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CALIFORNIA STYLE

Cover

INSIDE OUT NAPA VALLEY PACIFIC HEIGHTS DESERT HOT SPRINGS HOLMBY HILLS LAGUNA BEACH SILVERLAKE


HOME Classic silhouettes, authentic craftsmanship and exquisite finishes create a home that’s as individual as you are. Find this season’s inspiration at wshome.com

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A Polished C ollection 25 YEARS IN THE MAKING

Mitchell Gold

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open

This is neither an offer to sell, nor a solicitation of offers to buy any condominium units where such offers or solicitations canno The Agency CA RE #01904054


open

t be made. Plans, materials, specifications, amenities, pricing and inventory are subject to change without notice.


TOC 1 SUMMER 2014 IDYLL AWAY, p.74.

Who’s who behind the scenes of summer’s C Home—plus, their go-to picks for California design.

15 DOSSIER

Serena & Lily breezes into Sacramento Street. LCDQ catches some AIR. Casa Acanto gets into vacation getaways. Advice from a top lawyer in the L.A. cultural scene. Parisian patterns, dreamy Brazilian loungers and coastal Pacifica yields a trove of fresh ceramics and curated finds.

22 LANDSCAPE

State-of-the-art patios. The vintage vibe, from David Cressey to McGuire. Find out who’s in the Bay Area’s Garden Tribe.

24 TREND

In bronze, indigo and leather, DISC Interiors takes a cool, Iberian spin.

C 8 SUMMER HOME 2014

29 INSIDER

Courtney Applebaum rows to Melrose Place. The studio of Santa Barbara artist R. Nelson Parrish.

Springs prefab where every room is a room with a view.

62 BRODY REBORN

39 WELCOME HOME

Making your space your own.

A. Quincy Jones’ distinguished paean to modern arts and architecture is ready for the modern of today.

40 SILVER LININGS

68 XANADU

In Silverlake, stylist Jessica de Ruiter and sculptor-designer Jed Lind update a 1950s gem into a bright family oasis.

48 FASHION HOUSE

With interior designer Dara Rosenfeld, Stephanie Marver looked to her couture wardrobe as inspiration for her flirty Pacific Heights flat.

56 A SEPARATE PEACE

That’s no mirage. Kristopher Dukes shares a glimpse into her private retreat: a revolutionary Desert Hot

Beneath a sculptural dome overlooking North Laguna’s pristine waters, a rarefied miracle of glass and limestone reflects the clean, organic warmth of sun and sea.

74 IDYLL AWAY

For the Hanson family, St. Helena’s Daniel Hale created a classic wine country residence high above Napa Valley.

82 COLLAGE

Ken Fulk’s elevator pitch.

COVER: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN. IDYLL AWAY: SEAN DAGEN

12 C PEOPLE


Serena & Lilly

w e are al l cr e at i v e g e n i u s e s. ( som e of

us just

don ’t k n o w i t y e t . )

3457 sACRAMENTO sTREET sAN FRANCIsCO sERENAANdlIly.COM/dEsIGNsHOP


JENNIFER HALE

Founder + Editorial Director

LESLEY CAMPOY

President + Publisher JENNY MURRAY Editor

EDITORIAL

ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD

BERNARD SCHARF

KELSEY McKINNON

Design Editor

Art Director

Senior Editor

BRIAN D. LEITCH

MARGOT FODOR

Features Director

Photo Editor

JACKIE TREITZ

MEGAN MEYER

ELIZABETH VARNELL

Assistant Editor

Digital Editor

Designer

MOR WEIZMAN Art Production Assistant

ANGELA GIGLIA Managing Editor

PUBLISHING

Masthead

SUE CHRISPELL

RENEE MARCELLO

Associate Publisher, West

CRISTA VAGHI

Associate Publisher, East

ALEXANDRA VON BARGEN

Account Director, California

CAMERON HARROS

Account Director, New York

MARY KENNEDY

Director, Business Development

Account Director, Home + Beauty

ANNE MARIE PROVENZA

KRISTA NATALI

Account Manager

Administrative Assistant

SANDY HUBBARD

TROY FELKER

Information Technology Director

Finance Associate

CONTRIBUTORS DESIGN EDITOR-AT-LARGE

Andrea Stanford

SAN FRANCISCO EDITOR-AT-LARGE

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR-AT-LARGE FASHION EDITOR ARTS + CULTURE EDITOR

Samantha Traina

ASSOCIATE FASHION EDITOR

Elizabeth Khuri Chandler

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Annina Mislin

STYLE EDITOR-AT-LARGE

CIRCULATION CONSULTANTS/CIRCULATION SPECIALISTS, INC. SPECIAL PROJECTS CONTRIBUTORS

Diane Dorrans Saeks

Kendall Conrad George Kotsiopoulos

Greg Wolfe, Russell Marth

Diana Gonzalez, Stephanie Steinman, Lily Maximo Villanueva, Courtney Zupanski Christine Lennon, Suzanne Rheinstein, Cameron Silver, Michael S. Smith,

Jamie Tisch, Nathan Turner, Mish Tworkowski, Hutton Wilkinson INTERNS

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PEOPLE

WHO’S WHO BEHIND THE SCENES OF THIS ISSUE AND THE PLACES THEY FIND INSPIRATION

Amelia Fleetwood “I raised my son in Silverlake many years ago, and I still have such a soft spot for it,” says Ojai-based interior designer/writer/ poet Amelia Fleetwood (“Silver Linings,” p.40). In addition to tending to her exotic chickens, goats and horses, Fleetwood has also been published in Santa Barbara Magazine. C SPOTS • Santa Anita Park • Downtown L.A.’s historic movie

Dara Rosenfeld

palaces • Matilija Canyon’s swimming

“We paid tribute to some amazing

holes with their deep, clear waterscapes

female designers of the past,” says S.F.-based interior designer Dara

Kristopher Dukes

Rosenfeld (“Fashion House,” p.48),

“The most beautiful part of the house is that while you’re in it, it disappears

Tahoe and Wyoming. She recently

into the desert landscape,” explains writer and interior designer Kristopher

launched a jewelry line of her own,

who is currently at work on projects in

Dukes on her hideaway in

Tamsyn. C SPOTS • de Young Museum

Desert Hot Springs (“A

• FOG Design + Art fair • New local

Separate Peace,” p.56).

restaurants for both food and design

Dukes is currently at work on homes in the South Bay

C People 1 as serializing her first novel, A Sworn Virgin, via

Facebook. C SPOTS • L.A.’s Westin Bonaventure Hotel & Suites • The Getty Center • Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels

Douglas Friedman “It must have been 100 degrees

Ken Fulk “Our freight elevator has been many

outside, but we played some great

things over the years...a bar, an empanada

music, ate good food and laughed

stand, a gallery and even an impromptu

our way through,” says L.A.-,

guest suite!” explains multi-hyphenate

N.Y.- and Marfa, Texas-based

interior designer/party planner/graphic

photographer Douglas Friedman

designer Ken Fulk. This issue’s guest

about the cover shoot, “Silver

designer shared his California vision

Linings” (p.40). Friedman has

with us for Collage (p.82). The S.F. artist

been at work on his first book and

is busy this summer directing events for

preparing for an upcoming fine art

Hamel Valley Wines and as creative

show in San Francisco, which will

director at The Battery. C SPOTS • Point

be curated by Ken Fulk (far right). C SPOTS • Palm Springs • Fort Point • Just One Eye

C 12 SUMMER HOME 2014

Reyes • San Simeon • The Witching Hour, a particular time of day when the light in the sky hits a certain mark

FLEETWOOD: DEWEY NICKS. ROSENFELD: MATTHEW MILLMAN. DUKES: MATT JACOBSON. FULK: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN

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Waldo’s Designs

Waldo Fernandez

los angeles www.waldosdesigns.com


DOSSIER A surfboard shaped by Michel Junod of Santa Cruz shows a range of custom paints—many originating as wall colors Serena Dugan hand-mixed during catalog shoots. Floor pillow with Madeline Weinrib Zig Zag Amagansett fabric; ikat pillows in Stripe, Luce and Mu; Vintage Moroccan carpet; madelineweinrib.com.

