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ndersen is known for its strong history of commitment to its business partners, employees, community and environmental stewardship. Our mission is to meet the needs of the present without compromising the needs of future generations.

WILLIAMS LUMBER & HOME CENTER

Williams Lumber is clearly the best choice when it comes to choosing & installing Andersen windows or doors for your home. Visit our displays in Rhinebeck, Hudson and Pleasant Valley to start dreaming of the possibilities.

WILLIAMS

Lumber & Home Centers

Rhinebeck • Hudson • Hopewell Junction • Tannersville • Red Hook • Pleasant Valley • High Falls • Hyde Park

www.williamslumber.com

845-876-WOOD


Oh My God!

THE LARGEST ASIAN ART STORE IN AMERICA... AND YOU HAVEN’T SEEN IT?

E L A S Y A T D N R E O B T A L E U R G H U T H UGUST 25

A M O FR

ASIA-BARONG

Great Barrington, MA (413) 528-5091 www.asiabarong.com call for hours

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STAY FRESH DRINK TEA www.harney.com

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Giovanni Anselmo Marco Bagnoli Domenico Bianchi Alighiero Boetti Pier Paolo Calzolari Luciano Fabro Jannis Kounellis Mario Merz Marisa Merz Giulio Paolini Pino Pascali Giuseppe Penone Michelangelo Pistoletto Remo Salvadori Gilberto Zorio

Free admission by appointment only Thursday through Monday Bookings available at magazzino.art 2700 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY 10516 8/17 CHRONOGRAM 3


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modern

Home Building/Green Building Seminar Saturday, August 19th

11AM-1PM

This free Seminar gives you a realistic overview of how to design and create your own energy efficient custom home, from buying land through construction and finishing. Reservations are needed, please call 845-265-2636 or email us at Info@LindalNY.com for more information or directions.

We will be happy to speak with you about the services we offer, including free site evaluations and site visits, and our free Design Program.

Atlantic Custom Homes, Inc. Stop by our Classic Lindal model at: 2785 Route 9 • Cold Spring, NY 10516 888.558.2636 • 845.265.2636 Info@LindalNY.com www.HudsonValleyCedarHomes.com

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Great Food from Local Restaurants, Craft Beers, Local Spirits, Live Music by Paul Green Rock Academy, Petting Zoo, Pony Rides, Crafts, and More!

2017

27 years Thank You to Our Sponsors:

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FRUITION CHOCOLATE WORLD’S BEST MILK CHOCOLATE MADE IN ULSTER COUNTY

Photo by Franco Vogt

Paris, Copenhagen, Shokan: three towns that boast world-class chocolatiers who won best in competition at the 2016 International Chocolate Awards. Representing Ulster County was Fruition Chocolate’s Marañon Canyon Dark Milk bar, which earned the coveted Best Milk Chocolate in the World award. Chocolatier Bryan Graham draws inspiration for his confections from Ulster County’s farms and food producers, using local dairy and in-season fruit to complement high-quality, ethically sourced cocoa.

Ulster County is committed to helping the food and beverage industry thrive. By listening to the needs of business owners and offering a full range of services, the Office of Economic Development has helped this industry more than double in size over the past few years. From site selection to securing funding to assistance with research and with networking, food producers know they have a trusted partner in Ulster. Ulsterforbusiness.com (845) 340-3556

ULSTER COUNTY YOUR BUSINESS HERE

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Quail Hollow Events 36th Anniversary

W - N P

Art&CraftsFair L D W

SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY

SEPT 2 SEPT 3 SEPT 4

10am - 5:30pm 10am - 5:30pm 10am - 4:00pm

CHECK WEB SITE FOR SEASONAL FEATURES The Nation’s Finest Juried Artists & Craftspeople • Continuous Demonstrations Furniture • Architectural Crafts • Handcrafted Specialty Foods & Healthcare Products Supervised Children’s Activities • Live Entertainment

“Voted One of America’s best Craft Fairs” – Sunshine Artist Magazine Our nation’s most creative small businesses.

Entertainment Schedule Subject to change

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

12:00 Side by Side 1:30 The Phantoms 3:00 Blind Mice

12:00 Pops and The Weasels 1:30 Bill Robinson’s Wildlife Show 3:00 Shep & the Coconuts

12:00 All-She-Wrote 1:30 Billy Mitchel 2:00 Eric Erickson

FREE PARKING

RAIN OR SHINE

BUSES WELCOME

Polar Fleece Jacket, Jill Stern.

NO DOGS

$9 Adult, $8 Senior, Children 12 & under FREE • Ulster County Fairgrounds: 249 Libertyville Rd, New Paltz, NY 12561

Details & Discounts at: QUAILHOLLOW.COM 845.679.8087 8 CHRONOGRAM 8/17


SUNY New Paltz Master of Fine Arts program recognized among the best schools in the Northeast Offering ceramics, metal, painting/drawing, printmaking, and sculpture Lectures and studio visits by our renowned faculty, famous artists, critics, and historians Access to state-of-the-art facilities and the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art Scholarships and teaching assistantships available

Accepting part-time and full-time applicants www.newpaltz.edu/art

adams fairacre farms

Fresh from Adams FARM-FRESH PRODUCE • BUTCHER SHOP • FISH MARKET • DELI SWEET SHOP • DELECTABLE BAKED GOODS • PREPARED FOODS VAST GOURMET GROCERY, C O F F E E & C H E E S E S E L E C T I O N FLOWER SHOP • GIFT SHOP • NURSERY • GARDEN CENTER

www.adamsfarms.com

POUGHKEEPSIE

KINGSTON

NEWBURGH

WA P P I N G E R

Route 44 845-454-4330

Route 9W 845-336-6300

Route 300 845-569-0303

Route 9 845-632-9955

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Global or Local, Our Choices Matter

1. Better fuel economy 2. Lower emissions 3. Less waste

1. Family owned and operated in the Hudson Valley for over 40 years

BEGNAL MOTORS

2. Investing in our local infrastructure using local professionals and businesses 3. Keep it Local

Begnal Motors is now your exclusive Fiat dealer in the Hudson Valley Currently located at: 552 Albany Avenue, Kingston 845-331-5080 WWW.BEGNALMOTORS.COM COMING SOON New Address: 129 ROUTE 28, KINGSTON, NY

Design: DittoDoesDesign.com

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Benmarl Winery Nestled in the lush green hills of Marlboro you will find Benmarl Winery. Overlooking the historic Hudson River Valley, its 37 acre estate lays claim to the oldest vineyard in America. Our focus is on hand crafting wines that capture the essence of where they are sourced. CHECK OUT OUR UPCOMING EVENTS! AUGUST 12 & 13

Sangria Festival SEPTEMBER 16 & 17

Harvest Grape Stomping Festival OCTOBER 7 & 8

Harvest Grape Stomping Festival

benmarl.com

156 Highland Ave • Marlboro, NY 845.236.4265

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Chronogram ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

CONTENTS 8/17

VIEW FROM THE TOP

HOME & GARDEN

24 WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING

44 CAPTURING THE WILD

Snorting cacao, cruise ship predators, a 101-year-old sprinter, and other juicy tidbits.

27 BEINHART’S BODY POLITIC Batteries vs. Hydrogen The race to develop renewably powered vehicles is on despite the White House’s decidely un-green leanings.

ART OF BUSINESS 28 This month: Dreaming Goddess, Halstead Realty, Kaatsbaan Dance Center, and Woodstock Art Exchange.

EDUCATION 30 IS TUITION-FREE COLLEGE REALLY FREE?

As another batch of fledglings prepares to fly the nest, Anne Pyburn Craig examines Governor Cuomo’s plan to provide tuition-free college education to middle-class New York residents and the effects of the Excelsior Scholarship on private institutions.

COMMUNITY PAGES 36 BODY & SOUL: WOODSTOCK & SAUGERTIES

These neighboring towns are hubs of creativity, commerce, and community.

54 THE FIGHTING CITY: PEEKSKILL Peekskill dispenses with pretense in an earnest effort to redefine and revitalize itself.

93

The Kingston Artist Soapbox Derby rolls down Broadway on August 20.

FORECAST

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A Carpenter Gothic cottage in Germantown provides a perfect artist retreat.

51 PLATES, NOT MIRRORS

The dirt on how tree roots grow and tips for gardening compatibly.

FOOD & DRINK 74 ROLL OUT THE BARRELS Beacon’s Hudson Valley Brewery specializes in sour beers aged in wooden barrels.

LOCALLY GROWN 79 FROM THE LOCAL TO THE GLOBAL

Maria Reidelbach’s Stick to Local Farms scavenger hunt brings commerce to farms.

WHOLE LIVING 86 QUIET CRUSADER

Veteran politician Maurice Hinchley battles a degenerative speech disorder.

COMMUNITY RESOURCE GUIDE 77 TASTINGS A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 84 BUSINESS DIRECTORY A compendium of advertiser services. 90 WHOLE LIVING Opportunities to nurture mind, body, and soul.


SPECIAL EVENTS THIS SUMMER

Mohonk Mountain House

AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2017

DINNER & STARGAZING

DINNER & HERB WORKSHOP

NIGHT OF THE SHOOTING STARS

HERBS FOR THE SENSES AUGUST 31, 2017 | 3PM

AUGUST 12, 2017 | 9PM Enjoy dinner followed by a meteor shower preview with Bob Berman, one of the bestknown and most widely-read astronomers in the world. $72*

Join herbalist, David Hyde to explore the fascinating world of herbs and their unusual fragrances and flavors; experience tasty basils, exotic jasmines, and unique ethnic varieties. After dinner, enjoy the evening with music by Tom Stewart & Maureen Kelly. $72*

LINDSEY WEBSTER & KEITH SLATTERY

NIGHT HIKE TO COPES LOOKOUT

SEPTEMBER 4, 2017 | 9PM

AUGUST 22, 2017 | 9PM Tap into your night vision on this mile-long hike to spot creatures and events of the night—owls, insects, coyotes, stars, and satellites. $72*

BBQ LUNCH & SURVIVAL SKILLS

Dine on a three-course meal prepared by our culinary team then enjoy the refreshing sounds of Lindsey Webster whose vocals compare to the likes of R&B queens Sade, Mariah Carey, and Anita Baker. $72*

DINNER & SWING

THE ART OF PRIMITIVE FIRE-MAKING

FLEUR SEULE SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 9PM

AUGUST 24, 2017 | 10:15AM Learn the fire-by-friction method of firemaking—a technique passed down by our ancestors for generations, then enjoy an outdoor barbecue lunch at the Granary. $72*

Celebrate the weekend with our new signature bloody mary and mimosa menu. Savor made-to-order omelet stations, carving stations, salad bar, smoked salmon, jumbo chilled shrimp, and decadent desserts. $72*

ELEVEN COURSE CHEF’S TABLE FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS | 6:30 PM

DINNER & JAZZ

LOBSTER BAKE & HIKING

SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH

Enjoy an evening of fine dining followed by music from 1940’s Jazz and Swing band Fleur Seule. Take a musical journey through the songs of by Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Edith Piaf, Marlene Dietrich, Dinah Shore, and more. $72*

Dine “behind the scenes” in the heart of our fast-paced kitchen. Meet our talented culinary team as they prepare and present a specially created 11-course tasting menu complete with wine pairings and an unforgettable dessert finale. $155*

MOHONK GOLF COURSE TEE TIME RESERVATIONS REQUIRED | 845.256.2154 Established in 1897, our 9-hole historic Scottish-inspired golf course is one of the oldest continuous-use courses in the country. Please note: guests of the golf course do not have access to the Mountain House. Green Fees 9 holes 18 holes

Mon-Fri $19 $26

Weekends/Holidays $26 $33

TWO-FOR-ONE GREEN FEES ON WEDNESDAYS

CALL TO PLAN YOUR MOHONK EXPERIENCE 844.859.6716 | www.mohonk.com *Advanced reservations are required. Price excludes taxes and administrative fee.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM 13


Chronogram ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

CONTENTS 8/17

ARTS & CULTURE

THE FORECAST

60 GALLERY & MUSEUM GUIDE

93 DAILY CALENDAR Comprehensive listings of local events. (Updated daily at Chronogram.com.)

64 MUSIC: AARON DESSNER

Peter Aaron talks with Aaron Dessner of the acclaimed indie quintet The National about hometown influences, charity, and his sustainable upstate recording studio.

PREVIEWS 95 Brooklyn-born band Grizzly Bear comes out of hibernation for an album release tour.

Nightlife Highlights includes Robyn Hitchcock and Mazzstock.

97 The Phoenicia Festival of the Voice serves up the musical creme de la creme.

Reviews of Testimony by Howard Johnson and Gravity, Woodstock Sessions by

99 “Just the Facts” is a curated photographic response to the post-election oppression.

Marco Benevento, and Stay Bright by Phineas and the Lonely Leaves.

100 Food/wine/music festival Huichica East returns to the sprawling Chaseholm Farm.

68 BOOKS: JONATHAN LERNER Sparrow interviews Jonathan Lerner about his new memoir, which details his days as a young, gay radical in the clandestine revolutionary group the Weather Underground.

101 Dutchess County Fair is back, boasting headliners like Old Crow Medicine Show. 102 Pride and Prejudice is adapted to stage in the Hudson Valley Shakespear Festival. 103 Buddhist meditation teacher Jack Kornfield hosts a retreat at the Garrison Institute. 105 Dance, film, music, and visual art converge at the two-day Wassaic Project Festival.

70 BOOK REVIEWS

Carolyn Quimby reviews Samantha Hunt’s The Dark Dark: Stories, collection of paranormal tales centered on female protagonists.

PLANET WAVES 106

72 POETRY Poems by Evelyn Augusto, Steve Baltsas, Richard R. Binkele, Lachlan Brooks,

108

THE FULCRUM, THE VENTURI, AND THE CYCLE OF FIRE

As we accelerate toward the Great American Eclipse, prepare for a big pivot. HOROSCOPES

What’s in our stars? Eric Francis Coppolino knows.

Darren Lyons, Alexandra Marvar, Jack River O’Neill, ooznozz, p, Anya Ptacek, Anne Richey, Matthew J. Spireng, Ken Sutton, Steven Swyryt, Diane Webster,

112 PARTING SHOT

Roger Whitson, and Michelle Williams.

6

64

“Drawing Sound,” a multimedia collaboration of graphic musical scores comes to the Kleinert/James Center.

The National performing material from their upcoming album Sleep Well Beast at Basilica Hudson on July 15.

MUSIC

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SARAH PEZDEK

Edited by Phillip X. Levine.


JUNE 30 – AUGUST 20

BARDSUMMERSCAPE 2017 Seven inspired weeks of opera, music, theater, dance, film, and cabaret set to the theme of the 28th Bard Music Festival, Chopin and His World.

OPERA JULY 28 – AUGUST 6

JUNE 30 – AUGUST 20

By Antonín Dvoˇrák American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein Directed by Anne Bogart Acclaimed for its original melodies and masterful choral writing, Dimitrij vividly depicts the intrigue and struggles for power in Russian society.

1950s: Hollywood & Vine: Jazz Goes West The Aaron Johnson Ensemble, featuring Veronica Swift Thursday, August 3

DIMITRIJ

28TH BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL AUGUST 11–20

CHOPIN AND HIS WORLD An exploration of the life and times of Polish composer Fryderyk Chopin (1810–49).

845-758-7900 fishercenter.bard.edu

FILM SERIES JULY 27 – AUGUST 20

CHOPIN AND THE IMAGE OF ROMANTICISM

Photo by ©Peter Aaron ’68/Esto.

the bard music festival

SPIEGELTENT

Mx. Justin Vivian Bond’s House of Whimsy Friday, August 4 and Saturday, August 5 1960s: Songs of Protest and Reconciliation Vuyo Sotashe Ensemble Thursday, August 10 BACK TO (ab)NORMAL: An Evening with Rebecca Havemeyer, Dane Terry, & CHRISTEENE Saturday, August 12 John Cage’s Musicircus Sunday, August 13 Joan As Police Woman Friday, August 18 Mx. Justin Vivian Bond Shows Up Saturday, August 19

CHOPIN AND HIS WORLD

August 11–13 Chopin, the Piano, and Musical Culture of the 19th Century August 17–20 Originality and Influence An illuminating series of orchestral, choral, opera, and chamber concerts—as well as pre-concert talks and panel discussions—devoted to examining the life and times of the supreme “poet” of the piano, Fryderyk Chopin.

845-758-7900 | fishercenter.bard.edu Chopin’s Polonaise (Ball in Hotel Lambert in Paris), 1859 by Teofil Kwiatkowski, culture-images/Lebrecht

8/17 CHRONOGRAM 15


EDITORIAL HUDSON VALLEY GOLDSMITH

Best Jewelry Store 2015 & 2016

Custom one-of-a-kind fine jewelry made from recycled precious metals and conflict free diamonds. Handmade in front of you in any style. Best Jewelry Store 2015 & 2016

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Perry dperry@chronogram.com ASSISTANT EDITOR Marie Gillett mdoyon@chronogram.com HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR Wendy Kagan wholeliving@chronogram.com POETRY EDITOR Phillip X Levine poetry@chronogram.com MUSIC EDITOR Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com

71Afine Main Street, New Paltz Custom one-of-a-kind jewelry made from Bestmetals Jewelry 2015, 2016 2017 HudsonValleyGoldsmith.com | 845& •255 •5872 recycled precious andStore conflict free diamonds. Handmade in front of you in any style. Choose from many styles of beautiful handcrafted jewelry made in store71A and around the world. Main Street, New Paltz HudsonValleyGoldsmith.com | 845•255•5872

71A Main Street, New Paltz HudsonValleyGoldsmith.com 845•255•5872

Gatehouse Gardens Bed and Breakfast

EDITOR-AT-LARGE Hillary Harvey hharvey@chronogram.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Anne Pyburn Craig apcraig@chronogram.com HOME EDITOR Mary Angeles Armstrong home@chronogram.com CONTRIBUTORS Mary Angeles Armstrong, Larry Beinhart, John Burdick, Mike Campbell, Eric Francis Coppolino, Larry Decker, Deborah DeGraffenreid, John Garay, Tom Gillon, Leah Habib, Timothy Malcolm, Carolyn Quimby, Sarah Pezdek, Benjamin Powers, Jeremy Schwartz, Seth Rogovoy, Sparrow, Zan Strumfeld, Michelle Sutton, Franco Vogt, Diana Waldron

PUBLISHING Bed, Breakfast ... and so much more!

Located on beautiful Gatehouse Road, next to the Testimonial Gateway. Gatehouse Gardens is a very peaceful and private setting bordering The Mohonk Preserve. Rates starting at $120. AMENITIES INCLUDE:

GatehouseGardens.com 845-255-8817 info@gatehousegardens.com

Heated Swimming Pool Hot Tub Air Conditioning Private Entrances

Private Patio/Decks Secluded/Wooded Location Private Baths/Kitchen BBQ Grills Hiking Trails

FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky CEO Amara Projansky amara@chronogram.com PUBLISHER Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com CHAIRMAN David Dell Chronogram is a project of Luminary Media ADVERTISING & MARKETING (845) 334-8600x106 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Anne Wygal awygal@chronogram.com MARKETING DIRECTOR Brian Berusch bberusch@chronogram.com DIGITAL MARKETING COORDINATOR Emily Boziwick eboziwick@chronogram.com ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER Lisa Montamarano lisa.montanaro@chronogram.com ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS MANAGER Phylicia Chartier office@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107 DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Samantha Liotta sliotta@chronogram.com MINISTER WITHOUT PORTFOLIO Peter Martin pmartin@chronogram.com PRODUCTION PRODUCTION MANAGER Sean Hansen sean@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 PRODUCTION DESIGNER Kerry Tinger OFFICE 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 | (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

MISSION Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Luminary Media 2017.

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CHATHAM DANCE fEST AUGUST 4-5

PARSONS dANCE

AUGUST 4-SEPTEMBER 3

AUGUST 11-12

CALEB TEiCHER & CO AUGUST 18-19

MONiCA BiLL BARNES & CO AUGUST 25-26

EPHRAT ASHERiE dANCE SEPTEMBER 2-3

CHRiSTOPHER k MORGAN in PÅŒHAKU

The TenT 2980 ROUTE 66 CHATHAM NY PS21CHATHAM.ORG 518.392.6121

TiCkET ORdERS 800.838.3006

8/17 CHRONOGRAM 17


ON THE COVER

Cemetery Rd pete mauney | photograph | 2015

F

Styling the Hudson Valley for more than 25 years On the Kingston Waterfront, 17 W Strand St, Kingston (845) 331-4537 Open Mon. – Sat. at 11:30. Sunday at noon.

APPLE BIN Farm Market

• Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches • Apple Cider Donuts All Year • Pies, Muffins, Local JB Peel Coffee • Homegrown Fruits, Local Produce • Plants, Trees • Gluten Free Products

Route 9W - 810 Broadway, Ulster Park, NY (845) 339-7229 www.theapplebinfarmmarket.com 18 CHRONOGRAM 8/17

rom children with mason jars to furtive couples entwined on benches, it is no wonder we are drawn to the glinting of fireflies. There are just under 2,000 species of fireflies worldwide, lighting up six continents and countless imaginations with their ephemeral flashes. For New York State residents, the twinkling of these bioluminescent faeries is an endearing sign that summer, in all its hot and humid glory, has returned. Over the past five summers, Tivoli-based photographer Pete Mauney has trekked through marshes and fields all over the Hudson Valley. His time-lapse firefly images are taken over periods from 15 to 60 minutes. Asked about his obsession, Mauney responds, “They are stunningly beautiful. And alien, even though they’re not. I could spin a yarn of artspeak BS miles long about them. But that would seem to me to do them a great disservice.” He finds the science behind these glowing beetles “mind-blowing,” adding, “Even the vocabulary is great: luciferin and luciferase are among the chemicals responsible for the bioluminescent reaction. Lucifer (as a word, not a religious concept) means bearer of, or holder of, light.” A note on the anatomy of fireflies: Lightning bugs modulate their oxygen intake to regulate the length and frequency of their flashes. The sparks we see on a given midsummer’s eve are mostly the displays of strutting males, flashing as quickly and ostentatiously as possible, hoping to hit paydirt. Like some primordial Tinder exchange, discerning females lie hidden, swiping left until a potential mate catches their eye and they signal back. There is even a “femme fatale” in the firefly world—the carnivorous female of the genus Photuris imitates other species, luring unsuspecting males in and devouring them. To Mauney, fireflies are a rare window into the unseen parallel world of bugs. “The visualization of an otherwise mostly invisible biomass that dominates humans on a planetary scale, both in mass and speciation, is fascinating. I think of it as the inter-dimensional protein blanket that covers our planet.” “As a human, a photographer, and a parent, I often have to choose between experiencing something or recording it. But this subject matter, because of the extended timeframes involved, actually allows you to do both on a pretty deep level.” While there are many aspects to photographing fireflies that attract Mauney, he remains adamant that they are secondary to his “initial and consistent impulse: Fireflies are transcendently beautiful.” Follow Mauney’s work at Ninetyninenorth.com or on Instagram: pete_mauney. –Marie Gillett


2017 AUG 5 SANTANA SEPT 16 SCOTT SAMUELSON & JEANNE OF LEON AUG 6 KINGS MACDONALD NATHANIEL RATELIFF & THE NIGHT SWEATS

AUG 10 FLORIDA GEORGIA LINE NELLY, CHRIS LANE & RYAN HURD

AUG 11 REO SPEEDWAGON STYX DON FELDER

AUG 12 ROCKTOPIA THE HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC

AUG 19 PEACE, LOVE & FOOD TRUCKS AUG 19 GOO GOO DOLLS PHILLIP PHILLIPS AUG 20 MARK NADLER BRADSTAN CABARET SERIES EVENT GALLERY

BRADSTAN CABARET SERIES EVENT GALLERY

SEPT 24 GRAHAM NASH EVENT GALLERY SEPT 28 BORISLAV & FRIENDS

PLAY: THE CLASSICS EVENT GALLERY

OCT 7 WINE FESTIVAL OCT 14 CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL OCT 19 PLAY: ZOFOTHE CLASSICS EVENT GALLERY

OCT 28 BLUES FESTIVAL EVENT GALLERY NOV 4 BÉLA FLECK & ABIGAIL WASHBURN

AUG 26 LYNYRD EVENT GALLERY SKYNYRD HANK WILLIAMS JR. NOV 5 LOS LONELY BOYS AARON LEWIS EVENT GALLERY SEPT 1 STING DEC 2&3 HOLIDAY FREE THE LOST BANDOLEROS JOE SUMNER MARKET SEPT 3 HARVEST FREE DEC 15 EILEEN IVERS EVENT GALLERY -OCT 1 FESTIVAL SUNDAYS

BOUTIQUE 34 John Street Kingston, NY 845-339-0042 www.OAK42.com

SEPT 14 THE MANHATTAN CHAMBER PLAYERS PLAY: THE CLASSICS EVENT GALLERY

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR COMPLETE CALENDAR OF EVENTS!

2017 SPECIAL EXHIBIT

LOVE FOR SALE: THE COMMERCIALIZATION OF THE COUNTERCULTURE

THRU DECEMBER 31 TICKETS AT BETHELWOODSCENTER.ORG

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts is a not-for-profit cultural organization that inspires, educates, and empowers individuals through the arts and humanities.

All dates, acts, times and ticket prices subject to change without notice. All ticket prices may increase on the day of show.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM 19


ESTEEMED READER

Extraordinary Flowers, Beautiful Jewelry and Unique Gifts 1204 RT. 213, HIGH FALLS, NY THEGREENCOTTAGE.COM 845-687-4810

EXPERIENCE INSTANTLY RADIANT SKIN Stop in to try new, 97% naturally derived* tulasāra™ skin care. Our pure facial oils, ultrasoft facial brush and highly concentrated treatments awaken your glow and visibly transform skin. Uniting advanced skin care science with the wisdom of Ayurveda, the ancient healing art of India, it’s a new generation of skin care you won’t want to miss. Experience tulasāra™ skin care today!

awaken the glow within you NEW tulasā ara™ skin care

advanced science. ayurvedic wisdom. proven results.

47 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK, NY ALLURERHINEBECK.COM 845.876.7774 * From plants, non-petroleum minerals or water. Learn more at aveda.com.

We are proud to be offering the freshest local fare of the Hudson Valley, something that is at the core of our food philosophy. OPEN 5 DAYS A WEEK

Serving breakfast & lunch all day 8:30 - 4:30 PM Closed Mondays and Tuesdays CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS

845-255-4949 2356 RT. 44/55 Gardiner NY 12525 VISIT US ONLINE

www.miogardiner.com

20 CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: I remember studying World War II in high school, specifically the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. I read that 225,000 human beings were killed by the bombs instantly. As many died slower deaths from radiation poisoning, burns, and other injuries. I remember the tone of the textbook and teacher, which suggested that this intentional holocaust was justified, necessary, and in a word, normal. My reaction was that this was not normal, that it was a hideous act conceived by ignorant and deranged minds. The image of the destruction was horrifying and equally so was the presentation of the bombing as “right,” which, no matter how I looked at it, I could not justify in any context. The feeling of this obvious absurdity initiated a line of questioning about many things I was taught in school, which became a constant source of irritation for my teachers. Like suddenly noticing so many blackened spots of chewing gum on a subway platform, I began to see examples of weird and illogical deeds and institutions everywhere. These were called normal and good, like the naked emperor insisting that his clothes were fine. The names given to things was so opposite of the actual function and intent that I began to suspect a cynical conspiracy to mess with my head. Here’s a tiny sampling of what surfaced: A warring empire’s invasions, assassinations, wholesale destruction, and murder of communities and cultures is called “defense” and “peacekeeping.” A system designed to brainwash, indoctrinate, and render passive the capacity for genuine initiative, creativity, and critical thinking is called “education.” A cult of illness that charges huge fees to destroy the capacity for people’s bodies to effectively heal and be naturally balanced is called “healthcare.” A political system that favors the rich, powerful, and nonhuman entities called corporations; allows rule by a malleable mob, that steadfastly obscures its agenda to confuse constituents; is referred to as “democracy.” The list seemed endless, and as a teenager led to a state of deep confusion, hopelessness, and cynicism. Having just read 1984 and seeing a manifestly Orwellian world in which Big Brother’s slogans of the operative paradigm—War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength—I understood the easy slide toward insanity or suicide. The coup de grâce was noticing that all the contradictions and absurdities I saw in the world were equally reflected in myself. I was a bundle of contradictions, unkind to the people I loved, easily distracted from my values, generally unable to stick to my intentions and achieve what I set out to do. Worst of all, I saw that I was suggestible, lacking in tenacity to find what was really true, and would believe any old thing suggested by the right person or authority. I saw I was a microcosm of the ignorant, divided, upside-down world. This blow to my trust in the fundamental basis of everything was paralyzing, but gradually became a fuel for a line of questioning that went something like this: What is normal, and how do I, and people, individually and collectively, achieve normality? I haven’t found any final or definitive answers, but I’ve picked up a few clues from a variety of sources. Here’s a small sample in the 240 words remaining to me: Striving. I learned about this from my children’s kindergarten teacher. She said the way young children learn is mostly by example and participation, and the most important quality to embody is striving. This, she said, is not a striving to get somewhere else, but an effort to give a fullness of attention in the moment, to fully embody values of mindfulness, integrity, and reverence. Striving to be present, to do whatever one is doing fully and well, is a mode of being that has a certain flavor which is a key component of normality. Mutuality. Being humbled is different from being humiliated. The word humble has the same root as humus, the organic component of soil. It means standing on the ground of one’s being, present to what one is experiencing, here and now, without trying to manipulate internal or external factors or otherwise flee from suffering. In this place of humility we can have mutuality, recognizing that we are all equally exactly where we are, and that we can meet one another without superiority or inferiority on this ground of being. Positivity. This is to use our power of imagination to hold a positive view of our own fulfillment and the future of humanity as a whole. This is not Pollyanna or unrealistic. Mostly it requires sacrificing gratuitous negativity—all the unnecessary thoughts and expressions of complaint, criticism, ill-will, and contempt. Positivity also requires holding attention on an image of a possible normality—a picture of ourselves and the future that shows at its epicenter what is most valuable and precious. —Jason Stern


LAUREN THOMAS

Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note Oh Rats! or Lessons from the Infestation

T

here is much that humans can learn from rats. The fact that most us are rat-ignorant has long roots in the human/rat relationship, which casts rats in the role of villains to righteous humans. The longstanding antagonism between rats and humans is epitomized by the Black Death of the 14th century, after which rats were convicted in absentia for killing 30 to 60 percent of the population of Europe through the transmission of bubonic plague. A reputation like that is hard to shake, even six centuries later. (It should be noted, however, that a 2015 study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences absolved Europe’s black rats of responsibility for the deaths of 75 to 100 million people. The researchers blamed Asian gerbils instead.) No one studies rats for fun; if you’re watching YouTube videos on trapping rats, you’ve got a problem. I would not be here telling you things you may not want to know—like this, for example: male rats can mate with 20 females in a few hours; the gestation period for rats is three weeks; the average rat litter is between 15 and 20 pups—if rats had not taken up residence in my home. A disquieting experience to say the least, a rodent infestation is not just a call to interspecies warfare. It’s also a distorting mirror in which our reflected selves look at once vexed, frightened, enraged, and despondent. If you find yourself running an unintended AirBnB for large rodents, I offer the following advice based on recent experience. For those who normally read my column to their children at bedtime to soothe them into sleep, you may want to skip this month. Believe your wife when she tells you she’s seen a rat. Here’s one I can’t stress enough.You may have heard scratching in the wall, but that was probably just a squirrel that crawled in through the crack where the addition is separating from the house. Squirrels, you think, are not that bad. But after you’ve gone to bed one night, your wife sees a rat—not a mouse but a big, brown, fuzzy long-tailed rodent—on the basement stairs. This being the 21st century, you find this out via text the morning when you wake up. Now, you’ve lived in this house almost 15 years, and you’ve never had rats before. Perhaps your wife was tired, or it was a trick of the light and shadows. While you may question the veracity of your wife’s claims in your mind, do not express any overt skepticism. That plan of action will lead to an untenable two-front war you will be ill-equipped to fight. Don’t wait the three days until you find rat poop in the basement. Just believe your wife and start to wrap your mind around the essential existential question, “Why me?” Having rats in your home is not a moral failure. Despite the fact that you’ve known about that hole in the side of the house for weeks and did nothing about it, don’t be too hard on yourself. As the exterminator will tell you, there are a number of other ratholes in the foundation of your home that you did not know about. You will find out that the long, flexible, and cylindrical bodies of rats can fit through surprisingly small holes, some no larger than the size of a quarter. You will spend hours searching for quarter-sized holes in your basement, filling every nook and cranny with steel wool, which the Internet has told you is a rat deterrent.

Resist the urge to tell people that you have a rat problem. When people ask you “What’s new?” you will find yourself dying to share with them something that is legitimately new in your life. Do not do this. Don’t tell your neighbors, don’t tell your coworkers, don’t ask for exterminator recommendations. Let this be your secret. Telling people you have rats in your home is like confiding in someone you’re not going to have sex with that you’ve got herpes. It’s information about you others would rather not possess. Think of it as classified intelligence and everyone is on a need-to-know basis. Some people keep rats as pets. When you do spill the beans about your rats—as they are, indeed yours now—people will tell you about someone they know who has a rat as a pet, and how smart and affectionate and adorable it is. You will think of this on nights when the scratching in the walls of your kitchen cannot be ignored, even over the sound of the television, which you’ve been turning up higher and higher.You will wonder what kind of person would keep a rat as a pet as you stealthily cross the kitchen floor wielding a souvenir baseball bat you got at Bat Day at Shea Stadium in 1979 and hoping to God they finally eat through the paneling because you are itching for a fight. Rats are the darlings of the animal research community. Rats make up more than 90 percent of the animals used in medical research. As rats and humans share many similarities in structure and function and rats are low in cost, easy to handle, and mate in captivity, they are ideal for research. PETA claims more than 100 million mice and rats are killed in US labs every year. Given the fact that there are still so many diseases to cure, you think 100 million is not enough.You wish more rats would be used in research. Specifically, cancer research. Specifically, colon cancer research.You wish that these rats in your home were captured alive so that they, in particular, could play a crucial part in curing colon cancer. You will be right to be nervous when the exterminator comes. After you proudly tell him all you’ve done to battle the rats these past weeks, he will say that the only correct move you made was calling him. The way you set the traps is wrong, the way you filled the holes in your house is wrong, the way you waited so long to call him is wrong. You’ve just made his job harder, and he’s not confident he will be able to get the rats out in four visits spread out over a month.You’ll need to go on monthly maintenance for a year. Oh, they’ll get the rats out for sure, it just might take some time. When you ask if they will use poison, the exterminator says yes, and you’ll be told it’s safe for humans and animals.You may follow up with, “Is it wise to poison creatures as large as a good-sized sweet potato that live within the walls of my house? If they should die in the wall, I may not be able to find the bodies but be haunted by the smell of a deliquescing corpse for weeks.” To which you will be given a crowning bit of knowledge by the exterminator: A dead rat in your house is better than a live one. You will find no fault with this reasoning.You will hire him without asking how much it costs. 8/17 CHRONOGRAM 21


AUGUST 19 3-11PM WALL STREET, KINGSTON

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22 CHRONOGRAM 8/17

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On July 6, Luminary Media hosted the Chronogram Conversations salon series at Colony Woodstock. Nearly 150 attendees heard panelists Michael Lang (producer, 1969 Woodstock Festival), Kitt Potter (executive director, Maverick Concerts), Meira Blaustein (co-founder and executive director, Woodstock Film Festival), Barbara Bravo (chairperson, Saugerties Artists Studio Tour), and Jen Dragon (owner, Cross Contemporary Art) engage the topic “From ‘The Garden’ to the Future: The Persistence of the Arts in Woodstock and Saugerties.” Luminary Editorial Director Brian K. Mahoney moderated the conversation, prompting lively input from the audience on the intersection of politics and art and a seeming lack of diversity in the arts scene of Woodstock and Saugerties. The Chronogram Conversations series is a monthly social and networking event that brings community leaders, creative types, and influencers together to discuss a regional issue in a friendly setting. In Woodstock, guests were treated to culinary offerings from Sunflower Market and Sugar Beet Catering, as well as a variety of beers from Catskill Brewery. Cellist Daniel Frankhuizen opened the social hour with creative sounds using looping techniques. Many of the voices heard and seen at this event are represented in the Community Pages feature on Woodstock and Saugerties on page 36. Those looking to be spotlighted as leaders in Hudson (and surrounding communities), should reach out to account executive Ralph Jenkins (Ralph.Jenkins@chronogram.com), as it will be the subject of a feature in our September issue. A special thank you to Neil and Alexia Howard, Jean Michel, and the Colony Woodstock staff for hosting the Luminary business development, events, and video production teams during our Conversations event. If you haven’t been to the revitalized music and nightlife venue, it’s well worth the visit. To see the video produced from this event, go to Chronogram.com/WoodstockConversation.

