Chairish Magazine - April 2021

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VOL 2

CHAIRISH.COM GETS MAG AZIN I SH


G I B T A E R G A RIUM O P S M R E XPLORE E R O F YLE T S OF ATS ER HE OOD H T A EW M E WE AS TH ERE’S A NCHAIRISH H UP, T MING AT RY, AND , O BLO RIGHT, AI HAN NOT HQ: B OFTEN T VINTAGE MORE NED IN A ITION IS ADOR . THIS ED OF OUR PRINT ODBOARDATIONS: A MO G INSPIR TO THE R SPRIN E LETTER HE POWE GS V A L O O N A N D TO M E T H I N S A SE HANGE. S E DESIGN IRS, OF C L SPY AR PED CHA YOU’LD: SCALLO , WAVY BASE TER BUSTS S, AND A IO PLAS NO GLAS OR STUD C MURAM OUTDO ISING NY KO. DREA NED BY R NEDY YANND DESIGPTOR KEN NSORY A UCH SCUL RS ARE SE(LIKE SO M WER OTHERIENTIAL EAR): FLO M EXPE TIME OF YTIONS FRO T THIS MMENDA A PLAYLIS S K RECO S M I L L E R , I T E T R AC I R O W V LE ANCE UR FA O F O I N E A N D D B AC E O U S O M E TO D ND A HER AKE AT H TO, A TAIL TO M IN SAN N. COCKISTER JIU’S HINATOW BY M CISCO’S C FRAN

Every piece of vintage furniture, art or design in the issue is shoppable (even the cover). Prices range from $75 to $5,500, with plenty in between. If something you want has sold, you’ll find similar pieces recommended. With 2,500 new items arriving daily on Chairish, there’s always something unexpected to fall in love with. Shop the edit at CHAIRISH.COM/COLLECTION/MAGAZINISH.


FRONT COVER INTERIORS, FROM TOP: Photograph by Laurey Glenn, STYLING BY DAKOTA WILLIMON (AT THE HOME OF PATRICIA ALTSCHUL). Photograph by Francesco Lagnese/OTTO, INTERIOR DESIGN BY DAVID NETTO.

ER O -F O U N D Y A IR IS H ’S C IC K G O RD ANNA, CH EK D SI BE LOV ED W IT H H ER

DITOR THE E h M O R RF azinis L ET T E s Mag t e G ish C hair h h a i ri s the C f o n io d edit secon e ition. h d t e d ing e to r m p on an o s c l s We d it r m at i n o f a s , . n e e a zin rt s , t r at h o m o s t ) Maga sh sta c i a l ly e m e r f p s n e ey (al go s— ts. Th m u s i n n ew t h i n g c n n i t e s e I’ve b our in ing of llow y ssom o o f l : b e e c th dv i sig n a tray. My de ou as y d a le never t age ! la vin Viva

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SAN FRANCISCO, CA


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S R O O D T U

INTERVIEW BY LAURA BANNISTER PHOTOGRAPHY (INTERIORS) BY MATTHEW WILLIAMS

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Anyone who’s entered the black hole that is YouTube celebrity interiors tours (be it Architectural Digest, New York Magazine’s Interior Lives, or whatever the algorithm recommends into infinity) understands a certain truth about New York apartments: the best ones contain a surprise. You turn the key in an ordinary-seeming door, and enter a universe unto its own: bright pink and zigzagged or with wallpapered ceilings, a gleaming Aladdin’s cave. Brent Neale has one of those apartments, an artful, joyous respite from the city below, located near Central Park. “Because I have three children,” she says, “it needed to be warm and happy, hence all the patterns and colors. But I also wanted there to be an underlying sense of sophistication. It’s a New York apartment so all the rooms have to work together … it’s about scale and color and surprise right?” The jeweler, whose eponymous,

often playful line sees her integrating precious stones from gem dealers and cutters on Manhattan’s 47th Street, has always loved the organic shapes and variegated hues found in nature. Her debut collection was an ode to rain, while petals and mushrooms are constant motifs. It was, perhaps, inevitable the outdoors would seep into her home, be it wallpapers with supersized flower cut-outs or photorealist paintings that could be windows. “I didn’t grow up in an apartment,” she says. “Being outside was a huge part of my childhood. The Gracie papers and Josef Frank textiles all have nature themes. We have an enormous diptych of St. Barts in our bedroom, a painting by Jason Bereswill, which for me is like a portal. There’s another of the Galápagos Islands in the entry. Both remind me of very special trips.”