Dossier (Opener) Room and Board

Serena & Lily makes a summer splash on S.F.’s Sacramento Street

COURTESY OF SERENA & LILY

BY JENNA SCATENA

The Ikat’s Meow

New York’s painterly prints maven shares her exuberant patterns with San Francisco EDITED BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD

SUMMER HOME 2014

C 15


DOSSIER

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE Summer

finds: colorblocked pillows, striped beach towels and Gobi linens. Lily Kanter and Serena Dugan. The shop joins district neighbors such as March and Anyon Atelier.

LOS ANGELES

E

ntering Serena & Lily’s first West Coast home decor outpost feels like stepping into your preternaturally chic friend’s beach bungalow: relaxed, playful and effortlessly stylish. Launched a decade ago with baby bedding, the powerhouse duo from Sausalito decided this was the year to bring their home goods home. Design Shop, a showroom-meets-creative lab, is in prime territory, too: S.F.’s Sacramento Street. “A catalog is static, so we wanted to open a more dynamic space where customers are part of the design experience,” says Lily Kanter. The boutique blurs the line between consumer and decorator; clients can mix and match cheerful pillow fabric, textured wallpaper and rug swatches on a sprawling island to explore visual conceits. This season, they’ve filled the backyard with the coastal nonchalance of bold boho fabrics for sling chairs, elegant off-whites and unfussy wicker seating. On-site advisers help hit the sweet spot between the self-satisfaction of DIY and the professional eye of the trade. In other words, it’s a real-life Pinterest board. “It’s like discovering peanut butter and chocolate. Putting unexpected things together can inspire your inner creative genius,” says Serena Dugan. No need for a shopping cart—selections are delivered next day, anywhere in the Bay Area. 3457 Sacramento St., serenaandlily.com/designshop. S.F., 415-580-7078; serenaandlily.com/designshop 127 components: 30 survival, 67 first-aid and 30 luxury amenities. BELOW $295-335; preppi.co.

Dossier (Bits)

LOS ANGELES

AIR APPARENT From Therien’s shaded courtyard, the patinated options beckon: decadent antiques galleries filled with gilded benches and marvelous marble; studio designs like sculpted Stephen Antonson plaster chandeliers; and, now, a new exhibition space. The first initiative after Therien’s acquisition by Dessin Fournir, AIR—Artist-in-Residence— balances a commitment to past beauty with cutting-edge furnishings

C 00 SUMMER HOME 2014

from emerging talents. Its launch show charted a course with Dougall Paulson, a Watts-based duo that’s truly out of this world. Think art nouveau-meets-2001: A Space Odyssey with everything from consoles to weavings. “We want to bring new meaning to the idea of space exploration,” they say. Mission accomplished. 716 N. La Cienega Blvd., L.A., 310-657-4615; therien.com.

Therien’s antiques gallery, terrace, and Dougall Paulson at AIR.

FROM FAR LEFT

WRITTEN BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD. PREPPI (2): PREPPI. AIR: BRITTNI MOTEN

FIRST AID, L.A. MADE Earthquake Kits by Preppi aren’t only packed with flares and crank chargers; the monogrammed bag also packs Malin+Goetz toiletries, even chocolate. You might as well survive with sophistication.


Madeline Weinrib


Joshua Roth in front of an Alex Israel artwork.

PACIFICA

Far Out THE C LIST

CANVASSING L.A. WITH ARTS ATTORNEY JOSHUA ROTH Now on the acquisition committee at LACMA, the board of LA><ART and chair of the just-announced Director’s Council at MOCA, Joshua Roth, at only 36, is grooming the city’s next generation of cultural leadership while concurrently building a corporate finance specialization that represents collectors, creators and galleries alike. Perhaps good taste is genetic: father Steven is one of the city’s foremost (and most generous) arts patrons, and Joshua has been building his own art collection filled with names like Sterling Ruby and Mark Hagen for 15 years. • HOT SPOT Downtown and along the Highland Avenue corridor. • WEAR COMFORTABLE SHOES Before buying anything, take a year and meet artists; find out which galleries to go to. • HOLD ON After you’ve held a piece for a time, then you can argue the fair market value is higher. • GENEROSITY Spreading out giving and selling helps cover tax liability. • SHOWTIME If you’re from L.A., Mike Kelley’s exhibition at MOCA (through July 28) is like required reading. Whether you like it or not, have a discussion on why this is important to art history. glaserweil.com.

Near Half Moon Bay, in the wild seaside town of Pacifica, Linda Fahey has opened Yonder Shop with a curation of home goods; seasonal florals; Caru soaps; workshops with artists like block printer Jen Hewett; and ceramics (including her own). Look for scratch-illustrated porcelain platters; indigo splash cups; and spoons with handles carved from found pine, cypress and alder. “Potters know the value of using handmade objects daily,” says Fahey. “We like to serve and eat off dishes made by someone, often someone you know.” 158 Reina Del Mar, Pacifica; yondershop.com. FROM TOP Platter,

spoon, $32.

$250. Original table

Dossier (Bits) STINSON BEACH

HOT PROPERTY

Turnkey in the most creative sense, Coup de Coeur arrives fully furnished: a cook’s kitchen, crystal stemware, Brown Jordan loungers for afternoons in the sun and a contemporary art collection throughout. The residence combines Cape The oceanfront setting is 35 Cod-style charms with minutes from S.F. glass skylights, cheerful blond woods and a bold color scheme. A guest cottage and hot tub count among the sought-after amenities—the most priceless of which is the view. $8,995,000; Sotheby’s Homes, S.F.; sothebyshomes.com.

TAKE COVER With its unmistakable flair, Manuel Canovas offers a new crop of exquisite embroidery, graphic toiles in unexpected tangerines and lilacs, and a return of Les Cavaliers Lin. Lutece, Parfum d’Été, Les Cavaliers Lin; Cowtan & Tout, PDC, L.A., 310-659-1423; and S.F., 415-863-3955; cowtan.com.

