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Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010

At a Time


When the world says, “Give up,” hope whispers, “Try it one more time.” ~Author Unknown


Table of Contents

Page 2 |

Letter from the CW/NE Co-Chair Members Page 4 |

Who is the CW/NE Collaborative? Page 6 |

Central Detroit Christian Page 10 |

Vanguard CDC

Page 14 | Page 18 | 4C

Focus: HOPE

[at The Family Place] Child Care Coordinating Council Page 22 | Page 26 | Page 29 |

New Center Council

Where do we go from here?

CW/NE Collaborative Acknowledgements

Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 1


Letter from the CW/NE Collaborative Co-Chair Members. Scott Alan Davis

Greetings! In 2006, the Central Woodward/North End Collaborative was born. It started with two organizations, Vanguard CDC and Central Detroit Christian CDC. It only took meeting a couple of times to realize that New Center Council (now merged with Midtown Detroit, Inc.) needed to be a part of this new wave of doing business differently in Detroit. Karen Gage was such a valuable addition to the planning and the work we were all doing. And while it seemed like a stretch, at first, to invite and include Focus: HOPE, Debbie Fisher brought a wealth of knowledge and team spirit to the table. About a year into the planning process we had heard about some of the technology work that was going on at The Family Place under the direction of Denise Wellons-Glover at Child Care Coordinating Council of Detroit/Wayne County. Without hesitation we extended an invitation for 4C’s to join the Collaborative. We were on our way! Meet with the community. Plan, plan, plan. Implement, implement, implement. Learn how to work with one another to effect even greater change in our community. With priorities established from the neighborhoods, we developed our work plan with each organization taking on a specific task beyond their normal day-to-day work. Focus: HOPE housed the Safety Initiative and spearheaded a new innovative way to tackle crime. The Child Care Coordinating Council of 2

Debbie Fisher

Detroit/Wayne County developed the Technology arm of our work with the goal of getting wireless connections into homes in Detroit’s North End neighborhood. Central Detroit Christian CDC took on the housing rehab strategy for the Boston Edison Historic District. We all knew that we had to do more as it related to educational initiatives, but we also had to look at creating new models for our children. Vanguard CDC willingly rose to the occasion to lead the charge in education. And finally, New Center Council, with their wealth of experience in commercial development, took on the role of doing business differently in Economic Development. You will see in the pages following all that was accomplished between 2008—2010. Some pretty good stuff! With grateful hearts, we applaud Detroit LISC for tirelessly believing in us and our work. They were a constant resource to us in so many ways, and without them, the Collaborative would not have existed. A special thanks also to the Kresge Foundation for direct financial support. Many others whose partnership with us is listed on the acknowledgement page were invaluable to our work too. The GREATEST outcome of our nearly six years of working together? The trust, love and respect each of us has developed for one another. That takes a long time to build, and if the Bible says a three strand cord cannot be easily broken, just imagine the strength of a five strand


Karen Gage

Denise Wellons-Glover

Lisa Johanon

cord (as represented on the cover)! We created a team and a family, and we are doing business differently in the Central Woodward/North End. May what we started together live on for years to come.

Scott Alan Davis

Denise Wellons-Glover

Debbie Fisher

Lisa Johanon

Scott Alan Davis CW/NE Collaborative Co-Chair Vanguard CDC Excecutive Director

Debbie Fisher CW/NE Collaborative Co-Chair Focus: HOPE Director

Karen Gage

Denise Wellons-Glover CW/NE Collaborative Co-Chair 4C | Child Care Coordinating Council (at The Family Place) Project Director

Lisa Johanon CW/NE Collaborative Co-Chair Central Detroit Christian Excecutive Director

Karen Gage CW/NE Collaborative Co-Chair New Center Council Vice President and Director of Planning & Development

Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 3


Restoring Neighborhoods Community volunteers transforming blighted area into a new playground.

Who is the CW/NE Collaborative? Housing Development Village of Oakman Manor on Woodrow Wilson.

Detroit has always known adversity. In fact, bad times once prompted a few detractors to say that the last person leaving the city should turn off the lights. As if that were ever a real possibility. Detroit has been down, but Detroit has never been out. During the three years from 2008 to 2010—a period spanning 36 months, 156 weeks, 1,096 days, 26,280 hours and 1,576,800 minutes—the Central Woodward/North End Collaborative leveraged time, talent and finances to make sure the lights will forever shine brightly in a section of the city this partnership targeted for intensive care. Talk? There had already been enough of that. The Collaborative was formed by five task-oriented agencies that came with their sleeves rolled up, ready and excited to do the work that needed to be done to rebuild the neighborhoods they operated in and cared about.

