Page 1

are the best accessory

DOGS PAGE 32

CH2’S MOST ADORABLE PET CONTEST

CHECK OUT OUR TOP 15 PETS!

THE BEST FOODS FOR MAN’S BEST FRIEND SWIPE RIGHT: HILTON HEAD HUMANE ASSOCIATION’S MOST ELIGIBLE PETS

THE SCOOP ON POOP

PAGE 49

THE LAW OF THE JUNGLE

PAGE 53

THE LOVE OF A RESCUE DOG KNOWS NO BOUNDS FROM POUND PUPPIES TO THERAPY DOGS

plus CULTIVATING A BETTER RELATIONSHIP WITH MYSELF

5

DRINKS WITH:

MAYOR JOHN MCCANN FEBRUARY 2019


P18

There will always be evil abroad; I can’t help that. But let there not be any evil within me” - PAGE 95

EDITOR’S NOTE Lucy, Lucy, Lucy

P21

A WORD FROM OUR MAYOR Lisa Sulka of Bluffton updates you on town happenings.

P23

5 DRINKS WITH Mayor John McCann

P27

THIS & THAT

P31

CH2’S MOST ADORABLE PET CONTEST WINNERS!

P45

THE BEST FOODS FOR MAN’S BEST FRIEND

P49

THE SCOOP ON POOP

P51

P32

ESA AND SERVICE DOG FAKERS

DOGS THE BEST ACCESSORY Model Alexia with Abbey, formerly a rescue from Maranatha Farms who is now a Hos-Pet for Hospice Care of the Lowcountry.

CB2 CELEBRATE BLUFFTON & BEYOND

CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

CH2’S MOST ADORABLE PET CONTEST CHECK OUT OUR TOP 15 PETS!

THE LOVE OF A RESCUE DOG KNOWS NO BOUNDS THE LAW OF THE JUNGLE

are the best accessory

DOGS

are the best accessory

DOGS

SWIPE RIGHT: HILTON HEAD HUMANE ASSOCIATION’S MOST ELIGIBLE PETS

THE SCOOP ON POOP

PAGE 49

THE LAW OF THE JUNGLE

PAGE 53

THE LOVE OF A RESCUE DOG KNOWS NO BOUNDS FROM POUND PUPPIES TO THERAPY DOGS

plus CULTIVATING A BETTER RELATIONSHIP WITH MYSELF

5

DRINKS WITH:

MAYOR JOHN MCCANN FEBRUARY 2019

THE BEST FOODS FOR MAN’S BEST FRIEND FEBRUARY 2019

FEBRUARY 2019

PAGE 32

CHECK OUT OUR TOP 15 PETS!

THE BEST FOODS FOR MAN’S BEST FRIEND

THE SCOOP ON POOP

THE LAW OF THE JUNGLE Laura Sterling thought she was done with the law and with politics. Instead, she found herself back in the fray, with the lives of a farm full of animals on the line.

P57

PAGE 53

CH2’S MOST ADORABLE PET CONTEST

P53

CULTIVATING A BETTER RELATIONSHIP WITH MYSELF LOVING YOUR PARTNER IN SICKNESS AND HEALTH

plus FIT CLUB

MEN OF F3 TRAINING FOR A CAUSE

PAGE 49

FEBRUARY 2019

ON OUR COVERS ON THE CH2 COVER

ON THE CB2 COVER

Photography by M.Kat Ensemble by Too Belles Styling by Kaila Manthei Hair and Make-up by Bride’s Side Beauty Thanks to Alexia and Halo Model and Talent Agency

Photography by M.Kat Ensemble by Gigi’s Boutique Styling by Kaila Manthei Hair and Make-up by Bride’s Side Beauty Thanks to Kathleen and Halo Model and Talent Agency

THE LOVE OF A RESCUE DOG KNOWS NO BOUNDS

P59

FROM POUND PUPPIES TO THERAPY DOGS Second chances lead to amazing community contributions

P62

SWIPE RIGHT Hilton Head Humane Association’s Most Eligible Pets

P66

CHOW DADDY’S

P71

PRETTY NAIL & SPA For a polished look and a personalized experience

P73

NEW YEAR, NEW SMILE If you’ve already given up on your New Year’s resolution, Harbor Point Dentistry has a great way to get back on track.

P75

BENCHMARK® PHYSICAL THERAPY Setting the bar for outpatient rehabilitation

P78

A G THING The G-Free Spot proves you don’t need gluten to have a decadent treat.

P83

HILTON HEAD PREPARATORY SCHOOL TO PRESENT JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT

P93

CULTIVATING A BETTER RELATIONSHIP WITH MYSELF

P101

NINE THINGS I’VE LEARNED IN NINE DECADES by Evie McCandless

P102

MUSICIANS IN BATHROOMS Featuring As Husband and Wife


ď ™

invades J Lucy the set during

F EBR UA RY 2 01 9

the headshots for the Academy Mortgage team

editor’s note

I

Queen Lula crashes a shoot with Melissa Harrison and her pup Ryder.

Dog Mom shirt can be found at D-Luxe on Main Street

K

Lucille helps herself to some love from our Bachelorette of the Year Vanessa Stewart.

nominee Katie Metropolis makes O Bachelorette room for Lou.

MAGGIE WASHO

Publisher / Editor-in-Chief


M AY O R < Bluffton Mayor

Photography by Krisztian Lonyai

A Note from Lisa Sulka

DON RYAN CENTER ENHANCES VIBRANT BUSINESS CLIMATE

T

he new year is off to a good start in the heart of the Lowcountry. This season represents a blank slate, looking ahead and setting goals. It’s the time to take action. As Mark Twain said, “The secret to getting ahead is getting started.” To help you take the leap, the Don Ryan Center for Innovation (DRCI) announces its first-ever business acceleration cohort, “LAUNCH,” which began January 29 and is designed to provide entrepreneurs with tools, insights and resources to start and grow successful businesses. LAUNCH is the perfect introduction to the entrepreneurial lifestyle and was created to help participants develop the tactical skills necessary for success. Industry experts and

business mentors will lead 10 classes as participants meet weekly to map out business plans and startup goals. LAUNCH is another example of how the DRCI is fostering opportunities for emerging, innovative leaders and enhancing our already vibrant business climate. Registration is available at www.donryancenter.com or by calling (843) 540-0405. Entrepreneurs who wish to take the next step in building their business can apply for the DRCI business incubator, a more in-depth and personalized program. The incubator nurtures scalable businesses and assists companies with issues such as market entry, creating a minimal viable product (MVP), cash flow generation, preparation for outside funding, and more. Charles Wohl, the DRCI’s vice president of innovation, will lead the cohort and business incubator. Additionally, Charles is building programming for our growing group of business mentors, advisors and alumni. In 2019, the Don Ryan Center for innovation will also move into its new state-of-theart space known as The HUB, which will be located in Buckwalter Place Commerce Park. The HUB will be designed to inspire creativity, focus and connection for entrepreneurs and local businesses. It will house the Town of Bluffton’s economic development headquarters and business incubator, while offering coworking and meeting space. The HUB will also be home to the DRCI community and a place for collaboration in a hightech, open environment. There’s no doubt The HUB will quickly become an asset for Bluffton and the region. The DRCI continues to offer its monthly event, SESSIONS, upstairs at Corner Perk Café on the last Thursday of the month from 8-9 a.m. The event series is a “mustattend” for entrepreneurs and professionals at all stages. We have recently added “Open House Office Hours” on Thursdays, 8-10 a.m. It’s a casual, drop-in format at the DRCI’s temporary space next to the Town of Bluffton Law Enforcement Center in Buckwalter Place Commerce Park. You can meet the staff, hear more about The HUB, and learn about various programs and resources available. I encourage you to stop in for a cup of coffee and some conversation to learn more about the organization and how you can plug in. Membership in the Don Ryan Center community continues to grow and offers unique privileges such as complimentary access to events and workshops. Members can also utilize a collaborative online community, will receive priority access to The HUB, and more. Most important, joining the Don Ryan Center contributes to the entrepreneurial spirit of Bluffton and helps ensure a vibrant business climate for our future. To learn more about the exciting things happening within the Don Ryan Center for Innovation, I encourage you to follow the DRCI on social media or call the office at (843) 540-0405. 

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

21


5 DRINKS WITH: Mayor John McCann THIS IS A PARTIAL EXCERPT FROM OUR FIRESIDE CHAT WITH MAYOR JOHN MCCANN. PLEASE SEE THE ENTIRE VIDEO ON OUR WEBSITE: WWW. CELEBRATEHILTONHEAD.COM f you go by public perception, John McCann might seem like a hardliner. With his strong New York accent and even stronger viewpoints, he cuts the figure of someone who draws a line in the sand and refuses to back down. But meet him in person, as so many have through his regular community meetings, and you find someone open to communication. You find an island resident who has seen changes made that left his fellow residents behind. You find a newly elected mayor who simply wants to do right by them. He’s drinking: Ketel One on the rocks with a lime. I’m drinking: Jim Beam on the rocks. How are you enjoying the gig so far? Loving it. A lot of the narrative of your election was framed as John McCann’s coming in to fix the mistakes. Would you think that’s a fair representation? I don’t think so at all. In the year and a half I’ve been running, I’ve learned a lot more from the people who are here than I have as a councilman. I don’t think it’s a matter of fixing mistakes; it’s a

I

A rti c l e b y B ar r y Ka uf ma n Ph o t o g r aph y b y M.Ka t

matter of doing what the people want to do. We did lose four years, because we didn’t get a lot accomplished. You never get those four years back, so you shouldn’t worry about the mistakes. There are four more good years coming up for the people of this town. What are you most excited about in the next four years? Spending as much time as I can with the people of this island. I mean, we’ve decided to move four council meetings outside of the chambers; we’ve decided to have meet and greets—12 of them next year. I enjoy being on the outside. We did 43 different meet and greets at 43 different homes and talked to people along the way. People are concerned about the corridor coming in with the one percent sales tax. People are concerned about workforce development. People are concerned about having a master plan for our parks. And people are concerned about health care. Those are the four major things people are concerned about. And they want a little more civility at the town than we’ve had in the past. That, we’re hoping to accomplish right away. That’s a pretty heavy-duty punch list. It is. That’s why there are four years. You’ve talked about workforce housing as being something the private sector should handle. Are you seeing a lot of hospitality groups stepping up? I believe that workforce housing should not be subsidized housing. The government shouldn’t be involved in it. We shouldn’t build housing; we shouldn’t use our own land; we should just help people along with their building process. In the last three weeks, I’ve talked to at least five or six people around here who want to build something here because they need something. If you look at Sea Pines, they bought land outside of Sea Pines to build housing. A lot of people have started to work on their own. If you give people an opportunity and the right tools, capital markets will take care of all this. But you have to help them along. Let’s talk about your personal life a little bit.