C 18 SUMMER HOME 2014

WRITTEN BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD. ROTH: CURTIS BUCHANAN. PLATTER: LINDA FAHEY. COUP DE COEUR: CASSIO ALVES

DOSSIER


southern california’s best

home collection

South Coast Plaza

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DOSSIER SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE

COMPOUND INTEREST

CURVE APPEAL

Architect Oscar Niemeyer (1907-2012)—his sole U.S. project was in Santa Monica (C Magazine, May 2007)—also designed furniture, and four pieces have been reissued stateside (at last) via Espasso. The Brazilian must have been talking about the Rio when he said, “What attracts me is the free, sensual curve.” 8687 Melrose Ave., Ste. B433, WeHo, 310-657-0020; espasso.com.

Dossier (Bits)

Rio rocking chaise, 1977/1978, $38,400.

EYE-CATCHING This rug, we promise, isn’t giving you the evil eye. Mara Hoffman’s interiors foray explodes with the same vibrant colors, graphics and punchy mystical motifs seen in her ready-to-wear. SILVERLAKE

IRON CURTAINS

$298-$1,898, anthropologie.com.

C 20 SUMMER HOME 2014

For summer’s “Competing Utopias” installation, furnishings in the Neutra VDL House will be swapped with Eastern Bloc counterparts from the Wende Museum and Archive of the Cold War. July 11-Sept. 14; neutra-vdl.org.

WRITTEN BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD. CASA ACANTO (3): GREY CRAWFORD. NIEMEYER: COURTESY OF ESPASSO. RUG: COURTESY OF ANTHROPOLOGIE. “COMPETING UTOPIAS” (2): DAVID HARTWELL

W

ant to see the cobblestone inspiration for San Francisco interior designers Andrew Fisher and Jeffry Weisman’s furniture line, Casa Acanto? Rent it. The duo’s five-bedroom, seven-bathroom retreat right in historic San Miguel de Allende is an 18th-century stone enclave, reconstructed as an entertaining haven. Behind the plank doorways, find exquisite indoor and outdoor living rooms, roof terraces, a saltwater pool, and meandering gardens and fountains. Upon arrival at León or Querétaro airports, a full staff is at the ready with city tours, turndown service, even afternoon cocktails. From $10,000/week; fisherweisman.com; premiersanmiguel.com.


Environment


DOSSIER landscape

Artful white furnishings like a James Perse sofa and Paola Lenti wicker chairs.

Stoneware signatures to look for (bottom row): geometric relief and leaf patterns.

BEL AIR

W

hat’s state of the art in outdoor rooms? Consider Rios Clemente Hale Studios’ recently completed project in Bel Air. RCHS installed a steel-boned pavilion with retractable glass walls and a turf-topped viewing deck. Glossed automotive paint lacquers the highconcept decor of the cantilevered, slightly asymmetrical space, while motorized doors, Aero floor-to-ceiling sunshades, infrared heaters and touch screens round out the details. The firm joined with Ferrari Forge to create furnishings like a fire table and console. Even so, the Air Frame Pavilion doesn’t detract from the wide L.A. vistas. rchstudios.com. SANTA MONICA

WICK-IPEDIA FLEUR: (n). Candle to buy when you want your party to smell like neroli but you were born with a black thumb.

CULVER CITY

FIRED UP Inner Gardens owner Stephen Block’s latest acquisition is a rare gathering of vintage planters by David Cressey, the Venice-based ceramicist who shared studio space with the great Robert Maxwell and designed for A. Quincy Jones, Architectural Pottery and Earthgender. 310-838-8378; innergardens.com.

Dossier (Garden)

SAN FRANCISCO

Fringe benefits The 65-year-old S.F. company that helped put Cali-cool on the map has taken a New York minute with Laura Kirar helming a new collection. Standout in the McGuire collaboration is the Guernica, an armchair that uses custom needles to thread 3,500 holes with leather laces.

C 22 SUMMER HOME 2014

Laura Kirar Guernica lounge chair, from $17,496; and tall concrete stool, from $1,094, mcguirefurniture.com.

Blanc Collection, $46, Hollyhock, L.A., and Upstairs at Pierre Lafond, Montecito; fleurcollection.com.

THE C LIST

GARDEN TRIBE SOURCEBOOK

Jen Long and Beth LaDove of Garden Tribe (gardentribe.com)—a new online hub for expert classes—share their circle of friends. • POLLINATE FARM & GARDEN, OAKLAND Turn your backyard into an organic farm. 2727 Fruitvale Ave.; pollinatefarm.com. • LIVING GREEN DESIGN, S.F. An exceptional nursery of plants and artifacts. 1465 Custer Ave.; livinggreen.com. • MOSTLY NATIVES NURSERY, TOMALES For coastal natives. 27235 Hwy. One; mostlynatives.com. • LILA B., S.F. Making beautiful statements with living things. 2128 Folsom St.; lilabdesign.com. • FLORA GRUBB GARDENS, S.F. The ultimate designer garden shop. 1634 Jerrold Ave.; floragrubb.com.

FROM TOP

Pollinate Farm. Beth LaDove and Jen Long of Garden Tribe. Lila B. Design display at Restoration Hardware, S.F.

WRITTEN BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD. PATIO PERFECTION: JIM SIMMONS. CHICKS: LIESA JOHANNSSEN FOR GARDENISTA.COM. LONG AND L A DOVE PORTRAIT: RICH DAHLGREN

PATIO PERFECTION


Ike Kligerman


DOSSIER trend

Milo Baughman for Thayer Coggin bronze drum table, $2,100, dwr.com. BELOW Ode vintage kimono pillow, $535, Hollywood at Home, L.A., hollywoodathome.com.

LEFT

White hydrangea.

Dossier (Trend) CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE Suede oven mitts, $25/each, March, S.F., marchsf.com. Aerin floor lamp, $630, aerin.com. Farrow & Ball paint, from $95/gallon, farrow-ball.com.

Mix Masters From Portuguese desks to vintage indigo, diverse influences bring traditional into transition

C 24 SUMMER HOME 2014

LEFT Cappellini Cap 2 chair by Jasper Morrison, from $2,880, cappellini.it. ABOVE Noir Portuguese desk, to the trade, noirfurniturela.com.

INTERIORS: DAVID GILBERT. HYDRANGEA: INANAVCI/DREAMSTIME.COM. MITTS: BEN KIST. TOTE: JONATHAN KLINE

LEFT (2) DISC Interiors’ David John Dick and Krista Schrock channel Ilse Crawford with saturated color, velvety textures, edgy art and metallic glam; discinteriors.com. BELOW Vintage Malian woven indigo panel, $3,000, The Lotus Collection, S.F., 1stdibs.com. Kelly Wearstler Flaunt rug, $163/sq. ft., therugcompany .com. Black Ash Baskets tote, $650, March, S.F., marchsf.com. Eero Saarinen 54-inch round table, $2,865, knoll.com.


www.emptyvase.com

Empty Vase


J

ust ten minutes from Montecito and Santa Barbara, Rancho Monte Alegre has been planned as a small

rural community set within the spectacular coastal California foothills of the Santa Barbara region. Over 2,800 acres have been preserved on a historical 19th century ranch by limiting development to 25 carefully selected Homesites. Rancho Monte Alegre is one of the last pristine, expansive pieces of land remaining on the California central coast. With spectacular vistas and natural beauty as well as miles of private riding and hiking trails, the Ranch provides a rare opportunity to experience nature in an undisturbed state, while still being within minutes of the city and beach.

