 3-5pm.

THEO GANZ STUDIO 149 MAIN STREET, BEACON (917) 318-2239. “Form and Function.” Home staples like tables, chairs, as art. Through February 3.

THOMPSON GIROUX GALLERY 57 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-3336. “Installations by Nathalie Ferrier.” Through March 17.

TIVOLI ARTISTS CO-OP 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI 758-4342. “We’re Still Here!” The show celebrates the perseverance of the human spirit. Through February 3. “13th Annual Erotica Show.” February 8-March 3. Opening reception, Saturday, February 9, 6pm-9pm.

TREMAINE GALLERY AT THE HOTCHKISS SCHOOL

a fresh look at contemporary fine art.

North Country by Julija Mostykanova (Oil)

Water Street Market, New Paltz – Open Daily 11a to 6p – Call for Winter Hours 845-518-2237 – All Credit Cards Welcome

11 INTERLAKEN ROAD, LAKEVILLE, CT (860) 435-3663. “I Am.” Photographs and prints from the collection of Raymond J. McGuire. “Manifest Destiny.” Photographic works by Leigh Merrill. February 9-March 8.

WALLKILL RIVER SCHOOL AND ART GALLERY 232 WARD STREET, MONTGOMERY 457-ARTS. “Group Show of Instructors.” February 1-15. “Defeated Angel.” Works by emerging artists Troy Mack. February 1-28. “Seniors Paint!” Exhibit of art created by seniors. February 16-28.

WEATHERVANE CLUBHOUSE 25 WEATHERVANE DRIVE, WASHINGTONVILLE 614-4066. “Sabrina Leviton and Rachel Spear.” Opening reception, Friday, February 1, 5-8pm.

WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION AND MUSEUM 28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2940. “Embracing the New: Modernism’s Impact on Woodstock Artists.” February 9-May 5. Opening reception, Saturday, Feburary 9, 4pm.

THE WOODSTOCK JEWISH CONGREGATION 1682 GLASCO TURNPIKE, WOODSTOCK 399-3505. “Multi-Media Show by Kelli Bickman.” Through April 9.

WOODSTOCK SCHOOL OF ART 2470 RouTE 212, WOODSTOCK 679-2388. “Student Exhibit I.” February 9-March 16.

2/13 ChronograM galleries & museums 49


Music

far from farewell Music and Dance at the New Ashokan Center By Peter Aaron Photograph by Fionn Reilly

Jay Ungar, Molly Mason, Ruthy Ungar, Mike Merenda, and baby Opal Merenda in front of the dining hall at the new Ashokan Center in Olivebridge.

50 music ChronograM 2/13


J

ay Ungar’s ringtone? Old-time fiddle music, naturally. One of the world’s most renowned folk players, the Saugerties fiddler, along with his wife and musical partner, guitarist and bassist Molly Mason, is revered for “Ashokan Farewell,” the beautifully haunting theme to Ken Burns’s game-changing PBS miniseries “The Civil War.” The song on his cell, however, is not the one he’s best known for. Instead, it’s a version of the folk standard “Rye Whiskey” by a Western swing band. But this afternoon Ungar’s not taking calls. He and Mason are giving us a private tour of the Ashokan Center’s stunning, newly built facilities in Olivebridge, about 10 minutes from Woodstock, where for nearly 35 years the couple has overseen the institution’s famous Music and Dance camps. “All four of these buildings were created to be as sustainable as possible, and the materials we used are almost entirely local,” says Ungar as he opens the door to the large upstairs sleeping room of the center’s bunkhouse. Lined with rustic, two-tiered beds, the space is centrally dominated by a towering reclaimed tree trunk. All is aglow with golden-warm wood whose freshly cut aroma is, quite simply, olfactory nirvana. “Nearly all of this wood and stone came from the land right here around us.The floors have radiant heating, and the buildings are built along a hillside, which gives us great natural insulation.” Ungar grew up in the Bronx and began playing when he was seven. After making field trips to the South to learn folk tunes from older players, he joined New York roots rockers Cat Mother and the All-Night Newsboys as a bass player. Although he left the group to attend college just before its 1969 Jimi Hendrix-produced debut was recorded, Ungar returned in time for the band’s 1970 follow-up and next went on to play with folk-blues guitarist David Bromberg. Mason was raised in Washington and toured with swing trio the Mostly Sisters before moving to Minneapolis to become the house bassist of the embryonic “A Prairie Home Companion.” She and Ungar stayed in touch after meeting at a gig at the Towne Crier in Pawling, and in 1981 she moved East to co-found Fiddle Fever with Ungar and join him at Ashokan, where he’d been teaching for a year. Since then, the two have co-led the celebrated Ashokan Music and Dance (formerly Fiddle and Dance) camps, whose immersive, thematic, multi-day programs for adults and families feature classes, jam sessions, guest performers, dances, workshops, song swaps, band clinics, indigenous food, outdoor events, and more. (Master fiddler Mark O’Connor is among the camps’ esteemed alumni, and many other past participants have gone on to teach or become professional players.) In 1984 Fiddle Fever recorded “Ashokan Farewell,” a waltz Ungar had written earlier in dedication to the beloved spot. Little did anyone know what the plaintive song would lead to. Ken Burns heard the piece and was so moved by it that he contacted Ungar to use it in his 1985 documentary Huey Long. But the track would reach a much wider audience when the filmmaker used it once again, this time for 1990’s “The Civil War.” The rest, one might say, is history. “It’s just incredible, what’s happened from that song,” says Ungar. “Because of it, people from as far away as Asia, the British Isles, all kinds of places, have sought out the Ashokan Center and come here to visit or enroll in the classes or camps—without knowing anything about the area beforehand.” Opened in 1967 by the State University of New York as the Ashokan Field Campus, the Ashokan Center is a pioneering outdoor environmental learning and conference complex that hosts young students from across the Northeast, who come for its distinctively experiential classes in natural and man-made history,

science, crafts, and the arts. The 374-acre area is a lush, natural wonderland populated with geologic marvels like the 350 million-year-old Cathedral Gorge and with a history traceable to Ice Age wildlife, Native Americans, Dutch homesteaders, and Revolutionary War activity. Its numerous antique structures include an 1885 covered bridge and 18th- and 19th-century buildings and working craft shops, where visiting students learn firsthand about such age-old arts as printing, broom making, and pewter and tin working. Since its inception Ashokan’s core curriculum has expanded to include “place-based” educational programs in community building, social and emotional learning (also called SEL), language arts, and hands-on living history and field-science research. The center also regularly hosts retreats sponsored by outside groups whose activities dovetail with its prevailing backto-the-land themes; one steady client is the Northeast Blacksmith Association, which meets there twice yearly, taking advantage of Ashokan’s fully operational blacksmith shop. SUNY’s decision to sell off the site in 2006, however, threatened to bring the institution’s days to a close. But in 2008 the day was saved when the land was acquired by the Open Space Conservancy, which in turn sold a portion of it to the State Environmental Protection Agency and the rest to the newly formed Ashokan Foundation, a nonprofit parent organization. (Ungar and Mason currently serve on the foundation’s board of directors as president and vice president, respectively, and are quick to praise the invaluable collective efforts of Ashokan’s sizeable staff in maintaining its daily operations.) Behind the scenes, everything looked as idyllic as the environment itself. Until the day the center got a call from the New York City Environmental Protection Agency, which manages the adjacent Ashokan Reservoir. “It turned out our main campus buildings, the ones SUNY built in 1967, were right in the middle of the new Esopus Creek runoff path, which the EPA needs to control the levels of the reservoir,” explains Mason. “At first we thought about trying to move the buildings. But, besides that idea being really costly, the terrain would’ve made it almost impossible. And by that point we’d really begun to outgrow the older buildings and wanted to be able to better accommodate more campers, students, and family groups.” And so after much brainstorming the Ashokan Foundation voted to channel the EPA’s initial monetary compensation for the land into the construction of a new, intelligently designed, ecofriendly campus. The Open Space Institute provided additional funding and technical aid; further grants and loans came from the Catskill Watershed Corporation, and additional cash was raised by the foundation itself through donors. The new central bunkhouse and its neighbors, which include structures with more communal and private overnight and residential accommodations, classrooms, dining rooms, kitchen facilities, and a giant, cathedralceilinged performance hall, were designed by Gardiner architect Matt Bialecki. “The finishing touches are still being put on things, but with the new buildings we can accommodate up to 160 people and feed about 200,” says Ungar. “Part of the plan to help fund the center is to make it available for weddings, parties, and other private functions. We just had a ‘test-run’ with our annual New Year’s Eve Dance Party and Weekend Gala, which went amazingly well. We had a few hundred guests, and everybody was totally blown away by the new buildings. We’re really looking forward to opening up to the local community with more public events.” One such event is this month’s three-day Winter Hoot festival, which is being organized by Jay’s daughter,

singer, guitarist, and fiddler Ruthy Ungar, and her husband, singer-guitarist Mike Merenda—also known as Hudson Valley alt.roots duo Mike and Ruthy. “Mike and I were inspired to put [the festival] together after we played at the Earthwork Harvest Gathering in Lake City, Michigan, which is this incredible event that focuses mainly on local acoustic music and food,” says Ruthy, who grew up playing and working with her father on the Ashokan campus. “When the new buildings went up, we said, ‘We have this amazing place, what can we do here?’” With all of its profits going to help fund visits by classes from nearby schools, the festival kicks off February 1 with a screening of John Bowermaster’s film Dear Governor Cuomo, about the 2012 NewYorkers Against Fracking concert in Albany, starring Natalie Merchant, Medeski, Martin and Wood, the Felice Brothers, and others. In addition to dinner and a family square dance with live callers, the next day features music by Elizabeth Mitchell and Your Are My Flower, Amy Helm, Spirit Family Reunion, Jeffrey Lewis, and, of course, Mike and Ruthy, along with Jay Ungar and Molly Mason. “It’s very much geared toward people being able to bring their kids,” stresses Ruthy, the mother of two small children. “There’ll be supervised areas with mats for kids to crash out on while their parents enjoy the music, and Christina Brady and Shea Lord-Farmer from [Saugerties craft studio] Fiber Flame will be leading art activities for kids and families. And besides all of the other stuff there is to do here, like hiking and artisan demos, on the Saturday we’re going to turn the new dining hall into an indoor farmers market, with locally grown and baked food.” Day three promises a brunch, a song circle, a puppet show, and a rollicking farewell concert. “We played [at the center] last fall, and it was a completely magical day,” says Mitchell, who performs in indie band Ida as well as her own group. “You could feel the creative, positive energy everywhere, people were inspired, and community was happening. The Ashokan Center is a national treasure, we are so deeply fortunate to have it in our backyard.” As Ashokan’s facilities expand, so does its enlightening offerings. Along with returning happenings like March’s Maple Fest, a musical and culinary celebration of the campus-harvested maple syrup, there’s the popular SummerSongs songwriter’s camps, and, adds Ruthy, another Hoot festival slated for August. Mason mentions plans for an upcoming ukulele weekend catering to those wanting to learn more about the recently repopularized instrument. Stewards and residential ambassadors of traditional music, dance, folk art, science, and living and natural history, Ashokan’s staff are not only preserving our cultural riches and the site’s own glorious environment: With every visiting student or camper they’re sowing the seeds that those spirited vessels take home and use to improve their own surroundings. “We want the dances and other events we do at the new campus to be an engine for community,” says Ungar, who with Mason hosts WAMC’s monthly “Dancing on the Air” broadcasts. “But it’s also incredibly important for people, especially kids, to experience the kind of nature that’s here at Ashokan. I guess it sounds kind of New Agey, but the instant I came here I was changed. And somehow the feeling of that came out as “Ashokan Farewell,” which ended up really affecting people on this incredible level. There’s definitely something really magical about this place.” The Winter Hoot festival takes place February 1-3 at the Ashokan Center in Olivebridge. For ticket information and a full schedule, visit Homeofthehoot.com or Ashokancenter.org. 2/13 ChronograM music 51


THE LINDA WAMC’S PERFORMING ARTS STUDIO

339 CENTRAL AVENUE ALBANY TIFT MERRITT

MILO GREEN

FEB 1 / 8pm

FEB 9 / 8pm

FEB 21 /67

PM -RECEP PM- FILM

nightlife highlights Handpicked by music editor Peter Aaron for your listening pleasure.

Robbie Burns Night at the Rhinecliff Hotel February 1. The Burns supper, also called Robbie Burns Day or Burns Night, is an annual Scottish tradition that celebrates the life and art of the legendary poet Robert Burns. Thanks to the Rhinecliff Hotel, which this month hosts its own festive Burns event for the fifth straight year, it’s becoming a much-anticipated tradition in our area. Besides the recitation of Burns’s poetry, a traditional dinner with the entrance of the haggis, storytelling, songs, and whisky toasts, the bill promises bagpiper Jeremy Freeman and swordsman Neil Roberts. Burns, baby, Burns! (Elaine Rachlin sings for jazz brunch February 17.) 6:30pm. $35.95, $25.95 (plus tax and gratuity). Rhinecliff. (845) 876-0590; Therhinecliff.com.

Superhuman Happiness

JIM GAUDET AND THE RAILROAD BOYS

ELLIS PAUL

FEB 23 / 8pm

MAR 1 / 8pm

MAR 3 / 8pm

A 40TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

GRAHAM ALEXANDER

MAR 9 / 8pm

MAR 29 / 8pm

TICKETS ONLINE AT

THELINDA.ORG OR CALL 518.465.5233 x4

February 2. Brooklyn’s supremely funky Afrobeat/electronica collective Superhuman Happiness, which is set to turn MassMOCA into a throbbing, sweaty dance club this month, is led by band founder Stuart Bogie. The saxophonist is no stranger to the style, being a veteran member of Antibalas, which had a rabid following long before it became the house band for Broadway’s hit musical “Fela!”, and having also worked with Paul Simon, the Roots, Public Enemy, Iron and Wine, Wu Tang Clan, Passion Pit, Bat for Lashes, and more. Bogie and band’s latest recording is the 2011 EP Physical. (Chicha Libre brings psychedelic cumbias February 9; Neutral Milk Hotel’s Jeff Mangum visits February 16.) 8pm. $12, $16 ($10 students). North Adams, Massachusetts. (413) 662-2111; Massmoca.org.

Twin Berlin February 15. Hailing not from Germany but from Boston, garage outfit Twin Berlin returns to rock Kingston with this date at Snapper Magee’s. Aurally, the band’s melancholy pop punk sound is a dead ringer for that of the Strokes. Thus, it makes perfect sense that the quartet would end up working with Stone Ridge producer Jimmy Goodman, who engineered Is This It?, the Stokes’ acclaimed, big-selling breakthrough album. Last year Twin Berlin released There Goes My Virtue, a three-track EP produced by Blink 182’s Travis Barker. While preparing to record new material, the band is playing a few rare regional dates. 10pm. $5. Kingston. (845) 339-3888; Facebook.com/pages/Snapper-Magees.

Jazz Vespers

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PETER AARON Music editor, Chronogram. Award-winning music columnist, 2005-2006, Daily Freeman. Contributor, Village Voice, Boston Herald, All Music Guide, All About Jazz.com, Jazz Improv and Roll magazines. Musician. Consultations also available. Reasonable rates.

See samples at www.peteraaron.org. E-mail info@peteraaron.org for rates. I also offer general copy editing and proofreading services, including editing of academic and term papers.

February 16. Led by pianist Tom McCoy, the First Presbyterian Church of Philipstown’s nondenominational Jazz Vespers have been taking place on the third Saturday of each month from September through May since 2001. According to McCoy, the monthly event is not a concert-interrupted-with-a-sermon affair, as some might expect. Instead, he maintains, the event provides attendees the opportunity to hear great jazz and connect with the music’s spiritual element as a way to find release from the stresses of life. Each program centers on a thought-provoking theme designed to inspire reflection. February’s installment features McCoy, saxophonist and flutist Rob Schepps, bassist Cameron Brown, and guest singer Catherine Gale. 5:30pm. Free. Cold Spring. (845) 265-3220; Presbychurchcoldspring.org.

Alexander Turnquist February 22. Palates were aflutter last year when New York’s inimitable Two Boots pizzeria opened an eatery across from Bard College. And to sweeten the deal the new bistro has been booking some choice music. Here, the space hosts Hudson acoustic guitar innovator Alexander Turnquist, who recently unveiled Like Sunburned Snowflakes, a 12-inch colored vinyl EP on the Virginia-based VHF Records label. Turnquist’s divinely ethereal live performances never fail to put the room in a trance. With Avondale Airforce. (DJs Mr Chips and Mikey Palms spin Mardi Gras getdown February 9; Nightmares for a Week and the Grape and the Grain rock February 15.) 9pm. $5. Red Hook. (845) 758-0010; Twoboots.com.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NEW,USED & VINTAGE Sales, Service, Repairs, Rentals, Lessons We Buy, Trade & Consign Fender, Martin, Gibson, Gretsch 99 Route 17K, Newburgh, NY 845-567-0111 WWW.IMPERIALGUITAR.COM

52 music ChronograM 2/13

Twin Berlin play Snapper Magee’s in Kingston on February 15.


cd reviews Ann Osmond and Dennis Yerry Optimistic Voices (2012, Independent)

A new year is a good time for optimism and a fresh start, and this eclectic debut from singer/actor Ann Osmond and jazz pianist/composer Dennis Yerry is as crisp as winter. Though the 12 tracks on Optimistic Voices are not their own compositions, this recently formed jazz cabaret duo has claimed these well-loved tunes as such, producing tight arrangements, lively vocals, and a charming new sound that has been enthralling sell-out audiences all over the Hudson Valley. Jazz standards, Broadway, Great American Songbook— it’s all here. The CD kicks off with Frank Sinatra’s upbeat “I’m Gonna Live Till I Die,” which introduces the spunky vocal harmonies of the pair, Yerry’s spirited keys, and the tight rhythm section of bassist John Menegon and drummer Jeff Siegel. “West Coast Blues,” popularized by jazz guitar legend Wes Montgomery, is cleverly combined with the Lane/Lerner Broadway hit “Come Back To Me.” Slowing down the pace, Ann’s enchanting vocals lead off a unique version of Stevie Wonder’s “I Believe (When I Fall in Love It Will Be Forever),” and “Tea for Two” is warm and charming. The Chick Corea/Al Jarreau tune “Spain (I Can Recall)” starts off as a beautifully somber addition before bursting at the seams with enthusiastic animation. Of special note is “The Bird Suite,” which features four tunes about our feathered friends, from Gershwin’s sweet “Little Jazz Bird” to Charlie Parker’s spirited “Yardbird Suite”. This delightful twosome, joined by Menegon and Siegel, will play the Falcon in Marlboro on February 10. Osmondandyerry.com. —Sharon Nichols

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Spiv U:K Quietly Falling to Pieces (2012, Independent)

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This release marks the fourth long-player for these Woodstock purveyors of textured British psychedelica. The unusual band moniker is intriguing, but also somewhat misleading. Various sources of British slang refer to a spiv as a somewhat disreputable individual, living by his or her wits and often dealing on the black market. Although this is likely a tongue-in-cheek analogy to the hustling lifestyle of the working musician, it certainly does not reflect the bright production, sturdy songwriting, and warm arrangements of this quartet. Comprised of British ex-pats Sham Morris (rhythm guitar, vocals) and Tom Newton (bass) and stateside compatriots John Gullo (lead guitar) and Chris Morgan (drums), Spiv’s members certainly have a collectively distinguished musical pedigree, with previous collaborators such as Mick Ronson, Nicky Tesco of the Members, active contributions to the early ’80s punk/new wave scenes of London and the Lower East Side, and even a stint at the legendary Creative Music Studio jazz workshop. This accumulated history and knowledge richly imbues Quietly Falling to Pieces with a generous sonic landscape bearing repeated listening. One touchstone is the whimsical lyricism of early Pink Floyd, which comes through winningly on the nursery rhyme-gone-kaleidoscope beat of “Aunty Petunia.” A harder psychedelic guitar sound and band dynamic give the album a rousing outro on the closing numbers, “How Can I Love You?” and “Whatcha Gonna Do About It.” Spivuk.com. —Jeremy Schwartz

Steve Almaas Trailer Songs (2012, Lonesome Whippoorwill Records)

In 1985, I was playing guitar in a cowpunk band and spending more time on the air at my college’s radio station than I was in the school’s classrooms. One Tuesday afternoon, checking in the newest load of vinyl, I came across Staying Out Late with Beat Rodeo. It was a minor revelation, chock full of high, sweet, and soulful harmonies, percolating Bakersfield twang, jangling pop hooks, and an energy that suggested someone in the group had punk rock roots. That would be singer-guitarist Steve Almaas, the Minneapolis native who as a teenager had spearheaded the cultish but still legendary Suicide Commandos. When Spotify dawned, one of the first records I searched out was Staying Out Late, and it slayed me all over again. Now Almaas, gray like me, is making music in the Hudson Valley. Trailer Songs—recorded, true to its title, in spare fashion in a pair of Airstreams—captures everything good about Steve Almaas. Despite the low-key approach, the download-only set does feature some heavy friends, including Ambrosia Parsley, the dB’s’ Peter Holsapple, fellow Minneapolitan-gone-Manhattanite Marcellus Hall, and the mighty Mitch Easter, who is as close to Almaas’s musical kin as can be imagined. The tunes are hooky, simple, and often deceptively deep. The beautiful “Two Black Swans,” for example, will linger in your ear long after the track has finished. “A Blues for Pilar” puts rootsy slide behind a minor-key groove. And the opening “Saturday’s Child” sounds of a piece with Almaas’s past and present. Stevealmaas.com. —Michael Eck 2/13 ChronograM music 53


Books

WALKABOUT

Michael Perkins’s Literary Wanderlust  By Nina Shengold Photograph by Roy Gumpel

54 books ChronograM 2/13


358. To make a perfect sentence is a hard day’s work. Michael Perkins has put in a lot of hard workdays. His new book, Life Sentences: Aphorisms & Reflections (Bushwhack Books, 2012) includes 500 deft observations, as polished as stones in a creekbed. The aphorist lives in a sage-green house at the foot of a mountain in Glenford outside the village of Woodstock. His driveway is lined with bare winter lilacs and filled with snow. Perkins doesn’t drive. 484. We don’t drive cars; they drive us. For decades, neighbors have watched his gaunt figure traversing Ohayo Mountain Road’s steep switchbacks on the three-and-a-half-mile walk to Woodstock. When Perkins and fellow poet/hiker Will Nixon published Walking Woodstock: Journeys Into the Heart of America’s Most Famous Small Town (Bushwhack, 2009), an event flyer featured a photo of Giacometti’s elongated Walking Man sculpture, captioned “Do You Know This Man? You’ve Seen Him on Woodstock Roads.” Walking Woodstock was Golden Notebook’s bestselling paperback that year, abetted by Carol Zaloom’s gorgeous cover and a “foot-stomping launch party” with local musicians. In his introduction, Perkins opined, “Taking a walk is a declaration of independence, like unhooking from the grid, or shooting your television, as that desert walker Edward Abbey once did. Walking is subversive.” 308. Walk in the sun, walk in shadow; walk in all weathers, walk to work, walk to play, walk to get somewhere, walk to leave there. Walk until you fall down. Get up and stagger on. Perkins brings the same dogged persistence to his literary peregrinations, having published some 40 books. “I’ve written in almost every genre,” he says with some pride. Born in Portsmouth, Ohio, where he “grew up like Huck Finn” on the banks of the river his parents had crossed from Kentucky, he started sending out poems in his early teens; editor Irving Rosenthal encouraged his promise. At 14, Perkins was diagnosed with nephritis and told had three years to live. “It turned out not to be true,” he says. “But it gave me a kick in the pants. I grew up fast. Had to. I didn’t want to miss anything.” 78. When the odds are overwhelmingly against you, yield, but never surrender. He married at 17, sped through college, and moved to NewYork at 20 with his artist wife and young daughter. “I hit the ground running,” he says. He wrote for the Village Voice and New York Times Book Review, hanging out with such literary notables as Andrei Codrescu, Janine Pommy Vega, and Samuel R. Delany while renting a series of Lower East Side apartments. His one-act play “Death of the King of Harlem” premiered in Greenwich Village in 1966, and he soon became an editor at Tompkins Square Press. Shortly after their second daughter was born, Perkins’s wife took her own life. He was 25 and a widower, raising two daughters. “I got other people to help,” he says, but the girls traveled with him. “They were dancing on tables in Madrid.” When he was hired to write a screenplay for Cannon Films, they spent a year in Europe, traveling to London, Spain, Italy, Tangiers, Greece, Scandinavia, and Paris.

Next came two years in Brooklyn, where Perkins wrote the memoir Double Dealer. “My best book, and it’s never been published,” he says ruefully. He moved to Woodstock in 1972, joining a woman he’d met. “We lived in the slums of Woodstock,” he deadpans. “We loved it. It was the country. After Brooklyn, a pure delight.” Three years later, he bought the house in Glenford and joined the volunteer fire company. 431. Ethics simplified: what we owe to others is the best of ourselves. Community work is essential to Perkins, who’s also maintained trails for the Appalachian Mountain Club, organized the Woodstock Bicentennial, and spent 10 years as Program Director of the Byrdcliffe Guild (he’s married to former Guild director Sondra Howell). But his most enduring contribution may be the Woodstock Library Forum, now in its 27th year. Three Saturdays a month, Perkins offers a lively mix of political speakers and literary events; he estimates that he’s presented over a thousand writers. 83. Poetry should be pursued for its own sake, as a private spiritual practice. Throughout, Perkins was writing, for love and for hire. “I’ve been a professional writer for almost 50 years,” he reflects. “It filled me because I had the drive. A lot of people want to be writers; they don’t want to write. If you don’t love the process, it won’t last.” He writes seven days a week, rising at 6am to work three or four hours.Writing, he says, is its own reward. “If I’ve got one reader, it’s a miracle. If I’ve got two, it’s a groundswell. If I’ve got three, it’s a mass movement.” 154. I wear many hats, but they’re all cocked at an angle. With a family to support, Perkins interspersed his own work with assignments. By his reckoning, he’s published over a million words of journalism, including criticism in The Nation, American Book Review, Mother Jones, and a long-running stint as book editor of a libidinous underground magazine. “I had a page to myself for 30 years,” he reports. “I wrote about classic literature, great novels, Philip Roth.” More than 100 of these columns are collected in his 1994 book The Good Parts: An Uncensored Guide to Literary Sexuality (RK, 1994); authors discussed include John Updike, Jerzy Kosinski, John Hawkes, Anais Nin, Mark Twain, and Honey Bruce. From the introduction: “Focusing on Eros is one of the many ways to focus on life, and because this perspective is usually forbidden, perhaps the sweetest.” 89. Blessed to be here in this body of incarnate delight, this cloud of consummate bliss, inside this lightly perspiring golden skin. Perkins’s other books include The Secret Record: Modern Erotic Literature (William Morrow, 1976), alongside science fiction, steamy paperbacks, novelizations of movies, a ghost-written memoir for Melvin Van Peebles, and a second collaboration with Nixon, The Pocket Guide toWoodstock (Bushwhack, 2012).  “Michael is one of a rapidly dwindling breed, the kind of writer who used to be referred to as a ‘man of letters,’” says poet Mikhail Horowitz, a friend of several decades. “The practice of reading and writing informs his entire life, and he’s equally adept at writing poems, essays, novels, erotica, art and literary criticism, even guide books. Each wrinkle and crease in his beloved

Catskills landscape summons up a literary allusion; hiking, for him, is above all else an act of reading.” A self-described “neo-Luddite,” Perkins eschews e-mail and only started using an iPad in recent months, when he lost too much use of his hands to work on a manual typewriter. “I hate it, but I Google,” he admits. But he misses the percussion and permanence of typewritten text. “You feel like a craftsperson, like you’re making something. You’re banging the letters right into the paper.”  He asserts that the discipline of retyping a manuscript leads to more rigorous editing. “If you use a word processor, you get processed words. It’s too easy. I’d rather retype it again and again and again. But now I can’t.” He shrugs. 137. Having a neurological disease like Parkinson’s is like dancing each day with a new and sadistically energetic partner who has two left feet. Perkins was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease 10 years ago, and it gives his limbs a gnarled, restless energy; he’s never still. “If you’re unlucky enough to get any disease, cancer or anything else, people don’t know what to do with you,” he says. “You’re like a wounded bird—they avoid you, or overcompensate with sympathy. Treat the afflicted like you would anyone else. If they ask for help, give it. Other than that, ignore it.” “I think we’re all handicapped in one way or another,” he adds, noting that living with Parkinson’s “makes me more appreciative of what I have, more able to see the world the way it should be. We’re all in this together.” This seems a very different worldview than his frequently mordant Life Sentences: 4. Two-and-a-half-million years of humanity, and then the Industrial Revolution; in two hundred years, planetary disaster. 117. Mankind is nature’s original sin. 162. Tattoos: maps to a missing soul. 146. The blank page will not fail me. Perkins spent three or four years gathering aphorisms for the book. Eventually he typed all 500 on cards, spreading them out to arrange them thematically, a process he likens to ordering a volume of poetry (he’s published four, most recently Carpe Diem: New and Selected Poems; 2011, Bushwhack). Though both forms encourage succinctness, “A poem has to have rhythm and melody. An aphorism gets right to the point,” Perkins says. He’s currently writing a second collection, some of which are displayed on his refrigerator with magnets shaped like glittering cockroaches. Also in progress: Bartleby Crump, a children’s book—“A genre I haven’t tried yet!”—about two 11-year-olds who want to become adults, and another collection of poems. 390. Everything is astonishing. If it doesn’t seem that way, keep looking until it does. You might want to start by watching a man walk uphill. Better yet, drop your car keys and join him. This month at the Woodstock Library Forum: Michael Perkins presents novelist Tad Richards (2/2), filmmaker Cambiz Khosravi (2/9), and the creator of “Alan’s Italy” (2/16). All events at 5pm; free admission and refreshments. 2/13 ChronograM books 55


SHORT TAKES Tweet, Pray, Love: Hudson Valley nonfiction writers light the way. Social Marketology: Improve Your Social Media Processes and Get Customers to Stay Forever Ric Dragon, foreword by David Armano McGraw Hill, 2012, $25

Ulster County entrepreneur Ric Dragon, CEO of search engine marketing firm DragonSearch, shares his insights into 21st century branding using Twitter, Facebook, and evolving social media platforms. Targeting media professionals, he offers new marketing strategies in a series of steps, from assessing goals and creating an action plan to evaluating and improving results. 

Essential Chan Buddhism: The Spirit and Character of Chinese Zen Chan Master Guo Jun, foreword by Robert Thurman Monkfish, 2013, $16.95

This graceful book grew from a series of talks given by the former abbot of Pine Bush’s Dharma Drum Retreat Center, on subjects ranging from his brutally rigorous training in Korea to gentle explications of such Chan precepts as falling in love with the breath and sitting patiently as a nesting hen. ”You stop thinking, When will the egg crack? When will my chick come out? You just sit.”  Rumi’s Holistic Humanism: The Timeless Appeal of the Great Mystic Poet Mirza Iqbal Ashraf Codhill Press, 2012, $16

America’s best-selling poet is 13th century Sufi mystic Jalaluddin Rumi. Poughkeepsie author Ashraf describes his roots as an Islamic religious scholar, his transformative relationship with the wandering dervish Shams of Tabriz, and his spiritual evolution into an ecstatic poet of love as a transcendent, unifying force: “The lamps are different, but the Light is the same.” 

Parenting in Your Own Voice: Finding Your Inner Parent to Bring Out the Best in Your Child Joan L. Reynolds, MS and Sheila Dinaburg-Azoff, PsyD Parent Connection, 2012, $21

As parenting coaches and mothers, Woodstock educator Reynolds and psychologist Dinaburg-Azoff urge parents to trust their instincts and tap their own innate wisdom. In clear and encouraging language, they offer a series of workbook exercises and activities designed to explore the unique identities, strengths, and needs of each parent and child, creating a flexible parenting plan. 

A Manual of Dynamic Play Therapy: Helping Things Fall Apart, the Paradox of Play Dennis McCarthy, foreword by David A. Crenshaw Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2012, $29.95

Kingston-based therapist Dennis McCarthy uses creative play to help troubled children’s stories emerge. In this concise and inspiring book, he examines the concept of “falling apart” to enable new growth, and the importance of play itself in a world increasingly skewed toward tangible results. Dragons and monsters don’t teach to the test--and that’s why we need them. 