Saftey Initatives CW/NE youth volunteers at Central High School discuss saftey programs and strategies for the local area.

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Geographically, the Central Woodward/ North End Community is a section of the city that is bound by Oakman and Tuxedo to the north, the Edsel Ford Freeway to the south, Linwood to the west and the Chrysler Freeway to the east. It is an area that has experienced the devastating effects of poverty, blight, crime and abandonment by

far too many businesses and residents. Rather than focusing on people who’d left, the Central Woodward/North End Collaborative concentrated on making life better for the people who stayed, while simultaneously making strategic improvements that were designed to attract new believers, new boosters—businesses and residents, alike—to the community. The plan is working, thanks to the efforts of The Central Woodward/North End Collaborative (CW/NE) which consists of five well-established, Detroit-based nonprofits: The Central Detroit Christian Community Development Corporation, The Child Care Coordinating Council of Detroit/Wayne County (at the Family Place), Focus: HOPE, The New Center Council and Vanguard Community Development Corporation. All have been meeting the needs of the men, women and children of Detroit for years, driven by their own well-defined and disparate missions. They all decided to partner in 2007 to achieve another common and compelling goal: to build sustainable communities in Detroit. And where better to begin than in their own contiguous neighborhoods?

implement a strategic plan designed to restore economic vitality and quality living to the crumbling blocks within their neighborhoods. This report documents the efforts of the CW/NE Collaborative from 2008 to 2010 to make the communities in which they

operate attractive places to live, work, play, do business and raise families. Their achievements were realized through five geographic and programmatic thrusts. Equally important as the Collaborative’s accomplishments, however, is the example this partnership provides for other organizations to follow.

Positive Youth 8th graders work with Focus: HOPE engineering candidates to build and drive electric cars.

It is the Collaborative’s hope that other groups in the city will band together to build sustainable communities in other parts of Detroit, places that offer the positive environments needed to ensure that all residents, regardless of income level, are provided the opportunities and tools needed to build assets, participate in their communities and become part of the mainstream economy. For many years, Detroit was known as “The City of Neighborhoods.” It can regain that moniker—and all of the positives that go along with it. All that’s needed is the committed work of partnerships such as the Central Woodward/North End Collaborative, along with the support of residents, businesses, funders and other stakeholders who are determined to rebuild Detroit, one neighborhood at a time.

The organizations came together to do what others had merely talked about: Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 5


Restoring Neighborhoods Central Detroit Christian helped curb the recent foreclosures in Detroit’s Historic Boston-Edison District by purchasing & renovating several homes in this neighborhood.

Central Detroit Christian

Community Development Corporation

Through education, employment and economic development, Central Detroit Christian (CDC) strives to instill hope, faith and values, while inspiring individuals within the community to reach their highest potential as confident, productive and caring community leaders and citizens. Our community-based approach means that a majority of staff and board members are from the community. We have implemented a number of youth centered activities; developed 5 businesses; are working on several different housing projects; developed a work training program for teens and young adults; and provide for direct needs in the community through outreach events. CDC was founded in 1993 when a coalition of pastors agreed that the community Healthy Choices Peaches & Greens, a community produce market that offers community residents the opportunity to have a nutritionally adequate diet through a sustainable food system that maximizes community self-reliance.

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Housing Rehabilitation Foreclosure Prevention Neighborhood Beautification Education Programs

It has been a joy to work with members of the Collaborative who have the same vision and passion for community revitalization that we have at Central Detroit Christian. Friendships and trust enabled us to work as a team to more effectively serve the needs of people. I’ve lived in this community for 24 years, so I know first-hand that we’re better off because of the work of the Collaborative. – Lisa Johanon - Central Detroit Christian, Excecutive Director Home Restoration

would experience a greater impact with a unified effort. At that time the coalition developed the following focus areas: youth ministry, job training and development, housing, and meeting direct needs. Our vision is to be an agent of change creating a community of choice. We desire to meet the real needs of our community in such a way that we see the community restored and made whole, and as a result, people will take pride in their community and desire to stay there. In the summer of 2011, CDC started

renovating a home in the Historic Boston– Edison District of Detroit as part of Mayor Bing’s Project 14 program. We were able to get a Detroit Police Officer qualified for a mortgage through our home buyers education program, and before, Christmas he and his family moved into his home. Education of children is vital to a healthy community as well. Last spring CDC launched a tutoring program for children. We heard the consistent cry of our parents looking for academic assistance and saw the struggles of students. About 40 K-8 students attended

