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1,000 Gift Card

$

WILLIAMS

With a 12 cabinet purchase of Omega or Schrock Cabinetry before 5/31/19. 6/1/19.

Not available on Schrock Entra Line.

Planning a kitchen starts at Williams Lumber. Our expert designers can help your vision come to life with Omega and Schrock cabinets. Visit our displays in Rhinebeck, and Pleasant Valley to start dreaming of the possibilities.

WILLIAMS

Lumber & Home Centers

Rhinebeck • Hopewell Junction • Tannersville • Red Hook • Pleasant Valley • High Falls • Hyde Park

www.williamslumber.com

845-876-WOOD


Enjoy the retirement lifestyle you desire...

With the Shawangunk Ridge at your doorstep, Woodland Pond offers boundless opportunities for learning and personal growth, allowing you to live your retirement years to the fullest. And with the Lifecare promise, access to a full spectrum of the highest rated supportive care options if and when you need them. Imagine the peace of mind that comes from knowing this one choice takes care of everything you want or need in retirement.

Call today to take a tour of our beautiful community. Be our guest for lunch and learn why our residents wish they moved in sooner!

Mid-Hudson Valley’s Premier Continuing Care Retirement Community 4/19 CHRONOGRAM 1

100 Woodland Pond Circle, New Paltz, NY 12561 | 845.256.5520 | wpatnp.org


JIM HYLAND, CEO THE FARM BRIDGE The Farm Bridge—“the co-packer that cares”—creates clean foods in their 30,000SF production kitchen for a customer base ranging from local family farms to a business with 70 fast-casual restaurants. The Farm Bridge is small enough to be flexible, yet big enough to address the most challenging emerging food issues. Revenue and profits have never been better and they have a company-wide profit sharing plan. The caring part makes all the difference.

The Ulster County Office of Economic Development helps farmers, entrepreneurs and production facilities every day. We offer low-interest loans coupled with a new, streamlined application process for the food and beverage cluster. What can Ulster County do for your business? UlsterForBusiness.com (845) 340-3556 2 CHRONOGRAM 4/19

ULSTER COUNTY ROOM TO GROW


Opportunity. Care. Connections. Why Woodland Pond? Our mission says it best. “Opportunity. Care. Connections.” Three simple words that say so very much about life at Woodland Pond. Our residents will tell you that they never expected to have a new chance at relationships, contentment, and joy after retirement. But yet everyday they are blessed with endless opportunities to enrich their lives and wish they moved in sooner. Woodland Pond, approaching our 10th anniversary of providing service to our residents, builds on a set of simple, fundamental values to ensure that the lives our residents lead are rich and fulfilling — personal engagement; communication and transparency; accountability for our actions and responsibility for our choices; person-centered care; a commitment to actively fostering personal growth. Woodland Pond offers all of this in a safe environment of dignity, honesty, ethical integrity, inclusivity, and respect that is enlivened by the natural beauty and cultural richness of the Hudson Valley. Over the last nine years Woodland Pond has become home to so many incredible members of the regional community and truly reflects the personality of the area. The residents, staff, family, and friends of Woodland Pond embrace life, and show everyone exactly what it means to be experiencing retirement at its best. And with the Lifecare advantage, our residents and their loved ones truly enjoy the peace of mind knowing that they are protected from the dangers of rising healthcare costs

Call us today to schedule a private tour. Learn how you can reserve one of our last remaining apartments!

and the volatility of the stock market. Contact us to learn how you can pursue the ideal retirement lifestyle, while being completely freed from the stress and worries of any future long-term needs.

Mid-Hudson Valley’s Premier Continuing Care Retirement Community 4/19 CHRONOGRAM 3

100 Woodland Pond Circle, New Paltz, NY 12561 | 845.256.5520 | wpatnp.org


Historic Riverfront Hotel & Tavern Now booking special events and private parties The River Grill Opening May 2019 4 CHRONOGRAM 4/19

2 North Water Street Athens, NY (518) 444-8317 stewarthouse.com


LINDAL CEDAR HOMES PRESENTS

THE LINDAL IMAGINE SERIES Architect-inspired cottages and homes for daily living. Designed in partnership with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Lindal Cedar Homes has created a new line of homes utilizing the enduring and inspiring design principles of a Usonian home with current developments in technology, and construction. The result is a harmonious synthesis - a beautiful, functional home that accommodates and expresses the way people live today. To learn more go to: Lindal.com/imagine

Independent representative:

ATLANTIC CUSTOM HOMES, INC. 2785 Route 9 Cold Spring, NY 10516 Info@LindalNY.com LindalNY.com HudsonValleyCedarHomes.com 845-265-2636 4/19 CHRONOGRAM 5


adams fairacre farms

From farm to farmstand to super farm market... We’re celebrating our centennial throughout 2019! Go to adamsfarms.com for promotions, historic information and more!

adamsfarms.com

POUGHKEEPSIE

KINGSTON

NEWBURGH

WA P P I N G E R

Route 44 845-454-4330

Route 9W 845-336-6300

Route 300 845-569-0303

Route 9 845-632-9955

Nationally ranked with a personal touch: Adelphi’s Master of Social Work. Our M.S.W. program is for those seeking to advance their careers, change careers or return to the workforce after raising a family. Adelphi’s small class sizes ensure personalized attention from the dedicated faculty, who are leaders in the fields of social work and nursing. For more than 40 years, the program has offered many benefits to help and encourage students, including: • Classes at times and locations convenient to working students • On-site financial aid, admissions and academic advisement • Staff members who act as liaisons to Adelphi’s main Garden City campus • Individualized social work field placement advisement and internship planning with a field coordinator Stop by the Hudson Valley Center. Hudson Valley Center Open House April 23, 2019 6:00 p.m.– 8:00 p.m. Or visit Adelphi.edu/MSWHudsonValley

NEW YORK

6 CHRONOGRAM 4/19


4 19

april

Patrons outside the Historic Village Diner in Red Hook. See page 24 for our feature on Hudson Valley diners. Photo by Tom Eberhardt-Smith

FRONT MATTER

HEALTH & WELLNESS

10 On the Cover 12 Esteemed Reader 15 Department of Uncertainty 16 While You Were Sleeping 19 Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

42 Gaining Traction on ADHD

FOOD & DRINK 24 Dear Diner Lifelong diner enthusiasts Tom and Alecia Eberhardt-Smith dish on their seven favorite Hudson Valley diners.

29 The Drink: Applecar Named Desire At Gardiner Liquid Mercantile, the Applecar Named Desire offers a pomme-forward brandy spin on the classic cognac Sidecar.

31 Hudson Valley CSA List A compendium of Hudson Valley farms offering CSA shares.

HOME & GARDEN 32 Spontaneous Community Photographer, gallerist, chef, world traveler, and budding DJ Robin Rice has found a home for herself and her art in one of the 200 renovated spaces in The Lofts at Beacon.

Mountain biking offers a non-medicated approach to helping kids with ADHD succeed.

ART OF BUSINESS 46 Pioneers of Regeneration Hudson Hemp is leading research into the myriad uses of the hemp plant using regenerative farming practices.

OUTDOORS 48 The Long & Winding Path With spring upon us, a look at some of the rail trail expansions afoot locally.

COMMUNITY PAGES

features 62 undocumented in the hudson valley by Michael Frank

Following the arrest of New Paltz resident Luis Martinez, we examine how his detention and possible deportation both diverges from and typifies recent crackdowns by ICE.

68 rhyme & punishment by Jane Vick

A conversation with poet Gretchen Primack about her recent book of poems, Visiting Days, and her work with bringing poetry into prisons.

52 Rising from the Storm: Newburgh Last spring’s tornado may have set Newburgh back a few months, but the tide of revitalization is advancing with a vengeance.

HOROSCOPES 92 “Sharing is Caring”: A Lifehack Lorelai Kude scans the skies and plots our horoscopes for April.

4/19 CHRONOGRAM 7


A WEEKEND OF COLLABORATIVE AAART WEEKEND MAKINGOF BEER BREWING WEEKEND OF& COLLABORATIVE COLLABORATIVE AART WEEKEND OF& COLLABORATIVE MAY 19th MAY 18th MAKING BEER BREWING ON 14 HISTORIC ACRES ART MAKING & BEER BREWING AART WEEKEND OF& COLLABORATIVE MAKING BEERACRES BREWING ON 14 HISTORIC 12-4pm 2-6pm ON 14 HISTORIC ACRES INDUSTRIAL ARTS BREWING FOLLOW US ARTON MAKING & BEER BREWING 14 HISTORIC ACRES MAY 19th MAY 18th ON 14 HISTORIC ACRES & GARNER ARTS CENTER INDUSTRIAL BREWING of the New York State Department of Economic Development; used with permission.

ESTNY.COM MAY 19th MAY 18th MAY 19th 12-4pm MAY 18th 2-6pm FOLLOW US MAY 19th MAY 18th Presents & GARNER ARTS CENTER 12-4pm 2-6pm 12-4pm 2-6pm R AARTS F T B RUS RMAY I E S 19th INDUSTRIAL MAY 18th4 0 CFOLLOW FOLLOW USE W EBREWING 12-4pm 2-6pm IPresents N TFOLLOW E R A C T I V EUSP E R F12-4pm ORMANCES &2-6pm GARNER ARTS CENTER I M MFOLLOW E R S I V E US ART INSTALLATIONS 4RPresents 0E GCIROANFATL BFROEOWD ETRRI UE CS K S 4I N0TCERRAAFCTT IBVREE PWEERRFI OE RS M A N C E S

Poughkeepsie keep

4AND 0 C R A MORE... FT BREWERIES 4II NM 0N TTMCEEERRRRAAASFCCITTTV IIEBVVREEAERPPWTEEERRIRNFFISOOETRRSAM MLAALNNACCTEEI OSS N S 4IRNM0ETMGCEIERORRANASFCAITTLV IEBFVROEAEORPWDTEERTIRNRFISOUETRCSAMKLSALNACTEI OS N S IMMERSIVE ART INSTALLATIONS IRAND N T E R A CAI TLV IEFV OEA ORPDTE RTI NRFSOUTRCAMKLSALNACTEI OS N S RMEE MGG IIEOORNNSMORE... AL FOOD TRUCKS IRAND ME MG IEORNSMORE... AI LV EF OA OR DT TI NRSUTCAKLSL A T I O N S ®IAND LOVE NEW YORK RAND ENew G IYork O NMORE... A Lis Fa registered O O D Ttrademark R U C Kand S service mark MORE... of the State Department of Economic Development;

When students are engaged in what they are studying, they make deeper connections and show greater interest in learning.

LABFESTNY.COM

L A B FAND E SMORE... TNY.COM LL AA BB FF EEOF SS TTCOLLABORATIVE NN YY .. CC OO M M A WEEKEND L A B F E S T N Y . C O M ART MAKING & BEER BREWING L A B F EOF S TCOLLABORATIVE NY.COM A WEEKEND used with permission.

Keep it interesting.

®I LOVE NEW YORK is a registered trademark and service mark of the New York State Department of Economic Development; ®I LOVE YORK is a registered trademark and service mark used withNEW permission. ®I LOVE a registeredoftrademark service mark of the NewNEW YorkYORK StateisDepartment Economicand Development; of the NewNEW YorkYORK StateisDepartment Economicand Development; ®I LOVE a registeredoftrademark service mark used with permission. used of thewith Newpermission. York State Department of Economic Development; ®I LOVE YORK is a registered trademark and service mark used withNEW permission. of the New York State Department of Economic Development; used with permission.

Get to know us.

ON 14 HISTORIC ACRES ART MAKING & BEER BREWING A WEEKEND OF COLLABORATIVE ON 14 HISTORIC ACRES 19th MAYMAKING 18th & BEERMAY ART BREWING ON18th 14 HISTORIC ACRES 12-4pm 2-6pm MAY FOLLOW US MAY 19th

PoughkeepsieDay.org 260 Boardman Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12603

POUGHKEEPSIE EST. 1934

DAY SCHOOL

VE NEW YORK is a registered trademark and service New York State DepartmentBARDAVONPRESENTS of Economic Developme 2-6pm FOLLOW US 12-4pm MAY 19th MAY 18th with permission. PreK– Grade 12

12-4pm 2-6pm 4 0 CFOLLOW R A F T B RUS EWERIES

INTERACTIVE PERFORMANCES 4I M0 MC ERRASFITV EB RAERWT EIRNISETSA L L A T I O N S IRNETGEI OR NA CA TL I FV OE OPDE RT RF OU RC MK SA N C E S M0 MC ERRASFITV EB RAERWT EIRNISETSA L L A T I O N S 4IAND MORE... RI NETGEI OR NA CA TL I FV OE OPDE RT RF OU RC MK SA N C E S I M M E R SMORE... IVE ART INSTALLATIONS AND REGIONAL FOOD TRUCKS

LABFESTNY.COM L A B FAND E SMORE... TNY.COM LABFESTNY.COM

®I LOVE NEW YORK is a registered trademark and service mark of the New York State Department of Economic Development; used with permission. ®I LOVE NEW YORK is a registered trademark and service mark of the New York State Department of Economic Development; used with permission. ®I LOVE NEW YORK is a registered trademark and service mark of the New York State Department of Economic Development; used with permission.

with

Drew Carey Thursday April 11 at 7:30pm - UPAC

Friday April 12 at 8pm - UPAC

Buena Vista Social Club’s

Bruce

Hornsby

AND THE NOISEMAKERS

Saturday April 27 at 8pm - UPAC

Omara

Portuondo Sunday April 28 at 7pm - Bardavon

BARDAVON 35 Market St Poughkeepsie • 845.473.2072 UPAC 601 Broadway Kingston • 845.339.6088

BARDAVON.ORG TICKETMASTER.COM 8 CHRONOGRAM 4/19


4 19

Tony of Tony's Newburgh Lunch. Our Community Pages profile on Newburgh appears on page 52. Photo by John Garay

april

ARTS

THE GUIDE

71 Books

79 Beninese diva Angelique Kidjo performs the Talking Heads’ Remain in the Light at UPAC.

From a nail-biting gothic thriller to a comical memoir by caterer to the stars Mary Giuliani to a dystopian novel about post-Trump America under Russian rule, seven short book reviews.

73 Music Album reviews of This Too Shall Light by Amy Helm; The Message by Joel Weiskopf; Finish Him by Liam Singer; and Kiku by The Parlor.

74 Poetry Poems by Cassandra Alfred, Jared Bertholf, Tom Corrado, Christine Donat, Faith Fury, Steven A. Grogan, Nicholas Haines, Anthony G. Herles, Maria Lisella, Heidi Evans McArdle, George Ryan, Lisa Hafner Stafford, Mike Vahsen, Anna Victoria, and Rosa Weisberg. Edited by Philip X Levine.

81 Brian Nice’s emphatically two-dimensional photographs are up at Buster Levi Gallery. 82 Painter, performance artist, and serial disruptor Carolee Schneemann died on March 6. A tribute. 84 In remembrance of Don Nice, whose artistic career spanned Pop Art to landscape painting. 88 A gallery guide for April. 91 Six live music shows to pencil in, from 24-Hour Drone to Habibi and Y La Bamba.

96 Parting Shot Painter Lindsey Wolkowicz eschews the fragile. Using the movement of wood and paper as a foundation, she delves into the lived experience.

4/19 CHRONOGRAM 9


on the cover

“In this time of troubles, we need leaders who embody truth.”

—Robert Hansen-Sturm

Luis Martinez FRANCO VOGT photograph, 2017

I

n the September 2017 issue of Chronogram, we profiled New Paltz developer Luis Martinez. Franco Vogt, a frequent contributor, was assigned to shoot a portrait. “During the shoot, Martinez told me how he went from working on a construction crew to managing the crew and then, eventually, to starting his own business,” says Vogt. “I remember leaving and thinking, man if you work your ass off and you are diligent, there is opportunity in this country. This guy just proved it. He was totally the embodiment of the American dream!” At the time of that writing, the big-thinking businessman was working on two local projects. One was a $50-million hotel/residential/retail development in the village of New Paltz that was a real long shot given the community’s careful stewardship of what it allows to be built within its borders. That project never overcame the opposition it faced. Construction just began on the second, Zero Place, a high-tech geothermal and solar-powered multi-use complex. Zero Place will be built without Martinez, however, as on the morning of January 16, he was arrested by ICE agents outside his office. Martinez, an undocumented immigrant who’s lived in the US since the age of eight, has been confined in an ICE facility in Goshen ever since. This month, we tell Martinez’s story—at least as much of it as we know, as we were not permitted by ICE to interview him in detention—a story that’s emblematic of the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in this country. In “Undocumented in the Hudson Valley” (page 62), a collaboration with The River, Michael Frank investigates how Martinez might have come under ICE’s scrutiny, ICE’s ramped-up activity in the Hudson Valley, and the ways communities are responding to this spike in detentions and deportations by rallying around their embattled residents.

10 CHRONOGRAM 4/19

Dalai Lama at Andy Lee Field 9-21-06 ROBERT HANSEN-STURM photograph, 2006

department of corrections In the March issue of Chronogram, we miscredited some of the photos accompanying our feature on Carole Kunstadt's art. When I stopped by Robert Hansen-Sturm's Storm Photo studio in Kingston to apologize, he was gracious and unoffended. While we mostly geeked out about guitars and the quilt work of Ramona Jenkin, which he had photographed, I was able to secure a promise for an uplifting photo to accompany this note of amendment. The above shot of the Dalai Lama, taken by Robert, reflects my feelings on our resolution. —David Clark Perry


EDITORIAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR David C. Perry dperry@chronogram.com DIGITAL EDITOR Marie Doyon mdoyon@chronogram.com HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR Wendy Kagan wholeliving@chronogram.com POETRY EDITOR Phillip X Levine poetry@chronogram.com ARTS EDITOR Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Anne Pyburn Craig apcraig@chronogram.com HOME EDITOR Mary Angeles Armstrong home@chronogram.com

contributors Larry Beinhart, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Alecia Eberhardt-Smith, Tom Eberhardt-Smith, Michael Eck, Michael Frank, John Garay, Mikhail Horowitz, Carolita Johnson, Lorelai Kude, Haviland S. Nichols, Seth Rogovoy, Sparrow, Jane Vick, Franco Vogt

PUBLISHING FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky

Time For A Classic. Wüsthof Classic, the ergonomic internationally renown for classic functionality, balance and long-lasting sharpness. Wüsthof, based in Solingen, Germany, still family owned for seven generations, and top rated by Consumer Reports. Celebrated for precision edges and balanced design. Known by chefs everywhere for its extensive line. And it’s on sale from March through May 2019. Each design offers exceptional sharpness, feel and authority. We stock the full range all because we believe it’s the only way to choose. The Wüsthof Trident symbolizes three values, to which the company are committed: Passion, Diligence and Perfection. These values form the guiding principle for the manufacture of Wüstof products. Warren Kitchen & Cutlery offers more Wüsthof than any retailer in the Hudson Valley, and proud to be the Hudson Valley’s only retailer to stock the full range of Wüstof cutlery.

CEO Amara Projansky amara@chronogram.com PUBLISHER Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com CHAIRMAN David Dell

media specialists Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com Anne Wygal awygal@chronogram.com

6” Utility Knife reg. 94.99, Sale 69.99

Kris Schneider kschneider@chronogram.com Bob Pina bpina@chronogram.com Jordy Meltzer jmeltzer@chronogram.com 8” Offset Deli Knife reg. 109.99, sale 79.99

Kelin Long-Gaye k.long-gaye@chronogram.com Susan Coyne scoyne@chronogram.com SALES MANAGER / SMARTCARD PRODUCT LEAD Lisa Marie lisa@chronogram.com

5” Santoku reg 109.99, sale 59.99

marketing

• • • • •

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Samantha Liotta sliotta@chronogram.com CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS DIRECTOR Brian Berusch bberusch@chronogram.com

Unique and rare knives from around the world. Expert sharpening on premises, Mon.–Sat. Cookware, bakeware and barware A full range of coffee brewing appliances. Gift wrapping available.

The Hudson Valley’s best selection of fine cutlery, professional cookware, appliances and kitchen tools.

MARKETING SPECIALIST Victoria Levy victoria@chronogram.com

interns EDITORIAL Shrien Alshabasy, Gina Pepitone SOCIAL MEDIA Sierra Flach SALES Cassie Bailey

administration CUSTOMER SUCCESS & OFFICE MANAGER Molly Sterrs office@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107

production PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Kerry Tinger ktinger@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 PRODUCTION DESIGNERS Kate Brodowska, Mosa Tanksley

office 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 • (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

mission Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley.

6934 Route 9 Rhinebeck, NY 12572 Just north of the 9G intersection 845-876-6208 Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30, Sun 11–4:30

All contents © Luminary Media 2019. 4/19 CHRONOGRAM 11 wk&c_chron_wusthof_2019hpv.indd 1

2/12/19 4:44 PM


esteemed reader by Jason Stern

Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: Love your enemies, robustly. I read this admonition somewhere I cannot remember, but it struck me, and it stuck. The key word in the phrase, the one that drives it home, is “robustly.” I am no fan of adverbs, but there’s a difference between loving one’s enemies and loving them in a manner that can be called robust. I’ve seen that this extra push of robust loving is actually necessary to counteract the enmity one feels toward an enemy. The relationship is neither benign nor tepid. Rather, there’s passionate negativity at work. A special effort is needed to metabolize hate and transmute it into love. We can see two things at work. We can understand that everyone is driven by a complex set of attitudes, reactions, and patterns and all are slaves to this matrix of mechanicality, while also knowing that beneath the conditioned reactional self lies a fundamental goodness all people share. This latter part is always present, however obscured. While fundamental goodness may only show up as potential, it is no less real than the actual. No one is intentionally evil. Everyone believes he is doing the good or at least serving some real and pressing need. It may be that crimes are carried out because conscience is asleep and clarity is obscured by rationale, but no one thinks “I’m going to go do something evil.” We can’t expect people to be other than their automatic attitudes and attachments dictate. No one can be required to do the work needed to transcend and transmute automatism and abide only in fundamental goodness. This impulse must be personal, and the effort to do the work can only be a choice. The effort to see and relate to the fundamental goodness in each person, including oneself, itself engenders love. This is the foil to the enmity felt towards enemies. This disposition affords us the opportunity to avoid the habit of withdrawal, submission, or aggression—our usual reactions. Instead, we’re able to address attention to potential goodness, seeing beyond the reactional self. To be clear, robust loving of an enemy is not ignorant Pollyannaism. Seeing a person’s potential fulfillment is to see with exact precision where he or she is limited. This is the part that requires real strength of being. One has to be able to see oneself and others as each is in the moment, warts and all. One has to develop the capacity to see and embrace bad habits and unconscious reactions without reacting from that same set of impulses. In this direction is the Tibetan Buddhist teaching of Compassionate Abiding. This practice extends the invitation to do this work of robust love for an enemy firstly with oneself. One suffers in ways large and small, deep and shallow, all the time. This suffering can feel like an inner enemy. In compassionate abiding, one first looks to the body, to locate the somatic, proprioceptive experience of the suffering. Then one embraces the suffering, rather than pushing it away. Next is to notice and stop the thought-forms and associations giving rise to the suffering. Finally, one repeats the process, again and again. Some American students formulated this process as a mnemonic acronym: LESR. Locate, Embrace, Stop, Repeat. “Keep your friends close and your enemies closer,” Michael Corleone says in The Godfather. In the sense of inner work, this is true in a different way. To keep enemies close is to see and cherish their potential. If a person is able to do this, one's life and the lives it touches are transformed. Enough people doing this will conceive, gestate, and bear the yet-unborn child that is the future humanity. —Jason Stern 12 CHRONOGRAM 4/19


MILAN CASE STUDY IS A MODERN RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT LOCATED MINUTES FROM RHINEBECK, NY WITH HOMES DESIGNED BY AWARD WINNING ARCHITECT JAMES GARRISON Each home is placed within the environment to maximize the enjoyment of the natural beauty, and minimize the disturbance to the surroundings. 3,256 square feet / 4 bedrooms / 4.5 baths Lots from 7 - 17 acres Saltwater heated pool, studio/garage, pantry, media room, fireplace, screened in porch

40% sold. Please contact us to purchase your home today. milancasestudy.com

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info@milancasestudy.com 4/19 CHRONOGRAM 13


Benmarl Winery

Nestled in the lush green hills of Marlboro you will find Benmarl Winery. Overlooking the historic Hudson River Valley, its 37 acre estate lays claim to the oldest vineyard in America. Our focus is on hand crafting wines that capture the essence of where they are sourced.

EVENTS: Annual Barrel Tasting Event April 5-7 Join our winemaker in the cellar for a rare and intimate look at the 2018 vintage. He will walk you through the intricacies of how we grow and craft our small batch wines as well as taste through the unbottled wines from the previous harvest. Benmarl Winery and Hudson Valley Seafood All You Can Eat Seafood Picnic May 11, 12pm- 6pm Enjoy a casual yet elegant picnic buffet of Hudson Valley Seafood that can be paired with Benmarl’s award winning wines and draft beer selections. Live music by Rock Steady. Wood fired pizza slices, hot dogs and french fries for the kids.

benmarl.com

Enlightened Landscaping

COME & VISIT US! TOUR OUR CRAFT WHISKEY DISTILLERY & TASTE OUR AWARD WINNING SPIRITS

THE HOME OF

156 Highland Ave • Marlboro, NY 845.236.4265

LANDSCAPING Working with nature to create beautiful, sustainable, and natural landscapes. POLLINATOR GARDENS WOODLAND RESTORATION PERMACULTURE FOREST STEWARDSHIP • TREE CARE INVASIVE PLANT REMOVAL • NATIVE LANDSCAPING

845-687-9528 www.hudsonvalleynative.com

- Your Gardens are our Gardens 14 CHRONOGRAM 4/19

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TUTHILLTOWN.COM LOCATED IN GARDINER, NY

ENJOY IN SMALL BATCHES. DRINK RESPONSIBLY. HUDSON WHISKEY, 46% ALC/VOL ©2018 DISTRIBUTED BY WILLIAM GRANT & SONS, INC. NEW YORK, NY.


department of uncertainty

Sturgie revealed in a detail of Jervis McEntee’s View on the Hudson Near the Rondout.

The Hudson River: Alternative Facts

by Mikhail Horowitz

Editor’s note: To counter the current political climate, in which scientific and historical facts are derided by many as “fake news,” we asked the writer of this piece to lend his considerable erudition to the sharing of some little-known factoids, the debunking of a few myths, and the correcting of several misconceptions regarding the Hudson River and its valley and environs. A rarity among rivers, in that its lower half is a tidal estuary, the Hudson was dubbed Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk (“the river that flows two ways”) by the Mohican people, although certain wits among the Wappingers referred to it as Ma-pipi-nawee-ew, “the river that can’t make up its mind.” It was also thought by the Munsee to very occasionally flow, when no one was watching, from east to west. 3

The first European to see the Hudson River was Giovanni “Johnny the Map” Verrazzano, in 1524. As recorded in his captain’s log, the Sicilian explorer was drooped over the taffrail of his flagship, La Cosa Nostra, when he glimpsed the fogbound estuary in between spasms of regurgitated shad. Eighty-five years later, the crew of Henry Hudson’s Half Moon treated the river to its first sea chantey, of which an excerpt follows: Henry Hudson he’s a Britisher —Way, away me Dutch boys! Might as well be a New York Yiddisher —Way, away me jolly Dutch boys Blunderin’ up the Hudson!

Thought we discovered a route to the Indies —Way, away me Dutch boys! More like a way to McDonald’s and Wendy’s —Way, away me jolly Dutch boys Blunderin’ up the Hudson!

