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THE ILLUSTRATORS

TH E B R IT I SH ART OF I L LU S TR AT I ON 19 0 0 -2 0 1 6


Copyright © Chris Beetles Ltd 2016 8 & 10 Ryder Street St James’s London SW1Y 6QB 020 7839 7551 gallery@chrisbeetles.com www.chrisbeetles.com

THE ILLUSTR ATORS

ISBN 978-1-905738-76-2 Cataloguing in publication data is available from the British Library Researched and written by David Wootton, with contributions from Alexander Beetles Edited by David Wootton, with Fiona Nickerson and Pascale Oakley Design by Jeremy Brook of Graphic Ideas Photography by Julian Huxley-Parlour Reproduction by www.cast2create.com Colour separation and printing by Geoff Neal Litho Limited

T H E BR I TI SH A RT OF ILLUS TR ATION 190 0- 201 6

Front cover: Helen Jacobs On a Bat’s Back I Do Fly [89] Front endpaper: William Heath Robinson Waterlow Park, Highgate [detail] [31] This page: André François Mr Punch as a Knight [141] Title page: Sara Midda Painting the Beast [206] Back endpaper: Ed Sorel Jack ran as fast as he could, and the Ogre came rushing after him [detail] [131] Back cover: Paul Mak Two Witches [94]

CHRIS BEETLES 8 & 10 Ryder Street, St James’s, London SW1Y 6QB 020 7839 7551 gallery@chrisbeetles.com www.chrisbeetles.com


The Twentieth Century

CONTENTS T H E TW EN T IE T H CENT URY

RO NAL D SE ARLE AS ARTI ST AND C OL LEC TO R

Edmund Joseph Sullivan

6

William Heath Robinson

21

Ronald Searle

104

E H Shepard

30

George Du Maurier

108

Randolph Schwabe

36

Christian Bérard

109

H M Bateman

50

André François

110

David Low

58

E O Plauen

112

Pont

60

Alain Bonnec

112

Helen Jacobs

62

Jessie Dunlop

64

C ONTE MPOR ARIES

Paul Mak

66

Quentin Blake

114

Mervyn Peake

80

Jane Pinkney

116

Rowland Emett

82

Sara Midda

118

Paul Cox

140

Matt

146

Frank Dickens: In Memoriam

148

A M E RI C AN S Al Hirschfeld

88

Peter Arno

93

David Levine

94

Select Bibliography

150

Arnold Roth

97

Cumulative Index

151

Ed Sorel

99

Index

155


TH E TW ENTIETH CENT URY

E D M UN D J O S E P H SU L L I VA N Edmund Joseph Sullivan, RWS RE IS (1869-1933) E J Sullivan was one of the most striking and confident illustrators of his generation. His work ranged across many moods and media, and he became a particularly influential teacher. Edmund Joseph Sullivan was born in Putney, London, on 8 September 1869. He was the second son and third of twelve children of the Irishborn art teacher, Michael Sullivan – then an assistant teacher at the Roman Catholic school, St Mary Magdalene’s, Mortlake – and his wife, Mary Anne (née Melady). During the early 1870s, the Sullivans lived at 3 Beech Hill Terrace, Kendal, Westmoreland. Then, in the middle of the decade, the growing family moved to Hastings, settling at 1 South Terrace, and later moving to 8 Quarry Terrace. Michael Sullivan became the first headmaster of the new School of Art at the Brassey Institute (and would later be appointed Chairman of the Society of Art Masters, in the years 1891-93).

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Edmund Sullivan was educated at Mount St Mary’s College, at Spinkhill, near Chesterfield, a Roman Catholic boarding school in the Jesuit tradition. Following his family’s move to Hastings, he may have attended the local Grammar School. Certainly, by 1885, he was studying under his father, as did his brothers, Leo and Basil, both of whom became architects. (However, the cartoonist, James Frank Sullivan, was not related, contrary to a long-held assumption.) While still a student in 1887, Edmund became an Assistant Master at the School of Art, and was advertising his services as an experienced drawing master in the Hastings and St Leonards Observer. The label in his copy of Alexander Gilchrist’s Life of William Blake evidences his having won the book from Hastings School of Art in 1888 as a prize for obtaining a ‘class excellent in the 3rd grade examination in art’ and achieving similar distinction in other exams. In 1884 and at the age of 15, Sullivan published his first drawing in the children’s comic, Scraps. Then, in 1889, he moved to London and took a room in Chelsea, becoming a staff artist of the weekly illustrated newspaper, the Graphic, the studio of which was led by Godefroy Durand. A year later, Sullivan also began to work for its new sister title, the Daily Graphic, mainly producing portraits. However, in 1893, he was dismissed by its founder, William Luson Thomas, possibly for showing too much originality. This provided an opportunity for him to extend his ambitions, and he quickly moved to the weekly Penny Illustrated Newspaper to contribute as both artist and writer. In the same year, he began to share lodgings at 18 Fitzroy Street with Frank Dean and Archibald Standish Hartrick, who had also drawn for the Daily Graphic. Dean, Hartrick and Sullivan together became close friends and admirers of their fellow contributor, Phil May. Hartrick, Sullivan, and possibly Dean, worked at 8 Wentworth Studios, Manresa Road, Chelsea, and Hartrick proposed Sullivan as a member of the Chelsea Arts Club.

EDMU ND JOSEPH SU LLIVA N

‘Sullivan was naturally the most gifted of the younger black-and-white artists of my time, not excepting Beardsley.’ (A S Hartrick, Painter’s Pilgrimage Through Fifty Years, Cambridge University Press, 1939, page 156)

On 18 July 1894, Sullivan married the journalist, Frances Louisa Williamson, at Marylebone registrar office. She was the daughter of the farmer, Matthew Williams, and widow of the journalist, William Williamson. The Sullivans’ only child, Lilian Eileen, would be born in 1896. Both Sullivan and Hartrick joined the staff of the weekly magazine, The Pall Mall Budget, as relaunched by William Waldorf Astor, and also contributed to his new publication, The Pall Mall Magazine. When The Pall Mall Budget folded in 1895, Harry Furniss took it on, renaming it The New Budget, and merging it with his own periodical, Lika Joko. Sullivan and Hartrick continued to work for this weekly until its swift demise later that year. As a member of the newly founded, but short-lived, Society of Illustrators, Sullivan contributed an illustration to W E Henley’s anthology, A London Garland, which was published in 1895 to mark the society’s inauguration. While continuing to work for many periodicals, he turned decisively to illustrating books during the late 1890s, many of which were editions of popular classics published by Macmillan (including George Borrow’s Lavengro of 1896). He worked both in pen and ink and in chalk and wash in a style that has been compared to that of Edmund Dulac and Arthur Rackham, and shows the influence of Continental, especially German, artists, including Dürer.

At the time that he was working on Sartor Resartus and A Dream of Fair Women, Sullivan and his family were living at 30 Belsize Road, Hampstead. In the opening decade of the twentieth century, and certainly in the years 1905-8, they moved out to Stile Gate at Cookham Dean, in Berkshire, though he continued to use 8 Wentworth Studios as a London base. While at Cookham, he received a visit from the father of Stanley Spencer, who showed him drawings by his teenage son and asked him for advice. During this period, he worked regularly for the publisher, George Newnes, providing frontispieces for two thin paper series – ‘Novels’ and ‘Great Poets and Prose Writers’ – and illustrating classics for the Caxton Series (notably The Pilgrim’s Progress of 1901). At the same time, he contributed to volumes in the series of ‘Daily Mail Sixpenny Novels’ (including three by Stanley J Weyman, ‘the Prince of Romance’). In 1910, Sullivan returned to the writings of Carlyle, illustrating The French Revolution (Chapman & Hall), which many, including Percy Bradshaw, have thought his masterpiece. He showed drawings for this at the Liverpool Autumn Exhibition of Modern Art, in 1910, and at the ‘VI Exposición Internacional de Arte’, in Barcelona, in 1911 (when they were praised in the Spanish periodical, Museum, as ‘a prodigy’). Similarly, he showed drawings for The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam (that he had developed in over more than a decade and published by Methuen in 1913), in the British Pavilion of the Venice Biennale in 1914. By the outbreak of the First World War, Sullivan was living at 18 Hill Road, St John’s Wood, and had become a member of the St John’s Wood Arts Club, like his neighbour, Edward Handley-Read. While Handley-Read saw active service in the Machine Gun Corps, Sullivan’s main contribution to the war effort was his volume of powerful satirical images, The Kaiser’s Garland (exhibited at the Leicester Galleries in October 1915 and published by Heinemann later that year). Before the end of the war, he was drawing political cartoons for the National News, a Sunday newspaper.

Dürer’s influence may be seen in his work for Thomas Carlyle’s Sartor Resartus (George Bell, 1898), one of his earliest successes as a book illustrator, which exemplifies both his beautiful balance of design and his often bizarre imagery. Though he fully exploited the innovative processes of photographic reproduction, that particular book makes use of woodengraving. James Thorpe has stated that with it, ‘he has very definitely arrived and begun to establish his position as the greatest book-illustrator in line that this country has produced’ (Thorpe 1948, page 25).

A very versatile artist, Sullivan also produced advertisements, portrait studies, independent watercolours and etchings. Yet, despite his many achievements, his greatest influence probably lay in his qualities as a teacher, in the tradition of his father. He published two manuals, The Art of Illustration (1921) and Line (1922), and lectured on Book Illustration and Lithography at Goldsmiths’ College School of Art. His students included Eric Fraser, Rowland Hilder, C Walter Hodges, D L Mays and Graham Sutherland. In addition, he was an examiner for the Board of Education and the Joint Matriculation Board, Manchester.

An early member of the International Society of Sculptors, Painters and Gravers, Sullivan included 18 drawings for Sartor Resartus in its second exhibition, held at the Prince’s Skating Rink, Knightsbridge, in 1899. He also submitted drawings for Tennyson’s A Dream of Fair Women (Grant Richards, 1900) to the famous ‘Loan Exhibition of Modern Illustration’, held at the Victoria and Albert Museum in 1901. The book developed what he had achieved in Sartor Resartus. Another significant group of his works was exhibited in Vienna in about 1903.

Sullivan was a member of the Council of the International Society of Painters, Sculptors and Gravers (from 1904), and President of the Art Workers Guild (in 1931). Exhibiting widely, he was elected associate and full member of both the Royal Society of Painters in Water-Colours (1903, 1929) and the Royal Society of Painter-Etchers and Engravers (1925, 1931).

Continuing to live at 18 Hill Road for the rest of his life, he died there on Easter Monday, 17 April 1933. Having remained true to his Catholic faith, he was given a requiem mass at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, and then buried at East Finchley Cemetery. His wife and daughter both survived him. Memorial exhibitions of his original drawings were held at the Royal Institute Galleries, Piccadilly, London, the Mortimer Museum, Hull, and Sunderland Public Art Gallery in 1934, and at Wakefield City Art Galleries in 1935. His work is represented in the collections of the British Museum, the Imperial War Museum, the National Portrait Gallery and the V&A; and The Morgan Library & Museum (New York, NY) and the Harold B Lee Library (Provo, UT). Further reading Percy V Bradshaw, E J Sullivan and His Work, London: Press Art School (Art of the Illustrator), 1918; Mark Bryant, ‘Sullivan, Edmund Joseph (1869-1933), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, online edition: October 2015; James Thorpe, Edmund Sullivan, London: Art and Technics (English Masters of Black-and-White), 1948

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TH E TW ENTIETH CENT URY

EDM UND JOSEP H S ULLIVA N

A Preliminary Checklist of Books Illustrated by Edmund Joseph Sullivan 1892 Charles Blatherwick Cynthia London: Chapman & Hall [4 illustrations, shared with Archibald Standish Hartrick, who was Blatherwick’s stepson and son-in-law] 1895 W E Henley A London Garland: Selected from five centuries of English verse London: Macmillan & Co [with other members of the Society of Illustrators] The Special Commissioners of the Daily Chronicle New London: her Parliament and its Work London: Edward Lloyd [with others]

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1896 George Borrow (with an introduction by Augustine Birrell) Lavengro: The Scholar, the Gypsy, The Priest London: Macmillan & Co (Illustrated Standard Novels, No 6) [12 illustrations] Thomas Hughes Tom Brown’s Schooldays. By an Old Boy London: Macmillan & Co (Cranford Series, No 19) [80 illustrations] Richard Brinsley Sheridan (with an introduction by Augustine Birrell) The School for Scandal and The Rivals London: Macmillan & Co (Cranford Series, No 14) [50 illustrations] Isaak Walton (edited with an introduction by Andrew Lang) The Compleat Angler, or The Contemplative Man’s Recreation London: J M Dent & Co [100 illustrations]

1897 Frederick Marryat (with an introduction by David Hannay) Newton Forster, or The Merchant Service London: Macmillan & Co (Illustrated Standard Novels, No 28) [40 illustrations]

1901 John Bunyan The Pilgrim’s Progress from this world to that which is to come London: George Newnes (Caxton Series, No 2) (2 Vols) [20 illustrations]

Frederick Marryat (with an introduction by David Hannay) The Pirate and the Three Cutters London: Macmillan & Co (Illustrated Standard Novels, No 31) [40 illustrations]

1902 Robert Barr A Prince of Good Fellows London: Chatto & Windus [15 illustrations]

1898 Thomas Carlyle Sartor Resartus: The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdröckh London: George Bell & Sons [77 illustrations] Sir Walter Scott The Pirate London: Service & Paton (Illustrated English Library) [16 illustrations] Early 1900s Produced frontispiece portraits for several volumes in George Newnes’s Thin Paper Series of Famous Novels and Thin Paper Series of Great Poets and Prose Writers, including, in the latter, Shakespeare’s Plays and Poems (No 1: in 3 volumes), The Poems of John Milton (No 2) and The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns (No 3) 1900 George Horton A Fair Brigand London: Ward Lock & Co [6 illustrations] Alfred Lord Tennyson (selected by E J Sullivan) A Dream of Fair Women & Other Poems London: Grant Richards [40 illustrations] The Rev Gilbert White (edited by R B Sharpe) The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne and A Garden Kalendar London: S T Freemantle (2 Vols) [with others]

J H L Hunt The Old Court Suburb, or Memorials of Kensington Regal, Critical and Anecdotical London: Freemantle & Co (2 Vols) [with others] Washington Irving The Sketch Book London: George Newnes (Caxton Series, No 6) (2 Vols) [20 illustrations] Thomas Lodge Rosalynde London: George Newnes (Caxton Series, No 7) [with others] 1904 Oliver Goldsmith (with an introduction by Richard Garnett) Letters from A Citizen of the World to his Friends in the East London: Wells Gardner Darton & Co [33 illustrations, also headpieces & tailpieces] 1905 H G Wells A Modern Utopia London: Chapman & Hall [8 illustrations] 1906 Henry Harland My Friend Prospero London: George Newnes (Sixpenny Novels, No 94) [8 illustrations]

1907 Arthur Conan Doyle The Stark Munro Letters London: Amalgamated Press (Daily Mail Sixpenny Novels, No 21) [3 illustrations] George Gissing (with an introductory survey by Thomas Seccombe) The House of Cobwebs, and other stories London: Archibald Constable & Co Maurice Hewlett New Canterbury Tales London: Amalgamated Press (Daily Mail Sixpenny Novels, No 27) [3 illustrations] John Keats (edited by Oliphant Smeaton; selected and with an introduction by Arthur Symons) Poems of Keats London: Caxton (Golden Poets) [with A S Hartrick] 1908 F H K La Motte Fouqué (translated by A C Farquharson) Sintram and His Companions London: Methuen & Co [21 illustrations] Robert Louis Stevenson The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde: with other fables London: The Amalgamated Press (Daily Mail Sixpenny Novels, No 37) [3 illustrations] Stanley John Weyman The House of the Wolf London: The Amalgamated Press (Daily Mail Sixpenny Novels, No 42) [3 illustrations] Stanley John Weyman Under the Red Robe London: The Amalgamated Press (Daily Mail Sixpenny Novels, No 32) [4 illustrations]

1909 Stanley John Weyman Count Hannibal: A Romance of the Court of France London: The Amalgamated Press (Daily Mail Sixpenny Novels, No 63) [3 illustrations] 1910 Thomas Carlyle The French Revolution London: Chapman & Hall (2 Vols) [157 illustrations] Circa 1910-1919 William Shakespeare Shakespeare’s Tragedies, London: Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co Shakespeare’s Comedies, London: Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co Shakespeare’s Histories and Poems, London: Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co [frontispiece in each] 1911 Mark Over Wisdom Compressed: A Book of Humour Containing the Soul of 20th Century Wit & Philosophy London: W H Smith [with others] William Shakespeare The Works of Shakespeare London: J M Dent & Sons (3 Vols) [39 illustrations] 1913 Edward FitzGerald The Rubáiyát of the Omar Khayyám London: Methuen & Co [76 illustrations] 1914 Oliver Goldsmith The Vicar of Wakefield London: Archibald Constable & Co [64 illustrations]

1915 The Kaiser’s Garland London: William Heinemann [43 illustrations] 1916 George Outram Legal and Other Lyrics London: T N Foulis (Making of Modern Law) [15 illustrations] 1917 F C Owlett (with an introduction by A St John Adcock) Kultur and Anarchy London: Elkin Mathews [frontispiece] 1922 Alfred Lord Tennyson Maud: A Monodrama London: Macmillan & Co [12 plates, 26 headpieces]

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TH E TW ENTIETH CENT URY

Nos 1 and 2 are both illustrated in Alfred Lord Tennyson, A Dream of Fair Women & Other Poems, London: Grant Richards, 1900

EDMU ND JOSEPH SU LLIVA N

A Dream of Fair Women

Sarah Siddons’ Tryst

‘Like Sartor Resartus this book was a “labour of love” for Sullivan. He admits in his preface that, in his selection of poems to be illustrated, “regard has been taken rather to their pictorial suggestiveness than to purely poetic qualities” (p x). Hence no doubt the preponderance of “fair women,” in the depiction of whom he was in any event an acknowledged master. The strongest drawings in the book are those which he devotes to occasional manifestations of Tennyson’s grim or sardonic strain, such as “St Simon Stylites,” “The Vision of Sin,” and “The Palace of Art”.’

The short story, ‘Sarah Siddons’ Tryst’, was written by Clara Morris (1849-1925), the Canadian-born American actress turned author. Steeped in theatrical history and experience, Morris constructed a narrative in which the celebrated eighteenthcentury British actress, Sarah Siddons (1755-1831), grows from failure to success.

(Gordon N Ray, The Illustrator and the Book in England from 1790 to 1914, New York: The Pierpoint Morgan Library/London: Oxford University Press, 1976, pages 188-189)

10 1 MADELINE ‘THOU ARE NOT STEEP’D IN GOLDEN LANGOURS, NO TRANCED SUMMER CALM IS THINE, EVER VARYING MADELINE.’ Signed and dated 99 Pen and ink on board 6 1⁄2 x 5 inches oval Provenance: Brigadier A C Sykes of Corton, Wiltshire and by descent Illustrated: page 45, ‘Madeline’ Exhibited: ‘Loan Exhibition of Modern Illustration’, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1900

2 THE VISION OF SIN ‘FEAR NOT THOU TO LOOSE THY TONGUE; SET THY HOARY FANCIES FREE; WHAT IS LOATHSOME TO THE YOUNG SAVOURS WELL TO THEE AND ME.’

Signed and dated 99 Pen and ink on board 5 1⁄2 x 5 1⁄4 inches Provenance: Brigadier A C Sykes of Corton, Wiltshire and by descent Illustrated: page 103, ‘The Vision of Sin’

Having had her talents nurtured within her own theatrical family of the Kembles, Mrs Siddons is bruised by negative audience reaction early in her career. She leaves London with her husband, William Siddons, and works in a number of provincial companies, until she is ready to return to the capital, and take Drury Lane by storm as Belvidera in Thomas Otway’s Restoration tragedy, Venice Preserv’d. Her ‘tryst’ is with her younger self, that, ‘if ever triumph came’, she would return to her former lodging, and ‘sup full with her, and pride and gratitude might drive away the memory of that hiss!’ Sullivan’s image of Siddons depicts this moment. He based his likeness – and particularly the head, framed by powdered hair and crowned with a dramatic hat – on Thomas Gainsborough’s famous 1785 portrait of the actress (which had entered the collection of the National Gallery in 1862). Morris employed some artistic licence in shaping her story, as Siddons had actually gained her first success as Belvidera in 1774, before she began to be badly received and decided to withdraw to the provinces.

3 SHE LEANED ACROSS THE TABLE, AND WITH INEFFABLE GENTLENESS, SAID: ‘TO YOU POOR HEART! I DRINK AND BRING TO YOU SUCCESS.’ Signed and dated 01 Inscribed with title and ‘addressing space’ on reverse Pen and ink on board 13 3⁄4 x 9 3⁄4 inches Provenance: Brigadier A C Sykes of Corton, Wiltshire and by descent Illustrated: McClure’s Magazine, May 1902, page 83, ‘Sarah Siddons’ Tryst’ by Clara Morris

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EDM UND JOSEP H S ULLIVA N

THE TWENTIETH CENT URY

Nos 4-11 are all illustrated in Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution. A History, London: Chapman and Hall, 1910

The French Revolution

‘Between November 4 and December 8, 1908, Sullivan filled the first 101 pages of [a] sketchbook with pencil drawings and notes for his edition of Carlyle’s French Revolution, which appeared in 1910. Taking his task seriously, he was annoyed when acquaintances remarked about the project: “Ah yes – you will have a fine chance for costume” … His greatest problem, as he saw it, was to tell the truth without losing his audience … The images of starvation and corruption, violence and horror which Sullivan evoked did indeed alienate some readers, who were otherwise impressed by the force and vigor of his designs, but his portraits of heroic figures like Danton and Mirabeau were generally admired.’ 12

13

(Gordon N Ray, 1976, pages 190-191)

4 LE ROI S’AMUSE ( LOUIS XV AND MME DU BARRY ) Signed and dated 1910 Inscribed with title below mount Pen and ink on board 12 1⁄2 x 9 inches Illustrated: Vol I, ‘The Bastille’, Book III, Chapter III, facing page 70

5 PORCELAIN AND TILECLAY (‘ BOTH WERE BROKEN ’) Signed and dated 09 Inscribed with title below mount Pen and ink on board 11 x 8 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Vol I, ‘The Constitution’, Book I, Chapter II, facing page 288 Exhibited: ‘VI Exposición Internacional de Arte’, Barcelona, 1911

6 THE REIGN OF TERROR Signed and dated 1909 Inscribed with title below mount Pen and ink on board 13 3⁄4 x 8 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Vol II, ‘The Constitution’, Book VI, Chapter V, facing page 124

7 THE EVIL EYE AND THE APES OF DEATH ( THE LAW OF THE SUSPECT ) Signed and dated 1910 Inscribed ‘The Evil Eye’ and ‘The Law of The Suspect’ below mount Pen and ink on board 14 x 9 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Vol II, ‘The Guillotine’, Book I, Chapter VIII, facing page 204


TH E TWENTIET H CENT URY

EDMUND JOSEPH SULLIVA N

14

15

8 LE ROI FAINEANT Signed and dated 1909 Inscribed ‘Veto’ below mount Pen and ink on board 10 3⁄4 x 6 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Vol I, ‘The Bastille’, Book VI, Chapter III, facing page 212

9 LATEST PORTRAITS OF CELEBRITIES ( THE HEADS OF FOULON AND LE LAUNAY, AND

THE HEAD AND HEART OF

BERTHIER ARE FROM SKETCHES MADE BY GIRODET AS THEY WERE CARRIED IN THE STREETS OF PARIS )

Signed and dated 1909 Inscribed ‘Latest Portraits of Celebrities’ below mount Pen and ink on board 12 3⁄4 x 8 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Vol II, ‘The Guillotine’, Book IV, Chapter VI, facing page 316

10 PHOENIX DEATH-BIRTH ( THE FRENCH ARMY, AS BELLONA , IS CONSUMED, AND NAPOLEON ARISES FROM THE ASHES ) Signed and dated 1909 Inscribed with title and ‘Bellona + Napoleon’ below mount Pen and ink on board 14 x 9 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: Vol II, ‘The Guillotine’, Book V, Chapter II, facing page 342

11 THE WHIFF OF GRAPESHOT Signed and dated 1910 Inscribed with title below mount Pen and ink on board 13 1⁄2 x 9 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: Vol II, ‘The Guillotine’, Book VI, Chapter I, facing page 380


TH E TW ENTIETH CENT URY

ED MUN D JOS EPH SULLIVA N

Nos 12-18 are all illustrated in Edward FitzGerald, The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam, London: Methuen & Co, 1913 Provenance: Brigadier A C Sykes of Corton, Wiltshire and by descent

‘The Omar Khayyam club commissioned replicas of the mug illustrating verse LXIV. These were made by Arnold Bennett’s brother [Septimus] and used at their meetings.’ (James Thorpe, 1948, page 31)

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17

12 AH, MAKE THE MOST OF WHAT WE YET MAY SPEND, BEFORE WE TOO INTO THE DUST DESCEND; DUST INTO DUST, AND UNDER DUST, TO LIE, SANS WINE, SANS SONG, SANS SINGER, AND – SANS END! Signed and dated 1900 Inscribed with title on reverse Pen and ink with pencil on board, 5 x 4 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Verse XXIII

13 AND THOSE WHO HUSBANDED THE GOLDEN GRAIN, AND THOSE WHO FLUNG IT TO THE WINDS LIKE RAIN ALIKE TO NO SUCH AUREATE EARTH ARE TURN’D AS, BURIED ONCE, MEN WANT DUG UP AGAIN Signed and dated 1900-07 Inscribed ‘XV’ below mount Pen and ink on board, 6 1⁄4 x 4 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Verse XV; Exhibited: Venice Biennale, 1914

The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam

Magazine in 1900, and another two in The Studio in 1901, in a special number devoted to ‘Pen and Ink’. Some of these were also shown in exhibitions.

