Page 1

U.S. Department of Education Nationally Recognized School of Excellence Association of Christian Schools International Exemplary Program

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Martha S. Lindner High School ď Ť CHCA Administrative Offices 11525 Snider Road Cincinnati, OH 45249 Phone: 513-247-0900 http://www.chca-oh.org

2012 ~ 2013 Unleashing a Passion To Learn, To Lead, To Serve

COURSE OF STUDY

MARTHA S. LINDNER HIGH SCHOOL


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 University of Florida

Virginia Military Institute

University of Georgia

Virginia Polytechnic Institute

University of Hartford

Wake Forest University

University of Illinois at Chicago

Walsh University

University of IllinoisUrbana Champaign

Washington University in St. Louis

Transylvania University Trinity University

University of Indianapolis

Trinity International University

University of Kentucky

Tulane University

University of Louisville

Tuskegee University

University of Maryland College Park

University of Aberdeen

University of Miami

United States Air Force Academy

University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

United States Naval Academy

University of Mississippi

University of Akron

University of Missouri-Columbia

University of Alabama-Tuscaloosa

University of North Florida

University of Arizona

University of Notre Dame

University of Arkansas

University of Pittsburgh

University of California-Berkeley

University of Richmond

University of California-Davis

University of Rochester

University of California-Irvine

University of St. Andrews (Scotland)

University of California-Los Angeles

University of San Diego

University of California-San Diego

University of South Carolina

University of Central Florida

University of Southern California

University of Charleston

University of South Florida-Tampa

University of Cincinnati

University of Tennessee-Chattanooga

University of Colorado at Boulder

University of Tennessee-Knoxville

University of Connecticut

University of Toledo

University of Dallas

University of Utah

University of Dayton

University of Virginia

University of Delaware

University of Washington

University of Denver

University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Dundee

Urbana University

University of Evansville

Valparaiso University

University of Findlay

Vanderbilt University

The University of North Carolina at Wilmington The University of Texas at Austin Thomas More College Tiffin University

44

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy…Unleashing a passion to learn, to lead, to serve Vision Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy will unleash each student’s God-given gifts through Christ-centered academic excellence. We are devoted to developing the whole person, and instilling a lifelong passion for learning, leading and serving.

Mission

West Liberty University

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy is a Christ-Centered, Non-Denominational, College Preparatory Academy that exists to prepare students intellectually and spiritually for success in higher education and to impact and influence the world according to their unique gifts and talents. This will be accomplished by l Creating an environment that encourages students, faculty, staff and families to develop and live out their relationship in Jesus Christ; l Developing a passion for lifelong learning that leads to thoughtful, effective service through excellent, intentional curriculum and extra-curricular offerings; l Empowering outstanding Christian faculty and staff to fully use their passions and expertise to create engaged critical thinkers; l Fostering an exceptional environment that develops students’ gifts and talents in the arts, athletics, leadership, and additional extra-curricular opportunities for God’s purposes; l Building an engaged school community – encompassing faculty, staff, students, families, alumni, and donors – that reinforces the school’s vision, mission, and core values.

West Virginia University

Core Values: We Believe In

West Virginia Wesleyan College

Christ-Centeredness: ~ Following how Christ himself led, served, taught, loved, and lived; we strive to base all we do on His word.

Waynesburg College Western Kentucky University Westfield State University

Westminster College Westmont College Wheaton College (Illinois) Wheaton College (Massachusetts) Wilmington College Wittenberg University Wright State University Xavier University

Academic Excellence: ~ Reflecting we are an academy of learning, it is our primary, but not exclusive goal to prepare our students academically for college and beyond. The Whole Person: ~ Recognizing all are gifted by God in unique ways, we believe in developing all forms of those spiritual, intellectual, artistic and athletic gifts in each student to their fullest potential. Servant Leadership: ~ Believing in the power of servanthood, servant leadership will be taught, modeled and encouraged to all students, staff and parents so that all are equipped for the situations in life that God calls them to lead. Outreach/Service: ~ Modeling Christ in all we do, we will provide opportunity daily and through special events for students, staff, and parents to share Christ’s love through service and witness to others. Stewardship: ~ Acknowledging we are blessed in many ways, we as a school will model strong fiscal stewardship and will encourage, train and expect students, staff and parents to be wise and generous stewards over their time, talents, and money. The Value of Each Person: ~ Demonstrating biblical equality, we will embrace each individual as a distinct creation of God, ensure an emotionally, socially and physically safe and nurturing environment and intentionally enroll a student body, faculty and staff that reflect the socioeconomic and racial make-up of the community in which we live. A Vibrant Sense of Community: ~ Acting intentionally, we will foster a vibrant, connected culture of caring, fellowship and respect among students, staff and parents. Accountability: ~ Holding ourselves and each other to the highest standards of integrity, excellence and to constant measurable improvement. A Joyful Spirit: ~ Having an attitude of gratitude for God’s blessings that are lived out in every day smiles, laughter, and by celebrating demonstrated character and unique achievements. This results in a contagious joy that connects at the heart-level . (Board Approved May 2011)


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Indiana Technical College Indiana University Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State Milligan College

Reed College Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Rhodes College

Mississippi State University

Robert Morris College

Indiana Wesleyan University

Monmouth College

Indian River Community College

Moore College of Art & Design

Jacksonville University

Morehead State University

James Madison University

Morehouse College

John Carroll University

Mount Vernon Nazarene University

Johns Hopkins University

Murray State University

Kalamazoo College

Muskingum College

Kent State University

New York University

Kenyon College

North Carolina State University

Kettering University

Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine

School of Visual Arts

Northeastern University

Shawnee State University

Northern Arizona University

Sinclair Community College

Northern Kentucky University

Southern Connecticut State

Northwestern University

Southern Methodist University

Notre Dame College

St. Edward's University

Oberlin College

St. Johns University-Queens

Ohio Dominican University

St. Olaf College

Ohio Northern University

State University of West Georgia

Ohio University

Stetson University

Ohio Christian University

Stony Brook University

Ohio Wesleyan University

Tabor College

Oklahoma Christian University

Taylor University

Old Dominican University

Tennessee Technological University

Old Dominion University

Texas A&M University

Otterbein University

Texas Christian University

Palm Beach Atlantic University

Texas Tech University

Pennsylvania State University

The Citadel

Pepperdine University

The King's College

Purdue University

The Ohio State University

Quinnipiac University

The University of Findlay

Knox College Lee University Lehigh University Lewis and Clark College Liberty University Lipscomb University Louisiana State University

"Thoughtful Christians know that if we obey the Bible's great commandment to love God with our whole mind, as well as with everything else, then we will study the splendor of God's creation in the hope of grasping part of the ingenuity and grace that form it. One way to love God is to know and love God's work. Learning is therefore a spiritual calling: properly done it attaches us to God. In addition, the learned person has, so to speak, more to be Christian with. "

Loyola Marymount University

Excerpted from Engaging God's World by Cornelius Plantinga Jr. Copyright Š 2002 by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company

Marietta College

Loyola University Chicago Lynn University Macalester College

Marquette University Marshall University Maryland Institute College of Art Mercyhurst College Miami University Miami University-Hamilton Michigan State University Middle Tennessee State University

43

Rollins College Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Saint Joseph's College Saint Louis University Salem College Samford University Santa Clara University Savannah College of Art & Design Scarlet Oaks Fire Academy


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 College and University Acceptances 2009 ~ 2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS Graduation Requirements

1

Christian Studies

3

English / Language Arts

6

bold denotes matriculation Abilene Christian University

Calvin College

Drexel University

Agnes Scott College

Campbell University

Duke University

Alvernia University

Capernwray Bible School

Duquesne University

American University

Capital University

Earlham College

Anderson University

Carnegie Mellon University

Eastern Kentucky University

Arizona State University

Carthage College

Eastern Michigan University

Art Institute of Cincinnati

Case Western Reserve University

Eckerd College

Asbury University

Cedarville University

Elon University

Ashland University

Central Michigan University

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Auburn University

Centre College

Evangel University

Baldwin Wallace College

Chatham University

Florida Institute of Technology

Ball State University

Cincinnati Christian University

Florida International University

Barry University

Cincinnati State Technical & Community College

Florida State University

Baylor University Bellarmine University Belmont University Benedictine College Berea College Berklee College of Music Binghamton University Biola University Boston University Bowling Green University Brown University Butler University California Polytechnic State University California State University-Fullerton California State Los Angeles California State University-Northridge California State UniversitySan Marcos

Clemson University

Fordham University

Mathematics

10

Science

13

Social Studies

16

World Languages

20

Music Fine Arts

24

Visual Fine Arts

26

Health

28

Physical Education

29

Technology

31

Grade Level Course Options

33

Community Service Requirements

37

Credit Flexibility Statement

38

College and University Acceptances

42

Cleveland State University

Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering

Coastal Carolina University

Furman University

College of Charleston

Georgia Institute of Technology

College of Mount St. Joseph

Georgetown College

College of Holy Cross

Gordon College

College of William & Mary

Grace College

College of Wooster

Grove City College

Colorado School of Mines

Hanover College

Colorado State University

Harding University

Columbia College

Heidelberg College

Columbus College of Art & Design

High Point University

Cornell University

Hillsdale College

Davidson College

Hiram College

Denison University

Hocking College

DePaul University

Hope College

DePauw University

Huntington University

Courses listed are offered regularly. Some courses are offered as enrollment and faculty availability permit.

Indiana State University

Course of Study prepared by: Karen Smeltzer, PK-12 Academics

California University of Pennsylvania Drake University

42


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Note NCAA requires courses taken by alternative means must be so indicated on transcripts, while the Ohio Department of Education requires high schools not to differentiate a course by name or grade as taken by alternative means. Please review the statements below about NCAA requirements sent by Ohio Superintendent of Education on June 7, 2010: Recent information sent to schools from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Eligibility Center regarding prospective Division I student-athletes and coursework taken in nontraditional classroom settings may impact school district credit flexibility plans. The NCAA guidance applies to all student-athletes entering a Division I NCAA college or university on or after Aug. 1, 2010. Visit http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/eligibility_center/OVN/Nontraditional_Course_FAQ/engage.html Specifically, schools are advised to counsel prospective Division I student-athletes not to use the “test-out option” of credit flexibility. They also should advise students that any coursework earned via credit flexibility needs to be comparable in length, content and rigor to credits earned in a traditional classroom setting. The course also must be four-year college-preparatory in nature and have a defined time period for completion. Although, in general, ODE recommends that districts list “credit flexibility” credits on student transcripts in the same manner as credits earned via traditional classroom settings, the NCAA requires that any credits earned through nontraditional ways (e.g., distance learning, online, credit recovery) must be so designated on the transcripts of potential Division I student athletes. Schools should note on student transcripts submitted to the NCAA for review which course credits were earned through nontraditional ways, or attach an addendum with the explanation. The designation of credits on the transcript applies only for NCAA purposes. If in doubt, contact the NCAA Eligibility Center for specific advice on this issue. (June 7, 2010. Ohio Dept. of Education EdConnection) Appeals and Review Process

" '...Of all the commandments. which is the most important?' " " 'The most important one,' answered Jesus, 'is this: Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is this: Love your neighbor as yourself. There is no commandment greater than these.' " (New International Version, Mark 12. 28-31)

If the appropriate department denies a student's alternative learning credit proposal, the student may appeal to the Credit Flexibility Review Panel, which is an interdisciplinary body comprised of faculty, Guidance office personnel, and a school administrator. A student has a maximum of three (3) days from the denial of his petition by the department to indicate that he wishes to appeal the department's decision. The student must contact the High School Principal or Flex Credit Coordinator within those three (3) days; no extensions will be permitted. Once a student appeals to the Credit Flexibility Review Panel, the Panel will convene within one week for an appellate hearing. The student, the student's parents/guardian(s), the department chair, and the Review Panel will meet to hear the student's appeal, and the Review Panel will render its decision. The Review Panel will evaluate if all steps in pursuit of alternative educational options were met as stated in the Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Martha S. Lindner High School Credit Flexibility Statement. Communication with Parents and Students The CHCA Credit Flexibility statement will be posted as part of the CHCA MSL High School Course of Study booklet on the Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Web site, so that it may be accessed at any time. Copies of the Credit Flexibility statement will be available from the High School Guidance Office.

41


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Issuance of credit, once the Personal Learning Plan has been approved, will be determined by the CHCA teacher of record (with input from the off-campus sponsor if one is utilized), even if the program involves an off-campus activity, program, or project system. If, in the course of the student's regular meeting schedule with the CHCA teacher of record, that teacher believes that the student is not making sufficient progress in accordance with the Personal Learning Plan, the teacher of record will write a letter of concern to the student, his or her parents, the off-campus sponsor (if there is one), and the High School Principal If, after a subsequent meeting, the CHCA teacher of record still believes that the student is making insufficient progress towards agreed-upon objectives and competencies, then a letter of warning will be written that indicates the student is in danger of not receiving credit for his or her course work. Again, issuance of credit will ultimately be determined by the CHCA teacher of record. A Personal Learning Plan for Flex Credit that is not completed will be recorded as a Fail grade on the student transcript. According to state law, schools must award high school credit for college credit. ORC 3313.613 states, "If a course comparable to the course successfully completed under this section is offered by the school district, the district board shall award comparable credit for the completed equivalent course. If no comparable course is offered by the school district, the district board shall grant to the student an appropriate number of credits in a similar subject area."

incinnati Hills Christian Academy Martha S. Lindner High School provides for students a Christian environment where the best in academics, enrichment opportunities, resource support, and extracurricular activities builds on the elementary and middle school experiences. The high school strives to develop, honor, and validate the talent and interests of each student in academics, athletics, fine and performing arts, and performing Christian outreach. We honor the diverse student population, challenge students to leadership, community outreach, and academic excellence in our Christcentered environment.

Should a student not complete the Flex Credit course after letters of concern, warning and communication with the teacher of record, a fail grade will be recorded on the transcript. Unless the minimum 80% average of assessments is accomplished, the course will be recorded as a fail. A student has one opportunity to achieve a given course credit through Flex Credit Should a student fall ill or otherwise have circumstances that prevent on time completion the Flex Credit course for award of credit, the course will be re-taken using the “seat time� option.

For students graduating 2013 and before:

Students need to have a Personal Learning Plan in place and approved before credit may be given. Students who seek credit after the fact (after they have begun or completed their proposed learning alternative) without pre-approval will not receive credit. Students who transfer into Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School bring with them a transcript that includes courses for which credit has been granted by virtue of "seat time" or by alternative means (testing out of a course or through an alternative educational option). The State guidelines indicate a school must accept credit earned via Flex Credit from an Ohio school provided the school met the state's minimum operating standards of OAC Chapter 3301-35 "Local board policies may accept credit from other educational providers including on-line providers in accordance with the operating standards" (note the use of the word "may," not "must"). Students transferring into CHCA MSL High School who are in process of a Flex Credit course may have that course plan evaluated and may not receive credit. In addition, all transcript credits are also considered in the placement of students into the proper courses. Students who seek early graduation must meet with the CHCA MSL High School Principal and the College Counselor eighteen months ahead of their desired graduation date in order to prepare an overall strategy for achieving their goal. If their strategy involves the testing out/demonstrating mastery category of required courses and/or alternative educational options, they must follow all the procedures listed for each option for submitting and receiving approval, and monitoring as outlined above. Ohio High School Athletic Association and the NCAA Any courses taken using alternative means that students wish to conform to the Ohio High School Athletic Association guidelines for student athletic eligibility or that fall under the NCAA core course guidelines should be scrutinized for meeting these requirements when the student applies for the alternative course approval. Courses for which the student "tests out" do not qualify for meeting course load requirements for eligibility.

C

This Course of Study sets out the academic program for the High School. The academic program fulfills the school vision, mission and core values statements and seeks continuously to improve. We give honor and glory to God and see His blessing on this school and our efforts as we stand for excellence in education in a Christ-centered environment. A rigorous college preparatory curriculum includes Advanced Placement courses and a community service requirement of 120 hours. A two week intercession term alternating January and May is when CHCA High School enriches its curriculum with experiential learning. This term is part of the CHCA academic program, course grades appear on the transcript, are calculated in the cumulative GPA, and each intercession term carries a .25 credit. Recommended credits exceed the State of Ohio requirements and minimum entrance requirements for most colleges and universities.

To earn a CHCA diploma students must achieve the following 24 credits: 4 English 1 Elective 1 Fine Art 3 Mathematics 3 Social Studies .5 Computer 3 Science 3.5 Christian Studies 1 Jan./May Term 3 World Language .5 Physical Education1 Pass Ohio Graduation Test (5) .5 Health CHCA recommends students achieve the following 28 credits 4 English 1 Elective 1 Fine Art 4 Mathematics 4 Social Studies .5 Computer 4 Science 3.5 Christian Studies 1 Jan./May Term 4 World Language .5 Health Pass Ohio Graduation Test (5) .5 Physical Education1 1 CHCA permits 2 full seasons of interscholastic sports, cheerleading, or marching band to satisfy the PE requirement, provided the student take .5 credit in another area, not PE. For students graduating 2014 and beyond: To earn a CHCA diploma students must achieve the following 25 credits: 4 English 1 Elective3 .5 Fine Art2 4 Mathematics 3 Social Studies .5 Computer 3 Science 3.5 Christian Studies .5 Speech 1 Jan./May Term 3 World Language .5 Physical Education1 .5 Health Pass Ohio Graduation Test (5) or the named assessments CHCA recommends students achieve the following 28 credits 4 English 1 Elective3 4 Mathematics 4 Social Studies 4 Science 3.5 Christian Studies 4 World Language .5 Health .5 Physical Education1 1

2 3

40

.5 Fine Art2 .5 Computer .5 Speech 1 Jan./May Term Pass Ohio Graduation Test (5) or the named assessments

CHCA permits 2 full seasons of interscholastic sports, cheerleading, or marching band to satisfy the PE requirement, provided the student take .5 credit in another area, not PE. CHCA requires .5 Fine Art credit grades 9-12 PE courses may not serve as electives

1


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Grade Scale: A = 90-100

B = 80-89

GPA Scale for academic courses: A = 4.0 B = 3.0

C = 70-79

D = 60-69

C = 2.0

D = 1.0

F = 59 & below

GPA Scale for Honors Level Courses (includes VT, Vertical Team, designated): A = 4.5 B = 3.5 C = 2.5 D = 1.0 GPA Scale for Advanced Placement Courses: A = 5.0 B = 4.0 C = 3.0

D = 1.0

GPA Scale for High Honors and Honors recognition: High Honors = 3.75 – 4.0 Honors = 3.5 – 3.749 Selected courses offer dual credit under the Xavier University Collegium. We publish this statement of program with trust in its validity and the belief that we will grow as an institution by making widely known our practices.

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 The school must receive a notice of student intent to participate in Flex Credit before May 1 for Summer Credit, on or before August 1 for First Semester or year-long credit, and before November 20 for Second Semester credit. For Demonstrating Mastery/Testing Out, a student has 60 days from the plan approval date to complete all assessments. c) Pursuit of Alternative Educational Options A third required option is for students to develop a plan for pursuing an alternative educational option. The state guidelines offer examples of such options as "distance learning, educational travel, independent study, an internship, music, arts, after school program, community service or engagement project and sports." Independent study is when a student proposes to execute a course already named in the CHCA MLS High School Course of Study for the given school year but to do so by alternative means. Sometimes this means the student embarks on totally self-paced learning or may engage a tutor or may use community resources. The student and family compose the detailed learning plan and seek approval. The student would follow the process listed below for writing a detailed Personal Learning Plan and meet all requirements. Alternative Educational Options require the student meet the detailed Personal Learning Plan explained here. The student interested in pursuing an alternative educational option must write a detailed Personal Learning Plan that includes the following elements: 1) Course description, syllabus, and rationale. A narrative that describes the motivation for the alternative option, the specific topics that will be studied (a syllabus), what the student wishes to gain from such a program, and the tangible and intangible results of the learning plan. The narrative must include a listing of specific course objectives and desired outcomes, along with how those outcomes will be achieved and measured. Students must discuss how assessment will be done, how often, and what criteria will be used in doing such assessment This Plan will include how the CHCA benchmark curriculum learning and competencies will be met and assessed, and identify any parallels to the CHCA course. It will be the methods to achieve the learning that will differ, but the Department reviewing the Plan must find that the learning evidenced is congruent with the CHCA course for which the student seeks credit. CHCA and its faculty within departments will review any distance learning providers named in a Personal Learning Plan to insure the integrity and accreditation of such provider and may withhold approval of the Personal Learning Plan if such a provider does not meet with CHCA approval.

Dean Nicholas, PhD CHCA Martha S. Lindner High School Principal

2) Textbooks and/or Resources. Students must list the textbooks and/or resources that will be used. 3) Meeting Schedule. Students must include a specific schedule of when the student will meet with and/or have contact with his or her proposed off-campus teacher, supervisor, or program director. The student must have a CHCA High School teacher of record agree to be his or her sponsor for the Personal Learning Plan, even if the learning plan is based on an off-campus program. The student must also indicate who the lead contact person off campus is. The proposed Personal Learning Plan must be presented to the appropriate department chair. The school must receive a notice of student intent to participate in Flex Credit before May 1 for Summer Credit, on or before August 1 for First Semester or year-long credit, and before November 20 for Second Semester credit. For Demonstrating Mastery/Testing Out, a student has 60 days from the plan approval date to complete all assessments. No extensions on these deadlines will be allowed. Members from the department will meet with the student and parents to understand the plan and mutually agree on the credit being sought and the grading options. Should no agreement be reached about how the grading will be accomplished, the achievement on all assessments must average at minimum 80% and will be recorded as a pass/fail on the transcript. The student should realize that pass/fail might disadvantage a student during the transition to post-secondary life. The department will make a decision regarding the proposal within two weeks of that meeting. 2

39


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School provision to grant credit for course work accomplished by non-traditional means A provision within the Ohio state budget bill (Am. Sub. H.B. 153) exempts nonpublic schools from the requirement to offer credit flexibility as an instructional option for students. Please note that the provision still permits nonpublic schools to include credit flexibility within their educational options. That decision now falls within the authority of the nonpublic school governing board. [Non Public Schools ODE Newsletter, Winter 2012] CHCA Implementation of How Students Will Earn Credit Students may earn credits through any of the following or a combination thereof: a) the completion of courses b) testing out or otherwise demonstrating mastery of the course content; or c) pursuit of one or more "educational options" a) Completion of Courses In terms of ways students will earn credit, Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy will clearly continue to provide credit through "seat time," where 120 contact hours equals one high school credit. We anticipate that the vast majority of our students will continue to accrue credit this way. b) Testing out or Otherwise Demonstrating Mastery A second option for students is testing out or otherwise demonstrating mastery of a course. The state guidelines give the school the choice of using various commercial assessments (such AP exams and assessments in mathematics or world languages) or locally developed assessments. The process and procedures available to students who want to earn credit through the demonstration of mastery are a local determination. Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy made the decision that "testing-out" may not mean a single paper-pencil, high stakes exam, but rather incorporates multiple measures of student learning. The process includes the completion of applicable quarter or semester exams, or an exam to be named such as commercially available for world languages or forthcoming “end of course exams” as part of the Ohio Department of Education graduation requirement, and one of the following: 1. research paper 2. project-based learning assignment 3. portfolio of work 4. performance (when applicable for courses such as band) and/or other demonstration or performance-based task. Students begin the process by submitting a request to the High School Principal or Flex Credit Coordinator announcing in writing their intent to enter the testing out / demonstrating mastery process and the course they seek to test out of. The Department provides the course benchmarks from the CHCA benchmarked curriculum, a course syllabus, and texts. The Principal or Flex Credit Coordinator will schedule a meeting to include the student, parent, members of the department of the course requested in order to agree on the test out process (the exam(s) plus additional project), dates, times, and locations of testing . Credit granted this way may receive a letter grade or be graded pass/fail to be determined by mutual agreement. All directions and grading criteria or rubrics used to determine the student's grade would be agreed upon by the department in which the credit applies and the student requesting “test out / demonstrating mastery.” The content and processes evaluated during the “testing out” process will align with the CHCA benchmark curriculum. Should no agreement be reached, the school will record the credit as pass/fail on the transcript if mastery is achieved. Mastery is demonstrated by the student achieving a minimum of 80% (B-) on the comprehensive assessments. The student who pursues this option needs to understand that pass/fail might disadvantage that student in applying for colleges or during the transition to post-secondary life. 38

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 CHRISTIAN STUDIES Vision At the heart of our Christian faith is the belief that God is a personal God who reveals to humanity His nature, His redemptive purpose in history, and His love for all creation. Also central to our faith is the crucified and risen Jesus Christ and our belief that the “son of God became a man so that humanity could become children of God” (C.S. Lewis, Mere Christianity). It is our conviction that in understanding the incarnate God, we come to understand our own nature and purpose, for we are created in God’s image. Given these core convictions, the purpose of the Christian Studies curriculum is to create an environment in which we listen to God speak to us through the words of Scripture, encourage a love of learning and the exercise of reason, gain wisdom from the historic voices and traditions of the Church, and seek to understand our own human experience within this world. The goals of this curriculum are therefore to i) develop the student holistically; ii) allow students to articulate a distinctly Christian world view; and iii) encourage students to pursue excellence in order to engage God’s world. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Christian Studies: l Explain God’s love for humanity and a desire for a relationship which yields a life lived in imitation and service to Christ l Explain God’s purpose in restoring humanity and creation into right relationship and humanity’s participation in building the Kingdom of God l Explain the role and value of Scripture, reason, tradition, and experience in theologically forming a Christian world view l Explain the nature of the triune God: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit l Explain the unique nature of Christ as fully divine and fully human l Explain the tools and steps in the responsible reading and interpretation of Scripture and its application to life l Explain the nature of humanity including as made in the image of God yet fallen l Explain God’s redemptive work through Christ for salvation l Explain the importance of spiritual formation through classic spiritual disciplines including prayer, meditation, fasting, study, simplicity, solitude, submission, service, confession, worship, guidance and celebration l Explain the relevance of Church history and historical theology in the formation of faith and appreciation for the diversity of God’s Kingdom l Explain the importance of applying a theologically formed Christian world view into ethics, service and every aspect of vocation and life. Sequence 9 10 Old/New Testament History of Christianity Covenants Required for graduation: 3.5 Crd in Christian Studies

11 Christian Thought & Spirituality

12 Senior Elective

Electives: Within the Senior Elective category exists course choice. Enrichments/Highlights: Possible trips to Israel and Japan, Field trips include Hebrew Union College, Synagogue, In-school Seder, church visits, and Islamic Center visit. through Scripture; becoming familiar with Ancient Near Eastern cultures of Sumer, Babylon, Assyria, Syrian Levant, and Egypt in relation to Western Civilization studied in 9th grade and with multimedia resources; investigating religion / traditions of Judaism in shared study with English 9 and English 9 VT while reading Chaim Potok’s The Chosen. 1 Crd

CHRISTIAN STUDIES Old and New Testament Covenants (9th) Students overview the Bible from Genesis through the Gospels, with special attention to God’s covenants with Israel and humanity. Objectives include: understanding the foundations of Bible study; becoming familiar with the content of the Bible, particularly as it pertains to God’s covenants with humanity; and hearing the voice of God

3


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Lastly the study turns to the modern literary and cinematic retellings and perspectives. .5 Crd

The History of Christianity (10th) Students continue study in Biblical history begun in the freshman year and take up the birth of the Christian Church in the book of Acts and its growth as seen in the epistles, then study the historical and theological development of Christianity to the present day. Course objectives include: understanding how the church made the transition from a persecuted minority to an empowered majority in the years from Constantine to the Middle Ages; studying the impact of the Reformation on Christianity; investigating the influence of the church on the art, literature, and architecture of Western Civilization; comprehending the effect of the Great Awakening on American Christianity; gaining an appreciation of the depth and diversity of God’s Kingdom in the present day. 1 Crd

Senior Elective: Israel in the World (12th) Students explore the dynamics of history, religions, and cultures of Israel. James Michener’s The Source forms the main text with the Bible and other sources as supplemental reading. Students see the struggles of history and religion throughout the past millennia which give insight into the complexity of the current Middle East crisis. Myths of the region are exposed as propagated by politicians and religionists in their battle for control of the region. Students appreciate how Christians must engage deeply in the world, avoiding mistakes and missteps of the past. Honors .5 Crd Senior Elective: Jesus and the Gospels (12th) Through analysis of biblical scholarship and current New Testament archaeology, students examine the historical, cultural, economic, and geographical context of Jesus in order to understand him as a historical figure as well as to better understand his message as it was heard by his historical audience. The course gives attention to the historical, cultural, economic, geographical, and communal context of the audience of the four canonical gospels-Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John so students may understand their variegated presentations of the life of Jesus. .5 Crd

Christian Thought and Spirituality (11th) Students begin to think theologically about their faith. Students read and examine some of the great minds of Christianity, as they ponder why the righteous suffer, wrestle with the relationship of faith to contemporary issues, ask how to grow deeper in their spirituality, and call the faith their own. Course objectives include: enabling students to apply Biblical information to life situations; learning to think about what they call their faith; providing a safe environment to ask hard questions about Christianity. 1 Crd

Senior Elective: Bio-Ethics (12th) Students explore moral and ethical questions raised in the fields of medicine and biotechnology. Students examine issues surrounding the moral status of human life and personhood at its very beginning and then address questions raised in abortion, assisted reproductive technologies, embryonic stem cell research, reproductive cloning, experimental research, genetics, transplantation, allocation of medical resources, euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. As students examine medical and bioethical issues, they explore the foundations for moral thought and ethics and understand major approaches to the field of ethics, such as virtue theory, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism and ethical egoism. Students are asked to examine issues from a Biblical and theological perspective with the task of identifying the contours of a distinctly Christian world view and ethic. .5 Crd

Senior Elective: Origins and the Bible (12th) Students explore in depth the message of the Bible as it relates to Origins. Students examine other cosmologies from the ancient Near East, biblical passages pertaining to Creation, and a history of their interpretations. Students examine scientific explanations of the origin of the universe, especially the appearance of humans. The work of Darwin, the development of his theory, and modern critiques of his theory will raise topics about the ways the Bible and science have been integrated, especially relating to Creation. Honors .5 Crd Senior Elective: The Nature of Scripture (12th) Students consider such questions as: How do we know the Bible is true? Students study the Bible in depth and explore questions raised about it in the post-modern world. This class is well suited to those interested in continued study of the Bible and religion in a collegiate setting. Students analyze Exodus 1-15, use readings from religious, historical, literary, folklorist, and feminist perspectives, then explore the stories’ later retellings from the ancient world including Philo, Josephus, the New Testament and others.