The American environmental movement was kick-started in 1858, when Henry David Thoreau, visiting from Concord, spent a tedious day along the east bank of the Hudson in Hyde Park, picking up discarded beer steins. o

Lobster Newburgh, a world-famous seafood dish, was originally called Lobster Poughkeepsie. It took a lengthy, acrimonious lawsuit, along with an angry letter to the Woodstock Times, co-signed by every professor at the Culinary Institute of America, to settle the matter. Today, to truly qualify as Lobster Newburgh, the tasty crustacean must be certified as having been harvested in the murky waters just below the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge. Bon appetit! r

What Champie is to Lake Champlain, Sturgie is to the Hudson River. Sturgie, an Atlantic sturgeon who is 100 feet long and weighs 5,500 pounds, has been sighted from Albany to Ossining, and can be seen in the background of countless selfies. He survives, barely, on a copious diet of industrial effluvia. This will eventually make for a problematic trade-off: the day the river is finally cleansed of chemical spillage is the day that Sturgie will go extinct. j

Before the 1950s, the Hudson River served as the de facto Thruway for settlers, tourists, and commercial enterprises. Bluestone, timber, cement, and coonskin caps were shipped downriver to New York City from such thriving ports as Tivoli and Rifton. There were tollbooths at various stages along the way, and the tollbooth at Bannerman’s Island is credited with introducing the EZ-Paddle payment option.

The Holland Tunnel, one of the greatest engineering feats of all time, follows the course of a long-submerged trail that was used by the Lenape to access the rich hunting grounds in what is now Jersey City. (Incidentally, the site of Jersey City was called Muh-he-skunk-ne-tuk, or “village that smells like a hundred skunks.”) i The summer of 2013 witnessed the return of those periodic choristers, the 17-year cicadas, to the mid-Hudson Valley. The three species came forth from the soil to mate and die, and basically did no harm. But entomologists have recently discovered a fourth species—perhaps the original species, from which the others evolved—that also emerges according to a prime-numbered cycle, but one that is considerably, almost unbelievably, longer: 1,019 years, to be precise. These insects, which are the size of large pepper mills and have a wicked, disabling bite, are slated to arrive this June on both banks of the Hudson. Short of blacktopping every woodland, wetland, orchard and yard, we cannot stop them. And there is no negotiating with insects. P Contrary to most accounts of art history and tourist guides, the Hudson River School of Painting was not the first such art movement in America. That distinction would go to the Hudson River School of Mud-Smearing, whose anal-compulsive members convened in a cave in what is now Rosendale. Alas, mud being a medium that does not survive the attrition of time and tide, none of their works have come down to us. How, then, do we know of them? You may well ask—but please don’t.

4/19 CHRONOGRAM 15


WHILEYOUWERESLEEPING

TOONA

Forty percent of the world’s population depends on seafood as its primary source of protein. Although meat has recently gotten the plant-based makeover with products like Beyond Burger hitting the shelves, seafood has dallied in joining the rising vegan tide. But last year,

companies like Good Catch and Atlantic Natural Food started to bring legume-, bean-, and algae-based “tuna” to the market. Products like Tuno are made from soy flour and sold in cans as well as pouches. While avoiding the usual seafood

dangers, like mercury, PCBs, and microplastic health hazards, these new products are adapting to new consumer preferences, offering a tasty way to protect the oceans. Overfishing has caused detrimental effects on fish reserves in tuna-concentrated regions, like the Philippines, which are on course to disappear by 2048. Source: Entrepreneur.com

JUSTSAYNAH

A new ad hoc group under the Trump administration has been established to question the severity of human contribution to climate change and carbon output. Unlike a formal advisory

committee, this new group will not be treated with the same level of public scrutiny or subjected to the Federal Advisory Committee’s ground rules, which require groups to meet in public, subject their records to public inspection, and include a representative membership. The counter-climate change coalition receives money from far-right organizations and donors with fossil fuel investments. In 2003, an extensive Pentagon report argued that climate change should be deemed a US

national security concern. Despite this evidence, the group is moving ahead with plans to disprove decades worth of scientific research regarding climate hazards. Source: Washington Post

NOT IMPRESSED

Skepticism towards journalism has only intensified in the past few decades, causing more readers to fact-check and resist narratives of once-reputable information sources. An online poll, conducted last December by Reuters/Ipsos, showed that distrust in the press creates misguided understandings of journalistic processes and intentions. Responses from 4,214 adults (1,657 Democrats, 1,505 Republicans) showed that 60 percent of participants believe reporters get paid by their sources sometimes or very often. Nearly half of all

Americans reported having “hardly any confidence at all” in the integrity of the press; less than 50 percent of millennials believe that the press is honest in their coverage. Democrats show a greater deal of

confidence in the press than Republicans, while more white Americans distrust public journalism compared to their black counterparts. Source: Columbia Journalism Review

OO

On August 24, 2017, Red Hook resident Jenica Igoe was arrested and charged with two counts of public lewdness for topless gardening after an offended passerby snapped a picture of her and brought it to the police. A month later, the

charges against Igoe were dropped, as it has been legal since 1992 for women to be topless in public in New York State as long as they aren’t doing it for money. Igoe filed

suit against the village and the arresting officer, Travis Sterritt, in 2018. On March 5, US District Court Judge Vincent Briccetti ruled that Igoe can sue Sterritt for false arrest and malicious prosecution, but she cannot sue the village for violating her constitutional rights by failing to properly train the officer. Source: Daily Freeman

HOWEME

Nursing homes across rural America are closing or merging, exceeding 440 closures over the last decade. Unable to care

for themselves, many patients end up at nursing homes that are far from their hometowns, causing traumatic stress for patients. Thirty-six nursing homes have been forced to close in the last 10 years due to failure to meet health and safety standards, but more have closed due to financial reasons. Changing health care regulations have affected the funding and survival of these nursing homes; as occupancy rates fall, more care is covered by Medicaid. In many states, this payment is not enough to keep homes open. At current reimbursement rates for Medicaid, nursing homes in states like South Dakota lose $58 a day for each resident, up to $66 million a year in losses statewide. Although rural states have enough long-term care beds for clients, the distance between the nursing homes and families have created difficult decisions for loved ones. Source: New York Times

VACYOU

Although anti-vaccine groups are becoming more popular through celebrity and political support, a new study confirms decisively that the Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) vaccine does not increase the risk of autism. A new study of over 650,000 children in Denmark between 1999 and 2010 documented diagnoses of autism after the MMR vaccine was administered. Although over 95 percent of the children received the MMR vaccine, only one percent were diagnosed with autism. The myth of the link between vaccines and autism still holds strong in America, and the refusal to vaccinate has contributed to measles outbreaks. There were at least 206 cases in 2019 and 372 in 2018. Anti-vaccination groups are often supported by large, well-funded companies, like AmazonSmile’s customer-driven fundraising program, which includes an array of anti-vaccine organizations such as American Citizens for Health Choice (ACHC). Facebook and Youtube have also faced backlash over spreading anti-vaccine propaganda. Sources: CNN, Guardian

XDRESSING

Carolita Johnson

16 CHRONOGRAM 4/19

Last September, TSL cofounders Linda Mussmann and Claudia Bruce, Reverend Ed Cross, and Peter Spear were accused of painting illegal crosswalks at the center of Third and State Streets in the city of Hudson. This act of vigilante road maintenance was intended as a protest against the absence of crosswalks in Hudson, a significant threat to pedestrian safety. Both Mussmann and Bruce pleaded guilty to marking the pavement, which is a violation similar to a traffic ticket under the law. Bruce and Mussmann will serve one hour of community service, and the cases against Case and Spear were dismissed in the “interest of justice.” The crosswalks have been repainted to meet state standards and increase public safety. Source: Hudsonvalley360.com Compiled by Shrien Alshabasy


4/19 CHRONOGRAM 17


Celebrate Spring in Uptown Kingston

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Uptown Kingston is full of great things to see and do. Spend the day with us. Explore the shops and businesses. Visit our notable historic sites.

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Stockade Guitars 41 N. Front St. (845) 331-8600 Facebook.com/stockadeguitars New, used and vintage guitars and amps.

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Bop to Tottom

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Boptotottom.com The corner store that is a cornerstone.

CoWork Space

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8 N. Front St. (845) 802-5900 A creative co-work space. Work in

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Exit 19 309 Wall St. (845) 514-2485 Exitnineteen.com The latest in home design wizardry.

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Hamilton and Adams 32 John St. (845) 383-1039 Men’s apparel, skin care, gifts, and more.

Coworkkingston.com good company.

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Potter Realty 1 John St. (845) 331-0898 Potterrealtymanagement@gmail.com Leasing office and commercial space in Uptown Kingston.

Kingston Opera House 275 Fair St. (845) 331-0898 Potterrealtymanagement@gmail.com Commercial storefronts and 2 levels of handicap accessible offices. Leasing property to tenants. Call Potter Realty Management.

Yum Yum Noodle Bar 275 Fair St. (845) 338-1400 Yumyumnoodlebar.com Noodle bar and Asian street food with a twist. Every day 11:30am-10pm. New location: 7496 S. Broadway, Red Hook.

34 John St. (845) 339-0042 Oak42.com A clothing and lifestyle boutique offering fashion, home goods, and accessories.

334 Wall St. (845) 802-5900

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KINGSTON WINTER MARKET Every Other Saturday Dec. – April

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43 N. Front St. (845) 338-5686 Kovorotisserie.com Greek-inspired casual restaurant with a focus on rotisserie meats and fresh, seasonal salads. 9

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KINGSTON FARMERS’ MARKET Every Saturday May – Nov.

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50 N. Front St. (845) 331-8217 Rocketnumber9records@gmail.com Best selection of vinyl in the Hudson Valley. We buy records.

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47 N. Front St. (845) 339-2333 Boitsons.com Modern American bistro food served in an intimate setting. Gorgeous back deck for dining, drinking, and watching the sunset over the Catskills.

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Kingston Consignment

73 Crown St. (845) 331-7139 Birchkingston.com Boutique day spa offering therapeutic massage, facials, and waxing.

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127 N. Front St. (845) 331-5321 Dietzstadiumdiner.com Where everyone is treated like family.

66 N. Front St. (845) 481-5759 Kingstonconsignments.com Two stories of antiques, vintage clothing, tools, electronics, lighting, and more.

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and gifts.

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151 Plaza Rd. (845) 338-6300 Herzogs.com A family owned hardware store featuring building supplies, paint, kitchen & bath design center, power tools, garden center,

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Kingston Plaza Plaza Rd. (845) 338-6300 Kingstonplaza.com 35 shops including dining, wine & spirits, beauty & fashion, hardware, fitness, banking, grocery, and pharmacy.

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Crown 10 Crown St. (845)-663-9003 10crownstreet.com Lounge featuring bespoke libations, seasonal cocktails, along with local beer and wines. This directory is a paid supplement.


body politic by Larry Beinhart

Everyone’s Coming Out of the Closets

T

he grotesque, over-the-top, outrageous, spend-and-bribe-yourkid’s-way-into-college scandal is a coming-out-of-the-closet moment. The progeny of the rich, the wellconnected, and the traditional upper echelon of society have always had a huge advantage in college admissions. The more “elite” the institution, the more likely that was to be true. Simply being able to pay full tuition increases the chance of admission. Upper-class homes are vastly more likely to be part of the same culture as upper-level universities. They speak the same language and teach it to their children. They are intertwined with the same networks and connections. The richer the neighborhood, the better the public schools are. Rich parents can afford tutors, special programs, and, if their children get in trouble, lawyers who will keep their records clean. As for private schools, the selling point of the most desirable ones is that they are feeder programs for the most coveted college. If all of that doesn’t cut it, there are “legacy” programs, preferential treatment for children—even nieces and nephews—of alumni. (Come on, did you think George W. Bush got into Yale and Harvard Business School by merit?) The Wall Street Journal (April 25, 2003) summed it up nicely with this little tale of two students from Groton, with virtually identical accomplishments, one from an established white family (Roberts) and one the child of Korean immigrants (Park). Mr. Roberts, unlike Mr. Park, had a significant Harvard hook. His grandfather and uncle, both alumni, gave Harvard an indoor track and tennis center and a professorship, among other donations. Mr. Roberts’s... family arranged for him to meet with Mr. Fitzsimmons, the admissions dean, and Jeremy Knowles, then dean of arts and sciences. Mr. Roberts’s relatives also linked him up with Harvard’s track coach and team members in the hope that he would be given preferential treatment as an athletic recruit. Harvard accepted him. There have been thousands of articles written about affirmative action. Many have been critical. The positive ones twist themselves into pretzels to justify it. Very few, on either side, include legacies, the affirmative action for the rich, even though there are more legacies in elite colleges than members of any other affirmative action group.

The current college admissions scandal is not about substance. It reveals substance, but it is about vulgarity. The parents who were caught had not played the game the true, well-mannered, WASP* ascendency way. They laundered mere tens of thousands through a fake charity to bribe characters like soccer coaches, instead of pledging a robust $2.5 million directly to Harvard as Jared Kushner’s father had done! (In case anyone thinks that Jared might also have been a stellar student earning gold stars for all his grades who could have gained admittance on achievements—no, he couldn’t.) A host of abuses and deceptions that had been disguised as established norms have been dragged from their hiding places. Not so much because crusaders after truth have revealed them, but due to events. Police have always killed black people far more often and with far less reason than white people. They’ve always denied it. Investigations have always found them justified. Then everyone had smart phones, and smart phones came with cameras. Suddenly, there was video, and video trumped testimony. Drug abusers were thought to be black or, if white, counterculture types. They were seen as horrible criminals, low, vile, to be attacked by the most endless of endless wars, the War on Drugs. Life sentences. Even for weed. And heroin was worse. Yet marijuana use became widespread among middle and upper class white people. Marijuana activists cleverly promoted legalization—starting with medical use—as a source of significant tax revenue. Meanwhile, Purdue Pharma—along with other “ethical pharmaceutical” companies, various health care providers, and selected doctors—got into the business of addicting everyone they could, even white people, to opioids. Now cultivating and selling marijuana is (mostly) not a crime—it’s a growth industry. Addiction is no longer a crime, it’s a disease. Simply changing the hue of the users has pulled the actuality of drugs out of the closets they’d been locked in. A politician’s private life was regarded as a private matter. Until the pursuit of Gary Hart dragged it out of the closet. When Bill Clinton was president, the religious right, Republicans, and conservatives were united in their cry that “character matters!”—

with character defined exclusively by what a man did with his penis. Yet members of the religious right, Republicans, and conservatives stripped themselves naked and stepped forth from the closets of righteousness to support Donald Trump, hypocrisy hanging uncovered, revealing themselves to not really be concerned with sexual conduct and even less with character. Think back, for a moment, to the days of George W. Bush. Alex Jones, Laura Ingraham, Rush Limbaugh, and the rest of the right-wing talk radio crew were around, but their lunacies were regarded as fringe. Fox News was big, but their relentless fictions were regarded as journalistic variety. The racism was there but restrained by good manners. The dedication to pass tax cuts for the rich above all else was regarded as legitimate and the lies that sold it were treated as truths.

There have been thousands of articles written about affirmative action. Many have been critical. The positive ones twist themselves into pretzels to justify it. Very few, on either side, include legacies, the affirmative action for the rich, even though there are more legacies in elite colleges than members of any other affirmative action group. All of that was there before Donald Trump. He’s dragged them out of the closet. Truths do not reveal themselves. They do not establish themselves. It is because we have so many people dedicated to lying and to keep lies alive that we have to rely on truths stumbling out of their closets by accident. * With apologies to Catholics, Catholic universities like Notre Dame, and Catholic private schools like Georgetown Prep, and to Irish who might think themselves distinct from Anglo-Saxons, to Italians, Germans, Jews, and others who’ve learned to play the game without disruption and to the schools they’ve embraced and endowed, this is a style reference more than anything else. 4/19 CHRONOGRAM 19


Sponsored

THE CATSKILL RANCH W

hen the current owner of The Catskill Ranch bought the rambling house, it was to enjoy the countryside and spectacular views of North Dome Mountain. Located on three lush acres in Catskill, complete with pond, fields, garden, and pool, the 3,836-square-foot home was the perfect indoor/outdoor space to spread out. (Greene County’s low property taxes were also an attraction.) Built in 1975, the five-bedroom home was completely rebuilt and renovated in 2016. With the help of local firm Paul Alexander Construction, the home’s exterior siding was replaced, and a new roof and septic system were added. All of the home’s exterior doors and windows were replaced with Pella windows. A new beamed cathedral ceiling with a complete wall of windows offering breathtaking views of the woods and nearby Catskill mountains anchors one end of the home. There’s also a new master suite with a private entrance. To revitalize the interior, the seller collaborated with LaBounty Restorations, with an eye toward high-end finishes and a close attention to the details. Together, they installed hardwood flooring throughout the living area and sunroom, the bedrooms, and the ensuite bathroom. A stone walk-in shower adds a touch of high-end elegance to the home’s contemporary interior. In the living room, a newly installed bluestone fireplace gives a cozy feel to the spacious, open area. The home’s outdoor space includes a covered porch with a cathedral ceiling and a barbecue area, overlooking the slate in-ground pool.

A spacious, fully equipped chef ’s kitchen is the heart of the home, with room enough for extended family gatherings. There is abundant Shenandoah wood cabinetry along the walls and ample black granite countertops for preparing large meals, as well as a central kitchen island for chatting and chopping. A new stainless steel refrigerator, dishwasher, and oven complement the cabinetry and countertops, and there’s extra space for a full-length table and chairs, making it a full eat-in kitchen. Over time, the owner also reconstructed the interior to be barrierfree and added several access ramps to the exterior. All on one level, the contemporary Ranch is completely, but subtly, handicapaccessible making it ideal for multi-generational living. There is also an attached two-bedroom apartment with its own separate entrance for guests, and a partially finished lower level that could add even more usable space. The remodel has resulted in the desired effect. “The home feels warm and welcoming, with plenty of room for everyone,” the owner says. “And there are gorgeous mountain views from almost every room.” Ready to downsize, the owner recently moved back to her hometown of Woodstock. The Catskill Ranch, which she’s been successfully renting on AirBnB, is on the market with Halter Associates Realty for $650,000. “It’s been great for others to enjoy it until the new owners come home,” the seller explains. Learn more about this property at HalterAssociatesRealty.com.

Clockwise from top left: The Catskill Ranch is set against North Dome Mountain; the backyard features a heated saltwater pool; the great room offers lofty ceilings and a bank of windows; the dining room overlooks the backyard and mountains.

20 CHRONOGRAM 4/19


SUNY New Paltz offers CAMPS & CLINICS for kids of all ages!

We hope to see you this summer!

Kids on Campus www.newpaltz.edu/kidsoncampus

4/19 CHRONOGRAM 21


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food & drink

Dear Diner A Love Affair with Diners

By Alecia Eberhardt-Smith Photos by Tom Eberhardt-Smith

W

e’ve been diner lovers since the beginning (Tom is from New Jersey, I’m from Long Island—we were basically born in diner booths). In 2013, we started Diner Porn, a blog-turned-book, as a way to document the American diner experience through photos and vignettes. Six years and nearly a hundred “professional” diner meals later, we’ve learned some things: namely, that when it comes to diners, nostalgia and personal loyalties reign supreme. You may love your favorite diner because they cook their hash browns to your preferred level of crispness, or because you visited often as a child; because the wait staff is particularly warm (or, depending on your preferences, particularly sassy); because you can get a hearty breakfast for under $8; or, often, because they happen to be down the street and open 24 hours. What’s objectively true is that good diners come in different flavors. “Foodie diners” go above and beyond the typical burger-and-fries or breakfast fare, offering some new and creative. “Historic diners” are charming relics of a predigital era, with antique typewriter-style cash registers and original countertops with wear from thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of coffee cups and resting elbows. And “people diners” are most important for the role they play in the community: that of a gathering place, where neighbors are greeted and news is exchanged. Good diners fit at least one of these descriptions and a select few, like our Hudson Valley favorites below, check two or even all three boxes. 24 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 4/19

Alecia Eberhardt-Smith at Broadway Diner in Kingston.

Historic Village Diner Red Hook A classic 1950s train-style dining car, the chrome exterior of the Village Diner is a throwback to its earlier form, the Halfway Diner—so named for its previous location in Rhinebeck, halfway between Albany and New York City. The diner now holds a place on the National Register of Historic Places, a recognition earned by current owners Arleen and Sam Harkins. They used to meet often at the diner before commuting to work for corporate America, Arleen Harkins explains, and when the diner went up for sale, it was the impetus they needed to make a life change. “We wanted to do something totally different,” she says, and the diner was just that. They took the leap, and they’ve now been there for 36 years. Today, the diner is run by the Harkinses alongside business partner Melissa Wambach, who started as a dishwasher at age 14. It gained a bit of fame when Arleen made a 2017 appearance on a diner-focused episode of the food competition show “Chopped,” but at its core, it’s a neighborhood institution. They’ve had people get engaged there and they’ve even hosted funeral receptions for the families of patrons who called the restaurant a second home. “We have people who come for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, seven days a week,” Arlene says.

What to order: Try the hearty, tangy Reuben soup ($5.75); it’s everything that’s great about the sandwich, without the bread. Their fried pickles ($5.50), lightly breaded, crispy, and served with addictive horseradish sauce, are perfect on the side. And leave room for a house-made dessert, like their enormous homemade sticky buns ($3.95).


Elizaville Diner Elizaville Elizaville Diner proprietor Brian Pitcher is no stranger to the diner world. His mother was a diner waitress, and he started working as a dishwasher at age 13, growing up amidst the “hustle and bustle.” “It was my first job and it will be my last job,” he says with a laugh. After selling his previous venture, the West Taghkanic Diner, in 1997, Pitcher and his business partner Dale Strong were on the hunt for a new project. A friend alerted them to a diner in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, that was about to be demolished—the lot it was on had been sold and the diner had to go. When they first visited, the original dining car was barely visible beneath exterior paneling. “It looked like an IHOP,” Pitcher recalls. But what they found underneath was one of a kind: a 1951 dining car. They moved the diner, along with some of the original tables and stools, which the previous owner had removed but thankfully saved, to Elizaville, where it’s lived, as an iconic time capsule of mid-century America, since 2007. What to order: Hungry? Try the blue-ribbon breakfast plate special ($8.99), which comes with a little bit of everything, cooked your way: home fries, eggs, bacon or sausage, toast, and pancakes or French toast. “That’s everybody’s go-to, breakfast, lunch, and dinner,” Pitcher says. As for him? He likes a simple spinach and feta omelette with an English muffin and home fries, well done. Red Line Diner Fishkill The Vanikiotis family has been in the diner business for almost 40 years, beginning in 1981 when they first emigrated to the United States from Greece. Nicholas Vanikiotis, owner of Fishkill’s Red Line Diner, is following in the footsteps of his father, uncles, and grandfather, but he’s also stepping up the game. Red Line, which opened in 2012, is less “greasy spoon” and more “retro American sleek.” The architecture was based off the nostalgic look of classic diners—chrome, neon, and cozy booths abound—but it’s decidedly modern, bright, and clean. Red Line strikes the same balance between comfort and creativity with its menu. They offer the classics, like a patty melt blue plate special ($11.95), but aren’t afraid to try items you wouldn’t expect from a diner, like their pan-fried dumplings ($9.95) and slow-roasted BBQ pulled pork sliders ($9.95). They’ve elevated the food quality by using local ingredients whenever possible (they work directly with local farms) and focusing on freshly prepared options. And if the line out the door on weekend mornings says anything, it’s that they’ve found a way to please pretty much everyone. What to order: Fluffy buttermilk pancakes ($6.50) are great any time of day. But the diner’s unexpected specialty is classic New York cheesecake ($5.75), found front and center in the bakery case. The family recipe, passed down by Nicholas’s father, is heaven on a fork, and served in oversized slices perfect for sharing.

Top: Elizaville Diner Bottom: Red Line Diner in Fishkill

4/19 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 25


Left to right: Phoenicia Diner; Dan’s Diner in Chatham; Gracie’s Luncheonette in Leeds.

Dan’s Diner Chatham Dan Rundell was not particularly interested in diners—or even owning a restaurant—before he bought this Chatham establishment. He worked as a mason and in his free time enjoyed restoring old cars and trucks to their previous glory. So when he found the 1920s dining car that would later become Dan’s Diner advertised for sale in Connecticut, he approached it as another fun project. “I thought it was neat,” he says. “It was in pretty bad shape. I didn’t think I’d ever get it done.” And it wasn’t easy. Rundell spent 12 years renovating the restaurant, poaching parts— like counters and tile—from similar diners that were being sold and antiquing for stools and other decor. The result is a sparkling clean, historically accurate approximation of what the dining car would’ve looked like over 50 years ago. Today, the diner serves a smattering of local regulars along with a regular influx of weekenders and summer tourists at 18 stools and a seasonal backyard patio. Rundell, his wife, and his daughter-in-law manage the grill, where they cook up breakfast and lunch basics along with some creative limited-time specials, like their Red Flannel Hash ($8.00) with corned beef and beets. What to order: The Hot Mess ($7.95)—a zesty plate of peppers, onions, ham, cheese, and home fries scrambled into eggs—is sure to keep you full till lunch. 26 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 4/19

Phoenicia Diner Phoenicia If cheap, fast, and greasy is what you’re looking for, Phoenicia Diner might not be the right pick. Since opened in 2012, it’s garnered a dedicated following of hip Brooklyn weekenders and trendy transplants. On Saturday and Sunday morning, the line can trail out the door. But if you can stomach the wait, you’ll understand what all the fuss is about: Phoenicia Diner is absolutely a foodie diner. The diner had been serving customers for almost 50 years when Mike Cioffi, a Brooklyn native and long-time Margaretville weekender, bought it in 2010. He spent two years renovating, focusing on removing the drapes, drab colors, and other ’70s trappings the diner had accumulated over the years. The result is a hip and streamlined interior with a menu to match. The diner team, led by general manager Courtney Malsatzki, recently hired Chef Merrill Moore, who is also responsible for the new menu at nearby Mama’s Boy Burgers and previously of destination restaurant Hartwood in Tulum, Mexico. About 15 percent of the menu changes seasonally, a testament to the diner’s dedication to local food. One example is the Catskills trout that’s central to several breakfast and lunch options, including smoked trout on a bagel with scallion cream cheese ($11) and the Catskills po’boy topped with remoulade ($14). And they increased appeal even more by opening The

Lot, a food truck that lives in an Airstream trailer next to the diner. In addition to casual outdoor seating and live music, The Lot offers coffee and pastries—perfect for those who need something to tide them over while they wait for the full Phoenicia Diner experience inside. What to order: We’re longtime fans of the Phoenicia Diner’s breakfast skillets; they’re switched up seasonally but have never disappointed. The farmers’ skillet ($12) comes with smoked bacon and their perfect rustic home fries, which they’ve given the fancy title of “Phoenician potatoes,” served in a delightful (and highly Instagrammable) mini cast iron. Gracie’s Luncheonette Leeds Allyson Merritt and Andrew Spielberg, owners of Gracie’s, have an unexpected (for the diner world, at least) traditional food background—the two met as students at the Culinary Institute of America. Merritt was a pastry chef. Spielberg was working as a cook at Fleisher’s in Kingston in 2012 when the butcher shop decided to move production to Brooklyn, “a place neither Ally or I could ever imagine living,” Spielberg says. They decided to strike out on their own. “We got the idea to test our recipes at a couple of farmers’ markets,” Spielberg explains. “We set up a Weber grill and put a cast-iron skillet over the coals, and that’s how we cooked our burgers for the first year and a half.”