Sullivan has been considered ‘the first artist to illustrate every one of the 75 quatrains’ of Edward FitzGerald’s first, 1859 edition of his much-loved translation of The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam (William Mason and Sandra Martin, The Art of Omar Khayyam: Illustrating FitzGerald’s Rubaiyat, London: I B Tauris, 2007, page 22). Sullivan was originally commissioned to illustrate FitzGerald’s text by a publisher at the turn of the century. However, the project fell through after he had produced only nine of the drawings. Five appeared in The Pall Mall

Sullivan seems to have returned to the text in 1907, as he revised and redated some of his earlier drawings in that year. He then began to complete the remaining 67 drawings in 1912, in response to a commission from Methuen & Co to illustrate an edition that would appear in 1913. The selection included here represents the full range of dates and thus the development of Sullivan’s style at a crucial stage in his career. His general approach to the poem is naturalistic, humane and humorous while also exploiting its potential for the imaginative, symbolic and grotesque.

14 SAID ONE – ‘FOLKS OF A SURLY TAPSTER TELL AND DAUB HIS VISAGE WITH THE SMOKE OF HELL; THEY TALK OF SOME STRICT TESTING OF US – PISH! HE’S A GOOD FELLOW, AND ’TWILL ALL BE WELL’ Signed and dated 1907 Inscribed ‘LXIV’ below mount Pen and ink on board 5 3⁄4 x 4 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Verse LXIV

15 MYSELF WHEN YOUNG DID EAGERLY FREQUENT DOCTOR AND SAINT, AND HEARD GREAT ARGUMENT ABOUT IT AND ABOUT: BUT EVERMORE CAME OUT BY THE SAME DOOR AS IN I WENT Signed and dated 1912 Pen and ink on board 9 x 6 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Verse XXVII Exhibited: Venice Biennale, 1914


TH E TWENTIET H CENT URY

EDMU ND JOSEPH SU LLIVA N

The Kaiser’s Garland

Nos 19-22 are all illustrated in Edmund J Sullivan, The Kaiser’s Garland, London: William Heinemann, 1915

Sullivan produced The Kaiser’s Garland during the First World War as a satirical attack on Prussian militarism. It has been noted that ‘its ferocity must have seemed excessive even when it first appeared’ in 1915 (Gordon N Ray, 1976, page 187). However, at least one anonymous critic provided a positive, nuanced review of the original drawings for the book when they were exhibited at the Leicester Galleries in October 1915, prior to publication. This critic wrote that Sullivan’s ‘fine draughtsmanship allied to his sense of style in composition … allowed him to present us with caricatures which, if barbed and penetrating, have yet a dignity in their poignant satire’ (The Studio, 1915, Vol 66, page 136). In suggesting his ability to balance a variety of skills and convey a complex of emotions, this estimate now seems truer to the artist’s achievement than an exclusive emphasis on the anger that fuelled the project. 17 AND MUCH AS WINE HAS PLAY’D THE INFIDEL, AND ROBB’D ME OF MY ROBE OF HONOUR – WELL, I OFTEN WONDER WHAT THE VINTNERS BUY ONE HALF SO PRECIOUS AS THE GOODS THEY SELL Signed and dated 1900-7 Inscribed ‘LXXI’ below mount Pen and ink on board, 6 1⁄2 x 6 inches Illustrated: Verse LXXI Literature: Edmund J Sullivan, Line: An Art Study, London: Chapman & Hall, 1922, page 14

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16 INDEED, INDEED, REPENTANCE OFT BEFORE I SWORE – BUT WAS I SOBER WHEN I SWORE? AND THEN AND THEN CAME SPRING, AND ROSE-IN-HAND MY THREAD-BARE PENITENCE A-PIECES TORE Signed and dated 1912 Pen and ink on board 9 3⁄4 x 6 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Verse LXX

18 ALAS, THAT SPRING SHOULD VANISH WITH THE ROSE! THAT YOUTH’S SWEET-SCENTED MANUSCRIPT SHOULD CLOSE! THE NIGHTINGALE THAT IN THE BRANCHES SANG, AH, WHENCE, AND WHITHER FLOWN AGAIN, WHO KNOWS! Signed and dated 1900-7 Pen and ink with pencil on board 6 1⁄2 x 5 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Verse LXXII

19 THE RAGPICKER ( LE Signed and dated 1915 Pen and ink 10 1⁄2 x 7 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 21

CHIFFONIER )

20 THE KING OF CLUBS ( THE Signed and dated 1915 Pen and ink 10 1⁄2 x 7 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 11

KAISER ’ S FORTUNE )


TH E TW ENTIETH CENT URY

WIL LIA M HE AT H ROBINSON

W ILLIA M HE ATH ROB INSON William Heath Robinson (1872-1944) Heath Robinson is a household name, and a byword for a design or construction that is ‘ingeniously or ridiculously over-complicated’ (as defined by The New Oxford Dictionary of English, 1998, page 848). Yet, he was also a highly distinctive and versatile illustrator, whose work could touch at one extreme the romantic watercolours of a Dulac or Rackham, at another the sinister grotesqueries of a Peake, and at yet another the eccentricities of an Emett. For a biography of William Heath Robinson, please refer to The Illustrators, 2007, page 147. Essays on various aspects of Heath Robinson’s achievements have appeared in previous editions of The Illustrators: on his illustrations to Rabelais in 1996, pages 112-113; on the relationship of his illustrations to those of Arthur Rackham in 1997, pages 124-125; on his illustrations to The Arabian Nights Entertainments in 1999, pages 73-74; and on one of his illustrations to Twelfth Night in 2000, pages 17-18. Key works written and illustrated: The Adventures of Uncle Lubin (1902); Bill the Minder (1912)

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Key works illustrated: H N Williams (intro), The Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (1900); The Works of Mr Francis Rabelais (1904); contributed to The Bystander (from 1905) and The Sketch (from 1906); Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales (1913); Shakespeare’s Comedy of A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1914); Walter de la Mare, Peacock Pie (1918)

22 MYSELF AND GOD Signed and dated 1915 Inscribed with title below mount Pen and ink 10 1⁄2 x 7 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 15

21 POUR LES BEAUX YEUX DU KAISER Pen and ink 10 1⁄2 x 7 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 13

His work is represented in the collections of the British Museum, The Cartoon Museum, the V&A and The West House and Heath Robinson Museum Trust.

23 GOTT AND MYSELF ( MOLOCH & HIS HIGH FRIEND ) Inscribed with title Inscribed ‘A Whole Banal Offering to Moloch’ and ‘Men, Women and Children’ on reverse Pencil, 9 x 6 3⁄4 inches Preliminary drawing for 22

Further reading Geoffrey Beare, The Art of William Heath Robinson, London: Dulwich Picture Gallery, 2003; Geoffrey Beare, The Brothers Robinson, London: Chris Beetles Ltd, 1992; Geoffrey Beare, Heath Robinson Advertising, London: Bellew, 1992; Geoffrey Beare, The Illustrations of W Heath Robinson, London: Werner Shaw, 1983; Geoffrey Beare, William Heath Robinson 1872-1944, London: Chris Beetles Ltd, 2011; Langston Day, The Life and Art of W Heath Robinson, London: Herbert Joseph, 1947; James Hamilton, William Heath Robinson, London: Pavilion Books, 1992; Simon Heneage, ‘Robinson, William Heath (1872-1944)’, H C G Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, Vol 47, pages 428-431; John Lewis, Heath Robinson. Artist and Comic Genius, London: Constable, 1973

The Chris Beetles Gallery has mounted a number of significant exhibitions of the work of William Heath Robinson: 1. ‘William Heath Robinson (1872-1944)’, Chris Beetles Gallery, March 1987 (with a fully illustrated catalogue) 2. ‘The Brothers Robinson’, Chris Beetles Gallery and the Royal Festival Hall, February 1992 (with a fully illustrated catalogue – detailed in further reading) 3. ‘William Heath Robinson (1872-1944). 50th Anniversary Exhibition’, Chris Beetles Gallery, September 1994 4. ‘The Gadget King’, Manchester City Art Galleries, Heaton Hall, May-October 2000 5. ‘W Heath Robinson’, Dulwich Picture Gallery, Linbury Room, November 2003 (to complement Dulwich’s own exhibition of William Heath Robinson) 6. ‘Heath Robinson at Nunnington Hall’, National Trust, Nunnington Hall, North Yorkshire, July 2005 7. ‘Contraptions. William Heath Robinson (1872-1944)’, Chris Beetles Gallery, June-August 2007 (to launch a volume of cartoons published by Duckworth) 8. ‘William Heath Robinson 1872-1944’, Chris Beetles Gallery, May-June 2011 (with a fully illustrated catalogue – detailed in further reading) 9. ‘The Inventive Art of William Heath Robinson’, Chris Beetles Gallery, March-April 2016 The new Heath Robinson Museum opened in Pinner Memorial Park, in north-west London, in October 2016. A permanent home for the Heath Robinson collection, and the only museum devoted to the artist, it is also the first purpose-built museum to open in Greater London in over 40 years. Its rolling programme of special themed exhibitions begins with ‘Heath Robinson at War’, which runs until January 2017.

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Nos 24-28 are all illustrated in The Works of Rabelais, London: Grant Richards, 1904

WIL LIA M HE AT H ROBINSON

The Works of Rabelais Following the success of his own illustrated story, The Adventures of Uncle Lubin (1902), William Heath Robinson suggested to its publisher, Grant Richards, an idea for their further collaboration. He chose the five connected satirical novels that comprise The Works of Mr Francis Rabelais, in the unexpurgated translation by Sir Thomas Urquhart and Peter Anthony Motteux, which was first published in full in 1694. In doing this, he ‘was making a conscious and highly ambitious effort to launch himself as a leading illustrator of serious, if fantastical, books for adults’ (James Hamilton, 1992, page 40). Such an undertaking was bound to test any illustrator’s talents, yet Heath Robinson treated it confidently as a show-case for many aspects of his genius. One of the most luxurious illustrated editions of a classic of the Western canon, its two large volumes contained a total of 254 black and white illustrations, including two frontispieces in photogravure and 98 full-page line drawings. In contrast to Gustave Doré (1832-1883), whose edition of Rabelais had appeared in England in 1871, Heath Robinson inevitably concentrated on the humour of the text. Yet his interpretation was anything but one-dimensional, either in appearance or tone. His considerable use of portrait caricature, in both the plates and the vignettes, extended the memorable qualities of Rabelais’ characters and placed the potent multifariousness of humanity to the fore. By means of a confident articulation of the degrees of monochrome, Robinson was able to evoke frivolity, melancholy and terror, sometimes in a single image.

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24 GOOD MAN, THESE TWO GIRLES, ARE THEY MAIDS? Signed and inscribed with title and ‘Chap XV Book II’ Pen and ink study of a gentleman on reverse Pen and ink 22 1⁄4 x 17 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Vol I, the Second Book, Chapter XV, page 187

The success of Rabelais was hard-won for Heath Robinson, and short-lived for Grant Richards. Robinson was reported to have complained about the quality of reproduction, and expressed his disappointment at the reduction in the number of photogravures. In turn, the expense of the project contributed to the bankruptcy of Richards, who omitted to mention it in his autobiography. In 1904, his business was sold to Alexander Moring, who did not release Rabelais for another eight years. By that time, Robinson had evolved his style through the illustration of another 20 books, including Twelfth Night (1908). Yet if reviews of a past production were inevitably mixed, the critic of The Athenaeum found the drawings for Rabelais ‘as good as any Mr Robinson has done’. Few would now fail to concur with such a positive verdict.

25 AND ASK’D HIM WHY HE DID SO TOIL HIS BODY Signed and inscribed ‘One of his friends seeing all this, asked him why he did so toil his body, perplex his spirit’ 22 3⁄4 x 18 inches Illustrated: Vol I, the Author’s Prologue to the Third Book, page xxxi

26 WHO DISGUISE THEMSELVES LIKE MASKERS TO DECEIVE THE WORLD Signed Pen and ink 21 1⁄4 x 16 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Vol I, the Second Book, Chapter XXXIV, page 251

27 HOW IS’ST MY TOP Signed Inscribed with title below mount Pen and ink 22 1⁄2 x 15 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Vol II, the Fourth Book, Chapter IX, page 79

28 A LAW CAT Signed Inscribed ‘Gripe-Men-All, a Law Cat’ below mount Pen and ink 22 1⁄2 x 15 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Vol II, the Fifth Book, Chapter XII, page 239

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WIL LIA M HE AT H ROBINSON

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29 THE EDITING OF ‘THE WOMAN ABOUT TOWN’ Signed Inscribed ‘Editing Woman’s Ways’ and ‘Production of “Sketch’” below mount Signed and inscribed with artist’s address and ‘Sketch’ on reverse Pen ink and watercolour on board 15 x 10 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: The Sketch, 19 June 1912, page 346, ‘The Editing and Production of The Sketch’

30 OUTWARD BOUND Signed and inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour on board 8 3⁄4 x 6 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: William Heath Robinson, Peter Quip in Search of a Friend, London: S W Partridge & Co, 1922, frontispiece


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WIL LIA M HE AT H ROBINSON

Once Upon a Time This volume of four original fairy stories was the last of William Heath Robinson’s illustrated books to be published in his lifetime, and was also his only collaboration with either the author, Dr Liliane Clopet, or the publisher, Frederick Muller. For a longer note on Once Upon a Time please refer to The Illustrators, 2015, pages 103-104.

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Nos 32-42 are all illustrated in Liliane M C Clopet, Once Upon a Time, London: Frederick Muller, 1944

31 WATERLOW PARK, HIGHGATE Signed Watercolour and pencil with bodycolour on tinted paper laid on board 13 x 16 inches Exhibited: ‘A Memorial Exhibition of Drawings by the late W Heath Robinson’, The Fine Art Society, Bond Street, London, February 1945, no 66

32 NO ONE EXCEPT THE KITCHEN CAT THOUGHT WELL OF PENNYWORT Inscribed with title Pen and ink, 4 1⁄2 x 3 inches Illustrated: page 21, ‘The Apothecary’s Assistant’

34 MY DEAR FELLOW, I’M ALMOST DEAD Inscribed with title and story title below mount Pen and ink 3 x 5 inches Illustrated: page 49, ‘The House With The Glass Key’

33 HE HAD A BIG CANDLE ON THE TABLE BY HIS BED Inscribed ‘The End’ and with story title below mount Pen and ink 4 x 4 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: page 45, ‘The Scarlet Boots’

35 UNTIL HE HAD BECOME A VERY YOUNG COLT Inscribed with title and story title below mount Pen and ink 4 1⁄2 x 4 inches Illustrated: page 54, ‘The House With The Glass Key’

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WIL LIA M HE AT H ROBINSON

Nos 36-42 are all from the story, ‘The Woodcutter and his Three Sons’ 36 WILLIAM DID ALL THE COOKING Inscribed with title and story title below mount Pen and ink 4 1⁄2 x 4 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: page 59 37 WHEN JOLT HAD CARRIED HIM HOME Inscribed with title and story title below mount Pen and ink 3 1⁄2 x 3 inches Illustrated: page 62

40 CAMILLA AND THE BLUE GOOSE Inscribed ‘Vignette’ and with story title below mount Pen and ink 2 1⁄2 x 3 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: page 106

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29 41 THEY HAD A REUNION FEAST WHICH LASTED FOR A WHOLE MONTH Inscribed with title and story title below mount Pen and ink 3 3⁄4 x 5 1⁄2 inches and 3 3⁄4 x 5 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: pages 104 & 105

38 FELT HIMSELF SINKING Inscribed with title and story title below mount Pen and ink 8 1⁄2 x 5 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: page 66 39 HE FELL, CLUTCHING THE BAG OF GOLD Inscribed with title and story title Pen and ink 8 1⁄2 x 7 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 101

42 ALL AGREED THAT WILLIAM SHOULD HAVE CAMILLA Inscribed with title below mount Pen and ink 3 3⁄4 x 3 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: page 107


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E H SHEPAR D Ernest Howard Shepard, MC OBE (1879-1976)

E H SHEPAR D

While Shepard is now best remembered for his immortal illustrations to Winnie-the-Pooh and The Wind in the Willows, he was a wide-ranging illustrator, with an unsurpassed genius for representing children, and an underrated talent for political cartoons. For a biography of E H Shepard, please refer to The Illustrators, 2007, page 199; for essays on various aspects of the artist’s achievements, see The Illustrators, 1999, pages 151-152; The Illustrators, 2000, pages 28-32; and The Illustrators, 2007, pages 199-200.

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Key works illustrated: contributed to Punch from 1907, becoming second cartoonist in 1935, and chief cartoonist from 1945 until 1949; A A Milne, When We Were Very Young (1924); E V Lucas, Playtime and Company (1925); A A Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh (1926); Everybody’s Pepys (1926); The House at Pooh Corner (1928); Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (1931); Richard Jeffries, Bevis (1932); E V Lucas, As the Bee Sucks (1937) His work is represented in the collections of the V&A; and the Shepard Archive at the University of Surrey (Guildford). Further reading Arthur R Chandler, The Story of E H Shepard: the man who drew Pooh, West Sussex: Jaydem, 2001; Rawle Knox (ed), The Work of E H Shepard, London: Methuen, 1979; C A Parker (rev), ‘Shepard, Ernest Howard (1879-1976)’, H C G Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, Vol 50, pages 230-231 The Victoria and Albert Museum is planning a major exhibition of the work of E H Shepard for 2017. 43 BUSMAN’S HOLIDAY Signed Pen and ink, 12 x 9 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Punch Almanack for 1946, 29 October 1945

44 SURPRISED TO SEE A KNEELING FIGURE Signed with initials Inscribed with title and publication details, and dated 1961 below mount Signed and inscribed with artist's address on reverse Pen ink and watercolour with bodycolour and pencil 7 x 6 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: The Illustrated London News, Christmas Number, 1961, page 848, ‘Regency Interlude’ by Dorothy Margaret Stuart

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45 FLASHBACKS TO THE FAMOUS – SCRIPT-WRITING AT THE BRONTES Signed Pen ink and watercolour 11 3⁄4 x 9 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Punch, 18 September 1957, page 332 Exhibited: ‘The Heatherley School of Fine Art, 150th Anniversary Exhibition’, Mall Galleries, February-March 1996, no 104


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Nos 46-48 are all illustrated in A A Milne, Winnie The Pooh, London: Methuen, 1926

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46 HE HELD IT VERY TIGHTLY AGAINST HIMSELF, SO THAT IT SHOULDN’T BLOW AWAY, AND HE RAN AS FAST AS HE COULD SO AS TO GET TO EEYORE BEFORE POOH DID Pen and ink on board 3 x 3 inches Illustrated: page 81

47 AND THINKING HOW PLEASED EEYORE WOULD BE, HE DIDN’T LOOK WHERE HE WAS GOING … Pen and ink on board 3 x 3 inches Illustrated: page 81

48 ‘WITH – WITH MANY HAPPY RETURNS OF THE DAY’ AND HE GAVE EEYORE THE SMALL PIECE OF DAMP RAG Signed with initials Pen and ink on board 3 x 4 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 84


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49 CORSICAN RHAPSODY FOR PIPES Signed Pen ink with bodycolour on board 11 1⁄2 x 17 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Punch, 22 November 1950, pages 496-497, ‘Corsican Rhapsody for Pipes’ by P M Hubbard

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R A NDOLPH SCHWABE

RA ND O LPH SC H WA B E Randolph Schwabe, RWS LG NEAC (1885-1948) A clear eye and sure hand enabled Randolph Schwabe to produce drawings, etchings and lithographs of consistent clarity and strength. Trained at the Slade School of Fine Art, he would return there to become an influential Principal and Professor. He also held a significant position as an Official War Artist in both world wars. Though he is best remembered for his attentive, absorbing images of buildings and landscapes, his subjects included figures and still life compositions, and he also produced illustrations and designs for the theatre. Randolph Schwabe was born at Alsbach House, 4 Cambridge Grove, Eccles, Lancashire, on 9 May 1885, the younger son of Lawrence Schwabe and Octavie Henriette (née Ermen). His paternal grandfather, a cotton merchant, had migrated from Germany to England in 1820.

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Having failed in various business enterprises, Lawrence Schwabe finally settled with his family in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, and set up as a letterpress printer and stationer. Randolph was then educated privately as a day boy at the nearby Heath Brow School, Boxmoor. Revealing a prodigious talent for drawing, he contributed to the weekly school magazine, the Heath Brow Chronicle, which was edited by his elder brother, Eric. At the age of 14, Schwabe left school to study at the Royal College of Art, but did not respond well to the teaching methods. So, in 1900, he transferred to the Slade School of Fine Art, and found that he much preferred its atmosphere of greater artistic freedom.

After five years, he took advantage of a Slade scholarship and, in 1906, went to Paris to study at the Académie Julian under Jean Paul Laurens. He lived at the Hôtel de la Haute Loire, Boulevard Raspail, which was popular with artists, and at some stage worked at Paul Bornet’s Cercle International des Arts, which was in the same street. In 1908, Schwabe left Paris and travelled to Italy for the first time, in the company of his artist friend, Francis Unwin. They worked in Rome, and also visited Florence and Venice, among other Italian cities. On their return to London, Schwabe lived at 37 Howley Place, Maida Vale. Producing landscapes and architectural subjects in oil and watercolour, he began to exhibit at the New English Art Club. After a further extended stay in France – at Siouville, in Normandy, in 1911-12 – he settled in Chelsea, living in a flat at 43A Cheyne Walk, and moving within an artistic circle that included Francis Unwin and Gerald Summers. He also contributed to the exhibitions of the Friday Club, which had been founded by Vanessa Bell and showed at the Alpine Club Gallery, in Mill Street. In 1913, Schwabe married Gwendolen Rosamund Jones, who had also studied at the Slade, where she acquired the nickname ‘Birdie’. Honeymooning in Whitby, they then lived at the flat in Cheyne Walk. In the following year, their daughter, Alice, was born. When war broke out in 1914, Schwabe was busily developing his career. He held his first solo show at the Carfax Gallery in April 1915, while in the November of the same year he exhibited at the London Group for the first time, and was made a member. Then, in 1917, he was elected to the New English Art Club, and added to his skills by taking lessons in lithography from C R W Nevinson, a fellow member of both the Friday Club and the London Group, who had just been appointed an Official War Artist. Schwabe had attempted to enlist, in 1916, but was rejected on health grounds. However, in March 1918, he too was appointed an Official War Artist, and recorded members of the Women’s Land Army at work at Rushden Farm, near Podington, in Northamptonshire. Even while war continued, Schwabe began to design costumes for the theatre, drawing on a deep knowledge of historic dress. In June 1918, his designs appeared on the stage of the New Theatre, St Martin’s Lane, in Leslie and Dymock’s The Loving Heart, based on stories from Boccaccio’s The Decameron. Then, in April 1919, his costumes were seen in a production of Romeo and Juliet at the Lyric Theatre, Shaftesbury Avenue. His interest in historic costume later led to collaborations with Francis Kelly, a friend from Slade student days, and together they published Historic Costume: A Chronicle of Fashion in Western Europe, 1490–1790 (1925) and A Short History of Costume and Armour (1931).

50 SELF PORTRAIT Dated ‘March 26 1938’ Chalk on tinted paper 11 3⁄4 x 8 1⁄2 inches

In 1919, Schwabe was also employed by the writer, publisher and balletomane, Cyril Beaumont, to design wooden figures based on dancers in Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, which had become all the rage in London. This was the beginning of a close relationship, in which Schwabe and Beaumont worked on more than a dozen illustrated books, beginning with Walter de la Mare’s Crossings: A Fairy Play (1921), and including A Manual

of the Theory and Practice of Classical Theatrical Dancing (Méthode Cecchetti) (1922). In the same period, in 1924, Schwabe exhibited his drawings in a solo show at the Redfern Gallery.

member, Sir Walter Westley Russell, as an overseas expert adviser to the Committee of the Felton Bequest on the purchase of English watercolours and drawings for the National Gallery of Victoria, Australia.

