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2020 I M PAC T RE P O RT

WE’RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER


WE AIM TO USE THE RESOURCES WE HAVE—OUR VOICE, OUR CENTER, OUR PARTNERS, AND OUR COMMUNITY— TO DRIVE POSITIVE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL CHANGE. CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


T H E Y EA R 2020 HA S TE STE D U S IN WAYS T H AT WER E UNTHINKAB LE J U S T O N E YE AR AGO. THE COVID- 19 PA N D E MIC H AS D IS R U PTE D DA ILY L IFE FOR CLOSE TO TE N MO N TH S IN M OST OF THE COUNTRY — AN D TH E CO MIN G M ONTHS PR OMISE MOR E U N CE R TAIN T Y. TH E NATION FOUND ITSEL F IN TOO MAN Y MO ME N TS OF A NG UISH A ND A NGE R AF TE R SE N SE LE SS SHOOTING S OF B L ACK ME N AN D WO ME N. TIME HA S FELT L IKE IT IS B OTH S TAN D IN G STILL YE T M OVING FA STER THA N E V E R . I N THE MID ST OF SO MU CH U N CE R TAIN T Y AND VOL ATIL IT Y, WE H AV E O N E CLE AR M ESSAGE: WE’R E HER E F O R YO U. J U S T AS YOU R STEA D FA ST COMMITME N T TO TH E CE N TE R F O R U R B A N FA MIL IES HA S GU ID E D U S TH R OU GH T IMES OF UNCER TA INT Y, O U R COMMITME N T TO SER VING YOU, OUR ME MB E R S, AN D O U R COMMUNITIES THR OUGH O U R LIF E ’ S WO R K IS U NWAVER ING. L ET US R ECOMMIT OU R S E LV E S TO THE G OA L OF ACHI E V IN G S OCIAL AN D ECONOMIC EQUA L IT Y F OR ALL. LE T U S REMIND OUR SELVES TH AT W E AR E AL L IN T H IS TOG ETHER .

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WE ARE THE CENTER FOR URBAN FAMILIES A

leading voice in the national conversation on

responsible fatherhood A

support network for Baltimore’s most

vulnerable citizens A

staunch advocate for child support reform at

the state and federal levels A

trainer that helps non-profits across the

country strengthen low-income families

OUR CO R E M I S S I O N I S TO S T R EN G T H EN U RB AN CO M M U N I TI ES BY HE LP I N G FATH ER S AN D FA M I L I ES AC H I EV E S TAB ILI T Y A N D ECO NO M I C S U CC ES S .

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


We were energized in early 2020 when we began to co-design a twogeneration (2Gen) ecosystem initiative with community and parent partners, and with technical assistance from Ascend at the Aspen Institute that moves children and their parents toward educational success and economic security. We had received significant investments from major funders and other investment partners that were committed to CFUF’s mission. These investments provided us with the resources to execute new strategies and solutions, and collaborate with other key partner organizations and systems change makers to improve human services outcomes and achieve racial equity in social and economic mobility. Then, in March, there was noise of a novel coronavirus and our world abruptly changed. We swiftly developed our remote operations plan, whose design team was led by COO Brian Lyght, and converted our direct services programs to virtual engagement under the leadership of Cathy Pitchford, our Director of Programs. We were acutely aware of how the decision to close the building would impact those with the least amount of resources and the greatest need. While nothing can replace the benefit of human interaction, our service delivery and critical operations continued without disruption. We leveraged technology to provide virtual case management services, employment training, and job placement assistance to our members. We were fortunate that a number of funders provided additional emergency resources for our members, those most impacted by the pandemic. Despite the disruption to the economy, our employer partners continued to hire graduates of our STRIVE® job training program.

"O UR STO RY IS ABO UT PER S ISTEN CE, CO N TIN UO US IM PROVEM EN T, AN D A VIS IO N FO R WHAT IS PO SS IBL E."

As the fatigue of the pandemic started settling in, our nation found itself in a moment of anguish and anger after the horrific murder of George Floyd. Nothing could have prepared us for the haunting image of a police officer’s knee on the neck of a fellow American murdered in broad daylight by someone sworn to protect and serve us. Nothing could have prepared us for the senseless murders of black and brown men and women that followed. These murders can be linked to another insidious disease, structural racism. While many have dedicated and given their lives to eradicating this disease, it continues to exist today seemingly unabated, and it must be more widely acknowledged, confronted and dismantled. We must use our collective voices to demand reform, equity, and reconciliation. We all play a role. The Center’s role includes deliberate work with our members to amplify their voices to be heard by policy makers and create platforms for constructive individual and collective action. Input from our members also informs our operating strategy and family strengthening advocacy agenda. Reflecting on this past year, and the past 21 years as a human services organization, our story is about persistence, continuous improvement, and a vision for what is possible. We provide a demanding and human-centered circle of supports to our members grounded in mutual trust and respect. We work with our members to embrace past mistakes in exchange for a commitment to personal and professional development. And we take pride in advocating for policies that promote equity, social justice, and economic mobility for people and communities of color. I am confident that, despite the unimaginable events that occurred this year, we will come through this experience stronger, wiser, and more unified as a City and as a nation. Thank you to our donors for standing with us. Thank you to our members for the inspiration we derive from you through every interaction.

