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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.......................................................................................................MESSAGE FROM DFIT 4............................................................................................................. NEWS FROM HQ 4.................................................................................................. DFIT – FITNESS AND SPORTS SYMPOSIUM 5.................................................................................FORCE REWARDS: “MENS SANA IN CORPORE SANO” 6.................................................................... FORCE REWARDS PROGRAM AMBASSADORS: SET YOUR BAR 7...................................................................................GENERAL VANCE PRESENTS FIRST FORCE REWARDS .................................................................... PLATINUM PINS AT GENERAL AND FLAG OFFICER SYMPOSIUM 8............................................................................... 2018 PSP FITNESS STAFF FORCE EVALUATION REPORT 9...............................................................................................GREAT WORK IN THE FIELD 9........... PSP INITIATIVES IN SUPPORT OF ARMY TRAINEES DURING THE DEVELOPMENTAL PERIOD 1 (DP1) 9..................................................................................................... DP1 NCM PREPARATION IN WAINRIGHT 10......................................................... GENERATING RESILIENCE TO INJURIES THROUGH TRAINING (GRIT) 11.....................................................................TRAINING LOADS: A SIMPLE TOOL TO BETTER UNDERSTAND .............................................................................................. INJURY RISK DURING BASIC ARMY TRAINING 12.....................................................................................................GAGETOWN CLIMBING COMPETITIONS 14.................................................................................................................JUNGLE WARFARE, VALCARTIER 15............................................................................................................................. A LITTLE MOTIVATION… 15.......................................................................EDMONTON FEB AND MAR 2019 – WE WERE (VERY) BUSY 16................................................................................ 2019 CAF NATIONAL BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS 17................................................................................................ CONGRATULATIONS PSP 17................................................................................................MEET THE 2018 WOMAN OF DISTINCTION 17............................................................................................................................................... PSP AWARD 18....................................................... LEADING FITNESS FROM THE FRONT - A FEATURE ON OUR ATHLETES 19..................................................................................................... MEET PSP KINGSTON 19.............................................................................ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF THE PSP PRO-FIT SYSTEM 19................................................................................................................................ FITNESS AND SPORTS 20.................................................................................................................................HEALTH PROMOTION 20........................................................................................... CHANGES TO FIELD AND HQ

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

MESSAGE FROM DFIT It was a busy spring with the release of the CAF Physical Performance Strategy – Balance, the PSP Fitness and Sports Symposium in Cornwall, the CDS and CAF CWO presenting the first platinum pin, and 6 CAF Nationals hosted on your bases and wings. You’ll see many of these key efforts captured within this edition of the DFIT Newsletter in which most necessitated close collaboration between both field and HQ staff. In the coming months this collaboration will need to continue as collectively PSP HQ and Base/Wing PSP will need to support CAF command and Base/Wing leadership in operationalizing the Balance Strategy. Looking forward to what we can accomplish when we further align our Fitness, Sport and Health Promotion effort towards common Balance Strategy Goals.

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

NEWS FROM HQ DFIT – FITNESS AND SPORTS SYMPOSIUM Marcel Roy, CAF Fitness Manager, PSP HQ From 29 Apr to 3 May 19, DFit hosted a Fitness and Sports Symposium at the NAVCAN Centre in Cornwall, ON. The timing was perfect to update the Base/Wing Fitness, Sports and Recreation Managers on the newly released BALANCE Strategy, provide updates on some of DFit key programs and activities, and host select working groups on key initiatives. Some of the symposium highlights included our day one guest Speaker, Brett Batholomew, author of the book “Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-In”. His discussion was centered on influencing people and creating buy-in. His presentation had much impact in the audience and was often referred to in the following days. Watch out, you’ll be charmed by your Manager’s newly learned skills! Additionally, CWO Ridley, RSM at the Canadian Forces Military Police Academy (CF MPA) in Borden, was our honorary guest during the Closing Dinner and shared the impacts and success that Rachel Griese, Fitness Coordinator at the CF MPA has brought, by being embedded in the Unit since 2015. Most of the participants enjoyed their experience, as it provided them a chance to meet some new Mgr, FSR or reconnect with others who’ve been in their position for a longer duration. The updates received during the symposium were greatly appreciated; the opportunity for some priceless face-time with colleagues from other B/W, was much valued by all, especially by the DFit HQ team. All are looking forward for the next F&S national event.