I’m a Yankee fan. I was in the financial service businesses for 44 years. Started out at Merrill Lynch as a trainee and retired as CEO and chairman of a firm in St. Louis, Bridge Trading. I’ve been coming here since 1988. We bought a timeshare in 1988, bought our home in 1998, and we’ve been coming down here full-time since 2003.

I’m a yankee fan. I was in the financial service businesses for 44 years. Started out at Merrill Lynch as a trainee and retired as ceo and chairman of a firm in st. louis, bridge trading. So, when did you get into local politics? The first three years, I was president of the Port Royal Plantation board. Then I was chairman of the Technical College’s foundation board. Then I went into politics. We were sitting around complaining, just like you and me sitting around talking about things. My friend said, “You should get into politics,” and I laughed. That’s how we got into it. I’d never run for political office before. When we first moved here, my wife made it clear to me that she wasn’t making lunch for me every day and I should find something to do with my life. It’s been interesting. It’s different. What’s something that would surprise people about you? That I wasn’t born in the South? (laughs). I’m an avid baseball fan—my wife and I go to spring training every year. We bid on something two years ago—time on the field with Brian McCann. We got there around 3 p.m. for a 7 p.m. game and spent time with Brian during batting practice. It happened to be the day

Barry Kaufman and HIlton Head Island Mayor, John Mccann enjoy some libations in the Port Royal Clubhouse

a

5


5 DRINKS WITH: Mayor

John Mccann

A-Rod was playing his last game, so the whole place was going crazy. What are some of the positives you’ve seen in your eight years on council? I’m very impressed by the people who work there. They’re dedicated; they’re hard-working; they’re brighter than the average person. You need to respect what they do, and I don’t think we’ve done that a lot. There’s a lot of talent there. [Steve] Riley is as good a town manager as you can get. I think the public wants someone to represent them and be out there. I mean, the public wants to know who their mayor is and get their two cents in without complaining all the time. The town is doing its three biggest projects ever in the next three years. Have you been to the new USCB campus yet? The outside looks like the one out in Bluffton, the inside is totally different. It’s huge, welcoming. We did one of our town council meetings there. We did our annual retreat there. That’s on one corner. Halfway down Pope Avenue is the new Marriott hotel; it’s going to be four stories with a pool and a bar on the roof that can see the ocean. Then on the end of the block is a $20 million park we’re building. Those will be the three cornerstones of Coligny. What are some other areas of the island you think could benefit from that kind of attention? You look right up here at the corner, you have Northridge Plaza. You have Sea Turtle which has stopped building. Then you look across the street at Port Royal Plaza. That’s a whole area that needs revitalization. And I also believe you can take a lot of empty commercial space and convert that into housing, too. There are opportunities to do things here; it’s just a matter of time and money. The native islanders on the north end of the island need more sewers; that could be a project that would go on for many years. And it’s a very worthwhile project. Speaking of native islanders, it seems over the last few years there’s been a heightened awareness that this is an important part of our cultural fabric. How do you see that growing? I think it’s one of the biggest economic drivers we have. It could be another Williamsburg. There’s a whole opportunity there; it’s just a matter of doing it right and 24

FEB. 2019 C2 MAGAZINE

protecting all the land around it so we don’t have just one park that doesn’t belong there. We’re looking at doing some land purchasing with the county there. We’re looking to move the old St. James Church. I’ve been going first Tuesday of each month to a meeting at St. James Church for two and a half years to talk about how we move the church, how we relocate the people that are there. The more time you spend there, they’re really great people. A lot of them were born here, went away, got educated, spent time in military, had another life, and came back. And they brought back with them all their brainpower and education.

on Chamber transparency:

They should be transparent on where they spend their money, but a lot of the detail behind that is very iffy. There has to be a balance between what we give out and what we don’t give out. But we should definitely give out more than we do now. You’ve talked about Chamber transparency in the past. What drew you to look into that? The question is how much should there be? There should be a line item saying we spent $125,000 on media coverage. This is my personal opinion, but list the firms that get part of that $125,000 and not get into how much you get and how much I get. You can’t get down to that level. You don’t want to dig that far into the weeds where people are going to say, “Why did Condé Nast give them a better rate than somebody else?” They should be transparent on where they spend their money, but a lot of the detail behind that is very iffy. And a lot of the vendors don’t want that detail known, either. There has to be a balance between what we give out and what we don’t give out. But we should definitely give out more than we do now. Without a doubt. And they know it, too. Are they willing to work with us? The answer is yes. Have we started talking about it? The answer is yes. Are we going to get

somewhere before the contract expires? I’m positive we will. They know what the public wants, and we just have to make sure the public gets what’s reasonable for everybody. You were also outspoken about the Visioning process… You think I was outspoken (laughs)? I’m just a quiet New Yorker. Those exist? (laughs). Do you feel like people were with you on that, on the Visioning process? When you hire a consultant, who does whatever he or she is doing and gives a report at the end, it’s supposed to leave the community in a better frame of mind than when they started. Whether you like the answer or not. He left the community really aggravated, and that was bad. He thought the people in Hilton Head Plantation and Port Royal were not this, not that, not the other; he said some really bad things about them. That doesn’t make people happy. I don’t think we covered a lot of things in visioning we should have covered. We didn’t cover what you wanted; we covered whatever the visioning projected that we should talk about. If you wanted to talk about healthcare, it wasn’t there. If you wanted to talk about parks, it wasn’t there. It wasn’t what everyone wanted to talk about; it was the subjects they wanted to talk about. I think it took away from everything. I think people came away from it with a bad feeling, and nothing really got accomplished. And we spent a lot money. We’re taking some of the good things from there, and we’re putting it into the town comprehensive plan, which has to be done in a year and a half. What sort of things? Just the pillars of things we should look at. We should be in better communication with the public out here; we should have better contact with them—a better feel for them. We should be enhancing our environment, which are things you and I could have thought of by ourselves. Everyone has to be an environmentalist on Hilton Head Island. We live here. But you can’t be an environmentalist here if part of the island doesn’t have sewers. You can’t be an environmentalist if the garbage isn’t getting picked up or if the garbage is going into the back of the truck with the recyclables. There are lot of things we don’t talk about that we need to talk about if we’re going to be environmentalists. There are homes in Port Royal that don’t have sewers. Spanish Wells doesn’t have sewers at all. Is that being an environmentalist? Do you think it’s largely just lip service? No, I think it’s become a bigger project than people thought it was going to be when they talked about it. But it’s those kinds of pillars that are worth holding onto. There should be more community involvement, and there is, but you have to draw the community out. You can’t draw the community out to a meeting at Town Hall. You need the meeting in Port


Royal. You need the meeting in Palmetto Hall. You need the meeting in Mitchelville. People aren’t coming out to get to you; you need to come to them. Hilton Head Plantation, for the visioning thing, drew 130 people one night. Port Royal did over 100 one night. What’s your most controversial opinion? I think my slogan or message through the whole thing was that island residents should come first. I think that aggravated a lot of people, and I understand that. But I believe that. I believe that when you look at Hilton Head Plantation, Palmetto Hall, Port Royal and Indigo Run, that’s a residential community. You see kids on bikes you see people on walkers; everything is there. When you go to Palmetto Dunes and Shipyard, you see more tourists. We have two different worlds here. We’re not a resort. We’re a residential community that has great resorts. Yeah, but that’s always been the balance of Hilton Head. It’s a hometown that sort of grew from a resort, but there are still plenty of people making their living from hospitality. There are still plenty of people who can’t live here without the tourists. Do you find yourself trying to find that balance? No, I think anything we do has to be looked at as, “Are we hurting the residents?” If it’s good for tourism, it’s good. But we shouldn’t be doing it at the expense of the residents. That’s the dividing line. Are we hurting the residents? And it’s a big dividing line. What would you want your ultimate legacy as mayor of Hilton Head Island to be? That I treated everybody with respect—that there was civility and dedication among the council and myself. I think respect is the most important thing. I’d like to the leave the island somewhat like when I first arrived here. But I’d like to leave the beauty it has today, making sure the apple keeps getting polished so people after us enjoy what we had without changing into something we’re not. And if we look in the mirror, we know who we are. We shouldn’t be afraid of who we are.  Many thanks to the Port Royal Clubhouse for so graciously hosting our fireside chat with Mayor McCann.

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

25


This & That Whiskey, Wine & Wildlife (W3) is a culinary event on Jekyll Island, Georgia, that blends gourmands with nature, taking place February 7-10. W3 artfully combines legendary beverage tastings of all kinds – from all types of spirits, beers, whiskies and wines, along with inspired cuisine from some of the South’s best chefs and local culinary superstars, with a chance to experience coastal wildlife up-close. The weekend’s events will raise funds and awareness for programs of the Jekyll Island Foundation. Visit www. whiskeywineandwildlife.com for more information on events, W3 Weekend Getaway Packages and fun volunteer opportunities.