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Photography by Richard A. Smith Edit, video, and event production by Brian Berusch 1. Chronogram Editorial Director Brian K. Mahoney leads a panel discussion with Kitt Potter (executive director, Maverick Concerts), Meira Blaustein (cofounder and executive director, Woodstock Film Festival), Michael Lang (producer, 1969 Woodstock Music Festival), Jen Dragon (owner, Cross Contemporary Art), and Barbara Bravo (chairperson, Saugerties Studio Tour) at Colony Woodstock. 2. Brian K. Mahoney talking with Lu Ann Bielawa of the Woodstock Invitational Luthier’s Showcase prior to the panel discussion. 3. Tom Pignone of Mountainview Studio talking with Chronogram publisher Jason Stern. 4. Jeff Beals, Democratic contender for New York’s 19th congressional district, with Suhayr Beals of the Woodstock Day School, and Luminary Media CEO Amara Projansky. 5. Chronogram Conversations attendees enjoying the panel discussion “The Persistence of the Arts in Woodstock and Saugerties.” 6. Wendy Weinrich, co-director of the Mountaintop School. 7. Chronogram publisher Jason Stern warming up the crowd. 8. Woodstock Festival producer Michael Lang, Dawn Seretta of Sunflower Natural Foods, and Luminary Media Marketing Director Brian Berusch. 9. Cellist Daniel Frankhuizen performing at Colony Woodstock during the opening social hour. 8/17 CHRONOGRAM 23


Reuters/Francois Lenoir

The Environmental Defense Fund has gathered and analyzed data from the FDA ranging from 2003 to 2013, focusing on the presence of lead in baby food. The amount of lead in baby food significantly exceeds the amount of lead found in other types of food. Of the 2,164 types of baby food that were tested, 20 percent of them contained detectable levels of lead. The most common places where lead was found included fruit juices, root vegetables, and cookies. The EDF also found that more than one million children consume a level of lead that exceeds the FDA’s limit. Source: Environmental Defense Fund Sexual assault is one of the most commonly reported crimes at sea. According to US government data, sexual assaults on cruise ships exceed the number of any other major offense on board. Of the 92 alleged crime incidents reported on cruise ships in 2016, 62 were related to sexual assault: 70 percent of all criminal incidents were attributed to unwanted sexual contact. This is not a new problem for cruise lines: In 1999, Carnival Cruise Lines stated there had been 108 accusations of sexual assault and sexual misconduct aboard its ships within a five-year period. In October 2015, a 15-year-old girl attended an alcohol-free teen club on board a Carnival cruise ship. She left the club to get ice cream and was attacked and raped by a group of drunk men. Florida-based Attorney Michael Winkelman stated that if the cruise lines “were truly honest and transparent to the general public about the risk of rape and sexual assault at sea, their business would likely go down.” Source: New York Times, Quartz, Miami New Times Politicians introduced a bill into the Senate calling for the cessation of tax-payerfunded stadiums. Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey and Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma both supported the proposal of the bill that would prohibit the use of municipal bonds to fund sports stadiums. “Professional sports teams generate billions of dollars in revenue. There’s no reason why we should give these multimillion dollar businesses a federal tax break to build new stadiums,” stated Booker. In September 2016, the Brookings Institution reported that $3.2 billion in federal taxpayer money has been used to fund the construction or renovation of 36 sports stadium since 2010. According to the report, the New York Yankees had received $431 million in federal money, while the Chicago Bears received $205 million, and the New York Mets received $185 million. Source: ESPN Starting in 2019, Volvo will make all of their cars electric. The car company, owned by the Zhejiang Geely Holding Group, will be getting rid of all combustion engines 24 CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Snorting cacao powder is now a thing. It’s called Coco Loko. (You can buy your 1.25-ounce can for $24.99.) An Orlando-based company called Legal Lean came up with the idea two years ago—to snort the same chemicals that exist in energy drinks for a high that lasts up to an hour. Founder Nick Anderson was inspired by the “chocolate-snorting trend” he’d heard about in Europe. He stated the effects were “almost like an energy-drink feeling, like you’re euphoric but also motivated to get things done.” The idea behind the powder was to create the drug-free version of “lean”—a cough-syrup cocktail made with promethazine or codeine, also known as “purple drank.” Anderson stated he uses Coco Loko for music festivals, long car rides, and “those types of social situations when you feel anxious.” Source: Washington Post and focusing solely on electric motors. The company plans to release five new models between 2019 and 2021—three will be Volvos and two would be branded as Polestar. BMW also has plans to release an electric version of its 3 series in September. Source: Reuters In June, 101-year-old Julia Hawkins became the champion in the 100-yard dash in her age group (women 100 and older). Known as “Hurricane Hawkins,” her record for the dash—39.62 seconds—was set at the National Senior Games in Birmingham, Alabama. She also competed in the 50-yard dash, where she out-ran competitors at least 10 years younger than she is, clocking in at 18.31 seconds. Hawkins just recently picked up running as a hobby, when she turned 100. Source: AP News In early June, the US Supreme Court removed a North Carolina law that banned sex offenders from social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. The law, implemented in 2008, made it a felony for sex offenders to use online social media services that could lead to communication with minors. “To foreclose access to social media altogether is to prevent the user from engaging in the legitimate exercise of First Amendment rights,” Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote. “Even convicted criminals—and in some instances, especially convicted criminals—might receive legitimate benefits from these means for access to the world of ideas, in particular if they seek to reform and to pursue lawful and rewarding lives.” Source: Reuters, Washington Post The most expensive House race in history occurred in June with candidates and outside groups spending about $55 million. Republican Karen Handel, the winner, and Democrat Jon Ossoff ran in a special election for a Georgia House seat. The seat was formerly held by Tom Price, who left to take on a new role as the health and human services secretary in Trump’s administration. Ossoff raised $23.6 million from his campaign, while Handel raised $4.5 million. Fifty-six percent of Handel’s donations came from Georgia. California and New York funded the majority of contributions for Ossoff. Handel also received $25 million support from party committees and “super PACs” mostly in advertising against the Democrat side. The cost of the 2017 race was nearly double the amount of the last House race, which was in Florida in 2012. Source: CNN, BBC, New York Times Compiled by Diana Waldron


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PIANO FESTIVAL Anna Polonsky/Orion Weiss, duo piano – January 14, 2018 Roman Rabinovitch, piano – January 28, 2018 Charlie Albright, piano – February 11, 2018 Inon Barnatan, piano – March 4, 2018 SPRING CONCERTS Jason Vieaux, guitar – March 18, 2018 Parker String Quartet with Charles Neidich, clarinet – April 8, 2018 Harlem String Quartet with Michael Brown, piano – April 29, 2018 Calidore String Quartet – March 20, 2018 All concerts are at 4pm at the Howland Cultural Center, 477 Main Street, Beacon, NY FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO PURCHASE TICKETS: HOWLANDMUSIC.ORG • 845-765-3012

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8/17 CHRONOGRAM 25


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26 CHRONOGRAM 8/17


GILLIAN FARRELL

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Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

BATTERIES VS. HYDROGEN

accept happiness when it drives up. In these dismal times of rising seas, droughts, forest fires, intense storms, and the United States withdrawing from the Climate Change Accords, hydrogen cars are heading east. George W. Bush was an advocate of hydrogen cars. Generally speaking, if he was for it, there was almost certainly a good reason to be against it. Back then, the reasons were that he was advocating them as a way to say that technology would be the answer, not regulations or government action, and that most everyone else was saying that hydrogen cars were a future dream, like power from safe nuclear fusion or colonizing Mars as an alternative human habitation when this planet was excessively trashed, too far away to consider seriously. There are three ways to use hydrogen to move a vehicle. The first is the same way NASA uses it to launch rockets. Do that with a car and it’s fast, fun, and very impractical. The second is the same way we use gas and diesel, in an internal combustion engine. The advantage is that the only waste product is water vapor. A hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine was first invented in 1807. One hundred and 58 years later, a high school student converted a Ford Model A to run on hydrogen, which is to say a normal car could be altered without much difficulty to run on hydrogen.Two hundred and a few years later, they’re mostly showing up in concept cars and experimental vehicles. The third is a hydrogen fuel cell. A membrane gets in the way of hydrogen’s urge to join with oxygen to become water (H2O). It strips the electrons from the hydrogen and makes them travel through a circuit to get back to the hydrogen ions, which is what you call a hydrogen atom that’s lost its electrons, as it joins the oxygen. Electrons through a circuit is electrical energy, and there you go, an electric car, trailing water vapor. If you’re in California and you see a hydrogen car, that’s what they’re running on, hydrogen fuel cells. The advantage of hydrogen cars over battery operated is that they can go 300-plus miles on a single tank and refuel in minutes. Though Tesla has a car edging up on a 200-mile range and a super-charger that can do the job in 30 minutes, most e-cars go less than 100 miles on a full charge, and take one to six hours to recharge. Toyota was first in the market with hydrogen cars. Over 1,000 are on the road, with a goal of 3,000 by the end of the year. Honda started just this this year. There are already 30 hydrogen filling stations in California, so you can roam the whole state. What got me excited is that hydrogen fueling stations are coming to the Bronx! For those who don’t know, the Bronx is what Brooklyn used to be before it became a destination for French people looking for fashionable restaurants. I wouldn’t be surprised if a hydrogen station was coming to Brooklyn. In fact, one is. It’s part of a set of 12, from Long Island, through New York, even into New Jersey, and on up to Boston.

Elon Musk says hydrogen fuel cells are “mind-bogglingly stupid” and other dreadful things. Musk is the CEO of Tesla, a company that’s never made a profit, only sells 80,000 cars a year, yet became (however briefly), the most valuable car company in the world. His business is not just the e-vehicles, it’s designing and building the batteries they run on. Is he right? Hydrogen is the most common element in our universe (the part that’s not dark matter and dark energy). The problem is that hydrogen loves other elements so compulsively that it’s always bonding with them to form hydrocarbons, water, whathaveyous, so you practically never see a hydrogen atom on his or her own, and if they are, they’re so light that they float out of Earth’s atmosphere. If you want hydrogen for fuel cells, you have to break it away from some other relationship. That costs energy. These days, most fuel cell hydrogen comes from natural gas. So isn’t it more energy efficient, less expensive, and even greener, to just go ahead and use the natural gas as gas? The answer is well yes, sort of, and at the moment. If, sometime in the future, we used solar or wind power for electrolysis to take hydrogen from water, those answers all change. For the better. In addition to Toyota and Honda, the companies betting on hydrogen cars include Audi, BMW, Ford, Mercedes-Benz, Pininfarina (0 to 62 mph in 3.4 seconds, goes 186 mph, and refuels in three minutes), there’s a Welsh start-up, Riversimple, and General Motors has produced a monster military version. The auto wars for the future appear to be batteries vs. hydrogen. GM is actually much more invested in battery cars. They’ve been first to produce a mass market totally electric car, the Bolt, with a range of more than 200 miles, about $30,000 with the $7,500 federal rebate. They are not selling very well. But Tesla’s version, which does not yet exist, has terrific sales. Volvo has announced that it’s going all electric or hybrid by 2019. Just two years from now. Volvo is owned by Geely, a Chinese company. A Swedish car maker going green is about as unexpected as spotting a single-speed bicycle in Brooklyn. But when it’s secretly a Chinese car company, that’s exciting. And much bigger. Geely intends to produce 1,000,000 electrified cars by 2025. Norway, plans to be auto-emission free by 2025.The Dutch parliament (the lower house) has passed a bill that no new gas or diesel cars will be sold after 2025. France has plans to end the sale of gas and diesel cars by 2040.What’s really important is that Peugeot-Citroen, their largest auto company, is onboard, already planning to be 80-percent hybrid and electric by 2023. India is talking about making all the cars in their country electric by 2030. The politics over climate change, especially in America, are a treacherous place of lies, confusion, and delusion, fueled by big oil, big money, and ideology. The deniers will still be calling it a hoax when Atlantic waves meet tides from the Gulf of Mexico and salt the greens at Mar-a-Lago. Hopefully, it won’t come to that. They’re being rescued, in spite of themselves, by liberal politicians in Europe, by China, by India, and, can you imagine this, the planet saved by General Motors.

Volvo has announced that it’s going all electric by 2019. A Swedish car maker going green is about as unexpected as spotting a singlespeed bicycle in Brooklyn.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM 27


Art of Business PROFILES OF OUR ADVERTISING PARTNERS

The small businesses of the Hudson Valley are the engine of our local living economy. These enterprises are of a different type than national and global business brands. They are owned and run by our friends, neighbors, and the fellow participants in our community. Rather than being siphoned off to Wall Street, the money these businesses take in is immediately circulated back into the local economy, a natural reinvestment in the commons. This Art of Business section in Chronogram is to introduce the founders and creators, and tell the inspiring and instructive backstories of these local businesses.

LIVING THE DREAM

At Dreaming Goddess New Age and Esoteric Gift Shop, Rhianna Mirabello makes it a priority to offer a safe space for seekers, offering easily affordable classes and workshops and free gatherings. Giving back to the community, in her case, is not just a catchphrase but a necessity. “I was a single mom of a toddler, struggling to make ends meet, when I started doing beadwork and selling it at festivals and in church basements all up and down the East Coast,” she says. “My son was seven when the perfect store became available, but I had no savings. The community basically gathered around me and said, ‘You must do this’ and handed me $5,000. I could never have imagined what life would look like now, 22 years later; I just followed spirit, and the greater good is what drives the business. My son basically grew up in the store; he’s 33 now and grateful for all of it.” Dreaminggoddess.com

Rhianna Mirabello and her son Tyler at the 2016 grand opening of the expanded Dreaming Goddess in Poughkeepsie.

Clockwise from left: Pablo Weinschenk blowing glass; inside the Woodstock Art Exchange; the Exchange is located near the intersection of Routes 375 and 28.

TRANSLUCENT VISIBILITY

Pablo Weinschenk moved his glassblowing operation, Pablo Glass, from Rockland County up to Woodstock after his original space was wrecked by Hurricane Irene. Then he found himself drawn to a big old house out on Rt. 28 near the intersection of Rt. 375. “It became available, so I took a year and built Woodstock Art Exchange. We show the works of all the glassblowers from the studio, and the walls are for rotating shows from local painters. People in the neighborhood seem very happy, both the artists and the visitors, to have a slice of Woodstock out on the main highway. We get a lot of people who move up here stopping in, wanting ‘something special for the new place.’” Woodstockartexchange.com 28 ART OF BUSINESS CHRONOGRAM 8/17


EN POINTE

Kaatsbaan, in Tivoli, is an internationally renowned “cultural park for dance” founded in 1990 by four young dancers with Woodstock homes. Today, Kaatsbaan hosts residencies for up to 20 dance companies a year; in 2016, over 200 professionals from Singapore, Spain, France, Italy, Argentina, Cuba, Brazil, Japan, Canada, New York, and nearly every state performed in their black-box theater. Given that thousands of young creatives have dreamed of buying a farm and inviting their favorite colleagues to hang out, we asked co-founder Gregory Cary how this group made it real. So what was the path from performers to founders? We formed a 501(c)3, non-profit organization and created a model, an upstate creative-residency center for dance. The Dutchess County Department of Planning and Development helped us write an 86-page business plan to present to the IDA. They liked it and financed the purchase of Tivoli Farms and the construction of studios and the 160-seat black box theater with a $3.9 million bond. Two years later, Governor Pataki kicked in $1.25 million for onsite housing and we launched a major dance residency program. So clearly your model’s been well-received. New York Theatre Ballet soloist Steven Melendez says he looks forward to the company’s return in 2018, “because I feel so very comfortable there.” Choreographer Doug Varone says he does some of his best work “when I’m alone at Kaatsbaan, just listening.” ZviDance director Zvi Gotheimer called Kaatsbaan “a passionate vision of community in a modern age.” Exactly what we intended.

Gregory Cary

What is Extreme Ballet? Isn’t ballet extreme to begin with? In the winter, we go to 18 cities and audition over 500 pre-professional dancers, ages 13 to 18, and we bring 120 of them here for nine weeks of intensive training, and that’s Extreme Ballet®. The competition to get in is tough; the work is intensely focused and hard, which is the only way a dancer will ever achieve their goals. Kaatsbaan.org

ZviDance performs “On the Road,” created during a Kaatsbaan residency by Zvi Gotheimer and performed at Kaatsbaan.

CURATING THE CHANGES

Nancy Felcetto is having a blast running the Hudson Valley outpost of leading metro realtor Halstead with her sister Robin. “We had fun working Tribeca, lunch at Maxwell’s and 21, all that, but after a while I was walking around talking to myself,” she says. “Had to get out. So we bought a place in Ghent and started to think we could bring a little city up here with us—and I’ve just kept meeting people. I met my husband (Roy, owner of popular Hudson restaurant Ca’Mea) up here. “My mother was one of the founders of the National Organization for Women; she worked with Bella Abzug and for Eugene McCarthy’s campaign, so we were stuffing envelopes and marching on Washington when we were 10, 11 years old. She raised us to stay humble, empathize, and take care of ourselves; nobody will come along and do it for you. So we guide without pushing, we make transitions comfortable, and we stay attentive. The capitalist system has done great harm to agriculture and health, and I pay attention to that.” Halstead.com/real-estate-agent/nancy-felcetto Clockwise from top left, properties available through Nancy Felcetto at Halstead Realty: The Bavarian Manor in Purling; the Lady of the Lake, formerly a chapel for the Graymoor Friars, at Indian Lake; 705-707 Cherry Alley in Hudson.

FOR MORE PROFILES OF INSPIRING LOCAL BUSINESSES VISIT CHRONOGRAM.COM/ARTOFBUSINESS 8/17 CHRONOGRAM ART OF BUSINESS 29


Education

Governor Cuomo announced his Excelsior Scholarship to students and faculty at LaGuardia Community College in Queens on January 3.

Is Tuition-Free College Really Free? THE EXCELSIOR SCHOLARSHIP By Anne Pyburn Craig

J

uly 21st was the application deadline for the launch of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Excelsior scholarship program, widely hailed at its January announcement as the “first” free tuition program to include four-year college in the United States. (California offered residents tuition-free public postsecondary education until 1982, as did CUNY until 1976.) Side by side with Senator Bernie Sanders, a vocal advocate of free postsecondary education who included it as a cornerstone of his presidential campaign platform, Cuomo announced that since college was now as necessary as high school, he wanted to be sure it was available to every family. The first round of Excelsior scholarships, rolling out this year, will exempt families making under $100,000 a year from the $6,470 tuition portion of a SUNY price tag or the $4,350 to $4,800 tuition at a community college. By 2020, the program will have expanded to cover those making under $125,000, or roughly 80 percent of all families in New York. Initial estimates from SUNY suggested that 80,000 current students—about 20 percent—fit the criteria. Excelsior funding would kick in to cover tuition expenses not covered by funds from federal Pell grants or monies from New York’s Tuition Assistance Program (TAP). “I endorse the Excelsior Scholarship Program’s goals of increasing college affordability and completion for more New York students and their families. It will help more students gain access to high-quality public higher education in NewYork,” SUNY New Paltz President Donald Christian wrote in an e-mailed statement in mid July. “At this time, it is still difficult to predict exactly how

30 EDUCATION CHRONOGRAM 8/17

many students might qualify for the Excelsior Scholarship and the impact it will have on the College. The application deadline is not until July 21 and it’s unclear at this time how many will qualify for the program. We are working daily with the Higher Education Services Corporation to process applications and verify eligibility as quickly as possible.” Generally, higher education administrators and advocates are pleased with any news that makes college more accessible to more people in an era of crippling college loan debt and declining enrollment. (Between 2010 and 2017, SUNY enrollment dropped by over 7 percent.) But the restrictions placed on the aid have some shaking their heads: The scholarship does not cover room, board, or books; students must remain New York residents and work here for the same number of years that they have received the Excelsior; and they must be enrolled full-time, something many lower-income and nontraditional students can’t manage while also paying living expenses. SUNY Ulster President Alan P. Roberts agrees the program addresses an important goal. “The fact that the governor focused on higher education is exceptional,” Roberts says. “It draws attention to the fact that New York residents absolutely need additional training after high school. He’s sending the message that education is important to our economy. The statistics ring very true: 70 percent of new jobs need some type of post-secondary education and 50 percent of our population has none, and that is alarming. The jobs won’t come here if they can’t find the people.” Roberts doesn’t expect the Excelsior scholarship to be a huge factor in


REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst Governor Cuomo with US Senator Bernie Sanders at LaGuardia Community College for the unveiling of the first signature proposal of his 2017 agenda: making college tuition-free for New York’s middle-class families at all SUNY and CUNY two- and four-year colleges.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM EDUCATION 31


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My Climate Change

Friday, September 8 at 7 p.m. Award-winning science journalist Andrew Revkin to discuss lessons learned, and unlearned, in 30 years of reporting on climate change, from the North Pole to the Vatican. Now at ProPublica, Revkin was with the New York Times for two decades. Seating is first come first served.

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SUNY Ulster’s enrollment. “It doesn’t really hit our demographic,” he says. “Most of our traditional students leave debt-free, even before this. We have very low tuition despite having some of the best professors in the state; the TAP program is heaven-sent, and they just opened up the Pell grants to cover summer study. I do believe SUNY will see an enrollment increase, but most of those students were coming one way or another anyway—you can pretty much predict enrollments. I’d love to see a big increase here; we’re far from full capacity.” The people Roberts believes could really use some help are the nontraditional scholars: older students who have already launched in life and want to add velocity and altitude on their journeys. “Most of our students are actually part time, students who end up back in school after a year or two or 10 and may be juggling kids or working two jobs,” he says. “There’s not as much assistance for these people as there should be. And they’re likely to stay around and use their degree in New York—their lives here are already established.” Private colleges, meanwhile, were offered something that struck many administrators as an afterthought and not much of one at that. “The Excelsior was designed to enhance access to public, not private schools, and that drew some criticism,” says Mount Saint Mary College President David Kennett. “In response to that, they created an Enhanced Tuition Award program that accompanies Excelsior and applies to private colleges and universities. Qualifying students can get an additional $3,000 on top of their existing aid, as long as the school pledges to match it with $3,000 from their own aid budget.” Kennett is somewhat underwhelmed by this prospect, as are many of his counterparts—of New York’s 90 private colleges, only 30 have chosen to opt in. “This was created in response to the criticisms offered at the time by those who felt that the Excelsior program would undermine the financial position of private colleges. It’s in its first year, and no one fully understands it yet. We think the two thirds of schools that aren’t participating this year may be able to opt in later, but it isn’t certain.” Mount Saint Mary has opted in on Enhanced Tuition Awards this year, says Kennett. “We have a very serious commitment to exploring all possible ways to lower costs for students, so it was incumbent on us to involve ourselves in this,” he says. “That said, Excelsior may be a boon to society as a whole, but not necessarily for private schools. There was a study from Georgetown University that said free public tuition could reduce enrollment at private colleges by 7 to 15 percent by making us less attractive financially. And I don’t think this ETA program will help us as much as we would like; requiring the matching investment from our own financial aid funds puts additional strain on colleges that may already be quite stressed.” Basic tuition at Mount Saint Mary is $28,233 this year without financial aid; with room, board, and other fees, a year there costs $44,811. Of 411 freshman who began studying there last year, 410 received grants averaging $14,603 and 76 percent took out federal loans averaging $7,736. Statewide, 86 percent of students at private not-for-profit schools get grants and 42 percent get federal loans. It’s an evolving scenario, set against a backdrop of fewer high school seniors and of tension surrounding student loan debt, rising tuitions, and (in some quarters) questioning of the intrinsic value of higher education in the first place. Private schools with national enrollment draw, such as Vassar and NYU, have generally chosen to sit out the first year of the ETA program. Smaller private colleges—both in New York and nationally—are struggling, and Kennett says Excelsior may have unintended consequences. “I would have liked to see more evenhanded assistance,” he says. “You have to remember that there are already problems with oversubscription at public colleges; this will increase enrollment, but without more resources, that will lead to problems. So in Albany they’re talking about increasing resources directed to public schools—and if all that happens, yes, the privates will see enrollment pressure. It’s possible that some may be forced out of business, meaning their physical and financial resources will be lost. “The future for young people and for America depends on access to college, and inasmuch as government is drawing attention to that, we can all applaud,” says Kennett. “But if this increases stress on private colleges and reduces their number, I don’t think that’s the result the governor intended.”


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Community Pages

BODY & SOUL

A performance of “Mary Poppins” at the Woodstock Playhouse.

WOODSTOCK & SAUGERTIES BY TOM GILLON PHOTOS BY JOHN GARAY Woodstock Perhaps lured in by the smell of fresh-baked brioche, visitors to Bread Alone on Mill Hill Road are greeted with an array of pastries and bread that immediately catches the eye and tantalizes the stomach. A changing selection of chalkboard quotes complements this display, including a recently featured John Muir saying that astutely describes not only the ethos of Bread Alone, but the evolving creative spirit of the entire Hudson Valley: “Everyone needs beauty as well as bread, places to play and pray, where nature heals and gives strength to body and soul alike.” Anyone who has met for a lunch date in Saugerties or spent an afternoon browsing the storefronts of Woodstock will find that Muir’s quote resonates. Each town has become a cultural beacon for the Hudson Valley, offering a diverse selection of food, art, commerce, and entertainment that consistently delights natives and visitors alike. Although the “peace, love, and music” mythology of the `60s is certainly still a big part of the Woodstock way of life, the town has evolved to be much more than a monument to the past. Instead, current residents look to the legendary music festival as a source of inspiration for their current creative endeavors, which manage to find expression in an expansive collective of restaurants, stores, and galleries. The Kleinert/James Art Center is located in the heart of town and houses exhibits such as “Drawing Sound” (opening August 25), a series of colorful, abstract images that function both as musical notation and works of visual art. One of the center’s goals is to honor the legacy of Byrdcliffe, a utopian arts colony established in 1902 that 36 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 8/17

stood against rapid industrialization by highlighting the skill and nobility of handmade craftsmanship. Establishments such as the Woodstock Art Exchange show that these values still hold credence today by providing local craftsmen, painters, sculptors, and glassblowers with a forum to showcase and sell their work. A revolving collection of handblown glass is always for sale, while temporary curated shows like Linda Knaus’s “Ode to Bees” often make use of other media. Budding creatives looking to have a voice in the thriving cultural conversation can hone their skills at the Woodstock School of Art, which offers classes in various media by noted local artists like Poly Law, Staats Fasoldt, and Kate McGloughlin. However, fine art galleries and schools are far from the only spaces that nurture Woodstock’s connection between community and the arts. As a legendary bookstore, the Golden Notebook has been a cultural institution since 1978, and has only grown in its role as a community hub since Jacqueline Kellachan took the reins in 2010. The shop organizes frequent community events, has hosted conversations with literary giants such as Joyce Carol Oates and Neil Gaiman, and sponsors fundraiser book fairs that have given thousands of dollars to local schools and nonprofits. For Kellachan, a devotion to strong community interaction has been the key to keeping the shop alive: “We believe that books are things that can bring people together,” says Kellechan. “One way that this can happen is through our author events, but another way is just providing the physical space for serendipity, where people from all over the country can wander in and find books, and maybe each other.”


Crusaders Black vs. CT Hornets (Annual Kingston American Legion Post 150 Ulster Fillies) at the Cantine Memorial Complex in Saugerties. A&P Bar in Woodstock.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 37


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Clockwise from top: Angel Lemus at Woodstock Meats in Woodstock; smiling faces at Bread Alone in Woodstock; Jaime Keeling, at Sunflower Natural Foods Market in Woodstock; Jen Powlison at Wise Old Owl in Saugerties; Kylla, True, Jordan, Lauren and Michael at the Garden Cafe in Woodstock.

Those who immerse themselves in Woodstock cuisine will find that a good meal can be just as inspiring as a trip to the gallery. There’s certainly no shortage of options – dozens of delectable eateries populate the streets surrounding the village green. The Garden Cafe borrows a page from the flower-power playbook, offering up a completely vegetarian menu that will tempt the palate of even the most ardent carnivore with dishes such as the spicy-sweet curried tofu and fresh mango sandwich. The Joyous Lake, a historic nightclub that has been graced by performances from the likes of Charles Mingus and the Rolling Stones, is set to serve up a locally-sourced, vegetable-centric menu when it reopens as Silvia this fall. If you need something sweet to snack on while walking around town, be sure to stop by Nancy’s Artisanal Creamery, where the all-natural, farm-fresh ice cream flavors range from the essential to the experimental (their Keegan Ales-inspired Mother’s Milk scoop beautifully merges the worlds of craft beer and handmade ice cream.) Looking to spend a night out on the town? Stop in to A&P Bar—recently opened by Nina Paturel and Pierre-Luc Moeys of Oriole 9—for specialty cocktails featuring Hudson Valley spirits and a curated wine list. For dinner, reserve a table at The Pines—a newly established lodge and eatery founded by Jeremy Bernstein, AKA Burnell Pines, who is a local musician with deep roots in the Woodstock community. The menu draws from the landscape of the Catskills and features a dynamic selection of dishes such as cucumber and red onion gazpacho and burgers made with local beef. Bernstein embraces the growing and shifting nature of Woodstock, but believes that its core spirit remains true to its history: “I still always feel like there’s this cozy, hometown aspect of Woodstock [that] hasn’t changed as much as everywhere else. I think that the base community is rich and strong…alive.” 8/17 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 39


Clockwise from top: Woodstock Playhouse; Paula Chandler at The Golden Notebook in Woodstock; a room at the White Dove Rockotel in Woodstock; Angel Thorbjornsen at Miss Lucy’s Kitchen in Saugerties; Jen Dragon next to monotypes by Richard Bosman at Cross Contemporary Art in Saugerties; “The Abstract Landscape” exhibit at the Kleinert/James Center for the Arts in Woodstock.

Saugerties Travel about nine miles east and you’ll find the village of Saugerties, a lively center for art and commerce that has become a tourism magnet in its own right. So what’s drawing in the visitors? According to Mark Smith, chair of the Saugerties Chamber of Commerce: “The largest industry in Saugerties is tourism. In order to support that, you need restaurants, you need points of interest [such as] the lighthouse and Opus 40. There’s plenty to do here.” Indeed, Saugerties is home to a wide variety of cultural attractions that set the town apart from the rest of the Hudson Valley. Many visitors come for the mystical experience of exploring Opus 40’s sprawling expanse of climbable rock sculpture, while others may have been signaled by the Saugerties Lighthouse, the only lighthouse on the Hudson accessible entirely on foot. Performances by the Arm-of-the-Sea Theater company, such as the upcoming (to be performed in Saugerties on August 19) “Dirt: The Secret Life of the Soil,” hope to illuminate the link between humans and their environment through experimental puppet theater that combines art, ecology, and activism. Pro Musica, an organization devoted to hosting and promoting chamber music in Saugerties, will begin its 22nd season on September 17 with a concert by the acclaimed Boston Trio. However, the epicenter of Saugerties is undoubtedly its collection of friendly storefronts, each brimming with life and surrounded by bustling foot traffic. 40 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 8/17


Contemporary Art of the Mid-Hudson/Catskills Region

Rodney Alan Greenblat (detail)

August 5 - 27, 2017

Reception: Saturday, August 5, 4-6 pm Juror: David A. Ross

Chair, MFA Art Practice School of Visual Arts Former director, Whitney Museum of American Art, and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. For a list of artists please visit woodstockart.org

Panel Discussion: Who Speaks for Whom The Issue of Voice in the Visual Arts

Led by David A. Ross with Ike Onyewuenyi and Jillian Steinhauer Saturday, August 19, 2pm $12/$8 WAAM members WAAM’s Recent Trends Series is made possible with support from the New York State Council on the Arts and the Milton & Sally Avery Foundation

Fathom: Hudson River Hurricane Data as Music

Created and Performed by Mimi Goese and Ben Neill Sunday, August 20, 2pm $12/$8 WAAM members

Woodstock Artists Association & Museum, 28 Tinker Street, Woodstock NY 12498 woodstockart.org • info@woodstockart.org • 845-679-2940

8/17 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 41


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Many of the village’s businesses locate themselves at the crossroads of utility and style: The veteran barbers at Union Shave have invented a lifestyle brand on the cutting edge of men’s fashion, and offer up clothing and skate decks alongside fades and pompadours; Green showcases a selection of recycled or sustainable mid-century furniture that has the potential to awaken the interior designer within all of us; and Montano’s Shoes promises a trusted, custom footwear experience that has attracted patrons from across the region for over 100 years. Bibliophiles will find themselves right at home in between the stacks of used books at Our Bookshop, and those looking for caffeine and a comfy chair to read in are welcome to spend the day at Inquiring Minds, a bookstore and coffee shop located just down the street. Culinary tourists will have plenty of innovative dishes to sample, no matter what their tastes. Lucky Chocolates sculpts organic sweets into detailed bulldogs and terriers that are almost too adorable to eat, while the Dutch Ale House combines a historic atmosphere (rows of wooden clogs adorning the walls conjure the town’s Dutch heritage) with a diverse local beer list to keep ale aficionados in their seats. Deli-Cioso combines authentic Caribbean fare with American classics to create masterwork sandwiches such as their bestselling Cubano, and the multicultural menu of the newly opened Wise Old Owl has piqued the curiosity of those keen on vegetarian and pescatarian fare. Those in search of casual fine dining should look no further than the Red Onion, a 19th-century farmhouse turned restaurant that features an elegantly eclectic menu that spotlights old favorites such as the braised beef short rib as well as the more adventurous sautéed calf’s liver. Nestled between these storefronts and eateries are Cross Contemporary Art and Emerge, two galleries that ensure the fine arts maintain a presence right in the center of town. Emerge focuses on upcoming yet respected artists in the Hudson Valley and New York metro area, while Cross features the work of established, mid-career artists. In an effort to make purchasing the featured art economically viable for a wider audience, Cross owner/curator Jen Dragon encourages her artists to sell more affordable paper works as well as paintings. In this way, she hopes to involve more people in the fine arts community: “These are artists who live among us, and they happen to be world class, but then also possibly [people] can afford to buy [a work of art], and they made a good investment because this artist’s work is also in the MoMA…and yet it’s also something they can have in their living room.”The gallery’s current exhibition, “Site/Sight,” features six painters, all women, who draw on the cultivated practice of close study to create works that challenge the viewer’s concepts of scale and perception. In their own ways, Saugerties and Woodstock exemplify the mixture of art, commerce, and community that has made the Hudson Valley a distinctly alluring place to live and explore. Marjorie Block, a Saugerties native and tourism director who also happens to work as an artist in Woodstock, is intimately familiar with both communities. She believes that the area’s expanding success can be attributed to its willingness to simultaneously respect the past and welcome the future: “There are families who have been here for generations, but newer families are being embraced, newer businesses are finding a home here, and we want that.”


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The House

Valerie Shaff’s Carpenter Gothic cottage was designed by 19th-century landscape architect A. J. Downing. Downing was inspired by both the romantic movement and the egalitarian ideals of early American life. “Tasteful simplicity, not fanciful complexity, is the true character of cottages,” he wrote in The Architecture of Country Houses. “Nature here, as always, must constantly be respected.”

Capturing the Wild A PHOTOGRAPHER FINDS THE RIGHT FRAME IN GERMANTOWN by Mary Angeles Armstrong photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid

44 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 8/17


Valerie Shaff and Stephen Kingsley enjoying their front porch. Behind them hangs a painting of a chipmunk by outsider artist Earl Swanigan.

I

n photography, as in life, timing is everything. Portrait artist Valerie Shaff has built a career, a home, and a life by mastering this truth. Best known for her intimate photos of the living and the wild, her work, born of patience and skill, captures and reveals the essence of the creatures—untamed and domesticated—that live amongst us. Shaff’s cottage, overlooking a quiet road in Germantown, is an embodiment of this same creative principle. Designed by 19th-century landscape architect Andrew Jackson Downing and built in 1843, the carpenter gothic home, painted camouflage green, blends with the surrounding pastoral landscape. Rooted in egalitarian ideals, Downing’s architectural plans rejected pretension and encouraged simplicity, usefulness, and reverence for the natural world. Symmetry and proportion, he believed, were the keys to beautiful composition, and a beautiful home should be accessible to all. In much the same way Downing believed a home’s interior should frame the surrounding landscape, Shaff’s home serves as gallery for the fauna surrounding her. Hanging in simple frames along the home’s interior walls and printed onto plush cushions lining couches and seats throughout the house, her diverse array of images offers a candid glimpse into the natural world. Animals are everywhere: Along the living room walls, snakes slither and a bison stomps. At the door to the downstairs bath, a dark horse is framed by a bright printed backdrop; on another wall there is a bright yellow duckling against a stark background of black. Shot with film then printed on canvas or material, Shaff’s photographs seem as natural in the domestic setting as an otter swimming in a lake.

Gateway Species A Westchester native, Shaff grew up in a family of artists and a home full of pets. “We had a menagerie,” she explains, “there were golden retrievers, cats, hamsters, and turtles—my brother even had a pet piranha for a while. I was always fascinated by watching animals be who they are.” At age seven, her parents gave her a camera and a love of picture taking was born. College years were spent at Bard, where Shaff began her studies as a painter. When the school started a photography department, it was only natural for her to lay down her brushes and pick up a camera, and Shaff shifted majors. After graduation, she took every opportunity available to make connections and further develop her craft, photographing everything from nightclubs to fishermen to historic homes for the architect Joseph Pell Lombardi. Shaff’s talent for working with other species emerged in those early days of her career. It began with pictures of dairy cows she had often biked past during her time upstate. The series on cows lead her to study other farm animals and then to dogs—a creature that, like many people, she’d always felt a close affinity with. Those early canine portraits proved so popular a friend suggested she try a book. This was in the early days of Amazon and both her subject matter and the platform amplifying it were fresh. The combination of those factors proved to be combustible and the resulting coffee table book If Only You Knew How Much I Smell You, published in 1998 in collaboration with humorist Roy Blount Jr., sold a quarter of a million copies and landed her on the NewYork Times bestseller list. The success launched her to new professional and creative heights. 8/17 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 45


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Above: The library and study area of Shaff’s home. True to the spirit of gothic architecture, the home’s ample doors and windows invite the outside in. “One of beauties of being in the woods is affirming your own romantic natural essence—your animal being,” Shaff explains. Right: The dining area of Shaff’s home overlooking the backyard. “In the warmer weather we live between the house, the out building, and the iron bed under a shade tree,” she explains.

By day, Shaff worked for a dog food company; in her creative hours she continued what was to become one of her life’s major works. Her close, careful photographic study of animals took her to rescue facilities, sanctuaries, and farms. Along the way, Shaff encountered sheep, roosters, bunnies, dolphins, owls, wolves, and even rhinos and zebras. (Shaff’s photo of a musk ox, Baby Highlander, appeared on the February 2004 cover of this magazine.) With each new encounter her passion for her subject matter deepened. “It’s such an honor,” she says, “to be up close and personal with an animal you might not otherwise have an opportunity to connect with.” Shaff was studying the natural world, but what she was really gaining was a better understanding of herself. “Living with animals is a lot like doing yoga,” she explains. “Through the careful observation of nature, humans can have a reflective, meditative experience and also get in touch with our intuition. Animals can help us feel more magical about life.” Animal Refuge Success kept her busy, but her heart never really left the Hudson Valley. After years of alternating between traveling for work, her Manhattan apartment, and weekends in the country, Shaff decided to buy a full-time residence upstate. With the same patience and clarity of vision she utilizes in her work, she searched out her house. “I wanted a refuge,” she explains. “I was single and wanted a place I could be comfortable with on my own.” 8/17 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 47


Above: Kingsley, a real estate agent in Hudson, relaxing next to a pillow printed with one of Shaff’s hawk portraits. Many of Shaff’s bird portraits were taken at Green Chimneys Farm and Wildlife Center in Brewster. A row of pillows printed with Shaff’s bunny portraits. Designed to be affordable and lived with, her compositions are simple yet singular expressions of each animal subject, and by extension, the humans that identify with them.