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

FORCE REWARDS: “MENS SANA IN CORPORE SANO” Kevin Chenard, CAF Fitness Standards and Policies Coordinator, PSP HQ

‘A HEALTHY MIND IN A HEALTHY BODY. A BRAVE HEART THAT HAS NO FEAR CAN ENDURE ALL TYPES OF TOIL AND ANGUISH. WHERE RESILIENCE AND PERSEVERANCE EXCEEDS LUXURY AND INDULGENCE. THROUGH SUCH VIRTUES, WE CAN BECOME THE BEST VERSIONS OF OURSELVES.’ This powerful Latin phrase honors Physical Education and Recreation (PE&R) tradition within the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) while establishing a theme for the FORCE Rewards Program; overcoming adversity. January 2019 marked the debut of this novel program. In line with the CAF objective of enhancing the level of operational readiness and health-related fitness, the FORCE Rewards Program has taken aim to encourage members of the CAF to surpass their health and fitness goals through methods of external motivation using material rewards. To be eligible for a FORCE Reward, one must achieve Silver or higher on the FORCE Fitness Profile when completing their annual FORCE Evaluation. As of 21 May 2019, almost 4500 members are eligible for the FORCE Rewards program and are beginning to claim their prize. Of those 4500, 1638 CAF members have already claimed their reward. In order to collect feedback and evaluate the effectiveness of the program, we polled eligible members who claimed their rewards. Almost 70% of them have confirmed that the FORCE Rewards program has encouraged them to push themselves harder to increase their overall fitness in order to improve their results on their annual FORCE Evaluation. PSP plays a vital role in the long-term health of our CAF. The FORCE Rewards program is one of the many tools we can all use to enhance an individual’s motivation to become active, overcome adversity and work a little harder in the pursuit of a healthy mind in a healthy body.

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

FORCE REWARDS PROGRAM AMBASSADORS: SET YOUR BAR Keira Lee, CAF Fitness Policies and Standards Coordinator, PSP HQ

To intrinsically motivate CAF personnel to pursue physical, social and emotional well-being, six exemplary military members of the CAF were nominated and selected to champion the FORCE Rewards Program as ambassadors. Each FORCE Rewards Program ambassador has a unique and impressive story to share in order to inspire other CAF personnel to set and achieve fitness-related goals. These ambassadors are available to lead, mentor and support their peers while vigorously supporting CAF leadership to strengthen a culture of fitness within their CAF communities. The ambassadors are: LS Matthew O’Flynn (NCS, CFB Halifax), MCpl Philippe Martineau (CFSATE, CFB Borden), Sgt Laura Frey (HMCS St Johns Log, CFB Halifax), Maj Lindsay Jackson (3 Cdn Div TC C Coy, CFB Shilo), Capt Luka Normandin (1 R22eR Svcs Coy, CFB Valcartier) and MCpl Andrew Warnell (RCEME School Regt Coy, CFB Borden). Each ambassador has shared their story on video, with each piece illustrating a theme unique to the ambassador’s story: extreme weight loss, well-being as way of life, mental wellness, leading by example, family life, and overcoming injury and illness.

FORCE Rewards Program Ambassador LS Matthew O’Flynn

The ambassadors’ stories help demonstrate that health and physical fitness are powerful resources for everyday life. Motivate yourselves and motivate each other. Set your bar. Videos are available at:

https://www.cafconnection.ca/National/Programs-Services/ For-Military-Personnel/Military-Fitness/FORCE-Program/FORCERewards-Program/Set-Your-Bar.aspx