Joseph T. Jones, Jr. Founder, President & CEO

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TRANSFORMING FAMILIES & COMMUNITIES SINCE 1999 Humble Beginnings Since our founding, CFUF has remained at the forefront of addressing some of our City’s most pressing issues, including poverty, unemployment, father-absence, and family disintegration. We maintain an unwavering focus on addressing the key challenges of Baltimore’s urban families by working to connect fathers to their children, creating opportunities for economic and financial security through work, and providing access to other key interventions and supportive services.

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


IMPACTFUL GROWTH 21 years later, a whole generation of Baltimoreans have engaged, strived, and thrived with us— and we’re just getting started. We continue to work to expand our proven program models to new cities across the country while innovating and improving to maximize our impact.

W I T H YOUR SUPPOR T, OUR WO R K IS POS S IB LE

MEMBERS’ HOURLY WAGES HAVE INCREASED TO:

68,891 $13.46 CH ILD R E N’ S LIVES TOUCHED

AV E R AGE WAGE

4,876 $15.84

F U LL-TIME J OB S SECU R E D

31,565

MEN’S AND WOMEN’S LI VE S TR A NSFOR MED

404

J O B PL ACE ME N TS

AVERAGE WAGE IN TRANSPORTATION

$14.60

AVERAGE WAGE IN MANUFACTURING

Data represents 1/1/2019 – 12/31/2019

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OUR PROGRAMS STRIVE® Baltimore

Back to Business

An intensive 3-week workshop that combines tangible

A 3-day job readiness training that focuses on

skills, such as resume writing and interviewing, with

refreshing the soft skills and job search skills of

attitudinal training that prepares individuals to obtain

individuals with prior work experience who are seeking

and retain employment.

employment.

Baltimore Responsible Fatherhood Services

Baltimore BOOST (Boosting Opportunities for Social and Economic Mobility for Families)

A 3-week training integrated into STRIVE® Baltimore and other CFUF initiatives that utilizes CFUF’s

A partnership between CFUF and the Baltimore City

Developing All Dads for Manhood and Parenting

Community College (BCCC) that provides individuals,

(DADMAP) curriculum to assist non-custodial fathers,

with low incomes, access to work and life skills training,

with low-incomes, to increase and build their

BCCC labor market and employer driven job training

fatherhood knowledge and skills.

certification programs, job placement and retention support, and other supportive services to accelerate social and economic mobility.

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


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WE’RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


For self. For family. For future.

BY COMB IN IN G E V E RY TH IN G W E H AV E L EA R NED FR OM 2 1 YE AR S O F H U MAN SE R V ICE S A ND WOR KFORCE D E V E LOPME N T PR ACTICE S, O U R S T R AT E G Y TA C K L E S T H E C Y C L E S O F INEQUITY THAT EXIST IN SO MANY PLACES. ALL In is defined by our key critical components: Continual assessment on 10 common barriers to self-sufficiency; Progress tracking along a continuum from crisis to thriving; Empowering case managers with real-time data. We believe that this is not just a strategy for CFUF but a vision to elevate and empower fathers, families, and communities everywhere.

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WHAT’S AHEAD In the year ahead, the Center for Urban Families,

Start, Union Baptist Head Start, and Dorothy I. Height

funded by the Kresge, O’Neil, and Shelter Foundations

Judy Center, along with eight parent partners. Our

and other investment partners, is doubling down on

vision prioritizes the whole family. The application of

our ALL In strategy by launching a Two-generation

2Gen practices will impact a parent’s education, social

(2Gen) Ecosystem Model to serve families, inclusive

and economic stability, and simultaneously impact

of fathers, in Baltimore City. The Ecosystem, co-

the child’s overall health, learning, and development

designed by parents (referred to as “parent partners”

trajectory. The outcomes on children’s education and

and community organizations (referred to as “primary

healthy development are powerful catalysts for parents

partners”), will address various needs that fall under

to improve their own well-being. The ecosystem

2Gen and serve the whole family. In addition to CFUF,

compliments our wraparound services portfolio and

the primary partner organizations involved in the

increases our organizational capacity to serve the

2Gen Design Work Group include: Baltimore Healthy

whole family.

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


The final phase in the design process is to finalize

in solidarity with parents to advocate for policies that

the projection of service numbers, the selection of

strengthen families and demand reform of policies

priority outcomes and the target goals for each of

that are outdated and punitive. The year 2020 has also

the outcomes. Through collaboration, secondary

provided a platform for our collective voices to be

partnerships, complementary programming, and

heard, for local, national and global movements to take

resource sharing, we envision an ecosystem that

ownership of our future, and for us as leaders to lean

propels families out of poverty and guarantees that

into our ability to advocate.

every child is prepared to succeed academically.