Supplementing his income as an artist, designer and illustrator, Schwabe began to teach drawing at Camberwell and Westminster Schools of Art, in 1919, and at the Royal College of Art, in 1921. He also confirmed his scholarly reputation by regularly contributing articles and reviews of exhibitions and books to various art periodicals, including The Burlington Magazine and The Studio. Later in the decade, in 1928, and until 1945, he examined for the Ministry of Education, for the greater part as the Chief Examiner in Drawing and Painting.

In 1942, Schwabe undertook one of the most unusual projects of his career, illustrating Shooting to Live with the One-Hand Gun, written by his brother, Captain ‘Bill’ Sykes, with Captain William E Fairbairn. (Eric had changed his surname to Sykes by deed poll in 1917 because of the German overtones of Schwabe.)

In 1929, the Schwabes moved from Chelsea to Hampstead, settling into 20 Church Row, which Birdie decorated with style and maintained with care. From the following year, and until his death, Randolph kept a detailed diary, recording his artistic practice, his active public life, and his views on the arts, current affairs and the people that he met. 1930 proved a momentous year, as Schwabe replaced Henry Tonks as Principal and Professor of the Slade School of Fine Art. He gave the responsibility for painting to his friend Allan Gwynne-Jones, and concentrated on communicating the skill of drawing. His close friend, Charles Tennyson, would later describe his approach to teaching as ‘enthusiastic, sympathetic and profoundly scholarly’. These words might equally be applied to his role as Editor of Artwork, an international quarterly magazine of arts and crafts, which he took over from D S MacColl in 1930. However, despite his assiduousness, the magazine closed after a year, a victim of the uncertain economic climate.

During the years of international turmoil, Schwabe had provided a strong sense of stability at the Slade School. At the end of the war, in 1945, Schwabe and his wife left Oxford in order to prepare for the school’s reopening in London, which it did on 1 October. In the same month, five of his drawings were shown at the Suffolk Street Galleries in the exhibition, ‘The Londoner’s England’, which showcased a scheme that commissioned artists to provide views of the capital. This limited sequel to the Pilgrim Trust’s scheme, Recording Britain, was generated by the Central Institute of Art and Design, and funded by four leading brewers, with the intention of bringing ‘the art to the pub’. From this time, Schwabe also joined Sir Kenneth Clark, a member of the selection committee for both Recording Britain and The Londoner’s England, in advising the Felton Bequest on its purchases of Old Masters, French Impressionists and contemporary artists. In 1946, as a sequel to his wartime activities, Schwabe illustrated H E Bates’ The Tinkers of Elstow, which told the story of the Royal Ordnance Factory managed by J Lyons and Co for the Ministry of Supply during the war. Schwabe continued as Slade Professor until his death. He died at his daughter’s home at Helensburgh, Dumbartonshire, on 19 September 1948. Three years later, the Arts Council of Great Britain mounted a memorial exhibition of his work at its gallery in St James’s Square.

Through the 1930s, Schwabe was very busy both as an artist and administrator. He held solo shows in London – at the Batsford Gallery in 1931 – and Madrid – at the Museo Nacional de Arte Moderno in 1935. He led the selection committee of the South London Group in 1931, and in subsequent years was elected as a member of the Manchester Academy of Fine Arts (1932) and the Athenaeum Club (1934). His work was grounded in the English watercolourists of the eighteenth century – despite his German origins – and so it seemed only fitting that he should be elected an associate of the Royal Society of Painters in Water-Colours in 1938, and a full member four years later. In the second half of the decade, he also worked on one of his most significant sets of illustrations, for an edition of Somerset Maugham’s autobiographical novel, Of Human Bondage, published by Doubleday Doran in 1936.

Further reading Stephen Bone, rev Terry Anne Riggs, ‘Schwabe, Randolph (1885-1948)’, H C G Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, Vol 49, pages 294-295; Gill Clarke, Randolph Schwabe, Bristol: Sansom & Company, 2012; Rose Eva, Randolph Schwabe, Edinburgh: Bourne Fine Art, 1994

On the outbreak of the Second World War, in 1939, Schwabe supervised the evacuation of the Slade School of Fine Art to Oxford. Combined with the Ruskin School of Drawing, it was based at the Ashmolean Museum. While continuing as Principal and Professor, he also responded, in 1940, to a commission from the War Artists’ Advisory Committee (WAAC) to make drawings of the bombed Coventry Cathedral and portraits of members of the Ministry of Home Security. Then, in 1941, he joined the WAAC as the art school representative, at the same time joining his fellow committee

The Chris Beetles Gallery has had a long association with the work of Randolph Schwabe, and has recently mounted two rich and varied exhibitions devoted to his achievement. The first, in 2013, coincided with a new biography by Gill Clarke and a loan show at the St Barbe Museum, Lymington, Hampshire. The second, earlier this year, coincided with the publication of Gill Clarke’s edition of The Diaries of Randolph Schwabe and a loan show of Schwabe and his contemporaries, at the Otter Gallery, at the University of Chichester.

His work is represented in numerous public collections, including the Imperial War Museums, UCL Art Museum (University College) and the V&A; the Ashmolean Museum (Oxford) and Manchester Art Gallery; and the Art Gallery of New South Wales (Sydney).

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Of Human Bondage

Preliminary Checklist of Illustrated Books 1921 Cyril W Beaumont The Sleeping Princess London: C W Beaumont (Impressions of the Russian Ballet, Nos 11-12) (2 Vols) Walter De La Mare (with music by C Armstrong Gibbs) Crossings – A Fairy Play London: The Beaumont Press 1922 Cyril W Beaumont and Stanislas Idzikowsi (with a preface by Enrico Cecchetti) A Manual of the Theory and Practice of Classical Theatrical Dancing, according to the method of Cav E Cecchetti London: C W Beaumont

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Valerien Svetlov (translated by Helen de Vere Beauclerk and Nadia Evrenov, and edited by Cyril Beaumont) Thamar Karsavina London: C W Beaumont [with others] Oscar Wilde (with a preface by More Adey) After Berneval – Letters of Oscar Wilde to Robert Ross London: Beaumont Press 1923 Edmund Blunden To Nature – New Poems London: Beaumont Press Arthur Symons The Café Royal and other essays London: Beaumont Press 1924 John Clare Madrigals & Chronicles – Being newly found poems … Edited with a preface and commentary by Edmund Blunden London: Beaumont Press

1925 Edmund Blunden Masks of Time – A new collection of poems principally meditative London: Beaumont Press Harold Child The Curwen Press Almanack 1926 London: The Fleuron Francis Michael Kelly and Randolph Schwabe Historic Costume: A Chronicle of Fashion in Western Europe, 1490-1790 London: B T Batsford 1926 Cyril W Beaumont The Art of Stanislaus Idzikowski London: C W Beaumont [with others] J E Flecker (with a foreword by Hellé Flecker) The Letters to Frank Savery London: The Beaumont Press Robert Lloyd The Actor: A Poem. To which is prefix’d an essay by Edmund Blunden London: C W Beaumont 1927 Cyril W Beaumont The First Score … An account of the foundation and development of the Beaumont Press and its first twenty publications London: The Beaumont Press 1929 Henry Williamson The Wet Flanders Plain London: The Beaumont Press 1930 Cyril W Beaumont and Margaret Craske The Theory and Practice of Allegro in Classical Ballet (Cecchetti Method) London: C W Beaumont Edmund Blunden A Summer’s Fancy London: The Beaumont Press

1931 Edmund Blunden To Themis – Poems on Famous Trials with Other Pieces London: The Beaumont Press Francis M Kelly and Randolph Schwabe A Short History of Costume and Armour, Chiefly in England, 1066-1800 London: B T Batsford (2 Vols) 1936 W Somerset Maugham Of Human Bondage Garden City NY: Doubleday Doran & Company [Doubleday then issued it in a special edition for the New York Literary Guild, a book club that it owned, in the following year] 1938 Francis M Kelly Shakespearian Costume for Stage and Screen London: A & C Black [with others] 1942 W E Fairbairn and E A Sykes Shooting to Live, with the One-Hand Gun Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd 1946 H E Bates The Tinkers of Elstow: The Story of the Royal Ordnance Factory Managed by J Lyons & Company Limited for the Ministry of Supply during the World War of 1939-1945 London: Bemrose & Sons

A loyal exponent of Naturalism, William Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) was one of the most successful writers in English of the early twentieth century, his novels, short stories and plays proving to be as popular as each other. Much of his work, and particularly his stories, concern the experience of colonials in the Far East, though he dealt equally well with life in Britain itself.

Nos 51-55, 57-59, 62-64 & 66-72 are all illustrated in W Somerset Maugham, Of Human Bondage, New York: The Literary Guild, 1937. Provenance: The Estate of Randolph Schwabe

Maugham’s novel, Of Human Bondage, was initially criticised on its first appearance in 1915, but soon gained in reputation and is now considered by many to be his masterpiece. Highly autobiographical, it is a classic bildungsroman in that it charts the development of its protagonist, Philip Carey, from his being orphaned at the age of nine to his finally establishing a contented domestic and working life. Often compared to Charles Dickens’s David Copperfield, it cried out to be comprehensively illustrated, but was first published with just a pictorial dust jacket (initialled ‘MB’). A fully illustrated version appeared only in 1936, Maugham’s American publisher, Doubleday Doran & Company, having commissioned Randolph Schwabe to provide the images for a new edition. By this time, Schwabe was established as an illustrator, but not as an illustrator of narrative fiction. In 1935, Somerset Maugham had asked his friend, the painter, Gerald Kelly, to suggest a suitable artist to illustrate Of Human Bondage, and he in turn asked Schwabe’s friend and colleague, Allan Gwynne-Jones. Gwynne-Jones recommended Schwabe, and eventually he was chosen over John Farleigh and Barnett Freedman. Following a successful meeting with Nelson Doubleday, in London on 12 July 1935, Schwabe wrote in his diary, ‘Farleigh will be disappointed …’ (Gill Clarke (ed), 2016, page 202).

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Three months later, on 14 October, Schwabe recorded that he had ‘dined with Somerset Maugham at the Café Royal’, and that Maugham seemed ‘inclined to leave me a pretty free hand’. They found much common ground, including the fact that ‘he stammers as much as I do … it is this infliction, of course, transmuted into a club foot, which makes him so sensitive in the autobiographical parts of the novel. Kelly told me this.’ (op cit, page 207). Schwabe had made a start on the project by 8 November 1935, when he recorded that he worked at home, ‘in Hampstead all day on a “rough”’ (op cit, page 210). At the end of the year, while staying at Dover with his wife’s in-laws, the Cobbes, he ‘went over to Whitstable’, the seaside town in which Maugham had spent part of his childhood, and which he had lightly disguised as ‘Blackstable’ in Of Human Bondage. He then went on to Canterbury to look at King’s School, at which Maugham had been a pupil, and which he had again transformed in the novel. Early in 1936, while still at Dover, Schwabe was shown a film of some medical operations, including a Caesarean and an amputation. This film and related photographs acted as the initial sources for his image of Philip in an

51 THEY CAME TO A SMALL BEACH ... WITH A VIEW OF THE SEA Signed Pen ink and chalk 16 3⁄4 x 10 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: facing page 10


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operating theatre, though he was so thorough in his researches that in the July he would actually attend an operation, of the removal of gall stones, at University College Hospital [see 72]. Working ‘at a complicated drawing of a staircase, for my 13th illustration’ in late March 1936 [66], Schwabe showed all the drawings that he had completed to Maugham and Kelly on 16 April. Maugham ‘said they made him want to read the book again’, not having done so since its first publication, while Kelly said that what he ‘had done was what he understood by “illustration”’ (op cit, page 225). However, a few days later – on 22 April – Kelly phoned to suggest a few tactful improvements to some of the figures. As a result, Schwabe became more selfcritical, noting in his diary on 2 May, ‘Took back the photographs

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of my illustrations made by Cooper of Rose & Crown Yard, at Doubleday’s expense; I thought them not good enough. It is the first time they have disappointed me’. Nevertheless, he pressed on, and on the same day, ‘Made a brief note, for another illustration, of some details in Peter Robinson’s shop window’, though he was challenged by a shop assistant, who ‘was afraid that I was pirating some of their dress designs’ (op cit, page 226). He would finish that particular illustration – his twenty-second – on 8 July [69], and by 1 September he was able to arrange for the completed set of drawings to be dispatched to the United States. In November 1936, Doubleday Doran & Company published the first illustrated editions of Maugham’s Of Human Bondage. In the trade edition, Schwabe’s images were reproduced in photogravure, while in the limited edition of 751 copies on rag paper, signed by both author and illustrator, they were reproduced in collotype. Then, in the following year, they appeared again in photogravure in a special printing for the New York Literary Guild, a book club that it owned. Advertisements for the book described Schwabe as ‘one of England’s greatest artists’ and his illustrations as reflecting ‘perfectly the spirit of the book itself ’. The success of Schwabe’s naturalistic approach is due in great part to his ability to combine his equal strengths as a draughtsman of figures and of settings. This becomes all the clearer when his illustrations are compared to the 16 etchings produced by the American artist, John Sloan (1871-1951), for a rival edition of Maugham’s novel, which was published by the Limited Editions Club in two volumes just two years later in 1938. Sloan’s interpretation relies heavily on Schwabe’s, his version of She took the leg of mutton being particularly derivative. However, despite being an accomplished painter of the ‘Ashcan School’, Sloan created a set of illustrations that, as a whole, seems overworked yet imprecise when placed against the clarity of that by Schwabe. (To be fair, Maugham himself told Sloan that his illustrations had ‘caught wonderfully the tang of the period’, in a letter quoted in Elizabeth H Hawkes, John Sloan: Spectator of Life, Delaware Art Museum, 1988, page 147.) A third illustrated edition of Of Human Bondage appeared three decades later, in 1967 – over 50 years after the novel was first published, and by which time Maugham, Schwabe and Sloan were all dead. Published by Heron Books in two volumes and containing 16 images by Charles Keeping (1924-1988), it was part of a set of complete works, each illustrated by a different artist. Keeping’s vision is spare and abstracted, drawing on the darker, more expressionist elements of Maugham’s text. As a result, it complements Schwabe’s great achievement rather than competing with it. 52 SHE TOOK THE LEG OF MUTTON AND HELD IT HIGH ABOVE HER, AS THOUGH IT WERE THE HEAD OF JOHN THE BAPTIST ON A PLATTER Signed Pen and ink with chalk 21 x 13 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: facing page 246

53 THEY WANDERED UP TO THE CASTLE (opposite) Signed Pen and ink 16 3⁄4 x 10 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: facing page 86

From Emotion to Understanding: Of Human Bondage in Synopsis Nine-year-old Philip Carey, who suffers from a club foot, is the only child of a surgeon and his wife. His father has died just six months earlier, and now, in 1885, his mother lies seriously ill, having been delivered of a stillborn baby boy. When she also dies, he goes to live with his childless uncle and aunt, the Reverend William and Mrs Louisa Carey, at the vicarage in Blackstable, a coastal town some 60 miles from London. His uncle is cold and his aunt unused to children [51], so he withdraws within himself and develops a love of literature. Philip is soon sent to King’s School, Tercanbury, where he does fairly well academically, but is generally teased and shunned by the other boys. On leaving, he insists on going to Germany, to study the language, and lodges in Heidelberg [53]. Back in Blackstable, Philip is introduced to Emily Wilkinson, the daughter of a vicar to whom his Uncle William had been curate [55]. An older woman, of a romantic and fanciful nature, she introduces him to love, though he soon finds her distasteful and breaks off their relationship. Philip bows to his uncle’s wishes by serving as an articled clerk to a London firm of accountants. However, he finds the work boring and, after a year, resigns in order to go to Paris to train as an artist [54]. While in the French capital, he makes many friends, including Fanny Price, a young woman who mistakenly believes herself to be a great artist [57]. When she kills herself, as the result of depression and near destitution, he begins to doubt his own devotion to his art [58]. Then, on the death of his Aunt Louisa, Philip returns to England, and goes to Blackstable to attend her funeral. While there, he decides to follow in his father’s footsteps, and study medicine at St Luke’s Hospital in London [62]. Though he enjoys his studies, he is soon distracted from them by an almost obsessive love for Mildred Rogers, a waitress in a tea shop. While she does not return his affections, she enjoys his attentions, and especially the treats that he gives her [61]. Eventually, she breaks his heart when she tells him that she is to marry another man, Emil Miller. Within a few months Philip gains a new girlfriend, Norah Nesbit. The mother of a child, but separated from her husband, Norah earns her living as a part-time actress and the author of penny novelettes. She is kind to Philip and makes him happy, but cannot incite the same degree of passion in him that Mildred did [59]. Indeed, when Mildred returns, he leaves Norah and takes her back. Mildred has been left pregnant by Miller, who was already married to another woman. So Philip pays for her keep until she gives birth. However, following the baby’s arrival, Mildred falls in love with Harry Griffiths, a medical student friend of Philip, and abandons him again [64]. Philip throws himself into his work, only to come across Mildred again sometime later, working as a prostitute. He invites her to live with him, but

insists that they remain just friends. Confused by this, she determines to make him love her; then, when she fails, she destroys his few precious possessions before leaving for good. Philip invests his money in the stock market, hoping to recoup some of the money that he has spent on Mildred. However, the stock crashes and he loses everything, ending up living on the streets [68]. He is taken in by a friend, Thorpe Athelny, who is the press representative for Lynn and Sedley’s, a firm of linen drapers in Regent Street [66]. Athelny helps him gain a position as an assistant in the shop, and he reluctantly applies his artistic talents to dressing the windows [69]. Philip works at this job until his uncle dies and leaves him with enough money for him to be able to complete his medical studies [72]. He then spends a month in Farnley, Dorset, as a temporary assistant to the crotchety but kindly Dr South [71]. He initially declines South’s offer of a partnership, and becomes assistant house physician at St Luke’s, while he entertains ideas of foreign travel. However, having fallen in love with Sally, one of Athelny’s many children, he changes his mind and settles with her as his wife in Farnley.

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55 ‘THIS IS MISS WILKINSON, PHILIP,’ SAID MRS CAREY Signed Pen ink and chalk 19 x 12 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: facing page 126 54 PHILIP ... STARED AWKWARDLY AT THE MODEL ... HE HAD NEVER SEEN A NAKED WOMAN BEFORE Signed Pen and ink with chalk 21 x 13 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: facing page 182

56 UNCLE WILLIAM Chalk on tinted paper 15 x 10 1⁄2 inches Preliminary drawing for 55

57 HE THANKED HER WARMLY FOR THE TROUBLE SHE HAD TAKEN Signed Pen and ink with chalk 16 3⁄4 x 10 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: facing page 214 Exhibited: ‘Randolph Schwabe. Artist, Teacher, Diarist’, February 2016

58 PHILIP GAVE A CRY AND INSTINCTIVELY COVERED HIS EYES WITH HIS HANDS Signed Pen and ink with chalk 28 1⁄2 x 17 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: facing page 278


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60 PHILIP TOLD NORAH THE WHOLE STORY Chalk on tinted paper 15 1⁄2 x 11 inches Preliminary drawing for 59

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59 ONE EVENING HE TOLD NORAH THE WHOLE STORY OF HIS LOVE Signed Pen ink and chalk 21 1⁄4 x 13 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: facing page 342

61 THEY DINED IN SOHO Pen and ink with chalk on tinted paper 16 1⁄2 x 13 1⁄2 inches Preliminary drawing for the final illustration that faces page 302

62 THE LECTURER CAME IN ... HE SPOKE OF ANATOMY WITH ENTHUSIASM Signed Pen ink and chalk 19 x 12 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: facing page 286

63 THE VAUXHALL BRIDGE ROAD Pen and ink with chalk 16 1⁄4 x 13 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: facing page 374


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65 MILDRED Chalk on tinted paper 12 3⁄4 x 8 1⁄2 inches Preliminary drawing facing for 64

66 HE ... PASSED HIS HAND LOVINGLY OVER THE BALUSTERS Signed Pen ink and chalk 16 3⁄4 x 10 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: facing page 478

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64 AND THEN ON A SUDDEN, WITHOUT WARNING, MILDRED BROKE INTO A STORM OF TEARS Signed Pen ink and chalk 20 x 12 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: facing page 406

67 SHE HAD BEEN OBLIGED TO TELL HER AT LAST THAT IF SHE DID NOT GO AWAY SHE WOULD SEND FOR A POLICEMAN Signed Pen and ink with chalk 21 x 13 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: facing page 438

68 … HE WENT INTO THE GREEN PARK AND LAY DOWN ON THE GRASS Signed Pen and ink with chalk 18 x 11 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: facing page 566


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71 DOWN BELOW, BY THE HARBOUR, THE LITTLE STONE HOUSES OF A PAST CENTURY WERE CLUSTERED Signed Pen and ink with chalk 18 1⁄4 x 11 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: facing page 638 Literature: Gill Clarke, Randolph Schwabe, Bristol: Sansom & Company, 2012, page 152

69 HE DREADED FRIDAY MORNING, ON WHICH THE WINDOW WAS DRESSED Signed Inscribed ‘He went into the window with a sickening sense of shame’ below mount Pen and ink with chalk 18 1⁄4 x 11 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: facing page 598 Literature: Gill Clarke, Randolph Schwabe, Bristol: Sansom & Company, 2012, page 153

70 SUDDENLY THERE WAS A LOUD RATTLE ... THE OLD MAN WAS DEAD Signed Pen and ink 17 x 10 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: facing page 630

72 ON CERTAIN AFTERNOONS IN THE WEEK THERE WERE OPERATIONS Pen and ink 22 x 14 inches Illustrated: facing page 534 Literature: Gill Clarke (ed), The Diaries of Randolph Schwabe. British Art 1930-48, Bristol: Sansom & Company, 2016, plate 11


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H M B ATEM A N

H M BAT E MA N Henry Mayo Bateman (1887-1970) H M Bateman established his inimitable style before the First World War when, as he put it, he ‘went mad on paper’, by drawing people’s mood and character. It reached its zenith with ‘The Man Who ...’, his famous series of cartoons dramatising social gaffes. For a biography of Henry Mayo Bateman, please refer to The Illustrators, 2009, page 72; for an essay on the revolutionary and reactionary aspects of the artist’s work, see The Illustrators, 2000, pages 21-22. His work is represented in numerous public collections, including the British Museum. Further reading: Anthony Anderson, The Man Who Was H M Bateman, Exeter: Webb & Bower, 1982; John Jensen, ‘Bateman, Henry Mayo (1887-1970)’, H C G Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, Vol 4, pages 299-301

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The Sculptor – Portrait of A E West A E West was a close friend of H M Bateman for at least four decades of the early twentieth century, during which time they exchanged letters, cards and presents.

Calvert This is probably Leonard Calvert, who, with A F Marston Edwards, was one of the secretaries of the London Sketch Club during the decade 1905-15.

