Page 1

C For men

caliFornia style

PAUl RUDD This all-american TalenT conTinues To upsTage

speed machine

eric Dane rips up The coasT

checklist

GRand cRU

The worlD oF napa’s privaTe pioneer bill harlan

class act From cool creatives to old-school icons, take a look inside the hearts, minds and homes oF the Golden state’s adventUroUs power players

fall 2013

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guiDeboaTs sTuDio arT secreT menus Designer gear ageD spiriTs surF sessions


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C

FOR MEN

features

96 GAME CHANGER Minus the handlebar mustache, actor Paul Rudd reports on the twists and turns of his storied career...and the strategy behind being a team player.

104 OUT OF AFRICA Inspired by the spirit of Karen Blixen’s Kenyan aesthetic, a Malibu ranch beats to its own drum.

112 FAST AND FURIOUS From quick turns to magnificent secret stretches, actor Eric Dane opens up on the rip-roaring Ferrari rally from Pasadena to Pebble Beach in one of the most luxurious speed machines— and lives to tell us about it.

118 SUPER NATURAL The Sea Ranch, an undisturbed colony of architectural marvels on the Sonoma Coast, stands the test of time.

With a luxury hotel, private club and two of the most coveted cult labels, Bill Harlan, Napa’s kingpin of hospitality, details the good life. PAUL RUDD in a Prada coat, sweater and trousers, Page 96.

C 16 MEN’S FALL 2013

CLIFF WATTS

124 THE TASTEMAKER


FAST AND FURIOUS, Page 112.

departments 22 FOUNDER’S LETTER

heard of. Paul Newman and dress

91 C TRAVEL

Best in class.

watches. Hedi Slimane heads to

In a New York state of mind?

S.F. Denim for all mankind. Plus,

Plus, paddleboarding with

this season we’re mad for plaid.

Laird Hamilton.

67 C DESIGN

129 SHOPPING GUIDE

24 C PEOPLE Who’s who behind the scenes of C for Men.

Driving test: What kind of Mercedes

27 C WHAT’S HOT

man are you? One-on-one

130 C CALIFORNIA

A look at new and exciting

with S.F. designer Yves Béhar.

Home team advantage: Bill Walsh

people, places and products

Order your perfectly constructed,

takes a knee with Joe Montana.

around the state: Ian Barry’s custom

Cali-designed guideboat.

bikes. All eyes on photographer Estevan Oriol. Greg Lauren sniffs

79 C THE MENU

out success. The best of Nat

A new pit stop along PCH

Geo. Rehabbed Land Rovers.

worth braking for: Big Sur

PAUL RUDD photographed by Cliff Watts

Roadhouse. Juicy news from

in an Etro blazer and shirt, Prada trousers

Pono Burger. Belcampo’s finest

Dior Homme’s artist in residence.

cuts. A Seaworth cold brew.

The coolest shop you’ve never

Edible art on display at SMMOA.

C 18 MEN’S FALL 2013

and J.Press tie. See Shopping Guide for more details, page 129. Styled by Michael FIsher for Starworks Artists. GROOMER Rheanne White for See Management.

NATE CHRISTENSON

43 C STYLE

On Our Cover


BEVERLY HILLS

BEVERLY CENTER

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C FOR MEN

JENNIFER HALE

Founder + Editorial Director

LESLEY CAMPOY President + Publisher JENNY MURRAY Editor

KELSEY McKINNON

SUE CHRISPELL

Senior Editor

Associate Publisher, West

RENEE MARCELLO

SAMANTHA TRAINA

Associate Publisher, East

Fashion Editor

CRISTA VAGHI

ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD

Account Director, California

Design + Menu Editor

ALEXANDRA VON BARGEN

ELIZABETH KHURI CHANDLER

Account Director, New York

Arts + Culture Editor

KRISTINE SCHREIBER Account Director, New York

ELIZABETH VARNELL Digital Editor

CAMERON HARROS Director, Business Development

ANNINA MISLIN Associate Fashion Editor

ANN SONG Director of Integrated Media

JACKIE TREITZ

CATHERINE ABALOS

Designer

Sales + Marketing Manager

TARA MINSHULL

KRISTA NATALI

Photo Editor

Administrative Assistant

MOR WEIZMAN

TROY FELKER

Art Production Assistant

Finance Associate

ALLISON OLESKEY

SANDY HUBBARD

Special Projects Director, SHO & Company, Inc.

Information Technology Director

STYLE EDITOR-AT-LARGE

George Kotsiopoulos

SAN FRANCISCO EDITOR-AT-LARGE

Diane Dorrans Saeks

DESIGN EDITOR-AT-LARGE

CIRCULATION CONSULTANTS/CIRCULATION SPECIALISTS, INC. SPECIAL PROJECTS CONTRIBUTORS CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Andrea Stanford

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR-AT-LARGE

Kendall Conrad

Greg Wolfe, Russell Marth

Molly Creeden, Nicolas Stecher, Stephanie Steinman, Alisa Wolfson

Christine Lennon, Suzanne Rheinstein, Cameron Silver, Michael S. Smith,

Jamie Tisch, Nathan Turner, Mish Tworkowski, Hutton Wilkinson CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Caroline Cagney, Kristina Dechter, Heather John Fogarty, Marshall Heyman, Deborah Schoeneman, Nora Zelevansky

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS INTERNS

David Cameron, Lisa Eisner, Douglas Friedman, Lisa Romerein, Williams + Hirakawa

Kendra Alder, Haley Barth, Madison Dahlke, Alexandra Floersch, Alyssa Fung, Jack Siebert, Rebecca Wheeler

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Chairman NICHOLAS HALE

Vice President + Chief Financial Officer C OFFICES CALIFORNIA NEW YORK

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founder’s letter

B

est in class…It’s something to strive for in all aspects of life. From the best cars, clothes and products to being the best person we can be, it all boils down to standing apart from the crowd. And our fall C for Men issue is full of distinctive stories. Winemaker Bill Harlan is a true artist. His wines are cult favorites.

His other endeavors, from resorts to restaurants, are success stories in

themselves. That the intensely private man opens up to C in a special interview inviting us into his world is an incredible honor. Recalling the origin of a storied enclave in Northern California, we profile The Sea Ranch, a unique community north of San Francisco. The architecture, preservation and passion behind this place are unparalleled. Some guys love the art of collecting…watches, wines, cigars…and let’s not forget about cars! We asked our friend, actor Eric Dane, to join a Ferrari road rally up California’s coast and report back. The ultimate road trip if there ever was one, and we’re bringing you along for the ride. Paul Rudd’s career trajectory is on its own course…straight to the top. Playing Mr. Nice Guy or the funny guy for most of his career has proved him well. That he stars in some of the most memorable movies (Anchorman, This Is 40) of course only helps cement his celebrity status. Men like him, women like him…he can do no wrong. We present fall’s cool classics on this versatile actor. Uber realtor Chris Cortazzo’s Malibu getaway in the hills of Mulholland Drive is the perfect weekend escape. From the cottages that dot the property to the most beautiful pool and grounds, this place is magical. He brought in friend and decorator Martyn Lawrence Bullard to amp it up to the nines and put it in a class of its own. All of these stories show you best in class in multiple categories. From actors to architecture, wines and wardrobes, we keep you up to date on high-performance living…full

Jennifer Hale Founder & Editorial Director

WE’D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU Please send letters to edit@magazinec.com.

C 22 MEN’S FALL 2013

AZABRA PHOTOGRAPHY

of the best life has to offer.


C

people WHO’S WHO BEHIND THE SCENES OF THIS MONTH’S ISSUE, PLUS THEIR FAVORITE CALIFORNIA PLACES

CLIFF WATTS

“Driving through beautiful countryside to work with a wonderful and talented man like Paul [Rudd] was a pleasure. It’s why I love doing my job so much,” says photographer Cliff Watts of this month’s cover shoot, “Game Changer” (p.96). Watts has also shot for Vogue, Bazaar and W. C SPOTS • Big Sur • Ojai’s cactus and succulent gardens • Santa Cruz beach and boardwalk

MICHAEL FISHER “The trick was to keep the wardrobe sophisticated rather than let it be a more obvious, relaxed, rural vibe,” says stylist Michael Fisher of Rudd’s cover portfolio “Game Changer” (p.96). This fall, Fisher will be working with C SPOTS • DTLA: Bar Ama and Boca • La Otra Taqueria Escuela on

ERIC DANE “It was a dream come true to

Beverly Boulevard

coast up the highway behind the wheel of one of the world’s most

• Sweeney Todd’s Barber

prestigious machines,” says actor Eric Dane of his assignment for

Shop in Hollywood

“Fast and Furious” (p.112). The “Grey’s Anatomy,” Marley & Me and Valentine’s Day star will begin filming TNT’s “The Last Ship” this

NATE CHRISTENSON “My only concern was...how do I tail an exotic sports car enthusiast, driving an F12 Ferrari, through L.A. and up the coast to Santa Barbara?” recalls photographer Nate Christenson, who documented “Fast and Furious” (p.112). Christenson recently shot for Red Bull and Electric Run. C SPOTS • Continuum Estate in Napa • The Roxy Theater in Hollywood • Hanging out in Beverly Grove with my goddaughter

fall. C SPOTS • In-N-Out Burger • Surfing • Driving on PCH

NICOLAS STECHER “Despite knowing Ian [Barry] for so many years, it’s the first time we’ve recorded a conversation,” says veteran automotive writer Nicolas Stecher, who authored Barry’s profile “Full Throttle” (p.27), as well as “The Classics” (p.67) and “Fast and Furious” (p.112). The book he co-wrote with Barry, The Impossible Collection of Motorcycles, is featured in “Impossibly Cool” (p.28). C SPOTS • Louie’s of Mar Vista, my new watering hole • Bar 107 • J. Nichol’s Kitchen

FISHER: PAUL GILMORE. DANE: NATE CHRISTENSON. CHRISTENSON: ERIC DANE. STECHER: ROBERT KERIAN

the actor and Jonah Hill.


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KARL PUCHLIK, COURTESY OF MICHAEL KOHN GALLERY

Ian Barry’s The Kestrel, 2010, and framed clay, plywood and foam in Memories III, I, II, 2013.

Full Throttle

Form meets function as Ian Barry’s masterpieces go on display BY NICOLAS STECHER

W

hen I was editor of Intersection magazine about seven years ago, we were chasing down actor/proskater Jason Lee for a feature. For months he’d cancel at the last minute, until one time he called and told us he had commissioned a motorcycle from a guy in Silverlake; if we showed up to the shop when Lee was picking it up, we could do the exclusive. I went to the workshop to witness the completed bike for the first time and had a chance to meet Ian Barry, the

builder of the bike. The Santa Cruz native, who was a student of architecture, metal fabrication and computer science, was like this mad scientist—hadn’t slept or showered in days, hair a mess and shirt covered in oil; he was burning with that manic high that only comes from ignited creativity. Then and there I realized the bike and Barry were as much, or more, of the story than Lee. No one had any idea The Bullet would gain the fame it did—winning first place at the Pebble Beach Motorcycle >>

EDITED BY KELSEY McKINNON MEN’S FALL 2013

C 27


what’s hot

The White, 2013, with framed aluminum sculpture, The White, 2013.

<< Concours d’Elegance and landing him in publications across the world. Of The Bullet, Barry explains, “The 1950 Triumph Silverbird engine was a starting point, and the rest was handmade.” This was the beginning of The Falcon Series. Barry, now 40, has produced three bikes since (each requiring between one and two-and-a-half years to complete), which were the subjects of his first fine art exhibit, at the Michael Kohn Gallery this summer. The floating functional sculptures in “The White, The Black, The Kestrel” were featured alongside Barry’s other framed works (e.g., metal shavings from the construction of The White are hung beside the finished product). Kohn says of the new work, “The frame of the motorcycle becomes the legs of a gazelle; the

sheen of the stainless steel and worked aluminum and brass fittings acquire this Blade Runner-esque mix of futurism and nostalgia in one. It’s the beautiful balancing act of all these elementals that make it interesting.” That’s not to say the pieces are just meant to be looked at—with the exception of The White, Barry has ridden all of his bikes for hundreds of miles. And, in the spirit of an artist, he goes at his own pace. “In my experience, evolution happens over time,” Barry says. “Movement isn’t contrived. I am continuing to move forward in the directions that inspire me. Being exhibited at the Kohn Gallery feels in sync and harmony with the deeper intentions behind my work.” ianbarry.com; kohngallery.com. •

Impossibly Cool The thick rubber cover is just a hint at what’s inside: L.A.based artist/motorcycle designer Ian Barry and writer Nicolas Stecher hand-selected 100 bikes for Assouline’s new title The Impossible Collection of Motorcycles. What were the criteria? BARRY It was based on rarity, design, performance, historical impact, innovation and aesthetics. Popularity, uniqueness and of course personal connection were also considered. It ultimately came down to: What are the 100 motorcycles I would want to spend the most time with? Where did you find these bikes? STECHER Some of these had been destroyed, so we had to use vintage photography; others

HarleyDavidson’s “Captain America,” 1969.

were replicas. And some were completely unknown one-offs that only the most hard-core collector would know. If you could pick one favorite? BARRY The Britten V1000. Britten designed and made the entire motorcycle from scratch, even hand-wrapping the carbon fiber in his backyard and casting his own engine cases. He went on to win first place at Daytona against multimillion-dollar factorysponsored machines. STECHER I’ll go with the Curtiss V8. It was just such an abomination, such a middle finger of engineering. Imagine the hubris of fastening an airplane-derived V8 engine onto two wheels, the absurd vision and engineering talent needed to make it function. • The Motosacoche was made in France In 1914.

BMW’s R7 1934 prototype graces the cover (Assouline, $695).

TOP: KARL PUCHLIK, COURTESY OF MICHAEL KOHN GALLERY

Two California experts single out the best bikes ever known to man


what’s hot

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT “We came

across a village in Turkey where people made homes inside these crazylooking rocks,” says Oriol. David Choe inside a Russian helicopter in Panjshir Valley, Afghanistan. LA Portraits will be printed in Italy (Drago, $50).

L

Point of View

ike the city he calls home, photographer Estevan Oriol represents many worlds— from the gun-toting, prison-tattooed back alleys of East L.A. to the gilded streets and high cheekbones of Hollywood. The son of Latino photographer Eriberto, Oriol first began taking photos as tour manager for early-’90s hip-hop group House of Pain. Now, 20 years later, Oriol has shot movie posters (Al Pacino and Robert De Niro in Righteous Kill), brand work (Vans, Adidas, Nike, Diesel, Citizens of Humanity, RVCA, et al.) and highly coveted pet projects—like participating in MOCA’s “Art In the Streets” exhibit and following renowned street artist David Choe through Afghanistan, Turkey and Dubai this past summer. Most recently he shot the chiseled profiles of Ryan Gosling, Josh Brolin and Emma Stone for their L.A. noir flick Gangster Squad. His fifth book, due in October, LA Portraits, explores some of the most insular subcultures of Los Angeles, doing more to illuminate those worlds than Gangster Squad ever could. estevanoriol.com.

