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SPRING/SUMMER 2018

THIRST QUENCHERS p. 29

The Art Of Plating p. 49 Up for catching some ZZZZs? Generation Z, that is

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THIS ISSUE

D E PA R TM E N T S 2

President’s Letter

7

Great Advice

12

Staying Ahead

38

Taste Nation

43

Inspired Menu

57

Recipe Central

FE AT U R ES

7 Chef Connexion is published twice a

Creative Direction and Production

year by Greenbridge Foodservice

Bravada Consumer Communications

Managing Editor

Translation

Jane Auster

Jérôme Kurès

Contributing Writers

Mailing Address

Suzanne Boles

Chef Connexion Magazine

Darren Climans

Greenbridge Foodservice Inc.

Kate Engineer

1373 Victoria Street N. Unit 201

Julie Gedeon

Kitchener, ON N2B 3R6

Lawrence Herzog Alison Kent Cherie Thompson

www.chefconnexion.ca www.brandpointsplus.ca

17

IN SEASONS Spring Fling

21

WHAT’S UP! Brand Points PLUS

29

OPEN MENU Global Thirst Quenchers

35

MARKETING 101 Are You Instagrammable?

44

COST CHECK Bread That’s Worth The Dough

49

GOOD BUSINESS The Art of Plating

52

FOODIE Generation Zs

Look for Brand Points PLUS qualifying products throughout the magazine!


Great advice

By Cherie Thompson

The vegetarians are coming... are you ready?

Mentions of "vegetarian" on Canadian menus grew 7.2% over the past two years and 24.5% over the past year. Mentions of "vegan" are up 29.6% and 16% over the same time period.

©2016 Technomic Inc.

A menu lacking vegetarian options alienates up to 33%, or nearly 12 million Canadians, according to a poll commissioned by the Vancouver Humane Society. That’s right. Onethird of our population is either vegetarian or eating less meat. Operators can ill afford to close the door on this growing consumer group. But designing your existing menu took time and creativity. Don’t worry; you

don’t need to blow up all your hard work to make room for vegetarian diners.

Who are they and what do they want? Collectively, vegetarians choose, whether for health, preference, ethical, religious or environmental reasons, to exclude some or all animal products from their diets. You need to ask what they eat to know how to serve them: u CHEFCONNEXION.CA

7


GREAT ADVICE

According to technomic’s menumonitor, “gluten-free” is the leading health claim on Canadian menus, appearing 1,956 times. Operators are expanding the gluten-free options they offer on menus to appeal to health-focused diners in addition to diners with dietary restrictions. Restaurants are serving up gluten-free varieties of pizza crust, bread for sandwiches, breading and desserts. The second leading health claim on Canadian menus is “vegetarian.” A lot of this popularity can be attributed to an increased interest in plant-based menus. Vegetables are taking centre stage on many menus as operators attempt to court not only vegans or vegetarians, but flexitarian diners as well.

Vegetarian – exclusion of meat and other animal products from the diet Lactovegetarian – vegetarian who eats dairy products Ovovegetarian – vegetarian who eats eggs Pescevegetarian or pescatarian – vegetarian who eats fish and seafood Pollovegetarian – vegetarian who eats chicken Vegan – one who excludes meat and other animal products from the diet and does not use any animal products Flexitarian – primarily a vegetarian who sometimes eats animal products

Put out the welcome signs “Take all requests with the utmost respect,” says Kyla Tuori, Unilever Food

Solutions’ corporate chef for Canada. “There are a variety of reasons, all very personal and subjective, that someone may choose to follow a specific diet.” The “why” should not matter to you as an operator in the customer service business. Tuori reminds us of the importance of spreading the word. “Many customers, with special diets, tend to remain loyal to restaurants they know have food for them and tend to avoid others. Unless the operator informs potential new customers, they may not even consider dining there.” TOP TIP. Advertise at the table or counter, online and on social media to communicate to current and potential customers. Use table tent cards, for now, if changing your menu isn’t in the budget. u

Another health claim appearing on menus is “organic.” This term fits within a growing call for clean and natural foods produced without fertilizers, antibiotics, pesticides and other additives. Not only are organic foods appealing for health reasons, but organic sourcing also promotes eco-friendly practices.

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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GREAT ADVICE

Power up your menu “Vegetarian menu offerings should not be an ‘afterthought’,” advises Tuori. “However, (operators) can use a variety of the ingredients already on hand.” You don’t need to clear out your kitchen. TOP TIP. Evaluate your current menu with the palate of a vegetarian. Read label ingredients diligently – gelatin and

Worcestershire

sauce,

for

example, are no-goes for vegetarians. How

many

offerings?

Tuori

suggests, “At least a couple in each segment of the menu. Variety is key and will drive loyal customers.”

Add to your existing menu focusing on non-meat protein sources: • Dairy • Eggs • Pulses (beans and lentils) • Tofu – soybean curd, available in various textures and flavours

However you rework the menu, ensure your offerings suit your capabilities and represent your brand. “The

simplest

approach

is

substitution. If you are a proteincentred

establishment,

options available to us,” says Juriaan Snellen, executive corporate chef for McCormick Canada. There are

• TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein) – extracted plant-based proteins, available as granules, powder, cubes or slices

chicken breasts.

• Seitan – cooked wheat protein (gluten)

cooking. “The biggest difference

• Grains SPRING/SUMMER 2018

Don’t make it more complicated than necessary. Do you need a vegetarian version of a Caesar salad? “No, it makes more sense to offer a completely different salad, well prepared and well seasoned, suitable for a plant-based diet,” Chef Juriaan offers. Unilever’s Kyla Tuori adds, “Create these dishes with creativity and care. Make these veggie dishes so ‘craveable’ they tempt even the most steadfast carnivore.” After all, who could resist a Red Curry Thai Fried Cauliflower? The vegetarians are here to stay. Embrace this growing segment. Open your menu and invite them in.

advantage of all the vegetarian

delicious,

• Seeds

“Clubhouse has a roasted garlic and red pepper seasoning, and LaGrille has a vegetable seasoning perfect for basting vegetables for the grill, pan or oven,” Snellen suggests.

take

• Tempeh – fermented pressed soybean that can also be made from other legumes, cereals or coconut

• Nuts

10

Food strategies

dazzles the palate with a blend of North African spices.

high-quality

pre-made

options that go from freezer to table – think veggie burgers and hot dogs, seitan sausages and meatless Snellen, like a third of Canadians, is consuming less meat and enjoys the creative challenge in vegetarian between meat and vegetables is the lack of umami flavours. Using spices and seasonings can boost the umami on your vegetarian menu.” A Mediterranean Vegetable Shakshuka

Vegetarian recipes to tickle diners’ palates http://clubhouseforchefs. ca/recipes/flavourforecast/mediterraneanvegetable-shakshuka http://clubhouseforchefs. ca/recipes/vegetarian/ red-curry-thai-friedcauliflower


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STAYING AHEAD

Platemates By Lawrence Herzog

Time to sidle up to your seconds-in-command

Add Miscela to your favourite side for a punch of flavour!

12

SPRING/SUMMER 2018


STAYING AHEAD

Lift your profits and your menu with creative sides. They’re a great way to freshen menus without too much extra financial outlay, and you can even reduce the cost of proteins by offering smaller portions dressed up with their sidekicks. Sides can also spark cravings that spur traffic. Highlighting more seasonal and limited-availability sides may help drive more visits, data from Technomic suggest. Shifting eating habits = new opportunities Technomic’s Canadian Starters, Small Plates & Sides Consumer Trend Report reveals: • Leading sides at top LSR chains serve both sit-down and on-the-go occasions. Breads and fries are still top choices. Fastest-growing are proteins (up 50%) and non-breaded vegetables (up 19%). • At FSRs, fries and non-breaded vegetables are still top sides. More filling options are growing, such as taco and pizza starters and pasta/noodle sides (up 38%). Healthier sides are also growing, including deli salads (up 22%), sweet potatoes and varieties of rice.

SM A LL PL ATES A ND SIDES GROW ING IN POPUL A RIT Y POWERHOUSE SIDES “Health-conscious consumers are looking for better choices without compromising on taste,” says Mars Canada Food Service chef and writer Cherie Thompson (also a writer for Chef Connexion). “Grains are always in season and don’t take up valuable fridge or freezer space. A quick trip to the spice rack (or herb garden) will keep things fresh all year long without straining food costs.” A clean ingredient list (natural, familiar, simple) is the opportunity for customization for flavour and nutrition and a way to meet the growing dietary needs of your customers, she says. Technomic data indicate that consumers are more likely to pay extra for vegetarian, vegan and perceived healthy options. Grains have great plate appeal, adding texture, colour and nutrition, she notes. They’re kitchen-friendly time savers, too, with easy prep, exceptional hold and dry storage.

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

13


STAYING AHEAD

MISCELA CAN ADD A BOOST OF FLAVOUR TO ANY DISH, ESPECIALLY SIDES Cherie’s tip:

Appetizer: Panna cotta made with

Uncle Ben’s Quinoa and Ancient Grains Medley makes a nutritious Vegan Apple Cinnamon Breakfast

topped with some zest of orange.