R a n cho M o n te A l e g re .co m

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Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. CALBRE# 01106512

stunning hilltop hacienda - WestCaminoCielo.com


Cavalier

Available at

www.meridastudio.com 1035 Post Street San Francisco 415.440.7300 cavaliergoods.com


INSIDER

Profile (Opener)

HOMEBODY

Courtney Applebaum reinterprets the essentials of the California look, one room at a time BY KELSEY McKINNON PHOTOGRAPHED BY JESSICA SAMPLE

Applebaum in the doorway of her studio, a JosĂŠ Zanine Caldas ipe-wood house that was shipped from Brazil and rebuilt by Thomas Hayes Gallery in Hollywood.

EDITED BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD

SUMMER HOME 2014

C 29


INSIDER

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT A handmade Mark Coppos bench, sourced through Heath Ceramics. On Applebaum’s studio deck, Blackman Cruz’s BC Workshop Outdoor Acapulco Rocker chair in bronze. A Fritz Hansen settee from Galerie Half, with an antique Soumak rug from Lawrence of La Brea underfoot. Built-in bookshelves provide a peek into her influences. Applebaum sits at an American trestle table, on a Brazilian rosewood swivel-back dining chair from Thomas Hayes Gallery.

The Row on Melrose Place: period furnishings include a pair of Lina Bo Bardi armchairs, Poul Henningsen table lamp and a Poul Kjærholm pk61 coffee table.

Then, we layered things into that to make it like a home.” The result is an intimate, yet modern California aesthetic. A courtyard pool divides the east and west galleries, respectively designed as a living and dining room (with a smaller area in front dubbed the library) incorporating a Jean Prouvé dining table, a Fortuny floor lamp, Poul Kjærholm coffee tables and Paul McCobb woven leather chairs, all of which are for sale. Applebaum, who calls Laurel Canyon home, juggles mainly residential projects from her Hollywood office, which itself is a testament to her effortless curation. She frequently calls on JF Chen, Galerie Half, Blackman Cruz and Brenda Antin. A longtime customer of Thomas Hayes’ Hollywood gallery, Applebaum and the designer struck a friendship. “A few years ago, he brought back and rebuilt this incredible demountable house by José Zanine Caldas from Brazil and installed it behind his showroom. I have been obsessed with it ever since, and when it came time to get a new office, he offered it to me,” says Applebaum. Her ideal project? “An unlimited budget and no time constraints!” she kids. “I think a perfect project would be when both the client and I haven’t had to compromise on anything and integrity is intact.” Just have a look at her portfolio. courtneyapplebaumdesign.com. •

THE ROW: WILLIAM ABRANOWICZ

I

Profile (Turn)

f you are called upon to outfit the homes and businesses of L.A.’s most chic, does that make you the pre-eminent tastemaker? Courtney Applebaum, 28, disagrees. “I don’t think design should be imposed upon something or someone, but rather it be a collaboration. It’s imperative that I get to know and understand my clients and that we work together,” she says. For the interior designer’s latest commission, The Row’s gleaming new storefront on Melrose Place, no introductions were needed. Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen are childhood friends—in fact, Applebaum’s first project after opening her business in 2009 was Ashley’s apartment in N.Y. Together with architect David Montalba, Applebaum says, “We sought a purity that would reflect both The Row and the building architecturally [the former John Frieda salon].


HILLSBOROUGH Priceless Tudor re-created • Coveted location • 5,570+/- sf • 4 bd / 4 full / 2 half ba • Office Game /media room • Pool • Walled private gardens • 3-car garage • $5,495,000 •

Alain Pinel

650.400-2558 ARILEY@APR.COM 650.739-5596 AGREENMAN@APR.COM 449HILLSBOROUGHBOULEVARD.COM

Anne: License #00859837 | Andrew: License #01874265 Alain Pinel does not guarantee or warrant the accuracy of lot size, sq. ft., or other information concerning the features or the condition of the property provided by the seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and appropriate professionals. Some items of personal property attached to the walls, shown in photos, or represented in text are not included in the sale of the property. Photography by Joel Puliatti.


INSIDER at work

#105 (Light Over the Pacific), 2013, debuted at “streetseasky,” a solo exhibition at Edward Cella Art+Architecture, L.A.

Color Theory WHAT’S YOUR RELATIONSHIP TO COLOR? I try to translate experience

through the language of color. In the end, I want to be a storyteller, but normal words and phrases just never did enough to capture what I was trying to convey. Color did. AND WHY TOTEMS? A lot of reasons. Totems are so referential to my home [Alaska]. First, they were decorative; then, became this sort of heritage lineage. On top of that they have these historical stories that are almost always in reference to man’s interaction with the land: How did we get fire? How did the moon come up? Then it occurred to me that when you stuck something tall and skinny in the ground, it looked like a totem. So you take a surfboard, it’s a totem. You take skis,

Profile (Turn) it’s a totem. It’s a story of that object. They are portraits of experiences, but at the same time, they’re portraits of the landscape or of a person. YOU USE MATERIALS SUCH AS WOOD, BIO-RESIN, PIGMENTS, ACRYLIC, FILAMENT, THREAD, AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, SIGN PAINTER’S PAINT...

They’re like notes. You’ve got to have the right notes. WHAT’S YOUR PHILOSOPHY? I really think about making work that is long lasting, not only in fabrication but also in impact. My dad has a phrase which is, “overkill is underrated.” So everything is built solid, like the Hoover Dam. And the craftsmanship has to be perfect. A Ferrari or a Maserati or an Hermès handbag—I consider those items as competition. YOU’VE WORKED IN PHOTOGRAPHY, VIDEO, PAINTING, GOT A BFA

R. Nelson Parrish

FOLLOWED BY AN MFA AT UCSB, HAD A STINT WORKING ON CAPITOL HILL, EVEN WENT BACK TO ALASKA FOR A YEAR TO BE A WELDER. WHEN DID YOU DEVOTE YOURSELF TO ART?

I was living a cowboy country song: got fired, girlfriend left me, my dog got epilepsy, car blew up. It’s just like, what else could go wrong? I’m gonna give being an artist another shot, one more time. This was five years ago. I literally was down to my

last $50, put everything into this solo show at Cabana Home. And then it just so happens that opening night was the night of the Jesusita Fire. All of Santa Barbara is engulfed in flames. Nobody showed up. And my parents were like, “OK, kid. The dream is done. We’re buying you a one-way ticket home.” So I’m just dragging my feet. And then I get this call from the gallery owner on the last day of the show: Rob Lowe came in and bought 70 percent of the collection. And then randomly I did the guitar [on top of the Roxy Theatre]. I got a solo show in a museum in Park City; John Legend happened to buy a piece. That was last year. You keep making and suddenly people buy stuff. WHAT’S NEXT? I really want to start my next body of work, to explore the idea of activity in space, vastness. I want to work with same color on same color. I think a whole series of white on white on white can be on totems, big wall works. I think it’s very impactful in this day and age, where everything kind of seems crowded and with cellphones and we just need to unplug. We have time, we have space, and it’s a lot bigger than we actually think it is. rnelsonparrish.com. •

#113 (Big Blue), 2013. ABOVE Three Untitled, 2011, works of color, wood, fiberglass and bio-resin.