TighT kniT Of Spindle & Canister’s Italian cashmere, only 20 Bade honeycomb-stitched sweaters were produced. Look for the brand’s relocated post at the Malibu Country Mart. spindleand canister.com. Bade cashmere sweater, $820.

FIELD NOTES The private life of the world’s top soccer star is documented by two of his biggest fans—Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana—in the new tome Lionel Andrés Messi ($195, Rizzoli). The Argentine forward for La Liga club FC Barcelona and Argentina’s national team, Messi seems happy to swap his jersey for designer garb. dolcegabbana.com.

Out of the Ordinary Not all tequila is created equal. S.F.-based Partida Tequila begins with handpicking the sweetest agave plants grown in Mexico. After baking in modern stainless steel ovens, the tequila is twice distilled. Founder Gary Shansby says, “We also age Partida longer than most premium tequila brands—six months for Reposado, 18 months for Anejo and 39 months for Elegante.” Sip away. From $40; partidatequila.com.

C 30 MEN’S FALL 2013

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Harvesters in Mexico’s Tequila Valley. Except the Blanco variety, Partida is aged in one-pass Jack Daniel’s Whiskey barrels. Reposado, $45.

WRITTEN BY NICOLAS STECHER (ESTEVAN ORIOL). LA PORTRAITS COVER AND IMAGES (2): ESTEVAN ORIOL. MESSI: DOMENICO DOLCE, COURTESY OF DOLCE & GABBANA. SPINDLE & CANISTER SWEATER: MOR WEIZMAN

Messi, photographed by Domenico Dolce in Barcelona.


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Bottles get a personalized touch. Lauren at the Cegedis factory in Paris. BELOW Greg Lauren for Barneys New York, $195.

Objet d’Art

I

wanted the bottle to capture the artistic spirit of being a painter...as if it was discovered behind jars of paint in my studio,” says L.A.-based artist/designer Greg Lauren, who debuts his first fragrance with Barneys New York as part of its Designer Fragrance Collection. After developing the scent (“It’s unusual...with a vanilla quality, and a couple other secret ingredients”) with master perfumer Ralf Schwieger in New York, Lauren traveled to the Cegedis factory in Paris’ Cosmetic Valley to customize 3,000 bottles. He used a hammer, chlorine and sandpaper to achieve a weathered cap, then splattered the glass with paint, ink and even coffee. The result is Lauren to a T and a testament to the family métier (his uncle Ralph would be proud). “I loved the challenge of creating a unisex scent, the contradiction of masculine and feminine, rugged and vulnerable, artistic and elegant, pain beneath beauty. These are all themes at the core of my clothing, and what I always try to explore as an artist.” Available exclusively at Barneys New York; barneys.com.

After a breakout set at Lollapalooza this summer, L.A. rock band Bad Things releases its self-titled debut album October 8th on Warner Bros. Records. The headbanging lead guitarist is none other than pro-snowboarder Shaun White enjoying his off-season. badthings.net.

Bad Things album cover. Palomar, Anthony Sanudo, Lena Zawaideh, Davis LeDuke, Shaun White.

RIGHT Jared

MAR VISTA

Surf School Make your own board at L.A.’s Shaper Supply co—right down to the decals. $699; shaper supply.com. C 32 MEN’S FALL 2013

WEST HOLLYWOOD

STEP TO IT

Step 1: Place foot on the 3-D scanner. Step 2: Select style (options range from desert boots to golf shoes and elegant oxfords), color, material and sole. Step 3: Wait six weeks as your shoes are constructed by artisans in Portugal. Behold: bespoke kicks from WeHo’s newly opened The Left Shoe Company. 8473 Melrose Ave., WeHo, 323-944-0764; leftshoecompany.com.

FROM LEFT The

Londra, $595. The Melrose shop.

GREG LAUREN (2): CHRISTIAN ABOMNES. BAD THINGS PORTRAIT: DORON GILD

Banded Together

Shaping lessons are six hours for boards under seven feet.


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Zegna’s new storefront. Fall 2013 runway looks. Accessories on display.

BEVERLY HILLS

House of style Metallic strands embedded into the glass at ermenegildo Zegna’s new

337 N. Rodeo Dr., B.H., 310-247-8827; zegna.com

The hottest faces at Switzerland’s Baselworld this year: dark, simple dials wrapped with sleek steel bands.

IWC Jewels 21, $6,600. Montblanc TimeWalker Southern Hemisphere, $5,700. TAG Heuer Carrera 1887, price upon request.

FROM LEFT

LEFT As

Faster and Faster

The title John Divola: As Far As I Could Get was lifted from a series the photographer shot between 1996 and 2010. He positioned his camera on a tripod, set the timer for 10 seconds, then ran as far as he could into the frame. Pomona College Museum of Art (through Dec. 22), LACMA (Oct. 6-Feb. 2) and Santa Barbara Museum of Art (Oct. 13-Jan. 12) host simultaneous exhibits of the L.A. artist’s remarkable, yet largely uncelebrated, 40-year career. His 1974 series “Vandalism,” ’75’s “Forced Entry,” ’77-’78’s “Zuma” (a documentation of the gradual destruction of an abandoned house in Malibu) will be on view. pomona.edu; lacma.org; sbma.net.

Far As I Could Get, 10 Seconds, 2_15_2010, 3:29PM to 3:42 PM PST, 34.166301,-116.033714, 2010, LACMA. BELOW From, Dogs Chasing my Car in the Desert, D24 Run Sequence, 1996-2001, Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

AS FAR AS I COULD GET, 10 SECONDS, 2_15_2010, 3:29 PM TO 3:42 PM PST, 34.166301,-116.033714 AND FROM, DOGS CHASING MY CAR IN THE DESERT, D24 RUN SEQUENCE: JOHN DIVOLA

Show Steelers


a sporting life

Alastair Cook, England Cricket Captain 2 S av i l e R o w, L o n d o n 8 1 6 M a d i s o n Av e n u e , N e w Y o r k k e n ta n d c u r w e n . u s . c o m


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pose with the Mark Twain redwood in California, 1892. CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: N.E BECKWITH, GEORGE STEINMETZ, VOLKMAR K. WENTZEL, GEORGE STEINMETZ AND ROBERT E. PEARY

LEFT Loggers

Adventure Seekers

FROM TOP Limestone hills punctuate privately owned fields, Luoping, China, 2007. Nepalese workers carry a Mercedes from Kathmandu to India to trade for an American model, 1948. Dunes trap rainwater in Brazil, 2009. American explorer Robert E. Peary claimed to be the first to reach the North Pole, 1909.

Riveting images from National Geographic’s archives go on display

A

n Alaskan Eskimo wearing a parka made of walrus intestines. A South African lion braving a violent dust storm. Rush hour at the Churchgate Railway Station in Mumbai. These diverse snapshots of life on our planet are among 501 works judiciously selected from National Geographic’s 11.5-million-image library for the Annenberg Space for Photography’s “The Power of Photography: National Geographic 125 Years.” Taking viewers to every corner of the globe—and back—the breathtaking scenes are presented in special print and scrolling digital installations at the Century City center to commemorate

C 36 MEN’S FALL 2013

the photojournal’s anniversary. Curators commissioned an original documentary produced by Arclight Productions to accompany the exhibition, which profiles six of National Geographic’s top contributors. Lynsey Addario, the Pulitzer-winning human rights photojournalist who was kidnapped in Libya in 2011, was interviewed for the film, along with David Guttenfelder, whose recent work offers a rare glimpse inside North Korea. A visually moving look at the past and the present, proprietor Wallis Annenberg explains, it reminds us “we are all stewards of this remarkable planet.” Oct. 26-Apr. 27; annenbergspace forphotography.org. •


RACING IN STYLE. MILLE MIGLIA MILLE MIGLIA GMT

South Coast Plaza • 714.432.0963 E x p l o r e t h e c o l l e c t i o n a t U S . C H O PA R D . C O M SPONSOR S I N C E 1 9 8 8 A N D O FFI CI AL TI ME KE E PE R O F THE M ILLE M IGLIA RAC E


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This 1986 Land Rover Defender was equipped for a California client to use at his ranch for off-roading and hunting. “We outfitted it with checker plating, a roof rack for storage and a ladder, as well as adding two fog lights in the center of the grille and four lights to the roof rack,” says Matthew Perlman.

Pimp My Ride Introduced in 1948, the Land Rover Defender was a textbook utility vehicle for off-roading in the English countryside—and a staple of the British Army. This past spring, L.A.-based Matthew Perlman opened West Coast Defender to import vintage models and transform them into luxury SUVs —adding amenities like cross-stitched or piped leather seating, Bluetooth and navigation. Clients can also customize gas or diesel engines, manual or automatic transmissions and leftor right-hand steering. From $95,000; westcoastdefender.com.

5

TRAVEL COMPANIONS RIGHT Louis

Vuitton watch, $9,250, louisvuitton.com. Dior Homme sneakers, $700, diorhomme.com.

SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR MORE DETAILS, PAGE 129

Whether trailblazing or tooling around town, a tricked-out vintage Defender is the way to go

Hit the road in the season’s coolest gear for the well-traveled gentleman

FROM TOP David Yurman key chain, $295. Persol sunglasses, $380, sunglasshut.com.

Gucci travel bag,

mr.porter.com. C$870, 00 MEN’S FALL 2013


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TAG HEUER Carrera Calibre 36 Flyback chronograph, $7,900. Valley Fair Mall, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 1355, Santa Clara, 408-247-0620; Westime, 254 N. Rodeo Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-270-0000.

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO Black calfskin boot with raspberry rubber sole, $1,300. 357 N. Rodeo Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-273-9990; ferragamo.com.

ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA French calfskin briefcase, $1,760; 337 N. Rodeo Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-247-8827; South Coast Plaza, Costa Mesa, 714-444-1534.

TALLIA ORANGE OFFICINE PANERAI Radiomir 1940 Oro Rosso 42MM (PAM513), $22,300. 9490A Brighton Way, Beverly Hills, 310-734-0522; 1137 Prospect St., La Jolla, 855-459-1950.

Vogue TJV0060, $175. Macyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; talliaorange.com.

PORTS 1961 Forty-eight hour travel bag, $2,375. ports1961.com for locations.


style

HOMME BODIES

WRITTEN BY MOLLY CREEDEN. SARAH TRIGG

L

os Angeles artist Aaron Curry’s sculptures stand somewhere between two and three dimensions, in abstract, anthropomorphic shapes made of plywood, metal and cardboard. From a cursory glance, you might see a hint of Picasso, a nod to Basquiat, but the structures, which extend with limb-like pieces and palpable emotion, aren’t familiar to the eye. As part of Dior Homme’s collaborative series, Curry, shown here in his Hollywood studio, has created a totemic installation for the Rodeo Drive store. Whimsical and human-like, the piece, crafted in cardboard and painted black and white (a departure from Curry’s usual Day-Glo palette) makes for a playful juxtaposition to the calm and restraint that characterized the fall collection’s tightly tailored suits, buckled outerwear and Gattaca-inspired cardigans. Closer inspection of Curry’s piece reveals photo prints of the artist’s skin and hair. “It deals with people thinking about covering their skin—the way they obsess about their own bodies before getting dressed,” says Curry, whose first solo museum exhibition was staged at the Hammer in 2008. “It seemed particularly appropriate for L.A.” The window display is the West Coast counterpart to the 57th Street store in New York, where artist Matt Keegan installed a stainless steel, highly reflective mirror structure called “How Do I Look?” 315 Rodeo Dr., B.H., 310-247-8003; dior.com. •

Born in San Antonio, Curry has an MFA from Pasadena’s Art Center College of Design.

EDITED BY SAMANTHA TRAINA MEN’S FALL 2013

C 43


style

An Archival Clothing backpack bookends a rack at Wittmore. BELOW Paul C. Witt.

WEST HOLLYWOOD

GO WEST After Wittmore launched from New York last year as an online marketplace for the guy who is “professional, but doesn’t wear a suit for a living,” a large percent of orders started coming from California. So founder Paul C. Witt, who spent 17 years in the fashion industry, cutting his teeth at Diesel and Original Penguin and consulting for Club Monaco and Interview Magazine, headed west to ride the Pacific swell with an L.A. pop-up. After its success, he opened doors to a permanent location in West Hollywood, stocking a blend of well-known and niche labels, including Levi’s Vintage, Gant Rugger, Cardigan, Oliver Spencer and Timo Weiland. “There’s a modern, laid-back, city meets West Coast vibe happening,” Witt says of the simply turned-out shop. 8236 West 3rd St., WeHo, 323-782-9791; shopwittmore.com.

MAKE YOUR MARK Arriving from Milan at the TOD’S store on Rodeo Drive in late October, the limitededition Sartorial Touch collection— branded JP TOD’S as a tribute to the original name of the company—can be customized with leather preference and marked with the client’s initials. 310-285-0591; tods.com.

BEVERLY HILLS

Brown Monk Strap shoes, $1,545.

Join the races with Gucci’s recent debut of 12 new trainers, from suede autumn solids to color-blocked nylon kicks. gucci.com. Brown crocodile and mesh runners, $950, and blue and black satin runners, $490, gucci.com.

Ref. 5227G, Calatrava watch with mechanical self-winding movement, $37,300.

C 44 MEN’S FALL 2013

TIME TRAVELER

F

or Thierry Stern, president of venerable Geneva watchmaker Patek Philippe, Los Angeles is great for inspiration. “I think California is a dream place for young people,” he said at a recent event in Beverly Hills. No one can accuse Stern of failing to give the next generation its due—he’s spent the past three years refining Patek’s signature timepiece, the Calatrava, to give it a more youthful appeal. Unveiled in April, Ref. 5227G comes in a slender 18k gold case with a display back protected by an elegant officer’s-style dust cover. “I tried to build a watch that a father and son would fight over,” Stern says. By all accounts, mission accomplished. patek.com.

WRITTEN BY MOLLY CREEDEN, VICTORIA GOMELSKY (PATEK) AND ANNINA MISLIN. TOD’S: COURTESY OF TOD’S. WITT PORTRAIT: MATTHEW KRISTALL

ON YOUR MARK


TIMEWALKER VOYAGER UTC SPECIAL EDITION

Wherever the journey takes you, the second time zone synchronized with Universal Time Coordinated (UTC) lets you keep track of all your global interests. Automatic movement. Second time zone with 24-hour display and day/night indication. 42 mm stainless-steel case with satin-finished bezel. Crafted in the Montblanc Manufacture in Le Locle, Switzerland.

south coast plaza â&#x20AC;˘ montbl a nc.com


style Behind the showroom, Knight produces large-scale furniture, also available for purchase.

