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Engineering What’s Next in Outdoor Living

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The stories you trust for the place you love Hudson Valley is home to a diverse range of compelling people, issues and perspectives. And now, it’s also home to the historic and award-winning Times Union. Times Union: Hudson Valley covers it all for a place that has it all — from the latest topics locals care about, to only-here experiences.

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30thCCSBard anniversary Closer to Life: Drawing and Works on Paper in the Marieluise Hessel Collection CCS Bard Galleries 6.26 – 10.17.2021

Kai Althoff Deborah Barrett Georg Baselitz Joseph Beuys Manuel Álvarez Bravo Cecily Brown Nick Cave William Copley Nicole Eisenman General Idea Isa Genzken Robert Gober Felix GonzalezTorres Rachel Harrison Jörg Immendorff Clotilde Jiménez Rashid Johnson Ray Johnson Anselm Kiefer Seydou Keïta Martin Kippenberger Imi Knoebel David Koloane Robert Kushner Maria Lassnig Charles LeDray Sol LeWitt Robert Longo Carlos Mérida Dan Miller

Ulrike Müller Matt Mullican Cady Noland Toyin Ojih Odutola Gabriel Orozco Giuseppe Penone Sigmar Polke Arnulf Rainer Gerhard Richter Allen Ruppersberg Peter Saul Thomas Schütte Hollis Sigler Diane Simpson Lorna Simpson Sable Elyse Smith Nancy Spero Rosemarie Trockel Germán Venegas Danh Vo Kara Walker Franz Erhard Walther David Wojnarowicz Nahum B. Zenil

Closer to Life: Drawings and Works on Paper in the Marieluise Hessel Collection is curated by Tom Eccles and Amy Zion. Exhibitions at CCS Bard are made possible with support from the Marieluise Hessel Foundation, the Audrey and Sydney Irmas Foundation, the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, the Board of Governors of the Center for Curatorial Studies, the CCS Bard Arts Council, and the Center’s Patrons, Supporters, and Friends. Image caption: Maria Lassnig, Visionen, ca. 2002, Pencil and acylic on paper, 12 3/8 × 9 1/16 in. Marieluise Hessel Collection, Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale on-Hudson, New York. © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Bildrecht, Vienna

Free and open to the public with advance reservation only: ccs.bard.edu 2 CHRONOGRAM 7/21


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Historic Kinderhook Creek Colonial $599,000

Magical historic waterfront home, 1830s 3 BR/2 BA colonial house overlooking Kinderhook Creek. Kayak in your own backyard and let the week’s stress just melt away. Many original details have been preserved throughout this stately home. The first floor flows seamlessly with a formal entrance way, large living room with fireplace, dining room, kitchen, library/den, full bath and sun porch. The second floor offers three bedrooms and a full bath. Massive deck overlooks the creek below. There is a separate 2-car garage (originally an ice house, could be artist’s studio) with a room below with sliding glass doors that open to the creek’s edge. Located in the charming hamlet of Chatham Center, surrounded by beautifully restored homes.

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Ghent Charmer

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Classic 1800s renovated & turnkey 3 BR/3 BA farmhouse with 9’ ceilings, and newly refinished original wide board floors throughout the entire house. The kitchen and all three bathrooms were updated in the last two years, along with new central A/C, new propane furnace, and a second set of laundry machines added to second floor. Large fenced back yard, blue stone patio, garage and storage sheds, and beautiful landscaping. Partial basement with dry storage. Metal, asphalt and rubber roofs, 16KW Generac generator, and the septic was inspected 2019. Great location.

❚ Pamela Belfor 917.734.7142

Athens Circa 1820 House

$474,000

Classic early 4 BR/2 BA house w/ original character: beamed living room ceiling & wood burning fireplace, wide-plank flooring, tin ceilinged laundry room & claw foot bathtub. Modern baths, energy efficient windows, propane stove in family room. Private double lot w/ high rock outcroppings. Green lawns, fern gardens & flowering specimen trees. Back porch & stone dining patio. Walk to town, Hudson River peeks from covered front porch & side windows.

❚ David Ludwig 917.365.1894

Hudson Riverscape

$425,000

Located in the Hamlet of New Baltimore, 1850s Center Hall Colonial with Hudson River views & Scenic Hudson protected lands. 2 BR/3 BA. Enjoy country tranquility for full or part time resdents. House has been restored & renovated with every modern convenience. Blue stone entry, kitchen with granite counters, and dining area with wine fridge, family room with fireplace and radiant floor heat. The master bedroom is impressive with its custom-designed sitting room with beamed ceiling and wood stove, and gorgeous ensuite bath. Raised deck with Hudson River views.

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7 21 K.O. In Three, by Melissa Stern. “Stronger Than Dirt,” a retrospective of Stern’s work, is on view at the Lockwood Gallery through July 11. Lockwood won this year’s Chronogrammie for Art Gallery.

july

CHRONOGRAMMIES, PAGE 53

DEPARTMENTS 8 On the Cover: Hudson Talbott Celebrated children’s book author and illustrator Hudson Talbott is featured in a retrospective, “River of Dreams,” at Hudson Hall through August 15.

10 Esteemed Reader Jason Stern TK.

13 Editor’s Note Brian K. Mahoney impressions of a .

HIGH SOCIETY 15 Growing Pains While New York State legalized home cultivation of marijuana (in theory) at the end of March, actual legit home grow is still likely more than a year away. Sign up for the High Society newsletter at Chronogram.com/highsociety.

FOOD & DRINK

CHRONOGRAMMIES:

READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS 53 Winner’s Circle

Our second anual readers’ choice awards garnered participation from 20,000 community members, who cast 140,000 votes for their favorite Hudson Valley businesses across 230 categories.

16 La Salumina: Cure-All In the Sullivan County hamlet of Hurleyville, Eleanor Friedman and Gianpiero Pepe operate a whole-animal Tuscan-style charcuterie company and market.

21 Sips & Bites Food and drink news from Talbott & Arding, Love Bird, Bus Stop Grill, The Dig on Main, The River Pavillion at Hutton Brickyards, and Seminary Hill.

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july

Tim Mullally and Bob Maxwell, owners of Style Counsel boutique in Warwick. Photo by David McIntyre COMMUNITY PAGES, PAGE 46

HOME

70 Poetry Poems by Nidhi Agrawal, Heather Craig, Julianne DeMartino, George Freek, Joanne Grumet, Cliff Henderson, Stephen Jones, Jahnvi Mundra, Drew Nacht, Livingston Rossmoor, Mark Philip Stone, and Lyla Yastion. Edited by Phillip X Levine.

24 Giverny in the Catskills On 155 acres in Greene County, photographer and flower farmer Anne Hall updates an 18th-century farmhouse built by French Huguenots.

HEALTH & WELLNESS 39 Healing the Trauma Body with EMDR When the psyche sends out an SOS, EMDR (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy), a science-based therapy, can help.

EDUCATION 42 Continuing Curriculum In-person adult education returns to learning centers, museums, and schools.

COMMUNITY PAGES

THE GUIDE 73

Tom Eccles, director of the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, talks with Sparrow about the center’s 30th anniversary and two new exhibits on view.

74

The Short List: post-COVID cultural season is underway in a big way. Our cultural crib sheet for July includes Pilobolus at the Mahaiwe, the Miro Quartet at Maverick Concerts, a whodunnit performed in the Widow Jane Mine, and much, much more.

77

Live Music: Some of the concerts we’re going to this month include Modern English at Daryl’s House, Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Seats at Belleayre, Jim Campilongo at the Falcon, and Donavan Frankenreiter at Infinity Hall.

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46 Warwick: Fertile Ground Orange County’s legendary Black Dirt region gets ready for the next wave in farming.

ARTS 68 Music Album reviews of Long Time Passing by Kronos Quartet & Friends; Universal Blues by Keith Pray; and Spy Detective Collective by Scott Helland Guitarmy of One. Plus listening recommendations from Alexander Platt in Sound Check.

69 Books Jane Kinney Denning reviews Ian Manuel’s My Time Will Come. Plus short reviews of Michael Sadowski’s Men I’ve Never Been, Mark Bittman’s Animal, Vegetable, Junk, James Romm’s Sacred Band, Alysa Wishingrad’s The Verdigris Pawn, and Bright Green Lies by Derrick Jensen, Lierre Keith, and Max Wilbert.

82

Taliesin Thomas reviews Shona McAndrews’ Just the three of us at Art Omi. Peter Aaron talks with multidisciplinary artist Joseph Keckler about touring with Sleater-Kinney, covering Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, and his fascination with opera prior to his performance at the Ancram Opera House on July 24. Exhibits: Gallery shows around the region.

HOROSCOPES 84 Laughing and Crying, It’s All the Same Release Lorelai Kude looks at the what’s in the stars for July.

PARTING SHOT 88 Queer Ecology Hanky Project A traveling exhibition of 125 artist bandanas at Women’s Studio Workshop.

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on the cover

Cover illustration from Picturing America: Thomas Cole and the Birth of American Art

Illustration from United Tweets of America, Hudson Talbott

W

hat do King Arthur, Henry Hudson, and Thomas Cole have in common? They’ve all been featured in the books of celebrated children’s author and illustrator Hudson Talbott whose work is featured in a retrospective, “River of Dreams,” at Hudson Hall through August 15. In a career that spans more than 30 years, Talbott has written and illustrated over 27 books for young readers. The cover image is from United Tweets of America (Puffin Books, 2015), which celebrates the state birds of the US. The eastern bluebird— not the pigeon—is New York’s avian mascot. “I imagined a chirpy little bluebird from upstate, thrilled about his first time in the big city, with the jaded New York pigeons looking on, smirking at the naïveté, and that reminded me of myself arriving from Kentucky to New York City a few decades ago,” says Talbott. “I had fun losing my innocence in the Big Bad Apple, but now I’m just glad to be here upstate, with bluebirds nesting in my backyard.” Talbott is well known for From Wolf to Woof, It’s All About Meow, and Leonardo’s Horse. His book O’Sullivan Stew was inspired by trips to Ireland; 8 CHRONOGRAM 7/21

Tales of King Arthur from travels to the UK; while Amazon Diary is based on his time spent among the Yanomami tribe in South America with photographer and coauthor Mark Greenberg. The two friends accompanied Dr. John Walden on his mission to bring much-needed malaria medicine to remote tribal people. “It’s important to share that there are other cultures out there,” Talbott says. “I love to impart a sense of wonder about the world with young readers.” Stephen Spielberg came across Talbott’s first book We’re Back: A Dinosaur’s Story, bought the rights, and made it into an animated feature length film in 1993, which helped kickstart Talbott’s career. Eventually, he moved up to the Hudson Valley, where he now resides in a farmhouse overlooking the Catskills.  “This region played such a pivotal role in American history and directly influenced my book River of Dreams: The Story of the Hudson River,” he explains. “In order to make it more personal, I thought of myself as a dreamer coming to the big city, which would never have been here without the big river. I found my thread in all the dreams the river has

inspired over the centuries and used that as the foundation for my story, right up to the 20th century, which placed the Hudson Valley at the center of the environmental movement.” Knowing that he was seeking additional information for the history of the Hudson, his editor connected him with Pete Seeger who called him on the phone. “Hearing his voice, I felt like I was talking to Abraham Lincoln. He couldn’t have been nicer and was so ready to share what he knew about the Hudson River. He was a huge force in raising consciousness about the region and the whole environmental movement. So, I made sure he appeared in my book.” The legacy of the Hudson River School moved Talbott to pay tribute to the movement in Picturing America: Thomas Cole and The Birth of American Art. “A teacher of mine suggested I create a book about him. I ran it past my editor who loved the idea,” he says. “As an immigrant, Cole viewed this country with a fresh perspective and helped Americans see the magnificence of this country.” Portfolio: Hudsontalbott.com. —Michael Cobb


EDITORIAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brian K. Mahoney brian.mahoney@chronogram.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR David C. Perry david.perry@chronogram.com DIGITAL EDITOR Marie Doyon marie.doyon@chronogram.com ARTS EDITOR Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR Wendy Kagan health@chronogram.com HOME EDITOR Mary Angeles Armstrong home@chronogram.com POETRY EDITOR Phillip X Levine poetry@chronogram.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Anne Pyburn Craig apcraig@chronogram.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Phillip Pantuso phillip.pantuso@chronogram.com

TO THE

contributors Winona Barton-Ballentine, Jason Broome, Michael Cobb, Brian PJ Cronin, Rhea Dhanboora, Morgan Y. Evans, Lisa Iannucci, Jane Kinney Denning, Lorelai Kude, David McIntyre, Haviland S Nichols, Seth Rogovoy, Jeremy Schwartz, Sparrow, Taliesen Thomas

PUBLISHING FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky CEO Amara Projansky amara.projansky@chronogram.com BOARD CHAIR David Dell

media specialists Kelin Long-Gaye kelin.long-gaye@chronogram.com Kris Schneider kris.schneider@chronogram.com Jen Powlison jen.powlison@chronogram.com DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Lisa Montanaro lisa.montanaro@chronogram.com

marketing DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS Samantha Liotta samantha.liotta@chronogram.com SPONSORED CONTENT EDITOR Ashleigh Lovelace ashleigh.lovelace@chronogram.com

interns MARKETING & SALES Casey Reisinger and Ian Rothstein EDITORIAL Naomi Shammash

administration FINANCE MANAGER Nicole Clanahan accounting@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600

A SUMMER GETAWAY TO THE HUDSON VALLEY’S MOST ICONIC RESORT Explore 85 miles of hiking trails with unparalleled views at Mohonk Mountain House. Enjoy our barbecue, beach, boating, outdoor music, archery, fitness classes, complimentary golf greens fees, and farm-to-table cuisine—all included in your overnight rate. Indulge yourself with a nature-inspired treatment in our award-winning spa. We’re taking every precaution to keep our guests and staff safe, so you can relax and reconnect with the ones you love. Join us on the mountaintop and feel your stresses melt away.

production PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Kerry Tinger kerry.tinger@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 PRODUCTION DESIGNERS

ENJOY A DAY SPA VISIT OR BOOK THE ULTIMATE STAYCATION

Kate Brodowska kate.brodowska@chronogram.com Amy Dooley amy.dooley@chronogram.com

office 45 Pine Grove Avenue, Suite 303, Kingston, NY 12401 • (845) 334-8600

mission

844.859.6716 | mohonk.com | New Paltz, NY

Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Chronogram Media 2021. 7/21 CHRONOGRAM 9


esteemed reader by Jason Stern

Why can’t I free your doubtful mind and melt your cold, cold heart? —Hank Williams

BARD SUMMERSCAPE 2021

CELEBRATE SUMMER Bard SummerScape and Bard Music Festival return for five weeks of artistic discovery.

DANCE

I was waiting for the echo of a better day PAM TANOWITZ AND JESSIE MONTGOMERY JULY 8–10 OPERA

King Arthur (LE ROI ARTHUS)

JULY 25 – AUGUST 1

THE STAGE AT MONTGOMERY PLACE

Justin Vivian Bond

YOUR AUNTIE GLAM’S MIDSUMMER FLUTTER BY JULY 15–17

Black Roots Summer JULY 23–24 JULY 29 JULY 30–31

MWENSO & THE SHAKES LOVE WILL BE THE ONLY WEAPON GENIUS MOTHER MARY A SONIC RETROSPECTIVE OF MARY LOU WILLIAMS THE SOUND OF (BLACK) MUSIC

Most Happy in concert SONGS FROM FRANK LOESSER’S THE MOST HAPPY FELLA AUGUST 5–7

AUGUST 6–8 AUGUST 13–15

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©Peter Aaron ’68 / Esto

BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL

Nadia Boulanger and Her World

We were preparing a meal, my teenage sons and I. The three of us worked together to prepare koobideh, a spiced ground lamb kebab served with grilled vegetables on a small mountain of yellow, saffron-infused rice. Our work was harmonious and positive, cutting vegetables, grating onions, shaping and grilling kebabs, each working in response to the living pattern of the moment. A Persian dervish shared the manner of preparing the dish a decade before the boys were born. Since then, the occasions of koobideh’s appearance on our table have been special, even sacred, events arising from the shared life of the family. The dish’s abundant presentation and synergy of flavors verges on the psychotropic and transcendental.  The boys and I prepared the meal for a gathering in honor of their grandparents and some others. During a period of lockdowns last year, the younger envisaged a studio in which to work at art and music, to explore and create with guitar and violin, paint, wood, and words. The elders were inspired by his vision and, possessing the requisite skills, organized to run electric lines, build insulated walls, and install windows and workbenches. After a period of intense effort, the group—spanning three generations—completed the studio and the boy moved in to work and live in his creative garden.  We greeted our guests with warmth, hors d’oeuvres, and glasses of dry, effervescent Cava. Though some were skeptical of the dish, unusual for the American palate, an atmosphere of enjoyment surrounded the meal.  Remarkable to me was the harmonious manner in which we worked throughout the process of preparing, serving, and enjoying this meal. It had the quality of a sacred feast in large part because not one iota of negativity entered the atmosphere. By some grace, all were able to maintain fixity in a world that is simple, good, and imbued with a quality of gratitude and presence.  Though I observed in myself the temptation to impatience or doubt, I could see these impulses with enough clarity to desist from entertaining them. It was in these moments that I understood something about choice. I saw that real choice is between levels of being, between the world that I choose to inhabit. When I wish for fixity in presence, I can and will be present and obedient to the unfolding pattern of the moment. I can choose to inhabit a more rarefied sphere. Paradise and hell are not elsewhere. Both are right here. When I am hooked by fear, resentment, anger, disdain, the endless list of contracted states, I am in hell. Pure and simple. With work at the kind of watchful presence that grows out of meditation, I am presented with the possibility of a choice, a real choice that cannot be premeditated or retroactive but can only be made with observation in the moment of action.  The choice to live in the paradise of gratitude and understanding is in front of each of us all the time. Though we can prepare for the moment of choice, the result is not something developed. It is already always present in the corresponding world.  In this sense, the Sufi litany of the attributes of the Insan-i-Kamil, the “perfected person” is already present within each human being: SHE is without doubts, without self-love, SHE does not have impatience, nor does SHE grab at things. In HER the Higher Sacred Impulses are always present and it is with these that she manifests.


Hudson Valley Artists 2021: Who Really Cares?

Ransome, Gee’s Bend Quilter Minnie, 2021, courtesy the artist

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7/21 CHRONOGRAM 11


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editor’s note

by Brian K. Mahoney

Merrily, Merrily, Shall I Live Now

S

ummer is upon us and there are real reasons for optimism. Although there will always be subset of folks who are irrationally exuberant—their toxic positivity causing a range of disasters from boom-and-bust cycles in the stock market to a belief that the Mets will ever win another National League title, let alone a World Series (don’t be fooled by a strong start!)—there is a case to be made for cautious optimism. Not just because the groundhogs who live underneath the shed in my backyard have yet to eat my broccoli plants. (Clearly, those ingenious critters are biding their time until the florets start to form, prompting maximal hope but likely delivering nibbled-to-the-ground devastation. It makes one not want to want things. As Annie Lennox sang, in a different context: “Desire, despair, desire / so many monsters.”) Well, for one thing: if you are reading this, you are alive.1 I won’t bore you with all the details of the spectacular miracle of your existence, but I’ll note this: the odds of you ever being born were one in 400 trillion. And you’ve made it thus far through a pandemic that’s killed 600,000 people in the US and four million worldwide and is not through with us yet, Delta variant and all. It’s still dire in some spots across the globe, but US fatalities peaked in mid-January at 3,300 a day. We’re down to 343 a day as of mid-June. Plus: Almost half the US population is fully vaccinated. (Some may decry that only half of our country’s somewhat-prone-to-knuckleheadedideas citizens are vaxxed, but I prefer to see the glass as half poked.) Seventy percent of New Yorkers have received at least one dose of vaccine, and Governor Cuomo declared that “we can now return to life as we know it,”2 easing many of the remaining social distancing rules in place to protect us from the coronavirus/each other. Even Lissa Harris, my colleague who exhaustively covered COVID for The River Newsroom—and is reliably the skunk at any picnic when talk turns positive regarding the pandemic—told me “the worst of the pandemic is over in the US.”3 Just the fact that we’ve scaled back our COVID coverage and Lissa has taken on a new disaster beat, climate change in the Hudson Valley, shows how far we’ve come. Those are some of the numbers—the stats—on how this is the beginning (middle?) of the end of the pandemic. The emotional texture of our lives is not in the numbers, however, but in our day-to1. Apologies to any Chronogram fans on the other side of this mortal coil. As an atheist, I don’t believe you’re out there, but in this media landscape of infinitely splintered attention, I’ll take any readers I can get, corporeal or not. 2. Life as we know it will not be possible for the over 13,000 nursing home residents in the state who died after the enactment of a controversial policy in late March of 2020 that sought to create more space in hospitals by releasing recovering COVID-19 patients into nursing homes. Watching the governor

day experience. Here are some impressions from the past month as we reawaken from the long slumber of COVID. Where Do the Children Play? The back side of our office here in Kingston looks out on land owned by the YMCA. Long an urban wild space, the fields were underutilized as a community resource and overutilized by some who were a nuisance to the community until 2014, when some visionary folks—my wife Lee Anne among them—decided to put in a small farm and community garden known as the Kingston YMCA Farm Project.4 Soon afterward, some rudimentary metal children’s play equipment was installed next to the farm. At some point during COVID, the Y embarked on a playground upgrade, installing a series of interconnected wooden play environments connected by whimsical winding paths. And then supply chains shut down, lumber was unavailable, and work on the playground stalled just short of completion. All through the fall and winter of COVID, I watched the rain and snow fall on a half-built playground. Is there anything sadder than cold rain on an abandoned jungle gym?5 And then a few weeks ago, I looked out the window to see children cavorting—climbing up the rope tower, balancing on the stacks of long logs, tearing ass around, and shrieking in the upper registers of playground delight. It’s a sound that parents stop hearing at a certain point but it can be dental-drill-unsettling to the childless. Except this time. I listened to the high-pitched squeals as if I, too, were ready to join in the game I dubbed Run Shriek Tag Shriek Climb Shriek. Rules to follow, once I can get close enough to the kids to ask without losing my hearing. People on the Streets I traveled to Hudson for the city’s inaugural 2econd Saturday Gallery Crawl in June. It also happened to be Flag Day, and Warren Street was chock full of folks headed to the carnival rides and fireworks at one end of town and the galleries mostly clustered at the other end. There was music on the sidewalks and people filling cafes that spilled into the street. It all felt so very, well, normal—like old normal, like hug-an-acquaintance normal. And it’s the same all over the region, as David McIntyre’s photographic portrait of Warwick will attest (page 46).

To-Do List And the press releases keep pouring in. There are more and more events to cover, from must-see concerts (Neko Case at Levon Helm Studios on August 18) to unclassifiable performance ( Joseph Keckler at Ancram Opera House on July 24; read Peter Aaron’s interview with the earnestly odd Keckler on page 81) to the standard embarrassment of riches that is the summer arts calendar here in the Hudson Valley.6 To make sense of it all, we’ve revived our long-dormant cultural crib sheet, the Short List (page 74). My pick this month is “Mystery in the Mine,” a whodunit staged in Rosendale’s Widow Jane Mine by local theater troupe Murder Cafe. Set inside a cave, it’ll be cool, no matter what. The other show I won’t miss this summer is “The Tempest” at Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. It’s HVSF’s last year at Boscobel before they move into their permanent home just down the road, and I want to take in that sui generis setting one more time before it goes disappearo. If you don’t know: HVSF’s performances take place in a large tent high on a bluff on the Hudson River in Garrison. The opening of the tent faces west, toward the river, and it’s a tradition at the festival for plays to begin with a procession up and over the hill and across the lawn while the sun is gently dipping down behind the Catskills across the river. There’s real magic in it. And how fitting that HVSF should stage “The Tempest” as its Boscobel swan song. One of the last plays Shakespeare wrote, and his final masterwork, the drama climaxes [spoiler alert] with a poignant leave-taking of a spell weaver. The conclusion also brings freedom to the sprite Ariel, who caused the titular storm that is the show’s inciting incident. In revisiting the text, I was struck by how much Ariel’s monologue after being released by Prospero resonates with this delicious post-COVID feeling—a summer of freedom, or something close to it. Where the bee sucks, there suck I: In a cowslip’s bell I lie: There I couch when owls do cry. On the bat’s back I do fly After summer merrily. Merrily, merrily, shall I live now Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.

celebrate New York’s reopening, complete with fireworks—already a seasonal nuisance for dog owners and their shell-shocked companions—like a victorious general left a bit to be desired.

4. Congrats to the Kingston YMCA Farm Project on their second-place Chronogrammies award in the Food Justice Organization category. A full list of winners begins on page 54.

his toe over and over. He could just barely heave the ball high enough to reach the backboard. I half expected some Parks and Rec employee to show up and take his ball away.

3. Lissa, never one to let good news go unspoiled, did note that cases are gently rising again in the US—though a lot less deadly because the vulnerable are mostly vaccinated. Further, she told me: “We are not going to eliminate this bad boy, and I think we might well get a smaller fall wave.”

5. Well of course there is. One day during the pandemic, I watched Parks and Rec workers remove the rims from the basketball court near my house, leaving nothing but bare backboard. A week or so later, in early April, a pudgy kid in a puffy coat was out on the court, just bouncing his ball against the backboard like he was intentionally stubbing

6. One notable exception is Vassar College-based Powerhouse Theater, which choose not to mount a 2021 season. This development lab for new theater has given birth to Tony award-winning shows like “Hamilton” and “Hadestown,” and the regional cultural scene will not be fully intact until they’re up and running again in 2022. 7/21 CHRONOGRAM 13


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It will be at least a year until New Yorkers can relax among their pot plants like this St. Bernard-Husky mix in British Columbia, where home grow is legal.

Growing Pains

Home Cultivation Challenges for Cannabis By Rhea Dhanbhoora

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annabis is now legal in New York, and if you’re over 21, you can legally possess up to three ounces of it and 24 grams of cannabis oil. You can smoke it everywhere that you can smoke tobacco, and eventually, you will also be able to grow and store five pounds in your home. But before you start looking up cannabis-growing tutorials or saving up for a fancy automated home grow system, remember that it could take a year—probably longer— before retail sales begin and before cannabis can be grown for personal consumption. So, while the legalization of personal cultivation is an exciting DIY component of the Marijuana Regulation Tax Act (MRTA), those eager to start may have to wait a while before they can begin cultivating their own plants.

if a person starts growing before the Office of Cannabis Management (OCM) issues rules and regulations surrounding home cultivation. The rules are still unclear to the District Attorneys and police departments across the state.” There’s a lot we don’t know about how long issuing these rules will take, but what we do know is that medical cannabis patients are first in line. McGuire explains, “Under the current regulations, medical patients will be permitted to start growing on September 30, 2021, whereas recreational gardeners must wait until 18 months after the first authorized retail sale of adult-use cannabis products to a consumer.” Since the first retail sale may not occur until sometime in 2022 (perhaps even later), personal cultivators may not be able to begin growing legally until as late as 2024.

Getting Organized The New York City Cannabis Industry Association and Hudson Valley Cannabis Industry Association (NYC/HVCIA) are organizations that formed as a hub for industry stakeholders to work together on all things cannabis-related. The members include entrepreneurs, consumer and patient advocates, lawyers, and regulators who, among other things, use the association to develop their networks, formulate good policy, and help each other get their businesses off the ground. They recently authored a policy paper on home grow: “Personal Cultivation, Equity, and Cannabis Markets: Creating an Ideal Cannabis Regulatory Structure.” In it, they discuss what this act says, and perhaps more importantly—what it doesn’t say—about personal cultivation.

