Page 1


7/08 CHRONOGRAM 1


   

NO CUTTING, INCISIONLESS TECHNIQUES A VA I L A B L E

   

M.T. ABRAHAM, M.D., F.A.C.S.

O F F I C E S

    

        

    

           

    

2 CHRONOGRAM 7/08

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THE SOURCE FOR ITALIAN SPECIALTY PRODUCTS IN THE HUDSON VALLEY

Leonardo’s Italian Market

In the Courtyard behind the former Rhinebeck Hardware Store 9 Imported Berretta Cured Meats and Italian Cheeses

9 12 Signature Sandwiches made on our real Italian Bread

9 Fresh Sweet, Hot, Fennel and Cheese & Parsley Italian Sausage

9 Italian Sodas, Waters, Juices, Nectars, Syrups and Bitters

9 Fresh (Made Daily) Hormone-free Mozzarella

9 Imported Oils, Vinegars, Musts, Glazes and Truffles

9 Italian Pastries, Italian Cookies, Tiramisu and Ricotta Cheesecakes

9 Real Espresso and Cappuccino Illy Ground Coffees & Beans

9 Fresh Green, Seafood and Pasta Salads, Marinated Vegetables and 8 Varieties of Imported Olives

9 Crunchy Semolina Bread, Baguettes and Our Incredible Proscuitto Bread

9 14 Varieties of Fresh Ravioli & Fresh 9 Our Famous Spumoni Ice Cream (Simply Unbelievable) Pastas. 6 Homemade Pasta Sauces 9 Incredible Prepared Italian Entrees 9 Italian Ices, Gelato, Sorbet, Italian Chocolate & Torrone for Take-Out Made on the Premises 9 Large Selection of Fresh Legumes, Semolina Flour, Nuts & Honeys

9 Italian Novelty Shirts, Hats, Aprons, Bibs, Books and Music

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7/08 CHRONOGRAM 3


Come Visit Ours!

Here’s your invitation to visit our Lindal Cedar Homes Display Model in Cold Spring, New York in the beautiful Hudson Valley.

Atlantic Custom Homes Open Houses Saturday - July 12 & August 23, 2008 10 AM – 5 PM Home Building Seminar Saturday, July 19, 2008 11AM – 1 PM (Reservations are needed) Call 888-558-2636 today for information and directions.

4 CHRONOGRAM 7/08


A STAR-STUDDED

SUMMER! FRIDAY

SUNDAY

SATURDAY

JULY 11

JULY 13

JULY 19

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

JULY 27

AUG 12

AUG 13

WITH SPECIAL GUEST TAYLOR SWIFT

CONCERT SERIES ON TWO NEW STAGES INCLUDE:

ADDITIONAL CONCERTS... AUG 2 - NY DOO WOPP SHOW

Arts Under the Stars at the TERRACE STAGE

AUG 3 - HIPPIEFEST AUG 14 - JONAS BROTHERS AUG 22 - BOSTON POPS AUG 30 - JOURNEY, HEART & CHEAP TRICK FULL SCHEDULE AT BETHELWOODSCENTER.ORG

ADD A MUSEUM ADMISSION TO YOUR CONCERT TICKET ORDER TODAY!

OPEN NOW

Music in The Museum at the EVENTS GALLERY Get full concert schedule at BethelWoodsCenter.org

Tickets available at BethelWoodsCenter.org | by phone 845.454.3388 Bethel Woods Box OfямБce | Ticketmaster.com or Outlets | Group sales 845.295.2521 | Info at 1.866.781.2922 Bethel, New York | Exit 104 off Route 17 at the site of the 1969 Woodstock festival

1.800.882.CATS www.scva.net 7/08 CHRONOGRAM 5


CONTENTS 7/08

NEWS AND POLITICS

CULINARY ADVENTURES

23 WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING

77 OFF THE BEATEN PALATE

The gist of what you may have missed in the back pages of the global media maelstrom: rising preamture births, organic ingredients, and shark populations.

Brian K. Mahoney tours the region in search of offbeat fare.

80 LISTING OF LOCAL FARMERS’ MARKETS

26 DEADLY HARVEST Lorna Tychostup, reporting from Iraq, speaks with members of the Mines Advisory Group about the details of ensuring the safety of Iraqi citizens from explosions.

32 BEINHART’S BODY POLITIC Larry Beinhart examines how articles of impeachment against George W. Bush were barely covered by the major news outelts and why they should have been.

COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK 34 A PASSION FOR PIANO

86 THE UNKNOWN HEALTH PRICE OF PLASTICS Ilyse A. Simon discusses the dangers of the chemical Bisphenol A and suggests modifications to how we use plastic, as well as alternatives to plastic.

BUSINESS SERVICES 73 TASTINGS A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 81 BUSINESS DIRECTORY A compendium of advertiser services. 89 WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY For the positive lifestyle. Amber S. Clark

Dorothy Noe interviews freelance concert pianist Babette Hierholzer about her childhood in Berlin, her home in Red Hook, and the development of her craft.

WHOLE LIVING GUIDE

34

6 CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Pianist Babette Hierholzer on the shore of the Hudson River in Rhinecliff. COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK


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CONTENTS 7/08

ARTS & CULTURE 38 PORTFOLIO Artwork as well as photographs from an installation by Tatana Kellner.

40 LUCID DREAMING Beth E. Wilson airs her grievances with the “Cat-n-Around Catskill” project.

42 GALLERY & MUSEUM GUIDE 50 MUSIC Peter Aaron profiles Cottekill-based saxophonist Joe Giardullo. Nightlife Highlights by DJ Wavy Davy and CD reviews of: Bill Brovold & Larval Surviving Death/Alive Why? Reviewed by Cheryl K. Symister-Masterson. The Gypsy Nomads Eternal Summer Reviewed by Sharon Nichols. The Chief Smiles Great for Terrible Times Reviewed by Jason Broome.

54 BOOKS Nina Shengold profiles The Baby-Sitters Club series author Ann M. Martin.

56 BOOK REVIEWS Anne Pyburn reviews Maiden USA: Girl Icons Come of Age by Kathleen Sweeney and Do My Story, Sing My Song: Music Therapy and Playback Theater with Troubled Children by Jo Salas. Our summer reading list of recently published books for kids, teens, and young writers by Hudson Valley authors and illustrators.

60 POETRY

Jennifer May talks with Amy Goldman about her extensive garden and her advocacy for heirloom fruits and vegetables in Arbiter of Heirlooms.

132 PARTING SHOT An Interpretation of Cartography, a silk screen print by Caitlin Wheeler, part of the “Printed Matter” exhibition at the Ann Street Gallery in the city of Newburgh.

THE FORECAST 108 DAILY CALENDAR Comprehensive listings of local events. (Daily updates of calendar listings are posted at Chronogram.com.) PREVIEWS 107 Sparrow previews the Berkshire Fringe Festival, July 16 through August 4 at Simon’s Rock College in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. 109 Jay Blotcher profiles Thomas Kail, Broadway director of “Broke-ology,” which will be at the Williamstown Theater Festival in Massachusetts, July 9 through July 20. 110 King Roger and Harnasie will be performed at the Bard College’s SummerScape. 113 The exhibition “Current” will be held at five riverfront towns through August 10. 117. Maya Horowitz previews the The Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, which runs through August 24, in Becket, Massachusetts. 121 Sparrow profiles the The Post Neo Trio, to perfrom July 25 at Belleayre Mountain. 123 Brian K. Mahoney’s Q&A with comedy writer Alan Zweibel, who will perform “History of Me” at the Powerhouse Theater at Vassar July 18 through July 20.

PLANET WAVES 126 In Canada, They Call it Therapy Eric Francis Coppolino reflects upon his first experience teaching the Chiron process to astrology students at the Omega Institute. Plus horoscopes.

Jennifer May

Poems by Tricia J. Asklar, John Tiong Chunghoo, Michael Colwell, Emily Daly, Howie Good, Kevin Kenny, Ginger McMahon, Elaine Mills, Lisa Parisio, Aaron Poochigian, Xavier Roca, Christiaan Sabatelli, Herschel Schlank, and Stephen Jarrell Williams.

64 FOOD & DRINK

64

8 CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Amy Goldman and Alberto Shatters, an heirloom tomato from her Rhinebeck greenhouse. FOOD & DRINK


7/08 CHRONOGRAM 9


ON THE COVER

Lobster House lisa krivacka | oil on wood |  Though some might view images of cooling towers, house fronts, giant generators, or baton twirlers as hackneyed Americana, Lisa Krivacka sees them as artistic gold. Krivacka finds images for her artwork in anonymous amateur photos, magazines, travel guides, and most importantly, postcards. “I would go to flea markets and see really quirky postcards and I became interested in the more banal ones. Why would someone make a postcard of the state highway building of Columbia, South Carolina?” Krivacka said. “I really seek out the humor.” Krivacka’s paintings are renderings of mostly vintage postcards advertising restaurants, hotels, or anything that stands out to her as interesting or odd. Her fascination with illustrating postcards could be due to the fact that she traveled little during her childhood; her father’s job—as an employee of the Vacationland Motor Hotel in her hometown of Clarksville, Tennessee—kept her at home as he made vacations possible for others. It’s as if Krivacka is living out her lost vacations vicariously through her paintings, scribbling “Wish you were here” on the back of the postcards she never got to write as a child. Despite the surrealist quality and bright colors in Krivacka’s work, a noticeable eeriness pervades a tension that Krivakca likes to play with in her postcard renderings. “You can take an innocent-looking postcard that’s advertising a room but yet, there is something that could be very creepy about that room.” She references Paul Dennis Reid Jr., who murdered seven people in 1997 in a string of restaurant robberies while living at the Vacationland Motor Hotel, and who is currently awaiting execution in Tennessee. While her work has been characterized as ironic, Krivacka explains that this is never a conscious intention. “I think it’s just there in the resource material that I use and I’m just bringing it out, what I find to be the quirkiness about it, that the person who actually generated it in the first place was probably unaware of,” she said. Lobster House is based upon an image Krivacka purchased 10 years ago at a postcard show at the New Yorker Hotel advertising a restaurant of the same name that once existed in Jacksonville, Florida. The piece was painted shortly after Krivacka moved to Germantown, where she currently lives. “I wanted to do something aquatic, and I had that postcard of the basic lobster house boat with that shadowy man driving it,” Krivacka said. At the same time, she was looking at the scientific illustrations by Ernst Haeckel from the 1800s. “I was fascinated in his kind of beautiful, otherworldly drawings of these actual microscopic creatures in the sea—they added to the element of mystery and scariness in a way.” Thirty of Krivacka’s paintings will be displayed in “Almost Utopia,” a solo show at the Frederieke Taylor Gallery in Chelsea through August 8. Krivacka is represented by the Leo Fortuna Gallery in Hudson. www.frederieketaylorgallery. com; www.leofortuna.com; Portfolio: www.lisakrivacka.com. —Amy Lubinski 10 CHRONOGRAM 7/08


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EDITORIAL Meet the farmers who put the local in locally grown

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Perry dperry@chronogram.com SENIOR EDITOR Lorna Tychostup tycho56@aol.com BOOKS EDITOR Nina Shengold books@chronogram.com HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR Lorrie Klosterman wholeliving@chronogram.com POETRY EDITOR Phillip Levine poetry@chronogram.com

July 26 & 27, 2008

MUSIC EDITOR Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com VISUAL ARTS EDITOR Beth E. Wilson visualarts@chronogram.com EDITORIAL INTERN Amy Lubinski alubinski@chronogram.com

Enjoy spectacular scenery, sample farm-grown products, and watch demonstrations of sustainable agriculture, beekeeping, corn harvesting and more while learning about the rich agricultural heritage of this special region. The self-guiding tour will feature classes or demonstrations all weekend long at:

Gill Corn Farms

Experience a corn harvesting demonstration from a haywagon pulled alongside an operating corn harvester.

Five Springs Farm

An up-close demonstration of bees

and beekeeping.

Davenport Farms Take a tour of this full scale vegetable operation to learn what goes into raising vegetables from farm to fork. Farm & Granary

A walking tour and class on Sustainable Agriculture in the Rondout Valley.

westwind organic Orchard A guided tour through one of the area’s historic orchards, where you will learn about running a small organic apple orchard. Rusty Plough Farm

Learn about their unique CSA/buying club model, as well as how to grow healthy plants via healthy soils and management of the surrounding habitat.

Duchess Farm

This horse facility’s manure management program creates composted manure mixed with topsoil for garden and landscaping use.

Country Flowers

A greenhouse tour and demonstration of bedding plant propagation.

Catskill Native Nursery

Learn what it means to become an ecological gardener and turn your property into a beautiful, bio-diverse haven for birds, butterflies, beneficial insects and small mammals.

Hasbrouck Farms A tour of a large selection of antique farming equipment and hand tools along with the RVGA’s walk-through historical farming exhibit. Farm Tour participants receive a map, coupons for local businesses, restaurants, B&Bs, & farm products. Experience the culinary pleasures of good, wholesome locally grown food. Aroma Thyme Bistro, DePuy Canal House, Friends and Family ll Hillside Restaurant, High Falls Café, Northern Spy Cafe, and Oscar Restaurant will use Rondout Valley products as part of their menu and offer discounts to all tour participants. Stay with us the whole weekend and receive discounts at participating bed & breakfasts: Baker’s Bed & Breakfast, The LockTender’s House, The Sheeley House Bed & Breakfast, Sparrow Hawk Bed & Breakfast, and 1712 House.

For more information visit www.rondoutvalleygrowers.org

PROOFREADER Teal Hutton CONTRIBUTORS Emil Alzamora, Tricia J. Asklar, Jennifer Barry, Larry Beinhart, Jay Blotcher, Jason Broome, Amber S. Clark, Michael Colwell, Eric Francis Coppolino, David Morris Cunningham, Emily Daly, DJ Wavy Davy, Howie Good, Maya Horowitz, Annie Dwyer Internicola, Kevin Kenny, Jennifer May, Ginger McMahon, Elaine Mills, Sharon Nichols, Lisa Pariso, Matt Petricone, Aaron Poochigian, Anne Pyburn, Fionn Reilly, Xavier Roca, Christiaan Sabatelli, Herschel Schlank, Ilyse A. Simon, Sparrow, Cheryl K. Symister-Masterson, John Tiong-Chunghoo, Stephen Jarrell Williams

PUBLISHING FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky PUBLISHER Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com ADVERTISING SALES Talisa Foulks tfoulks@chronogram.com; (518) 505-2907 France Menk fmenk@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x106 Eva Tenuto etenuto@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x102 Shirley Stone sstone@chronogram.com; (845) 876-2194 ADMINISTRATIVE CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Amara Projansky aprojansky@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x105 BUSINESS MANAGER Ruth Samuels rsamuels@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107 PRODUCTION PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Jacky Davis-Soman jdavis@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 PRODUCTION DESIGNERS Mary Maguire, Sabrina Gilmore, Eileen Carpenter OFFICE 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

MISSION Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Luminary Publishing 2008

SUBMISSIONS CALENDAR: To submit calendar listings, e-mail: events@chronogram.com Fax: (845) 334-8610. Mail: 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 Deadline: July 15

POETRY Submissions of up to three poems at a time can be sent to poetry@chronogram.com or our street address. See above.

or email Debbie@rondoutvalleygrowers.org The Farm Tour was made possible by grants from The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, Watershed Agricultural Council and NYC DEP. All monies raised from this event go directly to support the Rondout Valley Growers Association

12 CHRONOGRAM 7/08

FICTION/NONFICTION: Fiction: Submissions can be sent to fiction@chronogram.com. Nonfiction: Succinct queries about stories of regional interest can be sent to bmahoney@chronogram.com.


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7/08 CHRONOGRAM 13


LETTERS Meat Is Methane To the Editor: Thank you for publishing Teal Hutton’s article on “Tips on Sustainable Living” in your June issue. This valuable information was presented in a clear, easily digested fashion. My concern is focused on the “Buy Local” section. Supporting local agriculture is one of the best ways to reduce the carbon footprint our food makes on its way from farm to dinner plate. However, studies have shown that what we choose to eat has a far greater impact on the environment than how far it was shipped. The single most important step a person can take in this regard is to reduce or eliminate consuming animal flesh. Animal agriculture is the number one source of methane, a gas 21 times more potent than CO2 in its capacity to trap heat in our atmosphere. While CO2 levels have risen by about a third since pre-industrial times, methane has more than doubled. Whereas human sources of CO2 amount to just 3 percent of natural emissions, human sources produce one and a half times as much methane as natural sources. While a single cow releases a relatively small amount of methane, the collective effect on the environment of the billions of livestock animals worldwide is enormous. An additional 15 percent of animal agriculture methane emissions are released from massive “lagoons” used to store untreated animal waste, and are the number one source of water pollution in this country. A shift away from methane-emitting food sources is much easier than cutting CO2. First, there is no limit to reductions in this source of greenhouse gas that can be achieved through a vegetarian diet. Second, shifts in diet lower greenhouse gas emissions much more quickly than shifts away from the fossil fuel—burning technologies that emit CO2. The turnover rate for most ruminant farm animals is one or two years, so decreases in meat consumption would result in an almost immediate drop in methane emissions. The turnover rate for cars and power plants, on the other hand, can be decades. In addition, while CO2 can remain in the air for more than a century, methane cycles out of the atmosphere in just eight years, so that lower methane emissions quickly translate into a cooling planet. So yes, please buy from your local farmers, but try to reduce or eliminate your consumption of anything with a face. Like the bumper sticker says, “Real environmentalists don’t eat meat.” Dr. Michael Roth, Canaan

Reactionary Reaction To the Editor: Larry Beinhart’s “commentary” column [“Old Myths/New Truths,” 6/08] proclaiming the new truth that jean-craving, rock-loving “hippies” tore down the Berlin Wall overlooked the fact that there was no “Evil Empire” with waiting gulags to gobble up the happy waifs. That was due to a pope, a prime, and a prez, according to John O’Sullivan in a book out by Regnery about the three tyranny breakers, subtitled “Three Who Changed the World.” Jim Motavalli’s very informative piece on immigration [“Coming to America,” 6/08] noted that without immigrants, jobs would go begging—an unmentioned factor is the missing 43 million, or about 1.3 million a year, since Roe v. Wade. With that fateful decision, America declared war on its own people, leaving a vacuum that the immigrants seeking jobs and opportunity are very happy to fill. Dick Murphy, Beacon

DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS Due to an editing error, last month’s edition of Chronogram carried the May horoscope for a second time. The correct June horoscope is posted at www.chronogram.com. Our astrologer, Eric Francis Coppolino, notes that when the error occurred, Mercury was retrograde in Gemini, an astrological phenomenon associated with chaos and disorder. An article in the June issue previewing a show of illustrations from Ladybug Girl, a children’s book by David Soman and Jacky Davis, incorrectly asserted that Soman teaches at the Art Students League. He does not. 14 CHRONOGRAM 7/08


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16 CHRONOGRAM 7/08


LOCAL LUMINARY JILL GRUBER LEADING LIGHTS OF THE COMMUNITY

At the Hudson Valley Materials Exchange, one might find an item as small as the spine of a three-ring binder or something as large as a window unit. “Stuff Central,” as Newburgh native and HVME founder Jill Gruber likes to describe the nonprofit, is an organization dedicated to keeping usable materials out of the waste-stream. Originally created as a municipal program in the Town of New Paltz to catalogue local materials waste in 1993, the HVME has grown into a place that creates the possibility for useful exchange among the local community. Gruber also runs programs in area schools, teaching students how the materials, with a little bit of imagination, can make the amazing transformation into art. Since 2001, the organization has been housed in a 10,000 square-foot warehouse

at Stewart Airport, where shoppers could browse at their leisure. Following the recent purchase of Stewart by the Port Authority, HVME moved to Town of New Paltz Transfer Station in June. Instead of its former warehouse set-up, the format will be much like that of an open-air market housed in a succession of trailers. Shoppers can now browse the myriad items Gruber has saved by browsing a series of trailers, each with an aisle down the center. More of Gruber’s “stuff” will be housed out in the open; in the future, Gruber hopes to see the entire operation under a large tent for shelter. For more information: www.hvmaterialsexchange.com. —Jennifer Barry

DAVID MORRIS CUNNINGHAM

What was the initial spark of inspiration for the Hudson Valley Materials Exchange? I was originally the recycling coordinator of both New Paltz and Saugerties. It was really an eye-opener to see all the stuff that we got that could be reused. The one moment that sticks out in my mind was this guy who came with a pickup truck full of perfectly good clay flower pots. I said to myself, “There needs to be some kind of a system to capture this kind of stuff.” At that time, legislation was also being put into place where the government was telling businesses how to manage their waste. I wanted to understand, as a person who had worked in both the public and the nonprofit sector, how businesses worked. I thought that the only way to do that was to run a business myself. Also, part of it is that I’ve always been a packrat. It was great having 10,000 square feet of stuff that I didn’t have to take home with me.

What makes the Hudson Valley Materials Exchange different from other materials exchange programs? We are the only program that does both [retrieval and dispersal]. We rescue materials and make them available to the public, and we also have our education program. Education is a big part of the Hudson Valley Materials Exchange. Most organizations are an either/or kind of deal. I’m really looking to partner with schools in the area and teach them about different recycling methods, and using art as a recycling tool. We are a great resource for teachers, and they can create an account with us. Bard College has been really good about using us. Teachers from Bard will bring their students down on fieldtrips and have them create projects based on the pieces they find. Unfortunately, most schools don’t use us enough or don’t even know about us. Now that we have a new home, I’m looking for different ways to change that.

What can we do in their day-to-day lives to become more conscientious consumers? Another goal of ours is to come up with simple things people can do that have not been talked about before. One thing the Hudson Valley Materials Exchange works educating people about is default margins on a computer. Thanks to Bill Gates, the margins on a printed document are 1.25 inches on the side and 1 inch on the top and bottom. If you reduce that to the minimum margin that the printer will take, it saves 30 percent on paper. And it takes about 30 seconds to do. Another one that I personally work on is “phantom load.” That’s when your electronics stand ready so they don’t have to warm-up. For example, if your modem is still on, its using energy, even if the computer is off. By turning those things off, you can save substantial amounts energy.

7/08 CHRONOGRAM 17


PIANOSUMMER

AT NEW PALTZ

I N S T I T U T E / F E S T I V A L

Vladimir Feltsman, Artistic Director

LIVE PERFORMANCES, FILM, THEATER, DEBATE

TICKETS & INFORMATION ONLINE AT THELINDA.ORG OR CALL 518-465-5233 Ex 4.

IT’S ALL HAPPENING AT THE LINDA! Meet the Composers

Festival Concerts July 12

PianoSummer Faculty Gala “Make it a point to visit the website for PianoSummer and check out a slew of the greatest pianists on the planet.” – alm@nac Vladimir Feltsman Bach-Busoni: Chaconne in D minor Susan Starr Rachmaninoff: Moments Musicaux, Op. 16, Nos. 3 and 4 Phillip Kawin Chopin: Ballade No. 3 in A-flat major, Op. 47 Alexander Korsantia Chopin: Scherzo No. 1 in B minor Robert Hamilton Ravel: Sonatine Paul Ostrovsky Ravel: Jeux d’Eau Alexander Slobodyanik Mendelssohn: Fantasia in F sharp minor

July 19

Robyn Hitchcock

Graham Parker & Mike Gent

Jul/9 8pm

Jul/10 8pm

Jul/18 5pm workshop 8pm show

Duo Piano Recital Vladimir Feltsman Alexander Korsantia Mozart: Sonata in D major for two pianos, K. 381, Kissine: “Recto-Verso” world premiere, Brahms: Variations on a theme by Haydn, Op. 56b, Ravel: La Valse for two pianos

July 26

Dancing on the Air

FEATURING

Annie & The Hedonists

Mark Frederick Band Katie Haverly Joe Nacco

Jul/19 8pm

Jul/24 7pm

Jul/26 Noon-11pm

Asylum Street Spankers

The Gourds

Keith Pray’s Big Soul Ensemble

Jul/29 8pm

Aug/27 8pm

Sep/18 8pm

Ira Glass

Cheryl Wheeler

Frigg

Sep/20 8pm

Oct/3 8pm

Oct/9 8pm

Ilya Yakushev Recital “Mr. Yakushev can do just about anything he wants.” – The New York

Times

Haydn: Sonata in D major, Hob. XV1:37, Prokofiev: Sonata No. 7 in B flat major, Op. 83, Ravel: Gaspard de la Nuit/Ondine/Le Gibet/Scarbo, La Valse

August 1

Vladimir Feltsman conducts the Hudson Valley Philharmonic 2008 Jacob Flier Competition Winner, featured soloist

Tchaikovsky: Suite from The Nutcracker, Prokofiev: Suite from Romeo and Juliet, and a concerto (tbd) performed by the winner of the 2008 Flier Competition

Plus Institute recitals, master classes, lectures and the Jacob Flier Piano Competition

On Exhibit Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art

McKenna Theatre 845.257.3880 box office Tkts: $27/22 Symphony: $37/32 Concerts begin at 8pm www.newpaltz.edu/piano

(845) 257-3844 www.newpaltz.edu/museum Hours: Monday – Friday, 11a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 1-5:00 p.m. Admission is free. Wheelchair accessible Two new exhibitions Opening reception: July 18, 5-8:00 p.m. Noongar Boodja: Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Ecology and Culture and All Hot and Bothered: Photographs from The Center for Photography at Woodstock

Live at The Linda!

The SDMA will be open one hour prior to PianoSummer events and during intermission.

Hear broadcasts of past live performances at The Linda, Wednesdays at 8pm on WAMC Northeast Public Radio 90.3FM or 1400AM on your radio dial. 7/2 - Gandalf Murphy & The Slambovian Circus of Dreams 7/9 - Dancing on the Air 7/16 - Melissa Ferrick and Chris Pureka 7/23 - Red Molly 7/30 - Chris Smither Dancing on the Air made possible by Tech Valley Communications. Meet the Composers is made possible in part by the City of Albany, NY. Media Sponsorship of CRUMBS Nite Out at The Linda by Exit 97.7 WEXT. Music programming supported by the New York State Music Fund, established by the New York State Attorney General at Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors.

18 CHRONOGRAM 7/08


CHRONOGRAM SEEN

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In finding a dentist

it’s important to make the best choice. Dr. Schwartz is a knowledgeable, caring, and experienced professional. He LISTENS to your concerns and does a thorough diagnosis of any problems. Then we DISCUSS options and COMMUNICATE with you until you are satisfied with any plan of treatment or maintenance. We are a small office in a small town. But we offer a level of treatment that you would expect in a large city. Dr. Schwartz is a graduate of NYU College of Dentistry. He continues to pursue additional training at dental education centers across the nation in such subjects as periodontics, orthodontics, implantology, and surgery. Dr. Schwartz has been at this location for eleven years. You will see the same dentist every time. You will notice that the dentist spends more time with you and takes more of a personal interest in your care than just about any other health professional you’ve ever met! We provide general dentistry including family care, implants, artistic cosmetic dentistry, surgical and non-surgical periodontics, extractions, root canal, and other services.

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Cafe Chronogram on June 21 at the Muddy Cup in Kingston. Top: David Temple Bottom: David Oliver and Rick Altman

CHRONOGRAM SPONSORS IN JULY: NEW YORK STATE BEER EXPO (7/19) ROSENDALE STREET FESTIVAL (7/19-20) READINGS AT MAPLE GROVE (7/27) 7/08 CHRONOGRAM 19


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Esteemed Reader “Man suffers mechanically from something that happened or did not happen.The Absolute suffers just because in a moment of panic the creation sprang from nothingness; and now He is helplessly crucified upon it, nailed down solid, as it were.” —Gorebag Da Lost aka EJ Gold

Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: The inside of a glacier is quiet. Nevertheless I listened for a sound, having always harbored the suspicion that glaciers are alive. I deduced this from the fact that like all sentient beings, they eat and excrete—everything in their path, and digested bits of detritus, respectively. So once inside the hollowed tunnels of the Mer de Glace, the largest glacier in the Alps, I tried to get very still to hear the inner organs of the glacier working. Unfortunately there was French muzak and a photographer hawking instant prints of tourists sitting next to his St. Bernard in a small studio carved out of the glacial ice. In between offers he would blow on his hands and stomp his feet, for it was cold in the glacier, though surreally warm enough for T-shirts outside. With the flow of tourists speaking French, and my little son saying, “Daddy, it’s cold, I want to go out of here,” I couldn’t make out the sound of the glacier breathing. There was also the noisy waterfall one was required to run through at the entrance of the “grotto.” Yes, the glacier is melting. It’s shrunken by half in 20 years—the blink of an eye in the life of a glacier—which suggests that if the glacier is alive, it is dying fast.The analogy of melted glacier spilling down the mountain like tears for the glacier’s own imminent demise was too obvious to miss. Inside, the tunnel walls glisten.The smooth ice has a large granular texture with bits of rock suspended here and there. Putting my hands on the cold, wet walls I felt the layered tons of frozen weather. And finally, though not hearing glacial stomach rumblings, I did hear silence; the quietude of the scale of time in which a glacier exists; a time in which traveling a hundred meters takes as many years. Quiet. Silence—behind the sound, within the sound; always present; like space in our universe in which matter is all-important, but almost non-existent—a cosmic silence that holds all sound in her perpetual embrace. In this silence I could vaguely make out something else—the Absolute’s pain at our collective ignorance that would kill a perfectly good glacier. But then, continues Gorebag (from above), “The Absolute is alone, eternally sensing the agony of eternity, and there is no one else out there. Outside help will never come.” Maybe I was just feeling sorry for God, like the man outside the glacier who said, “It’s sad, isn’t it? A pity that the glacier is melting.” It’s a pity, I thought, that the only beings—yes, humans—that have the possibility of sharing the Absolute’s burden are a bunch of comfort- and thrill-seekers who squander the resources given to help us fulfill a definite purpose. But there’s a particularly despicable sound in “it’s a pity” talk. It’s shallow and lacks teeth. Clearly pity and sympathy are useless for glaciers, the Absolute, or anyone, really. They are a self-indulgent means of self-calming, like a special pharmaceutical designed to anesthetize the pangs of genuine conscience. Which raises a further question, once again formulated by Gorebag (almost certainly a relative of the famous purveyor of Gold’s Horseradish): How exactly can I return the hospitality of the Absolute? This question increased in intensity with each of the 300 steps up the mountain out of the glacier. As we got onto the train, my son hit his shin. I held him as he wailed. I breathed into his pain. And realized that was it—compassion. Its root means “suffer with,” suggesting that the burden of pain is truly shared. Clearly this is very different from sympathy or pity, as it means making the emotional realm available to feel whatever the other is feeling. Every being that feels itself as a separate ego is a part of the all-in-all, the Absolute. If I can “suffer with” whoever is suffering in front of me, I am, in a small but infinitely meaningful way, alleviating some of the suffering of the Absolute. Even a dying glacier. Even a tree. A dog. A child. Even an arrogant fool that doesn’t even recognize he’s suffering, or why. —Jason Stern

MELISSA MCDONALD

7/08 CHRONOGRAM 21


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22 CHRONOGRAM 7/08


decades. Additionally, one billion square feet of storage space was created between 1998 and 2005, even though the average American home has grown 900 square feet in the past three decades. Source: Alternet.org Recently retired Army official Charles M. Smith said he was forced out of his job in 2004 as the senior civilian overseeing the multibillion-dollar contract with Kellogg Brown & Root—the Houston-based company that has provided food, housing, and other services to American troops in Iraq since the start of the war—after he refused to approve more than $1 billion in questionable charges by the company. After Smith was removed from his position, Army officials reversed his decision, arguing that blocking the payments to KBR would have eroded basic services to troops in Iraq. KBR has been contracted for more than $20 billion by the Pentagon thus far in the Iraq War and has come under intense scrutiny from Congress and Pentagon auditors. In April, the Pentagon awarded KBR part of a 10-year $150 billion contract in Iraq. Source: New York Times

Americans waste 30 million tons of food each year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, with 27 percent of that food suitable for consumption: fresh produce, milk, and grain products. In addition, food donations have decreased 9 percent but the number of people showing up for those donations has increased 20 percent. The Department of Agriculture estimates that recovering five percent of wasted food could feed four million people a day. In an effort to combat the large amounts of wasted food, major cities such as New York and San Francisco have developed food-rescue organizations as well as composting programs. Source: New York Times Premature births in the US increased 10 percent between 1996 and 2004, according to research conducted by the March of Dimes and the Centers for Disease Control. Ninety-two percent of those premature births occurred by C-section. C-sections are usually only performed when a natural birth is not feasible because of complications that could threaten the life of the mother or child, but many women are opting for C-sections out of convenience and their doctors are obliging due to fear of patient litigation. In 2004, 30 percent of births in the US were by C-section, an increase of 25 percent since 1970. Source: CommonDreams.org The US Department of Agriculture has proposed adding 38 previously nonorganic ingredients to foods that receive the “USDA Organic” label. Sales of organic foods have more than doubled in the past five years. Food is considered organic when 95 percent or more of its makeup is considered natural and was grown by a farmer who is registered and approved by organic certification bodies. Proposed organic ingredients would include 19 food colorings, sausage and hot dog casings, fish oil, and gelatin. Organic food advocates are fighting the possible change. Source: Los Angeles Times A recent poll of 24 countries revealed that the image of the US has improved sightly over the past year. This improvement was largely driven by the fact that President Bush will be leaving in January 2008 and could be replaced by Democratic nominee Barack Obama. The survey of nearly 25,000 people conducted by the Pew Global Attitudes Project in March and April also revealed that many people blame the US in part for slumping economies and global warming, a concern that has increased since last year. Source: New York Times The self-storage business may have started small four decades ago, but it has grown into a $22 billion-a-year industry. There are 45,000 storage facilities in the US today. Square footage of rentable storage has increased 740 percent in the past two

What we think we know about global warming may not be accurate, as research findings about climate change have been controlled and distorted by political appointees in the Office of Public Affairs at NASA for at least two years. Fourteen senators requested an investigation after the Washington Post reported in 2006 that Bush administration officials had monitored and impeded communications between NASA climate scientists and reporters. The investigation disclosed in April that news releases from NASA regarding climate change were inaccurate and factually insufficient, but the Office of Public Affairs said that the topic was managed in that way for technical reasons, not political interference. Source: Washington Post With food prices at their highest in three decades, the world is in a hunger crisis. Several world leaders are blaming the hunger crisis on the priority of generating biofuels for reduced transportation costs, rather than using the crops and farming land to feed the needy. In order to end the crisis, food production needs to be doubled in the next 30 years, an effort that Jacques Diouf, director general of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, estimated will cost $30 billion a year. The efforts would include providing small farmers with seeds and fertilizer, and increasing agricultural research and outreach programs to improve crop production so as to provide more food for poor countries, as well as meeting the demands for food among the emerging middle class in China and other developing countries. Source: New York Times Common Pleas Judge Jane Cutler Greenspan ruled in favor of the National Rifle Association that the City of Philadelphia could not enforce two new ordinances that would ban assault weapons and limit handgun purchases to one person per month. After Mayor Michael Nutter signed five gun-control bills into law last month, the NRA sued the city, arguing that only the state can regulate firearms, based on a 1996 State Supreme Court ruling. Greenspan, however, denied on procedural grounds the NRA’s request to overturn three of the recently passed laws: allowing guns to be removed from people declared to be a risk to themselves or others; doing the same for those under a protection-from-abuse order; and requiring the reporting of lost or stolen guns. Source: Philadelphia Inquirer Several shark populations in the Mediterranean Sea have declined by more than 96 percent over the past two centuries, according to a study conducted by the Lenfest Ocean program. The study focused on five of the 47 shark species that reside in the Mediterranean Sea and for which there were sufficient records to chart a long-term trend: hammerhead, blue, thresher, and two types of mackerel sharks. Francesco Ferretti, lead author of the study, said that this decline could hold serious implications for the entire marine ecosystem, affecting the food webs throughout the region. Researchers have linked the decline to decades of overfishing in the Mediterranean. Source: New York Times Compiled by Amy Lubinski

7/08 CHRONOGRAM 23


Showroom Locations Fishkill Brewster Kingston Catskill 845-896-6291 845-279-8075 845-331-6700 518-947-2010 www.nssupply.com www.nsbathclassics.com 24 CHRONOGRAM 7/08


MARK JOSEPH KELLY

Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note Hole

F

irst it was the electricity.

The lights in the house flickered on and off like in a horror movie.They sputtered like the toothpaste forcesqueezed out of any almost-empty tube. But only some of them. The rest of the lamps shone brilliantly, just like always. Lee Anne suggested we change the light bulbs. Then we chose to ignore it, as some of the lights still worked. What did it matter that the others, in a house with hundred-year-old wiring, blinked like neon? Or perhaps it was the ankle that started it. I had spent the long winter in the gym, dutifully trying to stay in shape. I went to spin class at the YMCA five or six days a week; sometimes, incredibly, at six in the morning in the dark and the blue-black cold. Pedaling and pedaling, sweating and pedaling, gasping and sweating and pedaling, listening to the instructors as they barked out the next command—up! down! turn it up a notch! sprint!—on their headset microphones, perfectly poised on their stationary bikes like fitness Madonnas (the singing-and-dancing kind, not the mother-of-Jesus kind), setting the pace for the rest of us as we all spun maniacally toward nowhere like the kidnapped cyclists in The Triplets of Belleville. When spring sprang, I didn’t have to come off the couch with an extra 20 pounds and atrophied muscles as in years past. I was probably more fit than when winter began. As a strategy, it worked fairly well. I experienced the low-key euphoria that success through discipline over time brings. This was short-lived, however. At the first practice of the season for my ultimate Frisbee team in early May—the Frisbee season being a major reason for my fitness regimen in the first place—I collided with another player during a scrimmage and twisted my ankle, subsequently missing six weeks of training. Then there were the ants. (Or are, I should say, as they’re still with us.) The first day it was just one, scuttling across the back of the kitchen sink. I squashed it with my index finger and tried not to think about the social nature of ants, contenting myself with the illusion of a bold pioneer who had become separated from the colony and met an explorer’s fate.Two days later, there was a bubbling mass of brown, the size of penny, on the counter. It took me a minute or two to chase down the ants that wriggled out from under my thumb. Now the ants don’t travel in packs anymore. And I would need twice as many fingers to deal with them in their current profusion. Then there’s my favorite jacket that I left on a plane last fall. And the garden that has yet to be planted as of late June. And the e-mail from someone I hardly know addressing me as “Bri”—who was it that okayed the societal shift toward informality that results in such presumption? Was this the same person who green lighted the short-sleeve shirt and tie combo? (And is there a Brian out there who enjoys being called Bri? For the record: I am named after Brian Boru, an 11th-century Irish warrior-king. Do you think anyone called him Bri as he looted and burned the cities of his enemies?) And global warming, and population growth, and the war, and the laundry, and the tall grass that needs mowing. Some days, I feel like I’ve fallen in a hole. I may have been in a rut the day before, but now I’m fully below sea level. Looking up from inside the depression, I stare at the sky and wonder what we have left to hope for. Even if I cut the grass, it’ll only grow back. Even if we stop emitting carbon in world-killing quantities today, what kind of planet will we have left tomorrow? What does it matter if Amy Goldman is saving hundreds of varieties of tomatoes from extinction in her Rhinebeck garden? (“Arbiter of Heirlooms,” page 64.) How much of a difference is the Mines Advisory Group really making in Iraq in its effort to rid that country of unexploded ordnance? (“Deadly Harvest,” page 26.) And will we ever come to terms with the legacy of the synthetics we’ve created in the past 100 years? (“The Health Price of Plastics,” page 86.) There is hole enough for all of us in this. It can be quite difficult at times to claw our way out. But I do it every time, pulling myself up hand over hand, cursing and sweating up a rope of my own stubbornness and will. When I get to the top, I’m back where I started. Hit reset, begin again. Tell myself the reward is in the effort. —Brian K. Mahoney

Get your weekly dose of Chronogram on Monday mornings at 8:15 with Brian and Greg Gattine on “The Morning Show with Gattine and Franz.” WDST 100.1FM. 7/08 CHRONOGRAM 25


NEWS & POLITICS World, Nation, & Region

deadly harvest

clearing Iraq’s killing fields

Text and photo by Lorna Tychostup

I

t looks like any normal construction site. A pattern of foundations line trenches cut deep into the earth. Workers are busy handmixing and applying fresh cement to the newly minted cinder blocks that line and cover the crude broken stones of the foundation. The blocks will grow to form walls of a housing complex for dozens of families. Except this site is anything but normal. Aside from its location in Kurdistan, in northern Iraq, just over the Azmar Mountain range from Sulaimaniyeh, a young child recently lost three fingers here when an unexploded unidentified piece of ordnance left over from the days of the Iran-Iraq war blew up at his touch. If not for this tragedy, the story reads like a “things gone right” tale of Iraq. The housing under construction here in Samsawa is meant for 1,500 Kurdish internally displaced persons (IDPs), forced to leave their homes as part of Saddam Hussein’s retaliatory “Arabization” of Kurdistan after the First Gulf War. In addition to draining the southern Mesopotamian Marshlands in an effort to remove Shiite Marsh Arabs from the region and destroy their 7,000-year-old culture, Saddam’s campaign forced Kurds from Kurdistan while at the same time enticing Arabs north to take the Kurd’s homes, virtually replacing them—ethnic cleansing tactics that have created a tense legacy in today’s already intense Iraq. The Kurdish IDP families are a minute representation of the estimated one million Iraqis displaced by Saddam’s regime pre-2003 and the current conflict. At present, these families live in a makeshift shanty village immediately next to the construction site, which in the 1980s and `90s was an Iraqi military base. Located close to the Iranian border, it housed the infamous Peshmerga—Kurdish freedom fighters who date back to fall of the Ottoman Empire, include women within their ranks, and whose name literally means “those who face death”—who currently provide security to northern Iraq.The site is also home to munitions, the exact amount yet to be discovered, buried when Iranians threatened to overrun the area. A BURIED WAR “So far we’ve removed 240 mortars, a combination of 105 and 122mm artillery projectiles, type 63 107mm Chinese rockets, and mortars sized 120 down to 60mm, an assortment of RPG tail heads, fuses, and other items, all ready to be fired save for a fuse,” says Mick Beeby, on-site technical field manager of the Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Iraq. A neutral and impartial international humanitarian organization with fundraising arms in both the US and UK, MAG has been working to remove such leftovers from various conflicts and wars—former and current— in 35 countries (out of an estimated 82 known to be mined) since 1989. Mostly funded by institutional donors, governments, and foundations and other charities, MAG’s income—$8 million in 1995, growing to $62 million by 2007—is project-specific, meaning the funds can only be spent on predetermined projects and activities. However, it also benefits from public donations and fundraising campaign like a recent “Celebrity Shoe Auction” in the UK. Such “unrestricted” income enables it to react quickly to emergencies, or to fund projects where other funding isn’t available. 26 NEWS & POLITICS CHRONOGRAM 7/08


REUTERS/SHANNON STAPLETON

PEOPLE FLOCK OVER THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE DURING A MASSIVE POWER OUTAGE IN NEW YORK ON AUGUST 14, 2003. THE US HAS THE WORLD’S THIRD-LARGEST POPULATION, WHICH IS EXPECTED TO GROW BY 100 MILLION PEOPLE, TO 400 MILLION, IN THE NEXT 30 YEARS.

UNEXPLODED ORDNANCE BEING READIED FOR DEMOLITION BY THE MINES ADVISORY GROUP OUTSIDE SAMSAWA, IN KURDISTAN, IN NORTHERN IRAQ, IN EARLY JUNE.