C2 Magazine • February 2019 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email m.washo@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

GET READY FOR A “SPIRITED” GOOD TIME WITH THE ARTS CENTER’S WINTER COMEDY

T

he smash comedy hit of the London and Broadway stages is also the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina’s winter production Blithe Spirit, onstage February 12-March 3. This brilliantly funny revival is from the playwright of Private Lives, none other than the witty, clever, and classy Noel Coward. In Blithe Spirit, he offers up the cantankerous but popular novelist Charles Condomine as his hero. Condomine is married to the super-rational Ruth, his second wife, after his first wife passed away. When researching his latest thriller about a spirit medium, he impetuously holds a séance for background material. But what begins as a lighthearted experiment for the sake of art results in marital mayhem, chaos and misunderstandings, as a good farce should! Quite by accident, the famously eccentric medium, Madame Arcati, summons the spirit of Charles’s first wife, Elvira, and try as she might, cannot make the disruptive presence go away. Charles, to his disbelief, discovers Elvira has suddenly materialized, and the spirit can only be seen by him (and of course the audience)! And this is just the beginning! What follows is a hilarious spectral variation on a love triangle, with Charles torn between two equally strong women, and we know he doesn’t stand a ghost of a chance. The Arts Center production will be directed by NYC’s Russell Treyz. The show, when revived on Broadway in 2009 won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Revival.  Tickets and three-show subscription packages can be purchased online or by calling the box office. Preview performances, February 12-14, are $39 for adults and $26 for children ages 5-15. Regular performance tickets, Feb. 15-March 3, are $49 for adults and $36 for children ages 5-15. To purchase, visit www.artshhi.com or call (843) 842-ARTS (2787).

BRING THE BLING FOR “JEWELS & JEANS” FOR OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS

JANE UPSHAW

ARTICLE BY GRAYSON COLLERAN

I

t’s one of the best parties of the year with denim, dancing and dining. Bring your BLING to Jewels & Jeans! Deas Guyz will bring the jamz, so don your sparkles, grab your friends and plan to rock the dance floor and savor the fabulous eats. Don’t miss this year’s “Jewels & Jeans” gala Saturday, March 2, from 6 to 9:30 p.m., at the Country Club of Hilton Head, 70 Skull Creek Drive. While the party is awesome, the proceeds from the evening are the real stars. They fund the Foundation For Educational Excellence, which enables them to award grants to Beaufort County Schools for innovative, cool projects in the classroom. Since 2009, proceeds from Jewels & Jeans and other grants have allowed the Foundation to award over $215,000 to implement innovative projects not funded through traditional channels. Last year, over 10,000 students were directly impacted by the grants.

To top it all off, this year the Foundation will recognize Dr. Jane Upshaw as the recipient of the 2019 “Peggy May Inspiration Award” for her professional contributions over three decades to advance education throughout the Lowcountry. The annual award recognizes those who demonstrate extraordinary dedication, passion, and skills that influence and inspire local students. From her early teaching days at May River Academy to becoming the first female Dean of the University of South Carolina Beaufort and establishing USCB as a regional and comprehensive four-year university, Upshaw has exemplified dedication to the future of education in the Lowcountry. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www. FoundationEdExcellence.com or call (843) 301-7150. The Foundation for Educational Excellence is a 501(c)3 and a fund of Community Foundation of the Lowcountry. 

The Women’s Association of Hilton Head Island (WAHHI) is pleased to announce the February luncheon to be held at the Sonesta Resort in Shipyard Plantation on Thursday, February 21. The keynote speaker is founder and CEO of Spartina 449, Kay Stanley. A shopping bazaar featuring local vendors opens at 10 a.m.; social hour begins at 11 a.m.; luncheon and program at noon. Following tradition, WAHHI will also collect hand-baked cookies to distribute to first responders on Hilton Head Island and in Bluffton. The luncheon is open to WAHHI members and the general public. To reserve your seat for the luncheon, please visit www.wahhi.org; contact Anne Lambdin at (443) 418-6445; or email reservations@wahhi.org. Tickets are $30 ($32 online) for members and $38 ($40 online) for guests.


Most adorable 

pet 

contest

top 15 pets from facebook HERE ARE THE TOP 15 PETS THAT YOU, OUR READERS HAVE CHOSEN! YOU HAVE GREAT TASTE CH2 READERS!

3. Bonnie blue 460 LIKES

2. Orion

1. Rocky

579 LIKES

870 LIKES

4. Benny 209 LIKES

5. Orion 203 LIKES

6. pearl 194 LIKES

7. Calypso 184 LIKES

9. Scout 155 LIKES

8. Axel

10. Lex Bruno 143 LIKES

11. gator

165 LIKES

137 LIKES

Lucy’s Pick

12. Duke 137 LIKES

14. cosgrove 118 LIKES

MEET ORION, CH2’S MOST ADORABLE PET CONTEST WINNER FOR 2019! ORION WON A PHOTOSHOOT WITH HIS FAMILY IN CH2’S STUDIO AND A $200 GIFT CERTIFICATE TO TAILWIGGLES!

15. lulu 117 LIKES

13. mona 134 LIKES


DOGS are the best accessory

Photography by M.Kat Styling by Kalia Jeffcoat Hair and Makeup by Brideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Side Beauty Clothing modeled by Ralph, Alexia and Kathleen of Halo Model & Talent Agency

On Ralph: Heritage pants $175, Johnnie-O shirt $125 Available at Coastal Bliss Men

Greta & Vinnie You may have seen Greta and Vinnie Bowser escorting their parents on the beaches of Port Royal Plantation or at the library listening to children practice their reading skills. They have received the Canine Good Citizen Advanced certification and are both registered Alliance Therapy dogs. These German shepherd siblings volunteer monthly at the Parris Island Marine Base, the local library, USCB and the Technical College of the Lowcountry.

Since the dawn of time, our wardrobes have taken a cue from our animal companions. The splotchy stripe of the zebra on the latest flats, or the faux fur of the fox adorning the hood of a winter coat are just a few examples. For this monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fashion feature, our stylist was tasked with finding tones that complemented our canine models. Blacks, tans, whites and greys, the natural palettes of our four-legged friends make for beautiful tones on us as well. We present to you a pairing of man and beast, in complementary colors.


Bear It’s not this goldendoodle’s first rodeo. Bear is a professional in the modeling arena. You may recognize him as the family pet from HGTV’s Palmetto Bluff Smart Home. Bear even showed up to work with a manbun to match our model’s updo.

On Alexia: Tribal pants $86, Symphony & Note top $115, Streets Ahead belt $195, Donald Pliner shoes $235 Available at Palmettoes

DOGS


Captain Bogie This dog is Insta-famous. Originally a rescue from Hilton Head Humane, this handsome pup hit the parent lottery and is currently livinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; da ruff life with his mom and dad on sunny Hilton Head Island. Follow his adventures on Instagram @capnbogey.

Dixie

When her tail wags, the whole body sways! Dixie is a nine-year-old pit bull, originally from California, who spends her days hanging out with her two human sisters and showering them with kisses.

DOGS On Ralph: Oxford shorts $85, Oxford shirt $95, Raffi Pullover $135 Available at Palmettoes On Kathleen: Sympathy by SW Dress $238, Dhort Dupio Earrings $195 Available at Birdie James

Lucille

Lucy is an eight-year-old Bernese mountain dog who loves dining out at local restaurants, long walks on the beach and weekends at Walt Disney World. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a true diva in every sense of the word.

Charlie A miniature poodle who will be celebrating his fifth birthday next month, Charlie has his Canine Good Citizen certificate and is a Hos-Pet therapy dog for Hospice Care of the Lowcountry.

On Alexia: AZI pants $112, M top $79.95, Lysse jacket $148, Wrap Necklace $89.95, Azura shoes $79.99 (Sale $49) Available at The Pink Pineapple

On Kathleen: Farrow pants $188, BB Dakota sweater $95, San Diego Hat Company $58, Dolce Vita shoes $100 Available at Coastal Bliss


Henry Don’t blink or you might miss this silky little blur run past you. Henry is an affectionate four-year-old Yorkshire terrier, whose tail never stops wagging. Our stylist matched his coat so well to the model that it’s hard to see where he ends and the sweater begins. Perfection!

DOGS On Alexia: Spanx pants $110, Sweater: $59 Available at fab’rik


Bella The beauty queen with the soulful eyes is an Australian labradoodle, which is a mix of four dogs: poodle, labrador, cocker spaniel and Portuguese water dog. Bella is involved in the Hos-Pet organization, a part of Hospice Care of the Lowcountry. She is a Certified Canine Good Citizen as well as a member of Alliance of Therapy Dogs. Bella spreads her sunshine and sweet temperament in schools, hospitals, and nursing homes when she isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t performing tricks and stealing hearts on her numerous outings around town.

DOGS

On Ralph: Link Soul pants $110, Travis Matthew shirt $89.95 Available at Coastal Bliss Men


Aslan It’s not a trick of the camera; this Anatolian shepherd (a breed that dates back 6,000 years to Turkey) is one big pooch. His name is Aslan, which is Turkish for “Lion.” He lives in Wexford Plantation and enjoys the beach, eating out and playing with other dogs. Follow his adventures on Instagram @Aslan_the_ Anatolian and on Facebook at Aslan the Anatolian. Gorgeous!

On Kathleen: Hayden dress $42, Taylor Creek Designs necklace $60 Available at Gigi’s


Harley He may be blind in one eye, but that doesn’t slow him down. Harley, the 11-year-old pug, loves chillin’ at the beach, long rides in the car, and snoozing in his big fluffy bed. And treats. LOTS of treats.

Hank and Yogi

On Kathleen: Frame pants $220, Frame belt $225, Monrow top $63, Bonnie Strauss kimono $495, Elizabeth Moore Designs necklace $325

Look out world, here they come! Hank and Yogi are a rambunctious pair of French bulldogs who love each other and TOYS! TOYS! TOYS! When they are on the move, you better just try and keep up.

On Ralph: Ballin pants $155, Oxford shirts $129, Peter Millar vest $425 Available at Teagues

Available at D-Luxe

On Alexia: Tyler Boe dress $160, Tyler Boe shawl $174, Chinese Laundry heels $79.95, Silver Girl earrings $36 Available at Too Belles Boutique

Moose The sweet personality of a Cavalier King Charles spaniel is unmatched, and Moose was no exception. He was a natural in front of the camera. When he’s not posing perfectly, he goes to work as a therapy dog with Hospice Care of The Lowcountry.