Community Service Hour Graduation Requirement CHCA MSL High School Graduation requirements include 120 hours of community service, including hours of direct contact. A community service contract must be completed for each project. This contract must be documented and verified by the agency where the service is performed. •

We believe the spirit of community service at CHCA ought to reflect our commitment to follow Christ. In Christ’s teachings and examples we see that He placed special emphasis upon serving those less fortunate, such as the poor, widows, and children. We believe students and society would benefit greatly from direct involvement with people versus taskoriented jobs.

What does count: Community Service may be defined as unpaid work performed to benefit the community – whether emotional, material, or spiritual. Community service is to be completed through a non-profit agency or event or to a person in the community who would be considered disadvantaged. What does not count: Please keep in mind that service completed for profit-making businesses/services or individuals who can afford to pay for services rendered, and for family members, including family owned businesses, are not considered community service. Babysitting counts only if approved by the Outreach Office. Neither training nor practicing count. Requirements: 1. Students are to perform 50% or more of their community service hours in direct participation with underserved populations, which may be defined as the poor, elderly, handicapped, the widow, orphan, and stranger (homeless). Direct service involves students engaging with people. Preparing goods for distribution to underserved people are not direct contact hours. 2. Inclusive to the 120 hours of community service hours, students are to complete two mission projects, one of which must be a CHCA High School Mission Project. Students are to complete one mission project by the end of their sophomore year and a second mission project by the end of the first semester of their senior year. To graduate a student must complete 1 mission project for every 2 years enrolled; 2 mission projects for 3 and 4 years enrolled. Non-CHCA mission projects must be pre-approved by the Outreach Office. 3. Mission hours counted are those in which the student is engaged in direct service/ministry. Hours not counted in the 120 hour requirement are: training, travel, sleeping, eating, social time, and recreation. 4. Students lacking 30 hours of service for each academic year and at least 1 mission project by end of sophomore year will not be eligible for extra-curricular activities until hours are completed and documented in the high school Outreach Office. 5. Hours are to be completed outside of normal school hours. 6. Record of service hours performed is due immediately after the service is completed.

4

37


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Grade 12 Course Options 2012 - 2013 This course option sheet has been individually prepared for your student by the Guidance Department. The courses circled are based on teacher recommendations, demonstrated work ethic, and academic achievement to date. Please review carefully with your student. Once the final schedule is generated changes will generally be denied. Requirements Christian Studies Senior Elective: * Rank your choice in order of preferences 1st - 4th Eastern World Religions (S), Western World Religions (S), Bio-Ethics (S), Ethics and Justice (S), Eschatology (S), Faith in Fiction and Film (S), Israel in the World (S Honors), Jesus and the Gospels (S) English: Select One English 12, English 12 Honors, AP English 12 Literature & Composition (Teacher approval) Math ** Select One or more Science** Algebra II Anatomy and Physiology Functions and Trigonometry Physics or Physics VT (Honors) Statistics Environmental Science semester 1 and 2 Pre Calculus or Pre Calculus VT (Honors) AP Environmental Science (Teacher approval) Calculus AP Biology (Teacher approval) College Algebra AP Chemistry (Teacher approval) AP Calculus AB ; AP Calculus BC (Teacher approval) AP Physics B (Teacher approval) AP Statistics (Teacher approval) Social Studies ** World Language ** US History Latin I (Honors), II )Honors), III (Honors), Government / Economics (one sem each) AP Latin:Vergil in 3rd or 4th yr Spanish I, II, III, IV; AP Spanish (Teacher approval) Sociology (S); Research in Politics (S) Spanish II, III, IV VT (Honors) Mandarin Chinese I, II, III (Honors), A.P. Chinese East Asian History (S) *Required to graduate 3 consecutive years of the same AP Microeconomics (Teacher approval) world language AP European History (requires teacher approval) **Students are strongly encouraged to take four years of math, AP US Government & Politics U.S. (Teacher approval) science, world language and social studies. Teacher approval needed for Advanced Placement enrollment AP US History (Teacher approval) Electives: Rank your choices in order of preference 1st - 6th Courses one year unless designated (S) is one semester Visual Fine Arts (Gen Art pre requisite to all art courses) , Technology: Computer Applications (S), Computer Layout & General Art (S), Ceramics (S), Stained Glass(S), Studio Art I & Design I (S) & II (S), Adobe Flash (S), Video Editing (Teacher II (S), Photography (S), Computer Layout & Design I (S) & II (S), approval) AP Studio Art (Teacher approval), Drawing (S) Drama & Vocal Music: Concert Choir, Encore Performing Choir Health /Physical Education: Health (S), Physical Education.25 (audition), AP Music Theory (Teacher approval), Drama (S) Crd (S), Weight Training .25 Crd (S), Dance as PE.25 Crd (S) Instrumental Music: Concert Band (Y), Lab Band(Y) (audition), Others: Greek I (Honors),Spanish Conversation in Context Percussion Ensemble/Steel Drum Band (Y) (audition), Symphony 1st sem & 2nd sem (S), (Neither fulfills the World Language Orchestra (Y) (audition), Electric Jazz Orchestra (Y) (audition) requirement), Speech (S), Dance as Fine Art (S), Journalism (Teacher approval), Media, Race, and Representation (S) Electives required for graduation: All elective requirements must be completed by end of 1st semester senior year Students graduating 2014 and beyond: .5 credit of Fine Art grades 9-12 and .5 credit in Speech 2 semesters of PE .25 credit each. 1 semester Health .50 credit See PE Waiver notice in PE section 2 semesters Fine Art (Music, Dance as Fine Art; Visual Art satisfy this requirement for those graduating 2013 and before); 1 semester Fine Art satisfies this requirement for those graduating 2014 and beyond.

36

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Senior Elective: Faith in Contemporary Fiction and Film (12th) Students analyze literature and film as mediums wherein contemporary society wrestles with answers to philosophical and theological questions ranging from identity to memory, purpose, knowing, free will and determinism. Rather than “simply stories� students use these stories to pose thought-provoking questions. Students interpret these questions through a lens of faith, examining the issue from a perspective of belief. Deconstructing these answers through a faith construct enables the students to explore their own understanding of personal, societal, and religious issues in both literature and film. Using their faith concepts in this manner enables students to develop their interpretive skills while fine tuning their critical thinking. Students combine analysis of these cultural mediums with a practical application of living our faith within culture. .5 Crd

Senior Elective: Ethics and Justice (12th) Students explore important ethical and theological questions justice. Students examine alternative systems to achieve justice in the world, the development and significance of human rights, and the degree to which cultural differences impact whether rights and wrongs are universally held. Case studies include genocide and ethnic cleansing, 21st Century slavery, education, women, poverty and the consumption of world resources. Students explore controversial issues where philosophy, ethics, theology and law intersect such as capital punishment, the morality of war, terrorism, racism, gender, and homosexuality. Students examine these issues, using foundations for moral thought and major approaches to the field of ethics such as virtue theory, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism, situational ethics, Rawlsian ethics and ethical egoism. Students examine these issues from a biblical and theological perspective with the task of indentifying the contours of a distinctly Christian world view and ethic. .5 Crd

Senior Elective: Eschatology (12th) Students examine biblical teachings on the final events of the world, primarily from The Revelation of John and selected areas of the Old and New Testaments. Topics include the development of eschatology in the Bible compared with neighboring societies, the historical and modern interpretations most Christians accept including the pre/post/a-millennial doctrines, and cursory examination of Christian eschatology in modern literature such as Left Behind. The course concludes comparing Christian eschatology to modern teachings of other world religions. .5 Crd

Senior Elective: Eastern World Religions (12th) Students examine beliefs and practices of various Eastern traditions beginning with Hinduism and moving eastward through Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. Students compare and contrast these traditions with Christianity and other monotheisms through readings, discussions, media presentations, and field trips. Study reveals the fundamental human need for the Divine helps students gain skills in relating to other peoples and cultures in the world and gain greater depth and appreciation of their own faith by exploring similarities and differences between Christianity and other religions. .5 Crd Senior Elective: Western World Religions (12th) Students examine beliefs and practices of Western traditions focusing primarily on Judaism and Islam. The course concludes with a brief survey of the major Eastern religions. Students compare and contrast these traditions with Christianity and other monotheisms through readings, discussions, media presentations, and field trips. By understanding the fundamental human need for the Divine, students gain skills in relating to other peoples and cultures in the world and gain greater depth and appreciation of their own faith by exploring similarities and differences between Christianity and other religions. .5 Crd

1 semester Computer .50 credit 4 January/May Term experiences .25 credit each

5


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

ENGLISH / LANGUAGE ARTS

Grade 11 Course Options 2012 - 2013

Vision As a result of a CHCA Language Arts education, students recognize language is a gift from God and as such should be used to glorify and serve Him. Students are encouraged to develop a lifelong love of learning through reading, study, and applying scriptural principles to these studies. Growing from these studies is an appreciation of the diversity of human experience, culture, and values and an ability to evaluate spoken, written, and media messages for truth. Students apply analytical skills in reading, thought, writing, study, and discussion to realize their unique, God-given gifts and their place in the world. Students pursue research with confidence using a familiarity with sources and their uses and applying the aid that technology brings to learning. Students engage competently in a variety of writing experiences, both academic and personal, demonstrating clarity, logic, persuasiveness, creativity, and accuracy in the use of Standard Edited American English. Articulate, even eloquent, language denotes a person whose ideas are worthy of consideration and respect, thus an education to raise up Christian leaders must provide for sound language arts training. CHCA students speak with confidence, fluency, and precision in a variety of situations as well as work cooperatively and responsively in groups demonstrating appropriate leadership and giving value to others’ work. Students receive academic challenge and support in pursuit of success in language arts. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Language Arts: in Reading: l Demonstrate competence in the general skills and strategies of the reading process l Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of literary works of enduring quality and increasing complexity including the truth of Scripture and its influence on literary forms and themes l Demonstrate competence in applying reading strategies to learn from literature and specific types of informational and functional texts and digital sources. In Writing: l Demonstrate competence in the general skills and strategies of the writing process including narration, exposition and persuasion l Write with a command of the grammatical, mechanical and usage conventions of Standard Edited American English l Demonstrate competence in the stylistic and rhetorical aspects of writing l Gather and use information from a variety of print and digital sources for research purposes. In Speaking/Listening/Discussion: l Demonstrate competence in speaking, listening, and viewing as tools for learning l Participate effectively in a range of interactions to communicate and collaborate. Sequence 9 English 9 English 9 VT Western Studies Honors

10

11

English 10 English 10 VT

English 11 English 11 VT Heritage Studies Honors

12 English 12 English 12 Honors A.P. English Literature & Composition

A.P. English Language & Composition Required for graduation: students graduating 2013 and before 4 Crd in English, one each year from those listed above. Students graduating 2014 and beyond 4 Crd in English one each year from those listed above plus .5 Crd in Speech. Electives:

This course option sheet is individually prepared for your student by the Guidance Department. The courses circled are based on teacher recommendations, demonstrated work ethic, and academic achievement to date. Please review carefully with your student. Once the final schedule is generated changes will generally be denied. Requirements Christian Studies: Christian Thought and Spirituality English: Select One English 11, English 11 VT (Honors), Heritage Studies (Honors Teacher approval), AP English 11 Language and Composition (Teacher approval) Social Studies: Select One U.S. History or Heritage Studies (Honors Teacher approval), AP US History (Teacher approval) Math Science World Language* Algebra II or Chemistry or Chemistry VT (Honors) Latin I (Honors), Latin II (Honors), Latin Algebra II VT (Honors) AP Chemistry (Teacher approval) III (Honors). Latin IV (Honors), AP Latin-Vergil in year 3 or 4 Pre Calculus or Physics2 (concurrent Alg. II or higher) Spanish I, II, III, IV Pre Calculus VT (Honors) or Physics VT (concurrent Pre-Calc) Spanish II, III, or IV VT (Honors) (Honors) AP Spanish Language & Comp. (Teacher approval) Functions & Trigonometry (p/r algII) Environmental Science I (S) Mandarin Chinese I (Honors), Mandarin Statistics Environmental Science II (S) Chinese II (Honors) AP Statistics (Teacher approval) AP Environmental Science Chinese III (Honors) AP Calculus AB (Teacher approval) (Teacher approval) *Required to graduate: 3 consecutive years AP Calculus BC (Teacher approval) A.P. Biology (Teacher approval) of the same world language Electives: Rank your choices in order of preference 1st - 4th Courses one year unless designated (S) is one semester Visual Fine Arts (Gen Art pre requisite to all art courses) Technology: Computer Applications (S), Computer Layout & General Art (S), Ceramics (S), Stained Glass(S), Studio Art I Design I (S) & II (S), Adobe Flash (S), Video Editing (Teacher & II (S), Photography (S), Computer Layout & Design I & II approval) (each S, no p/r), Drawing (S) AP Studio Art (2D, 3D, Drawing choices. (Teacher approval) Drama & Vocal Music: Concert Choir, Encore Performing Health /Physical Education: Health (S), Physical Education .25 Choir (audition), AP Music Theory (Teacher approval), Drama (S) Crd (S), Weight Training .25 Crd (S), Dance as PE .25 Crd (S) Instrumental Music: Lab Band (audition), Percussion Others: Spanish Conversation in Context 1st sem & 2nd sem (S) Ensemble/Steel Drum Band (audition), Symphony Orchestra, (p/r Spanish III. Does not fulfill the 3rd yr World Language Electric Jazz Orchestra (audition) requirement), Speech (S), Sociology (S), East Asian History (S), Journalism, (Teacher approval), Creative Writing (S), Dance as Fine Art (S), Greek I Honors (p/r Latin II. Does not fulfill a World Language requirement), Study Hall (S). Race, Media, and Representation (S), Research in Politics (S) Electives required for graduation: All elective requirements must be completed by end of 1st semester of senior year. Students graduating 2014 and beyond: .5 credit of Fine Art grades 9-12 and .5 credit in Speech 2 semesters of PE .25 credit each. 1 semester Health .50 credit See PE Waiver notice in PE section 2 semesters Fine Art (Music, Dance as Fine Art; Visual Art satisfy this requirement for those graduating 2013 and before); 1 semester Fine Art satisfies this requirement for those graduating 2014 and beyond.

Speech I (required for students graduating 2014 and beyond) Creative Writing Journalism/Yearbook Drama

Enrichments/Highlights: Drama Club, Drama Performances; possible Heritage Studies Boston trip.

6

35

1 semester Computer .50 credit 4 January/May Term experiences .25 credit each


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Grade 10 Course Options 2012 - 2013

ENGLISH

This course option sheet is individually prepared for your student by the Guidance Department. The courses circled are based on teacher recommendations, demonstrated work ethic, and academic achievement to date. Please review carefully with your student. Once the final schedule is generated changes will generally be denied.

English 9 Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in Writing and Reading as well as skills tested on the PLAN and PSAT. Students study vocabulary from Classical Roots and within the context of literature. Rhetorical modes of exposition, narration, persuasion, and analysis allow students to respond to prompts to produce both expressive and academic prose. Literature of all genres develops students’ comprehension and analytical skills. Students examine literary themes and their congruence to biblical principle. In alignment with the Old and New Testament Covenants class, students study religion/ traditions of Judaism revealed in The Chosen. Students explore various cultures yet the focus of diverse voices in literature is in African-American literature. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

Requirements English: Select One World Language*: Select One English 10, English 10 VT (Honors) Latin I Honors, Latin II Honors, Latin III Honors Christian Studies: History of Christianity Mandarin Chinese I (Honors), Chinese II (Honors) Social Studies: Select One Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish III, Spanish II VT (Honors), Government/Economics, AP European History (Teacher approval) Spanish III VT (Honors) Science: Select One Chemistry, Chemistry VT (Honors) *Required to graduate 3 consecutive years of the same world Biology, Biology VT (Honors) language at the high school. Math: Select One Algebra II or Algebra II VT (Honors) Geometry or Geometry VT (Honors) Pre Calculus or Pre Calculus VT (Honors) A.P. Statistics Electives: Rank your choices in order of preference 1st - 4th Courses one year unless designated (S) is one semester Visual Arts: General Art (S) is requisite for other art courses, Instrumental Music: Lab Band (audition), Percussion Ceramics (S), Stained Glass (S), Studio Art I (S),Studio Art II (S), Ensemble/Steel Drum Band (audition), Symphony Orchestra, Photography (S), Computer Layout & Design I (S) & II (S) no Electric Jazz Orchestra (audition) pre-requisite AP Art Studio (teacher approval), Computer Layout & Design I and/or II each (S), Drawing (S) Drama & Vocal Music: Concert Choir,, Encore Performing Others: Speech (S), Study Hall (S); Creative Writing (S), Dance Choir (audition), AP Music Theory (Teacher approval), Drama (S) as Fine Art (S), Journalism, Media, Race and Representation (S), Greek I Honors (p/r Latin II) Greek does not fulfill a World Language requirement Health /Physical Education: Health (S), PE .25 Crd (S),Weight Training .25 Crd (S), Dance as PE .25 Crd (S) Technology: Applications (S), Layout & Design I (S) & II (S), Adobe Flash (S) Electives required for graduation: One PE and Health must be completed before the beginning of 11th grade. Students graduating 2014 and beyond: .5 credit of Fine Art grades 9-12 and .5 credit in Speech 2 semesters of PE .25 credit each. 1 semester Health .50 credit 1 semester Computer .50 credit See PE Waiver notice in PE section 2 semesters Fine Art (Music, Dance as Fine Art; Visual Art satisfy this requiremente 4 January/May Term experiences .25 credit each for those graduating 2013 and before); 1 semester Fine Art satisfies this requirement for those graduating 2014 and beyond.

literature, culture, politics, economics, and religious systems. The course focuses on historical documents, key individuals and events and their relation to biblical principles. Students produce in a variety of rhetorical modes to analyze, evaluate and synthesize information, defend conclusions, and present findings. Students produce both expressive and academic prose. Students examine literary themes and their congruence to biblical principles. Research and written work adhere to MLA style, and students must learn to use and include electronic sources in their research Units of study are presented in an engaging multisensory manner. Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test as well as skills tested on the PSAT. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Double period. Honors 2 Crd English 10 Students master the defining features of a range of genres and write to express opinion and analysis of literature. Expectations increase for student writing to demonstrate competence in writing modes and conventions of Standard Edited American English. Expectations include higher performance levels in sentence structures and precise diction. Students continue study of vocabulary from Classical Roots and in the context of literature. In addition to essays and short, cited papers, students produce a research paper. Research uses print and online full text databases aid student projects, particularly in the Careers unit. Thematic aspects of literature and their congruence to biblical principle is a focus. The focus of diverse voices in literature is in Latino literature. Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test as well as hone skills tested on the PSAT. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

English 9 VT English VT, where Vertical Team refers to the College Board Advanced Placement skills preparation, focuses on skill development in literary analysis and writing for academic purpose. Students identify tone, figures of speech, rhetorical devices and modes then analyze their impact on theme. Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test as well as the PLAN and PSAT. Students study vocabulary from Classical Roots and within the context of literature. Rhetorical modes of exposition, narration, persuasion, and analysis allow students to respond to prompts to produce both expressive and academic prose. Literature of all genres develops students’ comprehension and analytical skills. Students examine literary themes and their congruence to biblical principle. In alignment with the Old and New Testament Covenants class, students study religion/ traditions of Judaism revealed in The Chosen. Students explore various cultures yet the focus of diverse voices in literature is in AfricanAmerican literature. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Honors 1 Crd

English 10 VT English VT, where Vertical Team refers to the College Board Advanced Placement skills preparation, focuses on skill development in literary analysis and writing for academic purpose. Students identify tone, mood, figures of speech, rhetorical devices and modes then analyze their impact on theme. Prose, poetry, and drama challenge capable students to extend their ability to discuss, research, and write about varied texts. Students work independently and collaboratively using texts of literary merit, electronic secondary sources, and MLA citation format to produce varied written assignments. Students work to increase vocabulary and examine ideas in light of biblical principles. The focus of diverse voices in literature is in Latino

Western Studies Students study Western Civilization and Western Literature to meet both English and Social Studies requirements for grade nine. Students study patterns of continuity and change and the cause and effect nature of historical events primarily from a European perspective. The study begins with formation of democracy in ancient Greece and Rome to the latter part of the twentieth century as students examine

34

7


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 to analyze and synthesize information, defend conclusions, and present findings showing a high level of performance in Standard Edited American English. Skills in writing, grammar, usage, word choice and idiom will align with the SAT I. Research and written work adhere to MLA style, and students learn to use and include electronic sources in their research. Units of study are presented in an engaging multisensory manner. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Double period. English & Social Studies credits. Honors 2 Crd

literature. Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test as well as hone skills tested on the PSAT. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Honors 1 Crd English 11 Students continue progress in reading challenging texts with an emphasis on American literature. Students place literature in historical context, understand defining features of major literary movements and genres, analyze theme by focusing on evidence. The focus of diverse voices in literature is in Native American literature. Students write with increased mastery over mechanics/usage and rhetorical forms such as: critical, persuasive, and personal essays. Students write responding to prompts, produce MLA-style research papers, apply research skills to writing and speaking tasks, and engage in discussions. Vocabulary study continues from context and a separate text. Skills aligned with SAT I are embedded throughout units of study. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Language and Composition (11th) Students prepare for A.P. English Language & Composition Exam of the College Board by learning how to read closely, write effectively, and argue persuasively both across the curriculum and in personal contexts. This course is suited to students who perform at high levels in writing and analytical thinking, who enjoy challenge, and who are committed to the rigors of Advanced Placement course work. The class marries the goals of the AP Language and Composition curriculum with our school’s junior year emphasis on American Literature with some emphasis on African and Native American texts/voices in particular. Students examine literary themes and their congruence to biblical principles. Students read and analyze both nonfiction and fiction in order to understand better how an author’s rhetorical choices shape a text. Fiction texts provide a context for issues-oriented discussion and research-based persuasive writing. In preparation for the researched argument paper and the synthesis essay, students learn to read and evaluate primary and secondary sources, to synthesize material, and to write material using MLA conventions. Students produce abundant academic writing. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

English 11 VT Students receive challenge beyond English 11. Students examine American Literature with a focus on historical context that reveals how the American experience is portrayed through the unique voice of American writers who separate themselves from the European tradition of literature. Students analyze one Native American text, as well as a Native American anthology. Students write with increased mastery of mechanics and rhetoric, focusing on critical and persuasive writing while using MLA format. Students hone their skills through the research process and evaluate literary criticism for the works they read. Students continue their growth in strong development of vocabulary. Skills aligned with SAT I are embedded throughout units of study. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Honors 1 Crd

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Grade 9 Course Options 2012 - 2013 This course option sheet is individually prepared for your student by the Guidance Department. The courses circled are based on teacher recommendations, demonstrated work ethic, and academic achievement to date. Please review carefully with your student. Once the final schedule is generated changes will generally be denied. Requirements English: Select One English 9 , English 9 VT (Honors), Western Studies (Honors) Christian Studies: Old/New Testament Covenants Science: Select One Biology or Biology VT (Honors) Social Studies: Select One Western Civilization or Western Studies (Honors) Math: Select One

Electives Rank your choices in order of preference 1st - 4th Courses one year unless designated (S) is one semester; Visual Fine Arts: General Art (S) pre-requisite to all art courses Ceramics (S), Stained Glass (S), Studio Art I (S), Drawing (S) Technology: Computer Layout & Design I (S) Computer Layout & Design II (S) no pre-requisite Drama/Vocal Music: Concert Choir,, Encore Performing Choir (audition); AP Music Theory (Teacher approval) Health/ Physical Education: Health (S) PE .25 Crd (S),Weight Training ,25 Crd (S), Dance as PE .25 Crd (S) Technology: Computer Applications (S), Computer Layout & Design I & II (each S), Adobe Flash (S) Instrumental Music: Lab Band (audition), Percussion Ensemble/Steel Drum Band (audition), Symphony Orchestra, Electric Jazz Orchestra (audition)

Algebra I, Algebra II, Algebra II VT (Honors) Geometry, Geometry VT (Honors) World Language*: Select one: Latin I (Honors), Latin II (Honors) Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish II VT (Honors) Mandarin Chinese I (Honors) * Required to graduate 3 consecutive years of the same world language at the high school.

Others: Speech (S), Study Hall (S); Creative Writing (S); Dance as Fine Art (S), Journalism, Media Race, and Representation (S).

Electives required for graduation: One semester PE and Health must be completed by the end of the 10th grade Students graduating 2014 and beyond: .5 credit of Fine Art grades 9-12; .5 credit in Speech 2 semesters of PE .25 credit each. 1 semester Health .50 credit See PE Waiver notice in PE section 2 semesters Fine Art (Music, Dance as Fine Art; Visual Art satisfy this requirement for those graduating 2013 and before); 1 semester Fine Art satisfies this requirement for those graduating 2014 and beyond.