7/08 CHRONOGRAM NEWS & POLITICS 27


MAG’s work in the Shamsawa is funded by the US State Department program Grants for Conventional Weapons Destruction and to Assist Injured Conflict Survivors, overseen by the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (OWRA). To help reduce the reported 5,751 casualties worldwide from explosive remnants of war and landmines in 2006, OWAR “approved more than $4.4 million in grants to 32 organizations to destroy conventional weapons, landmines, and explosive remnants of war, and to assist those who have been permanently injured by conflict,” from its projected $123 million budget for conventional weapons destruction in fiscal year 2008. Beeby’s grant obligations stipulate that his six Mine Action Teams and three Community Liaison Teams operating within the Sulaimaniyeh sector must work on 3.9 million square meters of land per contract period, which is one year in this case. “Donors just don’t give money for nothing. I have to actually physically clear 650,000 square meters, plus another 3.52 million [need] to be demarcated. I also have to destroy a minimum of 4000 items ranging from mines to UXO (unexploded ordnance), which includes such items as unexploded bombs, rockets, missiles, mortars, and grenades.” Beeby’s work— either demarcation efforts or actual ground clearance—must have an immediate effect on 10,000 beneficiaries, people who can once again use the land. Direct beneficiaries from clearance efforts at the construction site number 1,500, and 3,000 indirectly. Pointing to one of his team leaders Beeby says, “He has to destroy 770 items per month for 10 months to meet his team’s quota. This is not a problem at all.” After all, 500 “live” items were removed from just one pit among many excavated in the construction site, in addition to what is called “scrap”—spent ammunition cases, projectiles, and mortars with no explosive fill, and three Katyusha missiles. “You do get a lot of explosive harvesting in this part of the world,” says Beeby. HARVESTING EXPLOSIVES While MAG’s work at the construction site did not begin in time to save the fingers of the young child, that was not due to any fault on their part. “We were supposed to start this task on the fifth of May but the contractor wouldn’t let us, because he didn‘t want to delay construction,” says MAG Technical Field Manager, Mechanical, Brendon Remshaw, in an incredibly thick British accent. The first person to speak to me as I arrived at the site, his accent however, was not thick enough for me to misunderstand his greeting: “Wearing flip flops to a construction site is not a good idea.” He is easily forgiven when he tells me of the single place in Kurdistan where dark beer is served. A mechanic by trade, Remshaw has been working in Iraq for the last two-andhalf years after coming straight from a stint in Sudan with a different NGO. Leaving Sudan because there was “no action,” a clearly irate Remshaw says he takes the boy’s injury personally. “They [cleared] half of the danger area [before we arrived]. Then we thought we got permission to start but [the] paperwork [did not arrive]. I wasn’t a very happy man.We found out after the contractor had left the site that the little kid had lost three fingers. But wasn’t what actually got the contractor to stop, it was because the Governorate officials got involved. But if they would have let us start when we wanted to, the job would be finished now and the kid would not have lost his fingers. And I haven’t seen the contractor since.” Like tag team wrestlers, the two burly men, Beeby and Remshaw, give me the full picture of their work on the site. The team will walk the box—a targeted area cordoned off and searched—doing a visual sweep twice. Any surface items or scrap metal detected by the metal detector will see them stop, raise their hand, identify to the team leader that they have found an item. The team leader will come forward and tell them whether the item is safe to move or not. Scrap metal will simply be picked up and put in a bucket. “If the team leader can’t make a judgment call, he will speak to an international or national supervisor, one of whom is always on-site. In some other cases—mechanical operations, Remshaw’s area of expertise—a “roller” is used. A team member sits in an armored cabin, drives over the field, applies pressure, explodes the mines hit, and marks the spot. But the roller cannot detect everything and afterward team members carrying metal detectors walk the field. “Basically we remove a lot of surface items, and most of it will be scrap,” Beeby says. Found items are then placed in a storage pit and taken weekly to a remote demolition pit. “How they will explode or if they will explode is questionable,” Beeby says. “I don’t know how long they have been in the ground.” What he does know is that two of the items found at the Shamsawa construction site were mines: a V69 of Italian manufacture, and an American M15. Focusing my eyes into the scrap pit, the metal of some of the items is so 28 NEWS & POLITICS CHRONOGRAM 7/08

rusted and earth worn, deciphering the “items” from the dirt that surrounds them is, in some cases, virtually impossible. Beeby then introduces me to Rebaz Azad, a national member of the MAG team and this site’s Community Liaison Coordinator. He is oversees all four Community Liaison Teams who carry out community and impact assessments, analyzing what the threat is in the local area and how it affects the local community and population. “At the end of the day,” says Beeby, “realistically, everyone completes their meters. But what’s the point of clearing meters that nobody wants to use?” One of MAG’s main priorities is to get a high value impact on any clearance operation they carry out. They look to create access to water sources, free land for agriculture, and reduce the potential for further conflict. They are about to start working in the village of Saraw, what MAG classifies as a “high impact community.” Mines found and confirmed to be affecting the community are Italian V69s and Chinese anti-personnel mines. During the winter months, Saraw has between 120 and 130 inhabitants, but during the cultivation season the population increases to 500. All are Kurdish citizens and all are literally living on the edge of a minefield. “In this one valley alone, there are up to 19 minefields, says Beeby. “These areas have been demarcated in the past, but the markers fall over or get removed for various reasons. This is the sort of work the Community Liaison Teams produce. Eventually, in the long term, everything has to be cleared. But if you go for the high impact testings first, people can rehabilitate, repatriate, and we can make an immediate effect to the community and people’s lives.” THE ART OF MINING Creating safe areas where people can go about their ordinary lives and eventually thrive is a priority for MAG staffers. However, frustration marks various aspects their work, some of it stemming from the very people they are trying to help. According to Stuart Lappington, another MAG technical field manager, injuries or fatalities from remnant explosives in Kurdistan occur at least once a month. “It comes in fits and starts depending upon the time of year. Now it is grazing time and the farmers and sheep are about.” Highlighting the importance of demarcation and the hazards of its removal, he tells a story about an area that had been demarcated four weeks earlier. “Someone decided the warning markers made better fence poles. A local farmer told MAG he had two of his sheep blown up. When they went to examine the area, they recognized it as a known minefield and saw that the warning markers had been stolen.” Unlike Beeby, who belongs to MAG’s Mine Action Group, Lappington is connected to their Conflict Recovery Program for Iraq. “We’ll demarcate a minefield, walk off and do another one, maybe four or five. By the time we get done with the fifth one, we’ll go back to the first one and half the markers are gone. That happens quite a lot. Demarcation is a constant job. We have identified hundreds of demarcated areas. I’ve got four teams working constantly and we’ve worked 160,000 square meters of land.” An arms and explosive disposal officer during his 23-and-a-half-year stint in the Royal Air Force, Lappington is an expert in his field. Leaving the military eight months ago, he began work with MAG immediately. Our conversation turns specifically to mines. There are three types. The first is called a blast mine, the force of which can amputate a limb. Next is the blast and fragmentation mine, which is designed to take the limb of the person who steps on it and also spreads fragmentation within the surrounding area, damaging anyone within its range. The third is called a bounding mine. Once tripped, the mine will pop up approximately waist-high and initiate. Minefields aren’t designed to kill, Lappington adds. “They are designed to maim. They are laid out to instill fear in a body of troops moving forward and impede their progress.” Once the conflict ends the mines remain and the civilian population becomes victim because minefields can be found anywhere, even in riverbeds. In Iraq, minefields were historically deployed to defend military posts. POLITICAL MINEFIELDS Iraq is probably one of the most contaminated areas worldwide, says Lappington. “It’s been fought over for many years, so not only do the minefields and ordnance come from internal disputes, but also from the Iranians and others.” According to Lappington, the few years before and after 1993 saw a lot of mines placed, some against the coalition forces at the start of the First Gulf War, others were laid on the “Green Line”—the border area that separates Kurdistan Iraq from the rest of Iraq. “Saddam laid a load of mines along that line to stop black market trade and keep the Kurdish people from entering Iraq


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7/08 CHRONOGRAM NEWS & POLITICS 29


and vice versa. If you look the Green Line on the map, probably 99 percent of that was mined. The last lot of mines were laid last year, I think it was.” “By whom?” I ask. “I think it was Turkey,” says Lappington. “Don’t quote me on that. We don’t get told who lays mines.” He tells me he heard a report about Turkey laying mines on the news. I ask, “So you saw it on the news, but you have no knowledge—” “No.” “And if you did, would you tell me?” Silence and a friendly smile. It is no secret that last year Turkey began making small forays into northern Kurdistan, although Turkey’s foreign minister denied this occurred. This led to a major incursion of Turkish troops into northern Iraq in February, the latest skirmish in a multi-year struggle between Turkey and the Kurdish PKK that has seen the deaths of over 30,000 people (mostly Kurds). With the US (a MAG donor) a longstanding ally to both Turkey and the Kurds of northern Iraq, whose separatist tendencies unnerve Turkey with its own restive Kurdish population, Turkey laying mines in northern Iraq is inescapably political. As an apolitical organization, however, MAG doesn’t involve itself in the who and why of the laying of mines. Anyone can ask them to clear mines and no questions are asked. Their mission is to clear land, make it socio-economically viable, and also to satisfy their donors. “How dangerous is this work?” I ask. “I heard you lost two people a few months ago.” Again silence, to which I protest. “We don’t want to publicize what happened,” he says. “Obviously, by nature, the job that we do is fairly dangerous. We’re working with mines, with unexploded ordnance.” He says that while they’ve lost no internationals, they have lost local staff, but he cannot tell me how many in the last five years. He then asks, “Who told you about the accident?” Later, after doing some legwork, I find that yes, two local members of their team had been killed at a site of supposedly non-risk items. One died on scene and the other at the hospital. “DANGER CLOSE” As Beeby and I walk the construction area, his team members load up the UXO into a pickup truck and soon we are off to the demolition site. It is a jarring ride on a partially eroded road streaming its way through the roundtopped mountains covered with dried grass and dotted with contrasting green bushy-head trees.The wind gusts occasionally from one direction and then dies down, only to pick up from the opposite direction. It is the dry season here in northern Iraq. To make matters worse, the entire country is experiencing a severe drought.What the Iraqi’s call “dust” rises up some days to the point where you cannot see the ever-vigilant mountain range normally visible from any vantage point on a clear day. One Baghdad woman living now in Sulaimaniyeh told me a cousin’s husband had died a few days ago from an asthma attack. Two days later his mother was found dead from the same cause. We arrive at the isolated site; a pit in the ground reached by a 100-yard length of dirt road where one end is nestled in the valleys of three adjoining mountains and the other opening to the eroded road we have been traveling on. “I have no objection to your being at the firing zone, and when it comes to the firing, I have no objection to your being at the firing point,” says Beeby. “But we are danger close and in the splash zone,” adding something about “frag,” the meaning of which I don’t catch. He then explains we will be in a culvert and says I can set up my camera to a timed exposure. I immediately reject this idea and then it suddenly dawns on me that “frag” is the splintered and torn shards of metal from past controlled demolitions that have lined our walk to the firing point and look deadly enough to kill. It is unimaginable what even one of these frags would do to my gear. Beebe then adds, “But I can’t guarantee that your camera won’t get smashed. But you can be right next to the guy priming the exploder, and watch him pressing the button.You’ll be inside protection.” He explains the culvert is down at the road where we parked, a distance of approximately 300 feet. “Is there any live visual?” I ask. “No, because we are danger close.” Pushing the idea of his arranging for me to have a view of the actual explosion, I point to the road and say, “But from there, is there a visual?” A patient man, he hesitates and before he responds I answer my own question, “No, there is not a visual.” Beeby explains the benefits of this location. “It is ideal because access in and out of the site can be easily controlled. And that is the idea of a controlled demolition site—you’ve got control of the ground so you don’t frighten the local population or innocent 30 NEWS & POLITICS CHRONOGRAM 7/08

people. You generally find children are very inquisitive and as soon as you arrive at a location, they are all over the place. And trying to explain what we are doing, either by way of the local police or their parents, doesn’t really work.” THE POETRY OF DEMOLITION The logic of the demolition activities is almost as exquisite as the language used to describe it. The pit itself is approximately 10 feet deep. Its bottom is lined with a neatly stacked mound of mortars and other ordnance—smaller items on bottom and largest on top. Then what are called initiation charges are strapped to the top mortars. These charges act as a fuse that “sympathetically” detonates the top layer, the detonation of which will in turn sympathetically travel down through the stack. “Explosives are like electricity,” says Beeby. “They will take the easiest route out, but you will get enough of a shockwave to initiate the items below.” Yes, the language is exquisite, a poetry of explosive devices and their potential—a clean aesthetic diction that belies its subject entirely. The actual explosives that will ignite this stack are two inert liquids—what Beeby calls binary explosives—that when mixed together will explode. “They’re in bottles and you’ll see them doing charge preparation shortly.” Ever press conscious, he adds, “That’s normally a good action shot as well.” Most ordnance can’t be destroyed on-site, so it must be transported to the safest place where its demolition can occur. The move I witnessed was relatively safe. Others, called controlled moves, contain more dangerous items. Beeby conducted one of these a few days earlier, removing 68 items from the site. The press is not invited to such events. “We had to remove it,” he explains. “We couldn’t destroy it there. The fragmentation zone of a 122mm is in the region of 800 to 1000 meters.” In this particular case, the construction site is immediately adjacent to the makeshift IDP shanty town in Shamsawa, near the home of Mamjalal Taliban— translated, it means Uncle Jalal Talabani—the Kurdish president of Iraq and head of the Kurdish PUK political party. No one is really interested in disturbing him in his Peshmerga-controlled region. After allowing me to photograph the munitions being loaded into the pit, the connecting of the charges, and bolstering of the pile with sandbags, we walk down to the culvert and all cars and personnel are ordered to leave the area. Staff radio that the road is clear, the minimal traffic traversing the eroded road is stopped some distance from us in both directions, and we enter to the three-foot opening of the 50-foot-long cement culvert. As promised, I am allowed to enter after the primer, the person who will actually detonate the explosives. After being out in the bright sun, the blackness shocks my eyes. There is a countdown and then the detonation. Within a second or two, the blast is not only heard, but the pressure emanating knocks the culvert ceiling against my head. Within seconds after the ignition, I hear what sounds like a Harley go by and think that of all vehicles, nothing could be worse than a motorcycle going by at this time. “There goes a frag, and a pretty big one at that,” says Beeby. No motorcycle, just a huge chunk of now-exploded ordnance passing over us in the air. ORDNANCE ORDNANCE EVERYWHERE It is no exaggeration to say that Iraq is possibly the most contaminated areas worldwide in terms of unexploded ordnance, mine fields and leftover objects of destruction. In just the last few days I have had friends here in Sulaimaniyeh show me recently taken photos of remnant missiles and explosives—one was of an abandoned Katyusha rocket partially sticking up out of the ground, spotted while hiking in the northern mountains. Another showed two 18-inch long missiles lying side by side on top of dried mud in the southern marshlands. I myself have seen remnants of long ago war—portable Iranian bridge sections half floating in a remote dam-fed lake region and huge rusted hulks of missilelaunching stanchions on the shore of a secluded riverbed area, to name a few. None of them recent, none of them from the ongoing conflict. “These areas have been mined for many years,” says Lappington. “We’ve gone in and cleared it and all of a sudden they’ve got this big vast expanse that the children can play on. This gives me a sense of achievement. I’ve used my skills, which have taken me a long time to acquire, to make the land safe. The politics don’t matter. Back home in Ireland, I can walk where I want. And I come here and you’ve got the children, their families that can’t go in certain areas because they’re mined and there UXO is lying around. As MAG’s logo says, we’re saving lives and building futures.”


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7/08 CHRONOGRAM NEWS & POLITICS 31


DION OGUST

Commentary

Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

THE CASE FOR IMPEACHMENT (SO FAR)

Dennis Kucinich introduced 35 articles of impeachment against George W. Bush on June 10, 2008. It was on C-SPAN, it was covered by the AP, and the story is available on the websites of the major news organizations. The New York Times buried it in the National Briefing on page A21. The other major papers treated it likewise. It wasn’t featured in the network or major cable news shows, except Keith Olbermann’s. If you already knew to look for it, you could find it. But otherwise, you would never know it had happened. It had been rendered invisible. The articles were referred to the Judiciary Committee. According to NPR and several other mainstream news sources, this is a way to bury them. They’ll be put on the shelf until after next January. It’s too bad. The actions of the Bush Administration deserve full and open debate.With members of the administration forced to answer subpoenas and to testify under oath. Does anyone even remember why we went to war? Officially? House Joint Resolution 114, signed into law on October 16, 2002, is the bill that authorized the war. It states explicitly that we were going to war because: Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. Iraq had ties to Al Qaeda and other terrorists. Iraq was therefore implicitly tied to 9/11. Iraq posed an imminent threat. It has now been established that all those things were false. Kucinich claims, with a great deal of documentation, that the president was informed that those things were false—or at least flimsy and questionable—back in 2002. That makes the carefully orchestrated propaganda campaign that sold those ideas a deliberate deception of Congress and the American people. According to the Constitution, only Congress can declare war. HJR 114 delegated that authority to the president under certain circumstances: If “the reliance by the United States on further diplomatic or other peaceful means alone either (A) will not adequately protect the national security of the United States against the continuing threat posed by Iraq or (B) is not likely to lead to enforcement of all relevant United Nations Security Council resolutions regarding Iraq.” By the time we went to war, Iraq had admitted weapons inspectors with full access in compliance with the toughest of the UN resolutions. They had not found the weapons that didn’t exist and had said so, publicly. Therefore, the president violated the Constitution, his oath of office, and the law. War against another country is illegal under international laws that the United States helped invent and implement. The exceptions are self-defense and with UN Security Council approval. The UN Security Council never authorized the Iraq War. If Iraq did not attack us—and did not even support the people who attacked us— we did not act in self-defense. Bush doctrine—the war in Iraq being its prime example—is an attempt to extend the concept of self-defense. If we “know” they are about to attack us, we can strike first (preemptive war). If we think that someday they might get around to attacking us, we can strike them now (preventive war). These are very suspect ideas. Nonetheless, if Iraq didn’t have the means to attack us, and they were in compliance with inspections, those facts took the invasion of Iraq out of even the wide range of preventive and preemptive war. It is squarely in the realm of “aggressive war.” An aggressive war, as established at Nuremburg and the Japanese war crimes trials after World War II, and enshrined in the UN Charter, is a war crime.

32 NEWS & POLITICS CHRONOGRAM 7/08

If this were a mystery novel—my primary business—or even a real world trial, we would want to know motive. It is clear that the declared reasons for going to war were false and that the administration had reason to know that. It is well established that many members of the administration wanted that war even before they came into office. Was it part of a dream of imperial glory? Pax Americana with forward military posts in all strategic and profitable regions? Was it for the oil, as Article XII charges? Did the administration’s secret task force on energy plan the overthrow of Saddam by force to get that oil, as Article XIII charges? Was it to demonstrate how powerful the US military machine is, so that every other country would think twice before they dared defy us on anything? To terrorize the whole world through a display of irresistible force? Once the war was launched, a whole new set of crimes was committed. They often are. It’s hard to fight a “clean” war.That’s why the chief American prosecutor at Nuremberg, US Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, stated: “To initiate a war of aggression, therefore, is not only an international crime; it is the supreme international crime differing only from other war crimes in that it contains within itself the accumulated evil of the whole.” The crimes contained within the war on terror and the war in Iraq include torture; illegal detention; detaining indefinitely and without charge persons both US citizens and foreign captives; rendition: kidnapping people and taking them against their will to “black sites” located in other nations, including nations known to practice torture; imprisoning children; failure, as the occupying power, to protect the civilian population of Iraq; providing immunity for criminal acts by contractors, thereby condoning murder, rape, and other crimes. Were these things necessary? Did they work?Were they useless and counterproductive? Is anyone responsible? Or is the age of responsibility over? The Bush Administration, while fighting a war on terror, has supported terrorist organizations in Iran, attacking the Iranian government and population, as the Los Angeles Times reported in April. Is one man’s terrorist the other man’s freedom fighter? Is there such a thing as good terror and bad terror? And if there is, hadn’t we better redefine things to make it clear that we are fighting a war on bad terror? Let us turn to the domestic front: 1. Spying on Americans without warrants. 2. Intentionally subverting and refusing to enforce laws through signing statements. 3. Tampering with free and fair elections. 4. Corruption of the administration of justice. 5. Conspiracy to violate the Voting Rights Act of 1965. 6. Obstruction of the Investigation into the attacks of September 11, 2001. 7. Denial of habeas corpus. It may be true that a trial about all of this would not be nearly as titillating as one about semen stains on a blue dress. But ignoring it and just letting the man slide, because it’s not worth the effort, is criminal. It makes anyone who helps that happen, who doesn’t stand up and demand answers, a coconspirator. The man who will now make that decision is John Conyers. If the articles of impeachment are still stashed away on the shelf by the time you read this, give him a call at (202) 225-5126.


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by Melissa Everett, Executive Director Sustainable Hudson Valley - SHV

Gas Prices: Taking the High Road with People Power Everyone is worried about the cost of commuting, powering our homes, even producing our food, as fuel prices skyrocket. A tempting path is to trim gas taxes for short-term relief. But that misses the true costs of fossil fuels. There’s a smarter alternative. It’s time to use an unlimited resource to meet more of our needs: people power. Hudson Valley communities can spend less on energy, and improve quality of life, if they tap the opportunities to cut waste and use rediscover human-powered alternatives to fossil fuels. Join us as we save fuel by getting a grip on waste and, in the process, make life more interesting this summer. Create bike-friendly communities–and enjoy them! The League of American Bicyclists (www.bikeleague.org) has every resource you can possibly need, from case studies to a “how to overcome excuses and bike to work” tip sheet.

Carpool, vanpool, combine trips, get out of the car!!!! See www.metropool.com and www.nuride.org for help. Stop engine idling. It’s illegal in NY to idle for more than three minutes (and in Europe for more than 15 seconds!). Ask friendly businesses to put reminders near entrance or cash register. Use this tool kit from the EPA to take effective action: www.epa.gov/oms/schoolbus/antiidling.htm#irk. Buy local, buy in bulk, swap, and reuse – commit yourself to a lifestyle of “more fun, less stuff”–see the website of the Center for a New American Dream for tips and resources (www.newdream.org). And to really reconnect with people power, check out The Green Ride (www.thegreenride.org) a spectacular three day fundraising bike ride from New York City to the Catskills and back, Columbus Day Weekend, to benefit Sustainable Hudson Valley’s climate action work and the research of the Black Rock Forest Consortium. Ride, or sponsor a rider. Please spread these ideas widely. This invitation is brought to you by the members and friends of Sustainable Hudson Valley (www.sustainhv.org).

Citizen creativity is already in play. The New Paltz Green Team used May, National Bike Month, to launch “Ride To Eat/Eat To Ride,” wherein 17 area restaurants gave discounts and other incentives to customers who arrived by bicycle. For details on projects and events described above, visit www.sustainhv.org.

7/08 CHRONOGRAM NEWS & POLITICS 33


COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK

A Passion for Piano Babette Hierholzer by Dorothy E. Noe photographs by Amber S. Clark

D

warfed by the horse totem that oversees the stage of the Maverick theater outside Woodstock, New York, Babette Hierholzer stands beside a nine-foot piano, her left hand resting lightly on its glossy frame. Dressed in black sequins, she bows her head to acknowledge the polite applause of the audience. Sitting, her wrists arch upward and pause above the keyboard as she prepares to play the first notes of Edvard Grieg’s Arietta op. 12, no. 1. That delicate arch belies the power of her hands. Hierholzer is a petite woman, so when the tsunami of sound her fingers generate floods the concert hall, it comes as a bit of a shock. Unfortunately, flood is a word that resonates with Hierholzer. When the Sawkill Creek reared up over its banks in the spring of 2007, it inundated the lower level of the house she shares with her husband, Michael Simpler, in Red Hook, NewYork. Muddy waters swirled through and destroyed a lifetime’s collection of books along with the kitchen appliances. And yet, she smiles: Her two grand pianos were safely ensconced on the second floor. Sitting in her second floor music studio, you would never know Hierholzer was gutting, renovating, and reconstructing her home. In her studio, Oriental carpets cushion each Steinway piano (“the best piano for solo playing because they are so powerful”) sitting beneath large skylights, and two cream leather sofas reflect each other; tables holding mementoes of world travel plus the floor-to-ceiling bookcases of sheet music make her world look ordered and sane. But a freelance concert pianist’s life is anything but routine—even when it starts at age 11. Babette Hierholzer was a child prodigy. As the oldest of four siblings on the west side of the Berlin Wall, it was clear by the time Hierholzer was five that she was not likely to follow in the family tradition and become a doctor. It wasn’t as if her family had no musical interests; her great-grandmother was not only an opera singer but conducted as well, and both of Hierholzer’s parents played instruments when not practicing medicine. By the age of five, however, Hierholzer’s skill and interest in the piano were apparent, and her parents found the ideal teacher to nurture and encourage her talent. “My first teacher knew how to motivate young players,” recalls Hierholzer fondly, her tumble of long brown curls clipped back in a semblance of order.

34 COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK CHRONOGRAM 7/08

“Instead of drills of boring scales, she selected actual phrases from a piece of music for us to master a technique. We always played good pieces—minuets by Haydn or Bach—and were always preparing for a competition or recital.” “The Berlin Steinway competitions are the Olympics of piano playing for children under the age of 16,” she continues in lightly accented English. “I entered at age six and won first prize in my age category. I was very motivated to win the second year. I won another major competition at age nine. Competitions are necessary because there are so many musicians, and it’s good to see other musicians and build a repertoire.” “Besides,” she confides with a chuckle, “Berliners are competitive by nature.” Despite the lessons and practice, competitions, recitals, and awards, she describes her childhood as normal—there was no dramatic change precipitated by the crescendo of her talent. “Like other children, I always wanted a dog,” she recalls with a wry smile seasoned with adult insight, “but we lived in an apartment. My parents thought they could placate me by promising a dog if I played in the Philharmonic Hall. But, when I reminded them of the bargain after I made my professional debut there at age 11,” Hierholzer said, “they forgot the promise.” Public elementary school, followed by attendance in the Humanistic Gymnasium where she studied Latin and Greek along with English, continued until her father’s sabbatical, spent in the United States.This move allowed for further music studies in Fort Worth, Texas, with Lili Kraus and the Julliard Pre-College program with Herbert Stessin. Her formal education was completed with four years of music theory and history at a conservatory in Essen. “There was never a conscious decision to be a concert pianist,” Hierholzer reflects. “I had thought might want to study something in addition to the piano— criminal pathology or archeology—but I can’t even recall when I went from ‘child prodigy’ to professional pianist because the work is the most important thing.” Sadly, even for many who begin working later in life, the flip side of “the work” is all too often burnout: the drag-yourself-to-the-job-on-Monday despair. The syndrome manifests itself when the spark of interest and challenge is extinguished by numbing ennui. When you begin working professionally at age


11, however, and are still happily at it three decades later, one can only assume that the driving force must be a passion—plus something else. For Hierholzer, the excitement for piano’s challenges is obvious, and that “something else” takes many forms. The counterpoint of sitting on a piano bench for hours practicing and perfecting a piece is the recharge of physical activity: peddling a bike 20 miles (her husband is an avid cyclist) or, when time and weather allow, running and swimming. In addition, for a while, she was seriously breeding German Shepherds. Possessing an inquisitive and disciplined mind has enabled her to earn her private pilot’s license (Simpler is a retired airline pilot). Plus, she is currently adding Spanish to her collection of languages as her concert schedule often takes her to South America. But, when at home, her Saturday night addiction takes over: She is a regular at the auction houses, adding artwork, furniture, rugs, and pottery to her collections. “And,” she fairly bubbles, “I’m an opera fanatic and love to accompany singers.” Beyond the actual preparation for performances that has her on the piano bench five to six hours a day, coaxing a cascade of music from a stationary keyboard and the rehearsals for the concert itself, there are many professional demands that require Hierholzer’s attention. For starters, she employs two agents: one in the United States and another in Germany. She must inform them both of any benefit concerts she accepts so they can coordinate her calendar of worldwide commitments. She also spends time marketing herself by granting interviews, encouraging attendance at performances, and being involved in music-related activities. Prior to the advent of her website, she worked with her agents organizing the press packets of information and photos that preceded her arrival. There is also the fun part—wardrobe selection. Over the years, she has accumulated a substantial number of gowns and outfits for concerts and photo shoots for general publicity and CD covers. The cover photo for a CD is, perhaps, the easiest part of the production. “You would think that being able to repeat a piece until the sound engineer thinks it’s perfect would make it easier than a live concert,” she muses, “but it isn’t. I prepare for a recording the same as for a concert, but playing things six or seven times doesn’t make it better. I like to have an audience of even one at the recording to get me pumped up, but they must be extremely quiet. Taking two and a half days to record is standard, and sometimes, they deliberately pick the version with a mistake in it so the piece is not mechanical. At least you don’t have to worry about your attire.” “Luckily, I love black, but every skirt or dress has to be comfortable to sit in and of a material that travels well.” And, then she jokes, “Don’t even ask my husband about the weight of my luggage when I travel.” Sixteen years ago, in order to minimize travel, she and Simpler sold their home in Germany in oreder to live permanently in the United States.While the move reduced Hierholzer’s annual trips from 40 to a mere 20, it also presented new challenges and insights to maintaining her international career. As if sustaining a freelance pianist career weren’t challenge enough, there are also the inherent risks of live performances going awry: Beverly Sills danced out of her shoes during one opera, Marie Osmond’s collapse during a recent taping of “Dancing with the Stars,” and Janet Jackson’s infamous “wardrobe malfunction.” Hierholzer fortunately recalls only one such nightmare. “I was playing in FDR’s birthplace in New York City on an old Steinway,” she states with appropriate horror. “The ending of the piece was six very loud F-minor chords.When I hit the first one, it sounded horrible. I was shocked and checked my hands to see that I had the right notes. The second and third chords still were awful, but in the cloud of sound, I couldn’t tell which note was off. After the performance I found that the F had been tuned to F-sharp. Now, before I perform, I always play a slow chromatic scale so I know if every key is tuned.” Performances have had her checking keyboards on four continents—Europe, South America, North America, and Africa—with some invitations including travel arrangements and expenses and others not. While Hierholzer enjoys large venues—the Berlin Philharmonic, playing in castles, and Carnegie Hall are among her favorites—she has a special fondness for more intimate settings with great acoustics, such as churches in Mexico and the Maverick barn outside of Woodstock. Besides enjoying new destinations, constant travel has afforded her an intimate awareness of how the business of music is approached. “In Europe,” she explains, “the state supports music programs. In America, there is constant fundraising to support music. I have found that when you have to raise the money, you are much more involved, and that is a good thing.” In addition to performing, Hierholzer judges piano competitions for young artists, similar to the contests that launched her career. This exposure has led

her to certain truths regarding young players. “Children should be exposed to music,” she states unequivocally. “As a child, music was all around me. And, young children should get a very good teacher at the beginning, because he or she lays the foundation and motivation. Also, parents should not put hopes and pressure on children to become a professional. After a competition, when upset parents are allowed to question my decisions, I always focus on the child and advise the child: Become a musician only if it is the only thing you want to do, and be able to take criticism.” Hierholzer concedes that despite the glamour associated with the life of a classical pianist—the travel, the clothes, collaborating with some of the best musicians on the planet—working as a freelance pianist can be grueling. “Some weeks are really full,” she says. “I have to be constantly ready for new challenges or to substitute for a pianist anywhere in the world at a moment’s notice. You are always reviving old pieces or learning something new, preparing for a concert or recording. I play every day except when I travel because the mechanical part is like running or playing tennis; I notice a difference if I haven’t practiced. Luckily, as a recognized ‘Steinway pianist,’ I have access to their pianos anywhere in the world to practice. One of my professional goals is to work more with singers—especially in German. But there is never enough time. On the other hand, the unpredictability keeps things fresh.” And, every concert is, essentially, a fresh start for a freelance pianist. With the last notes of the Maverick concert lingering on her finger tips and drifting into the darkening summer air, Hierholzer’s head bows briefly and her wrists arch off the keyboard before she rises to accept the resounding applause of a very pleased audience. The next day will find her back in her studio preparing for the next concert. In the end, neither height nor age matter; it is her passion for “the work” that counts. Babette Hierholzer will be performing on July 13 with Nancy Allen Lundy, soprano, and other young German musicians at the Church of the Messiah in Rhinebeck to benefit the Rhinebeck-Rhinebach Exchange Program. www.rhinebeckexchange.org/index.html. Hierholzer and Lundy will also perform a Schubert-dominated program at the Maverick Concert Hall in Woodstock with clarinetist Ethan Sloane on July 19. (845) 679-8217; www.maverickconcerts.org.

7/08 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK 35


Woodstock Iyengar

Yoga Barbara Boris 5 classes a week at Mt. View Studio, Woodstock Tuesday, 6pm Class at Satya Yoga, Rhinebeck

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36 COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK CHRONOGRAM 7/08


JULY 2008

ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM

Tatana Kellner, Iron, installation. PORTFOLIO, p.38

7/08 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY NOTEBOOK 37


Portfolio Tatana Kellner

Tatana Kellner is the artistic director of the Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale. Her own work ranges from printmaking and photography to artist’s books and installations, focusing on subjects drawn from her personal history and reflection on contemporary events. Born in Czechoslovakia, Kellner and her family fled Prague when Russian tanks rolled into the city in August 1968. When she arrived in Lima, Ohio, she initially sufferwed from intense culture shock, but she ultimately enrolled in art school, where she first studied painting, and printmaking. She eventually moved to Rosendale after graduate school in the early 1970s and founded the Women’s Studio Workshop with Ann Kalmbach and Anita Wetzel, in 1973. Kellner’s reflections on topics ranging from the Holocaust (her parents are both survivors) to 9/11 strike a balance between the largeness of the events and the intimacy of a personal engagement, often emphasizing the materials she works with, and the processes to which they have been subjected. Her most recent installation, Iron, looks at the history of women’s domestic labor, printed screened photographs of antique irons, on the backs of crisp white shirts in invisible ink. The images are revealed by the heat of an electric iron, also part of the installation. This work is on display through September 7 at the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, part of its summer show of regional artists. Portfolio: www.tatanakellner.com —Beth E. Wilson

TATANA KELLNER ON HER WORK Mass and Multiplicity It’s the printmaker in me—I’ve always liked working in multiples. I find pattern and repetition interesting, and also mass. How do you obtain some kind of substantiality out of that? I went to school in the ‘70s, when they didn’t teach you anything. It was all about the business of art, or you could do anything because it was conceptual art. I was in painting, and decided I wasn’t learning anything in that class, so I figured that in printmaking at least I would learn a skill. I went to graduate school for painting, but the teachers there weren’t that good either, so I moved back into printmaking. The idea of multiples of things are not so precious, and make the work more affordable—all those elements are important issues for me. I have this love-hate relationship with the multiple. Obviously, I like the idea of having the multiple, I like the processes, but at the same time, the repetition [of making them] becomes tedious. When it’s something like an installation, it’s different. It involves a lot of research, and solving problems, which

38 PORTFOLIO CHRONOGRAM 7/08

can get frustrating on the other side. My working methods and my work are about that sort of dichotomy. I want things to be slightly mysterious, not completely defined. That’s why I don’t do straight photography. Don’t get me wrong, I love to see that sort of thing, but it’s not for me, not my work—it’s too defined. Working process I’m a very process-oriented person; that’s how it usually starts. With the 9/11 piece, I had this idea to work with long banners. I always liked transparency, but I could never figure out how to use it in my work. I was thinking about all the photographs, all the posters people put up, looking for people from the World Trade Center. For this piece, it seemed to be about mass, heaviness, and sadness. So I decided to print it on organza, which is sheer. [The work involved screening hundreds of photographs of 9/11 victims on the banners.] Then it turned into something that was 16 feet tall, and I was going to need hundreds and hundreds of yards of this fabric. I wasn’t sure how I was going to do

it, either physically or financially. But it worked when I got to put it together for the CEPA Gallery in Buffalo, which showed it on the first anniversary of 9/11. Research and development The Dorsky piece—I started it last year, when I was invited to be in an exhibition called Reimagining the Distaff Toolkit. Ricky Salinger’s premise is about what happens to objects used in drudgery, for domestic labor, and how they become aestheticized as they become obsolete. Ironing came to mind, which is something I never do. But they wouldn’t allow the heat to be on—I was really upset because the whole idea was about the invisibility of this kind of labor (which is revealed when the invisible ink is heated by the iron). We did a video [of the process], but in the installation we needed to have the writing visible on the ironing board. I had to figure out how to make the invisible ink, which took a long time. It took so long, I decided to make an artist’s book to accompany the piece. In order to read the book, you need to iron the pages to make the printing appear. I


ABOVE: (clockwise from upper left) Compulsion, transfer drawing, collage; Civil Disobedience, trace monoprint, drawing, collage; Re-consider, drawing on handmade paper, sewn. OPPOSITE: Details from the installation Iron, silkscreens on fabric.

like the whole idea of working with things that surprise the viewer somehow. Normally you would use lemon juice, but I had to wait to see if it would work as the show traveled, and that after three months if it would still work. But lemon juice is too runny, so I tried yogurt, and that worked for the first two weeks, and then it stopped working because after the bacteria died, it wasn’t acidic anymore. So I just kept doing research online, and I came across baking soda…it’s the opposite, it’s alkaline (instead of acid, like the yogurt), but at least it wasn’t runny to use on the printing plates. It’s a very simple formula. I don’t know how long it’s going to work, but it works now at least. It’s a risk. Building an alternative space Back in the ‘70s, you didn’t worry about working nine to five. If you wanted an alternative, you went out and did what you wanted to do, in many fields, not just in art. But slowly and surely through the ‘80s, things have changed with yuppiedom. Now alternatives are all trying the same

model. It’s an outrage. Ann (Kalmbach) went to school at New Paltz, along with Anita (Wetzel). Their teacher was Ken Burge, who eventually got us this job—a half-time, part-time job (as a tech in the art studios) at SUNY New Paltz. We shared this part-time job, and needed studio space, and I needed a press to do printmaking now that we were all out of grad school. Then Anita wrote a grant for the NY State Council on the Arts, for $2,400. And we got it, in 1974. When they came to visit us [to follow up on the grant], they said “You have to do something, you can’t just use the money for yourself!” So we started on James Street in Rosendale in this little house, and began offering some classes to supplement our halftime, part-time job—that’s how we started. The ‘F’ Word The perception [of the Women’s Studio Workshop as a feminist organization] is something we’ve struggled with forever. When we started, we were seen as housewives

with aprons. That tells you, “We’ve come a long way baby.” [Laughs] It’s interesting because it was never strictly a feminist idea—we’re women-centered, but not everybody is a feminist, not everybody is comfortable with that label. We struggle with the question of renaming the organization, and the conclusion is that we should keep it, because it’s important for many artists who expect and need that kind of atmosphere. WSW is about noncompetitiveness, it’s about cooperation, and being in a supportive environment. I think we need more places like that. Because it’s competitive to be selected to come here, once you come in, you’ve got your stamp of approval, and whatever you do, it will be supported. Lots of other places have this jockeying for power. If anybody ever does that here, they don’t do it for too long, because there’s just no response. There’s no reinforcement for that, for namedropping, stuff like that. We’re trying to set up an alternative to all of that, to all the ego-playing. When you come here, you can just leave all that at the door. It’s about your work, not about all that other stuff.

7/08 CHRONOGRAM PORTFOLIO 39


Lucid Dreaming BY BETH E. WILSON

TOUCH NOT THE CAT “OF COURSE IN SCULPTURE...THE WORK HAS TO STAND OR FALL ACCORDING TO WHAT IT DOES WITH SPACE...IT IS THE SPACE A WORK CREATES WITHIN AND AROUND ITSELF WHICH ARTICULATES ITS STRENGTH, ITS JOY, OR ITS SUFFERING.” —JOHN BERGER

As many of you who follow this column regularly may have noticed, I normally focus my attention on various art phenomena in and around the region that I find interesting, positive, noteworthy—recognizing exhibitions and other artistic efforts that bring some sort of benefit, that raise the bar or otherwise contribute to the general advance of humankind. This column does not follow that precedent. A few weeks ago, a bunch of over-life-size fiberglass cats, mounted on black steel posts, arrived on the streets of Catskill. There are two basic variations— the cat is either sitting or standing, stylized tail raised high in the air—and each has been painted or otherwise decorated, and given a cute name, usually a bad play on words like “cat” or “kitty.” They are, apparently, enormously popular. They also bear approximately the same relationship to “art” that McDonald’s has to real food, and are, to my mind, just about as detrimental. Don’t get me wrong—I love cats. I have one myself, and I’m very attached to him. (He sits curled up on my lap as I type these very words.) Such sentiments no doubt help fuel the popularity of the unfortunately named “Cat-nAround Catskill” project, but popularity alone is not a proper gauge for the success or failure of a public art project. It’s a tricky thing, erecting artwork (typically sculpture) in a public space— our society has become so compartmentalized when it comes to culture, that the average citizen will often throw his or her hands in the air, shrugging helplessly when confronted with an example of bleeding edge contemporary art. It’s like stumbling awkwardly into an intense discussion that a few other people have been having for the past hour, when you have little hope of catching up, or even comprehending the primary subject of the conversation.You feel powerless, and then alienated, and more likely than not you’ll be walking in the opposite direction in short order. This is not only an American phenomenon. Last summer, I was fortunate to visit the Münster Sculpture Project in Münster, Germany. This exhibition was originally inspired by a local public art furor, set off when the city purchased and installed a large, stainless steel kinetic sculpture by George Rickey. It was, and is, pretty damn ugly—not the Rickey I would’ve picked, had I been part of the selection process, and the citizens of Münster were rightly ticked about spending so much public money on it.The curator of the regional art museum, Kasper König, saw the controversy as an opportunity to put together an exhibition intended to bring everyone up to speed on the conversation that had been 40 LUCID DREAMING CHRONOGRAM 7/08

going on in 20th-century sculpture. It spilled out of the museum itself into the streets and public squares of the city, functioning not only in its intended local function, but attracting the attention of the international art world at large as well. That was in 1977, and König has since, with the full blessing and support of the local government, organized three more editions of this show, which takes place once every 10 years (sort of a contemporary art equivalent of the Oberammergau Passion Play). It must be working. When I visited last summer, it was striking to me how the general public—certainly not artworld insiders—seemed genuinely attracted to, and engaged with the work on view. One work, by Pawel Althamer, consisted of a narrow dirt path worn through a public park, and across a field of wheat, maybe a half mile long altogether. That was it. Walking along the path, I encountered a group of middle-aged German women, happily chatting among themselves. When I asked them what they thought of the work, they laughed and called it “the path to nowhere.” As it turns out, it wasn’t their first visit to the piece—even knowing that it went nowhere, they were back again to walk it once more. Such openness to art that can seem counterintuitive, or that poses open, unresolved questions, is the mark of a public that is capable of engaging the world, of experiencing and thinking through things with uncertain answers. For my money, that’s a desirable leading characteristic of citizens in a true democracy as well. “What’s so bad about the cats?” you may ask.They represent a formulaic, utterly lowest-common-denominator surrender of aesthetics to commerce and to marketing (this is a project sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce, after all). As ingeniously as some of the individual cats may be decorated, they’re just an evolved form of paint-by-numbers, where the most challenging issue is figuring out if you’ve tracked down all the spots calling for color number 15. Cheesy, cat-related title? Check. Humorously cheeky, coyly veiled sexual reference? Check. And so on. It’s an “art” project that’s as glossy and bomb-proof as the “sculptures” in it, most of which seem to have been dipped in a polyurethane bath that renders them impervious to just about everything, including real thought. Even if you think they’re just fun, a mere diversion, they do positive damage as they become the sole representation of “art” in the community. Two women I encountered on Main Street, who’d just posed for photographs with one of


ABOVE: BARBARA ETHAN, SELF-PORTRAIT, 2008 OPPOSITE: BETH E. WILSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CAT

the cats, commented to me, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We love them, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so creative. Every one is so different!â&#x20AC;? Sad, but true. While Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll grant that the original inspiration for projects like thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in 1999, when the model was staged as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cows on Paradeâ&#x20AC;? in Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; displayed a measure of inventiveness, but since then, the mindless replication of these animal projects has rendered them as imaginative as the average franchise store at the mall. They create the illusion of creativity, without any of the attendant difficulties, without substance. Instead of drumming up community support for good local artists, and cultivating new ways of imagining and using public space, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cat-n-Around Catskillâ&#x20AC;? merely toys with these ideas, like a cat with a dead mouse. The viral popularity of these projects is perhaps their greatest danger. In the larger scope of things, Catskill might be excused its event, if only because it was organized by the Chamber of Commerce. But I am sad to report that Hudson has succumbed to the same disease (this time with dogsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;their project is called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best in Showâ&#x20AC;?), which is cosponsored by the local Chamber and the Columbia County Council on the Arts, of all things. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as though there werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t any active, engaged, serious artists in Columbia Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which I know for a fact is not the case. The CCCA should know better than to abdicate its responsibility to these artists, and to the public itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supposed to serve, by endorsing this dumbed-down project. The self-congratulatory attention that these animal projects receive, and the easy popularity that they seem to enjoy are slaps in the face to any number of other, less pre-packaged, and more significant artistic projects that are being done in the area, from the Unseen America workshop organized by the Kingston Museum of Contemporary Art, which has been connecting a number of normally overlooked members of the community with the means and the skills to portray their own experiences, to Ellenvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10 x 10 x 10, which brings talented artists from around the region to do work in storefront spaces around the downtown, presenting a range of ideas and artistic visions to enliven the community. Painting a bunch of pre-fab animals, no matter how â&#x20AC;&#x153;creativeâ&#x20AC;? it may seem on the surface, only ever skims the surface. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s please stop this madnessâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;now! â&#x20AC;&#x153;CAT-N-AROUND CATSKILLâ&#x20AC;? IS ON VIEW, MOSTLY ON/NEAR MAIN STREET IN CATSKILL, THROUGH THE SUMMER. THE â&#x20AC;&#x153;KITTIES WILL BE LOOKING FOR A PERMANENT HOMEâ&#x20AC;? AT THE CATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MEOW AUCTION ON SEPTEMBER 21. (518) 943-0989; WWW.CAT-N-AROUND.COM. â&#x20AC;&#x153;BEST IN SHOWâ&#x20AC;? LETS THE DOGS OUT IN HUDSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUSINESS DISTRICT

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7/08 CHRONOGRAM LUCID DREAMING 41


museums & galleries

Carlsen Gallery, Inc Presents

A “Summer Sizzler” Antique Auction Sunday, July 20, 2008 at 10:30am * Special Coin Session at 10:30am * Main Antique Auction at 11:30am Previews: Thurs, Fri. & Sat. 11am to 5pm & Sun. 8am until sale Carlsen Gallery, Inc. ~ Rt. 32 Freehold, New York www.carlsengallery.com For our July auction we are pleased to have been chosen to offer items from a lifelong Hudson, NY collector’s estate.This untouched house & attic are loaded! For July we will offer their collection of vintage toys & advertising. July’s sale will also include two coin collections including Gold & Silver Bullion and American Coinage from the 19th & 20th Century (Pre 1964). Also included is a wonderful 1788 Philadelphia “Peaceable Kingdom” Sampler, a Great Portrait by Ammi Phillips, Duncan Phyfe Sofa, French Erard Baby Grand Piano, fine examples of Period Furniture, Oil Paintings, Georgian & American Sterling & Coin Silver, Oriental Carpets, Mirrors & Country & Formal Accessories, etc. Mark your calendar and please plan to attend or print an online catalogue from our website: www.carlsengallery.com Phone and absentee bids are gladly accepted; we must ask that those arrangements be made no later than Friday July 18th. Terms: CASH, Approved Check, MC, VISA, DISCOVER (Credit Cards for Gallery Purchases Only) 15% Buyer’s Premium CALL: (518) 634-2466 FAX (518) 634-2467 E-Mail: info@carlsengallery.com

DIRECTIONS: From the South: NYS Thruway Exit 21 (Catskill) to Rt. 23 West to Rt. 32 North. Gallery approx. 6 miles on left. From the North: NYS Thruway Exit 21B (Coxsackie) to Rt.9W So. to Rt. 81 West to Rt. 32 So. Gallery is approx. 4 mi.on the right

42

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES CHRONOGRAM 7/08


galleries & museums

THE ALDRICH CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM

CLEMENT ART GALLERY

258 MAIN STREET, RIDGEFIELD, CT (203) 438-4519.

201 BROADWAY, TROY (518) 272-6811.

“Elizabeth Peyton: Portrait of an Artist.” Comprehensive exhibition of photographs. Through November 1.

“Ab Ovo (From the Egg)—Ten Painters in Tempera.” Through July 23.

“Serge Spitzer: Still Life.” Through July 13.

ANN STREET GALLERY 140 ANN STREET, NEWBURGH 562-6940 EXT. 119. “Printed Matter.” A contemporary view of printmaking in its many manifestations. Through August 2.

BARRETT ART CENTER 55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-2550.

COLDWELL BANKER 6 ROCK CITY ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-2255. “An Abstract Vision.” Works on canvas and paper by Barbara Adrienne Rosen. Through July 7.

DANBURY RAILROAD MUSEUM 120 WHITE STREET, DANBURY, CT (203) 778-8337. “The Railroad Legacy.” Works by John Fleming Gould. Through December 31.

“The Best of Barrett.” Annual summer members’ exhibition. Through July 3.

DEBORAH DAVIS FINE ART, INC.

BASILICA INDUSTRIA

510 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-1885.

110 SOUTH FRONT STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-0131.

“Bamboo.” Paintings and monoprints of Maj Kalfus. July 10-August 4.

“Tides.” Works by Emily Hassell. Through July 13.

BAU 161 MAIN STREET, BEACON 440-7584. “Recent Paintings by Jane Blake.” Through July 6.

Opening Saturday, July 12, 5pm-7pm.

DEWEY HALL ROUTE 7- SHEFFIELD VILLAGE, SHEFFIELD, MA (413) 229-7907. “Juried Art Show.” Sponsored by the Housatonic Valley Art League. Through July 13.

BE GALLERY

“Member Art Show.” Sponsored by the Housatonic Valley Art League. July 17-August 10.

11 MOHONK ROAD, HIGH FALLS 687-0660.

Opening Friday, July 25, 4:30pm-6pm.

“New Work by Judith Hoyt.” July 4-August 11. Opening Sunday, July 6, 1pm-3pm.

THE BEACON INSTITUTE 199 MAIN STREET, BEACON 838-1600. “Works of Leigh Wen.” Paintings. Through July 8.

museums & galleries

Hester Keith, Gathering, stoneware clay, 2008. At Unison in New Paltz through July 31.

DOWNTOWN ELLENVILLE (413) 229-7907. “ArtsWAVE.” Third annual invitational exhibition of 10 Hudson Valley artists. Through October 5.

THE FIELDS SCULPTURE PARK OMI INTERNATIONAL ARTS CENTER GHENT (518) 392-4568.

CATSKILL COMMUNITY CENTER

“Clench 2008.” Oliver Kruse. Through November 30.

344 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-4950.

“Stepping Stones (Pots and Pans).” Jean Shin and Brian Ripel. Through November 30.

“Cat-n-Around Catskill Cats of 2008.” Through July 14.

“Twitchers and Cheaters.” Nina Katchadourian. Through November 30.

CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK

FOVEA EXHIBITIONS

59 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-9957.

143 MAIN STREET, BEACON 765-2199.

“The Camera Always Lies.” Regional triennial of the photographic arts. Through August 17.

“Dispatches from the Frontlines: 12 Women Photojournalists.” Through August 9.

7/08 CHRONOGRAM MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

43


THE FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER

KENT ART ASSOCIATION

VASSAR COLLEGE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5632.

21 SOUTH MAIN STREET, KENT, CT (860) 927-3989.

“Facebook: Images of People in Photographs from the Permanent Collection.” Through August 10.

“Kent Art Association Founders’ Show and Summer Members Show.” Through July 6.

KINGSTON MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART G.A.S.

105 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON WWW.KMOCA.ORG.

196 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 486-4592.

“Unseen America.” Photographs by workers. July 5-31.

“Gassed Up!” Group exhibition presented by Long Reach Arts. Through July 13.

Opening Saturday, July 5, 5pm-7pm.

“Posthumous Eruptum.” Works by Michael X. Rose. July 19-August 10. Opening Saturday, July 19, 6pm-9pm.

KLEINERT/JAMES ARTS CENTER 34 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2079.

GALERIE BMG

“Woven Walls.” Solo exhibition by Harry Roseman. July 3-27.

12 TANNERY BROOK ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-0027.

Opening Saturday, July 12, 4pm-7pm.

“Constructing the Feminine.” Laura D’Alessandro. July 4-August 4. Opening Saturday, July 12, 5pm-7pm.

LEO FORTUNA GALLERY 422 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 697-7907.

GALLERY 384

“Levitating Rabbit.” Works by Liliana Porter. Through August 17.

384 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 947-6732. “New Works.” Showing sculptures by Eileen Brennen Michael Limberger and Shigeru Nishikawa Paintings. Through July 3.

MARK GRUBER GALLERY

“Remove the Landmark.” Work by Cannon Hersey and Aaron Yassin. Through August 9.

“Painting the Town.” Local color of New Paltz. Through July 16.

THE GALLERY AT ARTEMIS 33 BROADWAY, KINGSTON 339-2494.

“Hudson Valley Landscapes.” Group show. July 19-September 3. Opening Saturday, July 19, 6pm-8pm.

“Queenie Ann Garsuta & Matt Becher.” Hindu deities and Japanese folkart meet street art. Through July 2.

MIDDLETOWN THRALL LIBRARY

THE GALLERY AT R & F

“Benjamin Franklin: In Search of a Better World.” Through July 25.

84 TEN BROECK AVENUE, KINGSTON 331-3112. “Mixed Images.” Group exhibition celebrating five years of Photo and Encaustic workshops. Through July 19.

museums & galleries

NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ 255-1241.

DEPOT STREET, MIDDLETOWN 341-5454.

MILL STREET LOFT GALLERY 455 MAPLE STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-7477.

Opening Saturday, July 12, 5:30pm-7:30pm.

“Ladybug Girl.” Sketches and paintings by David Soman. Through July 25.

GCCA CATSKILL GALLERY

MONTGOMERY ROW SECOND LEVEL

398 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-3400.

6423 MONTGOMERY STREET, RHINEBECK 876-6670.

“Gardens and Trees.” Group exhibition exploring gardens and trees in all media. Through August 2.

“An Inaugural Solo Exhibit: Photographs & Landscapes.” By Nicole Sausto-Grady. July 18-August 30.

“Search for the Sublime.” Oils and pastels by Michelle Moran. Through August 2.

GCCA MOUNTAINTOP GALLERY

Opening Friday, July 18, 5:30pm-7:30pm. “Photographic Artistry on Canvas.” Photographs by Joel Weisbrod. Through July 15.

5348 MAIN STREET, WINDHAM (518) 734-3104. “Journeys in Clay 2008.” Annual juried clay exhibit featuring fine crafts, utilitarian objects, and sculptures. Through July 26.

GO NORTH GALLERY

MORGAN LEHMAN GALLERY 24 SHARON ROAD, LAKEVILLE, CT (860) 435-0898. “Paintings by Robert Andrew Parker.” Through July 6.

469 MAIN STREET, BEACON . GONORTHGALLERY.COM.

MOUNT TREMPER ARTS

“Resurrection Insurrection.” Michael X. Rose. July 12-August 3.

647 S. PLANK ROAD, MOUNT TREMPER 688-9893.

Opening Saturday, July 12, 6pm-9pm.

“Signs.” Group photography exhibit. July 19-August 31.

“Ketta Ioannidou—Mutant Nature.” Through July 6.

Opening Saturday, July 19, 8pm-12am.

GRIMM GALLERY

NICOLE FIACCO GALLERY

6 BROADHEAD AVENUE, NEW PALTZ 255-1660.

506 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5090.

“A Notion to Sew.” 19th century needlework of Hylah Hasbrouk and her daughters. Through October 31.

“The Rain, the Park and Other Things.” Curated by Renee Riccardo. Through July 12.

THE HARRISON GALLERY

PALENVILLE BRANCH LIBRARY

39 SPRING STREET, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA (413) 458-1700.

3335 ROUTE 23A, PALENVILLE (518) 678-3357.

“Works by Hale Johnson.” Realist landscapes. August 2-31.

“Palenville Photography Premiere.” Through August 3.

Opening Saturday, August 2, 5pm-7pm.

PARK ROW GALLERY

HUDSON OPERA HOUSE

2 PARK ROW, CHATHAM (518) 392-4800.

327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-1438.

“Michael Zelehoski.” Solo exhibit of new work. Through August 2.

“Doug Clow.” An exhibition of his series of small scale, 8x10 oil on linen paintings. Through July 12.

Opening Saturday, July 5, 4pm-6pm.

HUDSON VALLEY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART

THE PEARL ART GALLERY

1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 788-0100.

3572 MAIN STREET, STONE RIDGE 687-0888.

“Works by Chris Jones.” Through August 17.

“Eternal Egypt.” Encaustic and collage by Astrid Fitzgerald and photography by Sarite Sanders. Through July 6.

HUDSON VALLEY GALLERY 246 HUDSON STREET, CORNWALL-ON-HUDSON (845) 534-5278.

PEARLDADDY GALLERY

“Animals in Art.” Paintings by Lucy DiMiceli, Fred Mitchell and Clayton Buchanan and photo images by Sue Aikin and Don Fowler. July 5-August 31.

183 MAIN STREET, BEACON 765-0169.

Opening Saturday, July 5, 5pm-8pm.

RIVERWINDS GALLERY

THE IO GALLERY

172 MAIN STREET, BEACON 838-2880.

131 KENT ROAD SOUTH, CORNWALL BRIDGE, CT (860) 672-6631.

“Poetry of Color.” Paintings by Clayton Buchanan. Through July 7.

“Girls Girls Girls.” Through July 20.

ROSENDALE CAFE

JOHN DAVIS GALLERY

434 MAIN STREET, ROSENDALE 658-9048.

362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5907.

“New Works by Cindy Hoose & Jacinta Bunnell.” August 3-31.

“La Wilson: Witness Assemblage.” Through July 13.

Opening Sunday, August 3, 2pm-4pm.