WRITTEN BY JENNY MURRAY. #105 (LIGHT OVER THE PACIFIC), #113 (BIG BLUE) AND PORTRAIT: JONAS JUNGBLUT

Santa Barbara artist R. Nelson Parrish is a born narrator. Reared in Alaska, he now tells tales through wood and bio-resin totems

Parrish’s Santa Barbara work space.


Ocean Ave South


C HOME

An insider’s tour of California’s stylish homes and gardens ALL

HOMES

SPACES

LIFESTYLE

RESOURCES

FOR SALE

BASIC INSTINCTS The Beverly Hills family residence of fashion designer Jenni Kayne and realtor Richard Ehrlich offers exalted quietude for reflection and play

C Home

HOMES

MODERN

BEACH

COUNTRY

WWW.C-HOME.COM


STYLISH LISTINGS Exquisite Grandeur & Cheerful Elegance Rare Palisades Huntington Bluff ocean-view beauty. Exquisite almost 1920’s grandeur and cheerful elegance. But this is not your “grandfather’s” estate. Five bedrooms, one a quaint guest/maid’s suite, five full-baths plus powder room. Walk to the beach and Palisades Village. 14954 La Cumbre Drive Pacific Palisades, California Price available upon request

Chuck Husting 310.770.6353 chuck@chuckhusting.com

Christina Jhun Hopkins 310.430.9559 christinaJhunHopkins@gmail.com

Pacific Luxury / Jacobson Stunning Big Canyon Estate Designed by renowned architect Fred M. Briggs, this custom 5 bedroom home represents the best of Big Canyon in Newport Beach. Boasting unsurpassed views of Big Canyon Country Club’s 8th fairway and expansive vistas of Fashion Island’s city lights, this architecturally distinct home is represented by The Georgina Jacobson Group. Newport Coast, California Price available upon request

The Georgina Jacobson Group 949-285-8380 georgina@georginajacobson.com


The Frame Shop


Glenbrook-Rarely Offered-Always Desired

In a class of it’s own…

Discretely located within the gated community of Glenbrook on Lake Tahoe’s

Tuscan Villa on 2.3 Acres of lushly landscape grounds. Rich in architectural

East shore is a rare opportunity to create a family legacy. Prominently situated

detail blending artfully designed spaces with sumptuous finishes. The home features generously proportioned rooms; sun splashed chef’s

on 3.7 acres is an unassuming and quietly elegant retreat. With seven bedroom suites and multiple living areas; rolling lawns; private pier and buoys this is a perfect family cocoon. Glenbrook amenities include gated entrance;

kitchen; Four Bedrooms and custom finishes. The grounds include gardens; terraces with features all majestically

security; on site management; community pier and buoy field; beaches; golf

situated behind artful gates on a quiet country road.

club; tennis club; trails and community park. This property is situated outside

19450 Hidden Lakes Lane, Woodbridge CA

the newer Glenbrook homeowners association and not subject to CC&R’s.

Listing Price: $2,600,000

183 Yellow Jacket Rd, Glenbrook NV Listing Price: $12,750,000

Jean Merkelbach (775) 588-0609 jean.merkelbach@sothebysrealty.com

Sierra Sotheby’s / Garage Solutions 03_Home Stylish_Listings_Summer .indd 39

6/4/14 12:48 PM

Awaken to your life’s higher purpose– you know, finding stuff.

A new definition of happiness: always finding exactly what you need. In the garage, this means beautiful wood, steel and aluminum cabinetry, infinitely adjustable wall storage and striking floor finishes. We do affordable and insanely deluxe and the 3D proposal is always complimentary. When you eliminate chaos you quickly find two important things in your life: your gear and your sanity.

800.755.7704 garagesolutions.com CA License #: 722005


Heidi Merrick

VIEW OUR NEW COLLECTION AT WWW.HEIDIMERRICK.COM | 323.717.2153


WELCOME HOME

Founders Letter

They say the clothes make the man (or the woman). But what does your house, or more specifically, your interiors, say about you? Even if you don’t entertain all the time, I think it is essential to come home to an environment that speaks to you and inspires you to live in a more gracious way. When the bed is nicely made and the vase of freshly picked roses is on my side table, I feel like all is right with the world. Those small things add up to the big picture. Speaking of large scale, this issue of C Home has loads of ideas for you to perfect your space and make it more YOU. Find your style, stick with it consistently and your interiors will start to illustrate who you really are. For me? It’s the silver frames containing photos of my family; the antiques I inherited from my beloved father who left this world too soon; the Fortuny fabric I picked up on a trip to Venice with my husband and had upholstered onto a bench; the Lalique perfume bottle collection on my dressing table. When I close my eyes and dream of home, these are the things I see…and these things make me happy.

SEAN DAGEN

Have fun creating and perfecting your joyful space!

Jennifer Hale Founder & Editorial Director SUMMER HOME 2014

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Silver Linings In Silverlake, stylist Jessica de Ruiter and sculptor-designer Jed Lind update a 1950s gem into a bright family oasis

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By Amelia Fleetwood Photographed by Douglas Friedman

Jessica de Ruiter stands at her chevron-patterned front door, designed by husband Jed Lind. PRODUCED BY: KENDALL CONRAD

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Original to the house, a Paavo Tynell pulley pendant was replated and now hangs above the dining room table. OPPOSITE Resurfaced exposed aggregate surrounds the pool, carport and backyard.

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BUY A HOUSE, THEN LIFE HAPPENS. For Jessica de Ruiter and Jed Lind’s midcentury modern abode in Silverlake, the renovation of the structure was definitely a bigger project than they had anticipated. “It took two years,” explains de Ruiter, a fashion stylist (C, Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, W). “Plus, I had our baby girl, James, during the middle of it.” Lind, a sculptor-turned-newly enlisted member of Commune Design’s team, took the reins on the lengthy process. In 1953, a woman artist and civil-rights activist commissioned Gregory Ain to design the house. It was then stamped by James H. Garrott, one of the few African-American architects working in L.A. at the time (he shared an office on nearby Hyperion Avenue with Ain). Lind was concerned that the footprint of the house remain true to its origins, but he wasn’t overly bound to them. Ain’s daughter Emily paid a surprise visit during construction and was able to share valuable recollections (as well as confirm the rumors of her father’s eccentric habit of doing headstands in every house he built). The couple upgraded the kitchen, bathrooms and even the built-ins. A number of rooms are angled with unusual geometry, so in James’ playroom, for example, they made the space feel more square by adding a daybed and bookshelf. They finished the exterior’s breezy landscaping with unmanicured plants such as creeping fig, lavender, sage, melaleuca and a myriad of natives; for the interior, they used warm woods, Moroccan rugs, kilims from Woven Accents and vintage Ikat pillows to soften and contrast sharper angles. De Ruiter’s first love is textiles— all upholstery on the couches is Libeco— and she has a major rug obsession. A share of the couple’s pieces were inherited from Lind’s mother. Other objects, like their white Milo Baughman chair, was picked up along the way. Many were commissioned, such as the unlacquered brass Byron Stripling coffee tables, and pots by ceramicist Stan Bitters. Lind fabricated several choice pieces including the office desk and the bedroom side tables. “If you look around, you realize there’s not much furniture. Most of the bigger pieces are built-ins,” says de Ruiter. “This is a very different house for us. We both grew up in Toronto and were used to much more traditional architecture.” But Silverlake drew them in with all things cool: midcentury modern and high design, coffee spots and boutiques, the lake meadow and reservoir—that, and the house’s light, airy charms. “It just gets better and better,” de Ruiter adds. “It feels like it’s ours. I love the way the layers of the house keep building to make a real home.” •