When decorating, Neale is especially drawn to butterflies, nature’s go-to ambassador for transformation. There are antique butterfly glass domes in her living room (by Dawn Nakamura), a gift from her sister. There is a screenprint by the artist Damien Hirst, entitled Mantra (Diamond Dust), 2011, which uses the real, precious stone dust to depict fluttering creatures. There is a butterfly sofa, where the insects mingle with leaves, like an illustrated issue of National Geographic. Like jewelry, Neale’s collector-chops came from her mother, who took her to gem shows near her native Baltimore as a kid. “Every year I think I turn more into her,” says Neale. “She collects [the tin-glazed pottery] majolica, and now I’m obsessed too. It always has nature themes and tremendous colors.” CHAIRISH.COM


SCALLOP SHAPED

SOFT CURVES

AN ART DECO DREAM


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Invite Only

REMEMBER FANTASY DINNER PARTIES? WE DO. TO TOAST THE (CAUTIOUS) Phoebe Philo RETURN OF HOME “I’m inspired by her revolutionary aesthetic ENTERTAINING, that unites strength and femininity (plus, I ANNA BROCKWAY, collect her vintage Chloe and Celine pieces).” CO-FOUNDER OF CHAIRISH, SHARES FIVE Daniel Craig PEOPLE SHE DREAMS “For obvious reasons.” OF DINING WITH.

Cy Twombly

YL O R BY TR EY TA

DESCRIBE YOUR RELATIONSHIP TO YOUR OWN WRITING DESK. Cultural soothsayer and author of I’m utilizing an eight-seater Artek the bestselling novel, Trivial Pursuits, conference table as my desk, which Raven Smith knows a good desk is a writing requirement, but he’s into the sounds overblown and grandiose— kind that is big enough to host drinks because it is. I tend to travel for work, and though I love the variety a after hours. The Brit’s eclectic floating desk in Venice or a fallen prose—frivolous observations and obelisk in Egypt might riotous witticisms scattered across offer, it’s the coming his book, a regular HE LEGS, home to my own desk T IN L L A Vogue.com column, IT’S OR AND and Instagram— SAYS AUTH UMNIST where the graft hits. L WHAT DOES IT LOOK directly reflects the VOGUE CO H OF THE IT LIKE AND WHAT DO kooky home updates RAVEN SM ATE MILO YOU KEEP IN IT? M M U S N O he publishes to his C N DESK. I like full wood socials, including a BAUGHMA with minimal embellishment pink-striped bedroom because I’m a fusspot. I find looking (in shades made just for him) and a at too many things a distraction so cantilevered wooden loveseat. We spoke to Smith, as he enters a period it’s deliberately minimal, just a clamped-on Dyson lamp. I’d quite like of hibernation to draft a follow-up a clamp-on champagne bucket, too, novel, to find out which table he’s in case any hot neighbors swing by. been dreaming of. TELL ME ABOUT YOUR DREAM TABLE. WHAT FEATURES MAKE A GOOD It would be this Milo Baughman DESK, IN YOUR OPINION? Parsons extension dining table-comeMy legs are my best asset and I partners desk. What an absolute beast expect the same from a desk. The top has to feel both luxurious and ancient of a desk—all that polished burl gets my juices flowing. This desk is more so it’s like I’m typing on top of history worthy of memoir-writing rather than itself (I am pretentious). I assume I a few short tweets, that’d be rude. would prefer a marble top although I’ve never actually written at one.