English 12 Students examine principally British Literature and prepare for the challenges of college writing with preparations in literary analysis, critical thinking, and research. Studies from diverse voices focus on Asian-American literature. Students build upon grammar and usage skills and continue to study vocabulary in literary context. Students place works in historical context and grow in their understanding of literary forms such as the epic, satire, persuasion, and poetic forms with an emphasis on biblical principles. Students demonstrate leadership in discussions and classroom presentations. Students produce a Literary Research Paper and summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

Heritage Studies Students study American Literature and History to meet the English and Social Studies requirements for grade eleven. Students study the cultural and ethnic diversity of our rich heritage to acknowledge American’s imperfections and honor her greatness. Students examine the origin and development of American experiences in the study of literature, culture, politics, economics, and religious systems. Study focuses on historical documents, key individuals and events and their relation to biblical principles. Students produce in a variety of rhetorical modes

8

33

1 semester Computer .50 credit 4 January/May Term experiences .25 credit each


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Speech I Students develop confidence in oral communication. Students gather, analyze, and express ideas for formal speeches, to explain, persuade, demonstrate and motivate and present in less formal presentations and discussions. Students build self confidence before groups, understand strategies that give speakers control and confidence. Students learn speech writing techniques, research techniques, and support one another during this time of growth. .5 Crd

English 12 Honors This course provides challenge and rigor beyond English 12. Students examine principally British Literature, as well as one Asian-American voice, a world masterpiece, and study poetry in depth. Students prepare for the challenges of college writing using literary analysis, critical thinking, and the research method. Students hone skills for the SAT II Literature and Writing tests. Students place works in historical context and grow in their understanding of literary forms such as the epic, satire, drama, persuasion, and poetic forms through the lens of biblical principles. Students produce a Literary Research Paper and summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Honors 1 Crd

Creative Writing Students explore various genres of written expression with instruction in prose, nonfiction, drama, and poetry. Students receive instruction that emphasizes the creative process and experimentation with elements of a variety of rhetorical modes. Growing as a writer, taking risks into new forms, and revising are all encouraged. .5 Crd

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition (12th) This course challenges the most capable student to master skills necessary for success on the A.P. English Literature & Composition Exam of the College Board. The study, organized around thematic issues, genres, historical movements, or literary devices, spans literature from classic to contemporary pieces of literary merit. Literature focus includes World, British, Asian-American, and in-depth poetry studies. Students write for academic purpose and to grasp both technical devices and thematic issues, discuss interpretive issues, and use research methods and MLA format. The course promotes mastery of a mature writing style including a strong voice, few or no significant errors in conventions of writing and ability to use figurative language to personal purpose. Student writing meets a standard that requires apt and specific reference to text and shows fluency, insight, and eloquence. Particularly relevant to college bound students is further work in the research method and aligned skills for the SAT II Literature and Writing tests. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

Journalism Journalism introduces students to reporting, news writing, copy editing, layout and design, and media publication. Students produce two publications: the yearbook and newspaper. Topics include history of journalism in America and its presence in the 21st century including the role of media in life and culture. Students produce writing for informational, critical, editorial, interview, and blog purposes. Students integrate technology in the journalist process for the online newspaper where articles are updated weekly by lead and content editors. To produce the yearbook students compose, edit, and design layouts using specific software. Editors monitor progress, meet deadlines and finish by spring. Students sell advertising, calculate and monitor a budget and collaborate to produce the product. 1 Crd Drama I Students work independently and cooperatively to practice essential elements of dramatic arts, to produce and design technical production elements, to research the history of theater, to analyze and create scenes, and to develop verbal and physical skills to create characters. Students actively participate and divide time between theater knowledge and acting skills, and construct and decorate actual productions. .5 Crd

English Language Learners This course is open only to students who seek to gain fluency in English and adapt to the school expectations for reading, writing, and speaking English. ELL is an adapted version of English 9 for those international students for whom English is not their native language. It focuses on essential curriculum concepts of reading comprehension including full-length novels, adapted writing instruction, and academic vocabulary acquisition, including the rules of Standard American English grammar, mechanics, and usage. The course serves to create an English language foundation for ELL students entering the CHCA community at any level and supports adaptation into non-ELL English classes the following year. 1 Crd

32

9


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

MATHEMATICS

TECHNOLOGY

Vision Mathematics is one tool by which we better understand God’s precise, orderly, and sometimes mysterious creation. As a result of a CHCA mathematics education, students will value mathematics and develop proficiency in the use of mathematics. Proficiency in mathematics learning refers to conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, strategic competence, and adaptive reasoning. [Adding it Up, National Research Council, 2001] Students experience instruction based on Standards for Mathematical Practice. [http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards/mathematics] Students express an understanding of concepts using a variety of methods and media. Developmentally appropriate instruction challenges and supports students.

Vision As a result of a CHCA education students will implement Technology to conduct research, to promote productivity, to perform basic operations, to communicate, and to enhance problem-solving and decision-making. Students will practice responsible use of technology mindful of the ethical and social issues impacted by biblical principles surrounding this medium. Both academic and personal use of technology will extend the students’ environment and spheres of influence. Students will understand the benefits and cautions that technology now presents us with in the 21st century. CHCA understands that leadership development is predicated not only upon moral principles, discipleship, and collaborative social interaction, but also upon facility in communication, gathering resources, creativity, problem-solving and decision-making, all of which technology aids. Technology literacy of all students is a goal of Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy.

Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Mathematics in courses Algebra I and beyond: Know and apply the concepts of l Number and Quantity l Algebra l Functions l Geometry l Statistics and Probability l Modeling. Standards of Mathematical Practice K-12: l Be mathematical problem solvers l Reason and construct mathematical arguments l Communicate mathematically l See connections within mathematics and to other subject areas l Look for and make use of structure and patterns. Theological Integration: l See God’s orderliness and mystery reflected in mathematics. Sequence (note pre-requisites for courses in descriptions) 9 10 11 Algebra I CP Geometry CP Algebra II CP Geometry VT

Algebra II VT

12 College Algebra Functions & Trig Pre-Calculus CP College Algebra Statistics A.P. Statistics

Geometry CP

Algebra II CP

Functions & Trig

Statistics Pre-Calculus CP

Geometry VT

Algebra II VT

Pre-Calculus CP Pre-Calculus VT A.P. Statistics

Statistics A.P. Statistics A.P. Calculus Calculus

Functions & Trig Pre-Calculus CP Pre-Calculus VT

Pre-Calculus CP Statistics A.P. Statistics

Statistics Calculus A.P. Calculus

A.P. Statistics Pre-Calculus CP Functions & Trig

Pre-Calculus VT Statistics Pre-Calculus CP

A.P. Calculus Calculus A.P. Statistics

Algebra II CP

Algebra II VT

Required for graduation: students graduating 2013 and before 3 Crd in Math. Recommended: four years, 4 Crd. Students graduating 2014 and beyond 4 Crd in Math, which must include Algebra II, required for Ohio diploma.

10

Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Technology l Demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology l Use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others l Apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information l Use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources l Understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior l Demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations. [Informed by International Society for Technology in Education - National Educational Technology Standards for Students, 2007] Sequence Required for graduation: .5 Crd in Computer Technology. All courses have keyboarding ability as a prerequisite. Enrichments/Highlights: Create videos, brochures, artwork, graphics, yearbook cover, school planners, t-shirts for admission and advancement offices of CHCA; design school calendar.

TECHNOLOGY

Layout & Design I, II Students use Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 gaining competence in the technical skills needed to execute the capabilities of the products. Students work with the art department to incorporate design using computers. May serve as fine art or computer credit. Each semester. .5 Crd

Computer Applications In this beginning course students use the computer as a tool to solve problems. Students create and modify text and visual information; students work in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, use peripherals such as digital still and video cameras, use the scanner and apply skills in computer graphics, word processing, database, spreadsheets, page layout, and presentation tools. .5 Crd

Adobe Flash Students employ Flash authoring skills to design animations, games, web graphics, and movies. Flash allows students to create vector based interactive web movies integrated with other classes. Students integrate their skills and ideas, content and purposes from other classes to create end products. .5 Crd

Video Editing Students work with the MacIntosh computers in Final Cut Pro software and use the digital video cameras to film and edit videos. Students are responsible for creating videos to use for school chapel and other events related to the school. .5 Crd

31


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 The above sequence represents choices at each grade level based on the student’s grade nine course. Courses taken prior to grade nine will inform student placement. Credits toward the required number for graduation are counted beginning in grade nine, conversely, courses taken prior to grade nine will be used for placement only, no credit.

Dance as Physical Education In this one semester course students learn the basics of ballet, jazz, modern, tap, musical theater, and Latin dance forms. Students participate in daily dance exercise focusing on the use of dance for physical fitness. No experience necessary. All welcome. 25 Crd

Advanced Topics in Math course available to students who complete AP Statistics and AP Calculus BC. Enrichments/Highlights: All math courses provide grade-level appropriate preparation for the PLAN, Ohio Graduation Test, PSAT, and SAT. Each course also incorporates real world applications through the use of graphing calculators, Computer Based Laboratory (CBL), and other computer technology. Math classes make connections to science concepts where appropriate. The Math Department sponsors a chapter of Mu Alpha Theta, a math honor society for students who excel in mathematics. Students are provided opportunities to participate in competitive events including the Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics math tournament, AMC competition, and the National Assessment and Testing Competitions. MATHEMATICS

Algebra II College Prep Algebra II is a study of functions through algebraic and graphical approaches. This course encompasses the following topics: applications of linear functions; quadratic and polynomial functions; rational expressions; logarithms and exponents; trigonometry; conic sections; matrices; transformations of functions. Students use graphing technology to discover relationships between symbolic and graphical representations. (p/r: alg I & geometry) 1 Crd

Algebra I College Prep Algebra I is a foundational course for future mathematics and science courses. This course explores topics using a function approach and seeks to make connections between symbolic and graphical representations. Topics include: solving linear equalities, inequalities, and systems; solving quadratic equations and inequalities; simplifying polynomial, rational, and exponential expressions and working with their equations and graphs. (p/r: pre-alg) 1 Crd

Algebra II VT Algebra II VT is designed to pursue higher intellectual engagement through challenging and academically rigorous explorations. This courses includes the same topics as Algebra II and extends the scope of those topics. This extension is accomplished through critical analysis of the complex relationships between concepts and theoretical examination of topics. This is well suited to students who enjoy the abstract nature of mathematics. (p/r alg I & geometry) Honors 1 Crd

Geometry College Prep Students explore plane figures and their properties in this study of Euclidean geometry. Students study relationships between congruent and similar figures, study and use deductive and inductive logic to understand the structure of geometry, and use technology to discover relationships. Topics include: plane figures and their properties, transformational geometry, coordinate geometry, right triangle trigonometry, area and volume. (p/r: alg I) 1 Crd

College Algebra This course helps students formalize algebraic and geometric ideas and introduces students to mathematical concepts not traditionally addressed in Calculus-bound mathematics courses. Topics include: linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions and the algebraic manipulations and geometric representations of those functions; graph theory; linear programming; coding; social choice; voting methods; and game theory. The course serves students anticipating a non-mathematics college major, not requiring a pre-calculus course. (p/r: senior standing and teacher approval, alg II & geometry) 1 Crd

Geometry VT In Geometry VT students pursue higher intellectual engagement through challenging and academically rigorous explorations. Included are the same topics as Geometry providing opportunities for discovery and proof of conjectures. Students discover the need for clear, concise forms of communication to prove mathematical conjectures. (p/r: alg I) Honors 1 Crd

30

11


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 inference; confirming models. Students explore and analyze data through the use of technology and various software. Students take the A.P. Statistics Exam in the spring. (p/r: alg II) 1 Crd

Functions and Trigonometry This course helps students make connections within and between algebraic and geometric concepts before taking pre-calculus. Students explore problems numerically, algebraically, and graphically. Through collections and study of data, and use of technology, students connect algebraic and geometric concepts to real life. This course includes the following topics: polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations and inequalities; conic sections; matrices; and sequences. (p/r: alg. II & geometry) 1 Crd

Pre-Calculus VT Pre-Calculus VT is designed to pursue higher intellectual engagement through challenging and academically rigorous explorations. This course includes the same topics as Pre-Calculus and extends the scope of those topics through critical analysis and theoretical examination of relationships between concepts. Students use technology to examine applications to physics and other real life situations. (p/r: geometry, alg. II) Honors 1 Crd

Pre-Calculus College Prep Pre-Calculus lays the foundation for the study of calculus. A calculator-based graphing approach is used to explore functions. Using graphs, students find characteristics of graphs such as extrema, domain, range, and limits of the function. Students graph using transformations. Properties of exponential, logarithmic, rational, and trigonometric functions are specifically studied. Students explore problems numerically, algebraically, and graphically. The study includes applications of matrices, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. (p/r: geometry, alg II) 1 Crd

Calculus Calculus is designed to prepare students for success in a college Calculus course. This course focuses on the concepts of limits, derivatives, and integrals and the relationships between the concepts. Students work with concrete examples and hands-on explorations to understand the methods and applications of each concept. Students use technology to explore concepts, confirm results, and produce models. (p/r: pre-calc) 1 Crd

Statistics Course is a year-long introduction to Statistics. Students use technological methods, including calculators and computer software to explore and analyze data. Students work independently and cooperatively to understand and make statistical inferences rather than calculating answers from memorized formulas. Students predict patterns in data through the use of probability modeling and simulation. Students participate in cooperative learning with other disciplines to develop projects related to everyday activities. This course is designed for students interested in exploring other branches of mathematics and is ideally suited to students interested in non-mathematics intensive college majors. Topics include: exploring data by observing patterns and departures; determining what and how to measure; anticipating patterns by introducing probability and simulations; and statistical inference using confirming models.(p/r: alg II or pre-calc) 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Calculus AB - BC A.P. Calculus provides college level work in calculus, providing the equivalent of one semester of college calculus. This course encompasses the concept of limits, derivatives, integrals, and the relationships between each concept. Additionally students may explore polynomial approximations and series. Students use technology to explore concepts, confirm results, and produce models. Precise communication of mathematical ideas both in written and oral form is a focus of this course. This course is well suited to students who enjoy the abstract nature of mathematics. (p/r: success in pre-calc & alg II) 1 Crd Advanced Topics in Mathematics This year long course is intended for students who have completed AP Statistics and AP Calculus BC. The course grade is weighted as Advanced Placement. Course topics are selected based on the interests of the enrolled students and the instructor. Topics from which the instructor will choose include introductory topics in Number Theory and Abstract Algebra with an emphasis on understanding and using rigorous proof techniques. Additionally, topics from Multivariable Calculus may be selected to extend students’ experiences in single variable Calculus. (p/r: completion of AP stats and AP calc BC) weighted as AP level 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Statistics A.P. Statistics provides college level work in statistics, providing the equivalent of one semester of non-calculus based statistics. Topics include:: exploring data: observing patterns and departures from patterns, planning a study; deciding what and how to measure, anticipating patterns in advance; introducing probability, simulation, and statistical

12

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 PHYSICAL EDUCATION Vision Above all, Physical Education at CHCA reflects the high value God places on human life and the respect we have for each person in God’s community. Activities offer opportunities for spiritual growth where students are encouraged to explore how Christ would react. CHCA physical education helps students develop in cognitive, psychomotor, affective, and spiritual domains. The program and teaching faculty provide an environment that recognizes individual potential and encourages leadership and participation. Students grow in an understanding of rules, safety, and strategies of games and activities and develop skills and abilities through participation in a variety of team and individual activities. Physical Education incorporates the importance of health-enhancing, lifelong fitness. Students use their God-given gifts to engage in teamwork, individual achievement and physical fitness activities equipping them with a sense of self-esteem and sportsmanship to participate in a diverse society. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Physical Education: l Exhibit responsible personal, social, cooperative, and Christian behavior that respects self and others in physical activity settings l Demonstrate competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities l Demonstrate understand of movement concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics as they apply to learning/performing physical activities l Participate regularly in, and understand the costs and benefits of health-enhancing physical activities l Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness l Engage in physical activity as it provides the opportunity for enjoyment, challenge, self expression, and social interaction. Sequence Required for graduation: .5 Crd (two semesters) in Physical Education. Students may sequence Physical Education courses in any order. Effective April 2007 the Ohio Legislature SB311 reads: “…each chartered nonpublic school may adopt a policy to excuse from the high school physical education requirement each student who, during high school, has participated in interscholastic athletics, marching band, or cheerleading for at least two full seasons. If the board or authority adopts such a policy, the board or authority shall not require the student to complete any physical education course as a condition to graduate. However, the student shall be required to complete one-half unit, consisting of at least sixty hours of instruction, in another course of study.” (adopted 4-07 CHCA Board of Trustees) Students graduating 2014 and beyond may not use physical education courses as electives.

Physical Education: Team & Individual Sports This course combines skills to develop improved performance in selected games, sports, and fitness activities. Flag football, soccer, volleyball, and basketball are some examples of team sports. Badminton and tennis are examples of individual sports. The course promotes training and conditioning which increases endurance, strength, and flexibility. Students demonstrate safe, responsible behavior and practice good sportsmanship. This course leads students to view sports and physical activities as a means to bring honor and glory to God. .25 Crd

Weight Training and Fitness Students work independently and cooperatively to analyze, develop, and experience specific training techniques. Students work to increase strength, flexibility, speed, quickness, and power. Recreational games and activities will promote cardiovascular fitness. Students set goals and work toward achieving them during the course. Students learn to assess their personal health fitness relative to fitness standards. This course stresses proper safety techniques. Students are taught to recognize the body as a temple of God and to accept personal responsibility for a healthy lifestyle. .25 Crd

29


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

HEALTH

SCIENCE

Vision As a result of a CHCA health education, students will make informed decisions within a Christian perspective about personal, community, and global health issues. Students receive instruction in mental, physical, social, and spiritual health. Students are encouraged and guided to develop positive self-esteem, to accept themselves and others, to handle stress, to solve problems, and to exercise leadership. By learning about body systems, nutrition, exercise and by practicing physical activities students embrace health allied to physical fitness as a lifelong goal. Social health includes working within diverse relationships to share feelings with friends, family, and peers. Spiritual health places Christ at the center of a Christian’s life. Students are encouraged to seek physical, mental, and social challenges in life utilizing faith-informed, responsible choices

Vision Science is a method of inquiry founded upon the order of the natural world and the design of its Creator, and in addition, science is an ongoing process that is limited as an investigative tool. Students become responsible, independent, questioning, creative, and organized learners moving from curiosity to familiarity, then mastery of scientific skills, processes, concepts, and theories. Students explore the various disciplines of science through an organized progression of class presentations, hands-on activities, and laboratory investigations that emphasize scientific processes and develop critical thinking skills. Students recognize that science integrates with mathematics, technology, written language, consumer and career interests. Resulting from scientific knowledge, students come to acknowledge personal responsibility as stewards to care for humanity and conserve resources for the glory of God.

Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Health: l Explain key elements to maintain mental and emotional health l Demonstrate in conversation the relationship of individual health to family health l Explain the fundamental concepts of growth and development l Recognize key elements to maintain and promote personal health l Recognize and apply essential concepts about nutrition and diet l Recognize aspects of substance use and abuse l Explain essential concepts about the prevention and control of disease l Locate the availability and list effective use of health services, products, and information l Explain practices concerning injury prevention and safety l Accept personal responsibility for seeking total health for self and others through recognizing God’s plan for human life.

Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Science: Scientific Inquiry and Application l Observe and identify questions that can be investigated about the natural world l Generate and evaluate scientific evidence and explanations using the scientific method, models, mathematics, and appropriate technology l Distinguish scientific evidence from opinion and exhibit critical thought to distinguish between fact, myth, and theory l Understand the nature and development of scientific knowledge l Participate productively in scientific practices and discourse l Practice safe and appropriate use of scientific instruments, materials, equipment, and procedures In Physical, Life, Earth and Space Science l Exhibit knowledge of the historical development in science l Understand the unifying concepts and processes of science: systems, organization, rules of evidence, models, explanations, measurement, change, equilibrium, and structure-function relationships l Identify questions and apply skills, concepts and processes to construct further knowledge and understanding using inquiry-based investigations In Theological Integration l Recognize that science plays a profound role in personal and social perspectives relating to natural resources, environmental quality, health, hazards, and global challenges utilizing the biblical directive to be good stewards from a scientific and Christian perspective l Recognize that science is a human endeavor where people interpret scientific knowledge and ethical conduct based on historical context and their personal faith and beliefs l Understand God’s revelation in such verses as: “Ever since the creation of the world His invisible nature, namely, His eternal power and deity, has been clearly perceived in the things that have been made.” [Rom 1:19-20] As well: Gen.1,2; Job 38-41; Psalm 19:1-6; Psalm 24:1-2.

Sequence Required for graduation: .5 Crd in Health. Health may be taken in grade 9, 10, 11, or 12. Enrichments/Highlights: Students become CPR certified unless taking this course off site.

responsible food choices; the body’s need for nutrients; health and diet; weight control and eating disorders; substance use and abuse. Social health topics include: a child’s relationship with parents; development of friendships; puberty; dating relationships; sexually transmitted diseases; abstinence; the marriage relationship. Students discuss Christ’s teaching as it relates to all facets of health. Students who meet this required course through online or off site instruction do not necessarily receive the same topics. .5 Crd

Health The Health course presents students with methods to ease the transition from the role of a child to the role of an independent adult. The study of Health encourages useful decisions within the Christian perspective about personal, community, and global health issues. Mental health topics include: building and maintaining self-esteem; taking personal responsibility; understanding personal and emotional needs; examining personality components and some disorders; strategies to cope with stress; setting goals; managing time. Physical health topics include: making

Sequence 9 Biology Biology VT

10 Chemistry Chemistry VT

11 Physics Physics VT Environmental Science 1 & 2 Anatomy & Physiology A.P. Biology A.P. Chemistry A.P. Environmental

12 Physics Physics VT Environmental Science 1 & 2 Anatomy & Physiology A.P. Biology A.P. Chemistry A.P. Environmental A.P. Physics B Required for graduation: 3 Crd in science: one course from each of the following: Biology or Biology VT; Chemistry or Chemistry VT; Physics or Physics VT (Honors) Recommended 4 Crd in Science. Electives Anatomy & Physiology AP Chemistry Environmental 1 & 2 A.P. Biology A.P. Physics B A.P. Environmental Science Enrichments/Highlights: Data collection and analysis using CBL, Organelle Project, Various Dissections, Rocket Project, Center of Mass Project, Miniature Golf Project, “Physics Commentator” Sports Video Project, Field Trips to and speakers from Industry/Hospitals; Science Olympiad, Robotics Team, Math/Science Day at Kings Island.

28

13


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 SCIENCE

through guided inquiry, explorative research, and cooperative learning. (p/r: or concurrent with alg. II VT, pre-calc/pre-calc VT) Honors 1 Crd

Biology Students are introduced to basic biological principles and life processes. Students investigate living organisms from the simplest to the most complex forms of life in their natural environment. The course includes dissection labs. Topics include: organic / biochemistry principles; cell structure / function; production/use of energy; ecosystems; genetics; evolution and geologic time lines; food webs; zoology and body systems in detailed dissection of pigs, frogs, sampling of in/vertebrates. Students prepare for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in science. 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Chemistry Advanced Placement Chemistry is equivalent to a first year college chemistry program. It is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam in Chemistry. Topics include atomic theory, the periodic law and properties, gas laws, properties of solutions; solubility, chemical bonding, molecular structure; intermolecular forces, molecular kinetics and equilibria, acid-base equilibria; electrochemistry; thermodynamics. Students take the A.P. Chemistry Exam. (p/r: chem. VT.) 1 Crd

Biology VT Students admitted using teacher recommendation and evidence of strong reading skills. Course challenges students to think scientifically, to integrate concepts, to analyze data, and to explore complex issues. The molecular approach investigates concepts of biology with a focus on the nature and methods of science. Major emphases include genetics, cell biology, development, systematics, behavior, and immunology. Course includes pre-AP strategies such as drawing inferences, asking questions at the application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation levels, using double-entry journals and synthesizing varying perspectives. Topics from the Ohio Graduation Test also covered. Honors 1 Crd

Anatomy and Physiology Students engage in comprehensive study of each of the body systems in human anatomy/physiology. Topics include: organization of the body; systems that cover and support the body; systems that control communication; systems that transport and protect; metabolic processing systems; and cycle of life. This course prepares students for pursuing careers in allied health fields and other diverse disciplines such as physical education, art, psychology, or anthropology. Students study the structure and function of the human body using prior knowledge from courses in biology and chemistry. (p/r: bio and chem) 1 Crd

Chemistry Students are introduced to the chemical and technological issues confronting our world. Lecture and laboratory periods focus on problem solving techniques. Emphasis is placed on the application and practical use of chemical concepts and their impact on the environment. Topics include: history of science; introduction to chemistry and matter; organization of matter; nomenclature; phases of matter; properties of gases; solutions, acids, bases, pH, and titration; thermochemistry; molecular structure and bonding; chemical reactions; organic chemistry; descriptive chemistry; and nuclear chemistry. Students prepare for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in science. (p/r: alg.I) 1 Crd

Investigations in Environmental Science 1 A one semester elective course explores interdisciplinary topics with focus on earth systems, resource management and water systems. Lecture, classroom discussion, case studies, and field work give students varied learning contexts. Topics include scientific and political issues related to the environment and the role of science in contemporary society. Students will reflect on and distinguish between scientific evidence and personal values in a perspective as future Christian leaders. The course is suited to students seeking a non-AP elective. (p/r bio & chem.) .5 Crd

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 VISUAL FINE ARTS

Ceramics Students explore various hand-constructed and wheel-thrown ceramic techniques. Form and function are integral components of the student’s in class production. Students use creative / design problem solving and demonstration of skill. (p/r gen art) .5 Crd

General Art Students study foundational elements and principles of art/design. Topics include color, value, line, space, shape, form, and texture. Design principles include rhythm, balance, proportion, emphasis, variety, and unity. A Discipline Based Art Education approach is used to insure students receive well-rounded visual arts education. .5 Crd

Stained Glass Course presents intensive study of stained glass, its limitations and expressions through student investigations in various techniques and procedures common to material. Final piece is an aanraku style table lantern. (p/r gen art) .5 Crd

Studio Art I and II Students explore their creativity through larger scale, more intense endeavors than in General Art. Project based, the class focuses on media and technique. Studio Art II tailored to student interests. Suited to students not aspiring to Advanced Placement. (p/r gen art with 75% + ) .5 Crd/sem

Advanced Placement Art Studio Students work independently to apply Christian values, integrity, and ethical use of the media and their talents. Students produce either a Drawing portfolio, 2D Design portfolio, or 3D Design portfolio evaluated on three aspects: Quality of five works, Concentration that shows a series of works organized around a compelling visual concept with twelve digital images, and Breadth where twelve digital images show works that each demonstrate a variety of concepts, media, and approaches. Work submitted to AP program for evaluation in May. Teacher recommendation. (p/r gen art) 1 Crd

Photography Students receive instruction in the proper use of camera and how to compose a good picture. Aspects of composition and camera use produce desired effects in a traditional darkroom setting. Photo history and famous photographers are introduced. (p/r gen art) .5 Crd Layout and Design I and II Each a one semester interdisciplinary graphic design course where students produce in a variety of design techniques that encompass free-hand drawing with computer enhancement using Adobe Creative Suite as software design tools. Students enter knowing basic computer applications. (p/r gen art) .5 Crd/sem

Drawing Students study and produce using various drawing techniques. Media include graphite, charcoal white, charcoal, and ink. Works focus on observation / still life setups, contour drawing, value and gesture drawing. Aesthetic awareness grows by experimenting with techniques and renderings from realism to non-objective art. .5 Crd

Investigations in Environmental Science 2 A one semester elective course explores interdisciplinary topics with focus on energy resources and consumption, pollution, waste management and global change. Lecture, classroom discussion, case studies, and field work give students varied learning contexts. Topics include scientific and political issues related to the environment and the role of science in contemporary society. Students will reflect on

Chemistry VT Students admitted with teacher recommendation, PLAN scores, math placement and OGT diagnostics. Topics parallel Chemistry; increased depth and breadth particularly in molecular structure and bonding, equilibria, kinetics, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Approach is

14

27


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

VISUAL FINE ARTS Vision CHCA Visual Fine Arts is designed to nurture and develop the student’s God-given desire to create and appreciate the aesthetic beauty in God’s universe. Students use value judgments to make decisions about art that honors God and shows appreciation for God’s handiwork and its effect on their lives. Through various processes, students will become aware how art relates to other areas of study. Students examine the human experience through their own creativity, through art history as an expression of culture and through the use of visual mediums, technology, literature, and God’s Word. Students experience and gain skill with the various art processes to gain confidence in their ability and grow in their aesthetic sense. Students value cultural diversity through the knowledge of the visual arts. Visual Fine Arts prepares students to acknowledge their God-given talents and to pursue with confidence opportunities and challenges set before them. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Visual Fine Arts: l Develop visual awareness of God’s creation in order to produce an individual artistic awareness l Make Christ-centered judgments about art l Make connections between the visual arts, the other fine and performing arts and other disciplines outside the arts l Apply media, techniques, and processes related to the visual arts l Use the elements and principles of visual organization l Choose from a range of subject matter, symbols, icons, and potential ideas in visual arts l Relate the visual arts to history and culture l Value the characteristics and merits of one’s own artwork and expression and appreciate the artwork of others l Develop knowledge of aesthetics and art criticism. Sequence 9 General Art – p/r for all others Studio Art I & II after general art semester Layout and Design I & II Photography Stained Glass Ceramics Drawing

10

11

General Art

General Art

12 General Art

Studio Art I & II after general art semester

Studio Art I & II after general art semester

Studio Art I & II after general art semester

Layout and Design I & II

Layout and Design I & II

Layout and Design I & II

Photography

Photography

Photography

Stained Glass

Stained Glass

Stained Glass

Ceramics

Ceramics

Ceramics

Drawing

Drawing

Drawing

A.P. Art Studio

A.P. Art Studio

A.P. Art Studio

Required for graduation: students graduating 2013 and before 2 semesters of Fine Art (Visual, Music, Drama, Dance as Fine Art) ; students graduating 2014 and beyond 1 semester of Fine Art grades 9-12.