In 2009 and 2010, CDC acquired 10 properties in the Boston-Edison Historic District and rehabbed 4 of the homes. During that same time, CDC also began a partnership with the Detroit Land Bank to try to have an even greater impact on housing renovation in the Boston-Edison District.

Community Participation [A] Volunteers help plant vegetables in the community garden. [B] Governor Jennifer Granholm pays a visit to Peaches & Greens, moble produce market.

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Special Visit First Lady Michelle Obama visited the Peaches & Greens mobile truck in her 2010 visit to Detroit.

Commitment At Every Level

RECENT ACTIVITY IN CENTRAL DETROIT CHRISTIAN FOCUS AREA: HOUSING DEVELOPMENT COMMERCIAL / RETAIL CONSTRUCTION / REHAB / BEAUTIFICATION

the tutoring program. In October 2011, we started offering tutoring for our high school students as well. Factors that helped these accomplishments: • Project manager hired through grant funds. • Improved relations with Boston-Edison Neighborhood Association. • Extensive marketing campaign. • Support from Next Detroit. • Innovative thinking.

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Achievements: • 4 Housing units rehabbed. • 16 Sites improved via blight elimination/beautification projects. • 33 Abandoned houses boarded and secured. • 101 Homes saved from foreclosure.

Most of the homes are about a hundred years old, so I would definitely invest in grants to try to fix the homes… - James Hamilton, Resident and past President of The Boston-Edison Association

Starting Young Community Participation: Neighborhood children help plant vegetables in the community garden.

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Neighborhood children jump rope outside of Peaches & Green Produce Market. Local Employment

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Jump for Joy, fresh produce is here!

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Higher Ground Landscaping provides lawn services to the Detroit area and provides jobs for local residents.

Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 9


Education Preparation Vanguard CDC offers free tutorial and homework help for students K-12 and college students by request in math, reading, literature, english & language arts.

Vanguard

Community Development Corporation

Vanguard Community Development Corporation (CDC) is a comprehensive, holistic community service and development organization that works to facilitate, coordinate and ignite educational, economic and community development. Founded in 1994, Vanguard CDC is the nonprofit development arm of Detroit’s Second Ebenezer Church. The Early Education Initiative currently targets the area commonly known as Central Woodward/North End. Vanguard established a working group to engage partners, define early education goals, and identify strategies to achieve these goals. This group includes representatives of several foundations with an interest in education, as well as early education providers, advocates, and community representatives. We are currently working towards a goal of ensuring that 100 of North End/Central Housing Cameron Court Senior Village completed and occupied.

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• Education Development • Economic Development • Community Development

We’re teaching parents how to become better advocates for early childhood education. We want the kids in the North End neighborhood to be connected to the best possible opportunities. – Scott Alan Davis - Vanguard CDC Executive Director.

Local Roots

Woodward children, ages 0-5, are prepared to succeed in school. Our community reintegration programs are designed to encourage and motivate positive change through the realization of a “second chance” for those who have paid their debt to society and are ready to be productive, wealth-building members of the community. Through the support of staff, community, other stakeholders, and funders, trainees and members of the Next Steps programs clearly demonstrate a commitment to change. New job skills, new tools, and resources are an integral part of the human capital available in our

community. Many use their new skills and resources to provide valuable community service and outreach projects or use those skills to start new small businesses, complete educational goals, or realize the meaning and purpose to their lives.

The headquarters of Vanguard CDC is located on East Grand Blvd.

Vanguard Community Development Corporation is invested in creating residential communities that are targeted at mixed income price points to attract a diverse group of residents, as well as support, sustain, and compliment the existing housing stock and residents. Our projects include: Blight Improvements [A] The Chap lofts, is an example of the revitalization of the Detroit’s North End. Once an empty industrial building, the building is now renovated into residential living units. This development has curbed blight on E. Grand Blvd. in Detroit, MI.

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[B] A public display of art in an open field in Detroit’s North End.

Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 11


Restoring Neighborhoods Melrose Square, 26 units of tax cut housing under construction.

Rebuilding Neighborhoods

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Factors that helped these accomplishments: • Support from the City of Detroit and MSHDA (Michigan State Housing Development Authority). • Capable General Contractor. • Focus on early childhood education.

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HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

Genesis Villas at Medbury Park Melrose Square Cameron Court Senior Village West Oakland Homes Maxwell Homes

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RECENT ACTIVITY IN VANGUARD CDC FOCUS AREA:

• • • • •


Achievements: • 54 Homes saved from foreclosure. • 18 Parents involved in local Parent Advocacy Network. • 62 Units of new construction.

I haven’t seen a lot of effort at trying to improve the education in the community. There have been some, but in my opinion...not really enough to be able to push children to get where they need to go. We need more help! - Jonathan Shropshire Student and Resident of the North End

Project Building Part of community building includes the CW/NE Collaborative’s push for property improvements, new housing and commercial development.

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A vibrant community park in the North End brightens the day of North Enders.

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Melrose Square Completed

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Much needed housing has sprung up in recent years in Detroit’s North End. This not only curbs the blight in this area, but will eventually strengthen Detroit’s tax base of homeowners.

Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 13


Embodiment of Community Service Eleanor Josaitis, Focus: HOPE co-founder, shares a laugh with children.

Focus: HOPE

Education | Safety | Jobs Pipeline

In 1968, Father William Cunningham (1930–1997) and Eleanor Josaitis (1931-2011) co-founded Focus: HOPE, an organization dedicated to intelligent and practical solutions to the problems of hunger, economic disparity, inadequate education, and racial divisiveness. Together, they adopted the following mission statement: Recognizing the dignity and beauty of every person, we pledge intelligent and practical action to overcome racism, poverty and injustice. And to build a metropolitan community where all people may live in freedom, harmony, trust and affection. Black and white, yellow, brown and red from Detroit and its suburbs of every economic status, national origin and religious persuasion we join in this covenant. —Adopted March 8, 1968 Skills Training Computer training takes full concentration. Teachers work one-onone with students to help them succeed.

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• Basic Needs Food Program • Career Training Programs • Neighborhood Revitalization

By working together instead of independently, these five non-profits ((Central Central Woodward/North End Collaborative) have made tangible strides in improving safety across the target area, increasing broadband access in the community, and much more. This type of collaboration holds great promise for the future. – Debbie Fisher - Focus: HOPE Director (HOPE Village Initiative) Education and Training

Over the years, Focus: HOPE has had three primary focus areas: food and basic needs, workforce development and education, and neighborhood revitalization. Through its food program, it provides monthly food packages to over 42,000 people. It has trained thousands of machinists, information technology specialists, and manufacturing engineers, as well as hundreds of people in a range of other disciplines. In the Central Woodward/North End Collaborative (CW/NE), Focus: HOPE played several key roles: it spearheaded

the Collaborative’s safety initiative; it led the development of the neighborhood jobs pipeline strategy, and it led the Connect Your Community broadband development strategy.

Focus: HOPE offers education, experience and training programs at all levels.

The safety initiative employed a safety management strategy, led by its Community Safety Coordinator, Bridget Vance, which focused on reducing auto theft, break-ins and drug-related crimes. Training significant numbers of youth on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles, the safety initiative also undertook clean-up and blight removal Neighborhood Improvements [A] Clearing overgrown brush is really a crime deterrent, especially when everyone joins in to help.

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[B] Oakman Place Apartments completed. Developed by Lutheran Child, Family Service of Michigan & The Damone Group. This apartment provides shelter to families at 60% AMI (Area Media Income) or below, as well as homeless families.

Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 15


Walk for HOPE Focus: HOPE’s annual walk for diversity attracts thousands of supporters.