“Slate and Steel: Sisyphean Circle: Beijing Series.” John Van Alstine. July 17-August 10. Opening Saturday, July 19, 6pm-8pm. “Witness: La Wilson.” Through July 13.

44

“The Best Medicine.” Paintings and sculpture by Edie Nadelhaft. Through August 3.

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES CHRONOGRAM 7/08


Catch Great New Theater on its way to New York. July 1-13: 1+1 by Drama Desk and Obie winner Eric Bogosian. In the dark undercurrent of human desire, how far can you go to get what you want? (For mature audiences)

July 23 – August 3: Finks by Joe Gilford. The summer of 1952, a love story, and a terrible choice presented by the House Un-American Activities Committee. Based on true events in the lives of the author’s parents.

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SCULPTURE AND PAINTINGS

Explore the Clark’s 140-acre campus while visiting Stone Hill Center, designed by Tadao Ando.

Williamstown, MA 413 458 2303 clarkart.edu 87 Marshall Street

North Adams, Massachusetts

413.MoCA.111

www.massmoca.org

7/08 CHRONOGRAM MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

45


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2591 South Ave Rt 9D Wappingers Falls nancyschneider@allstate.com Insurance subject to availability and qualifications. The "Cupped Hands" logo is a registered service mark and "Our Stand" is a service mark of Allstate Insurance Company.Allstate Insurance Company, Allstate Indemnity Company, Allstate Property and Casualty Insurance Company, Northbrook, Illinois © 2007 Allstate Insurance Company.

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September 6th & 7th Saturday 11am-6pm - Sunday 11am-5pm ◊ Sample hundreds of wines from all over New York and the world. ◊ Taste culinary delights from the Hudson Valley’s best restaurants & caterers.

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◊ Enjoy cooking demonstrations, wine tasting seminars and live music!

845 373-8309 Millerton, NY 518 789-4603

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For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.HudsonValleyWineFest.com

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Hummingbird Jewelers Creators of Fine Gold and Diamond Jewelry

14k Palladium White Gold and Silver Mokume Gane by James Binion

STORM KING ART CENTER 500 Acre Outdoor Sculpture Park & Museum

Master goldsmiths specializing in custom design, antique restoration and remounting.

An enchanting realm where art and nature meet.

Master Goldsmith Bruce Anderson

Open Wednesday through Sunday until November 15

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Closed Monday and Tuesday Self-guided tram tours available daily 12:00 noon – 4:30 pm

Call for directions and calendar of events – 845-534-3115

www.stormking.org

Shelley K

museums & galleries

20 West Market St. Rhinebeck, New York (845) 876-4585 hummingbirdjewelers.com

SPECIAL EXHIBITION SOL LEWITT

110 Partition St. Saugerties, NY 12477 Open Tuesday - Saturday | 12–6 by appt. Sunday & Monday

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MUSEUMS & GALLERIES CHRONOGRAM 7/08


SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART SUNY NEW PALTZ, NEW PALTZ 257-3858. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All Hot and Bothered.â&#x20AC;? Photographs from The Center for Photography at Woodstock. Through September 28. Opening Friday, July 18, 5pm-8pm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Defining Art: Recent Acquisitions 2005-2007.â&#x20AC;? Work by Abbott, Atget, Cartier-Bresson, Chia, Nice, Oliveira, Rauschenberg. Through August 31. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Medium is the Message.â&#x20AC;? Hudson Valley Artists 2008. Through September 7. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Noongar Boodja: Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Ecology and Culture.â&#x20AC;? July 11-September 28. Opening Friday, July 18, 5pm-8pm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reading Objects 2008.â&#x20AC;? Works from the Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection with texts created by University faculty and staff. Through September 28.

SHARADA GALLERY 45 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK 876-4828. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Visual Conversation.â&#x20AC;? Visual software by artist Robert Hills. Through July 21. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paper.â&#x20AC;? Featuring works on paper by seven artists from New York, Massachusetts and Louisiana. July 3-August 3. Opening Saturday, July 5, 6pm-8pm.

MELINDA YALE

SHELLEY K GALLERY 110 PARTITION STREET, SAUGERTIES 246-5250. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Works by Jean Campbell.â&#x20AC;? Through July 20. Opening Sunday, July 20, 12pm-5pm.

SPIRE STUDIOS 45 BEEKMAN STREET, BEACON 231-3275. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Habitat for Artists.â&#x20AC;? Group show curates by Simon Draper. Through September 30.

TIVOLI ARTISTS CO-OP 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI 758-4342. â&#x20AC;&#x153;4th Annual Landscape Show.â&#x20AC;? Through July 13.

104 Ann Street Newburgh, NY 12550

TROLLEY MUSEUM 89 EAST STRAND, KINGSTON 331-3399. â&#x20AC;&#x153;2008 Artist-in-Residence Ian Gordon.â&#x20AC;? Through July 13.

Thurs-Sat 11am-5pm or by appointment

Opening Saturday, July 5, 5pm-8pm. ETCHING, PLUSH

UNFRAMED ARTIST GALLERY 173 HUGUENOT STREET, NEW PALTZ 255-5482. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dreamers Dreamtime Show.â&#x20AC;? Through July 31.

UNISON GALLERY

*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;ViÂ?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;

(IRING(AAKONTOFRAMEYOURART

WATER STREET MARKET, NEW PALTZ 255-1559. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gathering.â&#x20AC;? Sculpture by Hester Keith. Through July 31.

museums & galleries

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VAN BRUNT GALLERY 460 MAIN STREET, BEACON 838-2995. â&#x20AC;&#x153;James Westwater and Peter Ianarelli.â&#x20AC;? Through July 7.

VARGA GALLERY 130 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-4005. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art in the Time of Chaos: New Mosaics.â&#x20AC;? Kevin Postupack. Through July 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Found Object, Mixed Media & Assemblage Art.â&#x20AC;? Through July 6.

VITA GALLERY 12 OLD FORGE ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-2329.

2ED(OOK

  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;From the Heart of the Child.â&#x20AC;? The heroic journey of 5 women who discover their creative voice. Through July 21.

WHITECLIFF VINEYARDS 331 MCKINSTRY ROAD, GARDINER 255-4613. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wine Countryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Old World and New World.â&#x20AC;? Photography by Robert Goldwitz. Through August 31.

WILLIAMMAXWELL FINE ARTS 1204 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 737-8622. â&#x20AC;&#x153;INside/OUTside.â&#x20AC;? Works by 6 artists exhibited inside and outside the gallery. Through September 21.

WILLIAMS COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 15 LAWRENCE HALL DRIVE, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA (413) 597-2429. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Julie Mehretu: City Sitings.â&#x20AC;? Through July 27. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Laser Show: Six Perspectives on a Chaotic Resonator.â&#x20AC;? The relationship between visual, aural, and physical vibration and its ability to carry information. July 12-September 14. Opening Tuesday, July 22, 2pm-12am.

WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION AND MUSEUM 28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2940. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Active Members Walls.â&#x20AC;? Through July 6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People of Woodstock: Lois Woolley.â&#x20AC;? Through July 6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection.â&#x20AC;? Through September 21. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stamens & Pistils.â&#x20AC;? Through July 6.

7/08 CHRONOGRAM MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

49


Music FIONN REILLY

BY PETER AARON

gra

vity

’s

rai

nb

ow

Joe Giardullo

I

n the liner notes to Red Morocco, the 2007 release by saxophonist and composer Joe Giardullo’s Open Ensemble on France’s RogueArt label, jazz authority John Szwed describes the session: “The results are elegant, shimmering, ringing music, like colors spiking across the plane of a Monet canvas, or spinning like a piece of Calder’s kinetic art; a constantly moving, deeply sonic performance, collectively improvised, and decentered; a self-organizing musical system, with minimal input or constraints from outside. Giardullo is willing into existence a music that occurs beyond his control.” Szwed, who has authored award-winning books on Sun Ra, Miles Davis, and Jelly Roll Morton, is grappling with what Giardullo calls his G2 Music, or Gravity 2 Music; an updated version of the compositional approach he developed in the mid 1970s, then known simply as Gravity Music. But what, exactly, is all this Gravity business about, and what’s the difference between the old and new models? Leaning into his latte in a Kingston coffeehouse, the white-bearded Giardullo, attempts an explanation. “Most Western music is based on functional harmony,” he offers. “That is, it’s the harmony that moves the material, the chords that dictate the movement. Which is fine, but I don’t find that very interesting. Gravity [Music] is about not making any one particular aspect of the music more important than the others; it’s about having no solos and being omniharmonic, of giving equal weight to every pitch, every note.To play it correctly, you really have to leave your ego out of it—in fact, [Down Beat critic] Francis Davis said my first record [1979’s Gravity] was the most democratic music there was. The reason I call the method I use now Gravity 2 is because during the first period I was doing all of this without really understanding what it was that I was doing. Now I see more how it works, and that affects the music. So I wanted to make a distinction. It was just something I had to go through to get to this point.” There were, of course, other things the Cottekill resident went through before he arrived at his current spot in the avant-jazz firmament. Giardullo, a primarily self-taught soprano specialist who also plays tenor, sopranino, flute, and bass clarinet, was born in Brooklyn in 1948 and at the age of seven moved to Long Island, where he discovered rhythm and blues. “I was part of a clique that was really into that stuff before it crossed over into the pop charts,” he recalls. “James Brown, The

50 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Falcons with Wilson Pickett, Sam & Dave—all of those guys.” By the time he was 14, Giardullo was playing with R&B bands up down the East Coast on weekends. “My folks were cool with it, as long as I kept my grades up and didn’t get into trouble,” he says. “It was an easy deal for me. And until I got into college, I thought R&B was the be-all and end-all.” College was SUNY New Paltz, a school that Giardullo selected at random. Or maybe it selected him. “I had qualified for a scholarship to the state college of my choice, and I just blindly picked it out of the guidebook,” he says. “I didn’t know anything at all about the town, or know any of the students. The first time I saw New Paltz was the day I arrived to move into the dorm.” And in 1967, once his studies were under way, he found himself drawn to another area he knew little about: Indian music. It proved to be a revelation. “There was a course being offered on Indian music, an elective,” the saxophonist recalls. “I signed up for it, but since I was the only one who did, they decided to cancel it. I ended up working out a deal with the teacher to get private lessons, and it really turned my head around. I was really focused on the rhythms, which are just a matrix of possibilities, since the beats can be subdivided in a million different ways.” Giardullo continued his immersion in Indian forms for another seven years and eventually became attracted to New Thing jazz, studying sporadically with trumpeters Wadada Leo Smith and Donald Cherry. But the next major turning point occurred when he came across jazz composer George Russell’s book on his Lydian Chromatic Theory of Tonal Organization. A concept that utilizes scales or a series of scales known as modes instead of chords or harmonies, Russell’s methodology greatly influenced the music of John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Eric Dolphy, and others. “It’s a totally true approach to understanding music, that’s the only way I can explain it,” says Giardullo. “Whenever I hear something that’s confusing, Russell’s ideas will always open it up for me.” Another artist whose ears had been opened by Russell’s theory is influential pianist and composer Paul Bley, who Giardullo met by chance at a Kingston bus stop in the late ‘70s. As the two shared the ride, Giardullo showed Bley a few of the experimental scores he had with him. Impressed, Bley offered encouragement that later led to the sessions for Gravity that feature Giardullo’s Creative Chamber Ensemble.


Unbeknownst to Giardullo, however, at around the same time as his fateful meeting with Bley, Giardulloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Indian music teacher had sent copies of the same scores to her own teacher, the iconic Paris Conservatoire composer-educator Nadia Boulanger. Boulanger, instructor to George Antheil, Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, Philip Glass, Paul Bowles, and legions of others, was also impressedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;enough to invite the young saxist-composer to attend her classes. Unfortunately, a lack of funding prevented him from going. Eventually, though, Giardullo did make it to Europe, and from 1977 through 1980 divided his time between the continent and the Hudson Valley. He spent most of his European sojourns in Amsterdam, a city famous for its vital free jazz scene, and worked with many of the other American avant players also drawn to the city. During one of his upstate stays he began an association with revered saxophonist and composer Anthony Braxton, for whom he worked as a transcriber and who sponsored Giardulloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s receiving of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 1979. Braxton also introduced Giardullo to the music of influential German avant-garde composer Karlheinz Stockhausen, which had a galvanizing effect on Giardulloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own compositions and led to his discovery of another, even greater, influence, Stockhausen contemporary Luciano Berio. But despite all of his growth as a composer, by 1981 Giardullo found himself growing frustrated as a performer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really working in Europe that much, and the scene [in the US] had become really depressing. People just werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t appreciating the music,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And my wife and I had started a family. So I decided to stop playing out for a while.â&#x20AC;? He lanched a successful marble and granite business, took part in a program that taught music in prisons, and continued to compose in private. But it would be another chance meeting, 10 years later, that brought him back to the bandstand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was out to see a local performance and I ran into [internationally known multi-instrumentalist] Joe McPhee,â&#x20AC;? says Giardullo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We started talking and he got me excited about playing out again. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my bro, one of the greatest people on the planet.â&#x20AC;? (McPhee was profiled in the June 2007 issue of Chronogram.) In addition to directly supporting his re-emergence, the Poughkeepsie-based McPhee introduced Giardullo to Kingston composer and Deep Listening Institute founder Pauline Oliveros, with whom he has since played and who has commissioned and performed several of his works. Since the fateful meeting with McPhee, Giardulloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resurgence has become a high-gear affair. In addition to more commissions, residencies, and regular engagements in NewYork and abroad, the saxophonist has loosed a string of well-received recordings: Primal Intentions (2001, Cadence Jazz Records), Specific Gravity (2001, Boxholder Records), Language of Swans and Shadow and Light (both 2002, Drimala Records), Art Spirit (2003, Boxholder), Now Is and FallingWater (both 2002, Drimala), NoWork Today (2005, Drimala), Weather (2007, Not Two Records), and the aforementioned Red Morocco. (The Pearl Road is due out on the Mode label in 2009.) On hand for the recording of Red Morocco, Szwed in his notes offers a glimpse of Giardulloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s singular technique as a bandleader: â&#x20AC;&#x153;[After dispensing vaguely mapped lead sheets and instructions, Giardullo] quietly asks the musicians to be gracious in allowing things to happen, to resist the need to lead or to react to everything around them. Rather, they should be committed to whatever they are doing, no matter how small it is, for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;small ideas can be strong if you are committed to them.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Szwed also describes the leaderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s often impressionistic approach as being painterly; indeed, Giardullo himself says itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;like Jackson Pollock stuff.â&#x20AC;? For Red Moroccoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 14-member Open Ensemble, Giardullo tapped David Arner, the former organizer of Kingstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much-missed New Vanguard Series, who contributes xylophone instead of his usual piano. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For me as a musician, there was nothing else quite like [the session],â&#x20AC;? says Arner. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joe has a very particular vision; even though he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t directly control any of the notes per se, with G2 heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s found a way to control the music as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being played. It is very open, no one sound dominates. But collectively thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still a melodic line being made. And when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing it you have to really pay attention [to Giardulloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s directions] in a very intense, particular way. After weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d finish a tune, it would feel like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d spent all day in a dark room and then walked out into the sunlight.â&#x20AC;? While Giardulloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current schedule is certainly keeping him occupiedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;on the books are more New York gigs and fall tours of Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;he maintains heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looking forward to entering another relaxed period in the coming year. While leaning toward keeping most of his gigs local, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s especially excited about being involved in the recently opened art/performance co-op space High Falls Wonderland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I even volunteered to work in the box office,â&#x20AC;? he says. He also has some more music heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to perform and record. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working on something with instrumentation for five players, the next Gravity project,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So right now, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up in the air.â&#x20AC;? Joe Giardulloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Language of Swans Trio, featuring bassist Reuben Radding and drummer Todd Capp, will play at the Cornelia Street Cafe in New York on August 13.

                  

  

   

  

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NIGHTLIFE HIGHLIGHTS Handpicked by local scenemaker DJ WAVY DAVY for your listening pleasure.

KELLEIGH MCKENZIE July 10. McKenzie weaves a strange tale through the music business and back again. After leaving rural Oregon for a New York acting/singing career, she found a musical soulmate along the way in musician/coproducer Jeff Michne. Together, they began work on Chances, McKenzie’s first album—until a mystery physical affliction kept her from playing for years. Cut to Ulster County, where the now recovered McKenzie found a new career leading Music Together classes, an interactive, child-parent music education series. Mckenzie remains a bit of an enigma, with a voice straight from heaven pouring out rootsy songs like “Gin,” which features a haunting banjo hook and production that would make T Bone Burnett jealous. Join Mckenzie and her bandmates Scott Petito, Dan Hickey, and Michne at the Bearsville Theater in honor of the long-awaited debut of Chances (Zatchubilly Music). Mark Brown (from Uncle Buckle) opens this highly recommended record-release show. 8pm. $10. Bearsville. (845) 679-4406. www.kelleighmckenzie.com.

INNER VISIONS July 12. In the last few months, Leah Boss and her Upstate Reggae production team have brought continuous vibes with Luciano, Crucial Massive, and The Skatalites. Her monthly summer series at the Colony Cafe, which began last month with a show by Herbal Nation, continues tonight with Inner Visions from the I-tal roots reggae scene of St. John, Virgin Islands. Visit www.myspace.com/innervisionsreggae to sample the group’s uplifting music, which is described as “Third World all mixed together with rock’n’roll influences, the Wailers, Steel Pulse, Aswad, the Mighty Diamonds, and some ’70s soul music stylings added for flavorings!” Pass the rice and peas, and we’ll get lifted together (with yours truly as DJ selector for the evening). 9pm. $20/$15. Woodstock. (845) 679-5342. www.reggaewoodstock.us.

BRION SNYDER July 12. Singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Snyder tours our area in support of his new self-released CD, Build Another Empire (Independent), which was produced by his bandmate Kenny Siegal (Joseph Arthur, Johnny Society) at Old Soul studios in Catskill. Head up Route 28 to the classic Boiceville Inn, where Shokan’s Reservoir Music store hosts the weekly Saturday band happenings. Snyder’s music has an abundance of Southern charm, as he hails from Raleigh, North Carolina, by way of Brooklyn. 9pm. $10. Boiceville. (845) 657-8500. www.bandshellartists.com.

ALPHA MALE GORILLAS, THE VIRGINIA WOLVES July 19, 20. Among the dozens of cool acts at this year’s Rosendale Street Festival these two area bands stand out. The Virginia Wolves, guaranteed to be your next favorite band, feature the truly mesmerizing voice of guitarist/songwriter Kelly McNally, Adele Schulz on French horn, and Sean Crimmins on lead guitar. They will play the Canal Locks stage at 4pm on July 19. Alpha Male Gorillas had much buzz earlier this year by being this close to winning $1 million in the national Bodog Battle of the Bands. The band hits the festival’s Firehouse Stage at noon on July 20. Free. Rosendale. (845) 750-6168. www.rosendalestreetfestival.com.

BLUEBERRY CD RELEASE PARTY July 26. Singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and producer Blueberry (aka Gwen Snyder) is the new civic leader of One Nation Under a Groove. She and her band will celebrate the release of Blueberry’s self-titled fourth album on the local Euphoria!/Sundazed Music label at Jason’s Upstairs Bar on fashionable Warren Street. Blueberry’s smooth funk is like a Blow Pop: sweet and sugary, but always with a surprise inside. DJs from the Sundazed stable (including the crisp Mr. Chips) will spin before, between, and after the band’s two sets, and the label will offer cool giveaways from its vast catalog of classic funk, soul, jazz, and more on CD and vinyl. 8pm. Free. Hudson. (518) 731-6262. www.sundazed.com.

BRION SNYDER PLAYS AT RESERVOIR MUSIC IN SHOKAN ON JULY 12.

52 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 7/08


CD REVIEWS BILL BROVOLD & LARVAL SURVIVING DEATH/ALIVE WHY? 2007, CUNEIFORM RECORDS

C Could death be more inspiring than life? You’d have to aask guitarist and recent Kingston transplant Bill Brovvold, who survived five heart attacks within 18 months bback in 2003. He’s lived on to produce the suitably titled ddouble CD Surviving Death/Alive Why?, his fifth release w with his Detroit-born avant/progressive rock ensemble LLarval and his second for Cuneiform Records. Compparatively, Larval scrapes up against King Crimson and sshards of Captain Beefheart, expressing as much love for eexperimentation as for high-decibel output. Disc one, Surviving Death, is a swatch from Larval’s 13 i f 13-year existence andd references events surrounding Brovold’s heart attacks and recuperation (see the title tune,“The Hospital Visit,” and “The 300-Pound Nurse”). “It Was a Puny Plan” is a rocker that intermittently becomes thumpy and texturally thick while “Scottish Blood,” with its parlor room-polite piano sound, is quietly rapturous as it simmers and boils continuously upon its theme. Alive Why? documents concert performances between 1999 and 2006 and features band members past and present; Larval has an “evolving-door” policy with its members. The recorded material is subjectively upstaged by the very loud and dramatic live shows, as exemplified in “Last Ditch,” a rampage of fuzzy noise. But, like other prog rock groups that have pushed beyond the hearing loss of their audiences, Larval also shows off its soft side with the lazy-metered “Long Lake.” Repetitiveness may get the best of a few cuts on Surviving Death/Alive Why? as Larval builds industriously on themes, expressions, and impressions. But it’s heartfelt, for sure. www.cuneiformrecords.com. —Cheryl K. Symister-Masterson

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THE GYPSY NOMADS ETERNAL SUMMER 2008, ATMOSPHERIC AUDIO

I you’re already a devotee of Scott Helland and the If G Gypsy Nomads, their latest 11-track CD might come aas a bit of a shocker. But what a pleasant shocker it is. H Hardcore punk bassist turned medieval rocker Helland sstill pounds out tempestuous rhythms on his acoustic gguitar for the pagan, Celtic, renaissance, and gypsy mussic fans out there, but now we’ve finally got his sidekick aand percussionist, Samantha Stephenson, in the mix aand she’s crooning sultry, original French pop tunes in a classy cabaret fashion. Admittedly, I can’t mutter a lick of French unless Par I’m ordering a cheese omelet at a Parisian cafe, so I have no idea what Stephenson is singing about. But neither do I care, because to me her emotive, aphrodisiacal voice is just another instrument. The entire recording and its combination of folkish styles and moods smacks of individuality, and we certainly need more of that in an industry that is content to crank out pappy crap. I understand their live shows are captivating, and the Nomads are all over the map on tour this summer. Their next local appearance is at the Bennystock memorial festival at the Clermont State Historic Site in Germantown on July 20. www.myspace.com/ thegypsynomads. —Sharon Nichols

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THE CHIEF SMILES GREAT FOR TERRIBLE TIMES 2008, INDEPENDENT

The Chief Smiles won me over with the first chords.The rrest was icing—beautiful, thick, and creamy. Great for Terrible Times opens with sonic guitar and violin, followed bby a hard-to-capture drumbeat that provides an intricate dichotomy to haunting vocals. The guitar breathes deeply, the drums gasp and lurch, the vocals weep. This iis alternative rock in the early ‘90s vein, adventurous and w willing, before it became diluted by corporate plague. The music combines shades of indie, prog, metal, classic, sweater, and sugar rock into a unique vision of sound. The songs are good (a few great), alternating deftly bek ff andd come-hither, h h bbut what makes the record, and maybe the band, is the tween ffuck-off distinctive blend of Alex Trimpe’s heavy guitars and Sarah Trimpe’s violin and voice.Yes, this is a brother-sister team, but it isn’t shtick. They both have able musical voices that reach for heights and harmony just shy of peril. Sibling rivalry or synergy, they have a nice feel for when to play together and when to back off, and the energy is best radiated on the heavy and quirky tracks. The band currently resides in the musical center of the world, Brooklyn, and the Trimpes originally hail from Kerhonkson—not necessarily known for its creative spawn. But this CD indicates that there may be something in the water there, and perhaps it should be bottled. www.thechiefsmiles.com. —Jason Broome

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Books

PAPERBACK WRITER Ann M. Martin Lifts the Corners by Nina Shengold photo by Jennifer May

Name a small town with the following Christmas Eve tradition: “After the parade, Santa Claus arrived in town and not just waving from the last float. No, the method of his arrival was magical and unexpected and different every year. No one (except the mayor) knew who played Santa; it was a big [town] secret. And no one knew how he would appear. Min said that once Santa had sprung out of a giant jack-inthe-box in the town square, and once he had been flown in on a helicopter, and once he had even ridden down Main Street on an elephant.” If you answered “Woodstock,” you’re not far off. The small town with the mysteriously athletic Santa is Camden Falls, Massachusetts, created by bestselling young adult author Ann M. Martin for her latest series. “Woodstock was definitely my inspiration for Main Street,” Martin affirms between bites of a grilled veggie sandwich from Bread Alone. Soft-spoken, petite, and simply dressed in a pink fleece sweatshirt and jeans, she’s extraordinary self-effacing for a publishing phenomenon. Martin’s long-running series The Baby-Sitters Club has sold more than 176 million copies, prompting Publishers Weekly to declare, “Ann M. Martin rules the paperback roost.” Her other books include the award-winning A Corner of the Universe, Belle Teal, and A Dog’s Life:The Autobiography of a Stray, plus two more series coauthored with Laura Godwin (Doll People) and the late Paula Danziger (P.S. Longer Letter Later and Snail Mail, No More)—in all, over 200 titles. Martin never imagined such a prodigious output when she published her first book, Bummer Summer, in 1983. A recent Smith College graduate, she worked as an editor at Scholastic and Bantam Books. The Baby-Sitters Club was originally sold as a series of four, and Martin remembers her editor talking about how to construct a story arc that spanned several books. “I’d never heard the term ‘story arc.’ I didn’t know what I was doing—I was just thinking of each book and how to tell that story best.” Clearly her instincts were golden. Scholastic commissioned more BSC books right away, planning to release four per year. “I was surprised and very grateful,” Martin says. By book number six, “they realized it was taking off, and the schedule jumped up to one a month.” Scholastic also launched the Little 54 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Sister spinoff series, hiring a small staff of regular writers to work from Martin’s detailed outlines, like a TV staff working with a head writer who plots, supervises, and does final line-editing to maintain a consistent voice. By the time the Baby-Sitters Club’s perennial eighth-graders booked their last client in 2000, Martin had been on the production treadmill for 14 years. “I thought I would never write a series again,” she asserts. But one of her BSC editors, David Levithan, wooed her back via her love of sewing. “Maybe he left me alone for four years,” she grins, clearly fond of the man who cajoled her into creating Main Street, which debuted in May 2007. Camden Falls’ Main Street features less tie-dyed versions of such Tinker Street mainstays as the Golden Notebook, Clouds, and the Woodstock Wool Company, locus in quo for Martin’s sewing store and community hub, Needle & Thread. The hardware store with knotholes in the floor was actually in Princeton, NJ, where Martin grew up. “We used to lie on our stomachs on the floor trying to peer through those knotholes and see what was below,” she recalls. Seeing what’s below is one of the author’s recurring themes. Though the New England facades of Camden Falls’ shops and row houses seem Norman Rockwell timeless, Martin is careful to fill their interiors with lives that are not picture-perfect. Her two leading characters, sisters Flora and Ruby, lose both parents in a car accident and come to live with their practical grandmother, Min, co-owner of Needle & Thread. Min’s neighbors include two Chinese artists, an African-American widower struggling to remain independent, and families coping with a mentally handicapped teenager, Alzheimer’s disease, and the shame of poverty. These edgy topics unfold in a reassuringly old-fashioned context, penned by a writer who actually says things like “Gosh!” At a time when most fiction aimed at tween girls reads like chick lit in a training bra, it’s refreshing to see middle-school characters act their own age. “I always wanted to write children’s books because they were so important to me growing up,” Martin says. She was raised in a household in which reading aloud and library visits were family activities. Her mother taught preschool, and


her father was a New Yorker cartoonist; young Ann met his colleagues George Booth and Charles Addams. Though Henry Martin kept a studio downtown, he often worked at home in the evenings. His daughter remembers standing behind his chair, watching him draw. Martin describes her child self as “much more like Flora than Ruby,” an introspective, studious girl who loved sewing and crafts, and was scared to try sleepaway camp. Her vivid imagination concocted a family of foxes under her bed. “When I got out of bed, I would leap three or four feet away so Mr. and Mrs. Fox couldn’t get me. I sort of knew they weren’t really there, but I still had to leap,” she says, adding that she always slept with the light on.Though her younger sister Jane acted in community theatrical productions, Ruby’s “singing, dancing, ta-da! personality” also borrows from Doll People coauthor Laura Godwin’s younger niece. The collaboration with Godwin opened new doors for both writers. Godwin’s previous works were picture books, and Martin had not written fantasy, which she insists she “would never have tried without Laura.” When working with free-spirited Paula Danziger, Martin, a self-described “compulsive outliner,” learned to be more spontaneous. She now writes “anywhere,” toting her laptop onto the porch in good weather, or using the dining room table to spread out her copious notes. Martin bought her house outside Woodstock in 1990—the same year she launched two charitable foundations with her BSC earnings. A well-hidden, lushly gardened Victorian fantasy erected in 1907, the house features an imposing four-story tower built five years later. Martin’s filled it with lovely antiques—a grandfather clock, a Victrola, a Rosebud-like sled, a glass-front cabinet packed with Limoges china boxes—which add to its pervasive aura of vintage magic: one would not be surprised to find Narnian fauns in its wardrobes, or keyholes leading to secret gardens. The interior features two back-to-back stairwells that somehow suggest the inside of a lighthouse, possibly one drawn by Edward Gorey. One leads to the light-filled sewing room in which Martin relaxes with pleating machines and embroidery hoops, making intricate smocked dresses for her friends’ daughters. The second leads up to her writing office, the only room in the house that isn’t impeccably neat, thanks to a mischievous foster kitten named Pippin. Martin is an animal lover whose household often includes foster pets. A lifelong cat person, she took in her first dog 10 years ago. A silky blond golden retriever/beagle mix with a BSC zipper pull on her collar, Sadie was born to a stray taken in by a volunteer just before giving birth; Martin and others adopted the puppies. “Sadie’s so shy—I often wonder what would have happened if nobody rescued her mother,” Martin says with a shudder. This line of inquiry inspired her award-winning novel A Dog’s Life, which follows the sometimes heartrending fate of two stray puppies born in a summer house toolshed; she’s currently planning a sequel. For someone who writes so much about the complex emotional lives of children and animals, Martin is strikingly reticent about her own. This may be temperamental—she refers several times to her shyness, a problem she overcomes on book tours by using PowerPoint presentations—or a buttoneddown remnant of the WASP heritage she can trace back to the Mayflower. It’s telling that even what Martin calls her most personal book, Newbery Honor winner A Corner of the Universe, is based on tales of her mother’s mentally ill younger brother, who died before Martin was born. But her 12-year-old narrator channels a pitch-perfect first-person voice. Hattie is a shy nonconformist in a town where the biggest divide is between Presbyterians and Episcopalians. Into this straitlaced community comes Uncle Adam, a schizophrenic savant just discharged from the residential school where his tight-lipped parents have tucked him away. Inappropriately dressed for every occasion and constitutionally incapable of hiding emotions that swing from childlike glee to frightening volatility, Adam is like nobody Hattie has ever met. Her reflections at the book’s end could serve as a credo for Ann M. Martin’s fiction: “I thank Adam, as I have thanked him almost every night since August, for showing me that it’s possible to lift the corners of our universe. Adam told me about lifting the corners the second time I met him, but I had no idea what he meant. Now I think I do. It’s about changing what’s handed to you, about poking around a little, lifting the corners, seeing what’s underneath, poking that. Sometimes things work out, sometimes they don’t, but at least you’re exploring. And life is always more interesting that way.”

7/08 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 55


Maiden USA: Girl Icons Come of Age

Do My Story, Sing My Song: Music Therapy and Playback Theater with Troubled Children

Kathleen Sweeney Peter Lang Publishing, , .

Jo Salas Tusitala Publishing, , 

O

• Recognizes the stages of physical, emotional and cognitive developement • Offers a rich curriculum and innovative teaching methods • Begins foreign Languages and music instructions in first grade • Supports developing intelligence through cultivation and power of the aesthetic

56 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 7/08

n the dedication page of Do My Story, Sing My Song, Jo Salas quotes Oliver Sacks: “To restore the human subject at the center—the suffering, afflicted, fighting human subject.” This quotation, from The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, could serve as a mission statement of sorts for Kathleen Sweeney’s Maiden USA as well. Both of these books explore the central question of safeguarding for our children the right to have and to use their own voices. Maiden USA begins with an extremely scholarly parsing of media phenomena such as lipstick Lolitas, the virgin/slut dichotomy, Mean Girls, Barbie, and fear of menstruation. Though the book seems a bit overwrought (or perhaps overthought) at some points, these idiosyncrasies are well worth forgiving in order to share Sweeney’s insights into the state of young womanhood at the turn of the millennium. For, unlike so many analysts of pop culture, Sweeney, who has worked extensively as an educator in the Mid-Hudson Valley, doesn’t stop at identifying the problem. There is good news out there; in the emergence of powerful female icons (one has to love an author who distinguishes icons and eye-cons) and in the growing tendency of young women to step out of the passive role of object, creating media of their own. Inside the queen bee of a swarm of Mean Girls may well lurk a frustrated Fellini. Maiden USA is a fascinating read for all who care about the well-being of young women—and young men, for clearly the well-being of one impacts the other. In Do My Story, Sing My Song, the population under scrutiny is troubled children—severely troubled. Salas began doing music therapy at a residential treatment home for emotionally disturbed kids as a pioneer, patching together a program that initially had little in the way of funding, facilities, or comprehension from her superiors. Salas’ storytelling method fits her subject matter perfectly. We come to know and care about the author and the children she meets, some of whom will go on to self-sufficiency and others fated to lifelong institutionalization. From this perspective, the common sense of what once seemed a radical notion becomes obvious: there’s just about nobody on this earth is not helped in some way by facilitated, nurtured self-expression. Salas reaches kid after kid, first with music and then, as her confidence grows, with the more involved methods of Playback Theater. For some children, the resultant gains spill over into academics and interpersonal skills. For others, the music therapy room may be the only place where the light of something healthy can shine, and Salas is honest about this. She makes a powerful case for the innate right to such creative expression. Both books touch on key current issues. What is at the heart of a huge brouhaha like the Texas polygamist cult scandal, if not our comprehension of maidens in the USA? Is it possible that some of the many thousands of children who are prescribed psychiatric medications would be better served by being handed an instrument, a script, or a camera? For anyone who believes that society is better served by ardent creators than by passive consumers, teachers like Salas and Sweeney offer thoughtful maps. —Anne Pyburn


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Writers Reading from Their Work Sunday, July 27, 3 to 5 p.m. Fergus Bordewich, Susan Richards, and Paul Russell Sunday, August 24, 3 to 5 p.m. James Howard Kunstler, John Darnton, and Hillary Jordan

Mystery Meets History: A Story Adventure at Maple Grove Sunday, October 19, 2 to 4 p.m. with storytellers Lorraine Hartin-Gelardi, Karen Pillsworth, and Patricia Tomlinson

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Arts & Education Supplement and corner the market on new enrollment.

Maple Grove is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hudson River Bracketedâ&#x20AC;? country villa built in 1850. It is located in Poughkeepsie, New York. Its entrance is at 24 Beechwood Avenue. Check the website for further information: www.maplegroveny.org

ADVERTISING DEADLINE: JULY 13, 2008 sales@chronogram.com Phone 845.334.8600 | Fax 845.334.8610 7/08 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 57


When “School’s out!” gives way to “There’s nothing to doooo,” check out these new titles by Hudson Valley children’s authors and illustrators.

SUMMER READING ROUNDUP FOR KIDS AND TEENS PICTURE BOOKS:

SEE HOW THEY RUN: CAMPAIGN DREAMS, ELECTION SCHEMES, AND THE RACE TO THE WHITE HOUSE

BECAUSE YOU ARE MY BABY BE SHERRY NORTH, ILLUSTRATED BY MARCELLUS HALL SHE

SUSAN E. GOODMAN, ILLUSTRATED BY ELWOOD H. SMITH

ABRAMS BOOKS FOR YOUNG READERS, 2008, $16.95 AB

BLOOMSBURY CHILDREN’S BOOKS, 2008, $9.95

W What would you do for your child? Would you write a hit song, throw a winning touchdown, make a “Pisa pizza” so 12 feet high? Engagingly illustrated bedtime comfort food captures the to-the-ends-of-the-Earth bond between ca parent and baby. The artwork by Chronogram frequent p flyer Marcellus Hall plays nicely with North’s text.

Did you know that it took the founding fathers four months to write the Constitution? That in 1938, a mule was elected mayor of Milton, Washington? Or that after the 2000 presidential election, the name Chad fell to 338th on the popularity chart? A lighthearted but very thorough look at the US government and electoral process, peppered with Rhinebeck illustrator Smith’s instantly recognizable drawings.

LADYBUG GIRL LA SPIN THE BOTTLE

DAVID SOMAN & JACKY DAVIS DA

ELIZABETH CODY KIMMEL

DIAL BOOKS FOR YOUNG READERS, 2008, $16.99 DIA

DIAL BOOKS FOR YOUNG READERS, 2008, $16.99

To her lofty brother, Lulu’s just a pesky little sister, but send her outdoors and she’s Ladybug Girl, able to rescue se eendangered ants, walk a fallen tree trunk without slipping, aand leap shark-infested puddles in a single bound! Created by a local husband-and-wife team, this affirmative C big girl adventure recently hit the New York Times children’s bestseller list.

New middle-schoolers Phoebe and Harper sign up for a Drama Club production of Guys & Dolls and stumble into a hilarious tangle of humiliations and an opening night ritual involving the dreaded kissing game. Fans of Kimmel’s popular Lily B. series will enjoy Phoebe’s effervescent narration, out-of-the-box creative drive, and resilient spirit.

TRAINSTOP TR BARBARA LEHMAN BA HOUGHTON MIFFLIN, 2008, $16 HO

A little girl and her parents take their usual subway ride, but when all the grown-ups fall asleep, the rid train makes a stop that’s definitely off the beaten tr tr track. An enchanting adventure ensues, and when th the train moves on, the grown-ups awaken, none th the wiser. Real, or just a dream? The conductor seems to know. An imaginative wordless tale from Caldecott honoree Lehman. THE WOLVES ARE BACK TH

TEEN: ALIVE AND WELL IN PRAGUE, NEW YORK DAPHNE GRAB LAURA GERINGER BOOKS, 2008, $16.99

Matisse’s father has Parkinson’s disease, and her family’s relocated from her beloved Manhattan to an upstate backwater where high school means equal parts perky pep rallies and poisonous rumors, and no one appreciates your cool shoes. Grab’s empathetic and heartfelt first novel explores problems that can’t be solved by attitude or denial, but just might be eased by accepting a little help from your friends.

JEAN CRAIGHEAD GEORGE, ILLUSTRATED BY WENDELL MINOR JEA DUTTON CHILDREN’S BOOKS, 2008, $16.99 DU

W When Yellowstone’s wolves were exterminated, no one realized that its badgers would disappear too, as would Vesper re sparrows, bears, and wildflowers. This compelling pairing of sp aan acclaimed illustrator and legendary children’s author (My Sid Side off the Mountain) depicts nature’s chain of coexistence, and what happens when mankind breaks and then restores it.

MAP OF IRELAND STEPHANIE GRANT SCRIBNER, 2008, $22

It’s 1974, South Boston is a racial minefield, and Ann Ahern’s crush on her Senegalese French teacher, Mademoiselle Eugenie, is inflammatory in more ways than one. Grant’s perfect-pitch evocation of a working-class Irish teenager’s diction, hair-trigger mood swings, and passionate longings makes this an indelible read for older teens and adults.

WYNKEN, BLYNKEN, AND NOD WY EUGENE W. FIELD, ILLUSTRATED BY GISELLE POTTER EUG SCHWARTZ & WADE BOOKS, 2008, $16.99 SCH

“W “Wynken, Blynken, and Nod one night sailed off in a wooden shoe ...” And then what? The trio’s adventures wo are stranger than you may remember: seems the fellas ar are fishing for stars. Kingston resident Giselle Potter’s ar gorgeously illustrated re-visioning of this poem brings out go the nocturnal magic and charm of a timeless classic. th

MIDDLE GRADE: LIGHTS, CAMERA, AMALEE LIG

WHAT THEY ALWAYS TELL US MARTIN WILSON DELACORTE PRESS, 2008, $15.99

An evocative, sensitively told tale of two brothers from Alabama. James is an inwardly restless golden-boy senior, fixated on college and freedom. When Alex, already an outcast after an impulsive suicide gesture, starts secretly dating a boy on his track team, the brothers’ uneasy relationship deepens in moving and unpredictable ways. Hudson Valley Southerner Wilson’s debut is a winner.

DAR WILLIAMS SCHOLASTIC, 2008, $7.99 SCH

Be Between Bearsville Theater gigs, songwriter Williams penned two delightful books about a wise tween named Amalee. In Lights, de Camera, C Amalee, she inherits a magnum champagne bottle full of money for “something important.” Inspired by a teacher’s d documentary film, Amalee sets out to make her own, learning a lo lot about endangered species and her unconventional family. LOVE ME TENDER LOV AUDREY COULOUMBIS AUD

UPCOMING RELEASES BY HUDSON VALLEY AUTHORS: Forbidden Tales: Sword, by Da Chen (Laura Geringer Books, 8/08) Humpty Dumpty Climbs Again, by Dave Horowitz (Putnam Juvenile, 10/08) Mother Teresa: a Pictorial Biography, by Maya Gold (Dorling Kindersley, 8/08) The New York State Reader, by Ann Burg (Sleeping Bear Press, 9/08) T is for Terrible, by Peter McCarty (Square Fish, 9/08) Token, by Alisa Kwitney & Joelle Jones (Minx, 10/08) The Yggyssey, by Daniel Manus Pinkwater (Houghton Mifflin, 9/08)

RANDOM HOUSE, 2008, $16.99 RAN

Elv Elvira’s having a lousy summer. Her pregnant mother’s acting wacky, her Elvis impersonator-father has left in a huff, and her wa estranged grandmother is near death. There’s a whole lotta es shaking going on, but what follows is a spicy-sweet story of sh family conflict, comedy, and resolution. South Fallsburg resident fa Couloumbis is a Newbery Honor winner. C

58 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 7/08

FOR YOUNG WRITERS: “Hunting the Wild Word,” summer writing workshop for 9-to-15 year-olds with Jo Treggiari (The Curious Misadventures of Feltus Ovalton), Wednesdays, July 9,16, and 23 from 1:00 through 2:30 pm at the Woodstock Children’s Library. Limited space. (845) 679-2213. —Susan Krawitz & Nina Shengold


Whirling Dervish Workshop Corporeal and Inner Development Recognition of self and beyond

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7/08 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 59


POETRY

Edited by Phillip Levine. Submissions are accepted year-round. Deadline for our August issue is July 5. Send up to 3 poems or 3 pages (whichever comes first), by regular mail, to: Poetry, 314 Wall St., Kingston, NY 12401, or via e-mail (preferred) to poetry@chronogram.com. Subject: Poetry Submission. Full submission guidelines at www.chronogram.com\submissions. i’m so distracted

I am me

i can’t even focus on my obsessions

and my sister is too

—p

—Ginger McMahon (6 years old; about herself and her twin, Hominy)

AN INTRODUCTION TO POETRY

LINES

Don’t look here for ideas, there are no ideas here,

Cleaning out her house after the funeral I found sixteen jars of Noxzema cold cream under the bathroom sink, all half-used while my mother boxed the plates and cursed and listened to the answering machine greeting over and over again, crying.

only dark slashes of rain, and scavenger birds able to speak but often unwilling, and my heart, thirteen years old again and in a dirty red hoodie, glad for the rain and the burning wind that brings it.

In the back office there was the push-pin map of all the places she’d been, a certificate of a solo hot-air balloon ride over north Jersey a box from the Soviet Union marked with a Post-it note and my initials, across the hall, my grandfather’s separate room. I remember that as a child I had tried to smooth out the wrinkles in her face to see if she hid her secrets there so I could pull them from her like turnips, red and bitter and offer them to my mother. —Lisa Parisio

—Howie Good

WHERE THE DEW FALLS

LIVE ALONG THESE LINES (BEDIENUNGSANLEITUNG)

I see, I taste and Touch, But I will never know What it’s like To love where the dew falls. To cradle a lover in my arms And wish that the night would never end. Or maybe I’ve known it often. How else would I be so familiar with it? Love, stay with me!

Some measures need to be taken, immediately, meaning there’s nothing between I and objective necessity.

—Michael Colwell

A PLEA TO FEED THE FISH A sonnet’s like the pond outside my house. This pond was built for sewage management. I’ll take you down to it, you have intelligence I like. We’ll trundle down and hush. You ask me, why so quietly? Answer: my fish will swim to suck your toes and stick Their fishy noses in the weeds and muck Around in spotted shiny golden gear. I swear this pond a poem it has a fish; I dropped her in myself, bowl and all the plastic mermaids, still might be you can’t yet find her past your wavering face she’s underneath just look dammit and if you had a real pond deep pond thoughts—I should have tried to give you more than mud. —Emily Daly

60 POETRY CHRONOGRAM 7/08

This is only the setting not something that happens or doesn’t happen one day or today. And all along knowledge and facts come and go that I cannot grasp, for I’m not looking nor considering or thinking. I am just wondering where the focus is hidden or misunderstood, as if I had missed the caption, or the prompt, or that very poorly outlined bedienungsanleitung that would, eventually, reveal everything in its true light, probably common, maybe nondescript but true and mine anyway. —Xavier Roca


FREEDOM FANTASY

DIGITAL TREES

POTATO CROP

I no longer know where I can go to let the wind tipple at my nipples, to be uncrazy and free, unclothed and unrestrained. In 1972 I stood naked as the day I was born talking pleasantly with the State Police, who had remarkably little to say. But then there were several thousand of us and only two of them, and the young one was nervous, didn’t know where to fasten his jittery eyes. Hell, he was scared, of buttocks and bellies, upper arms and ankles thonged, hair streaming wet down cello-shaped backs above rumps, so many rumps, and flitches with dangles and flitches without, thick furry or nude themselves. Three reporters from the New York Times tried to hide in a tree, ashamed of all their clothes. Only the woman spoke to me; the men had things to do that involved much looking down. Out on the lake a crazy guy from the suburb across the way circled his speedboat time and again. Naked bodies flopping like fish slithered in and out of the boat, taking him for a ride. When I was tired I laid me down by a fire, just nodding hello. My sleep was dreamless —who needed dreams?— and the stranger tending the fire stoked it, banked it, fed it for hours, ensuring that I was kept warm. When I awakened all that I said —there was no requirement to speak— was thanks, and he knew for what: for the freeness of it all.

After swinging from digital Trees, I retired But sometimes I miss the intangible Seeds and metaphors about reasons

What I remember of 1985 are the round rock clumps of potatoes. My first job is a ritual of plastic gloves, a conveyor belt, and a sacred mountain of starch at the end of the hangar-like farm outbuilding.

—Elaine Mills

—Kevin Kenny

NO RETURN We catch ourselves saying we can never go back across the bridge into the sun-drenched thickets. But the smell of pink tangerines brings us here again, on the border of no return. We eat on the side of the road. The old music hasn’t lost its zip. The dust rises and falls as we dance, our skin gleaming. I have wronged you right, all of these years. You step away giggling, trying to convince me I can change the way I see the dying flow of the landscape.

We are all women. I’m thirteen, just old enough to work here. The others are poor, some are missing teeth, their eyes wrinkle when they laugh. They challenge me to potato-cleaning contests to pass the time until lunch. Our fingers often catch in the machine. It stops automatically: we look at each other in accusation. The guilty woman shrugs, nurses a pinched thumb or forefinger. We palm stones and dream of rings, we hope the clock will click to home. We rub off clumps of dirt, throw out imposters, cull out the rotten and the bug-ridden. Our hands slide over each potato: the thin skin and the rough. I’m the kid with the bright yellow gloves. I can’t remember any of their faces. —Tricia J. Asklar

LAZARUS You have already turned, loving my hands exploring, like we have never been here before. All the world is green. The city looming in the distant smog and fire.

After four days in the cave, Lazarus mistook the face of his Savior for a loaf of bread, the hands that had raised him for goblets. He did not see his sister Martha longing for a man she would never wed, craving to smell the skin of another, to feel the thorns of his beard.

—Stephen Jarrell Williams

WELL, SINCE YOU ASKED... A homesick exile under an alpine range I feel close to a summit—distant, blue. Did you mean monkhood when you praised the change? Not even God will talk to you-know-who. Oh, and the natives? Gorgeous but too good, Too eager to fill cribs and weed the lawn. Say Hello to the gang back in the ‘hood And pretty please think of me—or I’m gone. —Aaron Poochigian

Childhood river so small it has become

CONVERSATIONS WITH GHOSTS The darkness comes in at night, when you leave the windows open, and the air is still. It creeps in with the shadows and settles in your belly, along with the stars. Sometimes you can hear what is said in the day by putting your ear close to the earth and smelling the shine of the moon. I am wise to the night since it settles in my throat as I lie along the edge of the day. But it is never far enough away for me to see its full shape. I see pieces of it on my fingers and even on my toes. I do not know what it looks like though. I just know the way it feels.