48 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 8/17


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When she found the two-acre compound in Germantown, she was struck by its simple beauty and how much the aesthetic matched her own creative vision. “It embodied harmony between the interior and the natural world,” she explains. A covered front porch overlooked a yard with a giant shade oak. Scrollwork around the windows and a slight touch of gingerbread ornamentation accentuated the board and batten siding. Downing’s ideals were also expressed in ways large and small throughout the home’s 1,600-square-foot interior.The front door, with original twist doorbell, opened into a parlor with fireplace and wood floors.Through a library with built-in bookshelves was the home’s passthrough kitchen leading to a 20th-century addition. “Every wall was covered in windows,” she explains. However, it was the second-floor landing at the top of the wooden staircase, with its row of casement windows and curved ceiling, that sold Shaff on the place. It was somewhere that was both comfortable and would allow her to live close to nature. She knew she’d found her place to roost, and bought the house in 2000. Familiarity Breeds Content Shaff renovated and restored the home over the next few years, always keeping in mind Downing’s aesthetic of simplicity married to usefulness. She stripped away dated wallpaper and repainted the walls, inside and out, shades of green. In the front parlor, a couch and high back chair sit next to the wooden mantel, where portraits of her dogs, gone but still beloved, watch over everything. She removed a wall between the kitchen and a utility room, raised the floor, and extended the ceiling to create an airy dining area. Benches sit beneath double-hung windows around a table with views to backyard and forest. French doors lead to an added deck and pergola where grapevines, wisteria, and roses engage in a slow battle for dominance. Shaff added rough-hewn wood floors and screened doors to an out building with high-peaked ceilings and a woodstove. It’s been guest room, yoga and photography studio, and the site of much summer dining and dancing. Five years ago, Shaff married real estate agent Stephen Kingsley in the home’s backyard. Upstairs, the master bedroom overlooks the backyard through a large square window. Shaff took space from the second bedroom to expand the upstairs bath. It now contains a soaking tub perched right below another row of casement windows. The addition is where Shaff does much of her production work. She replaced a large picture window with double-hung panes and added an additional row of windows to the northern wall. Here, a large work table dominates and it’s one of the only spaces in the house without animal companionship. Instead, a portrait of wild flowers—the draft of another series—hangs on the wall in the midst of being carefully considered. Just as Downing advised, Shaff finds beauty and a certain symmetry in her life’s unfolding. She finds herself sleeping in the same northwestern corner, along the same ridge above the river, as she slept in her childhood bedroom in Hastings. She’s moved by the same western light as it bounces across the water, the anticipation of the seasons and the same sound of the train. “We live very close to the earth here,” Shaff says. “It’s a beautiful way to live.”

From top: Like the rest of the house, the living room is decorated with Shaff’s images. She’s found that the photos that most resonate with people are analog images that are scanned and digitally printed. Upstairs, Shaff captured space from a front bedroom to build her dream bathroom. This includes a soaking tub with bird’s eye view out the casement windows. The property’s rustic outbuilding has been utilized for guests, as a photo studio and even for dance parties. An iron bed in the outbuilding is decorated with Shaff’s owl portraits printed on pillows. 50 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 8/17


The Garden

Rather than being a mirror image of the canopy, tree roots for most species grow close to the surface in a strongly horizontal plate.

Plates, Not Mirrors: How Tree Roots Grow, and What That Means for Gardeners by Michelle Sutton illustration and photo by Larry Decker

The Rhizotron Has Spoken Most of us grew up with—and still often see—illustrations of a tree’s root system depicted as a mirror image of the tree’s canopy. However tall and wide the canopy, that’s how deep and wide the roots grow, right? Turns out, that’s not the case. Though they were not the first to examine the issue, more than 20 years ago, researchers at Cornell’s Urban Horticulture Institute (UHI) definitely debunked the “mirror image” folklore around tree roots. The UHI researchers observed root growth with the help of a rhizotron, a simple belowground viewing chamber that gives a literal window into a tree’s roots as they grow. (More recently, scientists are using ground-penetrating radar to find out where tree roots are.) The UHI researchers found that the “mirror of the canopy” portrayal of how tree roots grow is incorrect. For the vast majority of species, tree roots grow close to the surface and spread laterally in a webbed plate; the roots get finer in width the farther out you go.You may have observed this yourself on trees that are growing on, say, the edge of a river bank, where some portion of their root system is exposed. Have you ever been digging in the garden, nowhere near a tree, and found fine tree roots and been at a loss as to where they came from? Fine “feeder” roots not only grow horizontally beyond the dripline (the canopy edge), there is often a higher percentage of them beyond the dripline than within it. (This is why those orange plastic six-by-six-foot protection zones around trees on construction sites are woefully inadequate.) Rhizotron observers also found that tree roots are found primarily in the top 12 inches of soil. The reason for this is that oxygen becomes limiting the further down you go through the soil profile.Tiny absorbing roots, responsible for most of the tree’s intake of water and nutrients—and therefore critically important—are in the top few inches of soil, right under your feet. The finer the roots, the greater the surface area through which water can enter by osmosis, which is why conservation of fine roots matters.

Another rather amazing observation UHI researchers made has to do with trees that are harvested from the fields of tree nurseries. The most common digging method—with a hydraulic tree spade, with roots then “balled” in burlap—leaves 90 to 95 percent of tree roots behind in the nursery fields! Furthermore, the critical fine absorbing roots that are harvested are easily broken off, damaged, or desiccated. Water stress, resulting in part from this tremendous reduction in root mass that occurs at the nursery, is the main reason transplanted trees fail. Whether from a nursery field to the city tree lawn, or just from one place in your yard to another, it’s the roots that suffer when trees are transplanted. What can you as a home gardener do to protect your trees’ root systems? Put the tree’s health above your garden ambitions. If you value a tree on your property, give it first consideration over other types of landscape plants. Some treasured tree species, like oaks, dogwoods, and sugar maples, have roots that are especially sensitive to disruption. Resist putting in a major new garden underneath or anywhere near these trees. Instead, let them be the beautiful specimens and focal points that they are, and don’t make them compete with perennials and shrubs for water and nutrients. If you must plant, plant small plants. Smaller plants can be fitted among roots with less root disruption than large plants cause—so go for a perennial in a 4-inch pot rather than a 1-gallon pot. These small plants have to be tough species, however, because they will be competing with tree roots for water and nutrients, and sites permeated with tree roots are likely to be chronically dry. Regardless of species, as you’re establishing those small plants, you’ll need to water them a whole bunch. Don’t wound. Be careful not to wound the major anchoring roots that flare out at the bottom of the trunk, as wounds can lead to decay and they also allow 8/17 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 51


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Community Pages

Peekskill’s Hudson River frontage is one of the city’s greatest assets.

THE FIGHTING CITY PEEKSKILL

BY TIMOTHY MALCOLM PHOTOS BY PAMELA PASCO

J

ust past quiet single-family homes on John Street in Peekskill, the brick, Gothic Revival buildings of the Community of St. Mary magically rise from the earth. Some of the structures date back to the 1870s, when the Episcopal community of sisters acquired the land on a hilltop overlooking the Hudson River. For nearly 130 years the Community of St. Mary served there, operating a girls’ school out of what is now known as Chateau Rive. These sacred buildings (by the way, the girls’ school is thought by some to be the inspiration for the Eastland School of `80s sitcom “The Facts of Life”) are about to change. Fourteen years after acquiring the 47 acres from the Community of St. Mary’s—who’ve since relocated to Washington County—Ginsburg Development Companies is constructing market-rate townhouses near the chapel and convent, then renovating those buildings into a luxury inn with a spa and swimming pool. The $500-million project is the latest in a recent round of punches by Peekskill’s investors, politicians, and residents to earn the unofficial title of “the place to be.” “Peekskill is happening, here, right now,” says Deb Milone, the executive director of the Hudson Gateway Chamber of Commerce, which serves Peekskill. See for yourself: Spend a couple hours walking the city’s cozy streets and burgeoning waterfront, then return a month later: Chances are you’ll see a bunch of new things.

54 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 8/17

One of those new things is Spins Hudson, a 40,000-square-foot entertainment venue at Charles Point Marina that opened in June. Spins has a bowling alley, four-level aerial ropes course, and two-story laser tag arena. Plus there’s a 4,000-square-foot redemption arcade, and bocce and shuffleboard. There’s more to the venue, but first let’s introduce the major players: Louie Lanza, owner of Hudson Hospitality Group; Bill Diamond of Diamond Properties; Scott Vaccaro, owner of Captain Lawrence Brewing Co.; and John Sharp, co-owner of Birdsall House and Gleason’s. Diamond’s Spins Bowl is the alley, Vaccaro is opening a Captain Lawrence satellite brewery, Sharp is running the indoor and outdoor dining operations, and Lanza is the lead developer, adding to a portfolio that includes practically every new restaurant in Peekskill. Those restaurants include two new riverfront neighbors for the stalwart Peekskill Brewery: Taco Dive Bar, whose margaritas are a great companion for happy hour, and Buns-N-Bourbon, whose burger-and-whiskey theme is basically the best way to spend a Saturday evening. Plus there’s the Hudson Room, the sleek sushi-and-cocktails joint two doors from the Paramount Hudson Valley, perfect for a nightcap. Lanza will later in 2017 be opening the Eagle Saloon, whose Low Country menu would pair well with the Buddy Guy show at the Paramount (October 8).


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Art for the Home, Body and Soul

PEEKSKILL 15 oct 2017

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56 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 8/17

World Art Sculptures Home Furnishings Vintage Designer Fabrics and Textiles Wearable Art 15 SOUTH DIVISION STREET PEEKSKILL, NY 10566 HUDSONARTNY@GMAIL.COM 215-410-4071


Birdsall House

Dating back to 1930, the red-brick Paramount remains an anchor for the city’s arts scene. Upcoming concerts include new wavers the Fixx (August. 10) and rockers-for-kids the Dirty Sock Funtime Band (August 20). Don McLean and Howard Jones are among those scheduled for the fall. With all the development happening in Peekskill, the Paramount is among the assurances that the city’s history remains intact and vital. That can also be said for Sharp’s two downtown restaurants, Gleason’s and Birdsall House. The former, named after Peekskill’s Jackie Gleason, maintains a Prohibition aura with cool walls, dim lighting, and a cocktail menu that offers a Manhattan and an Old Fashioned. Also, order the clam pizza, the best this side of the Housatonic. Birdsall—at least the name—dates back to 1776, when GeorgeWashington set down headquarters for the Continental Army at a site across the street called Birdsall House. The property’s role as a neighborhood watering hole dates to the 1940s, when it was John Connolly’s no-nonsense taproom, where patrons watched Friday night fights on the first TV in the city, and their grandkids peered through the windows from outside. Back in 2010 when Sharp and restaurateur Tim Reinke bought the building, they spoke about keeping the past alive. They’ve followed through: photos of Peekskill’s past crowd a brick wall in Birdsall, where solo drinkers, couples, and families eat Carolina BBQ burgers and drink pints of Peekskill Eastern Standard at the outdoor picnic tables or at the friendly bar. “During the day my bocce ball court becomes a sandbox, and that’s totally cool,” says Sharp. “That’s what we want, straddling the lines between being a restaurant, a bar, and place to hang.” That’s a defining characteristic of Peekskill: It’s impossible to find pretense. That’s probably due to the city’s fighting spirit—since being a Revolutionary outpost for Washington, Peekskill has battled to stay an integral hub first for the national defense, then for large manufacturing, and now for the arts and tourism. A major arts player is the Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, established in 2004 by Livia and Marc Straus. At the foot of a residential neighborhood, the warehouse structure proclaims, “It’s what outside that counts.” You can’t discount the inside, which crams insightful paintings, photographs and installations into a 12,000-square-foot space, but the sign makes a good point. After opening the building, the Strauses launched the Peekskill Project, an exhibit of site-specific installations designed to move art

outdoors. Since the first Peekskill Project in 2004, HVCCA has produced five more, inviting visitors to engage with artwork in parks, in parking lots (Peter Bynum’s exhilarating “Life” paintings by the Peekskill Metro-North Station), and sometimes even in residents’ homes. Beyond Peekskill Project, HVCCA operates programs that give Peekskill public school students the power to create and engage. Student works have been showcased at the museum, while the center’s artists in residence typically visit schools to give talks and host workshops. Here, everyone seems to be working toward improvement while retaining the diversity found in much of the city. “This is a community that works together,” says Straus. “The goal of the community was not to gentrify, but to build a community to support the arts and to get people who were struggling to get jobs back to work.” Walk the streets and you may agree. The public art, new restaurants and eclectic coffee shops sit comfortably next to delis flashing neon Corona signs and small businesses like the Fern Tree, which sells African gifts and clothing. You’re bound to find the community working together August 5 at the Hudson Valley Expedition, a daylong festival celebrating the region’s bounty of artists, wellness providers, and businesses. Running 1 to 10pm at Peekskill Riverfront Green Park, the event includes live music, artisans, children’s activities, food, and fireworks. Then, on October 15, vintage wheels aged at least 50 years will be cruising the downtown at the first-ever Peekskill Vintage Grand Prix. More festivals. More tourism destinations. That means visitors from New York City are spending more time in Peekskill. (Sharp typically finds plenty of dollar coins when counting Birdsall’s and Gleason’s receipts on Monday morning, a sign the MTA ticketing machines were busy.) Maybe they’re slurping down some Dan Dan Ramen at the homey RameNesque, or leisurely munching on a classic egg sandwich at BeanRunner Cafe, or perusing the vinyl bins and fingering the vast book collection at Bruised Apple, the city’s bookstore. And maybe they’ll also stop into Division Street Guitars to tune up their Fenders, then visit Jeans Town for new kicks (and a cell phone) before sitting back on one of those mid-century-modern diner chairs at the Peekskill Coffee House, which perfectly balances kitsch and comfort. It’s easy to go on, but see for yourself. Go now. Or wait, and before you know it, there’ll be a bevy of new things to explore in Peekskill. 8/17 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 57


ARTISTS AS INNOVATORS CELEBRATING THREE DECADES OF NYSCA/NYFA FELLOWSHIPS

Chitra Ganesh, Delicate Line: Corpse She Was Holding, 2009-2010, silkscreen print.

AUGUST 30 – NOVEMBER 12, 2017

Opening reception: Saturday, September 9, 5-7 p.m. SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART

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Bird and Nest, Stephanie Anderson, graphite on clayboard, from “Radius 50,” a juried exhibition of works by contemporary artists of the Mid-Hudson/Catskills region at Woodstock Artists Association & Museum from August 5 through August 27.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 59


galleries & museums

Ruth Wetzel’s May Day, a 2017 photograph included in the exhibition “Ruth Wetzel: Ethereal Swamps,” through October 14 at Hurley Motorsports Gallery in Kingston. 510 WARREN ST GALLERY 510 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-0510. Nancy Felcher: “Grids, Drips & Drawn Line.” August 4-27. Opening reception August 5, 3pm-6pm. ALBANY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 737 ALBANY-SHAKER ROAD, ALBANY (518) 242-2241. “Momento.” This exhibition features five artists whose work reflects a pictorial affection for unplugged past. Through February 7, 2018. ALBERT SHAHINIAN FINE ART GALLERY 22 EAST MARKET STREET SUITE 301, RHINEBECK (845) 876-7578. “Summer Salon: The Art of Paper.” Through August 30. THE ALDRICH CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM 258 MAIN STREET, RIDGEFIELD, CT (203) 438-4519. “My Potential Future Past.” This exhibition presents three interrelated bodies of Beth Campbell’s work from 1988 to present. Through September 4. ART SCHOOL OF COLUMBIA COUNTY 1198 ROUTE 21C, HARLEMVILLE (518) 672-7140. “words || woods.” This exhibit explores the interconnections between getting lost and becoming found in the world and in words. Through September 14. ART SOCIETY OF KINGSTON 97 BROADWAY, KINGSTON (845) 338-0333. “Mortal: Sculpture, Drawings, and Paintings by Ernest Shaw.” August 5-30. Artist’s talk: August 26, 4pm. ARTS MID HUDSON 696 DUTCHESS TURNPIKE, POUGHKEEPSIE (845) 4543222. “Significantly Small.” Group exhibit. Through August 27. ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER 24 SECOND STREET, ATHENS (518) 945-2136. “A Declaration of Sentiments.” This women’s suffrage centenial exhibit juxtaposes the art of 18 contemporary women with artifacts and images of the 1840s. Through August 20. BANNERMAN ISLAND GALLERY 150 MAIN STREET, BEACON (845) 416-8342. “B.I.G. Hudson River Art Exhibition.” Multimedia group exhibit of over 25 artists. Through September 3. BARD COLLEGE : CCS BARD GALLERIES ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON (845) 758-7598. “No to the Invasion: Breakdowns and Side Effects.” Works referencing significant histories and conflicts across the Arabicspeaking world. Through October 29. BARRETT ART CENTER 55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE (845) 471-2550. “We the People.” Political art in an age of discord. Through August 12. BCB ART 116 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-4539. “To find a form that accommodates the mess.” An multimedia exhibition of new work by Richard FInkelstein, focusing on cinematic isolation as being familiar, yet unreal. Through August 6. BEACON ARTIST UNION 506 MAIN STREET, BEACON (845) 222-0177. “The Physical World,” new work by David Link. Also showing “Symmetry of Light!,” paintings by Jennifer W. Graham. August 12–September 3. Opening reception August 12, 6-9pm. BETHEL WOODS CENTER FOR THE ARTS 200 HURD ROAD, BETHEL (866) 781-2922. “Love For Sale: The Commercialization of the Counterculture.” $5. Through December 31.

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BETSY JACARUSO STUDIO & GALLERY 43 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK (845) 516-4435. Art Studio Views. August 3-September 3. Opening reception August 5, 5-7pm. BLUE HILL GALLERY COLUMBIA-GREENE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, HUDSON. “The Bird’s Nest.” An exploration in watercolor and oil paint by Dea Archbold. Through August 27. BOSCOBEL 1601 ROUTE 9D (BEAR MOUNTAIN HIGHWAY), GARRISON BOSCOBEL.ORG. “Make-Dos: Curiously Repaired Antiques.” Through October 1. CAFFE A LA MODE 1 OAKLAND AVENUE, WARWICK (845) 986-1223. Paintings by Janet Howard-Fatta. Through September 30. CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY 622 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1915. Summer Exhibit. Group show. Through August 6. CLARK ART INSTITUTE 225 SOUTH STREET, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA (413) 458-2303. “An Inner World: Seventeenth-Century Dutch Genre Painting.” Through September 17. CLOVE AND CREEK 73 BROADWAY, KINGSTON CLOVEANDCREEK.COM. “Shut Up, Kiss Me, Hold Me Tight.” Male nudes drawn in pastels by Theresa Drapkin. Through September 30. CROSS CONTEMPORARY ART 99 PARTITION STREET, SAUGERTIES (845) 399-9751. “Site/Sight.” The paintings in this group exhibition are rooted in direct observation. Through August 21. CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA (CIA) 1946 CAMPUS DRIVE (ROUTE 9), HYDE PARK (845) 4529430. “Cooking Up a Nation: [Im]migration and American Foodways.” Through December 13. DIA:BEACON 3 BEEKMAN STREET, BEACON (845) 440 0100. Michelle Stuart. Dia will present Michelle Stuart’s four part rubbing Sayreville Strata Quartet (1976). Mondays, Thursdays-Sundays through April 1, 2018. DUCK POND GALLERY 128 CANAL STREET, TOWN OF ESOPUS LIBRARY, PORT EWEN (845) 338-5580. “Mindscapes.” Augie Wiedemann, mixed medium. August 4-25. Opening reception August 4, 5:30-7pm. ECKERT FINE ART 1394 ROUTE 83, PINE PLAINS (518) 592-1330. “Robert Rauschenberg: Anaglyphic Anecdotes.” Through September 2. EMPIRE STATE PLAZA CORNING TOWER 100 S MALL ARTERIAL, ALBANY (518) 473-7521. Works by Phil Frost. Through August 18. FRG OBJECTS & DESIGN / ART 217 WARREN STREET 2ND FLOOR, HUDSON. “Halaburda.” Philippe Halaburda’s unusal work is inspired by his move to New York City Works on cardboard. August 5-September 30. Opening reception August 5, 5:30-8:30pm. FRIENDS OF HISTORIC KINGSTON 63 MAIN STREET, KINGSTON (845) 339-0720. “Treasures.” A new exhibit featuring portraits of John Vanderlyn and a commemoration of Kingston’s part in World War I. Through October 28.

GALLERY 66 NY 66 MAIN STREET, COLD SPRING (845) 809-5838. “In Two Worlds.” Two distinct bodies of work by the same artist. Fridays-Sundays through August 27. GARDINER LIBRARY 133 FARMER’S TURNPIKE, GARDINER (845) 255-1255. “Flora, Fauna and the Feminine.” Works by Lois Linet. Through August 12. GARRISON ART CENTER 23 GARRISON’S LANDING, GARRISON (845) 424-3960. “The Other Side of Things.” Works by six female artists. TuesdaysSundays through September 3. Opening reception August 12, 5-7pm. GREENE COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS GALLERY 398 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-3400. “Co-Lab Lab.” The exhibition features artwork by teams of two or more people, an exploration of the concept of “working together.” Through September 23. H-ARTS GALLERY 1 SOUTH DIVISION STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 643-4392. “Complex Simplicity.” Work by Jamaican-born abstract painter Aritha Corry. Through August 12. HILO GALLERY 365 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL HILOCATSKILL.COM “New York: Shadow and Substance.” Photographs by Ted Barron and Richard Sandler. August 4-30. Opening reception: August 4, 7-9 PM HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF WOODSTOCK 20 COMEAU DRIVE, WOODSTOCK (845) 679-2256. “Gathering Woodstock Women: A Celebration of the New York State Women’s Suffrage Centennial.” Through September 3. HOTCHKISS LIBRARY 10 UPPER MAIN, SHARON, CT (860) 364-5041. “The Atmosphere of Landscape.” Paintings and drawings by Dennis Fritz. Through August 31. HUDSON BEACH GLASS GALLERY 162 MAIN STREET, BEACON (845) 440-0068. “Matt Kinney: Blackbird Sings at Midnight.” Kinney juxtaposes large scale scraps of timber with cultural detritus ranging from archaic weaponry to industrial trash. Through August 6. HUDSON HALL 327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-1438. “Just the Facts.” LightField’s 2nd Festival of photography and multimedia art. August 12-September 30. HUDSON VALLEY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 788-0100. “Peter Bynum: Illumination of the Sacred Forms: Divine Light Mission and Sanctuary.” First Saturday and Sunday of every month, 12-6pm and Fridays, 11am-5pm, through December 17. HURLEY MOTORSPORTS GALLERY 2779 ROUTE 209, KINGSTON (845) 338-1701. “Ruth Wetzel: Ethereal Swamps.” Photo exhibit.Through October 14. JEFF BAILEY GALLERY 127 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-6680. “Nichole van Beek: The Longest Day.” Paintings. ThursdaysSundays through August 6. JOHN DAVIS GALLERY 362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5907. Multimedia group show featuring Bruce Gagnier and others. Through August 13.


Sara Green berger Rafferty Gloves Off CAMERON MARTIN

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JUNE 30 - SEPTEMBER 9, 2017

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A contract for sale imposes an obligation on each party that the other’s expectation of receiving due performance will not be impaired. When reasonable grounds for insecurity arise with respect to the performance of either party the other may in writing demand adequate assurance of due performance and until he receives such assurance may if commercially reasonable suspend any performance for which he has not already received the agreed return. Between merchants the reasonableness of grounds for insecurity and the adequacy of any assurance offered shall be determined according to commercial standards. Acceptance of any improper delivery or payment does not prejudice the aggrieved party’s right to demand adequate assurance of future performance. After receipt of a justified demand failure to provide within a reasonable time not exceeding thirty days such assurance of due performance as is adequate under the circumstances of the particular case is a repudiation of the contract. A contract for sale imposes an obligation on each party that the other’s expectation of receiving due performance will not be impaired. When reasonable grounds for insecurity arise with respect to the performance of either party the other may in writing demand adequate assurance of due performance and until he receives such assurance may if commercially reasonable suspend any performance for which he has not already received the agreed return. Between merchants the reasonableness of grounds for insecurity and the adequacy of any assurance offered shall be determined according to commercial standards. Acceptance of any improper delivery or payment does not prejudice the aggrieved party’s right to demand adequate assurance of future performance. After receipt of a justified demand failure to provide within a reasonable time not exceeding thirty days such assurance of due performance as is adequate under the circumstances of the particular case is a repudiation of the contract. A contract for sale imposes an obligation on each party that the other’s expectation of receiving due performance will not be impaired. When reasonable grounds for insecurity arise with respect to the performance of either party the other may in writing demand adequate assurance of due performance and until he receives such assurance may if commercially reasonable suspend any performance for which he has not already received the agreed return. Between merchants the reasonableness of grounds for insecurity and the adequacy of any assurance offered shall be determined according to commercial standards. Acceptance of any improper delivery or payment does not prejudice the aggrieved party’s right to demand adequate assurance of future performance. After receipt of a justified demand failure to provide within a reasonable time not exceeding thirty days such assurance of due performance as is adequate under the circumstances of the particular case is a repudiation of the contract. A contract for sale imposes an obligation on each party that the other’s expectation of receiving due performance will not be impaired. When reasonable grounds for insecurity arise with respect to the performance of either party the other may in writing demand adequate assurance of due performance and until he receives such assurance may if commercially reasonable suspend any performance for which he has not already received the agreed return. Between merchants the reasonableness of grounds for insecurity and the adequacy of any assurance offered shall be determined according to commercial standards. Acceptance of any improper delivery or payment does not prejudice the aggrieved party’s right to demand adequate assurance of future performance. After receipt of a justified demand failure to provide within a reasonable time not exceeding thirty days such assurance of due performance as is adequate under the circumstances of the particular case is a repudiation of the contract. A contract for sale imposes an obligation on each party that the other’s expectation of receiving due performance will not be impaired. When reasonable grounds for insecurity arise with respect to the performance of either party the other may in writing demand adequate assurance of due performance and until he receives such assurance may if commercially reasonable suspend any performance for which he has not already received the agreed return. Between merchants the reasonableness of grounds for insecurity and the adequacy of any assurance offered shall be determined according to commercial standards. Acceptance of any improper delivery or payment does not prejudice the aggrieved party’s right to demand adequate assurance of future performance. After receipt of a justified demand failure to provide within a reasonable time not exceeding thirty days such assurance of due performance as is adequate under the circumstances of the particular case is a repudiation of the contract. A contract for sale imposes an obligation on each party that the other’s expectation of receiving due performance will not be impaired. When reasonable grounds for insecurity arise with respect to the performance of either party the other may in writing demand adequate assurance of due performance and until he receives such assurance may if commercially reasonable suspend any performance for which he has not already received the agreed return. Between merchants the reasonableness of grounds for insecurity and the adequacy of any assurance offered shall be determined according to commercial standards. Acceptance of any improper delivery or payment does not prejudice the aggrieved party’s right to demand adequate assurance of future performance. After receipt of a justified demand failure to provide within a reasonable time not exceeding thirty days such assurance of due performance as is adequate under the circumstances of the particular case is a repudiation of the contract. A contract for sale imposes an obligation on each party that the other’s expectation of receiving due performance will not be impaired. When reasonable grounds for insecurity arise with respect to the performance of either party the other may in writing demand adequate assurance of due performance and until he receives such assurance may if commercially reasonable suspend any performance for which he has not already received the agreed return. Between merchants the reasonableness of grounds for insecurity and the adequacy of any assurance offered shall be determined according to commercial standards. Acceptance of any improper delivery or payment does not prejudice the aggrieved party’s right to demand adequate assurance of future performance. After receipt of a justified demand failure to provide within a reasonable time not exceeding thirty days such assurance of due performance as is adequate under the circumstances of the particular case is a repudiation of the contract. A contract for sale imposes an obligation on each party that the other’s expectation of receiving due performance will not be impaired. When reasonable grounds for insecurity arise with respect to the performance of either party the other may in writing demand adequate assurance of due performance and until he receives such assurance may if commercially reasonable suspend any performance for which he has not already received the agreed return. Between merchants the reasonableness of grounds for insecurity and the adequacy of any assurance offered shall be determined according to commercial standards. Acceptance of any improper delivery or payment does not prejudice the aggrieved party’s right to demand adequate assurance of future performance. After receipt of a justified demand failure to provide within a reasonable time not exceeding thirty days such assurance of due performance as is adequate under the circumstances of the particular case is a repudiation of the contract. A contract for sale imposes an obligation on each party that the other’s expectation of receiving due performance will not be impaired. When reasonable

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8/17 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 61


11TH ANNUAL

Hudson Jazzworks Concert

PIANIST ARMEN DONELIAN AND SAXOPHONIST MARC MOMMAAS (CO-DIRECTORS)

August 17-20 2017

PERFORM WITH SPECIAL GUEST GUITARIST FREDDIE BRYANT AND PARTICIPANTS OF THE 11TH ANNUAL HUDSON JAZZ WORKSHOP

Sunday, August 13th, 2017

4:00pm Artists’ Talk - 4:30pm Concert

CONCERT INFO & RESERVATIONS

www.hudsonhall.org 327 Warren St, Hudson, NY (518) 822-1438 WORKSHOP INFO

www.hudsonjazzworks.org hudsonvalleyjazzfest.org

62 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 8/17


galleries & museums A man carries a mirror on the back of a motorbike in Yambio, South Sudan. 2011. A photograph by Tim Freccia from the exhibition “Next of Kin,” to be held at on August 5 at 7pm at 704 Columbia Street in Hudson.

JOYCE GOLDSTEIN GALLERY 16 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-2250. “New York Photographer Eve Stuart.” Open daily through August 6. KEN POLINSKIE: INFINITE PAPER 508 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 929 1958. “Ken Polinskie: Infinite Paper.” Paper as a medium. Open Daily through August 6. KENT ART ASSOCIATION 21 SOUTH MAIN STREET, KENT, CT (860) 927-3989. “The President’s Show.” Painting, sculpture, photography, and more. Through August 6. KLEINERT/JAMES CENTER FOR THE ARTS 36 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK (845) 679-2079. “Drawing Sound.” A multimedia exhibit of graphic scores. August 25-October 15. Opening reception and performance: August 26, 4-7pm. LABSPACE 2642 NY ROUTE 23, HILLSDALE LABSPACEART.BLOGSPOT. COM/. Hat Tip. A group exhibition of artists nominated by other artists. Through August 12. LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5632. “Other People’s Pictures.” An exhibit of 200 black-and-white photographs. Through September 17. LIFEBRIDGE SANCTUARY 333 MOUNTAIN RD, ROSENDALE (845) 658-3439. Harmonies of Nature. Through September 30. MARK GRUBER GALLERY 17 NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ (845) 255-1241. “The Hudson River School Revisited.” Through August 26. MATTEAWAN GALLERY 436 MAIN STREET, BEACON (845) 440-7901. “Super Natural.” A group exhibition. Through August 21. MONTGOMERY PLACE 25 GARDENER WAY, RED HOOK (845) 758-5461. “Historic Garden Tools of Montgomery Place.” Presented by the Landscape and Arboretum Program at Bard, with special thanks to Claire Copley. Through October 31. THE MOVIEHOUSE GALLERY 48 MAIN STREET, MILLERTON THEMOVIEHOUSE.NET. “Harper Blanchet: Abstract Paintings.” Through October 4.

OLANA STATE HISTORIC SITE 5720 ROUTE 9G, HUDSON (518) 828-0135. “Overlook: Teresita Fernández confronts Frederic Church at Olana.” Fernández examines Church and his contemporaries’ response to Latin America. Open daily, 11am-4pm, through November 5. THE OLD BANK OF AMERICA 2808 ROUTE 28, SHOKAN. “Super Single.” Paintings by Matthew Every. Through August 17. ORIOLE 9 17 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK (845) 679-5763. Works by Lenny Kislin. August 5-27. Opening reception August 5, 5-7pm. RED HOOK PUBLIC LIBRARY 7444 SOUTH BROADWAY, RED HOOK (845) 758-3241. “The Moon: Cosmic Decoder Ring.” The exhibit features standing panels designed to be viewed with 3-D glasses that explain the moon’s topography. Through August 18. ROELIFF JANSEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM 8 MILES ROAD, COPAKE FALLS (518) 329-0652. “All Roads to the River: the 1799 Columbia Turnpike and Historic Tollhouses.” Through September 3. SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART 1 HAWK DRIVE, NEW PALTZ NEWPALTZ.EDU/MUSEUM “Artists as Innovators: Celebrating Three Decades of New York Council on the Arts / New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowships.” August 30–November 12. Opening reception September 9, 5-7pm. SCHANTZ GALLERIES CONTEMPORARY ART 3 ELM STREET, STOCKBRIDGE, MA RIVERARTPROJECT. COM. “The River Art Project.” An exhibit of river-centric paintings. Through September 4. SELIGMANN CENTER FOR THE ARTS 23 WHITE OAK DRIVE, SUGAR LOAF (845) 469-9459. “Season of the Witch.” Group exhibit of focused on art making as magic. Through September 4. SEPTEMBER 449 WARREN STREET #3, HUDSON. “Odessa Straub: Real Puss Technologies.” Through August 20. SPENCERTOWN ACADEMY ARTS CENTER 790 ROUTE 203, SPENCERTOWN (518) 392-3693. “The Curator as Artist.” Through August 13. THE CHATHAM BOOKSTORE 27 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-3005. “Troy, New York: A Tarnished City Alive Again.” Susan Anthony’s photos of Troy. Through August 6.

THOMAS COLE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 218 SPRING STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-7465. “Parlors.” An immersive installation featuring interior decorative paintings. Through October 29. THOMPSON GIROUX GALLERY 57 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-3336. “Character and Direction.” An exploration of line. Mondays, Thursdays-Sundays through August 20. TIVOLI ARTISTS GALLERY 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI (845) 757 2667. “Surrealism A Second Look.” Through August 20. TURN PARK ART SPACE 2 MOSCOW ROAD, WEST STOCKBRIDGE TURNPARK.COM. “Jim Holl At Turn Park: Sculpture and Drawings.” Through September 30. UNISON 68 MOUNTAIN REST ROAD, NEW PALTZ (845) 255-1559. “19th Annual Unison Arts Invitational Outdoor Sculpture Garden Exhibition.” Through October 31. UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM. 1400 WASHINGTON AVENUE, ALBANY (518) 442-4035. “Gloves Off.” Sara Greenberger Rafferty and “Abstracts” by Cameron Martin. Through September 9. UPSTREAM GALLERY 8 MAIN STREET, HASTINGS ON HUDSON (914) 674-8548. 3rd Annual Red Circle PhotoArts Exhibit. August 3-27. Opening reception August 3, 6-8pm. VASSAR FARM AND ECOLOGICAL PRESERVE 124 RAYMOND AVE, POUGHKEEPSIE (845) 437-7414. Art on the Farm: 1st Annual Outdoor Sculpture Exhibit. One-mile walking loop. Through October 29. WILDERSTEIN PRESERVATION 330 MORTON ROAD, RHINEBECK (845) 876-4818. “4th Outdoor Sculpture Biennial. 18 sculptural works curated by Franc Palaia.” Through October 31. WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION AND MUSEUM 28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2940. “Radius50: Contemporary Artists of the Mid-Hudson/Catskills Region.” August 5-27. Opening reception August 5, 4-8pm. WOODSTOCK SCHOOL OF ART 2470 RTE. 212, WOODSTOCK (845) 679-2388. Art on the Green. Through October 31.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 63


Music

Active State

Aaron Dessner of The National By Peter Aaron Photo by Sarah Pezdek

I

f you know where to look and listen, Cincinnati, Ohio’s psychogeography is obvious in the sounds that have originated there. Take the honky-tonkin’ country singers on WLW’s “Midwestern Hayride,” who evoked the hills and stills of nearby Northern Kentucky. Or the gritty urban blues, R&B, funk, and soul bred in African American neighborhoods like Lincoln Heights (the Isely Brothers), the West End (Mamie Smith, Bootsy Collins), and Avondale (Midnight Star). Or, in more recent times, alternative acts like the Afghan Whigs, Over the Rhine, and Wussy, all of whom have roots in the beer-soaked clubs of Clifton, the area around the University of Cincinnati campus, and blend glimpses of the city’s soul and country heritage with college rock. A far less expected local musical incubator, though, is Indian Hill, 64 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 8/17


a highly affluent suburb almost 15 miles from downtown Cincinnati. Known of literate melancholia. TV appearances, a tour with R.E.M., The Virginia EP for its country clubs and sprawling estates, it was named “The Best Place to (2008), headline slots at Coachella and other festivals, and a documentary Raise a Family” by the Robb Report and seems wholly devoid of the elements about the band, A Night, A Skin, came next, followed by a switch to the 4AD that would shape the sound of a rock band in any kind of vital way. And yet this label for 2010’s HighViolet (with the bittersweet standout “Bloodbuzz Ohio”). outlying village has given us the National, one of today’s most acclaimed indie Trouble Will Find Me, which was nominated for a 2013 Grammy, followed, outfits. So can you hear any Indian Hill in the National’s music? along with a second documentary, Mistaken for Strangers (2015) and A Lot of Yes, says this Cincinnati native. There’s an air of mannered quietude in the Sorrow, a nine-LP box set of the group and Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson quintet’s brooding chamber pop that hints at drawing rooms and verandas. performing the High Violet track “Sorrow” live (105 times!) at MoMA PS21. And as guitarist Aaron Dessner confirms, classical music is, indeed, a formative Next month, after taking time off for family life and a raft of side projects, the essence of the National’s sound. “There’s some folk influence there as well, National at long last returns to the record with Sleep Well Beast. but, yeah, baroque and orchestral music was important,” says the guitarist. Although several of the group’s earlier releases were fully or partially “When we were really young, I studied upright bass and my brother [Bryce recorded at DIY spaces or Aaron’s garage studio in Brooklyn, Sleep Well Beast Dessner, Aaron’s twin, bandmate, and fellow composer] studied classical is the first of their albums to be cut at the guitarist’s recently completed Long guitar. Experiencing classical music from a young age definitely affected our Pond Studio, a sustainable, clean-lined, barn-like structure next to, yes, a perceptions. Our dad was a jazz drummer who also loved classical music, so shimmering pond on the musician’s Columbia County property (the group we would listen to his classical and jazz records.” And yet the rock took root debuted material from the forthcoming album last month during a two-night early on as well. “We also got into the Grateful Dead through our dad, and stand at Basilica Hudson). He and his wife became besotted with the region they’re really the biggest influence, which I guess might be a surprise to a lot during visits while the group was recording in 2013. “[The band] worked on of people. After the Dead, it’s New Order and the Smiths, who we discovered TroubleWill Find Me at [studios] the Clubhouse, in Rhinebeck, and Dreamland, in high school.” in Woodstock, and we just loved it here,” says Aaron, who with his Danish wife The band’s other brothers, Scott (bass) and Bryan Devendorf (drums; and their two young children (now two and six), found a restored farmhouse he took lessons from Afghan Whigs drummer not far from Hudson soon after the Trouble Steve Earle), were raised in nearby Anderson sessions (Bryce has a house across the Hudson “Someone on Breitbart called Township, while vocalist Matt Berninger grew in Olivebridge; the other members live outside me a ‘pro-abortion snowflake,’ up on a farm near the West Side. Although all the Hudson Valley). “The studio was designed of the National’s members are originally from and built by Erland Neuman, a local architect. or something like that, because Cincinnati, the group actually came together in My daughter Ingrid goes to Hawthorne Valley we did a 7-inch for this Planned NewYork after they’d all ended up there in 1999. School, and, coincidentally, everyone who Parenthood benefit series. It’s too At the dawn of the decade, Matt and Scott had worked on the construction was associated with formed a band called Nancy, which relocated to the school in some way.” Perhaps returning the important for us to keep doing Brooklyn in 1994 and released one record before these things, especially now, when favor, the National played a Hawthorne Valley splitting up in 1998. That year, Aaron and Bryan, benefit concert at Mass MoCA in North Adams, people suddenly think it’s okay to who’d played together in bands since their teens Massachusetts, last year. (the last being the enigmatically named Project act like a douchebag and persecute Assisting charitable and progressive causes Nim), joined the singer and bassist in Brooklyn minorities and women. The way we has long been a staple activity for the National. and the foursome began making and homeAmong other projects, the Dessner brothers see it, we’re lucky to be in a band recording music. “I don’t think any of us ever curated the 2009 compilation Dark Was the really expected to become a professional band,” that’s in a position to be able to do Night, a benefit album for AIDS awareness Aaron says. “I was going to Columbia and the group the Red Hot Organization, and 2016’s things that help people.” other guys were working at dot-coms, mostly. Day of the Dead, a six-hour, 59-track Grateful —Aaron Dessner But when we first started playing, we listened Dead tribute album featuring over 60 artists back to the recordings we’d made and we were, that has raised over $3 million for the same like, ‘Well, this actually sounds pretty good. I guess we should go out and play group (as part of the latter project they even got to perform with the Dead’s these songs in front of people.’ So that’s really how it started.” Bob Weir); currently, $1 from every ticket sold at their concerts goes to the Aaron and Bryce co-launched Brassland Records in 2001 to release the Plus One Foundation, which helps people affected by neurological disorders, National’s eponymous debut, although during its recording Bryce had yet and global medical relief organization Partners in Health. And in addition to join the band—in the studio, Aaron and Scott switched off on guitar to performing at Democratic rallies and fundraising events during Barrack and bass—and they didn’t play out until after it was made. Once they did, Obama’s 2008 election and 2012 reelection, the band enthusiastically lent however, they were in the right place at the right time. In the early 2000s, the their music to both campaigns. New York rock scene, especially in Brooklyn, was blowing up like a brick of “To us, it’s impossible to separate our art from what’s going on the firecrackers. The postpunk-revival wave that included Gotham bands like the world,” says Aaron, who also maintains an active career as a producer, Walkmen, the Strokes, Interpol, and Yeah Yeah Yeahs was building in force, directing recording sessions not only by his own band but also by such acts as and with their moody, broody Joy Division-esque approach the National fit Frightened Rabbit, Sharon Von Etten, the Lone Bellow, and Lisa Hannigan. right in. Kind of. “Most of the New York bands then were heavier on [visual] “We do get hate mail, people saying, you know, ‘Just shut up and play your style,” Aaron recalls. “But we had this the sort of unassuming Ohio thing that music!’ Someone on Breitbart called me a ‘pro-abortion snowflake,’ or was, and still is, a huge part of who we are.” something like that, because we did a 7-inch for this Planned Parenthood Befitting the band’s approach, The National began quietly winning cachet benefit series. If someone doesn’t want to like our music because they don’t among the cognoscenti, and Bryce was welcomed into the fold as they began like it when we do things like that, well, that’s up to them. It’s too important working the New York clubs. Sad Songs for Dirty Lovers arrived in 2003 and for us to keep doing these things, especially now, when people suddenly think was named album of the year by the Chicago Tribune and other publications, it’s okay to act like a douchebag and persecute minorities and women. The and the group got down to business and got on the road, grinding it out on way we see it, we’re lucky to be in a band that’s in a position to be able to van tours that took them around the US, England, and Europe. The 2004 do things that help people. Like Matt Berninger said, ‘If we’re just gonna be EP Cherry Tree was the pick of many a critic’s poll and snagged them a sweet another group doing boy-misses-girl or girl-misses-boy pop songs, we may as tour opening for the Walkmen, as well as a plum deal with Beggars Banquet. well be making French fries.’” They made their major-label debut with 2005’s Alligator, which, along with its successor, 2006’s Boxer, solidified their standing as the new young lions Sleep Well Beast is out September 8 on 4AD Records. Americanmary.com. 8/17 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 65


NIGHTLIFE HIGHLIGHTS Handpicked by music editor Peter Aaron for your listening pleasure.