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Maddy’s Diner in Middletown.

This gig allowed them space to perfect their from-scratch recipes—for ketchup, bacon, cheese, and more—but the income was paltry. “When Ally found an ad for a food truck, we both agreed this was what we needed to get our business going,” Spielberg recalls. Thankfully, the response from customers was overwhelmingly positive, and they quickly gained the confidence to make the leap to a brick-and-mortar. The former Borcsht Belt-era Koch’s Drive-In, which had stood empty since 2010, was the perfect place. In addition to the expected homemade items, like soups, meatloaf, and gravies, they bake their own biscuits and buns, craft their own condiments, cure their own bacon, smoke their own lox, and have even developed their own artisanal sodas. “Everything we make at the diner is a specialty in some way,” Spielberg says. The convergence of hyper-fresh sourcing and a dedication to laid-back approachability makes this little eatery a pleasure to frequent. What to order: Steak at a diner? Yes—at this diner, at least. Theirs is flavorful, grilled, dry-aged pastured beef from nearby Pine Plains ($22). And don’t leave without trying one of their housemade donuts (price varies); our favorite is the maple bacon. Maddy’s Diner Middletown When Franco and Paula Fidanza bought Maddy’s in 2012, it had a storied past. Feeding the community in that location since 1950, the diner survived a fire in 2006 and was renovated in 2007, but then closed again in 2010 amidst financial troubles. “I was a customer of Maddy’s for many years before the fire,” Franco says. “When the opportunity became available to take over and continue the tradition, it was a no brainer for me.” Franco, who founded the Planet Wings franchise and has been in the restaurant industry for 17 years, wanted to honor Maddy’s long history when he reopened and maintain its particularly local flavor. That feeling is obvious from the moment you walk in—smalltown small talk about sports, weather, and local politics can be heard at the counter, and staff and customers trade familiar banter. Three years ago, when a regular won $10,000 in the lottery playing numbers recommended by his waitress at Maddy’s, he split the winnings with her—that’s just the kind of tight-knit community that revolves around this diner. The vibe hasn’t changed much, and neither has the menu. Maddy’s serves up classic American homestyle diner cuisine: breakfast, burgers, fries, and shakes. What to order: Go for the classics. Try a burger and fries ($8)— here, they’re juicy and perfectly cooked—with a Nutella and peanut butter milkshake ($5.50) on the side.


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COLUMBIA COUNTY Red Oak Farm of Stuyvesant 1921 Route 9, Stuyvesant Vegetables, berries, apples, herbs Redoakfarmny.com/CSA.html

Abode Farm CSA 10 Chairfactory Road, New Lebanon Herbs, vegetables Abodefarmcsa.com

Common Hands Farm 257 Stevers Crossings, Hudson Vegetables commonhandscsa.com

Hawk Dance Farm 362 Rodman Road, Hillsdale Vegetables, herbs Hawkdancefarm.com

Hawthorne Valley Farm 327 County Route 21C, Ghent Dairy, eggs, fruit, meat, vegetables Hawthornevalleystore.org

Hearty Roots Community Farm 1830 Route 9, Germantown Eggs, meat, vegetables Heartyroots.com

Letterbox Farm 4161 Route 9, Hudson Egg, meat, vegetables Letterboxfarm.com

Lineage Farm 1630 County Route 7A, Copake Egg, meat, vegetable Lineagefarmcsa.com

Little Seed Gardens 541 White Mills Road, Chatham Beef, vegetables Littleseedgardens.com

New Leaf Farm 15 Crystal Springs Drive, New Lebanon Vegetable, flowers Newleaffarm.wordpress.com

Roxbury Farm 2501 State Route 9H, Kinderhook Fruit, lamb, beef, pork, chicken, vegetables Roxburyfarm.com

Ten Barn Farm 1142 County Route 22, Ghent Vegetables, flowers Tenbarnfarm.com

Threshold Farm 16 Summit Street, Philmont Fruit Spiritualfoodcsa.org

Tiny Hearts Farm 1649 County Route 7A, Copake Flowers Tinyheartsfarm.com

Trusted Roots Farm 402 County Route 34, East Chatham Vegetable, eggs Trustedrootsfarm.com

Field Apothecary & Herb Farm Germantown Four-season wellness box Fieldapothecary.com/csa/

Good Fight Herb Co. 253 1/2 Warren Street, Hudson Herbal remedies Goodfightherbco.com

Highland Farm Game Meats 283 County Route 6, Germantown Egg, meat Eat-better-meat.com

Kinderhook Farm 1958 County Rd 21, Valatie Meat Kinderhookfarm.com

Sparrowbush Farm 2409 Route 9, Hudson Winter Full Diet Sparrowbushfarm.com

The Farm at Miller’s Crossing

CSA LIST

170 Rt. 217, Hudson Meat, vegetables Farmatmillerscrossing.com

Woven Stars Farm 52 Winter Hill Rd Ghent Eggs, mushrooms, meat Wovenstarsfarm.com

Ironwood Farm/Rivertown CSA 103 County Route 9, Ghent Vegetables Ironwood.farm

DUTCHESS COUNTY Common Ground Farm 79 Farmstead Lane, Wappingers Falls Flowers, herbs, vegetables Commongroundfarm.org

With spring upon us, it’s time to support your favorite local farm (or find a new one) and sign up for a community-supported agriculture (CSA) share. Pay upfront for the whole season and receive weekly baskets of farm-fresh fruit, vegetables, flowers, eggs, meats, and herbs through the whole growing season. Through a recent study, Glynwood discovered that if CSA farms in the region were to sell at capacity, an estimated 5,100 additional households could be eating healthy, locally grown produce. Add your family to the list and support a local grower while you’re at it. Here is a list of farms throughout the region that offer CSA shares, compiled by the Hudson Valley CSA Coalition. Hudsonvalleycsa.org

Diana Mae Flowers Beacon Flowers Dianamaeflowers.com

Fishkill Farms 9 Fishkill Farm Rd, Hopewell Junction Fruit, vegetable, eggs Fishkillfarms.com

Full Circus Farm 27 Mils Path, Pine Plains Flowers, fruit, vegetables, herbs Fullcircusfarm.wordpress.com

Great Song Farm 475 Milan Hill Rd, Red Hook Eggs, flowers, fruit, vegetables Greatsongfarm.com

Maitri Farm 143 Amenia Union Road, Amenia Vegetables, meat Maitrifarmny.com

Meadowland Farm 689 Schultzville Road, Clinton Corners Flowers, fruit, herbs, meat, vegetables Meadowlandfarmny.com

Miracle Springs Farm 709 County Route 11, Ancram Vegetable, cheese Miraclespringsfarm.com

Northwind Farms 185 W Kerley Corners Road, Tivoli Meat Northwindfarmsallnatural.com

Obercreek Farm 59 Marlorville Road, Wappingers Falls Eggs, flowers, fruits, herbs, meat, vegetables Obercreekfarm.com

Poughkeepsie Farm Project 51 Vassar Farm Lane, Poughkeepsie Vegetables (includes some berries) Farmproject.org

Rock Steady Farm & Flowers

GREENE COUNTY Black Horse Farms 10094 Route 9W, Athens Dairy, eggs, fruit, meat, vegetables Blackhorsefarms.com

Foxtail Community Farm 506 County Route 75, Greenville Eggs, fruit, poultry, vegetables Foxtailcommunityfarm.com

Stoneledge Farm 145 Garcia Lane, Leeds Vegetables, fruit, coffee, dry beans Stoneledge.farm

Heather Ridge Farm 989 Broome Center Rd, Preston Hollow Meat, poultry Heather-ridge-farm.com

ORANGE COUNTY Bialas Farms 75 Celery Avenue, New Hampton Flowers, herbs, vegetables Bialasfarms.com

Gray Family Farm 261 Otterkill Road, New Windsor Eggs, meat Grayfamilyfarm.com

J&A Farm 12 Indiana Road, Goshen Vegetables Jafarm.org 153 Johnson Road, Chester Vegetables, flowers, herbs Peaceandcarrotsfarm.com

Royal Acres Farm and CSA 621 Scotchtown Collabar Rd, Middletown Vegetables Facebook.com/RoyalAcresFarmAndCsa

ULSTER COUNTY

Sawkill Farm

283 Springtown Road, New Paltz Eggs, fruit, vegetables Facebook.com/EvolutionaryOrganics/

Shoving Leopard Farm Barrytown Flowers Shovingleopardfarm.org

Sisters Hill Farm 127 Sisters Hill Road, Stanfordville Vegetables Sistershillfarm.org

Hepworth Farms @ Primrose Hill School 23 Spring Brook Park, Rhinebeck Fruit, vegetables Primrosehillschool.com/csa

45 Phillies Bridge Road, New Paltz Vegetables, herbs, flowers Philliesbridge.org

Rondout Valley Organics 331 Dowe Road, Ellenville Eggs, flowers, fruit, herbs, meat, vegetables Farmtocity.org/find-local-food

Sea Change Farm 221 Marcott Road, Stone Ridge Flowers Seachange.farm

Second Wind CSA 158 Marabac Road, Gardiner Eggs, flowers, fruit, meat, vegetables Secondwindcsa.com

Solid Ground Farm 205 Hidden Valley Road, Kingston Eggs, vegetables Solidground.farm

SustainAbility Farm 2880 Lucas Avenue, High Falls Vegetables sustainabilityfarm.org

The Farm Bridge Shares 195 Huguenot Street, New Paltz Fruit, vegetables Thefarmbridgeshares.com

Tributary Farm 222 Lower Whitfield Road, Accord Vegetables Tributary-farm.com/csa

Peace and Carrots Farm

41 Kaye Road, Millerton Eggs, flowers, fruit, herbs, meat, vegetables Rocksteadyfarm.com 7782 Albany Post Road, Red Hook Meat Starlingyards.com/farmshares

Phillies Bridge Farm Project

Evolutionary Organics

Grass + Grit Farm Lenape Lane, New Paltz Pork, lamb, duck, goats, chickens, eggs Grassgritfarm.com/csa

Huguenot Street Farm 205 Huguenot Street, New Paltz Fruit, vegetables Huguenotfarm.com

Kelder’s Farm 5755 Route 209, Kerhonkson Vegetables, fruit, herbs, flowers, meat Keldersfarm.com

Old Ford Farm 1359 Old Ford Rd, New Paltz Vegetables Oldfordfarm.com

WESTCHESTER COUNTY Fable: From Farm to Table 1311 Kitchawan Road, Ossining Eggs, vegetables Fablefoods.com

Harvest Moon Farm and Orchard 130 Hardscrabble Rd, North Salem Dairy, flowers, fruit, meat, vegetables Hmorchard.com

Hemlock Hill Farm 500 Croton Avenue, Cortlandt Manor Vegetables, eggs, meat, poultry hemlockhillfarm.com

Hilltop Hanover Farm & Environmental Center 1271 Hanover Street, Yorktown Heights Vegetables Hilltophanoverfarm.org

Pound Ridge Organics 22 & 24 Westchester Avenue, Pound Ridge Dairy, eggs, flowers, fruit, herbs, meat, vegetables PoundRidgeOrganics.com

Sweet Earth Co. 20A Salem Road, Pound Ridge Flowers, herbs sweetearthco.com/we-grow

4/19 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 31


caption tk

32 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 4/19


the house

Spontaneous Community PHOTOGRAPHER AND GALLERIST ROBIN RICE’S BEACON LOFT By Mary Angeles Armstrong Photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid

F

Robin Rice’s loft is one of 200 renovated spaces in The Lofts at Beacon created from a 19th-century textile mill. Right next to the Fishkill Creek’s dam and waterfall, the live/work spaces incorporate many of the original industrial features and enjoy multiple community spaces both indoor and out. Opposite: Rice in her music nook, carved from the space under her floating staircase. The photographer, gallerist, chef, and world traveler has recently added DJ to her list of talents. With two turntables and a large collection of records stored in red crates, she goes by “DJ Red Shoes” and likes to mix show tunes, jazz, and—of course—disco. “It’s really like playing an instrument,” she says. “It’s the basics of music.” Conquering new terrain, creative or geographic, is something Rice has embraced throughout her life. “I live a big life. I travel. Nothing stops me.”

irst, let’s clear something up: Robin Rice never officially attended Pratt Institute. When she was 21, the aspiring photographer moved in with a high school friend, who was actually enrolled at the college, living in an apartment near Pratt’s Brooklyn campus. “Everyone thinks I went to Pratt because I used the dark room there, I went and had lunches there, and I printed there. In fact, some of my first pictures were made there,” she explains. “But the truth was, back then no one ever asked for ID.” The Philadelphia native must have just looked the part. She’d gotten her first camera at the age of 11 and had spent the rest of her childhood taking pictures. “It was the best way to express myself,” she remembers. “It was easier for me than writing or even speaking.” Rice credits those early years not-quite-attending Pratt, surrounded by creative people, for planting the seeds of her long, varied career as a photographer and gallery owner. “I was always taking pictures,” she recalls, “but when I moved to New York City I really blossomed.” Rice’s Beacon loft—one of 200 units recently converted from a 19th-century textile mill along the Fishkill Creek—suits the current chapter of her creative journey perfectly. Since December 2017, when Rice found her way from Manhattan to the Hudson Valley, she’s been loving every inch of the open 1,250-square-foot space. It’s also close enough to Manhattan’s West Village, where she’s operated her eponymous gallery for the past 30 years, to commute part of the week. Her Beacon loft is also just far enough away that she can focus on processing her own images. “I moved here mainly for my own work—some days I just scan all day long.” She’s also found her place in the community of creatives thriving around her. Much like her early days in Brooklyn, Rice has both a place to creatively process and, in the midst of a neighborhood that she estimates is 70 percent artists, the perfect atmosphere of camaraderie. “Because it’s an art community, it’s so perfect for me to do my work,” she explains. 4/19 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 33


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In Rice’s studio, she and neighbor Amy Pilkington look over Rice’s pictures of Studio 54’s opening night. A fellow artist, Pilkington also modeled for the print hanging along the back wall.

From Black-and-White to Full-Color Landing in Brooklyn in the mid-1970s, Rice and her camera had an intimate view of a distinctive moment in New York City’s history. Shooting mainly in black and white, she developed her particular style of not-quite portraiture by training her lens on the artists, musicians, and iconoclasts around her, in a time of youthful freedom and self-discovery, right before the HIV/ AIDS epidemic struck. An admitted “old-school photographer” Rice has been using the same style of small manual Nikon camera since those early days. (She still eschews digital cameras, preferring traditional film.) Instead of relying too heavily on technique or elaborate equipment, she learned to trust the simple chemistry between photographer and subject to create her portraits. “It just happens,” she explains. “Maybe I have an idea before, but the actual shooting part happens so organically. It’s like I’m not even aware—my camera has a mind of its own.” The success of this simple formula is evident throughout her wide-ranging body

of work, on display for the first time at her own gallery in her show “It’s About Time.” Her switch from black and white to color came when she was hired by Discoworld to shoot the opening night of Studio 54. Her close-up photos were shot on color slides and intimately capture the characters and the mood that made the nightclub infamous. (Rice’s Studio 54 pictures will be included in an upcoming retrospective at the Brooklyn Museum of Art.). After developing her artistic eye, Rice worked in commercial photography for 15 years, then found a disheveled storefront on far West 11th street. First intending to utilize it as a studio, she soon realized the space’s potential to show work, and opened the Robin Rice Gallery in 1990. Specializing in fine art photography, Rice has developed her aesthetic as a gallerist by understanding both the temperament of artists and the needs of her clientele. “I’m into strong photographs that have lasting power,” she says. “I don’t like portraits when you think, who is that person? It’s more like a feeling. I’m interested in a strong image.” 4/19 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 35


Industrial Modern The move to Beacon was precipitated by a desire to turn back to her own creative work. After many years of dividing her time between a small apartment in the West Village and a shared house in Bridgehampton, Rice was ready to set up a complete work studio in one space. The Hudson Valley called, and she chose Beacon as the perfect jumping off point to explore the region. “I loved the art community in Beacon, but mostly I loved the loft itself,” she says. Created from the shell of a former carpet mill, the Lofts at Beacon were designed by architect Aryeh Siegal with working artists in mind. (Siegal is also one of Rice’s new neighbors.) Updated into a modern vernacular, the home incorporates many of the building’s original industrial features. Rice investigated four of the complex’s lofts, but came back to the first she’d seen: a corner unit with ample space indoors and out. The 22-foot-high ceilings and open, airy flow of the space seemed huge compared to how she’d been living. “When I first moved in I shouted ‘Hello,’ and ran from one end of the loft to the other,” she remembers. She’s since decorated the loft with some of her work, paintings and photos collected throughout the years, and what she calls a “modern farm-to-table” aesthetic. True to her tendency to create and promote the community around her, she’s also bought pieces, or commissioned work, from many of the artisan neighbors in the complex who she now counts as friends. From top: The front end of the loft is dominated by a bright red closet Rice added when she moved in. She found the striped grey chairs in Amagansett and paired them with a cowhide bench made by Amy Pilkington. The marble coffee table in the foyer is from Maison Gerard in New York. Rice utilizes one of the loft’s 22-foot walls as an ad-hoc gallery space for her work. Along the opposite brick wall, she features an extensive collection of art books as well as work collected during multiple travels through Italy. The bright blue oil-on-canvas painting Queen Kong is by Giacomo Piussi and comes from Florence. France Sangiovanni’s hand-welded glass lamp is from Salerno. The upstairs sleeping loft features a dresser from the Italian design house Calligaris as well as Pilkington’s handmade textiles. Rice’s framer made her mirrors for the space and architect Aryeh Siegal helped her hang privacy curtains.

36 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 4/19


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A Splash of Red Rice’s unit features two walls of original brick punctuated with large windows overlooking the Fishkill Creek to one side, and a common courtyard to another. Black, poured concrete floors stretch throughout the ground level. A wood-and-steel floating staircase stretches along a white painted wall that Rice utilizes as an ad-hoc gallery space to display collages of her own work. At the loft’s entrance Rice added a built-out closet and painted it bright red to contrast the sleek interior design features. Upstairs, the bedroom loft has room enough for two full beds. Rice commissioned Irina Siegal (Aryeh’s wife) to make grey linen privacy curtains for the upstairs and bought oneof-a-kind handmade pillows and textiles for the beds from neighbor and artisan Amy Pilkington. Tucked underneath the secondfloor loft is an ample work space where Rice has installed a scanner, flat files, a computer and shelving for her work. A full bathroom

38 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 4/19

upstairs and a half-bathroom downstairs are decorated with a collection of Rice’s portraits as well as works she’s collected over the years. Rice painted the walls of the open chef ’s kitchen the same shade of red as the closet. Central to both the kitchen area, and the entire loft, a large farmhouse-style wooden dining table Rice bought in Bridgehampton is matched with modern white chairs. The modern rustic vibe is echoed by the kitchen’s quartz countertops and white cabinetry decorated with Rice’s collection of Brazilian wood bowls. It’s the natural gathering place for guests, and a place where Rice loves to cook. Outside, Rice also has a patio with a raised garden as well as a table and chairs. While she’s found the space she’s needed to focus on work, Rice has also delighted in the surrounding community she’s found. “It’s like an adult dorm,“ she explains. “Here I get to do whatever I want, but people are also really friendly and supportive. It’s a perk— the beauty of this community.”

Rice’s kitchen is both the center and heart of her loft. “I love to cook,” she explains, adding that her world travels influenced her culinary tastes. In the year since she moved to the Lofts at Beacon, she’s turned many neighbors into friends and often throws dinner parties in the open, airy space. DJ Red Shoes always makes an appearance after the meal. “Here, after dinner, we always dance.”


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presents the Clean Power Guide In partnership with Upstate House & Sustainable Hudson Valley

Join us Thursday, May 9 from 6-8pm at The Beverly Lounge in Kingston as we discuss renewable energy options in the Hudson Valley and celebrate the new Clean Power Guide - part of the Spring issue of Upstate House.

Be part of what’s happening in clean energy policy, technology, finance and innovation. Moderated by Chronogram Editor Brian Mahoney with a panel curated by Sustainable Hudson Valley.

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health & wellness Mountain bikers at the Storm King School train on campus trails and in the many nearby forests. Photo courtesy of the Storm King School

GAINING TRACTION ON ADHD MOUNTAIN BIKING CAN BE A FRESH-AIR APPROACH TO HELPING KIDS SUCCEED. By Wendy Kagan

R

ounded as a Buddha’s belly and crisscrossed with rugged trails, Storm King Mountain looms over the west bank of the Hudson River like a gatekeeper to highlands beauty. It’s a spot for dreamers and poets, hikers and adventurers—and now it is also the birthplace of a uniquely therapeutic summer mountain biking program. Focused Riding, a two-week program geared toward middle and high schoolers who have an attention deficit disorder or learning disability, is the brainchild of David Mendlewski, director of the academic support program at Storm King School (SKS), an international boarding and day school nestled in the mountain’s foothills. Mendlewski, who also coaches a mountain biking team at SKS, had a lightbulb moment two years ago while driving home from a training with the National Interscholastic Cycling Association (NICA). At the training, he had run into a colleague from another part of the state who enthused about how mountain biking was benefiting his 14-year-old son, who had been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). “He told me how mountain biking had helped his son focus in school and improved his organizational and time management skills—a really big step for him,” says 42 HEALTH & WELLNESS CHRONOGRAM 4/19

Mendlewski. “The idea came to me that I could combine my 20-plus years of working with kids with attention deficit disorders and learning disabilities with my lifelong passion for mountain biking to create a program that could help kids improve their focus in school and prepare for the upcoming school year.” Focused Riding had its first season last summer. Along with rides every day throughout the valley—from Stewart State Forest and Black Rock to Minnewaska State Park and Wyndham Mountain— the group of five kids also took time for yoga and mindfulness techniques, writing and reflection time, and academic and organizational skill-building, including reading under the guidance of an English teacher. The combination of physical and mental stimulation unlocked capabilities in the kids: They became more focused and better able to tackle the challenges in front of them. They also became skilled mountain bikers and had a lot of fun. “The intervention we provide, the mountain biking, seems to have a calming effect,” says Mendlewski. “The mind develops clarity as a result of the vigorous exercise, and the kids are not as intense or distracted as they were before. I also see an improvement in their personal engagement and interaction with each other. I’m very encouraged by the results so far.”

A Trail to a Brighter Future Mountain biking might seem like an unusual therapy for attention deficit disorder, especially when it is so easy in our culture to pop pills like Adderall and Ritalin to control its symptoms. Yet it is perhaps because these pills are so ubiquitous—Adderall has black-market popularity as a productivitybooster on college campuses, and can be addictive—that we also need natural, freshair alternatives. About 6.4 million American schoolchildren have a diagnosis of ADHD/ ADD, and its symptoms can include difficulty focusing and staying on task, absent-mindedness, irritability, mood swings, impulsivity, lack of restraint, and sometimes aggression. While exercise might not entirely replace pharmaceuticals for everyone, there is a growing body of research to support its effectiveness in relieving the effects of attention deficit disorders, which can impact a person’s quality of life, relationships, and ability to succeed in school and beyond. A 2018 review of 15 different studies found that exercise led to improvements in the attention and social behavior of children with ADHD/ADD, among a slew of other benefits. Experts like John Ratley, author of the book Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain


Letting the Best of the Kid Shine Through ADHD and ADD are often difficult diagnoses to make, and parents may realize that something is up with their child for years before arriving at a clinical definition. “I’m conservative about [making a diagnosis like this], because psychological problems with kids are often expressed in overlapping ways,” says Sandra Regis, a psychologist who, with her husband Mark Guido, has a private practice in Goshen and also works with kids at the Storm King School. “Hyperactive behaviors that appear to be ADHD might really be an expression of anxiety or other emotional issues. You can also have ADHD overlapping with a conduct disorder or learning disorder.” That’s why it’s important to get a thorough evaluation, Regis advises—whether it’s through a private psychiatrist or a school psychologist who, unbeknownst to the child, can visit the classroom to observe him or her in action and also meet with the child individually, using a rating scale to determine a diagnosis. Yet it is tricky terrain to medicalize a kid’s personality type, putting a clinical label on something as intangible as a child’s spirit. “Any provider in mental health services has to have that sitting on his or her shoulder,” says Regis. “How much of something is a disorder, and how much is just an expression of who they are?” Of course, a diagnosis is useful—even, some might argue, essential—if certain behaviors prevent a child from realizing their full potential and succeeding in school and in life. Some children will have social problems because a hallmark of ADHD is impulsivity, and social problems can lead to low self-esteem. A diagnosis can open up a world of options for treatment and support; often, a pharmaceutical solution is part of the equation. Take the case of one 16-year-old boy, Alex Gold from Red Hook. Gold (not his real name) started Adderall about three months ago after his parents suspected for years that ADD might be an issue that was holding him back. “He was always a little rambunctious,” says his father, “a little bit mischievous, not paying attention and sometimes disrupting class. He’s smart, so he picks things up quickly, but as he grew older we found that he had difficulty retaining interest in any particular thing. He might be athletically gifted, good

A C a wa V i s i fé r d t O in Wi ur K i nn ng in st g on

(Little, Brown and Company, 2008), have been touting the advantages of exercise for ADHD/ADD for decades, and healthcare providers are increasingly recommending physical activity of all kinds to help manage attention deficit disorders. Though many forms of exercise can calm the nervous system and help focus attention, biking might be particularly effective. An organization called the Specialized Foundation—which uses cycling to help kids achieve academic, health, and social success—sponsored a study in which 47 students, aged 11 to 14, rode bicycles outside for 30 minutes before school over a one-month period. The results showed positively altered brain activity in the kids, increased attention span, and boosted moods. Inspired after he read a 2010 article in Bicycling magazine called “Riding Is My Ritalin,” Specialized Foundation CEO Mike Sinyard—who has ADD himself, as does his son—now helps bring cycling programs to schools nationwide through the nonprofit’s grant-based Riding for Focus program. While Specialized uses road cycling, Mendlewski sees unique advantages in adding mountainous terrain to the equation. “When kids are mountain biking, they need to use a lot of focus and attention because there’s a lot going on,” he says. “If they’re riding on a trail at a moderate pace and all of a sudden there’s a turn ahead, they’re going to need to put all of that together in their mind and prepare for that turn. I teach kids that when you’re mountain biking you’re focusing on the horizon in front of you. You need to see everything because you need to know what’s coming up next.”

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Lifebridge Foundation, Mohonk Consultations, RiverTides & Mid Hudson UNA-USA Present:

Climate Action: A call for greater collaboration across communities The United Nations Sustainable Development Goal #13

This conversation will focus on successful efforts in climate action and the need to foster greater collaboration among regional organizations, governments and individuals engaged in the climate crisis.