BASIC APPEAL

T

Ware House

LOS ANGELES

Interior designer Amaryllis Knight has a knack for bringing underrepresented gems to her Los Angeles showroom Altai—whether last spring’s exclusive menswear pieces from Raf Simons, Casely-Hayford and Tim Coppens, or her current stock of special-edition furniture from Alexandra Llewellyn, Benjamin Hubert and The Hansen family. Her studio in the back, with floor-to-ceiling windows, sets a peaceful scene for private design consults. 5810 West 3rd St., L.A., 323-931-3333; altai.la.

TAKE FLIGHT To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the French jet The Falcon, Bell and Ross created two limited-edition timepieces. Part of its Vintage Sports Heritage line, the watches are crafted with the same precision that delineates the aeronautics world, with a polished steel case, leather band, anti-reflective sapphire crystal and the aircraft’s likeness silk-screened at six o’clock. Available online only in October; bellross.com.

Alex Drexler

Vintage BR 123 Sport Heritage watch, $3,100.

SILVERLAKE

Major Duffle in British Tan, $745.

Skip Town

Dark blue denim in 6 Week wash, $225. Green Pacific Plaid shirt, $160. FROM ABOVE

C 46 MEN’S FALL 2013

Los Angeles-based accessory designer Clare Vivier makes her first official foray into men’s design this fall with structured leather weekenders in black, tan and cobalt blue. 3339 Sunset Blvd., Silverlake, 323-665-2476; clarevivier.com.

WRITTEN BY MOLLY CREEDEN AND ANNINA MISLIN. ALTAI: TRAVIS SHINN. DREXLER PORTRAIT: COURTESY OF ALEX MILL

his fall, uniform mainstays— jeans that go with everything, the soft and sturdy T-shirt, a woven oxford—are hewn in a new line, Alex Mill. Founded by Alex Drexler (the son of J. Crew CEO Mickey), an alum of Gryphon and Steven Alan, the brand is built around essentials for men and boys (all shirts are wash-and-go), with a few individualized details (the letter “A” stitched onto buttons). “Growing up in California was quite simple and laid back,” recalls Drexler, “That idea of simplicity has influenced the line— it’s not overthought or too fussy. Once men find the right shirt or pair of jeans, they want to buy multiples.” From $55; available at Barneys.com, Odin and Unionmadegoods; the brand recently found a concrete home in Nolita, N.Y.; alex-mill.com.


NEW YORK BAL HARBOUR BEVERLY HILLS LAS VEGAS

TO BE ONE OF A KIND BRIONI.COM


style

Wares at Mohawk Man. BELOW Kevin Carney. Garrett Leight sunglasses, $310.

BOYS CLUB This fall, San Francisco welcomes Saint Laurent Paris men’s-only

108 Geary St., San Francisco; ysl.com.

THE C LIST

ALL SHOOK UP

Want to dress like a King? In October, Opening Ceremony and the Elvis Presley Foundation team up on a capsule collection of stage gear. Tees, sweatshirts, shirting and denim jackets showcase archival photographs of the singer, song lyrics, lettering from record sleeves and crystal details in the style of Elvis’ Legendary “TCB” ring. 451 N. La Cienega Blvd., L.A., 310-652-1120.

Jean jacket in vintage wash, $285.

PERFECT TIMING NORTH With one of the world’s largest collections of vintage Rolexes, San Francisco’s H.Q. Milton knows the ins and outs of the trading, selling and repair businesses. “A perfect way to start a collection would be the Submariner 5513 without a date,” advises partner and Rolex expert Jacek Kozubek. “Another is a GMT 1675. They’re not the most expensive choices, but they’re special; they’re classic.” 2318 Mission St., S.F., 415-848-7464; hqmilton.com.

C 48 MEN’S FALL 2013

SOUTH “Like a vintage automobile, expect to pay more over the years in upkeep and maintenance on a vintage watch than you would on a new one,” says Ken Jacobs of L.A.’s Wanna Buy a Watch?, which has sourced and placed timepieces on the wrists of Hollywood’s boldest names. Select from Rolex, Cartier, Omega, Patek Philippe, Franck Muller and other Swiss stunners. 8465 Melrose Ave., L.A., 323653-0467; wannabuyawatch.com.

Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane Fall/ Winter 2013

WRITTEN BY MOLLY CREEDEN AND ANNINA MISLIN. CARNEY PORTRAIT: ANDREW LEE. TIMEPIECES: ERIC KU; 10PASTTEN.COM

KEVIN CARNEY’S ULTIMATE WEEKEND GUIDE

Since opening Mohawk General Store in 2008, husband-andwife duo Bo and Kevin Carney have been L.A.’s arbiters of cool. This year, they decided to divide and conquer, opening Mohawk Man (stocking Dries van Noten, Engineered Garments and Arpenteur), two doors down from their Silverlake Junction shop, and another women’s post in Pasadena. Kevin explains, “We curate each space with friends in mind, filtering what we have been lucky enough to see on our travels. It’s about what people actually wear and want.” Mohawk Man, 4017 W Sunset Blvd., L.A., 323-669-1601. • THE JOLLY OYSTER Picnic, bring your own wine and relax. Ventura, 805-798-4944; thejollyoyster.com. • CAFE STELLA’S BAR For a cocktail at the end of day with friends. Silverlake, 323-666-0265; cafestella.com. • DOG BEACH Let your pet run wild. Huntington Beach, dogbeach.org. • ROSE BOWL It’s right in our backyard. Pasadena, rgcshows.com. • THE RAYMOND RESTAURANT Built in 1886, it has a beautiful bar with handcrafted cocktails. Pasadena, 626-441-3136.


paulshark.it

MADISON AVENUE | AVENTURA MALL | RODEO DRIVE


style

ABOVE, FROM LEFT Brioni scarf,

$2,500, brioni. com. Etro jacket, $1,430, mr.porter.com. Guess shirt, $59, guess.com.

Valentino

Louis Vuitton

CROSS CHECK

From dapper to rugged, fall’s bold patterns have got you covered

BELOW, FROM LEFT

Paul & Shark tie, $155, paulshark.it. Marc by Marc Jacobs bag, $120, mr.porter.com. Sperry Top-Sider shoes, $100, sperry topsider.com. Burberry London cuff links, $165, neimanmarcus.com.

Prada

VENICE

H

ave you found yourself looking for the appropriate chapeau to pull off a sensibility best described as “Huck Finn meets a Native American meets Keith Richards meets a cowboy meets a samurai?” Look no further than Nick Fouquet, whose hats, made at his workshop in Venice Beach, recall other eras and characters entirely. With classic craftsmanship and a backstory that places Fouquet in Los Angeles after traversing the globe, the collection, which features panamas, derbies, fedoras and an assortment of widebrims out of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, is made from 100% beaver fur felt, sourced from Tennessee. Individualized shaping and personalized touches—a family heirloom scarf, a leather accent—have Bergdorf Goodman and Isetan Japan taking note. 1629 Abbot Kinney Blvd., Venice, 424238-8382; nickfouquet.com. FROM LEFT The

Brooks hat, $795. Nick Fouquet. Venice store. Fouquet in his workshop.

WRITTEN BY MOLLY CREEDEN AND ANNINA MISLIN. SPERRY SHOE: SPERRYTOPSIDER.COM. NICK FOUQUET: ASHLEY NOELLE

Urban Cowboy


NEW BR 03 GOLDEN HERITAGE COLLECTION Ø 42 MM · WWW.BELLROSS.COM


style denim WEST HOLLYWOOD

Well Worn

S FROM LEFT Industrial

work space and displays. Shop exterior. Denim, from $199.

ustainable Swedish brand Nudie Jeans will go to great lengths to maintain your favorite pair. The Jeans Repair shop will mend any purchases (gratis) within one to two weeks. Pick up a pair at the brand’s only North American location (a cozy cottage nestled in WeHo). 710 N. Edinburgh Ave., WeHo, 323-951-0677; nudiejeans.com.

Dark denim jacket, $364, and vintage wash shirt, $258.

When a premium American denim brand looks abroad to develop its first capsule collection, expect the standards to be exacting. True Religion’s Italian-made line incorporates new techniques with suiting style names like Rocco and Marco. From $258; 130 S. Robertson Blvd., L.A., 310-248-2844; truereligionbrandjeans.com.

Black Zayden jeans, $172.

EAGLE ROCK

Top Marks

Performance and recovery might typically conjure feats of athleticism, but for 7 For All Mankind, it’s all about fabric. The new Luxe performance line— made at a specialized Italian mill—is brushed on the inside to feel like cashmere, and woven to ensure the integrity of the shape stays in place. $189-$198; 7 For All Mankind stores; 7forallmankind.com.

Standard jeans in Sunsets Edge, $189.

C 52 MEN’S FALL 2013

DETAILS, DETAILS Oftentimes, jeans take up the most real estate in a guy’s closet. Rising Sun & Co.’s new boutique, workshop and showroom in Eagle Rock has every cut and color you’re looking for, with an on-site tailor. 2246 Fair Park Ave., L.A., 323-982-9798.

The all-American outpost. Reliable Brown Stoker Wash jeans, $330.

WRITTEN BY MOLLY CREEDEN AND ANNINA MISLIN. NUDIE STORE (2): JOSH SPENCER; JEANS: MOR WEIZMAN. RISING SUN STORE: NATALIE YOUNG; JEANS: MOR WEIZMAN

CIAO, CALIFORNIA

Rock on Inspired by the rock ‘n’ roll era, Joe’s Vintage Reserve 1971 jeans come in nine washes (light to indigo), a selvage style and a distressed denim jacket. $172-$249; 8432 Melrose Place, L.A., 323-944-0656; joesjeans.com.


style valet box

Piaget, $26,000. Jaeger-LeCoultre, $15,700. Harry Winston, $22,300.

FROM TOP

PAUL NEWMAN: CSFF/RDA/GETTY IMAGES. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR MORE DETAILS, PAGE 129

Paul Newman in Sweet Bird of Youth, 1960.

LESS IS MORE

Your dress watch doesn’t need 16 functions to be cool. Try these understated, classic timepieces on for size

C 54 MEN’S FALL 2013

FROM LEFT

Vacheron Constantin, $30,600. IWC, $10,800. Baume & Mercier, $2,700.


PREMIUM DENIM


C

magazine

GET THE ULTIMATE INSIDER’S GUIDE TO THE GOLDEN STATE

12 Issues for $19.95 Subscribe 1.800.775.3066 Or online at www.magazinec.com


PRESENTED BY JAEGER-LECOULTRE

spotlight THE ART OF THE FILM THE CREATIVE, CALIFORNIA-BASED TALENTS BEHIND THIS FALL’S SEMINAL MASTERWORK MORNING—DIRECTOR LELAND ORSER, PRODUCER TODD TRAINA, ACTRESS JEANNE TRIPPLEHORN AND MUSIC DIRECTOR CHRIS DOURIDAS— EACH BROUGHT THEIR TIME-HONORED CRAFT TO SET, AND CAME AWAY WITH AN EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME

Actress Jeanne Tripplehorn and Director of Photography Paula Huidobro on the set of Morning in San Francisco.


spotlight

THE WRITER/ DIRECTOR/ACTOR

LELAND ORSER

What made you pursue filmmaking? I have been an actor all my life. Becoming a writer/director was not a path I actively pursued until a few years ago. I had dinner one night with Blake Edwards, and he encouraged me. Then, on the flight back to L.A. from Robert Redford’s Sundance Institute, the idea for Morning came to me, and I started writing it on cocktail napkins. How do you develop your craft? By listening, reading, smelling, tasting, watching people and life as it passes me by. Also by writing regularly, taking photographs and videos. What interested you about this subject? I read an article about couples surviving a tragedy as unthinkable as the one in Morning. The percent who stayed together was so small in relation to the number of those who split up. I was struck and so saddened by that, I think the seed was planted there. What is it that you hope people will take away from the film? Respect for grief and its process—and to have less fear about reaching out to those in need.

If you had an extra hour in the day, what would you do? I would spend time with my family. If they weren’t around, I would read. What does craftsmanship mean to you? The perfect combination of labor and love.

AMANDA DEMME

How do you spend your time off-set? You’ve got to reboot and clear your mind. Jeanne [Tripplehorn] and I made a rule to never discuss the film when we were in our own home.


The Inventors of the VallĂŠe de Joux


spotlight

THE PRODUCER

TODD TRAINA What made you pursue producing? I enjoy solving problems. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like building a house or a successful company. You have to find the right product, build the foundation and hire the right crew and teammates. How do you develop your craft? I ask advice from people who do it better. And I learn from mistakes. What does the art of filmmaking mean to you? Film is the most powerful art form because it communicates with you using two of your senses for a sustained period of time in an experiential and emotional way. How did you become involved with this film? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been family friends with Leland [Orser] for a long time. We both grew up in S.F. What about this story interested you? I have many friends who have lost children, family members and people with whom they were extremely close. I fall into that category too. So even though I really prefer comedy, I saw Morning as a film that needed to be made.

Watching the clock... I am lucky enough to own a Jaeger-LeCoultre timepiece. It was given to me by my father, John Traina, who was a consummate collector of many things. He loved their watches. He also loved a good film, and he and my mother took us to dozens of films when we were young.

DUSTY ANSELL

If you had an extra hour in the day, what would you do? I would sleep for half of it and spend the other half with my 6-year-old daughter, Daisy.


Since 1833, the Grande Maison has created 1,242 of the world’s smallest and most complicated mechanical watch movements. Reflecting a consistent concern for elegance and performance, each of them is perfectly matched with the proportions of the case housing it. From the iconic Reverso to the fascinating Sphérotourbillon, the Inventors of the Vallée de Joux, who are acknowledged masters in the art of sophisticated horological complications, continue to write new chapters in the history of Fine Watchmaking.

MASTER GRANDE TRADITION GYROTOURBILLON 3 JUBILEE Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 176 With the Master Grande Tradition Gyrotourbillon 3 Jubilee, Jaeger-LeCoultre reaches a new peak of the watchmaking art. The tenth Grande Complication model in the Hybris Mechanica collection, this new work presents two world firsts symbolising the watchmaking genius that has nurtured the Grande Maison since 1833. Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 176 is equipped with a new Gyrotourbillon featuring a spherical balance-spring, an exclusive watchmaking feat in the domain of three-dimensional balancesprings. To emphasise the light, airy nature of the tourbillon, the watchmakers of the Manufacture have done away with the upper bridge and thus adopted a flying or cantileveredtype construction. The second remarkable characteristic of this model in extra-white platinum is its instant digital chronograph display – a world first in the field of Grandes Complications. The minutes are thus easily read off by means of two instant-jump discs – one for the units and the other for the tens. True to the tradition of late 19th century pocket watches, this chronograph is of the single-pusher type.