On Kathleen: Pinch dress $68, Necklace 43 Collective $62, L Kennedy Designs earrings $19, Bracelets: $8 ea. or $35 for 5 Available at Haskins Co.

Ruby This purebred chocolate chihuahua enjoys posing for the camera in a variety of ensembles she has accumulated over the years. For this particular shoot, however, Ruby chose to go au naturel to show off her beautiful white patches.


Country We’ve never met a more well-behaved golden retriever. It could be because Country’s mom, Jessie Ray, is in the business of teaching good canine etiquette, but wow was she a sophisticated Southern lady. As if on cue, she even stuck out her tongue to match the pink in Kathleen’s scarf.

On Kathleen: Mesmerize pants $119, Last Tango top $72, Pashmina scarf $32, Earrings $22, Simply Noelle necklace $28 Available at So Sandra

DOGS


Harley Now thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a hairstyle to envy. When Harley the Sheltie is not at the salon or on a date with his girlfriend Bella (see page 36), heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s participating in agility classes with his trainer Abby Bird. A well-rounded chap, Harley also donates his time as a Hos-Pet.

On Ralph: Ballin pants $165, St Croix shirt $255 Available at Teagues

DOGS


On Alexia: Lysse pants $98, Lysse top $108, Beauty in Stone Jewelry $89, Azura shoes $99.95, sale $75 Available at Pink Pineapple

DOGS

Fletcher and Emma Fletcher is a four-year-old Airedale (right) with a spunky personality and curious nature. Emma is his older sibling (no relation) who is calm, quiet and gentle. You could say heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the yang to her yin. They adore people and other dogs and excel at accessorizing Alexiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grey ensemble from the Pink Pineapple.


goes in, ! What must come out.

The Best Foods for

Man's Best Friend W

hen my gorgeous mutt Harlan was nearing the end of his life and had digestive issues, our veterinarian suggested we prepare a homemade dog food recipe of boiled chicken breasts and sweet potato and add it to his regular dry food. We enjoyed making it (because it feels good to feed a being that is in need). He loved it. And it bought us all enough time to say goodbye. Ten months later we said goodbye to our other longtime friend, a lab named Lefty. He, too, needed something beyond regular dry food in the end, but this time it was prescription-grade wet dog food. As a result, my family began to question what we were feeding our pets. We have all seen alerts over the years warning us about dog food recalls, added ingredients like fillers, and possible allergens. Did we unintentionally harm our pets? Would they have lived longer if we had given them more homemade food or specialized food? This was all so new to me. I did not grow up making or buying homemade or specialized dog food. I spent my first few years of life on a dairy farm, then it was the ’80s in Nashville, and then the ’90s on Hilton Head Island. On the farm, in the city, and eventually here on the island, we consistently fed all our animals veterinarian-approved, and yet processed, dry food. Only after mealtime did the dogs get scraps and, as far as dog nutrition went,

Go raw! A raw dog food diet emphasizes raw meat (often muscle and organ meat), whole or crushed bones, fruits, vegetables, raw eggs and some dairy. Raw diets started with racing greyhounds and sled dogs. It wasn’t until more recently, in 1993, when Australian veterinarian Ian Billinghurst proposed extending these diets to family dogs. He called this the BARF diet for dogs, which stands for Bones and Raw Food or Biologically Appropriate Raw Food. caninejournal.com/raw-diet-for-dogs/

Article by Becca Edwards all we knew was to not feed them chocolate, grapes or raisins. By my 20s, I adopted my own pets (Harlan and Lefty), and even though I worked as a health writer and advocate, I did not feel the need, or, perhaps more to the point, qualified to apply the same nutrition concepts to my dogs. I just went with my vet’s recommendation and the status quo, and I continued feeding them solely high-quality, dry dog food.

! The raw dog food diet gives dogs healthier skin and coat because their dietary needs are fully taken care of. homeoanimal.com/ blogs/blog-pethealth/81206276top-10-raw-fooddiet-benefits-fordogs


The Best Foods for

Man's Best Friend With Harlan’s and Lefty’s passings, I felt compelled to learn more about canine wellness, especially since we recently adopted a rescue named Goodman (aka Goody). We asked my long-time friend (who recently moved to the area) and internal medicine veterinarian, Dr. Heather Graham, of Collaboration Veterinary Consulting, LLC., “Is high-quality, veterinarian-recommended dry food enough?” Graham responded first with a list of pros and cons about homemade dog food. Pros of Homemade Dog Food: • You have control over your dog’s ingredients, both from a source (organic, antibiotic-free, etc.) and composition perspective. • The food is void of additives and preservatives. • You can customize the food to the dog, which means the food contains ingredients the pet enjoys, is not allergic to, and that address any specific needs. Cons of Homemade Dog Food • Without a veterinarian nutritionist’s oversight, you will have difficulty adequately balancing the dog’s diet-based needs which can vary based on medical condition and in-life stage, amongst other factors. • Also, without a veterinarian nutritionist, the improper provision of adequate minerals can complicate a variety of problems including, but not limited to, skeletal defects, kidney damage, urinary stones, growth retardation, skin disorders, and neurological defects.

44

FEB. 2019 C2 MAGAZINE

• Homemade food can be more time consuming and expensive. Without seeming like a dog chasing its tail, when it comes to feeding Fido, consider combining homemade dog food and dry food—under the supervision of a veterinary professional. “There are a number of veterinary nutritionists who offer services where they formulate homemade diets based on owner preferences,” Graham said. When it comes to dry food, Graham said, “Honestly, there are too many dog food brands to endorse one or another, but I use Hill’s and Purina, as well as Royal Canin, primarily because there is actual research behind their diets, including placebo-controlled trials and peer-reviewed claims. However, I’m using a lot of prescription diets for my patients, because I see a specific

homemade food pro: You can customize the food to the dog, which means the food contains ingredients the pet enjoys, is not allergic to, and that address specific needs.

homemade food con: Without a veterinarian nutritionist’s oversight, you will have difficuly adequately balancing the dog’s diet-based needs, which can vary based on medical condition and in-life stage, among other factors.


subset of the population that often needs precisely formulated nutrition for whatever chronic condition is being managed.” Graham then referred me to an article on the website www.vetnutrition.tufts.edu. This article provided a wealth of tail-wagging insight. For those of us with puppy-like attention spans, here are two take aways from the piece: When choosing a dry food, don’t fetch up the marketing ploys. The article reported, “Studies show that most owners base their pet food decisions on impulse and advertising, not facts.” People tend to ask themselves, “Does this sound like it tastes good?” or “Is it organic, or heritage, or wild?” Instead, check the label. Though current regulations do not require pet food companies to provide much factual information on their labels, you can decode the food label by looking for the “Nutritional Adequacy statement” or the “AAFCO (the Association of American Feed Control Officials) statement.” These small print statements answer, “Does the diet contain all the essential nutrients that a pet needs?” “How was that determined?” and “For which age or stage is this diet appropriate?” Do not judge a food by its brand, either. According to the article, “Just because a pet food company is large doesn’t mean it’s using substandard ingredients, or tricking people into buying too much food. And just because a company is small, or ‘artisanal,’ or ‘makes its food with love,’ doesn’t mean it necessarily manufactures more wholesome dog food.” “The bottom line is, though, your dog’s primary nutrition should come from formulated, mainstream dog food, and when needed prescription dog food,” Graham

Looks like someone is starting a diet! ! When choosing a dry food, don’t fetch up the marketing ploys. Studies show that most owners base their pet food decisions on impulse and advertising, not facts. People tend to ask themselves, “Does this sound like it tastes good?” or “Is it organic, or heritage, or wild?” Instead, check the label.

said. “You can augment their diet with nutritious foods like sweet potatoes, rice, and lean ground beef or turkey, but make sure it only accounts for 10 percent of the dog’s caloric intake. My favorite recipe book is ‘Home-Prepared Dog and Cat Diets: The Healthful Alternative,’ by Dr. Donald R. Strombeck. This allows pet owners to feel more involved in their pet’s diet, add variety, and help dogs recovering from a surgery or with special needs.”  Becca Edwards is a wellness professional, freelance writer, and owner of b.e.WELL+b.e.CREATIVE (bewellbecreative.com).

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

45


The Scoop on poop A R T I C L E

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good poop, mom!

B Y

K I R K

D I X O N ,

D V M

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

47


Article by Abby Bird

ESA AND SERVICE DOG S

ER K A F

S

ome dog owners need to ask themselves this question: “How selfish am I?” That’s a pretty bold question on a topic that has received much press but doesn’t seem to be going anywhere toward a resolution. Legitimate emotional support animals (ESA) and service dogs provide serious and critical functions to people with a variety of disabilities. For ESA individuals who cannot function normally in public without the support of a dog to keep them from getting stressed, panicked, unable to cope within their environs, their support dog can be the difference between remaining housebound or getting out into the world. These dogs, while might be considered pets, have a dual purpose for the owner as a house dog and as a public comfort support animal. These dogs provide security and a calming function to both keep their owner stable as well as to react to and assuage stress when the owner has already gone into a panicked mode. Not all pet dogs, just because we love them and use them for comfort, meet this stringent requirement. A legitimate ES dog is required to have been recommended by the owner’s psychologist or psychiatrist as performing comfort that allows the person to be relatively stress free. A number of emotional disorders would be defined to require an emotional support dog: extreme anxiety, agoraphobia, untreatable mood disorders, paranoia, other specific psychoses, forms of other stress disorders and more. What is not included on this list is mere nervousness without the dog or a selfish desire to be able to go anywhere with your pet because you cannot bear to leave the animal at home. Unfortunately, people often abuse the laws regarding who may have an ESA. In most but not all cases, they are small-dog owners who believe it is their privilege, because their dog is small and can travel easily. These dogs are not necessarily well-trained or even well-behaved, because the owner doesn’t think they need to be and the law only requires that they provide a comfort for certain emotional conditions. One can easily see how this might be abused, and it is! An ESA is provided no protections under the law in public accommodations. A service animal has many more rights under the law. Service animals may go anywhere the owner may go. A service animal has been trained to perform work or a specific task that benefits a person with a disability. Helping the blind, deaf, those with physical handicaps that require stability, movement from place to place or picking up items and those that have been diagnosed with PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). Public accommodations are only allowed to ask two questions: Do you need this animal because of a disability, and what work or tasks have they been trained to perform? So here is the catch and why abuse continues. You are not required to show any written proof that this is a required service animal. While most legitimate service dog owners carry documentation, others do not. Anyone can go online for ESA or service animal badges, ID, vests, etc., but they are not real proof! Service animal registrations, vests, and any other means to identify service animals do not have any legal significance, according to the Department of Justice, and may be easily obtained online. Some states are finally cracking down on falsification of ESA and service dog use by fining and even using imprisonment as a deterrent. The problem is that retail establishments and other