Great Sex Made Simple: Tantric Tips to Deepen Intimacy and Heighten Pleasure Mark A. Michaels and Patricia Johnson Llewellyn Worldwide, 2012, $17.99

The Kingston couple behind the award-winning Tantra for Erotic Empowerment offer a straightforward, warm, and refreshingly inclusive road map to physical and spiritual bliss: “We firmly believe that the Tantric approach to sexuality can benefit virtually anyone–of any gender; totally new to the Tantra or experienced; single or partnered; gay, straight, or bisexual.” Happy Valentines Day!

56 books ChronograM 2/13

Give Me Everything You Have: On Being Stalked James Lasdun

Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, 2013, $25

E

very day, people discover what the Internet can do for them. Less obvious is what the Internet can do to them. Yes, it can enmesh humans across the globe, inspiring tribal loyalty and charity; it can open portals to education, entertainment, and commerce; but it can also give rise to dark angels hiding in a sociopath, angels for whom creation and destruction are two sides of one coin. Such is the case with “Nasreen,” selfanointed “verbal terrorist” and IranianAmerican former student of Ulster County poet/novelist/screenwriter James Lasdun. His book Give Me EverythingYou Have is, in part, a spellbinding account of Nasreen’s cyberattacks. She barrages Lasdun, a non-observant Jew, with frequently anti-Semitic emails and slanders him on Amazon, Wikipedia, and Goodreads. She also fires off invectives to his employers, accusing him of rape and plagiarism. The story begins when Lasdun allows a student-teacher relationship to morph into a peer-to-peer correspondence. (Nasreen’s in her thirties.) Although their friendship begins in a workshop, they converse mostly via email. Nasreen’s missives become increasingly flirty, Lasdun’s ever more reserved. He rebuffs her, and Nasreen snaps. An unrelenting fugue of delusion swirls up from her fingertips, in which Lasdun is the focus of myriad grievances, both personal and political. The more Lasdun ignores Nasreen, the heavier the onslaught. Police, the FBI, lawyers, and his wife advise him not to block her, in case she forecasts a horrific plan to be enacted in the physical world. In the meantime, due to the current “Wild West” nature of the Internet, no one can stop her. Lasdun is honest about his own motives and prejudices, admitting that he may have subconsciously overlooked some red flags while basking in Nasreen’s epistolary enthusiasm. Her fascinating back story of fleeing the Shah may have distorted his focus; her “demure Middle Eastern woman” persona, he allows, is partly his own creation. She’s far from demure. Nasreen is tirelessly malicious, emboldened by the un-policed terrain of the Internet. Despite a detective mentioning “borderline personality,” Lasdun shies away from labeling Nasreen “mentally ill,” and that’s refreshing. To do so would give her vindictiveness the excuse of pathology, which would supplant much of the fascinating cultural influences he investigates, and insult this story with tired psychobabble. So Lasdun despairs, flailing in constant damage control mode.The 21st-century fear of slander, he says, is ironically like bygone days, when artifice was king. “The Internet,” he writes, “with its arbitration of reality, is an indiscriminate tumult of truth and lies…the zone in which our public identities, our outer selves, once again [begin] to assume their definitive form.” At the close of the first third of Give Me Everything You Have, he’s a mess. Just in time, the book takes a sharp turn into memory, self-analysis, and travelogue, offering a welcome break from Nasreen. We traverse beautifully rendered episodes of Lasdun’s childhood, tagging along as he interweaves “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” with Freud’s examination of Judaism and D. H. Lawrence’s peccadilloes. We accompany him on work pilgrimages to D. H. Lawrence Ranch in New Mexico, and to troubled, provocative Israel. Why the detours? Returning to Nasreen, Lasdun has reframed his trauma: through force of artistic will, he’s broadened the context of his suffering. Turning from the tyranny-fostering abyss of the Internet, he creates a vista of story, independent of a computer screen, and wide enough to contain the fire of the darkest angel. Reading 2/16 at 4pm, Golden Notebook. —Robert Burke Warren


Experience What will you experience at Mirabai?

The Water Witch Juliet Dark Ballantine, 2013, $15

E

verybody knows academia is a bit nuts, and the Catskills a bit enchanted. The misadventures of Callie McFay blend these two ingredients into a yummy confection in the hands of Juliet Dark, the pseudonymous lighter side of acclaimed author Carol Goodman. In The Demon Lover, readers met Callie as she signed on as a faculty member at Fairwick College and slowly came to realize that she was surrounded by supernatural creatures of all sorts, including the titular incubus who fell madly in love with her, allowing Goodman to unleash her own considerable talents as a writer of erotica. Water Witch picks up where The Demon Lover left off: Callie has reluctantly banished her supercharged lover and is striving to get a handle on her own powers. It’s not as though life gives her the opportunity to do so at leisure. There’s a plot concocted by the extremely staid and snobbish witches’ society to cut the connection between the village of Fairwick and the netherworld of Faerie, putting Callie’s friends and colleagues at risk. There are ongoing situations that require her to use her magical gifts before she’s fully versed in how they work. And last but not least, she’s torn between trying to be grateful that she rid herself of that pesky incubus (or did she?) and missing the best soul mate she’s ever had. It’s a lot of fun hanging with Callie as she rises to the occasion of one magical crisis after the other. Freeing the Undines, shape-shifting into an owl, studying up on correlative spells, learning to cope with the Botox-like powers of Aelvesgold, facing down snooty witches, or just handling the labyrinthine interpersonal politics of a small Catskills college town during fishing season, she is spunky and bold as she adapts to the magical realities surrounding her. Goodman/Dark has an exquisite and clear voice that makes reading her prose a delicious mind massage; even in this sassier persona, one is aware of being in the hands of a mistress of the fine arts of storytelling and characterization. Those who haven’t read The Demon Lover first may feel a bit overwhelmed at the outset, as WaterWitch plunges us straight into the otherworldly goings-on around Fairwick and only gradually fills in the back story, but the liveliness and music of the tale weave their own enchantment. Passages such as “Maria was a liderc—a life-sucking bird monster—who had masqueraded as my student” may be a bit much to take in, but then, it’s been a lot for Callie to take in too, and she’s coping admirably. The juxtaposition of post-hippie small-town life and ancient magical realities makes Fairwick at once familiar (at least for those who’ve spent time in the Catskills) and deliciously exotic. The embattled love story rings true, and the persecution by a witches’ society that’s reminiscent of a particularly rigid chapter of the DAR adds a subtle political flavor, never overplayed. Mostly, it’s all just great fun.Will Callie and her cohorts succeed in keeping the Door between the worlds open? Will there be a reunion between Callie and her beloved carnal spirit, and would that be a good thing, or a lethal thing? Readers who enjoy a good romp (and the romps are first-rate) will be glad to see that “Juliet Dark” has already scheduled a third semester at Fairwick. —Anne Pyburn Craig

Mirabai of Woodstock

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2/13 ChronograM books 57


POETRY

Edited by Phillip X Levine. Deadline for our March issue is February 5. Send up to three poems or three pages (whichever comes first). Full submission guidelines: www.chronogram.com/submissions.

Snow covers ground. Trees compete for light. Ice hangs past the roof.

Cat’s ears soft as lambs. Cat’s belly white as snow. Cat’s claws, sharp as hell.

The sound of workmen, One cloud in a blue window. Lichen dampens trees.

—Zephyr Hrechdakian (11 years)

Why Parents Fear Space Travel

Cup Dream

The limits are endless. We can send them there but cannot bring them back.

I have written a poem that must be kept in a cup It must have a white calla lily somewhere in the design I search every cupboard but all the cups are gone

Because of some miscalculation, we could cause a soft landing to badly slam the surface

There is a three-tiered wire shelf in the middle of a room A woman is also heading towards the last remaining cups stacked on three shelves

or go pell-mell into that hell of a place without anchoring, where the nothing of is is.

I help her balance the stack of cups already loaded in her arms As I turn away from the stack of cups to help her, she grabs the only with the calla lily design and says, “I’ll take that one too.”

Nothing we have seen or wanted— no journeys, traumas, itineraries— prepares us for this trajectory.

The cup casts a shadow on the white linen covered table it invites slightly beaten raw eggs chicken soup chamomile tea Johnny Carson’s whisky braced for coffee cooled by water The cup emptied wiped clean reveals no traces keeps all secrets

—Steve Clark

Sketching In Winter Watching the sky fall one tiny piece at a time— sparrow in winter Taming a dragon— the boy draws one on paper on a snowy day

—Millie Falcaro

On a winter day they arrive quietly—wind and a red-tailed hawk

His Regrets

—Priscilla Lignori

If I were different in a different life I would tend more to the earth.

Outside Dannemora Prison

I would hold the garden beds with breezes, the shoots becoming open windows.

old ladies stare up from lace quilt work frowning light bulbs flicker and fade into the embrace of night’s iron chair. —Timothy Ennis

58 poetry ChronograM 2/13

Vines would go along the ground, the flowering speak low intimacies there. Fruit trees would be pruned. I’d wash their eyes, I’d carry out their wishes in the heat. There would be no border of wire, no opposite lie. I’d carry water to the plumbs. —Michael Sciarretta

I love history. I’m very old. —p In our January issue, we misspelled the name of poet Jo Hausam (“Roiled Coaster”). Our apologies.

Lullaby for the Beast (or Burn Survivor’s Anthem) I am the girl who makes children scream (unintentionally, of course) I interrupt their flawless dreams as I enter the playground a tempest on their pageant, a centipede in their ice cream. I am the freak without a cage. I make: perverts masturbate, doctors confused, an audience drool, cameras break Who hasn’t felt sunlight in decades as I crawl out of my cave a lonely ghost with undone business to deliver notes in chains. They run for their normality, shriek and hide, cringe in disgust, when I wear a dress on a summer day. In fear of life under my skin, they say “A monster she-wolf! Scarred walking dead!” A witch, escaped the stake, in search of a special ingredient: blood-thirsty, fanged, looking for love I never mind being this way (deformed, my melted clump of clay) What matters most—a spirit untouched, free to float invincibly, to slow dance with invisible men, to serenade those missing tongues: a lullaby for the beast and all the pregnant ones. —Dina Peone

Beads of diamond water on Thorn bushes. Finches Are the only flutter, Here my soul finds rest. —Opal Wood


Birches Under Snow

11:38 pm in the halfway house

The Pebble

I can see myself at 10 paces I am my own second, my own enemy and my own enemy’s second. I can see the steam rising from my mouth In the brilliant cold But no one else can;

i can’t just leave this in here justin

After you died I picked the pebble you carried in your pocket which had become rounded and smoothed. Safe inside my pocket it grew into a boulder I could not throw away.

Just as well. No one hears the report As my enemy and I fall. And the seconds collect our things.

i might aspirate on it in my sleep. she actually uses the word aspirate. i look up into the dead horseshoe of her mouth

The frozen woods are the same After the wolves drag our bodies away. This is what we remember after all: The peace and quiet of the unattended place.

half her teeth already gone

—Louis N. Altman

loose

there it is towards back

not too loose.

Lover’s Broth My heart— The compressed Concentrated Bouillon cube that it is— Melts Effort Less ly When you pour your Steaming hot love all over it! —Joe Frey

The Layman’s Song A little girl, initials S. N., passed away on… Slain at the age of 6 We all ask the questions, Like, how could he, and Why are we here? Shackled with the bonds of free will Good or bad lies the soul within This is the Law and Order “Hold high Truth and Justice” The marker of her eternal headstone —George W. Doran

Sitting still Sitting still Motionless Staring at the wall Thinking about nothing But getting a lot done —Benny Boy

if she goes to the county hospital across the street they won’t touch the tooth they’ll just shoot her up with morphine and tell her come back when the free dental clinic opens in the morning. she tries with a rag it won’t budge. i have gomez get a shower curtain in case there’s blood lambert holds her head i clean the needle-nose pliers with an alcohol wipe. there is no blood. comes out easy like a piece of corn off the cob.

—C. E. Pertchik

The Light from the Hall Washes white She smokes Through the window No fan The blinds crooked Bean can for ash (inside: a despicable oily blackness like Strangled fear— The nightmares of wild dogs) but Most ends up On the floor anyway She leans lips strained Pushing the smoke through the screen Rather than blowing A soft blue From the television (Like signs of old film diners) Splashes her shirt and When she smiles (At something I say) Her teeth —Garrett De Temple

lambert cleans the needle-nose pliers in the kitchen

i certainly can’t and it might not be, but understanding seems the best possible puzzle. fact stood still, we just looked at it certain, and different.

i wash my hands in the bathroom

—Eleie Fibonacci

a little calendar above the mirror says it’s twelve days until christmas

(Untitled)

hathaway tosses the tooth in the garbage and goes to bed gomez puts the shower curtain back up

whatever that means.

Intrepid resolve flouted by the premature. (wait for it) The siege, the aftermath and the ellipsis.

—Justin Hyde

—Lea Springstead 2/13 ChronograM poetry 59


Community Pages

Pleasure + Business Community By Gregory Schoenfeld Photographs by David Morris Cunningham

Equals Success in

Warwick, CHESTER, and SUGAR LOAF

R

egardless of the amount of flowing adjectives, photographs, or event listings that one might use to paint a picture of the Warwick Valley, there remains but one way to gather any kind of realistic perspective: get in the car, or grab a bus or a train, and see for yourself. Of course, depending upon the trip, it may require all three—one of the signature, paradoxically charming truths of the region is that it blends proximity with a remoteness all its own. Arriving at the destination may require a few extra turns, but the results will be well worth the effort. The town of Warwick—just 50 miles from Manhattan—strikes a balance of bucolic and modern. Along with the neighboring town of Chester, the region offers a panorama that spans from cutting-edge culture to carefully preserved vistas of rich farmland. The soothing, captivating fields of “black dirt” that are special to the region give way to a plethora of sights, sounds, and flavors unequalled throughout the Hudson Valley. The region’s progress is fueled by a fiercely independent, community-minded sensibility, suffusing everything from a roadside farmstand to the annual Applefest harvest celebration with a welcoming sense of home. Mountain View Farm in chester

60 warwick + chester + sugar loaf ChronograM 2/13


top row from left: Maria Malara and Laura Vreeland at Laura’s Sweets Specialty Bake Shoppe; Suzanne O’Brien at The Work Bench; Rachel Bertoni at Bertoni Gallery; Susan Kirschke, Jane Quesada, and Connie Winters at 19 Main Street; Anthony Mangano at Next Generation Hobbies; Kim Gabelmann and Dana Regan at Conscious Fork. bottom row from left: Vivien Greiser and Carola Greiser at Polymer Clay Shed; Yaron Rosner at Rosner Soap; Don and Beth Duke at My Sister’s Closet; Maureen Cuddeback AT Baird Tavern, Warwick Historical Society; Elie Aji at Into Leather.

Jillian Graham, Roseanne D’angelo, Doreen Keyes, and Michelle Dawson at The Body Art Studios.

2/13 ChronograM warwick + chester + sugar loaf 61


f b l u e s t o n e A C U P U N C T U R E pllc Clinic and Herbal Dispensary

hours T U E S D AY THURSDAY SATURDAY

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9

Warwick, NY

by appointment 9

10990

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community pages: warwick + chester + sugar loaf

8 4 5

9

9 8 6

9

7 8 6 0

Hair Studio 8 WeSt Street WarWick, NY 10990 845-987-1150

hair cutting . colour . waxing . facials . massage therapy

39 Main Street, Warwick, NY 10990 845.986.4544

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62 warwick + chester + sugar loaf ChronograM 2/13

Locally Crafted In fact, every facet of the region’s progress seems to stem from both a proud sense of tradition and a forward-thinking commitment to enhancing the local quality of life. A deeply ingrained respect and regard for the past continues to promise a bright future, with light enough to spare. There is no better example than Chester’s hamlet of Sugarloaf, known as a haven for notable craftspeople as far back as the 18th century. Today, it remains a dedicated community of artists and artisans, and a premiere destination for those who appreciate all manner of carefully crafted quality. Those “in the know” won’t miss a chance to visit resident leatherworkers Elie and Paula Aji’s Into Leather for a glimpse of their latest creations; and no mention of “Sugarloaf ” and “light” is complete without noting 40 years of candlecraft courtesy of Peter and Amy Lendved’s Sugar Loaf Candle Shop (where Peter’s signature farewell of “enjoy the light” is as appealing as his specially scented recipe). It was that same combination of community and country that convinced Sugarloaf’s Rosner Soap owners, Kiki and Yaron Rosner, to relocate to the area, and handmade soap enthusiasts remain thankful that they did. Formerly living in France, and then Israel, the leap for the Rosners and their children to Sugarloaf required more than just faith, but the collective appeal that the community provided. Joining the involvement and dedication of the community has proved a successful choice, says Kiki Rosner. “We came here precisely for that quality of life,” Rosner explains. “There is a special energy here that creates possibility. Most of the artisans do live and work here, and that is an unusual thing to find. You wont find another community like this on the east coast.” Of course, that spirit of artistry and craftsmanship translates beyond the tangible, and the richness of Sugarloaf is exemplified by far more than what can be purchased on its shelves. Sugarloaf’s Seligmann Center for the Arts, once the home of renowned Surrealist artist Kurt Seligmann, is now a cultural hub as well as a far-reaching community development, hosting the Orange County Citizens Foundation, the Orange County Land Trust, as well as film screenings, live performances, and art exhibits. For longtime resident Russ Layne, the Seligmann Center provided just the right inspiration for him to rejuvenate his Sugarloaf Music Series. Soon after moving to the area 30 years ago, the former Paterson, NJ, schoolteacher began his folk-and-jazz-centered concert series, drawing a growing number of well-known names and providing great entertainment for what was once a limited musical landscape. After closing a successful 25-year run two years ago, Layne is now planning a more intimate “Salon” series at the Seligmann Center, beginning this fall and featuring the likes of folk artist John Flynn and incomparable jazz guitarist Vic Juris. “There’s a lot of great energy here,” says Layne, “and we are definitely hoping to keep it going.” And the Winner Is... There is certainly no shortage of that “great energy” at the core of what makes the Warwick Valley run.The roots of Warwick’s constantly evolving vitality can be found both in the celebration of its storied past and in the fresh energy of its new arrivals, the combination of the two garnering palpable results. For instance, in the recently-posted Times Herald-Record yearly “Best Of ” competition—a solid barometer for the finest favorites in the region—Warwick’s dominance is reminiscent of a Peter Jackson jaunt to the Oscars. In the case of Al and Judy Buckbee’s Bellvale Farms, that commitment can be traced back to founding of Warwick itself, with the farm now under the care of 9th and 10th family generations (with 11th generation also assisting!). The now 450-acre dairy and vegetable farm also features the ice cream shop that is a perennially award-winning favorite. Since 2006, a conversation about Warwick’s favorite institutions must include the village’s own Tuscan Café—not only a true herald of the region’s burgeoning art and music scene, but simply the ideal picture of a warm, welcoming place to eat, sip, and relax. As much as co-owners Cristie Ranieri and Kristen Ciliberti take pride in the well-deserved accolades they have earned (among them, the Record’s “Best Cafe” and “Best Small Music Venue” this year, along with a few more), it is the family-like sense of connection they have brought to the community that they cherish most highly. “I get thanked for existing,” Ciliberti says, humbly. “I also get thanked for my cookies. Both hold value,” she adds with a smile.


LOCAL NOTABLE Nancy Proyect President, Orange County Citizens Foundation

NEW, USED & RARE BOOKS COLLECTABLES & CURIOSITIES Open 7 Days 31 Main Street Warwick, NY 845.544.7183

www.yeoldewarwickbookshoppe.com warwickbookshoppe@hotmail.com

An uncommon collection of women’s clothing.

MY

Sister’s CLOSET ESTABLISHED 1973

Celebrating 40 years! – Day to Evening Wear – Open Tuesday - Sunday 11am to 5:30pm

1385 Kings Hwy, Sugar Loaf, NY • 845-469-9681

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Marina Smith

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845-258-8457 by appointment

LINTON DESIGNS STUDIO ARTIST JEWELRY

Adding beauty to the Planet 50 Main Street Warwick 845-987-9933 Winter hours: Wed-Sat, 12 to 6pm. Or happily by appointment!

Five HeARTs in Copper

Original Jewelry Designs Hand Made in Warwick by Cathe Linton

2/13 ChronograM warwick + chester + sugar loaf 63

community pages: warwick + chester + sugar loaf

Perhaps the most compelling aspect of the Warwick Valley, and of Orange County as a whole, is how a population that represents such a diverse range of views and backgrounds is able to successfully join and work toward common community goals. Yet, as any community activist can attest, without the proper platform and organization, even the most committed efforts can fall short of achieving measurable results. Now entering its fifth decade, the Orange County Citizens Foundation offers the kind of proving ground necessary to shape those ideals into actual, beneficial change. Part think tank, part research foundation, and part universal community center, the OCCF continually seeks to transcend divisiveness in pursuit of a higher quality of life throughout the region. What began as a coalition focused upon open space preservation and development—still a primary objective—now comprises over 450 members on 16 different committees, addressing everything from healthcare to the arts. Since 2006, OCCF President Nancy Proyect has been at the helm of this groundbreaking organization—and, though the mission may seem as wide-ranging as it is challenging, Proyect is anything but daunted. The necessary fuel, Proyect says, comes from the unparalleled inspiration of the residents themselves. “I’ve never experienced the intensity of community spirit that I’ve found in Orange County,” she says. Proyect proudly describes an environment in which, regardless of intrinsic differences—be they religious, political, cultural, or financial—common goals and the common good bring invested residents together. “People all over the county want to improve the community, just because they love where they live and believe it’s special,” Proyect explains. Proyect’s ardor matches the community she represents. After transitioning back to a more rustic way of life from the bustle of the New York City metro area, the Sullivan County native soon found herself inspired to lend her background in writing and finance to a full-time commitment to the OCCF. Housed in Sugarloaf’s Seligmann Center—Arlette Seligmann, widow of Surrealist pioneer Kurt, bequeathed the estate to the Foundation in 1991—Proyect explains that, with so many projects in development, it is difficult for her to pinpoint any one part of the organization’s efforts for distinction. One noted achievement, however, helps describe the OCCF’s comprehensive approach: the Orange County Quality of Life Report Card, compiled every five years, is a particular point of pride for Proyect. The data-gathering mission that she helped make a reality serves to shape the rest of the organization’s approach. “It provides focus and unbiased information that can help policymakers, planners, advocates, nonprofits, and governments move forward in an intelligent, informed way,” Proyect says. The most satisfying accomplishment of all, says Proyect, is her ongoing work to broaden the base of what the OCCF encompasses, expanding upon who is heard, and who is affected. “We really encourage all sorts of people with diverse interests to come to the table, asserts Proyect. “It’s so important in our mission to speak for the residents of the county in advocating for the greater public good. My role is to do everything I can to keep the forum open to all, and to keep it growing to bring more diversity and new voices to the conversation.” Occf-ny.org


Art i sA n B Ak e rY & D e sse rt C A fe

2013 ZAGAT® Survey Rated Excellent Hudson Valley Magazine Best of the Hudson Valley 2008

• Romantic Heart-shaped Cakes for Two • Unique Chocolate Candy Boxes • Valentine Cookie Trays and much more! Visit us at www.jeanclaudesbakery.com Like us on FACEBOOK 122 Windermere Ave. 25 Elm St Greenwood Lake NY Warwick NY

(845) 986-8900

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the outfitting shop outdoors in chester

community pages: warwick + chester + sugar loaf

It Takes a Village That special quality of mutual support and responsibility gives rise to a constant evolution within the village of Warwick, manifesting itself in new businesses and efforts that reinvigorate the community’s vibrancy. New on the village forefront is another award-winner (“Best Vegan” to be exact), Kim Gabelmann’s Consciousfork restaurant. Gabelmann traded a successful career in corporate media for a certification as a holistic health counselor, choosing Warwick as the perfect place to launch her multifaceted approach to raising awareness of nutrition and sustainability. “I want Consciousfork to be a gathering place and platform for all the amazing artists in our area,” describes Gabelmann. “These artists are the farmers, chefs, painters, healers, and so on, who are living in Warwick for all it has to offer and creating incredible things.” From food to nonprofit fundraising, Warwick’s spirit continues to inspire new and diverse endeavors. Though Nicole Repose’s Etched In Time Engraving is not brand new—Repose has been an established Main Street business owner for eight years—her newly minted Community Vision puts a new spin on the “buy local” movement. Along with her son, Greyson Floss, and local PTA president Laura Callaghan, Repose offers a better, locally supported fundraising option for local organizations. “Community Vision was created to help these nonprofits and local businesses partner to create a sustainable way of supporting each other,” she explains. Finally, nothing exemplifies the joining of old and new quite like Thomas Roberts’ new Main Street creation: a good, old-fashioned bookshop. For the former theater professional and NewYork City denizen,Ye Olde Warwick Book Shoppe described his purpose perfectly—and Roberts and partner Joseph John Justin are more than happy to provide Main Street’s “missing piece”. “I owe a lot to the lovely people of Warwick,” says Roberts. “Being a cynical old NewYorker prior to arriving here, we never expected anything like the reception we have received. It really is Brigadoon, a step back in time to a better place.” View a slideshow of more Warwick, Sugar Loaf, and Chester photos at Chronogram.com.

RESOURCES

REACH OUR READERS New for 2013: your Chronogram ad buy combines print + digital advertising! Find out more at info.chronogram.com.

Chronogram.com it’s new | it’s now

64 warwick + chester + sugar loaf ChronograM 2/13

scan to download 2013 media kit

Blustone Acupuncture Bluestoneacupuncture.com Center for Metal Arts Centerformetalarts.com CertaPro Painters Certapro.com Exposures Gallery Theexposuresgallery.com Fetch Fetchbarandgrill.com Glenn Bryon Hair Salon (845) 987-1150 Irace Architecture Iracearchitecture.com Jean Claude’s Artisan Bakery Jeanclaudesbakery.com Linton Designs (845) 987-9933 Marina Smith Massage Therapy Marinasmithlmt.com My Sister’s Closet Mysistersclosetsugarloaf.com Newhard’s (845) 986-4544 Olde Warwick Shoppe Yeoldewarwickbookshoppe.com Pennings Penningsfarmmarket.com Savvy Chic Mysavvychicboutique.com Sugar Loaf Art & Craft Village Sugarloafnewyork.com


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community pages: warwick + chester + sugar loaf

Leather

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weddings & celebrations 66 weddings & celebrations ChronograM 2/13


weddings & celebrations

Dress Your Best

Trends and Classics For Wedding Day Attire By Anne Roderique-Jones

E

very bride and groom wants to sparkle and shine on the big day, but looking good is different for everyone. Strapless dress for the bride? Top hat and tails for the groom? It all depends on your style. Sartorial experts of the Hudson Valley provide some pointers on getting dressed.

The Blushing Bride (And Her BFFs) Thanks to Jessica Biel’s cotton candy-colored wedding gown, brides are literally blushing. A hint of color has them walking down the aisle looking pretty in pink. Barbara Kerner, owner of Style des Reves Custom Dressmaking in Accord, says that pink’s not the only color that is trendy now—the boldest brides are choosing aqua, a brighter extension of blush and ivory. In addition to color, Kerner is seeing more brides asking for a classic silhouette with strong ball gowns and slim-fitting sheaths with lace overlay (also a trend for bridesmaids and moms) and a trumpet skirt—higher and fuller than the mermaid—all with luxe fabrics. She also mentions that shoulders now are being covered and sleeves are coming back.You can thank Kate Middleton for that. Kerner points out that these are not your grandma’s sleeves. “These gowns have stretch tulle with T-hole openings in the back—there’s a sheerness with bare skin.” And the

A cushion cut ring by Sasha Primak. Available from Hummingbird Jewelers in Rhinebeck.

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weddings & celebrations

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BEAR MOUNTAIN

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Allow us to host your unforgettable wedding at Bear Mountain Inn. 845-786-2731 (press 2 for catering) visitbearmountain.com

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Locust Grove The back view of a custom-made gown in ruched silk taffeta with a bustle of gathered tulle, and embellished with a custom-made silk flower “bling” at waistline, by designer Barbara Kerner of Style des Reves Custom Dressmaking in Accord.

peplum trend that’s been seen so often in ready-to-wear has made its way to bridal and adds beautiful curves to a wedding gown. Kerner’s designs are all custom-made, so brides literally get to create their dream wedding dress. “If brides want the Goth look, we’ll make it dark, and they end up with something completely more majestic then they ever imagined. It they want the skirt from one dress and the bodice of another— we’ll make it happen, too,” says Kerner. For the wedding party, brides want their ladies to be able to actually wear the dress again. Cocktail-length bridesmaid dresses in more stylish fabrics make this possible, according to Gladys Portalatin, owner of The Bridal Cottage in Kingston. “Brides often choose a color and let their ladies pick the style,” she says. “The average woman is a size 16, so if she prefers sleeve or strapless—this idea fits the bill.” For the Man of Honor (another trend), Portalatin says that he will often bridge the gap with the groomsmen and bridesmaid with color. Portalatin says that moms are also becoming more progressive, looking for less traditional dresses and opting for something more playful and stylish—often black and worn with a fun shrug or bolero instead of a more structured jacket.

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combinations. Available from Hummingbird Jewelers in Rhinebeck.

The Bridal Cottage Ulster County’s premier retailer for Maggie Sottero and Sottero Midgley; Featuring Casablanca, Enzoani Beautiful and Modeca.

The Dashing Groom Let’s not forget the gents. Pete Esposito, owner of Esposito’s Tux Shop in Kingston, says that black tuxedos still reign as the most popular option for men; but the guys are dressing it down with a long tie instead of a traditional, and more formal bowtie. The ease of colored accessories is what makes black such a easy choice. Esposito says that men often wear vests that match the wedding colors—which changes according to women’s styles and seasons. Fall brings burgundy, wine, cinnamon and chocolate, while in warm weather months a color palette of lavender, mint, and periwinkle make an appearance. “One new trend that we’re seeing is a steel grey tux—a good alternative to black,” says Esposito. Grey or black—how to choose? Either way, both the bride and groom are involved in the decision, according to Esposito. “Women tend to have as much input as the groom, but if push comes to shove, it’s the bride’s decision on what he wears.” Perhaps it’s to ensure that they’re wearing something they don’t regret down the road. “That’s for prom,” says Esposito. “If you’re looking for a Dumb and Dumber tux, we don’t do those.”

Celebrating 20 years of lasting relationships with Brides near & far!!! Alterations are done on the premises Kings Mall Court ~ Suite 400 1200 Ulster Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 331-6596 ~ (845) 340-1808 gpbridal@aol.com www.thebridalcottage.com

WEDDINGS & PARTIES

A Little Bit of Pomp When it comes to ‘dos, brides are letting their hair down. While many still love a classic updo, a natural blowout has brides feeling their best for the big day. According to Janet Ruggiero, owner and master makeup artist and esthetician of Giannetta Salon and Spa in Beacon says that their Gianneta signature

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weddings & celebrations

Rings by German designer Christian Bauer feature palladium and 18-karat white and rose gold


blowout—a style created by wrapping hair in a curl and treating it to create full, sexy waves—is incredibly popular. Mother of the brides love it, too. As for the ‘maids, we can thank the wedding gods they’re no longer required to wear matching French twists. “Bridesmaids have their own style now and it’s almost always an updo,” says Ruggiero. As for makeup, Ruggiero say that brides, “wants to look like themselves, only more beautiful.” She helps them to achieve that by meeting with the bride-to-be six months to a year prior to the big day. They work together on prepping the skin and shaping the brows (a Ruggiero signature treatment) to create the perfect look for the weddingday makeup. She’s seeing a huge trend toward airbrushing and recommends high-definition airbrush makeup to all of her brides. “We call the stuff flawless makeup because the wedding photos always look better when we use it.” And let’s hear it for the boys. Men are coming in more often than ever—even if the bride prompts it. Ruggiero says that it’s important for the guys to get their skin and brows in order for the big day. “Before the wedding, he’ll often have a nice (yet, very masculine) manicure.” But it’s not all work to look this good— her spa is popular for wedding pre-parties where bridesmaids often gather for manicures and pedicures, and to spoil the bride-to-be with the works. Ruggiero says that brides are often given a body polish treatment in order to have glistening skin for the honeymoon.