73 THE SCULPTOR – PORTRAIT OF A E WEST Pen ink and watercolour, 10 x 7 1⁄4 inches

75 CALVERT Pencil and watercolour 9 3⁄4 x 8 inches

Dudley Hardy A fellow member of the London Sketch Club, Dudley Hardy (1867-1922) was among the artists and illustrators who influenced H M Bateman early in his career. 74 DUDLEY HARDY Inscribed with title Watercolour and pencil 9 1⁄4 x 8 inches

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76 A SCOTCHMAN RECEIVING A CUT GLASS WATER JUG FOR A WEDDING PRESENT Signed and inscribed with title Inscribed ‘Piccadilly Calendar’, ‘G Delgado Ltd’ and ‘2075’ on A E Johnson, artist's agent, stamps on reverse Pen and ink 14 x 10 inches Illustrated: Piccadilly Calendar, London: G Delgado Ltd

77 THE ARTISTS Signed and dated 1910 Pen ink and watercolour with bodycolour 14 x 9 3⁄4 inches


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78 THE SAME VERY GOOD STORY Signed Inscribed with title below mount Stamped ‘Passing Show’, ‘No 2375’ and with A E Johnson, artist’s agent, stamp on reverse Pen and ink 15 x 23 inches Provenance: Ernest Brown & Phillips Ltd, The Leicester Galleries Illustrated: Passing Show

79 FIRST AND SECOND IMPRESSIONS OF THE MAJOR’S VOICE Signed Inscribed ‘First and Second Impressions’ below mount Inscribed ‘Tatler’ and ‘2263’ on A E Johnson, artist’s agent, stamps on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 14 x 10 1⁄4 inches Provenance: The Fine Art Society, March 1961 Illustrated: The Tatler

80 ACTION AND REACTION COLONEL X IN 1918 – AND IN 1920 Signed, inscribed ‘Colonel X in 1918 – and in 1920’ and dated 1920 Pen ink and watercolour 15 x 10 inches Illustrated: The Tatler, 11 February 1920 [published in black and white and subsequently coloured]


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81 THE THIRD ENCORE Signed and inscribed with title Inscribed ‘Tatler’ on A E Johnson, artist’s agent, stamp on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 13 1⁄4 x 19 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: The Tatler

82 THE ETONIAN WHO WAS ASKED TO PLAY ‘NUTS AND MAY’ Signed Inscribed with title below mount Stamped ‘The Tatler No 1535’ and with A E Johnson, artist’s agent, stamps on reverse Inscibed ‘Leicester Galleries’ with typed exhibition details on original backboard Pen ink and watercolour 13 3⁄4 x 20 inches Illustrated: The Tatler, Christmas Number, 1930 Exhibited: Fine Art Society, 1969; ‘Caricatures by H M Bateman’, Leicester Galleries, February-April 1974


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83 THE SECOND LIEUTENANT WHO JOINED HIS REGIMENT COMPLETE WITH WIFE Signed Inscribed‘Tatler’ and ‘2205’ on A E Johnson, artist’s agent, stamps on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 13 x 19 1⁄4 inches Provenance: The Fine Art Society, March 1961 Illustrated: The Tatler, 6 January 1929

84 THE PASSENGER WHO DARED TO FEEL SEA-SICK ON THE ‘QUEEN MARY’ Signed Inscribed with title on reverse Inscribed ‘Leicester Galleries’ with typed exhibition details on original backboard Pen ink and watercolour with pencil 13 x 19 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: The Tatler Exhibited: ‘Caricatures by H M Bateman’, Leicester Galleries, February-April 1974


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DAVI D LOW

DAV ID LOW Sir David Alexander Cecil Low (1891-1963) David Low was considered the most outstanding British political cartoonist of his generation. Able to capture recognisable likenesses with great economy, he produced the definitive image of a number of leading figures of the day. And he did so with a subtle combination of ridicule and insight, rather than exaggeration and condemnation. A key feature of his approach was the use of such symbols as the strong but stubborn TUC carthorse and the reactionary Englishman, Colonel Blimp.

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To Facilitate the Health of the Public Mind In this cartoon, published in the Evening Standard on 26 May 1928, a selfportrait of David Low sits and draws five of the leading politicians of the day sitting in the stocks, on the orders of the author and journalist, Rebecca West (1892-1983). This is her punishment meted out to each political figure for the factual inaccuracies of their respective claims. West’s reputation for her witty and frequently savage reviews and essays had grown since she began working for Freewoman, a feminist weekly, as a teenager. By the time of this cartoon, her essays and reviews had appeared in many publications in England and the USA, such as The New Statesman, the Daily Telegraph, the New York Herald Tribune and The New Republic. In January 1928, she had published her first collection of her works, The Strange Neccessity: Essays and Reviews. The five politicians pictured are (left to right): William Joynson-Hicks (1865-1932) was Home Secretary in the Consevative government, serving from 1924 to 1929. His statement that ‘Dora died years ago’ refers to the Defence of the Realm Act, enacted in 1914, four days after the outbreak of war, which gave the government special powers to aid the war effort. Although it officially ended with the war, much of the act was reprised as part of the Emergency Powers Act of 1920. This Act was used extensively during the General Strike of 1926, which, in his role as Home Secretary, Joynson-Hicks played a central role in opposing. Though he states that ‘Politics have only brought me disappointment’, the leadership of David Lloyd George (1863-1945) during the First World War had ensured an Allied victory. He had served as Prime Minister from 1916, as head of the wartime coalition, until 1922. At the time of this cartoon, he was leader of the Liberal Party, a position he would hold until November 1931.

For a biography of David Low, please refer to The Illustrators, 2011, page 180. His work is represented in numerous public collections, including the British Museum, the National Portrait Gallery and the V&A; and the British Cartoon Archive, University of Kent (Canterbury). His papers are in the Beinecke Library (Yale University). Further reading Colin Seymour-Ure and Jim Schoff, David Low, London: Secker & Warburg, 1985

Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947) was serving his second term as Prime Minister (November 1924 – June 1929). Though he hopes that ‘someone some day will take my place’, he had refused to step down when the opportunity had been presented to him. After an inconclusive election result in December 1923, he had remained as Prime Minister until January 1924, only stepping down after a vote of no confidence in his government. He then resisted calls for his resignation as Conservative leader, and returned as Prime Minister later that year. He would go on to serve a third term as Prime Minister from June 1935 to May 1937.

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Austen Chamberlain (1863-1937) was Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs between November 1924 and June 1929. Prior to this, he had served twice as Chancellor of the Exchequer, under Arthur Balfour from October 1903 to December 1905 and under David Lloyd George from January 1919 to April 1921. It was, however, Chamberlain’s work on the Locarno Treaties, which eased growing tensions between Germany and France, that ensured his place in history. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1925, and was further recognised when he was made a Knight of the Order of the Garter, at odds with his claim that ‘The politician’s is a dog’s life’. Frederick Edwin Smith, Lord Birkenhead (1872-1930), was Secretary of State for India from November 1924 to October 1928. This post was a return to office, his not having served in the government of Bonar Law or Stanley Baldwin between 1922 and 1924, despite serving as Lord Chancellor between 1919 and 1922. Contrary to his assertion that ‘There is no inconsistency in my attitude’, a reason for this had been his increasingly bombastic and arrogant oratory style, as well as concerns about his frequent drinking. His outbursts led David Low to caricature him throughout the 1920s as ‘Lord Burstinghead’. The note on To Facilitate the Health of the Public Mind is written by Alex Beetles.

85 ‘TO FACILITATE THE HEALTH OF THE PUBLIC MIND I WOULD ABOLISH FREE SPEECH SO FAR AS FACTUAL ACCURACY IS CONCERNED ... ANYBODY WHO IN THE COURSE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS MADE ANY STATEMENT OF FACT WHICH WAS NOT TRUE ... SHOULD BE PUT IN THE STOCKS ... (I SHOULD GET LOW TO DRAW THEM IN THE STOCKS)’ – REBECCA WEST OH, WELL, ANYTHING TO OBLIGE A LADY Signed Pen and ink 10 1⁄2 x 18 inches Illustrated: Evening Standard, 26 May 1928


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PON T

P ONT Gavin Graham Laidler, ARIBA (1908-1940), known as ‘Pont’ Following in the Punch tradition of George Du Maurier and Frank Reynolds, Graham ‘Pont’ Laidler excelled at satirising the British middle classes. Before his premature death at the age of just 32,

Laidler had established a reputation as one of the finest cartoonists of the twentieth-century with his acute observations of ‘the British Character’. For biography of Pont, please refer to The Illustrators, 2014, page 130.

87 YOUR LADYSHIP SEEMS TO HAVE FORGOTTEN THE TIMETABLE. IT SAYS THAT RICHARD IS ONLY TO BE KISSED BETWEEN 5.30 AND 6 Signed Pen and ink 8 x 10 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Punch, 24 June 1936, page 723

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88 THE BRITISH CHARACTER: A TENDENCY TO LEARN THE PIANO WHEN YOUNG Signed and inscribed with title Pen and ink on board 9 x 11 inches Illustrated: Punch, 29 September 1937, page 340; Pont, The British Character Studied and Revealed, London: Collins, 1938, page 28

86 THE BRITISH CARRY ON: ‘I’LL TELL NOBODY WHERE ANYWHERE IS’ (opposite) Signed, inscribed with title and dated ‘July 1940’ Pen and ink on board 9 x 11 inches Illustrated: Punch, 24 July 1940, page 84; Pont, The British Carry On, a Collection of Wartime Drawings by Pont, London: Collins, 1940, page 86


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HELEN JACOBS

HE LE N JACO B S Helen Mary Jacobs, BWS (1888-1970) Talented in both draughtsmanship and watercolour painting, Helen Jacobs soon established herself as a children’s illustrator. Though best known for the precision, energy and imagination of her early fairy subjects, she responded well to a variety of commissions; and, as a primary teacher, she seemed an ideal interpreter of textbooks and primers.

89 ON A BAT’S BACK I DO FLY Signed Pen ink, watercolour and bodycolour 7 x 10 1⁄2 inches

For a biography of Helen Jacobs, please refer to The Illustrators, 2007, page 11.

This image was clearly inspired by Shakespeare’s The Tempest and, in particular, the character and speech of Ariel.

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90 ‘TAKE ROGER AND BETTY WITH YOU!’ NEDDY COMMANDED GRANDLY (opposite) Signed Pen ink and watercolour with bodycolour on board 15 1⁄2 x 10 inches Illustrated: Stella Mead, The Land of Never-GrowOld, London: George Newnes, 1935, frontispiece


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J ESS IE DUN LOP

JE SSI E DUN LO P Jessie Isobel Dunlop (Mrs Wilson) (1902-1970) Though she is little known, Jessie Dunlop well represents the distinctive character of Scottish art in the early twentieth century. Jessie Dunlop was born at 35 Glen Street, Paisley, to the west of Glasgow, on 17 May 1902. She was the only child of Edward Dunlop, a draughtsman for Fleming & Ferguson, a company of marine engineers and shipbuilders on the Clyde, and his wife, Jessie Dunlop (née Hendry). By 1910, Edward had become general manager at Fleming & Ferguson Limited, and the family had moved across Paisley to 1 Greenlaw Avenue. Studying at Glasgow School of Art, Jessie Dunlop developed as a painter in oil of portraits and figure groups, which she exhibited at Paisley Art Institute, the Aberdeen Artists Society, the Royal Scottish Academy (RSA) and the Glasgow Society of Lady Artists, becoming a member of the latter in about 1934.

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In 1931, Jessie Dunlop married David MacArthur Wilson, in a Baptist service at 13 Riccartsbar Avenue, Paisley. Wilson had graduated from Glasgow University with a BSc in Electrical Engineering in 1922, and worked in that field throughout the 1920s. However, by the time of his marriage, he was working as a furniture designer, probably for his father, who was a cabinet maker, and living at 2 Grafton Place, Glasgow.

While Dunlop’s portraits – of dogs as well as humans – tend to be naturalistic, her figure compositions are Symbolist in approach. They may be compared to the work of John Duncan and similar artists of the Celtic Revival, but are more eclectic in style and wide ranging in theme, responding as they do to imagery and narrative that is variously Biblical, Classical and Oriental. They are likely to have been underpinned by a belief in the mystical philosophy of Theosophy. The eclecticism of the present work, in which Dawn drives an astrological procession, can be seen particularly in the representation of the earth: Islamic buildings combining with Celtic vegetal knots. While exhibiting this work, at the RSA in 1934, Dunlop was living at ‘Lathan Sona’, Kinpurnie Road, Paisley. However, she sent it from Slapton, near Kingsbridge, Devon, where she may have been on holiday or had a second home. The original frame was produced by Glasgow maker, John Gibson. Two years later, Dunlop and her husband moved to Largs, on the Ayrshire coast, to the west of Paisley. At some point, she painted her friend, Robert B McPhaden, who had been Provost (or Mayor) of Largs in the years 1928-30. By 1939, she, her husband and McPhaden had travelled south and settled permanently in Kingsbridge. McPhaden – who was born in 1885 – died first, in 1956. Dunlop herself died early in 1970, while her husband survived her by 11 years, dying in 1981.

91 DAWN (opposite) Signed Oil on canvas laid down on board 25 x 37 inches Exhibited: Royal Scottish Academy, 1934, no 556

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PAUL MA K Pavel Petrovich Ivanov (1891-1967), known as ‘Paul Mak’ and ‘Pavel Ivanov Mak’ The life of the Russian-born artist, Paul Mak, was so crowded with incident that his biography reads like a novel. He was at various times an outstanding tango dancer, distinguished soldier, reckless gambler, impoverished labourer and enforced worker, first in a coal mine and then on an airfield. The stage for these activities took in not only Moscow and St Petersburg, but also Persia and Egypt, and several European capitals. Indeed, if he were not so divinely talented, there might be the danger of his life overshadowing his art. However, he distinguished himself in many forms of image-making, including portraits and caricatures, designs for the theatre, illustrations and Persian style miniatures. At the height of his fame, he became court painter to the Shah of Persia and had many international exhibitions.

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Paul Mak was born Pavel Petrovich Ivanov in the Moscow region of Russia on 16 July 1891. He was the son of a retired colonel, aged 55, and his much younger second wife. However, he always claimed that he was actually the fruit of a liaison between his mother and a prince, who was his godfather. Possibly even before he ended his schooldays at the First Moscow Gymnasium, Pavel Ivanov came into contact with the artistic community of Moscow, through his elder brother, Viktor Petrovich Ivanov (1888-1952), who worked as a literary and theatre critic under the pseudonym ‘Viktor Iving’. The distinguished painter, Natalia Goncharova, produced a portrait of Pavel in 1910, and would become a friend. Between 1911 and 1914, Pavel Ivanov produced caricatures of leading cultural figures for several magazines, including the Moscow publication, Rampa i zhizn’ (Footlights and Life), and the St Petersburg publications, Satirikon and Teatri iskusstvo (Theatre and Art). In this period, he began to make use of the pseudonym, ‘Paul Mak’, and ‘Mak’ became his definitive signature by 1915. Between 1911 and 1915, he also designed productions for Mamontov and Artsybusheva’s Theatre of Miniatures, at 42 Mamonovsky Lane, Moscow, which specialised in presenting one-act plays and ballets. It is possibly through this theatre that he met the famous dancer, Elsa Krüger. Gaining a passion for the then highly fashionable tango, he partnered Elsa with great success. He also painted her portrait. Around 1913, Ivanov spent ten months of formal studies in the school run by the artists, K F Yuon and I O Dudin (the first private painting and drawing school in Moscow). He also absorbed the influence of such artists as Edward Burne-Jones and Aubrey Beardsley, who were known in Russia

PAUL MA K

through magazines, and especially Mir iskusstva (World of Art). In spring 1913, he contributed portraits to a group exhibition at La Galerie Lemercier, Moscow, alongside many other artists, including Natalia Goncharova. Accounts differ as to the year in which Ivanov began to take an active part in the First World War. According to articles published in English in 1929, in Apollo and Asian Affairs, he volunteered for service soon after war broke out, and went to train at the First Konstantinovskoye Military School in Kiev in 1915. He was then commissioned as a lieutenant in the cavalry – possibly the Black Hussars – and, though wounded several times, remained at the front and received the Military Order of St Vladimir (1st class with swords). However, Ivanov’s younger son and chief biographer, Dr Dimitri Dourdine-Mak, provides a different account. He states that Ivanov did not enter the military school in Kiev until 1916, and was then sent to the front as an officer in the 89th Belomorsk (White Sea) infantry regiment, becoming involved in the last great offensive against the Germans. Seriously wounded with a break to his right femur, he underwent an operation, which saved his leg, but left it some centimetres short. Having been promoted to the rank of captain, he was awarded the St George Cross (4th class). When the Bolsheviks came to power in October 1917, Ivanov was lying severely wounded in a hospital. Some months later, while still on crutches, he was arrested and incarcerated in Butyrskaya prison. During his time there, he was allowed to draw, and made a sketch of the prison governor, which helped him to secure his rehabilitation. The governor – an illiterate peasant – is said to have exclaimed, ‘Your fame as an artist will more than balance any harm you can do to Russia as an Imperialist’ (‘The Art of Paul Mak’, Journal of the Central Asian Society, 1929, page 249).

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In 1920-21, Ivanov worked as a stage designer at the newly founded Terevsat (Theatre of Revolutionary Satire), on a corner of Bolshaya Nikitskaya Street, in Moscow. However, in 1921, he fled south with his wife, Elena Kourbskaia. They made a long and perilous journey by horse and on foot, by way of Turkestan and Afghanistan, with Ivanov making sketches on the way to exchange for a night’s lodging or a meal. Arriving in northeast Persia (now known as Iran), they lived for a while in Mashhad, in Khorasan, but in 1922 settled in Tehran. Initially, Ivanov trained the race horses of a rich dentist, frequented the races, painted and made amusing caricatures of the personalities that he met. Taking lessons from an old master of Persian miniatures, he acquired their technique and spirit. So he established a new style – exemplified by the works included here – and through it quickly developed popularity within high society. The friends he made included the Qajar prince, Mohammed Hossein Mirza Firouz, who had served in the Russian army during the First World War, and Friedrich-Werner, Graf von der Schulenburg, the German Ambassador to Persia. In June 1925, an article with illustrations by Ivanov appeared in Asia: The Journal of the American Asiatic Association. This was ‘Ways of the Persian

92 CONJURING DEMONS Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1923 Pen and ink with watercolour and bodycolour 9 x 6 1⁄4 inches


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Heart and Mind: The Spectacle of Life Glimpsed Here and There in Streets and Gardens of Teheran’ by Thomas Pearson, the economic adviser to Persia. In the same year, his daughter, Elisabeth, was born in Tehran, and baptised there in the Russian Orthodox Cathedral of Saint-Nicholas, her godfather being Graf von der Schulenburg. He and Elena also had a son named Wladimir. At about this time, Sir Percy Loraine, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, introduced Ivanov to Reza Shah Pahlavi, the new leader of Persia. Having headed a British-supported coup in 1921, Reza Khan – as he was originally known – was selected Prime Minister in 1923, and became the first democratically elected monarch in 1925. He would do much to revive the arts in the country. Early in 1926, Ivanov held a solo exhibition in Tehran, which included miniatures on themes from oriental history and literature and scenes from the everyday lives of Mongols, Turkomans and Persians. Later the same year, Ivanov commemorated the coronation of Reza Khan by painting a monumental full-length portrait of him. (It hung in the throne room of the Golestan Palace in Tehran, but disappeared following the overthrow of the imperial regime in 1979.)

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In 1927, Ivanov was made official court painter, and, in the September, became a Persian national under the name of ‘Mack’, a mistranscription of Mak. He seems not to have changed his citizenship again after this date. However, early in 1928, he left Persia for Egypt, where he earned his living painting portraits. He held an exhibition in Cairo in that year, and then others in London (‘Drawings in Colour’ at the Leicester Galleries in 1928), Paris (1928-29, both alone and with the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts) and again in Cairo (1930). In 1929, a Georgian prince, Iveria Mikeladze, commissioned Ivanov to paint a portrait of Lord Allenby, Chairman of the Central Asian Society, and then presented it to the society. In 1931, Ivanov moved to Athens, where he had previously settled his sister, Valentina. In the same year, he held an exhibition of his work in the city, at the gallery called Palais de Versailles. In 1932, he moved to Paris and held an exhibition at the gallery, BernheimJeune, in December of that year. From Paris he visited London to mount a second exhibition, ‘Persian Miniatures and Drawings’, which was held at the Fine Art Society in 1933. Though making money from these international exhibitions, he lost much of it while gambling on horse races in each of the cities. In 1938, he was forced to leave France by the Paris Prefecture, as a result of pressure from the influential Armenian oilman and philanthropist, Calouste Gulbenkian. This was because Gulbenkian believed that Ivanov had become the object of affection of his married daughter, Rita. She was married to Turkish born, Kevork Loris Essayan, who worked closely with Gulbenkian in the fields of finance, oil and diplomatic affairs.

PAUL MA K

In March 1938, Ivanov moved to Belgium, living first to the south of Namur and then, from the May, in Brussels, which provided a home to many émigré Russians. There he produced miniatures for exhibitions that did not materialise and attempted to gain commissions for portraits. By March 1939, his circumstances were so desperate that he was forced to work as a labourer, painting the interiors of shops, producing lettering on their windows, and even engaging in plastering. In February 1940, the government decision ‘to regularise the situation of immigrants with no income’ led him to become a coal miner in the region of Charleroi. However, following the Nazi invasion of the country in May 1940, he was forced to work at the airfield at Evere, on the eastern edge of Brussels. In 1942, Ivanov met Lydia Dourdina, a young actress of Russian origin, who had worked at the Universum Film AG in Berlin before the war. She wrote to Graf von der Schulenburg, who led the Russia Committee of the German Foreign Office, to explain Ivanov’s position, and as a result he was released from his forced labour and able to return to painting. (In 1944, Schulenburg was implicated in a plot to assassinate Hitler, charged with high treason and executed.) Even before the end of the war, he began to exhibit again, contributing to the Salon des Peintres Russes at the Galerie de la Toison d’Or, Brussels (between 18 December 1943 and 5 January 1944). Becoming Ivanov’s mistress, Lydia gave birth to his son – Dimitri DourdineMak – in January 1946. However, during the course of 1945, he had already fallen in love with Emilie Mostovoy, who had two young children from her former marriage to Léon Wrangel. So, before Dimitri was of walking age, he left Lydia for Emilie. For the last 20 years of his life, he lived and worked in the Brussels suburb of Ixelles, in a two-room, first floor apartment at 558 Chaussée de Waterloo. He exhibited his work regularly in Brussels, Charleroi, Ghent and Antwerp [see separate table]. He died in Brussels on 22 June 1967, and was buried in the cemetery at Ixelles. Retrospective exhibitions took place in Belgium and England. The first was entitled ‘Exposition retrospective des oeuvres de feu Paul Mak’, and held at the Galerie Rubens in Brussels (between 31 October and 12 November 1967). The second was ‘Works of Paul Mak (1890-1967)’, which was organised by Mak’s elder son, Wladimir, and held at the Walton Gallery in London (in August 1968). Further reading ‘The Art of Paul Mak’, Journal of the Central Asian Society, Vol XVI, 1929, pages 249-250; Dr Dimitri Dourdine-Mak, ‘Le Peintre Paul Mak’, on his website, dourdine-mak.be (in French); ‘Ivanoff P (alias Paul Mac)’, on the website, artrz.ru (in Russian)

93 THE PRINCE’S VISION (opposite) Signed, ‘Mak’, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1924 Watercolour, bodycolour and gold paint with pen and ink on tinted paper 8 1⁄4 x 5 1⁄4 inches

Paul Mak’s Exhibitions, 1944-1963 1944 12-24 November Galerie Albert Bruyninckx, Brussels 1945 1-14 December Art Gallery Jordaens, Ghent 1947 5-17 April ‘Le Peintre P Mak’, Galerie Rubens, Brussels 1948 24 April-5 May Galerie Breeckpot, Antwerp 1950 28 October-8 November ‘Paul Mak’, Galerie Ex-Libris, Brussels 1951 10-21 November ‘Paul Mak’, Galerie Ex-Libris, Brussels 1952 20 September-2 October ‘Exposition des oeuvres du peintre Paul Mak’, Galerie Rubens, Brussels 1953 25 September-3 October ‘Exposition du Peintre Paul Mak’, Galerie Rubens, Brussels 1953 Charleroi 1954 31 October-12 November ‘Paul Mak’ [ex-court painter to S M I Reza Shah Pahlavi], La Petite Galerie, Ghent 1956 Until 2 November, Paul Mak’, Galerie Rubens, Brussels 1958 At the Exposition Universelle in Brussels, the international jury awarded him at gold medal for the works that he exhibited in the Iran pavilion. 1960 1-13 October ‘Paul Mak’, Galerie Rubens, Brussels 1961 Until 22 February ‘Paul Mak’, Galerie Breeckpot, Antwerp 1963 17-13 August ‘Paul Mak’, Galerie Générale, Ostende

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94 TWO WITCHES Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1924 Pen ink and watercolour 10 x 5 1⁄2 inches

95 THE PRINCESS OF THE PEACOCKS Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1925 Pen ink, bodycolour and gold paint 9 3⁄4 inches diameter


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PAUL MA K

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96 UP FROM THE EARTH’S CENTRE THROUGH THE SEVENTH GATE I ROSE, AND ON THE THRONE OF SATURN SATE, AND MANY KNOTS UNRAVEL’D BY THE ROAD; BUT NOT THE KNOT OF HUMAN DEATH AND FATE (opposite) Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1925 Inscribed with title and on reverse Pen and ink 12 1⁄4 x 7 1⁄2 inches The title comprises quatrain XXXI of Edward Fitzgerald’s The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam, in the 1859 edition.

97 BUT THAT IS BUT A TENT WHEREIN MAY REST A SULTAN TO THE REALM OF DEATH ADDREST; THE SULTAN RISES AND DARK FERRASH STRIKES, AND PREPARES IT FOR ANOTHER GUEST Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1925 Signed and inscribed with title on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 9 1⁄2 x 15 1⁄4 inches The title comprises quatrain LXX of Edward Fitzgerald’s The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam, in the 1868 edition.