places do not want to appear as bad guys to their clients, so it virtually never gets challenged! Realistically, until the ADA can balance a person’s right to privacy with the rights of the community who feel abused by the fakers, we will all be overwhelmed. It has gotten so bad that airlines are just recently taking a stand with their own requirements. Just go to the airport and see how many ES animals board the plane. Complaints from consumers are frequent, especially when many of these animals are not trained and affect other passengers as well as the legitimate service and support animals on the plane. This gives all the animals a bad name, and because of these issues, several airlines have taken a stand. American Airlines requires that you have a mental or emotional disability recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; that you need the emotional support or psychiatric service animal as an accommodation for air travel and/or for activity at your destination; that the individual providing the assessment is a licensed mental health professional or medical doctor. The date and type of the mental health professional or medical doctor’s license and the state or other jurisdiction where it was issued must be provided. The documentation should be provided to the airline at least two days before the scheduled flight or the emotional support animal will have to travel in a kennel in the checked cargo compartment or onboard as a pet, in which case all pet requirements and applicable fees will apply. Delta Airlines recommends an early notification about traveling with animals when booking reservations, and you can request a seat assignment while doing so. The animal, however, will be required to stay on the floor beside the individual’s seat. As stated on the company’s site, “No animals are allowed to occupy seats that are designed for passengers.” The airline expects the emotional support animal to be well-behaved and will need documentation from the individual before travel. Specifically, the letter must include the following, per the company site: title, license number and jurisdiction (state/country where issued), phone number, and signature of mental health professional stating that the passenger has a mental health related disability recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual—Fourth Edition; that the passenger needs the emotional support or psychiatric service animal as an accommodation for air travel and/or for activity at the passenger’s destination; that the person listed in the letter is under the care of the assessing physician or mental health professional. So again the question: “Just how selfish are you?” Please abide by the meaning and intent of the law until this problem gets solved.  Abby Bird is owner of Alpha Dog Training Academy in Bluffton. She can be reached at alphadogtrainingacademy@ gmail.com or by calling (843) 304-4327.


Laura with two of her critters, Tallulah the goat and Ducky the pig. Tallulah was given to Laura by Beaufort County Animal Services when she was just a day old, and Laura named her after Tallulah McGee , the Director of Animal Services. Ducky was also given to Laura by Beaufort County Animal Services, along with his mother, Hushpuppy.

Kaki the Duck and his girlfriend, Mrs. Duck. “He doesn’t know he’s the wrong species,” laughed Laura. “He can’t fertilize her eggs, but he loves her just the same.”

OC Angel is the famous goat from the OC Welch commercials, who now lives at Laura’s Little Critter Barn.

The Law of the

JUNGLE

LAURA STERLING THOUGHT SHE WAS DONE WITH THE LAW AND WITH POLITICS. INSTEAD, SHE FOUND HERSELF BACK IN THE FRAY, WITH THE LIVES OF A FARM FULL OF ANIMALS ON THE LINE. Article by Barry Kaufman . Photography by MKat


R

Laura with Daisy, an orphaned oppossum that was raised and rehabilitated â&#x20AC;&#x201C; she just refuses to leave!

Chicken Nugget is a rooster that Laura has had since he was an orphaned baby chick.

52

FEB. 2019 C2 MAGAZINE


The Law of the

JUNGLE

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

53


Maggie (Pretty Girl) poses with Ann-Marie and Christian, her new parents.

T

ARTICLE BY LINDSAY PERRY

The Love of a Rescue Dog Knows No Bounds

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

55


ARTICLE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY REBECCA W. BASS

did you know:

3.3million 6.5 million 3.2million Approximately

From pound puppies therapy dogs

are dogs and

companion animals enter U.S. animal shelters nationwide every year.

www.aspca.org/animal-homelessness/shelter-intake-and-surrender/pet-statistics

to

SECOND CHANCES LEAD TO AMAZING COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTIONS

are cats.

a

Rebecca Bass with her rescue dogs Mousse (left) and Elke (right).


a

From pound Puppies to Therapy Dogs

Ann Cofield and her two dogs, Missy (Dachshund/ Beagle Mix) and Journey (Golden retriever)

58

FEB. 2019 C2 MAGAZINE


a

Mame Bowser and her German Shepherd, Vinnie.

Area rescue resources: Doberman Rescue of the Triad: www.doberman-rescue.com. German Shepherd Rescue and Adoptions: www.gsdrescue.org. Hilton Head Humane Association: www.hhhumane.org. Palmetto Animal League: www.palmettoanimalleague.org.

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

59


swipe right: HILTON HEAD HUMANE ASSOCIATION’S MOST ELIGIBLE PETS

THESE ARE THE DOGS AND CATS OF HILTON HEAD ISLAND HUMANE THAT PEOPLE ARE LINING UP TO TAKE HOME. COME MEET YOUR NEW FUR-EVER FRIEND. ART I C L E BY BARRY KAUFMAN

Bella, 13 50 pounds Lab Mix At my age, I’m not looking to play games. Unless that game is “let’s snuggle on the couch,” in which case I am the champion. I’m just looking for someone who knows how to treat a lady—with belly rubs and treats.

.

PH OTO GRAPH Y BY M.KAT

Doris 9 years old Domestic Short Hair I’m looking for the quiet life. They tell me I have a heart murmur and high blood pressure, which is why I tend to be a little more chill than most cats. If the alternative is being one of those maniacs who shreds up curtains and tears around the house for no reason, I’m okay with that. If you are, too, you know where to find me.


Ammo, 9 60 pounds Coonhound Mix ’Sup dog lovers? You’re looking at a dyed in the wool hunting dog, and I’m aiming Cupid’s arrow right for your heart. Get me out in the field and let me run, and I am yours.

Flower 5 years old Domestic Short Hair You don’t have to bring me flowers. I’m content with a quiet spot in the sun where I can lounge for a little bit before it’s time for some cuddles. Flower is 5 miles away.

Oreo 10 years old Domestic Short Hair You think you’re ready for a cat who will love up on you? You’d better be. Because I am ready for a new home where I can be treated right. Yeah, I have a few years on me. I prefer to call it experience.

Rowe, 8 51 pounds Hound Mix I’m a good boy, even if these shades make me look like a total bad boy. I’m a high-energy fella who’s always ready for a run on the beach. If it’s play time, you better be able to keep up.


Del Webb, 6.5 58 pounds Hound Mix They told me I’d look great in my profile pic if I wore a tie. Don’t let it fool you. I’m a casual guy who wants nothing more than a quiet night with a bowl of kibble and maybe some of those Pup Peronis. Man, those are good.

Snuggles 13 pounds Domestic Short Hair Yes, it’s me. The famous Snuggles. I’ve got Instagram fans from here to Finland, drawn by my unique fashion sense and natural star power. But even with all my Internet stardom and fame, I just want a home to call my own. #catsofinstagram #meow #lovethatdress

Jax 16 years old Domestic Short Hair I’m a big old cat with a lot of love to give. Yeah, I’m a little fluffy, but that just means there’s more of me to love. I prefer a house without any other cats—not that I’m antisocial or anything. I get along with other cats just fine. I just kind of prefer being the center of attention.

Chunky Monkey, 6 45 pounds Beagle Mix I am a big, beautiful woman, and when I walk into a room, people notice. I’m on a special diet to slim down a little bit, but I’m still a whole lot of dog. I can sit on command and break hearts like nobody’s business.

Hilton Head Humane Association is located at 10 Humane Way, Hilton Head Island, open 11 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. For more information, visit www.hhhumane.org or call (843) 681-8686.


 ART I CLE

BY

BA RRY

K AUF MAN

.

PHOTOGRAPHY

BY

M.KAT

Chow Daddy’s SPICES THINGS UP WITH FRESH NEW MENU ADDITIONS


CD

The happy hour crowd gets a jump on the weekend at Chow Daddy’s Bluffton on a chilly Thursday in January.


CD Nachos 2.0 Pulled pork, jack and cheddar cheese, fresh corn, homemade potato chips, fresh jalapeño

Rum S Signature Owner Price Beall’s vanilla-infused rum sits on the bar. Order the Cuba Libre to enjoy a taste.

S

66

FEB. 2019 C2 MAGAZINE

The Corner Booth Unique lighting features and coffee burlap bag drapes accent the dark wood of Chow Daddy’s warm and inviting Bluffton location.

Tilapia Tacos S Blackened Green slaw, Garlic Aioli, Salsa Verde


Article by Linda S. Hopkins

Pretty Nail & Spa FOR A POLISHED LOOK AND A PERSONALIZED EXPERIENCE

A The Pretty Nail & Spa team

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

69


PHOTOGRAPHY BY ABRI KRUGER AND ELIZABETH RAINEY

NEW YEAR, If you’ve already given up on your New Year’s resolution, Harbor Point Dentistry has a great way to get you back on track.

NEW SMILE

Dr. Elizabeth Abell and husband, Thomas, with family pet, “Gus”

S

Dr. Elizabeth Abell

Q

ARTICLE BY BARRY KAUFMAN

Q

Wedding Portrait

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

71


ARTICLE BY LINDA S. HOPKINS

BenchMark

ÂŽ

Leah Woods providing external resistance to help Katelyn Minick improve her ability to descend stairs without knee pain.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Setting the bar for outpatient rehabilitation

Improving shoulder stability is an integral part of the rehabilitation process. Leah Woods is utilizing a theraband to provide random perturbations in order to challenge Katelyn Minick.