CHECK IT OUT!!! 6


VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

GENERAL VANCE PRESENTS FIRST FORCE REWARDS PLATINUM PINS AT GENERAL AND FLAG OFFICER SYMPOSIUM Keira Lee, CAF Fitness Policies and Standards Coordinator, PSP HQ Incentive Levels of Silver, Gold or Platinum on the annual FORCE Evaluation respectively represent the top: 14%, 2% and 0.1% of the CAF. The reward for achieving the Platinum level is a performance hoodie, Platinum pin and a certificate, all presented in a public ceremony by the CAF member’s Chain of Command (CoC). CAF personnel may wear their Platinum pin on their dress attire during the year they achieved the Platinum Incentive level and the following year e.g. a Platinum pin earned in 2019 may be worn until 31 December 2020. The first presentation of Platinum pins for 2019 was held at the General Officer and Flag Officer (GOFO) Symposium in Ottawa on 24 April 2019. The Chief of Defence Staff (CDS), General Jonathan Vance, alongside the CAF CWO, CWO Alain Guimond, presented Platinum pins to four well-deserving recipients. The awards presentation provided a fruitful opportunity for senior PSP and CAF leadership to witness the positive impact of an extrinsic rewards program.

Photo (left to right): Captain Mary MacDonald (Canadian Army), CWO Steve Compton (Royal Canadian Air Force), MCpl Marie-Soleil Harvey (CANSOFCOM) and LCdr Richard Cobb (Royal Canadian Navy), all proudly received their Platinum rewards in front of the CAF’s senior leadership.

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

2018 PSP FITNESS STAFF FORCE EVALUATION REPORT Félix-Antoine Proulx, CAF Fitness Standards and Policies Coordinator, PSP HQ Each and every year, PSP employees challenge themselves against the annual FORCE Evaluation. It is with great enthusiasm and effort that we run, drop, lift, drag and carry our way through the evaluation in an effort to complete each task in as little time as possible. As a team, we share the responsibility to maintain a high level of fitness and wellness, and to set the example for all CAF personnel. In doing so, we help encourage and motivate personnel to increase their own level of physical conditioning throughout their career in the Canadian Armed Forces. Having PSP Fitness staff lead from the front will not only emulate the leadership qualities recognized by the CAF, it will also bring recognition and credibility to our PSP division. Here are some highlights from the 2018 PSP Fitness staff FORCE Evaluation Report: • National average: Mid Silver and above the middle of green (87,364) • PSP staff that reached the incentive level: 96.3% (261 out of 271) • # of platinum recipients throughout all Base/Wing (B/W): 43 (16%) • Fittest regions (ranked from highest to lowest): Quebec / Ontario / West / Maritimes • B/W with the highest % of platinum employees: DHTC 75% • #1 B/W: DHTC then Bagotville • #1 male PSP employee: Vincent Meunier (DHTC) • #1 female PSP employee: Sophie Turcotte (Valcartier)

ALL PSP

PSP HQ would like to thank all PSP employees who completed their FORCE Evaluation in 2018 and who contributed to maintain our high level of excellence.

With 2018 behind us… Who will rise to the top in 2019?

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

GREAT WORK IN THE FIELD PSP INITIATIVES IN SUPPORT OF ARMY TRAINEES DURING THE DEVELOPMENTAL PERIOD 1 (DP1) The next 3 articles describe interventions for reducing injuries/attrition through DP1 in the Army and improving throughput numbers. After BMQ, NCM Infantry recruits must complete the DP1 Infantry course before reaching their operationally functional point (OFP). Army officer candidates that successfully complete BMOQ (CAF course) go on to BMOQ-A (Environmental Army Course) followed by DP 1.1 and DP 1.2 (MOSID Trades training) before reaching OFP. These courses suffer from high attrition rates of (e.g. 18.5 % BMOQ-A, 48.5% DP1.1 Infantry) many of which are a result of MSK injuries. In between each course, candidates are awaiting training in holding platoons for periods as little as 1 week to up to 6 months or more. In line with the Army Mission Ready strategy, these initiatives provide a potential opportunity to improve candidate performance readiness and knowledge to prevent injury on course.