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Atop tables made by Lind are side lights by Doug Newton for Nightwood. James enjoys story time in her built-in daybed. The powder room’s rare 19th-century mercury mirror with 14-karat gold leaf paint hovers above a handsome travertine countertop. Soft textiles and a vintage Moroccan rug warm up the living room’s built-in sofa.

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With smooth Carrara marble and stools from Sawkille, N.Y., the kitchen is admittedly de Ruiter’s favorite room. OPPOSITE Thanks to their eclectic art collection, the living room is the most colorful space; the sofa was a gift from Lind’s mother.

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With interior designer Dara Rosenfeld, Stephanie Marver looked to her couture wardrobe as inspiration for her Pacific Heights flat BY DIANE DORRANS SAEKS PHOTOGRAPHED BY MATTHEW MILLMAN

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With 3,000 sheets of gold leaf shimmering through the glass top, the superstar of the living room is the 1963 Yves Klein table. Its Lucite reflects onto the screen from Imari Gallery, left. Jean de Merry chairs C 00 face a custom DRD sofa with mink cushions lined in cashmere.


ITH GLAMOROUS CLOSETS bursting with custom-crafted Giambattista Valli, Fendi and Dennis Basso party dresses, Stephanie Marver knew exactly the design approach to take for her newly acquired Pacific Heights apartment, built in 1928. “I love couture gowns, and I appreciate every subtle and original touch, every stitch and layer and trim. I wanted that same attention to detail and luxury with the decor,” says Marver. Her 6-year-old daughter is equally hypnotized by style. “I wanted Carissa’s bedroom to feel very girly, with Mark Shaw’s iconic ’60s photographs of Dior fashions on the walls, and a golden bed,” she continues. “For me, I wanted a tranquil bedroom and a larger closet, and beautiful rooms for entertaining.” She turned to her friend Dara Rosenfeld to design every corner. The S.F.-based decorator looked to great 20th-century women designers. “I found a Chanel-inspired chair, and we visited Chanel’s apartment in Paris. We found ideas in Helena Rubinstein’s Paris apartment and the work of Dorothy Draper,” adds Rosenfeld. Marver also credits Paris fashion legend Valli: “He gave me courage to create the design of my dreams, to take risks, create new ideas and to express who I am,” Marver says of her longtime friend. He designed her frothy, lace-appliqué embroidered, tulle wedding dress for her recent marriage to Jim Marver, the co-founder and managing director of a local venture capital firm. “Giambattista is a master of mixing textures, of creating hand-crafted luxury, at adding ‘secret’ unseen luxury touches that only the woman wearing it can see and feel,” she says. “Dara and I took that concept and included custom-made trim for curtains, handcrafted door handles, embroidered silk wall coverings and antique lighting that’s like jewelry in the hallway.” “It’s rare to have a client this passionate about the details of haute couture and jewelry,” says Rosenfeld, whose design background includes a richly varied career with The Wiseman Group, and in-depth study of antiques and art while working at Christie’s. “We translated fashion details like trim and hand-stitching and embellishment onto almost every surface.” Her first Valli dress, for example, was an ombré cheetah-patterned chiffon cocktail number, and it directly inspired the hall carpet. With her jewelry collection in mind, Rosenfeld designed a rose gold fireplace screen for the dining room, made by Tuell and Reynolds. A pair of crystal-encrusted chenets, also crafted by the NorCal company, were inspired by Van Cleef & Arpels Maharajah earrings. A quick design concept turned into an extensive one-year remodel. They took the awkwardly renovated 3,100-square-foot, three-bedroom layout down to the studs. “We wanted it to look layered, as if I had lived here for years,” says Marver. She adores the beautifully proportioned new interior architecture, complete with a new plaster ceiling in the living room, refinished oak floors, even hand-painted dining room walls in a soft, glowing “makeup” color. “When guests arrive for a fundraiser, there is always a ‘wow’ moment,” says Rosenfeld. Carissa calls it “our fashionista pad,” and for this family, the residence is uplifting, glamorous and fun. •

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The exterior was modeled after a Parisian townhouse. A Lucite chair in the entry was styled after 1930s designs in Helena Rubinstein’s Paris apartment, through The Paris Apartment in Miami Beach, Fla. In the breakfast room, a Madeline Stuart chair accompanies a cream craquelure-finish table from Marbello Design. Rosenfeld designed the chenets based on jeweled Maharajah earrings; Tuell and Reynolds fabricated them. The chaise longue was given Baroque Lucite legs. Dramatic bronze ibex table bases by Léon François Chervet, mid-20th century, topped with a cognac-colored glass top.

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Dramatic mirrored walls turn the dining room into a shimmering jewel box of intricate, beveled, antiqued panels by Paige Glass.

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CLOCKWISE In Carissa’s

glamorous bedroom, a pair of faux-tigerstriped chests, late 20th century, from Battersea. Pillows in velvet, llama and faux snakeskin. Underfoot in the entry: goldflecked, leopard-patterned carpet. The “Coco” chair is dressed in a repurposed Oscar de la Renta pink fur evening coat.

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00 Porta Romana bedside C lamp; wallpaper is by Fromental.


A SEPARATE PEACE That’s no mirage. Kristopher Dukes shares a glimpse into her private retreat: a revolutionary Desert Hot Springs prefab where every room is a room with a view PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOE FLETCHER

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Next to a pool filled with mineral water from a spring on the property, clean-lined loungers provide a platform for afternoon respite. A large share of the furniture was designed by architects Leo Marmol and Ron Radziner, and handmade by Monte Allen Interiors. Similar exterior styles are now available through Danao Outdoor.