Presenters include: Laura Weiland, Director of Omega’s Center for Sustainable Living Amanda LaValle, Coordinator of the Ulster Department of the Environment Dan Shornstein, Outreach and Education Coordinator at the Ashokan Center

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in one particular sport, but he’d lose interest and move on to the next thing.” Over the years, Gold’s doctors brushed aside his parents’ concerns and said he was fine. Yet when things worsened, the boy wasn’t focusing on academics, his attitude soured, and he was rude and disrespectful a lot of the time. “That was not the kind of a person we believed he really was,” says his dad. “So we took him for testing, and now the doctors say they could have missed something; there is probably some ADD here after all.” Once Gold started on Adderall, the change was dramatic. “His focus has increased, he does better in school, and the attitude and rudeness have largely gone away. It’s allowing the best of the kid to come through.” Road Map for a Challenging Course Putting a kid on medication isn’t easy for parents, who often worry about the child’s developing brain or their chances of instigating a substance abuse problem. “I don’t know if there is any clear evidence that this is true, but pharmaceuticals permeate our culture and it’s a legitimate concern,” says Regis. Gold’s parents are looking into switching him from Adderall to a newer drug called Vyvanse, which is metabolized in the stomach and not as habit-forming. Side effects are a concern as well; Adderall can in some cases cause stomach pain, loss of appetite, weight loss, a faster heart rate, and sleep problems. And some people complain that ADHD/ADD drugs have the effect of flattening or muting their personality, particularly with long-term use. Regis notes that while medications can be very helpful (though she cannot prescribe them herself, because she is not an MD), she likes to try alternatives such as mindfulness meditation, counseling, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). “With CBT, we’re talking about reprogramming the brain,” she explains. “For example, an ADHD kid who has gotten in trouble for blurting out something in class can feel very bad about it afterwards. I’ll ask the student, what are you saying in your head? They might say, ‘I’m a loser,’ ‘I get in trouble all the time,’ ‘My life sucks.’ Then we’ll go back over the situation. I try to help them find their own words and think about it differently: ‘It was just a mistake,’ ‘I’m only human,’ or ‘Next time I’ll try this instead.’ There are things we can do to help them with their struggles.” Interventions like the Storm King School’s mountain biking program can also be part of the toolkit. This year, the program will interweave the vigorous cycling sessions with a few more academic strategies, such as how to do research and orchestrate writing a paper. In a typical school setting, a teacher might give kids two weeks to write a paper, but a kid with ADHD or ADD will not know how to manage their time or might forget about the assignment altogether. “The teacher will come back and say, ‘OK, don’t forget that your papers are due tomorrow,’ and this kid will be like, ‘What paper?’—because there was no plan in place for them to follow through,” says Mendlewski. “We teach them how to use a plan and what that plan should include.” It all goes back to keeping your eyes on the horizon, critical for any mountain biker looking to tackle the road ahead. “One of the things I stress with my students is, yes, this stuff works, but you have to put the effort and energy into it,” says Mendlewski. “I can teach all the strategies in the world, but they’re not going to do anything for you unless you truly engage with them and use them to your advantage.” With grit and determination, the trail’s hard-won rewards are that much sweeter. Registration is open for “Focused Riding: Mountain Biking and Personal Development,” July 22–August 2, at the Storm King School. Boarding and day options available. Sks.org/focused-riding

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art of business

Pioneers of Regenerative Agriculture

HUDSON HEMP By Anne Pyburn Craig

A

t a pivotal moment in the history of a supercrop, Hudson Hemp is cultivating a long-term vision of a cannabis industry in which social justice, sustainability, and wellness are the gold standard. The woman-owned regenerative agriculture and research company, based at Old Mud Creek Farm in Columbia County, is gearing up to launch a line of CBD-based health and beauty products in 2019. It’s just one facet of the business, which lives at an intersection of agriculture and culture, stewardship and wellness. And with the legalization of industrial hemp in the 2018 Farm Bill, the scalability of their tactics just took a great leap forward. “I was very happy to see the bill passed to normalize hemp at the federal level,” says Benjamin Banks-Dobson, Hudson Hemp’s CEO and farm manager. “It will open up opportunities in parts of the country that desperately need a new staple crop, and it will enable us to reassess major supply chains for essentials like paper goods, food, fuel, and building materials.” Even in the wake of federal legalization, a faint whiff of stigma follows the subject of hemp. A non-psychoactive strain of

46 ART OF BUSINESS CHRONOGRAM 4/19

the cannabis plant, hemp was made illegal alongside its THC-containing cousin in 1937, after centuries of peaceful use of its fibers for paper, cordage, and fabric. (Unlike a tree, the hemp plant grows from seed to harvest in about three months.) More and more uses have been found in recent history: biofuels, heart-healthy foods and beverages, bioplastics, building materials, solvents, and a wide range of wellness products. Regenerative Hemp And if that weren’t enough to establish the plant’s cred as the ultimate Giving Tree, hemp is an ideal companion crop for organic growers. It requires little water and no pesticides and increases carbon and microbial content in soil to make it more fertile while removing contaminants. Hemp has even been used to remediate irradiated soil in Chernobyl. Like any crop, hemp can be grown using a wide variety of practices. Hudson Hemp is committed to the practice of regenerative agriculture, which builds up soil carbon. This beyond-organic production method imitates nature, minimizing waste through closedloop systems that recycle nutrients and water and increase biodiversity. In addition to its own production of “sun-grown hemp,”

Hudson Hemp sources its product from three affiliate research partners: Stone House Grain, Earth Born Gardens, and Sky Farm. Along with producing organic hemp oil distillate and CBD isolate for the booming wholesale market, Hudson Hemp is committed to the whole plant and its biodynamic properties. Partnerships with regenerative agriculture researchers Hudson Carbon and agricultural genomics company Phylos Bioscience position Hudson firmly on the leading edge of regenerative ag as well as of the emerging cannabis industry, which some fear will get swallowed up in profit-seeking and leave social and racial equity by the wayside. Billion-Dollar Track CBD products are at a curious juncture indeed. While the FDA maintains that the cannabinoid is a drug, and therefore an illegal additive to food or medicine, mounting scientific and massive anecdotal evidence indicates its safety and effectiveness for a host of health conditions. As a natural substance, cannabidiol interacts with the human body’s endocannabinoid system to promote homeostasis, offering relief anxiety, pain, and inflammation. Companies making specific health claims


Hudson Hemp’s crop at Old Mud Creek Farm. Photo by Jeremy Sachs-Michaels

have received warning letters, even as more states and countries move forward with outright medical marijuana legalization and research. But despite the murkiness, CBD oil is projected to become a billion-dollar market by 2020. When the New York Industrial Hemp Agricultural Research Initiative was expanded to include farmers in 2017, Hudson Hemp’s application was one of the first to be approved. They’ve collaborated with like-minded retailers on product development; products made with their CBD oil can be purchased through Alchemist Kitchen, (Plant Alchemy CBD Oil) Hudson Standard (Watermelon Chill Shrub), Cocorau (CBD raw cacao bites and adaptogenic herb powders), and the Elevated Apothecary line from Source Adage Fragrances. Banks-Dobson is excited to be moving into production with Hudson Hemp’s own Treaty line of wellness products. “It’s been going very well,” he says of the whole operation. “This is our second year of processing, the clean room is ready to go, and we expect to be launching product somewhere around March.” But he remains adamant that Hudson Hemp’s main focus will always be on the whole plant—and all

its many applications. “We’re thinking of putting a small hempcrete building on the property as a demonstration project. And we’re looking into decorticating the fiber from the stalks, which opens up a whole new range of possibilities.” According to Banks-Dobson, the Hudson Valley, with its once-again-growing ag sector, is well-positioned to benefit from the economic and ecological potential of cannabis cultivation. But then, so could the whole world if the word can be spread fast enough and far enough: The worst effects of climate change can still be avoided if farmers and land stewards widely adopt regenerative agricultural practices, and hemp delivers the goods in unique ways. “The industrial revolution and industrial agriculture had benefits for humans, but it’s been horrific for the environment,” says Banks-Dobson. “If we retool our systems and supply chains, rebuild with a focus on regenerative practice and use what we know about hemp, we might get this ship turned around yet.” Hudsonhemp.com Right, from top, the administrative team at Hudson Hemp: Benjamin Banks-Dobson; John Gilstrap; and Melany Dobson. Photos by Hilary Steadman 4/19 CHRONOGRAM ART OF BUSINESS 47


outdoors

Harlem Valley Rail Trail

THE LONG & WINDING PATH

SIGNIFICANT EXPANSIONS TO THE HUDSON VALLEY RAIL TRAIL SYSTEM By Anne Pyburn Craig

W

ith the Hudson Valley’s industrial history, the region is a prime breeding ground for adaptive reuse projects— factories turned artist lofts, warehouses rebuilt as community spaces, brickyards transformed into concert venues, and the like. But one most accessible facets of our industrial legacy is the region’s network of rail trails, and, with spring upon us, now is a fortuitous time to emerge from your winter hibernation and take to the trails. These recreational byways reclaim the land once cleared for railways, creating public spaces perfect for great hiking, biking, dogwalking, cross-country skiing, and snowshoeing adventures. The terrain is easy, much of it fully accessible, and the views are often glorious. And unlike a venture into the deep woods, you can often plan a route that takes you to fine food and drink, entertainment, and retail (yes, they probably will hold that gorgeous piece for you until you can drive back). 48 OUTDOORS CHRONOGRAM 4/19

But rail trails don’t just happen. The Walkway Over the Hudson was once just a gleam in the eye of a community organizer (shout-out to Fred Schaeffer!). Even creating trails that stay on solid ground requires a lot of negotiating, permitting, budgeting, and maintenance, much of the grunt work carried out by volunteers. This was especially true in the late ’80s and early ’90s, when the concept was in its infancy. The benefits, from present-day community health to keeping future transit options open via railbanking (the concept that trails could one day be re-converted to rails), are so clear that our rail trail system has grown by leaps and bounds. Federal Highway Administration funds are available to local governments via block grants under the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act of 2015, administered by the New York State Department of Transportation, and trail advocates have taken the opportunity to plan more miles of multi-use, non-motorized fun.


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50 OUTDOORS CHRONOGRAM 4/19

$10/vehicle Call (518) 537-4240 for more info or see friendsofclermont.org


Harlem Valley Rail Trail The Harlem Valley Rail Trail starts in Wassaic and offers a total of 15 paved miles through gorgeous Eastern Dutchess and Columbia Counties; towns to explore include Amenia, Millerton and Copake. Highlights include fine antiques at Blueberry Hill Galleries and the Millerton Antique Center, books and music at Oblong, a plethora of refreshments, and a state park with rustic camping. Currently, the trail is in two sections; with a gap between Millerton and Copake that requires navigating eight miles of country roads. But a connection is in progress. A $3.5 million grant received in 2016 from the Federal Highway Administration and the New York State Department of Transportation is fueling the construction of that stretch of trail, creating a 28-mile connector from Wassaic to Hillsdale in Columbia County. Organizers hope to ultimately finish the route out to Chatham, north of Hudson. The 18 miles north of Hillsdale are in various stages of development. Kingston Rail Trail In Ulster County, the Kingston Rail Trail will connect the county seat to the O&W Rail Trail in Hurley, which runs 12 miles south to Marbletown. From there, the Wallkill Valley rail trail runs east through Rosendale, New Paltz, and Gardiner. The Kingston connection is a paved 1.8-mile stretch being built by Ulster County with federal funds. The county has received design approval from the New York State DOT and is preparing final plans to go to bid, while working to acquire three permanent easements needed for the project. Construction is scheduled to start in mid-2019, with completion by the end of 2019. The long-range dream is an uninterrupted 35-mile trail from Kingston to Ellenville, rich in both railroad and D&H Canal history. Heritage Trail In Orange County, the same consulting and design firm (HVEA Engineers) is working with the county’s planning department and Department of Parks, Recreation, and Conservation on the Heritage Trail Extension, which would connect Middletown and Goshen via a 10-mile link, The county is ponying up 20 percent of the $2.9 million involved, with the rest coming from the FHA and state DOT. Permissions are still being finalized but the project will double the length of the existing Heritage Trail, which runs from the Village of Goshen south to Airplane Park in Monroe. Blazing a Trail for the Future All told, New York State currently has 110 rail trails totaling 1,152 miles, with another 683 miles of railbed identified as “potential.” The Empire State Trail, a plan laid out by Governor Andrew Cuomo in 2017 and funded to the tune of $200 million, includes joining the north-south Hudson River Valley Greenway with the east-west Erie Canalway, forming a 750-mile Empire State Trail that would be the largest multiuse, nonmotorized transit option in the US, connecting communities across 27 counties. When completed by the end of 2020, the Empire State Trail will be a continuous 750-mile route spanning the state from New York City to Canada and Buffalo to Albany. Rail trails, both current and future, will play a major role in the plan’s success. Ambitious? Yep. Also healthy, sustainable, and lots of fun. So get out on a rail trail, and you’ll understand why the expansion plans just keep...chugging along.

845-457-4082 718 River Road, Montgomery, NY

www.montgomeryveterinaryhospital.com

Dog Obedience Training: Starts April 27th: (4) 1-Hour sessions

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Regent Tours, Inc. Wendy Rothkopf 646 286 3430 wendy@vwti.com

EAT. PLAY. STAY. N EW S L E TTE R

Insider access on where to go and what to do, plus the best local food and drink, and the hottest houses on the market. Sign up today } chronogram.com/eatplaystay

4/19 CHRONOGRAM OUTDOORS 51


community pages

Rising From the Storm NEWBURGH By Anne Pyburn Craig Photos by John Garay

O

n May 15, 2018, the City of Newburgh was struck by a tornado. Two lives were lost to falling trees. In a bitterly ironic touch, the damage was worst on Liberty Street, the epicenter of the city’s revitalization. Roofs were ripped from two restaurants, thousands lost power for days. The next day, there was an epic picnic on Liberty Street. Rapper and poet Decora and Caffe Macchiato owner Jodi Cummings organized, and soon all and sundry were munching on shrimp, oysters, and steaks that would otherwise have gone bad. Barbecues sizzled, music played, people laughed and cried and began cleaning up. Less than three weeks later, the city hosted its Newburgh Illuminated Festival, filling the streets with delectable food, art, performance, and joy. “Twenty thousand people! Joyful faces everywhere, bands, fire dancers! We asked ourselves, how do we make it like this all the time?” says entrepreneur Michael Muyot, referencing the festival. 52 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 4/19


Carmela, Zach Jr., Giovanni, and Zachary Murry in front of the Dutch Reformed Church on Grand Street. Opposite top: Street art by Will Teran on the corner of Washington and Liberty, across from Washington’s Headquarters. Opposite bottom: Pitch Party for Awesome Newburgh Foundation at the Thornwillow Institute.

Shaking the Stigma An ambitious goal for any community, but to know the story of Newburgh is to know that this little city is no stranger to the storm. “Newburgh!” said an old friend when I happened to mention this story. “You do know it’s the worst city?” A few fast facts turned her head around, but the stigma is real. Named an AllAmerican City by Look magazine in 1952, Newburgh at midcentury was a wonder of industry and prosperity. That was before a city manager with policies so racist that the federal government overruled them, before urban “renewal” razed the waterfront shopping district, before industry left with a giant sucking sound to be replaced by faceless absentee landlords and crack cocaine. In 1979, Newburgh got another national spotlight—this time in Oui, as one of 10 “Towns Without Pity.” People fighting to rescue Newburgh in the late 20th century had a rough ride. Many never gave up. Her assets—the glorious

Newburgh Bay, the largest contiguous historic district in the state, lovely Downing Park, Washington’s Headquarters—have always inspired a love not easily foresworn, no matter the frustration and heartbreak. But it became increasingly clear that it was going to take more than a few angel investors or waterfront clubs to rescue the All-American City. Opportunity Flowing Now for the good news. Much, much more than that is going on. “Sally’s Fish Market is still thriving, 80-plus years old,” says Allison Cappella. “Commodore Chocolatier is in their third generation; so is Pete’s Hot Dogs. That’s off the very top of my head. And there are a whole lot of cool things happening on the streets around them. We’re changing neighborhoods one house at a time, getting them back on the tax rolls with Newburgh families living in them.” Cappella is the new executive director of

the Newburgh Community Land Bank, a nonprofit founded in 2012 that buys derelict properties from the city and partners with Habitat for Humanity Newburgh and RUPCO to make them livable. Many are abused Victorian gems; if this work were easy, it would have long since been done. “We often need to do lead or asbestos abatement, which are factors that discourage speculators from buying these properties and sitting on them,” Capella says. Once a space is safe, but before it’s resold, it may become a venue in the NCLB’s Artists in Vacancy program before the keys are handed over to new owners; the NCLB has the power to establish deed restrictions requiring renovation or owner occupancy. “A lot of conscious thought is going into preventing gentrification,” says Cappella. “We want everybody welcomed and mixed together. The strongest community is a diverse community. The most amazing feeling is seeing kids who are used to survival mode react to having clean, safe rooms of their own.” 4/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 53


SERVING

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& THE HUDSON VALLEY REGION FOR OVER

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LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT

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Commercial properties are marketed by A River of Opportunities, a project of the Strategic Economic Consortium, which partners with the Orange County Incubator to bring employers to the area. Their latest success is on Upper Broadway, where fitness apparel manufacturer Zielwear will employ 25 locals. “There are so many passionate people here,” says Muyot. “It’s a matter of building the channels for them.” Leveraging his background in sustainability, Muyot is organizing a green tech conference to be held June 17 to 21 at SUNY Orange in conjunction with the East by Northeast International Film Festival put together by author, actor, and director Robert Fontaine Jr,. Muyot has also created 12550 The Zine, a glossy, ad-free publication showcasing Newburgh’s progress. The first issue highlighted a diverse array of developments in the city’s creative renaissance: a film production jobs bootcamp, a new skate park drawing shredders from across the TriState area, and a Great Gatsby Gala held in Downing Park. The theme of the coming issue is Makers, and Muyot interviewed 27 of them. “We’ve just passed 1,400 submissions to the film festival,” he says. “We’re bringing visitors from everywhere. And when they go home, we’ll still be here training people for filmrelated and green tech jobs.” Makers of Change Underpinning the renaissance and undermining (at long last) Newburgh’s reputation as dangerous is a switch from zerotolerance to targeted policing. The loathed “jump-out squad” has been eliminated and the Community Progressive Response Team has taken its place; violent crime dropped to a historic low in 2018. “The police do popup street barbecues and walk around, play basketball with the kids,” says Muyot. “The good people aren’t afraid of them anymore.” All these factors and more are giving Newburgh’s revitalization serious traction at last. Luke Pontifell, founder of Thornwillow Press, set up shop in the Burgh in 2004 to have enough room for his fine bookbindery; he’s moving forward with plans to repurpose more industrial space into a Maker’s Village. Joseph Fratesi and Thomas Wright relocated their Atlas Industries from Brooklyn to a 55,000-square-foot Spring Street factory in 2013, creating studios for all kinds of creatives and a gallery/event space; they’ve got 32 tenants and are hosting a spring market over Mother’s Day weekend, celebrating the opening of their new 17 Spring Street Garden. VIP Partners LLC is converting its six lots into the William Street Hub, with 15,000 square feet of commercial space and 12 one-bedroom affordable apartments. Labor will be locally sourced.

From top: Justin Hastey and Rebecca Nissen at 2 Alice’s Coffee House; Marcelis, Maiya, Doris, Micah, and Courtland at Blacc Vanilla; Gena Wirth and Peter Adams at First United Methodist Church on Liberty Street in Newburgh. 4/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 55


From top: Yaakov Sullivan of Palate Wines & Spirits; Virginia Kasinski, director of Newburgh Urban Farm and Food Initiative; Nassar of Mike’s Convenience Store.

56 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 4/19

Down by the river—where, it must not be forgotten, there is a selection of restaurants with truly spectacular views—the renovated West Shore Railroad Depot, designed by the creator of Grand Central Station, is now home to eateries in the Cosimo’s restaurant family. Pizza Shop has been serving thin crust pan pizzas for eight years, with a new riverside patio; Hudson Taco, an eclectic taqueria crafting dishes like Korean BBQ short rib tacos from local ingredients and serving an exclusive corn lager from Newburgh Brewery. Up at the city’s northern gateway, hardcore bibliophiles are opening the Barking Goose Bookstore Bar & Cafe later this month, serving up craft beverages and topnotch coffee with the literature. Local book clubs are salivating. And you can shop the Newburgh Vintage Emporium, a passion project of weekenders-turnedfulltimers featuring 11,000 square feet of vintage, antique, and locally made treasures that’s a “Best of the Best” pick from Hudson Valley magazine. Beatrice “Bibi” Lorenzetti first drove down Newburgh’s wide, rolling Broadway just a couple of years ago, marveling at the blend of majesty and grit. Lorenzetti, a yoga teacher, and her drummer partner had been dreaming of someplace with room for a garden and easy access to mountains and water. “We loved that it was so gangster, almost an ’80s New York City feel, and found out that abandoned property was selling cheap. We decided to try an apartment first.” A month later, the right fixer-upper appeared; now, her Ashtanga Yoga and his music studio are realities. “We’ve been in Newburgh for a year now, and so much has changed,” she says. “The city sold 1,400 building permits this year! Liberty Street’s gone from two blocks of stores and restaurants to four. You walk around and you see homes being brought back to life all over the place.” Fittingly, the Tower of Victory—originally constructed to celebrate the centennial of the end of the Revolutionary War—will host a grand reopening on April 27, welcoming visitors at Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, the place where the Purple Heart medal was born. Come take in the five-star view and then hear some Fourth Saturday jazz at The Wherehouse. Come to the one-of-a-kind Motorcyclepedia Museum for Hudson Farm and Flea on April 6, or the Newburgh Illuminated Fashion Show on April 13. Sample the exquisite fare at the newly expanded Liberty Street Bistro, where CIA-trained chef Michael Kelly revels in his return to his Newburgh roots. Save June 1 for Newburgh Illuminated, bigger and better than ever this year. But whatever you do, do come witness the reinvention of Newburgh. What’s going on in this most diverse and beautiful all-American city of the Valley will give you fresh hope. “This community is so strong, and we have all walks of life around the table determining the vision,” says Cappella.” It’s the Little Engine that Could. People are feeling proud to live here again, and it’s an honor to be part of the transformation.”


h u ds o n va lley

HOUSE PARTS arc hitectural salvage

Thursday - Sunday / 11am - 5pm 159 Broadway Newburgh, NY 12550 hudsonvalleyhouseparts.com

Mount Saint Mary College www.msmc.edu

Ready for the next level?

Elevate your career with a degree from the Mount Explore your options at an upcoming admissions event! TRANSFER ADMISSIONS EVENT

Day and evening bachelor’s degree programs Wednesday, April 17 • 10 am–6 pm RSVP at msmc.edu/transferevent

GRADUATE PROGRAM SHOWCASE Master’s degree programs Wednesday, April 17 • 5–7 pm RSVP at msmc.edu/gradevent

330 Powell Avenue, Newburgh, NY 1-888-YES-MSMC 4/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 57


High-quality products with top-notch customer service. We bring over 30 years of experience in both residential & commercial contracting, & we bring that expertise to our community of customers.

Offering a simple, locally sourced menu focused around cured meats, & fine cheese. 10 rotating taps & specialty cocktails.

FAMILY-OWNED.

105 Liberty Street, Newburgh (845) 565-0169

msfairfax.com

199 Broadway, Newburgh · 845.562.5126 · haleshardware.com

Original Clothing for Original People

Liberty Street

Vintage

Newburgh

Mercantile Delightful Gifts and Custom Picture Framing

authentic vintage for men and women

75 BROADWAY NEWBURGH, NEW YORK

845-569-7266

89 Liberty Street, Newburgh, New York

Hours Tue-Fri 12-5:30, Sat 1-5

www.libertystreetvintage.com

WWW.NEWBURGHMERCANTILE.COM

HENDLEY

Interior Design and Decoration for Your Home

87 ann street newburgh ny info hendleyandco .com

 co

PILATES IS FOR EVERYBODY!

We work with each person individually and in small groups to help you achieve your fitness goals. Pilates is designed to improve physical strength, flexibility, and posture, and enhance mental awareness. 87 Liberty Street, Newburgh, NY 917-403-3136 Book an intro session: apgpilates.com

www.thenewburghpottery.com

102 South William Street, Newburgh In the Gallery through April 20th:

KEN BUTLER ‘Hybrid Visions’

Ken Butler Live Performance ‘Voices of Anxious Objects’ Saturday April 13th, 8pm $5

Gallery Hours: Sat/Sun 2pm-5pm and by appointment 917-520-8971 hollandtunnelart@gmail.com

58 COMMUNITY PAGES CHRONOGRAM 4/19


ATLAS SPRING MARKET! MAY 11, 10 - 7PM (GARDEN PARTY 5-7) MAY 12, 10 - 5PM 11 SPRING STREET NEWBURGH NY

Offering great wines and spirits at fair prices, and a treasure trove of rarities and surprises. 115 Liberty Street, Newburgh | (845) 419-8466

palatewines.com

Serving the Hudson Valley Since 2013

Over 45 dealers & 11,000 sq ft of shopping under one roof.

Americana Mid-Century Primitive American

Victorian Rare Collectables Lionel Trains

5006 Route 9W Newburgh, NY 12550 10AM - 6PM. Closed Mondays. 845-562-5200 We Buy Vintage Clothing, Collectables, & Antiques

SAVE THE DATE!

Vinyl Records Custom Farm Tables Local Makers & More!

Voted ‘Best Hudson Valley Antique Shop’

@newburghvintageemporium newburghvintageemporium.com

ALL PROCEEDS FROM SPECIAL EVENTS TO BENEFIT HUDSON VALLEY SEED & NEWBURGH URBAN FARM & FOOD INITIATIVE. 845-391-8855 // www.atlasnewburgh.com // atlasmarketnewburgh@gmail.com

www.newburghlibrary.org

Katrina Gordineer working on Beetlejuice the Musical Designed by David Korins

We create backdrops and sculptures in our 15,000 square foot studio located in Newburgh, NY, as well as painting built scenery for multiple production companies across the Tri-State area. scenicartstudios.com

Irina Portnyagina working on Anastasia National Tour Designed by Alexander Dodge

302 NORTH WATER STREET, NEWBURGH, NEW YORK • (845) 245-4648

@scenicartstudios

#scenicartstudios

4/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 59


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Sponsored

1. APG Pilates Newburgh

87 Liberty Street / (917) 403-3136 / Apgpilates.com Pilates is for everybody! Whether you’re new to Pilates or at an advanced level, at APG Pilates we work with each person individually and in small groups to help you achieve your personal goals.

2. Atlas Studios

11 Spring Street / (845) 391-8855 / Atlaseast.com Atlas East is a modern, loft style collective of artists' studios, in addition to the home base of Atlas Industries—a multidisciplinary design and manufacturing firm integrating interiors, furniture, and objects in a craft-based sensibility.

3. Catania, Mahon, Milligram & Rider

1 Corwin Court / (845) 565-1100 / Cmmrlegal.com The full range of legal services for businesses & individuals.

4. Cream Vintage & Consignment

118A Liberty Street / (845) 300-2190 Creamnewburgh.com/creamvintagenbny Not your typical vintage/ consignment boutique. Specializing in current high end clothing, shoes and accessories as well as everyday wear.

5. Cream Boutique Newburgh

101 Liberty Street (845) 245-4331 / Creamnewburgh.com Contemporary fashion boutique. Carrying the latest styles & trends, at affordable prices.

6. Design by Sue

128 Liberty Street (845) 561-2704 / Designbysue.com Your Source for Creative Solutions. Graphic Design, Copies, Printing, Wide Format, Signs, Website Design and Hosting Stained Glass, New Repair and Restoration.

7. FABHAUS

26 Liberty Street (845) 440-7090 / Fabhausbeacon.com Custom fabrication and engineering for brands, experiences, scenery, and creatives. Specializing in unconventional materials and digital fabrication.

8. Field and Vintage

Inside the Newburgh Vintage Emporium; Booth #89 5006, Route 9W / (914) 426-7360 / Fieldandvintage.com One-of-a kind curated collection of vintage home decor, found objects, textiles, art and furniture. Interior design and styling consulting service.