DP1 NCM PREPARATION IN WAINRIGHT Jordan Leeming Manager, Fitness, Sports & Recreation, 3 CDSB Garrison Wainwright Our Fitness Instructors, with guidance and input from the Reconditioning Specialist, have designed a program for our BTP (Basic Training Platoon) members. These are NCM soldiers who have just finished their Basic Training and are waiting to be loaded on course. This PT program is designed to prepare them for the physical demands of the NCM DP1 Infantry Course that is regularly conducted in Wainwright. The DP1 course has high injury rates, especially among the members who are not physically prepared. Our goals with the program are 1. Injury reduction and improved success rate on the DP1 course. 2. Overall improvement in physical fitness and functional movement capabilities. 3. Preparation for the demanding tasks seen on the DP1 course. It is a 5-week, 20-session program with room for customization depending on the member’s physical ability or the course schedule. This is a prehab-style program with an emphasis on developing proper movement patterns (push, pull, twist, bend, squat, lunge, and gait) before increasing the intensity/load towards the end of the 5 weeks.

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

GENERATING RESILIENCE TO INJURIES THROUGH TRAINING (GRIT) Eric Robitaille PT, PhD (CFHS) & Tara Reilly PhD (DFIT) Overuse injuries are the most common injury type among Developmental Period 1 Infantryman (NCM) course (DP1) candidates. One of the 4 behaviours affecting physical performance identified in the BALANCE strategy is Injury Prevention, linked to Sleep/Rest, and Physical Activity. Currently, DP1 marching/Physical Training (PT) is not standardized, which may be contributing to overuse injuries in DP1 candidates. GRIT is a collaboration, following the BALANCE strategy recommendations, between Canadian Forces Health Services (CFHS), Personnel Support Program (PSP) & 4th Canadian Division Training Centre (4CDTC) DP1 staff to determine: 1) The feasibility of comparing outcomes of usual DP1 marching/PT with an evidence-based, standardized, gradually progressive marching/PT program, 2) Any differences between experimental and control groups in measures of fitness, injury occurrences, and quantified measures of activity and sleep via the activity monitors. Eligible DP1 candidates awaiting infantry training at 4CDTC between 01 April 2019 – 31 March 2020 will be invited to participate. Those consenting to participate will wear activity monitors, complete fitness measures (balance, mobility, strength, power & functional performance) and an injury questionnaire before, during & after their 13 week DP1. Based on their arrival to 4CDTC, they will complete either 12 weeks of usual DP1 marching/PT or a standardized marching/PT program. Usual DP1 marching/PT will be led by 4CDTC staff and left to their discretion. The standardized marching/PT program will be led by PSP staff and integrates best practice strategies in improving fitness while reducing overuse injury risk. To determine if the GRIT study is feasible focus groups will be held with CFHS, PSP & 4CDTC staff. Should the GRIT study be feasible, 4CDTC Command will consider supporting it as standardized marching/PT for DP1 and the investigators will follow up with a full-scale experimental trial.

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

TRAINING LOADS: A SIMPLE TOOL TO BETTER UNDERSTAND INJURY RISK DURING BASIC ARMY TRAINING Michael Stolberg, Human Performance Specialist, Combat Training Center (CTC) Gagetown My mandate is to enable the increase of our (CTC) personnel’s readiness and resilience through the Canadian Army’s Mission Ready strategy. CTC leadership expressed concerns over the high rates of attrition due to injuries on certain basic courses. Which led me to focus on BMOQ-A (basic military officer qualification - Army), the 2nd phase of basic training for Army officers. Discussions with the candidates and their troop leaders provided an understanding of the day-to-day reality and how it affects their physical and mental readiness and resilience.

Using my experience in high performance sport, I recognized an integrated support model would best serve the candidates’ performance. Assembling a multi-disciplinary team, and keeping the Mission Ready strategy in mind, our focus was to deliver a curriculum with an emphasis on practical skill development in the areas of injury prevention, physical fitness, nutrition, sleep and psychology.