How to MIX and (MIS)MATCH COLORED GLASSWARE NOTHING SAYS “PLEASE ENJOY MY GARDEN PARTY” LIKE A CACOPHONY OF VINTAGE VESSELS. HERE’S A FEW SIMPLE RULES FOR … WELL, BREAKING THE RULES.

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1. When it comes to cut glass, intricate patterns are key. They tend to feel freshest on short, stout tumblers. 2. Mixing hues is great—but don’t span the whole rainbow. Try and keep it to three or four shades. 3. Everything works with cobalt blue. (If there’s an exception, we don’t want to hear it.)

Julia Sarr-Jamois

"I love her sartorial style—and I’m inspired by the fresh thinking she and her team are bringing to British Vogue.”

Debbie Harry

“My childhood hero and style North Star.”

M O O N L I G H T I N M A Y

LATE NIGHT TUN DINING, DAN ES FOR AND STARING CING AT THE SKY. LI ST EN AT: SO CI AL .C HA IR IS H. CO M /S

POTI FY

COME LIVE W

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DO ROTH Y AS HB Y

STORM

The BEST Spring BLOOM

ACCORDING NEW YORK F TO L LEWIS MILLE ORIST R

“To me, the m ost underrated , dark horse sp ring flower LOVE IN OUT is the jonquil. ER SPACE (V It is the most ocal) understated an SU N RA d elegant sister of the br ash daffodil. LOVE VIBES Jonquils are so TH E EM OTI O delicate, NS sweet and poet ic . They SPACE TALK remind me of E ng land. Their AS HA PU TH scent is light an LI d conjures up spring like SPRING AFFA nothing else! IR DO NN A SU M [T hey evoke] cris M ER p, cool air, fresh soil and the smell of GLOW WORM grass and dam p moss.” O ’FLYN N MIDNIGHT IN PECKHAM CH AO S RA RE SI LK

IN TH E CB D

MESSAGES F

ROM THE ST A

TH E RA H BA ND

FULL MOON M R. FI NG ER S

MR. GOODNIG PR IN CE

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6AM MIMOSA DJ BO RI NG

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LE W IS M IL LE R AR RA N G EM EN T, STAR RI N G TH E JO N Q U IL .

IN TE RV IE W

“He’s my favorite artist. He reinterpreted classical themes in a wholly modern way.”


S WE’VE E N E C S D O O F N E E R C SILVER S

GOT ON REPLAY

NG IF YOU’RE NOT BREAKI MPANY, BREAD WITH GOOD CO ELL W THEN YOU MIGHT AS DO IT. SE EL WATCH SOMEONE TING: SI VI MAY WE SUGGEST RE

Spring Scents

gues, courtesy Towers of pastel merin ent Marie ulg ind the for , of Ladurée Antoinette (2006)

a $5 milkshake with Uma Thurman drinking Pulp Fiction (1994) a cherry on top in of mashed potatoes An enormous mountain Third Kind (1977) the of in Close Encounters ng up the “best Two besotted dogs slurpi ’s Lady and the ney spaghetti in town” in Dis Tramp (1955) shrimp being sliced Seductive close-ups of a ve (2009) and swallowed in I Am Lo ling water and The crackle of fire, bubb ner scene of din the in ing wine bottles popp Babette’s Feast (1987) and steam rising The clanking of cutlery pans in The Cook, n che kit in long, unbroken r Lover (1989) He d an fe Wi His The Thief,

T AN (INCOMPLETE) LIS UR YO NG HI OF EVERYT NOSE SHOULD BE . SAMPLING THIS SEASON

LLEY SWEET LILY OF THE VA MELTING SNOW CLEAN LAUNDRY S FRESHLY MOWN GRAS GNOLIAS YOUR NEIGHBOR’S MA , DEFOILED CHOCOLATE BUNNIES E TONICFLORIDA WATER, TH ES ITS US AT TH E GN LO CO LIKE ULA ORIGINAL 1808 FORM DAFFODILS WAFTING