9. Goldsmith Denniston House B&B

227 Montgomery Street (845) 562-8076 / Dennistonbb.com The B&B, c.1820 is in the historic district, a short walk from Newburgh's waterfront. Breakfast is served in the elegant diningroom. There's WiFi, river views, patio, porches, and off-street parking.

10. Hales Hardware & Home Supplies

199 Broadway (845) 562-5126 / Haleshardware.com Hales Hardware & Home Supplies is a family-owned hardware store located in Newburgh, New York. The / owners have more than 30 years of experience in both residential and commercial contracting, and bring that expertise to their diverse community of customers. We are the first hardware shop the town has known in a decade, and we've gotten a great welcome. In return, we deliver high-quality products with top-notch customer service.

11. Hendley and Co

87 Ann Street (845) 784-4744 / Hendleyandco.com Hendley & Co is an interior design office and shop, pairing memories from yesterday with ideas of tomorrow. The office operates Monday-Friday and the shop Friday-Sunday.

12. Holland Tunnel Gallery

46 Chambers Street (917) 520-8971 / Hollandtunnelgallery.com A unique art space concept where a local and international crowd meets to enjoy art, music and performances.

13. Hudson Taco

27 South Water Street (845) 565-8226 / Hudsontaco.com Tapas style tacos and tequila by the Hudson in the Historic West Shore Train Station. We at Hudson Taco pride ourselves on using the freshest ingredients (local when in season) to create food that is bursting with flavor! Sip a delicious craft cocktail at our buzzing bar or enjoy a scenic meal on our enclosed patio. Don’t forget to try our famous empanada! Open seven days a week.

14. Hudson Valley House Parts

159 Broadway (518) 755-1913 / Hudsonvalleyhouseparts.com House parts including plumbing, lighting, doors of all kinds, window of all kinds, One-off specialty decor items, ironwork, mantles galore.

15. Jon Beer Contracting

45 Henry Avenue #1E (518) 588-9035 / Jonbeercontracting.com Jon Beer Contracting specializes in kitchens, bathrooms, custom carpentry, and restoration. We strive to deliver a quality product that is well designed and executed, providing use and happiness for years to come.

16. Liberty Street Bistro

97 Liberty Street (845) 562-3900 / Libertystreetbistro.com Chef/owner Michael Kelly's New American tasting menu restaurant inspired by French cooking techniques in a bistro setting.

17. Liberty Street Vintage

89 Liberty Street / Libertystreetvintage.com Original clothing for original people. Authentic vintage for men and women.

18. Motorcyclepedia Museum

250 Lake Street (845) 569-9065 / Motorcyclepediamuseum.org A motorcycle enthusiast’s paradise: 85,000 square feet of museum space. Over 600 Motorcycles. Motorcycles from 1897-Present. Military, Police and Harley Davidson galleries Rare vintage bikes such as a circa 1897 DeDion THREE Incredible Motordromes! Fun for the whole family!

19. Mount Saint Mary College

330 Powell Avenue / (845) 561-0800 / Msmc.edu We offer our students an affordable liberal arts education with strong academic undergraduate programsand three graduate programs. Our degree programs in business, education, the health professions, media studies, and the social sciences are linked to high career growth fields. Mount students excel in their chosen fields by selecting internships and study abroad experiences that add dimension and value to their education.

20. Ms. Fairfax

105 Liberty Street / (845) 565-0169 / Msfairfax.com Ms. Fairfax, located in the heart of the city of Newburgh, is open for lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch. Offering a simple, locally sourced menu focused around cured meats, and fine cheese. 10 rotating taps and specialty cocktails.

21. Newburgh Brewing Company

88 South Colden Street (845) 569-2337 / Newburghbrewing.com Craft brewery distributing beer to five states with a full restaurant on-site. (Open Wednesday through Sunday)

22. Newburgh Flour Shop

109 Liberty Street (845) 568-3400 / Newburghf lourshop.com Newburgh Flour Shop is a family-owned bakery located in downtown historic Newburgh. Part of the bustling Liberty Street Corridor, we specialize in artisanal breads, baked goods, pastries, and cakes.

23. Newburgh Free Library

124 Grand Street / (845) 563-3600 / Newburghlibrary.org Inform, inspire, and connect with all you expect at your library—plus high-speed internet, art, concerts, coding classes, learning, and community. The library you want, not what you remember.

24. Newburgh Illuminated Festival

Corner of Broadway and Liberty Street June 1, 2019 / Newburghilluminatedfestival.com The Newburgh Illuminated Festival is an event designed to celebrate the diversity and dynamism of our wonderful river city with a day of music, art, dance, poetry, food, and more. It brings people and families together to shine a light on the City of Newburgh to bring new people to the area, increased tourism, attract new businesses, and have a positive effect on our regional perception.

25. Newburgh Mercantile Gifts & Picture Framing 75 Broadway (845) 569-7266 / Newburghmercantile.com Founded in 2014, Newburgh Mercantile offers a collection of thoughtfully curated, delightful merchandise created locally and globally. Custom picture framing services are offered onsite.

26. Newburgh Vintage Emporium

5006 Route 9W (845) 562-5200 / Newburghvintageemporium.com

Located at the “crossroads of the Northeast” in Newburgh. Established in 2013, we are one of the Hudson Valley’s premiere destinations for vintage and antique furniture, home goods, furnishings and gifts.

27. North Plank Road Tavern

30 Plank Road (845) 562-5031 / Northplankroadtavern.com Fine dining restaurant, historic building, former speakeasy, tavern, local ingredients.

28. Oliver & Chatfield

42 Liberty Street / oliverandchatfield.com A modern day "General Store du Jour" with great design in mind!

29. Palate Wines and Spirits

115 Liberty Street (845) 419-8466 / Palatewines.com Palate Wines & Spirits strives to be two things above all else: A responsive and resourceful neighborhood retailer offering great wines and spirits at fair prices, and a treasure trove of rarities and surprises for those who have grown weary of all the same old brands and labels in all the same old places.

30. Pamela's On The Hudson

1 Park Place (845) 562-4505 / Pamelasonthehudson.com Located on the hidden waterfront. Modern American cuisine. Extensive wine list. Live music and special events. We're more than a restaurant, we are a lifestyle.

31. Pizza Shop

27 South Water Street (845) 565-7467 / Pizza-shop.com Indulge in our artisanal pizzas, fresh salads, and so much more in the Historic West Shore Train Station. Enjoy gorgeous views of the Hudson River from our outdoor patio which is also pet friendly. Bring the kids, they will love to watch the train go by! Open seven days a week.

32. Regal Bag Studios

302 North Water Street (845) 562-4922 / Regalbagstudios.com Beautiful artist's studios on the historic Newburgh waterfront.

33. Scenic Art Studios

302 North Water Street (845) 245-4648 / Scenicartstudios.com Scenic Art Studios creates backdrops and sculptures in their 15,000 square foot studio located in Newburgh, NY, as well as painting built scenery for multiple production companies across the Tri-State area.

34. Shapiro's Furniture Barn

71-75 Chambers Street (845) 562-8400 / Shapirosfurniturebarn.com Shapiro's Furniture Barn has been in business for more than 100 years in Newburgh. Originally, it was the largest horse auction mart in New York, before cars were invented. In 1938 we diversified and began to sell appliances and furniture. The showroom changed in 1952 to carry a wide selection of bedroom, living room, and dining room furniture, beautifully displayed in our 30,000-square-foot showroom. Today, we carry some of the most recognized names in furniture and mattresses. As we always say “A little out of the way, a lot less to pay.”

35. Stone Cottage Veterinary Hospital

154 Route 17K (845) 567-8740 / Vetnewburgh.com At Stone Cottage Veterinary Hospital, our focus is and always will be on delivering state-of-the-art medicine in a way that is warm, friendly and welcoming. It’s a difference that has made us the trusted veterinary provider to countless pet parents in Newburgh, the Hudson Valley, and the surrounding communities.

36. The Newburgh Pottery

102 South William Street (201) 741-3552 / Thenewburghpottery.com The Newburgh Pottery is a communal ceramics studio offering eight-week courses, weekly one-time workshops, and studio memberships for experienced potters and ceramicists who are looking for an affordable, low-hassle, stress-free place to do their work, and a community to be a part of.

37. Valuation Consultants Inc.

6 Front Street (845) 568-0600 / Vciny.com Valuation Consultants is a full-service local residential and commercial real estate appraisal company covering counties of Orange, Dutchess, Ulster, Rockland, Sullivan & Putnam in New York. This directory is a paid supplement.

4/19 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 61


On the morning of January 16, businessman Luis Martinez was arrested by agents of the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency outside his office in New Paltz. Martinez’s detention and possible deportation is part of a wave of recent crackdowns by ICE across Upstate New York.  His story is both distinctive and typical of undocumented residents, part of a larger narrative caught in the crosshairs of a bitter national debate on immigration.

Photo by Franco Vogt 62 FEATURE CHRONOGRAM 4/19


in collboration with

UNDOCUMENTED IN THE HUDSON VALLEY The Luis Martinez Story By Michael Frank

L

uis Martinez was born in Mexico in 1979. His mother, Maria Raymundo, was married, and had another younger son, Jesus. When Martinez was eight and Jesus was six, her husband was murdered by the Mexican mafia while the family attended a wedding. Terrified the mafia would come for her next, she took her two boys and fled to the US to claim asylum, which she was granted— but her sons were not. They had to enter the laborious process toward getting green cards. The family was poor and moved first to Florida, and eventually to New Paltz, in the heart of the Hudson Valley. They worked and lived on Dressel Farms, south of town, picking apples and strawberries. Both brothers went to New Paltz High School and Raymundo remarried and gave birth to two more sons. Martinez never got full citizenship, but because he came to the US as a child, didn’t behave like a foreigner. His half-brother, Sergio Raymundo, said “America is his home. We’re New Paltz boys. This is our town.” This story, however, isn’t just about Martinez, who has a wife and three US-born children, ages 11, 12, and 16. It is about how ICE’s actions have put a chill on the Mid-Hudson Valley immigrant population, and how a single arrest has a profound impact on a community. We talked to dozens of people who know Martinez well beyond the bounds of New Paltz, and we kept meeting undocumented, DACA, green card holders, and citizens who had met him, befriended him, and worked with Martinez.

While we weren’t able to meet with Martinez in person (ICE doesn’t make easy for journalists to speak with detainees), we learned he’s more than socially influential. He’s cast an outsize economic shadow for an undocumented immigrant. While the Center for the New American Economy shows that immigrants nationally are 28 percent more likely to be entrepreneurs than natives and that in New York’s 19th Congressional District they contribute $460 million annually to the local tax base, Martinez is a bigger fish than most. His development firm, Lalo Group, has construction projects in four of the five boroughs of New York City. While staff at his New Paltz office were gunshy about talking to the press in the wake of Martinez’s arrest, the company employs dozens of people at its New York City job sites as well as in projects closer to home, such as at Zero Place, a high-tech geothermal and solarpowered multi-use complex in New Paltz. The project faced significant headwinds from some town elders who like the village of 7,000 to stay relatively sleepy. Nonetheless, it eventually passed village planning board approval, and Martinez himself took a minority financial stake. Construction has just begun. So, partly people know Martinez because of his work, and partly because he’s a local guy made good. Three weeks after Martinez was detained, nearly 300 people crowded into yet another one of Martinez’s businesses, La Charla, a Mexican restaurant on Main Street in New Paltz. Well-wishers wrote notes on

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heart-shaped cutouts while sipping beer and margaritas. With Valentine’s Day looming, hundreds of the cards were packed into banker’s boxes and hauled by a group of Martinez’s friends to the Orange County Correctional Facility, in Goshen, where he’s in detention. The boxes arrived on February 13, just in time for the first Valentine’s Day Martinez has spent apart from his wife, Tina, since they met 19 years ago. A few days later, Tina said she was astonished by the community support. One of her friends, Alex Baer, said Tina is a lot more introverted than her husband. Tina said that before the event for Luis, she never quite felt comfortable in New Paltz, “Like we were invisible.” Their eldest child, 16-year-old Sharia, said the outpouring made her mother feel like she was finally welcome. “With how hard this situation is,” Sharia said, “That night lifted everyone’s spirits.” A Pattern Under Trump ICE’s detention of Martinez follows a pattern of ignoring an immigrant’s legal status. Martinez is pursuing what’s known as a U Visa, a special form of protection—but it didn’t shield him from ICE. In the late 1990s, peak gang violence in the US spurred Congress to pass the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act in 2000. Offering a kind of amnesty, this law created the U Visa, among a few other forms of deportation protection. To be eligible for a U Visa, in exchange for coming forward and giving evidence as well as testifying against criminal gangs, victims would gain some immunity from deportation, including help getting a green card and working toward citizenship. Martinez’s case is especially strong. In 1999, he witnessed the gangland killing of his brother, Jesus, in Newburgh. Jesus wasn’t the target: The leader of a Mexican gang known as La M was being pursued by a rival gang, but Jesus caught the bullet instead. Subsequent to the murder, Martinez helped the police. He would become eligible for the visa a year later, after Congressional passage, but he only learned of it, and applied, in 2016. Nevertheless, since Trump’s January 25, 2017 executive order, ICE is regularly detaining every class of citizenship seeker, including green card holders and other applicants. Sarah Pierce, an analyst at the nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute in Washington, said Trump’s ICE doesn’t seem to care about pending visas. “In the past ICE would give deference, by closing removal proceedings.” Today, however, she said, “Just because you have that piece of paper doesn’t mean you’re protected.” Lee Wang, staff attorney with the advocacy group, the Immigrant Defense Project, paints Trump’s ICE in clear contrast to Obama’s ICE. “Obama was no saint on deportations, 64 FEATURE CHRONOGRAM 4/19

but later in his presidency ICE prioritized arrests of people with a serious criminal history, who posed a threat to public safety,” Wang said, referring to an ICE program known as Priority Enforcement, which focused specifically on higher-level criminals and known gang affiliation. But when Trump came to power, ICE reinstated an earlier Obama program called Secure Communities. The system cross-checks anyone arrested for any form of crime against a national database, and ICE is now attempting to arrest everyone who crops up, regardless of the level of offense. That’s resulted in the highest rates of detention since ICE was created in the wake of 9/11, with an average of roughly 50,000 detainees per month as of early 2019. Last year the total number of arrests hit 159,000, an 11-percent increase compared to 2017 and a 30-percent increase compared to 2016, according to ICE’s 2018 fiscal year report. (A larger percentage of those arrested wound up detained, too, and a study by the New York Times shows that as much as 71 percent of these detainees wound up in private, forprofit prisons.)

“The idea is to impose constant terror and, if you’re not yet a citizen, to make you wonder, ‘Is it safe to go to the hospital? Is it safe to take my kids to school?’ It’s very deliberate.” —Lee Wang “They’re being purposefully indiscriminate,” Wang continued, characterizing the “dragnet” approach of ICE since Trump took office. “The order said to deport people to the fullest extent practicable. What does that mean for the millions of people who have a green card, who actually have documentation?” In fact IDP’s 2017 data shows that 20 percent of people targeted by ICE in New York had some form of legal status. There’s further confusion around what ICE deems criminal behavior, too.

Syracuse University’s Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) crunches 250 million government documents every month, all in the study of US immigration patterns. A basic sift of one recent posting shows that since 2017, fewer than five percent of the people that courts are issuing orders of deportation to have committed a serious crime, while during Obama’s eight years in office that average was just shy of 15 percent. But what exactly is a “serious” crime? According to TRAC’s co-founder, Susan Long, nobody knows what ICE’s terms mean. Long said, for instance, crossing the border is considered a civil violation. “Under immigration law that’s not criminal activity, but that’s not how ICE defines it.” According to Long, ICE frequently changes its own rules, “And just the suspicion of criminal activity is sometimes the basis for seeking a deportation order. ICE was bad under Obama and they’ve gotten worse during Trump,” she said. The Case Against Martinez We reached out to ICE to find out the nature of Martinez’s detention. We were trying to confirm what we already learned from his wife, Tina. She explained that when Martinez and his brother Jesus were minors, their mother would bring them back to Mexico when she went home to visit her parents. This was illegal, because if you’re in pursuit of a green card, which both her boys were, you cannot leave the country without special permission. To avoid voiding their legal status, Maria Raymundo would smuggle her sons back into the US after these vacations to Mexico. On one such crossing in 1997, Martinez, then 18, was caught and deported for violating the terms of his agreement with the US government. But Tina explains that Mexico wasn’t Martinez’s home, and at the time it cost a mere $25 to hire a “coyote” to smuggle him back into the US. In 2002, Martinez was once again deported. By then, he and Tina already had their first child, Sharia. Martinez had been working with an attorney, trying to clear up his case and get back on track to apply for citizenship, but the lawyer turned out to be unscrupulous and never alerted Martinez that ICE had called him in for an interview. Instead, the lawyer ignored the letter, and by the time Martinez knew about it, ICE’s request had morphed into a final order of deportation. After that deportation Martinez again reentered the US illegally. We asked ICE about Martinez’s case because we wanted to know whether the agency was first checking on his, or other detainees’ U Visa application or green card status before arrest. What exactly is their process or priority?


A rally in support of Luis Martinez on Main Street in New Paltz on February 16. Photo by Michael Frank

ICE never responded to this request, and Long said that even frequent Freedom of Information requests that seek clarity on who ICE tries to detain at jails— information the agency used to release— have been stonewalled, prompting TRAC’s most recent lawsuit, one of three pending against the agency. Who’s a Target? Daniel Valdez is friends with Luis Martinez and, like him, was smuggled into the US as a child. He said that what happened to Martinez is exactly what he feared would happen to him, but, unlike Martinez, Valdez began his green card process decades ago and didn’t violate it. Still, he is terrified of Trump. “The day of the Muslim ban I was like, ‘Right, they’re coming for us next.’” Valdez’s reaction was to immediately begin the process to transition from having a green card to becoming a citizen, which he’s just achieved. However, he said he still feels afraid. IDP’s Wang said that fear is no accident. “The idea is to impose constant terror,” she said. “And if you’re not yet a citizen, to make you wonder, ‘Is it safe to go to the hospital? Is it safe to take my kids to school?’ It’s very deliberate.” And Valdez’s fear was apparently justified, because while he was still going through the final stages of becoming a US citizen, according to an ACLU lawsuit against ICE in Massachusetts, the agency was going after immigrants who were in his same situation. The suit alleges that ICE conspired with a local office of US Citizenship

and Immigration Services. The latter is responsible for processing immigrants who are complying with federal law. Despite the fact that USCIS is not a law enforcement agency, the ACLU claims that in both Rhode Island and Massachusetts, couples who were appearing at offices to establish that they were married (where one half of a couple was an immigrant, the other a US citizen), were instead interrupted by ICE, and the immigrant in the couple was detained. The suit further claims that USCIS was colluding with ICE to help facilitate these arrests. This resulted in 17 detentions, according to the ACLU suit. Besides the crackdown, another aspect of the suit shows that ICE was aware that publicity around this practice looked bad. The ACLU suit includes an email exchange between an ICE official and the USCIS office requesting widely spaced scheduling, since simultaneous arrests “has the potential to be a trigger for negative media interests, as we have seen in the past.” ICE doesn’t like bad PR, but recent arrests of immigrants in the Hudson Valley have put the agency on a collision course with unfavorable media coverage. The Immigrant Defense Project’s recent deep dive into ICE actions at courthouses shines a bright light on these events. IDP’s Wang said ICE actions at courthouses across New York State are up 1,700 percent in 2018 compared to 2016. The local numbers may seem less startling. There were four courthouse arrests in Ulster County in 2018, compared to one in 2017. Eight courthouse arrests in Orange County,

up from zero in 2017. And 13 in Westchester in 2018, compared to four in 2017. But each individual arrest sends ripples through the community. In March 2017, shortly after Trump signed his executive order, New Paltz resident Joel Guerrero was detained by ICE during his regular, biannual check-in with the agency in Manhattan. The case drew national media attention in part because Guerrero is a green card holder and is married to an American. ICE said the green card had been rescinded in 2011 because of a felony conviction for marijuana. His lawyer, Daniel Green, successfully argued that there was never any such felony, that the crime had been a misdemeanor. Guerrero was jailed for 10 weeks and was released by ICE. He still has a green card. Joel’s wife, Jessica Guerrero, believes New Paltz residents have made a difference in his case so far. “A hundred people wrote letters and inundated our politicians’ phone lines,” she said. The activism put pressure on then Congressman John Faso as well as Assemblyman Kevin Cahill, and she believes it eventually helped lead to the release of her husband shortly before the birth of their first son. Guerrero is currently awaiting a judge’s decision on whether or not to vacate his final order of deportation and to allow him to pursue full citizenship status. Local activism may only go so far, however. In January 2018, then-acting ICE director Thomas Homan released guidelines for how ICE was supposed to perform its duties in and around courtrooms—and that ICE was taking these actions because, in part, 4/19 CHRONOGRAM FEATURE 65


What’s Your Status? Green Card Technically a Permanent Legal Resident, with the right to work, some benefits, and obtain full citizenship. Violating the terms of a green card, such as breaking some laws, can void your rights.

Working Papers There are multiple levels of work visas in the United States, and they vary widely in what jobs they are meant for, who can obtain them, and how long they last. As with all other levels of documentation, violating the law, and/or travel outside the US without special permission, can void your visa.

DACA Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival was an executive order established by President Obama in 2012. It allowed some people who were under 31 on June 15 of that year to apply. Additionally, you would have had to arrive in the US before the age of 16 and had continuously resided in the US since June 15, 2007. There are further rules around education, military status, and other factors. Committing certain misdemeanors or a felony can cause a DACA recipient to lose those protections, including the right to work and having a driver’s license, and such a crime would also put them at risk of deportation. While Trump rescinded DACA September 5, 2017, barring new applicants, that order has stalled in federal court, so current DACA recipients can still renew every two years.

Undocumented Anyone who is not legally residing in the US. Although the recent surge at the US-Mexico border may eventually change the makeup of who is in the US without some form of documentation, according to the Center for Migration Studies, the vast majority of undocumented residents in the US arrived by plane and overstayed their tourist, work, or education visas. 66 FEATURE CHRONOGRAM 4/19

some towns and cities were showing an “unwillingness…to cooperate with ICE in the transfer of custody of aliens from their prisons and jails.” Indeed this past November, in the wake of the Homan memo, Matthew Rojas, a 23-year-old DACA recipient, was arrested by three ICE agents in New Paltz while walking with a friend to town Justice Court to plead not guilty to an October charge of possession of a controlled substance. In the wake of his arrest, Rojas’s charge was quickly reduced by the county attorney general to disorderly conduct. According to Rojas’s attorney, Mariann Connolly, ICE’s action was preemptive, because it precluded adjudication or even the chance for the sentence reduction that came after his arrest. Notably, as in Guerrero’s case and the aforementioned ACLU lawsuit, ICE does this often, detaining people and denying due process based on the premise that being in the US under tenuous legal status gives them that right. New Paltz rallied behind Rojas, with his friends promoting twice-weekly street protests and raves at town bars Snug’s Tavern and Bacchus—the latter as fundraisers for Rojas’s legal fees. His detention was shortlived, but his future legal status is tenuous. Whether he can reapply for DACA in the wake of this arrest is an open question. As for Martinez’s arrest, reaction among those in citizenship limbo has been swift. One local DACA recipient, an 18-yearold who is friends with Sharia (and who, for obvious reasons already laid out in this piece, fears any form of attribution) said she knows the situation is “heartbreaking. Especially for Sharia’s younger siblings. They’re so dependent and used to being with both parents. This isn’t an easy separation to ease into. It’s an abrupt world-flipper.” Her mother, who is undocumented, said she didn’t even want her daughter to know about Martinez’s arrest; she said she’s been trying to keep her daughter calm after she found out about her friend’s father. She focuses on the pragmatic rather than dwelling on the constant threats to her own family. “We are immigrants,” she said. “I work. My husband works. Our kids go to school. It’s all we can do.” Another undocumented community member went to the February event for Martinez. He said he’s never driven to his job in Newburgh because he fears getting pulled over. He knows how to drive but can’t get a license because of his status. And while he was happy to see so many people rallying for Martinez, he said, “Every day I’m very afraid.” The Case for the U Visa Jesus Martinez, Luis’s kid brother, was 18 when he was murdered. It was May 9, 1999. Mother’s Day. Tina Martinez said that according to her husband, Luis, Jesus, and another man

named Hector Lima had been out at a party and Luis offered to give Lima a ride home to his apartment in Newburgh. Tina said when they arrived, the three men all piled out of Luis’s car to say their goodbyes at the apartment when Jesus spotted a car racing by with a gunman leaning out of the passenger side. On impulse, Jesus shoved both his brother and Lima to the ground. “When they got up Luis looked at Jesus and realized he’d been shot through the skull,” Tina said, still profoundly shaken by what her husband witnessed. Detective Rolando Zapata had only recently risen to working with the gang unit for the Newburgh Police in 1999. Zapata is 61 now and retired, but he described the events of the murder very clearly. He said this case “sticks in the back of [his] head,” and that he wants it solved. It’s why, though he rarely talks to the media, he agreed to discuss Jesus Martinez’s murder. Zapata said Luis and Jesus had been out the night before the murder at the invitation of Lima. “As far as they knew this guy was just someone cool. They’d met him at a party a few weeks before,” Zapata said. But Lima wasn’t just another guy. He was the leader of a Mexican crew called La M, and the brothers, naive to mob culture, were clueless about how much danger that meant for them. Jesus and Luis eventually realized that the party was full of mobsters. They wanted to leave and offered to give Lima a lift home to his apartment in Newburgh. “That apartment had already been the scene of numerous attempts on Lima’s life. The rival gang wanted him dead,” Detective Zapata said. Detective Zapata said one of the hardest moments of his career was having to visit Maria Raymundo on the Mother’s Day that her son was murdered. “I went to his house, to speak to his mother. She showed me a little gift that was still wrapped, that he was going to give her that day,” he said. “It just tore my heartstrings.” Zapata, who has since written a letter to ICE at the request of Martinez’s attorney, said no witness to a crime ever worked harder for him during his 28-year career. In 2000, a tip to Zapata about Jesus’s murder led to the arrest and eventual deportation of La M gang leader Lima for unlawful criminal possession of a handgun and a 12-gauge shotgun. Zapata is careful not to confirm that this tip came directly from Martinez. Zapata can’t. Jesus’s murder is still an open case—in the life of Martinez and his mother, it’s more like an open wound. And there’s a deep irony for the family that Martinez’s cooperation with Zapata helped deport the leader of a gang, and now he faces the same fate despite his help. Sharia Martinez said her father’s detention 20 years later is a ghostly echo for her grandmother, Maria Raymundo. “First my uncle, now my dad. It’s really


hard for my grandma.” Sharia said. “It’s like she’s reliving the death of Jesus all over again.” A Hole in the Community New Paltz’s citizens have in part rallied around one of their own because he’s built an outsized reputation. Martinez has given broadly. He’s had an active financial and personal presence in the Chamber of Commerce, in St. Joseph’s Church, in working the Taste of New Paltz, in helping the youth basketball and soccer leagues, and in financial support of the Phillies Bridge Project, which in part donates more than four tons of food each year to Healthy Ulster to provide fresh produce to poorer community members in need. Treasurer Terence Ward said, “He told me he was quite familiar with the project and the food justice work. One year when the budget was tight he donated $1,000 on the spot.” In ICE’s eyes, however, Martinez is typical. He got a misdemeanor DUI in July of 2014 in New York City. He didn’t post bail, which would have triggered a court date, which in turn might have raised a flag to ICE about that date, giving them the chance to detain and deport him a third time. A pending New York State law may make it harder for ICE to arrest people at court, but such a law cannot restrict community arrests; and any civil arrest by local or state police will still include fingerprinting and, likely, running those prints will ping ICE’s system. Recently elected Ulster County Sheriff Juan Figueroa said when an entire community is afraid to testify about a crime, every town and city is at risk. “Organized crime in our country— any form of the mob—whether they were Irish or Italian, had power to scare their own people, to prevent them from talking to their own government,” he said, drawing a parallel to ICE’s intimidation tactics. “If they don’t want to talk to me and they’re a witness to a homicide, that puts us all in danger.” Figueroa said forcing people into hiding “is the lifeblood of organized crime.” Cecelia Friedman Levin, senior policy counsel at Asista, an organization that advises immigration attorneys, seconded that assessment, saying, “The Trump Administration’s focus on increased enforcement has caused a chilling effect on survivors’ willingness to come forward and seek protection.”