And Don’t Forget The Sparkle

weddings & celebrations

The wedding ring—a circle with no beginning or end—symbolizes eternity. While the band was traditionally a gold metal, times have changed. Bruce Lubman, owner of Hummingbird Jewelers in Rhinebeck, says that white gold and platinum are now the predominant color metals, but palladium is becoming a new alternative (especially if price is a concern). This metal comes out of the earth white and holds up very well over time—which comes in handy when you plan on wearing it forever. Still, it’s certainly not all about the band. Engagement rings are just as important, and finding the right one is now a two-person job. “It is a rare and courageous young man that comes in alone and actually chooses a ring without feedback from the intended bride,” says Lubman. He points out that brides prefer larger diamonds in yellow, champagne, and black with unique shapes like a cushion or asscher cut, and custom creations are being done more than ever. “Custom work is a process that can be very satisfying when two people create something unique together that won’t be seen on anyone else’s finger,” says Lubman. Ethically sourced stones and environmentally conscious mining practices are also increasing, and everything at Hummingbird is made in-house with harmony gold and comes from a refiner that uses only recycled gold and palladium. It’s not only a bride who’ll appreciate this kind of thoughtfulness. Lubman says that jewelry has always been a popular gift for the wedding party. You can’t go wrong with handsome cuff links for the guys and lovely initial pendants for the ladies. A dress they’ll actually wear again and mindful jewelry? There’s no better way to honor your best buddies. RESOURCES The Bridal Cottage Kingston (845) 331-6596 Style des Reves Custom Dressmaking Accord (845) 626-5353 Styledesreves.com Esposito’s Tux Shop Kingston (845) 339-8899 Giannetta Salon & Spa Beacon (845) 831-2421 Giannettasalonandspa.com Hummingbird Jewelers Rhinebeck (845) 876-4585 Hummingbirdjewelers.com 72 weddings & celebrations ChronograM 2/13


89

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44 north front street • 331-2210 • www.stellaskingston.com located in kingston’s historic stockade district

290 Wall Street, Uptown Kingston 845-331-1888 • schneidersjewelers.com 2/13 ChronograM valentine’s day gift guide 75

valentine’s day gift guide

Cleanse with French Pink & Green Clays to draw out impurities and soften the skin as DMAE helps to firm, tone and tighten skin’s appearance. Experience the healing blend of skin-softening Bulgarian Rose and moisture-rich Coconut Oil in luxurious, hand-crafted formulas that help diminish fine lines and keep skin rose petal-soft. Visit the Clairvoyant Beauty website now through February 28th and receive 30% off any order plus receive a FREE Lip Balm with Coupon Code VD2013KISS. Clairvoyant Beauty is also available at Bodhi Holistic Spa, Hudson, NY www.ClairvoyantBeauty.com


Frankie Kimm

Food & Drink

American Idyll

Building a Regional Food System at Glynwood By Peter Barrett

W

hen the 2012 Farm Bill (which should really be called the Food Bill) died in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives last year, so did any hope for meaningful reform to the many programs it covers. The best that Congress could do was to extend the 2008 bill through October of this year. While it is easy to despair that nothing will ever get done at the national level, there is more cause for optimism regionally. We live in a region with extraordinary agricultural riches, and there are some talented people working hard to leverage those assets into a viable long-term economic force. Glynwood is a nonprofit dedicated to promoting sustainable agriculture in the Hudson Valley. Founded 17 years ago on 225 rolling acres in Putnam County, it is an innovative and resourceful force for change as well as a working livestock and vegetable farm with a CSA and retail meat sales. The Perkins family, which first bought the land in 1929, funded an endowment that provides about one third of Glynwood’s $3 million annual budget. The endowment funds are earmarked for property maintenance and farming; all other programs must be paid for with funds raised from organizations and individuals. Members of the Perkins family are still on the board, and actively involved with funding and steering the organization. Most of the original Perkins property is now Fahnestock State Park, and the Glynwood campus is owned by the Open Space Institute, which works actively throughout the Eastern US to purchase and protect land from development. Last summer, Glynwood hired Kathleen Frith as President. Previously the managing director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment at the Harvard Medical School, Frith brings a passion for sustainable local agriculture informed by her years of experience addressing our complex relationship with the planet on land and sea. She speaks enthusiastically about her new job. “Glynwood is uniquely positioned to help build a regional food system. We believe in an agriculture-based economy in the Hudson Valley, and there’s a lot 76 food & drink ChronograM 2/13

Director of Farmer Training Dave Llewellyn trains apprentice Amy Scott in horse-powered cultivation. This technique minimizes soil compaction and relies on renewable energy, as opposed to doing the same work with a tractor.

of work to do to make those efforts viable.” In addition to expanding existing programs and launching new ones, she is also hiring five new employees— including communications and events directors—to form a more cohesive group that works together full time rather than using consultants as in the past. Frith intends to build on that focused collaborative environment by making Glynwood available to other organizations to hold meetings and retreats, citing the Aspen Institute as a model. “We’ll have convenings and lectures, produce white papers, and foster conversation on a wide variety of subjects,” she explains, “and we’ll be hosting many more public events. We’re part of a large movement, but we’re working locally, so it’s important for people to know what we do.” Frith and four other senior staff live at Glynwood. Besides the numerous farm buildings, the campus is dotted with houses, including a large main house for guests and meetings, and another for the offices. The overall impression of the place is a balance between rugged and refined: steep, rocky land and well-kept buildings. The dramatic topography makes for constantly shifting views, and the interior spaces are large and comfortable. The Farm Ken Kleinpeter is vice president of operations, meaning he manages the farm. The CSA has about 120 members, and during the weekly pickups the farm also sells meat and other local products to members and the general public. With seven acres of vegetables, the flat land is mostly used up, so his main focus is on the animals: cows, sheep, goats, chickens, and pigs. Glynwood practices rotational grazing, where different animals move through the pastures in sequence to eat all the various plants and bugs and enrich the soil with their different manure. Goats can graze on marginal land, relishing tough shrubs that other ruminants avoid. Because of this, Glynwood is formulating strategies to promote the raising and consumption of goats in the region, much of which is too steep and rocky for crops. “Goats love multiflora roses [thorny,


Frankie Kimm

Virginia Kasinki. Sara Forrest

Top: Volunteers build the City of Newburgh’s community garden at the Armory Unity Center. Bottom: Glynwood’s 2011 Apple Exchange included a trade tasting of products from the Le Perche region of Normandy, France. It was held in Glynwood’s barn in October of 2011.

Above: Lise Serrell and Lara Sheets prepare the Glynwood CSA harvest for distribution.

invasive brambles that cover much of our region] and will stand in clover to eat them, while the sheep and cows don’t like them much.” A few years of grazing goats on brushy land can turn it into pasture suited for other animals, and they provide excellent milk and meat. Look for goats to become a thing in the near future. Kleinpeter believes that meat farming is absolutely sustainable, given the right method: “People talk about how it takes seven pounds of grain to produce one pound of beef, but our cows don’t see a bit of grain in their whole lives. And this land can’t grow anything else, so it’s better to raise animals on it and keep it in use.” The paucity of humane slaughterhouses in the region represents a major sticking point for small-scale meat farmers, many of whom have to reserve time months in advance. In response, Glynwood developed the Modular Harvest System: a mobile, USDA-approved slaughterhouse consisting of four trailers intended to be moved between different docking sites throughout the region.The MHS is run by LILA (Local Infrastructure for Local Agriculture), a Glynwood offshoot, though it is not currently processing animals. The biggest obstacle to its operation appears to be the many requirements and regulations governing prospective docking sites, ranging from power and water to waste disposal and Animal Welfare Approved housing for animals. Contrary to what many people believe, the MHS does not drive from farm to farm; it is mobile, but can only operate at an approved site.

a group of our cider and liquor makers over to France; both groups spoke enthusiastically about the knowledge they gained from experiencing both the creation and marketing of the others’ products. Cider Week, the public education portion of the program, has grown into a significant institution in just the two years since it began; attendance and media attention at last year’s events were significantly higher than the first year. And the beverage makers have been meeting regularly, with Glynwood’s help, to build a trade association to promote their products and lobby for regulatory reforms and enlist state aid with promotion and marketing. “It’s a sign of the maturity of that project that the industry is beginning to flourish,” says Sara Grady, vice president of programming, who oversaw the Apple Project from its inception. Keep Farming is a Glynwood program that helps towns retain and expand their agricultural base. Virginia Kasinski, director of community-based programs, explains the idea: “We offer guidance and technical assistance, but it has to be tailored to each community based on their needs and the type of agriculture they have.” In Chatham, once the town realized that farmers spent $1.25 million a year on local goods and services and that 60 percent of the farmland was rented, they created a new committee, which included farmers, to formulate strategies for land use and preservation. The committee is now a permanent part of the town government. Durham, a town in Greene County where second home development was putting pressure on open spaces, used Keep Farming to reinvent land use for the current economy. Formerly, the area mostly produced dairy, but the town’s new plan is based on developing a combination of forestry, maple syrup, grass-fed beef, and agritourism.

Preserving a Signature Crop The Apple Project, covered here in November, may be the program that Glynwood is best known for. The multifaceted effort began with the mission of preserving the apple as a signature crop in the Hudson Valley, and developed strategies for promoting value-added products—specifically hard cider and spirits—to make apple farming more viable as a business. The Apple Exchange brought French farmers from Normandy to the Hudson Valley and then took

Youth Lead the Way While Glynwood hosts interns every season who live on campus and help either with the vegetable or meat sides of the farm, educating aspiring farmers will become Glynwood’s biggest focus. Beginning this year, in collaboration 2/13 ChronograM food & drink 77


The Merchant

Wine and Spirits Price - Service - Selection - Value A tasting room offering beer pairings with small plates celebrAting locAl seAsonAl products retAiling craft beer, cheese, house-mAde charcuterie, And locAl speciAlty food products personalized service for beer And food pAirings

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730 Ulster Avenue Kingston, NY (845) 331-1923 www.themerchantwine.com

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Sara Forrest

C H I N A JA P AN KO R EA IN DO N ESIA

EAT HEALTHY & ENJOY EVERY MOUTHFUL.

Join Us For Valentine’s Day Flowers, Dinner and Drinks for 2. Reservations Suggested.

Have a smart phone? Check out our menu!

Open 7 days for Lunch and Dinner ROUTE 300, NEWBURGH, NY As part of Glynwood’s 2011 Apple Exchange, apple growers from the Le Perche region of Normandy, France, visit Derek Grout of Harvest Spirits (pictured extreme right) in Valatie.

with the Open Space Institute, Glynwood will start its Farm Incubator program on 400 acres near New Paltz owned by OSI. The program will solicit proposals from young farmers with some experience and clear plans for their businesses and give them land and guidance to get up and running. After three years, they will be placed on other OSI-owned land in the region to continue farming. Dave Llewellyn, director of farmer training, heads the program. “The plan is to begin with livestock; the soil needs to be restored, so we’ll be setting up a composting operation and focusing on animals. Over time, though, there will be room for all sorts of possibilities, and we’ll choose plans that complement each other.” Three farmers will be added each year, up to a total of nine, at which point the first three will move on and three new ones will enter the program. It’s a good example of the way in which Glynwood designs its programs to tie together: Towns participating in Keep Farming will need good farmers to keep their open spaces healthy and productive, and the incubator will be a source for seasoned talent looking for a permanent home. Glynwood’s first new hire was Jason Wood, former executive chef at Tavern in Garrison. As he upgrades the kitchen, he is also working with Frith and Grady to develop a plan for using it to further all of the organization’s goals. He will cook farm-to-table dinners every month, with different themes and intended audiences, and he will teach classes to the CSA members about how to use whole animals and other products, and instruct chefs interested in working more closely with farms. In keeping with Glynwood’s holistic approach, he plans to promote goat meat to chefs and home cooks alike. He’s also developing a line of value-added foods, like stock and garlic powder, that make full use of surplus ingredients and can be sold at the weekly CSA pickup. “Restaurant chefs have to figure out how to make money off of everything, says Wood, “but here I can use everything, not waste anything, and if it doesn’t sell I can use it in the kitchen.” Pushback Against Big Ag Frith sums up Glynwood’s purpose this way: “We craft programs and use philanthropic money to build infrastructure and give them the organizational character that they need so that they can be not only self-sufficient, but actually attracting investment.” She speaks about regional replicability as the new business model, a counterweight to growth for its own sake. It’s a compelling form of pushback against Big Ag: not Luddite, but one which includes all the costs and benefits of sustainable food in its calculus. Appropriately enough, a key to the success of this vision is in keeping the endeavors local, creating markets that keep dollars in their communities where they can do the most good. Talking about the realities of industrial agriculture and the many ways in which the system is heavily tilted against small farms, Kleinpeter, bumping along the road in a golf cart with his big dog Dudley sitting on my feet, says, “Realistically, this kind of food is never going to be for everyone, I don’t think. But it can be for a lot more people, and maybe that will be enough.”

(845) 564-3848

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CH IN A JA PA N KO R EA IN DO N ESIA

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EAT HEALTHY & ENJOY EVERY MOUTHFUL. CHINESE NEW YEAR CELEBRATION Sunday Feb. 10th Chinese Dragon Show on-going from 4:30pm - 9:30pm. Good fortune and wealth for the year of the snake. ROUTE 300, NEWBURGH, NY

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For more information, visit Glynwood.org. 2/13 ChronograM food & drink 79


The Natural Gourmet Cookery School For more than 20 years people around the world have turned to Natural Gourmet’s avocational public classes to learn the basics of

healthy cooking. They come to the Chef’s Training Program to prepare for careers in the burgeoning Natural foods Industry.

With the growing awareness of the effect that food has on health and well-being, there is a great demand for culinary professionals who can prepare food that is not only beautiful and delicious, but health-supportive as well. Our comprehensive Chef’s Training Program, the only one of its kind in the world, offers preparation for careers in health spas and restaurants, bakeries, private cooking, catering, teaching, consulting, food writing and a variety of entrepreneurial pursuits. Please browse our website to see how much we can offer you!

tastings directory

www.NaTuralGourmeTSChool.Com TelePhoNe: 212-645-5170 FaX: 212-989-1493 48 weST 21ST STreeT, New York, NY 10010 emaIl:INFo@NaTuralGourmeTSChool.Com

Serving New Paltz for 23 years…

Treat your sweetheart to pizza and cake balls this Valentine’s Day. 194 Main St, New Paltz 845-255-2633 www.LaBellaPizzaBistro.com We are New Paltz. From our home to yours... You ask and we deliver.

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Custom Cut • Home Cooking Delicatessen Nitrate-Free Bacon • Pork Roasts • Beef Roasts Bone-in or Boneless Ham: smoked or fresh Local Organic Beef • Exotic Meats (Venison, Buffalo, Ostrich) • Wild Fish 80 tastings directory ChronograM 2/13

KRISTA WILD, Owner www.wildfireny.com

74 Clinton Street Montgomery, NY 12549 (845) 457-3770


tastings directory A wintertime restaurant with fireside dining. Rated “Excellent” by the New York Times.

Your Host: James Brown 955 Route 9D, Garrison, NY (845) 424-3254 highlandscountryclub.net

Bakeries Jean-Claude’s Artisan Bakery & Dessert Café 23 Elm Street, Warwick, NY (845) 986-8900 122 Windermere Avenue, Greenwood Lake, NY (845) 595-6580 www.Warwickinfo.net/Jean-Claude

Rene’s Bistro 33-37 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2300

Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co. 237 Forest Hill Drive, Kingston, NY (845) 453-404277

Stella’s Italian Restaurant

948 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 340-9800 www.bluemountainbistro.com

Tavern

Gourmet take-out store serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week. Featuring local and imported organic foods, delicious homemade desserts, sophisticated four-star food by Chefs Richard Erickson and Jonathan Sheridan. Off-premise full-service catering and event planning for parties of all sizes.

Terrapin Catering & Events

79 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2244

Restaurants Aroi Thai 55 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-1114

Flatiron Restaurant 7488 South Broadway, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-8260 www.flatironsteakhouse.com

LaBella Pizza Bistro 194 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2633 www.labellapizzabistro.com

Leo’s Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria 1433 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 564-3446

Osaka 22 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7338 or (845) 876-7278 www.osakasushi.net Foodies, consider yourselves warned and informed! Osaka Restaurant is Rhinebeck’s direct link to Japan’s finest cuisines! Enjoy the freshest sushi and delicious traditional Japanese small plates cooked with love by this family owned and operated treasure for over 18 years. For more information and menus, go to osakarestaurant.net.

Pizzeria Posto 43 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3500

6426 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 889-8831 www.terrapincatering.com hugh@terrapincatering.com

tastings directory

Delis Jack’s Meats & Deli

955 Route 9D, Garrison, NY (845) 424-3254

Rene’s Bistro PVC Sign

Local. Organic. Authentic. At a Terrapin event, you can expect the same high quality, awardwinning cuisine and service that you know and love at Terrapin Restaurant. Terrapin’s professional event staff specializes in creating unique events to highlight your individuality, and will assist in every aspect of planning your Hudson Valley event.

Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro 6426 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3330 www.terrapinrestaurant.com custsvc@terrapinrestaurant.com Voted “Best of the Hudson Valley” by Chronogram Magazine. From far-flung origins, x1 - 48” x 30” x 1/2” PVC panel with digitally printed graphics the world’s most diverse flavors meet and Text to be 1/4” custom routed letters Open for Lunch and Dinner from 11:30am. Closed Mondays. mingle. Out of elements both historic and 33-37 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2300 eclectic comes something surprising, fresh, Project Manager: Tyson McCasland 845-331-8710 x1012 Project: Logo Panel and dynamic: dishes to delight both body and Client S Approval: CATx1011 ER I N GFileFTitle:OLogo-FS.ai R A LL O CCA I O________________________________ NS Drawn By: Brittney Scott 845-331-8710 soul. Serving lunch and dinner seven days a Date: _________________________________________ Date: September 18, 2012 Timely Signs of Kingston, Inc. 154 Clinton Avenue | Kingston NY 12401 | p 845.331.8710 | f 845.331.8712 | toll free 800.676.8710 | timelysigns.com week. Local. Organic. Authentic.

Fine Italian Cuisine

This original drawing and the artwork contained within is provided as part of a planned project and is not to be exhibited, copied or reproduced without the written permission of Timely Signs of Kingston, Inc. or its authorized agents. Copyright 2012.

INTERIOR + EXTERIOR SIGNAGE | DONOR RECOGNITION

Electrical to use U.L. Listed components and shall meet all N.E.C. Standards

The Hop at Beacon 458 Main Street, Beacon, NY www.thehopbeacon.com

The Ice House 1 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 232-5783 www.poughkeepsieicehouse.com

The Would Restaurant 120 North Road, Highland, NY (845) 691.9883 www.thewould.com

Wildfire Grill 74 Clinton Street, Montgomery, NY (845)457-3770 www.wildfireny.com

Yobo Restaurant Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 564-3848 www.yoborestaurant.com

(845) 232 -5783 1 Main Street Poughkeepsie, NY PoughkeepsieIceHouse.com Waterfront Patio Dining Culinary Chefs • Raw Bar Close to Train & Walkway Over Hudson Public Boat Docking • Happy Hour Casual, Sophisticated Menus On Premise Catering • Group Tours Local Hudson Valley Foods Live Music & Entertainment

Water Street

Bistro-to-Go

44 North Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2210

Hudson River

Cafés

Main Street

2/13 ChronograM tastings directory 81


business directory Accommodations Belvedere Mansion 10 Old Route 9, Staatsburg, NY (845) 889-8000 www.belvederemansion.com

Diamond Mills 25 South Partition Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 247-0700 www.DiamondMillsHotel.com info@DiamondMillsHotel.com

Fleet Service Center

Gray Owl Gallery

Ruge’s Subaru

Water Street Market, New Paltz, NY www.grayowlgallery.com

Mark Gruber Gallery New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241 www.markgrubergallery.com

185 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4812 6444 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7074 www.rugessubaru.com

Banks

Mohonk Mountain House

Mildred I. Washington Art Gallery

Mid Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union

1000 Mountain Rest Road, New Paltz, NY (800) 772-6646 www.mohonk.com

53 Pendell Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 431-8610

(800) 451-8373 www.mhvfcu.com

Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art

Ramada Inn

1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY www.newpaltz.edu/museum

542 Route 9, Fishkill, NY (845) 896-6281

Windham Mountain Ski Resort Windham, NY (518) 734-4300 www.windhammountain.com edewi @windhammountain.com

Alternative Energy Hudson Solar

business directory

panoramas of the Hudson Valley runs through May 19. Visit exposures.com for a current listing of Nick’s photo workshops.

(845) 876-3767 www.hvce.com

Lighthouse Solar (845) 417-3485 www.lighthousesolar.com

Antiques Beekman Arms Antique Market Behind the Beekman Arms Hotel, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 879-3477

Outdated 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0030 outdatedcafe@gmail.com

Architecture North River Architecture 3650 Main Street, PO Box 720, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-6242 www.nriverarchitecture.com

Richard Miller, AIA (845) 255-4480 www.RichardMillerArchitect.com

Art Galleries & Centers Dean Vallas-Studio 303 37 Wynkoop Lane, Rhinebeck, NY (914) 456-9983 www.deanvallas.net

Sierra Lily 1955 South Road Square, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 297-1684

Vassar College The Frances Lehman Loeb Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 437-5632 fllac.vassar.edu

Woodstock Artists Association and Museum 28 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY www.woodstockart.org

Art Supplies Catskill Art & Office Supply Kingston, NY (845) 331-7780

Rhinebeck Artist’s Shop Rhinebeck & New Paltz, NY www.rhinebeckart.com

Astrology Joyous Sky Transformational Astrology (845)246-2703 www.joyoussky.com iamliamwatt@gmail.com

Attorneys Traffic and Criminally Related Matters Karen A. Friedman, Esq., President of the Association of Motor Vehicle Trial Attorneys, 30 East 33rd Street, 4th FL, New York, NY (212) 213-2145, fax (212) 779-3289 www.newyorktrafficlawyers.com Representing companies and motorists throughout New York State Speeding, Reckless Driving, DWI Trucking Summons and Misdemeanors Aggravated Unlicensed Matters

1357 Kings Highway, Sugar Loaf, NY (845) 469-9382 www.exposures.com

Appeals, Article 78 Cases

Internationally recognized, photographer Nick Zungoli has been photographing the Hudson Valley since 1979 when he opened Exposures Gallery. To date he has sold over 50,000 prints to collectors and for fine residences and commercial spaces. The gallery offers interior design services and installation. His new special exhibit “Light in the Valley” color

82 business directory ChronograM 2/13

Esotec (845) 246-2411 www.esotecltd.com www.thirstcomesfirst.com www.drinkesotec.com sales@esotecltd.com

Book Publishers Monkfish Publishing 22 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4861 www.monkfishpublishing.com

Bookstores Barner Books 3 Church Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2635

Mirabai of Woodstock

Exposures Gallery

Open Saturday, Sunday, 11am to 5pm  or by appointment through March.

Beverages

27 Years of Trial Experience

Audio & Video Markertek Video Supply www.markertek.com

Auto Sales & Services Arlington Auto & Tire 678 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 471-2800 www.arlingtonautotire.com

23 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2100 www.mirabai.com

Olde Warwick Booke Shoppe 31 Main Street, Warwick, NY (845) 544-7183 www.yeoldewarwickbookshoppe.com

Building Services & Supplies Bundschuh Stone Preservation www.bundschuhstonedesign.com

Cabinet Designers 747 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2200 www.cabinetdesigners.com

Foster Flooring Staatsburg, NY (845) 889-4747

Glenn’s Wood Sheds (845) 255-4704 www.glennssheds.com

Marbletown Hardware True Value 3606 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-2098 www.marbletownhardware.com

N & S Supply www.nssupply.com info@nssupply.com

Will III House Design 199 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0869 www.willbuilders.com office@willbuilders.com

Cinemas Upstate Films 6415 Montgomery Street/Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2515, 132 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-6608 www.upstatefilms.org

Clothing & Accessories Liza Jane Norman Designs 7 Old State Route 213, High Falls, NY (845) 687-8393 www.lizajanenorman.com

My Sister’s Closet 1385 Kings Highway, Sugar Loaf, NY (845) 469-9681 www.mysistersclosetsugarloaf.com

Savvy Chic 26 R. Reagan Boulevard, Warwick, NY (845) 988-2442 www.mysavvychicboutique.com

Cooking Classes Natural Gourmet Cookery School 48 West 21st Street, New York, NY (212) 645-5170, Fax (212) 989-1493 www.naturalgourmetschool.com info@naturalgourmetschool.com

Custom Home Designer Atlantic Custom Homes 2785 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY (888) 558-2636 www.LindalNY.com and www.hudsonvalleycedarhomes.com info@LindalNY.com

Education Center for Metal Arts 44 Jayne Street, Florida, NY (845) 651-7550 www.centerformetalarts.com/blog

Events Kaatsbaan International Dance Center www.facebook.com/kaatsbaan WWW.KAATSBAAN.ORG

Farm Markets & Natural Food Stores Adam’s Fairacre Farms 1240 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845)569-0303 1560 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-6300 765 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-4330 www.adamsfarms.com

Brookside Farm 1278 Albany Post Road, Gardiner, NY (845) 895-7433 www.Brookside-farm.com Info@brookside-farm.com Brookside Farm, organic grass-fed beef, chicken, eggs and pork. We go beyond organic to bring gourmet quality, healthy food to the Hudson Valley. Visit our farm store and specialty shop for your gourmet needs.


Hawthorne Valley Farm Store

Cord King

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A full-line natural foods store set on a 400-acre Biodynamic farm in central Columbia County with on-farm organic Bakery and Creamery. Farm-fresh foods include cheeses, yogurts, raw milk, breads, pastries, sauerkraut, and more. Two miles east of the Taconic Parkway at the Harlemville/Philmont exit. Farm tours can also be arranged.

Mother Earth’s Store House 1955 South Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 296-1069 249 Main Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-9614 300 Kings Mall Court, Route 9W, Kingston, NY (845) 336-5541 www.motherearthstorehouse.com Founded in 1978, Mother Earth’s is committed to providing you with the best possible customer service as well as a grand selection of high quality organic and natural products. Visit one of our convenient locations and find out for yourself!

Pennings Farm Market & Orchards 161 South Route 94, Warwick, NY (845) 986-1059 www.penningsfarmmarket.com

Sunflower Natural Foods Market 75 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5361 www.sunflowernatural.com info@sunflowernatural.com

Lounge High Falls, NY (845) 687-9463 www.loungefurniture.com

Newhard’s 39 Main Street, Warwick, NY (845) 986-4544

JustLeanBack 51 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2888 www.justleanback.com

Moose Crossing Route 28, Shokan, NY (845) 657-9792 www.rustic-cabin.com

Home Improvement Certapro Painters (845) 987-7561 www.certapro.com

William Wallace Construction (845) 750-7335 www.williamwallaceconstruction.com

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Peaceful Living by Design (914) 456-2810 www.PeacefulLivingByDesign.com

Internet Services DragonSearch

Merrill Lynch 2649 South Road, Pougkeepsie, NY (845) 431-2202 http://fa.ml.com/amy.pender

Third Eye Associates, Ltd 38 Spring Lake Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 752-2216 www.thirdeyeassociates.com

Florists

(845) 383-0890 www.dragonsearchmarketing.com dragon@dragonsearch.net

Jewelry, Fine Art & Gifts Dreaming Goddess 44 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2206 www.DreamingGoddess.com

Flower Nest Florist

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Kingston Plaza, Kingston, NY www.flowernest.com

23 A. East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4585 www.hummingbirdjewelers.com hummingbirdjewelers@hotmail.com

Gardening & Garden Supplies Mac’s Agway 68 Firehouse Lane, Red Hook (845) 876-1559 145 Route 32N, New Paltz (845) 255-0050

Graphic Design Annie Internicola, Illustrator www.aydeeyai.com

Hair Salons Allure 47 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7774 allure7774@aol.com

Glenn Bryon Hair Studio 8 West Street, Warwick, NY (845) 987-1150

Marion Salon 1600 Main Street, Pleasant Valley, NY (845) 635-1626 www.marionsalonspa.com

Heating Ashleigh’s Hearth & Home, Inc. 3647 Albany Post Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 471-0789 www.enjoywarmth.com

digitaL MarkEting Search Engine Optimization / Pay-per-Click Management / Social Media

Kitchenwares Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6208 www.warrenkitchentools.com

Landscaping Coral Acres, Keith Buesing, Topiary, Landscape Design, Rock Art (845) 255-6634

Lawyers & Mediators Law Offices of Michel Haggerty 37 West Market, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2888 www.haggertylawoffices.com

Pathways Mediation Center 239 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0100 www.PathwaysMediationCenter.com A unique mediation practice for couples going through divorce or families in conflict with the innovative, combined services of 2 professionals. Josh Koplovitz has 30 years as a matrimonial & family law attorney and Myra Schwartz has 30 years as a guidance counselor. This male/female team can effectively address all your legal and family

Cutting EdgE, StratEgiC digitaL MarkEting SoLutionS for BuSinESSES and agEnCiES

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2/13 ChronograM business directory 83

business directory

Financial Advisors

Home Furnishings & Decor


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Schneider, Pfahl & Rahme, LLP (212) 629-7744 www.schneiderpfahl.com

Musical Instruments Imperial Guitar & Soundworks 99 Route 17K, Newburgh, NY (845) 567-0111 www.imperialguitar.com

Organizations American Heart Association www.heart.org/DutchessUlsterGoRedLuncheon

Children’s Media Project www.childrensmediaproject.com

Re>Think Local www.facebook.com/ReThinkLocal

Performing Arts Bardavon Opera House 35 Market Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2072 www.bardavon.org

Club Helsinki Hudson 405 Columbia Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-4800 www.helsinkihudson.com info@helsinkihudson.com

Eisenhower Hall Theatre - USMA West Point, NY www.ikehall.com

business directory

Metatron The Rock Musical (845) 569-1234 www.metatrontherockmusical.com

The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio 339 Central Ave, Albany, NY (518) 465-5233 www.thelinda.org The Linda provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personnel with world-renowned artists, academy award winning directors, headliner comedians and local, regional, and national artists on the verge of national recognition. An intimate, affordable venue, serving beer and wine, The Linda is a night out you won’t forget.

Pet Services & Supplies Brook Farm Veterinary Center Patterson, NY (845) 878-4833 www.brookfarmveterinarycenter.com

Earth Angels Veterinary Hospital 8 Nancy Court, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 227-7297 www.earthangelsvet.com

Photography Fionn Reilly Photography Saugerties, NY (845) 802-6109 www.fionnreilly.com

Ulster County Photography Club 128 Canal Street, Port Ewen, NY (845) 338-5580 www.esopuslibrary.org The Ulster County Photography club meets the 2n Wednesday each month at 6:30 pm. Meet at the Town of Esopus Library, 128 Canal Street, Port Ewen, NY. 845-338-5580. www. esopuslibrary.org. All interested are welcome.

Picture Framing Atelier Renee Fine Framing The Chocolate Factory, 54 Elizabeth Street, Suite 3, Red Hook, NY

84 business directory ChronograM 2/13

(845) 758-1004 www.atelierreneefineframing.com renee@atelierreneefineframing.com A visit to Red Hook must include stopping at this unique workshop! Combining a beautiful selection of moulding styles and mats with conservation quality materials, expert design advice and skilled workmanship, Renee Burgevin, owner and CPF, has over 20 years experience. Special services include shadow-box and oversize framing as well as fabric-wrapped and French matting. Also offering mirrors.

Pools & Spas Aqua Jet 1606 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-8080 www.aquajetpools.com

Printing Services

SUNY New Paltz School of Fine and Performing Arts

(845) 255-2278

New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3860 www.newpaltz.edu/artnews

puja@rootsnwings.com

SUNY Ulster 491 Cottekill Road, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 339-2025 www.sunyulster.edu/CampUlster Campulster@sunyulster.edu

1830 South Rd Suite 101, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-5600 www.fastsigns.com/455 455@fastsigns.com

Real Estate Catskill Farm Builders catskillfarms.blogspot.com

Paula Redmond Real Estate Inc. (845) 677-0505 or (845) 876-6676 paularedmond.com

The Gardens at Rhinebeck 301 Ivy Trail, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 516-4261

Schools

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-5343 www.caryinstitute.org

Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7092 www.hawthornevalleyschool.org Located in central Columbia County, NY and situated on a 400-acre working farm, Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School supports the development of each child and provides students with the academic, social, and practical skills needed to live in today’s complex world. Also offering parent-child playgroups and High School boarding. Local busing and regional carpools.  Nurturing living connections, from early childhood through grade 12.