Porridge, a delectable Smoked Cheddar Veggie Burger and a gutsy Roasted Garlic and Herb Pilaf that pairs with any protein. Take a simple, easy-to-prepare pilaf, use one of Uncle Ben’s trending premium, wholegrain blends and see what it can do. • Spring – Ginger Coconut Spinach • Summer – Thyme Walnut Green Bean • Fall – Smokey Mushroom • Winter – Carrot Ras al Hanout

QUICK

Plants on the side FACT

consumers are more likely to pay extra for vegetarian, vegan and perceived healthy options. Technomic’s Consumer Trend Report

14

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

More diners are looking for plantbased foods. Appetizers and creative sides are a great way to introduce new tastes and fresh flavours to your guests, says John Placko, culinary director at Modern Culinary Academy.

On the menu with Chef John: Appetizer: Cauliflower florets roasted with olive oil, garlic, paprika and sea salt and topped with a purée of roasted red pepper blended with yogurt and ground cumin.

butternut squash and goat cheese Main course side: Pan-seared kale with bacon, caramelized onion, pepitas and roasted garlic. Main course side: Slow-roasted tomatoes served warm with a drizzle of olive oil blended with fresh basil, oregano and parmesan cheese.

Creating simple sides Finding ways to design simple and easy sides that look like a lot more work has gone into them is a big saver – in time and dollars. One example is miscela, a mixture of garden vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices with bold flavours. “Miscela can add a boost of flavour to any dish, especially sides where you can simply mix in with a grain or pasta to create a complex dish in seconds, says Matt Park, marketing coordinator, Derlea Brand Foods. “Miscela is versatile; it can act as an ingredient or topper in both hot and cold applications. It’s a low calorie, natural, gluten-free, vegetarian, kosher product that accommodates a wide range of food and dietary restrictions.” So do your mains – and your budget – a favour by sidling up to creative sides that add oomph to the plate and colour to any menu.


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IN SEASONS

By Lawrence Herzog

How sweet it is! • Only 51% of consumers eat dessert at the same restaurant where they eat their meal. • Desserts are more likely to influence younger than older diners’ restaurant choices. • 3 in 10 (31%) consumers and 37% of women say they’d be more likely to order dessert if a mini-portioned option were available. Sources: Technomic’s 2017 Canadian Ethnic Food & Beverage CTRE Menu and Technomic’s latest desserts report 14 16

FALL/WINTER 20172018 SPRING/SUMMER


IN SEASONS

By Lawrence Herzog

Fall in love with spring colour on your menu through spices, vegetables, global flavours, and spring desserts. Here’s how to wake up your plates as the seasons turn. Celebrate the delight of the warmer months and tempt your guests with brighter and lighter choices.

Delicious dessert dayparts According to Technomic, 57% of Canadian consumers indulge in dessert at least once a week and across all dayparts. “While consumers eat dessert throughout the day, their need states differ by daypart,” explains Anne Mills, manager of consumer insights. “Smaller, handheld desserts such as cookies and doughnuts will appeal for daytime snacks or lunch add-ons, while indulgent varieties such as cake or pie appeal more strongly later in the day. Healthier options such as muffins, smoothies and fruit resonate for desserts eaten as meal replacements.”

Think bright, think fresh Tossed crisp salads with an abundance of spring vegetables like asparagus, red radishes, shaved fennel and watercress will brighten up your menu. “Use herbs like dill, cilantro or parsley to add a fresh spring element to any dish,” says Juriaan Snellen, McCormick Canada’s executive corporate chef. u CHEFCONNEXION.CA

17


IN SEASONS

Fall in love with spring colour on your menu through spices, vegetables, global flavours, and spring desserts. “Spring is the season for lighter fare, fluffy frittatas topped with green asparagus, snipped chives and a touch of lemon pepper,” Snellen adds. Edible flowers are becoming more popular and they bring colour to the plate and add a unique peppery note.

Celebrating the stalk When he thinks of spring menus, John Placko thinks first of asparagus. The culinary director of Modern Culinary Academy says the short window of opportunity for wonderfully fresh asparagus makes it all the more precious and delightful. You could even create an asparagus menu, he suggests. •

Start with an appetizer of steamed asparagus with a gremolata of parsley, lemon zest, garlic and olive oil – a nice way to let the vegetable shine.

Craft a cream of asparagus soup by using the spears as well as all the trimmings and top it with chopped fresh mint and a drizzle of Tabasco spiked sour cream.

Create a salad with asparagus cooked al dente and then chilled and topped with a drizzle of sriracha mayo, sliced green onion and smoked salt that brings this dish to life.

18

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

“As a side with warm asparagus, a soft poached egg and shaved Parmesan cheese with cracked black pepper is a nice way to enjoy asparagus. A

the meringue with whipped cream, layer a tall glass with multiple levels of strawberries, passion fruit sauce and the meringue/cream mix.”

baked flatbread with Alfredo sauce, asparagus, sliced cooked potato, mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses. And even as a sorbet between courses.”

Mindful consumption

Put some spring in your soups Lighter, broth-based soups like lemon chicken and rice or a spicy Thai pea soup go well with the season, Snellen says. Spring is the best time to enjoy succulent lamb seasoned with rosemary, thyme and green peppercorns paired with fresh peas, mint and a refreshing Middle Eastern labneh made from strained yogurt.

Light, fruity, colourful desserts Rhubarb in pies, jams or paired with a touch of honey as a side dish brings a sour tart element to the table. Fresh fruits paired with egg white meringue and tangy sorbets are good options for spring desserts, Snellen says. “Make spring desserts light, fruity and colourful,” John Placko suggests. “An Eton Mess is a perfect choice. Take crumbled meringue, whipped cream, fresh strawberries and add a twist on a classic with passionfruit sauce. Mix

We’re starting to see more interest and availability of food that feeds both mind and body, Chef Juriaan notes. “This holistic approach to mindful consumption while shaking off some excess weight put on over the colder months and holiday season is very popular in the springtime. Chilled artisanal tonics that promote gut health or a rebalancing cocktail of ginger, turmeric, pineapple and dandelions offered as a digestive will give your menus a spring makeover.”

Recipes: http://clubhouseforchefs.ca/recipes/ other-meats/fennel-lamb-burgers-with-piripiri-romesco-sauce http://clubhouseforchefs.ca/recipes/eggsdairy/tuscan-frittata http://clubhouseforchefs.ca/recipes/ vegetable-fruit/spinach-salad-with-lemonherb-goat-cheese http://clubhouseforchefs.ca/recipes/ poultry/strawberry-asparagus-chicken-salad


IN SEASONS

Edible Flowers bring colour to the plate

spring & summer are the seasons for lighter fare Fresh Asparagus Makes any meal more inviting

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

19


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stories

IN WHAT’S SEASONS UP?

By Lawrence Herzog

Casino Rama Gives Back To Their Community Meet executive chef John Cordeaux

Please tell us about your business,

and

especially the foodservice element.

Jeff

Mustoe,

director

of

procurement at Casino Rama Resort, Orillia, Ont.

Mustoe: Casino Rama Resort creates the perfect entertainment experience, blending hot casino action, big name

PLUS rewards for kitchen upgrades,

concerts and sporting events, luxury

Cordeaux and Mustoe turned their focus

accommodations, along with a variety

outward. Casino Rama Resort, which

of delicious dining options. As one of

served more than 1.6 million meals

the province’s premier entertainment

last year, decided to donate kitchen

destinations, the casino features over

equipment and supplies to Orillia’s

2,500 of the latest slot machines and

Lighthouse Soup Kitchen and Shelter.

more than 100 gaming tables including

How would you describe your cuisine? Cordeaux: Casino Rama Resort mixes a blend of everything from fine dining in our St. Germain’s outlet to authentic Asian cuisine in our Willow outlet, to our main buffet, Couchiching Court. We offer casual dining and late night treats in our Cedar outlet. u

UR

S E LF

INTS PLUS PO

RE W RD Y A

O

BRAN D

Rather than using their Brand Points

a 12-table poker room and 11 different foodservice outlets to suit almost any culinary desire.

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

21


WHAT'S UP?

We intend to continue to leverage the opportunities that the Brand Points PLUS program offers How do you use the Brands Points PLUS program?

What have you donated to this point?

Mustoe: We are happy to participate in the program through our business partnership with Flanagan Foodservice. We monitor the sponsors and have made some changes in the SKUs we purchase in order to obtain more points.

Mustoe: So far we’ve donated a KitchenAid Pro Line Series 7-Qt Bowl Lift Stand Mixer, Zwilling Twin Professional S 6-Piece Knife Block Set, Browne-Halco Full Size Clear Rack Cover, EFI Full Size Front Load 20Tier Bun Rack, JA Henckels Twin Four Star II 8" Chef's Knife, JA Henckels 10" Diamond Coated Knife Sharpener, Vollrath Tribute 14" Stainless Steel Fry Pan, and various food products.

How did you come to the decision to donate your points?

We've donated many commercial grade appliances, hardware and food products.