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98 THE POTENTATE Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1926 Pen ink and watercolour with pencil 11 x 7 3⁄4 inches

99 THE PRINCESS AND THE PHOENIX Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1926 Pen ink, watercolour, bodycolour and gold paint on paper 10 3⁄4 x 6 3⁄4 inches


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100 THE SORCERESS Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1926 Watercolour, bodycolour and gold paint with pencil on tinted paper 8 3⁄4 x 12 1⁄4 inches

101 DERVISH AT PRAYER Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1927 Pen ink, watercolour and bodycolour with gold paint on parchment 7 x 4 1⁄4 inches


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102 AMONG DRAGONS Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1927 Pen ink, watercolour, bodycolour and gold paint 10 3⁄4 inches diameter

103 PROTECTING THE PRINCESS (opposite) Signed, inscribed ‘Teheran’ and dated 1927 Pen ink, watercolour, bodycolour and gold paint 11 1⁄2 x 9 1⁄2 inches


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M ERV Y N PEA K E Mervyn Laurence Peake (1911-1968) Though already developing as a painter, Mervyn Peake established himself as a writer and illustrator in 1939, with Captain Slaughterboard Drops Anchor, a comic fantasy intended for children. This revealed that he had an outstanding talent for the grotesque, and was ready to align himself to Romantic tendencies in British art. He applied that talent to a broad range of visual and verbal forms, central to which was his ‘Gormenghast’ trilogy, an extraordinary imaginative achievement detailing a parallel world. For a biography of Mervyn Peake, please refer to The Illustrators, 2007, page 337.

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Key works written and illustrated: Captain Slaughterboard Drops Anchor (1939); Ride a Cock Horse, and Other Nursery Rhymes (1940); Titus Groan (1946); Gormenghast (1950); Titus Alone (1959) Key works illustrated: Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1943); Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island (1949); Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (1954) Further reading John Batchelor, Mervyn Peake. a biographical and critical exploration, London: Duckworth, 1974; Colin Manlove (rev Clare L Taylor), ‘Peake, Mervyn Laurence (1911-1968)’, in H C G Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, Vol 43, pages 269-271; John Watney, Mervyn Peake, London: Michael Joseph, 1976; G Peter Winnington (ed), Mervyn Peake. The Man and His Art, London: Peter Owen Publishers, 2006; G Peter Winnington, Vast Alchemies. The Life and Work of Mervyn Peake, London: Peter Owen Publishers, 2000; Malcolm Yorke, Mervyn Peake: My Eyes Mint Gold: A Life, London: John Murray, 2000 His work is represented in numerous public collections, including the Imperial War Museum; and the Wordsworth Trust (Grasmere).

M ERV Y N PEA KE

Peter Back, a Condemned War Criminal at Rheinbeck Prison, 1945 In 1945, Mervyn Peake offered his services as a war artist to Charles Fenby, the editor of Leader, a weekly current affairs magazine. Fenby agreed that he could go to Germany to make drawings. However, Peake was not recognised in Fleet Street as a writer but only as an artist, Fenby asked the journalist, Tom Pocock, to accompany him. Pocock would later recall their tour in 1945: The Dawn Came Up Like Thunder (London: Collins, 1983), including their attendance of the first war crimes trial in Germany, at Ahrweiler, and their visit to Peter Back, one of the accused, in a prison at Rheinbeck in the Rhineland. As Peake wrote in a letter to his wife, Maeve, his intention was ‘to make records of what humanity suffered through war’ (quoted in Pocock 1983, page 128). He was therefore reluctant to draw Peter Back in his cell, and did so only at the urging of public relations officers. Pocock remembers that, ‘Mervyn suggested to the interpreter that Back should sit … and he did so, while the sketching was done as quickly as the pencil could move. We left in a few minutes, the doomed man thanking us’ (op cit, page 134). The story of Back’s crime was reported in Life magazine, as can be read below.

‘[On 15 August 1944], an American Liberator began to smoke … over the Rhineland village of Preist. Three Americans bailed out. One American landed in a tree in a wheat field. Two German soldiers started to help him out of his parachute when a crowd, headed by a paralytic much resembling Goebbels himself, tore into the wheat field. The paralytic was the Nazi leader of Preist, and he had clearly in mind Goebbels’ pronouncement, “It is far too much for us to ask that we call on German police to protect these murderers from the fate they deserve.” Goebbels was referring to US airmen, described in the Nazi press as “Air Huns” and “pleasure murderers.” The little man, one Peter Back, shot the American twice. Twice the American stood up again and came on. Another German, [Peter] Kohn, clubbed the wounded man and he fell on his face. A third, [Matthias] Gierens, swung a stone hammer into his head. A fourth, [Matthias] Krein, whose home-guard responsibility was to guard prisoners, stood by. The airman did not rise again. His body has been found but not identified. One old German, a veteran of World War I, had protested, “This man is a prisoner: this is no way to treat him.” Peter Back sneered, “You can bury him and put forget-me-nots on his grave.” The trial of three men, not including Peter Back, was held in Ahrweiler [on 1 June] by a military commission named by Lieut General Gerow of the Fifteenth Army. The prosecution cited the Ten Commandments, the laws of decency, the Laws and Customs of War and Nazi German regulations for the treatment of prisoners. All three were sentenced to death by hanging, but General Gerow commuted Krein’s sentence to life imprisonment. Back was caught [on 6 June] and sentenced [16 June]. [He was hanged on 29 June.]’ (Life, 16 July 1945, page 17, ‘US Army Justice Falls on Germans’)

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104 PETER BACK, A CONDEMNED WAR CRIMINAL AT RHEINBECK PRISON, 1945 Signed Watercolour, ink, pencil and white chalk on tinted paper 13 1⁄2 x 10 inches Literature: Gordon Smith, Mervyn Peake, A Personal Memoir, London: Gollancz 1984, page 122, where it is incorrectly described as ‘Condemned Cell at Belsen with Nazi War Criminal’


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ROWLA ND EMET T

ROWLAN D E M E T T Frederick Rowland Emett, OBE (1906-1990) Rowland Emett established himself as the creator of elegant and whimsical cartoons during the 1930s, while working as an industrial draughtsman. In 1951, he reached a wider public with his designs for The Far Tottering and Oyster Creek Railway, which was sited at Battersea Park during the Festival of Britain. Gradually, he converted more of his illustrations into increasingly complex three-dimensional machines. Both drawings and inventions helped cheer a nation fed up with years of austerity.

For a biography of Rowland Emett, please refer to The Illustrators, 2009, pages 74-75 Key works illustrated: contributed to Punch (1939); Walter de la Mare, Bells and Grass (1941) His work is represented in the collections of The Cartoon Museum, Tate and the V&A. His open air sculptures can be seen at the Victoria Centre, Nottingham and Eastgate Shopping Centre, Basildon; and at the Mid America Science Museum (Hot Springs, Arkansas) and the Ontario Science Centre (Toronto).

Further reading Jacqui Grossart, Rowland Emett: From ‘Punch’ to ‘Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang’ and beyond, London: Chris Beetles Ltd, 1988; John Jensen, ‘Emett, (Frederick) Rowland (1906-1990)’, H C G Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, Vol 18, pages 404-406

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105 MUMBLING MAGNA AND LITTLE FIEFIELD ‘WINGS FOR VICTORY’ WEEK Signed Pen and ink 10 1⁄2 x 13 inches Illustrated: Punch, 12 May 1943, page 392

106 SOME SAY IT’S HAUNTED BY THE FIRST EARL AND THE NINTH EARL ... I WONDER HOW THEY’D GET ON TOGETHER ... ? Signed and inscribed with title Pen and ink 18 x 13 inches Illustrated: Punch Almanack for 1949, 1 November 1948, page 24


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85 107 THE LONG PLAYING RECORD Signed Pen and ink 10 x 12 inches Illustrated: Punch, 29 November 1950, page 514

108 Y’KNOW, FRED, I’VE GOT A QUEER SORT OF FEELING WE ’AVEN’T GOT THE DIRECTIONS RIGHT Signed Pen ink and monochrome watercolour 8 3⁄4 x 9 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Emett’s Domain: Trains, Trams, and Englishmen: The Best of Rowland Emett, New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1953, page 38

109 A PLEASING AND SEASONABLE PROSPECT OF HATFIELD AT CHRISTMASTIDE, SHEWING DISTINGUISHED PERSONS, HUSH-HUSH CRAFT, DIVERS ACTIVITIES AND THE LIKE Signed and inscribed with title Pen and ink 20 3⁄4 x 28 inches


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110 NELLIE THE AFTERNOON TEA-TRAIN AT WISTERIA HALT Signed Pen and ink 9 x 20 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Sussex Life, March 1976, pages 30-31 Exhibited: ‘Rowland Emett: From “Punch” to “Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang” and Beyond’, 1988, no 53

Nellie the Afternoon Tea-Train at Wisteria Halt In 1951, Rowland Emett created The Far Tottering and Oyster Creek Branch Railway, a fully-working miniature gauge line, for the Festival of Britain. Based on his popular cartoons and constructed by Harry Barlow, the trains included Nellie, his most famous locomotive. They ran in Battersea Pleasure Gardens throughout the festival, on a line of 500 yards that took in Wisteria Halt, Paddlecombe, Prawnmouth, Friars Ambling, King’s Bedpost, St Torpids Creek and Little Figment. The railway continued

to operate in Battersea Park, in one form or another, until 1975, when the park’s funfair began to go into decline. However, Nellie has had a strong afterlife, as she has appeared on a Royal Mail stamp, as various kinds of merchandise, and in further cartoons. Furthermore, a version of Nellie, hauling the Afternoon Tea-Train, is owned by the Ontario Science Centre, and displayed each December alongside nine other machines by Emett.


A L HIR SCHFELD

AME RIC ANS

A L HI RS CHF E L D Albert Hirschfeld (1903-2003) Al Hirschfeld had the first and last word on New York theatre for nearly 80 years. Heralding the arrival of virtually every show on Broadway with a caricature each Sunday in The New York Times, he has as his legacy the longest-standing eyewitness record of the most elusive of art forms. With seemingly few strokes of ink, he captured all that is enthralling about one genre while demonstrating an unmatchable talent in another. For a biography of Al Hirschfeld, please refer to The Illustrators, 2007, pages 325-326.

The Year’s Best, 1982 Each year, in the 26 December edition of The New York Times, Al Hirschfeld published his ‘Year’s Best’, celebrating the finest shows and performances from the previous 12 months. In 1982, he acknowledged the contributions of the following:

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Choreographer William Forsythe, who had spent much of his early career in Germany with the Stuttgart Ballet, opened his ballet, Say Bye Bye, at the Netherlands Dance Theater in July to great critical acclaim. George Balanchine, the choreographer and co-founder of the New York City Ballet, had opened the Stravinsky Centennial Celebration at the New York State Theater on 10 June. The eight-day celebration opened to great acclaim and was a fitting end to the career of one of the fathers of American Ballet. He died the following year and was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Altynai Asylmuratova, the Kazakhstan-born ballerina, had been promoted to principal dancer in the Kirov Ballet Company in St Petersburg in 1982. She had come to the attention of western audiences for her performances in the Kirov’s Swan Lake this year at the Palace of Congresses in Moscow. She had also been the subject of a documentary, Backstage at the Kirov, which chronicled her preparations for this breakthrough role. Christopher Plummer played the role of Iago alongside James Earl Jones in Othello, which ran at the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway between February and May. Plummer received a Tony Award for Best Actor for his performance, becoming the first actor to receive a Tony nomination for a performance in Othello. Joan Sutherland performed the lead role in Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor, which opened at the Metropolitan Opera House on 1 November. This appearance was her first with the company after a four-year absence. Ingrid Bergman had starred in the TV movie A Woman Called Golda, a biopic of Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir, which was first released in April. It was to be Bergman’s final role, as she died on 29 August. She was posthumously awarded an Emmy for her performance. Zoe Caldwell, the Australian-born actress, was awarded a Tony Award in 1982 for her performance as the title role in Medea, which had opened at the Cort Theatre on Broadway in May.

Bill Irwin, comedy performer and clown, had come to prominence in the 1970s for his circus performances. In 1982, he wrote and starred in The Regard of Flight at the American Place Theater. The popular show, which showcased Irwin’s mime, dance and clowning talents, was made into a film for television in the following year. On 16 September, pianist Leon Fleisher performed Cesar Franck’s Symphonic Variations at the gala opening of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra’s new concert hall. This appearance was remarkable, as it was the first time Fleisher had performed with two hands since temporarily losing the use of his right hand to Focal Dystonia in 1965. Eva Marton, the Hungarian Soprano, performed Ponchielli’s La Gioconda at the opening night of the Metropolitan Opera House in September, and in Wagner’s Tannhäuser in November. For her performances, she was named Artist of the Year by The New York Times. In 1982, a two-part documentary, Laurence Olivier: A Life, was released to mark the 75th birthday of Laurence Olivier, and celebrate his almost 60-year career. In January of this year, the television production of Brideshead Revisited was first aired in the USA, for which Olivier won an Emmy for Outstanding Supporting Actor. Alec Guinness had portrayed George Smiley in the BBC television adaptation of John Le Carré’s Smiley’s People. The six-part mini-series first aired in the United Kingdom on 20 September, and in the United States on 25 October. He won a British Academy Television Award for Best Actor for the role and was nominated in the USA for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie.

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Jack Lemmon was the lead in the historical drama, Missing, released in February 1982. The role won Lemmon the Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actor, and he was also nominated for an Academy Award, BAFTA and Golden Globe for Best Actor. Al Hirschfeld would later give the present caricature to Jack Lemmon and his wife Felicia Farr as a gift. Julie Andrews starred in the musical comedy, Victor/Victoria, which was directed by her husband, Blake Edwards, and released in March. She was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her performance. In May 1982, David Hockney opened Drawing with a Camera at the André Emmerich Gallery in New York, an exhibition of over 150 polaroid composite works. This followed the opening of series of operas and ballets at the Metropolitan Opera House in 1981 for which Hockney designed the sets. On 16 September, the Whitney Museum of American Art opened a major retrospective exhibition of the American Modernist painter, Milton Avery. The show ran until 5 December of that year, before travelling around the country. Between March and June, the Museum of Modern Art in New York held an exhibition of the work of the Italian surrealist painter, Giorgio de Chirico. The exhibition was accompanied by a series of essays on De Chirico by such writers as Maurizio Fagiolo dell’Arco and William Rubin. Rudolf Serkin, the great Czech-born pianist, had turned down invitations to mark his upcoming 80th birthday in 1983 with gala concerts in Boston and London, but on 6 December 1982, a gala concert was held at Alice Tully Hall, benefitting Young Audiences, a charity tasked with bringing classical music to schoolchildren. A cause dear to Serkin’s heart, he attended, discovering it to be in fact more of a celebration of his life and career.

Pierre Boulez, the French composer, first performed his composition, Répons, at the Donaueschingen Festival in October 1981. On 6 September 1982, he performed a 33-minute version at the BBC Proms in London. Dee Hepburn starred as Dorothy alongside John Gordon Sinclair in the 1981 film Gregory’s Girl. In 1982, she was awarded the Variety Club’s Actress of the Year Award for her performance. Lou Reed released his eleventh studio album, The Blue Mask, on 23 February, shortly before his 40th birthday. The album was critically acclaimed, with many believing it to be one of his finest records.

In 1981, while still an undergraduate at Yale University, Maya Yang Lin won a public design competition for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC, beating over 1,400 other entrants. The memorial was completed in October and dedicated on 13 November 1982.

111 THE YEAR’S BEST, 1982 Signed ‘Hirschfeld 5’ and inscribed ‘to Jack and Felicia’ Pen and ink, 20 1⁄2 x 26 1⁄2 inches Provenance: The Estate of Jack Lemmon Illustrated: The New York Times, 26 December 1982


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A L H IR SCHFELD

This collection of illustrations [112-118] was drawn as part of an advertising campaign for the El San Juan Hotel and Casino, in Carolina, Puerto Rico. Published between 1964 and 1973, the advertisements not only show off the sun, water sports and fine dining on offer at the Puerto Rican resort, but also the entertainment. Al Hirschfeld immortalised many of the stars who sang and performed at the El San Juan Hotel during this period, including Shirley Bassey, Sammy Davis Jnr, Robert Goulet, B B King and Liza Minnelli.

114 WATER-SKIING AT THE EL SAN JUAN HOTEL Signed Pen and ink, 12 1⁄2 x 16 1⁄2 inches First published about 1970

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112 ON STAGE AT THE EL SAN JUAN HOTEL Signed Pen and ink 18 1⁄4 x 18 1⁄4 inches First published in 1967

113 A STANDING OVATION AT THE EL SAN JUAN HOTEL Signed Pen and ink 24 x 16 3⁄4 inches First published in 1968

On Stage at the El San Juan Hotel This image portrays some of the acts that performed at the El San Juan Hotel in 1967: Kaye Stevens, Sergio Franchi, Sonny & Cher, Jerry Vale, Jane Morgan, Liza Minnelli, Dana Valery, Paul Anka and Bobby Vinton.

A Standing Ovation at the El San Juan Hotel The El San Juan Hotel was able to attract some of the finest performers and Caberet stars of the day. In 1968, they welcomed Paul Anka, Lainie Kazan, Jerry Vale, Jane Morgan, Leslie Uggams, Sammy Davis Jnr, Robert Goulet, Sergio Franchi and Caterina Valente.

116 ROULETTE AT THE EL SAN JUAN CASINO Signed Pen and ink, 30 1⁄4 x 22 inches First published in about 1970 115 THE SUN IS 93 MILLION MILES AWAY FROM MOST PLACES. AT EL SAN JUAN HOTEL IT’S YOURS FOR THE BASKING Signed Pen and ink, 14 1⁄4 x 16 1⁄2 inches First published on 1 April 1970

Roulette at the El San Juan Casino In this image, Al Hirschfeld promotes the El San Juan Hotel’s celebrated casino. The figure of Woody Allen at the roulette table is possibly linked to his appearance in the 1970 film Bananas, which was partly filmed in Puerto Rico. Other recognisable figures include Noel Coward, Al Hirschfeld himself and his wife, Dolly, who can be seen sitting at the end of the table.


AME RIC ANS

PET E R A RN O

PETER A RNO Curtis Arnoux Peters Jr (1904-1968), known as ‘Peter Arno’ Hailed as ‘the greatest artist in the world’ by its founder Harold Ross, Peter Arno did much to establish The New Yorker’s reputation for sophisticated humour, through his satirical look at the decadent New York society of the inter-war period. Quickly establishing himself as one of the pillars of the magazine’s earliest days, Peter Arno would continue to produce cartoons and covers for The New Yorker until his death, an association of over 40 years. Described as ‘a master of composition’, perhaps his most famous cartoon, which he produced in 1941, coined the phrase ‘back to the old drawing board’.

Further reading Robert C Harvey, ‘Arno, Peter (8 Jan 1904-22 Feb 1968)’, John A Garraty and Mark C Carnes (eds), American National Biography, Oxford University Press, 1999, Vol 1, pages 628-629; Michael Maslin, Peter Arno: The Mad, Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist, New York: Regan Arts, 2016

Peter Arno was born Curtis Arnoux Peters Jr in New York, on 8 January 1904, the son of a New York State Supreme Court Justice. Encouraged to draw from an early age, he was educated at The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, CT, before attending Yale between 1922-24. Whilst there, he contributed illustrations, covers and cartoons to campus magazine, The Yale Record, under the name ‘Peters’. Music was also a great passion, inspiring Arno to form the nine-piece jazz band the Yale Collegians, the members of which also included Rudy Vallée.

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Following his graduation, Peters returned to New York and settled in the bohemian Greenwich Village. There he began painting decoratively, producing screens and panels for restaurants. He was on the verge of giving up on drawing to pursue a musical career, when the newly formed The New Yorker published one of his cartoons, marking the beginning of a collaboration that would last until his death. Crucial to developing the signature style and sophistication of the magazine, he would produce countless cartoons and 99 covers, as ‘Peter Arno’, over the course of his career, with founder Harold Ross describing him as ‘our pathfinder artist’.

117 PERFORMERS AT EL SAN JUAN HOTEL Signed Pen and ink 28 1⁄4 x 20 1⁄4 inches First published on 1 December 1973

Performers at El San Juan Hotel In 1973, the El San Juan Hotel welcomed performances by Enzo Stuarti, Shirley Bassey, Al Martino, B B King, Trini Lopez, Sergio Franchi, Dana Valery, Bobby Vinton and Kaye Stevens.

118 AT EL SAN JUAN HOTEL THERE’S A TIME AND PLACE FOR EVERYTHING, AT DINNER TIME THERE ARE FIVE PLACES Signed Pen and ink 15 x 15 1⁄4 inches First published on 7 October 1973

In 1927, Peter Arno married Lois Long, a popular New Yorker columnist and fashion editor, who wrote under the pseudonym ‘Lipstick’. The embodiment of the 1920s ‘flapper’, Long also wrote reviews of New York clubs and speakeasies. Her popularity was such that when she became pregnant in 1929, Peter Arno first learned of it through Walter Winchell’s gossip column in the New York Daily Mirror. They divorced in 1931, before Arno married socialite Mary Livingston Lansing in 1935. They had no children and divorced in 1939, after which Peter Arno moved to a farm near Harrison, NY. In addition to his work for The New Yorker, Peter Arno co-authored the 1931 musical satire, Here Comes the Bride, and produced numerous books and collections of his work, such as Peter Arno’s Parade (1929), Peter Arno’s Man in the Shower (1944) and Peter Arno’s Sizzling Platter (1949). Peter Arno died of emphysema in Port Chester, NY, on 22 February 1968.

119 THAT’S Q37, IN HER DAY ONE OF OUR MOST EFFECTIVE SECRET AGENTS Signed Pen ink and watercolour with bodycolour 19 1⁄4 x 14 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: The New Yorker, 24 August 1940, page 17


AME RIC ANS

DAVID LE VINE

DAV ID LE VIN E David Julian Levine (1926-2009) David Levine was widely acknowledged as one of the greatest, and most influential, caricaturists of the second half of the twentieth century. Best known as the staff artist of The New York Review of Books, he revived the tradition of American political caricature that originated in the nineteenth century with

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120 VOLTAIRE Pen and ink 4 1⁄4 x 2 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: The New York Review of Books, 16 April 1964, ‘Voltaire’ by Peter Gay (A review of Select Letters of Voltaire, translated and edited by Theodore Besterman)

‘The eighteenth century was a century of great letter writers, and Voltaire was the greatest of them all … [He] subordinated letterwriting to the business of living, and what his letters lose in polished artificiality, they gain in immediacy. He was a man of comprehensive interests and admirably lucid intelligence … And whatever he experienced, he experienced intensely, and poured into his letters.’ (Peter Gay, ‘Voltaire’, The New York Review of Books, 16 April 1964)

Thomas Nast, and has been frequently described as equal to Honoré Daumier. However, he sustained an equally distinguished career as a painter, producing figurative oils and watercolours in a poetically naturalistic style. His love of Corot and Vuillard, Eakins and Sargent, pervades his studies of Coney Island and the Garment District. But more fundamental to both his paintings and his caricatures is the fact that he said, ‘I love my species’.

121 NAPOLEON Signed and dated 64 Pen and ink 5 x 3 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: The New York Review of Books, 25 June 1964, ‘Napoleon Against Himself ’ by Peter Gay (A review of Napoleon by Felix Markham)

‘For a century and a half now, Napoleon Bonaparte has been a projective test and a convenient symbol … Historians have been as tempted to project their own prejudices on Napoleon as everyone else … Mr Markham has no stake in turning Napoleon into a symbol … His is a professional historian’s biography: sober, fair, and responsible. Yet its very real merits are compromised by the fact that the book is much too short, a serious error in judgment.’ (Peter Gay, ‘Napoleon Against Himself ’, The New York Review of Books, 25 June 1964)

For a biography of David Levine, please refer to The Illustrators, 2010, pages 277-278. His work is represented in numerous public collections, including the National Portrait Gallery; and Brooklyn Museum, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Library of Congress (Washington DC), the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), the National Portrait Gallery (Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC) and The Morgan Library & Museum (New York). Further reading (including collections of caricatures) Thomas S Buechner (foreword), The Arts of David Levine, New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1978; Thomas S Buechner, Paintings and Drawings by David Levine and Aaron Shikler, New York: Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, 1971; John Kenneth Galbraith (intro), No Known Survivors. David Levine’s Political Prank, Boston: Gambit, 1970; David Leopold (ed), American Presidents, Seattle: Fantagraphics, 2008; Malcolm Muggeridge (intro), The Man from M.A.L.I.C.E., New York: Dutton, 1960; John Updike (intro), Pens and Needles. Literary Caricatures by David Levine, Boston: Gambit, 1969; Ian McKibbin White, The Watercolors of David Levine, Washington DC: The Phillips Collection, 1980

‘From his early days in Scotland till the last chapter of his life as enacted in Samoa, it is possible to think that there were at least two Stevensons: the respectable and the bohemian, the successful and the delinquent, the man of letters and the prototypical hippie. Travels with a donkey, adventures among the doxies of the Edinburgh underworld, did not prevent him from qualifying as a lion of the Savile Club in London, or from becoming the respected friend of leading literary figures’ (Karl Miller, ‘The Two Stevensons’, The New York Review of Books, 29 May 1975)

122 ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON Signed and dated 75 Inscribed with title on reverse Pen and ink 13 x 7 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: The New York Review of Books, 29 May 1975, ‘The Two Stevensons’ by Karl Miller (A review of James Pope-Hennessy’s Robert Louis Stevenson)

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AME RIC ANS

A R NOLD ROTH

‘Akhmatova is a traditional poet, in the highest sense of the word. Her verse looks traditional not only to the American reader, but to the Russian one as well. But it possesses a quality which allows the Russian reader to love it more than the achievements of the Russian Futurists, Constructivists, Imagists, etc., with all their stylistic transformations and transfigurations … even an inexperienced reader will immediately single her out in the crowd—not by her dress, but by her speech.