Slow Growth How many plants do you think you can grow in the privacy of your own home? If your answer is “as many as I can fit,” you’re wrong. Even if you’re going by the assumption that you can grow as many plants as you want as long as the cannabis you cultivate at the end of it all doesn’t exceed the stipulated five-pound limit, you’re wrong again. The current limitations on the number of plants residents can grow at home are set at three mature and three immature cannabis plants. There’s also a per-residence cap that allows no more than six mature and six immature plants for households with more than one adult. If this sounds confusing, it’s because these limits are still very vague, especially when it comes to cannabis plants. “Cannabis plants have a growth cycle that can make it difficult for there to be an identifiable transformation from ‘immature’ to ‘mature,’” says McGuire. And does an immature plant include seedlings, cuttings, and clones? “Like a rose, a cannabis plant can propagate from a cutting, but we do not believe the legislature meant to include trimmings, which occur as part of routine maintenance, as ‘immature’ even though they can be replanted and become a viable cannabis plant,” McGuire adds.

Home Grow Timelines If you’ve already started looking for the perfect spot in the sun to put your cannabis plants—you may want to take a small step back. It’s important to understand that while cannabis is legal, some laws are still unclear. As Michael McGuire, Chair of the Home Cultivation Committee for NYC/ HVCIA, tells me during a series of conversations in June, “It is not yet clear what would happen

This ambiguity stretches to the permitted weight of dried flowers, too—which is what the current five-pound limit refers to. McGuire explains, “Cannabis is wet and heavy when it is first harvested. Five pounds of wet plant matter translates into a minimal amount of dried and cured cannabis flower.” And, how does the OCM plan to evaluate this weight? Like a lot else, this is also unclear. “The weight of cannabis should not use ancillary ingredients—for example, the full weight of a pan of brownies should not count against the total weight of cannabis a person is allowed to possess in their home,” McGuire says.  Cannabis Sourcing Issues While medical patients can look forward to being legally permitted to start growing in September, some obstacles could still throw a wrench in their plans. The first is that the growing season in New York (especially outdoors) is relatively short, and most cultivators harvest in the fall. You may have realized through all of this that you have to wait to start growing (legally), but even if the laws magically permitted home growing as soon as tomorrow, there’s another issue you’ll run into. Where would you get your plants, seeds, and clones? Federal laws haven’t changed, and crossing state lines with cannabis is still illegal. And, as McGuire says, “It is unclear whether a nursery or a dispensary will be permitted to sell plants directly to the public.”  Even if this is all clarified and ironed out over the next few months, it’s already July, so realistically, even medical patients may have to wait until next year to grow outdoors.  Housing Issues  Legalization was a crucial step for communities that have been disproportionately arrested and incarcerated for cannabis historically. McGuire points out that there’s a lot that makes this a good bill. “The social equity provisions are very strong, and the right to home cultivation is foundational to a healthy cannabis industry,” he says. The social and economic equity provisions 7/21 CHRONOGRAM 15


include investing 40 percent of tax revenue in communities affected by drug enforcement, expunging past convictions, and prioritizing licenses for minorities, women-owned businesses, service-disabled veterans, and distressed farmers. Even with these promising inclusions, the MRTA’s equity provisions are up against institutional hurdles. One that stands out is that public housing across the state, like the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), usually receive federal funding. It’s unclear what this will mean for residents, and it’s this lack of clarity that’s worrying. Cannabis is still illegal according to federal law, which currently prohibits even cigarette smoking in public housing. There’s no clear indication of whether there will be any protections for residents from unfair evictions or how federal and state laws will interact regarding cannabis. It’s essential to clarify this, McGuire says, adding, “If NYCHA and HUD tenants are excluded from participating in this market, be it home cultivation or consumption, we are excluding and locking out close to 1 million impacted/ BIPOC New Yorkers.” Even private landlords, who cannot prohibit home cultivation completely, can restrict it based on bylaws or leases. “They may restrict where one may grow their plants in regards to communal spaces, patios, balconies, and fire escapes,” McGuire explains. And, although counties can’t stop retail sales completely, communities and towns can opt out of retail dispensaries and set restrictions on social consumption. Municipalities like Middletown, Crawford, and North Salem scheduled public hearings in June for proposals to ban retail dispensaries and smoking lounges as part of these opt-out options. Local governments across the state may also place further limits on growing. However, McGuire clarifies that the MRTA does not allow municipalities to ban home cultivation outright. Still, it’s unclear what these additional restrictions can include, so homeowners will want to keep an eye on what local laws will mean for their personal cultivation plans.   There’s no clarification on community garden growing either—the MRTA simply states that residents can cultivate cannabis within or on the grounds of private residences. McGuire says the MRTA should have provisions for and encourage community gardens, which could be the only accessible space for some people to cultivate their plants. “Outdoor cultivation is far cheaper and more environmentally sustainable,” he says. So, do community gardens have a plan yet, regarding what to allow or restrict for homegrowers eager to start cultivating cannabis here? Not yet, according to Cheryl Hearty, president and secretary of New Paltz Gardens for Nutrition. “The legislation won’t be finalized for quite some time. We will have to wait until we know more before making any decision as to whether or not cannabis will be allowed to be grown in members’ plots,” says Hearty. 16 CHRONOGRAM 7/21

Inspections and Penalties With legalization come the laws to regulate it, although violations for exceeding the plant limit are expected to result in civil penalties and community service not exceeding 20 hours. The specifics of what these violations would include are unclear and will likely remain so until the OCM issues the home cultivation regulations. A spokesperson from the Dutchess County Drug Task Force told me over the phone that while things are still vague, the legalization has put certain things in motion. “If you had a drug conviction for five pounds or less, the courts are already asking us to start sealing the records,” they say. However, there’s no word on whether anything will change for home growers until there’s more clarity about the specifics of the laws. “It’s all vague, and it’s going to cause some problems,” they add. Perhaps most significantly, officers are now prohibited from using the “smell” of cannabis as a reason to conduct searches. But when it comes to personal cultivation, New Yorkers could face penalties if they exceed the vague six-plant limit. People should know whether penalties will be per violation or per extra plant, and McGuire says the OCM needs to clarify the consequences too, especially because those without significant experience can inadvertently exceed the three mature plant limits without realizing it. “While we agree that unlicensed sales should be unlawful, enforcing this prohibition by treating minor violations of the home cultivation law as an offense worthy of a fine, or worse, is misguided,” he says. Imagine this scenario—there’s a knock at the door. You go and open it and find the authorities there to inspect your plants. No warrant needed. The MRTA, as currently written, does not specify whether warrants are required for residential home inspection, and that frightens McGuire. “While commercial cultivators will be subject to such inspections, we believe it is unlikely that the legislature intended to empower the OCM or law enforcement to conduct warrantless inspections of private homes,” he says.  Allowing warrantless searches would also be counterproductive to the goals of the MRTA. After all, if home growers thought that letting the government know they were growing at home could put them at risk of a warrantless search, there’s a higher likelihood of people returning to the approaches they took during prohibition—think legacy dealers and hidden grow boxes. Besides, as McGuire says, “Such searches would violate the Fourth Amendment.” Even if the legislation didn’t intend to allow warrantless searches of people’s homes, it’s all still too vague. Who will regulate home growing limits? Who will conduct the inspections, at-will or otherwise—local police, or the OCM? The lack of clarity is pretty worrying, especially when you think of already disenfranchised groups. “We are concerned that the same communities that were grievously harmed by the War on Drugs and subjected to disproportionate enforcement of our criminal laws will be the same communities that endure regular warrantless inspections of their homes. We’re particularly concerned that

individuals living in federally subsidized housing might be subjected to warrantless inspections. This would be a dangerous encroachment on their privacy and civil rights, and the OCM should immediately clarify that such inspections are not permitted under the statute,” McGuire adds. A Way Forward From increasing the plant limits, clarifying the weight of permitted flowers, and setting up safeguards for our most vulnerable communities, the NYC/HVCIA have several recommendations for the MRTA going forward. One of them is increasing the plant limit, essential in part because there’s no sure-shot success rate—a plant can fail to grow for various reasons. As McGuire says, “A six-plant limit is an unnecessarily small number. The limitation is presumably to eliminate underground unlicensed commercial cultivation, but any such operation needs far more plants to be viable.”  Then there’s the issue of medical patients, who should be permitted to start growing as soon as possible. “There is no benefit to preventing the 150,000 people who possess a medical cannabis card from growing their own cannabis outdoors this summer. If the OCM waits until September, only people who can afford to grow inside their homes will be able to cultivate cannabis at home in 2021,” McGuire says.  While all of this means it’s going to be challenging for residents to start cultivating any time soon, cannabis legalization, as well as the passing of the MRTA, is still a significant step forward for New York. McGuire tells us that the legalization of personal cultivation, in particular, will be a boon for residents as well as for the cannabis industry since home growers are also usually the best customers. They’re more likely to shop at dispensaries and are great ambassadors for cannabis. And, for those with a green thumb or even a little curiosity about the plant, being able to experiment with growing it at home eventually is an exciting prospect. “All you need to start is a seed, sunlight, soil, and water! Once you take that first step, I promise you, you’re never going to look back. It’s a fantastic hobby,” says McGuire.

HIGH SOCIETY Chronogram has launched a dedicated cannabis content stream. Stay in the know with the latest on industry news, cultivation tips, social-equity initiatives, dispensary openings, and more in our weekly High Society newsletter. Sign up: Chronogram.com/HighSociety.


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food & drink

CURE-ALL LA SALUMINA IN HURLEYVILLE By Marie Doyon

Opened in April 2020, La Salumina is an authentic Tuscanstyle salumeria producing whole-animal charcuterie including salami, guanciale, pancetta, rillettes, headcheese, and paté. Photo by Pippa Drummond

18 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 7/21


Eleanor Friedman and Gianpiero Pepe met at a bar in Siena in 2013, when Friedman was apprenticing with traditional whole-animal salumi makers. Photo by Ashley Sears

H

urleyville’s quaint main drag has undergone a quiet renaissance in recent years. Backed by the benevolent benefactor the Center for Discovery, with its altruistic mission and seemingly bottomless funding, the shabby, run-down buildings of my childhood town have been renovated, restored, and rented out through their Healthy Community Model. The Pickled Owl serves up craft beer and farm-to-table fare. The Hurleyville General Store offers artisanal products for the kitchen, body, and home. A rail trail bisecting Main Street offers a convenient and scenic thoroughfare for strollers and stroller-pushers, joggers, cyclists, dog-walkers, and families. It’s not all different. Frankie and Johnnie’s pizzeria is still there, at least in spirit—and signage (in October, the business went on the market). And the Mobil is a forever fixture, though now it stands in the shadow of the lofty Hurleyville Arts Centre, which houses a cinema, live performance venue and ballroom event space, fitness studios, and an art gallery. But the newest kid on the block is La Salumina, an artisanal charcuterie company and food market. The Italian-style salumeria opened last April amid the first wave of the pandemic. Ethical Charcuterie In the summer of 2010, Eleanor Friedman packed up and headed off to a farm in rural Tuscany. Having recently renounced vegetarianism, she set out to reconcile herself to the reality of

meat-eating. “I was on this quest to know all of the processes along the food chain—to have some ownership over what I was eating,” she says. For three months, Friedman worked as a farmhand, tending, feeding, herding, and helping slaughter the pigs, occasionally pitching in with the salumi production, before returning tanned and transformed to the New York City service industry. But the small taste she had gotten of Tuscan charcuterie techniques was not enough. “I realized I really wanted to pursue this,” she says. Sustainable and ethical practices were core to her ethos from the start. “It turned into: If people are going to choose to eat meat, then let’s make these products available from meat that we can stand behind.” And in 2013, she returned to the farm, this time to intern with the salumieres. At that point, Friedman says she had no attachment to opening her own place; she was happy to learn the craft and work for someone else. But as it turns out, Diane Lane was not the only one to fall in love under the Tuscan sun. One evening at a bar in Siena during her second farm apprenticeship, Friedman was introduced to Gianpiero Pepe—a friend of a friend, who was working as a chef. The rest, as they say, is storia. After six years in New York City, working both front and back-of-house in restaurants, hosting supper clubs, and catering small events, in late 2019, the couple moved upstate with the goal of opening a small Italian salumeria, using Tuscan techniques and local pasture-raised pigs.

Cart Before the Horse Because many of these products take months and even years to cure and age, the plan was always to get a jumpstart on production before opening the retail store to the public. “This is the way Italian small producers do it,” Pepe says. “You make your product and then you sell it in your front shop.” But when COVID hit, USDA inspectors were a hard commodity to come by and the rent had to be paid anyway, so the plan was turned on its head. They opened in April 2020 as a small market, stocking a curated selection of local goods and imported Italian sundries, plus raw and cooked meat products like sausages, which helped them squeak by until they were able to get the first phase of their USDA certification in early February. This preliminary approval means they have the greenlight to make fresh, cooked, and some cured products like salami. “We’re very Tuscan-focused,” Friedman says of their salumi selection. “We don’t want to be doing the American version of Italian, which is grabbing random stuff from all over the country, because the food in Italy is so regional. But we do have a couple of products that fall sort of outside of the confines of Tuscany, because we work with a whole animal and we don’t find that the American public will eat the Tuscan product made with that part of the animal.” For example, a pate rustico, familiar and pleasing to the American palate, replaces Tuscan fegatelli, a grilled liver dish. 7/21 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 19


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Other Salumina products include rillettes, a pork confit that is delicious slathered on a cracker or a piece of focaccia (which they bake fresh on Sundays); coppa di testa, a headcheese made with garlic, lemon, and spices; and tonno—braised pork, preserved in olive oil with black pepper, bay leaves, and cinnamon leaves—a play on tuna, in both word and texture. The pastured whole pigs used in all the products are sourced locally from Kinderhook Farm, Climbing Tree Farm, and Gibson Family Farms. Pepe and Friedman do all the butchering in the back of the shop, as well as the curing, cooking, and aging. In Italy, there is a word for the artisanal craft that Pepe and Fridman practice: norcini. “This is the people like us,” Pepe says. “They produce traditionally, they butcher the whole animal. They use every part of the animal.” Il Mercato La Salumina’s labels, a pretty, pale peach with coral accents and cutaways that reveal the inside product, stand out against the retail space’s gleaming white subway tiles. Stuffed salumi by “imaginary grocer” Yuki & Daughters hangs from meat hooks behind the counter. (You may recognize the delectable, inedible creations from the Whitney Museum gift shop.) The carefully chosen foodstuffs are as visually appealing, with their clean packaging, as they are delectable. The selection is limited, due to both space constraints and curatorial choice. The emphasis is strictly on quality not quantity, a disruption of that distinctly American mentality that idealizes infinite options. “We don’t have too many things. It is very selective,” Pepe says. “It doesn’t make sense with our production style to buy products that everybody has. The idea is not that you are coming into the supermarket with your bag and you’re picking up your product. We do a different kind of work with the clients. We explain, we educate people. If somebody wants to buy olive oil, I can explain my olive oils. I can give you a suggestion. If you want to use it for cooking, I don’t want you to buy a $30 bottle of olive oil.” Most of the pasta and tomato products are from one brand—Gentile. “Gentile is in a town close to Napoli, they just make pasta...forever,” Pepe says. “It’s very famous for pastificio artigianale [artisanal pasta]. So you don’t make any mistakes with this kind of pasta. I think it’s the best pasta in the world.” That’s the kind of endorsement behind every product choice. The cheese, when not from upstate farms like Old Chatham Creamery, is sourced from New York City through an Italian distributor and friend. The fresh Italian cheeses—burrata, bufala, mozzarella—are made in New Jersey by a childhood friend of Pepe’s and picked up weekly. (The creamery, Lioni, is named for their hometown.) There is Italian balsamic vinegar, half a dozen different olive oils from different regions in Italy, capers, mustard, jams, Baiocchi cookies, flour— both Italian semolina and Hudson Valley-grown Wild Hive, 2 Queens Coffee, chocolate bars, and legumes. (“Umbria is very famous for legumes,” Pepe says proudly.) They also have a small selection of ciders and beers from New York producers. “There are a few breweries up here that are so ubiquitous,

The imported selection of foodstuffs is limited, due to both space constraints and curatorial choice, with the emphasis strictly on quality not quantity.

like Catskill and Upward, that people were not purchasing them here,” Friedman says. “So the beers that we’re working with tend to be mostly New York City-based. They’re people we’ve been working with over the years, whose product you can’t find up here, but they’re doing a really good job.” Some of the four-packs on offer are from West Kill Brewing, Transmitter, Folksbier, and Finback. “We don’t have a lot of space,” she adds, “so we try to rotate.” The ciders are from well-reputed natural cideries in New York like Sundstrom and Aaron Burr. During the pandemic, La Salumina launched veggie boxes, which Friedman describes as a noncommittal CSA. These curated produce pickups are sourced from nearby Sullivan County farms like Somewhere in Time and Sprouting Dreams Farm. “When we started offering this in COVID, it was to give people coming from the city access to fresh produce,” Friedman says. “It was more a service we were providing rather than something for our business.” Now, customers use the veggie boxes as a departure point for their shopping and build out from there, add on other products from the store. Looking Forward The duo recently set out some tables on the sidewalk, so customers and people passing on the

rail trail can have a little picnic with provisions from the shop or a hot panini, which they serve on Fridays and Saturdays. The second phase of USDA approval, which they hope to get in early fall, will allow La Salumina to delve deeper into whole-muscle charcuterie—lonza, capocollo, and of course, prosciutto. (They are currently able to offer guanciale and pancetta, which are also whole-muscle products, because they are both intended for cooking.) “So for right now, with the exception of those two products, we are basically taking the whole thing and turning it into little, teeny, tiny cubes and grinding it to make salami and sausage and all the other stuff,” Friedman says, ruefully. When eager customers ask how long before the prosciutto will be ready, Friedman explains the multistep process, in which time is a nonnegotiable ingredient, and tells them not to expect it before 2024. “It takes a few years to get up and running, until you have a cycle,” she says. “We’re never going to have all of the products all the time if we continue to work with full animals, because certain things are going to sell out faster. That’s just the nature of the game. But it’s much better for small farms to be selling whole animals. And it’s easier for them to do what they’re doing, which is what we support. So it’s about changing the way people think about it.” 7/21 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 21


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sips & bites Talbott & Arding

Hudson’s premier cheese and provisions shop Talbott & Arding is making big moves this month, expanding into a sprawling new space on Allen Street. Clocking in at 8,000 square feet, the new storefront will be a continuation of T&A’s current concept as a hub for local provisions makers. With plenty of room to stretch their wings, the new location will have expanded offerings of cheese, charcuterie, pastries, and fresh pasta; plus a recrafted food menu and space to eat in-house. 202 Allen Street, Hudson Talbottandarding.com

Love Bird

Over the years, the small roadhouse restaurant next to A&S Auto & Tire Shop in Accord has cycled through several culinary identities (most recently Mama Boyz—a casual burger spot). But its current incarnation—Love Bird, a fried chicken joint with blue plate specials—looks to have promising staying power. Things kick off with Southern backyard barbecue classics like fried green tomatoes ($8) and deviled eggs ($6). For a more international option, try the fried chicken bao buns, served with cucumber, cilantro, and sauce (two for $10). Moving to mains, the all-star is the three-piece box coming in at $16. Or, opt for a sandwich and choose from the classic Southern, which comes with remoulade, pickles, lettuce, tomato, and ‘bama white sauce ($12), or the One Night in Saigon, featuring chicken, pickled carrot and daikon, cucumber, cilantro, po’mi sauce, and ’bama sauce (also $12). Crispy on the outside, tender and moist on the inside, it’s hard to go wrong whatever direction you choose. 4728 Route 209, Kerhonkson Lovebirdcatskills.com

Bus Stop Grill

Bus Stop Grill is the brainchild of 79-year-old local bus business owner Ernest Knippenberg––a double-decker bus converted into a mobile restaurant. Providing classic American fare, Bus Stop Grill’s menu is all the better because it’s cheap––in the morning, there are breakfast sandwiches for up to $3.75, rolls and bagels for $1.50, and pastries and muffins for $2. Lunch brings corned beef, pastrami, cheeseburgers, and chicken sandwiches for $6.50, grilled cheese or mac and cheese for $4, and hot dogs for $2.50––not to mention sides. Roadside near 1111 Route 9, Garrison Busstopgrill.com

The Dig on Main

Slide on over to the Dig on Millerton’s quaint Main Street for fresh-pressed raw juices ($9) and smoothies ($8.50) and crepes both savory and sweet. For a bright start, kick things off with the Sip of Sun juice, which includes lemon, apple, celery, and turmeric. If you’re feeling tropical, try the Morning Lori smoothie with pineapple, mango, banana, ginger, yogurt and milk. There are also vegan options like coconut yogurt and flaxseed milk. On the crepe side of things, the Chunky Monkey is a classic cavity-inducing favorite with Nutella, banana slices, powdered sugar, and whipped cream, while picks like the Western Croque Monsieur keep things salty with smoked ham, creamy brie, and honey mustard for good measure. 3 Main Street, Millerton Thedigonmain.com

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The River Pavilion at Hutton Brickyards

The arrival of sea-level riverfront dining in Kingston would be headlineworthy even if the Executive Chef Dan Silverman’s pedigree didn’t include Balthazar and Minetta Tavern. While things ramp up, both the food menu and wine list are limited but well curated. Start with the light and summery fluke crudo ($17), before chowing on some mussels and fries ($24). For a tasty turf option, the burger ($18) gets high marks. And whether you’re sipping on a classic cocktail or ordering a romantic feast for two, the river at sunset can’t be beat. Head to the Pavilion on Tuesdays for Hutton Hang, when La Ruta Del Sol food truck relieves the kitchen with cheap and cheerful Ecuadorian and Puerto Rican food (three dishes for $13), plus live entertainment. 200 North Street, Kingston Huttonbrickyards.com

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Seminary Hill is taking the trend of “craft beverage producer as tourism destination” to new and glorious heights. Set in the bucolic rolling hills of the Delaware River valley, the 12-acre property brings together a vintage, eight-room boarding house and two other accommodations with a certified Passive House tasting room. The cider is made largely with fruit from the holistically managed orchard with over 60 varieties of heirloom American, English, and French apples and pears. Choose from one of the five dry and off-dry ciders on offer and sit on the expansive deck while taking in the rural landscape. 43 Wagner Lane, Callicoon Seminaryhill.co —Naomi Shammash & Marie Doyon

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7/21 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 23


the house

GIVERNEY IN THE CATSKILLS

ANNE HALL’S HISTORIC STONE HOME AND FLOWER FARM IN LEXINGTON By Mary Angeles Armstrong Photos by Winona Barton Ballentine

24 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 7/21


Anne Hall and her partner Kate Steciw enjoy some down time between tending to their creative work and flower gardens (and the resident flock of chickens). “When the temperature warms up, we spend most of our time on the back patio surrounded by a blooming magnolia tree, red-winged blackbird males stalking their territory, chickadees flitting, and the mountains, distant but ever present.”

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Hall stands in the front doorway of the home’s front rooms. She was able to keep most of the first floor’s original features, including the plaster walls, wooded beams, and window sills. The home’s previous owner was an antiques dealer who added a few interior doors throughout the home complementing the home’s antique style. Multiple works by Hall and other artists hang throughout the home, including the original Alice Neel 1978 oil on canvas Geoffrey Hendricks and Brian. 

I

n 2015, when Anne Hall first encountered her historic 1783 farmstead, she didn’t see a stone house that needed major renovations, or 35 acres that wanted planting, or even the attached modernist barn-cum-studio washed in light waiting for makers to make some creative hay. “I just saw one huge canvas,” she remembers. Hall admits she has a hard time doing anything on a small scale. A photographer who was living and teaching in New York City at the time, she was drawn upstate by the timeless landscape and the area’s abundant flora and fauna. The stone house and surrounding 155-acre farm seemed to offer enough creative and logistical challenges to capture her imagination. Handcrafted from local bluestone and ancient hardwood, the 1,500-square-foot farmhouse was built by French Huguenot settlers during the 18th century and retains many of the original features of that bygone era. The original structure was added onto over the years, most notably in the 1970s when former owners moved an abandoned 18thcentury wooden barn to the property, attaching it at the northern end of the stone house and effectively doubling the footprint to 3,000 square feet. Hall, who has traveled extensively since childhood, has a deep appreciation for anything handcrafted. “My mother instilled a love of the handmade in me,” Hall explains. “Wherever I

go I pay attention to the local handcrafts—the plaster work in the humblest places in Mexico or Morocco; French-style kitchen cabinets that have screens rather than glass; and the Japanese attention to both texture and imperfection in their designs.” When she first entered the stone house, Hall recognized the original builder’s detailed handiwork immediately—even 250 years later. “I was so excited, I had to touch the house,” she remembers. “I slapped my hand down on the 18-inch deep window sill and was completely delighted by the solid slab of rock.” Set in Stone The abiding nature of the entire property appealed to Hall. Tucked between the Schoharie Creek and a ridge of the Rusk Mountain Wild Forest in Greene County, the 155-acre farm included 35 acres of flat fields supplied with water from the neighboring mountain slopes and unfettered exposure to the sunshine. “The possibility to have that amount of land as a place to sculpt and interact with inspired me,” she explains. The property’s ample acreage is further buffered by surrounding forever wild forest. “I love knowing that the mountains I look at from the window will always look that way.” Before she could begin any agrarian project, Hall needed to tackle the major rehab of the historic 7/21 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 27


Downstairs, Hall converted a former second kitchen into a full guest bathroom. Influenced by a trip to Morocco, Hall wanted to capture the colors, textures, and lighting she’d found while traveling though the country. She found bronze and beige handcrafted ceramic tile for the bathtub wall and paired it with mother-of-pearl mosaic tile for the floors—all from Mosaic House in Manhattan. 28 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 7/21


7/21 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 29


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Hall organizing her weekly late spring flower harvest. Crespell Farms, her flower CSA, delivers throughout the Hudson Valley from spring through the autumn—making weekly drops in Kingston, Hudson, and New York City. Its popularity is growing. “I’m building a crew of some outstanding women who can take more of the reins next season,” she says.

home. While renovating the 3,000-square-foot space, she tried to stay as true to the original architecture and construction as possible. Preserving the integrity of the handmade design while at the same time modernizing the spaces for comfort, shoring up the foundation, roof and walls, and adding some of her own creative touches became a two-year long undertaking. Luckily, Hall had the help of her partner, the artist Kate Steciw. Steciw, who moved from New York City to nearby Willow at the same time as Hall, was happy to pitch in with both the physical work and re-imaging the design. (Hall also brought in a construction team from Brooklyn, putting them up in trailers on the property for part of the rebuild.) The home’s stone facade and original wooden front door were well preserved. Hall brightened them up by painting the window trims and door a robin’s egg blue. She kept most of the original first-floor rooms intact—only removing a small wall between sitting and dining rooms to create one open space that seems to not have changed in three centuries. Wide-plank wooden floors stretch throughout and the low ceilings are reinforced by exposed, rough-hewn, dark wood beams—all from some long-forgotten tree. To repair the original sky blue plaster walls and staircase, Hall and Steciw took historic preservation workshops in early American trade techniques at the Historic Eastfield Village outside Albany. Hall was also able to preserve the two giant bluestone

fireplaces and wooden mantels. To create a cozy sitting area, Hall added a fireplace insert to one and found animal hair insulation tucked between the wood and stone. At the back of the house, the home’s kitchen and entire back wall required a complete restoration. Looking eastward to the nearby mountains, the kitchen area had been split into two spaces by previous owners. Hall tore out both sets of aging appliances, counters, cabinetry and even the floors and then replaced the windows and back wall siding. At one end of the space, she installed an entirely new kitchen with marble countertops, stainless steel appliances, bright blue cabinetry, and black-and-white floor tiles. Hall updated the adjacent sun room with Moroccan tile floors. The second kitchen area was transformed into a full bathroom, finished with earth-tone tiles in multiple patterns but complementary in color and texture. Hall reconfigured the upstairs spaces to include two bedrooms, a full bathroom, and a walk-in closet. (An additional guest bedroom is on the first floor.) After replacing the roof and dormer windows, she added an opulent bathroom with both tub and walk-in shower. Hall finished the tub with hand-painted green and white tiles collected from a trip to Italy as well as a handpainted green and white sink from the same trip. The upstairs shower is finished in a mix of glassy green and matte white tiling. 7/21 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 31


The home’s original kitchen was completely gutted and rebuilt from the studs to the roof. Hall kept the original wood ceiling beams, but lightened the space with a white wash of paint to the ceilings and walls. Marble countertops and cobalt blue cabinets modernize the space and black-and-white Moroccan-style tiles accentuate the floor.