Mustoe: Casino Rama Resort is fortunate to be well funded with top-ofthe-line kitchen facilities. Our culinary team wanted to reach out to our community to see if we could donate to another facility that could use a boost of quality kitchen equipment and food offered by the Brand Points PLUS program. We made a donation to the Lighthouse in Orillia as a gift from our culinary team to theirs through our charitable arm Casino Rama Cares. We thought: What could we do to make an impact on the community? We really wanted it to be from our culinary team to someone else’s culinary team and when we found out what the Lighthouse was doing, it just seemed like a perfect fit. Cordeaux: I am very fortunate to work in an amazing kitchen, but not everybody has that kind of facility. If there’s an opportunity to help those less fortunate than ourselves and we can give them a helping hand, then that’s what we want to do.

22

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

What has been the response to the donation both inside and outside the organization? Mustoe: It’s been very positive both internally as well as externally. We are planning to do this again next year once we accumulate enough points to make another meaningful donation. What is on your radar for your points in the months ahead? Mustoe: We intend to continue to leverage the opportunities that the BPP program offers and we are intending to reach out to some of our key business partners to see what we can do to strengthen our ability to provide meaningful donations to others in the community in the future.


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WHAT'S UP?

iron goat

By Julie Gedeon

What is the story behind the Iron Goat name?

When did your restaurant join the Brand Points PLUS program?

Meet Michael Hay, the Iron Goat’s general manager and the restaurant/ pub’s first chef.

We were inspired by Canmore history, specifically a train engine that was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1905 and sold to Canmore Mines Ltd. in 1943. It hauled coal until it was retired to Calgary’s Heritage Park in 1963. And, of course, it was named after the goats that were used to haul coal out of mines years earlier. Our restaurant/ pub pays tribute to Canmore’s railway past with a depiction of the Iron Goat carved into our front door and actual train track at the base of our bar, embedded into some of our floor, and continuing up a stairway.

Our representatives at Pratts Food Service encouraged us to join four years ago and were great in explaining the benefits. So we joined immediately. Restaurants are a penny business, so anything that we can do to leverage the benefits from our purchases is truly appreciated. The Brand Points PLUS program helps us to get those items that make the day-to-day work easier but are a bit of a luxury.

The Iron Goat in Canmore, Alta., beams with pride as a restaurant/ pub rooted in the community. Awardwinning architecture greets patrons. A two-storey building features 40-foot windows, cathedral ceilings and a 125seat patio to admire the beauty of the nearby Rockies. The menu is meant for local folks and innovatively embraces regional cuisine. The restaurant/ pub’s name and décor are inspired by Canmore’s railway and mining history.

Congratulations on the Iron Goat entering its 11th year. What do you attribute to its enduring success? Our primary goal was to establish a place that pulled the community together. It’s designed for locals. We love when tourists visit, but they’ll be greeted by servers wearing comfortable T-shirts and jeans and told about the meatloaf on the menu. It’s been our No. 1 seller since we opened. I know you focus on great pub food, but it seems you nearly always incorporate regional flair. You’re right. For instance, our meatloaf has bison and elk. We serve duck wings instead of chicken wings. And people love to munch on our pickle fries or start off with our cheddar and ale dip. 24

IN SEASONS

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

ANYTHING THAT WE CAN DO TO LEVERAGE THE BENEFITS FROM OUR PURCHASES IS TRULY APPRECIATED. So how have your redeemed some of your points? One of our best acquisitions has been a set of Cambro food inserts that our chefs really appreciate having in their kitchen, and we really couldn’t have afforded to purchase them unless we had cut back on something else. The Brand Points PLUS program was a way to get them in the course of doing business with Pratts, a supplier that we hold in high regard because its team is always ready to help us with whatever our restaurant needs.


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WHAT'S UP?

rockaberry as

By Julie Gedeon

Meet Kevin Groleau If you still believe that no one could make apple pie better than your grandma, you haven’t tried the apple crumble or apple crumble cheese at Rockaberry. The restaurant’s pies – some 25 varieties in all – consistently win acclaim from Montreal media as the best desserts in and around town. Kevin Groleau, who with partner Dany Hashem, now owns three locations, originally just dropped by the eatery for a scrumptious slice. Franchise owner, Rockaberry, Dollard des Ormeaux, Kirkland and Vaudreuil-Dorion, Que.

So how did you become an owner of the business? I first became familiar with Rockaberry as a customer and, of course, love the various pies that are baked fresh daily. I admired the concept of a more upscale café/restaurant where people could relax and chat over a slice of pie and coffee. I also liked that it didn’t stay open as late as a bar, or attract that kind of crowd. 26

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

So I talked to the owners and bought the Sources Blvd. location in 2004. For several years, I also continued to work as an aircraft maintenance engineer at Air Canada. What convinced you that you could be successful as a restaurateur? I already had a lot of management experience at Air Canada. I thought I would enjoy the challenge of managing a Rockaberry location because I love people and I love food! Plus my maternal grandmother owned restaurants all her life, so I guess I sensed this is in my blood. Has Rockaberry changed since it first opened in 1989? Rockaberry started out in 1989 by distinguishing itself with its variety of innovative fresh pies that people enjoyed on the premises or took home or to a friend’s house for dessert. Since then, it has evolved into a full-service restaurant that more recently also has a liquor permit. So I love that at one table we’ll have a family with young children for dinner, at another a group of teens later enjoying a slice of pie after a movie night, and at the bar a group of sports fans or business colleagues toasting a special event or achievement. Rockaberry is now open from 11 a.m. to 1 a.m., so it accommodates everyone but remains a more relaxed and familyoriented atmosphere than a bar. What goes into deciding what kind of pies to make? Our

bakers

are

constantly

IN SEASONS

experimenting. One of our newest creations is a cabane à sucre/sugar shack pie that has a sponge base that’s soaked in maple sugar. If you have a sweet tooth, you’ll love this one. Of course, we have blueberry, strawberry and all the other fruit pies that give Rockaberry its name, but also innovative desserts, such as truffle, banalicious, and chocolate lasagna pie. Sometimes, we just introduce a new twist on a favourite as another option. For instance, we put cheese into our most popular apple crumble a couple of years ago to create a new pie and it’s now our second bestseller. Why did you join the Brand Points PLUS program? I found out about it when I changed distributors a while back after my existing supplier was letting me down with shortages, delays and other problems. Of course, getting the supplies I need in time is paramount. My current distributor’s representative will drop everything and personally deliver products if I ever find myself in a jam. The Brand Points PLUS program is a nice added bonus to all of this. Do you have plans for your points? We just started a while ago, so we don’t have that many loyalty points yet. However, we recently signed a few bigger supply deals that should generate quite a number of points. So we’ll see what we need when those materialize. There’s always a need for something when you’re running a restaurant.


CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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28

SPRING/SUMMER 2018


OPEN MENU

GLOBAL THIRST QUENCHERS By Suzanne Boles Beverages aren’t just about thirst quenching anymore; they’re also about health and refreshment. Twists on tried and true drinks and global infusions are increasingly popular. Drinks are also morphing into meal supplements with protein additives, combined with healthy fruits, a trend being fuelled by the growth of fresh pressed juice bars.

u

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

29


OPEN MENU

QUICK

While orange and apple juice are still leaders on the menu, customers are clamouring for tropical infusions, which are easy to access in today’s global markets.

28 30

FACT

Cold brew coffee actually tastes a lot sweeter than traditional hot-brewed coffee because cold brew has approximately 67% less acidity than hot-brewed coffee

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JUICY ALTERNATIVES

COLD BREW CAFFEINE

“Mango and other fruit flavours (papaya and kiwi, for example) are

Cold brew coffees are popular in the U.S. and moving into Canada, says

trending on cocktail menus and smoothies,” says Patricia Cobe, senior editor at Winsight Media. Though not considered tropical, she adds that watermelon is also gaining in popularity for its antioxidant properties.

Cobe, and now many operations are introducing cold brew on tap. These nitro cold brews, with a little effervescence, give them foaminess similar to beer. Restaurants can easily tap into this market by using one of their beer-on-tap lines to make cold brews.

“Ethnic flavours continue to grow in popularity,” according to Barb Grant, director of marketing for SunRype Products Ltd. SunRype features a variety of mango offerings as well as pineapple, which she says is growing significantly, along with berry and tropical fruit segments and fruit and veggie combinations. Juriaan Snellen, executive corporate chef for McCormick Canada, says the company in its annual flavour report as early as three years ago forecasted that coconut would gain in popularity “Not just coconut water but coconut in any shape or form to make an explosion. We’re starting to see more and more of that.”

HOW CAN RESTAURANTS TAP INTO THESE TRENDS? Using fresh ingredients elevates drinks, particularly mocktails, Winsight’s Patricia Cobe offers. “You don’t have to make them very elaborate. Restaurants can look at the kitchen and see what’s available.” She suggests a seasonal drink menu similar to your seasonal food offerings. Healthy ingredients and clean eating and drinking are growing trends that restaurants can easily tap into. “A few years ago it was all about lower in calories. Now people are looking for what will help promote health, like antioxidants in the green tea, and some of the fruits that have a lot of vitamins and nutrients,” says Cobe.