Enrichments/Highlights: Field trips; shows; competitions.

and distinguish between scientific evidence and personal values in a perspective as future Christian leaders. The course is suited to students seeking a non-AP elective. (p/r bio & chem.) .5 Crd

energy transformations; genetics, molecular genetics, heredity, evolutionary biology theory; organisms and populations, principles of taxonomy, survey of the five kingdoms; animal structures and functions; and ecology. (p/r: bio VT and chem. VT) 1 Crd

Physics Required of all students graduating 2011 and thereafter. Physics presents the fundamental principles of physical science and its foundational concepts and operations governing matter, energy. and their interconversion on systems ranging from subatomic to galactic scales. The principles are conservation of energy, momentum, charge, and mass; laws of motion; law of universal gravitation; work/energy theorem; forces; waves; fields. Careful design and analysis of many lab activities lead to understanding these ideas. Topics include: mechanics, properties of matter, thermodynamics, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, modern physics, nuclear reactions, and the study of the universe. Whereas honors physics emphasizes physics tools and their mathematical integration, physics focuses on conceptual understanding. Course includes real world analogies and clear explanations, focusing on qualitative questions and algebraic problems. (p/r: concurrent with algebra II). 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Environmental Science The course includes topics: earth systems and resources; the living world; population; land and water use; energy resources and consumption; pollution; and global change. Students explore the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world and draws upon various scientific disciplines. Students analyze and interpret information and experimental data including mathematical calculations. Students identify and analyze environmental problems to evaluate the ecological and human health risks associated with these problems and the solutions for resolving or preventing them. Laboratory and/or field investigations are included. Students' roles as Christian Leaders will integrate with their studies. (p/r bio VT, chem. VT, phys VT) 1 Crd Advanced Placement Physics B A.P. Physics B is an extension of the Physics VT course in both content and depth. Topics include both classical and modern physics. Knowledge of algebra and basic trigonometry is required. The basic ideas of calculus are introduced related to physical concepts such as work, position, velocity and acceleration. A major goal is for students to apply their understanding of the principles to solve problems. Principles include Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics, thermal physics, electricity, magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. (p/r: honors physics and pre-calc) 1 Crd

Physics VT VT refers to the Vertical Team skills preparation for taking College Board Advanced Placement Physics. If taken in grade 12 this course awards honors weight. The course presents the fundamental principles of physical science and its foundational concepts and operations governing the interaction of matter and energy. This course prepares successful students for Advanced Placement Physics B. The principles are conservation of energy, momentum, charge, and mass; laws of motion; universal gravitation; work/ energy theorem; forces; impulse; waves, fields. Careful design and analysis of many lab activities lead to understanding these ideas. Topics include: kinematics and dynamics, properties of matter, vectors, rotational motion, heat, thermal energy, thermodynamics, waves, sound, light, optics, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics, nuclear reactions, and the study of the universe. (p/r: concurrent with pre-calc) Honors 1 Crd Advanced Placement Biology Students cover material equivalent to freshman college Biology. Students prepare for the Advanced Placement Exam in Biology; therefore classes meet some double periods. Laboratories are crucial to each unit of study. Topics include: molecules and cells, biological chemistry,

26

15


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 SOCIAL STUDIES Vision Students acquire an awareness and understanding of the world, its people, and its history and investigate ways the past may influence the present. Within the diverse range of Christian perspective, students explore patterns of human and environmental interaction through history, geography, government, and economics, aware of the interconnectedness of these disciplines. Just as Luke recognized the importance of firsthand accounts in understanding historical events: Luke 1:1-2, “Many people have done their best to write a report of things that have taken place from the beginning,” so too, student learning in the social studies focuses on primary and secondary sources. Technology surrounds students and aids all facets of the learning and presentation process. Students apply Christian principles to examine past and present, local, state, national, and global events, and relationships between these events. Students develop an appreciation for a personal heritage and cultural differences as they evaluate their role and responsibility in God’s creation. Students grow in their ability as Christian citizens to bring reasoned decision-making to a culturally diverse, democratic society, and to a fallen world. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Social Studies: In History: l Develop increasingly precise concepts of time: past, present, and future l Locate, research, analyze, and interpret both primary and secondary sources to draw conclusions l Identify characteristics of civilizations including cities, central governments, religion, job specialization, social classes, arts, public works, and a writing system l Demonstrate knowledge of the significant persons and events of history including characteristics of historical periods l Apply patterns of continuity, irregularity, and attributed or possible purpose in historical events to an understanding of history l Identify and analyze causes and catalysts of change l Identify and apply ways peoples and institutions value cultural diversity l Develop a historical perspective and awareness of bias. In Government l Recognize the need for government as comparing to rules of behavior to establish order in families, classrooms, and organizations l Trace the historical development and structure of the United States Constitution, the division of roles in the federal system, the political processes of the United States government l Identify and apply the roles, rights, and responsibilities of US citizenship in various contexts. l Locate areas of citizen participation in government l Recognize different government systems of the world. In Economics: l Understand economic concepts of scarcity and opportunity cost, price, supply and demand, unemployment and income, savings, investment, and interest rates l Achieve financial literacy so the individual can use knowledge and skills to manage limited financial resources for lifetime financial security l Exercise economic decision making as the student is consumer, producer, saver, investor, and citizen so as to analyze costs and benefits in various contexts l Demonstrate understanding of the United States Government’s role in US fiscal and monetary policy l Identify characteristics of different global economic systems and patterns of economic interdependence on earth. In Geography: l Explain the relationship, both positive and negative, between the human and natural environment l Choose from various tools to understand the earth’s geography and research, compare and contrast characteristics of places, regions, and human processes, migrations and cultural traits l Access, read, interpret, and create maps and geographic representations l Apply concepts of global development and economic interdependence to identify and analyze environmental issues. In Theological Integration: l Use a Christian theological perspective to understand how the study of social studies and history affects the way we think, live, and learn l Apply the theological framework of intellectual learning that makes no topic beyond discussion l Discuss and apply the role of a Christian citizen in a democratic society and global community l Apply what would be the spectrum of Christian theological perspective to world events l Recognize that a theological perspective combines faith and learning. In 21st Century Skills: l Demonstrate creativity, critical thinking, problem solving, communication and collaboration skills and use technology resources to learn and to share learning.

16

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 MUSIC FINE ARTS

Lab Band This ensemble studies different styles of jazz and early rock. The band performs with the pep band and concert band; students also study and perform a wide variety of jazz charts. Emphasis is to develop individual technique and gain knowledge of music theory, history, performance practices, and musical genres. Students develop stage presence, performance etiquette, and contribute to larger musical productions. Requires prior music experience; private lessons are encouraged. Performance venues include school concerts and football games. Audition required 1 Crd

Percussion Ensemble/Steel Drum Band This ensemble is for percussionists and those who desire to study steel drums. During football season students study drum line and perform at home games. Students develop instrumental technique and knowledge of music theory, history, and performance practices. All welcome. 1 Crd Encore Students are encouraged to further develop their musical confidence and presentation. The focus is on building skills that involve solo and group singing in various musical styles. Choreography is combined with selected songs. Students continue in the study of music theory, multicultural music, music history, and appreciation. Students exercise leadership and explore careers in music including opportunities to minister through music. Audition required. 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Music Theory AP Music Theory develops a student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. This is achieved through listening, sight singing, performance, written, compositional and analytical exercises. The course instills mastery of the rudiments and terminology of music, including hearing and notating: pitches, intervals, scales and keys, chords, metric organization, and rhythmic patterns. Basic concepts are addressed through listening to a variety of music, including music from a standard Western tonal repertoire and contemporary, jazz, popular music, and the music of nonwestern cultures. Content equips students to understand and appreciate music of their own time and various world cultures. Emphasis is on acquisition of correct notational skills. Students engage in melodic and harmonic dictation, composition of a bass line for a given melody, implying appropriate harmony, realization of a figured bass, realization of a Roman numeral progression, analysis of repertoire, including melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, and form, and sight-singing. The exam includes: Musical Terminology, Notational Skills, Basic Compositional Skills, Score Analysis (with or without aural stimulus), and Aural Skills. 1 Crd

Concert Choir Students learn proper vocal technique, basic sight-singing and musical skills emphasis on part-singing in a choral group. Performances include concerts, chapels, and outreach. All welcome. 1 Crd Electric Jazz Orchestra For the most advanced jazz performers, this ensemble performs jazz literature including swing, bebop, fusion, and rock. Emphasis is on developing individual technique and gaining knowledge of music theory, history, performance practices, and musical genres. Students also develop stage presence, performance etiquette, and contribute to larger musical productions. Frequent performances and end of year tour are highlights. Private lessons required. Audition required. Honors 1 Crd Symphony Orchestra/Concert Band This performance group includes ensemble for strings and winds and percussion. Students perform a broad range of orchestral works and literature for concert band with emphasis on developing individual technique and gaining knowledge of music theory, history, performance practices, and musical genres. Students develop stage presence, performance etiquette, and contribute to the larger musical productions. Requires prior music experience and private lessons are encouraged. All welcome. 1 Crd

Dance as Fine Art One semester course for .5 credit in fine arts or as an elective. Students learn and perform basics of multiple dance forms, research culture and history of dance forms, undergo written and performance assessment, view examples of professional dance and create individual choreography. No experience necessary. .5 Crd

25


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 MUSIC FINE ARTS Vision As a result of a CHCA Music Fine Arts education, students recognize that music is a gift from God and as such should be used to glorify and serve Him. Students are encouraged to develop a lifelong love of music through participation in performance and study. Growing from these studies is an appreciation of the diversity of musical experience, culture, Christian heritage, and an ability to evaluate both aural and written music for quality and to evaluate music and performances congruent with scriptural principles. Students pursue musical opportunities with confidence and knowledge. They engage competently in a variety of musical experiences both for academic and personal purposes demonstrating creativity, appreciation, and expression in a variety of situations. Audiences within and beyond the school provide opportunities for musical outreach. Students work cooperatively and responsively in groups demonstrating appropriate leadership and giving value to others’ work. Students receive challenge and support in pursuit of success in music. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Music Fine Arts: l Sing/Perform on instruments alone and with others a varied repertoire of music including selections of Christian story and praise l Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments l Compose music within specific guidelines l Read and notate music l Apply appropriate personal as well as Christ-centered evaluative criteria to music and musical performances that acknowledge music as an art form embracing diversity l Apply appropriate etiquette as an audience member and/or performer l Research and explain, using various technologies including print, electronic, and recordings, the relationship between music, history, and culture l Use music as a personal and interpersonal expression to honor God. Sequence Required for graduation: students graduating 2013 and before 2 semesters of Fine Art; students graduating 2014 and beyond 1 semester of Fine Art 1 grades 9-12. (Visual, Music, Dance as Fine Art). Music courses may be taken in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 schedule permitting. Enrichments/Highlights: Performances both locally and on national/international tours; performances in outreach and in conjunction with nationally known performers.

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Sequence 9 Western Civilization Western Studies

10 Government/Economics2 A.P. European History

11 U.S. History 1 Heritage Studies 1 A.P. U.S. History 1 A.P. European History A.P. Microeconomics2 Sociology (1 sem) East Asian History (1 sem) Media, Race, and Representation (1 sem)

Required for graduation 3 Crd. one course from each of the following: Western Civilization / Western Studies; Economics; Government; U.S. History. 1course meets U.S. History graduation requirement 2course meets financial literacy graduation requirement for students graduating 2014 and beyond. Electives: Courses beyond the graduation requirement. century. Students examine literature, culture, politics, economics, and religious systems. The course focuses on historical documents, key individuals and events and their relation to biblical principles. Students produce in a variety of rhetorical modes to analyze, evaluate and synthesize information, defend conclusions, and present findings. Students produce both expressive and academic prose and compile a writing portfolio. Students examine literary themes and their congruence to biblical principles. Research and written work adhere to MLA style, and students use various digital media and print sources in their research. Units of study are presented in an engaging multisensory manner. Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test as well as skills tested on the PSAT. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Meets grade nine English and Social Studies requirements. Double period. Honors 2 Crd

SOCIAL STUDIES Western Civilization Western Civilization surveys the history of the Western world from Greece to the Cold War of the 1950s-60s. Students study patterns of continuity and change and the cause and effect nature of historical events from a predominately Western perspective. Topics include: democracy formation in Ancient Greece and Rome; development of Christianity and Islam; Middle Ages, rise of modern nations; Renaissance and Reformation including art and intellectual mood; the Age of Monarchs, the Enlightenment, and the French, Russian, and Industrial Revolutions; exploration and imperialism; Depression of the 1930s, World Wars, and their aftermath. Students use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information for use in creative productions. Historically appropriate primary and secondary source analysis and novels serve as resources beyond the text. Students prepare for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in Social Studies. 1 Crd

Economics Economics provides students an overview of economic theories and principles. Both macro and micro economics are treated including such topics as: scarcity and opportunity cost; supply and demand; monetary, fiscal, and tax policy; personal and governmental budgeting; comparative economic systems; business structure and production choices; family budget project; online Stock Market Game to gather data and manage stock portfolios.

Western Studies Students study Western Civilization and Western Literature to meet both English and Social Studies requirements for grade nine. Students study patterns of continuity and change and the cause and effect nature of historical events primarily from a Western perspective. The study spans democracy in ancient Greece and Rome to the latter part of the twentieth

24

12 U.S. History1 A.P. Government A.P. U.S. History1 A.P. European History A.P. Microeconomics2 Sociology (1 sem) East Asian History (1 sem) Media, Race, and Representation (1 sem) Research in Politics (1 sem)

17


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Students use economic formulas to calculate real GDP, change in demand, and values of foreign currencies. This course meets the graduation requirement in financial literacy and includes those benchmarks: using budgets in personal economic decisions; income differences in labor markets; role of individuals as consumers, producers, savers, workers, investors; managing financial resources, budgets, savings, investments, credit and philanthropy; and how interest rates affect savers and borrowers. .5 Crd

including electoral laws and systems; institutions of the Congress, the Presidency, the Bureaucracy and the Federal Courts; public policy; and civil rights and civil liberties. Students who take the course during grade ten, prepare for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in social studies. 1 Crd United States History US History meets the 11th grade U.S. History requirement. Students survey our nation’s origins from the pre-Columbian era to the present, with emphasis on the 20th century. Topics include: development of cultural, political and religious systems; patterns of continuity and change; causal relationships of historical events; significant historical figures and their impact; intellectual, political, and reform movements; historically appropriate novels; primary and secondary source analysis. 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Microeconomics Students receive the equivalent of a one-semester introductory college course and prepare for success on the AP US Microeconomics Exam in the spring. The course includes principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. Primary emphasis is on the nature and functions of product markets, including the study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. This course meets the graduation requirement in financial literacy and those benchmarks: using budgets in personal economic decisions; income differences in labor markets; role of consumers, producers, savers, workers, investors; managing financial resources, budgets, savings, investments, credit and philanthropy; how interest rates affect savers and borrowers. 1 Crd

Heritage Studies Heritage Studies is a synthesis of U.S. History and American Literature. This program deepens students’ understanding of the two disciplines, increases their critical thinking and research skills, and teaches to all seven “intelligences” - linguistic, logical/mathematical, musical, bodily/kinesthetic, spatial, inter/intrapersonal. Activities include research, games, songs, crafts in a given time period, and analysis of cultural artifacts. Topics include: development of cultural, political and religious systems; patterns of continuity and change; causal relationships of historical events; significant historical figures and their impact; intellectual, political, artistic, and reform movements; primary and secondary source analysis. Students use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information as well as to present findings. Course satisfies the U.S. History graduation requirement. Double period. Social Studies & English credits. Honors 2 Crd

Government American Government is a survey course that explores the origins of the U.S. Government, its Judeo-Christian heritage, and its present status and functions. Topics include: foundation, structure, and function of government; comparison of different forms of governments to U.S.; rights and responsibilities of a citizen in a democracy; U.S. Constitution and the American legal system; Constitutional Convention project; statistical models to evaluate election returns; and changing laws and court cases. Students who take this course during grade ten, prepare for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in Social Studies. .5 Crd

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 various exercises and research. Students further develop vocabulary and ability in daily Chinese conversations. Language structure and foundational grammar are developed in written exercises, complex sentences and short paragraphs. More in-depth discussions of Chinese culture, history and social-economic environment are aided by multimedia. Honors 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Mandarin Chinese The course prepares students for success on the Advanced Placement exam in May. Students demonstrate proficiency across three communicative modes: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. The course addresses cultural competence, connections to other school disciplines, comparisons between Chinese language and culture and the learners’ language and culture, and the use of the language within the broader communities beyond the school. Both conventional print and aural materials give variety to language learning and various forms of communication in print, media, cultural situations present interest to the student. Students develop Chinese handwriting skills and word processing skills in Hanyu Pinyin or Bopomofo. 1 Crd

Mandarin Chinese III This course readies the intermediate language learner for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication in Mandarin Chinese. It readies the student for Advanced Placement course work. Student performance in the language focuses on how well does the student understand, how well is the student understood, who accurate is the student’s language production, how extensive and applicable is the language production, how culturally aware is the student. Students learn in scenario contexts to accomplish cultural awareness, comparisons of Chinese to their own language, and explore comparisons and communities of language learners. Honors 1 Crd

Greek Students learn the entire language from the beginning and by May can read Greek authors. Parallels with Latin are extensively drawn upon. Greek culture, vocabulary, syntax, forms of nouns and verbs are emphasized. Course does not count toward World Language requirement. (p/r Latin II) Honors 1 Crd

Advanced Placement United States History A.P. U.S. History is a rigorous, in-depth study of the history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to present day. Students recall factual information, interpret data to develop and defend these conclusions related to the causes, effects, and relationships of past events. This course prepares students for the A.P. U.S. History Exam and includes these topics: development of cultural, political, and religious systems; patterns of continuity and change; causal relationship of historical events; significant historical figures and their impact; intellectual, political, artistic and reform movements; primary and secondary source analysis; and use of technology to view and analyze primary source documents. 1 Crd

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics Students receive the equivalent of a one-semester college course and prepare for success on the AP US Government and Politics Exam in the spring. Topics include: Constitutional underpinnings of the US government; intention of the framers including theories of democratic government; political belief and behavior of the voting public; political parties, interest groups, and mass media

18

23


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 nature of the Roman culture. Political history focuses on details of the late republican and imperial eras. Suits students who seek familiarity and confidence in the great works of Latin literature. Students attain Stage Four of Language Development. Honors 1 Crd

Spanish Conversation in Context semester 1 This one semester elective is suited to serious Spanish students interested in perfecting oral and written proficiency using vocabulary, grammar, and syntax in situational settings for Christian outreach and mission work. Topics include travel, health and nutrition, Christian outreach and others. Students may have opportunities to apply learning locally for service hours. (p/r Spanish III) .5 Crd

Advanced Placement Latin: Vergil Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s Gallic Wars comprise this course in general conformity with college Latin studies fourth to sixth semesters of college Latin study, and prepares students for the AP exam in the spring. Progress in reading, translating, understanding, analyzing, and interpreting Latin in the original is the goal. Students translate the works accurately from Latin into English demonstrating a grasp of grammatical structures, vocabulary, poetic meters, Students engage in stylistic analysis and study the cultural, social, political context of the Gallic Wars. 1 Crd

Spanish Conversation in Context semester 2 This one semester elective continues from the first semester or may be taken without the first semester. Topics include education, construction and building, general conversation to use in situational settings. Students may have opportunities to apply learning locally for service hours. (p/r Spanish III) .5 Crd Latin I This course operates within Stage One of Language Development described in the curriculum standards. Reading and writing are stressed more than speaking and listening. Latin I introduces Latin grammar: syntax, morphology, and vocabulary. Course goals include mastery of the case system, verb conjugations, prepositions, relative pronouns, and nuances of the language. Students discover European-American culture’s dependence on Roman culture through the study of derivatives and begin to read Latin texts with some independence. Honors 1 Crd

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture This one semester elective course develops basic skills to listen, speak, read and write using interactive multimedia, games, role-play, and songs. Scripture, psalms, and prayer (in Chinese) reinforce lesson objectives. Students use the Chinese Pinyin system to identify the 5 Chinese tones and recognize Chinese characters. Students practice basic oral communication using vocabulary of everyday conversation situations. Students learn fundamental grammar and sentence structures of proper spoken Chinese. Culture expressed through videos, internet, presentations and class discussion. This class builds a foundation for understanding Chinese language and culture. As interest allows a second semester will be offered. .5 Crd

Latin II At the close of Latin II students achieve Stage Two of Language Development. This course builds on Latin I. Topics include: forms and functions of participles, irregular verbs, and the subjunctive mood. Vocabulary expectations increase, and students explore more difficult grammatical and syntactic nuances. Texts increase in sophistication; students discover topics in Roman culture and history. Honors 1 Crd Latin III Course builds on Latin I and II introducing final aspects of general Latin grammar. Study includes: classical Latin texts such as speeches of Cicero and historical/cultural aspects of ancient Rome. Students reach Stage Three of Language Development. Honors 1 Crd

Mandarin Chinese I This beginning Mandarin Chinese course focuses on both language and culture. The Chinese Pinyin system, a Romanized system, aids students to sound out Chinese characters. The course establishes a strong foundation in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and stresses mastery of the 5 tones of the Chinese sound system, rules of phonetic spelling, pronunciations, basic vocabulary and fundamental character writing: stroke order and structure. Students engage in dramatic play, oral practice through conversations, media, and practice using the internet. Honors 1 Crd

Latin IV/V Students continue the advanced grammar and texts of Latin III. Selections from Horace, Vergil, Cicero and other authors form the basis of study with greater emphasis on the literary

Mandarin Chinese II Students enter after successful completion of Chinese I. Students continue their development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through extended conversations,

22

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Advanced Placement European History Students prepare for the A.P. European History Exam through an in-depth study of Western Civilization from 1450, the High Renaissance, to the present. Students are expected to recall principal facts and themes in modern European history, analyze historical evidence, and express their understanding in organized essays. The intense workload prepares students for the A.P. Exam. Topics include: primary and secondary source analysis; significant historical figures and their impact; patterns of continuity and change; cause and effect relationships in history; intellectual-cultural, political-diplomatic, and socialeconomic themes; and cross-curricular emphasis on historical art interpretation. 1 Crd

East Asian History Students study the extensive histories of China, Korea, and Japan and explore the cultural, political, economic, and social connections developing within and among these nations. Students investigate the impact that these East Asian societies have had on the modern world. The study includes primary and secondary source documents, relevant film material, and research. Students demonstrate knowledge of the significant persons and events of East Asian History, the patterns of continuity and causes of change, and the value of cultural diversity. (p/r western civ or western studies) .5 Crd Research in Politics: Campaigns and Elections Students gain understanding of the election processes in the United States using a variety of approaches. Students study campaigns, elections, and political strategies of the candidates through analysis of polls, use of the media, and what effect personalities seem to have on outcomes. Students evaluate the presidential primaries, voter turnout, and how the Electoral College works. The fall 2012 presidential and congressional elections will form the basis of focused study. Honors .5 Crd

Sociology Students study patterns of societies and connect theory and practice of social interaction. Two non-western perspectives are included as well as current events so students can make informed choices about societal values. Technology integrates with this study. Topics include: structuralism, realistic group conflict and conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, exchange theory, social dominance theory, cultural relativism, linguistic relativity theory, ethnocentrism, urban development theory, and ethnographies. .5 Crd

Seminar on Leadership and Research This course is by invitation and is part of the Cum Laude Scholar experience and students seeking challenge. The course nurtures students’ curiosity and converts interest into research during the remaining high school years. Skills to publish articles, participate in sponsored research, and research competitions provide students with academic and foundational leadership skills. Honors 1 Crd

Media, Race, and Representations This one semester elective course provides students methodology to examine analytically media messages about race in America. Students explore key questions about media messages and psychology and politics of race. A variety of media are represented. .5 Crd

19


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in World Languages: Communication in the target language (hereafter TL): l Use the TL to engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, exchange feelings, and opinions l Understand and interpret written and spoken language from diverse media l Present information and concepts to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics; Cultures: l Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of perspectives, practices, and products of other countries; Connections: l Reinforce and acquire knowledge of other disciplines through TL l Acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints available only through TL and target culture (hereafter TC); Comparisons: l Develop insight into the nature of language and culture through comparisons; Communities: l Use the TL both within and beyond the school setting. Sequence 9 Spanish I Spanish II or II VT Latin I honors Latin II honors

10 Spanish II or II VT Spanish III or III VT Latin II honors Latin III honors

11 Spanish III or III VT Spanish IV Latin III honors Latin IV/A.P. Latin Vergil

Chinese I honors

Chinese II honors

Chinese III honors

12 Spanish IV A.P. Spanish Language Latin IV/ AP Latin: Vergil A.P. Latin: Vergil or Latin V honors A.P. Mandarin Chinese

Required for graduation 3 Crd: three years of the same world language. Recommended for graduation is four years of the same world language. The three courses must be taken consecutively. Courses taken prior to grade nine will inform student placement. Credits toward the required number for graduation will be counted from courses taken beginning in grade nine, conversely, courses taken prior to grade nine will be used for placement only, not credit. Electives: do not count as the required sequence of 3 classes for graduation

Spanish Conversation in Context semester 1 and semester 2 Chinese Language and Culture semester 1 and semester 2 Greek

Enrichments/Highlights: Language Lab; Students participate in Spanish Club activities; E-mail with “Pen Pals”; Internet Projects; Read authentic literature and realia based on interest and ability; Foreign Travel (Israel, Mexico, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Italy, China); Outreach into Hispanic communities at home and abroad. Latin students take the National Latin Exam.

20

through the target language and begin to develop insights into various Hispanic perspectives from the past and present. Hispanic literature, music, dance and film topics are examined and discussed. Teacher/publisher-directed internet research, authentic realia, and texts, audio and video presentations supply topics for debates/discussions. Readings include Hispanic culture and the Bible. 1 Crd

WORLD LANGUAGES

WORLD LANGUAGES Vision Each World Language, Spanish, Classical, including Latin and Greek, and Chinese, states a unique Vision Statement. Following is a Vision Statement representing key elements of each. Students at CHCA, through the study of World Languages, will appreciate the unlimited capabilities that God has given all peoples for glorifying and serving Him through language. They will recognize that “the body of Christ is made up of people of faith, of all nations, all languages and races.” Students will gain an awareness of both their own language and culture as well as that of the language and culture targeted. Students will comprehend, analyze, and critique texts and media of excellence and demonstrate competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the target language. Students will also be encouraged to exercise initiative and leadership as well as participate in cooperative learning and research. Students will be afforded opportunities beyond the school setting to practice and expand their knowledge of a world language. Students receive meaningful instruction, academic challenge and support toward success in learning the language.

Spanish I This course operates at Stage One of Language Development outlined in the curriculum standards document. Students work cooperatively and independently in reading, listening, speaking, and writing to recognize common phrase groups and voice inflection, produce proper pronunciation, correct grammar, and syntax. Students use basic vocabulary to identify objects from everyday environments, school subjects, family members, and express preferences. Students learn numbers, tell time, ask and give directions, and look into the nature of Hispanic culture through interdisciplinary studies such as art and music. Mastery of present and preterite tenses is achieved through the use of texts, workbooks, video/audio tapes, puzzles, flashcards, computer media and authentic realia in language and culture. 1 Crd

Spanish III VT Develops the same topics as Spanish III but allows for deeper study of language/culture while students master grammar topics. Students prepare for success in Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Composition. Honors 1 Crd Spanish IV This course strives to complete Stage Four of Language Development outlined in the curriculum standards document. Course focuses on both study of authentic literary works and brief historical examinations of various Spanish-speaking countries to appreciate the language and culture. Spanish IV lays the foundation for the more intense study offered in Advanced Placement Spanish. Students work to master all four language skills, listening, reading, writing and speaking, through guided conversations, grammar activities, and compositions. Grammar study includes previous skills adding conditional perfect, future perfect, perfect subjunctive and sequence of tenses. Study topics organize around various countries but do vary and respond to class interest. 1 Crd

Spanish II This course builds upon skills learned in Spanish I. Students review previous grammar and syntax, present and preterite tense and continue to expand their ability to speak, listen, read and write adding additional tenses, double object pronouns, reflexive verb forms, idiomatic expressions, and more complex grammar. Students use the target language to analyze, categorize, compare and contrast, and make associations through cultural readings, videos, authentic realia, and publisher-directed internet research in areas such as religious events, holidays, customs, architecture, and cuisine. Oral competency is stressed with students creating and performing role-playing situations for leisure activities, travel, sports, all situations of appeal to high school students. By the close of Spanish II, students achieve Stage II of Language Development. 1 Crd

Spanish IV VT Develops the same topics as Spanish IV but allows for deeper study of language/culture while students master various grammar topics. Students prepare for success in Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Composition. Honors 1 Crd

Spanish II VT Develops the same topics as Spanish II but advances at more rapid pace and prepares students for success in Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Composition. Honors 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Composition Advanced Placement Spanish challenges students to reach proficiency in the language to achieve success on the A.P. Spanish Language Exam in the spring. Students gain mastery of more complex grammar such as the perfect tenses, subjunctive tenses, sequence of tenses, and prepare for the speaking part of the A.P. Exam by regularly giving responses to prompts. Preparation for the written part includes writing compositions on given topics as well as completing grammar exercises reflective of the exam format. 1 Crd

Spanish III Spanish III strives to complete Stage Three of Language Development. The introduction of more complex vocabulary, grammar, and syntax includes subjunctive, future, and conditional tenses. Students are encouraged to reach a level of confidence and competence in reading, listening, speaking and writing in everyday situations. Students begin to acquire knowledge of other disciplines

21


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in World Languages: Communication in the target language (hereafter TL): l Use the TL to engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, exchange feelings, and opinions l Understand and interpret written and spoken language from diverse media l Present information and concepts to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics; Cultures: l Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of perspectives, practices, and products of other countries; Connections: l Reinforce and acquire knowledge of other disciplines through TL l Acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints available only through TL and target culture (hereafter TC); Comparisons: l Develop insight into the nature of language and culture through comparisons; Communities: l Use the TL both within and beyond the school setting. Sequence 9 Spanish I Spanish II or II VT Latin I honors Latin II honors

10 Spanish II or II VT Spanish III or III VT Latin II honors Latin III honors

11 Spanish III or III VT Spanish IV Latin III honors Latin IV/A.P. Latin Vergil

Chinese I honors

Chinese II honors

Chinese III honors

12 Spanish IV A.P. Spanish Language Latin IV/ AP Latin: Vergil A.P. Latin: Vergil or Latin V honors A.P. Mandarin Chinese

Required for graduation 3 Crd: three years of the same world language. Recommended for graduation is four years of the same world language. The three courses must be taken consecutively. Courses taken prior to grade nine will inform student placement. Credits toward the required number for graduation will be counted from courses taken beginning in grade nine, conversely, courses taken prior to grade nine will be used for placement only, not credit. Electives: do not count as the required sequence of 3 classes for graduation

Spanish Conversation in Context semester 1 and semester 2 Chinese Language and Culture semester 1 and semester 2 Greek

Enrichments/Highlights: Language Lab; Students participate in Spanish Club activities; E-mail with “Pen Pals”; Internet Projects; Read authentic literature and realia based on interest and ability; Foreign Travel (Israel, Mexico, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Italy, China); Outreach into Hispanic communities at home and abroad. Latin students take the National Latin Exam.