High Meadow School Route 209, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-4855 www.highmeadowschool.org

Hotchkiss School 11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, CT (860) 435-3663 www.hotchkiss.org/arts

New York Military Academy 78 Academy Avenue, Cornwall-on-Hudson, NY (845) 534-3710 www.nyma.org admissions@nyma.org

Poughkeepsie Day School 260 Boardman Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 462-7600 www.poughkeepsieday.org admissions@poughkeepsieday.org

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Wild Earth Wilderness School New Paltz / High Falls area, 845-256-9830 www.wildearth.org info@wildearth.org

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Shaman Mikki (917) 620-0444 www.shamanmikki.com

The Belltower Venue 398 Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-8077

Edible Arrangements

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900 Ulster Avenue, Kingston, NY, 10 IBM Road Plaza, Poughkeepsie, NY EdibleArrangements.com

The Bridal Cottage

Stained Glass DC Studios 21 Winston Drive, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3200 www.dcstudiosllc.com info@dcstudiosllc.com

Summer Camps Renaissance Kids 1821 Route 376, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 452-4225 www.renkids.org

Sunrooms

Bard College at Simon’s Rock (800) 235-7186 www.simons-rock.edu/admit admit@simons-rock.edu

Rev. Puja A. J. Thomson will help you

Trinity - Pawling School

Specialty Food Shops

Fast Signs

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Hudson Valley Sunrooms Route 9W, Beacon, NY (845) 838-1235 www.hvsk.fourseasonssunrooms.com

Tourism Historic Huguenot Street Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1660

Typing Services

Kings Mall Court, Suite 400, 1200 Ulster Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 331-6596 www.thebridalcottage.com

The Links at Union Vale 153 North Parliman Road, Lagrangeville, NY (845) 223-1002 www.thelinksatunionvale.com

Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2079 www.byrdcliffe.org events@woodstockguild.org

Wine & Liquor Merchant Wine and Liquor, the 730 Ulster Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 331-1923

Miron Wine and Spirits 15 Boices Lane, Kingston, NY (845) 336-5155 www.mironwineanspirits.com

CompuWord Pros Hollowbrook Bldg., Off Myers Corners Rd. Wappinger Falls, N.Y. (845) 298-7029 Professional typing of manuscripts, letters, résumés, reports, post cards, business cards, booklets, labels for past 25 years. Transcription services available.

Weddings Brave NYC (917) 991-3165 www.bravenyc.com todd@bravenyc.com

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Workshops HudsonValleyPhotoshop.com The Shirt Factory, 77 Cornell Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-7834 www.HudsonValleyPhotoshop.com

Writing Services Peter Aaron www.peteraaron.org info@peteraaron.org

Cold Spring, NY (845) 429-0555 www.inncrediblecaterers.com

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whole living guide

KEEPERS of the

TAO

The age-old Chinese practices of qi gong and tai chi— and an émigré spiritual teacher— are still kicking in the Hudson Valley. by wendy kagan illustration by annie internicola

W

hen aged Taoist master Kwan Saihung makes his way to a table at Yum Yum Noodle Bar in Kingston, he doesn’t need a cane. The white-haired teacher of tai chi and qi gong breezes in, followed by one of his senior disciples, Paul Bloom. Over bowls of soba, Master Kwan regales Bloom and me with stories and spiritual lessons from his long and colorful life—a life so interesting that it was the subject of the 1993 tome Chronicles of Tao. Some readers have questioned the veracity of what the book’s author, Deng Ming-Dao, calls a biographical novel—and seeing my copy on the table, Kwan cautions me not to believe everything in its pages. Deng, a onetime student of Kwan’s, took artistic license; the effect was cinematic. “My life was not a movie,” he says. “This is a very serious life.” Yet the stories Kwan tells are every bit as fantastical as the ones in the book—from an aristocratic early childhood in China and a monastic upbringing on the mountain of Hua Shan to his arrival and travels in the US in the 1960s. Along with brief stints as a Peking Opera star, village doctor, Golden Gloves boxer, and soldier, Kwan has followed the path of the Tao since he took his vows at 12 years old. If he’s everything he claims, he may well be a living example of an ancient tradition, a primary source of Chinese heritage and wisdom. How ironic it seems at the end of our meal, then, when the waiter presents our check on an iPod Touch. The deep past meets the present moment as the wizened master pauses to observe the pixelated interface. Health with a Higher Purpose Traditional Chinese wellness practices, once fringe activities in our culture, have carved out a place in the American mainstream. According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 3.1 million people had tried acupuncture in 2007—a million more than in 2002. Nowadays it’s not just elderly Chinese men performing tai chi in public parks, but Caucasian men and women also slice the air with the forms of the graceful martial art. A few studies about tai chi’s health benefits find improvements in the symptoms of various ailments from osteoarthritis to Parkinson’s disease; a recent trial found that practicing tai chi regularly improved cognitive function in senior subjects. Although Americans are less familiar with qi gong—a close relative of tai chi without the martial edge—the 5,000-year-old form is likely to offer similar benefits. Yet achieving ultimate wellness is not the end goal. “Just doing these practices for health is spiritual materialism,” says Bloom. “The idea is to discover your true nature, your purpose in life. The traditional Chinese doctor’s responsibility is not just to heal or cure you but to nourish your destiny.”

86 whole living ChronograM 2/13

On a recent Friday night at Mountain View Studio in Woodstock, a group of students gathers to glean Kwan’s knowledge of the long-form Yang-family style of taiji quan (tai chi). Bloom says you’d be hard-pressed to find a teacher so close to the style’s roots: Kwan says that he learned this form in the 1930s from Yang Chang Fu, the grandson of the man who created it, Yang Luchan. Having studied tai chi before Communism came to China, Kwan is said to offer teachings from the martial art’s purest, strongest lineages. “When Communism came in, the teachings were dumbed down,” explains Bloom, who organizes and assists Kwan’s classes and is a senior teacher in his own right. “You had maybe 37 tai chi moves instead of the 113 that he teaches. I’ve studied with other people, and in terms of delivering the goods, he’s by far the best.” After leading the students through warm-up exercises, Kwan guides the class into sequences with lyrical names like “the crane spreads his wing” and “wild horse shaking his mane.” He stays close to a beginner student who has wandered into the class for the first time. At times he is stern. “You are too stiff, and you are throwing your hands all over the place!” he says. “This is not tai chi. It is very gentle.” It’s easy to spot the serious practitioners: They have an effortless grace that shines through even the most complex series of motions. “Keep the body relaxed,” Kwan reminds the room, “and the qi will move through the meridians like a wave.” Pronounced “chi” and meaning “vital energy,” qi is the breath of life or motivational force in every individual. Tai chi moves—based on animal movements and translated into martial art against an imaginary opponent— are designed to cultivate, balance, and optimize qi’s flow. On a practical level, says Kwan, tai chi helps practitioners learn to breathe properly, to control the emotions, and to stay grounded, relaxed, and aware. “The motions help the muscles relax,” he explains. “Then the qi and the blood are moving harmoniously. This is how you heal yourself. The mind feels comfortable, the body is satisfied.” But that doesn’t mean it’s a walk in the park; the practice is intricate and often elusive. Kwan tells the room that with his teacher, everything had to be exact (“He had a whip!”)—yet with his own students, the master is more forgiving and sometimes wryly humorous. “Getting better, I must say,” he observes at the end of class. “I’ll drink to that. I mean tea!” Wisdom for the Ages—and the Ageless As I watch Kwan glide, pivot, and box his way through an elegant tai chi sequence, a question loops through my head like a mantra: Can this man really


be 92 years old? With hardly a line on his face nor a quaver in his voice, he moves with not just ease but vigor. Others have doubted his alleged age—and with it, his entire story—but Kwan dismisses these skeptics with a wave of his hand. (“I say, ‘How old do you think I am?’ They say ’60.’ I say, ‘Okay, I am 60!’”) Despite the anything-goes attitude, a youthful mien like Kwan’s does match up with a key goal and cornerstone of Taoism: increased longevity. “Practices like meditation, tai chi, and qi gong balance and harmonize the body’s energy fields,” says Bloom. “They calm the emotions and elevate them to virtues. Taoism says if you do all that, you’ll live to be 100. And it says, let’s make you want to live to 100, to realize your destiny.” Bloom, who has studied with Kwan for over 25 years, doesn’t question his teacher’s age or integrity—nor does he uphold an unrealistically spotless image of the master, who can be difficult at times. “He has his foibles,” says Bloom. “But he is beautiful to watch and can be very inspiring. To me, he is the most amazing example of a person who has increased his longevity through the practice.” Inhabiting the sacred core of Chinese history and culture, Taoism dates back to predynastic times. It’s a vast system of spirituality encompassing everything from shamanism and philosophy to art and divination. Yet, as spacious as life itself, Taoism has fallen prey to our modern habit of oversimplification. “Nowadays, the way people talk about Taoism is not Taoism,” says Kwan. “They just talk about the Tao Te Ching, some philosophy, Lao Tzu. It goes beyond that. It goes before that.” Studying with his master on the mountain of Hua Shan, Kwan learned the breadth and depth of the Tao—or “The Way”—a system so flexible that it finds unique expression with every individual. “The main purpose is to find out what your soul is all about,” says Kwan. To guide him toward that, his teacher instructed Kwan to spend time in nature. He was told to choose a tree and to meditate upon it—first facing the tree and then with his back to its trunk. “The tree will breathe with you. Eventually it will reveal its secrets to you.” Ultimately, the Tao is the journey of a lifetime, yet it also extends no further than your own essence. “A soul is your expression—what you relate to,” says Kwan. “You immerse in it without any conditions. You are free. It’s not like you’ve committed yourself and can’t get out of it. It’s natural.” As an example, Kwan tells the story of an African drumming master who recently visited Woodstock and riveted the audience with his rhythms. “Each person has their own Taoism,” says Kwan. “He has his way, I have mine. People make it out like something mystical. It’s just a way of doing things.”

A Path for Seekers On a Wednesday afternoon at Clear Yoga in Rhinebeck, I find myself inscribing the yin-yang symbol into the air in a qi gong sequence led by Bloom. It’s a new language to me, and with my two left feet I’m all yin and no yang. Yet there’s a poetry to qi gong that allures me, and a squatand-lift move called “picking up the moon from the water and putting it back into the sky” draws me in with its imagery and fluidity. When I throw self-consciousness to the wind, the practices calm my mind—much like the sitting meditation that Bloom led at the start of class. “We’re trying to get back to the point before we were born,” Bloom says of Taoist meditation. “It’s an ocean of wisdom from which we come. It’s here that you discover your true nature and what you are meant to do—your destiny.” Later, I ask Bloom what it is he’s meant to do. “Spread these teachings,” he says. Once a theater and film producer, Bloom led “a crazy life” in showbiz. Although he had been practicing for a couple of decades, he became very serious about 10 years ago when qi gong and tai chi carried him through the illness and death of his wife. “All I could do was practice,” he says. “This saved my life.” Now he helps others find their Tao through his teaching, and through helping his master continue this work, too. An aura of legend and many questions surround Kwan, but his teachings— and lifestyle—speak for themselves. He lives alone in Rosendale, with no car, relying on students like Bloom to drive him to classes. He has no computer, preferring books, and no bed, favoring a chair. With his daily routine of breathing exercises, stretching, and meditation, he says he needs no more than two hours of sleep a night. His greatest teacher is life itself: experience and the people he meets. In a quest for truth like the Tao, he suggests, you must open yourself to everything yet remain attached to nothing. “If you learn something that is very valuable to you, appreciate it as much as you can while you have it. Use it to the best of your ability,” says the master. “Become one with it—until you’re finished and you know, okay, the time has come to let go.” To learn more about classes with Master Kwan or Paul Bloom, visit Mtnviewstudio.com or contact Bloom at (914) 466-2714. chronogram.com Watch a video of Master Kwan teaching a qi gong class.

2/13 ChronograM whole living 87


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Joan Apter

44 West Street, Warwick, NY (845) 986-7860 www.bluestoneacupuncture.com

(845) 679-0512 (845) 338-2965 joanapter@earthlink.net

Creekside Acupuncture and Natural Medicine, Stephanie Ellis, L Ac 371A Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 546-5358 www.creeksideacupuncture.com

Private treatment rooms, attentive one-onone care, affordable rates, many insurances, sliding scale. Stephanie Ellis graduated magna cum laude from Columbia University in pre-medical studies. She completed her acupuncture and Chinese medicine degree in 2001 as valedictorian of her class and started her acupuncture practice in Rosendale that same year. Ms. Ellis uses a combination of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Classical Chinese Medicine, Japanese-style acupuncture and trigger-point acupuncture. Creekside Acupuncture is located in a building constructed of non-toxic, ecofriendly materials.

For “hands-on care,” call us: 845-679-9767

2568 Route 212 • Woodstock, NY www.WoodstockPhysicalTherapy.com

Hoon J. Park, MD, PC 1772 South Road, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-6060

New Paltz Community Acupuncture — Amy Benac, L Ac

The Sedona Method

21 South Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2145 www.newpaltzacu.com

Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy Discover how to effortlessly turn fear, loss, grief, stress, trauma, addiction, spiritual crisis, and any other life challenge into courage, joy, peace, love, creativity, abundance, self mastery, life mastery and flow. The Sedona Method is an elegantly simple yet remarkably profound and effective way to effortlessly dissolve any obstacle to having the life that we all desire. For the only certified and authorized Sedona Method coaching in the Hudson Valley call The Accord Center, 845 626 3191. Phone sessions are available. Find more information and testimonials at www.theaccordcenter.com

©2012

$25-$40 sliding scale (you decide what you can afford within that range). As a community-style practice, treatments occur in a semi-private, soothing space with several people receiving treatment at the same time. This allows for frequent, affordable sessions while providing high quality care. Also available: massage after acupuncture sessions during certain clinic hours, and 5 free acupuncture clinic sessions through Breast Cancer Options. Private sessions and herbal consults available outside of clinic hours.

Addiction and Recovery

Zweig Therapy Julie Zweig, MA

Imago Relationship Therapy New Paltz, New York • (845) 255-3566 • (845) 594-3366

www.ZweigTherapy.com • julieezweig@gmail.com

88 whole living directory ChronograM 2/13

Aromatherapy

Steven C. Siegel, LCSW, CASAC Rhinebeck/Red Hook and Manhattan (845) 233-0705 S.SiegelLCSW@yahoo.com

I am a clinical social worker and also a certified substance abuse counselor, skilled in working with teens and adults who struggle with depression, anxiety and addiction. I provide a nonjudgmental and safe environment in which we can explore and solve issues collaboratively. I rely heavily on cognitive-behavioral theory but my approach is conversational and insightoriented. Together we can help you get more joy out of life and have fuller more meaningful relationships. I offer sliding scale payment and accept several insurance providers.

See also Massage Therapy

Astrology Planet Waves Kingston, NY (845) 797-3458 www.planetwaves.net

Body & Skin Care Clairvoyant Beauty (888) 758-1270 www.clairvoyantbeauty.com

Hudson Valley Skincare www.hudsonvalleyskincare.com

Medical Aesthetics of the Hudson Valley 166 Albany Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 339-LASER (5273) www.medicalaestheticshv.com

Counseling Healing at Heart (845) 242-5038 www.healingatheart.com

Julie Zweig, MA, Certified Rosen Method Bodywork Practitioner, Imago Relationship Therapist and NYS Licensed Mental Health Counselor New Paltz, NY (845) 255-3566 www.zweigtherapy.com julieezweig@gmail.com

The Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy (845) 646-3191 www.theaccordcenter.com

The Rite Brane 69 Main Street, 3rd Floor, New Paltz, NY (845) 625-7591 theritebrane@gmail.com

Dentistry & Orthodontics The Center For Advanced Dentistry‚ Bruce D. Kurek, DDS, FAGD 494 Route 299, Highland, NY (845) 691-5600 www.thecenterforadvanceddentistry.com

Fitness Centers Fitness Fusion of the Hudson Valley Red Hook, NY (845) 835-8048 www.fitnessfusionhv.com


Fitness Trainers Primal Life Training New Paltz, NY (845) 380-2314 primallifetraining.com

Healing Centers Namaste Sacred Healing Center Willow, NY (845) 688-7205 or (845) 853-2310 www.namasteshc.com

15 plus years of helping people find their balance. As a holistic nurse consultant, she weaves her own healing journey and education in psychology, nursing, hypnosis and integrative nutrition to help you take control of your life and to find True North. She also assists pregnant couples with hypnosis and birthing.

Nancy Plumer, Energy Healing and Mystery School Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-2252 www.womenwithwisdom.com nplumer@hvi.net

Villa Veritas Foundation Kerhonkson, NY (845) 626-3555 www.villaveritas.org info@villaveritas.org

Herbal Medicine & Nutrition

Hospitals Health Alliance

New Paltz Community Acupuncture

Amy Benac, M.S., L.Ac.

$25-$40 a session (You decide what you can afford) Now open Saturdays 10-1 with Yukiko Naoi, M.S., L.Ac. Private sessions and herbal consults available outside of clinic hours 5 free acupuncture sessions through Breast Cancer Options

Effective, affordable acupuncture in a beautiful community setting Please see Whole Living Directory listing for more info

21 S. CHESTNUT STREET, NEW PALTZ TEL: 845-255-2145 WWW.NEWPALTZACU.COM

396 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 334-4248 www.hahv.org

Health Quest Medical Practice Empowered By Nature (845) 416-4598 www.EmpoweredByNature.net lorrainehughes54@gmail.com

Holistic Health Cassandra Currie, MS, RYT — Holistic Health Counselor 41 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 532-7796 www.holisticcassandra.com

ChiroSoma 222 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2225 www.chirosoma.com

Hansen Healing (845) 687-8440 www.hansenhealing.com

Hudson Valley Center for Neurofeedback 12 Davis Avenue, Vassar Professional Building Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-4939 www.HVCNF.com

John M. Carroll 715 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 338-8420 www.johnmcarrollhealer.com

John is a spiritual counselor, healer, and teacher. He uses guided imagery, morphology, and healing energy to help facilitate life changes. He has successfully helped his clients to heal themselves from a broad spectrum of conditions, spanning terminal cancer to depression. The Center also offers hypnosis, and Raindrop Technique.

Kary Broffman, RN, CH (845) 876-6753 Karyb@mindspring.com

Sharon Hospital 50 Hospital Hill Road, Sharon, CT (860) 364-4000 www.sharonhospital.com

Massage Therapy Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 www.apteraromatherapy.com joanapter@earthlink.net

Luxurious massage therapy with medicinal grade Essential Oils; Raindrop Technique, Emotional Release, Facials, Stones. Animal care, health consultations, spa consultant, classes and keynotes. Offering full line of Young Living Essential oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, children’s and non-toxic cleaning products.

Marina Smith Massage Therapy Pine Island, NY (845) 258-8457 www.marinasmithlmt.com

Mid-Hudson Rebirthing Center (845) 255-6482

Mediators Pathways Mediation Center 239 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0100 www.PathwaysMediationCenter.com

A unique mediation practice for couples going through divorce or families in conflict with the innovative, combined services of 2 professionals. Josh Koplovitz has 30 years as a matrimonial & family law attorney and Myra Schwartz has 30 years as a guidance counselor. This male/female team can effectively address all your legal and family issues. Use our one-hour free consultation to find out about us.

Osteopathy Stone Ridge Healing Arts— Joseph Tieri, DO, & Ari Rosen, DO

Invites you to

REINVENTING OURSELVES Spring Weekend | March 15-17, 2013 Is there passion and excitement in your life? Are you feeling burnt out? Have you always dreamed of doing something different? Have you always wanted to explore other possibilities for yourself? Join us in a systematic process to gain insight into your life’s purpose, design a course of action to manifest your goals and dreams and become fully engaged in transforming and celebrating your life. Linwood Spiritual Center, Rhinebeck, NY : Nancy 845–687–2252

FOR INFO AND REGISTRATION

iNtEgR atE YOuR LiFE i t ’ s

a

B a L a N c i N g

a c t

Holistic Nurse HealtH coNsultaNt

Manage stress • apprehensions • Pain • improve sleep Release Weight • set goals • change Habits Pre/Post surgery • Fertility • Hypno Birthing immune system Enhancement • Nutritional counseling Past Life Regression • intuitive counseling Motivational & spiritual guidance

Breathe • Be Mindful • Let Go • Flow

H Y P N O s i s - c Oac H i N g Kary Broffman, R.N., c.H. 845-876-6753 • karybroffman.com

Primal Life Training Balanced alternative personal training adopts ancestral principles and incorporates them into modern life Keith Kenney, NSCA-CPT, CSCS

New Paltz 845-380-2314 primallifetraining.com

3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY 138 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 687-7589 www.stoneridgehealingarts.com

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whole living directory

Lorraine Hughes, Registered Herbalist (AHG) and ARCB Certified Reflexologist offers Wellness Consultations that therapeutically integrate Asian and Western Herbal Medicine and Nutrition with their holistic philosophies to health. This approach is grounded in Traditional Chinese Medicine with focus placed on an individual’s specific constitutional profile and imbalances. Please visit the website for more information and upcoming events.

www.health-quest.org


Drs. Tieri and Rosen are NY State Licensed Osteopathic Physicians specializing in Osteopathic Manipulation and Cranial Osteopathy. Please visit our website for articles, links, books, and much more information. Treatment of newborns, children, and adults. By appointment.

Pain Management Topical BioMedics Rhinebeck, NY (800) 959-1007 www.topricin.com

Physical Therapy Woodstock Physical Therapy

I NPATIENT T REATMENT

AND

WELLNESS CENTER

2568 Route 212, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-9767 www.woodstockphysicaltherapy.com

Physicians Dr. Louis Cox, Ph.D. and Sarah Cox, casac-t (646) 306-2319 smrwaves@gmail.com

Valley Endovascular Associates

whole living directory

Helping the alcoholic and addict find the gift of sobriety for over 4 decades and 4 generations. MEN’S PROGRAM

WOMEN’S PROGRAM

(845) 626-3555

Kerhonkson, New York

FAMILY PROGRAM

www.villaveritas.org

One Webster Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 483-5352 www.endovasulartherapy.com

Psychics

PROFESSIONAL TRAINING

e-mail: info@villaveritas.org

Licensed by NYS Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse

CARF Accredited

Psychically Speaking (845) 626-4895 or (212) 714-8125 www.psychicallyspeaking.com gail@psychicallyspeaking.com

Psychotherapy

Judy Swallow MA, LCAT, TEP

PSYCHOTHERAPIST • CONSULTANT

Rubenfeld Synergy® Psychodrama Training

~

25 Harrington St, New Paltz, NY 12561 (845) 255-7502

The Mother-Daughter Connection a parenting support group

New Paltz, NY (845) 706-0229

Janne Dooley, LCSW, Brigid’s Well New Paltz, NY (347) 834-5081 www.Brigidswell.com Janne@BrigidsWell.com

Brigid’s Well is a psychotherapy, coaching and supervision practice. Janne specializes in childhood trauma, addictions, codependency, relationship issues, and inner child work. Coaching for Life Transitions and Practice Building for Health Professionals. Starting in 2013 monthly Trauma Training Workshops for therapists and healers and Circle of Women Workshop Series. Call for information or consultation. FB page: www.BrigidsWell.com/ facebook. Sign up for Newsletter on Website.

Judy Swallow, MA, LCAT, TEP 25 Harrington Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-7502 www.hvpi.net

Rhinebeck/Red Hook,and Manhattan (845) 233-0705 S.SiegelLCSW@yahoo.com

Saturday mornings and Wednesday evenings • New Paltz, NY Facilitator: Amy Frisch, LCSW (845) 706-0229 for more information www.itsagirlthinginfo.com

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Resorts & Spas Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa 220 North Road, Milton, NY (877) 7-INN-SPA or (845) 795-1310 www.buttermilkfallsinn.com

Giannetta Salon and Spa 1158 North Avenue, Beacon, NY (845) 831-2421 www.gianettasalonandspa.com

Retreat Centers Garrison Institute Route 9D, Garrison, NY (845) 424-4800 www.garrisoninstitute.org garrison@garrisoninstitute.com

Retreats supporting positive personal and social change in a renovated monastery overlooking the Hudson River. David Frenette: Centered Life, Mindful Life, March 15-21, and Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World: A Mindfulness Meditation weekend for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, and Queer Communities, April 12-15.

Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-6897 ext. 0 www.menla.org menla@menla.org

Amy R. Frisch, LCSW

Steven C. Siegel, LCSW, CASAC

A support group for women raising teenage daughters

my approach is conversational and insightoriented. Together we can help you get more joy out of life and have fuller more meaningful relationships. I offer sliding scale payment and accept several insurance providers.

I am a clinical social worker and also a certified substance abuse counselor, skilled in working with teens and adults who struggle with depression, anxiety and addiction. I provide a nonjudgmental and safe environment in which we can explore and solve issues collaboratively. I rely heavily on cognitive-behavioral theory but

Spirituality AIM Group 6 Deming Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5650 www.sagehealingcenter.org

Tarot Tarot-on-the-Hudson, Rachel Pollack Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-5797 www.rachelpollack.com rachel@rachelpollack.com

Yoga Clear Yoga: Iyengar Yoga in Rhinebeck Suite 6423 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6129 www.clearyogarhinebeck.com

Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health Stockbridge, MA (800) 741-7353 www.kripalu.org

Satya Yoga Center Rhinebeck and Catskill, NY (845) 876-2528 www.satyayogacenter.us


Overeating and Food Addiction Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy

and breathe…

While sometimes endlessly alluring, overeating doesn’t actually satisfy any of our true and deepest hungers. These deep hungers are messages from the soul. We need to listen deeply to hear those messages. Learn how to deeply listen to your soul by being deeply listened to and discover how to gently and effectively unravel the pattern of overeating and food addiction. The Accord Center has been successfully helping people to dissolve the pattern of overeating and food addiction since 1986. 845 626 3191 • www.theaccordcenter.com Both in-person and phone sessions are available.

©2012

John M. Carroll H ,T ,S C EALER

EACHER

PIRITUAL

OUNSELOR

“ John is an extraordinary healer whom I have been privileged to know all my life. Miracles still do happen.” —Richard Brown, MD Author Stop Depression Now “ John Carroll is a most capable, worthy, and excellent healer of high integrity, compassion, and love.” —Gerald Epstein, MD Author Healing Visualizations

At Kripalu, we invite you to breathe—to intentionally pause the ongoing demands of life, bring your attention inward, and rediscover your authentic nature. Conscious engagement with the breath connects you with the intelligence and power of the life force within and around you. Whenever you are faced with a challenge— on the yoga mat, in a relationship, at work, or with your health—you can draw on a deep sense of ease, purpose, and mastery to create positive change. We call it the yoga of life. read kripalu.org/onlinelibrary/whydopranayama join the conversation

johnmcarrollhealer.com or call 845-338-8420

mission driven, donor supported Stockbridge, Massachusetts | 800-741-7353 | kripalu.org

Hansen Healing Carolyn E Hansen

Brennan Healing Science Practitioner Certified Hands of Light ™ Workshop Leader Brennan Integration Practitioner E X P E R I E N C E E N E R G Y H E A L I N G A S TA U G H T AT THE PREMIER HEALING SCHOOL IN THE WORLD

www.hansenhealing.com Give me a call! (845) 687-8440

Susan DeStefano Medical. Swedish. Deep Tissue. Hot Stone. Shiatsu. Craniosacral. Lymph Drainage. Reflexology. Specializing in relief of back neck & shoulders Advanced trainings in working on people with cancer

845.255.6482

JOY is an OPTION Cassandra Currie, MS, RYT How do you feel? Why wait?

For the way… you move you eat • Ayurvedic nutritionist

you relate • Master's level Psychotherapist appointments at my office/studio or in the comfort of your home call 845 • 532 • 7796 or email tripleplay.cassandra@gmail.com www.holisticcassandra.com 2/13 ChronograM whole living directory 91

whole living directory

See John’s website for schedules of upcoming classes and events.


THE BEST CALENDAR OF EVENTS IN THE HUDSON VALLEY Chronogram.com/events

Chronogram.com it’s new | it’s now

A

Put New Paltz on your Calendar www.newpaltz.edu/fpa 845.257.3860 M MUSIC

free D THE DORSKY MUSEUM

www.newpaltz.edu/music 845.257.2700

Ride on the Underground Railroad SPECIAL CONCERT EVENT African American History Month Feb.10 at 3:00 p.m. Julien J. Studley Theatre Ticket information: www.newpaltz.edu/music

publicprograms NATIONAL PARKS, NATIONAL TREASURES

www.newpaltz.edu/museum for a complete list of exhibitions 845.257.3844

Thursday, February 7 at 7 p.m. Each year, 275 million people visit our national parks. Jonathan Jarvis, Director of the National Park Service, will discuss preserving America’s most treasured landscapes and cultural icons. Join us for a picturesque program. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Seating is first come first served.

Photo-Rapide: François Deschamps and Malian Portrait Photography Thru April 14 Opening reception: Feb. 2 5–7:00 p.m.

First Sunday Free Gallery Tour Feb. 3 at 2:00 p.m.

West African Film Series Feb. 20 at 5:00 p.m. Lecture Center 104, Free

SE SPECIAL EVENT Paul Robeson Starring Floyd Patterson, Jr. Feb.16 at 7:30 p.m. McKenna Theatre Purchase tickets on line at www.unisonarts.org or by calling 845.255.1559

Faculty Jazz Recital

Feb. 26 at 8:00 p.m. Julien J. Studley Theatre Tickets $8, $6, $3 at the door

Friday, March 29 at 7 p.m. Should drinking water be accessible as a human right or is it a commodity? James Salzman, Duke’s Nicholas Institute Professor of Environmental Policy, will talk about his new book Drinking Water, examining the history and science of water—a basic human need. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Seating is first come first served.

Learn more at www.caryinstitute.org S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y O F N E W Y O R K

92 forecast ChronograM 2/13

THE WATER WE DRINK

2801 Sharon Turnpike (Rte. 44)|Millbrook, NY 12545|845 677-5343


star nigro

the forecast

event PREVIEWS & listings for FEBRuary 2013

Lucas Handwerker brings his modern mystery performances to Woodstock on February 9, 10, and 22.

Sleight of Handwerker By the time he was in his teens, Lucas Handwerker was already outgrowing sleight of hand. “I was always wanting to get outside of everyday reality,” Handwerker says. “But magic trick stuff lost its appeal. It’s basically lying to people. I stopped performing ‘tricks’ and started studying hypnotism—typical party trick hypnotism at first.” As a senior at Woodstock Day School, he delved into applied hypnosis and produced a 20-page thesis on its history, learning about its use as an alternative anesthetic, an aid to stamina and creativity, and a means of helping people to transcend their limitations. A friend asked Lucas whether hypnosis could help him ace a coming test, and the two tried a memory technique that had apparently incredible results. “He thought I must be messing with him; meanwhile, I thought he was messing with me,” Handwerker recalls. “A week later he called me and told me he’d used the same technique, hypnotized himself, and scored in the high 90s. I started to realize there was something to this.” Delving more deeply into applied hypnosis and branching out into neuro-linguistic programming techniques and psychological persuasion, he found his performance style evolving into a deeply interactive experience. “I’m more of a facilitator than a performer,” he says of the Modern Mystery evenings he presents. “More and more, I try to take the ego out of the equation. I don’t claim any special powers and I don’t do ‘tricks,’ as such. There’s a whole campy world of that out there that has nothing to do with what I’m doing.” What Handwerker does do is lead his audience down corridors in their own minds that they may not have realized existed, in an experience that’s been compared to a 19th-century parlor performance—an elegantly presented “symphony of wonders”

utterly lacking in hokum. “What I do is more about the audience than it is about me,” he says. “I use the techniques I’ve studied to bring out what the mind can do—to get people to the point where they are aware of their own untapped potential to memorize, to conquer their fears, to read each other’s minds using tiny cues.” The more this 19-year-old gives it away, shifting the spotlight to his guests’ previously unsuspected capabilities, the more he seems to charm. “Enthralling,” “inspiring,” and “Dopest show I have seen in a long time…just plain messes with your mind,” are a few of the remarks left in his online guestbook from those who’ve been there. “It’s a little different every time, and every last thing may not even work every single time,” Handwerker says candidly. “But people are mostly very engaged and welcoming—in four years I’ve never had a heckler. I think being genuine about what it is and isn’t helps. What it is can be hard to describe, but my goal is to plant a seed, so that people leave with a powerfully expanded awareness of their own capability. They don’t need me, they don’t need experts—they’ve got all the tools to use their intuition, their memory. I want people to go home knowing their own mental strength.” Lucas Handwerker is the opening act of Paul Green’s star-studded presentation of the music of “Jesus Christ Superstar,” a benefit the Woodstock Day School, at the Bearsville Theater on February 9 and 10. On February 22, he’ll present his latest incarnation of modern mystery, "The Process," as a headliner at the Kleinert/James Arts Center. Get tickets in advance—Handwerker prefers an intimate audience—and prepare to have your mind blown. Woodstockguild.org; Bearsvilletheater.com. —Anne Pyburn Craig

2/13 ChronograM forecast 93


Hey!