OPEN MENU

Mocktails & Cocktails Using healthier ingredients in cocktails – like carrot juice and matcha – is also gaining in popularity. “Even though they have alcohol in them, there’s the perception that you’re drinking something better for you,” says Cobe. Mocktails are “definitely becoming more popular,” adds Juriaan Snellen. Elevated mocktails include fruit juices like clementine, grapefruit and guava because “more exotic juices ultimately make your cocktail more interesting.” Both Cobe and Snellen mention that spices and herbs like rosemary, ground up cinnamon sticks and more are also being used to add an interesting twist to alcohol drinks and mocktails.

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The Sparkle is Real, so is the Tea The real brewed flavour of SunRype’s Mango Peach Black Tea makes this smooth, slow sipper, the perfect drink for a casual spring and summer afternoon. 1 Can SunRype Sparkling Mango Peach Black Tea 3 oz. SunRype Unsweetened Orange Juice ½ oz. white rum ½ oz. tequila ½ oz. vodka ½ oz gin ½ oz. triple sec This simple and delicious recipe can easily be increased to make a full pitcher to serve on your patio.

www.sunrype.ca/recipes/drinks-recipes For additional information, please contact Inform Food Brokerage Marketing@informbrokerage.com


OPEN MENU

Tea time “Consumers are looking for variety, less sugar, and the combination of fruit and tea, and tea offers both a health benefit and great-tasting refreshment,” says SunRype’s Barb Grant. SunRype Sparkling teas power up the fruit flavour with Twist of Lemon and Mango Peach, both made with black tea, Raspberry Rooibos and Honey Lemon Green Tea. “The popularity of green tea and matcha in beverages is really growing because people are looking for the health benefits of when they drink as well as when they eat,” says Winsight’s Cobe.

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DAVID ROBERTS OFFERS THE MOST

topportunities TO ADD FL AVOUR TO YOUR SAL ADS

HUNDREDS OF TOPPORTUNITIES TO ENHANCE YOUR MENU Customers are always looking for more flavour. David Roberts offers premium selection of fresh nuts, dried fruits, snacks, and all your baking needs that will add that extra flavour to your salads, desserts or main entree.

www.davidrobertsfood.com


MARKETING 101

ARE YOU INSTAGRAMMABLE? By Kate Engineer

248,366,466* That’s the number of #food hashtags globally on Instagram, rising minute by minute. To say that Instagram’s food community is an impactful marketing channel for your restaurant business is an understatement. Restaurateurs need always to be thinking about how every element and square inch of their restaurant can be used to create their unique brand and be “Instagram worthy.” The more potential photo opportunities designed within your restaurant and menu, the more diners will want to snap and share, and the bigger your following will become. It’s that simple. So first off, who is your customer base? Of the current 800 million Instagram users, the majority are Millennials with 90% of the Instagram user base 35 years and younger. That’s not to say Instagram can’t be effective connecting with a mature restaurant clientele, you just might experience slower growth through the platform. u *as of November 30, 2017 at 11:00 a.m.

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MARKETING 101

QUICK

INSTAGRAM IS A RESTAURANT’S GATEWAY TO THE FOOD PHOTO FRENZY COMMUNITY

36

TIP:

Organize your Instagram feed as a story of six posts; each post should depict a different part of your restaurant brand. • TEAM • MENU ITEM • DÉCOR • DRINK ITEM • SERVICE • BRAND ELEMENT

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

Cater your Instagram content to your demographic by sharing photos and messages that will matter to them. Out of the average 80 million daily Instagram posts, #pizza is the most popular Instagrammed food, followed by steak and sushi. #nomnom

#Food #Drinks When designing your food and drink menus, create three to five items that will become your “Instagram stars” in addition to your other items. The “Insta Stars” should be unique to

What should restaurants posts?

your restaurant – for example, in their

Before it was just about food, now it’s about sharing everything about your restaurant that is consistent with your brand.

Snap these items with a consistent

presentation, the ingredients, or the way they’re prepared or consumed. aesthetic to your brand and add a custom hashtag so you can track how many times they’re posted.


Your Insta Stars will be the key elements that get you the most #instalove, and are likely to be snapped and shared the most, garnering your brand the most attention. Try to create new Insta Star dishes seasonally so Instagrammers and diners continue to come back to see what’s new. The people behind popular dessert shop Sweet Jesus in Toronto are pros at getting Instagrammers to snap and share almost identical photos of their ice cream cone creations on the shop’s branded turquoise backdrop. It’s often difficult to know if it was a post from the brand or an Instagrammer, that’s how well they have influenced Instagrammers.

#InstaDesign Your restaurant’s design and décor provide endless opportunities to incorporate Instagram-worthy elements that are consistent with your brand. TIP: Consider messaging in tiles or signs, unique wallpaper, interesting colour palettes, feature photo walls, and themed sitting areas. Exterior to interior design, nothing should be overlooked as Instagrammers flock to restaurants for the trendy design photo opp, but then stay for the food. San Francisco-based restaurant, Media Noche, is a design haven for Instagrammers. When you search the restaurant online, images of people and pets posing in front their infamous Pink Flamingo wall mural are the first to appear even before food pics.

#GoTeam Action shots of your chefs cooking or plating, servers sharing their favourite dishes, bartenders shaking up fancy cocktails are all great photo opportunities. It is an Instagram fact that photos featuring faces get 38% more likes than those without, according to Sproutsocial.com.

QUICK

MARKETING 101

TIPS:

#PicturePerfect A professional photographer will always take the better shot and edit it to perfection, hands down. But for restaurateurs who are managing Instagram in-house it is most effective to have one team member manage the process for consistency. TIPS: • Take your shots in natural light or bright, well-lit spaces. • Purchase a Selfie Ring Light to attach to your phone for immediate lighting. • Avoid using a flash.

Hashtags Hashtags allow users who are searching that hashtag to connect with your post. 1. Hashtags allow your posts to be part of a trending topic. 2. Hashtags allow you to track the number of posts associated with the hashtag, for effectiveness.

• Use a tripod built for phones. • Figure out if the shot will be of one item or a few items to create a scene. • Use props to help fill in the shot. • Try different angles. • Add a human element. • Maintain a consistent filter. Instagram is a restaurant’s gateway to the influential food photo frenzy community who are flocking to restaurants for the best opportunity to share one plate at a time. Kate Engineer is the Director of Communications for Fervid Communications, Restaurant Marketing and PR www.fervid.ca

TIPS: • Create unique brand-specific hashtags. • Post hashtags that are relevant to the image and message being posted to capture the RIGHT follower attention. • Be aware of the trending food holidays on Instagram, like National Taco Day, to join in the conversation when appropriate for your brand.

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TASTE NATION

‘TRUCKIN’ By Lawrence Herzog

Not all restaurant operators choose to stay inside in the comfort of their bricks and mortar buildings. Some decide to take their act on the road and try out a more mobile culinary experience. Lancaster Smokehouse owner-operator Chris Corrigan decided to plunge into the food truck business in 2014. He purchased and outfitted a heavy-duty chassis with help from a local stainless-steel fabricator. “I built a versatile mobile kitchen and went with commercial grade quality to make it an extension of our Kitchener (Ontario) restaurant,” he says. “It cost more, but we feel it was important to do it right – especially as it reflects on the restaurant and our brand.” u 38

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TASTE NATION

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TASTE NATION

Corrigan chose a late model lower mileage vehicle to outfit to his specifications. Originally he planned for curbside operation, but once he started running smack into webs of regulations, he decided to focus instead on catering and events. “By putting our focus on catering, the costs and profit margins are more controllable,” he explains. “Our barbecue style product lends itself well to mobile operation, and we just modified our existing recipes to simplify and streamline where necessary. By catering events where we know the number of plates going in, we can be more efficient and it is far more lucrative.”

TIPS

• Build a menu with items that are simple, good and distinctive. • Keep recipes simple and easy to vary. • Get creative with dish names customers will remember. • Watch your food costs and price points. • Make your brand strong and distinctive. • Get social, interact with your customers online. • Be ready for bad weather. • Budget for slow days in your business plan. 40

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

Lancaster’s mobile kitchen helps increase the traffic at his standalone location and vice-versa. As part of the preparation for an event like a wedding, customers often come into the restaurant for a tasting session to help them decide on menu items for the event. The restaurant’s kitchen staff love working the truck, he says. “When we go to events, they are competing to be along. There’s a lot of time pressure at the events and high energy. The service is fun because we’re parked at a location where everybody is having a great time.” Corrigan is part of one of a growing number of foodservice operators choosing to go mobile. Canada-wide, estimates put the number of food trucks at more than 400, with more in the west than the east.

Corrigan’s takeaways For the best results, buy or build a quality food truck with commercial equipment that will last since it needs to handle a more industrial operation. Carefully evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of focusing on catering and events versus curbside service. Use a food truck as an opportunity for your staff, especially younger employees, to have fun and learn the business.

