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MARCH 2015

THINGS WE

LOVE

ABOUT SPRING

THE FASHION OF

COASTAL BLISS

CH2 HOME SECTION LESS IS MORE: THE BIG FASCINATION WITH LITTLE HOUSES DESIGN INSPIRATION FROM RANDY JEFFCOAT BUILDERS AND WILLIAM BYRD CUSTOM HOMES TRANSFORMING EVERYDAY SPACE INTO A HOME OASIS


MARCH 2015

CH2 SPRING HOME SECTION uring

THINGS WE

feat

LESS IS MORE: THE BIG FASCINATION WITH LITTLE HOUSES

LOVE

ABOUT SPRING

DESIGN INSPIRATION FROM RANDY JEFFCOAT BUILDERS AND WILLIAM BYRD CUSTOM HOMES

THE FASHION OF

COASTAL BLISS A PEEK INSIDE POSEIDAN

TRANSFORMING EVERYDAY SPACE TO A HOME OASIS

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WINDY CITY STYLE WITH RANDY JEFFCOAT BUILDERS

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THINGS WE LOVE ABOUT SPRING PAGE

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THE HOME ISSUE

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DESIGN INSPIRATION FROM CAMERON & CAMERON

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MARCH 2015


A LINE IN THE SAND PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNE

ONE subject. TWO opinions.

BARRY KAUFMAN

H

IS EVERYTHING REALLY A KEEPSAKE?

ere’s a fun mental exercise you can try out next time you have a few minutes to space out: Imagine your house is on fire. Are you picturing it? Okay, great, because we’re about to do something stupid. Let’s say you’ve just called the fire department, and they’re going to be there in five minutes, tops. At this point, all your stuff is either going to be ashes or waterlogged. Either way, you can kiss that sweet eBay revenue goodbye from all those Beanie Babies you’ve been hanging onto. But wait, you argue to yourself, picturing that limited edition Brownie the Bear going up in flames. There’s still time. You can still get in there and save one or two things. So what do you save first?

(By the way, don’t ever do this during an actual fire, because it’s totally unsafe. Get kids and pets out and stay out). Emboldened by the fact that this is all pretend, you burst through the door, brave the searing heat, and you grab… what? Family photos? Those are irreplaceable, unless this fire is happening in 2015, in which case your family photos are in the cloud somewhere. So that leaves… important documents? Passports? Birth certificates? Let’s say for argument’s sake that you have some kind of “go bag” with all the important documents ready to roll. You grab it, you head outside and check your watch to find that you still have four minutes. Plenty of time to grab that next-tierdown stuff.

COURTNEY HAMPSON

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f I didn’t save everything, I wouldn’t have just found my baby book. And if I hadn’t just found my baby book, I (and you) wouldn’t know when I first sat on the potty (December 30, 1974) or that by two and a half years old, I was dressing myself. Or, that my mom probably let me dress myself, because according to my baby book, “Courtney wets her pants if she doesn’t like them. Two years old.” Ah, so I have always been a ball buster. And, now have the forty year old data to prove it. While we’re at it, you’ll be interested to know that at seven months I was chewing on plugs and wires, and ripping the phone book to shreds. Apparently, I was a puppy. I walked around with a bucket on my head at 13 months and threw my toys in the garbage at 14 months. As I pack up my house, after 10 years in the same spot (a record since I’ve been all grown up and on my own), I am discovering all kinds of treasures. Last weekend, I stood in the office, pouring over a decade of public speaking students’ final thought cards and speeches. I don’t save them all, but some students affect me just as much as I hope I have them, and I can’t bear to purge at the end of the semester. So, instead of packing, I read through more than 20 semesters of memories, as tears ran down my face.


BARRY KAUFMAN

So you go back in and grab… family heirlooms? Expensive works of art? Sports memorabilia? So now, arms laden with greatgrandma Iris’ collection of slightly racist postcards, your Jack Kirbysigned Spider-Man #1, and your official Rob Gronkowski beer bong, you escape the flames once again. You look at your watch, and wouldn’t you know it, you still have time for another trip. My point is, how many times do you have to keep going back into that burning house, lowering your standards of what’s important each time, before you grab your fourth grade report card? My guess is you grab it approximately never. In fact, I’m willing to bet if your fourth grade report card accidentally landed on the important stuff you were carrying out, you’d shake it off so it wouldn’t slow you down. My mega-roundabout point here is that there are so many things you think are important, but when you really get right down to it, they’re just things you haven’t thrown away yet. And unless they hold some truly irreplaceable nostalgic connection to a place and time, please believe me; they are worthless. Take a look around you and you’ll realize that a lot of the junk that you call stuff—those things that you keep packing in boxes, stuffing into drawers, piling onto shelves—is all just garbage. At some point, fire or not, someone, maybe you, is going to pick up that fourth grade report card and wonder why you held onto this thing for so long. Then they’ll throw it away. So why not save them the effort and do it yourself? In the event of an actual fire, it will give you that much more time to preserve your Beanie Baby collection. 

FUN FACT #509 BROWNIE BEAR IS WORTH $3600 http://www.celebritynetworth.com/articles/ entertainment-articles/5-valuable-beaniebabies/#!/brownie-the-brown-bear_567/


COURTNEY HAMPSON

AND THEN IT HIT ME. IT’S NOT ABOUT THE STUFF I’VE ACCUMULATED OVER THE YEARS. IT IS ABOUT THE MEMORIES. THE PRECIOUS TIME. IT IS THE MOMENTS THAT MATTER.

When I moved to Bluffton from New Jersey, it was the fourth time I’d moved with all of my college textbooks and two boxes of my master’s thesis notes. I guess I am still waiting to apply that thesis research to real life. Might as well have been calculus, because I don’t see that happening any time soon. I also uncovered every annual planner (you know, the ones you actually write your appointments in) I’ve had since graduating college, just in case I need to know who I met with at 10 a.m. on March 1, 2004. And, this got me thinking, how long is too long to hold onto something? And, as I lay in bed that night, overthinking this column (and life in general)

MARCH 2015

and willing myself back to sleep whilst scanning Facebook, I saw this post by a friend: “Things. Things. Things. Things are just things. It’s really the thought that counts. Yesterday, I lost my wallet: all of my credit cards and driver license gone. And yet, the one thing about which I keep thinking is that old, worn, leather wallet, which my cousin Kathy gifted to me when I graduated high school 19 years ago. The cards and license are replaceable (in fact, they’ve already been replaced). But 19 years of being by my side—in college, in law school, and every corner of the world— can’t be replaced. I miss my wallet.”

And then it hit me. It’s not about the stuff I’ve accumulated over the years. It is about the memories. The precious time. It is the moments that matter. You don’t need a picture or a date in your daily planner to remember your first kiss. Or an afternoon on swing set with the wind blowing in your hair. Or the first crack of a baseball bat on opening day. Or the first time you held your niece in your arms. We remember what’s important. The rest is just stuff. So, as I continue to sort through all of my “stuff,” I am forced to ask myself questions. Namely, why do I still have this? And, if I don’t know the answer, I’ve decided to let it go. 

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Article By Clayton Rollison

S P R I N G

F L I N G

Recipe

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fter all of this silly cold weather (I know it’s Hilton Head and it wasn’t all that cold), spring is right around the corner. It is the time of year when chefs start to get excited again. Most of us love all the root vegetables, cabbages, greens and hardy braises that we use during the fall and winter seasons. But it’s time for some lighter fare. Spring is very much the unicorn season for us here. It almost always seems a little elusive. Some years we get way too much rain, or it gets hot really fast, or there is a late freeze that kills everything. It’s just a strange weather pattern for us, but that is what makes everything that is spring so great. First and foremost, soft shell crabs are coming. We take for granted how truly special they are. When I was cooking in Manhattan, we were bringing in soft shell crabs from northern North Carolina and Virginia. They would cost you your first born child; we sold them for over $40 an entrée. Fresh and alive coming in the back door, they looked like our crabs, they smelled like our crabs, but they weren’t our crabs. They just were not as soft. They had to spend extra time in the water getting a little firmer to be shipped. If you really want to see how soft shells are harvested, go check out Hudson’s on the Docks. They are doing it in their packing house on the back dock! Yet spring is so much more. The vegetables that show themselves for such a short period are fantastic. At the market, we will see asparagus, fava beans, English peas, spring onions, spring garlic, chive blossoms, fiddlehead ferns, ramps and so much more. That asparagus you just ate in December out of Peru has nothing on what is going to be at the farmers market. Not just that, but there are wild edible greens that pop up: lemon balm, purse lain, sorrel, chamomile, dandelions, and still too many more to name. Maybe that’s why all of this sounds so great—it’s only here for a moment. I couldn’t tell you if I would still love fava beans if I could have them year round. I think because the season for them is so short, I love them much more. Maybe it is all the work that goes into shucking them, blanching them, peeling them, and finally cooking and serving them. Spring is tricky. It separates who is truly paying attention and who is still doing the same ol’ thing. That flash of life is why I love the spring: It’s here, then it’s gone. Clayton Rollison is the chef/owner of Lucky Rooster Restaurant in South Island Square.

SAUSAGE STUFFED YELLOW PEPPERS Recipe courtesy of Pomodori

INGREDIENTS: 4 yellow peppers (Make sure you find the ones that can stand up on their own.)

1 lb mild Italian sausage (You could have your butcher grind some pork and mix your own!)

1-11/2 cups of your favorite tomato sauce 3/4 cup freshly grated Pecorino Romano cheese (Don’t skimp on the cheeses; they are very important for flavor... Buy the good stuff; it’ll be worth it. I grate mine in my food processor so it’s fresh...just use the normal blade and let it run until it’s in tiny tiny pieces)

3/4 cup freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiano (Same thing, get the good stuff, save and freeze the cheese rinds for flavoring sauces and adding depth of flavor to soups)

FILLING: Sauté the Italian sausage in a little bit of olive oil until cooked through. in a medium bowl, combine the sauce, cooked sausage and cheeses until you find a desired consistency and flavor. PREPARATION Carefully cut off the tops of the yellow peppers, keeping the stems intact so that you can replace them during cooking. Remove the membrane and the seeds inside the pepper and underneath the stem. Place the peppers in a baking dish and try and wedge them up next to each other so they stay upright. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with kosher salt. Fill the peppers with the mixture and return the tops to the peppers. In your baking dish, add water to the bottom of the pan, about 1/2 inch up the pepper. Cover the peppers with aluminum foil and bake at 400 for about 45 minutes, or until the peppers take on your desired firmness.


M A Y O R

Hilton Head Island Mayor

A Note from David Bennett

HILTON HEAD NEWS

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sk anyone in my family: I relish a good ride. Here on Hilton Head Island, we enjoy a fine array of excursions on ocean’s waves, calm inlets and marshes, leisure paths, wooded trails, and even through the air on ziplines and parasails. During March, I will enjoy some unique rides. I have the honor to sit in a 1966 Lincoln Continental for the St. Patrick’s Day Parade and anticipate a grand trolley tour at the Heritage Library’s Hilton Head Island History Day. As your new mayor, perhaps the most compelling trip this month will be the commencement of the fiscal year 2016 budget cycle excursion. Together, you and I, the town staff and Town Council will embark upon a multi-month journey of discussions and workshops to advantageously prioritize spending, culminating in the town’s FY16 budget, effective July 1, 2015. Be assured, I have deliberately acquired knowledge about funding sources, requirements, town operations and other topics necessary to engage in this process. I have sought input, advice and assistance from wise, talented citizens who volunteer time and expertise to research, gather data, and interview key people and organizations in matters pertaining to the success of our community. It’s vital to work with real tools and knowledge, not fuzzy numbers and fear. Last December, Town Council established priorities, including delivery of sanitary sewer service to citizens who desire it. Why are sewers a priority? What should the town’s role and goal be for those unserved areas of our community, currently draining sewage into the ground upon which they stand? If a universal and sound sewer

M AY O R < Bluffton Mayor

A Note from Lisa Sulka

MAY RIVER ROAD STREETSCAPE UPDATE

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he May River Road streetscape project was recently discussed at a Town Council public workshop. This is the last phase of construction presently planned for this roadway. It will include construction of sidewalks, drainage, curb and gutter and parking from Pin Oak Street to Whispering Pines. The sidewalk will continue on the north side of the road from Whispering Pines to Jennifer Court and tie to existing sidewalk around Parker’s gas station. Lighting will continue from the existing completed section of May River Road to Whispering Pines, with sidewalk lights continuing on the north side of the road to Jennifer Court. In addition to the basic design of the road, Council provided input on the proposed landscaping. Rest assured that every effort

will be made to work with property owners to obtain landscape easements to provide additional landscaping to screen parking areas off street and beautify the area. To assure the health of the landscaping, irrigation will be installed, with water supplied from a well located on private property, which will be donated as an easement to the town. Additionally, we’ll work with property owners to reduce the number of driveway openings, which will increase opportunities for additional landscaping. As you know, Town Council identified celebrating the May River as our number one priority during last year’s strategic planning effort. Thus, every capital improvement project the town undertakes looks for opportunities to address stormwater quality and quantity. The streetscape project is no different, and sediment basins as well as other best management practices (BMPs) will be constructed. An example of additional stormwater treatment options includes working with the owners of Stock Farm to create a basin on a portion of their open space. There will also be a smaller rain garden on the north side of the road by the Dollar General. Drain inlets are also likely to have treatment systems installed to remove pollutants and litter as the stormwater leaves the roadway. An additional item discussed was a SC Department of Transportation (SCDOT) requirement to widen parking spaces to 10 feet and the effect it would have on trees. There was general consensus to eliminate the parking areas where significant trees may be affected and protect the trees close to the roadway by creating “bump outs”— areas where the curb is brought out to the drive lane to minimize disturbance around trees. No parking would be available in these areas, and the sidewalk would meander to follow the curb. To capture the essence of this guidance for the design, staff is working with the consultant to develop a concept plan of the engineered design. This plan will be shared with the public and used by staff to illustrate to the property owners as we request their cooperation with obtaining construction, landscape and pedestrian easements. Our goal is to provide a vision of what the entryway into our National Register Historic District could look like with their active participation in the project. 

system protects the environment, are we remaining true to our environmental stewardship legacy when sewage seeps into our sandy soil in high seasonal water table areas? As a developer, I know sanitary sewer access promotes economic activity. It increases values of real estate (our town’s largest economic driver) and invites additional improvements. These, in turn, increase available housing choices. Providing sanitary sewer access to citizens who desire it is the right thing to do. But budgeting only the average annual amount of town committed capital spent over the last seven fiscal years will result in the completion of this project by roughly 2039 (assuming no increase in cost of labor and materials). And, Hilton Head Island has limited large tracts of land remaining, which makes the “Growth Pays for Growth” sewer policy we currently follow insufficient to complete the sewer system. What are some real options? A State Revolving Fund currently has sufficient capital to lend to our PSD’s to complete our sanitary sewer project as quickly as we secure necessary easements and design and install the improvements. Terms are two percent interest with a 30year amortization. This equates to an annual cost of less than $400,000, with no impact on local property taxes. Additionally, Hilton Head PSD may contribute some required capital, further reducing the cost. This is a priority we can accomplish! Finally, I invite you to ride the Internet with me! I’ve established a website you may use to stay in touch and participate in surveys. Visit MayorDavidBennett.com. 