Robyn Hitchcock plays Woodstock Playhouse September 2.

HUSH August 5. Albany sludge metal titans Hush are not for the timid of tympanic membrane. Even in small venues, the quintet, which kicks off this month by crushing the Anchor atop a fourband bill, has been known to perform utilizing a solid, stage-to-ceiling wall of mismatched, high-output amplifiers—actual fully functioning amplifiers, not the empty, false-front cabinets that form the so-called backlines at arena rock shows. No surprise the band claim “the end of the world” as their only musical influence on their Facebook page. With God Root, Hellkeeper, and Sunroot. (The Rough Shapes rock August 4; the Jonny Monster Band jams August 18.) 9pm. $6. Kingston. (845) 853-8124. Theanchorkingston.com.

BELEW, LEVIN, MASTELOTTO, AND FRIENDS August 11. This hot evening assembles three veteran members of prog rock legends King Crimson: guitarist Adrian Belew, bassist and stickist Tony Levin, and drummer Pat Mastelotto. Collectively, the three have also worked with the likes of John Lennon, Peter Gabriel, Pink Floyd, XTC, Talking Heads, David Bowie, Frank Zappa, Nine Inch Nails, David Sylvian, Laurie Anderson, and many, many others. The show at Colony is being held in conjunction with the trio’s week-long music camp at Full Moon Resort. At the time of this writing, it’s not clear who, exactly, their “friends” will be for the night of the gig—but for diehard Crimson fans, does it really matter? (Laura Cantrell lays it down August 4; Marshall Crenshaw croons August 12.) 8pm. $30, $35. Woodstock. (845) 679-7625; Colonywoodstock.com.

JAZZ IN THE VALLEY August 20. The Hudson Valley’s longest-running jazz festival, Jazz in the Valley, marks its 17th year when it returns this month to Waryas Park, in the shadow of the majestic Walkway Over the Hudson. In addition to perennial festival favorite saxophonist Javon Jackson, the headliners for 2017 include trombonist Delfeayo Marsalis, pianist Cyrus Chestnut, bassist Christopher Dean Sullivan, pianist Elio Villafranca, pianist and vocalist Mala Waldron, vibraphonist Steve 66 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Nelson, drummers Jimmy Cobb and Jeff “Siege” Siegel, and percussionist Neil Clarke. The New Groove, Poughkeepsie Funk, and the Dutchess Community College Alumni Jazz Combo will perform on the free second stage at nearby Upper Landing Park. Noon. $50, $60 ($20 students with ID). Poughkeepsie. (845) 384-6350; Jazzinthevalleyny.org.

MAZZSTOCK August 25-27. Now in its 10th year, this three-day music festival started out to honor local Marlboro resident “Big Lee” Mazzola on his 50th birthday. Jam-heavy but with flavors of contemporary folk rock as well, the outdoor blowout now encompasses two stages and also features food and craft vendors, camping, acoustic sessions, and other activities. Performing this time around are Zach Deputy, the NYChillharmonic, Spiritual Rez, Sophistafunk, the Big Takeover, Primate Fiasco, Cosmal, Junket, Teddy Midnight, Skydaddy, Alpha Male Gorillas, the Deadbeats, Space Carnival, David Kraii, Los Thujones, the Grape and the Grain, Fred Zeppelin, Still Alive taking on a tribute to Pearl Jam’s Ten, and others. Check website for schedule and ticket prices. Marlboro. Mazzstock.com.

ROBYN HITCHCOCK September 2. How about getting a head start on next month—in high style? Here, the modern psychedelic/indie folk troubadour and Soft Boys leader, the one and only Robyn Hitchcock, pays a rare visit to the Woodstock Playhouse for an intimate and idiosyncratic summit of surreal song. And no doubt this particular engagement carries with it a special resonance for the English singer-songwriter: It was in 1970 at this (since rebuilt) venue that the Band recorded Stage Fright, Hitchcock’s most beloved album by the town’s favorite fivesome and one that he’s performed in its entirety on occasion. Which makes it a pretty darn good guess that on this occasion, at least one of the songs from that opus might just find its way into his set. Woodstock. (845) 679-6900. 7pm. $28. Woodstockplayhouse.org.


CD REVIEWS

ROCKET NUMBER NINE RECORDS

HOWARD JOHNSON AND GRAVITY TESTIMONY

Suspend all preconceptions of what the tuba can do until listening to Howard Johnson and Gravity’s Testimony, and you will be more than pleasantly surprised. Far from being limited to providing the bass line in a brass band or portraying Tubby in an orchestra, the tuba becomes a vessel of expansive tonality, and, in genius/visionary Johnson’s hands, a medium of masterful improvisation equal to any trumpet. Johnson long ago established his bona fides working with the likes of Charles Mingus, Gil Evans, the Band, and Jack DeJohnette. Herein Johnson, a staple of Levon Helm’s Midnight Rambles in Woodstock, displays his prowess as frontman and arranger—he veritably sings through his instrument on Carole King’s “Natural Woman” and finds fresh inspiration in two numbers by McCoy Tyner. He also flies on several tunes that feature an ensemble of fellow tubists. Forget the cowbell—more tuba! Hojozone.com. —Seth Rogovoy

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MARCO BENEVENTO WOODSTOCK SESSIONS (ROYAL POTATO FAMILY/WOODSTOCK SESSIONS, 2017)

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LISTEN to tracks by the artists reviewed in this issue.

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413-229-8536 www.magicfluke.com

PHINEAS AND THE LONELY LEAVES STAY BRIGHT

Peekskill’s Phineas and the Lonely Leaves have that nu-sensitivo barfly mentality. It is as if singer-songwriter Tim Feeney allows himself to let his guard down and become in tune with his emotions over a few too many pints, but it doesn’t result in the output being addled or impaired at all. In fact, the energy of golden-era Soul Asylum and the lilting lead vocals of the Cure’s Robert Smith is almost sobering in its execution. Stay Bright is a collection of songs that falls somewhere between bar and college rock (college-bar rock, if you will). It also has an element of ’70s guitar worship and nostalgia that we’ve seen of late from newer indie and punk bands, such as Titus Andronicus and Christopher Owens’s Girls. Layered acoustic and electrics on melodic and up-tempo confessionals in mostly major keys make this an entirely pleasant repeat listen. Lonelyleaves.com —Mike Campbell

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Keyboard ace Marco Benevento’s Woodstock Sessions is a joint release between Kevin Calabro’s Royal Potato Family and Applehead Recording studio’s Woodstock Sessions imprint. It is the latest release in Applehead’s excellent series—live, in-studio performances in front of small audiences who pay handsomely for the privilege and receive a great meal, some hang time with the artists, and mementos including a finely recorded live record. It’s a novel idea, and very well executed. Woodstock Sessions finds Benevento in his familiar mode as a solo artist—clowning ringleader of a psychedelicelectro cabaret, presiding over a fritzy and cartoonish fusion of rock songs, good jamming, and insistent electrobeat grooves (a joint venture between Benevento’s beatboxes and the great drummer and Tom Waits alum Andrew Borger). Feels great, sounds great. Perhaps the only real surprise here is how comfortable Benevento is becoming as a vocalist, a job he began broaching only a few years ago. Woodstocksessions.com. —John Burdick

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Music editor, Chronogram. Published author. Award-winning music columnist, 2005-2006, Daily Freeman. Contributor, Village Voice, Boston Herald, All Music Guide, All About Jazz.com, Jazz Improv and Roll magazines. Musician. Consultations also available. Reasonable rates.

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8/17 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 67


Books

MEMOIRS OF A REVOLUTION

An interview with Jonathan Lerner Interview by Sparrow photo by Franco Vogt

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onathan Lerner grew up in the suburbs of Washington, DC, the son of a State Department official. In 1967 Lerner dropped out of Antioch College and began working at the national office of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS). In 1969 he followed the faction that broke away from SDS to form the Weathermen. Lerner moved to Chicago to work at their office, helping to plan the Days of Rage, a violent attack by hundreds of radicals shouting “Bring the War Home!” in downtown Chicago. Lerner became the editor of New Left Notes, which was renamed The Fire Next Time. (One of his essays was entitled “Wargasm.”) After flying to Cuba to cut sugarcane with the Venceremos Brigade, Lerner heard that three of his comrades had died in an explosion at a West Village townhouse while making anti-personnel bombs. At this point, the Weathermen dropped out of sight, transforming into the Weather Underground. Lerner had no way of contacting them and spent months traveling through Europe searching for false identification papers. Later in 1970, Lerner reconnected with the Weathermen in New York City, functioning as a liaison between the underground and the outside world. In 1973 Lerner traveled to Wounded Knee, South Dakota, to write about the American Indian Movement uprising. Throughout the 1970s Lerner began exploring his identity as a gay man. He left the Weathermen when the organization began to splinter in 1976. In the years since, Lerner has worked as a journalist focusing on architecture and city planning. He has also published two novels. Lerner’s unsparing memoir, Swords in the Hands of Children: Reflections of an American Revolutionary (OR Books), will be published in September. He lives with his husband in Hudson. 68 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Your father worked for the State Department. In a sense, you worked as a bureaucrat for the “anti-state” department. Have you noticed this parallel? Yes. When I was at the SDS collective in Washington, we had an office in an old crumbling townhouse at 3 Thomas Circle. Various Leftist and peace organizations had offices there, and a radical print shop. My father’s State Department office was at 1 Thomas Circle, right across the street! I used to run into him in the drugstore downstairs, when I went to buy cigarettes. What year was this? 1969. Then, at the same time that I was leaving Washington for Chicago, my father went to work at the embassy in Brazil, under a military junta fighting a dirty war against Leftists. He was an innocent administrator in human resources; I don’t think he was involved in police torture or CIA activity, but he was there as a functionary of imperialism, as we called it at the time. How did the Weathermen elude capture for so many years? Weren’t they infiltrated by the police? The organization wasn’t infiltrated; that’s how it eluded capture. Before the organization went underground, there were police plants, and there was one informer brought into the underground, who was responsible for the arrest of one person—in the very, very beginning, in 1970. But by setting up that arrest, he unmasked himself, so he was no longer able to function as an


informer. And that was the end of it. The organization existed for another six or seven years, and nobody was busted. The FBI was desperate to try and crack us, and they weren’t able to. What exactly was the ideology of Weatherman? Were you Marxists? Well, that evolved. In the beginning, we called ourselves “anti-imperialist,” but we were also wild about youth culture, which doesn’t really have an “ism.” We thought that young people would run amok in the streets, and that would start a revolution. That was our pretty facile understanding at the time that Weatherman was formed, out of SDS. I’d call the `60s counterculture basically anarchist. Were you anarchists? In an organizational sense, we were into structure and leadership, centralization, and top-down control. In that sense, we weren’t anarchist. In the sense of wanting to create chaos, you might call us anarchists. At the end of Swords in the Hands of Children, you wonder about the continuing appeal of the Weathermen, and I’d say there are two reasons: They never got caught, and they were basically benign. They didn’t hurt anyone else—only themselves, in the West Village townhouse, where three Weathermen died. After that, they vowed to set off bombs without harming innocent people. They were a hippie version of those romantic bank robbers of the 1930s: Pretty Boy Floyd, Bonnie and Clyde. In the book I call them “The Terrorists You’d Want to Cuddle Up With.” The problem with the Weather Underground is that they outlived their time. The counterculture that spawned them died, replaced by its twin offspring: punk and disco. At that point, the leadership decided to “go retro” and become pure MarxistLeninist. In retrospect, it would’ve been smarter if they had gone punk. [Laughs.] Maybe, yeah! They certainly didn’t get much audience for going Marxist-Leninist. Did it strike you as weird that John McCain tried to discredit Obama for associating with Weatherman leader Bill Ayers in 2008? Not really. I don’t know what the nature of Bill and Barack’s relationship is. I know that they lived in the same neighborhood. I heard that they played tennis together. But the Republicans are happy to throw mud. I thought it was perfectly characteristic of the Republicans to have discovered that and gleefully smear Obama with it. I was surprised they expected Americans to remember the Weathermen. Well, I think the Republicans reinvigorated Bill Ayers’s celebrity. In your book, you imply that the Weathermen’s bombs occasionally did kill an innocent person, but that they denied responsibility for such an action. I’m not implying it; I’m saying I don’t know, and that I think it’s possible. It wouldn’t surprise me if it were true, because there was enough dishonesty and dissembling and spin from the leadership, and since we had only their word for what was going on, it’s impossible to know. What’s your overall feeling about being a Weatherman now? I’m aware of what drove us to do what we did: the idealism and legitimate anger; and I also feel very aware of how destructive a force we were in the Left, and how much we contributed to a culture of violence, and a culture of terrorism. So I have very mixed feelings about it. Reading your book, I noticed that the Weathermen were all

nearly the same age. There was no mentorship, no one older and wiser to guide you. That’s right. In 1969 there were a couple of people around in their 30s, but probably the average age was 22 or 23. Meanwhile, the intelligent, gray-headed men running the US were conducting a pointless and destructive war in Southeast Asia. It was a very crazy time. A crazy time that seems to be returning. In some ways, yeah. These are scary times, but we’ve been through scary times before. It kind of always feels like it’s the end of the world. [Laughs.] Or, let’s say, cyclically it does. Although Swords in the Hands of Children suggests that the real end of the world is coming. I feel that environmental collapse is underway, actually, which makes it hard for me to be optimistic in the largest sense. I think you and I will probably be dead before the worst effects of it are seen, but not necessarily. Plus, the incredible political instability in the world, and the millions of people who are refugees now, and the millions of people who are starving to death, I would have trouble being optimistic. As a Weatherman, you were optimistic. Well, yeah, but I was also delusional! 8/17 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 69


SHORT TAKES Part wine, part philosophy, part memoir, this month’s selection presents a collection of books to distract your mind from summer’s end.

HUDSON VALLEY WINE: A HISTORY OF TASTE & TERROIR TESSA EDICK AND KATHLEEN WILLCOX ARCADIA PUBLISHING, 2017, $21.99

Wine lovers will love this book, which explores vintages in the “birthplace of American wine,” the Hudson Valley, from the 17th-century Huguenots who brought French winemaking skills to the New World to contemporary winemakers like Benmarl Winery in Marlboro, the oldest vineyard in America sprouting grapes since 1772. The book includes paragraph summaries and tidbits on on the many regional wineries.

WHO DID YOU SAY YOUR FATHER WAS?

The Dark Dark: Stories

SAM TALLERICO 2017, $16.99

Sam Tallerico, host of WVKR’s “Lost and Found Oldies Show,” was raised by an adopted family in a suburb of Detroit. At age 51, he found out his biological father was the singer Bobby Darin, and his musical talents and fondness made more sense. What follows is Tallerico’s journey to establish a connection with his late celebrity father. This memoir wrestles with the many different layers of family and what a past secret means for a future life.

MAD MONK: IMPROPER PARABLES LARRY LITTANY LITT, DRAWINGS BY WONSOOK KIM SILVER HOLLOW PRESS, 2017, $14.99

Chichester-based Litt’s latest protagonist Mad Monk is far from your typical Chan/Zen Buddhist Monk. These 60 stories are quick, witty reads that allow Mad Monk to teach readers valuable, life lessons in subtle ways. Take Mad Monk’s funny interaction with Buddha: “All that we are is a result of what we have thought; it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts.” Mad Monk: “Whatever happened to ‘You are what you eat?’” Buddha: “Okay, that too.”

THE SUFFRAGENTS: HOW WOMEN USED MEN TO GET THE VOTE BROOKE KROEGER EXCELSIOR EDITIONS, SEPTEMBER 1, 2017, $24.95

Just in time for the November centennial anniversary of women’s suffrage in New York, The Suffragents examines men’s roles in the historical feminine milestone. With the formation of the Men’s League for Woman’s Suffrage in 1909, the league soon grew from 150 founding members to thousands advocating across over 30 states in 1917. Kroeger details how key members of the league fought relentlessly to alter the course of history.

LAO-TZU’S SHOE BOB GRAWI WHITE BEAR ENTERPRISES, 2017, $16

Existential questions have flooded Bob Grawi’s mind for most of his life. When he had his first son at age 48, the magnitude of these questions changed. Lao-Tzu’s Shoe chronicles philosophical conversations between Bob Grawi and his teenage son as they reflect upon deep subjects like the nature of the universe. A guidebook appropriate for all who are curious about the peculiarities of life, the dialogue between the two is clearly written and followed by insightful reflections by Grawi.

SAVAGE JOY ROBERT DUNN CORAL PRESS, 2017, $27

At age 25, Robert Dunn landed in the East Village in the heat of the `70’s, scoring a job at the New Yorker and throwing himself into the gritty New York scene. This is the basis for his latest novel, which follows narrator Cole Whitman in his life and struggles in mid-seventies New York navigating the agressive worlds of punk music and young love.

70 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Samantha Hunt

FSG Originals, 2017, $15

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hirteen pregnant teenagers close their eyes and think of the Founding Fathers. Two strangers bring a dog back to life with grief-induced sex. A robot is sent on a suicide mission by the man who loves her. A wife harbors two secrets: her infidelity and her nightly transformation into a deer. In her debut short story collection, The Dark Dark: Stories, Samantha Hunt writes about the ordinary through a supernatural kaleidoscope. She holds the mundane and extraordinary up to the light and tries to explain the shadows. Hunt, the author of three novels (The Seas, The Invention of Everything Else, Mr. Splitfoot), is no stranger to the intersection of the real and paranormal. These short stories all exist in an amorphous area between the real and the mystical; the domestic and the fantastic; the living and the dead. The women-centric stories explore loss, anger, sex, apathy, love, and mental illness. Whether it’s girls, teens, wives, mothers, or even robots, we witness their lives with an intimacy that blurs the boundaries of fiction. Their hopes, dreams, neuroses, fears, and regrets are on full display, and it feels painfully real. Hunt’s writing does not gloss over the dark, ugly parts of womanhood. Instead, she allows women the space to be wild in ways the real world does not—by writing with empathy and grace. The first and last stories in the collection serve as bookends through the looking glass. In both “The Story Of” and “The Story of Of,” Norma, a happy-enough but bored housewife, yearns for a child more than anything. In the first tale, Norma meets Dirty Norma—her husband’s estranged half-sister—and discovers a secret that nearly leads to violence. In the last story, Norma is still barren but everything else is slightly off-kilter: Dirty Norma is not who we think she is, Norma’s husband is cheating on her, and Norma finds a life-changing stenographer’s notebook. Part nesting doll and part Spot the Difference game, “The Story of Of” divides, doubles, and rewrites its predecessor into near nonexistence. When the two-part collection ends, we realize that Norma has indeed given birth to something—not the baby she desired, but something much more sinister. If women serve as the North Star of this collection, nature is the cosmos around it. The stories are deeply rooted and inexorably connected with the natural world. Hunt’s writing tends to anthropomorphize nature: It invades, gets jealous, swallows, speaks, obfuscates, beckons. Above all else, Hunt seems to view women and nature through a similar lens: unbridled and not fully knowable. The story “All Hands” takes place in a Coast Guard town where the guardsmen come and go like the tide. The middle-aged female narrator, who works at the school the 13 pregnant girls attend, is scared for them and all girls around the world. She’s afraid they will sail away with the men before we can know who they are, what they are capable of, and how we can protect them. In the closing lines of the story, she compares the 13 girls to the ocean: “Does he understand what the girls mean or does he, like me, at least understand that he doesn’t understand? We don’t know the alphabets they use, but we can read a curve. We see a girl’s reflection. We tilt our faces toward their glow, warmed by their light, their meaning bubbling up from a dark sea.” The story reveals how little we know about girls or the ocean; the ways we have barely begun to plumb the depths of either. Hunt’s stories show that we can no more easily see into the hearts of girls as we can the bottom of the ocean—we can see but cannot truly know the darkness they share. We can only appreciate them from afar and hope we are not left standing on the shore as they sail away. —Carolyn Quimby


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The Health of the Hudson August 1, 6pm - 8:15pm, Basilica Hudson, Free

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Luminary Media and the Chronogram editorial and business development teams have partnered with Riverkeeper for this special salon chat. We’ll hear from Riverkeeper authorities on the state of the Hudson River with regards to the GE/ EPA cleanup of PCBs, as the September deadline for public commentary looms. And of course, we’ll also have our Conversations panel program. The subject will be “Health of the Hudson” and cover businesses and people who benefit from a healthy river ecosystem. RSVP: CHRONOGRAM.COM/CONVERSATIONS-HUDSON

8/17 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 71


POETRY

Edited by Phillip X Levine. Deadline for our September issue is August 5. Send up to three poems or three pages (whichever comes first). Full submission guidelines: Chronogram.com/submissions.

“I’m going to break out of that jail.” (when asked about entering 2nd grade)

The Catskills Forever near wild —p

—Jack River O’Neill (7 years)

WILD VIOLETS

TABLE FOR ONE ON COBBLESTONE

Learn to love the wild violets.

I prepare myself for no one, everyone, someone—JUST myself carefully putting on lipstick, something at home I never do But the heat here makes it glide on my lips smoothly, effortlessly Like I am someone else painted red in Zadar’s city center Sacrificed the crunchy granola no make up for coy cat eyes Stardust sexy stilettos that promise by the night’s end I will have scraped knees Not because of that... Because I may look graceful but stumble on my own shadow Scuffing self consciously down cobblestone aware of every eye that turns Pleased burdened and shy all felt simultaneously My efforts and metamorphosis being noticed, witnessed by strangers The buildings are bleached sandstone Sometimes I can’t tell where the street ends and towers begin I want to disappear become ancient and recovered Rubble of war rebuilt civil battle celebrated here alone, surrounding by a city of stone and stairs Climbing and Stumbling Fumbling toward a meaning I See an angel, no quite literally painted white and illusioned to be floating with a genuine smile she’s silent as tourist toss kunas in an old coffee can A stillness in her heart lost to the clatter of a town square The sun sets and the tiled stone plays to the lowering tide Couples rush by and the air fills with an urgency One to be coupled, and again I’m approached and offered a pivo I sip my mineral water and smile flattered but uninterested I like to watch listen and feel the mix of people melding together separate and thinking of an early time, when I would have The wild freedom of carelessness the lubricant of booze and I sip harder and look out remembering Coolness rolls in and settles on my sunburnt knees Instead I eat carnival colored gelato My life not hidden somewhere else but current I once wanted the world to want me Now I long for the familiar smell of my sheets the touch of my partner and the casual I love yous that slip like hiccups from my four year olds lips I return to my apartment tired and knees unscathed Wipe the lipstick that is barely there Slip into a lukewarm foreign shower And think of the world I’ve seen, the places I’ve been Concluding that finally I have a home waiting that needs me and I it.

They neither reap nor sow, nor need to. Let them take the lawn if they will. They are more pleasing to the bare foot than indifferently sprouted seed purchased and strewn with blind intent. Your dog will roll in them and suffer only joy. You can learn a lot from your dog. —Ken Sutton

KEELHAULED A canvas sail, wind-battered, heavy with salt and spray, and I don’t think you have the lungs to fill it, to move it we will be buried at sea There will be no ceremony the jewelry I gave you, now worthless, can’t pay for a casket we will be wrapped in sailcloth, weighted with cannonball and pushed into the deep where I can only hope our corpses do not settle next to each other again —Steven Swyryt

OLD ROAD, LOMONTVILLE Up in the woods, signs of an old road, bounded by stone walls, parallel and straight, then turning, then parallel and straight again, slanting off across

—Michelle Williams

the neighbor’s lot and petering out, shagbark and ash on either side,

QUATRAIN FOR ROSARIO

FOR WHAT IT’S WORTH, EMILY

A doleful island my lovesick heart everywhere tempest rent and dearer bonds of love the very firmament.

Commas they left of You— Ruptures—tiny Sequins—

big, old trees so some are dying, and where the road was—never paved, just a packed trail—soil has eroded between the walls, left it irregular and rocky-bottomed, small trees grown up here and there, hemlock and blue beech, so it’s no road now, only a hint of what there was long ago when wagons and horses, perhaps oxen as well, made their way somewhere to somewhere through the woods. —Matthew J. Spireng

72 POETRY CHRONOGRAM 8/17

—Roger Whitson

DUCK LAUGHTER On the pond a family of ducks quack laughter at its long walk on a short pier. —Diane Webster

Comments have grown— Criticisms taken— Simply Shade around Rebellion— This life— This life Emily— Eternally—so so preoccupying —Darren Lyons


loVe PoEm

SEASICK AND SONGFUL

MOOSE

I have forgotten more than most women know of how the body yearns. Late night, my poems of you are read out loud in strange women’s bedrooms. My words cling to their tongues like the sweet heat of penny candy. They can’t stand it! Still, they want more and they refuse to spit you out.

O the hilly hellscape of the heart, heartsick, homesick, seasick, sick at sea and heart, whether waves or hills, the body flounders, heart spills, and the mind mutinies— mountains, it forms, impossible to scale.

and I, still here, in the vale of half-apologies and hope half stale— Lo, the masochist returns to the sites of sorrow where old agonies infinitely unfurl in some grim tomorrow, future-past tense world—

but a dog, a golden retriever trotting along, tail proud, a tree limb between his teeth—sans collar, sans master— on duty nonetheless:

what a shame it is that we are human, what a shame

We stood dumb-struck (what didn’t compute?) till one of us shouted: “A moose!” and, lo, the blind could see.

that I am, I say, I declare or pray; I am tossing on an ocean of treachery— O the heart is hilly, hurt and has every hole patched up, every hatch latched, where every agony is stacked neatly, ever and never tossed about by the jostling kinetic world—

“A heckuvamoose!”

Isn’t that how love is? They question themselves as they recycle each line while, maybe, a tabby cat presses closer beneath the sheet and digs in familiar places. Women wonder: Is it their lack of something or just their misfortune for never having met someone like you? And they lean hard against the porcelain sink, night gown clinging to damp thighs, as they scrub the syrup off their teeth. Isn’t that how love is? So tonight, while you are too far from me, I write this poem and somewhere, some woman, someday will read it and tell herself that she will ask for nothing more, ever, if she is given the chance to be close enough to press an ear against her own lover’s chest, close enough, to lose count of the rhythm of a heart that only beats for her, close enough to breathe in his exhale— grateful for the gift of it.

chronically seasick and always at sea— some god, in its infinite forethought ought to have wrought us from some other matter than this—this mess of flesh— something that neither breaks nor wears away, impervious to the perturbations of a day. The vocal cords are grief-catchers, and all that’s caught is then exposed in a tiny museum of frail dispatchers, sinews stretched and heart enclosed— what a shame it is that we are fragile, what a shame, that I am, am human, all, every inch, what a shame. —Lachlan Brooks

À LA BELLE ÉTOILE—A SNAPPY DAY FER SURE (Under the beautiful star the right path will be illuminated) Translucently straightforward, it’s all beyond explanation, Always golden… nourishing on the deliciousness of “now.” ! stir under a blanket o’ morn while the unraveling of a dream signals my arms t’pull back the rumpled fabric of sleep that covers me. ! conspire for so much more… Lopsided grace, and jus’ trying t’stay human makes my frayed angel hair a tangled mess —ooznozz

SUMMER CYCLE

—Evelyn Augusto

West is warm, it flows like blood East is cold and fresh and bright Northern light brings back the sun Southern light comes with the dark Upside down I find myself Beside a babbling waterfall The light inside me knows them all

summer entered in lavish american feasts grilled, charred with dripping strawberries and technicolor fireworks in the evenings summer rested in our trips to coney island, seaside heights so hot the mermaids and mysterious neon alleys sizzled summer left us in perpetual august, perennial and a reverie and echoes the memory in our worn baseball caps and stagnant pools

—Richard R. Binkele

—Steve Baltsas

(based on a Native American concept)

Not the bus-sized moose down by the low-lying creek the locals swore it would cross,

the limb a ponderous branching thing wobbling above his head.

At which the dog paused to look at us—all laughter & high-fives. No time for this, said a flick of his tail, and weaving his way past scrub and ferns, he trotted on. All eyes strained after him as at full sail, he veered into woods, our glee subsiding to a wondering hush,

soon shy—

which argued against lingering, yet linger we did, through a jangle of keys and a toddler’s whimper. Then a man clapped once: —Anne Richey

GRIP It would be so simple If love was measured in breath. Each day, I could hear you tell me that you drown. At my fingertips.

When you stopped loving me. Our talk fell to idle respiration

You, rasping and wheezing, And I Fully aware.

—Anya Ptacek

... An image of the truth whispers

Because isn’t that how love is?

SEVEN DIRECTIONS

It’s not easy for the casual tourist to see a moose in Vermont. —Online Trip Advisor

THE CLOUD (JAMES COMEY ELIMINATION POEM) On the morning of March 30, the President called me. He said a cloud was impairing his ability to act. He asked what we could do To lift the cloud: The cloud was interfering With his hope. I told him I would see, that we would work as quickly as we could. After that, I would await his guidance. I did not hear from the President again. —Alexandra Marvar

8/17 CHRONOGRAM POETRY 73


Food & Drink

ROLL OUT THE BARRELS HUDSON VALLEY BREWERY by Erik Ofgang Photos by Christine Ashburn

T

he first thing you notice when you walk into the Hudson Valley Brewery in downtown Beacon is the wall of wooden barrels on your left. Dozens of them are stacked, pyramid-like, on their sides and draw your gaze with more force than anything in the 10,000-square foot brewing space—and that’s saying something, because there is plenty see in the impressive, former factory space with a warehouse feel. To the right of the entrance there’s a square bar and taproom area that is full of beer drinkers on a recent Saturday afternoon. Behind that is the brew house, with rows of shining silver brewing equipment. But it is the wall of barrels that your eyes will return to. These barrels, which could be part of the prop list for a pirate film, give the brewery a less-industrial, more rustic vibe than many other breweries, but they are about far more than just aesthetics. They are the heart and soul of the enterprise. “It’s like a living, breathing wheel of time,” owner John-Anthony Gargiulo says as he gestures toward the wooden kegs. Sour beers, the brewery’s specialty, are aged within those barrels, which are constantly being emptied and refilled, and new barrels are being rotated onto the wall as well. “As beer is maturing, you’re putting new beer [barrels] on top of those,” Gargiulo says. “It’s not just the beer maturing—the actual organisms that are in the barrel, they mature. They get stronger, they develop, they grow. So the flavors constantly get better and better.” Over a period of months, the liquid inside those barrels develops desired qualities. As various microorganisms go to work on one beer, it might develop a strong sour flavor, while beer in another barrel might become less tart and mellow out.The liquid from different barrels is then blended together, creating one excellent final beer. This process is run by Gargiulo’s partners and Hudson Valley Brewery’s co-brewmasters Michael Renganeschi and Jason Synan, who started the Brewery at Bacchus in New Paltz before leaving that company for this venture. The blending process allows the brewers to accentuate certain 74 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 8/17

notes and cut back on others. After about six months, it results in the soughtafter sour beers offered at the brewery. The time-consuming nature of the process prevents many breweries from producing aged sour beers. “There’s not a lot of places that are making beer like this because it’s such a tough financial situation,” Gargiulo says. “You have a lot of investment sitting on the shelf.” In addition, few breweries are devoting as many resources to sour beers as the Hudson Valley Brewery, and only a select few can match the quality of the final products prepared by Renganeschi and Synan. Opened in December, the brewery has already generated buzz and excitement in the New York beer world and beyond. With statewide distribution, Hudson Valley Brewery beer is already a staple at celebrated New York City hotspots like the Momofuku restaurants and Torst. In addition to sour beers, the brewery specializes in IPAs and is earning a reputation for intriguing examples of the style that are more about fruity, tropical flavors than hop bitterness. “Our beer doesn’t have a lot of the aggression that some of the past IPAs have had, where it’s like a punch in your face. We’re really going for more balance and roundness of flavors,” Gargiulo says. “We’re putting a lot of really interesting hops into our stuff and using ingredients that might not necessarily be used by other breweries.” The IPAs offered at the brewery have a light mouthfeel and offer bursts of fruit flavors that will intrigue hop heads but won’t necessarily scare off those who don’t like bitter beers. They are reminiscent, albeit with a lighter mouthfeel, of some of the legendary unfiltered, New England-style IPAs that often garner long lines at places like Treehouse Brewing Co. in Massachusetts. This emphasis on approachability is also evident when it comes to the brewery’s sour beers, which are generally lightly sour and softer than some sours, with refreshing tartness rather than over-the-top acidity. “I get a lot of, ‘I don’t like sour beers but I love your beers,’” Gargiulo says. “I think the customer is


TASTING NOTES Opposite: Inside the tasting room at Hudson Valley Brewery. This page, clockwise from top left: A recent Saturday afternoon at the brewery; Grady Salter pouring brews; owner John-Anthony Gargiulo.

burnt out on the aggression side of craft beer.” The seeds of the brewery were sown about a decade ago. Gargiulo, a native of Highland, was living in California and working in the movie industry. His credits as a camera dolly operator include the original Iron Man, Frost/Nixon and The Informant! (directed by Steven Soderbergh and starring Matt Damon). While making films he developed a love for California’s craft beer scene. In 2008, wishing to be closer to family, Gargiulo decided to move back to the Hudson Valley with the hopes of opening a brewery. He ended up meeting Renganeschi and Synan, his future brewers and partners, at Bacchus and the plan to open a brewery took shape. After several years of searching for a location, Gargiulo spotted the abandoned factory space in Beacon on East Main Street consisting of two connected buildings, one dating to the 1820s and one to 1960s. After about a year and a half of renovations, the brewery began offering beer in December and opened its taproom in February. Ultimately, a full restaurant will be opened in a space adjacent to the brewery itself. Gargiulo hopes to have the brewery’s restaurant open by next summer, but that portion of the business is still in the relatively early planning stages. So far, Gargiulo definitely sees similarities between the film and brewing worlds. He thinks of himself as the brewery’s producer, while Renganeschi and Synan are the directors. “The producer brings in an artistic visionary to make the movie come to life, I see them there,” Gargiulo says. “I see the beers as the actors, because they’re the talent that plays out the movie or the story.” If the beers are indeed the actors and actresses of the brewing world, then the brews at Hudson Valley Brewery might just have star power. Hudson Valley Brewery 2 Churchill Street, Beacon (845) 218-9156; Hudsonvalleybrewery.com Tasting room open Thursday to Sunday.

Kinds of Light 6 percent ABV A sour farmhouse ale aged with Chardonnay grape skins, this special release has a burst of refreshing tartness and a white wine-like quality. More sour than some of Hudson Valley Brewery’s other beers, it is a personal favorite. Infinity Pool 7 percent ABV Deceptively high in alcohol content, this light IPA has lots of tropical hop flavors courtesy of the Citra, Hallertau Blanc, and Motueka hops. A mix of lime, lemon, and sweeter fruit flavors match just a hint of hop bitterness to make this beer a must-try. Falsetto 6 percent ABV A sour farmhouse beer aged with strawberries in oak, this brew has a beautiful, light pink appearance and an approachable soft sourness with flavors of blood orange and hibiscus. Perfect as a gateway sour. Pillow Hat 4 percent ABV This thoroughly nonaggressive session IPA is made with Citra and Motueka hops. Light and clean, it has low bitterness and a variety of subtle citrus notes including lime zest, honeydew melon, and grapefruit. Feel No Way 5 percent ABV A pilsner made with Sterling and Hallertau Blanc hops, the wildcard non-sour, non-IPA beer in the brewery’s lineup is approachable but full of character—expect a malty backbone and dandelion notes with a mildly heavy mouthfeel. Silhouette 5 percent ABV Made with tangerines and designed to be a brunch-style sour beer, Silhouette is laidback enough to be enjoyed early in the day. It has a light, refreshing tartness, quick mouthfeel, and fresh citrus juice notes reminiscent of a mimosa. 8/17 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 75


Crafting Exceptional Hudson River Region Wines

STONEHEDGE RESTAURANT Birthday? Date Night? It’s Friday and you don’t want to cook? Whatever the reason, come in tonight and let us take care of dinner for you. OUTDOOR SEATING AVAILABLE!