Calculate the $$$ Getting a food truck up and running is a challenging, competitive and potentially expensive venture. New fully operational trucks run to $120,000, and conversions of existing vehicles can cost between $30,000 and $100,000 plus the cost of a used truck like a step van. As well, consider the costs of: • licensing • permits • liability and business insurance • vehicle registration • parking

Build your brand Food trucks that distinguish themselves through smart marketing and menu choices can stand above the competition and reach customers they want to attract, says Small Business BC. Developing a strong brand is a top priority for successful food truck operators. “Aside from your menu, think of what sets you apart from your competition and sell it.”


TASTE NATION

Built to serve In Canada, food trucks are outfitted by a range of manufacturers and fabricators. They include:

Some food trucks proclaim their brand with LOUD letters and artistic flair, while others use a subtler approach. Experts say it’s important that branding fit and speak to your particular product niche and target clientele. Lancaster Smokehouse opted to mirror the look of their restaurant with similar colour scheme, fonts and graphic design. “It gives us a consistency and helps build brand awareness between our mobile kitchen and our standalone location,” Chris Corrigan says.

What’s in a name? Looking to be whimsical, clever, memorable, or humorous? Play on words, or keep it simple and descriptive? A name can make or break a food truck’s success. Some of Canada’s more popular food trucks have names that are short and memorable: Winnipeg’s Tot Wheels (think tater tots), Duck Truck MTL (nothing but duck on the menu), Toronto’s Fidel Gastro’s (retro

food), Vancouver’s Aussie Pie Guy (self-explanatory). By choosing a name that is easy to pronounce, understand and remember, customers are more likely to tell their friends and colleagues. Avoid names that are too long, confusing or trendy because fads pass, after all. Consider the visual impact of any name you choose; how will it look on the side of your truck? A useful name recognition exercise from the website mobile-cuisine. com: Share with 10 people the name you are considering and then, a week later, “connect with them again and ask them to recall that name. How many people were able to accurately remember it? If it was fewer than seven, you may want to consider other more memorable alternatives that truly grab people’s attention.” So, what’s stopping you? It’s time to get truckin’.

Venture Food Trucks, Napanee, ON Apollo Food Trucks, Surrey, BC Unique Food Truck, Laval, QC Kitchens on Wheels Canada, Alexandria, ON Dura Stainless & Sheet Metal Mfg., Calgary, AB Milenzo Corporation, Burford, ON Pizza Trucks of Canada, Dugald, MB Silver Star Metal Fabricating, Mississauga, ON

Food truck start-up checklist: https://canadabusiness.ca/ starting/checklists-and-guidesfor-starting-a-business/foodtruck-start-up-checklist/ Source: Canada Business Network CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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inspired menu

IQF CAULIFLOWER Florets At Alasko Foods, our vegetables are harvested at the peak of maturity. Our cauliflower florets are perfect to use right out of the freezer. No chopping required, no prep time, no mess. Simply remove the desired amount from the freezer and save the rest for later. Our cauliflower florets have a shelf life of two years essentially eliminating waste! Alasko’s cauliflower florets are ideal for menu trending applicaitons like cauliflower rice, mash, pizza crust and a vegetarian spin on chicken wings.

HALLOUMI CHEESE Unlike other cheeses, Salerno Halloumi's amazing nutty and slightly salty flavour shines only when cooked—and it's best served hot. Excellent as an appetizer, in salads, on skewers with other vegetables. You'll love it pan-seared, fried, grilled or barbecued. Halloumi cheese, sometimes just called "grilling cheese", is making its way up the list of popular food trends - and with good reason! Halloumi cheese is a delicious and uniquely grillable cheese.

Flatbread Rich’s Flatbreads feature quality ingredients and our gentle baking process delivers consistent product. Each product has bubbles on top with grill marks on the bottom for an authentic visual appearance! Simply thaw and prepare any way you like: sandwiches, pizza, appetizers, even dessert. We are here to help enhance your flatbreads with endless applications!

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COST CHECK

Bread that’s worth the dougH By Alison Kent

44

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Many operators contend they shouldn't use higher quality bread because of the higher cost and the perceived notion that these breads tend to age more quickly. However, the value and versatility of high quality bread tell a different story. You can add interest to your menu with top quality bread and help keep your customers coming back.


COST CHECK

FRENCH ONION SOUP

of flavourful add-ins such as roasted garlic, thyme, roasted cherry tomatoes and brie cheese (great with roasted chicken or steak). Or, serve as dessert with such extras as chopped dark chocolate and dried cherries, and accompanied with a complementary sauce like crème Anglaise or (perhaps vanilla or coconut) ice cream. For an outstanding twist, swap out the bread for stale croissant pieces. FRENCH ONION SOUP: this timeless dish offers a classic way to use stale bread, swimming in caramelized onion-andwine-enriched broth under a blanket of bubbling cheese. PAPPA AL POMODORO SOUP OR PANZANELLA SALAD: a pair of traditional Tuscan dishes, both serving as an ideal way to use stale cubes of rustic bread, along with tomatoes and extra virgin olive oil. FRENCH TOAST: another classic, this beloved brunch dish offers an excellent way to use quality bread, and is especially good made with brioche. While topped with maple syrup or fruit preserves and served up sweet is the norm, savoury stuffed French toast offers an enticing spin on tradition. Try it with ham or turkey, Swiss cheese and spinach along with grainy mustard.

Waste not

It’s a cinch avoiding bread waste, as quality bread – even a day or two past its prime – can take centre-stage in a multitude of dishes, from breakfast through dessert. “Typically, a few of the best ways to use bread as it ages are in crumbs, croutons, stuffing and as a base for crostini,” offers Jared Kwart, director of marketing at Weston Foods Foodservice. Crumbs can also be used as a binder in burgers, meatloaf and crab cakes, and are quintessential as breading used to coat everything from pan-fried schnitzel to deep-fried calamari.

FRENCH TOAST

Kwart goes on to share a selection of more deluxe ways for using up less-than-fresh bread: GREMOLATA BREAD CRUMBS: consisting of crumbs mixed with fresh herbs and lemon zest, used to add colourful and flavourful impact to a variety of dishes. Sprinkle on braised meats and baked or tossed pasta dishes – with or without the addition of minced garlic, extra virgin olive oil or grated Parmesan cheese. BREAD PUDDING: a baked dish made with day-old bread mixed with custard, it can be made savoury with the addition CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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COST CHECK

PANZANELLA SALAD

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COST CHECK

BREAD PUDDING

Did you know? • 40% of casual dining consumers would be more likely to visit/purchase food from restaurants more often if they offered higherquality menu items.* • Bread and meat quality are the top two most important attributes for premium burgers, at 84% and 85% respectively. ** • 71% of consumers are willing to pay more for sandwiches that feature premium or higherquality ingredients. ** • 53% of sandwich customers would pay more for higher-quality bread. ** • 84% agree that bread quality is extremely important when creating a good sandwich. ** *2015 Technomic Canadian Future of FSR: Family and Casual Dining Consumer Trend Report. **2016 Technomic Canadian Sandwich Consumer Trend Report

The upper crust “Quality breads are made with no preservatives, no additives, no added-sugar,” says Michelle Cave, key account manager at Ontario Boulart®. “It remains fresh because of the high hydration content but clearly ages more quickly than some commercial breads.” Along with knowing how best to make use of stale bread, Cave offers another perspective and simple solution: “If you believe in the true value of high quality bread but want to avoid waste, the best option is to buy full-baked flash frozen bread. The flash freezing process seals in freshness for up to nine months and allows the operator to simply thaw (or reheat, if crusty is preferred). A 100% baked bread gives you the possibility to thaw or reheat on demand. “Bread is the first impression you give to a customer,” she adds. “Is it really where you want to save?”

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You are only limited by YOUR imagination We offer a vast array of traditional topping favourites made with quality ingredients. Choose from Caramel, Chocolate, Toffee, Fudge and Fruit varieties. Our Toppings are ideal for a splash of colour and the finishing touch on ice cream and desserts, as well as for plate decorating. Adding our delicious and unique syrups to milkshakes or specialty coffees offer an unbeatable taste experience for your customers.

LynchFoods.com


GOOD BUSINESS

R A I S E YO U R PL AT ES TO N EW H EI GHTS By Cherie Thompson

You don’t need a fine art degree to execute beautifully presented plates. Somewhere between Chicago restaurant Alinea’s Da Vinci-esque attention to detail and a cafeteria scoop and slap, there is a style of plating that represents your very own establishment. Plating, like art, is personal and should tell the story of your menu. With a splash of art, a touch of math, and a dollop of common sense, you will be on your way to palatable plating. Here’s how: u CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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GOOD BUSINESS

Art Find your focal point. All meals have a focal point. Likely the starting ingredient you used to design the flavour of the dish. Focus on that one ingredient, usually the protein, and build complementary flavours around it. Apply the same principle when plating.

(or bowls or platters) no matter the shape or size to artfully showcase your focal ingredient.

The colour of the ingredients can be adjusted for further visual appeal without compromising on design flavour, like using purple fingerling potatoes instead of white.