20

through the target language and begin to develop insights into various Hispanic perspectives from the past and present. Hispanic literature, music, dance and film topics are examined and discussed. Teacher/publisher-directed internet research, authentic realia, and texts, audio and video presentations supply topics for debates/discussions. Readings include Hispanic culture and the Bible. 1 Crd

WORLD LANGUAGES

WORLD LANGUAGES Vision Each World Language, Spanish, Classical, including Latin and Greek, and Chinese, states a unique Vision Statement. Following is a Vision Statement representing key elements of each. Students at CHCA, through the study of World Languages, will appreciate the unlimited capabilities that God has given all peoples for glorifying and serving Him through language. They will recognize that “the body of Christ is made up of people of faith, of all nations, all languages and races.” Students will gain an awareness of both their own language and culture as well as that of the language and culture targeted. Students will comprehend, analyze, and critique texts and media of excellence and demonstrate competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the target language. Students will also be encouraged to exercise initiative and leadership as well as participate in cooperative learning and research. Students will be afforded opportunities beyond the school setting to practice and expand their knowledge of a world language. Students receive meaningful instruction, academic challenge and support toward success in learning the language.

Spanish I This course operates at Stage One of Language Development outlined in the curriculum standards document. Students work cooperatively and independently in reading, listening, speaking, and writing to recognize common phrase groups and voice inflection, produce proper pronunciation, correct grammar, and syntax. Students use basic vocabulary to identify objects from everyday environments, school subjects, family members, and express preferences. Students learn numbers, tell time, ask and give directions, and look into the nature of Hispanic culture through interdisciplinary studies such as art and music. Mastery of present and preterite tenses is achieved through the use of texts, workbooks, video/audio tapes, puzzles, flashcards, computer media and authentic realia in language and culture. 1 Crd

Spanish III VT Develops the same topics as Spanish III but allows for deeper study of language/culture while students master grammar topics. Students prepare for success in Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Composition. Honors 1 Crd Spanish IV This course strives to complete Stage Four of Language Development outlined in the curriculum standards document. Course focuses on both study of authentic literary works and brief historical examinations of various Spanish-speaking countries to appreciate the language and culture. Spanish IV lays the foundation for the more intense study offered in Advanced Placement Spanish. Students work to master all four language skills, listening, reading, writing and speaking, through guided conversations, grammar activities, and compositions. Grammar study includes previous skills adding conditional perfect, future perfect, perfect subjunctive and sequence of tenses. Study topics organize around various countries but do vary and respond to class interest. 1 Crd

Spanish II This course builds upon skills learned in Spanish I. Students review previous grammar and syntax, present and preterite tense and continue to expand their ability to speak, listen, read and write adding additional tenses, double object pronouns, reflexive verb forms, idiomatic expressions, and more complex grammar. Students use the target language to analyze, categorize, compare and contrast, and make associations through cultural readings, videos, authentic realia, and publisher-directed internet research in areas such as religious events, holidays, customs, architecture, and cuisine. Oral competency is stressed with students creating and performing role-playing situations for leisure activities, travel, sports, all situations of appeal to high school students. By the close of Spanish II, students achieve Stage II of Language Development. 1 Crd

Spanish IV VT Develops the same topics as Spanish IV but allows for deeper study of language/culture while students master various grammar topics. Students prepare for success in Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Composition. Honors 1 Crd

Spanish II VT Develops the same topics as Spanish II but advances at more rapid pace and prepares students for success in Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Composition. Honors 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Composition Advanced Placement Spanish challenges students to reach proficiency in the language to achieve success on the A.P. Spanish Language Exam in the spring. Students gain mastery of more complex grammar such as the perfect tenses, subjunctive tenses, sequence of tenses, and prepare for the speaking part of the A.P. Exam by regularly giving responses to prompts. Preparation for the written part includes writing compositions on given topics as well as completing grammar exercises reflective of the exam format. 1 Crd

Spanish III Spanish III strives to complete Stage Three of Language Development. The introduction of more complex vocabulary, grammar, and syntax includes subjunctive, future, and conditional tenses. Students are encouraged to reach a level of confidence and competence in reading, listening, speaking and writing in everyday situations. Students begin to acquire knowledge of other disciplines

21


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 nature of the Roman culture. Political history focuses on details of the late republican and imperial eras. Suits students who seek familiarity and confidence in the great works of Latin literature. Students attain Stage Four of Language Development. Honors 1 Crd

Spanish Conversation in Context semester 1 This one semester elective is suited to serious Spanish students interested in perfecting oral and written proficiency using vocabulary, grammar, and syntax in situational settings for Christian outreach and mission work. Topics include travel, health and nutrition, Christian outreach and others. Students may have opportunities to apply learning locally for service hours. (p/r Spanish III) .5 Crd

Advanced Placement Latin: Vergil Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s Gallic Wars comprise this course in general conformity with college Latin studies fourth to sixth semesters of college Latin study, and prepares students for the AP exam in the spring. Progress in reading, translating, understanding, analyzing, and interpreting Latin in the original is the goal. Students translate the works accurately from Latin into English demonstrating a grasp of grammatical structures, vocabulary, poetic meters, Students engage in stylistic analysis and study the cultural, social, political context of the Gallic Wars. 1 Crd

Spanish Conversation in Context semester 2 This one semester elective continues from the first semester or may be taken without the first semester. Topics include education, construction and building, general conversation to use in situational settings. Students may have opportunities to apply learning locally for service hours. (p/r Spanish III) .5 Crd Latin I This course operates within Stage One of Language Development described in the curriculum standards. Reading and writing are stressed more than speaking and listening. Latin I introduces Latin grammar: syntax, morphology, and vocabulary. Course goals include mastery of the case system, verb conjugations, prepositions, relative pronouns, and nuances of the language. Students discover European-American culture’s dependence on Roman culture through the study of derivatives and begin to read Latin texts with some independence. Honors 1 Crd

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture This one semester elective course develops basic skills to listen, speak, read and write using interactive multimedia, games, role-play, and songs. Scripture, psalms, and prayer (in Chinese) reinforce lesson objectives. Students use the Chinese Pinyin system to identify the 5 Chinese tones and recognize Chinese characters. Students practice basic oral communication using vocabulary of everyday conversation situations. Students learn fundamental grammar and sentence structures of proper spoken Chinese. Culture expressed through videos, internet, presentations and class discussion. This class builds a foundation for understanding Chinese language and culture. As interest allows a second semester will be offered. .5 Crd

Latin II At the close of Latin II students achieve Stage Two of Language Development. This course builds on Latin I. Topics include: forms and functions of participles, irregular verbs, and the subjunctive mood. Vocabulary expectations increase, and students explore more difficult grammatical and syntactic nuances. Texts increase in sophistication; students discover topics in Roman culture and history. Honors 1 Crd Latin III Course builds on Latin I and II introducing final aspects of general Latin grammar. Study includes: classical Latin texts such as speeches of Cicero and historical/cultural aspects of ancient Rome. Students reach Stage Three of Language Development. Honors 1 Crd

Mandarin Chinese I This beginning Mandarin Chinese course focuses on both language and culture. The Chinese Pinyin system, a Romanized system, aids students to sound out Chinese characters. The course establishes a strong foundation in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and stresses mastery of the 5 tones of the Chinese sound system, rules of phonetic spelling, pronunciations, basic vocabulary and fundamental character writing: stroke order and structure. Students engage in dramatic play, oral practice through conversations, media, and practice using the internet. Honors 1 Crd

Latin IV/V Students continue the advanced grammar and texts of Latin III. Selections from Horace, Vergil, Cicero and other authors form the basis of study with greater emphasis on the literary

Mandarin Chinese II Students enter after successful completion of Chinese I. Students continue their development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through extended conversations,

22

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Advanced Placement European History Students prepare for the A.P. European History Exam through an in-depth study of Western Civilization from 1450, the High Renaissance, to the present. Students are expected to recall principal facts and themes in modern European history, analyze historical evidence, and express their understanding in organized essays. The intense workload prepares students for the A.P. Exam. Topics include: primary and secondary source analysis; significant historical figures and their impact; patterns of continuity and change; cause and effect relationships in history; intellectual-cultural, political-diplomatic, and socialeconomic themes; and cross-curricular emphasis on historical art interpretation. 1 Crd

East Asian History Students study the extensive histories of China, Korea, and Japan and explore the cultural, political, economic, and social connections developing within and among these nations. Students investigate the impact that these East Asian societies have had on the modern world. The study includes primary and secondary source documents, relevant film material, and research. Students demonstrate knowledge of the significant persons and events of East Asian History, the patterns of continuity and causes of change, and the value of cultural diversity. (p/r western civ or western studies) .5 Crd Research in Politics: Campaigns and Elections Students gain understanding of the election processes in the United States using a variety of approaches. Students study campaigns, elections, and political strategies of the candidates through analysis of polls, use of the media, and what effect personalities seem to have on outcomes. Students evaluate the presidential primaries, voter turnout, and how the Electoral College works. The fall 2012 presidential and congressional elections will form the basis of focused study. Honors .5 Crd

Sociology Students study patterns of societies and connect theory and practice of social interaction. Two non-western perspectives are included as well as current events so students can make informed choices about societal values. Technology integrates with this study. Topics include: structuralism, realistic group conflict and conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, exchange theory, social dominance theory, cultural relativism, linguistic relativity theory, ethnocentrism, urban development theory, and ethnographies. .5 Crd

Seminar on Leadership and Research This course is by invitation and is part of the Cum Laude Scholar experience and students seeking challenge. The course nurtures students’ curiosity and converts interest into research during the remaining high school years. Skills to publish articles, participate in sponsored research, and research competitions provide students with academic and foundational leadership skills. Honors 1 Crd

Media, Race, and Representations This one semester elective course provides students methodology to examine analytically media messages about race in America. Students explore key questions about media messages and psychology and politics of race. A variety of media are represented. .5 Crd

19


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Students use economic formulas to calculate real GDP, change in demand, and values of foreign currencies. This course meets the graduation requirement in financial literacy and includes those benchmarks: using budgets in personal economic decisions; income differences in labor markets; role of individuals as consumers, producers, savers, workers, investors; managing financial resources, budgets, savings, investments, credit and philanthropy; and how interest rates affect savers and borrowers. .5 Crd

including electoral laws and systems; institutions of the Congress, the Presidency, the Bureaucracy and the Federal Courts; public policy; and civil rights and civil liberties. Students who take the course during grade ten, prepare for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in social studies. 1 Crd United States History US History meets the 11th grade U.S. History requirement. Students survey our nation’s origins from the pre-Columbian era to the present, with emphasis on the 20th century. Topics include: development of cultural, political and religious systems; patterns of continuity and change; causal relationships of historical events; significant historical figures and their impact; intellectual, political, and reform movements; historically appropriate novels; primary and secondary source analysis. 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Microeconomics Students receive the equivalent of a one-semester introductory college course and prepare for success on the AP US Microeconomics Exam in the spring. The course includes principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. Primary emphasis is on the nature and functions of product markets, including the study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. This course meets the graduation requirement in financial literacy and those benchmarks: using budgets in personal economic decisions; income differences in labor markets; role of consumers, producers, savers, workers, investors; managing financial resources, budgets, savings, investments, credit and philanthropy; how interest rates affect savers and borrowers. 1 Crd

Heritage Studies Heritage Studies is a synthesis of U.S. History and American Literature. This program deepens students’ understanding of the two disciplines, increases their critical thinking and research skills, and teaches to all seven “intelligences” - linguistic, logical/mathematical, musical, bodily/kinesthetic, spatial, inter/intrapersonal. Activities include research, games, songs, crafts in a given time period, and analysis of cultural artifacts. Topics include: development of cultural, political and religious systems; patterns of continuity and change; causal relationships of historical events; significant historical figures and their impact; intellectual, political, artistic, and reform movements; primary and secondary source analysis. Students use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information as well as to present findings. Course satisfies the U.S. History graduation requirement. Double period. Social Studies & English credits. Honors 2 Crd

Government American Government is a survey course that explores the origins of the U.S. Government, its Judeo-Christian heritage, and its present status and functions. Topics include: foundation, structure, and function of government; comparison of different forms of governments to U.S.; rights and responsibilities of a citizen in a democracy; U.S. Constitution and the American legal system; Constitutional Convention project; statistical models to evaluate election returns; and changing laws and court cases. Students who take this course during grade ten, prepare for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in Social Studies. .5 Crd

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 various exercises and research. Students further develop vocabulary and ability in daily Chinese conversations. Language structure and foundational grammar are developed in written exercises, complex sentences and short paragraphs. More in-depth discussions of Chinese culture, history and social-economic environment are aided by multimedia. Honors 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Mandarin Chinese The course prepares students for success on the Advanced Placement exam in May. Students demonstrate proficiency across three communicative modes: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. The course addresses cultural competence, connections to other school disciplines, comparisons between Chinese language and culture and the learners’ language and culture, and the use of the language within the broader communities beyond the school. Both conventional print and aural materials give variety to language learning and various forms of communication in print, media, cultural situations present interest to the student. Students develop Chinese handwriting skills and word processing skills in Hanyu Pinyin or Bopomofo. 1 Crd

Mandarin Chinese III This course readies the intermediate language learner for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication in Mandarin Chinese. It readies the student for Advanced Placement course work. Student performance in the language focuses on how well does the student understand, how well is the student understood, who accurate is the student’s language production, how extensive and applicable is the language production, how culturally aware is the student. Students learn in scenario contexts to accomplish cultural awareness, comparisons of Chinese to their own language, and explore comparisons and communities of language learners. Honors 1 Crd

Greek Students learn the entire language from the beginning and by May can read Greek authors. Parallels with Latin are extensively drawn upon. Greek culture, vocabulary, syntax, forms of nouns and verbs are emphasized. Course does not count toward World Language requirement. (p/r Latin II) Honors 1 Crd

Advanced Placement United States History A.P. U.S. History is a rigorous, in-depth study of the history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to present day. Students recall factual information, interpret data to develop and defend these conclusions related to the causes, effects, and relationships of past events. This course prepares students for the A.P. U.S. History Exam and includes these topics: development of cultural, political, and religious systems; patterns of continuity and change; causal relationship of historical events; significant historical figures and their impact; intellectual, political, artistic and reform movements; primary and secondary source analysis; and use of technology to view and analyze primary source documents. 1 Crd

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics Students receive the equivalent of a one-semester college course and prepare for success on the AP US Government and Politics Exam in the spring. Topics include: Constitutional underpinnings of the US government; intention of the framers including theories of democratic government; political belief and behavior of the voting public; political parties, interest groups, and mass media

18

23


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 MUSIC FINE ARTS Vision As a result of a CHCA Music Fine Arts education, students recognize that music is a gift from God and as such should be used to glorify and serve Him. Students are encouraged to develop a lifelong love of music through participation in performance and study. Growing from these studies is an appreciation of the diversity of musical experience, culture, Christian heritage, and an ability to evaluate both aural and written music for quality and to evaluate music and performances congruent with scriptural principles. Students pursue musical opportunities with confidence and knowledge. They engage competently in a variety of musical experiences both for academic and personal purposes demonstrating creativity, appreciation, and expression in a variety of situations. Audiences within and beyond the school provide opportunities for musical outreach. Students work cooperatively and responsively in groups demonstrating appropriate leadership and giving value to others’ work. Students receive challenge and support in pursuit of success in music. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Music Fine Arts: l Sing/Perform on instruments alone and with others a varied repertoire of music including selections of Christian story and praise l Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments l Compose music within specific guidelines l Read and notate music l Apply appropriate personal as well as Christ-centered evaluative criteria to music and musical performances that acknowledge music as an art form embracing diversity l Apply appropriate etiquette as an audience member and/or performer l Research and explain, using various technologies including print, electronic, and recordings, the relationship between music, history, and culture l Use music as a personal and interpersonal expression to honor God. Sequence Required for graduation: students graduating 2013 and before 2 semesters of Fine Art; students graduating 2014 and beyond 1 semester of Fine Art 1 grades 9-12. (Visual, Music, Dance as Fine Art). Music courses may be taken in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 schedule permitting. Enrichments/Highlights: Performances both locally and on national/international tours; performances in outreach and in conjunction with nationally known performers.

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Sequence 9 Western Civilization Western Studies

10 Government/Economics2 A.P. European History

11 U.S. History 1 Heritage Studies 1 A.P. U.S. History 1 A.P. European History A.P. Microeconomics2 Sociology (1 sem) East Asian History (1 sem) Media, Race, and Representation (1 sem)

Required for graduation 3 Crd. one course from each of the following: Western Civilization / Western Studies; Economics; Government; U.S. History. 1course meets U.S. History graduation requirement 2course meets financial literacy graduation requirement for students graduating 2014 and beyond. Electives: Courses beyond the graduation requirement. century. Students examine literature, culture, politics, economics, and religious systems. The course focuses on historical documents, key individuals and events and their relation to biblical principles. Students produce in a variety of rhetorical modes to analyze, evaluate and synthesize information, defend conclusions, and present findings. Students produce both expressive and academic prose and compile a writing portfolio. Students examine literary themes and their congruence to biblical principles. Research and written work adhere to MLA style, and students use various digital media and print sources in their research. Units of study are presented in an engaging multisensory manner. Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test as well as skills tested on the PSAT. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Meets grade nine English and Social Studies requirements. Double period. Honors 2 Crd

SOCIAL STUDIES Western Civilization Western Civilization surveys the history of the Western world from Greece to the Cold War of the 1950s-60s. Students study patterns of continuity and change and the cause and effect nature of historical events from a predominately Western perspective. Topics include: democracy formation in Ancient Greece and Rome; development of Christianity and Islam; Middle Ages, rise of modern nations; Renaissance and Reformation including art and intellectual mood; the Age of Monarchs, the Enlightenment, and the French, Russian, and Industrial Revolutions; exploration and imperialism; Depression of the 1930s, World Wars, and their aftermath. Students use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information for use in creative productions. Historically appropriate primary and secondary source analysis and novels serve as resources beyond the text. Students prepare for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in Social Studies. 1 Crd

Economics Economics provides students an overview of economic theories and principles. Both macro and micro economics are treated including such topics as: scarcity and opportunity cost; supply and demand; monetary, fiscal, and tax policy; personal and governmental budgeting; comparative economic systems; business structure and production choices; family budget project; online Stock Market Game to gather data and manage stock portfolios.

Western Studies Students study Western Civilization and Western Literature to meet both English and Social Studies requirements for grade nine. Students study patterns of continuity and change and the cause and effect nature of historical events primarily from a Western perspective. The study spans democracy in ancient Greece and Rome to the latter part of the twentieth

24

12 U.S. History1 A.P. Government A.P. U.S. History1 A.P. European History A.P. Microeconomics2 Sociology (1 sem) East Asian History (1 sem) Media, Race, and Representation (1 sem) Research in Politics (1 sem)

17


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 SOCIAL STUDIES Vision Students acquire an awareness and understanding of the world, its people, and its history and investigate ways the past may influence the present. Within the diverse range of Christian perspective, students explore patterns of human and environmental interaction through history, geography, government, and economics, aware of the interconnectedness of these disciplines. Just as Luke recognized the importance of firsthand accounts in understanding historical events: Luke 1:1-2, “Many people have done their best to write a report of things that have taken place from the beginning,” so too, student learning in the social studies focuses on primary and secondary sources. Technology surrounds students and aids all facets of the learning and presentation process. Students apply Christian principles to examine past and present, local, state, national, and global events, and relationships between these events. Students develop an appreciation for a personal heritage and cultural differences as they evaluate their role and responsibility in God’s creation. Students grow in their ability as Christian citizens to bring reasoned decision-making to a culturally diverse, democratic society, and to a fallen world. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Social Studies: In History: l Develop increasingly precise concepts of time: past, present, and future l Locate, research, analyze, and interpret both primary and secondary sources to draw conclusions l Identify characteristics of civilizations including cities, central governments, religion, job specialization, social classes, arts, public works, and a writing system l Demonstrate knowledge of the significant persons and events of history including characteristics of historical periods l Apply patterns of continuity, irregularity, and attributed or possible purpose in historical events to an understanding of history l Identify and analyze causes and catalysts of change l Identify and apply ways peoples and institutions value cultural diversity l Develop a historical perspective and awareness of bias. In Government l Recognize the need for government as comparing to rules of behavior to establish order in families, classrooms, and organizations l Trace the historical development and structure of the United States Constitution, the division of roles in the federal system, the political processes of the United States government l Identify and apply the roles, rights, and responsibilities of US citizenship in various contexts. l Locate areas of citizen participation in government l Recognize different government systems of the world. In Economics: l Understand economic concepts of scarcity and opportunity cost, price, supply and demand, unemployment and income, savings, investment, and interest rates l Achieve financial literacy so the individual can use knowledge and skills to manage limited financial resources for lifetime financial security l Exercise economic decision making as the student is consumer, producer, saver, investor, and citizen so as to analyze costs and benefits in various contexts l Demonstrate understanding of the United States Government’s role in US fiscal and monetary policy l Identify characteristics of different global economic systems and patterns of economic interdependence on earth. In Geography: l Explain the relationship, both positive and negative, between the human and natural environment l Choose from various tools to understand the earth’s geography and research, compare and contrast characteristics of places, regions, and human processes, migrations and cultural traits l Access, read, interpret, and create maps and geographic representations l Apply concepts of global development and economic interdependence to identify and analyze environmental issues. In Theological Integration: l Use a Christian theological perspective to understand how the study of social studies and history affects the way we think, live, and learn l Apply the theological framework of intellectual learning that makes no topic beyond discussion l Discuss and apply the role of a Christian citizen in a democratic society and global community l Apply what would be the spectrum of Christian theological perspective to world events l Recognize that a theological perspective combines faith and learning. In 21st Century Skills: l Demonstrate creativity, critical thinking, problem solving, communication and collaboration skills and use technology resources to learn and to share learning.

16

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 MUSIC FINE ARTS

Lab Band This ensemble studies different styles of jazz and early rock. The band performs with the pep band and concert band; students also study and perform a wide variety of jazz charts. Emphasis is to develop individual technique and gain knowledge of music theory, history, performance practices, and musical genres. Students develop stage presence, performance etiquette, and contribute to larger musical productions. Requires prior music experience; private lessons are encouraged. Performance venues include school concerts and football games. Audition required 1 Crd

Percussion Ensemble/Steel Drum Band This ensemble is for percussionists and those who desire to study steel drums. During football season students study drum line and perform at home games. Students develop instrumental technique and knowledge of music theory, history, and performance practices. All welcome. 1 Crd Encore Students are encouraged to further develop their musical confidence and presentation. The focus is on building skills that involve solo and group singing in various musical styles. Choreography is combined with selected songs. Students continue in the study of music theory, multicultural music, music history, and appreciation. Students exercise leadership and explore careers in music including opportunities to minister through music. Audition required. 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Music Theory AP Music Theory develops a student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. This is achieved through listening, sight singing, performance, written, compositional and analytical exercises. The course instills mastery of the rudiments and terminology of music, including hearing and notating: pitches, intervals, scales and keys, chords, metric organization, and rhythmic patterns. Basic concepts are addressed through listening to a variety of music, including music from a standard Western tonal repertoire and contemporary, jazz, popular music, and the music of nonwestern cultures. Content equips students to understand and appreciate music of their own time and various world cultures. Emphasis is on acquisition of correct notational skills. Students engage in melodic and harmonic dictation, composition of a bass line for a given melody, implying appropriate harmony, realization of a figured bass, realization of a Roman numeral progression, analysis of repertoire, including melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, and form, and sight-singing. The exam includes: Musical Terminology, Notational Skills, Basic Compositional Skills, Score Analysis (with or without aural stimulus), and Aural Skills. 1 Crd

Concert Choir Students learn proper vocal technique, basic sight-singing and musical skills emphasis on part-singing in a choral group. Performances include concerts, chapels, and outreach. All welcome. 1 Crd Electric Jazz Orchestra For the most advanced jazz performers, this ensemble performs jazz literature including swing, bebop, fusion, and rock. Emphasis is on developing individual technique and gaining knowledge of music theory, history, performance practices, and musical genres. Students also develop stage presence, performance etiquette, and contribute to larger musical productions. Frequent performances and end of year tour are highlights. Private lessons required. Audition required. Honors 1 Crd Symphony Orchestra/Concert Band This performance group includes ensemble for strings and winds and percussion. Students perform a broad range of orchestral works and literature for concert band with emphasis on developing individual technique and gaining knowledge of music theory, history, performance practices, and musical genres. Students develop stage presence, performance etiquette, and contribute to the larger musical productions. Requires prior music experience and private lessons are encouraged. All welcome. 1 Crd

Dance as Fine Art One semester course for .5 credit in fine arts or as an elective. Students learn and perform basics of multiple dance forms, research culture and history of dance forms, undergo written and performance assessment, view examples of professional dance and create individual choreography. No experience necessary. .5 Crd

25


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

VISUAL FINE ARTS Vision CHCA Visual Fine Arts is designed to nurture and develop the student’s God-given desire to create and appreciate the aesthetic beauty in God’s universe. Students use value judgments to make decisions about art that honors God and shows appreciation for God’s handiwork and its effect on their lives. Through various processes, students will become aware how art relates to other areas of study. Students examine the human experience through their own creativity, through art history as an expression of culture and through the use of visual mediums, technology, literature, and God’s Word. Students experience and gain skill with the various art processes to gain confidence in their ability and grow in their aesthetic sense. Students value cultural diversity through the knowledge of the visual arts. Visual Fine Arts prepares students to acknowledge their God-given talents and to pursue with confidence opportunities and challenges set before them. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Visual Fine Arts: l Develop visual awareness of God’s creation in order to produce an individual artistic awareness l Make Christ-centered judgments about art l Make connections between the visual arts, the other fine and performing arts and other disciplines outside the arts l Apply media, techniques, and processes related to the visual arts l Use the elements and principles of visual organization l Choose from a range of subject matter, symbols, icons, and potential ideas in visual arts l Relate the visual arts to history and culture l Value the characteristics and merits of one’s own artwork and expression and appreciate the artwork of others l Develop knowledge of aesthetics and art criticism. Sequence 9 General Art – p/r for all others Studio Art I & II after general art semester Layout and Design I & II Photography Stained Glass Ceramics Drawing

10

11

General Art

General Art

12 General Art

Studio Art I & II after general art semester

Studio Art I & II after general art semester

Studio Art I & II after general art semester

Layout and Design I & II

Layout and Design I & II

Layout and Design I & II

Photography

Photography

Photography

Stained Glass

Stained Glass

Stained Glass

Ceramics

Ceramics

Ceramics

Drawing

Drawing

Drawing

A.P. Art Studio

A.P. Art Studio

A.P. Art Studio

Required for graduation: students graduating 2013 and before 2 semesters of Fine Art (Visual, Music, Drama, Dance as Fine Art) ; students graduating 2014 and beyond 1 semester of Fine Art grades 9-12.