(ODDLY SPICY) COFFEE

TRICHOR POTTING SOIL AND PE EARTH) MP DA OF T EN SC (THE

AN EMAIL THREAD WITH SALLY BAKER —FORMER AMERICAN IN PARIS, CHAIRISH SELLER, AND FOUNDER OF LE BAZAR COASTAL, A PRINT-LADEN HOMEGOODS AND FASHION LABEL INSPIRED BY FRENCH SEASIDE MARKETS. INTERVIEW BY LAURA BANNISTER

FIRSTLY, TELL US ABOUT THE LIMITED-EDITION FABRICS YOU SELL AT LE BAZAR COASTAL, AND WHAT YOU’RE LOOKING FOR IN A GREAT PRINT. Our collections are typically 15 pieces or less per series—all hand blocked and finished in Jaipur, India. This multilayered, painstakingly precise art form is the base layer of each home and fashion piece. Picking fabrics for collections is great fun. I look through roughly 100+ fabrics a week, selecting only the ones that stop me in my tracks. I look for a balance of color, spatial arrangement and overall design. How does it make me feel? Does it remind me of a place we’ve traveled? If a blocked design feels right, but the colors are wrong, I work with my team and artisans to mix our own dyes and block exclusive fabrics. Currently, I’m exploring the use of vintage blocks. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE SPRING MEMORIES? Living in Paris taught me to truly appreciate springtime: the joy of

ger at Michelin-starred Garrett Marks, bar mana n n Francisco’s Chinatow hotspot Mister Jiu’s in Sa cocktail recipe for the shares a lunar themed warm, heady evenings. Red Envelope, a go-to on ist, it packs a flavorful According to the mixolog us and tart.” punch: “bitter, herbaceo

COCKTAIL HOUR:

Ingredients:

1 oz blanco tequila nte (amaro: vegetal, 1/2 oz Santa Maria Al Mo herbaceous, menthe) ol syrup 1/2 oz hibiscus chili arb ce jui e lim 1/2 oz ice to a Add all ingredients and strain into d an ake Sh cocktail shaker. and top ice d Ad ss. gla il kta a tall coc soda). b clu ro ma (A with Casamara syrup: To make the hibiscus chili ter wa 4 cups 4 cups sugar 1/2 cup hibiscus tea 10 chili arbol pods d chili and tea, Bring water to a boil, ad mixture cool to room the Let then stir in sugar. ough a mesh strainer. temperature, and pass thr

riding my bike in the sunshine and admiring just-blooming trees. I think of weekend picnics in our favorite pocket park, located behind the Hotel Salomon de Rothschild in the 8’eme. Our three children would not only pack boulangerie treats in our vintage basket, but also our guinea pig, Monsieur Pierre. Lounging in that sweet little park, sipping rosé and watching our California kids goof around is a special memory. HOW WOULD YOU RECREATE THAT FRENCH SPIRITEDNESS VIA AN OUTDOOR TABLE SETTING? I envision a vintage linen tablecloth as the base, layering lighter, colorful linens on top. I’d lean towards blue and pink florals, offset with coordinating stripes. One of my party tricks: tie LE BAZAR COASTAL napkins to the neck of wine and water bottles. For place settings, I’d layer our Gien Oiseaux de Paradis salad plates and vintage cabbage dinner plates atop loopy seagrass chargers. I’d serve drinks in anything from my grandmother’s funky cobalt blue tea goblets to vintage rattan-wrapped water glasses or good old basic stemware. Flowers and tea lights are a must; I’d make bouquets from flowers in and around our yard. While I want guests to know there was great care in preparing, I don’t want it to feel fussy or too matchy. It should be random and fun, like great dinner party conversation. CHAIRISH.COM/SHOP/LEBAZARCOASTAL

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Your walls should know there’s a CHAIRISH ARTIST COLLECTIVE, plus other original works—from paintings to collages—online. Your shelves? Show them the sculptures.