Work the odd numbers. Although

Mix up your texture. Offer different visual textures on the plate by mixing and matching to find a balance. Adjust textures while maintaining flavour. Hard, soft, smooth, grainy, fluffy, flaky and coarse.

a perception of more food. Even

Math

50

used photography rule to your plates

never scientifically proven, many chefs believe an odd number of elements, like shrimp or meatballs, is more visually appealing and gives numbers

typically

require

more

precise placement for balance. Consider shapes. Consider the shape of the food and the plate. Circles (dots of sauce, a timbale of grains, Brussels sprouts) on a square plate add instant drama. Include height and depth.

Find your best size. Choose plates large enough to accommodate food without overcrowding. Oversized plates offer a dramatic flair, but can give the impression of too-small portions. The less on the plate, the more precision required as focus is tight.

Common sense

Follow the rule of thirds. In food, the rule suggests placing the focal point to the left or right side of the plate. Go further and apply a well-

of the kitchen and skill level of staff. A

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

Learn to fit in. How the dish reads on the menu should translate easily to the plate. The customer shouldn’t be confused as the order is placed on the table. Plating must fit within the capabilities poor choice of plate, its size and colour, can throw off a well-organized kitchen if it doesn’t have a logical place.

Make it a movable feast. Walk around with your plated meal. Does it move? Step back. However beautiful your plate looks, it always comes down to how it “eats.” Sit in the customer’s chair and dig in. Is it the experience you were aiming for? Elevating your food with thoughtful plating gives a memorable first impression before your customers even take a bite. If they grab their cameras before their forks? Your plating is a masterpiece.

QUICK

Splash some colour. Plate colour should enhance the food. White plates are popular because they provide a blank canvas and great contrast for your dishes. However, a flavourpopping special’s ingredients that lean towards beige would benefit from a coloured plate instead.

TIPS

REMEMBER • Use a clean plate – no chips, fingerprints, scratches or markings • Plate quickly enough to maintain proper food temperature • Don’t let food touch the rim • Pick a focal point/ ingredient • Ensure servers know the direction in which the plate should be served


GOOD BUSINESS

Elevating your food with thoughtful plating gives a memorable first impression

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FOODIE

iGen G EN ER AT I O N Z s A R E S H A PI N G THE FUTURE OF FOOD SERVICE

By Darren Climans If you want to understand future consumer behaviour in foodservice, you must consider Generation Z, the next big consumer cohort on the horizon. Do not discount this group because of their relative youth; they have already proven themselves to be a force in shaping cultural attitudes. What to call this group is also problematic. Some of the many handles I’ve read include The Centennial Generation, Dot Com Kids, Generation Connected, the Net Generation, the Selfie Generation, to name a few. Another popular and descriptive label for the group is iGen. iGen refers to the emergence of Apple’s iPhone. The first iPhone was released on June 29, 2007. The first iPad was in stores in January, 2010. Check these dates against the milestone dates above and you’ll realize that GenZ has never known a world without the internet, smartphones, and mobile devices. In Japan, GenZ is referred to as “Neo-Digital natives.” This is key. No group is more plugged in to their smartphones and the internet than GenZ. Not surprisingly, this makes for an impatient consumer seeking out products and services tailored to their individual wants. A number of studies have looked more deeply at GenZ: In Canada (2016) The Globe & Mail sponsored an online survey of nearly 900 17 year-olds, and Technomic (2016) looked at restaurant 46 52

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ARTISAN GOURMET FOODIE

Gen Z currently makes up 25% of the population of Canada Source: Technomic Canada, The Canadian GenZ Selfie (2016

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FOODIE

78% of GenZ Enjoy Breakfast Foods Any Time Of Day Value “frictionless transactions.” Seek engaging and organic connections.

behaviour and menu choices in Canada. Here are some of the findings of these – and other – studies: Plugged-in. Spend 75% of their time online in one form or another. Forty per cent of Canadian youth said “they are using the internet almost constantly.” Value-conscious. Imprinted by living through the aftermath of The Great Recession. Quality/taste matters. Willing to spend on food that meets their affinity for adventurous flavours, ‘healthy food’, causes, nutrients, and visual appeal. Breakfast anytime. 78% of Gen Z consumers enjoy breakfast foods at nontraditional times. “Thrill of the hunt” mindset. Enjoy seeking out and discovering retail locations. 54

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Traditional print/mass advertising will not get it done with GenZ. It has been estimated that the average Gen-Zer has an attention span of about eight seconds. Cracking the code to achieve reach within the diverse strata of GenZ requires identifying and using a number of the touchpoints where they live online – influencers, bloggers, and even events where they are physically. The websites GenZers frequent reflect their visual orientation: YouTube, Vine, Periscope, and Meerkat. In the end, the kamikaze approach to marketing used by food trucks and independent restaurants across Canada may be better suited to GenZ than the traditional media mix relied on by restaurant chains. Bottom line is that the numbers around GenZ are staggering. Globally, there are over two billion people in this cohort. Liz Braun of the Toronto Sun cites that GenZ currently makes up 25% of the population in Canada, on the cusp of being one-third of the population – bigger than both the Boomers and the Millennials. Many foodservice operators are still in the midst of innovating to adapt to Millennials. Be aware that the next wave of change is already building. Mark McCrindle of the McCrindle Research Centre in Australia summed up iGen as follows: “They don’t just represent the future; they are creating it.” Are you ready?

Top tips to engage Gen Zers • What they want – When they want it. Breakfast in the 21st century will be a moving target. Think French Toast Waffle Bites or Bacon & Egg Muffins on your menu as a snack or dessert offering. • Make it snappy. Gen Zers like the convenience of QSRs, but are also interested in the unique taste experiences of independent operators. Consider delivery, kiosk ordering and mobile payment to speed up their eating occasions. • Shake up your menu with mashups. This cohort likes global flavours combined in innovative ways in mains, sides and desserts. • Make it pretty. Your dishes need to be instantly Instagrammable and shareable across multiple social media channels. • Don’t forget corporate responsibility and environmental stewardship. Gen Zers take social issues seriously and will be looking to you to support causes and community. Darren Climans is a foodservice insights professional with close to 20 years' experience partnering with broadline distributors, CPG suppliers, and foodservice operators. His practice is to understand issue-based decisions by taking a data-driven approach to strategic decision making.


GET SAUCY WITH SEAFOOD SPICE UP YOUR MENU Today's patrons demand the latest on-trend flavours and dishes. That's why we're no longer just your source for the highest quality seafood from around the globe. Now, we're your one-stop shop for everything seafood-from innovative cooking techniques to eye-popping plates. We're High Liner Culinary, and we're on a mission to make seafood the hottest thing on your menu. highlinerculinary.com

SEAFOOD IS BETTER™

© 2018 High Liner Foods. All rights reserved.

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RECIPE CENTRAL

Salads With A Twist By Alison Kent

Tasty recipes to turn salads into satisfying meals More than ever, customers are seeking menu options that offer variety, nutrition and freshness – a combo that most certainly includes salads. Main course-sized salads that feature proteins and special add-ins are also spiking in popularity. From seafood and beans to rice and pasta, here are five spins on the usual leafy green salad to capture your customers’ imagination and taste buds. u

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Prep Time: 15 minutes

Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 1750 mL/1245 g

Portions: 7 x 8 oz spoodle/178 g

Moroccan Pilaf Brown Rice and Quinoa

INGREDIENTS 20 mL

Canola oil

125 mL 75 g Diced onion 125 mL 90 g Diced red sweet pepper 10 mL 10 mL 5 mL

8 g Minced garlic Ras el hanout (Moroccan seasoning) 4 g Brown sugar

250 mL 200 g Uncle Ben’s® Brown Rice with Red and Black Quinoa 410 mL

Vegan broth

250 mL 88 g Julienne carrots 500 mL 350 g Cooked chickpeas 15 mL

2 g Chopped fresh mint

30 mL

4 g Chopped cilantro

30 mL

5 g Chopped parsley

30 mL

Orange juice

30 mL

NUTRITIONAL per 250 mL/178 g portion

15 g Toasted sliced almonds

Calories 223, Fat 4.5 g, Carbohydrates 48 g, Fibre 4.5 g, Protein 6.5 g, Sodium 264 mg

250 mL 155 g Halved or quartered red grapes

VEGAN / DAIRY-FREE GLUTEN-FRIENDLY WHOLE GRAIN

STEPS 1. In a pot heat oil over medium heat. Add onion, pepper and garlic and cook, while stirring for about 5 minutes or until soft. Add Ras el Hanout and brown sugar and cook for 1 minute. 2. Add Uncle Ben’s® Brown Rice with Red and Black Quinoa, broth, carrots and chickpeas. Stir until well combined. Increase heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 17 minutes. Remove from heat and let rest for 5 minutes. 3. Stir in mint, cilantro, parsley, orange juice, almonds and grapes until well combined. Serve.