At CFUF, we are continually evolving, innovating, and

The unfortunate reality is that families of color face

implementing services that meet the current needs of

a host of disparities, ranging from economic and

our fathers, families, and communities. We do so by

educational to health and housing, that systemically

imagining a world without limit; one where there is a

obstruct family prosperity. If an individual takes a step

place and a way for all to claim their voices, potential,

forward, policies and systems are often designed to

freedom, and joy. We can see it, and we believe it

push them back down by taking away vital resources

is a pathway to a more just, equitable world—one

or creating unnecessary hurdles to access them. The

where families have the autonomy and power to

2Gen ecosystem will also include a Parent Leadership

make choices, to spark change, and to empower our

Advocacy Academy designed to harness and amplify

children to be the next generation of leaders.

the experiences and voices of parents. We will stand

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OUR STORIES Members are the driving force of CFUF. Their perseverance and accomplishments bring to life the impact of the Center and the support of our partners. Our goal is to equip our members with the resources that empower them to become change agents able to transform their lives, families, and communities. Every day, as a member secures full-time employment, a youth is accepted into college, and a couple stabilizes a healthy relationship and home, we are reminded of the hope and promise that lies before them.

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


CFUF MEMBER/ALU M

BRITTANY ADAMS “THE CENTER HAS BEEN WITH ME FOR YEARS AND IT JUST KEEPS GETTING BETTER.”

Simply put, I’m thankful for the fact

Despite that, I quit my first go

to stab you there) to a Team Lead

that I’ve reached the age of 31.

around at CFUF. It was my way or

at Amazon. I am so much more

With everything that I have been

no way and that attitude apparently

than where I came from and I am

through I didn’t think I would see

didn’t fly at the Center. Eventually I

proud of the fact that I got myself

this age. During my youth, I was in

came back, had a second chance,

out of that dark place. That’s the

a gang and doing things an average

and understood what they were

power of CFUF. That’s the result of

16-year-old shouldn’t be doing.

saying. These people were just like

committing to yourself and having

Running the streets, drinking a lot,

me. Their stories were so similar

someone genuinely commit to

doing drugs. At seventeen, I was

to mine. I’m a competitive person

you. The Center has been with me

pregnant with my first baby. At

and don’t like to be defeated

for years and it just keeps getting

eighteen, I was pregnant with my

so I viewed the experience as a

better. You see, the class is just

second. By twenty, I had lost the

challenge to conquer. I set my

the door. It’s the front door to the

father of my two baby boys. Shortly

pride aside and allowed myself to

house. When you first show up,

thereafter I landed in jail.

help myself.

you haven’t even had a chance to

One day, this flyer for the Center

It amazes me to see where I

for Urban Families came across my

came from to where I am now.

desk. My government assistance

A young girl trusting her gang

required me to participate in a

members to have her back (while

workforce development program.

they were actually the first ones

look around yet. But you just wait. It’s worth the look around.

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In 2006, I was gunned down and

up without a father. So, I found a

attended my wedding. I’m a father

shot 12 times in Baltimore. The

button up shirt and showed up to

to 8 children and 1 grandson, and

next year of my life was spent in a

day one of the rest of my life.

because my passion is to help

wheelchair, trying to learn how to walk again. I was a street runner and a drug dealer. In and out of jail for drug charges, attempted murder, and robbery. Even in a wheelchair I still could not let go of the streets.

STRIVE® taught me how to build a resume, conduct a job search, and set up an email address. We learned how to present ourselves during an interview, what questions to ask and what not to ask, and

change people's lives just as CFUF did mine, I am currently working with our at-risk youth population inside several juvenile facilities throughout Maryland. I mentor them and have been adopted as

how to work with different types

a father figure. I use my voice to

Two years later, in 2008, I was

of teams. CFUF tapped into

ignite change at conferences like

walking down Greenmount Ave. in

skills that were always there and

the pre-pandemic one publicized

East Baltimore to a liquor store. The

showed me how to turn them

by the Baltimore Ravens. CFUF

owner handed me a flyer for CFUF.

from a negative to a positive. It’s

walks the walk with you, taking

That was a unique moment for

amazing for people to see me

you through the steps you need to

me. I had money, cars, and street

now. I received my Bachelors in

go through, and guides you in the

fame, but I wanted something

Business Administration in 2014. I

direction you need to take. Just as

more. I called the Center, did their

recently got married, and Mr. Jones

they have been ALL In for me, I am

intake, and they told me to return

and some of the CFUF staff even

ALL In for our youth.

on a certain day in professional clothing. Were they out of their minds?! I didn’t have that stuff! But I sat back and thought to myself, I had two sons and my biggest fear at that time was to be a bad father. That consisted of going to prison for the rest of my life or dying in the streets, and I did not want my sons to be a statistic by growing

CFUF MEMBER/ALU M

LAROY ALSTON “CHANGE THE GAME, CHANGE THE PLAN.”

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


C FUF M E M B E R/ A LU M

MARQUIS MCKNIGHT “STRIVE ® HELPED ME FEEL LIKE A MAN AGAIN.”