Hall left most of the living area intact, but to create a cozy space on one side of the room, she added a fireplace insert. “The fireplaces were so old they didn’t have flues,” she explains. “And I just wanted one warm, cozy space for the winter.”

32 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 7/21


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One of the 18-inch window sills that first captivated Hall. To properly recover the plaster stone walls, Hall and Steciw took workshops in early traditional American trade techniques at the Historic Eastfield Village near Albany.

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Halls refurbished 18th-century farmhouse sits on 155 acres of land. To Hall the entire project—first the rehabilitation and total renovation of the home and then the establishing of the resident flower farm—may seem almost opposite in nature, but Hall sees commonalities. “There’s definitely a very elemental thread through all of this,” she explains. “It’s taking things down to their most basic processes, appreciating those and then finding new ways to work their basic elements.”

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Nothing but Flowers The surrounding 35 acres of farmland are occupied by a project of a more ephemeral nature. “It was really inspired by my love for color,” explains Hall of the small-scale regenerative flower farm she began two years ago. Named Crespell Farms after the family that built her stone farmhouse, Hall operates the flower farm as a community-supported agriculture initiative, growing acres of both rare varieties and common favorites—all of the blooms curated to connect members to the seasons. Hall was inspired to farm flowers after a trip to Japan in 2011. “It’s traditional there to have a shrine that brings the outside indoors,” she explains. “It’s very seasonally tethered. The idea of having the presence of the passage of seasons inside the house appealed to me. It allows you to experience the different transitions through a single plant.” Hall is also inspired by Monet’s home and gardens at Giverney. “Life there was lived between the kitchen and gardens,” she says. “I love working in the dirt and learning about plants.” Currently Hall divides the fields between seasonal staples, such as tulips, snap dragons, and dahlias, as well as varieties that are rare and special. Italian anemones with black petals, colorful butterfly ranunculus, vintage roses and even eucalyptus plants dot the farm’s flower fields. “It’s an exhausting amount of work,” she admits. “But I have a hard time saying no to sumptuously gorgeous flower varieties.” Her work growing flowers has inspired Hall’s creative practice as well. After rehabbing the stone house, Hall and Steciw turned their attention to the attached barn, refurbishing the exterior and replacing the giant westfacing artist’s window. The ample split-level interior has enough area to give both Hall and Steciw studio space. Lately, Hall’s work is all about the flowers she cultivates. “I’ve been obsessed with Edward Steichen’s 1936 delphinium show at the Museum of Modern Art,” she says. Working with a friend at the Liberal Arts Roxbury gallery, Hall has tracked down some of Steichen’s hybridized delphinium seeds and plans to recreate the show sometime in the future. This autumn, however, she’ll begin with another show at the same gallery, dominated by plants she’s grown. “It will propose a post-human vision of a place dominated by plants,” Hall explains. For Hall, the spillage of her farm work into her art is completely natural. “Working with plants and flowers that are so jaw-droppingly stunning is a creative act,” she says.


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38 HEALTH & WELLNESS CHRONOGRAM 7/21


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efore COVID, Claudia Germuga lived a mile-a-minute New York City life. A Brooklyn-based Pilates and breathwork instructor, she sailed around the city from studio to studio, teaching as many as 26 fitness classes a week. That all stopped in March 2020, when lockdown found her solo in her studio apartment with time to spare. At first the solitude and calm were welcome, but as the novelty wore off, quarantine exacerbated lifelong feelings of being left alone. “I started to realize that I didn’t feel safe in my body or in my space,” she recalls. “I needed to heal some past trauma with my mother. I was also an only child, and this idea of loneliness has been very present through COVID. For a long time, I didn’t think there was any big trauma that I’d gone through. I always felt that if I could wait a few more years, the feelings would shift or fade away. But they never did.” A former dancer, Germuga knew that her most potent portal for healing would be her own body. “I didn’t want to do talk therapy—I wanted a more somatic technique that would help my nervous system,” she says. So, when a friend told her about Liza Roeckl, a Woodstockbased therapist and bodyworker who uses eye

By Wendy Kagan

movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), she booked some time with her on Zoom. EMDR is a psychotherapy that uses bilateral stimulation—the alternate stimulation of the right and left hemispheres of the brain—as a method of healing trauma by changing the way it’s stored in the body. Roeckl led her through several sessions of preparatory work to begin, including a session devoted to “resourcing,” in which Germuga was asked to choose a peaceful place, a protective figure, a nurturer, and a wise figure. “If we put all of those resources into the nervous system, then we keep the clients safe when they have to go into the harder parts of these traumas,” says Roeckl. Armed with these resources—her peaceful place was a favorite spot by the river, and her protector was a grizzly bear—Germuga was ready for a deep-dive into the psyche. It’s Human to Have (and Heal) Trauma Talk to any therapist these days, and you’re likely to hear the same thing: They’ve never been busier. As we slowly emerge from a global pandemic— one of the most traumatic collective events of the last century—people are exhausted from the strain of having to keep it all together. Amid the

quiet and isolation, we’ve had to face ourselves and, sometimes, our demons too. Under the guidance of a trained practitioner, EMDR is one way to process difficult life experiences safely, and for many of us, effectually. As one of the most thoroughly researched therapies for trauma and PTSD, it’s widely endorsed by mental health experts as a sciencebased modality. The US Department of Veteran Affairs named EMDR as one of three therapies with the highest level of evidence in treating trauma. And the national registry of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) cites EMDR as an evidence-based practice for treating PTSD, anxiety, and depression that can also lead to an improvement in mental health functioning. “What makes EMDR unique is that it uses bilateral stimulation as a mechanism to help people deepen their access to memory in a way that is, for some reason, more tolerable to the nervous system,” explains Amy Rosenthal, a Manhattan-based psychotherapist and EMDR consultant and clinician with a subspecialty in trauma and PTSD. “When trauma happens, it lands in a fixed state and leaves a residue of unprocessed material. And sometimes, we 7/21 CHRONOGRAM HEALTH & WELLNESS 39


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get stuck in it. We can get myopic and see the trauma like a snapshot, and we miss a lot of other things that have happened, including our own sense of agency.” Rosenthal compares trauma to a car that’s stuck on the superhighway of our brain’s neural networks—and EMDR is like AAA. “It gives the car a jumpstart so it can move from maladaptive to adaptive. It brings together both sides of the brain so you can look at the experience as a whole. Then you can see what else is there. What else do you know now that you didn’t know then, and that might help you?” From Butterfly Taps to Breakthroughs EMDR has evolved since the psychotherapist Frances Shapiro “discovered” it while walking in the park one day in 1987, when she found that if she moved her eyes (but not her head) from side to side while thinking of an agitating event, that helped to desensitize it. These days, EMDR therapists use different methods of connecting the right and left sides of the brain that may or may not involve eye movements—whether it’s having the client hold a buzzer in each hand, administering light and sound stimulation, or a process called butterfly tapping. The latter involves crossing your arms in front of your torso and alternately tapping each side of your upper chest. (British royal Prince Harry demonstrated it recently on the Apple TV+ series “The Me You Can’t See,” where he invited the world to sit in on one of his EMDR therapy sessions to deal with trauma from the death of his mother, Princess Diana.) Butterfly tapping works well for virtual EMDR sessions, so it’s the method that Germuga has mainly used in her ongoing therapy with Roeckl. “I’ll talk about what it is I’m feeling, and then we’ll do a round of taps and Liza will ask me what’s coming up as I tap,” she explains. “It feels associative and images arise in a nonlinear way, because the subconscious is not linear. What EMDR does really well is help locate what you’re feeling in your body. I’m able to directly regulate my nervous system, not by trying to combat what I’m experiencing by controlling it from my head, but by going into the body and addressing it there.” In one session, she traced her anxieties to the moment when she was dropped off at college for the first time, abruptly, during the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. With discoveries like these, things have begun to shift for her in subtle yet powerful ways. “I had a kind of breakthrough with my mom the other day where I was able to share something that I would have never spoken about with her before,” she says. “There’s more forgiveness, and there’s more availability of myself to share with her, to foster that connection.” “Often when trauma comes into the body, it gets stuck in one bundle of nerves and doesn’t cross over to the other side of the brain,” explains Roeckl. “Or it links up with a certain nerve pattern, and then you’re re-traumatized. Say you have a mean boss who intimidates you, and that might have linked up to an earlier memory on the same nerve pattern of your firstgrade teacher who was really mean, or your dad who was really mean. So, that mean boss you have at age 40 is stimulating earlier traumas. What we do with EMDR is light up the trauma. Then we start connecting it to the other

side of the brain through bilateral stimulation, and we process it out.” Roeckl herself grew up in a violent home where she experienced feelings of unsafety as a child. “I had some big T traumas to work out,” she says, “and I found EMDR to be profoundly healing. I found a feeling of being at home in my own body, which I definitely did not have growing up.” As a practitioner of EMDR, she has a subspecialty of working with women who are experiencing fertility issues or who have suffered a miscarriage or still birth. She uses EMDR to help them process their losses and find faith in their body again. Some clients come to her for help with addiction and recovery, while others, like Germuga, have family-of-origin issues. “We can’t change what happened,” she says, “but we can change how it’s affecting your everyday life.” Freedom from PTSD—and Gimmicks Some promoters of EMDR talk up how fast it works, but practitioners like Rosenthal are wary of that kind of hype. “At first, EMDR was marketed as therapy at warp speed. It was like, ‘Just go to this person, use this funny eye movement thing, and you’ll feel better. It won’t take that many sessions, and then you can go back to living your life.’ That’s not how I practice. Everybody’s different and has their own journey.” That said, Rosenthal has seen the therapy work for some people in as few as six to ten sessions. During COVID, she has volunteered as a therapist for medical personnel and emergency responders with an EMDR humanitarian assistance program through New York City’s trauma recovery network (TNR). “One of my TRN cases was a woman who felt like she couldn’t go back to working in a hospital again because of what she endured,” says Rosenthal. “But she loved that work so much, so she wanted to be able to get back in the hospital. And [after six to eight sessions] she was able to go back.” For Annabel Spencer, a single mother in Seattle, a shift was noticeable after a handful of sessions. When Spencer (not her real name) spent a month in an alcohol rehab program, EMDR was on the menu along with a range of other science-based therapies. “My focus was on family-of-origin issues, looking back at the root cause of why I was where I was at that point in my life,” she recalls. During the sessions, she focused on a time in second grade when her mother remarried and they moved across the country to start their new life. “Suddenly, my mom wasn’t available,” she recalls. “I remember standing alone in the middle of the night in this new apartment, her telling me to go back to bed, and just feeling completely despondent.” For bilateral stimulation, the EMDR therapist used light and sound pulsations. “It reminded me of the 1970s video game Pong,” she says. The electronic setup involved lights moving back and forth, as well as clicking sounds transmitted through headphones in alternate ears. “I chose a certain speed of clicks that were comforting to me and that didn’t increase the anxiety,” she notes. She also chose a safe space—a pickle jar where she could contain the thoughts if they got too overwhelming to continue. Spencer found the experience exhausting, but ultimately, effective. “I found that I was able to let go of a lot of the

“When trauma happens, it lands in a fixed state and leaves a residue of unprocessed material.” —Amy Rosenthal sadness and other feelings that came up, or at least know that it was okay to feel those things,” she says. “I could go back to that memory and stand in that living room next to my little self and know that I’d be alright. That image helped to resolve a lot of the trauma. It’s definitely a therapy that I’d work with again.” Not everyone takes to EMDR, and that’s okay. “If everybody did, then it would be the only therapy that people wanted to do,” says Rosenthal. “But I think that it does help to relieve suffering for many, many people.” When it’s a good fit, EMDR can work a kind of magic by changing our limiting beliefs. She’s seen traumatized rescue workers and earthquake survivors go from paralyzing thoughts of “I’m in danger” and “I’m flawed because I couldn’t save everybody” to thoughts of “I’m resilient, I’m creative, and I can figure out how to help myself and others.” This has been a through-line for many of us during COVID—and it will continue to be as long as there are humans walking on this earth. “I just want to be useful and help people who are suffering,” Rosenthal adds. “EMDR is a good modality for that.” RESOURCES

Liza Roeckl Lizaroeckl.com Amy Rosenthal Amyrosenthalpsychotherapy.com 7/21 CHRONOGRAM HEALTH & WELLNESS 41


education Jeanie Antonelle and Mike Sadowy inspect the John Magnus at the Hudson River Maritime Museum's Riverport Wooden Boat School.

Continuing Curriculum IN-PERSON ADULT EDUCATION RETURNS By Anne Pyburn Craig

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here’s just no substitute for fully present humans gathered around a fascinating task—no book, podcast, or Zoom screen can compare. In person, you can learn with your brain, gut, hands, and heart at once, enhancing all of the above while growing your real-time social world as well. Our area’s various centers of continuing education excellence are reopening their various campuses with happy hearts, planning all manner of face-to-face wisdom and skillsharings. Here is a cornucopia of options for mind and life expansion—check the organization’s website for up-to-date safety precautions.

Omega Institute reopens its Rhinebeck campus July 23 for three months of in-person workshops, conferences, retreats, and professional training opportunities. “We are committed to carrying forward the many lessons learned during the past year, and to be a resource for building personal and collective resilience. And we’re proud, not only to reopen our campus doors but also to keep open the virtual doors that have expanded access to Omega for our global community online,” says CEO Skip Backus. The dozens of workshops range from Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics (August 20-22) to Opening to Intimacy: A Course for Couples (September 19-24) to Little Flower Yoga Teacher Training (August 1-6), and plenty of other offerings on healing, mindfulness, spirituality, and creativity. Eomega.org Woodstock School of Art drew in 200 new students from everywhere last year, and Executive Director Nina Doyle says some plan to show up in person. When they do, they’ll find plenty to do face-to-face: adult courses in drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture led by professional

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teaching artists, held as weekly three-hour classes and intensive workshops. Online classes will continue too; scholarships are available for teens and adults. With a group of local arts organizations, the WSA is kicking off an ACE (Arts Collaborative Events) series with a free, immersive festival on July 10; preregistration required at the Opus 40/ACE website. Woodstockschoolofart.org The Hudson River Rowing Association will hold a free Intro to Rowing session on Sunday, August 15 from 11 to 1 at their spacious and lovely Poughkeepsie boathouse. They’d love to help you discover the joys of sculling and/or sweeping your way along the Hudson. There are novice and comprehensive programs for teens and adults; member Susan Beaudry says 70 adults of all ages and descriptions currently pull together, building skills, racing, and just playing. “It’s a great way to connect to the river, and it’s very social,” says Beaudry. “We do burgers, beers, and guac-offs as well as rowing.” Hudsonriverrowing.org


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FAMILY


The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park is joyfully re-booting its delectable three-day boot camps; here again, summer is full up, but registration for the fall sessions and for various one-day classes like Introduction to Wine, Pies and Tarts, and Soups for All Seasons (to name but a few) is ongoing. It’s all part of the CIA Foodies, a program designed to extend the “joys of the table” to all interested parties and home cooks. They also offer “Around the Kitchen Table,” a series of free virtual cooking sessions with CIA alumni chefs. Ciafoodies.com At the Hudson River Maritime Museum in Kingston you can dive deep into the lore of our region’s defining feature, whether on a museum visit, a themed boat tour, or at the Wooden Boat School, where you can also learn to build an Adirondack chair (August 28-29) or a bookcase (September 26). There are multi-day classes during which groups can produce a skiff, canoe, kayak or paddleboard, as well as sailing and rowing classes—certified sailors can reserve a boat to take out on their own. Online, you can catch the Follow the River series of virtual history lectures. Hrmm.org Improvisation is good for the soul. “It’s not about being funny, it’s about being free,” say the folks at Hudson Valley Improv, inspiration experts who’ll help you mine your insecurities and find precious mettle. Samantha Jones taught improv in New York City for two decades before founding the center. They’re back, Zooming through the summer and taking sign-ups for in-person courses in the fall. The basic Empowerment class will serve you well in any life situation; the Advanced track will help you polish those basics into performance skills. They quadruple dare you. Hudsonvalleyimprov.com Kingston Ceramics Studio offers ongoing weekly ceramics classes for adults and kids; you can book as you go, sign up for a batch, or book a day-long private lesson in hand building or pottery wheel work. Bring an apron and a towel; you can purchase tools on-site. Offerings include a basic Intro to Clay and the Studio, as well as throwing and handbuilding, mold making, and a Develop Your Skills class in which students work on projects independently with supervision, help, and feedback from an experienced potter. They also offer open studio memberships and an online instructional video series. Kingstonceramicsstudio.com At the Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale, their eight-week summer program offering week-long courses in book arts, papermaking, printmaking, and ceramics is back up and running this year after its first hiatus since 1979. Women’s Studio Workshop encourages the voice and vision of individual women and trans, intersex, nonbinary, and genderfluid artists and provide professional opportunities for artists at various stages of their careers and promote programs designed to stimulate public involvement, awareness, and support for the visual arts. The studios are extensively equipped and well-maintained. Pent-up demand from COVID means that there may or may not be space available by press time in classes like The Power of Electro-Etching or Indirect Magic: Working with Linocut. Wsworkshop.org “Crafts relax you and bring a sense of peace and it’s orders of magnitude better when you include the joy of being together,” says Circle Creative Collective cofounder Melissa Hewitt. “Traditional crafts are the ‘front’ for the healing we do, sitting together in a circle, quieting our minds. Stories come out about mothers, grandmothers, grandfathers.” Based in New Paltz, the Circle’s classes, retreats, and workshops for all ages and descriptions; weekly drop-in creative days; and Chrysalis program for teen girls all center the organization’s core principle of “weaving the fabric of community.” Ongoing collaborations with Central American and African craftsmasters make that community global. Circlecreativecollective.org

Our students establish roots in our beautiful valley, forming deep connections to their class, school, farm, and ultimately to our world.

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community pages

FERTILE GROUND Warwick

By Brian PJ Cronin Photos by David McIntyre

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o understand Warwick, you first have to look back. Waaay back. Like, 12,000-years-ago back. That’s when the glaciers receded from the Hudson Valley, leaving a carved out depression in the 104-square-mile area that currently encompasses the Town of Warwick, just a few miles north of where the border now runs between New York and New Jersey. Those lowlying areas turned into swampy bogs. Flash forward to the dawn of the previous century, when European immigrants to the Hudson Valley who had some experience farming in flooded lands drained the bogs to reveal the massive compost bounty beneath them. This is the fabled “black dirt” of Warwick, flush with nitrogen and sulfur, an agricultural jackpot like few other spots in America. The Hudson Valley is, of course, famous for its agrarian past. But Warwick has held fast to farm life, even after the local railroad system went kaput with the invention of the automobile and many other Hudson Valley towns looked to modernize. Those other towns didn’t have a dozen millennia or so of built-up rich soil to work 46 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 7/21

with, however. And so the town continued with its world-famous onion crop, its ample apple orchards spread wide. That’s the Warwick Michael Sweeton remembers when he moved from Brooklyn 60 years ago as a small boy, and it’s pretty much still the Warwick of today, in which Sweeton has served as Town Supervisor for the past 20 years. “We’ve maintained our preservation of farms despite growth,” he says. “We’ve had growth but we have a common vision of where that growth should be and how to manage it.” When Sweeton says “we,” he refers to not only himself and the leaders of the town’s three villages—Greenwood Lake, Florida, and the village of Warwick—but also the local residents and farmers. Everyone agrees what the town’s strengths are: agriculture and tourism. But those very strengths made it difficult for the town to diversify its economic base and provide more jobs for younger residents. “We don’t have the typical infrastructure that draws companies like road access, widespread utility access,” he says. “We’re a little bit off the beaten path.” But 10 years ago the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility in Warwick shutdown. When the jail

Jill and Steve Penning. Penning’s Farm Market began in 1983 as a seasonal farm stand and has since expanded into an agritourism destination with garden center, pub, grill, ice cream stand, bakery, and beer garden. Opposite from top: Continuing a COVID-era program, restaurants in Warwick spill out on to local streets on Friday and Saturday nights and Sunday afternoons, accompanied by live music. Ashley Allen celebrating her birthday with friends at the Warwick Valley Winery.


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Raluca Gold-Fuchs runs the Hudson Sports Complex with her husband, professional footballer Christian Fuchs. She’s pictured here at the facility with former USMNT soccer player Jermaine Jones.

closed, an opportunity opened. One that, as Sweeton admits, is more than a little ironic considering the prison’s history as a place that swelled during the War on Drugs, once housing up to 750 prisoners, and then becoming obsolete as the country’s attitude toward marijuana began to change. Cannabis Cluster It’s now known as the Warwick Valley Office and Technology Corporate Park, as if extensive focus-group testing was undertaken to come up with the most nondescriptive name possible. Sweeton calls it something else. “We’re calling it a Cannabis Cluster” he says of the former jail site. It started when the town’s farmers began experimenting with growing hemp, looking for a new cash crop. Companies interested in processing hemp for CBD oil and creating CBD products took an interest in the site and the local farmers who were willing to provide them with the raw materials they needed. Then a grower for medicinal marijuana moved in, and now, with recreational use being legalized, Green Thumb Industries is moving in with a $150 million investment and a promise of 150 local jobs. “We’ve got an integrated industry that fits with our strength: Our farm community,” says Sweeton. “Our growers have a convenient place to process their product and there are also people interested in purchasing their processed product for the CBD oil as well as building other value-

added products.” As the legislation that legalized marijuana mandated that any weed sold in New York must also be grown here—Warwick’s agricultural expertise and rich natural resources make it advantageously positioned to take advantage of the coming boom. There’s more than reefer madness here. Former Leicester City player Christian Fuchs has opened the Hudson Sports Complex on the site as well, offering fields and training programs for soccer, rugby, football, field hockey and other sports. And in another ironic twist—before it was a prison, the site was owned by New York City as a place to send chronic drunks to dry out—The Drowned Lands Brewery is up and running, offering beers that not only pay homage to Warwick’s geologic history (hence the name,) but also how that history can influence the future of American microbrewing. With over 10,000 craft breweries in business worldwide, Drowned Lands is betting that it can stand out by brewing seasonal beers with a sense of terroir, beers that literally could not be brewed anywhere else. Its current offerings include a Rose Mallow saison and the Slow River, brewed with local hops, oats, malt, wheat, and rye.

Original Vinyl Records specializes in new and used vinyl records, 45s, 78s, cassettes, 8-tracks, and music memorabilia. Co-owner Jim Eigo is pictured with Diesel, the store’s mascot. 7/21 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 49


Warwick is tripling down on the land, betting that the soil that helped get it where it is today will get it where it wants to be tomorrow. And the bounty of the land includes more than just the soil. WIDE OPEN Lynne Lorimer moved to the village of Warwick in 1987 from Bergen County, New Jersey. She raised a family here and now, as a real estate agent with Keller Williams Realty, shows off the town to those who come here looking for the same things that drew her here over 30 years ago: More space, a slower pace of life, but still an actual, walkable downtown like the one the village offers. “It still has that historic charm,” she says. “We haven’t seen strip malls and things like that. There’s been so much change but it still feels warm and welcoming.” As if to solidify her deep attachment to the village, Lorimer currently lives in a cottage that was designed and built in the 1800s by former Warwick mayor Clinton Wheeler Wisner. “It’s like a grownup doll’s house, and I absolutely love it,” she says. But as much as she loves the village, it’s the natural beauty of the townat-large that helped her, and the newcomers she shows around, fall in love with it: Kayaking at Greenwood Lake, skiing at Mt. Peter, hiking on the Appalachian Trail with a quick stop over at Bellvale Farms Creamery for ice cream, yoga in many of the town’s parks. There’s the three screens at the Warwick Drive-In, drinks at the Warwick Valley Winery and Black Dirt Distillery, and the apple cider doughnuts at Pennings Farm Market—so popular that they once had to hire a doughnut security guard to keep things from getting out of hand. Then there’s the bounty of Warwick’s AppleFest, which draws over 35,000 people every year. Well, not last year. And not this year, either. The local chamber of commerce recently made the tough call that there simply isn’t a realistic way to manage that many people at the (hopefully) tail end of the COVID era. It may be a mixed blessing—35,000 people is a lot of people. “Having lived through AppleFest the last two decades, I would literally plan on not pulling out of my driveway that weekend,” says Lorimer with a laugh. MORE OF A GOOD THING You wouldn’t think there would be an overlap between Pilates students and car mechanics. You would be wrong. “When you work on cars for a living, you eventually hurt your back,” says Pilates teacher Morganne Frazier, while showing off a gorgeously restored emerald green pickup truck, which came into her life via an enthusiastic client of hers with an automotive bent. The back of the truck has been converted into a mobile bar, with the words DRINK MORE GOOD painted on the side. Drink More Good was founded in 2012 by Beaconite Jason Schuler who mixed up all-natural syrups and concoctions to enliven homemade sodas and cocktails. The business outgrew Beacon, and Schuler, now married to Frazier, packed up the business and moved to Frazier’s hometown of Warwick. She now oversees the business and is in the process of opening Good Maker Acres outside the village of Warwick, in an area zoned for both residential and commercial uses. Behind the truck is the land where Frazier recently planted 1200 strawberry plants for eventual use in their syrups, as well as flowers that visitors can cut, arrange, pot, and take home. Animals, including alpacas, roam around behind the barn which is being turned into a shop for Drink More Good syrups, Pilates classes, and, one day, a bar. “I joke that I want this to be a Farm Disneyland for adults,” she says. As someone who grew up in Warwick and has now returned, Frazier has seen the gradual changes that have taken place here as it slowly begins to diversify. The predominantly white town recently held a Juneteenth celebration in the village of Warwick. Political opinions may differ, but in the end Warwick stands up for Warwick. “Everybody wants to support each other,” she says. “Everyone’s got chickens and everyone wants somewhere they can walk to and hang out. Maybe they don’t agree with it but they’re not going to fuss and muss about it.” That includes someone building a farm with a large shop and Pilates studio in a residential neighborhood. Frazier recalls the town board meeting in which her farm’s plans were up for public scrutiny. She worried that people might protest the project. She needn’t have worried. “My neighbors came up to me at the meeting and said ‘You should have made the buildings bigger,” says Frazier. 50 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 7/21


Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway being screened at the Warwick Drive-In.

Appalachian Trail thru-hikers at Bellevale Farms Creamery. These are their hiking names from left to right: Bare Paw, Lebowski, Dash, No Name, Aurora (the dog), Anna, Zero.

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CHRONOGRAMMIES

READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS WINNERS’ CIRCLE Our second anual readers’ choice awards garnered participation from 20,000 community members, who cast 140,000 votes for their favorite Hudson Valley businesses across 230 categories. Drum roll please! We’d like to tip our cap to the 230 winners of the second annual Chronogrammies Readers’ Choice Awards! We had 20,000 people participate, nominating more than 3,000 Hudson Valley businesses. In the final round, a whopping 140,000 votes were cast to determine the 2021 Chronogrammies winners. The arrival of summer’s indelible magic, combined with some semblance of return to “normal life,” is buoying spirits across the region, striking a very different tone for this announcement than last year, when we proclaimed the winners amid a stilluncertain landscape. It will be another year before we are able to do the grand winners’ gala that we had originally envisioned, but for now, we’re content just to see each other’s faces (mostly) unmasked. This year, we more than doubled the number of categories in order to recognize a broader swath of Hudson Valley professionals, creatives, and community organizers. We are especially excited about the introduction of the “people” category, where community members nominated exceptional individuals in the realms of art, advocacy, politics, radio, writing, and more. Much like the businesses that survived COVID, we could not have done these readers’ choice awards without support from all of you, so a big thank you. The pandemic was an emotional, psychological, and financial stress on individuals, families, and businesses around the world. But it was not all bad: we also saw grassroots mutual aid groups spring up, donations to food pantries surged even as demand skyrocketed, and in 2020, Americans gave a record $471 billion to charity. Food Justice Organization winners People’s Place served 1,156,502 free meals last year. Yes, you read that right—one local food pantry served over one million meals. But we lost many cherished community members—to COVID and otherwise. Most recently, the region’s booming craft beverage industry lost two of its titans—Gable Erenzo, founder of Gardiner Liquid Mercantile and son of Tuthilltown Spirits pioneer Ralph Erenzo; and Tommy Keegan of Keegan Ales, Midtown Kingston’s ahead-of-the-curve maverick brewer and avid community supporter. We’ll be pouring one out for each of them, and for all the loved ones we lost this year.  Thank you again to everyone that participated, and a heartfelt congratulations to the winners. 