A RNOLD ROTH Arnold Roth (born 1929) ‘Arnold Roth is surely the most imaginative and humorous graphic artist of this or any other day. Even Max Beerbohm at his best would have to take a back seat.’ (George Plimpton, Paris Review) For a biography of Arnold Roth, please refer to The Illustrators, 2015, page 158.

(Joseph Brodsky, ‘Translating Akhmatova’, The New York Review of Books, 9 August 1973)

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123 ANNA AKHMATOVA Signed and dated 71 Inscribed ‘Russian Poetess’ and stamped by The New York Review of Books on reverse Pen and ink 11 x 6 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: The New York Review of Books, 11 February 1971, ‘Under the Sign of Blok’ by Helen Muchnic (A review of translations of poems by Anna Akhmatova, Bella Akhmadulina and Alexander Blok); The New York Review of Books, 9 August 1973, ‘Translating Akhmatova’ by Joseph Brodsky (A review of Poems of Akhmatova, translated by Stanley Kunitz and Max Hayward)

124 THE PERSONAL AD (MATCHMAKERS) Signed Signed, inscribed with title, ‘For David Levine, the old Maestro’ and ‘With admiration & affection from that old Philadelphian’ below mount Pen ink and watercolour, 18 x 13 inches

125 TRUE BRIT Signed Pen ink and watercolour 12 1⁄2 x 9 1⁄2 inches


AME RIC ANS

E D SOREL

ED SOR EL Edward Sorel (born 1929) Edward Sorel’s clever and unforgiving satire is the product of a lifetime spent observing and criticising the unpleasant reality of the American Dream. His experiences of recent history from the Great Depression to Al-Qaeda, and his disdain for the greasy politics in between, have lent his cartoons a formidable bite that those his junior rarely match. For a biography of Ed Sorel, please refer to The Illustrators, 2014, pages 248-250.

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126 THE AVERAGE BRITON’S TYPICAL IDEA OF A TYPICAL SCENE OF AN ORDINARY STREET IN AN AVERAGE AMERICAN TOWN BASED ON THE AVERAGE CONTENT OF TYPICAL AMERICAN BOOKS AND ORDINARY AMERICAN MOTION PICTURES Signed twice and inscribed with title, ‘Caption 1’ and ‘For the William Davises – real life as seen from my studio window’ Pen and ink 22 x 15 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: Punch, 24 September 1969, page 484

127 REAL LIFE AS LIVED IN A REAL, TYPICAL BRITISH LIVING ROOM AS LODGED IN THE TYPICAL MIND OF THE AVERAGE AMERICAN WHO SEE TYPICAL, REAL BRITISH CINEMA AND READS REAL, AVERAGE BRITISH NOVEL Signed twice, inscribed ‘Caption 2’ and ‘For the William Davises – who have to live with this every day’ Pen ink and watercolour 20 x 15 inches Illustrated: Punch, 24 September 1969, page 485

128 NEW YORK SPRING Signed Pen ink and watercolour 21 1⁄4 x 15 inches Illustrated: The New Yorker, 15 April 2013, front cover


AME RIC ANS

E D SOREL

Nos 129-131 and 133 are all illustrated in Eric Metaxas, Jack and the Beanstalk, Westport CT: Rabbit Ears Books, 1991, [unpaginated] 129 FEE-FIE-FOE-FUM, I SMELL THE BLOOD OF AN ENGLISHMAN! BE HE ALIVE OR BE HE DEAD, I'LL HAVE HIS BONES TO GRIND MY BREAD! Signed Pen ink and watercolour, 13 x 16 1⁄2 inches 130 THE OGRE WOKE UP JUST IN TIME TO SEE JACK RUNNING OFF WITH THE HARP Signed Pen ink and watercolour, 9 x 11 3⁄4 inches

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131 JACK RAN AS FAST AS HE COULD, AND THE OGRE CAME RUSHING AFTER HIM Signed Pen ink and watercolour, 11 1⁄2 x 23 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: endpapers

132 AT LAST THE OGRE'S HEAD BEGAN TO NOD AND HE FELL ASLEEP Signed Pen ink and watercolour 14 x 17 inches Drawn for but not illustrated in Eric Metaxas, Jack and the Beanstalk, Westport CT: Rabbit Ears Books, 1991


AME RIC ANS

RONALD SEA RLE AS A RTIS T A ND COLLECTOR

Ronald Searle as Artist and Collector

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133 HE'D NOT GONE FAR, THOUGH, WHEN HE CAME UPON A VERY OLD, VERY ODD LOOKING MAN, WHO TIPPED HIS HAT AND GREETED HIM Signed Pen ink and watercolour 13 1⁄2 x 16 3⁄4 inches

The text for the Americans section is written by Alexander Beetles.


RONALD SEA RLE AS ARTIST AND CO LLECTOR

RONA LD S EA RLE

RONA LD SEA RL E Ronald William Fordham Searle, CBE (1920-2011)

Key works illustrated: Contributed to Punch (from 1946); Hurrah for St Trinian’s (1948); Geoffrey Willans, Down with Skool! (1953)

Equally inspired by a wide range of experience and a great knowledge of the history of caricature, Ronald Searle has honed an incisive graphic skill to develop an unparalleled graphic oeuvre, an oeuvre that has made him one of the most popular and influential cartoonist-illustrators.

Further reading Russell Davies, Ronald Searle, London: Sinclair Stevenson, 1990

For a biography of Ronald Searle, please refer to The Illustrators, 2007, pages 355-356; for essays on various aspects of the artist’s achievement, see The Illustrators, 1999, pages 228-230; and The Illustrators, 2000, pages 40-42.

Chris Beetles Gallery held the major tribute exhibition, ‘Ronald Searle Remembered’, in May-June 2012. It was accompanied by a 200 page fully illustrated catalogue, containing newly researched essays and notes.

His work is represented in numerous public collections, including the British Museum and the V&A; and the Bibliothèque Nationale (Paris).

134 KNOWN TO HAVE A PICK IN HIS POSSESSION ... (opposite) Signed Inscribed with title below mount Stamped on reverse with artist’s address and the date ‘autumn 1953’ on reverse Pen and ink on board 8 1⁄2 x 12 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Progress (Lever Bros), Autumn 1953, ‘Education for Productivity’ by Bernard Hollowood

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135 ST TRINIAN’S PARENTS’ DAY Signed and dated 1950 Stamped with artist’s details, ‘Lilliput’ and the date ‘7 Oct 1951’ on reverse Pen and ink on board 12 1⁄4 x 9 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: Lilliput, NovemberDecember 1951, page 39 Exhibited: ‘Ronald Searle, WaterColours, Drawings and Caricatures’, Leicester Galleries, London, October 1954, no 40, as ‘Parents’ Day’


RONALD SEA RLE AS ARTIST AND CO LLECTOR

RONA LD S EA RLE

Nos 136-138 are all Illustrated in Geoffrey Willans & Ronald Searle, Whizz for Atomms, London: Max Parrish, 1956

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107 In 2003, Chris Beetles Ltd published a new edition of Russell Davies’ biography of Ronald Searle, with an image of Nigel Molesworth on the front cover.

137 TO ME!!! THE GORILLA OF 3B. MY VEINS STAND OUT LIKE WHIPCORD. Signed, inscribed with title and publication details, and dated 1956 Pen and ink 9 x 11 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 35 136 NIGEL IS A SLO DEVELOPER Signed, inscribed with title and publication details, and dated 1956 Pen and ink 10 1⁄4 x 7 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 82

138 THERE WAS EVEN A TIME WHEN I HAD NO CULTURE MYSELF Signed, inscribed with title and publication details, and dated 1956 Pen and ink 9 1⁄4 x 11 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: page 79


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CH R ISTIA N BER A R D

Ronald Searle as Collector

G E O RG E D U M AU RIE R

C HRISTIA N B ERA RD

Ronald Searle was precocious not only as an artist but also as a connoisseur. Growing up in Cambridge, he frequented the local museums from an early age, and became particularly familiar with the collections of The Fitzwilliam Museum, including its fine holdings of drawings and prints. As soon as he could afford it, he began to collect illustrated books, and then original works of art. Once he was established as an artist, he also acquired drawings from fellow professionals, many of whom became friends. His collections informed both his knowledge of the history of cartooning and illustration, and his own practice as an artist, and helped him become an expert in the field, as well as the leading British cartoonist-illustrator of his generation. He even wrote the text, ‘Some Aspects of Graphic Satire from 1560 to 1969’, which was published, in a French translation, as a series of short articles for the journal, Le Club français de la Médaille, between 1975 and 1981. As an aid to his studies, he produced an extraordinarily intricate timeline, which he entitled, ‘Caricature: the ancient art of deflation’ (now in The Fitzwilliam Museum). Of the artists shown here, whose work he collected, George Du Maurier and Searle’s friend, André François, are listed on the timeline. And though Searle did not include his own name on the timeline, its very existence, in his inimitable hand, suggests that he himself might be the culmination of the great tradition that he detailed.

George Louis Palmella Busson Du Maurier (1834-1896)

Christian Bérard (1902-1949)

Equally talented as artist and writer, George Du Maurier developed a cartoon format for Punch that balanced text and image in order to record and satirise the fashions and foibles of society.

Christian Bérard was a French painter, fashion illustrator and wide-ranging designer, perhaps best remembered for his designs for Jean Cocteau’s film, La Belle et la Bête (1946). His close friend, Cecil Beaton, described his work as ‘about the only original contribution to stage design since Diaghilev’s ballet’ (The Happy Years. Diaries: 1944-48, London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1972, page 31). Bérard and the dancer, Boris Kochno, who had worked

For further information on Searle and the tradition of caricature, please refer to Elenor Ling, ‘Searle and “the ancient art of deflation”’, in Ronald Searle and Cambridge, Cambridge: The Fitzwilliam Museum/Cambridge School of Art, 2015, pages 65-71.

For a biography of George Du Maurier, please refer to The Illustrators, 2009, page 30. Key works written and illustrated: Trilby (1895); chief society cartoonist of Punch (1864-96) His work is represented in numerous public collections, including the British Museum and the V&A. Further reading Leonée Ormond, ‘Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834-1896)’, in H C G Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, Volume 17, pages 177-180; Leonée Ormond, George Du Maurier, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1969; Leonée Ormond, ‘Du Maurier, George (Louis Palmella Busson) (b Paris, 6 March 1834; d London, 8 Oct 1896)’, in Jane Turner (ed), The Dictionary of Art, London: Macmillan, 1996, Vol 9, page 384

with Diaghilev, comprised one of the most prominent openly homosexual couples in French theatre between the wars. Following Bérard’s early death – suffering a heart attack on stage at the Théâtre Marigny – Francis Poulenc wrote a Stabat Mater in his memory, and Cocteau made him the posthumous dedicatee of his film, Orphée.

A new volume of essays on George Du Maurier was published by Routledge earlier this year. Edited by Simon Cooke and Paul Goldman, George Du Maurier: Illustrator, Author and Critic: Beyond Svengali comprises 15 essays, including ‘A Novel Reflection: George Du Maurier as a Social Commentator’ by David Wootton.

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139 THINGS ONE WOULD RATHER HAVE LEFT UNSAID (opposite) HOSTESS (WHO HAS JUST SUNG). ‘ARE YOU QUITE SURE YOU DON’T SING, CAPTAIN LOVELL?’ CAPTAIN LOVELL. ‘I ASSURE YOU – I’VE NO VOICE WHATEVER – UNFORTUNATELY – I’M A LISTENER!’ Signed twice, inscribed with title and dated ‘June 86’ Stamped ‘Ronald Searle’ on reverse Pen and ink 6 3⁄4 x 8 1⁄2 inches Two pencil female profiles below mount Provenance: Ronald Searle Illustrated: Punch, 3 July 1886, page 6

140 SCENE DE THEATRE Signed Inscribed ‘Bought Cambridge 16 August 1966 £22’ and ‘Collection Monica Searle’ by Ronald Searle on reverse Pen and ink 10 x 15 inches Provenance: Magdalene Street Gallery, Cambridge, 1966; Monica Searle; The Estate of Ronald Searle


RO NALD S EARLE AS ARTIST AND CO LLECTOR

A N DRE FRA NCOIS

A N DR E FR AN CO I S André François (1915-2005) André François was a highly original artist, whose sharp satires of the human comedy influenced a generation of illustrators and cartoonists and, as such, paralleled the work of Ronald Searle and Saul Steinberg. For a biography of André François, please refer to The Illustrators, 2009, page 120. His work is represented in numerous public collections, including the Musée Tomi Ungerer (Strasbourg).

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‘the dividing line between reality and fantasy is barely visible. Ideas sprout like flowers from his head. But they are rooted in reality, not dottiness, and although the order of things is rearranged, it is only to sharpen our appreciation of them.’

142 THE AGE OF CHIVALRY Signed Inscribed with title and dated 26.11.49 on reverse Pen and ink 14 x 10 inches

(Ronald Searle (intro), The Biting Eye of André François, London: Perpetua Books, 1960, page 2) 141 HARLEQUIN DRINKING FROM A BOTTLE Signed Pen ink, oil and crayon with collage 12 1⁄4 x 12 1⁄4 inches Provenance: The Estate of Ronald Searle Literature: Ronald Searle (ed), André François: The Biting Eye, London: Perpetua, 1960, front cover

143 MR PUNCH AS A KNIGHT Signed Inscribed ‘André François, Punch cover, March 1958’ by Ronald Searle Pen ink, oil and bodycolour on board 18 x 15 inches Provenance: The Estate of Ronald Searle Illustrated: Punch, 12 March 1958, front cover


RONALD SEA RLE AS ARTIST AND CO LLECTOR

E O P LAU EN Erich Ohser (1903-1944), known as ‘E O Plauen’ Erich Ohser was a German cartoonist, best known for Vater und Sohn (Father and Son), the gentle yet incisive wordless strip that ran in the Berliner Illustrierte Zeitung between 1934 and 1937. Banned as the result of making satirical images of Hitler and other leading Nazis, he worked under the pseudonym, ‘E O Plauen’, which combined his initials with the name of the town in which he grew up. He was apprehended by the Gestapo in 1944, and committed suicide in his cell on the day before his trial.

CONTEM PORA RIES

144 THE RIGHT DISTANCE Signed Inscribed with title and ‘Vater und Sohn’ on reverse Inscribed ‘Vater und Sohn, Band I, Seite 19, 1935’ by Ronald Searle on reverse Inscribed ‘Bought from Mrs Plauen’ and ‘Monica’s Collection’ by Ronald Searle on original backboard Pen and ink 11 x 8 1⁄2 inches Provenance: Marigard Ohser, the widow of E O Plauen; Monica Searle; The Estate of Ronald Searle Illustrated: Berlin Illustrierte Zeitung, 1935, ‘Vater und Sohn’; Vater und Sohn, Vol I, Berlin: Verlag Ullstein. 1935, page 19

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Contemporaries

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ALAIN BONNEC Alain Bonnec (born 1952) Alain Bonnec and his brother, Daniel (born 1962), have been creating art together for over 20 years, in a delightfully whimsical, quintessentially French vein. They have exhibited in Europe, the United States and Japan, and are represented in the collections of the Musée de la Monnaie, Paris, and the Musée de Beaux Arts, Rennes. They have also been commissioned to create works for such large Japanese corporations as Sony Music and Sumimoto.

145 LE DEJEUNER SUR L’HERBE Signed Inscribed with title and ‘70.81’, and dated 81 on stretcher Oil on canvas 13 3⁄4 x 10 1⁄2 inches Provenance: The Estate of Ronald Searle The present work by Alain, suggestive of English fairy painting and illustration, includes a diminutive portrait of Ronald Searle.


CO NTEMP ORA RIES

QUEN T IN BLA KE

Q UEN T IN B L AK E Sir Quentin Saxby Blake, CBE (born 1932)

Nos 146-152 are all alternative versions for Michael Morpurgo, Didn’t We Have a Lovely Time!, London: Walker Books, 2016

Quentin Blake is the most popular of contemporary illustrators, with an instantly recognisable line and a back catalogue that includes some of the great children’s books of the last 50 years. For an extensive chronology of Quentin Blake, including his exhibitions at Chris Beetles Gallery, please refer to The Illustrators, 2007, pages 383-385. Key works written: Words and Pictures (2000); Laureate’s Progress (2002); Beyond the Page (2013) His work is represented in the collections of House of Illustration and the V&A. Further reading Joanna Carey, Quentin Blake, London: Tate Publishing, 2014; Ghislaine Kenyon, Quentin Blake: In the Theatre of the Imagination, London: Bloomsbury, 2016; Douglas Martin, The Telling Line, London: Julia MacRae Books, 1989, pages 243-263

114 This year Quentin has designed two tapestries for his alma mater, Downing College, Cambridge, and blinds for Cambridge University’s refurbished Museum of Zoology. Other design projects have included drawings for the newly named ‘Atlantic Bar’ at the seafood restaurant, J Sheekey, in London’s West End.

147 THE GREAT THING IS THAT WE ALL WORK ALONGSIDE REAL FARMERS AND GET TO FEEL LIKE PROPER FARMERS Signed Pen ink and watercolour 5 1⁄4 x 8 inches Alternative version: page 7

149 EVERY YEAR AFTER OUR WEEK IN DEVON, WE COME BACK TO SCHOOL AND THE WHOLE PLACE IS BUZZING WITH EXCITEMENT Signed Pen ink and watercolour 4 1⁄2 x 6 1⁄2 inches Alternative version: page 8

150 THE RESCUE OF A DUCK THAT WENT WALKABOUT AND WOULD HAVE BEEN EATEN BY THE FOX IF WE HAD NOT FOUND HER BEFORE NIGHTFALL Signed Pen ink and watercolour 4 3⁄4 x 7 inches Alternative version: page 10

151 EVEN SWEEPING DOWN THE PARLOUR AFTER MILKING, HE WOULD BE ALONE AND INTENT ON THE TASK IN HAND Signed Pen ink and watercolour 6 1⁄2 x 7 1⁄2 inches Alternative version: page 19

152 HE STOMPED ABOUT IN HIS WELLIES, CLAPPING HIS HANDS AT THEM, DRIVING THEM ON AS IF HE’D BEEN DOING IT ALL HIS LIFE Signed Pen ink and watercolour, 4 1⁄2 x 8 1⁄2 inches Alternative version: page 23

In April, the House of Illustration, at King’s Cross, opened a permanent gallery devoted to Quentin’s work. Exhibitions there have included one devoted to his original drawings for Beatrix Potter’s newly rediscovered story, The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots, published in September. On 16 September he was created an Honorary Fellow of Rose Bruford College of Theatre & Performance, located in his birthplace, Sidcup.

146 THE STABLE DOOR WAS OPEN AND THE LIGHT WAS ON. MICHAEL PUT HIS HAND ON MY ARM Signed Pen ink and watercolour 8 x 8 inches Alternative version: page 33

148 IN THE PLAYGROUND AND THE CLASSROOM ALL THE STORIES ARE TOLD AGAIN AND AGAIN Signed Pen ink and watercolour 2 1⁄2 x 5 inches Alternative version: page 8

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CO NTEMP ORA RIES

JA N E P IN KN E Y Lesley Jane Pinkney (née Magee) (born 1948) Jane Pinkney’s finely rendered depictions reveal a variety of anthropomorphic narratives steeped in nostalgia and charm. Her work can be firmly situated within the tradition of illustrative art, and her name comfortably coupled with those of Beatrix Potter, Edmund Dulac and Arthur Rackham.

J A NE PINK N EY

153 THE PHOTOGRAPHER Signed Watercolour 2 1⁄2 x 2 1⁄4 inches

For a biography of Jane Pinkney, please refer to The Illustrators, 2011, pages 338-340.

Nos 155-157 are all illustrated: in Margaret Greaves, Mouse Mischief, London: Marilyn Malin Books/Andre Deutsch, 1989, [unpaginated] and were all exhibited in ‘Mouse Mischief ’, Nunnington Hall, September 2012 155 ‘COME IN AT ONCE, YOU NAUGHTY CHILDREN!’ CALLED THEIR MOTHER. SHE WAS VERY ANGRY Signed Watercolour 6 1⁄2 x 6 inches

156 SO LIBBY HELPED TO CLEAR UP, AND MAKE THE HOUSE PRETTY FOR THE WEDDING (below) Signed Watercolour 7 1⁄2 x 6 1⁄4 inches

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117 157 THEN A CAR SHOT ROUND THE CORNER. ‘LOOK OUT, PIPKIN! RUN!’ SHOUTED AMANDA. PIPKIN JUMPED OUT OF THE WAY, BUT THEY WERE ALL FRIGHTENED Signed Watercolour 5 x 6 1⁄4 inches

154 TIMOTHY SQUEAK Signed Inscribed with title on reverse Watercolour, 5 1⁄4 x 8 inches Illustrated: Margaret Greaves, The Mice of Nibbling Village, London: Marilyn Malin Books/Andre Deutsch, 1986, [unpaginated]; London: National Trust Books, 2011, new edition, pages 16-17

158 THE KING WAS IN HIS COUNTING HOUSE, COUNTING OUT HIS MONEY Signed Watercolour, 3 1⁄2 x 3 inches Drawn for Mouse Rhymes: To Bed, To Bed; Munch Munch; Come and Play, an unpublished Nursery Rhyme Box Set of Three Books commissioned by Macmillan, circa 1995


CO NTEMP ORA RIES

S AR A MIDDA Sara Midda (born 1951) Sara Midda has gained an international reputation for her illustrated books and her product designs. While her work is often enchantingly diminutive in scale, it ranges in character from delicate, jewel-like watercolours to sharply humorous, even surreal, pen and ink drawings. Handwritten words combine actively with the images, as when they evoke the thoughts and emotions of ever characterful figures. If humans and animals are revealed at both their most vulnerable and their most endearing, the world that they inhabit is essentially edenic, a veritable garden of delights.

SA RA MIDDA

Sara Midda was born in Brighton, in Sussex, on 8 November 1951, and remembers ‘drawing since my earliest recollection and certainly since I was 2 years old’ (quoted in Suzanne Slesin, ‘Stylemakers: Sara Midda: Illustrator’, The New York Times, 9 April 1989). Sara took a two-year foundation course at Eastbourne College of Art before moving to London to study Graphics at Goldsmiths’ College School of Art, where her tutor was Wendy Coates-Smith. She then confirmed the direction of her artistic development by taking a postgraduate course in Illustration at St Martin’s School of Art. Among her teachers, Silvie Turner and Fritz Wegner proved particularly inspiring. As a student, Sara developed a love of lettering that led to her working on an idea that an alphabet could be created from just 11 components. (She would revisit this idea some decades later with the aid of Paul Hanson of Workman Publishing. He saw her drawings of little figures hauling shapes to build letters, and helped to create a kit to help children understand how the alphabet is formed. The result was published, in 2008, as How to Build an A.) Soon establishing herself as a freelance illustrator, Sara began to design cards, and contribute to such periodicals as Cosmopolitan, the Guardian, Harpers and Queen, The New York Times, Radio Times and The Sunday Times. She illustrated her first books in the mid 1970s. By this time, Sara had developed a form of illustration in which lettering played as lively a part in each design as did image. The ground-breaking book, In and Out of the Garden (1981), extended the fusion of word and image into parterres of prose and beds of poetry. It also gave her an extended opportunity to exhibit her skills as a watercolourist in pages that combine precise observation of the natural world with exuberant fantasy.