My story starts in high school. I

into Molly. Molly turned into Coke,

STRIVE® helped me feel like a man

was playing football and wrestling,

and next thing I knew I was selling

again. They pushed me to chase

keeping out of trouble during

Heroine. I was back on the streets.

what I wanted to do by asking,

the season. I was living with my grandparents—my grandfather was my father figure, and when he passed away my freshman year, I started to run around trying to prove myself to my peers. I quickly found myself arrested for armed robbery.

By 20 years old, I was convicted of another crime and at the age of 21 I was sentenced to ten years in prison. Those first three years were tough. I had my chest puffed up and answered everything in violence. It took me

After spending 18 months in jail,

awhile to acknowledge that I was

I was 18 years old and wanted

in prison because of me. Once I

to do the right thing. I got a job,

admitted that, I made a complete

worked like crazy, and was making

transformation. I did every job you

great money until a new manager

could in prison: medical, property,

joined. We didn’t see eye to eye

hand sanitation, ice man, you

and he began cutting my shifts. I

name it. I learned responsibility

started selling weed to make up

and how to do hard work. When

my income difference and quickly

I finally returned home, my father

realized that I was able to make

had a friend who was a graduate

more money sitting at home than

of the STRIVE® program at CFUF.

getting up and going to a job that

Shortly thereafter, Mr. Cooper gave

didn’t respect me. Weed turned

me a call and helped me enroll.

“what would you wake up in the morning and do for free?” When I told them I’d be a sports show host, they didn’t just say, “well, go do it.” They went the extra step and put me in contact with a gentleman who had his own show. We now stream a show together on Facebook covering football, basketball and an all-sports highlight. CFUF connected me with the Whiting-Turner Company where I am now an Assistant Superintendent. STRIVE® and the Center put in me a position to have a career. To be a man. To provide for my fiancé and our baby boy that is due in April.

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FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT The Center for Urban Families is proud to report another year of strong support from our amazing donors. As we look ahead toward growth and deeper involvement in our communities, we remain committed to fiscal prudence to ensure sustainability and high-quality programming for every family and individual we serve.

STAT E M E NT OF FINA NCIA L PO S ITIO N (CO N S OLIDATE D ) 2019

2018

ASSETS Cash and Cash Equivalents

$

1,278,455

$

1,329,920

Grants and Contributions Receivable, Net

416,086

673,357

Pledges Receivable, Net

984,627

903,292

Prepaid Expenses and Other Assets Property and Equipment, Net Total Assets

55,109

56,592

4,077,157

4,244,902

$

6,811,434

$

7,208,063

$

356,360

$

567,409

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Liabilities Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses Note Payable

161,621

202,139

Total Liabilities

517,981

769,548

Without Donor Restrictions

5,003,445

4,983,694

With Donor Restrictions

1,290,008

1,454,821

Net Assets

Total Net Assets

6,293,453

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

$

TOTAL R EVENUE

23% 26% CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT

51%

6,811,434

6,438,515 $

7,208,063

TOTAL E XPE N S E

Government Contracts Grants Contributions

72%

Program Services Support Services

28%


Financial Snapshot STAT E M E NT OF ACTIVITIES (CO N S OLIDATE D ) 2019

2018

CHANGES IN UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS Revenue and Support Government Grants

$

Grants Contributions and Special Events Investment Income Total Revenue Net Assets Released from Restrictions Total Revenue and Support

1,035,556

$

1,254,492

2,360,005

1,469,909

1,180,237

1,473,359

(507)

(1,007)

4,575,291

4,196,753

760,985

837,271

5,336,276

5,034,024

1,228,327

1,063,704

Expenses Program Services: Workforce Development Training and Technical Assistance Responsible Fatherhood Families Client and Alumni Services Total Program Services

208,614

346,430

1,088,777

1,181,240

590,307

571,388

835,755

508,039

3,951,780

3,670,801

825,014

687,293

Support Services: Management and General Research and Evaluation

279,710

277,783

Development and Special Events

444,585

694,302

Total Support Services

1,549,309

1,659,378

Total Expenses

5,501,089

5,330,179

(164,813)

(296,155)

780,736

817,837

(760,985)

(837,271)

Change in Net Assets Without Donor Restrictions CHANGES IN NET ASSETS WITH DONOR RESTRICTIONS Grants Satisfaction of Restrictions Change in Net Assets With Donor Restrictions

19,751

(19,434)

Changes in Net Assets

(145,062)

(315,589)

Net Assets, Beginning of Year

6,438,515

6,754,104

Net Assets, End of Year

$

6,293,453

$

6,438,515

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CHAMPIONS OF CHANGE Over twenty years of impact has been fueled by a group of people that have been ALL In since the beginning. A collection of dynamic individuals with infinite patience, quiet steadfastness, and an unwavering belief in the potential of all people. They have been, and continue to be, the perfect embodiment of everything CFUF stands for.