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

73


S

Article by Barry Kaufman

FIt Club Men of F3 training for a cause

I

f you’re familiar with the novel and film Fight Club, you’ll know the drill. A group of guys get together and encourage one another through tough love, and the next thing you know they’ve organized their collective efforts into a project designed to change the world. Okay, so that’s a fairly skewed interpretation of the film, but viewed through that lens, you can see how the Lowcountry F3 is sort of like Fight Club. Only instead of bare-knuckle brawling, it’s a series of workouts and strenuous exercises designed to get members feeling their best. And instead of Project Mayhem, this Fit Club is pooling efforts to raise money for a slew of local charities. Whereas Tyler Durden’s group made toxic masculinity an art form, F3 shows manhood as the force for positive change it can be. Their credo: “Leave no man behind, but leave no man where you find him.” “We make sure we all finish together,” said local F3 member Daniel McAvoy. “As we go through our series of workouts, if we see someone falling behind, we all band together to keep them going.” McAvoy, who had struggled for years to get back in shape and had, in his words, “never been the kind of guy who wanted to pay for a gym membership,” joined the local F3 pack in 2016, a year after it was founded. There, he found a community of like-minded guys who were all looking to get into better shape. Through pushups, sit-ups, burpees and extended runs, the whole mission of F3 is to not only elevate every member but hold every member accountable.

S A team of F3 finishers after

completing the 2018 Palmetto 200.

Paul Bailey running one of his segments on the 2018 Palmetto 200.

S

F3 chapter of Hilton Head post workout.

“You will get called out by other PAX on social media,” he said with a laugh. “But it’s all in good fun.” That good fun extends to the nicknames members give one another. McAvoy, for example, is “Squealer” when he’s with his F3 pack, a reference to an infamous scene in Deliverance, filmed where he grew up. Other code names include local Qs (essentially PAX leaders) who go by the monikers “Judge Judy” and “Gambit.” “His last name is Crapps, so Gambit came from the game of craps,” McAvoy explained. “He gets a cool name like Gambit, and I get Squealer.” These workouts begin bright and early, with groups on Hilton Head Island, in Bluffton and Beaufort meeting at 6 a.m. at locations around the Lowcountry, with workouts designed to be accessible to everyone in keeping with the “no man left behind” mantra. “It’s not CrossFit, it’s 100 percent outside, using your own body weight,” McAvoy said, pointing out that members range anywhere from dads who bring their kids along to men in their 60s and 70s. But the fitness is only part of it. “One of the missions is to inspire men to lead in their community; that’s one of the core principles,” McAvoy said. And the local F3 group is accomplishing this mission with a passion. It all started with 2017’s running of the Palmetto 200, when the group saw an opportunity to use their involvement as a fundraiser. “We were looking to raise $10,000 for Backpack Buddies that first year. We raised that and then some,” McAvoy said. The next year saw the group growing exponentially, and with it their capacity for positive change. In 2018, they raised $60,000 all told; $10,000 each for Backpack Buddies, Outside Foundation, Lowcountry Strong Foundation, Young Life, Greener Grass, and Lowcountry Dress for Success. “This year, we’re bumping that up to $80,000,” McAvoy said. They’ve targeted Open Arms Children’s Shelter, Greener Grass, Deep Well, Family Promise, Backpack Buddies and Young Life to be this year’s recipients—a list chosen from causes important to members. Ready to join the cause taken up by men all over the country and become a member of the local F3 chapter? Want to help pledge funds when our local men race the Palmetto 200, March 22-23? Give McAvoy a call at (843) 384-7544.  C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

75


Cinnamon Streusel Coffee Cake

Chocolate Cake Pops

Vanilla Cupcake with Chocolate Butter Cream

Key Lime Cupcake

Blueberry Scone

Signature Mini Carrot Cake

Double Fudge Brownies with Walnuts


Chocolate on Chocolate Mini Cake

Spinach & Cheese Frittatas

Article by Barry Kaufman Photography by M.Kat The G-Free Spot proves you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need gluten to have a decadent treat.

a

thing


a

thing

The Gardner Family (from left to right): Ean, Nicole, Shawn, Hailey and Conner

78

FEB. 2019 C2 MAGAZINE


Performances are February 13-17 at the Hilton Head Preparatory School Main Street Theatre, Wednesday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m., with a Sunday matinee at 2 p.m.

Hilton Head Preparatory School to Present Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s J o s e p h a n d t h e A m a z i n g Te c h n i c o l o r D r e a m c o a t

HH

ilton Head Preparatory School will continue their 2018-2019 season with an all-school performance of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. This thrilling musical adventure follows the Biblical story of Joseph and his famous coat—the favorite son blessed with prophetic dreams, on his journey to Egypt after being sold into slavery by his brothers. He rises to become advisor to the Pharaoh and eventually reunites with his family in forgiveness. The audience will enjoy an engaging, crazy quilt of musical styles, from country-western to calypso and bubble gum pop to rock ’n’ roll. The show runs at the Hilton Head Preparatory School Main Street Theatre February 13-17. Hilton Head Prep’s second show of the 2018-2019 season is once again an all-school production. “We had great success last year with Les Miserables with an allage cast including faculty, staff and parents. It is definitely something everyone wanted to do again,” said Prep’s director, Peggy Trecker White. With a cast of 30, it truly mirrors the family atmosphere that Prep instills on a daily basis within the community.

Noted for its family-friendly storyline, universal themes and catchy music, and told entirely through song, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat is the first full-length musical by the legendary theatrical team of Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. It is a lovely, comic and colorful journey, animated with a high-energy mix of music and dancing. This fast-paced show doesn’t give you much chance to catch your breath, but you’ll be singing and dancing all the way home! Seniors Avery Campbell (Joseph), Justin Stone (Levi, Baker, Pharaoh) and Frank Milbourn (Rueben, Butler, Potiphar) are once again featured in lead roles for their final Prep production. Underclassmen in other lead roles include Rachel Stratton, Luke Herman, Hudson Monts, JP Carr, Calvin Middleton, Sam Middleton, Tripp Hedden and Adam Levy. Several lower and middle school students will complete the ensemble. Performances are February 13-17 at the Hilton Head Preparatory School Main Street Theatre, Wednesday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m., with a Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. For tickets and information, visit www.hhprep.org or call (843) 715-8510. Tickets will also be available for purchase at the door.  C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

81


february 2019

dynamic duos special advertising section

pg. 86

pg. 88

pg. 90

Hilton Head Ice Cream Truck Eyeland optique

now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking therapy services The silver Garden

hilton head plastic surgery & Med Spa simply southern homebuilder, llc

pg. 87

pg. 89

pg. 91

just cushions upholstery & Fabric Gallery

Alliance Dance Academy and the alliance realty group

rose hearing healthcare centers


ASHTON & STEVE HARMON H I LTO N H E A D I C E C R E A M T R U C K Why did you decide to go into business together? When this opportunity came along, we saw this as a great way to network and spend more time together, while selling a product that we truly believe in that is local and homemade and makes everyone happy!

What advice would you have for someone considering going into business with a spouse or a family member? Stay patient and positive, and be there for each other whether at home or the workplace. Look at it as an opportunity to spend time together rather than just doing a “job.”

What strengths in the marketplace does your partner have that you lack? Ashton: Steve is the scooper! My arms weren’t built for scooping ice cream, haha! Steve: Ashton does a great job at keeping me working by booking gigs and keeping us organized.

Were there any books or local resources that guided you during start-up? The owners and management of Hilton Head Ice Cream encouraged and supported us throughout this entire endeavor. We could not have been successful without them!

How do you keep work from ruining extracurricular/fun events? We bring the truck to all of the events we normally attend. It’s fun to interact with the community and our friends while providing a great product.

BILLY SIMMONS AND JEANINE LUNDSTROM EYELAND OPTIQUE Why did you decide to go into business together? Four years ago, we began work together when we opened Hilton Head’s newest eyewear boutique, Spex. We quickly learned that, as a team, we had a great synergy and understanding of what our clients expect and how to deliver top notch service to them. When MyEyeDr decided to leave the market, we jumped on the chance to return to our passion by opening Eyeland Optique. What strengths in the marketplace does your partner have that you lack? Billy: As a long-term resident of Hilton Head, Jeanine understands all things that people on the island love and enjoy—especially golf. Jeanine’s background in prescription lens and the lab process gives our team a unique opportunity to deliver state-of-the-art technology and the ability to deliver expert optics that clients love to wear. Jeanine: Billy really excels at exceeding a client’s expectations and has a real passion for working oneon-one with each of his patients to determine all their needs. If a client is looking for something very specific, Billy’s knowledge and expertise in the industry gives him the ability to find the exact fit every time. Plus - he is a master at understanding insurance plans.