(845) 384-6555 • stonehedgerestaurant.com

H U D S O N

R I V E R

R E G I O N

Staatsburg, New York mileaestatevineyard.com

elephant FOOD & WINE

We’re changing things up a bit!!! NEW HOURS: Wed: 5-9:30ish (10% off industry night) Thurs: 5-9:30ish (20% of wine bottles) Fri & Sat: 5-10pm Sunday Brunch: 11:30-2pm Closed Mon & Tues

310 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-9310 www.elephantwinebar.com

of Full Line uts ld C o C ic n a Org e Cooking and Hom ssen Delicate

79 Main Street New Paltz 845-255-2244 Open 7 Days

Local Organic Grass-Fed Beef • Lamb • Goat • Veal • Pork • Chicken • Wild Salmon

No Hormones ~ No Antibiotics ~ No Preservatives Custom Cut • Home Cooking Delicatessen Nitrate-Free Bacon • Pork Roasts • Beef Roasts Bone-in or Boneless Ham: smoked or fresh Local Organic Beef • Exotic Meats (Venison, Buffalo, Ostrich) • Wild Fish

76 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Breakfast, lunch and dinner Full coffee bar Inn rooms Eat, Drink, Stay Private Events theclair.com • 845-482-4211 4053 State Route 52 • Youngsville N.Y. 12791


tastings directory Bakeries Alternative Baker 407 Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-3355 www.lemoncakes.com 100% All butter, hand-made, small-batch baked goods with many allergy-friendly options. Open at 7am until 7:30pm Friday and Saturday. Until 5pm Thursday, Sunday, and Monday. Closed Tuesday and Wednesday. All-vegan vegetable soups in season, an array of JB Peel coffees and Harney teas, artisanal drinks, plus our award-winning Belgian hot chocolate, also served iced! Unique wedding cakes for a lifetime’s treasure. All “Worth a detour”—(NY Times). Truly “Where Taste is Everything!”

Butchers Jack’s Meats & Deli 79 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2244

Cafés Bistro-to-Go 948 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 340-9800 www.bluemountainbistro.com Gourmet take-out store serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week. Featuring local and imported organic foods, delicious homemade desserts, sophisticated four-star food by Chefs Richard Erickson, Jonathan Sheridan, and Dan Sherman. Off-premise full-service catering and event planning for parties of all sizes.

Heather Ridge Farm 989 Broome Center Road, Preston Hollow, NY www.heather-ridge-farm.com

High Tea at Twin Gables B&B 73 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY www.tgwoodstock.com

Restaurants A&P Bar and Restaurant 83 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY www.aandpbar.com

American Glory BBQ 342 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 822-1234 www.americanglory.com

Clair Inn and Café 4053 State Route 52, Youngsville, NY (845) 482-4211 www.theclair.com

The premier Sushi restaurant in the Hudson Valley for over 21 years. Only the freshest sushi with an innovative flair.

Colony Woodstock 22 Rock City Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-7625 www.colonywoodstock.com

Elephant 310 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-9310 www.elephantwinebar.com

Nancy’s of Woodstock 105 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY www.nancysartisanal.com

Osaka Restaurant 22 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7338 74 Broadway, Tivoli, NY (845) 757-5055 www.osakasushi.net Foodies, consider yourselves warned and informed! Osaka Restaurant is Rhinebeck’s direct link to Japan’s finest cuisines! Enjoy the freshest sushi and delicious traditional Japanese small plates cooked with love by this family owned and operated treasure for over 21 years! For more information and menus, go to osakasushi.net.

Perch 1 King Street, Marlboro, NY (845) 236-3663 www.perchmarlboro.com

Red Hook Curry House 28 E Market Street, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-2666 www.redhookcurryhouse.com

Redwood Bar and Restaurant 63 N. Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 259-5868 www.redwooduptown.com

Stonehedge Restaurant 1694 Route 9W, West Park, NY (845) 384-6555 www.stonehedgerestaurant.com

Voted Best Indian Cuisine in the Hudson Valley

Red Hook Curry House ★★★★ DINING Daily Freeman & Poughkeepsie Journal ZAGAT RATED

HUNDI BUFFET

TUESDAY & SUNDAY 5-9PM

4 Vegetarian Dishes • 4 Non-Vegetarian Dishes includes: appetizers, soup, salad bar, bread, dessert, coffee & tea All you can eat only $15.00 • Children under 8- $8.95 28 E. MARKET ST, RED HOOK (845) 758-2666 See our full menu at www.RedHookCurryHouse.com

OPEN EVERY DAY Lunch: 11:30am - 3:00pm Dinner: 5:00pm - 10:00pm Fridays: 3:00pm - 10:00pm

Catering for Parties & Weddings • Take out orders welcome

Yobo Restaurant Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 564-3848 www.yoborestaurant.com

Yum Yum Noodle Bar Woodstock, NY (845) 679-7992, Kingston, NY (845) 338-1400, www.yumyumnoodlebar.com

Vineyard Milea Estate Vineyard Hollow Road, Staatsburg, NY www.mileaestatevineyard.com (845) 264-0403 info@mileaestatevineyard.com

Wine Bars Jar’d Wine Pub Water Street Market, New Paltz, NY www.jardwinepub.com

a west coast joint serving modern american cuisine in uptown kingston open kitchen, rooftop dining, banquet room 63 N. Front St • 845-259-5868 Serving lunch, dinner & Sunday brunch redwooduptown.com

8/17 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 77


store BIODYNAMIC® | ORGANIC | LOCAL | FRESH | DELICIOUS from our farm: raw sauerkraut | biodynamic raw milk, yogurt & cheeses | biodynamic veggies | animal welfare approved & biodynamic grass fed beef | organic chicken whey-fed heri tage pork | organic artisan baked goods other featured local farms: Blue Star Farm | double decker farm | The Farm at miller's crossing | rock ci ty mushrooms | mcenroe farm | thompson finch farm & more

Extreme integrity. This store offers some of the best food in the entire world! Beautiful, local Biodynamic selection. ~ Jeff B.

OPEN DAILY 7:30 AM-7 PM • HVFSTORE.ORG

AUGUST EVENTS Supper Club • Sat, Aug 12 • 7pm 5 course dinner, by reservation

2nd Sunday Session • Sun, Aug 13 • noon-2pm Live Irish music with brunch

Fried Chicken Picnic • Sat, Aug 26 • 6pm

Gluten-free with seasonal sides, dessert and beverages

Fiercely local food served on the farm Panoramic views of the Catskills

CATHRYN'S

Globally Inspired, Locally Sourced.

One King Street, Marlboro, NY 845-236-3663 per chm a r lb or o. com Walking distance to The Falcon

78 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 8/17

See our menu on FB

Bees Knees Café and Farm Store Expanded Summer Schedule: July & Aug Thurs-Sun 11am-3pm Grassfed Meats • Pastured Poultry • Catering On/Off Farm New! Farm Stay Cottages 989 Broome Center Rd, Preston Hollow, NY 518-239-6234 One hour from Kingston

Heather-Ridge-Farm.com


Locally Grown

The Stick to Local Farms map encourages participation by consumers in local agriculture.

FROM THE LOCAL TO THE GLOBAL STICK TO LOCAL FARMS PROJECT by Diana Waldron

H

ow do you get people to visit local farms they’ve never been to? Give them a map and send them on a scavenger hunt—for stickers (and fresh produce).

The Mastermind Behind the Map Maria Reidelbach is the mastermind behind Stick to Local Farms—an interactive art project created with the intention of connecting food lovers and farmers in the Rondout Valley. The driving force of the project is to encourage people to visit and support local farms. A longtime lover of maps, Reidelbach designed stickers for each farm to use on a colorful map of the area. “Everybody loves a sticker—it’s like a little, tiny limited-edition art print that you can go collect. I thought it would be really fun to put the two together. People are very shy about visiting farms, and farmers are shy about inviting people to visit them,” says Reidelbach. 8/17 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 79


Cajun-Creole Cuisine Happy Hour Fridays $1 oysters & half price beer and wine New Orleans style jazz brunch Sundays Tuesdays are burger nights. Burger and beer specials. www.t h e p a r i s h re s t a u ra n t .co m

Let us be your guide to all the great farm and food enterprises that the Hudson Valley has to offer. Use our searchable online directory to discover local farms, farm-to-table restaurants, farmers’ markets and food producers throughout the Hudson Valley.

www.hudsonvalleybounty.com (518) 432-5360 • info@hudsonvalleybounty.com

MAPLE SYRUP COFFEE-INFUSED MAPLE SYRUP MAPLE CREAM MAPLE GRANULATED SUGAR MAPLE HOT SAUCE MAPLE CANDY Dover Plains, NY (845) 264-3137 www.soukupfarms.com Tapping Trees Since 1955

VISIT THE FARM OR FIND US AT FARMERS’ MARKETS AROUND DUTCHESS COUNTY

Certified 100% Grass-fed Organic Beef Sold in Quantity: 20-pound Packs to Full Sides Advance orders only

estaBLIsheD 1775

Westtown, NY www.kezialain.com info@kezialain.com 845-683-1363

INTRODUCING

CHEF’S TABLE For reservations contact Mark@SproutCreekFarm.org

Try our award-winning cow & goat milk cheeses!

sproutcreekfarm.org 34 LAUER ROAD, POUGHKEEPSIE, NY Market & Creamery 845.485.9885 | Educational Programs & General Info 845.485.8438 | Culinary 845.206.0235 80 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 8/17


Alan Carey Above: The RVGA Cornucopia by Maria Reidelbach at the Common Ground celebration. Below: Seedlings from the Hudson Valley Seed Library.

Ilene Cutler 8/17 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 81


Participants in the Rondout Valley Growers Farmer to Farmer Pasture Walk.

markets throughout the Rondout Valley, collecting a sticker from each site along the way. It is completely free—visitors can pick up a map at any participating farm. If participants collect 10 stickers, they receive the Stick to Local Farms Cookbook and a free game of mini-golf at Kelder’s Farm. Those who stop at all locations receive a bag of farmers’ market products and a golden-edged completion sticker—the Green Man, a mythical creature that represents the vitality of nature. The image is a portrait of and a tribute to John Novi, the former chef of the Depuy Canal House in High Falls who has been active in the Farm to Table Movement since the `70s. (Novi turns 75 this year.) The project is in its fourth year. New this year are recipe cards, an idea that she first created while at Kelder’s. The Stick to Local Farms Cookbook was created as a compilation of these recipes. In the future, Reidelbach hopes to release new books that show people how to choose, prepare, and preserve local foods. She also hopes to write a book about local food for kids.

A Hudson Valley Vertical Farms market bag filled with goodies—the reward for collecting all the stickers on the Stick to Local Farms map.

For Reidelbach, an art school graduate who lived in New York City for 25 years, popular culture and roadside attractions were (and still are) a great passion. She wrote about them. (Her books include Miniature Golf and Completely MAD:A History of the Comic Book and Magazine.) She visited them. And eventually, she made one herself. Reidelbach created a Guinness World Record-setting garden gnome (Gnome Chomsky) that can be seen at Homegrown Mini-Golf at Kelder’s Farm in Kerhonkson. The gnome was built as an homage to Freida Carter, the creator of the first miniature golf course on Lookout Mountain in Tennessee in 1927, who also included garden gnomes on her mini-fairways. After Kelder’s, she started working with local farms and eventually joined the board of the Rondout Valley Growers Association, a farm advocacy group. She wanted to combine her love of local food and farming with her creative experience—and, thus, the Stick to Local Farms project was born. How It Works: Gotta Collect `Em All Enthusiastic food lovers and locavores alike can visit 26 farms and farmers’ 82 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Farming in the Rondout Valley One of the most notable scenes in the HudsonValley is the RondoutValley, which extends from Kingston to Ellenville between the Catskills and the Shawangunks. This land, formed 18,000 years ago by a receding glacier, was inhabited and farmed by the Lenape Native Americans. Alluvial floodplains along the Rondout and Esopus creeks left deep, mineral-rich deposits, creating fertile Unadilla soil for growing and farming—some of the richest soil in the United States. The topsoil can be as thick as 20 feet deep, with no rocks. The flatlands are supportive for vegetables, corn, and other food that requires steady weather to grow. Crops such as fruit trees, berries, and hops are more suitably grown in the uplands. According to the Rondout Valley Growers Association, the region produces more than 17 million pounds of produce each year—in addition to various flowers, herbs, trees, livestock, and more. The Rondout Valley is home to farms as old as 250 years and as young as one year—from vegetable and flower farms to cider farms, breweries, and more. From the Local to the Global “Connecting more with our local farmers is something that really benefits our lives in so many ways. It helps us put better food on our table, but it also helps us make the world better: Supporting local farming helps combat climate change. It really goes from the local to the global. And it’s delicious at the same time.” For more information about Stick to Local Farms or to view a list of participating farms, visit Stick2local.com.


Arch River Farm MILLBROOK, NY

Dutchess County Fair 2017 Poultry Exhibitor

Ava Clear

Good luck from Arch River Farm!

pasture raised, farm fresh meats & poultry Come visit us and see our farm. Open Daily. ALSO AT LOCAL FARMERS’ MARKETS THROUGHOUT DUTCHE SS COUNT Y

A RC H R I V E R FA R M .C O M 51 5 Wo o d s t o c k Rd . , M i l l b ro o k , N Y ( 8 4 5 ) 9 8 8 - 6 4 6 8 8/17 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 83


business directory Accommodations Blue Barn BnB 62 Old Route 82, Millbrook, NY (845) 750-2669 www.bluebarnbnb.com Gatehouse Gardens B & B New Paltz, NY (845) 255-8817 ww.gatehousegardens.com Mohonk Mountain House 1000 Mountain Rest Road, New Paltz, NY (800) 772-6646 www.mohonk.com

Antiques Outdated 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0030 outdatedcafe@gmail.com

business directory

Art Galleries & Centers Bradford Graves Sculpture Park Kerhonkson, NY (845) 230-0521 www.bradfordgraves.com Open May - October - by appointment. “Bradford Graves’ sculpture is complex. We see carved limestone slabs that look like the ruins of ancient walls. One senses obscure mystical meaning which is moving. Graves’ work is difficult to describe and very much worth seeing. Graves is a sculptor worth following. His work is original and very interesting indeed.” –The New York Times March 8, 1981 Cross Contemporary Art 99 Partition Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 247-3122 www.crosscontemporaryart.com Dorsky Museum SUNY New Paltz 1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3844 www.newpaltz.edu/museum sdma@newpaltz.edu Mark Gruber Gallery New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241 www.markgrubergallery.com Magazzino of Italian Art 2700 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY Storm King Art Center (845) 534-3115 www.stormkingartcenter.org University Art Museum at the University at Albany Albany, NY www.albany.edu/museum Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 437-5632 www.fllac.vassar.edu

Artists Studios Regal Bag Studios 302 North Water Street, Newburgh, NY (845) 444-8509 www.regalbagstudios.com

Attorneys Jacobowitz & Gubits (845) 778-2121 www.jacobowitz.com

Auto Sales Begnal Motors 552 Albany Avenue, Kingston, NY (888) 439-9985 www.ltbegnalmotor.com

Beverages Binnewater/Leisure Time Spring Water (845) 331-0504 www.binnewater.com

Books Monkfish Publishing 22 East Market Street, Suite 304, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4861 www.monkfishpublishing.com

Broadcasting WDST 100.1 Radio Woodstock Woodstock, NY www.wdst.com

Building Services & Supplies Associated Lightning Rod Co. (518) 789-4603, (845) 373-8309, (860) 364-1498 www.alrci.com Berkshire Products, Inc. 884 Ashley Falls Road, Sheffield, NY www.berkshireproducts.com Glenn’s Wood Sheds (845) 255-4704 H Houst & Son Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2115 www.hhoust.com Herrington’s Hillsdale, NY: (518) 325-3131 Hudson, NY: (518) 828-9431 www.herringtons.com Hudson River Design Saugerties, NY (845) 246-0725 www.chucksilver.com John A Alvarez and Sons 3572 Route 9, Hudson, NY (518) 851-9917 www.alvarezmodulars.com Smith Hardware 227 Main Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-4500

WAAM - Ulster Artists On-line 28 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2940 www.woodstockart.org

WCW Kitchens 3 Cherry Hill Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2022 Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2002

Woodstock Art Exchange 1398 Route 28, West Hurley, NY

Williams Lumber & Home Center 6760 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-WOOD www.williamslumber.com

Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2079 www.woodstockguild.org events@woodstockguild.org

Art Supplies Catskill Art & Office Supply Kingston, NY: (845) 331-7780, Poughkeepsie, NY: (845) 452-1250, Woodstock, NY: (845) 679-2251 84 BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Carpets & Rugs Anatolia-Tribal Rugs & Weavings 54G Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5311 www.anatoliarugs.com anatoliarugs@gmail.com Open Mon. & Thurs. 12-5, Friday-Sunday 12-6, closed Tues. & Wed. Established in Woodstock 1981. Offering old, antique

and contemporary handwoven carpets and kilims, from Turkey, Afghanistan, Iran, Central Asia, in a wide range of styles, colors, prices. Hundreds to choose from, in a regularly changing inventory. We are happy to share our knowledge about rugs, and try and simplify the sometimes overcomplicated world of handwoven rugs.

Cinemas Rosendale Theater Collective Rosendale, NY www.rosendaletheatre.org Upstate Films 6415 Montgomery St. Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2515 132 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-6608 www.upstatefilms.org

Clothing & Accessories Hamilton & Adams 32 John Street, Kingston, NY www.hamiltonandadams.com Next Boutique 17 W. Strand Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-4537 www.nextboutique.com OAK 42 34 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-0042 www.oak42.com Willow Wood 38 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4141 willowwoodlifestyle@gmail.com Woodstock Design 9 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-8776 www.shopwoodstockdesign.com

Computer Services Computing Solutions (845) 687-9458 alan.silverman.computers@gmail.com alan-silverman-computers.com Are computers impossible? At your wit’s end? Alan Silverman – Computer Concierge, I’m here when you need me. Helping people on three continents stay sane with computers since 1986. Home users and small businesses. I help buy the best built PCs, then set them up for you. Tech Smiths 45 North Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 443-4866 www.tech-smiths.com

Custom Home Design and Materials Atlantic Custom Homes 2785 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY www.lindalny.com

Education Adair Kleinpeter-Ross adair.kleinpeter.ross@gmail.com Unlock Your Child’s Narrative & Help Them Stand Out from the Crowd! Professional writing coach and editor for help with college essays, college interviews, cover letters, and resumes. This summa cum laude Ivy League graduate and young professional will work closely with your high school student to develop unique and compelling personal narratives to help achieve his/her goals. Bard MAT Bard College (845) 758-7151 www.bard.edu/mat mat@bard.edu Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-5343 www.caryinstitute.org Center for the Digital Arts/ Westchester Community College 27 North Division Street, Peekskill, NY (914) 606-7300 www.sunywcc.edu/peekskill

Green Meadow Waldorf School (845) 356-2514 www.gmws.org Kildonan School Amenia, NY (845) 373-2012 www.kildonan.org admissions@kildonan.org Mountain Laurel Waldorf School 16 South Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0033 www.mountainlaurel.org Next Step College Counseling Hyde Park, NY (845) 242-8336 www.nextstepcollegecounseling.com smoore@nextstepcollegecounseling.com Randolph School Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 297-5600 www.randolphschool.org SUNY New Paltz New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3860 www.newpaltz.edu Ashokan Childrens Garden Olivebridge, NY (518) 727-0043 www.theashokanchildrensgarden.com The Birch School 9 Vance Road, Rock Tavern, NY (845) 645-7772 www.thebirchschool.org

Events 8 Day Week www.chronogram.com/8dw Boscobel House & Gardens 1601 Route 9D, Garrison, NY (845) 265-3638 www.boscobel.org Chronogram Block Party Kingston, NY www.chronogramblockparty.com Drum Boogie Festival Andy Lee Field, Woodstock, NY www.drumboogiefestival.com Dutchess County Fairgrounds www.dutchessfair.com Garnerville Arts Center Annual Arts Festival 55 W. Railroad Ave., Garnerville, NY www.garnerartscenter.org Huichica Music Festival 115 Chase Road, Pine Plains, NY www.huichica.com Hudson Jazzworks Concert 327 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 822-1438 www.hudsonhall.org Hudson Valley Garlic Festival Cantine Field, Saugerties, NY www.hvgf.org Peekskill Vintage Grand Prix Peekskill, NY www.peekskillgrandprix.com Hudson Old Time Engine & Tractor Show 390 Fingar Road, Hudson, NY Grahamsville Little World’s Fair Grahamsville, NY www.grahamsvillefair.com Quail Hollow Events P.O. Box 825, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-8087 or (845) 246-3414 www.quailhollow.com Sunflower Art Festival Gardiner, NY www.sunflowerartfestival.com Woodstock Comedy Festival inc. www.woodstockcomedyfestival.org Woodstock Invitational LLC Bearsville Theater, Woodstock, NY www.woodstockinvitational.com


Farm Markets & Natural Food Stores Adam’s Fairacre Farms 1240 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 569-0303, 1560 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-6300, 765 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-4330 www.adamsfarms.com Apple Bin Farm Market 810 Broadway, Ulster Park, NY (845) 339-7229 www.theapplebinfarmmarket.com Hawthorne Valley Farm Store 327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7500 www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org McEnroe Organic Farm Market 5409 Route 22, Millerton, NY (518) 789-4191 mcenroeorganicfarm.com Pennings Farm Market & Orchards 161 South Route 94, Warwick, NY (845) 986-1059 www.penningsfarmmarket.com Sunflower Natural Food Market 75 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5361 www.sunflowernatural.com info@sunflowernatural.com

Farms Arch River Farm 515 Woodstock Road, Woodstock, NY www.archriverfarm.com Kezialain Farm Keziah Lane, Westtown, NY www.kezialain.com

Financial Advisors Third Eye Associates Ltd. 38 Spring Lake Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 752-2216 www.thirdeyeassociates.com

Graphic Design & Illustration Annie Internicola, Illustrator www.annieillustrates.com Luminary Media 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 334-8600 www.luminarymedia.com

Hair Salons Allure 47 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7774 allure7774@aol.com L Salon 234 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-0269 www.thelsalonny.com

Home Furnishings & Decor Asia Barong Route 7/199 Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington, MA (413) 528-5091 www.asiabarong.com exit nineteen 309 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 514-2485

Interior Design & Home Furnishings Cabinet Designers 747 State Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2200 www.cabinetdesigners.com Here at Cabinet Designers, we’re not your typical kitchen and bath company. We’re a design firm with great passion and attention

Jewelry, Fine Art & Gifts Crafts People 262 Spillway Road, West Hurley, NY (845) 331-3859 www.craftspeople.us Representing over 500 artisans, Crafts People boasts four buildings brimming with fine crafts; the largest selection in the Hudson Valley. All media represented, including: jewelry, blown glass, pottery, turned wood, kaleidoscopes, wind chimes, leather, clothing, stained glass, etc. Open Fri., Sat., Sun.,Mon. 10:30am - 6:00pm.

New Paltz Chamber of Commerce 257 Main Sreet, New Paltz, NY www.newpaltzchamber.org

Bard College Public Relations Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY (845) 758-7900 www.fischercenter.bard.edu

Kaatsbaan International Dance Center www.facebook.com/kaatsbaan www.kaatsbaan.org

Museums Motorcyclepedia Museum 250 Lake Street (Route 32), Newburgh, NY (845) 569-9065

Music BSP Kingston 323 Wall Street, Kingston, NY www.bspkingston.com The Falcon 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro, NY (845) 236-7970 www.liveatthefalcon.com

Musical Instruments Magic Fluke Co. 292 South Main Street, Sheffield, MA (413) 229-8536 www.magicfluke.com

Organizations Hudson Valley Bounty (518) 432-5360 www.hudsonvalleybounty.com Hudson Valley Current (845) 658-2302 www.hudsonvalleycurent.org

The Lace Mill 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, NY www.rupco.org

Bardavon 1869 Opera House 35 Market Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2072 www.bardavon.org

Hudson Valley Goldsmith 71A Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-5872 www.hudsonvalleygoldsmith.com

Lawyers & Mediators

Kingston’s Opera House Office Bldg. 275 Fair Street, Kingston, NY (845) 399-1212 Contact Bill Oderkirk (owner/manager) 3991212@gmail.com

Performing Arts

Center for Performing Arts 661 Route 308, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 232-2320 www.centerforperformingarts.org

Karen A. Friedman Esq. 30 East 33rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY www.newyorktrafficlawyer.com (212) 213-2145 k.friedman@msn.com Handling a variety of traffic-related and criminally-related traffic matters, including traffic and trucking violations, misdemeanors and appeals.

Real Estate Halter Associates Realty (845) 679-2010 www.halterassociatesrealty.com

YMCA of Kingston 507 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 338-3810 www.ymcaulster.org

Green Cottage 1204 Route 213, High Falls, NY (845) 687-4810 www.thegreencottage.com

Poison Ivy Patrol (845) 687-9528 www.poison-ivy-patrol.com

Aqua Jet 1606 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-8080 www.aquajetpools.com

Wallkill Valley Writers New Paltz, NY (845) 750-2370 www.wallkillvalleywriters.com khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Bethel, NY (800) 745-3000 www.bethelwoodscenter.org

Augustine Landscaping & Nursery 9W & Van Kleecks Lane, Kingston, NY (845) 338-4936 www.augustinenursery.com

Pools & Spas

Ulster County Office of Economic Development UlsterForBusiness.com

Dreaming Goddess 44 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2206 www.dreaminggoddess.com

Landscaping

as well as fabric-wrapped and French matting. Also offering mirrors.

Upstate House www.upstatehouse.com Upstater www.upstater.com Willow Realty 120 Main Street, Gardiner, NY (845) 255-7666 www.friendlycircle.weebly.com LWillow@Aol.com

Record Stores Rocket Number Nine Records 50 N Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-8217

Recreation

Performance Spaces of the 21st Century 2980 Route 66, Chatham, NY (518) 392-6121 www.ps21chatham.org

Town Tinker Tube Rental Bridge Street, Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-5553 www.towntinker.com

Shadowland Theater 157 Canal Street, Ellenville, NY (845) 647-5511 www.shadowlandtheatre.org

Shoes

The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio 339 Central Ave, Albany, NY (518) 465-5233 www.thelinda.org The Linda provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personnel with worldrenowned artists, academy award winning directors, headliner comedians and local, regional, and national artists on the verge of national recognition. An intimate, affordable venue, serving beer and wine, The Linda is a night out you won’t forget.

Pet Services & Supplies Sugar Loaf Koi 3244 NY-207, Campbell Hall, NY (914) 755-0159

Pegasus Comfort Footwear New Paltz (845) 256-0788 and, Woodstock (845) 679-2373, www.pegasusshoes.com

Specialty Foods Applestone Meat Co. Stone Ridge, Accord, NY www.applestonemeat.com Harney & Sons Fine Teas 13 Main Street, Millerton, NY www.harney.com

Storage Rentals Inside Storage Solutions 3 McElwain Avenue, Cohoes, NY (518) 620-6165

Tourism Historic Huguenot Street Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1660

Photography Fionn Reilly Photography Saugerties, NY (845) 802-6109 www.fionnreilly.com

Saugerties Tourism www.saugertiestourism.com www.discoversaugerties.com

Wine, Liquor & Beer

Picture Framing Atelier Renee Fine Framing The Chocolate Factory, 54 Elizabeth Street, Suite 3, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-1004 www.atelierreneefineframing.com renee@atelierreneefineframing.com A visit to Red Hook must include stopping at this unique workshop! Combining a beautiful selection of moulding styles and mats with conservation quality materials, expert design advice and skilled workmanship, Renee Burgevin, owner and CPF, has over 25 years experience. Special services include shadow-box and oversize framing

Benmarl Vineyards 156 Highland Avenue, Marlboro, NY (845) 236-4265 www.benmarl.com Whitecliff Vineyard 331 McKinstry Road, Gardiner, NY (845) 255-4613 www.whitecliffwine.com

Writing Services Peter Aaron www.peteraaron.org info@peteraaron.org

8/17 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY 85

business directory

Soukup Farms Dover Plains, NY (845) 264-3137 www.soukupfarms.com

to detail. Our kitchen and bath designs speak for themselves because we take pride in what we do. We don’t hesitate to think outside the box and create custom designs to fit your specific Kitchen & Bathroom needs. We work with high quality finishes and reliable materials from the most reputable vendors. We leverage the latest techniques and styles from around the world because we research our field constantly. We’re a kitchen and bath design firm like no other. We never settle for less, and neither should you.


whole living guide

QUIET CRUSADER ALWAYS A FIGHTER FOR THE PEOPLE, MAURICE HINCHEY NOW BATTLES A RARE BRAIN DISEASE by wendy k agan

F

ormer New York Congressman Maurice Hinchey is famous for his voice—a passionate, courageous voice that was an agent of change for decades, both locally and nationally. Before Hinchey retired in early 2013 after 38 years in public office, it was his voice that spoke up for environmental conservation, human rights, and economic opportunity, and that spoke out against polluting corporations, organized crime, and the Iraq War before it was politically popular to do so. Yet Hinchey’s family announced this summer that the 78-year-old statesman has been suffering for the past five years from a progressive neurological disorder called frontotemporal degeneration, which is gradually and insidiously eroding the language center of his brain—leaving the once highly verbal man at a loss for words. The announcement arrived at a peak moment during the American healthcare debate, as lawmakers were attempting to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. In Hinchey’s story, the deeply personal becomes the political, underscoring the need for legislation that protects the rights of people like him who find themselves requiring long-term medical care from a team of skilled providers. It is also a story that gives insight into a neurological disorder that most people, even many doctors, have never heard of—and the plight of millions of patients who suffer from rare diseases, often misdiagnosed and relegated to the outskirts of our much-needed awareness and understanding. When Words Slip Away Maurice Hinchey—a onetime navy sailor, toll collector, cement plant worker, and literature scholar—has been no stranger to medical uncertainty. Just after announcing that he was running for Congress in 1992, following 18 years in the New York State Assembly, Hinchey suffered from what doctors call profound sudden hearing loss. His hearing went out abruptly, for no discernable reason, and came back intermittently. After a course of steroids, his auditory function returned completely—but only in his right ear. “He went through Congress with one ear working,” says Hinchey’s wife, Ilene Marder Hinchey. Then, during his last congressional term nearly 20 years later, Hinchey underwent successful treatment for colon cancer. It was a few months later, at the end of his term, that the family noticed a change in his language pattern. “Like many of us, he would lose a word every once in a while, but it began happening more frequently,” says Marder Hinchey. Certain words weren’t just hard for Hinchey to find—they seemed to have vanished completely, as if erased from his consciousness. He went for testing, and a brain scan returned a diagnosis of frontotemporal degeneration (FTD), a progressive, fatal disease that gradually damages the brain’s frontal and temporal lobes. After facing sudden hearing loss and a curable form of cancer, Hinchey was coming up against something unbeatable. Currently, FTD has no cure, nor does it have any treatments to slow or stop its progression. “FTD is a form of dementia,” explains Susan L-J Dickinson, CEO of the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (theaftd.org), based in Pennsylvania. “But it differs from Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, 86 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 8/17

in three critical ways.” Unlike Alzheimer’s, FTD does not attack the memory center of the brain—instead, it can affect a person’s behavior, language, and movement, leaving their memory and ability to recognize people relatively intact. It is also rare, with about 55,000 diagnosed cases compared to the 5.5 million people in the US with Alzheimer’s. “A third way that FTD is different is that it hits people, on average, about 10 years younger than Alzheimer’s,” says Dickinson. “It can impact people anywhere from their 30s to their 80s. FTD is actually the most common form of dementia in people under age 60.” No two cases of FTD are exactly alike, as different variants of the disorder can produce very different symptoms. For Hinchey, the disorder started with a slow decline of his language function, manifesting in what doctors call primary progressive aphasia. As the disease has advanced, Hinchey has also developed a variant of FTD called Parkinsonian syndrome, marked by a decline in movement. “It’s not Parkinson’s disease,” says Marder Hinchey, “but some of the symptoms are similar. They’re not extreme. He might have a slight tremor in his leg from time to time, and he has some stiff muscles, affecting his ability to move.” FTD is a slow disease with plateaus that people get to live with for a period of time. But the symptoms will eventually progress. “For much of the time [he’s had FTD], Maurice was going out to dinner, having conversations, going to movies. It was only in the last year that he even began walking with a cane.” But the plateaus can change very quickly, bringing health issues that require skilled, round-the-clock nursing care. The Challenges of Long-Term Care Watching a loved one suffer is painful for anyone, and talking about the effects of FTD on a man of such public stature is not easy for Hinchey’s family.Yet his wife and children have decided to speak out, fueled by the hope that his story will help others. “We wanted to share with people his journey, his fight, and what he’s been going through because he is so beloved; he is a man of the people,” says the former congressman’s daughter, Michelle Hinchey. With affordable healthcare for Americans in peril earlier this summer, the timing to make a public announcement seemed right. “Unfortunately, people facing the most debilitating diseases and needing long-term care like my father are the ones on the front lines of this much larger fight. It’s not fair to them or their families.” Hinchey’s family feels very fortunate that he can remain at his home in Saugerties—overlooking the Hudson Valley landscape that he worked throughout his career to protect—and receive care from a dedicated team of experienced caregivers, as well as family members.With gratitude for the support they have found, the Hincheys know it can be even harder for many others facing similar predicaments. “A long-term condition like this is going to cost most families more than they can afford,” says Marder Hinchey. “It’s easy to exhaust lifelong savings. Some people mortgage their homes to cover the cost of long-term healthcare. Many families feel they have no other choice but to divest their assets to get on Medicaid, which is the only public program that covers long-term care, whether it’s in a nursing facility or at home. Some people have to choose between educating their college-bound children or paying for the healthcare of


Above: Rep. Maurice Hinchey at an anti-fracking rally on the steps of the New York State capitol in 2013. Below: Assemblyman Hinchey chairing a meeting of the Environmental Conservation Committee in the late 1970s.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING 87


Y O U R B R A N D , I L L U M I N AT E D . L U M I N A RY M E D I A . C O M DIGITAL STRATEGY. WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT. BRAND DEVELOPMENT. GRAPHIC AND WEB DESIGN. EVENT PRODUCTION. BUSINESS STRATEGY. CONTENT MARKETING.

88 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 8/17


another family member. It’s heartbreaking.” With a generation of baby boomers entering their golden years and falling prey to more chronic diseases, we could hear many more horror stories like these—especially if lawmakers succeed in making cuts to Medicaid or putting caps on treatments, as some have tried to do. “We should be doing everything we can to look out for the people who need the most assistance when faced with conditions like these,” says Michelle Hinchey, whose father proudly voted in favor of the Affordable Care Act—seeing it as an incremental step toward the larger goal of universal healthcare. “My father believes that access to healthcare is a basic human right, and that universal healthcare is something we should absolutely be striving for as a country. We are behind so many other nations in that fight.” A Little-Known Brain Disorder The Alzheimer’s epidemic is already putting an enormous financial burden on our healthcare system, and a tremendous emotional strain on patients and their families. Yet in some ways, the emotional burden on people with rare diseases like FTD is even greater because of the isolation they feel, and the lack of understanding by the general public. “We need a broader understanding that not all dementia is Alzheimer’s,” says Dickinson. “It’s not always a memory disorder, and it isn’t always limited to senior citizens.” Since FTD can cause so many different and seemingly unrelated kinds of symptoms, it’s a tough disease to pinpoint. While Hinchey mainly faces language and movement difficulties, other FTD patients may experience changes to their personality, behaving in ways their family doesn’t recognize. “The frontal lobe controls executive function, personality, behavior, our social filter,” says Dickinson. This is the part of the brain that tells us it’s not okay to steal a muffin from the convenience store, or that stops us from telling the neighbor that she’s wearing an ugly dress. People with the frontal variant of FTD have lost that social filter. In patients like these, the road to an accurate diagnosis is even more difficult. “On average, people go 3.6 years before they get a diagnosis of FTD,” says Dickinson. “Most of them have gone to a series of different physicians—GP, neurologist, psychiatrist—and gotten misdiagnosed. They’re told that everybody forgets words, or everybody makes inappropriate choices at times. Maybe it’s a midlife crisis. Why did he go out and spend the kids’ college fund on a new Porsche? You don’t necessarily think, ‘Well, he’s got a brain disease.’ People often get misdiagnosed with depression, bipolar, Alzheimer’s, or a movement disorder. It really complicates the journey for these families.” Dickinson’s organization, AFTD, offers support networks across the country for families affected by the disorder; they also raise funds for research to find a cure. “Medical technology is advancing, and the research into this disease is tremendously exciting,” she says. “We are working very hard to get biomarkers, something we can measure in the blood or cerebrospinal fluid for a more accurate diagnosis. There are no disease-modifying treatments for any of the degenerative brain disorders—Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, Lewy body dementia, FTD—but a breakthrough in any one of these diseases is going to help all of us.” Today Hinchey is where he wants to be: in the home that he built with his wife, surrounded by trees and nature, with windows looking out on Overlook Mountain. He still has his full mane of silver hair, and he is still a very dapper dresser. He may not passionately discourse about politics these days, but his progressive views and legacy surround him like an aura. “Maurice has always been completely dedicated to improving people’s lives,” says Marder Hinchey. “I think he feels that’s why he was put on this earth. If revealing that he has FTD can raise awareness and prevent people from being misdiagnosed, or help them plan for long-term care, then he continues having a positive impact on people’s lives, which is what he set out to do when he first ran for office more than 40 years ago.” FTD is a very tough disease, but Hinchey wakes up every morning with a smile. “He’s aware of everyone’s good wishes,” says Marder Hinchey, who has been sharing with her husband the many messages of support, admiration, and gratitude that have been flowing his way. “We’re lucky that he’s still fundamentally himself and is happy,” adds Michelle. “He’s still Maurice Hinchey. That hasn’t changed.”

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8/17 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING 89


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Retreat Centers Garrison Institute Route 9D, Garrison, NY (845) 424-4800 www.garrisoninstitute.org info@garrisoninstitute.org Retreats supporting positive personal and social change in a renovated monastery overlooking the Hudson River. Featuring Colin Beaven and Lama Willa Miller teaching Fierce Compassion: Where Activism Meets Spirituality, September 14-17; Josh Korda and Jessica Morey teaching Self Therapy: Healing the Wounds of the Emotional Mind, September 21-24; and David Rome and Hope Martin teaching Embodied Listening: Uncovering Our Bodies’ Natural Wisdom, September 22-24.