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


C FUF PAR T N E R

DANIELLE TORAIN, J.D. DIR EC TO R , O SI – BALT IMO R E

“OUR ROLE IS CONNECTING ORGANIZATIONS LIKE CFUF TO THE RESOURCES THEY NEED TO FULFILL THEIR MISSION.”

The Center for Urban Families

life and well-being, and how these

This year has pushed us all to

served as a cornerstone of my

frameworks translate into what an

assess where we are. To think

professional growth and as

organization like CFUF is able to do.

critically about where we are

my consciousness as a person

going, where is the need, who is

and member of the Baltimore

As funders, it’s important we

community. When I was recruited

maintain a sense of connection to

to meet that need. 2020 has

to join CFUF, I was a law student.

the communities we are ultimately

underscored the importance of

Over the course of my five years

here to serve. When developing

well-designed systems to support

with the organization, I worked

investment and grantmaking

the organizations that are filling the

in a variety of different capacities

strategy, and deciding who to

critical gaps in community service

and ultimately took the role of

invest in and what the impact of

and the teams on the ground

Senior Director of Strategy and

our decisions might be, people

doing the hard work every day.

Development. It was a privilege

must always be at the forefront

We’ve seen what transformation

to have this unique experience of

of those decisions. How do you

can and should look like. We’ve

attending law school during my

get the most marginalized groups

seen that no one can do this alone.

early days of work at the Center.

connected with opportunity?

We have to think about the ways

Working with the members of our

A large part of that is building

we are all uniquely equipped as

community who were directly

community capacity and

leaders, partners, and coalitions to

facing issues of reentering into

strengthening local organizations.

join together to meet the needs of

society and navigating support

Our role as philanthropists is

our communities.

systems while doing so, I learned

connecting organizations like

the very real ways that systems

CFUF to the resources they need

and policy impact our quality of

to fulfill their mission.

in need, and who is in a position

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CFUF PA R T NER

DR. ANTONIO OFTELIE

disproportionate impact on families

new ways to work across

and people of color. If we put all of

boundaries between the private

our policies and programs into this

and public sectors? We’ve learned

hypothetical MRI, and really see

a lot in this crisis and now we need

where we’re failing, the malignancy

to harness that going forward.

is in the design of our systems. Organizations like the Center In the midst of this year of crisis,

for Urban Families have the

many organizations have had a

momentum to reimagine the

chance to experiment and try

human services field. I recognized

new things. Smaller organizations

in Joe, from the moment I met him,

have taken this time to think about

that CFUF and he were a standout

new ways to interact with their

when it came to real impact at the

members and families. We’re

community level. In the podcast

seeing a lot of emergent ideas

that Joe and I did together, we

and innovations as we challenge

explored the Center’s unwavering

ourselves to ask, how do we

mission to invest in the whole family

radically reimagine human services

by empowering fathers to remain an

2020 has been like an MRI on

and cut the red tape? How can

integral part of it. They have created

racial equality. In this year alone,

we streamline or braid resources

an ecosystem of services that really

we experienced a health crisis,

together to be faster and more

wrap around families and fathers.

economic crisis, and social crisis.

effective? What new partnerships

And they don’t stop there. They’re

Across all three, we can see the

or collaborations would provide

continually evolving to reflect the

EX ECUT IVE DIRECTOR, LEA D ERS HIP FOR A N ET WORKE D WORL D, H A RVA RD UNIVE RSIT Y

changing landscape to maximize their reach and impact. You see this reflected in their recent work to build 2Gen solutions into their services, structures, and processes. CFUF is actively rethinking the way we approach systems around families and fathers to improve outcomes—and the entire nation can learn from it.

“CFUF IS ACTIVELY R ETHIN K IN G THE WAY WE APPROACH S Y STEM S ARO UND FAM IL IES AN D FATHER S ."

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


C FUF PART N E R

MARTIN SCHWARTZ P R ESIDEN T, V EH IC L ES F O R C H AN G E

“FAILUR E IS N OT AN O PTIO N.”

Joe and I have grown up

backgrounds, most of whom

placed an even greater spotlight on

together to a certain extent. We

were recently released from

systemic racism and generational

both launched our non-profit

incarceration. Several of the

poverty and elevated the work

organizations in 1999 with very

CFUF program graduates have

that CFUF is doing in Baltimore

synergistic service models. To this

found continued success

and across the country thanks to

day, we get together every six

through our internships.

the leadership of Joe Jones. The

months or so to compare notes over a meal of what’s working and what isn’t. We ask ourselves, “how we can do more together to further our impact?”

CFUF and VFC have evolved over the past 20 years to become critical components in the fight against poverty. The net result of systemic racism, which has

Vehicles for Change (VFC) is an

been front and center in 2020, is

organization that awards cars

generational poverty. The main

to families so they may gain or

barriers to escaping poverty is a

maintain employment. It’s been

lack of transportation, education

an honor to provide this service

and training. CFUF and VFC play

to CFUF members over the

a key role in reversing systemic

past 21 years. We also provide

racism and poverty by providing

paid internships in auto repair

families the tools necessary to

for individuals with criminal

overcome these barriers. 2020 has

COVID pandemic has forced so many organizations to adapt or perish. CFUF and VFC both made the necessary adjustments to our programing quickly and efficiently to assure that the families we serve continued to receive the support they need and deserve. Joe and I, and our teams, believe that the work we do is vital to the families we serve and because of that failure is not an option.