Looking ahead, the team will analyse the lessons learned from our first trial and start planning the future of this initiative. This The BMOQ-A pilot data that I gathered using Training Loads summer/fall, the intent is to observe and measure 6 BMOQ-A (ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) multiplied by duration) courses to better understand the factors that influence a higher (Foster et al., 2001) on various physically strenuous activities, risk to injury. We will use this evidence to further improve the led me to understand the potential causes of injuries on this readiness training and explore the possibility of implementing course. A relatively low volume of PT during 4 weeks in garrison daily monitoring tools (e.g. sleep, soreness, energy levels, (chronic load) followed by a spike in physical activity in the field effect of each training session) that enable individualization in by way of rucking all week (acute load). The acute to chronic the holding platoon and course training for optimal candidate load ratio being excessively high suggested that candidates performance. were not prepared for this type of loading and thus at higher risks of injury as per research in athlete populations (Gabbett, 2018). This information would suggest that preparation on holding platoons needs to target success on upcoming courses REFERENCES by ensuring progressive loading through consistent training in Foster, C., Florhaug, J. A., Franklin, J., Gottschall, L., order to keep the acute:chronic ratio in an optimal zone, which Hrovatin, L. A., Parker, S., ... & Dodge, C. (2001). A new has been shown to reduce the risk of injury. approach to monitoring exercise training. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 15(1), 109-115. Gabbett TJ. Debunking the myths about training load, injury and performance: empirical evidence, hot topics and recommendations for practitioners. Br J Sports Med. 2018 Oct 26: bjsports-2018. Blanch P, Gabbett TJ. Has the athlete trained enough to return to play safely? The acute: chronic workload ratio permits clinicians to quantify a player’s risk of subsequent injury. Br J Sports Med. 2016 Apr 1;50(8):471-5. (Blanch & Gabbett, 2016)

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

GAGETOWN CLIMBING COMPETITIONS Renée Racine, Health Promotion Specialist and Ben Noseworthy, Recreation Coordinator – organizers of the event. The Gagetown climbing wall was a happening spot this April as military and community volunteers, route setters and climbers worked together to roll out the 2019 Gagetown Climbing Competitions. The walls were completely stripped, holds were cleaned, and put back up as brand new challenges for every level of climber. The competition was every participant’s first shot at attempting the new routes – a sure-fire way of determining the best climber.

Friday 12 April – Inter-unit competition

Saturday 13 April – Community competition

At maximum capacity, this event brought 40 members from across the base (even one from Petawawa) together to represent their units and strive for the title of top climber. A time-cap of 3 hours was given to achieve the hardest climbs participants could top without falling. Morale was high as participants cheered each other on, and pushed their mental and physical limits with every new route.

The community competition brought in climbers from across New Brunswick. The 3-hour scramble was followed by World Cup style finals which drew a crowd of spectators. Climbers from the first day of competition came back to volunteer and support the event and watch the inspiring display of fitness and talent.

Top military climbers: Men: Sgt Bryan Gagnon-Lussier – RCACS Women: MCpl Karmen Osborn and Cpl Etta Degnan (tied for first) – 4ESR

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Top community climbers: Men: Max Mathies Women: Krista Demolitor


VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

The overwhelming commitment of the military and civilian volunteers combined with support from the base and community organizations made this event a huge success - a prime example of the community and base working hand in hand.

Cpl James Kennedy representing 5 CDSB Pers Sp Svcs in the inter-unit climbing competition

The Gagetown climbing wall can be booked for unit PT, and is open to the public on Monday, Thursday and Saturday evenings. With climbing making its debut in the 2020 Olympics, what better time to introduce it as an intersection sport? Stay tuned for Fall 2019!

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

JUNGLE WARFARE, VALCARTIER Quentin Martin, Fitness Instructor, Valcartier

In February, Company B of the 3 R22eR travelled to Martinique for warfare training at the Centre Nautique et d’Entraînement en Forêt (CNEF). The exercise had three phases: Phase 1: Water obstacle course, orienteering, amphibious launches, survival and introduction to jungle travel techniques. Phase 2: Land obstacle course, travel in tropical environments, unarmed combat, stretcher carrying and jungle warfare lesson. Phase 3: Conduct after capture, hand-to-hand combat and knowledge testing through multiple section attacks. The members of the 3 R22eR faced tough challenges, both physically and mentally. Lack of food and sleep, as well as the humidity, made the days even longer and harder. 14