Now you can submit your calendar listings through our website. It's easy as 1, 2, 3. 1 go here 2 click here 3 fill out the event info form.

It's That Easy! FRIDAY 1 Business & Networking Saugerties First Friday Shops, galleries and eateries will stay open for the evening. Downtown Saugerties. 246-1000.

Clubs & Organizations HV:CREATE 8:30am. Free. Informal meet-up space for creatives to meet, connect, and inspire each other. W/Jeffrey Davis. MaMa Cafe, Stone Ridge. 679-9441.

Dance Creative Yoga Children’s Yoga Class 4pm. $104/8 week session. Ages 4 to 9. Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. Young Choreographers Company 4:15pm. $15/class or 10-class card $140. Ages 9-12 create their own choreography. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187.

Film Body of War 7:30pm. Ridgefield Playhouse, CT. (203) 438-5795. Under Our Skin 6pm. $10. The hidden story of Lyme disease. Woodstock Day School, Saugerties. (917) 406-4486.

Food & Wine Robbie Burns Night 6:30pm. $39.95. Traditional Scottish dinner: Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590.

Private Angelic Channeling 11:30am. $125 for 90 minutes. W/Margaret Doner. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 750-9484.

Theater Annie Get Your Gun 8pm. $26/$24 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Born Yesterday 8pm. $15/ $12. Garson Kanin’s American screw-ball comedy. County Players, Wappingers Falls. 298-1491. Community Playback Theatre 8pm. $8. Actors play back stories told by audience members. Boughton Place, Highland. 797-4111.

Workshops & Classes Basic Drawing and Painting 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Tor Gudmundsen. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Painting the Figure 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kieth Gunderson. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Portrait in Clay 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Keith Gunderson. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Printmaking 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kate McGloughlin. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. The Bradley Method of Natural Childbirth 6:30-8:30pm. $350. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie.

SATURDAY 2

Health & Wellness

Clubs & Organizations

Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. $65 6 weeks/$12 drop-in. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Craft Supply Sale 10am-2pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Subzero Heroes Call for time. An icy jump into a frozen lake to raise awareness about Alzheimer’s disease. Berean Park, Highland. 471-2655.

Kids & Family Kids’ Yoga 4:30-5:30pm. $135 10 weeks/$12 drop-in. Ages 4-10 Yuj Yoga & Fitness, Pleasant Valley. Story Time 10:30am. Ages 1-3. Age appropriate stories and songs. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. The Ugly Duckling & Tortoise and the Hare 10am. Bardavon, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Yoga for Toddlers & Preschoolers 10:30am. $30 for 4-wek series. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 684-7024.

Literary & Books Reading by Tony Fletcher 7:30pm. Author of Smiths bio. With Smiths music by Robert Burke Warren, and Grasshopper from Mercury Rev. Two Boots, Red Hook. 758-0010.

Music The Bar Spies 9:30pm. Classic rock. The Quiet Man Pub, Peekskill. Thequietmanpublichouse.com. Cabaret Night 8pm. Great American Songbook with students from the Vassar College choirs, with David Alpher at the piano. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. Vassar.edu. Charlie Hunter 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. CJ Boyd 8pm. $5. Spotty Dog, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. The Duke McVinnie Band 9pm. $5. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Far Beyond Gone 10pm. Nellie Kelly’s, Poughkeepsie. 485-5050. The Gold Hope Duo and Frank McGinnis 8pm. $5. Dave’s Coffee and Wine House, Saugerties. 246-8424. Joe Paj and the Heartbreakers 8:30pm. Classic rock. Pamela’s, Newburgh. 562-4505. Martin Sexton 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Open Mike Night 10pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Ryan Montbleau 8:30pm. $25/$20 in advance. With special guest Susan Kane Towne. Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Tony Leon and his Group: Son Latino 7:30-pm. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Vito and 4 Guys in Disguise 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Co., Hyde Park. 229-8277.

Nightlife Flashback Fridays 9pm. $5. DJ Kue Steel House, Kingston. 338-7847.

Spirituality Krishna Das: Heart of Devotion Retreat Call for times. A weekend retreat of chanting and devotional practice Garrison Institute. 424-4800. Mindfulness Meditation Group of Gardiner 4:30-5:30pm. Led by George Devine. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. George7000@aol.com.

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Dance Vanaver Caravan DanceFest 2013 3:30/7:30pm. $15/$10. 11 HV dance schools perform. McKenna Theater, SUNY New Paltz. 256-9300. Swing Dance 7:30-10:30pm. $10. Linda and Chester Freeman. MAC Fitness, Kingston. 853-7377.

Food & Wine The Kingston Farmers’ Winter Market 10am-2pm. Old Dutch Church, Kingston. Kingstonfarmersmarket.org.

Health & Wellness Qi Gong Class 11am-noon. Wellness Center of Hyde Park, Hyde Park. 416-4598. Tai Chi in Woodstock 10am. $10. Woodstock Comm. Ctr. 679-2560. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. $65 6 weeks/$12 drop-in. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Creative Building Competition 10am. $10. Bring your own materials and build! Open to students in grade K-6. St. Joseph’s School, Kingston. 339-4390. Magician Margaret Steele 11am. $9/$7 children. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Mama’s Social Circle 10am. $5. A place to meet new and current friends. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Parents Choice Award Performer John Farrell 11am. $8 per person/$20 per family. Family sing along. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. We’re Goin’ on a Bear Hunt 11am/2pm. $20/$15 children. Ideal for ages 3-8 Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

Lectures & Talks Houseplant Smackdown 10am-2pm. $85/. Bring a plant to repot or be evaluated. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Literary & Books Poetry Brothel 7pm. Poetry in the style of a turn of the century brothel. Backstage Studio Productions, Kingston. 481-5158. Poetry on the Loose Reading/Performance Series 3:30pm. Featuring Anne Gorrick. Seligmann Center for the Arts, Sugar Loaf. 294-8085.

Music 3 and Stellar Young 8pm. $15. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Bob Stump & The Blue Mountain Band 8pm. $10. Mixing bluegrass, blues, country rock and jazz. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. Bryan Gordon 8pm. Acoustic. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000.

Coyote Love 9pm. Indie. The Andes Hotel, Andes. 676-3980. David Kraai & Amy Laber 8:30pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Deanna Witkowski Trio 7:30pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. The Differents 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. Ed Palermo Big Band 7:30pm. With Napoleon Murphy Brock. Rock. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Garland Jeffreys Band 8:30pm. $30 advance/ $35 door. Singer/songwriter. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. The Kurt Henry Band 8pm. Progressive. rock Peekskill Coffee House, Peekskill. (914) 739-1287. Madrigal Singing 2-3pm. All levels welcome. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Mahagonny Ensemble 7pm. William Healy's new work Upon Our Looking Glass. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370. Metropolitan Opera Live in HD: The Magistrate 6:30pm. $25/$20 members/$15 students. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Sweet Clementines and Damian Calcagne Band 10pm. $5. New Paltz smart pop band w/New Jersey roots rock royalty. Bacchus, New Paltz. 255-8636.

Nightlife Club Light 10:30pm. $10/$5. With DJ Kue The Steel House, Kingston. 338-7847. DJ Dance Party with In The Cut 9:30pm. $5. Two Boots, Red Hook. 758-0010. Freestyle Frolic 8:30pm-1am. $2-$10, children and volunteers free. Knights of Columbus, Kingston. 658-8319.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Adaptive Sports Foundation’s Winter Gala 7:30pm. $175/$150. Windham Mountain Ski Resort, Windham. (518) 734-4300. ASK's First Saturday Reception 5-8pm. Arts Society of Kingston, Kingston. 338-0331. Huguenot Street Farm Open House 4-6pm. Meet the farmers and learn about the CSA. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 419-2164.

Outdoors & Recreation Explore Columbia County Outdoors 2-4pm. Join the Columbia Land Conservancy and explore this 143 acre preserve. KEEP Conservation Preserve, Germantown. Clctrust.org/event-education.

Spirituality Imbolc Drumming Meditation Circle 2pm. $20/$15. With Kristine Flones. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100. Kirtan or Devotional Chanting 7-9pm. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Theater Annie Get Your Gun 8pm. $26/$24 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Born Yesterday 8pm. $15/ $12. Garson Kanin’s American screw-ball comedy. County Players, Wappingers Falls. 298-1491.

Workshops & Classes Basic Drawing and Painting 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Tor Gudmundsen. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Creative Writing Using Music from the Great American Songbook 1-3pm. Kirpal Gordon. Seligmann Center for the Arts, Sugar Loaf. 469-9459. Printmaking 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kate McGloughlin Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Singing Bowls of the Himalayas 2pm. $55. Hosted by Himalayan Bowl Master Mitch Nur, PhD. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Zumba 10am. $10. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. Jenzumbamama@aol.com.

SUNDAY 3 Clubs & Organizations Four Chaplain’s Day 2pm. Tribute to men who sacrificed their lives to save others when their ship sank. The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, New Windsor. 561-1765.

Dance Swing Dance 6:30-9pm. $10/$6 FT students. 6pm beginners lesson Arlington Reformed Church, Poughkeepsie. 454-2571.

Film Buster Keaton’s The Cameraman 2pm. Rosendale Theater Collective, Rosendale. Rosendaletheatre.org.

Health & Wellness Community Yoga 4:30pm. $5. The Yoga House, Kingston. 706-9642. Ying Yang Yawn & The Yoga of Sound 5-6:30pm. $15. A Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. $65 6 weeks/$12 drop-in. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Good Dog Program 9:30-10:30am. Children can read to a furry friend. Copake United Methodist Church. (518) 329-2523.

LEctures & Talks Politics and the Arts – An Open Dialogue 3pm. Martha Rosler, artist, Stephen Squibb writer and producer Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370.

Literary & Books Dirt Candy: Amanda Cohen 2-5pm. Upstart New York City vegetarian restaurant. Blue Cashew Kitchen Pharmacy, Rhinebeck. 876-1117. Hudson Valley YA Society 4pm. Featured authors: Gayle Forman, Elizabeth LaBan, and Amy McNamara. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. Rsvp@oblongbooks.com.

Music Blue Öyster Cult 8pm. $70. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Erik Lawrence Trio 10am. Sunday brunch The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Kairos: A Consort of Singers 4pm. $10. Holy Cross Monastery, West Park. 384-6660. Musical Brunch with Finley & Pagdon 11am. Café Mezzaluna, Saugerties. 246-5306.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Open Farm at Brook Farm 1pm. Brook Farm, New Paltz. 255-1052.

Spirituality A Course In Miracles (ACIM) Study Group 4pm. Open study group. Woodstock Library, Woodstock. (609) 865-8544. Sacred Chanting 10:30am-noon. $10. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Satsang with Gurudev Swami Nityananda 10am-noon. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Theater Annie Get Your Gun 3pm. $26/$24 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Born Yesterday 8pm. $15/ $12. Garson Kanin’s American screw-ball comedy. County Players, Wappingers Falls. 298-1491.

Workshops & Classes The Artist's Way Cluster 11am-1pm. Arts Society of Kingston, Kingston. 338-0331. Hypnobabies, Childbirth Hypnosis 10am-1pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Painting Artforms in Nature II with Yura Adams 1:30-4pm. $185, $155 members. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Print ans Stitch Block Prints and Fabric Cards 1-4pm. $42. Learn to carve your own rubber stamp(s). Ages 16+ Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132.

MONDAY 4 Business & Networking Dutchess Peace Meeting 5:30-7pm. Unitarian Fellowship, Pok. 876-7906.

Dance Creative Yoga Children’s Yoga Class 4pm. $104/8 week session. Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. Fusion Dance 5:30 & 6:45pm. $15. Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. Swing Dance Class Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, advanced 8pm Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331.

Health & Wellness Caregiver Support Group First Monday, Wednesday of every month, 10-11:15am. New Paltz Village Hall, New Paltz. 338-2980. Fitness Hour 4pm. Saugerties Public Library. 246-4317. The Gurdjieff Expansion Series 7:30-9:30pm. $5. With Jason Stern. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.


Music Linda Lavin

image provided

Broadway Baby Heads Upriver Hash slinging at Mel’s Diner wasn’t a career choice for the title character of the TV series “Alice”; it was a side job for aspiring singer Alice Hyatt. Linda Lavin, who played the iconic waitress for nine years, brought to the role a pair of pipes groomed in Manhattan cabarets and Broadway musicals. When “Alice” ended in 1985, Lavin moved on with a vengeance, producing TV movies and then returning to Broadway to win a Tony for “Broadway Bound” and to grab further accolades for “Gypsy,” “The Diary of Anne Frank,” “The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife” and last year’s “The Lyons.” But Lavin had never strayed far from singing, as proven by her 2011 CD Possibilities, as well as her cabaret show, which has toured for the past decade. The act showcases jazz, swing, Bossa Nova, and American Songbook with tart reminiscences of her early days on The Great White Way. The show arrives at Helsinki Hudson on February 10. “It’s meant to be an easy, fun, friendly, exciting, hot, sophisticated, romantic evening,” says Lavin. “And it is all of that.” $50 reserved seating, $30 barstool. (518) 828-4800; Helsinkihudson.com. —Jay Blotcher

other. It’s another way of loving, to make music together. And so, it’s not anything except total joy to me when we get together to do these shows.

Where did the idea for this cabaret show come from? Linda Lavin: I’ve been doing it about 10 years, and this show has evolved. I’ve been working all over the country with this act. The first time I did the act, I called it “The Song Remembers When,” and that was the centerpiece of the act, a wonderful Trisha Yearwood song that’s on the CD Possibilities.

For five years you and Steve Bakunas have operated and performed at the Red Barn Theatre in Wilmington, North Carolina. Now, you’re relocating? Linda Lavin: Yes, we have donated the Red Barn Theatre to the Cape Fear Community College theater department, which desperately needs a theater. We are ready for a new adventure, so we’re making our home in New York City and we’ve bought a weekend place in Upstate New York, which Steve is rebuilding.

You’re working again with Billy Stritch, a longtime collaborator. How do you two bring out the best in each other? Linda Lavin: We’ve been friends since 1993, when we met. I don’t know how we bring out the best in each other. But I do know that I love working with him. I love singing with him because he’s an extraordinary musician with great passion for the music—and clarity. And delicacy and firmness. He’s a great accompanist. Because he is a singer himself, he knows where the support needs to be. He knows where to comfort the singer and elevate the singer. And so, in all those ways, he brings out and supports and enhances the best in me. I don’t know what I do for him, but I know we have a wonderful time together. Let’s talk about another important onstage collaborator, Steve Bakunas. You share both work and life together. How are you able to make that succeed? Linda Lavin: Easily. Really, that’s just another one of our ways of connecting. Steve and I have a very full and creative life. We have a very simple life. We love to travel. We like to cook and we like to go out to restaurants. We like to be with ourselves and each other and with friends. We’re very comfortable with each other and on our own. And so we just extend those parts of ourselves into the music. It’s another way of being who we are. We are a couple of individuals who also support each other and enhance each

You said that the show has evolved over a period of time. Could you give examples? Linda Lavin: As I evolve, the songs tell the story of me. There are songs that I’ve either known all my life or songs that I wish I had sung and I want to sing now. So, I’m not the same person I was when I started this act 10 years ago. I started with a bunch of different songs 10 years ago and many of them have been discarded. I am who I am now. And the songs reflect me now, which is why I call the show “Now.” What is your preference for your next project? Linda Lavin: Oh, it’s really always about the material. If the material is wonderful, that’s where I’ll be, whether it’s television, theater, film. I have a film coming out in the spring called A Short History of Decay, and it’s the story of a woman with early Alzheimer’s. It’s an independent movie by writer-director Michael Marin and it will hopefully be in some festivals. And as far as the small screen is concerned, I’m looking into the possibility of some television pilots this season. This act I will continue to do until nobody wants me to do it anymore.

In your varied career, you seem to keep challenging yourself. Do you like moving outside of your comfort zone? Linda Lavin: I don’t think anybody likes moving out of their comfort zone. It’s always scary. But I think it’s essential for an artist and I think it’s essential for a human being who believes that they can grow and change to step into zones that are challenging and uncomfortable and scary. I think growth comes from the willingness to change and the courage to change, that we become the people, the persons, the human beings that we really want to be—if we will only get out of our way and be hopeful and explore all the possibilities of ourselves, all the potential of ourselves. That is why I call the CD Possibilities. Without possibilities, we stay stagnant, and that’s a kind of death for me.

chronogram.com Listen to Jay Blotcher's full interview with Linda Lavin.

2/13 ChronograM forecast 95


Mama’s Group with Breastfeeding Support 1:30-3pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. New Mother’s Adjustment Support Group 6:30-8:30pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. QiGong Class 6:30pm. Pleasant Valley. 635-2695. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Cruisers Play Group noon. $5. Ages 6-18 months. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Lego Club 6:30pm. Ages 7-12. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Music Together Babies: Birth-9mo 11:45am-12:30pm. $145/8 weeks/$10 1st time registration fee/$100 sibling. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie.

Lectures & Talks HUAC and McCarthyism 8pm. Sidney Plotkin will discuss the House UnAmerican Activities Committee and McCarthy hearings. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370.

Literary & Books Bookmark Club 4pm. Book reading journey for elementary age students. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

Spirituality Gurdjieff’s Teaching: An Approach to Inner Work 7:30pm. $5 donation. Facilitated by Jason Stern. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Private Energy Healing Sessions 12pm. $75 for 50 minutes. Bente Hansen works with The Orion, a healing group from the 17th dimension. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100. Private Spirit Guide Readings with Adam Bernstein 12pm. $40 for half hour/$75 for one hour. With Psychic medium. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100. Qigong with Zach Baker 11am-noon & 5:30-6:30pm. $5/$10/$12. Seniors meet at 11am. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Lectures & Talks Fake News vs. Real News 8pm. Political satirist and comedian Mo Rocca. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370. New Year and Old Wars in the Middle East 7pm. Phyllis Bennis. Bertelsmann Campus Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. (518) 966-5366. Commercial Fishing in the Hudson Valley 6:30-8pm. Local experts will discuss strategies for conserving the region’s habitats and wildlife. Scenic Hudson’s River Center, Beacon. Scenichudson.org.

kids & family Playspace for Tots 10-10:45am. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Music Open Mike with Chrissy Budzinski 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Informational Tour of Campus 10:30am. The Kildonan School, Amenia. 373-2012.

Spirituality Meditation in the Temple 6:30-7:15pm. Silent meditation with the Shanti Mandir community. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Workshops & Classes Advanced Landscape Care & Garden Maintenance 6-9pm. Weekly through Feb. 26. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926. Argentine Tango Class 7:30-8:30pm. Sadhana Center for Yoga and Meditation, Hudson. (518) 537-2589.

New Year Yoga 5pm. $88/8 wks. Taught by Mary Maitri Farel. Learn basic yoga postures. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 687-0617. QiGong - Discover the Benefits 9am. $12/$44 per month. Stone Ridge Healing Arts, Stone Ridge. 399-1033. Tai Chi 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Vinyasa Yoga 6:30-7:30pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Wabi Sabi Yoga 4-5pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family After School Art 3:30-5pm. Ages 3 and up. Scenic Hudson’s River Center, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. Art Class with Art Lab 3:30pm.Kid Around, Saugerties. 247-3342. Children’s Story Hours 10:30am. Toddler Time Tuesday (18 months to 3 years) and Preschool Wednesday (3 years to 5 years) followed by crafts and music. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Clay Play 3:30-5pm. $38/2 classes, $72/4 classes, $150/10 classes. Ages 5+. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. Great Fours and Fives Story Time 1:30-2:30pm. Children hear stories, explore books. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Food & Wine Arlington Farmers’ Market 3-7pm. College Center, Poughkeepsie.

Health & Wellness Caregiver Support Group 7:30-8:45pm. Saugerties Senior Center, Saugerties. Fitness Hour 4pm. Saugerties Public Library. 246-4317. Fun-Food-Fitness Youth Program 5-6:30pm. $25. 5-week program focused on both balanced nutrition and exercise for adolescents ages 8-13 and their parents Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 871-3600. Gurdjieff’s Movements: Inner Work & Sacred Dance 7:30-9:30pm. $5. Facilitated by Jason Stern Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Healthy Living Workshop: Why Supplementation? 8pm. Fitness Fusion of the Hudson Valley, Red Hook. 835-8048. Integrated Energy Healing with “Heart Whisperer” Kristine Flones 11:30am. $75 for 50 minutes/$95 for 80 minutes. A restorative combination of energy healing modalities. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 750-9484. Mama’s Group with Breastfeeding Support 1-3pm. 1-2pm infant under 1 year and 2-3pm toddler all ages Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Prenatal Yoga 6:15-7:30pm. $90/6 weeks. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Stress Reduction through Meditation 10:30am. This is a great way to find inner balance and deep relaxation. Kingston Library, Kingston. 339-8567. Wabi Sabi Yoga 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Yoga, Mind, and Body 6pm. $90/9 sessions. With Karen Signor. Women’s View Acupuncture, Rhinebeck. 876-7844. Zumba 6:45-7:45pm. $40/4sessions, $12 drop in. W/Amanda Gresens. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Workshops & Classes

Kids & Family

Adventures with Color 9am-4pm. $370. Through Feb. 7. With K.L. McKenna Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Beginner/Intermediate Pilates Mat Class 6:30pm. $10. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Photographing the Grand Landscape 6-8pm. Master class by Greg Miller Orange Hall Gallery, Middletown. 341-4790. Pilates Mat Class: Community Class 12pm. $5 donation. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Plant Propagation 6-9pm. $185. A level III course. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926. Technique and Improvisation 4:30pm. $15/class or 10-class card for $140. For 6-8 yr olds with Clyde Forth. Beginner ballet class. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 347-927-1187.

Brianna’s Blooming Barefoot Books Storytime 11:30am. Storytime for any ages New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Creative Youth Studio 3:30-5:30pm. $38/2 classes, $72/4 classes, $150/10 classes. Mixed-media open studio. Age 5+. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. Tiny Tots Storytime 11:15am. Ages 1-3. Age appropriate stories and songs Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

TUESDAY 5 Clubs & Organizations Young Mothers’ Group 5pm. For pregnant and parenting women under the age of 25. YWCA of Ulster County, Kingston. 338-6844.

Health & Wellness Afro-Caribbean Fitness 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Ages 3+ M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Caregiver Support Group 10-11:15am. Town of Shandaken Town Hall. 338-2980. Gentle Yoga for Mamas 4:30pm. $15/$50 for 4 classes. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Pilates: Mama with Baby 12:45-1:30pm. $15/$100 8 weeks. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Tai Chi Chuan 10am. $12 per class $44 per momth. Marbletown Community Center, Stone Ridge. 3991033. Wabi Sabi Yoga 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Zumba 6:45-7:45pm. $40/4sessions, $12 drop in. W/Amanda Gresens. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Kids & Family Bouncing Babies Story Time 9:30-10am. Birth to 18 months old. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Children’s Story Hours 10:30am. Toddler Time Tuesday (18 months to 3 years) and Preschool Wednesday (3 years to 5 years) followed by crafts and music. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. New Mother’s Social Circle 10am. $5. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624. Scrabble 4pm. Come test your vocabulary. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Spanish Club for Youth 4:30-5:30pm. Practice conversational Spanish. Ages 10 and older. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Terrific Two’s and Three’s Story Time 10-10:45am. Books, action rhymes, music, and crafts. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Tuesday Tales 11am. Stories, songs and more for 3-6 year olds. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

96 forecast ChronograM 2/13

Future of Tibet The Tibetan Center in Kingston and the Human Rights Project of Bard College co-host a twohour panel discussion, “The Future of Tibet,” at Bard’s Bertelsmann Campus on February 23. Panelists include Tendor, the executive director of Students for a Free Tibet; the Honorable Lobsang Nyandak, His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s Representative to the Americas; Tibetan scholar and President of Tibet House US Dr. Robert Thurman; Director of the Modern Tibet Studies Program at Columbia University Robert Barnett; and Professor of Political Science at City University of New York Ming Xia. The discussion focuses on the forced assimilation, repression, torture, displacement, and imprisonment that Tibetans have faced under more than 60 years of Chinese rule, resulting in an increased number of protests and suicides in the past year. The panel will examine past atrocities, the possibility for a reconciled future, and why world-leading countries have denied adequate help. Tibetancenter.org Artistic Anatomy 1-4pm. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Boxing Conditioning 6pm. $10. Workout with a certified boxing trainer. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Ecorche 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Intermediate Pilates Mat Class 9am. $10. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Life Drawing Sessions 7:30-9:30pm. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Managing Credit and Debt 6:30pm. Presented by Hope Glashen. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145. Mother/Daughter Belly Dancing Class 7:30pm. $20/4 weeks $69/mother daughter $118. Casperkill Rec Center, Poughkeepsie. (914) 874-4541. M*Power Dance 4:30-5:45pm. Ages 6-18. M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Teen Art Lab 3:30-5pm. After school art program with Jessica Poser. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. What do Doulas Do? 7pm. Curious about the role of a Doula? Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 684-7024.

WEDNESDAY 6 Dance Hip Hop Dance 5:15-6:15pm. All ages. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Film Original Short Films 8pm. A selection of student short films. Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370.

Health & Wellness Caregiver Support Group First Monday, Wednesday of every month, 10-11:15am. New Paltz Village Hall, New Paltz. 338-2980. Community Style Acupuncture 10am-noon. $30. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Gentle Yoga with Kelly 7:30-8:30pm. $10/$50 for 6 classes. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Music & Movement for Toddlers with Abby Lappen 10-10:45am. Ages 18 months and up. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Lectures & Talks Music and Words 3:30pm. Chamber music and original poetry by students Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370.

Literary & Books Classics in Religion: The Early Church 10:30-11:30am. Dr. Justo Gonzalez. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Hudson Community Book Group 6-7:30pm. 3rd through 5th graders. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Music Daughtry and 3 Doors Down 7pm. $51.50. Opening act: Aranda. Mid-Hudson Civic Center, Poughkeepsie. 454-5800. A Ride on the Underground Railroad Master Class 5pm. SUNY vocal students. Shepard Recital Hall, New Paltz. 257-2700.

Nightlife Terraoke! Karoake Night 10pm. Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro, Rhinebeck. 876-3330.

Spirituality A Course in Miracles 7:30-9:30pm. Study group with Alice Broner. Call to verify. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 229-8391.

Workshops & Classes Belly Dance Classes: Intermediate 7pm. $15. W/ Willow. Artspace at Ed Dempsey Tattoos, Woodstock. 594-8673. Express Yourself 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Leslie Bender. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Swing Dance Class Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, advanced 8pm. Linda & Chester Freeman. Boughton Place, Highland. 236-3939.

THURSDAY 7 Clubs & Organizations Gardiner Library Book Club First Thursday of every month, 3-4pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Film Freeze Frame Check website for times. Featuring Hudson Valley filmmakers The Beacon Theatre, Beacon. (914) 474-5986.

Lectures & Talks National Parks, National Treasures 7pm. Jonathan Jarvis, director of the National Park Service, Cary Institute, Millbrook. 677-5343.

Literary & Books Gardiner Library Book Club 3-4pm. Mrs. Queen Takes the Train by William Kuhn Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Poetry Slam2 7pm. Crafted Kup, Poughkeepsie. Craftedkup.com.

Music Acoustic Thursdays with Kurt Henry 6pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Late Night at Lehman Loeb Art Center 7pm. Chamber music and readings of original prose by Vassar students Loeb Art Center, Pok. 437-5370. The Dirty Dozen Brass Band 7:30pm. $44/$39 in advance. New Orleans band. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Group Guitar Lesson 5-6pm. $30/month (2 lessons). With Peter Theodore. All styles welcome. Acoustic and electric. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. JP Patrick & Friends 8:30pm. Blues, rock and jazz 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Live Jazz 7pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Vignettes of the Harlem Renaissance 7-10pm. McKenna Theatre, New Paltz. The Trapps 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits High Meadow School Open House 9:30-11am. For Grades 5 through 8. High Meadow School, Stone Ridge. 687-4855.

Spirituality Meditation in the Temple 6:30-7:15pm. Silent meditation with the Shanti Mandir community. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Workshops & Classes Beginner Ballet for Adults & Teens 7pm. $15. Instructor: Hillary Jackson. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Belly Dance Classes: Beginner 7pm. $12. W/ Willow. Artspace at Ed Dempsey Tattoos, Woodstock. 594-8673. Boxing Conditioning 6pm. $10. Workout with a certified boxing trainer. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Bullied, Bashed, but Not Broken 10:30am. $11/$10. To give teachers, students and parents the tools they need to stomp out bullying. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Drawing, Painting & Composition 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Eric Angeloch. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Ecstatic Dance Class 6:45pm. $10. Meditation-in-motion, a path toward wholeness. Shakti Yoga, Saugerties. 417-8341


Philosophy Simon Critchley image provided Simon Critchley speaks on "Philosophy and the Art of Dying" at EMPAC in Troy on February 12.

Funny Stories About Death Simon Critchley is a philosopher and public intellectual. Born in Hertfordshire, England

Critchley: Philosophy has become a profession, part of the university industry.

in 1960, he studied at the University of Oxford and the University of Nice—a rare

Philosophers dress themselves in the garb of science, and speak a technical language

Englishman who chose to pursue continental philosophy. He has been a professor at

which they hope no one else will understand—but the questions philosophy asks are

the New School for Social Research since 2004. Critchley is a prolific writer, averaging

still essential to the human enterprise. One of the most essential questions is the fact

one book a year since 2001. His most recent is The Faith of the Faithless, an effort to

they we’re going to die, and what relationship should we have to that fact? That’s pretty

create a system of belief for unbelievers. Critchley is moderator of “The Stone,” a forum

important, right? Death and taxes?

for contemporary philosophers in the New York Times. Simon Critchley will speak on “Philosophy and the Art of Dying” at EMPAC in Troy on February 12 at 6pm. The event is free. (518) 276-3921; Empac.rpi.edu. —Sparrow You’re giving a talk at EMPAC about dead philosophers? Critchley: Apparently. About the dying words of philosophers? Is that right? Critchley: Well, I wrote The Book of Dead Philosophers in 2009, which is a compendium of 190 deaths, from the pre-Socratics, in the 7th century BC, until... me. It’s a series of accounts of how philosophers died, and what we might learn from that. Philosophy’s an odd subject, because it begins with a death—the death of Socrates. Socrates is often considered to be the first philosopher, and was condemned by the city of Athens, given the choice of exile or death. He chose to die. Plato devoted four

It’s too bad philosophy has never resolved the problem of taxes. Critchley: You can evade taxes, but you can’t evade death. In the last the election, we learned that 47 percent of Americans don’t pay taxes— but they still die. Critchley: Even billionaires die! It’s the great leveler. It shows no respect for status and wealth—which is the nice thing about death. They haven’t been able to create a class system for death. Critchley: In a sense, they have, or they’ve tried to. One development is cryogenic freezing. Simon Cowell books his place in a cryogenic facility out there in the Nevada desert, where his body will be preserved and resuscitated when it becomes possible to do that. There’s been an obsession with refuting death, not so much with a spiritual afterlife as a fantasy of living forever on earth. Book Three of Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift has these amazing characters

texts to the trial and execution of Socrates, and in the last one of those, which is called

called the Struldbrugs. The Struldbrugs are human beings who are immortal.

the Phaedo, he talks about the philosopher as the one who prepares for death, who is

They have a black spot in the middle of their foreheads, and they can be found

not scared of death—of philosophy as an art of dying. It allows us to go to our death

slouched against walls—they’ve lost all interest in life. The worst curse imaginable

with a certain equanimity and tranquility.

is endless life.

Do you spend a lot of time preparing to die?

Death is the great leveler, but philosophers traditionally were seen as almost

Critchley: Well, yes and no. It depends what mood I’m in. Sometimes I don’t think

immune to death, as being on a higher spiritual level.

about it at all! [Laughs.] When I was writing the book, I was thinking about it quite a

Critchley: Well, there is that. One of the things I concentrate on is the ridiculousness

lot. I was living in Los Angeles, which is a great city to ponder mortality, because it’s a

of certain deaths. There was a great philosopher called La Mettrie, who wrote a book

city premised upon eternal youth—a city where death doesn’t really fit.

called The Man Machine in the 18th century, and who worked for Frederick the Great of

Do you have concrete plans for your own death? Critchley: I want my ashes to be scattered in the goal at the top end of the Liverpool football club. As for my epitaph, I’m contemplating: “He was a man more sinned against than sinning.”