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The Cost You don’t have to be an expert on immigration law, like Levin, to see what’s happening. One immigrant who has a work visa and is trying to get a green card said he is afraid for himself and his community. He lives about 20 miles from New Paltz but heard about Martinez’s arrest. “People are trying to be more quiet. They’re getting more tight. You can feel it. They won’t talk to strangers, you can tell,” he said, refusing to offer his name for the record. He thought that would be unwise, but he offered that he has a master’s degree in business administration, and so he doesn’t just look at the emotion of the situation. “This man has actually been employing people,” he said, referring to Martinez’s Lalo Group. “He has been an active member of his community. They’ve decided to cost taxpayers money by filling jails with people rather than collecting taxes from them. Now that person isn’t paying his mortgage, isn’t funding the schools that are teaching his American kids, so now we can’t pay the teachers.” He continued, laughing ruefully, “Is this really what MAGA is all about? Economically, if you’ve been trained like me, you have to scratch your head because it’s the stupidest idea. It’s not just mean. It’s absurd.” This story is a collaboration with The River, a digital Hudson Valley newsroom covering regional topics of national importance. Sign up for The River’s weekly newsletter at Therivernewsroom.com. 4/19 CHRONOGRAM FEATURE 67


arts profile

Rhyme & Punishment A Conversation with Gretchen Primack By Jane Vick Photo by Franco Vogt

O

n a snowy February morning, I drive down Dug Hill Road, Hurley, through bare trees and white fields, to the home of poet Gretchen Primack. She’s just returned from Costa Rica, where, among other things, she’s been working on her Spanish. I am greeted at the door by a brightly smiling Primack, two dogs, and more cats than I can count. The house is warmed by a magnificent wood stove and smells of the scones Primack is heating up for us. After a bit of preliminary conversation, and many pet introductions (I think I met the father of all cats, an ancient and brilliant orange creature rumored to run with coyotes), we sit down to scones, tea, and a discussion of Visiting Days, her collection of poems written from the perspective of incarcerated men, being released this month by Willow Books. Primack started her work behind bars with the Bard Prison Initiative, initially tutoring but quickly turning to teaching, and then working as the psych coordinator for Eastern Correctional Facility in Napanoch, BPI’s largest campus, and the one which offers a full BA program. Primack left in 2013, and is now at Shawangunk

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Correctional Facility in Wallkill, where she teaches creative writing. Visiting Days began to manifest during the transition between her work with BPI and SCF, as an organic method of processing. It has taken its final shape as a searing collection of direct and gripping poetry. Visiting Days falls perfectly between a bitter pill and a ray of hope. Its honesty leaves no room for evasion or misinterpretation, and its content is pressing and crucial. This is a collection of poems that will make you ache for humanity, and hopefully inspire you to take further steps to better it. During the course of my conversation with Primack, I learned a great deal about ways in which every community member can engage in improving the prison systems, gearing them toward betterment rather than psychological shaming. If you’d like to learn more about ways you can get involved, please email me at janevick07@gmail.com, and I will happily direct you to an organization that suits your intentions. Gretchen Primack will read from Visiting Days on April 13 at 5pm at the Woodstock Community Center.


Jane Vick: Visiting Days is exceptional. It’s the bitter medicine we need, and still so beautiful for all of its difficulty. When you started working in prisons, did you know a collection of poems was going to come out of it? Gretchen Primack: When I started, I didn’t think about writing at all. I didn’t start this until I’d left BPI, and had a break from doing the work entirely. While I was there, people would ask me if I was writing about it, and I would say no, this is my work, it’s not fodder for my own personal writing. But, when I left, they just started pouring out. And I do think it’s important to address issues of incarceration in this country, through any media possible. That said, the urge to write about it was bigger than an analytical decision. They sort of, pushed out of me. JV: I love that. GP: And I have a lot of friends who are now, or were formerly, incarcerated. JV: Really? As a result of this work? GP: Oh yeah. Because when they get out they contact me, and we get together. Not always, I mean, some of them might friend me on Facebook, but some of them, we get together, and they’ve become close friends. JV: That’s wonderful. And as an ally for these men while they’re in prison, how does the relationship after they’re released unfold? GP: I’m an ally, yes, but it’s on mutual terms, the way it is in any friendship. JV: Right, so it’s a friendship. You’re not the patron Saint of Incarcerated Men, or anything like that. There’s mutual respect. You’re not a benefactor. GP: Exactly. It’s hey, you’re a person, I’m a person, let’s have lunch. JV: Right, I’ll give you a scone and introduce you to my cats. That’s so awesome. And it’s another wonderful representation of what I notice in Visiting Days, which is the voice that you return to these men, in the face of the stripping of agency that these institutions very intentionally practice. You offer these people—I know these are fictional characters, but clearly grounded in very real experiences—the chance to reclaim their humanity. You rehumanize them. GP: That’s the intention.

JV: And it sounds like that’s how you are once they’ve left prison as well. It’s saying you are a person, in the world, and we have a relationship that could be good or bad, regardless of this part of your history. It’s the rehumanizing of a person who should never have been dehumanized in the first place. GP: Right, the individualizing. Because I think human beings tend to group into a faceless mass that we don’t understand, or which it benefits us to not understand. So, if we’re going to continue this mass incarceration, we need to see incarcerated men and women as faceless masses. If we’re going to vilify undocumented people, then we need to see them as nameless, faceless masses. We can’t see them as an individual. JV: This work happened organically, for you, you didn’t approach it with the intention of re-humanizing the inmates, so how did that aspect come out of it? GP: Because they are individuals. When I write about them, in fictional or real ways, I’m writing about individuals, and I want that perspective to be put into the world. So, it’s not that I try to put individualism on them; they are individuals. And then the idea is that, when the poems go into the world, people who might not have seen them that way will see that. JV: And what are some things about these people that were not individual? What are some things that you noticed, that are the same? GP: Well, that becomes a political and sociological question, because what you notice is the racial—the insane racial makeup. [Charles the cat jumps into her lap and she immediately begins to scratch his ears.] When I am walking down the hall to the classroom, escorted by an officer, I am intensely aware of who’s coming toward me, which is a sea of black and brown. And I just want to scream. But I can’t scream, I have to do my work. But to see it, is to not believe that people are accepting it. Because it’s not physically possible that this is the criminal makeup. It’s literally not possible. So, whether we’re in that environment or outside of that environment and knowing about it, the fact that we all are just allowing this is preposterous. So that’s something you notice. You notice the racial makeup of the group.

EDITOR’S SELECT SERIES

VISITING DAYS POEMS

GRETCHEN PRIMACK

visiting_days_final_FC.indd 1

12/19/18 11:32 AM

Papa G (B3) Fathers are not allowed to love I loved anyway. He was the moment that made my heart announce itself. But he slipped under the black rock as if I’d never loved at all. Took time but I found that devil Who pushed him under. Found him and pushed him under, his mouth round as a zero. I pushed him so far under the world his body was hardly found. They found me guilty. I found me.

From Visiting Days (Willow Books) by Gretchen Primack

JV: Right. The brutal reality of racial profiling and targeting. GP: Right, and who they’re choosing to examine, because every community has rampant drug use, but who came to Oberlin and arrested us? 4/19 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 69


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JV: Right, I had a boyfriend in college who sold a lot of drugs, and everyone knew, but he was white and from New England, so nobody bothered him. But if he were black, he probably would have gotten expelled, and even arrested.

JV: You have a line in Visiting Days which really stood out to me: “this place is ugly because you are ugly.” It’s so direct, and so brutal. That’s what makes this work so important, that it communicates the reality of what’s happening to the men and women in prisons. Because people have to know, before they can respond. So how can we use this brutality as a catalyst for change?

Photo: “Fox” by show judge Denis Curtis

GP: Yeah, I think, as with any issue, there are a lot of avenues. It’s important to know as much as you can. What organizations attend to these issues, what bills can be voted on, so forth. And then there are things like writing to incarcerated people, or raising and donating funds to different educational programs. There are so many opportunities to volunteer, to raise funds and awareness, to employ inmates hoping for clemency, or recently released inmates, and so on. There are so many things that can be done, so the more educated we are about the issue, and the more fired up we get, the more will be done. JV: Right. The more we know, the more we can do, the more we can change. GP: Exactly. JV: A triumph of this work is how each of these poems opens a door, behind which is a human being in prison. And that is a pathway for people to begin understanding “Oh, this ‘inmate’ is a human being, and I, too, am a human being, except I have all of this freedom and opportunity.” It’s that kind of awareness that initiates the process of doing our part. Was this what you sought to offer with this work? I know you said it came out naturally, as a way of processing your experiences, but in choosing to offer it to the community, what is your intention?

MarkWilson GP’19

Unstructured Structures

Through May 5, 2019 Artist talk: April 4, 7 p.m. q85008, digital image on canvas, 2013

11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, ct | 860.435.3663 | hotchkiss.org/arts 70 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 4/19

GP: It started, as I said, as a very organic process. But when it became clear to me that I wanted it to be a full-length book, then the idea of what I wanted to communicate began to come in more. Really, it’s about raising consciousness. Because, again, how people want to engage themselves around this issue is very personal. I would not say, just as with Kind [Primack’s book of poems around animal rights and veganism, published by Post Traumatic Press in 2013], how people are supposed to engage, with the issues around how we treat other living beings. But understanding what’s going on, that I feel comfortable sharing, and that’s what I would say here too. The idea of really working to individualize the people who are incarcerated, and not have this blanket disavowal and trashing of them. That’s my goal. JV: Right. Put the blatant realities of incarceration right in front of people, and let them go from there. I think Randall Horton [senior editor at Willow Press] says it perfectly in the Visiting Days introduction: “If you feel a little uncomfortable about this book, then we (Willow Press and Gretchen Primack) have done our job as both publisher and poet.” [We both laugh, rather gleefully.] GP: That’s exactly right.


books How to Disappear: Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency Akiko Busch Penguin, 2019, $26 Modern lives get documented in detail, sometimes by choice, like when we post a selfie that took 11 attempts. Other times we don’t have much say in the matter, like when our faces become identified as we walk through the airport, or shopping habits tracked for us to become targets for ads. We crave recognition and ask others to validate our appearance, choices, purchases, triumphs, and losses via posts on social media. We throw our identity out there for the world to see, scrutinize, and subject. At the same time, we are trying just as hard to hide our identity from being hijacked. Most of us live life very “out-front” and in public display. We aim to solidify a prominent place in the world by leaving our mark in the form of profile pictures and posts that require much deliberation. That comes with benefits, like being able to curate a collection of content that we feel represents who we are (or hope to be). It also comes with the inherent vulnerabilities associated with living out in the open. Akiko Busch’s collection of 11 essays, How to Disappear: Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency, encourages us to step back and challenges us to entertain the notion of retreating into the shadows to embrace a sense of invisibility. Hudson Valley-based Busch has mastered the art of the essay. Poignant and punchy, each chapter evokes thoughts on identity and pulls the veil from vanity. The unseen is assessed with clarity and presented in ways that show the value of staying out of sight. Invisibility has a light shined on it from all angles. The topic of invisible childhood friends leads to how we interact with “friends” on social media. Examples of deep sea fish using deception and distraction to alter the way predators perceive them make us look inward to relate. Invisible ink is highlighted to show the power of making a statement without the entire world feeling the impact; and to prove that we can create, and exist, without having to necessarily always be on display. Busch also brings topics like virtual reality and augmented reality to the table, as well as the digital imprints that create our online identity, which is forever archived for the world to reference. The author's technology-based examples of what invisibility means unearth the dark truth we all bury our heads in the sand over; it is nearly impossible to be unseen. The sociological, psychological, and ecological examples bring light to the subject. They attach value to the art of invisibility, encouraging us to asses our role on this bright stage that everyone in the world with an internet connection can view. —Brian Turk

THE NIGHT VISITORS

GRAVE EXPECTATIONS

WILLIAM MORROW, $15.99, 2019

BLACK OPAL BOOKS, $13.99, 2018

Based on her experience as a volunteer at a domestic abuse hotline, acclaimed author Goodman’s latest novel follows Alice, a mom fleeing the abusive father of her son. Desperate to find shelter and protect 10-year-old Oren, Alice calls the domestic abuse hotline for help. They send Mattie, a social worker, who brings Alice and Oren back to her house in the woods. Mattie immediately forms a connection with Oren, who reminds her of her little brother who died as a boy. As a snowstorm worsens, truths about both Alice and Mattie’s past are brought to light in this nailbiting gothic thriller.

When Marabella Vinegar’s beloved neighbor Sam Lipschitz passes away, nobody, not even the NYPD, suspects foul play. After all, Sam was pushing 80 years old and had pre-existing heart problems. But Marabella refuses to accept that there was anything natural about his death; after all, Sam had greedy relatives and another neighbor, Rose, overheard an argument about his will. After Rose is mysteriously pushed down a flight of stairs, and the NYPD refuses to take Marbella’s mounting suspicion seriously, she sets about to solve Sam’s murder herself, with the help of her mother’s ghost.

NEVER LOOK BACK

TINY HOT DOGS

WILLIAM MORROW, $16.99, 2019

RUNNING PRESS, $24, 2019

Alison Gaylin’s psychological thriller brings readers a story of murder, deception, and family secrets. In a new genre of nested meta-fiction, Never Look Back tells the tale of a fictional podcast producer named Quentin Garrison, who is investigating the story of April Cooper and Gabriel LeRoy, teenaged murderers who killed dozens of people in Southern California’s Inland Empire in 1976. These murderers were rumored to have died in a fire, but after receiving a mysterious tip from a source, Garrison has reason to believe that Alison Cooper might still be alive. With one phone call, Garrison turns the life of New York film columnist Robin Diamond upside down when he suggests that her mother might be a mass murderer.

Dubbed by the media as “caterer to the stars,” personal chef Mary Giuliani’s childhood was anything but glamorous. A lone Italian-Catholic growing up in a Jewish neighborhood on Long Island, she wanted nothing more than a bat mitzvah and shining Broadway career. While her stage dreams did not materialize, as a charismatic and well-loved chef, she has become the center of a never-ending party, mingling with the very crowd she hoped to be a part of. Tiny Hot Dogs mixes humorous anecdotes of growing up and sticking out, celebrity encounters, and the rocky road to motherhood; along with a handful of star-worthy party recipes. Giuliani will be at bluecashew Kitchen Homestead in Kingston on April 9 from 6-9pm for a book launch party with nibbles and cocktails.

Carol Goodman

Alison Gaylin

THE KITCHEN BRIGADE Laurie Boris

SELF-PUBLISHED, $14.99, 2019

The year is 2049. A post-Trump America is living under Russian rule and civil war has broken out. Russian forces are occupying New York, and Valerie Kipplander, the daughter of the assassinated secretary of state and gifted culinary student, is taken out of jail and forced to cook for a Russian general. Torn between the primal drive for survival and patriotic loyalty, Valerie struggles with the risky decision of either joining the resistance or cooking for the troops that plan on insidiously destroying her beloved country. Boris’s dystopian novel offers powerful insight into the haunting what-ifs with her rich, detailed narrative of the despair, courage, and persistent creativity.

Sandra Gardner

Mary Giuliani

THE HOUSE CHILDREN Heidi Daniele

SPARK PRESS, $24, 2019

Two years before World War II breaks out, in a conservative Ireland, bastard child Mary Margaret Joyce spends her early years in an unloving foster home before being sentenced to an industrial school for unwanted girls. Given the name Peg and the number 27, Mary is indoctrinated into a rigid routine of prayer, work, and silence under the watchful eye of Sister Constance. After accidentally learning her birthmother’s identity, 13-year-old Mary grapples with abandonment, while her mother separately wrestles with guilt and shame. In her debut novel, Daniele elegantly blends her passions for history and genealogy with true events in a period story about familial love, shameful secrets, and self-determination.

4/19 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 71


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56 Lucas Avenue, Kingston (845) 339-1619 • drvigs.com 72 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 4/19


music Amy Helm This Too Shall Light (Yep Roc Records)

On her sophomore solo effort, Amy Helm clinches her status as a premier roots-music vocalist in and beyond her native Hudson Valley. It’s no surprise, given her august musical lineage as the daughter of the Band’s drummer/vocalist Levon Helm and singer-songwriter Libby Titus. But Amy’s considerable achievements here do more than pay tribute to that lineage and the roots and branches running through it. In her song choices and her vocal stylings—crossing Emmylou Harris’s achy vulnerability with Mavis Staples’s hearty soul—Amy makes a strong statement for racial and economic justice fueled by the gospel spirit. These Joe Henry-produced tracks were laid down live and unrehearsed in a legendary Los Angeles recording studio in just four short days, blending contemporary compositions by Milk Carton Kids (“Michigan”) and Hiss Golden Messenger (the title track) with vintage R&B (Allen Toussaint’s “Freedom for the Stallion”) and jazz (Blossom Dearie’s “Long Daddy Green”). The most touching tribute, however, may well be her rendition of “The Stones I Throw.” Written by Robbie Robertson and dating back to the days when the Band was still known as Levon and the Hawks, the tune was originally sung by Richard Manuel, who boasted the group’s most soulful voice. Amy claims the tune for herself, breathing new life into a number that grew directly out of the ’60s civil rights movement but whose message is as urgent today—“Don’t build walls and barricades”—as it was then. Yeproc.com. —Seth Rogovoy

Joel Weiskopf The Message

Liam Singer Finish Him

The Parlor Kiku

Joel Weiskopf’s The Message is a reunion of sorts. The Syracuse pianist met Hudson Valley saxman Rob Scheps, bassist Joe Fitzgerald, and drummer Marcello Pellitteri when he was attending New England Conservatory in the early ’80s. They worked together as a combo then, on the Boston scene, but hadn’t played as a group in nearly 35 years before cutting this disc, in December 2016. In many ways, it’s Scheps’s date. His horn—organic, firm without bluster—dominates many tracks. Weiskopf plays sparely, but his inversions as are always intriguing, adding rich harmony to the proceedings. “Song for Karla” is beautiful and hooky, like a highclass television theme. “Another Chance Today” reflects Weiskopf’s deep faith, also echoed in the album’s title—a recurring theme in his compositions. And, as if to balance all, “The Original Search” explodes in a free jazz frenzy, with Scheps entirely channeling, of course, Archie Schepp. Steeplechase.dk. —Michael Eck

After detours to California and Ohio, the Oregon-raised pianist and singer-songwriter Liam Singer landed in Catskill not long before the release of Finish Him, his fifth studio album. While the pulsating backbones of Singer’s songs are descended from minimalist composers Steve Reich and Philip Glass and his earlier discs tend to be more spartan affairs, Finish Him finds the musician going further back in his roots and widening the screen to grasp the goth-y pop of Kate Bush and her sometime paramour Peter Gabriel in his early solo phase. Epically atmospheric it is—see the knowingly named instrumental closer, “French Goth”— but, somehow, at the same time, the album maintains a vibe that’s close, confessional, and confiding (Singer cites Elliott Smith as an influence). When not making music himself, Singer serves the creative community as the owner-operator of vital cafe/music venue the Hi-Lo. Birdwatcherrecords.com. —Peter Aaron

Torment can be the catalyst for creativity and beauty if you channel it as such. Domestic and musical duo Eric Krans and Jen O’Connor funnel the bereavement of two miscarriages into a requiem called Kiku, an explosion of wistful dream pop inspired by both the haunted farmhouse in which they live and record, and the chrysanthemums (Japanese: kiku) that fortuitously popped up in their garden after the second misfortune. This harvest yields vulnerable strings and immense orchestral synthscapes— often drum-driven, consistently luscious—that listeners may not attribute to grief, but moreso to the tranquility of acceptance. Keen listeners may perceive the ethereal strains of Love Spirals Downwards or Soul Whirling Somewhere, subtle traces of Björk and Saint Etienne, or even unexpected fragments of the Carpenters’ warm harmonic cloak. In exquisite artistry as overwhelming as heartache itself, the Parlor drifts in graceful aural anodyne and sighs, “Trust in love and time.” Theparlormusic.com. —Haviland S. Nichols

(Steeplechase Records)

(Birdwatcher Records)

(Five Kill Records)

4/19 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 73


poetry

EDITED BY Phillip X Levine

The Poet

storm coming brewed strong like coffee i smell it —p

(Pen drops!) My pen is too noisy My paper’s too thin! My poem is too short. Maybe I should go out to the real world to be an actor or even a waitress. I hate it! (Sighing) My pen is too noisy My paper’s too thin!!!! —Rosa Weisberg (9 years)

Must I Always Blame You? Every time I think of killing myself, I also think of you. You have a bittersweet aftertaste— same one as becoming famous after you’re dead or being a working writer instead of a good one. Well I woke up and changed my mind the way a metronome does —set up and then stopped in the middle of a movement to play a very different, very ugly tune. I listened to your song then rewrote lyrics I actually like —crossed them all out (it’s not mine to change) So now when I think of killing myself, I don’t think of you I think of my song —Christine Donat

Untitled The snow tastes like salt. Little Red Boat fills with water and tips over. Sometimes I am like that. Sometimes I fill with water and tip over. But I rescue myself. I straighten myself out. May I continue to float on the water. —Cassandra Alfred

Cinquain Sally has Three sexy things—almond Eyes—a crooked smile—a voice That bends my knees—that’s what Sally has. —Anthony G. Herles

Drilled and Tapped The rig cost me a fortune and what was left of my marriage but the boy understands; the former, at least. He seemed disappointed to wear those service blues at first though the day I ironed on that patch with his name above the breast pocket he started to take interest in what became our family business. Community school was a waste of time for both of us so now he helps set up the auger and watches for signs of danger while I run the levers as the homeowner —unfortunately, off from work— spies from cracked blinds in a house without running water and toilets that don’t flush. The best of them know that much: To stay inside avoiding stupid question time. If they’ve called me—us, really— it’s because their well’s run dry. They need us—our rig, really— to tap into what they can’t obtain on their own. And that’s what I tell the kid after the man dressed down in the polo shirt and crisp dungarees hands him a crumpled twenty behind my back: The tip is only there because the blade’s tip is sharp. It’s harsh, but it works. At night, he gets the file and heads out to the shop while I make sure that our ad’s still printed inside those yellow pages. —Mike Vahsen

Describing Frozen Rhinebeck to an Abequiú Native The tree dipped its elbow limb storm-strengthened to the fondant ice and I, the morning meeting, fell in love with so serene a might. —Heidi Evans McArdle

74 POETRY CHRONOGRAM 4/19

Walking with Dad I watch you baby-stepping in soft cushioned slip-ons emitting only the intermittent swish of slowtime; head bent willing feet (once intimate with a jitterbug) to move— stubborn anchors now— I watch you inch one then the other but I hear your alto sax crooning big band jazz and I see your toes— donning polished Florsheims— tapping out its measure do not tell me you can’t my heart hears your song. —Faith Fury

Compassionate Child My child, shed no tears for the snowman, Gabe, who was born yesterday who smiled all his life who smiles at us still whose face has returned to next season’s particles who is like us in that metamorphosis is the rule. —Nicholas Haines

Epiphanies 52 In the garden, gold and silver dew sparkles on the dazzling grass, as if starlight has been harvested, then distilled in globes of glass and displayed on the morning sun for all of Nature to adore; it’s proof that fairies work—at beauty— while we humans play—at war. —Jared Bertholf

Floating slowly north And taking my eyes with it— The morning fog.... —George Ryan


Bats Last night I dreamt of baby bats flitting out of the kitchen woodwork up a step stool I climb, fly-swatter in hand slip it deftly into the crevice but the smallest bat skittered back in. i step down to the linoleum floor, as the bat reappears— clings to the ceiling above me quivering. pipistrello, the Italian word for bat that sounds like the sounds they make when they fly in black formations over our heads almost invisible, but always audible I am relieved when you appear. you look up, silently arrive at a solution. your steady hands, solid shoulders move through the air. gentle and swift, you steer the bat to the window let it fly in the bright midday sun. —Maria Lisella

Seeing You Seeing Me Above the steady whir of the IV pump And the low moans from the other side of the curtain, Your voice resonates down the corridor Somehow amplifying the emptiness of this place It was dark when I awoke to the sound, confused I had been in my bed, covered by an afghan I crocheted myself It’s light now and from my position in bed I can see an expanse of rooftop It reminds me of me, this rooftop, with odd and ugly objects jutting from it A woman in a hair net briskly set my breakfast on the table earlier, With a second thought that keenly reminded me of pity, She came back, kindly moving the table over my bed I didn’t have the heart to tell her that my bed was too low and I could not sit up I smiled and nodded as best I could My gaze was always downcast now The hump in my back made looking up almost impossible My limbs are numb I should have pressed the call bell earlier when I might have been able But I didn’t want to bother this nurse with her too loud voice Amidst the backdrop of noxious smells and cold dampness I lie there in bed, lost in the agony A knock on the open door rattles me, you breeze into my prison “How are ya doin’ sweetie?” you ask, not waiting for an answer You take in the situation, your gaze never meeting my eyes I struggle to answer the questions you bark in that annoying sing-song way What is my name, my date of birth, why am I here “Why am I here?” I wonder I see you seeing what has become of my body The colostomy bag that needs emptying The catheter which seems to be leaking The bedclothes a damp and fetid mess I see you seeing me —Lisa Hafner Stafford

Dark Island Outside of a maritime dive bar, in the briny neon light leaking from the shape of a palm tree, three men share a single cigarette, the tallest in distressed denim and high tops with a hat reading OBEY, his stockier companions with matching haircuts—the fade from crown to nape of neck a masterpiece of Brooklyn barbership. The doorman nods as usual as they step inside. When they approach the well-worn bar adorned with miniature umbrellas ready to be stabbed through warm, red cherries and served to smiling women in pineapple-shaped soft drinks, they turn to scan the room, eyes black as scorpions. The sandy ocean-themed floor stained with the evening’s spills, appears as a dune field of stark hollows and aching peaks shaped with each boozy step, formed in a place where women were earth and men wind and water. The leader orders a mixed drink, leans over to pluck an extra garnish from the bartop dispenser and mixes it in with a middle finger while the others grin, clink shot glasses on the counter and devour them before ordering two more from a bartender who smiles stiffly when the hand bearing cash lingers with a prolonged grip. Two women in the corner conclude happy hour and motion to pay the bill, joking about work emails, about bureaucracy, about the insufferable stench of the city. They part ways with a hug and then turn to head to different hotels. The tall man crunches an ice cube like a bone and follows, leaving his friends behind, the street throbbing with traffic and stars drowned out by pollution, the sky replaced by a numb gray void. He catches her as she rounds a corner, stands in front of her like barbed wire, his face handsome and persuasive, when his friends catch up and flank him, now a brick wall closing in. The avenue is empty and the nearby bodega’s metal gate has been lowered. A street light goes out, catching the attention of the smaller man with brown eyes, who looks at his friend and back at the woman, then back at his friend for a long pause, before saying, quietly, Let her go, and, having undone the spell that held them all there together, the group steps aside as she ducks around and disappears into the haze, sprinting all the way to Bedford on a single breath, pressing the elevator button two hundred times, dashing down hallways until her hotel door was latched and bolted, her small shoulders collapsing inward, smaller and smaller, on the freshly made bed. —Anna Victoria

Woman XXXIX She says she wants to ride and pulls up on her Harley. I roll my Schwinn back into the garage. —Tom Corrado

To Eulogize Mary Butler Eternal Effervescence! No, not even close to that spark. Emotions are way too strong and describing is far short of the mark. Like the drugged archer shooting satellites at your bosom, or an endless chasm, or a beautiful lust ETERNALLY, in caps. A love found every century... Perhaps! So, if I’m to drown tomorrow in the Catskill Creek you can wipe the smile off of my face and unlodge the eels from my eye sockets. Thank you Mary, for the Bowman has pierced my heart. I love you. —Steven A. Grogan

Full submission guidelines: chronogram.com/submissions 4/19 CHRONOGRAM POETRY 75


Double Cross Ultimate Yankee Fan, a hand-carved wooden sculpture by John Cross, part of the exhibit "Double Cross: Linda Cross & John Cross" opening April 6 at Kaaterskill Gallery and running through May 18 Work courtesy of Carrie Haddad Gallery.