Company B had a strict training program to prepare. The 6–8 week program included twice-daily physical training with cardiovascular, muscular and aquatic components. Between workouts, they followed an equally rigorous training program: consolidation of knotwork skills, basic jungle skills (hygiene, preparing a bivouac, firing ranges, first aid, etc.), navigation and more. Thanks to their excellent preparation, the troops in Company B had a very high success rate and experienced very few injuries. It’s been a very educational experience that will help me tailor my training to better prepare the 3 R22eR’s jungle soldiers. I’ve been training Company B for these exercises for 4 years now. I had the great pleasure of taking part in the Spartiate Tropical exercise as an advisor. It helped me better understand the realities of military life. The 3 R22eR is already preparing for the next tropical exercise in Guyana, which will take place in October.


VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

A LITTLE MOTIVATION… Tammy Buchanan, Health Promotion Manager, 4 Wing Cold Lake Two members walk into the Health Promotion office for their appointments for a body composition test. They confirm they followed the protocol, although not having their morning coffee was a little tough! 4 Wing Cold Lake purchased an InBody570 bioelectrical impedance machine as an educational and motivational tool for CAF members. Individuals use the machine for various reasons: some are looking to improve their health by decreasing their visceral fat levels, others to improve their performance in various sports, activities, and the FORCE evaluation by modifying their body composition. Still others are looking to improve their self-esteem and body image through weight management. One of the members visiting Health Promotion this morning is a runner. Looking at his assessment results, he notes his lean tissue is not optimal. He resolves to start some strength training twice a week. The other member states that his BMI (body mass index)

always shows he is in the “overweight” category, but his waist circumference during the FORCE evaluation is in the appropriate range. He wants to know how much of his weight is fat and how much is muscle. His assessment results show his skeletal muscle mass is high, and his body fat is in the normal range. He leaves the office happy knowing his regular PT classes and healthy eating habits are working! Last year, the 4 Wing Defence Team utilized the InBody machine 1267 times. This included the participants of the Blast off the Pounds program, who lost 360 pounds, and the various site visits to Squadrons/Units to help with them with local workplace “Challenges”. This machine, in combination with helping members establish healthy habits, continues to be a great asset to the Health Promotion and Fitness & Sports Departments and is one of many tools used to encourage members to stay on track towards their healthy lifestyle goals.

EDMONTON FEB AND MAR 2019 – WE WERE (VERY) BUSY After helping facilitate Ex STRONG CONTENDER (a Bde level exercise centered around sport) late in January, 3 CDSB Edmonton would go on to host a string of events in the months of February and March. First was the Canada West Men’s Basketball Championship in conjunction with the Women’s Basketball Regional Development Camp. These basketball events ran from 11-16 Feb and saw seven teams competing and representation from 9 bases overall.

courses running before, during and after events which made for tight turnaround with accommodations but we managed to squeeze it all together. The last of this particular busy month and a half saw Canada West Men’s and Women’s Volleyball Championships held 10-15 Mar with 13 teams competing through the week. Don’t forget that throughout all of this hosting, Edmonton teams were being sent on the road for various other Regional tournaments, this meant next to zero downtime in the world of Edmonton mil sports for this timeframe.

We then had one week off to finish preparing for hosting the 2019 CAF National Men’s Hockey Championship from 23-28 Feb followed immediately by both 2019 CAF National Women’s and Old Timer’s Hockey Championships which ran 02-07 Mar. It It was a very busy but rewarding experience to see so many high was over this preparation week leading into the National Hockey level athletes come through 3 CDSB Edmonton and showcase their Championships, that we lost the use of both of our ice resurfacing machines, with neither being able to be fixed in time for the events. athletic potential both on and off the court and ice. After some quick action and many phone calls, (including to the Oilers Entertainment Group), we were able to source and rent one from a company in Cochrane AB to get us through the two weeks. The Hockey Patron, RAdm Auchterlonie, was able to make a last minute appearance despite his busy work schedule which added to the event also. In the background, 3 CDSB Edmonton had many 15


VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

2019 CAF NATIONAL BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS

WHO –

CFB Halifax, Atlantic CFB Edmonton, Canada West

SUCCESS

CFB Valcartier, Quebec WHEN – CFB Petawawa, Ontario WHERE – 8-12 Apr 19 WHY –

GOLD : CFB Valcartier, Quebec

5 CDSB Gagetown, Base Fitness Centre The CAF Sports Program plays a prominent role in promoting fitness and good health within the military community. Sports inspire CAF members to improve their physical fitness and build their leadership and self-discipline skills. Sports also promote teamwork, esprit de corps, loyalty, and commitment.

SILVER : CFB Halifax, Atlantic

A great week of close games at the CAF National Basketball Championships. These teams fought for every win. Members displayed their athleticism and passion for basketball as well as represented their home base and region with pride at this national event. 16


VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

CONGRATULATIONS PSP MEET THE 2018 WOMAN OF DISTINCTION Anne Dore is the recipient of CFMWS 2018 Woman of Distinction Award. Anne began working for PSP in 2010 and has held several positions: Fitness and Sports Instructor, Physical Exercise Specialist, Regional Adapted Fitness Specialist and currently Health Promotion Specialist. Anne is Co-Chair for Gagetown’s Defence Women’s Advisory Organization (DWAO). Q: What was your coolest PSP experience? A: In 2013, I assisted Human Performance collect data on the BMOQ-L course. I enjoyed trekking through Gagetown’s knee-deep swamp, eating combat rations and sleeping in a tent. The weeklong project helped me understand soldiers’ work environment and appreciate my warm and cozy gym office.

PSP AWARD On 13th April our CEO Bruce Ploughman presented a PSP award to Alyson Hodgson for her support to the 36th World Military Men’s and the 19th World Military Women’s Volleyball Championship at CFB Edmonton last May. Thank-you Alyson and the Edmonton team for your availability for this important event and our sincere appreciation for your assistance. Further recognition was also provided to Colonel Mckenzie BComd for the leadership support in hosting 36th World Military Men’s and the 19th World Military Women’s Volleyball Championship at CFB Edmonton last May.

Q: Why do you volunteer with DWAO? A: I was involved in a project to create a breast pumping room on base. Seeing the positive impact the initiative had on mothers returning to work made me want to do more. Using my “health promotion hat” to create inclusive environments for all genders is rewarding. Q: What is a fun fact your colleagues may not know about you? A: Before presenting to a large audience, I pose like Wonder-Woman to psych myself up.

Caption: CEO visit who took part in hosting the event (we were able to get a few ‘out of towners’ who were here for VBall Regionals in the shot too)

Q: Who mentors you? Who have you mentored? A: I have a network of great mentors I can ask for guidance and different perspectives. Through DWAO, I have organized mentoring workshops and “Mentor of the Month” presentations.

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VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

LEADING FITNESS FROM THE FRONT A FEATURE ON OUR ATHLETES

Name: Marty Raymond Age Group: 55-59 CAF Member 1981-2002 (20 years ) PSP FSI 2002 to present (17 years )

Recent Results (masters Swimming Ontario Championship, Markham, ON) 22-24 Mar 19 Canadian Forces National Swim Team / CISM 93-95 Canadian Forces National Triathlon Team 96-2007 (Manager, Head Coach and Athlete)

50 Freestyle – Gold

Canadian Forces Male Athlete of the Year 1993 (Swimming)

200 Freestyle – Gold

2 participations at World Military Games and 5 CISM Championships (Swimming & Triathlon) 11 times Ultraman World Triathlon Championship finisher, Hawai’I 2006 Ultraman World Champion (Age Group 40-49) Currently hold the 5 fastest 10 KM swim times at the Ultraman World Triathlon Championship since 2004.