QUÉBEC 450-449-4171

RECIPE NOTES • Can be prepared in oven. Preheat convection oven to 400ºF. Complete to end of Step 1. Transfer to an insert pan. Add Uncle Ben’s® Brown Rice with Red and Black Quinoa, broth, carrots and chickpeas. Stir until well combined. Tightly cover with foil and bake for 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and let rest for 5 minutes. Continue with Step 3. • Can be prepared in rice cooker. Complete to end of Step 1. Transfer to a rice cooker. Add Uncle Ben’s® Brown Rice with Red and Black Quinoa, broth, carrots and chickpeas. Stir until well combined. Start rice cooker according to manufacture settings. When cooked, continue with Step 3.

ONTARIO 905-625-4469

ALBERTA 403-207-3203

BRITISH COLUMBIA 604-526-1788

unclebens.ca


RECIPE CENTRAL

Cauliflower Steaks with Coconut Brown Rice and Quinoa This wholegrain main dish is dairy-free, gluten-friendly and vegan. Add any protein, if desired, keeping it meatless with a handful of chickpeas or serving it with grilled sausage. The coconut brown rice and quinoa can do double duty on menus as a hot side dish for curries and stews, or use it as a unique base for rice bowls.

I NG R E DI E N T S :

Salad Serves: 6

COCONUT BROWN RICE AND QUINOA: 1 tsp (5 mL)

canola oil

1/2 cup (125 mL) diced onion 1 tsp (5 mL)

minced garlic

1/2 tsp (2 mL)

ground turmeric

1/2 tsp (2 mL)

salt

1 cup (250 mL)

Uncle Ben's® Brown Rice with Red and Black Quinoa

340 mL

water or vegetable stock (about 1-1/2 cups)

170 mL

coconut milk (about 3/4 cup)

SALAD: 6 cups (1.5 L)

loosely packed baby spinach leaves

360 mL

diced red pepper (about 1-1/2 cups)

360 mL

diced cucumber (about 1-1/2 cups)

180 mL

sliced green onions (about 3/4 cup)

180 mL

loosely packed fresh cilantro leaves (about 3/4 cup) Olive oil or coconut oil Red wine vinegar Garam masala or ground cumin

CAULIFLOWER STEAKS: 6 slices

cauliflower, sliced top to bottom (1/2-inch/1 cm-thick)

2 tbsp (30 mL)

canola oil

1 tbsp (15 mL)

curry paste

M E T HOD : • Coconut brown rice and quinoa: In a saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and garlic; cook, stirring, for about 5 minutes or until softened. Stir in turmeric and salt; cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add Uncle Ben's® Brown Rice with Red and Black Quinoa; stir while cooking for 1 minute. Add water and coconut milk; stir until well combined. Increase heat to high; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer until tender, about 18 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand for 5 minutes. Remove lid and let cool completely. • Cauliflower steaks: Whisk together oil and curry paste; brush all over cauliflower “steaks”. Place on parchment paper-lined baking sheet; bake in a preheated 450°F (230°C) oven until tender-crisp, about 30 minutes. (Or prepare on the grill instead, cooking 6 to 8 minutes per side over medium heat.) • Salad: Divide spinach, cauliflower, coconut brown rice and quinoa, red pepper, cucumber, green onions and cilantro among 6 dinner plates. Drizzle with oil and vinegar and sprinkle with garam masala, to taste. CHEFCONNEXION.CA

59


RECIPE CENTRAL

This twist on more traditional tabbouleh switches out bulgur for Quinoa and Ancients Grains Medley, which adds nutty flavour and enticing chewy texture while packing a nutritional wholegrain punch. This is delicious as a side salad or main dish top with roasted, sliced chicken or eggplant and crumbled goat’s cheese.

Honey Pomegranate Tabbouleh with Quinoa and AncienT Grains

I NG R E DI E N T S :

Serves: 6 (1 cup/250 mL each)

GARLIC QUINOA AND ANCIENT GRAINS: 1 cup (250 mL)

Uncle Ben’s® Quinoa and Ancient Grains Medley

1-3/4 cups (425 mL) water 1 tsp (5 mL)

coconut oil or canola oil

½ tsp (2 mL)

minced garlic

½ tsp (2 mL)

salt

HONEY POMEGRANATE TABBOULEH: 2 cups (500 mL)

chopped parsley

1 cup (250 mL)

diced yellow and/or orange tomatoes

1/2 cup (125 mL)

pomegranate arils

1/2 cup (125 mL)

chopped fresh mint

1/4 cup (60 mL)

minced red onion

6 tbsp (90 mL)

olive oil

3 tbsp (45 mL)

fresh lemon juice

1 tbsp (15 mL)

honey

1/2 tsp (2 mL)

salt

1/4 tsp (1 mL)

black pepper

M E T HOD : • Garlic quinoa and ancient grains: In a saucepan over high heat, combine Uncle Ben’s® Quinoa and Ancient Grains Medley, water, coconut oil, garlic and salt; stir well. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, cover and simmer for 18 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand for 5 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl, fluff with a fork and let cool completely. • Honey pomegranate tabbouleh: Add parsley, tomatoes, pomegranate arils, mint and onion to cooled quinoa mixture; toss to combine. Stir in olive oil, lemon juice, honey, salt and pepper. Keep chilled and serve within 2 hours. (To make ahead, toss with tomatoes and pomegranate just before serving).

60

SPRING/SUMMER 2018


for

DRAMA Dinner...

Try Rosemount Fully Cooked Diced or Pulled Chicken in a zesty Mediterranean Pasta Toss and delight your discerning diners! It’s an easy meal with high protein that packs a delicious flavour-punch for lunch!

www.rosemountfoods.com


Let Us Do The

COOKIN’! Utilizing pre-cooked vs. raw proteins offers foodservice operators consistency and saves preparation time and labour costs. Let Maple Leaf Foods show how we can help you save labour time and cost with our wide variety of fully cooked, heat & serve proteins.

Schneiders Fully Cooked Pulled Meats Pork, Beef and Chicken Visit pulledmeats.ca


RECIPE CENTRAL

Crispy Garlic-Miso Glazed Cape Hake with Japanese Cucumber Salad This is the type of recipe you may expect to see with salmon, yet is exceptional with hake. Its mild flavour really lets the savoury garlic-miso glaze shine through. This dish is perfect for enjoying in summer served alongside this crisp and refreshing cucumber salad. Garnish with sliced green onions, if desired.

I NG R E DI E N T S : Serves: 4 4-113 g portions

High Liner Culinary Cape Hake Fillets IQF (product #5946), thawed

89 mL

liquid honey (about 6 tbsp)

59 mL

soy sauce (about 1/4 cup)

1-1/2 tsp (7 mL)

finely grated fresh ginger

1 tsp (5 mL)

miso paste

3 cloves

garlic, pressed

1 tsp (5 mL)

peanut oil

M E T HOD : • In a non-metallic bowl, whisk honey, soy sauce, ginger, miso and garlic. Add High Liner Culinary Cape Hake Fillets IQF turning to coat. Cover and refrigerate for at least 3 hours or overnight. • Pour off marinade into a small saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until reduced by half. Set aside. • Heat peanut oil in a heavy skillet until pan is very hot; sear top side of hake fillets to create a crust, about 1 minute. Immediately transfer fish, crisp side up, to a parchment

JAPANESE CUCUMBER SALAD:

paper-lined rimmed baking sheet. Bake in a preheated

3 mini

cucumbers

350°F (180°C) oven for 5 minutes or until cooked through.

1 small

bird’s eye chili, sliced

2 tbsp (30 mL)

rice vinegar

chili, vinegar, sesame seeds, sugar and salt; mound

1 tbsp (15 mL)

black and white sesame seeds

salad on four plates. Serve hake on top and drizzle with

1 tsp (5 mL)

granulated sugar

reduced sauce.

1/2 tsp (2 mL)

salt

• Japanese cucumber salad: In a bowl, toss cucumber,

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

63


RECIPE CENTRAL

Bam Bam Shrimp Taco Salad

Both taco salads and seafood tacos continue to be popular menu items. This colourful, crisp and fresh spin on the usual taco salad combines the best of these.

LIME SOUR CREAM DRESSING: 118 mL

sour cream (about 1/2 cup) Juice of 1 lime Salt and pepper, to taste

I NG R E DI E N T S : Serves: 4 454 g

High Liner Culinary Bam Bam Evercrisp™ Lightly Battered Shrimp (product #8750)

1 tsp (5 mL) chili powder 4 cups (1 L) chopped and lightly packed green leaf lettuce

64

1

ripe avocado, peeled, pitted and cubed

237 mL

tomato salsa (about 1 cup)

227 mL

lightly crushed blue and yellow tortilla chips (about 1 cup)

118 mL

roasted corn kernels (about 1/2 cup)

118 mL

cooked kidney beans (about 1/2 cup)

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

M E T HOD : • Lime sour cream dressing: In a bowl, whisk sour cream, lime juice, salt and pepper. Set aside. • Deep fry High Liner Culinary Bam Bam Evercrisp™ Lightly Battered Shrimp according to package directions. Drain and toss with chili powder. • In each of 4 wide serving bowls, layer lettuce, avocado, salsa, corn, beans and chips. Top each salad with chili shrimp and drizzle with lime sour cream dressing.