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CHRONOGRAMMIES

WINNERS ADVOCACY/ACTIVISM

AFFORDABLE HOUSING ORGANIZATION WINNER RUPCO 2ND HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF DUTCHESS CO. 3RD HUDSON RIVER HOUSING

ANIMAL WELFARE ORGANIZATION WINNER CATSKILL ANIMAL SANCTUARY 2ND ULSTER COUNTY SPCA 3RD TOWN OF SAUGERTIES ANIMAL SHELTER

ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIZATION WINNER SCENIC HUDSON 2ND HUDSON RIVER SLOOP CLEARWATER 3RD RIVERKEEPER

FOOD JUSTICE ORGANIZATION WINNER PEOPLE'S PLACE 2ND KINGSTON YMCA FARM PROJECT 3RD POUGHKEEPSIE FARM PROJECT

LGBTQ ORGANIZATION WINNER HUDSON VALLEY LGBTQ COMMUNITY CENTER 2ND NEWBURGH LGBTQ CENTER

PUBLIC HEALTH ORGANIZATION WINNER FAMILY OF WOODSTOCK 2ND THE ARC MID-HUDSON 3RD CENTER FOR SPECTRUM SERVICES

RACIAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATION WINNER RISE UP KINGSTON 2ND BLACK LIVES MATTER HUDSON VALLEY 3RD CITIZEN ACTION OF NEW YORK

SOCIAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATION WINNER RISE UP KINGSTON 2ND GRACE SMITH HOUSE 3RD NOBODY LEAVES MID-HUDSON

YOUTH ADVOCACY ORGANIZATION WINNER AWARENESSINC.ORG PEER TO PEER ADOLESCENT ADVOCACY 2ND BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF ULSTER CO. 3RD FAMILY OF WOODSTOCK

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ART CLASSES WINNER KINGSTON CERAMICS STUDIO 2ND WOODSTOCK SCHOOL OF ART 3RD WOMEN'S STUDIO WORKSHOP

ART GALLERY WINNER THE LOCKWOOD GALLERY 2ND ARTBAR GALLERY 3RD 11 JANE ST. ART CENTER

ART MUSEUM WINNER DIA BEACON 2ND MASS MOCA 3RD SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART

ART SUPPLY STORE WINNER CATSKILL ART & OFFICE SUPPLY 2ND MANNY'S ART SUPPLIES 3RD RHINEBECK ARTIST'S SHOP

ARTS ORGANIZATION WINNER O+ FESTIVAL 2ND ARTS SOCIETY OF KINGSTON 3RD FISHER CENTER AT BARD

CINEMA WINNER UPSTATE FILMS RHINEBECK 2ND ROSENDALE THEATRE 3RD LYCEUM CINEMAS

HISTORICAL SITE/MUSEUM WINNER OLANA STATE HISTORIC SITE 2ND HUDSON RIVER MARITIME MUSEUM 3RD FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

KIDS ATTRACTION WINNER CATSKILL ANIMAL SANCTUARY 2ND MID-HUDSON CHILDREN'S MUSEUM 3RD OPUS 40

LIVE MUSIC VENUE WINNER LEVON HELM STUDIOS 2ND COLONY 3RD THE FALCON

54 CHRONOGRAMMIES CHRONOGRAM 7/21

Lizzie Vann at the Bearsville Theater

Performance Space Bearsville Theater

Hotel Restaurant Beekman Arms and Delamater Inn

Lizzie Vann purchased the Bearsville Theater on Labor Day weekend in 2019 and immediately began renovations on the legendary but neglected venue. Just as repairs were about to be completed, COVID struck. The doors remained closed to the public, but behind the scenes Vann continued with the multimillion-dollar remodel. A year and a half later, Vann is excited to show off the new look to audiences that have been aching to have live shows back. “It looks beautiful, decorated in the MidCentury Modern style, which we believe is what Albert Grossman would have wanted it to look like,” says Vann, an entrepreneur who founded the organic baby food company Organix. Grossman, manager to Bob Dylan and Janis Joplin, built the Bearsville Theater in the 1980s, but died before it was finished. It was completed by his widow, Sally Grossman, and opened in 1989. The theater is the center of the cultural campus that was for decades the proud heart of the Hudson Valley’s music and arts scene. A model commercial-meets-cultural operation, it attracted international headliners to its stages and both far-flung and local audiences and diners to its events and eateries as it embodied the creative spirit of Woodstock itself. “I think people around here, and in our musical community, love this space,” says Vann. “It’s got the most wonderful sound and the room is beautiful, but it was derelict for three years. People just love the fact that it’s being renovated and it’s their wish that we reopen.” Upcoming shows include such acts as the Parker Brothers Extravaganza ( July 3), the Sweet Clementines with Tracy Bonham ( July 23), and Masters of the Telecaster featuring G. E. Smith, Larry Campbell, and Jim Weider (August 6). —Lisa Iannucci

The Beekman Arms is older than the United States itself, and its counterpart, the Delamater Inn, dates back to 1844. Originally built in 1706 and rebuilt in 1766 after a fire, the Beekman Arms hotel has a long history of welcoming folks to Rhinebeck––in fact, it was the catalyst for the formation of the town. “You build a bar and an inn first, and then people come,” says Corinne Galioto, sales manager at the Tavern, the inn’s Chronogrammie-winning hotel restaurant. Legend has it that the Beekman Arms and Delamater Inn once hosted George Washington. The Tavern’s history is on display in its architecture and style; there are exposed wooden beams, low ceilings, and dark wood. The further customers walk into the restaurant, the further back in time they go, finishing with the bar and a few open-hearth fireplaces. Diners can eat in many different spaces, such as the Pewter Room, whose walls are lined with portraits of old innkeepers, and the Atrium, a greenhouse which is a favorite for Sunday brunch. Serving lunch and dinner seven days a week, the Tavern boasts a variety of dishes, from comfort foods like pot pie to fancier fare like prime New York strip steak to bar bites like nachos or sliders. The Tavern’s rustic ambiance has made it a date night hotspot, and its history continues to attract customers both within the Hudson Valley and around it. “We’re not fancy, but welcoming,” says Galioto. “We treat everyone like family.” —Naomi Shammash


Photo by Melissa Ostrow

LIVE THEATER VENUE WINNER ULSTER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 2ND BARDAVON 3RD THE CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS AT RHINEBECK

LOCAL BAND/MUSICIAN WINNER IAN FLANIGAN 2ND LARA HOPE 3RD THE FELICE BROTHERS

MUSIC FESTIVAL WINNER O+ FESTIVAL 2ND BETHEL WOODS 3RD ROSENDALE STREET FESTIVAL

MUSIC SCHOOL WINNER THE ROCK ACADEMY 2ND BARD CONSERVATORY 3RD ASHOKAN MUSIC AND DANCE

MUSIC STORE WINNER RHINO RECORDS 2ND WOODSTOCK MUSIC SHOP 3RD DARKSIDE RECORDS

PERFORMANCE SPACE WINNER BEARSVILLE THEATER 2ND UPAC 3RD FISHER CENTER AT BARD

PUBLIC ART WINNER KINGSTON O+ MURALS 2ND ART OMI 3RD STORM KING ART CENTER

RADIO STATION WINNER RADIO WOODSTOCK WDST 100.1 2ND SOUL MOUTH RADIO 3RD WAMC NORTHEAST PUBLIC RADIO

Canna Provisions has two dispensaries in Massachussets: Holyoke and Lee.

REGIONAL PODCAST

Fine Dining The Culinary Institute of America If there is one thing that this last year of quarantine has taught us, it’s that we really love, and missed, our favorite restaurants. And in the Hudson Valley, the Culinary Institute of America’s restaurants were not only voted fan favorites in the Fine Dining category, but they were sorely missed when their doors closed. Fortunately, they are open again, which not only benefits the taste buds of the Valley residents but culinary students in training. “When you dine in our restaurants, you’re not just getting an excellent meal, your food is being prepared and served by the future leaders of the food, beverage, and hospitality industries, guided by our world-class faculty,” says Waldy Malouf, senior director of food and beverage operations at The Culinary Institute of America. “And your meal supports CIA student scholarships.” Both American Bounty and the Bocuse, a French fare restaurant, are now open, Tuesday through Saturday, for lunch and dinner. Reservations are required and masks must be worn on campus. Apple Pie Bakery Café and Ristorante Caterina de Medici will reopen this fall. —Lisa Iannucci Cannabis Dispensary Canna Provisions Meg Sanders founded Canna Provisions with Erik Williams in 2018, when they were drawn to Western Massachusetts for both its beauty and its culture of health and wellness. Between the two of them they have 25 years of experience in the cannabis industry and have both been pioneers of legalization efforts in

the field. With two outposts in Holyoke and Lee, their mission is to provide high-quality cannabis products to the Berkshires. Customers walking into Canna Provisions are met with a wide array of products and employees that help to tailor those offerings to each individual. Sanders and Williams want to ensure user education, through both visual user guidelines and an atmosphere that welcomes questions. Their interest in cannabis education extends from the local level to the national; they recently held a forum with New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand about cannabis legislation.  Sanders’s experience in the cannabis industry began when she worked with the governor of Colorado to develop its updated cannabis laws in 2009, later opening one of the state’s first dispensaries. Upon closer inspection of cannabis’s racist legal history, she became passionate about “righting the wrongs of the drug war,” which disproportionately affected people of color. “Unless CEOs like myself stand up and say enough is enough, that equity must come first, it will not happen,” says Sanders. Canna Provisions donates to nonprofits such as Last Prisoner Project, which work to end the incarceration of people of color whose cannabis charges are no longer illegal per recent legislation. Sanders believes in the power of cannabis as a tool for palliative care and pain relief, but also simply as both a preventative measure and antidote for everyday stress and anxiety. “They’re powerful areas of health and wellness,” says Sanders, who feels that Canna Provisions is well aligned with the region’s focus on wellbeing, evidenced by places like the Omega Institute and Canyon Ranch. —Naomi Shammash

WINNER CIDIOT 2ND BACKSTAGE WITH THE BARDAVON 3RD MURDER CAFE

SCULPTURE GARDEN WINNER STORM KING ART CENTER 2ND INNISFREE GARDEN 3RD OPUS 40

DRINK BARTENDER WINNER KIM MILLER 2ND AUBREY FLICK 3RD JON MCWEENEY

BEER LIST (BAR/RESTAURANT) WINNER KEEGAN ALES 2ND THE ANCHOR 3RD THE DUTCHESS BIERCAFE

BLOODY MARY WINNER PAKT 2ND MARINER'S HARBOR 3RD PHOENICIA DINER

CRAFT COCKTAILS (BAR/RESTAURANT) WINNER STOCKADE TAVERN 2ND GARDINER LIQUID MERCANTILE 3RD TERRAPIN RESTAURANT

DIVE BAR WINNER EXCHANGE HOTEL 2ND SNAPPER MAGEE'S 3RD SNUG HARBOR

LOCAL BEER WINNER KEEGAN ALES 2ND ARROWOOD FARM-BREWERY 3RD SLOOP BREWING CO. AT THE FACTORY

LOCAL CIDER WINNER ANGRY ORCHARD 2ND BAD SEED CIDER FARM BAR 3RD TWIN STAR ORCHARDS

LOCAL SPIRIT WINNER TUTHILLTOWN SPIRITS DISTILLERY 2ND HUDSON VALLEY DISTILLERS 3RD ARROWOOD FARM-BREWERY

LOCAL WINE WINNER MILLBROOK VINEYARDS & WINERY 2ND WHITECLIFF VINEYARD & WINERY 3RD ROBIBERO WINERY

MARGARITA WINNER SANTA FE UPTOWN 2ND MAIN STREET 3RD CASA VILLA 3RD DIEGO'S TAQUERIA

7/21 CHRONOGRAM CHRONOGRAMMIES 55


MARTINI WINNER HOFFMAN HOUSE 2ND RED ONION 3RD NEW YORK RESTAURANT

NEW BAR WINNER HAPPY VALLEY ARCADE BAR 2ND LUNCH NIGHTLY 3RD LIS BAR

TASTING ROOM WINNER ARROWOOD OUTPOST WINNER GREAT LIFE BREWING 3RD WHITECLIFF VINEYARD & WINERY

WINE LIST (BAR/RESTAURANT) WINNER TERRAPIN RESTAURANT 2ND BRUNETTE 3RD RED ONION

FAMILY FUN BOWLING ALLEY Photo by David McIntyre

WINNER PATEL'S KINGSTON LANES 2ND SAUGERTIES BOWLERS CLUB 3RD SPINS BOWL WAPPINGERS

DRIVE-IN MOVIE THEATER WINNER HYDE PARK DRIVE-IN THEATER 2ND HI-WAY DRIVE-IN THEATER 3RD OVERLOOK DRIVE-IN THEATER

MINI-GOLF COURSE WINNER PUTTIN PLUS 2ND ASCOT PARK 3RD THE SPORTS CONE

TOURIST ATTRACTION WINNER WALKWAY OVER THE HUDSON STATE HISTORIC PARK 2ND STORM KING ART CENTER 3RD FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

U-PICK FARM WINNER GREIG FARM 2ND KELDER'S FARM 3RD DRESSEL FARMS

FASHION/DESIGN FURNITURE MAKER WINNER HOPPY QUICK 2ND MILLSPAUGH FURNITURE 3RD BLACKCREEK MERCANTILE & TRADING CO.

HANDMADE/LOCALLY SOURCED WINNER KRAUSE'S CHOCOLATES 2ND HANDMADE AND MORE 3RD FACETS OF EARTH

HOUSEWARES/FURNISHINGS WINNER ULSTER HABITAT RESTORE 2ND HAMMERTOWN RHINEBECK 3RD EXIT NINETEEN

MEN'S SHOP WINNER LAST OUTPOST STORE 2ND HAMILTON & ADAMS 3RD KENCO OUTFITTERS

VINTAGE WINNER KINGSTON CONSIGNMENTS 2ND HAPPY PAWS THRIFT STORE 3RD NEWBURGH VINTAGE EMPORIUM WAREHOUSE

WOMEN'S BOUTIQUE WINNER BOP TO TOTTOM 2ND WINTER SUN & SUMMER MOON 3RD INDIGO AND VELVET

FINANCE/SERVICES BANK WINNER ULSTER SAVINGS BANK 2ND RONDOUT SAVINGS BANK 3RD BANK OF GREENE COUNTY

CREDIT UNION WINNER MID-HUDSON VALLEY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 2ND HUDSON VALLEY CREDIT UNION 3RD ULSTER FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

56 CHRONOGRAMMIES CHRONOGRAM 7/21

Happy Valley Arcade Bar

New Bar Happy Valley Arcade Bar

Cheese Shop Cheese Louise

There is nothing like the metallic ding and the flat thwap of pinball paddles to induce a state of exalted reverie. This and a dozen other nostalgic vintage arcade games are the central focus at Beacon’s Happy Valley Arcade Bar, which was opened last August by Johnny Coughlin and Alyssa Follansbee. At 25¢ a pop, the games invite you to come with your cup of quarters and play awhile. The retro offerings range from Mortal Kombat II ('93) to Donkey Kong ('81), Frogger ('81), Missile Command ('80), and a dozen others, all in their original dedicated cabinets. If gaming isn’t your cup of tea, there’s still plenty to love at Happy Valley, which boasts a big biergarten—a rarity for Main Street, Beacon—and a playful drink list. Despite punny names like the Bloody Mario, Sex on the Koopa Troopa Beach, and the Gin Blossom, the craft cocktail program is serious. “We really wanted to have fun names and bright cocktails without being too sweet or too kitschy,” Coughlin says. They also have wine, sake, and more than a dozen beers on tap, mostly local. On the food front, expect all-American boardwalk classics like chicken fingers, curly fries, jalapeno poppers, and tater tots, plus 10-inch pizzas.  The ambiance throughout is colorful and cheerful. “We didn’t want to be Chuck E Cheese and we didn’t want to be a dark bar,” Coughlin says. Follansbee, a former public school art teacher, did most of the design work herself, from mural painting to custom furniture building. With a Chronogrammie for New Bar under their belt, it would seem she nailed the atmosphere, creating a space that is as inviting to 30-something Millennials and young families as it is to sulky teens. “It’s been so nice to hear the games on and hear people groan and cheer,” says Coughlin. “It’s like something from the Before Times.” —Marie Doyon

With over 150 gourmet cheeses in store at any time, it’s no surprise that Chronogram readers chose Cheese Louise in Kingston as their favorite cheese shop. For over 10 years, owner Rick Regan has been curating a diverse selection of delicacies that long ago put the Route 28 shop on the region’s gourmet foods map. From nutty aged Alpine cheeses to an indulgent triple-cream black truffle Brie to adventurous washed-rind varieties like Stinking Bishop, the shop’s larders offer a global cheesemaking journey. “Many people say they feel like they’re in a shop in Europe,” says Regan.   And for good reason. It was Regan’s experience living in Europe for a dozen years after his military service that instilled a lifelong love of its cheese and charcuterie-centric cuisines. After moving back to his native Kingston and running a cafe and pizzeria in the Rondout for many years, he opened Cheese Louise in 2010 with his since-retired business partner, Megan Sam McDevitt, as a way to fill a much-needed niche in the local food scene.  In addition to its selection of cheeses, today the shop is also known for its finely tuned selection of charcuterie (including the much sought-after, authentic Jamón Ibérico DeBellota), crackers, jams, hand-sliced smoked salmon, caviar, and prepared foods.  Tucked inside Route 28’s “Gourmet Row” along with Blue Mountain Bistro to Go, the Wine Hutch, and La Bella Pasta, Cheese Louise has become a must-stop for its devoted local customers and Catskills-bound tourists alike. Much of the shop’s success (which has only sped up during the pandemic) Regan attributes to its central location and his team’s focus on service. “We’re a true mom and pop store,” he says. “We have fun with our customers, and people know when they come in who they’re going to see behind the counter.”  —Ashleigh Lovelace


FINANCIAL PLANNER WINNER SICKLER, TORCHIA, ALLEN & CHURCHILL CPAS 2ND THIRD EYE ASSOCIATES LTD 3RD JANE M. MCCARTHY, EQUITABLE ADVISORS

LAW FIRM WINNER BASCH & KEEGAN LLP 2ND O’CONNOR & PARTNERS, PLLC 3RD MAINETTI & MAINETTI P.C.

LAWYER WINNER JOHN A. DE GASPERIS 2ND JOSEPH E. O'CONNOR 3RD REBECCA MILLOURAS-LETTRE

TAX PREPARER/ACCOUNTANT WINNER SICKLER, TORCHIA, ALLEN & CHURCHILL CPAS 2ND ZULCH TAX CONSULTANTS & ACCOUNTANTS 3RD GAGNON & ASSOCIATES, CPAS

FOOD BAGEL WINNER SUNRISE BAGEL & DELI 2ND LOX OF BAGELS 3RD KINGSTON BREAD + BAR

BAKERY WINNER BREAD ALONE BAKERY 2ND THE MELTAWAY BAKERY 3RD DEISING'S BAKERY & RESTAURANT

An opening reception at the Lockwood Gallery

Art Gallery The Lockwood Gallery Since opening in 2019, the Lockwood Gallery has become one of the region’s premier venues for contemporary art featuring the work of Jenny Nelson, Andrew Lyght, Susan Spencer Crowe, Kurt Steger, Polly Law, and Jim Holl, among others. Located on Route 28 between Kingston and Woodstock, the gallery is located within a 1,300-square-foot-space that architect Michael Lockwood built for his practice. Once construction was finished, however, Lockwood realized what he had built was an ideal place to showcase art, and Lockwood Gallery was born. Lockwood, an artist himself, curated the first two shows himself before bringing in Alan Goolman, who has overseen the gallery ever since. “Before I was a curator, I was a collector,” says Goolman. “I choose art based on my personal taste and if I love something I'm willing to take a risk on showing it in the gallery.” —Brian K. Mahoney Podcast “Cidiot” A portmanteau of “city” and “idiot” to describe urban expats who lack country smarts, “Cidiot,” is a monthly podcast hosted by Mat Zucker about the transition from city to rural life. The region’s scenic landscape lured Zucker in, and he and his husband Brian explored towns in both Columbia and Dutchess counties before deciding on Red Hook in 2014. Zucker, a longtime podcast listener, started “Cidiot” in December 2018 as an “audio journal,” he says. The culture shock of moving from New York City to Dutchess County was positive but intense, so he began recording episodes as both a way to process his experience and “make the rural move an accessible idea” for city dwellers, while hopefully bridging the divide with locals through humor and earnest efforts.

With a property of their own to manage for the first time, surrounded by a goat farm, a sheep farm, and an orchard, the two had a lot to figure out. Episodes consist of Zucker’s learning moments, funny mishaps, and advice for moving into and living in a rural area. The first installment begins with disputes with their neighbor, their dog befriending that neighbor’s donkey, and the subsequent escape of the donkey onto their property. —Naomi Shammash Farm Stand Davenport Farms It’s easy to understand why our readers love Davenport Farms—alongside the homegrown produce there are soups, baked goods, homemade lunch goodies, local beef, organic baking supplies and bread, gourmet foods, and a wide variety of cheeses, everything marked by region of origin—not to mention a warm welcome from a close-knit staff, two of whom have been at the stand for over 30 years. “We’re starting to harvest a lot right now,” says Bruce Davenport, whose family has been farming the 200 rich acres since Isaiah Davenport came across the river to Stone Ridge in 1840. “Through early July, we’ll be harvesting early spinach, strawberries, asparagus, kale, collard greens, green beans, sugar snap peas. The second week of July, it will be corn, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant,” says Davenport. “What I’m doing changes every season, every month, every week. And not everyone gets a month of downtime.” The downtime is much appreciated— during the other 11 months, the job bears no resemblance to a 40-hour week and the 10week harvest season makes or breaks the whole year. But at Davenport’s it’s a labor of love. Not every legacy farm is lucky enough to have a new generation stepping up, but three of the next generation—Davenport’s own two children and

BBQ WINNER HICKORY BBQ SMOKEHOUSE 2ND OLE SAVANNAH RESTAURANT 3RD LEGAL SWINE BBQ

BRUNCH SPOT WINNER PHOENICIA DINER 2ND MAIN STREET BISTRO 3RD PAKT

BUFFET WINNER CINNAMON 2ND OLE SAVANNAH RESTAURANT 3RD MID-HUDSON BUFFET

BURGER WINNER THE ANCHOR 2ND BUNS BURGERS 3RD DUTCH ALE HOUSE

CARIBBEAN WINNER TOP TASTE 2ND URBAN FORK 3RD SEASONED DELICIOUS FOODS

CHEAP EATS WINNER DALLAS HOT WEINERS 2ND ABA'S FALAFEL 3RD DIEGO'S TAQUERIA

CHICKEN WINGS WINNER THE ANCHOR 2ND SANTA FE 3RD MCGILLICUDDY'S

CHILI WINNER THE ANCHOR 2ND P&G’S 3RD HICKORY BBQ SMOKEHOUSE

CHINESE WINNER ENG'S CHINESE KINGSTON 2ND KINGSTON WOK 2ND THE LITTLE BEAR

DATE NIGHT WINNER TERRAPIN RESTAURANT 2ND ANNARELLA RISTORANTE 3RD GARVAN'S GASTROPUB

DELI WINNER ROSSI ROSTICCERIA DELI 2ND TERRI'S MARKET & DELI 3RD FOXHALL DELI

DINER WINNER PHOENICIA DINER 2ND DIETZ STADIUM DINER 3RD KINGS VALLEY DINER

DOG-FRIENDLY DINING WINNER KEEGAN ALES 2ND ARMADILLO 3RD HUCKLEBERRY

7/21 CHRONOGRAM CHRONOGRAMMIES 57


DONUTS WINNER DEISING'S BAKERY & RESTAURANT 2ND THE MELTAWAY BAKERY 3RD HALF MOON RONDOUT CAFE

DUMPLINGS WINNER YUM YUM NOODLE BAR, WOODSTOCK 2ND PALACE DUMPLINGS 3RD GOLDEN GINZA

FALAFEL WINNER ABA'S FALAFEL 2ND OPA! GYROS GREEK RESTAURANT 3RD JOSHUA'S CAFE

FARM STAND WINNER DAVENPORT FARMS 2ND STORY FARMS 3RD MIGLIORELLI FARM STAND

FARMERS' MARKET WINNER KINGSTON FARMERS' MARKET 2ND RHINEBECK FARMERS' MARKET 3RD SAUGERTIES FARMERS' MARKET

FINE DINING WINNER THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA 2ND LE CANARD ENCHAINE 3RD TERRAPIN RESTAURANT

FOOD TRUCK WINNER THE GREEN PALATE 2ND OFF THE HOOK 3RD PIPPY’S

FRENCH WINNER LE CANARD ENCHAINE 2ND LE PETIT BISTRO 3RD BRASSERIE 292

A volunteer at People's Place in Kingston

FRIED CHICKEN WINNER BOITSON'S 2ND BARNWOOD RESTAURANT 3RD HIGH FALLS KITCHENETTE CHICKEN SHACK

GERMAN WINNER MOUNTAIN BRAUHAUS 2ND GUNK HAUS 3RD JAEGER HAUS

GLUTEN-FREE WINNER BLACK-EYED SUZIE'S UPSTATE 2ND MOTHER EARTH’S STOREHOUSE 3RD KARMA ROAD

GREEK WINNER OPA! GYROS GREEK RESTAURANT 2ND JOSHUA'S CAFE 3RD ATHENA GYRO

a niece, all thirtysomethings—have chosen to stick with the business. And the farm stand is where it all comes together for the public—and where you can be certain you’re getting the real thing when it comes to eating local veggies. “I don’t want to do vodka or beer or agritainment, although I respect and admire the people who do,” says Davenport. “It’s cool stuff, but not for everyone. I just want us to grow the best corn and tomatoes possible, and we’re pretty good at it.” —Anne Pyburn Craig

GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH WINNER BREAD ALONE BAKERY 2ND MAIN COURSE MARKETPLACE 3RD CIRCLE W MARKET