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8/17 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING 91


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Your Week. Curated.

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8pm Fri & Sat; 3pm Sun • Tickets: $27/$25

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6:30pm Doors; 8pm Show • Tickets: $100 A special night at The CENTER to celebrate some of our most beloved musicals. Raffle tickets to Broadway's Hamilton & Hello Dolly! Bid on exciting silent and live auctions, and enjoy complimentary food, wine and beverages all while enjoying a fabulous musical revue. All proceeds directly benefit The CENTER.

Chronogram Block Party: returning to Uptown Kingston 8/19

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SLEEPING BEAUTY by Tanglewood Marionettes August 5 MR. PENNYGRAFF’S CIRKUS SIDESHOW SPECTACLE August 22 JAMES & THE GIANT PEACH, JR. by Kids on Stage Aug. 19 & 20 (Sat. & Sun.)

Sign up now  Events newsletter every Thursday.

SATURDAYS AT 11 AM • Tickets: Summer Ticket Special! All seats $7 children and adults

The CENTER is located at 661 Rte. 308, 3.5 miles east of the light in the Village of Rhinebeck

92 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/17

See you at The CENTER!

.com/8DW


the forecast

EVENT PREVIEWS & LISTINGS FOR AUGUST 2017

In Solidarity Throughout his lifetime, Polish-born artist Jan Sawka refused to be confined to a single medium—he masterminded the cosmic, 10-story set for the Grateful Dead’s 25th anniversary tour; he designed buildings for Arab monarchs; he drew promotional posters and created theatrical sets for productions from Wrocław to Broadway. A student of painting and printmaking in Poland, in his 20s Sawka was the leading artist of the counterculture and the darling of the Polish Poster School. His iconic Solidarity poster sold in the millions, paving the way to his exile in 1976. A printmaker, painter, sculptor, animator, and architect, Sawka worked in New York City for years before moving to High Falls, where he resided until his death in 2012. To commemorate his life and work, the Rosendale Theatre will host a 75-minute show of selected sequential artworks and projected pieces, plus a preview of the forthcoming documentary The Voyages of Jan Sawka. The screening will be held on August 9 at 7:15pm. Tickets are $10 and $8 for members. (845) 658-8989; Rosendaletheatre.org. —Marie Gillett

Exodus, Jan Sawka, offset lithograph,1974 Poster for the STU Theatre, Krakow, Poland, for the play "Exodus" by L.A. Moczulski

8/17 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 93


TUESDAY 1 FOOD & WINE Food Bank Farm Stand 8:30-11:30am. People’s Place Food Pantry & Thrift Store, Kingston. (845) 338-4030.

Insurance Help with NYSOH Navigator First Wednesday of every month, 1-5:30pm. Get help registering for or changing your health insurance. Register in advance. Phoenicia Library, Phoenicia. (800) 453-4666.

THURSDAY 3

HEALTH & WELLNESS Alzheimer’s Support Group First Tuesday of every month, 7-8:30pm. All Sport Fishkill Health and Fitness Club, Fishkill. (800) 272-3900. Reiki Practitioner Healing Share First Tuesday of every month, 6:30-7:30pm. Gathering of trained Reiki practitioners to replenish your reserves. Dreaming Goddess Sanctuary, Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2206.

KIDS & FAMILY Build a Better Bridge 1:30pm. Learn about the history and the benefits of Hudson River bridges and then build your own bridge using a variety of craft supplies. Clinton Community Library, Rhinebeck. (845) 266-5530.

LITERARY & BOOKS Living Poetry: Douglas Kearney & Harmony Holiday 7-8pm. An unusual collaboration between four local arts-and-education organizations. Hudson Area Library, Hudson. (518) 828-1792 ext. 101.

MUSIC Alabama Shakes 8pm. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Incendio 1pm. A global fusion of Flamenco, classical, jazz, rock, and Celtic music. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

FILM Chopin and the Image of Romanticism Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-onHudson. Bard.edu.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Aging in our Society with Eleanor Minsky 7-8:30pm. Explore the options available for seniors including Medicare, federal programs, and money-saving prescription tips. Marbletown Community Center, stone ridge. (845) 687-0880.

KIDS & FAMILY The Art of Shapes 4:30-5:30pm. A STEAM program for ages 5-10. Exercise both sides of your brain to combine math and art in a fun and funky way. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. (845) 757-3771.

LECTURES & TALKS Folk Artist Mentoring Grant Info Session 7-9pm. Attend an information session on the NYSCA Mentoring and Professional Development for the Traditional Arts- a partnership with the New York Folklore Society. Arts Mid Hudson, Poughkeepsie. (845) 454-3222. Intro to Genealogy & Workshop 6-8pm. Learn about conducting your own genealogy research. Class followed by a resarch workshop. Registration required for workshop. Marlboro Free Library, Marlboro. (845) 236-7272.

Parsons Dance 8-10pm. Parsons Dance is known for its energized, athletic, ensemble work. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Cosmic Communityfest 12-11pm. A weekend of celebration, healing, and being one with Nature. The Healing Farm, New Hampton. (917) 250-4394. First Friday Kick Off: A Main Street Fair First Friday of every month, 5pm. Downtown Poughkeepsie, Poughkeepsie. (845) 202-3340. First Friday: Retro Cruise-In 5-8pm. Featuring an assortment of classic cars lining Main Street. The event will also include music by local favorites, Country Express, specialty foods, wine tasting, chocolate sampling, kids’ activities, Boy Scout derby cars and races, plus more fun attractions. Downtown Margaretville. Phoenicia Festival of the Voice 2017: A French Affair Musical and theatrical performances, lectures, workshops, master classes, food and nightlife. Phoenicia. Phoeniciavoicefest.org.

David Kraai with Josh Roy Brown 6-9pm. Country folk music with the help of Josh Roy Brown on lap steel. The Andes Hotel, Andes. (845) 676-3980. Gratefully Yours 9pm. Grateful Dead tribute band. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. bearsvilletheater.com. Folk-Rock Singer Songwriter Marc Cohn 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. MX Bond's House of Whimsey 8:30pm. An alluring, edgy, and irreverent evening of divas and deviants from the downtown performance scene—selected and introduced by Mx. Justin Vivian Bond. Spiegeltent at the Fisher Center , AnnandaleOn-Hudson. fishercenter.bard.edu. Orlando Marin Orchestra 8pm. Latin. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Piranha Brothers 8pm. Uncle Willy’s Tavern, Kingston. (845) 853-8049 Salsa Night with the Orlando Marin Orchestra 8-10:30pm. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Landline 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

Sue Anderson and Cris Groenendaa 9pm. Share an evening with one of Broadway’s super couples. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

FILM

Cosmic Communityfest 12-11pm. A weekend of celebration, healing, and being one with Nature. The Healing Farm, New Hampton. (917) 250-4394.

KIDS & FAMILY

Cruise Night 6-9pm. Local car enthusiasts will be showing off their favorite jeeps, jalopies, coupes, and compacts. Shops and eateries will be open late. Red Hook Village, Red Hook. (845) 758.0824.

Andy Stack’s American Soup 7pm. American classics. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

Just for Fun: Parsons Dance 1-1:45pm. A special program just for kids. The company dancers will get audience members up on stage learning some of the fun Parsons dance moves. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

5 Element Aromatherapy 7:30-8:30pm. Learn to combine the 5 Element concepts found in Traditional East Asian Medicine with essential oils and acupuncture points for healing. Sky Baby Yoga, Cold Spring. (845) 265-4444.

ChoroBop 9pm. This fast-rising band bases its repertoire on the traditional choro genre, best described as the New Orleans jazz of Brazil. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739.

Rebuilding Red Hook In Cardboard 4-6pm. Using photo references and a healthy dose of imagination, participants will collaborate to construct a replica of Red Hook. Red Hook Public Library, Red Hook. (845) 758-3241.

Surrealistic/Steam Punk Collages Workshop 3:30-5:30pm. Through August 3. For ages 12+. Athens Cultural Center, Athens. (518) 945-2136.

David Kraai 7-9:30pm. David Kraai plays a set as part of the High Falls Cafe’s First Thursdays SingerSongwriter Series. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. (845) 687-2699.

Tivoli Summer Chess Club First Friday of every month, 4-5pm. All skills levels and ages welcome. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. (845) 757-3771.

Thoroughly Modern Millie 8pm. Rhinebeck Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

LECTURES & TALKS

Marji Zintz 5pm. Acoustic. Bear Cafe, Woodstock. (845) 679-5555.

Artist on Art Tour: Mariella Brisson 4:30-6:30pm. During this series visiting artists use many mediums and “poetic license” to talk about Olana and the exhibition with concepts and connections that inspire them. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

The Versatility of Flax with Radha Pandey 9am-4pm. In this class, students will learn about flax fiber and the multitude of ways in which it can be used in papermaking. Explore its wide range of properties from start to finish and make thick, opaque sheets, suitable for book covers, as well and thin and translucent sheets for printmaking and/ or sculptural applications. Women's Studio Workshop, Rosendale. Wsworkshop.org/.

Jay Ungar and Molly Mason Family Band featuring Mike & Ruthy 9pm. Two generations of folk music. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

WEDNESDAY 2 HEALTH & WELLNESS Alzheimer’s Support Group First Wednesday of every month, 11am12:30pm. A support group for Alzheimer's caregivers. Vassar Warner Home, Poughkeepsie. (800) 272-3900. Qi Gong with Mark Pukmel 7-9pm. Qi Gong repeats very precise sets of movements to build strength, detoxify, and relax.. Dreaming Goddess Sanctuary, Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2206.

MUSIC Antonín Dvorák: Dimitrij 2pm. Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-onHudson. bard.edu. The Falcon Underground Songwriter Sessions 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Anger Management for Teens 4-5pm. Family of Woodstock, Woodstock. (845) 679-2485.

MUSIC

Music Socials for Middle-Stage Alzheimer’s Individuals & Family Caregivers 2-3:30pm. The socials provide an opportunity for those with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia and their family caregivers to socialize in a safe environment with Melinda Burgard, certified music therapist. Reservation required. Wingate at Ulster, Highland. (800) 272-3900. Shelley King 7pm. Southern blues. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Newburgh Jazz Series 2017 6:30pm. Walker Valley Marching Band, Chiku Awali African Drumming & Dancing, and Obi Kaye & Those Gypsies. People's Park, Newburgh Waterfront. (225) 366-2442.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Drawing & Mixed Media with Tim Ebneth 10am-1pm. Three Thursdays. Art School of Columbia County, Harlemville. (518) 672-7140.

FRIDAY 4

CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

94 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/17

DANCE Ballroom Dance with Pete Redmond & Crazy Feet First Friday of every month, 8-11:30pm. A lesson followed by an open dance to live music. Hudson Valley Dance Depot, LaGrangeville. (845) 204-9833.

Women Behind the Chador 7-9pm. Susan and Paul Sprachman will share images of Iran and an exploration of how Iranian women adapt to the restrictions imposed on them. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Kingston. Hudsonvalley@jewishvoiceforpeace.org.

LITERARY & BOOKS 21st Annual Hotchkiss Library of Sharon Summer Book Signing & Used Book Sale Hotchkiss Library, Sharon, CT. (860) 364-5041. Calling All Poets. First Friday of every month, 8-11pm. Readings by featured poets followed by open mike. Roost Studios, New Paltz. (845) 675-1217.

MUSIC Antonín Dvorák: Dimitrij 7:30pm. Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-onHudson. bard.edu. Ceesar: Classic R&R Show 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Crossroads Band 8pm. The Yankee, Fishkill. (845) 202-7384. Cuboricua Salsa Band 7pm. Latin dance. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

THEATER The Foreigner 8pm. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. (845) 647-5511. The Merchant of Venice 5:30-7:30pm. Bird-On-A-Cliff Theater Company will perform The Merchant of Venice outdoors on the Woodstock Shakespeare Festival Stage in Comeau Park. Outdoor Elizabethan Theater, Woodstock. (845) 247-4007.

WORKSHOP

SATURDAY 5 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS 49th Annual Antique and Flea Market 9am-4pm. More than 60 vendors plus a chicken BBQ, snacks, a bake sale, and live music. Margaretville Village Park, Margaretville.

COMEDY 3rd Annual Berkshire Comedy Festival 8pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

DANCE Parsons Dance 8-10pm. Parsons Dance is known for its energized, athletic, ensemble work, and has collaborated with iconic artists across all disciplines. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Swing Dance 7:30-10:30pm. Presented by Linda and Chester Freeman of Got2Lindy Dance Studios. Beginners’ lesson at 7:30pm before the dance. MountainView Studio, Woodstock. (845) 679-0901.


MUSIC GRIZZLY BEAR

Grizzly Bear performs a two-night stand at BSP Kingston this month.

Hibernation Culmination The pace of album-making by major pop acts in the 1960s was frantic, to say the least. From 1963 through 1966, the Beatles released seven studio albums; between 1965 and 1966, the Rolling Stones released six while Bob Dylan cut the groundbreaking electric trilogy of Highway 61 Revisited, Bringing It All Back Home, and Blonde on Blonde; and from 1962 through 1966—a four-year span—the Beach Boys made a staggering 10 LPs. But today it’s not uncommon for bands to go years between full-length releases. Why, though, is this the current paradigm, especially when recording technology is far more accessible and affordable for artists than it has been during the pop heights of the past? Perhaps bassist/multi-instrumentalist and producer Chris Taylor of Grizzly Bear, whose band will perform at BSP Kingston on August 15 and 16 in support of Painted Ruins, their first album of new material in half a decade, can help explain. “Well, for us, it’s been five years since our last record [2012’s Shields] came out,” says Taylor. “But for the first two of those years we were on tour. After that, we were feeling like we needed a second to get into more of normal life for a bit. So we decided to take a year or a year and a half off. And then that turned into a couple more years. The whole cycle of ‘make a record, go on tour, make a record, go on tour’…It’s a fun job, but it can become discombobulating. It’s good to be able to go be a normal person for a while.” Fair enough. Especially when one considers the amount of action the acclaimed, Brooklyn-born band packed into the early part of its nearly 15-year existence. Grizzly Bear began circa 2002 as the solo project of singer, guitarist, and keyboardist Ed Droste and debuted with 2004’s Horn of Plenty. Although Droste plays the majority of the instruments on the disc, it also features Chris Bear (real name), who would become the group’s permanent drummer. As Rolling Stone began trumpeting Horn of Plenty’s amalgamation of psychedelic pop, experimental, and lo-fi folk, Taylor joined the band

and they started playing out. Sensing something was missing, however, the unit added singer and guitarist Daniel Rossen immediately before hitting the road for two months and recording 2006’s Yellow House. The sophomore set caught the ears of Pitchfork and the New York Times, who tagged the hazy, home-recorded effort as one of the year’s best. It also got the atention of UK giants Radiohead, who tapped Grizzly Bear to open for a leg of their 2008 US tour and cited them as a favorite act. 2009’s more ambitious Veckatimest, named for a tiny, uninhabited island near Taylor’s mother’s Cape Cod home, came next, followed by more marathon world touring and the making of Shields. And then began the long hiatus, which saw Rossen pursuing a solo career and performing with side project Department of Eagles. The period also found Taylor living locally, in Germantown, for a year. “A friend and I decided [the Hudson Valley] would be a cool home base for a while so we moved there in 2014,” says the bassist. “I live in LA now but I really miss it out there, especially at this time of year.” So it’s fortunate for Taylor, then, that he, along with his bandmates, will get an upstate fix when the second and third dates of the Painted Ruins tour take them to our area. “We’ve been developing a new look for the stage, and we’ll be playing most of the new album along with some older tunes,” he says. “It’s been a while since we’ve played, so we’re really excited. It’s been good to take a break, but playing shows is still the best part of what we do.” Grizzly Bear will perform at BSP Kingston on August 15 and 16 at 8pm. Tickets are $40. (845) 481-5158; Bspkingston.com. —Peter Aaron 8/17 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 95


FAIRS & FESTIVALS The Gathering A celebration of the Huguenots and their descendants. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. Huguenotstreet.org/gathering. Hudson Valley Market First Saturday of every month, 10am-5pm. A gathering of dozens of Hudson Valley food, drink, and craft vendors. Crown Maple, Dover Plains. Crownmaple.com. Phoenicia Festival of the Voice 2017: A French Affair Musical and theatrical performances, lectures, workshops, master classes, food and nightlife. Phoenicia. Phoeniciavoicefest.org.

FILM 13th 6-9pm. 13th depicts the horrors of mass incarceration and the sprawling American prison industry with bracing lucidity. Old Chatham Quaker Meeting, Old Chatham. (518) 766-2992.

Tracey Tynan: Wear and Tear: The Threads of My Life 6pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-0500.

MUSIC Bela Fleck and the Flecktones and Chick Corea Elektric Band 7:30pm. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. The Ben Kono Group 6:30pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. The Benny Havens Band 7:30pm. The Trophy Point stage will be converted into a dance floor as the band puts on a family-friendly dance party overlooking the stunning Hudson River. West Point Military Academy, West Point. Usma.edu. Black Dirt Band 9pm. Alley Cat Blues and Jazz Club, Kingston. (845) 339-1300.

Landline 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

Bryan Gordon 8pm. Acoustic. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. (845) 647-3000.

Movies Under the Walkway Every other Saturday, 7-11pm. The fun begins with the bands at 7pm, followed by the family-friendly feature film at sundown at approximately 8:30pm. Upper Landing Park, Poughkeepsie. (845) 471-1775.

Cold Flavor Repair 7pm. Funk. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

Summer Movies on King Street 8-10pm. King Street Walkway, Middletown. (845) 343-8075.

HEALTH & WELLNESS AHA PALS Renewal Course 9am-4pm. You must be currently certified in PALS to take this abridged course resulting in a two-year PALS certification card. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. (845) 475-9742. Cosmic Communityfest 12-11pm. A weekend of celebration, healing, and being one with Nature. The Healing Farm, New Hampton. (917) 250-4394. New Paltz Big Latch On 10am-12pm. Come celebrate The Big Latch On during World Breastfeeding Week. We are helping set the world record for the most breastfeeding babies. New Baby New Paltz, New Paltz. (845) 255-0624.

KIDS & FAMILY Caravan Puppets: Timeless Tales 11am. Spectrum Playhouse, Lee, MA. (413) 394-5023. Creature Feature Weekend: Amazing Animal Adaptations 1 & 2:30pm. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781. Sleeping Beauty 11am. Performed by Tanglewood Marionettes. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080. Spanish Galleon Visits Kingston Take a deck tour of the 170-foot long Spanish Galleon Replica, El Galeon before she returns to Spain. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. (845) 338-0071.

Curtis Winchester Band 8pm. The Yankee, Fishkill. (845) 202-7384. David Kraai 3:45-4:15pm. David Kraai doles country folk. Village Green, Woodstock. (845) 679-6234. I Won’t Dance: Steve Ross Sings and Plays Fred Astaire 8-9:15pm. The legendary Steve Ross hits the stage for a one-night-only tribute to the immortal Fred Astaire. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (518) 943-3818. Indian Ragas 8pm. Steve Gorn, bansuri flute; Sanjoy Banerjee, vocals; Samir Chatterjee, tabla. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. (845) 679-8217. Jeff Pitchell & Texas Flood with Michael Allman 7pm. Greg Allman tribute. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Martin Sexton 9pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. bearsvilletheater.com. Mikhail Horowitz and Gilles Malkine 8pm. Literary lampoons, forgettable folk anthems, and comedy so intellectually dense that only a Martian anthropologist, a Swiss practitioner of cerebral topiary, and a genetically modified rutabaga can understand it. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. (845) 658-9048. MX Bond's House of Whimsey 8:30pm. An alluring, edgy, and irreverent evening of divas and deviants from the downtown performance scene—selected and introduced by Mx. Justin Vivian Bond. Spiegeltent at the Fisher Center , AnnandaleOn-Hudson. fishercenter.bard.edu. Premik Russell Tubbs 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Susanna Leonard Hill Book Signing 10am-12pm. Millbrook Farmer’s Market, Millbrook. (845) 677-5857.

Radar 9:30pm. Rock. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

LITERARY & BOOKS

Santana 8pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

21st Annual Hotchkiss Library of Sharon Summer Book Signing & Used Book Sale Hotchkiss Library, Sharon, CT. (860) 364-5041. Poetry Brothel 8pm. A lively evening of performance poetry in a nightclub setting replete with live music and fusion belly dance. BSP, Kingston. (845) 481-5158. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

96 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Shemekia Copeland with Soul Purpose 8:30-11:30pm. Blues. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. (845) 855-1300.

NIGHTLIFE Summer Groove On The Lake 5pm-1am. Multi-genre dance party and an amazing light show on a beautiful lake. Cluett Schantz Memorial Park, Milton. (845) 264-7535.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS First Saturday Reception First Saturday of every month, 5-8pm. An elegant affair with wine, hors d’oeuvres and art enthusiasts. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. (845) 338-0331.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Hike in the Shade 9:30am. Hike Byrdcliffe’s steep Mount Guardian trails. Dress appropriately, wear good footwear, and bring water. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. (845) 679-2079. Minnewaska Distance Swimmers Association Distance Swimming Tests 12-2pm. Moriello Pool, New Paltz. Minnewaskaswimmers.org. A Revolutionary Camp at Night at the New Windsor Historic Huts 7-9:30pm. A night of Revolutionary War military drills, musket firings, and other period activities. New Windsor Cantonment, New Windsor. (845) 561-1765 ext. 22.

THEATER The Foreigner 8pm. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. (845) 647-5511. The Merchant of Venice 5:30-7:30pm. Bird-On-A-Cliff Theater Company will perform The Merchant of Venice outdoors on the Woodstock Shakespeare Festival Stage in Comeau Park. Outdoor Elizabethan Theater, Woodstock. (845) 247-4007. Thoroughly Modern Millie 8pm. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Landscapes: From Photograph to Painting 10am-4pm. Art School of Columbia County, Harlemville. (518) 672-7140. The Oil Portrait Sketch 9am-4pm. Two-day workshop. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. (845) 679-2388. Repair Cafe: Port Ewen 10am-1pm. Have meaningful broken objects fixed for free by volunteers. Reformed Church of Port Ewen, Port Ewen. (845) 340-1293.

SUNDAY 6 FAIRS & FESTIVALS 7th Annual Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace 1-7pm. A whole day of family fun learning about Japanese culture and history. All will join the “Bon-Odori” dance at 6:30pm, followed by a prayer for the victims of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as well as the victims of the Fukushima disaster. Kingston Point Beach, Kingston. Facebook. com/BonOdoriKingston. La Guelaguetza Festival Poughkeepsie 1-7pm. Celebrate the diversity of Oaxacan culture through joyful dance, lively music, delicious food, and colorful costumes. Waryas Park, Poughkeepsie. Phoenicia Festival of the Voice 2017: A French Affair Musical and theatrical performances, lectures, workshops, master classes, food and nightlife. Phoenicia. Phoeniciavoicefest.org.

FILM Chopin and the Image of Romanticism Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-onHudson. Bard.edu. Landline 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

HEALTH & WELLNESS American Heart Association BLS Certification Course 9am-1pm. This course is suitable for both initial and renewal certification. Course completion results in a certification card valid for 2-years. Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel. (845) 475-9742. American Heart Association Pediatric First Aid & CPR AED Certification Course 9am-4pm. This course is designed to meet the regulatory requirements for child care workers in all states. Successful completion results in a certification card valid for 2-years. Pre-registration required. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. (845) 475-9742.

Cosmic Communityfest 12-11pm. A weekend of celebration, healing, and being one with Nature. The Healing Farm, New Hampton. (917) 250-4394. InnerJourney Yoga with Linda Freeman 10:45-11:30am. Studio87: The Wellness House, Newburgh. Studio87thewellnesshouse.com. Just Dance First Sunday of every month, 2:30-4:30pm. Dance to a live DJ on a journey of self expression. SkyBaby Yoga & Pilates, Cold Spring. (845) 265-4444.

KIDS & FAMILY Creature Feature Weekend: Amazing Animal Adaptations 1 & 2:30pm. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. (845) 534-7781. Dharma Sunday School First Sunday of every month, 12:30-2pm. A unique Buddhist oriented class for children ages 5 and up and their families. SkyBaby Yoga & Pilates, Cold Spring. (845) 265-4444. Ralph’s World 1-2:30 & 4-5:30pm. Ralph’s World is the mega-fun musical planet where kids rock and dance to live set of music. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. Spanish Galleon Visits Kingston Take a deck tour on the 170-foot long Spanish Galleon Replica, El Galeon before she returns to Spain. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. (845) 338-0071.

LITERARY & BOOKS 21st Annual Hotchkiss Library of Sharon Summer Book Signing & Used Book Sale Hotchkiss Library, Sharon, CT. (860) 364-5041.

MUSIC The Americana Music Sessions 7pm. Americana. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Antonín Dvorák: Dimitrij 2pm. Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-onHudson. bard.edu. Big Joe Fitz & The Lo-Fis 10am. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. bigBANG 8pm. Led by bassist Robert Kopec. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. Cheres! The Music of the Carpathian Mountains 7pm. Ukranian folk. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Dover Quartet 4pm. Classical. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. (845) 679-8217. David Kraai 12-2pm. David Kraai doles out a brunch show with country folk music. Zephyr, Pine Hill. (845) 254-8024. Ken Silverman Trio 8-10pm. Modern jazz guitar trio. Colony Woodstock, Woodstock. (845) 679-7625. Kings of Leon with Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats 7pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Lauren Fox and Peter Calo 9pm. I’m Your Man: The Songs of Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan. Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739. Michael Feinstein Performs the Great American Songbook 7pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Raise Your Spirits, Klezmer Meets Gospel 6-9pm. Rich Chiger and Renee Bailey with the Saints of Swing. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. (845) 338-0333. Rhiannon Giddens 7:30pm. With soul-stirring vocals and prowess on fiddle and banjo, she will perform original songs as well some traditional tunes. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Roosevelt Dime 12pm. Modern Americana mix steeped in Dixieland, blues, bluegrass and jug band music. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.


MUSIC THE PHOENICIA FESTIVAL OF THE VOICE

The Phoenicia International Festival of the Voice returns August 4 to 6.

In Full Voice “More than just a concert, it’s an experience,” says Maria Todaro, cofounder of the Phoenicia International Festival of the Voice (August 4 to 6), about the annual event that brings thousands to the quiet town of Phoenicia for a variety of world-class musical performances. What originally began as a small outdoor concert by local opera singers Kerry Henderson, Maria Todaro, and Louis Otey to raise money for playground equipment has become a staple of the summer cultural season eight years later. Expected to draw about 6,000 to 7,000 people from all corners of the US and beyond, this year’s festival has a distinctly French flavor. The festival will feature the operatic staple “La Boheme,” one of the most popular operas of all time, on the evening of August 5. The opera features Metropolitan Opera singers John Osborn as Rodolfo, Lynette Tapia as Mimi, and Lucas Meachem (who won the 2017 Best Opera Recording Grammy for “Ghosts of Versailles”) as Marcello. Local children will also have the chance to perform alongside these stars for part of the show, as part of a children’s chorus that has been training since May. The mix of both local and international voices is a symbol of what the festival hopes to feature on a larger level—the powerful and transcendent effect of music. Other performances will include the music of Jacques Offenbach, best known for his cancan music; the Cambridge Singers, who return with their a cappella stylings to explore the changing nature of the motet in the French Royal Court; and the songs of Edith Piaf, Charles Trenet, Yves Montand, Charles Aznavour, and Jacques Brel sung by French star Oliver Laurent, known as the Man of 110 Voices for his ability to imitate other singers. A new work, “The Three Musketeers” (which had never been adapted for opera)

will also have its world premiere at the festival. The composer who adapted the popular story, Mitchell Bach, is a descendant of Johann Sebastian Bach; the libretto is by Maria Todaro. “Since the age of eight, I have been absolutely passionate about the work of Alexandre Dumas,” says Todaro. “I learned everything I know about the 17th century in France from his work, as he is primarily an extraordinary historian. When I met Mitchell Bach in France, we connected deeply, and, given there was no treatment of the novel in an opera, it seemed like the perfect first collaboration.” While keeping with the tradition of closing the festival with choral music, this year the program takes a distinctly American turn with “The Spiritual Side of Duke,” which honors jazz legend Duke Ellington combining jazz, classical, and gospel. Led by percussionist John Lumpkin, a septet featuring renowned vocalists Brianna Thomas and Vuyo Sotashe will melodically traverse the spiritual elements of Ellington’s work. Feel like moving around during the festival? There will be “latte” lectures on subjects such as Duke Ellington’s gospel influences and a variety of hands-on workshops (such as one on shape note singing) to help festival attendees feel a part of the music and test their own musical pipes. “Absolutely world-class” is how Todaro describes the upcoming festival in just a few words. “We hope to bring the top talent in the opera world for people to enjoy in the truly beautiful surroundings of Phoenicia.” The Phoenicia Festival of the Voice talks place August 4 to 6 at various locations in Phoenicia. General admission tickets range from $25 to $35. Phoeniciavoicefest.org. —Benjamin Powers 8/17 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 97


Saints of Swing 6pm. Gospel. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. (845) 338-0331. The Secret Gong Orchestra Performs Red Kachina 3-5pm. A rare outside or in this case ‘inside’ performance of the latest tonal soundscape composed by the Secret Gong Orchestra. Century House Historical Society, Rosendale. (845) 658-9900.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Purple Heart Appreciation Day Program 2pm. The program will highlight the history of the Badge and its significance. The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, New Windsor. (845) 561-1765.

SPIRITUALITY

FILM

SPORTS

COMEDY

Landline 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

Green Chimneys 2017 Annual Golf Classic 10am-7pm. All proceeds will benefit The Friends of Green Chimneys. Sunningdale Country Club, Scarsdale. (845) 279-2995.

Comics at The Underground 8pm. Stand-up. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

MUSIC The San Francisco Trio 9pm. An evening of light classics fusing art and craft with a laid-back California vibe. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Opus 40 4-7pm. The Vanaver Caravan’s SummerDance on Tour goes to Opus 40 for a day of Site Specific pieces, community dances, and performances. (845) 256-9300.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES 5 Element Aromatherapy 7:30-8:30pm. Combine the 5 Element concepts found in Traditional East Asian Medicine with essential oils and acupuncture points for healing. Sky Baby Yoga, Cold Spring. (845) 265-4444. Printmaking with Gelli Plates Workshop 3:30-5:30pm. Create instant prints using gelli plates. Ages 12+. Athens Cultural Center, Athens. (518) 945-2136.

Color, Form and Composition Through Still Life Workshop 9am-4pm. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. (845) 679-2388.

Seeing Each Other: Portraiture Workshop for Young Artists 10am-3pm. 4-day teen workshop. Learn basic techniques of portraiture from camera to print. The Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock. (845) 679-9957.

Women’s Full Moon Gathering 7-9pm. A non-denominational gathering of women, drawing upon the powerful, rich energies of the full moon. Dreaming Goddess Sanctuary, Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2206.

Memoir Writing Workshop 1-3pm. Learn how to turn a significant memory into a captivating story at a Memoir Workshop on three consecutive Mondays. Northern Dutchess Hospital Center for the Healthy Aging, Rhinebeck. (845) 871-1720 ext. 4.

Shrinkable Jewelry Making Workshop For Kids 4:30-5:30pm. Using shrinkable plastic, students will create three unique charms and watch as they shrink into jewelry! Roost Studios & Art Gallery, New Paltz. (845) 518-0195.

THEATER

Mixed Media: Collage a Day with Tim Ebneth 6-9pm. Three Mondays. Art School of Columbia County, Harlemville. (518) 672-7140.

Dharma Sunday School First Sunday of every month, 12:30-2pm. A unique Buddhist-oriented class for children 5+ and their families. SkyBaby Yoga & Pilates, Cold Spring. (845) 265-4444.

The Foreigner 2pm. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. (845) 647-5511. The Merchant of Venice 5:30-7:30pm. Bird-On-A-Cliff Theater Company will perform The Merchant of Venice outdoors on the Woodstock Shakespeare Festival Stage in Comeau Park. Outdoor Elizabethan Theater, Woodstock. (845) 247-4007. Thoroughly Modern Millie 3pm. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Mindful Movement Class (monthly) First Sunday of every month, 12-1pm. Learn to use the principles of the Alexander Technique to develop coordination, balance and mindfulness. MaMa, Stone Ridge. (917) 373-6151. Summer Sunday Style: Makeup Lesson, Cocktails & Fashion Swap 5-7:30pm. Enjoy wine & cocktails and a buffet while learning professional makeup techniques Bring up to three new, gently used or vintage clothing items to swap. Center for Creative Education, Beacon. (914) 204-3020.

MONDAY 7 KIDS & FAMILY Family Camp Enjoy hands-on experiences in music, dance, storytelling, puppetry, nature, crafts, and pure play—for ages two to teens and parents to grandparents. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. (845) 657-8333. Once Upon a Pie: Pizza and Stories 12pm. Hotchkiss Library, Sharon, CT. (860) 364-5041. Spanish Galleon Visits Kingston Take a deck tour of the 170-foot long Spanish Galleon Replica, El Galeon before she returns to Spain. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. (845) 338-0071. Theater Arts Intensive Workshop 8:30am-1pm. For children ages 8-13. A 4-day intensive in theater improvisation, mime, recitation, and other performance skills. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

98 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/17

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Painting with Pastels 9am-12pm. Four consecutive classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. (845) 679-2388.

TUESDAY 8 FOOD & WINE Food Bank Farm Stand 8:30-11:30am. People’s Place Food Pantry & Thrift Store, Kingston. (845) 338-4030.

KIDS & FAMILY Family Camp Enjoy hands-on experiences in music, dance, storytelling, puppetry, nature, crafts, and pure play—for ages two to teens and parents to grandparents. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. (845) 657-8333. Spanish Galleon Visits Kingston Take a deck tour of the 170-foot long Spanish Galleon Replica, El Galeon before she returns to Spain. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. (845) 338-0071.

LECTURES & TALKS Food Safety, Wash Water Sanitizing and Workflow in the Packshed 1-5pm. Workshop on post-harvest considerations in the wash line and packing house. Hudson Valley Farm Hub, Hurley. (585) 271-1979. Monthly Open House with Dharma Talk 6pm meditation, 7pm talk, followed by tea and cookies. Sky Lake Lodge, Rosendale. (845) 658-8556. Tea & Stones: A Monthly Gathering of Stone Minds 6:30-7:30pm. Learn about the healing qualities of stones, their history, folklore, and ways to incorporate them into daily life. Dreaming Goddess, Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2206.

MUSIC Guy Davis 9pm. Rhythm and blues. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739.

WEDNESDAY 9 DANCE SummerDance on Tour 2-3pm. The Vanaver Caravan’s SummerDance on Tour. Woodland Pond at New Paltz, New Paltz. (845) 256-9300.

FILM Landline 1pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

The Vanaver Caravan 9pm. This performance focuses on the rhythms that different peoples have evolved to express their need to harmonize with the earth. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739.

FILM Chopin and the Image of Romanticism Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-onHudson. Bard.edu. Landline 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Breast Cancer Support Group Second Thursday of every month, 6-7:30pm. Peer led support group. 84 Greene Street, Hudson. (845) 339-4673.

KIDS & FAMILY Contemporary Tap Dance Workshops 10-11:30am. For youth ages 12-18. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Family Camp Enjoy hands-on experiences in music, dance, storytelling, puppetry, nature, crafts, and pure play—for ages two to teens and parents to grandparents. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. (845) 657-8333.

LITERARY & BOOKS Claire McMillan: “The Necklace” 7pm. Author reads from new novel. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006.

5th Year Memorial Jan Sawka Multimedia Screening 7:15pm. A 75-minute screening of selected sequential artworks and projected pieces of Polish artist Jan Sawka, plus a preview of the forthcoming documentary The Voyages of Jan Sawka. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

MUSIC

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Galactic & The Hip Abduction 8pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. bearsvilletheater.com.

Breast Cancer Support Group Second Wednesday of every month, 2-3:30pm. Peer-led support group. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. (845) 339-4673.

KIDS & FAMILY Family Camp Enjoy hands-on experiences in music, dance, storytelling, puppetry, nature, crafts, and pure play—for ages two to teens and parents to grandparents. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. (845) 657-8333.

MUSIC

The Fixx 9-11pm. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. Florida Georgia Line 7pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

Newburgh Jazz Series 2017 6:30pm. Neil Alexander & Nail. People's Park, Newburgh Waterfront. (225) 366-2442. Open Mike at the Gallery Second Thursday of every month, 7-9:30pm. Musicians, spoken word artists, others, all welcome. Artists’ Collective of Hyde Park, Hyde Park. (914) 456-6700. Popa Chubby & Dave Keyes 7pm. Blues rock and stories. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

Jazz Sessions at The Falcon Underground 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

Surfer Blood 8pm. BSP, Kingston. (845) 481-5158.

The Soul Rebels 12pm. Pop tunes performed New Orleans marching band style, and stirred up with funk and soul with elements of hip hop, jazz and rock. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

Jewelry Workshop Chain Making 10am-12pm. 4-week class. Byrdcliffe Colony, Woodstock. (845) 679 2079.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Anger Management for Teens 4-5pm. Family of Woodstock, Woodstock. (845) 679-2485.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Path to Entrepreneurship Program 6-8pm. An intro to small business ownership. Pre-registration is required. Women’s Enterprise Development Center Mid-Hudson Satellite, Poughkeepsie. (845) 363-6432.

FRIDAY 11

THURSDAY 10 BUSINESS & NETWORKING

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

Hudson Valley Garden Association Monthly Meeting Second Thursday of every month, 7pm. Shawangunk Town Hall, Wallkill. (845) 418-3640.

Iona Marsh Canoe Trip 10am-12:30pm. Paddle through this marshy maze in Rockland County with Reserve naturalists. Equipment provided. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. (845) 534-7781.

Path to Entrepreneurship Program: Poughkeepsie 6-8pm. An intro to small business ownership. Pre-registration required. Think Dutchess Alliance for Business, Poughkeepsie. (845) 363-6432.

Leo B 5pm. Acoustic. Billy Joe’s Ribworks, Newburgh. (845) 565-1560.

DANCE

ART 15th Annual Saugerties Artists' Studio Tour: Opening Reception 5pm. This year’s tour will feature 38 artists, kicking off with a reception at Opus 40. Opus 40, Saugerties. Saugertiesarttour.org.

DANCE Caleb Teicher and Company 8-10pm. A radiant performance of tap, jazz, and modern dance. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.


ART LIGHTFIELD

Home Visit, Masterji, late 1950s. Anna Van Lenten curates "Lightfield," showing through September 30 at Hudson Hall.