Prussia, as many French intellectuals did in that period. He was a doctor, and a good doctor. He saved a dignitary in the Prussian court from a dreadful disease, and as a reward he was given a wonderful feast, with a delicious paté—which turned out to be contaminated—and he died of food poisoning. So, “Physician, heal thyself!” There are

But in the modern world, philosophers don’t really discuss their approach to death.

deaths that crown lives, but there are also deaths which are a bit more comical. There

Hasn’t that disappeared from philosophy?

are some strange stories, which I plan to tell in Troy. 2/13 ChronograM forecast 97


For the Birds! 4-5:30pm. An elementary education program that teaches environmental awareness. Scenic Hudson’s River Center, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. Life Drawing Sessions 7:30-9:30pm. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Love-to-Dance Class 6:30pm. $15. Laban and Authentic Movement techniques connect movement with emotions. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. M*Power Dance 4:30-5:45pm. Ages 6-18. M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Rendering in Black & White 9am-noon. With Vince Natale. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

FRIDAY 8 Dance Creative Yoga Children’s Yoga Class 4pm. $104/8 week session. Creative yoga class for children ages 4 to 9. Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. LeeSaar The Company: Grass and Jackals 8pm. Boundary-pushing choreography. Mass MoCA, North Adams, MA. (413) 662-2111. Vassar Repertory Dance Theatre 8pm. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7470. Young Choreographers Company 4:15pm. $15/class or 10-class card $140. For ages 9-12. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187.

Film Airplane 7pm. $10. Includes popcorn and soda. Mikey Teutul’s Wolfgang Gallery, Montgomery. 769-7446. Anna Karenina Call for times. Rosendale Theater Collective, Rosendale. Rosendaletheatre.org. Freeze Frame Check website for times.Featuring Hudson Valley filmmakers. Beacon Theatre, Beacon. (914) 474-5986. North by Northwest 7:30pm. UPAC, Kingston. 339-6088.

Food & Wine Absinthe Dinner 7pm. Reservations required. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900.

Health & Wellness Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Kids’ Yoga 4:30-5:30pm. $135 10 weeks/$12 drop-in. Ages 4-10 Yuj Yoga & Fitness, Pleasant Valley. Story Time 10:30am. Ages 1-3. Age appropriate stories and songs. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Yoga for Toddlers & Preschoolers 10:30am. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 684-7024.

Lectures & Talks Report on the Code Pink Delegation to Pakistan 7pm. Presented by Paki Wieland. New Paltz Village Hall, New Paltz. 876-7906.

Literary & Books Meet Justine Blau 7pm. Author of Scattered Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300. Teen Book Club 4-5pm. Discussing Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Writers Evening Hosted by Leslie Gerber 7pm. PoetJudith Lechner, followed by open mike Café Mezzaluna, Saugerties. 246-5306.

Music Alexander Turnquist and Eric Carbonara 9pm. Guitarists Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Chris Raabe 8:30pm. Blues. Pamela’s, Newburgh. 562-4505. The Cupcakes 8pm. Acoustic Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Drew Bordeaux 9:30pm. Acoustic 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Emily Sprague, Vacation, and Shana Falana 8pm. $5. Spotty Dog, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Fat City 9:30pm. Blues. Bacchus, New Paltz. 255-8636. Kat Edmonson Group 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Larry Kolker 7:30pm. Singer/songwriter BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Leo & the Lizards 10pm. Classic rock. The National Hotel Bar And Grill, Montgomery. 457-1123. Lick the Toad 9:45pm. Classic rock. Billy Bob’s BBQ, Poughkeepsie. 471-7870. Maria Hickey &4G 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. Open Mike Night 6:30pm. Music, poetry, spoken word Irving Farm Coffee House, Millerton. 518-789-6540. Personal World 10pm. All original instrumental music from Mark Dziuba (guitar), Jim Donica (bass), and Chris Bowman (drums). Market Market Café, Rosendale. 658-3164. Second Friday Jam with Jeff Entin & Bob Blum 8:30pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Time Travels, Stellar Young, and Goodnight Brother 8pm. $5. Rock Dave’s Coffee and Wine House, Saugerties. 246-8424.

Nightlife Flashback Fridays 9pm. $5. With DJ Kue The Steel House, Kingston. 338-7847.

98 forecast ChronograM 2/13

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Go Red For Women Luncheon 9am-2pm. The keynote speaker is Celebrity Chef Ellie Krieger. The Grandview, Poughkeepsie. 905-2127.

Spirituality The Garrison Institute Personal Retreat Weekend $270. Spend quiet time in your personal spiritual practice. Garrison Institute, Garrison. 424-4800. Mindfulness Meditation Group of Gardiner 4:30-5:30pm. Lead by George Devine. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. George7000@aol.com.

Theater Annie Get Your Gun 8pm. $26/$24 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Born Yesterday 8pm. $15/ $12. Garson Kanin’s American screw-ball comedy. County Players, Wappingers Falls. 298-1491. Dramatic Reading of Wolf-Man 5pm. By Liz Egloff, visiting instructor of playwriting in the Department of Drama Vassar College: Vogelstein Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599.

Workshops & Classes Basic Drawing and Painting 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Tor Gudmundsen Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Bullied, Bashed but Not Broken 7:30pm. $11/$10. The Get Real Series. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Painting the Figure 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Portrait in Clay 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Keith Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Printmaking 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kate McGloughlin Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Title: The Bradley Method of Natural Childbirth 6:30-8:30pm. $350. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie.

Madrigal Singing 2-3pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Mardi Gras Celebration with DJs Mr Chips and Mikey Palms 9:30pm. $5. Two Boots, Red Hook. 758-0010. Mark Raisch Trio 6:30pm. Jazz Coppola’s Ristorante, Hyde Park. Coppolas.net/CoppolasRistorante/index.html. Music of Jesus Christ Super Star 9pm. $65/$45/$35/$20. A WDS Benefit Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. New Zion Trio 8pm. Roots, reggae, dub, doom and jazz styles in a soulful acoustic setting. Kleinert/James Center for the Arts, Woodstock. 679-2079. Robert Randolph Presents The Slide Brothers 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. The Rock Tavern Chapter of the Hudson Valley Folk Guild Coffeehouse 6:30pm. $6/$5 members. Featuring Meg Braun. Unitarian Universalist Congregation at Rock Tavern, New Windsor. Uucrt.org. Something to Say Café 7pm. Featuring up-and-coming singing group Thomas Wesley Stern and local singer-songwriter Jacob Bernz Howland Cultural Center, Beacon. 831-4988. Soul Purpose 9pm. Motown/R&B The Gold Fox Restaurant, Gardiner. 255-3700.

Nightlife Club Light 10:30pm. DJ Kue. Steel House, Kingston. 338-7847. Mardi Gras Celebration with the Tin Pan Band 7:30pm. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits

Film

Atlantic Custom Homes-Open House Weekend 10am-5pm. Visit their 3,600sf Classic Lindal Cedar Homes Model. Atlantic Custom Homes, Cold Spring. (888) 558-2636. Live Demonstration by WRS Artsits 5-7pm. Wallkill River School and Art Gallery, Montgomery. 457-ARTS. Mardi Gras Masquerade + Benefit 8:30pm. $15 advance/$20 at door. To benefit Corazon de Dahlia’s Community Center in Peru. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900. Open Farm 1pm. Brook Farm, New Paltz. 255-1052.

Anna Karenina Call for times. Rosendale Theater Collective, Rosendale. Rosendaletheatre.org. Freeze Frame Check website for times. Featuring Hudson Valley filmmakers. Beacon Theatre, Beacon. (914) 474-5986.

Outdoors & Recreation Four Seasons Hike 1: Winter 10am-1pm. Shaupeneak Ridge, Esopus. 473-4440 ext. 273. Tracks & Traces Snowshoe Hike 2-3:30pm. Mud Creek Environmental Learning Center, Ghent. (518) 828-4386.

Food & Wine

Spirituality

SATURDAY 9 Dance Contradance 8pm. $10/$9 members/kids 1/2 price. Woodstock Community Center, Woodstock. 246-2121.

Heat in the Cold Group Hug noon. $5 for a tasting. Hudson-Chatham Winery, Ghent. (518) 392-9463. Winter Millerton Farmer’s Market 10am-2pm. Gilmor Glass, Millerton. (518) 789-8000.

Health & Wellness Tai Chi in Woodstock 10am. $10. Woodstock Community Center, Woodstock. 679-2560. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Construct a Fairy House or Gnome Home 10am-2pm. $60/$50. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926. EagleFest 2013 9am. Find amazing vistas and viewing opportunities. Boscobel, Garrison. 265-3638. Kids’ Art Workshop 10am-noon. $12. Ages 4.5-12 years Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. Mama’s Social Circle 10am. $5. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Snowball Festival and Golf Tournament 2pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699.

Lectures & Talks Chris Crowley: Thinner This Year 4pm. Coauthor of Younger Next Year. Oblong Books & Music, Millerton. Gallery Talk: Howie Chen on Lawrence Weiner 2pm. Dia: Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100.

Music Anthony Nisi 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company. 229-8277. Bad Horse 1pm. Acoustic Taste Budd’s Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. The Bar Spies 9pm. Classic rock. Chill Wine Bar, Beacon. 765-0885. C.B. Smith & the Lucky Devils 7-9pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. The Chain Gang 9pm. Classic rock Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (800) 772-6646. Guitar Hero Johnny Winter 8pm. $47. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. It's Not Night It's Space Call for time. With guests Dead Empires and Moon Tooth. Snug Harbor Bar & Grill, New Paltz. 255-9800. Jay Collins & The Kings County Band 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Kurt Henry Parlour Band 8pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Lick The Toad 10pm. Classic rock. Millbrook R&B, Millbrook. Luther “Guitar” Johnson & The Magic Rockers 8:30pm. $25/$20 in advance. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

Kirtan or Devotional Chanting 7-9pm. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Theater Annie Get Your Gun 8pm. $26/$24 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Born Yesterday 8pm. $15/ $12. Garson Kanin’s American screw-ball comedy. County Players, Wappingers Falls. 298-1491.

Workshops & Classes Babywearing Bonanza 1-2pm. $10 non-members. Baby carrier workshop Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Bard Math Circle 1pm. Math puzzles, logic games, problem solving, and a hands-on math project. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Basic Drawing and Painting 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Tor Gudmundsen Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Family and Friends CPR and First Aid for Children 1-3:30pm. $45. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Jungian Depth Psychology 2pm. $20 exchange. With Dr. Craig Lennon. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679 5650. A Nature Library: Mixed Media Drawing Workshop 9am. $215. Woodstock School of Art. 679-2388. Origami Kingston 10:30am. Ages five and up may attend. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Printmaking 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kate McGloughlin Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Zumba 10am. $10. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. Jenzumbamama@aol.com.

SUNDAY 10 Film Anna Karenina Call for times. Rosendale Theater Collective, Rosendale. Rosendaletheatre.org. Freeze Frame Check website for times. Featuring Hudson Valley filmmakers Beacon Theatre, Beacon. (914) 474-5986.

Food & Wine Chocolatier Oliver Kita: From Bean to Bon Bon 4-6pm. Chocolate and wine tasting to Benefit Hudson River Heritage. Beekman Arms, Rhinebeck. 876-7077. Rhinebeck Farmers’ Market Winter Market 10am-2pm. Rhinebeck Town Hall, Rhinebeck. Rhinebeckfarmersmarket.com.

New Moon Energy Healing 6:30pm. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Good Dog Program 9:30-10:30am. Children read to a furry friend Copake United Methodist Church, Copake. (518) 329-2523.

Lectures & Talks Artist Talk: Asya Resnikov 4pm. Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Peekskill. (914) 788-0100. Hydroponic Herbs & Seedlings 1pm. Arts Society of Kingston, Kingston. 338-0331. Intro to Square Foot Gardening 11am. Arts Society of Kingston, Kingston. 338-0331. Thomas Cole & the Decorative Arts 2pm. $9/$7 members. Jean Dunbar. Thomas Cole Natural Historic Site, Catskill. (518) 943-7465.

Literary & Books Ina Claire Gabler Reading 2pm. Group Reading and Author Visit: Ina Claire Hyde Park Library, Hyde Park. Hydeparklibrary.org. Peter Glassgold: Anarchy! 4pm. Peter Glassgold will discuss the anthology of Emma Goldman’s Mother Earth. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck.

Music The Compact 10am. Brunch. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Ann Osmond & Dennis Yerry 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Greg Westhoff’s Westchester Swing Band 5:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Jazz at the Falls Valentine’s Singer Showcase Noon. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Jeffery Broussard & The Creole Cowboys 3pm. $25/$20 in advance. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Linda Lavin: Helsinki On Broadway 7pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Music of Jesus Christ Superstar 4pm. $65/$45/$35/$20. A Woodstock Day School benefit. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. A Ride on the Underground Railroad 3pm. $12/$8/$5. Studley Theater, New Paltz. 257-2700.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Atlantic Custom Homes Open House Weekend 10am-5pm. Visit their 3,600sf Classic Lindal Cedar Homes Model. Atlantic Custom Homes, Cold Spring. (888) 558-2636. Barrett Art Center ‘s Annual 100 X 100 Art Raffle 4-7pm. Paintings, watercolors, prints, drawings, photographs, sculpture, ceramics. Locust Grove, Samuel Morse Historic Site, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550. Chinese New Year Celebration 4:30-9:30pm. Yobo Restaurant, Newburgh. 564-3848.

Outdoors & Recreation Nyquist-Harcourt Wildlife Sanctuary Winter Walk 8am. Walk or snowshoe along the Wallkill Valley Rail Trail in and around New Paltz. 339-1277. Winter Tree Identification at Shaupeneak Ridge 10am. Meet trip leader Nava Tabak at the Shaupeneak Ridge trailhead lot. 339-1277.

Spirituality Meditation, Intention and the Zero Point Field 2-3:30pm. $20. With Ricarda O’Conner. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Sacred Chanting 10:30am-noon. $10. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Satsang with Gurudev Swami Nityananda 10am-noon. Spiritual discourse, singing of bhajans and kirtan. Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Sports Kayaking Paddler’s Pool Practice 10am. $60. River Connection, Hyde Park. 229-0595.

Theater Annie Get Your Gun 3pm. $26/$24 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Born Yesterday 8pm. $15/ $12. Garson Kanin’s American screw-ball comedy. County Players, Wappingers Falls. 298-1491.

Workshops & Classes Baking with Chocolate 2pm. $35. Learn to make delicious chocolate treats with natural foods chef Marika Blossfeldt. Gourmetibles, Beacon. (646) 241-8478. Crystal Connection 2pm. $20/$15. A workshop with Liz Connell. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100. Hypnobabies, Childbirth Hypnosis 10am-1pm. $375/6 weeks. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. A Nature Library: Mixed Media Drawing Workshop 9am. $215. Various drawing media will be explored and demonstrated Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Painting Artforms in Nature II with Yura Adams 1:30-4pm. $185, $155 members. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Sewing 101: Learning to Machine Sew 1-4pm. $35/$30 with your own machine. Ages 14+ Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132.

Health & Wellness Community Yoga 4:30pm. $5. The Yoga House, Kingston. 706-9642. Ying Yang Yawn & The Yoga of Sound 5-6:30pm. $15. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

MONDAY 11 Dance Creative Yoga Children’s Yoga Class 4pm. $104/8 week session. Creative yoga class for children ages 4 to 9. Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517.


Film Beacon Film Festival: Freeze Frame

A still from the music video for Theory's "We'll Be Alright," produced and directed by Jarek Zabczynski and filmed on the Walkway Over the Hudson.

Regional Reels Every two weeks, a language goes extinct. A 2008 documentary, The Linguists, tracks scholars Greg Anderson and David Harrison as they travel to Siberia, India, and Bolivia to record the last native speakers of dying tongues. The film was produced by the Garrison-based Ironbound Films and is being screened as part of the third annual Beacon Film Festival: Freeze Frame. Starting on February 7 and running through the 10, the festival will screen its slate of movies at the Beacon Theatre, an Art Deco building opened up as a cinema in the 1930s and operated for more than three decades before closing and falling into disrepair. In 2010, a theater group called 4th Wall Productions bought the building and began renovations. The restoration remains a work in progress, but the partially finished space was opened up for performances in mid 2011. Although the theater is primarily a venue for live performance, the festival, which was previously just called Freeze Frame, celebrates the Beacon’s origin by focusing on films produced in or by people from the Hudson Valley. The event opens at 7pm on Thursday with a selection of four documentaries and two shorts by Vassar students and three music videos directed by Jarek Zabcynski. Over the rest of the weekend, The Beacon will show four documentaries, including The Linguists, three shorts, three feature films, and, starting at 11am on February 9, a selection of family friendly animation. Festival director Kim Elizabeth emphasizes that the event’s focus was local, saying that she and the other organizers had “a unique opportunity to listen to the people of the Hudson Valley and try to screen films that resonate with them, and to also educate our own populace on the brilliant filmmakers right here in the Hudson Valley.” She adds that the festival is tied to its venue, and that both the renovation of the Beacon Theatre and the advent of the film festival are parts of a wider renaissance in the city of Beacon. Elizabeth, who is in her first year as the festival’s director and who also works on other projects at the theater, is very excited for this year’s lineup, and she pointed to one film in particular as a highlight.

Collar, which will screen at 4pm and then again at 8pm on Saturday, is the centerpiece of a day dedicated to the work of Goshen’s Willy-Gilly Productions. Written and directed by David Patrick Wilson (also one of the movie’s stars), Collar, which also features actors Tom Sizemore, Rebecca DeMornay, and Richard Roundtree, is a very contemporary story about a cop who gets suspended 30 days before he is due to retire and decides that he has to strike out on his own to clear his name. With Collar, Wilson was looking for a way to dramatize what happens when a person is “involved in a horrific event and suddenly loses his job, [and] is forced to take a look at his life without his work and without his pension.” The filmmaker adds that the movie, much of which was shot in Middletown, has a distinct Hudson Valley flavor. The region “really enhanced the look and feel of the film," Wilson says. "Made it feel like a real suburban-city environment.” Wilson, as well as the movie’s producer Nan Gill, will take questions after Collar’s second screening. There will also be question and answer sessions with Jarek Zabcynski following the presentation of his music videos on Thursday, and with directors Seth Kramer and Jeremy Newberger after the screening of The Linguists at 9pm on Friday. Saturday night’s festivities will end with a performance from The Back Again Band, a classic rock/blues group of which Kim Elizabeth is a member. The Beacon Film Festival: Freeze Frame runs from February 7 through February 10 at the Beacon Theatre. Passes for the whole weekend are available for $60, tickets for individual afternoon and evening blocks are $18, and tickets for the festival’s opening evening and the Saturday morning block of animation are both $5. Thebeacontheatre.org —Josh Kopin

chronogram.com Watch clips of the feature films, documentaries, shorts, and music videos from Freeze Frame.

2/13 ChronograM forecast 99


Fusion Dance 5:30 & 6:45pm. $15. A fusion of traditional styles of dance from India, West Africa, Spain, Latin America, and USA Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. Swing Dance Class Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, advanced 8pm Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331.

Film Anna Karenina Call for times. Rosendale Theater. Rosendaletheatre.org.

Food & Wine Wine Lovers’ Dinner 5pm. $49. Three-course wine pairing dinner. Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro, Rhinebeck. 876-3330.

Health & Wellness Fitness Hour 4pm. Saugerties Public Library. 246-4317. The Gurdjieff Expansion Series 7:30-9:30pm. $5. With Jason Stern. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Mama’s Group with Breastfeeding Support 1:30-3pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Natural Skin Care 6pm. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. New Mother’s Adjustment Support Group 6:30-8:30pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. QiGong Class 6:30pm. Pleasant Valley. 635-2695. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

New Mother’s Social Circle Call for time. $5. A place to meet new and current friends. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624. Scrabble 4pm. Test your vocabulary. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Spanish Club for Youth 4:30-5:30pm. Practice conversational Spanish. Ages 10 and older. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Terrific Two’s and Three’s Story Time 10-10:45am. Books, action rhymes, music, and crafts. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Tuesday Tales 11am. Stories, songs and more for 3-6 year olds Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Lectures & Talks How Do We Nourish the Souls of Our Children? 5:30-6:30pm. Rosendale Family Therapy Center, Rosendale. 658-9760.

kids & family Playspace for Tots 10-10:45am. Community room set up with rugs, stuffed animals, books, and toys. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Music Fat City 8pm. Blues. Wherehouse, Newburgh. 561-7240. Fat Tuesday Dixieland Tribute 7pm. Tribute to the late Rich LaVacca of Spanky’s. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Health & Wellness Community Style Acupuncture 10am-noon. $30. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Gentle Yoga with Kelly 7:30-8:30pm. $10/$50 for 6 classes. Walden. Shantimandir.com. New Year Yoga 5pm. $88/8 wks. Taught by Mary Maitri Farel. Learn basic yoga postures. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 687-0617. QiGong - Discover the Benefits 9am. $12/$44 per month. Stone Ridge Healing Arts, Stone Ridge. 399-1033. Tai Chi 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Vinyasa Yoga 6:30-7:30pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Wabi Sabi Yoga 4-5pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family After School Art 3:30-5pm. Ages 3 and up. Scenic Hudson’s River Center, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. Art Class with Art Lab 3:30pm. Kid Around, Saugerties. 247-3342. Children’s Story Hours 10:30am. Toddler Time Tuesday (18 months to 3 years) and Preschool Wednesday (3 years to 5 years) followed by crafts and music. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

Kids & Family Lego Club 6:30pm. Ages 7-12. We supply the bricks. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Music Together Babies: Birth-9mo 11:45am-12:30pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie.

An Acoustic Evening with Matisyahu In 2011, the Hasidic roots reggae rocker shaved his iconic beard. His music undergoes a similar shearing process in his short run of acoustic performances, which included a show at Hudson’s Club Helsinki in December and comes to the Bearsville Theater in Woodstock on February 16. The live acoustic sets, a stark difference from his signature high-energy blend of rock, reggae, and hip hop, celebrate his new release Spark Seeker: The Acoustic EP, which was released at the end of January. The acoustic sets reveal a starkly personal side of Matisyahu’s eclectic style, marked by collaborations with everyone from the electronic duo Crystal Method to rapper Shyne. Don’t worry, Matisyahu still uses his voice as an instrument in his acoustic sets, accenting heartfelt songs with his seemingly effortless beatboxing. Bearsvilletheater.com

Literary & Books Bookmark Club 4pm. Book reading journey with Sasha Finlay. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

Outdoors & Recreation Nyquist-Harcourt Wildlife Sanctuary Winter Walk 8am. Walk or snowshoe through Harcourt Sanctuary, along the Wallkill Valley Rail Trail, John Burroughs Natural History Society, Kingston. 339-1277.

Spirituality Gurdjieff’s Teaching: An Approach to Inner Work 7:30pm. $5 donation. Facilitated by Jason Stern. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Qigong with Zach Baker 11am-noon & 5:30-6:30pm. $5/$10/$12. Seniors meet at 11am. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Workshops & Classes

TUESDAY 12 Clubs & Organizations Young Mothers’ Group 5pm. Pregnant and parenting women under the age of 25. YWCA of Ulster County, Kingston. 338-6844.

Film The Silence of the Dream 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989.

Food & Wine Wine Lovers’ Dinner 5pm. $49. Three-course wine pairing dinner. Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro, Rhinebeck. 876-3330.

Health & Wellness Afro-Caribbean Fitness 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Ages 3+ M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Caregiver Support Group 10-11:15am. Town of Shandaken Town Hall, Phoenicia. 338-2980. Gentle Yoga for Mamas 4:30pm. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Pilates: Mama with Baby 12:45. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Tai Chi Chuan 10am. $12 per class $44 per momth. Marbletown Community Center, stone ridge. 3991033. Wabi Sabi Yoga 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Zumba 6:45-7:45pm. $40/4sessions, $12 drop in. W/ Amanda Gresens. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

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Beginner/Intermediate Pilates Mat Class 6:30pm. $10. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Pilates Mat Class: Community Class noon. $5 donation. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Technique and Improvisation 4:30pm. $15/class or 10-class card for $140. For 6-8 yr olds with Clyde Forth. Beginner ballet class. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 347-927-1187.

Open Mike with Chrissy Budzinski 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties.

Spirituality Meditation in the Temple 6:30-7:15pm. Meditation. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Workshops & Classes Argentine Tango Class 7:30-8:30pm. Sadhana Center for Yoga and Meditation, Hudson. (518) 537-2589. Artistic Anatomy 1-4pm. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Boxing Conditioning 6pm. $10. Workout with a certified boxing trainer. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Ecorche 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Intermediate Pilates Mat Class 9am. $10. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Life Drawing Sessions 7:30-9:30pm. $13/$10 members, $48/$36 series of 4. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Mother/Daughter Belly Dancing Class 7:30pm. $20/4 weeks $69/mother daughter $118. Casperkill Rec Center, Poughkeepsie. (914) 874-4541. M*Power Dance 4:30-5:45pm. Ages 6-18. M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Teen Art Lab 3:30-5pm. After school art program with Jessica Poser. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

WEDNESDAY 13

Kids & Family Bouncing Babies Story Time 9:30-10am. Birth to 18 months old. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Children’s Story Hours 10:30am. Toddler Time Tuesday (18 months to 3 years) and Preschool Wednesday (3 years to 5 years) followed by crafts and music. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Cruisers Play Group noon. $5. Ages 6-18 months. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Learn Mah-Jongg 6pm. A four-player game involving cards and tiles. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

100 forecast ChronograM 2/13

Clubs & Organizations End the New Jim Crow Action Committee 6-7:30pm. Family Partnership Center, Poughkeepsie.

Dance Hip Hop Dance 5:15-6:15pm. All ages. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Food & Wine Wine Lovers’ Dinner 5pm. $49. Three-course wine pairing. dinner Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro, Rhinebeck. 876-3330.

Clay Play 3:30-5pm. $38/2 classes, $72/4 classes, $150/10 classes. Ages 5+. Hand-building and glazing ceramics for kids, teens & adults Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. Great Fours and Fives Story Time 1:30-2:30pm. Children hear stories, explore books, and create related crafts. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. La Leche League of New Paltz Meeting 10am. Breastfeeding information New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Music & Movement for Toddlers with Abby Lappen 10-10:45am. Ages 18 months and up. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Literary & Books The Glaring Omissions Themed Reading Series 7pm. Three Hudson Valley authors reading from their recent work. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. Hudson Community Book Group 6-7:30pm. 3rd through 5th graders. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org. Living On, Loving On, With Breast Cancer 7pm. Book talk by author Patrick Kern. ColumbiaGreene Community College, Hudson. (518) 828-4181.

Music Open Mike Night With Jeff Entin 7pm. Jeff Entin. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699.

Nightlife Terraoke! Karoake Night 10pm. Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro, Rhinebeck. 876-3330.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Harvey School Open House Learn about the 9-12 grade 5-day boarding program. Harvey School, Katonah. (914) 232-3161.

Spirituality A Course in Miracles 7:30-9:30pm. Study group with Alice Broner. Call to verify. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 229-8391.

Workshops & Classes Belly Dance Classes: Intermediate 7pm. $15. W/ Willow. Artspace at Ed Dempsey Tattoos, Woodstock. 594-8673. Experimental Art Night 7pm. $25 includes all supplies. Shaqe’s A&I Studio, Beacon. 440-6802

Express Yourself 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Leslie Bender. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Swing Dance Class Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, advanced 8pm Linda & Chester Freeman. Boughton Place, Highland. 236-3939.

THURSDAY 14 Business & Networking HV Garden Association Monthly Meeting 7pm. Shawangunk Town Hall, Wallkill. 418-3640.

Clubs & Organizations Meeting of Middle East Crisis Response 7-8:30pm. Promoting peace and human rights. Woodstock Library, Woodstock. 679-4693.

Film Anna Karenina Call for times. Rosendale Theater Collective, Rosendale. Rosendaletheatre.org. Valentines Day Dinner and a Movie 7pm. Two Boots, Red Hook. 758-0010.

Food & Wine Arlington Farmers’ Market 3-7pm. College Center, Poughkeepsie. Valentine’s Day Prix Fixe Dinner 5pm. $49-$69. Choice of a 2 or 3-course dinner complete with tapas platter, entree and dessert Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro, Rhinebeck. 876-3330.

Health & Wellness Fitness Hour 4pm. Saugerties Public Library. 246-4317. Gurdjieff’s Movements: Inner Work, Sacred Dance 7:30-9:30pm. $5. Facilitated by Jason Stern Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Mama’s Group with Breastfeeding Support 1-3pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Prenatal Yoga 6:15-7:30pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Stress Reduction through Meditation 10:30am. Kingston Library, Kingston. 339-8567. Wabi Sabi Yoga 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Yoga, Mind, and Body 6pm. Women’s View Acupuncture, Rhbk. 876-7844. Zumba 6:45-7:45pm. $40/4sessions, $12 drop in. W/ Amanda Gresens. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Kids & Family Creative Youth Studio 3:30-5:30pm. $38/2 classes, $72/4 classes, $150/10 classes. Mixed-media open studio. 5+. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. Tiny Tots Storytime 11:15am. Ages 1-3. Age appropriate stories and songs Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Lectures & Talks The Impact of Multicore Architectures on Software 4:30-5:30pm. Dr. Michael Hind. Coykendall Science Building, SUNY New Paltz. 257-7869.

Music Acoustic Thursdays with Kurt Henry 6pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. The Alexis P. Suter Band 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Blood & Glass 8pm. $5. Spotty Dog, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Gala Champagne Fundraiser with Michael Bolton 6:30pm. $185/$130. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Group Guitar Lesson 5-6pm. $30/month (2 lessons). With Peter Theodore. All styles welcome. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Michelle LeBlanc 7-10pm. Hudson House, Cold Spring. 265-9355.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits One Billion Rising 9am-5pm. Dance in a global strike to end violence against women Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. Onebillionrising.org.

Spirituality Meditation in the Temple 6:30-7:15pm. Silent meditation with the Shanti Mandir community. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Theater TMI: Love Heals 9pm. Market Market Café, Rosendale. 658-3164.

Workshops & Classes Beginner Ballet for Adults & Teens 7pm. $15. Mt. View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Belly Dance Classes: Beginner 7pm. $12. W/ Willow. Artspace at Ed Dempsey Tattoos, Woodstock. 594-8673. Boxing Conditioning 6pm. $10. Workout with a certified boxing trainer. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Doody Calls 1-2pm. $10 non-members. Cloth diapering info sessions Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Drawing, Painting & Composition 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Eric Angeloch Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Ecstatic Dance Class 6:45pm. $10. Meditation-in-motion, a path toward wholeness. Shakti Yoga, Saugerties. 417-8341. Life Drawing Sessions 7:30-9:30pm. $13/$10 members, $48/$36 series of 4. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.


Love-to-Dance Class 6:30pm. $15. Laban and Authentic Movement techniques. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. M*Power Dance 4:30-5:45pm. Ages 6-18. M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Rendering in Black & White 9am-noon. With Vince Natale Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

FRIDAY 15 Dance Creative Yoga Children’s Yoga Class 4pm. $104/8 week session. Ages 4 to 9. Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. Young Choreographers Company 4:15pm. $15/class or 10-class card $140. For ages 9-12. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187.

Printmaking 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kate McGloughlin Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. The Bradley Method of Natural Childbirth 6:30-8:30pm. $350. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie.

SATURDAY 16 Comedy Eddie Izzard 6/9pm. $60. British comedian. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Spirituality

Health & Wellness

Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Kids’ Yoga 4:30-5:30pm. $135 10 weeks/$12 drop-in. Ages 4-10 Yuj Yoga & Fitness, Pleasant Valley. Story Time 10:30am. Ages 1-3. Age appropriate stories and songs. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Yoga for Toddlers & Preschoolers 10:30am. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 684-7024.

Lectures & Talks Ezra Fitch, Founder of Abercrombie & Fitch 5:30pm. Come learn how a Kingston attorney went on to found one of the most famous names in clothing. Senate House and Museum, Kingston. Meet the Author: LoraLee Ecobelli 7pm. Author of Laurina’s Kitchen. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties.