HOTEL RESTAURANT WINNER BEEKMAN ARMS & DELAMATER INN 2ND HOTEL KINSLEY 3RD HENRY'S AT THE FARM

ICE CREAM STAND WINNER BOICE BROS DAIRY 2ND HOLY COW 3RD ALLEYWAY ICE CREAM

INDIAN WINNER CINNAMON 2ND NAMASTE INDIAN RESTAURANT 3RD NEW PALTZ INDIAN RESTAURANT

ITALIAN WINNER FRANK GUIDO'S LITTLE ITALY 2ND SAVONA'S TRATTORIA 3RD ANNARELLA RISTORANTE

JAPANESE WINNER GOLDEN GINZA 2ND KYOTO SUSHI 3RD SUSHI MAKIO

JUICE BAR WINNER TURN UP THE BEET 2ND SISSY'S CAFE 3RD SUNFROST FARMS

LATE NIGHT EATS WINNER DIETZ STADIUM DINER 2ND KINGS VALLEY DINER 3RD HUCKLEBERRY

LATIN WINNER ARMADILLO 2ND MOLE MOLE 3RD GABY'S CAFE

58 CHRONOGRAMMIES CHRONOGRAM 7/21

Food Justice Organization People’s Place “I find many people know about one or two of our programs, but they do not realize the depth of programming that we offer—all for free—to our community,” says People’s Place Executive Director Christine Hein, who also won a Chronogrammie for Food Justice Advocate. “There is often a misconception that we only help individuals and families who live in Kingston, but this is not true, we serve all of Ulster County. Another misconception is that you must already be receiving services from Ulster County DSS. This is definitely not true. Anyone who feels they have a need can use any of our services.” Those services go far beyond food and clothing. Personal care items, housewares for people starting over, books, haircuts, a pet pantry, children’s birthday parties—23 programs in all provide not just the bare essentials but the things that make us feel more fully alive. The financial fuel comes from the People’s Place thrift store and boutique at 17 James Street in Kingston. The food programs involved are thoroughly worthy of the honor our readers have accorded them, with an emphasis on healthy, fresh, and local: People’s Place served 1,156,502 meals

in 2020. Summer feeding for school-age kids, holiday bags for families, a pantry at which recipients can choose the stuff they know they’ll eat, a free farm stand and a cafe are some of the highlights. Collaboration is key. “My hope is that all agencies who work in food justice outreach work together to bring this important service to the members of our community who are in need,” Hein says. “Like the broad scope of your readership, I believe we touch different people in a variety of meaningful ways. Hopefully, the aspect of People’s Place that is most valued is that we strive daily to treat people with dignity.” —Anne Pyburn Craig Public Health Organization Family of Woodstock In a lot of places in this world, when trouble strikes, you’re more or less on your own. In Ulster County, a friendly, trained voice on the other end of the line will offer comfort and connect you with food, clothing, a place to stay, and networks of helpers to keep your problem from becoming a catastrophe. Demonstrating their superb comprehension of the multifaceted nature of health, our readers chose Family of Woodstock as their favorite Public Health Organization. Family will strive to help you solve “any problem under the sun” by applying their core principles—help needs to be creative, tireless, confidential, caring, and generally free. From its humble beginnings as a hotline in 1970, the organization has become a multifaceted, problem-solving powerhouse taking on homelessness, domestic violence, child care, mental and physical health, hunger, and disasters of all sorts. Director Michael Berg takes pride in that evolution, which he says has been organic. “Our


MEXICAN WINNER MAIN STREET 2ND MEXICALI BLUE 3RD MEXICAN KITCHEN

OUTDOOR DINING WINNER STELLA'S STATION 2ND BOITSON'S 3RD MARINER'S HARBOR

OUTDOOR DINING PIVOT WINNER SHIP TO SHORE 2ND MARINER'S HARBOR 3RD GARVAN'S GASTROPUB

OYSTERS WINNER LE PETIT BISTRO 2ND BOITSON'S 3RD BOWERY DUGOUT

PASTA WINNER FRANK GUIDO'S LITTLE ITALY 2ND SAVONA'S TRATTORIA 3RD ANNARELLA RISTORANTE

PIZZA WINNER SLICES 2ND PICNIC PIZZA 3RD CATSKILL MOUNTAIN PIZZA CO

SANDWICH WINNER ROSSI ROSTICCERIA DELI 2ND JOE BEEZ DELI 3RD TERRI'S MARKET & DELI

SEAFOOD WINNER GADALETO'S SEAFOOD MARKET 2ND BOWERY DUGOUT 3RD RED ONION

Students of Rock Academy performing in Woodstock

SOUP

approach, to start with a rudimentary service and ask the person served what additional services or needs they have, has proven to be a very effective way to provide relevant services based upon the input of the people served,” he says. “Our staff and volunteers will not tell people what to do or burden them with judgement. We provide a safe space where people can describe their innermost secrets and those problems which are significantly impacting them without fear of judgement or violation of privacy.” Berg, who’s been leading the organization since its founding, says another part of the key to success is being on the ground, where the people are—in Family’s case, that means headquarters in four towns. And you’re invited to join the dance, as a donor, volunteer, or employee—you bring your heart and skills, they’ll teach you to apply them in the Family way. —Anne Pyburn Craig Music School Rock Academy Twisted Sister might have had us all screaming “I wanna rock!” but it’s the Rock Academy in Woodstock that makes those rock'n'roll dreams come true. Simply put, “We teach kids to rock,” says Jason Bowman, the Academy’s owner and director. “But it’s more than just a music school; it’s a community.” Bowman and his wife Acacia founded the Rock Academy with School of Rock founder Paul Green and his wife Lisa, but Jason and Acacia are the current owners. If “School of Rock” sounds familiar, you might have seen the iconic movie with comedian Jack Black in the lead role as teacher Dewey Finn. “A lot of the new students think I’m Jack Black,” jokes Bowman. All joking aside, Bowman says that the Rock Academy’s students, ages 8 to 18, just want to learn to play music and have fun while they are

playing. “And that’s the whole idea behind what we do,” he says. “We have students who come from over two hours away several times a week just to be in the school. We also have kids who come from Canada, Europe, and the West Coast for our camps.” The Rock Academy is a year-round, tuitionbased program where students take a weekly 45-minute lesson in their primary instrument and attend weekly rehearsals in preparation for seasonal shows. The primary instrument can be guitar, bass, drums, or keyboards. Camps have included interactions with professional musicians including a Tracy Bonham Vocal Workshop, Punk Rock Intensive with John Gullo, Jam with Seth Johnson, and a recording camp with Albert DiFiore. —Lisa Iannucci

WINNER YUM YUM NOODLE BAR, WOODSTOCK 2ND BLUE MOUNTAIN BISTRO TO GO 3RD LE CANARD ENCHAINE

STEAK WINNER SHIP TO SHORE 2ND THE AVENUE STEAKHOUSE 3RD FLATIRON

SUSHI WINNER KYOTO SUSHI 2ND SUSHI MAKIO 3RD HOKKAIDO

TACO WINNER DIEGO'S TAQUERIA 2ND SANTA FE UPTOWN 3RD HUDSON TACO

THAI WINNER AROI THAI RESTAURANT 2ND BANGKOK CAFE 3RD SUKHOTHAI

VEGAN WINNER GARDEN CAFE 2ND ABA'S FALAFEL 3RD THE ROSENDALE CAFE

VEGETARIAN

Tattoo Parlor Graceland Tattoo Adam Lauricella had just two years of tattooing under his belt when he opened Graceland Tattoo in Wappingers Falls in 2003. “I wanted to do what I thought to be right, to offer it in a way that people wanted to experience it,” he explains. “I had an idea of how I could present it and the environment that I could create.” Lauricella’s interest in tattoo art began in high school, but he didn’t know it was possible to become a tattoo artist. After attending SUNY New Paltz and studying theater art, he just fell into it. “There’s no real romantic story,” he admits. “Tattooing kind of chooses you in some weird way.” Graceland Tattoo sits one block from where Lauricella’s mother grew up. Lauricella, raised in the Hudson Valley, thinks the location is logical. “This is just where I’m from, I’ve made my mark here. Why not give it to the people I’m of ?” —Naomi Shammash

WINNER GARDEN CAFE 2ND THE ROSENDALE CAFE 3RD BLACK-EYED SUZIE'S UPSTATE

WAIT STAFF & SERVICE WINNER FRANK GUIDO'S LITTLE ITALY 2ND TERRAPIN RESTAURANT 3RD GARVAN'S GASTROPUB

WATERFRONT DINING WINNER OLE SAVANNAH RESTAURANT 2ND THE TAVERN AT DIAMOND MILLS 3RD SHADOWS ON THE HUDSON

HEALTH & WELLNESS ACUPUNCTURIST WINNER NEW PALTZ COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE 2ND ANDREA BAROUCH-HEBB ACUPUNCTURE 3RD KINGSTON ACUPUNCTURE & WELLNESS

BARBER SHOP WINNER PUGSLY'S BARBERSHOP 2ND LEWIS AND SCOTT 3RD UNION SHAVE

CANNABIS DISPENSARY (MA ONLY) WINNER CANNA PROVISIONS 2ND THEORY WELLNESS 3RD THE PASS

7/21 CHRONOGRAM CHRONOGRAMMIES 59


“Proud to Honor those who lead by example”

1ST PLACE

L

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2ND ANNU A HE

WINNER A

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A

ER

DS

RE

D

S’ C AW H OICE

Clayton and Karen Van Kleeck

Award-Winning, Organic, Vegan Cuisine

Personalized ceremonies that celebrate who you are together

Catering Services

Personal Chef, Drop Off, Staffed, Food Truck For intimate parties, to office lunches and weddings. Let us do the work…so you can enjoy!

Order Products & Pre-made Meals Delicious, Convenient, and Freezer-Friendly Seasonal, Holiday and Customized Menus.

Food Truck

Exciting, Mouth-Watering, and Satisfying Serving signature cold salads, hot sandwiches, various appetizers, spreads, and beverages, Sicilian Espresso and more!

T

2ND ANNU A HE

WINNER

1ST PLACE

PRIEST • CELEBRANT • WEDDING OFFICIANT • COUNSELLOR

A

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Reverend Jim Rooney

DS

WINNER D

Best Food Truck

L

FIRST ANNUAL THE

S’ C AW H OICE

Best Food Truck

At the foot of Mount Beacon, The Beacon Hermitage is available for weddings, overnight stays, retreats, meetings, and creative activities.

A WOMAN-OWNED, LOCAL BUSINESS

Beacon Hermitage • 376 Route 9D, Beacon NY • (917) 880-0791

TheGreenPalate.com l TheGreenPalate 60 CHRONOGRAMMIES CHRONOGRAM 7/21

f TheGreenPalateGrill

R E V J I M R OO N E Y . CO M

revjimrooney


CHIROPRACTOR WINNER BOYLE FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC 2ND UPSTATE CHIROPRACTIC CARE 3RD SMALDONE SPORTS & P.I. CHIROPRACTIC

COUNSELOR / THERAPIST WINNER IZLIND INTEGRATIVE HEALTH CENTER 2ND FAMILY OF WOODSTOCK 3RD THE INSTITUTE FOR FAMILY HEALTH

DAY SPA WINNER SPA 21 KINGSTON 2ND BUTTERMILK FALLS INN & SPA 3RD HAVEN SPA

DENTIST WINNER DEBRA A. KOEHN, DMD 2ND PINE STREET DENTAL 3RD TRANSCEND DENTAL

GENERAL PRACTITIONER WINNER DELEO FAMILY MEDICINE 2ND ELIZABETH COSTLEY, DO-MAHV 3RD ALLISON LUCCHESI

GYM WINNER BODIES BY COLOTTI 2ND YMCA OF KINGSTON AND ULSTER COUNTY 3RD IXL HEALTH & FITNESS CLUB

HAIR SALON WINNER FRINGE HAIR DESIGN 2ND HEADSPACE 3RD BEAUTY RITUAL SALON & SPA

MASSAGE THERAPIST

Grieg Farm in Red Hook has been a u-pick favorite since the early 1950s.

U-Pick Farm Grieg Farm One perk of living in the Hudson Valley is our abundance of farms. And harvesting one's own produce is an experience that everyone should have. Fortunately, Grieg Farm, located on Pitcher Lane in Red Hook, has been a u-pick favorite in the Hudson Valley since the early 1950s. “We have all this nature and beauty,” says Norman Grieg, farmer at Grieg Farms. “We always thought of the farm as an agricultural park that’s open to the public. When fruit is harvested and you eat it right there in the field, it tastes entirely different than when it’s been refrigerated and shipped.” At various times of the year, visitors can pick their own asparagus, blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, apples, and pumpkins. But Grieg Farm is more than just a pick-your-own experience. There is a farmers’ market, an opportunity to feed goats, a koi pond, a tasting room for Abandoned Hard Cider, and an art gallery. “We try to celebrate the arts and music and neighbors who do things that are also agricultural,” explains Grieg. “Abandoned Cider uses our apples to press out and make a halfdozen different ciders. The tasting room is a place to come and taste it and it’s really an amazing experience.” Being innovative is important to Grieg Farm, as is the safety of their food, knowing that children are tasting the food too. “We have customers of all ages, so we try to make sure that the food is absolutely safe to eat in the field at any time, and to do that, we don’t use any chemicals, herbicides, insecticides of any kind. The fruit doesn’t need to be washed and you can eat it right there.” For more than 70 years, Grieg Farm has served the Hudson Valley community and Grieg is proud of that accomplishment. “We’re three

WINNER SAKINAH IRIZARRY 2ND BIRCH BODY CARE 3RD JESSE SCHERER

generations in now and when I ask people how they’ve heard about the farm, they say their parents brought them when they were kids and they wanted to bring their children,” he says. —Lisa Iannucci Weddings, Florist Green Cottage As a child, Dennis Nutley would disappear into the woods near his house for the day and return with armfuls of flowers for his mother. She had a wildflower garden, for which he would go in the woods and dig up seedlings. Nutley, now a florist, founded the Chronogrammie-winning Green Cottage in 1997 with his partner David Urso. “It’s in my blood,” he says of the flower business. Nutley’s first flower shop job was as part of the maintenance crew, sweeping up for a local store in Staten Island where he grew up. His first time working as a florist was at Mohonk Mountain House. Nutley would go into the woods on the property, find flowers, and make them into arrangements placed throughout the hotel. At Green Cottage, he loves constantly creating new combinations of flowers, keeping himself on his toes by never repeating the same design. Nutley and Urso, a jeweler, decided to open Green Cottage as a home for both of their trades. They began without a business plan, asking Urso’s friends for consignment items like pottery and scarves to supplement Nutley’s flowers and Urso’s jewelry. Twenty-three years later, Green Cottage still offers home goods and remains focused on local artists. The changing seasons influence both Nutley’s arrangements and his partiality to certain flowers. Right now, he’s taken with peonies, “just like all the June brides,” he says. But he doesn’t want to play favorites too much. “Every flower is beautiful in its way, even carnations. Just not the blue ones.” —Naomi Shammash

MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY (NY, MA, NJ, CT) WINNER THEORY WELLNESS 2ND ETAIN HEALTH 3RD BERKSHIRE ROOTS

MEDICAL SPA WINNER MEDICAL AESTHETICS OF THE HUDSON VALLEY 2ND LILY'S MEDI SPA 3RD OASIS MEDI SPA

ORTHODONTIST WINNER EFROS ORTHODONTICS 2ND SUNSHINE ORTHODONTICS 3RD VAN VLIET ORTHODONTICS

PEDIATRICIAN/PEDIATRIC PRACTICE WINNER THE CHILDREN'S MEDICAL GROUP 2ND DR. JOSEPH APPEL, MD 3RD DANIELLE CIGLIANO, DO

PERSONAL TRAINER WINNER JULI COLOTTI 2ND OLIVIA GRIMSLAND 3RD HUDSON VALLEY PEAK PERFORMANCE

PHARMACY WINNER VILLAGE APOTHECARY 2ND DEDRICK'S PHARMACY AND GIFT SHOP 3RD SAUGERTIES PHARMACY

PILATES STUDIO WINNER RHINEBECK PILATES 2ND BREATHE BARRE & PILATES 3RD STUDIO24 FITNESS

REIKI PRACTITIONER WINNER SENSEI LORRY SALLUZZI 2ND RED HOOK WELLNESS CENTER 3RD AROMAGEE MASSAGE & HOLISTIC WELLNESS

RESORT/HOTEL SPA WINNER MOHONK MOUNTAIN HOUSE 2ND EMERSON RESORT & SPA 3RD MIRBEAU INN & SPA RHINEBECK

SPIRITUAL/CONTEMPLATIVE SPACE WINNER OMEGA INSTITUTE FOR HOLISTIC STUDIES 2ND ZEN MOUNTAIN MONASTERY 3RD RED HOOK WELLNESS CENTER

VETERINARIAN WINNER BETTER LIVES ANIMAL HOSPITAL 2ND CREATURE COMFORTS ANIMAL HOSPITAL 3RD SAUGERTIES ANIMAL HOSPITAL

7/21 CHRONOGRAM CHRONOGRAMMIES 61


T H A N K YO U ! VOTED B E S T M E D S PA I N T H E H U D S O N VA L L E Y W E LOV E YO U !

CREATING

HOMES

SUPPORTING

PEOPLE IMPROVING

COMMUNITIES

ENERGY SQUARE Kingston, NY

16 6 A L B A N Y AV E N U E • K I N G S T O N M E D I C A L A E S T H E T I C S H V. C O M

62 CHRONOGRAMMIES CHRONOGRAM 7/21

289 Fair St. Kingston, NY 12401

(845) 331-2140

www.rupco.org


Photo by Eva Tenuto

WELLNESS CENTER

ARTIST

WINNER SPA 21 KINGSTON 2ND WOODSTOCK HEALING ARTS 3RD MOMENTUM PHYSICAL THERAPY OF NEW PALTZ

WINNER PAUL HEATH 2ND JANE BLOODGOOD-ABRAMS 3RD CARI MARVELLI

AUTHOR

YOGA STUDIO

WINNER ELIZABETH CUNNINGHAM 2ND NINA SHENGOLD 3RD HOLLY GEORGE WARREN

WINNER LITTLE BLUEBERRYY 2ND STONE WAVE YOGA 3RD GINA DUBOIS YOGA

NATURE & THE OUTDOORS BIKE SHOP WINNER OVERLOOK BICYCLES 2ND KINGSTON CYCLERY 3RD BICYCLE RACK

BIKE TRAIL WINNER HUDSON VALLEY RAIL TRAIL 2ND ASHOKAN RAIL TRAIL 3RD RIVER-TO-RIDGE TRAIL

CAMPGROUND WINNER NORTH/SOUTH LAKE CAMPGROUND 2ND YOGI BEAR’S JELLYSTONE PARK CAMPRESORT AT LAZY RIVER 3RD BROOK N WOOD FAMILY CAMPGROUND

DOG PARK WINNER KINGSTON POINT BEACH 2ND RHINEBECK DOG PARK 3RD KENNETH L. WILSON CAMPGROUND

LGBTQ Activist Julie Novak

GOLF COURSE

“Comedy can serve as a bridge to approach subjects that are difficult to talk about and address them in a subversive way that can be highly effective—especially when the punchlines are anecdotal,” says Julie Novak, our readers’ choice for LGBTQ Activist. “With humor, there is a hyperbolic yet completely accurate way of describing the absurdity and idiocy of white supremacy and homophobia. A person might be laughing uncontrollably while being simultaneously uncontrollably outraged. In the end, they get to consider a new perspective they may not have occasion to otherwise.” Whether she’s emceeing, radio hosting (check out “No One Like You” on Radio Kingston), onstage as solo performer, or producing, Novak never loses sight of love and justice—or of how ridiculous it is that some still don’t get it. Laughter is her way to chant Babylon to its knees. Happily for the planet, Novak’s unstoppable energy generally has her working on more than one thing at a time. As cofounder and producer of the TMI Project, she’s mentored hundreds, helping them find comedy gold in things they never thought they’d tell a soul. And she’s constantly branching out every which way. Novak also works with the Future Perfect Project, which provides free creative arts workshops for LGBTQIA+ youth and allies across the United States and released the first season of a new animation series called “How Life Is: Queer Youth Animated,” in June on YouTube. Got an issue the mainstream is ignoring? Novak wants to hear from you. And she firmly believes we can all make things better. “Build partnerships, ask questions, don’t be afraid of things getting a little messy,” she says. “And support BIPOC trans folx. Equity and inclusion need to be the first two things considered by any white activist when making resources available to the entire LGBTQIA+ community, not just those in positions of privilege.” —Anne Pyburn Craig

HIKE

WINNER WILTWYCK GOLF CLUB 2ND WOODSTOCK GOLF CLUB 3RD RIP VAN WINKLE COUNTRY CLUB WINNER MINNEWASKA STATE PARK PRESERVE 2ND MOHONK PRESERVE 3RD OVERLOOK MOUNTAIN HOUSE RUINS 3RD POET'S WALK

OUTDOOR APPAREL & GEAR SHOP WINNER KENCO OUTFITTERS 2ND ROCK AND SNOW 3RD POTTER BROTHERS SKI AND SNOWBOARD

PARK/PRESERVE WINNER MINNEWASKA STATE PARK PRESERVE 2ND ASHOKAN RESERVOIR 3RD MOHONK PRESERVE

PICNIC SPOT WINNER VANDERBILT MANSION NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 2ND OLANA STATE HISTORIC SITE 3RD NORTH/SOUTH LAKE CAMPGROUND

PLACE TO PADDLE WINNER ESOPUS CREEK 2ND HUDSON RIVER 3RD RONDOUT CREEK, KINGSTON

PUBLIC SWIMMING AREA WINNER MINNEWASKA STATE PARK PRESERVE 3RD RIVERPOOL BEACON 2ND TOWN OF ROSENDALE SWIMMING POOL

RAIL TRAIL

AUTO MECHANIC WINNER VAN KLEECK'S TIRE 2ND ABBOTT AUTOMOTIVE 3RD STEYER'S SAUGERTIES

CHEF WINNER RIC ORLANDO 2ND JESSE FREDERICK, BUTTERFIELD 3RD SAMIR HRICHI, SHIP TO SHORE

ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCATE/ACTIVIST WINNER KATHY STEVENS, CATSKILL ANIMAL SANCTUARY 2ND HAYLEY CARLOCK, SCENIC HUDSON 3RD AMY TROMPETTER, PUPPETEER

FOOD JUSTICE ADVOCATE/ACTIVIST WINNER CHRISTINE HEIN, PEOPLE'S PLACE 2ND QUAY SMITH, RISE UP KINGSTON 3RD KATY KONDRAT, KINGSTON FOOD CO-OP

LGBTQ ADVOCATE/ACTIVIST WINNER JULIE NOVAK, TMI PROJECT 2ND SIGNY FURIYA, HUDSON VALLEY LGBTQ COMMUNITY CENTER 3RD LINDA MUSSMANN, TIME & SPACE LTD.

LOCAL CELEBRITY WINNER PAUL RUDD 2ND MARK RUFFALO 3RD JIMMY FALLON

POLITICIAN WINNER ANTONIO DELGADO 2ND JEN METZGER 3RD PAT RYAN

PUBLIC HEALTH ADVOCATE/ACTIVIST WINNER JEN METZGER 2ND JOE CONCRA, O+ FESTIVAL 3RD CAROL SMITH, ULSTER COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND MENTAL HEALTH

RACIAL JUSTICE ADVOCATE/ACTIVIST WINNER QUAY SMITH, RISE UP KINGSTON 2ND RASHIDA TYLER, KINGSTON YMCA 3RD LINDA MUSSMANN, TIME & SPACE LTD.

RADIO PERSONALITY WINNER IDA HAKKILA, WDST 2ND NADINE FERRARO, RADIO KINGSTON 3RD GREG GATTINE, WDST

SOCIAL JUSTICE ADVOCATE/ACTIVIST WINNER JEN METZGER 2ND EVA TENUTO 3RD CALLIE JAYNE

YOUTH ADVOCATE WINNER TAY FISHER 2ND DREW ANDREWS 3RD JESSICA JONES

WINNER ASHOKAN RAIL TRAIL 2ND WALLKILL VALLEY RAIL TRAIL 3RD HUDSON VALLEY RAIL TRAIL

RETAIL

SKI AREA

ANTIQUES SHOP

WINNER BELLEAYRE MOUNTAIN SKI CENTER 2ND HUNTER MOUNTAIN RESORT 3RD WINDHAM MOUNTAIN

WINNER KINGSTON CONSIGNMENTS 2ND NEWBURGH VINTAGE EMPORIUM 3RD HUDSON VALLEY HOUSE PARTS

SUNSET SPOT

AUTO DEALERSHIP

WINNER ASHOKAN RESERVOIR 2ND WALKWAY OVER THE HUDSON STATE HISTORIC PARK 3RD SAUGERTIES LIGHTHOUSE

AUTOBODY SHOP

PEOPLE AFFORDABLE HOUSING ADVOCATE/ACTIVIST WINNER LISA SILVERSTONE, SAFE HARBORS OF THE HUDSON 2ND RASHIDA TYLER, THE REAL KINGSTON TENANTS’ UNION 3RD CHRISTA HINES, HUDSON RIVER HOUSING 3RD JONATHAN BIX, NOBODY LEAVES MIDHUDSON

WINNER SAWYER MOTORS 2ND RUGE'S SUBARU 3RD KINGSTON NISSAN WINNER JAKE'S 2ND WARD BACKHAUS COLLISION 3RD STAGE 1 AUTOMOTIVE

BOOKSTORE WINNER ROUGH DRAFT BAR & BOOKS 2ND INQUIRING MINDS BOOKSTORE 3RD OBLONG BOOKS & MUSIC, RHINEBECK

BUTCHER SHOP WINNER SMOKE HOUSE OF THE CATSKILLS 2ND APPLESTONE MEAT CO. 3RD WOODSTOCK MEATS

7/21 CHRONOGRAM CHRONOGRAMMIES 63


CANDY STORE WINNER KRAUSE'S CHOCOLATES 2ND SAMUEL'S SWEET SHOP 3RD KINGSTON CANDY BAR

CBD PRODUCT WINNER HEMPIRE STATE GROWERS CBD MILL 2ND WOODS & MEADOW 2ND YOUR CBD STORE, KINGSTON

CHEESE SHOP WINNER CHEESE LOUISE 2ND THE BIG CHEESE 3RD GRAZERY

CHOCOLATIER WINNER KRAUSE'S CHOCOLATES 2ND FRUITION CHOCOLATE WORKS 3RD LAGUSTA'S LUSCIOUS

COFFEE SHOP WINNER MONKEY JOE ROASTING COMPANY 2ND ROUGH DRAFT BAR & BOOKS 3RD MUDD PUDDLE COFFEE ROASTERS

COMIC BOOK STORE WINNER MEGABRAIN COMICS & ARCADE 2ND WORLD'S END COMICS 3RD OCTOBER COUNTRY COMICS

CUSTOM FRAME SHOP WINNER CATSKILL ART SUPPLY, KINGSTON 2ND RHINEBECK ARTIST'S SHOP 3RD MARK GRUBER GALLERY

FISH MONGER WINNER ADAMS FAIRACRE FARMS 2ND GADALETO'S SEAFOOD MARKET 3RD SEA DELI

FOOTWEAR STORE WINNER MONTANO'S SHOE STORE 2ND PEGASUS FOOTWEAR 3RD LITTLE PICKLES

GIFT STORE WINNER BOP TO TOTTOM 2ND GREEN COTTAGE 3RD CANDLESTOCK

GOURMET FOOD WINNER ADAMS FAIRACRE FARMS 2ND BLUE MOUNTAIN BISTRO TO GO 3RD ROSSI ROSTICCERIA DELI

GREEN BUSINESS WINNER BREAD ALONE BAKERY 2ND THE O ZONE 3RD SUNCOMMON

GROCERY STORE WINNER ADAMS FAIRACRE FARMS 2ND MOTHER EARTH'S STOREHOUSE 3RD EMMANUEL'S MARKETPLACE 3RD SUNFLOWER MARKET

HEALTH FOOD STORE WINNER MOTHER EARTH'S STOREHOUSE 2ND SUNFLOWER MARKET 3RD HIGH FALLS FOOD CO-OP

JEWELRY STORE WINNER KINGSTON FINE JEWELRY 2ND HUDSON VALLEY GOLDSMITH 3RD FRANK & CO FINE JEWELERS

KIDS' CLOTHING STORE WINNER BOP TO TOTTOM 2ND STARRYBIRD KIDS 3RD LILY'S BOUTIQUE

OUTFITTER WINNER KENCO OUTFITTERS 2ND ROCK AND SNOW 3RD MOUNTAIN TOPS OUTDOORS

PET SITTING WINNER DAWN'S DOG BOARDING & PET SITTING 2ND LUCKIPUPS PET SITTING 3RD CAMP BELLY RUB

PET STORE WINNER LUCAS PET SUPPLY 2ND SAUGERTAILS PET SUPPLY 3RD PAUSE DOG BOUTIQUE

RECORD STORE WINNER RHINO RECORDS 2ND DARKSIDE RECORDS 3RD WOODSTOCK MUSIC SHOP

64 CHRONOGRAMMIES CHRONOGRAM 7/21

Captain's chairs from the DePuy Canal House at Ulster Habitat ReStore

Furniture Store Ulster Habitat ReStore Our readers, savvy shoppers indeed, have chosen Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore Ulster County as their favorite Furniture Store and Housewares/Furnishings destination. ReStores are independently owned and operated by local Habitat chapters, selling donated items at a fraction of retail. Proceeds support Habitat’s mission of helping build homes for the Ulster County community. “It’s the epitome of a mission-driven, community-oriented effort for Ulster County residents,” says ReStore Manager Lee Anne Albritton, “and an eco-friendly way to minimize waste and reduce landfill contributions. Plus, it’s a fun atmosphere and provides a ‘pay it forward’ camaraderie that can be rare in the world of retail.” You never know what’s at the ReStore. “Every day it’s a chorus of ‘Look what I found!’ from staff, volunteers, and customers,” says Albritton. A partial list of recent memorable items on sale: a caviar chiller, a debarking knife, a wooden neck rest for Saharan nomads, an entire maple kitchen cabinetry set in perfect condition, antique captain’s chairs from the Depuy Canal House, three ceramic mugs from Steve Ladin’s Tin Can series, an industrial kiln, a 1950s metal detector, and a Brazilian rosewood writer’s desk with hidden compartments and inkwell. All day, every day, ReStore customers participate in the big-hearted adventure alongside volunteers and staff. “I love when

people purchase things they weren’t expecting to find, as simple as a vegetable peeler or as cool as a 1950s orange enameled plate warmer,” says Albritton. “Almost every customer shares a quick story of what their purchase means for them.” The fun’s all the deeper for the mission, says Albritton. “Someone donating or purchasing something as simple as a teacup means that a family will get to wake up, cook, shower, do laundry, have game night in a house they own. How amazing is that?” —Anne Pyburn Craig Affordable Housing Organization RUPCO For 40 years, RUPCO—formerly known as the Rural Ulster Preservation Company—has been administering Section 8 rental vouchers, helping first-time home buyers, and working through the often arduous process of getting affordable housing approved and built. Post-9/11 urban flight, the economic meltdown of 2008, the rise of Airbnb, and the pandemic have only exacerbated the issues inherent in trying to keep affordability real in a gorgeous place within a stone’s throw of one of the planet’s biggest, wealthiest metro areas. “Zoning has been so difficult in the Hudson Valley because we all want to preserve the beauty of the environment,” says RUPCO Executive Director Kevin O’Connor, “and a lot of people want to close the gate behind them. But right now the situation is beyond critical.”