76 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 4/19


the guide

April 24 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 April 6: Arm-of-the-Sea Theater April 11: Angelique Kidjo at UPAC April 13: Easter Bunny Express April 16: Brian Nice's "Another Point of View" exhibition April 20: Earth Day with Mid-Hudson Adirondack Mountain Club April 26: Bread and Puppet Theater at Time and Space Limited April 28: TAP NY at Hunter Mountain

For comprehensive calendar listings visit Chronogram.com/events. 4/19 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 77


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Woodstock Cabaret & Fashion Show

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May 4, 2019

An explosive evening of music, art, performance, and fabulous fashion in the Byrdcliffe Barn

Join us as talented local performers swish and shimmy their way down the catwalk in fashion from regional merchants. Feast on delicious food, prosecco, and wines, and be prepared to bid on many silent auction items.

Tickets are available now at (845) 679-2079 or online at the link below. $65 in advance $75 at the door 5:30 - 7:30 PM 485 Upper Byrdcliffe Road

woodstockguild.org/event/cabaret-fashion-show

he 1969 Woodstock festival is remembered for many things­­—the legendary music, the mud, the melee of foot and car traffic, “but Woodstock was more than that,” says Wade Lawrence, director and senior curator at The Museum at Bethel Woods. “It was the coming together of a generation.” March 30 marked the kick-off of A Season of Song & Celebration, a yearlong commemoration of the golden anniversary of the 1969 festival with the grand opening of the special exhibit “We Are Golden: Reflections on the 50th Anniversary of the Woodstock Festival and Aspirations for a Peaceful Future.” “For this exhibit, we started by asking, ‘Why should anybody care about Woodstock 50 years later?’” Lawrence says. What emerged was the idea of Woodstock as a synonym and symbol for empowered activism. “Young people then had all kinds of things to face: the war in Vietnam, violent Civil Rights protests in the streets. It was a tumultuous time,” Lawrence says. “Woodstock offered a break from all that: three days of peace, love, and music. Then at the festival, people looked around and saw each other and realized ‘Wow! We young people are a group to be reckoned with. We are a voting bloc.’” Freshly aware of their combined power, this generation of young people returned to the real world with a newfound voice to cut a path into political and social spaces and fight for the world they wanted. Along with actual artifacts from the festival (like Jack Casady’s bass and a piece of the stage), the exhibit includes oral histories of original Woodstock attendees alongside those of today’s youth. “The wrongs being righted today aren’t too different from wrongs being righted in the ’60s,” says assistant curator Julia Fell. “Maybe we use different phrases now, but the fight has never really stopped. We still have the fight for civil rights, though we may call it social justice. We still have the fight for women’s rights, though we may call it Me Too. We still have the fight for gay rights, though now it’s LGBTQ. The fact that we can have a civic dialog about these issues and that young people are taking a stand is a direct link to the ’60s.” The exhibit culminates in an interactive invitation for young people to reflect on their hopes and fears for today, leaving viewers with the question, “How can we learn from the Woodstock generation to ensure our world is a better place in 50 years” “We are Golden” will be on display at the Museum at Bethel Woods until December 31. Bethelwoodscenter.org/the-museum

Above: Bass played at Woodstock by Jack Casady of Jefferson Airplane. Lent by Jack Casady.

78 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 4/19


BOOKS Jamaica Kincaid

For Vassar College’s annual Alex Krieger Memorial Lecture, writer Jamaica Kincaid will deliver a talk “Landscapes and Memories” on her masterful approach to interweaving prose and poetry. Currently the Professor of African and African American Studies in Residence at Harvard University, Kincaid is the author of many novels, including Annie John, Lucy, At the Bottom of the River and A Small Place, that are deeply admired in the American literary landscape for their loosely autobiographical takes on postcolonialism, gender, and racism. Kincaid has been awarded the Lannan Literary Award for Fiction, Prix Femina Étranger, Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, and the Clifton Fadiman Medal. More recently, she was the recipient of the American Book Award in 2014. April 11, 8pm in the Villard Room at Vassar College. Info.vassar.edu/calendar

PUPPETS Arm-of-the-Sea Theater

Filled with the larger-than-life magical realism of a Tim Burton film or Gabriel García Márquez novel, performances by Arm-ofthe-Sea theater troupe have been amazing audiences for 20 years. Their large-scale hybrid performances of visual arts and music create an atmosphere of strangeness and wonder. They will stage their latest production, “City That Drinks the Mountain Sky: Part Two,” at Phoenicia Elementary School. Featuring colorful costumes and hand-painted set designs, this eco-play follows the journey of water from mountains to your tap. Exploring the Catskill watershed and New York City’s water supply system, this production touches on important scientific and cultural concerns, like climate change and aging infrastructure, and proves to be engaging for audiences of all ages. April 6. Free. Armofthesea.org

PUPPETS Bread and Puppet Theater

Bread and Puppet continues to explore the limits of their medium with the latest eye-catching production of papier mache and cardboard puppets. “Diagonal Man,” which will be performed at Time & Space Limited in Hudson, challenges the pervasive verticality of our culture by incorporating radically diagonal movements. “The diagonal threatens collapse while always containing the possibility of uprising,” says B&P founder Peter Schumann. Combining mind-bending movements, music, and humor, “Diagonal Man” brings to life the light-hearted possibilities of diagonal existence. For $35, dine with the cast before the production in a benefit supper in support of Bread and Puppet Theater. April 26, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Timeandspace.org

COMEDY The Ghandi Comedy Show

Acclaimed comedians Brendan Fitzgibbons, Tyler Fischer, Leah Bonnema, Lance Weiss, and Justin Williams will take over Colony in Woodstock for one rip-roaring night of laughs. Featuring veterans of MTV, Comedy Central, The Onion, and “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert,” it’s no surprise The Gandhi Show has been called “one of New York City’s best comedy shows” by Time Out and Thrillist. April 25, 8pm. $20-$25. Colonywoodstock.com

For comprehensive calendar listings visit Chronogram.com/events.

Rise and Shine ANGELIQUE KIDJO PERFORMS TALKING HEADS’ REMAIN IN LIGHT

Nearly 40 years after its release, Remain in Light’s groundbreaking fusion of African polyrhythms, funk, electronics, and New York new wave has seen the set dubbed one of the most influential albums of all time. In 2017, the Library of Congress selected it for inclusion in the National Recording Registry for its being “culturally, historically, or artistically significant,” and it played a crucial part in introducing the music of Afrobeat legend Fela Kuti, a strong influence on the band during the album’s making, to Western audiences (see Brooklyn band Antibalas and the hit Off-Broadway musical “Fela”). Last year, the iconic Beninese singer Angelique Kidjo—called “the undisputed queen of African music” by the London Daily Telegraph—released a brilliant song-for-song cover of Remain in Light, which was produced by Jeff Bhasker (Kanye West, Rolling Stones, Beyonce) and won the enthusiastic endorsement of Byrne (the head Head himself even joined Kidjo onstage at Carnegie Hall when she performed the music there). Angelique Kidjo, who answered the questions below by email, will perform Talking Heads’ Remain in Light at UPAC in Kingston on April 11 at 7:30pm. Tickets are $46, $56, and $66. For information, visit Bardavon.org. —Peter Aaron Can you tell us about the first time you encountered Remain in Light—what was it about the album that attracted you to it and made an impression on you? I never thought anyone could suffer from music starvation! When I arrived in Paris fleeing the Communism dictatorship in my country, I felt that the world had passed me by musically. So one day I tagged along with some students from my music school to listen to new music in a party. That’s when among all the songs played on cassette came [the single] “Once in a Lifetime.” I reacted to it, as it felt so familiar. I wondered immediately how my whole family would have danced and reacted to this music that sounded very African to me. At the same time as I was singing along with the chorus the familiarity stopped, as I was feeling homesick and anxious at the same time because of the lyrics. But it made a big impression on me. Even though my fellow students thought there was nothing African about it. I learned, later on, that the band and [producer] Brian Eno were inspired by Fela Kuti’s music at the time.   Since the original Remain in Light was very much influenced by African music, in a way your being an African artist and reimagining the songs takes the music full circle. Obviously, you bring your personal perspective as an individual artist to the project, but would you say it feels more influenced by the Talking Heads side of the music or the African side? Which side would you say you feel more strongly? For me it wasn’t something I thought about. I just followed my inspiration. It was obvious from the first song that I should be using the call and response that we have in Beninese traditional music and develop it more by using some proverbs from my country that have many layers of meaning. Everyone has been telling me that the lyrics of the original album were absurd—but not for me. I tried to decipher proverbs used by elderly people and mix their meaning with the Talking Heads lyrics. And somehow, magical, it was working!

For some of the songs you’ve also added some new, socially relevant lyrics. The version of “The Great Curve,” which touches on the empowerment of women, is an example of this. What message are you hoping listeners will take from your new lyrics for this song? How about your additional lyrics for some of the other songs, like “Seen and Unseen” or “Born Under Punches”? One thing I know for sure is that we all have to live in the same ecosystem. There’s no other Earth out there. So, if we don’t take care of Mother Earth, we have no future. It is the same thing if we do not care for women’s rights and women’s empowerment! That is the message I want people to think about when they listen to “The Great Curve”: Our survival depends on how we treat these issues. It seems that African music is more popular now in America than it ever has been before. As someone who’s lived in New York for some time and toured America many times, why do you think this is the case? It has been popular in France and other European countries for some time, but what are your thoughts on Afropop, Afrobeat, and traditional African music having an increasing appeal here more recently? Life is a cycle. African music gave birth to almost every modern form of music worldwide because of the history of slavery. In a way, music is constantly reminding us of our shared humanity. It flows free from any agenda. It’s embedded in our DNA. Social media has shrunk the world and so now the African youths are witnessing this culture. So the music continues its journey back and forth between continents.   You’ve described your music as “a weapon for building bridges” and said that “We think there is things to divide us, but not much divides us.” Right now, though, to many people it certainly feels like there is a lot division in the world, so some people who are anxious about this feeling could be confused when you say there is “not much” that divides people. What would you say to them, to clarify what you mean and to give them hope? Before the birth of nations, flags, anthems, and the way our societies are built, we were all one people. What are the fundamental things that we all need? Love, health, the right to be able to raise our children the best we can, access to good education and living together, and to speak freely. There’s no one who could survive alone, and, in that spirit, we need a world that is much more equal. My experience travelling all over the world [shows] that we are more alike than we’re thinking we are. If we chose to live divided, if we chose hate and fear over love and kindness, we are just isolating [ourselves] from the rest of the world, and this is just not sustainable. There is a lot of anger and frustration. Is the solution hate and fear? Personally, I think that hate and fear are cowardly choices. Living together demands courage, honesty, and continual challenges. It’s not by hurting people that we will prevail, but by finding common ground to build a new world together while retaining our own cultures. So let’s remain in light!

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Wouldn’t It Be Nice?

BREWS TAP NY

BRIAN NICE EXHIBIT AT BUSTER LEVI GALLERY

For the past 21 years, TAP NY has brought together the best of New York State’s brewers to offer visitors a rare panoramic tasting opportunity. From experimental pale ales to style-pure lagers, barrel-aged stouts, and wild-fermented sours, this festival offers something for every palate. Held at Hunter Mountain, the bacchanal celebration also offers a wide range of tasty food options from area restaurants and food trucks. Brewers will contend for the title of “Best Beer” and “Best Brewery” in New York State. Gold, silver, and bronze medals are given to drinks based on style while cup winners are awarded for being the best in the region. April 27-28. $67-$133. Tap-ny.com

FOOD 5th Annual Snout to Tail

Despite popular conjecture, snout-totail eating is not something that current locavores, slow foodies, or the new generation of farmers have recently discovered. Using all parts of the animal is something that has been done worldwide for centuries, and indeed the revival of this form of cooking marks a return to a more primitive and holistic relationship with meat. On April 6, Slow Food Hudson Valley will host the fifth annual Snout to Tail workshop. Participants will have the opportunity to talk with and watch demonstrations by butcher and chef Tom Schneller, charcuterie master Chef John Kowalski, fine dining Chef Daniel Turgeon, and others, following the trajectory of an animal from pasture to table. Tickets include up to four small lamb plates and a one-pound goodie bag of sausage or another item. April 6, 10am. $110. Slowfoodhv.org/events-2/

FAMILY FUN Easter Bunny Express

Catskill Mountain Railroad’s kid-centric themed train rides are a delightful way to enjoy each season’s festivities. In the fall, Rails of Terror offers a deliciously spooky haunted train ride, while December’s Polar Express brings to life a timeless tale of Christmas magic. In April, the Easter Bunny Express gives children the chance to board a vintage train and travel in style up to Hurley Mountain, where they will disembark for an epic Easter egg hunt and visit from the Easter Bunny and his mischievous friend Fernando the Fox. April 6, 13, 20, five departures per day. $12-18, free for toddlers under 2. Catskillmountainrailroad.com

HIKES Mid-Hudson ADK Club Hike

While a solitary trek in nature offers peace seldom achieved in our busy lives, hiking in a group offers the camaraderie and motivation that is sometimes needed to get out the door. The Mid-Hudson Adirondack Mountain Club was founded with the threefold mission of exploring the outdoors, protecting nature, and connecting people. Diving headlong into spring, their April outings schedule offers weekly Thursday hikes of varying difficulties throughout the region. Throughout the month, the outdoor club also organizes weekend hikes and, as the weather warms up, paddling excursions. Midhudsonadk.org/outings

For comprehensive calendar listings visit Chronogram.com/events.

An image from Brian Nice's book My Point of View, a collection of photos taken on a 2013 cross-country trip.

“It’s like living in a Picasso painting nonstop,” says Brian Nice, describing his daily perception. A congenital cavernous malformation caused bleeding in his brain in 2009. After two operations, Nice found himself confined to a wheelchair, with almost no fine motor control. Since then, he has attempted to convey his visual reality through photographs. Nice’s show, “Another Point of View,” will be exhibited at the Buster Levi Gallery in Cold Spring April 5 through April 28. Few lives have changed as dramatically as Nice’s. The son of noted watercolorist Don Nice, Brian grew up in the East Village of the 1960s. After attending the Rochester Institute of Technology, he began a highly successful career as a fashion photographer. Nice loved the glamorous life: “It was like a party. I didn’t see winter for 15 years.” Suddenly he found himself in a coma, hearing a doctor say he would never move again. “I tried to move my middle finger, but I couldn’t,” Nice remembers. Arthur Rimbaud wrote: “The idea is to reach the unknown by the derangement of all the senses.” For Nice, this effect requires no mescaline or absinthe; it’s a bona fide medical condition. He uses a Russian toy camera, with a plastic lens, to simulate his own perception. The Holga often has light leaks, creating bright diagonal streaks, and easily produces double exposures. For most photographers, the trick is making a two-dimensional picture look three-dimensional. Nice is trying to convey his visual reality, which contains no depth, so he accentuates the twodimensionality of his medium. The prints are organic, untouched by Photoshop.

“I’m like a chameleon,” he says. “One eye is horizontal, the other is at 45 degrees, and they see independently from each other.” About half of the show is diptychs, which convey Nice’s divided sight by juxtaposing two unrelated images of equal size. How does he choose the images? Purely by feel. He’ll place Xeroxes of two pictures together, mount them on the wall and live with them for a few days. Then he’ll decide if they belong conjoined. “Another Point of View” contains messages from the skewed world Nice is forced to inhabit, but it doesn’t strike me as anguished. Rather it has an air of shimmering calm. The paired pictures resemble a two-page spread of a magazine. This effect was not intentional, but was perhaps the subliminal influence of a fashion photography career. Most artists speak of the centrality of their art, but for Nice it is absolutely essential. I asked him if art-making was the most important thing in his life. “It’s the only thing,” Nice replies. He still paints watercolors, and has made over 800 images of hearts for his 12-year-old daughter Sam, so even his personal relationships are mediated by art. Don Nice died the week I spoke to Brian. (An appreciation of the elder Nice appears on page 84.) The photographer almost canceled this show, but his father insisted: “No way! You’ve got to keep going.” Brian Nice’s “Another Point of View,” will run at the Buster Levi Gallery in Cold Spring April 5-28. Busterlevigallery.com —Sparrow

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in memoriam

Carolee Schneemann (1939-2019)

I

n the ’60s, as small manufacturing ebbed out of Manhattan, a new generation of artists flowed into the factories and industrial spaces, birthing a loft culture that catalyzed a new era of creativity. Carolee Schneemann was among these Downtown pioneers, a painter-turned-performance artist who used the alchemy of space and watching eyes to create a 3D canvas. In 1964, Schneemann staged a performance that became seminal to her oeuvre. Meat Joy was a mostly nude group performance whose props included raw fish, chickens, sausages, wet paint, plastic, rope, and shredded scrap paper. A sort of human-collage performed in real time, the work took the language of painting and collage into real space as it reveled in a kind of pagan ecstasy. Works such as Fur Wheel of 1962 and Untitled (Four Fur Cutting Boards) of 1963 also reflect this early desire to push painting into real space. Up to and Including Her Limits (1973-76), makes explicit the relationship of the body to the mark. A kind of performance-installation, the work offers the viewer the artifactual evidence of the artist’s body in space; what looks like a large scale abstract-expressionistic drawing constitutes the remains of a performance that is documented in still and moving pictures. The last five decades of her life were spent in a farmhouse outside New Paltz. In 2011 Schneemann told Chronogram, “All my work comes from this house,” citing “personal, elusive, paranormal events,” that defined her personal iconography and inspired her art. Schneemann passed away from breast cancer on March 6 at her home, leaving behind a legacy of unapologetic, body-centric art that held taboo in a tight embrace in order to transcend it. —Marie Doyon

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A 2016 photo of Carolee Schneemann taken by Lynne Sachs during the filming of Carolee, Barbara & Gunvor. Above: Carolee Schneemann's Aggression for Couples and Exercise for Couples (detail), gelatin-silver prints with hand coloring and collage, 1972.


Kids Read: A Book Festival Saturday, April 13, 10 am - 4 pm Our Lady of Lourdes High School 131 Boardman Road, Poughkeepsie • • •

35+ authors/illustrators, books for sale Crafts, presentations, readings, storybook characters In partnership with: Friends of Poughkeepsie Public Library District, Our Lady of Lourdes High School, Dutchess County, Dutchess Reads, Merritt Bookstore

Poughkeepsie Public Library District (845) 485-3445 x3368 • KidsRead@poklib.org poklib.org/events/kids-read/ • #kidsreadbookfest

Crown Cocktail Lounge

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4/19 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 83


in memoriam

Don Nice (1932-2019)

G

rowing up in California’s San Joaquin Valley in the 1930s and ’40s, Don Nice came of age enmeshed in a world of football, farming, and horses. “When he wasn’t in school, Nice himself grew up on the range,” writes Antonia D. Bryan in a essay on Nice’s website. “A sunburned teenager in chaps, herding cattle, dodging rattlesnakes, and setting out barbed wire.” Despite this rugged upbringing, from a young age Nice, who passed away on March 4, had a love of drawing, which his grandfather and aunt, both novice painters, nurtured. Nice’s football prowess that earned him a four-year scholarship to USC. After graduation, Nice worked for several years as a high school teacher before joining the army. In 1958, he spent a brief but formative period studying under the watercolor master Oskar Kokoschka. Later, in Paris, he encountered the work of Abstract Expressionist titans Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock. His initial fascination with Abstract Expression eventually gave way to exasperation, as Nice turned his attention to Pop Art and eventually to landscape painting. In 1968, his work was included in the student-curated exhibit “Realism Now,” at Vassar College and, a year later, he left the city to settle in Garrison, lured by the same Hudson River vistas that moved the likes of Frederick Church. Nice entered a chapter of landscape painting inspired by reverence for nature, yet characterized by the same distinctive brushwork he brought to his earlier studies of objects and labels. His landscapes evade categorization, blending the natural and the manmade, abstraction and realism, painting and sculpture and movement. Nice’s work is featured in many prominent institutions, including MoMA and the Whitney. Nice is remembered for eschewing what he called “the Renaissance window,” the rectangular confines of a typical canvas, experimenting in later years with sculptural, multipart paintings. —Marie Doyon

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Tootsie Pops, a 2014 watercolor by Don Nice. Above, left to right: Don in 1998; Don in his studio at 463 Broome Street in New York City in 1964 with his painting Strawberry.


OPUS 40 sculpture park & arts center

Scribner’s Catskill Lodge with our friends Dog & Co. + Ella Bean the Dog invite you to:

PUPSTATER WEEKEND AT SCRIBNER’S CATSKILL LODGE A PRIL 1 2 - 1 4, 201 9

Please join us for a weekend of dog friendly activities including wellness, treats, napping in the sunny spots with your favorite four-legged friends.

Scribner’s Catskill Lodge scribnerslodge.com

50 Fite Road, Saugerties • info@opus40.org Event Season www.opus40.org/events2019

SPRING FAIRE AT PRIMROSE HILL SCHOOL • MAY 4TH, 11AM-4PM

Maypole Dancing • Food • Music Crafts • Games • Jump Rope Making Silk Screening • Face Painting 23 SPRING BROOK PARK, RHINEBECK, NY RHINEBECK, NY876-1226 / (845) 876-1226 / PRIMROSEHILLSCHOOL.COM (845) PRIMROSEHILLSCHOOL.COM

4/19 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 85


Spring Market May 18th and 19th, 10am to 4pm At the White Hart Inn in the center of Salisbury, Connecticut

Over 20 unique, local artisans! www.artisansale.org

Just My Type:

Linda Montano: Angela Dufresne Curated by The MelissaArt/Life Ragona & Anastasia James Hospital Curated by Anastasia James

Rosendale, NY 1 2472 | 845.658.8989 | rosendaletheatre.org Dance Film Sunday Birds of Passage Great Art on Screen Klimt The Bolshoi Ballet’s (Pájaros de verano) & Schiele: Eros and Sleeping Beauty SUNDAY, Psyche SUNDAY 4/21, MONDAY 4/1 & THURSDAY 4/4 7:15pm. WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, 1pm

Apollo 11 FRIDAY 4/5 –

MONDAY 4/8 & THURSDAY 4/11, 7:15pm. WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, 1pm

Captain Marvel FRIDAY

4/12 – MONDAY 4/15 & THURSDAY 4/18, 7:15pm. WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, 1pm

4/14, $12/$10/$6, 2pm

$15/$12, 2pm

Fallout TUESDAY 4/16

Live Theatre How I Learned to Drive

7:15pm. Q&A with Sunny Jacobs & Peter Pringle

FRIDAY 4/26, 8pm, SATURDAY Crazywise WEDNESDAY 4/17, 4/27, 2 & 8pm, & SUNDAY 7:15pm. Roundout Valley Holistic 4/28, 7pm. TICKETS: $15 in advance at howilearnedtodrive. Health Community bpt.me / $18 at the door Gloria Bell FRI 4/19 – MON National Theatre I’m Not 4/22 & THUR 4/25 7:15pm. Running SUNDAY 4/28, WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, 1pm $12/$10, 2pm

Antique Fair and Flea Market May 4 - 5, 2019 August 3 - 4, 2019 Linda Montano, I’m Dying–My Last Performance, 2015, video, color, sound. Video still copyright of the artist, courtesy of Video Data Bank, www.vdb.org, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Angela Dufresne, Kerry Downey, 2016, oil on canvas, courtesy the artist

JANUARY 23 – APRIL 14, 2019 FEBRUARY 9 – JULY 14, 2019

Opening reception: Saturday, February 9, 5–7 p.m. SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

WWW.N EWPALTZ.E DU / M USE U M

86 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 4/19

at the

WASHINGTON COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Rt. 29, GREENWICH, NY (12 mi. East of Saratoga Springs, NY)

$4 admission,

(65+ $3, under-16 - FREE)

Old-Fashioned Antique Show featuring 220+ dealers, free parking, great food, and real bathrooms. ($10 - Early Buyers Fridays before show)

$90 - Dealer Spaces Still Available: FAIRGROUND SHOWS NY PO Box 528, Delmar NY 12054 www.fairgroundshows.com fairgroundshows@aol.com Ph. 518-331-5004


exhibits

caption tk

Anthrotopographies Chroma S5 St. Francis, a painting with pigments made from toxic wastewater by John Sabraw, is part of the exhibit “Anthrotopographies” at Beacon Institute Gallery, opening April 13 and running through October.

4/19 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 87


exhibits

Animal KingDUMB WIZdumb, one of the paintings featured in Paul Heath’s solo exhibit “Animal KingDUMB,” at Gallery Fifty5 in Kingston opening April 6 and running through April 30.

CMA GALLERY

AQUINAS HALL MOUNT SAINT MARY’S COLLEGE "Explorations in Form." Works by Sienna Martz and Erica Hauser. Through May 22.

COLUMBIA-GREENE COMMUNITY COLLEGE 4400 ROUTE 23, HUDSON "Reshape." Matt Frieburghaus. Through April 19.

CREATE COMMUNITY

11 PEEKSKILL ROAD, COLD SPRING "Forces of Nature." Group show. Through April 28.

DUCK POND GALLERY

128 CANAL STREET, ESOPUS LIBRARY, PORT EWEN

510 WARREN STREET GALLERY

BEACON ARTIST UNION

"Kate Knapp: April in Paris, Venice and Sicily." April 5-28. Opening reception April 6, 3pm-6pm.

"Fractured: Carol Flaitz." Through April 7.

510 WARREN STREET, HUDSON

ALBERT SHAHINIAN FINE ART GALLERY

22 EAST MARKET STREET SUITE 301, RHINEBECK

506 MAIN STREET, BEACON

BERKSHIRE BOTANICAL GARDEN

5 WEST STOCKBRIDGE ROAD, STOCKBRIDGE, MA

"Polly Law: Bricolage." Through May 12.

"Nature Narratives: The Botanical Art of Carol Ann Morley." April 6-May 26.

THE ALDRICH CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM

BERKSHIRE MUSEUM

"Harmony Hammond: Material Witness, Five Decades of Art." Through September 15.

"Leonardo Da Vinci: Machines in Motion." Explore 40 full-size models of Leonardo’s inventions. Through May 5.