Strength In Numbers

RECENT ACTIVITY IN FOCUS: HOPE FOCUS AREA:

HOUSING DEVELOPMENT COMMERCIAL / RETAIL CONSTRUCTION / REHAB / BEAUTIFICATION EDUCATION / COMMUNITY FOCUS: HOPE HEADQUARTERS

Area Map

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efforts with youth in key areas around schools. The CW/NE area saw significant decreases in crime in each year of the initiative, demonstrating the effectiveness of this approach. Focus: HOPE also led the development of a new concept for the CW/NE area a neighborhood jobs pipeline, bringing together workforce development and social service providers throughout the target area to develop a unified system for better linking neighborhood residents to job training and job placement opportunities. Focus: HOPE led the Connect Your Community Strategy to bridge the digital divide in the CW/NE area and beyond, working with 4C and Matrix Human Services to train and connect thousands of residents to the internet. Finally, Focus: HOPE also led development efforts for the Oakman East area, working with partners to attract over

225 new units of housing to the area, as well as over $500,000 in new park and community garden development. Factors that helped these accomplishments: • Residents inspired to bring about change. • Partnerships with Detroit Public Schools and Detroit Police. • An innovative approach to community patrolling. • Assistance from City of Detroit and MSHDA. • LISC Technical Assistance.

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Safety Achievements: • 7 New community policing programs instituted. • 11 New or resurrected neighborhood block clubs. • 30 Crime and safety awareness/education events held. • 30 Youth trained in CPTED (Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design) • 667 Residents involved in safety management activities. The safety efforts have been awesome! We’ve brought small block clubs together. We are working together as one, which is the first time that has happened in the city of Detroit. - Ava Tinsley, Resident and Member Crime and Saftey Committee

Center Stage Public performance space in HOPE Community Park.

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The community park is a new green-space park developed as a part of Focus: HOPE revitalization efforts in the Oakman Boulevard Woodrow Wilson area.

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This senior living housing (left, foreground) was the first new construction in the area in 50 years, opening in 2007. The landmark Bell Building on Oakman Boulevard (background) is on the verge of having a new life as the headquarters of Neighborhood Service Organization (NSO), providing 155 units of permanent supportive housing. Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 17


Children 1st Child development is crucial to community change and growth.

4C [at The Family Place]

Child Care Coordinating Council of Detroit/Wayne County

Since 1970, the Child Care Coordinating Council of Detroit/Wayne County, Inc. (4C) has been a leader in child development and family life education services and support. The organization’s mission is to educate, support and empower families, and to promote the development of children to their full potential. 4C researches and documents child and family needs, service and resource gaps, and emerging community problems. 4C brings all sectors together to cooperatively and corroboratively plan, problem solve, advocate and develop resources to improve supports and services for children youth, and families. 4C is also supporting families by facilitating Neighborhood Services The community looks to 4C at the Family Place to be an educational resource for just about anything related to children, youth and families. Pictured is 4C’s Family Place headquarters in Detroit’s North End.

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• • • •

Resource & Referral Child Development and Family Life Education Family Support: Education and Skills Training Child Care Provider Services

Providing computers and computer training to residents has empowered them and enhanced the lives immeasurably of residents who would not have been exposed to them otherwise. Coupled with other improvements, I believe free access to wireless technology could attract new residents to the area and add to neighborhood stabilization. – Denise Wellons-Glover - Collaborative Coordinator Making a Difference

the Mayor’s Task Force on Child Abuse and Neglect. The 4C/WC3D REAL DEAL Project was created as a means to inform, educate, train, support, and empower Central Woodward/North End Detroit caregivers (parents, relatives, and other primary caregivers). This program is designed to effectively advance the development of language and literacy skills of children birth to 9 years old by maximizing the benefits of consistent, reliable parenting with the uninterrupted time that supportive relative caregivers can give to children when parents are away either working or involved in other

adult family life responsibilities. It increases caregivers’ capacities to stimulate on-time development, school readiness and subsequent school success for the children in the Central Woodward/ Northend Detroit community. An important part of this program is that it introduces parents to the college experience by enrolling them into the WCC College Parent Academy; for many, this is a first step to future higher education and employment possibilities.

4C’s parent education services include individual consultations, home visits, child development screenings.

Detroit/Wayne County 4C serves as a collaborative partner within The Family Connecting the Community

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[A] + [B] The Connect Your Community Program is focused on engaging, training, and equipping target community residents to become Sustainable Broad Band Adapters. Key partners in the program are: 4C, Focus: HOPE and Matrix Human Services. In Aug. 2010, 4C hired 6 computer technology experts to deliver this program in the community.

Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 19


Child Development 4C training supports the development and maintenance of quality care and developmentally appropriate programs for children.