Shining a Light through a Darker America Facts have been quite a hot topic since the most recent election. The very definition of the word seems to change daily. But for Anna Van Lenten, New York City-based curator and founding director of Hudson’s LightField Festival of Photography and Multimedia Art, skirting around the truth isn’t an option. That’s what birthed the theme for her second annual festival. “Just the Facts” is the direct response to the anger and fear that arose post-election, specifically the increasing hostility toward immigrants and the working poor. From August 12 through September 30, six distinguished, local, national, and international artists will feature their work in the newly renovated Hudson Hall, exposing the raw, unconventional darkness—and unmistakable beauty—of what it means to be predominantly invisible in mainstream culture. Through long-form narrative pieces, each artist offers a different perspective on the real lives of working-class people and their daily struggles to maintain self-respect while facing constant adversity. Five of the six artists are women, which, Van Lenten explains, is not a coincidence. “I wanted to champion female photographers,” including Brenda Ann Kenneally, whose visceral and controversial work exploded right after the election. Her 12-year-long project, “Upstate Girls,” is a complex portrait and devastatingly intimate visual exploration of young women at the poverty line in Troy. “To me, Brenda takes pictures that almost no one has ever taken as an artist. The intimacy of her pictures is mind blowing to me,” says Van Lenten. Collaborating artists Stacy Kranitz and Zoe Strauss will show their site-specific installation, The Great Divide, seeking to reframe what it means to be marginalized in American society. Maganbhai Patel, better known as Masterji (and the exhibition’s sole male representative), displays colorful, even humorous images of a 50-year scope of work documenting his South Asian immigrant community in England. An additional special

feature includes the film screening of Manfred Kirchheimer’s documentary Canners, which portrays the men and women who collect New York City’s bottles and cans, and will play at Hudson Hall on Saturday, September 2 at 4pm. Displaying such powerful and eye-opening portraits is only the half of it. Van Lenten established the festival last year in order to encourage discussion between artist and audience, noting that this year’s theme is more important than ever for starting conversation. “The context of having free-form conversation is hugely important because we’re all staring at images on screens or reading the news all the time. Here’s a chance to talk face-to-face,” says Van Lenten. “Spontaneous, albeit focused. It’s a really nice, productive way to be as honest as you can be.” The festival will hold four separate artistbased conversations through August and September, including one with Kenneally, TIME’s deputy photo editor, Paul Moakley, and Linda Tirado, author of Hand of Mouth: Living in Bootstrap America, on August 26 at 5pm. Though only in its second year, Van Letten believes there’s a strong appetite for the kind of art they are showing. “I think that art is an imaginative response to crisis,” she says. “And I don’t think we’re going to get anywhere in this country unless we find common ground.” “Just the Facts,” the second annual Lightfield Festival of Photography and Multimedia Art, begins with an opening reception on August 12 at 5pm, with a talk with both Kranitz and Strauss, as well as honoring the young women who participated in LightField’s free, three-day Young Photographers Workshop. The entire exhibition runs through September 30 at Hudson Hall at the Historic Opera House. (518) 822-1438; Hudsonhall. org; Lightfield.vu. —Zan Strumfeld 8/17 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 99


Dances of Universal Peace Second Friday of every month, 7-9pm. Cultivate joy, peace, and integration with dances taught by certified leaders. Sadhana Center for Yoga and Meditation, Hudson. (518) 828-1034. SDoT at Montgomery Place 5-7pm. The Vanaver Caravan comes to Montgomery Place for an evening of outdoor, site specific performances. Montgomery Place, Red Hook. (845) 256-9300. The Vanaver Caravan 5pm. An evening of outdoor, site specific performances. Montgomery Place, Red Hook. (845) 758-5461.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS August Festival 6:30-9pm. Two days of dance performances on the Maxon Mill porch and feature film screenings in Luther Barn. The Wassaic Project, Wassaic. (914) 960-7861.

FILM The Hero 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

Rob Scheps/Tony Garnier Quartet 8pm. The Yankee, Fishkill. (845) 202-7384. The Saints of Swing 7:30pm. Alley Cat Blues and Jazz Club, Kingston. (845) 339-1300. Singer-songwriter Suzanne Vega 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Slam Allen 9:30pm. Blues. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Summer Front Porch Concerts 5-8pm. Red Hook Public Library, Red Hook. (845) 758-3241. Upstate Reggae 35th Anniversary with Maxi Preist With Lady Moon and the Eclipse, and Max Glazer. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. (845) 679-4406.

SATURDAY 12 ART 15th Annual Saugerties Artists' Studio Tour 10am-6pm. This year’s tour will feature 38 artists. Saugerties. Saugertiesarttour.org.

DANCE Caleb Teicher and Company 8-10pm. A radiant performance of tap, jazz, and modern dance. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Rail Trail Café 12-1pm. SummerDance on Tour, by The Vanaver Caravan. Rail Trail Cafe, New Paltz. (845) 256-9300. Southern Square & Cajun Dance + Dinner 6pm. Waltzes, southern squaresr, and Cajun dancing. Dinner at 6pm, lesson at 7:30pm, dance at 8pm. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. (845) 657-8333.

David Kraai 5-8pm. Country folk music. Free tours & tasting flights. Angry Orchard, Walden. (888) 845-3311. Frederic Chiu 9pm. This keyboard virtuoso is known for his award-winning pianism and innovative, audience-engaging programs. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739. Joan Osbourne Sings the Songs of Bob Dylan 8:30pm. Joan Osbourne makes her Spiegeltent debut with her acoustic trio, covering songs of Bob Dylan. Spiegeltent at the Fisher Center , Annandale-On-Hudson. fishercenter.bard.edu. Lindsey Webster 7pm. R&B. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. MSL + KYO 7pm. Power punk and dream rock. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. REO Speedwagon & Styx with special guest Don Felder 7pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

100 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/17

AHA ACLS Provider 2-Day Course 9am-3pm. Course completion results in a two-year ACLS certification from the AHA. You will need to review your text before class and complete the pre-course assessment. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. (845) 475-9742. Metastatic Breast Cancer Support Group Second Saturday of every month, 121:30pm. Peer led support group. Christ the King Church, New Paltz. (845) 339-4673.

Jungle Gym Jam 2-3pm. Interactive “kindie rock." Singing, dancing, puppets, and all sorts of fun. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (518) 943-3818.

Dinner Date, Kids Create! Second Friday of every month, 6:30-8:30pm. Drop off the kids and pick up your restaurant discount coupon. Roost Studios & Art Gallery, New Paltz. (516) 652-0229.

Daniel Rivera Band 8-10:30pm. A night of jazz/funk and soul with music spanning from Herbie Hancock to Adele. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Funny, but True! 11am-1pm. Learn to craft true and entertaining stories from your life and to tell your stories without any notes. 3-session workshop series.Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. (845) 757-3771.

Kids & Family Contemporary Tap Dance Workshops 10-11:30am. For youth ages 12-18. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

MUSIC

Supper Club 7pm. A five-course dinner of firecely local food served on the farm. By reservation only. Heather Ridge Farm, Preston Hollow. heather-ridge-farm.com.

Contemporary Tap Dance Workshops 10-11:30am. For youth ages 12-18. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Beginner’s Mind Retreat 4-6pm. Through Aug. 13. Dharma Drum Retreat Center, Pine Bush. (845) 744-8114.

Just for Fun: Caleb Teicher and Company 1-1:45pm. A tap performance for kids. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Farm to Table Dinner 5:30-9pm. Farmers and Chefs food truck presents a four-course meal showcasing Fishkill Farms' organic vegetables and fruit. Fishkill Farms, Fishkill. (845) 897-4377.

KIDS & FAMILY

SPONSORED CONTENT

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Family Camp Enjoy hands-on experiences in music, dance, storytelling, puppetry, nature, crafts, and pure play—for ages two to teens and parents to grandparents. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. (845) 657-8333.

FOOD & WINE

Peachtopia 10am-4pm. U-pick fruit and vegetables, live jazz, hard cider, and a crawdad boil. Fishkill Farms, Fishkill. (845) 897-4377.

LITERARY & BOOKS Huichica East Late August brings the second installment of Huichica East, a music/food/micro-wine fest set on the beatific acreage of Chaseholm Farm (camping available). Performing this year are Charles Bradley and His Extraordinaires, Real Estate, Doug Tuttle, Marissa Nadler, the Cass McCombs Band, MV & EE, Surf Curse, Currituck Co., the Mattson 2, Mail the Horse, John Andrews and the Yawns, Ruth Garbus, Meg Baird, Driftwood Soldier, ARD, and Cut Worms. Organized by Jeff Bundschu of Sonoma’s Gundlach Bundschu Winery and (((folkYEAH!))) Presents founder Britt Govea, the festival seeks to find unity in music. “Especially in these troubled political times, it’s important for the people to gather in rural spots and celebrate a few of the key ingredients of the fabled American Pie. Music will always see us through,” Govea told Jambase.com. August 25-26. Pine Plains. Huichica.com.

NIGHTLIFE

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Poetry Open Mike Second Friday of every month, 8-10pm. Sign up at 7:30 pm. 2 Alices Coffee Lounge, Cornwall on Hudson. (845) 534-4717.

12th Annual Rock, Rattle & Drum Pow Wow A weekend of American Indian music, dance, education, entertainment. Great Barrington Fairgrounds, Great Barrington, MA. (802) 753-6835.

Washingtonville Date Night 6-10pm. Live music, outdoor movie. L Vern Allen Park, Washingtonville. (845) 418-5347.

THEATER Stand-up Playwrights Workshop Second Friday of every month, 7-9:30pm. Bring original materials to develop plays for staged readings at a public performance. Tompkins Corners Cultural Center, Putnam Valley. (845) 528-7280. The Foreigner 8pm. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. (845) 647-5511. Thoroughly Modern Millie 8pm. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080. YouAreNoWhere by Andrew Schneider 8-10pm. A rapid-fire and witty theater performance that cycles through expressions of laughter, surprise, and angst. EMPAC at RPI, Troy. Empac.rpi.edu/events/.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES TMI Project Storytelling Workshop Through Aug. 13. During the weekend intensive workshop, participants craft compelling monologues from their true personal experiences. Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001.

Artists on the Street 11am-5pm. An all-day plein air event showcasing the talents of nearly 20 renowned Hudson Valley artists. Artists’ Reception at 4 pm. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. (845) 255-1660/1889. August Festival 2-11pm. Join us for two days of dance performances on the Maxon Mill porch and feature film screenings in Luther Barn. The Wassaic Project, Wassaic. (914) 960-7861. Beacon Second Saturday In honor of 10 years of continuous monthly art offerings, BAU has assembled a group show juxtaposing a contemporary works with 10-year-old pieces by the same artists. Downtown Beacon. Beaconarts.org. Markets at Round Lake 9am-5pm. Showcase of over 80 of the best and brightest in the local and regional maker, crafter and artisanal edibles community. Round Lake Village Hall, Round Lake. (518) 450-8148. Sangria Festival Ben Marl Winery, Marlboro. (845) 236-4265.

FILM The Hero 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

Lyrical & Surreal: Poetry Performance with Hamill, Herceg & Reis 4:30-6pm. Amity Gallery, Warwick. (845) 258-0818. Poetry Reading: Hamill, Reis & Herceg 4:30-6pm. Three renowned poets read from their work. (845) 258-0818. Poetry Reading & Open Mike 2pm. Paul Nash and the “Palisades Poets” will be featured readers. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. (845) 679-8000.

MUSIC Back to (ab)Normal 8:30pm. Mx. Bond presents a double bill of two rousing cabaret stars­—soulful piano balladeer Dane Terry, and actor Paul Soileau performing as his paradoxical alter egos Rebecca Havemeyer. These artists will seduce, amuse, and shock, with a sweetsalty smorgasbord of the very best of today’s queer performance. Spiegeltent at the Fisher Center , Annandale-On-Hudson. fishercenter.bard.edu. Black Dog 9:30pm. Classic rock. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. DeadGrass 7pm. Music of Garcia. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Decora 7pm. Spoken word and hip hop. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Young People's Concert: Harlem String Quartet 11am. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. (845) 679-2079. The Hudson Dusters 7:30-8:45pm. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (518) 943-3818. Leo B 9pm. Acoustic. Max’s on Main, Beacon. Maxsonmain.com. Live Jazz with The Conigliaro Consort 8:30-10pm. Jazz and blues. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. The Outlaws 8-10pm. The Outlaws are known for their triple-guitar rock attack and three-part harmonies. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039 ext. 2.


Triple Album Release Party 6:30-10pm. Paul Luke Band, Jimmy Eppard's Hobo Jungle, and Ian Flanigan celebrate the release of new allbums. Cash bar and raffle. The Kiersted Dutch Barn, Saugerties. (845) 750-0620. Rocktopia with the Hudson Valley Philharmonic 8pm. Rocktopia celebrates the fusion of classical music, classic rock, and opera. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Slam Allen 8pm. Blues. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. (845) 658-9048. Twisted Cats: A Benefit Concert 8-10pm. Enjoy the sounds of rock, blues, Reggae, Broadway and dance music. Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. (845) 784-1199.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Information Session for Prospective Families 10am-12:15pm. Prospective students and their families are invited to take a tour and learn more about academic, sports, arts, and service programs. The Storm King School, Cornwall on Hudson. (845) 458-7536.

Dance Film Sunday: Ft. the film Stomp and SDoT Dancers 2-5pm. SummerDance on Tour finishes the 3-week intensive here, with the film Stomp and with a dance performance. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 256-9300.

Singer-songwriter Jen Chapin 7pm. Soulful, jazzy, Urban folk. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

The Hero 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

FOOD & WINE 2nd Sunday Session 12-2pm. Live Irish music with brunch served on the farm. Heather Ridge Farm, Preston Hollow. heather-ridge-farm.com.

KIDS & FAMILY Camp Lightheart 9am. Camp Lightheart is a place for kids ages 8-14 who have a mother with breast cancer or have lost their mom to the disease. Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, Rhinebeck. (845) 339-4673.

Trout Fishing in America 9pm. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739. Butterfly Weekend 10am-2pm. Enjoy illustrated presentations, the Butterfly Tent, guided butterfly walks, and crafts for kids. Ages 3 and up. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. (845) 534-7781. The Foreigner 2pm. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. (845) 647-5511. Thoroughly Modern Millie 3pm. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Repair Café: Phoenicia 11am-3pm. Bring a beloved but broken item to be repaired by an expert who is also your neighbor. St. Francis De Sales Catholic Church, Phoenicia. (845) 688-1541. Repair Cafe: Rhinebeck 12-4pm. Bring a beloved but broken item to be repaired by an expert who is also your neighbor. Rhinebeck Town Hall, Rhinebeck. Repaircafehv.org.

SUNDAY 13 ART 15th Annual Saugerties Artists' Studio Tour 10am-6pm. This year’s tour will feature 38 artists. Saugerties. Saugertiesarttour.org.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS 12th Annual Rock, Rattle & Drum Pow Wow A weekend of American Indian music, dance, education, and entertainment. Great Barrington Fairgrounds, Great Barrington, MA. (802) 753-6835. Markets at Round Lake 11am-3pm. A showcase over 80 of the best and brightest in the local and regional Maker, Crafter and Artisanal Edibles community. Round Lake Village Hall, Round Lake. (518) 450-8148. Sangria Festival Ben Marl Winery, Marlboro. (845) 236-4265.

FILM Chopin and the Image of Romanticism Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-onHudson. Bard.edu.

FOOD & WINE Food Bank Farm Stand 8:30-11:30am. People’s Place Food Pantry & Thrift Store, Kingston. (845) 338-4030.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Alzheimer’s Support Group Third Tuesday of every month, 1-2:30pm. Support group for Alzheimer’s caregivers. Christ’s Lutheran Church, woodstock. (800) 272-3900. Buddy Guy 7:30pm. Blues. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Grizzly Bear 8pm. BSP, Kingston. (845) 481-5158. Megg Farrell and Jon Weber 9pm. Jazz vocalist Megg Farrell. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739.

Butterfly Weekend 10am-2pm. Enjoy illustrated presentations, the Butterfly Tent, guided butterfly walks, and crafts for kids. Ages 3 and up. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. (845) 534-7781.

Thoroughly Modern Millie 8pm. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

Stop Motion Video Workshop Through August 18. With Martin Domingues Ball. Milkweed, Sugar Loaf.

MUSIC

OUTDOORS & RECREATION

The Foreigner 8pm. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. (845) 647-5511.

Painting with Pastels 9am-12pm. Four classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. (845) 679-2388.

TUESDAY 15

Tour Future Historic Houses of Hillsdale 11am-3pm. Visit six unique houses exemplifying the best of 21st-century design. Downtown Hillsdale, Hillsdale. Hillsdaleny. com/2017/08/annual-historic-house-tour/.

THEATER

Famous Artists' Summer Camp 9am-12pm. Through August 18. Kids will study the works and inspirations of 8 art icons then use their work to bring about inspiration in a variety of mediums. Fishkill Recreation Center, Fishkill. (845) 518-0195.

THEATER

Pop-up Flea Market Second Saturday of every month, 9am-3pm. UUCC, Kingston. (845) 706-4318.

Night of the Shooting Stars 9pm. Enjoy dinner followed by a meteor shower preview with astronomer Bob Berman. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (844) 859-6716.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Lithography 9am-4pm. Three-day workshop. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. (845) 679-2388. Dutchess County Fair In 1842, after the establishment of the Dutchess County Agricultural Society, the first official Dutchess County Fair was held in Pleasant Valley. It did not move to its present-day location in Rhinebeck until 1919. It's now the largest six-day agricultural fair in the state. On Tuesday, August 22 the Dutchess County Fair returns for its 172nd year with 300 craft, food, and lifestyle vendors and over 50 rides. The grandstand concert series lineup features performances by 3 Doors Down and Old Crow Medicine Show. Advanced admission tickets are available for purchase locally, offering buyers the chance to save $3 on the admission fee. Ten ride tickets can also be acquired in advance for $20, a 50-percent savings from the cost at the fair itself. The Dutchess County Fair is at the Rhinebeck Fairgrounds from August 22 to August 27. (845) 876-4000; Dutchessfair.com. Family, Youth, and Teen Experience A hands-on introduction to primitive survival skills. Children of the Earth Foundation, Holmes. (609) 971-1799.

LITERARY & BOOKS Joan Osofsky: Entertaining in the Country Book Signing 11am. Love Where You Live: At Home in the Country book signing with Joan Osofsky. Rhinebeck Farmers’ Market, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-7756.

MUSIC An After12pm of Opera 2-3:30pm. Bel Canto Institute’s Performance Award Recipient Concert followed by a reception with light refreshments. Redeemer Evangelical Lutheran Church, New Paltz. (845) 255-0051. Harlem Quartet 4pm. Classical. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. (845) 679-8217. Hudson Jazz Workshop and Concert 4pm. Pianist Armen Donelian and saxophonist Marc Mommaas’ featuring guitarist Freddie Bryant. Hudson Hall, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Permaculture Design Course 8am-7pm. During this 2 week course you will learn about permaculture and yoga as holistic solutions that enable us to begin to live in balance with our environment and our relationships. Sivananda Yoga Ranch, Woodbourne. (845) 436-6492.

MONDAY 14 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Stormville Fire Company 2017 Golf Tournament 10am-7pm. Trump National Golf Course, Hopewell Jct. Stormvillefire.org.

FILM Moonlit Movie Mondays: Dirty Dancing 7:30pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. The Hero 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

MUSIC

Joe McPhee Kirk Knuffke, Michael Bisio, Adam Siegel, and Tani Tabbal 4pm. The Lace Mill, Kingston. (845) 331-2140.

Dana Louise and the Glorious Birds 9pm. This new songstress is quickly gaining fans for her vibrant, melodic vocals, adept finger-picking, and roots-oriented flung-intothe-future folk sound. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739.

Ryan Keberle & Catharsis 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

An Evening with Sutton Foster 8pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

WEDNESDAY 16 FILM The Big Lebowksi 6-8pm. Film is for ages 18+ only. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. (845) 757-3771. The Hero 1pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Memory Café 12-2pm. A free gathering for people with early-stage dementia and family caregivers to socialize, eat, and enjoy music. Preregistration is required. City Line Family Restaurant, 254 South Main Stree, New City. (845) 639-6776.

LECTURES & TALKS Tarot Wisdom Gathering Third Wednesday of every month, 6:30-8pm. Bring your own Tarot deck to enjoy this guided exploration to learn & connect more deeply with your deck. Dreaming Goddess Sanctuary, Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2206.

MUSIC Ambrose Akinmusire Quartet 8-10pm. Jazz trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire and his celebrated quartet. EMPAC at RPI, Troy. Empac.rpi.edu/events/. Grizzly Bear 8pm. BSP, Kingston. (845) 481-5158. Lakou Mizik 8pm. Haitian roots. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Petey Hop Hosts Roots & Blues Sessions 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

OPEN HOUSE The Birch School Open House 6-8pm. Come learn about The Birch School, a student-centered learning community offering full- and part-time options for students ages 7 to 17, plus homeschool support. The Birch School, Rock Tavern. (845) 645-7772.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 101


FRIDAY 18

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES #HandcraftNight Third Wednesday of every month, 5-8pm. Drop in with any portable handcraft project you would like to work on, and enjoy some good crafty company, snacks and beverages. Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. Dropforgeandtool.com/events/. Anger Management for Teens 4-5pm. Family of Woodstock, Woodstock. (845) 679-2485.

THURSDAY 17 FILM Chopin and the Image of Romanticism Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-onHudson. Bard.edu. Summer Movies on King Street 8-9:45pm. King Street Walkway, Middletown. (845) 343-8075. The Hero 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

DANCE Ballroom By Request Lesson & Practice Time Third Friday of every month, 8-11pm. Two lessons in 2 different dances, and practice/ social time afterwards. Hudson Valley Dance Depot, LaGrangeville. (845) 204-9833. Monica Bill Barnes & Company 8-10pm. With wit and heart, Monica Bill Barnes & Company create and produce each work entirely from its own rulebook– finding humor in awkward, everyday triumphs and failures. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS 138th Annual Little World's Fair An old-fashioned country fair with animal shows, carnival rides, games, attractions, and live entertainment daily. Grahamsville Fairgrounds, Grahamsville. Grahamsvillefair.com

"Artists & Friends Potluck/Slide Share" Third Friday of every month, 6-9pm. Artists, musicians, writers, filmmakers etc. all are welcome to bring a dish to share, and some art work to talk about. Hudson Area Library (518) 828-1792.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Sound Healing & Tibetan Singing Bowls Michelle Clifton will play the singing bowls and awaken our bodies’ own innate healing abilities and re-turn our bodies. SkyBaby Yoga & Pilates, Cold Spring. (845) 265-4444. Just for Fun: West African Dance & Drum Kids Workshop Performance 1-1:45pm. A high energy display of West African dance from Mali. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

LECTURES & TALKS Climate Change: How to Make Progress in an Era of Alternative Facts 7pm. A free talk by Philip Duffy. Cary Institute, Millbrook. (845) 677-5343.

Janis Siegel and John di Martino 9pm. Janis Siegel takes the stage in collaboration with superb jazz pianist John di Martino. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739. Joan As Police Woman 8:30pm. Indie rock darling Joan Wasser has been arresting audiences since 2003 with her sultry, slow-burning sound. Spiegeltent at Fisher Center, Annandale-On-Hudson. fishercenter.bard.edu. Maggie Rothwell: Rocking the Gazebo 6-7pm. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. (845) 757-3771. Ray Blue Quartet 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Singer-Songwriter Showcase Third Friday of every month, 8pm. Acoustic Music by three outstanding musicians. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. (845) 338-0311. Thrown Together Band 8pm. The Yankee, Fishkill. (845) 202-7384.

NIGHTLIFE Open Mike Night Poet Edition Third Friday of every month, 6:30-9pm. The Dream Center, Newburgh. (845) 234-8716.

FOOD & WINE Burger & Beer Bash 6-10pm. Dutchess Stadium, Wappingers Falls. (845) 463-0542.

Washingtonville Date Night 6-10pm. Live music, outdoor movie. L Vern Allen Park, Washingtonville. (845) 418-5347.

LITERARY & BOOKS PageTurners: March by Geraldine Brooks 7-8pm. A book signing of Brooks' March, one soldier's story ofmarriage, family, and the Civil War. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. (845) 757-3771.

Stargazing Party 8-10pm. View the night sky away from the lights of the cities and towns of our area! Bring your own telescope or view the stars through one brought by our members. Registration required. Lake Taghkanic State Park, Ancram. Midhudsonastro.org.

MUSIC Annual Campfire with the Paul Luke Band 6-8pm. Bring your own chairs and sticks. S'mores fixings provided. Plattekill Library, Modena. (845) 883-7286.

SPIRITUALITY Shamanic Journey Circle with David Beck 7-9pm. Through his rhythmic drumming, David Beck will aid us in transcending our normal conscious state and journey to meet the many helping spirits that are always surrounding us. Dreaming Goddess Sanctuary, Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2206.

bigBANG 7pm. Large ensemble jazz. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Dylan Doyle Band’s Live Recording 7pm. Blues rock. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

THEATER

Newburgh Jazz Series 2017 6:30pm. Latin Groove NY. People's Park, Newburgh Waterfront. (225) 366-2442.

Copenhagen 8pm. Staged reading performances. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. (845) 679-0154.

Sammy Wags and Friends 8:30pm. Jazz. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

Thoroughly Modern Millie 8pm. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

The Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’ Band 7:30pm. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Woody Sez 9pm. A joyous, musical portrait transporting the audience through the fascinating life of Woody Guthrier. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (866) 910-7739.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Best of Hudson Valley Party 6-10pm. This annual extravaganza celebrates the Best of Hudson Valley winners, including top-rated restaurants, shops, services, and professionals. Dutchess Stadium, Wappingers Falls. (845) 463-0542.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Encaustic Printmaking to the Next Level Through August 19. The Gallery at R&F, Kingston. (845) 331-3112.

“Pride” at Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival Kate Hamill is a Janeite—a devotee and enthusiastic admirer of Jane Austen. The playwright and actress is committed to adapting all seven of Austen’s novels. Her latest adaption of the classic love story Pride and Prejudice, in which Hamill plays Lizzy Bennet, acting alongside her real-life partner Jason O’Connell (Mr. Darcy), is being performed at the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival at Boscobel in Garrison. While Hamill has used her sense of humor to embellish characteristics of the Bennets, her adaptation honors Austen’s work. Writing in the Wall Street Journal, Terry Teachout gushed about the show: “The ever-ingenious Ms. Hamill has given us something completely and delightfully different, a smallish-cast period-dress ‘Pride and Prejudice’ that she’s done over in the revved-up manner of a Hollywood screwball comedy.” “Pride” is being staged in repertory at the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival at Boscobel in Garrison through September 4. (845) 265-9575; Hvshakespeare.org. Hudson Valley Ribfest Music, games, and lots of BBQ. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. Hudsonvalleyribfest.org.

FILM

Library Knitters Third Thursday of every month, 7-8pm. Sit and knit. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. (845) 255-1255.

Maudie 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

New Moon Manifestation Gathering 7-8:30pm. Join with others to manifest your heart’s desires with the creative energies of the New Moon. Dreaming Goddess Sanctuary, Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2206.

The Farthest: Voyager in Space 6:30pm. The film chronicles the NASA missions that brought us our first closeup views of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Red Hook Public Library, Red Hook. (845) 758-3241.

CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

102 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/17

FOOD & WINE 13th Annual Hudson Valley RibFest A food festival, a music festival, and a sanctioned Barbeque Contest. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. Hudsonvalleyribfest.org.

MUSIC Everything but the Kitchen Sink 7-9pm. MeadowSuite, a Greene County classical wind trio, will perform a variety of genres including ragtime, folk and classical. Prattsville Art Center, Prattsville. Arch Stanton Quartet 7-9pm. Putting a new spin on bop and post-bop jazz, with funk and Latin grooves, expansive improvisation, and inventive original tunes. The Pivot Ground Cafe & Work Space, Kingston. (845) 383-1663. David Kraai 7:30-9:30pm. Country folk music. Zephyr, Pine Hill. (845) 254-8024. Hudson Valley Jazz Festival presents the Ray Blue Quartet 8-10:30pm. A deep, rich fusion of straight ahead jazz and African groove. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Ian Flanagan CD Release 7pm. Americana. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

SATURDAY 19 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Woodstock Volunteers Day Music, food, and fun to express gratitude towards the town’s volunteers. Andy Lee Field, Woodstock. (845) 679-2485.

DANCE Monica Bill Barnes & Company 8-10pm. With wit and heart, Monica Bill Barnes & Company create and produce each work entirely from its own rulebook— finding humor in awkward, everyday triumphs and failures. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS 5th Annual Chronogram Block Party 3-11pm. Live music, beer and food vendors, DIY art tent, dunk tank for charity, and Chronogram cover cut outs. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. Chronogramblockparty.com. 138th Annual Little World's Fair An old-fashioned country fair with animal shows, carnival rides, games, attractions, and live entertainment daily. Grahamsville Fairgrounds, Grahamsville. Grahamsvillefair.com Cragsmoor Bear Fair “Fun”raiser 2-8pm. Raffle, games for kids and the young at heart, eats & drinks all day. Pool open 3-5. Cragsmoor Association, Inc, Cragsmoor. (845) 647-6604. Hudson Old Time Engine & Tractor Show The 42nd annual festival features19th century mills and farm equipment, flea market, food vendors, and tractor pulls for kids. 390 Fingar Road, Hudson.


Hudson Summerfest 11am-7pm. Enjoy savory foods while rocking to the rhythmic sounds of live music. Featuring cooking demonstrations, and mixologist demos. There will be arts and crafts, exhibits, and more entertainment than you can shake a stick at. Henry Hudson Riverfront Park, Hudson. (646) 584-4551. Hudson Valley Ribfest Music, games, and lots of BBQ. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. Hudsonvalleyribfest.org. Riverside Crafts Fair 10am-5pm. Garrison Art Center, Garrison. (845) 424-3960. St. Theresa’s Women’s Expo 10am-4pm. Proceeds from this event benefit The Greene County Domestic Violence Shelter. St. Theresa’s R.C. Church, Windham. St-theresas-womens-expo.org.

FILM Maudie 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989. Movies Under the Walkway Every other Saturday, 7-11pm. The fun begins with the bands at 7pm, followed by the feature film at sundown at approximately 8:30pm. Upper Landing Park, Poughkeepsie. (845) 471-1775.

Richie Goods & Nuclear Fusion 7-8:30 & 9:30-11pm. All-original, old school, high energy jazz-rock fusion that takes you back to the mid-1970s in the best possible way. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Loren Daniels 6:30pm. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (845) 545-1663. Nancy Kamen 8pm. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (845) 545-1663. Pimpinella 9:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Steve Riley and Racines 8pm. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. (845) 658-9048. Teddy Kumpel LOOPestra 7pm. Rock guitar. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Todd Marcus Quintet 6:30pm. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126.

Thoroughly Modern Millie 8pm. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Classical Figure Drawing 9am-4pm. Two-day workshop. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. (845) 679-2388. Elinor Carucci: The Personal Narrative 9am-5pm. Learn how to picture the personal in this intensive two-day workshop. The Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock. (845) 679-9957. Engaging with Landscape: Abstraction in Oil or Acrylic with Kari Feuer 10am-3pm. Art School of Columbia County, Harlemville. (518) 672-7140. Green Building Seminar 11am-1pm. Get a realistic overview of how to design and create your own energy efficient custom home, from buying land through construction and finishing. Reservation required. info@LindalNY.com. (845) 265-2636.

David Kraai with Josh Roy Brown 8:45-9:45pm. Country folk music. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (855) 883-3798. Ed Palermo Big Band 7pm. Rock orchestra. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Evoflo 6pm. 7-piece “psychedelic garage-soul band. Toenail Orchard, Milton. Goo Goo Dolls with Phillip Phillips 7pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Mx. Justin Vivian Bond Shows Up 8:30pm. A perfect finale for the Spiegeltent season, Mx. Bond bids adieu to summer with an evening of songs, stories, and surprises, selected from 25 years of legendary performances. Spiegeltent at Fisher Center, Annandale-On-Hudson. fishercenter.bard.edu.

Fiction Into Film Book Group 1pm. A Room With a View by E.M. Forster. Upstate Films, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-2515. Maudie 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

James & The Giant Peach, Jr. 11am. Performed by Kids on Stage. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080. Stephen Savage Book Signing 12pm. For ages 3-5. Bring the kids to meet children’s author/illustrator Stephen Savage who will be signing copies of his new book as. Old Rhinebeck Aerodome Museum, Rhinebeck. (845) 752-3200.

James & The Giant Peach, Jr. 11am. Performed by Kids on Stage. The CENTER, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

Bill’s Toupee Band 8pm. The Yankee, Fishkill. (845) 202-7384.

Chopin and the Image of Romanticism Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-onHudson. Bard.edu.

Dirty Sock Funtime Band 1-3 & 4-6pm. A wild, Technicolor adventure that is a hybrid of zaniness, jazz, rock, funk, dance, and comedy. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039.

Funny, but True! 11am-1pm. A youth workshop series that shows you how to craft true and entertaining stories from your life. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. (845) 757-3771.

Anthony Mennella 8pm. Acoustic. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. (845) 647-3000.

FILM

KIDS & FAMILY

KIDS & FAMILY

MUSIC

Riverside Crafts Fair 10am-5pm. Garrison Art Center, Garrison. (845) 424-3960.

Brunch Fest 11am-3pm. A fantastic daytime soiree full of delectable tasty bites and flowing libations. Angry Orchard Ciderie, Walden. Theangryorchard.tumblr.com/.

Cocktails & Chemistry 7-9pm. Enjoy cocktails, music and delicious food and you might even find chemistry with someone in the Hudson Valley. Learn where and how to meet people, make new friends and explore the Hudson Valley. Center for Creative Education, Beacon. (914) 204-3020.

Who Speaks for Whom: The Issue of Voice in the Visual Arts 2-5pm. Radius 50 juror David A. Ross will lead a panel discussion “Who Speaks for Whom”. Woodstock Artists Association and Museum, Woodstock. (845) 679-2940.

Kingston Artist Soapbox Derby 12pm. Parade of non-motorized kinetic sculptures. Rondout District, Kingston. Artistderby.com.

2017 Smorgasburg Third Sunday of every month, 11am-6pm. 50+ food and lifestyle vendors. Hutton Brickyards, Kingston. Huttonbrickyards.com.

2017 Smorgasburg Third Saturday of every month, 11am-6pm. 50+ food and lifestyle vendors. Hutton Brickyards, Kingston. Huttonbrickyards.com.

LECTURES & TALKS

Hudson Valley Ribfest Music, games, and lots of BBQ. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. Hudsonvalleyribfest.org.

FOOD & WINE

FOOD & WINE

Stephen Savage Book Signing 12pm. For ages 3-5. Bring the kids to meet New York Times bestselling and award winning children’s author/illustrator Stephen Savage who will be signing copies of his new book. Old Rhinebeck Aerodome Museum, Rhinebeck. (845) 752-3200.

Hudson Old Time Engine & Tractor Show The 42nd annual festival features19th century mills and farm equipment, flea market, food vendors, and tractor pulls for kids. 390 Fingar Road, Hudson.

MUSIC Amernet String Quartet 4pm. Featuring Ran Dank, piano. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. (845) 679-8217. Loving Awareness, Wisdom and Compassion in Tough Times Internationally acclaimed meditation teacher Jack Kornfield trained as a Buddhist monk in Thailand, Burma, and India in the late `60s and early `70s. He brought back to the West authentic Buddhist mindfulness practices, and has authored many books on the subject, including Buddha’s Little Instruction Book and After the Ecstasy, the Laundry. Over Labor Day weekend, Kornfield, along with fellow meditation teachers DaRa Williams and Bart van Melik, will lead a retreat focused on opening the heart, accepting what is, and practicing compassion at the Garrison Institute. September 1 to 4. (845) 424-4800; Garrisoninstitute.org.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Starr Community Celebration 12-3pm. Roast pork and savory sides, music, bouncy house, games, ice cream truck, solar eclipse facts & viewing glasses giveaway. Starr Library, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-4030.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Guided Nature Walk 2-4pm. Pre-registration is required. Delaware Highlands Conservancy, Kauneonga Lake. (570) 226-3164 ext. 6.

THEATER Actors and Writers 7pm. “Brand New Shorts” is a program of short plays written by company members. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. (845) 679-8217. Copenhagen 8pm. Staged reading performances. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. (845) 679-0154.

Make Your Own Dress Immersion Weekend 11am-4pm. 2-day workshop. Learn how to draft a pattern and make a shift dress. Some sewing experience required. Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. Dropforgeandtool.com/. Significant Others: The Women Beats 12-5pm. Poetry workshop with Lissa Kiernan. Poetry Barn, West Hurley. (646) 515-0919.

SUNDAY 20 FAIRS & FESTIVALS 138th Annual Little World's Fair An old-fashioned country fair with animal shows, carnival rides, games, attractions, and live entertainment daily. Grahamsville Fairgrounds, Grahamsville. Grahamsvillefair.com

Fathom: Hudson River Hurricane Data Becomes Music 2pm. Lyricist/vocalist Mimi Goese and composer/mutantrumpeter Ben Neill create an otherworldly blend of sensual lyricism and technology in their unique musical collaboration. Woodstock Artists Association and Museum, Woodstock. (845) 679-2940. Hudson Valley Jazz Festival presents the Thunderhead Trio 5-7pm. The group plays original material and also explores the grittier, rockier side of organ trio. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Jazz in the Valley: 17th Annual Celebration of America’s Music 12-6pm. Waryas Park, Poughkeepsie. Jeff “Tain” Watts Trio “Band of Tipsies” 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Mark Nadler: Cole Porter, After Dark 8pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Open Mike 4:00pm. Every third Sunday, 4-6pm. Open to performers of all kinds. No full bands. Darkside Records, Poughkeepsie. (845) 452-8010. Willa & Co. 10am. Blues, R&B. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

THEATER Copenhagen 2pm. Staged reading performances. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. (845) 679-0154.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 103


Thoroughly Modern Millie 3pm. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Build, Buy, or Franchise 6:30pm. Learn about the financing options for entrepreneurs through this free, informational SCORE workshop. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. (845) 226-2145.

MONDAY 21 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Pot Luck Dinner Third Monday of every month, 6:15-7:30pm. Cantine’s Island Cohousing, a family-friendly community welcomes visitors to a pot luck dinner on the 3rd Monday of every month. Cantine’s Island Cohousing, Saugerties. (845) 246-3271.

Mr. Pennygraff's Cirkus Sideshow Spectacle 11am. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

LITERARY & BOOKS Writing Among Friends Every other Tuesday, 5pm. Adult creative writing group. Red Hook Public Library, Red Hook. (845) 758-3241.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Night Hike to Copes Lookout 9pm. After a lobster bake, tap into your night vision on a mile-long hike. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (844) 859-6716.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Path to Entrepreneurship Program 5:30-7:30pm. A free intro to small business ownership. Pre-registation is required. Middletown Thrall Library, Middletown. (845) 363-6432.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS Eclipse in the Park A special viewing of the Great American Eclipse for kids and families. Registration required. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. (845) 757-3771.