AMITY GALLERY

BETSY JACARUSO STUDIO & GALLERY

"An Artful Union: The Art of Elizabeth and Joseph Sundwall." Through April 28. Opening reception April 6, 5pm-7pm.

"Winter Salon." Works by Cross River Artists. Through April 28.

258 MAIN STREET, RIDGEFIELD, CT

110 NEWPORT BRIDGE ROAD, WARWICK

BANNERMAN ISLAND GALLERY 150 MAIN STREET, BEACON

"The Contemporary Landscape Art Exhibition." A new contemporary art exhibition featuring representational landscape paintings by artists; Daniela Cooney, Tarryl Gabel, Laura Garramone, Judith Hraniotis and Susan Miiller. Through May 26.

BARD COLLEGE: CCS BARD GALLERIES ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON

2019 Spring Exhibitions and Projects. 14 exhibitions with more than 40 artists, offering a wide-ranging museum presentation organized by the graduating class of the Masters of Arts Curatorial Program. April 7-May 26. Opening reception April 7, 1pm-4pm.

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39 SOUTH STREET, PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS

43 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK

"Emilie Garman: Watercolors." April 5-27. Opening reception April 5, 5:30pm-7pm.

EAST FISHKILL COMMUNITY LIBRARY 348 ROUTE 376, HOPEWELL JUNCTION

"Flower Show Paintings: Art Exhibit by Nancy Woogen." April 1-30.

EDWARD HOPPER HOUSE ART CENTER 82 N. BROADWAY, NYACK

"Holly Zausner: Unsettled Matter." A multimedia installation featuring Zausner’s 2015 film, Unsettled Matter. Through June 2.

EMERGE GALLERY & ART SPACE 228 MAIN STREET, SAUGERTIES

"Art & Words: An Exhibition of Art & Poetry Inspiring One Another." April 6-28. Opening reception April 6, 5pm-8pm.

FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER AT VASSAR COLLEGE

BUSTER LEVI GALLERY

124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE

121 MAIN STREET, COLD SPRING

"Freehand: Drawings by Inez Nathaniel Walker" Through April 14.

"Brian Nice: Another Point of View." April 5-28. Artist’s Reception April 5, 5:30pm-8:30pm.

GALLERY 40

BYRDCLIFFE KLEINERT/JAMES CENTER FOR THE ARTS 36 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK

"The Haiku Box Project." Through June 30.

CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY

40 CANNON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE "Shakespeare Meets Zeppelin: Kimberlie Dykeman." Through April 20.

GARRISON ART CENTER

23 GARRISON’S LANDING, GARRISON

"Contemporary Artists." Group exhibit. Through April 21.

"Environmental Works: New Sculptures by Kurt Steger." Through May 5.

THE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK

HOLLAND TUNNEL ART

"Here Today." Featuring Judi Bommarito, KayLynn Deveney, Lydia Goldblatt and Jane Paradise. Through April 24.

"Ken Butler: Hybrid Visoins." Assemblage works created primarily from urban detritus. Through April 20.

622 WARREN STREET, HUDSON

59 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK

46 CHAMBERS STREET, NEWBURGH 917-520-8971.


exhibits

Everyday Perfection Matt LaFleur’s sculpture Let Us Labor, a six-foot diameter, saw-toothed disc whose colors and floor placement echo the knit rugs ubiquitous among the Shakers. Part of the "Everyday Perfection" exhibit at the Albany International Airport Gallery. Through September 2.

HUDSON AREA LIBRARY

51 NORTH 5TH STREET, HUDSON "Letters To Wild Women." Collages by Hudson-based artist Catalina Viejo Lopez de Roda. April 6-May 31. Opening reception April 6, 3pm-5pm.

HUDSON BEACH GLASS GALLERY 162 MAIN STREET, BEACON

"Reality Sandwich." Curated by Carl Van Brunt. Through April 7.

HUDSON HALL

327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON "Hudson Athens Light." Group show. Through June 9.

HUDSON VALLEY MOCA

1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL "Death is Irrelevant: Selections from the Marc and Livia Straus Collection, 1975–2018." Figurative sculpture from the Marc and Livia Straus Collection. Through August 2.

EMPORIUM SCULPTURE PARK

THOMAS COLE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

JOHN DAVIS GALLERY

Curated by Franc Palaia, includes 14 sculptures by 11 regional artists. Through May 31.

"The Art of Emily Cole." The project marks the first solo exhibition of Emily’s artwork on both paper and porcelain, revealing her exquisitely painted botanicals. Through July 7.

"Laetitia Hussain: Still Life Love Life." Through April 21.

RIVERWINDS GALLERY

362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON

JOYCE GOLDSTEIN GALLERY

19 CENTRAL SQUARE, CHATHAM

5229 ALBANY POST ROAD (RT 9), STAATSBURG

172 MAIN STREET, BEACON "Hue Tint Shade: Paintings by Karl LaLonde." Through April 7.

"Art 4 Food." Each artist showing will prepare a sit-down dinner in the gallery for those who have purchased their work. Through April 13.

ROSENDALE CAFE

KINGSTON CITY HALL

"Moving Mountains." An exhibition of new and recent collages by Susan Angeles. April 7-April 30.

"Pauline Oliveros: Still Listening in Kingston." April 6-June 30.

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART

420 BROADWAY, KINGSTON

434 MAIN STREET, ROSENDALE

218 SPRING STREET, CATSKILL

THOMPSON GIROUX GALLERY 57 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM

"Dan Devine: Impact." Through May 5.

TIVOLI ARTISTS GALLERY 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI

"Through the Alley: Urban and Recycled." Works made from “repurposed objects.” Through April 28.

1 HAWK DRIVE, NEW PALTZ

TREMAINE GALLERY AT THE HOTCHKISS SCHOOL 11 INTERLAKEN ROAD, LAKEVILLE, CT

"Woodstock School of Art Instructor’s Show." Through May 11.

"In Celebration: A Recent Gift from the Photography Collection of Marcuse Pfeifer." An exhibition featuring 52 images by important 19th and 20th century photographers. Through July 14.

"Unstructured Structures." Digital art pioneer Mark Wilson. Through May 5.

ONE MILE GALLERY

THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA

ULSTER SAVINGS BANK

MARK GRUBER GALLERY

17 NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ

475 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON "Works by Mark Hogancamp." Through May 31.

OPALKA GALLERY

140 NEW SCOTLAND AVENUE, ALBANY "In Place of Now." Group show co-curated by Judie Gilmore, gallery director, and writer and scholar Rone Shavers. Through April 14.

PLACE

23 MAIN STREET, MILLERTON "Johanna Lindsay: Photography." Through May 1.

1946 CAMPUS DRIVE, HYDE PARK "Appetites for Change: Foodways in Post-War America." Studentcurated exhibit. Through July 31.

THE FIELD LIBRARY

4 NELSON AVENUE, PEEKSKILL "Recent Works by Sherry Mayo." Through April 19.

THE LACE MILL

165 CORNELL STREET, KINGSTON "Womens’ Art Exhibit." Featuring over 20 local women artists, musicians, and poets. April 6-27.

7296 SOUTH BROADWAY, RED HOOK "Autism Awareness Art Exhibition." Artwork by Anderson Center for Autism students and residents. April 1-28. Artists reception April 24, 5pm-7pm.

WINDOWS ON NEWBERRY

236 MAIN STREET, SAUGERTIES "International Sculpture Day Exhibition." Throughout the month of April, Saugerties joins hundreds of artists, organizations and institutions in over 20 countries. Through April 28.

WOODSTOCK SCHOOL OF ART 2470 RTE. 212, WOODSTOCK

"Student Exhibition I." Through May 4.

4/19 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 89


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When you’re ready, I’m here.

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90 THE GUIDE CHRONOGRAM 4/19


live music Deradoorian plays the 24-Hour Drone festival at Basilica Hudson, April 27-28.

PREVITE/SAFT/CLINE

April 5. Fifty-three years after the formation of Cream, the term “super group,” which was originally coined to describe that particular trio of UK blues rock greats, feels overused. Except in the case of this new, all-star, semi-local experimental jazz unit, which performs at Club Helsinki. Guggenheim Fellowship-winning drummer Bobby Previte leads his own ensembles and was a seminal presence on the Downtown New York scene, as was keyboardist Jamie Saft (Beastie Boys, Laurie Anderson, Iggy Pop); guitarist Nels Cline had a lengthy resume from his time in LA’s jazz and punk/ underground rock scenes long before he joined Wilco in 2002. (The Suitcase Junket packs ’em in April 13; Roseanne Cash performs May 4.) 9pm. $22. Hudson. (518) 828-4800; Helsinkihudson.com.

HAND HABITS/ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER

April 9. Here’s a bill at the Half Moon that pairs two of today’s top-rated indie rock singer-songwriters. Hand Habits is the “band” name of Albany guitarist Meg Duffy, an erstwhile accompanist of ex-Woods man Kevin Morby. The sophomore Hand Habits album, placeholder, was released last month and has elicited praise for its vibes of dreamy, lulling post-folk rock. One half of the revered duo the Fiery Furnaces, reclusive Hudson Valley resident Eleanor Friedberger has released four solo albums since the Furnaces began their 2011 hiatus; the most recent, Rebound, was reviewed favorably by John Burdick in the November 2018 issue of Chronogram. (Jackson and the Janks and Will Lawrence visit April 4.) 8pm. $8, $10. Hudson. (518) 822-1913; Thehalfmoonhudson.com.

HABIBI/Y LA BAMBA

OMARA PORTUONDO

24-HOUR DRONE

MEG BAIRD AND MARY LATTIMORE

April 13. Yet again, BSP presents an evening of rising, raved-about indie rock names. The Brooklyn-based Habibi (“my love” in Arabic) is the brainchild of vocalist Rahill Jamlifard and blends the giddy girl group sounds of the 1960s with poppy, surfy garage rock moves. The band’s latest release, the EP Cardamom Garden, is sung entirely in her ancestral Farsi. Y La Bamba is another bilingual act. The alter ego of Portland, Oregon, singer-songwriter Luz Elena Mendoza, the project's danceable concept pop draws on her MexicanAmerican folk roots. Y La Bamba's fifth and newest full-length, Mujeres, has won plaudits from NPR for “making a musical and cultural statement without sounding preachy.” (The Skatalites celebrate 55 years April 5; Aldous Harding appears April 11.) 7:30pm. $15. Kingston. (845) 481-5158; Bspkingston.com.

April 27-28. This month marks the fifth year of Basilica Hudson’s transcendent 24-Hour Drone festival. At press time, the growing, diverse roster includes Ustad Shafaat Khan, Deradoorian, AHRKH, Kinlaw, Never Temple, Jay Rodriguez, Brooklyn Raga Massive, Famous Accordion Orchestra, the Hudson Valley Shakuhachi Choir, Iva Bittova and Matt Norman, Anastasia Clarke, Sondra Sun-Odean, and more. “[Attendees] are free to come and go over the 24 hours,” the organizers explain. “But those who make the commitment to this long-duration work will be rewarded with the intangible feeling of meditative contentment, pure bliss, and communal collaboration.” Wear something warm and bring bedding to crash on the floor. Food and beverages will be for sale. Hudson. Basilicahudson.org.

April 28. Known via her appearance in the 1996 documentary Buena Vista Social Club, singer and dancer Omara Portuondo, now 88 and coming to the Bardavon, is one of Cuba’s living cultural treasures. Born in Havana’s Cayo Hueso neighborhood, she began performing in the late 1940s and in the 1950s and ’60s sang with the prestigious Oquestra Anacona and the vocal group Cuarteto d’Aida, touring the US with the former ensemble. In 1967, she began a solo career that saw her become a major star in her homeland and in Europe. Portuondo’s duet with Ibrahim Ferrer in Buena Vista Social Club is one of the film’s most magical moments. (Angelique Kidjo does Talking Heads’ Remain in Light April 11; Bruce Hornsby makes his way in April 27.) 7pm. $44, $59, $156. Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2072; Bardavon.org.

April 28. It’s difficult to think of a more graceful, meditative way to musically welcome the long-awaited arrival of spring than this evening at the Beverly presented by BSP. Singer and guitarist Meg Baird will be well familiar with freak-folkies thanks to her work with Espers and Heron Oblivion, while harpist Mary Lattimore is a prolific solo artist who’s worked with Kurt Vile, Sunburned Hand of the Man, and others. It was only natural that the two friends would eventually make records together, and the first of them was released last fall: Ghost Forests, a six-song EP that weaves together softly soaring strands of psychedelia, contemporary experimentalism, and arcane, ancient Anglo-folk balladry. 7pm. $15. (845) 514-2570; Facebook.com/ TheBeverlyLounge.

4/19 CHRONOGRAM THE GUIDE 91


Horoscopes By Lorelai Kude

“SHARING IS CARING”: A LIFEHACK FOR SUCCESS A cosmic revolution in American consumer consciousness is underway as the lunar nodes transit though the regions of our national natal chart governing “things we share with others” and “things that belong to me.”

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Fundamental changes are afoot over the next two years—“battle lines being drawn, nobody’s right if everybody’s wrong” isn’t simply a refrain from a ’60’s protest anthem but the leitmotif of the currently emerging culture wars. April’s planetary powers come to teach us that polarized partisanship means very little when rising tides lift all boats and a perfect storm sinks each one of them. How obvious is it yet that we’re all in this together? The New Moon in Aries on April 6 beckons our inner child into the Garden of Eden, where cherubim with flaming swords bar the way for cynical, world-weary grownups who may not enter. The Full Moon at the final degree of Libra on March 19 falls on Good Friday, a day imbued with the very essence of the extremes to which unconditional love will go to prove itself real. Ultimately, it is our ability to share resources and establish intimacies with others which build relationships, both communal and personal. It is these relationships which will save us—not isolating ourselves in sterile safe rooms or behind backlit screens. Relationships are what makes us human and our humanity is what redeems us—not chasing the dragon of an unattainable, impossibly perfectionistic divinity. April’s message is about seeing yourself as a glorious individual who is part of an enormous, complicated cosmic dance. You’ve come to play a poignant, nuanced, triumphant, Oscar-winning part and April’s gift is the understanding that healthy self-respect is the key to successfully playing well with others. “Sharing is caring” isn’t just a feel-good slogan but a necessary, nourishing important lifehack.

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Fundamental delight in your own vitality and lifeforce motivate your will to power during April as you become increasingly attuned to sensual influence and the subtle nuances of new-grown hope. Communicative Mercury and romantic Venus meet up in assertive Aries on April 20, inspiring sweet talk and graceful yet courageous statements of truth. Steamroll through multitasking as ruling planet Mars in Gemini offers a smorgasbord of energetic outlets for both curiosity and passion, especially April 8-10. Relationship choices take a surprising turn by April 26 as you contemplate the cost benefits of stability over the exciting but erratic unknown.

TAURUS (April 19–May 20)

Uranus and the Sun in Taurus, April 20-23, activate fresh insights into issues of personal identity. Even the most down-to-earth Taurus balks when it comes to a choice between conforming to expectations and being true to your essential authenticity. You may fight for the right to be yourself by rebelling against someone else’s idea of who you should be. Dreams are the key to the storage vault of your subconscious this month; you’ve stored a lot of stuff and now it’s time to start unpacking those boxes, one by one. Your heart remembers where you hid your secret treasures.


GEMINI (May 20–June 21)

Energetic Mars in Gemini all during April keeps your multitrack, multitasking skill set razor-sharp. Like Alice, things will get curiouser and curiouser, and you can’t resist a puzzle of any kind, but don’t let yourself fall down the rabbit’s hole of distraction especially April 8-10. Keep forward-focused and resist ambivalence around assertive behavior after April 17 by understanding that the price of getting what you want is having to ask for it. Playing coy with your desires leaves you out in the cold so drop the shame game: Ask and ye shall be given, seek and ye shall find.

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(June 21–July 22)

By April 12 you’ll be testing your newfound vision against challenges of resources and realism. Double down on faith in your own dreams and inspire others to believe in you as well. Abundance flows from sources who consider you a wise investment. Power and control conflicts arise when externalized expectations clash with internalized concepts of competency and self-worth. Balance your self-perception with compassionate self-care and recalibrate your self-confidence with a review of your greatest hits April 17-19. Don’t rest on your laurels but wear them with pride: Acknowledging your past successes bolsters confidence in the fruit of your future efforts.

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LEO (July 22–August 23)

Surprising challenges to your competency and professionalism seem to come out of left field and you may feel blindsided by criticism from an unexpected source. Consider the risk/ reward ratio of acknowledging vulnerability instead of mounting a military self-defense. Don’t catastrophize imperfection— mistakes are your teachers, take the opportunity to learn from them. You have so much credibility in the bank, nobody is going to fault you for being human. You shine brightest in community April 13-14, attracting warmth and generosity as you radiate inspiration to others. Your true and authentic humility is born of acknowledged grace and realistic self-acceptance.

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VIRGO (August 23–September 23)

Sharing leadership, credit, and project outcomes with others without compromising your hard-won authority is your magic trick this month, Virgo. Undefined responsibilities and blurry roles become unacceptable after April 20; it’s hard for you to tolerate ambiguity in your professional associations. Support comes from surprising places and faces from the past whose respect and admiration for your good name is better than gold. Find your niche by doing what only you can do and do it with all your might. Rise to the level at which you’re aspiring to be acknowledged; your efforts will not go unrecognized or be undervalued.

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LIBRA (September 23–October 23)

Lucky Libra gets two Full Moons in your sign this year! Last month’s Full Moon at zero degrees Libra is bookended by this month’s Full Moon at 29 Libra on April 19. The entire swath of Libra’s emotional spectrum experiences deeper lessons in balancing the obligations of partnership with the imperative of self-care. You go from dreamily romantic to persistent and practical in your affections after April 20 as your nesting instinct kicks into high gear and harmonizing becomes your priority. Creativity and the urge to beautify gets a boost especially in your home environment. Don’t skimp on pleasure!

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4/19 CHRONOGRAM HOROSCOPES 93


Horoscopes

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

You’re re-energized and eager to take the next big step forward April 4-5, and you’re not inclined to politely wait your turn. After playing nice for an unusually extended period you’re primed for playing to win. Stakes are high April 19-20 but so is your self-confidence; you don’t bank on wind but on well-chosen, carefully planned and executed tactical moves with you coming out on top. You ponder the possibilities of partnership, but experience has taught you that no one person can meet all your multifaceted needs: Serenity comes by contenting yourself with “good enough” rather than unattainable perfection.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 22)

Jupiter’s retrograde in Sagittarius, April 10, puts the brakes on your “damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead” trajectory just in time to examine your ship of state for possible cracks in her hull. You’re busy in a zig-zaggy kind of way with every important detail of a million different projects, which seemingly have nothing in common. The Big Picture will start to emerge by mid-June, when you’ll find you’ve been instinctually following the right path even though everything seems so fragmented right now. Meanwhile follow the yellow brick road and keep those ruby slippers tight on your feet!

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 20)

Gain insight and create change

A strong sense of resolve and a no-nonsense approach to home security drives your concerns this month as you invest in protecting your environment and your personal space. Ideally, you’d like a love nest which doubles as a mighty fortress in which to stash your valuables and ensconce your beloveds, and you’re not in the mood to be told you need to choose either/or. Don’t accept binary solutions now when you know the answers lie somewhere in-between. Take a great quality of life leap forward April 23-25, accept all upgrades the universe is offering you with grace and gratitude.

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94 HOROSCOPES CHRONOGRAM 4/19

(January 20–February 19)

Projects you began in early February come to fruition by April 26, and you’re ready for the Next Big Thing, which may turn out to originate from a surprising source close to home. You are championed or challenged by “family” whether defined by blood or by choice. Either way, your closest connections urge you to carefully consider how to manifest resources for your next move. Take wise advice as offered from sages and experts rather than going it alone now. A timely confluence of tried and true supporters as well as unexpected allies are invested in supporting your success!

PISCES (February 19–March 20)

It’s all happy talk and love songs through April 17-19, when the holding pattern of your relationship breaks out of gravity’s pull and shoots for the stars. Whether you fall off the rocket or ride it to the moon depends on the faith you’ve developed in your own instincts and whether you’re ready to ignore negative nay-sayers who think love is a winner-take-all proposition. There are no losers in your emotional economy; love is a win-win for everyone or it’s just a contest not worth competing in. Those not rooting for you need to be cut from the roster.


Ad Index

Our advertisements are a catalog of distinctive local experiences. Please support the fantastic businesses that make Chronogram possible.

Adams Fairacre Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Halter Associates Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Newburgh Illuminated Festival . . . . . . . . . 58

Adelphi University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6

Hamlet Printing Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Newburgh Mercantile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

APG Pilates Newburgh . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Harney & Sons Fine Teas . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

The Newburgh Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Aqua Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

Hawthorne Valley Association . . . . . . . . . 50

Newburgh Vintage Emporium . . . . . . . . . . 30

Ari Rosen - Stone Ridge Healing Arts . . . . . 45

Health Quest . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

back cover

North Plank Road Tavern . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

Arrowood Farm-Brewery . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Hendley and Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Opus 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Atlantic Custom Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

Herrington’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Palate Wines and Spirits . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Atlas Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Hildi Kaufmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Pamela’s on the Hudson . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Augustine Landscaping & Nursery . . . . . . . 39

Holistic Natural Medicine: Integrative Healing Arts . . . . . . . . . . 45

Pegasus Comfort Footwear . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Bacchus Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 The Bakery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Bardavon 1869 Opera House . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Barn Star Productions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Beacon Institute For Rivers and Estuaries . . . 80 Beacon Natural Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Benjamin Custom Modular Homes . . . . . . . 41 Benmarl Vineyards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Bethel Woods Center for the Arts . . . . . . . . 78 Binnewater/Leisure Time Spring Water . . . . . 30 Bistro To Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Bodhi Spa, Yoga, & Salon . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Buns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Cabinet Designers, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Cafe Mio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Cantine Veterans Memorial Sports Complex, Town of Saugerties . . 49

Holland Tunnel Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Hollenbeck Pest Control . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 The Homestead School . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Hotchkiss School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Hudson Hills Montessori School . . . . . . . . 44 Hudson River Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Hudson Valley 5 Rhythms . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Hudson Valley Goldsmith . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Hudson Valley House Parts . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Hudson Valley Sunrooms . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Hurleyville Arts Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Inn and Spa at Beacon . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Jack’s Meats & Deli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Jacobowitz & Gubits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 John A Alvarez and Sons . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 John Carroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Jon Beer Contracting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Peter Aaron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Peter Saluk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Poison Ivy Patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

Poughkeepsie Day School . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Poughkeepsie Public Library District . . . . . . 85 Primrose Hill School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Radio Kingston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Red Hook Curry House . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Red Mannequin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Redeemer New Paltz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Regal Bag Studios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Regent Tours, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Rocket Number Nine Records . . . . . . . . . 86 Rosendale Theater Collective . . . . . . . . . . 86 Salisbury Artisan Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art . . . . . . . . . 59 Scenic Art Studios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Schatzi’s New Paltz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Cassandra Currie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Kaatsbaan International Dance Center . . . . . 92

Catania, Mahon, Milligram and Rider, PLLC . . 54

Kary Broffman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Catskill Art & Office Supply . . . . . . . . . . . 80

Kasuri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Catskill Case Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Kent Art Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Catskill Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Kingston Consignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Catskill Mountain Railroad . . . . . . . . . . . 85

Uptown Kingston Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Chronogram Smartcard . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Kol Hai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

CO. Rhinebeck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

L Browe Asphalt Services . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

Colony Woodstock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Leed Custom Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Crisp Architects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Liberty Street Vintage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

CSA Coalition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Lifebridge Foundation Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Daryls House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Liza Phillips Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Dental Office of Drs. Jeffrey & Maureen Viglielmo . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Lush Eco-Salon & Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

Dreaming Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

Mark Gruber Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Embodyperiod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

Menla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Exit Nineteen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

Ulster County Office of Economic Development . . . . . . . . . 2

Michael’s Appliance Center . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Fairground Shows NY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Mid Hudson Marketing . . . . . . inside back cover

Unison Arts Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Falcon Music & Art Productions . . . . . . . . 90

Mid Hudson Regional Hospital . . . . . . . . . 92

Fionn Reilly Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Mod66 Salon & Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Foster Flooring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Montgomery Veterinary Hospital . . . . . . . . 43

Friends of Clermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Mother Earth’s Storehouse . . . . . . . . . . . 57

From Europe to You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Motorcyclepedia Museum . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Glenn’s Wood Sheds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Mount Saint Mary College . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Gomez Mill House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

Mountain Laurel Waldorf School . . . . . . . . 58

Green Chimneys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Ms. Fairfax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Wimowe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Green Cottage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

My Cleaning Ladies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Woodland Pond at New Paltz . . . . . . . . . 1, 3

Maplebrook School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Schatzi’s Poughkeepsie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Scribner’s Catskill Lodge . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Solar Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Stamell String Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Stewart House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Stone Cottage Veterinary Hospital . . . . . . . 21 SUNY New Paltz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Thailicious . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Third Eye Associates Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Tiki Temple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Town and Country Liquors . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Transcend Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Transpersonal Acupuncture . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Tuthilltown Spirits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Vitality Bowls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 WAMC The Linda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 The Warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Warren Kitchen & Cutlery . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 WDST 100.1 Radio Woodstock . . . . . . . 80, 90 Wild Earth Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Williams Lumber & Home Center . . . . . . . inside front cover

Green Mountain Minerals . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

N & S Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild . . . . . . . . . . . 78

Gunk Haus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

New Genesis Productions . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

YMCA of Kingston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Hales Hardware & Home Supplies . . . . . . . 58

Newburgh Free Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Yoga on Duck Pond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

4/19 CHRONOGRAM HOROSCOPES 95


parting shot

“Fragility is not something that appeals to me,” says Lindsey Wolkowicz. This is obvious during a recent visit to the artist’s studio in Kingston. Far from precious, her paintings capture the hurlyburly of lived experience. Figures tumble through space in her work like characters pinwheeling through a particularly tumultuous Stoppard play. Carefully composed, they are lifelike, but clearly not an attempt to mimic life itself. Surfaces are important to Wolkowicz, who does much of her work on paper and wood. “You can beat on wood and paper,” she says. In her works on wood, she intentionally keeps part of the surface uncovered, so viewers are forced to reckon with it. “Wood has life in it, it contains movement in its skin,” Wolkowicz says. Although Wolkowicz does not currently have a show in the region, her work can be seen anytime on the back wall of the Anne Hebard School of Dance on Saint James Street in Kingston. Created for the 2018 O+ Festival, Lifted depicts a group of children, ascending through space against a wallpaper of colored vertical stripes twisted slightly out of shape. The children’s arms are all extended, reaching up, trying to find a grip on something to pull them out of the maelstrom. —Brian K. Mahoney 96 PARTING SHOT CHRONOGRAM 4/19

Cold Feet, graphite, acrylic, and wallpaper on wood. 2018.


30

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Now, when you visit the emergency rooms of HealthAlliance Hospital: Broadway Campus or MidHudson Regional Hospital, members of WMCHealth, you’ll be seen by a member of our care team within 30 minutes. That’s fast. That’s FAST E.R. Read our 30-Minutes-Or-Less E.R. Pledge at WMCHealth.org/ER30 HealthAlliance Hospital 396 Broadway, Kingston 845.331.3131 HAHV.org

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WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER HEALTH NETWORK Westchester Medical Center l Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital l Behavioral Health Center l MidHudson Regional Hospital Good Samaritan Hospital l Bon Secours Community Hospital l St. Anthony Community Hospital HealthAlliance Hospital: Broadway Campus l HealthAlliance Hospital: Mary’s Avenue Campus l Margaretville Hospital


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