Magdalene, with hennaed hair that had dried prayers from Jesus’ feet, her hands scented of spikenard, lips painted with calling men to bed, was the only one Lazarus recognized. He saw the falling away of her shoulder, the dark coins of her nipples through her linen dress, the tangle of hair between her hips. He wanted to taste sweat of other men on her lips, to smell beneath her hem. He saw that to live was to sin, that even his sisters were temptation. In that moment, he turned into the cave again, knowing his flesh called for darkness. —Christiaan Sabatelli

—Herschel Schlank —John Tiong Chunghoo

7/08 CHRONOGRAM POETRY 61


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Food & Drink

64 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 7/08


The Tomatoes of Amy Goldman Text and Photos by Jennifer May

O

n the 200-acre site of a former dairy farm in Rhinebeck, Amy Goldman has built a fortress around her vegetable gardens. Accessed through a gate by way of a call button, a half-mile driveway meanders through fields and forests, lined by stone walls, sugar maples, and a pond the size of a small lake. Near the heart of the property, a second gate opens at a vehicle’s approach. An impeccably restored 1788 Colonial farmhouse graces the inner sanctum, with a glass-walled greenhouse nearby, adjoining potting shed, and brick-lined herb garden.The grounds buzz with activity in early June: Goslings stagger across the lawn and rouse a trio of Indian Runner ducks from their preening. Beyond the fowl, workmen move trees while college interns prepare a vine-draped pergola for the onslaught of visitors Goldman expects through summer, heralded by the August publication of her third book, The Heirloom Tomato—From Garden to Table: Recipes, Portraits, and History of the World’s Most Beautiful Fruit (Bloomsbury). Goldman has good reason to believe that if she wrote it they will come. After the publication of her previous books, journalists, photographers, and videographers from the New York Times, the Washington Post, and “The Victory Garden” flocked to her gardens. Goldman is far more than a gardener. Equal parts author, detective, and plantsmith, Goldman researches, propagates, grows, tastes, preserves, and promotes heirloom vegetables and records her findings, which she has been doing for 35 years. Most recently her life has been consumed with tomatoes. Before that it was squash, and before that, melons. Both obsessions led to books—Melons for the Passionate Grower (Artisan, 2002) and The Compleat Squash (Artisan, 2004). Goldman grows tomatoes—and all her heirloom vegetables—because they are living folklore: rare, beautiful, historic, and, at their culinary best, more delicious than mass-market commodities. She also grows them because heirloom seeds contain valuable genetic diversity that is rapidly disappearing from the Earth. Goldman is part of what she describes as a subversive subculture that

aims to keep this genetic material alive. Members are as varied as government officials, homesteaders in Appalachia, and hobbyist kitchen-gardeners. Goldman sets a bronze casting of a giant tomato onto the table in her screened porch overlooking the pond. She flips open the first copy of her new book to a full-page photograph of the original specimen. Its name is Radiator Charlie’s Mortgage Lifter and its line can be traced back to West Virginia in the 1930s. Goldman says, “My mission in life is to get seeds back into the hands of farmers and gardeners.” She is on the board of the New York Botanical Garden and the New York Restoration Project, and is a chair of the board of the Seed Savers Exchange, the largest organization of its kind in the world. She travels across the globe to attend conferences and farmers markets and her eyes are always scouting. On a trip to New Zealand she saw fields of blue pumpkins. On a stroll in the Galapagos Islands, off the coast of Ecuador, she spotted the foliage of a wild tomato sprawling on the ground. She took a cluster home, planted the seeds, and named the resulting cultivar, with its tiny, juicy fruit, Sara’s Galapagos, for her daughter. Goldman later offered the seeds to the Seed Savers Exchange and they can now be found commercially. The heirloom movement is gaining ground. This year marks the opening of the Global Seed Vault in Norway—a storage facility built into the side of a mountain and descending 500 feet down into the permafrost. It was constructed to withstand bomb blasts and earthquakes, and already holds millions of seed samples from around the world. An heirloom, according to the Seed Savers Exchange, is any garden plant that has a history of being passed down within a family. It is also described as a plant whose lineage can be traced at least 50 years. When pollinated with another of its kind, an heirloom produces a plant that grows, looks, and tastes the same as its parents. This is in contrast to the common F1 hybrids that make up the bulk of the commercially grown crops we eat. Grow a plant from the seed of a hybrid salad tomato from your local supermarket and there is no telling 7/08 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 65


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PREVIOUS SPREAD: (L) AMY GOLDMAN AMONG HER TOMATO PLANTS IN RHINEBECK; (R) ALBERTO SHATTERS, A FULL-SIZED CURRANT TOMATO GROWN IN GOLDMAN’S GREENHOUSE; TOMATO SEEDLINGS IN GOLDMAN’S GREENHOUSE AWAIT TRANSPLANT TO HER ONE-ACRE TOMATO GARDEN.

what kind of tomatoes the plant will produce. Hybridizing is not new. Farmers and scientists have long known that pollinating a robust grower with a drought-tolerant specimen, for instance, may result in a plant that has a better chance in a dry environment. Mega sized agricultural corporations have taken the science to a new level, even crossing organisms and introducing the genetic material of mice, fish, and fruit flies into food crops. The use of terminator technology and suicide seeds—which produce sterile seeds—would biologically prevent farmers and gardeners from being able to grow anything at all from their crops, guaranteeing agricultural patents. “Greed, that’s the bottom line,” says Goldman. “It’s about controlling the first link in the food chain.” The greatest danger of exclusively growing fields of controlled hybrid and genetically modified plants is that the vast array of plants once available will die out, as will their unique genetic code. In the future, should we happen to see changing weather patterns, or new molds, fungus, and bacteria strains, there will be a very limited gene pool from which to source adaptations. The NewYork Times recently reported that three-quarters of biodiversity in crops has been lost in the last century. FAMILY JEWELS Over the past five years Goldman has grown over 1,000 varieties of tomatoes, chosen first from her favorites and then by recommendation, with names that are the fodder of fairy tales: Old Ivory Egg, Golden Ponderosa, Long Tom, White Beauty, Red Rose. She grows her tomatoes in a fenced, one-acre garden near the border of her land, and she keeps an isolation garden at the center of the property. It is located a half mile from any other garden and is where she experiments with the open pollination of heirlooms—without fear the busy bees will cross-breed the cultivars she wishes to keep pure. Her tomatoes range from the unusual to the familiar. Of the Red Currant, a blood-red, early crop tomato best eaten fresh, she writes, “Red Currant is the icing on the cake of every tomato basket I create for family and friends:They look

like cabochon rubies dangling from graceful stems.” Novogogoshary is a hollow, bell pepper shaped tomato best used for stuffing with crab, tuna, or pasta salad. Eva Purple Ball is a multi purposed, globe-shaped tomato reportedly brought from Germany in the late 1800s, and “so perfectly shaped that it could pass for a hybrid.” Novelty tomatoes are also included, such as Reisetomate (also known as Pocketbook), a cock’s comb red, ribbed variety with which Goldman once created a sensation on “The Martha Stewart Show” when she carried one as her purse on “handbag” day. “The tomato may not be as classic as Hermes, but it’s nonetheless a priceless heirloom,” she writes in Tomato. Goldman hopes her books will seduce readers into growing heirlooms. Each book includes photographs by Victor Schrager in a style inspired by Dutch flower paintings and medieval illustrated manuscripts, and reproduced gorgeously in an oversized, full-color format. Along with photographs, The Heirloom Tomato includes a chapter on the cycle of germinating, growing, and storing your own heirloom seeds. “Tomatoes won’t save us from starvation but they are the crop most loved by gardeners and they are critical in cookery,” she says. All 200 tomatoes profiled thrive in the Hudson Valley (sources for all varities are listed) and there are 55 tomato-based recipes. Goldman strolls along a herringbone-patterned path through fragrant oregano and thyme to inspect the isolation garden, framed by a white picket fence. Inside, black ground cloth covers the earth in a grid. Closing the gate behind her, she catches a bunch of columbine and geranium blooms in the door. She kicks the foliage out of the way and shorn petals scatter across the bricks. Goldman is unfazed. “I have no use for plants I can’t eat,” she says. Then she makes a beeline for the greenhouse. Tomato seedlings must be planted today. Amy Goldman’s garden will be open for visits on August 16 as part of the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Tour; at 6pm the same day, Goldman will read and sign The Heirloom Tomato at Oblong Books in Rhinebeck. On August 17, she will be at the Rhinebeck Farmers Market for a book signing from 10am to 2pm, with a tomato tasting (dependent on the harvest). www.rareforms.com. 7/08 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 67


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Here comes the sun!

Open daily 8 - 4 Summer Jazz Series (check jackandlunas.com for details)

Cool down with one of our refreshing beverages CATERING

"Best coffee in the Hudson Valley"

Full Line 0SHBOJD$ of PME$VUT BOE)PN F$PPLJOH  %FMJDBUFTT FO

IJQ 8FOPXT STUP NFBUPSEF PO BUJ BOZEFTUJO

Open 7 Days 845-255-2244

79 Main Street New Paltz

-PDBM0SHBOJD(SBTT'FE#FFGt-BNCt(PBUt7FBMt1PSLt$IJDLFOt8JME4BMNPO

No Hormones ~ No Antibiotics ~ No Preservatives $VTUPN$VUt)PNF$PPLJOH%FMJDBUFTTFO

(845) 246-2411 www.esotecltd.com sales@esotecltd.com

68 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 7/08

/JUSBUF'SFF#BDPOt1PSL3PBTUTt#FFG3PBTUT #POFJOPS#POFMFTT)BNTNPLFEPSGSFTI -PDBM0SHBOJD#FFGt&YPUJD.FBUT (Venison, BuямАalo, Ostrich)t8JME'JTI


LOCAL

S U S TA I N A B L E

SEASONAL

www. a ro i R e s ta u ra nt . co m

55 E. Market St, Rhinebeck

845- 876-1114 Dinner: Everyday Offering Outdoor Dining

Lunch: Thursday to Monday Reservation Recommended

MARKET CAFÉ Restaurant & Bar coming soon

108 Hunns Lake Rd Bangall, NY 12506 845 868 3175

BELL’S CAFE BISTRO ~ GOOD EATS

Market open 8am–6pm Breakfast served 8am–11am Lunch served 11am–3pm Closed Wednesday

WED–SAT DINNER WEEKEND BRUNCH 387 MAIN ST. CATSKILL NY 518-943-4070 BELLSCAFENY.NET

Kindred Spirits STEAKHOUSE & PUB at the Catskill Mountain Lodge

Master Jazz Guitarist Rick Stone July 4 & 5 at 8pm • A place for nature, art and music lovers. • Open seven days for breakfast and lunch. Dinner on weekends. • Live Jazz—Friday and Saturday—Starts at 6pm • Call for reservations or to cater your event. • Fireplace pub has 13 beers on tap. 334 Route 32A, Palenville, NY 518-678-3101 | www.catskillmtlodge.com

7/08 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 69


The Egg’s Nest where good friends meet

good

good

food

value

good

good

art

cheer

Rte 213 | Village of High Falls | 845.687.7255 Open 7 days...11:30 to 10:00

Fruit arranged like flowers? What a delicious idea! Same day pickup & delivery available

©1999

Delicious Party®

with Dipped Bananas

To order, please call or visit the location nearest you:

KINGSTON

POUGHKEEPSIE

900 Ulster Avenue

10 IBM Road, Suite B

845-339-3200

845-463-3900

EdibleArrangements.com Copyright © 2008 Edible Arrangements, LLC

70 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Franchises Available. Call 1-888-727-4258


d La Duchesse Anne La Duchesse Anne is located in the central Catskills - beautiful country with trout streams and mountains, forests and picturesque hamlets.

Mmmm! Taste Our Natural Goodness Bulk & Packaged Organic Foods 20% OFF on Vitamins and Supplements Everyday Gluten-Free and Wheat-Free Products Organic Dairy Products Organic Produce Natural Creams and Body Lotions

New

B a r | R e sturan t | Hot el

Kingston Super Store in the Kings Mall now open!

Zagat thinks we are in the top 10 “southern New York’s most romantic restaurants.”

d

“One of America’s top 25 eating inns”... Conde Nast Traveler 1564 Wittenberg Road Mt. Tremper, New York 12457 845.688.5260

www.laduchesseanne.com

For All That’s Naturally Good POUGHKEEPSIE:1955 South Road 296-1069 KINGSTON:Kings Mall, Rt. 9W N 336-5541 SAUGERTIES:249 Main St. 246-9614

www.motherearthstorehouse.com

7/08 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 71


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UP TO

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g in Everythin sale. the store on ULY 12 th ~ J

Join us for our Once-A-Year Summer Sale. One week of the lowest prices on the Hudson Valley’s best selection of fine cutlery, cookware, appliances, barware and professional kitchen tools. t6OJRVFLOJWFTGSPNBSPVOEUIFXPSMEt(SJMMJOHUPPMTt(SFBUHJGUTGPSBOZPOFXIPMPWFTUP DPPLPSFOUFSUBJOt'JOFDIPDPMBUFTt0JMT 4QJDFT $PGGFFT 5FBTBOEBDDPVUSFNFOUTt&YQFSU TIBSQFOJOHt$PPLJOHDMBTTFTBOEEFNPTt(MBTTXBSFBOE#BSXBSFt6OJRVFHBEHFUTt t4FSWJOHQJFDFTBOEBDDFTTPSJFTt

Saturday July 12 through Sunday July 20. Sale prices limited to store stock. Come early for best selection.

The Edge...

6934 Route 9 Rhinebeck, NY 12572 Just north of the 9G intersection 845-876-6208 Open Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30, Sun 11–4:30

An American Bistro Heart of Rhinebeck

babycakes café

Outside Seating Sun brunch @ 10:00am

Serving great food in a casual setting Now serving breakfast, lunch and dinner in our newly expanded space

Live Music Friday & Saturday Evenings

We’re More Than Just a Bakery! Tuesday 8:00 AM-6:00 PM

1-3 Collegeview Ave.

Wed.-Sat. 8:00 AM-10:00 PM

72 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 7/08

6417 Montgomery St 845 | 876 | 2924 www.starrplace.com

Sunday 8:00 AM-4:00 PM

Poughkeepsie, NY 12603

Phone 845-485-8411

Live Music Fri & Sat @ 9:00pm

(Near Vassar)

www.babycakescafe.com

Catering too!


tastings directory CAFÉ Babycakes Café 1-3 Collegeview Avenue Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 485-8411 www.babycakescafe.com Now in its seventh year, Babycakes Café recently expanded to a 65 seat full service restaurant. Offering breakfast, lunch, and dinner with waiter service and a full bar. European-style baked goods made from scratch are a big draw. Open Tuesday through Sunday.

Bread Alone Café E. Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3108 Route 28, Boiceville, NY, (845) 657-3328 (headquarters) Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2108 Bread Alone Café offers fresh breads, pastries, soups, and sandwiches at three mid-Hudson locations.

CATERING Bistro To Go

On- and off-premise catering. Sophisticated Zagat-rated food and atmosphere in a rustic country setting, wide plank floors, rough hewn beams and a stunning zinc bar. Open 7 Days. Chef, owner Erickson.

COOKING CLASSES Natural Gourmet Cookery School 48 West 21st Street, New York, NY (212) 645-5170, Fax (212) 989-1493 www.naturalgourmetschool.com info@naturalgourmetschool.com For more than 20 years people around the world have turned to Natural Gourmet’s avocational public classes to learn the basics of healthy cooking. They come to the Chef’s Training Program to prepare for careers in the burgeoning Natural Foods Industry.

FARMERS’ MARKETS Sprout Creek Farm 34 Lauer Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 485-9885 www.sproutcreekfarm.org cheese@sproutcreekfarm.org COME TO SPROUT CREEK FARM MARKET! Grass-fed cheese from our own Guernsey and Jersey Cows... Free from artificial antibiotics and hormones. While you’re here you can also pick up... grass fed pork, veal, and beef as well as Remsberger Farms honey and maple syrup. Come meet all of our cows, sheep, goats, and ducks!

PASTA La Bella Pasta (845) 331-9130 www.labellapasta.com Fresh pasta made locally. Large variety of ravioli, tortellini, pastas, and sauces at the factory outlet. We manufacture and deliver our excellent selection of pastas to fine restaurants, gourmet shops, and caterers throughout the Hudson Valley. Call for our full product list and samples. Located on Route 28W between Kingston and Woodstock.

RESTAURANTS Aroi Thai 55 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-1114 www.aroirestaurant.com Aroi means ‘delicious’ in Thai; and delicious it is. David Thompson writes in ‘Thai Food,’ “Thai food creates a locus of flavor within each dish through its components, producing a complexity that can be dazzling.” And Aroi illustrates his description faithfully.The wine list is spare and perfectly paired to the flavors of Thai cuisine. Some selections are familiar and some are off the beaten track; all compliment the food. Enter a little clapboard house with a treed, outdoor patio, and be in an oasis of muted green walls, fabric lamps, birch chairs and coral table runners; a perfect backdrop to the colors of the food. Thai artifacts and fabrics hang as the works of art they are. Each room is flooded with light and, for chilly evenings, has a working fireplace. Aroi is open seven days a week for dinner from 5-9; and Thursday through Monday for lunch from 11:30-3.

Barnaby’s Rt. 32 N. Chestnut & Academy Street (845) 255-2433

Bear Creek Restaurant and Recreational Park

Lagusta’s Luscious (845) 255-8VEG www.lagustasluscious.com Lagusta’s Luscious brings heartbreakingly delicious, sophisticated weekly meal deliveries of handmade vegetarian food that meat-and-potatoes people love too to the

Neko Sushi & Restaurant

(845) 687-7255 www.theeggsnest.com

49 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0162

Where Good Friends Meet. Located on Route 213 in the center of High Falls, NY, The Egg’s Nest is noted for its eclectic décor, unusual menu, and friendly, casual atmosphere. The Egg’s Nest offers creative cuisine with a southwestern flair, unique overstuffed sandwiches, vegetarian dishes, burgers, homemade desserts, and “Nest” Breads. Dinner specials start every night at 5:00pm and a cocktail lounge is also offered. The Egg’s Nest is open 7 days a week for lunch and dinner, 11:30am11:00pm Sunday-Thursday and 11:30am to midnight on Friday and Saturday. We accept cash and personal checks, with an ATM on premises.

Voted Best Sushi Restaurant by Chronogram readers and rated four stars by Poughkeepsie Journal. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Eat in or take out. We offer many selections of Sushi and Sashimi, an extensive variety of special rolls, and kitchen dishes. Live lobster prepared daily. Parking in rear available. Major credit cards accepted.

Emerson Organic Spa Café (845) 688-2828

Want to taste the best Sushi in the Hudson Valley? Osaka Restaurant is the place. Vegetarian dishes available. Given four stars by the Daily Freeman. Visit our second location in Tivoli.

Gilded Otter

107 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-3254

3 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-1700 A warm and inviting dining room and pub overlooking beautiful sunsets over the Wallkill River and Shawangunk Cliffs. Mouthwatering dinners prepared by Executive Chef Larry Chu, and handcrafted beers brewed by GABF Gold Medal Winning Brewmaster Darren Currier. Chef driven and brewed locally!

Kindred Spirits Steakhouse & Pub 334 Route 32A, Palenville, NY (518) 678-3101 www.caskillmtlodge.com Offering fine food and drink at reasonable prices. Open 7 days for breakfast and lunch and on weekends for dinner. The fireplace pub boast 13 taps and a great wine list. Visit our website to see our menus and call us for reservations.

Main Course

Bear Creek’s menu ranges from various smoked BBQ delights to entrees like Pan Seared Ahi Tuna and Cedar Planked Salmon. Whether it’s a great burger, steak or maybe a novel goat cheese, pear and apple salad, Bear Creek offers an action filled venue along with fine cuisine at family prices.

Four-star, award-winning, contemporary American cuisine serving organic, natural, and free-range Hudson Valley products. Wednesday and Thursday nights, food and wine pairing menu available. Voted Best Caterer in the Hudson Valley.

In a warm and inviting Bistro located on Historic Main Street in the Village of Catskill Yael/Keith Chef/Owners are serving down to earth foods with flavors from around the Mediterranean. Wine and beer menu available. Wed-Sat Dinner. Sat-Sun Brunch.

74 Broadway, Tivoli, NY, (845) 757-5055 18 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7338 or (845) 876-7278

Serevan

232 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2600 www.maincourserestaurant.com

387 Main Street, Catskill, NY (518) 943-4070 www.Bellscafeny.net

Osaka Restaurant

Refreshing, organic veggie and fruit drinks. Made-to-order salads and wraps. Daily soup specials. Everything available to-go or for enjoying in the Asian-inspired design of the Café. Servers will bring your selections to you on the wrap-around sundeck with views of Mt. Tremper and the Esopus Creek. Open for lunch every day, 11am to 4pm. Located at the Emerson Resort & Spa in Mt. Tremper, just 10 minutes from Woodstock.

Corner of Rt 23 A and Rt 214, Hunter, NY (518) 263-3839 www.bearcreekrestaurant.com

Bell’s Cafe-Bistro HOME COOKED MEALS

Egg’s Nest

Mexican Radio 9 Cleveland Place, NYC, (212) 343-0140 537 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-7770 www.mexrad.com pmljs@ecoipm.com Voted Best Mexican Restaurant in NYC and Best Margaritas in the Hudson Valley, Mexican Radio features fabulous, homemade dishes made fresh daily. Extensive vegetarian/vegan choices. A Great Place for Parties!

6 Autumn Lane, Amenia, NY 12501 (845) 373-9800

Starr Place 6417 Montgomery Street Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2924 www.starrplace.com

Soul Dog

Featuring a variety of hot dogs, including preservative-free and vegetarian hot dogs, chili, soup, sides, desserts, and many gluten-free items prepared in-house. Redefining the hot dog experience!

tastings directory

1633 Glasco Turnpike, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-8519 www.bluemountainbistro.com

Hudson Valley and NYC. We are passionate about creating political food—locally grown organic produce, fair wages, environmentally sustainable business practices—that tastes just as good as that served at the finest restaurants. Let us end weeknight meal boredom forever.

Sukhothai 516-518 Main Street, Beacon, NY (845) 790-5375 Sukhothai Restaurant, located in Beacon, NY, offers a delicious menu full of authentic Thai cuisine. From traditional dishes, such as Pad Thai and Som Tam, to custom dishes created exclusively by our master chef, our menu is sure to please any palate. Takeout is also available.

Terrapin 6426 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3330 www.terrapinrestaurant.com Welcome to Terrapin—Restaurant/Bistro/ Bar/Catering—where eating is believing! We are passionately committed to providing our guests with a delightfully unique dining experience. As a Hudson Valley dining destination, we strive to consistently provide you with the freshest, highest quality food; celebrating the robust local bounty. Whether a quiet dinner for two or large family gathering, our staff is dedicated to creating a personalized experience served in a warm yet elegant environment. From kitchen to table, our holistic approach to the dining experience compels us to be uncompromising in the quality of our product. Join us in celebration of food, family, and friends. We look forward to serving you soon.

TEA LOUNGE AND STORE Harney and Sons Railroad Plaza, Millertown NY (518) 789-2121

7/08 CHRONOGRAM TASTINGS DIRECTORY

73


Š 2008 Frances L. Fruit

Relax in our gardens and enjoy a refreshing white sangria, a mango margarita or wine from our awardwinning cellar. Perfect for a romantic dinner, a family weekend lunch or plan to have your special event here.

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We use the freshest ingredients, local and organic when possible.

A Selection from Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wood Burning Outdoor Grill Baby Back Ribs, Dry Aged Ribeye Entrecote Jumbo Marinated Green Shrimp Free Range Chicken With Hunt Country Whiskey BBQ Sauce Roasted Sweet Corn And a Variety of Salads

â&#x20AC;&#x153;...truly an adventure...unpretentious, hip interior... open kitchen...impeccable service and incomparably good food...â&#x20AC;? /'-2,15-+,2++#/  &#$#,(+',2)7**#,#,,# #//5',#'/#!1-/ #/3',%',,#/2#0"512/"51 .+ * ,5-01"15"#/)

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CASCADE

MOUNTAIN Winery & Restaurant At 835 Cascade Road

Visit our Gorgeous New Wine & Tapas Bar & Art Gallery 4258 Route 44 Millbrook, New York 12545 845-677-5888

http://charlottesny.net

r r r

CASCADE WINE

Open for tastings daily 11 - 5 Buffet lunch weekends 11:30 - 3:30 Restaurant, wine bar, and grounds are available for weddings, rehearsal dinners, and other special occasions

For additional info. & directions call 845-373-9021 email info@cascademt.com

845-373-9021 Amenia, NY 12501 w w w. c a s c a d e m t . c o m

74 CULINARY ADVENTURES CHRONOGRAM 7/08


BRING THE KIDS

KNOW WHAT YOU EAT

30 QUAKER AVE., CORNWALL (845) 534-1111 WOODYSALLNATURAL.COM

EAT SEASONAL EAT LOCAL 7/08 CHRONOGRAM CULINARY ADVENTURES 75


Meadowbrook Farm Market Open Everyday 9-6 (all year) Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Apple Cider Donuts! Fresh Homemade Salsa & Horseradish

Pick your own apples September 6th thru October Old Myers Corners Rd. 2.5 mi. east of Rt. 9 Wappingers Falls, N.Y. 845-297-3002

r e s t a u r a n t

www.ginoswappingers.com

Kingston Farmers’ Market Wall Street – Uptown Kingston Saturdays May 24 - November 22 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Rain or Shine

FROG HOLLOW FARM Celebrating the Partnership of Human & Horse

ENGLISH RIDING FOR ALL AGES Boarding and Training Saddle Club After School Program Summer Riding Weeks for Kids

ESOPUS, N.Y. (845) 384-6424 www.dressageatfroghollowfarm.com

Browse the The Best of the Hudson Valley Visit our Uptown stores & galleries, fine restaurants & cafés and enjoy the atmosphere of one of America’s oldest cities. free parking available

www.kingstonnyfarmersmarket.com

76 CULINARY ADVENTURES CHRONOGRAM 7/08

TALIAFERRO FARMS Farm Market Open to Public

4BUBNmQN 5IVSTBNmQN TUBSUT+VOFUI

1-"*/430"%r/&81"-5; /:r

www.taliaferrofarms.com


CHRONOGRAM 2008

CULINARY ADVENTURES

MATT PETRICONE

Chef Ola Svedman of DaBa in Hudson serves grilled filet mignon in a truffle-scented beef consommé with sunflower choke puree, steamed vegetables, and ginger foam. CULINARY ADVENTURES, p.78

7/08 CHRONOGRAM CULINARY ADVENTURES 77


Lauri Martin serves up sulze, a traditional German preparation of head cheese with vinegar and pickles, at the Mountain Brauhaus in Gardiner.

Off the Beaten Palate Beyond Comfort Food By Brian K. Mahoney Photo by Matt Petricone

I

’m an adventurous eater, but when I go out, I usually stay within a fairly limited range of dishes from the handful of restaurants that I patronize on a regular basis. (Admittedly, this includes the entire phalanx of French bistro fare, from frog’s legs to escargot, as well as the head-to-tail tapas of Rich Reeve at Elephant, which I wrote about in our May issue.) At home, I’m much the same but even more so: I try and cook seasonally appropriate dishes, quickly and simply. My assumption, based on purely anecdotal evidence, is that most of us are like this.We have a few go-to preparations in our repertoire, and we cleave fairly closely to them or variations of them. What we eat is many things—life-sustaining nutrient intake dressed up as ritual; status symbol; exercise in nostalgia; principal way most of us come into contact with the life-cycle of the planet; and the celebration of our dominion, as a species, over the planet. But it’s also a choice we make every day, multiple times a day, about what we put into our bodies. Not surprisingly, we want to ingest food that is familiar to us, not some off-putting assemblage of ingredients that looks/smells/tastes outside of the range of what we have defined as suitable eats. We want to be comforted. We want comfort food. Ask 10 people what their notion of comfort is, however, and you’re likely to get 10 different answers. Steak and potatoes for one, grilled cheese and tomato soup for another, and quinoa and seitan for someone else. Our collective sense of what is exotic is in an evolutionary process as well. The past few decades have witnessed the proliferation of ethnic eateries (think Greek and Jamaican as well as Chinese and Italian) and inventive chefs working in the Hudson Valley. According to John Novi, when he opened the Depuy Canal 78 CULINARY ADVENTURES CHRONOGRAM 7/08

House in High Falls in 1969, his was the only restaurant in the region serving duck that wasn’t in the classical continental l’orange style; instead, Novi made his own confit and also served the sliced duck breast, a bold move at the time. (Duck, sans the l’orange, is now de rigueur in the untold—but not all undistinguished—restaurants billing themselves as New American, the current epitome of high-end comfort food.) Even the august Depuy Canal House is furthering the trend toward greater culinary diversity, with a gourmet pizza shop and sushi bar in its cellar. And to his credit, Novi is still generating interesting ideas that turn comfort food on its head—he recently created a fivecourse meal around sweetbreads. Sweetbreads being, of course, the thymus gland of lamb, cows, or pigs. In June, I set out to find fare like Novi’s sweetbreads, dishes that challenged me to eat outside my normal limits, food that pushed me outside of my comfort zone and into unfamiliar culinary territory. I hesitate to use the word exotic to describe what I was looking for, as the word is freighted with subjectivity. A recent restaurant review in a local newspaper, for instance, described a local Indian restaurant as a “solid choice for exotic fare.” But for me, who has been eating Indian food on a regular basis for 15 years, samosas are to egg rolls as lo mein is to linguine. Indian food is no more exotic than pizza, it’s just what’s for dinner. What I was looking for was farther afield than sushi, jambalaya, or escargot. Call it “un-comfort” food, the preparations 180 degrees from what I would normally eat. It started with head cheese tacos and ended with venison kielbasa topped with kim chee. Along the way I was delighted, full to bursting at many points, and never once disgusted.


HEAD TO HEAD Living in Kingston, I eat at El Danzante quite a bit. El Danzante is an unprepossessing Mexican place on upper Broadway, with glass-topped tables and a bizarre grotto bar framed in stucco, that serves equal numbers of Mexican immigrants and gringos. I usually play it safe there, ordering either fried pork chops or a chorizo chimichanga, perhaps with a side of guacamole. The chimichangas are crisp, the chorizo is spicy, the guacamole is not whipped into a mousse—it’s solid and chunky. The chef at El Danzante isn’t aiming to win a James Beard award, but the food is filling and comforting. For the un-comfort food project, I ordered a couple of tacos that I had studiously avoided previously. The first was cabeza de puerco—head cheese, or boiled head of pig with herbs and spices; the second was lengua al vapor—steamed beef tongue.They were served on soft double corn tortillas with onions and cilantro. Curiously, both tasted quite similar, the tiny shards of meat contained in each overpowered by the other ingredients and the tortillas. Not at all the shock to the taste buds I was expecting, just slightly chewier in texture than shredded beef or pork. The tacos were perfectly fine, but not interesting enough to keep me from ordering chimichangas and pork chops next time at El Danzante. The Mountain Brauhaus, the standard bearer for German cuisine in the region, was my next stop. Located at the foot of the Shawangunk Ridge, the Brauhaus is always packed, with waitresses in dirndls ushering trays of sauerbraten and wiener schnitzel to and fro while diners drink mugs of Spaten. As a fan of stick-to-your-ribs cuisine, a meal at the Brauhaus is a sentimental journey for me, taking me back to my grandmother’s beef rouladen and German potato salad. On most trips, I’ll order the pot roast or the bratwurst, with sides of red cabbage and potato pancakes. The Brauhaus’s reputation for flavorful, generously portioned German food is well deserved. On a Father’s Day visit, I ordered the oddest thing on the menu—sulze. Served as an appetizer, sulze is the German version of head cheese. It’s served luncheon-meat style, a few disks of gelatin spotted with chunks of pink meat. Visually, it’s disconcerting to see bits of meat suspended in a clear gel. But that doesn’t detract from its fascinating taste. As sulze is made with pickles and vinegar, it has a tang that snaps in concordance with the snap of the sulze’s texture. The taste of the meat? Like boiled meat with pickles and vinegar, corned beef’s bite-sized cousin. The Brauhaus’s sulze was no revelation, but it was tasty and respectable for what it was, well made un-comfort food. GONE TO THE DOGS A dedicated carnivore, I don’t traffic much in protein substitutes—tofu, seitan, and the like. For instance, if I’m going to eat a hot dog, I’ll buy a couple of franks from the guy with a cart around the corner from my office, and not ask too many questions about the provenance of the meat. Sauerkraut and onions hides many an imperfection. So it seemed fitting, un-comfortwise, to venture to Soul Dog on Main Street in Poughkeepsie and try their veggie dogs on gluten-free buns. Opened in 2004 by a couple who wanted to create a place where people with dietary restrictions and food allergies could go for comfort food, Soul Dog offers about 25 toppings, ranging from old standbys like onions in red sauce to marsala mushrooms, guacamole, and vegetarian chili. In addition to veggie dogs, they also serve Sabrett all beef dogs and Applegate chicken dogs. I ordered one of each, all on gluten-free buns, along with a Redbridge, a gluten-free beer made from sorghum by Anheuser-Busch. The Redbridge was a bit disappointing, in an odd way. It was light-bodied like a pilsner, but also contained heavier, syrupy notes due to the sorghum that crept in every few sips. The dogs, however, were a delight. On my veggie dog, I ordered the day’s special topping, the “Jackie Chan,” peanut sauce and jalapenos. The chicken I had with roasted poblano pepper salsa. The Sabrett was served with “Soul sauce,” the house hot sauce/salsa. The veggie dog itself was bland, but that allowed it to be a blank slate for the spicy peanut sauce and pinpricks of heat in the diced jalapenos.The poblano pepper salsa was a winner, chunky and with a smoldering heat that knew how to play nice with the chicken dog.The true revelation at Soul Dog was the gluten-free buns, made with chick pea flour and lightly toasted. Having become accustomed to bleached white flour buns, usually primed for soggy disintegration under any overly moist topping, the chick pea flour buns had an actual flavor to them (the subtlest hint of toasted chick peas), and didn’t taste like they sprang fully formed from the Wonder Bread machine. Soul Dog is now my go-to hot dog stand.

BEST FOOT FORWARD Next door to Soul Dog, at the West Indies Jamaican Restaurant, I picked up the most un-comfortable food I encountered in my travels—cow foot. A take-out joint patronized solely by Jamaican-accented folks on the day I stopped, West Indies Jamaican Restaurant had a sign on its steam table that read “Cow Foot.” When the woman behind the counter asked me what I wanted, I asked to see the cow foot. She beckoned me over to view a mass of bone and cartilage in an oily broth. I ordered the medium size for $8, served on a bed of rice and beans and reheated-from-frozen vegetable medley. Cow foot is a traditional Jamaican stew, basically turning portions of an animal that those who could afford better cuts didn’t want, and making it palatable by a long braise. The sight alone of a mound of cross-sectioned foot bones on rice will probably put a number of people off, but cow foot looks a lot like shank cut for osso buco.The texture is more sinewy than osso buco and the layer surrounding the actual “meat” runs the spectrum between fatty and gelatinous. Fueled mostly by salt and pepper, the flavor spectrum of cow foot is a bit narrow, never revealing than its protein base and added condiments. Like skydiving, cow foot is something everyone should try once, after the initial foray, I leave it to the individual to decide. MOLECULAR GASTRONOMY My final pit stop in my culinary road rally was at DaBa in Hudson, a vision of Brooklyn hipsterdom transplanted to Hudson. And the food is just as good as you would expect from a New York City restaurant trying to push its cuisine in an adventurous direction. On the two occasions I’ve eaten at DaBa, my companion and I chose the tasting menu, and both times I was caught off-guard not only by the flavor pairings—wild boar paté with a gin-and-tonic glaze, for instance—but also by the inventive textures and chemical compositions of the ingredients. On my most recent visit, I was served a “Crispy Tuna Tartare.” The presentation, on a thin white plate with three serving hollows, was one part sautéed scallop, one part shards of tuna tartare with tiny enoki mushrooms surrounded by a thin ring of wonton crisp, and one part cucumber vinaigrette. But here’s the twist, or at least part of it—the vinaigrette ain’t wet, it’s set as a gelatin, and as subtle an accompaniment to seafood as you could hope for. The fun at DaBa is seeing where chef Ola Svedman might take you out of your comfort zone next. Oh, and the venison kielbasa with kim chee? That was just something I grilled up at home, the kielbasa given to me by my neighbor. I added the sauerkraut-esque kim chee from a jar I had in the fridge. Gamey, spicy venison sausage paired with piquant fermented cabbage was a tasty and insightful bookend to my adventure. After three weeks of scratching for the truffles of offbeat morsels at every crossroads, it was comforting to realize that not all culinary adventures need take me any further than my back patio. There are, no doubt, many more restaurants in the Hudson Valley serving food that is off the beaten path. (There have, in fact, been reported sightings of brain quesadilla in Wappingers Falls and confirmation of a Peruvian tripe dish at Machu Picchu in Newburgh!) If you have any suggestions on where to find food that takes the jaded palate out of its comfort zone, please post a comment to this article at www.chronogram. com or e-mail me at bmahoney@chronogram. I plan on posting a follow-up piece to the website later this month.

Restaurants mentioned in this article: DaBa 225 Warren Street, Hudson (518) 249-4631 www.dabahudson.com

Machu Picchu 301 Broadway, Newburgh (845) 562-6478 www.machupicchurest.com

Depuy Canal House Rt. 213, High Falls (845) 687-7700 www.depuycanalhouse.net

Mountain Brauhaus 3123 Route 44/55, Gardiner (845) 255-9766 www.mountainbrauhaus.com

El Danzante 720 Broadway, Kingston (845) 331-7070

Soul Dog 107 Main Street, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-3254 www.souldog.biz

Elephant 310 Wall Street, Kingston (845) 339-9310 www.elephantwinebar.com

West Indies Jamaican Restaurant 105 Main Street, Poughkeepsie (845) 473-7110

7/08 CHRONOGRAM CULINARY ADVENTURES 79


farmers’ markets BEACON Fruits, vegetables, organic produce, local cheese, smoked fish, wine, hot food, soy candles, honey, maple syrup, pottery, mushrooms, and fresh bread. Live music. Beacon Train Station, waterfront at the ferry landing. Through November. After November, Saturdays, 10am-4pm at the Beacon Sloop Clubhouse, an indoor shopping area with fieldstone fireplace and wood-burning stove. Sundays year round, 10am-4pm. (845) 562-0192.

HUDSON

NEWBURGH

Eggs, dairy, baked goods, prepared foods, jams and jellies, various fruits, vegetables in season, honey, wine, potted plants, cacti, wool yarn, various crafts, local coffee blends, and meat. Various events. Sixth Street at Columbia Street. Saturdays, 9am-1pm. Through mid November. (518) 828-7217.

Honey, fruits, fresh meats, cheese, produce, plants, and herbs. Downing Park at Route 9W and South Street. Friday 10am-5pm. July 18 through October 31. Also, behind Orange County DMV. Mondays, 9am-2pm. July 7 through October. (845) 565-5559.

NEW PALTZ Baked goods, maple syrup, honey, falafel, lunch, homemade soap, sundries, wines, produce, and cooking demonstrations. Hyde Park Drive-In lot, Route 9. Saturdays, 9am-2pm. Through October 25. (845) 229-9111.

Certified organic and heirloom vegetables, artisanal bread, cheese, baked goods, plants, fruits, eggs, flowers, jams, organic meats, herbs, cut flowers, demonstrations. Downtown New Paltz. Sundays, 10am-3pm. Through October. (845) 255-6093. www.newpaltzfarmersmarket.com.

HYDE PARK

KINDERHOOK

PLEASANT VALLEY

Artisan breads, baked goods, jams, jellies, sauces, cheeses, organic produce, flowers, plants, arts and crafts. Live music. Catskill Point Park at the bottom of Main Street. Saturdays, 9:30am-1:30pm. Through late October. (518) 622-9820, ext. 27.

Fresh fruits and vegetables, homemade baked goods, jams, jellies and preserves, maple syrup, honey, cider, fish, chicken, turkey, pork, beef, herbs, cut flowers, perennials, annuals for the garden, and organic produce. Village Square. Saturdays, 8am-12:30pm. Through mid October. (518) 758-1232.

Vegetables, fruits, berries, jewelry, gourmet bread, pastries, jam, honey, eggs, maple syrup, cut flowers, and plants. Cooking demonstrations. Town Hall, Route 44. Friday, 3-7pm, through September. Fridays, 3-6pm, through late October. (845) 635-9168.

COLD SPRING

CATSKILL

KINGSTON

RHINEBECK

Seasonal fruits and vegetables, eggs, specialty cheeses, mushrooms, salad dressings, homemade pies, breads, cookies, coffee, candies, organic produce, plants, herbs, maple sugar products, honey, wines, hard cider, grass-fed meats, chocolate, herb bundles, cookbooks, herbal tinctures, scrubs, and soaps. The Nest, 44 Chestnut Street (Route 9D opposite Foodtown Market). Saturdays, 8:30am-1:30pm. Through Thanksgiving. (845) 424-8332. www.csfarmmarket.org.

Locally grown or produced traditional and organic fruits and vegetables, herbs, flowers, potted plants, hearth-baked breads and baked goods, cheeses, meats, poultry and venison, wines, herbal bath and body products, teas, honey and maple syrup, ethnic prepared foods, and more. Special events. Chef demonstrations, and healthy eating series weekly. Wall Street, between Front and John streets. Saturdays, 9am-2pm. Through November 22. (845) 853-8512. www.kingstonfarmersmarket.com.

Locally grown produce, homemade jams, dairy foods, artisanal condiments, pasta, pickles, plants, meats, fish, cheeses, specialty breads, herbs, baked goods, wine, flowers, honey, special events. E. Market St. Parking Lot. Sundays, 10am-2pm and Thursday 3pm7pm. Through November. www.rhinebeckfarmersmarket.com.

ELLENVILLE

LA GRANGE

Conventional and organic vegetables, fruits, baked goods, homemade local cosmetics, wines, cheese, Italian specialties including soups, breads, and frozen dinners. Corner of Center and Market streets, one block east of Route 209. Sundays 9am2pm. Through the end of September with an additional day on October 19. (845) 647-5150.

FISHKILL Fresh fruits, vegetables, homemade baked goods, flowers, and plants. All are sold directly by producers and bakers. Fishkill Plaza, Route 52. Thursdays 9am-3pm. Through October. (845) 897-4430.

Vegetables, fruits, berries, jewelry, gourmet bread, pastries, jam, honey, eggs, maple syrup, cut flowers, and plants. Cooking demonstrations. M&T Bank parking lot and Route 55. Saturdays, 9am-2pm. Through September. (845) 635-9168.

MIDDLETOWN Produce, fruits, wine, cheese, cut flowers, and gourmet baked goods. Music and cooking demonstrations. Erie Way, from Grove Street to Cottage Street. Saturdays, 8am-1pm. Through October. (845) 343-8075.

Organic produce, flowers, seedlings, eggs, exotic and organic meats, Italian sauces and cheeses, breakfast food, specialty breads, cakes, and pies. Live music most weekends. Rosendale Recreation Center, Route 32. Sundays, 9am-3pm. Through November 9. (845) 658-3467. www.rosendalefarmersmarket.org.

SAUGERTIES Artisan breads, produce, berries, eggs, regional cheese, honey, maple syrup, jams, sauces, bottled milk, fresh herbs, cut flowers, ice cream, organic coffee, and pasture-raised meats. Chef demonstrations, free tastings, a variety of entertainment, and free cooking classes for kids. Main Street/Route 9W North. Saturdays, 9am-2pm. Through October 25. (845) 246-9371. www.saugertiesfarmersmarket.com.

MILLBROOK

Vegetables, organic produce, fruits, wine, pickles, seafood, pastas, cheese, pork, beef, lamb, baked goods, prepared foods, greenhouse stock, and dried flowers. A featured local business and merchant per week. Arts and music series and special events during the season. 190 North Main Street, Routes 94 and 17A, across from QuickChek. Tuesdays, 1-7pm. Through October. (845) 651-6000.

Locally grown, fresh produce (including organic), seasonal fruits, hearth-baked breads, cakes, pies, donuts, cider, granola, soap, lotion, lip balms, bath teas, candles, hand-carved bowls, salad dressings, goat cheese and milk, handcrafted utility knives, plants, prepared foods, farm products, cut flowers, lawn art, handcrafted furniture, and organic meats. Live music every other weekend as well as various special events. Franklin Avenue and Front Street Tribute Garden Parking Lot. Saturdays, 9am-1pm. Through October 25. (845) 677-3125. www.millbrookfarmersmarket.com.

GOSHEN

MILLERTON

FLORIDA

ROSENDALE

Fresh produce, fruits, honey, body lotions, baked goods, plants, flowers, soap, breads, biscotti, cookies, pies, homemade meals, frozen fish, mozzarella, soups, pickles, organic produce, cheesecake, seasonings, jams, wine, goat’s milk products, barbecue, and more. Village Square, at Main Street and Route 207. Fridays, 10am-5pm, rain or shine. Through October 31. (845) 294-7741. www.goshennychamber.com.

Vegetables, salad greens, honey, soups, teas, herbs, grass-fed beef, sausages, eggs, cheese, goat yogurt, baked goods, breads, pickles, sauerkraut, candles, soap, wool, yarn, cut flowers, and nursery plants. Weekly events include cooking demonstrations and live music. Millerton Methodist Church on Dutchess Avenue. Saturdays, 10am-2pm. Through October 11. (518) 789-4259. www.neccmillerton.org.

HIGHLAND

MONROE

WALDEN Locally grown fruits and vegetables, homemade breads and pies, sweets, jams, and entrees. Village Square, in front of library on Scofield Street. Thursdays, 11:30am-4pm. Through October 30. (845) 294-5557. www.villageofwalden.org.

WAPPINGERS FALLS Locally grown fruits and vegetables, breads, mozzarella, meat, and soap. Zion Park across South Avenue. Fridays, 3-7pm. Through October 31. (845) 632-1147.

WARWICK Jams, jellies, baked goods, organic produce and fruit, wine, artisan breads, cheese, honey, maple syrup, mushrooms, chickens, grass-fed beef, eggs, sausages, cut flowers, and garden plants. South Street Parking Lot. Sundays, 9am-2pm. Through October 26. www.warwickinfo.net/farmersmarket.

WOODSTOCK Produce, baked goods, wines, kitchen goods, and demonstrations. Intersection of Haviland Road and Route 9W. Wednesdays, 3-7pm. Through October 8. (845) 235-4771.

80 CULINARY ADVENTURES CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Locally grown fruits and vegetables, herbs, flowers, breads, cheeses, cured meats, jams, and jellies. Appropriate vendors accept FMNP coupons. Museum Village, 1010 Route 17M. Wednesdays, 9am-3pm. Through October 29. (845) 344-1234.

Fruits, vegetables, cheese, meat, poultry, locally milled grains, breads, cider, jam, pickles, and prepared foods. special events. Maple Lane. Wednesdays, 4-8pm. Through September 24. www.woodstockfarmfestival.com. Compiled by Amy Lubinski


business directory ACCOMMODATIONS

ART GALLERIES & CENTERS

Manny’s Art Supply

Catskill Mountain Lodge

Ann Street Gallery

83 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-9902

334 Route 32A, Palenville, NY (518) 678-3101 www.caskillmtlodge.com

104 Ann Street Newburgh, NY (845) 562-6940, ext.119 www.annstreetgallery.org

The Catskill Mountain Lodge, celebrating forty years of hospitality, is set on the banks of the historic Kaaterskill Creek in Palenville, America’s first art colony. Accommodations include fireplace rooms, cabins, cottages, and a three–bedroom house.

The Ann Street Gallery is a non-profit gallery located in the City of Newburgh, specializing in contemporary emerging and established artists.

ALTERNATIVE ENERGY

59 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-9957 Info@cpw.org

Altren Geothermal & Solar Systems (854) 658-7116 www.altren.net

ANIMAL SANCTUARIES Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary (845) 679-5955 www.WoodstockSanctuary.org A magical place where you can frolic with goats, cuddle with chickens and give belly rubs to pigs! Visit with over 100 farm animals—all rescued from terrible situations. Open weekends from 11-4 (other times by appointment). Tours on the hour from 11-3. Van Wagner Road in Willow, take 212 8 miles west of downtown Woodstock.

ARCHITECTURE d-v design (518) 986-0876 or (518) 280-8992 www.d-vdesign.com info@d-vdesign.com Focused on green design, our firm provides a full range of services for residential projects. With extensive experience in design and construction management, we are dedicated to providing solutions that lead to significant cost savings and dramatic aesthetic results. Located in New York State, our firm serves clients nationwide.

Center for Photography at Woodstock

Garrison Art Center 23 Garrison’s Landing, Garrison, NY (845) 424-3960 www.garrisonartcenter.org

246 Hudson Street, Cornwall-On-Hudson, NY (845) 534-5ART www.hudsonvalleygallery.com Paintings and limited edition prints of the Hudson Valley and beyond by Paul Gould. Changing exhibits of representational paintings, sculpture, and photography by established and emerging artists. Gallery offers painting and frame restoration services and art instruction in all media, beginners welcome. Gallery open Saturday and Sunday 1-5pm or by appointment.

Internationally known manufacturer of Pigment Sticks and Encaustic paint right here in the Hudson Valley. Stop in for a tour of our factory, get paints at discounted prices, sign up for an Encaustic or Pigment Stick workshop, or check out bi-monthly exhibits in the Gallery.

BODY & SKIN CARE

AUTOMOBILES

“Take Some Time Off” at Essence MediSpa with Skin Rejuvenation and Anti-Aging treatments. Non-surgical treatments for age spots and skin lesions, teeth whitening, Botox cosmetic, laser hair removal, non-surgical skin tightening using the titan system, varicose and spider vein treatments, microdermabrasion, chemical ceels, acne treatments, facials and massage services.

Essence MediSpa, LLC—Stephen Weinman, M.D. 222 Route 299, Highland, NY (845) 691-3773 www.EssenceMediSpa.com

Ruge’s Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-1057

BEAUTY Androgyny 5 Mulberry Street, in the Historic Hugenot Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-0620

New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241 www.markgrubergallery.com

Coffee System of the Hudson Valley

Van Brunt Gallery

(800) 660-3175 www.homecoffeesystem.com

460 Main Street, Beacon, NY (845) 838-2995 www.vanbruntgallery.com

BEVERAGES

ART INSTRUCTION

(845) 471-7477 millstreetloft.org

84 Ten Broeck Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 331-3112 www.rfpaints.com

Mark Gruber Gallery

Woodstock, NY (845) 247-4620

Mill Street Loft

R & F Handmade Paints

BEVERAGE SERVICES

EcoArch DesignWorks

ART CLASSES

Since 1962, big-city selection and smalltown service have made Manny’s special. We offer a full range of art materials, craft and bookmaking supplies, as well as the best selection of handmade and decorative papers north of Manhattan. Manny’s, it’s more than just an art store.

Hudson Valley Gallery

Exhibiting the work of contemporary artists. Featuring abstract painting, sculpture, digital art, photography, and video, the gallery has new shows each month. The innovative gallery Web site has online artist portfolios and videos of the artists discussing their work.

Award winning design,harmonizing Spirit, Health and the Environment, Solar and “Green” design. Licensed in New York, New Jersey and California, EcoArch DesignWorks specializes in planning, architecture and interiors for single-family or multi-family homes, entertainment, retail or office environments. Recent projects in New York include the Oriental Emerson Spa, the Ram Dass Library @ Omega and numerous Private homes and Additions. Unlock the potentials of your site, home, or office, to foster greater design harmony, prosperity, spirit, health, and ecological integrity.

delicious foods made here on our Biodynamic organic farm, including raw milk, artisan cheese, yogurt, homemade bread, and desserts. We also feature local and organic fruits snf vegetables, holistic body care and homeopathic remedies. We are part of Hawthorne Valley Association, a non-profit organization dedicated to sustainable agriculture, education, and the arts. Our farming practices reflect our commitment to the Earth and our education programs raise awareness of the social, ecological, and economic importance of agriculture in our daily lives.

Mount Beacon Fine Art 155 Main St. Beacon, NY (845) 765 - 0214 www.mountbeaconfineart.com

ART SUPPLIES Catskill Art & Office Supply Kingston (845) 331-7780 Woodstock (845) 679-2251 Poughkeepsie (845) 452-1250 Art Materials, studio furnishings, custom picture framing, blueprint copies, graphic design services, large format color output, custom printing, personal stationery, legal forms, cards, maps, and novelty gifts. Three locations dedicated to enhancing your creative adventure—voted ‘Best in the Valley’ year after year.