ARTICLE BY KENT THUNE

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Spring M

arch is here and spring is springing! It’s time to get outside and enjoy the warmer air and dip your toes into the proverbial water of life in the Lowcountry. There are so many things that we love about spring on Hilton Head Island, Bluffton and the greater Beaufort county area but there are at least seven that quickly come to mind: 1. Fun with Festivals: Fortunately we are blessed with winters that are not so cold that we can’t get outside and enjoy an occasional walk on the beach or a visit to a park on the warmer days; however the outdoor events and festivals are few and far between during the winter months. But by the time March rolls around, the festival season begins to kick into gear and there are plenty more reasons to get outside. For example, this year,

from March 9-15, we get the 30th Annual Hilton Head Wine and Food Festival, where wine and food enthusiasts can greet the island’s spring season with a sixday celebration to enjoy signature Lowcountry cuisine, the fruits of wines from around the world, and a feast of culture and art. March 30 will bring the Harbour Town Spring Fest, where participants of all ages can enjoy a variety of


activities, from live music, to great dining and discounts on fun water activities, to bounce houses for the little ones. But that’s only to name a few of the outstanding spring festivals going on around the Lowcountry. So be sure to keep your eyes open for the outdoor events that happen nearly every weekend, extending far beyond the spring. 2. St. Patrick’s Day in Savannah: This is more than just a festival; it’s a one-of-a-kind event that nearly rises to the level of Mardi-Gras in New Orleans, where gigantic parades turn into fun and festive parties. The Irish holiday that has become a must-do experience for people around the Lowcountry and from all over the world. The One-hundred-ninety-first St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Savannah will take place March 17 at 10:15 a.m. But the party starts Friday, March 13, when the green beer starts flowing and the smell of delicious Lowcountry cuisine fills the air on River Street. You can also see green water shooting out of the famous Forsythe Fountain in downtown Savannah. Who knows, maybe they’ll dye the Savannah River itself green, like they’ve done before! 3. The RBC Heritage Golf Tournament: This is another event in a class by itself and is affectionately known to islanders as “The Heritage.” The 2015 tournament will be held April 13-19 at the famous Harbour Town Golf Links on Hilton Head Island. But you don’t need to be a VIP, have a clubhouse badge, or even be a golf fan to enjoy the fun and scenery of the tournament. A daily grounds ticket can provide the best of The Heritage, which many of us would say consists of some combination of strolling along the beautiful golf course, taking in some amazing pro golf action, or eating food and having cocktails with old friends while making new ones. The tournament’s history is rich. The legendary Arnold Palmer won the first Heritage in 1969 and other winners include more hall of fame-level players: Jack Nicklaus, Greg Norman, Nick Price, Tom Watson, Davis Love III and Payne Stewart are just a few of the names inscribed upon the champions’ trophy. 4. Getting Back Into the Water: Whether you are a local or a visitor, the reason you are here probably has something to do with water, and springtime is when we get back into it, on it, or at least closer to it. Surrounding Hilton Head Island are Port Royal Sound, the Atlantic Ocean, and Calibogue Sound. Within the island itself, you’ll also find Broad Creek and countless tidal creeks and fishing ponds. The beautiful and expansive May River winds through the historic and charming Old Town area of Bluffton, which received its name from its position on the north bluff of the river. With all of this water surrounding us, there are plenty of wonderful water activities to enjoy, including boating, skiing, surfing, and just about any kind of fishing you can imagine. 5. Azaleas, Azaleas, Azaleas!: Blooming in spring, the beautiful flowers of this shrub often last several weeks. Azaleas are native not only to the Lowcountry but to several continents around the world including Asia, Europe and North America. They got their first introduction to the United States in the 1830s at Magnolia Plantation in nearby Charleston, South Carolina. From early March through the end of April, you’ll find Hilton Head Island and the surrounding Lowcountry pleasantly lost amongst abundant azalea blooms. During the late-March to early-April peak, there probably isn’t a place around here where you’ll look in any random direction and not see at least one azalea bush bursting with brilliant white flowers or with blooms of a striking shade of pink. In fact, some visitors plan their vacations around this colorful springtime visual treat. 6. The Call of the Whip-poor-will: A rarely seen but commonly heard bird on Hilton Head Island, the Whippoorwill sings a song that sounds like its name, and it is a hit on the soundtrack of our spring and summer evenings. For locals, and for frequent visitors to the area, the call of the Whip30

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poor-will can bring back fond memories of warm evenings in the Lowcountry or even turn the most stoic person into a hopeless romantic. Like owls, Whip-poor-wills are nocturnal birds. By day, the birds sleep on the forest floor, or on a horizontal log or branch. Their superior camouflage makes them hard to spot in the day, even for the most enthusiastic of bird watchers. At night, especially when the moon is more than half-full, Whip-poor-wills feed on night-flying insects, such as moths and mosquitoes, and their famous song begins to ring out into the evening air. It is the male Whip-poor-will that does the night singing, which is his way of defending territory and attracting a mate. 7. Getting Out on the Bike: When springtime hits, the people on Hilton Head Island hit the bike paths, which are abundant in supply and well-maintained by the town and volunteers. According to mapmyride.com, there are 7,845 different routes bikers can explore, which means that almost any destination on the island, including beaches, shopping, and restaurants, can be reached by bike path. If you are a resident or a guest with a gate pass, you can also take a relaxing ride in a plantation such as Hilton Head Plantation, Sea Pines or Palmetto Dunes. If you don’t have a bike, no need to worry, there are plenty of places around the island to rent bikes (and don’t forget your helmet)! Now that you’ve finished reading, get outside and enjoy spring in the Lowcountry!  Kent Thune enjoys spring, as well as the other seasons of the year, in and around his home on Hilton Head Island, where he lives with his wife and two sons. You can catch up with Thune on his blog at TheFinancialPhilosopher.com or on Twitter @ ThinkersQuill.

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Article By FRANK DUNNE JR.

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made it to the Final Four. Yep. Me, a guy just shy of six feet tall with “limited” quickness, agility, speed, and verticality who can’t go to the left hand; I made it to the Final Four. I never saw the floor and I had to buy a ticket…but I made it to the Final Four. It was back in the day, 1985, when—you know the story if you’re a college basketball fan—the Villanova Wildcats shocked the world by knocking off big, bad, mighty defending champions Georgetown in the NCAA Tournament final to claim a national championship. Some call it one of the greatest games ever played. Maybe. Some call it the biggest NCAA Tournament upset of all time. Not so much, but that’s another story. To me, though, it was the greatest day in my sports fan life. A fresh-faced freshman that year and a huge college basketball buff, I arrived on campus excited about the upcoming season because ’Nova had

put together a pretty good team and it was the heyday of the original Big East Conference. Back then, our head coach Rollie Massimino matched wits with other greats like Lou Carnesecca at St. John’s, Jim Boeheim at Syracuse, and John Thompson at Georgetown, and I was going to see it live and in person for the next four years. We had high hopes for our Wildcats, but admittedly nobody dared to dream of winning it all, especially with Georgetown, who were expected to repeat as champions, standing in the way. Obviously it was thrilling for any basketball fan to be at Villanova in those days, but there was a little extra juice in it for me. I didn’t become a Villanova fan just because I was a student (and I use the term loosely) there; it was the other way around. You can see from the accompanying photo that I was destined for Villanova from the very beginning. My dad went to school there and loved to regale us with tales of Villanova basketball


OVA N LA

1985

VIL

5 198 nal io Nat pions m Cha


greatness in the 1960s. In my teenage years, we would watch the Wildcats in the NCAA Tournament with guys like E-Z Ed Pinckney, Dwayne “D-Train” McClain, and Gary McLain. They played some exciting games, almost always the underdog, but could never break through to the Final Four. Nevertheless, those guys were heroes to me, and now I was walking through the same quads and sitting in the same classrooms with them. The ’84-’85 basketball season turned out to be a bit of a rocky road for Villanova and ended on a very sour note with an 82-65 drubbing at the hands of Pittsburgh before tournament play began. We were worried that a regular season record of 18-9 wouldn’t be good enough for an invitation to the NCAA Tournament and that the only hope would be to win the Big East Tournament. That didn’t happen. The ’Cats did avenge Pittsburgh with a win in the first round, but were soundly beaten by St. John’s in the second round. Now all we could do was wait and hope that the NCAA Tournament Selection Committee would deem ’Nova’s 19 wins significant enough to offset their 10 losses. They got in as an eighth seed, which basically means not much was expected of them in the tournament. We watched the first round game against University of Dayton in Hogan and Bartelone’s dorm room. The team’s shaky finish to the season and the number eight seed had taken a little wind out of our sails, so there wasn’t a lot of tension in the room. Besides, nobody expected Dayton to give us much of a game, but Villanova only squeaked by 51-49. Now there was tension. Villanova’s second round opponent, number one seeded and second ranked Michigan, loomed. I remember Valenti, one of my many dorm neighbors from Brooklyn, pacing up and down the hall with his crazy nervous twitch as he always did, “Oh my God! How’re we gonna beat dese guys? Dese guys, dey’re numbah two in da nation! Dey’re ani-MAHL!” I had a greater concern. Bragging rights. You see, I grew up outside of Detroit and had many friends from high school at Michigan. We didn’t have texting and Twitter back then (Heck, we didn’t even have cell phones. If you wanted to call home, you used the pay phone at the end of the hall.) so we couldn’t talk smack in real time like we do today. My fear was that, if we lost to Michigan, my friends would bottle it all up and then assault me with a fusillade of trash talk that summer. If we lost to Michigan, I could never go home again. I think we watched that game in Hogan and Bartelone’s room again. This time we paid more attention, and Villanova won 59-55. This time we celebrated too, by making a lot of noise and drinking beer. Now it was getting interesting. Next up, Maryland. Again we were worried. Maryland already beat us by three earlier in the season, and they had Len Bias, one of the best players in the nation. How good was he? I’d say he was the closest thing we had to LeBron James in that era. Bias was eventually drafted by the Boston Celtics, but sadly died of a cocaine overdose before ever playing an NBA game. Anyway, we watched that game in Newman and Grosso’s room because they had the biggest TV on the floor. This time Villanova won by three, and we were starting to sense that something magical was afoot. To celebrate, we made a lot of noise and drank beer. So Villanova had already accomplished the impossible: They had advanced to the Elite Eight and were one win away from the coveted Final Four. All that stood in the way were the North Carolina Tar Heels, coached by the recently 34

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departed Dean Smith. Everybody in the basketball world said the clock would strike midnight on Villanova’s Cinderella tournament run. It didn’t. Villanova won convincingly, 5644. We watched that game in Newman and Grosso’s room because they had the biggest TV on the floor. To celebrate, we made a lot of noise and drank beer…and Newman got in trouble because of it. It turned out that a local TV news crew was wandering around campus to do a little slice of life piece. They wanted to see what those crazy Villanova kids would do if our team reached the Final Four. Somebody told them to go to Newman and Grosso’s room in Fedigan Hall because our game watch parties had become legendary. So we and our beer bottles got on TV! Unfortunately the dean of students watched the news that night and was not pleased. We weren’t “officially” allowed to have beer in a freshman dorm because…well…we were all freshmen and nobody was of legal age. But we partied in the dorm anyway until we heard from somewhere in the distance, “We gotta get out to the quad! Everybody’s there!” So we dropped everything and raced to “The Quad.” Sure enough, everybody was there, all 6,000 of us hootin’ and hollerin’ and throwing rolls of toilet paper. One hit me in the face, but I didn’t care. My boys were going to the FINAL FOUR! Word spread that there would be a pep rally to greet the team when they returned to campus at about 3 a.m. So all 6,000 of us headed to the old fieldhouse, one of those old-fashioned brick fieldhouses that only seated about 3,000 for a basketball game. Somehow we all packed in (probably in violation of fire codes) and awaited our heroes’ triumphant return. It was quite a spectacle, like a rock concert. When the team took the stage, the roar was deafening, and the mass of humanity crushed forward…like a rock concert. Thankfully, I don’t believe there were any injuries. Not much studying got done that week. It was all about the mad scramble to get tickets to the Final Four in Lexington, Kentucky. There weren’t many to go around, and you had to sign up for a lottery to get them. So you signed up and cut deals with as many “proxies” (people who had no interest in buying tickets but would sell you theirs if they hit the lottery and you didn’t) as you could find. That, or you worked your connections with alumni, faculty, and staff if you had them. By whatever method, Newman, Lumpy, Whitey, Critter, my big Sis (she was a sophomore), some other guy and I got lucky and scored tickets. We rented a car, got a Trip-Tik from AAA (no GPS in those days) and drove through the night to Lexington. I don’t think Sis enjoyed riding 10 hours in the car with me, Newman, Lumpy, Whitey, Critter and that other guy much, but I know she had a great time at the games, and it was pretty special to be able to share the whole experience with my big (although much shorter than me) sis. So there we were—Rupp Arena on the campus of the University of Kentucky where the semi-final and final games were played that year. Four teams and one championship trophy up for grabs, and one of the four was our beloved Villanova Wildcats. Basketball intelligentsia still considered the ’Cats a Cinderella team who didn’t belong with the others: Georgetown, St. John’s, and Memphis State, who would be our semi-final opponent. Frankly, that game is a blur in my memory, but the ’Cats won 52-45. After the game, Memphis State head coach Dana Kirk had this to say: MARCH 2015

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“If Villanova’s Cinderella, then Cinderella wears combat boots.” Georgetown beat St. John’s in the other semi-final to set the stage. Once again, nobody was giving Villanova much of a chance. No eighth seeded team with 10 losses is going to win this championship was the conventional wisdom. This was mighty Georgetown after all, the defending national champions with stars like Patrick Ewing (maybe the greatest college center of all time) Reggie Williams, Michael Jackson, Ralph Dalton, and Sleepy Floyd. It was a forgone conclusion that Georgetown would repeat as champions. Well, guess what? It was April 1, 1985. April Fool’s Day. Despite all the trials and tribulations of the season, our ’Cats had played nearly flawlessly since the Dayton game in Round 1 to get here. As great as Georgetown was, we knew our guys could play with them. They’d beaten us twice during the regular season, but only by a combined nine points, and one of the games went into overtime. We felt that probability was in our favor. Rollie Massimino was a brilliant tactical coach and was not about to lose to the same team three times. We also felt… well…we just felt something. So did the team. Like the semi-final game, the final game is a largely a blur in my mind. Most of what I remember about it I get from having watched on video a million times since. I do remember this, though: With a two-point lead and mere seconds to go, all Villanova had to do was inbound the ball and run the clock out. Dwayne McClain cut to his left to shed a defender as Harold Pressley threw him the inbound pass, but McClain tripped and fell! He caught the ball sprawled out on the floor and cradled it like a baby. Game over. Final Score: Villanova 66 – Georgetown 64. Villanova had done it. Newman rushed down from his seat a few rows up so we could all share our one shining moment. “What just happened?” he screamed at us. Lumpy, bawling like a baby, replied, “We