How did you meet your business partner? The eyecare industry is a small world. We met working in different parts of the industry in the Chicago area. Billy grew up in the world of optics in his family’s optical practice in Georgia but moved to Chicago when he graduated college. There he became manager of an optical boutique that was a client of Jeanine’s prescription lab business. What advice would you have for entrepreneurs considering entering a business partnership? You need to make sure your values and passion for the business are a good match. If you share these two things, everything else falls into place. Like any partnership, work hard to respect each partner’s strengths, and let them shine. If the common goal is to provide the best possible service to your clients, you will be very successful. 890 William Hilton Parkway, Suite 93 Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 (843) 681-2020 info@EyelandOptique.com www.EyelandOptique.com

5 New Orleans Rd., #114 Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 (843) 816-2749 HiltonHeadIceCreamTruck@gmail.com www.hiltonheadicecreamshop.com


LARRY SETOLA SR. & LARRY SETOLA JR. J U ST

C U S H I O N S

INNOVATION BROUGHT TO A CLASSIC TRADE

W

hat makes these two men a dynamic duo is the Yin and Yang effect shared in their family business. Larry Setola Sr. has been working in the trade since 1974. But Larry Jr. provides a fresh new perspective on what the company can offer and how to further their growth while incorporating their specialties. What one lacks, the other provides. For instance, Larry Sr. had no experience with marketing beyond the reliance on “word of mouth.” Larry Jr. noticed this and was able to take an outsider-looking-in approach to provide the company with a long-term marketing strategy

U P H O L ST E RY

&

and a website, which includes many pictures of their finished projects. At Just Cushions, Larry Sr. handles the projects in the workroom, while Larry Jr. manages the sales and daily operations of the business. However, together they have their hands in all aspects of their business. What makes this duo efficacious is that they come from two different generations, which cater to many different needs. Larry Jr. said, “When you have something that works, it is so important to expand and continue to evolve what you have in order to remain relevant in the future.” As a three-generation family business, they continue to do just that. In 1994 they operated out of an extremely small workshop, and at that time, Just Cushions only specialized in cushions and

FA B R I C

GA L L E RY

slipcovers. Now, in their newly renovated 6,500-sq.-ft. showroom and workroom, they also offer custom re-upholstery, window treatments, bedding, rugs, custom built furniture and more! Their partnership has rendered a 25-year business tenure on Hilton Head Island, and they look forward to another 25 years of “Making Your Life More Comfortable.” 45 New Orleans Rd. Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 (843) 681-9995 www.JustCushionsHHI.com


JIM AND LINDA SAYLOR TH E

O

S I LVER

ur partnership began in 1992 when we married and joined forces to continue raising our four daughters. After completing successful 35+-year careers in Cincinnati, we embarked on a new life in retirement. Our careers had been demanding and focused on lofty goals and results for our employers. A lifetime of identifying problems and creating solutions would pay off as the idea of opening a business was born. Though we were partners in life, we never foresaw a scenario where we would work together as business partners. That opportunity gradually arose as retirement evolved into semi-retirement. During this phase, we were learning the basics of jewelry design and construction. In 2012, the desire to grow to the next level was the genesis for opening The Silver

GAR D EN

Garden. Now in our seventh year, we have a fun, growing postretirement career. Though most of our friends are winding down their careers, last year we expanded our business to include a full art gallery, featuring the works of over 40 local artists in all mediums. It was a “let’s just do it” decision that has been energizing and fun. Retirement will have to wait a little longer. We feel blessed and thankful for this second career and that we still possess the energy and desire to pursue our dreams. 32 Palmetto Bay Rd., Suite 3A Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 (407) 595.2119 www.thesilvergarden.net


BOB AND ROCHELLE CLARKSON

B

T H E A L L I A N C E G R O U P R E A LT Y ALLIANCE DANCE ACADEMY

ob and Rochelle Clarkson fell in love with the Lowcountry while they were dating, back in 2003. Shortly thereafter, they married and relocated from Orlando, Florida to Hilton Head Island to start a new life together in a slower paced environment. But the slower pace didn’t last long. Too young to retire and too passionate about their careers, they drew from past experiences and launched new businesses that have both become local success stories. Bob founded The Alliance Group Realty in 2010, which has become one of the leading real estate brokerages in the Lowcountry with over 70 sales associates and offices on Hilton Head Island and in Bluffton. In 2016, Rochelle opened Alliance Dance Academy in Bluffton, which currently has over 250 students and recently relocated to a larger facility. Although they are in completely different businesses, the couple’s philosophies are exactly the same: They believe business is all about the people, and if you take care of your people, everything else will take care of itself.

“My teachers are my family and the kids are like my own,” Rochelle said. Bob agreed, adding, “I work for our Realtors, not the other way around.” They also share core values including the importance of integrity, because it is fundamental to the reputation of their businesses. But most important is their mantra: “Work hard, Play hard.” The Clarksons spend most weekends on their sailboat named Turning Pointe. “We both work very intensely, and our sailboat is our sanctuary,” Rochelle said. “It’s how we recharge our batteries,” Bob added. “It’s a continuation of our honeymoon.” The Clarksons acknowledge that couples working together can be challenging, so they keep it separate. Bob doesn’t dance and Rochelle doesn’t watch mortgage rates. That leaves their free time for the things they love to do together, along with their two dogs. It is the perfect Alliance! The Alliance Group Realty 890 William Hilton Parkway, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 45 Calhoun Street Bluffton, SC 29910 www.thealliancegrouprealty.com (843) 785-5200

Alliance Dance Academy 39 Persimmon St., Suite 404 Bluffton, SC 29910 www.alliancedanceadademy.com (843) 757-8277


DAVID S REID IV, MD, BOARD CERTIFIED PLASTIC SURGEON MANDY FULMER, LICENSED MEDICAL AESTHETICIAN H I LT O N H E A D P L A S T I C S U R G E R Y A N D M E D S P A Why did you go into business together? Dr. Reid: I was impressed by Mandy’s reputation and expertise as a licensed medical aesthetician. Mandy Fulmer: I was drawn to Dr. Reid’s years of experience, reputation, and his desire to provide the latest technology in our industry, such as CoolSculpting®, which is an FDA-cleared, non-surgical fat reduction treatment. And it’s permanent!

consultation, he can determine whether a patient is a good candidate for CoolSculpting and set expectations for results. Dr. Reid: Both Mandy and I have in-depth training and certification specifically for this treatment having attended Cool University certification in Virginia.

How do you keep work from ruining hobbies or fun events? Mandy: We keep a good work/ life balance. I especially enjoy the gym and travelling. Dr. Reid How did you decide to offer plays trombone in the Hilton CoolSculpting? Head Plantation Big Band and Dr. Reid: I thoroughly enjoys playing golf. investigate and evaluate new Dr. Reid: And we do incorporate technology before offering it to some fun into our work. We my patients. CoolSculpting had offer CoolEvents, for instance, been proven extremely effective for people interested in learning in freezing and removing about CoolSculpting. They’re fat cells from the abdomen, casual meetings, usually in the arms, thighs and chin with evening, with cocktails and hors lasting results. The procedure d’oeuvres, too. has been performed millions Hilton Head Plastic Surgery, LLC of times worldwide, and it’s 35 Bill Fries Dr., Bldg. E safe, requiring no surgery or Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 info@myhhps.com anesthesia. How do you work together in providing this service? Mandy: Dr. Reid has the medical perspective. During a

+1 (843) 310-3065 myhhps.com


RANDY AND CARYN ROSE R O S E H E A R I N G H E A LT H C A R E C E N T E R S Why did you decide to go into business together? We just did. I was already working in the hearing aid business, and Caryn really liked the idea of helping people. We decided to do our first clinic, and it just worked; we worked well together. What strengths in the marketplace does your partner have that you lack? Randy: Caryn has organization skills that are unmatched. She has the ability to do the books, payroll, advertising. She just keeps us sane. Caryn: Randy has the ability to communicate with anyone. His passion drives our success. Randy believes everything works out. I am a little more pessimistic. I admire that about him and try to see it his way. How do you keep work from ruining extracurricular/fun events? We leave work at work. Early on it was hard to separate the two, but as we always do, we just sat and decided not to discuss business on our free time. It does pop up from time to time, but we manage to keep it separate. How did you meet your business partner? We met at Montgomery Ward (now thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a throwback). Randy was managing Miracle-Ear, and Caryn was managing a hair salon, all inside Wards.

Biggest pet peeve about your partner: Randy: I really have no pet peeves with Caryn. I do, however, hate it when people litter or leave their shopping carts in parking spaces. What advice would you have for entrepreneurs considering a business partnership? Randy: Be honest; know your partnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strengths and weakness, and build on both. Caryn: Communication is key, as with any relationship. Never hide anything from your partner. Talk through everything. Were there any books or local resources that guided you during start-up? Randy: Experience. I had a great mentor; I read everything I can find. Our goal is to serve our patients and give the best service we can. Caryn: Not for this location. When we first started years ago, we purchased a book on how to write a business and marketing plan. Very important. Keeps you on track. 1505 Main Street Hilton Head Island, 29926 (843) 802-2957 55 Sheridan Park Circle Ste. B Bluffton, SC 29910 (843) 547-5832 rosehearinghealthcarecenters@gmail.com www.rosehearinghealthcarecenters.com


? Article by Michele Roldan-Shaw

CULTIVATING A BETTER RELATIONSHIP WITH MYSELF


CULTIVATING A BETTER RELATIONSHIP WITH MYSELF

VIPASSANA IS A UNIVERSAL, NONRELIGIOUS TECHNIQUE OF SELF-PURIFICATION THROUGH SELF-OBSERVATION. IT HAS GIVEN ME A CONCRETE METHOD TO LOOK DEEPLY WITHIN AND NOT ONLY UNDERSTAND WHAT IS HAPPENING INSIDE MYSELF, BUT TO DISSOLVE DESTRUCTIVE HABIT PATTERNS WHILE BUILDING OR REINFORCING HELPFUL ONES.

THERE IS ONE AREA WHERE I FIND IT ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT TO SHIFT THE FOCUS BACK ON MYSELF, AND THAT IS IN RELATIONSHIPS. HUMAN NATURE IS SUCH THAT WE ALWAYS WANT TO BLAME THE OTHER PERSON; WE ALWAYS WANT THEM TO DO THE WORK. RARELY DO WE HIT THE PAUSE BUTTON ON OUR EMOTIONS LONG ENOUGH TO LOOK OBJECTIVELY AT OUR OWN BEHAVIOR AND TRY TO UNDERSTAND THE ROLE WE PLAY IN ANY GIVEN DYNAMIC. 92

FEB. 2019 C2 MAGAZINE


IT’S NOT EASY TO LOOK LONG AND DEEPLY AT MYSELF. SOMETIMES I AM HORRIFIED BY WHAT I FIND. BUT THEN I REMEMBER IT’S A FALSE EGO THAT WANTS TO BELIEVE I’M ABOVE HUMAN FRAILTIES LIKE ENVY, RESENTMENT, SELF-PITY, AND KNOW-ITALL-ISM … TO NAME A FEW OF THE WORST.