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With In and Out of the Garden, Workman Publishing of New York became Sara’s regular publisher. On her visits to the city, she developed happy working relationships with Peter Workman (chief executive), Sally Kovalchick (editor in chief ) and Paul Hanson (creative director) – and also with Ted Riley, who, for the few years before his death, was her agent. Together they gave her creative freedom. Winning the V&A’s Francis Williams Award in 1982, for the best descriptive illustration, In and Out of the Garden also attracted the attention of Toru Ando, the merchandise planning manager of Mitsukoshi. After a preliminary visit to Japan, she began a 20-year collaboration in which she designed many and varied products for the Japanese department store company, including babywear and linen, crockery and glasses, and stationery and product packaging. Sara also collaborated with Workman on various items of stationery, including the In and Out of the Garden Day Book. After spending much time in France, Sara produced Sara Midda’s South of France: A Sketchbook, which Workman published in 1990. Combining images, photographs and handwritten texts, it provided a rich scrapbook of a year of experiences, from anthologies of house fronts and shop signs to varied depictions of mouth-watering foods. She recently returned to the subject and approach in A Bowl of Olives: On Food and Memory, for which she had envisaged a large format; however, in publishing it in 2002, Workman presented it as uniform with South of France. 159 REACHING FOR THE MOON Watercolour with pen ink and varnish 5 x 3 1⁄4 inches

Having exhibited at the Workshop Gallery, Sara began to show work at Chris Beetles Gallery in 1991. In three books produced through the following decade, she applied her unique view of the world to the human condition, from birth through growing up to growing older.

First published by Jonathan Cape in 1994, Growing Up and Other Vices was, in the words of its flyleaf: a magical evocation of the mysteries of childhood and also a gentle satire on adulthood. Through her captivating watercolour illustrations Sara Midda conveys the perceptions and inner feelings of children in a way that is both profound and revealing. It had been developed with the stimulating editorial encouragement of Tom Maschler, the head of Jonathan Cape, and won the Bologna Ragazzi Award in 1995.

Baby Book (Workman, 1999) provided pages in which parents could record significant moments in their baby’s life, though Sara’s exquisite illustrations, interpreting such themes as ‘first tooth’ and ‘early art’, make the book as complete in itself as any of her publications. A is for adultery, angst and adults only (Workman, 2002) is an entertainment for grown-ups that explores the linguistic and visual potential of each letter in the alphabet, and is at turns delightful, mischievous and profound. Sara later divided her time between London and France, with her husband, Heinz Propper, and now lives in West Sussex, with Sally, her dog.

A Preliminary Checklist of Books Illustrated by Sara Midda 1973 Henry Lefever One Man and His Dog: Ancient Eastern Myths and Legends Guildford: Lutterworth Press [with others] 1975 Hammond Innes The White South London: Heron Books

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1979 Roger McGough and Michael Rosen You Tell Me: Poems Harmondsworth: Kestrel Books 1981 In and Out of the Garden New York: Workman Publishing 1990 Sara Midda’s South of France: A Sketchbook New York: Workman Publishing 1994 Growing Up and Other Vices London: Jonathan Cape; New York: Workman Publishing 1999 Baby Book New York: Workman Publishing 2002 A is for Adultery, Angst and Adults only New York: Workman Publishing 2008 How to Build an A: An Alphabet Book New York: Artisan 2014 A Bowl of Olives: On Food and Memory New York: Workman Publishing

160 FLYING FREE Watercolour and pencil, 4 3⁄4 x 4 inches Preliminary cover design for Walter De La Mare (ed), Come Hither, Harmondsworth: Kestrel Books, 1978


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The Sunday Times Nos 162-166 were all illustrated in The Sunday Times Magazine, 14 December 1980

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163 AIDS TO RECOVERY Inscribed with title on original protective tracing paper Pen and ink 4 x 2 1⁄4 inches

161 SOME PEOPLE LOVE CATS Signed Pen and ink 4 1⁄2 x 2 inches

162 A SPARKLING PERFORMANCE Signed Pen and ink 4 1⁄4 x 2 1⁄2 inches

164 GOD REST YE MERRY GENTLEMEN Inscribed with title on original protective tracing paper Pen and ink 3 1⁄2 x 2 1⁄2 inches

165 MEDICINAL DROPS (above right) Signed Inscribed with title on original protective tracing paper Pen and ink 2 x 1 1⁄2 inches

166 TERRIBLY TERRIBLY SORRY Inscribed with title on original protective tracing paper Pen and ink 3 1⁄4 x 2 inches

167 SECOND GENERATION Inscribed with title Pen and ink on paper laid on card 3 3⁄4 x 2 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: Designer, December 1981, page 8, ‘One Design Group leads to another’ by Betty Mcalhone


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Product designs for Mitsukoshi Nos 168-181 are all designs for stationery for Mitsukoshi, a Japanese chain of department stores

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169 CATILLAC Signed and inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour 3 1⁄4 x 6 inches

168 DREAMING OF FISH Signed Pen ink and watercolour 4 1⁄4 x 4 inches

170 THE YEAR OF THE CAT Signed Pen ink and watercolour 1 1⁄2 x 2 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Sara Midda, Baby Book, New York: Workman Publishing, 1999, ‘Year of The ...’


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173 PIGGY BACK Signed Pen ink and watercolour 1 1⁄4 x 1 1⁄2 inches

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174 THE YEAR OF THE RABBIT Inscribed ‘Rabbit’ below mount Pen ink and watercolour on paper on card 1 3⁄4 x 2 1⁄4 inches

176 DANCING DOGS Pen ink and watercolour 2 3⁄4 x 2 inches

171 SEDUCTIVE MOUSE Inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 1 3⁄4 inches

172 PUTTING ON MY BONE-TIE PUTTING ON MY TAILS Inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour, 4 x 1 3⁄4 inches

175 EXCHANGING GOOD THINGS TO EAT Signed Pen ink and watercolour 1 1⁄4 x 2 inches


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178 ENCOURAGING AN ELEPHANT Signed Pen ink and watercolour 1 1⁄4 x 2 inches

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177 BIRTHDAY SMILE Signed Pen ink and watercolour 5 3⁄4 x 4 1⁄2 inches

179 ELEPHANT SHOWER Pen ink and watercolour 2 3⁄4 x 4 1⁄4 inches

180 DANCING WITH AN ELEPHANT Signed Pen ink and watercolour 3 x 4 inches


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182 THE DAFFODIL FAIRY Signed Watercolour 2 1⁄4 x 4 1⁄4 inches Similar to dedication page

In and Out of the Garden Nos 183-185 are all illustrated in Sara Midda, In and Out of the Garden, New York: Workman Publishing, 1981, [unpaginated]

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183 TO PICK A PERFECT PEAR Pen ink and watercolour 5 3⁄4 x 4 inches 181 BIRTHDAY CAKE Signed Pen ink and watercolour 3 1⁄4 x 5 1⁄2 inches

184 THE PLEASURES OF AN ORCHARD Watercolour 2 3⁄4 x 3 inches


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185 IT SEEMED AS THOUGH THERE WERE FLOWERS IN THE AIR Pen ink and watercolour 5 3⁄4 x 3 3⁄4 inches

186 THE TREE-LINED PATH Signed Watercolour 2 3⁄4 x 2 inches Preliminary drawing

187 ALL SORTES OF FRUITS AND HERBES Watercolour and pencil 4 x 3 1⁄4 inches Preliminary drawing

188 AUTUMN Signed Pen ink and watercolour 11 1⁄2 x 8 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: Publisher’s Weekly, 1981, front cover This work was drawn to celebrate the publication of In and Out of the Garden.


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Sara Midda’s South of France Nos 190-192, 194-197 & 199-200 are all illustrated in Sara Midda’s, South of France: A Sketchbook, New York: Workman Publishing, 1990

190 OLIVES Watercolour 5 1⁄4 x 7 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 42

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189 SAUCERS OF OLIVES Signed Watercolour 10 1⁄2 x 7 1⁄2 inches Drawn for but not illustrated

191 BLACK OLIVES Watercolour 1 1⁄4 x 3 inches Illustrated: page 74

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192 A PLATE OF BLACK OLIVES Watercolour 2 x 3 inches Illustrated: page 75


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194 POTS OF FLOWERS Watercolour 4 x 3 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: page 44

193 LE VOYAGE Watercolour 4 1⁄4 x 3 inches Preliminary drawing for page 110

195 MONSIEUR CROISSANT Pen ink and watercolour 3 1⁄2 x 2 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 118

196 BREAD Watercolour with pencil 6 x 3 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: page 119


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198 CHARENTAIS MELON Watercolour 4 1⁄2 x 6 inches Drawn for but not illustrated

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197 FIGS Signed Watercolour 5 1⁄4 x 6 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: page 42

199 OLIVES Pen ink and watercolour 5 x 4 inches Illustrated: page 62

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200 GUAVA Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 3 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: page 63


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Baby Book Nos 202-206 are all illustrated in Sara Midda, Baby Book, New York: Workman Publishing, 1999

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202 BIRTHDAY BALLOON Signed Pen ink and watercolour 5 1⁄2 x 2 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: ‘First Birthday’

201 GROWING UP AND OTHER VICES Pen ink and watercolour with pencil 11 1⁄2 x 8 3⁄4 inches Alternative cover design for Sara Midda, Growing Up and Other Vices, New York: Workman Publishing, 1994

203 STAR CAT Pen ink and watercolour 2 1⁄4 x 1 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: ‘Toys’ (in reverse)

204 ALSEEP TOGETHER Signed Pen ink and watercolour 2 1⁄4 x 5 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: ‘Pets’

205 EXTENDED FAMILY Pen ink and watercolour 1 1⁄4 x 8 inches Illustrated: ‘Extended Family’

206 PAINTING THE BEAST Signed Pen ink and watercolour 2 1⁄4 x 3 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: ‘Pets’

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PAUL COX

PAUL COX Paul William Cox (born 1957) Paul Cox’s fluid, immediate draughtsmanship and vibrant colour make him one of the most enjoyable, versatile and sought-after of contemporary illustrators. Well known for his warm and witty contributions to books and magazines, he has ranged in his work as a designer from stamps to stage sets. For a biography of Paul Cox, please refer to The Illustrators, 2009, page 182. Chris Beetles Gallery has held a number of major solo shows of the work of Paul Cox since 1989. The latest, ‘A Journey Through His Art’, took place in 2013, and was accompanied by a comprehensively illustrated catalogue, which is still available for sale.

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Paul has just completed a full-page section cover for a feature in The New York Times on the delights of Washington Heights. He is continuing to contribute monthly assignments on national eccentricities to Britain, The Official Magazine of VisitBritain [211-215]. At the same time, he is working on three books: a children’s story with Graydon Carter and Lucy Cornell, a literary classic for The Folio Society and his own project on the changing face of London.

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209 FISHING TRIP Stamped '10 Jan 2001' on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 7 x 5 1⁄2 inches

207 DESIGN SERVICES – RENOVATING SPACES Signed Inscribed with title and ‘Elle Decor’, and dated ‘Dec 2013’ on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 30 x 12 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: Elle Decor, December 2013

208 WOMAN WRITER Pen ink and watercolour 5 x 7 1⁄2 inches Illustrated: Vanity Fair, 5 July 1993, letters page

210 THROUGH TWENTIES FRANCE BY BUGATTI Signed Inscribed ‘Michel Deon – excerpt from The Foundling Boy’, and dated ‘31/1/14’ on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 23 1⁄4 x 16 1⁄2 inches Drawn for a post about Michael Deon’s Novel, The Foundling Boy, for Michael Kerr’s blog, The Deskbound Traveller, 25 January 2014


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Nos 211-215 were all illustrated in Britain, The Official Magazine of VisitBritain

212 SETTING OFF – THE CANTERBURY TALES Signed Inscribed with title and ‘Britain Magazine’, and dated ‘20/5/2016’ on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 11 3⁄4 x 16 1⁄4 inches

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213 STAND ON CEREMONY Signed Inscribed with title, ‘Strange Traditions for London Livery Companies’ and ‘Britain Magazine’, and dated ‘26/11/2016’ on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 10 1⁄2 x 15 1⁄4 inches

211 SCENES FROM SHAKESPEARE (opposite) Signed Inscribed ‘Britain Magazine’ and ‘Shakespeare Map’, and dated ‘19/3/2016’ on rerverse Pen ink and watercolour 19 x 15 1⁄4 inches


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214 OXBRIDGE TRADITIONS Signed Inscribed with title, ‘Britain Magazine’ and dated ‘13/11/2015’ on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 10 1⁄2 x 15 inches

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215 MARY ROSE SINKING Signed Inscribed with title and ‘Britain Magazine’, and dated ‘19/3/2016’ on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 11 1⁄4 x 16 1⁄4 inches

216 THE FARLEY POST OFFICE UNDER CONSTRUCTION FOR THE NEW MOYNIHAN STATION (opposite) Signed Inscribed with title and ‘Elliman Magazine’, and dated ‘23/5/2016’ on reverse Pen ink and watercolour 23 1⁄4 x 20 1⁄4 inches Illustrated: Elliman


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M AT T Matthew Pritchett, MBE (born 1964), known as ‘Matt’

MAT T

Matt’s much-loved pocket cartoons for the Daily Telegraph provide a consistently original take on the big news stories of the day. For a biography of Matt, please refer to The Illustrators, 2009, page 185.

Nos 217-225 were all illustrated in the Daily Telegraph 217 WE’VE STARTED USING LEECHES AGAIN. THEY DON’T MAKE YOU BETTER, BUT THEY’RE HAPPY TO WORK AT WEEKENDS Signed and inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 2 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Friday 2 September 2016

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218 I WANT TO IMPRESS THERESA MAY, SO I’M GOING TO STOP HER COMING BACK INTO THE COUNTRY Signed and inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 2 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Tuesday 20 September 2016

221 THE MANAGER’S BROUGHT SHAME ON ENGLISH FOOTBALL. THAT’S THE PLAYER’S JOB Signed and inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 2 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Tuesday 27 September 2016 222 OI, REF!!! YOU’RE THE ONLY PRINCIPLED, DECENT MAN IN THE WHOLE GAME Signed and inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 2 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Thursday 29 September 2016

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219 ANGELINA & BRAD SPLIT TRUMP: ‘I’LL BUILD A WALL BETWEEN THEM’ Signed Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 2 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Wednesday 21 September 2016 220 THANK GOODNESS WE MOVED IN HERE AFTER THE BREXIT VOTE. CIVILISATION WILL HAVE COLLAPSED BY NOW Signed and inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 2 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Thursday 22 September 2016

223 LOOK AWAY NOW IF YOU DON’T WANT TO KNOW THE SIZE OF THE BUNG YOUR CLUB MANAGER RECEIVED Signed and inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 2 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Thursday 29 September 2016

224 I’D LIKE TO BET £500 ON ME TO SCORE IN THE NEXT MINUTE Signed and inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 2 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Saturday 1 October 2016

225 GO ON, SON ... FOUL HIM ... BRIBE THEM ... GIVE HIM A BUNG Signed and inscribed with title Pen ink and watercolour 4 x 2 3⁄4 inches Illustrated: Saturday 1 October 2016


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F R AN K D ICK E N S Frank William Huline-Dickens (1931-2016)

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‘Young Frank Dickens The Child Star’ – as he was affectionately known to his friends – was one of the most successful and enduring of strip cartoonists to have worked for British newspapers. He is best remembered for ‘Bristow’, which related the life of a bowler-hatted anti-heroic office worker, and gained him a place in The Guinness Book of Records for the longestrunning daily cartoon strip by any single author. However, he preferred another of his creations, the even more lucrative ‘Albert Herbert Hawkins: The Naughtiest Boy in the World’. While his drawings were highly effective and instantly recognisable precisely because of their simplicity, he considered himself a better gag writer than artist. He was also very funny in person, and became famous among colleagues for his selfdeprecating sense of humour and rambling anecdotes, which were encouraged, for many years, by a weakness for drink. Frank Dickens was born in Hornsey, North London, on 9 December 1931, the eldest of the six children of William Huline-Dickens, a painter and decorator, and his wife, Lucy (née White). He attended the Stationers’ Company’s School, leaving at the age of 16 to work with his father before becoming a buying clerk with an engineering company, and then a salesman, first of vacuum cleaners and later sewing machines. Following National Service in the Air-Sea Rescue service, he returned to life in an office; however, having become a member of the Unity Cycling Club in 1947, he soon left in order to establish himself as a racing cyclist. He went to Paris, in the hope of competing in the Tour de France, but failed to qualify. So he turned to cycling journalism and then, despite no formal artistic training, to producing cycling cartoons, selling the results to such French publications as Paris Match and L’Equipe. On his return to London, Dickens became the straight man in the comedy duo, Dickens and Mandel, though they later split following performances at the Windmill Theatre in 1958. Soon drawing one-off cartoons for the Sunday Express and the Daily Mirror, he began to contribute the cartoon strip, ‘Oddbod’, to The Sunday Times in December 1960. This led to the development of a book of short stories, What the Dickens (Dobson, 1961), out of which emerged ‘Bristow’, Dickens’ best-known strip, initially written with his sister, Pam. ‘Bristow’ records the ridiculous day-to-day life of a rebellious office clerk, eighteenth in line for the post of Chief Buyer of the Chester Perry Company. Rejected by every national paper, ‘Bristow’ first appeared in 1961 in the Aberdeen Press & Journal, and then in other regional papers before the

I N M E M ORI AM : FRA NK D ICK ENS

Evening Standard took it in 1962. It ran in the Evening Standard for over 40 years, and in the Aberdeen Press & Journal for over 50, so qualifying it for a place in The Guinness Book of Records, as the longest-running daily cartoon strip by any single author. It was also syndicated internationally in compilation annuals and later online, and won Dickens the title of Cartoonist Club of Great Britain’s Strip Cartoonist of the Year on eight occasions, including the four years running from 1964 to 1967. ‘Bristow’ also had an afterlife on stage and radio. A play ran at the ICA in January 1971, while, almost three decades later, from 1999, a radio adaptation, in 14 episodes, began to appear on BBC Radio 4, with Michael Williams as the man himself. Dickens also teamed up with Lionel Bart to turn ‘Bristow’ into a West End musical, but their working collaboration quickly turned into a series of drinking sessions and the work failed to materialise. Even more lucrative than ‘Bristow’ was the strip, ‘Albert Herbert Hawkins, The Naughtiest Boy in the World’. From 1967, it ran in the Daily Express and then internationally, and with particular success in the United States, though it was banned in some American schools for appearing to condone bad behaviour. The strips were also collected in book form. Dickens’ other strips include ‘Patto’, about a hapless cat, which appeared in the Evening Standard, ‘Willie Biggelow’ which appeared in the Sunday Express, and ‘Mavis’, for Woman’s Realm. He also produced pocket cartoons for Punch. Over the years, Dickens published more than 40 books. These included 12 for children, beginning with Fly Away Peter (Dobson, 1964), which was illustrated by Ralph Steadman. He also wrote two thrillers, based around cycle racing, entitled A Curl Up and Die Day (Peter Owen, 1980) and Three Cheers for the Good Guys (Macmillan, 1984). And, as if to confirm the breadth of his range, one of his last publishing projects was A Calmer Sutra (Time Warner, 2002), a comic variation on the sex manual ‘for those in the afternoon of their lives’. His 13-year marriage to María del Sagrario ended in divorce, but resulted in a daughter, Julia, who survives him. Having living in London for most of his life, he retired to Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire. He died on 8 July 2016.

Nos 226-229 were all illustrated in the Evening Standard 226 HOW ARE YOU GETTING ON WITH YOUR NEW BOSS? Pen and ink 4 1⁄2 x 18 1⁄2 inches

227 LISTEN TO THIS ... IF A MUSCLE IS NOT USED IT VERY QUICKLY BECOMES ATROPHIED ... THAT IS TO SAY, WASTED Signed Pen and ink 4 1⁄2 x 18 1⁄2 inches

228 ARE YOU GOING TO THE CHRISTMAS DINNER AND DANCE? Signed Pen and ink 6 x 19 inches

Since 1993, his cartoons and illustrations have been exhibited at the Chris Beetles Gallery. His work is represented in the collections of the British Cartoon Archive, University of Kent (Canterbury). Further reading Rick Brookes, ‘Frank Dickens’ [obituary], Guardian, 22 September 2016; ‘Frank Dickens’ [obituary], Daily Telegraph, 11 July 2016; ‘Frank Dickens’ [obituary], The Times, 1 August 2016

229 MY FEATHERED FRIEND Pen and ink 4 1⁄2 x 18 1⁄2 inche Illustrated: 23 October 1971

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SE LECT BIBLIOGR APH Y

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CUMULATIVE IN DE X OF CATALOGUE S ( 1 99 1-2 0 1 6)

Backemeyer 2005 Sylvia Backemeyer (ed), Picture This: The Artist as Illustrator, London: Herbert Press, 2005

Mallalieu 1976 Huon Mallalieu, The Dictionary of British Watercolour Artists up to 1920, Woodbridge: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1976

Dates in bold indicate entire chapters devoted to single illustrators

Baker 2002 Martin Baker, Artists of Radio Times. A Golden Age of British Illustration, Oxford: The Ashmolean Press & Chris Beetles Ltd, 2002

Martin 1989 Douglas Martin, The Telling Line. Essays on fifteen contemporary book illustrators, London: Julia MacRae Books, 1989

Bryant 2000 Mark Bryant, Dictionary of Twentieth-Century British Cartoonists and Caricaturists, London: Ashgate, 2000

Matthew and Harrison 2004 H C G Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (61 Vols)

Bryant and Heneage 1994 Mark Bryant and Simon Heneage, Dictionary of British Cartoonists and Caricaturists 1730-1980, Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1994

Peppin and Mickelthwait 1983 Brigid Peppin and Lucy Mickelthwait, The Dictionary of British Book Illustrators: The Twentieth Century, London: John Murray, 1983

Clark 1998 Alan Clark, Dictionary of British Comic Artists, Writer and Editors, London: The British Library, 1998

Price 1957 R G G Price, A History of Punch, London: Collins, 1957

A Abbey, Edwin Austin: 1997 Adams, Christian: 2011 Adams, Frank: 2007 Addams, Charles: 1991, 2015 Ahlberg, Janet: 1992 Aldin, Cecil: 1991, 1992, 1997, 1999 Aldridge, Alan: 2011 Allen, Daphne: 2003 Allingham, Helen: 1996, 1997 Anderson, Anne: 1991, 1996, 2001, 2011, 2012, 2014 Anton (Beryl Antonia Thompson and Harold Underwood Yeoman Thompson): 1991 Appleby, Barry: 2010, 2014 Appleton, Honor: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2014 Ardizzone, Edward: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 Aris, Ernest: 2007, 2010, 2011 Armour, George Denholm: 2010 Arno, Peter: 2016 Atkinson, Maud Tyndal: 1997 Attwell, Mabel Lucie: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2015 Austen, John: 1991, 1996, 2012 Ayrton, Michael: 1993, 1997

Driver 1981 David Driver (compiler), The Art of Radio Times. The First Sixty Years, London: BBC, 1981 Feaver 1981 William Feaver, Masters of Caricature. From Hogarth and Gillray to Scarfe and Levine, London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1981 Horne 1994 Alan Horne, The Dictionary of 20th Century Book Illustrators, London: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1994

Ray 1976 Gordon Norton Ray, The Illustrator and the Book in England from 1790 to 1914, New York: Pierpoint Morgan Library, 1976 Reid 1928 Forrest Reid, Illustrators of the Sixties, London: Faber & Gwyer, 1928 Souter 2007 Nick and Tessa Souter, The Illustration Handbook. A Guide to the World’s Greatest Illustrators, Royston: Eagle Editions, 2007 Spalding 1990 Frances Spalding, 20th Century Painters and Sculptors, Woodbridge: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1990

Houfe 1996 Simon Houfe, The Dictionary of British Book Illustrators and Caricaturists 1800-1914, Woodbridge: Antique Collectors’ Club Ltd, 1996 (revised edition)

Spielmann 1895 M H Spielmann, The History of ‘Punch’, London: Cassell and Company, 1895

Johnson and Gruetzner Jane Johnson and Anna Gruetzner, The Dictionary of British Artists, 1880-1940, Woodbridge: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1986 (reprint)

Suriano 2000 Gregory R Suriano, The Pre-Raphaelite Illustrators, New Castle: Oak Knoll Press/London: The British Library, 2000

Khoury 2004 George Khoury (ed), True Brit. A Celebration of the Great Comic Book Artists of the UK, Raleigh, NC: TwoMorrows Publishing, 2004

Turner 1996 Jane Turner (ed), The Dictionary of Art, London: Macmillan, 1996 (34 Vols)

Lewis 1967 John Lewis, The 20th Century Book, London: Herbert Press, 1967

Wood 1995 Christopher Wood, The Dictionary of Victorian Painting, Woodbridge: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1995 (2 Vols)

B V A B: 1991 Bacon, John Henry Frederick: 2012 Badmin, Stanley Roy: 1993, 1997, 2015 Louis Bailly: 2000 Bairnsfather, Bruce: 1992, 1999, 2007, 2008, 2015