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CFUF BOARD MEMBER

NANCY BRENNAN DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT & BOARD MEMBER, BRENNAN CENTER FOR JUSTICE After returning to Baltimore four years ago, I told a friend during lunch that I wanted to do something to help communities impacted by the uprising and asked

services can intervene in a system

simultaneously. First, the member

him, “where do I start?” He told

where so much is going south

and family level. There’s so much

me to call Joe Jones. Speaking

for families and individuals. Our

economic disruption coming. We

with Joe it quickly became evident

members are asking, “If I have a

are ready to help. Second, the

that we shared the same hunger

record, who is going to hire me? If I

opportunity for systematic change.

to serve. With my non-profit

have trouble reading or doing math

Health disparities, economic

management and fundraising

that a potential employer requires,

insecurity, racial injustice, and

background, I thought that I could

how am I going to get those skills,

unequal policing practices—all

contribute to sustaining CFUF’s

in a way that I feel supported and

parts of a vicious cycle that needs

mission by working to attract

respected?” CFUF knows how

to be addressed citywide. CFUF is a

like-minded donors. Joe asked me

to step in, in some very practical

leader in how to dismantle poverty

to roll up my sleeves and join the

ways, to rebuild security so that

and affirm individuals and families.

board. I’ve loved every minute of it.

our members and their families

And lastly, CFUF is ready to be part

see the benefits. It’s a long-term

of national dialogues. How do we

commitment that is now being

make it easier for families to be

operationalized through ALL In.

financially and emotionally stable?

What I have seen during my time at the Center is very practical and strategic but also very aspirational. They understand that the whole

The pandemic has accelerated a

person—the whole family—needs

set of conditions that the uprising

a support network. Just having

was a symptom of—decline in

a record can have a decades-

available employment, lack of

long impact on earning ability.

social safety nets, and unequal

That inability to make what peers

law enforcement practices. These

without an arrest record can earn

flawed systems devalue black men

affects the whole family. It holds

and women’s lives. As we navigate

them down in long-lasting financial

the coming months, CFUF has

insecurity and prevents them

both the commitment and skill

from living their lives to their full

set to contribute to social and

potential. CFUF’s programs and

economic equality on three levels

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT

CFUF has part of the answer.

“CFUF K N OWS HOW TO S TEP IN, IN SO M E VERY PR ACTICAL WAYS, TO R EBUIL D THAT S ECUR IT Y.”


C FUF B OARD M E M B E R

BRANDON SCOTT MAYOR-ELECT, BALTIMORE CITY COUNCIL

“ SYS TEM S CAN N OT CO N TIN UE TO LO O K FOR IM M EDIATE S O LUTIO N S TO PRO BL EM S THAT DO N’ T HAVE IM M EDIATE SO LUTIO N S .”

One of the most important factors

stick with folks for a significant

forward on how to handle the

in our work is something that

period of time to have the long-

issues but we need partners and

doesn’t get talked about a lot:

term impact needed for the whole

supports to continue to effectively

we have to look at this from a

family. Systems cannot continue

do so. Moving forward, the Center

comprehensive approach as to

to look for immediate solutions

will do what it has always done.

how we are impacting families.

to problems that don’t have

Take the moment and have

Look at me for example, I grew

immediate solutions.

deeper impact. Continue to be

up in Park Heights and went to school there. Many of my peers wound up dead or in jail, struggling with abuse. Some of us were lucky enough to have different outcomes. The common denominator was family life.

The challenges of this year have further exemplified that. This is a moment where some organizations are saying, “I told you so,” but for CFUF what’s happening is a wind-in-their-sails

ALL In building families from top to bottom. Using proven models for success to rebuild and repair neighborhoods and families that have been broken by many different things over the years.

moment. The Center’s work has

I stumbled upon the Center

always been about furthering

for Urban Families while doing

economic and social justice

research on who was working on

causes. While the country is

building families in our community.

coming into a racial reckoning,

CFUF understands that you must

the Center is able to show a path

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CF U F BOARD MEMB E R

RONAE BROCK INTERIM CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, BALTIMORE URBAN LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION

“C FUF P ER F O R M ED A S T HE Y ALWAY S D O I N A MOME N T O F C R I S I S — S T E A DFA S T. ” At the start of 2020, we were excited to host the Urban Visionary Awards and celebrate champions of Baltimore and nationwide human services. We were honoring Jessica and Jerry

This year has amplified both the

The Center has always used

Seinfeld and Congressman Danny

economic and social injustice and

its resources and relationships

Davis. Sponsorships had been

inequalities in our country. The

to be a leader in the field. Its

secured and planning was moving

loss of black and brown men and

programmatic models and long-

along. Then suddenly news of a

women’s lives, criminal justice

term case management approach

virus hit and we were in a holding

system inequalities, confederate

have proven incredibly successful.

pattern. Once we understood the

monuments, higher visibility of hate

Navigating COVID-19 has allowed

gravity of COVID-19, the event

groups, voter suppression efforts,

us a chance to evaluate our

was postponed. CFUF’s team

police brutality. It has been a series

processes and asses our impact.

immediately began developing and

of unimaginable events that have

As we move forward, we will

executing a remote operations plan

brought a renewed awareness and

explore using virtual innovations

as well as converting direct service

willingness for many to help in the

as additive to in-person services.

programs to virtual engagement.

racial and economic justice area.