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

93


Loving your Partner

in sickness & Health Article by Linda S. Hopkins


Loving your Partner in sickness & health

ANY MEDICAL ISSUE, FROM THE OCCASIONAL VIRUS OR MINOR ACCIDENT, TO CHRONIC PAIN, SERIOUS ILLNESS, A DEBILITATING CONDITION, OR TERMINAL DISEASE CAN PUT A STRAIN ON THE RELATIONSHIP. THIS IS WHEN LOVE STEPS UP AND DOES WHAT IT IS CALLED UPON TO DO.

96

FEB. 2019 C2 MAGAZINE


A MEDICAL EVENT CAN SUCK THE LIFE OUT OF A RELATIONSHIP AND KILL INTIMACY. OR, IT CAN DRAW YOU CLOSER THAN EVER BEFORE.

FIND THIS ARTICLE ON OUR WEBSITE TO VIEW TIPS FOR CAREGIVERS AND PATIENTS.

C2 MAGAZINE FEB. 2019

97


ON LOVE I have learned that true love is unconditional. We may not love something our child does, but we always love the child. We were made to be loved and to love. Our first instinct is to be held and made to feel secure. The Bible has a lot to say about love. First Corinthians 13 is often quoted at weddings: “Love is patient and kind, not jealous or boastful or rude. Love rejoices in the right. Love hopes and endures. Love never ends.” A few years ago, a dear friend gave me a book titled, All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten. I’ll share some of the highlights here: Share everything. Play fair. Don’t hit people. Put things back where you found them. Clean up your own mess. Don’t take things that aren’t yours. Say you’re sorry when you hurt somebody. Wash your hands before you eat. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you. Take a nap every afternoon. Hold hands and stick together. Good basic advice in life. ON HEALTH Do all things in moderation. Let your conscience be your guide. ON RELIGION Jesus Christ is my Savior. I praise God for my daughter, Lynn, who led me to the Lord when she was 17. My faith has sustained me through the years, and especially when Lynn died suddenly in a car accident. Years later, our son, Mark died suddenly from meningitis. In these desperate times, we need our Comforter. Dave (my husband) and I walk with the Lord. Christian friendships are so vital. We cry together, and we laugh together. Our son Jeff and his dear family live here as well. We pray together and are comforted that each of them knows the Lord. A verse in the Bible that gives me hope is Romans 8:28: “All things work together for good to those who love The Lord and are called according to His purpose.” We are blessed to live in a land where we are free to worship as we choose. ON REGRET Regret is a hard thing to live with. You look back at an event and wish you could do it over. Do not let your tongue be your enemy. Life is a matter of sowing and reaping. Let your harvest be rejoicing, not weeping. ON EXERCISE If you are interested in good mental and physical health and happiness, you must exercise. Walking is the best. Walk with a friend or your

EVIE MCCANDLESS AGE: 93 A CONTINUING SERIES FEATURING THE WISDOM OF AN OLDER GENERATION. spouse. It is the best time to talk, and you are in the beautiful outdoors. I love the sunshine. I go outside every day. I no longer bike or golf or ski, but I walk, and I thank Jesus I can walk and talk with Him. ON MARRIAGE The war ended in 1945. I was a freshman in college. Suddenly, our campus was filling up with the recently discharged soldiers from the armed forces. After our third date, Dave and I were madly in love. I graduated; we had a lovely church

PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT

wedding; I got a job and I love to say, “I put Dave through dental school.” This February, we are celebrating our seventieth wedding anniversary. That is a long time to live together! You do fall in and out of love, but commitment is strong, and what God puts together stays together. Talk, laugh, listen, be patient, and encourage one another. Don’t take yourself too seriously. Dave surprises me often with his sincere compliments. He fills the empty spaces in my life and makes me feel secure. Our love has been tested with trials and challenges, and we have held fast. Love is a strong foundation. Marriage is new every day. Never stop working on it. The scripture Ephesians 5:33 exhorts: “Wife, respect your husband; husband, love your wife.” God will bless your efforts. Go for it. ON PARENTING Parenting is the most important job you will ever have. It is also a privilege. I feel honored to be a mother and grandmother. Amazing that we parent without any formal training. A motherly instinct is inherent. Mom and Dad should work together and support each other. Discipline with love. Set boundaries. Your most valuable tool is listening. Listen to them. Our children watch us, so set a good example. Teach and learn. I love it when I learn from them. Young people are so smart. Conversation around the dinner table is a good time to share and encourage each other. Find the activity you all enjoy and play together. Cherish your family moments. You have heard it said, “The family who prays together stays together.” It works. ON GRACE Grace is defined as unmerited, unearned favor. It is what we receive in knowing Jesus as Savior and Lord. It is free—a gift. We have received an abundance of grace. We are healthy, have each other, have family and friends to love. I am still learning to be thankful, to be still and know God. ON LOWCOUNTRY LIVING We thank God we were born in America. We are very grateful that we were encouraged by Jeff and Debbie to move to Hilton Head Island. For me, life in the South is more casual with more freedom to be yourself. This is a very friendly island, and it has everything one could hope for. Enjoy each day. Take a walk and enjoy the sunshine. Let the North keep their snow and cold. Greet your seasonal visitors with a warm hug and your best cup of tea. 


A Q&A Series with Local Artists

I S C MUin bathroomsIANS

MUSICIANS: GENO AND ANDREA MILLER BAND: AS HUSBAND & WIFE

Special thanks to Brock and Elizabeth Rowley for hosting our shoot at their Colleton River hideaway.

P

H

O

T

O

G

R

A

P

H

Y

B

Y

M

.

K

A

T


What’s your sign? Andrea Miller: Peace sign Geno Miller: Sagittarius Most underrated song that, in your opinion, should be a classic: AM: “Sweet Disposition,” by The Temper Trap—best road trip song. GM: “Georgia,” by Emily King. Biggest compliment you’ve ever gotten from a fan? AM: Someone once told me that I sound like the black Norah Jones! But honestly, when people tell me they feel closer to Jesus when they hear us sing worship songs, it’s truly an honor. GM: The best compliment we’ve heard so far is that our voices blend so well together.

Turn the page to learn more about this musical family


MAYBE I’M HER FAVORITE CEREAL... MAYBE I’M NOT

What is your favorite song to perform? AM: “I Don’t Know You”—off of our EP. It brings me back to when I wrote it, while sitting on my bed with my first son when he was a baby— simple times. GM: We do a version of “Hit the Road Jack,” by Ray Charles. I’m always excited to sing and play that song! What do you sing in the shower? AM: I’m one of those people who turns into an opera singer in the shower. GM: I like to consider myself a rapper. So, I like to rap in the shower, which means I’m rapping Drake! Favorite cereal? AM: Oh’s—it’s a yellow box. GM: Without a doubt, Frosted Flakes. At what venue do you most like to perform? AM: We love the Roasting Room; we have had so much fun there. But house concerts have been extra special. GM: In Chicago, we did a Sofar Sounds show and loved it, because they transformed an awesome African restaurant into a listening room. Most requested song at shows? AM: We usually come with a prepared set list, so they end up being original songs. GM: Our original song, “There’s Still Time.” First concert you attended? AM: Pretty sure it was Taylor Swift—no shame. GM: Dave Matthews Band at Wrigley Field in Chicago—a night I won’t forget. Favorite artist? AM: Currently, I try to find good music for my two-year-old, so Ellie Holcomb’s children’s album Sing has been on repeat, and I actually love it. I also like funky artists like Lianne La Havas, Emily King, Yebba. GM: I’m an old school guy. Ray Charles and Stevie Wonder, Quincy Jones—all those artists speak to my soul; but [my favorite] present day artist is Jon Bellion. Place you go to get away from it all? AM: Any kind of body of water. GM: The golf course.

In case you wondered what an African rain stick looked like, this is it! Do you tweet, gram or book? What’s your handle? AM: I barely understand what Twitter is, but Instagram and Facebook@ashusbandandwife. GM: I’m terrible with social media. I barely post anything, lol. Finish this verse as if it were the hook of a song: “Sally went down to the bayou...” AM: Hoping to sit beside you… Who would star as you in the epic retelling of your life on film? AM: Hmmm … Zoey Deschennel; she’s odd like me. GM: People say I look like Phil LaMarr, so I would get him to play me. First instrument you learned to play? AM: I barely made it through piano lessons, then tried every instrument you can think of in middle school. GM: The African rain stick—just joking. Piano. Song you were thrilled to finally master? AM: Oh, gosh; I am one of those people who feels like I haven’t mastered anything—always room to improve, but I do a pretty good Shakira impersonation. GM: “Sir Duke,” by Stevie Wonder. What do you wish you knew more about? AM: I have a list a mile long, but for now, I wish I knew more about cooking; I love food GM: Just like most men, I already know everything. What famous musician would you love to sing a duet with? AM: Maybe a powerhouse singer like Adele, Lady Gaga or Celine Dion. GM: A singer/songwriter named MARO Musica or Cory Henry. What animal do you most identify with? AM: A little teacup pig; they are so cute, and they sprint around everywhere. GM: A black panther—mainly the superhero. If you got super-famous and you had to change your name, what would your new name be? AM: I would hope our sons join along in the family band; then I would call us As Husband & Wife and Kin GM: That’s easy: G Master Flex.  QUICK 18 ANYONE?

Join Andrea and Geno (As Husband & Wife) for a very special Valentine’s Day show at Venue 1223. Journey with them as they sing the themes of love and allow yourself to laugh, cry and remember what love is really about. Tickets are $58 each and include a three-course dinner. For more information, visit: https://ashusbandandwife.com/valentinesday/


2-21

5

6

14 16

17

19

31


Profile for CH2/ CB2

Celebrate Hilton Head and Celebrate Bluffton & Beyond - February 2019 Issue  

Editors Note, A Word from our Mayor, 5 Drinks with John McCann, This and That, CH2' Most Adorable Pet Contest Winners!, DOGS The Best Access...

Celebrate Hilton Head and Celebrate Bluffton & Beyond - February 2019 Issue  

Editors Note, A Word from our Mayor, 5 Drinks with John McCann, This and That, CH2' Most Adorable Pet Contest Winners!, DOGS The Best Access...

Profile for celebrat