BOOKSTORES Mirabai of Woodstock 23 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2100 www.mirabai.com The Hudson Valley’s oldest spiritual/holistic bookstore, providing a vast array of books, music, and gifts that transform, renew, and elevate the spirit. Exquisite statuary and other art works from Nepal, Tibet, Bali. Expert Tarot reading, astrological charts/ interpretation available.

Esotec (845) 246-2411 www.esotecltd.com Choose Esotec to be your wholesale beverage provider. For 21 years, we carry a complete line of natural, organic, and unusual juices, spritzers, waters, sodas, iced teas, and iced coffees. If you are a store owner, call for details or a catalog of our full line. We’re back in Saugerties now!

BUILDERS Atlantic Custom Homes 2785 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY 10516 (888) 558-2636 www.lindalny.com

BIKES Overlook Mountain Bikes

BUILDING SUPPLIES

93 Tinker Street Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2122 www.overlookmountainbikes.com

Williams Lumber & Home Centers

From professional repairs, to integral sales, bicycle rentals,or just talking about your concerns and questions, we are here and ready to assist you with all your cycling needs.

BIODYNAMIC Hawthorne Valley Farm Store 327 Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7500, ext. 1 www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org An Organic & Natural Grocery Store. Hawthorne Valley Farm Store features

6760 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-WOOD 317 Kyserike Road, High Falls, NY (845) 687-7676 2612 Route 44, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-2324 www.williamslumber.com The name you know and the name you trust. Our Design Centers are located at our Rhinebeck and Millbrook locations. Come meet with our outstanding design team and start creating your perfect kitchen or bath today!

7/08 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY

81


Portraits of Loved Ones

WWW . PATSTATS . COM

PATSTATS 1@ HVC . RR . COM

CARPETS & RUGS

COLLEGE ADVISING

Anatolia Tribal Rugs & Weavings

College Pathways—Kris Fox

54G Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5311

Latham, NY (518) 782-1270 or (800) 391-5272

Winner: Hudson Valley Magazine “Best Carpets.” Direct importers since 1981. Natural-dyed Afghan carpets; Balouchi tribal kilims; Russian sumaks; antique Caucasian carpets; silk Persian sumaks; Turkish kilims. Hundreds to choose from, 2’x3’ to 9’x12’. Kilim pillows, $20-$55. We encourage customers to try our rugs in their homes, without obligation. MC/Visa/AmEx.

The Capital District’s answer to Sensible College Planning. Specializing in Financial Aid, College Selection, Timeline Management, PSAT and SAT Prep and Essay Writing for College Applications. If your child is a high school sophomore or junior, don’t delay—contact us today!

CHI GUNG—TAI CHI CHUAN

Past ‘n’ Perfect

Red Land Internal Arts

1629 Main Street (Route 44), Pleasant Valley, NY (845) 635-3115 www.pastnperfect.com

(845) 750-6488

business directory

The spiritual alchemy practices of ancient Taoist sorcerers and Shaolin Buddhist monks, yielded these two treasures of Chinese internal Gung Fu. CHI GUNG: This meditative practice incorporates and integrates both stillness and motion to strengthen the body and mind. It’s deep breathing techniques, stretching, and massaging of the acupuncture meridians, tendons, ligaments, and muscles helps to fend off disease and old age. It prepares the body to withstand the rigorous training of Martial Arts and helps us to live a long life, free of degenerative diseases. Tai Chi Chuan, based on the same principles as Chi Gung, further embodies the expression of our intrinsic energy (CHI) in general physical movement and stillness meditation, as well as the deeply intricate movements found in the self-defense aspect of the Tai Chi form. Both of these practices were founded on the combination of Shaolin Buddhist meditation, Shaolin martial body mechanics and Taoist spiritual alchemy, but the first step in attaining results in these arts depends on setting the body and mind to the true nature of things… there are no short cuts. These esoteric practices have brought health, vitality, and youthfulness, to me and my students, some of whom are in their 70’s and 80’s. The only requirements for Chi Gung and Tai Chi Chuan are determined practice of the principles and the will to persevere.

CINEMA Upstate Films 26 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2515

CONSIGNMENT SHOPS

A quaint consignment boutique that offers distinctive clothing, jewelry, shoes, and accessories, and a unique variety of highquality furs and leathers. Always a generous supply of merchandise from casual to chic; contemporary to vintage; all sizes accepted. Featuring a diverse and illuminating jewelry collection. Conveniently located in Pleasant Valley, only 9 miles east of the Mid-Hudson Bridge.

The Present Perfect 23G Village Plaza, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2939 Designer consignments of the utmost quality for men, women, and children. Current styles, jewelry, accessories, and knicknacks. Featuring beautiful furs and leathers.

CRAFTS Crafts People 262 Spillway Road, West Hurley, NY (845) 331-3859 www.craftspeople.us Representing over 500 artisans, Crafts People boasts four buildings brimming with fine crafts; the largest selection in the Hudson Valley. All media represented, including: sterling silver and 14K gold jewelry, blown glass, pottery, turned wood, kaleidoscopes, wind chimes, leather, clothing, stained glass, etc.

CUSTOM PORTRAITS

Showing provocative international cinema, contemporary and classic, and hosting filmmakers since 1972 on two screens in the village of Rhinebeck.

Pet Painting

CLOTHING

DANCEWEAR

Pegasus Comfort Footwear

First Street Dancewear

10 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock and New Paltz, NY (845) 679-2373 www.PegasusShoes.com

Saugerties, NY (845) 247-4517 www.firststreetdancewear.com

Offering innovative comfort footwear by all your favorite brands. Merrell, Dansko, Keen, Clarks, Ecco and Uggs, and lots more. Open 7 days a week—or shop online at PegasusShoes.com.

(845) 679-7327 www.petpaintingusa.com

First Street dancewear in Saugerties, NY, offers quality dancewear for adults and children. We have dancewear, knit warmups, ballet, jazz, tap shoes, gymnastics wear, skatewear, accessories, and gift items. We also feature a line of women’s active wear clothing suitable for Yoga and Pilates.

White Rice 531 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 697-3500 Clothing and accessories for women and children. Furniture and home furnishings. With an Asian sensibility. Open 7 days.

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DATING SERVICE Mass Match (413) 665-3218 massmatch.com


DENTISTRY

FENG SHUI

Center For Advanced Dentistry — Bruce D. Kurek, DDS, FAGD

Feng Shui Solutions

494 Route 299, Highland, NY (845) 691-5600 www.thecenterforadvanceddentistry.com Setting the standard for excellence in dentistry for more than 25 years, the Center for Advanced Dentistry attracts clients from throughout the northeast and abroad. Their client-centered approach to providing comprehensive dental services for adults and children includes old-school care and concern combined with the latest technologies. The office is conveniently located 1.5 miles east of the NYS Thruway, exit 18.

72 North Slope Road, Shokan, NY (845) 231-0801 www.fengshuisolutions.info Discover the richness of the ancient principles of Feng Shui applied to modern life and enjoy a more harmonious and balanced existence. Our consultations are aimed at improving family relationships, health and prosperity; clearing negative energy from any space; improving business viability and selecting or designing the perfect home or office.

FINANCIAL ADVICE 151 Stockade Drive, Kingston, NY (845) 334-3841

Dog Love, LLC

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Personal hands-on boarding and daycare tailored to your dog’s individual needs. Your dog’s happiness is our goal. Indoor 5x10 matted kennels with classical music and windows overlooking our pond. Supervised playgroups in 40 x 40 fenced area. Homemade food and healthy treats.

Pi in the Sky Design (845) 613-0683 piintheskydesign@france-menk.com We make your virtual world real. Promotional, advertising, and editorial design. Book jackets, brochures, corporate identity campaigns, dvds, magazines, newsletters, posters. 100% focused on your needs.

Reservoir Inn

11 South Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-2690 www.casaurbanaboutique.com

Kingston Farmers’ Market Historic Wall Street, Uptown Kingston, NY www.kingstonnyfarmersmarket.com Creating a Harmony of History, Community and Farmland with the BEST of the Hudson Valley. Over thirty vendors bring certified organic, and traditionally grown farm fresh fruits, vegetables, field-cut fresh flowers and plants, hand made mozzarella and assorted cheeses, meats, poultry, eggs, fresh and dried herbs, artisan breads and sweet baked goods, herbal remedies, prepared foods, honey, jams, condiments, olive oil, and more. Weekly special events bring an festive and educational air to the rain or shine venue. Crafts on John join the Market on1st Saturdays, June-September. Free parking and proximity to NYS Thruway (Exit 19) Saturdays May 24 until Nov 22.

FAUX FINISHES Faux Intentions (845) 532-3067 Cat Quinn, professional decorative artist, setting the standard for excellence in Custom Faux Finishes for your home and business. With infinite possibilities, your walls, floors, ceilings, fireplaces, and furniture can be transformed using my faux finishing techniques. A full spectrum of decorative finishes using plasters, glazes, and many other mediums, help to fill your home full of your unique personality and spirit. Don’t miss the beauty and exhilaration of transforming the rooms you live and work in every day into spaces that reflect your sense of style. Portfolio showing a phone call away.

Mountain Valley Spring Water

featuring Leisure Time Spring Water

Casa Urbana was originally our “Townhouse” home in Hudson. Now, as our Boutique and Salon, we can enjoy sharing this space with you. Casa Urbana in Italian means “Townhouse.” We chose to use the Italian translation to remind us that our goal is to offer our customers and friends a touch of the old world charm and opulence Hudson has become known for. Through our selection of luxurious bath and body product, candles, teas and salon services, we accomplish our goal. Our collections include such worldclass lines as Thymes; Caswell Massey; Claus Porto; Jack Black; Lafco House and Home; Tea Forte; and Skin by Monica Olsen. Our Hair Studio provides the best in creative and corrective hair color, highlighting, and styling for both men and women.

Arctic Glacier Packaged Ice

25 South Pine St. Kingston NY 12401 (845) 331-0237

www.binnewayer.com

business directory

Casa Urbana Boutique and Salon

FARMERS’ MARKETS

Kingston’s own Ice and Bottled Water Supplier

HAIR SALONS

FAMILY FUN Redfield, NY (315) 599-7411 www.reservoirinn.com

964 Main St. Great Barrington MA (413) 528-3801 k2binc@verizon.net

Merrill Lynch

DOG BOARDING 240 N. Ohioville Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-8254 www.dogloveplaygroups.com

Crystal’s Green-Core products are made with materials that have a reduced effect on human health and the environment and are a perfect option for the environmentally- and health-conscious consumer. When you choose Green-Core by Crystal, you are assured the added benefits and the finest custom cabinetry with a tradition of handcrafted quality for 60 years.

INTERIOR DESIGN AND HOME FURNISHINGS Hammertown Pine Plains (518) 398-7075 Rhinebeck (845) 876-1450 Great Barrington (413) 528-7766 hammertown.com

Marigold Home 747 Route 28, Kingston NY (located 3.5 miles west of the NYState Thruway Exit 19 in the Green Building next to The Hickory Smokehouse) (845) 338-0800 www.marigold-home.com Marigold Home offers professional interior design services and home furnishings for stylish living. Furnish your entire home with an elegant selection of upholstered furniture, wood and metal furnishings, interior and exterior lighting, wallcoverings, window shades and cusutom draperies, area rugs, outdoor furnishings, tabletop and accessories, decorative interior mouldings, and a variety of wonderful gift items. Marigold Home is the most remarkable home furnishings destination in The Hudson Valley!

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Kitchens 2 Baths, Inc. 964 Main Street Great Barrington, MA (413) 528-3801 k2binc@verizon.net A kitchen and bath showroom, located south on Rt. 7, displaying cabinets for all rooms of your home, counter surfaces, hardware, plumbing fixtures, tile, marble, and granite.Owners Stewart Sweet and Diana Jamieson, CKD. will bring your ideas into being. Design service, on-site consultation, and installation is available.

INTERNET SERVICES Webjogger (845) 757-4000 www.webjogger.net

business directory

Webjogger is a local company with offices in Tivoli and Kingston. We have a great solution for small businesses IT including symmetrical High Speed Internet, Offsite On-line Data Backup and Storage, Collaborative Archived Email, Web Hosting and Domain Registration, Server Collocation and Management, and IT support by phone or on site, with nice discounts for bundled services. We’re big enough to have what you need and small enough to make it work for your individual needs. Many local companies swear by us, not at us! We also do high end routing and switching and Gigabit Wireless connectivity for local hospitals and radiology labs.

JEWELRY, FINE ART & GIFTS Hummingbird Jewelers 20 West Market Street Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4585 hummingbirdjewelers.com

Jewel 21 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-3775 Spectacular jewelry and clothing designers from the U.S., Canada, Europe, and South America are represented here with many one-of-a-kind pieces of art. Owners Ronny and Michael Widener are committed to providing an inspired and diverse collection of jewelry, accessories, and artwork for your pleasure.

Pearldaddy 183 Main Street, Beacon, NY (845) 765-0169 www.pearldaddy.net Pearldaddy’s newly relocated boutique and fine art gallery originally opened its doors in Manhattan in May, 2001. Now in Beacon, they still offer handmade and custom freshwater pearl jewelry as well as CDs, clothing, bags, and accessories handcrafted by local and international artists with six fine art exhibits a year. Mon. & Thurs. 11am-5pm, Fri. 11am-6pm, Sat. 12pm-6pm, Sun. 12pm-5pm.

Dreaming Goddess 9 Collegeview Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2206 www.DreamingGoddess.com We carry hand-made jewelry, gifts, and clothing that will touch your heart, uplift your spirits, and heal your soul. We offer various tools that will assist you on your quest for spiritual awareness and help you to deepen that connection. Essential Oils-HerbsCrystals-Incense-Candles-Divination Tools and so much more.

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KITCHENWARES Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6207 www.warrenkitchentools.com Located in historic Rhinebeck, in New York’s beautiful Mid-Hudson Valley, Warren Kitchen & Cutlery is a true kitchenware emporium—a place where inspired chefs and cooking enthusiasts can find their favorite cutlery, cookware, appliances, kitchen tools, and serving pieces for home or restaurant. Knives are our specialty; we have more than 1,000 different styles and sizes in stock. We encourage you to take advantage of our in-store sharpening and engraving services.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS Restiano Design Landscape Architects PC 290 Main Street, PO Box 778 Grahamsville, NY (845) 985-0202 www.restianodesign.com At Restaino Design, we focus on providing personalized landscape architecture services to our Clients. Our artfully inspired landscape plans are coupled with contemporary sustainable site design methods. From intimate meditation gardens and outdoor rooms for enjoyment and entertainment, to large scale site design and native plantings, we instill our work with ‘the sense of place’ unique to each landscape. Barbara Restaino, RLA, ASLA is principal and a LEED Accredited Professional.

LODGING Buttermilk Falls Inn and Spa 220 North Road, Milton, NY (877) 7-INN-SPA (845) 795-1310 www.buttermilkfallsinn.com/7 info@buttermilkfallsinn.com

Garden of One 25 miles SW of Albany (518) 797-3373 www.gardenofone.com A Center for Spiritual Evolution. Rejuvenate your body, mind, and spirit in this sacred place.

Hampton Inn 1307 Ulster Avenue Kingston, NY (845) 382-2600 www.hamptoninn.com

Inn at Stone Ridge 3805 Route 209 Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-0736 Let us be your House in the Country! Available as a large private guest house or by the individual room on a bed & breakfast basis, daily, weekly, or monthly. The accommodations of our Inn take you back to an era of country comfort unparalleled in the Catskill Region. Set on 150 acres of lawns, manicured gardens, a working apple orchard, and untouched woods. Our rooms are furnished in a blend of period antiques and modern luxuries that provide a place of stress free relaxation. Nestled in the peaceful village of Stone Ridge, with the Hudson River to the east, Woodstock to the north, and the Catskill Mountains and Shawangunk Ridge all around, we are only 95 miles from Manhattan.

Mohonk Moutain House 1000 Mountain Rest Road, New Paltz, NY General Info (845) 255-1000 Reservations (800) 772-6646 www.mohonk.com

YMCA 2000 Frost Valley Road Claryville, NY 12725 (845) 985-2291 http://www.frostvalley.org/

MANAGEMENT SERVICES Judith Johnson Management Services PO Box 624, Croton-on-Hudson, NY (914) 271-5018 (914) 271-9113 Judithjmanagement@gmail.com Organized, discrete and professional management services offered for dissolution of estates, downsizing, and insurance documentation. Multi-format cataloging; written and DVD photograph presentations; management of all details, including liaison with international, national, and local auction houses; shipping.

MUSIC LESSONS Center for Personal Development Through Music (845) 677-5871 www.cpdmusic.com Piano Lessons for Thwarted Geniuses with Peter Muir.

Music Immersion with Debbie Lan (845) 255-2193 deblan@hvi.net Innovative programs for all ages, levels, and styles. Private piano and vocal sessions: tailor-made for the individual. Early childhood music immersion: filled with a rich variety of musical activities. Birth—5 years with caretakers. Adult and teenage vocal ensembles: vocal technique, part-singing, harmonizing, deep listening skills.

Perry Beekman (845) 679-2364 perrybeekman.com

Piano Lessons by David Arner (845) 339-7437

MEDIATION & CONFLICT RESOLUTION Pathways Mediation Center (845) 331-0100 www.PathwaysMediationCenter.com We are a unique mediation practice for couples going through divorce or for families in conflict. Josh Koplovitz has over 30 years as a Matrimonial and Family Law Attorney, and Myra Schwartz has over 30 years as a Guidance Counselor working with families and children. This male/female, counselor and attorney team can effectively address all your legal and family issues. Use our one-hour free consultations to meet us or visit us on the web.

MUSIC

I am a classically trained avant-garde jazz pianist and composer, teaching since 1976. I teach beginners, professionals, children, and adults. Every student is different, so how and what I teach varies accordingly. My mission is to encourage creativity, understanding, and technical advancement no matter what your level is.

PET SERVICES & SUPPLIES Pussyfoot Lodge B&B (845) 687-0330 www.pussyfootlodge.com The Pioneer in Professional Pet Care! Full house-pet-plant sitting service, proudly serving three counties for 32 years. Experienced, dependable, thorough, and reasonable housesitting for your pets.

Burt’s Electronics 549 Albany Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 331-5011 Good music deserves quality sound! Avoid the malls and shop where quality and personal service are valued above all else. Bring Burt and his staff your favorite album and let them teach you how to choose the right audio equipment for your listening needs.

Colony Cafe 22 Rock City Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5342 www.colonycafe.com

Deep Listening Institute, Ltd. (845) 338-5984 www.deeplistening.org

PHOTOGRAPHY France Menk Photography (845) 750-5261 www.france-menk.com iam@france-menk.com Fine art limited edition prints. Internationally exhibited. Events / Portraits / Advertising / Fine Art. Private instruction in the art of photography: for all levels of experience.

Photosensualis 70 Rock City Rd. Woodstock (845) 679-5333 www.photosensualis.com

PIANO MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT AMA DJ Productions (845) 489-5214 myspace.com/amadjproductions At AMA DJ Productions we provide you with a professional, attentive, and positive DJ service. We play YOUR music choices. We play at weddings, all parties, and corporate events. Your professional music entertainment source. Fun, dancing, and memories! Since 1998.

Adam’s Piano (518) 537-2326 or (845) 343-2326 www.adamspiano.com Featuring Kawai and other fine brands. 75 pianos on display in our Germantown (just north of Rhinebeck) showroom. Open by appointment only. Inventory, prices, pictures at www.adamspiano.com. A second showroom will be opening in New Paltz in November. Superb service, moving, storage, rentals; we buy pianos!


PLUMBING & BATH

TATTOOS

N & S Supply

Pats Tats

205 Old Route 9, Fishkill, NY (845) 896-6291 Showrooms Fishkill (845) 896-6291 Kingston (845) 331-6700 Catskill (518) 947-2010 info@nssupply.com

948 State Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 338-TAT2 www.patstats.com

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t settle for less, benefit from the best! At N&S Supply, we take pride in offering the highest quality plumbing and heating products at a competitive price. Our experienced sales professionals will help you determine the right product for your project while keeping you within your budget. With many convenient locations, stop by and see why service at N&S Supply is second to none!

10 Westbrook Lane Kingston NY (845) 340-3566 www.ulstertourism.info

TOURISM Ulster County Tourism

WEB DESIGN Curious Minds Media Inc. (888) 227-1645 www.curiousm.com

New York Press Direct

Coding skills + design sensibility makes Curious Minds Media the right choice for your next project. We are the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere provider of new media services.

(845) 896-0894

ICU Publish

At NY Press Direct we exist for one reasonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; to delight our customers! What does that mean to you? Worry-free shopping for all your printing and fulfillment needs. Our solutions are leading-edge in the industry. Our pricing is among the most competitive in the northeast region. Call John DeSanto or Larry Read for more information.

www.icupublish.com info@icupublish.com

PRINTING SERVICES

(845) 687-4855 www.highmeadowschool.org

WORKSHOPS

Dutchess Community College

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Media Project

(845) 431-8020 www.sunydutchess.edu

www.childrensmediaproject.org

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WRITING SERVICES SNACKS Mister Snacks, Inc. (845) 206-7256 www.mistersnacks.com Call Vinny Sciullo for distribution of the finest snacks in the Hudson Valley. Visit our Gift Shop online.

SOCIAL INVESTMENTS Domini Social Investments (800) 530-5321 www.domini.com

CenterToPage: Moving Writers From The Center To The Page Accord, NY (845) 679-9441 www.CenterToPage.com With 20 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience as author and teacher, Jeff Davis meets each person where he or she is at for coaching, editing, and ghostwriting. Jeff works in all stages of writing and publishing with scholars, nonfiction writers, novelists, poets, and people simply wishing to develop a writing practice from their center. Teaches at WCSU MFA Program and at conferences nationwide. References available.

SUNROOMS

Emerging Writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Studio

Four Seasons Sunrooms

(845) 688-7328 www.emergingwriters.us

Beacon (845) 838-1235 Kingston (845) 339-1787 www.hvsk.fourseasonssunrooms.com Four Seasons Sunrooms has been selling and installing Four Seasons Sunrooms since 1984. We offer sales, skilled installation and service, as well as experienced consultation on residential and commercial sunroom projects. We welcome you to visit our showroom located just south of Kingston on Route 9W. We provide free in-home estimates.

SUPER FARM MARKET Adams Fairacre Farms Poughkeepsie, Route 44, (845) 454-4330 Kingston, Route 9W, (845) 336-6300 Newburgh, Route 300 (845) 569-0303 www.adamsfarms.com

business directory

High Meadow School

ICU Publish specializes in intensive care graphic design. On-site personalized consultation and training for both Mac and PCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Web design and publishing with customized data base driven websites created with the artist in mind. Limitededition book publishing, artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books, portfolios, dummys, proposals, business reports, manuscript editing, off-site or onsite freelance editing available.

SCHOOL

Bags

Weekly workshops, e-courses, manuscript consultation, and private mentoring for writers of fiction and memoir. Deepen awareness of craft, release your voice, and write the stories that are meant for you. Come join a supportive community of writers! Workshops: Phoenicia and beyond. Led by writer/teacher Nanci Panuccio, M.F.A.

Gifts with a Twist 299 WALL STREET â&#x20AC;˘ KINGSTON, NEW YORK 12401 â&#x20AC;˘ 845-338-8100

In The Heart of Uptown Kingston LIGHTING â&#x20AC;˘ JEWELRY â&#x20AC;˘ ART â&#x20AC;˘ GIFTS â&#x20AC;˘ SWELL STUFF

Boutique & Salon

Wallkill Valley Writers (845) 255-7090 khamherstwriters@aol.com Creative writing workshops in New Paltz led by Kate Hymes, poet and educator. Aspiring and experienced writers are welcome. WVW provides structured time, a supportive community, and a safe place for you to fulfill the dream of writing your stories, real or imagined. Many writers find the community of a workshop benefits their work and keeps them motivated.

Our Boutique Collections Such world-class lines as Thymes, Claus Porto, Musgo Real, Jack Black, Lafco House & Home, Tea Forte, Wooster & Prince Papers, Skincare by Monica Olsen, Art of Shaving, Immortals Botanicals, Linari Home Fragrances, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zentsâ&#x20AC;? Body Care. Our hair studio The best in cutting and styling, specializing in creative & corrective hair color, highlights, styling and waxing for men & women. Offering Purology haircare products.

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11 South 6th St. Hudson, NY 12534 518.828.2690 www.CUHudson.com

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whole living guide

the health price of plastics Bisphenol A Worries Won’t Go Away Plastics are versatile, convenient, and ubiquitous. But recurrent concern over bisphenol A leaching from containers begs the question: Is there a health price we pay, or that our children will pay years from now?

by ilyse a. simon illustration by annie dwyer internicola

F

or a parent of a young child, each plastic plate, saucer, or bottle thrown from the high chair is a gift of technology when it doesn’t shatter into thousands of pieces. For the rest of us, plastic is the material of choice for items too numerous to tally. At the same time, many of us have simmerings of concern that plastic may be exposing us to harmful chemicals when it is heated, boiled, microwaved, frozen, left in the baking sun, dishwashed, scrubbed, chewed on, or dropped for the umpteenth time. And what about teething toys parents sterilize in a pot of boiling water, or toddlers’ cups and straws used warm from the dishwasher, or plastic bowls used to mix instant cereal?

BISPHENOL A (BPA) AND XENOESTROGENS In the 1950s a manmade chemical, BPA, was found to be a good starting material for the synthesis of polycarbonate, a unique, sturdy plastic. But, earlier, during the 1930s, a study in the scientific journal Nature reported that BPA had estrogen-like properties when fed to rats. (BPA apparently was being investigated as a potential synthetic estrogen.) Since then, hundreds of studies have confirmed that BPA is a xenoestrogen. Xenoestrogens are compounds that affect living organisms in ways similar to the naturally occuring hormone estrogen. BPA attaches to estrogen receptors, which are proteins within the nucleus of cells that mediate estrogen’s actions in humans and many animals, of both sexes. BPA also interacts with thryoid hormone receptors, androgen receptors, and may interfere with an key enzyme that converts androgens into estrogens. In 1996 the Environmental Protection Agency categorized xenoestrogens, including BPA, as endocrine disruptors, which are chemicals that can have significant influence on the endocrine (hormonal) and reproductive systems. BPA is a weak estrogen, meaning it is not as poweful as our natural hormone. Still, routine exposure to weak estrogens may influence the production of natural estrogen, alter the response of cells, or interact with estrogen-sensitive medications. There may be additive effects of exposure to this and other xenoestrogens in everyday chemicals (such as in pesticides and herbicides). In addition, a new type of estrogen receptor was recently discovered on the surfaces of cells to which BPA attaches and triggers certain cellular responses as strongly as estrogen does, and at very low doses. The question of BPA’s safety has its ardent defenders and equally ardent 86 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 7/08

skeptics. One point of contention is whether significant amounts of BPA get into foods and beverages from containers, and then into us. In 1998, researcher Frederick vom Saal published proof that BPA was leaching from plastic tableware, bottle tops, and the plastic linings of some metal canned foods during the heated canning process. Scientists went a step further to discover that foods processed in cans lined in plastic had detectable levels of BPA. In 1999, studies confirmed reports by the Food and Drug Administration that 95 percent of baby bottles sold in the United States were leaching BPA when heated and scratched. In 2005, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that 95 percent of Americans excrete at least 100 parts per trillion of BPA in their urine, demonstrating that we all are getting at least some exposure from plastics. A 2008 CDC research study confirmed this, and found the amounts of BPA to often exceed the current safety threshold of exposure set by the EPA. Debates continue, however, about how much BPA leaches from polycarbonate, and under what conditions. For instance, researchers at the Department of Pharmacology and Cell Biophysics at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine reported in January that BPA leached from high-quality polycarbonate water bottles at rates ranging from 0.20 to 0.79 nanograms per hour. After holding boiling water, the bottles leached 55 times that amount. The researchers concluded that “the amounts of BPA found to migrate from polycarbonate drinking bottles should be considered as a contributing source to the total ‘EDC-burden’ [endocrine-disrupting compound-burden].” The Bisphenol A Global Industry Group dismisses the findings in its online information by calling this yet another “scare story,” while ceding that “increased migration into boiling water is not news at all since it is well known as a general phenomenon that migration levels increase with increasing temperature.” The group discounts several other scientific studies as scare stories that promote myths among consumers.

WHAT’S THE HARM IN BPA? Studies funded by the plastics industry support the stance that BPA exposure produces no ill effects and is well below governmental safety limits. Industry


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literature continues to assert that low doses of BPA are safe, as are plastics made with it. The American Plastics Council funded an expert panel’s input, which concluded in 2004, after reviewing 19 published animal studies for “potential male reproductive impacts” in particular, that evidence for low-dose effects of BPA was weak. But a year later, scientists from the University of Missouri and East Carolina University, concerned that the review was too limited, conducted their own extensive literature review. They concluded “the opposite is true,” finding instead that “as of December 2004, there were 115 published in vivo [live animal] studies concerning low-dose effects of BPA, and 94 of these report significant effects. In 31 publications with vertebrate and invertebrate animals, significant effects occurred below the predicted ‘safe’ or reference dose of 50 micrograms per kilogram per day BPA.” Further, the independent reviewers stated that “chemical manufacturers continue to discount these published findings because no industry-funded studies have reported significant effects of low doses of BPA, although 90 percent of government-funded studies have reported significant effects.” They further add that studies that showed no adverse health effects of BPA often had “used a strain of rat that is inappropriate for the study of estrogenic responses.” The kinds of effects reported in the animal studies are many and varied, but often involve reproduction (in both males and females), fetal development, and cancer. Examples are miscarriages, low sperm count and testosterone levels, prostate cancer, polycystic ovarian disease, and abnormal fat cell growth. Exposure during fetal development leads to abnormalities in sexual organs and sex differentiation, genetic damage to oocytes (immature eggs), precancerous lesions, and altered hormone levels later in life. (BPA rapidly crosses the placenta from pregnant animals into the fetus.) In June of 2006, the Environmental Science and Technology Journal published a study showing that low doses of BPA alters the brains of female mice to behave more like their male counterparts. Another study found that BPA at doses similar to amounts already found in people altered DNA in animals. There are new reports that BPA causes insulin resistance, the condition of prediabetes, in mice. In addition, BPA alters how DNA is used in several different cellular activities, some of which are linked with human diseases and health problems.

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH? While independent studies in animals support BPA as a chemical with biological effects, the amounts that cause harm in animals vary. Some toxicologists argue that BPA and other xenoestrogens do not pose a health hazard due to their weakness in comparison to estrogen. But researchers at Tufts University published a study indicating that even the tiniest dose of BPA can have an estrogenic effect. Ana Soto, BPA researcher and professor of cellular biology at Tufts, asserted in the Environmental Science and Technology Journal online that “There is plenty of evidence now that low-dose levels lead to problems.” Soto was coauthor of a study that found that female fetal mice exposed during embryonic development to tiny amounts of BPA—2,000 to 20,000 times lower than what is considered safe in people—had fewer cells in an area of the brain related to gender-specific behavior, and behaved like males when they matured. A key question is whether the amount of BPA leached from plastics can affect the human body as it does in animals. Studies involving people or human tissue are still scarce. BPA has been shown to have an estrogenic effect on cultures of human breast cancer cells, and to cause mutations in human cells in laboratory experiments. In April of this year, the National Toxicology Program (within the National Institutes of Health) released the most comprehensive examination of BPA studies to date. It found that human studies based on measurements of BPA in urine and blood show a correlation of higher levels of BPA with altered reproductive hormone levels in men and women, polycystic ovary syndrome, recurrent miscarriage, and chromosomal defects in fetuses. But the report also states, “Drawing firm conclusions about potential reproductive or developmental effects of bisphenol A in humans from these studies is difficult because of factors such as small sample size, cross-sectional design, lack of large variations in exposure, or lack of adjustment for potential confounders. However, the NTP Expert Panel on Bisphenol A concluded that several studies collectively suggest hormonal effects of bisphenol A exposure.” The report further states that thorough studies are warranted. Over the last several decades, a number of health trends have been identified 88 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 7/08

but not sufficiently explained. Among them are low sperm count, infertility, early puberty, genetic abnormalities, birth defects of the sexual organs, diabetes, and obesity.While there are probably many significant factors contributing to each of these health conditions, xenoestrogens could be among them.

WHAT TO DO? Amidst the controversy surrounding BPA, it’s understandable to become alarmed and unsure of what to believe. What’s more, plastic is incredibly practical. How can we protect ourselves and our families from possible harmful effects while maintaining our fast-paced lifestyles? Change is already underway. Several companies are now marketing products specifically as BPA-free alternatives, such as baby bottles made of other kinds of plastic or glass. Nalgene, maker of popular reusable drinking containers, has announced it will avoid plastic containing bisphenol A. Wal-Mart will no longer sell baby bottles with bisphenol A. Legislation may play an increasing role, too: San Fransisco has banned BPA in products intended for children under the age of three, and Canada has banned polycarbonate baby bottles. NewYork Senator Charles Schumer has introduced legislation in Congress that would prohibit the use of bisphenol A in all products for children aged seven and younger; the bill would also allow states to pass laws restricting BPA plastics without federal interference. As consumers, there are relatively simple changes we can make to reduce exposure to BPA. Avoid exposing plastic containers to high heat, harsh detergents, and heavy wear and tear. Switch to hand washing plastic water bottles, baby items, and food containers with a biodegradable, earth-friendly dish soap like Ecover or Seventh Generation Dish Liquid. Don’t leave beverage bottles or food containers in the car, where temperatures can soar. When microwaving foods, use a glass or ceramic container and cover with wax paper (not plastic wrap, which contains phthalates, other xenoestrogens of concern). When buying plastic containers, those with numbers other than 7 shouldn’t have BPA. Plastics have a numbering system defined by the Society of the Plastics Industry in which each number corresponds to composition, as follows: #1, polyethylene terephthalate (PETE); #2, high-density polyethylene (HDPE); #3, polyvinyl chloride (PVC or vinyl); #4, low-density polyethylene (LDPE); #5, polypropylene (PP); #6, polystyrene (PS), and #7, all other plastics and combinations of them. BPA is found in some #7 plastics. Better yet, switch to glass, ceramic, or stainless steel containers when you can. If you must rely on plastic while on the go, use glass storage containers at home. Since school lunchrooms, gyms, and pool areas generally don’t permit glass, buy non-BPA plastic containers. Freezing plastics has not been shown to cause leaching of BPA (a current debate), so putting water or other beverage bottles in the freezer seems harmless. But don’t use any polycarbonate container that becomes worn and cloudy. David Feldman, a doctor and emeritus professor of endocrinology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, supports a “better safe than sorry” approach. Feldman and coworkers first identified BPA’s potential to interact with our endocrine systems in the early 1990s. In an April 2008 press release from the university, Feldman counseled, “The prudent thing for current or expectant parents or those planning a pregnancy to do would be to limit their child’s exposure to bisphenol A by avoiding bottles and cups that are made of polycarbonate, and to microwave food in glass containers whenever possible. Not only do [children] weigh much less than adults, making their relative exposure greater, but they are also still developing estrogen-sensitive breast and prostate tissue. For adults, however, canned foods and beverages may be the most important source of bisphenol A. I don’t microwave food in plastic containers, or wash the containers in the dishwasher because heat and some detergents cause leaching. I try to limit the amount of canned food I eat, or rinse the food before consuming the contents.” The tempo and routine of our lives change continuously. Being aware of the obstacles and making small adjustments is a good practice. Maybe you can switch to using glass storage containers at home and plastic when you are on the go. Perhaps you will commit to washing plastic containers by hand, or gradually replacing them with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or other non-BPA products.These are some of the easy solutions you can take to replace nagging doubts about plastics with a confidence that you are moving toward a healthier lifestyle. Ilyse Simon is a registered dietitian and freelance writer from Kingston.


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WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/08

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My Numbness is Gone. After I gave birth, my numbness was so bad I could barely change my newborn due to my carpal tunnel syndrome. Dr. Ness released the nerves from the muscles in my neck to my hands using Active Release Techniques, and within a few weeks, I was 90% better.

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whole living guide

ACTIVE RELEASE TECHNIQUES Dr. David Ness (845) 255-1200

ACUPUNCTURE Acupuncture Health Care Assoc. 108 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-7178 Peter Dubitsky, L.Ac., Callie Brown, L.Ac., and Leslie Wiltshire, L.Ac. Mr. Dubitsky is a faculty member and the Director of Clinical Training at the Tri-State College of Acupuncture, and a member of the NY State Board for Acupuncture. Ms. Brown and Ms. Wiltshire each have years of acupuncture experience in private practice and in medical offices. We are all highly experienced, national board certified, NYS Licensed acupuncturists. We combine traditional Asian acupuncture techniques with a modern understanding of acupuncture and Oriental medicine to provide effective treatments of acute and chronic pain conditions, and other medical disorders. In addition to our general practice we also offer a Low Cost Acupuncture Clinic which is available for all people who meet our low income guidelines. Carrie Andress 166 Albany Avenue, Kingston, NY, (845) 338-5575 120 Main Street, Gardiner, NY, (845) 674-3778 Carrie Andress is a NYS licensed and nationally board certified acupuncturist and certified in Chinese Medicine.

Classical Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs 303 Fair Street, Kingston, NY (914) 388-7789 For those looking for a radical, no-nonsense approach to pain, physical, mental, and spiritual dis-ease or discomfort, Dylana Accolla and Classical Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs offers 17 years of experience in the healing arts. Co-author of “Back to Balance, a Self-Help Guide to Far East Asian Remedies,” Dylana trained in bodywork, qigong, and tai ji chuan in Japan, graduated from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, and completed post-graduate studies at the Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Cheng-Du, China. She specializes in gynecological and fertility work. Her practice is wide-ranging, including treatment of allergies, asthma, bronchitis, chronic and acute pain, depression and anxiety, digestive issues, fatigue, gallstones, headaches, lingering common colds, Lyme disease, menopausal issues, prostate problems, sleep disorders, vertigo and dizziness, and weakened immune systems. “Dylana’s approach is dynamic. Her results are dramatic. Her practice brings about life-changing epiphanies, releasing pain and trauma.”—A Satisfied Patient Earthbound Herbs and Acupuncture Main Office, Apothecary in Kingston; Home Office, Gardens in Accord, NY (845) 339-5653 www.earthboundapothecary.com Creating health in partnership with nature. Effective, informative healthcare based in the profound traditions of Chinese medicine. Both private and community acupuncture ($15-$35 sliding scale) is available to ensure affordability to all. Apothecary specializes in local, organic Asian and native herbs available in bulk, tincture, tea mixtures, and much more. Workshops, apprenticeships, garden tours. Founded by Hillary Thing, MS, L.Ac., Professor and Clinic Supervisor at the Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in NYC, with over 10 years of clinical experience.

Hoon J. Park, MD, PC 1772 Route 9, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-6060 For the past 18 years, Dr. Hoon J. Park has been practicing a natural and gentle approach to pain management for conditions such as arthritis, chronic and acute pain in neck, back, and legs, fibromyalgia, motor vehicle and work-related injuries, musculoskeletal disorders, and more by integrating physical therapy modalities along with acupuncture. Dr. Hoon Park is a board-certified physician in physical medicine and rehabilitation, pain medicine, and electrodiagnostic studies. His experienced, friendly staff offer the most comprehensive and individualized rehabilitative care available. Please call the office to arrange a consultation. New patients and most insurances are accepted. Half mile south of the Galleria Mall.

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Active Release Techniques (ART®) is a patented soft tissue treatment system that heals injured muscles, tendons, fascia (covers muscle), ligaments, and nerves. It is used to treat acute or chronic injuries, sports injuries, repetitive strain injuries and nerve entrapments like carpal tunnel syndrome, and sciatica. ART® is also used before and after surgery to reduce scar tissue formation and build up. ART® works to break up and remove scar tissue deep within and around injured muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves. The injured muscle, joint, ligament, and nerves are moved through a range of motion while a contact is held over the injured structure. This breaks up the scar tissue and heals the tissue faster than traditional treatments. ART® doctors are trained in over 500 hands on protocols and must undergo rigorous written and practical examination to become certified. In order to maintain their certification in ART doctors attend yearly continuing education and re-certification by ART®.

Her main focus is in helping the body return to a healthy state, bringing dramatic results to acute and chronic pain and internal disorders. Carrie combines a genuinely inspirational and original blend of Acupressure, Applied Kinesiology, Cranial Sacral Therapy, Acupressure, Chinese Medicine, and Nutrition to transform people to their highest potential of greater health.

Transpersonal Acupuncture (845) 340-8625 www.transpersonalacupuncture.com Transpersonal Acupuncture is the practice of Jipala Reicher-Kagan L.Ac. Jipala is a New York State licensed acupuncturist and a graduate of Tri-State College of Acupuncture. She has completed a three year post-graduate study in Alchemical Acupuncture, which specializes in psychological and spiritual healing. She has over eight years of experience working with a certified nutritionist and knowledge of Western herbology, homeopathic medicine, nutritional supplements, and dietary/lifestyle counseling. Her main goal is to restore balance and to facilitate the innate healing power within each of her clients. She focuses on connecting the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of the self and breaking blocks that contribute to pain, disease, trauma, and lifestyle imbalances. She welcomes clients who are interested in relief from acute or chronic pain, Facial Rejuvenation treatments, and quitting smoking. Please call to make an appointment or visit us online if you would like to learn more about Transpersonal Acupuncture and Jipala Reicher-Kagan.

ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE Judith Muir (845) 677-5871 www.JudithMuir.com The Alexander Technique is a simple practical skill that when applied to ourselves enhances coordination, promoting mental, emotional, and physical well-being. Improve the quality of your life by learning how to do less to achieve more. Judith Muir, AmSAT. 7/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

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APOTHECARY Monarda Herbal Apothecary (845) 339-2562 www.monarda.net In honoring the diversity, uniqueness, and strength of nature for nourishment and healing, we offer organic and ecologically wildcrafted herbs using tradition as our guide. Certified Organic Alcohol Tinctures, Teas, Salves, Essential Oils, and more. Product Catalog $1. Workshops and Internships.

the next generation in high-tech skin enhancement. These gentle, no downtime treatments are used to improve cosmetic appearance of the face, neck, hands, and body. The results are brighter, smoother, more radiant, and luminescent skin. This process delivers results that skin care products alone cannot do! Recover and rediscover the youth and vitality of your skin. Call for a complimentary consultation: Janice DiGiovanni. Essence MediSpa, LLCâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Stephen Weinman, M.D. 222 Route 299, Highland, NY

AROMATHERAPY

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Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 www.apteraromatherapy.com japter@ulster.net

ART THERAPY Deep Clay (845) 255-8039 www.deepclay.com

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deepclay@mac.com Michelle Rhodes, LMSW ATR-BC. Short-term counseling and in-depth psychoanalytic arts-based psychotherapy. Activates creative imagination to enhance healing and problem solving for life transitions, bereavement, trauma, and dissociative disorders. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group and individual studio sessions. Children, adults, and teens.

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BIODYNAMIC Hawthorne Valley Farm Store 327 Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7500, ext. 1 www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org An Organic & Natural Grocery Store. Hawthorne Valley Farm Store features delicious foods made here on our Biodynamic organic farm, including raw milk, artisan cheese, yogurt, homemade bread, and desserts. We also feature local and organic fruits and vegetables, holistic body care and homeopathic remedies. We are part of Hawthorne Valley Association, a non-profit organization dedicated to sustainable agriculture, education, and the arts. Our farming practices reflect our commitment to the Earth and our education programs raise awareness of the social, ecological, and economic importance of agriculture in our daily lives.

BODY & SKIN CARE Absolute Laser, LLC Springbrook Medical Park, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7100 www.absolute-laser.com

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WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Absolute Laser, LLC offers commitment to beautiful skin through outstanding care and service. Offering Laser Hair Removal, Microdermabrasion, Vitalize Peel, and Fotofacial RF. The Fotofacial RF is

BODY-CENTERED THERAPY Irene Humbach, LCSW, PC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Body of Wisdom Counseling & Healing Services (845) 485-5933 By integrating traditional and alternative therapy/healing approaches, including Body-Centered Psychotherapy, IMAGO Couplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Counseling, and Kabbalistic Healing, I offer tools for self healing, to assist individuals and couples to open blocks to their softer heart energy. Ten-session psycho-spiritual group for women in recovery. Offices in Poughkeepsie and New Paltz. Julie Zweig, M.A. Certified Rosen Method Bodywork Practitioner and NYS Licensed Mental Health Counselor. New Paltz, NY (845) 255-3566 www.RosenMethod.com julieezweig@gmail.com Provide Rosen Method Bodywork and Body-Centered verbal Psychotherapy. 20 years experience. Rosen Method Bodywork is distinguished by its gentle, direct touch. Using hands that listen rather than manipulate, the practitioner focuses on chronic muscle tension. As relaxation occurs and the breath deepens, unconscious feelings, attitudes, and memories may emerge. The practitioner responds with touch and words that allow the client to begin to recognize what has been held down by unconscious muscle tension. As this process unfolds, habitual tension and old patterns may be released, freeing the client to experience more aliveness, new choices in life, and a greater sense of well-being. Verbal Body-Centered Psychotherapy utilizing doctoral level training in psychology with many areas of specialty, as well as the principles of Rosen Method Bodywork, but without touch.


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IONE — Healing Psyche (845) 339-5776

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Fax: (845) 331-6624

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IONE is psycho-spiritual therapist, Qi Healer, and inter-faith minister, who is director of the Ministry of Maåt, Inc. Specializing in myth and heritage, dream phenomena, and women’s issues, she facilitates writing workshops and Women’s Mysteries programs and leads retreats to sacred locations throughout the world. An author and playwright, her works include Pride of Family; Four Generations of American Women of Color and Listening in Dreams. Offices in Kingston and New York City.

BOOKSTORES Inner Traditions/Bear & Co. (800) 246-8648

A Yoga-based mind-body approach for children and special needs populations of all ages. Gentle, safe, and effective treatment for ASD’s, developmental, attention, and learning differences; anxiety, depression, chronic pain and immune syndromes. Yoga for the Special Child®, Therapeutic Yoga, licensed Massage Therapy, Flower Essences, Reiki and other traditional healing modalities can help bring your child or loved one to a naturally balanced state of health and harmony. Namaste. Alice Velky LMT, RYT.

Priscilla A. Bright, MA—Energy Healer/Counselor Kingston, NY

CHIROPRACTIC Dr. David Ness

Dr. David Ness is a Certified Active Release Techniques (ART®) Provider and Certified Chiropractic Sports Practitioner specializing in helping athletes and active people quickly relieve their pain and heal their injuries. In addition to providing traditional chiropractic care, Dr. Ness utilizes ART® to remove scar tissue and adhesions in order to restore mobility, flexibility, and strength faster than standard treatments will allow. If you have an injury that has not responded to treatment, call Dr. Ness for an appointment today.

COLON HEALTH CARE Connie Schneider—Certified Colon Therapist New Paltz, NY (845) 256-1516 Colon hydrotherapy or colonics is a gentle approach to colon health. A healthy digestive tract helps support a healthy immune system, improving overall health, basics for a healthy lifestyle. Herbal Detox Programs available. See display ad.

COOKING CLASSES Nourishing Wisdom Nutrition (845) 687-9666 www.nourishingwisdom.com Holly’s Cooking Classes have been inspiring people to cook since 1999, and will inspire you too! We use seasonal, organic ingredients including produce from local farms. At the end of each class we sit around the table to enjoy a

Specializing in women’s stress, emotional issues, and physical illness, including stress-related anxiety, depression, and physical burnout. Women in transition, businesswomen, mothers, all welcome. Experienced counselor. Faculty, Barbara Brennan School of Healing. Convenient offices in Kingston and New Paltz. Initial phone consultation no charge.

A Place for Healing

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annie serrante, lmt, lmsw $15 off each massage – 3 to 9 sessions For more information: 255-3337 ext. 1

GENTLE YOGA JENNIFER HUNDERFUND, RYT, lmt Fridays, 12–1pm — Core strengthening and hip openers Drop-in rate: $12. Monthly rate: $40

Counseling & Psychotherapy ARiella Morris, LCSW-R EMDR, Somatic Experiencing, Mindfulness Body-Centered and Talk Therapy for Trauma, Abuse, Relationships, Accidents, Illness/Surgery & the hurts of life (Sliding scale) 853-3325

jin shin jyutsu Anita Falcone, Practitioner Unblock the door of your body, mind and spirit... (845) 926-7096 for appointments July 12, 3-4 pm- Free Intro.

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(845) 255-1200

(845) 688-7175

THE SANCTUARY

DENTISTRY Tischler Family Dental Center Woodstock, NY (845) 679-3706 www.tischlerdental.com With over 35 years experience, Tischler Dental is the leading team of dental care experts in the area. Dr. Michael Tischler is currently one of only two Board Certified Implant Dentists in the Hudson Valley Region of NYS and one of only 300 dentists in the world to have achieved this honor. Sedation dentistry, acupuncture with dental treatment, dental implant surgery, cosmetic makeover procedures, and gum surgery are just a few of the many unique services Tischler Dental offers. Their practice philosophy is that each modality of dental treatment is performed by the practitioner that is best trained in that area. Working as a team, they deliver ideal dental care.

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ally grown farm fresh fruits, vegetables, field-cut fresh flowers and plants, hand

Dragonfly Holistic

made mozzarella and assorted cheeses,

1181 North Avenue, Beacon, NY

meats, poultry, eggs, fresh and dried

(845) 463-2802

herbs, artisan breads and sweet baked

www.dragonflyholistic.com

goods, herbal remedies, prepared foods, honey, jams, condiments, olive

Garden of One

oil, and more. Weekly special events

25 miles SW of Albany

bring an festive and educational air to

(518) 797-3373

the rain or shine venue. Crafts on John

www.gardenofone.com

join the Market on1st Saturdays, June -

A Center for Spiritual Evolution. Rejuvenate your body, mind, and spirit in this sacred place.

September. Free parking and proximity to NYS Thruway (Exit 19) Saturdays May 24 until Nov 22.