We will continue to build internal

They performed as they always do

CFUF is very well positioned to be a

capabilities for future growth. We

in a moment of crisis—steadfast.

conduit for people to help make a

will use this unique moment in

We couldn’t just shut down. Our

change. Their mission, and the work

time to maximize our impact as it’s

members still had needs and their

they have been doing for the past

needed now more than ever. If we

needs were being magnified by

21 years, is addressing the exact

serve our communities well, we

the pandemic.

issues that 2020 has amplified.

will do well as an organization.

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


CFUF S TAF F

MICHAEL WILLIAMS EMPLOYMENT SPECIALIST

those face-to-face interactions with members is key to seeing how they are doing and making sure that we are staying engaged so that we continue to serve our members. We also launched our Workforce Wednesdays weekly online presentation which is a way to keep our members engaged and informed of current employment opportunities. In addition to the pandemic, the social injustice of this year has equally tested us. CFUF has been at the forefront of tackling these My role as an employment

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit,

issues prior to everything that is

specialist allows me to assist

we had no choice but to quickly

happening, and as we continue

individuals, build connections,

pivot and adapt to the changing

to go through these events, it

discuss career pathways, as well

environment. We transitioned

further fuels our role as a support

as guide and assist them through

to a non-typical face-to-face

system for our members and the

meeting with real employer

environment via Zoom. Having

community.

partners that are crucial to our success as an organization. Through these strong relationships with our employer partners, we have been able to continue to be successful in assisting our members with job placement opportunities throughout the

“ W H EN THE COVID-19 PAN DEM IC HIT, W E HAD N O CHO ICE BUT TO QUICKLY P I VOT AN D ADAPT TO THE CHAN G ING EN V IRO N M EN T.”

course of the pandemic.

27


CFUF S TAF F

HELENA WISE FIRST IMPRESSION SPECIALIST

let’s have a conversation.” After speaking about CFUF and our STRIVE® program, she immediately came in. I welcomed her with an incredibly warm smile and open arms, connected her with an intake specialist, and three weeks later she couldn’t stop thanking me for talking to her on that first day. It made me feel wonderful to have that type of impact on someone. A happy person is a happy heart. I’m the first touchpoint to make sure our members immediately feel how genuine the Center for Urban Families is. That’s what I love about my job: making sure people feel welcome and comfortable. Especially in a year that has been so overwhelming and challenging, it’s more important now than

“A HAPPY PERSON IS A HAPPY HEART.”

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT

When people find that you’re

ever that when someone calls the

genuine, they confide in you and

Center, they hear a voice. Even

trust you. In 2018, I answered the

though our building is closed to

phone to a young lady bawling

members at the moment, when

her eyes out as she was driving

you call us you still speak with a live

down the road after an interview

person. We are still here to assist,

had gone poorly. She had just

still here to make sure you can sign

driven past our building and asked

up for a program, still here to let

what we do. I said, “Pull over,

you know that we genuinely care.


“ALL IN IS A STRATEGY, A MENTALIT Y, A COMMITMENT, A BATTLE CRY.”

CFUF S TAF F

MARK SMITH STRIVE ® TRAINER

I’ve always said that nothing happens without a reason. What we’ve gone through this year is the perfect storm. It provided people the opportunity to assess who they are, where they are, and where they want to go. At CFUF, we are trust agents. Many of our members have a huge problem with trust as they’ve been lied to, ridiculed,

has been a great example of this

abandoned, and incarcerated.

perseverance and we saw that in

During my interview process, the CFUF team told me about their ALL In strategy. When they say they are ALL In, everyone is truly ALL In. While it’s a strategic approach to tackle the cycles of inequity that exist in so many places, it’s

the midst of crisis, our network showed up for each other— through generous donations from funders, resources from partners, supply drop-offs from staff, and continued engagement from our members.

hung in there, and now, they don’t want to get off the Zoom when the session ends. They’ve created their own study groups and interact virtually outside of class and work. This isn’t necessarily something we saw much of prior to the pandemic and it will be really interesting to see if this camaraderie continues post-pandemic. Launching a virtual

also a mentality, a commitment, a

It’s been particularly impressive

pilot program was an aspiration

battle cry— for us, our members,

seeing the members navigate

of mine even before the world

and our partners. We’re able to be

the transition from in-person to

shut down, so I’m excited for the

trust agents because we are ALL In,

virtual. There were inevitable early

innovations that will emerge from

always. Navigating the pandemic

adaptation challenges but they

this experience.