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ARTICLE BY ERIN LAYTHAM LENTZ & ANNA SCHAFFER

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aturday morning cartoons may have changed shapes and sounds in the past few decades, but one reigns supreme in the hearts of many: Schoolhouse Rock. This spring, the talented company at The Main Street Youth Theatre will take to the stage performing these sacred tunes that will leave you longing for lazy mornings by the television set. This fun, fastpaced stage musical, based on the 1970’s cartoon series, teaches history, grammar, math, science and politics through clever and catchy songs. The show features a new teacher, Tom (Georgie Weisner), who is suffering from anxiety and nerves, on the brink of his first day of school. As all the personalities of Tom join the stage, your favorite Schoolhouse Rock tunes are presented. Tom is reminded of some important tools for the classroom by these ‘voices of reason.’ “George,” the romantic side of Tom is played by Raechel Schroeder & Harrison Leahy. “Dori,” the goofy side of Tom, is played by Hannah Schuler, Anna Gray Ashton and Emeree Putich. “Shulie,” the sweet side of Tom is played by Elliott Lentz, Gabi Deir, Lauren Schuler & Nichole Hamilton. “Joe,” the cool side of Tom features Derrick Dees, Amber Sternitzke and McKara

Johnston. Finally, “Dina,” the mature side of Tom, is played by Edi Darnell and Amy Hughey. They all come together to present a journey through the iconic music of Schoolhouse Rock Live. Many of the cast are veteran performers with MSYT, some have performed in Productions at the Arts Center as well as other community theaters and school. The talented cast is comprised of performers ages 9-16 years of age. The show opens when Tom, nervous about his first day teaching, tries to relax by watching TV. Various characters emerge from the set and show him how to win his students over with imagination and music, through beloved Schoolhouse Rock Live songs such as “Just a Bill,” “Lolly, Lolly, Lolly” and “Conjunction Junction.” The brilliance of this show is not the recreation of the cartoons you may remember so

SIT BACK, LISTEN AND LEARN


Top row: Mckara Johnston, Emeree Putich, Edi Darnell, Raechel Schroeder, Georgie Weisner, Amy Hughey, Gabi Deir, Nicole Hamilton, Amber Sternitzke, Hannah Schuler (Bottom: from left to right) Lauren Schuler, Elliott Lentz, Harrison Leahy, Anna Gray Ashton and Derrick Dees

the fresh storyline and 22 songs that together create a highly entertaining one-act performance. The sounds of the ’50s in “Victim of Gravity,” the acoustic resonance in “Noun is a Person, Place or Thing,” or the sweet harmonies of “Figure Eight” are just a few examples of the varied sounds and genres presented in Schoolhouse Rock Live! The show offers something for an audience of all ages. At the helm is director Blake White, who returns to MSYT after previously directing productions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Twelfth Night for Main Street’s Shakespeare in Shelter Cove Park series. Joining White on the production team are Anna Schaffer, music director, Patti Mauer, choreographer, Ben Wolfe, set designer, Terry Cermack, lighting designer and Scott Grooms, sound designer. When asked what the appeal of this show will be to the community, White responded, “Schoolhouse Rock Live is a classic for a good reason. To see the songs that many of us grew up with and the lessons they impart come alive on stage is simply a delight. But the biggest treat is to see these ‘Generation Z’ kids fall in love with music of so many different styles. We are trying to teach/reinforce 48

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the fundamentals though storytelling about grammar, mathematics, a woman’s right to vote, etc. Today’s world is one that can borderline on toxic at times, and it’s always welcome to be reminded of simple foundations that we all received as children.” Are you ready to return to a place where PJs, big bowls of cereal and an old “tube” television come alive again? Grab your friends, children, parents, neighbors and treat yourself to a nostalgic show full of familiar tunes. You will be left with a sense of renewed awareness of the functions of the parts of speech, how a bill becomes a law, the way your blood circulates and so much more. Come along for this journey through a lifetime of Saturday mornings.  Schoolhouse Rock Live! opens Friday, March 20 with a 5:30 p.m. fundraising gala that includes food & drinks followed by the show. Tickets for the gala are $50/adults and $25/students. Shows from Tuesday, March 24-Saturday March 28 are at 7 p.m. Other show dates include 2 p.m. matinees on Saturday, March 21, Sunday, March 22 and Sunday, March 29. Ticket prices are $25/adults and $15/students. For tickets, including group ticket information, call 843-689-MAIN (6246) or www.msyt.org. MARCH 2015


ARTICLE BY ANDREA GANNON

AT THE ARTS CENTER... “Mad About Plaid” Gala & 8-Show Run of Forever Plaid!

I

t’s March Plaidness at the Arts Center, with two chances to get your plaid on in honor of the looming tournament season upon us (and warm weather perhaps?). Once, at the Arts Center’s Spring Gala and again during the exciting production of Forever Plaid. “Mad About Plaid:” The Gala March 28 First, the Arts Center will be draped in plaid, when its Spring Gala – Mad about Plaid – happens Saturday, March 28, beginning at 6:30. You are cordially invited to attend the festivities, which will include delicious heavy hors d’oeuvres and libations at the Cocktail Party sponsored by the Westin Hilton Head Resort and Spa. After that, partygoers adjourn to the theater for an exciting live auction with a few fun surprises in store! At the conclusion of the live auction is the Gala Premiere of the musical Forever Plaid! This will be Opening Night of the eight-show run, and in all our plaid, we will kick off the tournament season in style! Make your plans now for the Mad about Plaid Gala, Saturday, March 28, by calling Lynda Halpern, Patron Event Manager, at (843) 686-3945, x 307 or email her at lhalpern@artshhi.com.

Forever Plaid: The Musical March 29 – April 4 On a stormy night in the 1960s, four eager-to-be-famous singers known as “The Plaids” – Sparky, Jinx, Frankie and Smudge – are killed in a car crash on the way to their first big gig. In the spring of 2015, they get one chance to return from the afterlife and bopshoo-bop their way through classic hits that pay an affectionate homage to the close-harmony male singing groups of the 1950s, and fulfill their dreams by performing the show that never was.


Written by Stuart Ross, with arrangements by James Raitt, Forever Plaid will be directed and choreographed by Mark Martino, new to the Arts Center, but not new to the show. Mark said, “the show is very close to my heart as I was a part of the show when it was originally created, and have had a long and happy history with “Plaidland” ever since! “In fact, I can’t wait to share the joy that is Forever Plaid with the Hilton Head audiences. The story of these four lovable characters as they get a once in a lifetime chance to do the show of their dreams is filled with lots of laughs, a couple of tears, and some of the most beautiful songs from the golden era of male quartets (the late 1950’s and early 1960’s) ever written. When the Plaids launch into the soaring harmonies of “Three coins in the fountain,” “No not much”, “Shangri-la” and “Love is a Many Splendored thing” the Arts Center audiences will find themselves transported to those days when The Four Freshman, The Platters, The Four Lads, Bobby Darin, Tennessee Ernie Ford, and Perry Como ruled the radio with their smooth vocals and thrilling harmonies. “We’ve assembled an amazing cast of singing actors who will take us on a journey to 1964 that will tickle our funny bones, tug at our heart strings, and amaze us with their vocals. I know it’s a show that will resonate in Hilton Head Island...and I’m so looking forward to bringing it to this beautiful theatre.” You’ll love the music … you’ll love the story! Don’t miss this fabulous Arts Center production and limited-run theater bonus. Tickets are on sale now and are $41/adult and $29/child. To purchase, visit online www.artshhi.com or call (843) 842-ARTS (2787). 


he annual Hilton Head Island Seafood Fest is back and better than ever. A full week of culinary, educational, and outdoor events will begin March 1 this year, kicking off the festival season. This year’s festival promises to the best yet, anchored by a festival headlining performance by local funk musician Zach Deputy. The Headliners and DeasGuyz will round out an all-star lineup on Saturday, March 7. But it is the weeklong list of events that has locals reeling. There is literally something for everyone (who likes seafood). Lucky Rooster and Michael Anthony’s are bringing local seafood to the next level with guest chefs, farm-to-table oysters, and wines to match. Local watermen are teaching locals and visitors how to forage for fresh local seafood (and then how to eat it!). The Coastal Discovery Museum is dishing out pearls of wisdom on local seafood in restaurants. The week starts at Hudson’s for a Fish Fry and Oyster Roast with Cranford Hollow. Festival organizer, Andrew Carmines, promises that the oysters will be harvested on the day of the event. The Hilton Head Island Seafood Fest, hosted by

the David M. Carmines Memorial Foundation and presented by Hilton Head Monthly and forkandfun.com, has become a favorite for locals and visitors in recent years with proceeds that benefit MD Anderson Cancer Research Center, The Island Recreation Scholarship Fund and the American Cancer Society. What better way to fight cancer than to enjoy local seafood all week? We agree. See below for full event details. Sunday, March 1, 3-7 p.m. Kickoff Fish Fry and Oyster Roast Those looking to broaden their seafood horizon will be rewarded with plenty of options starting with a Kickoff Fish Fry and Oyster Roast at Hudson’s Seafood House on the Docks. Live music from local band Cranford Hollow, fried fish, fire pit, fun and games and a River Dog Brewing Co. Tap Takeover...need we say more? Monday, March 2, 6:30 p.m. Cocktail and Appetizer Reception | 7 p.m. Dinner Chef Collaboration Dinner with Clayton Rollison of Lucky Rooster Kitchen + Bar (HHI) and Tyler Lyne of Cloud Catering and Events (NYC) One of the most exclusive local culinary events


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A LARGE CROWD ENJOYS SEAFOOD FEST 2014, WHICH IS HELD YEARLY AT SHELTER COVE COMMUNITY PARK. PRALINES AND CARAMEL-COVERED APPLES ON DISPLAY COURTESY OF THE ISLAND FUDGE SHOPPE SMALL BITES OF SEAFOOD DISHES LINE UP WAITING ON PATRONS TO PURCHASE THE CRAB RACE IS A CROWD FAVORITE, WITH COLORFULLY-PAINTED CRABS VYING FOR FIRST PLACE WHILE CHILDREN CHEER THEM ON. THE ENTERTAINMENT LINE-UP THIS YEAR WILL INCLUDE DEAS-GUYZ, THE HEADLINERS AND ZACH DEPUTY

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MARCH 2015


of the year, this collaboration dinner pairs two renowned chefs to prepare a seven-course feast with unbelievable wine pairings. Monday, March 2 through Friday, March 6, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Lowcountry Seafood Experience on the Water Two of the Lowcountry’s foremost watermen, Christopher and Matthew Shoemaker, will treat lucky islanders to a two-hour excursion, complete with shrimping, oystering, clamming and crabbing. After the work is done, guests will have their catch prepared at Hudson’s and will enjoy the fruits of their labor. Thursday, March 5, 6:30 p.m. Michael Anthony’s Wine Dinner Featuring Shell Ring Oysters Led by Executive Chef Chris Johnson, Michael Anthony’s culinary team offers an exquisite four-course menu of Italian regional delights featuring Shell Ring oysters and paired with featured wines. Friday, March 6, 3-4 p.m. A Fisherman’s Guide to Seafood in our Lowcountry Restaurants David Harter leads an enlightening lecture on the best seafood to order for your palette, your health, and your wallet when dining in our local restaurants and buying fish from distributors. Saturday, March 7, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Hilton Head Island Seafood Fest The week culminates in our headlining event! Held at Shelter Cove Community Park, this family-friendly fete features area restaurants and chefs serving up seafood specialties and other tasty cuisine; Kids Zone; silent auction; crab races; arts and crafts booths, and more! Three amazing bands will keep you entertained and dancing throughout the day: 11 a.m.-1 p.m. -- The Headliners 1:30-3:30 p.m. -- Deas-Guyz 4-7 p.m. -- Zach Deputy

Admission is $6, free for kids under 10. Attendees can purchase food/drink tickets at the entrance and redeem them at the various booths. For ticket prices and more information, contact the Island Recreation Center at (843) 681-7273, or visit hhiseafoodfest.com.


Distinctive

G R A N I T E I

t’s spring. The air is fragrant, the flowers are beautiful and it’s time to move outdoors. Here in the Lowcountry, we are blessed with a climate that allows us to live outdoors practically all year long. Many residents have already discovered how to use stone in creative ways to design outdoor living spaces that are practical, comfortable, elegant and virtually maintenance-free. Natural stone is used in abundance on patios, pool surrounds, fireplaces, cabana baths and most every other alfresco application. Outdoor kitchens and entertainment areas have become increasingly popular. In fact, the outdoor kitchen has moved from luxury concept to mainstream reality. One important reason for this focus on outdoor furnishings is the easy accessibility and affordability of natural stone. Natural stone is durable and virtually indestructible. It’s the perfect material for outdoor applications, because it can withstand almost anything. In addition to requiring virtually no maintenance, stone actually mellows with time and use, providing a rich patina that endures for generations. Visit the ancient cities of Europe and the Mediterranean to quickly see why they first chose this material to build structures.

&

M A R B L E

Practically speaking, natural stone actually camouflages dirt, dust, dander and the variety of small particles that drift around your home. Because no two stone tiles are exactly alike, the eye appreciates the overall composition as an ebb and flow of subtle hues, shade variations and muted color tones. Granite, the granddaddy of natural stone, comes is so many colors and patterns, and has so many varieties from subtle texture to dramatic color movement, that it has become the focal point of outdoor design. The same quality and timeless look that is created inside the home can be created outdoors as well. The options are virtually limitless. The leather finish available for granite has become one of the most popular options for outdoor surfaces. With a rustic look and a finish that hides pollen and causes water to bead, maintaining and cleaning leatherfinished granite on counters, cooking islands and serving bars couldn’t be easier. Travertine is an excellent choice for patios and pool decks, often preferred by architects and interior designers. With a surface that is brushed, the stone feels soft; it is not hot or cold on your feet, and it’s not slippery. Travertine is also a good choice for floors in an outdoor cabana bath. Combined with granite that could

A R T I C L E B Y A N D R E A A N T U N E S M C G I LT O N


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Andrea Antunes McGilton

be finished in different ways for different uses, a stone bath and shower is perfectly suited for outdoor living. Colorful mosaics have existed outside for thousands of years and have a firm place in this ideal outdoor locale. While it might not be possible to clad the entire pool in a beautiful mosaic design, you can create borders, focal points and virtual art installations throughout your outdoor living areas. Using granite, limestone and marble in your outdoor living spaces is also a wise investment. Realtors agree that the use of stone increases the value of your home. It also reduces maintenance costs and offers long-term durability in addition to aesthetic appeal. Once considered, the applications for stone in outdoor living are indeed exciting. Granite tabletops and benches can be custom made, as can seating in and around a pool. Stone wet bars, serving bars, grill islands and cooking islands can add color and practicality. One island homeowner creatively installed a large slab of dramatic swirling granite as the artistic backdrop for the alfresco shower. This spring, think stone, and let your imagination blossom!  Andrea Antunes McGilton is project manager at Distinctive Granite and Marble, the 32-year-old company founded by her father, John Antunes. Distinctive has showrooms in River Walk, Lady’s Island, Pooler (Ga.) and on Hilton Head Island.