Helping Young Minds Develop

RECENT ACTIVITY IN 4C (AT THE FAMILY PLACE) FOCUS AREA: HOUSING DEVELOPMENT COMMERCIAL / RETAIL CONSTRUCTION / REHAB / BEAUTIFICATION EDUCATION / COMMUNITY 4C (AT THE FAMILY PLACE) HEADQUARTERS

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The Connect Your Community Program (CYC) is focused on engaging, training, equipping, and supporting target community residents to become Sustainable Broadband Adapters. CYC is funded under a Federal American Recovery and Reinvestments Act (ARRA) grant. The CYC key partners are Focus: HOPE, The Child Care Coordinating Council (4C) and Matrix Human Services. The primary service neighborhood for 4C is located within the Central Woodward/ North End boundaries that extend from I-94 (south) to Woodland (north), I-75 (east) to Linwood (west). These neighborhoods are specifically targeted by the project, but all of Detroit is ultimately eligible.

Factors that helped these accomplishments: • Combining Knight Foundation funding with Recovery Act dollars. • Satellite training centers in housing developments.

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Place, an Early Childhood Development Center that has continuously served pregnant women, teens, and families with children under the age of eleven since 1997. From this location, 4C also offers financial literacy and computer-based vocational training.


Achievements: • 134 Households were provided with computers. • 173 Households were provided wireless access to the Internet. • 257 Households received technology training.

The computer is important to me because it brings you up to date with a lot of things you wouldn’t ordinarily know. - Herbert Jackson, North End Resident & “Connect Your Computer Program” Participant

Great Parent, Great Start Program Provides a service model that teaches parents how to prepare their children for school readiness.

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Young students learn basic computer skills.

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Assistance 4C at the Faimily Place provides after school tutoring programs.

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Upgrades A completed New Center Park - a tranquil place in the middle of the hustle of New Center.

New Center Council

Clean Safe | Economic Development | Image Building

New Center Council, Inc. (NCC) is a nonprofit business organization dedicated to the beneficial development and management of Detroit’s Historic New Center as a vibrant, diverse and economically healthy district and the northern anchor of Detroit’s Greater Downtown. Established in 1967, the Council has evolved from a neighborhood “caretaker” and civic organization to a proactive leadership organization providing public space maintenance, planning and development services, security coordination, and marketing, among numerous other duties related to the maintenance and betterment of the 40 square blocks known as New Center. NCC maintains the public spaces in the New Center through litter removal, Detroit’s New Center A bustling and robust view of 2nd Avenue looking South from West Grand Blvd.

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• Commercial Corridor Revitalization • Business Retention, Attraction and Marketing

New Center Park will allow Detroit’s historic New Center neighborhood, for the first time, to enjoy a year-round gathering place for programming and special events. - New Center Council President Michael Solaka

Education Resources

an annual flower and landscaping program, holiday lighting, banners, and tree maintenance. NCC works closely with the City of Detroit, Detroit Police Department and other agencies to plan, promote and implement the highest quality development in New Center. Economic development initiatives spurred by the 1997 New Center Economic Development Plan have led to $257 million of completed and pending investment in New Center since 1997. New Center’s Planning and Development activities include, but are not

limited to, the following: • Update and assist in enforcing zoning and land use laws to promote desired new development and discourage nuisance properties. • Establish specialized districts for economic development tax breaks. • Apply for grants and loans to subsidize pre-development, construction, and other eligible costs in property development. • Conduct inter-departmental City and stakeholder meetings to work through project issues.

The New Center Area is home to a satellite campus of the College for Creative Studies. The campus also houses Henry Ford Academy for grades 6 -12.

Job Growth [A] New Center spearheads liter removal. [B] Construction underway for New Center Park, creating local jobs.

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Neighborhood Night Life The completion of New Center Park breathes new life into the city with a variety of entertainment, from fashion shows, live music and movies.

Neighborhood Amenities

• RECENT ACTIVITY IN NEW CENTER COUNCIL FOCUS AREA: HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

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Factors that helped these accomplishments: • Recoverable loan from LISC Detroit. • Modified New Center Park renovation to one phase. • Dedicated staff to pursue flowerbed sponsors.

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In addition to the day-to-day activities, the NCC Planning & Development staff develops and manages many Economic Development initiatives.

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a single organization to provide business district improvement services for Detroit’s developing Midtown area.

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Provide developers with technical information relating to housing reports, real estate transactions, application and approval procedures, program restrictions, land use laws, etc. Seek out suitable private developers for specific desired projects.