REMOTE WORK SPOT WINNER ROUGH DRAFT BAR & BOOKS 2ND ONE EPIC PLACE 3RD CO.

TATTOO PARLOR WINNER GRACELAND TATTOO 2ND METAMORPHOSIS TATTOO 3RD INK INC

TOY STORE WINNER TINKER TOYS 2ND LAND OF OZ TOYS 3RD LITTLE PICKLES

WINE/LIQUOR SHOP WINNER TOWN & COUNTRY LIQUOR 2ND KINGSTON WINE CO. 3RD VISCOUNT WINES & LIQUOR

YARN STORE WINNER PERFECT BLEND YARN & TEA SHOP 2ND WHITE BARN FARM SHEEP & WOOL 3RD LOOPY MANGO

SHELTER

The knife room at Warren Kitchen & Cutlery

APPLIANCE STORE

RUPCO has created around 700 units of affordable housing in the region. In progress right now: East End II, 61 affordable rental units scattered through 22 buildings in Newburgh’s historic district that will feature onsite management and laundry facilities, with trash and snow removal included. All properties remain on the tax rolls. The goal, says O’Connor, has to be “home plus opportunity”—homes need to be climateresilient, walkable, transit-adjacent, and ideally flexible enough to be offices and/or recovery wards should a family member be taken ill. “Multiple approaches are being pursued, and it’s going to take time,” says O’Connor. “Right now, many people are aware and awake because they’re personally affected. Our building projects are part of it; along with rent controls, just eviction laws, mixed-use zoning, and higher-density zoning. These factors, and the many roles housing is asked to serve, all intersect and they all really matter. But it can be done. As I’ve said at so many meetings, a great town can house everyone, and you’re not a great town until you can house everyone.” —Anne Pyburn Craig Auto Dealership Sawyer Motors

the Sawyer Automotive Foundation, and has held many charitable events over the years, raising $400,000 to benefit organizations and individuals in need. These events include the annual Sawyer Motors Car Show ( July 11), where 15,000 visitors enjoy hot rods and classic cars, live bands, and fireworks. This year, Siracusano expects to donate approximately $45,000 to charities and individuals in need. In the past, he has donated to Saugerties Animal Shelter, Saugerties Boys and Girls Club, American Legion’s baseball team, Saugerties Police Department, and Madison Jones, a cancer patient. Each December, Sawyer Motors hosts an annual Holiday in the Village with wagon rides, performances, a parade of lights, a tree lighting, and Santa. “We reach out to families who need assistance at the holidays,” said Siracusano, whose Foundation also raised $70,000 for a responder memorial, which was unveiled in mid-June. “I have a big heart and personally feel rewarded when I’m able to give back to a child, family or veteran,” he says. —Lisa Iannucci

Bob Siracusano doesn’t know if he will ever retire, but when he finally does, he’s passing the keys to Sawyer Motors down to his children, Macy and Joe. Along with those keys comes Siracusano’s 31-year dedication to giving back. It will be an easy transition, though, because Macy and Joe already work in the family business and have inherited their father’s dedication to both family and philanthropy. “Our goal in life is to coach our kids, and now they feel the same way about giving back to the community that we do,” says Siracusano. “And this award means that we are being recognized for all of these efforts.” Sawyer Motors isn’t a typical automotive dealership. The Saugerties showroom is filled with 1950s jukeboxes, black-and-white checkered floors, a mock diner, vintage signs, gas pumps, and ice cream carts galore. Siracusano is as unique and genuine as his decor. He created

Located in a bright yellow building on Route 9 just outside the village of Rhinebeck, Warren Kitchen & Cutlery is the kind of spot home cooks are afraid to visit—because they may end up buying way too many delightful toys for the kitchen. Its customer base includes enthusiastic home cooks, students at the Culinary Institute of America (just down the road in Hyde Park), and chefs from throughout the region and beyond. Warren carries a comprehensive (some would say, exhaustive) range of baking equipment, high-end cookware, coffee and tea-making equipment, and a wide selection of mixers and food processors. But it’s knives that give Warren’s “The Edge,” as their slogan boasts; they carry over 1,000 different styles, from Wustof to Shun and many brands in between. “If we had more space, we’d have more knives,” says owner Richard Von Husen. Wouldn't we all? —Brian K. Mahoney

WINNER EARL B. FEIDEN APPLIANCE 2ND H. L. SNYDER & SONS 3RD CLARKSON'S APPLIANCES

ARCHITECT WINNER DUTTON ARCHITECTURE 2ND LARSON ARCHITECTURE WORKS PLLC 3RD S3 ARCHITECTURE (UPSTATE MODERNIST)

BED & BREAKFAST WINNER THE FORSYTH B&B 2ND HASBROUCK HOUSE 3RD BEACON BED AND BREAKFAST

CARPENTER WINNER BOB JONES 2ND PARAGON BUILDING GROUP 2ND PAUL ALEXANDER CONSTRUCTION CO.

ELECTRICIAN WINNER OSTRANDER ELECTRIC 2ND MIKE TIANO 3RD DS ELECTRIC

FURNITURE STORE WINNER ULSTER HABITAT RESTORE 2ND WIEDY FURNITURE CENTER 3RD MILLSPAUGH FURNITURE

GARDEN CENTER WINNER ADAMS FAIRACRE FARMS 2ND CATSKILL NATIVE NURSERY 2ND VICTORIA GARDENS

GENERAL CONTRACTOR WINNER ROTHE ENGINEERING 2ND PARAGON BUILDING GROUP 2ND PETER LONGO CUSTOM CARPENTRY

GENERAL HOME REPAIR BUSINESS

Kitchen Store Warren Kitchen & Cutlery

WINNER HUDSON VALLEY KITCHEN DESIGN 2ND SUPERIOR PAINTING AND REMODELING

HARDWARE STORE WINNER HERZOG'S HOME CENTER OF KINGSTON 2ND WILLIAMS LUMBER 3RD ACE HARDWARE 3RD H HOUST & SON

HOME BUILDER WINNER UPSTATE MODERNIST 2ND ASHLEY HOMES CONSTRUCTION CO 3RD WILLIAM WALLACE CONSTRUCTION

HOME CENTER WINNER HERZOG'S HOME CENTER OF KINGSTON 2ND WILLIAMS LUMBER 3RD LOWE'S HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME INSPECTOR WINNER NACCARATO HOME INSPECTION 2ND MOUNTAIN VALLEY INSPECTIONS 3RD COVELLO AND SONS

HOTEL WINNER MOHONK MOUNTAIN HOUSE 2ND EMERSON RESORT & SPA 3RD STARLITE MOTEL

INTERIOR DESIGNER WINNER MARLA WALKER INTERIORS 2ND SIMONE EISOLD 3RD JENNIFER LYNN INTERIORS

7/21 CHRONOGRAM CHRONOGRAMMIES 65


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66 CHRONOGRAMMIES CHRONOGRAM 7/21


Pharmacist Dr. Neal Smoller of Woodstock Apothecary and members of his volunteer vaccination army at the Comeau Property in Woodstock. Photo by Franco Vogt

KITCHEN STORE WINNER WARREN KITCHEN & CUTLERY 2ND THE CULINARY WAREHOUSE 3RD BLUECASHEW KITCHEN HOMESTEAD

LANDSCAPER WINNER VICTORIA GARDENS 2ND CATSKILL NATIVE NURSERY 3RD EARTH DESIGN COOPERATIVE

MOVING/STORAGE WINNER MAN WITH A VAN 2ND ARNOFF MOVING & STORAGE 3RD AGS MOVING DELIVERIES & STORAGE

PLUMBER WINNER DOLPHIN PLUMBING 2ND CARL BELL PLUMBING 3RD JSP HOME SERVICES

PLUMBING SUPPLIES WINNER N&S SUPPLY 2ND WOODSTOCK HARDWARE 3RD WILLIAMS LUMBER CO.

REAL ESTATE AGENT WINNER KYLA THOMAS 2ND BRIANA DEVOL CERMAK 3RD LISA HALTER 3RD LORRIE MORSE

REAL ESTATE FIRM WINNER KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY HUDSON VALLEY NORTH 2ND GRIST MILL REAL ESTATE 3RD MURPHY REALTY GROUP

RESORT WINNER MOHONK MOUNTAIN HOUSE 2ND EMERSON RESORT & SPA 3RD SAGAMORE RESORT

ROOFER WINNER J AND A ROOFING 2ND COLONIAL ROOFING & SIDING 3RD ROBERTS ROOFING

WEDDINGS CATERER WINNER AGNES DEVEREUX CATERING 2ND BLUE MOUNTAIN BISTRO TO GO 3RD RED MAPLE VINEYARD

DIVORCE LAWYER WINNER REBECCA MILLOURAS-LETTRE 2ND JONNA SPILBOR LAW 3RD MCCABE, COLEMAN, VENTOSA & PATTERSON PLLC

FLORIST WINNER GREEN COTTAGE 2ND DANCING TULIP FLORAL BOUTIQUE 3RD PETALOS FLORAL DESIGN

Pharmacy Village Apothecary Trying to get Dr. Neal Smoller to slow down for an interview isn’t an easy thing to do. This busy holistic pharmacist, supplement expert, and founder of Village Apothecary on Tinker Street in Woodstock has also been on a mission to end the pandemic. “By mid-June, we immunized over 36,000 people against the coronavirus in Ulster, Dutchess, and surrounding counties,” says Dr. Smoller, who started out working in his hometown family-owned pharmacy, Beadle’s Pharmacy in Saugerties, when he was just 14 years old. “We traveled to churches, high schools, colleges, and community centers to ensure everyone had equal access as soon as possible.” Since his early exposure to the pharmaceutical industry to his quest to vaccinate as many people as possible, Dr. Smoller (affectionately known as Dr. Neal), has always looked for new and improved ways to help his patients and the community.

Dr. Smoller is a holistic pharmacist, which means that he not only fills traditional medication prescriptions, but he also works with finding his patients the best and healthiest supplements. He’s developed the Holistic Standard, which redefines holistic care as the science-backed pursuit of healthy goals using lifestyle, natural products, and conventional medicine. He also founded Supplement School, an online education platform teaching people how to build a sustainable wellness practice with their expertise in the center. He’s proud to receive a Chronogrammie. “It’s recognition of us—the members of our Hudson Valley community—coming together as the COVID Busting Volunteer Army to make immunization easy, efficient, and fun,” he says. “I’m honored to have inspired and led a group of over 500 such community members and personally gave so many people peace. I also look forward to helping people attain their wellness goals holistically in a post-pandemic world.” —Lisa Iannucci

OFFICIANT WINNER REV. JIM ROONEY 2ND HUDSON VALLEY CEREMONIES 3RD MICHELLE ZIPP

RENTAL COMPANY WINNER GLAMPSTAR 2ND SAV-ON PARTY CENTRAL 3RD EVENTS UNLIMITED TENTS & PARTY

WEDDING CAKE MAKER WINNER THE PASTRY GARDEN 2ND AGNES DEVEREUX CATERING 3RD BANANA MOON BAKING COMPANY

WEDDING DJ WINNER JTD PRODUCTIONS 2ND DJ DOLCE PRODUCTIONS 3RD DJ FE

WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER WINNER PHOTOMUSE 2ND CHRISTINE ASHBURN 3RD KRISTINE PALMER PHOTOGRAPHY

WEDDING VENUE WINNER RED MAPLE VINEYARD 2ND FEAST AT ROUND HILL 3RD THE GRANDVIEW

WEDDING/EVENT PLANNER WINNER DIAMOND MILLS HOTEL 2ND RSVP BY B 3RD JENNY OZ / SHALE HILL

7/21 CHRONOGRAM CHRONOGRAMMIES 67


music Kronos Quartet & Friends

Long Time Passing (Smithsonian Folkways) Folkways.si.edu First, what this is not. This is not a covers album along the lines of “Kronos Quartet Plays the Hits of Pete Seeger.” This is a Kronos Quartet album first and foremost, in which the four instrumentalists celebrate the musical and cultural impact of “the godfather of folk protest,” emphasizing the social justice aspect of his life and career. Except for a couple of contemporary numbers, the program includes songs written or cowritten by Seeger himself (about half) and songs that in one way or the other were associated with him, mostly in arrangements fusing old-time string-band sounds with Kronos’s avant-classical aesthetic. A dozen or so musical “friends”—mostly vocalists—help Kronos reanimate and reimagine the material; these include Sam Amidon, Aoife O’Donovan, Brian Carpenter, and Lee Knight. The hits indeed are all here: versions of “If I Had a Hammer,” “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?,” and “Turn, Turn, Turn,” bump up against lesser-known tunes, including Seeger’s “Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram,” in which Seeger transposed a Hindu devotional song to banjo (just a year or so before the Beatles discovered raga), plus songs about the Spanish Civil War, the environment, and the mournful labor ballad “Step by Step.” Zoe Mulford’s recent “The President Sang Amazing Grace,” here given an emotionally resonant delivery by Ethio-American vocalist Meklit, also stands out. The highlight, however, is Jacob Garchik’s epic, 16-minute sonic collage, interspersing and juxtaposing Seeger recordings and audio clips with Kronos’s exquisitely rendered avant-Americana. —Seth Rogovoy

sound check

Alexander Platt Each month here we visit with a member of the community to find out what music they’ve been digging.

Ever since the pandemic began, I’ve been listening even more to chamber music and old-school jazz, which I guess makes sense in a time of solitude. So far, my favorites have been the old recordings of the middle-period Haydn Symphonies by Antal Dorati and the Philharmonia Hungarica— really, chamber music in its ultimate form. Also: the new release of Ella Fitzgerald: The Lost Berlin Tapes; the Prague Quartet’s recordings of the complete Dvorak string quartets, truly one of the great journeys in the history of music; and Erroll Garner’s Magician, the last album he ever made. Alexander Platt is a conductor and the musical director of Maverick Concerts in Woodstock. Maverick’s 2021 season begins on July 18 and runs through September 12. Maverickconcerts.org.

68 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 7/21

Keith Pray

Scott Helland Guitarmy of One

Universal Blues

Spy Detective Collective

(PrayNation Records) KeithPray.com

Atmospheric Audio Guitarmyofone.com

Universal Blues opens with an expansive and adventurous seven-and-a-half-minute jazz/blues exploration. Saxophonist Keith Pray’s addition of electronica may have you questioning your gear, but once you let go and fall in line, the interplay between the organic and the digital is symbiotic. The give and take of Pray’s sultry sax, Bobby Previte’s drumming, and Dave Gleason’s piano is sublime. Justin Hendricks’s guitar swirls with effortless subtlety until provoked to fierce satisfaction. Bobby Kendall’s bad-ass bass tone holds your hand throughout the six thick tracks, the final piece in a flawless quintet. Everyone finds their place in Pray’s seductive compositions, each brilliantly starring and supporting as called upon, seeking, but never stepping out or on the other. There is space, but never a wasted moment. An apt title for recent global tumult, Universal Blues is an all-originals effort, tapping into blues culture from around the world, with a copacetic landing in Pray’s home base, the Capital District. —Jason Broome

With over three dozen records to his credit already— having leapt from punk and thrash metal to cabaret— New Paltz’s Scott Helland dives guitar-first into James Bond territory with Spy Detective Collective, providing the throwback soundtrack for your next undercover operative. This exhibit of instrumental intrigue is an atmospheric mood setter, a time machine to the retro TV of childhood memory and its popular espionageoriented shows’ theme music: “I Spy,” “Get Smart,” “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,” and others. Helland goes rogue with electric strings and tireless beats, sleuthing through clever titles such as “Perry Mason Exoneration,” “Emma Bella Citronella,” and “Keeping up with the Barnaby Joneses” while honoring iconic secret agents with vigorous performance. Fans of surf music and film noir will also enjoy the mysterious moods and supersonic strumming, as “Coronets for Clouseau and Columbo” and “Gone with the Bond” close the case. Snoop around this for this one. —Haviland S Nichols


books Bright Green Lies Derrick Jensen, Lierre Keith, & Max Wilbert MONKFISH, $24.95, 2021

Rhinebeck publisher Monkfish has released Bright Green Lies: How the Environmental Movement Lost Its Way and What We Can Do About It, a book in conjunction with a film of the same name––both investigations of the mainstream environmental movement’s unwillingness to tell the public that our current industrial civilization is unsustainable. Derrick Jensen, author of 25 books, activist, teacher, and small farmer, works with coauthors Lierre Keith and Max Wilbert to explain that life as we know it in hyperindustrialized countries like the US can’t continue if we want to save the planet. Jensen takes an interdisciplinary stance, merging history, philosophy, environmentalism, economics, and psychology to produce a literary call to arms.

Men I’ve Never Been Michael Sadowski UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN PRESS, $24.95, 2021

Bard College professor Michael Sadowski’s memoir recounts his shunning of his queer identity and sexuality as a boy in order to become the man society wants him to be. In each chapter, Sadowski witnesses a different facet of manhood, drawing on examples from home, school, media, and general social expectations to reject his gayness. The price of becoming the idealized stoic man is emotional isolation, and Sadowski suffers under his self-imposed silence. As he grows older, he learns to accept himself and to find love and purpose, rejecting toxic masculinity for human connection––bringing to light the kinds of lies we tell ourselves about our identities, and the price of maintaining them.

Animal, Vegetable, Junk Mark Bittman

My Time Will Come: A Memoir of Crime, Punishment, Hope and Redemption Ian Manuel PANTHEON, 2021, $25.95

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT, $28, 2021

Subtitled “A History of Food, from Sustainable to Suicidal,” is a look at how our societies have been shaped by human need for food. Bittman, a New York Times bestselling author and Garrison resident, looks forward as well as backward, imagining a better future for the food industry. Food is our most essential fuel, but it can sicken us and our environment; big food industry players largely contribute to climate change, even as farm-to-table movements are sweeping the nation. Bittman knows that food is both past and future, and Animal, Vegetable, Junk is hopeful that we can reshape how we feed ourselves for better personal and environmental health and sustainability.

The Sacred Band James Romm SCRIBNER, $28, 2021

James Romm, classics professor at Bard College, has written a tale of the greatest military corps during the last decades of ancient Greek freedom. The Sacred Band, a unit 300 strong composed of 150 pairs of male lovers, fought to defend Thebes, at the time the leading power of the ancient Greek world. Beginning in 379 BC, when the Sacred Band formed, the story chronicles the 40 years afterward, in which the Sacred Band remained undefeated until their demise, meaning the end of free ancient Greece for 2,000 years. The book chronicles the story of the Sacred Band against the greater backdrop of ancient Greece; power struggles amongst city-states, the fight to maintain democracy, and a rising importance of sexual love in the public sphere.

The Verdigris Pawn Alysa Wishingrad HARPERCOLLINS, $16.99, 2021

Alysa Wishingrad of New Paltz gives us a fantasy young adult novel that tackles systematic injustice and abuse of power. A Junior Library Guild Gold Standard Selection, The Verdigris Pawn features Beau, future successor to his father’s throne, kept locked away as a cog in the wheel of his father’s quest for ultimate dominance over the land that he rules. Beau’s father teaches him that he must be fierce and ruthless, but Beau just can’t seem to follow in his father’s footsteps. Beau doesn’t take control over his life until he meets a girl who reveals to him his father’s secrets, causing him to question the status quo and run away to find a rebel who he hopes will be the catalyst for social change across the land. What Beau doesn’t know is that he just might have the power that he has run away to seek. —Naomi Shammash

Ian Manuel’s tragic, compelling, inspiring, and important memoir is a hard book to read. Not because of any stylistic issues—he is a beautiful writer and an extraordinarily talented poet—but because of the unfiltered story he shares of his experience as a child sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole and the horror of spending nearly two decades in solitary confinement in the Florida state prison system. Solitary confinement is an abusive isolation control management technique that Bryan Stevenson, the founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, says “was justified by misguided protocols and a devastating lack of understanding about adolescent development, mental health, or behavioral science.” Specifically, the labeling of young minority youth in the 1990s as superpredators, so-called “impulsive juvenile criminals who are willing to commit violent crimes without showing any remorse.” It was in this atmosphere, in July of 1990, that Manuel shot Debbie Baigrie during a botched robbery. A young mother, the bullet destroyed much of Baigrie’s lower jaw, blowing out her teeth and gums. While not life threatening, it was a devastating experience that sent Baigrie on a decades-long journey of recovery, including over 40 surgeries to reconstruct her mouth. It was a horrific, heinous crime and Manuel, at 14, was made an example of. Advised by his attorney to plead guilty, Manuel was promised that he would receive a sentence of 15 to 20 years, the first of many times being betrayed by the system. Charged as an adult as per Florida law for a life-or-death felony, he was sentenced to life in prison. “In retrospect, I feel that I was being tried not only for the crimes I had committed, but for proof that I had the right to exist,” Manuel writes. A harsh sentence for a non-homicide offense and terrifying for a child. A child who grew up homeless, in extreme poverty, in violent neighborhoods, and in violent families. Neglected, unprotected, and vulnerable like hundreds of thousands of children in this country who grow up without safety, guidance, or direction and who experience trauma disorders even as toddlers. Many of these children turn to drugs or crime or join gangs for their very survival. “My story has been told many times,” writes Manuel. “You can read it in police files and court records, case notes, and daily logs.” A story told by a judge of his mother being sentenced to prison soon after his birth, or a story told in the case notes of his social worker telling of his removal and return—at five years old—to the room he shared with his abuser. Stories told by juvenile probation officers who found him “a problem to be best managed inside the walls of institutions.” Manuel’s remorse for the pain and suffering he caused Baigrie is genuine and deep. As his second Christmas in prison approached, he called her from prison to apologize and ask for her forgiveness. Deeply moved and surprised by his call and the well written, articulate letters that followed, Baigrie and Manuel developed a strong bond. Even though they had not communicated for over a decade prior to his release in 2016 after 26 years of imprisonment, Baigrie showed up at Manuel’s parole hearing and was an important advocate for his release. Full of unexpected twists and turns as it describes his struggle for survival, Manuel’s story is ultimately one of redemption and forgiveness and the power of the human spirit to heal. “I have reason to believe the experts may have been wrong about me. You see, today, 30 years later, I am neither in prison or dead,” writes Manuel. —Jane Kinney Denning 7/21 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 69


poetry

EDITED BY Phillip X Levine

Kindness

Dear Returns and Exchanges,

She’s a flower Within everyone Waiting to bloom In hard times. Her vibrant colors give Light, Understanding, And trust. But Sometimes she doesn’t bloom And she wilts, Loses her colors to a dull grey Because she loses that strength To give. And in that dark little time, She might just think of herself. She becomes blind to the other wilted flowers, And soon it’s a chain reaction Of selfishness Sadness Hate. And it may seem impossible For things to be alright. Kindness, Now fading into an echo. But there are always more flowers out there Wanting to give Willing to help.

It has most recently befallen me I may be missing an essential element of instructions from a product I purchased from you some years ago. The approximate purchase date was on or around my birth.

—Jahnvi Mundra (14 years old) Thoughts on an Autumn Evening (After Su Tung Po) I dream of a girl with raven hair, but I’m too old for that. My fingers are as cold as the evening dew. Still, my flesh will stir, as a blossom stirs, but the unfolding is too long. My blood can’t move uphill. I look at the young trees, shedding their leaves. I walk in the evening dew. It’s like a field of cotton. I dream of a golden-haired girl and her smooth bottom. I stare at apple trees, but the apples are rotten. —George Freek Are Also Words here are skeletons, scaffolding Picked clean from bodies, times, places Arranged on the page in patterns Calculated to encourage Rehydration, reconstruction, resurrection You are the gods who must breathe life back into these words —Alan Cohen 70 POETRY CHRONOGRAM 7/21

It seems the life I have assembled ceases to work intermittently and without warning. I do not believe in blaming erroneously, but perhaps we might come to a mutual understanding to conclude where I might put upon your department that mentioned culpability. In my search for answers, prior to contacting your department, I began reviewing the instructions already on my person. One of my theories is that there may be missing pages, which you might be so kind as to send to me. These missing pages may be the answer to my dilemma. I can explain briefly the effect the broken product has had on my life, but I understand you are most likely inundated with this particular issue. If I could be so bold, I recommend you construct a department with the sole purpose of assisting consumers like myself to better navigate this defective product and its implicit ramifications. The department could also investigate why the instructions, which should be complete, arrive with missing pages. I do choose, however, to explain the impact of how the lack of instructions has instigated my wobbly life. You see, the importance does not lie in the absence of pages but more so in the effect the missing pages have on one’s ability to utilize the product in relation to the world around them. My reference to “one’s” and “them” derive from my confidence that I am indeed not the first person to be writing you on this matter. As we all most likely do, I require a method to navigate the world around me with a bit of knowledge. Through my experience, without the proper information, one is doomed to fail, whether in work, relationships, or even something as simple as a hobby. At this time, I place the burden solely on you to provide me with the answer, inductions, and perhaps a refund to rectify this tragic situation. I place complete sureness you understand my predicament. Yours Truly, Ms. Common Variablé —Julianne DeMartino

Paradise

Old Love

When you were a little painter, every line, color, came from me; floating not on any foundation, time and time again, you saw me through the clouds. When you were not a painter, you forgot me. You needed something solid to sit on or stand up. When you pick up brush again, you try to paint me, but cannot find me. You think you can reconstruct from your memory; a river, trees full of foliage, abundant fruits, a bungalow, couple of hammocks…. But you cannot remember the color, or how it floated.

Old love is slow. I look up from my Sunday paper at you cooking breakfast. “How would you like your eggs?”