John M. Carroll, Healer Kingston, NY

FENG SHUI Feng Shui Solutions 72 North Slope Road, Shokan, NY

illuminating the world of the sensitive

(845) 231-0801 www.fengshuisolutions.info Discover the richness of the ancient principles of Feng Shui applied to modern life and enjoy a more harmonious and

(845) 338-8420 John Carroll is an intuitive healer, teacher, and spiritual counselor who integrates mental imagery with the God-given gift of his hands. John has helped individuals suffering from acute and chronic disorders, including back problems and cancer. Remote healings and telephone sessions. Call for consultation.

balanced existence. Our consultations

whole living directory

Accompanying artists, healers, creatives & innovators on the journey to belonging.

are aimed at improving family relation-

Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health

ships, health, and prosperity; clearing

Lenox, MA

negative energy from any space; im-

(800) 741-7353

proving business viability and selecting

kripalu.org

or designing the perfect home or office. Omega Institute for Holistic Studies www.jessicathayer.com 800.291.5576

(800) 944-1001

GOURMET FRUIT ARRANGEMENTS Edible Arrangements

Jill Malden

Poughkeepsie and Kingston Locations (877) DoFruit

RD, LMSW

www.ediblearrangements.com

Specializing in Nutrition & Eating Behavior "OPSFYJB/FSWPTBt#VMJNJB/FSWPTB #JOHF&BUJOH%JTPSEFSt$PNQVMTJWF0WFSFBUJOH 0QUJNJ[F.FUBCPMJTNt4UBCJMJ[F#MPPE4VHBS *NQSPWF&OFSHZ$PODFOUSBUJPO .FEJDBM/VUSJUJPO 20 Years of Experience Warm & Caring Treatment 1 Water Street, New Paltz, NY 

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845.489.4732

HEALTH & HEALING FACILITIES The Sanctuary: A Place for Healing (845) 255-3337 A quaint healing center in a quiet part of downtown New Paltz. Offering Craniosacral Therapy, Massage, Psychotherapy, Reiki, Dr. Hauschka Facials, Counseling, Restorative Yoga, and Kabbalistic Healing. Classes in Spontaneous Theater, Toning, NVC, Pathwork.

H YPNOCOACHING M I N D / B O D Y I N T E G R A T I O N ):1/04*4t/-1t$0"$)*/( .ĒğĒĘĖ4ĥģĖĤĤt"ġġģĖęĖğĤĚĠğĤt1ĒĚğt*ĞġģĠħĖ4ĝĖĖġ 3ĖĝĖĒĤĖ8ĖĚĘęĥt4Ėĥ(ĠĒĝĤt$ęĒğĘĖ)ĒēĚĥĤ 1ģĖ1ĠĤĥ4ĦģĘĖģĪt(ĖğĥĝĖ$ęĚĝĕēĚģĥę *ĞĞĦğĖ4ĪĤĥĖĞ&ğęĒğĔĖĞĖğĥ 1ĒĤĥ-ĚėĖ3ĖĘģĖĤĤĚĠğt4ĠĦĝ3ĖĥģĚĖħĒĝ .ĠĥĚħĒĥĚĠğĒĝé4ġĚģĚĥĦĒĝ(ĦĚĕĒğĔĖ

Call for an appointment.

130 Dolson Avenue, Middletown, NY (845) 343-4040 www.pleasantstonefarm.net Helping people get healthy—Naturally! If you went down a dusty road off a blue highway, you would expect to find

H Y P N O B I RT H I N G Kary Broffman, R.N., C.H. --

®

a place like Pleasant Stone Farm, a natural health store boasting a bountiful herbal apothecary, organic pantry, and dietary supplements, but it is just 4 lights off exit 3W I-84, in Middletown.

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WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Omega Institute is in its fourth decade of awakening the best in the human spirit. Join us for Winter Learning Vacations in Costa Rica and St. John and keep your eye on our website—our 2008 Rhinebeck season will be for sale soon. Cassandra Currie, MS, RYT—Holistic Health Counselor 41 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 532-7796 Cassandra is a Kripalu-Certified Yoga Teacher, and Certified Ayurvedic Nutritionist, with a MS in Counseling Psychology. She offers integrative health counseling to individuals as well as groups, melding Ayurvedic nutritional counseling, yoga, and more traditional therapeutic techniques to guide people toward greater self-awareness, empowering them to find joy, balance, and health in their daily lives. Call for classes, appointments, and consultations.

HEALTH FOOD Pleasant Stone Farm

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www.eomega.org

HOMEOPATHY Suzy Meszoly, DSH/Classical Homeopathy (845) 626-7771 Safe, effective, natural, individualized homeopathic health care for chronic and acute illness. Suzy Meszoly is an internationally trained and experienced homeopath, hands-on healer and counselor. Using a gentle approach suitable for newborns, infants, pregnant moms, adults, and the elderly for a wide range of physical, mental, and emotional issues.


HYPNOSIS Kary Broffman, RN, CH

Shirley Stone, MBA, Certified Empowerment Life Coach Rhinebeck, NY

Hyde Park, NY

(845) 876-2194

(845) 876-6753

www.findingthecourage.com

A registered nurse with a BA in psychology since 1980, Kary is certified in Ericksonian Hypnosis, Hypnobirthing, and Complementary Medical Hypnotism, hypnocoaching with the National Guild. She has also studied interactive imagery for nurses. By weaving her own healing journey and education into her work, she helps to assist others in accessing their inner resources and healing potential.

Shirley@findingthecourage.com

Sharon Slotnick, MS, CHt. New Paltz and Kingston, NY

Want to convert fear into courage, stress into power, depression into joy, worry into satisfaction? Consider empowerment life coaching. Get clarity on the life you want plus the tools and techniques to make your dreams a reality. Stop being a problem solver and become a vision creator.

River Rock Health Spa

Increase self-esteem and motivation; break bad habits; manage stress, stress-related illness, and anger; alleviate pain (e.g. childbirth, headaches, chronic pain); overcome fears and despondency; relieve insomnia; improve learning, memory, public speaking, and sports performance; enhance creativity. Other issues. Change your outlook. Gain Control. Make healthier choices. Certified Hypnotist, two years training; broad base in Psychology.

62 Ricks Road, Woodstock, NY

INTUITIVE ANALYSTS & REMOTE VIEWERS

MASSAGE THERAPY

www.riverrock.biz Your day retreat for rebalancing and rejuvenation. Guests rave: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to live here!â&#x20AC;? AR, New Paltz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the best spaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the world. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been to many.â&#x20AC;? SN, Portland. Guests are nurtured and pampered by large staff and luxurious state-of-the-art spa. Massage, facials, body scrubs/wraps, waxing, and more.

PO box 83, Milton, NY

426 Main Street Rosendale, NY

(845) 566-4134

(845) 658-8400

www.marisaanderson.com

www.consciousbodyonline.com

Specializing in Individual Concerns, Law Enforcement, Personal Healing and Health Issues, Corporate Analysis, Animal Concerns, and Science/Technology Data. Guest speaker on many radio programs, featured in noted publications nationally, and in books, and on The Discovery Channel. Available for private sessions (in person or by phone), parties, and corporate events.

Ellen@consciousbodyonline.com

JEWISH MYSTICISM & KABBALAH

Offering deep, sensitive, and eclectic massage therapy with over 22 years of experience as a licensed Massage Therapist working with a wide variety of body types and physical/medical/ emotional issues. Techniques included: deep tissue, Swedish, Craniosacral, energy balancing, and chi nei tsang (an ancient Chinese abdominal and organ chi massage). Hot stone massage and aromatherapy are also offered. Gift certificates available.

Irene Humbach, LCSW, PC

Hudson Valley Therapeutic Massage

(845) 485-5933

Michele Tomasicchio, LMT

Kabbalistic Healing in person and long distance. 6 session Introduction to Kabbalistic Healing based on the work of Jason Shulman. See also Body-Centered Therapy directory.

Katie Hoffstatter, LMT

www.jessicathayer.com Serving artists, healers, creatives, and other sensitives called to integrate their rich interior worlds into their daily lives. When therapy for the past fails to provide the tools for the future. Schedule your complimentary consultation online.

CertiďŹ ed Rosen Method Bodywork Practitioner NYS Licensed Mental Health Counselor

Gia Polk, LMT 243 Main Street, Suite 220, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4832 Are your muscles feeling tight and congested? Are you dealing with stress from emotional, physical, or environmental causes? Do you just feel overwhelmed? Our conscientious and skilled NY Licensed Massage Therapists can help you discover a place of ease within your body, mind, and spirit. Let us help you to feel whole! Craniosacral, energy healing, therapeutic massage, and health kinesiology. Monday-Friday 8:30-7, Saturday 9-3pm.

Save the date! Monday Rosen evening,Method October 13, 2008 in Garrison, NY Bodywork &

Marion Rosen, founder of Rosen Method Bodywork, will give a Body-Centered Psychotherapy

lecture and demonstration of her work that is now recognized and practiced world-wide. This is a rare opportunity to learn about and witness the transformative work of Marion Rosen here in New York. Details TBA. Please contact Julie Zweig at julieezweig@gmail.com to join a mailing list that will keep you apprised of the time and location of this event.

New Paltz, New York t (845) 255-3566

New Paltz, New York t (845) 255-3566 t julieezweig@gmail.com

w w w. R o s e n M e t h o d . o r g w w w. R o s e n M e t h o d . c o m

+PIO.$BSSPMM

whole living directory

Marisa Anderson

(800) 291-5576

Rosen Method Bodywork & Body-Centered Psychotherapy

(845) 679-7800

Conscious Bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ellen Ronis McCallum, LMT

Jessica Thayer, LLC

Julie Zweig, MA

MASSAGE

(845) 389-2302

LIFE COACHING

Julie Zweig, MA

H EALER, TEACHER, S PIRITUAL COUNSELOR â&#x20AC;&#x153;John is an extraordinary healer whom I have been privileged to know all my life and to work with professionally these last three years. His ability to use energy and imagery have changed as well as saved the lives of many of my patients. Miracles still do happen (with Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help).â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Richard Brown, M.D. Author, Stop Depression Now â&#x20AC;&#x153;John Carroll is a most capable, worthy, and excellent healer of high integrity, compassion, and love.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gerald Epstein, M.D. Author, Healing Visualizations

All levels of healing from chronic back problems to cancer.

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7/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

97


Dr. Amy Jo Davison

TAROT on the HUDSON with Rachel Pollack

internationally renowned Certified Tarot Grand Master & Award Winning Novelist

Monthly classes - Rhinebeck & NYC Lectures Workshops Private Consultations Mentoring in Tarot and Writing

Specializing in Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine Caring for infants, children, adolescents & adults Open Tuesday thru Saturday Call for an appointment 518-567-9977 197 County Route 10, Germantown, New York 12526

Telephone: 845-876-5797 rachel@rachelpollack.com www.rachelpollack.com

Tuesday Evenings New Paltz, New York

Facilitator: Amy Frisch, CSWR some insurances accepted space is limited

(845) 706-0229

whole living directory

for more information

A group designed especially for teenage girls focusing on issues of adolescence: relationships, school, dealing with parents, coping with teen stress, and more. Group sessions include expressive art activities - it‛s not all talk!

71 Main St. New Paltz

Yoga for Kids Wednesdays 11:30am-12:15pm July 9th-August 13th $66 for 6 week session See our web-site or call for details

FACIALS • WAXING • SKINCARE

Classes for All Levels Offered 7 Days a Week UPCOMING AT SATYA YOGA CENTER

Very Beginner Yoga Series Sundays, July 13 Ð August 3 12:30Ð1:30 pm, $65/series

Teacher Training Orientation

T H E

Sun., August 3, 4:00 pm, or Wed., August 6, 7:45 pm

B O D Y STU D I O

www.thebodystudionewpaltz.com 845-255-3512

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WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Healing Chod with Dungse Rigdzih Dorje Rinpoche & the monks and nuns of Zangdokpalri Saturday & Sunday, July 19Ð20 2:30Ð4:00 pm & 4:30Ð6:30 pm each day $195, includes both days

Satya Yoga Center 6400 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY 845.876.2528 satyayogacenter @ gmail.com

www.satyayogacenter.us

Satya Yoga Center/Upstate Yoga, LLC is a Registered Yoga Alliance School


Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 www.apteraromatherapy.com japter@ulster.net Offering luxurious massage therapy, including Raindrop Technique, with therapeutic essential oils to relieve stress, boost the immune system, and address system imbalances. Natural animal care, individual consultations for a healthy home and personal concerns, spa consultant, classes, and keynotes. Essential oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and home cleaning products from Young Living Essential Oils. For more information, contact Joan Apter. Madhuri Therapeutics â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bringing Health to Balance 69 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 797-4124 madhurihealing@optonline.net

Mid-Hudson Rebirthing Center (845) 255-6482 Sarah Samuels, LMT (845) 430-2266 Graduate of the Swedish Institute of Massage Therapy. Licensed and practicing since 2001. Specializing in Deep Tissue, Trigger Point, Swedish and Medical massage. Also available for corporate and event chair massage. Gift certificates available. Massage by appointment.

MEDIATION Kadampa Meditation Center 47 Sweeny Road, Glen Spey, NY (845) 856-9000 www.kadampaNewYork.org

Bless Your Hearth (845) 706-8447 Soundofspheres@aol.com Experienced, Professional, Non-Toxic Cleaning and Organizing Service. Pet Sitting. Home/Business Blessings. Excellent References.

NUTRITION COUNSELING Holly Anne Shelowitz, CNC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Director of Nourishing Wisdom Nutrition

(518) 678-3154 womanway@gmail.com Since the 1970s Jennifer has been actively involved in childbirth. She is an expert in preserving natural birth and has attended over 3,000 births in hospitals, high-risk medical centers, birth centers, and homes. She is uniquely qualified to provide women with personal, safe, and supportive pregnancy and birth care in their homes. Certified Nurse Midwife and NYS licensed with excellent medical backup.

Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;ÂŤiÂ&#x153;ÂŤÂ?iĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â?`Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;>Â?Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x152;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x203A;Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;LÂ?Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; VÂ?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?i>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;L>Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;v

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(845) 687-9666 www.nourishingwisdom.com In addition to private sessions, our programs include cooking classes, teaching tangible ways to incorporate nourishing foods into your life. Shopping trips to natural food stores and local farms are part of our work together, as well as telephone classes and retreats. For the most effective and supportive nutrition counseling you will ever experience, call us or visit us online. Long-distance telephone clients welcome. Jill Malden, RD, LMSW 1 Water Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 489-4732 Prominent Nutritionist specializing in eating behavior and eating disorders for 15 years. Warm, nonjudgmental treatment. Understand the effects of nutrition on your mood, anxiety level, cravings, concentration, energy level, and sleep, in addition to body weight. Recover from your eating issues and enjoy a full life! Vicki Koenig, MS, RD, CDN 7 Innis Avenue, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2398 www.Nutrition-wise.com Creating Wellness for individuals and businesses. Nutrition counseling: combining traditional and integrative solutions to enhance well-being. Corporate Wellness fairs, assessments, classes, and programs for businesses wanting to improve employee productivity. Providing help with diabetes, cardiovascular conditions, weight loss, digestive support, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health, and pediatric nutrition. Call for an appointment.

MIDWIFERY Jennifer Houston, Midwife

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OSTEOPATHY Osteopathy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joseph Tieri, DO, and Ari Rosen, DO 138 Market Street, Rhinebeck (845) 876-1700 3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge (845) 687-7589 www.stoneridgehealingarts.com Drs. Tieri and Rosen are New York State Licensed Osteopathic physicians specializing in Cranial Osteopathy. As specialists in Osteopathic manipulation, we are dedicated to the traditional

7ITH THE GROWING AWARENESS OF THE EFFECT THAT FOOD HAS ON HEALTH AND WELL BEING THERE IS A GREAT DEMAND FOR CULINARY PROFESSIONALS WHO CAN PREPARE FOOD THAT IS NOT ONLY BEAUTIFUL AND DELICIOUS BUT HEALTH SUPPORTIVE AS WELL /UR COMPREHENSIVE #HEFS 4RAINING 0ROGRAM THE ONLY ONE OF ITS KIND IN THE WORLD OFFERS PREPARATION FOR CAREERS IN HEALTH SPAS AND RESTAURANTS BAKERIES PRIVATE COOKING CATERING TEACHING CONSULTING FOOD WRITING AND A VARIETY OF ENTREPRENEURIAL PURSUITS 0LEASEBROWSEOURWEBSITETOSEEHOWMUCHWECANOFFERYOU

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In ROSENDALE

Conscious Body

whole living directory

Whether your goal is to relieve stress and pain, address a health concern, or simply to pamper yourselfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;our tranquil healing space in downtown New Paltz offers individualized sessions to nourish and repair body, mind, and spirit. Licensed Massage Therapy, Therapeutic Yoga, Flower Essences, Ayurvedic treatments and products, and master-level Reiki; all-natural and organic oils, herbs, and body products; 15 years experience. Alice Velky LMT, RYT.

NON-TOXIC CLEANING SERVICES

Pilates Massage DreamCrafting Authentic Movement

NYC Trained Ulster County Prices Conscious Body is dedicated to helping you achieve and maintain a strong healthy body, a dynamic mind and a vibrant spirit. Come visit our beautiful new studio where perceptive, knowledgeable and experienced instructors will help you achieve your goals, no matter your age or physical abilities. For more information, call 845-658-8400 or visit our website at www.consciousbodyonline.com

426 Main Street, Rosendale 7/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

99


philosophy and hands-on treatment of our predecessors. We have studied with Robert Fulford, DO, Viola Freyman, DO, James Jealous, DO, and Bonnie Gintis, DO, and completed a two-year residency in Osteopathic Manipulation. We treat newborns, children, and adults. By Appointment. For more information call or visit the website.

ceives detailed attention to his/her needs while maintaining the energizing flow of the pilates system. Hours are flexible enough to accommodate any schedule.

PSYCHICS Psychically Speaking (845) 626-4895 or (212) 714-8125

PASTORAL COUNSELING Lifepath (845) 657-9835 www.lifepathtransformations.com

PHYSICIANS Amy Davison D.O., LLC

www.psychicallyspeaking.com gail@psychicallyspeaking.com Psychic Consultations by Gail Petronio, internationally renowned psychic. Over 20 years experience. It is my sincere hope to offer my intuitive abilities and insights as a means to provide awareness of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life and destiny. Sessions are conducted in person or by telephone.

205 Old Route 9, Fishkill, NY (518) 567-9977

PSYCHOLOGISTS Integrated Health Care for Women Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 485-7168

whole living directory

Dr. Jemiolo is board certified in Family Practice and certified by the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis. She has 25 years experience in patient care. She offers group sessions in meditation as well as individual treatment of stress-related illness. Sessions are designed to teach self-help tools based on mindfulness based stress reduction, guided imagery, Twelve Steps, Reiki and Qigong. Her individual practice combines traditional medical practice with an integrative approach in an effort to decrease dependency on medication.

applied kinesiology t acupressure t t soft tissue therapy t t cranial sacral therapy t facial rejuvination t t

t pain t sinusitus t stress reduction t t stomach/gastrointestinal distress t t GYN disorders t fertility t

Dreamwork Sandplay Art Therapy

100

WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Licensed psychologist. Doctorate in clinical psychology, post-doctoral training focused on adolescents and young adults, post-graduate candidate for certification in adult psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Offering psychotherapeutic work for adults and adolescents. Additional opportunity available for intensive, supervised psychoanalytic treatment at substantial fee reduction for appropriate individual.

Conscious Body

Amy R. Frisch, CSWR

426 Main Street, Rosendale, NY

New Paltz, NY

(845) 658-8400

(845) 706-0229

Husband and wife team Ellen and Tim Ronis McCallum are dedicated to helping you achieve and maintain a strong healthy body, a dynamic mind, and a vibrant spirit. We are perceptive, experienced, and certified instructors who would love to help you achieve your goals whatever your age or level of fitness. Private and semi private apparatus and mat classes available. Visit our studio on Main Street in Rosendale. Moving Body 276 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-7715 www.themovingbody.com Pilates of New Paltz

Michelle Rhodes LMSW ATR-BC 845-255-8039 deepclay@mac.com www.deepclay.com

(845) 380-0023

PSYCHOTHERAPY

Ellen@consciousbodyonline.com

Psychotherapy

Located across from Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY

PILATES

www.consciousbodyonline.com

Deep Clay

Emily L. Fucheck, Psy.D.

12 North Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0559 www.pilatesnewpaltz.com This studio offers caring, experienced, and certified instruction with fully equipped faciliti es. Each student re-

Psychotherapist. Individual, family, and group sessions for adolescents and adults. Currently accepting registration for Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Girl Thing: an expressive arts therapy group for adolescent girls, and The Healing Circle: an adult bereavement group offering a safe place to begin the healing process after the death of a loved one. Most insurances accepted. Debra Budnik, CSW-R New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4218 Traditional insight-oriented psychotherapy for long- or short-term work. Aimed at identifying and changing self-defeating attitudes and behaviors, underlying anxiety, depression, and relationship problems. Sliding scale, most insurances accepted including Medicare/Medicaid. NYS-licensed. Experience working with trauma victims, including physical and sexual abuse. Educator on mental health topics. Located in New Paltz, one mile from SUNY.


Deep Clay (845) 255-8039 www.deepclay.com deepclay@mac.com Michelle Rhodes LMSW ATR-BC. Short-term counseling and in-depth psychoanalytic arts-based psychotherapy. Activates creative imagination to enhance healing and problem solving for life transitions, bereavement, trauma, and dissociative disorders. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group and individual studio sessions. Children, adults, and teens. Irene Humbach, LCSW, PC (845) 485-5933 Body of Wisdom Counseling & Healing Services. See also Body-Centered Therapy directory. Judy Swallow, MA, LCAT,TEP

erson Resort & Spa. A place just minutes from Woodstock offering the comforting sense that one is no longer part of the outside world. The new Spa, with 10 beautifully designed treatment rooms, celebrates the old-world traditions of India and the Orients with Ayurvedic rituals and Japanese and Chinese therapies. Modern spa-goers will also appreciate more wellknown treatments like Swedish, sports, and deep tissue massage, manicures, facials, and body wraps. Individuallytailored treatments are created by the experienced therapists who are skilled at delivering virtually all the Emerson Spaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 40+ treatments. Spend the day enjoying the Spaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hot tubs, steam showers, sauna, resistance pool, cardio equipment, yoga/meditation room and relaxation area... all included with your Spa visit. Day spa appointments available.

25 Harrington Street, New Paltz, NY

River Rock Health Spa

Integrative body/mind therapist using Rubenfeld synergy and psychodrama in her work with individuals, couples, groups, and families. Inquire for workshops and training, as well as therapy.

62 Ricks Road, Woodstock, NY

Kent Babcock, MSW, LMSW â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Counseling & Psychotherapy (845) 679-5511, ext. 304

K. Melissa Waterman, LCSW-R Dooley Square, 35 Main Street, #333, Poughkeepsie, NY, Just off the Train 464-8910 and 452-0884 (845) 464-8910 http://therapist.psychologytoday. com/52566

SKIN CARE Body Studio, The (845) 255-3512

www.riverrock.biz bmr@ureach.com Your day retreat for rebalancing and rejuvenation. Guests rave: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to live here!â&#x20AC;? AR, New Paltz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the best spaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the world. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been to many.â&#x20AC;? SN, Portland. Guests are nurtured and pampered by large staff and luxurious state-of-the-art spa. Massage, facials, body scrubs/wraps, waxing, and more.

New dimensions of well-being tIntegrated Energy Therapy tHomeopathy tYoga & Relaxation Techniques tReiki

Marnie McKnight-Favell /PSUI"WFOVFt#FBDPO /: tXXXESBHPOnZIPMJTUJDDPN

SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY Patricia Lee Rode, M.A. CCC-SLP (646) 729-6633

whole living directory

Development of solutions through simple self-observation, reflection, and conversation. Short- or long-term work around difficult relationships; life or career transitions; ethical, spiritual, or psychic dilemmas; and creative hurdles. Roots in yoga, dreamwork, spiritual psychology, and existential psychotherapy. Sliding scale.

(845) 679-7800

Dragonfly Holistic llc

Speech Language Pathologist with ten years experience providing diagnostic/ therapeutic services for children/adults with speech/language delays and neurological disorders. Specializing in Autistic Spectrum Disorders, PDD, ADHD, Apraxia, memory and language related disorders. Trained in P.R.O.M.P.T., and Hippotherapy. Offer individual therapy and social skills groups. Offices in NYC/ Rhinebeck.

www.thebodystudionewpaltz.com

SPAS & RESORTS Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa 220 North Road Milton, NY 12547 877-7-INN-SPA (845-795-1301) www.buttermilkfallsinn.com www.buttermilkspa.com Located on 75 acres overlooking the Hudson River. Brand new full service geothermal and solar spa. Organic products, pool, sauna and steam room. Hiking trails, gardens, waterfalls, peacock aviary. Emerson Resort & Spa (845) 688-1000 www.emersonresort.com There is a Silk Road running through the Hudson Valley. Introducing the new Em-

SPIRITUAL Healing, Pathwork & Channeling by Flowing Spirit Guidance (845) 679-8989 www.flowingspirit.com It is our birthright to experience the abundance of the universe, the deep love of God, and our own divinity! It is also our birthright to share our own unique gifts with the world. We long to do it. So why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we? Our imperfections get in the way. As we purify, we experience more and more fully the love and the abundance of Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s universe. We can have it in any moment. We can learn to purify our imperfections AND experience heaven on earth. Jaffe Institute Spiritual Healing; Pathwork and Channeling available. Contact Joel Walzer for sessions. 7/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

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SWIM LESSONS

Integrative Health Care for Women Group Meditation and Individual Treatment Stress-related illness, chronic pain, anxiety/depression, insomnia, phobia, weight and smoking. Using traditional medical practice, clinical hypnosis, and meditative energy healing. Kristen Jemiolo, MD American Board of Family Medicine, Diplomate American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, Certification Poughkeepsie (845) 485-7168

Total Immersion Swim Studio 246 Main Street, Suite 15A, New Paltz, NY (845)255-4242 www.totalimmersion.net

TAROT

Rhinebeck, NY

www.jmyoga.com

(845) 876-5797

Established in 1999, Jai Ma Yoga Center offers a wide array of Yoga classes, seven days a week. We offer classes for every level of student. Our classes are in the lineages of Anusara, Iyengar, and Sivananda, with certified and experienced instructors. Private consultations and Anusara Therapeutics available. Owners Gina Bassinette, RYT and Ami Hirschstein, RYT have been teaching locally since 1995.

rachel@rachelpollack.com Exploratory, experiential play with the Tarot as oracle and sacred tool, in a monthly class, with Certified Tarot Grand Master and international Tarot author Rachel Pollack. All levels welcome. Tarot Readings in person or by phone.

(845) 679-7979 www.meatfreezone.org

whole living directory

andy@meatfreezone.org

m.s.,l.aC.

Kingston (914) 388-7789

The single most important step an individual can take to help save the planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s precious resources, improve and protect oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health, and stop the senseless slaughter of over 50 billion animals a year...is to Go Vegan. What could make you feel better about yourself than knowing you are helping the planet, your own health, and the lives of countless animals all at the same time? If the idea is daunting and seems undoable to you, then let your personal Vegan Lifestyle Coach take you through steps A to Z. Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a cattle rancher eating meat three times a day or a lacto-vegetarian wanting to give up dairy, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a process that can be fun, easy, and meaningful. You can do it easily with the proper support, guidance, and encouragement from your Vegan Lifestyle Coach.

YOGA Ashtanga Yoga of New Paltz 71 Main Street, New Paltz

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102

WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/08

69 Main Street, Suite 201, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-0465

Andrew Glickâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Vegan Lifestyle Coach

dylana accolla

Jai Ma Yoga Center

Tarot-on-the-Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Rachel Pollack

VEGAN LIFESTYLES

C LASSICAL A CUPUNCTURE & C HINESE H ERBS

Standing poses are emphasized: building strong legs, increased general vitality, and improved circulation, coordination and balance. 12 years teaching yoga, 20 years practicing. 12 trips to India. Extensive training with the Iyengar family.

Satya Hudson Valley Yoga Center Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2528 www.satyayogarhinebeck.com Satya Hudson Valley Yoga Center is located in the heart of Rhinebeck village, on the third floor of the Rhinebeck Department Store building. We offer classes for all levels, 7 days a week. There is no need to pre-register: we invite you to just show up. The Living Seed 521 Main Street (Rte. 299, across from Econo Lodge), New Paltz, NY (845) 255-8212 www.thelivingseed.com Open to the community for over 5 years. Inspiring movements of inner freedom and awareness. We offer Yoga classes for all levels of students, gentle/beginner to advanced. Including pre- and post-natal yoga, family and kids yoga, as well as a variety of dance classes, massage, acupuncture, sauna, and organic yoga clothing. Wen Barn & Gardens Accord, NY

(845) 430-7402

679-9441

www.ashtangaofnewpaltz.com

www.wenbarn.com

Offering Ashtanga / Vinyasa style yoga classes for all levels seven days a week. This style of yoga is both therapeutic and dance-like. By first warming up the body naturally we can stretch safely, gaining an understanding of how to move from our core. We also offer â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community Yoga classesâ&#x20AC;? which are by donation.

Open May 17-October 13. Practice yoga, meditation, and Yoga As Muse in the rustic, open-air WEN Barn to the sounds of songbirds and falling water. Caring teachers, 6 days a week. Community Yoga, Monday evening. Special 2-hour indoor-outdoor yoga/meditation class, Saturday morning. Workshops in permaculture and herbalism, non-violent communication, and more. Jeff Davis, member of the national Green Yoga Association., and Hillary Thing, an herbalist developing WENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s medicinal teaching gardens, co-steward WEN. Skin Care.

Barbara Borisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Woodstock Iyengar Yoga Mt. View Studio, Woodstock (845) 679-3728 www.barbaraborisyoga.com bxboris@yahoo.com The Iyengar method develops strength, endurance, and correct body alignment in addition to flexibility and relaxation.

Body Studio, The (845) 255-3512 www.thebodystudionewpaltz.com


A SUMMER OF FUN AWAITS AT YMCA DAY CAMPS!

CAMP SEEWACKAMANO Located in Shokan, NY. Monday-Friday (Phone: 845-338-3810 OR 845-657-8288)

CAMP WILTMEET Located at Camp Epworth in High Falls, NY. Monday-Friday (Phone: 845 255-2107) Fax (845-256-0327)

or visit us on the web at

www.ymcaulster.org

Acupuncture by M.D.

Vans

whole living directory

FOR MORE INFO CALL (845) 338-3810

DISTIBUTION & DELIVERY

Hoon J. Park, MD, P.C. Board Cer tified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation "VUPBOE+PC*OKVSJFTt"SUISJUJTt4USPLFTt/FDL#BDLBOE+PJOU1BJOt$BSQBM5VOOFM4ZOESPNF

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298-6060 4PVUI3PBE 8BQQJOHFST'BMMT /: ½ mile south of Galleria Mall

MOST INSURANCE ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICARE, NO FAULT, AND WORKER’S COMPENSATION

CHRONOGRAM IS EVERYWHERE Your publication, brochure, or catalog can be too.

Distribute to over 900 locations in the Greater Hudson Valley. We can help you achieve the peace and ease of movement you are searching for in your body, in your mind, and in your spirit. CranioSacral Therapy, Energy Healing, Therapeutic Massage, Advanced Myofascial Techniques & Health Kinesiology are available to assist you with finding health. You take care of your car, why not take care of the primary vehicle that gets you through life —YOU!

Hudson Valley Therapeutic Massage 243 Main St., Suite 220 Michele Tomasicchio, LMT, Owner New Paltz, NY 12561 Katie Hoffstatter, LMT (845) 255-4832 / hvtm@hvc.rr.com M-F: 8:30am - 7pm Sat: 9am - 3pm

Ask about our special delivery service! Contact Jason Stern 845.334.8621 | chronovans@chronogram.com CALL TODAY AND GET OUR SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER:

10% OFF YOUR FIRST 3 MONTHS* *with one year commitment

7/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

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LIFE TRANSITIONS AND CHANGE support for women INTERNATIONAL HEALER - PRISCILLA BRIGHT, MA 26 years experience | Opening your energy system & clearing blocks DEEP INTUITIVE TRANSFORMATION WORK t3FMBUJPOTIJQT%JWPSDF t$BSFFST$SFBUJWF-POHJOHT t)FBMUI-JGF$IBMMFOHFT School Dean - Barbara Brennan School of Healing MA Health Behavior - Boston U. School of Medicine ,JOHTUPO/:oQBSLJOHPOTJUF]'SFFQIPOFDPOTVMUBUJPOo  

Patricia Lee Rode, M.A. CCC-SLP speech language pathologist Rhinebeck/NYC

646.729.6633

whole living directory

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Helping People Get Healthy - Naturallyâ&#x20AC;? Organic CafĂŠ and Juice Bar and Natural Health Food Store t'VMMMJOFBQPUIFDBSZ tɨFSBQFVUJDUFBT t4VQQMFNFOUT WJUBNJOT IFSCT minerals, tinctures, proteins...) t'PPEGPSTQFDJBMEJFUBSZOFFET (gluten free, wheat free...)

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130 Dolson Ave., Middletown, NY 10940 (EXIT 3W I-84, LEFT AT 4TH LIGHT) t'BY www.pleasantstonefarm.com

Offering a holistic approach to children and adults with speech language developmental delays and neurological disorders. Specializing in autistic spectrum disorders, PDD, ADHD, auditory and phonological processing, apraxia, selective mutism and memory dysfunction. Individual and Social Skills Groups.

speech therapy from the heart â?¤

private t semi-private t mat

          

Fully equipped Pilates studio Ask about our package specials

PILATES OF NEW PALTZ Elise Bacon, Director CertiďŹ ed Instructor Since 1987 12 North Chestnut Street New Paltz NY 12561 Phone: 845.255.0559

Judy Swallow MA, LCAT, TEP

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25 Harrington St, New Paltz NY 12561 (845) 255-5613 104

WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Monarda Herbal Apothecary Annual Herbal Classes Beginning Every Spring.

Monarda Offers: Full Herbal Products Line, Certified Organic Alcohol Tinctures, Private Consultations.

www.monarda.net Thank you for supporting local herbalists. Amy ColĂłn, Herbalist

845-339-2562

48 Cutler Hill Road Eddyville, NY 12401


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whole living directory

IRENE HUMBACH, LCSW, PC OямГces in New Paltz & Poughkeepsie (845) 485-5933

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7/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

105


We opened to support the local community.

HF

Now we thank the local community for supporting our opening.

High Falls

W Wonderland

What a success!

a creative arts playground

Performing Arts Summer Program Ages 11 - 18 (2 groups)

Thank You! Thank You! Thank You!

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HIGH FALLS WONDERLAND

(3) Two Week Sessions

Thank you for attending, volunteering and performing!

A variety of spaces are available for most

BSP

Thank you for your sponsorship!

Multimedia Functions

If you are interested in rehearsing, speaking, singing, dancing, teaching, performing, or volunteering at our space, please contact Richard Murphy, Patty Curry, or Eva Tenuto at

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www.highfallswonderland.com http://www.myspace.com/highfallswonderland wonders@wonderland.com

845-687-4161 BACKSTAGE STUDIO PRODUCTIONS

Daniela Passal Galleries Literary & Arts Foundation

845.338.8700 | 323 Wall Street, Uptown Kingston teri@backstagestudios.net

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Music every weekend

Bearsville Theater

“committed to bringing music back to Woodstock”

Wickets & Wine

EVERY WEDNESDAY

Jack Grace Band with SURPRISE Guests!

MOST THURSDAYS

Karaoke with Miss Angie

BEARSVILLE THEATER Moon Boot Lover

Wine and Croquet on the lawn of the 1894 Deyo House Historic Huguenot Street

Saturday July 5 Friday July 11

Purple k’niF’s Summer Surf Twist Party

Friday, July 18th, 5:30pm Saturday, August 30th, 4pm

Friday July 18

JOHN HAMMOND with Bruce Katz

Friday July 25

Austin to Woodstock Concert Series:

$5 per person Space is limited. Register at 845.255.1660 or register@huguenotstreet.org

Thursday July 10 Kelleigh McKenzie CD Release Party

JIMMIE DALE GILMORE

Saturday July 26

18 Broadhead Street, New Paltz (btw Huguenot & Chestnut Streets)  www.huguenotstreet.org

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/08

80’s Underground Dance Party

with DJ’s Anthony Molina and Grasshopper of Mercury Rev

TODD RUNDGREN Back to Bearsville Wednesday-Thursday July 30-31

Monday July 28

PHOEBE SNOW live album recording

No experience necessary . . . Just the desire to have fun!

106

✶ Independence Day DJ Dance Party

Friday July 4

Returning to Bearsville Theater in August:

James Hunter, Robbie Dupree, Pat Metheny, Jack Dejohnette and Larry Grenadier Full Bar, Streamside Lounge, Gourmet Dining at

The Bear Cafe! 2 miles west of Woodstock on Rt. 212....

Tickets (845) 679-4406 •

www.bearsvilletheater.com


EVENT LISTINGS FOR JULY 2008

the forecast

IMAGES PROVIDED

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Highlights from the Berkshire Fringe Festival: Jessica Cerullo in “Miracle Tomato”; Under the Table Ensemble in “The Only Friends We Have”; Alexandra Beller in “US”; Arthur Collins in “The Chosen One”; Beth Allen in “Rock That Uke”

A MOP, AN AMERICAN FLAG, A SEX DOLL, AND A BEDBUG ROBOT MTV and special effects have transformed movies. We now accept a trampoline filled with snails as “visual art.” But theater has barely evolved since Arthur Miller and “Camelot.” Why is this? Actually, theater has changed considerably, but most of the theater audience doesn’t know it yet. Actors are writing their own shows, combining music, and chanting with traditional acting. Video and computers are now tools of drama. But largely for financial reasons, most theaters present the greatest hits of the past 50 years. The Berkshire Fringe, now in its fourth year, is different. The festival will offer six genre-bending theater works from July 16 to August 4 on the campus of Bard College at Simon’s Rock in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Under the Table Theater is a three-person, Brooklyn-based ensemble that studied at the Dell’arte International School of Physical Theater in Blue Lake, California. Dell’arte specializes in training “actor-creators.” Under the Table’s piece, “The Only Friends We Have,” was developed through improv and draws on the performers’ clown training. This “antisocial comedy” has both a script and slapstick motifs.” It’s a window into the lives of three friends who are all eccentric characters, and their tangled relationships,” explains Sarah Petersiel, a troupe member. “And it’s about negotiating desire, fear, and infestation.” The infestation refers to bedbugs. Why bedbugs? “That aspect does come from our lived experience,” Petersiel says. “Josh and I, in two different apartments, had bedbugs. We no longer do; we’re survivors. So we have a lot to say about the neurosis, the exhaustion, the paranoia, the fascination that sets in when you have bedbugs.” Under the Table has been developing the piece for a year and a half, and this is its premiere. “The Only Friends We Have” will include a puppet and a remote-controlled robot, both in the shape of bedbugs.

Alexandra Beller’s one-woman show “US” is a political statement involving an American flag, a sex doll, and a mop. “I deal with my relationship with the country through these three objects, and the objects become different things to me: lovers, enemies, parental figures,” Beller recounts. “The flag becomes a burqa, a gun, a dress, a picnic blanket, a jump rope. I deal with issues of homophobia and gay marriage through the mop, because it’s one of those raghead mops that looks a little like a woman if you stand it upside down.” “US” uses a central stage surrounded by the audience on four sides. “It feels like I’m in a boxing ring,” says Beller. Alexandra Beller performed with the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company for six years. She has her own troupe in Brooklyn, for which she choreographs. Every Fringe show has at least one audience discussion, and some have conversations after each performance. Often informal discussions will arise in the lobby afterwards, as well. Audiences are pleased to learn that performers are curious about their reactions. When you walk out of “Grease,” you’re humming the songs. Walking out of a Fringe show, you may be humming the discussion. One of the goals of the festival is accessibility. Many young people and local workers can’t easily afford theater today. “:30 Live!” is a series of free music concerts preceding performances. These include music by Itsnotyouitsme, an electric violin/electric guitar duo, and Newspeak, a five-piece chamber music/rock hybrid with Orwellian lyrics. Audiences pay close attention to these musical shows—this isn’t “background music.” For the first time, the festival will also include a film series, on Fridays. The Berkshire Fringe will take place July 16 through August 4 at Bard College at Simon’s Rock in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 320-4175. www.berkshirefringe.org. —Sparrow

7/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

107


TUESDAY 1 JULY ART Camp Art Omi Call for times. Art Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4568.

CLASSES

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visit our web site or call for fall course schedule

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Interpreting the Landscape Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Rhythm Tap Dance Classes 5:30pm. Introduction to the art of sound and movement taught by Stefanie Weber. $50 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 281-6734.

Mike Jackson Quintet 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198.

Chess Review 2pm-4pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

Summerstage Nova Through 7/12. Theater camp for ages 7-12. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival Call for times. Cymbeline. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-on-Hudson. 265-3638.

Triumph dealer for over 50 years!

www.TriumphMotorcycles.com

108

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Life Drawing 7pm. No materials or instructor provided, just a live model. $4 to $8. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 499-9348. Hustle Dance Class 7:30pm. $15/class. Strictly Ballroom, Balmville. 569-0530.

DANCE

WORKSHOPS

Lar Lubovitch Dance Company 8pm. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

ART Watercolor Painting 9am-12pm. $220/8 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company Call for times. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Muddy Lindy 8pm-10pm. Kingstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Casual Swing Stomp. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881. Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company 8:15pm. $45. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

FILM All For Free Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

MUSIC

Figurative Clay Sculpture 1pm-4pm. $166/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877.

Drawing for Painting 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Jazz Pioneers 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198.

Drawing, Painting and Composition 6pm-9pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Chicago and The Doobie Brothers 7pm. $40.50-$75. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Beginner Pilates Mat Workout 6:30pm-7:30pm. $119. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Open Mike 7:30pm-9:30pm. Joshuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Java Lounge, Woodstock. 679-5533.

Summer Easy Menu 6:30pm-8:30pm. $35/$30 in advance/$25 former clients/current clients free. Call for location. 231-2470.

Lake George Opera 7:30pm. The Pirates of Penzance. $50-$80. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

DANCE

Greater Ellenville Jazz Trio 8pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000.

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company Call for times. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. New York Theatre Ballet 6:30pm. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Go your own way

Broadway/Regional Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Beginning acting class for adults, and teens. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154.

Donna Scro Gentile/Freespace Dance 6:30pm. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

CLASSES

600 Violet Ave. Dealer Tag (Route 9-G) Dealer Tag Hyde Park, NY, 12538 Dealer Tag (845) 454-6210 eds-service.com

THURSDAY 3 JULY

Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival Call for times. Twelfth Night. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-on-Hudson. 265-3638.

Tonalism and Color in Oil 7pm-9pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

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Tudor and Limn at 100 5pm. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Scene study/technique. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154.

WEDNESDAY 2 JULY

Thruxton One hot cafe racer

SPOKEN WORD

Nature Strollers 10am. Hiking group for families with babies, toddlers, and young children. Hudson Highlands Nature Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall-onHudson. 534-5506 ext. 204.

Painting the Landscape Indoors 1pm-4pm. John Creagh. $160. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

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Keith Prayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Soul Ensemble 9pm. Tessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

Drawing, Painting, and Composition 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Screenwriting Workshop Call for times. With Lisa Katzman. Call for location. (347) 200-1855.

The Thruxton is a modern cafe racer based on the hybrid specials that used to blast up and down British roads in the Sixties. It keeps faith with a single seat hump, upswept megaphones, rearset pegs, aluminum rims and ďŹ&#x201A;oating front disc. The tweaked 69bhp 865cc twin keeps you charged until the next espresso.

Brazilian Aire with David Temple 8pm. Brazilian rhythms and melodies. $18/$16 seniors and students. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

CLASSES

THEATER

First Fridays of the month, 8pm at Boughton Place, Kisor Road, Highland, NY. Call 845.691.4118 or 845.255.5613

Open Mike Night 7pm-9pm. Acoustic solos and duets. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739.

Summerstage Arts Intensive Through 7/12. Theater camp for ages 13-17. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

Community Music Night 8pm-9:45pm. Six local singer-songwriters. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048.

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Open Mike 7pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300.

Ulster CSI Camp Through 7/3. Ages 12-18. $229. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

MUSIC

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All For Free 7:30pm. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

EVENTS

Pond Life Explorers Camp Through 7/4. Ages 8-13. $135. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

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1776 7pm-9:15pm. Middletown Thrall Library, Middletown. 341-5454.

NCM Call for times. Punk, garage, alternative. Oasis Cafe, New Paltz. 255-2400.

Chess Mates Camp Through 7/3. Ages 8-10. $99. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

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FILM

MUSIC

KIDS

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Minnewaska Distance Swimmers Association Testing 5:30pm. $18/$15. Minnewaska State Park, New Paltz.

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company Call for times. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dancing! 8:30pm. Retrospective documentary from 1985. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

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Woodstock Farm Festival 4pm-8pm. Farm products, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, live music, and gardening advice. Maple Lane, Woodstock. 679-7618.

DANCE

FILM

Public shows, school programs and other events. www.hudsonriverplayback.org or call 845.255.7716

EVENTS

Lar Lubovitch Dance Company 8pm. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Vegitation 8pm. Roots reggae. $15. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394. The Locks 9pm. Acoustic with Eddie Fingerhut. The Red Brick Tavern, Rosendale. 658-8500. Long Neck Band 10pm. The Dubliner, Poughkeepsie. 454-7322.


THEATER WILLIAMSTOWN THEATER FESTIVAL CHARLES ERICKSON

The cast from Christopher Durang’s “Beyond Therapy,” directed by Alex Timbers, which was staged at the Williamstown Theater Festival in June.

A Tale of Two Brothers One could forgive Broadway director Thomas Kail for resting on his laurels. His hit musical “In the Heights,” a “Rent”-like fairy tale about inner-city kids with unshakable dreams, just was named Best Musical at the Tony Awards, and won in three other categories. But while the show continues to sell-out audiences at the Richard Rodgers Theater, this restless wunderkind (Kail is all of 30) is in rehearsals for a new play several degrees less giddy and candy-coated than his current project. “The best thing always is to go back to work,” Kail says. “That keeps us grounded.” “Broke-ology” will have its world premiere at the acclaimed Williamstown Theater Festival, opening on July 9 and running through July 20. “I really wanted to work on a straight play immediately after ‘Heights,’” Kail explained by telephone from New York City. “I didn’t know it would be the day after the Tonys [were announced].” This modern kitchen-sink drama by Nathan Louis Jackson was brought to Kail’s attention last November. It was a chaotic time for Kail: the scrappy, heart-on-the-sleeve “Heights” had just been plucked from a small off-Broadway venue and was being polished for its Broadway debut. He could easily have passed on the project, but “I responded very strongly,” he says. “I was struck by the thematic material.” The play concerns an African American family named King who have quietly suffered the radical and economic injustices of everyday life. Another test of their unity comes when the father falls ill and his two sons are summoned home. As they interact with the headstrong paterfamilias, family obligation joust with personal dreams. Kail recognized the universality of the story.

“It’s a play that exists in our world,” Kail says, “and there are liberties within that world that we will explore.” In Jackson’s text, Kail acknowledges echoes of the fatalistic tragedies crafted by Arthur Miller and Eugene O’Neill. But “Broke-ology” also breaks from tradition by offering “language and vocabulary that is not often heard in the theater.” The title refers to wrangling with omnipresent poverty. “It’s the study of being broke,” Kail said, “trying to make do without a lot in your pocket economically.” For director-of-the-moment Thomas Kail, the notion of overnight fame is risible; he worked on “In the Heights” for six years with composer-lyricist Lin-Manuel Miranda and playwright Quiara Alegría Hudes. But any memories of those difficult years are effectively pushed every time the curtain goes up. “The joy comes in that we do the show eight days a week,” he said. “I am constantly engaged and excited.” More proof of Kail’s red-hot status is his involvement in a fall remake of “The Electric Company,” the PBS kids' show from the early 1970s. He’s a coproducer and music director. But for now, Kail is immersed in “Broke-ology.” As for relocating from Manhattan to small-town western Massachusetts, Kail embraces his transient status. “We who are in the theater are constantly looking for a home—a place to put our bags down for the moment.” “Broke-ology” by Nathan Louis Jackson will be at the Williamstown Theater Festival in Williamstown, Massachusetts, from July 9 through July 20. (413) 597-3400; www.wtfestival.org. —Jay Blotcher 7/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

109


IMAGE PROVIDED

OPERA KING ROGER

A sketch of the set design for King Roger at Bard Summerscape.

A Different Type of Pole Dance Plots revolving around a gang of mountain bandits and a philosophy of erotic abandon may sound more like the makings of an upcoming episode of “Lost” than early 20thcentury opera. But, these are, in fact, thematic elements from two of the works this month at Bard SummerScape. Continuing its tradition of producing seldom performed theater and opera, SummerScape presents the opera King Roger (The Shepherd) and the ballet Harnasie by Karol Szymanowski—a friend of Sergei Prokofiev’s and the composer who is widely considered the father of modern Polish music. The performances are in conjunction with the Bard Music Festival’s celebration of “Prokofiev and His World.” King Roger (The Shepherd) was written in 1924 in collaboration with Jaroslaw Iwaszkiewicz after Szymanowski returned from Sicily, and is loosely based on an actual Sicilian potentate, Roger II. The opera premiered in Warsaw in 1926 to enormous critical acclaim though it is now rarely staged. The title character, played by baritone Adam Kriszewski, is a 12th-century Sicilian monarch who is being challenged by a mysterious shepherd who preaches the Dionysian thesis that the mysteries of divine 110

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/08

love and creative work can only be apprehended through sex. When the king confronts the shepherd, he experiences a sensual revelation. (A popular reading of King Roger is that the composer, a homosexual, used the work to push for tolerance of love outside of normal constraints.) Harnasie, a ballet-pantomime from 1931 inspired by the composer’s heightened interest in Polish folk music, will precede each performance of King Roger. Harnasie tells the story of a reluctant peasant bride who falls in love with Harnas, the leader of a gang of mountain bandits. The production will include tenor Tadeusz Szlenkier and the Wroclaw Opera Chorus. Szymanowski’s two largest works for the stage will be performed by the American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, under the design and direction of Lech Majewski. The productions will be sung in Polish with English supertitles, at the Sosnoff Theater at Bard College from Friday, July 25 through Sunday, August 3. (845) 758-7900; www.fishercenter.bard.edu. —Amy Lubinski


THE OUTDOORS An Evening at Beaver Pond Call for times. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320.

THEATER Sedation 8pm. By David Wiltse. $21-26. Shadowland Theater, Ellenville. 647-5511.

WORKSHOPS The Artist’s Way Part I 1pm-3pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

FRIDAY 4 JULY CLASSES Salsa Dance Class Call for times. $15/class. Strictly Ballroom, Balmville. 569-0530.

Merce Cunningham Dance Company 2pm. Dia: Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100. The School at Jacob’s Pillow: Cultural Traditions 7:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Lar Lubovitch Dance Company 8pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Kingston’s History Tour Call for times. 18th-century cooking, crafts, and games demonstrated by interpreters in period clothing, with guided and self tours. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786. Pakatakan Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326. Riverside Farmers and Artisians Market 10am-2pm. With live music. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-3400.

New York Export: Opus Jazz 4pm. Screening and discussion. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Rhythm Songs in Rhythm Tap 5pm-6pm. Beginner to advanced beginner jazz tap taught by Sherry Hains-Salerno. $12 . Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 663-7962.

KIDS

Feet of Rhythm 6:30pm. Afro-Haitian dancers and drummers. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Swing Dance 7pm. $10/$8 members. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Lar Lubovitch Dance Company 8pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Anniversary of the First in the Nation Call for times. Baseball and fireworks. Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, Newburgh. 562-1195. Bard Summerscape Call for times. Call for specific events—including music, theater, art. Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Crazy Sexy Cancer Boot Camp Call for times. $375-$340 members. Omega Institute, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001.