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400 Freestyle – Gold 800 Freestyle – Gold 1500 Freestyle – Silver


VOLUME 16, ISSUE 2 • July 2019 • WWW.CFMWS.COM

MEET PSP KINGSTON ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF THE PSP PRO-FIT SYSTEM In May of 2018, the PSP Kingston Fitness Department released the new PSP PRO-Fit System that updated the physical training programs offered to CFB Kingston military members. The system places programs within 3 different phases (Performance, Regeneration, and Operational) depending on the member’s fitness level and experience to allow for a more individualized fitness prescription. The first phase, Regeneration, focuses on members who are injured or have a low fitness level. These members are referred to the Reconditioning Program to fit into one of their four programs to help them return to an operationally fit status. The second phase, Operational, focuses on larger group classes for members/units who are healthy with a moderate level of fitness. The final phase, Performance, is our biggest update to our program as we introduced the Advanced Performance Training (APT) program. APT is focused on members with a moderate to high level of fitness looking for a complete Strength and Conditioning program from Monday to Friday. Members receive consistent programming with increased long term planning (12 week training blocks) that is measured based on a variety of important performance markers that allows us to track progress over time. The goal of these changes is to integrate the differing departments within PSP Kingston (Fitness & Sports, Reconditioning, and Health Promotion) to increase the value of our services by referring to our proper subject matter experts. This has resulted in increased participation, and consistent progression amongst our regular members.

FITNESS AND SPORTS

Back Row Left to Right – Kim Baylis (Fitness & Sports Instructor), Gage Smith (Fitness & Sports Instructor), Justin Moore (Physical Exercise Specialist), Kristofer Klith (Fitness & Sports Instructor), Steve Brick (Fitness Coordinator), Walter Kendall (Fitness & Sports Instructor) Front Row Left to Right – Tyson Staples (A/Reconditioning Manager), James Orsatti (Fitness & Sports Instructor), Tammy McCaugherty (Fitness & Sports Instructor), Jo-Anie Moreau (Fitness & Sports Instructor), Steve Ruttan (Manager, Fitness & Sports)

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HEALTH PROMOTION Back Row Left to Right – Rachel Askett (HPS), Sharon Ash (HPS), Christa Snow (HPM), Jeremy Bauman (HPS) Front Row Jackie LeSarge HPS, Cynthia Vanderstoop HPAA Cynthia Vanderstoop (HPAA) is in an acting role with Corporate Service until end Sept 2019. Currently Lori Popkie is the HPAA.

CHANGES TO FIELD AND HQ BASE

NAME

POSITION

BAGOTVILLE

CYNTHIA RUEST

HPM

BORDEN

JACQUIE UPRICHARD

HPS

BRAYDEN LISIECKI

HPS

CFSU(O)

JEAN-CHRISTIAN GAGNON

HPS

COLD LAKE

MARIE-EVE PAQUET

HPAA

LISA FISHER

HPS

ALICIA PERRY

HPM

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BASE

NAME

POSITION

EDMONTON

CHARISSA MCKAY

HPS

SERENA BENALI

HPS

ANDREA LAM

HPS

AMY GORDICHUK

HPS

JENA MACLEOD

HPS

JESSICA CLEMENTS

FSI

JESSICA BEEBE

FSI

TONY MCLEAN

FSI

KALI BORUTSKI

FSI

GANDER

KRISTEN BISHOP

HPAA

GREENWOOD

GINETTE BOUDREAU

HPS

HALIFAX

SAMANTHA NOSEWORTHY

HPS

KINGSTON

LORI POPKIE

HPAA

RACHEL ASKETT

HPS

DERRICK ENSLOW

HPM

SHARON JOY

HPAA

PETAWAWA

TRINA MANSOUR

HPS

SHILO

RUBY SZPEFLICKI

HPAA

ST. JOHN'S

RACHEL LITTLE

HPAA

TORONTO

KRISTIN TOOMSALU

HPM

TRENTON

CINDY TROMP

HPS

ERIN MENARD

HPS

ISABELLE DEMERS

HPAA

VALCARTIER

SOPHIE TESSIER-GAGNÉ

HPS

WINNIPEG

DEANNE BENNET

HPS

ESQUIMALT GAGETOWN

MOOSE JAW

UPDATES FOR FITNESS AND SPORTS COMING IN THE NEXT NEWSLETTER.

21

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