MASTER GRANDE TRADITION TOURBILLON CYLINDRIQUE À QUANTIÈME PERPÉTUEL JUBILEE Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 985 Drawing inspiration from its 19 th century perpetual calendars, Jaeger-LeCoultre introduces one of its finest new complications in an extra-white platinum case: the Master Grande Tradition Tourbillon Cylindrique à Quantième Perpétuel Jubilee. It skillfully combines pure, classic aesthetics with an extremely precise horological heart that restores the sense of performance inherent in the watchmaking tradition. The new Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 985 embodies an authentic revolution. Equipped with a flying tourbillon featuring a cylindrical balance-spring, it guarantees the exceptional precision-timing performance of this perpetual calendar model. The oscillating weight bears a reproduction of the gold medal won by the Manufacture at the 1889 Universal Exhibition, in reward for the pioneering spirit of the Grande Maison.

MASTER ULTRA THIN JUBILEE Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 849 In 1907, the Grande Maison wrote a new chapter in watchmaking history by creating the world’s thinnest mechanical manually-wound pocket watch. In 2013, Jaeger-LeCoultre repeats this feat by presenting a new ultra-thin mechanical watch. The Master Ultra Thin Jubilee sets a new record for slenderness with an extra-white platinum case measuring a mere 4.05 mm thick. At its heart beats Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 849, an ultra-thin 1.85 mm mechanical manually-wound movement. All parts of this watch have been designed so as to reduce the overall thickness to an absolute minimum. Only the most experienced watchmakers are capable of assembling this masterpiece of horological miniaturisation.


spotlight THE ACTRESS

JEANNE TRIPPLEHORN What made you pursue acting? I have been performing in one way or another since I was a little girl. It’s all I’ve ever done. It’s all I’ve ever known. How do you develop your craft? Work at it as much as I can. Gene Hackman once told me the most important thing about acting is relaxation, so the more I work, the more relaxed I become. On the other hand, you have to step back and live your life and bring those experiences back to your work. What does the art of filmmaking mean to you? A beautiful collaboration between a group of artists all coming together to tell a story and then groups of people coming together to experience that story. How did you become involved with this project? I slept with the director. What about this story interested you? I was actually scared of it but drawn to my character, Alice—the strong female at the center and the beautiful and heroic struggle she wages against the hand she has been dealt. What would you like people to take away from the film? Hope. What is time for you? A gift.

What’s your favorite moment in time? The beginning of a road trip, pulling out onto a highway and the road stretched out before us with the promise of new adventure. What does craftsmanship mean to you? A skill handed down through time.

TIMOTHY WHITE

If you had an extra hour in the day, what would you do? Lie in bed reading with my son.


RENDEZ-VOUS The new Rendez-Vous collection is a concentrated blend of the creativity and the pioneering spirit that have consistently characterised the history of the Grande Maison. In this gallant rendezvous between Haute Horlogerie and Haute Horlogerie, fine watchmaking proudly displays its feminine side.

RENDEZ-VOUS PERPETUAL CALENDAR

RENDEZ-VOUS CELESTIAL

Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 868 The Rendez-Vous Perpetual Calendar is equipped with one of the most iconic Fine Watchmaking complications: the perpetual calendar. Its classic design showcases this timeless complication, highlighted by a subtly guilloché dial. Mechanically programmed until the year 2100, its calendar driven by a mechanical automatic movement will precisely indicate the day, month and years until the next turn of the century.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 809 Its appealing aesthetic is matched by the fascination of its mechanical excellence. The finely guilloché dial is graced with the signature numerals of the Rendez-Vous line. A disc in lapis lazuli, a gem known from antiquity as a celestial stone evoking paradise and the skies above, indicates the passage of the constellations and the zodiac signs – a complication formerly reserved for men only. A star stands out against the dial rim to indicate the time chosen for an upcoming rendezvous.


spotlight

THE MUSIC DIRECTOR

CHRIS DOURIDAS

What was your career path? I started as an actor and segued into the radio world. I hosted KCRW’s “Morning Becomes Eclectic” and started getting calls from filmmakers and producers inviting me to get involved in their projects. It was a natural step for me, combining my love of film and music. How did you become involved with this project? A few months prior to production, I happened to meet Paula Huidobro [director of photography] at The Hotel Cafe. We became fast friends. I had shared with her my recent experience of losing my daughter. Shortly after, she called and asked if I would read a script she was involved with, and said it was written by Leland Orser and starring Jeanne Tripplehorn. I was so swept away by its realistic portrayal of what a couple goes through, I was convinced Leland had been through a similar loss. Turns out the script was inspired by the birth of Leland and Jeanne’s son, August. Upon August’s birth, Leland became immediately fearful of losing this precious new arrival. I began to look at this project as a cathartic, healing experience. Also, I really couldn’t imagine letting someone else do it. How do you make the most of your time off? I really try to take the time to appreciate those special sunsets, a good beach day or spontaneous opportunities.

What does craftsmanship mean to you? For me, it’s a celebration of passion.

MARC GOLDSTEIN

What does time mean for you? Making the most of this life, sharing quality time with the rare and special people who make life worth living.


REVERSO An undisputed watchmaking icon since 1931, the famous swivelling case of the Reverso is in fact a complex technical accomplishment comprising over 50 parts. The watch with twin faces has been an ongoing source of inspiration for the Manufacture Jaeger-LeCoultre, as was admirably confirmed in 1994 with the birth of the Duo concept. The in-house technicians and

engineers achieved an authentic watchmaking feat by developing a unique mechanical movement serving to drive the displays on two back-to-back dials, showing different time zones and all controlled via a single crown. The Grande Reverso Ultra Thin now houses new calibres inspired by the Duo and Duetto movements, all adapted to its extremely slender case.

GRANDE REVERSO ULTRA THIN DUO

GRANDE REVERSO LADY ULTRA THIN DUETTO DUO

Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 854 /1 The new Grande Reverso Ultra Thin adopts a new face. The front is inspired by the original 1931 aesthetic, with a characteristic small seconds subdial, while the back features a classically designed dual time-zone display enriched with an elegant guillochĂŠ pattern.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 864 /A The front shows a contemporary classic face set against a guillochĂŠ dial base, while the back displays a second time zone in a resolutely different style adorned with splendid mother-of-pearl marquetry.


2 8 E A S T S I X T Y T H I R D S T R E E T, N E W Y O R K , N E W Y O R K 212 838 1400 R E S E RV A T I O N S @ L O W E L L H O T E L . C O M W W W. L O W E L L H O T E L . C O M


design The 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL led this year’s Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Tour and was driven by Sir Stirling Moss.

The Classics In the market for a “new” car? Try one that has been around the block a couple times BY NICOLAS STECHER

MERCEDES-BENZ USA

S

ure, there’s nothing that matches that new car smell— that distinct fragrance that says you’re crawling into virgin space, throttling an engine that’s never been throttled, gripping a voluptuous wheel never before squeezed. But there is something to be said for letting your eye wander toward an older model, one that has experienced the yawn of time, yet has maintained a sophisticated beauty unmatched by any vehicle clogging a dealership lot. Vintage cars might not only be an expression of your unique tastes; they may also be a considerably more sound investment. Consider this summer’s Pebble Beach classic car auctions, more than $300 million in vintage coupes, roadsters, saloons,

race cars and automotive novelties sold in one weekend. The total was a 13.5% boost from last year. It’s a sign of recovery and a sign of greater machines at work. No, not the engine of the 1937 Bugatti Type 57SC (which sold for $8.75 million), but the power of the economy. An ultra-rare 1967 Ferrari NART Spyder took the crown, garnering a record-setting $27.5 million at the gavel. It was the most ever paid publicly for a Ferrari. That made it the most expensive car ever sold in America and the second-highest-priced car ever sold at public auction. The first? Well, that would be another marquee auto that perennially demands top dollar from world investors: MercedesBenz. A two-time Grand Prix-winning 1954 W196 Benz, >>

EDITED BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD MEN’S FALL 2013

C 67


design Technician Lawrence Aspinwall with a 1969 280SL at the MercedesBenz Classic Car Center in Irvine.

<< which sold in London this past July for a celestial $29.7 million. Of the Pebble Beach extravagance, “It’s mind-boggling; the excess of everything was overwhelming, and I love it,” says Wes Anderson (no relation to the film director), a MercedesBenz collector, restoration specialist and student at McPherson College’s Automotive Restoration program in Kansas—the only four-year bachelor’s degree program of its type in the U.S. He’s also a columnist for the Mercedes-Benz Club of America Star Magazine. At last year’s Concours d’Elegance, he saw a 1928 Mercedes-Benz 680S Saoutchik Torpedo win Best In Show—a car that spent 30 years collecting dust in storage before it received its full body treatment. It was the seventh Benz to win the coveted blue ribbon. “I’ve personally seen people spend a million dollars on a restoration, and I know some of the cars that go to Pebble Beach take 10 years to restore. You can’t get the parts anymore,

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JAGUAR F-TYPE Jag returns to the 2-door roadster game

it has left vacant for more than a half-century, and it’s come back with a vengeance. The F-Type is one of the most perfectly balanced sports cars on the market, with a V8 that’ll melt asphalt. From $69,000; jaguarusa.com. BMW 4 SERIES Yes, it was called the 3-series coupe, but BMW decided to differentiate model names between its sedan and coupe. Albeit confusing, it may work in the 4’s favor as Bimmer has regained its design mojo. From $41,425; bmw.com. MERCEDES-BENZ CLA45 AMG It’s not technically a 2-door, but Benz’s “Baby CLS” is touted as a 4-door coupe. Add that it’s the most powerful 4-cylinder ever made, and you have an entry-level AMG that can’t be matched. From $48,350; mbusa.com. ROLLS-ROYCE WRAITH Rolls chops two doors from its Ghost, lends a fastback silhouette and updates the technology. Shag lambswool carpet, Champagne chiller and knowledge that you’re driving the most luxurious car on Earth—all standard. Est. from $300,000; rolls-roycemotorcars.com.

TOP: COURTESY OF ROYCE RUMSEY

4

Cool Coupes

so you have to manufacture the pieces. That’s incredibly expensive.” (A recent Jaguar E-Type, for instance, claimed 7,000 hours of restoration.) So what’s it like actually living with these cars? After dropping ludicrous sums to restore these white whales to their pristine conditions, is it worth driving them? “Well, that’s a real good question,” says Anderson, pondering what vexes many a vintage car collector. According to this expert, there are three things you need: 1) Money. Lots of it. 2) A certified, specialized mechanic/restorer. He should be well proven. If you’re not driving the cars, they’ll need more maintenance. 3) A dry, cool, shaded place to store your treasures. No sunlight to ruin leathers and paint, no moisture for rust. “Some people do drive them, but others have them as centerpieces of their collection, because they’re so rare and valuable. Lord knows you wouldn’t want anything to happen to them.” •


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design

SHORE THING

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hen Stephen Gordon was renovating his Queen Anne Victorian back in 1979, the Eureka resident struggled to track down period-specific knobs and fittings. As he sought them out, he began to photograph and file his findings in binders. With a sign out front and that de facto catalog, Restoration Hardware was born. Gordon moved on from the company he built and in 2005 started running Robert Redford’s Sundance Catalog. But his attempt to retire from retail was short-lived. Spending time on Lake Tahoe in the mid-2000s, Gordon turned his attention to a rare 19th-century marine vessel. He procured a model of an Adirondack guideboat—similar to the one his grandfather owned, along with other sportsmen and society families from 1860 to 1950. “It was the fastest six-seat rowboat in the world,” he says of the 1892 J. Henry Rushton. “It was smooth and quiet, and I always adored it for its lines, contours and history. Then I thought it would be plenty fun to have a small business…I thought to reproduce my guideboat.” He’s done just that with the launch of Guideboat Company. For the prototype, the Larkspur resident used his Rushton to create a mold. (The only difference was a composite body for the hull instead of the original wood one.) Gordon traveled to “innumerable” places to find the right craftspeople—Vermont, Rhode Island—and fortuitously found a Golden State builder.

“We worked jointly in design and execution, and that was timeconsuming, difficult and, at times, heart-wrenching.” Backed by financial and strategic partner Chad Hurley (founder of YouTube), the Mill Valley Lumberyard workshop and store opened as August ended. (Launch activities will continue into the fall, with a showing at America’s Cup in S.F.; and back at the flagship, the Mill Valley Film Festival; a Bourbon and Boats cocktail benefit; and October’s Art on Oars auction.) The company has experimented with niche boats from other geographic pockets, too. The late-1800s Maine peapod is an early lobsterman’s boat (“a favorite of U.S. lighthouse keepers to take them back and forth,” Gordon notes). The postwar Balboa Island sabot was built in Long Beach, equipped to row, sail and motor. The other component was a tangible, merchandisable vision of the weekend house on Lake Arrowhead and blanketwrapped evenings on twinkling docks. “Not everyone wants a boat,” explains Gordon. “It’s a lifestyle brand in the same way Restoration [Hardware] was, and is.” The net result is a finely sourced mix of high-end marine accessories and a wealth of European goods. Gordon promises a real experience—not a flotation device paired with a waxed jacket made in China. “[Guideboat] isn’t a prop.” He pauses. “We’re very serious about building boats.” 129 Miller Ave., Mill Valley; guideboatco.com. •

ABOVE Custom-painted Canadian Sitka spruce oars, from $150/each. Midnight Blue Guideboat, $4,850. Embellished bronze oarlocks. RIGHT Sketch of the guideboat hull, an exact reproduction of Gordon’s extremely rare 1892 J. Henry Rushton Saranac Laker Guideboat.

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GUIDEBOAT COMPANY (3): KELLY PULEIO. VINTAGE ADIRONDACK GUIDEBOAT PLAN: COURTESY OF GUIDEBOAT CO.

A retail legend revives a rare piece of American craftsmanship BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD


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design spotlight

Yves Béhar

Unlocking the Future San Francisco designer Yves Béhar brightens the world of design with high-flying ideals and brilliant ingenuity BY DIANE DORRANS SAEKS

FROM TOP RIGHT

S.F.-based Public bike collaboration. Herman Miller Sayl chair, from $449, is based on suspension technology. The direct-trade Briggo Coffee Haus. Jawbone UP wristband tracks the day’s calories burned, $130; Jambox comes in multiple colorways, from $180. Ouya gaming console, $99.