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RANDY PHOTOGRAPHY BY CLAYTON GIRARD INTERIOR DESIGN BY KELLEY DESIGNS, INC

JEFFCOAT BUILDERS

202 GOOD HOPE DR.

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or a pair of Chicago transplants, relocating to the Lowcountry did not mean leaving behind the slick style of the Windy City. The experts at Randy Jeffcoat Builders recently constructed a spectacular new abode for this couple in beautiful Berkeley Hall Plantation. Assisted by the creative talents at Kelley Designs, Inc., they combined old world European charm with sleek, modern sophistication. The home is elegant, inviting, and full of little surprises. In the main house, a succession of interestingly shaped rooms and spaces with varying volume ceilings wrap around a central courtyard with a pool, spa, and outdoor fireplace. Bordered on the other side is a casita, housing a guest room, an office, and a large outdoor bar for parties. A butler’s pantry with a barrel-vaulted ceiling links the formal dining room to the spacious gourmet kitchen, which boasts a semi-circular built-in booth. An inviting wine cave, complete with a cork floor, rounds out the entertainment areas of the main house.

METALLIC GLAZED CERAMIC TILES LEND A CONTEMPORARY TOUCH TO THE FIREPLACE, WHILE A CUSTOM MADE ROUND RUG ANCHORS AN INTIMATE SEATING GROUP IN THE LIVING ROOM.


MILK-CHOCOLATE COLORED WALLS ENVELOPE THE MASTER BEDROOM WITH WARMTH, WHILE THE AMBIENT LIGHTING HIGHLIGHTS THE CROWN MOLDING. A LACQUERED BED EVOKES THE ASIAN VIBE. IN THE DINING ROOM A PAIR OF CYLINDRICAL PENDANT LIGHTS CAST A WELCOMING GLOW ON THE CUSTOM TABLE, TOPPED WITH DOLCE VITA GRANITE. A LARGE WALL OF WINDOWS AFFORDS SERENE VIEWS OF THE LAGOON AND GOLF COURSE. IN THE POWDER ROOM AN UP-LIT GLASS COUNTERTOP GLOWS AND ADDS A GLIMMERING SHINE TO THE METALLIC FAUX-FINISHED WALLS. THE WINE CAVE FEATURES CUSTOM-BUILT WINE RACKS, A CORK FLOOR, AND A BUILT-IN TABLE MADE FROM A WINE BARREL.


THE LARGE BUT EFFICIENT KITCHEN MAKES ROOM FOR TWO COOKS TO ENJOY THE SPACE.

ARCHES, CURVES, AND ANGLED VAULTS CONVERGE IN THE FOYER AND LIVING ROOM TO CREATE A DYNAMIC SPACE. THE STAIRWAY LEADS TO A PRIVATE RETREAT FOR READING, WATCHING TELEVISION, OR TAKING IN THE VIEWS FROM THE EXTERIOR BALCONY.


ADJACENT TO THE KITCHEN, A SPACIOUS FAMILY ROOM, WITH DISAPPEARING SLIDING DOORS, CONNECTS THIS PART OF THE HOUSE WITH THE COURTYARD.

DESIGNED FOR ENTERTAINING, THE COURTYARD FEATURES EVERY IMAGINABLE CONVENIENCE INCLUDING POOL, SPA, FIREPLACE, AND A LARGE BAR.


IF WALLS COULD TALK ( They Would Tell Stories )

WHAT MAKES A HOUSE A HOME? Article by Linda S. Hopkins


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local realtor once described his work by saying, “I sell boxes and dirt.” His statement took me aback at the time, because among his listings were many multi-million-dollar mansions and oceanfront lots. But I think I understand now what he meant. After all, a house, no matter how big or fancy—or not—is just a box, grounded in a piece of earth: a structure, a space, a shelter from the elements, and, if we’re lucky, a place to escape the stresses of the day. A house can be bought or sold for a price, but a home is something more precious. A home is a collection of memories and stories which comprise who we are. Growing up in East Point, Georgia, home was a tiny brick house, wedged between Highway 166, the lumber yard and the government housing project. The smell of creosote and fuel exhaust mingled with the sounds of 18-wheelers roaring by, emergency sirens wailing and freight trains blasting their horns as they clicked and clacked along the track that ran through the middle of town. Our family of four shared one small bathroom with the bare essentials: toilet, sink, tub/shower, complete with pink plastic shower curtain. Our living room was unfurnished, aside from an old upright, out-of-tune piano. We had to close that room off at night, because there were no curtains on the window. Bare windows were not en vogue in East Point, but considering our “view,” which consisted of telephone poles, power lines, street lights and the highway, the main concern was not what we were missing, but what strangers might see from the street. The “dining room” was not a room, but a Formica-topped table in the space between the kitchen and the pinepaneled den where I watched Popeye and Gilligan’s Island on a portable black and white Zenith with tin-foil topped rabbit ears. On the wall opposite the television, a cheap window-mounted air conditioner thundered, threatening to fall out into the backyard below. We had no garage, but we did have a carport, which doubled as a skating rink when the car was in use. Landscaping was some patchy grass mingled with assorted weeds where I hunted four-leaf clovers, made wishes on dandelions and ran through the sprinkler in the summer. Life in that house was not without drama. If the walls could talk, they would reveal all manner of secrets, best reserved for a therapist’s office or a trusted friend’s ear. They would tell of a chain-smoking, mentally ill, unemployable father, a working mother struggling to make ends meet and two frightened, confused children. They might also whisper of the day Daddy died at age 42, of Mama’s heartache and subsequent heart attack, of teenage rebellion, raised voices and slammed doors. But those walls would also cheer us on. They would remember the rocking chair where Mama sang me to sleep, PB&J sandwiches on white bread in a sack, heated games of Parcheesi and Go Fish, hot chocolate on a winter’s night, newborn kittens in the closet, a Barbie Dreamhouse, a shiny new bike, a first kiss at the front door and a heart full of hope as a young woman of 17 packed up for college. Since leaving East Point, I have lived in dormitories, apartments, a duplex, a house and a townhouse, each with varying degrees of space, comforts and amenities, and all with specific sets of memories and stories. When I got married at the ripe age of 19 and divorced at the more mature age of 21, I remember calling Mama to break the news. Expecting a lecture and a lot of “I told you so’s,” this is what she said: “Come on home, baby.” That night, I left the house that was no longer home and drove to East Point. Never was I so glad to sleep in my lumpy old bed with the faint odor of creosote creeping through the window screen and the sound of freight trains rumbling through my dreams. When my mother died suddenly at age 57, my brother and I were surprised to find out that, in addition to providing our basic needs, she had somehow accumulated a small nest egg, presumably for her old age. Turns out that she could have afforded draperies, a new sofa or a nicer house, but she chose to forego those luxuries, gambling on a more secure future. After the sale of the house in East Point, in honor of my mother’s sacrifices, I decided to spend part of my inheritance improving my own living space. I had dreamed my whole life of an antebellum mansion with white columns, a spiral staircase and draperies that could, in case of emergency, be made into a fancy dress. At the time, however, home was a two-bedroom Newport villa at Shelter Cove, and I was about to have custom-made window treatments that Scarlett O’Hara would have been proud to wear. Twenty-five years later, when I put that villa up for sale, it broke my heart to remove the silky blue panels and swags, but that’s what my realtor advised—“to maximize the view.” Since my coveted draperies were too old and faded to sew together as a ball gown, I gave my husband permission to discard them. Letting go of those bits of fabric not only opened up the view, but opened my wound for a fresh round of grief, as if recycling a piece of my heart. The villa eventually sold, which brought with it another kind of sadness—a final farewell to a place that I had called home. But I came to realize that what I sold was really just a box and some dirt. The memories had long since moved on. Today, home is a wood and stucco house with twice as many toilets as people, appropriate window treatments for privacy and décor, central heating and air, a two-car garage and a golf course view—by far the nicest house I have ever called home. My husband Tom and I have completed some remodeling over the past 10 years and plan to do more this year. It’s wonderful to select pleasing paint colors, new floors, comfortable furnishings and stylish accessories; and while those personal touches can make the space more “homey,” what matters more is the overall feeling the house evokes. What makes this house a home is our presence and the peacefulness we feel within these walls. This is where old memories now reside and new ones are in the making. If the walls could talk, they would tell stories.


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BUILDER: BRIGHTON BUILDERS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY: Matthew Emmer


SOPHISTICATED

C

oastal living offers a multitude of inviting lifestyle possibilities. Open floor plans and relaxing outdoor retreats are among the intriguing attractions of a Lowcountry home. Imagine being able to entertain in an intimate area that invites friends to gather by a fireplace and enjoy the spaciousness of dining adjacent to an open chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen. The expansive windows and trim detail, create the ideal environment to show off the Southern charm of every home. A gracious outdoor space provides versatility for extending the living area while experiencing the lowcountry at its finest. Whether you are following the sea gulls over the water, watching golfers on a fairway or looking up at the stars from a cozy backyard patio, no view from a Brighton Builders home is to be missed.


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The floor-to-ceiling windows and doors allow for natural sunlight to expose the hardwood floors and custom crafted built-ins. Relaxing in this room is easy.

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an elegant chandelier, this formal dining room is spacious enough for a quiet dinner for two or for entertaining family and friends.

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With a back patio fireplace made of stone, the homeowners are sure to stay nice and cozy all winter long while enjoying time with family and friends.

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A custom designed bar tucks nicely between the kitchen and living spaces.


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Holding 524 bottles of wine from top to bottom, this wine room is composed of custom racks made from premium redwood.

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This outdoor kitchen boasts beautifully stained custom cabinets with granite countertops. A high-end grill with stainless steel hood and back splash complement the outdoor amenity.

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A chandelier and eight-foot custom wainscoting accentuate this powder room your guests are sure to love.

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When walking through the elegant foyer, you immediately enter the spacious great room that opens into the formal dining room.


W A RUG IS PLACED INTO THE CENTRIFUGE AND THE FORCE WITH WHICH IT TURNS SPINS MOST OF THE WATER OUT QUICKLY.


lowcountry

CLEAN CARE ARTICLE BY PAUL DEVERE PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT

he beautiful Oriental rug you inherited from your grandparents graces the spacious entryway of your home. You have just returned from the Hilton Head Humane Association’s shelter with Rex, the cute Boxer-Golden Retriever-Beagle mix puppy you and the kids picked out. You are excited. The kids are excited. Unfortunately, so is Rex… on the rug. There is a solution. Authentic Oriental rugs can be the height of craftsmanship. Many consider them works of art. Count Gerald and Kim Brant in that camp. Their company is also the solution to young Rex’s unfortunate “accident” on the family heirloom. Lowcountry Clean Care will wash Rex right out of your precious rug. Yes, wash. With extreme care, the Lowcountry Clean Care crew vacuum and blow out all the loose dirt in these valuable rugs, wash them in a large tub, then ring them out in a special centrifuge and hang them up to dry. The main ingredient used to clean the rug is filtered rain water. “Rain water is softer than tap water and gentler on the rugs,” Gerald Brant explained, referring to the pH of the water. Rain water is close to seven, the perfect balance between an acidic and alkaline solution. Brant collects the water that runs off the roof of his plant in Hampton, South Carolina into large containers. It is then piped back into the plant.


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ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND

Rugs are washed using twice-filtered rainwater collected in three giant containers. They have the capacity to store up to 9,000 gallons of rainwater at any given time.

The Brants started cleaning things up in 1979 with a carpet cleaning business. Over the years, they became certified in a long list of services, from water and smoke damage restoration to general and contract cleaning and, pretty much everything in between. But in 2011, on one of the many trips Gerald took to gain more training, experience and certification for the company’s growing customer base, he discovered a new service: cleaning and washing Oriental rugs, a highly specialized service.

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FINAL STEP

Rugs are hung to dry and then delivered to the customer.

“Over the years I learned how to clean just about anything,” Gerald Brant said in the reception area of his new plant. He took extensive courses from experts and learned how to clean a wide variety of textiles. A few years ago, he was able to save some very delicate antique baby clothes that suffered smoke damage in a fire. “They weren’t something you’d send to the dry cleaners,” he said. But Oriental rugs really caught Brant’s fancy and he made a considerable investment in his small plant in 2011 to enter this specialty field. He went to school, becoming a member of


lowcountry

CLEAN CARE

W Gerald Brant describes the cleaning process to CH2 writer Paul deVere. The team traveled to Hampton in February to watch Gerald and his crew in action.

the Association of Rug Care Specialists (ARCS) and getting certified as a Master Rug Cleaner. “You train for a week and when you come back you take a picture of every rug that comes in. You try to identify it, where it was made, just by its construction, then send your evaluation in,” Brant explained. “They review everything, tell you if you are right or wrong and help you. Identifying the rug gives you a clue about how you’re going to clean it.” Brant said the term “Oriental” paints a big swath. “These rugs are woven in China, India, Tibet, Iran, Egypt. I picked up a tribal rug in Bluffton recently. It was very simple, maybe eight feet long and made up of variegated oranges,” Brant said. “There were no designs on it, just about six people. It was a real simple rug, a nomadic rug, so it was wool on wool. It was very pretty.” Authentic Oriental rugs are hand woven. They are usually made with a combination of cotton (the warp and weft or foundation) and wool, which is tied in individual knots to create the pile, which is what we walk on. An Oriental rug can have anywhere from 16 to 800 knots per square inch. Brant’s “wool on wool” reference was to the warp and weft and the pile. Tribal rugs are usually all wool. “The people making tribal rugs don’t usually have access to cotton, but they have wool and use it for all parts of the rug,” he said. If there is a worn spot or fraying at the fringe or a tear or, as Brant said, “a dog bite,” in an Oriental rug, he has an associate in Denver, Colorado who can fix anything. “Of course that can be costly, but the rug could be a family heirloom and important.” Oriental rugs of any size can cost thousands of dollars, and it is not unusual for one to be a part of someone’s will. Brant said an Oriental rug “is just getting broken in at 50 years. They can easily last a couple hundred years if they’re taken care of.” Which is what his business is all about. Brant knows about the natural dyes, the hand-spun wool, the city looms and the nomads who must tie fewer knots because they, and their looms, are always on the move. And it is he and his crew who can make it possible that your family’s heirloom Oriental rug can again grace your floor without any traces of young Rex. Continued on the next page...