—Livingston Rossmoor

—Mark Philip Stone

“Over easy.” I drawl in a soft tone and remember how you rolled over easy to me last night with your lips eager to taste my warm flesh. “Over easy, it is.” as you cock your hip remembering the heat that poured from your breasts as we embraced. After you’ve flipped the eggs and removed the pan from the flame, you turn to me and smile; remembering.

Is There Not? is there not a point b e t w e e n two points that a man can rest —Stephen Jones


New York, You’re Hardest in February

Moving at 80

New York you are hardest in February, but you are my everything. FDNY trucks of my dreamer child, who believes things are greater than they are.

It takes time to decouple, time to sever the relationship— except in memory where the bond holds— between this body and the body of a home that, like another layer of skin, coats my mind. But at a certain life stage time doesn’t wait for me to catch up; it signals compliance— and that assent is the saving balm.

My everythings are hiding here, Asleep in New York. Theaters asleep, laughing basements asleep. My leaving isn’t because I don’t love you. It’s because you aren’t here. Where did you go? Are you under the snow? Are you hiding in Macaulay Culkin’s loft, under his shoe rack? Or maybe you’re around the corner from Erica’s Reggio, behind the garbage can on the basketball court. Or did that smug bastard Lou Reed take you? Stole you in the night while we had our backs turned. Stole you while we were gawking at P.S. Hoffman, looking for his keys in a nice neighborhood. Do you need me to spell out Philip Seymour Hoffman for you New York? New York, I know you’re in here. Lou Reed, did you save MTV? That’s not important now. Is the Statue of Liberty where you are? Vapid and nauseous in the penny stenched crown? Where are you?! I’m getting upset. I’m getting upset, New York and there is nowhere to go with my feelings. Nowhere to hang my paintings. Nowhere to scream my punk. Nowhere to dance my song. Nowhere to take this gloom to but SUNNY LA! Fuck you New York. You are hardest in February. I didn’t know this but I’m starting to believe Patti Smith has a car!? A SECRET KIA???? Oh, this doesn’t look good Lou. New York are you hiding in Patti’s trunk? Under Mexican blankets and floral sheets of sand. Oh, fuck you New York and my sick need for abandonment. —Heather Craig Acceptance The whole length of the sky, Chopped, the breadth of the oceans is smashed, Affection feels like a betrayal Every time skin wins the battle against the Raw heart and mind. I have heard that You are happiest around water. Will you accept my love if I pour my tears over the lingam? —Nidhi Agrawal Full submission guidelines: Chronogram.com/submissions

—Lyla Yastion

For My Children I stare at the handcuff around my wrist and try to calm my heart rate until I am at fake peace with the chains of my bondage. I don’t want to tell a tall tale, this is not the Jews in Egypt or the southern Blacks in America but it is my life and how can anything be more meaningful than that? But I see those vulnerable, dependent faces in my mind’s eye without even trying. It turns out there is more to live for than my own needs and desireshow to weigh the cost is the thing, the unknown component of the works. I see a picture of my wife behind meit is one of the old, good pictures of her sparking nothing but positive nostalgia. It’s a sigh of resignation from herea sigh that lights the road ahead as far as the eye can see and the mind can imagine —Drew Nacht

In the Valley I walk north where garlic mustard grows along the highway; heart-shaped leaves, clusters of tiny white stars. The narrow trail I take into the woods, leading to a brook where deer drink, skirting a deserted property where deer forage, taking me back toward David’s house, is bordered with these slender stalks. I never noticed them before but now I see them everywhere; they nod to me in Manhattan along the walkways in the park. Back and forth, Beacon and the City, I flow like the Hudson River, called the Mahicantuck by the Lenape, river that moves in both directions. —Joanne Grumet 7/21 CHRONOGRAM POETRY 71


Rosemarie Trockel, Vater Morgana, 2001 Acrylic on paper 41 1/2" x 36 5/8" Marieluise Hessel Collection, Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College. Courtesy of the artist and Sprüth Magers.

72 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 7/21


the guide

Takako Yamaguchi, Magnificat #6, 1984 Oil, bronze leaf, and glitter on paper, two parts, overall 74" × 107 1/2". Deutsche Bank Collection. Photo by Liz Ligon

Closer & Closer

“Closer to Life: Drawings and Works on Paper in the Marieluise Hessel Collection,” through October 17 “With Pleasure,” through November 28 Ccs.bard.edu “Often exhibitions built around collections are nauseatingly tedious,” Tom Eccles explains. He is executive director of the Center for Curatorial Studies (CCS) at Bard College. The show he recently co-curated, “Closer to Life: Drawings and Works on Paper in the Marieluise Hessel Collection,” manages to avoid tedium. The exhibition, which marks the 30th anniversary of the CCS, will remain on view until October 17. The Center for Curatorial Studies was the first graduate school for curators in North America, and exists because of a bequest by Marieluise Hessel in 1992. Her gift of 439 artworks has since expanded to 1,745 items. “It’s a bit of a Cinderella story,” Eccles says of Hessel’s life. Raised poor in postwar Bavaria, Hessel impulsively entered a beauty contest at the age of 19, won, and went on to become Miss Germany. After a year of all-expenses-paid touring, she married the industrialist Egon Hessel, and moved to Mexico City, where his bicycle factory was located. When her husband died in 1980, Hessel relocated to New York City, where she has lived ever since. “Closer to Life” roughly follows the history of her life: one room for Mexican art, one for German work, one for New York artists. One gallery is based on the display of

drawings in Hessel’s study. There is a politics to art-buying. Hessel invested in women artists when they were considered secondrate, and in scruffy provocateurs like Raymond Pettibon, who began his art career drawing cartoons for punk rock posters. A collector can give a fledgling artist recognition—and rent money. In fact, there are many Cinderella stories in the art world. Today, at the age of 82, Hessel is acquiring works as avidly as ever. In recent years, she has focused on art from the African diaspora. The CCS encourages the museum directors of the future to take similar risks—to move beyond a “greatest hits” approach to exhibition design. Lorna Simpson’s 7 Mouths is a simple experiment: seven photographs of the same mouth, arranged vertically, creating a palpable sevenfold silence. Kara Walker’s Look Away! Look Away! Look Away! is a parody of revisionist Southern art, celebrating antebellum plantation life as an innocent paradise. Nearly life-size silhouettes show gentle, playful teasing between masters and slaves. The title—a quote from “Dixie,” of course—reminds us of all the American suffering we turn away from. The show is not entirely works on paper. There are

several cloth pieces, including Felt Suit, a gray jacket and pants made of felt that simultaneously resembles a prison uniform and a shaman’s cloak. It’s by deadpan trickster Joseph Beuys. Nick Cave’s Hustle Coat is an ordinary trench coat on the outside, with a baroque full-length vest inlaid with watches and glittering costume jewelry—representing, perhaps, the inner riches we hide beneath our clothing? The whole piece hangs from a hook shaped like a hand. Franz Erhard Walther’s Untitled is a large book made of cloth, with no writing: a minimalist “novel” a toddler could love. One role of a curator is to inform you, the gallery goer, of new or neglected artists. The second show at the Hessel, “With Pleasure,” does precisely this. It celebrates the Pattern and Decoration movement, an exuberant, festive art style that flourished in America during the 1970s and 1980s. Young artists and art audiences are drawn to the saturated colors and rhythms of this art, which sometimes quotes tribal artifacts. Originally mounted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the exhibition includes 12 pieces from the Hessel collection. It will run until November 28. —Sparrow 7/21 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 73


Contemporary Theatre Alternative Cabaret Storytelling

THE SHORT LIST

A cultural crib sheet for the month of July

2021 Season

“The Most Spectacularly Lamentable Trial of Miz Martha Washington” at Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival

We’re thrilled to announce AOH AFIELD—a summer hybrid season that combines free virtual programs with LIVE, in-person events at outdoor locations across the beautiful Roe-Jan region.

ACE Summer Arts Festival Kick-Off

Joseph Keckler

We are closely following the protocols established by the state as part of NY FORWARD. www.ancramoperahouse.org

Graham Martini: Synapses July 7 – 31

Opening Reception July 10, 2021 6 – 9pm

Connective Tissue, 2020, Mixed Media on Panel

James Ijames's “The Most Spectacularly Lamentable Trial of Miz Martha Washington,” staged by the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival at Boscobel, examines America’s original sin: slavery. The 2018 play centers on the drama of the impending death of George Washington’s widow Martha, whose passing, by decree, will mean freedom for the enslaved people at Mount Vernon. July 24-30 in Gardiner. Hvshakespeare.org

Presented by Ulster County’s new Arts Collaborative Events (ACE), the inaugural ACE Summer Festival commences at Opus 40 with a free celebration featuring Arm-of-the-Sea Theater, Art Society of Kingston (ASK), Center for Photography at Woodstock, Rock Academy, Unison Arts, and others. Preregistration required. July 10 at 1pm and 3pm in Saugerties. Opus40.org

Miro String Quartet at Maverick Concerts One of America’s most acclaimed string quartets, the Miro String Quartet, returns to the nation’s longest-running summer chamber music festival, Maverick Concerts. The celebrated quartet is comprised of Daniel Ching (violin), William Fedkenheuer (violin), John Largess (viola), and Joshua Gindele (cello). July 25 at 4pm in Woodstock. Maverickconcerts.org

Pam Tanowitz/Jessie Montgomery Dance Premiere Bard College’s 2021 SummerScape festival opens outdoors at historic Montgomery Place with the world premiere of I was waiting for the echo of a better day, a new commission from Fisher Center inaugural choreographer in residence Pam Tanowitz with composer Jessie Montgomery. July 8-10 in Annandale-on-Hudson. Bard.edu

89 VINEYARD AVE HIGHLAND, NY studio89hv.com

“Row” at the Clark Art Institute Dawn Landes’s new musical, “Row,” will premiere outdoors at the Clark Art Institute via the Williamstown Theatre Festival. Inspired by A Pearl in the Storm by Tori Murden McClure and directed by Tyne Rafaeli, the play tells the tale of an extraordinary woman undeterred by the odds. July 13-August 8 in Williamstown, Massachusetts. Wtfestival.org

Pilobus at the Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center The Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center welcomes live (limited-capacity) indoor programming back this summer with “Four@Play” by the award-winning Pilobolus contemporary dance company. The program features a group of four Pilobolus dancers in a “mixtape” of vintage favorites. July 31 at 1pm, 4pm, and 7pm in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Mahaiwe.org

2econd Saturday Hudson Gallery Crawl On the second Saturday of each month, Hudson’s art galleries, shops, restaurants, bars, food trucks, and other businesses will stay open late as visitors wander to take in displays of new works by exhibiting artists and enjoy pop-performances and other attractions. July 10 in Hudson. Hudsongallerycrawl.com

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1ST PLACE

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“Mystery in the Mine” in Rosendale Local theatrical troupe Murder Cafe will stage an original whodunit in the historic Widow Jane Mine for three performances this month. Set in 1889, the play portrays several historic figures who impacted the local business and arts scene. Tickets are $20. July 15-17 in Rosendale. Murdercafe.net

Catskill Mountain Yoga Festival How does the idea of practicing yoga under a blue sky on top of a mountain sound? The Catskill Mountain Yoga Festival is a family-friendly event at Plattekill Mountain centering on a variety of classes in yoga and meditation led by visiting instructors from across the country. July 24 in Roxbury. Catskillmountainyogafestival.com

Avant-Garde-Arama in Woodstock Avant-Garde-Arama, a festival of short works of dance, film, music, performance art, poetry, and puppetry founded in 1980 at New York’s PS122 by performance artist Charles Dennis and musician/visual artist Jeffrey Isaac, takes over Mountain View Studio for one weekend this month. July 24-25 in Woodstock. Mtnviewstudio.com —Peter Aaron


NIKOLAI ASTRUP: VISIONS OF NORWAY THROUGH SEPTEMBER 19

Discover the paintings and prints of one of Norway’s most beloved artists

Nikolai Astrup, Growing Season at Sandalstrand (detail), linoleum and woodblock, 1923; print, 1923. Savings Bank Foundation DNB / The Astrup Collection / KODE Art Museums of Bergen.

CLAUDE & FRANÇOIS-XAVIER LALANNE: NATURE TRANSFORMED THROUGH OCTOBER 31

See the first North American museum exhibition in 40 years devoted to Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne’s madly inventive and irresistible world of objects

WILLIAMSTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS CLARKART.EDU Nikolai Astrup: Visions of Norway is generously supported by the Savings Bank Foundation DNB. Support for Claude & François-Xavier Lalanne: Nature Transformed is provided by Denise Littlefield Sobel, Sylvia and Leonard Marx, and the Kenneth C. Griffin Charitable Fund. Claude Lalanne, Choupatte (Cabbagefeet), 2017. Galvanized copper. Private collection © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

7/21 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 75


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live music

Modern English plays Daryl's House in Pawling July 7.

caption tk

Jim Campilongo

July 3. Roots-rocking New York guitarist Jim Campilongo is a treasured Falcon fave, and his return to the waterfalls-side Ulster County bistro is a sure sign that summer music is back in swing. Although the Telecaster-wielding firebrand is widely known for his membership in the Norah Jones-fronted supergroup the Little Willies, his expansive resume also includes his own bands as well as work with Nels Cline, Cake, J. J. Cale, Charlie Hunter, Teddy Thompson, Peter Rowan, Martha Wainwright, NRBQ’s Al Anderson, and others. (Fantastic Cat saunters in July 17; the Kenny Roby Band plays July 23.) 7pm. Donation requested. Reservations encouraged. Marlboro. Liveatthefalcon.com

Modern English

July 7. Rescheduled from a 2020 date that fell victim to the pandemic is this engagement at Daryl’s House by 1980s new wave hitmakers Modern English. MTV legends for their video-driven 1982 smash “I Melt with You,” the UK group formed in their native Colchester in 1979 and signed to the seminal 4AD label the following year. (Notably, “I Melt with You” was a pop-y departure from the postpunk band’s comparatively darker and less commercial early repertoire.) Although the group broke up in 1987 and briefly reunited in 1991, lead singer Robbie Grey has led the reactivated outfit since 1995. Bootblacks open. (Mutlu makes time for a visit July 9; Sean Rowe sings July 16.) 7pm. $40. Pawling. Darylshouseclub.com

Let It Be Tribute

Donavon Frankenreiter

Upstate Reggae 40th Anniversary Series

Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats

July 10. During the making of Let It Be, their 12th and final album, the Beatles famously played a concert on a London rooftop. This celebration of the album by an all-star ensemble of local musicians, however, will be on the stage of the Bearsville Theater, not its roof. No complaints, though: It’s gratifying to once again be talking up an actual in-person live event at the recently renovated venue. Leading this performance of the full Beatles album plus bonus material is bassist Scott Petito (the Fugs), who has also steered projects celebrating The White Album, Traffic, Steely Dan, and Joni Mitchell. (The Sweet Clementines and Tracy Bonham team up July 23; Gratefully Yours honors the Dead on July 31.) 8pm. $35. Bearsville. Bearsvilletheater.com

July 17-October 16. Overseen by promoter Leah Boss, the Upstate Reggae organization has been booking exceptional reggae riddims around the Hudson Valley since 1981. To celebrate its four decades, Boss has assembled a town-wide series that kicks off this month to bring events to several Woodstock-area venues. The string of happenings begins with Boston band Mighty Mystic (July 17; Bearsville Theater) and continues with reggae DJs and Jamaican food (August 6; the Station Bar and Curio), the Big Takeover (August 7; Bearsville Theater), acts TBA (Colony; August 8), the Wailers (September 9; Bearsville Theater), and a Peter Tosh tribute (October 16; Bearsville Theater). See website for times and ticket prices. Facebook.com/leah.boss

July 20. Singer-songwriter Donavon Frankenreiter’s sunny, laid-back tunes reflect his other life as a professional surfer. Here, he and his long-time accompanist Matt Grundy return to preferred area haunt Infinity Hall on “The Record Player Tour,” which finds them playing along on stage to a vinyl copy of Bass & Drums Tracks, Frankenreiter’s 2019 album comprised mainly of rhythm-section-only versions of his fan-favorite originals. Aficionados of similarly earnest and quiet contemporary tunespinners like Jack Johnson, Ray LaMontagne, Todd Snider, and Dave Matthews should take note. (Tusk pays tribute to Fleetwood Mac on July 9; the Cast of Beatlemania gets back July 24.) 7pm. $39-$54. Norfolk, Connecticut. Infinityhall.com

July 31. With their soulful brew of upbeat Americana, it’s not surprising that Colorado’s Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats would find a formidable fanbase right here in the Hudson Valley—this is, after all, the land the Band built. No doubt the beards and denim will be thick and strong on the lawn when the band ascends to the glorious heights of Belleayre Mountain for this openair summer hoedown sponsored by Radio Woodstock. Although of course Rateliff’s eight-piece outfit had to wait out last year’s lockdown before rolling back out on the road again, they’ve been riding high since a February appearance on “Saturday Night Live.” The Marcus King Band and Allison Russell open. 7pm. $59$169. Highmount. Belleayre.com —Peter Aaron 7/21 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 77


art

Shona McAndrew's Just the three of us at Art Omi Photo by Bryan Zimmerman

Three’s Company

Just the three of us by Shona McAndrew at Art Omi through August 29 Artomi.org In early June I came upon an unexpected and delightful scene: a life-sized papier-mâché living room filled with a trio of half-clothed females looking comfortably stoned, holding space together, pigging out on snacks, and focused on each other while offering us a peek into their intimate womanly sphere. This is the artist Shona McAndrew’s (b. 1990) creative world—Just the three of us—and it is gleefully fun. Every single object in this colorful, contained environment—170 objects total—was lovingly crafted by McAndrew, and it is stunning thing to behold a reality rendered entirely of paper. Known for her papier-mâché sculptures, digital collages, and paintings that depict women in private moments, McAndrew draws from her personal pleasures and experiences. Her art is also beautifully honest in its portrayal of women’s bodies and related themes. Perhaps one of the most contested issues in the field of art theory, the idea of the “gaze” is often fraught with notions of male desire, sex, and objectification. This installation by McAndrew repositions the gaze among women as to foster a celebratory mood that appears to be one-part comedy sketch—we can almost hear the witty banter—and one-part therapy session— what exactly are they discussing in this enamored moment? With an intentional sense of arrangement and placement, the artist has created a relaxed atmosphere that we can enjoy with her winsome threesome. McAndrew studied psychology and painting during 78 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 7/21

her undergraduate years at Brandeis University and she did her MFA at RISD. Her art reflects a combination of the psychological dynamics of womanhood and an expert handling of her chosen material. With this show at Art Omi, McAndrew has orchestrated an elaborate composition that is both curiously cerebral and artfully calculated—Just the three of us is a 3D story, one that brings us in on several levels. At closer inspection, everything about this domestic scene hints at a narrative beyond what we are seeing. Peering down from the top of the bookshelf, for example, is a doyenne in the form of an ancient Grecian bust—she smiles overhead with puckered red lips like a jubilant grandmother. Her historical form recalls the Three Graces from classical mythology, a natural allegory with respect to Just the three of us. To the left of the bookshelf is a portrait of an old woman wrapped in a shawl—she glares at us from a time and place long ago as compared with the jovial contemporary energy of the room. Are these representations of a family legacy or are they symbolic traces of a more conservative era for women? In either case, we get the feeling that all of these ladies are purposefully positioned within the maidenly picture. There are several overtly feminine references that are amusing tropes in their own right: the rug is patterned with boobs and nipples, unopened tampons are littered about, and an enormous pink bra below the couch proposes a night of bare-breasted freedom.

Here the hackneyed cliche of the single, middle-aged “cat lady” stereotype—as suggested by the prominent cat-scratching tower and “World’s best cat mom” coffee mug—does not detract from the spectacle due to McAndrew’s admirable command over the fine art of papier-mâché. And among the most compelling moments of this female love-fest is the copy of Hayden Herrera’s Frida biography on the lamp stand—the detailed drawing of Kahlo on the cover is one of the most precious aspects of the installation. As a cannabis enthusiast, I was charmed by McAndrew’s candid presentation of marijuana as part of this tableau vivant. Besides the presence of a canister of weed, rolling papers, and several thick joints poised to be burned (and two ashtrays with no less than five blunt butts), the table is distinctly arranged with everything one could need after a proper smoke-out with friends: chips, hummus, ice cream, cans of Stella Artois, a pack of Marlboro cigarettes, a bowl of purple M&Ms, and a heaping plate of Oreos. The blissful energy among these figures is palpable, and I found myself smiling giddily as I realized the full scope of the stoner scene. As I was preparing to leave a group of three women entered the space and one blurted out, “Look, it’s us!” as she came upon the exhibit. That moment warmed my heart in the same way that McAndrew’s work kindles a realm of earthly delights that is both silly and sincere. —Taliesin Thomas


Mario Merz Long-term view

Dia Beacon 3 Beekman Street Beacon, New York

Gallery hours: Thursday 12–5, Friday–Saturday 12–6, Sunday 12–5

Artist Lisa Samalin

At the Juncture of Dark and Light July 10–August 15 OPENING Sat. July 10, 12–6pm Free Artist Talk July17, 3pm Special Event Aug 7, more info TBA Check our website for upcoming events & performances © Lisa Samalin

www.11janestreet.com

SCULP TURE & ARC H ITECTURE PARK

KENISE BARNES FINE ART KBFA.COM

7 FULLING LANE | KENT, CT Explore Contemporary Art in a Stunning Natural Landscape Open daily from dawn to dusk.

Register in advance for your visit at artomi.org

7/21 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 79


X Ensemble & Safe Harbors of the Hudson Presents A Free Concert of Modern Chamber music by

With Original music by Neil Alexander

SAFE HARBORS GREEN Corner Liberty & Ann St, Newburgh NY Rain Date Sunday July 18th

Bring Chairs/Blanket - Enjoy a Picnic Dinner Special takeout menu available from the

W H EREH OUSE RESTAURANT 1 1 9 L i b e r t y S t N e w b u rg h

W W W. X E N S E M B L E . O R G

Antique Fair and Flea Market

ROCKET NUMBER NINE RECORDS

Painting by Sean Sullivan

The best selection of used and new vinyl in the Hudson Valley

TURN THOSE UNPLAYED RECORDS INTO CASH! We are looking to buy vinyl record collections in good condition. Rock, jazz, blues, and soul. Email us today for an appointment rocketnumber9records@gmail.com 845 331 8217 • 50 N. FRONT ST. UPTOWN KINGSTON Open Friday–Monday. Check hours on FB.

KSA Portrait #1 (Noura Alqahtani), 2019

The Re Institute

May 1-2, 2021 July 31 - August 1, 2021 at the

WASHINGTON COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Rt. 29, GREENWICH, NY (12 mi. East of Saratoga Springs, NY)

$5 admission,

(65+ $4, under-16 - FREE)

Old-Fashioned Antique Show featuring 220+ dealers, free parking, great food, and real bathrooms. ($10 - Early Buyers Fridays before show)

$90 - Dealer Spaces Still Available: FAIRGROUND SHOWS NY PO Box 528, Delmar NY 12054 www.fairgroundshows.com fairgroundshows@aol.com Ph. 518-331-5004

VERA KAPLAN - LARGE PAINTINGS ON CANVAS

Brenda Zlamany The Itinerant Portraitist, 2011-2021 Open Saturday from 1pm to 4pm & by appointment Wed. & Fri. nights TheReInstitute.com Millerton, NY

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Commissions Welcome Participant: Labor Day Artists Studio Views - Rhinebeck Contact verakaplan@yahoo.com or 845-546-1349 cell

80 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 7/21


theater

High Art

Joseph Keckler at Ancram Opera House July 24 Ancramoperahouse.org Although the themes explored in the art of Joseph Keckler parallel the rich, free-ranging diversity of the mediums he operates within—music, acting, storytelling, writing, painting, performance art—his breakthrough creation is concerned with a particular topic: tripping balls. “Shroom Aria,” Keckler’s hilariously weird, operatic account of an experience with psychedelic mushrooms, portrayed in a suitably surreal animated video by Liam Lynch, gained him web-wide recognition in 2013. Declared Best Downtown Performance Artist by the Village Voice and further exalted by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other publications, the Kalamazoo, Michigan-born, classically trained bassbaritone singer recently authored a book, Dragon at the Edge of a Flat World; taped an NPR “Tiny Desk Concert” that debuted last month; and has appeared at Lincoln Center, Paris’s Pompidou Center, and other celebrated venues. On July 24 at 8pm, Joseph Keckler will perform at the Ancram Opera House in Ancramdale. Tickets are $35, with reservations required. Keckler answered the questions below by email. —Peter Aaron It was the blues that initially attracted you to singing—in particular, the blues of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, whose “I Put a Spell on You” you still perform today. What was it about Hawkins and the blues that spoke to you as a junior high schooler in southwest Michigan? “I Put a Spell on You” is overdone, yet it really is one of the best songs. Menacing, seductive, and unhinged, it is about desperately resorting to magical thinking, or to magic itself. That’s a matter of perspective. What did I like about Screamin’ Jay? I just responded to his style. Unsurprisingly, I didn’t analyze this much at age 11. To analyze now, though, it was probably his marriage of the sublime and the ridiculous. He’s a god disguised

as a novelty act: funny and serious, with an edge. His recording of “Spell” was banned on the radio because of the “cannibalistic” sounds he made. This was a deeply racist censorship. Still, he was a provocateur. In the case of blues in general, I imagine I was responding to the direct narration of daily life; the revelation, the transformation of daily life. I’m sure it was influential: however different, my work has turned out also to be half story and half music, and all about locating dramatic undercurrents in daily life. Not long after you’d immersed yourself in the blues, you became interested in opera, which is certainly uncommon for a Midwestern kid of your generation. What was it that drew you to opera and made you want to become an opera singer at such a young age? Which composers, singers, and operas first grabbed you, and what made them so compelling? I actually wasn’t sure what I wanted to become—or I sensed I wanted to become something complicated— mission accomplished, maybe? I went on to study visual art, yet I trained vocally at the same time. My voice, more than I, seemed to want to sing operatically, so it led me in that direction, like a leashed creature. The first operatic recording I possessed and responded to was Jessye Norman’s recording of Dido & Aeneas by Purcell. I was introduced to classical singing by a voice teacher. I was intrigued by this whole elevated plane of drama upon which opera played; the purity of tone; also by the mysterious discipline within the form and the connoisseurship that surrounded it. In 2019 you toured with indie rock icons SleaterKinney, playing in large halls and clubs across the US. What was that like? Had you appeared on many rock bills prior? How was your cabaret-like set received by Sleater-Kinney’s audiences, and how

did the experience affect you as a performer? Yes, I’ve shared bills with rock acts in more underground settings numerous times, but I absolutely loved touring with Sleater-Kinney. I was shown immense love by the group and their audience. [Band members] Carrie Brownstein and Corin Tucker had written [the song] “The Future is Here” after seeing me play in Los Angeles. The shows themselves were exhilarating. I liked it all—the energy, context, schedule, and scale. Other than making me regret all the less-fun things I’d put energy into in the past, the experience presented no negatives. I also slept better on that tour bus than I ever have—was it the coffin-like pod that so comforted me? The constant motion? Lack of oxygen? Like most artists, you were unable to perform to live audiences for the past year, due to the pandemic. What did you do during the downtime? How has COVID shaped your art? At the end of the pandemic, I put together an NPR Tiny Desk concert with some of my favorite collaborators, and it just came out. Before that, I wrote and published four essays, wrote a few songs, another TV script, a film script, did vocal exercises and—to brag further— drank no alcohol for a year. I was very happy being utterly alone for nine months, but after that I felt bad and went insane. You gave a well-received performance at the Ancram Opera House in 2016. What should people expect when they attend your show (rescheduled from 2020) there this month? Now that I’m insane, who knows? But I’m trying to vary the set from last time and share some work I haven’t played up there before and even a little material I wrote during the pandemic.

7/21 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 81


exhibits

James Kitchen, Saturn, part of SculptureNow 2021 at The Mount in Lenox, Massachusetts

11 JANE ST

ART SALES & RESEARCH

“At the Juncture of Dark and Light.” Work by Lisa Samalin. July 10-August 15.