Music ASK for Music 8pm. $6. Open Book, Garrin Benfield and James Krueger. Arts Society of Kingston, Kingston. 338-0331. Bill’s Toupee 9pm. Dance music. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277. The Chain Gang 8pm. La Puerta Azul, Salt Point. 677-2985. Chris Bergson Band 9pm. $10. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Chris Walsh 7pm. Singer/songwriter. Catamount Banquet Center, Mount Tremper. 688-2444. The Grape and the Grain/Nightmares For A Week 9pm. $5. Two Boots, Red Hook. 758-0010. Lucky House Band 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company. 229-8277. Michelle LeBlanc 7:30-10:30pm. Hudson House, Cold Spring. 265-9355. MidNite Image Band 8:30pm. Classic rock. Pamela’s on the Hudson, Newburgh. 562-4505. Painted Betty 7:30-10:30pm. $10. Jazz BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. The Ryan Montbleau Band 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Tisziji Munoz Quartet Featuring John Medeski 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Twin Berlin 10pm. $5. Snapper Magees, Kingston. 339-3888. Jeff Mangum of Neutral Milk Hotel 8pm. Bardavon, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Nightlife Flashback Fridays 9pm. $5. DJ Kue. Steel House, Kingston. 338-7847.

Spirituality Mindfulness Meditation Group of Gardiner 4:30-5:30pm. Lead by George Devine. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. George7000@aol.com.

Theater Annie Get Your Gun 8pm. $26/$24 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Born Yesterday 8pm. $15/ $12. Garson Kanin’s American screw-ball comedy. County Players, Wappingers Falls. 298-1491. VDay 2013 Call for times. $10. A new production of the Vagina Monologues Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. 481-5158.

Workshops & Classes Basic Drawing and Painting 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Tor Gudmundsen Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Painting the Figure 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Portrait in Clay 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Keith Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Outdoors & Recreation

Food & Wine

Health & Wellness

Food & Wine

The Cupcakes Benefit Show 7pm. Lyn Hardy, Janice Kellar, and Elly Wininger. Woodstock Community Center, Woodstock. 684-5226.

Brydcliffe By Design Through Jan. 18, 11am-5pm. Indoor designer craft market featuring some of the region’s most talented artisans Kleinert/James Ctr., Woodstock. Byrdcliffe.org.

Valentine’s Day Dinner Dance 7pm. $99/couple. Four course dinner, top shelf open bar, DJ with dancing and photobooth. Arbor Ridge, Hopewell Junction. 226-8714.

The Cardboard Bernini 7pm. Ridgefield Playhouse. (203) 438-5795.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits

Great Backyard Bird Count 9-11am. OOMS Conservation Area, Chatham. Clctrust.org/event-education. Continental Army Winter Encampment 10am-4pm. See muskets and a cannon fired, children drill with wooden muskets The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, New Windsor. 561-1765.

Fairs & Festivals

The Kingston Farmers’ Winter Market 10am-2pm. Old Dutch Church, Kingston. Kingstonfarmersmarket.org. Spencertown Revels: a Mid-Winter Moveable Feast 5:30pm. $60-$500. Festive drinks and hors d’oeurves followed by dinner. Spencertown Academy Arts Center, Spencertown. Spencertownacademy.org. Winter Green Market Third Saturday of every month, 11:30am-2:30pm. Indoor farmers’ market. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Film

Freestyle Frolic 8:30pm-1am. $2-$10, children and volunteers free. Knights of Columbus, Kingston. 658-8319. Pamela’s Not So Valentines Day Dance 8pm. Pamela’s on the Hudson, Newburgh. 562-4505.

Qi Gong Class 10-11am. $10. Inner Light Heath Spa, Poughkeepsie. 229-9998. Tai Chi in Woodstock 10am. $10. Tai Chi and Eternal Spring Chi Kung (Qigong) by certified instructor. This system improves strength, relaxation, flexibility, balance, coordination, breath, awareness, spirit, and chi. Appropriate for all ages and fitness levels Woodstock Community Center, Woodstock. 679-2560. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. $65 6 weeks/$12 drop-in. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Hansel and Gretel 11am. $9/$7 children. Tanglewood Marionettes Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Kids’ Art Workshop 10am-noon. $12. Ages 4.5-12 years Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. Mad Science of the Mid Hudson: Up Up and Away! 10:30am. Discover the principles of air & pressure Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Mama’s Social Circle 10am. $5. A place to meet new and current friends. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Puppet Play 10:30am/11:30am. Matrushka Toys and Gifts, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-6911.

Lectures & Talks The Minimal Vegetable Garden 1-3pm. $35/$25. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Literary & Books Fred Goldstein 2pm. Meet the author of Capitalism at a Dead End. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties.

Music Akie B & The Falcons 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Blues Hall Of Fame Night 8pm. $30/$25 in advance. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-2063. Bryan Gordon 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company. 229-8277. Acoustic Evening with Matisyahu 9pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Fred Thomas, Trummors, Pigeons 8pm. $5. Spotty Dog, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Jazz Vesperes 5:30-7pm. 5:30-7pm. Rob Scheps, Cathy Gale, and Tom McCoy 1st Presbyterian Church of Philipstown, Cold Spring. Presbychurchcoldspring.org. Joe Louis Walker Band 8:30pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Madrigal Singing 2-3pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Mark Raisch Trio 6:30pm. Jazz Cappucino by Coppola’s, Poughkeepsie. Coppolas.net/CoppolasOn9/index.html. The Met: Live in HD Verdi’s Rigoletto 1pm. $26 adult/ $24 member/ $19 child. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Michelle LeBlanc 7:30-10:30pm. Hudson House, Cold Spring. 265-9355. Mr. Ian and the Blue Rays 9pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Native Soul 7:30pm. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Planetary Tuning Forks Concert 6pm. $20. The music of the spheres. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Stax of Soul 9:30pm. Motown. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. The Official Blues Brothers® Revue 8pm. $50. Ridgefield Playhouse. (203) 438-5795. Tricky Britches 8pm. $10. High-energy string band Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048.

Nightlife Club Light 10:30pm. DJ Kue. Steel House, Kingston. 338-7847.

Kirtan or Devotional Chanting 7-9pm. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Theater Annie Get Your Gun 8pm. $26/$24 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Born Yesterday 8pm. $15/ $12. Garson Kanin’s American screw-ball comedy. County Players, Wappingers Falls. 298-1491. Paul Robeson Starring Floyd Patterson II 7:30pm. $22/$20 in advaance. One-man show about American athlete, activist, actor, singer and scholar. McKenna Theatre, New Paltz. 255-1559. VDay 2013 Call for times. $10. Vagina Monologues. Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. 481-5158.

Continental Army Winter Encampment 1-4pm. The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, New Windsor. 561-1765. Clermont Estates Walk Call for times. 2-3 hr. hike or snow shoe. Clermont State Historic Site, Germantown. 471-9892.

Spirituality A Course In Miracles (ACIM) Study Group 4pm. Open study group. Woodstock Library, Woodstock. (609) 865-8544. Sacred Chanting 10:30am-noon. $10. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Satsang with Gurudev Swami Nityananda 10am. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Sports Kayaking Eskimo Rolling Clinic 10am. $60/hour Individual/$50/hour small group. Learn to roll your kayak in a controlled setting. The River Connection, Inc., Hyde Park. 229-0595.

Theater Annie Get Your Gun 3pm. $26/$24 seniors and students. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Workshops & Classes The Artist's Way Cluster 11am-1pm. Discussions of a healthy and creative lifestyle. Arts Society of Kingston, Kingston. 338-0331. Hypnobabies, Childbirth Hypnosis 10am-1pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Painting Artforms in Nature II with Yura Adams 1:30-4pm. $185, $155 members. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

MONDAY 18

Workshops & Classes Basic Drawing and Painting 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Tor Gudmundsen Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Creative Pipe Forging 9:30am-4:30pm. $130/$30 materials. Fine Architectural Metalsmiths, Florida. 651-7550. Organic/Natural Beekeeping Workshop 10am-6pm. $190. W/Honeybee Lives. Sustainable Living Resource Center, Rosendale. 255-6113. Knitting Club 2pm. This informal group welcomes all skill level knitters. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Sound Healing with the Tuning Forks 3pm. $30 Exchange. W/Philippe Pascal Garnier. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 845 679 5650. Printmaking 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kate McGloughlin Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Supply and Demand 1-2pm. $10 non-members. Breast pump info sessions Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Zumba 10am. $10. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. Jenzumbamama@aol.com.

SUNDAY 17 Dance West Coast Swing Dance 6-9pm. $8/$6 FT students. Reformed Church of Port Ewen, Port Ewen. 255-1379.

Health & Wellness Community Yoga 4:30pm. $5. The Yoga House, Kingston. 706-9642. Ying Yang Yawn & The Yoga of Sound 5-6:30pm. $15. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family

Clubs & Organizations Gardiner Library Board Meeting 7-9pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Dance Creative Yoga Children’s Yoga Class 4pm. Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. Fusion Dance 5:30 & 6:45pm. Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. Swing Dance Class Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, advanced 8pm Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331.

Health & Wellness Fitness Hour 4pm. Saugerties Public Library. 246-4317. The Gurdjieff Expansion Series 7:30-9:30pm. $5. With Jason Stern. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Mama’s Group with Breastfeeding Support 1:30-3pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. New Mother’s Adjustment Support Group 6:30-8:30pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. QiGong Class 6:30pm. Pleasant Valley. 635-2695. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Lego Club 6:30pm. Saugerties Public Library. 246-4317. Music Together Babies: Birth-9mo 11:45am-12:30pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Performance and Book Signing with Peter Yarrow 2pm. Author of I’m in Love With a Big Blue Frog. Barnes and Noble, Kingston. 336-0590.

Literary & Books Bookmark Club 4pm. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

Good Dog Program 9:30-10:30am. Children read to a furry friend. Copake United Methodist Church, Copake. (518) 329-2523. Kids’ Open Mic Night 5:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. 914-737-6624.

Outdoors & Recreation

Lectures & Talks

Gurdjieff’s Teaching: An Approach to Inner Work 7:30pm. $5 donation. Facilitated by Jason Stern. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Qigong with Zach Baker 11am/5:30pm. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Hudson Valley Ya Society: Marissa Meyer in Conversation with Jean Feiwel and Liz Szabla 4pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck.

Music American String Quartet 3pm. $12/$10 seniors, faculty and staff. Orange Hall Theater, Middletown. 341-4891. Ariel String Quartet 3pm. The Ulster Chamber Music Series Church of the Holy Cross, Kingston. 331-6796. The Funk Junkies 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Gustafer Yellowgold & Rachel Loshak 10am. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Kimberly CD Release Party 4pm. $10. Time’s A Thief CD Release Party. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Marji Zintz 11am. Brunch and acoustic music Café Mezzaluna, Saugerties. 246-5306. Open Mike 4-6pm. $7/$5 members. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Steve Riley & The Mamou Playboys 4pm. $25/$20 in advance. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

Outdoors & Recreation Animal Tracking Adventure Through Feb. 18, 1:30pm. Participants will learn how to identify animal tracks and more. John Burroughs Preserve, Kingston. Greg.perantoni@yahoo.com.

Continental Army Winter Encampment 10am-4pm. The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, New Windsor. 561-1765.

Spirituality

Workshops & Classes Beginner/Intermediate Pilates Mat Class 6:30pm. $10. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Storm King School Open House 10am. Storm King School, Cornwall-On-Hudson. 534-9860 to register. Pilates Mat Class: Community Class 12pm. $5 donation. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Technique and Improvisation 4:30pm. $15/class or 10-class card for $140. For 6-8 yr olds with Clyde Forth. Beginner ballet class. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 347-927-1187.

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2/13 ChronograM forecast 101


TUESDAY 19 Clubs & Organizations Friends of the Gardiner Library Meeting Third Tuesday of every month, 7-8pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Young Mothers’ Group 5pm. For pregnant and parenting women under the age of 25. YWCA of Ulster County, Kingston. 338-6844.

Health & Wellness Afro-Caribbean Fitness 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Ages 3+ M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Caregiver Support Group 10-11:15am. Town of Shandaken Town Hall, 338-2980. Gentle Yoga for Mamas 4:30pm. $15/$50 for 4 classes. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Pilates: Mama with Baby 12:45-1:30pm. $15/$100 8 weeks. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Tai Chi Chuan 10am. Marbletown Comm. Ctr., Stone Ridge. 3991033. Wabi Sabi Yoga 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Bouncing Babies Story Time 9:30-10am. Birth to 18 months old. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Children’s Story Hours 10:30am. Toddler Time Tuesday (18 months to 3 years) and Preschool Wednesday (3 years to 5 years) followed by crafts and music. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Cruisers Play Group noon. $5. Ages 6-18 months. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Learn Mah-Jongg 6pm. A four-player game involving cards and tiles. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. New Mother’s Social Circle Call for time. $5. New Baby New Paltz. 255-0624. Scrabble 4pm. Come test your vocabulary. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Spanish Club for Youth 4:30-5:30pm. Practice conversational Spanish. Ages 10 and older. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Terrific Two’s and Three’s Story Time 10-10:45am. Books, action rhymes, music, and crafts. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Tuesday Tales 11am. Stories, songs and more for 3-6 year olds Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Winter Art Camp 9am-3pm. $50/day. Ages 4.5-12. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. Playspace for Tots 10-10:45am. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Gentle Yoga with Kelly 7:30-8:30pm. $10/$50 for 6 classes. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com. New Year Yoga 5pm. $88/8 wks. Taught by Mary Maitri Farel. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 687-0617. QiGong: Discover the Benefits 9am. $12/$44 per month. Stone Ridge Healing Arts, Stone Ridge. 399-1033. Tai Chi 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Vinyasa Yoga 6:30-7:30pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Wabi Sabi Yoga 4-5pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family After School Art 3:30-5pm. Ages 3 and up Scenic Hudson’s River Center, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. Art Class with Art Lab 3:30pm. Kid Around, Saugerties. 247-3342. Children’s Story Hours 10:30am. Toddler Time Tuesday (18 months to 3 years) and Preschool Wednesday (3 years to 5 years) followed by crafts and music. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

Spirituality Meditation in the Temple 6:30-7:15pm. Silent meditation with the Shanti Mandir community. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Workshops & Classes Argentine Tango Class 7:30-8:30pm. Sadhana Center for Yoga and Meditation, Hudson. (518) 537-2589. Artistic Anatomy 1-4pm. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Boxing Conditioning 6pm. $10. Workout with a certified boxing trainer. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Ecorche 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Intermediate Pilates Mat Class 9am. $10. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Life Drawing Sessions 7:30-9:30pm. $13/$10 members, $48/$36 series of 4. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Mother/Daughter Belly Dancing Class 7:30pm. $20/4 weeks $69/mother daughter $118. Casperkill Rec Center, Poughkeepsie. (914) 874-4541. M*Power Dance 4:30-5:45pm. Ages 6-18. M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Teen Art Lab 3:30-5pm. After school art program with Jessica Poser. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

WEDNESDAY 20 Dance Hip Hop Dance 5:15-6:15pm. All ages. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Health & Wellness Able Together 6:30-8:30pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Caregiver Support Group Third Wednesday of every month, 10-11:15am. New Paltz Village Hall, New Paltz. 338-2980. Community Style Acupuncture 10am-noon. $30. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie.

102 forecast ChronograM 2/13

Arlington Farmers’ Market 3-7pm. College Center, Poughkeepsie. Italian Wine Tasting and Food 6pm. $35. Bread & Bottle, Red Hook. 758-3499.

Health & Wellness Brain Games 2pm. 6-week program for adults. Grinnell Library, Wappingers Falls. 297-3428. Fitness Hour 4pm. Saugerties Public Library. 246-4317. Gurdjieff’s Movements: Inner Work & Sacred Dance 7:30-9:30pm. $5. Facilitated by Jason Stern Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Mama’s Group with Breastfeeding Support 1-3pm. 1-2pm infant under 1 year and 2-3pm toddler all ages Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Prenatal Yoga 6:15-7:30pm. $90/6 weeks. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Stress Reduction through Meditation 10:30am. Kingston Library, Kingston. 339-8567. Wabi Sabi Yoga 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Wellness Center Office Hours 12-5pm. Wellness Center of Hyde Park. 233- 5757. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

V-Day: “One Billion Rising” V-Day presents an alternative view on traditional February 14 celebrations. An examination of (not rebellion against) the concept of true love lauded on Valentine’s Day, V-Day has encouraged people to take part in global demonstrations against violence perpetrated against women and girls, including physical and sexual abuse, for 15 years. “One Billion Rising” encourages people to join the fight to end this violence, and events for awareness are scheduled across the world. One of the Ulster County events for “One Billion Rising” will be held at Back Stage Productions (BSP) in Kingston, led by the womenowned consulting firm Hale Advisors. Dancing and dance lessons will be interwoven with presentations from women in the arts, healthcare, and government between 12pm and 5pm. “One Billion Rising” events will be held at locations across the region, including Market Market in Rosendale and Time and Space Limited in Hudson. Onebillionrising.org

Music Dance Party with Big Joe Fitz and the Lo-Fis 7pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Open Mike with Chrissy Budzinski 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties.

THURSDAY 21 Food & Wine

Clay Play 3:30-5pm. $38/2 classes, $72/4 classes, $150/10 classes. Ages 5+. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. Great Fours and Fives Story Time 1:30-2:30pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Music & Movement for Toddlers with Abby Lappen 10-10:45am. Ages 18 months and up. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org. Winter Art Camp 9am-3pm. $50/day. Ages 4.5-12. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747.

Lectures & Talks What is Creativity Coaching? 7pm. Four basic components of creativity. Shaqe’s A&I Studio, Beacon. 440-6802.

Literary & Books Hudson Community Book Group 6-7:30pm. 3rd through 5th graders. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Music Rebecca Martin & Larry Grenadier Duo 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Nightlife Terraoke! Karoake Night 10pm. Terrapin Restaurant, Rhinebeck. 876-3330.

Outdoors & Recreation Coping with the Cold Snowshoe Hike 2-3:30pm. Mud Creek Environmental Learning Center, Ghent. (518) 828-4386.

Spirituality A Course in Miracles 7:30-9:30pm. Study group with Alice Broner. Call to verify. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 229-8391.

Workshops & Classes Belly Dance Classes: Intermediate 7pm. $15. W/ Willow. Artspace at Ed Dempsey Tattoos, Woodstock. 594-8673. Express Yourself 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Leslie Bender Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Songwriters’ Workshop with Bill Pfleging 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. Swing Dance Class Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, advanced 8pm Linda & Chester Freeman Boughton Place, Highland. 236-3939.

Yoga, Mind, and Body 6pm. Women’s View Acupuncture, Rhbk. 876-7844. Zumba 6:45-7:45pm. $40/4sessions, $12 drop in. W/ Amanda Gresens. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Kids & Family Brianna’s Blooming Barefoot Books Storytime 11:30am. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Creative Youth Studio 3:30-5:30pm. $38/2 classes, $72/4 classes, $150/10 classes. 5+ Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. Tiny Tots Storytime 11:15am. Ages 1-3. Age appropriate stories and songs Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Winter Art Camp 9am-3pm. $50/day. Ages 4.5-12. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747.

Music Acoustic Thursdays with Kurt Henry 6pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Group Guitar Lesson 5-6pm. $30/month (2 lessons). With Peter Theodore. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Open Mike Hosted by Jess Erick 8:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

Spirituality Meditation in the Temple 6:30-7:15pm. Silent meditation. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Workshops & Classes Beginner Ballet for Adults & Teens 7pm. $15. Mt. View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Belly Dance Classes: Beginner 7pm. $12. W/ Willow. Artspace at Ed Dempsey Tattoos, Woodstock. 594-8673. Boxing Conditioning 6pm. $10. Workout with a certified boxing trainer. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Drawing, Painting & Composition 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Eric Angeloch Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Ecstatic Dance Class 6:45pm. $10. Meditation-in-motion, a path toward wholeness. Shakti Yoga, Saugerties. 417-8341. First Time Homebuyers: What to Expect? 6:30pm. Free seminar presented by Bill Walsh, MHV Mortgage Originator. Mid-Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union, Rhinebeck. (800) 451-8373 ext. 3238.

Library Knitters 7-8pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Life Drawing Sessions 7:30-9:30pm. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Love-to-Dance Class 6:30pm. $15. Laban and Authentic Movement techniques. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. M*Power Dance 4:30-5:45pm. Ages 6-18. M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Rendering in Black & White 9am-noon. With Vince Natale Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Sacred Sound Ceremony 7pm. $20/$15. A workshop with Lev Natan. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100. Supply and Demand 1-2pm. Breast pump info sessions. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

FRIDAY 22 Comedy Reb Kugel 6pm. Sharing her comic wisdom as part of the Shabbat service. The Woodstock Jewish Congregation, Woodstock. 399-3505.

Dance Creative Yoga Children’s Yoga Class 4pm. $104/8 week session. Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. Young Choreographers Company 4:15pm. $15/class or 10-class card $140. For ages 9-12. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187.

Film Economics of Happiness 7pm. A documentary about the worldwide movement for economic localization. Unitarian Universalist Congregation at Rock Tavern, New Windsor. Uucrt.org. The Way We Were 7:30pm. Bardavon, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Health & Wellness Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Kids’ Yoga 4:30-5:30pm. $135 10 weeks/$12 drop-in. Ages 4-10 Yuj Yoga & Fitness, Pleasant Valley. Story Time 10:30am. Ages 1-3. Age appropriate stories and songs. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Yoga for Toddlers & Preschoolers 10:30am. $30 for series. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 684-7024.

Lectures & Talks Lucas Handwerker: The Process 7pm. $20. Magaician. Byrdcliffe Kleinert/James Center for the Arts, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Literary & Books Randy Susan Meyers: The Comfort of Lies 7pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. Cristina. suarez@simonandschuster.com. Poetry with Jeanne Stauffer-Merle and Claire Hero 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

Music Alexander Turnquist & Avondale Airforce 8pm. $5. Two Boots, Red Hook. 758-0010. Annalise Azadian and Ian Flanigan 8pm. $5. Singer-songwriters. Dave’s Coffee and Wine House, Saugerties. 246-8424. The Cagneys 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company. 229-8277. CKS 7pm. Featuring Randy Ciarlante, Bruce Katz & Scott Sharrard The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Den Series Open Showcase 7:30pm. $5-$10. New York School of Music, Walden. 778-7594. Garnet Rogers 9pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Henderson & Olszinski 8:30pm. Pamela’s, Newburgh. 562-4505. Lunasa 8:30pm. $35/$30 in advance. All-star quintet from Ireland. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Marc Von Em 9:30pm. Acoustic 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Montana Skies 7:30-10:30pm. $10. Jazz BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Teri Roiger 10pm. Market Market Café, Rosendale. 658-3164.

Nightlife Flashback Fridays 9pm. $5. DJ Kue. Steel House, Kingston. 338-7847.

Outdoors & Recreation Clearwater Winter Open Boat 4pm. Bundle up and come down to the river with a potluck meal. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 265-8080.

Spirituality Mindfulness Meditation Group of Gardiner 4:30-5:30pm. Lead by George Devine. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. George7000@aol.com.

Theater Encore Presentation of Next Fall 8pm. $20/$18 in advance. Mohonk Mountain Stage Company Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.


Workshops & Classes Basic Drawing and Painting 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Tor Gudmundsen Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Painting the Figure 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Portrait in Clay 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Keith Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Printmaking 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kate McGloughlin Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Swing Dance Workshops 6:30pm and 7:15pm. $15/$20 for both. Poughkeepsie Tennis Club. Hudsonvalleydance.org. The Bradley Method of Natural Childbirth 6:30-8:30pm. $350. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie.

SATURDAY 23 Comedy The Capitol Steps 8pm. $40/$35 members. Equal opportunity offenders. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Dance Ballroom by Request 9-11pm. $12. With Joe & Julie Donato. Lesson at 8pm Hudson Valley Dance Depot, Poughkeepsie. 204-9833. Annual Valentine’s Dance and Food Drive 7pm. Food donation. Support the work of our local food banks: Angel Food East, Dutchess Outreach and the Queen’s Galley Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center, Inc., Kingston. 331-5300.

Film 3rd Annual Catskill Film and Video Festival 12-6pm. Community Theater, Catskill. (518) 943-2410.

Food & Wine Dinner at the Farm at Soons Orchards 7:30pm. $40/$75 per couple. 3-course dinner by Chef Shawn Hubbell. Soons Orchards, New Hampton. 374-5471. Pine Island Off-Season Farmers’ Market 10am-3pm. W. Rogowski Farm, Pine Island. 258-4574. Winter Millerton Farmer’s Market 10am-2pm. Gilmor Glass, Millerton. (518) 789-8000.

Health & Wellness Kundalini Yoga Class 2-3:30pm. $25. Tadasana Yoga Studio, Wappingers Falls. 297-2774. Tai Chi in Woodstock 10am. $10. Woodstock Community Center, Woodstock. 679-2560. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. $65 6 weeks/$12 drop-in. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Kids’ Art Workshop 10am-noon. $12. Ages 4.5-12 years Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. Mama’s Social Circle 10am. $5. A place to meet new and current friends. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402.

Lectures & Talks Back to the Future: The Garden at Hidcote 2pm. $42/$35. Glyn Jones, head gardener of Hidcote Manor Garden in the Cotswolds of England. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926. The Future of Tibet 2-4pm. $20. Panel discussion Tibetan Center, Kingston. 383-1774. Linda Zimmermann: In the Night Sky 2pm. Examines Hudson Valley UFO sightings. Barnes and Noble, Kingston. 336-0590. The Restoration of Elihu Vedder’s “Morning” 3pm. Slide Presentation and Lecture. Hudson Chautauqua, Hudson. (518) 478-3660.

Literary & Books Friends of the Kingston Library Book Sale 10am-3pm. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Reading by Ina Claire Gabler 7pm. $5. Author of Unexpected Return Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 229-9998. Laura Ludwig Presents Performance Art and Poetry 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. Spoken Word with Guest Ina Claire Gabler 7pm. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 471-6580.

Music Angélique Kidjo 8pm. $25-$65. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. The Bean Runner Jazz Project 7:30pm. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Bindlestiff Family Cirkus Cabaret 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Chris Walsh 8pm. Main Street Restaurant, Saugerties. 246-6222. Dorraine Scofield and JB Hunt & Larry Balestra 7pm. Acoustic Café Mezzaluna, Saugerties. 246-5306. An Evening with Bruce Cockburn 8pm. $54/$49 in advance. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Follow the North Star 8pm. $40. Jazz. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Helen Avakian 8pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Jon Cobert 8pm. Singer/songwriter. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Madrigal Singing 2-3pm. All levels welcome. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Marilyn Miller 1pm. Acoustic Taste Budd’s Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. Miss Tess and the Talkbacks 8pm. $10. Singer/songwriter Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. Naomi Shelton and the Gospel Queens 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. O Solo Vito 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company. 229-8277. Peach Project and Rob Cannillo 7pm. $5. Rob Cannillo opening up for Peach Project. Featuring a night of music from the Allman Brothers The Castle Fun Center, Chester. 469-2116. Rooftrees 8pm. $5. Spotty Dog, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Sloan Wainwright Band 8:30pm. $30/$25 in advance. Folk/pop Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Sweet Clementines & The Argentine 8pm. $5. Two Boots, Red Hook. 758-0010.

Nightlife Club Light 10:30pm. $10/$5. With DJ Kue The Steel House, Kingston. 338-7847.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits 16th Annual Chili Bowl Fiesta Fundraiser 2pm. $5/free general admission. Women’s Studio Workshop's Annual Chili Bowl Fundraiser. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-9133.

Origami Kingston 10:30am. Ages five and up may attend. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Printmaking 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kate McGloughlin Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Soul Empowerment 2pm. $20/$15. A group attunement with Rand Shields. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100. Zumba 10am. $10. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. Jenzumbamama@aol.com.

SUNDAY 24 Food & Wine Rhinebeck Farmers’ Market Winter Market 10am-2pm. Rhinebeck Town Hall. Rhinebeckfarmersmarket.com.

Health & Wellness Community Yoga 4:30pm. $5. The Yoga House, Kingston. 706-9642. Ying Yang Yawn & The Yoga of Sound 5-6:30pm. $15. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Literary & Books Cane River 2-3:30pm. Facilitated discussion of the novel by Lalita Tademy. Rosendale Library, Rosendale. 658-9013.

Health & Wellness Fitness Hour 4pm. Saugerties Public Library. 246-4317. The Gurdjieff Expansion Series 7:30-9:30pm. $5. With Jason Stern. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Mama’s Group with Breastfeeding Support 1:30-3pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. New Mother’s Adjustment Support Group 6:30-8:30pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. QiGong Class 6:30pm. Low impact. Pleasant Valley. 635-2695. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family Lego Club 6:30pm. Ages 7-12. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Music Together Babies: Birth-9mo 11:45am-12:30pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie.

Literary & Books Bookmark Club 4pm. Go on a book reading journey. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

Spirituality Gurdjieff’s Teaching: An Approach to Inner Work 7:30pm. $5 donation. Facilitated by Jason Stern. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Qigong with Zach Baker 11am & 5:30pm. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Workshops & Classes

“Paul Robeson” Starring Floyd Patterson II Unison Arts Center has partnered with the Black Studies and Fine and Performing Arts Departments at SUNY New Paltz to present Phillip Hayes Dean’s “Paul Robeson” in celebration of Black History Month. The play, originally performed in 1979 by James Earl Jones, chronicles the life of the scholar, athlete, musician, actor, and civil rights activist from his childhood in New Jersey to his international cinematic stardom. Renouncing a career in law because of racism, Robeson pursued his twin passions of music and acting. He was the first black actor cast as Othello in Britain since Ira Aldridge, and his rendition of “Ol’ Man River” in “Show Boat” became a benchmark for all future performers of the song. Robeson’s civil rights activism eventually resulted in his blacklisting during the age of McCarthyism. Floyd Patterson II, son of heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson, stars in Unison’s production at SUNY New Paltz. Unisonarts.org

Spirituality Khenpo Lama Pema Wangdak 2-4pm. Based on teachings by the great Indian Mahasiddha. Palden Sakya Center Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-4024. Kirtan or Devotional Chanting 7-9pm. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Theater Encore Presentation of Next Fall 8pm. $20/$18 in advance. Presented by Mohonk Mountain Stage Co. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Lesbian Love Octagon Benefit Call for info. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900. VDay 2013 Call for times. $10. A new production of the Vagina Monologues Oasis Café, New Paltz. 255-2400.

Workshops & Classes Basic Drawing and Painting 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Tor Gudmundsen Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Doody Calls 1-2pm. $10 non-members. Cloth diapering info sessions. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. First Time Homebuyers: What to Expect? 10am. Free seminar presented by Jodie Stevens, MHV Sr. Mortgage Originator. Mid-Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union, Middletown. (800) 451-8373 ext. 3238. Genealogy with Heritage Quest 10:30am. With town Historian Audrey Klinkenberg. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. The Herb Garden 10-midnight. $31/$28. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. Home Building/Green Building Seminar 11am-1pm. Designing and creating your own energy efficient custom home. Reservations are needed. Atlantic Custom Homes, Cold Spring. (888) 558-2636. Make Yourself Heard! 3-6pm. Meet a representative from the office of NYS Assemblymember Kevin Cahill (D-Ulster-Dutchess). Starr Library, Rhinebeck. 876-4030. Meeting Your Spirit Guides with Adam Bernstein 2pm. $40 exchange. You have a “Spiritual Team” or “Soul Group." Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Needle Felting: Basics and Beyond 1-3:30pm. $$0. Ages 8+ Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132.

Beginner/Intermediate Pilates Mat Class 6:30pm. $10. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Introduction to Landscape Design 6-9pm. $171/$154. Three sessions. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. Pilates Mat Class: Community Class noon. $5 donation. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Technique and Improvisation 4:30pm. $15/class or 10-class card for $140. For 6-8 yr olds with Clyde Forth. Beginner ballet class. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 347-927-1187.

TUESDAY 26 Clubs & Organizations Young Mothers’ Group 5pm. For pregnant and parenting women under the age of 25. YWCA of Ulster County, Kingston. 338-6844.

Health & Wellness

Reading by Children’s Book Author McKenzie Willis 3pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties.

Music An Afternoon of Jazz 3pm. $40. Jazz violinist Sonya Robinson. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Jazz at the Falls Sunday Brunch noon. Host Bill Bannan, featuring Featuring Greg Glassman. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. JB’s Soul Jazz Brunch with Myles Mancuso 10am. Sunday brunch The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Kimberly with Bruce Hildenbrand 11am. Café Mezzaluna, Saugerties. 246-5306. Scott Barkan 6pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699.