FILM Screening of Changing Steps 2pm. Dia: Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100.

MUSIC Aston Magna Concert Call for times. Music of the 17th and 18th centuries performed on period instruments. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7216. John Schrader Band 5pm. Rock. Steelhouse, Kingston. 338-7847. Metropolitan Hot Club 7pm-10pm. 1940’s style acoustic swing. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411. The Crossroads Band 9pm. Starr Alley, Rhinebeck. 876-2924.

THEATER Community Playback Theatre 8pm. Improvisations of audience stories. $6. Boughton Place, Highland. 691-4118. Evita 8pm. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s and Tim Rice’s hit Broadway musical. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. My Fair Lady 8pm. Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. 687-5263. Sedation 8pm. By David Wiltse. $21-$26. Shadowland Theater, Ellenville. 647-5511.

SATURDAY 5 JULY ART Michael Zelehoski 4pm-6pm. Solo exhibit of new work. Park Row Gallery, Chatham. (518) 392-4800. Unseen America 5pm-7pm. Photographs by workers. Kingston Museum of Contemporary Art, Kingston. Kmoca.org. 2008 Artist-in-Residence Ian Gordon 5pm-8pm. Trolley Museum, Kingston. 331-3399. Animals in Art 5pm-8pm. Paintings by Lucy DiMiceli, Fred Mitchell and Clayton Buchanan and photo images by Sue Aikin and Don Fowler. Hudson Valley Gallery, Cornwall. 534-5278. Paper. 6pm-8pm. Featuring works on paper by seven artists from New York, Massachusetts and Louisiana. Sharada Gallery, Rhinebeck. 876-4828.

The Daily Telegraph, (U.K.)

FILM

Printmaking 9am-12pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

DANCE

Hofesh Shechter Company 7/9-13 "Instantly, you're hooked"

JACOB’S PILLOW DANCE

Dog on Fleas 11am. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

MUSIC The People’s Open Mike 8pm. Peint o Gwrw Tavern, Chatham. (518) 392-2943. Dog on Fleas 11am. $6-$9. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Spuyten Duyvil 2pm. Folk. Taste Budd’s Chocolate and Coffee Cafe, Red Hook. 758-6500. Hurley Mountain Highway 5pm. Pop. Pamela’s on The Hudson, Newburgh. 562-4505. Mark Raisch 6pm-9:30pm. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411. La Traviata 7:30pm. $50-$80. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. An Evening with Rush—Snakes and Arrows Tour 8pm. $95-$35. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Belleayre Festival Orchestra 8pm. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344. The 2008 Woodstock Beat 8pm. A benefit concert for the Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild Canadian group Nexus and special guest Peter Schickele. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. Chopin: Poet of the Human Soul 8pm. $18. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Catskill. (518) 263-2066. Chopin: Poet of the Human Soul 8pm. Pleshakov Piano Museum, Hunter. (518) 263-3333. Bearfoot: Bluegrass and Country Rising Stars 8:30pm. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. 255-1559. Haitian Rhythms Evoke Love and Struggle 9pm. African, Latin and Haitian voodoo rhythms. $12. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington. (413) 528-0248. The Sad Little Stars 9pm. $10. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Memphis Soul 9pm. Rhythm & blues, Motown, jazz. Starr Alley, Rhinebeck. 876-2924. Deep Chemistry 10pm. The Firebird Lounge, Rhinebeck. 876-8686.

THE OUTDOORS Canoe Trip to Buckley Dunton Lake 9am-12pm. $20/$15 members. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320. Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables Hike: Undercliff/Overcliff 9am-12pm. Meet at the West Trapps Trailhead, New Paltz. 255-0919. How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

THEATER Evita 8pm. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s and Tim Rice’s hit Broadway musical. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. My Fair Lady 8pm. Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. 687-5263. Sedation 8pm. By David Wiltse. $21.00 - $26.00. Shadowland Theater, Ellenville. 647-5511. The Owl and the Pussycat 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. Basilica Industria, Hudson. (518) 828-0131.

WORKSHOPS

DANCE

Photographing the Nude in Nature 10am-4pm. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company 2:15pm. $45. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Beginning/Intermediate Oil Painting 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Extreme Ballet 12pm. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5107.

Beginning Drawing 1pm-3pm. With Shawn Dell Joyce. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Ballet Boyz 7/16-20 "Simply exquisite" The Herald (Scotland)

Alonzo King's LINES Ballet 7/23-27 "LINES looked stunning…focused, passionate, and in command." San Francisco Chronicle

Mimulus 7/30-8/3 "Infectious wit and energy" The New York Times

www.jacobspillow.org 413.243.0745 Hofesh Shecter; photo Carl Fox

Since 1976

RHINEBECK ANTIQUES FAIR “Summer Magic”

32 years 1976

2008

Presented by Bruce Garrett

JULY 26

Saturday Only 10-5

RhinebeckAntiquesFair.com Admission $7 This ad admits two at $6 each

ENTIRELY INDOORS ON THE DUTCHESS COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS RAIN OR SHINE! Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY FREE PARKING DELIVERY SERVICE FOOD COURT

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111


SUNDAY 6 JULY ART New Work by Judith Hoyt 1pm-3pm. Be Gallery, High Falls. 687-0660.

CLASSES The Hudson: Cradle of Culture and Elegance Call for times. Elderhostel Program. Mount Gulian Historic Site, Beacon. 831-8172. Atelier-Figure Painting 9am-12pm. $120-$300. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

DANCE

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EVENTS 15 Anniversary Party Call for times. Giant Cajun barbecue. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900.

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THE OUTDOORS Canoe Trip to Buckley Dunton Lake 9am-12pm. $20/$15 members. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320.

SPOKEN WORD

My Fair Lady 3pm. Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. 687-5263.

TUESDAY 8 JULY CLASSES Rhythm Tap Dance Classes 5:30pm. Introduction to the art of sound and movement taught by Stefanie Weber. $50 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 281-6734.

Lake George Opera 2pm. The Pirates of Penzance. $50-$80. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. The Summer Sunset Concert Series 5:30pm. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200. The Daryl Hall Band 7pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100. Blues Jam 7:30pm. Ciboney Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 486-4690.

DANCE All Robbins 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

EVENTS Chess Review 2pm-4pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

FILM

THE OUTDOORS

Dirty Dancing 8:30pm. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

KIDS

Walk the Huguenot Path 10am. $5. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

Taconic Hills Summer Enrichment Program Through 7/31. four weekly session for kindergarten through 7th grade. $40/week. Taconic Hills Performing Arts Center, Craryville. (518) 325-0447. Illuminated Art with Greylock Arts 10am-11:30am. MassMoCA, North Adams, Massachusetts. (413) 662-2111.

MUSIC La Traviata 2pm. $50-$80. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

WORKSHOPS

NCM 8pm. Punk, garage, alternative. Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

IWT Writing Workshops for Teachers Call for times. Institute for Writing and Thinking, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7484.

THE OUTDOORS

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Community Yoga 6pm-7:15pm. $5. Wen Barn and Gardens, Accord. Summer Yoga on the Lawn 6pm-7:15pm. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-onHudson. 265-3638.

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Sprouts Summer Arts Program Through 7/11. Ages 3-7. Ski Windham, Windham. (518) 943-3400.

Hurley Mountain Highway 1:30pm. Benmarl Vineyards, Marlboro-on-Hudson. 236-4265.

MONDAY 7 JULY

112

High School Musical on Stage Through 7/20. Summer acting program for ages 9-14. Orange Hall Theater, Middletown. 986-2629.

MUSIC

Mushrooms of the Northeast 1:30pm-3pm. Introduction to mushrooms, including habitats, seasons of availability, and identifying characteristics. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320.

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Summer Arts Program for Children 9am-1pm. Ages 5-7. $190 members/$210 per week. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Minnewaska Distance Swimmers Association Testing 5:30pm. Moriello Pool, New Paltz. dchorny@earthlink.net.

Plein Air Painting Workshops 9:30am-1pm. Call for location. 728-4001.

www.towntinker.com

Wearable Art Camp Through 7/11. Ages 7-12. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

THEATER

Sedation 2pm. By David Wiltse. $21-$26. Shadowland Theater, Ellenville. 647-5511.

(845) 688-5553

Tennis Camp Call for times. Ages 8-18. $269. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 687-5263.

East Durham Market Days 10am-3pm. Goods and activities including live music. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham.

Evita 3pm. Andrew Lloyd Webberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Tim Riceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hit Broadway musical. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

10 Bridge Street, Phoenicia, New York Memorial Day Weekend to September 30th

Soccer Camp Call for times. Two week sessions for various ages. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Poetry Open Mike 7pm. Featuring Billy Internicola and Frank LaRonca. $4. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

THEATER

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Dutchess Arts Camp Call for times. Weekly session for ages 4-12. Dutchess Day School, Millbrook. 471-7507.

2008 Rosendale Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market 9am-3pm. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-3467.

Open Mike 8pm. The Country Inn, Krumville. 657-8956.

WHY NOT TUBE THE ESOPUS?

KIDS

CLASSES Small Still Life Oil Painting Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing and Painting 9am-12pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Acting for the Camera 6pm-9pm. Casting director Jenny Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Haver teaches how to hone acting skills to the camera. $25/$100 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 528-6728.

Dragons and Damsels 10am-12pm. Explore the sanctuaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s freshwater pond and field habitats where these winged jewels reside. $6/$4 members. Lime Kiln Farm Wildlife Sanctuary, Sheffield, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320. Nature on the Run 6:30pm. Group job. Poetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Walk, Red Hook. 473-4440 ext. 117.

WORKSHOPS Painting the Landscape Indoors 1pm-4pm. John Creagh. $160. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Writing Poetry, Short Story, Novel, Memoir or Creative Non-fiction (and Getting It Published) 6:30pm-8:30pm. Led by Iris Litt. $60/$15 per session. Call for location. 679-8256. Tonalism and Color in Oil 7pm-9pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

WEDNESDAY 9 JULY ART Watercolor Painting 9am-12pm. $220/8 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. The Clark: Art in Nature 7pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

FILM

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Screening of Changing Steps 7pm. Dia: Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100.

Pilates at the Pavilion 6am-7am. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.


SCULPTURE CURRENT IMAGES PROVIDED

Tidal Surge

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: James Murray, Rising, steel and stone; Alejandro Dron, Aleph, welded and painted steel; Lydia Musco, Stacks B and D, concrete; Leila Bander, Pipe Organ, steel pipe.

Through August 10, “Current,” an outdoor exhibition featuring 50 works by 20 sculptors, will be on display at five landmark sites along the Hudson River in Cold Spring and Garrison, including Boscobel Restoration, the Desmond Fish Library, Garrison’s Landing, Manitoga, and on the Cold Spring waterfront. The exhibition, produced by the Garrison Art Center, features sculptures by Gilbert Boro, Stephen Fabrico, and Lori Nozick, among others, and was juried by curator Merrill Falkenberg, artist Edward Smith and sculptor Grace Knowlton. In conjunction with and in the exhibition, the Garrison Art Center is sponsoring a photography contest of the exhibition. All entries should be submitted by July 6, and there will be an exhibition of the photographs at the Garrison Art Center on July 19, from 12 to 6pm. (845) 424-3960; www.garrisonartcenter.org. —Brian K. Mahoney 7/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

113


Create Abundance, Peace & Health 6:30pm-8:30pm. A class based on spiritual healing and Pathwork. Flowing Spirit Healing, Woodstock. 679-8989.

Life Drawing 7pm. No materials or instructor provided, just a live model. $4 to $8. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 499-9348.

CLASSES

Hustle Dance Class 7:30pm. $15/class. Strictly Ballroom, Balmville. 569-0530.

Impressionism with Oil 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Drawing for Painting 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Figurative Clay Sculpture 1pm-4pm. $166/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing, Painting and Composition 6pm-9pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Beginner Pilates Mat Workout 6:30pm-7:30pm. $119. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

DANCE Natural Dance Theatre and Ko & Edge Company 6:30pm. Japanese contemporary dance-theatre. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. All Balanchine 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

The Custodian 7:30pm. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

MUSIC NCM Call for times. Punk, garage, alternative. Oasis Cafe, New Paltz. 255-2400. Neil Alexander with Nail 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198.

Where our clients are treated like Kings and Queens Are you a senior living alone or are you family who are concerned about your loved one living alone? Call Us. 87 East Market St, Suite 103, Red Hook QIPOFtGBY www.royaltycaregivers.com

114

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877. Alexa Wilkinson 6pm-8pm. Town of Rochester Park, Accord. 687-7540. New York Swing Exchange 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Open Mike 7:30pm-9:30pm. Joshuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Java Lounge, Woodstock. 679-5533. Gianni Schicchi with Buosoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ghost 7:30pm. Lake George Opera. $50-$80. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Greater Ellenville Jazz Trio 8pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000.

Dancing On The Air 8pm. $12. WAMC Linda Norris Auditorium, Albany. (518) 465-5233.

Bennett Harris 8:30pm. Blues. 12 Grape Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

Open Mike Night 9:30pm. Sign up at 8:30 p.m. Tessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

Live Jazz After Dinner 9pm. $10. Suruchi Indian Restaurant, New Paltz. 255-2772.

SPOKEN WORD

SPOKEN WORD

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Happening in Japan 5pm. Dance producer Mayumi Nagatoshi offers her insight into the contemporary scene in Japan. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Holistic Living Book Club 7pm-8pm. Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. Barnes and Noble, Newburgh. 567-0782.

Franklin and Independence 7pm-8pm. Middletown Thrall Library, Middletown. 341-5454.

Sedation 7pm. By David Wiltse. $21.00 - $26.00. Shadowland Theater, Ellenville. 647-5511.

THEATER

Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

THURSDAY 10 JULY

CLASSES

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MUSIC

Robyn Hitchcock 8pm. $25. WAMC Linda Norris Auditorium, Albany. (518) 465-5233.

Intro to Kabbalistic Healing: A Framework for Living a Healed Life 6pm-8pm. Miriamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Well, Saugerties. 246-5805.

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FILM

Open Mike Night 7pm-9pm. Acoustic solos and duets. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739.

Eckhart Tolle Silent Meetings and Meditation Call for times. Call for location. 687-8687.

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After-Hours Mixer 5:30pm-7:30pm. New Paltz Regional Chamber of Commerce. $5 non-members. Gold Fox Restaurant, Gardiner. 255-0243.

Steely Dan 8pm. $29-$109. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

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EVENTS

Open Mike 7pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300.

Uncle Vanya 8pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

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Natural Dance Theatre and Ko & Edge Company 8:15pm. Japanese contemporary dance-theatre. $29. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Kept & Dreamless 4:45pm. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

Kept & Dreamless 4:45pm. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

& CONSULTANTS

Founding Choreographers 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

EVENTS

Foreign and Documentary Films Series 7pm. $5. Olive Free Library, West Shokan. 657-2482.

CA R E G I V E R S

Muddy Lindy 8pm-10pm. Kingstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Casual Swing Stomp. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881.

The Custodian Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

FILM

Locally Owned & Operated

Lane & Co. 6:30pm. Explores the relationship between movement, words, art, and music. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Hofesh Shechter Company 8pm. Contemporary. $58. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Woodstock Farm Festival 4pm-8pm. Farm products, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, live music, and gardening advice. Maple Lane, Woodstock. 679-7618.

Celebrating our First Year

DANCE

Introduction to Watercolor 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Pastel Techniques 1pm-3pm. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Drawing, Painting, and Composition 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Scene study/technique. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154. Broadway/Regional Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Beginning acting class for adults and teens. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154.

THEATER

The Owl and the Pussycat 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. Basilica Industria, Hudson. (518) 828-0131. Uncle Vanya 8pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

WORKSHOPS The Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Part I 1pm-3pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

FRIDAY 11 JULY CLASSES Salsa Dance Class Call for times. $15/class. Strictly Ballroom, Balmville. 569-0530. Printmaking 9am-12pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Floral Painting with Acrylics 10am-12pm. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Photography Part 2 1pm-3pm. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Rhythm Songs in Rhythm Tap 5pm-6pm. Beginner to advanced beginner jazz tap taught by Sherry Hains-Salerno. $12. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 663-7962.


DANCE Nicholas Andre Dance Theater 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Mixed Rep 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330 Natural Dance Theatre and Ko & Edge Company 8:15pm. Japanese contemporary dance-theatre. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Parsons Dance Company 8:30pm. $35/$30 members. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

FILM Kept & Dreamless Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. The Spiderwick Chronicles 1pm. Ellenville Public Library, Ellenville. 647-1497. The Custodian 4:45pm. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

MUSIC Aston Magna Concert Call for times. Music of the 17th and 18th centuries performed on period instruments. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7216. Bill’s Toupee 6pm. Dance music covers. 26 Front Street, Newburgh. 569-8035. Metropolitan Hot Club 7pm-10pm. 1940’s style acoustic swing. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411. La Traviata 7:30pm. Lake George Opera. $50-$80. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Berkshire Opera Company: Women on the Verge 8pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100. Steve Schultz 8pm. Acoustic. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881. Donna Summer 8pm. $25-$65. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Chris Smither 9pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394. Head Soup 9pm. Blues, singer-song writer and classic rock music. Starr Alley, Rhinebeck. 876-2924.

Hofesh Shechter Company 2pm. Contemporary. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Natural Dance Theatre and Ko & Edge Company 2:15pm. Japanese contemporary dance-theatre. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. The School at Jacob’s Pillow: Contemporary Traditions 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Founding Choreographers 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Parsons Dance Company 8:30pm. $40/$35 members. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

EVENTS Kingston’s History Tour Call for times. 18th-century cooking, crafts and games demonstrated by interpreters in period clothing, with guided and self tours. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786. Pakatakan Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326. Riverside Farmers and Artisians Market 10am-2pm. With live music. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. walkingthedogWALK 2008 10am. Dog parade and show, mini-fair. $20. Basilica Industria, Hudson. (518) 828-0131. Native American Social 12pm-4pm. Drumming, dancing, food, and a short ceremony. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469.

THE OUTDOORS How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. The Beauty of Butterflies 10am-12pm. $6/$4 members. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320. Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables HikeStokes Loop 9:30am-3:30pm. Strenuous 8-mile hike. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. Summer Butterflies and Late Blooming Flowers 10am-1pm. Moderate 3-mile hike hike through the fields. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SPOKEN WORD History of the Hudson River in Early Settlement of Orange County 10am. Learn about the importance of our river in the early settlement of Orange County. Museum of the Hudson Highlands, Cornwall-on-Hudson. 534-5506 ext. 204. Woodstock Poetry Society Meeting and Festival 2pm. Featuring poets Baron James Ashanti and Bertha Rogers. Woodstock Town Hall, Woodstock.

THEATER Evita 8pm. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s and Tim Rice’s hit Broadway musical. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Lithographs by Benton Spruance Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, Massachusetts. (413) 597-2429.

Uncle Vanya 8pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown 7pm. Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15/$5 children. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286. Nanabozho 8pm. Mettawee River Theater Company. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

WORKSHOPS

KIDS

The Yen of Apple Growing Workshop Call for times. June Drop, Fruit Set, and Growth. $125/$200. Stone Ridge Orchard, Stone Ridge. 626-7919.

Wild World of Reptiles 11am. Wildman Jack DiMuccio . $6-$9. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Beginning/Intermediate Oil Painting 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Evita 8pm. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s and Tim Rice’s hit Broadway musical. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

MUSIC

Photographing the Nude in Nature 10am-4pm. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Sedation 8pm. By David Wiltse. $21-$26. Shadowland Theater, Ellenville. 647-5511.

Gianni Schicchi with Buoso’s Ghost 1pm. Lake George Opera. $50-$80. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Menopause the Musical 8pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Lake George Opera 1:30pm. The Pirates of Penzance. $50-$80. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Space 8pm. The true story of my life 50 years in the future written by local rock legend Les Vegas. $25/$20 members. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Amati Student Performances 3pm. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Catskill. (518) 263-2066.

Trout Fishing In America 9pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300. 4 Of A Kind 9:30pm. Rock. Annies 40 Western, Marlboro. 236-2667.

THEATER

The Owl and the Pussycat 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. Basilica Industria, Hudson. (518) 828-0131. Uncle Vanya 8pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

SATURDAY 12 JULY ART Woven Walls 4pm-7pm. Solo exhibition by Harry Roseman. Kleinert James Arts Center, Woodstock. 679-2079. Bamboo 5pm-7pm. Paintings and monoprints of Maj Kalfus. Deborah Davis Fine Art, Hudson. (518) 822-1885. Constructing the Feminine 5pm-7pm. Laura D’Alessandro. Galerie BMG, Woodstock. 679-0027. Mixed Images 5:30pm-7:30pm. Group exhibition celebrating five years of Photo and Encaustic workshops. Gallery at R & F, Kingston. 331-3112.

Tokyo String Quartet 11am. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217.

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine 4:30pm. $18. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Catskill. (518) 263-2066. Mark Raisch 6pm-9:30pm. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411. Folk Legend Woody Guthrie’s Birthday Celebration 7pm-9:30pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Brian Wilson 8pm. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344. Emily Zuzik 8pm. A.I.R. Studio Gallery, Kingston. 331-2662. Woodstock Legends I 8pm. Frederic Hand, lute and guitar. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. PianoSummer Faculty Gala 8pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869. Piantist Simone Dinnerstein 8pm. $20. Windham Performing Arts Center, Windham. (518) 263-5165. Los Lobos 8pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

Resurrection Insurrection 6pm-9pm. Michael X. Rose. Go North Gallery, Beacon. www.gonorthgallery.com.

J+H Projections 9pm-11pm. Live drums. Hudson’s Parc Park, Hudson. www.cityofhudson.org.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Memphis Soul 9pm. Starr Alley, Rhinebeck. 876-2924.

Green and Healthy Living Expo Call for times. In cooperation with the NOAH Center. Ski Butternut, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-2000.

The Blue Method 9pm. $15. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394.

DANCE All Balanchine 2pm. New York City Ballet. $10-$27.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

The Roost 9pm. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595. The Refugees 9pm. $27.50/$22.50. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300. The Backburners 10pm. The Firebird Lounge, Rhinebeck. 876-8686.

KIDS World of Reptiles 11am. Wildman Jack. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

MUSIC The Big Bang Jazz Gang 7pm. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739. La Traviata 2pm. Lake George Opera. $50-$80. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Daedalus String Quartet with Frederic Chiu 4pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. The Summer Sunset Concert Series 5:30pm. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200.

Blues Jam 7:30pm. Ciboney Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 486-4690.

FILM

Brother Thomas The Harrison Gallery, Williamstown, Massachusetts. (413) 458-1700.

Sawyer Motors 2008 Car Show 1pm-6pm. Hot rods, classics and antiques, live entertainment. Downtown Saugerties, Saugerties. 246-3412.

Sedation 8pm. By David Wiltse. $21.00 - $26.00. Shadowland Theater, Ellenville. 647-5511.

The Owl and the Pussycat 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. Basilica Industria, Hudson. (518) 828-0131.

GALLERY

5th Annual New Paltz Regional Garden Tour 11am-5pm. $30/$25 in advance. Call for location. 255-0243.

Steve Miller Band and Joe Cocker 7pm. $25-$100. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

Uncle Vanya 2pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Summer Projection Series 7:30pm-10pm. Live music and outdoor screening. Fovea Exhibitions, Beacon. 765-2199.

East Durham Market Days 10am-3pm. Goods and activities including live music. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham.

Menopause the Musical Call for times. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Hidden Treasures of the Berkshires 10pm-4pm. 2008 tour of gardens and houses presented by The Lenox Garden Club. Call for location. (413) 528-3089.

Something Old, Something New 4pm. Screening and discussion. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

2008 Rosendale Farmers’ Market 9am-3pm. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-3467.

Art Collage Workshop 11am. Ages 12-19. Call for location. 269-7232. Bone Health 11am. Nourishing Wisdom series. Kingston Farmers’ Market, Kingston. Beginning Drawing 1pm-3pm. With Shawn Dell Joyce. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

SUNDAY 13 JULY

Open Mike 8pm. The Country Inn, Krumville. 657-8956. Richard Shindell 8pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394.

THE OUTDOORS How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. Annual Paddlefest 9am-3pm. Plum Point, New Windsor. 297-5126. Family Hiking Club 1pm-3pm. $8/$5 members. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall-onHudson. 534-5506 ext. 204.

THEATER Evita 3pm. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s and Tim Rice’s hit Broadway musical. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Sedation 2pm. By David Wiltse. $21-$26. Shadowland Theater, Ellenville. 647-5511. Menopause the Musical 2:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Uncle Vanya 3pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown 2pm. Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15/$5 children. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286.

WORKSHOPS Plein Air Painting Workshops 9:30am-1pm. Call for location. 728-4001.

MONDAY 14 JULY

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Green and Healthy Living Expo Call for times. In cooperation with the NOAH Center. Ski Butternut, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-2000. Very Beginner Yoga Series 12:30pm-1:30pm. $65. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528. ECK Worship Service: Discover How to Master Your Spiritual Destiny 2pm-3pm. Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Catskills, Kingston. (800) 791-8871.

CLASSES The Hudson: Playground and Sanctuary of our Early Aristocracy Call for times. Elderhostel Program. Mount Gulian Historic Site, Beacon. 831-8172. Atelier-Figure Painting 9am-12pm. $120-$300. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Watercolor Workshop 1pm-4pm. $75. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

DANCE Hofesh Shechter Company 2pm. Contemporary. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Natural Dance Theatre and Ko & Edge Company 5pm. Japanese contemporary dance-theatre. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

ART So You Want to Be Hero Camp—Girls Only Through 7/18. Ages 10-13. $150. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Community Yoga 6pm-7:15pm. $5. Wen Barn and Gardens, Accord. Summer Yoga on the Lawn 6pm-7:15pm. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-onHudson. 265-3638.

CLASSES Landscape Painting Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing and Painting 9am-12pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Town of Red Hook’s Summer Language Institute Through 7/25. Children in grades 2-6 are encouraged to join our language immersion experience. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-4626. Acting for the Camera 6pm-9pm. Casting director Jenny O’Haver teaches how to hone acting skills to the camera. $25/$100 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 528-6728.

KIDS

EVENTS

Superheroes & Cartooning Camp Through 7/18. Ages 7-12. $239. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Minnewaska Distance Swimmers Association Testing 5:30pm. $18/$15. The Rosendale Pool, Rosendale. dchorny@earthlink.net.

Archaeology Camp for Teens Through 7/18. $200/$180 members. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

7/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

115


Architectural Drafting Camp Through 7/18. Ages 13-18. $169. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Drawing, Painting and Composition 6pm-9pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Green Architecture Camp Through 7/18. Grades 6-8. $215. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Beginner Pilates Mat Workout 6:30pm-7:30pm. $119. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Circus Camp Through 7/17. Ages 8-14. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

DANCE

Sprouts Summer Arts Program Through 7/18. Ages 3-7. Coxsackie Elementary School, Coxsackie. (518) 943-3400. Dying & Undying Shirt Design 7pm. Grades 5 and up. Ellenville Public Library, Ellenville. 647-1497.

SPOKEN WORD Poetry Open Mike 7pm. Featuring Allen Murphy and Judy Lechner. $4. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

TUESDAY 15 JULY ART Let’s Go Letterboxing 7pm. Treasure Hunting, hiking, puzzle solving, learning, stamp carving. Ellenville Public Library, Ellenville. 647-1497.

CLASSES Rhythm Tap Dance Classes 5:30pm. Introduction to the art of sound and movement taught by Stefanie Weber. $50 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 281-6734.

DANCE All Robbins 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

EVENTS Chess Review 2pm-4pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

FILM At The Circus 8:30pm. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

KIDS Nature Strollers 10am. Hiking group for families with babies, toddlers, and young children. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall-onHudson. 534-5506 ext. 204.

Ballet Boyz 8pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Four Voices 8pm. New York City Ballet with American Girl Ambassador Singers. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Multimedia Dance 5pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Minnewaska Distance Swimmers Association Testing 5:30pm. $18/$15. Minnewaska State Park, New Paltz. dchorny@earthlink.net. Business Luncheon 12pm-1:30pm. Tanatillo’s Market, Gardiner. 255-0243.

Painted Garden Call for times. Teatro di Piazza o D’Occasione. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Ballet Boyz 12am. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Japanese Garden Call for times. Teatro di Piazza o D’Occasione. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Four Voices 2pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Muna Tseng Dance Projects, Inc. 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Muddy Lindy 8pm-10pm. Kingston’s Casual Swing Stomp. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881. Mixed Rep 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

MUSIC

Franklin the Musician 7pm-8:30pm. Middletown Thrall Library, Middletown. 341-5454. New Paltz—Meet Your Community Leaders Forum 7pm-9pm. Ulster Boces, New Paltz. 255-0243. Summer Artist Slide Lectures 7:30pm. Chris Petrone, Ellen Kucera, Laura Moriarty, Cynthia Winika, and Tatana Kellner. Women’s Studio Workshop Gallery, Rosendale. 658-9133.

WORKSHOPS Tonalism and Color inOil 7pm-9pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

WEDNESDAY 16 JULY

Dance Theatre of Harlem Ensemble 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

MUSIC

Rebecca Coupe Franks Band 6pm-8pm. Town of Rochester Park, Accord. 687-7540.

NCM Call for times. Punk, garage, alternative. Oasis Cafe, New Paltz. 255-2400. Upstate Independents 6:30pm-2pm. WAMC Linda Norris Auditorium, Albany. (518) 465-5233. Eric Person & Meta-Four 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Open Mike 7pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300. Open Mike Night 7pm-9pm. Acoustic solos and duets. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739. Timur Moustakimov Recital 7:30pm. $10. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-3880.

Uncle Vanya 2pm/8pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown 2pm. Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15/$5 children. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286.

Gene Krupa II Orchestra 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Open Mike 7:30pm-9:30pm. Joshua’s Java Lounge, Woodstock. 679-5533. Greater Ellenville Jazz Trio 8pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Live Jazz After Dinner 9pm. $10. Suruchi Indian Restaurant, New Paltz. 255-2772.

SPOKEN WORD

THEATER Cocktails with Mimi 7pm. $15/$10 students and seniors. New Rose Theater, Walden. 778-2478. Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Family & Friends—Retreat and Fun Weekend Call for times. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000.

FILM Chatham Real Food Films 7pm. The Real Dirt on Farmer John. Chatham Real Food Market Co-op, Chatham. (518) 392-3353.

GALLERY Visions of the Valley 2008/09 Exhibition Rondout Golf Club, Accord. 626-2513.

MUSIC Aston Magna Concert Call for times. Music of the 17th and 18th centuries performed on period instruments. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7216. Bennystock Memorial Festival 10am-8pm. Arts, poetry and music festival to benefit local graduating high school seniors with epilepsy. $10. Clermont State Historic Site, Germantown. (518) 537-4240. Grey Fox Bluegrass Festival Call for times. Walsh Farm, Oak Hill. (888) 946-8495. Meet The Composers Night with Graham Parker and Mike Gent Call for times. Workshop followed by concert. Workshop free/concert $20. WAMC Linda Norris Auditorium, Albany. (518) 465-5233. 4 Of A Kind 8pm. Rock. Gail’s Place, Newburgh. 567-1414.

Defending the Caveman 8pm. $40. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

Nanci Griffith 8pm. $29.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845.

The Owl and the Pussycat 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. Basilica Industria, Hudson. (518) 828-0131.

John Covelli Unplugged 8pm. Beethoven to the blues. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344.

Uncle Vanya 8pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Amati Resident Artist Performance 8pm. Alejandro Mendoza, Si-Nae Shim, Soyeon Park and others. $18. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Catskill. (518) 263-2066.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

WORKSHOPS

John Reddan Band 9pm. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595.

Living Values Educator Training Call for times. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000.

The Artist’s Way Part I 1pm-3pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Lloyd Cole 9pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington. (413) 528-0248.

WORKSHOPS Energy 24/7 6:30pm-8pm. 10 Ways to boost your energy every day. Nature’s Pantry Health Food Store, Fishkill. 765-2023.

THURSDAY 17 JULY

Intro to Kabbalistic Healing: A Framework for Living a Healed Life 6pm-8pm. Miriam’s Well, Saugerties. 246-5805.

FRIDAY 18 JULY

Steve Mosto 9pm. Starr Alley, Rhinebeck. 876-2924.

THEATER CLASSES

ART

Introduction to Watercolor 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

All Hot and Bothered 5pm-8pm. Photographs from The Center for Photography at Woodstock. Samuel Dorsky Museum, New Paltz. 257-3858.

CLASSES Watercolor Painting 9am-12pm. $220/8 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Pastel Techniques 1pm-3pm. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Level 1 Thai Yoga Massage Course Through 7/20. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 255-8212.

Pianist Andre-Michel Schub 2:30pm. $10. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-3880.

Impressionism with Oil 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Painted Garden Call for times. Teatro di Piazza o D’Occasione. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS

Drawing, Painting and Composition 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Learn Thai Yoga Massage Through 7/20. $500. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 255-8212.

Japanese Garden Call for times. Teatro di Piazza o D’Occasione. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877.

ASK Reads—A Short Story Lover’s Delight 7pm-9pm. $5. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

The Legacy of Arthur Schnabel 2:30pm. $10. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-3880.

Ballet Boyz Call for times. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

The Kite Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

FILM

THEATER

SPOKEN WORD

DANCE

Founding Choreographers 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Children’s Watercolor Through 7/18. Art camp for ages 6-11. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Toddlers on the Trail—Stream Walk 10am-12pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Rhythm Songs in Rhythm Tap 5pm-6pm. Beginner to advanced beginner jazz tap taught by Sherry Hains-Salerno. $12. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 663-7962.

Bennystock Memorial Festival 10am-8pm. Arts, poetry and music festival to benefit local graduating high school seniors with epilepsy. $10. Clermont State Historic Site, Germantown. (518) 537-4240.

Open Mike Night 9:30pm. Sign up at 8:30 p.m. Tess’ Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

THE OUTDOORS

Photography Part 2 1pm-3pm. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Swing Dance 7pm. $10/$8 members. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Gallery Talk by Tatana Kellner, Christopher Haun, Laura Moriarity 12pm-1pm. Artists in the exhibition—Hudson Valley Artists 2008: The Medium is the Message. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz. 257-3858.

Community Music Night 8pm-9:45pm. Six local singer-songwriters. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048.

Floral Painting with Acrylics 10am-12pm. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Grey Fox Bluegrass Festival Call for times. Walsh Farm, Oak Hill. (888) 946-8495.

Woodstock Farm Festival 4pm-8pm. Farm products, children’s activities, live music, and gardening advice. Maple Lane, Woodstock. 679-7618.

Face to Face With the Mona Lisa and Girl With a Pearl Earring 10am-11:30am. Ages 3 and up. MassMoCA, North Adams, Massachusetts. (413) 662-2111.

MUSIC

116

Corbin Dances 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

DANCE

Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Scene study/technique. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154. Broadway/Regional Director’s Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Beginning acting class for adults and teens. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154.

Noongar Boodja: Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Ecology and Culture 5pm-8pm. Samuel Dorsky Museum, New Paltz. 257-3858 An Inaugural Solo Exhibit: Photographs & Landscapes 5:30pm-7:30pm. By Nicole Sausto-Grady. Montgomery Row Second Level, Rhinebeck. 876-6670. Thoroughbred Racing Exhibit 6pm-8pm. Tom Myott Gallyer, Glens Falls. (518) 798-8431.

Mind on Trial Call for times. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667. Cocktails with Mimi 7pm. $15/$10 students and seniors. New Rose Theater, Walden. 778-2478. Evenings of Psychodrama 7:30pm. $6/$4 students and seniors. Boughton Place, Highland. 255-7502. Defending the Caveman 8pm. $40. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. Evita 8pm. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s and Tim Rice’s hit Broadway musical. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

CLASSES

Menopause the Musical 8pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Drawing for Painting 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Life Drawing 7pm. No materials or instructor provided, just a live model. $4 to $8. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 499-9348.

Salsa Dance Class Call for times. $15/class. Strictly Ballroom, Balmville. 569-0530.

The Owl and the Pussycat 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. Basilica Industria, Hudson. (518) 828-0131.

Figurative Clay Sculpture 1pm-4pm. $166/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Hustle Dance Class 7:30pm. $15/class. Strictly Ballroom, Balmville. 569-0530.

Printmaking 9am-12pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Uncle Vanya 8pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/08


DANCE JACOB'S PILLOW DANCE FESTIVAL

Shantala Shivalingappa, from the exhibit “Sculpting Movement and Time: Making Slow Dancing,” a behind-the-scenes view of David Michalek’s portraits of 46 dancers.

Soft Return The Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, which runs through August 24, is unique in the dance world. Staged near the Berkshires town of Becket, Massachusetts, it’s the longestrunning dance festival in the US. Both a school and a performance complex, “the Pillow” also houses as an archive of dance history that includes performance videos, books, photographs, and rare film clips dating back to its founding by Ted Shawn in 1933. Perched on a mountain with a zigzag road resembling the rungs of a ladder and a large, pillow-shaped boulder, the site, a 163-acre former farm, was named by locals who were reminded of the Bible story of Jacob lying on a rock and dreaming of a ladder to heaven. Made up of 31 buildings (including three dance studios and three stages), the facility is the only dance institution named a National Historic Landmark. Shawn and his wife Ruth St. Denis formed Denishawn, the first American modern dance company, in 1915. The organization changed the course of dance by creating new techniques and spawned the next generation of modern dancers; artists like Martha Graham, Charles Weidman, and Doris Humphrey. When the couple separated in 1930, Denishawn disbanded and Shawn formed the all-male Men Dancers company, which also built many of the site’s buildings. The facility’s Ted Shawn Theater was the first in the US built specifically for dance. When it opened in 1942, gas-rationing audiences climbed the mountain on foot to see modern, ballroom, folk, ballet, and ethnic dancers perform. Today, the theater houses one of the stages where several of the 40 companies from nine countries are

performing this season. Shawn’s vision of the Pillow School, a place where young dancers could study with master teachers while living on site, also continues, and offers free preshow talks by resident scholars, question-and-answer sessions with dancers, photography exhibits, and films. Among the groups appearing this season are Holland’s Conny Janssen Danst company, which will perform the edgy and witty “Rebound” (July 24-27), and India’s Shantala Shivalingappa, which will perform traditional Kuchipudi dance to live music (August 7-10). Among the returning American choreographers are Bill T. Jones, whose “Chapel/Chapter” (July 3-6) challenges the audience to reflect on our media-fueled society, and Alonso King, whose “Migration: The Hierarchal Migration of Birds and Mammals” and “RASA” (both July 23-27) feature, respectively, scores by jazz great Pharoah Sanders and tabla master Zakir Hussain. Running the length of the festival is the exhibit “Sculpting Movement and Time: Making Slow Dancing,” a behind-the-scenes view of David Michalek’s portraits of 46 dancers. Also on the grounds are gardens, restaurants, a wetlands trail, a store, and public classes in dance, yoga, and Pilates. The 2008 Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival runs through August 24 in Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-0745; www.jacobspillow.org. —Maya Horowitz 7/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

117


SATURDAY 19 JULY

A COMMUNITY SUPPORTED ARTS CENTER

july 2008

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ART Fourth Annual Pittsfield Art Show 10am-4pm. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 499-9348. Slate and Steel: Sisyphean Circle: Beijing Series 6pm-8pm. John Van Alstine. John Davis Gallery, Hudson. (518) 828-5907. Hudson Valley Landscapes 6pm-8pm. Group show. Mark Gruber Gallery, New Paltz. 255-1241. Posthumous Eruptum 6pm-9pm. Works by Michael X. Rose. G.A.S., Poughkeepsie. 486-4592. Signs 8pm-12am. Group photography exhibit. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

Floyd Patterson Jr. Band 7pm. Hasbrouck Park, New Paltz. 255-1559. Yamaha Piano Series 7pm. Nancy Allen Lundy, soprano; Babette Hierholzer, piano; Ethan Sloane, clarinet. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. Annie and the Hedonists CD Release show 8pm. $15. WAMC Linda Norris Auditorium, Albany. (518) 465-5233.

Healing Chod Call for times. With Dungse Rigdzih Dorje Rinpoche. $195. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528.

Duo Piano Recital 8pm. Vladimir Feltsman and Alexander Korsantia. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869.

CLASSES

Hurley Mountain Highway 8pm. Pop, soft rock. The Harp & Whistle Restaurant and Pub, Newburgh. 565-4277.

The Poetic Landscape Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Japanese Garden Call for times. Teatro di Piazza o Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Occasione. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Painted Garden Call for times. Teatro di Piazza o Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Occasione. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Ballet Boyz 2pm/4pm. $58. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Four Voices 2pm. New York City Ballet. $10-$27.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. The School at Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow: Contemporary Traditions 6:30pm. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. All Robbinsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The Ballet Gala 8pm. New York City Ballet. $50-$250. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

EVENTS

The Crossroads Band 9pm. Starr Alley, Rhinebeck. 876-2924. Modern Man 9pm. Singer/songwriter. $25/$20. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300. John Schrader Band 9pm. Rock. Hickory BBQ Smokehouse, Kingston. 338-2424. The Real Men 10pm. The Firebird Lounge, Rhinebeck. 876-8686.

THE OUTDOORS How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. Singles and Sociables Hikeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;North/South Lake 9am-3:30pm. Strenuous 9-mile hike. Meet at Saugerties Park and Ride, Saugerties. 255-0919. Minnows and More 10am. Learn the natural history of some of the interesting fish living in the Hudson River. $5/$3 members. Museum of the Hudson Highlands, Cornwallon-Hudson. 534-5506 ext. 204.

SPOKEN WORD Stories with Teeth 10am-12pm. Ancient Native stories. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469.

Archaeology Weekend: What Lies Beneath Call for times. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

Steven A. A. Mann 1:30pm. The Dutchess County Historical Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s luncheon speaker series. $30/$25 members. Violet Creek, Poughkeepsie. 463-3633.

Kingstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History Tour Call for times. 18th-century cooking, crafts and games demonstrated by interpreters in period clothing, with guided and self tours. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786.

Those Two Guys 2pm. Comedy. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Rosendale Street Festival 11am. Music, food, vendors on Main Street. Rosendale. www.rosendalestreetfestival.com. Pakatakan Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326. Riverside Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Artisiansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market 10am-2pm. With live music. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. Third-Annual Mountaintop Summer Festival 11am-4pm. Bear Creek Landing, Hunter. (518) 263-3839. Thomas Cole National Historic Site Fifth Annual Summer Party 5pm. Cocktails, music, and hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres. Thomas Cole National Historic Site, Catskill. (518) 943-7465. Mount Tremper Summer Festival Opening Party 8pm-12am. $20. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

FILM Ballet Boyz Filmz 4pm. Screening and discussion. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Music at the Pavilion: Soul Purpose 6:30pm-8pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Bacon Brothers Band 8pm. Rock. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344.

DANCE

118

Mark Raisch 6pm-9:30pm. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Kayak Skills Class 9am. Plum Point, New Windsor. 457-4552.

*OWFTU$SFBUJWFMZ

Amati Student Performances 3pm. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Catskill. (518) 263-2066.

Selected Shorts 4pm. With Isaiah Sheffer, James Naughton and Jane Curtin. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100. Those Two Guys 8pm. Comedy. $20/$15. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Hotflash and the Whoremoans 9pm. Comedy. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595.

THEATER Menopause the Musical Call for times. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Defending the Caveman 8pm. $40. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. Evita 8pm. Andrew Lloyd Webberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Tim Riceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hit Broadway musical. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

KIDS

Uncle Vanya 2pm/8pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Beginning Drawing 10am-12pm. Ages 7-11, 4 sessions. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Cocktails with Mimi 7pm. $15/$10 students and seniors. New Rose Theater, Walden. 778-2478.

Sleeping Beauty 11am. By Tanglewood Marionettes. $6-$9. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

The Owl and the Pussycat 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. Basilica Industria, Hudson. (518) 828-0131.

MUSIC

WORKSHOPS

Tony Bennett Call for times. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

Photographing the Nude in Nature 10am-4pm. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Bennystock Memorial Festival 10am-8pm. Arts, poetry and music festival to benefit local graduating high school seniors with epilepsy. $10. Clermont State Historic Site, Germantown. (518) 537-4240.

Beginning/Intermediate Oil Painting 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Grey Fox Bluegrass Festival Call for times. Walsh Farm, Oak Hill. (888) 946-8495.

Home Building Seminar 11am-1pm. Atlantic Custom Homes, Cold Spring. 558-2636.

Ron Renninge 2pm. Acoustic. Taste Buddâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chocolate and Coffee Cafe, Red Hook. 758-6500.

Natural Sweets from the Farm 11am. Nourishing Wisdom series. Kingston Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Kingston.

The Barefoot Boys 2pm-4pm. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786.

Beginning Drawing 1pm-3pm. With Shawn Dell Joyce. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.


SUNDAY 20 JULY ART Fourth Annual Pittsfield Art Show 10am-4pm. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 499-9348. Works by Jean Campbell 12pm-5pm. Shelley K Gallery, Saugerties. 246-5250.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Uncle Vanya 3pm. $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Defending the Caveman 8pm. $40. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

WORKSHOPS

cafe

Plein Air Painting Workshops 9:30am-1pm. Call for location. 728-4001.

MONDAY 21 JULY

Very Beginner Yoga Series 12:30pm-1:30pm. $65. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT CLASSES Arts in the Hudson Valley Call for times. Elderhostel Program. Mount Gulian Historic Site, Beacon. 831-8172. Atelier-Figure Painting 9am-12pm. $120-$300. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Watercolor Workshop 1pm-4pm. $75. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

DANCE Japanese Garden Call for times. Teatro di Piazza o D’Occasione. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Painted Garden Call for times. Teatro di Piazza o D’Occasione. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Ballet Boyz 2pm. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Swing Dance Jam 6:30pm-9pm. Beginner lesson at 6pm. Music by Rhythm Depot. $5. White Eagle Hall, Kingston. 339-3032.

EVENTS Rosendale Street Festival 11am. Music, food, vendors on Main Street. Rosendale. www.rosendalestreetfestival.com. Archaeology Weekend: What Lies Beneath Call for times. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. 2008 Rosendale Farmers’ Market 9am-3pm. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-3467. East Durham Market Days 10am-3pm. Goods and activities including live music. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. Jacob’s Pillow Community Day 10am-1pm. Performances, dance workshops, crafts, family friendly games and activities. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

GALLERY MFA Thesis Exhibition Features works by third-year graduate students in film/ video, music/sound, painting, photography, sculpture, and writing. Bard College Exhibition Center/UBS, Red Hook. 758-7481.

MUSIC Grey Fox Bluegrass Festival Call for times. Walsh Farm, Oak Hill. (888) 946-8495. Bennystock Memorial Festival 10am-8pm. Arts, poetry and music festival to benefit local graduating high school seniors with epilepsy. $10. Clermont State Historic Site, Germantown. (518) 537-4240. Pacifica Quartet 4pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. the Summer Sunset Concert Series 5:30pm. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200.

Community Yoga 6pm-7:15pm. $5. Wen Barn and Gardens, Accord. Summer Yoga on the Lawn 6pm-7:15pm. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-onHudson. 265-3638.

CLASSES Drawing and Painting 9am-12pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Acting for the Camera 6pm-9pm. Casting director Jenny O’Haver teaches how to hone acting skills to the camera. $25/$100 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 528-6728.

KIDS Movement Class for Kids and Teens Call for times. $12/$60 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Basketball Camp Through 7/25. Ages 8-15. $189. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 687-5263. Cyber Sleuth Camp Through 7/25. Ages 9-13. $249. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025. Rocket Robotics Camp Through 7/25. Ages 7-12. $169. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025. Summer Arts Program for Children 9am-1pm. Ages 5-7. $190 members/$210 per week. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Sprouts Summer Arts Program Through 7/28. Ages 3-7. Resurrection Lutheran Church, Cairo. (518) 943-3400. Make it and Take it Home Camp Through 7/25. Ages 6-11. $169. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025. Altered Picture Frames 7pm. Grades 5 and up. Ellenville Public Library, Ellenville. 647-1497.

MUSIC Jacob Flier Piano Competition 3pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-3880.

SPOKEN WORD Intro Lecture on Bees and Organic 5:30pm-8pm. Learn about the lives of Honeybees from Bee Doctor Chris Harp. $25. Sustainable Living Resource Center, Rosendale. 255-6113. Poetry Open Mike 7pm. Featuring Joanne Pagano Weber and Bruce Weber. $4. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

WORKSHOPS Sixth Annual Rock On Workshop Call for times. Instrument instruction and ensemble training. Berkshire Community College, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 447-9964. Intro Lecture on Bees and Organic Beekeeping 5:30pm-8pm. $25. Sustainable Living Resource Center, Rosendale. 255-6113.

Open Mike 8pm. The Country Inn, Krumville. 657-8956. Lizzie West and the White Buffalo 8pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington. (413) 528-0248.

THE OUTDOORS How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. Van Leuven Cabin Hike 10am-12pm. Easy 2-mile hike. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown 2pm. Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15/$5 children. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286.

SPOKEN WORD Lewis Black: Let Them Eat Cake 8pm. Comedy. $42.50-$62.50. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

THEATER Menopause the Musical 2:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Evita 3pm. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s and Tim Rice’s hit Broadway musical. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Cocktails with Mimi 3pm. $15/$10 students and seniors. New Rose Theater, Walden. 778-2478.

MUSIC THE RHODES

TUESDAY 22 JULY ART Laser Show: Six Perspectives on a Chaotic Resonator 2pm-12am. The relationship between visual, aural, and physical vibration and its ability to carry information. Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, Massachusets. (413) 597-2429.

CLASSES Rhythm Tap Dance Classes 5:30pm. Introduction to the art of sound and movement taught by Stefanie Weber. $50 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 281-6734.

DANCE All Robbins 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

SPOKEN WORD JONATHAN GOULD

VISUAL ART PATRICK WINFIELD

A monthly salon featuring artists seen in the pages of Chronogram magazine. Enjoy great performances and art, with coffees, teas, pastries, beers, and wines in Kingston’s most comfortable cultural venue on the third Saturday of each month.

(

MUDDY CUP

)

516 broadway kingston sat july 19 8-10 free www.chronogram.com

AUGUST 19 CAFE CHRONOGRAM IN KINGSTON: VON ROBINSON & HIS OWN UNIVERSE MUSIC STEPHEN DODGE SPOKEN WORD RODNEY ALAN GREENBLATT VISUAL ART

EVENTS Chess Review 2pm-4pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

FILM The Red Violin 8:30pm. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

7/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

119


KIDS

THEATER

Face to Face With the Mona Lisa and Girl With a Pearl Earring 10am-11:30am. Ages 3 and up. MassMoCA, North Adams, Massachusetts. (413) 662-2111.

Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

SPOKEN WORD Summer Artist Slide Lectures 7:30pm. Shannon Brock, Kathleen Sherin, and Beatrice Coron. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Studio Workshop Gallery, Rosendale. 658-9133.