CREATE EXTRAORDINARY SALADS with Hellmann’s Dressings ®

Salads are profitable dishes that let chefs showcase their creativity. When fresh produce is combined with culinary vision and great-tasting Hellmann’s® Dressings, your menu can truly stand apart from the rest.

HELLMANN’S® DRESSINGS:

TOP 10 SALAD TRENDS:

• • • • •

• • • • •

Add variety to seasonal menu items Consistent quality Easy to use and less labour intensive Recyclable packaging Shelf-stable dressings save refrigerator space

Citrus Fruit Forward Tropical Botanical Sweet Heat

• • • • •

Smoked Roasted Pickled Umami Exploration Globally Influenced

TABBOULEH AND HERB SALAD Traditional tabbouleh with quinoa, cherry tomatoes, avocado and cilantro adding flavor and texture. Topped with Hellmann’s® Creamy Ranch Dressing blended with cucumber and lemon zest.

For more recipes that deliver, on the hottest salad trends visit ufs.com/top10salads ©2018 Unilever Food Solutions. Pure Leaf, Hellmann’s, and the Blue Ribbon Device are registered trademarks of the Unilever Group of Companies. Bring Out the Best is a trademark of the Unilever Group of Companies. UC 1/18


creations

From

Thailand

to Your Tables

KITCHEN

Thai Kitchen has one simple goal — to help you bring the Thai experience to your diners. Our high quality, authentic, easy-to-use Thai ingredients will make it easy to satisfy even the most discerning palates.

Coconut Milk 400 mL Made from the pressing of fresh, ripe coconut meat, Thai Kitchen coconut milk is naturally processed in Thailand without preservatives or additives.

Red Curry Paste 992 g High on the heat scale (but generally more moderate than green curry), this red curry paste is a mix of fresh red chilis and aromatic spices, carefully blended to achieve layers of flavours perfect for Thai cuisine and more.

Green Curry Paste 992 g Aromatic herbs such as lemongrass, galangal (Thai ginger) and fresh green chilis are harvested at their peak of freshness and carefully blended with fragrant spices for the perfect balance of flavours with a spicy kick.

clubhouseforchefs.ca McCormick Canada Food Service ÂŽ Reg. TM McCormick & Co., Inc. Used under licence

Contact your foodservice sales representative for more information

Ontario

Quebec

Newfoundland & Maritimes

British Columbia / Prairies

Total Focus Sales & Marketing (800) 265-2513 email: orders@totalfocus.com

AGG Foods (450) 965-9782 email: ggratton@agginc.ca

Ronahan Food Brokers (902) 468-6111 email: patty@ronahan.com

Summit Marketing Canada Ldiv. (BC/AB/SK/MB) (604) 523-0332 email: elizabeth@summitmarketing.ca


RECIPE CENTRAL

Topped with tasty, lemon-herbed shrimp, this warm lentil and vegetable salad is a comforting entrée at any time of year. For additional protein and interest, top each serving with crumbled feta cheese, and increase the number of shrimp if desired.

Warm lentil salad with seared shrimp I NG R E DI E N T S : Serves: 8 24

High Liner Culinary Pacific White Shrimp, Raw, Peeled & Deveined, Tail-on (product #5748)

2 tbsp (30 mL) olive oil 1 tbsp (15 mL)

fresh thyme leaves Zest of 1 lemon Prepared herb vinaigrette dressing

WARM LENTIL SALAD: 227 g

French green (de Puy) lentils

710 mL

water

1

bay leaf

3

sprigs thyme Salt and pepper, to taste

1 tbsp (15 mL)

butter

2

large stalks celery, diced

1

medium onion, diced

1

large carrot, diced

2

cloves garlic, minced

M E T HOD : • In a bowl, toss shrimp with olive oil, thyme and lemon zest; let marinate for 30 minutes. (Or, cover and refrigerate for up to 2 hours.) • In a saucepan, combine lentils, water, bay leaf, thyme sprigs and salt, to taste. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer until lentils are just tender. Drain off any excess water, if necessary. Cool; remove bay leaf and thyme. Set lentils aside. • Meanwhile, heat a large skillet over low to medium-low heat; melt butter. Sweat celery, onion, carrot, garlic, and salt and pepper, to taste, until tender-crisp. Cool and combine with lentils. • To order, season shrimp with salt and pepper, to taste. Sear in a preheated cast iron skillet over medium-high heat for about 1 or 2 minutes per side or until cooked through. • In a sauté pan over medium heat, reheat lentil mixture with desired amount of prepared herb vinaigrette. Serve shrimp on a bed of warm lentil salad and garnish with additional sprigs of thyme, if desired. CHEFCONNEXION.CA

67


` Twice Baked Goat’s Cheese SouffLEs 1. Melt the butter over medium heat and stir in the flour. Cook the roux for a minute, then gradually whisk in the hot milk to make a thick white sauce. 2. Simmer for a minute, then season with cayenne pepper, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the Hewitt’s Goat Cheese until it melts. Gay Lea Butter MILK FLOUR Cayenne Pepper Lemon juice Hewitt’s Goat Cheese, crumbled Eggs, separated Egg whites Bread crumbs Ground Hazelnuts, or walnuts Gay Lea Butter (melted) Salt & Freshly Ground Pepper

2 tbsp 1 1/4 cup 4 tbsp 1 pinch squeeze 3 1/2 oz 2 2 3 tbsp 3 tbsp extra

3. Cool slightly, then beat in the egg yolks. 4. Brush the inside of six ramekins with the melted butter and coat them with the breadcrumbs and nuts mixed together. 5. Preheat oven to 375ºF and prepare a roasting pan with boiling water. 6. Whisk the four egg whites to soft peaks and carefully fold them into the main mixture using a figure eight motion. Spoon into the ramekins. 7. Place the soufflés in the roasting pan in the oven with boiling water for about 12-15 minutes or until risen and golden brown. You can serve soufflés at this stage, or allow to cool and chill. 8.To serve twice-baked, pre-heat the oven to 375ºF. Run a knife around the inside of each ramekin and turn out soufflé onto a baking dish. 9. Bake soufflés for about 12 minutes. Serve on plates with a dressed salad for garnish.


Spring/Summer 2018 Chef Connexion is published twice a year by Greenbridge Foodservice in partnership with the following distributor members: ADL Foods 400 Read Drive Summerside, Prince Edward Island C1N 5A9 888-235-6455 adlfoods.ca AOF Service Alimentaire 2150 rue Sigouin Drummondville, Québec J2C 5Z4 819-477-5353 aof.ca

N ex t Issue: FALL/WINTER 2018 For the upcoming Chef Connexion, we’ll once again take the pulse of the Canadian restaurant industry to bring you plenty of practical information. You can look forward to carefully researched, lively articles about topics that mean the most to you and your profitability. What’s more, we’ll shine the spotlight on the many great ways you can take advantage of Brand Points PLUS.

AD INDEX Pg IFC 20 8 15 BC 34 42 25 23 68

Advertiser Alasko Arla Foods Ardent Mills Boulart Cavendish Farms David Roberts Derlea Deluxe Erie Meats Gay Lea

Pg 55 48 64 66 11 61 32 58 65 27

Advertiser High Liner Lynch Foods Maple Leaf McCormicks National Egg/Vanderpol’s Rosemount SunRype Uncle Ben's Unilever Weston Foodservice

We welcome your comments and suggestions. Material chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and fit. Please direct all correspondence to: Greenbridge Foodservice, 1373 Victoria Street N., Unit 201, Kitchener, Ontario N2B 3R6 or info@greenbridgefoodservice.ca

Copyright 2018 Greenbridge Foodservice. All Rights Reserved.

Capital Foodservice 10 MacNaughton Avenue Caledonia Industrial Park Moncton, New Brunswick E1H 3L9 800-561-7026 capitalfoodservice.ca Flanagan Foodservice 145 Otonabee Drive Kitchener, Ontario N2C 1L7 519-748-2190 flanagan.ca Multi Plus DM Inc. 10389 Côte de Liesse Dorval, Québec H9P 2Z3 866-745-8881 multiplusdm.com Pratts Food Service (Alberta) 291196 Wagon Wheel Road Rocky View County, Alberta T4A 0E2 403-476-7728 pratts.ca Pratts Food Service (Manitoba) 101 Hutchings Street Winnipeg, Manitoba R2X 2V4 204-949-2832 pratts.ca Pratts Food Service (Saskatchewan) 1450 Park Street Regina, Saskatchewan S4N 2G2 306-546-5444 pratts.ca Yen Bros. Food Service 1988 Vernon Drive Vancouver, British Columbia V6A 3Y6 604-255-6522 yenbros.com CHEFCONNEXION.CA

69


NEW!

Flavour Crisp

®

Crinkle Cut Medallions Fuel your customers’ need for great quality, and flavourful convenience foods. Perfect for dipping, sharing, or snacking, medallions will help your customers indulge their cravings. Available in two flavours: Tuscan Herb and Spicy Chili.

1-800-561-7945 • cavendishfarms.com

® TM/MC Trademarks of Cavendish Farms Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Chef Connexion Spring / Summer 2018  

English

Chef Connexion Spring / Summer 2018  

English

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