FILM Maudie 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY 23 FAIRS & FESTIVALS The Dutchess County Fair 7:30pm-Brothers Osbourne. Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-4001.

FILM Maudie 1pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

Willie Carter/Tuskegee Airmen Memorial Golf Tournament 9am-6pm. Registration opens at 9 a.m., breakfast service, silent auction and raffle. Shotgun start with food at the turn and beverages available on the course. West Hills Country Club, Middletown. 914-329-0036.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Poet Gold’s Poelodies 7pm. Spoken word, hip hop & nu music. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

Famous Artist’s Summer Camp 9am-12pm. Through August 25. Kids will study the works and inspirations of 8 art icons and use their work to bring about inspiration in a variety of mediums.Beekman Town Center Park, Hopewell Junction. (845) 518-1095. Instant Filmmaking 10am-5pm. In this week-long workshop, students will engage with ephemeral storytelling and learn how to make responsible decisions about what to share online, while crafting short-yet-impactful videos on their own devices. Ages 1114. Poughkeepsie Underwear Factory, Poughkeepsie. (845) 454-1234. Painting with Pastels 9am-12pm. Four classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. (845) 679-2388. WSA Landscape with Peter Clapper 9am-4pm. Through August 25. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. (845) 679-2388.

TUESDAY 22 FAIRS & FESTIVALS The Dutchess County Fair 7:30–Three Doors Down. Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-4001.

FOOD & WINE Food Bank Farm Stand 8:30-11:30am. People’s Place Food Pantry & Thrift Store, Kingston. (845) 338-4030.

KIDS & FAMILY Go Back in Time with Clermont State Historic Site: Special Story Hour 11am-12pm. Gather in the Livingston Family estate and listen to the same stories the many generations of Livingston children loved over the years. For children ages 5-8. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. (845) 757-3771. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

104 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Qi Gong with Mark Pukmel 7-9pm. Qi Gong repeats precise sets of movements, designed to build strength, detoxify, and relax. Dreaming Goddess Sanctuary, Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2206.

LECTURES & TALKS

MUSIC The Sweetback Sisters 12pm. Honky-tonk harmony from the golden age of country music. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Anger Management for Teens 4-5pm. Family of Woodstock, Woodstock. (845) 679-2485. Pigment Stick Fundamentals Through August 25. The Gallery at R&F, Kingston. (845) 331-3112.

THURSDAY 24 COMEDY Comics at The Underground 8pm. Stand-up. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS The Dutchess County Fair 7:30pm-Marshall Tucker Band. Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-4001.

FILM

Newburgh Jazz Series 2017 6:30pm. Eric Persons & Meta Four. People's Park, Newburgh Waterfront. (225) 366-2442. Ryan O’Connor 8:30pm. Acoustic. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

THEATER Hello Dolly! 2 & 8pm. The Mac-Haydn Theatre, Chatham. (518) 392-9292.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES The Art of Primitive Fire-Making 10:15am. Learn the fire-by-friction method of fire-making, then enjoy an outdoor BBQ lunch. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (844) 859-6716.

FRIDAY 25

NIGHTLIFE Washingtonville Date Night 6-10pm. Live music, outdoor movie. L Vern Allen Park, Washingtonville. (845) 418-5347.

THEATER Hello Dolly! 8pm. The Mac-Haydn Theatre, Chatham. (518) 392-9292.

SATURDAY 26 DANCE

Swing Dance 8-11:30pm. Dance to the music of The Roadhouse Revival band. Beginner’s swing dance lesson 8-8:30 pm. Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, Poughkeepsie. (845) 454-2571.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS

FAIRS & FESTIVALS 5th Annual Summer Hoot Food and craft vendors, live music, outdoor activities, kids’ activities, square dancing, workshops, jams, and singalongs. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. (845) 657-8333. The Dutchess County Fair 7:30pm–Old Crow Medicine Show. Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-4001. Mazzstock X 2017 3-11:45pm. 3-day music festival with camping, featuring 30+ local, regional, and national acts, yoga, vendor village, live artists, fire spinners, campfire jams, silent disco, and more. Mazzstock, Marlboro. (845) 430-9341. Wave Farm’s WGXC presents Lodge 2017 Two full nights of live music and sounds. Food, drink, and other on-site activities will be available throughout the weekend. Riedlbauer’s Resort, Round Top. Wavefarm.org.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Thresholds: Retreats for Deep Cleansing and Transformation A 3-day retreat that includes daily colon hydrotherapy with nutritional support, yoga, meditation, craniosacral therapy, massage therapy, chiropractic care and neuroemotional technique (NET), Bemer sessions and time to relax. Yamuna Healing Arts, Stone Ridge. (518) 837-1729.

LECTURES & TALKS Artist on Art Tour: Catherine Lord 4:30-6:30pm. During this series artists use many mediums and “poetic license” to talk about Olana and the exhibition with concepts and connections that inspire them. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

MUSIC

Chris Robinson Brotherhood 8pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. (845) 679-4406.

Music Social Program for MiddleStage Alzheimer’s Individuals & Family Caregivers 2-3:30pm. These socials provide an opportunity for those with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia and their family caregivers to socialize in a safe environment. Registration required. Wingate at Dutchess Recreation Room, Fishkill. (800) 272-3900.

Silencio: The Sounds of Twin Peaks & David Lynch 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

Ephrat Asherie 8-10pm. This urban dance theater company combines the rawness of underground styles with a contemporary dance aesthetic. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Milkweed Poetry Slam Milkweed, Sugar Loaf.

Mazzstock Pre-Party 7pm. Rock. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

Royal Jelly Jive 9pm. Soulful, brassy party music. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

DANCE

Maudie 7:15pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989. Heart of the Matter Songwriters’ Series 7-9pm. Features three highly accomplished songwriters. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Lucky House 8pm. The Yankee, Fishkill. (845) 202-7384.

MUSIC

2nd Annual Huichica East Festival 11am-10pm. A farm-to-table event with two days of incredible live music, locally sourced food concession, wine, and craft beer Chaseholm Farm, Pine Plains. Huichica.com. Hurley Mountain Highway 8pm. Pop, soft rock. Brothers Barbecue, New Windsor. (845) 534-4227. KJ Denhert & The New York Unit 7pm. Urban folk pop. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Live Jazz with the Alexis Cole Ensemble 8-10:30pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Mise En Dance 6-9pm. A dance rehearsal and choreographic workshop where dance makers interface with their audience. Safe Harbors Green, Newburgh. (845) 562-6940. 5th Annual Summer Hoot Food and craft vendors, live music, outdoor activities, kids’ activities, square dancing, workshops, jams, and singalongs. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. (845) 657-8333. The Dutchess County Fair Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-4001. Mazzstock X 2017 10am-11:45pm. 3-day music festival with camping, featuring 30+ local, regional, and national acts, yoga, vendor village, live artists, fire spinners, campfire jams, silent disco, and more. Mazzstock, Marlboro. (845) 430-9341. Wave Farm’s WGXC presents Lodge 2017 Two full nights of live music and sounds. Food, drink, and other on-site activities will be available throughout the weekend. Riedlbauer’s Resort, Round Top. Wavefarm.org.

FILM Summer Movies on King Street 8-9:45pm. King Street Walkway, Middletown. (845) 343-8075.

FOOD Fried Chicken Picnic 6pm. Gluten-free picnic with seasonal sides, dessert, and beverages, served outdoors on the farm. Heather Ridge Farm, Preston Hollow. heather-ridge-farm.com.

GALAS Spotlight on the Center Celebrate the CENTER for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck at this gala fundraiser. A raffle, silent and live auctions, food and wine, and a musical revue. All proceeds go to the CENTER. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

HEALTH & WELLNESS American Heart Association BLS Provider Certification Course 9am-1pm. This course is suitable for both initial and renewal certification. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. (845) 475-9742. Pilates Last Saturday of every month, 11am. Attendees must bring a mat and a small towel. Reservations recommended. Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. (845) 784-1199.

KIDS & FAMILY Family Day Teams Up with Habitat for Artists 12-3pm. Participate in hands-on art projects in the Habitat for Artists at WAAM. Supplies will be provided. Woodstock Artists Association and Museum, Woodstock. (845) 679-2940. Funny, but True! 11am-1pm. A youth workshop series that shows you how to craft true and entertaining stories from your life. 3-session workshop. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. (845) 757-3771.


Museum Storytelling: Family Tours 9-10am. Master storyteller Tom Lee integrates traditional stories, myths, and legends from countries and cultures around the world to expand and collapse history. Ages 5+. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872. Special Nature Play Event: Tree Friends 10am-12pm. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. (845) 534-7781.

LECTURES & TALKS Garden Dialogues 3-5pm. A tour of Olana focusef on the significance of the landscape and its impact on art. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

MUSIC Beach Party Cabaret 8-10pm. An evening of 1950’s & 1960’s songs performed by local singers. Boughton Place, Highland. (845) 224-3350. Berkshire Hot SummerSwing: Squirrel Nut Zippers 3-8pm. Ski Butternut, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-2000.

SUNDAY 27 FAIRS & FESTIVALS The Dutchess County Fair Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-4001. 5th Annual Summer Hoot A weekend of world-class music on two outdoor stages, plus family friendly activities like arts & crafts Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. Facebook.com/homeofthehoot/.

FILM National Theater: Angels in America, Parts 1 & 2 2pm & 7pm. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. (845) 658-8989.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Babysitting Preparedness Course 9am-4pm. Course covers feeding, diapering, prevention of SIDS, Shaken Baby Syndrome, basic first aid skills, how to cope with a crying baby, pediatric CPR & more. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. (845) 475-9742.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

MUSIC

Carve This! The Fundamentals of Carving a Wooden Spoon with Rowland Butler 10am-2:30pm. Learn the basics of wood identification; as well as the layout, carving and finishing a hardwood wooden spoon. Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. Dropforgeandtool.com/.

65th Anniversary Performance of John Cage’s 4’33” 6pm. Woodstock Artists Association and Museum, Woodstock. (845) 679-2940.

Repair Café: Gardiner 12-4pm. Get stuff fixed for free and champion frugality, ingenuity, and the appreciation of everyday objects. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. Repaircafehv.org.

DANCE

MONDAY 28 KIDS & FAMILY Moonlit Movie Mondays: Fantastic Mr. Fox 7:30pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

MUSIC Jeffery Broussard & The Creole Cowboys 7pm. Zydeco. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

Bowery Creek 6:30pm. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (845) 545-1663.

Priscilla Baskerville 8pm. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (845) 545-1663. The Reveries 7pm. Garage rock. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Rhythm Matters: Joe Giardullo Late 20th Century Quartet 8pm. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. (845) 658-9048.

Anger Management for Teens 4-5pm. Family of Woodstock, Woodstock. (845) 679-2485.

THURSDAY 31 FOOD & DRINK

Wassaic Project The hamlet of Wassaic derives its name from the Native American word washaic, meaning “land of difficult access.” Since 2008, the Wassaic Project has transformed the former Maxxon Mills property into an annual summer art, dance, film, and music festival. This year’s two-day event (August 11 to 12) features Friday night dance performances by Davalois Fearon, Movement of the People Dance Company, Branfman & Strimpel / BS Movement and more troupes on Saturday. The festival culminates with live music at the Lantern by Upstate Rubdown, Madaila, and Midnight Magic. The Wassaic Project August Festival events will be held August 11 at 6:30pm until August 12 at 11pm. There is a $10 cover charge to get into The Lantern on August 12. Wassaicproject.org Friends & Family CPR AED Class 9am-1pm. This course is for people who want to learn CPR but do not require a certification card in CPR for their job. Ages 12+. Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel. (845) 475-9742.

MUSIC Lillie Howard 7pm. Jazz vocalist. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Open Mike Night Fourth Sunday of every month, 7:30-10pm. Hudson Valley Dance Depot, LaGrangeville. (845) 204-9833.

Stone Hill Band 8pm. The Yankee, Fishkill. (845) 202-7384.

Saints of Swing 10am. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

THEATER Hello Dolly! 4 & 8pm. The Mac-Haydn Theatre, Chatham. (518) 392-9292.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Fan Your Talents Workshop 1-3pm. Participants will decorate a traditional Chinese fan in their own creative way. Twin Star Orchards, New Paltz. (845) 214-8579.

Kids in the Kitchen 11am-12pm. An introductory 3-day culinary class for children ages 7 and up. All materials are provided, including a recipe card to take home. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. Safe-harbors.org/events/kids-inthe-kitchen/.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

Stax of Soul 9:30pm. Motown, R&B. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

The THE BAND Band 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

KIDS & FAMILY

Hello Dolly! 2pm. The Mac-Haydn Theatre, Chatham. (518) 392-9292.

Hot House Latin Jazz Ensemble 8-10:30pm. Hot House juxtaposes traditional Cuban dance forms with the jazz idiom. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Mamalama and Andes Manta 3-5pm. Mamalama, led by harpist/pianist composer Elizabeth Clark, plays original songs backed by a band of eclectic instruments. Widow Jane Mine, Century House Historical Society, Rosendale. (845) 658-9900.

Qi Gong with Mark Pukmel 7-9pm. Qi Gong repreats very precise sets of movements, designed to build strength, detoxify, and relax. Dreaming Goddess Sanctuary, Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2206.

THEATER

David Kraai with Chris Macchia 7-10pm. Country folk music with Chris Macchia on upright country bass. Station Bar & Curio, Woodstock. (845) 810-0203.

Lynyrd Skynyrd and Hank Williams Jr. 7pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Petey Hop Hosts Roots & Blues Sessions 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

Chris Jackson 8pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. (845) 647-3000.

Royal Jelly Jive 7pm. Soulful, brassy party music. The LINDA, Albany. (518) 465-5233.

Ellen Sinopoli Dance Company 12pm. Modern dance. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

MUSIC

Chamber Orchestra Concert 6pm. Classical. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. (845) 679-8217.

2nd Annual Huichica East Festival 11am-10pm. A farm-to-table event with two days of incredible live music, locally sourced food concession, wine, and craft beer Chaseholm Farm, Pine Plains. Huichica.com.

WEDNESDAY 30

TUESDAY 29 FOOD & WINE Food Bank Farm Stand 8:30-11:30am. People’s Place Food Pantry & Thrift Store, Kingston. (845) 338-4030.

HEALTH & WELLNESS American Heart Association Basic Life Support (BLS) Certification Course 5:30-9:30pm. This course is suitable for both initial and renewal certification. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. (845) 475-9742.

Trio Solisti 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. (845) 679-8217.

Pathways to Prevention: Treating Joint Pain & Arthritis 5:30-6:30pm. A 20-minute talk, followed by a short walk with the expert on Olana’s carriage roads. Snacks will be served. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872.

THEATER

KIDS & FAMILY

Hello Dolly! 2 & 7pm. The Mac-Haydn Theatre, Chatham. (518) 392-9292. Thoroughly Modern Millie 3pm. The CENTER for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. (845) 876-3080.

Kids in the Kitchen 11am-12pm. An introductory 3-day culinary class for children ages 7 and up. All materials are provided, including a recipe card to take home. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. Safe-harbors.org/events/.

Herbs for the Senses 3pm. Join herbalist David Hyde to explore the fascinating world of herbs and their unusual frangrances and flavors. After dinner enjoy the evening with music by Tom Stewart and Maureen Kelly. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (844) 859-6716.

KIDS & FAMILY Kids in the Kitchen 11am-12pm. An introductory 3-day culinary class for children ages 7 and up. All materials are provided, including a recipe card to take home. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. Safe-harbors.org/events.

LECTURES & TALKS Lipbone Redding 7pm. Songs, stories, and loops. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970.

MUSIC David Kraai 9:30pm. Country folk music. Birdsall House, Peekskill. (914) 930-1880. Latin Jazz Express: The Music of Tito Puente 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. (845) 236-7970. Newburgh Jazz Series 2017 6:30pm. Christopher Dean Sullivan Quartet. People's Park, Newburgh Waterfront. (225) 366-2442. Yellowman 9pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. bearsvilletheater.com.

THEATER Hello Dolly! 2 & 8pm. The Mac-Haydn Theatre, Chatham. (518) 392-9292.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Living with Alzheimer’s for the Early Stage Caregiver 10am-3pm. Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center, Inc., Kingston. (800) 272-3900.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 105


Planet Waves BY ERIC FRANCIS COPPOLINO

The Fulcrum, the Venturi, and the Cycle of Fire

It may sound like superstition to “believe” that this might “mean” something, though I suggest going beyond both belief and meaning, and observing what’s actually happening. See if you notice the acceleration effect of an eclipse, even set amidst our light-speed world. Notice the sense of unusual pressure that people are not readily admitting to. Feel the sensation that change is imminent. Notice the strange events that are not easily explained. One distinction of this eclipse is that the shadow is cast not just on Earth but also directly over the United States, touching both coasts and peaking over Missouri. This has never happened in American history; neither have many other things we’re seeing happen, or have witnessed the past two years. The path of totality extends from south of Portland, Oregon, to Charleston, South Carolina. The rest of the country on either side of the path of totality will experience a partial solar eclipse. Another factor making this eclipse a distinctly American event is that it comes within one degree of the ascendant of Donald Trump’s natal chart. This is extremely unlikely, but it’s happening. Any eclipse in Leo (the sign of royalty) would raise concerns about the president or the king of a nation. Align an eclipse directly with the well-timed chart of the president-who-would-be-king, and you know something is up. Neither he nor his presidency will be the same on the other side of this event, yet it is we who must deal with the results of that. Incidentally, for those astrologers who did not predict that Donald Trump would be president, this eclipse would have been a clue that he would, and that it would turn out exceedingly strange. What we are not really doing, though, is seeing Trump as a product of his environment. When Mick Jagger said that “after all, it was you and me” who killed the Kennedys, this is the effect he was talking about. If this eclipse draws a straight line between the entire United States and the personal chart of the president, we are being asked to make the connection. We will make it, one way or another. The president/king, in this context, is a symbol of the country he leads. I know that this is difficult to accept, Russian infiltration and all.

The Phenomenon of Eclipses To start, it’s worth mentioning that traditional astrology does not take a happy view of eclipses. They represent breaks or shifts in continuity, which is not often seen as a positive thing. Many people tend to prefer the devil they know, and still think that solving a problem is in itself a problem. Since psychology has become the main substance of Battle of Salamis, Athens astrology, we see eclipses differently: as necessary pressure And when justice is gone, there’s always force. relief points, or points of transition. —Laurie Anderson The full effect of eclipses lasts for years. They stand as before-and-after moments that define watersheds in history, or at least tell us where to find e’re now in the final weeks before the total solar eclipse of August them. Eclipses in Leo are particularly significant, given that the Sun, which is 21, 2017. For those who are uncertain of whether astrology has eclipsed, is darkened for a moment in its own sign. any validity, this is a good time to pay attention. Eclipses are one We get a clue from William Lilly, who wrote back in 1647 (I am of the very best laboratory-of-life ways to observe astrology. You would just paraphrasing) that if it’s been a while since there was a solar eclipse in Leo, need to associate what you notice with the eclipses. and it hasn’t rained for a while, expect a lot of rain. If it’s been raining a lot, A solar eclipse is an exact alignment of the Moon and the Sun, at the New it’s likely to dry up. He’s saying there’s a shift in not just the weather but the Moon. Usually at the New Moon, the Moon will pass a little above or below weather pattern; which is literal as well as a metaphor. the Sun, from our viewpoint on Earth. There is a shadow cast, but it extends Let’s move on to a general description of eclipses, which I wrote in 1999 into space, and we don’t see it. When a solar eclipse happens, the Moon’s (and which was very likely published in Chronogram). This was anticipating another historic eclipse in Leo, which you may remember: the grand cross shadow is cast on the Earth. 106 PLANET WAVES CHRONOGRAM 8/17

Anthony Ayiomamitis

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and total solar eclipse of August 11, 1999. That was the one coinciding with the Cassini Space Probe flying past the Earth on its way to Saturn, loaded with 72 pounds of weapons-grade plutonium. We survived; now NASA plans to plunge the probe and all its radiation into Saturn. Here’s what I said about eclipses back then: Eclipses are astrology we can’t deny. If there is a conjunction between Saturn and Uranus, it’s invisible to the unaided eye, and while many people may experience changes, only astrologers and their merry bands of readers and students know what’s happening. Yet when the Sun vanishes, you can be sure that normal activity will come to a stop. Our busy world will pause, and everyone, from herbicide activists nestled in the hills of Oregon to rock stars in Nashville, will stand in the silent shadow of the cosmic order with the astonishment of small children coursing in their hearts. This doesn’t happen often, and you can imagine the awesome power of so many people embraced in a kind of simultaneous, captive meditation as everything around them momentarily ceases to be normal. Call it a reality lapse, only it’s one into which the real reality can flow very easily. In terms of their astrological meaning, eclipses of the Sun follow this image of collective awareness and radical break of continuity. Whether you can see the eclipse does not matter; part of the miracle of astrology is it works anyway. As many of us are discovering personally, eclipses are expanded moments of often uncontrollable, unpredictable change. They also bring the civilization and its communities together, usually through important collective events and the media. Eclipses are evolutionary gateways, which is another way of saying that when they show up, we do a lot of growing in a short time. Delays are compensated. Old accounts can be wiped clean. While each is unique, eclipses often feel like being shot through a funnel of space-time, and we emerge somewhere different than where we entered. The key to making the best use of them is to move with the energy, not cling to anything or anyone too tightly, and to stay open.

Imagine you’re paddling a canoe and you’re heading for the rapids. You want to point your boat directly down the rapids, rather than going through sideways. I am talking about growth as well as about activity. What problems have you persistently encountered? Can you see yourself healing them? You may only need a small adjustment to point yourself in a direction that, today, may seem like a remote destination, whether improbable or impossible. How you orient yourself as we go through this event is crucial. It’s more important than flocking to the path of totality and looking at the thing through a Mylar visor. We are about to experience a very, very exact—and improbable— alignment. What are you going to do with it? As Dr. Eleanor Arroway’s father said to her as a child, in the film Contact, “Small moves, Ellie. Small moves.”

See if you notice the acceleration effect of an eclipse, even set amidst our light-speed world. Notice the sense of unusual pressure that people are not readily admitting to. Feel the sensation that change is imminent. Notice the strange events that are not easily explained.

The Fulcrum Let’s consider a few other metaphors for eclipses, which I can offer after an additional 17 years of contemplation. I think of an eclipse as a fulcrum point—something on which everything pivots, such as a lever. Perhaps the best example is a telescope. If you move the telescope just a little at the fulcrum, you will shift your field of view many light years on the other end. That’s how to think of an eclipse: as a moment where you can shift your orientation just a little right now, and point yourself toward a vastly different destination as time unfolds. This is, of course, a model based on a linear concept of time. Eclipses, which align at least one dimension of time and several dimensions of space, take us well beyond the linear, which only increases the fulcrum value. So, this is a good time to observe where your life is headed, and which way you want to turn. If you’re not planning to do what you’re doing “forever,” what do you want to do? If you’re not planning to be with the person you’re with “forever,” what are you planning? If you’re not going to be here (wherever here is) “forever,” where are you planning to be? Imagine that there is a future and that it includes you. Let yourself believe, for a moment, that everything is not going to crash down on your head before you have a chance to live a little. In what direction would you point yourself?

The Venturi Effect In physics, there’s something called the Venturi effect, which is one of my favorite metaphors for eclipses. The Venturi effect is the reduction in fluid pressure that results when a fluid flows through a constricted section (or choke) of a pipe. The Venturi effect is named after Giovanni Battista Venturi (1746–1822), an Italian physicist. Said another way, when you run a fluid through a pipe that constricts, it rapidly turns to a gas. This is how a carburetor works—that thing that used to be in cars, which turned liquid gasoline to a vapor usable as fuel. Part of what happens is an acceleration effect, and a reduction of density, and an increase in volatility. Those are all metaphors for eclipses. We’re about to experience an extraordinarily potent increase in the velocity of events. That will come with a sensation of chaos, and of events running out of control. Remember that this is also about you; there may be a point where you just have to surrender to events.

The Grand Fire Trine One last metaphor, directly from the chart. The famous Leo eclipse of 1999 was part of a grand cross aspect—planets aligned in a rather exact square, with the Moon and Sun at one corner. The eclipse of August 21 is part of a grand trine, which covers the fire signs Aries (the Uranus-Eris conjunction), Leo (the Moon and Sun), and Sagittarius (the Galactic Core/ black hole/cosmic portal at the center of the Milky Way), plus centaur planet Pholus (rapid reactions, out of control reactions, catalysts, small cause/big effect), and Quaoar (personal creation myth, cosmic identity, family patterns). At the Sagittarius end, Saturn is not far from the action, and will soon become a much more prominent figure in the astrology. So, what does this tell us? Grand trines have a distinctive property: momentum. Once things get going in a certain direction, it’s not so easy to shift. That’s why it’s essential to work the “fulcrum” quality as early in the process as possible. All these fire planets point to a kind of cycle of fire, which can be destructive if not managed carefully. With a grand trine, you can look to certain points in the chart for what might serve as an exit from the cycle, or put the brakes on it. We have two possibilities: Jupiter in Libra, which would be justice; or the South Node in Aquarius, which would be the power of reasoning. Both of these factors describe things in exceedingly short supply right now.You will need to supply yourself. CHRONOGRAM.COM READ Eric Francis Coppolino’s weekly Planet Waves column.

8/17 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 107


Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

ARIES (March 20-April 19) Life is creative. Most people never figure that out. Some people do, and they often become artists, musicians, dancers, jewelers, writers, or some other form of aesthetic contributor—they just can’t help themselves. Yet the creative function is not really about art; it’s about existence. Plenty of cab drivers, hedge fund managers, house moms, crochet masters and printing press operators figure it out too. This month’s rare, magnificent total solar eclipse in Leo occurs on the line in your chart where your creative source meets your daily devotion to service, work and healing. The personal message of the eclipse is to make the connection between these two seemingly different aspects of life. It happens right in that sweet spot where inspiration meets action meets daily devotion. There’s something deeper here, as well. The healing source is the creative source. They are the same thing, applied in slightly different ways. To work this potent zone, whether you think of it as describing astrology or existence, takes a conscious decision. Once you do that, you will tap into a seemingly endless well of energy. Explore that for a while and you will discover, further, that you can direct “creative chaos” in refined, specific and purposeful ways. This is all good practice for Saturn moving in your favor later in the year. Your level of responsibility will increase considerably, and you must bring all of your talent to bear on whatever you do.

TAURUS (April 19-May 20) There is, in your solar chart, a brittle line between your need for security and your desire for unpredictable experience. I say brittle because your idea of security is pretty bold; you tend to feel safe on the planet, and you possess a rare kind of confidence. Yet it’s easy to lose track of that, because another side of your nature is averse to taking risks. Part of this relates to your somewhat infamous tendency to overthink things, and to talk yourself out of what you want. So, in many ways, you’re like a Porsche being driven around a parking lot. You need to get yourself on the open road; and for that to happen, it will help if you lure yourself with visions of the great mountain ranges of Montana, the ancient forests of California, or sunset over the Pacific Ocean. Said another way, you don’t need to justify your desire for experience with a theory, or the need for a certain level of expertise, experience or freedom from other commitments. You don’t need an academic degree of certification. Rather, you must feel your curiosity burning like an itch that won’t go away. Feel your urgent need to change the world building tension like an earthquake that’s about to happen. Feel your desire for sex like something that would happen on a cool, moist forest floor rather than in a pristine bed.

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GEMINI (May 20-June 21) Yours is the sign associated with verbal mastery. That’s partly a Mercury thing—the god of mind and alchemy rules your sign. It’s also because Leo covers the 3rd house of your chart, the one about communication themes. This is a bold, hot sign associated with your ability to speak and write. Yet a careful critique of Gemini will often reveal that you don’t usually go to your true intellectual depth. You are too often content with a basic analysis, or something that sounds good, and/or is true enough. The total solar eclipse later this month, which takes place in Leo, your 3rd solar house of thought and messages, is calling you to your full depth. Eclipses often accelerate processes; this one will slow down your mental metabolism and encourage you to be more reflective. You are being summoned to engage all of your mental gears and get to the bottom of things. At the same time, you must alternate that with a wide-angle approach, and see everything you know in the context of everything else you know. This applies to whatever you may be working on. There’s a special message about comprehending the impact that your family had on your intellectual development. You may still be trapped in their perception of you, which is limited by their own intelligence and perception. It’s time to set yourself free.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) You are in the process of becoming a financial ninja. See if you can set aside all the mysticism associated with money, and the emotional baggage. Set aside the fact that it’s the only thing too many people seem to care about. Pause on the notion that people think money absolves all sin, solves all problems and grants only happiness. This is about the practical matter of ensuring that your life and your creative activities are properly funded. But there is something deeper. One of the deepest struggles of the human race, particularly here in the rather wealthy Western world, is the crisis of connecting one’s personal values, innate assets, and the ability to eat food, keep a dry roof over your head, and support your family. We simply assume it’s only vaguely possible that someone will be able to live on their talents; or, said another way, actually do what they came to the Earth to do. For you, the root of this is to respect your own gifts. That does not mean being proud, boastful or even ambitious. It does mean understanding that you possess something you came here to share. Your part in this begins in that respect, which comes as part of a conscious maturity process. To that, you would add connecting daily discipline to your sense of purpose. That’s not about hope; it’s about action.


Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

LEO (July 22-August 23) Once again, one of the outstanding astrological events of our lifetimes occurs in your sign. That would be the Great American Eclipse of August 21, 2017. There’s a precedent for this: the total solar eclipse of August 11, 1999. Consider what you were doing that summer, and what you were doing for the next three or so years. When you think of 1999 as a before and after moment, what do you get? You are now standing at the threshold of another such moment. What you’ve lived through the past several years is the “before”; the moment you’re in is like a dimensional gate; and the future is unwritten. Take the time and the care to point your life in the direction that you want to go. This need not take longer than a few moments, though deep meditation and grounded decisions usually require more investment of thought. Remove the no-longer-valid priorities from your agenda; decide what no longer serves you. Then, search your soul and remind yourself what you simply must do. Be exceedingly honest with yourself about this, and don’t be distracted by whether you think something is or is not possible. You might know what this agenda is without even thinking about it. Then, use the power of your mind and point your existence in that direction. Then, steady as she goes.

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VIRGO (August 23-September 23) You rarely reveal your true power. It’s a mystery why; I think you’re afraid of getting in trouble. Yet you would benefit greatly from questioning and challenging the structure of authority that you’ve set up in your mind, and which you seem convinced reflects actual reality. Your fear of what might go wrong, were you to assert yourself, contains a deeper anxiety about challenging authority. Yet anything of any merit that happens in the world, anything that changes something, or that has the unmistakable vibration of the life force, is not about avoiding challenge or friction. To the contrary, anything that’s actually relevant in some way must break the mold of what came before it, and that’s the story of your life right now. The August 21 total solar eclipse will encourage or even push you to let yourself out of your self-imposed container. The effects of this event will come on gradually over the next few months, with a concentration at the end of the year when Saturn, entering Capricorn, moves in your favor. Then it will be obvious that commitment moves providence and that fortune favors the bold. Yet till then, nobody is shackling you to your caution, or your fear of rattling the surrogate mothers, fathers, ministers and school deans who populate the world. You are larger, braver and more intelligent than them all. Trust that.

LIBRA (September 23-October 23) There are moments when your potential feels like pretty balloons floating in the air, and there are those times it feels as if you’re in four-wheel drive. You have traction now; you have ideas about what you want to do; and you have an unusually strong sense of who you are. Yet you may also feel locked into something that you don’t see a way out of—or you may live with this feeling silently, below the level of full awareness. So let’s start with that: in what ways are you stuck in a pattern, and in what ways does that prevent you from living the way you want, or doing what you want? It’s rare that people abandon what they are doing to pursue something else. It’s more often true that, step by step, we convert aspects of our lives to a new purpose. You might cut off cable TV so you have more time to practice music, cultivate a talent or learn a skill. You might clear out a room that’s under-utilized and devote it to a new purpose. You might spend less idle time with friends, and instead choose to associate with people who share a common purpose and commitment. In sum, you must make every moment, every hour and every day count for its full value. Time is your most precious resource.

SCORPIO (October 23-November 22) Long ago, my father explained to me that there are basically two kinds of power: formal and informal. Formal power is the manager of a baseball team. Informal power is the most popular player, adored by the fans and the press. The laws of a country represent formal power; its customs are informal power. You are working with both kinds of influence at the moment, and it’s crucial that you distinguish the two—and that you know which to use in what situation. Most of the time, informal power is what runs the world. Custom trumps law almost every time. You may be out of step with these informal kinds of influences. For one thing, you’re too self-critical, needlessly so, and this interferes with the notion that people might like you enough to play on your team. Of course, people tend to like you, and they tend to respect you innately; but it’s hard to take this in if you are in a nearly constant state of self-judgment. One thing that will help is if you catch yourself whenever you think that the past is the present. It may be, until you interrupt that pattern, and get yourself into this moment, and fully inhabit this time of your life. Your opinions, fears, judgments, and hang-ups are all products of the past. Forget it! You can only be alive now.

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MIDDAYS WITH JUSTIN

Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 22) One of the most challenging aspects of maturity, success, or bold achievement is clearing the psychological baggage of others out of the way. Most of the problems we deal with in life are not our own. They belong to our parents and other ancestors, and must be treated as such, if they are to be addressed efficiently. That, in turn, frees up the bandwidth to take care of your actual karma, and to fulfill your actual agenda. With the total solar eclipse later this month, you get an opportunity to purge your consciousness of some inherited problems, most likely ones imposed on you by your dominant parent (and potentially other persons who had power over you as a child). In order to take advantage of this, you must not be afraid of “betraying” any of these people. You must be willing to stand apart. This is about nothing less than claiming your birthright and, in a sense, your destiny. There’s always a delicate transaction when authority and influence are seized from one generation by the next, in each individual life; and for you that time has come. Set yourself free from the fears of your parents and your grandparents. Cut the cords, cut the apron strings, let the dead be gone and commit to living your life on your terms. If this isn’t scary, you’re not doing it right.

CAPRICORN (December 22-January 20)

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110 PLANET WAVES CHRONOGRAM 8/17

From the wisdom of traditional tantra, we know that spiritual growth isn’t real unless it incorporates and accepts sexual awareness and experience. We know that sexual experience verges on meaningless if it does not invest itself in existential awareness and love, which is the actual meaning of ‘spiritual’. You often struggle to claim yourself back from the sexual situations in which you become involved. Often, money gets mingled up in them, your sense of self-worth and identity gets invested, and it’s just too complicated. Fear of these scenarios prevents you from actually getting to know people, since typically these associations seem to be all or nothing. Yet you don’t commit to having three of someone’s children by smiling at them. A dinner invitation is not a marriage proposal. And you’re a whole person, never half of a relationship. A total eclipse in the angle of your chart that describes all of these issues will feel like a birth from one reality to the next. You may experience yourself passing through a narrow passageway, which may have the feeling of giving something up. Take the trip willingly. It will take some time for the dust to settle; by the time Saturn arrives in your sign later in the year, you will know that you are safely in a new reality and a new experience of your existence.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February 19) It’s time to break the tension of your relationships. To this end, letting go of expectations will be helpful; it’s the source of much stress, and of difficulty getting close to others. Another source involves how you may perceive yourself as a ‘public person’ and a somewhat opposite experience of yourself as a private person. You seem much more rigid than you actually are, though it’s unclear why you don’t take a more relaxed attitude toward the world, and give yourself and everyone else space to be themselves. Then there’s the matter of commitment. Do you really think you can choose what you commit to and what you don’t? Or have you observed that there’s a larger pattern involved, and that your involvements select you just as much as you select them? The total solar eclipse of August 21 is an invitation to be absolutely true to your relationships. It’s bidding you to have the utmost respect for the karma that you share with others. What you want to do is work that karma out and move onto better things, rather than get more deeply mired in it. Therefore, say what you need to say to people. Listen to what they say to you. Honor the bonds you share with them, and honor your need to be independent as well. Both are true at once and are equally valid.

PISCES (February 19-March 20 Every relationship is a collaboration. That’s helpful, since relationships need a purpose, if they are to be happy. Almost any purpose will serve, though it must be sincere. In the coming seasons, people from your past are likely to re-enter your life. Sometimes this will be for the purpose of completion. Sometimes it will be for continuation. A simple exchange of thoughts may complete the conversation; sometimes more time and thought will be required. This will precede moving forward, which will be on entirely new terms. It’s essential that you see people from your past as they are today, rather than as they were in years before. Sometimes there will be a profound difference, and other times it will be subtle. As for the collaborative nature, you set the purpose mutually, based on a full palate of possibilities: your shared mission, assisting with one another’s missions, financial gain, sexual bonding or selfless service—to name a few. What this all implies is a wholly conscious approach to relating, rather than what usually happens on our planet. This kind of focused intention is, perhaps, uncomfortable to some people, and you may need to lead the way gently. One of the most important things you can size up, with everyone you meet or encounter from the past, is what their agenda is. What do they claim their purpose is, and what do they actually do? What about you?


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8/17 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 111


Parting Shot

Marilyn Crispell and Jo Ganter’s Before Dawn, Time Points, and Afternoon, from the exhibition “Drawing Sound” at The Kleinert/James Center for the Arts in Woodstock.

Scottish printmaker Jo Ganter has been creating images for over 30 years. Most of Ganter’s inspiration stems from architectural structures and grids. In 2014, fellow Scottish composer and musician Raymond MacDonald broached the idea of an equal collaboration of art and music in which the two would develop graphic scores. (Graphic scores are the representation of music using symbols, colors, and illustrations as opposed to traditional notes). “I then took a notebook of drawings I had been making for some time: The notebook was lined and I was creating a series of abstract ‘grids’ by drawing different vertical lines in response to the horizontals. I scanned these and then colored them digitally using simple distinctions of color to signify each instrument, and each broad line of the pattern to be 60 seconds,” Ganter says. Together, using this process, Ganter and MacDonald created the colorful series of original prints and compositions Running Under Bridges. Ganter also collaborated with Woodstock-based composer Marilyn Crispell, leading

112 CHRONOGRAM 8/17

to the symphony Gradients of Light. Although her artistic process with Crispell was the same, the scores produced were completely different. “Raymond and I produced scores for anyone to play, but with Marilyn we produced scores for her to play,” Gantner says. “The suite of seven images is very cohesive as a series.” Both Running Under Bridges and Gradients of Light will be featured in the exhibit “Drawing Sound” at The Kleinert/James Center for the Arts in Woodstock along with original scores by John Cage, Anthony Braxton, and others. “Drawing Sound” will be exhibited from August 25 to October 8. On August 26 an opening reception will be held beginning at 4pm and excerpts from both series will be performed by Marilyn Crispell on piano and Raymond MacDonald on saxophone alongside other musicians from 5 to 6:30pm. A 36-page catalog will be available as well. (845) 679-2079; Woodstockguild.org. —Leah Habib


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Chronogram August 2017  
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