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Achievements: • 21,940 sq. ft. of West Grand Blvd. office space renovated. • 83 Sponsored flower beds on West Grand Blvd. • Completed renovation of New Center Park. • Bike lane study completed.

I love the park and the concerts presented there! -New Center Resident

Beautiful Boulevard Boulevard beautification spearheaded by NCC.

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Audiences of all ages enjoy events at New Center Park. A wonderful place to relax.

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Entertainment for All

The renovated Boulevard West building on West Grand Boulevard attracts new businesses to the area.

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Where do we go from here? Clean Corps Clean Corps volunteers spent the summer cutting down weeds, trimming bushes and boarding up houses to make neighborhoods safe.

While the Central Woodward/North End Collaborative was successful in reaching many of its goals, there is much work left to be done before the area serviced by the Collaborative can lay claim to a sustainable environment. Far more resources - human and financial - will be needed to build on the momentum that has been growing since this effort began in 2007 and escalated in 2008. That’s why a new partnership is in the works: an alliance that will include the organizations that comprised the Collaborative, as well as hundreds of other businesses, block clubs, churches, advocacy groups, economic and community development corporations, residents and grassroots organizations located within the target area. Also expected to lend support are new grantors, governmental entities, civic and social groups, and other stakeholders. The plan is for all interested parties to come together to form the NorthEnd/ Central Woodward Alliance, which is expected to become the largest and

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strongest membership organization in Detroit. The Alliance will continue the Collaborative’s mission of serving the needs of residents and businesses in the target area, while adding advocacy to its agenda. So, if you have something to say—or something you want to do—to help move the Central Woodward/North End neighborhoods closer to becoming sustainable, viable communities, you need to join the Alliance! For information on how to get on board, contact Patricia Dockery: 313.556.2034 dockery313@aol.com


construction.

667Residents in safety management activities.

257 Households received technology training.

New Center Council Inc.

foreclosure.

62 Units of new

Prevention Through Environmental Design.

(4C) at the Family Place

101Homes saved from

Focus: HOPE

boarded and secured.

Va n g u a r d C D C

Central Detroit Christian

C W / N E C o l l a b o r a t ive ’s 2008- 2010 Imp ac t R e sul t s 7 New community policing 4 Housing units rehabbed. programs instituted. 134 Households 54 Homes saved from provided foreclosure. 11New or resurrected with computers. neighborhood block 16 Blight elimination/ clubs. beautification projects. 30 Crime and safety 18 Parents involved in 173 Households provided awareness/education local Parent Advocacy wireless access to Network. 33 Abandoned houses the Internet. 30 Youth trained in Crime

21,940SF of West Grand Blvd. office space renovated.

83 Sponsored flower

beds on West Grand Blvd.

1 Renovation of New Center Park.

1 Bike lane study completed.

We have experienced the power of collaboration. We can see all around us the benefits of what can happen when you work together, instead of independently. Clearly, collaboration is the way to proceed in the future. – Patricia Dockery

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New raised planting beds at the Focused Hands community garden.

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RECENT ACTIVITY IN CENTRAL WOODWARD/ NORTH END COLLABORATIVE FOCUS AREA:

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HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

EDUCATION / COMMUNITY ORGNIZATION HEADQUARTERS

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CITY OF DETROIT

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Focus Area Area Map

Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 27


Partnering to

28

Rebuild Detroit

One

Neighborhood


At a Time!

CW/NE Collaborative Acknowledgements

Grantors/Supporters: City of Detroit Detroit Land Bank Authority Detroit Police Department – Central District Knight Foundation Kresge Foundation LISC Detroit MSHDA Skillman Foundation

Central Woodward/North End Collaborative Performance Report 2008 - 2010 29


8840 Second Avenue Detroit, MI 48202 (313) 873-0064 www.centraldetroitchristian.org

2785 E. Grand Boulevard Detroit, MI 48211 (313) 872-7831 www.vanguardcdc.org

cw/ne collaborative

1355 Oakman Boulevard Detroit, MI 48238 (313) 872-7831 www.focushope.edu

8726 Woodward Avenue Detroit, MI 48202 (313) 664-0700 www.thefamilyplace4c.org

Designed by:

3011 W. Grand Boulevard Detroit, MI 48202 (313) 420-6000 www.newcenter.com

www.centricdesign www.centric designstudio.com studio.com Printed in the USA on 10% recycled paper.


Central Woodward / North End Collaborative Performance Report