Enrichments/Highlights: Field trips; shows; competitions.

and distinguish between scientific evidence and personal values in a perspective as future Christian leaders. The course is suited to students seeking a non-AP elective. (p/r bio & chem.) .5 Crd

energy transformations; genetics, molecular genetics, heredity, evolutionary biology theory; organisms and populations, principles of taxonomy, survey of the five kingdoms; animal structures and functions; and ecology. (p/r: bio VT and chem. VT) 1 Crd

Physics Required of all students graduating 2011 and thereafter. Physics presents the fundamental principles of physical science and its foundational concepts and operations governing matter, energy. and their interconversion on systems ranging from subatomic to galactic scales. The principles are conservation of energy, momentum, charge, and mass; laws of motion; law of universal gravitation; work/energy theorem; forces; waves; fields. Careful design and analysis of many lab activities lead to understanding these ideas. Topics include: mechanics, properties of matter, thermodynamics, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, modern physics, nuclear reactions, and the study of the universe. Whereas honors physics emphasizes physics tools and their mathematical integration, physics focuses on conceptual understanding. Course includes real world analogies and clear explanations, focusing on qualitative questions and algebraic problems. (p/r: concurrent with algebra II). 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Environmental Science The course includes topics: earth systems and resources; the living world; population; land and water use; energy resources and consumption; pollution; and global change. Students explore the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world and draws upon various scientific disciplines. Students analyze and interpret information and experimental data including mathematical calculations. Students identify and analyze environmental problems to evaluate the ecological and human health risks associated with these problems and the solutions for resolving or preventing them. Laboratory and/or field investigations are included. Students' roles as Christian Leaders will integrate with their studies. (p/r bio VT, chem. VT, phys VT) 1 Crd Advanced Placement Physics B A.P. Physics B is an extension of the Physics VT course in both content and depth. Topics include both classical and modern physics. Knowledge of algebra and basic trigonometry is required. The basic ideas of calculus are introduced related to physical concepts such as work, position, velocity and acceleration. A major goal is for students to apply their understanding of the principles to solve problems. Principles include Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics, thermal physics, electricity, magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. (p/r: honors physics and pre-calc) 1 Crd

Physics VT VT refers to the Vertical Team skills preparation for taking College Board Advanced Placement Physics. If taken in grade 12 this course awards honors weight. The course presents the fundamental principles of physical science and its foundational concepts and operations governing the interaction of matter and energy. This course prepares successful students for Advanced Placement Physics B. The principles are conservation of energy, momentum, charge, and mass; laws of motion; universal gravitation; work/ energy theorem; forces; impulse; waves, fields. Careful design and analysis of many lab activities lead to understanding these ideas. Topics include: kinematics and dynamics, properties of matter, vectors, rotational motion, heat, thermal energy, thermodynamics, waves, sound, light, optics, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics, nuclear reactions, and the study of the universe. (p/r: concurrent with pre-calc) Honors 1 Crd Advanced Placement Biology Students cover material equivalent to freshman college Biology. Students prepare for the Advanced Placement Exam in Biology; therefore classes meet some double periods. Laboratories are crucial to each unit of study. Topics include: molecules and cells, biological chemistry,

26

15


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 SCIENCE

through guided inquiry, explorative research, and cooperative learning. (p/r: or concurrent with alg. II VT, pre-calc/pre-calc VT) Honors 1 Crd

Biology Students are introduced to basic biological principles and life processes. Students investigate living organisms from the simplest to the most complex forms of life in their natural environment. The course includes dissection labs. Topics include: organic / biochemistry principles; cell structure / function; production/use of energy; ecosystems; genetics; evolution and geologic time lines; food webs; zoology and body systems in detailed dissection of pigs, frogs, sampling of in/vertebrates. Students prepare for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in science. 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Chemistry Advanced Placement Chemistry is equivalent to a first year college chemistry program. It is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam in Chemistry. Topics include atomic theory, the periodic law and properties, gas laws, properties of solutions; solubility, chemical bonding, molecular structure; intermolecular forces, molecular kinetics and equilibria, acid-base equilibria; electrochemistry; thermodynamics. Students take the A.P. Chemistry Exam. (p/r: chem. VT.) 1 Crd

Biology VT Students admitted using teacher recommendation and evidence of strong reading skills. Course challenges students to think scientifically, to integrate concepts, to analyze data, and to explore complex issues. The molecular approach investigates concepts of biology with a focus on the nature and methods of science. Major emphases include genetics, cell biology, development, systematics, behavior, and immunology. Course includes pre-AP strategies such as drawing inferences, asking questions at the application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation levels, using double-entry journals and synthesizing varying perspectives. Topics from the Ohio Graduation Test also covered. Honors 1 Crd

Anatomy and Physiology Students engage in comprehensive study of each of the body systems in human anatomy/physiology. Topics include: organization of the body; systems that cover and support the body; systems that control communication; systems that transport and protect; metabolic processing systems; and cycle of life. This course prepares students for pursuing careers in allied health fields and other diverse disciplines such as physical education, art, psychology, or anthropology. Students study the structure and function of the human body using prior knowledge from courses in biology and chemistry. (p/r: bio and chem) 1 Crd

Chemistry Students are introduced to the chemical and technological issues confronting our world. Lecture and laboratory periods focus on problem solving techniques. Emphasis is placed on the application and practical use of chemical concepts and their impact on the environment. Topics include: history of science; introduction to chemistry and matter; organization of matter; nomenclature; phases of matter; properties of gases; solutions, acids, bases, pH, and titration; thermochemistry; molecular structure and bonding; chemical reactions; organic chemistry; descriptive chemistry; and nuclear chemistry. Students prepare for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in science. (p/r: alg.I) 1 Crd

Investigations in Environmental Science 1 A one semester elective course explores interdisciplinary topics with focus on earth systems, resource management and water systems. Lecture, classroom discussion, case studies, and field work give students varied learning contexts. Topics include scientific and political issues related to the environment and the role of science in contemporary society. Students will reflect on and distinguish between scientific evidence and personal values in a perspective as future Christian leaders. The course is suited to students seeking a non-AP elective. (p/r bio & chem.) .5 Crd

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 VISUAL FINE ARTS

Ceramics Students explore various hand-constructed and wheel-thrown ceramic techniques. Form and function are integral components of the student’s in class production. Students use creative / design problem solving and demonstration of skill. (p/r gen art) .5 Crd

General Art Students study foundational elements and principles of art/design. Topics include color, value, line, space, shape, form, and texture. Design principles include rhythm, balance, proportion, emphasis, variety, and unity. A Discipline Based Art Education approach is used to insure students receive well-rounded visual arts education. .5 Crd

Stained Glass Course presents intensive study of stained glass, its limitations and expressions through student investigations in various techniques and procedures common to material. Final piece is an aanraku style table lantern. (p/r gen art) .5 Crd

Studio Art I and II Students explore their creativity through larger scale, more intense endeavors than in General Art. Project based, the class focuses on media and technique. Studio Art II tailored to student interests. Suited to students not aspiring to Advanced Placement. (p/r gen art with 75% + ) .5 Crd/sem

Advanced Placement Art Studio Students work independently to apply Christian values, integrity, and ethical use of the media and their talents. Students produce either a Drawing portfolio, 2D Design portfolio, or 3D Design portfolio evaluated on three aspects: Quality of five works, Concentration that shows a series of works organized around a compelling visual concept with twelve digital images, and Breadth where twelve digital images show works that each demonstrate a variety of concepts, media, and approaches. Work submitted to AP program for evaluation in May. Teacher recommendation. (p/r gen art) 1 Crd

Photography Students receive instruction in the proper use of camera and how to compose a good picture. Aspects of composition and camera use produce desired effects in a traditional darkroom setting. Photo history and famous photographers are introduced. (p/r gen art) .5 Crd Layout and Design I and II Each a one semester interdisciplinary graphic design course where students produce in a variety of design techniques that encompass free-hand drawing with computer enhancement using Adobe Creative Suite as software design tools. Students enter knowing basic computer applications. (p/r gen art) .5 Crd/sem

Drawing Students study and produce using various drawing techniques. Media include graphite, charcoal white, charcoal, and ink. Works focus on observation / still life setups, contour drawing, value and gesture drawing. Aesthetic awareness grows by experimenting with techniques and renderings from realism to non-objective art. .5 Crd

Investigations in Environmental Science 2 A one semester elective course explores interdisciplinary topics with focus on energy resources and consumption, pollution, waste management and global change. Lecture, classroom discussion, case studies, and field work give students varied learning contexts. Topics include scientific and political issues related to the environment and the role of science in contemporary society. Students will reflect on

Chemistry VT Students admitted with teacher recommendation, PLAN scores, math placement and OGT diagnostics. Topics parallel Chemistry; increased depth and breadth particularly in molecular structure and bonding, equilibria, kinetics, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Approach is

14

27


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

HEALTH

SCIENCE

Vision As a result of a CHCA health education, students will make informed decisions within a Christian perspective about personal, community, and global health issues. Students receive instruction in mental, physical, social, and spiritual health. Students are encouraged and guided to develop positive self-esteem, to accept themselves and others, to handle stress, to solve problems, and to exercise leadership. By learning about body systems, nutrition, exercise and by practicing physical activities students embrace health allied to physical fitness as a lifelong goal. Social health includes working within diverse relationships to share feelings with friends, family, and peers. Spiritual health places Christ at the center of a Christian’s life. Students are encouraged to seek physical, mental, and social challenges in life utilizing faith-informed, responsible choices

Vision Science is a method of inquiry founded upon the order of the natural world and the design of its Creator, and in addition, science is an ongoing process that is limited as an investigative tool. Students become responsible, independent, questioning, creative, and organized learners moving from curiosity to familiarity, then mastery of scientific skills, processes, concepts, and theories. Students explore the various disciplines of science through an organized progression of class presentations, hands-on activities, and laboratory investigations that emphasize scientific processes and develop critical thinking skills. Students recognize that science integrates with mathematics, technology, written language, consumer and career interests. Resulting from scientific knowledge, students come to acknowledge personal responsibility as stewards to care for humanity and conserve resources for the glory of God.

Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Health: l Explain key elements to maintain mental and emotional health l Demonstrate in conversation the relationship of individual health to family health l Explain the fundamental concepts of growth and development l Recognize key elements to maintain and promote personal health l Recognize and apply essential concepts about nutrition and diet l Recognize aspects of substance use and abuse l Explain essential concepts about the prevention and control of disease l Locate the availability and list effective use of health services, products, and information l Explain practices concerning injury prevention and safety l Accept personal responsibility for seeking total health for self and others through recognizing God’s plan for human life.

Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Science: Scientific Inquiry and Application l Observe and identify questions that can be investigated about the natural world l Generate and evaluate scientific evidence and explanations using the scientific method, models, mathematics, and appropriate technology l Distinguish scientific evidence from opinion and exhibit critical thought to distinguish between fact, myth, and theory l Understand the nature and development of scientific knowledge l Participate productively in scientific practices and discourse l Practice safe and appropriate use of scientific instruments, materials, equipment, and procedures In Physical, Life, Earth and Space Science l Exhibit knowledge of the historical development in science l Understand the unifying concepts and processes of science: systems, organization, rules of evidence, models, explanations, measurement, change, equilibrium, and structure-function relationships l Identify questions and apply skills, concepts and processes to construct further knowledge and understanding using inquiry-based investigations In Theological Integration l Recognize that science plays a profound role in personal and social perspectives relating to natural resources, environmental quality, health, hazards, and global challenges utilizing the biblical directive to be good stewards from a scientific and Christian perspective l Recognize that science is a human endeavor where people interpret scientific knowledge and ethical conduct based on historical context and their personal faith and beliefs l Understand God’s revelation in such verses as: “Ever since the creation of the world His invisible nature, namely, His eternal power and deity, has been clearly perceived in the things that have been made.” [Rom 1:19-20] As well: Gen.1,2; Job 38-41; Psalm 19:1-6; Psalm 24:1-2.

Sequence Required for graduation: .5 Crd in Health. Health may be taken in grade 9, 10, 11, or 12. Enrichments/Highlights: Students become CPR certified unless taking this course off site.

responsible food choices; the body’s need for nutrients; health and diet; weight control and eating disorders; substance use and abuse. Social health topics include: a child’s relationship with parents; development of friendships; puberty; dating relationships; sexually transmitted diseases; abstinence; the marriage relationship. Students discuss Christ’s teaching as it relates to all facets of health. Students who meet this required course through online or off site instruction do not necessarily receive the same topics. .5 Crd

Health The Health course presents students with methods to ease the transition from the role of a child to the role of an independent adult. The study of Health encourages useful decisions within the Christian perspective about personal, community, and global health issues. Mental health topics include: building and maintaining self-esteem; taking personal responsibility; understanding personal and emotional needs; examining personality components and some disorders; strategies to cope with stress; setting goals; managing time. Physical health topics include: making

Sequence 9 Biology Biology VT

10 Chemistry Chemistry VT

11 Physics Physics VT Environmental Science 1 & 2 Anatomy & Physiology A.P. Biology A.P. Chemistry A.P. Environmental

12 Physics Physics VT Environmental Science 1 & 2 Anatomy & Physiology A.P. Biology A.P. Chemistry A.P. Environmental A.P. Physics B Required for graduation: 3 Crd in science: one course from each of the following: Biology or Biology VT; Chemistry or Chemistry VT; Physics or Physics VT (Honors) Recommended 4 Crd in Science. Electives Anatomy & Physiology AP Chemistry Environmental 1 & 2 A.P. Biology A.P. Physics B A.P. Environmental Science Enrichments/Highlights: Data collection and analysis using CBL, Organelle Project, Various Dissections, Rocket Project, Center of Mass Project, Miniature Golf Project, “Physics Commentator” Sports Video Project, Field Trips to and speakers from Industry/Hospitals; Science Olympiad, Robotics Team, Math/Science Day at Kings Island.

28

13


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 inference; confirming models. Students explore and analyze data through the use of technology and various software. Students take the A.P. Statistics Exam in the spring. (p/r: alg II) 1 Crd

Functions and Trigonometry This course helps students make connections within and between algebraic and geometric concepts before taking pre-calculus. Students explore problems numerically, algebraically, and graphically. Through collections and study of data, and use of technology, students connect algebraic and geometric concepts to real life. This course includes the following topics: polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations and inequalities; conic sections; matrices; and sequences. (p/r: alg. II & geometry) 1 Crd

Pre-Calculus VT Pre-Calculus VT is designed to pursue higher intellectual engagement through challenging and academically rigorous explorations. This course includes the same topics as Pre-Calculus and extends the scope of those topics through critical analysis and theoretical examination of relationships between concepts. Students use technology to examine applications to physics and other real life situations. (p/r: geometry, alg. II) Honors 1 Crd

Pre-Calculus College Prep Pre-Calculus lays the foundation for the study of calculus. A calculator-based graphing approach is used to explore functions. Using graphs, students find characteristics of graphs such as extrema, domain, range, and limits of the function. Students graph using transformations. Properties of exponential, logarithmic, rational, and trigonometric functions are specifically studied. Students explore problems numerically, algebraically, and graphically. The study includes applications of matrices, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. (p/r: geometry, alg II) 1 Crd

Calculus Calculus is designed to prepare students for success in a college Calculus course. This course focuses on the concepts of limits, derivatives, and integrals and the relationships between the concepts. Students work with concrete examples and hands-on explorations to understand the methods and applications of each concept. Students use technology to explore concepts, confirm results, and produce models. (p/r: pre-calc) 1 Crd

Statistics Course is a year-long introduction to Statistics. Students use technological methods, including calculators and computer software to explore and analyze data. Students work independently and cooperatively to understand and make statistical inferences rather than calculating answers from memorized formulas. Students predict patterns in data through the use of probability modeling and simulation. Students participate in cooperative learning with other disciplines to develop projects related to everyday activities. This course is designed for students interested in exploring other branches of mathematics and is ideally suited to students interested in non-mathematics intensive college majors. Topics include: exploring data by observing patterns and departures; determining what and how to measure; anticipating patterns by introducing probability and simulations; and statistical inference using confirming models.(p/r: alg II or pre-calc) 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Calculus AB - BC A.P. Calculus provides college level work in calculus, providing the equivalent of one semester of college calculus. This course encompasses the concept of limits, derivatives, integrals, and the relationships between each concept. Additionally students may explore polynomial approximations and series. Students use technology to explore concepts, confirm results, and produce models. Precise communication of mathematical ideas both in written and oral form is a focus of this course. This course is well suited to students who enjoy the abstract nature of mathematics. (p/r: success in pre-calc & alg II) 1 Crd Advanced Topics in Mathematics This year long course is intended for students who have completed AP Statistics and AP Calculus BC. The course grade is weighted as Advanced Placement. Course topics are selected based on the interests of the enrolled students and the instructor. Topics from which the instructor will choose include introductory topics in Number Theory and Abstract Algebra with an emphasis on understanding and using rigorous proof techniques. Additionally, topics from Multivariable Calculus may be selected to extend students’ experiences in single variable Calculus. (p/r: completion of AP stats and AP calc BC) weighted as AP level 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Statistics A.P. Statistics provides college level work in statistics, providing the equivalent of one semester of non-calculus based statistics. Topics include:: exploring data: observing patterns and departures from patterns, planning a study; deciding what and how to measure, anticipating patterns in advance; introducing probability, simulation, and statistical

12

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 PHYSICAL EDUCATION Vision Above all, Physical Education at CHCA reflects the high value God places on human life and the respect we have for each person in God’s community. Activities offer opportunities for spiritual growth where students are encouraged to explore how Christ would react. CHCA physical education helps students develop in cognitive, psychomotor, affective, and spiritual domains. The program and teaching faculty provide an environment that recognizes individual potential and encourages leadership and participation. Students grow in an understanding of rules, safety, and strategies of games and activities and develop skills and abilities through participation in a variety of team and individual activities. Physical Education incorporates the importance of health-enhancing, lifelong fitness. Students use their God-given gifts to engage in teamwork, individual achievement and physical fitness activities equipping them with a sense of self-esteem and sportsmanship to participate in a diverse society. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Physical Education: l Exhibit responsible personal, social, cooperative, and Christian behavior that respects self and others in physical activity settings l Demonstrate competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities l Demonstrate understand of movement concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics as they apply to learning/performing physical activities l Participate regularly in, and understand the costs and benefits of health-enhancing physical activities l Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness l Engage in physical activity as it provides the opportunity for enjoyment, challenge, self expression, and social interaction. Sequence Required for graduation: .5 Crd (two semesters) in Physical Education. Students may sequence Physical Education courses in any order. Effective April 2007 the Ohio Legislature SB311 reads: “…each chartered nonpublic school may adopt a policy to excuse from the high school physical education requirement each student who, during high school, has participated in interscholastic athletics, marching band, or cheerleading for at least two full seasons. If the board or authority adopts such a policy, the board or authority shall not require the student to complete any physical education course as a condition to graduate. However, the student shall be required to complete one-half unit, consisting of at least sixty hours of instruction, in another course of study.” (adopted 4-07 CHCA Board of Trustees) Students graduating 2014 and beyond may not use physical education courses as electives.

Physical Education: Team & Individual Sports This course combines skills to develop improved performance in selected games, sports, and fitness activities. Flag football, soccer, volleyball, and basketball are some examples of team sports. Badminton and tennis are examples of individual sports. The course promotes training and conditioning which increases endurance, strength, and flexibility. Students demonstrate safe, responsible behavior and practice good sportsmanship. This course leads students to view sports and physical activities as a means to bring honor and glory to God. .25 Crd

Weight Training and Fitness Students work independently and cooperatively to analyze, develop, and experience specific training techniques. Students work to increase strength, flexibility, speed, quickness, and power. Recreational games and activities will promote cardiovascular fitness. Students set goals and work toward achieving them during the course. Students learn to assess their personal health fitness relative to fitness standards. This course stresses proper safety techniques. Students are taught to recognize the body as a temple of God and to accept personal responsibility for a healthy lifestyle. .25 Crd

29


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 The above sequence represents choices at each grade level based on the student’s grade nine course. Courses taken prior to grade nine will inform student placement. Credits toward the required number for graduation are counted beginning in grade nine, conversely, courses taken prior to grade nine will be used for placement only, no credit.

Dance as Physical Education In this one semester course students learn the basics of ballet, jazz, modern, tap, musical theater, and Latin dance forms. Students participate in daily dance exercise focusing on the use of dance for physical fitness. No experience necessary. All welcome. 25 Crd

Advanced Topics in Math course available to students who complete AP Statistics and AP Calculus BC. Enrichments/Highlights: All math courses provide grade-level appropriate preparation for the PLAN, Ohio Graduation Test, PSAT, and SAT. Each course also incorporates real world applications through the use of graphing calculators, Computer Based Laboratory (CBL), and other computer technology. Math classes make connections to science concepts where appropriate. The Math Department sponsors a chapter of Mu Alpha Theta, a math honor society for students who excel in mathematics. Students are provided opportunities to participate in competitive events including the Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics math tournament, AMC competition, and the National Assessment and Testing Competitions. MATHEMATICS

Algebra II College Prep Algebra II is a study of functions through algebraic and graphical approaches. This course encompasses the following topics: applications of linear functions; quadratic and polynomial functions; rational expressions; logarithms and exponents; trigonometry; conic sections; matrices; transformations of functions. Students use graphing technology to discover relationships between symbolic and graphical representations. (p/r: alg I & geometry) 1 Crd

Algebra I College Prep Algebra I is a foundational course for future mathematics and science courses. This course explores topics using a function approach and seeks to make connections between symbolic and graphical representations. Topics include: solving linear equalities, inequalities, and systems; solving quadratic equations and inequalities; simplifying polynomial, rational, and exponential expressions and working with their equations and graphs. (p/r: pre-alg) 1 Crd

Algebra II VT Algebra II VT is designed to pursue higher intellectual engagement through challenging and academically rigorous explorations. This courses includes the same topics as Algebra II and extends the scope of those topics. This extension is accomplished through critical analysis of the complex relationships between concepts and theoretical examination of topics. This is well suited to students who enjoy the abstract nature of mathematics. (p/r alg I & geometry) Honors 1 Crd

Geometry College Prep Students explore plane figures and their properties in this study of Euclidean geometry. Students study relationships between congruent and similar figures, study and use deductive and inductive logic to understand the structure of geometry, and use technology to discover relationships. Topics include: plane figures and their properties, transformational geometry, coordinate geometry, right triangle trigonometry, area and volume. (p/r: alg I) 1 Crd

College Algebra This course helps students formalize algebraic and geometric ideas and introduces students to mathematical concepts not traditionally addressed in Calculus-bound mathematics courses. Topics include: linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions and the algebraic manipulations and geometric representations of those functions; graph theory; linear programming; coding; social choice; voting methods; and game theory. The course serves students anticipating a non-mathematics college major, not requiring a pre-calculus course. (p/r: senior standing and teacher approval, alg II & geometry) 1 Crd

Geometry VT In Geometry VT students pursue higher intellectual engagement through challenging and academically rigorous explorations. Included are the same topics as Geometry providing opportunities for discovery and proof of conjectures. Students discover the need for clear, concise forms of communication to prove mathematical conjectures. (p/r: alg I) Honors 1 Crd

30

11


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

MATHEMATICS

TECHNOLOGY

Vision Mathematics is one tool by which we better understand God’s precise, orderly, and sometimes mysterious creation. As a result of a CHCA mathematics education, students will value mathematics and develop proficiency in the use of mathematics. Proficiency in mathematics learning refers to conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, strategic competence, and adaptive reasoning. [Adding it Up, National Research Council, 2001] Students experience instruction based on Standards for Mathematical Practice. [http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards/mathematics] Students express an understanding of concepts using a variety of methods and media. Developmentally appropriate instruction challenges and supports students.

Vision As a result of a CHCA education students will implement Technology to conduct research, to promote productivity, to perform basic operations, to communicate, and to enhance problem-solving and decision-making. Students will practice responsible use of technology mindful of the ethical and social issues impacted by biblical principles surrounding this medium. Both academic and personal use of technology will extend the students’ environment and spheres of influence. Students will understand the benefits and cautions that technology now presents us with in the 21st century. CHCA understands that leadership development is predicated not only upon moral principles, discipleship, and collaborative social interaction, but also upon facility in communication, gathering resources, creativity, problem-solving and decision-making, all of which technology aids. Technology literacy of all students is a goal of Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy.

Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Mathematics in courses Algebra I and beyond: Know and apply the concepts of l Number and Quantity l Algebra l Functions l Geometry l Statistics and Probability l Modeling. Standards of Mathematical Practice K-12: l Be mathematical problem solvers l Reason and construct mathematical arguments l Communicate mathematically l See connections within mathematics and to other subject areas l Look for and make use of structure and patterns. Theological Integration: l See God’s orderliness and mystery reflected in mathematics. Sequence (note pre-requisites for courses in descriptions) 9 10 11 Algebra I CP Geometry CP Algebra II CP Geometry VT

Algebra II VT

12 College Algebra Functions & Trig Pre-Calculus CP College Algebra Statistics A.P. Statistics

Geometry CP

Algebra II CP

Functions & Trig

Statistics Pre-Calculus CP

Geometry VT

Algebra II VT

Pre-Calculus CP Pre-Calculus VT A.P. Statistics

Statistics A.P. Statistics A.P. Calculus Calculus

Functions & Trig Pre-Calculus CP Pre-Calculus VT

Pre-Calculus CP Statistics A.P. Statistics

Statistics Calculus A.P. Calculus

A.P. Statistics Pre-Calculus CP Functions & Trig

Pre-Calculus VT Statistics Pre-Calculus CP

A.P. Calculus Calculus A.P. Statistics

Algebra II CP

Algebra II VT

Required for graduation: students graduating 2013 and before 3 Crd in Math. Recommended: four years, 4 Crd. Students graduating 2014 and beyond 4 Crd in Math, which must include Algebra II, required for Ohio diploma.

10

Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Technology l Demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology l Use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others l Apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information l Use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources l Understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior l Demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations. [Informed by International Society for Technology in Education - National Educational Technology Standards for Students, 2007] Sequence Required for graduation: .5 Crd in Computer Technology. All courses have keyboarding ability as a prerequisite. Enrichments/Highlights: Create videos, brochures, artwork, graphics, yearbook cover, school planners, t-shirts for admission and advancement offices of CHCA; design school calendar.