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Thank you to our partners and supporters for always being ALL In Your generosity means the world to us. We could not do this without you.

KEY EMPLOYE R PAR TN E R S:

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


KEY COMMUNIT Y, AGE N CY, AN D GOV E R N ME N T PAR TN E R S:

KEY COR POR ATE PAR TN E R S:

Oprah Winfrey

Charitable Foundation 31


CFUF BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF F I C E RS

D IR ECTOR S

Henry D. Kahn

Daman C. Blakeney

Chairman Partner – Hogan Lovells US LLP

Managing Director/Senior Portfolio Manager – Brown Capital Management

David L. Warnock

Joseph T. Jones, Jr.

Nancy Brennan

William (Chip) F. Wendler, II

Founder, President & CEO Center for Urban Families

Development Consultant

Peter Bowe

Vice President, Head of Global Consultant Relations – T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc.

Founder – The Peter Bowe and Barbara Stewart Foundation

Alicia Wilson

Patrick Sissman Principal – Redwood Capital Investments

Swata Gandhi Chair, Governance Committee Counsel – Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr

Ronae Brock Chris Rockey Chair, Development Committee SVP, Territory Executive, National Expansion Markets, Community Development Banking – PNC Bank

Ben Seigel Chair, Program Quality Committee Baltimore Opportunity Zones Coordinator – Baltimore Development Company

Interim Chief Operating Officer – Baltimore Urban Leadership Foundations (t/a The Door)

Managing Partner – Camden Partners

Vice President for Economic Development – Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Health System

Kenneth Jones, II

E ME R ITU S

Vice President and Chief Financial Officer – John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

James R. Calvin Professor of Practice – The Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

John G. McLean, Jr. Senior Director of Finance – RocketDocs

Guy E. Flynn Partner – DLA Piper US LLP

Scott Soffen, CFA, CAIA

Vernā Myers

Chair, Finance & Audit Committee Senior Investment Officer – American Trading & Production Company

Vice President, Inclusion Strategy – Netflix

Jamie McDonald Founder – Generosity, Inc.

Bill Norris Senior Manager – RSMUS LLP (Finance & Audit Committee Member)

Rodney Oddoye Senior Vice President of Governmental and External Affairs – Baltimore Gas & Electric (BGE)

Terry Owens Director of Communications – District of Columbia Department of Transportation

Scott Sherman Retired, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives – T. Rowe Price

Brandon Scott Mayor-Elect – Baltimore City Council

Robin Williams Wood Community Leader

CFUF 2020 IMPACT REPORT


CFUF TEAM E XECU T I VE LE ADE RSHIP Joseph T. Jones, Jr. Founder, President & CEO

Brian S. Lyght Chief Operating Officer

Nicole Jordan Manager of Special Projects & Executive Support

AL L IN PR OGR AMS:

F IN AN CE

FA M ILY STAB IL IT Y & ECONO MIC SUCCESS

Bobbi Lewis Associate Accountant

Terrence Allen Senior Manger of Workforce & Trainings

Grants Accountant

Kate Wolfson, Esq. Manager of Program Coordination

Lenora Davis ALL In Case Manager

Cayla Moore ALL In Case Manager

SE N I OR L EA D ER SHIP

Mary Stewart

H U MAN R E S OU R CES Jasmine Roberts Human Resources Manager

Lavatte David STRIVE® Trainer

Marilyn Aklin, D.P.A. Director of Development

Bryant Jeffers, CPA Director of Finance & Administration

Catherine Pitchford Director of Programs

Mark Smith STRIVE® Trainer

Michael Williams Employment Specialist

Wayne Cooper Intake & Retention Specialist

Tyler Yutzy Intake & Retention Specialist

OPE R ATIO N S Arielle Forrest Operations Manager

Lloyd Wright Facilities Manager

Wanda Liggins Operations Specialist

Helena Wise First Impressions Specialist

D EVE LOPME N T

Gregory Smith Security Coordinator

Pete Broyles Grants Compliance Manager

Amanda Ellis Development Specialist

R E SE AR CH & E VALUATIO N Zachary Alberts Data Analysis & Performance Manager

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TOGETHER, WE CAN DO SO MUCH MORE Our goal is to provide each and every single person who comes through our doors with equal opportunity to transform their lives. You too can ignite change, dismantle poverty, and empower our members to recognize their potential and realize their dreams.

SHA R E OUR STO RY.

CO N TR IB U TE .

Tell your family member,

Your support and invested resources

co-worker, or neighbor about

help increase the impact of our

CFUF and our services.

work for our shared community.

VOLUNTEER .

BECOME A CORPORATE PARTNER.

We’re always looking for inspiring mentors to work directly

We’ll work with you to figure out the

with our members and make a

best opportunity for your group.

lasting impact on their lives.

F O LLOW U S. @centerforurbanfamilies

For more ways to get involved, email maklin@cfuf.org or call 410.246.1415

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