Outdoors & Recreation Early Migrants on the Rondout 9am. John Burroughs Natural History Society, Kingston. Carolorganistin@gmail.com.

Spirituality Sacred Chanting 10:30am-noon. $10. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Satsang with Gurudev Swami Nityananda 10am. Includes spiritual discourse, singing of bhajans and kirtan. Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Workshops & Classes Akashic Records Revealed with June Brought 2pm. $20 exchange. The Akashic field of energy. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Hypnobabies, Childbirth Hypnosis 10am-1pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Painting Artforms in Nature II with Yura Adams 1:30-4pm. $185, $155 members. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

MONDAY 25 Dance Creative Yoga Children’s Yoga Class 4pm. Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. Fusion Dance 5:30/6:45pm. $15. Shambhala Yoga Studio, Beacon. 922-4517. Swing Dance Class Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, advanced 8pm Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331.

Afro-Caribbean Fitness 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Ages 3+ M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Caregiver Support Group 10-11:15am. Town of Shandaken Town Hall. 338-2980. Gentle Yoga for Mamas 4:30pm. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Long-Term Care 6pm. Led by James Farnham. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Pilates: Mama with Baby 12:45pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Tai Chi Chuan 10am. Marbletown Community Center, Stone Ridge. 3991033. Wabi Sabi Yoga 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Zumba 6:45-7:45pm. $40/4sessions, $12 drop in. W/ Amanda Gresens. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Kids & Family Bouncing Babies Story Time 9:30-10am. Birth to 18 months old. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Children’s Story Hours 10:30am. Toddler Time Tuesday (18 months to 3 years) and Preschool Wednesday (3 years to 5 years) followed by crafts and music. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Cruisers Play Group noon. $5. Ages 6-18 months. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. New Mother’s Social Circle Call for time. $5. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-0624. Scrabble 4pm. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Spanish Club for Youth 4:30-5:30pm. Practice conversational Spanish. Ages 10 and older. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Terrific Two’s and Three’s Story Time 10-10:45am. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Tuesday Tales 11am. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Playspace for Tots 10-10:45am. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

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Faculty Jazz Recital 8pm. $8. Studley Theater, SUNY New Paltz. 257-2700. Open Mike with Chrissy Budzinski 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties.

Spirituality Meditation in the Temple 6:30-7:15pm. Silent meditation with the Shanti Mandir community. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Workshops & Classes Argentine Tango Class 7:30-8:30pm. Sadhana Center for Yoga and Meditation, Hudson. (518) 537-2589. Artistic Anatomy 1-4pm. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Boxing Conditioning 6pm. $10. Workout with a certified boxing trainer. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Ecorche 9am-noon. $140/4 classes. With Kieth Gunderson Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Intermediate Pilates Mat Class 9am. $10. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. Life Drawing Sessions 7:30-9:30pm. $13/$10 members, $48/$36 series of 4. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Mother/Daughter Belly Dancing Class 7:30pm. $20/4 weeks $69/mother daughter $118. Casperkill Rec Center, Poughkeepsie. (914) 874-4541. M*Power Dance 4:30-5:45pm. Ages 6-18. M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Teen Art Lab 3:30-5pm. After school art program with Jessica Poser. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507.

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Experimental Art Night 7pm. $25 includes all supplies. Shaqe’s A&I Studio, Beacon. 440-6802 call to inquire and reserve spot. Express Yourself 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Leslie Bender Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Swing Dance Class Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, advanced 8pm Linda & Chester Freeman Boughton Place, Highland. 236-3939.

End the New Jim Crow Action Committee 6-7:30pm. Family Partnership Center, Poughkeepsie.

Dance Hip Hop Dance 5:15-6:15pm. All ages. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Health & Wellness Community Style Acupuncture 10am-noon. $30. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Gentle Yoga with Kelly 7:30-8:30pm. $10/$50 for 6 classes. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com. New Year Yoga 5pm. $88/8 wks. Taught by Mary Maitri Farel. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 687-0617. QiGong - Discover the Benefits 9am. Stone Ridge Healing Arts. 399-1033. Tai Chi 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Vinyasa Yoga 6:30-7:30pm. $ Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Wabi Sabi Yoga 4-5pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952.

Kids & Family After School Art 3:30-5pm. Ages 3 and up Scenic Hudson’s River Center, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. Art Class with Art Lab 3:30pm. Kid Around, Saugerties. 247-3342. Children’s Story Hours 10:30am. Toddler Time Tuesday (18 months to 3 years) and Preschool Wednesday (3 years to 5 years) followed by crafts and music. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Clay Play 3:30-5pm. $38/2 classes, $72/4 classes, $150/10 classes. Ages 5+. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. Great Fours and Fives Story Time 1:30-2:30pm. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. La Leche League of New Paltz Meeting 10am. Breastfeeding information New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. 750-4402. Music & Movement for Toddlers with Abby Lappen 10-10:45am. Ages 18 months and up. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Literary & Books Hudson Community Book Group 6-7:30pm. 3rd through 5th graders. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. Hudsonoperahouse.org. Storytelling with Janet Carter 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties.

Music Nadia Ackerman and The Harold Pinter Orchestra 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Open Mike Night with Jeff Entin 7pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699.

Nightlife Terraoke! Karoake Night 10pm. Terrapin, Rhinebeck. 876-3330.

Spirituality A Course in Miracles 7:30-9:30pm. Study group with Alice Broner. Call to verify. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 229-8391.

Workshops & Classes Belly Dance Classes: Intermediate 7pm. $15. W/ Willow. Artspace at Ed Dempsey Tattoos, Woodstock. 594-8673.

THURSDAY 28 Clubs & Organizations Meeting of Middle East Crisis Response 7-8:30pm. Promoting peace and human rights. Woodstock Library, Woodstock. 679-4693.

Comedy The Not Too Far From Home Comedy Tour 9pm. $15/$10 in advance. Aaron David Ward and opener Deric Harrington. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699.

Food & Wine Arlington Farmers’ Market 3-7pm. College Center, Poughkeepsie.

Health & Wellness Brain Games 2pm. Give your brain a work out at this 6-week program for adults. Grinnell Library, Wappingers Falls. 297-3428. Fitness Hour 4pm. Combination of band and body work. Instructed by Connie Scuitto Saugerties Public Library. 246-4317. Gurdjieff’s Movements: Inner Work & Sacred Dance 7:30-9:30pm. $5. Facilitated by Jason Stern. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Mama’s Group with Breastfeeding Support 1-3pm. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Prenatal Yoga 6:15-7:30pm. $90/6 weeks. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. Sleep Divine Yoga Nidra 6:30pm. $10. Participate in gentle movement to relax the body. YMCA, Kingston. 338-3810 ext. 110. Stress Reduction through Meditation 10:30am. Kingston Library, Kingston. 339-8567. Wabi Sabi Yoga 11am-noon. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Yoga for Mama with Baby 10-11am. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 876-5952. Yoga, Mind, and Body 6pm. Women’s View Acupuncture, Rhbk. 876-7844. Zumba 6:45-7:45pm. $40/4sessions, $12 drop in. W/ Amanda Gresens. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Kids & Family Creative Youth Studio 3:30-5:30pm. $38/2 classes, $72/4 classes, $150/10 classes. 5+ Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. Tiny Tots Storytime 11:15am. Ages 1-3. Age appropriate stories and songs Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Music Acoustic Thursdays with Kurt Henry 6pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Group Guitar Lesson 5-6pm. $30/month (2 lessons). With Peter Theodore. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Jim Campilongo Power Trio 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Marco Benevento, Dave Dreiwitz and Andy Borger 6pm. Storytellers Concert Series. Woodstock Day School, Saugerties. 246-3744 ext. 337.

Outdoors & Recreation Give a Hoot Owl Hike 7-9pm. Shaupeneak Ridge, Esopus. 473-4440 ext. 273.

Spirituality Meditation in the Temple 6:30-7:15pm. Silent meditation with the Shanti Mandir community. Shanti Mandir, Walden. Shantimandir.com.

Workshops & Classes Babywearing Bonanza 1-2pm. $10. Waddle n Swaddle, Rhinebeck. 473-5952. Beginner Ballet for Adults & Teens 7pm. $15. Mt. View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Belly Dance Classes: Beginner 7pm. $12. W/ Willow. Artspace at Ed Dempsey Tattoos, Woodstock. 594-8673. Boxing Conditioning 6pm. $10. Workout with a certified boxing trainer. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. 679-0901. Drawing, Painting & Composition 1-4pm. $140/4 classes. With Eric Angeloch Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Ecstatic Dance Class 6:45pm. $10. Meditation-in-motion, a path toward wholeness. Shakti Yoga, Saugerties. 417-8341. The Home Vegetable Garden $25/$75 series/$65 member series. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926. Life Drawing Sessions 7:30-9:30pm. $13/$10 members, $48/$36 series of 4. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Love-to-Dance Class 6:30pm. $15. Class for those wanting to be familiar (again) with their dancing body. Clyde Forth Dance & Pilates, Mount Tremper. (347) 927-1187. M*Power Dance 4:30-5:45pm. Ages 6-18. M*Power Center for Cultural Fitness, Poughkeepsie. Mpowercfcf.org. Rendering in Black & White 9am-noon. With Vince Natale Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388


2/13 ChronograM forecast 105


eric francis coppolino

Planet Waves by eric francis coppolino

Water Sign Theater Waterfall at the old Smitty’s Ranch, High Falls.

W

hat is it about 2013 that makes its astrology distinctive? In a word, water. That means a year of exploring the nuances of, and the existence of, emotion, empathy, and intuition. If you’ve ever wanted to take up photography, painting, music, or filmmaking, now is the perfect time. The Asian year of the Water Snake begins this month, which accents the Western astrology perfectly (more on that closer to the event). Over the past few years, there has been a gradual accumulation of planets in water signs, calling attention to corresponding issues with actual water on our planet. To those with strong water sign charts (for example, Sun, Moon, or rising sign in one of the water signs Cancer, Scorpio, or Pisces), the world feels a little more like home when there are planets in those signs. There is space and a kind of invitation to open up the emotional spectrum, and to feel ourselves, one another, and existence itself. We are constantly interacting with material objects, electricity, data, money, ideas, concepts, paper, metal, and machines that burn fuel flying across the sky and speeding across the countryside. How much time do we spend with water? Let’s see, 10 minutes in the shower, 10 minutes doing the dishes, and an extra 15 minutes chatting by the water cooler. Water is the missing element in most of our lives. We live in a kind of desert. My old friend Be’jamin once said the world is divided between those who drink water and those who do not. Those who do are in the minority. Pepsi in any form is not water. Smart Water isn’t either. Rising Tide, 2010 to Present Over recent years, planets have been moving into water signs. As happens with water, the tide rises slowly and steadily. It’s now about to come to a crest. But let’s take the story back a few years. In 2010, Chiron began its ingress to Pisces, which started things off. That is Chiron for you—leading the way. (Well, Uranus had been in Pisces for six years prior, but that wasn’t very watery; it was like a hot tub with a short circuit.) The very day that Chiron ingressed Pisces for the first time, the Deepwater Horizon oil platform exploded. We watched for 90 agonizing days as crude oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico. Chiron will be in Pisces through 2018-2019, and is a constant reminder to take care of the oceans, lakes, and rivers. However, it’s never really clear how to do this, since the problem comes from industry. Fighting industry, its lawyers and its scamming environmental consultants, is never easy, but we all have to participate in the old heave-ho that will be necessary to set things right. Every product choice, indignant phone call to customer relations, and public meeting in your community counts, as does doing what you can personally. Neptune, a watery blue planet named for the god of oceans (and earthquakes) began its ingress into Pisces in 2011, completing that ingress in early 2012. 106 planet waves ChronograM 2/13

Meanwhile, Uranus left Pisces with a bang in March 2011. I mean several bangs, starting with an earthquake and tsunami, followed by multiple reactors in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station exploding and melting down, and then spilling vast quantities of radiation into the air, the ocean, and the groundwater. It’s fair to say that the combination of Uranus in Pisces and Neptune in Aquarius was not good for water: through these transits, hydraulic fracturing became all the rage. This is a process of gas extraction that consumes millions of gallons of water per gas well, and leaves the Earth and groundwater contaminated with many toxic chemicals—all to do what solar or wind energy could do more cheaply and cleanly. In October 2012, Saturn ingressed Scorpio for the first time since the early 1980s. This is providing some stability to the planets in Pisces. Chiron and Neptune give us more water and more awareness of the feeling level of existence. Saturn is here to help keep that yin energy in balance, and also help dredge out the territory deep at the bottom of things. In human consciousness, the Saturn in Scorpio factor brings up the theme of emotional maturity. Oh, that thing! It’s about learning to have some modicum of boundaries around our feelings, some sense of containment. We are said to live in a society where yang energy is out of balance—our aggressive, competitive, and warlike society. Just as strong a case can be made that we struggle with emotional stability and maturity. That people are not encouraged to grow up is a problem. That there are so many constantly refreshing sources of instability is an even worse situation. Saturn in Scorpio is the territory where sex meets the emotions—the hormone drive, hormonal cycles, the deep emotional need to connect sexually in a way that’s not merely physical, or a merger of DNA. Saturn in Scorpio is here to help us dredge out these channels. They are so cluttered with emotional discharge it’s amazing anyone knows what they feel. There is a big problem with ignorance around sexually transmitted infections, which is a form of passing around karma through sex. Saturn is saying: wise up, grow up, and get a grip. We also face a significant problem of hormone pollution. Everything you consume that has touched plastic (including cans, which are plastic-lined), as well as many, many other products, contain hormonally active chemicals. Then there are untold millions of people consuming hormone birth control and discharging it into the public waterways. In many areas of the United States and other countries, there are just nine short steps between what you flush down the toilet and what comes out of your kitchen faucet. The sewage per se is the last thing we need to worry about; the problem is the contaminants, such as the drugs and, in many places, PCBs at the bottom of riverbeds. PCBs are a form of liquid plastic that was used through most of the 20th century and which still finds its way into nearly everything. They are hormonally active chemicals, like every pesticide, dioxin, and most heavy metals.


I often wonder about the effects of all of this hormone pollution on our behavior and the ways in which we interrelate, which are so dependent on hormones and pheromones. I wonder about how much of the gender anarchy that’s so popular now is fueled by toxins on the parts-per-billion level. For years I have been proposing that there is a behavior problem with these contaminants. Now, that turns out to have some validity. A recent retrospective of prior studies associates reduced lead rates with lower rates of violent crime. The researchers looked at every other social or economic explanation for the trends they could think of—and it turns out that lead is the probable culprit in unexplained, wide-scale violent behavior. We can only wonder what the thousands of other chemicals are contributing to planetary insanity, as well as the political madness that is swallowing all common sense and reason. One vision I would offer for Saturn in Scorpio is coming to terms with this issue, both as an environmental pollutant and as an emotional pollutant. How many people do you know who suffer from some endocrine disorder? Common ones include endometriosis, diabetes, thyroid problems, pituitary disorders, and obesity (often undiagnosed as a hormonal issue). Saturn in Scorpio is calling for awareness—and for a kind of purge. Do you know the sources of hormone pollution in your diet? Do you consider things like high fructose corn syrup as one of them? What about the hormones present in milk and meat? It’s time to get a grip on these issues. One other not-so-minor point: Scorpio is associated with jealousy and possessiveness, and all the dramas that often ensue from there. Of all emotions, I think jealousy is the one that (suitably) people are the most covetous of; it’s treated like an entitlement. I would say more people feel entitled to be jealous than feel entitled to be happy. This is not serving anyone’s creative, constructive, or loving purpose. Saturn in Scorpio is going to push the issue, which has a first cousin—the truth about the sex we want, the sex we actually get, and our whole history. Most of this is left out of the relationship discussion, which is convenient until it is not so convenient at all. Clip and Save: More Water in 2013 That’s just the background! In mid-2013, Jupiter joins Saturn, Chiron and Neptune in the water signs, as it ingresses Cancer. By July and August, there’s an impressive lineup in Cancer, which brings the water issue to the most personal level. That’s the dimension of home, nourishment, and the choice whether to nurture ourselves and those around us. Cancer is about the most tangible level of actual human feelings. Yes it has the intuitive dimension, but really it’s where feelings come home to the gut level, the bosom and maternal instinct. I would propose that this is about a reconsideration of how and whether we take care of ourselves, our families, and those we say we love. What is the balance of giving and receiving in your life? What are your motives to share or to express your needs? Can you discern a need from a desire? Mercury ingresses Cancer on May 31, where it stays through Aug. 8 (more on that in a moment). Through nearly all of the month of June, Venus is in Cancer. Meanwhile, Jupiter ingresses Cancer on June 25, a few days after the Sun does. It’s there for about one year. This is the faster-acting piece of the grand trine—Jupiter spends just a year in Cancer, and when it shows up it will be accompanied by several other quick-movers passing through this sign. Mars enters Cancer on July 13, where it stays through August 27. So through Northern Hemisphere spring and summer, there will be a rather impressive grand trine in the water signs, involving the following planets: Mercury, Venus, Mars and Jupiter (all buzzing around in Cancer), as well as Saturn, Chiron and Neptune. If you count times when the Sun and Moon are in water signs, all of the traditional planets will be part of that grand trine for part of the year. There’s one more fun thing to consider: every time Mercury is retrograde, it will be in a water sign. Indeed, during the retrograde phase it will not leave the water sign it’s in—that is, it doesn’t dip into the neighboring sign. The Mercury retrograde beginning February 23 is exclusively in Pisces (Venus, Mars, Neptune, Chiron and the Sun will also be there). The one beginning June 26 will be exclusively in Cancer. It will be joined by the Sun, Mars, Vesta, and Jupiter. The one beginning October 21 will be exclusively in Scorpio, joined by the Sun, Saturn, and the North Node. Okay, that’s a lot of water. This is coming from someone with about 10 water placements in my natal chart, depending on what you count, and it still feels like a lot of water. The meta theme here is that it’s time to connect with the truth that we are beings made of water, with feelings attuned to water, which flow like water. We need to nourish our bodies with water, and take care of the Earth’s limited supply of fresh water. And it’s time to imbibe those forms of watery creative expression, and tune into the “psychic” or intuitive realm—which will be coming through more distinctly (that’s a topic deserving of another article). Water is the medium of intuition. Imagine that all water resonates with all other water. There are no secrets and no point trying to keep them. Sooner or later, anyone aspiring to a more spiritually grounded life figures this out.

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2/13 ChronograM planet waves 107


Planet Waves Horoscopes Aries (March 20-April 19) You may find yourself drawn into social environments, though I suggest you take a strategic approach—spend only as much time there as it takes to meet your objective. That might include meeting the one person you know you were ‘supposed’ to meet, having one conversation, making a cameo and moving on, or hanging out in the back room during your own party. I say this for two reasons, besides the fact that the social realm can be a waste of time, energy, and aspiration. One current reason is you need to be careful of group dynamics, and conscious when you’re in their midst. I would encourage you not to surrender your power to a group. Another is that small shifts in trajectory will take you in significantly different directions than you’re currently moving, and it’s necessary to be aware of when you feel that change. Last is that you have deeper pleasures waiting for you than those you can have in public, hence the social realm is merely a means to something better, and that something better is the thing you want. Part of creating it will involve setting up the environment for it to manifest; the idea that comes to mind is containment, a kind of world apart. Make sure that your home is prepared, with various libations and the implements of pleasure (soft lighting, clean sheets, phones disconnected, suitable music) and then go with the flow.  

Taurus (April 19-May 20)

Your charts indicate some unusual progress in your career, though if you’re part of an organization, remember that you’re not in this alone. I suggest that your real success is about being a positive, professional influence on the people around you as well as on the creative flow. There’s something about understanding the nature of how choices and actions turn to consequences, and the ways that process can be intervened in early on to create better outcomes. That’s another way of saying be proactive and what, to you, may feel like vigilant. If you’re working with others in their leadership capacity, remember that you have extra influence because of that contact; use it judiciously. The theme of this moment is that it’s not all about you, and in connecting with that, you may discover a realm of personal satisfaction that you’ve never felt before. Many people fear that they will have to “give themselves up” to be part of something larger than they are, though if that’s true, then there is some other problem. Your current astrology is about discovering, encountering, and fully engaging who you are, within a context. If you use your sense of perspective and maturity to see that context, you may notice that you have the sensation of being a visitor, not just to this particular situation but to the world itself. The nice thing about being a visitor is that you can exchange a sense of ownership for a sense of stewardship. I think you will like it.  

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Gemini (May 20-June 21)

Take care handling your professional affairs this month. Your chart indicates the possibility of some authentic success or breakthrough, particularly in matters where your creative life intersects with your work life. You could discover a bold, vivid sense of purpose. However, if you are not 100 percent impeccable on matters of communication, that will come back to you. Therefore, begin now making sure that your intentions are precisely aligned with your words. Keep people up to date about what in your life influences them. I suggest you be careful about any tendency you may have to yield to your doubts and change your mind. I know that change is in the nature of the universe and you in particular have a mental state that’s constantly on the move. Often you decide that there’s something that just looks like it might be better. However, you and the people around you will benefit from your consistency through any relatively brief phase of doubt, challenge, or adversity. Being a pro means sticking with things through moments of uncertainty, and being true to your vision. Therefore, trust your original intentions, and I strongly suggest that you honor your original commitment, at least through the Mercury retrograde from February 21 through March 17. You may have the sensation of swimming upstream during this phase, or meeting some inner resistance, though the real rewards are on the other side of this event, if you give yourself the gift of consistency.  

Cancer (June 21-July 22)

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Some of the most appealing people you meet this month will resemble you the least. As one born under the sign Cancer, familiarity is something you treasure, understandably enough. I suggest that this month you place an enhanced value on what is different, interesting, and which challenges your emotional perspective. For example, if you have a tactile approach to contact, or if you like affection demonstrated openly, you may experience some unusual pleasures from someone who takes a more detached approach. Overall, actually, a bit of detachment would be a good approach; I suggest that you sidestep any urge to make a “permanent” bond with someone at this point. The wheel of your life is spinning pretty quickly, and there’s still no telling where it’s going to stop. Therefore, this is a good time to place a high value on your freedom of movement and your freedom to choose. Leave your options open—particularly if you feel pressured to make a decision by your friends (or by some other social pressure) to make a commitment you don’t feel right about making. It’s not always obvious when these kinds of influences are applied, or when we’re falling for them; I suggest you pay careful attention. The idea here, as I’ve suggested, is to leave some options open for the near future, when many other options are likely to manifest. You’re likely to discover that you can have worthwhile experiences in the moment without clinging to them.


Planet Waves Horoscopes Leo (July 22-August 23) Don’t be too hard on yourself, and make sure that you depend on the presence of others in your life to take care of you as much as you take care of them. They are there and they are willing to help. However, don’t expect anyone to read your mind. Be as clear as you can be about what you want and need. This may bring up some interesting emotional dynamics for you. This may include various shades of wondering whether your environment really is friendly, whether you can trust people to support you, and so on. Most of these misgivings have no reality in the present, but are more like relics from ancient history. It can be challenging to see these relics for what they are, as they tend to show up in consciousness as something real and immediate. It’s just not always obvious that they are some kind of memory fragment bubbling to the surface, pretending to be real now. The thing to watch out for is projection: for example, ascribing your own fears to someone else. You may need to be vigilant about claiming what you own, so that you can be clear about whom others really are and what they are offering you. If anything gets in the way of an authentic exchange, check for projection. If you can keep this boundary clear, an unusual alignment that happens around the 10th of the month may represent a meaningful turning point not just in one relationship but in how you experience all relationships.  

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Virgo (August 23-September 22)

The planets seem aligned to reveal just how much someone in your life means to you, despite any challenges that may exist in the relationship. The situation looks like the perfect setup for healing, though if you miss that particular point (for example, by getting caught in any drama, or by misinterpreting someone’s desire for you as a form of aggression), you may find yourself in an unnecessarily complex situation. It will be helpful if you use your intuition and anticipate someone’s needs in advance—or use your experience with them and remember where they are coming from. It’s not up to you to fix anyone, but it will serve both your purposes and theirs if you hold open the space for their emotional process. This may feel like you’re going against the grain of your personality, though that’s exactly what you need to do for the benefit of making space for your own emotional process. By offering your empathy to someone you care about, you’re learning to offer your empathy to yourself. This really is a case of you cannot give what you do not have. In this situation, trust will be one of the most meaningful forms of empathy, including allowing the space for someone to change their mind a few times without deciding that they are trying to deceive you in some way. I don’t think that’s true; there are deep, potentially ambiguous feelings involved, though this does not dampen your love in any way.  

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Libra (September 22-October 23)

Your creativity may, at the moment, be in service of something else, something besides your personal creative aspirations. From the look of your solar chart, that could work well for you, as a way of deepening your talent, establishing yourself professionally, and as a satisfying way to express yourself. Creativity is often confused with something personal. At times, that is true, though this attribute is over-emphasized in our romanticized, glory-oriented notions of what it means to express oneself. You are playing a pivotal role within some organization or group structure. Your devotion is providing stability to guide others around you through various everyday challenges and the occasional unusual challenge. This is a situation where the more you put in, the more you will get back, though you don’t have to think of it that way; rather, the more you put in, the better things will go, for you and for everyone. If you maintain awareness of how there are certain challenges inherent in human nature, you will see the way those challenges can be subverted, minimized or even resolved through creative thinking. You seem to have ideas that are ahead of the crowd or the curve, and I suggest you not hold back. Say what you’re thinking. Be clear when you notice a problem, even if you don’t have a solution for it; your mere acknowledgment of the issue will set the creative process and the group mind into motion. But that’s not enough; make sure you follow through.  

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Scorpio (October 23-November 22)

You’re headed for a passionate month, though you’ve likely already noticed this developing. The sign Pisces, one of the most dependable sources of pleasure in your life, is gradually filling up with planets, which will reach a peak in the coming weeks. You may find yourself taking emotional and erotic risks you’ve only dreamed of, though never imagined you could make real. This is a healthy, creative place for you to hang out. I would caution you about one thing, though, which is a potentially slippery aspect of emotional communication that might appear late in the month. No two humans ever agree on everything. It’s up to us to find and honor the common ground that we might share. You will be able to help matters considerably with your willingness to listen, and to really understand where someone else is coming from. This will help you identify the mutual space you can share with someone, based on actual intimate knowledge. Remember that you have more flexibility than you credit yourself for, and more than you generally like to offer. I suggest you go the whole distance being generous with yourself. The pleasure you may share in this time of your life is a luxury and a privilege, though some would say it’s a basic human need. These things all may be true, and you can still offer your life to the improvement of the human condition, starting with the people you care about the most. 2/13 ChronograM planet waves 109


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Sagittarius (November 22-December 22) What you think and how you feel are related, though they are two different things. Listen to both your thoughts and your feelings and you’ll get a dialog going, and get closer to a deeper level of personal truth. If you can reach that level of awareness of what’s actually real for you, you will discover that it’s a lot easier to get along with others. Said another way, honoring your inner reality opens up a capacity for intimacy that would decidedly not be there otherwise. Once you’re clear with yourself, any ambiguity that someone else may feel is a lot easier to work with. Once you have that inner dialog going, it becomes easier to set priorities that apply in the world that exists both within and outside your home. Speaking of, you are currently in contact with what is, in truth, a significant professional goal. You may doubt your ability to fulfill this one, and as the astrology has been developing, it tends to appear and then disappear from your radar. I suggest that you put this into manual mode. This particular goal may seem to fade away, though that’s an illusion; it will be back soon enough, and I would urge you to focus on it even when it’s not a priority knocking on your head all the time. Part of the sense of relief of not having it annoy you is the feeling of not being up to the task, though I assure you that is not true.  

Capricorn (December 22-January 20)

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You have a rare opportunity to both tidy up your finances and take a significant step toward increased revenue from your profession. As for the tidying up, this is a matter of intention, discipline and structure. In the current version of the world, I recommend that anyone serious about earning money from professional activities get a professional accountant on their team. Money flows toward structure. But it also flows toward purpose, and this is a time to focus your purpose. It’s not a time to drift and see what the future may hold; it is, to say it simply, time to get real. There is a purpose you are here to fulfill, and though you may live a while, you’re not going to live forever. That’s part of honoring the fact that things take time to develop and generally do not develop “on their own.” What you are doing seems to require actual planning, as well as cooperation and the cultivation of a niche market of some kind. It also seems to depend on the involvement of friends or associates with more experience than you have. To benefit from that knowledge base, you will need to open the side of your mind that is not inquisitive for its own sake, but rather focused on learning toward a specific goal. This is a new method of gaining understanding, one that may make you feel submissive to your subject matter for a while. I would rate that as a positive development.  

Aquarius (January 20-February 19)

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Remember what is the most meaningful to you. You might forget, or take it for granted. Who you value, what you value, and what ideas you hold dear are worth not only contemplating, but acting on. Love in any form is an active process, though as frantic as the world is (and as your world gets at times), what you crave is love in action. I would add that this is not a magical process, but a human experience of making your way through an uncertain world; it’s the very opposite of taking anything for granted. In this spirit, I would propose that for you, failure is a means to success. Willingness to make mistakes is a key element of what is called ‘correct action’ that can lead to a good, whole, and wholesome destination. You are a person who loves ideas, though fully engaging in the beauty of being a creature of blood and flesh and feelings is essential to your participation in the human family right now. Spirit is our home, though you are an incarnation, and that has a purpose—to embrace the complexities and challenges of existence rather than to avoid them in any way. That new gesture includes embracing what you care deeply about but which in some way challenges you. You’ve probably thought of all of this before, though in my reading of the planets, now is a poignant moment for getting it from the realm of theory to that of tangible reality.  

Pisces (February 19-March 20)

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110 planet waves ChronograM 2/13

An unusual alignment is gathering in your sign, which indicates an atypical, as in truly special, time in your life. Find a balance between moving with the flow and guiding yourself toward the destinations that you choose—and note that choosing is key. You may be tempted with moments when pushing the river seems like the thing to do, and others when drifting seems like the thing to do; consider this consciously so you do the right thing at the right time. Mars, Mercury and Chiron (among other influences) in your sign are saying focus on what you want, who you want and what you want to create. For a while you may feel like you are merely fantasizing, or asserting yourself into an energy field that is not exactly responsive, but I would urge you not to fall for that. You’re in one of the most workable environments you’ve ever been in, with lavish resources available to you. Rather than getting caught in the opinions or intentions of others, take what they say under advisement and allow it to inform you without any obligation to act. The complications of others are not yours, and you provide plenty of help, guidance and support merely by being yourself. By the time the Sun ingresses your sign on the 19th, you will feel the strength of your presence on the planet, and recognize that you’re an attractive, creative force, as well as one to be reckoned with. Did your horoscope for last month pan out? Browse the horoscope archives at Chronogram.com.


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Parting Shot

The Boy with the Valentine Balloon, Carol Rizzo, colored pencil, 9” X 12”, 2011. A boy dressed like a Harlequin stares out at the viewer. His cheeks are almost as red as the heart-shaped balloon he’s clutching, and the corners of his lips are turned up into a slight, secret-holding smile. The piece, The Boy with the Valentine Balloon, is undeniably the work of Carol Rizzo. The holiday-themed drawing embodies the illustrator’s quirky style and her tendency to playfully manipulate anatomical proportions. The boy’s head—too large and round for his lithe body—brings attention to his face. Most of Rizzo’s art focuses on faces that typically blur the boundaries between realistic and fantastical, such as in Aging, which features a human face rooted in a tree trunk. For the featured piece, Rizzo lifted the boy’s features from an old circus acrobat poster in a subway. “I quickly sketched it years ago when I was living in London and it’s just a face that I felt was 112 ChronograM 2/13

a wonderful little’s boys face,” she says. The artist was also influenced by Jerdine Nolen’s picture book Harvey Potter’s Balloon Farm. The Boy with the Valentine Balloon was born out of project Rizzo is currently working on. She’s creating a line of greeting cards for all occasions, and wanted to find less a clichéd and more universal way to celebrate Valentine’s Day. Rizzo wanted the boy to be holding a heart and the balloon proved to be the perfect solution. “Instead of ‘I love you, sweetheart,” the piece “gives a feeling of ‘Valentine’s for anybody,’” she says. Rizzo lives in Staatsburg. Her illustrations have appeared in Newsweek, The New Yorker, and on the cover of Roll magazine. Rizzo’s Portrait of an Easter Bunny was featured on the cover of Chronogram’s April 2011 issue. —Carolyn Quimby


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February 2013 Chronogram  

The February 2013 issue of Chronogram

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