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COURTESY OF FUSEPROJECT

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hat does a state-of-the-art robotic coffee kiosk have in common with a new game console supported by 80,000 Kickstarter backers? These concepts and their jolt of forward engineering were both filtered through the mind of San Francisco designer and entrepreneur Yves Béhar, the man behind the award-winning Fuseproject firm. One reason Béhar has been so successful and in demand by a broad range of international companies is he has boldly stepped away from the outdated designer-for-hire model. He teams up with his clients (Fortune 500 corporations, museums and startups) and is free to invent out of the box, gaze far into the future, and bring his intense energy to best purpose. He’s no longer self-defined as an industrial designer—more often a creative director, a brand creator, a visionary for large companies. “We are changing the way we engage clients so today we are less vendor and more strategic partner,” says Béhar. “I’ve always disliked the mentality that puts designers in this self-defeating position. Now, we are partners in the orchestration of success. I am a stakeholder and risk taker. For example, I’m Jawbone’s creative director and partner.” That model has proven beneficial. The San Francisco-based company’s Jambox—a wireless portable speaker—is a best-seller in North America. In 2011, Fuseproject also restyled the brand’s trend-setting UP, a mobile health and sleep tracking system that combines a wristband and smartphone app. The wristband has become a hip accessory— Béhar wears one to monitor his daily patterns. Béhar, 45, was born in Switzerland and holds a BS in industrial design from the Art Center College of Design, Pasadena. After working with the great and outspoken Hartmut Esslinger at Frogdesign in Silicon Valley (responsible for many of the notably elegant Apple products throughout the 1980s), Béhar founded Fuseproject in 1999. CONTINUED ON PAGE 128


MAN UP.

No one needs to tie your ties, mix your drinks, or close your deals. You know how to handle yourself. And everything about you speaks to that. Show the world what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got . . . and wear it well.

Savanna pocketknife, with 24K gold koftgari, and fossil Woolly Mammoth

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Venice architect/artisan Marmol Radziner’s Vienna Way sofa, chair, side table and lamp, $3,500$14,400; and dining group sideboard, $5,480, deringhall.com.

STRONGHOLD

With graphic punches, statement-making accessories and reimagined vintage pieces, who’s afraid of the dark?

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Paule

Marrot print, $2,550, jonathanadler.com. Modernica planter, $330, modern ica.net. Baxter of California candle, $45, Unionmade, Brentwood Country Mart. Ralph Lauren Home pillow, $450, ralphlauren home.com. Tia Maria by Moroso chaise, $3,150, Dzine, S.F. Bottega Veneta screen, $24,400, select Bottega Veneta stores. When Objects Work ashtray, $355, fitzsu.com. Turkish Anatolian runner, $2,115; and Mr. Brainwash Creation plate, $65, Garde, L.A. Heijden Hume for Jean de Merry table, $13,200, Jean de Merry, WeHo. Greta Grossman lamp, $744, dwr.com.

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EDITED BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD. MARMOL RADZINER: JOE FLETCHER. BOTTEGA VENETA: COURTESY OF BOTTEGA VENETA. HEIDJEN HUME: JONN COOLIDGE. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR MORE DETAILS, PAGE 129

design


Stanford Shopping Center BLOOMINGDALE’S MACY’S NEIMAN MARCUS NORDSTROM THE APPLE STORE THE ART OF SHAVING BANG & OLUFSEN BOSE BOSS HUGO BOSS BROOKSTONE BURBERRY COACH ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE & WINE BAR KIEHL’S SINCE 1851 LACOSTE LOUIS VUITTON THE MELT MICHAEL KORS MICROSOFT NIKE RUNNING RALPH LAUREN SHREVE & CO. SONY TIFFANY & CO. TOMMY BAHAMA VINCE. WILKES BASHFORD EL CAMINO REAL & SAND HILL ROAD, PALO ALTO SHOPPING LINE® 650.617.8200 ■


C S OCI AL F R ONT from the editors of C Magazine

T H E P L ACE T O SE E & B E S E EN DAILY DIARY POSTINGS AND CALIFORNIA’S UPCOMING EVENTS

w w w. c s o c i a l f r o n t . c o m


menu The Sanborn family—owners of Big Sur’s Glen Oaks—open the area’s first restaurant in more than a decade.

On the Road JAMES HALL PHOTOGRAPHY

Along Highway 1, a tempting new restaurant marries Central Coast flavors with authentic Cajun style

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itting beneath towering Big Sur redwoods might be an unexpected setting for a dinner of rich gumbo and the zip of Creole mustard; then again, you may not have met New Orleans-born Matt Glazer. When the CIA-trained chef decamped to Big Sur back in 2006, manning stoves at culinary fixtures Esalen and Big Sur Bakery, he recalled the dishes of his youth. Paired with the area’s bounty, man, does his Monterey Bay sea bass po’boy get one inspired rendition. With geometric art and cozy seating around steel firepits, the 110-seat Big Sur Roadhouse arrived this past summer with a Mid-century Modern lounge and dining room serving three square meals. Best fuel before a hike? Buttermilk biscuits with Big Sur honey butter—and one for the road. Glen Oaks Big Sur, 831-667-2370; glenoaksbigsur.com. •

WRITTEN AND EDITED BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD MEN’S FALL 2013

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menu

CASE STUDY An Oakland company finds the green in grassroots butchery

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Belcampo’s NorCal ranch. Certified organic and pastureraised cattle—a breed of Angus, Hereford and Wagyu. The Larkspur menu includes a Bully Burger with ham, beef tallow fries, Waldorf salad and brussels sprouts. The flagship at Marin Country Mart.

FROM TOP

White-tipped Mount Shasta is the backdrop to the ranch’s 10,000 acres. ABOVE Wholeanimal butchery means more offerings in the case. RIGHT Eat The Fat tote, $15.

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purchased extensive farmland assets following his retirement. The following year they formed sustainable agribusiness Belcampo Group. Already one of The New York Times “Nifty 50” and a pioneering force for her activism with Eat Real Food and Slow Food, Fernald, 37, is the CEO of the three-pronged company. There’s Belcampo Meat Co. in Shasta Valley, raising grass-fed cattle, hogs, sheep and goats, all manner of fowl, lamb, rabbits, and game birds; a growing chain of butcher shops with adjacent eateries; a biodynamic ranch in Uruguay devoted to olive oil, wine and beef; and a design-savvy, agrotourism eco-lodge in Belize with a rum distillery, and coffee and cacao plantations. Operations are all run in-house. The flagship butchery opened at Marin Country Mart in November, 2012, complete with an ingredient-driven restaurant. Expansion also begins this fall: Town & Country Village, Palo Alto; S.F.’s Russian Hill; Santa Barbara Public Market; Grand Central Market in Downtown L.A.; and Santa Monica. For operations, Fernald says this number hits the quality sweet spot: “I don’t see any glory in opening 30 Belcampos.” While she admits Americans aren’t going to start eating organ meats overnight, Fernald wants to begin the conversation: “At small butcher shops in Europe, on Monday and Tuesday you’ll see the liver and tongue in the case, and by end of the week they’re selling off prime cuts—not like the U.S., where every piece that is not a steak is shipped off… That’s how we decided to add the restaurant. You might not cook calf’s liver every night, but the restaurant will.” belcampomeatco.com. •

WRITTEN BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD. JACK SCHOW

hen Anya Fernald returned to the Bay Area from living in Europe eight years ago, she was concerned about the quality of meat available at the market. “I eat a lot that’s rare and raw. What I saw was typically frozen and vacuum-packed,” she explains. Fernald’s solution: Buy a whole cow instead. Cut to 2010. Fernald found a kindred spirit in Todd Robinson, a financial world veteran who


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menu spotlight

Connections won’t get you into Wolvesmouth, chef Craig Thornton’s long-running series of private tasting dinners BY ALISON CLARE STEINGOLD It’s not a restaurant, but the refined Technicolor beauty on the plate hints at a world-class culinary experience, devoid of pretension. Wolvesmouth is managed via lottery email, an invite sent periodically to a list of 9,000. Whoever follows instructions and replies in a timely fashion goes into the pool, out of which a random selection leads to a mere 18 for dinner. By Lexus, limo or Linus bike, they gather outside a Downtown L.A. loft, hugging bottles of beer and wine and nervously re-checking

tions at the end of the meal are simply dropped into the mouth of a taxidermy crocodile on the way out. For the remaining 8,982, there’s “Cut Your Teeth” this October. The Santa Monica Museum of Art will host Thornton and L.A. artist Matthew Bone for a dual residency that’s not for the weary. A longtime friend, Bone has been working with the team for a few years. Thornton has described the intertwined project of ticketed 10course dinners and multimedia

iPhones. Inside, the evening commences around the communal table. Tacked on the fridge, near the miscellany of strange and funky ingredients, there’s one handwritten menu— ostensibly for chef Craig Thornton and his crew of prep cooks, who, for the most part, donate their time and are more than pleased to dice and peel alongside the acclaimed talent. Thornton, 31, works on a central cooktop with a multitude of components in process. The first plate is served, then dishes are washed and re-used, for about 10 courses. There’s an enormous amount of labor involved in the preparation; the end result is remarkably serene. Asparagus, squid ink mascarpone gnocchi, lemon jam, pan frico, crawfish squid ink sabayon, flowers, borage...are all in one dish. Dona-

as “an installation show.” The subject: “nature at its most beautiful and grotesque.” For the video, there’s “Consumption” and “Decay.” In “Beauty,” the quiet of the forest unfolds as we watch droplets of water on a scalloped nasturtium leaf. Against a black screen, “Aggression” plays the feed of a wolf attacking a deer—and the stillness thereafter. Whether or not you enter the wolvesden any time soon, there’s hope: Manager Julian Fang promises they’re “exploring options for a casual spot in DTLA.” October 15-26; wolvesmouth.com/cutyourteeth.

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Chef Craig Thornton and three dishes he’s prepared for his lotteried Wolvesmouth dinners, including (bottom left plate) a ribeye cap with broccoli purée, Pink Lady apple, Hook’s cheddar, jalapeño and broccoli stalk slaw, broccoli flower and broccoli tempura.

ALL PLATES PREPARED BY CHEF CRAIG THORNTON FOR WOLVESMOUTH. BOTTOM LEFT: JULIAN FANG. RIGHT (3): CHRISTIE HEMM KLOK

The Individualist


menu SONOMA

Not Jerking Around

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ith Krave Jerky’s natural, gourmet spin on the dried meat, Jonathan Sebastiani— great-grandson of the Sonoma vineyards’ founder—has re-thought an oft-maligned snack. As a nod to his wine country roots, drink pairings for flavors such as pineapple-orange beef, basil-citrus turkey, or black cherry barbecue are listed on the website. There are also recipes: garden tomato and spicy jerky bruschetta; harvest grape and chanterelle chicken. kravejerky.com. FROM LEFT Krave

Sweet Chipotle, at top, and Chili Lime, below. Krave Chili Lime gourmet beef jerky, $7.

Duke Special Reserve Brandy, aged 24 years, $350. BELOW Kontextür tumblers, $400/ set of 4.

Plate Lunch

Thyme and parsley dust the organic hand-cut russet frîtes with aïoli.

SANTA MONICA

From a funky steel Quonset hut, Pono Burger is organic, and enticing: Kuawa Crunch burgers piled with piquant guava-rum sauce, potato chips and Hook’s Cheddar; domed brioche or gluten-free bun; a Strauss-and-bacon milkshake. Artisanal beer by the pitcher? Yes, please. 829 Broadway, S.M., 310584-7005; ponoburger.com.

SAUSALITO

Duke it Out

In the Newport Beach warehouse where the John Wayne estate is stored, the actor’s son Ethan Wayne discovered a 20-foot liquor cabinet stashed with ’60s Margauxs, Inglenooks, Bourbons and tequilas. He also learned that his father had begun to blend a Bourbon before he passed away in 1979. Using these bottles as a touchstone of sorts, Wayne partnered with Richard Howell, and Chris Radomski and Jayson Woodbridge of Napa Valley’s Hundred Acre fame. Two years later, the creation of Duke Spirits is marked with its first release: a 24-year Aged Brandy. The 350 bottles sold out overnight. It’s not some licensing gimmick, assures Radomski: “We took the samples to the original distillers and said, ‘We’re trying to make this historic blend.’ It’s what [John Wayne] loved to drink and was trying to formulate himself.” dukespirits.com.

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Stockpile When guests drop in unannounced, Heath ceramics has you covered with its new Winter Cocktail Set. heathceramics.com.

Winter Cocktail Set, $590.

HEATH: JEFFREY CROSS

NEWPORT BEACH


menu SANTA BARBARA

Culinary Commune

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At The Lark, seasonal small plates include roasted beets with sheep’s milk feta, hazelnuts, honey, thyme, orange and dandelion greens.

esign-savvy restaurateur Doug Washington and Funk Zone visionary Sherry Villaneuva have pulled off a hat trick with this cluster along Anacapa Street: Santa Barbara’s old Fish Market building has been transformed into The Lark (thelarksb. com)—complete with communal table and in-season dishes. What’s more, award-winning sommelier Eric Railsback and Master Sommelier Brian McClintic have filled the floor-to-ceiling racks at Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant (lesmarchandswine.com) with drink-now and cellar-for-later labels, including their Syrah, Vallin. Finally, at adjacent Lucky Penny (luckypennysb.com), order coffee, wood-fired pizza and meatball sandwiches for takeaway.

Akifusa Masami Asai, $165-$448.

SAN FRANCISCO

S.F.’s cocktailing design duo, the Bon Vivants, have lived up to their moniker. At Trick Dog, beer nuts are dusted with espelette, and there’s a full cocktail menu offered in Edison bulb-dotted environs. If olive oil-infused gin isn’t enough, try sous-vide sirloin tartare, a hearty kale salad and shoestrings—fried not twice but thrice. 3010 20th St., S.F., 415-471-2999; trickdogbar.com.

chop chop Carve out time to visit Bernal cutlery’s supply of handmade Akifusas from Takefu. The S.F. knife specialist is the designer’s sole stockist outside of Japan. 593 Guerrero St., S.F., 415-902-6531; bernalcutlery.com. OAKLAND

Thrill of Brazil Amazon-foraging, Time 100 gastronome Alex Atala arrives in Oakland at Camino Restaurant on October 21st to toast his new book, D.O.M.: Rediscovering Brazilian Ingredients ($50, Phaidon Press), with a full-on Brazilian block party. Tickets at eventbrite. com; 3917 Grand Ave., Oakland. Ants and pineapple is one of the chef’s signatures. D.O.M. in São Paolo is sixth on S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna’s World’s 50 Best list.

The menu is made of vintage record albums.

COSTA MESA

Caffeine Fix

By surfers, for surfers: Seaworth Coffee Co.’s cold-brew growlers. For tropical sweetness, add a drop of the O.C. company’s small-batch coconut syrup. $15/growler; seaworthcoffee.com.

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Organic coconut syrup, $5.

THE LARK: MACDUFF EVERTON. BERNAL CUTLERY: LISA WEISS. TRICK DOG: COURTESY OF BON VIVANTS. ANTS AND PINEAPPLE FROM D.O.M: REDISCOVERING BRAZILIAN INGREDIENTS BY ALEX ATALA: COURTESY OF SERGIO COIMBRA AND PHAIDON PRESS. SEAWORTH COFFEE CO.: COURTESY OF SEAWORTH COFFEE CO.