THE CLEANING PROCESS

1. Dirt is blown out of the rug then flipped and blown again.

2. Rugs are then vacuumed two to three times on each side.

3. Some rugs with especially tough stains are put into a large washtub.

4. Rugs are then sprayed with water to rinse away any remaining residue.

5. The next step is rolling them up for the centrifuge.

6. Rugs are placed in this giant tube that spins so fast water is sucked out quickly.

7. A special rake is used to comb the fibers.

8. The rug is hung to dry with large fans circulating air nearby.

To have Lowcountry Clean Care pick up your rugs, call 803.943.4416 or visit yourcleancare.com for more information.


JACOBY & SONS C U STO M H O M E B U I L D E R S

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ne of the undisputed founding fathers of Hilton Head Island real estate, Tom Jacoby and his wife Sue, of Jacoby & Sons Custom Home Builders, moved to the island when the closest grocery was in Savannah, and it was out of the ordinary to see more than two other cars on the road trip there and back. Starting his real estate career with Sea Pines in 1971, Jacoby has since built more than 1,300 homes, likely twice the number of any other area builder. As a founding partner of Lighthouse Realty, Jacoby has had a pulse on island housing for over 40 years. Few local business owners understand the nuances of responsible development and the unique nature of Hilton Head Island better than Jacoby. After setting down solid footings in the island real estate market, Jacoby saw a need for a general contracting company that could offer a high level of control over the subcontractors on any project, and a skilled eye for architecture, knowing what works best in the journey from drawings and plans to a finished home. “I consider myself an expert in architecture. I can look at a plan and tell the customer what works and what doesn’t work, what should be altered to best suit their needs. It’s invaluable,” Jacoby said. “Further, our responsibility to our customers is to hire good subcontractors, supervise the work, and conservatively manage the budget,” Jacoby continued. “We have it down to a science. A home is the biggest investment of most people’s lives. It’s important to know who is doing the work and who is supervising the work.” The Jacoby & Sons building experience is first class from start to finish, and a big part of that is because this is a family business. Tom, Sue, their son Bubba and his wife Nicki are the owners of the company and personally guide the individual projects.

“Bubba learned construction the right way,” Jacoby said. “He worked out in the field for many years, learning each trade first-hand; he framed, trimmed, painted did complete renovation work, and electrical work among other things. So we have someone out in the field who actually knows how to do those things and get them done correctly.” Once a contract is acquired, Sue and Nicki personally take the homeowners to all of the suppliers; they pick out cabinets, granite, lighting, flooring, and plumbing fixtures, just to name a few. “We set up the meetings, go with them to every appointment, offer our expertise to find the perfect fit; what’s in and what’s not in, and find the best value,” Jacoby said. “There is absolutely no place like Hilton Head,” Jacoby added. He should know, because after reaching a level of success that enticed him to seek out another “Hilton Head” where he could again plant some footings, he spent six months looking—from California, to the desert of Arizona, to Florida, and North Carolina to ply his trade. What he found was that Hilton Head was the only place he wanted to be. “There’s no better place in the world to raise a family than the Lowcountry. We have this amazing opportunity to build homes for new families, as well as couples beginning to enjoy their next chapter in paradise. The diverse experience of our team allows us to relate to our clients because we truly understand how important of an investment your home is,” Jacoby said. If you are ready to build a home that will inspire for generations, call Jacoby & Sons, because quality never goes out of style. For more information about building your next home, call 843.681.8799 or visit online at jacobynsons.com.


STYLE

hen Nathan Cameron (of Cameron & Cameron Custom Homes) purchased a lot in Palmetto Bluff on which to build his personal home, he knew he needed the best architecture and design team at his fingertips. Cameron has a longstanding relationship with William Court and James Atkins (of Court Atkins Architects), so Court and his design director, Amanda Lamb, were never far away in the key architectural design stages of his home. Soon after the floor plans and structural designs were completed, it was imperative that the perfect interior design firm was added to the team. Cameron approached Kelley McRorie and Anna Gustafson of KS McRorie Interior Design about designing his new home in Palmetto Bluff; the designers jumped on board, and a very rewarding collaboration began. “Working with Nathan was so great” McRorie said. “He really let us run with our ideas for the house and took some major leaps of faith with some of our bolder design ideas.”

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COMFORT

Builder: Cameron and Cameron Custom Homes Interior Designer: KS McRorie Interior Design

Architecture by: Court Atkins Architects

Cabintry by: Palmetto Cabinet Studio Photography by: Josh Gibson


The house retains a traditional feel in keeping with a Lowcountry river house, but modern elements give the design of the home a fresh edge. Black stained oak floors with a dry, brushed finish anchor the interiors, which are masculine but accented with warm tones of ochre, smoke and the glint of antique brass, which is used throughout the home in plumbing, hardware, and lighting fixtures. Rather than creating variety in the interiors with colors, KSMID opted to create interest with texture and patterns, using grass cloth and suede wallcoverings, antique mirrors, hand painted tiles, wool and silk rugs, and graphic slabs of stone. Classic brick walls, butt board and tabby stucco intersect with steel and glass walls, contemporary art, and modern light fixtures, creating the perfect balance for this updated Southern river retreat. It was only through the collaboration of the talented designers, architects, builder and craftsman that such an inspiring and beautiful home came to fruition.

The powder room flooring is a hand painted terracotta tile from Tabarka Studios, a favorite of KSMID, adding color and pattern to the space. The custom vanity is made of reclaimed white oak.

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The master bedroom walls are covered in a mink colored grass cloth from Phillip Jeffries, imparting the walls with depth and adding texture to the room. The bed, by Lillian August, is a modern spin on a traditional four-poster frame. The patina of the leather benches contrasts beautifully with the jute and wool rug, another play on texture, which is a signature element in the house.

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The graphic slab of exotic stone was found early in the design process and dictated the design of the rest of the bathroom, separating the bathtub from the large walk-in shower with heated floors. According to KSMID, the graphic pattern of the stone reminded them of a piece of contemporary art. “We couldn’t imagine cutting it up as countertops, and we knew we needed to use it in a way that would showcase the entire slab.”

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The master hall separates the bedroom from the bath in the master suite. KSMID chose to change the floor layout in this area to a chevron pattern, giving the transition area its own special design element.

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The custom iron and glass wall is a true piece of art, fabricated to precisely fit the space. Originally intended as a large open hallway between the living room and master suite, KSMID encouraged Cameron to utilize the space as a study and designed the glass wall, which creates the office space Cameron needed but leaves the passageway feeling dramatic yet open.

The guest bedroom features suspended platform beds as well as a built-in twin size window seat, great for Cameron’s two boys and friends’ sleepovers. The jute rope used for the beds was sourced from a nautical supply house. The owners’ entry, connecting the garage and guest quarters to the main house, incorporates a multicolored cobblestone by Francois and Co. found by the designers on a sourcing trip to Atlanta. The dramatically scaled light fixtures create a grand sense of entry and are beautifully viewed from the exterior as well through the floor-to-ceiling windows.

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The kitchen was designed with custom cabinets by Palmetto Cabinet Studio with a furniture quality finish. All of the appliances are paneled and hidden from view, enabling the kitchen to feel like an extension of the adjacent living room. The cast stone hood with zinc banding is from Francois and Co. The brass farm sink and faucet were ordered from Italy. The butler’s pantry has many custom elements. The marble topped butcher block sideboard was also sourced early in the project, and the cabinets were built around the piece. KSMID designed the custom Dutch door with entertaining in mind. The bottom portion of the door can remain closed and has a shelf for serving. A great function for parties, it keeps guests separated from the work area, but leaves the space open to the adjacent wet bar area.

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The guest quarters incorporates a comfortable living area, featuring floor-toceiling butt board walls, also seen in many other areas of the home.

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The kitchen in the guest quarters was designed to allow guests their own dining area with a pub table nestled into a corner.

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TRANSFORMING EVERYDAY

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Home Oasis ARTICLE BY LAURA R. WILSON

ave you ever visited someone’s home and been completely in awe of their beautiful gardens, outside sitting areas, landscaping? Did you think to yourself, “I wish my home could look like this.”? Make your wishes come true with a bit of planning, guidance and vision. What a difference a beautifully landscaped area makes. It shows warmth, hospitality and pride in one’s home. We update our houses with new fixtures, countertops and furniture, yet often neglect updating our 20-year-old outside décor—shrubs, trees and plantings. What a statement it makes to have someone visit and to be greeted by lovely landscapes and enjoy a dinner on the deck with vibrant and eye-catching surroundings. Just think of the extended square footage of an outside dining area or living room when it comes to transforming everyday space to a home oasis. Achieving “the look” is a process, according to Hilton Head Island resident, Tim Drake, as evidenced by his own home’s transformation. “Anyone can plant a 15-gallon tree,” Drake said. However, all of the plants showcasing his beautiful outdoor living space were first containerized. As a landscape professional Drake has a leg up, but he also has a passion for plants. He says that anyone, yes anyone, can enhance their outdoor area. There are several types of gardeners. Some truly have a green thumb and love working with plants, digging in the dirt, and spending their free time pruning and maintaining their botanical surroundings. Others may need just a bit of help getting started and seek the expertise and guidance of a professional to make a plan; from there, they have it covered. Then there are those who know nothing of outdoor planting, yet love

the serenity of looking outside and seeing...beauty. We all stand at a kitchen sink, often mindlessly washing dishes, and what do we see before us? Breathtaking, vibrant, luscious landscaping, or old, deer-damaged beds and dated Saw Palms. To achieve the goal of updating or revitalizing a property, several questions should be considered: Is the desire to have more livable outdoor space? To have more privacy? Do you want an area where children or grandchildren can play or where pets can romp? Or are you looking to enjoy some personal space after a long day—a tranquil evening outdoors with good music and a glass of wine? Once what is desired is determined, an important first is laying good “bones” so that your garden still looks great in months where perennial material is dormant. Here are a few of Drake’s tips to achieve your oasis: • Don’t be afraid to experiment. Try one or two plant materials in different areas in the yard to see how they do. If they thrive, you can always get more. • Consider alternatives in areas where grass is difficult to grow. Shade-tolerant plant materials such as ferns, ivy, liriope will consistently look better than patchy turf. • Take advantage of our hardiness zone, using cold-tolerant palms, gingers, philodendrons and elephant ears that cannot be grown further north to add texture to your beds. • Use flowering understory trees, if possible, to add color and interest to large areas of the property that may lack their mid-level foliage, helping to soften the height of the large canopy trees. • Take what is existing and work in to your plan. Renewal pruning is a great plus! Take for example a


BEFORE AFTER 30-year-old Ligustrum which can grow to a height of 30 feet. Cutting back plants to 18 or 24 inches in late winter when the energy is in the root system allows a plant to have the energy to flush out vigorously within weeks. • Mow down old perennials to add compost and give the soil and plant area its own shredded leaves as fertilizer. • Add color with seasonal pots and/or variegated plants. For areas that are subject to damage by deer, the Foxtail Fern is shade-tolerant and sun-tolerant and brings vibrant variations of greens to the beds. Clerodendrum is a great shade shrub that deer won’t eat. • Add and subtract: Put in what you like and see if it works, because you can always subtract. Layering textures, height variations and variations of color

MARCH 2015

BEFORE AFTER are all a part of the canvass being created in a yard. When we update or renew our landscapes, we are essentially creating a work of art to be viewed and enjoyed—art that is pleasing to the eye and brings a smile to the heart. Ready to get started? Still have some questions? Reservations? Feel your task at hand is a bit daunting? Just as it is suggested to consult a doctor before starting a new exercise program, consider consulting a professional. A professional landscape company or a landscape architect can help with the master plan and identify appropriate plant materials to make that, “I wish my home could look like that” wish come true.  Tim Drake is a business developer and landscape enhancement designer for The Greenery, Inc. For more information or a landscape consultation, contact Drake at (843) 384-5963.

www.celebratehiltonhead.com 101


ARTICLE BY LAURA JACOBI

BRINGING THE

OUTDOORS

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MAY RIVER CUSTOM HOMES

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s the weather gets warmer, our natural inclination is to get outdoors, feel the sun on our face and enjoy the beauty of the Lowcountry. That’s why outdoor living is a cornerstone of Southern culture. Imagine spacious wrap-around porches dotted with rocking chairs and glasses of sweet tea. According to Jenny Nelson of May River Custom Homes, an outdoor living space not only provides you and your family a unique place to unwind or entertain, but also adds value to your home. “Whether starting from scratch or planning an addition, the simple inclusion of an outdoor feature can change the way you live your life,” Nelson said. You may suddenly find yourself living more of life outdoors. May River Custom Homes is a familyowned, custom home builder based in Bluffton. The Nelsons (Jay and Jenny) and their talented team of craftsmen and project managers have years of experience designing, building and renovating custom homes that provide the legendary comfort and style the Lowcountry is known for. Nelson was able to turn her passion for design into a career, studying at the Savannah College of Art and Design, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in interior design. She says that outdoor living spaces are essential when building in the Lowcountry.


BRINGING THE

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MAY RIVER CUSTOM HOMES

MARCH 2015

No matter what choices you make for your outdoor living space, make sure it incorporates personal style, comfort and function so it can be enjoyed for seasons to come. As fire pits have become increasingly popular in backyards, fireplaces are becoming common place in screened porches.

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“These spaces allow you more opportunities to enjoy the Lowcountry’s breathtaking views, breezes and year-round pleasant climate with the entire family.” Nelson gives these tips and suggestions when designing an outdoor living space: Before planning your outdoor space, think carefully about your home from a design perspective. Does your home have a particular architectural style or color scheme? What style do you want to use? Lowcountry or European? Do you want to incorporate stone or a rustic feel? You may want to use the same or complementary style in your new outdoor living space. This will make your outdoor area feel like a true extension of your home’s interior. It’s also vital to consider the function of the space. Do you want an additional entertaining space, family room, dining area or kitchen? Are you thinking about a sunroom, screened porch or covered porch?

www.celebratehiltonhead.com 105


BRINGING THE

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Nelson suggests looking online and through magazines to get ideas. Find inspiration and write it down. Accumulate pictures from various sources and make a list of what appeals to you. Screened porches are a top priority for many in this area, because they can be utilized year-round. “We haven’t built a home without a screened porch,” Nelson said. Some homes will have multiple screened porches— off the master bedroom and living room, or upstairs overlooking a golf course or marsh. The Nelsons built their own home in Oldfield and included a large screened porch as well as an adjacent covered porch for “when you want to be in the open air,” she said. The builder’s recently completed spec home in Berkeley Hall includes a gazeboshaped screened porch off the back of the house. This unusual shape provides a larger, unobstructed marsh view in the backyard.