TECHNOLOGY

Layout & Design I, II Students use Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 gaining competence in the technical skills needed to execute the capabilities of the products. Students work with the art department to incorporate design using computers. May serve as fine art or computer credit. Each semester. .5 Crd

Computer Applications In this beginning course students use the computer as a tool to solve problems. Students create and modify text and visual information; students work in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, use peripherals such as digital still and video cameras, use the scanner and apply skills in computer graphics, word processing, database, spreadsheets, page layout, and presentation tools. .5 Crd

Adobe Flash Students employ Flash authoring skills to design animations, games, web graphics, and movies. Flash allows students to create vector based interactive web movies integrated with other classes. Students integrate their skills and ideas, content and purposes from other classes to create end products. .5 Crd

Video Editing Students work with the MacIntosh computers in Final Cut Pro software and use the digital video cameras to film and edit videos. Students are responsible for creating videos to use for school chapel and other events related to the school. .5 Crd

31


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Speech I Students develop confidence in oral communication. Students gather, analyze, and express ideas for formal speeches, to explain, persuade, demonstrate and motivate and present in less formal presentations and discussions. Students build self confidence before groups, understand strategies that give speakers control and confidence. Students learn speech writing techniques, research techniques, and support one another during this time of growth. .5 Crd

English 12 Honors This course provides challenge and rigor beyond English 12. Students examine principally British Literature, as well as one Asian-American voice, a world masterpiece, and study poetry in depth. Students prepare for the challenges of college writing using literary analysis, critical thinking, and the research method. Students hone skills for the SAT II Literature and Writing tests. Students place works in historical context and grow in their understanding of literary forms such as the epic, satire, drama, persuasion, and poetic forms through the lens of biblical principles. Students produce a Literary Research Paper and summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Honors 1 Crd

Creative Writing Students explore various genres of written expression with instruction in prose, nonfiction, drama, and poetry. Students receive instruction that emphasizes the creative process and experimentation with elements of a variety of rhetorical modes. Growing as a writer, taking risks into new forms, and revising are all encouraged. .5 Crd

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition (12th) This course challenges the most capable student to master skills necessary for success on the A.P. English Literature & Composition Exam of the College Board. The study, organized around thematic issues, genres, historical movements, or literary devices, spans literature from classic to contemporary pieces of literary merit. Literature focus includes World, British, Asian-American, and in-depth poetry studies. Students write for academic purpose and to grasp both technical devices and thematic issues, discuss interpretive issues, and use research methods and MLA format. The course promotes mastery of a mature writing style including a strong voice, few or no significant errors in conventions of writing and ability to use figurative language to personal purpose. Student writing meets a standard that requires apt and specific reference to text and shows fluency, insight, and eloquence. Particularly relevant to college bound students is further work in the research method and aligned skills for the SAT II Literature and Writing tests. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

Journalism Journalism introduces students to reporting, news writing, copy editing, layout and design, and media publication. Students produce two publications: the yearbook and newspaper. Topics include history of journalism in America and its presence in the 21st century including the role of media in life and culture. Students produce writing for informational, critical, editorial, interview, and blog purposes. Students integrate technology in the journalist process for the online newspaper where articles are updated weekly by lead and content editors. To produce the yearbook students compose, edit, and design layouts using specific software. Editors monitor progress, meet deadlines and finish by spring. Students sell advertising, calculate and monitor a budget and collaborate to produce the product. 1 Crd Drama I Students work independently and cooperatively to practice essential elements of dramatic arts, to produce and design technical production elements, to research the history of theater, to analyze and create scenes, and to develop verbal and physical skills to create characters. Students actively participate and divide time between theater knowledge and acting skills, and construct and decorate actual productions. .5 Crd

English Language Learners This course is open only to students who seek to gain fluency in English and adapt to the school expectations for reading, writing, and speaking English. ELL is an adapted version of English 9 for those international students for whom English is not their native language. It focuses on essential curriculum concepts of reading comprehension including full-length novels, adapted writing instruction, and academic vocabulary acquisition, including the rules of Standard American English grammar, mechanics, and usage. The course serves to create an English language foundation for ELL students entering the CHCA community at any level and supports adaptation into non-ELL English classes the following year. 1 Crd

32

9


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 to analyze and synthesize information, defend conclusions, and present findings showing a high level of performance in Standard Edited American English. Skills in writing, grammar, usage, word choice and idiom will align with the SAT I. Research and written work adhere to MLA style, and students learn to use and include electronic sources in their research. Units of study are presented in an engaging multisensory manner. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Double period. English & Social Studies credits. Honors 2 Crd

literature. Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test as well as hone skills tested on the PSAT. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Honors 1 Crd English 11 Students continue progress in reading challenging texts with an emphasis on American literature. Students place literature in historical context, understand defining features of major literary movements and genres, analyze theme by focusing on evidence. The focus of diverse voices in literature is in Native American literature. Students write with increased mastery over mechanics/usage and rhetorical forms such as: critical, persuasive, and personal essays. Students write responding to prompts, produce MLA-style research papers, apply research skills to writing and speaking tasks, and engage in discussions. Vocabulary study continues from context and a separate text. Skills aligned with SAT I are embedded throughout units of study. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

Advanced Placement Language and Composition (11th) Students prepare for A.P. English Language & Composition Exam of the College Board by learning how to read closely, write effectively, and argue persuasively both across the curriculum and in personal contexts. This course is suited to students who perform at high levels in writing and analytical thinking, who enjoy challenge, and who are committed to the rigors of Advanced Placement course work. The class marries the goals of the AP Language and Composition curriculum with our school’s junior year emphasis on American Literature with some emphasis on African and Native American texts/voices in particular. Students examine literary themes and their congruence to biblical principles. Students read and analyze both nonfiction and fiction in order to understand better how an author’s rhetorical choices shape a text. Fiction texts provide a context for issues-oriented discussion and research-based persuasive writing. In preparation for the researched argument paper and the synthesis essay, students learn to read and evaluate primary and secondary sources, to synthesize material, and to write material using MLA conventions. Students produce abundant academic writing. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

English 11 VT Students receive challenge beyond English 11. Students examine American Literature with a focus on historical context that reveals how the American experience is portrayed through the unique voice of American writers who separate themselves from the European tradition of literature. Students analyze one Native American text, as well as a Native American anthology. Students write with increased mastery of mechanics and rhetoric, focusing on critical and persuasive writing while using MLA format. Students hone their skills through the research process and evaluate literary criticism for the works they read. Students continue their growth in strong development of vocabulary. Skills aligned with SAT I are embedded throughout units of study. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Honors 1 Crd

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Grade 9 Course Options 2012 - 2013 This course option sheet is individually prepared for your student by the Guidance Department. The courses circled are based on teacher recommendations, demonstrated work ethic, and academic achievement to date. Please review carefully with your student. Once the final schedule is generated changes will generally be denied. Requirements English: Select One English 9 , English 9 VT (Honors), Western Studies (Honors) Christian Studies: Old/New Testament Covenants Science: Select One Biology or Biology VT (Honors) Social Studies: Select One Western Civilization or Western Studies (Honors) Math: Select One

Electives Rank your choices in order of preference 1st - 4th Courses one year unless designated (S) is one semester; Visual Fine Arts: General Art (S) pre-requisite to all art courses Ceramics (S), Stained Glass (S), Studio Art I (S), Drawing (S) Technology: Computer Layout & Design I (S) Computer Layout & Design II (S) no pre-requisite Drama/Vocal Music: Concert Choir,, Encore Performing Choir (audition); AP Music Theory (Teacher approval) Health/ Physical Education: Health (S) PE .25 Crd (S),Weight Training ,25 Crd (S), Dance as PE .25 Crd (S) Technology: Computer Applications (S), Computer Layout & Design I & II (each S), Adobe Flash (S) Instrumental Music: Lab Band (audition), Percussion Ensemble/Steel Drum Band (audition), Symphony Orchestra, Electric Jazz Orchestra (audition)

Algebra I, Algebra II, Algebra II VT (Honors) Geometry, Geometry VT (Honors) World Language*: Select one: Latin I (Honors), Latin II (Honors) Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish II VT (Honors) Mandarin Chinese I (Honors) * Required to graduate 3 consecutive years of the same world language at the high school.

Others: Speech (S), Study Hall (S); Creative Writing (S); Dance as Fine Art (S), Journalism, Media Race, and Representation (S).

Electives required for graduation: One semester PE and Health must be completed by the end of the 10th grade Students graduating 2014 and beyond: .5 credit of Fine Art grades 9-12; .5 credit in Speech 2 semesters of PE .25 credit each. 1 semester Health .50 credit See PE Waiver notice in PE section 2 semesters Fine Art (Music, Dance as Fine Art; Visual Art satisfy this requirement for those graduating 2013 and before); 1 semester Fine Art satisfies this requirement for those graduating 2014 and beyond.

English 12 Students examine principally British Literature and prepare for the challenges of college writing with preparations in literary analysis, critical thinking, and research. Studies from diverse voices focus on Asian-American literature. Students build upon grammar and usage skills and continue to study vocabulary in literary context. Students place works in historical context and grow in their understanding of literary forms such as the epic, satire, persuasion, and poetic forms with an emphasis on biblical principles. Students demonstrate leadership in discussions and classroom presentations. Students produce a Literary Research Paper and summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

Heritage Studies Students study American Literature and History to meet the English and Social Studies requirements for grade eleven. Students study the cultural and ethnic diversity of our rich heritage to acknowledge American’s imperfections and honor her greatness. Students examine the origin and development of American experiences in the study of literature, culture, politics, economics, and religious systems. Study focuses on historical documents, key individuals and events and their relation to biblical principles. Students produce in a variety of rhetorical modes

8

33

1 semester Computer .50 credit 4 January/May Term experiences .25 credit each


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Grade 10 Course Options 2012 - 2013

ENGLISH

This course option sheet is individually prepared for your student by the Guidance Department. The courses circled are based on teacher recommendations, demonstrated work ethic, and academic achievement to date. Please review carefully with your student. Once the final schedule is generated changes will generally be denied.

English 9 Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test in Writing and Reading as well as skills tested on the PLAN and PSAT. Students study vocabulary from Classical Roots and within the context of literature. Rhetorical modes of exposition, narration, persuasion, and analysis allow students to respond to prompts to produce both expressive and academic prose. Literature of all genres develops students’ comprehension and analytical skills. Students examine literary themes and their congruence to biblical principle. In alignment with the Old and New Testament Covenants class, students study religion/ traditions of Judaism revealed in The Chosen. Students explore various cultures yet the focus of diverse voices in literature is in African-American literature. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

Requirements English: Select One World Language*: Select One English 10, English 10 VT (Honors) Latin I Honors, Latin II Honors, Latin III Honors Christian Studies: History of Christianity Mandarin Chinese I (Honors), Chinese II (Honors) Social Studies: Select One Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish III, Spanish II VT (Honors), Government/Economics, AP European History (Teacher approval) Spanish III VT (Honors) Science: Select One Chemistry, Chemistry VT (Honors) *Required to graduate 3 consecutive years of the same world Biology, Biology VT (Honors) language at the high school. Math: Select One Algebra II or Algebra II VT (Honors) Geometry or Geometry VT (Honors) Pre Calculus or Pre Calculus VT (Honors) A.P. Statistics Electives: Rank your choices in order of preference 1st - 4th Courses one year unless designated (S) is one semester Visual Arts: General Art (S) is requisite for other art courses, Instrumental Music: Lab Band (audition), Percussion Ceramics (S), Stained Glass (S), Studio Art I (S),Studio Art II (S), Ensemble/Steel Drum Band (audition), Symphony Orchestra, Photography (S), Computer Layout & Design I (S) & II (S) no Electric Jazz Orchestra (audition) pre-requisite AP Art Studio (teacher approval), Computer Layout & Design I and/or II each (S), Drawing (S) Drama & Vocal Music: Concert Choir,, Encore Performing Others: Speech (S), Study Hall (S); Creative Writing (S), Dance Choir (audition), AP Music Theory (Teacher approval), Drama (S) as Fine Art (S), Journalism, Media, Race and Representation (S), Greek I Honors (p/r Latin II) Greek does not fulfill a World Language requirement Health /Physical Education: Health (S), PE .25 Crd (S),Weight Training .25 Crd (S), Dance as PE .25 Crd (S) Technology: Applications (S), Layout & Design I (S) & II (S), Adobe Flash (S) Electives required for graduation: One PE and Health must be completed before the beginning of 11th grade. Students graduating 2014 and beyond: .5 credit of Fine Art grades 9-12 and .5 credit in Speech 2 semesters of PE .25 credit each. 1 semester Health .50 credit 1 semester Computer .50 credit See PE Waiver notice in PE section 2 semesters Fine Art (Music, Dance as Fine Art; Visual Art satisfy this requiremente 4 January/May Term experiences .25 credit each for those graduating 2013 and before); 1 semester Fine Art satisfies this requirement for those graduating 2014 and beyond.

literature, culture, politics, economics, and religious systems. The course focuses on historical documents, key individuals and events and their relation to biblical principles. Students produce in a variety of rhetorical modes to analyze, evaluate and synthesize information, defend conclusions, and present findings. Students produce both expressive and academic prose. Students examine literary themes and their congruence to biblical principles. Research and written work adhere to MLA style, and students must learn to use and include electronic sources in their research Units of study are presented in an engaging multisensory manner. Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test as well as skills tested on the PSAT. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Double period. Honors 2 Crd English 10 Students master the defining features of a range of genres and write to express opinion and analysis of literature. Expectations increase for student writing to demonstrate competence in writing modes and conventions of Standard Edited American English. Expectations include higher performance levels in sentence structures and precise diction. Students continue study of vocabulary from Classical Roots and in the context of literature. In addition to essays and short, cited papers, students produce a research paper. Research uses print and online full text databases aid student projects, particularly in the Careers unit. Thematic aspects of literature and their congruence to biblical principle is a focus. The focus of diverse voices in literature is in Latino literature. Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test as well as hone skills tested on the PSAT. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. 1 Crd

English 9 VT English VT, where Vertical Team refers to the College Board Advanced Placement skills preparation, focuses on skill development in literary analysis and writing for academic purpose. Students identify tone, figures of speech, rhetorical devices and modes then analyze their impact on theme. Students master skills for success on the Ohio Graduation Test as well as the PLAN and PSAT. Students study vocabulary from Classical Roots and within the context of literature. Rhetorical modes of exposition, narration, persuasion, and analysis allow students to respond to prompts to produce both expressive and academic prose. Literature of all genres develops students’ comprehension and analytical skills. Students examine literary themes and their congruence to biblical principle. In alignment with the Old and New Testament Covenants class, students study religion/ traditions of Judaism revealed in The Chosen. Students explore various cultures yet the focus of diverse voices in literature is in AfricanAmerican literature. Summer reading forms the basis of graded work. Honors 1 Crd

English 10 VT English VT, where Vertical Team refers to the College Board Advanced Placement skills preparation, focuses on skill development in literary analysis and writing for academic purpose. Students identify tone, mood, figures of speech, rhetorical devices and modes then analyze their impact on theme. Prose, poetry, and drama challenge capable students to extend their ability to discuss, research, and write about varied texts. Students work independently and collaboratively using texts of literary merit, electronic secondary sources, and MLA citation format to produce varied written assignments. Students work to increase vocabulary and examine ideas in light of biblical principles. The focus of diverse voices in literature is in Latino

Western Studies Students study Western Civilization and Western Literature to meet both English and Social Studies requirements for grade nine. Students study patterns of continuity and change and the cause and effect nature of historical events primarily from a European perspective. The study begins with formation of democracy in ancient Greece and Rome to the latter part of the twentieth century as students examine

34

7


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

ENGLISH / LANGUAGE ARTS

Grade 11 Course Options 2012 - 2013

Vision As a result of a CHCA Language Arts education, students recognize language is a gift from God and as such should be used to glorify and serve Him. Students are encouraged to develop a lifelong love of learning through reading, study, and applying scriptural principles to these studies. Growing from these studies is an appreciation of the diversity of human experience, culture, and values and an ability to evaluate spoken, written, and media messages for truth. Students apply analytical skills in reading, thought, writing, study, and discussion to realize their unique, God-given gifts and their place in the world. Students pursue research with confidence using a familiarity with sources and their uses and applying the aid that technology brings to learning. Students engage competently in a variety of writing experiences, both academic and personal, demonstrating clarity, logic, persuasiveness, creativity, and accuracy in the use of Standard Edited American English. Articulate, even eloquent, language denotes a person whose ideas are worthy of consideration and respect, thus an education to raise up Christian leaders must provide for sound language arts training. CHCA students speak with confidence, fluency, and precision in a variety of situations as well as work cooperatively and responsively in groups demonstrating appropriate leadership and giving value to others’ work. Students receive academic challenge and support in pursuit of success in language arts. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Language Arts: in Reading: l Demonstrate competence in the general skills and strategies of the reading process l Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of literary works of enduring quality and increasing complexity including the truth of Scripture and its influence on literary forms and themes l Demonstrate competence in applying reading strategies to learn from literature and specific types of informational and functional texts and digital sources. In Writing: l Demonstrate competence in the general skills and strategies of the writing process including narration, exposition and persuasion l Write with a command of the grammatical, mechanical and usage conventions of Standard Edited American English l Demonstrate competence in the stylistic and rhetorical aspects of writing l Gather and use information from a variety of print and digital sources for research purposes. In Speaking/Listening/Discussion: l Demonstrate competence in speaking, listening, and viewing as tools for learning l Participate effectively in a range of interactions to communicate and collaborate. Sequence 9 English 9 English 9 VT Western Studies Honors

10

11

English 10 English 10 VT

English 11 English 11 VT Heritage Studies Honors

12 English 12 English 12 Honors A.P. English Literature & Composition

A.P. English Language & Composition Required for graduation: students graduating 2013 and before 4 Crd in English, one each year from those listed above. Students graduating 2014 and beyond 4 Crd in English one each year from those listed above plus .5 Crd in Speech. Electives:

This course option sheet is individually prepared for your student by the Guidance Department. The courses circled are based on teacher recommendations, demonstrated work ethic, and academic achievement to date. Please review carefully with your student. Once the final schedule is generated changes will generally be denied. Requirements Christian Studies: Christian Thought and Spirituality English: Select One English 11, English 11 VT (Honors), Heritage Studies (Honors Teacher approval), AP English 11 Language and Composition (Teacher approval) Social Studies: Select One U.S. History or Heritage Studies (Honors Teacher approval), AP US History (Teacher approval) Math Science World Language* Algebra II or Chemistry or Chemistry VT (Honors) Latin I (Honors), Latin II (Honors), Latin Algebra II VT (Honors) AP Chemistry (Teacher approval) III (Honors). Latin IV (Honors), AP Latin-Vergil in year 3 or 4 Pre Calculus or Physics2 (concurrent Alg. II or higher) Spanish I, II, III, IV Pre Calculus VT (Honors) or Physics VT (concurrent Pre-Calc) Spanish II, III, or IV VT (Honors) (Honors) AP Spanish Language & Comp. (Teacher approval) Functions & Trigonometry (p/r algII) Environmental Science I (S) Mandarin Chinese I (Honors), Mandarin Statistics Environmental Science II (S) Chinese II (Honors) AP Statistics (Teacher approval) AP Environmental Science Chinese III (Honors) AP Calculus AB (Teacher approval) (Teacher approval) *Required to graduate: 3 consecutive years AP Calculus BC (Teacher approval) A.P. Biology (Teacher approval) of the same world language Electives: Rank your choices in order of preference 1st - 4th Courses one year unless designated (S) is one semester Visual Fine Arts (Gen Art pre requisite to all art courses) Technology: Computer Applications (S), Computer Layout & General Art (S), Ceramics (S), Stained Glass(S), Studio Art I Design I (S) & II (S), Adobe Flash (S), Video Editing (Teacher & II (S), Photography (S), Computer Layout & Design I & II approval) (each S, no p/r), Drawing (S) AP Studio Art (2D, 3D, Drawing choices. (Teacher approval) Drama & Vocal Music: Concert Choir, Encore Performing Health /Physical Education: Health (S), Physical Education .25 Choir (audition), AP Music Theory (Teacher approval), Drama (S) Crd (S), Weight Training .25 Crd (S), Dance as PE .25 Crd (S) Instrumental Music: Lab Band (audition), Percussion Others: Spanish Conversation in Context 1st sem & 2nd sem (S) Ensemble/Steel Drum Band (audition), Symphony Orchestra, (p/r Spanish III. Does not fulfill the 3rd yr World Language Electric Jazz Orchestra (audition) requirement), Speech (S), Sociology (S), East Asian History (S), Journalism, (Teacher approval), Creative Writing (S), Dance as Fine Art (S), Greek I Honors (p/r Latin II. Does not fulfill a World Language requirement), Study Hall (S). Race, Media, and Representation (S), Research in Politics (S) Electives required for graduation: All elective requirements must be completed by end of 1st semester of senior year. Students graduating 2014 and beyond: .5 credit of Fine Art grades 9-12 and .5 credit in Speech 2 semesters of PE .25 credit each. 1 semester Health .50 credit See PE Waiver notice in PE section 2 semesters Fine Art (Music, Dance as Fine Art; Visual Art satisfy this requirement for those graduating 2013 and before); 1 semester Fine Art satisfies this requirement for those graduating 2014 and beyond.

Speech I (required for students graduating 2014 and beyond) Creative Writing Journalism/Yearbook Drama

Enrichments/Highlights: Drama Club, Drama Performances; possible Heritage Studies Boston trip.

6

35

1 semester Computer .50 credit 4 January/May Term experiences .25 credit each


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Grade 12 Course Options 2012 - 2013 This course option sheet has been individually prepared for your student by the Guidance Department. The courses circled are based on teacher recommendations, demonstrated work ethic, and academic achievement to date. Please review carefully with your student. Once the final schedule is generated changes will generally be denied. Requirements Christian Studies Senior Elective: * Rank your choice in order of preferences 1st - 4th Eastern World Religions (S), Western World Religions (S), Bio-Ethics (S), Ethics and Justice (S), Eschatology (S), Faith in Fiction and Film (S), Israel in the World (S Honors), Jesus and the Gospels (S) English: Select One English 12, English 12 Honors, AP English 12 Literature & Composition (Teacher approval) Math ** Select One or more Science** Algebra II Anatomy and Physiology Functions and Trigonometry Physics or Physics VT (Honors) Statistics Environmental Science semester 1 and 2 Pre Calculus or Pre Calculus VT (Honors) AP Environmental Science (Teacher approval) Calculus AP Biology (Teacher approval) College Algebra AP Chemistry (Teacher approval) AP Calculus AB ; AP Calculus BC (Teacher approval) AP Physics B (Teacher approval) AP Statistics (Teacher approval) Social Studies ** World Language ** US History Latin I (Honors), II )Honors), III (Honors), Government / Economics (one sem each) AP Latin:Vergil in 3rd or 4th yr Spanish I, II, III, IV; AP Spanish (Teacher approval) Sociology (S); Research in Politics (S) Spanish II, III, IV VT (Honors) Mandarin Chinese I, II, III (Honors), A.P. Chinese East Asian History (S) *Required to graduate 3 consecutive years of the same AP Microeconomics (Teacher approval) world language AP European History (requires teacher approval) **Students are strongly encouraged to take four years of math, AP US Government & Politics U.S. (Teacher approval) science, world language and social studies. Teacher approval needed for Advanced Placement enrollment AP US History (Teacher approval) Electives: Rank your choices in order of preference 1st - 6th Courses one year unless designated (S) is one semester Visual Fine Arts (Gen Art pre requisite to all art courses) , Technology: Computer Applications (S), Computer Layout & General Art (S), Ceramics (S), Stained Glass(S), Studio Art I & Design I (S) & II (S), Adobe Flash (S), Video Editing (Teacher II (S), Photography (S), Computer Layout & Design I (S) & II (S), approval) AP Studio Art (Teacher approval), Drawing (S) Drama & Vocal Music: Concert Choir, Encore Performing Choir Health /Physical Education: Health (S), Physical Education.25 (audition), AP Music Theory (Teacher approval), Drama (S) Crd (S), Weight Training .25 Crd (S), Dance as PE.25 Crd (S) Instrumental Music: Concert Band (Y), Lab Band(Y) (audition), Others: Greek I (Honors),Spanish Conversation in Context Percussion Ensemble/Steel Drum Band (Y) (audition), Symphony 1st sem & 2nd sem (S), (Neither fulfills the World Language Orchestra (Y) (audition), Electric Jazz Orchestra (Y) (audition) requirement), Speech (S), Dance as Fine Art (S), Journalism (Teacher approval), Media, Race, and Representation (S) Electives required for graduation: All elective requirements must be completed by end of 1st semester senior year Students graduating 2014 and beyond: .5 credit of Fine Art grades 9-12 and .5 credit in Speech 2 semesters of PE .25 credit each. 1 semester Health .50 credit See PE Waiver notice in PE section 2 semesters Fine Art (Music, Dance as Fine Art; Visual Art satisfy this requirement for those graduating 2013 and before); 1 semester Fine Art satisfies this requirement for those graduating 2014 and beyond.

36

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Senior Elective: Faith in Contemporary Fiction and Film (12th) Students analyze literature and film as mediums wherein contemporary society wrestles with answers to philosophical and theological questions ranging from identity to memory, purpose, knowing, free will and determinism. Rather than “simply stories� students use these stories to pose thought-provoking questions. Students interpret these questions through a lens of faith, examining the issue from a perspective of belief. Deconstructing these answers through a faith construct enables the students to explore their own understanding of personal, societal, and religious issues in both literature and film. Using their faith concepts in this manner enables students to develop their interpretive skills while fine tuning their critical thinking. Students combine analysis of these cultural mediums with a practical application of living our faith within culture. .5 Crd

Senior Elective: Ethics and Justice (12th) Students explore important ethical and theological questions justice. Students examine alternative systems to achieve justice in the world, the development and significance of human rights, and the degree to which cultural differences impact whether rights and wrongs are universally held. Case studies include genocide and ethnic cleansing, 21st Century slavery, education, women, poverty and the consumption of world resources. Students explore controversial issues where philosophy, ethics, theology and law intersect such as capital punishment, the morality of war, terrorism, racism, gender, and homosexuality. Students examine these issues, using foundations for moral thought and major approaches to the field of ethics such as virtue theory, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism, situational ethics, Rawlsian ethics and ethical egoism. Students examine these issues from a biblical and theological perspective with the task of indentifying the contours of a distinctly Christian world view and ethic. .5 Crd

Senior Elective: Eschatology (12th) Students examine biblical teachings on the final events of the world, primarily from The Revelation of John and selected areas of the Old and New Testaments. Topics include the development of eschatology in the Bible compared with neighboring societies, the historical and modern interpretations most Christians accept including the pre/post/a-millennial doctrines, and cursory examination of Christian eschatology in modern literature such as Left Behind. The course concludes comparing Christian eschatology to modern teachings of other world religions. .5 Crd

Senior Elective: Eastern World Religions (12th) Students examine beliefs and practices of various Eastern traditions beginning with Hinduism and moving eastward through Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. Students compare and contrast these traditions with Christianity and other monotheisms through readings, discussions, media presentations, and field trips. Study reveals the fundamental human need for the Divine helps students gain skills in relating to other peoples and cultures in the world and gain greater depth and appreciation of their own faith by exploring similarities and differences between Christianity and other religions. .5 Crd Senior Elective: Western World Religions (12th) Students examine beliefs and practices of Western traditions focusing primarily on Judaism and Islam. The course concludes with a brief survey of the major Eastern religions. Students compare and contrast these traditions with Christianity and other monotheisms through readings, discussions, media presentations, and field trips. By understanding the fundamental human need for the Divine, students gain skills in relating to other peoples and cultures in the world and gain greater depth and appreciation of their own faith by exploring similarities and differences between Christianity and other religions. .5 Crd

1 semester Computer .50 credit 4 January/May Term experiences .25 credit each

5


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Lastly the study turns to the modern literary and cinematic retellings and perspectives. .5 Crd

The History of Christianity (10th) Students continue study in Biblical history begun in the freshman year and take up the birth of the Christian Church in the book of Acts and its growth as seen in the epistles, then study the historical and theological development of Christianity to the present day. Course objectives include: understanding how the church made the transition from a persecuted minority to an empowered majority in the years from Constantine to the Middle Ages; studying the impact of the Reformation on Christianity; investigating the influence of the church on the art, literature, and architecture of Western Civilization; comprehending the effect of the Great Awakening on American Christianity; gaining an appreciation of the depth and diversity of God’s Kingdom in the present day. 1 Crd

Senior Elective: Israel in the World (12th) Students explore the dynamics of history, religions, and cultures of Israel. James Michener’s The Source forms the main text with the Bible and other sources as supplemental reading. Students see the struggles of history and religion throughout the past millennia which give insight into the complexity of the current Middle East crisis. Myths of the region are exposed as propagated by politicians and religionists in their battle for control of the region. Students appreciate how Christians must engage deeply in the world, avoiding mistakes and missteps of the past. Honors .5 Crd Senior Elective: Jesus and the Gospels (12th) Through analysis of biblical scholarship and current New Testament archaeology, students examine the historical, cultural, economic, and geographical context of Jesus in order to understand him as a historical figure as well as to better understand his message as it was heard by his historical audience. The course gives attention to the historical, cultural, economic, geographical, and communal context of the audience of the four canonical gospels-Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John so students may understand their variegated presentations of the life of Jesus. .5 Crd

Christian Thought and Spirituality (11th) Students begin to think theologically about their faith. Students read and examine some of the great minds of Christianity, as they ponder why the righteous suffer, wrestle with the relationship of faith to contemporary issues, ask how to grow deeper in their spirituality, and call the faith their own. Course objectives include: enabling students to apply Biblical information to life situations; learning to think about what they call their faith; providing a safe environment to ask hard questions about Christianity. 1 Crd

Senior Elective: Bio-Ethics (12th) Students explore moral and ethical questions raised in the fields of medicine and biotechnology. Students examine issues surrounding the moral status of human life and personhood at its very beginning and then address questions raised in abortion, assisted reproductive technologies, embryonic stem cell research, reproductive cloning, experimental research, genetics, transplantation, allocation of medical resources, euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. As students examine medical and bioethical issues, they explore the foundations for moral thought and ethics and understand major approaches to the field of ethics, such as virtue theory, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism and ethical egoism. Students are asked to examine issues from a Biblical and theological perspective with the task of identifying the contours of a distinctly Christian world view and ethic. .5 Crd

Senior Elective: Origins and the Bible (12th) Students explore in depth the message of the Bible as it relates to Origins. Students examine other cosmologies from the ancient Near East, biblical passages pertaining to Creation, and a history of their interpretations. Students examine scientific explanations of the origin of the universe, especially the appearance of humans. The work of Darwin, the development of his theory, and modern critiques of his theory will raise topics about the ways the Bible and science have been integrated, especially relating to Creation. Honors .5 Crd Senior Elective: The Nature of Scripture (12th) Students consider such questions as: How do we know the Bible is true? Students study the Bible in depth and explore questions raised about it in the post-modern world. This class is well suited to those interested in continued study of the Bible and religion in a collegiate setting. Students analyze Exodus 1-15, use readings from religious, historical, literary, folklorist, and feminist perspectives, then explore the stories’ later retellings from the ancient world including Philo, Josephus, the New Testament and others.

Community Service Hour Graduation Requirement CHCA MSL High School Graduation requirements include 120 hours of community service, including hours of direct contact. A community service contract must be completed for each project. This contract must be documented and verified by the agency where the service is performed. •

We believe the spirit of community service at CHCA ought to reflect our commitment to follow Christ. In Christ’s teachings and examples we see that He placed special emphasis upon serving those less fortunate, such as the poor, widows, and children. We believe students and society would benefit greatly from direct involvement with people versus taskoriented jobs.