Hair of the Dog

SAN FRANCISCO


E V E N T S

9615 BRIGHTON WAY, SUITE 227 | BEVERLY HILLS, CA 90210 OFFICE: 310.273.8456 | CORYMARTINEVENTS.COM


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Meet the world at 40,000 feet Some of the most memorable moments on Earth aren’t happening on Earth. Find inspiration in exclusive lounges, refresh in Shower Spas and find sanctuary in your Private Suite. Say hello to the Emirates A380, departing daily from LAX starting December 2.

Hello Tomorrow “Airline of the Year” 2013 Skytrax World Airline Awards Shower Spas and Private Suites available in First Class. Onboard Lounge available in First and Business Class.


travel

CONNIE ZHOU

Designed by Roman and Williams, Viceroy New York opens in October.

New York Post

With a more masculine clientele in mind, three new boutique hotels stand out with innovative design, tempting fare and alluring nightlife options—offering much more than a place to hit the hay BY ALISA WOLFSON EDITED BY JENNY MURRAY MEN’S FALL 2013

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travel

Later this year, Viceroy, along with the Gerber Group, will open a rooftop lounge with views of Central Park.

VICEORY Roman and Williams put their stamp on the 29-story Viceroy (opening October 9th), starting with stone, marble and honey-toned wood in the common spaces. Akin to a tailored ship’s cabin, the 240 guest rooms feature exotic woods and brass accents, while the street-level bar and new American restaurant Kingside, helmed by Gerber Group and chef Marc Murphy (Benchmark, Ditch Plains and Landmarc), boast sky-high ceilings with zinc and tile motifs. 120 W. 57th St., N.Y., 212-830-8000; viceroyhotelsandresorts.com.

The 12-story hotel has 197 guest rooms.

REFINERY HOTEL Don’t be deterred by Refinery Hotel’s Fashion District address—this eclectic and artsy property that opened last fall is anything but femme. Using the building’s industrial past for inspiration, each room comes fully equipped with the latest in technology (Wi-Fi, iHome docking stations and LCD HD TVs). English pub-style restaurant Parker & Quinn, Prohibition-style whiskey lounge Winnie’s Bar and a rooftop bar round out the offerings. 63 W. 38th St., N.Y., 646-664-0310; refineryhotelnewyork.com. The Elm’s menu is categorized by Raw, Sea, Land and Shared.

KING & GROVE

BOY’S CLUB

Dapper duds suited for uptown and downtown FROM LEFT Kent

& Curwen sweater, $795, Nordstrom. Oliver Peoples sunglasses, $405, oliverpeoples. com. DL Denim jeans, $169, dl1961.com. Panerai watch, $7,800, Panerai, B.H. Tallia Orange peacoat, $215, Macy’s.

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VICEROY: CONNIE ZHOU. REFINERY: COURTESY OF REFINERY. THE ELM: EVAN SUNG. JEANS AND PEACOAT: MOR WEIZMAN

With 64 rooms overlooking McCarren Park, King & Grove in Williamsburg is the perfect retreat for those seeking a full-service stay with a rooftop pool and views of the Manhattan skyline. Be sure to check out chef Paul Liebrandt’s The Elm, a blend of classical French and contemporary cuisine that opened in July. 160 N. 12th St., Brooklyn, 718-218-7500; kingandgrove.com.


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travel CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Laird

Hamilton. St. Regis Princeville (stregisprinceville.com) is perched above Kauai’s Hanalei Bay. The Hanalei Pier.

Big Kahuna

If you’ve ever paddled out in front of the St. Regis Princeville in Kauai, chances are you’ve shared a lineup with legendary surfer Laird Hamilton, who lives half the year just up the dirt road from the luxury resort (and the other half in Malibu). We caught up with Hamilton to talk about his quest for the neverending ride. WHAT WAS IT LIKE GROWING UP IN HANALEI? It’s a very grounding place. It really helped me when I went out into the world because I felt like I always had a place where I was safe, and that gave me strength. Hawaiians call the power the earth gives you “mana.” YOU’RE KNOWN AS THE PUREST WATERMAN. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? A waterman has a relationship with the ocean, with water. He is conscious of the environment, the clouds, the wind, the swell and is skilled and proficient in what he does. This allows you to be safe and then go and play. My life is controlled by nature. HOW WERE YOU INVOLVED IN PIONEERING PADDLEBOARDING? Most of my creativity comes out of boredom, in all honesty. Standup came very organically; I wanted to take my daughter surfing and thought it was a good idea to learn how to ride these bigger (tandem) boards first. Soon I was saying, “I wish I didn’t have to lay back down.” A friend had some paddles at the beach, so I grabbed one and started catching waves. I probably did it for eight years before anyone else. Now we’ve built paddles and boards and it has evolved into an industry. YOU’VE DONE THAT A FEW TIMES NOW—BEING AN INNOVATOR OF TOW-IN, HYDROFOILS, KITEBOARDING— WHAT’S NEXT? I have this idea for an underwater surfing sub. You’re inside of it riding under

these giant waves. And then I developed this pool training thing that I’m trying to create a certification program for. A friend of mine who played professional basketball increased his vertical jump three and a half inches after one summer of training. ARE PEOPLE SURPRISED TO SEE YOU IN THE LINEUP? Some of them are happy; some are confused. But they don’t realize I love to surf little waves as much as big waves. I don’t discriminate. I just like being in the water. • MALIBU

URBAN ZEN Continuing his Malibu takeover, tech mogul Larry Ellison has turned again to the French architects at Studio PCH, this time to transform the Casa Malibu Inn. Imagine a cozy 16-room Japanese-inspired retreat—the perfect place to crash after dinner at his sushi joint (Nobu) down the street. . C 94 MEN’S FALL 2013

HAMILTON: BFA. HANALEI PIER AND THE RESORT: COURTESY OF ST. REGIS PRINCEVILLE

The king of big waves, Laird Hamilton knows no bounds


A JOIE DE VIVRE HOTEL

Luxury, naturally. SA N F R A N C I S CO ’ S LU X U RY WAT E R F R O N T D E S TI N ATI O N H O M E O F A M E R I C A N O R E S TAU R A N T & B A R

Ei g h t M i s s i o n Stre e t S a n Fr a n c i s c o , C A 9 41 0 5 T 41 5 . 27 8 . 3 70 0 R 8 8 8 . 8 9 0 . 8 6 8 8 h ote l v it a l e . co m


GAME CHANGER Minus the handlebar mustache, actor Paul Rudd reports on the twists and turns of his storied career... and the strategy behind being a team player BY MARSHALL HEYMAN PHOTOGRAPHED BY CLIFF WATTS

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Etro blazer, $1,377, and shirt, $443. Salvatore Ferragamo trousers, $800. Cole Haan shoes (worn throughout), $248, and belt, $75. OPPOSITE Brioni overcoat, price upon request. FASHION EDITOR MICHAEL FISHER

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Ports 1961 three-piece suit, $3,695, and shirt, $395. Alexander Olch tie, $150, and pocket round, $150. OPPOSITE Ermenegildo Zegna blazer, price upon request. Etro sweater, $1,231.

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Perry Ellis by Duckie Brown coat. Etro shirt, $294. Ermenegildo Zegna pants, price upon request.

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Last fall, a funny thing happened to Paul Rudd. He was

performing in a Broadway production of Craig Wright’s Grace, opposite Michael Shannon, and during an otherwise ordinary Wednesday evening show, an audience member lost his lunch from the balcony to the orchestra. “That was a first,” says the 44-year-old actor, still somewhat dumbfounded by the occurrence. Can you blame him? “The hard part was knowing how to handle the situation—not knowing what had happened, hearing the commotion and wondering whether to stop the play or keep focus,” he says. “But that’s why we do theater, right? For the pukers.” He laughs. “At least it makes for fun stories for magazine interviews.” Sometimes it’s difficult navigating the peaks and valleys of an acting career; people just tend to throw up—metaphorically—in your general direction. But the answer, at least according to Rudd, is to go with your gut. “I’ve always been very conscious of making decisions that felt right for me,” he explains. “You never know how anything is going to turn out. The majority of things I did in the first 10 years of my career were because I got the job. But I’d never audition for things I didn’t want to do just for the sake of work.” That outlook has enabled Rudd to enjoy an exceedingly varied and successful CV, one that started, somewhat remarkably, with 1995’s surprise hit Clueless. Amy Heckerling’s reinvention of Emma cast him as the dreamy ex-stepbrother to Alicia Silverstone’s Cher Horowitz and cemented him as a sex symbol for all contemporary Jane Austen lovers and, in particular, their swooning Jewish mothers. Despite finding relatively rapid success after its release, Rudd, born in New Jersey and bred in Kansas City, packed up his Hollywood belongings at 24 and made his way back East to tread the New York boards. “I knew the time was right through a series of crazy things that happened,” he says, as he dives into a vegetable omelette and a side of bacon at a low-key Mexican joint in Tribeca. “You know: car wrecks and all sorts of other cosmic messages. “I think I had hit a point where my own happiness as to where I was living had become just as important as my desire to be in the right place for my career,” Rudd says, finishing a second cup of black coffee. “I thought I could try and make it work out here. And so I did. I knew I’d miss out on some opportunities because I wasn’t in L.A., but it was right for me to live here and do those plays. It meant something to me to make artistically viable choices.” Living in New York with his wife, Julie Yaeger, and their two young kids, 8-year-old Jack and 3-year-old Darby, has enabled

Rudd to do it all and live relatively under the radar. It has always been his goal, he explains, to be a “working actor.” But, let’s face it: There are not that many performers with his longevity. Few who, after 18 years, find themselves not only on the cover of magazines, but fluidly moving from well-received independent features (Prince Avalanche) to big blockbuster comedies like this fall’s Anchorman: The Legend Continues. “I’ve certainly been in small clunkers,” Rudd says, smiling. “But even in the clunkers, my intentions were always good. I saw what could be good in them. And early on, when I was starting out, I knew I wanted to go for a slow burn. I knew it was going to take a big chunk of my life to learn how to do things. There are so many people who come on so strong so fast, and then where do you go from there? I wanted to be a solid utility player for a long time.” A football fan as a kid, Rudd says he always “gravitated toward players who weren’t showboats. They just were solid and great at their job and just showed up and did it.” He also moved a lot in his youth, because his father worked in the airline business. “I was always in new schools,” he recalls, “and my parents were both British. The way I would try to relate to people was always through jokes.” Eventually, he discovered “Saturday Night Live” and “Late Show with David Letterman” and, far predating Funny or Die, made humorous videos around the neighborhood, one of which “involved getting dressed up and going trick-or-treating on October 19th to beat the rush,” he says. And though it may have taken a little while, Hollywood discovered those irresistible comic chops in the 2001 cult hit Wet Hot American Summer. “When I read that script, I just remember thinking, ‘Oh man, there’s so much generic comedy, but this is pretty cutting edge. This speaks to me,’” he says. The movie wasn’t a big hit, but it was something that “comedy writers and comedy nerds were way into.” It also starred a gaggle of talent, from Amy Poehler to Judah Friedlander. And it opened Rudd up to a whole world of players (Will Ferrell, Adam McKay, Judd Apatow, Steve Carell and Jason Segel among them) and projects during a period of comedic renaissance in Hollywood. Many of the movies became huge hits, including The 40 Year Old CONTINUED ON PAGE 128

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Louis Vuitton bomber jacket, $4,600, and shirt, $1,000. Paul & Shark sweater, $330, and trousers, $420. Prada shoes, price upon request. OPPOSITE Tommy Hilfiger blazer, $549, and shirt, $199.


GROOMER: RHEANNE WHITE AT SEE MANAGEMENT. STYLIST ASSISTANT: AMBER SIMIRIGLIA

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OUT OF AFRICA

Inspired by the spirit of Karen Blixen’s Kenyan aesthetic, a Malibu ranch beats to its own drum BY DAWN MOORE PHOTOGRAPHED BY TIM STREET-PORTER

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Antique African currency mounted as sculpture from Primary Source joins Richard Gereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tibetan Boy on a Horse and Herb Rittsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Enveloped Girls on the stone mantel. OPPOSITE The pool is lined with greenery and terra-cotta pots from Inner Gardens.

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he ’Bu coastline is rife with power brokers, movie stars and surf fanatics averaging maybe seven feet between neighbors. But above them, there is space. Glorious space. Just ask Chris Cortazzo, who owns a slice of enchanted forest like no other. “I am sure elves and fairies live on this magical property; the spirit of the land is so powerful and positive.” And so is the house itself, boasting an intense tribal vibe throughout. Therein lies Cortazzo’s charm. Coldwell Banker’s top producing realtor in the U.S. hails from Malibu and appreciates the value of this land. A 30-year-long vegetarian, he has an elaborate (unused) outdoor grill and a menagerie of rescued feathered friends that include turkeys, chickens and peacocks. “They don’t have names, but I know all their personalities.” No doubt his two German shepherds, Lola and Tazzo, do, too. The 28-acre property loops up and down soft knolls and winds around the original 1940s California ranch structure. “It’s the most amazing place to entertain [whether for a friend’s wedding or an intimate gathering for allies from one of the 40-plus organizations Cortazzo supports, including PETA, Elton John AIDS Foundation, Boys & Girls Club and Farm Sanctuary]. Whenever I say there’s a party at the ranch, everyone scrambles!” While in escrow on the property in 2006, a New Year’s sojourn to South Africa’s Royal Malewane lodge (with close friend and interior decorator Martyn Lawrence Bullard) ignited the interior’s inspiration. Cortazzo was first introduced to the continent by lensman Herb Ritts while assisting on a shoot in 1993. Ritts encouraged Cortazzo’s love for both photography and African culture. Since then, Cortazzo has added images from Peter Beard, Nick Brandt, Richard Gere and, of course, Ritts himself. Prominent as they are, the emotive works offer a backdrop to the treasures collected over 20 years: beads from Tibet, artifacts from Peru, candlesticks from London, ceremonial jewelry from South Africa. And Bullard’s aesthetic was a perfect match. Cortazzo’s directive to the designer? To be able to curl up in any corner, barefoot. “The central hub is a cocoon for Chris,” says Bullard. “Luxurious, ethnic fabrics yet comfortable and laid back.” Perfect for those cool evenings tucked in with a little carbonneutral vodka. •

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“The house has a traveled eye. Great moments of photography, interesting bowls of beads, feathers in vases, collector’s items dropped on stacks of books,” notes designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard. Three powerful photographs by Leni Riefenstahl hang above a ladder-back chair and coffee table by Axel Vervoordt.