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Screened porches are a top priority for many in this area, because they can be utilized yearround. Some homes will have multiple screened porches—off the master bedroom and living room, or upstairs overlooking a golf course or marsh.

MARCH 2015


BRINGING THE

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The materials used and features included help make this space feel like your own, Nelson said. But she advises homeowners to be practical when choosing materials, furniture and fixtures to ensure they not only provide the right ambiance, but can stand up to the elements. For example, she suggests using porcelain tile for the flooring because it’s smooth to the touch and easy to maintain and keep clean. Another popular feature for slab porches is tabby, which is shellembedded concrete. As fire pits have become increasingly popular in backyards, fireplaces are becoming common place in screened porches. “The climate here allows you to sit by a fire so often, and fireplaces make the space feel a little more intimate,” Nelson said. Lighting options can also add ambiance to the outdoor living space. She suggests hanging bistrostyle string lights from the ceiling to create a cozy and enchanting mood. Potted plants and flowers also add an element of vitality to the space. Cushioned furniture brings the comfort of home outside, and pillows and throws are an inviting accent. You can also add an outdoor rug to help ground the room and create a cozy sitting and living space outdoors. Because more and more homeowners are entertaining in their outdoor space, the flat-screen TV has also become a popular focal point. Thankfully, there are screen covers to provide some level of protection from the elements. On the practical side, be sure the outdoor space has wet-rated outlets, she said. There are even wetrated ceiling fans, which can be hosed down for easy cleaning. No matter what choices you make for your outdoor living space, make sure it incorporates personal style, comfort and function so it can be enjoyed for seasons to come.  108

www.celebratehiltonhead.com

MARCH 2015


ream big. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what we are taught since infancy. Be a big boy or be a big girl; be a big success, buy a big house, and then buy a bigger house later. The American dream is a big one, and downsizing is an idea that is not generally received as a positive one. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just not normal in our culture to say that smaller is better. But there is a new wave of abnormal people that appear to be awakening from the big American dream and stepping into a smaller reality where they believe big things come in small packages. If you pay much attention to trends, you may have noticed stories of people happily giving up bigger homes for smaller onesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;much, much smaller to be more accurate. Images of tiny homes, measuring


250 square feet or so, are going viral on the Internet with millions of people sharing their big fascination with small homes on social media sites, such as Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. So who are the abnormal people who are buying tiny houses lately? How will they entertain guests? Why would they knowingly decrease resale value and ignore the two-and a-halfbath rule? Where will they put the 52-inch flat screen TV? How can the ladies live without extra closet space for their clothes and shoes? How can the guys give up their man caves? They might reply to those questions with these three words: Less is more. The idea of having smaller homes and less stuff is captured in the modern minimalist lifestyle movement. Minimalists believe that reducing one’s material possessions to the bare minimum translates into more freedom—freedom from more maintenance and cleaning, freedom from worry, freedom from being overwhelmed, freedom from guilt and freedom from the trappings of the consumer culture we’ve built our lives around. That doesn’t mean there’s anything inherently wrong with owning material possessions or living in a large home. Big houses are sexy. But little houses are romantic. A song performed by the 1990s country music artist, Doug Stone, captures this romance: “Love grows best in little houses, with fewer walls to separate, where you eat and sleep so close together, you can’t help but communicate. Oh, and if we had more walls between us, think of all we’d miss. Love grows best in little houses just like this.” If you’re not a little-house person, just join in the fascination for a moment: You could wake up in the morning and be in the kitchen after taking just a few steps; with less space, there’s less money spent filling it with things that you’ll just sell at a yard sale five years later; with your extra financial savings, you can spend more on other priorities; there’s more reason to step out of the house and enjoy the fresh air and the expansive universe of nature outside of your home; time spent cleaning the house will be measured in minutes, not hours; and if you ever move, you won’t spend weeks packing, while cursing the stuff you used one time and forgot about in the cabinet space you didn’t need. Sounds liberating, doesn’t it? If your fascination with little houses is growing, you’re not alone. The stories of people making the jump from big to small are spreading like wildfire for a reason. We see the little houses and fantasize about shedding the weight of the big furniture and the big utility bills. We dream about the simplicity and practicality of the homes we grew up in and the ones our parents or grandparents owned 50 or 60 years ago. According to the National Association of Home Builders, the average size of a new single-family American residence in 1950 was 983 square feet. By the 2010s, home sizes grew to nearly 2500 square feet. Ironically, as home sizes ballooned over that time, the average family size shrank. And to make the bigger houses more affordable, we built them on smaller lots. So what’s the reason for more house space? Oh yeah, it’s to accommodate our big dreams! But now we need more rooms to hold all the stuff we’ve accumulated. However, having more than two times the square footage of the typical home in the 1950s has not translated into double the happiness since then. Key findings of happiness studies reveal that the percentage of Americans describing themselves as either “very happy” or “pretty happy” has remained virtually constant, having peaked in the 1950s. How many kids today can build a tree house or play kick the can in the backyard? And how can more rooms equate to anything but more separation? If the progression (or perhaps digression may be a more fitting word) continues, the entire world that we know will be made of painted drywall, fabricated wood, and granite counter tops. It will be a rare exception, rather


than the rule, to at least have a window with a view of something outside other than the neighbor’s big house on a small lot. Perhaps the moral to the story here is that it is an illusion that bigger is better and that more things bring more happiness. Yes, two sinks can make for a happier marriage and people need their own space to a certain degree. But how much space is too much? At what point does more turn into less? Or the better question is this: How much is enough? Humans are not “bad” or “wrong” for wanting bigger things. It is natural for happiness to stretch into something more tomorrow than it was yesterday. But the more happiness stretches, the more difficult the larger spaces of happiness are to acquire and fill. This brings to mind a quote from the ancient Greek philosopher, Epicurus: “If thou wilt make a man happy, add not unto his riches but take away from his desires.” Epicurus lived 2500 years ago, if that tells you anything about what we’ve learned as humans since then. But all hope is not lost, dear reader. Human nature is such that we often need to experience things for ourselves before we learn if they are good for us or not. Perhaps that explains our growing fascination with shrinking home sizes, and maybe we have begun to bring back the virtue and values of simplicity, contentment and practicality to our lives. We are at least seeing more and more that big dreams can be accomplished with little homes. Here’s to having more with less… Kent Thune lives on Hilton Head Island with his wife and two young boys and he shares his philosophies of simplicity and contentment with his investment advisory clients at his firm, Atlantic Capital Investments.


ARTICLE BY KENT THUNE

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN MCMANUS

WILLIAM BYRD CUSTOM HOMEBUILDERS

fixture of the Lowcountry’s construction industry for more than 30 years, Byrd knows well the demands and requirements of coastal housing. But he also embraces the challenge. What’s changed most since he started building custom homes on Hilton Head Island? “The hurricane building codes,” says Byrd. But he’s not complaining because his policy of perfection aligns with the highest of standards, which is one of the many things that make William Byrd a go-to builder in the area. He adds with a chuckle, “50 years from now, if a builder begins a renovation on one of my constructions, they’ll probably say, ‘Oh no, not another William Byrd home’, because they’ll have a tough time tearing it down!” But when asked if custom building is an art or a science, Byrd does not hesitate to say, “Oh it’s definitely an art.” He fondly recalls a story that began with a casual dinner with friends, where the conversation led to Byrd’s love of finding and using unique materials, like old wood, glass and tin roofs. One of the friends mentioned that they knew someone in Roanoke that had recently torn down an old dilapidated barn. Byrd instantly perked up and replied with five words: “Do you have his number?” After calling the owner of the old barn in Virginia, Byrd made a reasonable offer for the wood, plus a bonus to bring it down to Hilton Head Island. The barn owner was happy because he was just going to throw away the wood anyway. “When I saw the wood, I discovered it was Wormy Chestnut,” says Byrd, with the excitement of a child who just found out he was going to Walt Disney World. What’s this tree with the funny name? It’s not a distinct species of tree, but rather refers to American Chestnut trees that were killed by the chestnut blight of the early 1900s, and were subsequently damaged by worms and insects, leaving holes and discoloration in the standing trees. The trees were then harvested and converted into lumber. Between the worm damage, discoloration, nail holes and several decades of aging, you end up with the rare and rustic appearance of Wormy Chestnut. And that’s just one example of how custom home builders like William Byrd, who has an artist’s flair and a perfectionist’s precision, are able to transform clients’ dreams into reality. If they want their kitchen cabinets from France and their bathroom tile from Italy, it can be done. And that’s not to mention Byrd’s constant supply of trash turned into treasure! Best of all, Byrd says that the combination of low lot prices and cheap borrowing costs makes now one of the best times in history to build on Hilton Head Island and adds “I wouldn’t be surprised to see values climbing at 15-20%.” And if Byrd has anything to do with it, his custom homes and renovations will play a big role in the growing property values all around the Lowcountry for years to come.

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Article by Laura Jacobi

Say Hello To The

FUTURE KIRK’S BLUFF

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new townhome development near Old Town Bluffton is drawing from the historic roots and urban feel of the area. Kirk’s Bluff, named after Bluffton’s co-founder James B. Kirk, will include 36 townhomes within walking distance to Bluffton’s Promenade and eclectic Calhoun Street. This “pocketneighborhood” is located at the corner of Goethe Road and Hildebrand Street. Developer Jim Moore has built townhomes like these all around the Southeast including Tennessee, Georgia and several towns in North Carolina. This parcel of land across from the Greater Bluffton Chamber of Commerce was the ideal location for one of his projects. “We had the perfect location and the infrastructure was already in place,” Moore said. According to Moore, most of his townhome developments are “designed to fit well in markets with historical roots and cultural appeal.” And as a Hilton Head Island resident since 1983, Moore knew this area of Bluffton fell right in line. “Old Town is a unique place and has a draw of its own,” he said. The rapid rate at which the lots

were reserved proved to him he made the right choice. The first 24 lots became available for commitment in September and were quickly reserved, according to the real estate agent selling the development, Michelle Moore. But she is quick to mention that these are only reservations at this point until building begins. Therefore, if anyone is interested in living in Kirk’s Bluff, there is a waiting list and could still be opportunity to buy. According to Michelle, developer Jim Moore’s daughter, the model homes should be up around the first of April. By that time, all who have reserved lots can take a walk through to ensure they want to move forward with their build. The first 24 townhomes built, which will be between 1,770 and 2,200 square feet, will range in price between $209,900 and $259,000 and include one- or two-car private garages. Those models include the Gaston, the Eaton and the Chatham Grand, and are planned to be completed by November of 2015. The second phase will include 12 lots fronting Goethe Road. These homes will have driveways and garages in the back along with larger porches and front

yards. Also, according to Michelle, these lots on Geothe Road are zoned for live/ work, which means if there is interest, buyers could have professional offices built on the top level of the townhomes. Michelle began taking reservations for the second phase in February but encourages those who desire to live near Old Town to call for availability. She says the second phase models, which include the Charleston, the Edisto and the Georgetown, should be open by the end of 2015. This phase will hopefully be built out by spring 2016. According to Michelle, potential homebuyers love the development’s proximity to Old Town and the Promenade, as well as the fact it will still provide that “neighborhood” feel they crave. She has seen a mix of interest from retirees looking to downsize to young families and professionals wanting to be near the heart and excitement of Old Town. The low-maintenance exteriors and floorplans have made these units very popular in other markets, Moore said. The landscaping, exterior of the buildings (except for the windows), roofs and common areas will be maintained


FUTURE by the homeowners’ association, and those fees will be $150 a month. This feature allows homeowners to “lock and leave,” meaning residents can leave for extended vacations or business trips without concern over the upkeep of their property. Three floorplans are available to choose from within each phase of the development, all with spacious interiors ideal for entertaining friends or family. Two of them include a master bedroom on the first floor, which is becoming increasingly popular according to Moore. The interiors include vaulted ceilings in the living room and an extra bank of windows to let in more natural light. “These (units) seem much more like a singlefamily home than a townhouse,” Moore said. The exteriors of the units are designed with Lowcountry architectural features including bigger shutters, shake-siding detail and more trim. Ashley Ingram LLC is the builder for the townhome development. Although Moore knew this location in Bluffton would be the perfect spot for his development, he was still a little surprised by how quickly the lots were initially reserved. He’s excited to get the models

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finished so prospective buyers can “see and feel the real product.” Moore is keeping a close eye on this particular development since the project is so close to home. “I want to make sure people get exactly what they want,” he said, “and be sure it’s done right.”  For more information, contact Michelle Moore at (843) 290-3466 or michelle@ kirksbluff.com. Visit kirsbluff.com for renderings and features.

FIRST PHASE: 24 LOTS THE CHATHAM GRAND 1,771 heated sq. ft., Three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, Open kitchen, Private office/study, Spacious great room, Vaulted ceiling, Private garage

THE EATON 1,830 heated sq. ft., Three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, Two-story family room, First floor master suite, Open kitchen, Private office or 4th bedroom, TV loft, Private garage, 2nd story private balcony

THE GASTON 2,207 heated sq. ft., Four bedrooms, 2 1/2 half baths, Wrap around porch, Vaulted ceilings, First floor master suite, Eat-in kitchen, Private office or nursery, Extra loft area, Bay window, Potential third bath, Private two-car garage

GOETHE ROAD: 12 LOTS THE CHARLESTON 1,717 heated SQ. FT., Three bedrooms, 2 1/2 half baths, Rear entry private garage, Separate family room, Open kitchen, Large front porch, Live/Work residence, Vaulted ceilings

THE EDISTO 1,830 heated sq. ft., Three-four bedrooms, First floor master suite, 2 1/2 baths, Open kitchen, TV loft, Spacious great room, Vaulted ceiling, Rear entry private garage, Live/Work residence, Double Carolina porch

THE GEORGETOWN 2,207 heated sq. ft., Four bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, Large wrap around porch, Vaulted ceilings, 1st floor master suite, Eat-in kitchen, Private office or nursery, Extra loft area, Bay window, Rear entry two-car garage, Live/Work residence