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primarily live at the beach near L.A., and the reason I love having a home in the desert is not because the two places are such opposites, but because of their sameness: Looking at the ocean’s horizon invites a sense of expansiveness, of traveling without moving; the desert’s vastness has the same effect on me. The Marmol Radziner Desert House is the 2005 prototype of the SoCal architects’ line of prefab homes; yet, the residence feels custom-tailored to its site. Lifted two feet off the ground, it frames a view of the San Jacinto Mountains as you walk up from the carport, and after entering through the front door, the house—with its walls of windows—disappears into the landscape. It’s not in spite of, but because of my career as an interior designer that I wanted to leave the original decor intact. Most of the furniture was custom-designed by the architects. Much of it is crafted of distressed wood that weathers well under the hot sun and wind; and neutral twill cushions and sage-green and golden rugs echo the muted earth tones of the surrounding environment. I could spend a quarter of my time seeking out treasures to accessorize this second home—after all, I was obsessive about choosing an organic woven wastebasket for the master bedroom. But I’m too busy standing still here, watching the windmills wink at me. •

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ABOVE Clad in harmoniously hued recycled steel with the San Jacinto and San Gorgonio Mountains in the distance, the eco-minded prefab hovers two feet above ground. BELOW Furnishings are minimal but significant—like a pair of Poul KjÌrholm PK22 wicker chairs; sofas are by Marmol Radziner.

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The project was a 2005 prototype for Marmol Radziner’s prefab division. Decking spans 2,400 square feet to connect the L-shaped main house, studio, guesthouse and pool. marmolradzinerdeserthouse.com.

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A. Quincy Jones’ distinguished paean to modern arts and architecture is ready for the modern of today BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD PHOTOGRAPHED BY JIM BARTSCH

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BRODY REBORN


To revive the patio, designer/restorer Stephen Stone removed an ailing tree and craned in replacements, and after restoring the William Haines furniture and lighting, he installed bronze-like tile on the weeping wall. “It looks old-school.�

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A party in 1959. The Brodys commissioned Henri Matisse to create La Gerbe Gerbe, now at LACMA, in 1953.

O STEP INTO THE BRODY HOUSE is as if you walked right into the 1950s pages of Holiday Magazine—where high society and leisure delicately overlap. A. Quincy Jones’ architectural vision of indoor-outdoor living is artful, not decorated. The winged residence is shaped like a boomerang with magnificent floating stairs and black-and-white terrazzo. Each part feels, says designer/restorer Stephen Stone, “like the only room in the whole house.” In collaboration with landscape designer Garrett Eckbo and Hollywood decorator William Haines, Jones designed it in 1949. The Brody House, however, owes much of its notoriety to its owners, Frances L. and Sidney Brody. The philanthropist and real estate developer were perhaps L.A.’s pivotal art collectors of their day. As president of the UCLA Art Council, Mrs. Brody forged ahead with a 1961 exhibition of Pablo Picasso’s work, as well as the development of the Chinese Garden at The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens. The couple helped make LACMA a reality in 1965 and were behind the unprecedented 1966 Henri Matisse retrospective. Sidney Brody passed away in 1983. Upon Frances Brody’s death in 2009, the auction houses themselves polished their paddles. In the end, the Brody Collection sold by Christie’s totaled $224.17 million, with Picasso’s Nude, Green Leaves and Bust, 1932, going for a record-setting $106.5 million. The Brodys bequeathed to LACMA the monumental ceramic La Gerbe, hanging in what she called “the heart of the home.” Senior Curator and Department Head, Modern Art at LACMA, Stephanie Barron said of the extraordinary unbolting and lifting of the 1,800-pound ceramic up and over the house by crane in 2010: “Watching the Matisse hovering in the air high above the trees was one of the most heart-stopping moments I have ever had as a curator.” Meanwhile, as the Christie’s auction unfolded, the 13,500-square-foot abode went to market for $24.95 million. The investor with whom Stone has collaborated for more than two decades purchased the property with the intent of renovation and sale. Stone began with the landscaping. He wanted healthy hedges by the time the construction side was completed. “I get the yards going so they’ll be mature, not anemic,” says Stone. That first night, Stone discovered a few surprises. “I opened up one closet and saw this rolled up set, and I grabbed it,” says Stone. “It was the original full set of plans.” The house had remained virtually undisturbed for decades, and while this would thrill the conservationist, immediate issues loomed, such as a giant tree in the atrium whose roots had upended the terrazzo. The estate was built for the affluent—but in an era when kitchens were low-ceilinged and in servant’s quarters. “I tweaked a few things—updated it without making it really obvious,” explains Stone. He transformed the LP room into a wine cellar,

The original A. Quincy Jones estate was a collaboration with landscape designer Garrett Eckbo and decorator Haines.

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RALPH CRANE/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES, 1959

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ABOVE Stone installed a new front gate to reference the front double doors, complete with a replicated set of Haines solid-brass rams; Aloe bainesii, native to South Africa, replaced the former overgrowth of greenery. BELOW The dining room table found its way back to the house from New York.

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Frances L. and Sidney Brody.

updated a kitchenette in the children’s wing. He added a family room, remodeled and expanded the kitchen. He installed Arcadia black-steel windows and added heat and central air. And if you can imagine, with all that art, there was no exterior gate, so up went an imposing black gate with a reproduction of the Haines ram pulls on the front double doors. “We brought back the original dining room table and restored it,” says Stone. “A family member in New York approached me and asked if we were interested. They had wanted it to stay with the house.” Indeed, there’s a healthy dose of Haines designs—such as the tufted chaise recovered in brown silk—and Stone was behind the restoration of the pieces. Yet, a mix of stylish pieces from contemporary makers like Minotti and Holly Hunt keeps the scene fresh. “I wasn’t trying to make the house a museum to Billy Haines,” Stone explains. As for the space where that showstopping ceramic once presided, says Stone, “I kind of figured, once you’ve had a Matisse on a wall…” The new owners can finish that thought. The estate was recently purchased off market for a tidy sum. An extra dimension of magic, adds Stone, was a firsthand glimpse of the Brody legacy. “Some of the former staff had worked for [the Brodys] for 20-25 years. Mrs. Brody’s daughter-in-law brought them in to see the house when it was finished. They loved her so much.” The former staff approved (but missed all the art). “They were all blown away—with tears in their eyes—that we hadn’t ruined it.” •

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A newly espaliered coral tree climbs happily. “The whole beauty of the house was its greenery,” adds Stone.

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FRANCES L. AND SIDNEY BRODY: RICHARD FISH COLLECTION, SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES, OVIATT LIBRARY, CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, NORTHRIDGE

The strong lines of Haines’ Hollywood Regency decoration was updated with Mokum upholstery.


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A myopic by John Duckworth at the top of the floating staircase illustrates the clean, simple decor that doesn’t compete with the house’s profound angles.

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XANADU Beneath a sculptural dome overlooking North Laguna’s pristine waters, a rarefied miracle of glass and limestone reflects the clean, organic warmth of sun and sea BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARK LOHMAN

A crisp stone border sets the blue mosaic pool apart from the deck’s wood planks and West Elm loungers. OPPOSITE A glass box breezeway connects the two structures; large glass doors pivot out on both the front and the back.