“July Group Show.” Stanley Rosen, Anne Brown, and others. July 2-25.

AIRFIELD

ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER

“Jahsiya Oliver, Claude Lawrence, Sylvia Snowden.” July 3-18. “Exene Karros and Paschke.” July 23-August 8.

11 JANE STREET, SAUGERTIES

26 STREET, KINGSTON

THE ALDRICH CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM 258 MAIN STREET, RIDGEFIELD, CT “After the Mobile: Tim Prentice.” Through October 4. “Lucia Hierro: Marginal Costs.” Through January 2, 2022.

CORNELL CREATIVE BUSINESS & ARTS CENTER

HESSEL MUSEUM OF ART/CCS BARD

129 CORNELL STREET, KINGSTON

BARD COLLEGE, ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON

“Motorcycle Show.” July 3-August 22.

“IDEA: Inclusion, Diversity, Equity in America.” A collaborative social justice art exhibit presented with New Horizons Resources, Arc Mid-Hudson, and Cornell Creative Arts Center. Through July 31.

“Closer to Life: Drawings and Works on Paper in the Marieluise Hessel Collection.” June 26-October 17. “With Pleasure: Pattern and Decoration in American Art 1972–1985.” June 26-November 28.

BARRETT HOUSE ART CENTER

CREATE CATSKILL GALLERY

HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF WOODSTOCK

“Slipping Over The Dark Hills.” A retrospective of Eric Lindbloom, Nancy Willard, and Judith Lindbloom. July 3-24.

"Rebirth Renew Revive." Group show. July 22-August 31.

BAU GALLERY

409 WARREN STREET, HUDSON

CLINTON CORNERS

24 SECOND STREET, ATHENS

55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE.

506 MAIN STREET, BEACON

398 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL

D'ARCY SIMPSON ART WORKS “UNGUNS: Will Squibb.” Sculptures of transformed weapons. Through December 31.

ALEXANDER GRAY ASSOCIATES, GERMANTOWN

“Compassion for the Stones.” Sascha Mallon installation. July 10-August 8. “Illuminated Clay.” Experimental ceramics by Eileen Sackman. July 10-August 8.

“Subliminal Horizons.” July 2-August 15.

BUSTER LEVI GALLERY

121 MAIN STREET, COLD SPRING

Works by Lee Ufan, Sam Gilliam, Barry Le Va, Richard Serra, Mario Merz, and others on long-term view.

“Affinities: Lynn Kotula and Friends.” July 3-August 1.

FAHRENHEIT 451 HOUSE

BYRDCLIFFE KLEINERT/JAMES CENTER FOR THE ARTS

“UnWalled.” Work by Corrine May Botz, Brenda Coultas, and Elana Herzog. Through August 29.

“Flashcard Memorials: Works by Judy Glantzman." July 3-August 15.

FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER AT VASSAR COLLEGE

224 MAIN STREET, GERMANTOWN

ART GALLERY 71

71 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK “Synapses.” Works by Evelyn LaStella and others. July 1-30.

ARTPORT

108 EAST STRAND STREET, KINGSTON “Blossom Return.” Kwadwo Andae, Betsy Friedman, Sara Jessie Kane, Slink Moss, Katy Schneider, Laura Stein, Rachel Urkowitz, and Guy Walker. Through July 25.

ARTS SOCIETY OF KINGSTON 97 BROADWAY, KINGSTON

“Landscapes, Waterscapes, and Escapes.” Paintings by Andrea Park and photographs by Terry Haas. July 3-August 3.

ARTSEE GALLERY

529 WARREN STREET, HUDSON “Fabulous! A Photographic Diary of Studio 54.” Bobby Miller’s photos of the iconic disco. Through August 31.

82 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 7/21

36 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK

CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY

622 WARREN STREET, HUDSON “New Work.” Featuring Alaina Enslen, Jeanette Fintz, Anne Francey, Jenny Nelson. Through August 1.

CLARK ART INSTITUTE

225 SOUTH STREET, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA “Erin Shirreff: Remainders.” Through January 2. “Claude & François-Xavier Lalanne: Nature Transformed.” Sculpture. Through October 31. “Nikolai Astrup: Visions of Norway.” Paintings. June 19-September 19. “Durer & After”. Works by Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528). July 17-October 3.

DIA:BEACON

3 BEEKMAN STREET, BEACON

451 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL

124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE

“Tilled Fields: Drawings by Harry Roseman.” July 3-September 12. “Time Capsule, 1970: Rauschenberg’s Currents.” June 26-September 19.

20 COMEAU DRIVE, WOODSTOCK "Seasons: Catching Nature’s Cycle." Landscapes from the Historical Society Collection. Through September 5.

HILO ART

365 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL “Simeon Amstutz and Ketshidile Tiro Matale.” Through August 1.

HOLLAND TUNNEL GALLERY

46 CHAMBERS STREET, NEWBURGH “Alejandro Dron and Johan Wahlstrom.” Through July 18.

HUDSON HALL

327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON “Hudson Talbott: River of Dreams.” The first retrospective of the artist’s work. Through August 15.

HUDSON VALLEY MOCA

1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL “How We Live, Part II.” Through January 31.

JOYCE GOLDSTEIN GALLERY

19 CENTRAL SQUARE, CHATHAM

FRIDMAN GALLERY

“Intercessions.” Bobbi Moline-Kramer and James Singelis. Through July 10.

“TimeLapse.” Group show. July 3-August 22.

LABSPACE

475 MAIN STREET, BEACON

GEARY CONTEMPORARY

34 MAIN STREET, MILLERTON "The Burning Kite." Group show. Through July 25.

2642 NY ROUTE 23, HILLSDALE “Kurt & Courtney: Never-before seen photos from the collaborative photography duo Guzman.” July 10-August 30.

To submit art exhibits for the gallery guide, visit Chronogram.com/submitevent. The deadline for print inclusion is the 10th of the month prior to publication.


exhibits Robert Rauschenberg, Surface Series from Currents #48, 1970, screenprint. Princeton University Art Museum, Gift of Arthur A. Goldberg, © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Showing as part of “Time Capsule, 1970: Rauschenberg's Currents” at Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center

LOCKWOOD GALLERY

747 ROUTE 28, WEST HURLEY “Melissa Stern: Stronger Than Dirt.” A 20-year retrospective. Through July 11.

LONGYEAR GALLERY

785 MAIN STREET, MARGARETVILLE “Deborah Ruggerio & Gary Mayer.” Paintings, plus members’ group show. Through June 7. Marilyn Silver and Gerda Van Leeuwen. Plus members’ show. June 11-July 5.

MAGAZZINO ITALIAN ART

2700 ROUTE 9, COLD SPRING “Nivola: Sandscapes.” 50 works of sandcast sculpting by Costantino Nivola (1911-1988). Through January 10.

MARK GRUBER GALLERY

433 WARREN STREET, HUDSON “Couples.” Paintings by artistic duos. June 5-July 24.

THE MOUNT

2 PLUNKETT STREET, LENOX, MA “SculptureNow 2021.” Through October 13.

NEWBURGH VINTAGE EMPORIUM 5006 ROUTE 9W, NEWBURGH

“New Enlightened Views.” Invitational exhibition of Hudson Valley landscape artists curated by the Historical Society of Newburgh and sponsored by the Newburgh Vintage Emporium Warehouse. Through July 31.

OLANA STATE HISTORIC SITE 5720 ROUTE 9G, HUDSON

“Cross Pollination: Heade, Cole, Church, and Our Contemporary Moment.” Paintings by Martin Johnson Heade plus site-specific artwork inspired by Heade, Cole, and Church. June 12-October 31.

OLIVE FREE LIBRARY

4033 ROUTE 28A, WEST SHOKAN “Between Wind and Water.” Work by 17 visual artists, writers, and photographers who traveled together to Orkney, Scotland. Through July 10.

OPUS 40

50 FITE ROAD, SAUGERTIES “Laura Battle: New Work.” June 17-July 30.

PAMELA SALISBURY GALLERY

362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON “Ron Milewicz: The Rhythm of Silence.” Paintings. Through July 25. “Wendy Ewald: Portraits and Dreams.” Photographs by children of the Appalachians, 1976-1982. Through July 25.

PINKWATER GALLERY

56 NORTH FRONT STREET, KINGSTON "Pinkwater Gallery à la Maison." Ongoing.

THE RE INSTITUTE

1395 BOSTON CORNERS ROAD, MILLERTON “Brenda Zlamany: The Itinerant Portraitist.” July 3-September 18.

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART 1 HAWK DRIVE, NEW PALTZ

“Dirt: Inside Landscapes.” Through July 11. “Kathy Goodell: Infra-Loop, Selections 1994—2020.” Through July 11. “Lewis Hine, Child Labor Investigator.” Through July 11. "Hudson Valley Artists 2021: Who Really Cares?" 14th annual Hudson Valley artists exhibition. Curated by Helen Toomer. July 7-November 14.

THE SCHOOL | JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY 25 BROAD STREET, KINDERHOOK

“Feedback." Sanford Biggers, John Buck, Becky Suss, Roy Dowell, and others. Through Through October 30.

SEPTEMBER

449 WARREN STREET, HUDSON “Strong Winds May Exist.” Paintings and works on paper by Annie Bielski. Through July 25.

THE WASSAIC PROJECT

WOMEN’S STUDIO WORKSHOP

“If You Lived Here You’d Be Home By Now.” Group show featuring 35 artists in and around the Maxon Mills with a particular emphasis on immersive, site-specific installations. Through September 18.

“Queer Ecology Hanky Project.”Bandanas by 125 artists from across North America organized and curated by Vanessa Adams and Mary Tremonte. July 12-October 30.

37 FURNACE BANK ROAD, WASSAIC

THOMAS COLE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 218 SPRING STREET, CATSKILL

“The New Divine Feminine: Woman as Goddess.” Tery Fugate-Wilcox. Through August 12.

“Cross Pollination: Heade, Cole, Church, and Our Contemporary Moment.” Paintings by Martin Johnson Heade plus site-specific artwork inspired by Heade, Cole, and Church. June 12-October 31.

STORM KING ART CENTER

TIVOLI ARTISTS GALLERY

“Crisis.” Site-specific installation by Rashid Johnson. Through November 8.

“Summertime.” Group show. Through July 18.

STUDIO 89

9 PARADIES LANE, NEW PALTZ

89 VINEYARD AVENUE, HIGHLAND

“Traces of Light.” Group show. Through August 25.

“Synapses.” Drawings and paintings by Graham Martini. Through July 11.

UNISON ARTS & LEARNING CENTER

SHAKESPEARE'S FULCRUM

612VWARREN STREET, HUDSON

1 MUSEUM ROAD, NEW WINDSOR

SURFACE LIBRARY GALLERY 1301 ROUTE 7, ANCRAM

“Bob Bachler and James Kennedy.” Paintings and ceramics. Ongoing.

SUSAN ELEY FINE ART

60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI

UNISON 9

68 MOUNTAIN REST ROAD, NEW PALTZ

“Owning Earth.” Outdoor sculpture installation of 19 responses to systems of human domination over our environments and the urgent need to enact futures guided by mutuality and reverence. Through June 1, 2020.

433 WARREN STREET, HUDSON

WEST STRAND ART GALLERY

“Jim Napierala and Lisa Pressman.” Paintings. Through July 11. “Katharine Dufault and Sarah Lutz.” Paintings. July 15-August 15.

“Abstractions in Space & Time.” Neville Bean, Janet Henry, Karen Shaw, Marsha Goldberg, Isabel Cotarelo. July 3-August 14.

722 BINNEWATER LANE, KINGSTON

WOMENSWORK.ART

4 SOUTH CLINTON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE “Folk Is Art.” Group show of contemporary folk art. July 2-25.

WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION AND MUSEUM (WAAM)

28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK “Featured Active Members Group Show”. Featuring work by Judy Abbott, Gail Albert, Cristeen Gamet, Calvin Grimm, Claudia Waruch. Through July 18. “Celebrating the Centennial: Selections from the Permanent Collection of the Woodstock Artists Association, Part 2.” Through September 12. “FAR & WIDE National.” The exhibition comprises work by 25 artists, selected through a national call and juried by Nicelle Beauchene and Franklin Parrasch, cofounders of Parts & Labor in Beacon. Through July 18.

29 WEST STRAND STREET, KINGSTON

7/21 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 83


Horoscopes By Lorelai Kude

LAUGHING AND CRYING, IT’S ALL THE SAME RELEASE The Moon-ruled month of July is the most emotionally volatile month of the year. Though researchers have recently reported that crying is actually a spiritual discipline, we learned this long ago from Joni Mitchell, who wrote: “Laughing and crying, you know it’s the same release.” Combative Mars in Leo opposite controlling Saturn in Aquarius at the Last Quarter Moon in Aries July 1 sets the stage for an epic battle of wills and clash of egos. The emotionally vulnerable should take cover July 2-3 with Mars trine Chiron and square Uranus; fireworks, surprises, and sudden shocks are guaranteed. Venus in Leo runs to play catch-up July 6-8, blowing kisses and dispensing Band-Aids on the smoldering battlefield Mars passed through the previous week. New Moon in Cancer July 9 is looney with Moon-madness—humor diffuses tensions just in time for Venus, Mars, and the Moon to meet in Leo for a passionate embrace July 13. This is possibly the hottest day of the year for melodramatic romance, theatrical love-making, and hyperbolic declarations of everlasting devotion. By July 17 at the First Quarter Moon in Libra, equilibrium is either restored or so damaged that the Sun’s opposition to Pluto completely severs the status quo. Full Moon in Aquarius July 23 reveals the dynamic tension between individual desire and communal responsibility. Retrograde Jupiter returns to Aquarius July 28, where he’ll be through December, giving another chance to refine idealism into a viable option for reality. By month’s end both Venus and Mars are in calm, cool-headed Virgo, and some will be denying promises made in the heat of passion. Last Quarter Moon in Taurus July 31 brings calmness and equanimity, and maybe even a chance to laugh at ourselves. Laughing and crying, it’s all the same release—choose whichever makes you feel better. RADIO WOODSTOCK 100.1 PRESENTS

ARIES (March 20–April 19)

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July 1–3 is power-packed and potentially explosive with Last Quarter Moon in Aries and combative Mars in Leo opposite controlling Saturn, trine vulnerable Chiron, and square erratic Uranus. Patience and a healthy desire to avoid unnecessary confrontation are your best weapons, but can you wield them wisely? Passions rise in a flamboyant (or flammable) style by July 13 when Venus and Mars meet in Leo; the Full Moon in Aquarius July 23 with Sun entering Leo help realign and refine feelings. For best results, expand your rationality rather than your rage when Mars in Virgo opposes Jupiter July 29.

TAURUS (April 19–May 20)

SATURDAY, JULY 31 BELLEAYRE MOUNTAIN

Planetary ruler Venus in red-hot Leo makes you jump through hoops July 6–8 when she opposes ice-cold Saturn, trines wounded healer Chiron and squares shock-jock Uranus in Taurus. Though you love stability, this is a time to learn to live with various levels of uncertainty. The conjunction of Venus and Mars in Leo July 13 stimulates sensuality and raises the bar for romantic recklessness higher than ever. Don’t allow passion to make promises until after Venus enters cool-headed, logical Virgo July 21. With Venus opposite Jupiter in Pisces July 27, themes of service and sacrifice rise to the forefront.

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84 HOROSCOPES CHRONOGRAM 7/21

A practicing, professional astrologer for over 30 years, Lorelai Kude can be reached for questions and personal consultations via email (lorelaikude@yahoo.com) and her Kabbalah-flavored website is Astrolojew.com.


Horoscopes

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Mercury enters emotional Cancer July 11, filtering facts through the lens of your own feelings. Beware of grandiosity and hyperbole July 12 with Mercury trine Jupiter. You do a lot of talking but it’s time to do some listening July 19–20 when you’re presented with shocking news; it wouldn’t come as a surprise if you were paying attention over the last several months. Delusional xi • rel a u i e t 24–25 l e a n • qJuly perceptions and power plays are dangerous c l• uopposite with Mercury trine Neptune and Pluto. Mercury tif enters Leo July 28; pride goes before a fall, so humility is your best bet to keep yourself upright.

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CANCER (June 21–July 22) Last Quarter Moon in Aries July 1 resolves a career issue percolating since April. New Moon in Cancer July 9 is your annual reset; new beginnings come with hard-won insights you’ve developed over the last stressful year. Protect your emotional equilibrium at First Quarter Moon in Libra with Sun opposite Pluto July 17; attempts to grab power or dominate others only create unpleasant imbalance in relationships. Full Moon in Aquarius July 23 emphasizes sharing values, resources, and intimacies with others. Last Quarter Moon in Taurus July 31 spotlights friendships, revealing those qualities of loyalty and steadfastness you most value.

LEO (July 22–August 23) Emotional Independence Day comes when Sun squares Chiron and trines Uranus July 4–5. Liberation is allowing yourself to be vulnerable and open to others rather than protecting yourself behind a veneer of self-sufficiency. Glimpse the fulfillment of a long-held dream July 15 at Sun’s trine to Neptune; but you can’t get there from here by strong-arming others, so avoid the urge to bully at Sun’s opposition to Pluto July 17. Sun enters Leo at the Full Moon in Aquarius July 23; a win-win path appears out of nowhere, enabling you to gracefully balance individual needs with obligations to community.

VIRGO (August 23–September 23) Mercury’s square to Neptune July 6 asks you to reexamine perceptions you thought were accurate in early June, but which now reveal themselves as distorted. Mercury enters sensitive Cancer and trines Jupiter in intuitive Pisces July 11–12; you’re hyper-aware of every emotional nuance between yourself and a partner. Beware of projecting your own critical inner narrator on to others. Nobody thinks as hyper-analytically about you as you think about them! Control issues and power differentials are highlighted at Mercury’s opposition to Pluto July 25; gain equilibrium and emotional balance before making any declarative statements or long-term changes of status.

LIBRA (September 23–October 23) You feel vulnerable and emotionally exposed July 6–8 when Venus aspects solitary Saturn, Wounded Healer Chiron, and unpredictable Uranus. You’re a partnership person learning to find contentment and fulfillment solo; successful coupling only happens when you’re secure in your own self and not dependent on others to reflect you. The hot conjunction of Venus and Mars in Leo July 13 ignites dramatic passion, but you’ve got to find balance at the First Quarter Moon in Libra July 17. Venus enters rational, analytic Virgo July 21 and opposes Jupiter July 24. Seek equilibrium between service and sacrifice in all relationships.

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7/21 CHRONOGRAM HOROSCOPES 85


Horoscopes

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) “Intensity” is the key word July 1–3 with Mars aspecting Saturn, Chiron, and Uranus in ways designed to test just how much ferocious potency you possess. Sun-Pluto opposition July 17 feels like rigid control versus messy chaos; both are equally threatening to your emotional equilibrium and neither is the optimum environment for your ultimate well-being. Though extremism is your default setting, it’s time to walk the golden path of the middle ground if you want to emerge from this time relatively unscathed. Powerful communications rock the status quo and trigger potential lifestyle changes when Mercury opposes Pluto July 25.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 22) Avoid boasting July 12 at Mercury’s trine to Jupiter July 12; boost your big ideas to supporters who look upon you favorably instead. Venus opposite Jupiter July 22 tests your commitment to long-term growth; shortcuts are tempting but not conducive to success. Modesty, though it doesn’t come as naturally to you as to some, is your most attractive adornment right now. Allow your tremendous accomplishment to speak for themselves. Jupiter returns to Aquarius July 28, where he’ll stay through the very end of December, allowing you another chance to align your high ideals with sober facts on the ground.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 20)

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The opposition of Mars to Saturn July 1 highlights the dynamic tension between your desire for decisive action and your instinct to act with caution and prudence in the realm of personal relationships. A partner may see you as aggressive or controlling, or you may see a partner that way: such perceptions aren’t 100 percent accurate, yet they represent a core relational imbalance which must be rectified to find success. Venus opposite Saturn July 6 offers passion if you can put aside pride; New Moon in Cancer July 9 opens emotional blockages and allows you to safely express vulnerable feelings.

AQUARIUS (January 20–February 19) Your modern planetary ruler Uranus is more volatile than usual early this month, with aspects from Mars, the Sun and Venus July 3–8. Are you the irresistible force or the immovable object? Full Moon in Aquarius at the Sun’s ingress into Leo July 23 blows all your attempts to detach emotionally; this Full Moon brings you back to a crucial big picture life-decision point from late December, and now you must either confirm or deny this path going forward. This is the last exit on the highway to the future. Do you have the right supplies for your journey?

PISCES (February 20-March 19) “This shed is one of the greatest additions to my property in the last ten years. It makes me happy daily!” —Bill, Chatham, NY

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845.328.0447 86 HOROSCOPES CHRONOGRAM 7/21

Jupiter in Pisces through July 27 supersizes sensitivity. You’re feeling especially porous July 15 at the Sun’s trine to Neptune, with Chiron retrograde. Your sensitivity attracts vulnerability, but also sends a green light to those who find power playing the victim. Do you really need all that extra caretaking work? Mercury trines Neptune July 24, facilitating the flow of intimate communication between the hidden places of your heart and your conscious mind. You didn’t even know you were thinking about that incredibly important thing until it popped out from your subconscious into your mouth, and you said it aloud!


Ad Index Our advertisements are a catalog of distinctive local experiences. Please support the fantastic businesses that make Chronogram possible. 11 Jane Street Art Center.................. 79 The Ancram Opera House................. 74 Angry Orchard................................... 20 Aqua Jet............................................... 6 Arcadia........................inside back cover Art OMI............................................... 79 Augustine Landscaping & Nursery..................................... 37 AWARENESS Inc............................... 52 Barbara Carter Real Estate............... 37 Bard College at Simon’s Rock.......... 43 Bard College-Hessel Museum, CCS Bard....................................... 2 Beacon Hermitage............................. 60 Beacon Natural Market..................... 22 Bearsville Center LLC........................ 11 Berkshire Food Co-op....................... 20 Berkshire Roots................................. 17 Bistro To Go....................................... 22 Black Dirt Distillery............................ 48 Boyle Family Chiropractic................. 66 Brickyard Pizza.................................. 23 Brook n Wood Family Campground................................ 85 Cabinet Designers, Inc...................... 37 Canna Provisions..................back cover Cassandra Currie............................... 85 Catskill Farms.................................... 29 City Winery......................................... 20 Clark Art Institute............................... 75 Colony Woodstock.............................. 6 Columbia Memorial Health............... 12 Cornell Cooperative ExtensionDutchess County......................... 44 Dedrick’s Pharmacy.......................... 66 Dia Beacon........................................ 79 Edie’s Fairytale Theatre..................... 44 Etain................................................... 14 Fairground Shows NY....................... 80 Fionn Reilly Photography.................. 84 Fisher Center at Bard College.......... 10 Forever Jewelers............................... 50 Gary DiMauro Real Estate................... 3 Geary.................................................. 74 Glenn’s Wood Sheds......................... 86 Golden Rule Project & Fifth Press................................ 38 Green Cottage................................... 86 The Green Palate............................... 60 H Houst & Son................................... 34 Hawthorne Valley Association.......... 45 Hempire State Growers..................... 14 Herrington’s....................................... 33 Historic Decorative Materials, a Division of Pave Tile, Wood & Stone, Inc................................. 33 Historic Huguenot Street................... 44 Holistic Natural Medicine: Integrative Healing Arts............... 40 The Homestead School..................... 43 Hudson Hills Montessori School...... 45 Hudson Sports Complex................... 48 Hudson Valley Hospice..................... 40 Hudson Valley Native Landscaping................................ 26 Hudson Valley Sunrooms.................. 37 Inner Waters Acupuncture................ 44 Innovation Glass................................ 30 Jack’s Meats & Deli........................... 22 Jacobowitz & Gubits......................... 87 Joane Cornell Fine Jewelry............... 79 John A Alvarez and Sons.................. 36 John Carroll....................................... 40 Kenise Barnes Fine Art...................... 79

Kimlin Energy..................................... 26 Kingston Ceramics Studio................ 66 Larson Architecture Works............... 34 Liza Phillips Design........................... 36 The Lockwood Gallery...................... 74 Mark Gruber Gallery.......................... 76 Masa Midtown................................... 22 Medical Aesthetics of the Hudson Valley........................ 62 Medical Associates of the Hudson Valley........................ 40 Milea Estate Vineyard.......................... 4 ModCraft............................................ 33 Mohonk Mountain House.................... 9 Montano’s Shoe Store....................... 62 Mother Earth’s Storehouse............... 22 Mountain Laurel Waldorf School............................ 45 Mountaindale, NY Business Committee................... 85 N & S Supply...................................... 62 Newhard’s.......................................... 48 The O Zone........................................ 44 Orange County Chamber of Commerce............................... 87 Original Vinyl Records....................... 50 The Pass............................................ 17 Pennings Farm Cidery....................... 50 Peter Aaron........................................ 80 Phoenicia Diner................................. 66 Phoenicia Festival of the Voice......... 75 Pinkwater Gallery.............................. 80 Re Institute......................................... 80 Red Maple Vineyard.......................... 66 Rennie Cantine Overlook Benches....................... 34 Resinate............................................. 17 Ridgeline Realty................................. 36 Rocket Number Nine Records.......... 80 RUPCO Inc......................................... 62 Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art......... 11 Sawyer Motors.................................... 4 Sickler, Torchia, Allen & Churchill CPA’s PC................... 52 Sinclair Fine Art Studio...................... 36 Solar Generation................................ 34 Spa21 Kingston................................. 66 Stockade Tavern................................ 22 Studio 89............................................ 74 Sunflower Natural Food Market........ 23 The Surface Library........................... 80 Third Eye Associates Ltd.................. 85 Times Union......................................... 1 Town & Country Liquors.................... 66 Ulster County Habitat for Humanity................................ 87 Ulster Savings Bank.......................... 76 Van Kleeck’s Tire Inc......................... 60 Vassar College................................... 12 Vera Kaplan........................................ 80 WAAM - Woodstock Artists Association & Museum............... 76 Warren Kitchen & Cutlery.................... 6 WDST 100.1 Radio Woodstock........ 84 West Strand Art Gallery..................... 11 Wildfire Grill....................................... 87 Williams Lumber & Home Center..... inside front cover Willow Deep Studio........................... 30 Wimowe............................................. 34 X Ensemble........................................ 80 YMCA of Kingston and Ulster County....................... 44

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Chronogram July 2021 (ISSN 1940-1280) Chronogram is published monthly. Subscriptions: $36 per year by Chronogram Media, 45 Pine Grove Ave. Suite 303, Kingston, NY 12401. Periodicals postage pending at Kingston, NY, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chronogram, 45 Pine Grove Ave. Suite 303, Kingston, NY 12401.

7/21 CHRONOGRAM AD INDEX 87


parting shot

A selection of hankies from the Queer Ecology Hanky Project, which will be exhibited at Women's Studio Workshop in Rosendale beginning this month.

88 PARTING SHOT CHRONOGRAM 7/21

Gold Rush-era San Francisco was a town without a lot of ladies, so if men wanted to get down at a square dance, they needed to boogie with each other. In order to know who would lead, a code developed: The man wearing the blue bandana took the male part, and the man wearing the red bandana took the female part. This hanky code was updated in the early ‘70s as a subtle way for gay men to indicate preferred sexual desires, what kind of sex was being sought, and whether one was a top or bottom. The code continues to this day, and its variations include all the colors of the rainbow and beyond. The Queer Ecology Hanky Project, organized and curated by Vanessa Adams and Mary Tremonte, uses the hanky code as a jumping-off point to showcase a diverse array of artistic responses to Queer Ecology— an area of inquiry that unites the study of biology, environment, and sexuality with a framework of queer theory. The traveling exhibition features over 125 artist bandanas from across North America and will be exhibited at Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale July 12–October 30. An opening reception and socially distanced queer dance party will be held on Friday, July 23, from 6–9pm. Additional curatorial assistance for the Women’s Studio Workshop exhibition was provided by Andrea Narno and Eriko Hattori. Wsworkshop.org —Brian K. Mahoney


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