MARCH 2015


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Bluffton. With a fashionable boutique owner and a creative event planner cochairing the event, it is guaranteed to be nothing short of fabulous. After a year of planning, Burden and Spencer have created what they hope to be the most enjoyable event to date. After being greeted with a glass of champagne upon arrival, party guests will enjoy dinner and dancing; live music from Java, a band out of Charlotte, North Carolina; bourbon and beer tastings; cigars; live and silent auctions; and lots of surprises. Last year’s auction included 100-150 gift cards and over 100 tangible items including art, vacations, oyster tables, kid’s picnic tables, kayaks, and more. This year’s fundraiser will also feature a wine auction. An online auction housing most of the gift cards will be held March 11-15. A link to this auction can be found on the school’s Facebook page: facebook.com/mayriver. montessori or you can contact the school for details. As an added bonus, ticket purchases and auction items are tax deductible. From a Corner Perk coffee bar to desserts from The Cottage, it is “truly a community event where the community comes together to support May River Montessori,” said Sharon Haag, the school’s director. Not only local businesses but also the people of the community embrace the event. “We had non-parents attend last year who are coming back this year because they had so much fun,” Burden added. “My husband and I have so much fun every year,” said May River Montessori parent and event attendee, Katie Houpt. “The food is fantastic, and there is always an awesome band. I look forward to seeing what our fantastic planners are going to come up with

each year. By far, Belles and Bow Ties rates as one of the top events of the year in Bluffton!” The maximum capacity of the Hampton Hall ballroom is 230, and this year Burden and Spencer hope to sell out the event. Sponsorship opportunities are available with a range of benefits, depending on the sponsorship level. All sponsorships include tickets to the event and a sign in front of the school, which is seen by all the parents in carpool line and passersby of the school. Each year, a number of businesses comment on how pleased they are with the effectiveness of the signs. About the school Located at 60 Calhoun Street in Old Town Bluffton, a few blocks from the May River, is the hidden gem, May River Montessori. Now in its twenty-seventh year of operation, the school has 160 students ranging from two years old to sixth grade. The knowledgeable staff has over 200 years combined experience, with the majority of the staff at the school for over 15 years. “Through our teachers, with their longevity and experience, Montessori is really done correctly.” Haag said, who has been at May River Montessori for 16 years and has 30 years of Montessori experience. “We often hear from alumni how they have thrived after getting a good Montessori education,” she said. In fact, the standardized test scores from the students of May River Montessori are in the top tiers in the country for private schools. Burden is not only a May River Montessori parent but also the daughter of May River Montessori co-founder, Mary Vaux. “It is the school’s mission to keep the tuition affordable so more families can attend, and this [Belles and Bow Ties] is the biggest fundraiser of the year to help keep rates low,” Haag said, adding that the money raised at the event goes directly back to the children via operating costs of the school. Who, what, when and where Belles and Bow Ties will be held March 20, 2015 from 6-11 p.m. at Hampton Hall Community Clubhouse. The attire is Bluffton Cocktail, which means women wear cocktail dresses and men dress more casual. Tickets are $75 per person and include dinner, drinks, live entertainment, live and silent auctions and more. Mark your calendars, buy your tickets, call the babysitter and do not miss Belles and Bow Ties, the party of year!  For more information about the school, please visit mayrivermontessori. com. To purchase tickets, become a sponsor, donate items for the auction or contact the school, call (843) 757-2312.

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MARCH 2015


Ý SOPHOMORE HOLDEN WHITT AS THE BEAST AND SENIOR MECCAY NIMMER AS BELLE

Beauty AND THE

ARTICLE BY MARY DELLE ROBINSON

e our guest! Hilton Head Christian Academy Theater Department invites one and all to its spring production of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, set to run Thursday through Saturday, March 26-28 at the Seahawk Cultural Center. This Academy Award-winning Disney classic and 15-year Broadway hit is a feast for the eyes and hearts of audiences of all ages. It’s a classic love story filled with unforgettable characters, lavish sets and costumes, and dazzling production numbers sure to delight the senses. Its “wow-factor” is amplified by the show’s talented cast of 50plus students in grades 6-12, directed by HHCA Teacher of theYear Michelle McElroy in her debut as head of the school’s up-andcoming theater department, and by Fine Arts department head James Berry’s live orchestra of 15-plus student and professional guest musicians. HHCA drama veteran Rhonda Stones fills the role of assistant director, and art director LouAnne Barrett returns as set

designer. All in all, this is one strong theater team. Indeed, it takes a village of talented townsfolk and guest professionals to pull off a masterful production of this magnitude, and Hilton Head Christian has been blessed with an abundance of both. McElroy is delighted and honored by the outpouring of assistance from a plethora of talented professionals in the surrounding arts community, all of whom treat one another like extended family. Costumes and props have been loaned by Main Street and May River Theatres, and arts folks from all over the island are lending their time and talents to this production. Guest choreographer Patti Maurer, president of the Island School Council for the Arts and professional dancer herself, offers her theatrical dance talents to HHCA for the second year in a row. Yet another professional guest is May River Theatre music director Beth Corry, who turned down several other offers to focus on HHCA’s Beauty and The Beast, because she experienced such joy in


the family atmosphere on campus. “I feel it in my heart. It makes me happy to be here,” Corry said. Another returning alumni guest from the local arts community is technical director Dick Sanders, who imparts his skills to this HHCA production for the twentieth year. What keeps him coming back year after year is the kids. “What I enjoy most is when a student who has never been involved in theater gets bitten by the bug and finds a passion for this kind of work— whether it’s power tools, lighting design or sound production,” Sanders said. Sophomore Jamie Hubbard, stepping into the role of stage manager, is one of those who got bitten by the tech crew bug in seventh grade. “It’s a lot of pressure to make sure the show runs smoothly, and Mr. Sanders expects a lot; but he wants what’s best for us and the show,” Hubbard said. She and Sanders know it’s the camaraderie of the cast and crew that binds everyone together as theater family. The joy of drama camaraderie is echoed by all—adults and young people alike—as their favorite part of the production process. The youngest cast member, sixth-grader Madison MacCabe, explains: “At first it was intimidating, but the older kids welcomed me—I got over it quickly.” Especially when fellow cast members brought cupcakes and balloons to practice to celebrate her eleventh birthday. “It’s delicious,” she chimed—oh, wait, that’s the line she delivers as Chip. McElroy credits the tremendous growth of the fine arts program at HHCA in recent years to the formation and dedication of HHCA’s Fine Arts Alliance, the school’s recent investment in a new performing arts facility, as well as the addition of middle and upper school theater classes. The return on investment is students who are fired up about theater. Junior Joseph Lankowski (Cogsworth) is one of several student-actor-athletes, juggling sports (soccer) and play practices. “Drama is first priority in my actor-athlete contract,” said Lankowski, also a star running back on the HHCA football team. McElroy relishes the enthusiastic drama culture she has helped to cultivate. “It is refreshing to see students make theater a priority on their long lists of extra-curricular activities. The energy and excitement surrounding this show has been evident since day one,” she said. Another member of the HHCA theater family since sixth grade, junior Henry Clark, who landed his first lead role as Gaston, admits that his headphones are usually plugged in to the show’s playlist. The Belle of Beauty and the Beast is a relative newcomer to the HHCA theater family. In her second year on stage, senior Meccay Nimmer is much like her simply beautiful, down-to-earth character. “She’s my favorite Disney princess of all time, so this is a dream come true,” said Nimmer, who channels a spot-on Belle. Rounding out the main cast is Holden Whitt as the Beast, landing his second lead role as just a sophomore. With only a few juniors and seniors in the production, McElroy is excited that her core group of theater students will be performing for years to come. “Combined with the current momentum of the program, this will be an exciting era for Hilton Head Christian Academy drama,” she said. This HHCA theater family is definitely one to watch. Beauty and the Beast is the classic story of Belle, a compassionate and confident, if odd, young woman, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped in a spell placed by an enchantress because of his selfish ways. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will end and he will be transformed to his former self. But time is running out. If the Beast does not learn his lesson soon, he and his household will be doomed for eternity.  HHCA’s Beauty and the Beast will run nightly March 26, 27 & 28 at 7 p.m. at the Seahawk Cultural Center on Wilborn Road, with an additional Saturday 2:30 matinee. Tickets are available at hhcadrama.eventbrite.com. 128

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MARCH 2015


WELCOME TO YOUR NEW BEAUTY ADDICTION! nce a well-kept Hollywood secret, Eyelash Extensions have become a regular beauty treatment for women around the world. More and more women are discovering their benefits because they offer a low maintenance beauty routine that is perfect for every day wear or special events. Alexis Sargo, Studio Manager of FACES Lash Studio, answers your Top 10 questions about Eyelash Extensions. Q. WHAT ARE EYELASH EXTENSIONS? Eyelash extensions are a very broad term that is being used. Here at FACES Lash Studio, our Lash Stylists specialize in providing each client with a customized look. We apply individual eyelashes, in different lengths and thicknesses, one-byone to your natural lashes. Our styles range from Coy to Captivating to Catwalk. Q. WHY WOULD I WANT TO GET EYELASH EXTENSIONS? Eyelash extensions will give you longer, fuller, darker eyelashes without the need for mascara. You’ll instantly have sexier, younger and refreshed-looking eyes. You’ll even wake up looking lusciously lashed and find that you have a lower-maintenance beauty routine. No longer will you need to curl your lashes and apply coats and coats of mascara! Q. WILL IT BE OBVIOUS THAT I’M WEARING EYELASH EXTENSIONS? You won’t feel you are wearing them, and no one will be able to tell that you weren’t born with such amazing lashes. Our eyelash extensions are semi-permanent so as your natural lashes shed, your extensions will shed with them. Q. WHAT IS THE PROCESS OF GETTING AND MAINTAINING EYELASH EXTENSIONS? The application process is very relaxing – like receiving a spa service. You lie down on a plush lounge and listen to soothing music with your eyes closed the entire time. Your technician will attach one lash extension to one of your natural lashes with medical grade adhesive. To maintain a full appearance, as your lashes naturally shed, it is recommended to get a refill every 2-4 weeks. Q. WILL LASH EXTENSIONS DAMAGE MY NATURAL LASHES? Absolutely not! In order to protect your lashes from damage, our stylists

take extra care and time to ensure that we apply only one lash extension to each of your individual lashes. In addition, lash extensions can even protect your lashes from the damage caused by curling and mascara application. Q. ARE THERE SPECIAL AFTER-CARE INSTRUCTIONS? With proper care, your new lash extensions will last longer and look lovelier. For the first 48 hours after application avoid water, steam and excessive perspiration. No oil based products are to be used on your lash extensions...ever! For best results, we recommend using after care products which are available at FACES Lash Studio or online at www.FacesLashStudio.com. Q. WHY SHOULD I GET MY EYELASH EXTENSIONS AT FACES LASH STUDIO? Applying extensions is a highly technical and skilled procedure. A poorly applied extension can be painful and damage your lashes. Our Lash Stylists train for months and are held to strict quality-control standards, and use the safest products. Our combination of great skill and excellent products will show in the longevity and the beautiful, natural appearance and feel of your lashes. Q. DO YOU OFFER ANY ALTERNATIVES TO SEMI-PERMANENT EYELASH EXTENSIONS? Yes, we offer several alternatives such as Eyelash Perms, Eyelash Tinting, Tabbing, and Strip Eyelashes. To compliment your new look we also offer Brow Tinting, Threading, and Waxing. Soon we will be adding Eyebrow Extensions to our menu for women who want thicker, fuller, more youthful-looking brows.

Q. WHAT ARE EYELASH PERMS? Eyelash Perms are similar in theory to a hair perm in the way it curls your lashes! During the application, we curl your lashes to a roller and apply both a perm and setting lotion. It’s a great process for those with long, straight lashes who want naturally curled lashes without having to take time out of their daily routine. We use a nourishing lotion at the end of the process so that you leave with healthy, beautifully curled lashes. On average the perm lasts around 6-8 weeks, so say goodbye to your curler! Q. WHAT IS TABBING? Tabbing is the process of applying clusters of lashes that only last for 4-5 days. They are laid on top of your natural lashes and help fill in gaps for those with more sparse lashes, giving you that extra full look. They’re great for special events or as an introduction to semi-permanent Eyelash Extensions. FACES Lash Studio, located in the Village at Wexford, is Hilton Head Island’s is Hilton Head Island’s premiere beauty lounge specializing in semi-permanent Eyelash Extensions. We treat every customer like a special guest by creating a relaxing and glamorous escape from daily life. We focus on providing amazing customer service and by building personal connections with each person. Our mission is to provide each client with a low-maintenance beauty routine, a simplified lifestyle, and a new definition of confidence. For more information, or to book a complimentary consultation, visit www. FacesLashStudio.com or call 785-LASH.


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ARTICLE BY MARGARET LOCKE PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROB KAUFMAN

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his year marks the thirtieth anniversary of the Hilton Head Island Wine and Food Festival. The festival is a six-day celebration where attendees can explore the best food and drink from Hilton Head’s rich culinary scene. Guests come from all over the country to participate in this historical festival, the oldest of its kind in the country. Not only do they enjoy Hilton Head Island’s beautiful atmosphere, but guests also encounter spectacular celebrity chef showcases, intriguing wine education seminars and visual, as well as performing, artists’ exhibitions. Historically, the island was considered to be a summer holiday spot and tourist destination. The festival was originally created in hopes of reviving the area’s food and beverage industry. In an attempt to restore their tourist population and give the residents a reason to celebrate, local wine connoisseurs and culinary talents came together to produce the very first wine and food festival. The inaugural event was a one-day, three-hour tasting, but has now extended into a six-day affair with an array of events ranging from movie screenings to food and wine pairing dinners, auctions and of course the famous Grand and Public tastings. Separate tickets are available for each festival event, so it is easy to pick and choose which events to attend. The festival events cover a wide range of topics, sure to garner anyone’s interest. For the wine enthusiasts, there are multiple celebrity chef vintners’ dinners and education sessions on a variety of topics. Educational seminars include pairing food and drink, learning how and why the glass you drink out of makes a difference, and building your own Bordeaux. Dinner guests can enjoy resort chef and regional guest chef collaboration dishes, which, perfectly paired with wine, capture the entire essence of Lowcountry cuisine.

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THE PUBLIC TASTING, THE BELOVED SHOWCASE EVENT, OCCURS ON SATURDAY, MARCH 14, AND IS THE MOST POPULAR EVENT OF THE FESTIVAL.

c THIS YEAR’S EVENT WILL MOVE FROM HONEY HORN PLANTATION TO SEA PINES RESORT.