What does count: Community Service may be defined as unpaid work performed to benefit the community – whether emotional, material, or spiritual. Community service is to be completed through a non-profit agency or event or to a person in the community who would be considered disadvantaged. What does not count: Please keep in mind that service completed for profit-making businesses/services or individuals who can afford to pay for services rendered, and for family members, including family owned businesses, are not considered community service. Babysitting counts only if approved by the Outreach Office. Neither training nor practicing count. Requirements: 1. Students are to perform 50% or more of their community service hours in direct participation with underserved populations, which may be defined as the poor, elderly, handicapped, the widow, orphan, and stranger (homeless). Direct service involves students engaging with people. Preparing goods for distribution to underserved people are not direct contact hours. 2. Inclusive to the 120 hours of community service hours, students are to complete two mission projects, one of which must be a CHCA High School Mission Project. Students are to complete one mission project by the end of their sophomore year and a second mission project by the end of the first semester of their senior year. To graduate a student must complete 1 mission project for every 2 years enrolled; 2 mission projects for 3 and 4 years enrolled. Non-CHCA mission projects must be pre-approved by the Outreach Office. 3. Mission hours counted are those in which the student is engaged in direct service/ministry. Hours not counted in the 120 hour requirement are: training, travel, sleeping, eating, social time, and recreation. 4. Students lacking 30 hours of service for each academic year and at least 1 mission project by end of sophomore year will not be eligible for extra-curricular activities until hours are completed and documented in the high school Outreach Office. 5. Hours are to be completed outside of normal school hours. 6. Record of service hours performed is due immediately after the service is completed.

4

37


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School provision to grant credit for course work accomplished by non-traditional means A provision within the Ohio state budget bill (Am. Sub. H.B. 153) exempts nonpublic schools from the requirement to offer credit flexibility as an instructional option for students. Please note that the provision still permits nonpublic schools to include credit flexibility within their educational options. That decision now falls within the authority of the nonpublic school governing board. [Non Public Schools ODE Newsletter, Winter 2012] CHCA Implementation of How Students Will Earn Credit Students may earn credits through any of the following or a combination thereof: a) the completion of courses b) testing out or otherwise demonstrating mastery of the course content; or c) pursuit of one or more "educational options" a) Completion of Courses In terms of ways students will earn credit, Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy will clearly continue to provide credit through "seat time," where 120 contact hours equals one high school credit. We anticipate that the vast majority of our students will continue to accrue credit this way. b) Testing out or Otherwise Demonstrating Mastery A second option for students is testing out or otherwise demonstrating mastery of a course. The state guidelines give the school the choice of using various commercial assessments (such AP exams and assessments in mathematics or world languages) or locally developed assessments. The process and procedures available to students who want to earn credit through the demonstration of mastery are a local determination. Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy made the decision that "testing-out" may not mean a single paper-pencil, high stakes exam, but rather incorporates multiple measures of student learning. The process includes the completion of applicable quarter or semester exams, or an exam to be named such as commercially available for world languages or forthcoming “end of course exams” as part of the Ohio Department of Education graduation requirement, and one of the following: 1. research paper 2. project-based learning assignment 3. portfolio of work 4. performance (when applicable for courses such as band) and/or other demonstration or performance-based task. Students begin the process by submitting a request to the High School Principal or Flex Credit Coordinator announcing in writing their intent to enter the testing out / demonstrating mastery process and the course they seek to test out of. The Department provides the course benchmarks from the CHCA benchmarked curriculum, a course syllabus, and texts. The Principal or Flex Credit Coordinator will schedule a meeting to include the student, parent, members of the department of the course requested in order to agree on the test out process (the exam(s) plus additional project), dates, times, and locations of testing . Credit granted this way may receive a letter grade or be graded pass/fail to be determined by mutual agreement. All directions and grading criteria or rubrics used to determine the student's grade would be agreed upon by the department in which the credit applies and the student requesting “test out / demonstrating mastery.” The content and processes evaluated during the “testing out” process will align with the CHCA benchmark curriculum. Should no agreement be reached, the school will record the credit as pass/fail on the transcript if mastery is achieved. Mastery is demonstrated by the student achieving a minimum of 80% (B-) on the comprehensive assessments. The student who pursues this option needs to understand that pass/fail might disadvantage that student in applying for colleges or during the transition to post-secondary life. 38

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 CHRISTIAN STUDIES Vision At the heart of our Christian faith is the belief that God is a personal God who reveals to humanity His nature, His redemptive purpose in history, and His love for all creation. Also central to our faith is the crucified and risen Jesus Christ and our belief that the “son of God became a man so that humanity could become children of God” (C.S. Lewis, Mere Christianity). It is our conviction that in understanding the incarnate God, we come to understand our own nature and purpose, for we are created in God’s image. Given these core convictions, the purpose of the Christian Studies curriculum is to create an environment in which we listen to God speak to us through the words of Scripture, encourage a love of learning and the exercise of reason, gain wisdom from the historic voices and traditions of the Church, and seek to understand our own human experience within this world. The goals of this curriculum are therefore to i) develop the student holistically; ii) allow students to articulate a distinctly Christian world view; and iii) encourage students to pursue excellence in order to engage God’s world. Standards What a CHCA student will know and be able to do in Christian Studies: l Explain God’s love for humanity and a desire for a relationship which yields a life lived in imitation and service to Christ l Explain God’s purpose in restoring humanity and creation into right relationship and humanity’s participation in building the Kingdom of God l Explain the role and value of Scripture, reason, tradition, and experience in theologically forming a Christian world view l Explain the nature of the triune God: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit l Explain the unique nature of Christ as fully divine and fully human l Explain the tools and steps in the responsible reading and interpretation of Scripture and its application to life l Explain the nature of humanity including as made in the image of God yet fallen l Explain God’s redemptive work through Christ for salvation l Explain the importance of spiritual formation through classic spiritual disciplines including prayer, meditation, fasting, study, simplicity, solitude, submission, service, confession, worship, guidance and celebration l Explain the relevance of Church history and historical theology in the formation of faith and appreciation for the diversity of God’s Kingdom l Explain the importance of applying a theologically formed Christian world view into ethics, service and every aspect of vocation and life. Sequence 9 10 Old/New Testament History of Christianity Covenants Required for graduation: 3.5 Crd in Christian Studies

11 Christian Thought & Spirituality

12 Senior Elective

Electives: Within the Senior Elective category exists course choice. Enrichments/Highlights: Possible trips to Israel and Japan, Field trips include Hebrew Union College, Synagogue, In-school Seder, church visits, and Islamic Center visit. through Scripture; becoming familiar with Ancient Near Eastern cultures of Sumer, Babylon, Assyria, Syrian Levant, and Egypt in relation to Western Civilization studied in 9th grade and with multimedia resources; investigating religion / traditions of Judaism in shared study with English 9 and English 9 VT while reading Chaim Potok’s The Chosen. 1 Crd

CHRISTIAN STUDIES Old and New Testament Covenants (9th) Students overview the Bible from Genesis through the Gospels, with special attention to God’s covenants with Israel and humanity. Objectives include: understanding the foundations of Bible study; becoming familiar with the content of the Bible, particularly as it pertains to God’s covenants with humanity; and hearing the voice of God

3


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Grade Scale: A = 90-100

B = 80-89

GPA Scale for academic courses: A = 4.0 B = 3.0

C = 70-79

D = 60-69

C = 2.0

D = 1.0

F = 59 & below

GPA Scale for Honors Level Courses (includes VT, Vertical Team, designated): A = 4.5 B = 3.5 C = 2.5 D = 1.0 GPA Scale for Advanced Placement Courses: A = 5.0 B = 4.0 C = 3.0

D = 1.0

GPA Scale for High Honors and Honors recognition: High Honors = 3.75 – 4.0 Honors = 3.5 – 3.749 Selected courses offer dual credit under the Xavier University Collegium. We publish this statement of program with trust in its validity and the belief that we will grow as an institution by making widely known our practices.

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 The school must receive a notice of student intent to participate in Flex Credit before May 1 for Summer Credit, on or before August 1 for First Semester or year-long credit, and before November 20 for Second Semester credit. For Demonstrating Mastery/Testing Out, a student has 60 days from the plan approval date to complete all assessments. c) Pursuit of Alternative Educational Options A third required option is for students to develop a plan for pursuing an alternative educational option. The state guidelines offer examples of such options as "distance learning, educational travel, independent study, an internship, music, arts, after school program, community service or engagement project and sports." Independent study is when a student proposes to execute a course already named in the CHCA MLS High School Course of Study for the given school year but to do so by alternative means. Sometimes this means the student embarks on totally self-paced learning or may engage a tutor or may use community resources. The student and family compose the detailed learning plan and seek approval. The student would follow the process listed below for writing a detailed Personal Learning Plan and meet all requirements. Alternative Educational Options require the student meet the detailed Personal Learning Plan explained here. The student interested in pursuing an alternative educational option must write a detailed Personal Learning Plan that includes the following elements: 1) Course description, syllabus, and rationale. A narrative that describes the motivation for the alternative option, the specific topics that will be studied (a syllabus), what the student wishes to gain from such a program, and the tangible and intangible results of the learning plan. The narrative must include a listing of specific course objectives and desired outcomes, along with how those outcomes will be achieved and measured. Students must discuss how assessment will be done, how often, and what criteria will be used in doing such assessment This Plan will include how the CHCA benchmark curriculum learning and competencies will be met and assessed, and identify any parallels to the CHCA course. It will be the methods to achieve the learning that will differ, but the Department reviewing the Plan must find that the learning evidenced is congruent with the CHCA course for which the student seeks credit. CHCA and its faculty within departments will review any distance learning providers named in a Personal Learning Plan to insure the integrity and accreditation of such provider and may withhold approval of the Personal Learning Plan if such a provider does not meet with CHCA approval.

Dean Nicholas, PhD CHCA Martha S. Lindner High School Principal

2) Textbooks and/or Resources. Students must list the textbooks and/or resources that will be used. 3) Meeting Schedule. Students must include a specific schedule of when the student will meet with and/or have contact with his or her proposed off-campus teacher, supervisor, or program director. The student must have a CHCA High School teacher of record agree to be his or her sponsor for the Personal Learning Plan, even if the learning plan is based on an off-campus program. The student must also indicate who the lead contact person off campus is. The proposed Personal Learning Plan must be presented to the appropriate department chair. The school must receive a notice of student intent to participate in Flex Credit before May 1 for Summer Credit, on or before August 1 for First Semester or year-long credit, and before November 20 for Second Semester credit. For Demonstrating Mastery/Testing Out, a student has 60 days from the plan approval date to complete all assessments. No extensions on these deadlines will be allowed. Members from the department will meet with the student and parents to understand the plan and mutually agree on the credit being sought and the grading options. Should no agreement be reached about how the grading will be accomplished, the achievement on all assessments must average at minimum 80% and will be recorded as a pass/fail on the transcript. The student should realize that pass/fail might disadvantage a student during the transition to post-secondary life. The department will make a decision regarding the proposal within two weeks of that meeting. 2

39


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013

Issuance of credit, once the Personal Learning Plan has been approved, will be determined by the CHCA teacher of record (with input from the off-campus sponsor if one is utilized), even if the program involves an off-campus activity, program, or project system. If, in the course of the student's regular meeting schedule with the CHCA teacher of record, that teacher believes that the student is not making sufficient progress in accordance with the Personal Learning Plan, the teacher of record will write a letter of concern to the student, his or her parents, the off-campus sponsor (if there is one), and the High School Principal If, after a subsequent meeting, the CHCA teacher of record still believes that the student is making insufficient progress towards agreed-upon objectives and competencies, then a letter of warning will be written that indicates the student is in danger of not receiving credit for his or her course work. Again, issuance of credit will ultimately be determined by the CHCA teacher of record. A Personal Learning Plan for Flex Credit that is not completed will be recorded as a Fail grade on the student transcript. According to state law, schools must award high school credit for college credit. ORC 3313.613 states, "If a course comparable to the course successfully completed under this section is offered by the school district, the district board shall award comparable credit for the completed equivalent course. If no comparable course is offered by the school district, the district board shall grant to the student an appropriate number of credits in a similar subject area."

incinnati Hills Christian Academy Martha S. Lindner High School provides for students a Christian environment where the best in academics, enrichment opportunities, resource support, and extracurricular activities builds on the elementary and middle school experiences. The high school strives to develop, honor, and validate the talent and interests of each student in academics, athletics, fine and performing arts, and performing Christian outreach. We honor the diverse student population, challenge students to leadership, community outreach, and academic excellence in our Christcentered environment.

Should a student not complete the Flex Credit course after letters of concern, warning and communication with the teacher of record, a fail grade will be recorded on the transcript. Unless the minimum 80% average of assessments is accomplished, the course will be recorded as a fail. A student has one opportunity to achieve a given course credit through Flex Credit Should a student fall ill or otherwise have circumstances that prevent on time completion the Flex Credit course for award of credit, the course will be re-taken using the “seat time� option.

For students graduating 2013 and before:

Students need to have a Personal Learning Plan in place and approved before credit may be given. Students who seek credit after the fact (after they have begun or completed their proposed learning alternative) without pre-approval will not receive credit. Students who transfer into Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School bring with them a transcript that includes courses for which credit has been granted by virtue of "seat time" or by alternative means (testing out of a course or through an alternative educational option). The State guidelines indicate a school must accept credit earned via Flex Credit from an Ohio school provided the school met the state's minimum operating standards of OAC Chapter 3301-35 "Local board policies may accept credit from other educational providers including on-line providers in accordance with the operating standards" (note the use of the word "may," not "must"). Students transferring into CHCA MSL High School who are in process of a Flex Credit course may have that course plan evaluated and may not receive credit. In addition, all transcript credits are also considered in the placement of students into the proper courses. Students who seek early graduation must meet with the CHCA MSL High School Principal and the College Counselor eighteen months ahead of their desired graduation date in order to prepare an overall strategy for achieving their goal. If their strategy involves the testing out/demonstrating mastery category of required courses and/or alternative educational options, they must follow all the procedures listed for each option for submitting and receiving approval, and monitoring as outlined above. Ohio High School Athletic Association and the NCAA Any courses taken using alternative means that students wish to conform to the Ohio High School Athletic Association guidelines for student athletic eligibility or that fall under the NCAA core course guidelines should be scrutinized for meeting these requirements when the student applies for the alternative course approval. Courses for which the student "tests out" do not qualify for meeting course load requirements for eligibility.

C

This Course of Study sets out the academic program for the High School. The academic program fulfills the school vision, mission and core values statements and seeks continuously to improve. We give honor and glory to God and see His blessing on this school and our efforts as we stand for excellence in education in a Christ-centered environment. A rigorous college preparatory curriculum includes Advanced Placement courses and a community service requirement of 120 hours. A two week intercession term alternating January and May is when CHCA High School enriches its curriculum with experiential learning. This term is part of the CHCA academic program, course grades appear on the transcript, are calculated in the cumulative GPA, and each intercession term carries a .25 credit. Recommended credits exceed the State of Ohio requirements and minimum entrance requirements for most colleges and universities.

To earn a CHCA diploma students must achieve the following 24 credits: 4 English 1 Elective 1 Fine Art 3 Mathematics 3 Social Studies .5 Computer 3 Science 3.5 Christian Studies 1 Jan./May Term 3 World Language .5 Physical Education1 Pass Ohio Graduation Test (5) .5 Health CHCA recommends students achieve the following 28 credits 4 English 1 Elective 1 Fine Art 4 Mathematics 4 Social Studies .5 Computer 4 Science 3.5 Christian Studies 1 Jan./May Term 4 World Language .5 Health Pass Ohio Graduation Test (5) .5 Physical Education1 1 CHCA permits 2 full seasons of interscholastic sports, cheerleading, or marching band to satisfy the PE requirement, provided the student take .5 credit in another area, not PE. For students graduating 2014 and beyond: To earn a CHCA diploma students must achieve the following 25 credits: 4 English 1 Elective3 .5 Fine Art2 4 Mathematics 3 Social Studies .5 Computer 3 Science 3.5 Christian Studies .5 Speech 1 Jan./May Term 3 World Language .5 Physical Education1 .5 Health Pass Ohio Graduation Test (5) or the named assessments CHCA recommends students achieve the following 28 credits 4 English 1 Elective3 4 Mathematics 4 Social Studies 4 Science 3.5 Christian Studies 4 World Language .5 Health .5 Physical Education1 1

2 3

40

.5 Fine Art2 .5 Computer .5 Speech 1 Jan./May Term Pass Ohio Graduation Test (5) or the named assessments

CHCA permits 2 full seasons of interscholastic sports, cheerleading, or marching band to satisfy the PE requirement, provided the student take .5 credit in another area, not PE. CHCA requires .5 Fine Art credit grades 9-12 PE courses may not serve as electives

1


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Note NCAA requires courses taken by alternative means must be so indicated on transcripts, while the Ohio Department of Education requires high schools not to differentiate a course by name or grade as taken by alternative means. Please review the statements below about NCAA requirements sent by Ohio Superintendent of Education on June 7, 2010: Recent information sent to schools from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Eligibility Center regarding prospective Division I student-athletes and coursework taken in nontraditional classroom settings may impact school district credit flexibility plans. The NCAA guidance applies to all student-athletes entering a Division I NCAA college or university on or after Aug. 1, 2010. Visit http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/eligibility_center/OVN/Nontraditional_Course_FAQ/engage.html Specifically, schools are advised to counsel prospective Division I student-athletes not to use the “test-out option” of credit flexibility. They also should advise students that any coursework earned via credit flexibility needs to be comparable in length, content and rigor to credits earned in a traditional classroom setting. The course also must be four-year college-preparatory in nature and have a defined time period for completion. Although, in general, ODE recommends that districts list “credit flexibility” credits on student transcripts in the same manner as credits earned via traditional classroom settings, the NCAA requires that any credits earned through nontraditional ways (e.g., distance learning, online, credit recovery) must be so designated on the transcripts of potential Division I student athletes. Schools should note on student transcripts submitted to the NCAA for review which course credits were earned through nontraditional ways, or attach an addendum with the explanation. The designation of credits on the transcript applies only for NCAA purposes. If in doubt, contact the NCAA Eligibility Center for specific advice on this issue. (June 7, 2010. Ohio Dept. of Education EdConnection) Appeals and Review Process

" '...Of all the commandments. which is the most important?' " " 'The most important one,' answered Jesus, 'is this: Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is this: Love your neighbor as yourself. There is no commandment greater than these.' " (New International Version, Mark 12. 28-31)

If the appropriate department denies a student's alternative learning credit proposal, the student may appeal to the Credit Flexibility Review Panel, which is an interdisciplinary body comprised of faculty, Guidance office personnel, and a school administrator. A student has a maximum of three (3) days from the denial of his petition by the department to indicate that he wishes to appeal the department's decision. The student must contact the High School Principal or Flex Credit Coordinator within those three (3) days; no extensions will be permitted. Once a student appeals to the Credit Flexibility Review Panel, the Panel will convene within one week for an appellate hearing. The student, the student's parents/guardian(s), the department chair, and the Review Panel will meet to hear the student's appeal, and the Review Panel will render its decision. The Review Panel will evaluate if all steps in pursuit of alternative educational options were met as stated in the Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Martha S. Lindner High School Credit Flexibility Statement. Communication with Parents and Students The CHCA Credit Flexibility statement will be posted as part of the CHCA MSL High School Course of Study booklet on the Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Web site, so that it may be accessed at any time. Copies of the Credit Flexibility statement will be available from the High School Guidance Office.

41


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 College and University Acceptances 2009 ~ 2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS Graduation Requirements

1

Christian Studies

3

English / Language Arts

6

bold denotes matriculation Abilene Christian University

Calvin College

Drexel University

Agnes Scott College

Campbell University

Duke University

Alvernia University

Capernwray Bible School

Duquesne University

American University

Capital University

Earlham College

Anderson University

Carnegie Mellon University

Eastern Kentucky University

Arizona State University

Carthage College

Eastern Michigan University

Art Institute of Cincinnati

Case Western Reserve University

Eckerd College

Asbury University

Cedarville University

Elon University

Ashland University

Central Michigan University

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Auburn University

Centre College

Evangel University

Baldwin Wallace College

Chatham University

Florida Institute of Technology

Ball State University

Cincinnati Christian University

Florida International University

Barry University

Cincinnati State Technical & Community College

Florida State University

Baylor University Bellarmine University Belmont University Benedictine College Berea College Berklee College of Music Binghamton University Biola University Boston University Bowling Green University Brown University Butler University California Polytechnic State University California State University-Fullerton California State Los Angeles California State University-Northridge California State UniversitySan Marcos

Clemson University

Fordham University

Mathematics

10

Science

13

Social Studies

16

World Languages

20

Music Fine Arts

24

Visual Fine Arts

26

Health

28

Physical Education

29

Technology

31

Grade Level Course Options

33

Community Service Requirements

37

Credit Flexibility Statement

38

College and University Acceptances

42

Cleveland State University

Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering

Coastal Carolina University

Furman University

College of Charleston

Georgia Institute of Technology

College of Mount St. Joseph

Georgetown College

College of Holy Cross

Gordon College

College of William & Mary

Grace College

College of Wooster

Grove City College

Colorado School of Mines

Hanover College

Colorado State University

Harding University

Columbia College

Heidelberg College

Columbus College of Art & Design

High Point University

Cornell University

Hillsdale College

Davidson College

Hiram College

Denison University

Hocking College

DePaul University

Hope College

DePauw University

Huntington University

Courses listed are offered regularly. Some courses are offered as enrollment and faculty availability permit.

Indiana State University

Course of Study prepared by: Karen Smeltzer, PK-12 Academics

California University of Pennsylvania Drake University

42


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 Indiana Technical College Indiana University Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State Milligan College

Reed College Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Rhodes College

Mississippi State University

Robert Morris College

Indiana Wesleyan University

Monmouth College

Indian River Community College

Moore College of Art & Design

Jacksonville University

Morehead State University

James Madison University

Morehouse College

John Carroll University

Mount Vernon Nazarene University

Johns Hopkins University

Murray State University

Kalamazoo College

Muskingum College

Kent State University

New York University

Kenyon College

North Carolina State University

Kettering University

Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine

School of Visual Arts

Northeastern University

Shawnee State University

Northern Arizona University

Sinclair Community College

Northern Kentucky University

Southern Connecticut State

Northwestern University

Southern Methodist University

Notre Dame College

St. Edward's University

Oberlin College

St. Johns University-Queens

Ohio Dominican University

St. Olaf College

Ohio Northern University

State University of West Georgia

Ohio University

Stetson University

Ohio Christian University

Stony Brook University

Ohio Wesleyan University

Tabor College

Oklahoma Christian University

Taylor University

Old Dominican University

Tennessee Technological University

Old Dominion University

Texas A&M University

Otterbein University

Texas Christian University

Palm Beach Atlantic University

Texas Tech University

Pennsylvania State University

The Citadel

Pepperdine University

The King's College

Purdue University

The Ohio State University

Quinnipiac University

The University of Findlay

Knox College Lee University Lehigh University Lewis and Clark College Liberty University Lipscomb University Louisiana State University

"Thoughtful Christians know that if we obey the Bible's great commandment to love God with our whole mind, as well as with everything else, then we will study the splendor of God's creation in the hope of grasping part of the ingenuity and grace that form it. One way to love God is to know and love God's work. Learning is therefore a spiritual calling: properly done it attaches us to God. In addition, the learned person has, so to speak, more to be Christian with. "

Loyola Marymount University

Excerpted from Engaging God's World by Cornelius Plantinga Jr. Copyright Š 2002 by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company

Marietta College

Loyola University Chicago Lynn University Macalester College

Marquette University Marshall University Maryland Institute College of Art Mercyhurst College Miami University Miami University-Hamilton Michigan State University Middle Tennessee State University

43

Rollins College Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Saint Joseph's College Saint Louis University Salem College Samford University Santa Clara University Savannah College of Art & Design Scarlet Oaks Fire Academy


Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy MSL High School Course of Study 2012 ~ 2013 University of Florida

Virginia Military Institute

University of Georgia

Virginia Polytechnic Institute

University of Hartford

Wake Forest University

University of Illinois at Chicago

Walsh University

University of IllinoisUrbana Champaign

Washington University in St. Louis

Transylvania University Trinity University

University of Indianapolis

Trinity International University

University of Kentucky

Tulane University

University of Louisville

Tuskegee University

University of Maryland College Park

University of Aberdeen

University of Miami

United States Air Force Academy

University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

United States Naval Academy

University of Mississippi

University of Akron

University of Missouri-Columbia

University of Alabama-Tuscaloosa

University of North Florida

University of Arizona

University of Notre Dame

University of Arkansas

University of Pittsburgh

University of California-Berkeley

University of Richmond

University of California-Davis

University of Rochester

University of California-Irvine

University of St. Andrews (Scotland)

University of California-Los Angeles

University of San Diego

University of California-San Diego

University of South Carolina

University of Central Florida

University of Southern California

University of Charleston

University of South Florida-Tampa

University of Cincinnati

University of Tennessee-Chattanooga

University of Colorado at Boulder

University of Tennessee-Knoxville

University of Connecticut

University of Toledo

University of Dallas

University of Utah

University of Dayton

University of Virginia

University of Delaware

University of Washington

University of Denver

University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Dundee

Urbana University

University of Evansville

Valparaiso University

University of Findlay

Vanderbilt University

The University of North Carolina at Wilmington The University of Texas at Austin Thomas More College Tiffin University

44

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy…Unleashing a passion to learn, to lead, to serve Vision Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy will unleash each student’s God-given gifts through Christ-centered academic excellence. We are devoted to developing the whole person, and instilling a lifelong passion for learning, leading and serving.

Mission

West Liberty University

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy is a Christ-Centered, Non-Denominational, College Preparatory Academy that exists to prepare students intellectually and spiritually for success in higher education and to impact and influence the world according to their unique gifts and talents. This will be accomplished by l Creating an environment that encourages students, faculty, staff and families to develop and live out their relationship in Jesus Christ; l Developing a passion for lifelong learning that leads to thoughtful, effective service through excellent, intentional curriculum and extra-curricular offerings; l Empowering outstanding Christian faculty and staff to fully use their passions and expertise to create engaged critical thinkers; l Fostering an exceptional environment that develops students’ gifts and talents in the arts, athletics, leadership, and additional extra-curricular opportunities for God’s purposes; l Building an engaged school community – encompassing faculty, staff, students, families, alumni, and donors – that reinforces the school’s vision, mission, and core values.

West Virginia University

Core Values: We Believe In

West Virginia Wesleyan College

Christ-Centeredness: ~ Following how Christ himself led, served, taught, loved, and lived; we strive to base all we do on His word.

Waynesburg College Western Kentucky University Westfield State University

Westminster College Westmont College Wheaton College (Illinois) Wheaton College (Massachusetts) Wilmington College Wittenberg University Wright State University Xavier University

Academic Excellence: ~ Reflecting we are an academy of learning, it is our primary, but not exclusive goal to prepare our students academically for college and beyond. The Whole Person: ~ Recognizing all are gifted by God in unique ways, we believe in developing all forms of those spiritual, intellectual, artistic and athletic gifts in each student to their fullest potential. Servant Leadership: ~ Believing in the power of servanthood, servant leadership will be taught, modeled and encouraged to all students, staff and parents so that all are equipped for the situations in life that God calls them to lead. Outreach/Service: ~ Modeling Christ in all we do, we will provide opportunity daily and through special events for students, staff, and parents to share Christ’s love through service and witness to others. Stewardship: ~ Acknowledging we are blessed in many ways, we as a school will model strong fiscal stewardship and will encourage, train and expect students, staff and parents to be wise and generous stewards over their time, talents, and money. The Value of Each Person: ~ Demonstrating biblical equality, we will embrace each individual as a distinct creation of God, ensure an emotionally, socially and physically safe and nurturing environment and intentionally enroll a student body, faculty and staff that reflect the socioeconomic and racial make-up of the community in which we live. A Vibrant Sense of Community: ~ Acting intentionally, we will foster a vibrant, connected culture of caring, fellowship and respect among students, staff and parents. Accountability: ~ Holding ourselves and each other to the highest standards of integrity, excellence and to constant measurable improvement. A Joyful Spirit: ~ Having an attitude of gratitude for God’s blessings that are lived out in every day smiles, laughter, and by celebrating demonstrated character and unique achievements. This results in a contagious joy that connects at the heart-level . (Board Approved May 2011)


U.S. Department of Education Nationally Recognized School of Excellence Association of Christian Schools International Exemplary Program

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Martha S. Lindner High School ď Ť CHCA Administrative Offices 11525 Snider Road Cincinnati, OH 45249 Phone: 513-247-0900 http://www.chca-oh.org

2012 ~ 2013 Unleashing a Passion To Learn, To Lead, To Serve

COURSE OF STUDY

MARTHA S. LINDNER HIGH SCHOOL

HSCourse+of+Study+Booklet+2012-13