THEATER Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival Call for times. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-onHudson. 265-3638. The Courage to Dream: The Amazing life of Ben Franklin 4pm-5pm. Middletown Thrall Library, Middletown. 341-5454.

WORKSHOPS Writing Poetry, Short Story, Novel, Memoir or Creative Non-fiction (and Getting It Published) Call for times. Led by Iris Litt. $60/$15 per session. Call for location. 679-8256. Tonalism and Color in Oil 7pm-9pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

WEDNESDAY 23 JULY ART Watercolor Painting 9am-12pm. $220/8 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Create Abundance, Peace & Health 6:30pm-8:30pm. A class based on spiritual healing and Pathwork. Flowing Spirit Healing, Woodstock. 679-8989.

CLASSES Hudson Valley Landscape in Watercolor Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Impressionism with Oil 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Drawing for Painting 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Figurative Clay Sculpture 1pm-4pm. $166/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing, Painting and Composition 6pm-9pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Beginner Pilates Mat Workout 6:30pm-7:30pm. $119. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

DANCE Conny Janssen Danst 6:30pm. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Alonzo Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lines Ballet 8pm. $58. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

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845.331.6949 120

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/08

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Intro to Kabbalistic Healing: A Framework for Living a Healed Life 6pm-8pm. Miriamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Well, Saugerties. 246-5805.

CLASSES Introduction to Watercolor 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Pastel Techniques 1pm-3pm. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Drawing, Painting and Composition 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Scene study/technique. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154. Broadway/Regional Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Beginning acting class for adults and teens. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154. Life Drawing 7pm. No materials or instructor provided, just a live model. $4 to $8. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 499-9348. Hustle Dance Class 7:30pm. $15/class. Strictly Ballroom, Balmville. 569-0530.

DANCE Founding Choreographers 2pm. New York City Ballet. $10-$27.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Earl Mosleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Institute of the Arts 6:30pm. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Alonzo Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lines Ballet 8pm. $58. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Muddy Lindy 8pm-10pm. Kingstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Casual Swing Stomp. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881. Founding Choreographers 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Conny Janssen Danstâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rebound 8:15pm. $29. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

FILM The Fish Fall In Love Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

MUSIC

EVENTS

Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877.

FILM Foreign and Documentary Films Series 7pm. $5. Olive Free Library, West Shokan. 657-2482. The Fish Fall In Love 7:30pm. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

MUSIC NCM Call for times. Punk, garage, alternative. Oasis Cafe, New Paltz. 255-2400.

NCM Call for times. Punk, garage, alternative. The Basement, Kingston. 331-1116.

Lemonade Grenade 6pm-8pm. Town of Rochester Park, Accord. 687-7540. Lemonade Grenade 6pm-8pm. Town of Rochester Park, Accord. Swinginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jive Patrol 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. CRUMBS Nite Out at The Linda 7pm. $10. WAMC Linda Norris Auditorium, Albany. (518) 465-5233. Open Mike 7:30pm-9:30pm. Joshuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Java Lounge, Woodstock. 679-5533.

Jacob Flier Piano Competition 3pm. Final round. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-3880.

Greater Ellenville Jazz Trio 8pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000.

Howland Wolves 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198.

Berkshire Opera: Secrets of the Sea & Sky 8pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

Open Mike Night 7pm-9pm. Acoustic solos and duets. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739.

SPOKEN WORD

Open Mike 7pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300.

www.tuttlesoundlabs.com info@tuttlesoundlabs.com

THURSDAY 24 JULY

Mixed Rep 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Woodstock Farm Festival 4pm-8pm. Farm products, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, live music and gardening advice. Maple Lane, Woodstock. 679-7618.

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Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a Good Man Charlie Brown 2pm. Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15/$5 children. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286.

Open Mike Night 9:30pm. Sign up at 8:30 p.m. Tessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

SPOKEN WORD Charting Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Future 5pm. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Framed in Words: Writing Inspired by Art 7pm. $5. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Gallery Talk by Kathleen Anderson, David Bush, Robert The 12pm-1pm. Artists in the exhibitionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Hudson Valley Artists 2008: The Medium is the Message. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz. 257-3858.

THEATER Cocktails with Mimi 7pm. $15/$10 students and seniors. New Rose Theater, Walden. 778-2478. Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.


MUSIC POST-NEO TRIO BARBARA MELLON KOLB

Mikhail Horowitz, Justin Kolb, and Abby Newton, aka the Post-Neo Trio, will perform at the Belleayre Music Festival on July 25.

What's Newer Than New? “I visit about 30 schools a year in North America, talking to kids about Classical music, and I tell every one of them, ‘There’s a Classical music composer within an hour of your house, I don’t care where you live,’” pianist Justin Kolb says. Kolb belongs to the Post-Neo Trio, which will prove his thesis by performing two works by Hudson Valley composers at the Belleayre Summer Music Festival on Friday, July 25. The centerpiece of the concert will be “Remembering Felix” by Robert Starer, a celebrated Woodstock composer who died in 2001. The libretto was written by his longtime partner, novelist Gail Godwin. It tells the tale of Felix, a concert pianist and teacher, who dies and is remembered by his concert agent, publicist, accountant, students, and two critics, who disagree about Felix’s talent. The Post-Neo Trio is a “supergroup” of local heroes. There are three instruments: cello, piano, and voice. The voice is not a tenor or soprano, but that of poet Mikhail Horowitz (who plays all 11 roles in “Remembering Felix”). Cellist Abby Newton performs with symphony orchestras, as well as with the Celtic trio Ferintosh, where she is known for her deft, prayerful solos. Kolb has played in over a hundred recital halls throughout Europe and the Middle East. Kolb and Horowitz will also present selections from David Alpher’s “Land of the Farther Suns,” a musical setting of ten poems by Stephen Crane. The score is jazzinspired and frisky. In 1992 “Land of the Farther Suns” was recorded with Garrison Keillor as narrator. Alpher lives in Stone Ridge. William Bolcom, who is perhaps the most prominent living American composer, wrote “Songs of Innocence and of Experience: A Musical Illumination of the Poems of William Blake.” This massive three and a half hour work includes a chamber choir, a children’s choir, a madrigal group, a folk singer, a rock singer, a country singer, a speaking actor, a coloratura soprano, and a symphony orchestra. The main chorus

contains 50 to 80 voices. In 2006, a recording of the piece received three Grammys. Kolb has arranged two of the poems from “Songs of Innocence and of Experience” for piano and spoken voice: “The Tiger” (“Tiger, tiger, burning bright...”) and “London.” (The score for “London” gives the tempo as “apocalyptic rock” and is dedicated to John Lennon.) Horowitz will recite his poem “Fireworks” with improvised accompaniment by Kolb. The pianist explains: “Mikhail has taken his knowledge of fireworks configurations in the sky, and he’ll say something like: ‘Aerial chrysanthemums!’, then I describe it on the keyboard. Or ‘Constellated hosannas’—I love that one.” Abby Newton and Kolb will duet on Schumann’s “Fantasy Pieces, Opus 73,” a fitful quarrel between piano and cello. Kolb will also perform solo piano pieces. “When I play music by traditional composers, I usually pull out what Leon Botstein loves to call ‘works that live in undeserved obscurity,’” he remarks. “So one of those works is ‘The Grand Gallop’ by Franz Liszt, which is transcendental in virtuosity, truly.” Kolb will also perform the final movement from Beethoven’s "Appassionata Sonata." “We’re quite proud of the name of our ensemble: Post-Neo Trio—some people get it, some people don’t question it,” Kolb observes. (In other words, how can something be “post-new?”) The concert will be unpretentious and relaxed; hecklers are welcome. Mikhail will recite the anonymous 17th century “Tom O’ Bedlam’s Song” while walking through the crowd. The Post-Neo Trio will perform at the Grand Lodge at Belleayre Mountain Ski Center, Highmount, on Friday, July 25 at 8 pm. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344; www.belleayremusic.org. —Sparrow 7/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

121


FRIDAY 25 JULY ART

DANCE

Member Art Show 4:30pm-6pm. “Sponsored by the Housatonic Valley Art League. Dewey Hall, Sheffield, MA. (413) 229-7907.

Alonzo King’s Lines Ballet 2pm. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Food for the . . . Loving Soul & Living Body Call for times. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000. Power of the Pen Call for times. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000.

CLASSES

Founding Choreographers 2pm. New York City Ballet. $10-$27.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Conny Janssen Danst’s Rebound 2:15pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. The School at Jacob’s Pillow: Contemporary Traditions 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Salsa Dance Class Call for times. $15/class. Strictly Ballroom, Balmville. 569-0530.

Extreme Ballet 8pm. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5107.

Printmaking 9am-12pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

All Robbins 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Floral Painting with Acrylics 10am-12pm. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Photography Part 2 1pm-3pm. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Rhythm Songs in Rhythm Tap 5pm-6pm. Beginner to advanced beginner jazz tap taught by Sherry Hains-Salerno. $12. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 663-7962.

DANCE Conny Janssen Danst’s Rebound 5pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Swing Dance Call for times. 7:30pm lesson. Live music. $15/$8 students. Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, Poughkeepsie. 454-2571. Lydia Johnson Dance 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Swing Dance 7pm. $10/$8 members. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Alonzo King’s Lines Ballet 8pm. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Mixed Rep 8pm. New York City Ballet. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

MUSIC

Full Circle 9pm. Aynsley Vandenbroucke Movement Group. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

EVENTS Rondout Valley Growers Farm Tour Call for times. Demos, sampling, tours of various farms. Call for location. Kingston’s History Tour Call for times. 18th-century cooking, crafts, and games demonstrated by interpreters in period clothing, with guided and self tours. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786. Pakatakan Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326. Riverside Farmers’ and Artisians’ Market 10am-2pm. With live music. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. Butterflies! 10am-12pm. Through art, myth, poetry, science, and literature participants will learn all about the butterfly. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469. Rhinebeck Antiques Fair 10am-5pm. $7. Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. 876-1989. 6th Annual Summer Party 7pm-11pm. Immerse your senses in the evocative sights, flavors, and sounds of India. $75/$60 members. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-0135.

The River Otter 10am. Learn about the River Otter that lives in New York State. $5/$3 members. Museum of the Hudson Highlands, Cornwall-on-Hudson. 534-5506 ext. 204. Dragonflies: Up Close and Personal ... Well, Not Very 10am-2:30pm. Overview of dragonfly biology and identification, then hike to a few choice viewing/catch and release spots. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SPOKEN WORD

THEATER

SPOKEN WORD

Menopause the Musical Call for times. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.The Pied Piper 11am. Kids on Stage Performance. $6-$9. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

I Grew Up on a Farm Call for times. Stories and more with local author Alan Lewis. Ellenville Public Library, Ellenville. 647-1497.

Cocktails with Mimi 7pm. $15/$10 students and seniors. New Rose Theater, Walden. 778-2478. You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown 7pm. Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15/$5 children. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286.

West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

Divas on the Delaware 3pm. Program of favorite opera highlights by Verdi, Puccini, Mozart, and others. $25/$22 seniors and students/$15 children. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272.

WORKSHOPS Beginning/Intermediate Oil Painting 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Photographing the Nude in Nature 10am-4pm. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

SUNDAY 27 JULY BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

The Wizard of Verse 7:30pm. Music of Yip Harburg. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272.

Big Blue Big Band 2pm-4pm. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786.

The Post-Neo Trio 8pm. Featuring pianist Justin Kolb with cellist Abby Newton and narrator Mikhail Horowitz. $20. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344.

Amati Student Performances 3pm. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Catskill. (518) 263-2066.

Gabrielle Roth’s 5Rhythms Movement Meditation Practice 2:30pm-5pm. $15. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

Creation 9pm. Starr Alley, Rhinebeck. 876-2924.

Columbia Festival Orchestra 6pm. A classical road trip. $35/$30. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Guy Davis 9pm. $20. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394. Reality Check 9pm. Rock. Quiet Man Pub, Wappingers Falls. 298-1724. The Rhodes 9pm. Muddy Cup, New Paltz. 338-3881.

THE OUTDOORS Twilight World of Bats 7pm-8:30pm. Learn about bats found in our area. $3-$6. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320.

SPOKEN WORD A Look at the Globalization of Art: Esthetics and Economics Call for times. Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Peekskill. (914) 788-0100. Summer Business Card Exchange 7:30pm-9pm. New Paltz Regional Chamber of Commerce Office, New Paltz. 255-0243.

THEATER Cocktails with Mimi 7pm. $15/$10 students and seniors. New Rose Theater, Walden. 778-2478. Menopause the Musical 8pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/08

CLASSES

DANCE

Rhett Miller 8pm. Rock. $25. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394.

EVENTS

The Rhodes 9:30pm. Mulligan’s Irish House, Poughkeepsie. 486-9044. NCM 10pm. Punk, garage, alternative. Cabaloosa’s, New Paltz. 255-3400. Pillowface 10pm. The Firebird Lounge, Rhinebeck. 876-8686.

THE OUTDOORS Nuclear Lake Hike 9am. AT Parking Lot, Pawling. 298-8379. Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables HikeRhododendron Bridge and Beyond 9:30am-2pm. Strenuous 7-mile hike. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

WORKSHOPS Plein Air Painting Workshops 9:30am-1pm. Call for location. 728-4001.

MONDAY 28 JULY BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Community Yoga 6pm-7:15pm. $5. Wen Barn and Gardens, Accord. Summer Yoga on the Lawn 6pm-7:15pm. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-onHudson. 265-3638.

CLASSES

Drawing and Painting 9am-12pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Conny Janssen Danst’s Rebound 2pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

The Mortal Brothers 9pm. Starr Alley, Rhinebeck. 876-2924.

West Side Story 3pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

Atelier-Figure Painting 9am-12pm. $120-$300. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Amati Resident Artist Performance 8pm. Anca Nicolau, Madeleine Golz, and Peter Vinograde. $18. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Catskill. (518) 263-2066.

Blueberry CD Release Party 9pm. Jason’s Upstairs Bar, Hudson. (518) 828-8787.

Cocktails with Mimi 3pm. $15/$10 students and seniors. New Rose Theater, Walden. 778-2478.

Short and Long Pose Drawing Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Alonzo King’s Lines Ballet 2pm. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Larry Chance & The Earls 8:30pm. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595.

Menopause the Musical 2:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

The Roosevelts: Life and Legacy of Eleanor and Franklin Call for times. Elderhostel Program. Mount Gulian Historic Site, Beacon. 831-8172.

Bebe Neuwirth 8pm. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344.

Ilya Yakushev Recital 8pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869.

Readings by Fergus Bordewich, Susan Richards, and Paul Russell 3pm. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

THEATER

Very Beginner Yoga Series 12:30pm-1:30pm. $65. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528.

Mark Raisch 6pm-9:30pm. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411.

Author Book Readings 3pm-5pm. Featuring Fergus M. Bordewich, Paul Russell, and Susan Richards. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

Divas on the Delaware 7:30pm. Program of favorite opera highlights by Verdi, Puccini, Mozart and others. $25/$22 seniors and students/$15 children. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272.

John Schrader Band 5pm. Rock. Steelhouse, Kingston. 338-7847.

Count Basie Orchestra 9pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables Hike—Mine Hole 9am-3:30pm. Strenuous 9-mile hike. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown 7pm. Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15/$5 children. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286.

Mat Burke 2pm. Acoustic. Taste Budd’s Chocolate and Coffee Cafe, Red Hook. 758-6500.

Free 103Point9’s Campfire Sounds 4pm-8pm. With MV & EE with The Golden Road, Latitude/Longitude, The Dust Dive, and Samara Lubelski. Waterfront Park, Hudson.

THE OUTDOORS

I Brought My Dance from San Francisco 4pm. Discussion and book signing with Janice Ross. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Eckhart Tolle Silent Meetings Call for times. Videos, meditation, and dialogue. Call for location. 687-8687.

The “The Band” Band 8:30pm. Acoustic. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595.

Sam Lardner & Barcelona 8pm. $18. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394.

How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

KIDS Bee Buzz for Kids Call for times. Two sessions- ages 4-9 and 10-15. $10. HoneybeeLives, New Paltz. 255-6113.

Rascal Flatts with Special Guest Taylor Swift 8pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

William McManus on Andy Warhol 1pm. Dia: Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100.

MUSIC

Aston Magna Concert Call for times. Music of the 17th and 18th centuries performed on period instruments. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7216.

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SATURDAY 26 JULY

The Remaking of An Icon: Behind the Scenes at the Jean House 10am-11:30am. Special tour of the newly reopened house. $5. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. 2008 Rosendale Farmers’ Market 9am-3pm. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-3467. East Durham Market Days 10am-3pm. Goods and activities including live music. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. Olde Hurley Guided Walking Tour 2pm. $3. Hurley Heritage Museum, Hurley. 338-5253.

MUSIC Columbia Festival Orchestra 2pm. A classical road trip. $25/$20. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. The Fitzwilliam Quartet of England 4pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. The Summer Sunset Concert Series 5:30pm. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200. Open Mike 8pm. The Country Inn, Krumville. 657-8956.

Acting for the Camera 6pm-9pm. Casting director Jenny O’Haver teaches how to hone acting skills to the camera. $25/$100 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 528-6728.

KIDS Movement Class for Kids and Teens Call for times. $12/$60 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Tennis Camp Call for times. Ages 8-18. $269. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 687-5263. Digi Photo Fun Camp Through 8/1. Ages 9-12. $249. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025. Marching Percussion Camp Through 8/1 Ages 11-17. $230. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025. Sprouts Summer Arts Program Through 8/1. Ages 3-7. Greenville Middle School, Greenville. (518) 943-3400. Smart Moves - Girls Only! Through 8/1. Ages 12-15. $150. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

MUSIC David Kraai 11pm. Oasis Cafe, New Paltz. 255-2400.

SPOKEN WORD Poetry Open Mike 7pm. Donald Lev & Home Planet News Benefit. $4. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.


THEATER ALAN ZWEIBEL IMAGE PROVIDED

A Life in Laughs The plot of Alan Zweibel’s Thurber Prize-winning novel The Other Shulman (Villard, 2006) is based on the premise that a doppelganger might be formed from all the weight one gains and loses over 30 years. It’s a premise zany enough for “Saturday Night Live,” where Zweibel wrote some of the most memorable skits for the original “not-ready-forprime-time players” in the late '70s. Zweibel, who created the Rosanne Rosanadanna character with Gilda Radner, later wrote a book about his intense friendship with the comedienne, Bunny Bunny, Gilda Radner: A Sort of Love Story (Villard, 1994), which he later turned into a play after workshopping the production at Powerhouse Theater in 1995. His credits also include cowriting Billy Crystal’s Tony Award-winning one-man show 700 Sundays, cocreating the influential “It’s Garry Shandling’s Show,” as well as producing Larry David’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm.” Zweibel brings his latest project, “The History of Me,” a one-man show tracing the ups and downs of his career in comedy, to Vassar this month for further development and a three-night stand. “The History of Me” will be presented July 18 through July 20, part of Powerhouse’s “Inside Look” series at the Susan Shiva Stein Theater. (845) 437-7235; http://powerhouse.vassar.edu. —Brian K. Mahoney You started out writing jokes for Borscht Belt comedians. What was it like to write jokes for the Borscht Belt in the late '60s, when the counter culture was in full swing? It was frustrating because I was 21 and they were 40 and 45. It was like writing for my parents and it was certainly not my sensibility. So I was grateful for the opportunity to learn how to start writing jokes. But ultimately, it became frustrating because my sensibilities were more Woodstock-ish, as opposed to paving the driveway. So it was a little difficult for me because I wasn’t able to write what I wanted to. That’s why, when “Saturday Night Live” came along, it was perfect, because that was my generation and that was my peers and with my life experiences and political and social views. What would have been a typical joke that you would have written for a Borscht Belt comedian? Oh God, do I have to do this? They paid me $7 a joke back then. That was the going rate for somebody who had no credits. They would tell you what they wanted jokes about, then you wrote those jokes. If they needed jokes about sperm banks, I’d write a joke saying there’s this new thing now called a sperm bank, which is just like an ordinary bank, except here, after you make a deposit, you lose interest. I read that [“Saturday Night Live” creator] Lorne Michaels had called you the worst comedian he had ever seen. Well, he had seen me at Catch a Rising Star, where I had grown tired of writing for those guys. I took all the jokes they wouldn’t buy from me and I started hanging out at the clubs in New York City, which were on the rise at that time, and the plan was to go on stage and to deliver the jokes with the hopes that somebody would come in and like the material and give me a job as a TV writer. And that’s what happened when Lorne came in one day and saw me and was totally underwhelmed by my stand-up, because I had only been doing it for four months and I wasn’t a performer. I was just saying the jokes basically, but he liked the material, and he wanted to see more of it. So we met a few days later, I showed him a lot more jokes, like 100 jokes that I had written, and based on that, he gave me a job.

What are some of your favorite bits that you wrote for “SNL?” I don’t know, jeez it’s so long ago. My God. Let me think. I used to like writing the Roseanne Rosannadannas for Gilda—that’s pretty much up there. How much of that was scripted and how much was her improvising? It was all written. I wrote the whole thing. There was no riffing. What about the John Belushi samurai bits? It was scripted. He would veer from it, but when you’re on television, the camera expects you to be at a certain place at a certain time, so there can be little ad-libs within somethings. But generally, they have to know where you’re going. How did “The History of Me” come about as a project? When I was on a book tour, I kept on writing stuff for me to do in speaking engagements to promote the book, and at the end of it, I had about two hours of material. I basically took the lectures, the anecdotes, all the stuff that I was talking about—myself, my family, whatever—and slowly started the process of turning it into “an evening with,” as opposed to a guy at a podium. So I did it at the Aspen Comedy Festival and it worked very, very well there. Right now, it’s OK. It gets laughs and it touches you in a spot, but I know in the writing there’s a lot of work I still have to do. Right now, it sounds too much like “And then I wrote this, and then I wrote that.” As funny as it is and all that stuff, I know there is another level to the piece that I want to explore up at Vassar. Is this your first one-person show? Oh yeah, I’ve never done anything like this before. I have just speaking engagements all over the country, but I’ve never done anything theatrical before. Are you nervous when you perform? Oddly enough, no. I don’t know why. [Laughs]. I’m not a stand-up comedian. But I have found that people listen to these stories, even in their primitive form if you will, and that their attention spans are longer than I ever thought. “The History of Me” is old-fashioned; it’s like a fireside chat. And people just sit back and listen. It’s very encouraging to me that people in this day and age, where everything has gone so quickly—computers, MTV, and the pace of media—that people will sit back and they’ll just listen to stories. I find comfort in that. It takes the pressure off me a little bit because I don’t have to get a laugh every two seconds.

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TUESDAY 29 JULY

EVENTS

SPOKEN WORD Historic High Falls—The Rustic Nooks of Mohonk and American Landscape Design 10am. Slide presentation. Bevier House Museum/Ulster County Historical Society, Kingston. 339-7858.

CLASSES

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Casting for Recovery Retreat Call for times. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 205.

Rhythm Tap Dance Classes 5:30pm. Introduction to the art of sound and movement taught by Stefanie Weber. $50 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 281-6734.

Intro to Kabbalistic Healing: A Framework for Living a Healed Life 6pm-8pm. Miriam’s Well, Saugerties. 246-5805.

FILM

CLASSES

The Bet Collector Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

EVENTS

Introduction to Watercolor 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

MUSIC

Chess Review 2pm-4pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

Pastel Techniques 1pm-3pm. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Aston Magna Concert Call for times. Music of the 17th and 18th centuries performed on period instruments. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7216.

Footloose 8:30pm. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Drawing, Painting and Composition 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

The Wizard of Verse 7:30m. Music of Yip Harburg. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272.

MUSIC

Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Scene study/technique. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154.

Hudson Valley Philharmonic 8pm. Conducted by Vladimir Feltsman. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869.

Broadway/Regional Director’s Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Beginning acting class for adults and teens. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154.

THEATER

FILM

Community Music Night 8pm-9:45pm. Six local singer-songwriters. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. The Asylum Street Spankers 8pm. $20. WAMC Linda Norris Auditorium, Albany. (518) 465-5233.

SPOKEN WORD Summer Artist Slide Lectures 7:30pm. Chris Petrone, Laura Moriarty, Kathy Walkup, and Jen Rose. Women’s Studio Workshop Gallery, Rosendale. 658-9133.

WEDNESDAY 30 JULY

Life Drawing 7pm. No materials or instructor provided, just a live model. $4 to $8. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 499-9348. Hustle Dance Class 7:30pm. $15/class. Strictly Ballroom, Balmville. 569-0530.

DANCE

ART

Mimulus 8pm. Brazilian dance troupe. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Watercolor Painting 9am-12pm. $220/8 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Artists of David Michalek’s Slow Dancing 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

CLASSES

Muddy Lindy 8pm-10pm. Kingston’s Casual Swing Stomp. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881.

Impressionism with Oil 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Drawing for Painting 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Figurative Clay Sculpture 1pm-4pm. $166/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing, Painting and Composition 6pm-9pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Beginner Pilates Mat Workout 6:30pm-7:30pm. $119. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

DANCE National Dance Institute 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Mimulus 8pm. Brazilian dance troupe. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Woodstock Farm Festival 4pm-8pm. Farm products, children’s activities, live music, and gardening advice. Maple Lane, Woodstock. 679-7618.

FILM Let The Wind Blow 7:30pm. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

KIDS Kids in the Kaatskills Call for times. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469.

MUSIC Dangling Success 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Open Mike 7pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300.

David Michalek’s Slow Dancing 8:15pm. Dance and video image performance. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

FILM

Jacques d’Amboise: Teaching Star 5pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

THEATER Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Souvenir 7:30pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 7/08

West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. The Pied Piper 11am. Kids on Stage Performance. $6-$9. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. Souvenir 8pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

WORKSHOPS Denise Jordan Finley 7:30pm. Guitar workshop. Hyde Park Library Annex, Hyde Park, Alabama. 229-7791.

Menopause the Musical 8pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Souvenir 8pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

SATURDAY 2 AUGUST ART

SUNDAY 3 AUGUST ART New Works by Cindy Hoose & Jacinta Bunnell 2pm-4pm. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Works by Hale Johnson 5pm-7pm. Realist landscapes. Harrison Gallery, Williamstown, MA. (413) 458-1700.

Very Beginner Yoga Series 12:30pm-1:30pm. $65. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528.

DANCE

CLASSES

Mimulus 2pm. Brazilian dance troupe. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

A Wealth of History and Fine Food in the Hudson River Valley Call for times. Elderhostel Program. Mount Gulian Historic Site, Beacon. 831-8172.

Stacks 8pm. Collaboration of poetry and dance. $15. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

DANCE

EVENTS

Mimulus 2pm. Brazilian dance troupe. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

13th Annual Gathering of the Vibes 2008 Call for times. Four day, car-side camping, all ages event with on site food, beverage, and arts and crafts vendors. Seaside Park, Bridgeport, Connecticut. (203) 908-3030. Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877. Swing Shift Orchestra 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Open Mike 7:30pm-9:30pm. Joshua’s Java Lounge, Woodstock. 679-5533. Greater Ellenville Jazz Trio 8pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000.

SPOKEN WORD Gallery Talk by Iain Machell, Deborah Davidovits, Allen Bryan 12pm-1pm. Artists in the exhibition—Hudson Valley Artists 2008: The Medium is the Message. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz. 257-3858. Dance, Technology, and Collaboration 7pm. $5. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

Antique Fair and Flea Market Call for times. $2/$1 seniors/children free. Washington County Fairgrounds, Greenwich. Kingston’s History Tour Call for times. 18th-century cooking, crafts, and games demonstrated by interpreters in period clothing, with guided and self tours. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786. Pakatakan Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326. Riverside Farmers and Artisians Market 10am-2pm. With live music. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. Archaeology Day on the Street 10am-4pm. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. Tannersville Crazy Race and Festival 11am-4pm. Main Street, Tannersville. (518) 589-5765.

West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

FRIDAY 1 AUGUST CLASSES Printmaking 9am-12pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Rhythm Songs in Rhythm Tap 5pm-6pm. Beginner to advanced beginner jazz tap taught by Sherry Hains-Salerno. $12. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 663-7962.

DANCE Mimulus 8pm. Brazilian dance troupe. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. David Michalek’s Slow Dancing 8:15pm. Dance and video image performance. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Atelier-Figure Painting 9am-12pm. $120-$300. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

David Michalek’s Slow Dancing 5pm. Dance and video image performance. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Antique Fair and Flea Market Call for times. $2/$1 seniors/children free. Washington County Fairgrounds, Greenwich. 2008 Rosendale Farmers Market 9am-3pm. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-3467.

KIDS The Three Bears 1pm. Children’s opera. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344.

FILM Dinner and a Movie 6:30pm. Chocolate with Francine Segan/Chocolat. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

THEATER

Souvenir 7:30pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

SPOKEN WORD

Menopause the Musical Call for times. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

MUSIC

Open Mike Night 7pm-9pm. Acoustic solos and duets. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739.

You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown 2pm. Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15/$5 children. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286.

Community Playback Theatre 7:30pm. Improvisations of audience stories. $6. Boughton Place, Highland. 691-4118.

THEATER

David Michalek’s Slow Dancing 2:15pm. Dance and video image performance. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

THE OUTDOORS

West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

Disappearing Dutch Brooklyn: Where Have All The Houses Gone? 7pm-9pm. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

Let The Wind Blow Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

Classical Guitarist Peter Fletcher 7pm. Ellenville Public Library, Ellenville. 647-1497.

Open Mike Night 9:30pm. Sign up at 8:30 p.m. Tess’ Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

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THURSDAY 31 JULY

MUSIC The People’s Open Mike 12am. Peint o Gwrw Tavern, Chatham. (518) 392-2943. Local Singer/Songwriter Showcase and Brunch Saturday 10:30am-12pm. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469. Young People’s Concert 11am. Maria Bachman, solo violin. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217.

MUSIC Trio Solisti 4pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. the Summer Sunset Concert Series 5:30pm. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200. HippieFest 6pm. Features performances from Eric Burdon & The Animals, Jack Bruce of Cream, The Turtles featuring Flo & Eddie, Melanie, Badfinger, and Terry Sylvester of The Hollies. $23-$60. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

THEATER

Mark Raisch 6pm-9:30pm. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411.

West Side Story 3pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

Big Blue Big Band 6pm-8pm. Waterfront Park, Hudson.

Souvenir 2pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

String Trio of New York 8pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217.

Menopause the Musical 2:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Belleayre Festival Opera 8pm. Ruggero Leoncavallo’s “Pagliacci” and Famous Opera Choruses. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344. Keith Pray’s Big Soul Ensemble 9pm. Tess’ Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779. Planeside 10pm. The Firebird Lounge, Rhinebeck. 876-8686.

THE OUTDOORS Canoe Trip to Buckley Dunton Lake 9am-12pm. $20/$15 members. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320.

Mozart’s Don Giovanni 3pm. Based on the character of Don Juan, probably the most notorious womanizer in literature. $25/$22 seniors and students/$15 children. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272.

WORKSHOPS Plein Air Painting Workshops 9:30am-1pm. Call for location. 728-4001. Teacher Training Orientation 4pm. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528.


CALL FOR ENTRIES Over $2,000 in Cash Prizes in Adult, Youth (16 and under) and Family Group Divisions For more information or to receive the Official Entry Form Call, write or visit our website: Donskoj & Company 93 Broadway Kingston NY 12401 845-338-8473 ArtistSoapboxDerby.com

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Planet Waves BY ERIC FRANCIS COPPOLINO

EMIL ALZAMORA

In Canada, they call it therapy

A

t Omega Institute last weekend, I did something that in retrospect was pretty daring—started a bunch of relatively new astrology students working with Chiron transits. Looking at the events and experiences surrounding several past Chiron transits is one of the most efficient ways to get an understanding of a person and of their chart. These transits include Chiron’s squares, oppositions, and return to its own natal position (each of which happens for a brief phase once per 50-year cycle), as well as Chiron conjunct the ascendant, Sun and Moon. 126 PLANET WAVES CHRONOGRAM 7/08

A friend made up a nifty 100-year Chiron ephemeris that fits on six pages (for easy copying), I brought a new, very fast printer so we could have instant charts for the class and—with a little bit of mindfulness—we had everything we needed to get going. After a brief introduction, I demonstrated the process on one student whose transits turned out to be quite dramatic and timed precisely to the 50-year orbit of Chiron. The themes of these events all related to his Moon/Chiron conjunction in Capricorn in the fourth house; the result being a long sequence of events involving his home, family, and security


base. This was astrology in real life, not in theory; and it was astrology connected to a living client we could all see and dialogue with, rather than case study in a book. Usually, astrology studies begin with the rote memorization of the planets through the signs and houses. Each placement is presumed to have a “meaning,” and that meaning is presumed to be static and definitive. For example, I have Venus in Taurus, and once I read in a book that this means I will go to the same restaurant every day and order the same thing. Which is precisely what I do, but I think it’s purely a coincidence. The themes of Chiron, as I mentioned last week, are apropos of Omega Institute because it’s a holistic studies center dedicated to the raising of awareness, the two most important themes of this archetype. The risk of using Chiron is that material “too deep” will come up, but the friendly part is that when we’re truly serving as a facilitator, we don’t need to fix anyone or do very much, but rather bear witness to the human condition, and serve as an honest reflecting pool. I also thought it was excellent that Mercury in Gemini was stationing retrograde in an exact trine to Chiron as we began the class Friday night. It can take an hour or two to do this process; I recommend that newer astrology students set aside a full session, and strive to accomplish nothing but hearing the client’s account of their biographical material. At this point in my work, I can usually spot check the transits in about half an hour and get a feel for how someone who has come to me processes their changes. Once the lifetime Chiron transits are out in the open, the choices the client faces in the present moment, and the factors influencing them, are much more obvious. The name of the tune is pattern recognition, and seeing where the current experience of life fits into a larger, often hidden pattern— then bringing that pattern to light. With this done, an astrologer and client can then work with the awareness of what has happened, what it represents, and what is happening—then use that information to look at options, consider possible courses of action, and to understand recurring issues much more clearly. I think this is more effective and far more ethical than an astrologer picking up the chart and telling the client who they are. Yes, there are times to read a chart; Saturn in Capricorn has a different sense of existence than Saturn in Aquarius, and you need to factor that. An astrologer needs to be able to feel the Moon in a chart and be aware of the way that it can dominate the personality. But in a process workspace, the sense of existence needs to come from the client’s experiences rather than from the astrologer’s projections. When I teach this process in Canada, they tell me it would be defined as “therapy,” and therefore questionably legal to practice without a therapist’s license. To which I reply, if there is an astrologer in the room with an ephemeris, a horoscope chart, and a client who thinks you’re an astrologer, who happens to be chasing a comet around the solar system, then that is clearly astrology. It may be “therapeutic,” but on the right day, so is going to the movies, a prostitute, or the gym. That an astrologer might listen to the client for an hour or two before making any pronouncements at all might be considered radical, but I think it’s common sense. When I train established professional astrologers in this, one of their most burning questions is how to condition their clientele not to show up with questions like, “When should I dump my stock portfolio?” or “When is the fabulous guy gonna show up?” This is easy. When you make the space for people to express their feelings, they usually open up. It happens rarely enough that anyone really cares or has time to listen, or the compassion to actually extend themselves emotionally. Using the Chiron process, we admit that a person has feelings; and in doing so, we might even get underneath the resistance to being in a loving relationship, and we might understand something about values concerning money that would influence a financial decision. This seems more in the domain of spiritual work than therapy or traditional astrology, and I would remind everyone that the practice of both spirituality and astrology (and indeed of therapy) are protected speech under the First Amendment of the Constitution. Such a process also does something vital, which is to teach astrologers how transits work, and thus how the natal chart works. It provides a window into human nature, and not merely astrological nature, as it attempts to explain human nature. Transits inherently remind us all that the cosmos is a thing in motion, and that planets act as waves much more than they act as particles.

Working this way runs precisely opposite to a dominant trend in mainstream astrology, which is harkening back to much older modes of work where things are perceived to be predetermined, predictable, and more orderly than life usually turns out to be. In a world that grows more complex and uncertain every day, the idea that there is a simple answer to the many questions of existence is appealing. Astrology is terrible for finding easy answers. It is excellent for taking a complex view of a situation, seeing the many factors and people involved, observing that everything is in relationship to everything else; and then for making observations that may be reflected both in life and in the chart. Closer to the heart of the matter is the need for astrology to face the many unknowns that come with existence, rather than attempting to explain the mystery away. That is religion: You co-opt philosophy, sex, death, and the meaning of life and sell it to people in a moral package. An art form connected to an ever-expanding cosmos needs to look at mystery and show respect for mystery. We need to recognize that each client and each reader presents an entirely different, truly unique worldview, metaphysical view, sexual orientation, and set of specific needs. We need to recognize that astrologers come to the work with their own issues. I encouraged my students, in particular, to know their sexual issues and to understand the specific ways in which religion and their parents messed them up. We may not be able to resolve all of this material before we start working with people, but if we know our issues it will be that much easier to keep them out of the way of our clients. We will be able to assist people who are happier than us, more successful than we are, or who dare to be freer than we would ever dream of being. And we can also work with those who face situations far more grim than we would ever wish for anyone, but not be coming from a sense of pity or the need to fix anyone. Along these lines, I recommend that anyone who is working with people as an astrologer be in a therapy process. I don’t think it’s necessary to have “completed” the process, but rather to be in deep enough to feel vulnerable, and to have opened the lid to the unknown within themselves. Part of therapy is claiming what you feel, what you know and what you don’t know, and if you get into those habits, you will be a lot less likely to inflict damage on the people who come to you for help. And if you have a therapist you trust and can go to, you will have a mentor who can guide you through difficult situations with clients, which may arise from time to time. This is a tall order, I know. But the short way around the tree is to listen, and in order for an astrologer to listen, the first thing that needs to happen is that an astrologer needs to know himself or herself. Clients need to be willing to speak about their lives, their needs, and what they want to create with the work—but this is much more likely to happen if the astrologer is open-minded and able to have a modicum of objectivity on their own situation. If your buttons get pushed really easily, or if you can’t at least make a space where this doesn’t happen, then it would be a lot better for you to not work with people until you get clear about your own inner condition. There is also a need to have faith in creativity. In other words, instead of telling a client what is going to happen, it makes much more sense to ask them what they want to happen, what they don’t want to happen, and to use the awesome power of astrology and awareness to help them make the necessary choices to get the results they need. And this, too, needs to stand apart from spiritual fascism and New Age megalomania: We are only cocreators of the world; it does quite a bit of cocreating with us, and to us. I think the single most significant thing that an astrologer can do is tune into the creative force behind it all. This is easy: You can start by asking for help, and agreeing that the work be devoted to the greatest good for all concerned. Then you gently move through the plasma of consciousness and see what comes to the surface. Chiron by its nature turns the discussion to receptive mode, puts the emphasis on healing, and has a useful way of dedicating everything to raising awareness. And, hey—this is what I learned in my first experience teaching astrology at a world-class holistic study center last weekend. Eric ogy fine can

Francis Coppolino has set up shop in Uptown Kingston and is taking astrol(and photography) clients in person, without a waiting list. He also has a website with daily content, photos and many excellent new features. You reach him locally at (845) 331-0355, and on the net at PlanetWaves.net.

7/08 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 127


Horoscopes The seemingly endless Mercury retrograde of May and June is fi nally over and a new season has begun. If that big hunk of iron going past the Earth set your life into various shades of technological or fi nancial chaos, use the new environment to gently set things back in order. Planetary movements for July take us from a prevailing state of restless mental agitation (a heck of a lot of Gemini) into a space of emotional depth (the Sun and personal planets in Cancer). There’s a significant difference, as you will feel. The widely perceived problem with emotions is that they seem to put us in a passive position. We seem so subjected to their movements, their currents, their unpredictability. When we’re mentally obsessed, we have the illusion of control. When the emotional waters grow deep, many people feel helpless, and retreat to their prefab concepts and ideas about life. However, there is nothing passive about feeling. Indeed, feeling is a form of initiative because it allows us to exist in the moment, within a shared environment. The ultimate proactive position in life is to be sincere. This month’s astrology will support you in doing just that. In my view as an astrologer and traveler, it’s worth the risk.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) I suggest you direct your energy and aggression toward feathering your nest. Such is not the pinnacle of human civilization, but in a sense it is the foundation of it. For the next couple of weeks, you may feel like you’re banging your head against a wall where work-related projects are concerned. You may be up against all of your limits, and there may be someone driving you to the edge of your patience, and you may have got the idea from somewhere that it’s your job to fi x them. In the alternate, you may decide it’s your job to fi x yourself. Growth, however, consists of more than mental or mechanical tinkering, and in a fairly short time, you’re likely to have decided that so much that you thought was wrong is simply well enough. Perfection for you is now a matter of easing back rather than driving forward. You clearly want a sense of belonging, of safety, of an environment that can support you, but the way to be there is to receive and accept, rather than to conquer and be aggressive. This is a fancy way of saying despite the many pressures you are under, take it easy.

TAURUS

(April 20-May 20)

You may be in a titanic struggle to set some aspect of your creativity free. It would not be a stretch to say that you’re also trying to dissolve some stubborn block to your erotic expression, which I would note is predominantly a mental block. If you are seeking the assistance of someone in this effort, be careful what role you assign them. Many people feel that it’s acceptable to let others take their risks, or to put themselves in a position that is essentially a setup for their own submission. This often happens when you cannot submit to your own will. You can then allow yourself to be backed into a corner and have certain decisions be made for you, or to allow someone else’s desire nature to take over where your own is lacking. One way to look at this month’s astrology on a psychological level is as an exploration of a struggle between your craving for curiosity and passion, and your tendency to be conservative, withholding, or psychologically rigid. On the interpersonal level, it’s a study in the role that you assign to men. You may fear that if you respect their strength, you must succumb to your own weakness. But that is not necessary.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You may have come to the point where you decided that making any decision was better than making no decision at all, and you will soon see how that works out for you. I can assure you that while it won’t develop quite as you planned, you set up the situation excellently for the opportunity to make another choice at an opportune moment. It’s important that you eliminate the concept “setback” or “detour” from your lexicon and instead work with the concept that each of the odd events of your recent life is leading you to the right place. This is particularly true regarding a fi nancial decision you seem to be making, or the choice about how to manage some of your assets. To reduce the margin for error, you need to think in terms of what you have rather than what you don’t have; what you are doing right rather than what you are doing wrong; what you know rather than what you don’t know. It is true that the past few weeks have been frustrating, but they’ve had a silver lining. You learned a lot about yourself, and by some odd coincidence, you have arrived right at the point where you can put that knowledge to work.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) Your moment, or a great moment, has arrived. It is however a time when you must be certain you’re more committed to success than to struggle. I know, this is not easy, mainly because few people recognize the issue in such simple terms. For most, the concept would seem like wishful thinking, which does not get the bills paid. For you, it is the only necessity. Ease and flow are indicative of a state of mind, not a particular result in the external world. Like all water sign people, it’s vital that you proceed with your life from the inside out: from your feelings, then extending into the world. Everything—and I do mean everything—emanates from your emotional core and ripples outward into your perception and experience. This, in turn, becomes the magnet that draws the life you want toward you. Stay close to your inner tides, your moods, your movements of energy. Pay attention to the

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Horoscopes elusive issue of balance, and remember that you are living on the planet in a time when very nearly everything and everyone is out of balance. Note carefully how your feelings change as the new season develops. In order to achieve the breakthrough that you seem destined to make, you are going to be inclined to push your mind into overdrive. Think, but think gently. Feel, and feel boldly.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) There are two kinds of fantasies: the idle ones, that are more like wishes, and the ones where you summon your deepest creativity and activate the power of your imagination. As a Leo, you are much more inclined to the second type, especially now. Consider for a moment that your thoughts actually have creative power. Consider that they are like blueprints that establish the pathways of your psychic architecture. One reason this is not a popular theory is because if it’s true, we might be concerned that fear would have the same power to create negativity. I don’t think this is true; rather, I think that fear serves mostly to block creative power, waste energy, and distract us, rather than to create specific negative outcomes. What you need to remember is that fear and creativity have a distinct relationship. The more creative potency we apply to a situation, the more fear we are likely to stir up and will need to process. This willingness to work with fear rather than against it is often the line between true and false creativity. So keep shining your light. Pour it into the shadows, and look for the many ways there is simply nothing there—then collect all that energy that was holding you back from envisioning the future and taking action to create it.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sep. 22)

You have a right to change who you are, and you’ve probably decided the time to do so is now. Indeed, it would appear that you have embarked on one of the most detailed and energetic self-improvement programs of your life. Before you get too far, I would propose that changing who you are is not nearly as important as revisioning how you feel about yourself. Notably, the influences that are pushing you, and pushing you so hard, to improve yourself are likely to be sending you negative, conflicted, or frustrated signals. Another set of influences is encouraging you to accept yourself exactly as you are right now. I recognize the difficulty of this paradox, and I know how pervasive it is in spiritual and self-help circles. The whole game seems to be founded in the need to change, and is activated by acceptance. But we don’t necessarily see that acceptance is the form of change that makes all others possible. Obviously, putting yourself under a lot of pressure does not work. If, however, you discover that you are already under some enormous psychic pressure or carrying what seems to be a burden you don’t understand, that is a sign that you need to switch methods. You may not recognize that what you are going through now is indeed a burden, even though may feel it is a virtue.

LIBRA (Sep. 23-Oct. 22) What is troubling you? It would help if your fears were not so detailed, and it would help more if they did not become an instant point of contention. The real fear you’re struggling with is that of isolation. It’s as though you feel removed from yourself as well as from the world, though there may be no physical reason in your environment for this. Your solar chart strongly suggests that you are starting to feel angry about being isolated. The problem is that it’s not entirely true. There are key facets of your life where you are visible, participating in the world and the focus of true admiration. This may confl ict directly with your sense of your own existence; you may not even be able to see the evidence that you are having an impact. Please recognize that your work is not only having an impact, but you are reaching people on the emotional level as well. You are fi nally involved with something that expresses your true values, your commitment to caring for the world, and which meets the most important criteria of all, contacts people personally. Therefore, you can feel good about responding to the call for leadership. If you’re feeling isolated, let that stand as a reminder of the condition of 99 percent of the population, and is a key part of why you must do the work you are being called up on to do.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) There are many ways to fi nd your niche in life, and this would seem to be your preoccupation at the moment. The service role you’re seeking in your community appears to be some combination of healer and information specialist. This is not particularly easy, given that most people, despite what they may claim, don’t actually want what helps them; they want what entertains them. Most don’t want what they need, they want what they want. It is not up to you to personally turn the tide of Western civilization, though for the next few weeks you may feel that it is. Start on a scale you understand, which is defi nitely smaller than the scale you want to be working on. Rather than alienating people with your message, I suggest you seek allies in your community who are on the same basic wavelength as you are, and then let your community function be about leadership and coordination. As someone who possesses both passion and intelligence, you’re the person with the best résumé for the job. If you look at your long-term vision, in part based on your extensive experience and in part based on your stated goals, you’ll see that this kind of involvement fits your agenda perfectly.

www.planetwaves.net 7/08 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 129


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Pluto has made a brief return to your sign, the last for more than two centuries. A long era of your life is drawing to a close. Indeed, an important era in the history of our community and our culture is about to turn the page. The brief interval between now and just before your birthday when Pluto is in Sagittarius is a crucial phase of summing up the many visions you have had for your life since the mid-1990s, and aligning the most meaningful ones with your true intentions. We have all grown a little too large in this era. This time in both personal and cultural history has been one characterized by the drive to put quantity over quality; to grab anything we can get, and to conquer the world rather than to see the world in a grain of sand. In this time, you have taken on a role of ideological leadership. There are aspects of this that have worked brilliantly, and others that seem to have fallen flat. You now have a brief interval of time to review your accomplishments, unfi nished business, and apparent failures. Five months at the end of an approximately 14-year phase is not long—it is so short most people will not even notice that the time has passed. Pluto is not one who appreciates being gainsaid. Note this moment carefully.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You cannot force yourself to believe something, no matter how much you may want to. Facts do not add up to faith, just as all the Saints do not add up to God. What you really need to do is look at the world around you with your eyes open, and take in the direct evidence of what is so. By that I mean look at the world immediately around you, close-by and right now, and you will have all the verification you need for a question that is grating at you; you will have all the justification for sincere belief, and in the end, all the supporting data to make the point to others who may need evidence. Anyway, the truth of one particular matter of right and wrong will soon be obvious, and the revelation is likely to compel you to change how you think. It may help to remind you that what is true needs to be valid more than in principle. Reality stands on its own merit and does not need a theory to back it up. Therefore, if you fi nd yourself theorizing, speculating, or projecting far into the future, stop and check yourself. Is there something you’re avoiding? Is there someone close to you whose feelings you need to admit and acknowledge, in their entirety? You may want to phrase the question that way, and make sure you open your heart and your mind when the time comes to listen.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Someone may be driving a hard bargain, and may indeed seem perfectly unreasonable in their approach. You must use psychology, not persuasion or force. They are being unreasonable with themselves more than with anyone else, and this situation will pass without your doing too much. However, you may be taking it personally, and you may feel inclined to respond. If so, you’ll need to work out the mental chess game that they are putting themselves through, and, in a sense, you’ll need to know anyone you’re dealing with better than they know themselves. This is easy because most people lack any objectivity on their own situation. What you need to do at the same time is maintain some objectivity about your own status. Here is one fairly obvious key. Finding a meeting place will come in the form of acknowledging the sprit of the plans rather than the excruciating details. To set yourself free of the scourge that is affl icting so many at the moment, you will need to keep your Aquarian equanimity at the front of your very broad mind. You also need to give the impression—and take on board—the fact that certain details do indeed matter, but what they add up to matters entirely more.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Distance yourself from the struggles of others. They’re not your problem, but they can become so if you get too involved. At this point, it may be that many people around you are in an identity crisis, struggling with changes or caught in some degree of mental frustration. However, this condition is not unanimous, and neither are the styles in which people are going through their wide diversity of movements and developments. This is a particularly meaningful time for you to figure out who’s who and what’s what in your relationships. It’s one part of an overall get-serious campaign that you were summoned to embark on about one year ago. To my thinking, this amounts to being aware and seeing patterns, for example, patterns of giving and receiving; of how people handle their life crises, and of how they perceive you and what they think your role is in their life. The overarching theme of your relationships now is setting limits and paying attention to the details. They are related, because being the generous person you are, you will need to set those limits—and reclaim your energy—one relationship at a time. After a while, you’ll figure out with whom you want to share the best of what you have to offer. Until then, bide your time.

www.planetwaves.net 130 PLANET WAVES CHRONOGRAM 7/08


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7/08 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 131


132 CHRONOGRAM 7/08

Caitlin Wheeler’s silk screens will be exhibited in the group show “Printed Matter,” an exploration of contemporary printmaking, at the Ann Street Gallery, 104 Ann Street, Newburgh, through August 2. (845) 562-6940; www.annstreetgallery.org.

An Interpretation of Cartography, Caitlin Wheeler, silk screen print on found paper, 2007

Parting Shot


Chronogram - July 2008  

A regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of New York's beautiful Hudson Valley. - July 200...

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