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In the garden, teak plantation chairs from British Khaki. In the dining room, a captain’s table from Dos Gallos and works by Peter Beard and Herb Ritts. On the master bedroom’s side table, a gift of Galle glass from Ritts sits beside the custom four-poster bed from MLB Home Collection. The pool cabana’s entrance drips with wisteria. Chris Cortazzo. Steel and brass custom log holders flank the sunroom’s stone fireplace. A Restoration Hardware lamp on an antique table in the guesthouse.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT

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MASTER BEDROOM (LEFT): SIMON BERLYN

An African indigo cloth at the foot of the custom bed. The tactile vibe continues with Sultan Garden fabriccovered walls and red Bobbin table from MLB Home Collection.

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Floating above the overscale tub from Waterworks in the master bath is a vintage Hundi lantern from JF Chen. Raw Belgium linen drapes puddle on an Afghan tribal rug. OPPOSITE â&#x20AC;&#x153;We found really fabulous textiles in London; a vintage Turkish horse blanket for the bedcovering,â&#x20AC;? Bullard notes. Chair and bed pillows covered in Senja linen from MLB Fabric. Giraffe prints by Nick Brandt.

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FAST AND FURIOUS

From quick turns to magnificent secret stretches, actor Eric Dane opens up on the rip-roaring Ferrari rally from Pasadena to Pebble Beach in one of the most luxurious speed machinesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and lives to tell us about it BY NICOLAS STECHER PHOTOGRAPHED BY NATE CHRISTENSON

Dane and the Ferrari FF.

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e were driving down this stretch of road where there was literally nothing but a corn silo in sight, some dilapidated barn off to the side being swallowed alive by the earth, and there were just these perfectly paved roads—a straight line downhill for a few miles. And it seemed safe to open it up,” recalls Eric Dane of the peak velocity—well into triple digits—he achieved during the recent Tributo Ferrari Pacific Coast rally. Then he seems to catch himself, as if realizing he could be implicated in some court of opinion. “I don’t ever initiate breaking the law, and I don’t advocate it. But if the car in front of me is doing it, and the car behind me is doing it, I don’t have much of a choice. I was driving the F12—I didn’t want to be jumped out in the fastest car on the street!” says Dane. “If you can hold your car in a straight line, and stay relaxed, and clamp onto the wheel for dear life, you’ve got a good chance of enjoying 160 miles per hour.” Although he’s enjoyed many a sports car over his career—which includes roles in films such as X-Men: Last Stand, Marley & Me and Valentine’s Day, but is best known for his role as Dr. Mark Sloan in the beloved medical drama “Grey’s Anatomy”—Dane has never owned a Ferrari. “I’ve driven just about everything, but I don’t know if there’s another car out there that the driver actually develops a relationship, a rapport, with like one would with the Ferrari.” Chances are his Porsche Panamera Turbo S wouldn’t like to hear that. “I don’t know how they got to me—I was asked if I wanted to rip up the California coastline in some Ferraris, and I was like, ‘Yeah, OK!’” he laughs. “Some of the roads I had no idea existed—absolutely stunning. This state is remarkably beautiful. And there were these old, kind of picturesque mission cities and towns that run up the coast—starting in Pasadena and ending in

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For the rally, 30 Ferrari enthusiasts raced up the coast in classic cars such as the 288GTO and SA Aperta and current models including the Enzo, FF, F12berlinetta and California. Dane switched off between driving the FF and F12berlinetta.


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Pebble Beach. The rally was unbelievable.” There’s a moment of consideration, and then he mutters: “Well, except for that person who drove an Enzo into the side of a mountain.” Somewhere along the line, a nervous wife took on more than she could handle. Fret not, everyone was OK—except, of course, for the husband, who saw his very rare million-dollar steed end up in a pile of smoldering steel, aluminum and glass by the side of a country road. Now Dane is off to mitigate his own disasters in the upcoming TNT drama “The Last Ship.” The big-budget series sees an off-radio destroyer return from Antarctica only to find the world’s population decimated by a pandemic. Michael Bay is not only executive-producing the show but also directing some of the action sequences. Expect plenty of explosions. “I saw the pilot episode; I think it’s terrific. I didn’t want to crawl up in the fetal position in the corner when I watched it— that’s always a good sign,” chuckles Dane, who plays the ship’s steel-jawed leader, Captain Tom Chandler. Even when he did his 140-episode run of “Grey’s Anatomy,” Dane still abhorred seeing himself on screen. “I was there when it happened, so I don’t need to relive it!” All variables aim at the show’s success, with a blockbuster filmmaker pulling the strings, an excellent staff that includes writers from “The Closer,” “Lost” and “Without a Trace,” and a top-notch supporting cast. Is he nervous about finally helming his own ship, and show? “The head of the network said, ‘It’s all yours to fuck up,’” he says flatly. “But pressure is what you make of it.” Well, as long as he can stay relaxed, keep his life in a straight line and clamp onto the wheel for dear life, he’s got a good chance of making it to Season Two. •

The high-performance Enzo is named after Ferrari’s founder, Enzo Ferrari.

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In 1965, The Sea Ranch’s first structures, with their irregular geometry, commanded an impressive vantage point to witness the elements; as of 2005, they’re on the National Register of Historic Places. OPPOSITE Moore Lyndon Turnbull Whitaker (MLTW)/Moore Turnbull’s Rush House (1970) is organized vertically around a central chimney and laddered walls “built for climbing,” and the living room’s bay windows admit ample natural light.

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SUPER NATURAL

The Sea Ranch, an undisturbed colony of architectural marvels on the Sonoma Coast, stands the test of time By Alison Clare Steingold


Malcolm Davis planned the corridor-like WatsonFinnegan House (2005) with a nod to clean-lined, early Sea Ranch design; situated in the meadow, it has two courtyard-connected wings with sloped roofs and entry closed to the winds.

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ne hundred miles north of San Francisco, the reflection of the sun on the water’s surface is brilliant like mercury. Dusky violet fog marches across the horizon with mist breaking into patches of open sky. Approaching The Sea Ranch, guardrails hugging the cliffside yield to wide, hedgerow-dotted meadows between Highway One and rocky beaches, where bluff cypress branches are permanently blown back. Northwesterly winds weren’t any less forgiving in the mid1800s, when Mexican and German settlers established logging and livestock operations; and neither was the seismic chaos. In the forest, a short hike past the road, the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake aggravated the San Andreas Faultline—7.8 was enough to split redwoods in two and force new ridges down to the water. Today, the natural envelopment that comes with the Sonoma Coast—i.e., no cell phone service—only adds to the mystique. On a 10-mile slice just shy of Gualala and the Mendocino County line, Oceanic California Inc. (spearheaded by Al Boeke) purchased thousands of sheep-grazing acres in 1963—for $2.3 million—and renamed it The Sea Ranch. Acclaimed landscape architect Lawrence Halprin, who’d studied under Walter Gropius at Harvard, envisioned the meandering coastline as a new kind of community. Along with a horde of specialists, the primary team vetted was the Bay Area’s most talented city planning

and environmental architecture experts: Joseph Esherick and Moore Lyndon Turnbull Whitaker (MLTW). The philosophy was radical. Halprin notes: “I was convinced we could avoid another suburbia and instead develop a social community for people of like minds, with a love of nature and of this site in particular, for whom ‘living lightly on the land’ would be a governing principle.” The idea was to encourage individuality with restrictions— a “vernacular architecture”—to tame the salty elements, encourage aesthetic harmony and minimize impact. That meant natural materials, native plantings and color palettes, roof slopes to match the wind, and living areas like interior courtyards to maximize functionality and enjoyment of space. Continues Halprin, “Mowed lawns so typical of suburbia would be outlawed. No palm trees, no flower beds, no prettiness. I also realized that we would have to avoid lining the cliffs’ edges with houses in what we termed a ‘Malibu Wall.’ So I held all houses away from the cliffs.” It was isolated; there’d be no town—just a post office, a shop that would become the Lodge, and, eventually, an airstrip. With huge swaths of land and trails owned by all, a nonprofit Sea Ranch Association would be, for example, a developer liaison, a community resource in the creation of trails and roads, organized to help in its years-long battle with the Coastal Commission over public access, and an umbrella for the Design Committee to approve plans. Condominium One (1965) became CONTINUED ON PAGE 128

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE SEA RANCH BY DONLYN LYNDON AND JIM ALINDER, PRINCETON ARCHITECTURAL PRESS.

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CLOCKWISE The

10-mile development follows the dramatic, wind-torn coastline. Architects MLTWâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Richard Whitaker, Donlyn Lyndon, Charles Moore and William Turnbullâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;gathered in the courtyard of Condominium One in 1991, when the building received the AIA Twenty-Five Year Award. The interior of Condominium One (1965), by MLTW.


Condominium Oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interior court, with Unit One on the left. ABOVE Frank Architects, with Richard Whitaker and Donlyn Lyndon, designed the more modern Spudich House (2010) in harmony with the forest microclimate.


The classic Schneider House (1997) is the final home Esherick designed at The Sea Ranch—a single-pitch-roof classic with decks, this time, on the meadow side, since the lot’s positioning is already sheltered from the area’s relentless winds.

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The Harlan Winery offices look out on vineyard landscapes. OPPOSITE Harlan with his AJS motorcycle.


THE TASTEMAKER

WITH A LUXURY HOTEL, PRIVATE CLUB AND TWO OF THE MOST COVETED CULT LABELS, BILL HARLAN, NAPA’S KINGPIN OF HOSPITALITY, DETAILS THE GOOD LIFE By Diane Dorrans Saeks

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eight years. To create Harlan Estate in 1984, he secured an initial slice on the western hillsides between the forest and elevated sites up toward the Mayacamas range to the west of Napa Valley. It was wild and rugged, surrounded by early morning mist Harlan carved 40 acres from 240 untamed acres of forest. “It’s a great place to be close to nature, and I’ve always found it life-enriching,” says Harlan. “The land has a fault running through it. Nature gives us everything we have, and it gave us a great blending ‘palate.’” Harlan’s Director of Winegrowing Bob Levy, and Winemaker Cory Empting pride themselves on non-intervention. The “juice” is bottled unrefined and unfiltered. It’s determined to last. Harlan and his team planted Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Merlot. “The soils and exposure turned out to be fantastic,” he adds. Harlan Estate’s first harvest was in 1987, and debut wine was released in 1996. Since then, five perfect 100 Robert Parker scores have been awarded to the label. The Financial Times wine authority Jancis Robinson wrote that “Harlan Estate is one of the 10 best wines of the 20th century.” Overlooking his prized wines above Oakville is the family retreat where Harlan and his wife, Deborah, who is passionately involved in local charities, raised their children—Will, 26, a tech entrepreneur who is also working closely with his father, and Amanda, 24, a recent graduate of USC and a competitive dressage equestrienne. This residence of timeless simplicity was designed by the great Napa Valley architect Howard Backen, a family friend and a longtime colleague. Harlan acquired Meadowood, a rustic country club, in 1979 and with Backen’s direction transformed it into an ultra-private and understated wine country resort destination, and headquarters for the top vintners of the region. Chic locals vie to sunbathe around the pool, and compete at croquet in the late afternoon. The direction of chef Christopher Kostow, in recent years, has also earned the restaurant three Michelin stars. “My purpose for shifting focus to different facets of winegrowing and hospitality has been this idea of delighting people and making their lives a little more enjoyable, a little more pleasurable,” adds Harlan. “Wine is a common thread.” Modeled after that famous auction Harlan and Mondavi attended, the first Auction Napa Valley was held here in 1981, after two years of planning by The Napa Valley Vintners. Meadowood has served as its setting for the subsequent 33 years. To date, the organization has raised more than $100 million in support of local charitable organizations. Just outside the Meadowood entrance is The Napa Valley Reserve, Harlan’s obsessively private wine club, which Backen designed a decade ago in his signature pared-down and unpretentious aesthetic. Co-directors Carol and Philip Norfleet have created fellowship around the love of wine and education with legendary vintners. The Reserve recently opened new wine caves and airy spaces for private entertaining. Harlan’s other great wine project was the Bond wine collection in 1997 (the labels look like they were CONTINUED ON PAGE 128

PREVIOUS SPREAD, LEFT: ERHARD PFEIFFER; RIGHT: STEVEN ROTHFELD. TOP 3: ERHARD PFEIFFER. HARLAN PORTRAITS (2): STEVEN ROTHFELD

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bserve Bill Harlan walking through his Oakville vineyards on the cusp of harvest season. Burnished by the sun and wind, he seems to be in communion with the terroir. Quiet and observant, he follows the closely spaced curves of the vines, crunching through the Franciscan shale and gazing out to the valley beyond. Napa Valley’s visionary vintner, hotelier, philanthropist H. William Harlan (Bill to his initiates), 73, is one of the most admired winegrowers in the world. Along with competing labels like Screaming Eagle, Colgin, Araujo and Dominus, he’s adding prestige to the area’s $13 billion annual earnings with his two super-cult wineries, Harlan Estate and Bond, and making the region’s appellations increasingly more desirable. Cachet comes with a price. Harlan Estate’s sought-after 2010 vintage, when released next year, will retail for approximately $800. The 1990s vintages retail for five to 10 times that amount. Both Harlan Estate and Bond have waiting lists to get on the waiting lists, and just 1,800 cases of the former are, on the average, annually produced. Appoximately 70% sells directly through the winery’s mailing list (all over the world); the remainder is distributed in 45 countries. “If Bob Mondavi was the one who put us on the world stage, Bill is the one who picked up the mantle and said, ‘Now let’s lead the world,’” says tech entrepreneur Trevor Traina, who grew up summering in the Valley and now owns an Oakville vineyard. “From [Harlan’s] manicured vineyards to the workers handpicking stems out of the fruit bins, he doesn’t give a damn what it takes to achieve the best quality,” Traina continues. “When my wife, Alexis, and I are splurging, it is always with a bottle of Harlan Estate. It has a remarkable consistency and all the smooth oak and fruit we look for.” Harlan comes from small-town Whittier, CA, and after a picaresque youth, went on to study at UC Berkeley in the 1950s, spending weekends tasting Napa Valley wines, cultivating his palate and imagining creating grand crus in Oakville. He graduated in 1963 and went on to eventually co-found Pacific Union Company with the late Peter Stocker, in 1974. But the seed had been planted. In 1966, Harlan attended opening week celebrations of Robert Mondavi Winery and forged a lifelong friendship with the icon. He invited Harlan to attend the historic wine auction at the legendary Hospices de Beaune in Burgundy. Discovering family-owned, centuries-old Burgundian vineyards offered a new perspective. “I began to think in terms of building something that would span generations,” he explains. “That led to my developing a 200-year plan, a specific vision for what I wanted to do ultimately with a wine estate. “The Napa Valley then was a very quiet place,” he says. “There was basically BV, Inglenook, Beringer, Christian Brothers and Krug. I developed a desire to have a winery one day and raise a family here.” Harlan searched for the perfect first-growth-worthy land for


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Harlan

Estateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s view. Caves at The Napa Valley Reserve. The Napa Valley Reserve. Harlan Estate wine. Harlan takes in the view. Will, Deborah, Bill and Amanda Harlan at home in Oakville.