In addition to these events and tastings, the festival’s biggest draw is the International Wine Competition. In February, a panel of 25 master sommeliers, certified sommeliers, advanced sommeliers, and certified wine educators chose the winning wines. Out of more than 700 entries provided by over 110 different entrants, including 315 international entries, six wines were chosen, based on appearance, body, taste, aroma and finish. The winning wines include: Best in Show Red -- Alexander Valley Vineyards, CYRUS 2010 Best in Show White -- Champagne J De Telmont, Grand Vintage 2005 Best in Show Value -- Trinchero Family Estates, Jargon Pinot Noir 2012 Festival Pick Red -- King Estate NxNW (North by NorthWest) Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 Festival Pick White -- Huia Sparkling Wine 2009 Festival Pick Value -- Pollak Vineyards Chardonnay 2013 Among the talented panel of wine judges, the competition featured Brett Davis, Wayne Belding and Jacob Gragg. Brett Davis has devoted his life to learning about wine. It was during his tenure at Commander’s Palace that his obsession with wine began. In a wine bar after work, a seven-yearold bottle of 1978 Bâtard-Montrachet paired with a plate of French cheese transcended anything he had experienced before or knew was possible. This epiphany was the catalyst for his journey to becoming a master sommelier almost 25 years later. Author of Diving into Wine, Wayne Belding, became the thirteenth American to pass the Master Sommelier exam in 1990. He has also served as education chairman and chairman of the American Chapter of the Court of Master Sommeliers. Jacob Gragg, earned his advanced sommelier from the Court of Master Sommeliers at the age of 24, making him one of the youngest to have achieved this certification. In addition, he is a certified specialist of wine, and was named one of the Best New Sommeliers of 2012 by Wine & Spirits magazine. The Grand Tasting, which occurs on Friday, March 13, is an exclusive tasting where the attendees taste the elite, award-winning wines from the International Wine Competition. The guests sip wine and enjoy light hors d’oeuvres as they soak in the spectacular Hilton Head Island view of the Calibogue Sound and signature candy-stripe lighthouse. The Public Tasting, the beloved showcase event, occurs on Saturday, March 14, and is the most popular event of the festival. The event features more than 250 wines, and guests are invited to speak with both domestic and international vineyard representatives. During the event, guests are also encouraged to view various mixology demos and guest chefs in action. Finally, the guests can bid on the various award-winning wines at the silent auction that occurs during the Public Tasting. The Hilton Head Island Wine and Food Festival is produced by Hilton Head Wine & Food Inc., and the proceeds from the wine auction at the Grand and Public Tastings go to the John and Valerie Curry Educational Scholarship Fund, which gives support to college students who are interested in pursuing degrees in hospitality and tourism. Currently, scholarships are being offered at the University of South Carolina Beaufort and the Technical College of the Lowcountry. 

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MARCH 2015

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this

is t Join mpin ju

he Hilton Head Shore Notes women’s a cappella chorus proudly presents This Joint is Jumpin’, a musical revue, under the direction of Faye McLanahan, on Saturday, March 7, 2015, at 7 p.m. at the Hilton Head High School’s Seahawk Cultural Center. The Shore Notes are thrilled to introduce “Boardwalk” as their special men’s guest quartet. The phrase, “This is not your father’s quartet” does not apply to Boardwalk. Coming from a long line of second-generation barbershop singers, each of their dads had a heavy influence on this quartet’s singing. Their versatility combines barbershop harmony with folk music and instrumentation. Boardwalk competed in their first Dixie District Competition last October and placed second out of 26 quartets. Show tickets are $20 and are available at Burke’s Pharmacy and Pretty Papers on Hilton Head Island and Markel’s Gifts in Bluffton or online at hhsn2015show.brownpapertickets.com. This Joint is Jumpin’ is sponsored by All Four Paws, Hilton Head BMW, Jones Tree Service, Lang’s 72 Degrees, Dr. Matthew Mastrorocco and Mangiamo’s, to whom the Shore Notes are very grateful for their ongoing and generous support. The Shore Notes have designated The Children’s Center as the recipient of a portion of the show’s profits.  For more information, visit www.hiltonheadshorenotes.com or call Barbara at (843) 705-6852.

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MARCH 2015


THE DANCE BOOSTERS OF BLUFFTON PRESENT

“A N E V E N I N G O F D A N C E ” G A L A

O

n Saturday, March 14 from 6-8 p.m. at Pinckney Hall in Sun City, the Dance Boosters of Bluffton will host its Fourth Annual Evening of Dance Gala, an evening of dance, music, food, fun and a silent auction to benefit the awardwinning Bluffton Dance Company. The evening will include student choreography, live music and hors d’oveures, served by the Bluffton School of Dance Company members. The highlight of the evening will be the dance showcase. Since January, students have been choreographing and rehearsing dances for the evening under the direction of artistic director Dawn Rosa Miller. “We have an abundance of amazing talent in our community and this evening provides us the chance to showcase our students

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locally,” Rosa Miller said. (The company usually performs out of town at regional and national conventions including Atlanta, Orlando, and Greenville.) “We hope to use the funds from the showcase to help defray expenses related to our upcoming 2015 Summer Nationals trip to Orlando. In addition, we will bring in master teachers from LA and other cities across the U.S. to provide intensive training for our dancers not available in our immediate area,” Rosa Miller said. This event is sponsored by The Alliance Group Realty and other additional local businesses. Tickets are $10, and all proceeds will benefit the dance company. For more information and to purchase tickets, contact the Bluffton School of Dance at (843) 815-2619. 

MARCH 2015


E C2 A SERIES OF

FORTUNATE EVENTS

First Citizens announced that Allison Trippe has been named vice president and retail sales manager for the company’s Hilton Head branch. She will be responsible for helping current customers meet their unique financial goals, introducing the bank’s products and services to new customers, and representing First Citizens in the community.

WEICHERT, REALTORS® - Coastal Properties welcomes Bob Jones to the agency’s sales team. Jones entered the real estate industry in 2006 and is a member of the Hilton Head Area Association of Realtors.

Charter One Realty recently presented a check for $10,000 as a donation to FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes.) Pictured left to right: Tom Reed (Charter One Realty); Richard MacDonald (Charter One Realty and FCA board member); Charles Sampson (Charter One Realty); James Wedgeworth (Charter One Realty); Paul Cifaldi (FCA area director); Dick Patrick (Charter One Realty), Richard Reed (Charter One Realty), Andy Reed (Charter One Realty).

Rich Hodsdon, a 35-year veteran of the Hilton Head Island real estate business, has joined the sales team at Hilton Head Properties as an associate broker.

Dr. Daniel Wesche, Hilton Head Christian Academy headmaster accepted a scholarship check from Olga Lisinska of Palmetto Kids First. State House Representative, Jeff Bradley and State Senator, Tom Davis, both strong supporters of the legislation that supports these scholarships, were also in attendance at the school’s reception

Joan Delozier has joined the Hilton Head Island-Bluffton Chamber of Commerce as membership coordinator. A Lowcountry resident for over 20 years and former owner of Authentic Builders, LLC, Delozier brings over 10 years of experience in the private club membership industry, and most recently served as office administrator with the Country Club of Hilton Head.

Allison Bonner of Pearce Scott Architects is now the firm’s new associate principal. A licensed architect and LEED accredited professional, she is involved in all aspects of design, from concept through construction administration, to quality control and coordination with consultants, builders and clients.

MARCH 2015

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Hilton Head Regional Healthcare is proud to welcome Jeremy Clark as market chief executive officer effective January 12, 2015. Clark will be responsible for the strategic direction of Hilton Head Hospital, Coastal Carolina Hospital, Bluffton Medical Campus, as well as all other affiliated facilities.

Hilton Head Attorney Denny Fraser has formed The Fraser Law Firm, LLC., offering legal services which include real estate closings, construction law, corporate law and estate planning.

Gina M. Dunn has been promoted to Mortgage Loan Partner with PNC Bank. She has many years of lending and Mortgage experience along with corporate management experience. She is located at the PNC Bank right off the Sea Pines circle on Pope Avenue in Hilton Head. She looks forward to serving you.

BB&T has promoted Pamela K. Wells to vice president. Wells, a 34-year resident of Hilton Head is manager of the Personal Lines department at BB&T Carswell Insurance Services on Park Lane and has been in the insurance industry since 1974.

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MARCH 2015


H & H Auto Service, Inc. is pleased to announce that Jimmy Ellis and Dustin Pascoe have earned ASE Master Certification. The National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence is an independent non-profit organization which works to improve the quality of vehicle repair and service by testing and certifying automotive professionals.

BB&T Carswell Insurance Services has promoted Sherry Slifer to vice president. Slifer is a Family Risk manager in the Personal Lines department and has earned designation as a Certified Insurance Service Representative from the National Alliance.

At the Hilton Head Island-Bluffton Chamber of Commerceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual ball, held Saturday, January 31, Ray Warco was honored with the coveted Alice Glenn Doughtie Good Citizenship Award; Memory Matters was recognized as Organization of the Year; Sea Pines Resort received the John Curry Tourism Award; Michele Quigley was named The Sue West Educator of the Year; and Suzi Oliver was named Zonta Woman of the Year.

ď&#x20AC;´ Send your submissions to hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com

MARCH 2015

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It’s

5

O’CLOCK

SOMEWHERE!

M

S

Charbar Co.- Mike Bagenstose (6-9PM) Chow Daddy’sHappy Hour (4-6PM)

Chow Daddy’sHappy Hour Daily! (4-6PM) Charbar Co.- Game day snacks and drink specials! (4-7PM) ELA’s Blu Water GrilleBill Peterson (11-2PM) Tim Malchak (7-10PM)

W

Charbar Co.Reid Richmond (6-9PM) Hudson’s- Happy Hour! Beer, cocktails & bites (Daily 3-6PM) Street Meet- Kitchen is Open til 1AM- Full Menu! (All Week) Lucky Rooster- Will Snyder (7-10PM Tuesdays)

Electric Piano BarMotown, R&B and Top 40 Night with Laiken Love & Willie Jones Charbar Co.- Whitley Deputy (7-10PM)

Holy Tequila- Happy Hour! $2.50 select liquors, beers, tacos & bar snacks! & MORE! (Daily 4-7PM)

Hudson’s- Happy Hour! Beer, cocktails & bites (Daily 3-6PM) Rooftop Bar- Coastal Country Night & Happy Hour (4-7PM)

Truffles-Happy Hour $3 wells, $5 absolut cocktails, $2 premium cocktails, wine, beer and appetizers at bar. (4-6:30PM) The Crazy CrabHappy Hour Daily at Jarvis Creek Bar (4-6pm)

T

Kingfisher (Pelican’s Point)Comedy Club of Hilton Head (Tuesdays @ 8PM)

Send your event/entertainment listing to hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com

Kingfisher (Pelican’s Point)- Mike Wilson (Wednesdays @ 6PM) Mellow MushroomTrivia Night (9PM, Hilton Head)


@

T

F

S

Electric PianoThe ONLY Dueling Piano show on HHI. All request, Interactive Fun. $4 fireball shots Rooftop Bar-Live Music! March 19: The Men of Chippendales (21& Over Only)6PM

Rooftop Bar- Happy Hour (4-7PM) Live Music Thursday and Fridays!

Kingfisher (Pelican’s Point)Earl Williams - Motown, Jazz & Blues (Fridays @ 6PM) Comedy Club of HH (Fridays @ 8PM)

Street Meet- Kitchen is Open til 1AM- Full Menu! (7 Days A Week)

ELA’s Blu Water Grille- John Wasem (Fridays 7-10PM)

Charbar Co.- Zack Stiltner (7-10PM)

Charbar Co. -Tommy Sims (7-10PM)

ELA’s Blu Water Grille- Reid Richmond ( Thursdays, 7-10PM) Electric Piano Bar-Smirnoff Vodka Ladies Night with The Simpson Brothers Kingfisher (Pelican’s Point)David Wingo (Thursdays @6PM)

Hudson’s- Happy Hour! Beer, cocktails & bites (Daily 3-6PM)

Captain Woody’s-March 7th :Oyster Roast Oysters, Burgers, Hot Dogs, Happy Hour Specials. LIVE MUSIC by Cranford Hallow (4-7PM) The Electric PianoMar. 7: & 14: 7th & 14th Dueling Pianos 21st and 28th: The Simpson Brothers Classic Rock Party. ELA’s Blu Water GrilleJohn Wasem (7-10PM) Mar. 9th-14th- Join us at ELA’S for WineFest! Chef Ryan Alpaugh will exhibit finely crafted fare and wine pairings in addition to our regular menu offerings. Rooftop Bar- DJ Scoobie’s Dance Party (Sat. Nights) & Dress to Impress Charbar Co. -Nick Poulin Trio (8-11PM)


MARCH

2015 SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

MARCH 1-7 3 8TH ANNUAL HILTON HEAD ISLAND SEAFOOD FESTIVAL Hosted by the David M. Carmines Memorial Foundation, features a week full of celebrating the island’s seafood heritage, culinary revival and the bounty of it’s local waters. davidmcarmines.org/seafoodfest.

15 2

Hilton Head Christian Academy Sundaes on Sunday 2:00PM www.hhca.org

15

THURSDAY

4

5

23

FURNITURE PAINTING CLASSES: 2-4PM RevivalDesigns HHI.com/ schedule

J BANKS DESIGN TENT SALE J Banks Design 9AM-6PM

.1974 est

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25

30

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31

7

BELLES AND BOW TIES Hampton Hall Community Clubhouse 6-11PM Bluffton Cocktail attire. $75 per person

14 ST. BALDRICK’S HEADSHAVING FUNDRAISER 3PM-5PM Mellow Mushroom Hilton Head 843.476.4768

21-22 19TH ANNUAL WINGFEST PRESENTED BY HARGRAY 21ST: 5-8 PM ND: 22 11 AM-6PM Shelter Cove Community Park 843.681.7273

26-28 Seahawk Cultural Center Thurs. & Fri @ 7:00PM, Saturday @ 2:30PM

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FARMERS MARKET IN OLD TOWN BLUFFTON 2-7PM Calhoun Street farmersmarket bluffton.org

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17

HHCA’S BEAUTY & THE BEAST

HARBOUR TOWN SPRING FEST Sidewalk Sale: 11-6PM Live Music: 1-4pm Children’s Activities 1-4pm (843) 842-1979

6

12

9-15 30TH ANNUAL HILTON HEAD ISLAND WINE + FOOD FESTIVAL Sea Pines Resort Proceeds from festival events will benefit the John T. and Valerie Curry Scholarship Fund. For additional information on the festival and the festival events, please visit hiltonheadwineandfood.com.

16

SATURDAY

HILTON HEAD SHORE NOTES PRESENT “THIS JOINT IS JUMPIN’!” 7:00 PM Seahawk Cultural Center hiltonheadshore notes.com.

MONDAY NIGHT TENNIS EXHIBITION Sea Pines Racquet Club Mondays; 5:30– 6:30pm 843.363.4495.

FRIDAY

8TH ANNUAL COOKS & BOOKS Hilton Head Marriott @ 11AM $20 in advance and $25 at the door.

8

HHCA OPEN HOUSE

WEDNESDAY

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1ST ANNUAL LEO’S WORLD'S LEGACY 5K LARGEST Race Starts at YARD SALE 3:30PM 9AM - 1PM Oscar Frazier Park Hilton Head Island $5 Entry Fee High School Music & Games Admission is free! www.active.com 843. 689.4811

SAVE THE DATE! 47TH ANNUAL RBC HERITAGE PRESENTED BY BOEING APRIL 13- APRIL 19, 2015; HARBOUR TOWN GOLF LINKS For additional information regarding staying at The Sea Pines Resort, please call 1.800.SEAPINES or visit seapines. com. To learn more about the RBC Heritage and available ticket packages, please call (843) 671-2448 or visit rbcheritage.com.

MARCH 2015


CH2 / CB2 March Issue  

Special Home Section 2015, 7 Reasons We Love Spring, Spring Fashion from Coastal Bliss, March Madness Memoirs, School House Rocks Live, 2015...

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