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A E R D S ’ R O T P A SCUL O I D U T S N E D R GA

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BROOKLYN ARTIST KENNEDY YANKO—BEST KNOWN FOR TACTILE SCULPTURES CAST FROM SCRAP METAL—TALKS NATURE AND HER FANTASY STUDIO, PACKED WITH CHAIRISH FINDS. HER NEW SHOW, POSTCAPITALIST DESIRE, OPENS THIS SPRING AT TILTON GALLERY IN NEW YORK. ILLUSTRATION BY LYNNIE Z WORDS BY LAURA BANNISTER PHOTOGRAPH BY MIKE VITELLI

There’s a sculpture in Kennedy Yanko’s 2020 series, Salient Queens—she calls it Judith—that involves a magic trick of sorts. A scrap of metal is suspended from a wall, rusted and bent in such a way that it resembles a beat-up suburban postbox, knocked off its hinges by a bored passerby. Nestled inside an opening is a rose made from a dusty pink paint skin, its thin film curling into exquisite petals, then spilling to the floor like a paint tin frozen mid pour. Like many of the St. Louis-born artist’s works, Judith is best experienced in person. It extends into the viewer’s space, forcing them to make room for it. (Yanko dedicated every work in the show to a woman who taught her to take up space, calling them “nonrepresentational portraiture.”) Yanko’s art toggles between opposites: the gestural machismo of abstract expressionism and something more fluid and ‘feminine.’ Since 2016, she’s been working with metal, first apprenticing in an iron-working factory by her studio. Now she sources scrap metal in Brooklyn’s demolition yards, affixing it to the supple, strangely pretty membranes of dried auto body paint. “Working in found objects makes for an interesting material selection process,” she says. “I have physical responses to the pieces I want to work with.” Most of Yanko’s time is spent in her studio, a space she’s made her second home. It abounds with books on friends and idols, flowers, plants, jars of paint and tools. “My drafting table is a thing of beauty, as is my sky-blue velvet couch. I spend a lot of time sitting there, staring at things until they’re just right.” If Yanko wasn’t there, she’d like to be outside, perhaps by the ocean, whose watery mass she finds “fluid, enveloping, cleansing.” Here, she dreams up her ideal garden studio—a calming oasis in green. She’s also added surfaces that give different sensations, like cast aluminum bamboo chairs that are cool to hot hands, ornate mirrors that play spatial tricks, and a natural-seeming cast resin block bench. “I introduced pieces that would be quiet extensions of the space,” Yanko says, “and that would punctuate bright moments.” Explore Kennedy Yanko’s outdoor favorites in our magazine edit: CHAIRISH.COM/MAGAZINISH.

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Best known for its use on ORNATE RENAISSANCE ceiling moldings, PLASTER still presents a feast for the eyes at ground level.

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THE QUILT

EFFEC T

Once known only as traditional handicrafts, QUILTS add an artful GRAPHIC punch to any interior. CHAIRISH.COM


Sixteen INTERIOR OBSESSIVES, living in cities from San Francisco to Dallas and Boston, share their latest and greatest CHAIRISH FINDS. Johnny Wei

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PH IA , PA

P IE D M O

SAN FRANCISCO, CA

DAL LAS, TX

Tania Sarin

Anthony Rodriguez

S pane

N T, C A

Betsy Bur

nham

EL ES , C A LO S A N G

LO S AN GE LE S,

SAN FRAN CISC O, CA

Margaret Wright

CH ARL ESTON , SC

Brigette Rom

anek

LO S AN GE LE S, CA

NASHVILLE, TN

Beth Diana Smith

LARC HMO NT, NY

Meredith Ellis

DA LLA S, TX

Michael Shome

Hannah Crowell

IRV ING TO N, NJ

Alyssa Coscarelli LO S AN GE LES , CA

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, NY

Liz Caan

Lauren Cha

BR O O KLYN

N E W TO

BACK COVER: A VERY CHAIRISH SPRING BY PHOTOGRAPHER Camila Falquez.

Michele

Benjamin Dhong

Zoe Bonnette

CA

O UT SI DE PH IL AD EL

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PRST STD US POSTAGE PAID ST CLOUD, MN PERMIT NO. 1017


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