UNLOCKING THE FUTURE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 72

Over the past decade, he has amassed a team of international specialists: model builders and sample makers, textile crafters and sewing artisans, materials experts, software developers, scientists and talented writers. In addition to Jawbone, Fuseproject has partnered with an impressive roster: Prada, Target, Cassina, Puma, Google, General Electric and Swarovski. Béhar is already in the TED Talks realm and one of Time magazine’s Top 25 Visionaries. Part of the force that drives the designer’s power is to always ask, what if? The recent Nivea brand tweak, which involved reinforcing and repositioning the ubiquitous indigo blue look, is Fuseproject at its most direct, eloquent and efficient. “Nivea had the distinctive round blue tin with the Bauhaus logo...but over the years, the design of its brand extensions had become confusing and incoherent,” explains Béhar. His concept: Place the signature round blue logo on every product, and streamline the bottles—a smooth, tactile experience that makes the line immediately identifiable. Indeed, sales increased. It’s not always about the bottom line, however. Social consciousness is part of his makeup—and product output. “Finally, I see a world where companies have to be very clear about not just what they bring to life from a commercial standpoint, but also what their social goals are.” As part of the Ver Bien para Aprender Mejor (“See Better to Learn Better”) program, students in Mexico have received free Béhardesigned glasses since 2010. In May, 2011, Béhar partnered with Tipping Point, a local philanthropic organization that created a similar initiative in S.F. The list continues: Just this summer, the Briggo coffee kiosk and XO (One Laptop Per Child) joined two possibly revolutionary concepts. “Every time I have the opportunity to inspire people and introduce them to forward-looking ideas, I take it,” he says. Ouya, a video-gaming console, offers an open development experience so any creator can publish a game on TV. Ouya both downloads and streams entertainment content in crisp 1080p HD quality. Sleekly designed, it still has old-school triggers, analog sticks and an accurate integrated touchpad. What’s more, the inexpensive, Béhar-designed August Smart Lock is an electronic lock operated by smartphone app, rendering keys obsolete. Rather poetically named, it’s easy to install, has a simple round design and allows the user to select who has access (for example, a housekeeper or guest). Béhar has enjoyed a long, successful relationship with Michigan-based Herman

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Miller (perhaps you recall the gorgeous lines of the Sayl chair) and just unveiled the Public Office Landscape with the manufacturer. Its modular and ergonomic Social Chair is the building block of the system, turning into a banquette, a sofa and a small-group meeting place, and making larger meetings possible (available later this year). And when he’s not revolutionizing the way we work, he might be spotted with his family (his partner, art advisor Sabrina Buell, and their two children) on a remote beach at Todos Santos, Baja, Mexico, or surfing beneath the Golden Gate Bridge during winter storms. Béhar especially likes balletic moves—the aesthetics and synchronicity of the waves, mind and body. “I like the idea of timing every move in the surf precisely,” says Béhar. “It enhances the work I do for my clients. Surfing, like design, is a kind of dreaming.” fuseproject.com. •

GAME CHANGER CONTINUED FROM PAGE 101

Virgin, Knocked Up, Role Models, Forgetting Sarah Marshall and, of course, the original Anchorman. “It’s not like I woke up one day and all of a sudden it was different,” says Rudd, finishing his plate of bacon. “But over the course of a few things, people started knowing my name. The Williamsburg crowd tends to veer toward Wet Hot American Summer, and then the Europeans know ‘Friends’ a lot [he played Phoebe’s boyfriend], and a lot of grandparents that live in New York picture me as this nice Jewish boy to date their granddaughter. It’s nice to feel that you’re not spinning in the wind.” Rudd recently reunited with the guys behind Wet Hot American Summer for an upcoming feature called They Came Together. And after filming the Anchorman sequel, he took some time off to be with his family at their house upstate, which has its own traditional Irish pub in the basement—a nod to his late father, Michael, who was obsessed with Ireland. His kids have yet to see any of his work. “I kind of don’t want them to see the stuff I’m in, at least until they’re a little older and can understand it,” he says. As for dream roles, “I don’t have that thing where there’s just the one part I have to do, like Hamlet,” says Rudd, who studied at Oxford after an early stint in television, “to which my agent asked, ‘Why are you doing that?’” he remembers. But does a background in Shakespeare really prepare you for the broad role of oversexed and arrogant field reporter Brian Fontana in an Anchorman sequel? “I don’t know,” says Rudd. “That’s a good question. There are probably more wrong ways

to do Shakespeare than there are wrong ways to do Anchorman, but if you can do Shakespeare, you can do most things. Some of the basic rules will help you in everything.” Despite the slow burn of his career, he has, surprisingly, never inhabited a superhero role. This, despite the ever-growing presence of the Marvel and D.C. universe in Hollywood. “That kind of stuff is not really in my orbit,” he says. “It’s a different kind of format that I’m interested in. There’s nothing I rule out, but it always seemed like I was working on Earth.” Or, as the case may be this fall, back behind a news desk, in very tight ’70s clothes, with an absurdly large handlebar mustache. •

SUPER NATURAL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 120

the founders’ showpiece (on the National Register of Historic Places since 2005), sited to harness eastern and southern sun for warmth against the brute chill. For many units, wind sweeps up and over a dramatic sloped roof as it ascends a knoll. Other features include giant square windows, redwood steps and sliding doors, and, of course, unparalleled vantage points. The 1,700-plus residences at The Sea Ranch are considered the pinnacle of Third Bay Tradition and a haven for architects and award-winning designers, yet to point to one definitive style would be erroneous. Here, creativity runs freely within the constraint of nature and the Sea Ranch covenant. It’s not a hasty pastiche of handmade craftsmanship, angular geometry, and graying, untreated wood; each abode conforms to its specific site. Though the Design Committee is slightly less stringent than it was five decades ago, construction and renovation processes and approvals are exquisitely detailed and laborious. Residences make sense of the landscape, like the Spudich House (2010), a modern cabin camouflaged by redwoods and firs. Some are crafted to preside without bombast— the Rush House (1970) and its eye-catching chimney jumps to mind. Many update the


California ranch home’s indoor-outdoor connection, whether Watson-Finnegan House’s (2005) horizontal glass sprawl, or the coliseumlike Clayton House (1993)—its central area is open, yet sheltered from strong gusts. All commune with nature. Case in point: Esherick’s single-pitch-roof Schneider House (1997), complete with decks acting as front-row seats for—what else—waves crashing against Black Point. Telltale of an enthusiast on a pilgrimage to tour the structural menagerie dotting the bluff, hillside and forest is most often a dogeared copy of The Sea Ranch on the passenger seat. Co-founding architect Donlyn Lyndon and fine arts photographer Jim Alinder produced the comprehensive—and heavy— book in 2004. Princeton Architectural Press has collaborated with them to present a recapitulated second edition this November— plus additional images, drawings, essays, and the benefit of photographic advances. Here, among the most memorable images from The Sea Ranch: Fifty Years of Architecture,

ON OUR COVER Etro navy and plaid wool blazer, $1,526, Etro, B.H., 310-248-2855, and brown and sunflower plaid cotton shirt, $370, Etro, B.H., 310-248-2855. J Press woolblend The Beaufort Knot tie, $80, J.Press, N.Y., 212-255-6151; jpressonline.com.

TABLE OF CONTENTS p.16 Prada wool cashmere coat with velvet collar, $3,290, Shetland wool sweater, $480, and silk wool pants, $780, select Prada stores; prada.com. A.P.C. long-sleeve Sport T-shirt, $110, A.P.C., L.A., 323-297-0414. Alexander Olch black and charcoal large check pocket round, $60, olch.com.

C STYLE LESS IS MORE p.54 Piaget white-gold Altiplano Date 40mm watch on a black alligator strap, $26,000, 877-874-2438; piaget.com. Jaeger-LeCoultre rose-gold Master Ultra Thin 41, $15,700, Jaeger-LeCoultre, B.H., 310-734-0525; jaeger-lecoultre.com. Harry Winston white-gold 42mm Midnight Monochrome $22,300, Harry Winston, B.H., 310-271-8554. IWC stainless steel Portofino Hand-Wound watch with black alligator strap and blue dial, $10,800, IWC, B.H., 310-734-0520. Vacheron Constantin manual winding Ultra-fine 1955 watch, $30,600, Vacheron Constantin, B.H., 310-598-2026. Baume

Landscape, and Placemaking on the Northern California Coast—many vintage shots taken with a Hasselblad Superwide. Like the book, reviewed and revisited, the cultural landscape of The Sea Ranch remains remarkably intact—like Esherick’s Hedgerow Houses, protected against the winds of change. •

THE TASTEMAKER CONTINUED FROM PAGE 126

designed at the U.S. Mint), with grapes culled from small properties offering what they considered “grand cru” distinction. “Of the 60 vineyards from which we’d purchased grapes, we selected two and started Bond. We continue to purchase the best grapes, and we’ve evolved Bond to include five wines,” Harlan says: the rocky St. Eden in Oakville and intense Vecina from the AVA’s western foothills; Pluribus from Spring Mountain; Melbury, east of Rutherford; and steep

& Mercier steel-case Clifton watch with black dial and brown alligator strap, $2,700, baume-et-mercier.com.

C DESIGN STRONGHOLD p.74 Paule Marrot textile print, $2,550, jonathanadler.com. Modernica large case-study ceramic planter with metal stand, $330, modernica. net. Baxter of California Noir Series: Cassis candle, $45, Unionmade, Brentwood Country Mart, S.M. Ralph Lauren Home La Hacienda Pinyon leather pillow, $450, ralphlaurenhome.com. Tia Maria by Moroso chaise, $3,150, Dzine, S.F. Bottega Veneta Nero VN Intrecciato parchment high screen, $24,400, select Bottega Veneta stores. When Objects Work by Jean Michel Wilmotte H square small ashtray, $355, fitzsu.com. Turkish Anatolian wool runner, $2,115; and Mr. Brainwash Creation plate, $65, Garde, L.A. Heijden Hume for Jean de Merry table, $13,200, Jean de Merry, WeHo. Greta Grossman Grasshopper floor lamp by Gubi, $875, dwr.com.

GAME CHANGER p.96 Brioni beige cashmere overcoat with mink collar, price upon request, select Brioni stores, 888-778-8775; brioni. com. Etro brown and purple cotton plaid shirt, $443, Etro, B.H., 310-248-2855. Salvatore Ferragamo burgundy wool trousers, $800, Salvatore Ferragamo, B.H., 310-273-9990. Cole Haan cognac Madison

Quella, on the valley’s growing east side. There’s even second-label Matriarch, too. So what’s next from the ever-creative mind of Harlan? “Now it’s really about setting the table for the next generation by giving them an opportunity to make the same mistakes we made, and giving them freedom to learn,” says Harlan. “I want to be clear that I’m not only talking about my immediate family. I include our extended family and the professionals in each of the different facets of our businesses.” There’s also talk of a Harlan white wine, and fans are clamoring for it, but Harlan is not ready to announce anything until next year. Until then, Cabernet-dominated wines remain his calling. “We have a new project on the horizon. Promontory, a project we’ve been working on for about six years. We will be announcing more about it in 2014,” says Harlan with characteristic understatement. Insiders are already whispering that this project could be the most formidable addition yet to Harlan’s sublime world of wines. •

Wingtip Oxford, $248, Cole Haan, L.A., 310-553-4800; colehaan.com. p.97 Etro brown wool plaid blazer, $1,377, Etro, B.H., 310-248-2855. Shirt and trousers as seen on p.96. p.98 Ermenegildo Zegna navy wool blazer, price upon request, Ermenegildo Zegna, B.H., 310-247-8827; zegna.com. Etro green cashmere turtleneck sweater, $1,231, Etro, B.H., 310-248-2855. p.99 Ports 1961 three-piece Peak lapel suit with vest, $3,695, and Drg neck formal shirt, $395. Alexander Olch wool boucle stripe The Chapman necktie in maroon, $150, and The Chapman wool boucle stripe pocket round in maroon, $150, olch.com. Shoes as seen on p.96. p.100 Perry Ellis by Duckie Brown burgundy trench coat, similar styles available, perryellis.com. Etro brown and white plaid cotton shirt, $294, Etro, B.H., 310-248-2855. Ermenegildo Zegna charcoal pants, price upon request, Ermenegildo Zegna, B.H., 310-247-8827. Shoes as seen on p.96. p.102 Louis Vuitton mixed-leather bomber jacket, $4,600, and casual shirt, $1,000. Paul & Shark Yachting Collection wool knit sweater, $330, and Luxury Collection pure new wool trouser, $420, Paul & Shark, B.H., 310-246-9744; paulshark.it. Prada black leather lace-up shoes, price upon request, select Prada stores; prada.com. p.103 Tommy Hilfiger Chalk stripe blazer, $549, and knit stripe shirt, $199, Tommy Hilfiger, L.A., 310-247-1475.

C for Men Magazine Fall 2013 is published 2 times/year by C Publishing, LLC. Editorial office: 1543 7th St., Santa Monica, CA 90401. Telephone 310-393-3800, Fax 310-393-3899, E-mail (editorial) edit@magazinec.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to C Magazine, P.O. Box 460248, Escondido, CA 92046. Subscriptions Telephone 800-775-3066 or E-mail: cmagcustomerservice@pcspublink.com. Domestic rates are $19.95 for one year (12 issues); for orders outside U.S., add $15 postage. Single copies available at newsstands and other magazine outlets throughout the United States.

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california

On a drizzly afternoon, 61,040 fans packed into S.F.’s Candlestick Park for the 1985 NFC Championship face-off between the S.F. 49ers and the Chicago Bears. Coming off a near-perfect regular season (15-1-0) and an at-home NFC Division Playoff victory against the New York Giants, the Niners’ West Coast Offense (WCO) was fully charged. Head Coach Bill Walsh devised the system, which relies more heavily on passing than running, and fully implemented it upon his 1979 arrival in S.F., the same year he drafted a backup QB from Notre Dame at the end of the third round. Taking a knee with “Golden Joe” mid-play, the strategy was simple: Throw the ball. The 49ers knocked off Chicago 23-0 and took home a Super Bowl trophy (against the Miami Dolphins) at Stanford Stadium two weeks later. After 14 seasons in S.F. and two with the Kansas City Chiefs, the all-star returned to NorCal and, now, has a new occupation…winemaker. PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL ZAGARIS

C 130 MEN’S FALL 2013

TEXT BY KELSEY McKINNON

GETTY IMAGES

BILL WALSH AND JOE MONTANA, JANUARY 6, 1985


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