Ball, Wilfrid: 1997 Banbery, Fred: 1999, 2000, 2002 Barker, Cicely Mary: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1999 Barrett, Angela: 1992, 1997, 1999 Bartlett, William: 1997 Barton, Rose: 1997 Bastien, A-T-J: 1992 Batchelor, Roland: 1993 Bateman, Henry Mayo: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 Batt (Oswald Barrett): 1997, 2011 Bauerle, Amelia: 1991 Baumer, Lewis: 1991, 1999, 2010 Bawden, Edward: 1993, 1997 Baxter, Doreen: 1992, 1997 Baxter, Glen: 1997, 2003 Baxter, William Giles: 1993, 1996, 1999, 2003 Beadle, James: 1997 Beardsley, Aubrey: 1999, 2000, 2008, 2010, 2015 Beardsley, Aubrey, follower of: 1999 Bedford, Francis Donkin: 1997 Beek, Harmsen van der: 1999 Beerbohm, Max: 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014 Begg, Samuel: 1992 Belcher, George: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2014 Bell, Robert Anning: 1993, 1996, 1999, 2003, 2007 Bentley, Nicholas: 1991, 2007 Bérard, Christian: 2016 Bernard, C E B: 1999, 2002 Berndt, Walter: 2015 Bestall, Alfred: 1993, 1999, 2011 Biro, Val: 2002 Blackmore, Katie: 1997 Blair, Preston: 1993, 1999

Blake, Quentin: 1991, 1992, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2015, 2016 Blampied, Edmund: 1992, 1993 Blathwayt, Ben: 1992, 2000 Bliss, Douglas Percy: 1993, 1997 Bond, Simon: 1993, 1997, 2001 Bone, Muirhead: 1992 Bonnec, Alain: 2016 Boswell, James: 1997 Boucher, William Henry: 1993 Bowman, Peter: 1992 Boyd, Tracey: 1992, 1993 Bradshaw, Percy: 1992 Brandt, Bill: 2011 Brangwyn, Frank: 1992, 1999 Brickdale, Eleanor Fortescue: 1991 Brierley, Louise: 1997 Briggs, Raymond: 1993, 2003 Brock, Charles Edmund: 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2010, 2012 Brock, Henry Matthew: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2012 Brockbank, Russell: 2002, 2003, 2007 Brooke, Leslie: 2009 Brookes, Peter: 1993, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 Browne, Gordon: 2003, 2012 Browne, Tom: 1991, 1992, 1997, 1999 Bryan, Alfred: 1993, 1999, 2003 Bull, René: 1991, 1992, 1997 Bunbury, Henry William: 1993 Burke, Chris: 1993 Burningham, John: 1993, 2002, 2003, 2007 Butterworth, Nick: 2002, 2003, 2009, 2010 C Caldecott, Randolph: 1991, 1992, 1996, 1999, 2003 Cameron, John: 1992 Cameron, Katharine: 1993, 1997, 2009 Canziani, Estella: 1993, 1996, 1999

Caran d’Ache (Emmanuel Poiré): 1992, 1993, 1999 Carse, Duncan: 1992, 2001, 2010, 2015 Cartlidge, Michelle: 2003 Casson, Hugh: 1991, 1992, 2002, 2003 Cattermole, George: 2012 Chalon, Alfred Edward: 1993 Cham (Amédée Charles Henri de Noé): 1991 Chapman, Charles Henry: 1999, 2002 Chapman, June Crisfield: 2007 Chesterton, Gilbert Keith: 1991, 1993, 2012 Churcher, Walter: 1992 Clark, Emma Chichester: 1999, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2015 Clarke, Harry: 1991, 1996, 2007, 2011 Claxton, Adelaide: 2003 Cleaver, Reginald: 1991 Cloke, Rene: 1996, 1999 Cobb, Rebecca: 2012, 2014 Coïdé (James Tissot): 2009 Cole, Richard: 1992, 1993 Collier, Emily E: 1996 Collins, Clive: 1993 Conder, Charles, follower of: 1993, 1999 Corbould, Edward Henry: 2003 Corbould, Richard: 2003 Cowham, Hilda: 1993, 1999, 2012 Cox, Paul: 1993, 1997, 2003, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014, 2015, 2016 Crane, Walter: 1996, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011 Cross, Peter: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2015 Crowe, Derek: 2007 Crowquill, Alfred: 1993, 2003, 2009 Cruikshank, George: 1991, 1996,

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1999, 2011, 2012 Cruikshank jnr, George: 1997, 1999 Cruikshank, Isaac: 1991, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2003, 2014 Cruikshank, Robert: 1993 Cubie, Alex: 1993 Cummings, Michael: 1992, 1997, 1999 Cushing, Howard Gardiner: 1999 Cusick, Jonathan: 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015

2007, 2008, 2010 Du Cane, Ella: 1997 Dulac, Edmund: 1991, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2015 Du Maurier, George: 1991, 1992, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2016 Duncan, John: 1991 Duncan, Walter: 1996 Dunlop, Jessie: 2016 Dyson, Will: 1993, 1997, 1999

D Dadd, Frank: 2015 Dadd, Philip: 1997 Dadd, Richard: 1997 Daley, Mike: 1992 Davidson, Victoria: 2003, 2011, 2014 Davis, Jon: 1991, 1992, 1993 Dawson, Eric: 1993 de Grineau, Bryan: 1992 De La Bere, Stephen Baghot: 1991, 1992, 1997, 2001, 2008 Dennis, Ada: 1996 Dickens, Frank: 1993, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2011, 2014, 2016 Dickinson, Geoffrey: 2011 Dighton, Richard: 2014 Dighton, Robert: 2014 Disney, Walt (and the Disney Studio): 1991, 1993, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003 Dixon, Charles: 1992 Dobson, Austin: 1996 Donnison, Thomas Edward: 2011 Doré, Gustave: 1997, 1999, 2009 Douglas (Thomas Douglas England): 1992, 1993 Doyle, Charles: 1991, 1992, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012 Doyle, Richard: 1991, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2010, 2011 Draner, Jules-Renard: 1993 Drew, Simon: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003,

E Earnshaw, Harold: 1996 East, Alfred: 1997 Edwards, Lionel: 1992 Egan, Beresford: 1997 Elgood, George Samuel: 1997 Elliott, James: 1999 Embleton, Ron: 2012 Emett, Rowland: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2014, 2016 Emmwood (John Musgrave Wood): 1991, 1993, 1997, 2002, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2014 Evans, Treyer: 2007 F Fantoni, Barry: 2014, 2015 Ferguson, Norman: 1993, 1999, 2003 ffolkes, Michael: 1991, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2014 Fitzgerald, John Anster: 1991, 1997, 1999, 2012 Flagg, James Montgomery: 2015 Flanders, Dennis: 1992 Flather, Lisa: 1991 Fletcher, Geoffrey Scowcroft: 1993 Flint, Francis Russell: 1992 Flint, William Russell: 1993 Folkard, Charles: 1991, 1992, 1997, 2003, 2010 Ford, Henry Justice: 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009 Ford, Noel: 1993 Foreman, Michael: 1991, 1992,

1993, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014 Foster, Myles Birket: 1991, 1999 Fougasse (Cyril Kenneth Bird): 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2003, 2009, 2014, 2015 François, André: 2009, 2014, 2016 Fraser, Claude Lovat: 1993 Fraser, Eric: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 Fraser, Gordon: 2015 French, Annie: 1991, 1992, 1997, 2003 Frith, Michael: 2010 Frost, William Edward: 1997, 2011 Fulleylove, John: 1996, 1997 Fullwood, John: 1997 Furniss, Harry: 1991, 1992, 1996, 1999, 2003, 2009, 2012 G Gaffney, Michael: 1991 Gardiner, Gerald: 1992, 1997, 2011 Garstin, Norman: 2003 Gaze, Harold: 1999, 2007 Gerrard, Roy: 2010, 2014, 2015 Gibbard, Les: 2011 Gibson, Charles Dana: 1991, 1999 Gilbert, John: 1993, 1996 Giles, (Carl Ronald Giles): 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011 Gilliam, Terry: 1992 Gilroy, John: 1997 Ginger, Phyllis: 1991, 1992, 1993 Glaser, Milton: 2015 Glashan, John: 1993, 2014 Goble, Warwick: 1997, 2002, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011 Godfrey, Bob: 1993 Goldsmith, Beatrice May: 1996 Goodall, John Strickland: 1991, 1996, 1997 Goodwin, Harry: 1992 Gould, Francis Carruthers: 1992,

1996, 1999, 2003, 2009, 2010, 2012 Gould, Rupert Thomas: 1996 Granville, Walter: 1992 Greeley, Valerie: 1992 Green, Charles: 1991, 1997, 1999, 2012 Green, John Kenneth: 1993 Green, Winifred: 1996, 1999 Greenaway, Kate: 1991, 1992, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2012 Gruelle, Johnny: 2015 Guthrie, Thomas Anstey: 1997 H I C H: 1997 Haité, George: 1997 Hale, Kathleen: 1991, 1996, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 Hall, Amanda: 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 Hall, Sidney Prior: 1991 Halswelle, Keeley: 1997 Hampson, Frank: 2002, 2003, 2008 Hancock, John: 1999 Hankey, William Lee: 1992, 1999 Hardy, Dorothy: 1991 Hardy, Dudley: 1991, 1992, 1997, 1999, 2014 Hardy, Evelyn Stuart: 1993 Hargreaves, Harry: 2015 Haro (Haro Hodson): 1991 Harris, Herbert H: 2003 Harrison, Florence: 2007, 2008, 2011, 2014, 2015 Harrold, John: 1993 Hartrick, Archibald Standish: 1999 Harvey, William: 2014 Haselden, William Kerridge: 2010 Hassall, Ian: 1992, 1997 Hassall, Joan: 1992, 2011 Hassall, John: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2011 Hatherell, William: 1991, 2003 Hawkins, Colin: 1999 Hay, James Hamilton: 1997 Hayes, Claude: 1997

Haywood, Leslie: 1992 Heath, Michael: 1993 Henderson, Keith: 1992, 2015 Hennell, Thomas: 1991 Henry, Thomas: 1999 Herbert, Susan: 1996 Hergé (Georges Remi): 1991 Hewison, Bill: 2007 Hickson, Joan: 1993 Hilder, Rowland: 1997 Hirschfeld, Al: 2007, 2015, 2016 Hodges, Cyril Walter: 1991, 1993, 1997, 2011 Hoffnung, Gerard: 1991, 1992, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014, 2015 Honeysett, Martin: 1999 Hopkins, Arthur: 1996 Hopwood, Henry: 1997 Houghton, Arthur Boyd: 2002 Housman, Laurence: 1991, 2010 Howitt, Samuel: 1993 Hughes, Arthur: 2003 Hughes, Shirley: 2003 Hughes, Talbot: 1997 Hughes-Stanton, Herbert: 1997 Hunt, William Henry: 1996 Hunt, William Henry, follower of: 1997 Husband, Tony: 2003, 2007 I Illingworth, Leslie: 1992, 1997 Ivory, Lesley Anne: 1993, 1996 J Jacobs, Helen: 1992, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014, 2015, 2016 Jacques, Robin: 1991, 1992, 1997 Jak (Raymond Allen Jackson): 1991, 1993, 1997, 1999 Jalland, G H: 1997 Janny, Georg: 1992 Jaques, Faith: 1991, 2009 Jeffers, Oliver: 2009, 2010, 2011 Jensen, John: 1991, 1993, 1997, 2008, 2009, 2011 Johnson, Jane: 1991, 1992, 1999, 2007, 2009 Johnstone, Anne Grahame:

1992, 1997, 1999, 2007 Johnstone, Janet Grahame: 1999, 2007 Jon (William John Philpin Jones): 1991 Jones, Jonah: 2014 K Kal (Kevin Kallaugher): 1991, 1992, 2014, 2015 Kapp, Edmond Xavier: 1999, 2007, 2011 Keene, Charles: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 Keeping, Charles: 1997, 2012 Kelly, Walt: 2003 Kimball, Ward: 1993, 2003 King, Jessie Marion: 1997, 1999, 2003 Kliros, Thea: 2003 Knight, Laura: 1993 Koren, Edward: 2015 L Lamb, Lynton: 1993, 1997, 2007, 2010 Lancaster, Osbert: 1991, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2008, 2009, 2011 Langdon, David: 1991, 1993, 1997 Langley, Jonathan: 1999, 2000, 2007, 2010 Langley, Walter: 1997 Lantoine, Fernand: 1992 Larcombe, Ethel: 1999 Larry (Terence Parkes): 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2014, 2015 Lawson, John: 2015 Lear, Edward: 1993, 1996, 2002, 2003, 2012 Le Cain, Errol: 1997 Lee, Alan: 1991 (insert), 2010 Lee, Joseph: 2007, 2015 Leech, John: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 2003, 2007, 2012, 2014 Leete, Alfred: 2014 Leighton, John: 2003 Leith, Barry: 2015

Leman, Martin: 1993 Leonard, Michael: 1991 Leslie, Charles Robert: 1993, 1996 Levine, David: 2008, 2010, 2014, 2015, 2016 Lewis, John Frederick: 1991 Linton, James Drogmole: 1997 Lodge, G B: 1991 Low, David: 1991, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2016 Lucas, John Seymour: 1997 Lucas, Sydney Seymour: 1993 Lusk, Don: 2003 Lynch, Bohun: 2007 Lynch, Patrick James: 1992 M Mac (Stanley McMurtry): 2007 Macbeth-Raeburn, Henry: 1997 Macdonald, Alister K: 1999, 2003 McDonald, Atholl: 2003, 2007, 2011 Macdonald, R J: 2002 McGill, Donald: 1991, 1992, 1997, 1999, 2010, 2011 McLachlan, Edward: 1997, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2014, 2015 MacWhirter, John: 1997 Maddocks, Peter: 1993, 1997 Magerl, Caroline: 2014 Mak, Paul: 2016 Mallet, Dennis: 1991, 2010 Mansbridge, Norman: 1991 Marc (Mark Boxer): 1991 Marks, Henry Stacy: 1991, 1997 Marshall, Herbert Menzies: 1997 Marwood, Timothy: 1999 Matania, Fortunio: 1992 Matt (Matt Pritchett): 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 Matthews, Rodney: 1991, 1993 Mavrogordato, Alexander: 1997 May, Phil: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2015 Mays, Douglas Lionel: 1997, 1999, 2007, 2008

Menpes, Mortimer: 1997, 1999 Meredith, Norman: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999 Meugens, Sibyl: 1993 Meyrick, Kathryn: 1991 Midda, Sara: 1991, 1992, 1993, 2003, 2016 Mill, W: 1999 Millais, John Everett: 2002 Minnitt, Frank J: 2002 Minton, John: 2003 Moira, Gerald: 1997 Monsell, John Robert: 2003 Moore, Fred: 1993, 1999, 2003 Morrow, Edwin: 1993 Morton-Sale, Isobel: 1999, 2002, 2003, 2007 Morton-Sale, John: 1997, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2007 Munnings, Alfred: 1991 N Nash, Paul: 1993, 1997 Neasom, Norman: 2014 Nevinson, Christopher Richard Wynne: 2003 Newman, Henry Roderick: 1996 Newman, Nick: 2007 Nibs (Frederick Drummond Niblett): 2008, 2014, 2015 Nichols, Charles: 1993 Nicholson, William: 1992, 1999 Nielsen, Kay: 1993, 2001, 2007 Nixon, John: 1999, 2007 Nixon, Kay: 1997 O Odle, Alan: 1991, 1996, 2007, 2010 Oppenheimer, Joseph: 1997 Orrock, James: 1997 Ospovat, Henry: 2002 Outhwaite, Ida Rentoul: 1991, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2008 Overend, William Heysham: 2014 Oxenbury, Helen: 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009

153


CU MULATIVE INDEX

154

P Paget, Wal: 2012 Palmer, Harry Sutton: 1991 Papas, William: 2007, 2014 Park, Bertram: 2011 Parsons, Alfred: 1992, 1997 Partridge, Bernard: 1997, 1999, 2002, 2014 Paton, Joseph Noel: 2003, 2015 Payne, David: 1992 Peake, Mervyn: 1997, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2016 Pears, Charles: 1991 Pearse, Susan Beatrice: 1996, 2003, 2014 Pegram, Frederick: 1993 Peploe, William Watson: 1996 Peto, Gladys: 1993, 2007 Phiz (Hablot Knight Browne): 1993, 1999, 2003, 2012 Pickersgill, Frederick Richard: 1997 Pinkney, Jane: 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 Pisa, Alberto: 1997 Plauen, E O: 2016 Pogany, Willy: 1992 Pollard, N: 1991, 1996 Pont (Graham Laidler): 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2014, 2016 Potter, Beatrix: 1991, 2002, 2007, 2010, 2011 Poy (Percy Hutton Fearon): 1999, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014 Prance, Bertram: 2003 Preston, Chloë: 1999, 2007 Protheroe, Thomas: 1992 Pullen, Alison: 1993 Purton, William, 2015 Pyne, Ken: 1993

IN DEX

Q Quiz (Powys Evans): 1993, 2007

Raemaekers, Louis: 1992, 1999 Ralston, William: 2015 Raven-Hill, Leonard: 1992, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2012, 2015 Reed, Edward Tennyson: 1993, 1996, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 Reid, Stephen: 2003, 2012 Reitherman, Wolfgang: 1993, 1999, 2003 Réthi, Lili: 2007 Reynolds, Frank: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2015 Richards, Frank: 1992 Ricketts, Charles: 1993, 2009 Ridegewell, William Leigh: 2003 Rimington, Alexander: 1997 Ritchie, Alick: 1992 Roberson, Peter: 1992 Robertson, Henry: 1997 Robinson, Charles: 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2014, 2015 Robinson, Thomas Heath: 2003, 2011 Robinson, William Heath: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 Rosoman, Leonard: 1997, 2011 Ross, Tony: 1999 Roth, Arnold: 2015, 2016 Rothenstein, William: 1997 Rountree, Harry: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2010 Rowlandson, Thomas: 1991, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2014 Rushton, William: 2003 Rutherston, Albert: 1992

R Rackham, Arthur: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015

S Sainton, Charles Prosper: 1997 Salaman, F J B: 1999 Salmon, J M Balliol: 1999 Sambourne, Linley: 1996, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2015

Sandy, H C: 1991 Saul, Isabel: 1997 Scarfe, Gerald: 1991, 1992, 1993 Schulz, Charles Monroe: 1991, 1992, 1997 Schwabe, Randolph: 1997, 2016 Searle, Ronald: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 Severn, Arthur: 1996 Shackleton, William: 2007 Shannon, Charles: 1999 Sheldon, Charles Mill: 1999 Shaw, Byam: 1991, 1997, 2014 Shepard, Ernest Howard: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 Shepard, Mary: 2014 Shepherd, Thomas Hosmer: 2014 Shepherd, William James Affleck: 1993 Shepperson, Claude: 1997, 2007, 2010, 2012 Sheringham, George: 1992, 1997, 2007 Sherriffs, Robert Stewart: 1997, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014 Sillince, William: 1991, 2003, 2014 Sime, Sidney Herbert: 1991, 1996, 1999, 2009, 2011 Simmons, John: 1997 Simmons, W St Clair: 1999 Simpson, Joseph W: 1993, 2007 Slater, Paul: 1999 Slocombe, Edward: 1997 Slocombe, Frederick: 1997 Small, William: 1999 Smith, Jessie Wilcox: 2007 Smythe, Reg: 1993, 1999 Soper, Eileen: 1991, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2008 Soper, George: 1991, 1997 Sorel, Ed: 2007, 2008, 2011, 2014, 2015, 2016 Sowerby, Millicent: 1991, 1992 Spare, Austin Osman: 1991, 1996

Sprod, George: 1997, 1999, 2010 Spurrier, Steven: 1992, 1999 Spy (Leslie Ward): 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 Stacey, Walter Sydney: 2009 Stampa, George Loraine: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2012, 2014 Staniforth, Joseph Morewood: 2010 Staniland, Charles Joseph: 2014 Steadman, Ralph: 1991, 1992, 1996, 1997 Stokes, Adrian: 1997 Stokes, Marianne: 1997 Stothard, Thomas: 1999 Stott, Bill: 2014, 2015 Strang, William: 2007 Strube, Sidney: 1999, 2003, 2007, 2014 Studdy, George Ernest: 1991, 1992, 1997, 1999, 2007, 2010, 2011 Sullivan, Edmund Joseph: 1991, 1992, 1997, 1999, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2016 Sullivan, James Frank: 2014 Swamy, S N: 2012 Swan, John Macallan: 1997 Swanwick, Betty: 1991, 1993, 1997, 2008, 2011 Szyk, Arthur: 2003 T Tansend: 1999 Tarrant, Margaret: 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2015 Tarrant, Percy: 1991 Taylor, John Whitfield: 2003 Tennant, Stephen: 2003 Tenniel, John: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 Thackeray, Lance: 1992, 1997 Thelwell, Norman: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014, 2015 Thomas, Bert: 1991, 1997, 1999,

2003, 2011, 2015 Thomas, Frank: 1993, 1999, 2003 Thomas, William Fletcher: 1993, 1996, 2003, 2014 Thomson, Hugh: 1991, 1997, 1999, 2015 Thorpe, James: 1991 Thurber, James: 1991 Tidy, Bill: 1993, 2014, 2015 Timlin, William Mitcheson: 1996, 1999 Titcombe, Bill: 1999 Topolski, Feliks: 1991, 2011 Tourtel, Mary: 1993, 1997, 2000, 2011 Townsend, Frederick Henry: 1999, 2010 Tyler, Gillian: 2012, 2014, 2015 Tyndale, Walter: 1997 Tyndall, Robert: 1999 Tytla, Bill: 1993, 1999, 2003 U Umbstaetter, Nelly: 2007 Underhill, Liz: 1992 V Van Abbé, Salomon: 1997, 1999, 2011, 2014 Van der Weyden, Harry: 1992 Vaughan, Keith: 1991 Vicky (Victor Weisz): 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2015 W Wain, Louis: 1996, 2007, 2010 Wainwright, Francis: 1991, 1997 Walker, Frederick: 1991, 1999 Walker, John Cuthbert: 2014 Walker, William Henry Romaine: 1993, 1996, 1999, 2010, 2014 Waller, Pickford: 2010 Ward, John: 2010 Ward, William: 1996 Waterman, Julian: 1993 Wateridge, Jonathan: 2002 Watts, Arthur: 2007 Webb, Clifford: 1993 Webster, Tom: 1992 Weedon, Augustus: 1997

Wehrschmidt, Daniel: 1997 Welch, Patrick: 1991 Wells, Rosemary: 1993 Wheeler, Dorothy: 1991 Wheelhouse, Mary Vermuyden: 2015 Whistler, Rex: 1991, 2003, 2008, 2009 Whitelaw, George: 2007, 2014 Wilkie, David: 1991 Wilkinson, Thomas: 1993 Williams, Kipper: 2007 Williams, Mike: 1999, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2014, 2015 Wilson, Thomas Walter: 2014 Wimbush, Henry: 1997 Wood, John Norris: 2012 Wood, Lawson: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2014 Wood, Starr: 1992, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007 Woodward, George Murgatroyd: 2007 Wootton, Reg: 1991, 2003, 2011 Wright, Alan: 1991, 1996, 1997, 2011, 2012 Wright, John Masey: 1996 Wright, Patrick: 1993, 1997, 1999 Wyllie, William Lionel: 1997 Wysard, Tony: 2015 Y Yeats, Jack Butler: 1993 Z Zinkeisen, Anna: 1993, 2007 Zinkeisen, Doris: 2007, 2008

IND EX Arno, Peter Bateman, H M Bérard, Christian Blake, Quentin Bonnec, Alain Cox, Paul Dickens, Frank Du Maurier, George Dunlop, Jessie Emett, Rowland François, André Hirschfeld, Al Jacobs, Helen Levine, David Low, David Mak, Paul Matt Midda, Sara Peake, Mervyn Pinkney, Jane Plauen, E O Pont (Graham Laidler) Robinson, William Heath Roth, Arnold Schwabe, Randolph Searle, Ronald Shepard, E H Sorel, Ed Sullivan, Edmund Joseph

93 50-57 109 114-115 112 140-145 148-149 108 64-65 82-86 110-111 88-92 62-63 94-96 58-59 66-79 146-147 118-139 80-81 116-117 112 60-61 21-29 97-98 36-49 104-107 30-35 99-102 6-20

155


CHRIS BEETLES

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The Illustrators 2016  

A catalogue to accompany our annual exhibition, the biggest event worldwide for cartoon and illustration collectors, features over 600 pictu...

The Illustrators 2016  

A catalogue to accompany our annual exhibition, the biggest event worldwide for cartoon and illustration collectors, features over 600 pictu...