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The concrete dome remained from the original house on the property. The dining room’s wall of glass opens onto a Texas cobbled limestone courtyard, where exterior seating, a wine cellar and humidor are nearby. FROM TOP

LIVING IN A COOL BUT SMALL ABODE that was not optimizing its location was reason enough for a pair of homeowners to raze their property high above North Laguna Beach’s ultramarine waters. What they kept: its sculpted concrete rotunda. (An architect and child of artists, who grew up in the house, had built it in his youth.) To design a dually ethereal and grounded contemporary residence is a difficult task, but Geoff Sumich was up to the challenge. The Orange County architect sited a new domicile of textural interplay with unusually placed wide stone steps and native vegetation. He planned for two simple buildings connected by a tall glass box with glass rafters high overhead. While the Tyndall effect is simply a natural phenomenon, light shining through glass creates a bare aqua tint—here, almost a nod to the sky above and bay below. In a

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smooth stucco structure, the glass-walled dining space spills out onto the lantern-lit cobblestone courtyard. On the living room side, facing the ocean, enormous picture windows slide open. The other building, a more private wing constructed of rough stone, leads to the serene master suite and media room. Next to the long, narrow pool above the main house and courtyard areas, the dome’s open-air space is used as a lounge and powder room for swimmers. With so many monochromatic stairs, paths, decks and garden terraces, a walkabout here is like cycling through an M.C. Escher drawing. Sumich and interior designer Lynn Pries both sought out a subtle blend of new materials (lightly stained wood floors) against rustic and unrefined ones (a custom dining table with a massive slab from Northern California). Tightly edited spaces are open, yet defined for a sense of intimacy with comfortable furnishings and a clean look—like hidden appliances and subtle gray panels that slide to reveal a bar and television. “It’s a livable house,” says Pries, “not overly modern but still with a lot of warmth. If it were too cluttered, you’d distract from the view.” Indeed, it’s a doors-open kind of place—one where the subtle movement of simple white sheers catching the breeze is its own form of meditation. •


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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Off the living and dining rooms, an almost floating wall of Miele kitchen appliances; the island is a thick basalt countertop with custom lighting and Dornbracht faucets; the sectional is a mushroom-hue Minotti. Thin hanging metal pendants from Lightopia illuminate a suede headboard, wood-stained wall and latte-color sheers by Urbana furniture. Dimensions of blue: In the front entry, glass rafters connect two structures in the main house.

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With so many monochromatic stairs, paths and garden terraces, a walkabout here is like cycling through an M.C. Escher drawing.

Recessed behind a quad of wicker chairs from Noir Furniture, L.A., a commissioned sculpture of metal “sticks� is actually a fireplace.

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IDYLL

AWAY

For the Hanson family, St. Helena designer Daniel Hale created a classic wine country residence high above Napa Valley BY DIANE DORRANS SAEKS

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SEAN DAGEN. OPPOSITE: LAURA RESEN

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A wooden bead chandelier from Pottery Barn and weathered RH dining tables add rustic glam to the outdoor terrace. OPPOSITE When seated on the RH sofas, one can view more than 30 miles in the distance.

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Designer Daniel Hale worked with painter Mike Pavlovsky to create the cloud-like, dappled pale gray wall color; the color was matched to an antique tool from a French flea market. The sofa is upholstered with Cisco fabric; polished petrified-wood cocktail tables contrast natural rush matting and poetic arrays on the mantel.

OPEN TO THE SUMMER AIR, DOORS SLIDE EASILY, AND THE LACK OF FORMALITY CREATES A RELAXED MOOD.

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created lots of outdoor space so that everyone could sit on a porch and watch the intense light changing across the valley.” The family brought in handsome tables, Gustavian-style Swedish chairs, silver-gilt mirrors and chandeliers. Sonoma-based landscape architects Roche + Roche started planning the site as the foundation was laid. A morning garden includes a Grecian bay laurel in the hedged gravel courtyard. London plane trees and Japanese wisteria vines provide shade on the pergola. The adjacent terrace is verdant with clipped globes of English boxwood, pittosporum and traditional hydrangea. A citrus and herb garden flank the residence, where there’s also a wine cellar and shed. Two acres have been planted with cabernet sauvignon grapes, just as they imagined, and a swimming pool is set on a sunny plateau. The kitchen garden includes raised vegetable beds, a fruit and nut orchard with European Mirabelle plums, a chicken coop and two new beehives. As the sun sets over the Mayacamas range, golden rays shine directly into the Hansons’ house. Patricia adds, “It is calm and meditative after the boys have gone to bed. We love weekends when everyone is gathered around the table, tasting wines, and music is playing. It’s private, very festive up here on our hillside.” •

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Patricia Adrian-Hanson and Nicolas Hanson with sons Felix, 8, and Theodore, 5. LEFT Van Mourik Cabinetry recycled Douglas fir planks from the old lodge on the property into the kitchen cabinets.

PORTRAIT: ERICA OLSSON. KITCHEN: SEAN DAGEN. PLATE: LAURA RESEN

NE SPRING WEEKEND IN SEARCH OF LAND, Patricia Adrian-Hanson and Nicolas Hanson happened upon a hidden knoll to the east of Napa. With olive groves and two sunny acres of volcanic soil that cabernet grapes love, the five-acre Coombsville plot was near perfect, save for a ramshackle hunting lodge amid the overgrown garden. Ever since the family arrived in Northern California from London nearly four years ago—she’s an interior designer; he’s an executive with a specialty foods company based near Davis—the couple was determined to put down roots so Felix, 8, and Theodore, 5, could grow up in the embrace of a rural setting. Better yet, one with excellent schools; one where they could ride bikes and skateboard along quiet country roads. “We love Napa Valley because it’s still authentically agricultural but at the same time very international and rich with cultural and culinary arts,” says Patricia. They soon met designer Daniel Hale on an architectural tour and quickly identified indoor-outdoor access, informality and light-filled rooms as qualities they desired. Hale’s evolved, earthy style embraces mill-cut exposed wood, concrete floors with a simple seal, recycled old timbers and hand-plastered walls. In 2011, with Hale on board, they started work with Trainor Builders in St. Helena to craft a simple 3,200-square-foot frame house with lots of terraces and the drama of wide overhanging verandas. “My go-to aesthetic and the Hansons’ is quiet and monochromatic,” says Hale. “We


Feature (Napa)

The exterior stucco, an ocher-gray-aubergine hue, was inspired by the clay and dirt of the landscape. The French oak plank floors in the master bedroom. The boys hang out in the pillow-filled “chill� room, where the family watches television.

SEAN DAGEN

FROM TOP

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BATHROOM: SEAN DAGEN. STUDY: LAURA RESEN

Feature (Napa)

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CREDITS

Feature (Napa)

To contrast the study’s French table, the 606 Universal Shelving System by Dieter Rams, now made by Vitsoe, is a different kind of classic. OPPOSITE The bathroom, with a Blu tub and Serena & Lily stool, overlooks an old oak forest.

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COLLAGE LAUDED DESIGNERS SHARE THEIR CALIFORNIA MOOD

Last Look

Using our San Francisco studio’s freight elevator as the staging ground for a grand lake house assignment, we have assembled a collection of well-worn, modern and timeless pieces. Rather than simply designing a backdrop, we set the stage for life to happen (right down to the custom plates and heirloom silver). This is a celebration of lakeside nostalgia and the greatness of Northern California—capturing the pioneering spirit of technology while paying tribute to our adventurous past and majestic natural beauty. •

C 82 SUMMER HOME 2014

KRISTEN LOKEN

KEN FULK


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